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Sample records for catalyst identification phase

  1. Dispersed catalysts for transforming extra heavy crude oil into transportable upgraded crude: phase identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, S.; Canizales, E.; Machin, I. [Gerencia Depttal de Investigacion Estrategica en Refinacion PDVSA Intevep (Venezuela); Segovia, X.; Rivas, A.; Lopez, E.; Pena, J.P.; Rojas, J.D.; Sardella, R. [Gerencia Depttal de Infraestructura y Mejoramiento en Faja Petrolifera PDVSA Intevep (Venezuela)

    2011-07-01

    A new technology to convert extra heavy crude oil into transportable upgraded crude has been developed. A water/oil emulsion composed of steam and catalyst precursors is introduced in the feed which then generates unsupported dispersed catalyst in situ under thermal decomposition. The aim of this paper is to characterize the particles. The study was conducted in a laboratory and on a pilot scale on three different vacuum residues using high resolution transmission electron microscopy and a transmission electron microscope. Results showed that the particles were formed by oxides and inorganic sulphur based in transition metals and their sizes ranged between 5 and 120 nm; in addition, good dispersion was observed. This study demonstrated that the process involved in the generation of dispersed catalyst is extremely complex and showed that further work with heavy crude oils and its residua is required to understand the mechanisms involved.

  2. A Systematic Modelling Framework for Phase Transfer Catalyst Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anantpinijwatna, Amata; Sales-Cruz, Mauricio; Hyung Kim, Sun

    2016-01-01

    Phase-transfer catalyst systems contain two liquid phases, with a catalyst (PTC) that transfers between the phases, driving product formation in one phase and being regenerated in the other phase. Typically the reaction involves neutral species in an organic phase and regeneration involves ions i....... The application of the framework is made to two cases in order to highlight the performance and issues of activity coefficient models for predicting design and operation and the effects when different organic solvents are employed....

  3. Immobilization of molecular catalysts in supported ionic liquid phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Doorslaer, Charlie; Wahlen, Joos; Mertens, Pascal; Binnemans, Koen; De Vos, Dirk

    2010-09-28

    In a supported ionic liquid phase (SILP) catalyst system, an ionic liquid (IL) film is immobilized on a high-surface area porous solid and a homogeneous catalyst is dissolved in this supported IL layer, thereby combining the attractive features of homogeneous catalysts with the benefits of heterogeneous catalysts. In this review reliable strategies for the immobilization of molecular catalysts in SILPs are surveyed. In the first part, general aspects concerning the application of SILP catalysts are presented, focusing on the type of catalyst, support, ionic liquid and reaction conditions. Secondly, organic reactions in which SILP technology is applied to improve the performance of homogeneous transition-metal catalysts are presented: hydroformylation, metathesis reactions, carbonylation, hydrogenation, hydroamination, coupling reactions and asymmetric reactions.

  4. Nitrogen controlled iron catalyst phase during carbon nanotube growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayer, Bernhard C., E-mail: bernhard.bayer@univie.ac.at [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Baehtz, Carsten [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Kidambi, Piran R.; Weatherup, Robert S.; Caneva, Sabina; Cabrero-Vilatela, Andrea; Hofmann, Stephan [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Mangler, Clemens; Kotakoski, Jani; Meyer, Jannik C. [Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Goddard, Caroline J. L. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-06

    Close control over the active catalyst phase and hence carbon nanotube structure remains challenging in catalytic chemical vapor deposition since multiple competing active catalyst phases typically co-exist under realistic synthesis conditions. Here, using in-situ X-ray diffractometry, we show that the phase of supported iron catalyst particles can be reliably controlled via the addition of NH{sub 3} during nanotube synthesis. Unlike polydisperse catalyst phase mixtures during H{sub 2} diluted nanotube growth, nitrogen addition controllably leads to phase-pure γ-Fe during pre-treatment and to phase-pure Fe{sub 3}C during growth. We rationalize these findings in the context of ternary Fe-C-N phase diagram calculations and, thus, highlight the use of pre-treatment- and add-gases as a key parameter towards controlled carbon nanotube growth.

  5. NOVEL SLURRY PHASE DIESEL CATALYSTS FOR COAL-DERIVED SYNGAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Dragomir B. Bukur; Dr. Ketil Hanssen; Alec Klinghoffer; Dr. Lech Nowicki; Patricia O' Dowd; Dr. Hien Pham; Jian Xu

    2001-01-07

    This report describes research conducted to support the DOE program in novel slurry phase catalysts for converting coal-derived synthesis gas to diesel fuels. The primary objective of this research program is to develop attrition resistant catalysts that exhibit high activities for conversion of coal-derived syngas.

  6. Advanced Aqueous Phase Catalyst Development using Combinatorial Methods, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Combinatorial methods are proposed to develop advanced Aqueous Oxidation Catalysts (AOCs) with the capability to mineralize organic contaminants present in effluents...

  7. The synthesis of nanostructured, phase pure catalysts by hydrodynamic cavitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moser, W.R.; Sunstrom, J.E.; Marshik-Geurts, B.J. [Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, MA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    A new process for the synthesis of advanced catalytic materials based on performing the synthesis under hydrodynamic cavitation conditions has been discovered. This continuous process for catalyst synthesis resulted in the formation of both supported and unsupported catalysts. The advantage of the process over classical methods of synthesis is that it permits the formation of a wide variety of nanostructured catalysts in exceptionally high phase purities. The synthesis of platinum and palladium catalysts supported on alumina and other supports resulted in high dispersions of the noble metals. The synthesis of alpha, beta- and gamma-bismuth molybdates resulted in catalysts having superior phase purities as compared to several other classical methods of synthesis. The beta-bismuth molybdate was synthesized directly onto Cabosil. These studies showed that the particle size of the active component could be varied from a few manometers to much larger grains. The process enabled the synthesis of other complex metal oxides like perovskites as pure phases. The process uses a commercially available Microfluidizer.

  8. The influence of phase transfer catalyst structure on reaction selectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demlov, Eh.V.

    1995-01-01

    A concise review is given of systematic studies which are concerned with the tuning of regio, frequentio-, chemo-, and diastereoselectivity by the structure or type of phase transfer catalyst. Use of MEI as an alkylating agent is described. Refs. 36, figs. 11

  9. Restrictive liquid-phase diffusion and reaction in bidispersed catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; Seader, J.D.; Tsai, C.H.; Massoth, F.E.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of bidispersed pore-size distribution on liquid-phase diffusion and reaction in NiMo/Al 2 O 3 catalysts is investigated by applying two bidispersed-pore-structure models, the random-pore model and a globular-structure model, to extensive experimental data, which were obtained from sorptive diffusion measurements at ambient conditions and catalytic reaction rate measurements on nitrogen-containing compounds. Transport of the molecules in the catalysts was found to be controlled by micropore diffusion, in accordance with the random-pore model, rather than macropore diffusion as predicted by the globular-structure model. A qualitative criterion for micropore-diffusion control is proposed: relatively small macroporosity and high catalyst pellet density. Since most hydrotreating catalysts have high density, diffusion in these types of catalysts may be controlled by micropore diffusion. Accordingly, it is believed in this case that increasing the size of micropores may be more effective to reduce intraparticle diffusion resistance than incorporating macropores alone

  10. Amphiphilic phase-transforming catalysts for transesterification of triglycerides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaratna, Gayan Ivantha

    Heterogeneous catalytic reactions that involve immiscible liquid-phase reactants are challenging to conduct due to limitations associated with mass transport. Nevertheless, there are numerous reactions such as esterification, transesterification, etherification, and hydrolysis where two immiscible liquid reactants (such as polar and non-polar liquids) need to be brought into contact with a catalyst. With the intention of alleviating mass transport issues associated with such systems but affording the ability to separate the catalyst once the reaction is complete, the overall goal of this study is geared toward developing a catalyst that has emulsification properties as well as the ability to phase-transfer (from liquid-phase to solid-phase) while the reaction is ongoing and evaluating the effectiveness of such a catalytic process in a practical reaction. To elucidate this concept, the transesterification reaction was selected. Metal-alkoxides that possess acidic and basic properties (to catalyze the reaction), amphiphilic properties (to stabilize the alcohol/oil emulsion) and that can undergo condensation polymerization when heated (to separate as a solid subsequent to the completion of the reaction) were used to test the concept. Studies included elucidating the effect of metal sites and alkoxide sites and their concentration effects on transesterification reaction, effect of various metal alkoxide groups on the phase stability of the reactant system, and kinetic effects of the reaction system. The studies revealed that several transition-metal alkoxides, especially, titanium and yttrium based, responded positively to this reaction system. These alkoxides were able to be added to the reaction medium in liquid phase and were able to stabilize the alcohol/oil system. The alkoxides were selective to the transesterification reaction giving a range of ester yields (depending on the catalyst used). It was also observed that transition-metal alkoxides were able to be

  11. Water detritiation: better catalysts for liquid phase catalytic exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braet, J.

    2005-01-01

    Fusion reactors are our hope for a clean nuclear energy. But as they shall handle huge amounts of tritium, 1.5 10 19 Bq GWth -1 a -1 or about 50 000 times more tritium than light water fission reactors, they need detritiation. Most tritium losses can be trapped as or can easily be transformed into tritiated water. Water detritiation is preferably based on the multiplication of the large equilibrium isotope effect during the exchange reaction of tritium between hydrogen gas and liquid water in a counter current trickle bed reactor. Such LPCE (Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange) requires an efficient hydrophobic catalyst. SCK-CEN invented and developed such a catalyst in the past. In combination with an appropriate packing, different batches of this catalyst performed very well during years of extensive testing, allowing to develop the ELEX process for water detritiation at inland reprocessing plants. The main objectives of this study were to reproduce and possibly improve the SCK-CEN catalyst for tritium exchange between hydrogen and liquid water; and to demonstrate the high overall exchange rate and thus high detritiation factors that can be realized with it in a small and simple LPCE column under typical but conservative operating conditions

  12. Highly Selective Continuous Gas-Phase Methoxycarbonylation of Ethylene with Supported Ionic Liquid Phase (SILP) Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khokarale, Santosh Govind; Garcia Suárez, Eduardo José; Fehrmann, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    Supported ionic liquid phase (SILP) technology was applied for the first time to the Pd-catalyzed continuous, gas-phase methoxycarbonylation of ethylene to selectively produce methyl propanoate (MP) in high yields. The influence of catalyst and reaction parameters such as, for example, ionic liquid...

  13. Identification of nitrogen compounds and amides from spent hydroprocessing catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, J.H.K.; Gray, M.R. (University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1991-06-01

    A spent commercial naphtha hydrotreating catalyst was analyzed to identify compounds which had accumulated on the catalyst surface during its active life. The catalyst was extracted with methylene chloride, methanol and pyridine to remove adsorbed organic material, which was rich in nitrogen and oxygen. A series of quinolones were identified in the methanol extract after enrichment with HCl-modified silica gel adsorption and subsequent silica gel chromatography. Tetra- and hexahydroquinolones with alkyl substituents up to C{sub 3} were identified. Similar amides have been identified in asphaltenes, and are very resistant to hydrogenation. Tetrahydroquinolines and piperidines were detected in the pyridine extract. 36 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Simulation of the catalyst layer in PEMFC based on a novel two-phase lattice model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Jiejing; Yang Wei; Xu Li [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Membrane Science and Desalination Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Wang Yuxin, E-mail: yxwang@tju.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Membrane Science and Desalination Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2011-08-01

    Highlights: > We propose a novel two phase lattice model of catalyst layer in PEMFC. > The model features a catalyst phase and a mixed ionomer and pores phase. > Transport and electrochemical reaction in the lattice are simulated. > The model enables more accurate results than pore-solid two phase model. > Profiles of oxygen level and reaction rate across catalyst layer vary with cell current. - Abstract: A lattice model of catalyst layer in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), consisting of randomly distributed catalyst phase (C phase) and mixed ionomer-pore phase (IP phase), was established by means of Monte Carlo method. Transport and electrochemical reactions in the model catalyst layer were calculated. The newly proposed C-IP model was compared with previously established pore-solid two phase model. The variation of oxygen level and reaction rate along the thickness of catalyst layer with cell current was discussed. The effect of ionomer distribution across catalyst layer was studied by comparing profiles of oxygen level, reaction rate and overpotential, as well as corresponding polarization curves.

  15. Use of solid-phase salt catalysts in furfural preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morozov, E.F.; Shkut, V.M.; Kebich, M.S.; Kuznetsova, T.A.

    1981-01-01

    The manufacture of furfural (I) from tanning waste, birch sawdust, or corncobs at 220-230 degrees in the presence of 2.0-3.0% double superphosphate, ammophos, (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, NH/sub 4/NO/sub 3/, or NH/sub 4/Cl was evaluated. Most of I is formed within 40 minutes in the presence of NH4NO3 or NH4Cl, and within 55 minutes in the presence of double superphosphate. The highest yield of I was obtained in the presence of NH4NO3 and/or NH4Cl. The solid-phase catalyst caused a little degradation of lignocellulose.

  16. Propene Hydroformylation by Supported Aqueous-phase Rh-NORBOS Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisager, Anders; Eriksen, Kim Michael; Hjortkjær, Jes

    2003-01-01

    The gas-phase hydroformylation reaction of propene using supported aqueous-phase (SAP) Rh-NORBOS modified catalysts in a continuous flow reactor has been examined. SAP catalysts supported on six different support materials were made by wet impregnation using solutions of the precursor complex Rh(...

  17. Sodium Tetraphenylborate Catalyst Identification: Preliminary Studies Set 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, M.J.

    1997-05-01

    This document details the results of these tests and represents the second report of the task designed to identify soluble NaTPB decomposition catalysts. This task, performed as part of the DNFSB Recommendation 96-1 Implementation Plan, partially fulfills the request by High Level Waste Engineering and the ITP Flow Sheet Team in task Technical Request HLW-TTR-97008

  18. Fe phase complexes and their thermal stability in iron phosphate catalysts supported on silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dasireddy, Venkata D. B. C., E-mail: dasireddy@gmail.com; Bharuth-Ram, K.; Harilal, A.; Singh, S.; Friedrich, H. B. [University of KwaZulu-Natal, School of Chemistry and Physics (South Africa)

    2015-04-15

    Comparative XRD and Mössbauer spectroscopy studies have been conducted on the effect of temperature on the phase transformations of an iron phosphate catalyst synthesized using the ammonia gel method (CAT1) and a commercial grade FePO {sub 4} catalyst supported on silica using wet impregnation method (CAT2). The XRD patterns of both catalysts showed the presence of iron phosphate and the tridymite phase of aluminum phosphate. Mössbauer spectra of the catalysts show that the phases present in CAT1 are thermally stable up to 500 {sup ∘}C, but CAT2 shows significant changes with the tridymite phase of iron phosphate increasing from 6 % to 29 % of the spectral area at a temperature of 500 {sup ∘}C.

  19. Influence of the phase composition on the catalytic properties of ammonia synthesis catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peev, T.M.; Bojinova, A.I.; Krylova, A.V.

    1981-01-01

    The phase composition of CA-1-type catalysts for ammonia synthesis was investigated by means of Moessbauer spectroscopy. A correlation was found between the catalytic activity of the samples and their wuestite content. (author)

  20. Microchannel Reactors for ISRU Applications Using Nanofabricated Catalysts, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Makel Engineering, Inc. (MEI) and USRA propose to develop microchannel reactors for In-Situ Resources Utilization (ISRU) using nanofabricated catalysts. The proposed...

  1. Additively Manufactured Monolithic Catalyst Bed for Green Propellants, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal aims to develop a low cost, high efficiency catalyst technology to address navigation and maneuver difficulties in NASA's return missions. Our approach...

  2. Synthesis of Acrolein from Glycerol Using FePO4 Catalyst in Liquid Phase Dehydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhmad Zainal Abidin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Acrolein is currently produced using propylene from crude oil while its price and scarcity are increasing. A renewable material such as glycerol is an attractive alternative for acrolein production. It can be obtained from crude palm oil (CPO and is a byproduct of biodiesel production. Besides being able to compete economically, glycerol is an environmentally friendly material. The purpose of this study is to synthesize acrolein from glycerol using FePO4 catalyst in liquid phase dehydration. The catalyst was prepared by three different methods: hydrothermal (catalyst A, deposition at Fe/P = 1.15 (catalyst B, and deposition at Fe/P = 1.20 (catalyst C. The experimental reaction temperature was varied at 220, 240 and 260 °C under constant atmospheric pressure. The results showed that catalyst C provided the best yield (91%, followed by catalyst A (90% and catalyst B (82%. The increasing reaction temperature showed a tendency to increase the yield of acrolein, while the presence of oxygen reduced the yield of acrolein and allowed the reaction to produce more side products such as glycerol propanal, acetaldehyde, and propionate. Catalyst reuse without any regeneration resulted in a yield profile of acrolein that continued to decline.

  3. Bimetallic Au-decorated Pd catalyst for the liquid phase hydrodechlorination of 2,4-dichlorophenol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Juan; Chen, Huan; Chen, Quanyuan; Huang, Zhaolu

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: 2,4-Dichlorophenol can be converted to phenol via the catalytic HDC method over Pd-Au/CNTs and the catalytic activity first increased and then decreased with Au content. - Highlights: • Bimetallic catalysts had smaller metal particles and larger number of exposed active site than the monometallic catalysts. • The cationization of Pd particles increased with Au content in the bimetallic catalysts. • The bimetallic catalysts exhibited higher catalytic activities for HDC of 2,4-DCP than the monometallic counterparts. • The concerted pathway for HDC of 2,4-DCP was more predominant with increasing Au content in the bimetallic catalyst. - Abstract: Monometallic and bimetallic Pd-Au catalysts supported on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with varied Au cooperation amounts were prepared using the complexing-reduction method in the presence of tetrahydrofuran (THF). The liquid phase catalytic hydrodechlorination (HDC) of 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) was investigated over these bimetallic catalysts. The catalysts were characterized by N 2 adsorption-desorption isotherms, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and H 2 chemisorption. Characterization results showed that the co-reduction of Pd and Au mainly formed alloy-like structure. The bimetallic catalysts had smaller metal particles and larger numbers of exposed active site than that of monometallic catalysts. In addition, compared with Pd(1.7)/CNTs and Au(0.4)/CNTs, the binding energies of Pd 3d 5/2 shifted to higher positions while that of Au 4f 7/2 had negative shifts in the Pd-Au bimetallic catalysts, which can be ascribed to the electrons transferred from metal Pd to Au and the cationization of Pd particles was enhanced. Accordingly, the bimetallic Pd-Au particles with different Au contents in the catalysts exhibited varied synergistic effects for the catalytic HDC of 2,4-DCP, with Pd(1.8)Au(0.4)/CNTs having the highest catalytic activity

  4. Bimetallic Au-decorated Pd catalyst for the liquid phase hydrodechlorination of 2,4-dichlorophenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Juan [School of the Environment, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Chen, Huan, E-mail: hchen404@njust.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Jiangsu Province for Chemical Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, School of Environmental & Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Chen, Quanyuan; Huang, Zhaolu [School of the Environment, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China)

    2016-11-30

    Graphical abstract: 2,4-Dichlorophenol can be converted to phenol via the catalytic HDC method over Pd-Au/CNTs and the catalytic activity first increased and then decreased with Au content. - Highlights: • Bimetallic catalysts had smaller metal particles and larger number of exposed active site than the monometallic catalysts. • The cationization of Pd particles increased with Au content in the bimetallic catalysts. • The bimetallic catalysts exhibited higher catalytic activities for HDC of 2,4-DCP than the monometallic counterparts. • The concerted pathway for HDC of 2,4-DCP was more predominant with increasing Au content in the bimetallic catalyst. - Abstract: Monometallic and bimetallic Pd-Au catalysts supported on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with varied Au cooperation amounts were prepared using the complexing-reduction method in the presence of tetrahydrofuran (THF). The liquid phase catalytic hydrodechlorination (HDC) of 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) was investigated over these bimetallic catalysts. The catalysts were characterized by N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption isotherms, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and H{sub 2} chemisorption. Characterization results showed that the co-reduction of Pd and Au mainly formed alloy-like structure. The bimetallic catalysts had smaller metal particles and larger numbers of exposed active site than that of monometallic catalysts. In addition, compared with Pd(1.7)/CNTs and Au(0.4)/CNTs, the binding energies of Pd 3d{sub 5/2} shifted to higher positions while that of Au 4f{sub 7/2} had negative shifts in the Pd-Au bimetallic catalysts, which can be ascribed to the electrons transferred from metal Pd to Au and the cationization of Pd particles was enhanced. Accordingly, the bimetallic Pd-Au particles with different Au contents in the catalysts exhibited varied synergistic effects for the catalytic HDC of 2,4-DCP, with Pd(1.8)Au(0.4)/CNTs having the highest

  5. Continuous fixed-bed gas-phase hydroformylation using supported ionic liquid-phase (SILP) Rh catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisager, Anders; Wasserscheid, Peter; Van Hal, R.

    2003-01-01

    Continuous flow gas-phase hydroformylation of propene was performed using novel supported ionic liquid-phase (SILP) catalysts containing immobilized Rh complexes of the biphosphine ligand sulfoxantphos in the ionic liquids 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate and halogen-free 1-n-butyl...

  6. Stability and kinetic studies of supported ionic liquid phase catalysts for hydroformylation of propene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisager, Anders; Fehrmann, Rasmus; Haumann, Marco

    2005-01-01

    Supported ionic liquid phase (SILP) catalysts have been studied with regard to their long-term stability in the continuous gas-phase hydroformylation of propene. Kinetic data have been acquired by variation of temperature, pressure, syngas composition, substrate concentration, and residence time...

  7. Colloidal polymer particles as catalyst carriers and phase transfer agents in multiphasic hydroformylation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peral, D; Stehl, D; Bibouche, B; Yu, H; Mardoukh, J; Schomäcker, R; Klitzing, R von; Vogt, D

    2018-03-01

    Colloidal particles have been used to covalently bind ligands for the heterogenization of homogeneous catalysts. The replacement of the covalent bonds by electrostatic interactions between particles and the catalyst could preserve the selectivity of a truly homogeneous catalytic process. Functionalized polymer particles with trimethylammonium moieties, dispersed in water, with a hydrophobic core and a hydrophilic shell have been synthesized by emulsion polymerization and have been thoroughly characterized. The ability of the particles with different monomer compositions to act as catalyst carriers has been studied. Finally, the colloidal dispersions have been applied as phase transfer agents in the multiphasic rhodium-catalyzed hydroformylation of 1-octene. The hydrodynamic radius of the particles has been shown to be around 100 nm, and a core-shell structure could be observed by atomic force microscopy. The polymer particles were proven to act as carriers for the water-soluble hydroformylation catalyst, due to electrostatic interaction between the functionalized particles bearing ammonium groups and the sulfonated ligands of the catalyst. The particles were stable under the hydroformylation conditions and the aqueous catalyst phase could be recycled three times. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Acrolein Production by Gas-Phase Glycerol Dehydration Using PO₄/Nb₂O5 Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyu Am; Ryoo, HeeKyoung; Ma, Byung Chol; Kim, Youngchul

    2018-02-01

    In this study, modified niobium oxide were prepared to study the addictive effects on the catalytic performance for gas-phase glycerol dehydration. The catalysts were characterized by N2 adsorption/desorption, XRD, NH3-TPD, FT-IR. The amount of phosphoric acid was up to 50 wt% in niobium. As a result, the highest glycerol conversion was achieved over 20 wt% PO4/Nb2O5. It indicates that the optimal amount of phosphoric acid leads the catalyst to have appropriate acidity which is an important factor for gas-phase glycerol dehydration.

  9. Features of the kinetics of heterogeneous reactions with phase transformations on catalyst surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, A D; Krylov, O V

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents a review of 41 bibliographic references to experiments on the adsorption of various gases (e.g., carbon monoxide, formic acid, ammonia, and oxygen) on metals (e.g., nickel, molybdenum, and platinum) and oxides covers observations of two-dimensional phases during adsorption; the kinetics of adsorption and catalysis associated with two-dimensional phase transitions; and several approximate models for describing the kinetics of heterogeneous catalysis which account for two-dimensional phase transformations on catalyst surfaces.

  10. Mixed phase Pt-Ru catalyst for direct methanol fuel cell anode by flame aerosol synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakraborty, Debasish; Bischoff, H.; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2005-01-01

    A spray-flame aerosol catalyzation technique was studied for producing Pt-Ru anode electrodes for the direct methanol fuel cell. Catalysts were produced as aerosol nanoparticles in a spray-flame reactor and deposited directly as a thin layer on the gas diffusion layer. The as-prepared catalyst wa......Ru1/Vulcan carbon. The kinetics of methanol oxidation on the mixed phase catalyst was also explored by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. (c) 2005 The Electrochemical Society.......A spray-flame aerosol catalyzation technique was studied for producing Pt-Ru anode electrodes for the direct methanol fuel cell. Catalysts were produced as aerosol nanoparticles in a spray-flame reactor and deposited directly as a thin layer on the gas diffusion layer. The as-prepared catalyst...... was found to be a mixture of nanocrystalline, mostly unalloyed Pt and an amorphous phase mostly of Ru and to a lesser extent of Pt oxides on top of the crystalline phase. The flame-produced Pt1Ru1 demonstrated similar onset potential but similar to 60% higher activity compared to commercially available Pt1...

  11. System Identification for Experimental Study for Polymerization Catalyst Reaction in Fluidized Bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmmed Saadi Ibrehem

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, system identification method is used to capture the reactor characteristics of production rate of polyethylene (PE based on published experimental data. The identification method is used to measure the percentage effect on the production rate of PE by measuring the effect of input factors of temperature of reaction, hydrogen concentration, and [Al]/[Ti] molar catalyst ratio. Temperature of reaction has big effects equal 52.4 % on the output of the system and 47.6 % on interaction of the system's parameters compare to other two factors. Also, hydrogen concentration has big effect equal 45.66 % on the output of the system and 14.7 % on interaction of the system's parameters. [Al]/[Ti] molar catalyst ratio has big effect on interaction of the system equal 28.6 and 1.94 % on the output of the system but less than the reaction temperature and hydrogen concentration. All these results depend on experiment results and these results are very important in industrial plants. ©2011 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved(Received: 13rd May 2011; Revised: 27th July 2011; Accepted: 22th September 2011[How to Cite: Ahmmed S. Ibrehem. (2011. System Identification for Experimental Study for Polymerization Catalyst Reaction in Fluidized Bed. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 6 (2: 137-146. doi:10.9767/bcrec.6.2.874.137-146][How to Link / DOI: http://dx,doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.6.2.874.137-146 || or local:  http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/874 ] | View in 

  12. Catalyst activity maintenance study for the liquid phase dimethyl ether process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, X.D.; Toseland, B.A.; Underwood, R.P. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The co-production of dimethyl ether (DME) and methanol from syngas is a process of considerable commercial attractiveness. DME coproduction can double the productivity of a LPMEOH process when using coal-derived syngas. This in itself may offer chemical producers and power companies increased flexibility and more profitable operation. DME is also known as a clean burning liquid fuel; Amoco and Haldor-Topsoe have recently announced the use of DME as an alternative diesel fuel. Moreover, DME can be an interesting intermediate in the production of chemicals such as olefins and vinyl acetate. The current APCl liquid phase dimethyl ether (LPDME) process utilizes a physical mixture of a commercial methanol synthesis catalyst and a dehydration catalyst (e.g., {gamma}-alumina). While this arrangement provides a synergy that results in much higher syngas conversion per pass compared to the methanol-only process, the stability of the catalyst system suffers. The present project is aimed at reducing catalyst deactivation both by understanding the cause(s) of catalyst deactivation and by developing modified catalyst systems. This paper describes the current understanding of the deactivation mechanism.

  13. Designing Multifunctionality into Single Phase and Multiphase Metal-Oxide-Selective Propylene Ammoxidation Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James F. Brazdil

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Multifunctionality is the hallmark of most modern commercial heterogeneous catalyst systems in use today, including those used for the selective ammoxidation of propylene to acrylonitrile. It is the quintessential principle underlying commercial catalyst design efforts since petrochemical process development is invariably driven by the need to reduce manufacturing costs. This is in large part achieved through new and improved catalysts that increase selectivity and productivity. In addition, the future feedstocks for chemical processes will be invariably more refractory than those currently in use (e.g., replacing alkenes with alkanes or using CO2, thus requiring a disparate combination of chemical functions in order to effect multiple chemical transformations with the fewest separate process steps. This review summarizes the key chemical phenomena behind achieving the successful integration of multiple functions into a mixed-metal-oxide-selective ammoxidation catalyst. An experiential and functional catalyst design model is presented that consists of one or both of the following components: (1 a mixed-metal-oxide–solid solution where the individual metal components serve separate and necessary functions in the reaction mechanism through their atomic level interaction in the context of a single crystallographic structure; (2 the required elemental components and their catalytic function existing in separate phases, where these phases are able to interact for the purposes of electron and lattice oxygen transfer through the formation of a structurally coherent interface (i.e., epitaxy between the separate crystal structures. Examples are provided from the literature and explained in the context of this catalyst design model. The extension of the model concepts to the design of heterogeneous catalysts in general is also discussed.

  14. Mechanisms and modeling development of water transport/phase change in catalyst layers of portion exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Yexiang [Dept. of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University Beijing (China)], email: Yexiang.Xiao@energy.lth.se; Yuan, Jinliang; Sunden, Bengt [Dept. of Energy Sciences, Faculty of Engineering, Lund University (Sweden)], email: Jinliang.yuan@energy.lth.se, email: bengt.sunden@energy.lth.se

    2011-07-01

    Research on proton exchange membrane fuel cells has shown that incorporation of nanosized catalysts can effectively increase active areas and catalyst activity and make a great contribution to development in performance and catalyst utilization. Multiphase transport processes are as significant and complicated as water generation/transfer processes which occur in nano-structured catalyst layers. A review project has been launched aimed at gaining a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms of water generation or transport phenomena. It covers catalytic reactions and water-phase change within the catalyst layers. The review proceeds in three main stages: Firstly, it characterizes and reconstructs the nano/micro-structured pores and solid-phases; secondly, it emphasises the importance of sensitive and consistent analysis of various water-phase change and transport schemes; and thirdly, it recommends development of microscopic models for multi-phase transport processes in the pores and the solid phases.

  15. Highly Selective Liquid-Phase Benzylation of Anisole with Solid-Acid Zeolite Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poreddy, Raju; Shunmugavel, Saravanamurugan; Riisager, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Zeolites were evaluated as solid acid catalysts for the liquid-phase benzylation of anisole with benzyl alcohol, benzyl bromide, and benzyl chloride at 80 °C. Among the examined zeolites, H-mordenite-10 (H-MOR-10) demonstrated particular high activity (>99 %) and excellent selectivity (>96...

  16. Vapor phase carbonylation of dimethyl ether and methyl acetate with supported transition metal catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikada, T.; Fujimoto, K.; Tominaga, H.O.

    1986-01-01

    The synthesis of acetic acid (AcOH) from methanol (MeOH) and carbon monoxide has been performed industrially in the liquid phase using a rhodium complex catalyst and an iodide promoter. The selectivity to AcOH is more than 99% under mild conditions (175 0 C, 28 atm). The homogeneous rhodium catalyst has been also effective for the synthesis of acetic anhydride (Ac 2 O) by carbonylation of dimethyl ether (DME) or methyl acetate (AcOMe). However, rhodium is one of the most expensive metals and its proved reserves are quite limited. It is highly desired, therefore, to develop a new catalyst as a substitute for rhodium. The authors have already reported that nickel supported on active carbon exhibits an excellent activity for the vapor phase carbonylation of MeOh in the presence of iodide promoter and under moderately pressurized conditions. In addition, corrosive attack on reactors by iodide compounds is expected to be negligible in the vapor phase system. In the present work, vapor phase carbonylation of DME and AcOMe on nickel-active carbon (Ni/A.C.) and molybdenum-active carbon (Mo/A.C.) catalysts was studied

  17. Supported liquid phase catalyst coating in micro flow Mizoroki-Heck reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stouten, S.C.; Noël, T.; Wang, Q.; Hessel, V.

    2015-01-01

    A Supported Liquid Phase Catalyst (SLPC) coating was successfully applied for the Mizoroki–Heck reaction in micro flow. Foremost, extended on stream operation was enabled and the on stream performance stability was verified. Stable catalytic activity was achieved during two consecutive runs totaling

  18. Operando Spectroscopy of the Gas-Phase Aldol Condensation of Propanal over Solid Base Catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernández-giménez, Ana M.; Ruiz-martínez, Javier; Puértolas, Begoña; Pérez-ramírez, Javier; Bruijnincx, Pieter C. A.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2017-01-01

    The gas-phase aldol condensation of propanal, taken as model for the aldehyde components in bio-oils, has been studied with a combined operando set-up allowing to perform FT-IR & UV–Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) with on-line mass spectrometry (MS). The selected solid base catalysts, a

  19. Gas-Phase Oxidation of Aqueous Ethanol by Nanoparticle Vanadia/Anatase Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Betina; Kristensen, Steffen Buus; Kunov-Kruse, Andreas Jonas

    2009-01-01

    The gas-phase oxidation of aqueous ethanol with dioxygen has been examined with a new nanoparticle V2O5/TiO2 catalyst. Product selectivity could to a large extent be controlled by small alterations of reaction parameters, allowing production of acetaldehyde at a selectivity higher than 90%, near...

  20. Deep desulfurization of diesel via peroxide oxidation using phosphotungstic acid as phase transfer catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachdeva, T.O.; Pant, K.K. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, New Delhi, 110016 (India)

    2010-09-15

    High sulfur level in diesel fuel has been identified as a major contributor to air pollutant in term of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub x}) through diesel fueled vehicles. The main aim of the present work is to develop a promising methodology for ultra deep desulfurization of diesel fuel using oxidation followed by phase transfer of oxidized sulfur. Experiments were carried out in a batch reactor using n-decane as the model diesel compound and also using commercial diesel feedstock. To remove sulfur tetraoctylammonium bromide, phosphotungstic acid, and hydrogen peroxide were used as phase transfer agent, catalyst and oxidant respectively. The percent sulfur removal increases with increasing the initial concentration of sulfur in fuel and with increasing the reaction temperature. Similar trends were observed when commercial diesel was used to carry out desulfurization studies. The amphiphilic catalyst serves as a catalyst and also as an emulsifying agent to stabilize the emulsion droplets. The effects of temperature, agitation speed, quantity of catalyst and the phase transfer agent were studied to estimate the optimal conditions for the reactions. The sulfur removal from a commercial diesel by phase transfer catalysis has been found effective and removal efficiency was more than 98%. Kinetic experiments carried out for the desulfurization revealed that the sulfur removal results are best fitted to a pseudo first order kinetics and the apparent activation energy of desulfurization was 30.6 kJ/mol. (author)

  1. Deep desulfurization of diesel via peroxide oxidation using phosphotungstic acid as phase transfer catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachdeva, T.O.; Pant, K.K.

    2010-01-01

    High sulfur level in diesel fuel has been identified as a major contributor to air pollutant in term of sulfur dioxide (SO x ) through diesel fueled vehicles. The main aim of the present work is to develop a promising methodology for ultra deep desulfurization of diesel fuel using oxidation followed by phase transfer of oxidized sulfur. Experiments were carried out in a batch reactor using n-decane as the model diesel compound and also using commercial diesel feedstock. To remove sulfur tetraoctylammonium bromide, phosphotungstic acid, and hydrogen peroxide were used as phase transfer agent, catalyst and oxidant respectively. The percent sulfur removal increases with increasing the initial concentration of sulfur in fuel and with increasing the reaction temperature. Similar trends were observed when commercial diesel was used to carry out desulfurization studies. The amphiphilic catalyst serves as a catalyst and also as an emulsifying agent to stabilize the emulsion droplets. The effects of temperature, agitation speed, quantity of catalyst and the phase transfer agent were studied to estimate the optimal conditions for the reactions. The sulfur removal from a commercial diesel by phase transfer catalysis has been found effective and removal efficiency was more than 98%. Kinetic experiments carried out for the desulfurization revealed that the sulfur removal results are best fitted to a pseudo first order kinetics and the apparent activation energy of desulfurization was 30.6 kJ/mol. (author)

  2. Functionalized Poly(propylene imine) Dendrimers as Novel Phase Transfer Catalyst in Supercritical Cabon Dioxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goetheer, E.L.V.; Baars, M.W.P.L.; Broeke, van den L.J.P.; Meijer, E.W.; Keurentjes, J.T.F.

    2000-01-01

    Perfluoro-functionalized poly(propylene imine) dendrimers have been used as reactive extractants for anionic species and as phase transfer catalysts for two types of reactions. Different generations of dendrimers have been used for applications in carbon dioxide. First, the reactive extraction of

  3. Graphite-supported platinum catalysts: Effects of gas and aqueous phase treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vleeming, J.H.; Kuster, B.F.M.; Marin, G.B. [Eindhoven Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    The effects on the platinum particle diameter and the available platinum surface area of a graphite-supported platinum catalyst resulting from pretreatments and from performing a selective oxidation reaction are investigated. In the gas phase considerable catalyst sintering occurs only in the presence of oxygen at 773 K due to extensive carbon burn-off, whereas in an aqueous phase platinum particle growth is limited upon oxidative treatment. A hydrogen treatment in aqueous phase at 363 K causes platinum particle growth, aggregate formation, and covering of metal sites. These phenomena become more important with increasing pH. Platinum particle growth and aggregate formation are attributed to platinum particle rather than platinum adatom mobility and is caused by the destruction of the oxygen-containing surface groups on the graphite support, which serve as anchorage sites for the platinum particles. Site covering is caused by products originating from the graphite support, which are formed as a result of the reductive treatments. When performing the aqueous phase oxidation of methyl {alpha}-D-glucopyranoside at 323 K and a pH of 9, catalyst modifications are small under oxidative conditions. Exposure of the catalyst for several hours to methyl {alpha}-D-glucopyranoside under the same conditions but in the absence of oxygen causes site covering. 50 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Supported Rh-phosphine complex catalysts for continuous gas-phase decarbonylation of aldehydes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malcho, Phillip; Garcia-Suarez, Eduardo J.; Mentzel, Uffe Vie

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneous silica supported rhodium-phosphine complex catalysts are employed for the first time in the catalytic decarbonylation of aldehydes in continuous gas-phase. The reaction protocol is exemplified for the decarbonylation of p-tolualdehyde to toluene and further extended to other aromatic...

  5. Phase composition and catalytic properties of oxide multicomponent molybdenum-containing catalysts for partial oxidation of propylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malakhov, V.V.; Vlasov, A.A.; Boldyreva, N.N.; Dovlitova, L.S.; Plyasova, L.M.; Andrushkevich, T.V.; Kuznetsova, T.G.

    1996-01-01

    The catalytic properties and phase composition of multicomponent molybdenum-containing catalyst treated under various redox conditions have been studied. The phase composition has been considered by the methods of X-ray phase analysis and noncalibrated methods of differentiating dissolution (DD). Using the DD method the data on element composition, stoichiometry and quantitative content of phases of complex molybdates have been obtained for the first time. Data on modification of basic phases of the catalyst-cobalt and iron molybdates - by other cations from its composition suggest that the mechanism of action of the multicomponent catalyst is defined by the properties of one or several formed modified phases combining all the functions of an effective catalyst. 18 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  6. WxC-β-SiC Nanocomposite Catalysts Used in Aqueous Phase Hydrogenation of Furfural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Rogowski

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effects of the addition of tungsten on the structure, phase composition, textural properties and activities of β-SiC-based catalysts in the aqueous phase hydrogenation of furfural. Carbothermal reduction of SiO2 in the presence of WO3 at 1550 °C in argon resulted in the formation of WxC-β-SiC nanocomposite powders with significant variations in particle morphology and content of WxC-tipped β-SiC nano-whiskers, as revealed by TEM and SEM-EDS. The specific surface area (SSA of the nanocomposite strongly depended on the amount of tungsten and had a notable impact on its catalytic properties for the production of furfuryl alcohol (FA and tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol (THFA. Nanocomposite WxC-β-SiC catalysts with 10 wt % W in the starting mixture had the highest SSA and the smallest WxC crystallites. Some 10 wt % W nanocomposite catalysts demonstrated up to 90% yield of THFA, in particular in the reduction of furfural derived from biomass, although the reproducible performance of such catalysts has yet to be achieved.

  7. WxC-β-SiC Nanocomposite Catalysts Used in Aqueous Phase Hydrogenation of Furfural.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogowski, Jacek; Andrzejczuk, Mariusz; Berlowska, Joanna; Binczarski, Michal; Kregiel, Dorota; Kubiak, Andrzej; Modelska, Magdalena; Szubiakiewicz, Elzbieta; Stanishevsky, Andrei; Tomaszewska, Jolanta; Witonska, Izabela Alina

    2017-11-22

    This study investigates the effects of the addition of tungsten on the structure, phase composition, textural properties and activities of β-SiC-based catalysts in the aqueous phase hydrogenation of furfural. Carbothermal reduction of SiO₂ in the presence of WO₃ at 1550 °C in argon resulted in the formation of W x C-β-SiC nanocomposite powders with significant variations in particle morphology and content of W x C-tipped β-SiC nano-whiskers, as revealed by TEM and SEM-EDS. The specific surface area (SSA) of the nanocomposite strongly depended on the amount of tungsten and had a notable impact on its catalytic properties for the production of furfuryl alcohol (FA) and tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol (THFA). Nanocomposite W x C-β-SiC catalysts with 10 wt % W in the starting mixture had the highest SSA and the smallest W x C crystallites. Some 10 wt % W nanocomposite catalysts demonstrated up to 90% yield of THFA, in particular in the reduction of furfural derived from biomass, although the reproducible performance of such catalysts has yet to be achieved.

  8. Liquid phase catalytic hydrodebromination of tetrabromobisphenol A on supported Pd catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Ke; Zheng, Mengjia; Han, Yuxiang; Xu, Zhaoyi; Zheng, Shourong

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Pd catalysts supported on TiO_2, CeO_2, Al_2O_3 and SiO_2 were prepared. • Deposition-precipitation method resulted in positively charged smaller Pd particle. • Complete debromination of tetrabromobisphenol A could be achieved on Pd/TiO_2. • Pd/TiO_2 prepared by the deposition-precipitation method was more active. - Abstract: Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) is a widely used brominated flame retardant and reductive debromination is an effective method for the abatement of TBBPA pollution. In this study, Pd catalysts supported on TiO_2, CeO_2, Al_2O_3 and SiO_2 were prepared by the impregnation (the resulting catalyst denoted as im-Pd/support), deposition-precipitation (the resulting catalyst denoted as dp-Pd/support), and photo-deposition (the resulting catalyst denoted as pd-Pd/support) methods. The catalysts were characterized by N_2 adsorption-desorption isotherm, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, measurement of zeta potential, CO chemisorption, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results showed that at an identical Pd loading amount (2.0 wt.%) Pd particle size in dp-Pd/TiO_2 was much smaller than those in im-Pd/TiO_2 and pd-Pd/TiO_2. Pd particle size of the dp-Pd/TiO_2 catalyst increased with Pd loading amount. Additionally, Pd particles in the dp-Pd/TiO_2 catalysts were positively charged due to the strong metal-support interaction, whereas the cationization effect was gradually attenuated with the increase of Pd loading amount. For the liquid phase catalytic hydrodebromination (HDB) of TBBPA, tri-bromobisphenol A (tri-BBPA), di-bromobisphenol A (di-BBPA), and mono-bromobisphenol A (mono-BBPA) were identified as the intermediate products, indicative of a stepwise debromination process. The catalytic HDB of TBBPA followed the Langmuir-Hinshelwood model, reflecting an adsorption enhanced catalysis mechanism. At an identical Pd loading amount, the Pd catalyst supported on TiO_2 exhibited a much higher catalytic activity

  9. Liquid phase catalytic hydrodebromination of tetrabromobisphenol A on supported Pd catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Ke [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Vehicle Emissions Control, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Zheng, Mengjia [Kuang Yaming Honors School, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Han, Yuxiang [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Vehicle Emissions Control, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Xu, Zhaoyi, E-mail: zhaoyixu@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Vehicle Emissions Control, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Zheng, Shourong [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Vehicle Emissions Control, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China)

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Pd catalysts supported on TiO{sub 2}, CeO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2} were prepared. • Deposition-precipitation method resulted in positively charged smaller Pd particle. • Complete debromination of tetrabromobisphenol A could be achieved on Pd/TiO{sub 2}. • Pd/TiO{sub 2} prepared by the deposition-precipitation method was more active. - Abstract: Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) is a widely used brominated flame retardant and reductive debromination is an effective method for the abatement of TBBPA pollution. In this study, Pd catalysts supported on TiO{sub 2}, CeO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2} were prepared by the impregnation (the resulting catalyst denoted as im-Pd/support), deposition-precipitation (the resulting catalyst denoted as dp-Pd/support), and photo-deposition (the resulting catalyst denoted as pd-Pd/support) methods. The catalysts were characterized by N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption isotherm, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, measurement of zeta potential, CO chemisorption, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results showed that at an identical Pd loading amount (2.0 wt.%) Pd particle size in dp-Pd/TiO{sub 2} was much smaller than those in im-Pd/TiO{sub 2} and pd-Pd/TiO{sub 2}. Pd particle size of the dp-Pd/TiO{sub 2} catalyst increased with Pd loading amount. Additionally, Pd particles in the dp-Pd/TiO{sub 2} catalysts were positively charged due to the strong metal-support interaction, whereas the cationization effect was gradually attenuated with the increase of Pd loading amount. For the liquid phase catalytic hydrodebromination (HDB) of TBBPA, tri-bromobisphenol A (tri-BBPA), di-bromobisphenol A (di-BBPA), and mono-bromobisphenol A (mono-BBPA) were identified as the intermediate products, indicative of a stepwise debromination process. The catalytic HDB of TBBPA followed the Langmuir-Hinshelwood model, reflecting an adsorption enhanced catalysis mechanism. At an identical Pd

  10. Application of New Electrolyte Model to Phase Transfer Catalyst (PTC) Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyung Kim, Sun; Anantpinijwatna, Amata; Kang, Jeong Won

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Phase transfer catalyst (PTC) is used to transfer the desirable active form of an anion from the aqueous phase to organic phase where the reaction occurs. One of major challenges for process design of the PTC system is to establish a reliable thermodynamic model capable of describing pha...... in PTC systems, thereby, extending the application range of the PTC-system model. The solubility of PTC in organic solvents, which is a key factor for strategy of PTC and solvent selection, has been calculated using the e-NRTL-SAC model....

  11. Predictive Modelling of Phase-Transfer Catalyst Systems for Improved and Innovative Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anantpinijwatna, Amata; Hyung Kim, Sun; Sales-Cruz, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    Phase-transfer catalyst (PTC) systems contain two immiscible liquid phases with a heterogeneous PTC transferring active ion from one phase to the other for converting the reactant to the desired product, and in the process generating the inactive ion. This type of reacting systems is receiving...... increasing attention as a novel organic synthesis option due to its flexible and easier operation, higher production yield, and ability to eliminate expensive solvents, although, not eliminating the use of solvents. New mathematical models of the PTC system, which includes physical and chemical equilibrium......, reaction mechanism and unit operation has been developed. In the developed model, the PTC system is divided into four sub-systems of aqueous-organic solvent partition, inorganic salt in aqueous phase, PTC in aqueous phase, and PTC in aqueous phase. Each subsystem requires an appropriate thermodynamic model...

  12. Cross-Aldol condensation of isobutyraldehyde and formaldehyde using phase transfer catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azhar Hashmi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The hydroxypivaldehyde (HPA precursor intermediate for the synthesis of neopentyl glycol (NPG is prepared by novel cross Aldol condensation of isobutyraldehyde and formaldehyde at 20 °C using benzyltrimethylammonium hydroxide, a basic phase transfer catalyst. A feed mole ratio of 1.1:1.0:0.04 (isobutyraldehyde:formaldehyde:benzyltrimethylammonium hydroxide afforded hydroxypivaldehyde as white solid in almost quantitative yield with ∼100% selectivity.

  13. Cross-Aldol condensation of isobutyraldehyde and formaldehyde using phase transfer catalyst

    OpenAIRE

    Azhar Hashmi

    2016-01-01

    The hydroxypivaldehyde (HPA) precursor intermediate for the synthesis of neopentyl glycol (NPG) is prepared by novel cross Aldol condensation of isobutyraldehyde and formaldehyde at 20 °C using benzyltrimethylammonium hydroxide, a basic phase transfer catalyst. A feed mole ratio of 1.1:1.0:0.04 (isobutyraldehyde:formaldehyde:benzyltrimethylammonium hydroxide) afforded hydroxypivaldehyde as white solid in almost quantitative yield with ∼100% selectivity.

  14. Synthesis of Acrolein From Glycerol Using FePO4 Catalyst in Liquid Phase Dehydration

    OpenAIRE

    Abidin, Akhmad Zainal; Afandi, Rani Guslianti; Graha, Hafis Pratama Rendra

    2016-01-01

    Acrolein is currently produced using propylene from crude oil while its price and scarcity are increasing. A renewable material such as glycerol is an attractive alternative for acrolein production. It can be obtained from crude palm oil (CPO) and is a byproduct of biodiesel production. Besides being able to compete economically, glycerol is an environmentally friendly material. The purpose of this study is to synthesize acrolein from glycerol using FePO4 catalyst in liquid phase dehydration....

  15. Procedure for the preparation of catalysts for application in catalytic gas phase reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The invention describes the preparation of catalysts to be used in catalytic reactions in the gaseous phase. The catalytic material is disposed at the surface of a ceramic or carbon substrate (av. particle size 0.1 μ - 0.5 cm, surface area smaller than 20 m 2 /g) by bombardment of the catalytic material (Pt, Rh, Pd, Ru, Os, Ir) with energetic ions (Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) in the vicinity of the substrate in medium vacuum

  16. Vapour phase dehydration of glycerol to acrolein over tungstated zirconia catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao Ginjupalli, Srinivasa; Mugawar, Sowmya; Rajan, Pethan N.; Kumar Balla, Putra; Chary Komandur, V.R., E-mail: kvrchary@iict.res.in

    2014-08-01

    Tetragonal (TZ) and monoclinic (MZ) polymorphs of zirconia supports were synthesised by sol–gel method followed by variation of the calcination temperature. Tungstated (10 wt% WO{sub 3}) supported on the zirconia polymorphs were prepared by impregnation method by using ammonium metatungstate precursor. The physico-chemical properties of the calcined catalysts were characterised by X-ray diffraction, UV–vis diffused reflectance spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), surface area and pore size distribution measurements to gain insight into the effect of morphology of the catalyst textural properties, and structure. The surface acidic properties have been determined by NH{sub 3} TPD method and also with FT-IR spectra of pyridine adsorption. Vapour phase dehydration of glycerol to acrolein was employed to investigate the catalytic functionalities. Glycerol conversion and acrolein selectivity was mainly dependent on the fraction of moderate acid sites with majority of them are due to Brønsted acidic sites. Monoclinic zirconia based catalysts have shown the highest activity and acrolein selectivity compared to the corresponding tetragonal zirconia catalysts.

  17. Vapour phase dehydration of glycerol to acrolein over tungstated zirconia catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao Ginjupalli, Srinivasa; Mugawar, Sowmya; Rajan N., Pethan; Kumar Balla, Putra; Chary Komandur, V. R.

    2014-08-01

    Tetragonal (TZ) and monoclinic (MZ) polymorphs of zirconia supports were synthesised by sol-gel method followed by variation of the calcination temperature. Tungstated (10 wt% WO3) supported on the zirconia polymorphs were prepared by impregnation method by using ammonium metatungstate precursor. The physico-chemical properties of the calcined catalysts were characterised by X-ray diffraction, UV-vis diffused reflectance spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), surface area and pore size distribution measurements to gain insight into the effect of morphology of the catalyst textural properties, and structure. The surface acidic properties have been determined by NH3 TPD method and also with FT-IR spectra of pyridine adsorption. Vapour phase dehydration of glycerol to acrolein was employed to investigate the catalytic functionalities. Glycerol conversion and acrolein selectivity was mainly dependent on the fraction of moderate acid sites with majority of them are due to Brønsted acidic sites. Monoclinic zirconia based catalysts have shown the highest activity and acrolein selectivity compared to the corresponding tetragonal zirconia catalysts.

  18. Vapour phase dehydration of glycerol to acrolein over tungstated zirconia catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao Ginjupalli, Srinivasa; Mugawar, Sowmya; Rajan, Pethan N.; Kumar Balla, Putra; Chary Komandur, V.R.

    2014-01-01

    Tetragonal (TZ) and monoclinic (MZ) polymorphs of zirconia supports were synthesised by sol–gel method followed by variation of the calcination temperature. Tungstated (10 wt% WO 3 ) supported on the zirconia polymorphs were prepared by impregnation method by using ammonium metatungstate precursor. The physico-chemical properties of the calcined catalysts were characterised by X-ray diffraction, UV–vis diffused reflectance spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), surface area and pore size distribution measurements to gain insight into the effect of morphology of the catalyst textural properties, and structure. The surface acidic properties have been determined by NH 3 TPD method and also with FT-IR spectra of pyridine adsorption. Vapour phase dehydration of glycerol to acrolein was employed to investigate the catalytic functionalities. Glycerol conversion and acrolein selectivity was mainly dependent on the fraction of moderate acid sites with majority of them are due to Brønsted acidic sites. Monoclinic zirconia based catalysts have shown the highest activity and acrolein selectivity compared to the corresponding tetragonal zirconia catalysts.

  19. Gas-phase Dehydration of Glycerol over Supported Silicotungstic Acids Catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong Tae; Park, Eun Duck; Jung, Kwang Deog

    2010-01-01

    The gas-phase dehydration of glycerol to acrolein was carried out over 10 wt % HSiW catalysts supported on different supports, viz. γ-Al 2 O 3 , SiO 2 -Al 2 O 3 , TiO 2 , ZrO 2 , SiO 2 , AC, CeO 2 and MgO. The same reaction was also conducted over each support without HSiW for comparison. Several characterization techniques, N 2 -physisorption, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), the temperature-programmed desorption of ammonia (NH 3 - TPD), temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO) with mass spectroscopy and CHNS analysis were employed to characterize the catalysts. The glycerol conversion generally increased with increasing amount of acid sites. Ceria showed the highest 1-hydroxyacetone selectivity at 315 .deg. C among the various metal oxides. The supported HSiW catalyst showed superior catalytic activity to that of the corresponding support. Among the supported HSiW catalysts, HSiW/ZrO 2 and HSiW/SiO 2 -Al 2 O 3 showed the highest acrolein selectivity. In the case of HSiW/ZrO 2 , the initial catalytic activity was recovered after the removal of the accumulated carbon species at 550 .deg. C in the presence of oxygen

  20. Characterization and parametrical study of Rh-TPPTS supported ionic liquid phase (SILP) catalysts for ethylene hydroformylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanh, Nguyen Thi Ha; Duc, Duc Truong; Thang, Vu Dao

    2012-01-01

    The supported ionic liquid phase (SILP) catalysis technology was applied to continuous, gas-phase hydroformylation of ethylene. Rh-TPPTS SILP catalysts with relatively low ionic liquid loading were shown to be stable and highly activity for ethylene hydroformylation. However, the catalytic activity......, BET surface area and pore morphology of the catalysts depended on the content of ionic liquid. Hence, catalysts with high ionic liquid loading content showed deactivation at high reaction temperatures, possibly caused by redistribution of ionic liquid out of the pores under these conditions. (C) 2012...

  1. One-pot aqueous phase catalytic conversion of sorbitol to gasoline over nickel catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng, Yujing; Qiu, Songbai; Xu, Ying; Ding, Mingyue; Chen, Lungang; Zhang, Qi; Ma, Longlong; Wang, Tiejun

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Directly production gasoline (C5–C12 alkanes) from biomass-derived sugar alcohol sorbitol. • Temperature of STG (553–593 K) was lower than that of traditional methanol to gasoline (MTG) (623–773 K). • Gasoline yield of 46.9% and C7–C12 hydrocarbons reached up to 45.5% in the gasoline products. - Abstract: The carbon chain extension and hydrodeoxygenation steps play critical roles in the high-energy-density hydrocarbons production. In this paper, a systematic study had been carried out to investigate one-pot aqueous phase catalytic conversion of sorbitol to gasoline (STG) over bifunctional Ni-based catalysts. Characterization technologies of N 2 physisorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and NH 3 temperature-programmed desorption (NH 3 -TPD) were used to study the textural properties, phase compositions, acid behavior and morphologies of the catalysts. The catalytic performances were tested in a fixed bed reactor. It was found that the physically mixed Ni/HZSM-5 and Ni/silica-gel (mesoporous SG) catalyst realized the carbon chain extension and exhibited excellent performances on hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) reaction (46.9% of gasoline (C5–C12) yield and 45.5% of C7–C12 hydrocarbons in the gasoline products). Especially, the temperature of STG (553–593 K) was lower obviously than that of the traditional methanol to gasoline (MTG) process (623–773 K). It provided a novel transformation of sorbitol to long-chain alkanes by one-pot process over the bifunctional catalyst (Ni@HZSM-5/SG), wherein hydrodeoxygenation, ketonization and aldol condensation steps were integrated

  2. Synthesis and Reactions of Five-Membered Heterocycles Using Phase Transfer Catalyst (PTC Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. El-Sayed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phase transfer catalysts (PTCs have been widely used for the synthesis of organic compounds particularly in both liquid-liquid and solid-liquid heterogeneous reaction mixtures. They are known to accelerate reaction rates by facilitating formation of interphase transfer of species and making reactions between reagents in two immiscible phases possible. Application of PTC instead of traditional technologies for industrial processes of organic synthesis provides substantial benefits for the environment. On the basis of numerous reports it is evident that phase-transfer catalysis is the most efficient way for generation and reactions of many active intermediates. In this review we report various uses of PTC in syntheses and reactions of five-membered heterocycles compounds and their multifused rings.

  3. Uniformly active phase loaded selective catalytic reduction catalysts (V_2O_5/TNTs) with superior alkaline resistance performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Haiqiang; Wang, Penglu; Chen, Xiongbo; Wu, Zhongbiao

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • VOSO_4 exhibited better synergistic effect with titanate nanotubes than NH_4VO_3. • Ion-exchange reaction occurs between VOSO_4 and titanate nanotubes. • Ion-exchange resulting in uniformly vanadium distribution on titanate nanotubes. • VOSO_4-based catalyst exhibited impressive SCR activity and alkaline resistance. - Abstract: In this work, protonated titanate nanotubes was performed as a potential useful support and different vanadium precursors (NH_4VO_3 and VOSO_4) were used to synthesize deNO_x catalysts. The results showed that VOSO_4 exhibited better synergistic effect with titanate nanotubes than NH_4VO_3, which was caused by the ion-exchange reaction. Then high loading content of vanadium, uniformly active phase distribution, better dispersion of vanadium, more acid sites, better V"5"+/V"4"+ redox cycles and superior oxygen mobility were achieved. Besides, VOSO_4-based titanate nanotubes catalysts also showed enhanced alkaline resistance than particles (P25) based catalysts. It was strongly associated with its abundant acid sites, large surface area, flexible redox cycles and oxygen transfer ability. For the loading on protonated titanate nanotubes, active metal with cation groups was better precursors than anion ones. V_2O_5/TNTs catalyst was a promising substitute for the commercial vanadium catalysts and the work conducted herein provided a useful idea to design uniformly active phase loaded catalyst.

  4. System identification on two-phase flow stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Shaorong; Zhang Youjie; Wang Dazhong; Bo Jinghai; Wang Fei

    1996-01-01

    The theoretical principle, experimental method and results of interrelation analysis identification for the instability of two-phase flow are described. A completely new concept of test technology and method on two-phase flow stability was developed by using he theory of information science on system stability and system identification for two-phase flow stability in thermo-physics field. Application of this method would make it possible to identify instability boundary of two-phase flow under stable operation conditions of two-phase flow system. The experiment was carried out on the thermohydraulic test system HRTL-5. Using reverse repeated pseudo-random sequences of heating power as input signal sources and flow rate as response function in the test, the two-phase flow stability and stability margin of the natural circulation system are investigated. The effectiveness and feasibility of identifying two-phase flow stability by using this system identification method were experimentally demonstrated. Basic data required for mathematics modeling of two-phase flow and analysis of two-phase flow stability were obtained, which are useful for analyzing, monitoring of the system operation condition, and forecasting of two-phase flow stability in engineering system

  5. Systematic Identification of Promoters for Methane Oxidation Catalysts Using Size- and Composition-Controlled Pd-Based Bimetallic Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Joshua J; Goodman, Emmett D; Wu, Liheng; Riscoe, Andrew R; Martins, Pedro; Tassone, Christopher J; Cargnello, Matteo

    2017-08-30

    Promoters enhance the performance of catalytic active phases by increasing rates, stability, and/or selectivity. The process of identifying promoters is in most cases empirical and relies on testing a broad range of catalysts prepared with the random deposition of active and promoter phases, typically with no fine control over their localization. This issue is particularly relevant in supported bimetallic systems, where two metals are codeposited onto high-surface area materials. We here report the use of colloidal bimetallic nanocrystals to produce catalysts where the active and promoter phases are colocalized to a fine extent. This strategy enables a systematic approach to study the promotional effects of several transition metals on palladium catalysts for methane oxidation. In order to achieve these goals, we demonstrate a single synthetic protocol to obtain uniform palladium-based bimetallic nanocrystals (PdM, M = V, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, Sn, and potentially extendable to other metal combinations) with a wide variety of compositions and sizes based on high-temperature thermal decomposition of readily available precursors. Once the nanocrystals are supported onto oxide materials, thermal treatments in air cause segregation of the base metal oxide phase in close proximity to the Pd phase. We demonstrate that some metals (Fe, Co, and Sn) inhibit the sintering of the active Pd metal phase, while others (Ni and Zn) increase its intrinsic activity compared to a monometallic Pd catalyst. This procedure can be generalized to systematically investigate the promotional effects of metal and metal oxide phases for a variety of active metal-promoter combinations and catalytic reactions.

  6. Continuous gas-phase hydroformylation of 1-butene using supported ionic liquid phase (SILP) catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haumann, Marco; Dentler, Katharina; Joni, Joni

    2007-01-01

    The concept of supported ionic liquid phase (SILP) catalysis has been extended to 1-butene hydroformylation. A rhodium-sulfoxantphos complex was dissolved in [BMIM][n-C8H17OSO3] and this solution was highly dispersed on silica. Continuous gas-phase experiments in a fixed-bed reactor revealed...

  7. Certain aspects of the formation and identification of nanosized oxide components in heterogeneous catalysts prepared by different methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellert, Ol'ga G; Novotortsev, Vladimir M; Tsodikov, Mark V

    2010-01-01

    The results of studies into the relationship 'methods and synthesis conditions of a catalyst→catalyst structure→catalytic properties' in highly efficient crystallo-graphically amorphous copper- and iron-containing heterogeneous systems obtained by different chemical methods are generalized. Polymorphism of active phases and catalytic properties of nanostructured copper-containing zinc, zirconium, manganese and cerium oxides are discussed. Unusual transformations of nanosized Pt- and Pd-containing components on the γ-Al 2 O 3 surface in nanostructured catalysts of ethanol steam reforming into synthesis gas and reductive dehydration of ethanol to alkanes are considered. The results of comparative studies on the crystallographically amorphous mixed iron oxide catalysts synthesized by either the alkoxy method or the deposition on various supports obtained by the Moessbauer and XAFS spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility measurements are presented. These materials are shown to be efficient catalysts of important processes such as liquid-phase oxidation of hydrocarbons, synthesis of alkenes and alkylaromatic hydrocarbons from CO and H 2 , hydrogenative transformation of brown coal organic mass to hydrocarbons.

  8. Reduction of Furfural to Furfuryl Alcohol in Liquid Phase over a Biochar-Supported Platinum Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariadna Fuente-Hernández

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the liquid phase hydrogenation of furfural has been studied using a biochar-supported platinum catalyst in a batch reactor. Reactions were performed between 170 °C and 320 °C, using 3 wt % and 5 wt % of Pt supported on a maple-based biochar under hydrogen pressure varying from 500 psi to 1500 psi for reaction times between 1 h and 6 h in various solvents. Under all reactive conditions, furfural conversion was significant, whilst under specific conditions furfuryl alcohol (FA was obtained in most cases as the main product showing a selectivity around 80%. Other products as methylfuran (MF, furan, and trace of tetrahydrofuran (THF were detected. Results showed that the most efficient reaction conditions involved a 3% Pt load on biochar and operations for 2 h at 210 °C and 1500 psi using toluene as solvent. When used repetitively, the catalyst showed deactivation although only a slight variation in selectivity toward FA at the optimal experimental conditions was observed.

  9. Propene and l-octene hydroformylation with silica-supported, ionic liquid-phase (SILP) Rh-phosphine catalysts in continuous fixed-bed mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisager, Anders; Eriksen, Kim Michael; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2003-01-01

    - and liquid-phase hydroformylation of propene and 1-octene, exhibiting TOFs up to 88 h(-1) for SILP Rh-2 catalysts, while only low selectivities up to 74% n-aldehyde (n/iso ratio of 2.8) were obtained. This is the first example of continuous fixed-bed liquid-phase hydroformylation using SILP catalysts.......Supported ionic liquid-phase (SILP) catalysts were made by immobilizing Rh-monophosphine complexes of bis(m-phenylguanidinium) phenylphosphine 1 and NORBOS 2 ligands in 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate, [BMIM] [PF6], on a silica support. The catalysts were active in continuous gas...

  10. Surface Termination of M1 Phase and Rational Design of Propane Ammoxidation Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guliants, Vadim [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2015-02-16

    This final report describes major accomplishments in this research project which has demonstrated that the M1 phase is the only crystalline phase required for propane ammoxidation to acrylonitrile and that a surface monolayer terminating the ab planes of the M1 phase is responsible for their activity and selectivity in this reaction. Fundamental studies of the topmost surface chemistry and mechanism of propane ammoxidation over the Mo-V-(Te,Sb)-(Nb,Ta)-O M1 and M2 phases resulted in the development of quantitative understanding of the surface molecular structure – reactivity relationships for this unique catalytic system. These oxides possess unique catalytic properties among mixed metal oxides, because they selectively catalyze three alkane transformation reactions, namely propane ammoxidation to acrylonitrile, propane oxidation to acrylic acid and ethane oxidative dehydrogenation, all of considerable economic significance. Therefore, the larger goal of this research was to expand this catalysis to other alkanes of commercial interest, and more broadly, demonstrate successful approaches to rational design of improved catalysts that can be applied to other selective (amm)oxidation processes.

  11. Identification of sigma and chi phases in duplex stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llorca-Isern, Núria, E-mail: nullorca@ub.edu [Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Enginyeria Metallurgica, Facultat de Química, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti-Franqués 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); López-Luque, Héctor, E-mail: hlopezlu7@alumnes.ub.edu [Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Enginyeria Metallurgica, Facultat de Química, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti-Franqués 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); López-Jiménez, Isabel, E-mail: ilopezji9@alumnes.ub.edu [Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Enginyeria Metallurgica, Facultat de Química, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti-Franqués 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Biezma, Maria Victoria, E-mail: maria.biezma@unican.es [Department of Earth, Materials Science and Engineering, University of Cantabria - UC, Gamazo, 1, 39004 Santander (Spain)

    2016-02-15

    The aim of this work is to find out the most suitable method for detecting and analyzing accurately the formation conditions of secondary phases, particularly Sigma-phase (σ-phase) and Chi-phase (χ-phase) in duplex stainless steels (UNS S32205 and UNS S32750). The microstructure was characterized after a solution annealing at 1080 °C followed by an isothermal heating at 830 °C for different time ranges, ranging from 1 min to 9 h, in order to enlighten the controversial point concerning the mechanism of χ-phase nucleation in relation with the σ-phase. Etched samples were observed using optical microscopy (MO), and scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) with a backscattered electron detector (BSE) was used on unetched samples. Compositional microanalysis (EDS) was carried out for identifying the different phases present in the steels. Sigma phase was easily observed using different etching procedures, whereas χ-phase was only clearly detected with FESEM–BSE on unetched samples. The compositional analyses showed that the molybdenum content in χ-phase almost doubles the content of this element in σ-phase, and as a result the kinetics of nucleation and growth were also found to be remarkably faster when the alloy content in the steel is higher. In addition, chromium nitrides and carbides were also observed to precipitate as a result of the heat treatments and, in the case of the chromium nitrides, they act as a favorable site for the nucleation of σ-phase and χ-phase. - Highlights: • Microscopy was used on heat treated duplex steels for microstructure identification. • FESEM–BSE observation on unetched samples provided the best contrast between phases. • Analyses of carbides, nitrides, chi and sigma phases were possible by EDS and WDS. • Chromium nitrides act as favorable site for the nucleation of chi and sigma phases. • Secondary phases nucleation kinetics are faster in superduplex than in duplex steels.

  12. Gas-phase Hydrogenation of Crotonaldehyde Over Nickel-on-Kieselguhr Catalyst Pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uraz, C.; Atalay, F.; Atalay, S.

    2001-01-01

    Gas phase catalytic hydrogenation of crotonaldehyde to η-butanol was investigated. A nickel based commercial catalyst produced by Harshaw was used at constant temperatures ranging from 160 to 210deg; at pressures of 1.5, 2 , and 2.5 atm and at different crotonaldehyde to hydrogen feed ratios changing from 0.134 to 0.226. The conversion of crotonaldehyde at different operating conditions were determined and the reaction rates were calculated . The experimental results were fitted to ten langmuir-Hinshelwood/ Eley Rideal type models in addition to a homogeneous kinetics modal and the best modal was identified. The effects of external and internal mass transfer resistances were found to be negligible .(authors) refs 28., 2 figs , 4 tabs

  13. Particle Size and Crystal Phase Effects in Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Xun Liu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS is an increasingly important approach for producing liquid fuels and chemicals via syngas—that is, synthesis gas, a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen—generated from coal, natural gas, or biomass. In FTS, dispersed transition metal nanoparticles are used to catalyze the reactions underlying the formation of carbon-carbon bonds. Catalytic activity and selectivity are strongly correlated with the electronic and geometric structure of the nanoparticles, which depend on the particle size, morphology, and crystallographic phase of the nanoparticles. In this article, we review recent works dealing with the aspects of bulk and surface sensitivity of the FTS reaction. Understanding the different catalytic behavior in more detail as a function of these parameters may guide the design of more active, selective, and stable FTS catalysts.

  14. Highly selective bimetallic Pt-Cu/Mg(Al)O catalysts for the aqueous-phase reforming of glycerol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boga, D.A.; Oord, R.; Beale, A.M.; Chung, Y.M.; Bruijnincx, P.C.A.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2013-01-01

    Monometallic Pt and bimetallic Pt-Cu catalysts supported on Mg(Al)O mixed oxides, obtained by calcination of the corresponding layered double hydroxides (LDHs), were prepared and tested in the aqueous-phase reforming (APR) of glycerol. The effect of the Mg/Al ratio and calcination temperature of the

  15. Studies about the transfer phenomena of tritium from liquid to gaseous phase in a catalyst and ordered packing successive system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bornea, Anisia; Cristescu, Ion; Zamfirache, Marius; Varlam, Carmen

    2002-01-01

    The processes for hydrogen isotope separation are very important for nuclear technology. One of the most important processes for tritium separation, is the catalyst isotope exchange water-hydrogen. In a column of isotope exchange tritium is transferred from liquid phase (tritiated heavy water) in gaseous phase (hydrogen). In the experimental setup, which was used, the column of catalytic isotope exchange is filled with successive layers of catalyst and ordered packing. The catalyst consists of 95.5 wt.% of PTFE, 4.1 wt. % of carbon and 0.40 wt. % of platinum and was made of Raschig rings 10 x 10 x 2 mm. The ordered packing was of B7 type and consists of a phosphor bronze wire mesh of 0.18 x 0.48 mm dimension. We analysed the transfer phenomena of tritium from liquid to gaseous phase, in this system. The mathematical model presented in the paper allowed computing experimental data for testing the catalyst performances. In this way the speed constants which characterized the isotopic exchange on the catalysis bed ks, and the distillation on the ordered packing kd, were expressed as function of experimental concentrations and hydrodynamic conditions. (authors)

  16. Effect of phase interaction on catalytic CO oxidation over the SnO_2/Al_2O_3 model catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai, Shujing; Bai, Xueqin; Li, Jing; Liu, Cheng; Ding, Tong; Tian, Ye; Liu, Chang; Xian, Hui; Mi, Wenbo; Li, Xingang

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Activity for CO oxidation is greatly enhanced by interaction between SnO_2 and Al_2O_3. • Interaction between SnO_2 and Al_2O_3 phases can generate oxygen vacancies. • Oxygen vacancies play an import role for catalytic CO oxidation. • Sn"4"+ cations are the effective sites for catalytic CO oxidation. • Langmuir-Hinshelwood model is preferred for catalytic CO oxidation. - Abstract: We investigated the catalytic CO oxidation over the SnO_2/Al_2O_3 model catalysts. Our results show that interaction between the Al_2O_3 and SnO_2 phases results in the significantly improved catalytic activity because of the formation of the oxygen vacancies. The oxygen storage capacity of the SnO_2/Al_2O_3 catalyst prepared by the physically mixed method is nearly two times higher than that of the SnO_2, which probably results from the change of electron concentration on the interface of the SnO_2 and Al_2O_3 phases. Introducing water vapor to the feeding gas would a little decrease the activity of the catalysts, but the reaction rate could completely recover after removal of water vapor. The kinetics results suggest that the surface Sn"4"+ cations are effective CO adsorptive sites, and the surface adsorbed oxygen plays an important role upon CO oxidation. The reaction pathways upon the SnO_2-based catalysts for CO oxidation follow the Langmuir-Hinshelwood model.

  17. Highly Efficient Gas-Phase Oxidation of Renewable Furfural to Maleic Anhydride over Plate Vanadium Phosphorus Oxide Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiukai; Ko, Jogie; Zhang, Yugen

    2018-02-09

    Maleic anhydride (MAnh) and its acids are critical intermediates in chemical industry. The synthesis of maleic anhydride from renewable furfural is one of the most sought after processes in the field of sustainable chemistry. In this study, a plate vanadium phosphorus oxide (VPO) catalyst synthesized by a hydrothermal method with glucose as a green reducing agent catalyzes furfural oxidation to MAnh in the gas phase. The plate catalyst-denoted as VPO HT -has a preferentially exposed (200) crystal plane and exhibited dramatically enhanced activity, selectivity and stability as compared to conventional VPO catalysts and other state-of-the-art catalytic systems. At 360 °C reaction temperature with air as an oxidant, about 90 % yield of MAnh was obtained at 10 vol % of furfural in the feed, a furfural concentration value that is much higher than those (<2 vol %) reported for other catalytic systems. The catalyst showed good long-term stability and there was no decrease in activity or selectivity for MAnh during the time-on-stream of 25 h. The high efficiency and catalyst stability indicate the great potential of this system for the synthesis of maleic anhydride from renewable furfural. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Automatic Identification System (AIS) Transmit Testing in Louisville Phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Firewall Louisville QM 65.206.28.x NAIS Site Controller PC RS232 Serial cable TV32 Computer Cmd Center Serial splitter SAAB R40 AIS Base Station...172.17.14.6 Rack mount computer AIS Radio Interface Ethernet Switch 192.168.0.x Firewall Cable Modem 192.168.0.1 VTS Accred. Boundary serial connection...Automatic Identification System ( AIS ) Transmit Testing in Louisville Phase 2 Distribution Statement A: Approved for public release

  19. Microindentation as a complementary method for phase identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupanič, Franc

    2011-12-01

    This work investigates the possibility of using microindentation as a complementary tool for phase identification, especially in heterogeneous microstructures. Five phases present in alloys Al64Cu23Fe13 and Al94Mn2Be2Cu2 were indented in the microindentation region. A load of 20 mN was found to be convenient for testing because it was too low to produce cracks around indents, yet high enough to avoid too large scattering of the results, occurring at smaller loads. It allowed testing of particles as small as 10 μm in the lateral direction and 3 μm in thickness. Some phases can be distinguished from others by specific characteristics of indentation curves. Otherwise, a single quantitative parameter or combinations of several indentation parameters (defined in EN ISO 14577-1) sufficed. The microindentation can considerably help by phase identification; however, a wider application will require a database, providing indentation properties for a particular phase at different loads and taking into account the indentation size effect.

  20. Formation of gas-phase π-allyl radicals from propylene over bismuth oxide and γ-bismuth molybdate catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martir, W.; Lunsford, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    Gas-phase π-allyl radicals were produced when propylene reacted over Bi 2 O 3 and γ-bismuth molybdate catalysts at 723 K. The pressure in the catalyst zone was varied between 5 x 10 -3 and 1 torr. The radicals were detected by EPR spectroscopy together with a matrix isolation technique in which argon was used as the diluent. The matrix was formed on a sapphire rod at 12 K which was located 33-cm downstream from the catalyst. Bismuth oxide was more effective in the production of gas-phase allyl radicals than γ-bismuth molybdate. By contrast α-bismuth molybdate was ineffective in forming allyl radicals and MoO 3 acted as a sink for radicals which were produced elsewhere in the system. Comparison of the π-allyl radical and the stable product concentrations over Bi 2 O 3 revealed that gas-phase radical recombination reactions served as a major pathway for the formation of 1,5-hexadiene. Addition of small amounts of gas-phase oxygen increased the concentration of allyl radicals, and at greater oxygen levels allyl peroxy radicals were detected. Because of the effect of temperature on the equilibrium between allyl and allyl peroxy radicals, the latter product must be formed in the cooler part of the system

  1. Synergy effects between bismuth molybdate catalyst phases (Bi/Mo from 0.57 to 2) for the selective oxidation of propylene to arcrolein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le, Minh Thang; Well, Willy van; Stoltze, Per

    2005-01-01

    In this work, the synergy effect between different phases of bismuth molybdate catalysts was investigated systematically. The catalysts were prepared by spray drying and had a Bi/Mo atomic between 0.57 and 2. It is found that the synergy effect is only observed in mixtures containing γ-phase. A m......-phase. A mixture with Bi/Mo ratio = 1.3 consisting of γ- and α-phase, exhibits the highest activity. Less homogeneous ‘artificial mixtures’ exhibit reduced synergy effects when compared to homogeneous ‘in situ mixtures’.......In this work, the synergy effect between different phases of bismuth molybdate catalysts was investigated systematically. The catalysts were prepared by spray drying and had a Bi/Mo atomic between 0.57 and 2. It is found that the synergy effect is only observed in mixtures containing γ...

  2. Identification of emission sources of umbral flashes using phase congruency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Song; Yang Yun-Fei; Ji Kai-Fan; Yu Lan

    2014-01-01

    The emission sources of umbral flashes (UFs) are believed to be closely related to running umbral and penumbral waves, and are concluded to be associated with umbral dots in the solar photosphere. Accurate identification of emission sources of UFs is crucial for investigating these physical phenomena and their inherent relationships. A relatively novel model of shape perception, namely phase congruency (PC), uses phase information in the Fourier domain to identify the geometrical shape of the region of interest in different intensity levels, rather than intensity or gradient. Previous studies indicate that the model is suitable for identifying features with low contrast and low luminance. In the present paper, we applied the PC model to identify the emission sources of UFs and to locate their positions. For illustrating the high performance of our proposed method, two time sequences of Ca II H images derived from the Hinode/SOT on 2010 August 10 and 2013 August 20 were used. Furthermore, we also compared these results with the analysis results that are identified by the traditional/classical identification methods, including the gray-scale adjusted technique and the running difference technique. The result of our analysis demonstrates that our proposed method is more accurate and effective than the traditional identification methods when applied to identifying the emission sources of UFs and to locating their positions. (research papers)

  3. Nanographene synthesized in triple-phase plasmas as a highly durable support of catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Tomoki; Kondo, Hiroki; Takeda, Keigo; Ishikawa, Kenji; Hiramatsu, Mineo; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru

    2018-04-01

    Nanographene was synthesized in triple-phase plasmas comprising a gaseous phase, a gas-liquid boundary layer, and an in-liquid phase using a setup in which one electrode was placed in the gaseous phase while the other was immersed in the liquid phase. The triple-phase plasmas were generated using a pure alcohol, such as ethanol, 1-propanol, or 1-butanol, by applying a high voltage to a pair of electrodes made of copper or graphite. The nanographene synthesized using ethanol had high durability and thus could serve as a catalyst support in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). The PEFCs exhibited low degradation rates in the high-potential cycle test of a half-cell, as a result of which, a loss of only 10% was observed in the effective electrochemical surface area of Pt, even after 10,000 cycles.

  4. Methods of making textured catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werpy, Todd [West Richland, WA; Frye, Jr., John G.; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA; Zacher, Alan H [Kennewick, WA

    2010-08-17

    A textured catalyst having a hydrothermally-stable support, a metal oxide and a catalyst component is described. Methods of conducting aqueous phase reactions that are catalyzed by a textured catalyst are also described. The invention also provides methods of making textured catalysts and methods of making chemical products using a textured catalyst.

  5. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in slurry-phase reactors using Co/SBA-15 catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, J.J.; Lima, L.A.; Lima, W.S.; Rodrigues, M.G.F. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia Quimica], e-mail: meiry@deq.ufcg.edu.br; Fernandes, F.A.N. [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFCE), CE (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica

    2011-07-15

    The objective of this work is to describe the production of bifunctional catalysts using the incipient humidity method, producing catalysts with 15 wt.% cobalt supported in SBA-15 molecular sieve, to be applied in the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) reaction. The originality of this work is its focus on the use of a 15 wt.% Co/SBA-15 catalyst in FT synthesis in slurry reactors. The deposition of cobalt over SBA-15 support was accomplished by impregnation with a 0.1-M aqueous solution of cobalt nitrate. The Fischer-Tropsch synthesis was carried out with the catalyst at 240 deg C and 20 atm, under a COH{sub 2} atmosphere (molar ratio= 1), in a slurry reactor for 8 hours. X-ray diffraction measurements showed that the calcined cobalt catalyst did not modify the structure of SBA-15, proving that Co was present under the form of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} in the catalyst. The addition of cobalt in the SBA-15 decreased the specific superficial area of the molecular sieve. The 15 wt.% Co/SBA-15 catalyst had a 40% CO conversion rate and a high selectivity towards the production of C{sub 5}{sup +} (53.9% after 8 hours). (author)

  6. Separation and determination of polyurethane amine catalysts in polyether polyols by using UHPLC-Q-TOF-MS on a reversed-phase/cation-exchange mixed-mode column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiaxiao; Zhu, Marcel

    2018-02-01

    A simple, selective, and accurate ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry method was established and validated for the efficient separation and quantification of polyurethane amine catalysts in polyether polyols. Amine catalysts were primarily separated in polyether polyol-based sample by solid-phase extraction, and further baseline separated on a reversed-phase/cation-exchange mixed-mode column (SiELC Primesep™ 200) using 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid/acetonitrile as a mobile phase in gradient elution mode at a flow rate of 0.2 mL/min. High-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis in electrospray ionization positive mode allowed the identification as N,N'-bis[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]urea, N-[2-(2-dimethylaminoethoxy)ethyl]-N-methyl-1,3-propanediamine, and N,N,N',N'-tetramethyldipropylenetriamine. The method was validated and presented good linearity for all the analytes in blank matrices within the concentration range of 0.20-5.0 or 0.1-2.0 μg/mL with the correlation coefficients (R 2 ) ranging from 0.986 to 0.997. Method recovery ranged within 81-105% at all three levels (80, 100, and 120% of the original amount) with relative standard deviations of 1.0-6.2%. The limits of detection were in the range of 0.007-0.051 μg/mL. Good precision was obtained with relative standard deviation below 3.2 and 0.72% for peak area and retention time of three amines, respectively. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Poly(Ionic Liquid: A New Phase in a Thermoregulated Phase Separated Catalysis and Catalyst Recycling System of Transition Metal-Mediated ATRP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Yao

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Poly(ionic liquids (PILs have become the frontier domains in separation science because of the special properties of ionic liquids as well as their corresponding polymers. Considering their function in separation, we designed and synthesized a thermoregulated PIL. That is, this kind of PIL could separate with an organic phase which dissolves the monomers at ambient temperature. When heated to the reaction temperature, they become a homogeneous phase, and they separate again when the temperature falls to the ambient temperature after polymerization. Based on this, a thermoregulated phase separated catalysis (TPSC system for Cu-based atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP was constructed. The copper catalyst (CuBr2 used here is easily separated and recycled in situ just by changing the temperature in this system. Moreover, even when the catalyst had been recycled five times, the controllability over resultant polymers is still satisfying. Finally, only 1~2 ppm metal catalyst was left in the polymer solution phase, which indicates the really high recycling efficiency.

  8. Effect of Al content on the gas-phase dehydration of glycerol over silica-alumina-supported silicotungstic acid catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong Tae; You, Su Jin; Park, Eun Duck; Jung, Kwangdeog

    2012-01-01

    The gas-phase dehydration of glycerol to acrolein was carried out over silicotungstic acid (H 4 SiW 12 O 40 ·xH 2 O, HSiW) catalysts supported on SiO 2 , η-Al 2 O 3 , and silica-alumina with different Al contents. The HSiW catalysts supported on silica-alumina showed higher glycerol conversions and acrolein yields during the initial 2 h at 315.deg.C than did SiO 2 - and η-Al 2 O 3 -supported HSiW catalysts. Among the tested catalysts, HSiW/Si 0.9 Al 0.1Ox exhibited the highest space-time yield during the initial 2 h. The loaded HSiW species can change the acid types and suppress the formation of carbonaceous species on Al-rich silica-alumina. The deactivated HSiW supported on silica-alumina can be fully regenerated after calcination in air at 500.deg.C. As long as the molar ratio between water and glycerol was in the range of 2-11, the acrolein selectivity increased significantly with increasing water content in the feed, while the surface carbon content decreased owing to the suppression of heavy compounds

  9. Liquid-Phase Catalytic Transfer Hydrogenation of Furfural over Homogeneous Lewis Acid-Ru/C Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotopoulou, Paraskevi; Martin, Nickolas; Vlachos, Dionisios G

    2015-06-22

    The catalytic performance of homogeneous Lewis acid catalysts and their interaction with Ru/C catalyst are studied in the catalytic transfer hydrogenation of furfural by using 2-propanol as a solvent and hydrogen donor. We find that Lewis acid catalysts hydrogenate the furfural to furfuryl alcohol, which is then etherified with 2-propanol. The catalytic activity is correlated with an empirical scale of Lewis acid strength and exhibits a volcano behavior. Lanthanides are the most active, with DyCl3 giving complete furfural conversion and a 97 % yield of furfuryl alcohol at 180 °C after 3 h. The combination of Lewis acid and Ru/C catalysts results in synergy for the stronger Lewis acid catalysts, with a significant increase in the furfural conversion and methyl furan yield. Optimum results are obtained by using Ru/C combined with VCl3 , AlCl3 , SnCl4 , YbCl3 , and RuCl3 . Our results indicate that the combination of Lewis acid/metal catalysts is a general strategy for performing tandem reactions in the upgrade of furans. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. PhasePApy: A robust pure Python package for automatic identification of seismic phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen; Holland, Austin

    2016-01-01

    We developed a Python phase identification package: the PhasePApy for earthquake data processing and near‐real‐time monitoring. The package takes advantage of the growing number of Python libraries including Obspy. All the data formats supported by Obspy can be supported within the PhasePApy. The PhasePApy has two subpackages: the PhasePicker and the Associator, aiming to identify phase arrival onsets and associate them to phase types, respectively. The PhasePicker and the Associator can work jointly or separately. Three autopickers are implemented in the PhasePicker subpackage: the frequency‐band picker, the Akaike information criteria function derivative picker, and the kurtosis picker. All three autopickers identify picks with the same processing methods but different characteristic functions. The PhasePicker triggers the pick with a dynamic threshold and can declare a pick with false‐pick filtering. Also, the PhasePicker identifies a pick polarity and uncertainty for further seismological analysis, such as focal mechanism determination. Two associators are included in the Associator subpackage: the 1D Associator and 3D Associator, which assign phase types to picks that can best fit potential earthquakes by minimizing root mean square (rms) residuals of the misfits in distance and time, respectively. The Associator processes multiple picks from all channels at a seismic station and aggregates them to increase computational efficiencies. Both associators use travel‐time look up tables to determine the best estimation of the earthquake location and evaluate the phase type for picks. The PhasePApy package has been used extensively for local and regional earthquakes and can work for active source experiments as well.

  11. Butanol Dehydration over V₂O₅-TiO₂/MCM-41 Catalysts Prepared via Liquid Phase Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyeonhee; Bae, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Do Heui; Park, Young-Kwon; Jeon, Jong-Ki

    2013-04-29

    MCM-41 was used as a support and, by using atomic layer deposition (ALD) in the liquid phase, a catalyst was prepared by consecutively loading titanium oxide and vanadium oxide to the support. This research analyzes the effect of the loading amount of vanadium oxide on the acidic characteristics and catalytic performance in the dehydration of butanol. The physical and chemical characteristics of the TiO₂-V₂O₅/MCM-41 catalysts were analyzed using XRF, BET, NH₃-TPD, XRD, Py-IR, and XPS. The dehydration reaction of butanol was performed in a fixed bed reactor. For the samples with vanadium oxide loaded to TiO₂/MCM-41 sample using the liquid phase ALD method, it was possible to increase the loading amount until the amount of vanadium oxide reached 12.1 wt %. It was confirmed that the structural properties of the mesoporous silica were retained well after titanium oxide and vanadium loading. The NH₃-TPD and Py-IR results indicated that weak acid sites were produced over the TiO₂/MCM-41 samples, which is attributed to the generation of Lewis acid sites. The highest activity of the V₂O₅(12.1)-TiO₂/MCM-41 catalyst in 2-butanol dehydration is ascribed to it having the highest number of Lewis acid sites, as well as the highest vanadium dispersion.

  12. A TECHNIQUE OF IDENTIFICATION OF THE PHASE-DISPLACEMENT GROUP OF THREE-PHASE TRANSFORMER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aburjania, A.; Begiashvili, V.; Rezan Turan

    2007-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the arbitrary choice of arbitrarily pisitive direction of induced currents and voltages contradicts the energy conservation law and leads to equilibrium equations and standards making no sense from the physical standpoint. Of 12 recognized standard phase-displacement groups of three-phase transformer, only three have real physical bases. The rest are based on a wrong assumption about mutual biasing of primary and secondary currents. They does not rule out the occurrence of emergency situations and, thus, must be eliminated from use. A new method of identification of the phase-displacement of three-phase transformer is proposed. The method is based on well-known physical laws with consideration for the dual character of the inertia of mutual inductance and exhausts for all possible versions of connection of transformer windings. (author)

  13. Reactor for tracking catalyst nanoparticles in liquid at high temperature under a high-pressure gas phase with X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Luan; Tao, Franklin Feng

    2018-02-01

    Structure of catalyst nanoparticles dispersed in liquid phase at high temperature under gas phase of reactant(s) at higher pressure (≥5 bars) is important for fundamental understanding of catalytic reactions performed on these catalyst nanoparticles. Most structural characterizations of a catalyst performing catalysis in liquid at high temperature under gas phase at high pressure were performed in an ex situ condition in terms of characterizations before or after catalysis since, from technical point of view, access to the catalyst nanoparticles during catalysis in liquid phase at high temperature under high pressure reactant gas is challenging. Here we designed a reactor which allows us to perform structural characterization using X-ray absorption spectroscopy including X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy to study catalyst nanoparticles under harsh catalysis conditions in terms of liquid up to 350 °C under gas phase with a pressure up to 50 bars. This reactor remains nanoparticles of a catalyst homogeneously dispersed in liquid during catalysis and X-ray absorption spectroscopy characterization.

  14. Formation of Multiple-Phase Catalysts for the Hydrogen Storage of Mg Nanoparticles by Adding Flowerlike NiS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiubo; Ma, Xiujuan; Liu, Peng; Shang, Jiaxiang; Li, Xingguo; Liu, Tong

    2017-02-22

    In order to enhance the hydrogen storage properties of Mg, flowerlike NiS particles have been successfully prepared by solvothermal reaction method, and are subsequently ball milled with Mg nanoparticles (NPs) to fabricate Mg-5 wt % NiS nanocomposite. The nanocomposite displays Mg/NiS core/shell structure. The NiS shell decomposes into Ni, MgS and Mg 2 Ni multiple-phases, decorating on the surface of the Mg NPs after the first hydrogen absorption and desorption cycle at 673 K. The Mg-MgS-Mg 2 Ni-Ni nanocomposite shows enhanced hydrogenation and dehydrogenation rates: it can quickly uptake 3.5 wt % H 2 within 10 min at 423 K and release 3.1 wt % H 2 within 10 min at 573 K. The apparent hydrogen absorption and desorption activation energies are decreased to 45.45 and 64.71 kJ mol -1 . The enhanced sorption kinetics of the nanocomposite is attributed to the synergistic catalytic effects of the in situ formed MgS, Ni and Mg 2 Ni multiple-phase catalysts during the hydrogenation/dehydrogenation process, the porthole effects for the volume expansion and microstrain of the phase transformation of Mg 2 Ni and Mg 2 NiH 4 and the reduced hydrogen diffusion distance caused by nanosized Mg. This novel method of in situ producing multiple-phase catalysts gives a new horizon for designing high performance hydrogen storage material.

  15. Influence of phase composition and structure of V-Mo mixed catalysts on the activity and selectivity in the oxidation of benzene to maleic anhydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kripylo, P.; Ritter, D.; Hahn, H.; Spiess, H.; Kraak, P.

    1981-01-01

    Whereas MoO 3 and phosphate stabilize the low valence states of vanadium in the phase structure of V-Mo mixed catalysts, CoO influences the activity only, but not the selectivity. The catalysts show maxima of activity and selectivity at V/Mo ratios of 4 to 6. Ageing is caused by phase separation connected with the appearance of an MoO 3 phase and an increase of the V/Mo ratio in the phase of the active component

  16. Cobalt nanoparticles as recyclable catalyst for aerobic oxidation of alcohols in liquid phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondal, Arijit; Mukherjee, Debkumar, E-mail: debkumarmukherjee@rediffmail.com [Ramsaday College, Department of Chemistry (India); Adhikary, Bibhutosh, E-mail: adhikarybibhu@yahoo.com [Indian Institute of Engineering, Sciences and Technology, Shibpur, Department of Chemistry (India); Ahmed, Md Azharuddin [University of Calcutta, Department of Physics (India)

    2016-05-15

    Cobalt nanoparticles prepared at room temperature from cobalt sulphate and tetrabutyl ammonium bromide as surfactant have been found to be effective oxidation catalysts. Palladium and platinum nanoparticles (average size 4–6 nm) can also be prepared from PdCl{sub 2} and K{sub 2}PtCl{sub 4}, respectively, using the same surfactant but require high temperature (~120 °C) and much longer preparation time. Agglomeration of nanoparticles prepared from metals like palladium and platinum in common solvents, however, restricts their use as catalysts. It is therefore our endeavour to find the right combination of catalyst and solvent that will be beneficial from industrial point of view. Magnetic property measurement of cobalt nanoclusters was made using SQUID to identify their reusability nature. Herein, we report the use of cobalt nanoparticles (average size 90–95 nm) in dichloromethane solvent as effective reusable catalysts for aerobic oxidation of a variety of alcohols.Graphical Abstract.

  17. Aqueous phase reforming of ethylene glycol - Role of intermediates in catalyst performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vlieger, Dennis; Mojet, Barbara; Lefferts, Leonardus; Seshan, Kulathuiyer

    2012-01-01

    Liquid product formation during the aqueous catalytic reforming of ethylene glycol (EG) was studied up to 450 °C and 250 bar pressure. Methanol, ethanol, and acetic acid were the main liquid by-products during EG reforming in the presence of alumina-supported Pt and Pt–Ni catalysts. The effect of

  18. Liquid phase in situ hydrodeoxygenation of biomass-derived phenolic compounds to hydrocarbons over bifunctional catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junfeng Feng; Chung-yun Hse; Zhongzhi Yang; Kui Wang; Jianchun Jiang; Junming Xu

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to find an effective method for converting renewable biomass-derived phenolic compounds into hydrocarbons bio-fuel via in situ catalytic hydrodeoxygenation. The in situ hydrodeoxygenation of biomass-derived phenolic compounds was carried out in methanol-water solvent over bifunctional catalysts of Raney Ni and HZSM-5 or H-Beta. In the in...

  19. Diesel Emission Control- Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Program- Phase II Summary Report: NOx Adsorber Catalysts; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    None

    2000-01-01

    The investigations performed in this project demonstrated the ability to develop a NO(sub x) regeneration strategy including both an improved lean/rich modulation cycle and rich engine calibration, which resulted in a high NO(sub x) conversion efficiency over a range of operating temperatures. A high-temperature cycle was developed to desulfurize the NO(sub x) absorber catalyst. The effectiveness of the desulfurization process was demonstrated on catalysts aged using two different sulfur level fuels. The major findings of this project are as follows: (1) The improved lean/rich engine calibration achieved as a part of this test project resulted in NO(sub x) conversion efficiencies exceeding 90% over a catalyst inlet operating temperature window of 300 C-450 C. This performance level was achieved while staying within the 4% fuel economy penalty target defined for the regeneration calibration. (2) The desulfurization procedure developed showed that six catalysts, which had been exposed to fuel sulfur levels of 3-, 16-, and 30-ppm for as long as 250 hours, could be recovered to greater than 85% NO(sub x) conversion efficiency over a catalyst inlet operating temperature window of 300 C-450 C, after a single desulfurization event. This performance level was achieved while staying within the 4% fuel economy penalty target defined for the regeneration calibration. (3) The desulfurization procedure developed has the potential to meet in-service engine operating conditions and provide acceptable driveability conditions. (4) Although aging with 78-ppm sulfur fuel reduced NO(sub x) conversion efficiency more than aging with 3-ppm sulfur fuel as a result of sulfur contamination, the desulfurization events restored the conversion efficiency to nearly the same level of performance. However, repeatedly exposing the catalyst to the desulfurization procedure developed in this program caused a continued decline in the catalyst's desulfurized performance. Additional work will be

  20. Studies on transfer phenomena of tritium from liquid to gaseous phase in a successive catalyst and ordered packing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bornea, Anisia; Cristescu, Ion; Zamfirache, Marius; Varlam, Carmen

    2001-01-01

    The processes for hydrogen isotope separation are very important for nuclear technology. One of the most important processes in tritium separation, is the water-hydrogen catalytic isotope exchange. In a column of isotope exchange, tritium is transferred from the liquid phase (tritiated heavy water) to the gaseous phase (hydrogen). In the experimental set-up, which was used, the column of catalytic isotope exchange is filled with successive layers of catalyst Pt/C/PtFe and B7 type ordered packing of phosphor bronze. The tritium transfer from liquid phase to water vapours, is achieved on ordered packing by distillation process: (DTO)L+(D 2 O)V → (D 2 O)L+(DTO)V. On the catalytic tritium transfer from water vapours to hydrogen gas is achieved by the catalytic isotopic exchange process: (DTO)V+(D 2 )G → (D 2 O)V+(DT)G. We analyzed the transfer phenomena of tritium in this system by using the experimental data obtained. The mathematical model presented in the paper allowed computing experimental data for testing the catalyst performances. The transfer equations are solved using the Runge - Kutta method. In this way the speed constants which characterized the isotopic exchange on the catalysis bed ks, and the distillation on the ordered packing kd, were expressed as function of experimental concentrations and hydrodynamic conditions. (authors)

  1. Enantioselective Alkylation of 2-Oxindoles Catalyzed by a Bifunctional Phase-Transfer Catalyst: Synthesis of (-)-Debromoflustramine B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Ryan; Sorrentino, Emiliano; Connon, Stephen J

    2018-03-26

    A new bifunctional phase-transfer catalyst that employs hydrogen bonding as a control element was developed to promote efficient enantioselective S N 2 reactions for the construction all-carbon quaternary stereocenters in high yield and excellent enantioselectivity (up to 97 % ee) utilizing the alkylation of a malleable oxindole substrate. The utility of the methodology was demonstrated through a concise and highly enantioselective synthesis of (-)-debromoflustramine B. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. The mild liquid-phase synthesis of 3-picoline from acrolein diethyl acetal and ammonia over heterogeneous catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Cai-Wu; Chao, Zi-Sheng; Lei, Bo; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Zheng-Hao

    2017-11-01

    The liquid-phase synthesis of 3-picoline from the reaction of acrolein diethyl acetal and ammonia over ion-exchanged resins (D402 and D002) and HZSM-5 (Si/Al = 25) was carried out in a batch reactor. Various influencing parameters, including by the addition of water, ion-exchanged resins, reaction temperature and HZSM-5, were systematically investigated. The results showed that the reaction could be directly conducted, and organic acid wasn’t utilized. The highest yield of 3-picoline reached up to 24% using HZSM-5 as catalyst at 110 °C.

  3. TECHNOLOGIES OF DOPING OF CAST IRON THROUGH THE SLAG PHASE WITH USING OF THE SPENT NICKEL- AND COPPER-CONTAINING CATALYSTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. B. Provorova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We have defined the regularities of the doping of cast iron through the slag phase of nickel and copper due to the waste catalysts using a carbonaceous reducing agent. We have justified the need to use the cast iron chips as a seed in the composition of the slag mixture. We have defined the dependence of the degree of extraction of nickel or copper from spent catalyst on the amount of the catalyst, on the basicity of the slag mixture, on the temperature and time of melting.

  4. Novel Oxidative Desulfurization of a Model Fuel with H2O2 Catalyzed by AlPMo12O40 under Phase Transfer Catalyst-Free Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    José da Silva, Márcio; Faria dos Santos, Lidiane

    2013-01-01

    A novel process was developed for oxidative desulfurization (ODS) in the absence of a phase transfer catalyst (PTC) using only Keggin heteropolyacids and their aluminum salts as catalysts. Reactions were performed in biphasic mixtures of isooctane/acetonitrile, with dibenzothiophene (DBT) as a model sulfur compound and hydrogen peroxide as the oxidant. Remarkably, only the AlPMo12O40-catalyzed reactions resulted in complete oxidation of DBT into DBT sulfone, which was totally extracted by ace...

  5. High pressure flow reactor for in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy of catalysts in gas-liquid mixtures—A case study on gas and liquid phase activation of a Co-Mo/Al2O3 hydrodesulfurization catalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haandel, L.; Hensen, E.J.M.; Weber, Th.

    2017-01-01

    An in situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts under industrial operating conditions may involve high pressure and reactants in both the gas and the liquid phase. In this paper, we describe an in situ XAS flow reactor, which is suitable to operate under such conditions (pmax 20 bar, Tmax 350

  6. Block Copolymers of Macrolactones/Small Lactones by a “Catalyst-Switch” Organocatalytic Strategy. Thermal Properties and Phase Behavior

    KAUST Repository

    Ladelta, Viko

    2018-03-16

    Poly(macrolactones) (PMLs) can be considered as biodegradable alternatives of polyethylene; however, controlling the ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of macrolactone (ML) monomers remains a challenge due to their low ring strain. To overcome this problem, phosphazene (t-BuP4), a strong superbase, has to be used as catalyst. Unfortunately, the one-pot sequential block copolymerization of MLs with small lactones (SLs) is impossible since the high basicity of t-BuP4 promotes both intra- and intermolecular transesterification reactions, thus leading to random copolymers. By using ROP and the “catalyst-switch” strategy [benzyl alcohol, t-BuP4/neutralization with diphenyl phosphate/(t-BuP2)], we were able to synthesize different well-defined PML-b-PSL block copolymers (MLs: dodecalactone, ω-pentadecalactone, and ω-hexadecalactone; SLs: δ-valerolactone and ε-caprolactone). The thermal properties and the phase behavior of these block copolymers were studied by differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy. This study shows that the thermal properties and phase behavior of PMLs-b-PSLs are largely influenced by the PMLs block if PMLs components constitute the majority of the block copolymers.

  7. Block Copolymers of Macrolactones/Small Lactones by a “Catalyst-Switch” Organocatalytic Strategy. Thermal Properties and Phase Behavior

    KAUST Repository

    Ladelta, Viko; Kim, Joey D.; Bilalis, Panagiotis; Gnanou, Yves; Hadjichristidis, Nikolaos

    2018-01-01

    Poly(macrolactones) (PMLs) can be considered as biodegradable alternatives of polyethylene; however, controlling the ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of macrolactone (ML) monomers remains a challenge due to their low ring strain. To overcome this problem, phosphazene (t-BuP4), a strong superbase, has to be used as catalyst. Unfortunately, the one-pot sequential block copolymerization of MLs with small lactones (SLs) is impossible since the high basicity of t-BuP4 promotes both intra- and intermolecular transesterification reactions, thus leading to random copolymers. By using ROP and the “catalyst-switch” strategy [benzyl alcohol, t-BuP4/neutralization with diphenyl phosphate/(t-BuP2)], we were able to synthesize different well-defined PML-b-PSL block copolymers (MLs: dodecalactone, ω-pentadecalactone, and ω-hexadecalactone; SLs: δ-valerolactone and ε-caprolactone). The thermal properties and the phase behavior of these block copolymers were studied by differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy. This study shows that the thermal properties and phase behavior of PMLs-b-PSLs are largely influenced by the PMLs block if PMLs components constitute the majority of the block copolymers.

  8. Disproportionation phenema of wistite phase in the model iron catalysts for ammonia synthesis studied by Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pattek-Janczyk, A.; Miczko, B.

    1990-01-01

    A model iron catalysts for ammonia synthesis containing a large amount of wustite (35 wt%) has been studied during the annealing in an inert atmosphere in the temperature range of 573-773 K. Changes in magnetite and wustite phases were followed by Muessbauer spectroscopy (MS). Before starting the thermal treatment, two kinds of wustite of different structures have been found by MS and X-ray diffraction. The behaviour of both kinds of wustite during the annealing was different. One of them, closer to the stoichiometric compound, disproportionated at once into magnetite and iron; its content decreased systematically without changes in the Muessbauer parameters. In the second wustite, only qualitatieve changes were observed at first (its nonstoichiometry decreases without changes in content and, next, this phase started to disproportionate too. (auhtor). 31 refs.; 6 figs.; 2 tabs

  9. CMS Phase 1 heavy flavour identification performance and developments

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    At the Large Hadron Collider, the identification of jets originating from heavy flavour quarks (b or c tagging) is important for searches for new physics and for measurements of standard model processes. A variety of b tagging algorithms has been developed at CMS to select b-quark jets based on variables such as the impact parameters of the charged-particle tracks, the properties of reconstructed decay vertices, and the presence or absence of a lepton, or combinations thereof. The CMS Phase 1 upgrade includes a new pixel detector with an addition layer. In consequence, the resolution of the track reconstruction is expected to improve, in particular close to the beam spot, leading to a more precise determination of the variables important for b tagging. The expected effect on the b tagging performance is presented for a selected set of existing algorithms: CSVv2, cMVAv2, and DeepCSV. The latter deep neural network based multi-classification algorithm is re-trained based on the new detector geometry, while the ...

  10. Glucose- and Cellulose-Derived Ni/C-SO3H Catalysts for Liquid Phase Phenol Hydrodeoxygenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasakov, Stanislav; Zhao, Chen; Barath, Eszter; Chase, Zizwe A.; Fulton, John L.; Camaioni, Donald M.; Vjunov, Aleksei; Shi, Hui; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2015-01-19

    Sulfonated carbons were explored as functionalized supports for Ni nanoparticles to hydrodeoxygenate (HDO) phenol. Both hexadecane and water were used as solvents. The dual-functional Ni catalysts supported on sulfonated carbon (Ni/C-SO3H) showed high rates for phenol hydrodeoxygenation in liquid hexadecane, but not in water. Glucose and cellulose were precursors to the carbon supports. Changes in the carbons resulting from sulfonation of the carbons resulted in variations of carbon sheet structures, morphologies and the surface concentrations of acid sites. While the C-SO3H supports were active for cyclohexanol dehydration in hexadecane and water, Ni/C-SO3H only catalyzed the reduction of phenol to cyclohexanol in water. The state of 3 – 5 nm grafted Ni particles was analyzed by in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The results show that the metallic Ni was rapidly formed in situ without detectable leaching to the aqueous phase, suggesting that just the acid functions on Ni/C-SO3H are inhibited in presence of water. Using in situ IR spectroscopy, it was shown that even in hexadecane, phenol HDO is limited by the dehydration step. Thus, phenol HDO catalysis was further improved by physically admixing C-SO3H with the Ni/C-SO3H catalyst to balance the two catalytic functions. The minimum addition of 7 wt.% C-SO3H to the most active of the Ni/C-SO3H catalysts enabled nearly quantitative conversion of phenol and the highest selectivity (90%) towards cyclohexane in 6 h, at temperatures as low as 473 K, suggesting that the proximity to Ni limits the acid properties of the support.

  11. Glucose- and cellulose-derived Ni/C-SO3H catalysts for liquid phase phenol hydrodeoxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasakov, Stanislav; Zhao, Chen; Baráth, Eszter; Chase, Zizwe A; Fulton, John L; Camaioni, Donald M; Vjunov, Aleksei; Shi, Hui; Lercher, Johannes A

    2015-01-19

    Sulfonated carbons were explored as functionalized supports for Ni nanoparticles to hydrodeoxygenate (HDO) phenol. Both hexadecane and water were used as solvents. The dual-functional Ni catalysts supported on sulfonated carbon (Ni/C-SO3H) showed high rates for phenol hydrodeoxygenation in liquid hexadecane, but not in water. Glucose and cellulose were precursors to the carbon supports. Changes in the carbons resulting from sulfonation of the carbons resulted in variations of carbon sheet structures, morphologies and the surface concentrations of acid sites. While the C-SO3H supports were active for cyclohexanol dehydration in hexadecane and water, Ni/C-SO3H only catalysed the reduction of phenol to cyclohexanol in water. The state of 3-5 nm grafted Ni particles was analysed by in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The results show that the metallic Ni was rapidly formed in situ without detectable leaching to the aqueous phase, suggesting that just the acid functions on Ni/C-SO3H are inhibited in the presence of water. Using in situ IR spectroscopy, it was shown that even in hexadecane, phenol HDO is limited by the dehydration step. Thus, phenol HDO catalysis was further improved by physically admixing C-SO3H with the Ni/C-SO3H catalyst to balance the two catalytic functions. The minimum addition of 7 wt % C-SO3H to the most active of the Ni/C-SO3H catalysts enabled nearly quantitative conversion of phenol and the highest selectivity (90%) towards cyclohexane in 6 h, at temperatures as low as 473 K, suggesting that the proximity to Ni limits the acid properties of the support. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Mineral phases identification inside an abandoned Zn/Pb mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goienaga, N.; Carrero, J.A.; Olivares, M.; Castro, K.; Fernandez, L.A.; Madariaga, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The aim of the work is the identification of the sulphurated phase's outbreak on an aragonite, dolomite and calcite-based original rock inside an abandoned mine. The studied Blende/Galena (ZnS/PbS) Mine, located in Lanestosa (Bizkaia, North of Spain) was operative until 1950. After decades, the area has only supported wild life and thus nowadays it could be considered as a polluted site which has become naturalized. The main alteration factors inside the mine are percolated water, gases come from the outside (CO 2 , O 2 ) and biological activities. Mining activities generates loads of ore minerals and unwanted materials that with the time impact the surrounding environment. The waste includes granular, broken rock and soils ranging in size from the fine sand to large boulders, with the content of fine material largely dependent on the nature of the formation and extraction methods employed during mining. Waste materials geochemistry varies widely from mine to mine and may vary significantly at individual mines over time as different lithologic strata are exposed and geochemical processes alter characteristics of the waste. In order to determine the finest mineral composition in the galleries, several samples were collected. Once dried in a fume hood and sieved, the portions below 250 μm were subjected to non-destructive Raman spectroscopic analysis. The measurements reflected the ore precursors (primary phases: Blende, and Galena), several primary carbonates (dolomite, calcite and aragonite) with secondary minerals in trace levels (Brookite, Libethenite, Fluorapatita, Anatasa, Quartz, Apatite, Augite, Diopside, Anthracite, Hematite, Cosalite, Epidote, Rutile) and transformation products, probably of recent formation (Smithsonite, Massicot, Plattnerite, Gypsum, Siderite, Mendiphite, Escorodite, Gauberite, Goethite or Mascagnite). The origin of the secondary mineral may be related to percolated rain and snow water. This

  13. Esterification of oleic acid in a three-phase, fixed-bed reactor packed with a cation exchange resin catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Sung Mo; Kimura, Hiroko; Kusakabe, Katsuki

    2011-01-01

    Esterification of oleic acid was performed in a three-phase fixed-bed reactor with a cation exchange resin catalyst (Amberlyst-15) at high temperature, which was varied from 80 to 120 °C. The fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) yields in the fixed-bed reactor were increased with increases in the reaction temperature, methanol flow rate and bed height. Moreover, the FAME yields were higher than those obtained using a batch reactor due to an equilibrium shift toward the product that resulted from continuous evaporation of the produced water. In addition, there was no catalyst deactivation during the esterification of oleic acid. However, addition of sunflower oil to the oleic acid reduced the FAME yield obtained from simultaneous esterification and transesterification. The FAME yield was 97.5% at a reaction temperature of 100 °C in the fixed-bed with a height of 5 cm when the methanol and oleic acid feed rates were 8.6 and 9.0 mL/h, respectively. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Characterization of catalysts by Moessbauer spectroscopy: An application to the study of Fischer-Tropsch, hydrotreating and super Claus catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraan, A.M. van der; Boellaard, E.; Craje, M.W.J.

    1993-01-01

    Moessbauer spectroscopy is an excellent in-situ technique for the identification of phases present in catalysts. Applied to metallic iron catalysts used in the Fischer-Tropsch reaction it reveals a detailed picture of the carburization process and provides insight into the relation between the properties of the catalytic material and its activity. The influence of a support and the effect of alloying iron with an (in)active metal on the catalytic performance is discussed for Fe, Cu-Fe and Ni-Fe systems. In addition, Moessbauer spectroscopy is used for the identification of 'Co-sulfide' species present in sulfided Co and CoMo catalysts applied in one of the largest chemical processes in the world, the hydrotreatment of crude oil. A structural model is proposed. Finally, the contribution of Moessbauer spectroscopic studies to the development of a new catalyst for cleaning of Claus tail gas via selective oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur is discussed. (orig.)

  15. Model Updating Nonlinear System Identification Toolbox, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ZONA Technology (ZONA) proposes to develop an enhanced model updating nonlinear system identification (MUNSID) methodology that utilizes flight data with...

  16. Catalysts for liquid phase oxidation of olefins and sulfur compounds; Catalyseurs pour l'oxydation en phase liquide d'olefines et de composes soufres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomeque Santiago, J.F.

    2002-07-01

    Several basic, acid and acid-base catalysts were studied for the epoxidation of olefins activated or not and dibenzo-thiophene.Hydrotalcite activation by thermic treatment and in situ re-hydration improves catalytic activity for 2-cyclohexene-1-one and isophorone. Bronsted basic sites were found to be more active than Lewis sites. Total conversion of 2-cyclohexene-1-one is reached in 1.5 h in polar solvents. W{sub 7}O{sub 24}{sup 6-} Iso-poly-anion was exchanged onto a meixnerite by a new preparation method, A meso-porous solid was obtained with good catalytic properties for cyclohexene epoxidation 100% selective to epoxide. W{sub 7}O{sub 24}{sup 6-} and WO{sub 5}{sup 2-} anions and phenyl and dodecyl-phospho-tungstates were grafted on hydrotalcites. Due to the acid-base characteristics of these solid catalysts, cyclohexene yields products of allylic reactions. Mg-La, and Mg-Al-La mixed oxides were synthesized and mixed phases were gotten. Their basic characteristics account for hydrogen peroxide decomposition which prevents DBT oxidation reaction to sulfone. On the contrary, Mg-Al re-hydrated hydrotalcites are very active for this reaction and remove 100% of sulfur compounds in 1 hour. New catalyst W-ZrO{sub 2} were synthesized with high acid properties. stable structure with temperature and high DBT conversion in less than 5 minutes of reaction. These catalytic systems can be applied for hydrocarbon desulfurization of fuels like naphtha, gas oil and kerosene. (author)

  17. KINETIC STUDY OF SELECTIVE GAS-PHASE OXIDATION OF ISOPROPANOL TO ACETONE USING MONOCLINIC ZRO2 AS A CATALYST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sadiq

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Zirconia was prepared by a precipitation method and calcined at 723 K, 1023 K, and 1253 K in order to obtain monoclinic zirconia. The prepared zirconia was characterized by XRD, SEM, EDX, surface area and pore size analyzer, and particle size analyzer. Monoclinic ZrO2 as a catalyst was used for the gas-phase oxidation of isopropanol to acetone in a Pyrex-glass-flow-type reactor with a temperature range of 443 K - 473 K. It was found that monoclinic ZrO2 shows remarkable catalytic activity (68% and selectivity (100% for the oxidation of isopropanol to acetone. This kinetic study reveals that the oxidation of isopropanol to acetone follows the L-H mechanism.

  18. Novel synthesis of manganese and vanadium mixed oxide (V2O5/OMS-2) as an efficient and selective catalyst for the oxidation of alcohols in liquid phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahdavi, Vahid; Soleimani, Shima

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Oxidation of various alcohols is studied in the liquid phase over new composite mixed oxide (V 2 O 5 /OMS-2) catalyst using tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP). The activity of V 2 O 5 /OMS-2 samples was considerably increased with respect to OMS-2 catalyst and these samples are found to be suitable for the selective oxidation of alcohols. - Highlights: • V 2 O 5 /K-OMS-2 with different V/Mn molar ratios prepared by the impregnation method. • Oxidation of alcohols was studied in the liquid phase over V 2 O 5 /K-OMS-2 catalyst. • V 2 O 5 /K-OMS-2 catalyst had excellent activity for alcohol oxidation. • Benzyl alcohol oxidation using excess TBHP followed a pseudo-first order kinetic. • The selected catalyst was reused without significant loss of activity. - Abstract: This work reports the synthesis and characterization of mixed oxide vanadium–manganese V 2 O 5 /K-OMS-2 at various V/Mn molar ratios and prepared by the impregnation method. Characterization of these new composite materials was made by elemental analysis, BET, XRD, FT-IR, SEM and TEM techniques. Results of these analyses showed that vanadium impregnated samples contained mixed phases of cryptomelane and crystalline V 2 O 5 species. Oxidation of various alcohols was studied in the liquid phase over the V 2 O 5 /K-OMS-2 catalyst using tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) and H 2 O 2 as the oxidant. Activity of the V 2 O 5 /K-OMS-2 samples was increased considerably with respect to K-OMS-2 catalyst due to the interaction of manganese oxide and V 2 O 5 . The kinetic of benzyl alcohol oxidation using excess TBHP over V 2 O 5 /K-OMS-2 catalyst was investigated at different temperatures and a pseudo-first order reaction was determined with respect to benzyl alcohol. The effects of reaction time, oxidant/alcohol molar ratio, reaction temperature, solvents, catalyst recycling potential and leaching were investigated

  19. Uniformly active phase loaded selective catalytic reduction catalysts (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/TNTs) with superior alkaline resistance performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haiqiang; Wang, Penglu [Key Laboratory of Environment Remediation and Ecological Health, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental & Resources Science, Zhejiang University, 310058 Hangzhou (China); Zhejiang Provincial Engineering Research Center of Industrial Boiler & Furnace Flue Gas Pollution Control, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Chen, Xiongbo [South China Institute of Environmental Sciences, Ministry of Environmental Protection, Guangzhou 510655 (China); Wu, Zhongbiao, E-mail: zbwu@zju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Environment Remediation and Ecological Health, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental & Resources Science, Zhejiang University, 310058 Hangzhou (China); Zhejiang Provincial Engineering Research Center of Industrial Boiler & Furnace Flue Gas Pollution Control, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • VOSO{sub 4} exhibited better synergistic effect with titanate nanotubes than NH{sub 4}VO{sub 3}. • Ion-exchange reaction occurs between VOSO{sub 4} and titanate nanotubes. • Ion-exchange resulting in uniformly vanadium distribution on titanate nanotubes. • VOSO{sub 4}-based catalyst exhibited impressive SCR activity and alkaline resistance. - Abstract: In this work, protonated titanate nanotubes was performed as a potential useful support and different vanadium precursors (NH{sub 4}VO{sub 3} and VOSO{sub 4}) were used to synthesize deNO{sub x} catalysts. The results showed that VOSO{sub 4} exhibited better synergistic effect with titanate nanotubes than NH{sub 4}VO{sub 3}, which was caused by the ion-exchange reaction. Then high loading content of vanadium, uniformly active phase distribution, better dispersion of vanadium, more acid sites, better V{sup 5+}/V{sup 4+} redox cycles and superior oxygen mobility were achieved. Besides, VOSO{sub 4}-based titanate nanotubes catalysts also showed enhanced alkaline resistance than particles (P25) based catalysts. It was strongly associated with its abundant acid sites, large surface area, flexible redox cycles and oxygen transfer ability. For the loading on protonated titanate nanotubes, active metal with cation groups was better precursors than anion ones. V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/TNTs catalyst was a promising substitute for the commercial vanadium catalysts and the work conducted herein provided a useful idea to design uniformly active phase loaded catalyst.

  20. Highly Efficient Catalytic Synthesis of α-Amino Acids under Phase-Transfer Conditions with a Novel Catalyst/Substrate Pair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belokon, Yuri N.; Kochetkov, Konstantin A.; Churkina, Tatiana D.; Ikonnikov, Nikolai S.; Larionov, Oleg V.; Harutyunyan, Syuzanna R.; Vyskočil, Štepán; North, Michael; Kagan, Henri B.

    2001-01-01

    A facile and fast enantioselective synthesis of α-amino acids with high ee values was achieved by the asymmetric alkylation of the glycine derivative under phase-transfer conditions with (R)- or (S)-2-amino-2'-hydroxy-1,1'-binaphthyl (NOBIN). The ee value of the catalyst can be as little as 40 %

  1. Model Updating Nonlinear System Identification Toolbox, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ZONA Technology proposes to develop an enhanced model updating nonlinear system identification (MUNSID) methodology by adopting the flight data with state-of-the-art...

  2. Drainage identification analysis and mapping, phase 2 : technical brief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    This research studied, tested and rectified the compatibility issue related to the recent upgrades of : NJDOT vendor inspection software, and uploaded all collected data to make Drainage Identification : Analysis and Mapping System (DIAMS) current an...

  3. Advanced 3D Object Identification System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Optra will build an Advanced 3D Object Identification System utilizing three or more high resolution imagers spaced around a launch platform. Data from each imager...

  4. 2D and 3D imaging of the gas phase close to an operating model catalyst by planar laser induced fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomberg, Sara; Gustafson, Johan; Lundgren, Edvin; Zhou, Jianfeng; Zetterberg, Johan

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, efforts have been made in catalysis related surface science studies to explore the possibilities to perform experiments at conditions closer to those of a technical catalyst, in particular at increased pressures. Techniques such as high pressure scanning tunneling/atomic force microscopy (HPSTM/AFM), near ambient pressure x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (NAPXPS), surface x-ray diffraction (SXRD) and polarization-modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRAS) at semi-realistic conditions have been used to study the surface structure of model catalysts under reaction conditions, combined with simultaneous mass spectrometry (MS). These studies have provided an increased understanding of the surface dynamics and the structure of the active phase of surfaces and nano particles as a reaction occurs, providing novel information on the structure/activity relationship. However, the surface structure detected during the reaction is sensitive to the composition of the gas phase close to the catalyst surface. Therefore, the catalytic activity of the sample itself will act as a gas-source or gas-sink, and will affect the surface structure, which in turn may complicate the assignment of the active phase. For this reason, we have applied planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) to the gas phase in the vicinity of an active model catalysts. Our measurements demonstrate that the gas composition differs significantly close to the catalyst and at the position of the MS, which indeed should have a profound effect on the surface structure. However, PLIF applied to catalytic reactions presents several beneficial properties in addition to investigate the effect of the catalyst on the effective gas composition close to the model catalyst. The high spatial and temporal resolution of PLIF provides a unique tool to visualize the on-set of catalytic reactions and to compare different model catalysts in the same reactive environment. The technique can be

  5. Polymer-Supported Cinchona Alkaloid-Derived Ammonium Salts as Recoverable Phase-Transfer Catalysts for the Asymmetric Synthesis of α-Amino Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Nájera

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Alkaloids such as cinchonidine, quinine and N-methylephedrine have been N-alkylated using polymeric benzyl halides or co-polymerized and then N-alkylated, thus affording a series of polymer-supported chiral ammonium salts which have been employed as phase-transfer catalysts in the asymmetric benzylation of an N-(diphenylmethyleneglycine ester. These new polymeric catalysts can be easily recovered by simple filtration after the reaction and reused. The best ee’s were achieved when Merrifield resin-anchored cinchonidinium ammonium salts were employed.

  6. 2D and 3D imaging of the gas phase close to an operating model catalyst by planar laser induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomberg, Sara; Zhou, Jianfeng; Gustafson, Johan; Zetterberg, Johan; Lundgren, Edvin

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, efforts have been made in catalysis related surface science studies to explore the possibilities to perform experiments at conditions closer to those of a technical catalyst, in particular at increased pressures. Techniques such as high pressure scanning tunneling/atomic force microscopy (HPSTM/AFM), near ambient pressure x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (NAPXPS), surface x-ray diffraction (SXRD) and polarization-modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRAS) at semi-realistic conditions have been used to study the surface structure of model catalysts under reaction conditions, combined with simultaneous mass spectrometry (MS). These studies have provided an increased understanding of the surface dynamics and the structure of the active phase of surfaces and nano particles as a reaction occurs, providing novel information on the structure/activity relationship. However, the surface structure detected during the reaction is sensitive to the composition of the gas phase close to the catalyst surface. Therefore, the catalytic activity of the sample itself will act as a gas-source or gas-sink, and will affect the surface structure, which in turn may complicate the assignment of the active phase. For this reason, we have applied planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) to the gas phase in the vicinity of an active model catalysts. Our measurements demonstrate that the gas composition differs significantly close to the catalyst and at the position of the MS, which indeed should have a profound effect on the surface structure. However, PLIF applied to catalytic reactions presents several beneficial properties in addition to investigate the effect of the catalyst on the effective gas composition close to the model catalyst. The high spatial and temporal resolution of PLIF provides a unique tool to visualize the on-set of catalytic reactions and to compare different model catalysts in the same reactive environment. The technique can be

  7. High-pressure vapor-phase hydrodeoxygenation of lignin-derived oxygenates to hydrocarbons by a PtMo bimetallic catalyst: Product selectivity, reaction pathway, and structural characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yohe, Sara L.; Choudhari, Harshavardhan J.; Mehta, Dhairya D.; Dietrich, Paul J.; Detwiler, Michael D.; Akatay, Cem M.; Stach, Eric A.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Delgass, W. Nicholas; Agrawal, Rakesh; Ribeiro, Fabio H.

    2016-12-01

    High-pressure, vapor-phase, hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) reactions of dihydroeugenol (2-methoxy-4-propylphenol), as well as other phenolic, lignin-derived compounds, were investigated over a bimetallic platinum and molybdenum catalyst supported on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (5%Pt2.5%Mo/MWCNT). Hydrocarbons were obtained in 100% yield from dihydroeugenol, including 98% yield of the hydrocarbon propylcyclohexane. The final hydrocarbon distribution was shown to be a strong function of hydrogen partial pressure. Kinetic analysis showed three main dihydroeugenol reaction pathways: HDO, hydrogenation, and alkylation. The major pathway occurred via Pt catalyzed hydrogenation of the aromatic ring and methoxy group cleavage to form 4-propylcyclohexanol, then Mo catalyzed removal of the hydroxyl group by dehydration to form propylcyclohexene, followed by hydrogenation of propylcyclohexene on either the Pt or Mo to form the propylcyclohexane. Transalkylation by the methoxy group occurred as a minor side reaction. Catalyst characterization techniques including chemisorption, scanning transmission electron microscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were employed to characterize the catalyst structure. Catalyst components identified were Pt particles, bimetallic PtMo particles, a Mo carbide-like phase, and Mo oxide phases.

  8. Synthesis of l-threitol-based crown ethers and their application as enantioselective phase transfer catalyst in Michael additions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapi, Zsolt; Nemcsok, Tamás; Pálvölgyi, Ádám; Keglevich, György; Grün, Alajos; Bakó, Péter

    2017-06-01

    A few new l-threitol-based lariat ethers incorporating a monoaza-15-crown-5 unit were synthesized starting from diethyl l-tartrate. These macrocycles were used as phase transfer catalysts in asymmetric Michael addition reactions under mild conditions to afford the adducts in a few cases in good to excellent enantioselectivities. The addition of 2-nitropropane to trans-chalcone, and the reaction of diethyl acetamidomalonate with β-nitrostyrene resulted in the chiral Michael adducts in good enantioselectivities (90% and 95%, respectively). The substituents of chalcone had a significant impact on the yield and enantioselectivity in the reaction of diethyl acetoxymalonate. The highest enantiomeric excess (ee) values (99% ee) were measured in the case of 4-chloro- and 4-methoxychalcone. The phase transfer catalyzed cyclopropanation reaction of chalcone and benzylidene-malononitriles using diethyl bromomalonate as the nucleophile (MIRC reaction) was also developed. The corresponding chiral cyclopropane diesters were obtained in moderate to good (up to 99%) enantioselectivities in the presence of the threitol-based crown ethers. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Oxidation catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyer, Sylvia T.; Lahr, David L.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention generally relates to catalyst systems and methods for oxidation of carbon monoxide. The invention involves catalyst compositions which may be advantageously altered by, for example, modification of the catalyst surface to enhance catalyst performance. Catalyst systems of the present invention may be capable of performing the oxidation of carbon monoxide at relatively lower temperatures (e.g., 200 K and below) and at relatively higher reaction rates than known catalysts. Additionally, catalyst systems disclosed herein may be substantially lower in cost than current commercial catalysts. Such catalyst systems may be useful in, for example, catalytic converters, fuel cells, sensors, and the like.

  10. Microemulsion and Sol-Gel Synthesized ZrO2-MgO Catalysts for the Liquid-Phase Dehydration of Xylose to Furfural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almudena Parejas

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Two series of catalysts were prepared by sol-gel and microemulsion synthetic procedure (SG and ME, respectively. Each series includes both pure Mg and Zr solids as well as Mg-Zr mixed solids with 25%, 50% and 75% nominal Zr content. The whole set of catalysts was characterized from thermal, structural and surface chemical points of view and subsequently applied to the liquid-phase xylose dehydration to furfural. Reactions were carried out in either a high-pressure autoclave or in an atmospheric pressure multi-reactor under a biphasic (organic/water reaction mixture. Butan-2-ol and toluene were essayed as organic solvents. Catalysts prepared by microemulsion retained part of the surfactant used in the synthetic procedure, mainly associated with the Zr part of the solid. The MgZr-SG solid presented the highest surface acidity while the Mg3Zr-SG one exhibited the highest surface basicity among mixed systems. Xylose dehydration in the high-pressure system and with toluene/water solvent mixture led to the highest furfural yield. Moreover, the yield of furfural increases with the Zr content of the catalyst. Therefore, the catalysts constituted of pure ZrO2 (especially Zr-SG are the most suitable to carry out the process under study although MgZr mixed solids could be also suitable for overall processes with additional reaction steps.

  11. Microemulsion and Sol-Gel Synthesized ZrO₂-MgO Catalysts for the Liquid-Phase Dehydration of Xylose to Furfural.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parejas, Almudena; Montes, Vicente; Hidalgo-Carrillo, Jesús; Sánchez-López, Elena; Marinas, Alberto; Urbano, Francisco J

    2017-12-18

    Two series of catalysts were prepared by sol-gel and microemulsion synthetic procedure (SG and ME, respectively). Each series includes both pure Mg and Zr solids as well as Mg-Zr mixed solids with 25%, 50% and 75% nominal Zr content. The whole set of catalysts was characterized from thermal, structural and surface chemical points of view and subsequently applied to the liquid-phase xylose dehydration to furfural. Reactions were carried out in either a high-pressure autoclave or in an atmospheric pressure multi-reactor under a biphasic (organic/water) reaction mixture. Butan-2-ol and toluene were essayed as organic solvents. Catalysts prepared by microemulsion retained part of the surfactant used in the synthetic procedure, mainly associated with the Zr part of the solid. The MgZr-SG solid presented the highest surface acidity while the Mg3Zr-SG one exhibited the highest surface basicity among mixed systems. Xylose dehydration in the high-pressure system and with toluene/water solvent mixture led to the highest furfural yield. Moreover, the yield of furfural increases with the Zr content of the catalyst. Therefore, the catalysts constituted of pure ZrO₂ (especially Zr-SG) are the most suitable to carry out the process under study although MgZr mixed solids could be also suitable for overall processes with additional reaction steps.

  12. Magnetic catalyst bodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunissen, Wendy; Bol, A.A.; Geus, John W.

    1999-01-01

    After a discussion about the importance of the size of the catalyst bodies with reactions in the liquid-phase with a suspended catalyst, the possibilities of magnetic separation are dealt with. Deficiencies of the usual ferromagnetic particles are the reactivity and the clustering of the

  13. Excited-state dynamics of a ruthenium(II) catalyst studied by transient photofragmentation in gas phase and transient absorption in solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imanbaew, D.; Nosenko, Y. [Fachbereich Chemie, Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schrödinger-Str. 52–54, 67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Forschungszentrum OPTIMAS, Erwin-Schrödinger-Str. 46, 67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Kerner, C. [Fachbereich Chemie, Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schrödinger-Str. 52–54, 67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Chevalier, K.; Rupp, F. [Fachbereich Physik, Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schrödinger-Str. 46, 67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Riehn, C., E-mail: riehn@chemie.uni-kl.de [Fachbereich Chemie, Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schrödinger-Str. 52–54, 67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Forschungszentrum OPTIMAS, Erwin-Schrödinger-Str. 46, 67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Thiel, W.R. [Fachbereich Chemie, Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schrödinger-Str. 52–54, 67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Diller, R. [Fachbereich Physik, Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schrödinger-Str. 46, 67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany)

    2014-10-17

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Ultrafast dynamics of new Ru(II) catalysts investigated in gas phase and solution. • Catalyst activation (HCl loss) achieved in ion trap by UV photoexcitation. • Electronic relaxation proceeds by IVR and IC followed by ground state dissociation. • No triplet formation in contrast to other Ru-polypyridine complexes. • Solvent prohibits catalyst activation in solution by fast vibrational cooling. - Abstract: We report studies on the excited state dynamics of new ruthenium(II) complexes [(η{sup 6}-cymene)RuCl(apypm)]PF{sub 6} (apypm=2-NR{sub 2}-4-(pyridine-2-yl)-pyrimidine, R=CH{sub 3} (1)/H (2)) which, in their active form [1{sup +}-HCl] and [2{sup +}-HCl], catalyze the transfer hydrogenation of arylalkyl ketones in the absence of a base. The investigations encompass femtosecond pump–probe transient mass spectrometry under isolated conditions and transient absorption spectroscopy in acetonitrile solution, both on the cations [(η{sup 6}-cymene)RuCl(apypm)]{sup +} (1{sup +}, 2{sup +}). Gas phase studies on mass selected ions were performed in an ESI ion trap mass spectrometer by transient photofragmentation, unambiguously proving the formation of the activated catalyst species [1{sup +}-HCl] or [2{sup +}-HCl] after photoexcitation being the only fragmentation channel. The primary excited state dynamics in the gas phase could be fitted to a biexponential decay, yielding time constants of <100 fs and 1–3 ps. Transient absorption spectroscopy performed in acetonitrile solution using femtosecond UV/Vis and IR probe laser pulses revealed additional deactivation processes on longer time scales (∼7–12 ps). However, the formation of the active catalyst species after photoexcitation could not be observed in solution. The results from both studies are compared to former CID investigations and DFT calculations concerning the activation mechanism.

  14. Cooperative properties of single phases of complex oxide catalyst for oxidation of propylene to acrolein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orel, L.I.; Udalova, O.V.; Korchak, V.N.; Isaev, O.V.; Krylov, O.V.; Gershenzon, Yu.M.; Aptekar', E.L.

    1992-01-01

    Synergetic effect of increase of acrolein yield during propylene oxidation on mechanical mixture of (α + β)CoMoO 4 and MoO 3 , as well as CO and CO 2 yield on mixture of CoMoO 4 and Bi 2 O 3 ·2MoO 3 was revealed. It is shown that CoMoO 4 generates allyl radicals, desorption of these radicals to gaseous phase is not practically observed with MoO 3 , bismuth molybdates and Fe 2 O 3 · Fe 2 O 3 ·3MoO 3

  15. Selective liquid-phase oxidation of alcohols catalyzed by a silver-based catalyst promoted by the presence of ceria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Matthias Josef; Hansen, Thomas Willum; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk

    2009-01-01

    simultaneously. When a high catalytic conversion (>30% over 2 h) was found the number of catalyst components was reduced in the following tests. Thereby, a collaborative effect between a physical mixture of ceria nanoparticles and silver-impregnated silica (10 wt.% Ag–SiO2) was found. The catalytic activity...... by in situ XAS experiments. Oxygen species incorporated in the silver lattice appear to be important for the catalytic oxidation of the alcohol for which a preliminary mechanism is presented. The application of the catalyst was extended to the oxidation of a wide range of primary and secondary alcohols....... Compared to palladium and gold catalysts, the new silver catalyst performed similarly or even superior in the presence of CeO2. In addition, the presence of ceria increased the catalytic activity of all investigated catalysts....

  16. Phase purity of NiCo2O4, a catalyst candidate for electrolysis of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, J.; Fielder, W. L.; Garlick, R. G.; Negas, T.

    1987-01-01

    NiCo2O4 is shown to be difficult to obtain as a pure phase, and may never have been so obtained. High resolution x-ray diffractometry is required for its precise characterization. Film XRD is not likely to show the asymmetry in the spinel diffraction lines, caused by poorly crystallized NiO, as seen in diffractometer traces. The Co3O4 which is expected to accompany NiO as an impurity in NiCo2O4 syntheses has the same diffraction pattern as the binary oxide. Firings of the co-precipitated hydroxides at 300, 350, and 400 C, including one in pure O2, failed to produce single phase cobaltate. Scanning electron microscopy showed all the sintered products to range over several orders of magnitude in agglomerate/particle size. Surface areas by BET were all in the range 40 to 110 m sq/g, equivalent to particles of 200 to 100 Angstrom diameter. The spinel diffraction line breadths were compatible with those approximate dimensions.

  17. Identification and Reduction of Turbomachinery Noise, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Communities near airports are often exposed to high noise levels due to low flying aircraft in the takeoff and landing phases of flight. Propulsion source noise is...

  18. Optimisation of hydrogenation reactors with heterogeneous catalysts operated in trickle phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoche, M. [CRI KataLeuna GmbH, Leuna (Germany)

    2010-12-30

    Maldistribution in trickle phase reactors is to be blamed for hot spot formation and non-ideal reaction. For a simple and quick evaluation, a virtually divided reactor model is presented for a better understanding and analysis of the consequences of liquid maldistribution. Based on this modelization, different methods are described to resolve microscopic and macroscopic maldistribution. The same model provides information to produce guidelines for reactor loading and evaluating the uneven effects of coking. It is shown that areas with specifically high liquid loads may suffer from insufficient gas supply and might therewith prevent a proper stoechiometric conversion of the gas with the liquid. In areas with lower liquid load, the gas has less hydraulic resistance and bypasses the effective reaction zone. (orig.)

  19. Grain-boundary, glassy-phase identification and possible artifacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, Y.K.; Carter, C.B.; Sklad, P.; Bentley, J.

    1985-01-01

    Specimen artifacts such as grain boundary grooving, surface damage of the specimen, and Si contamination are shown experimentally to arise from the ion milling used in the preparation of transmission electron microscopy specimens. These artifacts in polycrystalline, ceramic specimens can cause clean grain boundaries to appear to contain a glassy phase when the dark-field diffuse scattering technique, the Fresnel fringe technique, and analytical electron microscopy (energy dispersive spectroscopy) are used to identify glassy phases at a grain boundary. The ambiguity in interpreting each of these techniques due to the ion milling artifacts will be discussed from a theoretical view point and compared to experimental results obtained for alumina

  20. Status Report on Phase Identification in Hanford Tank Sludges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapko, B.M.; Lumetta, G.J.

    2000-01-01

    The US Department of Energy plans to vitrify Hanford's tank wastes. The vitrified wastes will be divided into low-activity and high-level fractions. There is an effort to reduce the quantity of high-activity wastes by removing nonradioactive components because of the high costs involved in treating high-level waste. Pretreatment options, such as caustic leaching, to selectively remove nonradioactive components are being investigated. The effectiveness of these proposed processes for removing nonradioactive components depends on the chemical phases in the tank sludges. This review summarizes the chemical phases identified to date in Hanford tank sludges

  1. Identification of an anomalous phase in Ni–W electrodeposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mizushima, Io; Tang, Peter Torben; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2008-01-01

    In the present work Ni–W layers electrodeposited from electrolytes based on NiSO4, Na2WO4, citrate, glycine and triethanolamine are characterized with glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GD-OES) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). XRD showed the occurrence of an anomalous phase...

  2. Removal of gas phase low-concentration toluene over Mn, Ag and Ce modified HZSM-5 catalysts by periodical operation of adsorption and non-thermal plasma regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenzheng; Wang, Honglei; Zhu, Tianle; Fan, Xing

    2015-07-15

    Ag/HZSM-5, Mn/HZSM-5, Ce/HZSM-5, Ag-Mn/HZSM-5 and Ce-Mn/HZSM-5 were prepared by impregnation method. Both their adsorption capacity and catalytic activity were investigated for the removal of gas phase low-concentration toluene by periodical operation of adsorption and non-thermal plasma regeneration. Results show that catalysts loaded with Ag (Ag/HZSM-5 and Ag-Mn/HZSM-5) had larger adsorption capacity for toluene than the other catalysts. And Ag-Mn/HZSM-5 displayed the best catalytic performance for both toluene oxidation by non-thermal plasma and byproducts suppression. On the other hand, the deactivated catalyst can be fully regenerated by calcining in air stream when its adsorption capacity and catalytic activity of the Ag-Mn/HZSM-5 catalyst was found to be decreased after 10 cycles of periodical adsorption and non-thermal regeneration. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Selective Production of 2-Methylfuran by Gas-Phase Hydrogenation of Furfural on Copper Incorporated by Complexation in Mesoporous Silica Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Gómez, Carmen Pilar; Cecilia, Juan A; Moreno-Tost, Ramón; Maireles-Torres, Pedro

    2017-04-10

    Copper species have been incorporated in mesoporous silica (MS) through complexation with the amine groups of dodecylamine, which was used as a structure-directing agent in the synthesis. A series of Cu/SiO 2 catalysts (xCu-MS) with copper loadings (x) from 2.5 to 20 wt % was synthesized and evaluated in the gas-phase hydrogenation of furfural (FUR). The most suitable catalytic performance in terms of 2-methylfuran yield was obtained with an intermediate copper content (10 wt %). This 10Cu-MS catalyst exhibits a 2-methylfuran yield higher than 95 mol % after 5 h time-on-stream (TOS) at a reaction temperature of 210 °C with a H 2 /FUR molar ratio of 11.5 and a weight hourly space velocity (WHSV) of 1.5 h -1 . After 14 h TOS, this catalyst still showed a yield of 80 mol %. In all cases, carbonaceous deposits on the external surface were the cause of the catalyst deactivation, although sintering of the copper particles was observed for higher copper loadings. This intermediate copper loading (10 wt %) offered a suitable balance between resistance to sintering and tendency to form carbonaceous deposits. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Methods to synthesize NiPt bimetallic nanoparticles by a reversed-phase microemulsion, deposition of NiPt bimetallic nanoparticles on a support, and application of the supported catalyst for CO.sub.2 reforming of methane

    KAUST Repository

    Biausque, Gregory; Laveille, Paco; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Caps, Valerie; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Methods to synthesize NiPt bimetallic nanoparticles by a reversed-phase microemulsion, deposition of NiPt bimetallic nanoparticles on a support, and application of the supported catalyst for CO.sub.2 reforming of methane

  5. Methods to synthesize NiPt bimetallic nanoparticles by a reversed-phase microemulsion, deposition of NiPt bimetallic nanoparticles on a support, and application of the supported catalyst for CO.sub.2 reforming of methane

    KAUST Repository

    Biausque, Gregory

    2015-04-28

    Methods to synthesize NiPt bimetallic nanoparticles by a reversed-phase microemulsion, deposition of NiPt bimetallic nanoparticles on a support, and application of the supported catalyst for CO.sub.2 reforming of methane

  6. Effect of phase interaction on catalytic CO oxidation over the SnO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} model catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chai, Shujing [Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science & Engineering (Tianjin), Tianjin Key Laboratory of Applied Catalysis Science & Technology, School of Chemical Engineering & Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300354 (China); The Institute of Seawater Desalination and Miltipurpose Utilization, State Oceanic Administration, Tianjin 300192 (China); Bai, Xueqin; Li, Jing; Liu, Cheng; Ding, Tong; Tian, Ye; Liu, Chang [Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science & Engineering (Tianjin), Tianjin Key Laboratory of Applied Catalysis Science & Technology, School of Chemical Engineering & Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300354 (China); Xian, Hui [Tianjin Polytechnic University, School of Computer Science & Software Engineering, Tianjin 300387 (China); Mi, Wenbo [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Materials Physics and Preparation Technology, Faculty of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300354 (China); Li, Xingang, E-mail: xingang_li@tju.edu.cn [Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science & Engineering (Tianjin), Tianjin Key Laboratory of Applied Catalysis Science & Technology, School of Chemical Engineering & Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300354 (China)

    2017-04-30

    Highlights: • Activity for CO oxidation is greatly enhanced by interaction between SnO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. • Interaction between SnO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} phases can generate oxygen vacancies. • Oxygen vacancies play an import role for catalytic CO oxidation. • Sn{sup 4+} cations are the effective sites for catalytic CO oxidation. • Langmuir-Hinshelwood model is preferred for catalytic CO oxidation. - Abstract: We investigated the catalytic CO oxidation over the SnO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} model catalysts. Our results show that interaction between the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SnO{sub 2} phases results in the significantly improved catalytic activity because of the formation of the oxygen vacancies. The oxygen storage capacity of the SnO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst prepared by the physically mixed method is nearly two times higher than that of the SnO{sub 2}, which probably results from the change of electron concentration on the interface of the SnO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} phases. Introducing water vapor to the feeding gas would a little decrease the activity of the catalysts, but the reaction rate could completely recover after removal of water vapor. The kinetics results suggest that the surface Sn{sup 4+} cations are effective CO adsorptive sites, and the surface adsorbed oxygen plays an important role upon CO oxidation. The reaction pathways upon the SnO{sub 2}-based catalysts for CO oxidation follow the Langmuir-Hinshelwood model.

  7. SCR at bio fuels combustion - phase 2. Measures to extend catalyst life time; SCR vid biobraensleeldning - etapp 2. Aatgaerder foer att foerlaenga katalysatorns livslaengd

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Christer; Bodin, Henrik; Sahlqvist, Aasa [Vattenfall Utveckling AB, Aelvkarleby (Sweden); Khodayari, Raziyeh; Odenbrand, Ingemar [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Engineering II

    2000-07-01

    In this project phase, the deactivation of catalysts during combustion of bio fuels, and different methods of regeneration have been investigated. The overall purpose is to improve the economic and technical possibilities to use SCR at bio fuels combustion. The two different methods for regeneration are washing with water and so called sulphation (treatment with sulphur dioxide). The results from wood fired FB-boilers show that the catalyst lose 25% (average) of the relative activity during a normal heat production season. The tendency is that a boiler with short residence time between final combustion and catalyst and/or high flame temperatures gives a faster deactivation. Such unfavourable conditions arise in FB-boilers with a large part of the combustion in freeboard/cyclone. The alkali content of the fuel (wood fuel) is of minor importance for the deactivation rate compared with the combustion conditions. The flue gas temperature within the interval 250 - 375 deg C is not an important parameter for the deactivation in the time interval 3 000 - 6 000 h. The 'new' honeycomb catalysts that were tested during phase two, BiotypA-C, evidently show different deactivation trends. The highly active BiotypC e.g. increases its activity during the first thousand hours. Calculations indicate that BiotypC at 315 deg C requires the smallest volume of catalyst over ten years of operation in order to maintain given performance. Practical consequences for downstream equipment also need to be carefully checked. Sulphation with SO{sub 2} works in the laboratory as a regeneration method for all of the tested samples. The sulphatised samples deactivation are almost comparable to a fresh sample when exposed to flue gas. About 80 % of the lost activity can be regained only by using sulphation. Plate-type catalysts gets a somewhat lower increase in activity compared to honeycomb-types, probably related to chemical rather than geometric design. High SO{sub 2}-concentration

  8. Horizontal two phase flow pattern identification by neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crivelaro, Kelen Cristina Oliveira; Seleghim Junior, Paulo; Hervieu, Eric

    1999-01-01

    A multiphase fluid can flow according to several flow regimes. The problem associated with multiphase systems are basically related to the behavior of macroscopic parameters, such as pressure drop, thermal exchanges and so on, and their strong correlation to the flow regime. From the industrial applications point of view, the safety and longevity of equipment and systems can only be assured when they work according to the flow regimes for which they were designed to. This implies in the need to diagnose flow regimes in real time. The automatic diagnosis of flow regimes represents an objective of extreme importance, mainly for applications on nuclear and petrochemical industries. In this work, a neural network is used in association to a probe of direct visualization for the identification of a gas-liquid flow horizontal regimes, developed in an experimental circuit. More specifically, the signals produced by the probe are used to compose a qualitative image of the flow, which is promptly sent to the network for the recognition of the regimes. Results are presented for different transitions among the flow regimes, which demonstrate the extremely satisfactory performance of the diagnosis system. (author)

  9. Water-dispersable hybrid Au-Pd nanoparticles as catalysts in ethanol oxidation, aqueous phase Suzuki-Miyaura and Heck reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Hyon Min

    2012-01-01

    The catalytic activities of water-dispersable Au@Pd core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) and Au-Pd alloy NPs were examined. There is growing interest in Au-Pd hybridized NPs in a supported matrix or non-supported forms as catalysts in various reactions that are not limited to conventional Pd-related reactions. Four different Au@Pd core-shell NPs in this study were prepared at room temperature with help from the emulsion phase surrounding the Au core NPs. Au-Pd alloy NPs were prepared over 90 °C, and underwent phase transfer to aqueous medium for their catalytic use. Au@Pd core-shell NPs show catalytic activity in ethanol oxidation reactions as electrocatalysts, and both core-shell and alloy NPs are good to excellent catalysts in various Suzuki-Miyaura and Heck reactions as heterogeneous catalysts. Specifically, Au@Pd core-shell NPs with sharp branched arms show the highest yield in the reactions tested in this study. A relatively small amount (0.25 mol%) was used throughout the catalytic reactions. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  10. Atomic scale insights into electrochemical versus gas phase oxidation of HCl over RuO2-based catalysts: A comparative review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over, Herbert

    2013-01-01

    In this article our current understanding of the electro-catalyzed chlorine evolution reaction (CER) in comparison with that of the heterogeneously-catalyzed gas phase oxidation of HCl (Deacon process: heterogeneous catalysis) over RuO 2 -based catalysts will be reviewed. Both types of harsh reactions are chemically similar: The main concern is catalyst stability, and in both cases the best catalyst contains RuO 2 as the catalytically active component so that a critical comparison may provide new insights into the underlying physicochemical processes. It is the primary scope of this review addresses atomic scale information on the RuO 2 -catalyzed HCl oxidation reaction either in electrochemical or in gas phase environment. In particular, the involved reaction mechanisms and the reason for the extraordinary stability of RuO 2 under such harsh reaction conditions will be discussed, emphasizing similarities and differences in the Deacon process and the CER and what can be learnt from this comparison. The distinct properties of RuO 2 , which are responsible for its extraordinary catalytic performance in both the CER and the Deacon process, are highlighted

  11. Mutagenicity of diesel engine exhaust is eliminated in the gas phase by an oxidation catalyst but only slightly reduced in the particle phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, Götz A; Krahl, Jürgen; Munack, Axel; Ruschel, Yvonne; Schröder, Olaf; Hallier, Ernst; Brüning, Thomas; Bünger, Jürgen

    2012-06-05

    Concerns about adverse health effects of diesel engine emissions prompted strong efforts to minimize this hazard, including exhaust treatment by diesel oxidation catalysts (DOC). The effectiveness of such measures is usually assessed by the analysis of the legally regulated exhaust components. In recent years additional analytical and toxicological tests were included in the test panel with the aim to fill possible analytical gaps, for example, mutagenic potency of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and their nitrated derivatives (nPAH). This investigation focuses on the effect of a DOC on health hazards from combustion of four different fuels: rapeseed methyl ester (RME), common mineral diesel fuel (DF), SHELL V-Power Diesel (V-Power), and ARAL Ultimate Diesel containing 5% RME (B5ULT). We applied the European Stationary Cycle (ESC) to a 6.4 L turbo-charged heavy load engine fulfilling the EURO III standard. The engine was operated with and without DOC. Besides regulated emissions we measured particle size and number distributions, determined the soluble and solid fractions of the particles and characterized the bacterial mutagenicity in the gas phase and the particles of the exhaust. The effectiveness of the DOC differed strongly in regard to the different exhaust constituents: Total hydrocarbons were reduced up to 90% and carbon monoxide up to 98%, whereas nitrogen oxides (NO(X)) remained almost unaffected. Total particle mass (TPM) was reduced by 50% with DOC in common petrol diesel fuel and by 30% in the other fuels. This effect was mainly due to a reduction of the soluble organic particle fraction. The DOC caused an increase of the water-soluble fraction in the exhaust of RME, V-Power, and B5ULT, as well as a pronounced increase of nitrate in all exhausts. A high proportion of ultrafine particles (10-30 nm) in RME exhaust could be ascribed to vaporizable particles. Mutagenicity of the exhaust was low compared to previous investigations. The DOC reduced

  12. Investigation of the promoting effect of Mn on a Pt/C catalyst for the steam and aqueous phase reforming of glycerol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossola, Filippo; Pereira-Hernández, Xavier Isidro; Evangelisti, Claudio; Wang, Yong; Dal Santo, Vladimiro

    2017-05-01

    The catalytic performances in steam reforming (SR) and aqueous phase reforming (APR) of glycerol of a bimetallic Pt-Mn catalyst supported on activated carbon are investigated and correlated with the surface properties of the catalyst. Under SR conditions, Mn showed a significant promoting effect over Pt/C, both in terms of hydrogen production rate and conversion, with a higher selectivity toward the glycerol dehydration products. Upon addition of Mn the amount of strong Lewis acid sites increased, promoting the dehydration of glycerol and favoring the CAO over CAC cleavage at expenses of hydrogen selectivity. Conversely, under APR conditions, a slightly higher hydrogen selectivity and only minimal enhancement in hydrogen production were found, while the products selectivity was comparable to Pt/C. Most of Mn leached into the aqueous media, but the remaining (<5% of the fresh parent sample) might be alloyed with Pt and promote the CO desorption from neighbor Pt sites.

  13. Revisiting source identification, weathering models, and phase discrimination for Exxon Valdez oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Driskell, W.B.; Payne, J.R.; Shigenaka, G.

    2005-01-01

    A large chemistry data set for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and saturated hydrocarbon (SHC) contamination in sediment, water and tissue samples has emerged in the aftermath of the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill in Prince William Sound, Alaska. When the oil was fresh, source identification was a primary objective and fairly reliable. However, source identification became problematic as the oil weathered and its signatures changed. In response to concerns regarding when the impacted area will be clean again, this study focused on developing appropriate tools to confirm hydrocarbon source identifications and assess weathering in various matrices. Previous efforts that focused only on the whole or particulate-phase oil are not adequate to track dissolved-phase signal with low total PAH values. For that reason, a particulate signature index (PSI) and dissolved signature index (DSI) screening tool was developed in this study to discriminate between these 2 phases. The screening tool was used to measure the dissolved or water-soluble fraction of crude oil which occurs at much lower levels than the particulate phase, but which is more widely circulated and equally as important as the particulate oil phase. The discrimination methods can also identify normally-discarded, low total PAH samples which can increase the amount of usable data needed to model other effects of oil spills. 37 refs., 3 tabs., 10 figs

  14. Weed diversity identification on growth phases of twelve maize varieties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahayu, M.; Yudono, P.; Indradewa, D.; Hanudin, E.

    2018-03-01

    Weed is one of the factors that disturb maize cultivation. Each maize variety has specific characteristics which will lead to weeds diversity in particular farm. This study aimed to identify the effect of maize variety on weed diversity on maize’s growth phases. The research was conducted from March to July 2016 in Banguntapan, Bantul, Yogyakarta, Indonesia. The field research was arranged by using Randomised Complete Block Design with three replications. The treatments were maize varieties, consist of 12 levels: ‘Bisi 18’, ‘Bisi 2’, ‘Pertiwi 3’, ‘NK 22’, ‘NK 33’, ‘DK 959’, ‘P23’, ‘DK 771’, ‘DK 95’, ‘Bima 19 Uri’, ‘Bisma’, and ‘Sukmaraga’. The results showed that at four weeks after planting (WAP) the most of weeds were growing on varieties ‘Bisi 18’, ‘NK 33’, ‘P 23’, and ‘DK 95’, there were 14 species. Bulbostylispuberula and Cyperusrotundus were growing on all maize varieties with the highest SDR on ‘Sukmaraga’ and ‘DK 959’. At six WAP, weeds that grew, most consists of four species of sedges, six species of grasses and 24 species of broadleaf. While at the age of eight WAP, the weeds that grow at least on ‘NK 33’ that were 13 species and the most on ‘P23’ that were 21 species. Dactyloctenium aeghypthium having highest SDR in all maize varieties except Bisi 18. The highest SDR value on Bisi 18 was Boerhaavia erecta about 16.23%.

  15. Impact of H2/CO ratios on phase and performance of Mn-modified Fe-based Fischer Tropsch synthesis catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Mingyue; Yang, Yong; Li, Yongwang; Wang, Tiejun; Ma, Longlong; Wu, Chuangzhi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Decreasing H 2 /CO ratio facilitated the conversion of Fe 3 O 4 to iron carbides on the surface layers. ► The formation of surface carbonaceous species was promoted in higher CO partial pressure. ► The formation of iron carbides on the surface of Fe 3 O 4 provided the FTS active sites. ► Decreasing H 2 /CO ratio promoted the product shifting towards heavy hydrocarbons. - Abstract: Impacts of H 2 /CO ratios on both the bulky and surface compositions of an iron–manganese based catalyst were investigated by XRD, MES, N 2 -physisorption, XPS and LRS. Fischer–Tropsch (F–T) synthesis performances were studied in a slurry-phase continuously stirred tank reactor. The characterization results showed that the fresh catalyst was comprised of the hematite, which was converted firstly to Fe 3 O 4 , and then carburized to iron carbides in both the bulk and surface regions under different H 2 /CO ratios atmosphere. Pretreatment in lower H 2 /CO ratio facilitated the formation of iron carbides on the surface of magnetite and surface carbonaceous species. During the F–T synthesis reaction, the catalyst reduced in lower H 2 /CO ratio presented higher catalytic activity, which is assigned probably to the formation of more iron carbides (especially for χ-Fe 5 C 2 ) on the surface of magnetite. The increase of CO partial pressure promoted the product distribution shifting towards heavy hydrocarbons

  16. Damping characteristic identification of non-linear soil-structural system interaction by phase resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poterasu, V.F.

    1984-01-01

    It is presented a method and the phase resonance for damping characteristic identification of non-linear soil-structural interaction. The algorithm can be applied in case of any, not necessarily, damping characteristic of the system examined. For the identification, the system is harmonically excited and are considered the super-harmonic amplitudes for odd and even powers of the x. The response of shear beam system for different levels of base excitation and for different locations of the load is considered. (Author) [pt

  17. Session 6: Liquid-phase chloro-benzene hydrogenolysis over alkali-doped zirconia supported palladium catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aramendia, M.A.; Borau, V.; Jimenez, C.; Marinas, A.; Marinas, J.M.; Moreno, J.M.; Ruiz, J.R.; Urbano, F.J. [University of Cordoba. Marie Curie Building, Dept. of Organic Chemistry (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons constitute one of the most important kind of organic pollutants due to their environmental impact and noxious effects. Catalytic hydro-dehalogenation is now emerging as a promising non-destructive alternative technology whereby the chlorinated waste is converted to products with a commercial value. It is simple, safe, effective, and it ensures, in many instances, the regeneration of the initial raw material. One of the main problems of catalytic hydro-dehalogenation arise from the deactivating effect of the hydrogen halide released as by product. This can be surpassed by, for example, adding a base, such as NaOH, or modification of the catalyst in order to neutralize the hydrogen halide released. In conclusion, the alkali modification of the zirconia supported catalysts did not enhance the catalytic activity in comparison to the undoped Pd/ZrO{sub 2}. Moreover, the lithium doped catalyst exhibits very poor results in initial rate and final chloro-benzene conversion. This could be related to the reduction in BET surface area caused by the doping together with a lower enhancement of the surface basicity of the doped catalysts. (authors)

  18. LIQUID PHASE SELECTIVE OXIDATION OF ETHYLBENZENE OVER ACTIVATED AL2O3 SUPPORTED V2O5 CATALYST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acetophenone, a very useful industrial chemical for fragrance and flavoring agent and a solvent for plastics and resins, is usually produced as a byproduct of phenol production from cumeme. Aluminia supported vandium oxide catalyst is now explored for the selective oxidation of e...

  19. The effect of temperature on nascent morphology of polyethylene polymerized over solution-phase flat model catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, S.D.; Kong, B.L.; Han, W.; Thune, P.C.; Yang, X.Z.; Loos, J.; Yan, S.K.

    2009-01-01

    The structure and morphology of polyethylene (PE) produced during solution polymerization using bis(imino)pyridyl metal catalysts supported by flat SiO2/Si(100) wafers were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electron diffraction. Depending on the polymerization temperature, ranging

  20. Hydrogenation of fast pyrolyis oil and model compounds in a two-phase aqueous organic system using homogeneous ruthenium catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahfud, F. H.; Ghijsen, F.; Heeres, H. J.

    2007-01-01

    The use of homogeneous ruthenium catalysts to hydrogenate the water-soluble fraction of pyrolysis oil is reported. Pyrolysis oil, which is obtained by fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass at 450-600 degrees C, contains significant amounts of aldehydes and ketones (e.g. 1-hydroxy-2-propanone (1)

  1. exchanged Mg-Al hydrotalcite catalyst

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ) catalysts, ... The catalyst can be easily separated by simple filtration ... surface area by the single-point N2 adsorption method ... concentration of carbonate anions (by treating the cat- .... hydrotalcite phase along with copper hydroxide and.

  2. Identification of two-phase flow regimes by time-series modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, C.H.; Ouyang, M.S.; Pei, B.S.

    1987-01-01

    The identification of two-phase flow patterns in pipes or ducts is important to the design and operation of thermal-hydraulic systems, especially in the nuclear reactor cores of boiling water reactors or in the steam generators of pressurized water reactors. Basically, two-phase flow shows some fluctuating characteristics even at steady-state conditions. These fluctuating characteristics can be analyzed by statistical methods for obtaining flow signatures. There have been a number of experimental studies conducted that are concerned with the statistical properties of void fraction or pressure pulsation in two-phase flow. In this study, the authors propose a new technique of identifying the patterns of air-water two-phase flow in a vertical pipe. This technique is based on analyzing the statistic characteristics of the pressure signals of the test loop by time-series modeling

  3. Identification of G-phase in aged cast CF 8 type stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentley, J.; Miller, M.K.; Brenner, S.S.; Spitznagel, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    The microstructure of as-cast and aged CF 8 type stainless steel, used for the primary coolant pipes in pressurized light-water nuclear reactors, is being studied by analytical electron microscopy (AEM) and atom probe field-ion microscopy (APFIM). The phase transformations of the ferrite (approx. 19 vol % of the duplex structure) that occur after aging at 673 K for 7500 h are described by Miller et al. The present work deals with the identification of G-phase (prototype compound Ni 16 Ti 6 Si 7 ) observed in the ferrite of aged material. 2 references, 3 figures

  4. Evidence for the Active Phase of Heterogeneous Catalysts through In Situ Reaction Product Imaging and Multiscale Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matera, S.; Blomberg, S.; Hoffmann, M. J.; Zetterberg, J.; Gustafson, J.; Lundgren, E.; Reuter, K.

    2015-06-17

    We use multiscale modeling to analyze laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements of the CO oxidation reaction over Pd(100) at near-ambient reaction conditions. Integrating density functional theory-based kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of the active catalyst into fluid-dynamical simulations of the mass transport inside the reactor chamber, we calculate the reaction product concentration directly above the catalyst surface. Comparing corresponding data calculated for different surface models against the measured LIF signals, we can discriminate the one that predominantly actuates the experimentally measured catalytic activity. For the probed CO oxidation reaction conditions, the experimental activity is due to pristine Pd(100) possibly coexisting with other (oxidic) domains on the surface.

  5. [Adsorption and removal of gas-phase Hg(0) over a V2O5/AC catalyst in the presence of SO2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun-wei; Yang, Jian-li; Liu, Zhen-yu

    2009-12-01

    The adsorption and removal behaviors of gas-phase Hg(0) over V2O5/AC and AC were studied under a simulated flue gas (containing N2, SO2, O2) in a fixed-bed reactor. The influences of the V2O5, loading, SO2 concentration and adsorption temperature on Hg0 adsorption were investigated. The speciation of mercury adsorbed was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It was found that the V2O5/AC catalyst has a much higher capability than AC for Hg(0) adsorption and removal, mainly because of the catalytic oxidation activity of V2O5. The Hg(0) adsorption capability depends on the V2O5 content of the V2O5/AC catalyst. The amounts of mercury adsorbed increase from 75.9 microg x g(-1) to 89.6 microg x g(-1) (in the absence of O2) and from 115.9 microg x g(-1) to 185.5 microg x g(-1) (in the presence of O2) as the V2O5 loading increases from 0.5% to 1.0%, which are much higher than those over AC under the same conditions (9.6 microg x g(-1) and 23.3 microg x g(-1)). SO2 in the flue gas enhances Hg(0) adsorption over the V2O5/AC catalyst, which is due to the reaction of SO2 and Hg(0) on V2O3/AC. But as the SO2 concentration increases from 500 x 10(-6) to 2000 x 10(-6), the amount of mercury adsorbed has only a slight increase. The optimal temperature for Hg(0) adsorption over the V2O5/AC catalyst is around 150 degrees C, at which the amounts of mercury adsorbed are up to 98.5 microg x g(-1) (in the absence of O2) and 187.7 microg x g(-1) (in the presence of O2). The XPS results indicate the formation of Hg(0) and HgSO4 on the surface of the V2O5/AC catalyst, which confirms the role of V2O5 and SO2.

  6. Electrochemically induced C-H functionalization using bromide ion/2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyl-N-oxyl dual redox catalysts in a two-phase electrolytic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Chao; Zeng, Cheng-Chu; Hu, Li-Ming; Yang, Feng-Lin; Yoo, Seung Joon; Little, R. Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Electrocatalytic C-H bond functionalization of tetrahydroisoquinolines is reported. •The transformation is mediated by a bromide ion/TEMPO dual redox catalyst system. •The transformation is conducted in a two-phase electrolytic medium. •The mechanism is proposed to proceed via a sequence of oxidation and addition reactions involving water as a nucleophile. •The procedure features wide substrate scope, the use of mild reaction conditions. -- Abstract: The electrochemical oxidative functionalization of benzylic C-H bonds, mediated by a dual bromide ion/2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyl-N-oxyl (TEMPO) redox catalyst system in a two-phase electrolytic medium, has been explored using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and preparative electrolysis techniques. The results show that electron transfer between TEMPO + and a neutral substrate occurs with an efficiency that depends upon the presence of a base. The preparative scale electrolysis led to the formation of dihydro-isoquinolinones, isochromanone and xanthenone in moderate to excellent yields. On the basis of the CV analysis and preparative electrolysis results, a reaction mechanism is proposed

  7. Reduced cobalt phases of ZrO2 and Ru/ZrO2 promoted cobalt catalysts and product distributions from Fischer–Tropsch synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kangvansura, Praewpilin; Schulz, Hans; Suramitr, Anwaraporn; Poo-arporn, Yingyot; Viravathana, Pinsuda; Worayingyong, Attera

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Ru/ZrO 2 , ZrO 2 promoted Co/SiO 2 for FTS were reduced by time resolved XANES. • Reduced catalysts resulted from XANES reduction showed the mixed phases of Co, CoO. • The highest percentages of CoO resulted from the high ZrO 2 promoted Co/SiO 2 . • Product distributions of 1-alkenes, iso-alkanes indicated sites for FTS and the 2° reaction. • Alkene readsorption were high corresponding to the high CoO forming branched alkanes. - Abstract: Co/SiO 2 catalysts were promoted with 4% and 8% ZrO 2 . Small amounts (0.07%) of Ru were impregnated onto 4%ZrO 2 /Co/SiO 2 . Catalysts resulting from time-resolved XANES reduction showed mixed phases of Co and CoO, with the highest percentages of Co resulting from Ru/4%ZrO 2 /Co/SiO 2 and the highest percentages of CoO resulting from 8%ZrO 2 /Co/SiO 2 . Product distributions of n-alkanes, iso-alkanes and alkenes during Fischer–Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) were used to investigate the catalyst performance of 4%ZrO 2 /Co/SiO 2 8%ZrO 2 /Co/SiO 2 and Ru/4%ZrO 2 /Co/SiO 2 . FTS steady state was studied by growth probabilities of n-alkane products. No 1-alkene was produced from Ru/4%ZrO 2 /Co/SiO 2 , indicating high availability of Fischer–Tropsch sites for long chain hydrocarbon growth, despite high methanation. Branched alkanes produced from the secondary reaction were related to the high CoO percentages on 8%ZrO 2 /Co/SiO 2 . Alkene readsorption sites were high, corresponding to the high CoO percentages, causing a high probability of forming branched alkane products

  8. O-alkylation of disodium salt of diethyl 3,4-dihydroxythiophene-2,5-dicarboxylate with 1,2-dichloroethane catalyzed by ionic type phase transfer catalyst and potassium iodide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Huasheng; Yin, Hengbo; Wang, Aili; Shen, Jun; Yan, Xiaobo; Liu, Yumin; Zhang, Changhua [Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang (China)

    2014-01-15

    Diethyl 3,4-ethylenedioxy thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylate was efficiently synthesized via the O-alkylation of disodium salt of diethyl 3,4-dihydroxy thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylate with 1,2-dichloroethane over ionic type phase transfer catalysts, such as tetrabutyl ammonium bromide and benzyl triethyl ammonium chloride. The ionic type phase transfer catalysts showed higher catalytic activities than the nonionic type phase transfer catalysts, such as triethylamine, pyridine, 18-crown-6, and polyethylene glycol 400/600, in the O-alkylation reaction. The conversion of the disodium salt of more than 97% and the selectivity of diethyl 3,4-ethylenedioxy thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylate of more than 98% were achieved when the O-alkylation reaction was synergistically catalyzed by tetrabutyl ammonium bromide and potassium iodide.

  9. Effective Liquid-phase Nitration of Benzene Catalyzed by a Stable Solid Acid Catalyst: Silica Supported Cs{sub 2.5}H{sub 0.5}PMo{sub 12}O{sub 40}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Shu-wen; Liu, Li-jun; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Liang-yin [Liaocheng University, Liaocheng (China)

    2012-04-15

    Silica supported Cs{sub 2.5}H{sub 0.5}PMo{sub 12}O{sub 40} catalyst was prepared through sol-gel method with ethyl silicate-40 as silicon resource and characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption-desorption and potentiometric titration methods. The Cs{sub 2.5}H{sub 0.5}PMo{sub 12}O{sub 40} particles with Keggin-type structure well dispersed on the surface of silica, and the catalyst exhibited high surface area and acidity. The catalytic performance of the catalysts for benzene liquid-phase nitration was examined with 65% nitric acid as nitrating agent, and the effects of various parameters were tested, which including temperature, time and amount of catalyst, reactants ratio, especially the recycle of catalyst was emphasized. Benzene was effectively nitrated to mononitro-benzene with high conversion (95%) in optimized conditions. Most importantly, the supported catalyst was proved has excellent stability in the nitration progress, and there were no any other organic solvent and sulfuric acid were used in the reaction system, so the liquid-phase nitration of benzene that we developed was an eco-friendly and attractive alternative for the commercial technology

  10. Identification of 3-phase flow patterns of heavy oil from pressure drop and flow rate data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacheco, F.; Bannwart, A.C.; Mendes, J.R.P. [Campinas State Univ., Sao Paulo (Brazil); Serapiao, A.B.S. [Sao Paulo State Univ., Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    Pipe flow of oil-gas-water mixtures poses a complex thermo-fluid dynamical problem. This paper examined the relationship between phase flow rates, flow pattern identification, and pressure drop in 3-phase water-assisted heavy oil in the presence of a gaseous phase. An artificial intelligence program called a support vector machine (SVM) was used to determine relevant parameters for flow pattern classification. Data from a 3-phase flow of heavy oil with gas and water in a vertical pipe was used in the study. The data were used to train the machine, which then predicted the flow pattern of the remaining data. Tests with different parameters and training data were then performed. The study showed that the proposed SVM flow pattern identification process accurately predicted flow patterns. It was concluded that the SVM took a relatively short amount of time to train. Future research is needed to apply the tool to larger flow datasets. 5 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  11. Efficient epoxidation of propene using molecular catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markovits, Iulius I. E.; Anthofer, Michael H.; Kolding, Helene

    2014-01-01

    The epoxidation of propene is performed in homogeneous phase using various molecular catalysts and H2O2 or tert-butyl hydroperoxide as oxidants. A comparison between some molybdenum catalysts and methyltrioxorhenium (MTO) shows that the well known Re catalyst is the best among the examined...

  12. Communicating catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2018-06-01

    The beauty and activity of enzymes inspire chemists to tailor new and better non-biological catalysts. Now, a study reveals that the active sites within heterogeneous catalysts actively cooperate in a fashion phenomenologically similar to, but mechanistically distinct, from enzymes.

  13. Rapid experimental SAD phasing and hot-spot identification with halogenated fragments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph D. Bauman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Through X-ray crystallographic fragment screening, 4-bromopyrazole was discovered to be a `magic bullet' that is capable of binding at many of the ligand `hot spots' found in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT. The binding locations can be in pockets that are `hidden' in the unliganded crystal form, allowing rapid identification of these sites for in silico screening. In addition to hot-spot identification, this ubiquitous yet specific binding provides an avenue for X-ray crystallographic phase determination, which can be a significant bottleneck in the determination of the structures of novel proteins. The anomalous signal from 4-bromopyrazole or 4-iodopyrazole was sufficient to determine the structures of three proteins (HIV-1 RT, influenza A endonuclease and proteinase K by single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD from single crystals. Both compounds are inexpensive, readily available, safe and very soluble in DMSO or water, allowing efficient soaking into crystals.

  14. One-step liquid phase chemical method to prepare carbon-based amorphous molybdenum sulfides: As the effective hydrogen evolution reaction catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Mengmeng; Wu, Qikang; Yu, Miaomiao; Wang, Yinling; Li, Maoguo

    2017-01-01

    Two different kinds of carbon-based amorphous molybdenum sulfide composite catalysts (activated carbon supported amorphous molybdenum sulfide and acetylene black supported amorphous molybdenum sulfide) had been prepared in a facile and scalable one-step liquid phase chemical method. The morphological and structural information of catalysts was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and it’s electro-catalytic HER activity were evaluated by linear sweep voltammetry(LSV), amperometric i-t technology and AC impedance technology. The as-prepared carbon-based amorphous molybdenum sulfides showed greatly enhanced electro-catalytic activity for HER compared with pure amorphous molybdenum sulfides. Especially, the nano-sized acetylene black supported molybdenum sulfide exhibited excellent electro-catalytic HER performances with a low onset potential of −116 mV versus reverse hydrogen electrode (RHE) and a small Tafel slope of 51 mV per decade.

  15. Metamorphosis of the mixed phase PtRu anode catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells after exposure of methanol: In situ and ex situ characterizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Debasish [Center for Individual Nanoparticle Functionality (CINF), Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Aerosol Laboratory, Nano.DTU, Department of Chemical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Chorkendorff, Ib [Center for Individual Nanoparticle Functionality (CINF), Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Johannessen, Tue [Aerosol Laboratory, Nano.DTU, Department of Chemical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2007-11-08

    The change in the mixed phase heavily oxidized PtRu anode with the exposure of methanol in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) has been investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The investigation had two major objectives: (i) to explore the original state of the active catalyst and (ii) to understand if alloying of Pt and Ru is a requirement for higher methanol oxidation activity. It was found that the methanol oxidation activity gradually improved for {proportional_to}2 h of exposure. The impedance spectra were taken at different times within this time of improvement of activity. The impedance spectra were deconvoluted in different contributions like membrane resistance (R{sub m}), charge transfer resistance (R{sub Ct}), adsorption resistance (R{sub ad}), and oxidation resistance (R{sub ox}). The improvement of the activity was explained in terms of the effect of the pretreatment on different contributions. XRD was done on the virgin and methanol exposed sample as a possible mean to identify the difference. It was postulated that the reduction of the as prepared PtRu after exposure was responsible for the activity improvement. Also, it was shown that bulk alloy formation is not a necessary condition for higher methanol activity of PtRu catalysts. (author)

  16. Identification of microfluidic two-phase flow patterns in lab-on-chip devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhaochu; Dong, Tao; Halvorsen, Einar

    2014-01-01

    This work describes a capacitive sensor for identification of microfluidic two-phase flow in lab-on-chip devices. With interdigital electrodes and thin insulation layer utilized, this sensor is capable of being integrated with the microsystems easily. Transducing principle and design considerations are presented with respect to the microfluidic gas/liquid flow patterns. Numerical simulation results verify the operational principle. And the factors affecting the performance of the sensor are discussed. Besides, a feasible process flow for the fabrication is also proposed.

  17. Phase identification of individual crystalline particles by combining EDX and EBSD: application to workplace aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ervik, Torunn Kringlen; Benker, Nathalie; Weinbruch, Stephan; Skogstad, Asbjørn; Thomassen, Yngvar; Ellingsen, Dag G; Berlinger, Balázs

    2018-04-01

    This paper discusses the combined use of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX) to identify unknown phases in particulate matter from different workplace aerosols. Particles of α-silicon carbide (α-SiC), manganese oxide (MnO) and α-quartz (α-SiO 2 ) were used to test the method. Phase identification of spherical manganese oxide particles from ferromanganese production, with diameter less than 200 nm, was unambiguous, and phases of both MnO and Mn 3 O 4 were identified in the same agglomerate. The same phases were identified by selected area electron diffraction (SAED) in transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The method was also used to identify the phases of different SiC fibres, and both β-SiC and α-SiC fibres were found. Our results clearly demonstrate that EBSD combined with EDX can be successfully applied to the characterisation of workplace aerosols. Graphical abstract Secondary electron image of an agglomerate of manganese oxide particles collected at a ferromanganese smelter (a). EDX spectrum of the particle highlighted by an arrow (b). Indexed patterns after dynamic background subtraction from three particles shown with numbers in a (c).

  18. Synthesis of cationic dibenzosemibullvalene-based phase-transfer catalysts by di-π-methane rearrangements of pyrrolinium-annelated dibenzobarrelene derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Luo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dibenzobarrelene derivatives, that are annelated with a pyrrolinium unit [N,N-dialkyl-3,4-(9',10'-dihydro-9',10'-anthraceno-3-pyrrolinium derivatives], undergo a photo-induced di-π-methane rearrangement upon triplet sensitization to give the corresponding cationic dibenzosemibullvalene derivatives [N,N-dialkyl-3,4-{8c,8e-(4b,8b-dihydrodibenzo[a,f]cyclopropa[cd]pentaleno}pyrrolidinium derivatives]. Whereas the covalent attachment of a benzophenone functionality to the pyrrolinium nitrogen atom did not result in an internal triplet sensitization, the introduction of a benzophenone unit as part of the counter ion enables the di-π-methane rearrangement of the dibenzobarrelene derivative in the solid-state. Preliminary experiments indicate that a cationic pyrrolidinium-annelated dibenzosemibullvalene may act as phase-transfer catalyst in alkylation reactions.

  19. {gamma} alumina- and HY zeolite-supported molybdenum catalysts: characterisation of the oxidic and sulfided phases; Catalyseurs a base de molybdene supporte sur alumine {gamma} et zeolithe HY: caracterisation des phases oxydes et sulfures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plazenet, G

    2001-10-01

    Oxidic precursors of hydro-treatment catalysts (Co)Mo/alumina or zeolite were characterised by Raman spectroscopy, NMR and EXAFS at the Mo and Co K-edges. The formation of an Anderson-type alumino-molybdate compound upon impregnation of the support with an ammonium hepta-molybdate solution was confirmed for alumina, and also observed for the HY zeolitic support, with consumption of the amorphous alumina of the zeolite. In absence of the latter, ammonium hepta-molybdate precipitates. The species are conserved upon drying; upon calcination, the alumino-molybdate evolves into a surface aluminium molybdate type phase, whereas the hepta-molybdate transforms into MoO{sub 3}. The species formed upon impregnation are located in the inter-granular porosity whereas MoO{sub 3} vapor-condensation leads to formation of dimers located inside the zeolitic structure. The study of the cobalt-promoted precursors showed that the evolution of the molybdenum is the same in the case of co-impregnation preparation. Impregnation with cobalt-molybdate prevents the formation of the alumino-molybdate anion and thus enables the preservation of the Mo-Co interaction but, whatever the precursor, the leveling effect of the calcination-re-hydration steps was demonstrated. An EXAFS study at different sulfur coverages of the MoS{sub 2} platelets in the alumina-supported sulfided catalysts showed the limitations of EXAFS for size determination of MoS{sub 2} crystallites, a parameter that can be reached by AWAXS, which also conveys information about sheet-stacking. The EXAFS study of sulfided (Co)Mo/HY systems revealed incomplete sulfidation of the samples and the very high dispersion of the active phase. The absence of an observable Mo-Co interaction whatever the preparation of the promoted catalysts is consistent with the absence of promoting effect in toluene hydrogenation. (author)

  20. STUDY OF IDENTIFICATION OF TWO-PHASE FLOW PARAMETERS BY PRESSURE FLUCTUATION ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondrej Burian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with identification of parameters of simple pool boiling in a vertical rectangular channel by analysis of pressure fluctuation. In this work is introduced a small experimental facility about 9 kW power, which was used for simulation of pool boiling phenomena and creation of steam-water volume. Several pressure fluctuations measurements and differential pressure fluctuations measurements at warious were carried out. Main changed parameters were power of heaters and hydraulics resistance of channel internals. Measured pressure data was statistically analysed and compared with goal to find dependencies between parameters of two-phase flow and statistical properties of pressure fluctuation. At the end of this paper are summarized final results and applicability of this method for parameters determination of two phase flow for pool boiling conditions at ambient pressure.

  1. A study on the isotopic exchange between hydrogen and water on a catalyst in the liquid phase; Etude de l'echange isotopique entre l'hydrogene et l'eau sur catalyseur en phase liquide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dirian, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Montarnal, R; Balaceanu, J C [Institut Francais du Petrole (IFP), 92 - Rueil-Malmaison (France)

    1958-07-01

    It is well known that catalytic exchange in the liquid phase offers many advantages over exchange in the gaseous phase; however the rate of reaction is much smaller in the former case. The object of the following work is to study the influence of the various parameters on which the reaction rate depends (pressure, temperature, concentration, agitation), to classify catalysts according to their activity and to determine the economic possibility of liquid phase exchange. (author) [French] Il est un fait bien connu que l'echange catalytique en phase liquide presente divers avantages, compare a l'echange en phase gazeuse; la vitesse de reaction est toute fois beaucoup plus faible que dans le premier cas. L'objet du present rapport est d'etudier l'influence des differents parametres agissant sur la vitesse de reaction (pression, temperature, concentration, agitation), de classer les catalyseurs en fonction de leur activite et d'evaluer les possibilites economiques de l'echange en phase liquide. (auteur)

  2. Reuse of Hydrotreating Spent Catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib, A.M.; Menoufy, M.F.; Amhed, S.H.

    2004-01-01

    All hydro treating catalysts used in petroleum refining processes gradually lose activity through coking, poisoning by metal, sulfur or halides or lose surface area from sintering at high process temperatures. Waste hydrotreating catalyst, which have been used in re-refining of waste lube oil at Alexandria Petroleum Company (after 5 years lifetime) compared with the same fresh catalyst were used in the present work. Studies are conducted on partial extraction of the active metals of spent catalyst (Mo and Ni) using three leaching solvents,4% oxidized oxalic acid, 10% aqueous sodium hydroxide and 10% citric acid. The leaching experiments are conducting on the de coked extrude [un crushed] spent catalyst samples. These steps are carried out in order to rejuvenate the spent catalyst to be reused in other reactions. The results indicated that 4% oxidized oxalic acid leaching solution gave total metal removal 45.6 for de coked catalyst samples while NaOH gave 35% and citric acid gave 31.9 % The oxidized leaching agent was the most efficient leaching solvent to facilitate the metal removal, and the rejuvenated catalyst was characterized by the unchanged crystalline phase The rejuvenated catalyst was applied for hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of vacuum gas oil as a feedstock, under different hydrogen pressure 20-80 bar in order to compare its HDS activity

  3. Toward stable nickel catalysts for aqueous phase reforming of biomass-derived feedstock under reducing and alkaline conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasterecht, van T.; Ludding, C.C.I.; Jong, de K.P.; Bitter, J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Nickel nanoparticles supported on carbon nanofibers (CNF) can be stabilized in aqueous phase processes at elevated temperatures and pressures by tuning the reaction conditions to control Ni oxidation and leaching. As a showcase, Ni/CNF was used for the production of hydrogen via aqueous phase

  4. 40 CFR 90.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress resistance... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a) The purpose of... catalyst conversion efficiency for Phase 1 engines. The thermal stress is imposed on the test catalyst by...

  5. Lunar CATALYST

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Lunar Cargo Transportation and Landing by Soft Touchdown (Lunar CATALYST) is a NASA initiative to encourage the development of U.S. private-sector robotic lunar...

  6. Shining X-rays on catalysts at work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunwaldt, J-D, E-mail: jdg@kt.dtu.d [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Building 229, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2009-11-15

    Structure-performance relationships gained by studying catalysts at work are considered the key to further development of catalysts underlined here by a brief overview on our research in this area. The partial oxidation of methane to hydrogen and carbon monoxide over Pt- and Rh-based catalysts and the total combustion of hydrocarbons demonstrate the importance of structural identification of catalysts in its working state and the measurement of the catalytic performance at the same time. Moreover, proper cell design is a key both here and in liquid phase reactions including preparation or high pressure reactions. In several cases structural changes during preparation, activation and reaction occur on a subminute scale or the catalyst structure varies inside a reactor as a result of temperature or concentration gradients. This, additionally, requires time and spatial resolution. Examples from time-resolved QEXAFS studies during the partial oxidation of methane over Pt- and Rh-based catalysts demonstrate some of the recent developments of the technique (use not only of Si(111) but also Si(311) crystals, angular encoder, full EXAFS spectra at subsecond recording time, and modulation excitation spectroscopy). In order to obtain spectroscopic information on the oxidation state inside a microreactor, scanning and full field X-ray microscopy with X-ray absorption spectroscopic contrast were achieved under reaction conditions. If a microbeam is applied, fast scanning techniques like QEXAFS are required. In this way, even X-ray absorption spectroscopic tomographic images of a slice of a microreactor were obtained. The studies were recently extended to spatiotemporal studies that give important insight into the dynamics of the catalyst structure in a spatial manner with subsecond time-resolution.

  7. Post-BEMUSE Reflood Model Input Uncertainty Methods (PREMIUM) Benchmark Phase II: Identification of Influential Parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovtonyuk, A.; Petruzzi, A.; D'Auria, F.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the Post-BEMUSE Reflood Model Input Uncertainty Methods (PREMIUM) benchmark is to progress on the issue of the quantification of the uncertainty of the physical models in system thermal-hydraulic codes by considering a concrete case: the physical models involved in the prediction of core reflooding. The PREMIUM benchmark consists of five phases. This report presents the results of Phase II dedicated to the identification of the uncertain code parameters associated with physical models used in the simulation of reflooding conditions. This identification is made on the basis of the Test 216 of the FEBA/SEFLEX programme according to the following steps: - identification of influential phenomena; - identification of the associated physical models and parameters, depending on the used code; - quantification of the variation range of identified input parameters through a series of sensitivity calculations. A procedure for the identification of potentially influential code input parameters has been set up in the Specifications of Phase II of PREMIUM benchmark. A set of quantitative criteria has been as well proposed for the identification of influential IP and their respective variation range. Thirteen participating organisations, using 8 different codes (7 system thermal-hydraulic codes and 1 sub-channel module of a system thermal-hydraulic code) submitted Phase II results. The base case calculations show spread in predicted cladding temperatures and quench front propagation that has been characterized. All the participants, except one, predict a too fast quench front progression. Besides, the cladding temperature time trends obtained by almost all the participants show oscillatory behaviour which may have numeric origins. Adopted criteria for identification of influential input parameters differ between the participants: some organisations used the set of criteria proposed in Specifications 'as is', some modified the quantitative thresholds

  8. Current injection phase thermography for low-velocity impact damage identification in composite laminates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grammatikos, S.A.; Kordatos, E.Z.; Matikas, T.E.; David, C.; Paipetis, A.S.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel Current injection phase thermography NDE method has been developed. • Blind impact damage has been successfully detected in composite laminates. • Carbon nanotubes enhance detection by improving of through thickness conductivity. • Detection is feasible with considerably less energy than for IR excited thermography. - Abstract: An innovative non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique is presented based on current stimulated thermography. Modulated electric current is injected to Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastics (CFRP) laminates as an external source of thermal excitation. Pulsed Phase Thermography (PPT) is concurrently employed to identify low velocity impact induced (LVI) damage. The efficiency of the proposed method is demonstrated for both plain and with Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) modified laminates, which are subjected to low-velocity impact damaged composite laminates at different energy levels. The presence of the nano reinforcing phase is important in achieving a uniform current flow along the laminate, as it improves the through thickness conductivity. The acquired thermographs are compared with optical PPT, C-scan images and Computer Tomography (CT) representations. The typical energy input for successful damage identification with current injection is three to four orders of magnitude less compared to the energy required for optical PPT

  9. Ru decorated carbon nanotubes - a promising catalyst for reforming bio-based acetic acid in the aqueous phase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vlieger, Dennis; Lefferts, Leonardus; Seshan, Kulathuiyer

    2014-01-01

    Catalytic reforming of biomass derived waste streams in the aqueous phase is a promising process for the production of sustainable hydrogen. Acetic acid will be a major component (up to 20 wt%) in many anticipated gasification feed streams (e.g. the aqueous fraction of pyrolysis oil). Conventional

  10. Development of monolith with a carbon-nanofiber-washcoat as a structured catalyst support in liquid phase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jarah nabeel abdul kareem amin, N.A.K.A.; Jarrah, Nabeel A.; van Ommen, J.G.; Lefferts, Leonardus

    2003-01-01

    Washcoats with improved mass transfer properties are necessary to circumvent concentration gradients in case of fast reactions in liquid phase, e.g. nitrate hydrogenation. A highly porous, high surface area (180 m2/g) and thin washcoat of carbon fibers, was produced on a monolith support by methane

  11. Unbalance Identification of Speed-Variant Rotary Machinery without Phase Angle Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Yue

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As rotary mechanical structure becomes more complicated, difficulty arises in receiving prime correction mass and optimum balancing plane efficiently. An innovative modal balancing process for estimating the residual unbalance from different equilibrium plane of complex flexible rotor system is presented. The method is based on a numerical approach with modal ratio among measurement points (MRMP coefficient and triple phase method (TPM. The veracity of calculation result is verified by an academic rotor model. The latter study in this paper is subsequently put forward through a power turbine rotor modeled by finite element method. Simulation results show that proper equilibrium plane performs commendably in recognizing residual unbalance and reducing the vibration effect through the critical region. Moreover, the inherent unbalance recognized by experimental data from a turbine rotor with slender shaft is found to be in certain difference under different counterweight combination. Choosing suitable balancing planes will improve the accuracy of unbalance identification.

  12. Rapid experimental SAD phasing and hot-spot identification with halogenated fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauman, Joseph D.; Harrison, Jerry Joe E. K.; Arnold, Eddy

    2016-01-01

    Through X-ray crystallographic fragment screening, 4-bromopyrazole was discovered to be a `magic bullet' that is capable of binding at many of the ligand `hot spots' found in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). The binding locations can be in pockets that are `hidden' in the unliganded crystal form, allowing rapid identification of these sites forin silicoscreening. In addition to hot-spot identification, this ubiquitous yet specific binding provides an avenue for X-ray crystallographic phase determination, which can be a significant bottleneck in the determination of the structures of novel proteins. The anomalous signal from 4-bromopyrazole or 4-iodopyrazole was sufficient to determine the structures of three proteins (HIV-1 RT, influenza A endonuclease and proteinase K) by single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD) from single crystals. Both compounds are inexpensive, readily available, safe and very soluble in DMSO or water, allowing efficient soaking into crystals.

  13. Flow Regime Identification of Co-Current Downward Two-Phase Flow With Neural Network Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiroshi Goda; Seungjin Kim; Ye Mi; Finch, Joshua P.; Mamoru Ishii; Jennifer Uhle

    2002-01-01

    Flow regime identification for an adiabatic vertical co-current downward air-water two-phase flow in the 25.4 mm ID and the 50.8 mm ID round tubes was performed by employing an impedance void meter coupled with the neural network classification approach. This approach minimizes the subjective judgment in determining the flow regimes. The signals obtained by an impedance void meter were applied to train the self-organizing neural network to categorize these impedance signals into a certain number of groups. The characteristic parameters set into the neural network classification included the mean, standard deviation and skewness of impedance signals in the present experiment. The classification categories adopted in the present investigation were four widely accepted flow regimes, viz. bubbly, slug, churn-turbulent, and annular flows. These four flow regimes were recognized based upon the conventional flow visualization approach by a high-speed motion analyzer. The resulting flow regime maps classified by the neural network were compared with the results obtained through the flow visualization method, and consequently the efficiency of the neural network classification for flow regime identification was demonstrated. (authors)

  14. Highly dispersed metal catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xin; West, William L.; Rhodes, William D.

    2016-11-08

    A supported catalyst having an atomic level single atom structure is provided such that substantially all the catalyst is available for catalytic function. A process of forming a single atom catalyst unto a porous catalyst support is also provided.

  15. Identification of liquid-phase decomposition species and reactions for guanidinium azotetrazolate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumbhakarna, Neeraj R.; Shah, Kaushal J.; Chowdhury, Arindrajit; Thynell, Stefan T.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Guanidinium azotetrazolate (GzT) is a high-nitrogen energetic material. • FTIR spectroscopy and ToFMS spectrometry were used for species identification. • Quantum mechanics was used to identify transition states and decomposition pathways. • Important reactions in the GzT liquid-phase decomposition process were identified. • Initiation of decomposition occurs via ring opening, releasing N 2 . - Abstract: The objective of this work is to analyze the decomposition of guanidinium azotetrazolate (GzT) in the liquid phase by using a combined experimental and computational approach. The experimental part involves the use of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to acquire the spectral transmittance of the evolved gas-phase species from rapid thermolysis, as well as to acquire spectral transmittance of the condensate and residue formed from the decomposition. Time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ToFMS) is also used to acquire mass spectra of the evolved gas-phase species. Sub-milligram samples of GzT were heated at rates of about 2000 K/s to a set temperature (553–573 K) where decomposition occurred under isothermal conditions. N 2 , NH 3 , HCN, guanidine and melamine were identified as products of decomposition. The computational approach is based on using quantum mechanics for confirming the identity of the species observed in experiments and for identifying elementary chemical reactions that formed these species. In these ab initio techniques, various levels of theory and basis sets were used. Based on the calculated enthalpy and free energy values of various molecular structures, important reaction pathways were identified. Initiation of decomposition of GzT occurs via ring opening to release N 2

  16. Agricultural production - Phase 2. Indonesia. Isolation of arboviruses, their identification and the identification of their culicoides vectors in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellor, P.S.

    1991-01-01

    The aims of the two-week mission were to provide assistance in studies to determine the incidence and importance of arbovirus infection in ruminants in Indonesia, specifically to help with identification of the vectors tat transmit bluetongue and related arbovirus infections, and to develop work plans for future studies under the project. The report contains detailed information on handling systems for Culicoides species, on identification of Culicoides to be used for viral isolation and on the isolation of virus from Culicoides

  17. Electronic Identification of the Parental Phases and Mesoscopic Phase Separation of K_{x}Fe_{2-y}Se_{2} Superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Chen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The nature of the parent compound of a high-temperature superconductor (HTS often plays a pivotal role in determining its superconductivity. The parent compounds of the cuprate HTSs are antiferromagnetically ordered Mott insulators, while those of the iron-pnictide HTSs are metals with spin-density-wave order. Here we report the electronic identification of two insulating parental phases and one semiconducting parental phase of the newly discovered family of K_{x}Fe_{2-y}Se_{2} superconductors. The two insulating phases exhibit Mott-insulator-like signatures, and one of the insulating phases is even present in the superconducting and semiconducting K_{x}Fe_{2-y}Se_{2} compounds. However, it is mesoscopically phase-separated from the superconducting or semiconducting phase. Moreover, we find that both the superconducting and semiconducting phases are free of the magnetic and vacancy orders present in the insulating phases, and that the electronic structure of the superconducting phase could be developed by doping the semiconducting phase with electrons. The rich electronic properties discovered in these parental phases of the K_{x}Fe_{2-y}Se_{2} superconductors provide the foundation for studying the anomalous behavior in this new class of iron-based superconductors.

  18. Identification and initial assessment of candidate BWR late-phase in-vessel accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.A.

    1991-01-01

    Work sponsored by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) to identify and perform preliminary assessments of candidate BWR [boiling water reactor] in-vessel accident management strategies was completed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during fiscal year 1990. Mitigative strategies for containment events have been the subject of a companion study at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The focus of this Oak Ridge effort was the development of new strategies for mitigation of the late phase events, that is, the events that would occur in-vessel after the onset of significant core damage. The work began with an investigation of the current status of BWR in-vessel accident management procedures and proceeded through a preliminary evaluation of several candidate new strategies. The steps leading to the identification of the candidate strategies are described. The four new candidate late-phase (in-vessel) accident mitigation strategies identified by this study and discussed in the report are: (1) keep the reactor vessel depressurized; (2) restore injection in a controlled manner; (3) inject boron if control blade damage has occurred; and (4) containment flooding to maintain core and structural debris in-vessel. Additional assessments of these strategies are proposed

  19. Use of Hydrogen Chemisorption and Ethylene Hydrogenation as Predictors for Aqueous Phase Reforming of Lactose over Ni@Pt and Co@Pt Bimetallic Overlayer Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Qinghua; Skoglund, Michael D.; Zhang, Chen; Morris, Allen R.; Holles, Joseph H.

    2016-10-20

    Overlayer Pt on Ni (Ni@Pt) or Co (Co@Pt) were synthesized and tested for H2 generation from APR of lactose. H2 chemisorption descriptor showed that Ni@Pt and Co@Pt overlayer catalysts had reduced H2 adsorption strength compared to a Pt only catalyst, which agree with computational predictions. The overlayer catalysts also demonstrated lower activity for ethylene hydrogenation than the Pt only catalyst, which likely resulted from decreased H2 binding strength decreasing the surface coverage of H2. XAS results showed that overlayer catalysts exhibited higher white line intensity than the Pt catalyst, which indicates a negative d-band shift for the Pt overlayer, further providing evidence for overlayer formation. Lactose APR studies showed that lactose can be used as feedstock to produce H2 and CO under desirable reaction conditions. The Pt active sites of Ni@Pt and Co@Pt overlayer catalysts showed significantly enhanced H2 production selectivity and activity when compared with that of a Pt only catalyst. The single deposition overlayer with the largest d-band shift showed the highest H2 activity. The results suggest that overlayer formation using directed deposition technique could modify the behavior of the surface metal and ultimately modify the APR activity.

  20. Application of phased array technology for identification of low frequency noise sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugo E. Camargo; Patricio A. Ravetta; Ricardo A. Burdisso; Adam K. Smith [NIOSH (United States)

    2009-12-15

    A study conducted by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) revealed that 90% of coal miners have hearing impairment by age 50, compared to only 10% of those not exposed to occupational noise. According to the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA), Continuous Mining Machine (CM) operators account for 30% of workers exposed to noise doses exceeding the Permissible Exposure Level (PEL). In this context, NIOSH is conducting research to identify and control dominant noise sources in CMs. Previous noise source identification was performed using a Bruel & Kjaer (B&K) 1.92-m diameter, 42-microphone phased array. These measurements revealed that the impacts from the conveyor chain onto the tail roller, and the impacts from the conveyor chain onto the upper deck are the dominant noise sources at the tail-section of the CM. The objectives of the work presented in this paper were: (1) To rank the noise radiated by the different sections of the conveyor, and (2) to determine the effect of a urethane-coated tail roller on the noise radiated by the tail-section. This test was conducted using an Acoustical and Vibrations Engineering Consultants (AVEC) 3.5-m diameter, 121-microphone phased array. The results from this new test show that a urethane-coated tail roller yields reductions in the tail-section of 2 to 8 dB in Sound Pressure Level in the frequency range of 1 kHz to 5 kHz. However, integration of the acoustic maps shows that the front-section and mid-section of the conveyor also contain dominant noise sources. Therefore, a urethane-coated tail roller in combination with a chain with urethane-coated flights that reduces the noise sources in the front and mid sections of the conveyor is required to yield a significant noise reduction on the CM operator's overall exposure. These results show the applicability of phased array technology for low frequency noise source identification.

  1. Determination of benzo[a]pyrene in edible oils using phase-transfer-catalyst-assisted saponification and supramolecular solvent microextraction coupled to HPLC with fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Liu, Laping; Shi, Ludi; Yi, Tingquan; Wen, Yuxia; Wang, Juanli; Liu, Shuhui

    2017-01-01

    For the analysis of edible oils, saponification is well known as a useful method for eliminating oil matrices. The conventional approach is conducted with alcoholic alkali; it consumes a large volume of organic solvents and impedes the retrieval of analytes by microextraction. In this study, a low-organic-solvent-consuming method has been developed for the analysis of benzo[a]pyrene in edible oils by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. Sample treatment involves aqueous alkaline saponification, assisted by a phase-transfer catalyst, and selective in situ extraction of the analyte with a supramolecular solvent. Comparison of the chromatograms of the oil extracts obtained by different microextraction methods showed that the supramolecular solvent has a better clean-up effect for the unsaponifiable matter from oil matrices. The method offered excellent linearity over a range of 0.03- 5.0 ng mL -1 (r > 0.999). Recovery rates varied from 94 to 102% (RSDs <5.0%). The detection limit and quantification limit were 0.06 and 0.19 μg kg -1 , respectively. The proposed method was applied for the analysis of 52 edible oils collected online in China; the analyte contents of 23 tested oil samples exceeded the maximum limit of 2 μg kg -1 for benzo[a]pyrene set by the Commission Regulation of the European Union. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Autothermal reforming catalyst having perovskite structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumpel, Michael [Naperville, IL; Liu, Di-Jia [Naperville, IL

    2009-03-24

    The invention addressed two critical issues in fuel processing for fuel cell application, i.e. catalyst cost and operating stability. The existing state-of-the-art fuel reforming catalyst uses Rh and platinum supported over refractory oxide which add significant cost to the fuel cell system. Supported metals agglomerate under elevated temperature during reforming and decrease the catalyst activity. The catalyst is a perovskite oxide or a Ruddlesden-Popper type oxide containing rare-earth elements, catalytically active firs row transition metal elements, and stabilizing elements, such that the catalyst is a single phase in high temperature oxidizing conditions and maintains a primarily perovskite or Ruddlesden-Popper structure under high temperature reducing conditions. The catalyst can also contain alkaline earth dopants, which enhance the catalytic activity of the catalyst, but do not compromise the stability of the perovskite structure.

  3. Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis: Influence of CO Conversion on Selectivities H2/CO Usage Ratios and Catalyst Stability for a 0.27 percent Ru 25 percent Co/Al2O3 using a Slurry Phase Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W Ma; G Jacobs; Y Ji; T Bhatelia; D Bukur; S Khalid; B Davis

    2011-12-31

    The effect of CO conversion on hydrocarbon selectivities (i.e., CH{sub 4}, C{sub 5+}, olefin and paraffin), H{sub 2}/CO usage ratios, CO{sub 2} selectivity, and catalyst stability over a wide range of CO conversion (12-94%) on 0.27%Ru-25%Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst was studied under the conditions of 220 C, 1.5 MPa, H{sub 2}/CO feed ratio of 2.1 and gas space velocities of 0.3-15 NL/g-cat/h in a 1-L continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR). Catalyst samples were withdrawn from the CSTR at different CO conversion levels, and Co phases (Co, CoO) in the slurry samples were characterized by XANES, and in the case of the fresh catalysts, EXAFS as well. Ru was responsible for increasing the extent of Co reduction, thus boosting the active site density. At 1%Ru loading, EXAFS indicates that coordination of Ru at the atomic level was virtually solely with Co. It was found that the selectivities to CH{sub 4}, C{sub 5+}, and CO{sub 2} on the Co catalyst are functions of CO conversion. At high CO conversions, i.e. above 80%, CH{sub 4} selectivity experienced a change in the trend, and began to increase, and CO{sub 2} selectivity experienced a rapid increase. H{sub 2}/CO usage ratio and olefin content were found to decrease with increasing CO conversion in the range of 12-94%. The observed results are consistent with water reoxidation of Co during FTS at high conversion. XANES spectroscopy of used catalyst samples displayed spectra consistent with the presence of more CoO at higher CO conversion levels.

  4. Non-destructive identification of unknown minor phases in polycrystalline bulk alloys using three-dimensional X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yiming, E-mail: yangyiming1988@outlook.com [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xu, Liang [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wang, Yudan; Du, Guohao [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Yang, Sam [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Melbourne, VIC 3168 (Australia); Xiao, Tiqiao, E-mail: tqxiao@sinap.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2017-02-15

    Minor phases make considerable contributions to the mechanical and physical properties of metals and alloys. Unfortunately, it is difficult to identify unknown minor phases in a bulk polycrystalline material using conventional metallographic methods. Here, a non-destructive method based on three-dimensional X-ray diffraction (3DXRD) is developed to solve this problem. Simulation results demonstrate that this method is simultaneously able to identify minor phase grains and reveal their positions, orientations and sizes within bulk alloys. According to systematic simulations, the 3DXRD method is practicable for an extensive sample set, including polycrystalline alloys with hexagonal, orthorhombic and cubic minor phases. Experiments were also conducted to confirm the simulation results. The results for a bulk sample of aluminum alloy AA6061 show that the crystal grains of an unexpected γ-Fe (austenite) phase can be identified, three-dimensionally and nondestructively. Therefore, we conclude that the 3DXRD method is a powerful tool for the identification of unknown minor phases in bulk alloys belonging to a variety of crystal systems. This method also has the potential to be used for in situ observations of the effects of minor phases on the crystallographic behaviors of alloys. - Highlights: •A method based on 3DXRD is developed for identification of unknown minor phase. •Grain position, orientation and size, is simultaneously acquired. •A systematic simulation demonstrated the applicability of the proposed method. •Experimental results on a AA6061 sample confirmed the practicability of the method.

  5. Oxidation catalysts on alkaline earth supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohajeri, Nahid

    2017-03-21

    An oxidation catalyst includes a support including particles of an alkaline earth salt, and first particles including a palladium compound on the support. The oxidation catalyst can also include precious metal group (PMG) metal particles in addition to the first particles intermixed together on the support. A gas permeable polymer that provides a continuous phase can completely encapsulate the particles and the support. The oxidation catalyst may be used as a gas sensor, where the first particles are chemochromic particles.

  6. Sputtered catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyerman, W.J.R.

    1978-01-01

    A method is described for preparing a supported catalyst by a sputtering process. A material that is catalytic, or which is a component of a catalytic system, is sputtered on to the surface of refractory oxide particles that are compatible with the sputtered material and the sputtered particles are consolidated into aggregate form. The oxide particles before sputtering should have a diameter in the range 1000A to 50μ and a porosity less than 0.4 ml/g, and may comprise MgO, Al 2 O 3 or SiO 2 or mixtures of these oxides, including hydraulic cement. The particles may possess catalytic activity by themselves or in combination with the catalytic material deposited on them. Sputtering may be effected epitaxially and consolidation may be effected by compaction pelleting, extrusion or spray drying of a slurry. Examples of the use of such catalysts are given. (U.K.)

  7. Mechanistic Study of the Gas-Phase In-Source Hofmann Elimination of Doubly Quaternized Cinchona-Alkaloid Based Phase-Transfer Catalysts by (+)-Electrospray Ionization/Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rong-Sheng; Sheng, Huaming; Lexa, Katrina W.; Sherer, Edward C.; Zhang, Li-Kang; Xiang, Bangping; Helmy, Roy; Mao, Bing

    2017-03-01

    An unusual in-source fragmentation pattern observed for 14 doubly quaternized cinchona alkaloid-based phase-transfer catalysts (PTC) was studied using (+)-ESI high resolution mass spectrometry. Loss of the substituted benzyl cation (R1 or R2) was found to be the major product ion [M2+ - R1 + or R2 +]+ in MS spectra of all PTC compounds. A Hofmann elimination product ion [M - H]+ was also observed. Only a small amount of the doubly charged M2+ ions were observed in the MS spectra, likely due to strong Columbic repulsion between the two quaternary ammonium cations in the gas phase. The positive voltage in the MS inlet but not the ESI probe was found to induce this extensive fragmentation for all PTC diboromo-salts. Compound 1 was used as an example to illustrate the proposed in-source fragmentation mechanism. The mechanism of formation of the Hofmann elimination product ion [M - H]+ was further investigated using HRMS/MS, H/D exchange, and DFT calculations. The proposed formation of 2b as the major Hofmann elimination product ion was supported both by HRMS/MS and DFT calculations. Formation of product ion 2b through a concerted unimolecular Ei elimination pathway is proposed rather than a bimolecular E2 elimination pathway for common solution Hofmann eliminations.

  8. Mechanistic Study of the Gas-Phase In-Source Hofmann Elimination of Doubly Quaternized Cinchona-Alkaloid Based Phase-Transfer Catalysts by (+)-Electrospray Ionization/Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rong-Sheng; Sheng, Huaming; Lexa, Katrina W; Sherer, Edward C; Zhang, Li-Kang; Xiang, Bangping; Helmy, Roy; Mao, Bing

    2017-03-01

    An unusual in-source fragmentation pattern observed for 14 doubly quaternized cinchona alkaloid-based phase-transfer catalysts (PTC) was studied using (+)-ESI high resolution mass spectrometry. Loss of the substituted benzyl cation (R1 or R2) was found to be the major product ion [M 2+ - R 1 + or R 2 + ] + in MS spectra of all PTC compounds. A Hofmann elimination product ion [M - H] + was also observed. Only a small amount of the doubly charged M 2+ ions were observed in the MS spectra, likely due to strong Columbic repulsion between the two quaternary ammonium cations in the gas phase. The positive voltage in the MS inlet but not the ESI probe was found to induce this extensive fragmentation for all PTC diboromo-salts. Compound 1 was used as an example to illustrate the proposed in-source fragmentation mechanism. The mechanism of formation of the Hofmann elimination product ion [M - H] + was further investigated using HRMS/MS, H/D exchange, and DFT calculations. The proposed formation of 2b as the major Hofmann elimination product ion was supported both by HRMS/MS and DFT calculations. Formation of product ion 2b through a concerted unimolecular E i elimination pathway is proposed rather than a bimolecular E2 elimination pathway for common solution Hofmann eliminations. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  9. Simple and reliable identification of the human round spermatid by inverted phase-contrast microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheyen, G; Crabbé, E; Joris, H; Van Steirteghem, A

    1998-06-01

    Based on the results of animal studies, round spermatid injection (ROSI) has been introduced into the clinical practice of several in-vitro fertilization (IVF) centres. The efficiency of this procedure in terms of fertilization rates and pregnancy rates, however, remains very poor. An essential aspect which does not receive enough attention is the correct identification of this type of round cell within a heterogeneous population of testicular cells. A Nikon inverted microscope equipped with phase-contrast optics (DLL) provided a clear image which allowed reliable recognition of round spermatids in cell suspensions smeared at the glass bottom of the dish. Fluorescent in-situ hybridization confirmed the haploid status of the selected cells. However, exploration of several biopsies from patients with non-obstructive azoospermia showing no spermatozoa after extensive search did not reveal any round spermatids. This observation questions whether enough effort is spent on searching for mature spermatozoa or late spermatids. Experimental investigations should precede the introduction of ROSI into the clinical practice of any IVF centre.

  10. Identification and fingerprinting of biodiesel blends by solid phase extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Z. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Emergencies Science and Technology Section, Emergencies, Operational Analytical Laboratories and Research Support Division; China Univ. of Geosciences, Wuhan (China). School of Environmental Studies; Hollebone, B.; Wang, Z.; Yang, C.; Landriault, M. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Emergencies Science and Technology Section, Emergencies, Operational Analytical Laboratories and Research Support Division

    2009-07-01

    Interest in biodiesel as a replacement for petroleum diesel fuel is growing. In North America, biodiesels are produced by the methyl esterification of plant and animal triglycerides, resulting in complex mixtures composed of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs). It is important for both environmental forensic and remediation purposes to determine diesel and biodiesel origins, and the biodiesel content when it is blended with conventional petroleum diesel. This paper reported on a study that combined 2 methods to determine biodiesel levels in blended fuels. Micro-column fractionation of FAMEs involving solid phase extraction (SPE) was combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to achieve detailed chemical fingerprinting of blends, including the identification and quantification of individual aliphatic hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons, fatty acid alkyl esters, and free sterols. Fractionation of the fuel samples was optimized for separation of fatty acid esters, free sterols from petroleum hydrocarbons into 4 fractions, notably aliphatic, aromatic, fatty-acid ester and polar components. A sum of the FAME components was used to determine an unknown blend level in freshly-prepared samples. This study showed that this method has great potential for identifying biodiesel in diesel fuel blends and could form the basis of a method for biodiesel-contaminated environmental samples. 28 refs., 5 tabs., 4 figs.

  11. Identification and fingerprinting of biodiesel blends by solid phase extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Z.; China Univ. of Geosciences, Wuhan; Hollebone, B.; Wang, Z.; Yang, C.; Landriault, M.

    2009-01-01

    Interest in biodiesel as a replacement for petroleum diesel fuel is growing. In North America, biodiesels are produced by the methyl esterification of plant and animal triglycerides, resulting in complex mixtures composed of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs). It is important for both environmental forensic and remediation purposes to determine diesel and biodiesel origins, and the biodiesel content when it is blended with conventional petroleum diesel. This paper reported on a study that combined 2 methods to determine biodiesel levels in blended fuels. Micro-column fractionation of FAMEs involving solid phase extraction (SPE) was combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to achieve detailed chemical fingerprinting of blends, including the identification and quantification of individual aliphatic hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons, fatty acid alkyl esters, and free sterols. Fractionation of the fuel samples was optimized for separation of fatty acid esters, free sterols from petroleum hydrocarbons into 4 fractions, notably aliphatic, aromatic, fatty-acid ester and polar components. A sum of the FAME components was used to determine an unknown blend level in freshly-prepared samples. This study showed that this method has great potential for identifying biodiesel in diesel fuel blends and could form the basis of a method for biodiesel-contaminated environmental samples. 28 refs., 5 tabs., 4 figs.

  12. Clays as green catalysts in the cholesterol esterification: spectroscopic characterization and polymorphs identification by thermal analysis methods. An interdisciplinary laboratorial proposal for the undergraduate level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maria, Teresa M R.; Nunes, Rui M. D.; Pereira, Mariette M.; Eusebio, M. Ermelinda S.

    2009-01-01

    A laboratory experiment that enables the professor to introduce the problematic of sustainable development in pharmaceutical chemistry to undergraduate students is proposed, using a simple synthetic procedure. Cholesteryl acetate is prepared by the esterification of cholesterol using Montmorillonite K10 as heterogeneous catalyst. Cholesterol and cholesteryl acetate are characterized by spectroscopic ( 1 H RMN, 13 C RMN, FTIR) and thermal analysis techniques. The thermal methods are used to introduce the concepts of polymorphism and the nature of mesophases. (author)

  13. Ultrathin 1T-phase MoS2 nanosheets decorated hollow carbon microspheres as highly efficient catalysts for solar energy harvesting and storage

    KAUST Repository

    Hsiao, Min-Chien

    2017-02-08

    The composite of MoS2 and hollow carbon sphere (MoS2@HCS) is prepared via a glucose-assisted one pot synthesis. The composite consists of hierarchical spheres with a diameter of 0.5–4 μm and these hollow spheres are decorated with a number of curled and interlaced MoS2 nanosheets. After the composite is subject to the lithium intercalation, the MoS2 is converted from 2H to 1T phase. In this current work, the activities of 1T-MoS2@HCS toward photocatalytic hydrogen evolution and the reduction of I3− in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) are systemically investigated. When evaluated as the photocatalyst for hydrogen evolution, the amount of evolved hydrogen over 1T-MoS2@HCS can reach 143 μmol in 2 h, being 3.6 times higher than as-synthesized 2H-MoS2@HCS. Additionally, the 1T-MoS2@HCS can be employed as the counter electrode (CE) material in DSCs. The DSCs based on 1T-MoS2@HCS CE possesses the power conversion efficiency of 8.94%, being higher than that with 2H-MoS2@HCS CE (8.16%) and comparable to that with Pt CE (8.87%). Our study demonstrates that 1T-MoS2@HCS has a great potential as an inexpensive alternative to Pt catalysts.

  14. Ultrathin 1T-phase MoS2 nanosheets decorated hollow carbon microspheres as highly efficient catalysts for solar energy harvesting and storage

    KAUST Repository

    Hsiao, Min-Chien; Chang, Chin-Yu; Niu, Li-Juan; Bai, Feng; Li, Lain-Jong; Shen, Hsin-Hui; Lin, Jeng-Yu; Lin, Tsung-Wu

    2017-01-01

    The composite of MoS2 and hollow carbon sphere (MoS2@HCS) is prepared via a glucose-assisted one pot synthesis. The composite consists of hierarchical spheres with a diameter of 0.5–4 μm and these hollow spheres are decorated with a number of curled and interlaced MoS2 nanosheets. After the composite is subject to the lithium intercalation, the MoS2 is converted from 2H to 1T phase. In this current work, the activities of 1T-MoS2@HCS toward photocatalytic hydrogen evolution and the reduction of I3− in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) are systemically investigated. When evaluated as the photocatalyst for hydrogen evolution, the amount of evolved hydrogen over 1T-MoS2@HCS can reach 143 μmol in 2 h, being 3.6 times higher than as-synthesized 2H-MoS2@HCS. Additionally, the 1T-MoS2@HCS can be employed as the counter electrode (CE) material in DSCs. The DSCs based on 1T-MoS2@HCS CE possesses the power conversion efficiency of 8.94%, being higher than that with 2H-MoS2@HCS CE (8.16%) and comparable to that with Pt CE (8.87%). Our study demonstrates that 1T-MoS2@HCS has a great potential as an inexpensive alternative to Pt catalysts.

  15. Automatic feed phase identification in multivariate bioprocess profiles by sequential binary classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikzad-Langerodi, Ramin; Lughofer, Edwin; Saminger-Platz, Susanne; Zahel, Thomas; Sagmeister, Patrick; Herwig, Christoph

    2017-08-22

    In this paper, we propose a new strategy for retrospective identification of feed phases from online sensor-data enriched feed profiles of an Escherichia Coli (E. coli) fed-batch fermentation process. In contrast to conventional (static), data-driven multi-class machine learning (ML), we exploit process knowledge in order to constrain our classification system yielding more parsimonious models compared to static ML approaches. In particular, we enforce unidirectionality on a set of binary, multivariate classifiers trained to discriminate between adjacent feed phases by linking the classifiers through a one-way switch. The switch is activated when the actual classifier output changes. As a consequence, the next binary classifier in the classifier chain is used for the discrimination between the next feed phase pair etc. We allow activation of the switch only after a predefined number of consecutive predictions of a transition event in order to prevent premature activation of the switch and undertake a sensitivity analysis regarding the optimal choice of the (time) lag parameter. From a complexity/parsimony perspective the benefit of our approach is three-fold: i) The multi-class learning task is broken down into binary subproblems which usually have simpler decision surfaces and tend to be less susceptible to the class-imbalance problem. ii) We exploit the fact that the process follows a rigid feed cycle structure (i.e. batch-feed-batch-feed) which allows us to focus on the subproblems involving phase transitions as they occur during the process while discarding off-transition classifiers and iii) only one binary classifier is active at the time which keeps effective model complexity low. We further use a combination of logistic regression and Lasso (i.e. regularized logistic regression, RLR) as a wrapper to extract the most relevant features for individual subproblems from the whole set of high-dimensional sensor data. We train different soft computing classifiers

  16. Wireless Hybrid Identification and Sensing Platform for Equipment Recovery (WHISPER), Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Systems & Technologies proposed WHISPER (Wireless Hybrid Identification and Sensing Platform for Equipment Recovery) solution to NASA's need for...

  17. Wireless Hybrid Identification and Sensing Platform for Equipment Recovery (WHISPER), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Systems & Technologies proposed WHISPER (Wireless Hybrid Identification and Sensing Platform for Equipment Recovery) solution to NASA's need for...

  18. Heterogeneous catalysis in liquid-phase oxidation of olefin--2. Dependence of the structure of vanadium-chromium binary oxide catalyst for oxidation of cyclohexene on the method of preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takehira, K; Hayakawa, T; Ishikawa, T

    1978-01-01

    Dependence of the structure of vanadium-chromium binary oxide catalyst for oxidation of cyclohexene on the method of preparation was studied in an extension of previous work by using three series of binary oxide catalysts, D, E, and F, which were prepared by coprecipitation from acidic, neutral, and alkaline media, respectively. The specific activity at 60/sup 0/C, 1 atm oxygen, and benzene solvent decreased in the order D > E > F, but all three series showed maximum activity at 90% chromium. The selectivity for epoxide also followed the order D > E > F, but the maximum selectivity occurred at 50% chromium for D, 75% for E, and 90% for F. Comparison of these results with X-ray diffraction and ESR spectral structural analysis of the various chromium(III) vanadate phases supported the previously proposed mechanism, with cyclohexene autoxidation initiated by free radical decomposition of cyclohexene hydroperoxide occurring on a different type of active site.

  19. Phase identification of quasi-periodic flow measured by particle image velocimetry with a low sampling rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Chong; Wang, Hongping; Wang, Jinjun

    2013-01-01

    This work mainly deals with the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) time coefficient method used for extracting phase information from quasi-periodic flow. The mathematical equivalence between this method and the traditional cross-correlation method is firstly proved. A two-dimensional circular cylinder wake flow measured by time-resolved particle image velocimetry within a range of Reynolds numbers is then used to evaluate the reliability of this method. The effect of both the sampling rate and Reynolds number on the identification accuracy is finally discussed. It is found that the POD time coefficient method provides a convenient alternative for phase identification, whose feasibility in low-sampling-rate measurement has additional advantages for experimentalists. (paper)

  20. Phase identification and internal stress analysis of steamside oxides on superheater tubes by means of X-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantleon, Karen; Montgomery, Melanie

    Steamside oxides formed on plant exposed superheated tubes were investigated using X-ray diffraction. Phase identification and stress analysis revealed that on ferritic X20CrMoV12-1 pure Hematite and pure Magnetite formed and both phases are under tensile stress. IN contrast, on austenitic TP347H...... Mn-, Cr- and/or Ni-containing oxides are observed, instead of pure Magnetite, underneath a pure Hematite surface layer. Oxides on the austenitic steel are under compressive stress or even stress-free....

  1. Using artificial intelligence to improve identification of nanofluid gas–liquid two-phase flow pattern in mini-channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Xiao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This work combines fuzzy logic and a support vector machine (SVM with a principal component analysis (PCA to create an artificial-intelligence system that identifies nanofluid gas-liquid two-phase flow states in a vertical mini-channel. Flow-pattern recognition requires finding the operational details of the process and doing computer simulations and image processing can be used to automate the description of flow patterns in nanofluid gas-liquid two-phase flow. This work uses fuzzy logic and a SVM with PCA to improve the accuracy with which the flow pattern of a nanofluid gas-liquid two-phase flow is identified. To acquire images of nanofluid gas-liquid two-phase flow patterns of flow boiling, a high-speed digital camera was used to record four different types of flow-pattern images, namely annular flow, bubbly flow, churn flow, and slug flow. The textural features extracted by processing the images of nanofluid gas–liquid two-phase flow patterns are used as inputs to various identification schemes such as fuzzy logic, SVM, and SVM with PCA to identify the type of flow pattern. The results indicate that the SVM with reduced characteristics of PCA provides the best identification accuracy and requires less calculation time than the other two schemes. The data reported herein should be very useful for the design and operation of industrial applications.

  2. Using artificial intelligence to improve identification of nanofluid gas-liquid two-phase flow pattern in mini-channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jian; Luo, Xiaoping; Feng, Zhenfei; Zhang, Jinxin

    2018-01-01

    This work combines fuzzy logic and a support vector machine (SVM) with a principal component analysis (PCA) to create an artificial-intelligence system that identifies nanofluid gas-liquid two-phase flow states in a vertical mini-channel. Flow-pattern recognition requires finding the operational details of the process and doing computer simulations and image processing can be used to automate the description of flow patterns in nanofluid gas-liquid two-phase flow. This work uses fuzzy logic and a SVM with PCA to improve the accuracy with which the flow pattern of a nanofluid gas-liquid two-phase flow is identified. To acquire images of nanofluid gas-liquid two-phase flow patterns of flow boiling, a high-speed digital camera was used to record four different types of flow-pattern images, namely annular flow, bubbly flow, churn flow, and slug flow. The textural features extracted by processing the images of nanofluid gas-liquid two-phase flow patterns are used as inputs to various identification schemes such as fuzzy logic, SVM, and SVM with PCA to identify the type of flow pattern. The results indicate that the SVM with reduced characteristics of PCA provides the best identification accuracy and requires less calculation time than the other two schemes. The data reported herein should be very useful for the design and operation of industrial applications.

  3. An introduction to catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Hak Je

    1988-11-01

    This book explains basic conception of catalyst such as definition, velocity of chemical reaction and velocity of catalyst reaction, absorption with absorption energy and chemical absorption, pore structure with the role of pore and measurement of pore structure, catalyst activity on solid structure, electrical property on catalyst activity, choice and design of catalyst, catalytic reaction with reaction velocity and chemical equilibrium and reaction velocity model, measurement of reaction velocity and material analysis, catalyst for mixed compound, catalyst for solid acid and catalyst for supported metal.

  4. Novel Reforming Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfefferle, Lisa D; Haller, Gary L

    2012-10-16

    Aqueous phase reforming is useful for processing oxygenated hydrocarbons to hydrogen and other more useful products. Current processing is hampered by the fact that oxide based catalysts are not stable under high temperature hydrothermal conditions. Silica in the form of structured MCM-41 is thermally a more stable support for Co and Ni than conventional high surface area amorphous silica but hydrothermal stability is not demonstrated. Carbon nanotube supports, in contrast, are highly stable under hydrothermal reaction conditions. In this project we show that carbon nanotubes are stable high activity/selectivity supports for the conversion of ethylene glycol to hydrogen.

  5. Identification of phase-II metabolites of flavonoids by liquid chromatography-ion-mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalet, Clément; Hollebrands, Boudewijn; Janssen, Hans-Gerd; Augustijns, Patrick; Duchateau, Guus

    2018-01-01

    Flavonoids are a class of natural compounds with a broad range of potentially beneficial health properties. They are subjected to an extensive intestinal phase-II metabolism, i.e., conjugation to glucuronic acid, sulfate, and methyl groups. Flavonoids and their metabolites can interact with drug transporters and thus interfere with drug absorption, causing food-drug interactions. The site of metabolism plays a key role in the activity, but the identification of the various metabolites remains a challenge. Here, we developed an analytical method to identify the phase-II metabolites of structurally similar flavonoids. We used liquid chromatography-ion-mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (LC-IMS-MS) analysis to identify phase-II metabolites of flavonols, flavones, and catechins produced by HT29 cells. We showed that IMS could bring valuable structural information on the different positional isomers of the flavonols and flavones. The position of the glucuronide moiety had a strong influence on the collision cross section (CCS) of the metabolites, with only minor contribution of hydroxyl and methyl moieties. For the catechins, fragmentation data obtained from MS/MS analysis appeared more useful than IMS to determine the structure of the metabolites, mostly due to the high number of metabolites formed. Nevertheless, CCS information as a molecular fingerprint proved to be useful to identify peaks from complex mixtures. LC-IMS-MS thus appears as a valuable tool for the identification of phase-II metabolites of flavonoids. Graphical abstract Structural identification of phase-II metabolites of flavonoids using LC-IMS-MS.

  6. Molecular metal catalysts on supports: organometallic chemistry meets surface science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serna, Pedro; Gates, Bruce C

    2014-08-19

    -support bonding and structure, which identify the supports as ligands with electron-donor properties that influence reactivity and catalysis. Each of the catalyst design variables has been varied independently, illustrated by mononuclear and tetranuclear iridium on zeolite HY and on MgO and by isostructural rhodium and iridium (diethylene or dicarbonyl) complexes on these supports. The data provide examples resolving the roles of the catalyst design variables and place the catalysis science on a firm foundation of organometallic chemistry linked with surface science. Supported molecular catalysts offer the advantages of characterization in the absence of solvents and with surface-science methods that do not require ultrahigh vacuum. Families of supported metal complexes have been made by replacement of ligands with others from the gas phase. Spectroscopically identified catalytic reaction intermediates help to elucidate catalyst performance and guide design. The methods are illustrated for supported complexes and clusters of rhodium, iridium, osmium, and gold used to catalyze reactions of small molecules that facilitate identification of the ligands present during catalysis: alkene dimerization and hydrogenation, H-D exchange in the reaction of H2 with D2, and CO oxidation. The approach is illustrated with the discovery of a highly active and selective MgO-supported rhodium carbonyl dimer catalyst for hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene to give butenes.

  7. Zircon Supported Copper Catalysts for the Steam Reforming of Methanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widiastri, M.; Fendy, Marsih, I. N.

    2008-03-01

    Steam reforming of methanol (SRM) is known as one of the most favorable catalytic processes for producing hydrogen. Current research on zirconia, ZrO2 supported copper catalyst revealed that CuO/ZrO2 as an active catalyst for the SRM. Zircon, ZrSiO4 is available from the by-product of tin mining. In the work presented here, the catalytic properties of CuO/ZrSiO4 with various copper oxide compositions ranging from 2.70% (catalyst I), 4.12% (catalyst II), and 7.12%-mass (catalyst III), synthesized by an incipient wetness impregnation technique, were investigated to methanol conversion, selectivity towards CO formation, and effect of ZnO addition (7.83%CuO/8.01%ZnO/ZrSiO4 = catalyst V). The catalytic activity was obtained using a fixed bed reactor and the zircon supported catalyst activity was compared to those of CuO/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst (catalyst IV) and commercial Kujang LTSC catalyst. An X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) analysis was done to identify the abundant phases of the catalysts. The catalysts topography and particle diameter were measured with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and composition of the catalysts was measured by SEM-EDX, scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive using X-ray analysis. The results of this research provide information on the possibility of using zircon (ZrSiO4) as solid support for SRM catalysts.

  8. Context based mixture model for cell phase identification in automated fluorescence microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Xiaobo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Automated identification of cell cycle phases of individual live cells in a large population captured via automated fluorescence microscopy technique is important for cancer drug discovery and cell cycle studies. Time-lapse fluorescence microscopy images provide an important method to study the cell cycle process under different conditions of perturbation. Existing methods are limited in dealing with such time-lapse data sets while manual analysis is not feasible. This paper presents statistical data analysis and statistical pattern recognition to perform this task. Results The data is generated from Hela H2B GFP cells imaged during a 2-day period with images acquired 15 minutes apart using an automated time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. The patterns are described with four kinds of features, including twelve general features, Haralick texture features, Zernike moment features, and wavelet features. To generate a new set of features with more discriminate power, the commonly used feature reduction techniques are used, which include Principle Component Analysis (PCA, Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA, Maximum Margin Criterion (MMC, Stepwise Discriminate Analysis based Feature Selection (SDAFS, and Genetic Algorithm based Feature Selection (GAFS. Then, we propose a Context Based Mixture Model (CBMM for dealing with the time-series cell sequence information and compare it to other traditional classifiers: Support Vector Machine (SVM, Neural Network (NN, and K-Nearest Neighbor (KNN. Being a standard practice in machine learning, we systematically compare the performance of a number of common feature reduction techniques and classifiers to select an optimal combination of a feature reduction technique and a classifier. A cellular database containing 100 manually labelled subsequence is built for evaluating the performance of the classifiers. The generalization error is estimated using the cross validation technique. The

  9. An Intelligent QoS Identification for Untrustworthy Web Services Via Two-phase Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Weidong; Wang, Liqiang; Lu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    QoS identification for untrustworthy Web services is critical in QoS management in the service computing since the performance of untrustworthy Web services may result in QoS downgrade. The key issue is to intelligently learn the characteristics of trustworthy Web services from different QoS levels, then to identify the untrustworthy ones according to the characteristics of QoS metrics. As one of the intelligent identification approaches, deep neural network has emerged as a powerful techniqu...

  10. Formation of acetic acid by aqueous-phase oxidation of ethanol with air in the presence of a heterogeneous gold catalyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus H.; Jørgensen, Betina; Hansen, Jeppe Rass

    2006-01-01

    Wine into vinegar: It is possible to selectively oxidize ethanol into acetic acid in aqueous solution with air as the oxidant and a heterogeneous gold catalyst (see TEM image of supported gold particles) at temperatures of about 423 K and O2 pressures of 0.6 MPa. This reaction proceeds readily...

  11. Water-dispersable hybrid Au-Pd nanoparticles as catalysts in ethanol oxidation, aqueous phase Suzuki-Miyaura and Heck reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Hyon Min; Moosa, Basem; Khashab, Niveen M.

    2012-01-01

    The catalytic activities of water-dispersable Au@Pd core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) and Au-Pd alloy NPs were examined. There is growing interest in Au-Pd hybridized NPs in a supported matrix or non-supported forms as catalysts in various reactions

  12. On the metal-support synergy for selective gas-phase ethanol oxidation over MgCuCr2O4 supported metal nanoparticle catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, P.; Zhu, X.; Yang, S.; Li, T.; Hensen, E.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Achieving high yields in the production of bulk chemicals is an important goal for the chemical industry. We investigated the influence of the metal on the catalytic performance of M/MgCuCr2O4 (M = Cu, Ag, Pd, Pt, Au) catalysts to better understand the metal-support synergy for the aerobic oxidation

  13. Tungsten-Based Mesoporous Silicates W-MMM-E as Heterogeneous Catalysts for Liquid-Phase Oxidations with Aqueous H2O2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya Maksimchuk

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Mesoporous tungsten-silicates, W-MMM-E, have been prepared following evaporation-induced self-assembly methodology and characterized by elemental analysis, XRD, N2 adsorption, STEM-HAADF (high angle annular dark field in scanning-TEM mode, DRS UV-vis, and Raman techniques. DRS UV-vis showed the presence of two types of tungsten oxo-species in W-MMM-E samples: isolated tetrahedrally and oligomeric octahedrally coordinated ones, with the ratio depending on the content of tungsten in the catalyst. Materials with lower W loading have a higher contribution from isolated species, regardless of the preparation method. W-MMM-E catalyzes selectively oxidize of a range of alkenes and organic sulfides, including bulky terpene or thianthrene molecules, using green aqueous H2O2. The selectivity of corresponding epoxides reached 85–99% in up to 80% alkene conversions, while sulfoxides formed with 84–90% selectivity in almost complete sulfide conversions and a 90–100% H2O2 utilization efficiency. The true heterogeneity of catalysis over W-MMM-E was proved by hot filtration tests. Leaching of inactive W species depended on the reaction conditions and initial W loading in the catalyst. After optimization of the catalyst system, it did not exceed 20 ppm and 3 ppm for epoxidation and sulfoxidation reactions, respectively. Elaborated catalysts could be easily retrieved by filtration and reused several times with maintenance of the catalytic behavior.

  14. Easy solid-phase synthesis of pH-insensitive heterogeneous CNTs/FeS Fenton-like catalyst for the removal of antibiotics from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Yang, Mingxuan; Yu, Fei; Chen, Junhong

    2015-04-15

    We report a facile solid method to synthesize efficient carbon-based Fenton-like catalyst (CNTs/FeS) using as-prepared carbon nanotubes (APCNTs), which makes full use of the iron nanoparticles in APCNTs without needless purification. Furthermore, the CNTs/FeS was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric (TG) and other analysis techniques, and then the CNTs/FeS was used as a Fenton-like catalyst for removing ciprofloxacin from aqueous solution. Response Surface Methodology (RSM) was applied to find the effect of the reaction parameter and the optimum operating condition. Results shows the catalytic reaction had better suitability than previous studies in a wide range of pH values (pH 3-8) and the Fenton-like catalyst CNTs/FeS exhibits good catalytic activity for removing of antibiotic, which be attributed to the synergistic effect of adsorption-advanced oxidation and significantly improves efficiency of advanced oxidation. More importantly, the CNTs/FeS catalyst exhibit good regeneration performance and retains a high catalytic capacity (>75%) even after four reaction cycles. The catalytic mechanism were also studied further, the removal mechanism of ciprofloxacin by a CNTs/FeS heterogeneous Fenton-like process primarily involves three removal pathways occurring simultaneously: (a) adsorption removal by CNTs, (b) Fenton-like degradation catalyzed by FeS, (c) catalytic degradation by CNTs catalyst. And these actions also have synergistic effects for ciprofloxacin removal. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Coking of residue hydroprocessing catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, M.R.; Zhao, Y.X. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; McKnight, C.A. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada); Komar, D.A.; Carruthers, J.D. [Cytec Industries Inc., Stamford, CT (United States)

    1997-11-01

    One of the major causes of deactivation of Ni/Mo and Co/Mo sulfide catalysts for hydroprocessing of heavy petroleum and bitumen fractions is coke deposition. The composition and amount of coke deposited on residue hydroprocessing catalysts depends on the composition of the liquid phase of the reactor. In the Athabasca bitumen, the high molecular weight components encourage coke deposition at temperatures of 430 to 440 degrees C and at pressures of 10 to 20 MPa hydrogen pressure. A study was conducted to determine which components in the heavy residual oil fraction were responsible for coking of catalysts. Seven samples of Athabasca vacuum residue were prepared by supercritical fluid extraction with pentane before being placed in the reactor. Carbon content and hydrodesulfurization activity was measured. It was concluded that the deposition of coke depended on the presence of asphaltenes and not on other compositional variables such as content of nitrogen, aromatic carbon or vanadium.

  16. Identification of sigma and OMEGA phases in AA2009/SiC composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigo, P., E-mail: pilar.rodrigo@urjc.e [Departamento de Ciencia e Ingenieria de Materiales, Escuela Superior de Ciencias Experimentales y Tecnologia, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, c/Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain); Poza, P.; Utrilla, M.V.; Urena, A. [Departamento de Ciencia e Ingenieria de Materiales, Escuela Superior de Ciencias Experimentales y Tecnologia, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, c/Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain)

    2009-08-12

    The microstructure evolution during ageing treatment at 170 and 190 deg. C of AA2009/SiC composites, reinforced with 15 vol.% particulates and whiskers, was studied by transmission electron microscopy. Besides theta' and S' phases, the typical hardening precipitates on Al-Cu-Mg alloys, it was found the presence of OMEGA and sigma (Al{sub 5}Cu{sub 6}Mg{sub 2}) phases in the matrix. sigma phase was only found in the matrix of particulate composite, while OMEGA phase appeared in both. This phase has not been previously observed in Al matrix composites based on conventional Al-Cu-Mg alloys.

  17. Prediction of retention time in reversed-phase liquid chromatography as a tool for steroid identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randazzo, Giuseppe Marco; Tonoli, David; Hambye, Stephanie; Guillarme, Davy; Jeanneret, Fabienne; Nurisso, Alessandra; Goracci, Laura; Boccard, Julien; Rudaz, Serge

    2016-01-01

    The untargeted profiling of steroids constitutes a growing research field because of their importance as biomarkers of endocrine disruption. New technologies in analytical chemistry, such as ultra high-pressure liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (MS), offer the possibility of a fast and sensitive analysis. Nevertheless, difficulties regarding steroid identification are encountered when considering isotopomeric steroids. Thus, the use of retention times is of great help for the unambiguous identification of steroids. In this context, starting from the linear solvent strength (LSS) theory, quantitative structure retention relationship (QSRR) models, based on a dataset composed of 91 endogenous steroids and VolSurf + descriptors combined with a new dedicated molecular fingerprint, were developed to predict retention times of steroid structures in any gradient mode conditions. Satisfactory performance was obtained during nested cross-validation with a predictive ability (Q"2) of 0.92. The generalisation ability of the model was further confirmed by an average error of 4.4% in external prediction. This allowed the list of candidates associated with identical monoisotopic masses to be strongly reduced, facilitating definitive steroid identification. - Highlights: • Difficulties regarding steroid identification are encountered when considering isotopomeric steroids. • Quantitative structure retention relationship (QSRR) models were developed from the linear solvent strength theory. • A dataset composed of 91 steroids and VolSurf + descriptors combined with a new dedicated molecular fingerprint, were used. • The list of candidates associated with identical monoisotopic masses was reduced, facilitating steroid identification.

  18. Prediction of retention time in reversed-phase liquid chromatography as a tool for steroid identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randazzo, Giuseppe Marco [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Geneva and University of Lausanne, Geneva (Switzerland); Tonoli, David [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Geneva and University of Lausanne, Geneva (Switzerland); Swiss Centre for Applied Human Toxicology (SCAHT), Universities of Basel and Geneva, Basel (Switzerland); Human Protein Sciences Department, University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Hambye, Stephanie; Guillarme, Davy [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Geneva and University of Lausanne, Geneva (Switzerland); Jeanneret, Fabienne [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Geneva and University of Lausanne, Geneva (Switzerland); Swiss Centre for Applied Human Toxicology (SCAHT), Universities of Basel and Geneva, Basel (Switzerland); Human Protein Sciences Department, University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Nurisso, Alessandra [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Geneva and University of Lausanne, Geneva (Switzerland); Goracci, Laura [Department of Chemistry, Biology and Biotechnology, University of Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Boccard, Julien [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Geneva and University of Lausanne, Geneva (Switzerland); Rudaz, Serge, E-mail: serge.rudaz@unige.ch [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Geneva and University of Lausanne, Geneva (Switzerland); Swiss Centre for Applied Human Toxicology (SCAHT), Universities of Basel and Geneva, Basel (Switzerland)

    2016-04-15

    The untargeted profiling of steroids constitutes a growing research field because of their importance as biomarkers of endocrine disruption. New technologies in analytical chemistry, such as ultra high-pressure liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (MS), offer the possibility of a fast and sensitive analysis. Nevertheless, difficulties regarding steroid identification are encountered when considering isotopomeric steroids. Thus, the use of retention times is of great help for the unambiguous identification of steroids. In this context, starting from the linear solvent strength (LSS) theory, quantitative structure retention relationship (QSRR) models, based on a dataset composed of 91 endogenous steroids and VolSurf + descriptors combined with a new dedicated molecular fingerprint, were developed to predict retention times of steroid structures in any gradient mode conditions. Satisfactory performance was obtained during nested cross-validation with a predictive ability (Q{sup 2}) of 0.92. The generalisation ability of the model was further confirmed by an average error of 4.4% in external prediction. This allowed the list of candidates associated with identical monoisotopic masses to be strongly reduced, facilitating definitive steroid identification. - Highlights: • Difficulties regarding steroid identification are encountered when considering isotopomeric steroids. • Quantitative structure retention relationship (QSRR) models were developed from the linear solvent strength theory. • A dataset composed of 91 steroids and VolSurf + descriptors combined with a new dedicated molecular fingerprint, were used. • The list of candidates associated with identical monoisotopic masses was reduced, facilitating steroid identification.

  19. Flow-pattern identification and nonlinear dynamics of gas-liquid two-phase flow in complex networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhongke; Jin, Ningde

    2009-06-01

    The identification of flow pattern is a basic and important issue in multiphase systems. Because of the complexity of phase interaction in gas-liquid two-phase flow, it is difficult to discern its flow pattern objectively. In this paper, we make a systematic study on the vertical upward gas-liquid two-phase flow using complex network. Three unique network construction methods are proposed to build three types of networks, i.e., flow pattern complex network (FPCN), fluid dynamic complex network (FDCN), and fluid structure complex network (FSCN). Through detecting the community structure of FPCN by the community-detection algorithm based on K -mean clustering, useful and interesting results are found which can be used for identifying five vertical upward gas-liquid two-phase flow patterns. To investigate the dynamic characteristics of gas-liquid two-phase flow, we construct 50 FDCNs under different flow conditions, and find that the power-law exponent and the network information entropy, which are sensitive to the flow pattern transition, can both characterize the nonlinear dynamics of gas-liquid two-phase flow. Furthermore, we construct FSCN and demonstrate how network statistic can be used to reveal the fluid structure of gas-liquid two-phase flow. In this paper, from a different perspective, we not only introduce complex network theory to the study of gas-liquid two-phase flow but also indicate that complex network may be a powerful tool for exploring nonlinear time series in practice.

  20. Identification of the iron oxidation state and coordination geometry in iron oxide- and zeolite-based catalysts using pre-edge XAS analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boubnov, Alexey; Lichtenberg, Henning; Mangold, Stefan; Grunwaldt, Jan Dierk

    2015-03-01

    Analysis of the oxidation state and coordination geometry using pre-edge analysis is attractive for heterogeneous catalysis and materials science, especially for in situ and time-resolved studies or highly diluted systems. In the present study, focus is laid on iron-based catalysts. First a systematic investigation of the pre-edge region of the Fe K-edge using staurolite, FePO4, FeO and α-Fe2O3 as reference compounds for tetrahedral Fe(2+), tetrahedral Fe(3+), octahedral Fe(2+) and octahedral Fe(3+), respectively, is reported. In particular, high-resolution and conventional X-ray absorption spectra are compared, considering that in heterogeneous catalysis and material science a compromise between high-quality spectroscopic data acquisition and simultaneous analysis of functional properties is required. Results, which were obtained from reference spectra acquired with different resolution and quality, demonstrate that this analysis is also applicable to conventionally recorded pre-edge data. For this purpose, subtraction of the edge onset is preferentially carried out using an arctangent and a first-degree polynomial, independent of the resolution and quality of the data. For both standard and high-resolution data, multiplet analysis of pre-edge features has limitations due to weak transitions that cannot be identified. On the other hand, an arbitrary empirical peak fitting assists the analysis in that non-local transitions can be isolated. The analysis of the oxidation state and coordination geometry of the Fe sites using a variogram-based method is shown to be effective for standard-resolution data and leads to the same results as for high-resolution spectra. This method, validated by analysing spectra of reference compounds and their well defined mixtures, is finally applied to track structural changes in a 1% Fe/Al2O3 and a 0.5% Fe/BEA zeolite catalyst during reduction in 5% H2/He. The results, hardly accessible by other techniques, show that Fe(3+) is

  1. Identification of vapor-phase chemical warfare agent simulants and rocket fuels using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stearns, Jaime A.; McElman, Sarah E.; Dodd, James A.

    2010-01-01

    Application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to the identification of security threats is a growing area of research. This work presents LIBS spectra of vapor-phase chemical warfare agent simulants and typical rocket fuels. A large dataset of spectra was acquired using a variety of gas mixtures and background pressures and processed using partial least squares analysis. The five compounds studied were identified with a 99% success rate by the best method. The temporal behavior of the emission lines as a function of chamber pressure and gas mixture was also investigated, revealing some interesting trends that merit further study.

  2. Identification of vapor-phase chemical warfare agent simulants and rocket fuels using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stearns, Jaime A.; McElman, Sarah E.; Dodd, James A.

    2010-05-01

    Application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to the identification of security threats is a growing area of research. This work presents LIBS spectra of vapor-phase chemical warfare agent simulants and typical rocket fuels. A large dataset of spectra was acquired using a variety of gas mixtures and background pressures and processed using partial least squares analysis. The five compounds studied were identified with a 99% success rate by the best method. The temporal behavior of the emission lines as a function of chamber pressure and gas mixture was also investigated, revealing some interesting trends that merit further study.

  3. Identification of two-phase flow patterns in a nuclear reactor by the high-frequency contribution fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.W.; Pei, B.S.; King, C.H.; Lee, S.C.

    1989-01-01

    Recently, King et al. and Wang et al. analyzed the fluctuating characteristics of differential pressure and void fraction by the optimum modeling method and by spectral analysis, respectively. These two investigations presented some new concepts and deterministic criteria, which are based on purely empirical formulas, to identify two-phase flow patterns. These deterministic criteria on two-phase flow patterns' identification seem to show reasonable performance. In King's and Wang's studies, there are at least three problems that need further investigations for the applications to the nuclear reactor engineering field. These three problems are the following: 1. Is the response to a certain two-phase flow pattern, i.e., the fluctuating characteristics, of neutrons the same as that of differential pressure or void fraction? 2. Could those criteria developed from air/water flow be allowed to identify steam/water two-phase flow patterns? 3. Could those criteria be applied to identify two-phase flow patterns in rod bundles? In this paper, parts of the investigated results answer the first problem, and detailed comparisons with the previous work of the authors are given on a variety of items

  4. Design of heterogeneous catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frey, Anne Mette

    was inspired by a computational screening, suggesting that alloys such as Ni-Fe, Co-Ni, and Co-Fe should show superior activity to the industrially used nickel catalyst. Especially the Ni-Fe system was considered to be interesting, since such alloy catalysts should be both more active and cheaper than the Ni...... catalyst. The results from the screening were experimentally verified for CO hydrogenation, CO2 hydrogenation, and simultaneous CO and CO2 hydrogenation by bimetallic Ni-Fe catalysts. These catalysts were found to be highly active and selective. The Co-Ni and Co-Fe systems were investigated for CO...... well, and the best catalyst prepared had a C5+ yield almost a factor of two higher than a standard air calcined Co catalyst. In the NH3-SCR reaction it is desirable to develop an active and stable catalyst for NOx removal in automotive applications, since the traditionally used vanadium-based catalyst...

  5. Heterogeneous catalysis in the liquid-phase oxidation of olefins--3. The activity of supported vanadium-chromium binary oxide catalyst for the oxidation of cyclohexene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takehira, K; Hayakawa, T; Ishikawa, T

    1979-03-01

    The activity of supported vanadium-chromium binary oxide catalyst for the oxidation of cyclohexene to 1-cyclohexenyl hydroperoxide, 2-cyclohexene-1-one, 2-cyclohexene-1-ol, and cyclohexene oxide was due to the interaction between the metal oxides and the carriers. The oxidation reaction was carried out in benzene at 60/sup 0/C for four hours with the binary oxide supported on (GAMMA)-alumina or silica; three series of catalysts were prepared by combining the vanadium and chromium oxide components with alumina hydrate or silica sol by a kneading method. The silica-supported catalysts had the greatest activity, the highest being the V/sub 2/O/sub 5//SiO/sub 2/ system, which lost its activity quickly during the reaction. This was followed in activity by the Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3//SiO/sub 2/ system, containing the chromium(V) species. The Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3//Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ system also had high activity and the chromium(V) species. The vanadium and chromium metal ions are probably coordinated tetrahedrally on the support, and these complexes catalyze cyclohexene autoxidation by decomposing 1-cyclohexenyl hydroperoxide.

  6. Influence of Solvent on Liquid Phase Hydrodeoxygenation of Furfural-Acetone Condensation Adduct using Ni/Al2O3-ZrO2 Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulfa, S. M.; Mahfud, A.; Nabilah, S.; Rahman, M. F.

    2017-02-01

    Influence of water and acidic protic solvent on hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of the furfural-acetone adduct (FAA) over Ni/Al2O3-ZrO2 (NiAZ) catalysts were investigated. The HDO of FAA was carried out in a batch reactor at 150°C for 8 hours. The NiAZ catalysts were home-made catalysts which were prepared by wet impregnation method with 10 and 20% nickel loading. The HDO reaction of FAA using 10NiAZ in water at 150°C gave alkane and oxygenated hydrocarbons at 31.41% with selectivity over tridecane (C13) in 6.67%. On the other hand, a reaction using acetic acid:water (1:19 v/v) in similar reaction condition gave only oxygenated compounds and hydrocracking product (C8-C10). The formation of tridecane (C13) was proposed by hydrogenation of C=O and C=C followed by decarboxylation without hydrocracking process. The presence of water facilitated decarboxylation mechanism by stabilized dehydrogenated derivatives of FAA.

  7. Separation, purification and identification of flavonoid glycosides using reversed phase hplc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, A.; Khan, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    Optimal high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separation conditions and semi-preparative scale isolation of flavonoid glycosides from three plant species namely Vitex nagunda, Rubus ulmifolious and Malotus philipensis is reported. Identification of purified flavonoid glycoside was achieved using spiking technique in HPLC. (author)

  8. Application of Moessbauer spectroscopy for the characterization of iron-containing catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, J.

    1998-01-01

    Work in our laboratory demonstrates the unique analytical power as well as the limits of Moessbauer Spectroscopy (MES) as a tool for characterizing the size and phase of supported iron containing catalyst particles, particularly carbon supported catalysts. The major challenge in employing MES to characterize catalytic particles is understanding the impact of the relaxation effects on the spectra. Proper methods yield particle size and phase information, whereas improper interpretation can lead to the misidentification of phases. This is illustrated by feeding ersatz 'relaxed' spectra data, generated mathematically with a program which accounts for all aspects of relaxation, to a standard fitting routine. The fitting routine misinterprets the data and provides false phase identification. Methods for recognizing relaxation phenomena and strategies for extracting correct information from relaxed spectra are reviewed. Also reviewed are the major findings of studies on carbon supported catalysts. For example, MES studies, in conjunction with other techniques, demonstrate that bulk and surface structures which are easily accessible for carbon supported bimetallics are generally not found on refractory oxides

  9. Identification of Mine-Shaped Objects based on an Efficient Phase Stepped-Frequency Radar Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Helge Bjarup Dissing; Jakobsen, Kaj Bjarne; Nymann, Ole

    1997-01-01

    a radar probe is moved automatically to measure in each grid point a set of reflection coefficients from which phase and amplitude information are extracted. Based on a simple processing of the phase information, quarternary image and template cross-correlation a successful detection of metal- and non...

  10. Identification of phases in zinc alloy powders using electron backscatter diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, Martin G. [Graduate Center for Materials Research, University of Missouri-Rolla, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Kenik, Edward A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 100 Bethel Valley Rd., Bldg. 4515, MS-6064, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); O' Keefe, Matthew J. [Graduate Center for Materials Research, University of Missouri-Rolla, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States)]. E-mail: mjokeefe@umr.edu; Miller, F. Scott [Graduate Center for Materials Research, University of Missouri-Rolla, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Johnson, Benedict [Graduate Center for Materials Research, University of Missouri-Rolla, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States)

    2006-05-25

    Scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) were used for the structural characterization of phases in Zn alloy powders. Commercial Zn alloy powders contained additions of <1000 ppm of Bi, In, Al or Mg. Bismuth and In have extremely low solubility in Zn and form intermetallic Bi-In compounds which segregate to the Zn grain boundaries. The Bi-In phases were <0.3 {mu}m in size, had low melting points, and were not abundant enough for EBSD analysis. Increasing the alloying additions 20-40-fold resulted in Bi-In phases >1 {mu}m that could be used for EBSD analysis for phase characterization. Deformation-free microstructures were obtained by mechanical polishing and ion milling. The Zn matrix was characterized as Zn via EBSD. A BiIn{sub 2} phase was identified in the powder microstructures via EBSD. An In phase with 8-9 wt.% Bi was identified using low voltage energy dispersive spectroscopy and closely matched the composition predicted by the Bi-In phase diagram.

  11. TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT FOR IRON FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, B.H.

    1998-07-22

    The goal of the proposed work described in this Final Report was the development of iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that combined high activity, selectivity and life with physical robustness for slurry phase reactors that will produce either low-alpha or high-alpha products. The work described here has optimized the catalyst composition and pretreatment operation for a low-alpha catalyst. In parallel, work has been conducted to design a high-alpha iron catalyst that is suitable for slurry phase synthesis. Studies have been conducted to define the chemical phases present at various stages of the pretreatment and synthesis stages and to define the course of these changes. The oxidation/reduction cycles that are anticipated to occur in large, commercial reactors have been studied at the laboratory scale. Catalyst performance has been determined for catalysts synthesized in this program for activity, selectivity and aging characteristics.

  12. [MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry: Evaluation of the preanalytical phase for identification of molds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Ivana; García Ramírez, Dolores; Striebeck, Pablo; Lafage, Marcelo; Fernández Canigia, Liliana

    In order to optimize the identification of molds with MALDI-TOF MS, three protein extraction-methodologies were evaluated against 44 isolates: water extraction (WE), zirconium extraction (ZE) and the provider's recommended method (PRM). Two data bases were compared, Bruker (BK) and Bruker+National Institutes of Health. Considering both databases, results were respectively as follows: correct identification (CI) at gender level, 10 and 16 by WE; 27 and 32 by ZE and 18 and 23 by PRM; CI at species level, 5 and 7 by WE; 17 and 20 by ZE and 11 and 14 by PRM; non-reliable identification, 18 and 12 by WE; 9 and 4 by ZE and by PRM. No peaks were observed in 16 by WE, 8 by ZE and 17 by PRM. ZE showed the best perfomance (p<0.05). Copyright © 2016 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Gas Phase Homo- and Co-polymerization of Ethylene over Mg(O Et){sub 2}/T HF/Si Cl{sub 4}/Ti Cl{sub 4}/ Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min-Chul, Chung [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Techology., Taejeon (Korea, Republic of); Il, Kim [Univ. of Ulsan., Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Jae-Ha, Kim [Korea Petrochemial Ind., Kyungnam (Korea, Republic of); Hong-Ki Choi [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology., Taejeon (Korea, Republic of); Seung-Ihl, Woo

    1994-08-01

    Homo- and co-polymerization of ethylene were carried out in both gas and slurry phases over Mg(O Et)2/T HF/Si Cl{sub 4}/Ti Cl{sub 4}-Al Et{sub 3} catalysts in the range of temperature 20-70{sup o} C and pressure 2-10 psig. In gas phase polymerization, maximum activity was measured at the Al/Ti mole ratio of 377, and reaction rate dependence on Al Et{sub 3} concentration could be explained with the Langmuir-Hinshelwood adsorption model. Even though maximum activities were obtained at the same temperature, 60{sup o} C in both gas and slurry phases, overall activation energy was higher for the slurry phase(13 kCal/mol) than for the gas phase(4.7 kCal/mol) polymerization. The molecular weight behavior has been examined by measuring intrinsic viscosity. The molecular weight was increased as the ethylene pressure increased, and as the temperature and the concentration of Al Et{sub 3} and hydrogen decreased. Using two different co monomers(propylene and butene-1), the copolymerization of ethylene was carried out. The intrinsic viscosity and the melt index were decreased as co monomer concentration increased, and the maximum activity was observed when the concentration of comonomer is about 20 mol%. (author). 28 refs. 6 tabs. 13 figs.

  14. Catalyst for hydrogen-amine D exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtslander, W.J.; Johnson, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    A process is claimed for deuterium isotopic enrichment (suitable for use in heavy water production) by amine-hydrogen exchange in which the exchange catalyst comprises a mixture of alkyl amides of two metals selected from the group consisting of the alkali metals. Catalyst mixtures comprising at least one of the alkali amides of lithium and potassium are preferred. At least one of the following benefits are obtained: decreased hydride formation, decreased thermal decomposition of alkyl amide, increased catalyst solubility in the amine phase, and increased exchange efficiency. 11 claims

  15. HPLC WITH SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION FOR IDENTIFICATION AND DIAGNOSIS OF ORGANOPHOSPHOROUS POISONING IN GOATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Manna

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available High performance liquid chromatographic determination of organophosphorous compound has been done by reverse phase chromatography in goats. The goats were dying showing the symptoms of organophosphorous poisoning. The viscera and stomach contents sample were received from Project Co-Ordinator, Animal Disease Research Institute, Phulnakhara, Cuttack, Orissa. The analysis of samples by HPLC with UV detector after cleaning up in Solid Phase Extraction (SPE revealed presence of malathion that was later quantified.

  16. DNA microarray-based solid-phase RT-PCR for rapid detection and identification of influenza virus type A and subtypes H5 and H7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yi, Sun; Dhumpa, Raghuram; Bang, Dang Duong

    2011-01-01

    of RNA extract in the liquid phase with sequence-specific nested PCR on the solid phase. A simple ultraviolet cross-linking method was used to immobilize the DNA probes over an unmodified glass surface, which makes solid-phase PCR a convenient possibility for AIV screening. The testing of 33 avian fecal....... In this article, a DNA microarray-based solid-phase polymerase chain reaction (PCR) approach has been developed for rapid detection of influenza virus type A and for simultaneous identification of pathogenic virus subtypes H5 and H7. This solid-phase RT-PCR method combined reverse-transcription amplification...

  17. Identifying active surface phases for metal oxide electrocatalysts: a study of manganese oxide bi-functional catalysts for oxygen reduction and water oxidation catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, Hai-Yan; Gorlin, Yelena; Man, Isabela Costinela

    2012-01-01

    Progress in the field of electrocatalysis is often hampered by the difficulty in identifying the active site on an electrode surface. Herein we combine theoretical analysis and electrochemical methods to identify the active surfaces in a manganese oxide bi-functional catalyst for the oxygen...... reduction reaction (ORR) and the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). First, we electrochemically characterize the nanostructured α-Mn2O3 and find that it undergoes oxidation in two potential regions: initially, between 0.5 V and 0.8 V, a potential region relevant to the ORR and, subsequently, between 0.8 V...

  18. Identification of various phases in HRTEM images of MgO-PSZ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Z.; Spargo, A.E.C.

    2000-01-01

    Magnesia partially stabilized zirconia is one of the most commonly used engineering ceramics based on zirconia. A detailed discussion about how to identify the various phases in the high resolution transmission electron microscopy images of this material is presented. It shows that in some cases, the standard procedures of image simulation are inadequate to interpret these images. By including the effect of astigmatism in both experimental and simulated images, together with the digital Fourier transforms of the images, orthorhombic ZrO 2 in [001] orientation was identified. The δ-phase, which has a marked effect on the thermomechanical properties of MgO-PSZ, can most easily be identified by high resolution imaging in the [130] c zone which coincides with a low-index zone axis of the δ-phase

  19. Identification of new phases in the Zr-Nb-Fe system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granovsky, Marta S.; Arias, Delia E.; Lena, Esteban M.

    1999-01-01

    Intermediate phases in the Zr - rich region of the Zr - Nb - Fe system have been investigated by X-ray diffraction, optical and electron microscopy and electron microanalysis. The chemical composition ranges of the alloys here studied were (52 - 97) at. % Zr, (14 - 0.9) at. % Nb and (38 - 0.6) at. % Fe. The phases found in this region were the solid solutions α(Zr) and β(Zr), the intermetallic Zr 3 Fe with less than 0.2 at. % Nb in solution, and two new ternary phases: (Zr + Nb) 2 Fe, identified as a cubic Ti 2 Ni - type structure and another compound with composition close to Zr - 12 at. % Nb - 50 at. % Fe. (author)

  20. Identification of two-phase flow pattern by using specific spatial frequency of differential pressure signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Bin; Tong Yunxian; Wu Shaorong

    1992-11-01

    It is a classical method by using analysis of differential pressure fluctuation signal to identify two-phase flow pattern. The method which uses trait peak in the frequency-domain will result confusion between bubble flow and intermittent flow due to the influence of gas speed. Considering the spatial geometric significance of two-phase slow patterns and using the differential pressure gauge as a sensor, the Strouhal number 'Sr' is taken as the basis for distinguishing flow patterns. Using Strouhal number 'Sr' to identify flow pattern has clear physical meaning. The experimental results using the spatial analytical technique to measure the flow pattern are also given

  1. Computerized identification and classification of stance phases as made by front og hind feet of walking cows based on 3-dimensional ground reaction forces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøth, F; Thorup, Vivi Mørkøre; do Nascimento, Omar Feix

    2013-01-01

    Lameness is a frequent disorder in dairy cows and in large dairy herds manual lameness detection is a time-consuming task. This study describes a method for automatic identification of stance phases in walking cows, and their classification as made by a front or a hind foot based on ground reaction...... phases, of these 1146 (62%) were automatically identified as full stance phases and classified as made by a front or hind foot. As intended, the procedures did not favour identification of stance phases of healthy cows over lame cows. In addition, a human observer evaluated the stance phases by visual...... inspection, revealing a very low discrepancy (3.5%) between manual and automated approaches. Further, a sensitivity test indicated large robustness in the automatic procedures. In conclusion, the experimental setup combined with the computerized procedures described in the present study resulted in a high...

  2. Systematic identification method for data analysis and phase equilibria modelling for lipids systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perederic, Olivia A.; Cunico, Larissa P.; Kalakul, Sawitree

    2018-01-01

    Industrial use of lipids has been increasing as a consequence of increased developments related to biobased economies. In addition to applications in food-products, lipids are used by many industrial sectors, for example, biodiesel, edible oil, health, and personal care. Phase equilibria...

  3. HLW Salt Disposition Alternatives Identification Preconceptual Phase I Summary Report (Including Attachments)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piccolo, S.F.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the process used by the Team to systematically develop alternative methods or technologies for final disposition of HLW salt. Additionally, this report summarizes the process utilized to reduce the total list of identified alternatives to an ''initial list'' for further evaluation. This report constitutes completion of the team charter major milestone Phase I Deliverable

  4. The use of Moessbauer technique in the identification of iron phases in blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A-lArabi, Ibtisam Abdusalam

    2008-03-01

    In this work we used marabou's technique, x-diffraction techniques, and thermal analysis to identify iron phases in a number of different samples such as: prescription medicine used as iron supplement, a blood sample from a healthy person, a blood sample from a person with thalassemia, and a sample from the plant (Jirjeer). In spite of the diminishing amount of iron in all of these samples we were able to identify the phases of iron and their proportions. There were an agreement between the results of x-ray diffraction and Moessbauer on the presence of the compound (FeSO 4 .H 2 O) in the first sample. We calculated the average particle size of this sample to be 0.2 μm. The Moessbauer results of the second sample indicated the presence of two iron phases. One with parameters (ΔΕ Q =1.376 mm/s, δ=-0.17 mm/s) was assigned to oxygenated hemoglobin. The second with parameters (ΔΕ Q =1.371 mm/s, δ=0.41 mm/s) was assigned to non-oxygenated hemoglobin. In the results of the third sample there was no indication of the presence of ferric iron which is the form in which excess iron is stored in the red blood cells of thalassaemic blood. The results of the fourth sample indicated that iron is present in the plant sample in two different sites in the iron-sulfur protein molecule. thermal analysis results helped in determining the temperatures at which there was phase transformation of iron compounds molecule. thermal analysis results helped in determining the temperatures at which there was phase transformation of iron compounds. (author)

  5. Catalyst volumetric fraction simulation in a riser of a cold flow pilot unit with aid of transmission gamma technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Kamylla A.L. dos; Lima Filho, Hilario J.B. de; Benachour, Mohand; Dantas, Carlos C.; Santos, Valdemir A. dos

    2013-01-01

    Was obtained the radial profile of the catalyst volume fraction in a riser of the cold flow pilot unit of the Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) unit, which was used for adjustment of the entrance conditions of the catalyst in a simulation program by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The height of the riser of the Cold Flow Pilot Unity (CFPU) utilized is 6.0m and its inner diameter is 0.097 m. A radiation-γ source of Am-241 and a NaI (Tl) detector, with shielding made of lead, have been installed on a steel backing that maintains the geometry of the source-detector-riser and allows to vary the distance from the source to the detector and the radial position in a given cross section of the riser. The data associated with the simulation of volume fraction radial profile of the catalyst were: Fluent software, version 12.0; preprocessor GAMBIT, version 2.3.16; Eulerian approach; structured mesh, cell number of 60000; turbulence model used was k-ε and kinetic theory of granular flow (KTGF) was implemented to describe the solid phase. Comparison of radial profiles simulated and experimental of the catalyst volumetric fraction in the CFPU riser allowed the identification of needs adjustments in the simulation for the input of catalyst, with consequent validation for the proposed model simulation. (author)

  6. Virtual Sensor for Failure Detection, Identification and Recovery in the Transition Phase of a Morphing Aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Heredia

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The Helicopter Adaptive Aircraft (HADA is a morphing aircraft which is able to take-off as a helicopter and, when in forward flight, unfold the wings that are hidden under the fuselage, and transfer the power from the main rotor to a propeller, thus morphing from a helicopter to an airplane. In this process, the reliable folding and unfolding of the wings is critical, since a failure may determine the ability to perform a mission, and may even be catastrophic. This paper proposes a virtual sensor based Fault Detection, Identification and Recovery (FDIR system to increase the reliability of the HADA aircraft. The virtual sensor is able to capture the nonlinear interaction between the folding/unfolding wings aerodynamics and the HADA airframe using the navigation sensor measurements. The proposed FDIR system has been validated using a simulation model of the HADA aircraft, which includes real phenomena as sensor noise and sampling characteristics and turbulence and wind perturbations.

  7. Virtual sensor for failure detection, identification and recovery in the transition phase of a morphing aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredia, Guillermo; Ollero, Aníbal

    2010-01-01

    The Helicopter Adaptive Aircraft (HADA) is a morphing aircraft which is able to take-off as a helicopter and, when in forward flight, unfold the wings that are hidden under the fuselage, and transfer the power from the main rotor to a propeller, thus morphing from a helicopter to an airplane. In this process, the reliable folding and unfolding of the wings is critical, since a failure may determine the ability to perform a mission, and may even be catastrophic. This paper proposes a virtual sensor based Fault Detection, Identification and Recovery (FDIR) system to increase the reliability of the HADA aircraft. The virtual sensor is able to capture the nonlinear interaction between the folding/unfolding wings aerodynamics and the HADA airframe using the navigation sensor measurements. The proposed FDIR system has been validated using a simulation model of the HADA aircraft, which includes real phenomena as sensor noise and sampling characteristics and turbulence and wind perturbations.

  8. Soft tissue freezing process. Identification of the dual-phase lag model parameters using the evolutionary algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochnacki, Bohdan; Majchrzak, Ewa; Paruch, Marek

    2018-01-01

    In the paper the soft tissue freezing process is considered. The tissue sub-domain is subjected to the action of cylindrical cryoprobe. Thermal processes proceeding in the domain considered are described using the dual-phase lag equation (DPLE) supplemented by the appropriate boundary and initial conditions. DPLE results from the generalization of the Fourier law in which two lag times are introduced (relaxation and thermalization times). The aim of research is the identification of these parameters on the basis of measured cooling curves at the set of points selected from the tissue domain. To solve the problem the evolutionary algorithms are used. The paper contains the mathematical model of the tissue freezing process, the very short information concerning the numerical solution of the basic problem, the description of the inverse problem solution and the results of computations.

  9. Catalyst-free vapor-phase transport growth of vertically aligned ZnO nanorods on 6H-SiC and (11-20)Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mofor, A.C.; Bakin, A.S.; Elshaer, A.; Waag, A. [Inst. of Semiconductor Technology, Technical Univ. Braunschweig (Germany); Fuhrmann, D.; Hangleiter, A. [Inst. of Applied Physics, Technical Univ. Braunschweig (Germany); Bertram, F.; Christen, J. [Dept. of Solid State Physics, Univ. of Magdeburg (Germany)

    2006-03-15

    ZnO nanostructures are expected to pave the way for many interesting applications in optoelectronics, spin electronics gas sensor technology and biomedicine. Fabrication methods, especially for nanorods have been based mostly on catalyst-assisted growth methods that employ metal-organic sources and other contaminating agents like graphite to grow ZnO nanorods at relatively high temperatures. We report on the growth of ZnO nanorods on 6H-SiC and (11-20)Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} using purely elemental sources, without catalysis and at relatively low temperatures and growth pressure in a specially designed vapor-phase transport system. ZnO nanorods with widths of 80-900 nm and lengths of 4-12 {mu}m were obtained. Nanorod concentrations of up to 10{sup 9} cm{sup -2} with homogenous luminescence and high purity were noted. (orig.)

  10. Ruthenium Modification on Mn and Zr-Modified Co/SiO2 Catalysts for Slurry-Phase Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohisa Miyazawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The addition of Ru to Mn and Zr-modified Co/SiO2 catalysts, while applying different preparation orders and loading amounts, was investigated as a means of enhancing the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis reaction. The coimpregnation of Zr/SiO2 with Co, Mn and Ru gave the most attractive catalytic properties. This can be attributed to the higher dispersion of Co metal resulting from the coimpregnation of Co and Mn as well as enhanced reducibility due to the presence of Ru. The addition of a moderate amount of Ru together with the appropriate order of addition affected both the Co reducibility and the catalytic activity, primarily because of increased reducibility. The addition of even 0.1 wt.% Ru resulted in an obvious enhancement of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis activity.

  11. Identification of the hydrate gel phases present in phosphate-modified calcium aluminate binders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavda, Mehul A.; Bernal, Susan A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Apperley, David C. [Solid-State NMR Group, Department of Chemistry, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Kinoshita, Hajime [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Provis, John L., E-mail: j.provis@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-15

    The conversion of hexagonal calcium aluminate hydrates to cubic phases in hydrated calcium aluminate cements (CAC) can involve undesirable porosity changes and loss of strength. Modification of CAC by phosphate addition avoids conversion, by altering the nature of the reaction products, yielding a stable amorphous gel instead of the usual crystalline hydrate products. Here, details of the environments of aluminium and phosphorus in this gel were elucidated using solid-state NMR and complementary techniques. Aluminium is identified in both octahedral and tetrahedral coordination states, and phosphorus is present in hydrous environments with varying, but mostly low, degrees of crosslinking. A {sup 31}P/{sup 27}Al rotational echo adiabatic passage double resonance (REAPDOR) experiment showed the existence of aluminium–phosphorus interactions, confirming the formation of a hydrated calcium aluminophosphate gel as a key component of the binding phase. This resolves previous disagreements in the literature regarding the nature of the disordered products forming in this system.

  12. Phase Identification and Internal Stress Analysis of Steamside Oxides on Plant Exposed Superheater Tubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantleon, Karen; Montgomery, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    During long-term, high-temperature exposure of superheater tubes in thermal power plants, various oxides are formed on the inner side (steamside) of the tubes, and oxide spallation is a serious problem for the power plant industry. Most often, oxidation in a steam atmosphere is investigated...... in laboratory experiments just mimicking the actual conditions in the power plant for simplified samples. On real plant-exposed superheater tubes, the steamside oxides are solely investigated microscopically. The feasibility of X-ray diffraction for the characterization of steamside oxidation on real plant......-exposed superheater tubes was proven in the current work; the challenges for depth-resolved phase analysis and phase-specific residual stress analysis at the inner side of the tubes with concave surface curvature are discussed. Essential differences between the steamside oxides formed on two different steels...

  13. Near-infrared line identification in type Ia supernovae during the transitional phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friesen, Brian; Baron, E.; Wisniewski, John P.; Miller, Timothy R. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, 440 West Brooks Street, Room 100, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Parrent, Jerod T. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Thomas, R. C. [Computational Cosmology Center, Computational Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road MS 50B-4206, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Marion, G. H. [University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States)

    2014-09-10

    We present near-infrared synthetic spectra of a delayed-detonation hydrodynamical model and compare them to observed spectra of four normal Type Ia supernovae ranging from day +56.5 to day +85. This is the epoch during which supernovae are believed to be undergoing the transition from the photospheric phase, where spectra are characterized by line scattering above an optically thick photosphere, to the nebular phase, where spectra consist of optically thin emission from forbidden lines. We find that most spectral features in the near-infrared can be accounted for by permitted lines of Fe II and Co II. In addition, we find that [Ni II] fits the emission feature near 1.98 μm, suggesting that a substantial mass of {sup 58}Ni exists near the center of the ejecta in these objects, arising from nuclear burning at high density.

  14. Identification of two-phase flow regimes under variable gravity conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiel S Gabriel; Huawei Han

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Two-phase flow is becoming increasingly important as we move into new and more aggressive technologies in the twenty-first century. Some of its many applications include the design of efficient heat transport systems, the transfer and storage of cryogenic fluids, and condensation and flow boiling processes in heat exchangers and energy transport systems. Two-phase flow has many applications in reduced gravity environments experienced in orbiting spacecraft and earth observation satellites. Examples are heat transport systems, the transfer and storage of cryogenic fluids, and condensation and flow boiling processes in heat exchangers. A concave parallel plate capacitance sensor has been developed to measure void fraction for the purpose of objectively identifying flow regimes. The sensor has been used to collect void-fraction data at microgravity conditions aboard the NASA and ESA zero-gravity aircraft. It is shown that the flow regimes can be objectively determined from the probability density functions of the void fraction signals. It was shown that under microgravity conditions four flow regimes exist: bubbly flow, characterized by discrete gas bubbles flowing in the liquid; slug flow, consisting of Taylor bubbles separated by liquid slugs which may or may not contain several small gas bubbles; transitional flow, characterized by the liquid flowing as a film at the tube wall, and the gas phase flowing in the center with the frequent appearance of chaotic, unstable slugs; and annular flow in which the liquid flows as a film along the tube wall and the gas flows uninterrupted through the center. Since many two-phase flow models are flow regime dependent, a method that can accurately and objectively determine flow regimes is required. (authors)

  15. Identification of two-phase flow regimes under variable gravity conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiel S Gabriel [University of Ontario Institute of Technology 2000 Simcoe Street North, Oshawa, ON L1H 7K4 (Canada); Huawei Han [Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Saskatchewan 57 Campus Dr., Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, S7N 5A9 (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Two-phase flow is becoming increasingly important as we move into new and more aggressive technologies in the twenty-first century. Some of its many applications include the design of efficient heat transport systems, the transfer and storage of cryogenic fluids, and condensation and flow boiling processes in heat exchangers and energy transport systems. Two-phase flow has many applications in reduced gravity environments experienced in orbiting spacecraft and earth observation satellites. Examples are heat transport systems, the transfer and storage of cryogenic fluids, and condensation and flow boiling processes in heat exchangers. A concave parallel plate capacitance sensor has been developed to measure void fraction for the purpose of objectively identifying flow regimes. The sensor has been used to collect void-fraction data at microgravity conditions aboard the NASA and ESA zero-gravity aircraft. It is shown that the flow regimes can be objectively determined from the probability density functions of the void fraction signals. It was shown that under microgravity conditions four flow regimes exist: bubbly flow, characterized by discrete gas bubbles flowing in the liquid; slug flow, consisting of Taylor bubbles separated by liquid slugs which may or may not contain several small gas bubbles; transitional flow, characterized by the liquid flowing as a film at the tube wall, and the gas phase flowing in the center with the frequent appearance of chaotic, unstable slugs; and annular flow in which the liquid flows as a film along the tube wall and the gas flows uninterrupted through the center. Since many two-phase flow models are flow regime dependent, a method that can accurately and objectively determine flow regimes is required. (authors)

  16. STRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF VOLCANIC ASH OF THE NEVADO DEL RUIZ: ZEOLITE PHASE IDENTIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiddy P. Quiroz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of the structural properties obtained from volcanic ash from Nevado del Ruiz located in the Central Range of Andes - Colombia. The volcanic ash samples were subjected to hydration processes and heat treatments in situ during characterization stage material. During the hydration process, which consisted of introducing 2.4875 ± 0.0002g of volcanic ash in 20ml of water for 48 hours, the organic fraction present was removed from the particulate suspension in the aqueous medium. From measurements of X-ray diffraction (XRD, it was observed, that the temperature variations between 323 and 673 K influence the phase formation of zeolite with structures Heulandite -Ca, Stellerita and gmelinite. XRD measurements were performed in vacuum and atmospheric pressure. X'pert Highscore Plus program and simulation Rietveld refinement were used for to obtain the structures of each of the phases. It was found, using the Scherrer equation, that crystallite sizes (Δ (2θ are influenced by changes crystal-chemical caused by hydration, heat treatment and pressure conditions during the characterization. A variation of Δ ( 2θ between 37 and 106.9 nm from XRD measurements was found. It was determined that from 423K in the sample of un-hydrated volcanic ash, the formation of zeolite Stellerita presents with a stable phase up to 673 K.

  17. Identification of symmetric and asymmetric responses in seasonal streamflow globally to ENSO phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Donghoon; Ward, Philip J.; Block, Paul

    2018-04-01

    The phase of the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) has large-ranging effects on streamflow and hydrologic conditions globally. While many studies have evaluated this relationship through correlation analysis between annual streamflow and ENSO indices, an assessment of potential asymmetric relationships between ENSO and streamflow is lacking. Here, we evaluate seasonal variations in streamflow by ENSO phase to identify asymmetric (AR) and symmetric (SR) spatial pattern responses globally and further corroborate with local precipitation and hydrological condition. The AR and SR patterns between seasonal precipitation and streamflow are identified at many locations for the first time. Our results identify strong SR patterns in particular regions including northwestern and southern US, northeastern and southeastern South America, northeastern and southern Africa, southwestern Europe, and central-south Russia. The seasonally lagged anomalous streamflow patterns are also identified and attributed to snowmelt, soil moisture, and/or cumulative hydrological processes across river basins. These findings may be useful in water resources management and natural hazards planning by better characterizing the propensity of flood or drought conditions by ENSO phase.

  18. Identification of secondary phases formed during unsaturated reaction of UO2 with EJ-13 water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.K.; Tani, B.S.; Veleckis, E.

    1989-01-01

    A set of experiments, wherein UO 2 has been contacted by dripping water, has been conducted over a period of 182.5 weeks. The experiments are being conducted to develop procedures to study spent fuel reaction under unsaturated conditions that are expected to exist over the lifetime of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository site. One half of the experiments have been terminated, while one half are ongoing. Analyses of solutions that have dripped from the reacted UO 2 have been performed for all experiments, while the reacted UO 2 surfaces have been examined for the terminated experiments. A pulse of uranium release from the UO 2 solid, combined with the formation of schoepite on the surface of the UO 2 , was observed between 39 and 96 weeks of reaction. Thereafter, the uranium release decreased and a second set of secondary phases was observed. The latter phases incorporated cations from the EJ-13 water and included boltwoodite, uranophane, sklodowskite, compreignacite, and schoepite. The experiments are continuing to monitor whether additional changes in solution chemistry or secondary phase formation occurs. 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Purification and Identification of Membrane Proteins from Urinary Extracellular Vesicles using Triton X-114 Phase Partitioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shuiwang; Musante, Luca; Tataruch, Dorota; Xu, Xiaomeng; Kretz, Oliver; Henry, Michael; Meleady, Paula; Luo, Haihua; Zou, Hequn; Jiang, Yong; Holthofer, Harry

    2018-01-05

    Urinary extracellular vesicles (uEVs) have become a promising source for biomarkers accurately reflecting biochemical changes in kidney and urogenital diseases. Characteristically, uEVs are rich in membrane proteins associated with several cellular functions like adhesion, transport, and signaling. Hence, membrane proteins of uEVs should represent an exciting protein class with unique biological properties. In this study, we utilized uEVs to optimize the Triton X-114 detergent partitioning protocol targeted for membrane proteins and proceeded to their subsequent characterization while eliminating effects of Tamm-Horsfall protein, the most abundant interfering protein in urine. This is the first report aiming to enrich and characterize the integral transmembrane proteins present in human urinary vesicles. First, uEVs were enriched using a "hydrostatic filtration dialysis'' appliance, and then the enriched uEVs and lysates were verified by transmission electron microscopy. After using Triton X-114 phase partitioning, we generated an insoluble pellet fraction and aqueous phase (AP) and detergent phase (DP) fractions and analyzed them with LC-MS/MS. Both in- and off-gel protein digestion methods were used to reveal an increased number of membrane proteins of uEVs. After comparing with the identified proteins without phase separation as in our earlier publication, 199 different proteins were detected in DP. Prediction of transmembrane domains (TMDs) from these protein fractions showed that DP had more TMDs than other groups. The analyses of hydrophobicity revealed that the GRAVY score of DP was much higher than those of the other fractions. Furthermore, the analysis of proteins with lipid anchor revealed that DP proteins had more lipid anchors than other fractions. Additionally, KEGG pathway analysis showed that the DP proteins detected participate in endocytosis and signaling, which is consistent with the expected biological functions of membrane proteins. Finally

  20. Method for filling a reactor with a catalyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The invention relates to a method for filling a reactor with a catalyst for the carbonylation of carbonylated compounds in the gas phase. According to said method, a SILP catalyst is covered with a filling agent which is liquid under normal conditions and is volatile under carbonylation reaction...... conditions, and a thus-treated catalyst is introduced into the reactor and the reactor is sealed....

  1. Oxidation of methyl heterocyclic compounds on vanadium oxide catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimanskaya, M.V.; Lejtis, L.A.; Iovel', I.G.; Gol'dberg, Yu.Sh.; Skolmejstere, R.A.; Golender, L.O.

    1985-01-01

    Data on vapor-phase oxidation of methyl derivatives of thiophene, Δ 2 - thiazo line, pyridine, pyrazine and pyramidine on oxide vanadium-molybdenum catalysts to corresponding heterylaldehydes are generalized. The dependence of catalytic properties of oxide vanadium-molybdenum systems in oxidation reactions of methylheterocyclic compounds on V:Mo ratio in the catalyst is revealed. It is shown that heterocyclic compounds are coordinated by a heteroatom on Lewis centres of V-Mo-O-catalyst primarily with partially reduced vanadium ions

  2. Ni Catalysts Supported on Modified Alumina for Diesel Steam Reforming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonios Tribalis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nickel catalysts are the most popular for steam reforming, however, they have a number of drawbacks, such as high propensity toward coke formation and intolerance to sulfur. In an effort to improve their behavior, a series of Ni-catalysts supported on pure and La-, Ba-, (La+Ba- and Ce-doped γ-alumina has been prepared. The doped supports and the catalysts have been extensively characterized. The catalysts performance was evaluated for steam reforming of n-hexadecane pure or doped with dibenzothiophene as surrogate for sulphur-free or commercial diesel, respectively. The undoped catalyst lost its activity after 1.5 h on stream. Doping of the support with La improved the initial catalyst activity. However, this catalyst was completely deactivated after 2 h on stream. Doping with Ba or La+Ba improved the stability of the catalysts. This improvement is attributed to the increase of the dispersion of the nickel phase, the decrease of the support acidity and the increase of Ni-phase reducibility. The best catalyst of the series doped with La+Ba proved to be sulphur tolerant and stable for more than 160 h on stream. Doping of the support with Ce also improved the catalytic performance of the corresponding catalyst, but more work is needed to explain this behavior.

  3. Sulfur deactivation of fatty ester hydrogenolysis catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brands, D.S.; U-A-Sai, G.; Poels, E.K.; Bliek, A. [Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1999-08-15

    Trace organosulfur compounds present as natural impurities in oleochemical feedstocks may lead to activation of copper-containing catalysts applied for hydrogenolysis of esters toward fatty alcohols. In this paper, the sulfur deactivation of Cu/SiO{sub 2} and Cu/ZnO/SiO{sub 2} catalysts was studied in the liquid-phase hydrogenolysis of methyl palmitate. The rate of deactivation is fast and increases as a function of the sulfur-containing compound present: octadecanethiol {approx} dihexadecyl disulfide < benzyl isothiocyanate < methyl p-toluene sulfonate < dihexadecyl sulfide < dibenzothiophene. The rapid deactivation is caused by the fact that sulfur is quantitatively removed from the reaction mixture and because mainly surface sulfides are formed under hydrogenolysis conditions. The life time of a zinc-promoted catalyst is up to two times higher than that of the Cu/SiO{sub 2} catalyst, most likely due to zinc surface sulfide formation. The maximum sulfur coverage obtained after full catalyst deactivation with dibenzothiophene and dihexadecyl sulfide--the sulfur compounds that cause the fastest deactivation--may be as low as 0.07. This is due to the fact that decomposition of these compounds as well as the hydrogenolysis reaction itself proceeds on ensembles of copper atoms. Catalyst regeneration studies reveal that activity cannot be regained by reduction or combined oxidation/reduction treatments. XRD, TPR, and TPO results confirm that no distinct bulk copper or zinc sulfide or sulfate phases are present.

  4. Data-driven risk identification in phase III clinical trials using central statistical monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Catherine; Venet, David; Burzykowski, Tomasz

    2016-02-01

    Our interest lies in quality control for clinical trials, in the context of risk-based monitoring (RBM). We specifically study the use of central statistical monitoring (CSM) to support RBM. Under an RBM paradigm, we claim that CSM has a key role to play in identifying the "risks to the most critical data elements and processes" that will drive targeted oversight. In order to support this claim, we first see how to characterize the risks that may affect clinical trials. We then discuss how CSM can be understood as a tool for providing a set of data-driven key risk indicators (KRIs), which help to organize adaptive targeted monitoring. Several case studies are provided where issues in a clinical trial have been identified thanks to targeted investigation after the identification of a risk using CSM. Using CSM to build data-driven KRIs helps to identify different kinds of issues in clinical trials. This ability is directly linked with the exhaustiveness of the CSM approach and its flexibility in the definition of the risks that are searched for when identifying the KRIs. In practice, a CSM assessment of the clinical database seems essential to ensure data quality. The atypical data patterns found in some centers and variables are seen as KRIs under a RBM approach. Targeted monitoring or data management queries can be used to confirm whether the KRIs point to an actual issue or not.

  5. A methodological approach for the identification of arsenic bearing phases in polluted soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matera, V.; Le Hecho, I.; Laboudigue, A.; Thomas, P.; Tellier, S.; Astruc, M.

    2003-01-01

    Arsenic in the three polluted soils is mainly associated with neoformed amorphous iron (hydr)oxides. - A methodological approach is used to characterize arsenic pollution in three soils and to determine arsenic speciation and association with solid phases in three polluted soils. HPLC-ICP-MS was used for arsenic speciation analysis, SEM-EDS and XRD for physical characterization of arsenic pollution, and sequential chemical extractions to identify arsenic distribution. Arsenic was concentrated in the finest size fractions also enriched in iron and aluminium. Total arsenic concentrations in soils are close to 1%. Arsenic was mainly present as arsenate, representing more than 90% of total arsenic. No crystallised arsenic minerals were detected by XRD analysis. SEM-EDS observations indicated arsenic/iron associations. Modified Tessier's procedure showed that arsenic was mainly extracted from amorphous iron oxide phase. The results of this methodological approach lead to predict the formation of iron arsenates in the case of one of the studied soils while arsenic sorption on iron amorphous (hydr)oxides seemed to be the determinant in the two other soils

  6. Characterization of steam-reforming catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos D. C. R.M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the addition of Mg and Ca to Ni/ a-Al2O3 catalysts was investigatedstudied, aiming to detail the promotion mechanismaddress their role as promoters in the steam reforming reaction. Temperature- programmed reduction and H2 and CO temperature-programmed desorption experiments indicated that Mg interacts with the metallic phase. Mg-promoted catalysts showed a greater difficulty for Ni precursors reduction besides different probe molecules (H2 and CO adsorbed states. In the conversion of cyclohexane, Mg inhibited the formation of hydrogenolysis products. Nonetheless, the presence of Ca did not influence the metallic phase.

  7. The combined use of EBSD and EDX analyses for the identification of complex intermetallic phases in multicomponent Al-Si piston alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.-L.; Thomson, R.C.

    2010-01-01

    Multicomponent Al-Si based casting alloys are used for a variety of engineering applications, including for example, piston alloys. Properties include good castability, high strength, light weight, good wear resistance and low thermal expansion. In order for such alloys to continue operation to increasingly higher temperatures, alloy element modifications are continually being made to further enhance the properties. Improved mechanical and physical properties are strongly dependent upon the morphologies, type and distribution of the second phases, which are in turn a function of alloy composition and cooling rate. The presence of additional elements in the Al-Si alloy system allows many complex intermetallic phases to form, which make characterisation non-trivial. These include, for example, CuAl 2 , Al 3 Ni 2 , Al 7 Cu 4 Ni, Al 9 FeNi and Al 5 Cu 2 Mg 8 Si 6 phases, all of which may have some solubility for additional elements. Identification is often non-trivial due to the fact that some of the phases have either similar crystal structures or only subtle changes in their chemistries. A combination of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) has therefore been used for the identification of the various phases. This paper will present comparisons of phase identification methodologies using EBSD alone, and in combination with chemical information, either directly or through post processing.

  8. Automatic identification of solid-phase medication intake using wireless wearable accelerometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui Wang; Sitova, Zdenka; Xiaoqing Jia; Xiang He; Abramson, Tobi; Gasti, Paolo; Balagani, Kiran S; Farajidavar, Aydin

    2014-01-01

    We have proposed a novel solution to a fundamental problem encountered in implementing non-ingestion based medical adherence monitoring systems, namely, how to reliably identify pill medication intake. We show how wireless wearable devices with tri-axial accelerometer can be used to detect and classify hand gestures of users during solid-phase medication intake. Two devices were worn on the wrists of each user. Users were asked to perform two activities in the way that is natural and most comfortable to them: (1) taking empty gelatin capsules with water, and (2) drinking water and wiping mouth. 25 users participated in this study. The signals obtained from the devices were filtered and the patterns were identified using dynamic time warping algorithm. Using hand gesture signals, we achieved 84.17 percent true positive rate and 13.33 percent false alarm rate, thus demonstrating that the hand gestures could be used to effectively identify pill taking activity.

  9. Rapid and Robust Cross-Correlation-Based Seismic Phase Identification Using an Approximate Nearest Neighbor Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibi, R.; Young, C. J.; Gonzales, A.; Ballard, S.; Encarnacao, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    The matched filtering technique involving the cross-correlation of a waveform of interest with archived signals from a template library has proven to be a powerful tool for detecting events in regions with repeating seismicity. However, waveform correlation is computationally expensive, and therefore impractical for large template sets unless dedicated distributed computing hardware and software are used. In this study, we introduce an Approximate Nearest Neighbor (ANN) approach that enables the use of very large template libraries for waveform correlation without requiring a complex distributed computing system. Our method begins with a projection into a reduced dimensionality space based on correlation with a randomized subset of the full template archive. Searching for a specified number of nearest neighbors is accomplished by using randomized K-dimensional trees. We used the approach to search for matches to each of 2700 analyst-reviewed signal detections reported for May 2010 for the IMS station MKAR. The template library in this case consists of a dataset of more than 200,000 analyst-reviewed signal detections for the same station from 2002-2014 (excluding May 2010). Of these signal detections, 60% are teleseismic first P, and 15% regional phases (Pn, Pg, Sn, and Lg). The analyses performed on a standard desktop computer shows that the proposed approach performs the search of the large template libraries about 20 times faster than the standard full linear search, while achieving recall rates greater than 80%, with the recall rate increasing for higher correlation values. To decide whether to confirm a match, we use a hybrid method involving a cluster approach for queries with two or more matches, and correlation score for single matches. Of the signal detections that passed our confirmation process, 52% were teleseismic first P, and 30% were regional phases.

  10. Cloud phase identification of Arctic boundary-layer clouds from airborne spectral reflection measurements: test of three approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ehrlich

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Arctic boundary-layer clouds were investigated with remote sensing and in situ instruments during the Arctic Study of Tropospheric Aerosol, Clouds and Radiation (ASTAR campaign in March and April 2007. The clouds formed in a cold air outbreak over the open Greenland Sea. Beside the predominant mixed-phase clouds pure liquid water and ice clouds were observed. Utilizing measurements of solar radiation reflected by the clouds three methods to retrieve the thermodynamic phase of the cloud are introduced and compared. Two ice indices IS and IP were obtained by analyzing the spectral pattern of the cloud top reflectance in the near infrared (1500–1800 nm wavelength spectral range which is characterized by ice and water absorption. While IS analyzes the spectral slope of the reflectance in this wavelength range, IS utilizes a principle component analysis (PCA of the spectral reflectance. A third ice index IA is based on the different side scattering of spherical liquid water particles and nonspherical ice crystals which was recorded in simultaneous measurements of spectral cloud albedo and reflectance.

    Radiative transfer simulations show that IS, IP and IA range between 5 to 80, 0 to 8 and 1 to 1.25 respectively with lowest values indicating pure liquid water clouds and highest values pure ice clouds. The spectral slope ice index IS and the PCA ice index IP are found to be strongly sensitive to the effective diameter of the ice crystals present in the cloud. Therefore, the identification of mixed-phase clouds requires a priori knowledge of the ice crystal dimension. The reflectance-albedo ice index IA is mainly dominated by the uppermost cloud layer (τ<1.5. Therefore, typical boundary-layer mixed-phase clouds with a liquid cloud top layer will

  11. Alloy catalyst material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel alloy catalyst material for use in the synthesis of hydrogen peroxide from oxygen and hydrogen, or from oxygen and water. The present invention also relates to a cathode and an electrochemical cell comprising the novel catalyst material, and the process use...... of the novel catalyst material for synthesising hydrogen peroxide from oxygen and hydrogen, or from oxygen and water....

  12. Metal catalysts fight back

    OpenAIRE

    George Marsh

    1998-01-01

    In recent years organometallic catalysts, especially metallocenes, have been a major focus of attention in terms of polymerisation chemistry. But the news earlier this year of a family of iron-based catalysts able to rival the effectiveness of both conventional and metallocene catalysts in the polymerisation of ethylene has excited the plastics industry. Because of the impact of this discovery and its potential as a route to lower-priced commodity plastics in the future, it may be useful at t...

  13. Calcined eggshell (CES): An efficient natural catalyst for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    hydes with active methylene compounds using calcined eggshell (CES) as an efficient ... of the important reactions to achieve carbon–carbon ... solid catalyst for biodiesel production,24 as a catalyst ... which supports for adsorption of water on CaO and ... The organic phase .... After extraction of the product with ethylac-.

  14. Catalytic oxidation of albendazole using molybdenum supported on carbon nanotubes as catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun-Kou, Maria del Rosario; Vega Carrasco, Edgar R.; Picasso Escobar, Gino I.

    2013-01-01

    The catalytic oxidation reaction of the thioether group (-S-) in the structure to the drug albendazole (C 12 H 15 N 3 O 2 S) was studied in order to obtain a pharmacologically active molecule known as albendazole sulfoxide. With this purpose, three heterogeneous catalysts were prepared using molybdenum (Mo) as active phase and carbon nanotubes as a multiple-layer catalyst support. The incorporation of the active phase was performed by wet impregnation, with subsequent calcination for 4 hours at 400 o C. For the catalytic oxidation reaction was employed hydrogen peroxide-urea (H 2 NCONH 2 ·H 2 O 2 ) as oxidizing agent and methanol (CH 3 OH) as reaction medium. The textural and morphology characterization of carbon nanoparticles and catalysts was carried out by adsorption-desorption of N 2 (BET) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The identification and quantification of the reaction products were followed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), respectively. With the yield, selectivity and conversion higher than 90% after 60 minutes of reaction, albendazole sulphoxide was obtained as major product of oxidation reaction. (author)

  15. Ab initio identification of the Li-rich phase in LiFePO4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hua; Gu, Yue; Teng, Gaofeng; Liu, Yimeng; Zheng, Jiaxin; Pan, Feng

    2018-06-27

    A recent discovery of anionic redox activity in Li-rich layered compounds opens a new direction for the design of high-capacity cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries. Here using extensive ab initio calculations, the thermodynamic existence of the Li-rich phase in LiFePO4 to form Li1+xFe1-xPO4 with x not exceeding 12.5% has been proved. Anionic redox activity and structural stability during delithiation are further investigated. Interestingly, it is found that Li1+xFe1-xPO4 cannot be delithiated completely and thus cannot achieve extra capacity by anionic redox activity, because the local oxygen-ion redox will cause the fracture of the rigid framework formed by phosphate tetrahedral polyanions. Although an extra capacity cannot be realized, the excess Li-ions at Fe sites can enhance the Li-ion diffusivity along the adjacent [010] channel and contribute to the shift from 1D to 2D/3D diffusion. This study provides a fresh perspective on olivine-type LiFePO4 and offers some important clues on designing Li-rich cathode materials with high energy density.

  16. The Focinator v2-0 - Graphical Interface, Four Channels, Colocalization Analysis and Cell Phase Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeck, Sebastian; Malewicz, Nathalie M; Hurst, Sebastian; Al-Refae, Klaudia; Krysztofiak, Adam; Jendrossek, Verena

    2017-07-01

    The quantitative analysis of foci plays an important role in various cell biological methods. In the fields of radiation biology and experimental oncology, the effect of ionizing radiation, chemotherapy or molecularly targeted drugs on DNA damage induction and repair is frequently performed by the analysis of protein clusters or phosphorylated proteins recruited to so called repair foci at DNA damage sites, involving for example γ-H2A.X, 53BP1 or RAD51. We recently developed "The Focinator" as a reliable and fast tool for automated quantitative and qualitative analysis of nuclei and DNA damage foci. The refined software is now even more user-friendly due to a graphical interface and further features. Thus, we included an R-script-based mode for automated image opening, file naming, progress monitoring and an error report. Consequently, the evaluation no longer required the attendance of the operator after initial parameter definition. Moreover, the Focinator v2-0 is now able to perform multi-channel analysis of four channels and evaluation of protein-protein colocalization by comparison of up to three foci channels. This enables for example the quantification of foci in cells of a specific cell cycle phase.

  17. Hydrogen production from bio-fuels using precious metal catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasel, Joachim; Wohlrab, Sebastian; Rotov, Mikhail; Löhken, Katrin; Peters, Ralf; Stolten, Detlef

    2017-11-01

    Fuel cell systems with integrated autothermal reforming unit require active and robust catalysts for H2 production. Thus, an experimental screening of catalysts for autothermal reforming of commercial biodiesel fuel was performed. Catalysts consisted of a monolithic cordierite substrate, an oxide support (γ-Al2O3) and Pt, Ru, Ni, PtRh and PtRu as active phase. Experiments were run by widely varying the O2/C and H2O/C molar ratios at different gas hourly space velocities. Fresh and aged catalysts were characterized by temperature programmed methods and thermogravimetry to find correlations with catalytic activity and stability.

  18. Hydrogen production from bio-fuels using precious metal catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasel Joachim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fuel cell systems with integrated autothermal reforming unit require active and robust catalysts for H2 production. Thus, an experimental screening of catalysts for autothermal reforming of commercial biodiesel fuel was performed. Catalysts consisted of a monolithic cordierite substrate, an oxide support (γ-Al2O3 and Pt, Ru, Ni, PtRh and PtRu as active phase. Experiments were run by widely varying the O2/C and H2O/C molar ratios at different gas hourly space velocities. Fresh and aged catalysts were characterized by temperature programmed methods and thermogravimetry to find correlations with catalytic activity and stability.

  19. Hydroxide catalysts for lignin depolymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckham, Gregg T.; Biddy, Mary J.; Chmely, Stephen C.; Sturgeon, Matthew

    2017-04-25

    Solid base catalysts and their use for the base-catalyzed depolymerization (BCD) of lignin to compounds such as aromatics are presented herein. Exemplary catalysts include layered double hydroxides (LDHs) as recyclable, heterogeneous catalysts for BCD of lignin.

  20. Hydroxide catalysts for lignin depolymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckham, Gregg T; Biddy, Mary J.; Kruger, Jacob S.; Chmely, Stephen C.; Sturgeon, Matthew

    2017-10-17

    Solid base catalysts and their use for the base-catalyzed depolymerization (BCD) of lignin to compounds such as aromatics are presented herein. Exemplary catalysts include layered double hydroxides (LDHs) as recyclable, heterogeneous catalysts for BCD of lignin.

  1. Phase identification and morphology study of hematite (Fe2O3) with sintering time varitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazirin, Cepi; Puspitasari, Poppy; Sasongko, Muhammad Ilman Nur; Tsamroh, Dewi Izzatus; Risdanareni, Puput

    2017-09-01

    Iron oxide has been the interest of many studies due to its applications in various scientific and industrial fields including in environment, corrosion, soil science, and exhaust emissions. Iron oxide (Fe2O3) has potential applications in catalytic reactions in electronic devices such as semiconductors, paint formulations, and lithium rechargeable batteries. Fe2O3 can be synthesized through the process of stirring, decomposition of organic iron, sol-gel, combustion, and evaporating solvents. Most of the methods used involve several steps and take a long time. The aim of this research was to investigate the phase and morphology characterization of iron oxide (Fe2O3) powder with solvent ethylene glycol after being sintered for 1 hour, 2 hours and 3 hours. The characterization tools utilized were XRD, SEM-EDX, and FTIR. The results of XRD analysis showed that the Fe2O3 sintered for 1 hour had the smallest crystallite size with a diameter of 21.05 nm. In the XRD test, the beam of X-ray was shot directly at the grain being tested. The results of SEM analysis showed thatthe Fe2O3 sintered for 1 hour produced the best result due to its crystallite size of 12.36 nm and hada shape of homogeneous nanosphere; the duration of sintering indeed had a great influence on the grain size of iron oxide (Fe2O3). In addition, the results of the elemental composition analysis indicate that the longer the sintering process, the higher the concentration of O but the lower the Fe.

  2. IDENTIFICATION OF THE MASS DISTRIBUTIONS OF THE MILK FAT PHASE USING UNIVERSAL PEARSON DISTRIBUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Khvostov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we consider the problem of approximating the experimental values of the coefficient of attenuation of ultrasonic oscillations and the mass distribution of the fat globules in the milk and milk products. The analysis of experimental data in terms of the choice of the method of approximation was done. A approximating dependence is based on the solution of Pearson differential equations. The advantages of the proposed method for the type of approximation of the experimental data obtained. An algorithm for constructing a mathematical model describing the relaxation spectrum and mass distribution of the fat globules in the milk and milk products was implemented. As a result, a family of Pearson approximation curves of the experimental data shows the ability to qualitatively correctly describe the change in the distribution of the fat phase in the process of homogenization. It estimates the error of approximating dependence, which amounted to 18 %. It is shown that during of the process of homogenization of dairy products changes shape of the curve describing the distribution of the fat globules, in view of the fact that there is a local extremum, caused by the presence of the non-homogenized fat globules. The accuracy of the selected mathematical model is significantly reduced. At the same time, it loses its physical meaning and its parameters. To address the identified deviations in the proposed mass distribution of fat globules as a function with two modes. It is proved that the complexity of the model is not only doubles the number of its parameters, but also complicates the interpretation of measurement results in a control system, and makes it difficult to analyze the obtained parameters of approximation by decision-maker. As a result of approximation of experimental data suggested to use statistical moments of the distribution for problem decision.

  3. Sulfidation of alumina-supported iron and iron-molybdenum oxide catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramselaar, W.L.T.M.; Crajé, M.W.J.; Hadders, R.H.; Gerkema, E.; Beer, de V.H.J.; Kraan, van der A.M.

    1990-01-01

    The transition of alumina-supported iron and iron-molybdenum catalysts from the oxidic precursor to the sulfided catalysts was systematically studied by means of in-situ Mössbauer spectroscopy at room temperature. This enabled the adjudgement of various sulfidic phases in the sulfided catalysts. The

  4. Hydroprocessing catalyst development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boorman, P.M.; Kydd, R.A.; Sorensen, T.S.; Chong, K.; Lewis, J.

    1992-08-01

    Co-Mo and Ni-Mo hydroprocessing catalysts were examined for their activity in removal of sulfur from thiophene in model compounds, and in the cracking and hydrocracking of cumene. Three types of support materials were examined: carbon, modified carbon, and carbon covered alumina. The objective of the study was to examine the correlation between catalyst activity in the hydrodenitrogenation of model compounds, and the resistance of the catalyst to nitrogen poisoning during use in the hydroprocessing of gas oils. The use of model compound testing provided information on the individual catalytic reactions promoted by those materials. Infrared spectroscopy was used to study surface species on the catalysts and to explain many of the trends in activity observed, revealing the role of fluoride and phosphorus as a secondary promoter. Testing of the catalysts in hydrotreating of gas oils allowed comparison of model compound results with those from a real feedstock. The gas oil was also spiked with a model nitrogen compound and the results from catalytic hydrotreating of this material were compared with those from unspiked material. A key finding was that the carbon supported catalysts were the most effective in treating high-nitrogen feeds. The very favorable deactivation properties of carbon and carbon-covered alumina supported catalysts make these promising from an industrial point of view where catalyst deactivation is a limiting factor. 171 refs., 25 figs., 43 tabs.

  5. Catalyst for hydrocarbon conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duhaut, P.; Miquel, J.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given for a catalyst and process for hydrocarbon conversions, e.g., reforming. The catalyst contains an alumina carrier, platinum, iridium, at least one metal selected from uranium, vanadium, and gallium, and optionally halogen in the form of metal halide of one of the aforesaid components. (U.S.)

  6. Catalyst for Ammonia Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation, a method for producing a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation and a method for tuning the catalytic activity of a transition metal. By depositing an overlayer of less catalytic active metal onto a more catalytic...

  7. Reducible oxide based catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Levi T.; Kim, Chang Hwan; Bej, Shyamal K.

    2010-04-06

    A catalyst is disclosed herein. The catalyst includes a reducible oxide support and at least one noble metal fixed on the reducible oxide support. The noble metal(s) is loaded on the support at a substantially constant temperature and pH.

  8. Thermal decomposition of phase-stabilised ammonium nitrate (PSAM), HTPB based propellants. The effect of iron(III)oxide burning-rate catalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalheira, P.; Gadiot, G.M.H.J.L.; Klerk, W.P.C. de

    1995-01-01

    Phase-stabilised ammonium nitrate (PSAN) and hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) are the main ingredients of propellants used with success in some pyrotechnic igniter components of the VULCAIN liquid rocket engine for the ARIANE 5. Small amounts of selected additives play an important role in

  9. Identification and quantification of organic pollutants in the air of the city of Astana using solid phase microextraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Orazbayeva

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Solid-phase microextraction in combination with gas chromatography and mass-spectrometry (GC-MS was used for determination of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and o-xylene (BTEX, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH, and for identification of volatile organic compounds (VOCs in ambient air of the city of Astana, Kazakhstan. The screening of the samples showed the presence of mono- and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, alkanes, alkenes, phenols, and benzaldehydes. The concentrations of naphthalene were 5-7 times higher than the permissible value, it was detected in all studied air samples. Average concentration of naphthalene was 18.4 μg/m3, acenaphthylene – 0.54 μg/m3, acenaphthene – 1.63 μg/m3, fluorene – 0.79 μg/m3, anthracene – 3.27 μg/m3, phenanthrene – 0.22 μg/m3, fluorantene – 0.74 μg/m3, pyrene – 0.73 μg/m3. Average concentrations of BTEX in the studied samples were 31.1, 84.9, 10.8 and 11.6 μg/m3, respectively. Based on the statistical analysis of the concentrations of BTEX and PAH, the main source of city air pollution with them was assumed to be vehicle emissions.

  10. Identification, measurement, and assessment of water cycle of unhusked rice agricultural phases: Case study at Tangerang paddy field, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartono, N.; Laurence; Johannes, H. P.

    2017-11-01

    According to one of UN reports, water scarcity has happened all around the world, including Indonesia. Irrigation sector takes up 70% of world water consumption and potentially increases 20% due to the population explosion. Rice is accounted for 69% of agricultural products contributions in Indonesia’s water footprint. Therefore, evaluation of water cycle was essential to raise awareness among practitioners. Data collections were conducted in the functional unit of one-hectare rice field located in Tangerang. This study used CropWat 8.0 and SimaPro software. Identification involved data such as climate, crop, and soil. Nursery became the highest water consumed phase, requiring 419 mm in height. Measurement through water footprint resulted in consumption of green water footprint for 8,183,618.5 liters (62.9%), followed by grey for 4,805,733.2 liters (36.9%) and blue for 23,902.36 liters (0.2%). The grey consumption was exceeding the average, which indicated high doses of pesticides. Life Cycle Assessment showed negative impacts of fertilizers that caused damages like fossil depletion, respiratory health, and eutrophication.

  11. Selective propene oxidation on mixed metal oxide catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, David William

    2002-01-01

    Selective catalytic oxidation processes represent a large segment of the modern chemical industry and a major application of these is the selective partial oxidation of propene to produce acrolein. Mixed metal oxide catalysts are particularly effective in promoting this reaction, and the two primary candidates for the industrial process are based on iron antimonate and bismuth molybdate. Some debate exists in the literature regarding the operation of these materials and the roles of their catalytic components. In particular, iron antimonate catalysts containing excess antimony are known to be highly selective towards acrolein, and a variety of proposals for the enhanced selectivity of such materials have been given. The aim of this work was to provide a direct comparison between the behaviour of bismuth molybdate and iron antimonate catalysts, with additional emphasis being placed on the component single oxide phases of the latter. Studies were also extended to other antimonate-based catalysts, including cobalt antimonate and vanadium antimonate. Reactivity measurements were made using a continuous flow microreactor, which was used in conjunction with a variety of characterisation techniques to determine relationships between the catalytic behaviour and the properties of the materials. The ratio of Fe/Sb in the iron antimonate catalyst affects the reactivity of the system under steady state conditions, with additional iron beyond the stoichiometric value being detrimental to the acrolein selectivity, while extra antimony provides a means of enhancing the selectivity by decreasing acrolein combustion. Studies on the single antimony oxides of iron antimonate have shown a similarity between the reactivity of 'Sb 2 O 5 ' and FeSbO 4 , and a significant difference between these and the Sb 2 O 3 and Sb 2 O 4 phases, implying that the mixed oxide catalyst has a surface mainly comprised of Sb 5+ . The lack of reactivity of Sb 2 O 4 implies a similarity of the surface with

  12. ETEM Studies of Electrodes and Electro-catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jooss, Christian; Mildner, Stephanie; Beleggia, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Environmental TEM is an excellent tool for gaining insight into the atomic and electronic structure of electro-catalysts under operating conditions. Several electrochemical reactions such as oxidation/reduction processes of electrodes, heterogeneous gas phase catalysis of water splitting...

  13. Palladium catalyst system comprising zwitterion and/or acid-​functionalized ionic liquid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention concerns a catalyst system in particular a catalyst system comprising Palladium (Pd), a zwitterion and/or an acid-functionalized ionic liquid, and one or more phosphine ligands, wherein the Pd catalyst can be provided by a complex precursor, such as Pd(CH3COO)2, PdCI2, Pd(CH3...... methyl methacrylate and/or methacrylic acid. Catalyst systems according to the invention are suitable for reactions forming separable product and catalyst phases and supported ionic liquid phase SILP applications....

  14. Metal-Organic-Framework mediated supported-cobalt catalysts in multiphase hydrogenation reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, X.

    2017-01-01

    The production of most industrially important chemicals involves catalysis. Depending on the difference in phases between the catalysts and reactants, one distinguishes homogenous catalysis and heterogeneous catalysis, with the latter being more attractive in real applications, due to the easy separation of products from catalysts and reusing the latter. In spite of the research and development of heterogeneous catalysts for decades, the exploration for catalysts system with outstanding activ...

  15. Research advances in the catalysts for the selective oxidation of ethane to aldehydes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhe; ZHAO Zhen; XU Chunming

    2005-01-01

    Selective oxidation of ethane to aldehydes is one of the most difficult processes in the catalysis researches of low alkanes. The development of selective oxidation of ethane to aldehydes (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and acrolein) is discussed. The latest progress of the catalysts, including bulk or supported metal oxide catalysts, highly dispersed and isolated active sites catalysts, and the photo-catalytic ethane oxidation catalysts, partial oxidation of ethane in the gas phase, and the proposed reaction pathways from ethane to aldehydes are involved.

  16. Moessbauer investigations of the Fe-Cu-Mn catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spanu, V.; Filoti, G.; Ilie, I.; Zamfirescu, E.

    1990-01-01

    In the selective process of the syngas conversion to synthetic gasoline a bifunctional catalytic system has to be used. It was obtained by combination a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst with the HZSM-5 zeolite. The phase compositions of the precursor and the fresh catalyst were established as well as the optimum thermal treatment. The catalyst was reduced in pure H 2 or in a H 2 +CO mixture. The influence of the reduction and reaction conditions on the catalyst structure was investigated. (orig.)

  17. Three-dimensional electron diffraction as a complementary technique to powder X-ray diffraction for phase identification and structure solution of powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Yifeng; Zou, Xiaodong; Hovmöller, Sven; Wan, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Phase identification and structure determination are important and widely used techniques in chemistry, physics and materials science. Recently, two methods for automated three-dimensional electron diffraction (ED) data collection, namely automated diffraction tomography (ADT) and rotation electron diffraction (RED), have been developed. Compared with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and two-dimensional zonal ED, three-dimensional ED methods have many advantages in identifying phases and determining unknown structures. Almost complete three-dimensional ED data can be collected using the ADT and RED methods. Since each ED pattern is usually measured off the zone axes by three-dimensional ED methods, dynamic effects are much reduced compared with zonal ED patterns. Data collection is easy and fast, and can start at any arbitrary orientation of the crystal, which facilitates automation. Three-dimensional ED is a powerful technique for structure identification and structure solution from individual nano- or micron-sized particles, while powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) provides information from all phases present in a sample. ED suffers from dynamic scattering, while PXRD data are kinematic. Three-dimensional ED methods and PXRD are complementary and their combinations are promising for studying multiphase samples and complicated crystal structures. Here, two three-dimensional ED methods, ADT and RED, are described. Examples are given of combinations of three-dimensional ED methods and PXRD for phase identification and structure determination over a large number of different materials, from Ni-Se-O-Cl crystals, zeolites, germanates, metal-organic frameworks and organic compounds to intermetallics with modulated structures. It is shown that three-dimensional ED is now as feasible as X-ray diffraction for phase identification and structure solution, but still needs further development in order to be as accurate as X-ray diffraction. It is expected that three-dimensional ED methods

  18. Three-dimensional electron diffraction as a complementary technique to powder X-ray diffraction for phase identification and structure solution of powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifeng Yun

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Phase identification and structure determination are important and widely used techniques in chemistry, physics and materials science. Recently, two methods for automated three-dimensional electron diffraction (ED data collection, namely automated diffraction tomography (ADT and rotation electron diffraction (RED, have been developed. Compared with X-ray diffraction (XRD and two-dimensional zonal ED, three-dimensional ED methods have many advantages in identifying phases and determining unknown structures. Almost complete three-dimensional ED data can be collected using the ADT and RED methods. Since each ED pattern is usually measured off the zone axes by three-dimensional ED methods, dynamic effects are much reduced compared with zonal ED patterns. Data collection is easy and fast, and can start at any arbitrary orientation of the crystal, which facilitates automation. Three-dimensional ED is a powerful technique for structure identification and structure solution from individual nano- or micron-sized particles, while powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD provides information from all phases present in a sample. ED suffers from dynamic scattering, while PXRD data are kinematic. Three-dimensional ED methods and PXRD are complementary and their combinations are promising for studying multiphase samples and complicated crystal structures. Here, two three-dimensional ED methods, ADT and RED, are described. Examples are given of combinations of three-dimensional ED methods and PXRD for phase identification and structure determination over a large number of different materials, from Ni–Se–O–Cl crystals, zeolites, germanates, metal–organic frameworks and organic compounds to intermetallics with modulated structures. It is shown that three-dimensional ED is now as feasible as X-ray diffraction for phase identification and structure solution, but still needs further development in order to be as accurate as X-ray diffraction. It is expected that three

  19. Facile solid-phase ruthenium assisted azide-alkyne cycloaddition (RuAAC) utilizing the Cp*RuCl(COD)-catalyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engholm, Ebbe; sgz228, sgz228; Blixt, Klas Ola

    2017-01-01

    The ruthenium assisted azide-alkyne cycloaddition (RuAAC) reaction is a well-established method for the generation of 1,5- and 1,4,5-substituted 1,2,3-triazoles, which we have extended to the solid-phase synthesis of 1,2,3-triazole-peptides. The 1,2,3-triazole moieties were formed upon the reacti...

  20. Induced Voltages Ratio-Based Algorithm for Fault Detection, and Faulted Phase and Winding Identification of a Three-Winding Power Transformer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung Eun Lee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an algorithm for fault detection, faulted phase and winding identification of a three-winding power transformer based on the induced voltages in the electrical power system. The ratio of the induced voltages of the primary-secondary, primary-tertiary and secondary-tertiary windings is the same as the corresponding turns ratio during normal operating conditions, magnetic inrush, and over-excitation. It differs from the turns ratio during an internal fault. For a single phase and a three-phase power transformer with wye-connected windings, the induced voltages of each pair of windings are estimated. For a three-phase power transformer with delta-connected windings, the induced voltage differences are estimated to use the line currents, because the delta winding currents are practically unavailable. Six detectors are suggested for fault detection. An additional three detectors and a rule for faulted phase and winding identification are presented as well. The proposed algorithm can not only detect an internal fault, but also identify the faulted phase and winding of a three-winding power transformer. The various test results with Electromagnetic Transients Program (EMTP-generated data show that the proposed algorithm successfully discriminates internal faults from normal operating conditions including magnetic inrush and over-excitation. This paper concludes by implementing the algorithm into a prototype relay based on a digital signal processor.

  1. Catalysts, methods of making catalysts, and methods of use

    KAUST Repository

    Renard, Laetitia; El Eter, Mohamad; Caps, Valerie; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for catalysts, methods of making catalysts, methods of using catalysts, and the like. In an embodiment, the method of making the catalysts can be performed in a single step with a metal nanoparticle precursor and a metal oxide precursor, where a separate stabilizing agent is not needed.

  2. Catalysts, methods of making catalysts, and methods of use

    KAUST Repository

    Renard, Laetitia

    2014-03-06

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for catalysts, methods of making catalysts, methods of using catalysts, and the like. In an embodiment, the method of making the catalysts can be performed in a single step with a metal nanoparticle precursor and a metal oxide precursor, where a separate stabilizing agent is not needed.

  3. Moessbauer spectroscopic investigations of Fe/Mn-Fischer-Tropsch-catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deppe, P.; Papp, H.; Rosenberg, M.

    1986-01-01

    The phase composition of Fe/Mn oxide catalysts of different compositions after 200 h of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis have been investigated by Moessbauer spectroscopy at room temperature, 77 K and 5 K. The final composition of the bulk catalysts depends strongly on the Mn content and the temperature of reduction before the synthesis. Catalytic activity and selectivity are partly correlated to this phase composition. (Auth.)

  4. Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Brien, R.J.; Raje, A.; Keogh, R.A. [and others

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this research project is to develop the technology for the production of physically robust iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that have suitable activity, selectivity and stability to be used in the slurry phase synthesis reactor development. The catalysts that are developed shall be suitable for testing in the Advanced Fuels Development Facility at LaPorte, Texas, to produce either low-or high-alpha product distributions. Previous work by the offeror has produced a catalyst formulation that is 1.5 times as active as the {open_quotes}standard-catalyst{close_quotes} developed by German workers for slurry phase synthesis. In parallel, work will be conducted to design a high-alpha iron catalyst this is suitable for slurry phase synthesis. Studies will be conducted to define the chemical phases present at various stages of the pretreatment and synthesis stages and to define the course of these changes. The oxidation/reduction cycles that are anticipated to occur in large, commercial reactors will be studied at the laboratory scale. Catalyst performance will be determined for catalysts synthesized in this program for activity, selectivity and aging characteristics.

  5. Catalyst in Basic Oleochemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Suyenty

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Currently Indonesia is the world largest palm oil producer with production volume reaching 16 million tones per annum. The high crude oil and ethylene prices in the last 3 – 4 years contribute to the healthy demand growth for basic oleochemicals: fatty acids and fatty alcohols. Oleochemicals are starting to replace crude oil derived products in various applications. As widely practiced in petrochemical industry, catalyst plays a very important role in the production of basic oleochemicals. Catalytic reactions are abound in the production of oleochemicals: Nickel based catalysts are used in the hydrogenation of unsaturated fatty acids; sodium methylate catalyst in the transesterification of triglycerides; sulfonic based polystyrene resin catalyst in esterification of fatty acids; and copper chromite/copper zinc catalyst in the high pressure hydrogenation of methyl esters or fatty acids to produce fatty alcohols. To maintain long catalyst life, it is crucial to ensure the absence of catalyst poisons and inhibitors in the feed. The preparation methods of nickel and copper chromite catalysts are as follows: precipitation, filtration, drying, and calcinations. Sodium methylate is derived from direct reaction of sodium metal and methanol under inert gas. The sulfonic based polystyrene resin is derived from sulfonation of polystyrene crosslinked with di-vinyl-benzene. © 2007 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.[Presented at Symposium and Congress of MKICS 2007, 18-19 April 2007, Semarang, Indonesia][How to Cite: E. Suyenty, H. Sentosa, M. Agustine, S. Anwar, A. Lie, E. Sutanto. (2007. Catalyst in Basic Oleochemicals. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 2 (2-3: 22-31.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.2.2-3.6.22-31][How to Link/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.2.2-3.6.22-31 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/6

  6. ALKALI RESISTANT CATALYST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention concerns the selective removal of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from gasses. In particular, the invention concerns a process, a catalyst and the use of a catalyst for the selective removal of nitrogen oxides in the presence of ammonia from gases containing a significant amount...... of alkali metal and/or alkali-earth compounds which process comprises using a catalyst combined of (i) a formed porous superacidic support, said superacidic support having an Hammett acidity stronger than Ho=-12, and (ii) a metal oxide catalytic component deposited on said superacidic support selected from...

  7. Physics-Based Identification, Modeling and Risk Management for Aeroelastic Flutter and Limit-Cycle Oscillations (LCO), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed research program will develop a physics-based identification, modeling and risk management infrastructure for aeroelastic transonic flutter and...

  8. Identification of a Catalytically Highly Active Surface Phase for CO Oxidation over PtRh Nanoparticles under Operando Reaction Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejral, U.; Franz, D.; Volkov, S.; Francoual, S.; Strempfer, J.; Stierle, A.

    2018-03-01

    Pt-Rh alloy nanoparticles on oxide supports are widely employed in heterogeneous catalysis with applications ranging from automotive exhaust control to energy conversion. To improve catalyst performance, an atomic-scale correlation of the nanoparticle surface structure with its catalytic activity under industrially relevant operando conditions is essential. Here, we present x-ray diffraction data sensitive to the nanoparticle surface structure combined with in situ mass spectrometry during near ambient pressure CO oxidation. We identify the formation of ultrathin surface oxides by detecting x-ray diffraction signals from particular nanoparticle facets and correlate their evolution with the sample's enhanced catalytic activity. Our approach opens the door for an in-depth characterization of well-defined, oxide-supported nanoparticle based catalysts under operando conditions with unprecedented atomic-scale resolution.

  9. Preparation of biodiesel from soybean oil by using heterogeneous catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferdous, Kaniz; Rakib Uddin, M.; Islam, M.A. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Polymer Science, Shah Jalal University of Science and Technology, Sylhet 3114 (Bangladesh); Khan, Maksudur R. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Polymer Science, Shah Jalal University of Science and Technology, Sylhet 3114 (Bangladesh); Faculty of Chemical and Natural Resources Engineering, University Malaysia Pahang, 26300 Gambang, Kuantan, Pahang (Malaysia)

    2013-07-01

    The predicted shortage of fossil fuels and related environmental concerns has recently attracted significant attention to search alternative fuel. Biodiesel is one of the alternatives to fossil fuel. Now-a-days, most biodiesel is produced by the transesterification of oils using methanol and a homogeneous base catalyst. The use of homogeneous catalysts is normally limited to batch mode processing followed by a catalyst separation step. The immiscible glycerol phase, which accumulates during the course of the reaction, solubilizes the homogeneous base catalyst and therefore, withdraws from the reaction medium. Moreover, other difficulties of using homogeneous base catalysts relate to their sensitivity to free fatty acid (FFA) and water and resulting saponification phenomenon. High energy consumption and costly separation of the catalyst from the reaction mixture have inspired the use of heterogeneous catalyst. The use of heterogeneous catalysts does not lead to the formation of soaps through neutralization of FFA and saponification of oil. In the present paper, biodiesel was prepared from crude (soybean) oil by transesterification reaction using heterogeneous base catalyst name calcium oxide (CaO). Various reaction parameters were optimized and the biodiesel properties were evaluated.

  10. Magnetic properties, microstructure and mineralogical phases of technogenic magnetic particles (TMPs) in urban soils: Their source identification and environmental implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Shenggao, E-mail: lusg@zju.edu.cn [College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Yu, Xiuling [College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Chen, Yuyin [Institute of Biological Resources, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic measurement is an effective method to determine spatial distribution and the degree of heavy metal pollution and to identify various anthropogenic sources of heavy metals. The objectives of this investigation are to characterize the magnetic properties, microstructure and mineralogical phases of technogenic magnetic particles (TMPs) in urban soils and to discuss their potential environmental implications. The TMPs are separated from the urban topsoils of Luoyang city, China. The magnetic properties, morphology, and mineral phase of TMPs are studied using mineral magnetic measurement, scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS), X-ray diffraction, and synchrotron–radiation-based microprobe. The content of TMPs in urban topsoils ranges from 0.05 to 1.95% (on average 0.32%). The magnetic susceptibility of TMPs ranges from 4559 × 10{sup −8} to 23,661 × 10{sup −8} m{sup 3} kg{sup −1} (on average 13,637 × 10{sup −8} m{sup 3} kg{sup −1}). Thermomagnetic and bulk X-ray diffraction analyses indicate that main magnetic minerals of TMPs are magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) and hematite (α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}). The morphology of TMPs observed by SEM includes three shape types: spherule, irregular-shaped, and aggregate particles. The size of spherical TMPs ranges from 30 to about 200 μm, with the largest percentage of 30–50 μm. Synchrotron–radiation-based microprobe (μ-XRF and μ-XRD) indicates that TMPs are enriched with heavy metals Pb, Cd, Zn, Cu, and Cr, which are incorporated into lattice or adsorbed on the surface of magnetite/hematite. The content of TMPs significantly relates with the Tomlinson Pollution Load Index (PLI) (R{sup 2} = 0.467), suggesting that it can be used as proxy indicator of degree of heavy metal contamination in urban soils. The magnetic properties, microstructure and mineralogical phases of TMPs can serve as the identification of pollution sources in urban soils. - Graphical

  11. Identification and verification of critical performance dimensions. Phase 1 of the systematic process redesign of drug distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colen, Hadewig B; Neef, Cees; Schuring, Roel W

    2003-06-01

    Worldwide patient safety has become a major social policy problem for healthcare organisations. As in other organisations, the patients in our hospital also suffer from an inadequate distribution process, as becomes clear from incident reports involving medication errors. Medisch Spectrum Twente is a top primary-care, clinical, teaching hospital. The hospital pharmacy takes care of 1070 internal beds and 1120 beds in an affiliated psychiatric hospital and nursing homes. In the beginning of 1999, our pharmacy group started a large interdisciplinary research project to develop a safe, effective and efficient drug distribution system by using systematic process redesign. The process redesign includes both organisational and technological components. This article describes the identification and verification of critical performance dimensions for the design of drug distribution processes in hospitals (phase 1 of the systematic process redesign of drug distribution). Based on reported errors and related causes, we suggested six generic performance domains. To assess the role of the performance dimensions, we used three approaches: flowcharts, interviews with stakeholders and review of the existing performance using time studies and medication error studies. We were able to set targets for costs, quality of information, responsiveness, employee satisfaction, and degree of innovation. We still have to establish what drug distribution system, in respect of quality and cost-effectiveness, represents the best and most cost-effective way of preventing medication errors. We intend to develop an evaluation model, using the critical performance dimensions as a starting point. This model can be used as a simulation template to compare different drug distribution concepts in order to define the differences in quality and cost-effectiveness.

  12. Optical properties and secondary phase identification in PLD-grown Cu2ZnSnS4 for thin-film photovoltaics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crovetto, Andrea; Cazzaniga, Andrea Carlo; Ettlinger, Rebecca Bolt

    2014-01-01

    -bath-deposited CdS due to its important use as a buffer layer in chalcogenide solar cells. The validity of the optical model used to derive optical constants by ellipsometry is discussed in relation to results from direct measurement methods such as UV-visible spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM...... in CZTS films independently of the chosen deposition technique. Identification by standard X-ray diffraction (XRD) of some of those phases is challenging since their diffraction peaks overlap with CZTS peaks. In this study we employ Raman spectroscopy to determine which secondary phases are incorporated...

  13. The identification of carbide phases by XRD analysis as the method of assess the extent of the steel damage after long time in service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Pietryka

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available After long time in service in contact in a superheated steam mechanical properties of materials decrease. Experiments revealed that the XRD analysis of electrocemically separated carbide phase is a rapid and informative method of evaluation the service condition of steel. Mechanical properties of ferritic and bainitic low-alloy steels are caused by many factors like: chemical composition, quantity and the kind of microstructural constituent, the precipitation hardening, substructure of matrix and index of matrix lattice defects. In this paper the results of investigations 13CrMo4-5 steel was shown. The material for research was taken from thermal power plant elements. Material A was after 150.000 hours of work as the pressure chamber in which was the temperature 530-580oC and the pressure was 12 MPa. Material B was after 250000 hours of work as the pipeline of superheated steam. The temperature in this case was 530oC but the pressure was 12 MPa as well. The mechanical properties after long time service and changes in fine structure were tested. Parameters of carbide phase electrochemical separation in electrolytes solutions are presented in this work.The most relevant electrolyte and the far better conditions of extraction process were chosen taking into consideration the time needed to get considerable amount of carbide phase constituents. The identification of carbide phases was the special goal of this work. Identification of electrochemically separated carbide phases by means of the XRD analysis was used.

  14. Microstructure formation and in situ phase identification from undercooled Co-61.8 at.% Si melts solidified on an electromagnetic levitator and an electrostatic levitator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Mingjun [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Materials Research Institute for Sustainable Development, 2266-98 Shimo-Shidami, Moriyama, Nagoya, Aichi 463-8560 (Japan); Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), Tsukuba Space Centre, ISS Science Project Office, 2-1-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8505 (Japan)], E-mail: li.mingjun@aist.go.jp; Nagashio, Kosuke [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), Sagamihara Campus, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8510 (Japan); Ishikawa, Takehiko [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), Tsukuba Space Centre, ISS Science Project Office, 2-1-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8505 (Japan); Mizuno, Akitoshi; Adachi, Masayoshi; Watanabe, Masahito [Department of Physics, Gakushuin University, 1-5-1 Mejiro, Toshima, Tokyo 171-8588 (Japan); Yoda, Shinichi [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), Tsukuba Space Centre, ISS Science Project Office, 2-1-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8505 (Japan); Kuribayashi, Kazuhiko [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), Sagamihara Campus, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8510 (Japan); Katayama, Yoshinori [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1-1-1 Kouto, Mikazuki, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2008-06-15

    Co-61.8 at.% Si (CoSi-CoSi{sub 2}) eutectic alloys were solidified on an electromagnetic levitator (EML) and an electrostatic levitator (ESL) at different undercooling levels. The results indicated that there is only a single recalescence event at low undercooling with the CoSi intermetallic compound as primary phase, which is independent of processing facilities, on either an EML or an ESL. The microstructure, however, is strongly dependent on the processing facility. The interior melt flow behavior in the sphere solidified at the EML differs substantially from that at the ESL, thus yielding different microstructures. On high undercooling, double recalescence takes place regardless of levitation condition. In situ X-ray diffraction of alloys solidified on the EML demonstrates that the CoSi{sub 2} compound becomes the primary phase upon the first recalescence, and the CoSi intermetallic phase crystallizes during the second recalescence. In addition to phase identification, real-time diffraction patterns can also provide additional evidence of the fragmentation of the primary phase and the ripening feature in the subsequent cooling process in the semisolid state. The phase competition between the CoSi and CoSi{sub 2} compounds is discussed when considering the nucleation barrier. The low interfacial energy of the CoSi{sub 2} phase favors a preferential nucleation event over the CoSi phase, which also plays a critical role in non-reciprocity nucleation and thus yields a double recalescence profile at high undercooling.

  15. Identification method for gas-liquid two-phase flow regime based on singular value decomposition and least square support vector machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Bin; Zhou Yunlong; Zhao Peng; Guan Yuebo

    2007-01-01

    Aiming at the non-stationary characteristics of differential pressure fluctuation signals of gas-liquid two-phase flow, and the slow convergence of learning and liability of dropping into local minima for BP neural networks, flow regime identification method based on Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) and Least Square Support Vector Machine (LS-SVM) is presented. First of all, the Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) method is used to decompose the differential pressure fluctuation signals of gas-liquid two-phase flow into a number of stationary Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMFs) components from which the initial feature vector matrix is formed. By applying the singular vale decomposition technique to the initial feature vector matrixes, the singular values are obtained. Finally, the singular values serve as the flow regime characteristic vector to be LS-SVM classifier and flow regimes are identified by the output of the classifier. The identification result of four typical flow regimes of air-water two-phase flow in horizontal pipe has shown that this method achieves a higher identification rate. (authors)

  16. Hydrogen evolution from aqueous-phase photocatalytic reforming of ethylene glycol over Pt/TiO{sub 2} catalysts: Role of Pt and product distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Fuying [State Key Laboratory of Photocatalysis on Energy and Environment, Research Institute of Photocatalysis, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); College of Resources and Chemical Engineering, Sanming University, Sanming 365004 (China); Gu, Quan [Key Laboratory of Applied Surface and Colloid Chemistry, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710062 (China); Niu, Yu [College of Resources and Chemical Engineering, Sanming University, Sanming 365004 (China); School of Chemical Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350116 (China); Wang, Renzhang [College of Resources and Chemical Engineering, Sanming University, Sanming 365004 (China); Tong, Yuecong; Zhu, Shuying; Zhang, Hualei [State Key Laboratory of Photocatalysis on Energy and Environment, Research Institute of Photocatalysis, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Zhang, Zizhong, E-mail: z.zhang@fzu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Photocatalysis on Energy and Environment, Research Institute of Photocatalysis, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Wang, Xuxu [State Key Laboratory of Photocatalysis on Energy and Environment, Research Institute of Photocatalysis, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China)

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Photocatalytic EG reforming generates many hydrocarbons besides H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} and CO. • Pt loading greatly improves the photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2} for EG reforming. • Half amount of the produced H{sub 2} over Pt/TiO{sub 2} originates from EG reforming. - Abstract: Pt nanoparticles were loaded on anatase TiO{sub 2} by the photodeposition method to investigate their photocatalytic activity for H{sub 2} evolution in an aqueous solution containing a certain amount of ethylene glycol (EG) as the sacrificial agent. The surface properties and chemical states of the Pt/TiO{sub 2} sample were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction analysis, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller surface area analysis, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance, and electrochemical resistance. The aqueous-phase photocatalytic EG reforming using Pt/TiO{sub 2} and anatase TiO{sub 2} generated not only H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}, but also CO, CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}. Moreover, the amount of formate and acetate complexes in the solution increased gradually. The EG adsorption and gas-phase intermediates during photocatalytic reaction processes were investigated by the in situ FTIR spectrum. Finally, the photocatalytic EG reforming reaction mechanism was elucidated. This helped to better understand the role of a sacrificial agent in a photocatalytic hydrogen production.

  17. Catalyst for microelectromechanical systems microreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Jeffrey D [Martinez, CA; Sopchak, David A [Livermore, CA; Upadhye, Ravindra S [Pleasanton, CA; Reynolds, John G [San Ramon, CA; Satcher, Joseph H [Patterson, CA; Gash, Alex E [Brentwood, CA

    2010-06-29

    A microreactor comprising a silicon wafer, a multiplicity of microchannels in the silicon wafer, and a catalyst coating the microchannels. In one embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a nanostructured material. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises an aerogel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a solgel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises carbon nanotubes.

  18. Epoxidation catalyst and process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linic, Suljo; Christopher, Phillip

    2010-10-26

    Disclosed herein is a catalytic method of converting alkenes to epoxides. This method generally includes reacting alkenes with oxygen in the presence of a specific silver catalyst under conditions suitable to produce a yield of the epoxides. The specific silver catalyst is a silver nanocrystal having a plurality of surface planes, a substantial portion of which is defined by Miller indices of (100). The reaction is performed by charging a suitable reactor with this silver catalyst and then feeding the reactants to the reactor under conditions to carry out the reaction. The reaction may be performed in batch, or as a continuous process that employs a recycle of any unreacted alkenes. The specific silver catalyst has unexpectedly high selectivity for epoxide products. Consequently, this general method (and its various embodiments) will result in extraordinarily high epoxide yields heretofore unattainable.

  19. EXAFS characterization of supported metal catalysts in chemically dynamic environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robota, H.J.

    1991-01-01

    Characterization of catalysts focuses on the identification of an active site responsible for accelerating desirable chemical reactions. The identification, characterization, and selective modification of such sites is fundamental to the development of structure-function relationships. Unfortunately, this goal is far from realized in nearly all catalysts, and particularly in catalysts comprised of small supported metal particles. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has had a dramatic effect on our understanding of supported metal particles in their resting state. However, the performance of a catalyst can not be assessed from such simple resting state measurements. Among the factors which influence catalyst performance are the exact catalyst composition, including the support and any modifiers; particle size; catalyst finishing and pretreatment conditions; pressure, composition, and temperature of the operating environment; time. Gaining an understanding of how the structure of a catalytic site can change with such an array of variables requires that we begin to develop measurement methods which are effective under chemically dynamic conditions. Ideally, it should be possible to obtain a full X-ray absorption spectrum of each element thought to have a causal relationship with observed catalyst properties. From these spectra, we can optimally extract only a relatively limited amount of information which we must then piece together with information derived from other characterization methods and intuition to arrive at a hypothetical structure of the operating catalyst. Information about crystallinity, homogeneity, and general disorder can be obtained from the Debye-Waller factor. Finally, through analogy with known compounds, the electronic structure of the active atoms can be inferred from near edge absorption features

  20. Wet chemical synthesis of nickel supported on alumina catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freire, Ranny Rodrigues; Costa, Talita Kenya Oliveira; Morais, Ana Carla da Fonseca Ferreira; Costa, Ana Cristina Figueiredo de Melo; Freitas, Normanda Lino de

    2016-01-01

    Heterogenic catalysts are those found to be in a different phase on the reaction when compared to the reactants and products. Preferred when compared to homogeneous catalysts due to the easiness on which the separation is processed. The objective of this study is to obtain and characterize Alumina based catalysts impregnated with Nickel (Al_2O_3), by wet impregnation. The alumina was synthesized by combustion reaction. Before and after the impregnation the catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), granulometric analysis, the textural analysis will be held by nitrogen adsorption (BET), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results show a presence of a stable crystalline phase of Al2O3 in all the studied samples and after the impregnation the second phase formed was of NiO and NiAl_2O_4. The Al_2O_3 e Ni/Al_2O_3 catalysts resulted in clusters with a medium diameter of 18.9 and 14.2 μm, respectively. The catalysts show a medium-pore characteristic (medium pore diameter between 2 and 50 nm), the superficial area to Al_2O_3 and Ni/Al_2O_3 catalysts were 8.69 m"2/g and 5.56 m"2/g, respectively. (author)

  1. The origin of the selectivity and activity of ruthenium-cluster catalysts for fuel-cell feed-gas purification: a gas-phase approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Sandra M; Bernhardt, Thorsten M; Krstić, Marjan; Bonačić-Koutecký, Vlasta

    2014-05-19

    Gas-phase ruthenium clusters Ru(n)(+) (n=2-6) are employed as model systems to discover the origin of the outstanding performance of supported sub-nanometer ruthenium particles in the catalytic CO methanation reaction with relevance to the hydrogen feed-gas purification for advanced fuel-cell applications. Using ion-trap mass spectrometry in conjunction with first-principles density functional theory calculations three fundamental properties of these clusters are identified which determine the selectivity and catalytic activity: high reactivity toward CO in contrast to inertness in the reaction with CO2; promotion of cooperatively enhanced H2 coadsorption and dissociation on pre-formed ruthenium carbonyl clusters, that is, no CO poisoning occurs; and the presence of Ru-atom sites with a low number of metal-metal bonds, which are particularly active for H2 coadsorption and activation. Furthermore, comprehensive theoretical investigations provide mechanistic insight into the CO methanation reaction and discover a reaction route involving the formation of a formyl-type intermediate. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Phase I - Smart Grid Data Access Pilot Program: Utilizing STEM Education as a Catalyst for Residential Consumer Decision Making and Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lishness, Alan [Gulf Of Maine Research Inst., Portland, ME (United States); Peake, Leigh [Gulf Of Maine Research Inst., Portland, ME (United States)

    2014-11-19

    Under Phase I of the Smart Grid Data Access Pilot Program, the Gulf of Maine Research Institute (GMRI) partnered with Central Maine Power (CMP), and the Maine Mathematics and Science Alliance (MMSA) and engaged key vendors Tilson Government Services, LLC (Tilson), and Image Works to demonstrate the efficacy of PowerHouse, an interactive online learning environment linking middle school students with their home electricity consumption data provided through CMP’s Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI). The goal of the program is to harness the power of youth to alter home energy consumption behaviors using AMI data. Successful programs aimed at smoking cessation, recycling, and seat belt use have demonstrated the power of young people to influence household behaviors. In an era of increasing concern about energy costs, availability, and human impacts on global climate, GMRI sought to demonstrate the effectiveness of a student-focused approach to understanding and managing household energy use. We also sought to contribute to a solid foundation of science-literate students who can analyze evidence to find solutions to increasingly complex energy challenges.

  3. Effect of preparation method on catalytic activity of Ni/ γ-Al2O3 catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda Morales, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    The performance of catalysts was shown to be strongly dependent on their methods of preparation. A study to examine the relationship between catalyst preparation procedures and the structure, dispersion, activity, and selectivity of the finished catalyst is reported. 10 wt.%Ni/γ-Al 2 O 3 catalysts were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation and by wet impregnation. The catalysts were used in the conversion of glycerol in gas phase and atmospheric pressure. The selectivity and activity of the catalysts were affected by the preparation method employed. The catalysts were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), N 2 -physorption, H 2 -chemisorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO). The Ni particle size and dispersion of the catalysts affected the selectivity to hydrogenolysis and dehydration routes, and the formation of carbon deposits was also affected. (author) [es

  4. Acid Dissolution of Depleted Uranium from Catalyst using Microwave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Jin Hyun; Jeong, Seong Gi; Park, Kwang Heon [Kyunghee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    The separation process of uranium is one of the most important fields in nuclear industry because uranium is used primary in nuclear power plants. Uranium ores are treated by either acid or alkaline reagents. Uranium can be dissolved by acid or alkaline solutions. There are two oxidation states in which the hexavalent form, the oxide of which is UO{sub 3}, and the tetravalent form, the oxide of which is UO{sub 2}. However, depleted uranium(DU) has also been used as a catalyst in specialized chemical reaction such as ammoxidation. The preferred catalyst for propylene oxidation with ammonia was a uranium oxide-antimony oxide composition. The active phase of catalyst was known as USbO{sub 5} and USb{sub 3}O{sub 10}. There is pentavalent form. Waste catalyst containing DU was generated and stored in chemical industry. In this work, we removed DU from catalyst by acid dissolution

  5. Single Turnover at Molecular Polymerization Catalysts Reveals Spatiotemporally Resolved Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easter, Quinn T; Blum, Suzanne A

    2017-10-23

    Multiple active individual molecular ruthenium catalysts have been pinpointed within growing polynorbornene, thereby revealing information on the reaction dynamics and location that is unavailable through traditional ensemble experiments. This is the first single-turnover imaging of a molecular catalyst by fluorescence microscopy and allows detection of individual monomer reactions at an industrially important molecular ruthenium ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) catalyst under synthetically relevant conditions (e.g. unmodified industrial catalyst, ambient pressure, condensed phase, ca. 0.03 m monomer). These results further establish the key fundamentals of this imaging technique for characterizing the reactivity and location of active molecular catalysts even when they are the minor components. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Catalyst Schools' Implementation of the Learning School Approach. Catalyst Schools Research Study Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Patricia Cahape

    2016-01-01

    "Catalyst schools" were 28 elementary and secondary schools selected to participate in a pilot project begun in July 2014, which explored how best to support teacher professional learning through decentralization of decision making and implementation of the Learning School approach. The pilot project was the first phase in a statewide…

  7. Rutile vanadium antimonates. A new class of catalysts for selective reduction of NO with ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brazdil, James F.; Ebner, Ann M.; Cavalcanti, Fernando A.P. [BP Chemicals Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes a new class of vanadium containing oxide catalysts that are active and selective for the selective catalytic reduction of NO with ammonia. Vanadium antimony oxide based catalysts were found to be effective in the conversion of NO with little or no ammonia slippage when tested using gas mixtures containing between 300 and 700ppm NO. X-ray diffraction analyses of the catalysts show that the dominant phase present in the catalyst is vanadium antimonate having a defect rutile crystal structure. The catalysts are active and selective in the ranges of 400-460C and gas hourly space velocities of 3000-8000h{sup -1}

  8. Identification and characterization of the intermediate phase in hybrid organic-inorganic MAPbI3 perovskite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xin; McCleese, Christopher; Kolodziej, Charles; Samia, Anna C S; Zhao, Yixin; Burda, Clemens

    2016-03-07

    Perovskite films were prepared using single step solution deposition at different annealing temperatures and annealing times. The crystal structure, phases and grain size were investigated with XRD, XPS and SEM/EDX. The prepared films show a typical orientation of tetragonal perovskite phase and a gradual transition at room temperature from the yellow intermediate phase to the black perovskite phase. Films with high purity were obtained by sintering at 100 °C. In addition, the chemical composition and crystal structure of intermediate phase were investigated in detail. FTIR, UV-vis and NMR spectra revealed the occurance of DMF complexes. Interestingly, the intermediate phase could be transformed to the black perovskite phase upon X-ray irradiation. In addition, the recovery of the aged perovskite films from a yellow intermediate phase back to the black perovskite was shown to be viable via heating and X-ray irradiation.

  9. Gross Mal distribution Identification and Effect of Inlet Distributor on the Phase Holdup in a Trickle Bed Reactor Using Gamma-Ray Densitometry (GRD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Fitri Abdul Rahman; Alexander, V.; Al-Dahhan, M.

    2016-01-01

    Local liquid and gas mal distribution and their holdups in a packed column are difficult to identify due to multiphase properties and other design factors. Good liquid and gas flow distribution important to determine to get high performance of Trickle Bed Reactor (TBR). Gross mal distribution indicates some faulty or bad flow distribution of liquid and gas. In this work, gross mal distribution of phases has been identified using Gamma Ray Densitometry (GRD) technique with three types of inlet distributors (single inlet towards the wall, single inlet at the center, and proper shower) by measuring line average diameter profile of phases (Liquid, Gas, and Solids) holdups. Gamma-ray densitometry is a non-invasive technique which can be implemented at the laboratory, pilot plant, and industrial scales reactors. Experiments were performed on 0.14 m diameter reactor made of Plexiglas filled with 0.003 m glass bead which acts as the solid. The superficial velocities for both gas and liquid were in the range 0.03 m/s to 0.27 m/s and 0.004 m/s to 0.014 m/s respectively. Proper shower distributor showed early liquid spreading than compared with other distributors. The effect of superficial gas velocity on liquid spread was seen to be non-significant, and liquid distribution is found to be almost uniform at the center region of the catalyst bed. (author)

  10. Bimetallic catalysts for continuous catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuny, A; Bengoa, C; Font, J; Fabregat, A

    1999-01-29

    Catalytic wet oxidation has proved to be effective at eliminating hazardous organic compounds, such as phenol, from waste waters. However, the lack of active long-life oxidation catalysts which can perform in aqueous phase is its main drawback. This study explores the ability of bimetallic supported catalysts to oxidize aqueous phenol solutions using air as oxidant. Combinations of 2% of CoO, Fe2O3, MnO or ZnO with 10% CuO were supported on gamma-alumina by pore filling, calcined and later tested. The oxidation was carried out in a packed bed reactor operating in trickle flow regime at 140 degrees C and 900 kPa of oxygen partial pressure. Lifetime tests were conducted for 8 days. The pH of the feed solution was also varied. The results show that all the catalysts tested undergo severe deactivation during the first 2 days of operation. Later, the catalysts present steady activity until the end of the test. The highest residual phenol conversion was obtained for the ZnO-CuO, which was significantly higher than that obtained with the 10% CuO catalyst used as reference. The catalyst deactivation is related to the dissolution of the metal oxides from the catalyst surface due to the acidic reaction conditions. Generally, the performance of the catalysts was better when the pH of the feed solution was increased.

  11. Isobutane alkylation over solid catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozorezov, Y.I.; Lisin, V.I.

    1979-05-01

    Commercial alumina modified with 6Vertical Bar3< by wt boron trifluoride was active in isobutane alkylation with ethylene in a flow reactor at 5:1 isobutane-ethylene and 5-20 min reaction time. The reaction rate was first-order in ethylene and increased with increasing temperature (20/sup 0/-80/sup 0/C) and ethylene pressure (0.2-3 atm). The calculated activation energy was 8.4 kj. Kinetic data and the activity of tert.-butyl chloride, but not ethyl chloride as alkylating agents in place of ethylene suggested a carbonium-ion chain mechanism involving both surface and gas-phase reactions. The ethylene-based yield of the alkylate decreased from 132 to 41Vertical Bar3< by wt after nine hours on stream, and its bromine number increased from 0.2 to 1 g Br/sub 2//100 ml. This inhibition was attributed to adsorption on the active acidic sites of the reaction products, particularly C/sub 10//sup +/ olefins. Catalyst stabilization could probably be achieved by selecting an appropriate solvent that would continuously desorb the inhibiting products from the catalyst surface.

  12. Identification of intermetallic phases in a eutectic Al-Si casting alloy using electron backscatter diffraction pattern analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kral, M.V.; McIntyre, H.R.; Smillie, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    Intermetallic phases in sand cast eutectic Al-Si alloys were characterized using a combination of SEM, EDS and EBSD pattern analysis. Chinese script α-phase particles were consistent with cubic Al 19 (Fe,Mn) 5 Si 2 . Plate-shaped β-phase particles were consistent with tetragonal Al 3 (Fe,Mn)Si 2

  13. Effect of Au Precursor and Support on the Catalytic Activity of the Nano-Au-Catalysts for Propane Complete Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshid M. Ali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic activity of nano-Au-catalyst(s for the complete propane oxidation was investigated. The results showed that the nature of both Au precursor and support strongly influences catalytic activity of the Au-catalyst(s for the propane oxidation. Oxidation state, size, and dispersion of Au nanoparticles in the Au-catalysts, surface area, crystallinity, phase structure, and redox property of the support are the key aspects for the complete propane oxidation. Among the studied Au-catalysts, the AuHAuCl4-Ce catalyst is found to be the most active catalyst.

  14. Influence of ni addition to a low-loaded palladium catalyst on the selective hydrogenation of 1-heptyne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia R. Lederhos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Semi-hydrogenation of alkynes has industrial and academic relevance on a large scale. To increase the activity, selectivity and lifetime of monometallic catalysts, the development of bimetallic catalysts has been investigated. 1-Heptyne hydrogenation over low-loaded Pd and Ni monometallic and PdNi bimetallic catalysts was studied in liquid phase at mild conditions. XPS results suggest that nickel addition to Pd modifies the electronic state of palladium as nickel loading is increased. Low-loaded Pd catalysts showed the highest selectivities (> 95%. The most active prepared catalyst, PdNi(1%, was more selective than the Lindlar catalyst.

  15. Development of industrial hydrogenating catalyst on rhenium base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chistyakova, G.A.; Bat', I.I.; Rebrova, V.V.

    1975-01-01

    Processes for forming rhenium catalysts on carbon carrier and their catalytic properties in nitrobenzene (NB) reduction were studied. Application of an ammonia preparation to the carbon surface produced impregnated carbon saturated at room temperature with a water solution of the ammonia preparation, taken in a volume equal to the volumetric capacity of the carbon. With one impregnation, 2% rhenium was taken up. Catalysts containing more than 5% rhenium were obtained by impregnating the carbon with heating and use of more concentrated solutions. Catalysts made in this way and dried at 100 0 C had the composition Re 2 OH/carbon/. The most active catalysts were those reduced at 200-250 0 C; higher temperatures, up to 300-500 0 C, decreased the activity. Study of the catalytic properties of the rhenium catalysts in a liquid phase reduction of NB showed that the specific activity of rhenium depends only slightly on the content of the active component in the catalyst and is close to the specific activity of palladium and considerably exceeds that of nickel. Study of the effect of the NB concentration and hydrogen pressure on the activity and stability of the 5% rhenium catalyst indicated that with NB concentrations from 50 to 10% the process takes place at an essentially constant rate; the order of the reaction was close to zero with an apparent activation energy of about 7000 cal/mole. At pressures of 15-200 atm the yield with the 5% catalyst was proportional to the hydrogen pressure. A big advantage of the rhenium catalysts in the reduction of NB is their high selectivity. With a higher activity than palladium and nickel catalysts, 5% rhenium catalyst produces a high operating capacity in a wide range of contact charges, which has considerable significance for industrial use in contact apparatus of the column type. Comparison of the costs of rhenium catalysts and granular carbon carrier with those of nickel, platinum, and palladium showed that 5% rhenium catalyst can

  16. Niobium, catalyst repair kit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, K.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that niobium oxides, when small amounts are added to known catalysts, enhance catalytic activity and selectivity and prolong catalyst life. Moreover, niobium oxides exhibit a pronounced effect as supports of metal or metal oxide catalysts. Recently we found that the surface acidity of hydrated niobium pentoxide, niobic acid (Nb 2 O 5 · nH 2 O), corresponds to the acidity of 70% sulfuric acid and exhibits high catalytic activity, selectivity, and stability for acid-catalyzed reactions in which water molecules participate. Although there are few differences in electronegativity and ionic radius between niobium and its neighbors in the periodic table, it is interesting that the promoter effect, support effect, and acidic nature of niobium compounds are quite different from those of compounds of the surrounding elements. Here we review what's known of niobium compounds from the viewpoint of their pronounced catalytic behavior

  17. Moessbauer study on the formation process of Fe-K composition in iron-based catalyst for dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Keyu; Zhao Zhenjie; Yang Xielong

    2001-01-01

    Fe-K spinel structure is the predecessor of active phase of potassium promoted iron-based catalyst for dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene. Moessbauer spectroscopy has been used to study the formation process of Fe-K spinel structure which depends on the catalyst composition and preparing condition. The results may prove useful for production of industrial catalyst

  18. Catalysts for Efficient Production of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ted X.; Dong, Yi

    2009-01-01

    Several metal alloys have shown promise as improved catalysts for catalytic thermal decomposition of hydrocarbon gases to produce carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Heretofore almost every experiment on the production of carbon nanotubes by this method has involved the use of iron, nickel, or cobalt as the catalyst. However, the catalytic-conversion efficiencies of these metals have been observed to be limited. The identification of better catalysts is part of a continuing program to develop means of mass production of high-quality carbon nanotubes at costs lower than those achieved thus far (as much as $100/g for purified multi-wall CNTs or $1,000/g for single-wall CNTs in year 2002). The main effort thus far in this program has been the design and implementation of a process tailored specifically for high-throughput screening of alloys for catalyzing the growth of CNTs. The process includes an integral combination of (1) formulation of libraries of catalysts, (2) synthesis of CNTs from decomposition of ethylene on powders of the alloys in a pyrolytic chemical-vapor-decomposition reactor, and (3) scanning- electron-microscope screening of the CNTs thus synthesized to evaluate the catalytic efficiencies of the alloys. Information gained in this process is put into a database and analyzed to identify promising alloy compositions, which are to be subjected to further evaluation in a subsequent round of testing. Some of these alloys have been found to catalyze the formation of carbon nano tubes from ethylene at temperatures as low as 350 to 400 C. In contrast, the temperatures typically required for prior catalysts range from 550 to 750 C.

  19. Dynamics of Catalyst Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Willum; Cavalca, Filippo; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    and pharmaceuticals, and the cleanup of exhaust from automobiles and stationary power plants. Sintering, or thermal deactivation, is an important mechanism for the loss of catalyst activity. In order to initiate a systematic study of the dynamics and sintering of nanoparticles, various catalytic systems have been...... under gas exposure, dynamic phenomena such as sintering and growth can be observed with sub-Ångstrøm resolution. Metal nanoparticles contain the active sites in heterogeneous catalysts, which are important for many industrial applications including the production of clean fuels, chemicals...

  20. Fuel cell catalyst degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arenz, Matthias; Zana, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Fuel cells are an important piece in our quest for a sustainable energy supply. Although there are several different types of fuel cells, the by far most popular is the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). Among its many favorable properties are a short start up time and a high power density...... increasing focus. Activity of the catalyst is important, but stability is essential. In the presented perspective paper, we review recent efforts to investigate fuel cell catalysts ex-situ in electrochemical half-cell measurements. Due to the amount of different studies, this review has no intention to give...

  1. Alkylation of isobutane by butenes on zirconium sulfate catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavrenov, A.V.; Perelevskij, E.V.; Finevich, V.P.; Zajkovskij, V.I.; Paukshtis, E.A.; Duplyakiv, V.K.; Bal'zhinimaev, B.S.

    2003-01-01

    Preparation of applied zirconium sulfate catalysts obtained by the method of impregnation is investigated. Results of comparative study of structural, acid-base and catalytic properties of sulfated zirconium dioxide applied on silica gel and aluminium oxide are represented. Intervals of values of synthesis basic parameters and characteristics of catalysts properties providing achievement of high activity and selectivity in isobutane alkylation by butenes in liquid phase are determined [ru

  2. Blind identification of full-field vibration modes from video measurements with phase-based video motion magnification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongchao; Dorn, Charles; Mancini, Tyler; Talken, Zachary; Kenyon, Garrett; Farrar, Charles; Mascareñas, David

    2017-02-01

    user supervision and calibration. First a multi-scale image processing method is applied on the frames of the video of a vibrating structure to extract the local pixel phases that encode local structural vibration, establishing a full-field spatiotemporal motion matrix. Then a high-spatial dimensional, yet low-modal-dimensional, over-complete model is used to represent the extracted full-field motion matrix using modal superposition, which is physically connected and manipulated by a family of unsupervised learning models and techniques, respectively. Thus, the proposed method is able to blindly extract modal frequencies, damping ratios, and full-field (as many points as the pixel number of the video frame) mode shapes from line of sight video measurements of the structure. The method is validated by laboratory experiments on a bench-scale building structure and a cantilever beam. Its ability for output (video measurements)-only identification and visualization of the weakly-excited mode is demonstrated and several issues with its implementation are discussed.

  3. Deactivation-resistant catalyst for selective catalyst reduction of NOx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to a catalyst for selective catalytic reduction of NOx in alkali metal containing flue gas using ammonia as reductant, the catalyst comprising a surface with catalytically active sites, wherein the surface is at least partly coated with a coating comprising at least...... one metal oxide. In another aspect the present invention relates to the use of said catalyst and to a method of producing said catalyst. In addition, the present invention relates to a method of treating an catalyst for conferring thereon an improved resistance to alkali poisoning....

  4. In-situ Spectroscopic Studies and Modelling of Crystallization Processes of Sulphuric Acid Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oehlers, C.; Fehrmann, Rasmus; Masters, Stephen Grenville

    1996-01-01

    Deactivation of commercial and prototype sulphuric acid catalysts has been investigated in-situ by ESR spectroscopy. The influence of support pore structure,and the chemical composition of the catalyst and the gas phase was dicussed.A statistical lattice model was applied to describe the crystall......Deactivation of commercial and prototype sulphuric acid catalysts has been investigated in-situ by ESR spectroscopy. The influence of support pore structure,and the chemical composition of the catalyst and the gas phase was dicussed.A statistical lattice model was applied to describe...

  5. Synthetic production of fuels by the Fischer Tropsch reaction using iron catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Cepeda, Rodrigo; Pacheco Ochoa, Luis

    2004-01-01

    A series of iron catalysts were prepared on three different types of supports: alumina and two activated carbons from eucalyptus woods and tagua seeds. Potassium was used as promoter and palladium was deposited by the excess wetness impregnation method. The catalysts were characterized by N 2 adsorption at 77 K, XRD and TPR analysis and evaluated as Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. The carbon supported catalysts favour the production of liquid hydrocarbons and decrease the aqueous phase. Those supported with alumina form gases and aqueous phase as the main products. The α p parameters of the Schulz-Flory distribution show hydrocarbons between gasoline and diesel

  6. Determination of concentration distribution and velocity of a catalyst in a model of a fluidized bed reactor using nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, V.A. dos.

    1981-09-01

    A simplified model of a cracking unit was construct. The gaseous phase consisted of air, the solid phase (zeolite catalyst cracking) and both the phases circulate at the ambiente temperature in the steady state with 500 g of catalyst and air flow of 1600 1/h. Measurements for the circulation time of the solid phase (catalyst), concentration and radial distribution of catalyst have been carried out. The reduced experimental model of the cracking reactor (FCC) was used and radioctive tracer and attenuation of γ-radiation techniques were employed. (E.G.) [pt

  7. Identification of an eta boride phase as a crystallization product of a NiMoFeB amorphous alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.W.; Rabenberg, L.; Bourell, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    A new, apparently metastable, Mo--Ni boride phase has been observed in transmission electron microscope samples of rapidly consolidated MoNiFeB metallic glass powders. The phase is cubic with lattice parameter 1.083 nm. Its space group as determined by electron diffraction is Fd3-barm and its approximate composition is Mo 3 Ni 3 B. Because its structure, its composition, and its role as a transition phase are analogous to those of eta carbide (M 6 C) in steels and cemented carbides, this phase has tentatively been named ''eta boride.''

  8. Hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbaraman, Ram; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad; Tripkovic, Dusan

    2016-02-09

    Systems and methods for a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst are provided. Electrode material includes a plurality of clusters. The electrode exhibits bifunctionality with respect to the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrode with clusters exhibits improved performance with respect to the intrinsic material of the electrode absent the clusters.

  9. Heterogeneous chromium catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to a heterogeneous chromium catalyst system for the polymerisation of ethylene and/or alpha olefins prepared by the steps of: (a) providing a silica-containing support, (b) treating the silica-containing support with a chromium compound to form a chromium-based

  10. Sabatier Catalyst Poisoning Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallette, Tim; Perry, Jay; Abney, Morgan; Knox, Jim; Goldblatt, Loel

    2013-01-01

    The Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA) on the International Space Station (ISS) has been operational since 2010. The CRA uses a Sabatier reactor to produce water and methane by reaction of the metabolic CO2 scrubbed from the cabin air and the hydrogen byproduct from the water electrolysis system used for metabolic oxygen generation. Incorporating the CRA into the overall air revitalization system has facilitated life support system loop closure on the ISS reducing resupply logistics and thereby enhancing longer term missions. The CRA utilizes CO2 which has been adsorbed in a 5A molecular sieve within the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly, CDRA. There is a potential of compounds with molecular dimensions similar to, or less than CO2 to also be adsorbed. In this fashion trace contaminants may be concentrated within the CDRA and subsequently desorbed with the CO2 to the CRA. Currently, there is no provision to remove contaminants prior to entering the Sabatier catalyst bed. The risk associated with this is potential catalyst degradation due to trace organic contaminants in the CRA carbon dioxide feed acting as catalyst poisons. To better understand this risk, United Technologies Aerospace System (UTAS) has teamed with MSFC to investigate the impact of various trace contaminants on the CRA catalyst performance at relative ISS cabin air concentrations and at about 200/400 times of ISS concentrations, representative of the potential concentrating effect of the CDRA molecular sieve. This paper summarizes our initial assessment results.

  11. Catalysts for Environmental Remediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrams, B. L.; Vesborg, Peter Christian Kjærgaard

    2013-01-01

    The properties of catalysts used in environmental remediation are described here through specific examples in heterogeneous catalysis and photocatalysis. In the area of heterogeneous catalysis, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx was used as an example reaction with vanadia and tungsta...

  12. Synthesis of biodiesel using local natural zeolite as heterogeneous anion exchange catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartono, R.; Wijanarko, A.; Hermansyah, H.

    2018-04-01

    Production of biodiesel using homogen catalyst: alkaline catalysts, acid catalysts, biocatalysts, and supercritical methanol are very inefficient, because these catalysts have a very high cost production of biodiesel and non-ecofriendly. The heterogeneous catalyst is then used to avoid adverse reaction of biodiesel production. The heterogeneous catalysts used is ion exchanger using natural zeolit catalists bayah banten (ZABBrht) and macroporous lewatit that can be used to produce biodiesel in the solid phase so that the separation is easier and can be used repeatedly. The results of biodiesel reach its optimum in engineering ion exchange catalyst natural zeolit bayah and macroporous lewatit which has been impregnated and calcinated at temperature 60 °C at reaction time 2 hours, are 94.8% and 95.24%, using 100 gr.KOH/100 mL Aquadest.

  13. Catalyst support structure, catalyst including the structure, reactor including a catalyst, and methods of forming same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Norman, Staci A.; Aston, Victoria J.; Weimer, Alan W.

    2017-05-09

    Structures, catalysts, and reactors suitable for use for a variety of applications, including gas-to-liquid and coal-to-liquid processes and methods of forming the structures, catalysts, and reactors are disclosed. The catalyst material can be deposited onto an inner wall of a microtubular reactor and/or onto porous tungsten support structures using atomic layer deposition techniques.

  14. Identification and Assessment of Paradoxical Ventricular Wall Motion Using ECG Gated Blood Pool Scan - Comparison of cine Loop , Phase Analysis and Paradox Image -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Tae; Kim, Gwang Weon; Lee, Kyu Bo; Chung, Byung Chun; Whang, Kee Suk; Chae, Sung Chul; Paek, Wee Hyun; Cheon, Jae Eun; Lee, Hyong Woo; Chung, Jin Hong

    1990-01-01

    Sixty-four patients with paradoxical ventricular wall motion noticed both in angiocardiography or 2-dimensional echocardiography were assessed by ECG gated blood pool scan (GBPS). Endless cine loop image, phase and amplitude images and paradox image obtained by visual inspection of each cardiac beat or Fourier transformation of acquired raw data were investigated to determine the incremental value of GBPS with these processing methods for identification of paradoxical ventricular wall motion. The results were as follows:1) Paradoxical wall motions were observed on interventricular septum in 34 cases, left ventricular free wall in 26 and right ventricular wall in 24. Underlying heart diseases were is chemic (23 cases) valvular(9), congenital heart disease (12), cardiomyopathy (5), pericardial effusion(5), post cardiac surgery(3), corpulmonale (2), endocarditis (l) and right ventricular tumor(l). 2) Left ventricular ejection fractions of patients with paradoxical left ventricular wall motion were significantly lower than those with paradoxical septal motion (p <0.005). 3) The sensitivity of each processing methods for detecting paradoxical wall motion was 76.9% by phase analysis, 74.6% by endless cine loop mapping and 68.4% by paradox image manipulation respectively. Paradoxial motions visualized only in phase, paradox or both images were appeared as hypokinesia or akinesia in cine loop image. 4) All events could be identified by at least one of above three processing methods, however only 34 cases (48.4%) showed the paradoxical motions in all of the three images. By these findings, we concluded that simultaneous inspection of all above three processing methods-endless cine loop, phase analysis and paradox image is necessary for accurate identification and assessment of paradoxical ventricular wall motion when performing GBPS.

  15. Identification and Assessment of Paradoxical Ventricular Wall Motion Using ECG Gated Blood Pool Scan - Comparison of cine Loop , Phase Analysis and Paradox Image -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Tae; Kim, Gwang Weon; Lee, Kyu Bo; Chung, Byung Chun; Whang, Kee Suk; Chae, Sung Chul; Paek, Wee Hyun; Cheon, Jae Eun [Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyong Woo; Chung, Jin Hong [Yeongnam National University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-07-15

    Sixty-four patients with paradoxical ventricular wall motion noticed both in angiocardiography or 2-dimensional echocardiography were assessed by ECG gated blood pool scan (GBPS). Endless cine loop image, phase and amplitude images and paradox image obtained by visual inspection of each cardiac beat or Fourier transformation of acquired raw data were investigated to determine the incremental value of GBPS with these processing methods for identification of paradoxical ventricular wall motion. The results were as follows:1) Paradoxical wall motions were observed on interventricular septum in 34 cases, left ventricular free wall in 26 and right ventricular wall in 24. Underlying heart diseases were is chemic (23 cases) valvular(9), congenital heart disease (12), cardiomyopathy (5), pericardial effusion(5), post cardiac surgery(3), corpulmonale (2), endocarditis (l) and right ventricular tumor(l). 2) Left ventricular ejection fractions of patients with paradoxical left ventricular wall motion were significantly lower than those with paradoxical septal motion (p <0.005). 3) The sensitivity of each processing methods for detecting paradoxical wall motion was 76.9% by phase analysis, 74.6% by endless cine loop mapping and 68.4% by paradox image manipulation respectively. Paradoxial motions visualized only in phase, paradox or both images were appeared as hypokinesia or akinesia in cine loop image. 4) All events could be identified by at least one of above three processing methods, however only 34 cases (48.4%) showed the paradoxical motions in all of the three images. By these findings, we concluded that simultaneous inspection of all above three processing methods-endless cine loop, phase analysis and paradox image is necessary for accurate identification and assessment of paradoxical ventricular wall motion when performing GBPS.

  16. Catalysts for synthetic liquid fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce, L.A.; Turney, T.W.

    1987-12-01

    Fischer-Tropsch catalysts have been designed, characterized and tested for the selective production of hydrocarbons suitable as synthetic liquid transport fuels from synthesis gas (i.e., by the reduction of carbon monoxide with hydrogen). It was found that hydrocarbons in the middle distillate range, or suitable for conversion to that range, could be produced over several of the new catalyst systems. The various catalysts examined included: (1) synthetic cobalt clays, mainly cobalt chlorites; (2) cobalt hydrotalcites; (3) ruthenium metal supported on rare earth oxides of high surface area; and (4) a novel promoted cobalt catalyst. Active and selective catalysts have been obtained, in each category. With the exception of the clays, reproducibility of catalyst performance has been good. Catalysts in groups 2 and 4 have exhibited very high activity, with long lifetimes and easy regeneration.

  17. Real-Time Identification of Smoldering and Flaming Combustion Phases in Forest Using a Wireless Sensor Network-Based Multi-Sensor System and Artificial Neural Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiaofei; Cheng, Hong; Zhao, Yandong; Yu, Wenhua; Huang, Huan; Zheng, Xiaoliang

    2016-08-04

    Diverse sensing techniques have been developed and combined with machine learning method for forest fire detection, but none of them referred to identifying smoldering and flaming combustion phases. This study attempts to real-time identify different combustion phases using a developed wireless sensor network (WSN)-based multi-sensor system and artificial neural network (ANN). Sensors (CO, CO₂, smoke, air temperature and relative humidity) were integrated into one node of WSN. An experiment was conducted using burning materials from residual of forest to test responses of each node under no, smoldering-dominated and flaming-dominated combustion conditions. The results showed that the five sensors have reasonable responses to artificial forest fire. To reduce cost of the nodes, smoke, CO₂ and temperature sensors were chiefly selected through correlation analysis. For achieving higher identification rate, an ANN model was built and trained with inputs of four sensor groups: smoke; smoke and CO₂; smoke and temperature; smoke, CO₂ and temperature. The model test results showed that multi-sensor input yielded higher predicting accuracy (≥82.5%) than single-sensor input (50.9%-92.5%). Based on these, it is possible to reduce the cost with a relatively high fire identification rate and potential application of the system can be tested in future under real forest condition.

  18. Development of Molecular Catalysts to Bridge the Gap between Heterogeneous and Homogeneous Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Rong

    Catalysts, heterogeneous, homogeneous, and enzymatic, are comprised of nanometer-sized inorganic and/or organic components. They share molecular factors including charge, coordination, interatomic distance, bonding, and orientation of catalytically active atoms. By controlling the governing catalytic components and molecular factors, catalytic processes of a multichannel and multiproduct nature could be run in all three catalytic platforms to create unique end-products. Unifying the fields of catalysis is the key to achieving the goal of 100% selectivity in catalysis. Recyclable catalysts, especially those that display selective reactivity, are vital for the development of sustainable chemical processes. Among available catalyst platforms, heterogeneous catalysts are particularly well-disposed toward separation from the reaction mixture via filtration methods, which renders them readily recyclable. Furthermore, heterogeneous catalysts offer numerous handles - some without homogeneous analogues - for performance and selectivity optimization. These handles include nanoparticle size, pore profile of porous supports, surface ligands and interface with oxide supports, and flow rate through a solid catalyst bed. Despite these available handles, however, conventional heterogeneous catalysts are themselves often structurally heterogeneous compared to homogeneous catalysts, which complicates efforts to optimize and expand the scope of their reactivity and selectivity. Ongoing efforts are aimed to address the above challenge by heterogenizing homogeneous catalysts, which can be defined as the modification of homogeneous catalysts to render them in a separable (solid) phase from the starting materials and products. Specifically, we grow the small nanoclusters in dendrimers, a class of uniform polymers with the connectivity of fractal trees and generally radial symmetry. Thanks to their dense multivalency, shape persistence and structural uniformity, dendrimers have proven to

  19. Basic study of catalyst aging in the H-coal process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cable, T.L.; Massoth, F.E.; Thomas, M.G.

    1985-04-01

    Samples of CoMo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts used in an H-coal process demonstration run were studied to determine causes of catalyst deactivation. Physical and surface properties of the aged and regenerated catalysts were examined. Model compounds were used to assess four catalyst activity functions, viz., hydrodesulfurization (HDS), hydrogenation, cracking and hydrodeoxygenation (HDO). Other tests were performed to study the effects of coke and metals separately on the four catalyst activity functions. Catalyst coke content and metal deposits first increased rapidly, then more gradually with exposure time in the process run. Surface area and pore volume markedly decreased with exposure time. Catalyst activities of aged catalysts showed a rapid decline with exposure time. One-day exposure to coal resulted in significant losses in HDS and hydrogenation activities and nearly complete loss in cracking and HDO activities. Although metal deposits caused some permanent catalyst deactivation, coke had a much greater effect. Regenerated catalysts showed less recovery of catalytic activity as processing time increased. These results agreed well with product inspections from the process run. Oxygen chemisorption on aged-regenerated catalysts decreased with catalyst exposure time, indicating a significant loss of active sites. However, ESCA results showed no evidence of extensive sintering of the active MoS/sub 2/ phase. Permanent deactivation of the longer-time exposed catalysts can be ascribed, at least partly, to lateral growth of the active molybdenum sulfide phase. In addition, some loss in cobalt promotion occurred early in the process, which may account for the rapid loss in HDS and HDO activity in regenerated catalysts. 24 references.

  20. Palladium catalyst system comprising zwitterion and/or acid-functionalized ionic liquid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention concerns a catalyst system in particular a catalyst system comprising Palladium (Pd), a zwitterion and/or an acid-functionalized ionic liquid, and one or more phosphine ligands, wherein the Pd catalyst can be provided by a complex precursor, such as Pd(CH3COO)2, PdCI2, Pd(CH3......COCHCOCH3), Pd (CF3COO)2, Pd(PPh3)4 or Pd2(dibenzylideneacetone)3. Such catalyst systems can be used for e.g. alkoxycarbonylation reactions, carboxylation reactions, and/or in a co-polymerization reaction, e.g. in the production of methyl propionate and/or propanoic acid, optionally in processes forming...... methyl methacrylate and/or methacrylic acid. Catalyst systems according to the invention are suitable for reactions forming separable product and catalyst phases and supported ionic liquid phase SILP applications....

  1. Tri-potassium phosphate as a solid catalyst for biodiesel production from waste cooking oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guan, Guoqing; Kusakabe, Katsuki; Yamasaki, Satoko [Department of Living Environmental Science, Fukuoka Women' s University, 1-1-1 Kasumigaoka, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 813-8529 (Japan)

    2009-04-15

    Transesterification of waste cooking oil with methanol, using tri-potassium phosphate as a solid catalyst, was investigated. Tri-potassium phosphate shows high catalytic properties for the transesterification reaction, compared to CaO and tri-sodium phosphate. Transesterification of waste cooking oil required approximately two times more solid catalyst than transesterification of sunflower oil. The fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) yield reached 97.3% when the transesterification was performed with a catalyst concentration of 4 wt.% at 60 C for 120 min. After regeneration of the used catalyst with aqueous KOH solution, the FAME yield recovered to 88%. Addition of a co-solvent changed the reaction state from three-phase to two-phase, but reduced the FAME yield, contrary to the results with homogeneous catalysts. The catalyst particles were easily agglomerated by the glycerol drops derived from the homogeneous liquid in the presence of co-solvents, reducing the catalytic activity. (author)

  2. Petroleum residue upgrading with dispersed catalysts. Part 1. Catalysts activity and selectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panariti, N.; Del Bianco, A.; Del Piero, G. [ENITECNOLOGIE S.p.A, Via Maritano 26, 20097 San Donato Mil. (Italy); Marchionna, M. [SNAMPROGETTI S.p.A, Via Maritano 26, 20097 San Donato Mil. (Italy)

    2000-12-04

    The results of a study aimed at the identification of the relevant chemical aspects involved in the process of upgrading heavy feedstocks in the presence of dispersed catalysts are discussed. The catalytic activity of different compounds was compared in terms of products yields and quality. Moreover, a detailed and systematic characterization of the catalysts recovered at the end of the reactions was achieved. The experimental work provided quite a large set of data, allowing to investigate the factors that may affect catalyst activity (precursor solubility, rate of activation, degree of dispersion, presence of promoters, etc.). The results of this study demonstrate that the best performances are obtained by the microcrystalline molybdenite generated in situ by oil-soluble precursors. The nature of the organic ligand does not play a very relevant role in influencing the hydrogenation activity. The presence of phosphorus, however, significantly enhances hydrodemetallation, at least in terms of vanadium removal. Bimetallic precursors show a slight synergistic effect towards the hydrodesulfurization reaction. Microsized powdered catalyst precursors have a much lower catalytic activity compared to the oil-soluble ones.

  3. Identification of dominant structures and their flow dynamics in the turbulent two-phase flow using POD technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munir, Shahzad; Siddiqui, Muhammad Israr; Heikal, Morgan; Aziz, Abdul Rashid Abdul [Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bander Seri Iskandar (Malaysia); Sercey, Guillaume de [University of Brighton, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-15

    The Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) method has seen increasingly used in the last two decades and has a lot of applications for the comparison of experimental and numerically simulated data. The POD technique is often used to extract information about coherent structures dominating the flow. The two-dimensional and two-component instantaneous velocity fields of both liquid and gas phases of a slug flow were obtained by Particle image velocimetry (PIV) combined with Laser induced fluorescence (LIF). POD was applied to the velocity fields of both phases separately to identify the coherent flow structures. We focused on POD eigenmodes and their corresponding energy contents of both liquid and gas phases. The sum of first few eigenmodes that contain maximum turbulent kinetic energy of the flow represents the coherent structures. In the case of liquid phase the first eigenmode contained 42% of the total energy, while in the gas phase the decaying energy distribution was flat. The POD results showed that the coefficient of mode 1 for the liquid phase oscillated between positive and negative values and had the highest amplitude. For the visualization of coherent motion different linear combinations of eigenmodes for liquid and gas phases were used. The phenomena of turbulent bursting events associated with Q2 events (low momentum fluid moving away from the wall) and Q4 events (high momentum flow moving towards the wall) were also discussed to assess its contribution in turbulence production.

  4. Algorithm for Identification Electromagnetic Parameters of an Induction Motor When Running on a Three-Phase Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Odnolko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthesized algorithm for electromagnetic rotor time constant, active resistance and equivalent leakage inductance of stator induction motor for free rotating rotor. The problem is solved for induction motor model in the stationary stator frame α-β. The algorithm is based on the use of recursive least squares method, which ensures high accuracy of the parameter estimates for the minimum time. The observer does not assume prior information about the technical data machine and individual parameters of its equivalent circuit. Results of simulation demonstrated how effective of the proposed method of identification. The flexible structure of the algorithm allows it to be used for preliminary identification of an induction motor, and in the process operative work induction motor in the frequency-controlled electric drive with vector control.

  5. Vibration measurements of automobile catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aatola, Seppo

    1994-09-01

    Vibration of catalyst cell, which is inside the casing of the catalyst, is difficult to measure with usual measuring instrumentation. When catalyst is in use, there is hot exhaust gas flow though the catalyst cell and temperature of the cell is approximately +900 degree(s)C. Therefore non-contact Laser- Doppler-Vibrometer was used to measure vibration velocity of the catalyst cell. The laser beam was directed towards the cell through pipe which was put through and welded to the casing of the catalyst. The outer end of the pipe was screw down with a tempered class to prevent exhaust gas flow from the pipe. The inner end of the pipe was open and few millimeters away from the measuring point. Catalyst was attached to the engine with two ways, rigidly close to the engine and flexible under the engine. The engine was running in test bench under controlled conditions. Vibration measurements were carried out during constant running speeds of the engine. Vibration signals were captured and analyzed with FFT-analyzer. Vibration of catalyst cell was strongest at running speed of 5000 rpm, from 10 to 20 g (1 g equals 9.81 ms-2), when catalyst was attached rigidly close to the engine. At running speed of 3000 rpm, vibration of catalyst cell was from 2 to 3 g in most cases, when catalyst was attached either rigidly or flexible to the engine. It is estimated that in real life, i.e. when catalyst is attached to car with same engine, vibration of catalyst cell at running speed of 5000 rpm is somewhere between 1 and 10 g. At running speed of 3000 rpm, which may be more often used when driving car (car speed approximately 100 kmh-1), vibration of catalyst cell is probably few g's.

  6. Automated identification of best-quality coronary artery segments from multiple-phase coronary CT angiography (cCTA) for vessel analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chuan; Chan, Heang-Ping; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Chughtai, Aamer; Wei, Jun; Kazerooni, Ella A.

    2016-03-01

    We are developing an automated method to identify the best quality segment among the corresponding segments in multiple-phase cCTA. The coronary artery trees are automatically extracted from different cCTA phases using our multi-scale vessel segmentation and tracking method. An automated registration method is then used to align the multiple-phase artery trees. The corresponding coronary artery segments are identified in the registered vessel trees and are straightened by curved planar reformation (CPR). Four features are extracted from each segment in each phase as quality indicators in the original CT volume and the straightened CPR volume. Each quality indicator is used as a voting classifier to vote the corresponding segments. A newly designed weighted voting ensemble (WVE) classifier is finally used to determine the best-quality coronary segment. An observer preference study is conducted with three readers to visually rate the quality of the vessels in 1 to 6 rankings. Six and 10 cCTA cases are used as training and test set in this preliminary study. For the 10 test cases, the agreement between automatically identified best-quality (AI-BQ) segments and radiologist's top 2 rankings is 79.7%, and between AI-BQ and the other two readers are 74.8% and 83.7%, respectively. The results demonstrated that the performance of our automated method was comparable to those of experienced readers for identification of the best-quality coronary segments.

  7. Identification and Authentication Policy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gimble, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    .... We will accomplish the audit objective in two phases. In this phase, we reviewed current DoD Component policies on the use of identification and authentication controls to access information systems...

  8. Tin-antimony oxide oxidation catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, Frank J. [Open University, Department of Chemistry (United Kingdom)

    1998-12-15

    Tin-antimony oxide catalysts for the selective oxidation of hydrocarbons have been made by precipitation techniques. The dehydration of the amorphous dried precipitate by calcination at increasingly higher temperatures induces the crystallisation of a rutile-related tin dioxide-type phase and the segregation of antimony oxides which volatilise at elevated temperatures. The rutile-related tin dioxide-type phase contains antimony(V) in the bulk and antimony(III) in the surface. Specific catalytic activity for the oxidative dehydrogenation of butene to butadiene is associated with materials with large concentrations of antimony(III) in the surface.

  9. An integrated electron and optical metallographic procedure for the identification of precipitate phases in type 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slattery, G.F.; O'Riordan, P.; Lambert, M.E.; Green, S.M.

    1981-01-01

    A sequential and integrated metallographic procedure has been developed and successfully employed to differentiate between carbide, sigma, chi, Laves and ferrite phases which are commonly encountered in type 316 austenitic steel. The experimental techniques of optical and electron microscopy to identify these phases have been outlined and provide a rapid and convenient method of characterizing the microstructure of the steel. The techniques sequence involves selective metallographic etching, Nomarski interference microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive microanalysis, transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction. (author)

  10. SELECTIVE HYDROGENATION OF CINNAMALDEHYDE WITH Pt AND Pt-Fe CATALYSTS: EFFECTS OF THE SUPPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.B. da Silva

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Low-temperature reduced TiO2-supported Pt and Pt-Fe catalysts are much more active and selective for the liquid–phase hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde to unsaturated cinnamyl alcohol than the corresponding carbon-supported catalysts. High-temperature reduced catalysts, where the SMSI effect should be present, are almost inactive for this reaction. There is at present no definitive explanation for this effect but an electronic metal-support interaction is most probably involved.

  11. Catalytic properties of mineral ion-exchangers previously used in uranium ore wastes treatment. I. Ammoniac octylation in gaseous phase using Y-type faujasite catalysts containing mainly uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azzouz, A.; Nibou, D.; Abbad, B.; Achache, M.

    1990-06-01

    Y-type faujasite, previously used in purifying aqueous wastes containing radioactive elements, are studied as catalysts in heterogeneous reactions such as octanol amination. This process consists in alkylating ammoniac NH 3 by octanol-1 in a flow reactor containing a fixed bed of pelleted catalysts. Acidic catalysts like Y-type faujasite impregnated with low concentration leaching solution containing between 10 and 1000 ppm of uranium show interesting activities and selectivities in yielding primary, secondary and tertiary amines. High octanol conversions were obtained reaching 60 mol.% for appreciable selectivities for producing amines of about 60-80 mol.%. Compared to the non-active fresh zeolite, the catalysts obtained present good activities essentially due to the presence of uranyl cations UO 2 ++ . The latter seems to play the main role in activating the zeolite by enhancing its Bronsted surface acidity. Another interest of this process consists in obtaining Trioctylamine (TOA), an important extraction agent in uranium hydrometallurgy or its derivatives (MOA and DOA) which are very used in chemical industry

  12. Alumina/silica aerogel with zinc chloride as an alkylation catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DEJAN U. SKALA

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available The alumina/silica with zinc chloride aerogel alkylation catalyst was obtained using a one step sol-gel synthesis, and subsequent drying with supercritical carbon dioxide. The aerogel catalyst activity was found to be higher compared to the corresponding xerogel catalyst, as a result of the higher aerogel surface area, total pore volume and favourable pore size distribution. Mixed Al–O–Si bonds were present in both gel catalyst types. Activation by thermal treatment in air was needed prior to catalytic alkylation, due to the presence of residual organic groups on the aerogel surface. The optimal activation temperature was found to be in the range 185–225°C, while higher temperatures resulted in the removal of zinc chloride from the surface of the aerogel catalyst with a consequential decrease in the catalytic activity. On varying the zinc chloride content, the catalytic activity of the aerogel catalyst exhibited a maximum. High zinc chloride contents decreased the catalytic activity of the aerogel catalyst as the result of the pores of the catalyst being plugged with this compound, and the separation of the alumina/silica support into Al-rich and Si-rich phases. The surface area, total pore volume, pore size distribution and zinc chloride content had a similar influence on the activity of the aerogel catalyst as was the case of xerogel catalyst and supported zinc chloride catalysts.

  13. A Catalyst for Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønsmann, Dorte

    2017-01-01

    This case study of a team in an international workplace investigates processes of language socialization in a transient multilingual setting. Using interview and observational data, the analysis shows how social and linguistic norms are negotiated, with the newcomer positioned as a catalyst...... for changing language practices toward more English, with the ultimate aim of creating a 'global mindset' in the organization. Language socialization in a transient multilingual setting is shown to focus on and assign positive value to new linguistic norms that experienced members are socialized...... into in a process that hinges on new members functioning as tools for management to bring about the desired change. The article shows that while the newcomer is used as a catalyst for increased use of English and for the creation of a 'global mindset,' she is at the same time socialized into the existing Danish...

  14. Photo catalyst; Ko shokubai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    While titanium oxide is excited by the light, electrons of titanium oxide are taken away by the light energy to form positive holes. Water will be decomposed into hydrogen ion and hydroxy radical (OH) by these positive holes. This hydroxy radical is a strong reactive substance called active oxygen, it decomposes organisms. Besides this photo- catalyst function, the titanium oxide can also make surface of a substance superhydrophilic. The super hydrophilicity results in not forming water drops on the glass surface but spreading all over the surface to prevent a covering of fog on the glass surface. The published patents concerning the photo catalysts were 593 from Jan. 1998 to Jan. 1999. The applicant order is the first TOTO 143, the second Daikin Industry 19, the third Toshiba Raitech, Nitto Denko, Hitachi 17 respectively. (NEDO)

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF PRECIPITATED IRON FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukur, Dragomir B.; Lang, X.; Chokkaram, S.; Nowicki, L.; Wei, G.; Ding, Y.; Reddy, B.; Xiao, S.

    1999-01-01

    Despite the current worldwide oil glut, the US will ultimately require large-scale production of liquid (transportation) fuels from coal. Slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology, with its versatile product slate, may be expected to play a major role in production of transportation fuels via indirect coal liquefaction. Some of the F-T catalysts synthesized and tested at Texas A and M University under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-89PC89868 were more active than any other known catalysts developed for maximizing production of high molecular weight hydrocarbons (waxes). The objectives of the present contract were to demonstrate repeatability of catalyst performance and reproducibility of preparation procedures of two of these catalysts on a laboratory scale. Improvements in the catalyst performance were attempted through the use of: (a) higher reaction pressure and gas space velocity to maximize the reactor productivity; (b) modifications in catalyst preparation steps; and (c) different pretreatment procedures. Repeatability of catalyst performance and reproducibility of catalyst synthesis procedure have been successfully demonstrated in stirred tank slurry reactor tests. Reactor space-time-yield was increased up to 48% by increasing reaction pressure from 1.48 MPa to 2.17 MPa, while maintaining the gas contact time and synthesis gas conversion at a constant value. Use of calcination temperatures above 300 C, additional CaO promoter, and/or potassium silicate as the source of potassium promoter, instead of potassium bicarbonate, did not result in improved catalyst performance. By using different catalyst activation procedures they were able to increase substantially the catalyst activity, while maintaining low methane and gaseous hydrocarbon selectivities. Catalyst productivity in runs SA-0946 and SA-2186 was 0.71 and 0.86 gHC/g-Fe/h, respectively, and this represents 45-75% improvement in productivity relative to that achieved in Rheinpreussen's demonstration plant

  16. Regeneration of a deactivated USY alkylation catalyst using supercritical isobutane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel M. Ginosar; David N. Ghompson; Kyle C. Burch

    2005-01-01

    Off-line, in-situ alkylation activity recovery from a completely deactivated solid acid catalyst was examined in a continuous-flow reaction system employing supercritical isobutane. A USY zeolite catalyst was initially deactivated during the liquid phase alkylation of butene with isobutane in a single-pass reactor and then varying amounts of alkylation activity were recovered by passing supercritical isobutane over the catalyst bed at different reactivation conditions. Temperature, pressure and regeneration time were found to play important roles in the supercritical isobutane regeneration process when applied to a completely deactivated USY zeolite alkylation catalyst. Manipulation of the variables that influence solvent strength, diffusivity, surface desorption, hydride transfer rates, and coke aging, strongly influence regeneration effectiveness.

  17. High-Activity Dealloyed Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kongkanand, Anusorn [General Motors LLC, Pontiac, MI (United States)

    2014-09-30

    Reduction of costly Pt usage in proton exchange membrane fuel cell electrodes is one of the major challenges towards development and commercialization of fuel cell vehicles. Although few have met the initial-kinetic activity requirements in a realistic fuel cell device, no catalyst material has ever met the demanding fuel cell durability targets set by DOE. In this project, a team of 4 universities and 2 companies came together to investigate a concept that appeared promising in preliminary non-fuel cell tests then to further develop the catalyst to a mature level ready for vehicle implementation. The team consists of academia with technical leadership in their respective areas, a catalyst supplier, and a fuel cell system integrator.The tightly collaborative project enabled development of a highly active and durable catalyst with performance that significantly exceeds that of previous catalysts and meets the DOE targets for the first time (Figure 1A). The catalyst was then further evaluated in full-active-area stack in a realistic vehicle operating condition (Figure 1B). This is the first public demonstration that one can realize the performance benefit and Pt cost reduction over a conventional pure Pt catalyst in a long-term realistic PEMFC system. Furthermore, systematic analyses of a range of catalysts with different performance after fuel cell testing allowed for correlation between catalyst microstructure and its electrocatalytic activity and durability. This will in turn aid future catalyst development.

  18. Investigation and development of heavy oil upgrading catalysts. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.K.; Lee, I.C.; Yoon, W.L.; Lee, H.T.; Chung, H.; Hwang, Y.J.; Park, S.H. [Korea Inst. of Energy Research, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    This study aimed at the domestic development of HDS catalysts which are most fundamental and wide-used in the petroleum refinery. In this year, some experimental works were conducted for developing the effective utilization technology of the novel dispersed-catalysts in the hydro-desulfurization of heavy oils, and improving the reaction performance of alumina-supported Mo-based hydro-treating catalysts conventionally used in most of refineries. First, it was experimentally proved that the dispersed catalysts of Co-Mo could be employed for the hydro-desulfurization of a heavy atmospheric residual oil excluding the catalyst deactivation. The utilization of a carbon-expanded reactor in combination with this dispersed catalyst system exhibited an enhanced reaction performance and provided an efficient way for the separation and recovery of the dispersed catalytic component from oils. Second, the tungsten-incorporated WCoMo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst revealed the improved catalytic performance in the various hydro-treating reactions and in the initial deactivation rates for the high pressure hydro-treatment of a heavy oil as compared with the commercial CoMo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. This new experimental finding for the promoting role of the monomeric WO{sub 3} species in CoMo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst may be generally applicable to the Mo-based alumina-sulfide phase, higher catalytic activity, and more extended service life. (author). 101 refs., 33 figs., 18 tabs.

  19. Novel reaction engineering concepts for catalyst immobilisation in hydroformylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole-Hamilton, D.J.; Desset, S.L.; Muldoon, M.J. [St. Andrews Univ. (United Kingdom). EaStChem, School of Chemistry; Hintermair, U. [St. Andrews Univ. (United Kingdom). EaStChem, School of Chemistry]|[CNRS, Lyon (France). Laboratoire de Chimie Organometallique de Surface; Santini, C.C. [CNRS, Lyon (France). Laboratoire de Chimie Organometallique de Surface

    2006-07-01

    Various methods for the separation of the aldehyde products from the catalyst and any solvent during or after hydroformylation reactions of long chain alkenes are reviewed. The catalyst can be immobilized on a soluble or insoluble support or in a phase that does not mix with the product phase under the separation conditions. Aqueous, fluorous, and ionic liquid biphasic systems as well as systems involving scCO{sub 2} sometimes in conjunction with one or other of the types of solvents listed above. Hybrid systems in which a liquid phase containing the catalyst is supported on a microporous solid support are also discussed. The advantages and disadvantages of the various systems are considered and new results concerning the addition of [1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium]Br to aqueous biphasic systems and the use of supercritical fluids to transport substrates over supported ionic liquid phases are presented. Both of these new approaches give high reaction rates, which for the supported ionic liquid phase catalysts can be maintained for at least 40 h of continuous flow operation. For the aqueous biphasic systems, leaching is low and phase separation is fast. (orig.)

  20. IDENTIFICATION OF PHASE COMPOSITION OF BINDERS FROM ALKALI-ACTIVATED MIXTURES OF GRANULATED BLAST FURNACE SLAG AND FLY ASH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOZEF VLČEK

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The prepared alkali-activated binders (AAB and composites using suitable latent hydraulic raw materials represent an alternative to materials based on Portland cements. This paper deals with ways how to influence the functional parameters of AAB by setting up mixtures of granulated blast furnace slag (GBFS and fly ash with selected chemical compositions. In this way the course of hydration process is modified and the phase composition of products of alkali activation is changed as well as their final properties. The amorphous character of the hydration products makes evaluation of the phase composition of hardened AAB difficult and significantly limits the number of experimental techniques suitable to characterise their phase composition. It was observed that measuring the pH of water extracts obtained from the alkali-activated mixtures can give supplementary information about the process of hardening of alkali-activated mixtures of GBFS and fly ash.

  1. Identification of lines of electric lines of three-phase distribution networks in the composition of ASMAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omorov Turatbek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of protection of a three-phase four-wire distribution network (DEN with a voltage of 0.4 kV from the interruption of electric power lines is considered. On the basis of the analysis of the values of complex resistances of interpersonal sections of the main line of the network, criteria are proposed that allow detecting critical situations associated with discontinuities in power transmission lines. Using these criteria makes it possible to localize the places of breaks of phase and neutral wires. Mathematical models and methods that are used to evaluate the complex resistances of interpersonal sections of a three-phase network are briefly considered. The obtained results are oriented for use in the automated system of electricity control and accounting (ASMAE.

  2. Identification of growth phases and influencing factors in cultivations with AGE1.HN cells using set-based methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Borchers

    Full Text Available Production of bio-pharmaceuticals in cell culture, such as mammalian cells, is challenging. Mathematical models can provide support to the analysis, optimization, and the operation of production processes. In particular, unstructured models are suited for these purposes, since they can be tailored to particular process conditions. To this end, growth phases and the most relevant factors influencing cell growth and product formation have to be identified. Due to noisy and erroneous experimental data, unknown kinetic parameters, and the large number of combinations of influencing factors, currently there are only limited structured approaches to tackle these issues. We outline a structured set-based approach to identify different growth phases and the factors influencing cell growth and metabolism. To this end, measurement uncertainties are taken explicitly into account to bound the time-dependent specific growth rate based on the observed increase of the cell concentration. Based on the bounds on the specific growth rate, we can identify qualitatively different growth phases and (in-validate hypotheses on the factors influencing cell growth and metabolism. We apply the approach to a mammalian suspension cell line (AGE1.HN. We show that growth in batch culture can be divided into two main growth phases. The initial phase is characterized by exponential growth dynamics, which can be described consistently by a relatively simple unstructured and segregated model. The subsequent phase is characterized by a decrease in the specific growth rate, which, as shown, results from substrate limitation and the pH of the medium. An extended model is provided which describes the observed dynamics of cell growth and main metabolites, and the corresponding kinetic parameters as well as their confidence intervals are estimated. The study is complemented by an uncertainty and outlier analysis. Overall, we demonstrate utility of set-based methods for analyzing cell

  3. Identification of growth phases and influencing factors in cultivations with AGE1.HN cells using set-based methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchers, Steffen; Freund, Susann; Rath, Alexander; Streif, Stefan; Reichl, Udo; Findeisen, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    Production of bio-pharmaceuticals in cell culture, such as mammalian cells, is challenging. Mathematical models can provide support to the analysis, optimization, and the operation of production processes. In particular, unstructured models are suited for these purposes, since they can be tailored to particular process conditions. To this end, growth phases and the most relevant factors influencing cell growth and product formation have to be identified. Due to noisy and erroneous experimental data, unknown kinetic parameters, and the large number of combinations of influencing factors, currently there are only limited structured approaches to tackle these issues. We outline a structured set-based approach to identify different growth phases and the factors influencing cell growth and metabolism. To this end, measurement uncertainties are taken explicitly into account to bound the time-dependent specific growth rate based on the observed increase of the cell concentration. Based on the bounds on the specific growth rate, we can identify qualitatively different growth phases and (in-)validate hypotheses on the factors influencing cell growth and metabolism. We apply the approach to a mammalian suspension cell line (AGE1.HN). We show that growth in batch culture can be divided into two main growth phases. The initial phase is characterized by exponential growth dynamics, which can be described consistently by a relatively simple unstructured and segregated model. The subsequent phase is characterized by a decrease in the specific growth rate, which, as shown, results from substrate limitation and the pH of the medium. An extended model is provided which describes the observed dynamics of cell growth and main metabolites, and the corresponding kinetic parameters as well as their confidence intervals are estimated. The study is complemented by an uncertainty and outlier analysis. Overall, we demonstrate utility of set-based methods for analyzing cell growth and

  4. Deuterium exchange reaction between hydrogen and water in a trickle-bed column packed with novel catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, D. H.; Baek, S. W.; Lee, H. S.; Kim, K. R.; Kang, H. S.; Lee, S. H.; Jeong, H. S.

    1998-01-01

    The activity of a novel catalyst (Pt/SDBC) for deuterium exchange reaction between water and hydrogen streams in a trickle bed was measured. The performance of the catalyst was compared with a commercial catalyst with same metal content. The catalytic activity for the bed of wet-proofed catalyst diluted with hydrophillic packing material also measured. The Pt/SDBC catalyst shows higher activity in the liquid phase reaction than the commercial catalyst as measured in the vapor phase reaction. The performance for 50% dilution of the Pt/SDBC catalyst bed with hydrophillic packing material is better than that of the 100% bed due to more liquid holdup and better water distribution

  5. Non-PGM cell catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colon-Mercado, H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Elvington, M. [Savannah River Consulting, Aiken, SC (United States); Ganesan, P. [Savannah River Consulting, Aiken, SC (United States)

    2017-09-27

    A unique approach has been developed to probe the non-PGM catalyst active site for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR) for PEMFCs. Iron based functionalities have been engineered into a variety of catalysts to evaluate their impact on activity for the ORR. A series of high surface area catalysts were synthesized and the impact of the chemical structure on the electrochemical and electrocatalytic properties was investigated. Elemental and surface analyses of the prepared catalysts reveal the incorporation of iron in a targeted and controlled manner. A high surface area framework catalyst was prepared that shows exceptional activity, comparable to state-of-the-art materials. The results of this research project provided critical seed data for the newly awarded ElectroCat project, which focuses on rationally designed framework catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction.

  6. Mass-spectrometric identification of T-kininogen I/thiostatin as an acute-phase inflammatory protein suppressed by curcumin and capsaicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joe, Bina; Nagaraju, Anitha; Gowda, Lalitha R; Basrur, Venkatesha; Lokesh, Belur R

    2014-01-01

    Curcumin and capsaicin are dietary xenobiotics with well-documented anti-inflammatory properties. Previously, the beneficial effect of these spice principles in lowering chronic inflammation was demonstrated using a rat experimental model for arthritis. The extent of lowering of arthritic index by the spice principles was associated with a significant shift in macrophage function favoring the reduction of pro-inflammatory molecules such as reactive oxygen species and production and release of anti-inflammatory metabolites of arachidonic acid. Beyond the cellular effects on macrophage function, oral administration of curcumin and capsaicin caused alterations in serum protein profiles of rats injected with adjuvant to develop arthritis. Specifically, a 72 kDa acidic glycoprotein, GpA72, which was elevated in pre-arthritic rats, was significantly lowered by feeding either curcumin or capsaicin to the rats. Employing the tandem mass spectrometric approach for direct sequencing of peptides, here we report the identification of GpA72 as T-kininogen I also known as Thiostatin. Since T-kininogen I is an early acute-phase protein, we additionally tested the efficiency of curcumin and capsaicin to mediate the inflammatory response in an acute phase model. The results demonstrate that curcumin and capsaicin lower the acute-phase inflammatory response, the molecular mechanism for which is, in part, mediated by pathways associated with the lowering of T-kininogen I.

  7. Mass-spectrometric identification of T-kininogen I/thiostatin as an acute-phase inflammatory protein suppressed by curcumin and capsaicin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bina Joe

    Full Text Available Curcumin and capsaicin are dietary xenobiotics with well-documented anti-inflammatory properties. Previously, the beneficial effect of these spice principles in lowering chronic inflammation was demonstrated using a rat experimental model for arthritis. The extent of lowering of arthritic index by the spice principles was associated with a significant shift in macrophage function favoring the reduction of pro-inflammatory molecules such as reactive oxygen species and production and release of anti-inflammatory metabolites of arachidonic acid. Beyond the cellular effects on macrophage function, oral administration of curcumin and capsaicin caused alterations in serum protein profiles of rats injected with adjuvant to develop arthritis. Specifically, a 72 kDa acidic glycoprotein, GpA72, which was elevated in pre-arthritic rats, was significantly lowered by feeding either curcumin or capsaicin to the rats. Employing the tandem mass spectrometric approach for direct sequencing of peptides, here we report the identification of GpA72 as T-kininogen I also known as Thiostatin. Since T-kininogen I is an early acute-phase protein, we additionally tested the efficiency of curcumin and capsaicin to mediate the inflammatory response in an acute phase model. The results demonstrate that curcumin and capsaicin lower the acute-phase inflammatory response, the molecular mechanism for which is, in part, mediated by pathways associated with the lowering of T-kininogen I.

  8. Oxygen-reducing catalyst layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Dennis P [Maplewood, MN; Schmoeckel, Alison K [Stillwater, MN; Vernstrom, George D [Cottage Grove, MN; Atanasoski, Radoslav [Edina, MN; Wood, Thomas E [Stillwater, MN; Yang, Ruizhi [Halifax, CA; Easton, E Bradley [Halifax, CA; Dahn, Jeffrey R [Hubley, CA; O'Neill, David G [Lake Elmo, MN

    2011-03-22

    An oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, and a method of making the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, where the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer includes a catalytic material film disposed on a substrate with the use of physical vapor deposition and thermal treatment. The catalytic material film includes a transition metal that is substantially free of platinum. At least one of the physical vapor deposition and the thermal treatment is performed in a processing environment comprising a nitrogen-containing gas.

  9. Catalyst systems and uses thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Umit S [Worthington, OH; Holmgreen, Erik M [Columbus, OH; Yung, Matthew M [Columbus, OH

    2012-07-24

    A method of carbon monoxide (CO) removal comprises providing an oxidation catalyst comprising cobalt supported on an inorganic oxide. The method further comprises feeding a gaseous stream comprising CO, and oxygen (O.sub.2) to the catalyst system, and removing CO from the gaseous stream by oxidizing the CO to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) in the presence of the oxidation catalyst at a temperature between about 20 to about 200.degree. C.

  10. Development of GREET Catalyst Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhichao [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Benavides, Pahola T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dunn, Jennifer B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cronauer, Donald C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-09-01

    In this report, we develop energy and material flows for the production of five different catalysts (tar reforming, alcohol synthesis, Zeolite Socony Mobil-5 [ZSM-5], Mo/Co/ γ-Al2O3, and Pt/ γ-Al2O3) and two chemicals (olivine, dimethyl ether of polyethylene glycol [DEPG]). These compounds and catalysts are now included in the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET™) catalyst module.

  11. Identification of regioisomers and enantiomers of triacylglycerols in different yeasts using reversed- and chiral-phase LC–MS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řezanka, Tomáš; Kolouchová, I.; Čejková, A.; Cajthaml, Tomáš; Sigler, Karel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 20 (2013), s. 3310-3320 ISSN 1615-9306 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP503/11/0215 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry * Chiral LC * Reversed phase LC Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.594, year: 2013

  12. Disruption in neural phase synchrony is related to identification of inattentional deafness in real-world setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callan, Daniel E; Gateau, Thibault; Durantin, Gautier; Gonthier, Nicolas; Dehais, Frédéric

    2018-06-01

    Individuals often have reduced ability to hear alarms in real world situations (e.g., anesthesia monitoring, flying airplanes) when attention is focused on another task, sometimes with devastating consequences. This phenomenon is called inattentional deafness and usually occurs under critical high workload conditions. It is difficult to simulate the critical nature of these tasks in the laboratory. In this study, dry electroencephalography is used to investigate inattentional deafness in real flight while piloting an airplane. The pilots participating in the experiment responded to audio alarms while experiencing critical high workload situations. It was found that missed relative to detected alarms were marked by reduced stimulus evoked phase synchrony in theta and alpha frequencies (6-14 Hz) from 120 to 230 ms poststimulus onset. Correlation of alarm detection performance with intertrial coherence measures of neural phase synchrony showed different frequency and time ranges for detected and missed alarms. These results are consistent with selective attentional processes actively disrupting oscillatory coherence in sensory networks not involved with the primary task (piloting in this case) under critical high load conditions. This hypothesis is corroborated by analyses of flight parameters showing greater maneuvering associated with difficult phases of flight occurring during missed alarms. Our results suggest modulation of neural oscillation is a general mechanism of attention utilizing enhancement of phase synchrony to sharpen alarm perception during successful divided attention, and disruption of phase synchrony in brain networks when attentional demands of the primary task are great, such as in the case of inattentional deafness. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Glycerol valorization: dehydration to acrolein over silica-supported niobia catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shiju, N.R.; Brown, D.R.; Wilson, K.; Rothenberg, G.

    2010-01-01

    The catalytic dehydration of glycerol to acrolein is investigated over silica-supported niobia catalysts in a continuous fixed-bed gas-phase reactor. Various supported niobia catalysts are prepared and characterized using surface analysis and spectroscopic methods (XRD, UV-Vis, XPS, N2 adsorption),

  14. Polyol Synthesis of Cobalt–Copper Alloy Catalysts for Higher Alcohol Synthesis from Syngas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mendes, Laiza V.P.; Snider, Jonathan L.; Fleischman, Samuel D.

    2017-01-01

    Novel catalysts for the selective production of higher alcohols from syngas could offer improved pathways towards synthetic fuels and chemicals. Cobalt–copper alloy catalysts have shown promising results for this reaction. To improve control over particle properties, a liquid phase nanoparticle s...

  15. Catalytic oxidation of albendazole using molybdenum supported on carbon nanotubes as catalyst; Oxidacion catalitica de albendazol empleando como catalizador molibdeno soportado en nanotubos de carbono

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun-Kou, Maria del Rosario; Vega Carrasco, Edgar R., E-mail: msun@pucp.edu.pe [Departamento de Ciencias, Seccion Quimica. Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Peru, Avenida Universitaria 1801, Lima (Peru); Picasso Escobar, Gino I. [Laboratorio de Investigacion de Fisicoquimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Avenida Tupac Amaru 210, Lima (Peru)

    2013-10-15

    The catalytic oxidation reaction of the thioether group (-S-) in the structure to the drug albendazole (C{sub 12}H{sub 15}N{sub 3}O{sub 2}S) was studied in order to obtain a pharmacologically active molecule known as albendazole sulfoxide. With this purpose, three heterogeneous catalysts were prepared using molybdenum (Mo) as active phase and carbon nanotubes as a multiple-layer catalyst support. The incorporation of the active phase was performed by wet impregnation, with subsequent calcination for 4 hours at 400 {sup o}C. For the catalytic oxidation reaction was employed hydrogen peroxide-urea (H{sub 2}NCONH{sub 2}·H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) as oxidizing agent and methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) as reaction medium. The textural and morphology characterization of carbon nanoparticles and catalysts was carried out by adsorption-desorption of N{sub 2} (BET) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The identification and quantification of the reaction products were followed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), respectively. With the yield, selectivity and conversion higher than 90% after 60 minutes of reaction, albendazole sulphoxide was obtained as major product of oxidation reaction. (author)

  16. Identification method of gas-liquid two-phase flow regime based on image wavelet packet information entropy and genetic neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yunlong; Chen Fei; Sun Bin

    2008-01-01

    Based on the characteristic that wavelet packet transform image can be decomposed by different scales, a flow regime identification method based on image wavelet packet information entropy feature and genetic neural network was proposed. Gas-liquid two-phase flow images were captured by digital high speed video systems in horizontal pipe. The information entropy feature from transformation coefficients were extracted using image processing techniques and multi-resolution analysis. The genetic neural network was trained using those eigenvectors, which was reduced by the principal component analysis, as flow regime samples, and the flow regime intelligent identification was realized. The test result showed that image wavelet packet information entropy feature could excellently reflect the difference between seven typical flow regimes, and the genetic neural network with genetic algorithm and BP algorithm merits were with the characteristics of fast convergence for simulation and avoidance of local minimum. The recognition possibility of the network could reach up to about 100%, and a new and effective method was presented for on-line flow regime. (authors)

  17. Identification of microRNA-like RNAs in mycelial and yeast phases of the thermal dimorphic fungus Penicillium marneffei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna K P Lau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Penicillium marneffei is the most important thermal dimorphic fungus causing systemic mycosis in China and Southeast Asia. While miRNAs are increasingly recognized for their roles in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in animals and plants, miRNAs in fungi were less well studied and their potential roles in fungal dimorphism were largely unknown. Based on P. marneffei genome sequence, we hypothesize that miRNA-like RNAs (milRNAs may be expressed in the dimorphic fungus. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We attempted to identify milRNAs in P. marneffei in both mycelial and yeast phase using high-throughput sequencing technology. Small RNAs were more abundantly expressed in mycelial than yeast phase. Sequence analysis revealed 24 potential milRNA candidates, including 17 candidates in mycelial and seven in yeast phase. Two genes, dcl-1 and dcl-2, encoding putative Dicer-like proteins and the gene, qde-2, encoding Argonaute-like protein, were identified in P. marneffei. Phylogenetic analysis showed that dcl-2 of P. marneffei was more closely related to the homologues in other thermal dimorphic pathogenic fungi than to Penicillium chrysogenum and Aspergillus spp., suggesting the co-evolution of dcl-2 among the thermal dimorphic fungi. Moreover, dcl-2 demonstrated higher mRNA expression levels in mycelial than yeast phase by 7 folds (P<0.001. Northern blot analysis confirmed the expression of two milRNAs, PM-milR-M1 and PM-milR-M2, only in mycelial phase. Using dcl-1(KO, dcl-2(KO, dcl(DKO and qde-2(KO deletion mutants, we showed that the biogenesis of both milRNAs were dependent on dcl-2 but not dcl-1 or qde-2. The mRNA expression levels of three predicted targets of PM-milR-M1 were upregulated in knockdown strain PM-milR-M1 (KD, supporting regulatory function of milRNAs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings provided the first evidence for differential expression of milRNAs in different growth phases of thermal dimorphic

  18. Synthesis of MoVTeNb Oxide Catalysts with Tunable Particle Dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolenko, Yury V.; Zhang, Wei; d'Alnoncourt, Raoul Naumann

    2011-01-01

    Reliable procedures for the controlled synthesis of phase-pure MoVTeNb mixed oxides with M1 structure (ICSD 55097) and tunable crystal dimensions were developed to study the structure sensitivity of the selective oxidation of propane to acrylic acid. A series of powdered M1 catalysts...... catalysts were studied in the selective oxidation of propane to acrylic acid, revealing that active sites appear on the entire M1 surface and illustrating the high sensitivity of catalyst performance on the catalyst synthesis method....

  19. Expression profiling of blood samples from an SU5416 Phase III metastatic colorectal cancer clinical trial: a novel strategy for biomarker identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smolich Beverly D

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray-based gene expression profiling is a powerful approach for the identification of molecular biomarkers of disease, particularly in human cancers. Utility of this approach to measure responses to therapy is less well established, in part due to challenges in obtaining serial biopsies. Identification of suitable surrogate tissues will help minimize limitations imposed by those challenges. This study describes an approach used to identify gene expression changes that might serve as surrogate biomarkers of drug activity. Methods Expression profiling using microarrays was applied to peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC samples obtained from patients with advanced colorectal cancer participating in a Phase III clinical trial. The PBMC samples were harvested pre-treatment and at the end of the first 6-week cycle from patients receiving standard of care chemotherapy or standard of care plus SU5416, a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK inhibitor. Results from matched pairs of PBMC samples from 23 patients were queried for expression changes that consistently correlated with SU5416 administration. Results Thirteen transcripts met this selection criterion; six were further tested by quantitative RT-PCR analysis of 62 additional samples from this trial and a second SU5416 Phase III trial of similar design. This method confirmed four of these transcripts (CD24, lactoferrin, lipocalin 2, and MMP-9 as potential biomarkers of drug treatment. Discriminant analysis showed that expression profiles of these 4 transcripts could be used to classify patients by treatment arm in a predictive fashion. Conclusions These results establish a foundation for the further exploration of peripheral blood cells as a surrogate system for biomarker analyses in clinical oncology studies.

  20. Expression profiling of blood samples from an SU5416 Phase III metastatic colorectal cancer clinical trial: a novel strategy for biomarker identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DePrimo, Samuel E; Wong, Lily M; Khatry, Deepak B; Nicholas, Susan L; Manning, William C; Smolich, Beverly D; O'Farrell, Anne-Marie; Cherrington, Julie M

    2003-01-01

    Microarray-based gene expression profiling is a powerful approach for the identification of molecular biomarkers of disease, particularly in human cancers. Utility of this approach to measure responses to therapy is less well established, in part due to challenges in obtaining serial biopsies. Identification of suitable surrogate tissues will help minimize limitations imposed by those challenges. This study describes an approach used to identify gene expression changes that might serve as surrogate biomarkers of drug activity. Expression profiling using microarrays was applied to peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) samples obtained from patients with advanced colorectal cancer participating in a Phase III clinical trial. The PBMC samples were harvested pre-treatment and at the end of the first 6-week cycle from patients receiving standard of care chemotherapy or standard of care plus SU5416, a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) inhibitor. Results from matched pairs of PBMC samples from 23 patients were queried for expression changes that consistently correlated with SU5416 administration. Thirteen transcripts met this selection criterion; six were further tested by quantitative RT-PCR analysis of 62 additional samples from this trial and a second SU5416 Phase III trial of similar design. This method confirmed four of these transcripts (CD24, lactoferrin, lipocalin 2, and MMP-9) as potential biomarkers of drug treatment. Discriminant analysis showed that expression profiles of these 4 transcripts could be used to classify patients by treatment arm in a predictive fashion. These results establish a foundation for the further exploration of peripheral blood cells as a surrogate system for biomarker analyses in clinical oncology studies

  1. Identification of Guest-Host Inclusion Complexes in the Gas Phase by Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, De´bora C.; Ramamurthy, Vaidhyanathan; Da Silva, Jose´ P.

    2015-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, students follow a step-by-step procedure to prepare and study guest-host complexes in the gas phase using electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Model systems are the complexes of hosts cucurbit[7]uril (CB7) and cucurbit[8]uril (CB8) with the guest 4-styrylpyridine (SP). Aqueous solutions of CB7 or CB8…

  2. Phase Identification and Dielectric Properties of Pb0.94 Ca0.06 TiO3 Ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khin Thida; Tin Tin Aye; Aye Aye Phyu; Moe Moe Myint; Ko Ko Kyaw Soe

    2008-03-01

    The ferroelectric materials of Ca (6 mol %) doped PbTiO3 (abbreviated to PCT6) ceamics were prepared by using conventional solid solution method. Phase assignment is identified by XRD technique. The change in capacitance, the variation of dielectric constant and dielectric loss as a function of applied frequency modes (1 kHz-10 kHz)at zero bias voltage of PCT6 ceramics by using Cu and Ag electrodes were investigated.

  3. Catalysts for petroleum desulfurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, A.; Diemann, E.; Baumann, F.W.

    1988-01-01

    In order to obtain marketable products from low-quality oils, efficient hydrogenation processes are required for removing sulfur (hydrodesulfurization, HDS), nitrogen (hydrodenitrification, HDN), and oxygen (hydrodeoxygenation, HDO), which would poison the noble metal catalysts of the downstream petrochemical processes. Hydrogenation will produce low-sulfur, low-nitrogen fuels and thus contribute to the reduction of SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/ emissions which is long overdue from the ecological point of view (forest decline, acidification of surface bodies of water, etc.).

  4. Performance characterization of hydrogen isotope exchange and recombination catalysts for tritium processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suppiah, S.; Ryland, D.; Marcinkowska, K.; Boniface, H.; Everatt, A.

    2010-01-01

    AECL's hydrogen isotope exchange catalyst and recombination catalysts have been successfully applied to a wide range of industrial tritium-removal applications. The catalysts are used for Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange (LPCE) and for gas-phase and trickle-bed recombination of hydrogen isotopes and have led to process simplification, improved safety and operational advantages. Catalyst performance design equations derived from laboratory testing of these catalysts have been validated against performance under industrial conditions. In a Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange (CECE) demonstration plant analyses of LPCE and recombiner efficiency were carried out as a function of catalyst activity over a wide range of operation. A steady-state process simulation used to model and design the hydrogen-water isotopic exchange processes, such as the CECE detritiation plant, was validated using the results of this demonstration. Catalyst development for isotope-exchange and recombination applications has continued over the last decade. As a result, significant improvements in catalyst performance have been achieved for these applications. This paper outlines the uniqueness of AECL's specialized catalysts and process designs for these applications with examples from laboratory and industrial case studies.

  5. Review of the Production of Biodiesel from Waste Cooking Oil using Solid Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.H. Said

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The need for fossil fuels and the emissions generated from these fuels are increasing daily. Researchers are concerned with global warming as well as climate change; and energy sustainability and material usages are important issues today. Waste cooking oil (WCO can be processed into biodiesel as an alternative fuel to replace diesel. Production of biodiesel using WCO as the feedstock has been of growing interest for the last two decades. A number of research papers related to the improvements in production, raw materials and catalyst selection have been published. This paper reviews the various types of heterogeneous solid catalyst in the production of biodiesel via the transesterification of WCO. The catalysts used can be classified according to their state presence in the transesterification reaction as homogeneous or heterogeneous catalysts. Homogeneous catalysts act in the same liquid phase as the reaction mixture, whereas heterogeneous catalysts act in a solid phase with the reaction mixture. Heterogeneous catalysts are non-corrosive, a green process and environmentally friendly. They can be recycled and used several times, thus offering a more economic pathway for biodiesel production. The advantages and drawbacks of these heterogeneous catalysts are presented. Future work focuses on the application of economically and environmentally friendly solid catalysts in the production of biodiesel using WCO as the raw material.

  6. Supported Catalysts Useful in Ring-Closing Metathesis, Cross Metathesis, and Ring-Opening Metathesis Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakkrit Suriboot

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Ruthenium and molybdenum catalysts are widely used in synthesis of both small molecules and macromolecules. While major developments have led to new increasingly active catalysts that have high functional group compatibility and stereoselectivity, catalyst/product separation, catalyst recycling, and/or catalyst residue/product separation remain an issue in some applications of these catalysts. This review highlights some of the history of efforts to address these problems, first discussing the problem in the context of reactions like ring-closing metathesis and cross metathesis catalysis used in the synthesis of low molecular weight compounds. It then discusses in more detail progress in dealing with these issues in ring opening metathesis polymerization chemistry. Such approaches depend on a biphasic solid/liquid or liquid separation and can use either always biphasic or sometimes biphasic systems and approaches to this problem using insoluble inorganic supports, insoluble crosslinked polymeric organic supports, soluble polymeric supports, ionic liquids and fluorous phases are discussed.

  7. Development of catalysts for chemical reactions driven by concentrated solar energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, A.; Levitan, R.; Levy, M.

    1992-03-01

    The aim of this phase of the work is to study commercially available low priced catalysts, for the methanation and reforming processes in the closed-loop solar chemical heat pipe. This report summarized some long term tests of commercially available methanation catalysts and the measurement of their active surface before and after reaction. It was found that the 1%Ru on alumina stars catalysts (prepared by Englehard Company according to our request) is very active and stable at 350-750 C. The catalyst 'A' produced in Russia, is less active, however, did not lose the mechanical strength. The 50% Ni/SiO 2 catalyst is active as the 'A' catalyst but loses its activity after treatment at temperature > 600 C, its geometrical size shrinked. (authors). 25 refs., 25 figs., 36 tabs

  8. Study on Endurance and Performance of Impregnated Ruthenium Catalyst for Thruster System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jincheol; Kim, Taegyu

    2018-02-01

    Performance and endurance of the Ru catalyst were studied for nitrous oxide monopropellant thruster system. The thermal decomposition of N2O requires a considerably high temperature, which make it difficult to be utilized as a thruster propellant, while the propellant decomposition temperature can be reduced by using the catalyst through the decomposition reaction with the propellant. However, the catalyst used for the thruster was frequently exposed to high temperature and high-pressure environment. Therefore, the state change of the catalyst according to the thruster operation was analyzed. Characterization of catalyst used in the operation condition of the thruster was performed using FE-SEM and EDS. As a result, performance degradation was occurred due to the volatilization of Ru catalyst and reduction of the specific surface area according to the phase change of Al2O3.

  9. Uranium oxide catalysts: environmental applications for treatment of chlorinated organic waste from nuclear industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazareva, Svetlana; Ismagilov, Zinfer; Kuznetsov, Vadim; Shikina, Nadezhda; Kerzhentsev, Mikhail

    2018-02-05

    Huge amounts of nuclear waste, including depleted uranium, significantly contribute to the adverse environmental situation throughout the world. An approach to the effective use of uranium oxides in catalysts for the deep oxidation of chlorine-containing hydrocarbons is suggested. Investigation of the catalytic activity of the synthesized supported uranium oxide catalysts doped with Cr, Mn and Co transition metals in the chlorobenzene oxidation showed that these catalysts are comparable with conventional commercial ones. Physicochemical properties of the catalysts were studied by X-ray diffraction, temperature-programmed reduction with hydrogen (H 2 -TPR), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The higher activity of Mn- and Co-containing uranium oxide catalysts in the H 2 -TPR and oxidation of chlorobenzene in comparison with non-uranium catalysts may be related to the formation of a new disperse phase represented by uranates. The study of chlorobenzene adsorption revealed that the surface oxygen is involved in the catalytic process.

  10. Heteropoly acid promoted Cu and Fe catalysts for the selective catalytic reduction of NO with ammonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putluru, Siva Sankar Reddy; Mossin, Susanne L.; Riisager, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Cu/TiO2, Fe/TiO2 and heteropoly acid promoted Cu/TiO2, Fe/TiO2 catalysts were prepared and characterized by N2 physisorption, XRPD, NH3-TPD, H2-TPR and EPR. The catalysts exhibited only crystalline TiO2 phases with the active metals and promoters in highly dispersed state. The acidic properties...... activity and acidity was lower for promoted catalysts than for unpromoted catalysts. In the heteropoly acid promoted catalysts the SCR active Cu and Fe metals were protected from potassium poisons by bonding of the potassium to the Brønsted acid centres. Thus heteropoly acid promoted catalysts might...... be suitable for biomass fired power plant SCR applications....

  11. Catalysts prepared by interaction of transition metal organometallic compounds with the surface of supporters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryndin, Yu.A.; Kuznetsov, B.N.; Moroz, Eh.M.; Tripol'skij, A.A.; Ermakov, Yu.I.

    1977-01-01

    The phase composition and dispersion of the catalyst (W + Pt)/SiO 2 , subjected to oxidation and reduction at an elevated temperature was investigated by roentgenographic methods (radial distribution of atoms and broadening of X-ray lines). The X-ray data are compared with the results of chemisorption measurements of platinum dispersion in the specimens and their activity in reactions of benzene hydration and ethane hydrogenolysis. It has been established that catalysts reduced at 600 deg C and not subjected to oxidation, as well as catalysts oxidized at 200 deg C and then reduced at 600 deg C are characterized by a high platinum dispersion. The dispersion catalysts are noted for their activity in the reaction of benzene hydration and ethane hydrogenolysis. On the other hand, the activity of catalysts oxidized and reduced in rigid conditions (600 deg C, air) is much lower and is close to the activity of the coarsely dispersed PtSiO 2 catalyst

  12. In-situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, Jose A; Chupas, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Helps researchers develop new catalysts for sustainable fuel and chemical production Reviewing the latest developments in the field, this book explores the in-situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts, enabling readers to take full advantage of the sophisticated techniques used to study heterogeneous catalysts and reaction mechanisms. In using these techniques, readers can learn to improve the selectivity and the performance of catalysts and how to prepare catalysts as efficiently as possible, with minimum waste. In-situ Characterization of Heterogeneous Catalysts feat

  13. TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT FOR IRON AND COBALT FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burtron H. Davis

    1999-01-01

    The impact of activation procedure on the phase composition of precipitated iron Fischer-Tropsch (FT) catalysts has been studied. Catalyst samples taken during activation and FT synthesis have been characterized by Moessbauer spectroscopy. Formation of iron carbide is necessary for high FT activity. Hydrogen activation of precipitated iron catalysts results in reduction to predominantly metallic iron and Fe(sub 3)O(sub 4). Metallic iron is not stable under FT 3 4 conditions and is rapidly converted to(epsilon)(prime)-Fe(sub 2.2)C. Activation with carbon monoxide or syngas 2.2 with low hydrogen partial pressure reduces catalysts to(chi)-Fe(sub 5)C(sub 2) and a small amount of 5 2 superparamagnetic carbide. Exposure to FT conditions partially oxidizes iron carbide to Fe(sub 3)O(sub 4); however, catalysts promoted with potassium or potassium and copper maintain a constant carbide content and activity after the initial oxidation. An unpromoted iron catalyst which was activated with carbon monoxide to produce 94%(chi)-Fe(sub 5)C(sub 2), deactivated rapidly as the carbide was oxidized to Fe(sub 3)O(sub 4). No difference in activity, stability or deactivation rate was found for(chi)-Fe(sub 5)C(sub 2) and(epsilon)(prime)-Fe(sub 2.2)C

  14. TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT FOR IRON AND COBALT FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burtron H. Davis

    1999-04-30

    The impact of activation procedure on the phase composition of precipitated iron Fischer-Tropsch (FT) catalysts has been studied. Catalyst samples taken during activation and FT synthesis have been characterized by Moessbauer spectroscopy. Formation of iron carbide is necessary for high FT activity. Hydrogen activation of precipitated iron catalysts results in reduction to predominantly metallic iron and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. Metallic iron is not stable under FT 3 4 conditions and is rapidly converted to {epsilon}{prime}-Fe{sub 2.2}C. Activation with carbon monoxide or syngas 2.2 with low hydrogen partial pressure reduces catalysts to {chi}-Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2} and a small amount of 5 2 superparamagnetic carbide. Exposure to FT conditions partially oxidizes iron carbide to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}; however, catalysts promoted with potassium or potassium and copper maintain a constant carbide content and activity after the initial oxidation. An unpromoted iron catalyst which was activated with carbon monoxide to produce 94% {chi}-Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2}, deactivated rapidly as the carbide was oxidized to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. No difference in activity, stability or deactivation rate was found for {chi}-Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2} and {epsilon}{prime}-Fe{sub 2.2}C.

  15. Mineralization of phthalic acid by solar photoelectro-Fenton with a stirred boron-doped diamond/air-diffusion tank reactor: Influence of Fe3+ and Cu2+ catalysts and identification of oxidation products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Segura, Sergi; Salazar, Ricardo; Brillas, Enric

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Almost total mineralization of phthalic acid by solar photoelectro-Fenton with Fe 3+ , Cu 2+ and Fe 3+ –Cu 2+ mixtures. • Hydroxyl radical generation from photo-Fenton reaction under solar radiation. • Enhancement of the mineralization rate using Fe 3+ and small amounts of Cu 2+ . • Detection of eleven aromatic intermediates and six short-linear carboxylic acids. • Oxidation of Cu(II)-carboxylate complexes with ·OH and photolysis of Fe(III)-carboxylate species. -- Abstract: Here, the substrate decay and mineralization rate for 100 cm 3 of a 2.0 mM phthalic acid solution in 0.10 M Na 2 SO 4 of pH 3.0 have been studied by electro-Fenton (EF) and solar photoelectro-Fenton (SPEF). The electrochemical cell was a stirred tank reactor containing a 3 cm 2 boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode and a 3 cm 2 air-diffusion cathode that generates H 2 O 2 . Cu 2+ and/or Fe 3+ were added as catalysts with total concentration of 0.50 mM and a constant current density of 33.3 mA cm −2 was applied. In EF with Cu 2+ or Fe 3+ alone and SPEF with only Cu 2+ , phthalic acid decayed slowly and poor mineralization was reached because the main oxidant was ·OH produced at the BDD surface from water oxidation. In contrast, the substrate destruction was largely enhanced using SPEF with 0.50 mM Fe 3+ since a high quantity of oxidant ·OH was produced in the bulk induced by photo-Fenton reaction. This treatment led to an almost total mineralization by the photolysis of generated Fe(III)-carboxylate complexes. In all cases, the decay of phthalic acid obeyed a pseudo-first-order reaction. The combination of Cu 2+ and Fe 3+ as catalysts accelerated the mineralization process in SPEF because Cu(II)-carboxylate complexes were also removed with ·OH formed from photo-Fenton reaction. The best SPEF process was found for 0.125 mM Cu 2+ + 0.375 mM Fe 3+ , giving rise to 99% mineralization with 40% current efficiency and 0.294 kWh g −1 TOC energy consumption. Eleven aromatics

  16. Phase identification and internal stress analysis of steamside oxides on superheater tubes by means of X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantleon, Karen; Montgomery, Melanie [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Inst. of Manufacturing Engineering and Management

    2005-05-01

    For superheater tubes, the adherence of the inner steamside oxide is especially important as spallation of this oxide results in a) blockage of loops which cause insufficient steam flow through the superheaters and subsequently overheating and tube failure and b) spalled oxide can cause erosion of turbine blades. Oxide spallation is a serious problem for austenitic steels where the significant differences of the thermal expansion coefficients of steel and oxide cause relatively high thermal stresses. Usually, various oxides layered within the scale are suggested from microscopical observations of the morphology and/or topography of the oxide scale accompanied by the analysis of chemical elements present. Reports about the application of X-ray diffraction on the study of steamside oxide formation are very scarce in literature. If applied at all, XRD-studies are restricted to ideally flat samples oxidized under laboratory conditions, but relation to real operating conditions and the effect of the real sample geometry is missing. Within the frame of the project, steamside oxides on plant exposed components of ferritic/ martensitic X20CrMoV12-1 as well as fine- and coarse-grained austenitic TP347H were studied by means of X-ray diffraction. Depth dependent phase analysis on sample segments cut from the tubes was carried out by means of grazing incidence diffraction and, in order to obtain information from a larger depth, conventional XRD was combination with stepwise mechanical removal of the steamside oxides. After each removal step phase analysis was performed both on the segments and on the removed powders. Phase specific stress analysis was carried out on rings cut from the tube. Results show that steamside oxides on X20CrMoV12-1 consist of pure Hematite at the surface followed by a relatively thick layer of pure Magnetite. Both phases are under relatively high tensile stresses. While the phase composition of the Hematite layer appears to be the same for all

  17. A Linker for the Solid-Phase Synthesis of Hydroxamic Acids and Identification of HDAC6 Inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Claus Gunnar; Jensen, Jakob Feldthusen; Cohrt, Anders Emil O'Hanlon

    2017-01-01

    We herein present broadly useful, readily available and nonintegral hydroxylamine linkers for the routine solid-phase synthesis of hydroxamic acids. The developed protocols enable the efficient synthesis and release of a wide range of hydroxamic acids from various resins, relying on high control...... and flexibility with respect to reagents and synthetic processes. A trityl-based hydroxylamine linker was used to synthesize a library of peptide hydroxamic acids. The inhibitory effects of the compounds were examined for seven HDAC enzyme subtypes using a chemiluminescence-based assay....

  18. Activating catalysts with mechanical force

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piermattei, A.; Karthikeyan, S.; Sijbesma, R.P.

    2009-01-01

    Homogeneously catalysed reactions can be ‘switched on’ by activating latent catalysts. Usually, activation is brought about by heat or an external chemical agent. However, activation of homogeneous catalysts with a mechanical trigger has not been demonstrated. Here, we introduce a general method to

  19. Phase-dependent space weathering effects and spectroscopic identification of retained helium in a lunar soil grain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, K. D.; Stroud, R. M.

    2018-03-01

    The solar wind is an important driver of space weathering on airless bodies. Over time, solar wind exposure alters the physical, chemical, and optical properties of exposed materials and can also impart a significant amount of helium into the surfaces of these bodies. However, common materials on the surface of the Moon, such as glass, crystalline silicates, and oxides, have highly variable responses to solar wind irradiation. We used scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) to examine the morphology and chemistry of a single grain of lunar soil that includes silicate glass, chromite and ilmenite, all present and exposed along the same surface. The exposure of the silicate glass and oxides to the same space weathering conditions allows for direct comparisons of the responses of natural materials to the complex lunar surface environment. The silicate glass shows minimal effects of solar wind irradiation, whereas both the chromite and ilmenite exhibit defect-rich rims that currently contain trapped helium. Only the weathered rim in ilmenite is rich in nanophase metallic iron (npFe0) and larger vesicles that retain helium at a range of internal pressures. The multiple exposed surfaces of the single grain of ilmenite demonstrate strong crystallographic controls of planar defects and non-spherical npFe0. The direct spectroscopic identification of helium in the vesicles and planar defects in the oxides provides additional evidence of the central role of solar wind irradiation in the formation of some common space weathering features.

  20. Plasma and catalyst for the oxidation of NOx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jõgi, Indrek; Erme, Kalev; Levoll, Erik; Raud, Jüri; Stamate, Eugen

    2018-03-01

    Efficient exhaust gas cleaning from NO x (NO and NO2) by absorption and adsorption based methods requires the oxidation of NO. The application of non-thermal plasma is considered as a promising oxidation method but the oxidation of NO by direct plasma remains limited due to the back-reaction of NO2 to NO mediated by O radicals in plasma. Indirect NO oxidation by plasma produced ozone allows to circumvent the back-reaction and further oxidize NO2 to N2O5 but the slow reaction rate for the latter process limits the efficiency of this process. Present paper gives an overview of the role of metal-oxide catalysts in the improvement of oxidation efficiency for both direct and indirect plasma oxidation of NO x . The plasma produced active oxygen species (O, O3) were shown to play an important role in the reactions taking place on the catalyst surfaces while the exact mechanism and extent of the effect were different for direct and indirect oxidation. In the case of direct plasma oxidation, both short and long lifetime oxygen species could reach the catalyst and participate in the oxidation of NO to NO2. The back-reaction in the plasma phase remained still important factor and limited the effect of catalyst. In the case of indirect oxidation, only ozone could reach the catalyst surface and improve the oxidation of NO2 to N2O5. The effect of catalyst at different experimental conditions was quantitatively described with the aid of simple global chemical kinetic models derived for the NO x oxidation either by plasma or ozone. The models allowed to compare the effect of different catalysts and to analyze the limitations for the efficiency improvement by catalyst.

  1. Oxygen isotope exchange on palladium catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravchuk, L.S.; Beschetvertnaya, T.I.; Novorodskij, V.G.; Novikova, M.G.; Zaretskij, M.V.; Valieva, S.V.

    1983-01-01

    Oxygen heteromolecular isotope exchange on unreduced palladium catalysts, distingushing by metal content is studied. Content of 18 O in gaseous phase is eoual to 46%. Calculations of heteroexchange rates are conducted with decrease of the 18 O in the gaseous phase over solid sample. Method of oxygen thermodesorption has been used to establish that palladium, deposited on γ-Al 2 O 3 during exchange process is in oxidized state; in this case strength of Pd-O bond is determined by content dispersity) of the metal. It is shown that significant increase of exchange rate on the samples with Pd >> 0.5 mass.% content can be induced as by side decomposition reaction of its oxide and corresponding dilution of gaseous mixture by ''light'' oxygen so by possibility of exchange with oxygen of PdO phase

  2. Flip angle modulations in late phase Gd-EOB-DTPA MRI improve the identification of the biliary system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stelter, Lars, E-mail: lars.stelter@charite.de [Klinik fuer Radiologie, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Grieser, Christian, E-mail: christian.grieser@charite.de [Klinik fuer Radiologie, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Fernandes, Carmen Maria Perez, E-mail: carmen.perez-fernandez@charite.de [Klinik fuer Radiologie, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Rothe, Jan Holger, E-mail: jan-holger.rothe@charite.de [Klinik fuer Radiologie, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Streitparth, Florian, E-mail: florian.streitparth@charite.de [Klinik fuer Radiologie, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Seehofer, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.seehofer@charite.de [Klinik fuer Allgemein-, Viszeral- und Transplantationschirurgie, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); and others

    2012-11-15

    Objectives: To assess the improvement of bile duct visualization in Gd-EOB-DTPA enhanced MR-cholangiography (EOB-MRC) by using an increased flip angle. Methods: 35 patients underwent Gd-EOB-DTPA enhanced MRI of the liver including T2-weighted MRCP and hepatobiliary phase EOB-MRC using a flip angle of 10 Degree-Sign (FA10) and of 35 Degree-Sign (FA35), respectively. Images were evaluated regarding the delineation of biliary ducts, the order of branching and anatomic visualization of the biliary tree. ROI analysis was performed to estimate the signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratios. Results: Applying the FA35 resulted in a significantly better SNR and CNR as compared to FA10. The overall image quality was rated as good for both, FA10 and FA35. The overall rating for regional delineation of the biliary system was rated significantly better for FA35 than for FA10 (p = 0.02). Classification of bile duct anatomy variations, however, was equivalent in both techniques. Conclusions: Increasing the flip angle of a T1-weighted 3D-sequence from 10 Degree-Sign to 35 Degree-Sign during the hepatobiliary phase of Gd-EOB enhanced MRI visually and quantitatively improved the visualization of the biliary ducts.

  3. Oxidative desulfurization of benzothiophene and thiophene with WOx/ZrO2 catalysts: Effect of calcination temperature of catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, Zubair; Jeon, Jaewoo; Jhung, Sung Hwa

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Oxidative desulfurization was studied with WO x /ZrO 2 calcined at different temp. ► The importance of the phases of zirconia and tungsten oxide was suggested. ► The catalyst was analyzed thoroughly with Raman and XRD techniques. ► The importance of electron density on S was confirmed with the kinetics of oxidation. - Abstract: Oxidative desulfurization (ODS) of model fuel containing benzothiophene (BT) or thiophene (Th) has been carried out with WO x /ZrO 2 catalyst, which was calcined at various temperatures. Based on the conversion of BT in the model fuel, it can be shown that the optimum calcination temperature of WO x /ZrO 2 catalyst is around 700 °C. The most active catalyst is composed of tetragonal zirconia (ZrO 2 ) with well dispersed polyoxotungstate species and it is necessary to minimize the contents of the crystalline WO 3 and monoclinic ZrO 2 for a high BT conversion. The oxidation rate was interpreted with the first-order kinetics, and it demonstrated the importance of electron density since the kinetic constant for BT was higher than that for Th even though the BT is larger than Th in size. A WO x /ZrO 2 catalyst, treated suitably, can be used as a reusable active catalyst in the ODS.

  4. Application of colloidal chemistry in aqueous phase to the preparation of supported metallic catalysts: particles size and aggregation control; Application de la chimie colloidale en phase aqueuse a la preparation de catalyseurs metalliques supportes: controle de la taille et de l`etat d`agregation des particules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pages, T.

    1998-09-16

    This work is an application of colloidal chemistry in aqueous phase on supported metal catalyst preparation. The objective is the control of particle size and aggregation. The preparation of the materials was achieved in two steps: - the synthesis of PdO hydrosols was obtained by two ways: neutralisation of the solution containing metallic salt by adding alkaline solution or by thermo-hydrolysis; the sols were then deposited on carriers (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SIO{sub 2}). The use of partial charge model allowed us to determine the complexes that were able to generate PdO. The preparation of PdO from Pd(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}{sup 2+} was studied and a mechanism of oxide formation was elaborated. The neutralisation of Pd(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}{sup 2+} obtained by adding alkaline solution led to particles with an average size of 1.8 nm and a narrow particle size distribution. Only the thermo-hydrolysis of Pd(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}{sup 2+} led to particles which size is higher than 3.0 nm. In the last case, particle size is controlled by the precursor concentration (Pd(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}(OH){sub 2}) generated in the medium. We have demonstrated that particle aggregation in the sol depends on the Ph and the way of preparation. It can be controlled by adding complexing anions (Cl{sup -}, NO{sub 2}{sup -}). Concerning the deposition of sols on carriers, it led to isolated or aggregated particles according to experimental conditions. Particle size was not modified during the deposition. Moreover, in our experimental conditions, reduction of particles did not modify particle size and aggregation. An application of this original way of preparation on catalysis allowed us to demonstrate the interest of controlling particle size and aggregation. (author) 186 refs.

  5. Effect of the dispersants on Pd species and catalytic activity of supported palladium catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Yue [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Process of Ministry of Education, School of Chemical Engineering and Pharmacy, Wuhan Institute of Technology, Wuhan 430205 (China); Yang, Xiaojun, E-mail: 10100201@wit.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Process of Ministry of Education, School of Chemical Engineering and Pharmacy, Wuhan Institute of Technology, Wuhan 430205 (China); Cao, Shuo, E-mail: cao23@email.sc.edu [North America R& D Center, Clariant BU Catalysts, Louisville, 40209, KY (United States); Zhou, Jie [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Process of Ministry of Education, School of Chemical Engineering and Pharmacy, Wuhan Institute of Technology, Wuhan 430205 (China); Wu, Yuanxin [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Process of Ministry of Education, School of Chemical Engineering and Pharmacy, Wuhan Institute of Technology, Wuhan 430205 (China); School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Han, Jinyu [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Yan, Zhiguo [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Process of Ministry of Education, School of Chemical Engineering and Pharmacy, Wuhan Institute of Technology, Wuhan 430205 (China); Zheng, Mingming [Oil Crops Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Hubei Key Laboratory of Oilcrops Lipid Chemistry and Nutrition, Wuhan 430062 (China)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) inhibited the sintering and reduction of Pd nanoparticles. • Activity was improved for supported Pd catalysts with PVA modified method. • PVA modified method minimized the catalyst deactivation. • This work provides an insight of the regeneration strategies for Pd catalysts. - Abstract: A series of supported palladium catalysts has been prepared through the precipitation method and the reduction method, using polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as dispersants. The effects of the dispersants on the properties of catalysts were evaluated and the catalytic performance of the new materials was investigated for the oxidative carbonylation of phenol to diphenyl carbonate (DPC). The catalysts as prepared were also characterized by the X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), Brunner-Emmet-Teller (BET) measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques. The results show that the addition of the dispersants had no effect on the crystal phase of the catalysts. However, the dispersion of Pd particles was improved when the dispersants were used. Moreover, the particle sizes of Pd nanoparticles modified by PVA were smaller than those modified by PVP. The catalysts prepared using the dispersants gave better yields of DPC than the catalysts prepared without the dispersants. The highest yield of DPC was 17.9% with the PVA-Red catalyst. The characterization results for the used catalysts showed that the Pd species in the PVA-Red catalyst remained mostly divalent and the lattice oxygen species were consumed during the reaction, which could lead to the higher catalytic activity of the PVA-Red catalyst. The experimental results confirm that PVA effectively inhibited the sintering and reduction of active Pd species in the oxidative carbonylation of phenol.

  6. Carbon-supported iron and iron-molybdenum sulfide catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramselaar, W.L.T.M.

    1988-01-01

    The main objective was to describe the relations between the characteristics (composition and dispersion) of the actual sulfide phase and the catalytic activity. Attention was also paid to the influence of preparational aspects on these characteristics. The catalysts were characterized using in-situ Moessbauer spectroscopy down to 2.0 K. 254 refs.; 47 figs.; 22 tabs

  7. BINIVOX catalyst for hydrogen production from ethanol by low ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B PATIL

    2017-11-04

    Nov 4, 2017 ... BINIVOX catalyst; catalytic activity; phase transition; crystal structure; thermal analysis. 1. ... and economic at the same time, are the need of the hour.5. Out of all the ... ichiometric amount of bismuth nitrate (Bi(NO3)3.5H2O).

  8. Xanthophylls in commercial egg yolks: quantification and identification by HPLC and LC-(APCI)MS using a C30 phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlatterer, Jörg; Breithaupt, Dietmar E

    2006-03-22

    The xanthophylls lutein and zeaxanthin have attracted a lot of interest since it was presumed that an increased nutritional uptake may prevent adult macula degeneration (AMD). Although egg yolks serve as an important dietary source of lutein and zeaxanthin, data on xanthophyll concentrations in commercial egg yolks are not available. Thus, an high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector (HPLC-DAD) method was developed allowing for simultaneous separation of eight xanthophylls used to fortify poultry feed. Peak identification was carried out by liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry [LC-(APCI)MS]. Egg yolks of four types of husbandry (seven batches each) were examined. Lutein and zeaxanthin were the predominant xanthophylls in egg yolks produced in accordance with ecological husbandry (class 0) because the concentrations of these xanthophylls ranged from 1274 to 2478 microg/100 g and from 775 to 1288 microg/100 g, respectively. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) proved that both mean lutein and mean zeaxanthin concentrations of eggs from class 0 were statistically discriminable from mean lutein and zeaxanthin concentrations from eggs of all other classes (P xanthophylls in eggs of classes 1 (free range), 2 (barn), and 3 (cage) were as follows: canthaxanthin, 707 +/- 284 microg/100 g; beta-apo-8'-carotenoic acid ethyl ester, 639 +/- 391 microg/100 g; and citranaxanthin, 560 +/- 231 microg/100 g. Experiments with boiled eggs proved that beta-apo-8'-carotenoic acid ethyl ester was the xanthophyll with the highest stability, whereas lutein was degraded to the largest extent (loss of 19%). Detailed knowledge about the xanthophyll amounts in eggs is indispensable to calculate the human uptake.

  9. Experimental investigation on single-phase pressure losses in nuclear debris beds: Identification of flow regimes and effective diameter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clavier, R., E-mail: remi.clavier@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN) – PSN-RES/SEREX/LE2M, Cadarache bât. 327, 13115 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Chikhi, N., E-mail: nourdine.chikhi@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN) – PSN-RES/SEREX/LE2M, Cadarache bât. 327, 13115 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Fichot, F. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN) – PSN-RES/SAG/LEPC, Cadarache bât. 700, 13115 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Quintard, M. [Université de Toulouse – INPT – UPS – Institut de Mécanique des Fluides de Toulouse (IMFT), Allée Camille Soula, F-31400 Toulouse (France); CNRS – IMFT, F-31400 Toulouse (France)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Single-phase pressure drops versus flow rates in particle beds are measured. • Conditions are representative of the reflooding of a nuclear fuel debris bed. • Darcy, weak inertial, strong inertial and weak turbulent regimes are observed. • A Darcy–Forchheimer law is found to be a good approximation in this domain. • A predictive correlation is derived from new experimental data. - Abstract: During a severe nuclear power plant accident, the degradation of the reactor core can lead to the formation of debris beds. The main accident management procedure consists in injecting water inside the reactor vessel. Nevertheless, large uncertainties remain regarding the coolability of such debris beds. Motivated by the reduction of these uncertainties, experiments have been conducted on the CALIDE facility in order to investigate single-phase pressure losses in representative debris beds. In this paper, these results are presented and analyzed in order to identify a simple single-phase flow pressure loss correlation for debris-bed-like particle beds in reflooding conditions, which cover Darcean to Weakly Turbulent flow regimes. The first part of this work is dedicated to study macro-scale pressure losses generated by debris-bed-like particle beds, i.e., high sphericity (>80%) particle beds with relatively small size dispersion (from 1 mm to 10 mm). A Darcy–Forchheimer law, involving the sum of a linear term and a quadratic deviation, with respect to filtration velocity, has been found to be relevant to describe this behavior in Darcy, Strong Inertial and Weak Turbulent regimes. It has also been observed that, in a restricted domain (Re = 15 to Re = 30) between Darcy and Weak Inertial regimes, deviation is better described by a cubic term, which corresponds to the so-called Weak Inertial regime. The second part of this work aims at identifying expressions for coefficients of linear and quadratic terms in Darcy–Forchheimer law, in order to obtain a

  10. Hydrodeoxygenation of mono- and dimeric lignin model compounds on noble metal catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guvenatam, Burcu; Kursun, Osman; Heeres, Hero; Pidko, Evgeny A.; Hensen, Emiel J. M.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of reaction conditions (temperature, acidity) on the catalytic performance of supported Pt, Pd and Ru catalysts for the aqueous phase hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of lignin model compounds was systematically investigated. Phenol conversion proceeds via hydrogenation of the aromatic ring

  11. The gas-phase on-line production of phosphoryl halides, Pox3 and their identification by infrared spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allaf, A.W.

    1998-01-01

    A new route has been devised, leading to the production of Pox 3 molecules where X=F, Br and I by an on-line process using phosphoryl chloride, POCL 3 as a starting material passed over heated sodium fluoride, NaF, potassium bromide, KBr and potassium iodide, K1 at 535 Centigrade, 690 Centigrade and 480 Centigrade, respectively. The low resolution gas-phase fourier transform infrared spectra reported for the first time showed strong bands centered at 1411.6, 1322.9, 1300.8 and 1285 cm - 1, assigned to Ε 1 (a 1 ), the O = P stretching fundamental of POF 3 , POCL 3 , POBR 3 and POI 3 , respectively. Attempts were made to prepare POCL 2 and POBr 2 , by an on-line process using POCL 3 again but passed over heated sodium and potassium bromide for POCL 2 and POBr 2 . (author). 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  12. The gas-phase on-line production of vanadium oxytrihalides, VOX3 and their identification by infrared spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zidan, M. D.; Allaf, A. W.

    2001-01-01

    A new route has been devised, leading to the production of VOX 3 molecules where X=F, Br and I by an on-line process using vanadium oxytrichloride, VOCl 3 as a starting compound passed over the following heated salts NaF, KBr and KI at 375, 700 and 550 centigrade, respectively. The products have been characterized by the IR spectra of their vapors. the low resolution gas phase on-line Fourier transform infrared spectra reported for the first time show strong bands with PQR type structure, centered at 1058, 1035, 1030 and 1025 cm -1 to the υ 1 (a 1 ), the O=V stretching fundamental mode of VOF 3 , VOCl 3 , VOBr 3 and VOI 3 , respectively. (Author)

  13. Encapsulation, solid-phases identification and leaching of toxic metals in cement systems modified by natural biodegradable polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasheras-Zubiate, M.; Navarro-Blasco, I.; Fernández, J.M.; Álvarez, J.I.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Speciation of Zn, Pb and Cr has been studied in chitosan-modified cement mortars. ► Metal retention mechanisms have been clarified by newly identified crystalline forms. ► Native chitosan induced and stabilized newly characterized Pb (IV) species. ► Dietrichite is responsible for the Zn immobilization in the polymer-modified mortar. ► Leaching of Zn decreased by 24% in the presence of low molecular weight chitosan. - Abstract: Cement mortars loaded with Cr, Pb and Zn were modified by polymeric admixtures [chitosans with low (LMWCH), medium (MMWCH) and high (HMWCH) molecular weight and hydroxypropylchitosan (HPCH)]. The influence of the simultaneous presence of the heavy metal and the polymeric additive on the fresh properties (consistency, water retention and setting time) and on the compressive strength of the mortars was assessed. Leaching patterns as well as properties of the cement mortars were related to the heavy metals-bearing solid phases. Chitosan admixtures lessened the effect of the addition of Cr and Pb on the setting time. In all instances, chitosans improved the compressive strength of the Zn-bearing mortars yielding values as high as 15 N mm −2 . A newly reported Zn phase, dietrichite (ZnAl 2 (SO 4 ) 4 ·22H 2 O) was identified under the presence of LMWCH: it was responsible for an improvement by 24% in Zn retention. Lead-bearing silicates, such as plumalsite (Pb 4 Al 2 (SiO 3 ) 7 ), were also identified by XRD confirming that Pb was mainly retained as a part of the silicate network after Ca ion exchange. Also, the presence of polymer induced the appearance and stabilization of some Pb(IV) species. Finally, diverse chromate species were identified and related to the larger leaching values of Cr(VI).

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF ATTRITION RESISTANT IRON-BASED FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adeyinka A. Adeyiga

    2001-01-01

    The Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reaction provides a way of converting coal-derived synthesis gas (CO+H 2 ) to liquid fuels. Since the reaction is highly exothermic, one of the major problems in control of the reaction is heat removal. Recent work has shown that the use of slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) can largely solve this problem. The use of iron-based catalysts is attractive not only due to their low cost and ready availability, but also due to their high water-gas shift activity which makes it possible to use these catalysts with low H 2 /CO ratios. However, a serious problem with use of Fe catalysts in a SBCR is their tendency to undergo attrition. This can cause fouling/plugging of downstream filters and equipment, makes the separation of catalyst from the oil/wax product very difficult if not impossible, and results in a steady loss of catalyst from the reactor. Recently, fundamental understanding of physical attrition is being addressed by incorporating suitable binders into the catalyst recipe. This has resulted in the preparation of a spray dried Fe-based catalyst having aps of 70 mm with high attrition resistance. This Fe-based attrition resistant, active and selective catalyst gave 95% CO conversion through 125 hours of testing in a fixed-bed at 270 C, 1.48 MPa, H 2 /CO=0.67 and 2.0 NL/g-cat/h with C 5 + selectivity of >78% and methane selectivity of <5%. However, further development of the catalyst is needed to address the chemical attrition due to phase changes that any Fe-catalyst goes through potentially causing internal stresses within the particle and resulting in weakening, spalling or cracking. The objective of this research is to develop robust iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that have suitable activity, selectivity and stability to be used in the slurry bubble column reactor. Specifically we aim to develop to: (i) improve the performance and preparation procedure of the high activity, high attrition resistant, high alpha iron

  15. Determination of surface coverage of catalysts : temperature programmed experiments on platinum and iridium sponge catalysts after low temperature ammonia oxidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, A.C.M.; Grondelle, van J.; Santen, van R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The activity of iridium and platinum sponge catalysts was studied in the low temperature gas phase oxidation of ammonia with oxygen. Under the reaction conditions used, iridium was found to be more active and more selective to nitrogen than platinum. Furthermore it was established from activity

  16. Identification of Inhibitory Premotor Interneurons Activated at a Late Phase in a Motor Cycle during Drosophila Larval Locomotion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Itakura

    Full Text Available Rhythmic motor patterns underlying many types of locomotion are thought to be produced by central pattern generators (CPGs. Our knowledge of how CPG networks generate motor patterns in complex nervous systems remains incomplete, despite decades of work in a variety of model organisms. Substrate borne locomotion in Drosophila larvae is driven by waves of muscular contraction that propagate through multiple body segments. We use the motor circuitry underlying crawling in larval Drosophila as a model to try to understand how segmentally coordinated rhythmic motor patterns are generated. Whereas muscles, motoneurons and sensory neurons have been well investigated in this system, far less is known about the identities and function of interneurons. Our recent study identified a class of glutamatergic premotor interneurons, PMSIs (period-positive median segmental interneurons, that regulate the speed of locomotion. Here, we report on the identification of a distinct class of glutamatergic premotor interneurons called Glutamatergic Ventro-Lateral Interneurons (GVLIs. We used calcium imaging to search for interneurons that show rhythmic activity and identified GVLIs as interneurons showing wave-like activity during peristalsis. Paired GVLIs were present in each abdominal segment A1-A7 and locally extended an axon towards a dorsal neuropile region, where they formed GRASP-positive putative synaptic contacts with motoneurons. The interneurons expressed vesicular glutamate transporter (vGluT and thus likely secrete glutamate, a neurotransmitter known to inhibit motoneurons. These anatomical results suggest that GVLIs are premotor interneurons that locally inhibit motoneurons in the same segment. Consistent with this, optogenetic activation of GVLIs with the red-shifted channelrhodopsin, CsChrimson ceased ongoing peristalsis in crawling larvae. Simultaneous calcium imaging of the activity of GVLIs and motoneurons showed that GVLIs' wave-like activity lagged

  17. The gas-phase on-line production of phosphoryl halides, Pox sub 3 and their identification by infrared spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allaf, A.W.

    1999-01-01

    A new route has been devised, leading to the production of Pox sub 3 molecules where X=F, Br and I by an on-line process using phosphoryl chloride, POCI sub 3 as a starting material passed over heated sodium fluoride, NaF, potassium bromide, KBr and potassium iodide, K1 at 535 Centigrade, 690 Centigrade and 480 Centigrade, respectively. The low resolution gas-phase fourier transform infrared spectra reported for the first time showed strong bands centered at 1411.6, 1322.9, 1300.8 and 1285 cm sup - 1, assigned to EPSILON sub 1 (a sub 1), the O = P stretching fundamental of POF sub 3 , POCI sub 3 , POBr sub 3 and POI sub 3 , respectively. Attempts were made to prepare POCI sub 2 and POBr sub 2 , by an on-line process using POCI sub 3 again but passed over heated sodium and potassium bromide for POCI sub 2 and POBr sub 2. (author)

  18. Identification of Noise Sources During Rocket Engine Test Firings and a Rocket Launch Using a Microphone Phased-Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Jayanta; Mosher, Robert N.; Porter, Barry J.

    2013-01-01

    A 70 microphone, 10-foot by 10-foot, microphone phased array was built for use in the harsh environment of rocket launches. The array was setup at NASA Wallops launch pad 0A during a static test firing of Orbital Sciences' Antares engines, and again during the first launch of the Antares vehicle. It was placed 400 feet away from the pad, and was hoisted on a scissor lift 40 feet above ground. The data sets provided unprecedented insight into rocket noise sources. The duct exit was found to be the primary source during the static test firing; the large amount of water injected beneath the nozzle exit and inside the plume duct quenched all other sources. The maps of the noise sources during launch were found to be time-dependent. As the engines came to full power and became louder, the primary source switched from the duct inlet to the duct exit. Further elevation of the vehicle caused spilling of the hot plume, resulting in a distributed noise map covering most of the pad. As the entire plume emerged from the duct, and the ondeck water system came to full power, the plume itself became the loudest noise source. These maps of the noise sources provide vital insight for optimization of sound suppression systems for future Antares launches.

  19. Development of GREET Catalyst Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhichao [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division; Dunn, Jennifer B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division; Cronauer, Donald C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division

    2014-09-01

    Catalysts are critical inputs for many pathways that convert biomass into biofuels. Energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions during the production of catalysts and chemical inputs influence the life-cycle energy consumption, and GHG emissions of biofuels and need to be considered in biofuel life-cycle analysis (LCA). In this report, we develop energy and material flows for the production of three different catalysts (tar reforming, alcohol synthesis, Zeolite Socony Mobil-5 [ZSM-5]) and two chemicals (olivine, dimethyl ether of polyethylene glycol [DEPG]). These compounds and catalysts are now included in the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET™) catalyst module. They were selected because they are consumed in existing U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) analyses of biofuel processes. For example, a thermochemical ethanol production pathway (indirect gasification and mixed alcohol synthesis) developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) uses olivine, DEPG, and tar reforming and alcohol synthesis catalysts (Dutta et al., 2011). ZSM-5 can be used in biofuel production pathways such as catalytic upgrading of sugars into hydrocarbons (Biddy and Jones, 2013). Other uses for these compounds and catalysts are certainly possible. In this report, we document the data sources and methodology we used to develop material and energy flows for the catalysts and compounds in the GREET catalyst module. In Section 2 we focus on compounds used in the model Dutta et al. (2011) developed. In Section 3, we report material and energy flows associated with ZSM-5 production. Finally, in Section 4, we report results.

  20. Strontium cobaltite oxygen sponge catalyst and methods of use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Nyung; Jeen, Hyoungjeen; Choi, Woo Seok; Biegalski, Michael; Folkman, Chad M.; Tung, I-Cheng; Fong, Dillon D.; Freeland, John W.; Shin, Dongwon; Ohta, Hiromichi; Chisholm, Matthew F.

    2017-01-24

    Rapid, reversible redox activity may be accomplished at significantly reduced temperatures, as low as about 200.degree. C., from epitaxially stabilized, oxygen vacancy ordered SrCoO.sub.2.5 and thermodynamically unfavorable perovskite SrCoO.sub.3-.delta.. The fast, low temperature redox activity in SrCoO.sub.3-.delta. may be attributed to a small Gibbs free energy difference between the two topotactic phases. Epitaxially stabilized thin films of strontium cobaltite provide a catalyst adapted to rapidly transition between oxidation states at substantially low temperatures. Methods of transitioning a strontium cobaltite catalyst from a first oxidation state to a second oxidation state are described.

  1. Study of iron-zinc catalysts by Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arriola, S.H.

    1990-01-01

    The Moessbauer parameters were determined on a series of catalyst mixtures of iron and zinc oxides with variable quantities of zinc. A change in the crystal structure of the iron oxide when introducing zinc into the samples was observed. The corundum structure of the α-Fe 2 O 3 phase was transformed into the spinel type of zinc ferrite when zinc oxide was present in any quantity. A strong electronic interaction between the zinc ferrite and the zinc oxide present in excess was evident. The catalysts were analyzed using x-ray fluorescence and x-ray diffraction methods. (author) 10 refs.; 4 figs.; 2 tabs

  2. Alternative SILP-SCR Catalysts based on Guanidinium Chromates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due-Hansen, Johannes; Riisager, Anders; Ståhl, Kenny

    There is an increasing global concern about human caused emissions of pollutants like sulfur and nitrogen oxides to the atmosphere leading to, e.g. smog and acid rain damaging to the human health and the environment. Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with ammonia as reductant is the most...... duct. There is therefore a demand for alkali-resistant SCR catalysts more flexible regarding temperature of operation and position in the duct. Supported ionic liquid phase (SILP) catalysts with 1,1,3,3-Tetramethylguanidinium (TMGH+) and a chromium oxide anion supported on anatase have exhibited...

  3. Deactivation and regeneration of refinery catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furimsky, E.

    1979-08-01

    A discussion covers the mechanisms of catalyst aging, poisoning, coke deposition, and metals deposition; feedstock pretreatment to extend catalyst life; the effects of operating conditions; the effects of catalyst composition and structure on its stability; nonchemical deactivation processes; and methods of catalyst regeneration, including coke burn-off and solvent extraction.

  4. Increasing the lifetime of fuel cell catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Latsuzbaia, R.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, I discuss a novel idea of fuel cell catalyst regeneration to increase lifetime of the PEM fuel cell electrode/catalyst operation and, therefore, reduce the catalyst costs. As many of the catalyst degradation mechanisms are difficult to avoid, the regeneration is alternative option to

  5. Identification of stable cytotoxic factors in the gas phase extract of cigarette smoke and pharmacological characterization of their cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noya, Yoichi; Seki, Koh-Ichi; Asano, Hiroshi; Mai, Yosuke; Horinouchi, Takahiro; Higashi, Tsunehito; Terada, Koji; Hatate, Chizuru; Hoshi, Akimasa; Nepal, Prabha; Horiguchi, Mika; Kuge, Yuji; Miwa, Soichi

    2013-12-06

    Smoking is a major risk factor for atherosclerotic vascular diseases, but the mechanism for its genesis is unknown. We have recently shown that the gas phase of cigarette smoke (nicotine- and tar-free cigarette smoke extract; CSE) likely to reach the systemic circulation contains stable substances which cause cytotoxicity like plasma membrane damage and cell death in cultured cells, and also that the plasma membrane damage is caused through sequential activation of protein kinase C (PKC) and NADPH oxidase (NOX) and the resulting generation of reactive oxygen species (PKC/NOX-dependent mechanism), whereas cell death is caused through PKC/NOX-dependent and -independent mechanisms. To identify these stable substances, the CSE was prepared by passing the main-stream smoke of 10 cigarettes through a Cambridge glass fiber filter, trapping of the smoke in a vessel cooled at -80°C, and subsequent dissolution in 10ml of water. The CSE was fractionated into nine fractions using reversed-phase HPLC, and each fraction was screened for cytotoxicity in cultured cells, using propidium iodide uptake assay for cell membrane damage and MTS [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium] reduction assay for cell viability. The cytotoxicity was positive in two of the nine fractions (Fr2 and Fr5). After extraction of the active fractions into dichloromethane, GC/MS analysis identified 2-cyclopenten-1-one (CPO) in Fr5 but none in Fr2. After derivatization of the active fractions with O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl) hydroxylamine hydrochloride, GC/MS analysis identified acrolein, acetone and propionaldehyde in Fr2, and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) in Fr5. After 4-h incubation, authentic acrolein and MVK induced concentration-dependent cytotoxicity with EC50 values of 75.9±8.2 and 47.0±8.0μM (mean±SEM; n=3), respectively, whereas acetone, propionaldehyde and CPO were without effect. However, after 24-h incubation, CPO induced concentration

  6. Source identification of underground fuel spills by solid-phase microextraction/high-resolution gas chromatography/genetic algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavine, B K; Ritter, J; Moores, A J; Wilson, M; Faruque, A; Mayfield, H T

    2000-01-15

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME), capillary column gas chromatography, and pattern recognition methods were used to develop a potential method for typing jet fuels so a spill sample in the environment can be traced to its source. The test data consisted of gas chromatograms from 180 neat jet fuel samples representing common aviation turbine fuels found in the United States (JP-4, Jet-A, JP-7, JPTS, JP-5, JP-8). SPME sampling of the fuel's headspace afforded well-resolved reproducible profiles, which were standardized using special peak-matching software. The peak-matching procedure yielded 84 standardized retention time windows, though not all peaks were present in all gas chromatograms. A genetic algorithm (GA) was employed to identify features (in the standardized chromatograms of the neat jet fuels) suitable for pattern recognition analysis. The GA selected peaks, whose two largest principal components showed clustering of the chromatograms on the basis of fuel type. The principal component analysis routine in the fitness function of the GA acted as an information filter, significantly reducing the size of the search space, since it restricted the search to feature subsets whose variance is primarily about differences between the various fuel types in the training set. In addition, the GA focused on those classes and/or samples that were difficult to classify as it trained using a form of boosting. Samples that consistently classify correctly were not as heavily weighted as samples that were difficult to classify. Over time, the GA learned its optimal parameters in a manner similar to a perceptron. The pattern recognition GA integrated aspects of strong and weak learning to yield a "smart" one-pass procedure for feature selection.

  7. Hydrogen production by dry reforming of methane with carbon dioxide in one-dimensional nickel-based catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez U, A. C.

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is development of nickel catalysts supported over 1D matrix of cerium oxide, to be used in dry reforming methane reaction with carbon dioxide for hydrogen production. The catalysts were characterized by: Temperature Programmed Reduction (TPR), Scanning Electronic Microscopy (Sem), Surface Area (Bet method) an X Ray Diffraction (XRD). The TPR technique allowed to define reduction temperature of the active phase in the catalyst, Sem technique showed that the CeO_2 matrix had a nano rod morphology. XRD allowed to identify the crystalline phases of the catalysts. Finally, the catalysts were tested in the dry reforming methane reaction, high catalytic activity and hydrogen production were performed at 700 degrees Celsius and the catalyst with 30 wt.% of nickel. (Author)

  8. Impeded solid state reactions and transformations in ceramic catalysts supports and catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernő E. Kiss

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Impeded chemical reactions and impeded polymorphous transformation in materials are discussed, as desired effects, for stabilization of ceramic catalyst supports and ceramic based catalysts. This paper gives a short overview about the possibilities of slowing down the aging processes in ceramic catalyst supports and catalysts. Special attention is given to alumina and titania based catalysts.

  9. Monodisperse Platinum and Rhodium Nanoparticles as Model Heterogeneous Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grass, Michael Edward [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-09-01

    Model heterogeneous catalysts have been synthesized and studied to better understand how the surface structure of noble metal nanoparticles affects catalytic performance. In this project, monodisperse rhodium and platinum nanoparticles of controlled size and shape have been synthesized by solution phase polyol reduction, stabilized by polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Model catalysts have been developed using these nanoparticles by two methods: synthesis of mesoporous silica (SBA-15) in the presence of nanoparticles (nanoparticle encapsulation, NE) to form a composite of metal nanoparticles supported on SBA-15 and by deposition of the particles onto a silicon wafer using Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayer deposition. The particle shapes were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution TEM (HRTEM) and the sizes were determined by TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and in the case of NE samples, room temperature H2 and CO adsorption isotherms. Catalytic studies were carried out in homebuilt gas-phase reactors. For the nanoparticles supported on SBA-15, the catalysts are in powder form and were studied using the homebuilt systems as plug-flow reactors. In the case of nanoparticles deposited on silicon wafers, the same systems were operated as batch reactors. This dissertation has focused on the synthesis, characterization, and reaction studies of model noble metal heterogeneous catalysts. Careful control of particle size and shape has been accomplished though solution phase synthesis of Pt and Rh nanoparticles in order to elucidate further structure-reactivity relationships in noble metal catalysis.

  10. Suitability of some promising soot combustion catalysts for application in diesel exhaust treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badini, Claudio; Saracco, Guido; Serra, Valentina; Specchia, Vito [Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali ed Ingegneria Chimica, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi, 24-10129 Torino (Italy)

    1998-09-21

    In this work, the effect of thermal treatment at 380C and 600C, under gaseous atmospheres containing some typical components of diesel emissions (SO{sub 2} and water), was studied on some promising catalysts for diesel particulate combustion. In particular, the ageing behaviour of two novel catalysts (based on CsVO{sub 3}+KCl and KVO{sub 3}+KCl, respectively) and of a more widely studied Cu-K-V-Cl catalyst was investigated. The catalytic activities of these novel catalysts were lower than that of the Cu-K-V-Cl one, but, contrary to this last counterpart, they almost completely maintained their activity during ageing treatments in dry or humid air at 380C and 600C, respectively. Moreover, after prolonged thermal exposure in wet air, the activity of the Cu-K-V-Cl catalyst became comparable with that of the CsVO{sub 3}+KCl one, while remaining still slightly higher than that of the KVO{sub 3}+KCl catalyst. The thermal treatments of all the catalysts under investigation in an atmosphere containing SO{sub 2} did not cause an activity decrease. X-ray diffraction analyses showed the formation of new phases (sulphates and vanadates with a K/V ratio different from that of metavanadates) which could also improve the catalytic activity, counterbalancing the loss of active components due to evaporation at high temperatures. Furthermore, the catalyst activity was evaluated after employing repeatedly these catalysts in carbon combustion. The catalytic activities were generally slightly lowered by the repeated use, even though, from this viewpoint, that of Cu-K-V-Cl was more affected than those of the other catalysts. On the basis of the obtained results the CsVO{sub 3}+KCl catalyst was found to allow the best compromise between satisfactory catalyst activity and stability

  11. SYNTHESIS OF UNSATURATED ESTERS VIA HIGHLY EFFICIENT ESTERIFICATION CATALYZED BY POLYMER GRAFTED QUARTERNARY AMMONIUM SALTS AS TRIPHASE CATALYSTS

    OpenAIRE

    LIANG, ZHENG YONG; WANG, LILI; LIU, HUI; HUANG, JIN SHUO

    2013-01-01

    A series of unsaturated esters were prepared via condensation of sodium carboxylates and alkenyl halide under the condition of macroporous polystyrene grafted quarternary ammonium salt as recyclable phase transfer catalyst, NaI as co-catalyst, Cu powder as inhibitor and H2O as solvent. Under optimal conditions, products yields are 78.2~ 96.0%. The catalyst can be convenient recycled and reutilized for about five times without losing its activity obviously.

  12. Rare earth metals for automotive exhaust catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinjoh, Hirohumi

    2006-01-01

    The usage of rare earth metals for automotive exhaust catalysts is demonstrated in this paper. Rare earth metals have been widely used in automotive catalysts. In particular, three-way catalysts require the use of ceria compounds as oxygen storage materials, and lanthana as both a stabilizer of alumina and a promoter. The application for diesel catalysts is also illustrated. Effects of inclusion of rare earth metals in automotive catalysts are discussed

  13. Samarium-modified vanadium phosphate catalyst for the selective oxidation of n-butane to maleic anhydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Hua-Yi; Wang, Hai-Bo; Liu, Xin-Hua; Li, Jian-Hui; Yang, Mei-Hua; Huang, Chuan-Jing; Weng, Wei-Zheng; Wan, Hui-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The addition of a small amount of Sm into VPO catalyst brought about great changes in its physicochemical properties such as surface area, surface morphology, phase composition and redox property, thus leading to a higher catalytic performance in the selective oxidation of n-butane to maleic anhydride, as compared to the undoped VPO catalyst. - Highlights: • The addition of Sm leads to great changes in the structure of VPO catalyst. • Sm improves performance of VPO for oxidation of n-butane to maleic anhydride. • Catalytic performance is closely related to structure of VPO catalyst. - Abstract: A series of samarium-modified vanadium phosphate catalysts were prepared and studied in selective oxidation of n-butane to maleic anhydride. The catalytic evaluation showed that Sm modification significantly increased the overall n-butane conversion and intrinsic activity. N 2 -adsorption, XRD, SEM, Raman, XPS, EPR and H 2 -TPR techniques were used to investigate the intrinsic difference among these catalysts. The results revealed that the addition of Sm to VPO catalyst can increase the surface area of the catalyst, lead to a significant change in catalyst morphology from plate-like structure into rosette-shape clusters, and largely promote the formation of (VO) 2 P 2 O 7 . All of these were related to the different catalytic performance of Sm-doped and undoped VPO catalysts. The roles of the different VOPO 4 phases and the influence of Sm were also described and discussed

  14. Biomass processing over gold catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Simakova, Olga A; Murzin, Dmitry Yu

    2014-01-01

    The book describes the valorization of biomass-derived compounds over gold catalysts. Since biomass is a rich renewable feedstock for diverse platform molecules, including those currently derived from petroleum, the interest in various transformation routes has become intense. Catalytic conversion of biomass is one of the main approaches to improving the economic viability of biorefineries.  In addition, Gold catalysts were found to have outstanding activity and selectivity in many key reactions. This book collects information about transformations of the most promising and important compounds derived from cellulose, hemicelluloses, and woody biomass extractives. Since gold catalysts possess high stability under oxidative conditions, selective oxidation reactions were discussed more thoroughly than other critical reactions such as partial hydrogenation, acetalization, and isomerization. The influence of reaction conditions, the role of the catalyst, and the advantages and disadvantages of using gold are pre...

  15. Interfacial charge distributions in carbon-supported palladium catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rao, Radhika G.; Blume, Raoul; Hansen, Thomas Willum

    2017-01-01

    Controlling the charge transfer between a semiconducting catalyst carrier and the supported transition metal active phase represents an elite strategy for fine turning the electronic structure of the catalytic centers, hence their activity and selectivity. These phenomena have been theoretically...... and experimentally elucidated for oxide supports but remain poorly understood for carbons due to their complex nanoscale structure. Here, we combine advanced spectroscopy and microscopy on model Pd/C samples to decouple the electronic and surface chemistry effects on catalytic performance. Our investigations reveal...... treatments can be used to tune the interfacial charge distribution, hereby providing a strategy to rationally design carbon-supported catalysts.Control over charge transfer in carbon-supported metal nanoparticles is essential for designing new catalysts. Here, the authors show that thermal treatments...

  16. Ozone Decomposition on the Surface of Metal Oxide Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batakliev Todor Todorov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic decomposition of ozone to molecular oxygen over catalytic mixture containing manganese, copper and nickel oxides was investigated in the present work. The catalytic activity was evaluated on the basis of the decomposition coefficient which is proportional to ozone decomposition rate, and it has been already used in other studies for catalytic activity estimation. The reaction was studied in the presence of thermally modified catalytic samples operating at different temperatures and ozone flow rates. The catalyst changes were followed by kinetic methods, surface measurements, temperature programmed reduction and IR-spectroscopy. The phase composition of the metal oxide catalyst was determined by X-ray diffraction. The catalyst mixture has shown high activity in ozone decomposition at wet and dry O3/O2 gas mixtures. The mechanism of catalytic ozone degradation was suggested.

  17. Hydrogen production by steam reforming of liquefied natural gas over a nickel catalyst supported on mesoporous alumina xerogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jeong Gil; Youn, Min Hye; Cho, Kyung Min; Park, Sunyoung; Song, In Kyu

    Mesoporous alumina xerogel (A-SG) is prepared by a sol-gel method for use as a support for a nickel catalyst. The Ni/A-SG catalyst is then prepared by an impregnation method, and is applied to hydrogen production by steam reforming of liquefied natural gas (LNG). The effect of the mesoporous alumina xerogel support on the catalytic performance of Ni/A-SG catalyst is investigated. For the purpose of comparison, a nickel catalyst supported on commercial alumina (A-C) is also prepared by an impregnation method (Ni/A-C). Both the hydroxyl-rich surface and the electron-deficient sites of the A-SG support enhance the dispersion of the nickel species on the support during the calcination step. The formation of the surface nickel aluminate phase in the Ni/A-SG catalyst remarkably increases the reducibility and stability of the catalyst. Furthermore, the high-surface area and the well-developed mesoporosity of the Ni/A-SG catalyst enhance the gasification of surface hydrocarbons that are adsorbed in the reaction. In the steam reforming of LNG, the Ni/A-SG catalyst exhibits a better catalytic performance than the Ni/A-C catalyst in terms of LNG conversion and hydrogen production. Moreover, the Ni/A-SG catalyst shows strong resistance toward catalyst deactivation.

  18. Identification of three new phase II metabolites of a designer drug methylone formed in rats by N-demethylation followed by conjugation with dicarboxylic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Židková, Monika; Linhart, Igor; Balíková, Marie; Himl, Michal; Dvořáčková, Veronika; Lhotková, Eva; Páleníček, Tomáš

    2018-06-01

    1. Methylone (3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylcathinone, MDMC), which appeared on the illicit drug market in 2004, is a frequently abused synthetic cathinone derivative. Known metabolic pathways of MDMC include N-demethylation to normethylone (3,4-methylenedioxycathinone, MDC), aliphatic chain hydroxylation and oxidative demethylenation followed by monomethylation and conjugation with glucuronic acid and/or sulphate. 2. Three new phase II metabolites, amidic conjugates of MDC with succinic, glutaric and adipic acid, were identified in the urine of rats dosed subcutaneously with MDMC.HCl (20 mg/kg body weight) by LC-ESI-HRMS using synthetic reference standards to support identification. 3. The main portion of administered MDMC was excreted unchanged. Normethylone, was a major urinary metabolite, of which a minor part was conjugated with dicarboxylic acids. 4. Previously identified ring-opened metabolites 4-hydroxy-3-methoxymethcathinone (4-OH-3-MeO-MC), 3-hydroxy-4-methoxymeth-cathinone (3-OH-4-MeO-MC) and 3,4-dihydroxymethcathinone (3,4-di-OH-MC) mostly in conjugated form with glucuronic and/or sulphuric acids were also detected. 5. Also, ring-opened metabolites derived from MDC, namely, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxycathinone (4-OH-3-MeO-C), 3-hydroxy-4-methoxycathinone (3-OH-4-MeO-C) and 3,4-dihydroxycathinone (3,4-di-OH-C) were identified for the first time in vivo.

  19. Identification of ortho-Substituted Benzoic Acid/Ester Derivatives via the Gas-Phase Neighboring Group Participation Effect in (+)-ESI High Resolution Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blincoe, William D; Rodriguez-Granillo, Agustina; Saurí, Josep; Pierson, Nicholas A; Joyce, Leo A; Mangion, Ian; Sheng, Huaming

    2018-04-01

    Benzoic acid/ester/amide derivatives are common moieties in pharmaceutical compounds and present a challenge in positional isomer identification by traditional tandem mass spectrometric analysis. A method is presented for exploiting the gas-phase neighboring group participation (NGP) effect to differentiate ortho-substituted benzoic acid/ester derivatives with high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS 1 ). Significant water/alcohol loss (>30% abundance in MS 1 spectra) was observed for ortho-substituted nucleophilic groups; these fragment peaks are not observable for the corresponding para and meta-substituted analogs. Experiments were also extended to the analysis of two intermediates in the synthesis of suvorexant (Belsomra) with additional analysis conducted with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), density functional theory (DFT), and ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) studies. Significant water/alcohol loss was also observed for 1-substituted 1, 2, 3-triazoles but not for the isomeric 2-substituted 1, 2, 3-triazole analogs. IMS-MS, NMR, and DFT studies were conducted to show that the preferred orientation of the 2-substituted triazole rotamer was away from the electrophilic center of the reaction, whereas the 1-subtituted triazole was oriented in close proximity to the center. Abundance of NGP product was determined to be a product of three factors: (1) proton affinity of the nucleophilic group; (2) steric impact of the nucleophile; and (3) proximity of the nucleophile to carboxylic acid/ester functional groups. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  20. SILP catalysis in gas-phase hydroformylation and carbonylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riisager, A.; Fehrmann, R. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Dept. of Chemistry; Haumann, M.; Wasserscheid, P. [Univ. Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Chemische Reaktionstechnik

    2006-07-01

    Supported ionic liquid phase (SILP) catalysts are new materials consisting of an ionic liquid-metal catalyst solution highly dispersed on a porous support. The use of a non-volatile, ionic liquid catalyst phase in SILP catalysts results in a stable heterogeneous-type material with selectivity and efficiency like homogeneous catalysts. The silica-supported SILP Rh-bisphosphine hydroformylation catalyst exhibited good activities and excellent selectivities in gas phase hydroformylation with stability exceeding 700 hours time-on-stream. Spectroscopic and kinetic data confirmed the homogeneous nature of the catalyst. In the Rh- SILP catalysed carbonylation of methanol the formation of undesired by-products could be suppressed by variation of residence time and gas pressure. (orig.)

  1. Bimetallic Catalysts Containing Gold and Palladium for Environmentally Important Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Alshammari

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Supported bimetallic nanoparticles (SBN are extensively used as efficient redox catalysts. This kind of catalysis particularly using SBN has attracted immense research interest compared to their parent metals due to their unique physico-chemical properties. The primary objective of this contribution is to provide comprehensive overview about SBN and their application as promising catalysts. The present review contains four sections in total. Section 1 starts with a general introduction, recent progress, and brief summary of the application of SBN as promising catalysts for different applications. Section 2 reviews the preparation and characterization methods of SBN for a wide range of catalytic reactions. Section 3 concentrates on our own results related to the application of SBN in heterogeneous catalysis. In this section, the oxidation of cyclohexane to adipic acid (an eco-friendly and novel approach will be discussed. In addition, the application of bimetallic Pd catalysts for vapor phase toluene acetoxylation in a fixed bed reactor will also be highlighted. Acetoxylation of toluene to benzyl acetate is another green route to synthesize benzyl acetate in one step. Finally, Section 4 describes the summary of the main points and also presents an outlook on the application of SBN as promising catalysts for the production of valuable products.

  2. Catalyst performance in magnetic esterification methyl soy oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, N.O.; Pereira, K R. de O.; Barros, A.B. de S.; Moura, T.F.B. de; Vilar, E.; Dantas, J.; Costa, A.C.F. de M.

    2016-01-01

    Growing concerns about the environment have encouraged the search for new fuels, including biodiesel, obtained from lipid sources that react with alcohol and catalyst. This aimed of this study to synthesize type catalyst (Ni-Zn)Fe_2O_4 and evaluate it in soy oil esterification. The catalyst was synthesized by combustion reaction and characterized by XRD, FTIR and BET. The esterification was carried out at high pressure reactor at 140°C for 1 hour with molar ratio of oil:alcohol 1:15 to 1 and 3% catalyst. From the XRD it was observed the formation of inverted spinel phase. FTIR revealed the presence of the vibrational bands 586, 1381, 1628, 2352, 2922, 3147 and 3457cm"-"1 and surface area 48m"2g"-"1, 10nm pore diameter and type IV isotherm, suggesting mesoporous material characteristic. The results indicate biodiesel conversion of 31.9% and 27.3% when using 1% and 3% catalyst, respectively. (author)

  3. Radiation modification of vanadium catalyst for anthracene oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norek, J.; Vymetal, J.; Mucka, V.; Pospisil, M.; Cabicar, J.

    1985-01-01

    Vanadium pentoxide on a suitable carrier is often used as catalyst for the oxidation of anthracene in the gaseous phase to 9,10-anthraquinone. The activity and selectivity of the catalyst may be affected by irradiation. The effects were studied of gamma radiation on the properties of the catalyst where the active system was a V 2 O 5 -KOH-K 2 SO 4 mixture on a Al 2 O 3 +SiO 2 carrier. The 60 Co radiation source had an activity of 185 TBq; the carrier of the catalyst was irradiated at a dose rate of 3.05, 1.98 and 0.084 kGy/h to a total dose of 10 kGy. Irradiation increased the selectivity of the catalyst such that in the oxidation temperature optimum of 300 to 400 degC the yield of 9,10-anthraquinone increased by 4.6 to 4.8 %mol. to roughly 90 %mol.; a significant reduction of the content of acid components (phthalanhydride) in the oxidation product also occurred. This effect remained unchanged for 5 months after irradiation. A reduction of selectivity was observed at lower dose rates only in the temperature range between 400 and 480 degC. (A.K.)

  4. Hydrogen Production by Steam Reforming of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Over Nickel-Phosphorus-Alumina Xerogel Catalyst Prepared by a Carbon-Templating Epoxide-Driven Sol-Gel Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Yongju; Park, Seungwon; Han, Seung Ju; Yoo, Jaekyeong; Choi, Jung Ho; Kang, Tae Hun; Lee, Jinwon; Song, In Kyu

    2016-05-01

    A nickel-phosphorus-alumina xerogel catalyst was prepared by a carbon-templating epoxide-driven sol-gel method (denoted as CNPA catalyst), and it was applied to the hydrogen production by steam reforming of liquefied natural gas (LNG). For comparison, a nickel-phosphorus-alumina xerogel catalyst was also prepared by a similar method in the absence of carbon template (denoted as NPA catalyst). The effect of carbon template addition on the physicochemical properties and catalytic activities of the catalysts in the steam reforming of LNG was investigated. Both CNPA and NPA catalysts showed excellent textural properties with well-developed mesoporous structure. However, CNPA catalyst retained a more reducible nickel aluminate phase than NPA catalyst. XRD analysis of the reduced CNPA and NPA catalysts revealed that nickel sintering on the CNPA catalyst was suppressed compared to that on the NPA catalyst. From H2-TPD and CH4-TPD measurements of the reduced CNPA and NPA catalysts, it was also revealed that CNPA catalyst with large amount of hydrogen uptake and strong hydrogen-binding sites showed larger amount of methane adsorption than NPA catalyst. In the hydrogen production by steam reforming of LNG, CNPA catalyst with large methane adsorption capacity showed a better catalytic activity than NPA catalyst.

  5. Structure-Reactivity Relationships in Multi-Component Transition Metal Oxide Catalysts FINAL Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altman, Eric I. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2015-10-06

    The focus of the project was on developing an atomic-level understanding of how transition metal oxide catalysts function. Over the course of several renewals the specific emphases shifted from understanding how local structure and oxidation state affect how molecules adsorb and react on the surfaces of binary oxide crystals to more complex systems where interactions between different transition metal oxide cations in an oxide catalyst can affect reactivity, and finally to the impact of cluster size on oxide stability and reactivity. Hallmarks of the work were the use of epitaxial growth methods to create surfaces relevant to catalysis yet tractable for fundamental surface science approaches, and the use of scanning tunneling microscopy to follow structural changes induced by reactions and to pinpoint adsorption sites. Key early findings included the identification of oxidation and reduction mechanisms on a tungsten oxide catalyst surface that determine the sites available for reaction, identification of C-O bond cleavage as the rate limiting step in alcohol dehydration reactions on the tungsten oxide surface, and demonstration that reduction does not change the favored reaction pathway but rather eases C-O bond cleavage and thus reduces the reaction barrier. Subsequently, a new reconstruction on the anatase phase of TiO2 relevant to catalysis was discovered and shown to create sites with distinct reactivity compared to other TiO2 surfaces. Building on this work on anatase, the mechanism by which TiO2 enhances the reactivity of vanadium oxide layers was characterized and it was found that the TiO2 substrate can force thin vanadia layers to adopt structures they would not ordinarily form in the bulk which in turn creates differences in reactivity between supported layers and bulk samples. From there, the work progressed to studying well-defined ternary oxides where synergistic effects between the two cations can induce

  6. The innovation catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Roger L

    2011-06-01

    A few years ago the software development company Intuit realized that it needed a new approach to galvanizing customers. The company's Net Promoter Score was faltering, and customer recommendations of new products were especially disappointing. Intuit decided to hold a two-day, off-site meeting for the company's top 300 managers with a focus on the role of design in innovation. One of the days was dedicated to a program called Design for Delight. The centerpiece of the day was a PowerPoint presentation by Intuit founder Scott Cook, who realized midway through that he was no Steve Jobs: The managers listened dutifully, but there was little energy in the room. By contrast, a subsequent exercise in which the participants worked through a design challenge by creating prototypes, getting feedback, iterating, and refining, had them mesmerized. The eventual result was the creation of a team of nine design-thinking coaches--"innovation catalysts"--from across Intuit who were made available to help any work group create prototypes, run experiments, and learn from customers. The process includes a "painstorm" (to determine the customer's greatest pain point), a "soljam" (to generate and then winnow possible solutions), and a "code-jam" (to write code "good enough" to take to customers within two weeks). Design for Delight has enabled employees throughout Intuit to move from satisfying customers to delighting them.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of catalysts for the selective transformation of biomass-derived materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghampson, Isaac Tyrone

    The experimental work in this thesis focuses on generating catalysts for two intermediate processes related to the thermal conversion of lignocellulosic biomass: the synthesis and characterization of mesoporous silica supported cobalt catalysts for the Fischer-Tropsch reaction, and an exploration of the reactivity of bulk and supported molybdenum-based nitride catalysts for the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of guaiacol, a lignin model compound. The first section of the work details the synthesis of a series of silica-supported cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts with pore diameters ranging from 2-23 nm. Detailed X-ray diffraction measurements were used to determine the composition and particle diameters of the metal fraction, analyzed as a three-phase system containing Cofcc, Cohcp and CoO particles. Catalyst properties were determined at three stages in catalyst history: (1) after the initial calcination step to thermally decompose the catalyst precursor into Co3O4, (2) after the hydrogen reduction step to activate the catalyst to Co and (3) after the FT reaction. From the study, it was observed that larger pore diameters supported higher turnover frequency; smaller pore diameters yielded larger mole fraction of CoO; XRD on post-reduction and post-FTS catalyst samples indicated significant changes in dispersivity after reduction. In the next section, the catalytic behaviors of unsupported, activated carbon-, alumina-, and SBA-15 mesoporous silica-supported molybdenum nitride catalysts were evaluated for the hydrodeoxygenation of guaiacol (2-methoxy phenol) at 300°C and 5 MPa. The nitride catalysts were prepared by thermal decomposition of bulk and supported ammonium heptamolybdate to form MoO 3 followed by nitridation in either flowing ammonia or a nitrogen/hydrogen mixture. The catalytic properties were strongly affected by the nitriding and purging treatment as well as the physical and chemical properties of support. The overall reaction was influenced by the

  8. Identification of microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padilha, A.F.; Ambrozio Filho, F.

    1984-01-01

    The identification of phases in a material can require the utilization of several techniques. The most used technique and discussed are: optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, X-ray diffraction and 'in-situ' chemical analysis of the phases. The microstructures were classified, in according to the size and phase volumetric fraction, in four types. For each type the most appropriate techniques for identifying the phases are discussed. (E.G.) [pt

  9. Gaseous exchange reaction of deuterium between hydrogen and water on hydrophobic catalyst supporting platinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izawa, Hirozumi; Isomura, Shohei; Nakane, Ryohei.

    1979-01-01

    The deuterium exchange reaction between hydrogen and water in the gas phase where the fed hydrogen gas is saturated with water vapor is studied experimentally by use of the proper hydrophobic catalysts supporting platinum. It is found that the activities of those catalysts for this reaction system are very high compared with the other known ones for the systems in which gas and liquid should coexist on catalyst surfaces, and that the apparent catalytic activity becomes larger as the amount of platinum supported on a catalyst particle increases. By analyses of the data the following informations are obtained. The exchange reaction can be expressed by a first order reversible reaction kinetics. The pore diffusion in the catalyst particles has significant effect on the overall reaction mechanisms. (author)

  10. Highly Durable Platinum Single-Atom Alloy Catalyst for Electrochemical Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Jiwhan; Roh, Chi-Woo; Sahoo, Suman Kalyan

    2018-01-01

    Single atomic Pt catalyst can offer efficient utilization of the expensive platinum and provide unique selectivity because it lacks ensemble sites. However, designing such a catalyst with high Pt loading and good durability is very challenging. Here, single atomic Pt catalyst supported on antimony...... functional theory calculations show that replacing Sb sites with Pt atoms in the bulk phase or at the surface of SbSn or ATO is energetically favorable. The Pt1/ATO shows superior activity and durability for formic acid oxidation reaction, compared to a commercial Pt/C catalyst. The single atomic Pt...... structure is retained even after a harsh durability test, which is performed by repeating cyclic voltammetry in the range of 0.05–1.4 V for 1800 cycles. A full cell is fabricated for direct formic acid fuel cell using the Pt1/ATO as an anode catalyst, and an order of magnitude higher cell power is obtained...

  11. Catalyst dispersion and activity under conditions of temperature-staged liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, A.; Schobert, H.H.; Mitchell, G.D.; Artok, L.

    1993-02-01

    This research program involves the investigation of the use of highly dispersed catalyst precursors for the pretreatment of coals by mild hydrogenation. During the course of this effort solvent preswelling of the coal was evaluated as a means of deeply impregnating catalysts into coal, active phases of catalysts under reaction conditions were studied and the impact of these techniques were evaluated during pretreatment and temperature-staged liquefaction. Two coals, a Texas subbituminous and a Utah high volatile A bituminous, were used to examine the effects of solvent swelling pretreatment and catalyst impregnation on conversion behavior at 275[degrees]C, representative of the first, low-temperature stage in a temperature-staged liquefaction reaction. Ferrous sulfate, iron pentacarbonyl, ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, and molybdenum hexacarbonyl were used as catalyst precursors. Without swelling pretreatment, impregnation of both coals increased conversion, mainly through increased yields of preasphaltenes.

  12. Catalyst dispersion and activity under conditions of temperature-staged liquefaction. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, A.; Schobert, H.H.; Mitchell, G.D.; Artok, L.

    1993-02-01

    This research program involves the investigation of the use of highly dispersed catalyst precursors for the pretreatment of coals by mild hydrogenation. During the course of this effort solvent preswelling of the coal was evaluated as a means of deeply impregnating catalysts into coal, active phases of catalysts under reaction conditions were studied and the impact of these techniques were evaluated during pretreatment and temperature-staged liquefaction. Two coals, a Texas subbituminous and a Utah high volatile A bituminous, were used to examine the effects of solvent swelling pretreatment and catalyst impregnation on conversion behavior at 275{degrees}C, representative of the first, low-temperature stage in a temperature-staged liquefaction reaction. Ferrous sulfate, iron pentacarbonyl, ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, and molybdenum hexacarbonyl were used as catalyst precursors. Without swelling pretreatment, impregnation of both coals increased conversion, mainly through increased yields of preasphaltenes.

  13. Hydroprocessing catalysts utilization and regeneration schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furimsky, E.

    The catalyst reactor inventory represents an important part of the cost of hydroprocessing operation. The selection of a suitable catalyst and reactor is influenced by feedstock properties. Processes ensuring an uninterrupted operation during catalyst addition and withdrawal are preferred for processing high asphaltene and metal content feedstocks. The spent catalyst can be regenerated and returned to the operation if the extent of its deactivation is not high. The regeneration may be performed either in-situ or off-site. The former is suitable for fixed bed reactors whereas the catalyst from ebullated bed reactors must be regenerated off-site. The regeneration of spent catalysts heavily loaded with metals such as V, Ni and Fe may not be economic. Such catalysts may be suitable for metal reclamation. An environmentally safe method for catalyst disposal must be found if neither regeneration nor metal reclamation from spent catalysts can be performed.

  14. On the importance of the phase distribution and acidity of VOx-ZrO2-SO4-sepiolite catalysts for the NH3-SCR process in relation to biomass fueled power plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due-Hansen, Johannes; Rasmussen, Søren Birk; Riisager, Anders

    A series of V2O5-ZrO2-SO42- - sepiolite mixtures were extruded, calcined and characterized. NH3-SCR activity was related to the phase distribution of the agglomerant and active VOX-ZrO2-SO42- phase, as well as the acidity of the composite material. Electrophoretic migration results showed...

  15. Method of preparing and utilizing a catalyst system for an oxidation process on a gaseous hydrocarbon stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, David A; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Smith, Mark; Haynes, Daniel

    2013-07-16

    The disclosure relates to a method of utilizing a catalyst system for an oxidation process on a gaseous hydrocarbon stream with a mitigation of carbon accumulation. The system is comprised of a catalytically active phase deposited onto an oxygen conducting phase, with or without supplemental support. The catalytically active phase has a specified crystal structure where at least one catalytically active metal is a cation within the crystal structure and coordinated with oxygen atoms within the crystal structure. The catalyst system employs an optimum coverage ratio for a given set of oxidation conditions, based on a specified hydrocarbon conversion and a carbon deposition limit. Specific embodiments of the catalyst system are disclosed.

  16. Novel sample preparation for operando TEM of catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Benjamin K; Barker, Trevor M; Crozier, Peter A

    2015-09-01

    A new TEM sample preparation method is developed to facilitate operando TEM of gas phase catalysis. A porous Pyrex-fiber pellet TEM sample was produced, allowing a comparatively large amount of catalyst to be loaded into a standard Gatan furnace-type tantalum heating holder. The increased amount of catalyst present inside the environmental TEM allows quantitative determination of the gas phase products of a catalytic reaction performed in-situ at elevated temperatures. The product gas concentration was monitored using both electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and residual gas analysis (RGA). Imaging of catalyst particles dispersed over the pellet at atomic resolution is challenging, due to charging of the insulating glass fibers. To overcome this limitation, a metal grid is placed into the holder in addition to the pellet, allowing catalyst particles dispersed over the grid to be imaged, while particles in the pellet, which are assumed to experience identical conditions, contribute to the overall catalytic conversion inside the environmental TEM cell. The gas within the cell is determined to be well-mixed, making this assumption reasonable. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Novel sample preparation for operando TEM of catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Benjamin K.; Barker, Trevor M.; Crozier, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    A new TEM sample preparation method is developed to facilitate operando TEM of gas phase catalysis. A porous Pyrex-fiber pellet TEM sample was produced, allowing a comparatively large amount of catalyst to be loaded into a standard Gatan furnace-type tantalum heating holder. The increased amount of catalyst present inside the environmental TEM allows quantitative determination of the gas phase products of a catalytic reaction performed in-situ at elevated temperatures. The product gas concentration was monitored using both electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and residual gas analysis (RGA). Imaging of catalyst particles dispersed over the pellet at atomic resolution is challenging, due to charging of the insulating glass fibers. To overcome this limitation, a metal grid is placed into the holder in addition to the pellet, allowing catalyst particles dispersed over the grid to be imaged, while particles in the pellet, which are assumed to experience identical conditions, contribute to the overall catalytic conversion inside the environmental TEM cell. The gas within the cell is determined to be well-mixed, making this assumption reasonable. - Highlights: • High in-situ conversion of CO to CO 2 achieved by a novel TEM sample preparation method. • A 3 mm fiber pellet increases the TEM sample surface area by 50×. • Operando atomic resolution is maintained by also including a 3 mm grid in the sample. • Evidence for a well-mixed gas composition inside the ETEM cell is given

  18. Studies on recycling and utilization of spent catalysts. Preparation of active hydrodemetallization catalyst compositions from spent residue hydroprocessing catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marafi, Meena; Stanislaus, Antony [Petroleum Refining Department, Petroleum Research and Studies Center, Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research, P.O. Box 24885, Safat (Kuwait)

    2007-02-15

    Spent catalysts form a major source of solid wastes in the petroleum refining industries. Due to environmental concerns, increasing emphasis has been placed on the development of recycling processes for the waste catalyst materials as much as possible. In the present study the potential reuse of spent catalysts in the preparation of active new catalysts for residual oil hydrotreating was examined. A series of catalysts were prepared by mixing and extruding spent residue hydroprocessing catalysts that contained C, V, Mo, Ni and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with boehmite in different proportions. All prepared catalysts were characterized by chemical analysis and by surface area, pore volume, pore size and crushing strength measurements. The hydrodesulfurization (HDS) and hydrodemetallization (HDM) activities of the catalysts were evaluated by testing in a high pressure fixed-bed microreactor unit using Kuwait atmospheric residue as feed. A commercial HDM catalyst was also tested under similar operating conditions and their HDS and HDM activities were compared with that of the prepared catalysts. The results revealed that catalyst prepared with addition of up to 40 wt% spent catalyst to boehmite had fairly high surface area and pore volume together with large pores. The catalyst prepared by mixing and extruding about 40 wt% spent catalyst with boehmite was relatively more active for promoting HDM and HDS reactions than a reference commercial HDM catalyst. The formation of some kind of new active sites from the metals (V, Mo and Ni) present in the spent catalyst is suggested to be responsible for the high HDM activity of the prepared catalyst. (author)

  19. Impact of anode catalyst layer porosity on the performance of a direct formic acid fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauskar, Akshay S.; Rice, Cynthia A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Lithium carbonate is used as a pore-former to increase porosity of anode catalyst layer. ► Maximum power density increased by 25%. ► Onset potential for formic acid electro-oxidation reduced by 30 mV for anode catalyst layer with 17.5 wt% pore-former. ► Electrochemical impedance spectra confirm increased formic acid concentration inside the anode catalyst layer pores. - Abstract: Direct formic acid fuel cells (DFAFCs) have attracted much attention in the last few years for portable electronic devices, due to their potential of being high efficiency power sources. They have the potential to replace the state-of-the-art batteries in cell phones, PDAs, and laptop computers if their power density and durability can be improved. In the present investigation, the influence of increased anode catalyst layer porosity on DFAFC power density performance is studied. Lithium carbonate (Li 2 CO 3 ) was used as a pore-former in this study because of its facile and complete removal after catalyst layer fabrication. The anode catalyst layers presented herein contained unsupported Pt/Ru catalyst and Li 2 CO 3 (in the range of 0–50 wt%) bound with proton conducting ionomer. Higher DFAFC performance is obtained because of the increased porosity within the anode catalyst layer through enhanced reactant and product mass transport. The maximum power density of DFAFC increased by 25% when pore-former was added to the anode catalyst ink. The formic acid onset potential for the anode catalyst layer with 17.5 wt% pore-former was reduced by 30 mV. A constant phase element based equivalent-circuit model was used to investigate anode impedance spectra. Fitted values for the anode impedance spectra confirm the improvement in performance due to an increase in formic acid concentration inside the anode catalyst layer pores along with efficient transport of reactants and products.

  20. Identification of alkyl dimethylbenzylammonium surfactants in water samples by solid-phase extraction followed by ion trap LC/MS and LC/MS/MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, I.; Furlong, E.T.

    2001-01-01

    A novel methodology was developed for the determination of alkyl (C12, C14, and C16) dimethylbenzylammonium chloride (benzalkonium chloride or BAC, Chemical Abstract Service number: 8001-54-5) in water samples. This method is based on solid-phase extraction (SPE) using polymeric cartridges, followed by high-performance liquid chromatography/ion trap mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and tandem mass spectrometry(MS/MS) detection, equipped with an electrospray interface in positive ion mode. Chromatographic separation was achieved for three BAC homologues by using a C18 column and a gradient of acetonitrile/10 millimolar aqueous ammonium formate. Total method recoveries were higher than 71% in different water matrices. The main ions observed by LC/MS were at mass-to-charge ratios (m/z) of 304, 332, and 360, which correspond to the molecular ions of the C12, C14, and C16 alkyl BAC, respectively. The unequivocal structural identification of these compounds in water samples was performed by LC/MS/MS after isolation and subsequent fragmentation of each molecular ion. The main fragmentation observed for the three different homologues corresponded to the loss of the toluyl group in the chemical structure, which leads to the fragment ions at m/z 212, 240, and 268 and a tropylium ion, characteristic of all homologues, at m/z 91. Detection limits for the methodology developed in this work were in the low nanogram-per-liter range. Concentration levels of BAC - ranging from 1.2 to 36.6 micrograms per liter - were found in surface-water samples collected downstream from different wastewater-treatment discharges, thus indicating its input and persistence through the wastewater-treatment process.