WorldWideScience

Sample records for catalysis research final

  1. Research on Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomew, Calvin H.; Hecker, William C.

    1984-01-01

    The objectives and philosophy of the Catalysis Laboratory at Brigham Young University are discussed. Also discusses recent and current research activities at the laboratory as well as educational opportunities, research facilities, and sources of research support. (JN)

  2. Operando research in heterogeneous catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Groot, Irene

    2017-01-01

    This book is devoted to the emerging field of techniques for visualizing atomic-scale properties of active catalysts under actual working conditions, i.e. high gas pressures and high temperatures. It explains how to understand these observations in terms of the surface structures and dynamics and their detailed interplay with the gas phase. This provides an important new link between fundamental surface physics and chemistry, and applied catalysis. The book explains the motivation and the necessity of operando studies, and positions these with respect to the more traditional low-pressure investigations on the one hand and the reality of industrial catalysis on the other. The last decade has witnessed a rapid development of new experimental and theoretical tools for operando studies of heterogeneous catalysis. The book has a strong emphasis on the new techniques and illustrates how the challenges introduced by the harsh, operando conditions are faced for each of these new tools. Therefore, one can also read th...

  3. Advanced Resources for Catalysis Science; Recommendations for a National Catalysis Research Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peden, Charles HF.; Ray, Douglas

    2005-10-05

    Catalysis is one of the most valuable contributors to our economy and historically an area where the United States has enjoyed, but is now losing, international leadership. While other countries are stepping up their work in this area, support for advanced catalysis research and development in the U.S. has diminished. Yet, more than ever, innovative and improved catalyst technologies are imperative for new energy production processes to ease our dependence on imported resources, for new energy-efficient and environmentally benign chemical production processes, and for new emission reduction technologies to minimize the environmental impact of an active and growing economy. Addressing growing concerns about the future direction of U.S. catalysis science, experts from the catalysis community met at a workshop to determine and recommend advanced resources needed to address the grand challenges for catalysis research and development. The workshop's primary conclusion: To recapture our position as the leader in catalysis innovation and practice, and promote crucial breakthroughs, the U.S. must establish one or more well-funded and well-equipped National Catalysis Research Institutes competitively selected, centered in the national laboratories and, by charter, networked to other national laboratories, universities, and industry. The Institute(s) will be the center of a national collaboratory that gives catalysis researchers access to the most advanced techniques available in the scientific enterprise. The importance of catalysis to our energy, economic, and environmental security cannot be overemphasized. Catalysis is a vital part of our core industrial infrastructure, as it is integral to chemical processing and petroleum refining, and is critical to proposed advances needed to secure a sustainable energy future. Advances in catalysis could reduce our need for foreign oil by making better use of domestic carbon resources, for example, allowing cost-effective and

  4. Coal-related research, organic chemistry, and catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    Coal chemistry research topics included: H exchange at 400 0 C, breaking C-C bonds in coal, molecular weight estimation using small-angle neutron scattering, 13 C NMR spectra of coals, and tunneling during H/D isotope effects. Studies of coal conversion chemistry included thermolysis of bibenzyl and 1-naphthol, heating of coals in phenol, advanced indirect liquefaction based on Koelbel slurry Fischer-Tropsch reactor, and plasma oxidation of coal minerals. Reactions of PAHs in molten SbCl 3 , a hydrocracking catalyst, were studied. Finally, heterogeneous catalysis (desulfurization etc.) was studied using Cu, Au, and Ni surfaces. 7 figures, 6 tables

  5. DOE Laboratory Catalysis Research Symposium - Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunham, T.

    1999-02-01

    The conference consisted of two sessions with the following subtopics: (1) Heterogeneous Session: Novel Catalytic Materials; Photocatalysis; Novel Processing Conditions; Metals and Sulfides; Nuclear Magnetic Resonance; Metal Oxides and Partial Oxidation; Electrocatalysis; and Automotive Catalysis. (2) Homogeneous Catalysis: H-Transfer and Alkane Functionalization; Biocatalysis; Oxidation and Photocatalysis; and Novel Medical, Methods, and Catalyzed Reactions.

  6. USD Catalysis Group for Alternative Energy - Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoefelmeyer, James

    2014-10-03

    I. Project Summary Catalytic processes are a major technological underpinning of modern society, and are essential to the energy sector in the processing of chemical fuels from natural resources, fine chemicals synthesis, and energy conversion. Advances in catalyst technology are enormously valuable since these lead to reduced chemical waste, reduced energy loss, and reduced costs. New energy technologies, which are critical to future economic growth, are also heavily reliant on catalysts, including fuel cells and photo-electrochemical cells. Currently, the state of South Dakota is underdeveloped in terms of research infrastructure related to catalysis. If South Dakota intends to participate in significant economic growth opportunities that result from advances in catalyst technology, then this area of research needs to be made a high priority for investment. To this end, a focused research effort is proposed in which investigators from The University of South Dakota (USD) and The South Dakota School of Mines and Technology (SDSMT) will contribute to form the South Dakota Catalysis Group (SDCG). The multidisciplinary team of the (SDCG) include: (USD) Dan Engebretson, James Hoefelmeyer, Ranjit Koodali, and Grigoriy Sereda; (SDSMT) Phil Scott Ahrenkiel, Hao Fong, Jan Puszynski, Rajesh Shende, and Jacek Swiatkiewicz. The group is well suited to engage in a collaborative project due to the resources available within the existing programs. Activities within the SDCG will be monitored through an external committee consisting of three distinguished professors in chemistry. The committee will provide expert advice and recommendations to the SDCG. Advisory meetings in which committee members interact with South Dakota investigators will be accompanied by individual oral and poster presentations in a materials and catalysis symposium. The symposium will attract prominent scientists, and will enhance the visibility of research in the state of South Dakota. The SDCG requests

  7. Dedicated Beamline Facilities for Catalytic Research. Synchrotron Catalysis Consortium (SCC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jingguang [Columbia Univ., New York, NY; Frenkel, Anatoly [Yeshiva Univ., New York, NY (United States); Rodriguez, Jose [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Adzic, Radoslav [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bare, Simon R. [UOP LLC, Des Plaines, IL (United States); Hulbert, Steve L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Karim, Ayman [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mullins, David R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Overbury, Steve [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-03-04

    Synchrotron spectroscopies offer unique advantages over conventional techniques, including higher detection sensitivity and molecular specificity, faster detection rate, and more in-depth information regarding the structural, electronic and catalytic properties under in-situ reaction conditions. Despite these advantages, synchrotron techniques are often underutilized or unexplored by the catalysis community due to various perceived and real barriers, which will be addressed in the current proposal. Since its establishment in 2005, the Synchrotron Catalysis Consortium (SCC) has coordinated significant efforts to promote the utilization of cutting-edge catalytic research under in-situ conditions. The purpose of the current renewal proposal is aimed to provide assistance, and to develop new sciences/techniques, for the catalysis community through the following concerted efforts: Coordinating the implementation of a suite of beamlines for catalysis studies at the new NSLS-II synchrotron source; Providing assistance and coordination for catalysis users at an SSRL catalysis beamline during the initial period of NSLS to NSLS II transition; Designing in-situ reactors for a variety of catalytic and electrocatalytic studies; Assisting experimental set-up and data analysis by a dedicated research scientist; Offering training courses and help sessions by the PIs and co-PIs.

  8. 2008 Gordon Research Conference on Catalysis [Conference summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soled, Stuart L.; Gray, Nancy Ryan

    2009-01-01

    The GRC on Catalysis is one of the most prestigious catalysis conferences as it brings together leading researchers from around the world to discuss their latest, most exciting work in catalysis. The 2008 conference will continue this tradition. The conference will cover a variety of themes including new catalytic materials, theoretical and experimental approaches to improve understanding of kinetics and transport phenomena, and state of the art nanoscale characterization probes to monitor active sites. The conference promotes interactions among established researchers and young scientists. It provides a venue for students to meet, talk to and learn from some of the world leading researchers in the area. It also gives them a platform for displaying their own work during the poster sessions. The informal nature of the meeting, excellent quality of the presentations and posters, and ability to meet many outstanding colleagues makes this an excellent conference.

  9. Seventh BES (Basic Energy Sciences) catalysis and surface chemistry research conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-03-01

    Research programs on catalysis and surface chemistry are presented. A total of fifty-seven topics are included. Areas of research include heterogeneous catalysis; catalysis in hydrogenation, desulfurization, gasification, and redox reactions; studies of surface properties and surface active sites; catalyst supports; chemical activation, deactivation; selectivity, chemical preparation; molecular structure studies; sorption and dissociation. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases. (CBS)

  10. Seventh BES [Basic Energy Sciences] catalysis and surface chemistry research conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    Research programs on catalysis and surface chemistry are presented. A total of fifty-seven topics are included. Areas of research include heterogeneous catalysis; catalysis in hydrogenation, desulfurization, gasification, and redox reactions; studies of surface properties and surface active sites; catalyst supports; chemical activation, deactivation; selectivity, chemical preparation; molecular structure studies; sorption and dissociation. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases

  11. 2016 Research Final Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koskelo, EliseAnne Corinne [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-16

    These are slides which show an example of research at Los Alamos National Laboratory done by E.C. Koskelo to show college professors in the hopes of earning a research position or fellowship position. In summary, this researcher developed a new in-situ technique for the inspection of additively manufactured parts, created an algorithm which can correct "skewed" scans of angular parts/taken at oblique angles, and used AWS to detect hidden defects and thickness changes in aerospace composites.

  12. 2010 CATALYSIS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JUNE 27 - JULY 2, 2010, NEW LONDON, NEW HAMPSHIRE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abhaya Datye

    2010-07-02

    Catalysis is a key technology for improving the quality of life while simultaneously reducing the adverse impact of human activities on the environment. The discovery of new catalytic processes and the improvement of existing ones are also critically important for securing the nation's energy supply. The GRC on Catalysis is considered one the most prestigious conference for catalysis research, bringing together leading researchers from both academia, industry and national labs to discuss the latest, most exciting research in catalysis and the future directions for the field. The 2010 GRC on Catalysis will follow time-honored traditions and feature invited talks from the world's leading experts in the fundamentals and applications of catalytic science and technology. We plan to have increased participation from industry. The extended discussions in the company of outstanding thinkers will stimulate and foster new science. The conference will include talks in the following areas: Alternative feedstocks for chemicals and fuels, Imaging and spectroscopy, Design of novel catalysts, Catalyst preparation fundamentals, Molecular insights through theory, Surface Science, Catalyst stability and dynamics. In 2010, the Catalysis conference will move to a larger conference room with a new poster session area that will allow 40 posters per session. The dorm rooms provide single and double accommodations, free WiFi and the registration fee includes all meals and the famous lobster dinner on Thursday night. Afternoons are open to enjoy the New England ambiance with opportunities for hiking, sailing, golf and tennis to create an outstanding conference that will help you network with colleagues, and make long lasting connections.

  13. Consideration of the Aluminum Distribution in Zeolites in Theoretical and Experimental Catalysis Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knott, Brandon C [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Robichaud, David J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Nimlos, Mark R [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kim, Seon Ah [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Nimlos, Claire T. [Purdue University; Gounder, Rajamani [Purdue University

    2017-12-11

    Research efforts in zeolite catalysis have become increasingly cognizant of the diversity in structure and function resulting from the distribution of framework aluminum atoms, through emerging reports of catalytic phenomena that fall outside those recognizable as the shape-selective ones emblematic of its earlier history. Molecular-level descriptions of how active-site distributions affect catalysis are an aspirational goal articulated frequently in experimental and theoretical research, yet they are limited by imprecise knowledge of the structure and behavior of the zeolite materials under interrogation. In experimental research, higher precision can result from more reliable control of structure during synthesis and from more robust and quantitative structural and kinetic characterization probes. In theoretical research, construction of models with specific aluminum locations and distributions seldom capture the heterogeneity inherent to the materials studied by experiment. In this Perspective, we discuss research findings that appropriately frame the challenges in developing more predictive synthesis-structure-function relations for zeolites, highlighting studies on ZSM-5 zeolites that are among the most structurally complex molecular sieve frameworks and the most widely studied because of their versatility in commercial applications. We discuss research directions to address these challenges and forge stronger connections between zeolite structure, composition, and active sites to catalytic function. Such connections promise to aid in bridging the findings of theoretical and experimental catalysis research, and transforming zeolite active site design from an empirical endeavor into a more predictable science founded on validated models.

  14. Advances in catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Gates, Bruce C

    2012-01-01

    Advances in Catalysis fills the gap between the journal papers and the textbooks across the diverse areas of catalysis research. For more than 60 years Advances in Catalysis has been dedicated to recording progress in the field of catalysis and providing the scientific community with comprehensive and authoritative reviews. This series in invaluable to chemical engineers, physical chemists, biochemists, researchers and industrial chemists working in the fields of catalysis and materials chemistry. * In-depth, critical, state-of-the-art reviews * Comprehensive, covers of all as

  15. Molecular ingredients of heterogeneous catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somorjai, G.A.

    1982-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a review and status report to those in theoretical chemistry of the rapidly developing surface science of heterogeneous catalysis. The art of catalysis is developing into science. This profound change provides one with opportunities not only to understand the molecular ingredients of important catalytic systems but also to develop new and improved catalyst. The participation of theorists to find answers to important questions is sorely needed for the sound development of the field. It is the authors hope that some of the outstanding problems of heterogeneous catalysis that are identified in this paper will be investigated. For this purpose the paper is divided into several sections. The brief Introduction to the methodology and recent results of the surface science of heterogeneous catalysis is followed by a review of the concepts of heterogeneous catalysis. Then, the experimental results that identified the three molecular ingredients of catalysis, structure, carbonaceous deposit and the oxidation state of surface atoms are described. Each section is closed with a summary and a list of problems that require theoretical and experimental scrutiny. Finally attempts to build new catalyst systems and the theoretical and experimental problems that appeared in the course of this research are described

  16. Molecular ingredients of heterogeneous catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somorjai, G.A.

    1982-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a review and status report to those in theoretical chemistry of the rapidly developing surface science of heterogeneous catalysis. The art of catalysis is developing into science. This profound change provides one with opportunities not only to understand the molecular ingredients of important catalytic systems but also to develop new and improved catalyst. The participation of theorists to find answers to important questions is sorely needed for the sound development of the field. It is the authors hope that some of the outstanding problems of heterogeneous catalysis that are identified in this paper will be investigated. For this purpose the paper is divided into several sections. The brief Introduction to the methodology and recent results of the surface science of heterogeneous catalysis is followed by a review of the concepts of heterogeneous catalysis. Then, the experimental results that identified the three molecular ingredients of catalysis, structure, carbonaceous deposit and the oxidation state of surface atoms are described. Each section is closed with a summary and a list of problems that require theoretical and experimental scrutiny. Finally attempts to build new catalyst systems and the theoretical and experimental problems that appeared in the course of this research are described.

  17. Catalysis and biocatalysis program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingham, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    This final report presents a summary of research activities and accomplishments for the Catalysis and Biocatalysis Program, which was renamed the Biological and Chemical Technologies Research (BCTR) Program, currently of the Advanced Industrial Concepts Division (AICD), Office of Industrial Technologies of the Department of Energy (DOE). The Program was formerly under the Division of Energy Conversion and Utilization Technologies (ECUT) until the DOE reorganization in April, 1990. The goals of the BCTR Program are consistent with the initial ECUT goals, but represent an increased effort toward advances in chemical and biological technology transfer. In addition, the transition reflects a need for the BCTR Program to assume a greater R&D role in chemical catalysis as well as a need to position itself for a more encompassing involvement in a broader range of biological and chemical technology research. The mission of the AICD is to create a balanced Program of high risk, long-term, directed interdisciplinary research and development that will improve energy efficiency and enhance fuel flexibility in the industrial sector. Under AICD, the DOE Catalysis and Biocatalysis Program sponsors research and development in furthering industrial biotechnology applications and promotes the integrated participation of universities, industrial companies, and government research laboratories.

  18. New Tools for CO2 Fixation by Homogeneous Catalysis - Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jessop, Phillip G.

    2006-01-20

    The overall goal is the development of new or more efficient methods for the conversion of CO{sub 2} into useful organic products, via the design or discovery of new catalysts, ligands, solvents, and methods. Specific objectives for this funded period: (1) To develop a high-throughput screening technique and use it to develop an efficient catalyst/reagent/solvent system for the synthesis of ureas or carboxylic acids. (2) To use in-situ spectroscopic and kinetic methods to study the mechanism of the synthesis of ureas or carboxylic acids. (3) To develop bifunctional ligands capable of secondary interactions with CO{sub 2}, to detect the interactions, and to demonstrate applications to catalysis.

  19. Supramolecular catalysis: Refocusing catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, P.W.N.M.; Freixa, Z.; van Leeuwen, P.W.N.M.

    2008-01-01

    This chapter contains sections titled: * Introduction: A Brief Personal History * Secondary Phosphines or Phosphites as Supramolecular Ligands * Host-Guest Catalysis * Ionic Interactions as a Means to Form Heterobidentate Assembly Ligands * Ditopic Ligands for the Construction of Bidentate Phosphine

  20. Final Report: Cathode Catalysis in Hydrogen/Oxygen Fuel Cells: New Catalysts, Mechanism, and Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gewirth, Andrew A. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Kenis, Paul J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Nuzzo, Ralph G. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Rauchfuss, Thomas B. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2016-01-18

    In this research, we prosecuted a comprehensive plan of research directed at developing new catalysts and new understandings relevant to the operation of low temperature hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells. The focal point of this work was one centered on the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR), the electrochemical process that most fundamentally limits the technological utility of these environmentally benign energy conversion devices. Over the period of grant support, we developed new ORR catalysts, based on Cu dimers and multimers. In this area, we developed substantial new insight into design rules required to establish better ORR materials, inspired by the three-Cu active site in laccase which has the highest ORR onset potential of any material known. We also developed new methods of characterization for the ORR on conventional (metal-based) catalysts. Finally, we developed a new platform to study the rate of proton transfer relevant to proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions, of which the ORR is an exemplar. Other aspects of work involved theory and prototype catalyst testing.

  1. Transition metal catalysis in the generation of petroleum and natural gas. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mango, F.D.

    1997-01-21

    This project originated on the premise that natural gas could be formed catalytically in the earth rather than thermally as commonly believed. The intention was to test this hypothetical view and to explore generally the role of sedimentary metals in the generation of light hydrocarbons (C1 - C9). We showed the metalliferous source rocks are indeed catalytic in the generation of natural gas. Various metal compounds in the pure state show the same levels of catalytic activity as sedimentary rocks and the products are identical. Nickel is particularly active among the early transition metals and is projected to remain catalytically robust at all stages of catagenesis. Nickel oxide promotes the formation of n-alkanes in addition to natural gas (NG), demonstrating the full scope of the hypothetical catalytic process: The composition of catalytic gas duplicates the entire range of natural gas, from so-called wet gas to dry gas (60 to 95+ wt % methane), while gas generated thermally is consistently depleted in methane (10 to 60 wt % methane). These results support the view that metal catalysis is a major pathway through which natural gas is formed in the earth.

  2. Final Report for: "Bis-pi-allylpalladium Complexes in Catalysis of Multicomponent Reactions"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinakova, H. C.; Shiota, Atsushi

    2012-06-29

    The research project involved the development of new and functionally improved Pd(II) catalyst for a three-component reaction of boronic acids, allenes and imines to afford homoallylic amines that are useful in synthesis of biologically active heterocycles. Furthermore, insights into the reaction mechanism and the structure and reactivity of the catalytically active intermediates involved in this process were sought. As a result of this work, a new type of Pd-catalysts possessing an auxiliary ligand attached to the Pd center via a C-Pd and N-Pd bonds were identified, and found to be more active than the traditional catalysts derived from Pd(OAc)2. The new catalysts provided an access to a broader range of homoallylic amine products. Although the final unequivocal evidence regarding the structure of the Pd(II) complex involved in the nucleophilic transfer of the allyl fragment from the palladium center to the imine could not be obtained, mechanistic insights into the events that are detrimental to the activity of the originally reported Pd(OAc)2-based catalytic systems were uncovered.

  3. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Frontiers in Polymerization Catalysis and Polymer Synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Guyot, A

    1987-01-01

    Due to their specific properties, polymers with well-defined structures have been receiving increasing attention over the last several years. Owing to the wide variability of their properties, these specialty polymers have been used in various areas from biomedical engineering to electronics or energy applications. The synthesis of such polymers necessi­ tates the use of new methods of polymerization which derived from an insight into the mechanism of polymerization reactions. A NATO Advanced Research Workshop on "Frontiers in Polymerization Catalysis and Polymer Synthesis" was held in BANDOl (FRANCE) in February 1987. Its aim was to assess the new polymerization methods, as well as the latest advances in the mechanisms of conventional polymerization reactions together with their applications to the synthesis of new macromolecular structures. The financial support from the NATO Scientific Affairs Division which covered the "lecturers' accomodation and travel expenses as well as the organization charges of th...

  4. Catalysis studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, T.N.; Ellis, W.P.

    1977-11-01

    The New Research Initiatives Program (NRIP) project on catalysis in Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) Group CMB-8 has made significant progress towards performing the first basic in situ experimental studies of heterogeneous catalysis on solid compound surfaces in a LEED-Auger system. To further understand the surface crystallography of a possible catalyst compound, LEED-Auger measurements were made on UO 2 (approximately 100) vicinal surfaces. These (approximately 100) vicinal surfaces were shown to decompose irreversibly into lower index facets, including prominent (100) facets, at temperatures below those needed for creation of lowest index faceting on (approximately 111) vicinal surfaces. LEED examination of fully faceted surfaces from both types of UO 2 vicinal cuts did not show evidence of cyclopropane or propene chemisorption. The existing LEED-Auger system was modified to allow catalytic reactions at approximately less than 10 -3 torr. A sample holder, specifically designed for catalysis measurements in the modified system, was tested while examining single crystals of CoO and Cr 2 O 3 . Extensive LEED-Auger measurements were made on CoO in vacuo and in the presence of light hydrocarbons and alcohols plus H 2 O, NO, and NH 3 . No chemisorptive behavior was observed except with H 2 O in the presence of the electron beam. Although only examined briefly, the Cr 2 O 3 was remarkable for the sharp LEED features obtained prior to any surface treatment in the vacuum system

  5. Basic petroleum research. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roesjoe, Bjarne; Stiksrud, Helge

    2004-01-01

    An overview of projects in the field of basic petroleum research (PetroForsk) is presented. A brief presentation of some of the projects is included, as well as political comments on the value of these projects. The research program Basic Petroleum Research (PetroForsk) was established in 1998 and ended in 2004. The program has been part of the Research Council of Norway's long-term effort in petroleum research (ml)

  6. Research symposium proceedings. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-12-31

    THE research symposium was organized to present the cutting edge research for PET by individuals from leading institutions throughout the world. The Institute for Clinical PET (ICP) has focused its annual meeting on the clinical applications of PET.

  7. Catalysis seen in action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tromp, M.

    2015-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation techniques are widely applied in materials research and heterogeneous catalysis. In homogeneous catalysis, its use so far is rather limited despite its high potential. Here, insights in the strengths and limitations of X-ray spectroscopy technique in the field of homogeneous

  8. Heterogeneous Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannice, M. A.

    1979-01-01

    Described is a graduate course in catalysis offered at Penn State University. A detailed course outline with 30 lecture topics is presented. A list of 42 references on catalysis used in place of a textbook is provided. (BT)

  9. Research in electrohydrodynamics. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1973-01-01

    An overview is presented in the form of publications for NASA research in electrohydrodynamics. Data cover basic electrohydrodynamics, management of liquids in zero gravity, continuum feedback control, and magnetohydrodynamics and ferrohydrodynamics. (GRA)

  10. Nuclear chemistry research. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugarman, N.

    1979-01-01

    Research on the mechanism by which a radioactive nucleus is produced from the interaction of a projectile with a complex nucleus in terms of the primary interaction of the projectile with a nucleon or cluster of nucleons is summarized. A list of major accomplishments and one of publications are included

  11. Stress Controlled Catalysis via Engineered Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-02

    fields on catalysis : “Stress Controlled Catalysis via Engineered Nanostructures.” For this effort a workshop was organized and held at Brown... Catalysis via Engineered Nanostructures" The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author(s) and should not contrued...Support for current award "Stress Controlled Catalysis via Engineered Nanostructures" Report Title This is the final report of the ARO project of

  12. Career Options Research and Development. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    YMCA of Metropolitan Chicago, IL. Career Options Research and Development (CORD).

    This final report of the Career Options Research and Development (CORD) Project reviews the original assumptions, objectives, problems, and opportunities related to training the poor for employment in the human services areas. Specific objectives of Project CORD were: (1) to test the validity and reliability of the social mobility theory, (2) to…

  13. Final Report: Performance Engineering Research Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellor-Crummey, John [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-10-27

    This document is a final report about the work performed for cooperative agreement DE-FC02-06ER25764, the Rice University effort of Performance Engineering Research Institute (PERI). PERI was an Enabling Technologies Institute of the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC-2) program supported by the Department of Energy's Office of Science Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) program. The PERI effort at Rice University focused on (1) research and development of tools for measurement and analysis of application program performance, and (2) engagement with SciDAC-2 application teams.

  14. Metal carbonyl-hydrosilane reactions and hydrosilation catalysis. Final report for period May 1, 1995 - August 14, 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cutler, Alan R.

    2001-04-14

    Manganese carbonyl complexes serve as hydrosilation precatalysts for selectively transforming a carbonyl group into a doxy methylene or a fully reduced methylene group. Substrates of interest include (1) aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, silyl esters, and esters, and (2) their organometallic acyl counterparts. Two types of manganese precatalysts have been reported: (a) alkyl and acyl complexes (L)(CO){sub 4}MnR [L = CO, PPh{sub 3}; R = COCH{sub 3}, COPh, CH{sub 3}] and (b) halides (CO){sub 5}MnX and [(CO){sub 4}MnX]{sub 2} (X = Br, I). The former promote hydrosilation and deoxygenation catalysis; the latter promote dehydrogenative silation of alcohols and carboxylic acids as well as hydrosilation and deoxygenation of some metallocarboxylic acid derivatives. In every case studied, these Mn precatalysts are far more reactive or selective than traditional Rh(l) precatalysts. The reaction chemistry of the above and other Mn alkyl complexes with hydrosilanes was studied in order to probe catalysis mechanism(s). Thus, Mn(CO){sub 5} methyl, benzyl, acetyl, and benzoyl (4 p-substituents) complexes reacted with hydrosilines by four different mechanisms, which were established. A noteworthy development was that the methyl and benzoyl complexes gave moderate yields of a new ({eta}{sup 2}-Si-H) silane adduct (CO){sub 4}Mn(SiMe{sub 2}Ph)(H-SiMe{sub 2}Ph), which is stable in the presence of excess silane. This silane adduct promotes all three catalytic reactions; its extraordinary activity and potential selectivity are under study.

  15. The CAT-ACT Beamline at ANKA: A new high energy X-ray spectroscopy facility for CATalysis and ACTinide research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimina, A.; Dardenne, K.; Denecke, M. A.; Grunwaldt, J. D.; Huttel, E.; Lichtenberg, H.; Mangold, S.; Pruessmann, T.; Rothe, J.; Steininger, R.; Vitova, T.

    2016-05-01

    A new hard X-ray beamline for CATalysis and ACTinide research has been built at the synchrotron radiation facility ANKA. The beamline design is dedicated to X-ray spectroscopy, including ‘flux hungry’ photon-in/photon-out and correlative techniques with a special infrastructure for radionuclide and catalysis research. The CAT-ACT beamline will help serve the growing need for high flux/hard X-ray spectroscopy in these communities. The design, the first spectra and the current status of this project are reported.

  16. Transition metal catalysis in the generation of petroleum and natural gas. Final report, September 1, 1992--October 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mango, F.D.

    1997-01-21

    This project originated on the premise that natural gas could be formed catalytically in the earth rather than thermally as commonly believed. The intention was to test this hypothetical view and to explore generally the role of sedimentary metals in the generation of light hydrocarbons (C1 - C9). We showed the metalliferous source rocks are indeed catalytic in the generation of natural gas. Various metal compounds in the pure state show the same levels of catalytic activity as sedimentary rocks and the products are identical. Nickel is particularly active among the early transition metals and is projected to remain catalytically robust at all stages of catagenesis. Nickel oxide promotes the formation of n-alkanes in addition to natural gas (NG), demonstrating the full scope of the hypothetical catalytic process. The composition of catalytic gas duplicates the entire range of natural gas, from so-called wet gas to dry gas (60 to 95+ wt % methane), while gas generated thermally is consistently depleted in methane (10 to 60 wt % methane). These results support the view that metal catalysis is a major pathway through which natural gas is formed in the earth.

  17. Catalysis seen in action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tromp, Moniek

    2015-03-06

    Synchrotron radiation techniques are widely applied in materials research and heterogeneous catalysis. In homogeneous catalysis, its use so far is rather limited despite its high potential. Here, insights in the strengths and limitations of X-ray spectroscopy technique in the field of homogeneous catalysis are given, including new technique developments. A relevant homogeneous catalyst, used in the industrially important selective oligomerization of ethene, is taken as a worked-out example. Emphasis is placed on time-resolved operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy with outlooks to novel high energy resolution and emission techniques. All experiments described have been or can be done at the Diamond Light Source Ltd (Didcot, UK). © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  18. Preface: Catalysis Today

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yongdan

    2016-01-01

    This special issue of Catalysis Today with the theme “Sustain-able Energy” results from a great success of the session “Catalytic Technologies Accelerating the Establishment of Sustainable and Clean Energy”, one of the two sessions of the 1st International Symposium on Catalytic Science and Techn......This special issue of Catalysis Today with the theme “Sustain-able Energy” results from a great success of the session “Catalytic Technologies Accelerating the Establishment of Sustainable and Clean Energy”, one of the two sessions of the 1st International Symposium on Catalytic Science...... and Technology in Sustainable Energy and Environment, held in Tianjin, China during October8–10, 2014. This biennial symposium offers an international forum for discussing and sharing the cutting-edge researches and the most recent breakthroughs in energy and environmental technologies based on catalysis...

  19. Enantioconvergent catalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin T. Mohr

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available An enantioconvergent catalytic process has the potential to convert a racemic starting material to a single highly enantioenriched product with a maximum yield of 100%. Three mechanistically distinct approaches to effecting enantioconvergent catalysis are identified, and recent examples of each are highlighted. These processes are compared to related, non-enantioconvergent methods.

  20. Catalysis in VOC Abatement

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ojala, S.; Pitkäaho, S.; Laitinen, T.; Koivikko, N.N.; Brahmi, R.; Gaálová, Jana; Matějová, Lenka; Kucherov, A.; Päivärinta, S.; Hirschmann, Ch.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 54, 16-18 (2011), s. 1224-1256 ISSN 1022-5528. [Nordic Symposium on Catalysis /14./. Marienlyst, Helsingør, 29.08.2010-31.08.2010] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : voc emissions * voc regulation * effects of VOC's Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.624, year: 2011

  1. Recent Advances in Supramolecular Gels and Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Weiwei; Zhang, Yang; Wu, Jiajie; Liu, Cong; Zhu, Haibo; Tu, Tao

    2018-04-04

    Over the past two decades, supramolecular gels have attracted significant attention from scientists in diverse research fields and have been extensively developed. This review mainly focuses on the significant achievements in supramolecular gels and catalysis. First, by incorporating diverse catalytic sites and active organic functional groups into gelator molecules, supramolecular gels have been considered as a novel matrix for catalysis. In addition, these rationally designed supramolecular gels also provide a variety of templates to access metal nanocomposites, which may function as catalysts and exhibit high activity in diverse catalytic transformations. Finally, as a new kind of biomaterial, supramolecular gels formed in situ by self-assembly triggered by catalytic transformations are also covered herein. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Applied heterogeneous catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Page, A.J.F.

    1988-01-01

    This reference book explains the scientific principles of heterogeneous catalysis while also providing details on the methods used to develop commercially viable catalyst products. A section of the book presents reactor design engineering theory and practices for the profitable application of these catalysts in large-scale industrial processes. A description of the mechanisms and commercial applications of catalysis is followed by a review of catalytic reaction kinetics. There are five chapters on selecting catalyst agents, developing and preparing industrial catalysts, measuring catalyst properties, and analyzing the physico-chemical characteristics of solid catalyst particles. The final chapter reviews the elements of catalytic reactor design, with emphasis on flow regimes vs. reactor types, heat and mass transfer in reactor beds, single- and multi-phase flows, and the effects of thermodynamics and other catalyst properties on the process flow scheme

  3. Research in High Energy Physics. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conway, John S.

    2013-08-09

    This final report details the work done from January 2010 until April 2013 in the area of experimental and theoretical high energy particle physics and cosmology at the University of California, Davis.

  4. Editorial: Nanoscience makes catalysis greener

    KAUST Repository

    Polshettiwar, Vivek

    2012-01-09

    Green chemistry by nanocatalysis: Catalysis is a strategic field of science because it involves new ways of meeting energy and sustainability challenges. The concept of green chemistry, which makes the science of catalysis even more creative, has become an integral part of sustainability. This special issue is at the interface of green chemistry and nanocatalysis, and features excellent background articles as well as the latest research results. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Applications of Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry in Mechanistic Studies and Catalysis Research

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schröder, Detlef

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 9 (2012), s. 1521-1532 ISSN 0001-4842 Grant - others:European Research Council(XE) AdG HORIZOMS Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : cross-coupling reactions * Baylis–Hillman reaction * molecular-dynamics simulations * solution-phase mechanism * gas-phase * infrared-spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 20.833, year: 2012

  6. International Assessment of Research and Development in Catalysis by Nanostructured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    forming indene derivatives from a titanocene species, and an asymmetric kinetic resolution of a planar chiral ferrocene by Mo-catalyzed metathesis...multifunction reactor. He is using hydrogen TPR, in situ FTIR , GC, mass spectroscopy, Raman, XRD, and TEM for characterization of catalyst structure and...research, e.g., solid-state NMR; 5 noncontact AFM, SEM, and STM units; photon emission 242 Appendix C. Site Reports—Asia microscope; 3 FTIRs ; 1

  7. Research into Flexibility Services. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    The Dutch Office for Energy Regulation (DTe) is currently investigating the Dutch gas flexibility market. DTe is concerned that Gasunie is dominant in the market. In order to take a view of Gasunie's market position, DTe needs to first define the market for gas flexibility services and then explore whether Gasunie is dominant in the market (or markets). DTe has commissioned Frontier to undertake the respective formal analysis. This report summarises the findings by Frontier. On the basis of this report and a formal consultation process, We follow a three-step approach to the study: (1) We first define the relevant markets for gas flexibility (Section 3); (2) We then analyse the structure of the markets for flexibility that we have defined (Section 4); (3) Finally, we assess whether Gasunie is dominant in the relevant markets, taking account of market shares and other competitive effects (Section 5). This document is the Final Report, which contains our views as to the market definition for gas flexibility and the position of Gasunie in the market. The remainder of this document is set out as follows: Section 2 provides an overview of aspects of the Dutch gas industry relevant to this study; Section 3 sets out our approach to defining the market and de-Mops our conclusions on the markets for gas flexibility; Section 4 provides our view as to the structure of the relevant flexibility markets as defined in Section 3; Section 5 reports our assessment as to whether Gasunie is dominant in the relevant markets, taking account of market shares and other competitive effects; Section 6 sets out our conclusions about the competitive assessment. We include three annexes that set out details related to the market definition and analysis of dominance

  8. Research in theoretical physics. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domokos, G.; Kovesi-Domokos, S.

    1998-06-01

    This report summarizes the research carried out under Grant DE-FG02-85ER40211. The main topics covered are: astroparticle physics at very high and ultrahigh energies; search for new physics by means of detectors of ultrahigh energy particles of extraterrestrial origin. Methods for searching in heavy quark decays for signatures of physics beyond the standard model are developed

  9. Geothermal research, Oregon Cascades: Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priest, G.R.; Black, G.L.

    1988-10-27

    Previous USDOE-funded geothermal studies have produced an extensive temperature gradient and heat flow data base for the State of Oregon. One of the important features identified as a result of these studies is a rapid transition from heat flow values on the order of 40 mW/m/sup 2/ in the Willamette Valley and Western Cascades to values of greater than or equal to100 mW/m/sup 2/ in the High Cascades and the eastern portion of the Western Cascades. These data indicate that the Cascade Range in Oregon has potential as a major geothermal province and stimulated much of the later work completed by government agencies and private industry. Additional data generated as a result of this grant and published in DOGAMI Open-File Report 0-86-2 further define the location and magnitude of this transition zone. In addition, abundant data collected from the vicinity of Breitenbush and Austin Hot Springs have permitted the formulation of relatively detailed models of these hydrothermal systems. These models are published in DOGAMI Open-File Report 0-88-5. Task 1.2 of the Deliverables section of Amendment M001 is fulfilled by DOGAMI publication GMS-48, Geologic map of the McKenzie Bridge quadrangle, Lane County, Oregon. This map was printed in October, 1988, and is part of the final submission to USDOE. 8 refs.

  10. Council of Energy Engineering Research. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, Richard J.

    2003-08-22

    The Engineering Research Program, a component program of the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), was established in 1979 to aid in resolving the numerous engineering issues arising from efforts to meet U.S. energy needs. The major product of the program became part of the body of knowledge and data upon which the applied energy technologies are founded; the product is knowledge relevant to energy exploration, production, conversion and use.

  11. Small Wind Research Turbine: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corbus, D.; Meadors, M.

    2005-10-01

    The Small Wind Research Turbine (SWRT) project was initiated to provide reliable test data for model validation of furling wind turbines and to help understand small wind turbine loads. This report will familiarize the user with the scope of the SWRT test and support the use of these data. In addition to describing all the testing details and results, the report presents an analysis of the test data and compares the SWRT test data to simulation results from the FAST aeroelastic simulation model.

  12. Electronics Engineering Research. Final report, FY 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissenberger, S.

    1980-01-01

    Accomplishments in Electronics Engineering Research (EER) during FY79 spanned a broad range of technologies, from high-speed microelectronics to digital image enhancement; from underground probing with electromagnetic waves to detecting neutrons with a small solid-state device; and from computer systems to aid engineers, to software tools to aid programmers. This report describes the overall EER program and its objectives, summarizes progress made in FY79, and outlines plans for FY80

  13. Electronics Engineering Research. Final report, FY 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weissenberger, S. (ed.)

    1980-01-01

    Accomplishments in Electronics Engineering Research (EER) during FY79 spanned a broad range of technologies, from high-speed microelectronics to digital image enhancement; from underground probing with electromagnetic waves to detecting neutrons with a small solid-state device; and from computer systems to aid engineers, to software tools to aid programmers. This report describes the overall EER program and its objectives, summarizes progress made in FY79, and outlines plans for FY80.

  14. Jointly Sponsored Research Program. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    The Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP) is a US Department of Energy (DOE) program funded through the Office of Fossil Energy and administered at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center. Under this program, which has been in place since Fiscal Year 1990, DOE makes approximately $2.5 million available each year to the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) to fund projects that are of current interest to industry but which still involve significant risk, thus requiring some government contribution to offset the risk if the research is to move forward. The program guidelines require that at least 50% of the project funds originate from nonfederal sources. Projects funded under the JSRP often originate under a complementary base program, which funds higher-risk projects. The projects funded in Fiscal Year 1996 addressed a wide range of Fossil Energy interests, including hot-gas filters for advanced power systems; development of cleaner, more efficient processing technologies; development of environmental control technologies; development of environmental remediation and reuse technologies; development of improved analytical techniques; and development of a beneficiation technique to broaden the use of high-sulfur coal. Descriptions and status for each of the projects funded during the past fiscal year are included in Section A of this document, Statement of Technical Progress.

  15. EMSL and Institute for Integrated Catalysis (IIC) Catalysis Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Charles T.; Datye, Abhaya K.; Henkelman, Graeme A.; Lobo, Raul F.; Schneider, William F.; Spicer, Leonard D.; Tysoe, Wilfred T.; Vohs, John M.; Baer, Donald R.; Hoyt, David W.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Mueller, Karl T.; Wang, Chong M.; Washton, Nancy M.; Lyubinetsky, Igor; Teller, Raymond G.; Andersen, Amity; Govind, Niranjan; Kowalski, Karol; Kabius, Bernd C.; Wang, Hongfei; Campbell, Allison A.; Shelton, William A.; Bylaska, Eric J.; Peden, Charles HF; Wang, Yong; King, David L.; Henderson, Michael A.; Rousseau, Roger J.; Szanyi, Janos; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Mei, Donghai; Garrett, Bruce C.; Ray, Douglas; Futrell, Jean H.; Laskin, Julia; DuBois, Daniel L.; Kuprat, Laura R.; Plata, Charity

    2011-05-24

    Within the context of significantly accelerating scientific progress in research areas that address important societal problems, a workshop was held in November 2010 at EMSL to identify specific and topically important areas of research and capability needs in catalysis-related science.

  16. Final Project Report Load Modeling Transmission Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesieutre, Bernard [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Bravo, Richard [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Yinger, Robert [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Chassin, Dave [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Huang, Henry [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Lu, Ning [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hiskens, Ian [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Venkataramanan, Giri [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-03-31

    The research presented in this report primarily focuses on improving power system load models to better represent their impact on system behavior. The previous standard load model fails to capture the delayed voltage recovery events that are observed in the Southwest and elsewhere. These events are attributed to stalled air conditioner units after a fault. To gain a better understanding of their role in these events and to guide modeling efforts, typical air conditioner units were testing in laboratories. Using data obtained from these extensive tests, new load models were developed to match air conditioner behavior. An air conditioner model is incorporated in the new WECC composite load model. These models are used in dynamic studies of the West and can impact power transfer limits for California. Unit-level and systemlevel solutions are proposed as potential solutions to the delayed voltage recovery problem.

  17. Environmental training research project. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    Santa Fe Community College serves an area including the city and county of Santa Fe. The population has a high percentage of Hispanics and a Native American population of about 3%. The student body at the college generally reflects that of the service district. The college strives to recruit students from all segments of the population so there is representation among all ethnic and economic groups. The college strives to serve students and the community by offering educational opportunities that meet the needs of both elements and which will lead to gainful employment. Instruction is also offered to meets needs for retraining, upgrades, and personal enlightenment. The college started a hazardous materials management program in the fall of 1991 which has since been renamed environmental management. The purpose of this program is to prepare students for environmental careers, to provide required training such as OSHA HAZWOPER and refresher courses, and to provide educational opportunities that would make the public more environmentally aware. The program content needs to be studied to ensure we`re meeting the needs of the students and the business community. There had not been a significant opportunity to conduct this research.

  18. Bat habitat research. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, B.L.; Bosworth, W.R.; Doering, R.W.

    1993-12-31

    This progress report describes activities over the current reporting period to characterize the habitats of bats on the INEL. Research tasks are entitled Monitoring bat habitation of caves on the INEL to determine species present, numbers, and seasons of use; Monitor bat use of man-made ponds at the INEL to determine species present and rates of use of these waters; If the Big Lost River is flowing on the INEL and/or if the Big Lost River sinks contain water, determine species present, numbers and seasons of use; Determine the habitat requirement of Townsend`s big-eared bats, including the microclimate of caves containing Townsend`s big-eared bats as compared to other caves that do not contain bats; Determine and describe an economical and efficient bat census technique to be used periodically by INEL scientists to determine the status of bats on the INEL; and Provide a suggestive management and protective plan for bat species on the INEL that might, in the future, be added to the endangered and sensitive list;

  19. 2012 Joint Research Target (JRT) Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The report summarizes: 1. Diagnostic upgrades and analysis improvements that support the JRT; 2. Descriptions of new experiments and a brief summary of findings; 3. New analysis of previous experiments; 4. Plans for further data analysis and recommendations for further work; 5. Scientific publications that are derived from or contributed directly to the JRT. The report is organized as follows: Section 1: Describes inter-machine comparisons that were facilitated by the JRT focus. Similarities and differences found on the different facilities are outlined, and plans for additional analysis of data and supporting simulations are described.Section 2: Reviews diagnostic development, experiments and results from C-Mod. C-Mod dedicated 13.1 run days to the JRT divided among 10 experimental proposals. These were organized into three general thrust areas that represent distinct experimental approaches to realizing the regimes called for in the JRT description. Initial comparisons with linear and nonlinear simulation have been carried out for these experiments, and plans for an extensive campaign of analysis have been outlined. Section 3: Reviews results from DIII-D including new experiments, detailed comparisons of simulations to previously collected data and connections between the new work and past research. Four experimental days were dedicated to the JRT in 2012. These included studies of L-modes, H-modes and QH-modes. Section 4: Summarizes new analysis of data collected before the NSTX shutdown. The work focuses on the roles of low and high-k turbulence; collisionality scans and impurity particle transport.

  20. 2012 Joint Research Target (JRT) Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Team, JRT

    2012-09-30

    The report summarizes: [1] Diagnostic upgrades and analysis improvements that support the JRT; [2] Descriptions of new experiments and a brief summary of findings; [3] New analysis of previous experiments; [4] Plans for further data analysis and recommendations for further work; [5] Scientific publications that are derived from or contributed directly to the JRT. The report is organized as follows: Section 1: Describes inter-machine comparisons that were facilitated by the JRT focus. Similarities and differences found on the different facilities are outlined, and plans for additional analysis of data and supporting simulations are described.Section 2: Reviews diagnostic development, experiments and results from C-Mod. C-Mod dedicated 13.1 run days to the JRT divided among 10 experimental proposals. These were organized into three general thrust areas that represent distinct experimental approaches to realizing the regimes called for in the JRT description. Initial comparisons with linear and nonlinear simulation have been carried out for these experiments, and plans for an extensive campaign of analysis have been outlined. Section 3: Reviews results from DIII-D including new experiments, detailed comparisons of simulations to previously collected data and connections between the new work and past research. Four experimental days were dedicated to the JRT in 2012. These included studies of L-modes, H-modes and QH-modes. Section 4: Summarizes new analysis of data collected before the NSTX shutdown. The work focuses on the roles of low and high-k turbulence; collisionality scans and impurity particle transport.

  1. Catalysis of Photochemical Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albini, A.

    1986-01-01

    Offers a classification system of catalytic effects in photochemical reactions, contrasting characteristic properties of photochemical and thermal reactions. Discusses catalysis and sensitization, examples of catalyzed reactions of excepted states, complexing ground state substrates, and catalysis of primary photoproducts. (JM)

  2. The Finnish research programme on climate change. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, J. [ed.

    1996-12-31

    This is the final report of the Finnish Research Programme on Climate Change (SILMU). This report includes the final results and conclusions made by the individual research groups. The aim of this report is to lay out the research work, and to present the main results and conclusions obtained during the six-year work. The Finnish Research Programme on Climate Change (SILMU) was a multidisciplinary national research programme on climate and global change. The principal goals of SILMU were: (1) to increase our knowledge on climate change, its causes, mechanisms and consequences, (2) to strengthen the research on climate change in Finland, (3) to increase the participation of Finnish researchers in international research programmes, and (4) to prepare and disseminate information for policy makers on adaptation and mitigation. The key areas of the research were: (1) quantification of the greenhouse effect and the magnitude of anticipated climatic changes,(2) assessment of the effects of changing climate on ecosystems, and (3) development of mitigation and adaptation strategies. The research programme started in June 1990, and it comprised more than 80 individual research projects, ranging from atmospheric chemistry to economics. There were approximately two hundred scientists working within the programme in seven universities and eleven research institutions. The research activities that comprise SILMU were grouped into four interdisciplinary subprogrammes: atmosphere, waters, terrestrial ecosystems and integration and human interactions

  3. Final Report on Pilot Studies / Final Report on Classroom Research with STEM and TESL Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biel, Carmen; Wake, Jo Dugstad; Hesse, Friedrich

    This Deliverable is the final report on pilot studies within the NEXT-TELL project (D6.7) and furthermore comprises the Deliverable on Classroom Research with STEM and TESL Assessment (D2.9) in order to avoid redundancies between those two Deliverables.......This Deliverable is the final report on pilot studies within the NEXT-TELL project (D6.7) and furthermore comprises the Deliverable on Classroom Research with STEM and TESL Assessment (D2.9) in order to avoid redundancies between those two Deliverables....

  4. Multicatalyst system in asymmetric catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Jian

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces multi-catalyst systems by describing their mechanism and advantages in asymmetric catalysis.  Helps organic chemists perform more efficient catalysis with step-by-step methods  Overviews new concepts and progress for greener and economic catalytic reactions  Covers topics of interest in asymmetric catalysis including bifunctional catalysis, cooperative catalysis, multimetallic catalysis, and novel tandem reactions   Has applications for pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, materials, and flavour and fragrance

  5. Catalysis of Supramolecular Hydrogelation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trausel, F.; Versluis, F.; Maity, C.; Poolman, J.M.; Lovrak, M.; van Esch, J.H.; Eelkema, R.

    2016-01-01

    ConspectusOne often thinks of catalysts as chemical tools to accelerate a reaction or to have a reaction run under more benign conditions. As such, catalysis has a role to play in the chemical industry and in lab scale synthesis that is not to be underestimated. Still, the role of catalysis in

  6. Kinetics and Catalysis Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, John L.; Britten, Jerald A.

    1984-01-01

    Eleven videotaped kinetics and catalysis demonstrations are described. Demonstrations include the clock reaction, oscillating reaction, hydrogen oxidation in air, hydrogen-oxygen explosion, acid-base properties of solids, high- and low-temperature zeolite reactivity, copper catalysis of ammonia oxidation and sodium peroxide decomposition, ammonia…

  7. Faraday Discussions meeting Catalysis for Fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Nico; Kondrat, Simon A; Shozi, Mzamo

    2017-05-02

    Welcome to Africa was the motto when after more than 100 years the flag ship conference series of the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Faraday Discussions was hosted for the first time on the African Continent. Under the fitting topic 'Catalysis for Fuels' over 120 delegates followed the invitation by the conference chair Prof. Graham Hutchings FRS (Cardiff Catalysis Institute), his organizing committee and the co-organizing DST-NRF Centre of Excellence in Catalysis c*change (). In the presentations of 21 invited speakers and 59 posters, cutting edge research in the field of catalysis for fuels, designing new catalysts for synthetic fuels, hydrocarbon conversion in the production of synthetic fuels and novel photocatalysis was presented over the two-day meeting. The scene was set by the opening lecture of Prof. Enrique Iglesias (UC Berkeley) and wrapped-up with the concluding remarks by Philip Gibson (SASOL).

  8. High energy physics research. Final technical report, 1957--1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, H.H.

    1995-01-01

    This is the final technical report to the Department of Energy on High Energy Physics at the University of Pennsylvania. It discusses research conducted in the following areas: neutrino astrophysics and cosmology; string theory; electroweak and collider physics; supergravity; cp violation and baryogenesis; particle cosmology; collider detector at Fermilab; the sudbury neutrino observatory; B-physics; particle physics in nuclei; and advanced electronics and detector development

  9. High energy physics research. Final technical report, 1957--1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, H.H.

    1995-10-01

    This is the final technical report to the Department of Energy on High Energy Physics at the University of Pennsylvania. It discusses research conducted in the following areas: neutrino astrophysics and cosmology; string theory; electroweak and collider physics; supergravity; cp violation and baryogenesis; particle cosmology; collider detector at Fermilab; the sudbury neutrino observatory; B-physics; particle physics in nuclei; and advanced electronics and detector development.

  10. Program and Abstracts, Boron Americas IX Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feakes, Debra A.

    2006-08-09

    The Scientific and Technical Information (STI) submitted includes the final report and a collection of abstracts for the Ninth Boron in the Americas Conference which was held May 19-22, 2004, in San Marcos, Texas. The topics covered in the abstracts include: Application in Medicine, Application in Organic Synthesis and Catalysis, Boranes and Carboranes, Materials and Polymers, Metallaboranes and Metallacarboranes, Organoboron Compounds, Synthesis and Catalysis, and Theoretical Studies. Attendees represented researchers from government, industry, and academia.

  11. Research on the climatic effects of nuclear winter: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickinson, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) has undertaken a series of research efforts to develop and implement improvements to the Community Climate Model (CCM) needed to make the model more applicable to studies of the climatic effects of nuclear war. The development of the model improvements has reached a stage where implementation may proceed, and several of the developed routines are being incorporated into the next approved version of the CCM (CCM1). Formal documentation is being completed describing the specific model improvements that have been successfully implemented. This final report includes the series of annual proposals and progress reports that have guided the project

  12. Research on the climatic effects of nuclear winter: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickinson, R.E.

    1986-12-03

    The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) has undertaken a series of research efforts to develop and implement improvements to the Community Climate Model (CCM) needed to make the model more applicable to studies of the climatic effects of nuclear war. The development of the model improvements has reached a stage where implementation may proceed, and several of the developed routines are being incorporated into the next approved version of the CCM (CCM1). Formal documentation is being completed describing the specific model improvements that have been successfully implemented. This final report includes the series of annual proposals and progress reports that have guided the project.

  13. Assessment of research needs for advanced heterogeneous catalysts for energy applications. Final report: Volume 2, Topic reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, G.A.

    1994-04-01

    This report assesses the direction, technical content, and priority of research needs judged to provide the best chance of yielding new and improved heterogeneous catalysts for energy-related applications over the period of 5-20 years. It addresses issues of energy conservation, alternate fuels and feedstocks, and the economics and applications that could alleviate pollution from energy processes. Recommended goals are defined in 3 research thrusts: catalytic science, environmental protection by catalysis, and industrial catalytic applications. This study was conducted by an 11-member panel of experts from industry and academia, including one each from Japan and Europe. This volume first presents an in-depth overview of the role of catalysis in future energy technology in chapter 1; then current catalytic research is critically reviewed and research recommended in 8 topic chapters: catalyst preparation (design and synthesis), catalyst characterization (structure/function), catalyst performance testing, reaction kinetics/reactor design, catalysis for industrial chemicals, catalysis for electrical applications (clean fuels, pollution remediation), catalysis for control of exhaust emissions, and catalysts for liquid transportation fuels from petroleum, coal, residual oil, and biomass.

  14. Surface and nanomolecular catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Richards, Ryan

    2006-01-01

    Using new instrumentation and experimental techniques that allow scientists to observe chemical reactions and molecular properties at the nanoscale, the authors of Surface and Nanomolecular Catalysis reveal new insights into the surface chemistry of catalysts and the reaction mechanisms that actually occur at a molecular level during catalysis. While each chapter contains the necessary background and explanations to stand alone, the diverse collection of chapters shows how developments from various fields each contributed to our current understanding of nanomolecular catalysis as a whole. The

  15. Molecular water oxidation catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Llobet, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Photocatalytic water splitting is a promising strategy for capturing energy from the sun by coupling light harvesting and the oxidation of water, in order to create clean hydrogen fuel. Thus a deep knowledge of the water oxidation catalysis field is essential to be able to come up with useful energy conversion devices based on sunlight and water splitting. Molecular Water Oxidation Catalysis: A Key Topic for New Sustainable Energy Conversion Schemes presents a comprehensive and state-of-the-art overview of water oxidation catalysis in homogeneous phase, describing in detail the most importan

  16. Catalysis in the Primordial World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nenad Raos

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Catalysis provides orderly prebiotic synthesis and eventually its evolution into autocatalytic (self-reproduction systems. Research on homogeneous catalysis is concerned mostly with random peptide synthesis and the chances to produce catalytic peptide oligomers. Synthesis of ribose via formose reaction was found to be catalysed by B(OH4−, presumably released by weathering of borate minerals. Oxide and clay mineral surfaces provide catalytic sites for the synthesis of oligopeptides and oligonucleotides. Chemoautotrophic or iron-sulphur-world theory assumes that the first (pioneer organisms developed by catalytic processes on (Fe/NiS particles formed near/close hydrothermal vents. The review provides an overlay of possible catalytic reactions in prebiotic environment, discussing their selectivity (regioselectivity, stereoselectivity as well as geological availability of catalytic minerals and geochemical conditions enabling catalytic reactions on early Earth.

  17. MIT LMFBR blanket research project. Final summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driscoll, M.J.

    1983-08-01

    This is a final summary report on an experimental and analytical program for the investigation of LMFBR blanket characteristics carried out at MIT in the period 1969 to 1983. During this span of time, work was carried out on a wide range of subtasks, ranging from neutronic and photonic measurements in mockups of blankets using the Blanket Test Facility at the MIT Research Reactor, to analytic/numerical investigations of blanket design and economics. The main function of this report is to serve as a resource document which will permit ready reference to the more detailed topical reports and theses issued over the years on the various aspects of project activities. In addition, one aspect of work completed during the final year of the project, on doubly-heterogeneous blanket configurations, is documented for the record.

  18. Tritium research laboratory cleanup and transition project final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.J.

    1997-02-01

    This Tritium Research Laboratory Cleanup and Transition Project Final Report provides a high-level summary of this project's multidimensional accomplishments. Throughout this report references are provided for in-depth information concerning the various topical areas. Project related records also offer solutions to many of the technical and or administrative challenges that such a cleanup effort requires. These documents and the experience obtained during this effort are valuable resources to the DOE, which has more than 1200 other process contaminated facilities awaiting cleanup and reapplication or demolition

  19. Research in theoretical nuclear and neutrino physics. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarcevic, Ina [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2014-06-14

    The main focus of the research supported by the nuclear theory grant DE-FG02-04ER41319 was on studying parton dynamics in high-energy heavy ion collisions, perturbative approach to charm production and its contribution to atmospheric neutrinos, application of AdS/CFT approach to QCD, neutrino signals of dark mattter annihilation in the Sun and on novel processes that take place in dense stellar medium and their role in stellar collapse, in particular the effect of new neutrino interactions on neutrino flavor conversion in Supernovae. We present final technical report on projects completed under the grant.

  20. Nano catalysis: Academic Discipline and Industrial Realities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olveira, S.; Forster, S.P.; Seeger, S.

    2014-01-01

    Nano technology plays a central role in both academic research and industrial applications. Nano enabled products are not only found in consumer markets, but also importantly in business to business markets (B2B). One of the oldest application areas of nano technology is nano catalysis—an excellent example for such a B2 B market. Several existing reviews illustrate the scientific developments in the field of nano catalysis. The goal of the present review is to provide an up-to-date picture of academic research and to extend this picture by an industrial and economic perspective. We therefore conducted an extensive search on several scientific databases and we further analyzed more than 1,500 nano catalysis-related patents and numerous market studies. We found that scientists today are able to prepare nano catalysts with superior characteristics regarding activity, selectivity, durability, and recoverability, which will contribute to solve current environmental, social, and industrial problems. In industry, the potential of nano catalysis is recognized, clearly reflected by the increasing number of nano catalysis-related patents and products on the market. The current nano catalysis research in academic and industrial laboratories will therefore enable a wealth of future applications in the industry

  1. Radiological Characterization and Final Facility Status Report Tritium Research Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, T.B.; Gorman, T.P.

    1996-08-01

    This document contains the specific radiological characterization information on Building 968, the Tritium Research Laboratory (TRL) Complex and Facility. We performed the characterization as outlined in its Radiological Characterization Plan. The Radiological Characterization and Final Facility Status Report (RC&FFSR) provides historic background information on each laboratory within the TRL complex as related to its original and present radiological condition. Along with the work outlined in the Radiological Characterization Plan (RCP), we performed a Radiological Soils Characterization, Radiological and Chemical Characterization of the Waste Water Hold-up System including all drains, and a Radiological Characterization of the Building 968 roof ventilation system. These characterizations will provide the basis for the Sandia National Laboratory, California (SNL/CA) Site Termination Survey .Plan, when appropriate.

  2. Radiological Characterization and Final Facility Status Report Tritium Research Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, T.B.; Gorman, T.P.

    1996-08-01

    This document contains the specific radiological characterization information on Building 968, the Tritium Research Laboratory (TRL) Complex and Facility. We performed the characterization as outlined in its Radiological Characterization Plan. The Radiological Characterization and Final Facility Status Report (RC ampersand FFSR) provides historic background information on each laboratory within the TRL complex as related to its original and present radiological condition. Along with the work outlined in the Radiological Characterization Plan (RCP), we performed a Radiological Soils Characterization, Radiological and Chemical Characterization of the Waste Water Hold-up System including all drains, and a Radiological Characterization of the Building 968 roof ventilation system. These characterizations will provide the basis for the Sandia National Laboratory, California (SNL/CA) Site Termination Survey .Plan, when appropriate

  3. Homogeneous, Heterogeneous, and Enzymatic Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, S. Ted; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses three areas of catalysis: homegeneous, heterogeneous, and enzymatic. Explains fundamentals and economic impact of catalysis. Lists and discusses common industrial catalysts. Provides a list of 107 references. (MVL)

  4. Catalysis for alternative energy generation

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Summarizes recent problems in using catalysts in alternative energy generation and proposes novel solutions  Reconsiders the role of catalysis in alternative energy generation  Contributors include catalysis and alternative energy experts from across the globe

  5. Catalysis induced by radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez B, J.; Gonzalez J, J. C.

    2010-01-01

    In Mexico is generated a great quantity of residuals considered as dangerous, for its capacity of corrosion, reactivity, toxicity to the environment, inflammability and biological-infectious potential. It is important to mention that the toxic compounds cannot be discharged to the sewerage systems and much less to the receiving bodies of water. The usual treatment that receives the dangerous residuals is the incineration and the bordering. The incineration is an efficient form of treating the residuals, but it can be dioxins source and benzofurans, being the phenol and chloro phenol the precursors of these compounds. At the present time the radiolytic degradation of organic compounds has been broadly studied, especially the 4-chloro phenol and of same form the photo catalysis of organic compounds. However the combination of both processes, called radio catalysis is barely reported. In this work the results of the experiments realized for to degrade the 4-chloro phenol by means of radio catalysis are reported. (Author)

  6. Photo-catalysis Plants from basic research to commercial reality; Plantas de tratamiento mediante fotocatalisis solar: de la investigacion basica a una realidad comercial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco, J.; Malato, S.

    2007-07-01

    The degradation process of nonbiodegradable organic substances by means of photo catalysis techniques allows the effective elimination of pollutants presents in water and air. The development during the last years of the solar photo catalysis technology, commonly called solar detoxification, has allowed that the first commercial plants based on solar collectors for the treatment of waste water containing persistent organic compounds become a reality. CIEMAT has played an essential roll on this process. This technology is based on the application of two different techniques (photo-Fenton and UV/TiO{sub 2} processes) implemented in static solar collectors CPC type (parabolic-compound). (Author)

  7. Cellulose conversion under heterogeneous catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhepe, Paresh L; Fukuoka, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    In view of current problems such as global warming, high oil prices, food crisis, stricter environmental laws, and other geopolitical scenarios surrounding the use of fossil feedstocks and edible resources, the efficient conversion of cellulose, a non-food biomass, into energy, fuels, and chemicals has received much attention. The application of heterogeneous catalysis could allow researchers to develop environmentally benign processes that lead to selective formation of value-added products from cellulose under relatively mild conditions. This Minireview gives insight into the importance of biomass utilization, the current status of cellulose conversion, and further transformation of the primary products obtained.

  8. Isotopes in heterogeneous catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Hargreaves, Justin SJ

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to review the current, state-of-the-art application of isotopic methods to the field of heterogeneous catalysis. Isotopic studies are arguably the ultimate technique in in situ methods for heterogeneous catalysis. In this review volume, chapters have been contributed by experts in the field and the coverage includes both the application of specific isotopes - Deuterium, Tritium, Carbon-14, Sulfur-35 and Oxygen-18 - as well as isotopic techniques - determination of surface mobility, steady state transient isotope kinetic analysis, and positron emission profiling.

  9. Final Report for NIREC Renewable Energy Research & Development Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borland, Walt [Nevada Institute for Renewable Energy Commercialization (NIREC), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2017-05-02

    This report is a compilation of progress reports and presentations submitted by NIREC to the DOE’s Solar Energy Technologies Office for award number DE-FG36-08GO88161. This compilation has been uploaded to OSTI by DOE as a substitute for the required Final Technical Report, which was not submitted to DOE by NIREC or received by DOE. Project Objective: The primary goal of NIREC is to advance the transformation of the scientific innovation of the institutional partner’s research in renewable energy into a proof of the scientific concept eventually leading to viable businesses with cost effective solutions to accelerate the widespread adoption of renewable energy. NIREC will a) select research projects that are determined to have significant commercialization potential as a result of vetting by the Technology and commercialization Advisory Board, b) assign an experienced Entrepreneur-in-Residence (EIR) to each manage the scientific commercialization-preparedness process, and c) facilitate connectivity with venture capital and other private-sector capital sources to fund the rollout, scaling and growth of the resultant renewable energy business.

  10. Green chemistry by nano-catalysis

    KAUST Repository

    Polshettiwar, Vivek

    2010-01-01

    Nano-materials are important in many diverse areas, from basic research to various applications in electronics, biochemical sensors, catalysis and energy. They have emerged as sustainable alternatives to conventional materials, as robust high surface area heterogeneous catalysts and catalyst supports. The nano-sized particles increase the exposed surface area of the active component of the catalyst, thereby enhancing the contact between reactants and catalyst dramatically and mimicking the homogeneous catalysts. This review focuses on the use of nano-catalysis for green chemistry development including the strategy of using microwave heating with nano-catalysis in benign aqueous reaction media which offers an extraordinary synergistic effect with greater potential than these three components in isolation. To illustrate the proof-of-concept of this "green and sustainable" approach, representative examples are discussed in this article. © 2010 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  11. Pollution Control by Catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Kim Michael; Fehrmann, Rasmus

    1998-01-01

    The report summarises the results of two years of collaboration supported by INTAS between Department of Chemistry,DTU,DK , IUSTI,Universite de Provence,FR, ICE/HT University 6of Patras,GR, and Boreskov Institute of Catalysis,RU.The project has been concerned with mechanistic studies of deNOx and...

  12. Anion-π catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yingjie; Beuchat, César; Domoto, Yuya; Gajewy, Jadwiga; Wilson, Adam; Mareda, Jiri; Sakai, Naomi; Matile, Stefan

    2014-02-05

    The introduction of new noncovalent interactions to build functional systems is of fundamental importance. We here report experimental and theoretical evidence that anion-π interactions can contribute to catalysis. The Kemp elimination is used as a classical tool to discover conceptually innovative catalysts for reactions with anionic transition states. For anion-π catalysis, a carboxylate base and a solubilizer are covalently attached to the π-acidic surface of naphthalenediimides. On these π-acidic surfaces, transition-state stabilizations up to ΔΔGTS = 31.8 ± 0.4 kJ mol(-1) are found. This value corresponds to a transition-state recognition of KTS = 2.7 ± 0.5 μM and a catalytic proficiency of 3.8 × 10(5) M(-1). Significantly increasing transition-state stabilization with increasing π-acidity of the catalyst, observed for two separate series, demonstrates the existence of "anion-π catalysis." In sharp contrast, increasing π-acidity of the best naphthalenediimide catalysts does not influence the more than 12 000-times weaker substrate recognition (KM = 34.5 ± 1.6 μM). Together with the disappearance of Michaelis-Menten kinetics on the expanded π-surfaces of perylenediimides, this finding supports that contributions from π-π interactions are not very important for anion-π catalysis. The linker between the π-acidic surface and the carboxylate base strongly influences activity. Insufficient length and flexibility cause incompatibility with saturation kinetics. Moreover, preorganizing linkers do not improve catalysis much, suggesting that the ideal positioning of the carboxylate base on the π-acidic surface is achieved by intramolecular anion-π interactions rather than by an optimized structure of the linker. Computational simulations are in excellent agreement with experimental results. They confirm, inter alia, that the stabilization of the anionic transition states (but not the neutral ground states) increases with the π-acidity of the

  13. NTRCI Legacy Engine Research and Development Project Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith-Holbert, Connie [National Transportation Research Center, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); Petrolino, Joseph [National Transportation Research Center, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); Watkins, Bart [Power Source Technologies Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States); Irick, David [Power Source Technologies Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2011-12-31

    The Legacy engine is a completely new design, transitional diesel engine, replacing the reciprocating engine with a rotary engine. The Legacy engine offers significant advances over conventional internal combustion engines in 1) power to weight ratio; 2) multiple fuel acceptance; 3) fuel economy; and 4) environmental compliance. These advances are achieved through a combination of innovative design geometry, rotary motion, aspiration simplicity, and manufacturing/part simplicity. The key technical challenge to the Legacy engine's commercialization, and the focus of this project, was the development of a viable roton tip seal. The PST concept for the roton tip seal was developed into a manufacturable design. The design was evaluated using a custom designed and fabricated seal test fixture and further refined. This design was incorporated into the GEN2.5A prototype and tested for achievable compression pressure. The Decision Point at the end of Phase 1 of the project (described below) was to further optimize the existing tip seal design. Enhancements to the tip seal design were incorporated into the GEN2.5B prototype and tested and evaluated using the iterative research strategy described below. Compression pressures adequate for compression ignition of diesel fuel were achieved, although not consistently in all combustion volumes. The variation in compression pressures was characterized versus design features. As the roton tip seal performance was improved, results pointed toward inadequate performance of the housing side seals. Enhancement of the housing side seal system was accomplished using a custom designed side seal test fixture. The design enhancements developed with the test fixture were also incorporated into the GEN2.5B prototype and tested and evaluated using the iterative research strategy described below. Finally, to simplify the requirements for the roton tip seals and to enhance the introduction and combustion of fuel, a flush-mount fuel injector

  14. International piping integrity research group (IPIRG) program final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, R.; Wilkowski, G.; Scott, P.; Olsen, R.; Marschall, C.; Vieth, P.; Paul, D.

    1992-04-01

    This is the final report of the International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG) Programme. The IPIRG Programme was an international group programme managed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and funded by a consortium of organizations from nine nations: Canada, France, Italy, Japan, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, the United Kingdom, and the United states. The objective of the programme was to develop data needed to verify engineering methods for assessing the integrity of nuclear power plant piping that contains circumferential defects. The primary focus was an experimental task that investigated the behaviour of circumferentially flawed piping and piping systems to high-rate loading typical of seismic events. To accomplish these objectives a unique pipe loop test facility was designed and constructed. The pipe system was an expansion loop with over 30 m of 406-mm diameter pipe and five long radius elbows. Five experiments on flawed piping were conducted to failure in this facility with dynamic excitation. The report: provides background information on leak-before-break and flaw evaluation procedures in piping; summarizes the technical results of the programme; gives a relatively detailed assessment of the results from the various pipe fracture experiments and complementary analyses; and, summarizes the advances in the state-of-the-art of pipe fracture technology resulting from the IPIRG Program

  15. International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG) Program. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkowski, G.; Schmidt, R.; Scott, P.

    1997-06-01

    This is the final report of the International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG) Program. The IPIRG Program was an international group program managed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and funded by a consortium of organizations from nine nations: Canada, France, Italy, Japan, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The program objective was to develop data needed to verify engineering methods for assessing the integrity of circumferentially-cracked nuclear power plant piping. The primary focus was an experimental task that investigated the behavior of circumferentially flawed piping systems subjected to high-rate loadings typical of seismic events. To accomplish these objectives a pipe system fabricated as an expansion loop with over 30 meters of 16-inch diameter pipe and five long radius elbows was constructed. Five dynamic, cyclic, flawed piping experiments were conducted using this facility. This report: (1) provides background information on leak-before-break and flaw evaluation procedures for piping, (2) summarizes technical results of the program, (3) gives a relatively detailed assessment of the results from the pipe fracture experiments and complementary analyses, and (4) summarizes advances in the state-of-the-art of pipe fracture technology resulting from the IPIRG program

  16. Predictive modeling in homogeneous catalysis: a tutorial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maldonado, A.G.; Rothenberg, G.

    2010-01-01

    Predictive modeling has become a practical research tool in homogeneous catalysis. It can help to pinpoint ‘good regions’ in the catalyst space, narrowing the search for the optimal catalyst for a given reaction. Just like any other new idea, in silico catalyst optimization is accepted by some

  17. 42 CFR 93.411 - Final HHS action with settlement or finding of research misconduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Health and Human Services Research Misconduct Issues § 93.411 Final HHS action with settlement or finding of research misconduct. When a final HHS action results in a settlement or research misconduct... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Final HHS action with settlement or finding of...

  18. Solid Base Catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Ono, Yoshio

    2011-01-01

    The importance of solid base catalysts has come to be recognized for their environmentally benign qualities, and much significant progress has been made over the past two decades in catalytic materials and solid base-catalyzed reactions. The book is focused on the solid base. Because of the advantages over liquid bases, the use of solid base catalysts in organic synthesis is expanding. Solid bases are easier to dispose than liquid bases, separation and recovery of products, catalysts and solvents are less difficult, and they are non-corrosive. Furthermore, base-catalyzed reactions can be performed without using solvents and even in the gas phase, opening up more possibilities for discovering novel reaction systems. Using numerous examples, the present volume describes the remarkable role solid base catalysis can play, given the ever increasing worldwide importance of "green" chemistry. The reader will obtain an overall view of solid base catalysis and gain insight into the versatility of the reactions to whic...

  19. Basic petroleum research. Final report; Grunnleggende petroleumsforskning. Sluttrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roesjoe, Bjarne; Stiksrud, Helge

    2004-07-01

    An overview of projects in the field of basic petroleum research (PetroForsk) is presented. A brief presentation of some of the projects is included, as well as political comments on the value of these projects. The research program Basic Petroleum Research (PetroForsk) was established in 1998 and ended in 2004. The program has been part of the Research Council of Norway's long-term effort in petroleum research (ml)

  20. Neutrons for Catalysis: A Workshop on Neutron Scattering Techniques for Studies in Catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overbury, Steven H.; Coates, Leighton; Herwig, Kenneth W.; Kidder, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes the Workshop on Neutron Scattering Techniques for Studies in Catalysis, held at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on September 16 and 17, 2010. The goal of the Workshop was to bring experts in heterogeneous catalysis and biocatalysis together with neutron scattering experimenters to identify ways to attack new problems, especially Grand Challenge problems in catalysis, using neutron scattering. The Workshop locale was motivated by the neutron capabilities at ORNL, including the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and the new and developing instrumentation at the SNS. Approximately 90 researchers met for 1 1/2 days with oral presentations and breakout sessions. Oral presentations were divided into five topical sessions aimed at a discussion of Grand Challenge problems in catalysis, dynamics studies, structure characterization, biocatalysis, and computational methods. Eleven internationally known invited experts spoke in these sessions. The Workshop was intended both to educate catalyst experts about the methods and possibilities of neutron methods and to educate the neutron community about the methods and scientific challenges in catalysis. Above all, it was intended to inspire new research ideas among the attendees. All attendees were asked to participate in one or more of three breakout sessions to share ideas and propose new experiments that could be performed using the ORNL neutron facilities. The Workshop was expected to lead to proposals for beam time at either the HFIR or the SNS; therefore, it was expected that each breakout session would identify a few experiments or proof-of-principle experiments and a leader who would pursue a proposal after the Workshop. Also, a refereed review article will be submitted to a prominent journal to present research and ideas illustrating the benefits and possibilities of neutron methods for catalysis research.

  1. Neutrons for Catalysis: A Workshop on Neutron Scattering Techniques for Studies in Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overbury, Steven {Steve} H [ORNL; Coates, Leighton [ORNL; Herwig, Kenneth W [ORNL; Kidder, Michelle [ORNL

    2011-10-01

    This report summarizes the Workshop on Neutron Scattering Techniques for Studies in Catalysis, held at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on September 16 and 17, 2010. The goal of the Workshop was to bring experts in heterogeneous catalysis and biocatalysis together with neutron scattering experimenters to identify ways to attack new problems, especially Grand Challenge problems in catalysis, using neutron scattering. The Workshop locale was motivated by the neutron capabilities at ORNL, including the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and the new and developing instrumentation at the SNS. Approximately 90 researchers met for 1 1/2 days with oral presentations and breakout sessions. Oral presentations were divided into five topical sessions aimed at a discussion of Grand Challenge problems in catalysis, dynamics studies, structure characterization, biocatalysis, and computational methods. Eleven internationally known invited experts spoke in these sessions. The Workshop was intended both to educate catalyst experts about the methods and possibilities of neutron methods and to educate the neutron community about the methods and scientific challenges in catalysis. Above all, it was intended to inspire new research ideas among the attendees. All attendees were asked to participate in one or more of three breakout sessions to share ideas and propose new experiments that could be performed using the ORNL neutron facilities. The Workshop was expected to lead to proposals for beam time at either the HFIR or the SNS; therefore, it was expected that each breakout session would identify a few experiments or proof-of-principle experiments and a leader who would pursue a proposal after the Workshop. Also, a refereed review article will be submitted to a prominent journal to present research and ideas illustrating the benefits and possibilities of neutron methods for catalysis research.

  2. Applications of metal-organic frameworks in heterogeneous supramolecular catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiewei; Chen, Lianfen; Cui, Hao; Zhang, Jianyong; Zhang, Li; Su, Cheng-Yong

    2014-08-21

    This review summarizes the use of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as a versatile supramolecular platform to develop heterogeneous catalysts for a variety of organic reactions, especially for liquid-phase reactions. Following a background introduction about catalytic relevance to various metal-organic materials, crystal engineering of MOFs, characterization and evaluation methods of MOF catalysis, we categorize catalytic MOFs based on the types of active sites, including coordinatively unsaturated metal sites (CUMs), metalloligands, functional organic sites (FOS), as well as metal nanoparticles (MNPs) embedded in the cavities. Throughout the review, we emphasize the incidental or deliberate formation of active sites, the stability, heterogeneity and shape/size selectivity for MOF catalysis. Finally, we briefly introduce their relevance into photo- and biomimetic catalysis, and compare MOFs with other typical porous solids such as zeolites and mesoporous silica with regard to their different attributes, and provide our view on future trends and developments in MOF-based catalysis.

  3. Catalysis by Atomic-Sized Centers: Methane Activation for Partial Oxidation and Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-21

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0195 CATALYSIS BY ATOMIC-SIZED CENTERS: METHANE ACTIVATION FOR PARTIAL OXIDATION AND COMBUSTION Horia Metiu UNIVERSITY OF...To) 01-04-2012 to 31-03-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE CATALYSIS BY ATOMIC-SIZED CENTERS: METHANE ACTIVATION FOR PARTIAL OXIDATION AND COMBUSTION 5a...livelink/llisapi.dll DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved for public release. Final Technical Report, FA9550-12-1-0147 “ CATALYSIS BY ATOMIC-SIZED

  4. Solar Energy Research and Education Foundation. Final reports by task

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    von Reis, K.; Waegel, A.S.; Totten, M.

    1997-12-10

    This document contains final reports for the following tasks: kiosk for the children`s museum renewable energy exhibit and display, internet promotional and educational material, Aurora renewable energy science and engineering, CD-ROM training materials, presentations and traveling display, radio show `Energy Matters`, and newspaper articles and weekly news column.

  5. Final Report. Research in Theoretical High Energy Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greensite, Jeffrey P. [San Francisco State Univ., CA (United States); Golterman, Maarten F.L. [San Francisco State Univ., CA (United States)

    2015-04-30

    Grant-supported research in theoretical high-energy physics, conducted in the period 1992-2015 is briefly described, and a full listing of published articles result from those research activities is supplied.

  6. 76 FR 17808 - Final Vehicle Safety Rulemaking and Research Priority Plan 2011-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-31

    ... [Docket No. NHTSA-2009-0108] Final Vehicle Safety Rulemaking and Research Priority Plan 2011- 2013 AGENCY... availability. SUMMARY: This document announces the availability of the Final NHTSA Vehicle Safety and Fuel.... This Priority Plan is an update to the Final Vehicle Safety Rulemaking and Research Priority Plan 2009...

  7. 42 CFR 93.410 - Final HHS action with no settlement or finding of research misconduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Health and Human Services Research Misconduct Issues § 93.410 Final HHS action with no settlement or finding of research misconduct. When the final HHS action does not result in a settlement or finding of... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Final HHS action with no settlement or finding of...

  8. Environmental-performance research priorities: Wood products. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-15

    This report describes a research plan to establish environmental, energy, and economic performance measures for renewable building materials, and to identify management and technology alternatives to improve environmental performance in a cost-effective manner. The research plan is designed to: (1) collect environmental and economic data on all life-cycle stages of the materials, (2) ensure that the data follows consistent definitions and collection procedures, and (3) develop analytical procedures for life-cycle analysis to address environmental performance questions. The research will be subdivided into a number of individual project modules. The five processing stages of wood used to organize the research plan are: (1) resource management and harvesting; (2) processing; (3) design and construction of structures; (4) use, maintenance, and disposal; and (5) waste recycling. Individual research module descriptions are provided in the report, as well as assessment techniques, research standards and protocol, and research management. 13 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Aggregation Processes with Catalysis-Driven Decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang Rong; Zhuang Youyi; Ke Jianhong; Lin Zhenquan

    2009-01-01

    We propose a three-species aggregation model with catalysis-driven decomposition. Based on the mean-field rate equations, we investigate the evolution behavior of the system with the size-dependent catalysis-driven decomposition rate J(i; j; k) = Jijk v and the constant aggregation rates. The results show that the cluster size distribution of the species without decomposition can always obey the conventional scaling law in the case of 0 ≤ v ≤ 1, while the kinetic evolution of the decomposed species depends crucially on the index v. Moreover, the total size of the species without decomposition can keep a nonzero value at large times, while the total size of the decomposed species decreases exponentially with time and vanishes finally. (general)

  10. A research agenda for academic petroleum engineering programs. [Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calhoun, J.C. Jr.

    1990-03-31

    The development of a research agenda should be a direct way of portraying the scope of petroleum engineering, of identifying the critical technological issues faced by the profession,of elucidating the gaps between the existing research resources and the needs. and of outlining a program of research through which the petroleum engineering departments can be collectively of maximum service. Such an agenda would be of value to the profession of petroleum engineering, to industry and to government agencies, as well as to the faculty and students of the petroleum engineering departments. The purposes of the activity that led to this report, therefore, were to develop a statement to serve as a beginning research agenda for the petroleum engineering academic community; to bring together representatives of the petroleum engineering academic community to recognize the importance of developing a consensus posture with respect to research; and to provide a document that will assist in portraying to industry, government agencies and others the problems and needs of the petroleum engineering departments for conducting research. Contents of this report include; introduction; the background; the scope of petroleum engineering research; priority research topics and technological issues; non-technological research issues; and conclusions and recommendations.

  11. Characterization techniques for graphene-based materials in catalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maocong Hu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Graphene-based materials have been studied in a wide range of applications including catalysis due to the outstanding electronic, thermal, and mechanical properties. The unprecedented features of graphene-based catalysts, which are believed to be responsible for their superior performance, have been characterized by many techniques. In this article, we comprehensively summarized the characterization methods covering bulk and surface structure analysis, chemisorption ability determination, and reaction mechanism investigation. We reviewed the advantages/disadvantages of different techniques including Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and Diffuse Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (DRIFTS, X-Ray diffraction (XRD, X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS, atomic force microscopy (AFM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis, X-ray fluorescence (XRF, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET, and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM. The application of temperature-programmed reduction (TPR, CO chemisorption, and NH3/CO2-temperature-programmed desorption (TPD was also briefly introduced. Finally, we discussed the challenges and provided possible suggestions on choosing characterization techniques. This review provides key information to catalysis community to adopt suitable characterization techniques for their research.

  12. Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms Part II: Homogeneous Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, D. O.

    1976-01-01

    Suggests several mechanisms for catalysis by metal ion complexes. Discusses the principal factors of importance in these catalysis reactions and suggests reactions suitable for laboratory study. (MLH)

  13. Renovation and Expansion of the Caspary Research Building. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grassia, V. L.

    2004-02-07

    Critical to the Hospital's rebuilding efforts have been its public partners at the federal, state, and local government levels who have made a major financial commitment to renovating the Hospital's research infrastructure. To date, the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) has been awarded a total of nearly $8.5 million to create and equip new, state-of-the-art laboratories for scientific investigations. The modernization of the Hospital's research facilities was jump-started in 1998 with a $950,000 seed grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to renovate laboratories for immunology research in the Caspary Research Building. Coupled with a matching $5.5 million commitment from HSS, this infusion of NIH funding laid the groundwork for an overhaul of all of the Hospital's research space.

  14. Metallic nanosystems in catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukhtiyarov, Valerii I; Slin'ko, Mikhail G

    2001-01-01

    The reactivities of metallic nanosystems in catalytic processes are considered. The activities of nanoparticles in catalysis are due to their unique microstructures, electronic properties and high specific surfaces of the active centres. The problems of increasing the selectivities of catalytic processes are discussed using several nanosystems as examples. The mutual effects of components of bimetallic nanoparticles are discussed. The prospects for theoretical and experimental investigations into catalytic nanosystems and the construction of industrial catalysts based on them are evaluated. The bibliography includes 207 references.

  15. Concepts in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-06-01

    Cordew, (;, Paw anW C, T. H. Stoddart , J. Am, Chem. Soc,, 3 6272 (1960). 919R. L. Burwell, G, L. Hailer, K. C, Taylor. and J. F. Read, Advances in...1969). Burwell, R. L., A. B. Littlewood, M. Cordew, G. Pass, and C. T. H. Stoddart , J. Am, Chem. Soc., 82 (1960). Burwell, R, L. and C. J. Loner, Proc... Hannah , Ed., ACS Monograph 140, chapter 14, Reinhold, New York 1959. Moro.oka, Y., Y. Morikawa, and A. Osaki, J. Catalysis, 7 (1967). Moro.oka, Y. and A

  16. Solar heating and cooling commercialization research program. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, D.L.; Tragert, W.; Weir, S.

    1979-11-01

    The Solar Heating and Cooling Commercialization Research Program has addressed a recognized need to accelerate the commercialization of solar products. The development of communication techniques and materials for a target group of heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) wholesalers and distributors has been the primary effort. A summary of the program, the approach to the development of the techniques and materials, the conclusions derived from seminar feedback, the development of additional research activities and reports and the recommendations for follow-on activities are presented. The appendices offer detailed information on specific elements of the research effort.

  17. Final report of 2002 small business innovation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Kyu Seok; Sim, Cheul Muu; Lim, Chang Hwan

    2003-07-01

    The purpose of the small business innovation research is to help and support small business for the development of the advanced technologies. In Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, sixteen companies are joined in this consortium for thirteen projects in year 2002. As a result of the investigation, application of the Gamma-ray for food products, real-time imaging system, micro laser, laser rangefinder, compact VOC analyzer, functional food, nano-sized metal powder, micorwave humidity sensor, supersonic impactor, etc have been developed. Several patents as well as research papers are produced and variety of prototype systems are developed

  18. Catalysis and prebiotic RNA synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, James P.

    1993-01-01

    The essential role of catalysis for the origins of life is discussed. The status of the prebiotic synthesis of 2',5'- and 3'5'-linked oligomers of RNA is reviewed. Examples of the role of metal ion and mineral catalysis in RNA oligomer formation are discussed.

  19. 76 FR 38134 - Final Priorities; Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program-Disability...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Final Priorities; Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program--Disability Rehabilitation Research Projects, etc. AGENCY: Office of Special Education and... Numbers: 84.133A-6, 84.133A-7, and 84.133A-8] Final Priorities; Disability and Rehabilitation Research...

  20. Development of catalysts and ligands for enantioselective gold catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Ming; Lackner, Aaron D; Toste, F Dean

    2014-03-18

    During the past decade, the use of Au(I) complexes for the catalytic activation of C-C π-bonds has been investigated intensely. Over this time period, the development of homogeneous gold catalysis has been extraordinarily rapid and has yielded a host of mild and selective methods for the formation of carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bonds. The facile formation of new bonds facilitated by gold naturally led to efforts toward rendering these transformations enantioselective. In this Account, we survey the development of catalysts and ligands for enantioselective gold catalysis by our research group as well as related work by others. We also discuss some of our strategies to address the challenges of enantioselective gold(I) catalysis. Early on, our work with enantioselective gold-catalyzed transformations focused on bis(phosphinegold) complexes derived from axially chiral scaffolds. Although these complexes were highly successful in some reactions like cyclopropanation, the careful choice of the weakly coordinating ligand (or counterion) was necessary to obtain high levels of enantioselectivity for the case of allene hydroamination. These counterion effects led us to use the anion itself as a source of chirality, which was successful in the case of allene hydroalkoxylation. In general, these tactics enhance the steric influence around the reactive gold center beyond the two-coordinate ligand environment. The use of binuclear complexes allowed us to use the second gold center and its associated ligand (or counterion) to exert a further steric influence. In a similar vein, we employed a chiral anion (in place of or in addition to a chiral ligand) to move the chiral information closer to the reactive center. In order to expand the scope of reactions amenable to enantioselective gold catalysis to cycloadditions and other carbocyclization processes, we also developed a new class of mononuclear phosphite and phosphoramidite ligands to supplement the previously widely

  1. Hawaii Integrated Biofuels Research Program: Final Subcontract Report, Phase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-01

    This report is a compilation of studies done to develop an integrated set of strategies for the production of energy from renewable resources in Hawaii. Because of the close coordination between this program and other ongoing DOE research, the work will have broad-based applicability to the entire United States.

  2. Electrorheological (ER) fluids: A research needs assessment. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krieger, I.M.; Collins, E.A. [Consultec Scientific, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1993-05-01

    This report consists of seven sections: (1) Executive Summary, (2) Introduction, (3) Overview, (4) Recommendations, (5) Panelist Reports, (6) Overseas Research and Development, and (7) Extended Bibliography. The Appendix contains the reports of site visits and contacts and other supplementary documents.

  3. Postdoctoral Fellowship Program in Educational Research. Final Technical Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, William P.

    During his postdoctoral fellowship year, Dr. Morgan took formal course work in computer programing, advanced research design, projective techniques, the physiology of aging, and hypnosis. He also attended weekly seminars in the Institute of Environmental Stress and conducted an investigation entitled "The Alteration of Perceptual and Metabolic…

  4. Catalysis and Downsizing in Mg-Based Hydrogen Storage Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianding Li

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium (Mg-based materials are promising candidates for hydrogen storage due to the low cost, high hydrogen storage capacity and abundant resources of magnesium for the realization of a hydrogen society. However, the sluggish kinetics and strong stability of the metal-hydrogen bonding of Mg-based materials hinder their application, especially for onboard storage. Many researchers are devoted to overcoming these challenges by numerous methods. Here, this review summarizes some advances in the development of Mg-based hydrogen storage materials related to downsizing and catalysis. In particular, the focus is on how downsizing and catalysts affect the hydrogen storage capacity, kinetics and thermodynamics of Mg-based hydrogen storage materials. Finally, the future development and applications of Mg-based hydrogen storage materials is discussed.

  5. Fossil energy biotechnology: A research needs assessment. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-01

    The Office of Program Analysis of the US Department of Energy commissioned this study to evaluate and prioritize research needs in fossil energy biotechnology. The objectives were to identify research initiatives in biotechnology that offer timely and strategic options for the more efficient and effective uses of the Nation`s fossil resource base, particularly the early identification of new and novel applications of biotechnology for the use or conversion of domestic fossil fuels. Fossil energy biotechnology consists of a number of diverse and distinct technologies, all related by the common denominator -- biocatalysis. The expert panel organized 14 technical subjects into three interrelated biotechnology programs: (1) upgrading the fuel value of fossil fuels; (2) bioconversion of fossil feedstocks and refined products to added value chemicals; and, (3) the development of environmental management strategies to minimize and mitigate the release of toxic and hazardous petrochemical wastes.

  6. Assessment of research needs for advanced heterogeneous catalysts for energy applications. Final report: Volume 1, Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, G.A.

    1994-04-01

    This report assesses the direction, technical content, and priority of research needs judged to provide the best chance of yielding new and improved heterogeneous catalysts for energy-related applications over a period of 5--20 years. It addresses issues of energy conservation, alternate fuels and feedstocks, and the economics and applications that could alleviate pollution from energy processes. Recommended goals are defined in 3 major, closely linked research thrusts: catalytic science, environmental protection by catalysis, and industrial catalytic applications. This volume provides a comprehensive executive summary, including research recommendations.

  7. Market research on biogas valorizations and methanization. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-09-01

    This market research aims at giving an overview of the existing methanization installations and of their dynamics in France, at assessing biogas production and use, at analyzing the methanization market, and at defining development perspectives for this sector by 2020. Based on a survey of methanization installations, on interviews with many actors of this sector, and on a seminar organized on this topic, this report presents and comments market data for biogas valorization and methanization in different sectors: household, agricultural, and industrial and waste water processing plants. It comments evolution trends by 2020 for these sectors, and the role that the emerging sector of centralized methanization could have in the years to come

  8. Final Technical Report for the MIT Annular Fuel Research Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mujid S. Kazimi; Pavel Hejzlar

    2008-01-01

    MIT-NFC-PR-082 (January 2006) Abstract This summary provides an overview of the results of the U.S. DOE funded NERI (Nuclear Research Energy Initiative) program on development of the internally and externally cooled annular fuel for high power density PWRs. This new fuel was proposed by MIT to allow a substantial increase in power density (on the order of 30% or higher) while maintaining or improving safety margins. A comprehensive study was performed by a team consisting of MIT (lead organization), Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Gamma Engineering Corporation, Framatome ANP(formerly Duke Engineering) and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

  9. Final Technical Report for Center for Plasma Edge Simulation Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pankin, Alexei Y.; Bateman, Glenn; Kritz, Arnold H.

    2012-02-29

    The CPES research carried out by the Lehigh fusion group has sought to satisfy the evolving requirements of the CPES project. Overall, the Lehigh group has focused on verification and validation of the codes developed and/or integrated in the CPES project. Consequently, contacts and interaction with experimentalists have been maintained during the course of the project. Prof. Arnold Kritz, the leader of the Lehigh Fusion Group, has participated in the executive management of the CPES project. The code development and simulation studies carried out by the Lehigh fusion group are described in more detail in the sections below.

  10. Methods of economic analysis applied to fusion research. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    In this and previous efforts ECON has provided economic assessment of a fusion research program. This phase of study focused on two tasks, the first concerned with the economics of fusion in an economy that relies heavily upon synthetic fuels, and the second concerned with the overall economic effects of pursuing soft energy technologies instead of hard technologies. This report is organized in two parts, the first entitled An Economic Analysis of Coproduction of Fusion-Electric Energy and Other Products, and the second entitled Arguments Associated with the Choice of Potential Energy Futures

  11. Network-based collaborative research environment LDRD final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, B.R.; McDonald, M.J.

    1997-09-01

    The Virtual Collaborative Environment (VCE) and Distributed Collaborative Workbench (DCW) are new technologies that make it possible for diverse users to synthesize and share mechatronic, sensor, and information resources. Using these technologies, university researchers, manufacturers, design firms, and others can directly access and reconfigure systems located throughout the world. The architecture for implementing VCE and DCW has been developed based on the proposed National Information Infrastructure or Information Highway and a tool kit of Sandia-developed software. Further enhancements to the VCE and DCW technologies will facilitate access to other mechatronic resources. This report describes characteristics of VCE and DCW and also includes background information about the evolution of these technologies.

  12. Seismic safety margins research program. Phase I final report - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.D.; Dong, R.G.; Bernreuter, D.L.; Bohn, M.P.; Chuang, T.Y.; Cummings, G.E.; Johnson, J.J.; Mensing, R.W.; Wells, J.E.

    1981-04-01

    The Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) is a multiyear, multiphase program whose overall objective is to develop improved methods for seismic safety assessments of nuclear power plants, using a probabilistic computational procedure. The program is being carried out at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and is sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Phase I of the SSMRP was successfully completed in January 1981: A probabilistic computational procedure for the seismic risk assessment of nuclear power plants has been developed and demonstrated. The methodology is implemented by three computer programs: HAZARD, which assesses the seismic hazard at a given site, SMACS, which computes in-structure and subsystem seismic responses, and SEISIM, which calculates system failure probabilities and radioactive release probabilities, given (1) the response results of SMACS, (2) a set of event trees, (3) a family of fault trees, (4) a set of structural and component fragility descriptions, and (5) a curve describing the local seismic hazard. The practicality of this methodology was demonstrated by computing preliminary release probabilities for Unit 1 of the Zion Nuclear Power Plant north of Chicago, Illinois. Studies have begun aimed at quantifying the sources of uncertainty in these computations. Numerous side studies were undertaken to examine modeling alternatives, sources of error, and available analysis techniques. Extensive sets of data were amassed and evaluated as part of projects to establish seismic input parameters and to produce the fragility curves. (author)

  13. Ambient Weather Model Research and Development: Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Stel Nathan; Wade, John Edward

    1990-08-31

    Ratings for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) transmission lines are based upon the IEEE Standard for Calculation of Bare Overhead Conductor Temperatures and Ampacity under Steady-State Conditions (1985). This steady-state model is very sensitive to the ambient weather conditions of temperature and wind speed. The model does not account for wind yaw, turbulence, or conductor roughness as proposed by Davis (1976) for a real time rating system. The objective of this research has been to determine (1) how conservative the present rating system is for typical ambient weather conditions, (2) develop a probability-based methodology, (3) compile available weather data into a compatible format, and (4) apply the rating methodology to a hypothetical line. The potential benefit from this research is to rate transmission lines statistically which will allow BPA to take advantage of any unknown thermal capacity. The present deterministic weather model is conservative overall and studies suggest a refined model will uncover additional unknown capacity. 14 refs., 40 figs., 7 tabs.

  14. Practical Engineering Aspects of Catalysis in Microreactors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Křišťál, Jiří; Stavárek, Petr; Vajglová, Zuzana; Vondráčková, Magdalena; Pavlorková, Jana; Jiřičný, Vladimír

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 12 (2015), s. 9357-9371 ISSN 0922-6168. [Pannonian Symposium on Catalysis /12./. Castle Trest, 16.09.2014-20.09.2014] Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : heterogeneous catalysis * homogeneous catalysis * photo catalysis Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.833, year: 2015

  15. Final report. [Research in theoretical and experimental elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This report gives summaries of particle physics research conducted by different group members for Task A. A summary of work on the CLEO experiment and detector is included for Task B along with a list of CLEO publications. During the present grant period for Task C, the authors had responsibility for the design, assembly, and programming of the high-resolution spectrometer which looks for narrow peaks in the output of the cavity in the LLNL experiment. They successfully carried out this task. Velocity peaks are expected in the spectrum of dark matter axions on Earth. The computing proposal (Task S) is submitted in support of the High Energy Experiment (CLEO, Fermilab, CMS) and the Theory tasks

  16. [Research in theoretical and experimental elementary particle physics. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-11-01

    This report gives summaries of particle physics research conducted by different group members for Task A. A summary of work on the CLEO experiment and detector is included for Task B along with a list of CLEO publications. During the present grant period for Task C, the authors had responsibility for the design, assembly, and programming of the high-resolution spectrometer which looks for narrow peaks in the output of the cavity in the LLNL experiment. They successfully carried out this task. Velocity peaks are expected in the spectrum of dark matter axions on Earth. The computing proposal (Task S) is submitted in support of the High Energy Experiment (CLEO, Fermilab, CMS) and the Theory tasks.

  17. Fundamental research of decision support systems: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurstedt, H.A. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Through an iterative application of Decision Support Systems (DSS) apparatus and evolution of DSS concepts, we redefined DSS from a systems perspective. By focusing on successful DSS and the definition of success for the newly-defined DSS, we generated a paradigm for understanding, applying, and improving DSS. The significance of the research is that we now: (1) understand the various roles management tools play within the new DSS concept; (2) recognize the need for characterizing the domain of responsibility of a manager to obtain a successful DSS; and (3) have learned special characteristics of government agencies like Nuclear Materials (NM) to identify what features of the new DSS concept can be expected to improve performance

  18. Simulations of chemical catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gregory K.

    This dissertation contains simulations of chemical catalysis in both biological and heterogeneous contexts. A mixture of classical, quantum, and hybrid techniques are applied to explore the energy profiles and compare possible chemical mechanisms both within the context of human and bacterial enzymes, as well as exploring surface reactions on a metal catalyst. A brief summary of each project follows. Project 1 - Bacterial Enzyme SpvC The newly discovered SpvC effector protein from Salmonella typhimurium interferes with the host immune response by dephosphorylating mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) with a beta-elimination mechanism. The dynamics of the enzyme substrate complex of the SpvC effector is investigated with a 3.2 ns molecular dynamics simulation, which reveals that the phosphorylated peptide substrate is tightly held in the active site by a hydrogen bond network and the lysine general base is positioned for the abstraction of the alpha hydrogen. The catalysis is further modeled with density functional theory (DFT) in a truncated active-site model at the B3LYP/6-31 G(d,p) level of theory. The truncated model suggested the reaction proceeds via a single transition state. After including the enzyme environment in ab initio QM/MM studies, it was found to proceed via an E1cB-like pathway, in which the carbanion intermediate is stabilized by an enzyme oxyanion hole provided by Lys104 and Tyr158 of SpvC. Project 2 - Human Enzyme CDK2 Phosphorylation reactions catalyzed by kinases and phosphatases play an indispensable role in cellular signaling, and their malfunctioning is implicated in many diseases. Ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical studies are reported for the phosphoryl transfer reaction catalyzed by a cyclin-dependent kinase, CDK2. Our results suggest that an active-site Asp residue, rather than ATP as previously proposed, serves as the general base to activate the Ser nucleophile. The corresponding transition state features a

  19. Magnetic catalysis and inverse magnetic catalysis in QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, N.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the effects of strong magnetic fields on the QCD phase structure at vanishing density by solving the gluon and quark gap equations. The chiral crossover temperature as well as the chiral condensate is computed. For asymptotically large magnetic fields we find magnetic catalysis, while we find inverse magnetic catalysis for intermediate magnetic fields. Moreover, for large magnetic fields the chiral phase transition for massless quarks turns into a crossover. The underlying mechanisms are then investigated analytically within a few simplifications of the full numerical analysis. We find that a combination of gluon screening effects and the weakening of the strong coupling is responsible for the phenomenon of inverse catalysis seen in lattice studies. In turn, the magnetic catalysis at large magnetic field is already indicated by simple arguments based on dimensionality. (author)

  20. Asymmetric trienamine catalysis: new opportunities in amine catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Indresh; Ramaraju, Panduga; Mir, Nisar A

    2013-02-07

    Amine catalysis, through HOMO-activating enamine and LUMO-activating iminium-ion formation, is receiving increasing attention among other organocatalytic strategies, for the activation of unmodified carbonyl compounds. Particularly, the HOMO-raising activation concept has been applied to the greatest number of asymmetric transformations through enamine, dienamine, and SOMO-activation strategies. Recently, trienamine catalysis, an extension of amine catalysis, has emerged as a powerful tool for synthetic chemists with a novel activation strategy for polyenals/polyenones. In this review article, we discuss the initial developments of trienamine catalysis for highly asymmetric Diels-Alder reactions with different dienophiles and emerging opportunities for other types of cycloadditions and cascade reactions.

  1. [Research and workshop on alternative fuels for aviation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-09-01

    The Renewable Aviation Fuels Development Center (RAFDC) at Baylor University was granted U. S. Department of Energy (US DOE) and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) funds for research and development to improve the efficiency in ethanol powered aircraft, measure performance and compare emissions of ethanol, Ethyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (ETBE) and 100 LL aviation gasoline. The premise of the initial proposal was to use a test stand owned by Engine Components Inc. (ECI) based in San Antonio, Texas. After the grant was awarded, ECI decided to close down its test stand facility. Since there were no other test stands available at that time, RAFDC was forced to find additional support to build its own test stand. Baylor University provided initial funds for the test stand building. Other obstacles had to be overcome in order to initiate the program. The price of the emission testing equipment had increased substantially beyond the initial quote. Rosemount Analytical Inc. gave RAFDC an estimate of $120,000.00 for a basic emission testing package. RAFDC had to find additional funding to purchase this equipment. The electronic ignition unit also presented a series of time consuming problems. Since at that time there were no off-the-shelf units of this type available, one had to be specially ordered and developed. FAA funds were used to purchase a Super Flow dynamometer. Due to the many unforeseen obstacles, much more time and effort than originally anticipated had to be dedicated to the project, with much of the work done on a volunteer basis. Many people contributed their time to the program. One person, mainly responsible for the initial design of the test stand, was a retired engineer from Allison with extensive aircraft engine test stand experience. Also, many Baylor students volunteered to assemble the. test stand and continue to be involved in the current test program. Although the program presented many challenges, which resulted in delays, the RAFDC's test

  2. Research in Neutrino Physics and Particle Astrophysics: Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kearns, Edward [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    2016-06-30

    The Boston University Neutrino Physics and Particle Astrophysics Group investigates the fundamental laws of particle physics using natural and man-made neutrinos and rare processes such as proton decay. The primary instrument for this research is the massive Super-Kamiokande (SK) water Cherenkov detector, operating since 1996 at the Kamioka Neutrino Observatory, one kilometer underground in a mine in Japan. We study atmospheric neutrinos from cosmic rays, which were first used to discover that neutrinos have mass, as recognized by the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics. Our latest measurements with atmospheric neutrinos are giving valuable information, complementary to longbaseline experiments, on the ordering of massive neutrino states and as to whether neutrinos violate CP symmetry. We have studied a variety of proton decay modes, including the most frequently predicted modes such as p → e+π0 and p → ν K+, as well as more exotic baryon number violating processes such as dinucleon decay and neutronantineutron oscillation. We search for neutrinos from dark matter annihilation or decay in the universe. Our group has made significant contributions to detector operation, particularly in the area of electronics. Most recently, we have contributed to planning for an upgrade to the SK detector by the addition of gadolinium to the water, which will enable efficient neutron capture detection.

  3. Lower Columbia River Terminal Fisheries Research Project : Final Environmental Assessment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-04-01

    This notice announces BPA`S`s decision to fund the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and the Clatsop Economic Development Committee for the Lower Columbia River Terminal Fisheries Research Project (Project). The Project will continue the testing of various species/stocks, rearing regimes, and harvest options for terminal fisheries, as a means to increase lower river sport and commercial harvest of hatchery fish, while providing both greater protection of weaker wild stocks and increasing the return of upriver salmon runs to potential Zone 6 Treaty fisheries. The Project involves relocating hatchery smolts to new, additional pen locations in three bays/sloughs in the lower Columbia River along both the Oregon and Washington sides. The sites are Blind Slough and Tongue Point in Clatsop County, Oregon, and Grays Bay/Deep River, Wahkiakum County, Washington. The smolts will be acclimated for various lengths of time in the net pens and released from these sites. The Project will expand upon an existing terminal fisheries project in Youngs Bay, Oregon. The Project may be expanded to other sites in the future, depending on the results of this initial expansion. BPA`S has determined the project is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and BPA`S is issuing this FONSI.

  4. DNA-based hybrid catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rioz-Martínez, Ana; Roelfes, Gerard

    2015-04-01

    In the past decade, DNA-based hybrid catalysis has merged as a promising novel approach to homogeneous (asymmetric) catalysis. A DNA hybrid catalysts comprises a transition metal complex that is covalently or supramolecularly bound to DNA. The chiral microenvironment and the second coordination sphere interactions provided by the DNA are key to achieve high enantioselectivities and, often, additional rate accelerations in catalysis. Nowadays, current efforts are focused on improved designs, understanding the origin of the enantioselectivity and DNA-induced rate accelerations, expanding the catalytic scope of the concept and further increasing the practicality of the method for applications in synthesis. Herein, the recent developments will be reviewed and the perspectives for the emerging field of DNA-based hybrid catalysis will be discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A Survey Course in Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaates, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    Describes a 10-week survey course in catalysis for chemical engineering and chemistry students designed to show how modern chemistry and chemical engineering interact in the ongoing development of industrial catalysts. Includes course outline and instructional strategies. (Author/JN)

  6. Asymmetric cation-binding catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira, Maria Teresa; Lee, Jiwoong

    2017-01-01

    solvents, thus increasing their applicability in synthesis. The expansion of this concept to chiral polyethers led to the emergence of asymmetric cation-binding catalysis, where chiral counter anions are generated from metal salts, particularly using BINOL-based polyethers. Alkali metal salts, namely KF...... and KCN, are selectively bound to the catalyst, providing exceptionally high enantioselectivities for kinetic resolutions, elimination reactions (fluoride base), and Strecker synthesis (cyanide nucleophile). Asymmetric cation-binding catalysis was recently expanded to silicon-based reagents, enabling...

  7. Enhanced Micellar Catalysis LDRD.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betty, Rita G.; Tucker, Mark D; Taggart, Gretchen; Kinnan, Mark K.; Glen, Crystal Chanea; Rivera, Danielle; Sanchez, Andres; Alam, Todd Michael

    2012-12-01

    The primary goals of the Enhanced Micellar Catalysis project were to gain an understanding of the micellar environment of DF-200, or similar liquid CBW surfactant-based decontaminants, as well as characterize the aerosolized DF-200 droplet distribution and droplet chemistry under baseline ITW rotary atomization conditions. Micellar characterization of limited surfactant solutions was performed externally through the collection and measurement of Small Angle X-Ray Scattering (SAXS) images and Cryo-Transmission Electron Microscopy (cryo-TEM) images. Micellar characterization was performed externally at the University of Minnesotas Characterization Facility Center, and at the Argonne National Laboratory Advanced Photon Source facility. A micellar diffusion study was conducted internally at Sandia to measure diffusion constants of surfactants over a concentration range, to estimate the effective micelle diameter, to determine the impact of individual components to the micellar environment in solution, and the impact of combined components to surfactant phase behavior. Aerosolized DF-200 sprays were characterized for particle size and distribution and limited chemical composition. Evaporation rates of aerosolized DF-200 sprays were estimated under a set of baseline ITW nozzle test system parameters.

  8. High energy physics research. Final report, October 1, 1969--December 31, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    The goal of this research was to understand the fundamental constituents of matter and their interactions. First, a brief history of the high energy research at Princeton University is presented. Next, the extensive research covered in this 21 year period is summarized. Finally, a list of all publications issued during this period is presented.

  9. High energy physics research. Final report, October 1, 1969--December 31, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    The goal of this research was to understand the fundamental constituents of matter and their interactions. First, a brief history of the high energy research at Princeton University is presented. Next, the extensive research covered in this 21 year period is summarized. Finally, a list of all publications issued during this period is presented

  10. Applied research and evaluation of process concepts for liquefaction and gasification of western coals. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiser, W. H.

    1980-09-01

    Fourteen sections, including five subsections, of the final report covering work done between June 1, 1975 to July 31, 1980 on research programs in coal gasification and liquefaction have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  11. Effects of Climate Change on Aquatic Invasive Species and Implications for Management and Research (Final Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA announced the availability of the final report, Effects of Climate Change on Aquatic Invasive Species and Implications for Management and Research . This report reviews available literature on climate-change effects on aquatic invasive species (AIS) and examines sta...

  12. Francois Garin: Pioneer work in catalysis through synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazin, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Starting from the late seventies, the progressively increased availability of beamlines dedicated to X-ray absorption spectroscopy allowed the execution of experiments in chemistry. In this manuscript, I describe the contribution of Francois Garin at the frontier of heterogeneous catalysis and synchrotron radiation. Working at LURE as a scientific in charge of a beamline dedicated to X-ray absorption spectroscopy during almost twenty years and thus, having the opportunity to discuss with research groups working in heterogeneous catalysis in Europe as well as in the United States, it was quite easy to show that his work is clearly at the origin of current research in heterogeneous catalysis, not only in France, but in different synchrotron radiation centres. (authors)

  13. Graphitic carbon nitride "reloaded": emerging applications beyond (photo)catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Wang, Hongqiang; Antonietti, Markus

    2016-04-21

    Despite being one of the oldest materials described in the chemical literature, graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) has just recently experienced a renaissance as a highly active photocatalyst, and the metal-free polymer was shown to be able to generate hydrogen under visible light. The semiconductor nature of g-C3N4 has triggered tremendous endeavors on its structural manipulation for enhanced photo(electro)chemical performance, aiming at an affordable clean energy future. While pursuing the stem of g-C3N4 related catalysis (photocatalysis, electrocatalysis and photoelectrocatalysis), a number of emerging intrinsic properties of g-C3N4 are certainly interesting, but less well covered, and we believe that these novel applications outside of conventional catalysis can be favorably exploited as well. Thanks to the general efforts devoted to the exploration and enrichment of g-C3N4 based chemistry, the boundaries of this area have been possibly pushed far beyond what people could imagine in the beginning. This review strives to cover the achievements of g-C3N4 related materials in these unconventional application fields for depicting the broader future of these metal-free and fully stable semiconductors. This review starts with the general protocols to engineer g-C3N4 micro/nanostructures for practical use, and then discusses the newly disclosed applications in sensing, bioimaging, novel solar energy exploitation including photocatalytic coenzyme regeneration, templating, and carbon nitride based devices. Finally, we attempt an outlook on possible further developments in g-C3N4 based research.

  14. Shape-controlled nanostructures in heterogeneous catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaera, Francisco

    2013-10-01

    Nanotechnologies have provided new methods for the preparation of nanomaterials with well-defined sizes and shapes, and many of those procedures have been recently implemented for applications in heterogeneous catalysis. The control of nanoparticle shape in particular offers the promise of a better definition of catalytic activity and selectivity through the optimization of the structure of the catalytic active site. This extension of new nanoparticle synthetic procedures to catalysis is in its early stages, but has shown some promising leads already. Here, we survey the major issues associated with this nanotechnology-catalysis synergy. First, we discuss new possibilities associated with distinguishing between the effects originating from nanoparticle size versus those originating from nanoparticle shape. Next, we survey the information available to date on the use of well-shaped metal and non-metal nanoparticles as active phases to control the surface atom ensembles that define the catalytic site in different catalytic applications. We follow with a brief review of the use of well-defined porous materials for the control of the shape of the space around that catalytic site. A specific example is provided to illustrate how new selective catalysts based on shape-defined nanoparticles can be designed from first principles by using fundamental mechanistic information on the reaction of interest obtained from surface-science experiments and quantum-mechanics calculations. Finally, we conclude with some thoughts on the state of the field in terms of the advances already made, the future potentials, and the possible limitations to be overcome. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Analysis of final year DVM research projects submitted to the Faculty ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study analyzed the intellectual output of the undergraduate final year students. research projects submitted to the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, from 1994 to 2004. The findings of the study show that a total of 194 research projects were produced within the period under study.

  16. Analysis of final year DVM research projects submitted to the Faculty ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Central Research Laboratory

    This study analyzed the intellectual output of the undergraduate final year students‟ research projects submitted to the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, from 1994 to 2004. The findings of the study show that a total of 194 research projects were produced within the period under study.

  17. 76 FR 33744 - Final Priority; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR)-Disability...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-09

    ... living for individuals with disabilities and their families. Types of Priorities When inviting... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION [CFDA Number: 84.133A-09] Final Priority; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR)--Disability Rehabilitation Research Project (DRRP)--Disability in...

  18. Catalysis and sustainable (green) chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Centi, Gabriele; Perathoner, Siglinda [Dipartimento di Chimica Industriale ed Ingegneria dei Materiali, University of Messina, Salita Sperone 31, 98166 Messina (Italy)

    2003-01-15

    Catalysis is a key technology to achieve the objectives of sustainable (green) chemistry. After introducing the concepts of sustainable (green) chemistry and a brief assessment of new sustainable chemical technologies, the relationship between catalysis and sustainable (green) chemistry is discussed and illustrated via an analysis of some selected and relevant examples. Emphasis is also given to the concept of catalytic technologies for scaling-down chemical processes, in order to develop sustainable production processes which reduce the impact on the environment to an acceptable level that allows self-depuration processes of the living environment.

  19. Aromatic Chlorosulfonylation by Photoredox Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Májek, Michal; Neumeier, Michael; Jacobi von Wangelin, Axel

    2017-01-10

    Visible-light photoredox catalysis enables the efficient synthesis of arenesulfonyl chlorides from anilines. The new protocol involves the convenient in situ preparation of arenediazonium salts (from anilines) and the reactive gases SO 2 and HCl (from aqueous SOCl 2 ). The photocatalytic chlorosulfonylation operates at mild conditions (room temperature, acetonitrile/water) with low catalyst loading. Various functional groups are tolerated (e.g., halides, azides, nitro groups, CF 3 , SF 5 , esters, heteroarenes). Theoretical and experimental studies support a photoredox-catalysis mechanism. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Photoredox Catalysis in Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, photoredox catalysis has come to the forefront in organic chemistry as a powerful strategy for the activation of small molecules. In a general sense, these approaches rely on the ability of metal complexes and organic dyes to convert visible light into chemical energy by engaging in single-electron transfer with organic substrates, thereby generating reactive intermediates. In this Perspective, we highlight the unique ability of photoredox catalysis to expedite the development of completely new reaction mechanisms, with particular emphasis placed on multicatalytic strategies that enable the construction of challenging carbon–carbon and carbon–heteroatom bonds. PMID:27477076

  1. Research in Support of Forest Management. Final report, 1986--1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marx, D.H. [comp.

    1991-12-01

    This final research report on Research in Support of Forest Management for the Savannah River Forest Station covers the period 1986 thru 1991. This report provides a list of publications resulting from research accomplished by SEFES scientists and their cooperators, and a list of continuing research study titles. Output is 22 research publications, 23 publications involving technology transfer of results to various user groups, and 11 manuscripts in pre-publication format. DOE funding contributed approximately 15 percent of the total cost of the research.

  2. Cooperative research in coal liquefaction infratechnology and generic technology development: Final report, October 1, 1985 to December 31, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sendlein, L.V.A.

    1987-06-29

    During the first year of its research program, the Consortium for Fossil Fuel Liquefaction Science has made significant progress in many areas of coal liquefaction and coal structure research. Research topics for which substantial progress has been made include integrated coal structure and liquefaction studies, investigation of differential liquefaction processes, development and application of sophisticated techniques for structural analysis, computer analysis of multivariate data, biodesulfurization of coal, catalysis studies, co-processing of coal and crude oil, coal dissolution and extraction processes, coal depolymerization, determination of the liquefaction characteristics of many US coals for use in a liquefaction database, and completion of a retrospective technology assessment for direct coal liquefaction. These and related topics are discussed in considerably more detail in the remainder of this report. Individual projects are processed separately for the data base.

  3. KCC1: First Nanoparticle developed by KAUST Catalysis Center

    KAUST Repository

    Basset, Jean-Marie

    2010-08-01

    KCC1 is the first Nanoparticle developed by KAUST Catalysis Center. Director of KAUST Catalysis Center, Dr. Jean-Marie Basset, Senior Research Scientist at KCC, Dr. Vivek Polshettiwar, and Dr. Dongkyu Cha of the Advanced Nanofabrication Imaging & Characterization Core Laboratory discuss the details of this recent discovery. This video was produced by KAUST Visualization Laboratory and KAUST Technology Transfer and Innovation - Terence McElwee, Director, Technology Transfer and Innovation - IP@kaust.edu.sa This technology is part of KAUST\\'s technology commercialization program that seeks to stimulate development and commercial use of KAUST-developed technologies. For more information email us at ip@kaust.edu.sa.

  4. Microstructuring of thermo-mechanically highly stressed surfaces final report of the DFG research group 576

    CERN Document Server

    Rienäcker, Adrian; Knoll, Gunter; Bach, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Maier, Hans; Reithmeier, Eduard; Dinkelacker, Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    This contributed volume presents the final research results of the DFG Research Group 576, which is a joint initiative of five different institutes of the Leibniz Universität Hannover and the Universität Kassel, Germany. The research of the DFG Research Group 576 focuses on improving the tribological behavior of thermomechanically highly stressed surfaces, particularly on cylinder liner for combustion engines. The target audience primarily comprises researchers and experts in the field but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students who want to specialize in the field.

  5. DNA-based asymmetric catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, Arnold J.; Megens, Rik P.; Feringa, Ben L.; Roelfes, Gerard

    2010-01-01

    The unique chiral structure of DNA has been a source of inspiration for the development of a new class of bio-inspired catalysts. The novel concept of DNA-based asymmetric catalysis, which was introduced only five years ago, has been applied successfully in a variety of catalytic enantioselective

  6. Transition Metal Complexes and Catalysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 9. Transition Metal Complexes and Catalysis. Balaji R Jagirdar. General Article Volume 4 Issue 9 ... Author Affiliations. Balaji R Jagirdar1. Department of Inorganic & Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  7. Molecular Mechanism of Heterogeneous Catalysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 13; Issue 6. Molecular Mechanism of Heterogeneous Catalysis - The 2007 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. R S Swathi K L Sebastian. General Article Volume 13 Issue 6 June 2008 pp 548-560 ...

  8. Research Project 'RB research nuclear reactor' (operation and maintenance), Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This final report covers operation and maintenance activities at the RB reactor during period from 1981-1985. First part covers the RB reactor operation, detailed description of reactor components, fuel, heavy water, reactor vessel, cooling system, equipment and instrumentation, auxiliary systems. It contains data concerned with dosimetry and radiation protection, reactor staff, and financial data. Second part deals maintenance, regular control and testing of reactor equipment and instrumentation. Third part is devoted to basic experimental options and utilization of the RB reactor including training

  9. Tritium inventory in fusion reactors. Summary report of the final research coordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.E.H.

    2007-11-01

    Detailed discussions were held during the final Research Coordination Meeting (RCM) at IAEA Headquarters on 25-27 September 2006, with the aim of reviewing the work accomplished by the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Tritium Inventory in Fusion Reactors'. Participants summarized the specific results obtained during the final phase of the CRP, and considered the impact of the data generated on the design of fusion devices. Conclusions were formulated and several specific recommendations for future fusion machines were agreed. The discussions, conclusions and recommendations of the RCM are briefly described in this report. (author)

  10. A conceptual translation of homogeneous catalysis into heterogeneous catalysis: homogeneous-like heterogeneous gold nanoparticle catalyst induced by ceria supporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen-Xing; Xue, Wei; Guan, Bing-Tao; Shi, Fu-Bo; Shi, Zhang-Jie; Jiang, Hong; Yan, Chun-Hua

    2013-02-07

    Translation of homogeneous catalysis into heterogeneous catalysis is a promising solution to green and sustainable development in chemical industry. For this purpose, noble metal nanoparticles represent a new frontier in catalytic transformations. Many challenges remain for researchers to transform noble metal nanoparticles of heterogeneous catalytic active sites into ionic species of homogeneous catalytic active sites. We report here a successful design on translating homogeneous gold catalysis into a heterogeneous system with a clear understanding of the catalytic pathway. This study initiates a novel concept to immobilize a homogeneous catalyst based on electron transfer between supporting base and supported nanoparticles. Meanwhile, on the basis of theoretical calculation, it has deepened the understanding of the interactions between noble metal nanoparticles and the catalyst support.

  11. Undergraduate research internships to support exploratory research in transportation engineering : project final report, Sept. 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    The Case Western Reserve University Department of Civil Engineering is in the process of expanding its teaching and research activities, Transportation Engineering as part of its initiative in the overall area of Infrastructure Performance and Reliab...

  12. Brandon Research, Inc. Orthopedic Implant Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, W.R.

    1999-04-22

    The project was a joint research effort between the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Kansas City Plant (KCP) and Brandon Research, Inc. to develop ways to improve implants used for orthopedic surgery for joint replacement. The primary product produced by this study is design information, which may be used to develop implants that will improve long-term fixation and durability in the host bone environment.

  13. Applied homogeneous catalysis; Angewandte homogene Katalyse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behr, Arno [Dortmund Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Technische Chemie A

    2008-07-01

    In the book under consideration, all persons which are interested in the homogeneous transition metal catalysis and their application in the chemical technology find a practice-orientated and didactically skilled worked-up introduction. This book is addressed to students in the training and also to practicians in occupation. Apart from the chemical fundamentals concerning to the homogeneous catalysis, also fundamentals of process engineering as well as homogeneous catalytic reactions are described. Typical homogeneous catalyzed reactions are hydroformylation, carbonylation, oligomerization and polymerization, metathesis, hydrogenations as well as oxidation reactions. Additionally, new trends in the homogeneous catalysis are described such as tandem reactions, combinatorial chemistry, high throughput catalyst testing, green solvents, activation of paraffines, activation of nitrogen, efficient ligands, nano-catalysis, homogeneous catalysis with regenerating raw materials, process development belong to electrical catalysis / sono-catalysis / photocatalysis / microwave irradiation / maximum pressure.

  14. Pincer-porphyrin hybrids : Synthesis, self-assembly, and catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suijkerbuijk, B.M.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Metal complexes play an important role in established research areas such as catalysis and materials chemistry as well as in emerging fields of chemical exploration such as bioinorganic chemistry. Changes in the metal center's ligand environment, i.e., the nature and number of the Lewis basic atoms

  15. FFUSION research programme 1993-1998. Final report of the Finnish fusion research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karttunen, S.; Heikkinen, J.; Korhonen, R.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of the Fusion Energy Research Programme, FFUSION, during the period 1993-1998. After the planning phase the programme started in 1994, and later in March 1995 the FFUSION Programme was integrated into the EU Fusion Programme and the Association Euratom-Tekes was established. Research areas in the FFUSION Programme are (1) fusion physics and plasma engineering, (2) fusion reactor materials and (3) remote handling systems. In all research areas industry is involved. Recently, a project on environmental aspects of fusion and other future energy systems started as a part of the socio-economic research (SERF) in the Euratom Fusion Programme. A crucial component of the FFUSION programme is the close collaboration between VTT Research Institutes, universities and Finnish industry. This collaboration has guaranteed dynamic and versatile research teams, which are large enough to tackle challenging research and development projects. Regarding industrial fusion R and D activities, the major step was the membership of Imatran Voima Oy in the EFET Consortium (European Fusion Engineering and Technology), which further strengthened the position of industry in the engineering design activities of ITER. The number of FFUSION research projects was 66. In addition, there were 32 industrial R and D projects. The total cost of the FFUSION Programme in 1993-1998 amounted to FIM 54 million in research at VTT and universities and an additional FIM 21 million for R and D in Finnish industry. The main part of the funding was provided by Tekes, 36%. Since 1995, yearly Euratom funding has exceeded 25%. The FFUSION research teams have played an active role in the European Programme, receiving excellent recognition from the European partners. Theoretical and computational fusion physics has been at a high scientific level and the group collaborates with the leading experimental laboratories in Europe. Fusion technology is focused on reactor materials, joining

  16. FFUSION research programme 1993-1998. Final report of the Finnish fusion research programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karttunen, S.; Heikkinen, J.; Korhonen, R. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)] [and others

    1998-12-31

    This report summarizes the results of the Fusion Energy Research Programme, FFUSION, during the period 1993-1998. After the planning phase the programme started in 1994, and later in March 1995 the FFUSION Programme was integrated into the EU Fusion Programme and the Association Euratom-Tekes was established. Research areas in the FFUSION Programme are (1) fusion physics and plasma engineering, (2) fusion reactor materials and (3) remote handling systems. In all research areas industry is involved. Recently, a project on environmental aspects of fusion and other future energy systems started as a part of the socio-economic research (SERF) in the Euratom Fusion Programme. A crucial component of the FFUSION programme is the close collaboration between VTT Research Institutes, universities and Finnish industry. This collaboration has guaranteed dynamic and versatile research teams, which are large enough to tackle challenging research and development projects. Regarding industrial fusion R and D activities, the major step was the membership of Imatran Voima Oy in the EFET Consortium (European Fusion Engineering and Technology), which further strengthened the position of industry in the engineering design activities of ITER. The number of FFUSION research projects was 66. In addition, there were 32 industrial R and D projects. The total cost of the FFUSION Programme in 1993-1998 amounted to FIM 54 million in research at VTT and universities and an additional FIM 21 million for R and D in Finnish industry. The main part of the funding was provided by Tekes, 36%. Since 1995, yearly Euratom funding has exceeded 25%. The FFUSION research teams have played an active role in the European Programme, receiving excellent recognition from the European partners. Theoretical and computational fusion physics has been at a high scientific level and the group collaborates with the leading experimental laboratories in Europe. Fusion technology is focused on reactor materials, joining

  17. Low-rank coal research: Volume 3, Combustion research: Final report. [Great Plains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, M. D.; Hajicek, D. R.; Zobeck, B. J.; Kalmanovitch, D. P.; Potas, T. A.; Maas, D. J.; Malterer, T. J.; DeWall, R. A.; Miller, B. G.; Johnson, M. D.

    1987-04-01

    Volume III, Combustion Research, contains articles on fluidized bed combustion, advanced processes for low-rank coal slurry production, low-rank coal slurry combustion, heat engine utilization of low-rank coals, and Great Plains Gasification Plant. These articles have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  18. Molecular catalysis science: Perspective on unifying the fields of catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Rong; Hurlburt, Tyler J; Sabyrov, Kairat; Alayoglu, Selim; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2016-05-10

    Colloidal chemistry is used to control the size, shape, morphology, and composition of metal nanoparticles. Model catalysts as such are applied to catalytic transformations in the three types of catalysts: heterogeneous, homogeneous, and enzymatic. Real-time dynamics of oxidation state, coordination, and bonding of nanoparticle catalysts are put under the microscope using surface techniques such as sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy and ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy under catalytically relevant conditions. It was demonstrated that catalytic behavior and trends are strongly tied to oxidation state, the coordination number and crystallographic orientation of metal sites, and bonding and orientation of surface adsorbates. It was also found that catalytic performance can be tuned by carefully designing and fabricating catalysts from the bottom up. Homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts, and likely enzymes, behave similarly at the molecular level. Unifying the fields of catalysis is the key to achieving the goal of 100% selectivity in catalysis.

  19. The Multi-Disciplinary Graduate Program in Educational Research. Final Report, Part II; Methodoloqical Trilogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarsfeld, Paul F., Ed.

    Part two of a seven-section, final report on the Multi-Disciplinary Graduate Program in Educational Research, this document contains discussions of quantification and reason analysis. Quantification is presented as a language consisting of sentences (graphs and tables), words, (classificatory instruments), and grammar (rules for constructing and…

  20. The Multi-Disciplinary Graduate Program in Educational Research. Final Report, Part VI; Essays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarsfeld, Paul F., Ed.

    This document, the sixth of a final report on the Multi-Disciplinary Graduate Program in Educational Research, is a collection of three essays. The first--Notes on the History of Interdisciplinarity--by Judy Rosen, brings together and outlines the general points and findings of the literature that has been generated in an attempt to evaluate the…

  1. 76 FR 14777 - National Dairy Promotion and Research Program; Final Rule on Amendments to the Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-18

    ... expenses from conducting export promotion marketing or coordination and management of export promotion... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 1150 [Docket No. DA-08-07: AMS-DA-08-0050] RIN 0581-AC87 National Dairy Promotion and Research Program; Final Rule on Amendments to...

  2. Final summary report of the Nordic Nuclear Safety Research Program 1994 - 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennerstedt, T.; Lemmens, A.

    1999-11-01

    This is a summary report of the NKS research program carried out 1994 - 1997. It is basically a compilation of the executive summaries of the final reports on the nine scientific projects carried out during that period. It highlights the conclusions, recommendations and other results of the projects. (au)

  3. Chemical catalysis in biodiesel production (I): enzymatic catalysis processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jachmarian, I.; Dobroyan, M.; Veira, J.; Vieitez, I.; Mottini, M.; Segura, N.; Grompone, M.

    2009-01-01

    There are some well known advantages related with the substitution of chemical catalysis by enzymatic catalysis processes.Some commercial immobilized lipases are useful for the catalysis of bio diesel reaction, which permits the achievement of high conversions and the recovery of high purity products, like a high quality glycerine. The main disadvantage of this alternative method is related with the last inactivation of the enzyme (by both the effect of the alcohol and the absorption of glycerol on catalyst surface), which added to the high cost of the catalyst, produces an unfavourable economical balance of the entire process. In the work the efficiency of two commercial immobilized lipases (Lipozyme TL IM y Novozyme 435 NNovozymes-Dinamarca) in the catalysis of the continuous transesterification of sunflower oil with different alcohols was studied. The intersolubility of the different mixturesinvolving reactans (S oil/alkyl esters/alcohol) and products (P mixtures with a higher content of 1% of glycerol,while for ethanol homogeneous mixtures were obtained at 12% of glycerol (44.44 12).Using and ethanolic substrate at the proportion S=19:75:6 and Lipozyme TL IM, it was possible to achieve a 98% of convertion to the corresponding biodiesel.When Novozymes 435 catalyzed the process it was possible to increase the oil concentration in the substrateaccording to proportion S=35:30:35, and a 78% conversion was obtained. The productivity shown by the firt enzyme was 70mg biodiesel g enzime-1, hora-1 while with the second one the productivity increased to 230. Results suggested that the convenient adjustement of substrate composition with the addition of biodiesel to reactants offers an efficient method for maximizing the enzyme productivity, hence improving the profitability of the enzymatic catalyzed process. (author)

  4. USAF Summer Research Program - 1993 Summer Research Extension Program Final Reports, Volume 2, Phillips Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-11-01

    principal investigator’s or research associate’s labor . Some institutions also provide other support (e.g., computer run time, administrative assistance...expression for the rate of precession 3 w 0 3 -Il 3 2o S- 1 cos0 = - AcosO , (32) 2 w3 13 2w 3 where A = (13 - I1)/I3 determines the oblateness of LAGEOS

  5. USAF Summer Research Program - 1994 Summer Faculty Research Program Final Reports, Volume 2A, Armstrong Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-12-01

    temperature seems to be the most important cue in eliciting UVs (although very young pups [newborns or day-old animals] vocalize very little under any...research. The question of frequency modulation patterns has yet to be resolved, with some authors reporting very little modulation across the duration of the...via ISDN lines was done with MERMAID system (Watabe et al., 90). The MERMAID system has been successfully tested in meetings connecting up to 4

  6. The Ademe research programme on atmospheric emissions from composting. Research findings and literature review - final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deportes, Isabelle; Mallard, Pascal; Loyon, Laurence; Guiziou, Fabrice; Fraboulet, Isaline; Clincke, Anne-Sophie; Fraboulet, Isaline; Tognet, Frederic; Bessagnet, Bertrand; Durif, Marc; Poulleau, Jean; Bacheley, Helene; Delabre, Karine; Zan-Alvarez, Patricia; Gourland, Pauline; Wery, Nathalie; Moletta-Denat, Marina; Deportes, Isabelle; Stavrakakis, Christophe; Schlosser, Olivier; Decottignies, Virginie; Akerman, Anna; Martel, Jean Luc; Senante, Elena; Givelet, Arnaud; Batton-Hubert, Mireille; Vaillant, Herve; Chovelon, Jean-Marc; Pradelle, Frederic; Sassi, Jean-Francois; Teigne, Delphine; Duchaine, Caroline; Jean, Thierry; Lavoie, Jacques; Le Cloarec, Pierre; Levasseur, Jean-Pierre; Morcet, Muriel; Rivet, Marie; Romain, Anne-Claude

    2012-07-01

    Emissions of gas and particulates (dusts, mineral and organic) linked to composting wastes essentially come from the biodegradation of organic matter by micro-organisms and from the related site management activities, especially material handling (of the raw waste, mixes and compost): movements, turning, sieving and loading. Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) is, in terms of mass, the main gas produced (along with water vapor) during composting. However, many other gases emitted in small amounts can also have a major impact on the environment and/or health risks. Such is the case for nitrous oxide (N 2 O) and methane (CH 4 ) with respect to global warming, and also for ammonia (NH 3 ) with respect to acidification and eutrophication of the local environment, and of a wide range of sulfur-based and volatile organic compounds which can potentially lead to very unpleasant (or offensive) odors and health risks. In the case of emitted dust particles, these can often carry micro-organisms and/or biological compounds with the known health effects of inflammation, allergic reactions and infection. Thus dealing with these emissions and the evaluation of their health and environmental impacts represents key aspects in the long term sustainability of the composting option. Even if the understanding of these emissions remains incomplete, taking into account the wide range of solid wastes treated and of the methods of composting available, efforts have been made these last years to better characterize the substrate and to improve the related measurement methods. ADEME launched in 2006 a research programme specifically addressing this theme in particular, involving many research organizations, technical centres, research consultancies and industrial partners. The work carried out in this framework has enabled an improvement in the knowledge of characterizing emissions, of their sources and controlling factors, of their metrology (whether at the source or within the environment around

  7. Spent Fuel Performance Assessment and Research. Final Report of a Coordinated Research Project (SPAR-II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    As storage of spent fuel has become a key technology in spent fuel management, wet and dry storage have become mature technologies and continue to demonstrate good performance. Increased spent fuel storage capacity in combination with longer storage durations will be needed over the foreseeable future as many countries have delayed their decision on spent fuel disposal or reprocessing. Extended spent fuel storage is, and will remain, an important activity for all countries with nuclear power programmes. A number of countries are planning or have already initiated research programmes on spent fuel storage performance, and there is a continuing benefit in exchanging spent fuel storage experience of the Member States in order to build a comprehensive technology knowledge base. Potential degradation mechanisms that may affect cladding integrity during wet storage are uniform corrosion, pitting, galvanic, and microbiologically-influenced corrosion. Potential degradation mechanisms that may affect cladding integrity during dry storage and subsequent handling and transportation operations are air oxidation, thermal creep, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), delayed hydride cracking (DHC), hydride re-orientation, hydrogen migration and re-distribution. Investigations carried out so far indicate that from the degradation mechanisms that may affect the integrity of spent fuel assembly/bundle structure during interim storage, hydride re-orientation has the potential to impair the ability of the cladding to effectively withstand potentially adverse mechanical challenges resulting from handling or transportation accidents. Fuel integrity issues are related to the definition and criteria of fuel integrity, failure classification, packaging and retrieval of damaged fuel and transport of damaged fuel assemblies. Various monitoring technologies have been developed and used to confirm the continued spent fuel integrity during storage or to provide an early indication of developing

  8. Electric Fields and Enzyme Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Stephen D; Boxer, Steven G

    2017-06-20

    What happens inside an enzyme's active site to allow slow and difficult chemical reactions to occur so rapidly? This question has occupied biochemists' attention for a long time. Computer models of increasing sophistication have predicted an important role for electrostatic interactions in enzymatic reactions, yet this hypothesis has proved vexingly difficult to test experimentally. Recent experiments utilizing the vibrational Stark effect make it possible to measure the electric field a substrate molecule experiences when bound inside its enzyme's active site. These experiments have provided compelling evidence supporting a major electrostatic contribution to enzymatic catalysis. Here, we review these results and develop a simple model for electrostatic catalysis that enables us to incorporate disparate concepts introduced by many investigators to describe how enzymes work into a more unified framework stressing the importance of electric fields at the active site.

  9. Magnetic catalysis in nuclear matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, Alexander; Preis, Florian; Schmitt, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    A strong magnetic field enhances the chiral condensate at low temperatures. This so-called magnetic catalysis thus seeks to increase the vacuum mass of nucleons. We employ two relativistic field-theoretical models for nuclear matter, the Walecka model and an extended linear sigma model, to discuss the resulting effect on the transition between vacuum and nuclear matter at zero temperature. In both models we find that the creation of nuclear matter in a sufficiently strong magnetic field becomes energetically more costly due to the heaviness of magnetized nucleons, even though it is also found that nuclear matter is more strongly bound in a magnetic field. Our results are potentially important for dense nuclear matter in compact stars, especially since previous studies in the astrophysical context have always ignored the contribution of the magnetized Dirac sea and thus the effect of magnetic catalysis.

  10. Harnessing Light: Capitalizing on Optical Science Trends and Challenges for Future Research. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svedberg, Erik

    2014-02-06

    The committee has during the earlier period finalized their work on the report, Optics and Photonics: Essential Technologies for Our Nation (2013) . The report did undergo review and initial editorial processing. The NRC released a pre-publication report on August 13, 2012. A final report is now available. The study director has been able to practice his skills in running a national academies committee. From a research perspective the grant has generated a report with recommendations to the government. The work itself is the meetings where the committee convened to hear presenters and to discuss the status of optics and photonics as well as writing the report.

  11. Clean ferrous casting technology research. Final technical report, September 29, 1993--December 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, C.E.; Griffin, J.; Giese, S.R.; Lane, A.M. [and others

    1996-01-31

    This is the final report covering work performed on research into methods of attaining clean ferrous castings. In this program methods were developed to minimize the formation of inclusions in steel castings by using a variety of techniques which decreased the tendency for inclusions to form during melting, casting and solidification. In a second project, a reaction chamber was built to remove inclusions from molten steel using electromagnetic force. Finally, a thorough investigation of the causes of sand penetration defects in iron castings was completed, and a program developed which predicts the probability of penetration formation and indicates methods for avoiding it.

  12. Virtual Special Issue on Catalysis at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruski, Marek [Ames Laboratory; Sadow, Aaron D. [Ames Laboratory; Slowing, Igor I. [Ames Laboratory; Marshall, Christopher L. [Argonne National Laboratory; Stair, Peter [Argonne National Laboratory; Rodriguez, Jose [Brookhaven National Laboratory; Harris, Alex [Brookhaven National Laboratory; Somorjai, Gabor A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Biener, Juergen [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Matranga, Christopher [National Energy Technology Laboratory; Wang, Congjun [National Energy Technology Laboratory; Schaidle, Joshua A. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Beckham, Gregg T. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Ruddy, Daniel A. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Deutsch, Todd [National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Alia, Shaun M. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Narula, Chaitanya [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Overbury, Steve [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Toops, Todd [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Bullock, R. Morris [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Peden, Charles H. F. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Wang, Yong [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Allendorf, Mark D. [Sandia National Laboratory; Nørskov, Jens [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory; Bligaard, Thomas [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    2016-04-18

    Catalysis research at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Laboratories covers a wide range of research topics in heterogeneous catalysis, homogeneous/molecular catalysis, biocatalysis, electrocatalysis, and surface science. Since much of the work at National Laboratories is funded by DOE, the research is largely focused on addressing DOE's mission to ensure America's security and prosperity by addressing its energy, environmental, and nuclear challenges through transformative science and technology solutions. The catalysis research carried out at the DOE National Laboratories ranges from very fundamental catalysis science, funded by DOE's Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), to applied research and development (R&D) in areas such as biomass conversion to fuels and chemicals, fuel cells, and vehicle emission control with primary funding from DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  13. Asymmetric Ion-Pairing Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brak, Katrien

    2014-01-01

    Charged intermediates and reagents are ubiquitous in organic transformations. The interaction of these ionic species with chiral neutral, anionic, or cationic small molecules has emerged as a powerful strategy for catalytic, enantioselective synthesis. This review describes developments in the burgeoning field of asymmetric ion-pairing catalysis with an emphasis on the insights that have been gleaned into the structural and mechanistic features that contribute to high asymmetric induction. PMID:23192886

  14. Assessment report of research and development activities FY2014. Activity: 'Advanced science research' (Final report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-09-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (hereinafter referred to as 'JAEA') consulted an assessment committee, 'Evaluation Committee of Research Activities for Advanced Science Research' (hereinafter referred to as 'Committee') for final evaluation and prior assessment of 'Advanced Science Research,' in accordance with 'General Guideline for the Evaluation of Government Research and Development (R and D) Activities' by Cabinet Office, Government of Japan, 'Guideline for Evaluation of R and D in Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology' and 'Regulation on Conduct for Evaluation of R and D Activities' by JAEA. In response to the JAEA's request, the Committee assessed the research programs and activities of the Advanced Science Research Center (hereinafter referred to as 'ASRC') for the period of five years from April 2010 and the research programs from April 2015. The Committee evaluated the management and the research programs of the ASRC based on the explanatory documents prepared by the ASRC and the oral presentations with questions-and-answers by the Director and the research group leaders. This report summarizes the results of the assessment by the Committee with the Committee report attached. (author)

  15. Ogallala Aquifer Program: A catalysis for research and education to sustain the Ogallala Aquifer on the Southern High Plains (2003-2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Ogallala Aquifer Program (OAP) was created in 2003 with support from Congressmen from Kansas and Texas. OAP is a research-education consortium seeking solutions from problems arising from declining water availability from the Ogallala Aquifer in western Kansas and the Texas High Plains. The cons...

  16. Nanometallic chemistry: deciphering nanoparticle catalysis from the perspective of organometallic chemistry and homogeneous catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ning; Yuan, Yuan; Dyson, Paul J

    2013-10-07

    Nanoparticle (NP) catalysis is traditionally viewed as a sub-section of heterogeneous catalysis. However, certain properties of NP catalysts, especially NPs dispersed in solvents, indicate that there could be benefits from viewing them from the perspective of homogeneous catalysis. By applying the fundamental approaches and concepts routinely used in homogeneous catalysis to NP catalysts it should be possible to rationally design new nanocatalysts with superior properties to those currently in use.

  17. Cosmic strings and baryon decay catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory, R.; Perkins, W.B.; Davis, A.C.; Brandenberger, R.H. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA); Cambridge Univ. (UK); Brown Univ., Providence, RI (USA). Dept. of Physics)

    1989-09-01

    Cosmic strings, like monopoles, can catalyze proton decay. For integer charged fermions, the cross section for catalysis is not amplified, unlike in the case of monopoles. We review the catalysis processes both in the free quark and skyrmion pictures and discuss the implications for baryogenesis. We present a computation of the cross section for monopole catalyzed skyrmion decay using classical physics. We also discuss some effects which can screen catalysis processes. 32 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Cooperative catalysis designing efficient catalysts for synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, René

    2015-01-01

    Written by experts in the field, this is a much-needed overview of the rapidly emerging field of cooperative catalysis. The authors focus on the design and development of novel high-performance catalysts for applications in organic synthesis (particularly asymmetric synthesis), covering a broad range of topics, from the latest progress in Lewis acid / Br?nsted base catalysis to e.g. metal-assisted organocatalysis, cooperative metal/enzyme catalysis, and cooperative catalysis in polymerization reactions and on solid surfaces. The chapters are classified according to the type of cooperating acti

  19. Solid acid catalysis from fundamentals to applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hattori, Hideshi

    2014-01-01

    IntroductionTypes of solid acid catalystsAdvantages of solid acid catalysts Historical overviews of solid acid catalystsFuture outlookSolid Acids CatalysisDefinition of acid and base -Brnsted acid and Lewis acid-Acid sites on surfacesAcid strengthRole of acid sites in catalysisBifunctional catalysisPore size effect on catalysis -shape selectivity-Characterization of Solid Acid Catalysts Indicator methodTemperature programmed desorption (TPD) of ammoniaCalorimetry of adsorption of basic moleculesInfrare

  20. Final report of the Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination, 1984-1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This document is the final report of the Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination (CIRRPC). The committee was established to address national and international issues involving ionizing and nonionizing radiation. Three sections are included in the report: a summary of CIRRPC`s history structure, and operations; CIRRPC`s most significant activities, findings and recommendations on national radiation issues of sufficient importance and scope to require interagency attention; topics for future consideration by Federal agencies.

  1. Final report of the Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination, 1984-1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This document is the final report of the Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination (CIRRPC). The committee was established to address national and international issues involving ionizing and nonionizing radiation. Three sections are included in the report: a summary of CIRRPC's history structure, and operations; CIRRPC's most significant activities, findings and recommendations on national radiation issues of sufficient importance and scope to require interagency attention; topics for future consideration by Federal agencies

  2. USAF Summer Research Program - 1993 High School Apprenticeship Program Final Reports, Volume 12, Armstrong Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Page No: 16- 1 Tullahoma High School Tullahoma, TN 37388-0000 Bowlby , Andrea Laboratory: PL/GP Mudge Way Vol-Page No: 13- 1 Bedford High School Bedford...Ingram Rd. San Antonio, TX 78238 Dr. John Taboada Mentor Final Report for: AFOSR Summer Research Program Armstrong Laboratory Sponsored by: Air Force...Photoelectric Aerosol Sensor (PAS) as well as with other methods for studies involving aerosols and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) (4-8). Dr. John

  3. Knowledge management in final repository research. Tools, potentials and demand; Wissensmanagement in der Endlagerforschung. Instrumente, Potentiale und Bedarf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spieth-Achtnich, Angelika; Schmidt, Gerhard [Oeko-Institut e.V. - Institut fuer Angewandte Oekologie, Darmstadt (Germany); Steinacker, Achim [intelligent views GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2012-05-31

    The study on knowledge management in final repository research covers the following issues: potentials and technologies of knowledge management; analysis of handling and application of research knowledge; knowledge management and final repository research of the German ministry for economic affairs and energy.

  4. Nuclear techniques in the coal industry. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    With the aim of promoting advanced research and facilitating a more extensive application of nuclear techniques for environmental protection in the exploration and exploitation of coal, the IAEA established the present co-ordinated research programme (CRP) in 1989. This report includes an assessment of the current status and trends in nuclear techniques in the coal industry and the results obtained by the participants at the CRP. Proceedings of the final CRP on ''Nuclear Techniques in Exploration and Exploitation of Coal: On-line and Bulk Analysis and Evaluation of Potential Environmental Pollutants in Coal and Coke'', was held in Krakow, Poland, from 9 to 12 May 1994. Refs, figs, tabs

  5. Cold climate oil spills: a terrestrial and freshwater research review. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKendrick, J.D.; LaPerrier, J.D.; Loynachan, T.E.

    1981-02-01

    The first part of this study reviews world-wide research on cold climate oil spills on land to identify some of the terrestrial environmental factors in cold regions affected by oil spills and some of the techniques for measuring impacts and terrestrial systems, primarily soils. The second part of the study reviews cold climate research on oil spills into fresh water. The final part of the report, surveys Alaskan hydrocarbon spills in the period January 1974 through May 1976. These studies will be of interest to all those concerned with cold climate oil spills on land and into fresh water.

  6. Enantioselective Bronsted Acid Catalysis with Chiral Pentacarboxycyclopentadienes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheewala, Chirag

    This thesis details the design and development of pentacarboxycyclopentadienes (PCCPs) as a new platform for enantioselective Bronsted acid catalysis. Prior to this research, enantioselective Bronsted acid catalysis was limited to the BINOL (and variations thereof) framework. While this catalyst platform has paved the way for a myriad of novel asymmetric chemical transformations, the utility of this catalyst scaffold has suffered from its lengthy and expensive preparations. As an alternative, starting from readily available 1,2,3,4,5-pentacarbomethoxycyclopentadiene and various chiral alcohols and amines, the synthesis of a library of strongly acidic chiral catalysts is described. The utility of these novel acid catalysts is explored in various transformations. As a prelude to the heart of this work, Chapter 1 focuses on the advancements made in asymmetric Bronsted acid catalysis through BINOL-phosphate derived catalysts, focusing on the major accomplishments made by researchers since 2004. The provided review highlights the utility of these chiral acid catalysts but also reveals the need for a new scaffold that is more affordable and accessible. Chapter 2 discusses the background of PCCPs, including its initial discovery and subsequent applications. Our work in developing novel transesterified and amidated derivatives is discussed with accompanying crystal structures of achiral and chiral PCCPs. pKa measurements demonstrate the capacity of PCCPs to be used as strong Bronsted acid catalysts and are compared to literature values of known Bronsted acid catalysts. Chapter 3 focuses on the utility of PCCPs as enantioselective Bronsted acid catalysts in a variety of chemical transformations including the Mukaiyama-Mannich reaction, transfer hydrogenation, Pictet-Spengler reaction, diaryl alcohol substitution, Mukayaiama oxocarbenium aldol reaction, and [4+2]-cycloaddition. Catalyst loadings down to 0.01 mol% and reaction scale up to 25 grams in the Mukaiyama

  7. Thirty years of microbial P450 monooxygenase research: Peroxo-heme intermediates-The central bus station in heme oxygenase catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxygen has always been recognized as an essential element of many life forms, initially through its role as a terminal electron acceptor for the energy-generating pathways of oxidative phosphorylation. In 1955, Hayaishi et al. [Mechanism of the pyrocatechase reaction, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 77 (1955) 5450-5451] presented the most important discovery that changed this simplistic view of how Nature uses atmospheric dioxygen. His discovery, the naming and mechanistic understanding of the first 'oxygenase' enzyme, has provided a wonderful opportunity and scientific impetus for four decades of researchers. This volume provides an opportunity to recognize the breakthroughs of the 'Hayaishi School.' Notable have been the prolific contributions of Professor Ishimura et al. [Oxygen and life. Oxygenases, Oxidases and Lipid Mediators, International Congress Series, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 2002], a first-generation Hayaishi product, to characterization of the cytochrome P450 monooxygenases

  8. An expedient variant of Heck Reaction of alkenyl nonaflates: Homogeneous ligand-free palladium catalysis at room temperature

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vogel, M. A. K.; Stark, Ch. B.; Lyapkalo, Ilya

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 349, č. 7 (2007), s. 1019-1024 ISSN 1615-4150 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : alkenyl nonaflates * catalyst poisoning * Heck reaction * homogeneous catalysis * ligand-free catalysis Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.977, year: 2007

  9. Intercampus institute for research at particle accelerators. Final report, March 15, 1992 - September 30, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This is the final report to the DOE for the Intercampus Institute for Research at Particle Accelerators, or IIRPA, at least for the San Diego branch. Over the years that DOE supported IIRPA, we were told that yearly reports (and the final report) were not necessary because the previous year's summary in our annual request for funds constituted those reports. Therefore, it has taken some effort, and a corresponding long time, to put something together, after the fact. The IIRPA was born as an idea that arose during discussions at the 1974 PEP summer study, and began to be funded by DoE during the early stages of PEP detector design and construction. The intent was for the members of the Institute to be responsible for the PEP-9 Facility; all of the PEP experiments were supposed to be facilities, rather than just experimental setups for a particular group or research goal. IIRPA was approved as a Multicampus Research Unit (MRU) in 1977 by the University of California, and it was active on the UCD, UCSB and UCSD campuses for 10 years. This report concentrates on the period of time when the Directorship of IIRPA was once again at the San Diego campus, 1989 to 1995. The collection of yearly reports consisting of research in different areas of particle physics, make up this report in the appendices

  10. Research and development on super heat pump energy accumulation system. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-06-01

    This is the final report on research and development of super heat pump energy accumulation system, which has been carried out from FY 1985 to 1992. It describes outline of the research and development program, R and D results, final evaluation methodology, evaluation of the R and D, proposals for the commercialization, and so on. The super high performance compression heat pumps are technically evaluated for highly efficient type (for heating, and cooling and heating), high temperature type (utilizing high temperature heat source, and low temperature heat source), working fluids (alcohol-based and nonalcohol-based), stainless steel plate fin type heat exchanger, EHD heat exchanger, and so on. The other techniques evaluated include those for chemical heat storage, combined systems, plant simulation, and systemization. The evaluation works are also directed to the economic and environmental aspects. Finally, the R and D themes are proposed to leap over various hurdles, e.g., reliability and economic viability, for the eventual commercialization of the energy accumulation system. (NEDO)

  11. Homogeneous catalysis by transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masters, K.

    1983-01-01

    Fundamentals of homogeneous catalysis by metal complex aAe presented in the monograph along with the mechanisms of practically all types of catalytic reactions proceeding in the presence of transition metal complexes. In particular, considered are: catalytic cycles for olefin hydrogenation in the presence of Ru(2) complex; for alkene epoxidation catalyzed by Mo(6); for alkene metathesis reaction catalyzed by Ta and W compounds. Catalytic systems on the basis of Zr, Mo, W, Ru complexes being in the stage of development of the processes of nitrogen fixation reductive oligomerization alkene activation are described. Bibliography contains more than 400 references

  12. Fundamental concepts in heterogeneous catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Norskov, Jens K; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Bligaard, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This book is based on a graduate course and suitable as a primer for any newcomer to the field, this book is a detailed introduction to the experimental and computational methods that are used to study how solid surfaces act as catalysts.   Features include:First comprehensive description of modern theory of heterogeneous catalysisBasis for understanding and designing experiments in the field   Allows reader to understand catalyst design principlesIntroduction to important elements of energy transformation technologyTest driven at Stanford University over several semesters

  13. Homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis production and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While the homogeneous catalysis route produced higher biodiesel yields, the heterogeneous catalyst method produced biodiesel of lower ester content. The fuel properties of biodiesels and blends were analysed quantitati-vely, and the biodiesel produced by homogeneous catalysis compared favourably with conventional ...

  14. catalysis of chemical processes: particular teaching aspects

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IICBA01

    of catalysis is included in the majority of textbooks covering, in particular, general chemistry, industrial processes and technologies, biochemistry and biotechnology[7-16]. Catalysis understood as an acceleration of a chemical reaction in approaching the equilibrium state is extremely important at the stage of obtaining the ...

  15. Radiological and environmental consequences. Final report of the Nordic Nuclear Safety Research project BOK-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palsson, S.E. [Icelandic Radiation Protection Institute (Iceland)

    2002-11-01

    Final report of the Nordic Nuclear Safety Research project BOK-2, Radiological and Environmental Consequences. The project was carried out 1998-2001 with participants from all the Nordic countries. Representatives from the Baltic States were also invited to some of the meetings and seminars. The project consisted of work on terrestrial and marine radioecology and had a broad scope in order to enable participation of research groups with various fields of interest. This report focuses on the project itself and gives a general summary of the studies undertaken. A separate technical report summarises the work done by each research group and gives references to papers published in scientific journals. The topics in BOK-2 included improving assessment of old and recent fallout, use of radionuclides as tracers in Nordic marine areas, improving assessment of internal doses and use of mass spectrometry in radioecology. (au)

  16. COE-INES report on research and education activities. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-03-01

    Research and education activities on innovative nuclear energy systems to solve safety, radioactive waste and proliferation problems simultaneously, were summarized as a final report of COE-INES program. CANDLE (Constant Axial shape of Neutron flux, nuclide densities and power shape During Life of Energy producing reactor), lead-bismuth cooled fast reactors, small long-life reactors and water-cooled thorium breeding reactors were studies as innovative nuclear reactors. Experimental study of hydrogen system with carbon dioxide zero emission was progressed. Basic research on micro/nano-scale separation/transmutation of actinide nuclides and long-life fission products was conducted. Research on nuclear energy and social involvement was also conducted. (J.P.N.)

  17. EDISON - research programme on electric distribution automation 1993-1997. Final report 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehtonen, M. [ed.] [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Systems

    1998-08-01

    This report comprises a summary of the results of the five year research programme EDISON on distribution automation in Finnish utilities. The research programme (1993 - 1997) was conducted under the leadership of VTT Energy, in cooperation with universities, distribution companies and the manufacturing industry. The main part of the funding has been from the Technology Development Centre TEKES and from manufacturing companies. The goal of the research programme was to develop a new scheme for a complete distribution automation system, including the network automation, computer systems in the control centre and the customer associated automation functions. In addition, the techniques for demand side management were developed and integrated into the automation scheme. The final aim was to demonstrate the automation functions and systems of the scheme in real distribution systems. The results of nineteen projects are given in this report

  18. Publicly administrated nuclear waste management research programme 1994-1996. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuori, S. [ed.] [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-09-01

    The main objective of the JYT-programme has been to provide the authorities with independent information and research results relevant for the safety of nuclear waste management. The main emphasis in this research programme has been devoted to the final disposal of spent fuel. The whole area of the research programme has been subdivided into following main topic areas: (1) bedrock structure and stability, rock investigation methods and characteristics and flow of ground water, (2) release of radionuclides from a repository and subsequent transport in the bedrock, (3) performance and safety assessment of repositories and other phases of nuclear waste management, (4) natural analogue studies, (5) waste management technology and costs and (6) socio political and other societal issues and environmental impact assessment.

  19. Publicly administrated nuclear waste management research programme 1994-1996. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuori, S.

    1997-09-01

    The main objective of the JYT-programme has been to provide the authorities with independent information and research results relevant for the safety of nuclear waste management. The main emphasis in this research programme has been devoted to the final disposal of spent fuel. The whole area of the research programme has been subdivided into following main topic areas: (1) bedrock structure and stability, rock investigation methods and characteristics and flow of ground water, (2) release of radionuclides from a repository and subsequent transport in the bedrock, (3) performance and safety assessment of repositories and other phases of nuclear waste management, (4) natural analogue studies, (5) waste management technology and costs and (6) socio political and other societal issues and environmental impact assessment

  20. "Nanocrystal bilayer for tandem catalysis"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Yusuke; Tsung, Chia Kuang; Huang, Wenyu; Huo, Ziyang; E.Habas, Susan E; Soejima, Tetsuro; Aliaga, Cesar E; Samorjai, Gabor A; Yang, Peidong

    2011-01-24

    Supported catalysts are widely used in industry and can be optimized by tuning the composition and interface of the metal nanoparticles and oxide supports. Rational design of metal-metal oxide interfaces in nanostructured catalysts is critical to achieve better reaction activities and selectivities. We introduce here a new class of nanocrystal tandem catalysts that have multiple metal-metal oxide interfaces for the catalysis of sequential reactions. We utilized a nanocrystal bilayer structure formed by assembling platinum and cerium oxide nanocube monolayers of less than 10 nm on a silica substrate. The two distinct metal-metal oxide interfaces, CeO2-Pt and Pt-SiO2, can be used to catalyse two distinct sequential reactions. The CeO2-Pt interface catalysed methanol decomposition to produce CO and H2, which were subsequently used for ethylene hydroformylation catalysed by the nearby Pt-SiO2 interface. Consequently, propanal was produced selectively from methanol and ethylene on the nanocrystal bilayer tandem catalyst. This new concept of nanocrystal tandem catalysis represents a powerful approach towards designing high-performance, multifunctional nanostructured catalysts

  1. Decommissioning techniques for research reactors. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1997-2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-02-01

    In its international role, the IAEA is faced with a wide variety of national situations and different availability of technical, human and financial resources. While it is recognised that nuclear decommissioning is a mature industry in some developed countries, and may soon become a routine activity, the situation is by no means so clear in other countries. In addition, transfer of technologies and know-how from developed to developing countries is not a spontaneous, straightforward process, and will take time and considerable effort. As mandated by its own statute and Member States' requests, the IAEA continues to respond to its Member States by monitoring technological progress, ensuring development of safer and more efficient strategies and fostering international information exchange. Previous co-ordinated research projects (CRP) conducted respectively from 1984 to 1987, and from 1989 to 1993, investigated the overall domain of decommissioning. In those CRPs no distinction was made between decommissioning activities carried out at nuclear power plants, research reactors or nuclear fuel cycle facilities. With technological progress and experience gained, it became clear that decommissioning of research reactors had certain specific characteristics which needed a dedicated approach. In addition, a large number of research reactors reached a state of permanent shutdown in the 1990s and were candidates for prompt decommissioning. With the progressive ageing of research reactors, many more of these units will soon become redundant worldwide and require decommissioning. Within this context, a CRP on Decommissioning Techniques for Research Reactors was launched and conducted by the IAEA from 1997 to 2001 in order to prepare for eventual decommissioning. Concluding reports that summarized the work undertaken under the aegis of the CRP were presented at the third and final Research Co-ordination Meeting held in Kendal, United Kingdom, 14-18 May 2001, and are collected

  2. Stable isotopes in human nutrition research. Final report on an IAEA co-ordinated research programme, Vienna, Austria, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on Applications of Stable Isotope Tracers in Human Nutrition Research was established by the Agency in October 1988 and was completed in 1992. At various times during this period the CRP encompassed 16 participants in 16 countries. Its general objective was to help establish competence in the use of stable isotope techniques, particularly in developing countries, and particularly with reference to applications of 2 H, 13 C, 15 N, and 18 O in human nutrition research. Thereby it was hoped that it would be possible (i) to identify centres and scientists throughout the developing world who could use stable isotopes in human nutrition research, (ii) to assess the need for methodological adaptations for isotope-based methods in developing countries, and (iii) to advance the competence of the participants in using stable isotopes as tracers of human metabolism. In addition it was expected that the CRP would make a study of some major questions which have been identified by international groups of nutrition experts, particularly in areas relating to energy and protein metabolism. This document comprises copies of the working papers submitted by all CRP participants who contributed a final report on their project. These reports include details of the rationale, methods, results and interpretations from each of the respective studies. Refs, figs and tabs

  3. Nuclear emergency preparedness. Final report of the Nordic Nuclear Safety Research Project BOK-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, B.

    2002-01-01

    Final report of the Nordic Nuclear Safety Research project BOK-1. The BOK-1 project, “Nuclear Emergency Preparedness”, was carried out in 1998-2001 with participants from the Nordic and Baltic Sea regions. The project consists of six sub-projects:Laboratory measurements and quality assurance (BOK-1.......1); Mobile measurements and measurement strategies (BOK-1.2); Field measurements and data assimilation (BOK-1.3); Countermeasures in agriculture and forestry (BOK-1.4); Emergency monitoring in theNordic and Baltic Sea countries (BOK-1.5); and Nuclear exercises (BOK-1.6). For each sub-project, the project...

  4. Chemistry of Fluorinated Carbon Acids: Synthesis, Physicochemical Properties, and Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanai, Hikaru

    2015-01-01

    The bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]methyl (Tf2CH; Tf=SO2CF3) group is known to be one of the strongest carbon acid functionalities. The acidity of such carbon acids in the gas phase is stronger than that of sulfuric acid. Our recent investigations have demonstrated that this type of carbon acids work as novel acid catalysts. In this paper, recent achievements in carbon acid chemistry by our research group, including synthesis, physicochemical properties, and catalysis, are summarized.

  5. Molecular-Level Design of Heterogeneous Chiral Catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaera, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    The following is a proposal to continue our multi-institutional research on heterogeneous chiral catalysis. Our team combines the use of surface-sensitive analytical techniques for the characterization of model systems with quantum and statistical mechanical calculations to interpret experimental data and guide the design of future research. Our investigation focuses on the interrelation among the three main mechanisms by which enantioselectivity can be bestowed to heterogeneous catalysts, namely: (1) by templating chirality via the adsorption of chiral supramolecular assemblies, (2) by using chiral modifiers capable of forming chiral complexes with the reactant and force enantioselective surface reactions, and (3) by forming naturally chiral surfaces using imprinting chiral agents. Individually, the members of our team are leaders in these various aspects of chiral catalysis, but the present program provides the vehicle to generate and exploit the synergies necessary to address the problem in a comprehensive manner. Our initial work has advanced the methodology needed for these studies, including an enantioselective titration procedure to identify surface chiral sites, infrared spectroscopy in situ at the interface between gases or liquids and solids to mimic realistic catalytic conditions, and DFT and Monte Carlo algorithms to simulate and understand chirality on surfaces. The next step, to be funded by the monies requested in this proposal, is to apply those methods to specific problems in chiral catalysis, including the identification of the requirements for the formation of supramolecular surface structures with enantioselective behavior, the search for better molecules to probe the chiral nature of the modified surfaces, the exploration of the transition from supramolecular to one-to-one chiral modification, the correlation of the adsorption characteristics of one-to-one chiral modifiers with their physical properties, in particular with their configuration

  6. Molecular-Level Design of Heterogeneous Chiral Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francisco Zaera

    2012-03-21

    The following is a proposal to continue our multi-institutional research on heterogeneous chiral catalysis. Our team combines the use of surface-sensitive analytical techniques for the characterization of model systems with quantum and statistical mechanical calculations to interpret experimental data and guide the design of future research. Our investigation focuses on the interrelation among the three main mechanisms by which enantioselectivity can be bestowed to heterogeneous catalysts, namely: (1) by templating chirality via the adsorption of chiral supramolecular assemblies, (2) by using chiral modifiers capable of forming chiral complexes with the reactant and force enantioselective surface reactions, and (3) by forming naturally chiral surfaces using imprinting chiral agents. Individually, the members of our team are leaders in these various aspects of chiral catalysis, but the present program provides the vehicle to generate and exploit the synergies necessary to address the problem in a comprehensive manner. Our initial work has advanced the methodology needed for these studies, including an enantioselective titration procedure to identify surface chiral sites, infrared spectroscopy in situ at the interface between gases or liquids and solids to mimic realistic catalytic conditions, and DFT and Monte Carlo algorithms to simulate and understand chirality on surfaces. The next step, to be funded by the monies requested in this proposal, is to apply those methods to specific problems in chiral catalysis, including the identification of the requirements for the formation of supramolecular surface structures with enantioselective behavior, the search for better molecules to probe the chiral nature of the modified surfaces, the exploration of the transition from supramolecular to one-to-one chiral modification, the correlation of the adsorption characteristics of one-to-one chiral modifiers with their physical properties, in particular with their configuration

  7. Participation in the IAEA Coordinated Research Project Fumex III: Final Report of AREVA NP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    After the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) FUMEXII, participants asked for a new exercise within an IAEA CRP. This CRP started in December 2008 in Vienna with the first Research Coordination Meeting (RCM). The CRP is titled ''Improvement of Computer Codes Used for Fuel Behaviour Simulation FUMEX III''. The object of FUMEX III were the improvement of fuel rod performance codes for modeling high burnup phenomena in modern fuel. This includes transient behavior, as well as mechanical interaction between pellet and cladding and, in progression to the FUMEX II exercise, fission gas release during various conditions (steady state, load follow, transient). AREVA NP agreed on participating in this exercise under the IAEA research agreement no. 15369 and expressed interest in the modeling of pelletclad mechanical interactions as well as fission gas release under steady state and transient conditions. In this exercise AREVA NP used its new global fuel rod code GALILEO, which is still under development (formerly known under the project name COPERNIC 3). During a Consultants Meeting potential topics and a proposed selection of cases have been prepared, which were discussed during the 1st Research Coordination Meeting (RCM) in Vienna in December 2008. During the discussions a number of additional cases motivated by the participants have been identified. Finally, a case table has been agreed upon, which included several cases for the different topics. Most of the cases have been based on the International Fuel Performance Experiments (IFPE) database, but additional cases have been provided during the exercise (e.g., the AREVA idealized case

  8. Nanocrystal assembly for tandem catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peidong; Somorjai, Gabor; Yamada, Yusuke; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Huang, Wenyu

    2014-10-14

    The present invention provides a nanocrystal tandem catalyst comprising at least two metal-metal oxide interfaces for the catalysis of sequential reactions. One embodiment utilizes a nanocrystal bilayer structure formed by assembling sub-10 nm platinum and cerium oxide nanocube monolayers on a silica substrate. The two distinct metal-metal oxide interfaces, CeO.sub.2--Pt and Pt--SiO.sub.2, can be used to catalyze two distinct sequential reactions. The CeO.sub.2--Pt interface catalyzed methanol decomposition to produce CO and H.sub.2, which were then subsequently used for ethylene hydroformylation catalyzed by the nearby Pt--SiO.sub.2 interface. Consequently, propanal was selectively produced on this nanocrystal bilayer tandem catalyst.

  9. Homogeneous Catalysis with Metal Complexes Fundamentals and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Duca, Gheorghe

    2012-01-01

    The book about homogeneous catalysis with metal complexes deals with the description of the reductive-oxidative, metal complexes  in a liquid phase (in polar solvents, mainly in water, and less in nonpolar solvents). The exceptional importance of the redox processes in chemical systems, in the reactions occuring in living organisms, the environmental processes, atmosphere, water, soil, and in industrial technologies (especially in food-processing industries) is discussed. The detailed practical aspects of the established regularities are explained for solving the specific practical tasks in various fields of industrial chemistry, biochemistry, medicine, analytical chemistry and ecological chemistry. The main scope of the book is the survey and systematization of the latest advances in homogeneous catalysis with metal complexes. It gives an overview of the research results and practical experience accumulated by the author during the last decade.

  10. 2013 Nutrition Risk Research Plan Review Final Report. Research Plan Review for: The Risk Factor of Inadequate Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 Nutrition Risk Standing Review Panel (from here on referred to as the SRP) was impressed by the degree of progress the nutrition discipline has made with the research plan presented since the 2012 Nutrition Risk SRP WebEx/teleconference. The scientists and staff associated with the nutrition discipline have, in addition, continued their impressive publication track record. Specifically the SRP found that the novel and important progress in the ocular health research area (Gap N7.3) represents an important advance in understanding the etiology and potential countermeasures for this condition and thinks that the work will not only be valuable for vision, but may have implications for cardiovascular health, as well. The SRP also considered the bone countermeasure data presented a potentially valuable tool for investigating bone metabolism under the unique conditions of space travel, specifically the innovation of variable use of stable Ca isotopes for bone synthesis and equal contribution for bone to investigate bone metabolism, as well as, the impact of the advanced resistive exercise device (ARED) on body composition during spaceflight. Finally, the SRP considers the planned Integrated Nutrition task to be an important and necessary strategic part of the research plan. The SRP is concerned that the risks observed in previous research on Low Earth Orbit (LEO) may not capture all the risks of longer duration flight beyond LEO. In particular, the SRP believes that there may be a much greater likelihood of an intensified chronic inflammatory response compared to the very minimal evidence seen to date and that modest effects seen in LEO, such as the reduction in appetite, may not predict an absence in longer duration flight out of LEO. The added complications of longer duration flight, greater bio-behavioral stress, radiation exposure, poorer communication, and inability to respond to unforeseen exigencies may create different risks. Thus, preparation for

  11. Electric Power Infrastructure Reliability And Security Research And Development Initiative. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dale, S.; Meeker, R.; Steurer, M.; Li, H.; Pamidi, S.; Rodrigo, H.; Suryanarayanan, S.; Cartes, D.; Ordonez, J.; Domijan, A.; Liu, W.; Cox, D.; McLaren, P.; Hovsapian, R.; Edwards, D.; Simmons, S.; Wilde, N.; Woodruff, S.; Kopriva, D.; Hussaini, Y.; Mohammed, O.; Zheng, J.; Baldwin, T.L.

    2008-01-01

    This is the final scientific/technical report for the Electric Power Infrastructure Reliability and Security R and D Initiative sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, under award number DE-FG02-05CH11292. This report covers results from the FSU-led, multi-institution effort conducted over the period 8/15/05 to 10/14/2007. Building upon existing infrastructure for power systems research, modeling, and simulation, the Center for Advanced Power Systems (CAPS) at Florida State University (FSU) is developing world-class programs in electric power systems research and education to support future electric power system needs and challenges. With U.S. Department of Energy Support, FSU CAPS has engaged in a multi-faceted effort to conduct basic and applied research towards understanding, developing, and deploying technologies and approaches that can lead to improved reliability and security of the North American electric power generation and delivery infrastructure. This wide-reaching project, through a number of carefully selected thrusts cutting across several research disciplines, set out to address key terrestrial electric utility power system issues and challenges. The challenges and the thrusts to address them were arrived at through analysis of a number of national reports and recommendations combined with input from an experienced multi-disciplined team of power systems research staff and faculty at FSU CAPS. The resulting project effort can be grouped into four major areas: - Power Systems and New Technology Insertion - Controls, Protection, and Security - Simulation Development - High Temperature Superconductivity (HTS)

  12. Nuclear emergency preparedness. Final report of the Nordic nuclear safety research project BOK-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauritzen, Bent [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    2002-02-01

    Final report of the Nordic Nuclear Safety Research project BOK-1. The BOK-1 project, 'Nuclear Emergency Preparedness', was carried out in 1998-2001 with participants from the Nordic and Baltic Sea regions. The project consists of six sub-projects: Laboratory measurements and quality assurance (BOK-1.1); Mobile measurements and measurement strategies (BOK-1.2); Field measurement and data assimilation (BOK-1.3); Countermeasures in agriculture and forestry (BOK-1.4); Emergency monitoring in the Nordic and Baltic Sea countries (BOK-1.5); and Nuclear exercises (BOK-1.6). For each sub-project, the project outline, objectives and organization are described and main results presented. (au)

  13. Nuclear emergency preparedness. Final report of the Nordic nuclear safety research project BOK-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritzen, Bent

    2002-02-01

    Final report of the Nordic Nuclear Safety Research project BOK-1. The BOK-1 project, 'Nuclear Emergency Preparedness', was carried out in 1998-2001 with participants from the Nordic and Baltic Sea regions. The project consists of six sub-projects: Laboratory measurements and quality assurance (BOK-1.1); Mobile measurements and measurement strategies (BOK-1.2); Field measurement and data assimilation (BOK-1.3); Countermeasures in agriculture and forestry (BOK-1.4); Emergency monitoring in the Nordic and Baltic Sea countries (BOK-1.5); and Nuclear exercises (BOK-1.6). For each sub-project, the project outline, objectives and organization are described and main results presented. (au)

  14. Cueing Metacognition to Improve Researching and Essay Writing in a Final Year High School Biology Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, L. N.

    2007-03-01

    This paper reports on degrees of awareness and use of specific metacognitive strategies by 16 students in a final-year high school biology class in New Zealand. The aims of the intervention were to broaden students' thinking about bioethical issues associated with cancer and to enhance students' use of metacognition. Cues and prompts were used in this unit of work to help students use metacognitive strategies since students did not generally use metacognitive strategies spontaneously. Scaffolding was mediated through the teacher modelling, questioning, cueing or prompting students to evaluate their learning. The research reported here illustrates how teachers can cue students to be more self-directed in their learning. Three case studies illustrate how learning strategies were used differentially. Most students were aware of strategies that could help them to learn more effectively. It was found that those students who were not only aware of but also used strategies to plan, monitor and evaluate their work, produced essays of higher quality.

  15. Special section on Nano-Catalysis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Makgwane, PR

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available to achieve sustainable and green catalytic processes. The special issue contains 40 peer reviewed scientific papers that include four comprehensive review articles contributions from the invited experts in the respective catalysis fields....

  16. Organometallic catalysis: some contributions to organic synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena V. Gusevskaya

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper some general aspects of metal complex catalysis and its applications for oxyfunctionalization of various olefins, including naturally occurring ones, via selective oxidation, hydroformylation and alkoxycarbonylation are discussed.

  17. Current trends of surface science and catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Jeong Young

    2014-01-01

    Including detail on applying surface science in renewable energy conversion, this book covers the latest results on model catalysts including single crystals, bridging "materials and pressure gaps", and hot electron flows in heterogeneous catalysis.

  18. Recent advances in homogeneous nickel catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasker, Sarah Z; Standley, Eric A; Jamison, Timothy F

    2014-05-15

    Tremendous advances have been made in nickel catalysis over the past decade. Several key properties of nickel, such as facile oxidative addition and ready access to multiple oxidation states, have allowed the development of a broad range of innovative reactions. In recent years, these properties have been increasingly understood and used to perform transformations long considered exceptionally challenging. Here we discuss some of the most recent and significant developments in homogeneous nickel catalysis, with an emphasis on both synthetic outcome and mechanism.

  19. Advancing Sustainable Catalysis with Magnetite Surface ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This article surveys the recent developments in the synthesis, surface modification, and synthetic applications of magnetitenanoparticles. The emergence of iron(II,III) oxide (triiron tetraoxide or magnetite; Fe3O4, or FeO•Fe2O3) nanoparticles as a sustainable support in heterogeneous catalysis is highlighted. Use of an oxide of earth-abundant iron for various applications in catalysis and environmental remediation.

  20. Enzyme catalysis with small ionic liquid quantities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Fabian; Mutschler, Julien; Zufferey, Daniel

    2011-04-01

    Enzyme catalysis with minimal ionic liquid quantities improves reaction rates, stereoselectivity and enables solvent-free processing. In particular the widely used lipases combine well with many ionic liquids. Demonstrated applications are racemate separation, esterification and glycerolysis. Minimal solvent processing is also an alternative to sluggish solvent-free catalysis. The method allows simplified down-stream processing, as only traces of ionic liquids have to be removed.

  1. Mechanisms and Design in Homogeneous Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark R. Landis

    2010-05-26

    The major goal of this research is the determination of structure-activity relationships with respect to the elementary reactions that constitute catalytic alkene polymerization. Three classes of structure-activity relationships pertain to this work: (1) The influence of the nature of the propagating alkyl (secondary, primary, β-substituted) and alkene monomer on the rates and selectivity of propagation, termination, isomerization, hydrogenolysis, etc. Such analyses are possible by direct observation methods (2) Influence of Cp-ligand substituents on fundamental reaction steps by application of direct observation and quenched-flow methods (3) Influence of counterion and solvent polarity on rates and selectivities of elementary steps during polymerization. At this point our rate of progress is limited by a combination of inefficiencies in some data collection modes (particularly quenched-flow studies) and by a relatively narrow range of accessible rates (especially for the NMR methods). Therefore, the bulk of our work concerns the development NMR, mass spectrometric, and chromatographic methods for probing catalytic reactions in a high throughput mode. Although these methods will be applied in the context of alkene polymerization, the NMR and mass spectrometric methods are completely general and will benefit research in all areas of catalysis.

  2. STIR: Redox-Switchable Olefin Polymerization Catalysis: Electronically Tunable Ligands for Controlled Polymer Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-28

    were reduced using standard hydrogenation conditions with hydrogen and palladium on carbon . Though the synthesis of 1,1’-diaminoferrocene has...forward reduction of diimine 7 proved unusually difficult under typical conditions, although a stepwise procedure utilizing formic acid and sodium...REPORT Final Report: STIR: Redox-Switchable Olefin Polymerization Catalysis: Electronically Tunable Ligands for Controlled Polymer Synthesis 14

  3. The Multi-Disciplinary Graduate Program in Educational Research. Final Report, Part I; An Historical Documentation of the Multi-Disciplinary Program in Educational Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarsfeld, Paul F., Ed.

    This document is the first in a multi-document final report on the Multi-Disciplinary Program in Educational Research conducted at the University of Pittsburgh, September 1972 to August 1974. Part one of this document gives a brief overview of the entire final report, describing the three products emerging from the program (student growth,…

  4. Specific acid catalysis and Lewis acid catalysis of Diels–Alder reactions in aqueous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mubofu, Egid B.; Engberts, Jan B.F.N.

    2004-01-01

    A comparative study of specific acid catalysis and Lewis acid catalysis of Diels–Alder reactions between dienophiles (1, 4 and 6) and cyclopentadiene (2) in water and mixed aqueous media is reported. The reactions were performed in water with copper(II) nitrate as the Lewis acid catalyst whereas

  5. Specific acid catalysis and Lewis acid catalysis of Diels-Alder reactions in aqueous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mubofu, E.B.; Engberts, J.B.F.N.

    A comparative study of specific acid catalysis and Lewis acid catalysis of Diells-Alder reactions between dienophiles (1, 4 and 6) and cyclopentadiene (2) in water and mixed aqueous media is reported. The reactions were performed in water with copper(II) nitrate as the Lewis acid catalyst whereas

  6. ISOTOPE METHODS IN HOMOGENEOUS CATALYSIS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BULLOCK,R.M.; BENDER,B.R.

    2000-12-01

    The use of isotope labels has had a fundamentally important role in the determination of mechanisms of homogeneously catalyzed reactions. Mechanistic data is valuable since it can assist in the design and rational improvement of homogeneous catalysts. There are several ways to use isotopes in mechanistic chemistry. Isotopes can be introduced into controlled experiments and followed where they go or don't go; in this way, Libby, Calvin, Taube and others used isotopes to elucidate mechanistic pathways for very different, yet important chemistries. Another important isotope method is the study of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and equilibrium isotope effect (EIEs). Here the mere observation of where a label winds up is no longer enough - what matters is how much slower (or faster) a labeled molecule reacts than the unlabeled material. The most careti studies essentially involve the measurement of isotope fractionation between a reference ground state and the transition state. Thus kinetic isotope effects provide unique data unavailable from other methods, since information about the transition state of a reaction is obtained. Because getting an experimental glimpse of transition states is really tantamount to understanding catalysis, kinetic isotope effects are very powerful.

  7. Nuclear research centres in the 21st century. Final report of a meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-11-01

    millennium attention was focused, in many areas, on changing times. In the field of nuclear technology, there were a number of major conferences addressing this issue. While the technology issue was discussed in these conferences, the general issues relating to NRCs were not the subject of discussion at any forum. To focus on these issues senior managers of nuclear research centres from 25 Member States were invited for an exchange of ideas regarding: orientation of the programmes of NRCs in the current environment; challenges faced by NRCs; interaction of NRCs with their governments, industry, academia and public; ways in which mutual collaboration could be used to enhance the technology; the possible role of the IAEA in this respect. Accordingly, the scope of the meeting was defined as follows: past and present situation of NRCs (R and D programmes and the related finances, manpower and infrastructure, strengths and limitations); challenges faced by NRCs (New directions, examples of successful orientation preservation of expertise); interaction of NRCs with their environment (social and economic sector, academia, public); collaboration and co-operation (North-South and South-South, IAEA role); and other issues considered relevant. All participants gave their country's views on these and related topics. There was extensive discussion on the subjects. The sections of the report giving highlights of presentations, summaries of discussions and recommendations were finalized at the meeting. The 44th General Conference of the IAEA passed a resolution (GC(44)/RES/23) which calls for strengthening co-operation between nuclear research centres in the area of the peaceful applications of nuclear technology. This resolution reaffirms the recommendations of the meeting. The Member States and the IAEA will now explore ways in which this co-operation can be strengthened. In the 2002-2003 Programme and Budget cycle the IAEA has also initiated a sub-programme on Management and

  8. Research program on fractured petroleum reservoirs. Final report, January 1, 1996--December 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firoozabadi, A.

    1997-05-01

    Multiphase flow in fractured porous media is a complex problem. While the study of single phase flow in a fractured or a layered medium can be pursued by some kind of averaging process, there is no meaning to averaging two-phase flow when capillarity is an active force. For a two-layer system comprised of high and low permeable layers, the performance of gas-oil gravity can be less efficient than the homogeneous low permeable medium. On the other hand, heterogeneity may enhance water imbibition due to capillarity. Due to the above and various other complexities, current tools for predicting the performance of fractured hydrocarbon reservoirs are not reliable. Based on the research work carried out at the Reservoir Engineering Research Institute, and some other Institutions, a good deal of progress has been made in recent years. But still we are a long way from good predictive reservoir models. In this final report, we summarize some of our achievements in the understanding of multiphase flow in fractured media. Since some of the features of two-phase flow in fractured and layered many are similar due to the capillary forces, the work includes progress in both types of media. There are some basic issues of flow in both fractured and unfractured media that are currently unresolved. These issues include: (1) new phase formation such as the formation of liquid phase in gas condensate reservoirs, and gas phase formation in solution gas drive process and (2) composition variation due to thermal convection and diffusion processes. In the following, a brief summary of our findings in the last three years during the course of the project is presented.

  9. Membrane/distillation hybrid process research and development. Final report, phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazanec, T.J.

    1997-07-01

    This report covers work conducted under the grant awarded to BP by DOE in late 1991 entitled {open_quotes}Membrane/Distillation Hybrid Process Research and Development.{close_quotes} The program was directed towards development and commercialization of the BP process for separation of vapor phase olefins from non-olefins via facilitated transport using an aqueous facilitator. The program has come to a very successful conclusion, with formation of a partnership between BP and Stone and Webster Engineering Corporation (SWEC) to market and commercialize the technology. The focus of this report is the final portion of the program, during which engineering re-design, facilitator optimization, economic analysis, and marketing have been the primary activities. At the end of Phase II BP was looking to partner with an engineering firm to advance the selective olefin recovery (SOR) technology from the lab/demo stage to full commercialization. In August 1995 BP and SWEC reached an agreement to advance the technology by completing additional Phase III work with DOE and beginning marketing activities.

  10. Photocatalytic pavement blocks. Air purification by pavement blocks. Final results of the research at BRRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    The use of materials can influence to a large extent the environmental impact of traffic and of road infrastructure. Especially in urban areas, where the risk on smog formation during hot summer days is high, the use of photocatalytic pavement blocks can reduce the air pollution significantly. A project on environmental friendly concrete pavement blocks is conducted at the Belgian Road Research Centre. The use of photocatalytic material in the surface of pavement blocks to obtain air purifying materials is investigated. In contact with light, TiO2 as photocatalyst, is able to reduce the NO and NO2 content in the air, caused by the exhaust of traffic. The efficiency is tested on pavement blocks, but the technique can as well be applied on other road elements (e.g. noise reducing walls, linear elements) or as a coating on new materials or existing structures. At the previous TRA conference in Gotenborgh, Sweden, the principle of photocatalysis was presented. In this paper, emphasis will be put on the final results of the 4-year project obtained in laboratory as well as on site at the Leien of Antwerp (10,000 m{sup 2}). The results indicate a durable efficiency towards NOx reduction, which is in favour for the diminishing of the risk on ozone formation. However, the precise translation from the laboratory towards the site is still in question. The results obtained during the project are discussed in this paper.

  11. Asymmetric catalysis in organic synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reilly, S.D.; Click, D.R.; Grumbine, S.K.; Scott, B.L.; Watkins, J.G.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goal of the project was to prepare new catalyst systems, which would perform chemical reactions in an enantioselective manner so as to produce only one of the possible optical isomers of the product molecule. The authors have investigated the use of lanthanide metals bearing both diolate and Schiff-base ligands as catalysts for the enantioselective reduction of prochiral ketones to secondary alcohols. The ligands were prepared from cheap, readily available starting materials, and their synthesis was performed in a ''modular'' manner such that tailoring of specific groups within the ligand could be carried out without repeating the entire synthetic procedure. In addition, they have developed a new ligand system for Group IV and lanthanide-based olefin polymerization catalysts. The ligand system is easily prepared from readily available starting materials and offers the opportunity to rapidly prepare a wide range of closely related ligands that differ only in their substitution patterns at an aromatic ring. When attached to a metal center, the ligand system has the potential to carry out polymerization reactions in a stereocontrolled manner.

  12. Mutational analysis of root characters in food plants. Proceedings of a final research coordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-04-01

    genomics and proteomics to address important agricultural issues, supporting successful agricultural production with minimal impact on the environment. Improvements in screening techniques and development of molecular markers are ways to alleviate the need for direct root assessment and speed up selection in plant breeding programmes. Root architecture models provide a tool to address the space-time dynamics of the soil/plant system. Genetic analysis of quantitative traits and methods in forward and reverse genetics will also contribute to breeding crops with root systems suitable for a range of agricultural environments. Recent evidence indicates that plant stresses are mediated by changes at the root system level. In this context, mutants and mutational analysis of root characters are becoming significant elements in research that seeks to clarify the ways by which root structure and function respond to environmental cues and alleviate the impact of stress. This publication summarizes the results presented at the third and final Research Coordination meeting (RCM) of the CRP, which was held in Antalya, Turkey, 11-15 October 2004

  13. Combination processes for food irradiation. Proceedings of the final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    There is an increasing consumer demand for food that is safe, minimally processed, visually attractive, full flavoured, nutritious, and convenient to prepare and serve, that has fewer preservatives, and that is available throughout the year at an affordable cost. Consumer concern and regulatory restrictions on the use of preservatives and pesticides in food are adversely affecting international trade in many food products. As a result, minimally processed, chilled foods and ready to eat foods are increasingly being marketed to satisfy consumer demand in both developed and developing countries. However, such foods could introduce new microbiological risks to the population, especially to those who are immunocompromised or generally at risk (children, pregnant women, the elderly, etc.). In view of these factors, a 5 year Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on Irradiation in Combination with Other Processes for Improving Food Quality was initiated in 1991 by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and the International Atomic Energy Agency through their Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture. The objectives of this CRP were to evaluate: 1) Combination treatment involving irradiation in order to extend the self-life of meat, seafood, fruits and vegetables at refrigeration temperatures and under ambient conditions; 2) Combination treatment involving irradiation in order to ensure the microbiological safety of foods, both individual and composite, including prepared meals; 3) Shelf-life extension of chilled, prepared meals and the development of shelf stable food and food components through combination treatment involving irradiation; 4) Energy requirements of combination processes involving irradiation in comparison to other food processes. Scientists from 14 countries participated in the CRP by carrying out the work under Research Contracts and Agreements with the Joint FAO/IAEA Division. The first Research Co

  14. Catalysis-by-design impacts assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fassbender, L L; Young, J K [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA); Sen, R K [Sen (R.K.) and Associates, Washington, DC (USA)

    1991-05-01

    Catalyst researchers have always recognized the need to develop a detailed understanding of the mechanisms of catalytic processes, and have hoped that it would lead to developing a theoretical predictive base to guide the search for new catalysts. This understanding allows one to develop a set of hierarchical models, from fundamental atomic-level ab-initio models to detailed engineering simulations of reactor systems, to direct the search for optimized, efficient catalyst systems. During the last two decades, the explosions of advanced surface analysis techniques have helped considerably to develop the building blocks for understanding various catalytic reactions. An effort to couple these theoretical and experimental advances to develop a set of hierarchical models to predict the nature of catalytic materials is a program entitled Catalysis-by-Design (CRD).'' In assessing the potential impacts of CBD on US industry, the key point to remember is that the value of the program lies in developing a novel methodology to search for new catalyst systems. Industrial researchers can then use this methodology to develop proprietary catalysts. Most companies involved in catalyst R D have two types of ongoing projects. The first type, what we call market-driven R D,'' are projects that support and improve upon a company's existing product lines. Project of the second type, technology-driven R D,'' are longer term, involve the development of totally new catalysts, and are initiated through scientists' research ideas. The CBD approach will impact both types of projects. However, this analysis indicates that the near-term impacts will be on market-driven'' projects. The conclusions and recommendations presented in this report were obtained by the authors through personal interviews with individuals involved in a variety of industrial catalyst development programs and through the three CBD workshops held in the summer of 1989. 34 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. Photoredox catalysis by [Ru(bpy)3]2+ to trigger transformations of organic molecules. Organic synthesis using visible-light photocatalysis and its 20th century roots

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Teplý, Filip

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 76, č. 7 (2011), s. 859-917 ISSN 0010-0765 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP207/10/2391 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Ruthenium complexes * catalysis with dyes * visible light photoredox catalysis * photocatalysis * review Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.283, year: 2011

  16. Operando chemistry of catalyst surfaces during catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Jian; Sun, Zaicheng; Opalade, Adedamola A; Wang, Nan; Fu, Wensheng; Tao, Franklin Feng

    2017-04-03

    Chemistry of a catalyst surface during catalysis is crucial for a fundamental understanding of mechanism of a catalytic reaction performed on the catalyst in the gas or liquid phase. Due to the pressure- or molecular density-dependent entropy contribution of gas or liquid phase of the reactants and the potential formation of a catalyst surface during catalysis different from that observed in an ex situ condition, the characterization of the surface of a catalyst under reaction conditions and during catalysis can be significant and even necessary for understanding the catalytic mechanism at a molecular level. Electron-based analytical techniques are challenging for studying catalyst nanoparticles in the gas or liquid phase although they are necessary techniques to employ. Instrumentation and further development of these electron-based techniques have now made in situ/operando studies of catalysts possible. New insights into the chemistry and structure of catalyst nanoparticles have been uncovered over the last decades. Herein, the origin of the differences between ex situ and in situ/operando studies of catalysts, and the technical challenges faced as well as the corresponding instrumentation and innovations utilized for characterizing catalysts under reaction conditions and during catalysis, are discussed. The restructuring of catalyst surfaces driven by the pressure of reactant(s) around a catalyst, restructuring in reactant(s) driven by reaction temperature and restructuring during catalysis are also reviewed herein. The remaining challenges and possible solutions are briefly discussed.

  17. 78 FR 26509 - Final Priority; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research-Disability and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-07

    ...--Inclusive Cloud and Web Computing AGENCY: Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, Department of Education. ACTION: Final priority. SUMMARY: The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 34 CFR Chapter III [CFDA Number: 84.133A-1] Final Priority; National...

  18. Final Technical Report. DeepCwind Consortium Research Program. January 15, 2010 - March 31, 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagher, Habib [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Viselli, Anthony [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Goupee, Andrew [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Thaler, Jeffrey [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Brady, Damian [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Browne, Peter [HDR, Inc., Omaha, NE (United States); Browning, James [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Chung, Jade [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Coulling, Alexander [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Deese, Heather [Island Institute, Rockland, ME (United States); Fowler, Matthew [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Holberton, Rebecca [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Anant, Jain [Intertek, Duluth, GA (United States); Jalbert, Dustin [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Johnson, Theresa [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Jonkman, Jason [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States); Karlson, Benjamin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kimball, Richard [Maine Maritime Academy, Castine, ME (United States); Koo, Bonjun [Technip, Paris (France); Lackner, Matthew [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Lambrakos, Kostas [Technip, Paris (France); Lankowski, Matthew [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Leopold, Adrienne [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Lim, Ho-Joon [Technip, Paris (France); Mangum, Linda [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Martin, Heather [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Masciola, Marco [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States); Maynard, Melissa [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); McCleave, James [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Mizrahi, Robert [New Jersey Audubon Society, Bernardsville, NJ (United States); Molta, Paul [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States); Pershing, Andrew [Gulf of Maine Research Institute, Portland, ME (United States); Pettigrew, Neal [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Prowell, Ian [MMI Engineering, Oakland, CA (United States); Qua, Andrew [Kleinschmidt Associates, Pittsfield, ME (United States); Sherwood, Graham [Gulf of Maine Research Institute, Portland, ME (United States); Snape, Thomas [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Steneck, Robert [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Stewart, Gordon [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Stockwell, Jason [Gulf of Maine Research Institute, Portland, ME (United States); Swift, Andrew H. P. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States); Thomas, Dale [Maine Maritime Academy, Castine, ME (United States); Viselli, Elizabeth [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Zydlewski, Gayle [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States)

    2013-06-11

    This is the final technical report for the U.S. Department of Energy-funded program, DE-0002981: DeepCwind Consortium Research Program. The project objective was the partial validation of coupled models and optimization of materials for offshore wind structures. The United States has a great opportunity to harness an indigenous abundant renewable energy resource: offshore wind. In 2010, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) estimated there to be over 4,000 GW of potential offshore wind energy found within 50 nautical miles of the US coastlines (Musial and Ram, 2010). The US Energy Information Administration reported the total annual US electric energy generation in 2010 was 4,120 billion kilowatt-hours (equivalent to 470 GW) (US EIA, 2011), slightly more than 10% of the potential offshore wind resource. In addition, deep water offshore wind is the dominant US ocean energy resource available comprising 75% of the total assessed ocean energy resource as compared to wave and tidal resources (Musial, 2008). Through these assessments it is clear offshore wind can be a major contributor to US energy supplies. The caveat to capturing offshore wind along many parts of the US coast is deep water. Nearly 60%, or 2,450 GW, of the estimated US offshore wind resource is located in water depths of 60 m or more (Musial and Ram, 2010). At water depths over 60 m building fixed offshore wind turbine foundations, such as those found in Europe, is likely economically infeasible (Musial et al., 2006). Therefore floating wind turbine technology is seen as the best option for extracting a majority of the US offshore wind energy resource. Volume 1 - Test Site; Volume 2 - Coupled Models; and Volume 3 - Composite Materials

  19. Final Report for Research in High Energy Physics (University of Hawaii)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Browder, Thomas E.

    2013-08-31

    Here we present a final report for the DOE award for the University of Hawaii High Energy Physics Group (UHHEPG) for the period from December 1, 2009 to May 31, 2013 (including a period of no-cost extension). The high energy physics (HEP) group at the University of Hawaii (UH) has been engaged in experiments at the intensity frontier studying flavor physics (Task A: Belle, Belle-II and Task B: BES) and neutrinos (Task C: SuperK, LBNE, Double Chooz, DarkSide, and neutrino R\\&D). On the energy frontier, new types of pixel detectors were developed for upgrades of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC (Task D). On the cosmic frontier, there were investigations of ultra high-energy neutrino astrophysics and the highest energy cosmic rays using special radio detection techniques (Task E: AMBER, ANITA R\\&D) and results of the analysis of ANITA data. In addition, we have developed new types of sophisticated and cutting edge instrumentation based on novel ``oscilloscope on a chip'' electronics (Task F). Theoretical physics research (Task G) is phenomenologically oriented and has studied experimental consequences of existing and proposed new theories relevant to the energy, cosmic and intensity frontiers. The senior investigators for proposal were T. E. Browder (Task A), F. A. Harris (Task B), P. Gorham (Task E), J. Kumar (Task G), J. Maricic (Task C), J. G. Learned (Task C), S. Pakvasa (Task G), S. Parker (Task D), S. Matsuno (Task C), X. Tata (Task G) and G. S. Varner (Tasks F, A, E).

  20. Isotopic assessment of long term groundwater exploitation. Proceedings of a final research coordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-10-01

    The stress imposed on the available water resources due to man's impact (exploitation, release of pollutants and agricultural practices) has resulted in depletion of the available reserves as well as deterioration of water quality in many parts of the world. Over wide areas, abstractions are exceeding current natural recharge and it is apparent from scientific studies that these water resources are being mined, especially in arid and semi-arid areas. Sustainable development and management of those water resources needs long term monitoring records to understand the changes and dynamic responses due to the exploitation. These proceedings provide a synthesis of a series of hydrochemical, isotope and geohydrological data sets which will be used for quantitative assessment of the long term dynamic response of the groundwater system. The results show that both stable and radioactive isotopes are excellent tools for characterizing and understanding aquifer systems that are undergoing long term exploitation. Specific outcomes include establishment of methodologies for monitoring and predicting changes in water quality and quantity that will lead to improved water resources management. This publication is a summary of the results achieved during the coordinated research project (CRP) and the various studies performed by the participating institutions are presented as individual presentations. The overall achievements are presented as an executive summary, and the detailed findings are presented in each contribution. These results were presented in the final coordination meeting held in Vienna, 12-16 May 2003. The results obtained from this CRP will be used to improve the predictions of future behaviour of groundwater resources in response to exploitation. The scientific component of this CRP will be a valuable source of information for isotope hydrologists involved in isotope field applications and a useful guide for groundwater managers involved in groundwater resources

  1. Progress towards bioorthogonal catalysis with organometallic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Völker, Timo; Dempwolff, Felix; Graumann, Peter L; Meggers, Eric

    2014-09-22

    The catalysis of bioorthogonal transformations inside living organisms is a formidable challenge--yet bears great potential for future applications in chemical biology and medicinal chemistry. We herein disclose highly active organometallic ruthenium complexes for bioorthogonal catalysis under biologically relevant conditions and inside living cells. The catalysts uncage allyl carbamate protected amines with unprecedented high turnover numbers of up to 270 cycles in the presence of water, air, and millimolar concentrations of thiols. By live-cell imaging of HeLa cells and with the aid of a caged fluorescent probe we could reveal a rapid development of intense fluorescence within the cellular cytoplasm and therefore support the proposed bioorthogonality of the catalysts. In addition, to illustrate the manifold applications of bioorthogonal catalysis, we developed a method for catalytic in-cell activation of a caged anticancer drug, which efficiently induced apoptosis in HeLa cells. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Sustainable green catalysis by supported metal nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Atsushi; Dhepe, Paresh L

    2009-01-01

    The recent progress of sustainable green catalysis by supported metal nanoparticles is described. The template synthesis of metal nanoparticles in ordered porous materials is studied for the rational design of heterogeneous catalysts capable of high activity and selectivity. The application of these materials in green catalytic processes results in a unique activity and selectivity arising from the concerted effect of metal nanoparticles and supports. The high catalytic performances of Pt nanoparticles in mesoporous silica is reported. Supported metal catalysts have also been applied to biomass conversion by heterogeneous catalysis. Additionally, the degradation of cellulose by supported metal catalysts, in which bifunctional catalysis of acid and metal plays the key role for the hydrolysis and reduction of cellulose, is also reported. Copyright 2009 The Japan Chemical Journal Forum and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Competing role of catalysis-coagulation and catalysis-fragmentation in kinetic aggregation behaviours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiao-Dong; Lin Zhen-Quan; Song Mei-Xia; Ke Jian-Hong

    2010-01-01

    We propose a kinetic aggregation model where species A aggregates evolve by the catalysis-coagulation and the catalysis-fragmentation, while the catalyst aggregates of the same species B or C perform self-coagulation processes. By means of the generalized Smoluchowski rate equation based on the mean-field assumption, we study the kinetic behaviours of the system with the catalysis-coagulation rate kernel K(i,j;l) ∝ l ν and the catalysis-fragmentation rate kernel F(i,j;l) ∝ l μ , where l is the size of the catalyst aggregate, and ν and μ are two parameters reflecting the dependence of the catalysis reaction on the size of the catalyst aggregate. The relation between the values of parameters ν and μ reflects the competing roles between the two catalysis processes in the kinetic evolution of species A. It is found that the competing roles of the catalysis-coagulation and catalysis-fragmentation in the kinetic aggregation behaviours are not determined simply by the relation between the two parameters ν and μ, but also depend on the values of these two parameters. When ν > μ and ν ≥ 0, the kinetic evolution of species A is dominated by the catalysis-coagulation and its aggregate size distribution a k (t) obeys the conventional or generalized scaling law; when ν k (t) approaches the scale-free form; and in other cases, a balance is established between the two competing processes at large times and a k (t) obeys a modified scaling law. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  4. Request for Symposia Support: Advances in Olefin Polymerization Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-24

    included, but were not limited to, heterogeneous catalysis , homogeneous catalysis , advances in catalyst activation, methods for polymer topological...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: This Advances in Olefin Polymerization Catalysis symposium was held at the 247th ACS National Meeting and Exposition...March 19, 2014 in Dallas, Texas and consisted of twelve (12) invited/contributed talks. The hosting ACS division was the Division of Catalysis Science

  5. Coordinated research programme on the application of isotope techniques to investigate groundwater pollution final research coordination meeting and consultants' meeting. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, B.; Chilton, J.; Travi, Y.; Gerardo-Abaya, J.

    1998-02-01

    This document summarizes the IAEA Coordinated Research Programme (CRP) on the Application of Isotope Techniques to Investigate Groundwater Pollution. Summaries of 16 completed investigations are given. The completed investigations resulted to the application of 18 O, 2 H, 3 H, 13 C, 14 C, 34 S, 15 N and boron isotopes integrated to some extend with the classical hydrological tools. These studies have broadly confirmed the use of isotope techniques on two main ways: a) to assist in the interpretation of groundwater flow systems; b) to act as tracers of the origin and pathways of ta range of groundwater pollutants. Several important aspects have become clear in the CRP: it is advisable not to rely on single isotopes, but to combine where possible the use of more than one, particularly oxygen with nitrogen and sulfur; it is essential to integrate isotope techniques with conventional hydrochemistry; trace elements have an important role to play in an integrated approach to the interpretation of contamination sources and pathways. This CRP should be regarded as a stepping stone, considering that the magnitude of the problem of groundwater pollution is enormous in global terms. In order to have an impact on the understanding of groundwater pollution, the need is seen for follow-up by several CRPs targeted at specific areas or problems. Of priorities are: a) urban waste, both human and industrial; b) the origin of saline groundwater; and c) nitrate in groundwater in both agricultural and urban areas

  6. Plasma Chemistry and Catalysis in Gases and Liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Parvulescu, Vasile I; Lukes, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Filling the gap for a book that not only covers gases but also plasma methods in liquids, this is all set to become the standard reference on the topic. It considers the central aspects in plasma chemistry and plasma catalysis by focusing on the green and environmental applications, while also taking into account their practical and economic viability. With the topics addressed by an international group of major experts, this is a must-have for researchers, PhD students and postdocs specializing in the field.

  7. Charge Transfer and Catalysis at the Metal Support Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Lawrence Robert [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-07-31

    Kinetic, electronic, and spectroscopic characterization of model Pt–support systems are used to demonstrate the relationship between charge transfer and catalytic activity and selectivity. The results show that charge flow controls the activity and selectivity of supported metal catalysts. This dissertation builds on extensive existing knowledge of metal–support interactions in heterogeneous catalysis. The results show the prominent role of charge transfer at catalytic interfaces to determine catalytic activity and selectivity. Further, this research demonstrates the possibility of selectively driving catalytic chemistry by controlling charge flow and presents solid-state devices and doped supports as novel methods for obtaining electronic control over catalytic reaction kinetics.

  8. 78 FR 76169 - Patuxent Research Refuge, Prince George's and Anne Arundel Counties, MD; Final Comprehensive...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-16

    ... species of conservation concern in the Chesapeake Bay region. In particular, it emphasizes forest... modifications described below, is the foundation for the final CCP. Background The National Wildlife Refuge...

  9. Keynotes in energy-related catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Kaliaguine, S

    2011-01-01

    Catalysis by solid acids, which includes (modified) zeolites, is of special relevance to energy applications. Acid catalysis is highly important in modern petroleum refining operations - large-scale processes such as fluid catalytic cracking, catalytic reforming, alkylation and olefin oligomerization rely on the transformation of hydrocarbons by acid catalysts. (Modified) zeolites are therefore essential for the improvement of existing processes and for technical innovations in the conversion of crude. There can be little doubt that zeolite-based catalysts will play a major role in the futu

  10. Heterogeneous catalysis at nanoscale for energy applications

    CERN Document Server

    Tao, Franklin (Feng); Kamat, Prashant V

    2015-01-01

    This book presents both the fundamentals concepts and latest achievements of a field that is growing in importance since it represents a possible solution for global energy problems.  It focuses on an atomic-level understanding of heterogeneous catalysis involved in important energy conversion processes. It presents a concise picture for the entire area of heterogeneous catalysis with vision at the atomic- and nano- scales, from synthesis, ex-situ and in-situ characterization, catalytic activity and selectivity, to mechanistic understanding based on experimental exploration and theoretical si

  11. Catalysis by nonmetals rules for catalyst selection

    CERN Document Server

    Krylov, Oleg V

    1970-01-01

    Catalysis by Non-metals: Rules of Catalyst Selection presents the development of scientific principles for the collection of catalysts. It discusses the investigation of the mechanism of chemosorption and catalysis. It addresses a series of properties of solid with catalytic activity. Some of the topics covered in the book are the properties of a solid and catalytic activity in oxidation-reduction reactions; the difference of electronegativities and the effective charges of atoms; the role of d-electrons in the catalytic properties of a solid; the color of solids; and proton-acid and proton-ba

  12. Eurogulf: an Eu-GCC dialogue for energy stability and sustainability. Final research report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naji, Abi-Aad [ECONERGY, Washington (United States); Skinner, R.; Arnott, R.; Mabro, R. [Oxford Institute for Energy Studies - OIES (United States); Luciani, G.; Luciani, G. [EUI, RSCAS, Mediterranean Programme (Italy)

    2005-07-01

    The EUROGULF project was launched in 2002 by a consortium led by the Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies at the European University Institute, and comprising the Oxford Institute of Energy Studies, the Energy Policy Unit of the National Technical University of Athens and ECONERGY SAL of Beirut. Funding is provided by the European Commission through a grant from the SYNERGY program. The objective of the project is to analyse European Union (EU) - Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) relations with respect to oil and gas issues and propose new policy initiatives and approaches to enhance cooperation between the two regional groupings. The project has originated a collection of papers whose provisional drafts have been discussed in two workshops: in Riyadh in April 2004, and in Florence in November 2004. This document is the final research report presented at the concluding conference in Kuwait, on April 2005. It gathers the final versions of the project papers: Executive Summary and Policy Paper; Task 1 - Economic and Political Conditions for Energy Security: Prospects for Oil and Gas Exports from the GCC Member Countries; Prospects for Oil and Gas Exports from the GCC Member Countries; Supply Responses to Price Changes in the Medium Term and the Definition of an 'Optimal' Price Band for Guaranteeing Energy Security in the Long Term; Discussion of the Desirable Rate of Exploitation of GCC Hydrocarbon Resources in the light of the Objectives of Maximizing Revenue and Achieving Economic Development in the Long Run; Promoting Economic Diversification as a Tool to Encourage Countries holding Major Hydrocarbon Reserves to Increase Production in line with Growing Global Demand at Stable Prices; Task 2 - Enhancing the Efficiency and Transparency of the International Oil Markets: The Reference Pricing System: Origins, Rationale, Assessment; Reforming Reference Pricing and Seeking for Alternative Pricing Systems; Strategic Stockpiles vs. Market Intervention for

  13. Eurogulf: an Eu-GCC dialogue for energy stability and sustainability. Final research report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naji, Abi-Aad; Skinner, R.; Arnott, R.; Mabro, R.; Luciani, G.; Luciani, G.

    2005-01-01

    The EUROGULF project was launched in 2002 by a consortium led by the Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies at the European University Institute, and comprising the Oxford Institute of Energy Studies, the Energy Policy Unit of the National Technical University of Athens and ECONERGY SAL of Beirut. Funding is provided by the European Commission through a grant from the SYNERGY program. The objective of the project is to analyse European Union (EU) - Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) relations with respect to oil and gas issues and propose new policy initiatives and approaches to enhance cooperation between the two regional groupings. The project has originated a collection of papers whose provisional drafts have been discussed in two workshops: in Riyadh in April 2004, and in Florence in November 2004. This document is the final research report presented at the concluding conference in Kuwait, on April 2005. It gathers the final versions of the project papers: Executive Summary and Policy Paper; Task 1 - Economic and Political Conditions for Energy Security: Prospects for Oil and Gas Exports from the GCC Member Countries; Prospects for Oil and Gas Exports from the GCC Member Countries; Supply Responses to Price Changes in the Medium Term and the Definition of an 'Optimal' Price Band for Guaranteeing Energy Security in the Long Term; Discussion of the Desirable Rate of Exploitation of GCC Hydrocarbon Resources in the light of the Objectives of Maximizing Revenue and Achieving Economic Development in the Long Run; Promoting Economic Diversification as a Tool to Encourage Countries holding Major Hydrocarbon Reserves to Increase Production in line with Growing Global Demand at Stable Prices; Task 2 - Enhancing the Efficiency and Transparency of the International Oil Markets: The Reference Pricing System: Origins, Rationale, Assessment; Reforming Reference Pricing and Seeking for Alternative Pricing Systems; Strategic Stockpiles vs. Market Intervention for Price

  14. 78 FR 22783 - Final Priority; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research-Disability and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-17

    ... Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research--Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program--Disability Rehabilitation Research Project AGENCY: Office of Special Education and... Special Education and Rehabilitative Services announces a priority for a Disability Rehabilitation...

  15. Final report on the IAEA research contracts No. 1194/RB, 1194/R1/RB and 1194/R2/RB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zobor, E.; Janosy, J.S.; Szentgali, A.

    1980-09-01

    The final report summarizes the research activities made in the framework of the IAEA Research Contracts No. 1194/RB, 1194/R1/RB and 1194/R2/RB. A multilevel hierarchical control system is treated which uses weakly-coupled low dimensional subsystems under the supervision of a dynamic coordinator program. This self-organizing adaptive control system was checked by a 5 MW research reactor. As an example the paper describes the experimental computer control system of the 5 MW WWR-SM research reactor, where the reactor power and outlet temperature have been controlled on the basis of the treated control concept since 1978. (author)

  16. Atomic and molecular data for plasma diagnostics. Summary report of final IAEA research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.E.H.

    2006-02-01

    Detailed discussions were held to determine the outcomes of participants' research at the final Research Coordination Meeting (RCM) on 'Atomic and molecular data for fusion plasma diagnostics' at IAEA Headquarters on 19-20 July 2004. Participants summarized the specific results obtained in the course of the Coordinated Research Project (CRP), and considered the impact of the data generated on the design and modelling of fusion devices. Areas for which data needs still exist were also identified, and hope was expressed that further research in these areas could be supported in the future. The discussions, conclusions and recommendations of the RCM are briefly described in this report. (author)

  17. Patient Dose Optimization in Fluoroscopically Guided Interventional Procedures. Final Report of a Coordinated Research Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Protection with Newer Imaging Techniques recently produced. In addition it has embarked on a series of CRPs, of which this is one, and which add to those already available in radiology, mammography and computed tomography (CT). This series of TECDOCs is a further contribution to the resources provided by the IAEA in support of implementation of the BSS. The International Action Plan for the Radiological Protection of Patients, approved by the General Conference of the IAEA in September 2002, requires that: 'The practice-specific documents under preparation should be finalized as guidance rather than regulations, and they should include input from professional bodies, from international organizations and from authorities with responsibility for radiation protection and medical care.' This TECDOC is prepared and issued in this spirit. It provides useful advice for those involved in one of the more dose intensive areas developing in radiology today. The present publication is based on the results of the groups who participated in the coordinated research project

  18. Direct sp(3)C-H acroleination of N-aryl-tetrahydroisoquinolines by merging photoredox catalysis with nucleophilic catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhu-Jia; Xuan, Jun; Xia, Xu-Dong; Ding, Wei; Guo, Wei; Chen, Jia-Rong; Zou, You-Quan; Lu, Liang-Qiu; Xiao, Wen-Jing

    2014-04-07

    Sequence catalysis merging photoredox catalysis (PC) and nucleophilic catalysis (NC) has been realized for the direct sp(3) C-H acroleination of N-aryl-tetrahydroisoquinoline (THIQ). The reaction was performed under very mild conditions and afforded products in 50-91% yields. A catalytic asymmetric variant was proved to be successful with moderate enantioselectivities (up to 83 : 17 er).

  19. The Multi-Disciplinary Graduate Program in Educational Research. Final Report, Part V; The Frame of Reference Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarsfeld, Paul F., Ed.

    This "Frame of Reference Study" consists of the fifth section of the final report of the Multi-Disciplinary Graduate Program in Educational Research of the University of Pittsburgh. The term, "frames of reference," is used to mean the context of assumptions, procedures, rules, cognitive models, and conceptions of the nature of…

  20. Laboratory directed research and development final report: Intelligent tools for on-machine acceptance of precision machined components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, N.G.; Harwell, L.D.; Hazelton, A.

    1997-02-01

    On-Machine Acceptance (OMA) is an agile manufacturing concept being developed for machine tools at SNL. The concept behind OMA is the integration of product design, fabrication, and qualification processes by using the machining center as a fabrication and inspection tool. This report documents the final results of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development effort to qualify OMA.

  1. Final summary report of the Nordic Nuclear Safety Research Program 1994 - 1997; Sammanfattning av det nordiska forskningsprogrammet foer kaernsaekerhet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennerstedt, T.; Lemmens, A. [eds.

    1999-11-01

    This is a summary report of the NKS research program carried out 1994 - 1997. It is basically a compilation of the executive summaries of the final reports on the nine scientific projects carried out during that period. It highlights the conclusions, recommendations and other results of the projects. (au)

  2. George Peabody College for Teachers Demonstration and Research Center for Early Childhood: Final Report to the Office of Economic Opportunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George Peabody Coll. for Teachers, Nashville, TN. Demonstration and Research Center for Early Education.

    This final report is a general description of the activities of the Demonstration and Research Center for Early Education (DARCEE), an Appalachian preschool program for disadvantaged children. Included in the document are: a general overview of the program, histories of the three Early Training Centers, and objectives and publications of the…

  3. Transition metal catalysis in confined spaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenders, S.H.A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Chemical reactions are required for the conversion of feedstocks to valuable materials, such as different types of plastics, pharmaceutical ingredients and advanced materials. In order to facilitate the conversion of these feedstocks to a wide array of products, catalysis plays a prominent role.

  4. Homogeneous Catalysis by Transition Metal Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawby, Roger

    1988-01-01

    Examines four processes involving homogeneous catalysis which highlight the contrast between the simplicity of the overall reaction and the complexity of the catalytic cycle. Describes how catalysts provide circuitous routes in which all energy barriers are relatively low rather than lowering the activation energy for a single step reaction.…

  5. Supported ionic liquid-phase (SILP) catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisager, Anders; Fehrmann, Rasmus; Wasserscheid, P.

    2005-01-01

    The concept of supported ionic liquid-phase (SILP) catalysis has been demonstrated for gas- and liquid-phase continuous fixed-bed reactions using rhodium phosphine catalyzed hydroformylation of propene and 1-octene as examples. The nature of the support had important influence on both the catalytic...

  6. Confined catalysis under two-dimensional materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haobo; Xiao, Jianping; Bao, Xinhe

    2017-01-01

    Confined microenvironments formed in heterogeneous catalysts have recently been recognized as equally important as catalytically active sites. Understanding the fundamentals of confined catalysis has become an important topic in heterogeneous catalysis. Well-defined 2D space between a catalyst surface and a 2D material overlayer provides an ideal microenvironment to explore the confined catalysis experimentally and theoretically. Using density functional theory calculations, we reveal that adsorption of atoms and molecules on a Pt(111) surface always has been weakened under monolayer graphene, which is attributed to the geometric constraint and confinement field in the 2D space between the graphene overlayer and the Pt(111) surface. A similar result has been found on Pt(110) and Pt(100) surfaces covered with graphene. The microenvironment created by coating a catalyst surface with 2D material overlayer can be used to modulate surface reactivity, which has been illustrated by optimizing oxygen reduction reaction activity on Pt(111) covered by various 2D materials. We demonstrate a concept of confined catalysis under 2D cover based on a weak van der Waals interaction between 2D material overlayers and underlying catalyst surfaces. PMID:28533413

  7. Transition metal catalysis in confined spaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenders, S.H.A.M.; Gramage-Doria, R.; de Bruin, B.; Reek, J.N.H.

    2015-01-01

    Transition metal catalysis plays an important role in both industry and in academia where selectivity, activity and stability are crucial parameters to control. Next to changing the structure of the ligand, introducing a confined space as a second coordination sphere around a metal catalyst has

  8. Loop residues and catalysis in OMP synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Gary P.; Hansen, Michael Riis; Grubmeyer, Charles

    2012-01-01

    (preceding paper in this issue, DOI 10.1021/bi300083p)]. The full expression of KIEs by H105A and E107A may result from a less secure closure of the catalytic loop. The lower level of expression of the KIE by K103A suggests that in these mutant proteins the major barrier to catalysis is successful closure...

  9. Surface temperature excess in heterogeneous catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, L.

    2005-01-01

    In this dissertation we study the surface temperature excess in heterogeneous catalysis. For heterogeneous reactions, such as gas-solid catalytic reactions, the reactions take place at the interfaces between the two phases: the gas and the solid catalyst. Large amount of reaction heats are released

  10. Hydrogen-bonding catalysis of sulfonium salts

    OpenAIRE

    Kaneko, Shiho; Kumatabara, Yusuke; Shimizu, Shoichi; Maruoka, Keiji; Shirakawa, Seiji

    2017-01-01

    Although quaternary ammonium and phosphonium salts are known as important catalysts in phase-transfer catalysis, the catalytic ability of tertiary sulfonium salts has not yet been well demonstrated. Herein, we demonstrate the catalytic ability of trialkylsulfonium salts as hydrogen-bonding catalysts on the basis of the characteristic properties of the acidic α hydrogen atoms on alkylsulfonium salts.

  11. Catalysis and Multi-Component Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibasaki, Masakatsu; Yus, Miguel; Bremner, Stacy; Comer, Eamon; Shore, Gjergji; Morin, Sylvie; Organ, Michael G.; van der Eycken, Erik; Merkul, Eugen; Dorsch, Dieter; Müller, Thomas J. J.; Ryabukhin, Sergey V.; Ostapchuk, Eugeniy N.; Plaskon, Andrey S.; Volochnyuk, Dmitriy M.; Shivanyuk, Alexander N.; Tolmachev, Andrey A.; Sheibani, Hassan; Babaie, Maryam; Behzadi, Soheila; Dabiri, Minoo; Bahramnejad, Mahboobeh; Bashiribod, Sahareh; Hekmatshoar, Rahim; Sadjadi, Sodeh; Khorasani, Mohammad; Polyakov, Anatoliy I.; Eryomina, Vera A.; Medvedeva, Lidiya A.; Tihonova, Nadezhda I.; Listratova, Anna V.; Voskressensky, Leonid G.; Merkul, Eugen; Dorsch, Dieter; Müller, Thomas J. J.; Sheibani, Hassan; Esfandiarpoor, Zeinab; Behzadi, Soheila; Titova, Julia A.; Fedorova, Olga V.; Ovchinnikova, Irina G.; Valova, Marina S.; Koryakova, Olga V.; Rusinov, Gennady L.; Charushin, Valery N.; Hekmatshoar, Rahim; Sadjadi, Sodeh

    We have been studying the development of new asymmetric two-center catalysis using rare earth alkoxides and bifunctional sugar and related ligands. In The Fourth International Conference on Multi-Component Reactions and Related Chemistry (MCR 2009), new catalytic asymmetric reactions using catalysts 1 and 2 and catalytic asymmetric syntheses of ranirestat 3 and tamiflu 4 will be presented.

  12. The mechanism of montmorillonite catalysis in RNA synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Prakash

    montmorillonite as reaction occurs. The application of the Scherer equation to the X-ray diffraction data showed differences in domain size. Modeling of the size of the activated nucleotide monomers and the charge on the montmorillonite surface provided an interpretation of how these factors influence adsorption. This research provides a basis for further understanding of the physical processes in the mechanism of this catalysis in prebiotic reactions. This research was supported by NASA Astrobiology Institute Grant NNA09DA80A. References: Aldersley, M.F., Joshi, P.C., Price, J.D., Ferris, J.P. The role of montmorillonite in its catalysis of RNA synthesis. Appl. Clay Sci. 54,1-14, 2011. Bishop, J.L., Dobrea, E.J.N., Mckeown, N.K., Parenta, M. Phyllos- ilicate diversity and past aqueous activity revealed at Mawrth Vallis, Mars. Science 321, 830-833, 2008. Joshi, P.C., Aldersley, M.F., Delano, J.W., Ferris, J.P., Mechanism of montmorillonite catalysis in the formation of RNA oligomers, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 131, 13369-13374, 2009.

  13. Nuclear reactor and materials science research: Final technical report, May 1, 1985-September 30, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harling, O.K.

    1987-01-01

    Throughout the 17-month period of the grant, May 1, 1985 - September 30, 1986, the MIT Research Reactor (MITR-II) was operated in support of research and academic programs in the physical and life sciences and in related engineering fields. The period encompassed MIT's fiscal year utilization of the reactor during that period may be classified as follows: neutron beam tube research, nuclear materials research and development, radiochemistry and trace analysis, nuclear medicine, radiation health physics, computer control of reactors, dose reduction in nuclear power reactors, reactor irradiations and services for groups outside MIT, and MIT research reactor. This paper provides detailed information on this research academic utilization

  14. Final report for the 'Melt-Vessel Interactions' Project. European Union R and TD Program 4th Framework. MVI project final research report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Dinh, T.N.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Bui, V.A.; Green, J.; Kolb, G.; Karbojian, A.; Theerthan, S.A.; Gubaidulline, A. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Power Safety; Helle, M.; Kymaelaeinen, O.; Tuomisto, H. [IVO Power Engineering Ltd., Vantaa (Finland); Bonnet, J.M.; Rouge, S.; Narcoux, M.; Liegeois, A. [CEA - Grenoble (France); Turland, B.D.; Dobson, G.P. [AEA Technology plc, Dorchester (United Kingdom); Siccama, A. [ECN Nuclear Research, Petten (Netherlands); Ikonen, K. [VTT Energy, Helsinki (Finland); Parozzi, F. [ENEL - SRI/PAM/GRA, Segrate, MI (Italy); Kolev, N. [Siemens AG, Erlangen (Germany); Caira, M. [Univ. of Roma (Italy)

    1999-04-01

    The Melt Vessel Interaction (MVI) project is concerned with the consequences of the interactions that a core melt, generated during a postulated severe accident in a light water reactor, may have with the pressure vessel. In particular, the issues concerned with the failure of the vessel bottom head are the focus of the research. The specific objectives of the project are to obtain data and develop validated models, which could be applied to prototypic plants, and accident conditions, for resolution of issues related to the melt vessel interactions. The project work has been performed by nine partners having varied responsibility. The work included a large number of experiments, with simulant materials, whose observations and results are employed, respectively, to understand the physical mechanisms and to develop validated models. Applications to the prototypic geometry and conditions have also been performed. This report is volume 1 of the Final Report for the Project, in which a summary of the progress achieved in the experimental program is provided. We have, however, included some aspects of the modeling activities. Volume 2 of the Final report describes the progress achieved in the modeling program. The progress achieved in the experimental and modeling parts of the Project has led to the resolution of some of the issues of melt vessel interaction. Considerable progress was also achieved towards resolution of the remaining issues.

  15. Cueing Metacognition to Improve Researching and Essay Writing in a Final Year High School Biology Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, L. N.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on degrees of awareness and use of specific metacognitive strategies by 16 students in a final-year high school biology class in New Zealand. The aims of the intervention were to broaden students' thinking about bioethical issues associated with cancer and to enhance students' use of metacognition. Cues and prompts were used in…

  16. Center for Catalysis at Iowa State University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, George A.

    2006-10-17

    The overall objective of this proposal is to enable Iowa State University to establish a Center that enjoys world-class stature and eventually enhances the economy through the transfer of innovation from the laboratory to the marketplace. The funds have been used to support experimental proposals from interdisciplinary research teams in areas related to catalysis and green chemistry. Specific focus areas included: • Catalytic conversion of renewable natural resources to industrial materials • Development of new catalysts for the oxidation or reduction of commodity chemicals • Use of enzymes and microorganisms in biocatalysis • Development of new, environmentally friendly reactions of industrial importance These focus areas intersect with barriers from the MYTP draft document. Specifically, section 2.4.3.1 Processing and Conversion has a list of bulleted items under Improved Chemical Conversions that includes new hydrogenation catalysts, milder oxidation catalysts, new catalysts for dehydration and selective bond cleavage catalysts. Specifically, the four sections are: 1. Catalyst development (7.4.12.A) 2. Conversion of glycerol (7.4.12.B) 3. Conversion of biodiesel (7.4.12.C) 4. Glucose from starch (7.4.12.D) All funded projects are part of a soybean or corn biorefinery. Two funded projects that have made significant progress toward goals of the MYTP draft document are: Catalysts to convert feedstocks with high fatty acid content to biodiesel (Kraus, Lin, Verkade) and Conversion of Glycerol into 1,3-Propanediol (Lin, Kraus). Currently, biodiesel is prepared using homogeneous base catalysis. However, as producers look for feedstocks other than soybean oil, such as waste restaurant oils and rendered animal fats, they have observed a large amount of free fatty acids contained in the feedstocks. Free fatty acids cannot be converted into biodiesel using homogeneous base-mediated processes. The CCAT catalyst system offers an integrated and cooperative catalytic

  17. Geoscience-related research needs for geothermal energy technology. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crane, C. H.; Markiewicz, J. J. Jr.

    1983-09-30

    A project to identify and prioritize geoscience-related research needs that would be of significant benefit in the assessment, exploration, and development of US geothermal energy resources is described. The federal research needs as identified by the Panel are summarized. The research needs are organized into specific research needs for four technology areas and a group of generic research needs which relate to all of the technology areas. Arranged in order of overall need for research, these technology areas are: reservoir engineering; resource exploration and reservoir definition; well drilling, completion, and stimulation; and environmental monitoring and control. The generic research needs are: geoscience case studies, scientific drilling, information and technology transfer, and improved research coordination. (MHR)

  18. Summer Research Program - 1998 High School Apprenticeship Program Final Reports. Volume 12, Armstrong Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1998-01-01

    The United States Air Force Summer Research Program (USAF-SRP) is designed to introduce university, college, and technical institute faculty members, graduate students, and high school students to Air Force research...

  19. Reinventing Schools Research Project: Collaborative Research Project on the Merger of General and Special Education School Reforms. Final Report--Executive Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Dianne L.; Meyer, Gwen; Dalmau, Mary; Droege, Cleo; Ferguson, Philip M.; Gudjonsdottir, Hafdis; Katul, Nadia; Lester, Jackie; Moore, Caroline; Oxley, Diana; Ralph, Ginevra; Rivers, Eileen

    This final report describes the activities of the Reinventing Schools Research Project, a project that investigated how the inclusion of students with severe and other disabilities merges with larger efforts of educators, administrators, and parents to restructure and reform schools and how to influence the direction of that merger. The project…

  20. Indoor Measurements of Environmental Tobacco Smoke Final Report to the Tobacco Related Disease Research Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apte, Michael G.; Gundel, Lara A.; Dod, Raymond L.; Russell, Marion L.; Singer, Brett C.; Sohn, Michael D.; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Chang, Gee-Minn; Sextro, Richard G.

    2004-03-02

    The objective of this research project was to improve the basis for estimating environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposures in a variety of indoor environments. The research utilized experiments conducted in both laboratory and ''real-world'' buildings to (1) study the transport of ETS species from room to room, (2) examine the viability of using various chemical markers as tracers for ETS, and (3) to evaluate to what extent re-emission of ETS components from indoor surfaces might add to the ETS exposure estimates. A three-room environmental chamber was used to examine multi-zone transport and behavior of ETS and its tracers. One room (simulating a smoker's living room) was extensively conditioned with ETS, while a corridor and a second room (simulating a child's bedroom) remained smoking-free. A series of 5 sets of replicate experiments were conducted under different door opening and flow configurations: sealed, leaky, slightly ajar, wide open, and under forced air-flow conditions. When the doors between the rooms were slightly ajar the particles dispersed into the other rooms, eventually reaching the same concentration. The particle size distribution took the same form in each room, although the total numbers of particles in each room depended on the door configurations. The particle number size distribution moved towards somewhat larger particles as the ETS aged. We also successfully modeled the inter-room transport of ETS particles from first principles--using size fractionated particle emission factors, predicted deposition rates, and thermal temperature gradient driven inter-room flows, This validation improved our understanding of bulk inter-room ETS particle transport. Four chemical tracers were examined: ultraviolet-absorbing particulate matter (UVPM), fluorescent particulate matter (FPM), nicotine and solanesol. Both (UVPM) and (FPM) traced the transport of ETS particles into the non-smoking areas. Nicotine, on the other hand

  1. Final Report - Independent Verification Survey Activities at the Seperations Process Research Unit Sites, Niskayuna, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evan Harpenau

    2011-03-15

    The Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) complex located on the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) site in Niskayuna, New York, was constructed in the late 1940s to research the chemical separation of plutonium and uranium (Figure A-1). SPRU operated as a laboratory scale research facility between February 1950 and October 1953. The research activities ceased following the successful development of the reduction oxidation and plutonium/uranium extraction processes. The oxidation and extraction processes were subsequently developed for large scale use by the Hanford and Savannah River sites (aRc 2008a). Decommissioning of the SPRU facilities began in October 1953 and continued through the 1990s.

  2. Radioprotective drugs: a synopsis of current research and a proposed research plan for the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickman, R.; Anspaugh, L.

    1985-04-01

    FEMA has broad roles in the management of disasters potentially involving substantial amounts of radioactive contamination. These could be either peacetime or wartime disasters. A meeting was held in March 1985 to see if there are any research contributions that FEMA might reasonably make in the area of radioprotective drugs that would substantially enhance its ability to perform its mission. The other federal agencies presently sponsoring research in the field were represented at the meeting. A few selected researchers also participated to provide complementary viewpoints. Activities of a modest scale that FEMA might undertake were identified, as were larger scale activities that might be undertaken in the event of long-term, major funding-level increases for FEMA. 2 refs

  3. Radioprotective drugs: a synopsis of current research and a proposed research plan for the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickman, R.; Anspaugh, L.

    1985-04-01

    FEMA has broad roles in the management of disasters potentially involving substantial amounts of radioactive contamination. These could be either peacetime or wartime disasters. A meeting was held in March 1985 to see if there are any research contributions that FEMA might reasonably make in the area of radioprotective drugs that would substantially enhance its ability to perform its mission. The other federal agencies presently sponsoring research in the field were represented at the meeting. A few selected researchers also participated to provide complementary viewpoints. Activities of a modest scale that FEMA might undertake were identified, as were larger scale activities that might be undertaken in the event of long-term, major funding-level increases for FEMA. 2 refs.

  4. Catalysis looks to the future. Panel on new directions in catalytic science and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    Catalysts play a vital role in providing society with fuels, commodity and fine chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and means for protecting the environment. To be useful, a good catalyst must have a high turnover frequency (activity), produce the right kind of product (selectivity), and have a long life (durability), all at an acceptable cost. Research in the field of catalysis provides the tools and understanding required to facilitate and accelerate the development of improved catalysts and to open opportunities for the discovery of new catalytic processes. The aim of this report is to identify the research opportunities and challenges for catalysis in the coming decades and to detail the resources necessary to ensure steady progress. Chapter 2 discusses opportunities for developing new catalysts to meet the demands of the chemical and fuel industries, and the increasing role of catalysis in environmental protection. The intellectual challenges for advancing the frontiers of catalytic science are outlined in Chapter 3. The human and institutional resources available in the US for carrying out research on catalysis are summarized in Chapter 4. The findings and recommendations of the panel for industry, academe, the national laboratories, and the federal government are presented in Chapter 5.

  5. Engineering Design Thinking and Information Gathering. Final Report. Research in Engineering and Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentzer, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this research was to explore the relationship between information access and design solution quality of high school students presented with an engineering design problem. This objective is encompassed in the research question driving this inquiry: How does information access impact the design process? This question has emerged in…

  6. A ProCoS II Project Final Report: ESPRIT Basic Research project 707

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bowen, J. P.; Hoare, C. A. R.; Langmaack, Hans

    1996-01-01

    An overview of the research and associated activities of the Europeancollaborative ESPRIT Basic Research ProCoS II project (no. 7071) on``Provably Correct Systems'' which ran from 1992 to 1995 is presented.This was a follow-on project to ProCoS (no. 3104) and ran inparallel with the ProCoS Workin...

  7. Final Technical Close out Report University Research Program in Robotics for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James S. Tulenko; Carl Crane

    2004-01-01

    The report covers the 2003-04 contract period, with a retrospective of the 11 years for the contract, from 1993 to 2004. This includes personnel, technical publications and reports, plus research laboratories employed. Specific information is given in eight research areas, reporting on all technology developed and/or deployed by the University of Florida

  8. Final Closeout Report University Research Program in Robotics for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James S. Tulenko; Carl Crane

    2004-08-24

    The report covers the 2003-04 contract period, with a retrospective of the 11 years for the contract, from 1993 to 2004. This includes personnel, technical publications and reports, plus research laboratories employed. Specific information is given in eight research areas, reporting on all technology developed and/or deployed by the University of Florida.

  9. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spivey, James J. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2016-02-02

    The research summarized here has the goal of developing a fundamental understanding of how catalysts work. These materials are demonstrably essential to our daily life, from the cars we drive to the clothes we wear. Our Center advances the science behind how we prepare, analyze, and describe catalysts. This has been identified by one of the documents guiding Federal research objectives (Directing Matter and Energy: Five Challenges for Science and the Imagination): “Major challenges in heterogeneous catalysis are to more clearly define the nature of the active sites, to engineer at the molecular level catalysis with designed properties in three dimensions, and to create new catalysts for new transformations.” This directly addresses this objective.

  10. Bimetallic redox synergy in oxidative palladium catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, David C; Ritter, Tobias

    2012-06-19

    Polynuclear transition metal complexes, which are embedded in the active sites of many metalloenzymes, are responsible for effecting a diverse array of oxidation reactions in nature. The range of chemical transformations remains unparalleled in the laboratory. With few noteworthy exceptions, chemists have primarily focused on mononuclear transition metal complexes in developing homogeneous catalysis. Our group is interested in the development of carbon-heteroatom bond-forming reactions, with a particular focus on identifying reactions that can be applied to the synthesis of complex molecules. In this context, we have hypothesized that bimetallic redox chemistry, in which two metals participate synergistically, may lower the activation barriers to redox transformations relevant to catalysis. In this Account, we discuss redox chemistry of binuclear Pd complexes and examine the role of binuclear intermediates in Pd-catalyzed oxidation reactions. Stoichiometric organometallic studies of the oxidation of binuclear Pd(II) complexes to binuclear Pd(III) complexes and subsequent C-X reductive elimination from the resulting binuclear Pd(III) complexes have confirmed the viability of C-X bond-forming reactions mediated by binuclear Pd(III) complexes. Metal-metal bond formation, which proceeds concurrently with oxidation of binuclear Pd(II) complexes, can lower the activation barrier for oxidation. We also discuss experimental and theoretical work that suggests that C-X reductive elimination is also facilitated by redox cooperation of both metals during reductive elimination. The effect of ligand modification on the structure and reactivity of binuclear Pd(III) complexes will be presented in light of the impact that ligand structure can exert on the structure and reactivity of binuclear Pd(III) complexes. Historically, oxidation reactions similar to those discussed here have been proposed to proceed via mononuclear Pd(IV) intermediates, and the hypothesis of mononuclear Pd

  11. Medium-energy nuclear physics research. Final technical progress report, May 1, 1971-November 30, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willard, H.B.

    1981-01-01

    Final results are summarized for this program with the primary emphasis on measurement of ten independent parameters for proton-proton elastic scattering at 800 MeV and four independent such parameters at 650 MeV. Inelastic proton-proton reactions have also been measured at 800 MeV. Proton-deuteron elastic scattering cross sections and polarization analyzing powers have been obtained at 800 MeV. Proton-nucleus total and total reaction cross sections were measured at 700 MeV for a number of nuclei. Major instrumentation was designed and constructed to carry out this program

  12. Supplement to the technical assessment of geoscience-related research for geothermal energy technology. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-09-01

    Detailed information (e.g., project title, sponsoring organization, research area, objective status, etc.) is presented for 338 geoscience/geothermal related projects. A summary of the projects conducted by sponsoring organization is presented and an easy reference to obtain detailed information on the number and type of efforts being sponsored is presented. The projects are summarized by research area (e.g., volcanology, fluid inclusions, etc.) and an additional project cross-reference mechanism is also provided. Subsequent to the collection of the project information, a geosciences classification system was developed to categorize each project by research area (e.g., isotope geochemistry, heat flow studies) and by type of research conducted (e.g., theoretical research, modeling/simulation). A series of matrices is included that summarize, on a project-by-project basis, the research area addressed and the type of R and D conducted. In addition, a summary of the total number of projects by research area and R and D type is given.

  13. Graduate trainee fellowships for energy research in Mississippi. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The Mississippi DOE EPSCoR Project has been a program of education and research which has (1) increased the number of trained professionals in the energy sciences and technology, particularly those from groups traditionally under-represented in the field and (2) interfaced with existing networks of universities, industry, federal, and state institutions involved in energy-related activities. Key project activities that have been accomplished are shown below: (1) Statewide conference on energy related research held; (2) HBCU pipeline issue addressed; (3) Research preceptors/problems selected; (4) Trainees screened and accepted; (5) Research initiated; and (6) Practicums organized. Mississippi`s three comprehensive universities -- The University of Mississippi, Mississippi State University, and the University of Southern Mississippi -- and the urban institution, Jackson State University have provided a foundation for the expansion of energy-related education and research in the state. The activities of the Mississippi DOE EPSCoR program have been executed under a management strategy developed to establish statewide coordination of research and education programs, i.e., the Mississippi Research Consortium. The Consortium has served as the steering committee for the DOE EPSCoR Program Consortium.

  14. Survey of Postdoctorates at FFRDCs: Final Report [Federally Funded Research and Development Centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulrow, Jeri

    2010-06-30

    The 2009 FFRDC survey collected the total number of postdocs employed by FFRDCs in the United States—categorized by source of support, citizenship, sex, and field of research—as of October 1, 2009. The universe for the 2009 GSS-FFRDC survey was the Master Government List of Federally Funded Research and Development Centers. The 2009 survey also contacted the NIH’s Intramural Research Program because it employs the largest number of postdocs in the federal government. The FFRDC survey collected data via a web instrument. Topics included the type of support the postdocs received (federal and nonfederal), their sex, citizenship, race/ethnicity, and field of research.

  15. Final results of the FY'78 chemistry and materials science research program review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frazer, J.W.

    1977-01-01

    18 projects which were selected to be sponsored by ''Chemistry Research Program'' are summarized. These include: lasers for chemical analysis; multi-element analysis systems; spectroscopic analysis of surface passivation; non-aqueous titrimetry; materials damage prediction for fiber composites; safe high energy explosives; single photon absorption reaction chemistry; reaction in shock waves; cryogenic heavy hydrogen technology; acoustic emission; metallic alloy glasses; basic study of toughness in steel; static equation-of-state at 100 GPa; transuranium element research; nuclear structure research; neutron capture gamma measurements; x-ray fluorescence analysis; and pyrochemical investigation

  16. Transit forecasting accuracy : ridership forecasts and capital cost estimates, final research report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    In 1992, Pickrell published a seminal piece examining the accuracy of ridership forecasts and capital cost estimates for fixed-guideway transit systems in the US. His research created heated discussions in the transit industry regarding the ability o...

  17. Federal Highway Administration research and technology evaluation final report : Eco-Logical

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-01

    This report documents an evaluation of Federal Highway Administrations (FHWA) Research and Technology Programs activities on the implementation of the Eco-Logical approach by State transportation departments and metropolitan planning organizati...

  18. STC synthesis of best practices for determining value of research results : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Transportation research projects are aimed at fostering innovation in different areas, such as : safety, cost savings, quality, efficiency, project delivery, and policy. Transportation agencies and : most notably State Departments of Transportation (...

  19. RATU Nuclear power plant structural safety research programme 1990-1994. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rintamaa, R.; Sarkimo, M.

    1995-12-01

    The major part of nuclear energy research in Finland has been organized as five-year nationally coordinated research programmes. The research programme on the Nuclear Power Plant Structural Safety was carried out during the period from 1990 to 1994. The total volume was about 76 person-years and the expenditure about 49 million FIM. Studies on the structural materials in nuclear power plants created the experimental data and background information necessary for the structural integrity assessments of mechanical components. The research was carried out by developing experimental fracture mechanics methods including statistical analysis methods of material property data, and by studying material ageing and, in particular, mechanisms of material deterioration due to neutron irradiation, corrosion and water chemistry. Besides material studies, new testing methods and sensors for the measurement of loading and water chemistry parameters have been developed

  20. SAFIR2010. The Finnish Research Programme on Nuclear Power Plant Safety 2007-2010. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puska, E.K.; Suolanen, V.

    2011-02-01

    Major part of Finnish public research on nuclear power plant safety during the years 2007-2010 has been carried out in the SAFIR2010 programme. The steering group of SAFIR2010 consisted of representatives from Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK), Ministry of Employment and the Economy (MEE), Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT), Teollisuuden Voima Oyj (TVO), Fortum Power and Heat Oyj, Fortum Nuclear Services Oy (Fortum), Finnish Funding Agency for Technology and Innovation (Tekes), Aalto University School of Science and Technology (Aalto, former Helsinki University of Technology) and Lappeenranta University of Technology (LUT). In addition to representatives of these organisations, the Steering Group had permanent experts from the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM) and Fennovoima Oy (Fennovoima). SAFIR2010 research programme was divided in eight research areas that were Organisation and human, Automation and control room, Fuel and reactor physics, Thermal hydraulics, Severe accidents, Structural safety of reactor circuit, Construction safety, and Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA). Research projects of the programme were chosen on the basis of annual call for proposals. The annual volume of the SAFIR2010-programme in 2007-2010 has been 6,5-7,1 M euro and approximately 50 person years. Main funding organisations in 2007-2010 have been the State Waste Management Fund VYR with 2,7-3,0 M euro and VTT with 2,4-2,7 M euro annually. In 2010 research was carried out in 33 projects. The research in the programme has been carried out primarily by VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. Other research units responsible for the projects solely or in co-operation with other institutions include Lappeenranta University of Technology, Aalto University (previously Helsinki University of Technology), Tampere University of Technology, Fortum Power and Heat Oy (previously Fortum Nuclear Services Oy), Finnish Institute of Occupational Health and Finnish

  1. Final report: A Broad Research Project in the Sciences of Complexity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2000-02-01

    Previous DOE support for ''A Broad Research Program in the Sciences of Complexity'' permitted the Santa Fe Institute to initiate new collaborative research within its Integrative Core activities as well as to host visitors to participate in research on specific topics that serve as motivation and testing-ground for the study of general principles of complex systems. The critical aspect of this support is its effectiveness in seeding new areas of research. Indeed, this Integrative Core has been the birthplace of dozens of projects that later became more specifically focused and then won direct grant support independent of the core grants. But at early stages most of this multidisciplinary research was unable to win grant support as individual projects--both because it did not match well with existing grant program guidelines, and because the amount of handing needed was often too modest to justify a formal proposal to an agency. In fact, one of the attributes of core support has been that it permitted SFI to encourage high-risk activities because the cost was quite low. What is significant is how many of those initial efforts have been productive in the SFI environment. Many of SFI'S current research foci began with a short visit from a researcher new to the SFI community, or as small working groups that brought together carefully selected experts from a variety of fields. As mentioned above, many of the ensuing research projects are now being supported by other funding agencies or private foundations. Some of these successes are described.

  2. US Army Research Laboratory Joint Interagency Field Experimentation 15-2 Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    exploratory data analysis , research, and investigation. Text analytics involves information retrieval, lexical analysis to study word frequency, data...7 7.1 US Army Research Laboratory 8 7.2 Strategic Analysis Enterprises, Inc. 8 7.3 Charles River Analytics, Inc. 9 7.4 Knowledge Based Systems...mining techniques including link and association analysis , visualization, and predictive analytics. The Department of Defense (DOD) recognizes the

  3. Catalysis in Molten Ionic Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boghosian, Soghomon; Fehrmann, Rasmus

    2013-01-01

    are not identified easily. It has been shown that the melt consists of vanadium oxosulfato complexes in the oxidation states III-V in an alkali pyrosulfate solvent. However, many basic data for alkali pyrosulfates and oxosulfato vanadates have turned out to be either nonexisting or unreliable. As a result...... of vanadium compounds, of which the majority are identified as catalyst deactivation products; and (v) studies of molecular structure and catalytic activity. Finally, the reaction mechanism is highlighted, which represents the state of the art of that catalytic process by 2013. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights...

  4. Feed-pump hydraulic performance and design improvement, Phase I: research program design. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, W.H.; Gopalakrishnan, S.; Fehlau, R.; Thompson, W.E.; Wilson, D.G.

    1982-03-01

    As a result of prior EPRI-sponsored studies, it was concluded that a research program should be designed and implemented to provide an improved basis for the design, procurement, testing, and operation of large feed pumps with increased reliability and stability over the full range of operating conditions. This two-volume report contains a research plan which is based on a review of the present state of the art and which defines the necessary R and D program and estimates the benefits and costs of the program. The recommended research program consists of 30 interrelated tasks. It is designed to perform the needed research; to verify the results; to develop improved components; and to publish computer-aided design methods, pump specification guidelines, and a troubleshooting manual. Most of the technology proposed in the research plan is applicable to nuclear power plants as well as to fossil-fired plants. This volume discusses the design, performance and failures of feed pumps, and recommendations for research on pump dynamics, design, and specifications.

  5. Redox Catalysis over Metallo-Zeolites. Contribution to Environmental Catalysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wichterlová, Blanka; Sobalík, Zdeněk; Dědeček, Jiří

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 41, - (2003), s. 97-114 ISSN 0926-3373 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS4040016; GA AV ČR IAA4040007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : metallo-zeolites * Co-beta * Fe-ZSM-5 Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.476, year: 2003

  6. Transition metal catalysis in confined spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenders, Stefan H A M; Gramage-Doria, Rafael; de Bruin, Bas; Reek, Joost N H

    2015-01-21

    Transition metal catalysis plays an important role in both industry and in academia where selectivity, activity and stability are crucial parameters to control. Next to changing the structure of the ligand, introducing a confined space as a second coordination sphere around a metal catalyst has recently been shown to be a viable method to induce new selectivity and activity in transition metal catalysis. In this review we focus on supramolecular strategies to encapsulate transition metal complexes with the aim of controlling the selectivity via the second coordination sphere. As we will discuss, catalyst confinement can result in selective processes that are impossible or difficult to achieve by traditional methods. We will describe the template-ligand approach as well as the host-guest approach to arrive at such supramolecular systems and discuss how the performance of the catalyst is enhanced by confining it in a molecular container.

  7. Approaches to single-nanoparticle catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambur, Justin B; Chen, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles are among the most important industrial catalysts, with applications ranging from chemical manufacturing to energy conversion and storage. Heterogeneity is a general feature among these nanoparticles, with their individual differences in size, shape, and surface sites leading to variable, particle-specific catalytic activity. Assessing the activity of individual nanoparticles, preferably with subparticle resolution, is thus desired and vital to the development of efficient catalysts. It is challenging to measure the activity of single-nanoparticle catalysts, however. Several experimental approaches have been developed to monitor catalysis on single nanoparticles, including electrochemical methods, single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, X-ray microscopy, and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. This review focuses on these experimental approaches, the associated methods and strategies, and selected applications in studying single-nanoparticle catalysis with chemical selectivity, sensitivity, or subparticle spatial resolution.

  8. ELECTROCHEMICAL PROMOTED CATALYSIS: TOWARDS PRACTICAL UTILIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DIMITRIOS TSIPLAKIDES

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical promotion (EP of catalysis has already been recognized as “a valuable development in catalytic research” (J. Pritchard, 1990 and as “one of the most remarkable advances in electrochemistry since 1950” (J. O’M. Bockris, 1996. Laboratory studies have clearly elucidated the phenomenology of electrochemical promotion and have proven that EP is a general phenomenon at the interface of catalysis and electrochemistry. The major progress toward practical utilization of EP is surveyed in this paper. The focus is given on the electropromotion of industrial ammonia synthesis catalyst, the bipolar EP and the development of a novel monolithic electropromoted reactor (MEPR in conjunction with the electropromotion of thin sputtered metal films. Future perspectives of electrochemical promotion applications in the field of hydrogen technologies are discussed.

  9. Symmetry and asymmetry in mandelate racemase catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitman, C.P.; Hegeman, G.D.; Cleland, W.W.; Kenyon, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    Kinetic properties of mandelate racemase catalysis (Vmax, Km, deuterium isotope effects, and pH profiles) were all measured in both directions by the circular dichroic assay of Sharp. These results, along with those of studying interactions of mandelate racemase with resolved, enantiomeric competitive inhibitors [(R)- and (S)-alpha-phenylglycerates], indicate a high degree of symmetry in both binding and catalysis. Racemization of either enantiomer of mandelate in D 2 O did not show an overshoot region of molecular ellipticity in circular dichroic measurements upon approach to equilibrium. Both the absence of such an overshoot region and the high degree of kinetic symmetry are consistent with a one-base acceptor mechanism for mandelate racemase. On the other hand, results of irreversible inhibition with partially resolved, enantiomeric affinity labels [(R)- and (S)-alpha-phenylglycidates] reveal a ''functional asymmetry'' at the active site. Mechanistic proposals, consistent with these results, are presented

  10. Supported Ionic Liquid Phase (SILP) catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisager, Anders; Fehrmann, Rasmus; Haumann, Marco

    2006-01-01

    Applications of ionic liquids to replace conventional solvents in homogeneous transition-metal catalysis have increased significantly during the last decade. Biphasic ionic liquid/organic liquid systems offer advantages with regard to product separation, catalyst stability, and recycling but util......Applications of ionic liquids to replace conventional solvents in homogeneous transition-metal catalysis have increased significantly during the last decade. Biphasic ionic liquid/organic liquid systems offer advantages with regard to product separation, catalyst stability, and recycling...... concept is surveyed by presenting results for the continuous gas-phase hydroformylation of propene, as a reaction example. (c) Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, 69451 Weinheim, Germany, 2006....

  11. Atomic data for heavy element impurities in fusion reactors. Summary report of the final research coordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.E.H.

    2009-04-01

    Eleven experts on the properties of heavy elements of relevance to fusion energy research attended the final Research Coordination Meeting (RCM) on Data for Heavy Element Impurities in Fusion Reactors, held at IAEA Headquarters on 4-6 March 2009. Participants summarized their accomplishments with respect to the revised work plan formulated at the second RCM. The overall work plan for the CRP was assessed and reviewed in detail, and achievements were noted. Discussions, conclusions and recommendations of the RCM are briefly described in this report. (author)

  12. Coolside Waste Management Research. Final report, April 23, 1991--June 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    This study was initiated during a successful test of the Coolside flue gas desulfurization technology at Ohio Edison`s Edgewater generating station in 1991. Coolside is a lime duct technology which is installed on the downstream side of the last heat exchanger. As tested by Ohio Edison, it also employs an alkali reagent, in this case NaOH, to enhance sulfur capture. The overall goal of this study was to develop sufficient chemical and physical data to insure the environmentally safe disposal of the material. This final report summarizes the important aspects of the project, but it does not present all of the data that was produced. Further details may be found in the monthly and quarterly reports that were filed with the Morgantown Energy Technology Center. This report is organized into six chapters which present the important conclusions of the principal areas of investigation.

  13. Feed-pump hydraulic performance and design improvement, Phase I: research program design. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, W.H.; Gopalakrishnan, S.; Fehlau, R.; Thompson, W.E.; Wilson, D.G.

    1982-03-01

    As a result of prior EPRI-sponsored studies, it was concluded that a research program should be designed and implemented to provide an improved basis for the design, procurement, testing, and operation of large feed pumps with increased reliability and stability over the full range of operating conditions. This two-volume report contains a research plan which is based on a review of the present state of the art and which defines the necessary R and D program and estimates the benefits and costs of the program. The recommended research program consists of 30 interrelated tasks. It is designed to perform the needed research; to verify the results; to develop improved components; and to publish computer-aided design methods, pump specification guidelines, and a troubleshooting manual. Most of the technology proposed in the research plan is applicable to nuclear power plants as well as to fossil-fired plants. This volume contains appendixes on pump design, cavitation damage, performance testing, hydraulics, two-phase flow in pumps, flow stability, and rotor dynamics.

  14. Research on reconfigurable and reliable manipulators: Final report, August 14, 1994--August 14, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khosla, P.K.; Kanade, Takeo

    1996-12-31

    To address the need for a more flexible and reliable manipulator, the authors propose the concept of a rapidly deployable fault tolerant manipulator system. Such a system combines a Reconfigurable Modular Manipulator System (RMMS) with support software for rapid programming, trajectory planning, and control. This allows the user to rapidly configure a fault tolerant manipulator custom-tailored for a given task. This thesis investigates all aspects involved in such a system. It describes an RMMS prototype which consists of seven manipulator modules with a total of four degrees-of-freedom. The reconfigurability of the hardware is made transparent to the user by the supporting control software that automatically adapts itself to the current manipulator configuration. To achieve high reliability, a global fault tolerant trajectory planning algorithm is introduced. This algorithm guarantees that a manipulator can continue its task even when one of the manipulator joints fails and is immobilized. Finally, all these aspects are considered simultaneously in the task based design software, that determines the manipulator configuration, its base position, and the fault tolerant joint space trajectory that are optimally suited to perform a given task. The most important contribution of this thesis is a novel agent-based approach to solve the task based design problem. The approach is based on a genetic algorithm for which the modification and evaluation operations are implemented as autonomous asynchronous agents. Finally, the thesis presents a performance analysis of the agent-based design framework by comparing its results with those of exhaustive search, random search, and multiple restart statistical hill-climbing.

  15. Research on reconfigurable and reliable manipulators: Final report, August 15, 1994-August 14, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khosla, P.K.; Kanade, Takeo

    1996-01-01

    To address the need for a more flexible and reliable manipulator, the authors propose the concept of a rapidly deployable fault tolerant manipulator system. Such a system combines a Reconfigurable Modular Manipulator System (RMMS) with support software for rapid programming, trajectory planning, and control. This allows the user to rapidly configure a fault tolerant manipulator custom-tailored for a given task. This thesis investigates all aspects involved in such a system. It describes an RMMS prototype which consists of seven manipulator modules with a total of four degrees-of-freedom. The reconfigurability of the hardware is made transparent to the user by the supporting control software that automatically adapts itself to the current manipulator configuration. To achieve high reliability, a global fault tolerant trajectory planning algorithm is introduced. This algorithm guarantees that a manipulator can continue its task even when one of the manipulator joints fails and is immobilized. Finally, all these aspects are considered simultaneously in the task based design software, that determines the manipulator configuration, its base position, and the fault tolerant joint space trajectory that are optimally suited to perform a given task. The most important contribution of this thesis is a novel agent-based approach to solve the task based design problem. The approach is based on a genetic algorithm for which the modification and evaluation operations are implemented as autonomous asynchronous agents. Finally, the thesis presents a performance analysis of the agent-based design framework by comparing its results with those of exhaustive search, random search, and multiple restart statistical hill-climbing

  16. Nanoscale Advances in Catalysis and Energy Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yimin; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2010-05-12

    In this perspective, we present an overview of nanoscience applications in catalysis, energy conversion, and energy conservation technologies. We discuss how novel physical and chemical properties of nanomaterials can be applied and engineered to meet the advanced material requirements in the new generation of chemical and energy conversion devices. We highlight some of the latest advances in these nanotechnologies and provide an outlook at the major challenges for further developments.

  17. Predictive Modeling in Actinide Chemistry and Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ping [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-16

    These are slides from a presentation on predictive modeling in actinide chemistry and catalysis. The following topics are covered in these slides: Structures, bonding, and reactivity (bonding can be quantified by optical probes and theory, and electronic structures and reaction mechanisms of actinide complexes); Magnetic resonance properties (transition metal catalysts with multi-nuclear centers, and NMR/EPR parameters); Moving to more complex systems (surface chemistry of nanomaterials, and interactions of ligands with nanoparticles); Path forward and conclusions.

  18. USD Catalysis Group for Alternative Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoefelmeyer, James D.; Koodali, Ranjit; Sereda, Grigoriy; Engebretson, Dan; Fong, Hao; Puszynski, Jan; Shende, Rajesh; Ahrenkiel, Phil

    2012-03-13

    The South Dakota Catalysis Group (SDCG) is a collaborative project with mission to develop advanced catalysts for energy conversion with two primary goals: (1) develop photocatalytic systems in which polyfunctionalized TiO2 are the basis for hydrogen/oxygen synthesis from water and sunlight (solar fuels group), (2) develop new materials for hydrogen utilization in fuel cells (fuel cell group). In tandem, these technologies complete a closed chemical cycle with zero emissions.

  19. Catalysis in micellar and macromoleular systems

    CERN Document Server

    Fendler, Janos

    1975-01-01

    Catalysis in Micellar and Macromolecular Systems provides a comprehensive monograph on the catalyses elicited by aqueous and nonaqueous micelles, synthetic and naturally occurring polymers, and phase-transfer catalysts. It delineates the principles involved in designing appropriate catalytic systems throughout. Additionally, an attempt has been made to tabulate the available data exhaustively. The book discusses the preparation and purification of surfactants; the physical and chemical properties of surfactants and micelles; solubilization in aqueous micellar systems; and the principles of

  20. Asymmetric Aminalization via Cation-Binding Catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Sang Yeon; Liu, Yidong; Oh, Joong Suk

    2018-01-01

    Asymmetric cation-binding catalysis, in principle, can generate "chiral" anionic nucleophiles, where the counter cations are coordinated within chiral environments. Nitrogen-nucleophiles are intrinsically basic, therefore, its use as nucleophiles is often challenging and limiting the scope...... of the reaction. Particularly, a formation of configurationally labile aminal centers with alkyl substituents has been a formidable challenge due to the enamine/imine equilibrium of electrophilic substrates. Herein, we report enantioselective nucleophilic addition reactions of potassium phthalimides to Boc-protected...

  1. Electromagnetic field redistribution induced selective plasmon driven surface catalysis in metal nanowire-film systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Liang; Huang, Yingzhou; Yang, Yanna; Xiong, Wen; Chen, Guo; Su, Xun; Wei, Hua; Wang, Shuxia; Wen, Weijia

    2015-11-25

    For the novel interpretation of Raman spectrum from molecule at metal surface, the plasmon driven surface catalysis (PDSC) reactions have become an interesting topic in the research field of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). In this work, the selective PDSC reactions of p,p'-dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB) produced from para-aminothiophenol (PATP) or 4-nitrobenzenethiol (4NBT) were demonstrated in the Ag nanowires dimer-Au film systems. The different SERS spectra collected at individual part and adjacent part of the same nanowire-film system pointed out the importance of the electromagnetic field redistribution induced by image charge on film in this selective surface catalysis, which was confirmed by the simulated electromagnetic simulated electro- magnetic field distributions. Our result indicated this electromagnetic field redistribution induced selective surface catalysis was largely affected by the polarization and wavelength of incident light but slightly by the difference in diameters between two nanowires. Our work provides a further understanding of PDSC reaction in metal nanostructure and could be a deep support for the researches on surface catalysis and surface analysis.

  2. 2001 Gordon Research Conference on Archaea: Ecology [sic], Metabolism. Final progress report [agenda and attendee list

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, Charles

    2001-08-10

    The Gordon Research Conference on Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism [and Molecular Biology] was held at Proctor Academy, Andover, New Hampshire, August 5-10, 2001. The conference was attended by 135 participants. The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field, coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, and included US and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field. There was a conscious effort to stimulate discussion about the key issues in the field today. Session topics included the following: Ecology and genetic elements; Genomics and evolution; Ecology, genomes and gene regulation; Replication and recombination; Chromatin and transcription; Gene regulation; Post-transcription processing; Biochemistry and metabolism; Proteomics and protein structure; Metabolism and physiology. The featured speaker addressed the topic: ''Archaeal viruses, witnesses of prebiotic evolution?''

  3. Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) University of California at Davis, California. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report for the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) Site (the Site) includes 1996 environmental monitoring data for Site air, soil, ground water, surface water, storm water and ambient radiation. DOE operation of LEHR as a functioning research location ceased in 1989, after the completion of three decades of research on the health effects of low-level radiation exposure (primarily strontium-90 and radium-226), using beagles to simulate effects on human health. During 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducted activities at the Site in support of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Environmental remediation and the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of Site buildings. Extensive environmental data were collected in 1996 to evaluate appropriate remedial actions for the Site.

  4. Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) University of California at Davis, California. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report for the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) Site (the Site) includes 1996 environmental monitoring data for Site air, soil, ground water, surface water, storm water and ambient radiation. DOE operation of LEHR as a functioning research location ceased in 1989, after the completion of three decades of research on the health effects of low-level radiation exposure (primarily strontium-90 and radium-226), using beagles to simulate effects on human health. During 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducted activities at the Site in support of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Environmental remediation and the decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) of Site buildings. Extensive environmental data were collected in 1996 to evaluate appropriate remedial actions for the Site

  5. 2001 Gordon Research Conference on Photoions, Photoionization and Photodetachment. Final progress report [agenda and attendees list

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Mark

    2001-01-01

    The Gordon Research Conference on Photoions, Photoionization and Photodetachment was held at Williams College, Williamstown, Massachusetts, July 8-13, 2001. The 72 conference attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field, coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, and including US and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field. There was a conscious effort to stimulate discussion about the key issues in the field today. Time for formal presentations was limited. Sessions included the following topics: Vibrational structure, Time resolved studies: nuclear wavepackets, Valence photoionization, Clusters and networks, Resonance structures and decay mechanisms, Ultrafast photoionization, Threshold photoionization, Molecule fixed properties, and Collisional phenomena

  6. 2012 Gordon Research Conference on Cellular and Molecular Fungal Biology, Final Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, Judith [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2012-06-22

    The Gordon Research Conference on Cellular and Molecular Fungal Biology was held at Holderness School, Holderness New Hampshire, June 17 - 22, 2012. The 2012 Gordon Conference on Cellular and Molecular Fungal Biology (CMFB) will present the latest, cutting-edge research on the exciting and growing field of molecular and cellular aspects of fungal biology. Topics will range from yeast to filamentous fungi, from model systems to economically important organisms, and from saprophytes and commensals to pathogens of plants and animals. The CMFB conference will feature a wide range of topics including systems biology, cell biology and morphogenesis, organismal interactions, genome organisation and regulation, pathogenesis, energy metabolism, biomass production and population genomics. The Conference was well-attended with 136 participants. Gordon Research Conferences does not permit publication of meeting proceedings.

  7. Coal liquefaction: A research and development needs assessment: Final report, Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindler, H.D.; Burke, F.P.; Chao, K.C.; Davis, B.H.; Gorbaty, M.L.; Klier, K.; Kruse, C.W.; Larsen, J.W.; Lumpkin, R.E.; McIlwain, M.E.; Wender, I.; Stewart, N.

    1989-03-01

    Volume II of this report on an assessment of research needs for coal liquefaction contains reviews of the five liquefaction technologies---direct, indirect, pyrolysis, coprocessing, and bioconversion. These reviews are not meant to be encyclopedic; several outstanding reviews of liquefaction have appeared in recent years and the reader is referred to these whenever applicable. Instead, these chapters contain reviews of selected topics that serve to support the panel's recommendations or to illustrate recent accomplishments, work in progress, or areas of major research interest. At the beginning of each of these chapters is a brief introduction and a summary of the most important research recommendations brought out during the panel discussions and supported by the material presented in the review. A review of liquefaction developments outside the US is included. 594 refs., 100 figs., 60 tabs.

  8. Evaluative studies in nuclear medicine research: positron computed tomography assessment. Final report, January 1, 1982-December 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potchen, E.J.; Harris, G.I.; Gift, D.A.; Reinhard, D.K.; Siebert, J.E.

    1983-02-01

    Results are reported of the final phase of the study effort generally titled Evaluative Studies in Nuclear Medicine Research. The previous work is reviewed and extended to an assessment providing perspectives on medical applications of positron emission tomographic (PET) systems, their technological context, and the related economic and marketing environment. Methodologies developed and used in earlier phases of the study were continued, but specifically extended to include solicitation of opinion from commercial organizations deemed to be potential developers, manufacturers and marketers of PET systems. Several factors which influence the demand for clinical uses of PET are evaluated and discussed. The recent Federal funding of applied research with PET systems is found to be a necessary and encouraging event toward a determination that PET either is a powerful research tool limited to research, or whether it also presents major clinical utility. A comprehensive, updated bibliography of current literature related to the development, applications and economic considerations of PET technology is appended

  9. Center for Fuel Cell Research and Applications development phase. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    The deployment and operation of clean power generation is becoming critical as the energy and transportation sectors seek ways to comply with clean air standards and the national deregulation of the utility industry. However, for strategic business decisions, considerable analysis is required over the next few years to evaluate the appropriate application and value added from this emerging technology. To this end the Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC) is proposing a three-year industry-driven project that centers on the creation of ``The Center for Fuel Cell Research and Applications.`` A collaborative laboratory housed at and managed by HARC, the Center will enable a core group of six diverse participating companies--industry participants--to investigate the economic and operational feasibility of proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel cells in a variety of applications (the core project). This document describes the unique benefits of a collaborative approach to PEM applied research, among them a shared laboratory concept leading to cost savings and shared risks as well as access to outstanding research talent and lab facilities. It also describes the benefits provided by implementing the project at HARC, with particular emphasis on HARC`s history of managing successful long-term research projects as well as its experience in dealing with industry consortia projects. The Center is also unique in that it will not duplicate the traditional university role of basic research or that of the fuel cell industry in developing commercial products. Instead, the Center will focus on applications, testing, and demonstration of fuel cell technology.

  10. Staff exchange with Spokane Intercollegiate Research and Technology Institute (SIRTI), final project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, G.M.

    1994-12-01

    Staff exchanges, such as the one described in this report, are intended to facilitate communication and collaboration among scientists and engineers at Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories, in U.S. industry, and academia. Funding support for these exchanges is provided by the DOE, Office of Energy Research, Laboratory Technology Transfer Program. Funding levels for each exchange typically range from $20,000 to $40,000. The exchanges offer the opportunity for the laboratories to transfer technology and expertise to industry, gain a perspective on industry`s problems, and develop the basis for further cooperative efforts through Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAS) or other mechanisms.

  11. LIEKKI 2 - Combustion and gasification research programme 1993- 1998. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hupa, M. [ed.

    1998-12-31

    The six-year Combustion and Gasification Research Programme LIEKKI 2 (1993-1998) was oriented towards research serving the development of energy production technologies based on combustion and gasification. The programme was divided into six research areas: 1. Modelling of the furnace processes (39 projects); 2. Chemistry of gaseous emission components (28); 3. Particle behaviour, ash, aerosols (42); 4. New combustion and gasification technologies (27); 5. Black liquor (33) and 6. Conventional combustion technologies, waste incineration (19). The main aim of the research has been to develop new, more efficient and environmentally friendly techniques. The development of conventional combustion technology has also been an important part of the programme. Another important goal has been to maintain and develop maintain the competence of the research organisations in the combustion area and to intensify their collaboration. Concerning its research contents and its objectives LIEKKI 2, like its forerunner, has not been fuel-specific. The programme has investigated the thermal conversion of oil, gas, black liquor, and coal as well as that of peat, biofuels, and various waste materials, and it has further advanced the know-how concerning the utilisation of these fuels. This approach differs from the usual fuel-specific differentiation, which, for instance, IEA (International Energy Agency) and EU have applied in their research activities. This approach seems in retrospect to have been the right choice. It has been appropriate to stimulate co-operation between parties who would not seek co-operation spontaneously. One example of this is the development of a steelmaking process by a Finnish steel manufacturer under the LIEKKI programme. The programme has also provided synergetic advantages to the development of the recovery boiler processes of the pulp industry. Assessing the impact of the programme is a matter of many facets. The six-year research work and a total

  12. Experimental and analytical research on the aerodynamics of wind driven turbines. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrbach, C.; Wainauski, H.; Worobel, R.

    1977-12-01

    This aerodynamic research program was aimed at providing a reliable, comprehensive data base on a series of wind turbine models covering a broad range of the prime aerodynamic and geometric variables. Such data obtained under controlled laboratory conditions on turbines designed by the same method, of the same size, and tested in the same wind tunnel had not been available in the literature. Moreover, this research program was further aimed at providing a basis for evaluating the adequacy of existing wind turbine aerodynamic design and performance methodology, for assessing the potential of recent advanced theories and for providing a basis for further method development and refinement.

  13. Cooperative research in coal liquefaction. Final report, May 1, 1990-- April 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffman, G.P. [ed.

    1992-02-15

    The Consortium for Fossil Fuel Liquefaction Science (CFFLS) is currently engaged in a three year contract with the US Department of Energy investigating a range of research topics dealing with direct coal liquefaction. This report summarizes the results of this program in its second year, from May 1, 1990 to April 30, 1991. Accomplishments for this period are presented for the following tasks: Iron-based catalysts for coal liquefaction, exploratory research on coal conversion, novel coal liquefaction concepts, and novel catalysts for coal liquefaction.

  14. Computational approaches to homogeneous gold catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faza, Olalla Nieto; López, Carlos Silva

    2015-01-01

    Homogenous gold catalysis has been exploding for the last decade at an outstanding pace. The best described reactivity of Au(I) and Au(III) species is based on gold's properties as a soft Lewis acid, but new reactivity patterns have recently emerged which further expand the range of transformations achievable using gold catalysis, with examples of dual gold activation, hydrogenation reactions, or Au(I)/Au(III) catalytic cycles.In this scenario, to develop fully all these new possibilities, the use of computational tools to understand at an atomistic level of detail the complete role of gold as a catalyst is unavoidable. In this work we aim to provide a comprehensive review of the available benchmark works on methodological options to study homogenous gold catalysis in the hope that this effort can help guide the choice of method in future mechanistic studies involving gold complexes. This is relevant because a representative number of current mechanistic studies still use methods which have been reported as inappropriate and dangerously inaccurate for this chemistry.Together with this, we describe a number of recent mechanistic studies where computational chemistry has provided relevant insights into non-conventional reaction paths, unexpected selectivities or novel reactivity, which illustrate the complexity behind gold-mediated organic chemistry.

  15. Hybrid Amyloid Membranes for Continuous Flow Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolisetty, Sreenath; Arcari, Mario; Adamcik, Jozef; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2015-12-29

    Amyloid fibrils are promising nanomaterials for technological applications such as biosensors, tissue engineering, drug delivery, and optoelectronics. Here we show that amyloid-metal nanoparticle hybrids can be used both as efficient active materials for wet catalysis and as membranes for continuous flow catalysis applications. Initially, amyloid fibrils generated in vitro from the nontoxic β-lactoglobulin protein act as templates for the synthesis of gold and palladium metal nanoparticles from salt precursors. The resulting hybrids possess catalytic features as demonstrated by evaluating their activity in a model catalytic reaction in water, e.g., the reduction of 4-nitrophenol into 4-aminophenol, with the rate constant of the reduction increasing with the concentration of amyloid-nanoparticle hybrids. Importantly, the same nanoparticles adsorbed onto fibrils surface show improved catalytic efficiency compared to the same unattached particles, pointing at the important role played by the amyloid fibril templates. Then, filter membranes are prepared from the metal nanoparticle-decorated amyloid fibrils by vacuum filtration. The resulting membranes serve as efficient flow catalysis active materials, with a complete catalytic conversion achieved within a single flow passage of a feeding solution through the membrane.

  16. Research and development on procedures to stabilize acaricides in livestock dips. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-11-01

    Ticks and mites are serious ectoparasites of livestock in many countries. As vectors of animal diseases they pose a threat to livestock production. Traditionally, different types of acaricides are used to control them. One of the most commonly used tick control techniques is to force animals to walk through an acaricide suspension in a trough or Cattle Dip. Dipping is quite effective as the entire body of the animal gets treated with the acaricide. However, with increased usage the concentration of the acaricide in the 'dip' declines due to removal by the animal and degradation by biological and chemicals processes. The dissipation of the acaricide results in loss of efficacy of the 'dip', and may also enhance the development of resistance by the ectoparasites to the acaricides. Maintenance of an effective concentration, by periodic recharge or stabilization of the acaricide, is essential to assure efficient and cost-effective control and to minimize chances of resistance to develop. In 1990, the FAO/IAEA Joint Division, recognizing the need for co-ordinated research on studying the dissipation of acaricides in cattle dips and developing procedures to stabilize them, established a 5-year Co-ordinated Research Programme on Development of Procedures to Stabilize Acaricides in Livestock Dips and of Simplified Methods to Measure Their Concentration, Using Nuclear Techniques. In initiating this programme, the Joint Division recognized that major gaps exist in the knowledge in this area which, if filled, would greatly aid developing countries in their effort to more effectively use acaricides to protect animal health. This TECDOC reports the accomplishments of this programme

  17. Advanced electron microscopy characterization of nanomaterials for catalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Su

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Transmission electron microscopy (TEM has become one of the most powerful techniques in the fields of material science, inorganic chemistry and nanotechnology. In terms of resolutions, advanced TEM may reach a high spatial resolution of 0.05 nm, a high energy-resolution of 7 meV. In addition, in situ TEM can help researchers to image the process happened within 1 ms. This paper reviews the recent technical progresses of applying advanced TEM characterization on nanomaterials for catalysis. The text is organized based on the perspective of application: for example, size, composition, phase, strain, and morphology. The electron beam induced effect and in situ TEM are also introduced. I hope this review can help the scientists in related fields to take advantage of advanced TEM to their own researches. Keywords: Advanced TEM, Nanomaterials, Catalysts, In situ

  18. 78 FR 29237 - Final Priority; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research-Rehabilitation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-20

    ... of research that generates hypotheses or theories by conducting new and refined analyses of data... inconsistency or otherwise interfere with an action taken or planned by another agency; (3) Materially alter the...); (4) To the extent feasible, specify performance objectives, rather than the behavior or manner of...

  19. 77 FR 41391 - Final Priority; Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Vocational Rehabilitation and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-13

    ... must conduct research to identify or develop effective strategic planning models that will support... employer needs; and strategic planning processes designed to respond to changing employer and economic... the Code of Federal Regulations is available via the Federal Digital System at: http://www.gpo.gov...

  20. Measurement, calculation and evaluation of photon production data. Final report of a coordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oblozinsky, P.; Dietrich, F.S.; Mengoni, A.

    1999-12-01

    The report summarizes results of the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) devoted to photon preduction in neutron-induced reactions. The report presents 25 original contributions that reflect accomplishments achieved in measurement, calculation and evaluation of photon production under the project in 1994-1997. Major results are highlighted and a list of the CRP publications is given. (author)

  1. Collaborative Research: Hydrogeological-Geophysical Methods for Subsurface Site Characterization - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavko, G.

    2000-01-01

    This research contributes three newly-developed relationships that significantly improve aquifer characterization: (1) a general relationship between total and channel porosities, (2) a general relationship between electrical resistivity and channel porosity, and (3) bounds on the electrical resistivity - seismic velocity relationship.

  2. 78 FR 34261 - Final Priority-National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research-Rehabilitation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-07

    ... individuals with disabilities among the stakeholder groups who are involved in the research activities conducted under paragraph (a). Changes: In paragraph (d) of the priority we clarified that ``key stakeholder... hypotheses or theories by conducting new and refined analyses of data, producing observational findings, and...

  3. 78 FR 27036 - Final Priority. National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research-Traumatic Brain...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-09

    ... this particular priority. Public Comment: In response to our invitation in the NPP, we did not receive... research, including the testing of approaches to treating TBIs or the assessment of the outcomes of... permitted by law, Executive Order 13563 requires that an agency-- (1) Propose or adopt regulations only upon...

  4. Advanced waste forms research and development. Final report, October 1, 1978-September 30, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, G.J.

    1979-08-01

    Research on supercalcine-ceramics was conducted with the objectives of characterizing the phases and of applying them to fluorine-containing Thorex wastes. This report is concerned with quantitative phase analysis of complex ceramics using x-ray powder diffraction methods and with scanning transmission electron microscopy of these ceramics and its correlation with fluorite structure solid solution phase diagrams

  5. Coupling and corona effects research plan for transmission lines. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bridges, J E; Formanek, V C

    1976-06-01

    Concern has arisen over the possible effects of electric and magnetic fields produced by EHV-UHV transmission lines. Past and ongoing research concerning the electric and magnetic field effects from EHV-UHV transmission lines was reviewed as it pertains to the following areas: (1) electromagnetic interference, (2) acoustic noise, (3) generation of gaseous effluents, and (4) safety considerations of induced voltages and currents. The intent of this review was to identify the short and long range research projects required to address these areas. The research plan identifies and gives priority to twenty programs in corona and coupling effects. In the case of the corona effects, a number of programs were recommended for acoustic noise and electromagnetic interference to delineate improved power line design criteria in terms of social, meteorological, geographical and cost constraints. Only one project is recommended in the case of ozone generation, because the results of comprehensive analyses, laboratory studies and field measurements have demonstrated that power lines do not contribute significant quantities of ozone. In the case of the coupling effects, a number of programs are recommended for HVAC transmission lines to improve the theoretically developed design guidelines by considering practical constraints. For HVDC transmission lines, programs are suggested to engender a better theoretical understanding and practical measurements capability for the coupling mechanisms of the dc electric and magnetic field with nearby objects. The interrelationship of the programs and their role in a long-term research plan is also discussed.

  6. 78 FR 27038 - Final Priorities; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research-Rehabilitation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-09

    ..., employment, independent living, family support, and economic and social self-sufficiency of individuals with... traumatic brain injury (TBI) or stroke have acquired cognitive or intellectual disabilities but often... research that generates hypotheses or theories by conducting new and refined analyses of data, producing...

  7. STUDY TO DEVELOP A RESEARCH PROGRAM FOR THE DESIGN DEVELOPMENT OF MODERN COLLEGE LIBRARIES. FINAL REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Historical Evaluation and Research Organization, McLean, VA.

    THIS STUDY FORMULATES A RESEARCH PROGRAM TO FACILITATE THE ESTABLISHMENT OF LIBRARIES FOR SMALL LIBERAL ARTS COLLEGES USING MODERN LIBRARY METHODS AND TECHNOLOGY AND NEW TECHNIQUES OF INFORMATION STORAGE, RETRIEVAL AND TRANSFER. AS A RESULT OF INTERVIEWS WITH LIBRARIANS AND OTHERS IN THE UNITED STATES AND EUROPE AND FROM A REVIEW OF CURRENT…

  8. Implications of Information Technology for Employment, Skills, and Wages: A Review of Recent Research. Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handel, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper provides an extensive review of the research literature on the effects of information technology (IT) on employment levels, job skill requirements, and wages. The first sections provide historical background on earlier waves of concern regarding automation, contemporary public opinion regarding new workplace technology, and trends in…

  9. 77 FR 54584 - Final Action Under the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (NIH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-05

    ..., researchers in gene and cell therapy, and microbiologists. In addition, a day-long public discussion of the... changes. Human gene transfer also raises scientific, medical, social, and ethical considerations that... replicate does not raise significant biosafety concerns that warrant oversight under the NIH Guidelines...

  10. 76 FR 37090 - Final Priorities; Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-24

    ... technology services to rural and urban areas; and (b) other scientific research to assist in meeting the...- responsive, and individual- and family-centered models for the delivery to both rural and urban areas of... educators, as appropriate. (4) Improved awareness and understanding of cutting edge developments in...

  11. 78 FR 36667 - Final Priority; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research-Disability and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-19

    ..., demonstration projects, training, and related activities, including international activities, to develop methods... NIDRR modify the priority to require engagement of stakeholders in developing, testing, evaluating, and... engage in research and development activities to build a base of evidence for the usability of, and cost...

  12. Pavement noise research : modeling of quieter pavements in Florida, final report, October 19, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    The research on noise created by the tire/pavement interface, while relatively new, has seen considerable interest over the past few years because of the potential benefits and a general desire by the public for quieter highways. The Florida Departme...

  13. Open Access to research data - final perspectives from the RECODE project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigagli, Lorenzo; Sondervan, Jeroen

    2015-04-01

    Many networks, initiatives, and communities are addressing the key barriers to Open Access to data in scientific research. These organizations are typically heterogeneous and fragmented by discipline, location, sector (publishers, academics, data centers, etc.), as well as by other features. Besides, they often work in isolation, or with limited contacts with one another. The Policy RECommendations for Open Access to Research Data in Europe (RECODE) project, which will conclude in the first half of 2015, has scoped and addressed the challenges related to Open Access, dissemination and preservation of scientific data, leveraging the existing networks, initiatives, and communities. The overall objective of RECODE was to identify a series of targeted and over-arching policy recommendations for Open Access to European research data based on existing good practice. RECODE has undertaken a review of the existing state of the art and examined five case studies in different scientific disciplines: particle physics and astrophysics, clinical research, medicine and technical physiology (bioengineering), humanities (archaeology), and environmental sciences (Earth Observation). In particular for the latter discipline, GEOSS has been an optimal test bed for investigating the importance of technical and multidisciplinary interoperability, and what the challenges are in sharing and providing Open Access to research data from a variety of sources, and in a variety of formats. RECODE has identified five main technological and infrastructural challenges: • Heterogeneity - relates to interoperability, usability, accessibility, discoverability; • Sustainability - relates to obsolescence, curation, updates/upgrades, persistence, preservation; • Volume - also related to Big Data, which is somehow implied by Open Data; in our context, it relates to discoverability, accessibility (indexing), bandwidth, storage, scalability, energy footprint; • Quality - relates to completeness

  14. Virtual Special Issue on Catalysis at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruski, Marek; Sadow, Aaron; Slowing, Igor; Marshall, Christopher L.; Stair, Peter C.; Rodriguez, Jose A.; Harris, Alex; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Biener, Juergen; Matranga, Christopher; Wang, Congjian; Schaidle, Josh; Beckham, Gregg T.; Ruddy, Daniel A.; Deutsch, Todd; Alia, Shaun; Narula, Chaitanya; Overbury, Steven H.; Toops, Todd J.; Bullock, R. Morris; Peden, Charles HF; Wang, Yong; Allendorf, Mark D.; Norskov, Jens K.; Bligaard, Thomas

    2016-04-21

    Catalysis research at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Laboratories covers a wide range of research topics in heterogeneous catalysis, homogeneous/ molecular catalysis, electrocatalysis, and surface science. Since much of the work at National Laboratories is funded by DOE, the research is largely focused on addressing DOE’s mission to ensure America’s security and prosperity by addressing its energy, environmental, and nuclear challenges through trans-formative science and technology solutions. The catalysis research carried out at the DOE National Laboratories ranges from very fundamental catalysis science, funded by DOE’s Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), to applied research and development (R&D) in areas such as biomass conversion to fuels and chemicals, fuel cells, and vehicle emission control with primary funding from DOE’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. National Laboratories are home to many DOE Office of Science national scientific user facilities that provide researchers with the most advanced tools of modern science, including accelerators, colliders, supercomputers, light sources, and neutron sources, as well as facilities for studying the nanoworld and the terrestrial environment. National Laboratory research programs typically feature teams of researchers working closely together, often joining scientists from different disciplines to attack scientific and technical problems using a variety of tools and techniques available at the DOE national scientific user facilities. Along with collaboration between National Laboratory scientists, interactions with university colleagues are common in National Laboratory catalysis R&D. In some cases, scientists have joint appoint-ments at a university and a National Laboratory.

  15. Virtual Special Issue on Catalysis at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruski, Marek; Sadow, Aaron D.; Slowing, Igor I.; Marshall, Christopher L.; Stair, Peter; Rodriguez, Jose; Harris, Alex; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Biener, Juergen; Matranga, Christopher; Wang, Congjun; Schaidle, Joshua A.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Ruddy, Daniel A.; Deutsch, Todd; Alia, Shaun M.; Narula, Chaitanya; Overbury, Steve; Toops, Todd; Bullock, R. Morris; Peden, Charles H. F.; Wang, Yong; Allendorf, Mark D.; Nørskov, Jens; Bligaard, Thomas

    2016-05-06

    Catalysis research at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) National Laboratories covers a wide range of research topics in heterogeneous catalysis, homogeneous/molecular catalysis, biocatalysis, electrocatalysis, and surface science. Since much of the work at National Laboratories is funded by DOE, the research is largely focused on addressing DOE’s mission to ensure America’s security and prosperity by addressing its energy, environmental, and nuclear challenges through transformative science and technology solutions. The catalysis research carried out at the DOE National Laboratories ranges from very fundamental catalysis science, funded by DOE’s Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), to applied research and development (R&D) in areas such as biomass conversion to fuels and chemicals, fuel cells, and vehicle emission control with primary funding from DOE’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. National Laboratories are home to many DOE Office of Science national scientific user facilities that provide researchers with the most advanced tools of modern science, including accelerators, colliders, supercomputers, light sources, and neutron sources, as well as facilities for studying the nanoworld and the terrestrial environment. National Laboratory research programs typically feature teams of researchers working closely together, often joining scientists from different disciplines to tackle scientific and technical problems using a variety of tools and techniques available at the DOE national scientific user facilities. Along with collaboration between National Laboratory scientists, interactions with university colleagues are common in National Laboratory catalysis R&D. In some cases, scientists have joint appointments at a university and a National Laboratory.

  16. Final report of the group research. Genome analysis on the biological effects of radiation. Second research group of NIRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-10-01

    This report concerns investigations on the title conducted by 5 subgroups of National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) during the period of 1993-2001. The report involves the organization of research teams and summary reports from the subgroups for Genome sequencing and informatics, Genome analysis on model organisms, The genome analysis on the specific chromosomal region related to radiation-sensitivity, Molecular analysis on the structure and function of particular regions of human genome, and Generation and characterization of DNA repair-deficient model mice. Significant results are as follows: Sequencing of the radiation sensitivity gene ATM, finding of a novel cell cycle regulator gene NPAT and regulation of gene expression of ATM/NPAT; Findings that the cause of the variability related to instability of human genome is derived from particular repeat structures of 5 and 35 bases and of the instability mutation, from the mutation of EPILS (mRNA synthase gene); Program development for novel human genome finding in the DNA sequences and making novel human gene as a resource by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique; and generation of the highly UV-sensitive mouse model for human xeroderma pigmentosum G. Conclusion is that findings will contribute for better understanding of the genes functioning radiation sensitivity and also biodefense mechanism against radiation and other environmental stress. (N.I.)

  17. Advanced Scientific Computing Research Network Requirements: ASCR Network Requirements Review Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacon, Charles [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bell, Greg [ESnet, Berkeley, CA (United States); Canon, Shane [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Dart, Eli [ESnet, Berkeley, CA (United States); Dattoria, Vince [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science. Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR); Goodwin, Dave [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science. Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR); Lee, Jason [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hicks, Susan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Holohan, Ed [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Klasky, Scott [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lauzon, Carolyn [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science. Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR); Rogers, Jim [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shipman, Galen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Skinner, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Tierney, Brian [ESnet, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-03-08

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of SC programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 25 years. In October 2012, ESnet and the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) of the DOE SC organized a review to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by the ASCR program office. The requirements identified at the review are summarized in the Findings section, and are described in more detail in the body of the report.

  18. Final Report on the Research Project Ringhals Diagnostics and Monitoring. Stage 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demaziere, C.; Arzhanov, V.; Karlsson, Joakim K.H.; Pazsit, I.

    1999-01-01

    This report gives an account of the work performed by the Department of Reactor Physics in the frame of a research contract with Ringhals, Vattenfall AB. The contract constitutes Stage 4 of a long-term co-operative research work concerning diagnostics and monitoring of the BWR and PWR units. The work in Stage 4 has been performed between 1 October 1998 and 1 September 1999. In Stage 4 we have worked with four items as follows: 1. Regional modes in R1 stability measurements; 2. Analysis of data from the measurement 980604; 3. Study of the possibility of measuring the moderator temperature coefficient using noise methods. Literature survey and measurement evaluation; 4. Transfer of the method for determining axial control rod elevation. Current situation and progress

  19. Experimental and analytical research on the aerodynamics of wind driven turbines. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrbach, C.; Wainauski, H.; Worobel, R.

    1977-12-01

    The successful development of reliable, cost competitive horizontal axis, propeller-type wind energy conversion systems (WECS) is strongly dependent on the availability of advanced technology for each of the system components. This aerodynamic research program was aimed at providing a reliable, comprehensive data base on a series of wind turbine models covering a broad range of the prime aerodynamic and geometric variables. Such data obtained under controlled laboratory conditions on turbines designed by the same method, of the same size, and tested in the same wind tunnel had not been available in the literature. Moreover, this research program was further aimed at providing a basis for evaluating the adequacy of existing wind turbine aerodynamic design and performance methodology, for assessing the potential of recent advanced theories and for providing a basis for further method development and refinement.

  20. Final Report on Contract N00014-85-C-0078 (IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    diaper - 2ger of the Yorktown Silicon Facility. His personal research activities in- sion-free dielectric, it also describes the group velocity. clude...Here Usually the photoconductive substrate is a silicon-on- sap - the rise time is 260 fs with a full width at half maximum phire (SOS) wafer, which...the earlier work." ble the precise fabrication of micron-sized dipoles, which The antenna was located at the focus of a collimating sap - when driven

  1. Final Technical Report summarizing Purdue research activities as part of the DOE JET Topical Collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molnar, Denes [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    2015-09-01

    This report summarizes research activities at Purdue University done as part of the DOE JET Topical Collaboration. These mainly involve calculation of covariant radiative energy loss in the (Djordjevic-)Gyulassy-Levai-Vitev ((D)GLV) framework for relativistic A+A reactions at RHIC and LHC energies using realistic bulk medium evolution with both transverse and longitudinal expansion. The single PDF file provided also includes a report from the entire JET Collaboration.

  2. [Fusion research/tokamak]. Final report, 1 May 1988 - 30 April 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of the Fusion Research Center Program are: (1) to advance /the transport studies of tokamaks, including the development and maintenance of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Database, and (2) to provide theoretical interpretation, modeling and equilibrium and stability studies for the text-upgrade tokamak. Work is described on five basic categories: (1) magnetic fusion energy database; (2) computational support and numerical modeling; (3) support for TEXT-upgrade and diagnostics; (4) transport studies; and (5) Alfven waves

  3. Final Technical Report summarizing Purdue research activities as part of the DOE JET Topical Collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molnar, Denes

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes research activities at Purdue University done as part of the DOE JET Topical Collaboration. These mainly involve calculation of covariant radiative energy loss in the (Djordjevic-)Gyulassy-Levai-Vitev ((D)GLV) framework for relativistic A+A reactions at RHIC and LHC energies using realistic bulk medium evolution with both transverse and longitudinal expansion. The single PDF file provided also includes a report from the entire JET Collaboration.

  4. Special Issue: Coinage Metal (Copper, Silver, and Gold Catalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sónia Alexandra Correia Carabineiro

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The subject of catalysis by coinage metals (copper, silver, and gold comes up increasingly day-by-day. This Special Issue aims to cover the numerous aspects of the use of these metals as catalysts for several reactions. It deals with synthesis and characterization of copper, silver and gold based catalysis, their characterization and use, both for heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis, and some of their potential applications.

  5. Special Issue: Coinage Metal (Copper, Silver, and Gold) Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabineiro, Sónia Alexandra Correia

    2016-06-08

    The subject of catalysis by coinage metals (copper, silver, and gold) comes up increasingly day-by-day. This Special Issue aims to cover the numerous aspects of the use of these metals as catalysts for several reactions. It deals with synthesis and characterization of copper, silver and gold based catalysis, their characterization and use, both for heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis, and some of their potential applications.

  6. Performance Engineering Research Institute SciDAC-2 Enabling Technologies Institute Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Mary [University of Utah

    2014-09-19

    Enhancing the performance of SciDAC applications on petascale systems has high priority within DOE SC. As we look to the future, achieving expected levels of performance on high-end com-puting (HEC) systems is growing ever more challenging due to enormous scale, increasing archi-tectural complexity, and increasing application complexity. To address these challenges, PERI has implemented a unified, tripartite research plan encompassing: (1) performance modeling and prediction; (2) automatic performance tuning; and (3) performance engineering of high profile applications. The PERI performance modeling and prediction activity is developing and refining performance models, significantly reducing the cost of collecting the data upon which the models are based, and increasing model fidelity, speed and generality. Our primary research activity is automatic tuning (autotuning) of scientific software. This activity is spurred by the strong user preference for automatic tools and is based on previous successful activities such as ATLAS, which has automatically tuned components of the LAPACK linear algebra library, and other re-cent work on autotuning domain-specific libraries. Our third major component is application en-gagement, to which we are devoting approximately 30% of our effort to work directly with Sci-DAC-2 applications. This last activity not only helps DOE scientists meet their near-term per-formance goals, but also helps keep PERI research focused on the real challenges facing DOE computational scientists as they enter the Petascale Era.

  7. Performance Engineering Research Institute SciDAC-2 Enabling Technologies Institute Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas, Robert

    2013-04-20

    Enhancing the performance of SciDAC applications on petascale systems had high priority within DOE SC at the start of the second phase of the SciDAC program, SciDAC-2, as it continues to do so today. Achieving expected levels of performance on high-end computing (HEC) systems is growing ever more challenging due to enormous scale, increasing architectural complexity, and increasing application complexity. To address these challenges, the University of Southern California?s Information Sciences Institute organized the Performance Engineering Research Institute (PERI). PERI implemented a unified, tripartite research plan encompassing: (1) performance modeling and prediction; (2) automatic performance tuning; and (3) performance engineering of high profile applications. Within PERI, USC?s primary research activity was automatic tuning (autotuning) of scientific software. This activity was spurred by the strong user preference for automatic tools and was based on previous successful activities such as ATLAS, which automatically tuned components of the LAPACK linear algebra library, and other recent work on autotuning domain-specific libraries. Our other major component was application engagement, to which we devoted approximately 30% of our effort to work directly with SciDAC-2 applications. This report is a summary of the overall results of the USC PERI effort.

  8. Research accomplishments and future goals in particle physics. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    This proposal presents the research accomplishments and ongoing activities of Boston University researchers in high energy physics. Some changes have been made in the structure of the program from the previous arrangement of tasks. Task B, Accelerator Design Physics, is being submitted as a separate proposal for an independent grant; this will be consistent with the nature of the research and the source of funding. Boston University is active in seven principal areas: (1) Task A: Colliding Beams -- physics of e + e - and anti pp collisions; (2) Task C: MACRO Experiment -- search for magnetic monopoles and study of cosmic rays; (3) Task D: Proton Decay -- search for nucleon instability and study of neutrino interactions; (4) Tasks E, J, and N: Particle Theory -- theoretical high energy particle physics, including two Outstanding Junior Investigator awards; (5) Task F: Muon G-2 -- measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon; (6) Task K: SSCintcal -- calorimetry for the GEM Experiment; (7) Task L: Muon Detectors for the GEM Experiment. The body of the proposal is devoted to detailed discussions of each of the tasks. The total budget request for the program appears in a summary chapter that includes a general budget discussion and individual budget requests and explanations for each of the tasks

  9. Center for Fundamental and Applied Research in Nanostructured and Lightweight Materials. Final Technical Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullins, Michael; Rogers, Tony; King, Julia; Keith, Jason; Cornilsen, Bahne; Allen, Jeffrey; Gilbert, Ryan; Holles, Joseph

    2010-09-28

    The core projects for this DOE-sponsored Center at Michigan Tech have focused on several of the materials problems identified by the NAS. These include: new electrode materials, enhanced PEM materials, lighter and more effective bipolar plates, and improvement of the carbon used as a current carrier. This project involved fundamental and applied research in the development and testing of lightweight and nanostructured materials to be used in fuel cell applications and for chemical synthesis. The advent of new classes of materials engineered at the nanometer level can produce materials that are lightweight and have unique physical and chemical properties. The grant was used to obtain and improve the equipment infrastructure to support this research and also served to fund seven research projects. These included: 1. Development of lightweight, thermally conductive bipolar plates for improved thermal management in fuel cells; 2. Exploration of pseudomorphic nanoscale overlayer bimetallic catalysts for fuel cells; 3. Development of hybrid inorganic/organic polymer nanocomposites with improved ionic and electronic properties; 4. Development of oriented polymeric materials for membrane applications; 5. Preparation of a graphitic carbon foam current collectors; 6. The development of lightweight carbon electrodes using graphitic carbon foams for battery and fuel cell applications; and 7. Movement of water in fuel cell electrodes.

  10. Final disposal of radwaste in salt formations in the Netherlands (OPLA research program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vons, L.H.; Prij, J.

    1988-01-01

    The Dutch OPLA research program on geological disposal of radioactive waste has been divided into: 1) inventory and comparison of potential disposal concepts and sites; 2) preliminary field research near selected sites; and 3) above-ground field research and exploration of a chosen site. This article gives information on Stage 1, which is almost finished. The OPLA work is internationally linked via participation in the European Community (EC) third five-year R and D program on disposal of radioactive waste and partly subsidized by the EC. To establish the total amount of Dutch nuclear waste, the following basic options have been studied: the nuclear power stations Borssele and Dodewaard will remain operational (500 MWe); additional nuclear capacity of 3000 MWe will become operational in the future. Three sources of radioactive waste can be identified, from: 1) reprocessing; 2) operating power stations, hospitals and laboratories; and 3) decommissioning of NPPs. To establish the heat-producing vitrified waste's influence on the safety of the repository, two periods of interim storage, 10 and 50 years, have been considered. 1 fig

  11. A research needs assessment: Energy efficient alternatives to chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Final reprot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-01

    An assessment of the state of the art in refrigeration and insulation technologies is carried out to evaluate the potential for efficient substitutes for CFCs and HCFCs to facilitate the transition to a CFC-free environment. Opportunities for improved efficiency in domestic refrigeration, building chillers, commercial refrigeration and industrial refrigeration are evaluated. Needs for alternate refrigerants, improved components, and/or alternate cycles are identified. A summary of on-going research is presented in each area, and the potential roles of industry and government are considered. The most promising approaches for refrigeration technology fall into these categories: (1) improved vapor compressor cycles with alternate fluids, (2) Stirling cycle development and (3) advances in absorption technology. A summary of on-going research into advanced insulation, focused on vacuum -- based insulation technology refrigeration is developed. Insulation applications considered include appliances, transport refrigeration, and buildings. Specific recommendations for a long-term R&D agenda are present. The potential benefits, research, general approach, and probability of success are addressed.

  12. 2010 Gordon Research Conference on Correlated Electron Systems: Final Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basov, Dmitri N. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2010-06-18

    The 2010 Gordon Conference on Correlated Electron Systems will present cutting-edge research on emergent properties arising from strong electronic correlations. The Conference will feature a wide range of topics, such as the role of topology in condensed matter systems, quantum Hall interferometry and non-Abelian statistics, quantum criticality, metal-insulator transition, quantum effects in conductivity, Dirac quasiparticles, and superconductivity in cuprates and pnictides. In addition, we are reserving two sessions for new developments in this field that may arise in the coming year. The Conference will bring together a collection of investigators who are at the forefront of their field, and will provide opportunities for junior scientists and graduate students to present their work in poster format and exchange ideas with leaders in the field. We intend to have talks by established leaders in the field and also by young researchers who have made seminal contributions to various aspects of correlated electron physics, The collegial atmosphere of this Conference, with programmed discussion sessions as well as opportunities for informal gatherings in the afternoons and evenings, provides an avenue for scientists from different disciplines to brainstorm and promotes cross-disciplinary collaborations in the various research areas represented.

  13. 2001 Gordon Research Conference on Applied and Environmental Microbiology. Final progress report [agenda and attendee list

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drake, Harold

    2001-07-26

    The Gordon Research Conference on Applied and Environmental Microbiology was held at Connecticut College, New London, Connecticut, July 22-27, 2001. The conference was attended by 121 participants. The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field, coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, and included US and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field. There was a conscious effort to stimulate discussion about the key issues in the field today. Session topics included the following: Environmental and applied genomics, Cell-to-cell signaling and multicellular behavior, Emerging technologies and methods, Novel metabolisms and ecosystems, Directed evolution of enzymes and pathways, Symbiotic and trophic relationships, Synthesis and application of novel biopolymers, and Microbes at the oxic-anoxic interface. There was also a special lecture titled ''Under the umbrella of the big tree: microbial biology into the 21st century.''

  14. Cadmium sulfide/copper ternary heterojunction cell research. Final report, April 1, 1980-August 25, 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickelsen, R. A.; Chen, W. S.

    1982-08-01

    The properties of polycrystalline, thin-film CuInSe/sub 2//CdS and CuInSe/sub 2//Zn/sub x/Cd/sub 1-x/S solar cells prepared by vacuum-evaporation techniques onto metallized-alumina substrates are described. An efficiency of 10.6% for a 1 cm/sup 2/ area cell and 8.3% for an 8 cm/sup 2/ cell when tested under simulated AM1 illumination is reported. The mixed-sulfide cells are described as exhibiting increased open-circuit voltages, slightly higher short-circuit currents, and improved efficiencies. Mixed-sulfide film preparation by evaporation of CdS and ZnS powders from a single source and from two sources is discussed with preference given to the later technique. Selenide-film preparation in a planetary or rotating substrate vacuum-deposition apparatus is described. A 1 cm/sup 2/ area cell without AR-coating produced by the planetary approach is reported to demonstrate a 7.5% efficiency. The results of cell heat-treatment studies showing a strong environmental dependence are presented and indicate the desirability of an oxygen-containing atmosphere. An automatic, computer-controlled, cell-measurement system for I-V, C-V, and spectral-response analysis is described. The results of the cell-analysis and cell-modeling studies on both the plain CdS and mixed Zn/sub x/Cd/sub 1-x/S thin-film devices are presented. Finally, data obtained from constant illumination and elevated temperature life-tests on the thin-film cells showing little degradation after 9300 hours is reported.

  15. Synergistic Catalysis: A Powerful Synthetic Strategy for New Reaction Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Anna E.; MacMillan, David W. C.

    2012-01-01

    Synergistic catalysis is a synthetic strategy wherein both the nucleophile and the electrophile are simultaneously activated by two separate and distinct catalysts to afford a single chemical transformation. This powerful catalysis strategy leads to several benefits, specifically synergistic catalysis can (i) introduce new, previously unattainable chemical transformations, (ii) improve the efficiency of existing transformations, and (iii) create or improve catalytic enantioselectivity where stereocontrol was previously absent or challenging. This perspective aims to highlight these benefits using many of the successful examples of synergistic catalysis found in the literature. PMID:22518271

  16. Controllable Catalysis with Nanoparticles: Bimetallic Alloy Systems and Surface Adsorbates

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Tianyou

    2016-05-16

    Transition metal nanoparticles are privileged materials in catalysis due to their high specific surface areas and abundance of active catalytic sites. While many of these catalysts are quite useful, we are only beginning to understand the underlying catalytic mechanisms. Opening the “black box” of nanoparticle catalysis is essential to achieve the ultimate goal of catalysis by design. In this Perspective we highlight recent work addressing the topic of controlled catalysis with bimetallic alloy and “designer” adsorbate-stabilized metal nanoparticles.

  17. RETU The Finnish research programme on reactor safety 1995-1998. Final Symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanttola, T.

    1998-01-01

    The Reactor Safety (RETU, 1995-1998) research programme concentrated on search of safe limits for nuclear fuel and the reactor core, accident management methods and risk management of nuclear power plants. The total volume of the programme was 100 person years and funding FIM 58 million. This symposium report summarises the research fields, the objectives and the main results obtained. In the field of operational margins of a nuclear reactor, the behaviour of high burnup nuclear fuel was studied both in normal operation and during power transients. The static and dynamic reactor analysis codes were developed and validated to cope with new fuel designs and complicated three-dimensional reactivity transients. Advanced flow models and numerical solution methods for the dynamics codes were developed and tested. Research on accident management developed and validated calculation methods needed to plan preventive measures and to train the personnel to severe accident mitigation. Efforts were made to reduce uncertainties in phenomena important in severe accidents and to study actions planned for accident management. The programme included experimental work, but also participation in large international tests. The Finnish thermal-hydraulic test facility PACTEL was used extensively for the evaluation of the VVER-440 plant accident behaviour, for the validation of the accident analysis computer codes and for the testing of passive safety system concepts for future plant designs. In risk management probabilistic methods were developed for safety related decision making and for complex event sequences. Effects of maintenance on safety were studied and effective methods for assessment of human reliability and safety critical organisations were searched. To enhance human competencies in control of complex environments, practical tools for training and continuous learning were worked out, and methods to evaluate appropriateness of control room design were developed. (orig)

  18. Research and development activities at INE concerning corrosion of final repository container materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kienzler, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    The present work provides a historical overview of the research and development activities carried out at the (Nuclear) Research Center Karlsruhe (today KIT) since the beginning of the 1980s on the corrosion of materials which might be suitable for construction of containers for highly radioactive wastes. The report relates almost exclusively to the work performed by Dr. Emmanuel Smailos, who elaborated the corrosion of various materials at the Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal (INE). The requirements for the containers and materials, which were subject to changes in time, are presented. The changes were strongly influenced by the changed perception of the use of nuclear energy. The selection of the materials under investigations, the boundary conditions for the corrosion experiments and the analytical methods are described. Results of the corrosion of the materials such as finegrained steel, Hastelloy C4, nodular cast iron, titanium-palladium and copper or copper-nickel alloys in typical salt solutions are summarized. The findings of special investigations, e.g. corrosion under irradiation or the influence of sulfide on the corrosion rates are shown. For construction of disposal canisters, experiments were conducted to determine the contact corrosion, the influence of the hydrogen embrittlement of Ti-Pd and fine-grained steels on the corrosion behavior as well as the corrosion behavior of welding and the influence of different welding processes with the resulting heat-affected zones on the corrosion behavior. The work was contributed to several European research programs and was well recognized in the USA. Investigations on the corrosion of steels in non-saline solutions and corrosion under interim storage conditions as well as under the expected conditions of the Konrad repository for low-level radioactive wastes are also described. In addition, the experiments on ceramic materials are presented and the results of the corrosion of Al 2 O 3 and ZrO 2 ceramics

  19. Safety research needs for carbide and nitride fueled LMFBR's. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastenberg, W.E.

    1975-01-01

    The results of a study initiated at UCLA during the academic year 1974--1975 to evaluate and review the potential safety related research needs for carbide and nitride fueled LMFBR's are presented. The tasks included the following: (1) Review Core and primary system designs for any significant differences from oxide fueled reactors, (2) Review carbide (and nitride) fuel element irradiation behavior, (3) Review reactor behavior in postulated accidents, (4) Examine analytical methods of accident analysis to identify major gaps in models and data, and (5) Examine post accident heat removal. (TSS)

  20. 2012 Gordon Research Conference on Water and Aqueous Solutions, Final Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Amotz, Dor [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2012-08-17

    Understanding the fundamental principles governing the structure and dynamics of water - and particularly how water mediates chemical interactions and processes - continues to pose formidable challenges and yield abundant surprises. The focus of this Gordon Research Conference is on identifying key questions, describing emerging understandings, and unveiling surprising discoveries related to water and aqueous solutions. The talks and posters at this meeting will describe studies of water and its interactions with objects such as interfaces, channels, electrons, oils, ions, and proteins; probed using optical, electrical, and particle experiments, and described using classical, quantum, and multi-scale theories.

  1. Innovations and Enhancements for a Consortium of Big-10 University Research and Training Reactors. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenizer, Jack

    2011-01-01

    The Consortium of Big-10 University Research and Training Reactors was by design a strategic partnership of seven leading institutions. We received the support of both our industry and DOE laboratory partners. Investments in reactor, laboratory and program infrastructure, allowed us to lead the national effort to expand and improve the education of engineers in nuclear science and engineering, to provide outreach and education to pre-college educators and students and to become a key resource of ideas and trained personnel for our U.S. industrial and DOE laboratory collaborators.

  2. A Research Needs Assessment for waste plastics recycling: Volume 1, Executive summary. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    This first volume provides a summary of the entire project. The study utilized the talents of a large number of participants, including a significant number of peer reviewers from industrial companies, government agencies, and research institutes. in addition, an extensive analysis of relevant literature was carried out. In considering the attractiveness of recycling technologies that are alternatives to waste-to-energy combustion units, a systems approach was utilized. Collection of waste streams containing plastics, sortation, and reclamation of plastics and plastic mixtures, reprocessing or chemical conversion of the reclaimed polymers, and the applicability of the products to specific market segments have been analyzed in the study.

  3. 08-ERD-071 Final Report: New Molecular Probes and Catalysts for Bioenergy Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thelen, M P; Rowe, A A; Siebers, A K; Jiao, Y

    2011-03-07

    A major thrust in bioenergy research is to develop innovative methods for deconstructing plant cell wall polymers, such as cellulose and lignin, into simple monomers that can be biologically converted to ethanol and other fuels. Current techniques for monitoring a broad array of cell wall materials and specific degradation products are expensive and time consuming. To monitor various polymers and assay their breakdown products, molecular probes for detecting specific carbohydrates and lignins are urgently needed. These new probes would extend the limited biochemical techniques available, and enable realtime imaging of ultrastructural changes in plant cells. Furthermore, degradation of plant biomass could be greatly accelerated by the development of catalysts that can hydrolyze key cell wall polysaccharides and lignin. The objective of this project was to develop cheap and efficient DNA reagents (aptamers) used to detect and quantify polysaccharides, lignin, and relevant products of their breakdown. A practical goal of the research was to develop electrochemical aptamer biosensors, which could be integrated into microfluidic devices and used for high-throughput screening of enzymes or biological systems that degrade biomass. Several important model plant cell wall polymers and compounds were targeted for specific binding and purification of aptamers, which were then tested by microscopic imaging, circular dichroism, surface plasmon resonance, fluorescence anisotropy, and electrochemical biosensors. Using this approach, it was anticiated that we could provide a basis for more efficient and economically viable biofuels, and the technologies established could be used to design molecular tools that recognize targets sought in medicine or chemical and biological defense projects.

  4. Research on Mega-Math: Discrete mathematics and computer science for children. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fellows, M.R. [Victoria Univ., BC (Canada)

    1995-06-26

    The objective of the subcontract was to provide further research on the approach to mathematics education embodied in the workbook ``This is Mega-Mathematics!`` essentially produced under the subcontract and its preceding informal (alas!) cooperative arrangements. The workbook is now widely and freely distributed on the Internet under the copyright of the Los Alamos National Labs. This research was to consist of: (1) the development and dissemination of materials, (2) experimentation with use of the materials in classroom visits and other events, (3) communication of the ideas embodied in the materials to various forums concerned with mathematics education reform, (4) the development of connections to the computer games industry, (5) the development of new workbook-type materials, (6) publications, (7) the development of connections to Science Museums, (8) the development of uses of the Internet to make MegaMath materials and ideas available through that medium, (9) the stimulation of and coordination with other projects in mathematics education reform. All of these objectives have been accomplished in what should be regarded as one of the most interesting and cost-effective projects ever undertaken in mathematics education, a testimony to the vision and creative imagination of the Los Alamos Labs.

  5. Final Report, Research Program to Investigate the Fundamental Chemistry of Technetium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukens Jr., Wayne W.; Fickes, Michael J.; Bucher, Jerome J.; Burns, Carol J.; Edelstein, Norman M.; Shuh, David K.

    2000-12-23

    The purpose is to increase the basic scientific understanding of technetium chemistry to better understand the behavior of technetium in chemical environments relevant to DOE. Two important areas in need of study are the behavior of technetium in highly alkaline solutions similar to high-level nuclear waste, and its behavior in different waste forms. This research program addressed these two needs. Two separate approaches were used in this program. The first focus was to understand the basic solution chemistry of technetium, which underlies its behavior in the highly alkaline environment of the nuclear waste tanks located at the Savannah River and Hanford Sites. The specific problems at these sites are related to the anomalous oxidation state of technetium (Schroeder 1995). Although, at high pH, technetium should exist in its highest oxidation state as TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, soluble, lower-valent technetium species have been observed in certain wastes. The specific unknowns that this program sought to answer are the nature of lower valent technetium species that can be formed in highly alkaline solution and whether pertechnetate undergoes radiolytic reduction in highly alkaline solution when nitrate is present in excess. The second focus area is the behavior of technetium immobilized in various waste forms. The behavior of technetium in cement wastes was examined to gain information about its long-term stability. Specifically, this research examined the oxidation of reduced technetium species by components present in high-level waste that are incorporated into cement waste along with technetium.

  6. Combustion energy frontier research center (CEFRC) final report (August 1, 2009 – July 31, 2016)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, Chung [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2017-05-05

    The Combustion Energy Frontier Research Center (CEFRC) was established to tackle the single overarching grand challenge of energy sustainability, energy security and global warming: to develop a “validated, predictive, multi-scale, combustion modeling capability to optimize the design and operation of evolving fuels in advanced engines for transportation applications,” as identified in the DOE report on “Basic Energy Needs for Clean and Efficient Combustion of 21st Century Transportation Fuels”. The challenge is particularly daunting since energy conversion efficiencies and exhaust emissions are governed by coupled chemical and transport processes at multiple length scales ranging from electron excitation to molecular rearrangements to nanoscale particulate formation to turbulent fuel/air mixing. To tackle this challenge, the CEFRC assembled a world-class team of 15 principal investigators, with the objectives to: 1) develop and test theoretical models to predict elementary reaction rates, molecule thermalization rates, chemical bond dissociation energies, and nonequilibrium transport properties using quantum chemistry calculations that account for strong electron correlation and multiple electronic potential energy surfaces; 2) develop automated kinetic mechanism generation, reduction, and error control methods for predicting alternative fuel including biofuel oxidation, fuel droplet decomposition, and NOx and particulate formation; 3) validate and improve the predictions of these models by measuring ignition delay times, species profiles, flame structures, burning limits, turbulence-kinetic coupling, and NOx and soot emissions at high-pressures and near-limit conditions, by using advanced experimental diagnostic techniques including multiple laser techniques, molecular beam sampling and synchrotron photoionization, and by conducting the measurements in high-pressure shock tubes, jet-stirred and flow reactors, flame bombs, counterflow flames, and advanced

  7. Final report for the protocol extensions for ATM Security Laboratory Directed Research and Development Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarman, T.D.; Pierson, L.G.; Brenkosh, J.P. [and others

    1996-03-01

    This is the summary report for the Protocol Extensions for Asynchronous Transfer Mode project, funded under Sandia`s Laboratory Directed Research and Development program. During this one-year effort, techniques were examined for integrating security enhancements within standard ATM protocols, and mechanisms were developed to validate these techniques and to provide a basic set of ATM security assurances. Based on our experience during this project, recommendations were presented to the ATM Forum (a world-wide consortium of ATM product developers, service providers, and users) to assist with the development of security-related enhancements to their ATM specifications. As a result of this project, Sandia has taken a leading role in the formation of the ATM Forum`s Security Working Group, and has gained valuable alliances and leading-edge experience with emerging ATM security technologies and protocols.

  8. Laboratory directed research and development on disposal of plutonium recovered from weapons. FY1994 final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitts, J.H.; Choi, J.S.

    1994-11-14

    This research project was conceived as a multi-year plan to study the use of mixed plutonium oxide-uranium oxide (MOX) fuel in existing nuclear reactors. Four areas of investigation were originally proposed: (1) study reactor physics including evaluation of control rod worth and power distribution during normal operation and transients; (2) evaluate accidents focusing upon the reduced control rod worth and reduced physical properties of PuO{sub 2}; (3) assess the safeguards required during fabrication and use of plutonium bearing fuel assemblies; and (4) study public acceptance issues associated with using material recovered from weapons to fuel a nuclear reactor. First year accomplishments are described. Appendices contain 2 reports entitled: development and validation of advanced computational capability for MOX fueled ALWR assembly designs; and long-term criticality safety concerns associated with weapons plutonium disposition.

  9. Magnetic liquid metal two-phase flow research. Phase 1. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graves, R.D.

    1983-04-01

    The Phase I research demonstrates the feasibility of the magnetic liquid metal (MLM) two-phase flow concept. A dispersion analysis is presented based on a complete set of two-phase-flow equations augmented to include stresses due to magnetic polarization of the fluid. The analysis shows that the stability of the MLM two-phase flow is determined by the magnetic Mach number, the slip ratio, geometry of the flow relative to the applied magnetic field, and by the voidage dependence of the interfacial forces. Results of a set of experiments concerned with magnetic effects on the dynamics of single bubble motion in an aqueous-based, viscous, conducting magnetic fluid are presented. Predictions in the theoretical literature are qualitatively verified using a bench-top experimental apparatus. In particular, applied magnetic fields are seen to lead to reduced bubble size at fixed generating orifice pressure

  10. Assessment of industry needs for oil shale research and development. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackworth, J.H.

    1987-05-01

    Thirty-one industry people were contacted to provide input on oil shale in three subject areas. The first area of discussion dealt with industry`s view of the shape of the future oil shale industry; the technology, the costs, the participants, the resources used, etc. It assessed the types and scale of the technologies that will form the industry, and how the US resource will be used. The second subject examined oil shale R&D needs and priorities and potential new areas of research. The third area of discussion sought industry comments on what they felt should be the role of the DOE (and in a larger sense the US government) in fostering activities that will lead to a future commercial US oil shale shale industry.

  11. Seismic Safety Margins Research Program Phase I final report: fragilities development (Project VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohn, M.P.; Cover, L.E.; Dong, R.G.; Vagliente, V.N.; Campbell, R.D.; Wesley, D.A.

    1982-12-01

    The Seismic Safety Margins Research Program is an NRC-funded program directed towards estimating the conservatism in the NRC Standard Review Plan seismic safety requirements with the ultimate goal of developing improved requirements. As part of this program, calculations of the seismic risk from a typical commercial nuclear reactor are being made. These calculations require a knowledge of the probability of failure (fragility) of safety-related components in the reactor system which actively participate in the hypothesized accident scenarios. This report describes the development of the required fragility relations and the data sources and data reduction techniques upon which they are based. Both building and component fragilities are covered. The building fragilities are for the Zion Unit 1 reactor which was the specific plant used for development of methodology in the program. Some of the component fragilities are site-specific also, but most have been developed to apply to generic categories of components

  12. Fluctuations of quasars and other astronomical sources: final report on New Research Initiatives Program W-210

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terrell, J.

    1978-01-01

    New Research Initiatives Program W-210 produced a number of scientific results, publications, colloquia, and talks. Investigations under this program dealt with power spectra of fluctuating light sources, the apparent expansion rates of astronomical sources exploding at relativistic speed, the limits on fluctuation rates of such expanding (and nonexpanding) light sources, and related matters. Probably the most important result was a study of the time history of such an exploding light source, which showed that a widely held belief that unusually rapid fluctuations of light output would be produced in this case is not correct. This result has an important bearing on the interpretation of the redshifts of quasars and BL Lac objects, indicating that cosmological distance is very difficult to reconcile with the observations of rapid variations of luminosity. These results, and the power-spectrum results, are also of considerable interest in the study of astronomical x-ray sources. A list of publications is included

  13. Cooperative research in coal liquefaction. Final report, May 1, 1992--April 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffman, G.P. [ed.

    1996-03-01

    Research on sulfate and metal (Mo, Sn) promoted Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts in the current year focused on optimization of conditions. Parameters varied included temperature, solvent, solvent-to-coal ratio, and the effect of presulfiding versus in situ sulfiding. Oil yields were found to increase approximately proportionately with both temperature and solvent-to-coal ratio. The donor solvent, tetralin, proved to give better total conversion and oil yields than either 1-methylnaphthalene or Wilsonville recycle oil. A significant enhancement of both total liquefaction yields and oil yields from lignites and subbituminous coals has been achieved by incorporating iron into the coal matrix by cation exchange. A study has been conducted on the synthesis of iron, molybdenum, and tungsten catalysts using a laser pyrolysis technique.

  14. Final report for the Integrated and Robust Security Infrastructure (IRSI) laboratory directed research and development project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchinson, R.L.; Hamilton, V.A.; Istrail, G.G.; Espinoza, J.; Murphy, M.D.

    1997-11-01

    This report describes the results of a Sandia-funded laboratory-directed research and development project titled {open_quotes}Integrated and Robust Security Infrastructure{close_quotes} (IRSI). IRSI was to provide a broad range of commercial-grade security services to any software application. IRSI has two primary goals: application transparency and manageable public key infrastructure. IRSI must provide its security services to any application without the need to modify the application to invoke the security services. Public key mechanisms are well suited for a network with many end users and systems. There are many issues that make it difficult to deploy and manage a public key infrastructure. IRSI addressed some of these issues to create a more manageable public key infrastructure.

  15. Summary of research on microbiological processes. International Energy Agency Subtask D, final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winters, A.L.

    1992-09-01

    Storage of thermal energy in aquifers has obvious benefits of saving energy and decreasing the consumption of fossil fuels. However, aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES), which involves groundwater aquifers as the storage medium for heat or chill, impinges on the environment. A literature review of pertinent microbiology publications (Hicks and Stewart, 1988) identified the potential for the interaction of ATES systems and microbiological processes to create a source of infectious diseases and the potential for damage to the environment. In addition, the review identified a potential for microbiological processes to develop conditions that would interfere with the operation of an ATES system. As a result of this research effort, investigators from Finland, Germany, Switzerland, and the United States have examined several ATES systems in operation and have observed that the ATES systems studied do not contribute to infectious disease transmission, do not adversely affect the environment, and do not contribute significantly to biofouling or biocorrosion.

  16. Bulk hydrogen analysis, using neutrons. Final report of the second research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-11-01

    The aims of the Second Co-ordination Meting (RCM) of the Coordinated Research Programme (CRP) were to report on and review progress against the work programme set at the beginning of the CRP and to discuss the work plans for the second half of the programme. In many cases hydrogen is required to be measured in a bulk medium rather than merely at a surface. For this reason neutrons are used due to their high penetrating power in dense material. In addition, the mass attenuation coefficient for neutrons in hydrogen is significantly larger than for all other elements, meaning that neutrons have a higher probability of interacting with hydrogen than with other elements in the sample matrix. Neutrons have been used in the following areas: Fast Neutron Transmission, Scattering and Activation Technique; Digital Neutron Imaging; Hydrogen Detection by Epithermal Neutrons; Microscopic Behaviour of Hydrogen in Bulk Materials

  17. Final Report for research on The Glucose 6-Phosphate Shunt Around the Calvin-Benson Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharkey, Thomas D. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2017-10-30

    In this research, photosynthetic carbon metabolism was studied to identify mechanisms by which plants store energy from sunlight as carbon compounds, especially sugars. Conditions were identified in which carbon appeared to flow backwards from outside the photosynthetic compartment (chloroplast) back into it. A specific gene product was manipulated to make the flow bigger or smaller. Preventing the flow (by eliminating the gene) had little effect on plant growth but increasing the flow, by overexpressing the gene, caused the plants to become extremely sensitive to changes in light. Plants with the gene overexpressed had high rates of cyclic electron flow, the photosynthetic electron transport pathway that occurs when plants need more of the energy molecule ATP. These and other observations led us to conclude that a metabolic pathway that is normally turned off because it is counter-productive during photosynthesis, in fact occurs at about 10% of the rate of normal photosynthesis. This creates an inefficiency but may stabilize photosynthesis allowing it to cope with the very large and rapid changes that leaves experience such as the hundred-fold changes in light intensity that can occur in seconds on a partly cloudy day. We also concluded that the back flow of carbon into chloroplasts could be important at high rates of photosynthesis allowing increased rates of starch synthesis. Starch synthesis allows plants to store sugars during the day for use at night. At high rates of photosynthesis starch synthesis becomes very important to protect against end-product inhibition of photosynthesis. This research identified two metabolic pathways that extend the primary carbon fixation pathway called the Calvin-Benson cycle. These pathway extensions are now called the cytosolic bypass and the glucose 6-phosphate shunt. This improvement in our understanding of carbon metabolism of photosynthesis will guide efforts to increase photosynthesis to increase production of food, fuel

  18. Spectroscopic and Collisional Data for Tungsten from 1 eV to 20 keV. Summary Report of the Final Research Coordination Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.-K.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Müller, A.; Ralchenko, Yu.; Braams, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    The final Research Coordination Meeting of a coordinated research project (CRP) on spectroscopic and collisional data for tungsten ions in fusion plasma was held at IAEA Headquarters with 17 external experts representing 14 research groups and staff from the International Atomic Energy Agency. Participants summarized their research during the CRP and made plans for a final report. The proceedings and conclusions of the meeting are summarized here. (author)

  19. Final Scientific/ Technical Report. Playas Grid Reliability and Distributed Energy Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, Van [New Mexico Institute Of Mining And Technology, Socorro, NM (United States); Weinkauf, Don [New Mexico Institute Of Mining And Technology, Socorro, NM (United States); Khan, Mushtaq [New Mexico Institute Of Mining And Technology, Socorro, NM (United States); Helgeson, Wes [New Mexico Institute Of Mining And Technology, Socorro, NM (United States); Weedeward, Kevin [New Mexico Institute Of Mining And Technology, Socorro, NM (United States); LeClerc, Corey [New Mexico Institute Of Mining And Technology, Socorro, NM (United States); Fuierer, Paul [New Mexico Institute Of Mining And Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)

    2012-06-30

    The future looks bright for solar and renewable energies in the United States. Recent studies claim that by 2050, solar power could supply a third of all electricity demand in the country’s western states. Technology advances, soft policy changes, and increased energy consciousness will all have to happen to achieve this goal. But the larger question is, what would it take to do more throughout the United States? The studies tie future solar and renewable growth in the United States to programs that aim to lower the soft costs of solar adoption, streamline utility interconnections, and increase technology advances through research and development. At the state and local levels, the most important steps are; Net metering: Net metering policies lets customers offset their electric bills with onsite solar and receive reliable and fair compensation for the excess electricity they provide to the grid. Not surprisingly, what utilities consider fair is not necessarily a rate that’s favorable to solar customers; Renewable portfolio standards (RPS): RPS policies require utilities to provide a certain amount of their power from renewable sources; some set specific targets for solar and other renewables. California’s aggressive RPS of 33% renewable energy by 2020 is not bankrupting the state, or its residents; Strong statewide interconnection policies: Solar projects can experience significant delays and hassles just to get connected to the grid. Streamlined feasibility and impact analysis are needed. Good interconnection policies are crucial to the success of solar or renewable energy development; Financing options: Financing is often the biggest obstacle to solar adoption. Those obstacles can be surmounted with policies that support creative financing options like third-party ownership (TPO) and property assessed clean energy (PACE). Attesting to the significance of TPO is the fact that in Arizona, it accounted for 86% of all residential photovoltaic (PV

  20. Final Report for Subcontract B541028, Pore-Scale Modeling to Support 'Pore Connectivity' Research Work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewing, R.P.

    2009-01-01

    This report covers modeling aspects of a combined experimental and modeling task in support of the DOE Science and Technology Program (formerly OSTI) within the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). Research Objectives The research for this project dealt with diffusive retardation: solute moving through a fracture diffuses into and out of the rock matrix. This diffusive exchange retards overall solute movement, and retardation both dilutes waste being released, and allows additional decay. Diffusive retardation involves not only fracture conductivity and matrix diffusion, but also other issues and processes: contaminants may sorb to the rock matrix, fracture flow may be episodic, a given fracture may or may not flow depending on the volume of flow and the fracture's connection to the overall fracture network, the matrix imbibes water during flow episodes and dries between episodes, and so on. The objective of the project was to improve understanding of diffusive retardation of radionuclides due to fracture / matrix interactions. Results from combined experimental/modeling work were to (1) determine whether the current understanding and model representation of matrix diffusion is valid, (2) provide insights into the upscaling of laboratory-scale diffusion experiments, and (3) help in evaluating the impact on diffusive retardation of episodic fracture flow and pore connectivity in Yucca Mountain tuffs. Questions explored included the following: (1) What is the relationship between the diffusion coefficient measured at one scale, to that measured or observed at a different scale? In classical materials this relationship is trivial; in low-connectivity materials it is not. (2) Is the measured diffusivity insensitive to the shape of the sample? Again, in classical materials there should be no sample shape effect. (3) Does sorption affect diffusive exchange in low-connectivity media differently than in classical media? (4) What is the effect of matrix

  1. Final Report for Subcontract B541028, Pore-Scale Modeling to Support "Pore Connectivity" Research Work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, R P

    2009-02-25

    This report covers modeling aspects of a combined experimental and modeling task in support of the DOE Science and Technology Program (formerly OSTI) within the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). Research Objectives The research for this project dealt with diffusive retardation: solute moving through a fracture diffuses into and out of the rock matrix. This diffusive exchange retards overall solute movement, and retardation both dilutes waste being released, and allows additional decay. Diffusive retardation involves not only fracture conductivity and matrix diffusion, but also other issues and processes: contaminants may sorb to the rock matrix, fracture flow may be episodic, a given fracture may or may not flow depending on the volume of flow and the fracture's connection to the overall fracture network, the matrix imbibes water during flow episodes and dries between episodes, and so on. The objective of the project was to improve understanding of diffusive retardation of radionuclides due to fracture / matrix interactions. Results from combined experimental/modeling work were to (1) determine whether the current understanding and model representation of matrix diffusion is valid, (2) provide insights into the upscaling of laboratory-scale diffusion experiments, and (3) help in evaluating the impact on diffusive retardation of episodic fracture flow and pore connectivity in Yucca Mountain tuffs. Questions explored included the following: (1) What is the relationship between the diffusion coefficient measured at one scale, to that measured or observed at a different scale? In classical materials this relationship is trivial; in low-connectivity materials it is not. (2) Is the measured diffusivity insensitive to the shape of the sample? Again, in classical materials there should be no sample shape effect. (3) Does sorption affect diffusive exchange in low-connectivity media differently than in classical media? (4) What is the effect of

  2. Combined methods for liquid radioactive waste treatment. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1997-2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-02-01

    The report contains 13 papers presented at the final research co-ordination meeting of the CRP. The subjects covered include processes and technologies for treatment and conditioning of liquid radioactive wastes. It quite often includes the application of several steps, such as filtration, precipitation, sorption, ion exchange, evaporation and/or membrane separation to meet the requirements both for the release of decontaminated effluents into the environment and the conditioning of waste concentrates for disposal. Combination of the processes and their consecutive or simultaneous application is also described. It results in an improved decontamination, waste volume reduction, safety and overall cost effectiveness in the treatment, conditioning and disposal of these wastes

  3. Spent fuel performance assessment and research. Final report of a co-ordinated research project on Spent Fuel Performance Assessment and Research (SPAR) 1997-2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-03-01

    The report provides an overview of technical issues related to spent fuel wet and dry storage and summarizes the objectives and major findings of research, carried out within the framework of the Coordinated Research Program. Included are the fuel integrity aspects, fuel degradation mechanisms in dry and wet storage, behaviour of storage facility components (metallic components, reinforced concrete). Also included are issues related to long-term storage and monitoring technologies and techniques. Country reports on research projects within the SPAR Coordinated Research Program is presented. A brief history is given on the history of the BEFAST and SPAR Coordinated Research Projects

  4. Final report on the project research 'stochastic effects of irradiation and risk estimation'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-03-01

    The title project research was carried out through 1983-1987, by three groups for the studies of radiation carcinogenesis, human genetic effects, and radiotoxicology. 8 reports by the first group, 3 by the second, and 6 by the third group are collected in this issue. The contents are as follows. Serial sacrifice study on tumorigenesis in male C57BL/6J mice exposed to gamma-ray or fast neutron radiation; Influence of biological variables on radiation carcinogenesis; Studies on radiation-induced thymic lymphomagenesis; Modifying factors of radiation induced myeloid leukemia of C3H/He mouse; Cell kinetic studies on radiation induced leukemogenesis; Cytogenetical studies on the mechanism of radiation induced neoplasmas; Molecular biological study on genetic stability of the genome; Protein factors regulating proliferation and differentiation of normal and neoplastic cells; Studies on dose-radiation relationships for induction of chromosome abberations in stem-spermatogonia of three crab-eating monkey after low and high dose rate γ-irradiation; Risk estimation of radiation mutagenesis in man by using cultured mammalian cells; Effects of ionizing radiation on male germ cells of crabeating monkey; Movement and metabolism of radioactive particles in the respiratory tract; Studies on dosimetry for internally deposited alpha-emitters; Comparative toxicological studies on the effects of internal exposures; Studies on treatment of alpha-radioactive wastes; Methodological studies on the inhalation of radioactive aerosols; Removal of transuranic elements by DTPA. (A. Y.)

  5. 1999 Gordon Research Conference on Mammalian DNA Repair. Final Progress Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NONE

    1999-01-01

    This Conference will examine DNA repair as the key component in genomic surveillance that is so crucial to the overall integrity and function of mammalian cells. Recent discoveries have catapulted the field of DNA repair into a pivotal position for fundamental investigations into oncology, aging, environmental health, and developmental biology. We hope to highlight the most promising and exciting avenues of research in robust discussions at this conference. This Mammalian DNA Repair Gordon Conference differs from the past conferences in this series, in which the programs were broader in scope, with respect to topics and biological systems covered. A conference sponsored by the Genetics Society in April 1998 emphasized recombinational mechanisms for double-strand break repair and the role of mismatch repair deficiency in colorectal cancer. These topics will therefore receive somewhat less emphasis in the upcoming Conference. In view of the recent mechanistic advances in mammalian DNA repair, an upcoming comprehensive DNA repair meeting next autumn at Hilton Head; and the limited enrollment for Gordon Conferences we have decided to focus session-by-session on particular areas of controversy and/or new developments specifically in mammalian systems. Thus, the principal presentations will draw upon results from other cellular systems only to the extent that they impact our understanding of mammalian DNA repair

  6. Harvard-MIT research program in short-lived radiopharmaceuticals. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adelstein, S.J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Office of Sponsored Programs

    1995-02-01

    The Harvard-MIT Research Program in Short-lived Radiopharmaceuticals was established in 1977 to foster interaction among groups working in radiopharmaceutical chemistry at Harvard Medical School, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the Massachusetts General Hospital. To this was added a group at The Childrens Hospital. From these collaborations and building upon the special strengths of the participating individuals, laboratories and institutions, it was hoped that original approaches would be found for the design of new, clinically useful, radiolabeled compounds. The original thrust of this proposal included: (a) examination of the coordination chemistry of technetium as a basis for rational radiopharmaceutical design, (b) development of an ultrashort-lived radionuclide generator for the diagnosis of congenital heart disease in newborns, (c) synthesis of receptor-site-directed halopharmaceuticals, (d) improved facile labeling of complex molecules with positron-emitting radionuclides. The authors` 1986 proposal was oriented toward organs and disease, emphasizing radiolabeled agents that delineate specific functions and the distribution of receptors in brain, heart, and tumors. In 1989, they further refined their purposes and focused on two major aims: (a) synthesis and utilization of neutral technetium and rhenium complexes of high specific activity, and (b) development of new approaches to the radiolabeling of proteins, peptides, immunoglobulins, and their fragments. In 1992, the authors amended this proposal to concentrate their efforts on biologically active peptides and proteins for targeted radiodiagnosis and therapy.

  7. 1999 Gordon Research Conference on Mammalian DNA Repair. Final Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-02-12

    This Conference will examine DNA repair as the key component in genomic surveillance that is so crucial to the overall integrity and function of mammalian cells. Recent discoveries have catapulted the field of DNA repair into a pivotal position for fundamental investigations into oncology, aging, environmental health, and developmental biology. We hope to highlight the most promising and exciting avenues of research in robust discussions at this conference. This Mammalian DNA Repair Gordon Conference differs from the past conferences in this series, in which the programs were broader in scope, with respect to topics and biological systems covered. A conference sponsored by the Genetics Society in April 1998 emphasized recombinational mechanisms for double-strand break repair and the role of mismatch repair deficiency in colorectal cancer. These topics will therefore receive somewhat less emphasis in the upcoming Conference. In view of the recent mechanistic advances in mammalian DNA repair, an upcoming comprehensive DNA repair meeting next autumn at Hilton Head; and the limited enrollment for Gordon Conferences we have decided to focus session-by-session on particular areas of controversy and/or new developments specifically in mammalian systems. Thus, the principal presentations will draw upon results from other cellular systems only to the extent that they impact our understanding of mammalian DNA repair.

  8. Harvard-MIT research program in short-lived radiopharmaceuticals. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelstein, S.J.

    1995-02-01

    The Harvard-MIT Research Program in Short-lived Radiopharmaceuticals was established in 1977 to foster interaction among groups working in radiopharmaceutical chemistry at Harvard Medical School, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the Massachusetts General Hospital. To this was added a group at The Childrens Hospital. From these collaborations and building upon the special strengths of the participating individuals, laboratories and institutions, it was hoped that original approaches would be found for the design of new, clinically useful, radiolabeled compounds. The original thrust of this proposal included: (a) examination of the coordination chemistry of technetium as a basis for rational radiopharmaceutical design, (b) development of an ultrashort-lived radionuclide generator for the diagnosis of congenital heart disease in newborns, (c) synthesis of receptor-site-directed halopharmaceuticals, (d) improved facile labeling of complex molecules with positron-emitting radionuclides. The authors' 1986 proposal was oriented toward organs and disease, emphasizing radiolabeled agents that delineate specific functions and the distribution of receptors in brain, heart, and tumors. In 1989, they further refined their purposes and focused on two major aims: (a) synthesis and utilization of neutral technetium and rhenium complexes of high specific activity, and (b) development of new approaches to the radiolabeling of proteins, peptides, immunoglobulins, and their fragments. In 1992, the authors amended this proposal to concentrate their efforts on biologically active peptides and proteins for targeted radiodiagnosis and therapy

  9. Building Efficiency Technologies by Tomorrow’s Engineers and Researchers (BETTER) Capstone. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yee, Shannon [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2017-09-30

    BETTER Capstone supported 29 student project teams consisting of 155 students over two years in developing transformative building energy efficiency technologies through a capstone design experience. Capstone is the culmination of an undergraduate student’s engineering education. Interdisciplinary teams of students spent a semester designing and prototyping a technological solution for a variety building energy efficiency problems. During this experience students utilized the full design process, including the manufacturing and testing of a prototype solution, as well as publically demonstrating the solution at the Capstone Design Expo. As part of this project, students explored modern manufacturing techniques and gained hands-on experience with these techniques to produce their prototype technologies. This research added to the understanding of the challenges within building technology education and engagement with industry. One goal of the project was to help break the chicken-and-egg problem with getting students to engage more deeply with the building technology industry. It was learned however that this industry is less interested in trying innovative new concept but rather interested in hiring graduates for existing conventional building efforts. While none of the projects yielded commercial success, much individual student growth and learning was accomplished, which is a long-term benefit to the public at large.

  10. Radioactive isotopes in clinical medicine and research. Final Programme and Abstracts Book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergmann, H.; Dudczak, R.; Markt, B.

    2002-01-01

    The 25 th symposium offers again a representative cross-section through the current topics of nuclear medicine of scientific interest. The general theme of research in nuclear medicine has shifted from the spectacular new developments which were so often reported in the first symposia to a less spectacular, nevertheless equally fruitful, consolidation period. The topics of the symposium reflect the major trends in nuclear medicine, witnessing the firm place which PET procedures have occupied in clinical practice. Standardization and validation is another area which has remained as a major task for the development of our specialty and which in spite of the enormous progress that has been made during the past two years still is far from a general solution. Networking, even between heterogeneous systems, has become less of a problem than it used to be a few years ago. However, new and more complex acquisition technology such as needed for quantitation in scintigraphy and for multi-modality imaging, is still a challenge for integration and for PACS systems. (author)

  11. Assessment of research directions for high-voltage direct-current power systems. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, W F

    1982-09-01

    High voltage direct current (HVDC) power transmission continues to be an emerging technology nearly thirty years after its introduction into modern power systems. To date its use has been restricted to either specialized applications having identifiable economic advantages (e.g., breakeven distance) or, rarely, applications where decoupling is needed. Only recently have the operational advantages (e.g., power modulation) of HVDC been realized on operating systems. A research project whose objective was to identify hardware developments and, where appropriate, system applications which can exemplify cost and operational advantages of integrated ac/dc power systems is discussed. The three principal tasks undertaken were: assessment of equipment developments; quantification of operational advantages; and interaction with system planners. Interest in HVDC power transmission has increased markedly over the past several years, and many new systems are now being investigated. The dissemination of information about HVDC, including specifically the symposium undertaken for Task 3, is a critical factor in fostering an understanding of this important adjunct to ac power transmission.

  12. Fundamental research on novel process alternatives for coal gasification: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, A H; Knight, R A; Anderson, G L; Feldkirchner, H L; Babu, S P

    1986-10-01

    The Institute of Gas Technology has conducted a fundamental research program to determine the technical feasibility of and to prepare preliminary process evaluations for two new approaches to coal gasification. These two concepts were assessed under two major project tasks: Task 1. CO/sub 2/-Coal Gasification Process Concept; Task 2. Internal Recirculation Catalysts Coal Gasification Process Concept. The first process concept involves CO/sub 2/-O/sub 2/ gasification of coal followed by CO/sub 2/ removal from the hot product gas by a solid MgO-containing sorbent. The sorbent is regenerated by either a thermal- or a pressure-swing step and the CO/sub 2/ released is recycled back to the gasifier. The product is a medium-Btu gas. The second process concept involves the use of novel ''semivolatile'' materials as internal recirculating catalysts for coal gasification. These materials remain in the gasifier because their vapor pressure-temperature behavior is such that they will be in the vapor state at the hotter, char exit part of the reactor and will condense in the colder, coal-inlet part of the reactor. 21 refs., 43 figs., 43 tabs.

  13. Inertial confinement fusion research and development studies. Final report, October 1979-August 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bullis, R.; Finkelman, M.; Leng, J.; Luzzi, T.; Ojalvo, I.; Powell, E.; Sedgley, D.

    1980-08-01

    These Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) research and development studies were selected for structural, thermal, and vacuum pumping analyses in support of the High Yield Lithium Injection Fusion Energy (HYLIFE) concept development. An additional task provided an outlined program plan for an ICF Engineering Test Facility, using the HYLIFE concept as a model, although the plan is generally applicable to other ICF concepts. The HYLIFE is one promising type of ICF concept which features a falling array of liquid lithium jets. These jets surround the fusion reaction to protect the first structural wall (FSW) of the vacuum chamber by absorbing the fusion energy, and to act as the tritium breeder. The fusion energy source is a deuterium-tritium pellet injected into the chamber every second and driven by laser or heavy ion beams. The studies performed by Grumman have considered the capabilities of specific HYLIFE features to meet life requirements and the requirement to recover to preshot conditions prior to each subsequent shot. The components under investigation were the FSW which restrains the outward motion of the liquid lithium, the nozzle plate which forms the falling jet array, the graphite shield which is in direct top view of the fusion pellet, and the vacuum pumping system. The FSW studies included structural analysis, and definition of an experimental program to validate computer codes describing lithium motion and the resulting impact on the wall

  14. Benefit/cost analysis for research in geothermal log interpretation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigby, F.A.; Reardon, P.

    1979-07-01

    Well log interpretation, the process of inferring subsurface geology from geophysical measurements made in boreholes, is the most versatile and direct means available of assessing important physical and structural reservoir properties. Historically, well logging has been developed primarily for use in oil and gas wells, and its application in a different environment such as a geothermal reservoir creates complex problems. Present geothermal development is severely hindered by lack of data. Adaptation of well logging techniques holds the promise of reducing development costs, encouraging investment, and assisting regulatory permitting. Such benefits will translate directly into lower power costs and an increased domestic energy supply. A significant acceleration of geothermal power-on-line is possible plus cost reductions through reduction of drilling failure rate, reduction of average well cost, earlier recognition of bad wells, reduced flow testing, and savings due to provision of better data for regulatory decisions. Net undiscounted benefits in 1979 dollars from improving logging and interpretation in geothermal areas can exceed half a billion dollars in slightly more than a decade, about 300 million of this should be regarded as the potential benefit of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory Geothermal Log Interpretation Program or similar research.

  15. REALCAT: A New Platform to Bring Catalysis to the Lightspeed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Sébastien

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Catalysis, irrespective of its form can be considered as one of the most important pillars of today’s chemical industry. The development of new catalysts with improved performances is therefore a highly strategic issue. However, the a priori theoretical design of the best catalyst for a desired reaction is not yet possible and a time- and money-consuming experimental phase is still needed to develop a new catalyst for a given reaction. The REALCAT platform described in this paper consists in a complete, unique, integrated and top-level high-throughput technologies workflow that allows a significant acceleration of this kind of research. This is illustrated by some preliminary results of optimization of the operating conditions of glycerol dehydration to acrolein over an heteropolyacid-based supported catalyst. It is shown that using REALCAT high-throughput tools a more than 10-fold acceleration of the operating conditions optimization process is obtained.

  16. Fundamentals of metal oxide catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Hari

    degradation. The affect of reaction conditions on the lifetime of these catalysts is investigated. The structural changes occurring in these catalysts are studied during thermal degradation at the bulk-scale (using UV-vis DRS, XAS and X-ray Diffraction) and at the atomic-scale (using High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy). These studies show that the actual mechanism of structural reorganization occurs through a twinning process which eventually leads to MoO3, which is inactive for methacrylic acid production. This gives new insight into how to make these catalysts commercially attractive. Finally, the design and fabrication of a micro-reactor to perform complete spectroscopic and reactive characterization of supported metal oxide catalysts is presented; we aim to integrate semiconductor microfabrication technology with conventional spectroscopic tools to create cost-effective, simple and flexible tools for catalytic studies.

  17. Cooperative research in coal liquefaction. Final report, May 1, 1991--April 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffman, G.P. [ed.

    1996-03-01

    Extensive research continued on catalysts based on novel anion-treated (mainly sulfated) oxides and oxyhydroxides of iron [Fe{sub x}O{sub y}/SO{sub 4}]. In addition, sulfated oxides of tin as well as molybdenum promoted iron oxides were used. Incorporation of small amounts of sulfate, molybdate, or tungstate anions by wet precipitation/impregnation methods was found to increase the surface acidic character of iron oxides; more importantly, it reduced the grain sizes significantly with corresponding increases in specific surface areas. These anion-treated iron and tin oxides were more active for direct coal liquefaction and coal-heavy oil coprocessing than their untreated counterparts. With these catalyst systems, higher conversion levels are obtained as compared to the soluble precursors of iron and molybdenum at the same catalyst metalloading (3500 ppm iron and 50 ppm molybdenum with respect to coal). Sulfated iron oxides and oxyhydroxides were equally active as coal liquefaction catalysts. The sulfate, molybdate, and tungstate anions were found to have similar promotional effects on the properties and activities of iron oxides. One step in the synthesis of anion-treated iron and tin oxides is precipitation as hydroxides using either urea or ammonium hydroxide. The catalysts prepared using urea as a precipitation agent were more reproducible than those using ammonium, hydroxide in terms of activities and properties. These catalysts/catalyst precursors were characterized by several techniques to determine their physical (size and structure related) and chemical (acidity) properties. Sulfated and molybdated iron oxides were found to have grain sizes as small as 10-20 nm. An attempt was made to correlate the physicochemical properties of these catalysts with their activity for coal liquefaction.

  18. Industrial process gamma tomography. Final report of a coordinated research project 2003-2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-05-01

    Gamma computed tomography (CT) is complementary to radiotracer and gamma sealed source techniques largely used for analyzing industrial process units. Relevant target areas for gamma CT applications are generally known. Although the methodology is generic and applicable across broad industrial specimen and facilities, a number of specific items have been identified as the most appropriate target beneficiaries of these applications: distillation columns; packed beds; risers; fluidized beds and other multiphase processing units. These industrial process units present significant technical challenges to CT investigations in terms of the complexity of the multiphase flows that occur in them. In order to address these needs, the IAEA implemented a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Industrial Process Gamma Tomography with the overall objective of testing and validating CT techniques for diagnosing industrial multiphase processes. CT laboratories from Argentina, Brazil, Czech Republic, France, Republic of Korea, Malaysia, Norway, Poland, United Kingdom and the United States of America have participated. The specific objectives of the CRP were assessment of the tomographic methods, evaluation of them for investigation of multiphase engineering processes, and design of prototypes of simple CT systems for industrial processing, which can be transferred to other developing countries. The CRP has generated an active network, which also included other groups engaged in the CT field. The round robin test has played an important role in validation of techniques and software. This TECDOC is prepared based on the findings and achievements of the CRP. It is a comprehensive technical report containing valuable information, not readily available in any single publication elsewhere. The participants' reports and software developed by them are compiled in a CD-ROM and attached to the back cover. The guidelines and software packages described in this report can be used as an

  19. High Burnup Dry Storage Cask Research and Development Project, Final Test Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-02-27

    EPRI is leading a project team to develop and implement the first five years of a Test Plan to collect data from a SNF dry storage system containing high burnup fuel.12 The Test Plan defined in this document outlines the data to be collected, and the storage system design, procedures, and licensing necessary to implement the Test Plan.13 The main goals of the proposed test are to provide confirmatory data14 for models, future SNF dry storage cask design, and to support license renewals and new licenses for ISFSIs. To provide data that is most relevant to high burnup fuel in dry storage, the design of the test storage system must mimic real conditions that high burnup SNF experiences during all stages of dry storage: loading, cask drying, inert gas backfilling, and transfer to the ISFSI for multi-year storage.15 Along with other optional modeling, SETs, and SSTs, the data collected in this Test Plan can be used to evaluate the integrity of dry storage systems and the high burnup fuel contained therein over many decades. It should be noted that the Test Plan described in this document discusses essential activities that go beyond the first five years of Test Plan implementation.16 The first five years of the Test Plan include activities up through loading the cask, initiating the data collection, and beginning the long-term storage period at the ISFSI. The Test Plan encompasses the overall project that includes activities that may not be completed until 15 or more years from now, including continued data collection, shipment of the Research Project Cask to a Fuel Examination Facility, opening the cask at the Fuel Examination Facility, and examining the high burnup fuel after the initial storage period.

  20. Molten salt steam generator subsystem research experiment. Volume I. Phase 1 - Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1984-10-01

    A study was conducted for Phase 1 of a two-phase project whose objectives were to develop a reliable, cost-effective molten salt steam generating subsystem for solar thermal plants, minimize uncertainty in capital, operating, and maintenance costs, and demonstrate the ability of molten salt to generate high-pressure, high-temperature steam. The Phase 1 study involved the conceptual design of molten salt steam generating subsystems for a nominal 100-MWe net stand-alone solar central receiver electric generating plant, and a nominal 100-MWe net hybrid fossil-fueled electric power generating plant that is 50% repowered by a solar central receiver system. As part of Phase 1, a proposal was prepared for Phase 2, which involves the design, construction, testing and evaluation of a Subsystem Research Experiment of sufficient size to ensure successful operation of the full-size subsystem designed in Phase 1. Evaluation of several concepts resulted in the selection of a four-component (preheater, evaporator, superheater, reheater), natural circulation, vertically oriented, shell and tube (straight) heat exchanger arrangement. Thermal hydraulic analysis of the system included full and part load performance, circulation requirements, stability, and critical heat flux analysis. Flow-induced tube vibration, tube buckling, fatigue evaluation of tubesheet junctions, steady-state tubesheet analysis, and a simplified transient analysis were included in the structural analysis of the system. Operating modes and system dynamic response to load changes were identified. Auxiliary equipment, fabrication, erection, and maintenance requirements were also defined. Installed capital costs and a project schedule were prepared for each design.

  1. Catalysis in electrochemistry: from fundamentals to strategies for fuel cell development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Santos, Elizabeth; Schmickler, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    "Catalysis in Electrochemistry: From Fundamentals to Strategies for Fuel Cell Development is a modern, comprehensive reference work on catalysis in electrochemistry, including principles, methods, strategies, and applications...

  2. Synthesis of Nanoparticle Model Systems for Sustainable Catalysis by Gas Aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodin, Anders

    The overall goal of this thesis is to develop better catalysts for chemical reactions used in sustainable energy storage and environmental protection. Specifically, the thesis presents research on well-defined catalyst model systems of nanoparticles synthesized by magnetron sputtering, gas......-aggregation, and subsequent massfiltering. The thesis opens with a presentation of the broader context of the research, particularly focusing on the societal importance of catalysis, followed by an introduction to the fundamentals of the science of catalysis. Three research projects are then described in individual chapters......-scale that is needed for significant global impact. This study investigates the relationship between catalytic activity for the HER and platinum catalyst loading using well-defined model systems with different loadings of mass-selected 5nm Pt nanoparticles. Using the knowledge gained on these systems, a technoeconomic...

  3. Seismic safety margins research program. Phase I final report - Major structure response (Project IV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benda, B.J.; Johnson, J.J.; Lo, T.Y.

    1981-08-01

    The primary task of the Major Structure Response Project within the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) was to develop detailed finite element models of the Zion Nuclear Power Plant's containment building and auxiliary-fuel-turbine (AFT) complex. The resulting models served as input to the seismic methodology analysis chain. The containment shell was modeled as a series of beam elements with the shear and bending characteristics of a circular cylindrical shell. Masses and rotary inertias were lumped at nodal points; thirteen modes were included in the analysis. The internal structure was modeled with three-dimensional finite elements, with masses again lumped at selected nodes; sixty modes were included in the analysis. The model of the AFT complex employed thin plate and shell elements to represent the concrete shear walls and floor diaphragms, and beam and truss elements to model the braced frames. Because of the size and complexity of the model, and the potentially large number of degrees of freedom, masses were lumped at a limited number of node points. These points were selected so as to minimize the effect of the discrete mass distribution on structural response. One hundred and thirteen modes were extracted. A second objective of Project IV was to investigate the effects of uncertainty and variability on structural response. To this end, four side studies were conducted. Three of them, briefly summarized in this volume, addressed themselves respectively to an investigation of sources of random variability in the dynamic response of nuclear power plant structures; formulation of a methodology for modeling and evaluating the effects of structural uncertainty on predicted modal characteristics of major nuclear power plant structures and substructures; and a preliminary evaluation of nonlinear responses in shear-wall structures. A fourth side study, reported in detail in this volume, quantified variations in dynamic characteristics and seismic

  4. Use of isotope techniques in lake dynamics investigations. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-03-01

    The Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on the Use of Isotope Techniques in Lake Dynamics Investigations was launched with the aim of assessing the potential of environmental isotope techniques in studying the dynamics of surface water bodies and related problems such as: dynamics of solutes; sediment focusing; establishment of water balance components; vulnerability to pollution. The CRP enabled a number of isotope and geochemical studies to be carried out on small and large water bodies, with the general aim of understanding of the dynamics of these systems under the growing anthropogenic influence. This publication is a compilation of the papers presented at the final Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) held in Rehovot, Israel, from 10 to 13 March 1997. Individual contributions have been indexed separately

  5. Magnetic Catalysis in Graphene Effective Field Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeTar, Carleton; Winterowd, Christopher; Zafeiropoulos, Savvas

    2016-12-23

    We report on the first calculation of magnetic catalysis at zero temperature in a fully nonperturbative simulation of the graphene effective field theory. Using lattice gauge theory, a nonperturbative analysis of the theory of strongly interacting, massless, (2+1)-dimensional Dirac fermions in the presence of an external magnetic field is performed. We show that in the zero-temperature limit, a nonzero value for the chiral condensate is obtained which signals the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry. This result implies a nonzero value for the dynamical mass of the Dirac quasiparticle.

  6. Surface Science Foundations of Catalysis and Nanoscience

    CERN Document Server

    Kolasinski, Kurt K

    2012-01-01

    Surface science has evolved from being a sub-field of chemistry or physics, and has now established itself as an interdisciplinary topic. Knowledge has developed sufficiently that we can now understand catalysis from a surface science perspective. No-where is the underpinning nature of surface science better illustrated than with nanoscience. Now in its third edition, this successful textbook aims to provide students with an understanding of chemical transformations and the formation of structures at surfaces. The chapters build from simple to more advanced principles with each featuring exerc

  7. Concepts of Modern Catalysis and Kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Chorkendorff, I

    2003-01-01

    Until now, the literature has offered a rather limited approach to the use of fundamental kinetics and their application to catalytic reactions. Subsequently, this book spans the full range from fundamentals of kinetics and heterogeneous catalysis via modern experimental and theoretical results of model studies to their equivalent large-scale industrial production processes. The result is key knowledge for students at technical universities and professionals already working in industry. "...such an enterprise will be of great value to the community, to professionals as well as graduate an

  8. Radioactively labelled DNA probes for crop improvement. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-11-01

    With the advent of DNA molecular marker technology in the 1980s plant breeding had a new and powerful tool with which to increase its efficacy. Such markers are abundant and directly reveal information about the genotype and therefore are more useful than simple phenotypic markers. In plant breeding applications, molecular markers reveal information about variability and genetic relationships, and enable genetic mapping, which greatly assists the breeder in selection of parents and progeny, as well as in management of breeding strategies. Furthermore, molecular markers linked to phenotypic traits permit very early selection of superior progenies from breeding populations, therefore significantly reducing the need for field testing and greatly increasing efficiency of plant breeding programmes. For this to occur the oligonucleotide probes for labelling genetic markers and/or the primers for polymerase chain reactions to amplify genetic markers needed to be also accessible to scientists in developing Member States. In addition, technical information, training and troubleshooting were needed to support the utilization of DNA markers. In the early 1990s there was a dramatic increase in requests for access to this technology. This co-ordinated research project (CRP) facilitated the transfer of molecular marker technology, in terms of both material and information, from advanced laboratories to assist breeding programmes in developing countries. Two other CRPs were conducted concurrently in order to assist developing Member States to utilise molecular markers - Application of DNA Based Marker Mutations for Improvement of Cereals and other Sexually Reproduced Crop Plants, and Use of Novel DNA Fingerprinting Techniques for the Detection and Characterisation of Genetic Variation in Vegetatively Propagated Crops (IAEA-TECDOC-1010 and IAEA-TECDOC-1047, respectively). The present CRP built upon the success of the former projects by ensuring the availability of probes

  9. Elements of power plant design for inertial fusion energy. Final report of a coordinated research project 2000-2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-06-01

    There are two major approaches in fusion energy research: magnetic fusion energy (MFE) and inertial fusion energy (IFE). The basic physics of IFE (compression and ignition of small fuel pellets containing deuterium and tritium) is being increasingly understood. Based on recent advances by individual countries, IFE has reached a stage at which benefits could be obtained from a coordinated approach in the form of an IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Elements of Power Plant Design for Inertial Fusion Energy. This CRP helped Member States to promote the development of plasma/fusion technology transfer and to emphasize safety and environmental advantages of fusion energy. The CRP was focused on interface issues including those related to, - the driver/target interface (e.g. focusing and beam uniformity required by the target), - the driver/chamber interface (e.g. final optics and magnets protection and shielding), - and the target/chamber interface (e.g. target survival during injection, target positioning and tracking in the chamber). The final report includes an assessment of the state of the art of the technologies required for an IFE power plant (drivers, chambers, targets) and systems integration as presented and evaluated by members of the CRP. Additional contributions by cost free invited experts to the final RCM are included. The overall objective of this CRP was to foster the inertial fusion energy development by improving international cooperation. The variety of contributions compiled in this TECDOC reflects, that the goal of stimulating the exchange of knowledge was well achieved. Further the CRP led to the creation of a network, which not only exchanged their scientific results, but also developed healthy professional relations and strong mutual interest in the work of the group members

  10. Research investigations in oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, and advanced fuels research: Volume 1 -- Base program. Final report, October 1986--September 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, V.E.

    1994-05-01

    Numerous studies have been conducted in five principal areas: oil shale, tar sand, underground coal gasification, advanced process technology, and advanced fuels research. In subsequent years, underground coal gasification was broadened to be coal research, under which several research activities were conducted that related to coal processing. The most significant change occurred in 1989 when the agreement was redefined as a Base Program and a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP). Investigations were conducted under the Base Program to determine the physical and chemical properties of materials suitable for conversion to liquid and gaseous fuels, to test and evaluate processes and innovative concepts for such conversions, to monitor and determine environmental impacts related to development of commercial-sized operations, and to evaluate methods for mitigation of potential environmental impacts. This report is divided into two volumes: Volume 1 consists of 28 summaries that describe the principal research efforts conducted under the Base Program in five topic areas. Volume 2 describes tasks performed within the JSRP. Research conducted under this agreement has resulted in technology transfer of a variety of energy-related research information. A listing of related publications and presentations is given at the end of each research topic summary. More specific and detailed information is provided in the topical reports referenced in the related publications listings.

  11. The Factors Influencing Depression Endpoints Research (FINDER study: final results of Italian patients with depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quail Deborah

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Factors Influencing Depression Endpoints Research (FINDER is a 6-month, prospective, observational study carried out in 12 European countries aimed at investigating health-related quality of life (HRQoL in outpatients receiving treatment for a first or new depressive episode. The Italian HRQoL data at 6 months is described in this report, and the factors associated with HRQoL changes were determined. Methods Data were collected at baseline, 3 and 6 months of treatment. HRQoL was measured using components of the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36; mental component summary (MCS, physical component summary (PCS and the European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D; visual analogue scale (VAS and health status index (HSI. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS was adopted to evaluate depressive symptoms, while somatic and painful physical symptoms were assessed by using the 28-item Somatic Symptom Inventory (SSI-28 and a VAS. Results Of the initial 513 patients, 472 completed the 3-month observation and 466 the 6-month observation. The SF-36 and EQ-5D mean (± SD scores showed HRQoL improvements at 3 months and a further smaller improvement at 6 months, with the most positive effects for SF-36 MCS (baseline 22.0 ± 9.2, 3 months 34.6 ± 10.0; 6 months 39.3 ± 9.5 and EQ-5D HSI (baseline 0.4 ± 0.3; 3 months 0.7 ± 0.3; 6 months 0.7 ± 0.2. Depression and anxiety symptoms (HADS-D mean at baseline 13.3 ± 4.2; HADS-A mean at baseline 12.2 ± 3.9 consistently decreased during the first 3 months (8.7 ± 4.3; 7.5 ± 3.6 and showed a further positive change at 6 months (6.9 ± 4.3; 5.8 ± 3.4. Somatic and painful symptoms (SSI and VAS significantly decreased, with the most positive changes in the SSI-28 somatic item (mean at baseline 2.4 ± 0.7; mean change at 3 months: -0.5; 95% CI -0.6 to -0.5; mean change at 6 months: -0.7; 95% CI -0.8 to -0.7; in 'interference of overall pain with daily activities' (mean at baseline 45

  12. Bioenergy Crop Breeding and Production Research in the Southeast, Final Report for 1996 to 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouton, J.H.

    2003-05-30

    on this species at the Athens location indicating its real potential lies mainly in the Gulf Coast region of the southeastern United States. The excellent characteristic of Tifton 85 and Merkron should therefore be enough to initiate more basic research for their chemical ability as a biofuels crop.

  13. Catalysis of chemical processes: Particular teaching aspects | Šima ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper is devoted to two main issues of catalysis from the viewpoint of teaching and learning activities. The first part deals with positive catalysis which treats the general features of catalytic processes and textbook imperfections. The second part focuses on decelerating or stopping-down chemical processes. It is shown ...

  14. Heterogeneous Catalysis with Renewed Attention: Principles, Theories, and Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumeignil, Franck; Paul, Jean-Francois; Paul, Sebastien

    2017-01-01

    With the development of a strong bioeconomy sector related to the creation of next-generation biorefineries, heterogeneous catalysis is receiving renewed attention. Indeed, catalysis is at the core of biorefinery design, and many new catalysts and catalytic processes are being developed. On the one hand, they are based on knowledge acquired during…

  15. The nature of the active site in heterogeneous metal catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Bligaard, Thomas; Larsen, Britt Hvolbæk

    2008-01-01

    This tutorial review, of relevance for the surface science and heterogeneous catalysis communities, provides a molecular-level discussion of the nature of the active sites in metal catalysis. Fundamental concepts such as "Bronsted-Evans-Polanyi relations'' and "volcano curves'' are introduced...

  16. Greening the Processes of Metal-Organic Framework Synthesis and their Use in Sustainable Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junying; Shen, Kui; Li, Yingwei

    2017-08-24

    Given the shortage of sustainable resources and the increasingly serious environmental issues in recent decades, the demand for clean technologies and sustainable feedstocks is of great interest to researchers worldwide. With regard to the fields of energy saving and environmental remediation, the key point is the development of efficient catalysts, not only in terms of facile synthesis methods, but also the benign utilization of such catalysts. This work reviews the use of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and MOF-based materials in these fields. The definition of MOFs and MOF-based materials will be primarily introduced followed by a brief description of the characterization and stability of MOF-related materials under the applied conditions. The greening of MOF synthesis processes will then be discussed and catalogued by benign solvents and conditions and green precursors of MOFs. Furthermore, their suitable application in sustainable catalysis will be summarized, focusing on several typical atom-economic reactions, such as the direct introduction of H 2 or O 2 and C-C bond formation. Approaches towards reducing CO 2 emission by MOF-based catalysts will be described with special emphasis on CO 2 fixation and CO 2 reduction. In addition, driven by the explosive growth of energy consumption in the last century, much research has gone into biomass, which represents a renewable alternative to fossil fuels and a sustainable carbon feedstock for chemical production. The advanced progress of biomass-related transformations is also illustrated herein. Fundamental insights into the nature of MOF-based materials as constitutionally easily recoverable heterogeneous catalysts and as supports for various active sites is thoroughly discussed. Finally, challenges facing the development of this field and the outlook for future research are presented. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Tandem Catalysis Utilizing Olefin Metathesis Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieliński, Grzegorz K; Grela, Karol

    2016-07-04

    Since olefin metathesis transformation has become a favored synthetic tool in organic synthesis, more and more distinct non-metathetical reactions of alkylidene ruthenium complexes have been developed. Depending on the conditions applied, the same olefin metathesis catalysts can efficiently promote isomerization reactions, hydrogenation of C=C double bonds, oxidation reactions, and many others. Importantly, these transformations can be carried out in tandem with olefin metathesis reactions. Through addition of one portion of a catalyst, a tandem process provides structurally advanced products from relatively simple substrates without the need for isolation of the intermediates. These aspects not only make tandem catalysis very attractive from a practical point of view, but also open new avenues in (retro)synthetic planning. However, in the literature, the term "tandem process" is sometimes used improperly to describe other types of multi-reaction sequences. In this Concept, a number of examples of tandem catalysis involving olefin metathesis are discussed with an emphasis on their synthetic value. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Mechanical catalysis on the centimetre scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashita, Shuhei; Audretsch, Christof; Nagy, Zoltán; Füchslin, Rudolf M; Pfeifer, Rolf

    2015-03-06

    Enzymes play important roles in catalysing biochemical transaction paths, acting as logical machines through the morphology of the processes. A key challenge in elucidating the nature of these systems, and for engineering manufacturing methods inspired by biochemical reactions, is to attain a comprehensive understanding of the stereochemical ground rules of enzymatic reactions. Here, we present a model of catalysis that can be performed magnetically by centimetre-sized passive floating units. The designed system, which is equipped with permanent magnets only, passively obeys the local causalities imposed by magnetic interactions, albeit it shows a spatial behaviour and an energy profile analogous to those of biochemical enzymes. In this process, the enzyme units trigger physical conformation changes of the target by levelling out the magnetic potential barrier (activation potential) to a funnel type and, thus, induce cascading conformation changes of the targeted substrate units reacting in parallel. The inhibitor units, conversely, suppress such changes by increasing the potential. Because the model is purely mechanical and established on a physics basis in the absence of turbulence, each performance can be explained by the morphology of the unit, extending the definition of catalysis to systems of alternative scales.

  19. Catalysis-Based Cataluminescent and Conductometric Gas Sensors: Sensing Nanomaterials, Mechanism, Applications and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyun Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Gas environment detection has become more urgent and significant, for both industrial manufacturing and environment monitoring. Gas sensors based on a catalytically-sensing mechanism are one of the most important types of devices for gas detection, and have been of great interest during the past decades. However, even though many efforts have contributed to this area, some great challenges still remain, such as the development of sensitively and selectively sensing catalysts. In this review, two representative catalysis-based gas sensors, cataluminescent and conductometric sensors, the basis of optical and electric signal acquisition, respectively, are summarized comprehensively. The current challenges have been presented. Recent research progress on the working mechanism, sensing nanomaterials, and applications reported by our group and some other researchers have been discussed systematically. The future trends and prospects of the catalysis-based gas sensors have also been presented.

  20. Catalysis Science Initiative: Catalyst Design by Discovery Informatics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgass, William Nicholas [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Chemical Engineering; Abu-Omar, Mahdi [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States) Department of Chemistry; Caruthers, James [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Chemical Engineering; Ribeiro, Fabio [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Chemical Engineering; Thomson, Kendall [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Chemical Engineering; Schneider, William [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    2016-07-08

    produces only oligomers to one that incorporates oligomers in polymer chains to introduce chain branching. These effects control the length of molecular chains, the number of errors in the regularity of the chains, and the variation of chain lengths in the final product distribution. These characteristics, in turn, determine the properties of the resulting polymer material. Predictive modeling of polymerization process cannot be done without the quantitative rate constant determination that our unique and comprehensive approach has produced. This tool, combined with insights on how catalyst chemistry affects the rate constants, is an important step toward establishing the quantitative relationships between catalyst chemistry and polymer properties that will allow more efficient searches for new catalysts and speed the discovery process. Thus, in both the heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis areas, this work has brought important new understanding to the field. The technical effectiveness of our approach is demonstrated by its success. For heterogeneous catalysis, experimental work alone showed the important of the metal-support interface, but the integration with theory has allowed deeper understanding of the fundamental source of the effects and shown the path for how to use this understanding for discovery. In the case of homogeneous catalysis, methodology for determination of which reactions are needed to account for the data and the extraction of quantitative values for rate constants for those reactions allows accurate modeling of reaction behavior. This allowed correlation of trends in catalyst properties with alterations of specific rates, thus contributing to a data base that will guide catalyst discovery. While not yet realized, the economic benefits of this approach will come in significantly shortened cycle times for discovery and ability to fill product demand at lower price.

  1. Application of personal computers to enhance operation and management of research reactors. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-02-01

    The on-line of personal computers (PCs) can be valuable to guide the research reactor operator in analysing both normal and abnormal situations. PCs can effectively be used for data acquisition and data processing, and providing information to the operator. Typical areas of on-line applications of PCs in nuclear research reactors include: Acquisition and display of data on process parameters; performance evaluation of major equipment and safety related components; fuel management; computation of reactor physics parameters; failed fuel detection and location; inventory of system fluids; training using computer aided simulation; operator advice. All these applications require the development of computer programmes and interface hardware. In recognizing this need, the IAEA initiated in 1990 a Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on ''Application of Personal Computers to Enhance Operation and Management of Research Reactors''. The final meeting of the CRP was held from 30 October to 3 November 1995 in Dalata Viet Nam. This report was written by contributors from Bangladesh, Germany, India, the Republic of Korea, Pakistan, Philippines, Thailand and Viet Nam. The IAEA staff members responsible for the publication were K. Akhtar and V. Dimic of the Physics Section, Division of Physical and Chemical Sciences

  2. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurney, Kevin R. [Arizona Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States)

    2015-01-12

    This document constitutes the final report under DOE grant DE-FG-08ER64649. The organization of this document is as follows: first, I will review the original scope of the proposed research. Second, I will present the current draft of a paper nearing submission to Nature Climate Change on the initial results of this funded effort. Finally, I will present the last phase of the research under this grant which has supported a Ph.D. student. To that end, I will present the graduate student’s proposed research, a portion of which is completed and reflected in the paper nearing submission. This final work phase will be completed in the next 12 months. This final workphase will likely result in 1-2 additional publications and we consider the results (as exemplified by the current paper) high quality. The continuing results will acknowledge the funding provided by DOE grant DE-FG-08ER64649.

  3. Preparation and Characterisation of Activated Ni(Mn)/Mg/Al Hydrotalcites for Combustion Catalysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirátová, Květa; Čuba, Pavel; Kovanda, F.; Hilaire, L.; Pitchon, V.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 76, č. 1 (2002), s. 43-53 ISSN 0920-5861. [European Congress on Catalysis EuropaCat V /5./. Limerick, 02.09.2001-07.09.2001] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/02/0523 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : hydrotalcites * metal oxide catalysts * methane combustion Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 2.146, year: 2002

  4. Bio- and air-tolerant carbon–carbon bond formations via organometallic ruthenium catalysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adriaenssens, Louis; Severa, Lukáš; Vávra, Jan; Šálová, Tereza; Hývl, Jakub; Čížková, Martina; Pohl, Radek; Šaman, David; Teplý, Filip

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 74, 7/8 (2009), s. 1023-1034 ISSN 0010-0765 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/0705; GA ČR GA203/09/1614 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : ruthenium * organometallic catalysis * C-C coupling * [2+2+2]cycloadditions Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.856, year: 2009

  5. On the mechanism of hydrogen evolution catalysis by proteins: A case study with bovine serum albumin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doneux, T.; Ostatná, Veronika; Paleček, Emil

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 25 (2011), s. 9337-9343 ISSN 0013-4686 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ME09038; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/11/2055 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : hydrogen evolution reaction * mediated catalysis * proton transfer Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.832, year: 2011

  6. Chiral phosphites as ligands in asymmetric metal complex catalysis and synthesis of coordination compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavrilov, Konstantin N [Department of Chemistry, S.A. Esenin Ryazan State Pedagogical University, Ryazan (Russian Federation); Bondarev, Oleg G; Polosukhin, Aleksei I [A.N. Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2004-07-31

    The data published during the last five years on the application of chiral derivatives of phosphorous acid in coordination chemistry and enantioselective catalysis are summarised and discussed. The effect of the nature of these ligands on the structure of metal complexes and on the efficiency of catalytic organic syntheses is shown. Hydroformylation, hydrogenation, allylic substitution and conjugate addition catalysed by transition metal complexes with optically active phosphites and hydrophosphoranes are considered. The prospects for the development of this field of research are demonstrated.

  7. Comments on Volcano Curves and Electronic Factors in Catalysis by Metals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Knor, Zlatko

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 245, č. 2 (2003), s. 185-189 ISSN 0926-860X R&D Projects: GA ČR GV202/98/K002; GA ČR GA202/02/0618 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : catalytic activity * catalysis by metals Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.825, year: 2003

  8. Development and characterization of semiconductor materials by ion beams. Final report of a co-ordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-06-01

    This CRP was recommended by the Consultants meeting on Ion Beam Techniques Applied to Semiconductor and Related Advanced Materials, held in April 1997 in Vienna. The consultants proposed to have a CRP in the field of application of MeV ion beams for the development and characterization of semiconductor materials. The CRP was approved and a first RCM was held in Vienna between 2-5 June 1998, in order to stimulate ideas and to promote collaborations among CRP participants. The goals and practical outcomes of the CRP were defined and several specific topics were identified including: optoelectronic characterization of semiconductor materials and devices by ion microbeams, characterization of thin films, defect transformations in semiconductors, light element analysis. One important recommendation was that sample exchanges among different laboratories be strongly encouraged. The participants presented individual activities on their projects, all subjects of research were identified and linked with approved individual projects. Collaboration among the participants was discussed and established. Some modifications to work plans were adopted. As proposed during the first RCM, the final RCM was held at the Ruder Boskovic Institute, Zagreb, Croatia, between 25 and 29 September 2000, with the purpose of reviewing/discussing the results achieved during the course of the CRP and to prepare a draft of the final report and associated publication. This document contains summary of the CRP and ten individual reports presented by participants. Each of the reports has been indexed separately

  9. Management of impacts and risks related to the exploitation of source rock hydrocarbons: stakes, locks, and research opportunities. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lary, L. de; Fabriol, H.; Azaroual, M.; Barthelemy, Y.; Bonijoly, D.; Seyedi, D.; Dorfliger, N.; Negrel, P.; Perrin, J.; Serrano, O.; Vernier, R.; Moretti, I.; Kalaydjian, F.; Benoit, Y.; Vially, R.; Didier, C.

    2011-09-01

    This report aims at identifying environmental challenges and risks related to the exploitation of source rock oils and gases, at identifying scientific and technological locks related to the management of potential risks and impacts for the environment, and at proposing actions in the field of scientific research to address the different risks raised by this technique, and to see whether existing locks can be unleashed. After having recalled the context (brief history of source rock gases and oils, methods of exploration and exploitation, North-American return on experience on hydraulic fracturing for the exploitation of source rock hydrocarbons, conclusions of a provisional report), the report describes various aspects related to the geological medium: source rock, stress status, cracks, natural fracturing, knowledge of the water resource. It identifies the various risks and pollutions related to hydraulic fracturing, to the use of chemical products (these products and their toxicity are indicated), to water quality, to the treatment and future of effluents, to induced seismicity phenomena, to non controlled migration of gases towards the surface, to surface installations, to the exploitation for the environment. The authors propose an assessment of current practices in the field of risk management: methodology of risk assessment, integrated exploitation management, control, corrective measures and repairs. A list of research topics and a selection of priority research topics are finally proposed

  10. Genetic engineering technology for the improvement of the sterile insect technique. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Since the beginning of the joint FAO/IAEA programme on the research and development of insect pest control methodology, emphasis has been placed on the basic and applied aspects of implementing the sterile insect technique (SIT). Special emphasis has always been directed at the assembly of technological progress into workable systems that can be implemented in developing countries. The general intention is to solve problems associated with insect pests that have an adverse impact on production of food and fibre. For several insect species SIT has proven to be a powerful method for control. This includes the New World screwworm fly (Cochliomyia hominivorox), the Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata), the melon fly (Bactrocera cucurbitae), the Queensland fruit fly (Bactrocera tryoni) and one tsetse fly species (Glossina austeni). Improvements of the SIT are possible, especially through the use of molecular techniques. The final report of the Co-ordinated Research Programme on ''Genetic Engineering Technology for the Improvement of the Sterile Insect Technique'' highlights the progress made towards the development of transformation systems for non-drosophilid insects and the research aimed at the identification and engineering of potential target genes or traits

  11. Final report for the 1996 DOE grant supporting research at the SLAC/LBNL/LLNL B factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judd, D.; Wright, D.

    1997-01-01

    This final report discusses Department of Energy-supported research funded through Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) which was performed as part of a collaboration between LLNL and Prairie View A and M University to develop part of the BaBar detector at the SLAC B Factory. This work focuses on the Instrumented Flux Return (IFR) subsystem of BaBar and involves a full range of detector development activities: computer simulations of detector performance, creation of reconstruction algorithms, and detector hardware R and D. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has a leading role in the IFR subsystem and has established on-site computing and detector facilities to conduct this research. By establishing ties with the existing LLNL Research Collaboration Program and leveraging LLNL resources, the experienced Prairie View group was able to quickly achieve a more prominent role within the BaBar collaboration and make significant contributions to the detector design. In addition, this work provided the first entry point for Historically Black Colleges and Universities into the B Factory collaboration, and created an opportunity to train a new generation of minority students at the premier electron-positron high energy physics facility in the US

  12. Final report on 'biological effects of tritium as a basis of research and development in nuclear fusion'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    The National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan, has undertaken a special study of ''biological effects of tritium as a basis of research and development in nuclear fusion'' over a 5-year period from April 1981 through March 1986. This is a final report, covering incorporation and metabolism of tritium, physical, chemical, and cellular effects of tritium, tritium damage to the mammalian tissue, and human exposure to tritium. The report is organized into five chapters, including ''Study of incorporation of tritium into the living body and its in vivo behavior''; ''Physical and chemical studies for the determination of relative biological effectiveness''; ''Analytical study on biological effects of tritium in cultured mammalian cells''; ''Study of tritium effects on the mammalian tissue, germ cells, and cell transformation''; and ''Changes in the hemopoietic stem cells and lymphocyte subsets in humans after exposure to some internal emitters''. (Namekawa, K.)

  13. Scale Up of Malonic Acid Fermentation Process: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-16-612

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schell, Daniel J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-04-16

    The goal of this work is to use the large fermentation vessels in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF) to scale-up Lygos' biological-based process for producing malonic acid and to generate performance data. Initially, work at the 1 L scale validated successful transfer of Lygos' fermentation protocols to NREL using a glucose substrate. Outside of the scope of the CRADA with NREL, Lygos tested their process on lignocellulosic sugars produced by NREL at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's (LBNL) Advanced Biofuels Process Development Unit (ABPDU). NREL produced these cellulosic sugar solutions from corn stover using a separate cellulose/hemicellulose process configuration. Finally, NREL performed fermentations using glucose in large fermentors (1,500- and 9,000-L vessels) to intermediate product and to demonstrate successful performance of Lygos' technology at larger scales.

  14. The OPLA-research program on the final disposal of radioactive waste in geological formations (salt) in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vons, L.H.

    1987-01-01

    The OPLA-program is the Dutch national research work on the final disposal, focussed on rocksalt formations, of all categories of solid radioactive waste that will arise from nuclear powerplants, hospitals and laboratories. The activities are split up in three stages: 1, 2 and 3. In the fall of 1987, stage 1, in which a comparison is made between disposal concepts, has to be finished. Before entering stage 2, existing of field work focussed on geological and geohydrological comparison of sites, a positive decision of the Dutch government is needed. In the technological and scientific activities of the OPLA-program, there is an extensive and fruitful cooperation between ECN and GSF (IFT) in the FRG

  15. Facet‐Controlled Synthetic Strategy of Cu2O‐Based Crystals for Catalysis and Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Shape‐dependent catalysis and sensing behaviours are primarily focused on nanocrystals enclosed by low‐index facets, especially the three basic facets ({100}, {111}, and {110}). Several novel strategies have recently exploded by tailoring the original nanocrystals to greatly improve the catalysis and sensing performances. In this Review, we firstly introduce the synthesis of a variety of Cu2O nanocrystals, including the three basic Cu2O nanocrystals (cubes, octahedra and rhombic dodecahedra, enclosed by the {100}, {111}, and {110} facets, respectively), and Cu2O nanocrystals enclosed by high‐index planes. We then discuss in detail the three main facet‐controlled synthetic strategies (deposition, etching and templating) to fabricate Cu2O‐based nanocrystals with heterogeneous, etched, or hollow structures, including a number of important concepts involved in those facet‐controlled routes, such as the selective adsorption of capping agents for protecting special facets, and the impacts of surface energy and active sites on reaction activity trends. Finally, we highlight the facet‐dependent properties of the Cu2O and Cu2O‐based nanocrystals for applications in photocatalysis, gas catalysis, organocatalysis and sensing, as well as the relationship between their structures and properties. We also summarize and comment upon future facet‐related directions. PMID:27980909

  16. Recent Progress in Asymmetric Catalysis and Chromatographic Separation by Chiral Metal–Organic Frameworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suchandra Bhattacharjee

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs, as a new class of porous solid materials, have emerged and their study has established itself very quickly into a productive research field. This short review recaps the recent advancement of chiral MOFs. Here, we present simple, well-ordered instances to classify the mode of synthesis of chiral MOFs, and later demonstrate the potential applications of chiral MOFs in heterogeneous asymmetric catalysis and enantioselective separation. The asymmetric catalysis sections are subdivided based on the types of reactions that have been successfully carried out recently by chiral MOFs. In the part on enantioselective separation, we present the potentiality of chiral MOFs as a stationary phase for high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and high-resolution gas chromatography (GC by considering fruitful examples from current research work. We anticipate that this review will provide interest to researchers to design new homochiral MOFs with even greater complexity and effort to execute their potential functions in several fields, such as asymmetric catalysis, enantiomer separation, and chiral recognition.

  17. Final report of the group research. Studies on elucidation of bioregulation mechanisms against radiation. First research group (Bioregulation Research Group of NIRS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-10-01

    This report concerns investigations on bio-effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and free radicals (FR) conducted by the Group of Pharmaceutical and Chemical-Pharmacological departments of National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) during the period of April 1995-March 2001. The report involves the organization of research teams; summary reports of teams for bioradical research, expression of bioregulator gene, radiation effects on endocrine systems and explorative study of bioregulator substances; and selected papers published. Significant results are as follows: Syntheses of novel bioregulator chemicals and elucidation of their eliminating activities against ROS and FR by electron spin resonance (ESR)-spin trapping method; Development of spin trapping agents of nitric oxide; and Discovery of protection of curcumin (a component of galenical Ukon) against radiation carcinogenesis. Conclusion is that findings will contribute not only for the progress of FR research but also for better understanding of anti-oxidants and radio-protection in biodefense mechanism against radiation and other environmental stress. (N.I.)

  18. Final report for the Department of Energy funded cooperative agreement ''Electronic Research Demonstration Project'' [University electronic research administration demonstration project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodman, John

    1998-07-31

    This is the final report for the Department of Energy (DOE) funded cooperative agreement ''Electronic Research Demonstration Project (DE-FC02-92ER35180)'' for the period August 1994-July 1998. The goal of the project, referred to as NewERA, was to demonstrate the use of open standards for electronic commerce to support research administration, otherwise referred to as Electronic Research Administration (ERA). The NewERA demonstration project provided a means to test interagency standards developed within the Federal Grant Electronic Commerce Committee, a group comprised of federal granting agencies. The NewERA program was initiated by DOE. NewERA was comprised of three separate, but related, ERA activities in preaward administration, postaward administration, and secure Internet commerce. The goal of New ERA was to demonstrate an open standard implementation of ERA using electronic data interchange, e-mail and Internet transaction security between grant applicants and DOE, along with t h e other participating agencies.

  19. Generic component reliability data for research reactors PSA. Final report of the CRP on data acquisition for research reactor PSA. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The scope of this document is to provide the final reference generic component reliability database information for a variety of research reactor types. As noted in Section 2.1 and Table 3a, many years of component data are represented in the database so that it is expected that the report should provide representative data valid for a number of years. The database provides component failure rates on a time and/or a demand related basis according to the operational modes of the components. At the current time an update of the database is not planned. As a result of the implementation of data collection systems in the research reactors represented in these studies, updating of data from individual facilities could be made available from the contributing research reactor facilities themselves. As noted in Section 1.2, the report does not include detailed discussion of information regarding component classification and reliability parameter definitions. The report does provide some insights and discussion regarding the practicalities of the data collection process and some guidelines for database usage. 9 refs, tabs

  20. Spent Fuel Performance Assessment and Research. Final Report of a Coordinated Research Project on Spent Fuel Performance Assessment and Research (SPAR-III) 2009–2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-10-01

    At the beginning of 2014, there were 437 nuclear power reactors in operation and 72 reactors under construction. To date, around 370 500 t (HM) (tonnes of heavy metal) of spent fuel have been discharged from reactors, and approximately 253 700 t (HM) are stored at various storage facilities. Although wet storage at reactor sites still dominates, the amount of spent fuel being transferred to dry storage technologies has increased significantly since 2005. For example, around 28% of the total fuel inventory in the United States of America is now in dry storage. Although the licensing for the construction of geological disposal facilities is under way in Finland, France and Sweden, the first facility is not expected to be available until 2025 and for most States with major nuclear programmes not for several decades afterwards. Spent fuel is currently accumulating at around 7000 t (HM) per year worldwide. The net result is that the duration of spent fuel storage has increased beyond what was originally foreseen. In order to demonstrate the safety of both spent fuel and the storage system, a good understanding of the processes that might cause deterioration is required. To address this, the IAEA continued the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Spent Fuel Performance Assessment and Research (SPAR-III) in 2009 to evaluate fuel and materials performance under wet and dry storage and to assess the impact of interim storage on associated spent fuel management activities (such as handling and transport). This has been achieved through: evaluating surveillance and monitoring programmes of spent fuel and storage facilities; collecting and exchanging relevant experience of spent fuel storage and the impact on associated spent fuel management activities; facilitating the transfer of knowledge by documenting the technical basis for spent fuel storage; creating synergy among research projects of the participating Member States; and developing the capability to assess the impact

  1. Development and comparison of the effectivity of oxidation processes initiated by radicals, created by heterogeneous catalysis and by high pressure process for the reduction of persistent organic sewage pollutants. Final report; Entwicklung und vergleichende Bewertung der Leistungsfaehigkeit von radikalisch initiierten oxidativen Verfahren auf Traegerkatalysator- und Hochdruckbasis zum Abbau persistenter organischer Wasserschadstoffe. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bach, G.; Maeurer, H.

    2002-07-01

    Persistente and highly toxic sewages with an extremely high content of substances are still a problem in the waste water management. Wet oxidation offers a possibility to reduce the pollutant content in the water. Comparative experiments of the efficiency of oxidation initiated by radicals were carried out, using as heterogeneous catalysis on strap catalyst base as cavitation. By means of the wet oxidation on strap catalyst base with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} as oxidation reagent it was possible, to decontaminate effectively as single pollutants in model sewages as complex substance mixtures in real sewages. The tested catalytic systems worked especially effectively for high pollutant concentrations. At lower concentrations of sewage pollutants the amount of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} must be increased in regard to the actual CSB. In real sewages the pollutant decrease was, related on the TOC, in the cut, at 50%, a raise of the average concentration of the oxidation agent didn't produce any further decrease of the pollutant concentration. Aromatic hydrocarbons could be reduced more effectively than aliphatic ones. The conception for a technical plant was developed including cost estimate. The reduction of pollutants by cavitation was fundamentally lower than by using the heterogeneous catalysis way. Without addition of an oxidation agent (i.e. H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) only a TOC decrease of approx. 15% was registered in real sewages. The pollutant reduction increased at higher pollutant concentration. A complete elimination of all pollutants could not be obtained in none of the examined cases neither at model nor at real sewages. Especially the long reaction times (6 to 24 h) of the cavitation process in comparison with those, necessary for the catalytic reaction (2 to 6 h) are hindering a technical realization of the cavitation process, which seems to be doubtful for this and other reasons. So the use of cavitation in industrial scale sewage cleaning plants under the parameter

  2. In vitro mutation breeding of bananas and plantains. Final reports of an FAO/IAEA co-ordinated research programme from 1988 to 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    This document contains 9 final reports of the participants at the FAO/IAEA co-ordinated research programme on 'In vitro mutation breeding of bananas and plantains'. A separate abstract was prepared for each report. Refs, figs and tabs

  3. Comprehensive Environmental Assessment Applied to Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Flame-Retardant Coatings in Upholstery Textiles: A Case Study Presenting Priority Research Gaps for Future Risk Assessments (Final Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In September 2013, EPA announced the availability of the final report, Comprehensive Environmental Assessment Applied to Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Flame-Retardant Coatings in Upholstery Textiles: A Case Study Presenting Priority Research Gaps for Future Risk Assessments...

  4. Food irradiation in the Middle East and Europe. Proceedings of the final research co-ordination meeting held in Cadarache, France, 8-12 March 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-07-01

    This paper contains the papers presented at the final research coordination meeting of the CRP. The subjects covered include radiosterilization of poultry, poultry products, mushrooms cereal grains and other agricultural products. Refs, figs and tabs

  5. Irradiation as a phytosanitary treatment of food and agricultural commodities. Proceedings of a final research coordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-11-01

    presented at the final research coordination meeting, where the work completed during the last 5 years (1998-2002) was analysed

  6. FINAL Progress Report DOE Grant DE-FG02-04ER15587

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullins, Charles Buddie [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2016-11-03

    Catalysis Program - Viviane Schwartz Program Manager This Final Report discusses several archival journal articles that have been published that present and discuss the results that were discovered through this DOE grant.

  7. Reaction mechanism of oxidation, hydroxylation, and epoxidation by hypofluorous acid: A theoretical study of unusual H-bond-assisted catalysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Srnec, Martin; Ončák, Milan; Zahradník, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 112, č. 6 (2008), s. 3631-3637 ISSN 1089-5639 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : hypofluorous acid * self-catalysis * Rozen oxidation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.871, year: 2008

  8. First-principles kinetic modeling in heterogeneous catalysis: an industrial perspective on best-practice, gaps and needs

    OpenAIRE

    Sabbe, Maarten; Reyniers, Marie-Françoise; Reuter, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    Electronic structure calculations have emerged as a key contributor in modern heterogeneous catalysis research, though their application in chemical reaction engineering remains largely limited to academia. This perspective aims at encouraging the judicious use of first-principles kinetic models in industrial settings based on a critical discussion of present-day best practices, identifying existing gaps, and defining where further progress is needed.

  9. Radicals and Transition-Metal Catalysis: An Alliance Par Excellence to Increase Reactivity and Selectivity in Organic Chemistry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ford, Leigh Robert; Jahn, Ullrich

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 35 (2009), s. 6386-6389 ISSN 1433-7851 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : cross-coupling * elimination * homogeneous catalysis * hydrogen transfer * radicals Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 11.829, year: 2009

  10. Novel Catalysis by Gold: A Modern Alchemy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruta, Masatake

    Gold has long been neglected as a catalyst because of its chemical inertness. However, when gold is deposited as nanoparticles on carbon and polymer materials as well as on base metal oxides and hydroxides, it exhibits unique catalytic properties for many reactions such as CO oxidation at a temperature as low as 200 K, gas phase direct epoxidation of propylene, and aerobic oxidation of glucose to gluconic acid. The structure-catalytic activity correlations are discussed with emphasis on the contact structure, support selection, and the size control of gold particles. Gold clusters with diameters smaller than 2 nm are expected to exhibit novel properties in catalysis, optics, and electronics depending on the size (number of atoms), shape, and the electronic and chemical interaction with the support materials. The above achievements and attempts can be regarded as a modern alchemy that creates valuables by means of the noblest element with little practical use.

  11. Heterogeneous Organo-Catalysis: Sustainable Pathways to ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glucose and fructose are among the most abundant plant-derived materials1 and have been converted into useful building units often used in the drug discovery and polymer architecture.2 Unfortunately, most of these conversions require mineral acids and complex heterogeneous catalysis systems which suffer from the diminished activity and recyclability issues.3 Herein, we report a highly reactive and inexpensive heterogeneous sulfonated graphitic carbon nitride (Sg-CN), endowed with strong acidity that readily transforms carbohydrates to furanics. The ready availability and benign nature of the material and its stability over the several reaction cycles renders this catalyst very useful in organic synthesis, polymer industry and in the preparation of drug precursors. Poster presentation at the 253rd American Chemical Society (ACS) National meeting in San Francisco, CA

  12. Catalysis in solid oxide fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorte, R J; Vohs, J M

    2011-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and solid oxide electrolyzers (SOEs) hold much promise as highly efficient devices for the direct interconversion of chemical and electrical energy. Commercial application of these devices, however, requires further improvements in their performance and stability. Because the performance of SOFC and SOE electrodes depends on their microstructures, electronic and ionic conductivities, and chemical reactivities, the needed improvements require the expertise of various disciplines, with catalytic science playing an important role. Highly active and thermally stable catalysts are required to limit the internal losses in the devices, increase the range of fuels they can use, and decrease the temperatures at which they operate. In this article we review some of the most important recent advances in catalysis for SOFC and SOE electrodes and highlight additional improvements that are needed.

  13. Relation between Hydrogen Evolution and Hydrodesulfurization Catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Šaric, Manuel; Moses, Poul Georg; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2016-01-01

    A relation between hydrogen evolution and hydrodesulfurization catalysis was found by density functional theory calculations. The hydrogen evolution reaction and the hydrogenation reaction in hydrodesulfurization share hydrogen as a surface intermediate and, thus, have a common elementary step......, which indicates that the same catalyst should perform well for both hydrogen evolution and hydrogenation. If that catalyst also fulfills additional criteria for breaking carbon–sulfur bonds and releasing hydrogen sulfide, it will be a good hydrodesulfurization catalyst. The hydrogen evolution reaction...... is normally performed at room temperature and standard pressure, whereas the hydrodesulfurization reaction is driven by high temperature and pressure. Owing to the very different operating conditions, the adsorption free energy of hydrogen differs between hydrodesulfurization and the hydrogen evolution...

  14. Heterogeneous catalysis in highly sensitive microreactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jakob Lind

    This thesis present a highly sensitive silicon microreactor and examples of its use in studying catalysis. The experimental setup built for gas handling and temperature control for the microreactor is described. The implementation of LabVIEW interfacing for all the experimental parts makes...... of adsorbates readily converted to methanol as the source of the transient increase in methanol production, is eliminated. A study of mass selected ruthenium nanoparticles from a magnetron-sputter gas-aggregation source, deposited in microreactors, is presented. It is, shown that CO methanation can be measured...... on the mass selected nanoparticles in the microreactor. A parameter study shows negative reaction order in the CO concentration and apparent acivation energies between 0.8 and 1.2 eV depending on reaction conditions. Temperature programmed reaction studies in H2m shows di_erent forms of carbon growth...

  15. µ-reactors for Heterogeneous Catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Robert

    is described in detail. Since heating and temperature measurement is an extremely important point in heterogeneous catalysis an entire chapter is dedicated to this subject. Three different types of heaters have been implemented and tested both for repeatability and homogeneity of the heating as well...... catalyst surface area by reacting off an adsorbed layer of oxygen with CO. This procedure can be performed at temperatures low enough that sintering of Pt nanoparticles is not an issue. Some results from the reactors are presented. In particular an unexpected oscillation phenomenon of CO-oxidation on Pt...... nanoparticles are presented in detail. The sensitivity of the reactors are currently being investigated with CO oxidation on Pt thin films as a test reaction, and the results so far are presented. We have at this point shown that we are able to reach full conversion with a catalyst area of 38 µm2 with a turn...

  16. Isotope based assessment of groundwater renewal in water scarce regions. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-10-01

    The isotopic composition and chemical constituents of water infiltrating through the soil zone (unsaturated zone, or zone of aeration) into groundwater can be employed to determine the moisture transport in the unsaturated zone, thus enabling estimation of the water infiltration rate to the underlying aquifer. This was the basis on which this CRP was initiated in 1996. The overall results obtained from three years of applied field research related to study of moisture transport dynamics and estimation of natural recharge through use of isotope/hydrochemical depth profiles of the soil moisture in the unsaturated zone were presented and discussed at the final Research Co-ordination Meeting held in Vienna from 18 to 21 October 1999. A total of 44 sites were involved in the project on which detailed information on physiography, lithology, rainfall, unsaturated moisture content and a variety of chemical and isotopic determinants is now available. This publication contains 11 individual reports presented by CRP participants at the Meeting. Each of the reports have been indexed separately

  17. A decade of DIII-D research. Final report for the period of work, October 1, 1989--September 30, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    During the ten-year DIII-D tokamak operating period of 1989 through 1998, major scientific advances and discoveries were made and facility upgrades and improvements were implemented. Each year, annual reports as well as journal and international conference proceedings document the year-by-year advances (summarized in Section 7). This final contract report, provides a summary of these historical accomplishments. Section 2 encapsulates the 1998 status of DIII-D Fusion Science research. Section 3 summarizes the DIII-D facility operations. Section 4 describes the major upgrades to the DIII-D facility during this period. During the ten-year period, DIII-D has grown from predominantly a General Atomics program to a national center for fusion science with participants from over 50 collaborating institutions and 300 users who spend more than one week annually at DIII-D to carry out experiments or data analysis. In varying degrees, these collaborators participate in formulating the research program directions. The major collaborating institution programs are described in Section 6.

  18. Impact of long term pesticide usage on soil properties using radiotracer techniques. Proceedings of a final research coordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-11-01

    An important activity of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) is to assist Member States to ensure that, as far as possible, pesticides are used effectively and safely. To this end, FAO has published Guidelines for the Registration and Control of Pesticides, which forms the basis of most national pesticide registration schemes. Among the recommendations is that data should be provided to show that a candidate pesticide has no unacceptable effects on non-target organisms. Soil micro-flora and fauna, because of their central role in maintaining soil fertility, are highly ranked in this context. Concern has been expressed that the data normally presented may not be adequate to predict the effects on soil micro-organisms of repeated, heavy, multiple applications of pesticides that are common in monocultures of crops, such as cotton, maize and rice. Evaluation of the effects of such pesticide regimes requires studies of a range of soil microbial activities, some of which require the use of 14 C-labelled pesticides. Therefore, the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture organised a Co-ordinated Research project to assess whether or not there is a need to extend the data requirements for pesticide registration to cover such extreme agricultural practices. This TECDOC summarises the outcome of this programme and includes papers presented at the final Research Co-ordination meeting held in Hangzhou, China, 24-28 May 1999

  19. Successively detected events of the multiple muon catalysis process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinov, V.G.; Somov, L.N.; Fil'chenkov, V.V.

    1984-01-01

    The kinetics of multiple muon catalysis process is considered. Expressions for the yields and time distributions of successive events of mu-catalysis reactions detected with epsilon 2 +t 2 mixtere are given. These results can be also applied to the synthesis reactions p+d -> 3 He+γ in h 2 d 2 mixture and p+t -> 4 He+γ in h 2 +t 2 mixture. It is shown that the mu-catalysis process parameters and the detection efficiency can be independently determined for the experimental data analysis

  20. Iminium and enamine catalysis in enantioselective photochemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörmann, Fabian M.

    2018-01-01

    Although enantioselective catalysis under thermal conditions has been well established over the last few decades, the enantioselective catalysis of photochemical reactions is still a challenging task resulting from the complex enantiotopic face differentiation in the photoexcited state. Recently, remarkable achievements have been reported by a synergistic combination of organocatalysis and photocatalysis, which have led to the expedient construction of a diverse range of enantioenriched molecules which are generally not easily accessible under thermal conditions. In this tutorial review, we summarize and highlight the most significant advances in iminium and enamine catalysis of enantioselective photochemical reactions, with an emphasis on catalytic modes and reaction types. PMID:29155908