WorldWideScience

Sample records for catalepsy

  1. Piracetam reverses haloperidol-induced catalepsy in mice

    OpenAIRE

    SALAM, Omar Abdel; NADA, Somaia

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the memory-enhancing drugs piracetam, vinpocetine, and ginkgo biloba for their ability to reduce catalepsy in mice treated with haloperidol. Haloperidol is a classic neuroleptic drug that induces motor abnormalities and cognitive impairment due to a blockade of dopamine D2 receptors in the striatum. Materials and methods: Catalepsy was induced by intraperitoneal haloperidol (2 mg/kg) administration. The drugs being tested were either administered intraperitoneally (IP) along ...

  2. Histamine Potentiates Cyclosomatostatin-Induced Catalepsy in Old Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionov

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background The decreased level of somatostatin and increased level of histamine are detected in the Parkinsonian brain. In old Wistar rats, the brain somatostatin deficiency can initiate catalepsy that suggests the pathogenic significance of this abnormality in Parkinson’s disease (PD. The ability of histamine to affect the somatostatin deficiency action is not studied. Objectives The current study aimed to examine if histamine alters the cataleptogenic activity of the brain somatostatin deficiency in Wistar rats. Materials and Methods The animals used in the study were 100 - 110 and 736 - 767 days old. Catalepsy was evaluated by the bar test. The inhibition of the brain somatostatin activity was simulated by I.C.V. administration of cyclosomatostatin (cycloSOM, a somatostatin receptor antagonist. Results CycloSOM (0.2, 1.0, and 5.0 µg and histamine (1.0 and 10.0 µg alone were ineffective in both young and old animals. In combination, however, cycloSOM and histamine initiated cataleptic response in old rats. Effect of the combination was inhibited by H1 and H2 but not H3 antagonists. Conclusions CycloSOM and histamine synergistically exert catalepsy in old rats. In light of these data, the combination of the decreased brain level of somatostatin and increased brain level of histamine may be of pathogenic relevance for extrapyramidal signs in PD.

  3. Effect of Tribulus terrestris on Haloperidol-induced Catalepsy in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Nishchal, B. S.; Rai, S.; Prabhu, M. N.; Ullal, Sheetal D.; Rajeswari, S.; Gopalakrishna, H. N.

    2014-01-01

    Haloperidol, an antipsychotic drug, leads to the development of a behavioural state called catalepsy, in which the animal is not able to correct an externally imposed posture. In the present study we have attempted to evaluate the anticataleptic effect of Tribulus terrestris on haloperidol-induced catalepsy in albino mice. Mice were allocated to four groups, each group containing six animals. Both, the test drug, Tribulus terrestris and the standard drug trihexyphenidyl were uniformly suspend...

  4. The Effect of Chronic Administration of Buspirone on 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Catalepsy in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdolah Sharifi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Several evidences show that serotonergic neurons play a role in the regulation of movements executed by the basal ganglia. Recently we have reported that single dose of buspirone improved 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA and haloperidol-induced catalepsy. This study is aimed to investigate effect of chronic intraperitoneal (i.p. administration of buspirone on 6-OHDA-induced catalepsy in male Wistar rats. Methods: Catalepsy was induced by unilateral infusion of 6-OHDA (8 μg/2 μl/rat into the central region of the SNc and was assayed by the bar-test method 5, 60, 120 and 180 min after drugs administration in 10th day. The effect of buspirone (0.5, 1 and 2 mg/kg, i.p. for 10 days was assessed in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Results: The results showed that chronic injection of buspirone (0.5, 1 and 2 mg/kg, i.p. for 10 days decreased catalepsy when compared with the control group. The best anticataleptic effect was observed at the dose of 1 mg/kg. The catalepsy-improving effect of buspirone was reversed by 1-(2-methoxyphenyl- 4-[4-(2-phthalimido butyl]piperazine hydrobromide (NAN-190, 0.5 mg/kg, i.p.,as a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist. Conclusion: Our study indicates that chronic administration of buspirone improves catalepsy in a 6-OHDA-induced animal model of parkinson's disease (PD. We also suggest that buspirone may be used as an adjuvant therapy to increase effectiveness of antiparkinsonian drugs. In order to prove this hypothesis, further clinical studies should be done.

  5. Comparative phenotypic and cytochemical characteristics of lymphocytes of Wistar rats and rats with genetic predisposition to catalepsy after retabolil administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panteleeva, N G; Shurlygina, A V; Trufakin, V A

    2013-11-01

    We studied the possibility of using anabolic steroid retabolil injections for complex correction of behavioral and immune parameters in rats with genetic predisposition to catalepsy. Subpopulation composition of lymphoid organ and blood cells was compared in rats with genetic predisposition to catalepsy and Wistar rats after retabolil administration. In rats predisposed to catalepsy, retabolil reduced the total content of thymus cells and increased absolute count of CD8 (+) thymocytes. In Wistar rats, retabolil increased the total cell count and the content of CD4 (+) thymocytes, but reduced the number of CD8 (+) cells. Therefore, changes in the subpopulation composition of thymus cells after retabolil administration were opposite in rats with genetic predisposition to catalepsy and Wistar rats. Retabolil injections reduced the severity of catalepsy response in rats with genetic predisposition. However, the time of freezing in Wistar rats significantly increased under these conditions.

  6. Effect of Tribulus terrestris on Haloperidol-induced Catalepsy in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishchal, B. S.; Rai, S.; Prabhu, M. N.; Ullal, Sheetal D.; Rajeswari, S.; Gopalakrishna, H. N.

    2014-01-01

    Haloperidol, an antipsychotic drug, leads to the development of a behavioural state called catalepsy, in which the animal is not able to correct an externally imposed posture. In the present study we have attempted to evaluate the anticataleptic effect of Tribulus terrestris on haloperidol-induced catalepsy in albino mice. Mice were allocated to four groups, each group containing six animals. Both, the test drug, Tribulus terrestris and the standard drug trihexyphenidyl were uniformly suspended in 1% gum acacia solution. Catalepsy was induced in mice with haloperidol (1.0 mg/kg, intraperitoneally). The first group received the vehicle (10 ml/kg, orally), the second group received trihexyphenidyl (10 mg/kg, orally) and the remaining two groups received Tribulus terrestris (100, 200 mg/kg, orally). The animals were assessed after single and repeated dose administration for ten days, 30 min prior to haloperidol, using standard bar test. The result of the present study demonstrates Tribulus terrestris has a protective effect against haloperidol-induced catalepsy, which is comparable to the standard drug used for the same purpose. Our study indicates Tribulus terrestris can be used to prevent haloperidol-induced extrapyramidal side effects. PMID:25593394

  7. Effect of Tribulus terrestris on Haloperidol-induced Catalepsy in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishchal, B S; Rai, S; Prabhu, M N; Ullal, Sheetal D; Rajeswari, S; Gopalakrishna, H N

    2014-01-01

    Haloperidol, an antipsychotic drug, leads to the development of a behavioural state called catalepsy, in which the animal is not able to correct an externally imposed posture. In the present study we have attempted to evaluate the anticataleptic effect of Tribulus terrestris on haloperidol-induced catalepsy in albino mice. Mice were allocated to four groups, each group containing six animals. Both, the test drug, Tribulus terrestris and the standard drug trihexyphenidyl were uniformly suspended in 1% gum acacia solution. Catalepsy was induced in mice with haloperidol (1.0 mg/kg, intraperitoneally). The first group received the vehicle (10 ml/kg, orally), the second group received trihexyphenidyl (10 mg/kg, orally) and the remaining two groups received Tribulus terrestris (100, 200 mg/kg, orally). The animals were assessed after single and repeated dose administration for ten days, 30 min prior to haloperidol, using standard bar test. The result of the present study demonstrates Tribulus terrestris has a protective effect against haloperidol-induced catalepsy, which is comparable to the standard drug used for the same purpose. Our study indicates Tribulus terrestris can be used to prevent haloperidol-induced extrapyramidal side effects.

  8. Epilepsy and catalepsy in Anglo-American literature between romanticism and realism: Tennyson, Poe, Eliot and Collins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, P

    2000-12-01

    Epilepsy and catalepsy were not clearly separated in the minds of people in the early 19th century, and catalepsy may have been used as a diagnostic euphemism for epilepsy. Tennyson, in "The Princess" describes, under the diagnosis of catalepsy, probable temporal lobe epileptic dreamy states with derealization which serve as a metaphor of sexual and moral ambivalence, the poem's central theme. It seems that Tennyson knew such seizures from his own father who had been given a diagnosis of catalepsy. Poe gave his Berenice in the novella of the same title a diagnosis of epilepsy as a reason for a premature burial. However, there was a good deal of unlikelyhood in this, and when he came to this theme in "The Fall of the House of Usher" and in "The Premature Burial" he chose instead a diagnosis of catalepsy which fitted better with the plot. The fits of the title character in George Eliot's Silas Marner, diagnosed as catalepsy, would today rather be seen as epileptic twilight states. It would seem that this author drew from contemporary dictionary descriptions which described conditions similar to Marner's fits under the heading of catalepsy. In Eliot's "legend with a realistic treatment", the twilight states are a central factor in the plot and explain Marner's reclusion and passivity. In Poor Miss Finch by English realist Wilkie Collins, the post-traumatic seizures of Oscar, one of the main characters, their cause, their treatment with silver nitrate, and the subsequent discoloration of his skin are central supporting elements of a perfectly constructed plot. Collins gives an exact description of a right versive seizure with secondary generalisation, and how to deal with it. In none of these works seizures are seen in a negative light. They rather evoke reactions of sympathy and support.

  9. Antidepressant-Like Effects of Central BDNF Administration in Mice of Antidepressant Sensitive Catalepsy (ASC) Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonova, Maria; Kulikov, Alexander V

    2012-08-31

    Although numerous data evidence the implication of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the pathophysiology of depression, the potential for BDNF to correct genetically defined depressive-like states is poorly studied. This study was aimed to reveal antidepressant-like effects of BDNF (300 ng, 2×, i.c.v.) on behavior and mRNA expression of genes associated with depression-like state in the brain in mice of antidepressant sensitive catalepsy (ASC) strain characterized by high hereditary predisposition to catalepsy and depressive-like features. Behavioral tests were held on the 7th-16th days after the first (4th-13th after the second) BDNF injection. Results showed that BDNF normalized impaired sexual motivation in the ASC males, and this BDNF effect differed, with advantageous effects, from that of widely used antidepressants. The anticataleptic effect of two BDNF injections was enhanced compared with a single administration. A tendency to decrease the immobility duration in tail-suspension test was observed in BDNF-treated ASC mice. The effects on catalepsy and sexual motivation were specific since BDNF did not alter locomotor and exploratory activity or social interest in the ASC mice. Along with behavioral antidepressant-like effects on the ASC mice, BDNF increased hippocampal mRNA levels of Bdnf and Creb1 (cAMP response element-binding protein gene). BDNF also augmented mRNA levels of Arc gene encoding Arc (Activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated) protein involved in BDNF-induced processes of neuronal and synaptic plasticity in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. The data suggest that: [1] BDNF is effective in the treatment of some genetically defined behavioral disturbances; [2] BDNF influences sexually-motivated behavior; [3] Arc mRNA levels may serve as a molecular marker of BDNF physiological activity associated with its long-lasting behavioral effects; [4] ASC mouse strain can be used as a suitable model to study mechanisms of BDNF effects on

  10. Synthesize of zinc nanoparticles using Indonesian velvet bean (Mucuna pruriens) extract and evaluate its potency in lowering catalepsy in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eko Sardjono, Ratnaningsih; Khoerunnisa, Fitri; Musthopa, Iqbal; Khairunisa, Dinar; Astuti Suganda, Putri; Rachmawati, Rahmi

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to synthesize zinc nanoparticles using Indonesian velvet bean (Mucuna pruriens) seed extract and evaluate its potency in lowering catalepsy in mice. The research conducted consist of extraction of M. pruriens seed powder, synthesis of zinc-M. pruriens seed extract nanoparticles (Zn-MPn), characterization of Zn-MPn, and catalepsy test of Zn-MPn. M. pruriens seed powder was extracted by maceration using ethanol-water (1:1) at pH 3 adjusted with citric acid. The Zn-MPn was synthesized by reacting zinc acetate dihydrate (Zn(CH3COO2)2.2H2O) solution with M. pruriens seed extract for 40 min, dispersibility of the reaction was controlled by using sonication and ultrasonic homogenizer. The Zn-MPn obtained was characterized by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR). Catalepsy test of Zn-MPn was conducted at doses of 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 mg/kg body weight. The results of SEM-EDX and TEM analysis showed that the Zn-MPn formed nanoparticles with a particle diameter of 55 nm. Based on FTIR analysis, the absorption band at 464.8 cm-1 was a typical absorption indicated the Zn-O interaction on Zn-MPn. Catalepsy test showed that Zn-MPn on the all five doses were able to lower the catalepsy in mice with the best dose was 10 mg/kg body weight.

  11. Cannabidiol attenuates catalepsy induced by distinct pharmacological mechanisms via 5-HT1A receptor activation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Felipe V; Del Bel, Elaine A; Guimarães, Francisco S

    2013-10-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is a non-psychotomimetic compound from Cannabis sativa plant that produces antipsychotic effects in rodents and humans. It also reverses L-dopa-induced psychotic symptoms and improves motor function in Parkinson's patients. This latter effect raised the possibility that CBD could have beneficial effects on motor related striatal disorders. To investigate this possibility we evaluated if CBD would prevent catalepsy induced by drugs with distinct pharmacological mechanisms. The catalepsy test is largely used to investigate impairments of motor function caused by interference on striatal function. Male Swiss mice received acute pretreatment with CBD (5, 15, 30 or 60mg/kg, ip) 30min prior to the D2 receptor antagonist haloperidol (0.6mg/kg), the non-selective nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor L-nitro-N-arginine (L-NOARG, 80mg/kg) or the CB1 receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 (5mg/kg). The mice were tested 1, 2 or 4h after haloperidol, L-NOARG or WIN55,212-2 injection. These drugs significantly increased catalepsy time and this effect was attenuated dose-dependently by CBD. CBD, by itself, did not induce catalepsy. In a second set of experiments the mechanism of CBD effects was investigated. Thirty minutes before CBD (30mg/kg) the animals received the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY100635 (0.1mg/kg). The anticataleptic effect of CBD was prevented by WAY100635. These findings indicate that CBD can attenuate catalepsy caused by different mechanisms (D2 blockade, NOS inhibition and CB1 agonism) via 5-HT1A receptor activation, suggesting that it could be useful in the treatment of striatal disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Antipsychotic-induced catalepsy is attenuated in mice lacking the M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink-Jensen, Anders; Schmidt, Lene S; Dencker, Ditte

    2011-01-01

    A delicate balance exists between the central dopaminergic and cholinergic neurotransmitter systems with respect to motor function. An imbalance can result in motor dysfunction as observed in Parkinson's disease patients and in patients treated with antipsychotic compounds. Cholinergic receptor...... antagonists can alleviate extrapyramidal symptoms in Parkinson's disease and motor side effects induced by antipsychotics. The effects of anticholinergics are mediated by muscarinic receptors of which five subtypes (M1–M5) exist. Muscarinic M4 receptors are found at high concentrations in motor parts...... of the striatum, suggesting a role for muscarinic M4 receptors in the motor side effects of antipsychotics, and in the alleviation of these side effects by anticholinergics. Here we investigated the potential role of the muscarinic M4 receptor in catalepsy induced by antipsychotics (haloperidol and risperidone...

  13. Evidence of interaction between fluoxetine and isosorbide dinitrate on neuroleptic-induced catalepsy in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pires J.G.P.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Drugs which influence 5-HTergic mechanisms can modify neuroleptic-induced catalepsy (NC in rodents, a phenomenon produced by striatal dopamine (DA receptor blockade. Previous research also suggests a role for endogenous nitric oxide (NO in the modulation of striatal DAergic neurotransmission; in addition, NO seems to play a role in the 5-HT reuptake mechanism. It is known that clomipramine potentiates NC in mice, but the reported effects of selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs in this model are rather contradictory. We then decided to re-address this issue, investigating the effect of fluoxetine (FX, an SSRI, on NC. In view of the ubiquitous role of NO as a central neuromodulator, we also studied the effect of isosorbide dinitrate (ID, a centrally active NO donor, and how both drugs interact to affect the phenomenon of NC. Catalepsy was induced in male albino mice with haloperidol (H; 1 mg/kg, ip and measured at 30-min interval by means of a bar test. Drugs (FX, ID and FX + ID or saline (controls were injected ip 30 min before H, with each animal used only once. FX (5 mg/kg significantly reduced NC, with maximal attenuation (about 74% occurring at 150 min after H. ID (5 mg/kg also inhibited NC (150 min: 62% attenuation. The combined drugs (FX + ID group, however, caused a great potentiation of NC (4.7-fold at its maximum, at 90 min. The effect observed with ID is compatible with the hypothesis that NO increases DA release in the striatum. The attenuation of NC observed with FX may be due to a preferential net effect on the raphe somatodendritic synapse, where inhibitory 5-HT1A autoreceptors are operative. The enhancement of NC caused by combined administration of FX and ID suggests the presence of a pharmacodynamic interaction, whose mechanism, still unclear, may be related to a decrease in striatal DA release

  14. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling of the relationship between D2 receptor occupancy and catalepsy in rats : Predicting extrapyramidal side effects in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, Martin; Kozielska, Magdalena; Pilla Reddy, Venkatesh; Vermeulen, An; Barton, Hugh A.; Grimwood, Sarah; de Greef, Rik; Groothuis, Genoveva; Danhof, Meindert; Proost, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Dopamine D2 receptor occupancy (D2RO) is the major determinant of efficacy and safety in schizophrenia drug therapy (1,2). Excessive D2RO (>80 %) is known to cause catalepsy (CAT) in rats and extrapyramidal side effects (EPS) in human(3). The relationship between CAT scores in rats and

  15. Correlation between the duration of perphenazine catalepsy and pressure maintained tonic immobility under the influence of beta-sympathotropic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikal, K

    1989-10-01

    In rats the effect of i.p. applied beta-adrenomimetic isoprenaline (ISO) 0.4 mg/kg, sulbutamol (SAL) 2mg/kg, beta-adrenoblocker propranolol (PRO) 2 mg/kg and metipranolol (MET) 4 mg/kg on the duration of perphenazine-induced catalepsy (CAT) and pressure-maintained tonic immobility (TI) was studied. It appeared that a mild constant pressure on the rat body permitted to measure the length of duration of TI in adult rats. The time course of changes in the duration of CAT and TI was repeatedly measured in one-hour intervals with different results. While ISO had no effect on the duration of CAT, SAL prolonged it. Both beta-symathomimetic compounds prolonged the duration of TI. PRO and MET shortened the duration of CAT. PRO did not influence, MET failed in the first phase but in the second phase it significantly prolonged TI duration. In spite of a certain affinity of both phenomena the two, that is, CAT and TI were not parallely influenced by the betasympathotropic agents used.

  16. Modafinil Improves Catalepsy in a Rat 6-Hydroxydopamine Model of Parkinson's Disease; Possible Involvement of Dopaminergic Neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajdi-Hokmabad, Reza; Ziaee, Mojtaba; Sadigh-Eteghad, Saeed; Sandoghchian Shotorbani, Siamak; Mahmoudi, Javad

    2017-09-01

    Purpose: Modafinil is a vigilance-enhancing drug licensed for narcolepsy. The use of modafinil leads to various neuromodulatory effects with very low abuse potential. A body of evidence suggested that modafinil may have anti-parkinsonian effects. This study was designed to evaluate whether modafinil could improve motor dysfunction in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced rat model of Parkinson's disease. Methods: Male Wistar rats (180-220 g, n= 98) were used in this study. Parkinsonism was induced by injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (10 μg/2μl in 0.2 % ascorbic acid-saline) into the right striatum. Parkinsonian rats received intraperitoneal (ip) injections of modafinil (50, 75, and 100 mg/kg) and catalepsy-like immobility was assessed by the bar test (BT). Furthermore, involvement of dopamine D 1 and D 2 receptors in modafinil's anti-parkinsonian effects was studied. For this purpose, parkinsonian animals were pretreated with SCH23390 and raclopride (the dopamine D 1 and D 2 receptor anatgonists, respectively) or SCH23390 + raclopride, and then assessed by the BT. Results: Modafinil (100 mg/kg) showed anti-cataleptic effects in the BT. Notably, the effect of modafinil in the BT was reversed in parkinsonian rats pretreated with raclopride (1.25 mg/kg) and/or SCH23390 + raclopride (0.75 and 1.25 mg/kg, respectively), but not in those pretreated with SCH23390 (0.75 mg/kg). Conclusion: Acute administration of modafinil improves 6-OHDA-induced motor impairment possibly through activation of dopamine D 2 receptors.

  17. Short- and long-term effects of risperidone on catalepsy sensitisation and acquisition of conditioned avoidance response: Adolescent vs adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Aung Aung Kywe; Medely, Gregory A; Reeks, Timothy; Burne, Thomas H J; Eyles, Darryl W

    2017-07-01

    The effects of antipsychotic drugs (APDs) on the adolescent brain are poorly understood despite a dramatic increase in prescription of these drugs in adolescents over the past twenty years. Neuronal systems continue to be remodeled during adolescence. Therefore, when given in adolescence, antipsychotic drugs (APDs) have the potential to affect this remodeling. In this study we investigated the effects of chronic 22-day risperidone treatment (1.3mg/kg/day) in both adolescent and adult rats. We examined short- and long-term changes in behaviour (catalepsy, locomotion and conditioned avoidance response (CAR)), and dopaminergic and serotonergic neurochemistry in the striatum and the nucleus accumbens. Here, we report that, both during chronic treatment and after a lengthy drug-free interval, risperidone induced a sensitised cataleptic response regardless of the age of exposure. Selectively in adolescents, risperidone-induced catalepsy was inversely correlated with striatal dopamine turnover immediately after chronic treatment. After a drug-free interval, a significant proportion of rats with prior adolescent risperidone treatment also failed to acquire CAR to a defined criterion. Our data provide evidence that the same chronic risperidone treatment regimen can induce contrasting short- and long-term neural outcomes in the adolescent and adult brains. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Role of vasopressin V1a receptor in ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol-induced cataleptic immobilization in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egashira, Nobuaki; Koushi, Emi; Myose, Takayuki; Tanoue, Akito; Mishima, Kenichi; Tsuchihashi, Ryota; Kinjo, Junei; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Satoshi; Iwasaki, Katsunori

    2017-12-01

    Cannabis is a widely used illicit substance. ∆ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major psychoactive component of cannabis, is known to cause catalepsy in rodents. Recent studies have shown that vasopressin V1a and V1b receptors are widely distributed in the central nervous system and are capable of influencing a wide variety of brain functions such as social behavior, emotionality, and learning and memory. The present study was designed to examine the possible involvement of V1a and V1b receptors in THC-induced catalepsy-like immobilization. The induction of catalepsy following treatment with THC (10 mg/kg, i.p.) or haloperidol (1 mg/kg, i.p.) was evaluated in wild-type (WT), V1a receptor knockout (V1aRKO), and V1b receptor knockout (V1bRKO) mice. The effect of treatment with the selective 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A receptor antagonist WAY100635 (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) on THC-induced catalepsy was also evaluated in V1aRKO mice. Moreover, the effects of the V1a receptor antagonist VMAX-357 and the V1b receptor antagonist ORG-52186 on THC-induced catalepsy were evaluated in ddY mice. THC and haloperidol markedly caused catalepsy in V1bRKO mice as well as in WT mice. However, V1aRKO mice exhibited a reduction in catalepsy induced by THC but not by haloperidol. WAY100635 dramatically enhanced THC-induced catalepsy in V1aRKO mice. Although VMAX-357 (10 mg/kg, p.o.) but not ORG-52186 significantly attenuated THC-induced catalepsy, it had no significant effect on the enhancement of THC-induced catalepsy by WAY100635 in ddY mice. These findings suggest that V1a receptor regulates THC-induced catalepsy-like immobilization.

  19. Katatoni er ofte overset i børne- og ungdomspsykiatrien

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballin, Nicola Hvidt; Pagsberg, Anne Katrine

    2016-01-01

    Catatonia is a common but often overlooked motor syndrome in child and adolescent psychiatry. It is characterized by a variety of symptoms, most often excitement, immobility, stupor, catalepsy, grimacing, echolalia, echopraxia, stereotypies, mannerisms, logorrhoea, verbigeration, negativism...

  20. Effects of lipopolysaccharide and interleukin-6 on cataleptic immobility and locomotor activity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazovkina, Daria V; Tibeikina, Marina A; Kulikov, Alexander V; Popova, Nina K

    2011-01-10

    Catalepsy (animal hypnosis, tonic immobility) is a type of passive defensive behavior. Its exaggerated form is a syndrome of some psychopathological disorders. Numerous neurotransmitters have impact on the regulation of catalepsy. In this paper we demonstrated the involvement of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the mechanism of cataleptic immobility. Effects of exogenous IL-6 treatment (7.5 and 10μg/kg, i.p) or stimulation of endogenous IL-6 secretion with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration (50, 100 and 200μg/kg, i.p.) on catalepsy and locomotor activity were studied in adult C57BL/6 male mice. IL-6 induced catalepsy in 70% (7.5μg/kg) or 72.7% (10μg/kg) of animals with no effect on locomotor activity. LPS administration reduced distance travelled and number of rears in the open field at any dose used, however, only high doses (100 or 200μg/kg) of the toxin induced catalepsy in 50% of mice. This result indicates that IL-6 is involved in the regulation of catalepsy, this effect is specific and does not arise from inhibition of locomotor activity. The study provides a new evidence on participation of IL-6 in mechanisms of abnormal behavior. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Targeting Dopamine D3 and Serotonin 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A Receptors for Developing Effective Antipsychotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brindisi, Margherita; Butini, Stefania; Franceschini, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    of extrapyramidal symptoms liability, sedation, and catalepsy. The potential atypical antipsychotic 5bb was selected for further pharmacological investigation. The distribution of c-fos positive cells in the ventral striatum confirmed the atypical antipsychotic profile of 5bb in agreement with behavioral rodent...... studies. 5bb administered orally demonstrated a biphasic effect on the MK801-induced hyperactivity at dose levels not able to induce sedation, catalepsy, or learning impairment in passive avoidance. In microdialysis studies, 5bb increased the dopamine efflux in the medial prefrontal cortex. Thus, 5bb...

  2. Synthèse et Etude pharmacologique de la 4-phényl-l, 5 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    benzodiazépin-2-one, 4-phényl-1,5-benzodiazépin-2-thiol synthesized in our laboratory showed that these products are not toxic at therapeutic doses and possess sedative, muscle relaxant, anxiolytic effects, but do not present any hypnotic, or catalepsy ...

  3. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 101 - 150 of 194 ... Vol 15 (1999), Influence of ionophores on new permeability pathways in malaria infected red blood cells, Abstract. C Diribe. Vol 11 (1995) .... fruit extract against haloperidol-induced catalepsy and scopolamine-induced memory impairment: Involvement of antioxidant system, Abstract. Ismail O Ishola ...

  4. Psychopharmacological properties of the saponin fraction of Ficus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The psychopharmacological effects of a saponin-rich fraction (SFG) obtained from crude methanolic extract of Ficus platyphylla stem bark were studied on spontaneous motor activity (SMA), pentobarbitalinduced sleep, motor coordination, amphetamine-induced hyperactivity and stereotyped behaviour, catalepsy, forced ...

  5. Ameliorative effect of the hydroethanolic whole plant extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    At the end of the study, biochemical markers of nitrosative and oxidative stress status were determined. Results: DH (12.5, 50 and 100 mg/kg) significantly ameliorated haloperidol-induced catalepsy (bar test), spontaneous motor and working memory deficits (open field and elevated plus maze tests, respectively), ...

  6. Clozapine-Induced Locomotor Suppression is Mediated by 5-HT2A Receptors in the Forebrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    McOmish, Caitlin E; Lira, Alena; Hanks, James B; Gingrich, Jay A

    2012-01-01

    The need for safer, more effective therapeutics for the treatment of schizophrenia is widely acknowledged. To optimally target novel pharmacotherapies, in addition to establishing the mechanisms responsible for the beneficial effects of antipsychotics, the pathways underlying the most severe side effects must also be elucidated. Here we investigate the role of serotonin 2A (5-HT2A), serotonin 2C (5-HT2C), and dopamine 2 receptors (D2) in mediating adverse effects associated with canonical first- and second-generation antipsychotic drugs in mice. Wild-type (WT) and 5-HT2A knockout (KO) mice treated with haloperidol, clozapine, and risperidone were assessed for locomotor activity and catalepsy. WT mice showed a marked reduction in locomotor activity following acute administration of haloperidol and high-dose risperidone, which was most likely secondary to the severe catalepsy caused by these compounds. Clozapine also dramatically reduced locomotor activity, but in the absence of catalepsy. Interestingly, 5-HT2A KO mice were cataleptic following haloperidol and risperidone, but did not respond to clozapine's locomotor-suppressing effects. Restoration of 5-HT2A expression to cortical glutamatergic neurons re-instated the locomotor-suppressing effects of clozapine in the open field. In sum, we confirm that haloperidol and risperidone caused catalepsy in rodents, driven by strong antagonism of D2. We also demonstrate that clozapine decreases locomotor activity in a 5-HT2A-dependent manner, in the absence of catalepsy. Moreover, we show that it is the cortical population of 5-HT2A that mediate the locomotor-suppressing effects of clozapine. PMID:22871913

  7. Behavioral effects of acute and long-term administration of catnip (Nepeta cataria) in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massoco, C O; Silva, M R; Gorniak, S L; Spinosa, M S; Bernardi, M M

    1995-12-01

    Catnip or catmint (Nepeta cataria) is a plant used extensively to treat human diseases and in toys for pets. We investigated the effects of acute and long-term administration of the plant on some behaviors of mice. The plant was fed as 10% of the normal diet for 2 h/d for 1 or 7 d. Acute and long-term dosing increased both rearing and locomotion frequencies observed in an open field. Acute exposure to catnip increased stereotyped behavior and susceptibility to seizures, did not interfere with haloperidol-induced catalepsy, and decreased sleeping time after sodium pentobarbital administration. Long-term exposure induced tolerance to stereotypic behavior, catalepsy and sleeping time, and increased the susceptibility to seizures induced by picrotoxin and strychnine. An amphetamine-like effect of catnip was suggested to explain the acute effects, while dispositional and functional adaptative changes were considered involved with the long-term effects.

  8. Delayed Diagnosis in an Elderly Schizophrenic Patient with Catatonic State and Pulmonary Embolism

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Hsueh-Chin; Chiu, Nien-Mu

    2013-01-01

    Catatonia is a syndrome with any two of five core features: stupor/motoric immobility/catalepsy/waxy flexibility, excitement, negativism/mutism, posturing, and echolalia/echopraxia. We describe a case of delayed diagnosis of pulmonary embolism with an atypical presentation in an elderly schizophrenia male patient, which led to a life-threatening brain infarction. A 75-year-old male was hospitalized in a psychiatric ward because of stupor, poor intake and mutism under a diagnosis of recurrent ...

  9. Antidepressant-like effect of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol and other cannabinoids isolated from Cannabis sativa L

    OpenAIRE

    El-Alfy, Abir T.; Ivey, Kelly; Robinson, Keisha; Ahmed, Safwat; Radwan, Mohamed; Slade, Desmond; Khan, Ikhlas; ElSohly, Mahmoud; Ross, Samir

    2010-01-01

    The antidepressant action of cannabis as well as the interaction between antidepressants and the endocannabinoid system has been reported. This study was conducted to assess the antidepressant-like activity of Δ9-THC and other cannabinoids. Cannabinoids were initially evaluated in the mouse tetrad assay to determine doses that do not induce hypothermia or catalepsy. The automated mouse forced swim (FST) and tail suspension (TST) tests were used to determine antidepressant action. At doses lac...

  10. Katatoni er ofte overset i børne- og ungdomspsykiatrien

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballin, Nicola Hvidt; Pagsberg, Anne Katrine

    2016-01-01

    Catatonia is a common but often overlooked motor syndrome in child and adolescent psychiatry. It is characterized by a variety of symptoms, most often excitement, immobility, stupor, catalepsy, grimacing, echolalia, echopraxia, stereotypies, mannerisms, logorrhoea, verbigeration, negativism......, staring and withdrawal. This case report illustrates how a 17-year-old man was diagnosed with catatonia after one year of repeating psychiatric care. The catatonic symptoms decreased significantly after a short period of lorazepam administration....

  11. Design, synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and anti-psychotic investigation of some novel Azo dye/Schiff base/Chalcone derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandravadivelu Gopi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to design, synthesise and assess the antipsychotic activity of a set of the novel (5-(10-(3-N, N-Dimethylamino propyl-10H-phenothiazine-3-yl-1,3,4-thiadiazo-2-yl Azodye/Schiff base/Chalcone derivatives. The newly synthesised compound structure was characterised by FT-IR, 1H NMR, Mass spectroscopy and elemental analysis. Each compound has been shown an excellent anti-psychotic activity in a haloperidol-induced catalepsy metallic bar test. The results found are firmly similar to docking study. Among the synthesised derivatives, compound 2-Amino-6-(3-hydroxy-4-methylphenyl pyrimidine-4-yl (7-chloro-10-(3-(N, N-dimethylamino propyl-10H-phenothiazine-3-yl methanone (GC8 exhibiting high potency of catalepsy induction. Therefore, the derivative of GC8 has been considered that a potent anti-psychotic agent among the synthesised compounds. Keywords: Design, MVD, Catalepsy, Antipsychotic agent, X-ray crystallography

  12. Atypical antipsychotic properties of blonanserin, a novel dopamine D2 and 5-HT2A antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Yukihiro; Okano, Motoki; Imaki, Junta; Tatara, Ayaka; Okumura, Takahiro; Shimizu, Saki

    2010-08-01

    Blonanserin is a novel antipsychotic agent that preferentially interacts with dopamine D(2) and 5-HT(2A) receptors. To assess the atypical properties of blonanserin, we evaluated its propensity to induce extrapyramidal side effects (EPS) and to enhance forebrain Fos expression in mice. The actions of AD-6048, a primary metabolite of blonanserin, in modulating haloperidol-induced EPS were also examined. Blonanserin (0.3-10mg/kg, p.o.) did not significantly alter the pole-descending behavior of mice in the pole test or increase the catalepsy time, while haloperidol (0.3-3mg/kg, p.o.) caused pronounced bradykinesia and catalepsy. Blonanserin and haloperidol at the above doses significantly enhanced Fos expression in the shell (AcS) region of the nucleus accumbens and dorsolateral striatum (dlST). The extent of blonanserin-induced Fos expression in the AcS was comparable to that induced by haloperidol. However, the striatal Fos expression by blonanserin was less prominent as compared to haloperidol. Furthermore, combined treatment of AD-6048 (0.1-3mg/kg, s.c.) with haloperidol (0.5mg/kg, i.p.) significantly attenuated haloperidol-induced bradykinesia and catalepsy. The present results show that blonanserin behaves as an atypical antipsychotic both in inducing EPS and enhancing forebrain Fos expression. In addition, AD-6048 seems to contribute at least partly to the atypical properties of blonanserin. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Anxiolytic Effects of Royal Sun Medicinal Mushroom, Agaricus brasiliensis (Higher Basidiomycetes) on Ischemia-Induced Anxiety in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunjing; Gao, Xiulan; Sun, Yan; Sun, Xiaojie; Wu, Yanmin; Liu, Ying; Yu, Haitao; Cui, Guangcheng

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the anxiolytic effects Agaricus brasiliensis extract (AbSE) on ischemia-induced anxiety using the plus-maze test and the social interaction test. The animals were treated orally with AbSE (4, 8, and 10 mg/kg/d, respectively) for 30 d, followed by middle cerebral artery occlusion-induced cerebral ischemia. Levels of noradrenaline, dopamine, and serotonin in the cerebral cortex of rats, as well as oxidative stress and plasma corticosterone levels were analyzed, respectively. The rota-rod test was carried out to exclude any false positive results in experimental procedures related to anxiety disorders, and the catalepsy test was carried out to investigate whether AbSE induces catalepsy. Our results demonstrate that oral administration of AbSE presented anxiolytic-like effects in the elevated plus-maze test and the social interaction test. Furthermore, AbSE did not induce extrapyramidal symptoms in the catalepsy test. The mechanism underlying the anxiolytic effect of AbSE might be increased brain monoamine levels and plasma corticosterone levels and decreased oxidative stress in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion rats.

  14. Haloperidol-induced parkinsonism is attenuated by varenicline in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Amit K; Gupta, Sparsh; Patel, Ranjan K; Wardhan, Neeta

    2018-04-10

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder of the central nervous system (CNS). However, there is no known drug to stop/slow down this neurodegeneration. Varenicline is an anti-smoking drug and has the potential to prevent neurodegeneration. Thus, the present study was designed to evaluate the effect of varenicline in animal models of PD. Levodopa and haloperidol were administered in doses of 30 and 1 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.), respectively. Group 1 was administered haloperidol; groups 2, 3 and 4 were administered haloperidol along with varenicline in doses of 0.5, 1.5 and 2.5 mg/kg, i.p., respectively and group 5 was administered levodopa along with haloperidol. Varenicline was administered daily, 30 min prior to the administration of haloperidol. Varenicline was administered for the first 8 days, and then from the 9th day until the 15th day. Behavioral assessment (rotarod and catalepsy tests) was performed on days 9 and 15. Assessment of striatal dopamine levels and histopathology were also performed. In the haloperidol-treated groups, significant decrease in latency to fall off (on rotarod) and increase in catalepsy duration (in catalepsy test) were observed as compared to the control group. In the levodopa-treated group, significant increase in latency to fall off the rotarod and significant decrease in catalepsy duration were observed as compared to the haloperidol-treated groups. Further, on day 9, varenicline (2.5 mg/kg) significantly increased the latency to fall off the rotarod, while varenicline (0.5 and 1.5 mg/kg) did not cause any significant change in latency to fall off the rotarod as compared to the haloperidol-treated group. On day 15, significant increase in latency to fall off the rotarod was observed in varenicline (at all doses) as compared to the haloperidol-treated group. In the catalepsy test, the varenicline-treated (at all doses) groups showed significant decrease in duration of catalepsy on day 9 and day 15 as compared

  15. Effects of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists on antipsychotic efficacy in a preclinical mouse model of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlhaas, Kathy L; Bitner, Robert S; Gopalakrishnan, Murali; Rueter, Lynne E

    2012-04-01

    Antipsychotics normalize responses in the DBA/2 mouse model of prepulse inhibition (PPI), a preclinical model of sensorimotor gating deficits. The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) as a molecular target is considered an attractive approach for improvement of cognitive deficits in schizophrenia (CDS). Assessment of clinical efficacy of novel agents in CDS involves treating patients already on antipsychotic medications. We evaluated the effects of the combination of α7 nAChR agonists ABT-107 (0.1-10.0 mg/kg i.p.), A-582941 (0.04-4.0 mg/kg i.p.), and PNU282987 (1.0-10.0 mg/kg i.p.) with risperidone (0.1-1.0 mg/kg i.p.) or haloperidol (0.3-3.0 mg/kg i.p.), representative atypical and typical antipsychotic agents in the DBA/2 mouse PPI model. The same α7 agonists were given alone or in combination with a dose of antipsychotic medication that induces a minimal level of catalepsy in rats, an assay with predictive validity for the induction of extrapyramidal symptoms. The α7 nAChR agonists ABT-107, A-582941, and PNU282987 had no effect in DBA/2 mouse PPI when given alone yet increased the effects of haloperidol and risperidone. The α7 nAChR agonists did not cause catalepsy in rats, nor did they enhance antipsychotic-induced catalepsy. When given in combination with either a typical or atypical antipsychotic, α7 nAChR agonists did not impair efficacy in the DBA/2 J mouse PPI model. The efficacy but not the motoric side effects of antipsychotics was enhanced, suggesting that adjunctive therapy of α7 nAChR agonists not only could be useful for the treatment of cognitive deficits associated with schizophrenia but also could enhance the efficacy against positive symptoms.

  16. FTBMT, a Novel and Selective GPR52 Agonist, Demonstrates Antipsychotic-Like and Procognitive Effects in Rodents, Revealing a Potential Therapeutic Agent for Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Keiji; Suzuki, Hirobumi; Harasawa, Toshiya; Suzuki, Noriko; Kurimoto, Emi; Kawai, Takayuki; Maruyama, Minoru; Komatsu, Hidetoshi; Sakuma, Kensuke; Shimizu, Yuji; Shimojo, Masato

    2017-11-01

    GPR52 is a Gs-coupled G protein-coupled receptor that is predominantly expressed in the striatum and nucleus accumbens (NAc) and was recently proposed as a potential therapeutic target for schizophrenia. In the current study, we investigated the in vitro and in vivo pharmacologic activities of a novel GPR52 agonist, 4-(3-(3-fluoro-5-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl)-5-methyl-1 H -1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)-2-methylbenzamide (FTBMT). FTBMT functioned as a selective GPR52 agonist in vitro and in vivo, as demonstrated by the activation of Camp signaling in striatal neurons. FTBMT inhibited MK-801-induced hyperactivity, an animal model for acute psychosis, without causing catalepsy in mice. The c-fos expression also revealed that FTBMT preferentially induced neuronal activation in the shell of the Nac compared with the striatum, thereby supporting its antipsychotic-like activity with less catalepsy. Furthermore, FTBMT improved recognition memory in a novel object-recognition test and attenuated MK-801-induced working memory deficits in a radial arm maze test in rats. These recognitive effects were supported by the results of FTBMT-induced c-fos expression in the brain regions related to cognition, including the medial prefrontal cortex, entorhinal cortex, and hippocampus. Taken together, these findings suggest that FTBMT shows antipsychotic and recognitive properties without causing catalepsy in rodents. Given its unique pharmacologic profile, which differs from that of current antipsychotics, FTBMT may provide a new therapeutic option for the treatment of positive and cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  17. Synthesis, Computational Studies and Preliminary Pharmacological Evaluation of New Arylpiperazines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushil Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of novel arylpiperazines were synthesized and the target compounds evaluated for atypical antipsychotic activity in apomorphine induced climbing behavior (D2 antagonism, 5-HTP induced head twitches (5-HT2A antagonism and catalepsy studies in albino mice. The physicochemical similarity of the target compounds with respect to standard drugs clozapine, ketanserine and risperidone was assessed by calculating from a set of physiochemical properties using software programs. The test compounds (3a-j demonstrated good similarity values with respect to the standard drugs. Among them, compound 3d has emerged as an important lead compound showing potential atypical antipsychotic like profile.

  18. Short term dietary fish oil supplementation improves motor deficiencies related to reserpine-induced parkinsonism in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcelos, Raquel Cristine Silva; Benvegnú, Dalila Moter; Boufleur, Nardeli; Pase, Camila; Teixeira, Angélica Martelli; Reckziegel, Patrícia; Emanuelli, Tatiana; da Rocha, João Batista T; Bürger, Marilise Escobar

    2011-02-01

    Fish oil (FO) supplementation could cause an increase in the concentration of plasmatic free fatty acids and, consequently, could compete with pro-inflammatory arachidonic acid (ARA) derived from brain biomembranes metabolism in the cerebrospinal fluid. Essential fatty acids (EFA) (n-3) have been reported by their antioxidant and neuroprotective properties, and therefore the influence of the FO supplementation on the reserpine-induced motor disorders was studied. Wistar rats were orally treated with FO solution for 5 days, and co-treated with reserpine (R; 1 mg/kg/mL) or its vehicle for 3 days (every other day). Reserpine-induced orofacial dyskinesia and catalepsy (P motor disorders.

  19. Preliminary screening of five ethnomedicinal plants of Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, C; Gomez-Serranillos, M P; Iglesias, I; Villar, A M; Cáceres, A

    2001-01-01

    We performed the Irwin test on some different extracts of the aerial parts of Tridax procumbens L., of the leaves of Neurolaena lobata (L.) R. Br., of the bark and leaves of Byrsonima crassifolia (L.) Kunth. and Gliricidia sepium Jacq. Walp. and of the root and leaves of Petiveria alliacea L. At a dosage of 1.25 g extract/100 g dried plant, the aqueous extracts of bark and leaves of Byrsonima crassifolia (L.) Kunth. and G. sepium Jacq. Walp. showed higher activity: decrease in motor activity, back tonus, reversible parpebral ptosis. catalepsy and strong hypothermia.

  20. Caffeine has greater potency and efficacy than theophylline to reverse the motor impairment caused by chronic but not acute interruption of striatal dopaminergic transmission in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña-Lizama, Miguel M; Bata-García, José L; Alvarez-Cervera, Fernando J; Góngora-Alfaro, José L

    2013-07-01

    In order to assess whether caffeine and theophylline have the same potency and efficacy to reverse the impairment of motor function caused by acute or chronic interruption of striatal dopamine transmission, a comparison of their dose-response relationship was made in the acute model of haloperidol-induced catalepsy, and the chronic model of unilateral lesion of the dopamine nigrostriatal pathway with 6-hydroxydopamine. At equimolar doses, both drugs reduced catalepsy intensity and increased its onset latency in a dose-dependent fashion, showing comparable potencies and attaining the maximal effect at similar doses. Catalepsy intensity: caffeine ED₅₀ = 24.1 μmol/kg [95% CI, 18.4-31.5]; theophylline ED₅₀ = 22.0 μmol/kg [95% CI, 17.0-28.4]. Catalepsy latency: caffeine ED₅₀ = 27.0 μmol/kg [95% CI, 21.1-34.6]; theophylline ED₅₀ = 28.8 μmol/kg [95% CI, 22.5-36.7]. In one group of hemiparkinsonian rats (n = 5), caffeine caused a dose-dependent recovery of the contralateral forepaw stepping: ED₅₀ = 2.4 μmol/kg/day [95% CI, 1.9-3.1]), reaching its maximum at the dose of 5.15 μmol/kg/day. When the treatment of these same rats was switched to 5.15 μmol/kg/day of theophylline, the stepping recovery was only 51 ± 12% of that induced by caffeine. Assessing the dose-response relationship of theophylline in another group of hemiparkinsonian rats (n = 7) revealed that it caused stepping recovery in an all-or-none fashion. Thus, the three lower doses had no effect, but at the dose of 5.15 μmol/kg/day theophylline suddenly increased the stepping to 56 ± 5% of the maximal effect observed when the treatment of these same rats was switched to an equimolar dose of caffeine. Increasing the dose of theophylline up to 15.45 μmol/kg/day caused no further stepping improvement since it was only 41 ± 6% of the maximal effect produced by caffeine at the dose of 5.15 μmol/kg/day. Given that theophylline showed less potency and efficacy than caffeine to reverse the

  1. [Effects of chronic fluoxetine treatment on manifestation of sexual motivation and social behavior in mice of ASC line].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonova, M A; Otroshchenko, E A; Kulikov, A V

    2010-02-01

    Sexual dysfunctions are the typical symptoms accompanying depressive disorders. However antidepressants which improve general state of the patients have no effect on sexual disorders. Mice of ASC (Antidepressant Sensitive Catalepsy) line with high hereditary predisposition to catalepsy were proposed as a model of genetically associated depressive-like condition. The work was aimed at comparison of behavioral indices of sexual motivation and social interest of ASC mice with those of mice of parental inbred AKR and CBA strains, and at the study of the effects of chronic fluoxetine treatment in doses of 10 and 20 mg/kg on these parameters in ASC mice. ASC males demonstrated reduced sexual motivation which was not corrected by fluoxetine. ASC mice did not differ in the expression of social interest and aggression towards juvenile intruder from mice of parental strains. Fluoxetine failed to alter social behavior of ASC mice in social interaction test but its higher dose decreased percentage of aggressors. ASC mouse line seems to be a perspective model to study genetic mechanisms of sexual dysfunctions associated with depressive conditions.

  2. Antiparkinsonian Efficacy of Guanosine in Rodent Models of Movement Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massari, Caio M.; López-Cano, Marc; Núñez, Fabiana; Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor; Tasca, Carla I.; Ciruela, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Guanosine (GUO) is a guanine-based purine nucleoside with important trophic functions and promising neuroprotective properties. Although the neuroprotective effects of GUO have been corroborated in cellular models of Parkinson’s disease (PD), its efficacy as an antiparkinsonian agent has not been fully explored in PD animal models. Accordingly, we evaluated the effectiveness of GUO in reversing motor impairments in several rodent movement disorder models, including catalepsy, tremor, and hemiparkinsonism. Our results showed that orally administered GUO antagonized reserpine-mediated catalepsy, reduced reserpine-induced tremulous jaw movements, and potentiated the number of contralateral rotations induced by L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine in unilaterally 6-hydroxidopamine-lesioned rats. In addition, at 5 and 7.5 mg/kg, GUO inhibited L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in rats chronically treated with a pro-dopaminergic agent. Overall, we describe the therapeutic potential of GUO, which may be effective not only for reversing parkinsonian motor impairments but also for reducing dyskinesia induced by treatment for PD. PMID:29046640

  3. Nootropic activity of tuber extract of Pueraria tuberosa (Roxb).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, N Venkata; Pujar, Basavaraj; Nimbal, S K; Shantakumar, S M; Satyanarayana, S

    2008-08-01

    Nootropic effect of alcoholic (ALE; 50, 75, 100 mg/kg) and aqueous (AQE; 100, 200, 400 mg/kg) extracts of P. tuberosa was evaluated by using Elevated Plus Maze (EPM), scopolamine-induced amnesia (SIA), diazepam-induced amnesia (DIA), clonidine-induced (NA-mediated) hypothermia (CIH), lithium-induced (5-HT mediated) head twitches (LIH) and haloperidol-induced (DA- mediated) catalepsy (HIC) models. Piracetam was used as the standard drug. A significant increase in inflexion ratio (IR) was recorded in EPM, SIA and DIA models. A significant reversal effect was observed on rectal temperature in CIH model, reduction of head twitches in LIH models. However no significant reduction in catalepsy scores in HIC models were observed with test extracts and standard piracetam. The results indicate that nootropic activity observed with ALE and AQE of tuber extracts of P. tuberosa could be through improved learning and memory either by augmenting the noradrenaline (NA) transmission or by interfering with 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) release. Further, the extracts neither facilitated nor blocked release of the dopamine (DA). Thus ALE and AQE elicited significant nootropic effect in mice and rats by interacting with cholinergic, GABAnergic, adrenergic and serotonergic systems. Phytoconstituents like flavonoids have been reported for their nootropic effect and these are present in both ALE and AQE extracts of tubers of P. tuberosa (Roxb) and these active principles may be responsible for nootropic activity.

  4. Cannabidiol prevents motor and cognitive impairments induced by reserpine in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Fiel Peres

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cannabidiol (CBD is a non-psychotomimetic compound from Cannabis sativa that presents antipsychotic, anxiolytic, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects. In Parkinson’s disease patients, CBD is able to attenuate the psychotic symptoms induced by L-DOPA and to improve quality of life. Repeated administration of reserpine in rodents induces motor impairments that are accompanied by cognitive deficits, and has been applied to model both tardive dyskinesia and Parkinson’s disease. The present study investigated whether CBD administration would attenuate reserpine-induced motor and cognitive impairments in rats. Male Wistar rats received four injections of CBD (0.5 or 5 mg/kg or vehicle (days 2-5. On days 3 and 5, animals received also one injection of 1 mg/kg reserpine or vehicle. Locomotor activity, vacuous chewing movements and catalepsy were assessed from day 1 to day 7. On days 8 and 9, we evaluated animals’ performance on the plus-maze discriminative avoidance task, for learning/memory assessment. CBD (0.5 and 5 mg/kg attenuated the increase in catalepsy behavior and in oral movements – but not the decrease in locomotion – induced by reserpine. CBD (0.5 mg/kg also ameliorated the reserpine-induced memory deficit in the discriminative avoidance task. Our data show that CBD is able to attenuate motor and cognitive impairments induced by reserpine, suggesting the use of this compound in the pharmacotherapy of Parkinson’s disease and tardive dyskinesia.

  5. Effects of sigma(1) receptor ligand MS-377 on D(2) antagonists-induced behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasawa, Jun-ichi; Takahashi, Shinji; Takagi, Kaori; Horikomi, Kazutoshi

    2002-10-01

    (R)-(+)-1-(4-Chlorophenyl)-3-[4-(2-methoxyethyl)piperazin-1-yl]methyl-2-pyrrolidinone L-tartrate (MS-377) is a novel antipsychotic agent with selective and high affinity for sigma(1) receptor. The present study was carried out to clarify the interaction of MS-377 with dopamine D(2) receptor antagonists (D(2) antagonists) in concurrent administration, and then the involvement of sigma receptors in the interaction. The effects of MS-377 on haloperidol- or sultopride-induced inhibition of apomorphine-induced climbing behavior and catalepsy were investigated in mice and rats, respectively. In addition, the effects of (+)-SKF-10,047 and SA4503, both of which are sigma receptor agonists, and WAY-100,635, which is a 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist, on the interaction due to the concurrent use were also investigated. MS-377 potentiated the inhibitory effects of haloperidol or sultopride on apomorphine-induced climbing behavior in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, MS-377 did not affect the catalepsy induction by these drugs. The potentiation of the inhibitory effects of haloperidol or sultopride on apomorphine-induced climbing behavior by MS-377 was not inhibited by WAY-100,635, but was inhibited by (+)-SKF-10,047 and SA4503. These findings showed that MS-377 potentiates the efficacy of D(2) antagonists, but it does not deteriorate the adverse effect. Moreover, sigma(1) receptors are involved in this potentiation of the efficacy of D(2) antagonists by MS-377.

  6. Synthesis and Evaluation of Phenylxanthine Derivatives as Potential Dual A2AR Antagonists/MAO-B Inhibitors for Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuebao; Han, Chao; Xu, Yong; Wu, Kaiqi; Chen, Shuangya; Hu, Mangsha; Wang, Luyao; Ye, Yun; Ye, Faqing

    2017-06-17

    The aim of this research was to prove the speculation that phenylxanthine (PX) derivatives possess adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR)-blocking properties and to screening and evaluate these PX derivatives as dual A2AR antagonists/MAO-B inhibitors for Parkinson's disease. To explore this hypothesis, two series of PX derivatives were prepared and their antagonism against A2AR and inhibition against MAO-B were determined in vitro. In order to evaluate further the antiparkinsonian properties, pharmacokinetic and haloperidol-induced catalepsy experiments were carried out in vivo. The PX-D and PX-E analogues acted as potent A2AR antagonists with Ki values ranging from 0.27 to 10 μM, and these analogues displayed relatively mild MAO-B inhibition potencies, with inhibitor dissociation constants (Ki values) ranging from 0.25 to 10 μM. Further, the compounds PX-D-P6 and PX-E-P8 displayed efficacious antiparkinsonian properties in haloperidol-induced catalepsy experiments, verifying that these two compounds were potent A2AR antagonists and MAO-B inhibitors. We conclude that PX-D and PX-E analogues are a promising candidate class of dual-acting compounds for treating Parkinson's disease.

  7. Exposure to an enriched environment facilitates motor recovery and prevents short-term memory impairment and reduction of striatal BDNF in a progressive pharmacological model of parkinsonism in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campêlo, Clarissa L C; Santos, José R; Silva, Anatildes F; Dierschnabel, Aline L; Pontes, André; Cavalcante, Jeferson S; Ribeiro, Alessandra M; Silva, Regina H

    2017-06-15

    Previous studies showed that the repeated administration with a low dose of reserpine (RES) induces a gradual appearance of motor signs and cognitive deficits compatible with parkinsonism in rodents. Environmental stimulation has neuroprotective effects in animal models of neurodegenerative damage, including acutely induced parkinsonism. We investigated the effects of exposure to an enriched environment (EE) on motor, cognitive and neuronal (levels of tyrosine hydroxylase, TH and brain derived neurotrophic factor, BDNF) deficits induced by a progressive model of Parkinson's disease (PD) in mice. Male mice were repeatedly treated with vehicle or 0.1mg/kg of RES (s.c) and kept under two housing conditions: standard environment (SE) and EE. In animals kept in SE, the treatment with RES induced deficits in motor function (catalepsy test, open field and oral movements), in novel object recognition (NOR) and plus-maze discriminative avoidance tasks. The environmental stimulation facilitated the recovery of motor deficits assessed by the catalepsy test after the end of treatment. Additionally, exposure to EE prevented the memory deficit in the NOR task. Treatment with RES induced a reduction in the number of TH positive cells in SNpc and VTA, which recovered 30days after the end of treatment. Finally, RES reduced the levels of BDNF in the striatum and the exposure to the EE prevented this effect. These results suggest that plastic brain changes induced by EE promote beneficial effects on the progression of neuronal impairment related to PD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. [Case with difficulty in differentiating between transient neuroleptic malignant syndrome and catatonia after neuroleptic analgesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagawa, Youichi; Miyazaki, Masaki

    2010-02-01

    An 18-year-old woman was treated with neuroleptic analgesia using fentanyl, morphine, droperidol and haloperidol for general anesthesia and pain control for her knee operation. Postoperatively, she showed emotional unstableness, following dyspnea, tachycardia, fever, hyperhydrosis, muscle rigidity and myoclonus like involuntary movement. She received infusion of 140 mg dantrolene in total under suspicion of having neuroleptic malignant syndrome, but her symptoms improved slightly. After being transferred to our hospital, she exhibited immobility, mutism, rigidity, and catalepsy, and she was suspected of having lethal catatonia. Infusion of diazepam 10 mg resulted in dramatical improvement of her symptoms. Differential diagnosis between neuroleptic malignant syndrome and catatonia is difficult; however, a first line therapy is differential diagnosis. Thus, physician should consider catatonia when treating neuroleptic malignant like syndrome.

  9. Pharmacological evaluation of bee venom and melittin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila G. Dantas

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to identify the pharmacological effects of bee venom and its major component, melittin, on the nervous system of mice. For the pharmacological analysis, mice were treated once with saline, 0.1 or 1.2 mg/kg of bee venom and 0.1 mg/kg of melittin, subcutaneously, 30 min before being submitted to behavioral tests: locomotor activity and grooming (open-field, catalepsy, anxiety (elevated plus-maze, depression (forced swimming test and apomorphine-induced stereotypy. Haloperidol, imipramine and diazepam were administered alone (positive control or as a pre-treatment (haloperidol.The bee venom reduced motor activity and promoted cataleptic effect, in a similar manner to haloperidol.These effects were decreased by the pretreatment with haloperidol. Both melittin and bee venom decreased the apomorphine-induced stereotypies. The data indicated the antipsychotic activity of bee venom and melittin in a murine model.

  10. Solcoseryl improves learning and memory in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winnicka, M M; Braszko, J J; Wisniewski, K

    1996-01-01

    Our previous experiments have shown that Solcoseryl (S), a protein-free extract of calves' blood stimulates locomotor activity and decreases haloperidol catalepsy in rats. In this study the influence of S on acquisition, consolidation, and recall of both, conditioned avoidance responses (CARs) and passive avoidance behaviour was tested. S at the intraperitoneal (i.p.) dose of 1.25 ml/kg significantly improved acquisition and at the dose of 1.0 ml/kg recall of CARs. In the passive avoidance situation the significant effect on acquisition and recall of information was observed after i.p. injection of 1.0 ml/kg of S, and on consolidation after 0.75 ml/kg. These data indicate that S may positively affect the CNS processes responsible for learning and memory.

  11. [Synthesis and pharmacologic study of diethyl N-palmitoyl glutamate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vamvakides, A; Kolocouris, N

    1989-01-01

    The diethyl N-palmitoyl glutamate (DEEPGt) was synthesized by the mixed anhydrides method and pharmacologically studied; hypothermy, sedation, myorelaxation and antagonism of the pentetrazole (PTZ) convulsions were obtained in mice. The haloperidol catalepsy's potentiation coming with oral dyskinesias were observed on rats. It seems, in the light of this pharmacological exploration, that DEEPGt penetrates easily in the brain and develops an anti-glutamatergic activity. It is probably the slow liberation of N-palmitoyl glutamic acid (PGt) from the DEEPGt which amplifies its anti-PTZ activity and could be interesting against the memory impairing action of all the glutamatergic antagonists which are actually considered as the possible next generation of antiepileptic and neuroprotecting drugs.

  12. Neuropharmacological profile of ethnomedicinal plants of Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Cifuentes, C; Gómez-Serranillos, M P; Iglesias, I; Villar del Fresno, A M; Morales, C; Paredes, M E; Cáceres, A

    2001-08-01

    We carried out the Irwin's test with some different extracts of the aerial parts of Thidax procumbens L., the leaves of Neurolaena lobata (L.) R. Br., bark and leaves of Byrsonima crassifolia (L.) Kunth. and Gliricidia sepium Jacq. Walp., and root and leaves of Petiveria alliacea L. At dosage of 1.25 g dried plant/kg weight aqueous extracts of bark and leaves of Byrsonima crassifolia (L.) Kunth. and Gliricidia sepium Jacq. Walp. demonstrated the most activity: decrease in motor activity, back tonus, reversible parpebral ptosis, catalepsy and strong hypothermia. These extracts of both plants were assayed for effects on CNS and they caused very significant reductions in spontaneous locomotor activity, exploratory behavior and rectal temperature and they increased the sodium pentobarbital-induced sleeping time.

  13. Functionality of colinergic systems in rats pre-treatment with triiodothyronine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, O.M.S. de.

    1990-01-01

    In order to investigate the influence of experimental hiperthyroidism in the colinergic activity, rats were injected daily, during 1, 5, 19 or 20 days, with triiodothyronine (0 to 100 ug/kg, s.c.). The hiperthyroidism was evaluated by the decrease of the body weight and the increase of the body temperature and serum hormonal levels (T3). After the administration of the cholinergic agonists (pilocarpine and oxotremorine) or a anticholinesterase drug (eserine), the cholinergic behavioural and pharmacologic activity was evaluated recording the rectal temperature, locomotor activity, catalepsy, tremor and cromodacryorrhea. The results suggests that T3 pre-treatment may induce in rats changes in the functionality of the central cholinergic post-sinaptic receptors. However, the administration of this hormone does not seem to induce any alterations in the periferic cholinergic receptors, implicated in cromodacryorrhea effect. (author)

  14. Antipsychotic, antidepressant, and cognitive-impairment properties of antipsychotics: rat profile and implications for behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kołaczkowski, Marcin; Mierzejewski, Paweł; Bienkowski, Przemyslaw; Wesołowska, Anna; Newman-Tancredi, Adrian

    2014-06-01

    Many dementia patients exhibit behavioral and psychological symptoms (BPSD), including psychosis and depression. Although antipsychotics are frequently prescribed off-label, they can have marked side effects. In addition, comparative preclinical studies of their effects are surprisingly scarce, and strategies for discovery of novel pharmacotherapeutics are lacking. We therefore compared eight antipsychotics in rat behavioral tests of psychosis, antidepressant-like activity, and cognitive impairment as a basis for preclinical evaluation of new drug candidates. The methods used in this study include inhibition of MK-801-induced hyperactivity, forced swim test (FST), passive avoidance (PA), spontaneous locomotor activity, and catalepsy. The drugs exhibited antipsychotic-like activity in the MK-801 test but with diverse profiles in the other models. Risperidone impaired PA performance, but with some dose separation versus its actions in the MK-801 test. In contrast, clozapine, olanzapine, lurasidone, and asenapine showed little or no dose separation in these tests. Aripiprazole did not impair PA performance but was poorly active in the MK-801 test. Diverse effects were also observed in the FST: chlorpromazine was inactive and most other drugs reduced immobility over narrow dose ranges, whereas clozapine reduced immobility over a wider dose range, overlapping with antipsychotic activity. Although the propensity of second-generation antipsychotics to produce catalepsy was lower, they all elicited pronounced sedation. Consistent with clinical data, most currently available second-generation antipsychotics induced cognitive and motor side effects with little separation from therapeutic-like doses. This study provides a uniform in vivo comparative basis on which to evaluate future early-stage drug candidates intended for potential pharmacotherapy of BPSD.

  15. Effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor on behavior and key members of the brain serotonin system in genetically predisposed to behavioral disorders mouse strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumenko, V S; Kondaurova, E M; Bazovkina, D V; Tsybko, A S; Tikhonova, M A; Kulikov, A V; Popova, N K

    2012-07-12

    The effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on depressive-like behavior and serotonin (5-HT) system in the brain of antidepressant sensitive cataleptics (ASC)/Icg mouse strain, characterized by depressive-like behavior, in comparison with the parental nondepressive CBA/Lac mouse strain was examined. Significant decrease of catalepsy and tail suspension test (TST) immobility was shown 17days after acute central BDNF administration (300ng i.c.v.) in ASC mice. In CBA mouse strain, BDNF moderately decreased catalepsy without any effect on TST immobility time. Significant difference between ASC and CBA mice in the effect of BDNF on 5-HT system was revealed. It was shown that central administration of BDNF led to increase of 5-HT(1A) receptor gene expression but not 5-HT(1A) functional activity in ASC mice. Increased tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (Tph-2) and 5-HT(2A) receptor genes expression accompanied by 5-HT(2A) receptor sensitization was shown in BDNF-treated ASC but not in CBA mouse strain, suggesting BDNF-induced increase of the brain 5-HT system functional activity and activation of neurogenesis in "depressive" ASC mice. There were no changes found in the 5-HT transporter mRNA level in BDNF-treated ASC and CBA mice. In conclusion, central administration of BDNF produced prolonged ameliorative effect on depressive-like behavior accompanied by increase of the Tph-2, 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A) genes expression and 5-HT(2A) receptor functional activity in animal model of hereditary behavior disorders. Copyright © 2012 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Dopaminergic profile of new heterocyclic N-phenylpiperazine derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neves G.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine constitutes about 80% of the content of central catecholamines and has a crucial role in the etiology of several neuropsychiatric disorders, including Parkinson's disease, depression and schizophrenia. Several dopaminergic drugs are used to treat these pathologies, but many problems are attributed to these therapies. Within this context, the search for new more efficient dopaminergic agents with less adverse effects represents a vast research field. The aim of the present study was to report the structural design of two N-phenylpiperazine derivatives, compound 4: 1-[1-(4-chlorophenyl-1H-4-pyrazolylmethyl]-4-phenylhexahydropyrazine and compound 5: 1-[1-(4-chlorophenyl-1H-1,2,3-triazol-4-ylmethyl]-4-phenylhexahydropyrazine, planned to be dopamine ligands, and their dopaminergic action profile. The two compounds were assayed (dose range of 15-40 mg/kg in three experimental models: 1 blockade of amphetamine (30 mg/kg, ip-induced stereotypy in rats; 2 the catalepsy test in mice, and 3 apomorphine (1 mg/kg, ip-induced hypothermia in mice. Both derivatives induced cataleptic behavior (40 mg/kg, ip and a hypothermic response (30 mg/kg, ip which was not prevented by haloperidol (0.5 mg/kg, ip. Compound 5 (30 mg/kg, ip also presented a synergistic hypothermic effect with apomorphine (1 mg/kg, ip. Only compound 4 (30 mg/kg, ip significantly blocked the amphetamine-induced stereotypy in rats. The N-phenylpiperazine derivatives 4 and 5 seem to have a peculiar profile of action on dopaminergic functions. On the basis of the results of catalepsy and amphetamine-induced stereotypy, the compounds demonstrated an inhibitory effect on dopaminergic behaviors. However, their hypothermic effect is compatible with the stimulation of dopaminergic function which seems not to be mediated by D2/D3 receptors.

  17. Augmentation by escitalopram, but not citalopram or R-citalopram, of the effects of low-dose risperidone: behavioral, biochemical, and electrophysiological evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Monica M; Jardemark, Kent; Malmerfelt, Anna; Gertow, Jens; Konradsson-Geuken, Asa; Svensson, Torgny H

    2012-04-01

    Antidepressant drugs are frequently used to treat affective symptoms in schizophrenia. We have recently shown that escitalopram, but not citalopram or R-citalopram, increases firing rate and burst firing of midbrain dopamine neurons, potentiates cortical N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated transmission and enhances cognition, effects that might influence the outcome of concomitant antipsychotic medication. Here, we studied, in rats, the behavioral and neurobiological effects of adding escitalopram, citalopram, or R-citalopram to the second-generation antipsychotic drug risperidone. We examined antipsychotic efficacy using the conditioned avoidance response (CAR) test, extrapyramidal side effect (EPS) liability using a catalepsy test, dopamine outflow in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and nucleus accumbens using in vivo microdialysis in freely moving animals, and NMDA receptor-mediated transmission in the mPFC using intracellular electrophysiological recording in vitro. Only escitalopram (5 mg/kg), but not citalopram (10 mg/kg), or R-citalopram (10 mg/kg), dramatically enhanced the antipsychotic-like effect of a low dose of risperidone (0.25 mg/kg), without increasing catalepsy. Given alone, escitalopram, but not citalopram or R-citalopram, markedly enhanced both cortical dopamine output and NMDA receptor-mediated transmission. Addition of escitalopram and to some extent R-citalopram, but not citalopram, significantly enhanced both cortical dopamine output and cortical NMDA receptor-mediated transmission induced by a suboptimal dose/concentration of risperidone. These results suggest that adjunct treatment with escitalopram, but not citalopram, may enhance the effect of a subtherapeutic dose of risperidone on positive, negative, cognitive, and depressive symptoms in schizophrenia, yet without increased EPS liability. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. In vivo effects of synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073 and phytocannabinoid Δ9-THC in mice: inhalation versus intraperitoneal injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshell, R; Kearney-Ramos, T; Brents, L K; Hyatt, W S; Tai, S; Prather, P L; Fantegrossi, W E

    2014-09-01

    Human users of synthetic cannabinoids (SCBs) JWH-018 and JWH-073 typically smoke these drugs, but preclinical studies usually rely on injection for drug delivery. We used the cannabinoid tetrad and drug discrimination to compare in vivo effects of inhaled drugs with injected doses of these two SCBs, as well as with the phytocannabinoid Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC). Mice inhaled various doses of Δ(9)-THC, JWH-018 or JWH-073, or were injected intraperitoneally (IP) with these same compounds. Rectal temperature, tail flick latency in response to radiant heat, horizontal bar catalepsy, and suppression of locomotor activity were assessed in each animal. In separate studies, mice were trained to discriminate Δ(9)-THC (IP) from saline, and tests were performed with inhaled or injected doses of the SCBs. Both SCBs elicited Δ(9)-THC-like effects across both routes of administration, and effects following inhalation were attenuated by pretreatment with the CB1 antagonist/inverse agonist rimonabant. No cataleptic effects were observed following inhalation, but all compounds induced catalepsy following injection. Injected JWH-018 and JWH-073 fully substituted for Δ(9)-THC, but substitution was partial (JWH-073) or required relatively higher doses (JWH-018) when drugs were inhaled. These studies demonstrate that the SCBs JWH-018 and JWH-073 elicit dose-dependent, CB1 receptor-mediated Δ(9)-THC-like effects in mice when delivered via inhalation or via injection. Across these routes of administration, differences in cataleptic effects and, perhaps, discriminative stimulus effects, may implicate the involvement of active metabolites of these compounds. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Repeated Exposure to the “Spice” Cannabinoid JWH-018 Induces Tolerance and Enhances Responsiveness to 5-HT1A Receptor Stimulation in Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua S. Elmore

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Naphthalen-1-yl-(1-pentylindol-3-ylmethanone (JWH-018 is a synthetic compound found in psychoactive “spice” products that activates cannabinoid receptors. Preclinical evidence suggests that exposure to synthetic cannabinoids increases 5-HT2A/2C receptor function in the brain, an effect which might contribute to psychotic symptoms. Here, we hypothesized that repeated exposures to JWH-018 would enhance behavioral responsiveness to the 5-HT2A/2C receptor agonist DOI. Male Sprague-Dawley rats fitted with subcutaneously (sc temperature transponders received daily injections of JWH-018 (1.0 mg/kg, sc or its vehicle for seven consecutive days. Body temperature and catalepsy scores were determined at 1, 2, and 4 h post-injection each day. At 1 and 7 days after the final repeated treatment, rats received a challenge injection of either DOI (0.1 mg/kg, sc or the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT (0.3 mg/kg, sc, then temperature and behavioral responses were assessed. Behaviors induced by DOI included wet dog shakes and back muscle contractions (i.e., skin jerks, while behaviors induced by 8-OH-DPAT included ambulation, forepaw treading, and flat body posture. On the first day of repeated treatment, JWH-018 produced robust hypothermia and catalepsy which lasted up to 4 h, and these effects were significantly blunted by day 7 of treatment. Repeated exposure to JWH-018 did not affect behaviors induced by DOI, but behavioral and hypothermic responses induced by 8-OH-DPAT were significantly augmented 1 day after cessation of JWH-018 treatment. Collectively, our findings show that repeated treatment with JWH-018 produces tolerance to its hypothermic and cataleptic effects, which is accompanied by transient enhancement of 5-HT1A receptor sensitivity in vivo.

  20. Dietary Tyrosine Protects Striatal Dopamine Receptors from the Adverse Effects of REM Sleep Deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdi, A; Brock, J W; Payne, S; Ross, K D; Bond, S P; Prasad, C

    1998-01-01

    L-Tyrosine is a non-essential amino acid that is produced as an intermediary metabolite in the conversion of phenylalanine to 3,4-dihyroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), and is a precursor of the neurotransmitter dopamine. In previous studies, tyrosine pretreatment was shown to protect against the neurochemical and behavioral deficits of acute stress caused by tail shock or cold exposure in rodents. The present study addressed the hypothesis that tyrosine administration may be an effective counter-measure to dopamine-mediated behaviors induced by rapid eye-movement sleep deprivation (RSD). In order to test the hypothesis, Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 9 treatment groups: RSD-treated rats on normal-protein diet (20% casein: 1% tyrosine, 1% valine); tank control (TC) rats on a normal diet; cage control (CC) rats on normal diet; RSD-treated rats on 4% tyrosine diet; TC rats on 4% tyrosine diet; CC rats on 4% tyrosine diet; RSD-treated rats on 4% valine diet; TC rats on 4% valine diet; CC rats on 4% valine diet. In the RSD group receiving tyrosine, there was no apparent change in Bmax for binding of the dopamine D2 receptor ligand [(3)H]YM-09151-2 in the striata as compared to the respective TC and CC groups; whereas RSD-treated rats maintained on the normal diet and valine supplementation demonstrated expected increases in Bmax for ligand binding. The TC group on the tyrosine diet showed attenuated catalepsy compared to the corresponding CC group, while the RSD group consuming tyrosine showed a catalepsy that was significantly increased, and similar to that of cage control animais on a control diet. These data suggest that the tyrosine-supplemented diet significantly attenuated RSD-induced changes in striatal dopamine D2 receptors, and the effect appeared sufficient to influence RSD-induced behaviors.

  1. Repeated administration of an aqueous spray-dried extract of the leaves of Passiflora alata Curtis (Passifloraceae) inhibits body weight gain without altering mice behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Andressa; Stein, Ana Cristina; Dischkaln Stolz, Eveline; Dallegrave, Eliane; Buffon, Andréia; do Rego, Jean-Claude; Gosmann, Grace; Fialho Viana, Alice; Kuze Rates, Stela Maris

    2013-01-09

    Passiflora alata is a Southern American species that constitutes many traditional remedies as well as phytomedicines used for sedative and anxiolytic purposes in Brazil. However studies on repeated treatment effects are scarce. To evaluate behavioral, physiological and biochemical effects of the repeated treatment with an aqueous spray-dried extract of Passiflora alata leaves containing 2.5% (w/v) of flavonoids (PA) in mice. Male adult CF1 mice were treated (p.o.) for 14 days with PA (2.5; 25 or 250 mg/kg). The feeding behavior was evaluated at the beginning (1h after the first administration) and at the end of the treatment (15th day). The body weight gain and food consumption were monitored along the days. On day 15 mice were evaluated on plus maze, spontaneous locomotor activity, catalepsy and barbiturate sleeping time tests. Serum glucose, lipids, ALT and AST enzymes were determined. Liver, kidney, perirenal fat, epididymal and peritoneal fat were analyzed. The repeated treatment with the highest dose tested (250 mg/kg) did not alter the mice behavior on open field, elevated plus maze, catalepsy and barbiturate sleeping time tests. Repeated administration of PA 250 decreased mice feeding behavior and weight gain. PA 25 and PA 250 reduced mice relative liver weight and caused mild hepatic hydropic degeneration as well as a decrease in alanine aminotransferase (ALT) serum level. These results indicate that Passiflora alata does not present central cumulative effects and point to the needs of further studies searching for its hepatotoxicity as well as potential anorexigenic. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Developmental aspects of anandamide: ontogeny of response and prenatal exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fride, E; Mechoulam, R

    1996-02-01

    Recent breakthroughs in cannabinoid research, including the identification of two cannabinoid receptors (CB receptors) and a family of endogenous ligands, the anandamides, may shed new light on the sequelae of pre- and perinatal exposure to cannabinoid receptor ligands and enable the experimental manipulation of the endogenous ligand in the developing organism. In the present study we examined the behavioural response to anandamide (ANA) in developing mice from day 13 into adulthood. We observed that depression of ambulation in an open field and the analgetic response to ANA are not fully developed until adulthood. In a separate set of experiments, we administered five daily injections of ANA (SC, 20 mg/kg) during the last trimester of pregnancy. No effects on birth weight, litter size, sex ratio and eye opening were detected after maternal ANA treatment. Further, no effects on open field performance of the offspring were observed until 4 weeks of age. However, from 40 days of age, a number of differences between the prenatal ANA and control offspring were detected. Thus, the offspring from ANA-treated dams showed impaired responsiveness to a challenge with ANA or delta 0-THC expressed as a lack of immobility in the ring test for catalepsy, hypothermia and analgesia. On the other hand, without challenge, they exhibited a spontaneous decrease in open field activity, catalepsy, hypothermia and a hypoalgetic tendency. These data suggest that exposure to excessive amounts of ANA during gestation alters the functioning of the ANA-CB receptor system. Further experiments investigating responsivity of the immune system suggest an increased inflammatory response to arachidonic acid, and enhanced hypothermic response to lipopolysaccharide in prenatally treated offspring. The results are discussed in relation to other manipulations of the maternal milieu, especially prenatal stress. It is concluded that alterations induced by prenatal exposure to ANA, cannabinoids and other

  3. Continuous dopaminergic stimulation by pramipexole is effective to treat early morning akinesia in animal models of Parkinson's disease: A pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic study using in vivo microdialysis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferger, Boris; Buck, Kerstin; Shimasaki, Makoto; Koros, Eliza; Voehringer, Patrizia; Buerger, Erich

    2010-07-01

    Short-acting dopamine (DA) agonists are usually administered several times a day resulting in fluctuating plasma and brain levels. DA agonists providing continuous dopaminergic stimulation may achieve higher therapeutic benefit for example by alleviating nocturnal disturbances as well as early morning akinesia. In the present study continuous release (CR) of pramipexole (PPX) was maintained by subcutaneous implantation of Alzet minipumps, whereas subcutaneous PPX injections were used to mimic PPX immediate release (IR) in male Wistar rats. In the catalepsy bar test, PPX-CR (1 mg/kg/day) reversed the haloperidol-induced motor impairment in the morning and over the whole observation period of 12h. In contrast, PPX-IR (tid 1 mg/kg, pre-treatment the day before) was not effective in the morning but catalepsy was reduced for 6 h after PPX-IR (1 mg/kg) injection. In the reserpine model, early morning akinesia indicated by the first motor activity measurement in the morning was significantly reversed by PPX-CR (2 mg/kg/day). Again, PPX-IR (tid 0.3 mg/kg, pre-treatment the day before) was not able to antagonise early morning akinesia. These results are in agreement with in vivo microdialysis measurements showing a continuous decrease of extracellular DA levels and a continuous PPX exposure in the PPX-CR (1 mg/kg/day) group. In contrast, PPX-IR (0.3 mg/kg) produced a transient decrease of extracellular DA levels over 6 h and showed maximum PPX levels 2 h after dosing which decreased over the following 6-8 h. The present study demonstrates that PPX-CR may offer a higher therapeutic benefit than PPX-IR on early morning akinesia and confirms earlier reports that PPX-IR reverses motor impairment for several hours.

  4. The comparative analysis of antiparkinsonian activity of glycine combined with amantadine in conditions of changing neurosynaptic transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamchur V.I.

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease is traditionally viewed as a disease which affects the human motor sphere. Besides motor manifestations in the clinical picture of the disease, non-motor manifestations with dementia as the most common are present. The purpose of the work – experimental evaluation of the possible antiparkinsonian action of glycine in terms of experimental models of Parkinson's disease equivalents (akinetic-rigid and tremor forms on the background of antiparkinsonian correction by amantadine. Methods: catalepsy model (inhibition of dopaminergic transmission, equivalents of hypokinesia and rigidity states and model of arekolyn tremor (activation of cholinergic transmission that corresponds to parkinsonian tremor on the background of amantadine administration (50 mg/kg, glycine (100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg and their combined introduction. The research results show a positive dynamic in combined using of amantadine with glycine at a dose of 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg, which was is determined by the low percentage of animals with symptoms of catalepsy (50-70% with evaluation criteria of 0.5-1.8 points with maximum possible 6 points. Similar results were obtained in terms of activation of the cholinergic system (arekolyn tremor. Glycine at a dose of 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg facilitated to optimization of antitremor action of amantadine, that is registered in increased latent period of tremor, reduction of its duration and intensity attenuation almost by 2,1 times in comparison with indicators of the control group. Thus, studied combinations of amantadine with glycine at a dose of 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg are promising in studying of their influence on dementia in Parkinson's syndrome, and this study will be continued.

  5. Extract of Synedrella nodiflora (L) Gaertn exhibits antipsychotic properties in murine models of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoateng, Patrick; Adjei, Samuel; Osei-Safo, Dorcas; Kukuia, Kennedy K E; Bekoe, Emelia Oppong; Karikari, Thomas K; Kombian, Samuel B

    2017-08-07

    The hydro-ethanolic whole plant extract of Synedrella nodiflora (SNE) has demonstrated anticonvulsant, sedative and analgesic effects. Preliminary studies conducted in animals, SNE significantly decreased stereotypic behaviours suggesting antipsychotic potential. Coupled with the central nervous system depressant effects of SNE, we hypothesized that it may have utility in the management of psychosis. The present study therefore investigated the antipsychotic potential of the SNE in several murine models of psychosis. The primary central nervous system activities of SNE (30-3000 mg/kg, p.o) were investigated using the Irwin's test. The novelty-induced rearing, locomotion and stereotypy counts provoked by SNE (100-1000 mg/kg, p.o) were conducted using the open-field paradigm. The antipsychotic test models used in the screening of SNE (100-1000 mg/kg, p.o) included apomorphine-induced stereotypy, rearing, locomotion and cage climbing activities. The combined effects of a low dose of SNE (100 mg/kg) with various doses of haloperidol and chlorpromazine were analysed using the apomorphine-induced cage climbing and stereotypy, respectively. The ability of SNE to cause catalepsy in naïve mice as well as its effect on haloperidol-induced catalepsy was assessed. SNE showed acetylcholine-like and serotonin-like activities in the Irwin test, with sedation occurring at high doses. SNE significantly reduced the frequencies of novelty- and apomorphine-induced rearing and locomotion; stereotypy behaviour and the frequency and duration of apomorphine-induced cage climbing in mice. In all the tests performed, SNE was less potent than the reference drugs used (chlorpromazine and haloperidol). In addition, SNE potentiated the effects of haloperidol and chlorpromazine on apomorphine-induced cage climbing and stereotypy activities in mice. SNE, while exhibiting antipsychotic properties itself, can also potentiate the antipsychotic effects of chlorpromazine and haloperidol.

  6. Synthesis and evaluation of fluorinated derivatives of fentanyl as candidates for opiate receptor studies using positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahren Hwang; Feliu, A.L.; Wolf, A.P.; MacGregor, R.R.; Fowler, J.S.; Arnett, C.D.

    1986-03-01

    Three fluorinated derivatives of fentanyl, fluorofentanyl (3), keto-fluorofentanyl (5), and fluorofentanol (6), were synthesized and their abilities to compete with /sup 3/diprenorphine for binding sites in guinea pig brain membranes were determined. The relative potencies were fentanyl > 3 approx.= 6 >> 5. On the basis of its apparent affinity for opiate receptors and its relative ease of synthesis, 6 was selected for further study. Fentanyl was slightly better than 6 in its ability to compete with (/sup 3/H)naltrexone for binding sites in rat brain membranes. Both fentayl and 6 exhibited a similar high ''sodium ratio'' (quotient of the IC/sub 50/'s against (/sup 3/H)naltrexone in the presence and absence of sodium chloride) generally characteristic of opiate agonists. The analgesic potencies of fentanyl and 6 were determined in rats by measuring suppression of locomotion and vocalization responses to footshock. 6 appeared slightly less potent than fentanyl, but produced a similar analgesia and catalepsy which was entirely blocked by pretreatment of rats with naloxone, an opiate antagonist. A rapid synthesis of (/sup 18/F)-6 was developed and the tissue distribution of (/sup 18/F)-6 in mice was determined 5, 60, and 120 minutes after intravenous injection. The use of this general route to /sup 18/F-labeled derivatives of fentanyl for studies of the opiate receptor using positron emission tomography is planned.

  7. Beneficial anti-Parkinson effects of camel milk in Chlorpromazineinduced animal model: Behavioural and histopathological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatoon, Humera; Najam, Rahela; Mirza, Talat; Sikandar, Bushra

    2016-09-01

    Potential roles of natural products have been identified for preventing or treating various diseases. Our aim was to investigate the effectiveness of camel milk in an animal model of Parkinson's disease and compare it with standard treatment (levodopa + carbidopa combination). 40 Wistar albino rats weighing 200-250 gram were divided into four groups of 10 animals each. Group I was kept on water and served as normal control, group II served as negative control, treated with chlorpromazine (5mg/kg i.p.), group III was given camel milk (33ml/kg p.o) and group IV the standard combination of levodopa + carbidopa (100+10mg/kg) respectively, 30 minutes after chlorpromazine treatment. All animals were subjected to the drugs treatment for 30 days. Catalepsy was assessed by Bar test on day 21 and day 30 at 30, 60, 90 and 120 minutes interval. On 30th day animals were sacrificed and whole brains were examined for histopathological changes. The results revealed highly significant (pcamel milk on day 21 and 30 in comparison to chlorpromazine. When compared with standard therapy, the results showed that anti-Parkinson's activity of camel milk was significant (pcamel milk reveals intact architecture with mild degenerative changes than chlorpromazine and levodopa + carbidopa treated animals. In conclusion, camel milk possesses anti-Parkinson's activity. However, its long term efficacy and safety needs to be evaluated clinically.

  8. (/sup 3/H)-beta-endorphin binding in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houghten, R.A.; Johnson, N.; Pasternak, G.W.

    1984-10-01

    The binding of (/sup 3/H)-beta-endorphin to rat brain homogenates is complex. Although Scatchard analysis of saturation studies yields a straight line, detailed competition studies are multiphasic, suggesting that even at low concentrations of the compound, the /sup 3/H-ligand is binding to more than one class of site. A portion of (/sup 3/H)-beta-endorphin binding is sensitive to low concentrations of morphine or D-Ala2-Leu5-enkephalin (less than 5 nM). The inhibition observed with each compound alone (5 nM) is the same as that seen with both together (each at 5 nM). Thus, the binding remaining in the presence of both morphine and the enkephalin does not correspond to either mu or delta sites. The portion of (/sup 3/H)-beta-endorphin binding that is inhibited under these conditions appears to be equally sensitive to both morphine and the enkephalin and may correspond to mu1 sites. Treating membrane homogenates with naloxonazine, a mu1 selective antagonist, lowers (/sup 3/H)-beta-endorphin binding to the same degree as morphine and D-Ala2-Leu5-enkephalin alone or together. This possible binding of (/sup 3/H)-beta-endorphin to mu1 sites is consistent with the role of mu1 sites in beta-endorphin analgesia and catalepsy in vivo.

  9. Behavioral methods in cannabinoid research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fride, Ester; Perchuk, Alex; Hall, F Scott; Uhl, George R; Onaivi, Emmanuel S

    2006-01-01

    In the absence of any specific behavioral assay for cannabinoids or endocannabinoids, a cannabinoid-induced profile in a series of four in vivo assays in mice is most commonly used to assess a specific cannabinoid activity at the behavioral level. Thus, when a given compound produces motor depression in an open field, catalepsy on an elevated ring, analgesia on a hot plate, as well as hypothermia, cannabinoid CB1 receptor activation is assumed, although exceptions are possible. The full cannabinoid profile, however, includes for example ataxia in dogs and discrimination learning in rats. In view of (1) the addictive/reward potential of cannabis and the cannabinoids and (2) the multiple roles of the endocannabinoid physiological control system (EPCS) in behavioral functions, including memory, emotionality, and feeding, a number of behavioral techniques have been used to assess the effects of cannabinoids in these functions. In this chapter we will describe the tetrad of cannabinoid-induced effects as well as a series of behavioral assays used in the behavioral pharmacology of marijuana-cannabinoid research. Since the EPCS plays an important role in the developing organism, methods used in the assessment of physical and behavioral development will also be discussed. The techniques include the tetrad, drug discrimination, self-stimulation and self-administration, conditioned place preference/aversion, the plus-maze, chronic mild stress (CMS), ultrasonic vocalizations, cognitive behaviors, and developmental assessment in mouse (and rat) pups.

  10. Motor vehicle collisions caused by the 'super-strength' synthetic cannabinoids, MAM-2201, 5F-PB-22, 5F-AB-PINACA, 5F-AMB and 5F-ADB in Japan experienced from 2012 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Shuji

    2017-01-01

    From 2012 to 2014 in Japan, 214 cases of motor vehicle collisions were attributed to the use of illegal drugs. In 93 out of 96 investigated cases, the causative agents were a variety of synthetic cannabinoids (SCs). These SCs can be classified into three groups according to the lineage of the chemical structures: (1) naphthoyl indoles, such as MAM-2201, (2) quinolinyl ester indoles, such as 5F-PB-22, and (3) indazole carboxamides, such as 5F-AB-PINACA, 5F-AMB, and 5F-ADB. These SCs became available sequentially with increasing cannabinoid CB 1 agonist potencies and reached a nationwide outbreak in the summer of 2014. They caused acute intoxication with impaired consciousness, anterograde amnesia (impaired memory), catalepsy with muscle rigidity, tachycardia, and vomiting or drooling soon after smoking. Drivers who had abused one of these SCs might unexpectedly experience the acute intoxication that caused uncontrolled driving. These SCs were generally difficult to detect from body fluid samples. It is thought that the highly lipophilic SCs disappear from the blood via rapid degradation by liver enzymes and selective accumulation into adipose tissues. Thus, much effort should be directed to the development of fast and sensitive chemical detection of the drug usage.

  11. Therapeutic attenuation of neuroinflammation and apoptosis by black tea theaflavin in chronic MPTP/probenecid model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandhan, Annadurai; Essa, Musthafa Mohamed; Manivasagam, Thamilarasan

    2013-02-01

    Neuroinflammation and apoptosis in the dopaminergic neurons of substantia nigra play an important role in the pathogenesis of experimental and clinical Parkinson's disease (PD). This study focused on the possible anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects of theaflavin (TF), a black tea polyphenol against 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced neurotoxicity in mice. C57BL/6 male mice were treated with 10 doses of MPTP (25 mg/kg, s.c.) and probenecid (250 mg/kg, i.p.) for 3.5 days interval. TF (10 mg/kg) was administered 1 h prior to the administration of MPTP for 35 days of experimental period. MPTP/p treatment upregulates the release of interleukin-1beta, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, IL-10, glial fibrillary acidic protein and Bax, and downregulates anti-apoptotic marker Bcl-2. Oral treatment of black tea polyphenol TF significantly attenuates MPTP-induced neuroinflammation as well as apoptosis. Behavioral studies (catalepsy and akinesia) were carried out to confirm these molecular studies. The results demonstrate that TF mediated its neuroprotection against chronic MPTP-induced toxicity through the involvement of multiple molecular events. It was concluded that TF may provide a precious therapeutic strategy for the treatment of progressive neurodegenerative disease such as PD in future.

  12. Inhalation Exposure Method for Illegal Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inomata, Akiko; Ogata, Akio; Tada, Yukie; Nagasawa, Akemichi; Yuzawa, Katsuhiro; Ando, Hiroshi; Kubo, Yoshikazu; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Kaihoko, Fujifumi; Tanaka, Kazuyoshi; Nakajima, Jun'ichi; Suzuki, Atsuko; Uemura, Nozomi; Moriyasu, Takako; Watanabe, Daisuke; Ishihara, Kei; Usami, Takashi; Kamei, Satoru; Kohno, Yasuaki

    2017-01-01

    We developed a new inhalation exposure method to evaluate effects of synthetic cannabimimetics that are being distributed as new, unregulated drugs in the Tokyo area. We selected the commercial product "SOUTOU" containing AB-CHMINACA and 5F-AMB as the test drug and dried marshmallow (Althaea officinalis) leaves as the negative control. A half cigarette packed with dried marshmallow leaves or SOUTOU was ignited, then mainstream smoke from each was delivered to five mice in an exposure box. After the cigarettes were fully consumed, neurobehavioral observations and a catalepsy test were performed at 15, 30 and 60 min after exposure. The effluent air from the exposure box was poured into impingers containing acetonitrile (first impinger) and dimethyl sulfoxide (second impinger). The resulting solutions were analyzed to assess decomposition of the synthetic cannabimimetics. Mice exposed to SOUTOU smoke showed many excitement behaviors and some suppressive behaviors at 15, 30 and 60 min. These clearly included cannabimimetic specific pharmacological actions. Negative control mice also showed some suppressive behaviors at 15 min but these were attenuated at later times, nearly disappearing at 60 min. In addition, the behavioral effects observed in controls were less pronounced than those in SOUTOU exposed mice. The inhalation exposure method developed in our study would be effective for determining cannabinoid specific pharmacological effects of illegal drugs, as well as for assessing the presence of active compound(s) by comparing the test substance with a negative control.

  13. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery of ropinirole for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcia, Emilia; Boeva, Liudmila; García-García, Luis; Slowing, Karla; Fernández-Carballido, Ana; Casanova, Yaquelyn; Negro, Sofía

    2017-11-01

    A new drug delivery system is developed for ropinirole (RP) for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) consisting of biodegradable poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs). The formulation selected was prepared with 8 mg RP and 50 mg PLGA 502. This formulation exhibited mean encapsulation efficiency of 74.8 ± 8.2%, mean particle size lower than 155 nm, the zeta potential of -14.25 ± 0.43 mV and zero-order in vitro release of RP (14.13 ± 0.17 μg/h/10 mg NPs) for 5 d. Daily doses of the neurotoxin rotenone (2 mg/kg) given i.p. to male Wistar rats induced neuronal and behavioral changes similar to those of PD. Once neurodegeneration was established (15 d) animals received RP in saline (1 mg/kg/d for 35 d) or encapsulated within PLGA NPs (amount of NPs equivalent to 1 mg/kg/d RP every 3 d for 35 d). Brain histology and immunochemistry (Nissl-staining, glial fibrillary acidic protein and tyrosine hydroxylase immunohistochemistry) and behavioral testing (catalepsy, akinesia, rotarod and swim test) showed that RP-loaded PLGA NPs were able to revert PD-like symptoms of neurodegeneration in the animal model assayed.

  14. [Caffeine as a preventive drug for Parkinson's disease: epidemiologic evidence and experimental support].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Góngora-Alfaro, José Luis

    Prospective epidemiologic studies performed in large cohorts of men (total: 374,003 subjects) agree in which the risk of suffering Parkinson's disease diminishes progressively as the consumption of coffee and other caffeinated beverages increases. In the case of women (total: 345,184 subjects) the protective effect of caffeine is only observed in menopausal women which do not receive estrogen replacement therapy. Studies with models of acute parkinsonism in rodents have shown that caffeine reduces the loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons induced with the neurotoxins 6-hidroxidopamine and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine, effect that seems to be mediated through blockade of A(2A) adenosine receptors. Recently, it was shown that male rats treated with moderate doses of caffeine (5 mg/kg/day) during six months, followed by a withdrawal period of at least two weeks, developed a greater resistance to the catalepsy induced with the dopaminergic antagonist haloperidol, which was possibly mediated by an increase of dopaminergic transmission in the corpus striatum. More studies are needed to demonstrate unequivocally that caffeine prevents the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in animal models of moderate, chronic, and progressive parkinsonism, since it could lead to the discovery of more effective drugs for the prevention of aging-related degenerative diseases of the central nervous system.

  15. Factor analysis of the catatonia rating scale and catatonic symptom distribution across four diagnostic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Stephanie; Bagby, R Michael; Höffler, Jürgen; Bräunig, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Catatonia is a frequent psychomotor syndrome, which has received increasing recognition over the last decade. The assessment of the catatonic syndrome requires systematic rating scales that cover the complex spectrum of catatonic motor signs and behaviors. The Catatonia Rating Scale (CRS) is such an instrument, which has been validated and which has undergone extensive reliability testing. In the present study, to further validate the CRS, the items composing this scale were submitted to principal components factor extraction followed by a varimax rotation. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed to assess group differences on the extracted factors in patients with schizophrenia, pure mania, mixed mania, and major depression (N=165). Four factors were extracted, which accounted for 71.5% of the variance. The factors corresponded to the clinical syndromes of (1) catatonic excitement, (2) abnormal involuntary movements/mannerisms, (3) disturbance of volition/catalepsy, and (4) catatonic inhibition. The ANOVA revealed that each of the groups showed a distinctive catatonic symptom pattern and that the overlap between diagnostic groups was minimal. We conclude that this four-factor symptom structure of catatonia challenges the current conceptualization, which proposes only two symptom subtypes.

  16. [A case of Asperger's disorder with catatonia originally suspected of being catatonic schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Shinnosuke; Yamaga, Kuniaki; Kobayashi, Toshiyuki; Kato, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of an adolescent male who presented with mutism, immobility, catalepsy, and mannerisms. The patient was admitted to our hospital with suspected catatonic schizophrenia; however, he was subsequently diagnosed with catatonia due to Asperger's disorder. The patient was a 16-year-old male. More than six months before presentation, his grandfather displayed bizarre and violent behavior. Subsequently, he began to experience catatonia, which eventually led to hospitalization. Treatment with diazepam improved his condition and, as no causal disorders other than Asperger's disorder were identified, he was diagnosed with catatonia. The patient had experienced persistent abuse by his mother during childhood; therefore, it is important to consider reactive attachment disorder (DSM-IV-TR) as a differential diagnosis. Among child and adolescent psychiatrists, catatonia is considered to occur at a high frequency among patients with autistic spectrum disorders. In contrast, general psychiatrists tend to consider catatonia as related to schizophrenia, which may be the reason why the diagnosis of our patient was difficult. We assume that the pathogenesis of catatonia in this case was death mimicry due to the subjective perception of a life-threatening situation. For the treatment of catatonia with autistic spectrum disorders, the efficacy of benzodiazepines and electroconvulsive therapy has been established. When a patient with an autistic spectrum disorder presents with motor functional disturbances, it is important to consider these disturbances as catatonia. Furthermore, it is also important to begin the treatment mentioned above even in the presence of definite psychogenic or situational factors.

  17. [German version of the Northoff catatonia rating scale (NCRS-dv) : A validated instrument for measuring catatonic symptoms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirjak, D; Thomann, P A; Northoff, G; Kubera, K M; Wolf, R C

    2017-07-01

    The clinical picture of catatonia includes impressive motor phenomena, such as rigidity, dyskinesia, festination, negativism, posturing, catalepsy, stereotypies and mannerisms, along with affective (e. g. aggression, anxiety, anhedonism or emotional lability) and behavioral symptoms (e.g. mutism, autism, excitement, echolalia or echopraxia). In English speaking countries seven catatonia rating scales have been introduced, which are widely used in clinical and scientific practice. In contrast, only one validated catatonia rating scale is available in Germany so far. In this paper, we introduce the German version of the Northoff catatonia rating scale (NCRS-dv). The original English version of the NCRS consists of 40 items describing motor (13 items), affective (12 items) and behavioral (15 items) catatonic symptoms. The NCRS shows high internal reliability (Crombachs alpha = 0.87), high interrater (r = 0.80-0.96) and high intrarater (r = 0.80-0.95) reliability. Factor analysis of the NCRS revealed four domains: affective, hyperactive or excited, hypoactive or retarded and behavior with individual eigenvalues of 8.98, 3.61, 2.98 and 2.82, respectively, which explained 21.5 %, 9.3 %, 7.6 % and 7.2 % of variance, respectively. In conclusion, the NCRS-dv represents a second validated instrument which can be used by German clinicians and scientists for the assessment of catatonic symptoms.

  18. Structure-based design, synthesis and molecular modeling studies of thiazolyl urea derivatives as novel anti-parkinsonian agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azam, Faizul; Prasad, Medapati Vijaya Vara; Thangavel, Neelaveni; Shrivastava, Anil Kumar; Mohan, Govind

    2012-11-01

    Synthesis of 1-(substituted aryl)-3-(thiazol-2-yl)urea derivatives was undertaken as our efforts to discover novel antiparkinsonian agents with improved pharmacological profile in haloperidol-induced catalepsy and oxidative stress in mice. Furfuryl, 2- and/or 3-methoxy substituted phenyl derivatives emerged as potent agents. With exception of 2-chloro,5-trifluoromethyl substituted analog, halogen substituted derivatives exhibited moderate antiparkinsonian activity. The results of biochemical investigations from brain homogenate of mice outline the importance of neuroprotective/antioxidant therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD), supporting the notion that the oxidative stress may play a significant role in the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying PD. Molecular docking studies of these compounds with adenosine A(2A) receptor exhibited very good binding interactions and warrants further studies to confirm their binding with human A(2A) receptor for the design and development of potent antagonists. Parameters for Lipinski's rule of 5 were calculated computationally because pharmacokinetic and metabolic behaviors in the body often are linked to the physical properties of a compound. None of the synthesized compounds violated Lipinski's rule, making them suitable drug candidate for the treatment of PD.

  19. The potent opioid agonist, (+)-cis-3-methylfentanyl binds pseudoirreversibly to the opioid receptor complex in vitro and in vivo: Evidence for a novel mechanism of action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Band, L.; Xu, Heng; Bykov, V.; Rothman, R.B.; Kim, Chongho; Newman, A.; Jacobson, A.E.; Rice, K.C. (NIDDK, Bethesda, MD (USA)); Greig, N. (NIA, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The present study demonstrates that pretreatment of rat brain membranes with (+)-cis-3-methylfentanyl ((+)-cis-MF), followed by extensive washing of the membranes, produces a wash-resistant decreasing in the binding of ({sup 3}H)-(D-ala{sup 2}, D-leu{sup 5})enkephalin to the d binding site of the opioid receptor complex ({delta}{sub cx} binding site). Intravenous administration of (+)-cis-MF (50 {mu}g/kg) to rats produced a pronounced catalepsy and also produced a wash-resistant masking of {delta}{sub cx} and {mu} binding sites in membranes prepared 120 min post-injection. Administration of 1 mg/kg i.v. of the opioid antagonist, 6-desoxy-6{beta}-fluoronaltrexone (cycloFOXY), 100 min after the injection of (+)-cis-MF (20 min prior to the preparation of membranes) completely reversed the catatonia and restored masked {delta}{sub cx} binding sites to control levels. This was not observed with (+)-cycloFOXY. The implications of these and other findings for the mechanism of action of (+)-cis-MF and models of the opioid receptors are discussed.

  20. Delayed Diagnosis in an Elderly Schizophrenic Patient with Catatonic State and Pulmonary Embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsueh-Chin Hu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Catatonia is a syndrome with any two of five core features: stupor/motoric immobility/catalepsy/waxy flexibility, excitement, negativism/mutism, posturing, and echolalia/echopraxia. We describe a case of delayed diagnosis of pulmonary embolism with an atypical presentation in an elderly schizophrenia male patient, which led to a life-threatening brain infarction. A 75-year-old male was hospitalized in a psychiatric ward because of stupor, poor intake and mutism under a diagnosis of recurrent catatonia. His inability to express his suffering, dehydration, exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and upper gastrointestinal bleeding, however, made an accurate diagnosis difficult. Finally, the high D-dimer level and further chest computed tomography confirmed pulmonary embolism in the trunk of the bilateral main pulmonary arteries. The brain computed tomography also confirmed brain infarcts. He was transferred to the cardiac intensive care unit and was eventually rescued from near death due to pulmonary embolism and brain infarction. A careful differential diagnosis for pulmonary embolism-induced delirium and catatonic state is important in the treatment of patients with a previous diagnosis of catatonic schizophrenia.

  1. The Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Aspidosperma tomentosum (Apocynaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anansa Bezerra de Aquino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of the crude ethanolic extract (CEE, its fractions, and the flavonoid isorhamnetin from Aspidosperma tomentosum using models of nociception and inflammation in mice. In the writhing test, the CEE and its fractions (except for soluble phase, CHCl3 100% and EtAcO 100% at 100 mg/kg p.o. induced antinociceptive activity. Isorhamnetin (100 μmol/kg, p.o. was also active. In the hot plate test, only the treatment with the fractions Hex : CHCl3 50%, CHCl3 100%, and CHCl3 : MeOH 5% (100 mg/kg, p.o. increased the latency time, reversed by the opioid antagonist naloxone. Fractions that were active in the hot plate test did not show catalepsy condition. It was observed that CEE, all fractions, and isorhamnetin reduced the formalin effects in the neurogenic phase. In the inflammatory phase, only CEE, isorhamnetin, and CHCl3 100% and CHCl3 : MeOH 5% fractions were active. CEE and all fractions, except for CHCl3 : MeOH 10% fraction, isorhamnetin, and soluble fraction were able to produce an antioedematogenic activity in the ear capsaicin-induced edema test. In the thioglycolate-induced peritonitis, only EtAcO 100% fraction was not active. The results demonstrate that A. tomentosum has antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities in animal models.

  2. Antidepressant-like effect of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and other cannabinoids isolated from Cannabis sativa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Alfy, Abir T; Ivey, Kelly; Robinson, Keisha; Ahmed, Safwat; Radwan, Mohamed; Slade, Desmond; Khan, Ikhlas; ElSohly, Mahmoud; Ross, Samir

    2010-06-01

    The antidepressant action of cannabis as well as the interaction between antidepressants and the endocannabinoid system has been reported. This study was conducted to assess the antidepressant-like activity of Delta(9)-THC and other cannabinoids. Cannabinoids were initially evaluated in the mouse tetrad assay to determine doses that do not induce hypothermia or catalepsy. The automated mouse forced swim (FST) and tail suspension (TST) tests were used to determine antidepressant action. At doses lacking hypothermic and cataleptic effects (1.25, 2.5, and 5 mg/kg, i.p.), both Delta(9)-THC and Delta(8)-THC showed a U-shaped dose response with only Delta(9)-THC showing significant antidepressant-like effects at 2.5 mg/kg (pcannabidiol (CBD) exhibited significant effect at 20 and 200mg/kg, respectively (p<0.01). The antidepressant-like action of Delta(9)-THC and CBC was further confirmed in the TST. Delta(9)-THC exhibited the same U-shaped dose response with significant antidepressant-like action at 2.5 mg/kg (p<0.05) while CBC resulted in a significant dose-dependent decrease in immobility at 40 and 80 mg/kg doses (p<0.01). Results of this study show that Delta(9)-THC and other cannabinoids exert antidepressant-like actions, and thus may contribute to the overall mood-elevating properties of cannabis. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Solcoseryl stimulates behavioural activity of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braszko, J J; Winnicka, M M; Wiśniewski, K

    1996-01-01

    The influence of Solcoseryl (S), a protein-free extract of calves' blood given intraperitoneally (i.p.) on the behavioural measures of activity of the central nervous system of male Wistar rats was examined. The drug (1.0 ml/kg i.p.) given 60 min before testing the animals in electromagnetic motimeter significantly enhanced overall and vertical motility of rats. S at the doses of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 ml/kg did not significantly influence the activity of rats in "open field". 1.0 ml/kg of S given 15, 45 and 60 min before thiopental (30 mg/kg i.p.) did not change the onset and time of sleep following the latter drug, except for the significant shortening of the time of sleep of animals injected with S 15 min before thiopental. S at the dose of 1.0 ml/kg did not change stereotypies produced by apomorphine (2.0 mg/kg i.p.) and amphetamine (6.5 mg/kg i.p.) but decreased intensity of haloperidol (1.0 mg/kg i.p.) catalepsy.

  4. The antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of Aspidosperma tomentosum (Apocynaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, Anansa Bezerra de; Cavalcante-Silva, Luiz Henrique Agra; Matta, Carolina Barbosa Brito da; Epifânio, Willians Antônio do Nascimento; Aquino, Pedro Gregório Vieira; Santana, Antônio Euzébio Goulart; Alexandre-Moreira, Magna Suzana; de Araújo-Júnior, João Xavier

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of the crude ethanolic extract (CEE), its fractions, and the flavonoid isorhamnetin from Aspidosperma tomentosum using models of nociception and inflammation in mice. In the writhing test, the CEE and its fractions (except for soluble phase, CHCl3 100% and EtAcO 100%) at 100 mg/kg p.o. induced antinociceptive activity. Isorhamnetin (100  μ mol/kg, p.o.) was also active. In the hot plate test, only the treatment with the fractions Hex : CHCl3 50%, CHCl3 100%, and CHCl3 : MeOH 5% (100 mg/kg, p.o.) increased the latency time, reversed by the opioid antagonist naloxone. Fractions that were active in the hot plate test did not show catalepsy condition. It was observed that CEE, all fractions, and isorhamnetin reduced the formalin effects in the neurogenic phase. In the inflammatory phase, only CEE, isorhamnetin, and CHCl3 100% and CHCl3 : MeOH 5% fractions were active. CEE and all fractions, except for CHCl3 : MeOH 10% fraction, isorhamnetin, and soluble fraction were able to produce an antioedematogenic activity in the ear capsaicin-induced edema test. In the thioglycolate-induced peritonitis, only EtAcO 100% fraction was not active. The results demonstrate that A. tomentosum has antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities in animal models.

  5. [3H]-beta-endorphin binding in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houghten, R.A.; Johnson, N.; Pasternak, G.W.

    1984-01-01

    The binding of [ 3 H]-beta-endorphin to rat brain homogenates is complex. Although Scatchard analysis of saturation studies yields a straight line, detailed competition studies are multiphasic, suggesting that even at low concentrations of the compound, the 3 H-ligand is binding to more than one class of site. A portion of [ 3 H]-beta-endorphin binding is sensitive to low concentrations of morphine or D-Ala2-Leu5-enkephalin (less than 5 nM). The inhibition observed with each compound alone (5 nM) is the same as that seen with both together (each at 5 nM). Thus, the binding remaining in the presence of both morphine and the enkephalin does not correspond to either mu or delta sites. The portion of [ 3 H]-beta-endorphin binding that is inhibited under these conditions appears to be equally sensitive to both morphine and the enkephalin and may correspond to mu1 sites. Treating membrane homogenates with naloxonazine, a mu1 selective antagonist, lowers [ 3 H]-beta-endorphin binding to the same degree as morphine and D-Ala2-Leu5-enkephalin alone or together. This possible binding of [ 3 H]-beta-endorphin to mu1 sites is consistent with the role of mu1 sites in beta-endorphin analgesia and catalepsy in vivo

  6. Design, synthesis, and preliminary in vitro and in vivo pharmacological evaluation of 2-{4-[4-(2,5-disubstituted thiazol-4-yl)phenylethyl]piperazin-1-yl}-1,8-naphthyridine-3-carbonitriles as atypical antipsychotic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowri Chandra Sekhar, Kondapalli Venkata; Rao, Vajja Samabasiva; Deuther-Conrad, Winnie; Reddy, Aravalli Satish; Brust, Peter; Krishna Kumar, Mutyala Murali

    2011-08-01

    A series of 2-{4-[4-(2,5-disubstituted thiazolyl)phenylethyl] piperazin-1-yl}-1,8-naphthyridine-3-carbonitriles were synthesized in an effort to prepare novel atypical antipsychotic agents. The compounds were synthesized either by microwave irradiation technique or by conventional synthesis and were characterized by spectral data (IR, (1)H NMR, and MS) and the purity was ascertained by microanalysis. The D(2) and 5-HT(2A) affinity of the synthesized compounds was screened in vitro by radioligand displacement assays on membrane homogenates isolated from rat striatum and rat cortex, respectively. Furthermore, all the synthesized compounds were screened for their in vivo pharmacological activity in Swiss albino mice. The D(2) antagonism studies were performed using climbing mouse assay model and 5-HT(2A) antagonism studies were performed using quipazine-induced head twitches in mice. It was observed that none of the new chemical entities exhibited catalepsy and 10f is the most active among the synthesized compounds with 5-HT(2A)/D(2) ratio of 1.1286 although the standard drug risperidone exhibited 5-HT(2A)/D(2) ratio of 1.0989.

  7. Synthesis and biological evaluation of a series of multi-target N-substituted cyclic imide derivatives with potential antipsychotic effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mingshuo; Wang, Yu; Yang, Feipu; Wu, Chunhui; Wang, Zhen; Ye, Bin; Jiang, Xiangrui; Zhao, Qingjie; Li, Jianfeng; Liu, Yongjian; Zhang, Junchi; Tian, Guanghui; He, Yang; Shen, Jingshan; Jiang, Hualiang

    2018-02-10

    In the present study, a series of multi-target N-substituted cyclic imide derivatives which possessed potent dopamine D 2 , serotonin 5-HT 1A and 5-HT 2A receptors properties were synthesized and evaluated as potential antipsychotics. Among these compounds, (3aR,4R,7S,7aS)-2-(4-(4-(benzo[b]thiophen-4-yl)piperazin-1-yl)butyl)-3a,4,7,7a-tetrahydro-1H-4,7-methanoisoindole-1,3(2H)-dione hydrochloride (3d) held a promising pharmacological profile. 3d not only showed potent and balanced in vitro activities on D 2 /5-HT 1A /5-HT 2A receptors, but also endowed with low to moderate activities on 5-HT 2C , H 1 , α 1A , M 3 receptors and hERG channel, suggesting a low liability to induce side effects such as weight gain, orthostatic hypotension and QT prolongation. In animal behavioral studies, 3d reduced phencyclidine-induced hyperlocomotion with a high threshold for catalepsy induction. Compound 3d was selected as a potential antipsychotic candidate for further development. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Premedication with amitraz or xylazine for anesthetic induction of cattle with ketamine Influência da pré-medicação com amitraz ou xilazina na indução anestésica de bovinos com cetamina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Gemio Reis

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available

    The alpha-2 agonists have sedative, analgesic and muscle relaxation properties in cattle. The ketamine is useful in anesthetic protocols as an inductor agent and it produces analgesia and anesthesia. The combination of ketamine with other drugs is necessary considering that it causes deleterious effects like catalepsy and muscle spasticity if given alone. This study evaluated clinical and behavioral effects of xylazine-ketamine or amitraz-ketamine combinations in twenty–one calves. The ketamine increased heart rate in amitraz and control groups. The respiratory rate increased in all experimental groups, restoring the basal values after 25 minutes. The ruminal motility was kept inhibited along whole observation period. It was concluded that xylazine-ketamine combination produced better sedation and muscle relaxation than amitraz-ketamine combination, characterized by a larger incidence of recumbency and by the absence of catalepsy. Both anesthetic protocols were safe for use in cattle, however, xylazine showed a better option as a preanesthetic medication.

     

    KEY WORDS: Amitraz, cattle, ketamine, xylazine.

    Os agonistas alfa-2 são muito utilizados como medicação pré-anestésica na espécie bovina, promovendo sedação, analgesia e miorrelaxamento, enquanto a cetamina, em virtude de suas propriedades analgésicas e simpatomiméticas, tem ótimo uso na indução anestésica. Com isso, estudaram-se os efeitos clínicos e cardiovasculares da indução anestésica intravenosa por cetamina em 21 bovinos pré-tratados com xilazina ou amitraz pela via intravenosa. A cetamina aumentou a freqüência cardíaca nos grupos amitraz e controle, o que não ocorreu no grupo xilazina. Houve aumento da pressão arterial sistólica durante os primeiros cinco minutos após a administração dos agonistas alfa-2. A freqüência respiratória elevou-se após a

  9. 2-Phenylethylamine, a constituent of chocolate and wine, causes mitochondrial complex-I inhibition, generation of hydroxyl radicals and depletion of striatal biogenic amines leading to psycho-motor dysfunctions in Balb/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, T; Mohanakumar, K P

    2010-11-01

    Behavioral and neurochemical effects of chronic administration of high doses of 2-phenylethylamine (PEA; 25-75 mg/kg, i.p. for up to 7 days) have been investigated in Balb/c mice. Depression and anxiety, as demonstrated respectively by increased floating time in forced swim test, and reduction in number of entries and the time spent in the open arms in an elevated plus maze were observed in these animals. General motor disabilities in terms of akinesia, catalepsy and decreased swimming ability were also observed in these animals. Acute and sub-acute administration of PEA caused significant, dose-dependent depletion of striatal dopamine, and its metabolites levels. PEA caused dose-dependent generation of hydroxyl radicals in vitro in Fenton's reaction in test tubes, in isolated mitochondrial fraction, and in vivo in the striatum of mice. A significant inhibition of NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex-I; EC: 1.6.5.3) activity suggests the inhibition in oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondria resulting in hydroxyl radical generation. Nissl staining and TH immnunohistochemistry in brain sections failed to show any morphological aberrations in dopaminergic neurons or nerve terminals. Long-term over-consumption of PEA containing food items could be a neurological risk factor having significant pathological relevance to disease conditions such as depression or motor dysfunction. However, per-oral administration of higher doses of PEA (75-125 mg/kg; 7 days) failed to cause such overt neurochemical effects in rats, which suggested safe consumption of food items rich in this trace amine by normal population. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. CP-809,101, a selective 5-HT2C agonist, shows activity in animal models of antipsychotic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siuciak, Judith A; Chapin, Douglas S; McCarthy, Sheryl A; Guanowsky, Victor; Brown, Janice; Chiang, Phoebe; Marala, Ravi; Patterson, Terrell; Seymour, Patricia A; Swick, Andrew; Iredale, Philip A

    2007-02-01

    CP-809,101 is a potent, functionally selective 5-HT(2C) agonist that displays approximately 100% efficacy in vitro. The aim of the present studies was to assess the efficacy of a selective 5-HT(2C) agonist in animal models predictive of antipsychotic-like efficacy and side-effect liability. Similar to currently available antipsychotic drugs, CP-809,101 dose-dependently inhibited conditioned avoidance responding (CAR, ED(50)=4.8 mg/kg, sc). The efficacy of CP-809,101 in CAR was completely antagonized by the concurrent administration of the 5-HT(2C) receptor antagonist, SB-224,282. CP-809,101 antagonized both PCP- and d-amphetamine-induced hyperactivity with ED(50) values of 2.4 and 2.9 mg/kg (sc), respectively and also reversed an apomorphine induced-deficit in prepulse inhibition. At doses up to 56 mg/kg, CP-809,101 did not produce catalepsy. Thus, the present results demonstrate that the 5-HT(2C) agonist, CP-809,101, has a pharmacological profile similar to that of the atypical antipsychotics with low extrapyramidal symptom liability. CP-809,101 was inactive in two animal models of antidepressant-like activity, the forced swim test and learned helplessness. However, CP-809,101 was active in novel object recognition, an animal model of cognitive function. These data suggest that 5-HT(2C) agonists may be a novel approach in the treatment of psychosis as well as for the improvement of cognitive dysfunction associated with schizophrenia.

  11. Atypical antipsychotic properties of AD-6048, a primary metabolite of blonanserin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatara, Ayaka; Shimizu, Saki; Masui, Atsushi; Tamura, Miyuki; Minamimoto, Shoko; Mizuguchi, Yuto; Ochiai, Midori; Mizobe, Yusuke; Ohno, Yukihiro

    2015-11-01

    Blonanserin is a new atypical antipsychotic drug that shows high affinities to dopamine D2 and 5-HT2 receptors; however, the mechanisms underlying its atypicality are not fully understood. In this study, we evaluated the antipsychotic properties of AD-6048, a primary metabolite of blonanserin, to determine if it contributes to the atypicality of blonanserin. Subcutaneous administration of AD-6048 (0.3-1mg/kg) significantly inhibited apomorphine (APO)-induced climbing behavior with an ED50 value of 0.200mg/kg, the potency being 1/3-1/5 times that of haloperidol (HAL). AD-6048 did not cause extrapyramidal side effects (EPS) even at high doses (up to 10mg/kg, s.c.), whereas HAL at doses of 0.1-3mg/kg (s.c.) significantly induced bradykinesia and catalepsy in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, the therapeutic index (potency ratios of anti-APO action to that of EPS induction) of AD-6048 was much higher than that of haloperidol, illustrating that AD-6048 per se possesses atypical antipsychotic properties. In addition, immunohistochemical analysis of Fos protein expression revealed that both AD-6048 and HAL significantly increased Fos expression in the shell part of the nucleus accumbens and the striatum. However, in contrast to HAL which preferentially enhanced striatal Fos expression, AD-6048 showed a preferential action to the nucleus accumbens. These results indicate that AD-6048 acts as an atypical antipsychotic, which seems to at least partly contribute to the atypicality of blonanserin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Protective Effects of Streblus asper Leaf Extract on H2O2-Induced ROS in SK-N-SH Cells and MPTP-Induced Parkinson’s Disease-Like Symptoms in C57BL/6 Mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanathip Singsai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of Streblus asper leaf extract (SA on reactive oxygen species (ROS in SK-N-SH cell culture and on motor functions and behaviors in MPTP-treated C57BL/6 mice. SK-N-SH cell viability after incubation with SA for 24 h was measured by MTT assay. Intracellular ROS levels of SK-N-SH cells were quantified after pretreatment with SA (0, 200, 600, and 1000 µg/mL in the presence of H2O2 (300 µM. Male C57BL/6 mice were force-fed with water or 200 mg/kg/day SA for 32 days. Intraperitoneal injection of MPTP was used to induce Parkinson’s disease-like symptoms. Catalepsy, beam balance ability, olfactory discrimination, social recognition, and spontaneous locomotor activity were assessed on days 19, 21, 23, 26, and 32, respectively. In cell culture, SA at 200, 600, and 1000 µg/mL significantly decreased ROS levels in H2O2-treated SK-N-SH cells. MPTP-treated C57BL/6 mice showed a significant change in all parameters tested when compared to the control group. Pretreatment and concurrent treatment with 200 mg/kg/day SA could antagonize the motor and cognitive function deficits induced by MPTP. The results show that SA possesses anti-Parkinson effects in MPTP-treated C57BL/6 mice and that reduction in ROS levels might be one of the mechanisms.

  13. Full Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Inhibition Combined with Partial Monoacylglycerol Lipase Inhibition: Augmented and Sustained Antinociceptive Effects with Reduced Cannabimimetic Side Effects in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sudeshna; Kinsey, Steven G; Liu, Qing-Song; Hruba, Lenka; McMahon, Lance R; Grim, Travis W; Merritt, Christina R; Wise, Laura E; Abdullah, Rehab A; Selley, Dana E; Sim-Selley, Laura J; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Lichtman, Aron H

    2015-08-01

    Inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) or monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), the primary hydrolytic enzymes for the respective endocannabinoids N-arachidonoylethanolamine (AEA) and 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG), produces antinociception but with minimal cannabimimetic side effects. Although selective inhibitors of either enzyme often show partial efficacy in various nociceptive models, their combined blockade elicits augmented antinociceptive effects, but side effects emerge. Moreover, complete and prolonged MAGL blockade leads to cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) receptor functional tolerance, which represents another challenge in this potential therapeutic strategy. Therefore, the present study tested whether full FAAH inhibition combined with partial MAGL inhibition would produce sustained antinociceptive effects with minimal cannabimimetic side effects. Accordingly, we tested a high dose of the FAAH inhibitor PF-3845 (N-​3-​pyridinyl-​4-​[[3-​[[5-​(trifluoromethyl)-​2-​pyridinyl]oxy]phenyl]methyl]-​1-​piperidinecarboxamide; 10 mg/kg) given in combination with a low dose of the MAGL inhibitor JZL184 [4-nitrophenyl 4-(dibenzo[d][1,3]dioxol-5-yl(hydroxy)methyl)piperidine-1-carboxylate] (4 mg/kg) in mouse models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. This combination of inhibitors elicited profound increases in brain AEA levels (>10-fold) but only 2- to 3-fold increases in brain 2-AG levels. This combination produced significantly greater antinociceptive effects than single enzyme inhibition and did not elicit common cannabimimetic effects (e.g., catalepsy, hypomotility, hypothermia, and substitution for Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in the drug-discrimination assay), although these side effects emerged with high-dose JZL184 (i.e., 100 mg/kg). Finally, repeated administration of this combination did not lead to tolerance to its antiallodynic actions in the carrageenan assay or CB1 receptor functional tolerance. Thus, full FAAH inhibition

  14. Hypercholesterolemia causes psychomotor abnormalities in mice and alterations in cortico-striatal biogenic amine neurotransmitters: Relevance to Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Rajib; Choudhury, Amarendranath; Chandra Boruah, Dulal; Devi, Rajlakshmi; Bhattacharya, Pallab; Choudhury, Manabendra Dutta; Borah, Anupom

    2017-09-01

    The symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) include motor behavioral abnormalities, which appear as a result of the extensive loss of the striatal biogenic amine, dopamine. Various endogenous molecules, including cholesterol, have been put forward as putative contributors in the pathogenesis of PD. Earlier reports have provided a strong link between the elevated level of plasma cholesterol (hypercholesterolemia) and onset of PD. However, the role of hypercholesterolemia on brain functions in terms of neurotransmitter metabolism and associated behavioral manifestations remain elusive. We tested in Swiss albino mice whether hypercholesterolemia induced by high-cholesterol diet would affect dopamine and serotonin metabolism in discrete brain regions that would precipitate in psychomotor behavioral manifestations. High-cholesterol diet for 12 weeks caused a significant increase in blood total cholesterol level, which validated the model as hypercholesterolemic. Tests for akinesia, catalepsy, swimming ability and gait pattern (increased stride length) have revealed that hypercholesterolemic mice develop motor behavioral abnormalities, which are similar to the behavioral phenotypes of PD. Moreover, hypercholesterolemia caused depressive-like behavior in mice, as indicated by the increased immobility time in the forced swim test. We found a significant depletion of dopamine in striatum and serotonin in cortex of hypercholesterolemic mice. The significant decrease in tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity in striatum supports the observed depleted level dopamine in striatum, which is relevant to the pathophysiology of PD. In conclusion, hypercholesterolemia-induced depleted levels of cortical and striatal biogenic amines reported hereby are similar to the PD pathology, which might be associated with the observed psychomotor behavioral abnormalities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Phenomenology and treatment of Catatonia: A descriptive study from north India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutt, Alakananda; Grover, Sandeep; Chakrabarti, Subho; Avasthi, Ajit; Kumar, Suresh

    2011-01-01

    Background: Studies on clinical features of catatonia in the Indian population are few in number. Aim: To study the phenomenology, clinical profile and treatment response of subjects admitted to the psychiatry inpatient with catatonia. Materials and Methods: Detailed treatment records of all the inpatients were scanned for the period January 2004 to December 2008. Patients with catatonia (diagnosed as two symptoms as per the Bush Francis Catatonia Rating scale) were included. Results: During the study period, 1056 subjects were admitted in the inpatient unit, of which 51 (4.8% of the total admissions) had catatonic features and had been rated on the Bush Francis Catatonia Rating scale. The mean age of the sample was 30.02 years (SD=14.6; range 13-69), with an almost equal gender ratio. Most of the patients presenting with catatonia were diagnosed as having psychotic disorders (40; 74.8%), of which the most common diagnosis was schizophrenia (27; 52.9%) of the catatonic subtype (20; 39.2%). Three subjects with primary diagnosis of a psychotic disorder had comorbid depression. Other diagnoses included mood disorders (7; 13.72%) and organic brain syndromes (04; 7.9%). According to the Bush Francis Rating scale, the common signs and symptoms exhibited by the subjects were mutism (94.1%), followed by immobility/stupor (78.5%), staring (78.4%), negativism (74.5%), rigidity (63%) and posturing/catalepsy (61.8%). All the patients were initially treated with lorazepam. Electroconvulsive therapy was required in most cases (42; 82.35%). Conclusion: The common symptoms of catatonia are mutism, immobility/stupor, staring, posturing, negativism and rigidity. The most common underlying psychiatric diagnosis was schizophrenia. PMID:21431006

  16. Antiasthmatic and antiallergic potential of methanolic extract of leaves of Ailanthus excelsa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Kumar

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of study was antiasthmatic potential of methanolic extract of leaves of Ailanthus excelsa Roxb., Simaroubaceae. Traditionally or in Indian system of medicine, A. excelsa is used in the treatment of asthma, cough, colic pain, cancer, diabetes and also used as antispasmodic, antifertility, bronchodilator. Stem bark of A. excelsa already reported for its potential against asthma. The pollens of Ailanthus excelsa reported allergic in nature and the time of collection of leaves were important in this study, generally the flowering stage of plant was avoided for the collection due to maximum chance of pollens at that time. Methanolic extract of leaves of A. excelsa was evaluated using in vitro goat tracheal chain preparation model and in vivo- Milk induced leucocytosis, eosinophilia, Clonidine induced catalepsy in mice model while Passive paw anaphylaxis and Clonidine induced mast cell degranulation in rat model. The extract showed the presence of flavonoids, terpenoids, saponins, quassonoids and test was also positive for alkaloids and steroids. The extract also showed the presence of quercetin which is flavonoid and detected on the preparative TLC plate with the help of standard quercetin. Dose response studies of methanolic extract of leaves of A. excelsa Roxb. were conducted at 100 µg mL-1 in vitro and 100, 200, 400 mg kg-1 p.o. in vivo models. The treatment with methanolic extract of A. excelsa at different dose level showed the significant (*p<0.05, **p<0.01, ***p<0.001 antiasthmatic activity. Inhibition or decrease the release of inflammatory mediators potentiates the antiasthmatic as well as antiallergic activity of methanolic extract of leaves of A. excelsa.

  17. Frontotemporal dementia with trans-activation response DNA-binding protein 43 presenting with catatonic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Ryohei; Kawakami, Ito; Onaya, Mitsumoto; Higashi, Shinji; Arai, Nobutaka; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Hasegawa, Masato; Arai, Tetsuaki

    2017-11-07

    Catatonia is a clinical syndrome characterized by symptoms such as immobility, mutism, stupor, stereotypy, echophenomena, catalepsy, automatic obedience, posturing, negativism, gegenhalten and ambitendency. This syndrome occurs mostly in mood disorder and schizophrenic patients, and is related to neuronal dysfunction involving the frontal lobe. Some cases of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) with catatonia have been reported, but these cases were not examined by autopsy. Here, we report on a FTD case which showed catatonia after the first episode of brief psychotic disorder. At the age of 58, the patient had a sudden onset of disorganized behavior and meaningless speech. Psychotropic drugs were effective for catatonic symptoms. However, after remission apathy, hyperorality, socially inappropriate behavior, hoarding, and an instinctive grasp reaction appeared and persisted. Brain MRI showed significant atrophy of the bilateral fronto-temporal lobes. A neuropathological examination revealed extensive trans-activation response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) positive neurocytoplasmic inclusions and dystrophic neurites in the brain, including the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, and brainstem. Pathological diagnosis was frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) with TDP-43 (FTLD-TDP) type C, which was also confirmed by the band pattern of C-terminal fragments of TDP-43 on western blotting of sarkosyl-insoluble fractions extracted from the frozen brain. Dysfunction of the thalamus, globus pallidus, supplementary motor area, amygdala and cingulate cortex have been said to be related to the catatonic syndrome. In this case, these areas were affected, showing abnormal TDP-43-positive structures. Further studies are expected to confirm further clinical - pathological correlations to FTLD. © 2017 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  18. Antipsychotic drug-like effects of the selective M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor positive allosteric modulator VU0152100.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Nellie E; Grannan, Michael; Bubser, Michael; Barry, Robert L; Thompson, Analisa; Rosanelli, John; Gowrishankar, Raajaram; Kelm, Nathaniel D; Damon, Stephen; Bridges, Thomas M; Melancon, Bruce J; Tarr, James C; Brogan, John T; Avison, Malcolm J; Deutch, Ariel Y; Wess, Jürgen; Wood, Michael R; Lindsley, Craig W; Gore, John C; Conn, P Jeffrey; Jones, Carrie K

    2014-06-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that selective M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) activators may offer a novel strategy for the treatment of psychosis. However, previous efforts to develop selective M4 activators were unsuccessful because of the lack of M4 mAChR subtype specificity and off-target muscarinic adverse effects. We recently developed VU0152100, a highly selective M4 positive allosteric modulator (PAM) that exerts central effects after systemic administration. We now report that VU0152100 dose-dependently reverses amphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion in rats and wild-type mice, but not in M4 KO mice. VU0152100 also blocks amphetamine-induced disruption of the acquisition of contextual fear conditioning and prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex. These effects were observed at doses that do not produce catalepsy or peripheral adverse effects associated with non-selective mAChR agonists. To further understand the effects of selective potentiation of M4 on region-specific brain activation, VU0152100 alone and in combination with amphetamine were evaluated using pharmacologic magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI). Key neural substrates of M4-mediated modulation of the amphetamine response included the nucleus accumbens (NAS), caudate-putamen (CP), hippocampus, and medial thalamus. Functional connectivity analysis of phMRI data, specifically assessing correlations in activation between regions, revealed several brain networks involved in the M4 modulation of amphetamine-induced brain activation, including the NAS and retrosplenial cortex with motor cortex, hippocampus, and medial thalamus. Using in vivo microdialysis, we found that VU0152100 reversed amphetamine-induced increases in extracellular dopamine levels in NAS and CP. The present data are consistent with an antipsychotic drug-like profile of activity for VU0152100. Taken together, these data support the development of selective M4 PAMs as a new approach to the treatment of psychosis

  19. Dopamine D2S and D2L receptors may differentially contribute to the actions of antipsychotic and psychotic agents in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, R; Hranilovic, D; Fetsko, L A; Bucan, M; Wang, Y

    2002-01-01

    Regulation of dopamine D2 receptor (D2) function plays an important role in alleviating either the motor deficits of Parkinson's disease or psychotic symptoms of schizophrenia. D2 also plays a critical role in sensorimotor gating which can be measured by monitoring the prepulse inhibition of the startle response. Alternative splicing of the D2 gene generates two isoforms, D2S and D2L. Here we investigated the role of D2S and D2L in the mechanisms of action of dopaminergic drugs, using mice lacking D2L (D2L(-/-)) but expressing D2S as a model system. We found that the typical antipsychotic raclopride was much less potent in inhibiting locomotor activity and eliciting catalepsy (or parkinsonism) in D2L(-/-) mice, whereas the atypical antipsychotic clozapine was equally effective in D2L(-/-) and wild-type mice. These suggest that the deletion of D2L diminishes drug-induced parkinsonism. Furthermore, two dopamine agonists, amphetamine and apomorphine, reduced prepulse inhibition to a similar degree in D2L(-/-) and wild-type mice. These results together suggest that D2S alone can mediate the action of clozapine and the dopamine agonist-induced disruption of prepulse inhibition. The differential binding affinities of these agents for D2S vs D2L were not sufficient to explain the divergent effects of typical vs atypical antipsychotics in D2L(-/-) mice. These findings suggest that D2S and D2L may differentially contribute to the therapeutic actions and side effects of antipsychotic agents, and may have implications for developing better antipsychotic agents.

  20. A behavioural comparison of acute and chronic Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol in C57BL/6JArc mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Leonora E; Chesworth, Rose; Huang, Xu-Feng; McGregor, Iain S; Arnold, Jonathon C; Karl, Tim

    2010-08-01

    Cannabis contains over 70 unique compounds and its abuse is linked to an increased risk of developing schizophrenia. The behavioural profiles of the psychotropic cannabis constituent Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta9-THC) and the non-psychotomimetic constituent cannabidiol (CBD) were investigated with a battery of behavioural tests relevant to anxiety and positive, negative and cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia. Male adult C57BL/6JArc mice were given 21 daily intraperitoneal injections of vehicle, Delta9-THC (0.3, 1, 3 or 10 mg/kg) or CBD (1, 5, 10 or 50 mg/kg). Delta9-THC produced the classic cannabinoid CB1 receptor-mediated tetrad of hypolocomotion, analgesia, catalepsy and hypothermia while CBD had modest hyperthermic effects. While sedative at this dose, Delta9-THC (10 mg/kg) produced locomotor-independent anxiogenic effects in the open-field and light-dark tests. Chronic CBD produced moderate anxiolytic-like effects in the open-field test at 50 mg/kg and in the light-dark test at a low dose (1 mg/kg). Acute and chronic Delta9-THC (10 mg/kg) decreased the startle response while CBD had no effect. Prepulse inhibition was increased by acute treatment with Delta9-THC (0.3, 3 and 10 mg/kg) or CBD (1, 5 and 50 mg/kg) and by chronic CBD (1 mg/kg). Chronic CBD (50 mg/kg) attenuated dexamphetamine (5 mg/kg)-induced hyperlocomotion, suggesting an antipsychotic-like action for this cannabinoid. Chronic Delta9-THC decreased locomotor activity before and after dexamphetamine administration suggesting functional antagonism of the locomotor stimulant effect. These data provide the first evidence of anxiolytic- and antipsychotic-like effects of chronic but not acute CBD in C57BL/6JArc mice, extending findings from acute studies in other inbred mouse strains and rats.

  1. Bee Venom Alleviates Motor Deficits and Modulates the Transfer of Cortical Information through the Basal Ganglia in Rat Models of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurice, Nicolas; Deltheil, Thierry; Melon, Christophe; Degos, Bertrand; Mourre, Christiane; Amalric, Marianne; Kerkerian-Le Goff, Lydia

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence points to a neuroprotective action of bee venom on nigral dopamine neurons in animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD). Here we examined whether bee venom also displays a symptomatic action by acting on the pathological functioning of the basal ganglia in rat PD models. Bee venom effects were assessed by combining motor behavior analyses and in vivo electrophysiological recordings in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr, basal ganglia output structure) in pharmacological (neuroleptic treatment) and lesional (unilateral intranigral 6-hydroxydopamine injection) PD models. In the hemi-parkinsonian 6-hydroxydopamine lesion model, subchronic bee venom treatment significantly alleviates contralateral forelimb akinesia and apomorphine-induced rotations. Moreover, a single injection of bee venom reverses haloperidol-induced catalepsy, a pharmacological model reminiscent of parkinsonian akinetic deficit. This effect is mimicked by apamin, a blocker of small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK) channels, and blocked by CyPPA, a positive modulator of these channels, suggesting the involvement of SK channels in the bee venom antiparkinsonian action. In vivo electrophysiological recordings in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (basal ganglia output structure) showed no significant effect of BV on the mean neuronal discharge frequency or pathological bursting activity. In contrast, analyses of the neuronal responses evoked by motor cortex stimulation show that bee venom reverses the 6-OHDA- and neuroleptic-induced biases in the influence exerted by the direct inhibitory and indirect excitatory striatonigral circuits. These data provide the first evidence for a beneficial action of bee venom on the pathological functioning of the cortico-basal ganglia circuits underlying motor PD symptoms with potential relevance to the symptomatic treatment of this disease.

  2. In Vitro and In Vivo Characterization of the Alkaloid Nuciferine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martilias S Farrell

    Full Text Available The sacred lotus (Nelumbo nucifera contains many phytochemicals and has a history of human use. To determine which compounds may be responsible for reported psychotropic effects, we used in silico predictions of the identified phytochemicals. Nuciferine, an alkaloid component of Nelumbo nucifera and Nymphaea caerulea, had a predicted molecular profile similar to antipsychotic compounds. Our study characterizes nuciferine using in vitro and in vivo pharmacological assays.Nuciferine was first characterized in silico using the similarity ensemble approach, and was followed by further characterization and validation using the Psychoactive Drug Screening Program of the National Institute of Mental Health. Nuciferine was then tested in vivo in the head-twitch response, pre-pulse inhibition, hyperlocomotor activity, and drug discrimination paradigms.Nuciferine shares a receptor profile similar to aripiprazole-like antipsychotic drugs. Nuciferine was an antagonist at 5-HT2A, 5-HT2C, and 5-HT2B, an inverse agonist at 5-HT7, a partial agonist at D2, D5 and 5-HT6, an agonist at 5-HT1A and D4 receptors, and inhibited the dopamine transporter. In rodent models relevant to antipsychotic drug action, nuciferine blocked head-twitch responses and discriminative stimulus effects of a 5-HT2A agonist, substituted for clozapine discriminative stimulus, enhanced amphetamine induced locomotor activity, inhibited phencyclidine (PCP-induced locomotor activity, and rescued PCP-induced disruption of prepulse inhibition without induction of catalepsy.The molecular profile of nuciferine was similar but not identical to that shared with several approved antipsychotic drugs suggesting that nuciferine has atypical antipsychotic-like actions.

  3. Design Expert(®) supported optimization and predictive analysis of selegiline nanoemulsion via the olfactory region with enhanced behavioural performance in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Shobhit; Ali, Javed; Baboota, Sanjula

    2016-10-28

    Selegiline is a monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) inhibitor and is used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. The main problem associated with its oral administration is its low oral bioavailability (10%) due to its poor aqueous solubility and extensive first pass metabolism. The aim of the present research work was to develop a nanoemulsion loaded with selegiline for direct nose-to-brain delivery for the better management of Parkinson's disease. A quality by design (QbD) approach was used in a statistical multivariate method for the preparation and optimization of nanoemulsion. In this study, four independent variables were chosen, in which two were compositions and two were process variables, while droplet size, transmittance, zeta potential and drug release were selected as response variables. The optimized formulation was assessed for efficacy in Parkinson's disease using behavioural studies, namely forced swimming, locomotor, catalepsy, muscle coordination, akinesia and bradykinesia or pole test in Wistar rats. The observed droplet size, polydispersity index (PDI), refractive index, transmittance, zeta potential and viscosity of selegiline nanoemulsion were found to be 61.43 ± 4.10 nm, 0.203 ± 0.005, 1.30 ± 0.01, 99.80 ± 0.04%, -34 mV and 31.85 ± 0.24 mPas respectively. Surface characterization studies demonstrated a spherical shape of nanoemulsion which showed 3.7 times enhancement in drug permeation as compared to drug suspension. The results of behaviour studies showed that treatment of haloperidol induced Parkinson's disease in rats with selegiline nanoemulsion (administered intranasally) showed significant improvement in behavioural activities in comparison to orally administered drug. These findings demonstrate that nanoemulsion could be a promising new drug delivery carrier for intranasal delivery of selegiline in the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  4. Behavioral effects of the novel potent cannabinoid CB1 agonist AM 4054.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Peter J; Thakur, Ganesh A; Vemuri, V Kiran; McClure, Evan D; Brown, Cara M; Winston, Keisha M; Wood, Jodianne T; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Salamone, John D

    2013-08-01

    Due to the ubiquity of the CB1 cannabinoid receptor throughout the nervous system, as well as the many potential therapeutic uses of CB1 agonist-based interventions, it is desirable to synthesize novel probes of the CB1 receptor. Here, the acute behavioral effects of systemic (i.p.) administration of the putative novel CB1 full agonist AM 4054 were tested in rats. In Experiment 1, a dose range (0.15625-1.25 mg/kg) of AM 4054 produced effects consistent with CB1 agonism in the cannabinoid tetrad of tasks in rats, including induction of analgesia, catalepsy, hypothermia, and locomotor suppression. These effects were reversed with the CB1-selective inverse agonist AM 251 in Experiment 2, indicating that AM 4054 produced CB1 receptor-mediated effects. Analysis of open-field activity indicated that the reduction in locomotion is more consistent with general motor slowing than anxiogenesis. AM 4054 (0.0625-0.5 mg/kg) also dose-dependently reduced fixed-ratio 5 (FR5) operant responding for food in Experiment 3, and microanalysis of the timing and rate of lever pressing indicated a pattern of suppression similar to other CB1 agonists. Minimum doses of AM 4054 (0.125-0.3125 mg/kg) required to produce significant effects in these behavioral assays were lower than those of many CB1 agonists. It is likely that AM 4054 is a potent pharmacological tool for assessment of cannabinoid receptor function. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Animal models of Parkinson׳s disease: Effects of two adenosine A2A receptor antagonists ST4206 and ST3932, metabolites of 2-n-Butyl-9-methyl-8-[1,2,3]triazol-2-yl-9H-purin-6-ylamine (ST1535).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasi, Maria Antonietta; Minetti, Patrizia; Lombardo, Katia; Riccioni, Teresa; Caprioli, Antonio; Vertechy, Mario; Di Serio, Stefano; Pace, Silvia; Borsini, Franco

    2015-08-15

    Antagonism of the adenosine A2A receptor represents a promising strategy for non-dopaminergic treatment of Parkinson׳s disease (PD). Previously, the adenosine A2A receptor antagonist ST1535 was shown to possess potential beneficial effects in animal models of PD. Two metabolites of ST1535, namely ST3932 and ST4206, were tested in vitro to assess their affinity and activity on cloned human A2A adenosine receptors, and their metabolic profile. Additionally, ST3932 and ST4206 were investigated in vivo in animal models of PD following oral/intraperitoneal administration of 10, 20 and 40mg/kg using ST1535 as a reference compound. ST3932 and ST4206 displayed high affinity and antagonist behaviour for cloned human adenosine A2A receptors. The Ki values for ST1535, ST3932 and ST4206 were 8, 8 and 12nM, respectively, and their IC50 values on cyclic AMP were 427, 450 and 990nM, respectively. ST1535, ST3932 and ST4206 antagonized (orally) haloperidol-induced catalepsy in mice, potentiated (intraperitoneally) the number of contralateral rotations induced by l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA) (3mg/kg) plus benserazide (6mg/kg) in 6-Hydroxydopamine hydrobromide (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats, and increased mouse motor activity by oral route. Thus, ST3932 and ST4206, two ST1535 metabolites, show a pharmacological activity similar to ST1535, both in vitro and in vivo, and may be regarded as an interesting pharmacological alternative to ST1535. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. ADN-1184 a monoaminergic ligand with 5-HT(6/7) receptor antagonist activity: pharmacological profile and potential therapeutic utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kołaczkowski, M; Mierzejewski, P; Bieńkowski, P; Wesołowska, A; Newman-Tancredi, A

    2014-02-01

    Many dementia patients exhibit behavioural and psychological symptoms (BPSD) that include psychosis, aggressivity, depression and anxiety. Antipsychotic drugs are frequently prescribed but fail to significantly attenuate mood deficits, may interfere with cognitive function and are associated with motor and cardiac side effects, which are problematic in elderly patients. A need therefore exists for drugs that are better suited for the treatment of BPSD. We used in vitro cellular and in vivo behavioural tests to characterize ADN-1184, a novel arylsulfonamide ligand with potential utility for treatment of BPSD. ADN-1184 exhibits substantial 5-HT6 /5-HT7 /5-HT2A /D2 receptor affinity and antagonist properties in vitro. In tests of antipsychotic-like activity, it reversed MK-801-induced hyperactivity and stereotypies and inhibited conditioned avoidance response (MED = 3 mg·kg(-1) i.p.). Remarkably, ADN-1184 also reduced immobility time in the forced swim test at low doses (0.3 and 1 mg·kg(-1) i.p.; higher doses were not significantly active). Notably, up to 30 mg·kg(-1) ADN-1184 did not impair memory performance in the passive avoidance test or elicit significant catalepsy and only modestly inhibited spontaneous locomotor activity (MED = 30 mg·kg(-1) i.p.). ADN-1184 combines antipsychotic-like with antidepressant-like properties without interfering with memory function or locomotion. This profile is better than that of commonly used atypical antipsychotics tested under the same conditions and suggests that it is feasible to identify drugs that improve BPSD, without exacerbating cognitive deficit or movement impairment, which are of particular concern in patients with dementia. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  7. ADN-1184 a monoaminergic ligand with 5-HT6/7 receptor antagonist activity: pharmacological profile and potential therapeutic utility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kołaczkowski, M; Mierzejewski, P; Bieńkowski, P; Wesołowska, A; Newman-Tancredi, A

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Many dementia patients exhibit behavioural and psychological symptoms (BPSD) that include psychosis, aggressivity, depression and anxiety. Antipsychotic drugs are frequently prescribed but fail to significantly attenuate mood deficits, may interfere with cognitive function and are associated with motor and cardiac side effects, which are problematic in elderly patients. A need therefore exists for drugs that are better suited for the treatment of BPSD. Experimental Approach We used in vitro cellular and in vivo behavioural tests to characterize ADN-1184, a novel arylsulfonamide ligand with potential utility for treatment of BPSD. Key Results ADN-1184 exhibits substantial 5-HT6/5-HT7/5-HT2A/D2 receptor affinity and antagonist properties in vitro. In tests of antipsychotic-like activity, it reversed MK-801-induced hyperactivity and stereotypies and inhibited conditioned avoidance response (MED = 3 mg·kg−1 i.p.). Remarkably, ADN-1184 also reduced immobility time in the forced swim test at low doses (0.3 and 1 mg·kg−1 i.p.; higher doses were not significantly active). Notably, up to 30 mg·kg−1 ADN-1184 did not impair memory performance in the passive avoidance test or elicit significant catalepsy and only modestly inhibited spontaneous locomotor activity (MED = 30 mg·kg−1 i.p.). Conclusions and Implications ADN-1184 combines antipsychotic-like with antidepressant-like properties without interfering with memory function or locomotion. This profile is better than that of commonly used atypical antipsychotics tested under the same conditions and suggests that it is feasible to identify drugs that improve BPSD, without exacerbating cognitive deficit or movement impairment, which are of particular concern in patients with dementia. PMID:24199650

  8. Pharmacological and chemical screening of Byrsonima crassifolia, a medicinal tree from Mexico. Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béjar, E; Malone, M H

    1993-06-01

    Leaf and bark extracts of Byrsonima crassifolia displayed concentration-dependent, spasmogenic effects on rat fundus in vitro and biphasic effects on rat jejunum and ileum in vitro. Dose-related in vivo effects in intact rats using hippocratic screening were: decrease in motor activity, mild analgesia, back tonus, enophthalmos, reversible palpebral ptosis, ear blanching, Robichaud positive, catalepsy (awake) and strong hypothermia. Rat fundus in vitro was used as the bioassay to carry out an activity-directed separation. Bioactive material was concentrated in a 2% acetic acid leaf extract (HOAcE). Potency of HOAcE was increased by the presence of pargyline in the bathing solution. HOAcE was antagonized noncompetively by 1(1-naphthyl) piperazine (1-NP) and cyproheptadine and antagonized competitively by atropine (ATR). Cumulative concentration-response curves of HOAcE and serotonin (5-HT) did not show significant departure from parallelism (P > 0.1) and 5-HT potency was 6040 times that of HOAcE (95% confidence limits: 4620-7850). Solvent extraction of HOAcE split the spasmogenic activity of HOAcE into two types: (i) high-efficacy, low-potency, n-butanol-extracted, pargyline- and 1-NP-sensitive, ATR-insensitive activity, and (ii) low-efficacy, high-potency, ethyl acetate-extracted, pargyline-insensitive, ATR- and 1-NP-sensitive activity. HOAcE lacked muscarinic and nicotinic effects on rat jejunum and frog rectus abdominis. Results suggest the presence of more than one spasmogenic compound in the plant.

  9. Design Expert® supported optimization and predictive analysis of selegiline nanoemulsion via the olfactory region with enhanced behavioural performance in Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Shobhit; Ali, Javed; Baboota, Sanjula

    2016-10-01

    Selegiline is a monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) inhibitor and is used in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. The main problem associated with its oral administration is its low oral bioavailability (10%) due to its poor aqueous solubility and extensive first pass metabolism. The aim of the present research work was to develop a nanoemulsion loaded with selegiline for direct nose-to-brain delivery for the better management of Parkinson’s disease. A quality by design (QbD) approach was used in a statistical multivariate method for the preparation and optimization of nanoemulsion. In this study, four independent variables were chosen, in which two were compositions and two were process variables, while droplet size, transmittance, zeta potential and drug release were selected as response variables. The optimized formulation was assessed for efficacy in Parkinson’s disease using behavioural studies, namely forced swimming, locomotor, catalepsy, muscle coordination, akinesia and bradykinesia or pole test in Wistar rats. The observed droplet size, polydispersity index (PDI), refractive index, transmittance, zeta potential and viscosity of selegiline nanoemulsion were found to be 61.43 ± 4.10 nm, 0.203 ± 0.005, 1.30 ± 0.01, 99.80 ± 0.04%, -34 mV and 31.85 ± 0.24 mPas respectively. Surface characterization studies demonstrated a spherical shape of nanoemulsion which showed 3.7 times enhancement in drug permeation as compared to drug suspension. The results of behaviour studies showed that treatment of haloperidol induced Parkinson’s disease in rats with selegiline nanoemulsion (administered intranasally) showed significant improvement in behavioural activities in comparison to orally administered drug. These findings demonstrate that nanoemulsion could be a promising new drug delivery carrier for intranasal delivery of selegiline in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease.

  10. Mu Opioid Receptors in Gamma-Aminobutyric Acidergic Forebrain Neurons Moderate Motivation for Heroin and Palatable Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbogne, Pauline; Gardon, Olivier; Martín-García, Elena; Keyworth, Helen L; Matsui, Aya; Mechling, Anna E; Bienert, Thomas; Nasseef, Taufiq; Robé, Anne; Moquin, Luc; Darcq, Emmanuel; Ben Hamida, Sami; Robledo, Patricia; Matifas, Audrey; Befort, Katia; Gavériaux-Ruff, Claire; Harsan, Laura-Adela; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Hennig, Jurgen; Gratton, Alain; Kitchen, Ian; Bailey, Alexis; Alvarez, Veronica A; Maldonado, Rafael; Kieffer, Brigitte L

    2017-05-01

    Mu opioid receptors (MORs) are central to pain control, drug reward, and addictive behaviors, but underlying circuit mechanisms have been poorly explored by genetic approaches. Here we investigate the contribution of MORs expressed in gamma-aminobutyric acidergic forebrain neurons to major biological effects of opiates, and also challenge the canonical disinhibition model of opiate reward. We used Dlx5/6-mediated recombination to create conditional Oprm1 mice in gamma-aminobutyric acidergic forebrain neurons. We characterized the genetic deletion by histology, electrophysiology, and microdialysis; probed neuronal activation by c-Fos immunohistochemistry and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging; and investigated main behavioral responses to opiates, including motivation to obtain heroin and palatable food. Mutant mice showed MOR transcript deletion mainly in the striatum. In the ventral tegmental area, local MOR activity was intact, and reduced activity was only observed at the level of striatonigral afferents. Heroin-induced neuronal activation was modified at both sites, and whole-brain functional networks were altered in live animals. Morphine analgesia was not altered, and neither was physical dependence to chronic morphine. In contrast, locomotor effects of heroin were abolished, and heroin-induced catalepsy was increased. Place preference to heroin was not modified, but remarkably, motivation to obtain heroin and palatable food was enhanced in operant self-administration procedures. Our study reveals dissociable MOR functions across mesocorticolimbic networks. Thus, beyond a well-established role in reward processing, operating at the level of local ventral tegmental area neurons, MORs also moderate motivation for appetitive stimuli within forebrain circuits that drive motivated behaviors. Copyright © 2017 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Pharmacological profile of the selective FAAH inhibitor KDS-4103 (URB597).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piomelli, Daniele; Tarzia, Giorgio; Duranti, Andrea; Tontini, Andrea; Mor, Marco; Compton, Timothy R; Dasse, Olivier; Monaghan, Edward P; Parrott, Jeff A; Putman, David

    2006-01-01

    In the present article, we review the pharmacological properties of KDS-4103 (URB597), a highly potent and selective inhibitor of the enzyme fatty-acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), which catalyzes the intracellular hydrolysis of the endocannabinoid anandamide. In vitro, KDS-4103 inhibits FAAH activity with median inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)) of 5 nM in rat brain membranes and 3 nM in human liver microsomes. In vivo, KDS-4103 inhibits rat brain FAAH activity after intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration with a median inhibitory dose (ID(50)) of 0.15 mg/kg. The compound does not significantly interact with other cannabinoid-related targets, including cannabinoid receptors and anandamide transport, or with a broad panel of receptors, ion channels, transporters and enzymes. By i.p. administration to rats and mice KDS-4103 elicits significant, anxiolytic-like, antidepressant-like and analgesic effects, which are prevented by treatment with CB1 receptor antagonists. By contrast, at doses that significantly inhibit FAAH activity and substantially raise brain anandamide levels, KDS-4103 does not evoke classical cannabinoid-like effects (e.g., catalepsy, hypothermia, hyperphagia), does not cause place preference, and does not produce generalization to the discriminative effects of the active ingredient of cannabis, Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta9-THC). These findings suggest that KDS-4103 acts by enhancing the tonic actions of anandamide on a subset of CB(1) receptors, which may normally be engaged in controlling emotions and pain. KDS-4103 is orally available in rats and cynomolgus monkeys. Sub-chronic repeated dose studies (1,500 mg/kg, per os) in these two species have not demonstrated systemic toxicity. Likewise, no toxicity was noted in bacterial cytotoxicity tests in vitro and in the Ames test. Furthermore, no deficits were observed in rats on the rotarod test after acute i.p. treatment with KDS-4103 at doses up to 5 mg/kg or in a functional observation battery

  12. Sex differences in cannabinoid 1 vs. cannabinoid 2 receptor-selective antagonism of antinociception produced by delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and CP55,940 in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, Rebecca M; Wakley, Alexa A; Tsutsui, Kimberly T; Laggart, Jillian D

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether sex differences in cannabinoid (CB)-induced antinociception and motoric effects can be attributed to differential activation of CB(1) or CB(2) receptors. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with vehicle, rimonabant [5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-N-1-piperidinyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (SR141716A), a putative CB(1) receptor-selective antagonist; 0.1-10 mg/kg] or 5-(4-chloro-3-methylphenyl)-1-[(4-methylphenyl)methyl]-N-[(1S,2S,4R)-1,3,3-trimethylbicyclo[2.2.1]hept-2-yl]-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (SR144528) (a putative CB(2) receptor-selective antagonist; 1.0-10 mg/kg). Thirty minutes later, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC; 1.25-40 mg/kg) or 5-(1,1-dimethylheptyl)-2-[5-hydroxy-2-(3-hydroxypropyl)cyclohexyl]phenol (CP55,940) (0.05-1.6 mg/kg) was injected. Paw pressure and tail withdrawal antinociception, locomotor activity, and catalepsy were measured. Rimonabant dose-dependently antagonized THC and CP55,940 in each test, but was up to 10 times more potent in female than male rats on the nociceptive tests; estimates of rimonabant affinity (apparent pK(B)) for the CB(1) receptor were approximately 0.5 to 1 mol/kg higher in female than male rats. SR144528 partially antagonized THC-induced tail withdrawal antinociception and locomotor activity in females, but this antagonism was not dose-dependent or consistent; no SR144528 antagonism was observed in either sex tested with CP55,940. Neither the time course of rimonabant antagonism nor the plasma levels of rimonabant differed between the sexes. Rimonabant and SR144528 did not antagonize morphine-induced antinociception, and naloxone did not antagonize THC-induced antinociception in either sex. These results suggest that THC produces acute antinociceptive and motoric effects via activation of CB(1), and perhaps under some conditions, CB(2) receptors, in female rats, whereas THC acts primarily at CB(1) receptors in male rats. Higher apparent pK(B) for

  13. Gonadal hormone modulation of ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol-induced antinociception and metabolism in female versus male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, R M; Haas, A E; Wiley, J L; Yu, Z; Clowers, B H

    2017-01-01

    The gonadal hormones testosterone (T) in adult males and estradiol (E2) in adult females have been reported to modulate behavioral effects of ∆ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). This study determined whether activational effects of T and E2 are sex-specific, and whether hormones modulate production of the active metabolite 11-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC) and the inactive metabolite 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THC-COOH). Adult male and female rats were gonadectomized (GDX) and treated with nothing (0), T (10-mm Silastic capsule/100g body weight), or E2 (1-mm Silastic capsule/rat). Three weeks later, saline or the cytochrome P450 inhibitor proadifen (25mg/kg; to block THC metabolism and boost THC's effects) was injected i.p.; 1h later, vehicle or THC (3mg/kg females, 5mg/kg males) was injected i.p., and rats were tested for antinociceptive and motoric effects 15-240min post-injection. T did not consistently alter THC-induced antinociception in males, but decreased it in females (tail withdrawal test). Conversely, T decreased THC-induced catalepsy in males, but had no effect in females. E2 did not alter THC-induced antinociception in females, but enhanced it in males. The discrepant effects of T and E2 on males' and females' behavioral responses to THC suggests that sexual differentiation of THC sensitivity is not simply due to activational effects of hormones, but also occurs via organizational hormone or sex chromosome effects. Analysis of serum showed that proadifen increased THC levels, E2 increased 11-OH-THC in GDX males, and T decreased 11-OH-THC (and to a lesser extent, THC) in GDX females. Thus, hormone modulation of THC's behavioral effects is caused in part by hormone modulation of THC oxidation to its active metabolite. However, the fact that hormone modulation of metabolism did not alter THC sensitivity similarly on all behavioral measures within each sex suggests that other mechanisms also play a role in gonadal hormone modulation of THC sensitivity in adult rats

  14. 5-HT1A Receptor Activation Improves Anti-Cataleptic Effects of Levodopa in 6-Hydroxydopamine-Lesioned Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Reyhani-Rad

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and the purpose of the study: In Parkinsons disease (PD prolong use of L-DOPA causes some motor disorders such as wearing-off and L-DOPA induced dyskinesia (LID. In this investigation the effect of 8-OHDAPT, as a 5-HT1A agonist on anti-cataleptic effect of L-DOPA in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA lesioned male Wistar rats was investigated. Methods: Catalepsy was induced by unilateral injection of 6-OHDA (8 μg/2μl/rat into the central region of the SNc. After 3 weeks as a recovery period, animals received intraperitoneally (i.p. L-DOPA (15 mg/kg twice daily for 20 days, and anti-cataleptic effect of L-DOPA was assessed by bar-test at days of 5, 10, 15 and 20. Results and major conclusion: The results showed that L-DOPA had anti-cataleptic effect only until the day of 15, and its effect was decreased on the day of 20. On the day of 21, rats were co-injected with three different doses of 8-OHDAPT (0.1, 0.5 and 2.5 mg/kg, i.p. and L-DOPA (15 mg/kg, ip. 8-Hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino tetralin (8-OHDAPT improved anti-cataleptic effect of L-DOPA at the dose of 0.5 mg/kg. Moreover the effect of 8-OHDAPT on anti-cataleptic effect of L-DOPA (15 mg/kg, ip was abolished by 1-(2-methyoxyphenyl-4-[4-(2-phthalamido butyl] piperazine hydrobromide (NAN-190; 0.5 mg/kg, i.p. as a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist. According to the obtained results, it may be concluded that activation of 5-HT1A receptors by 8-OHDAPT may improve anti-cataleptic effect of L-DOPA in a 6-OHDA- induced rat model of PD. Further studies are required to clarify the exact mechanism of interaction between 5-HT1A and dopaminergic neurons.

  15. A role for α4(non-α6)* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in motor behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soll, Lindsey G; Grady, Sharon R; Salminen, Outi; Marks, Michael J; Tapper, Andrew R

    2013-10-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) containing either the α4 and/or α6 subunit are robustly expressed in dopaminergic nerve terminals in dorsal striatum where they are hypothesized to modulate dopamine (DA) release via acetylcholine (ACh) stimulation from cholinergic interneurons. However, pharmacological blockade of nAChRs or genetic deletion of individual nAChR subunits, including α4 and α6, in mice, yields little effect on motor behavior. Based on the putative role of nAChRs containing the α4 subunit in modulation of DA in dorsal striatum, we hypothesized that mice expressing a single point mutation in the α4 nAChR subunit, Leu9'Ala, that renders nAChRs hypersensitive to agonist, would exhibit exaggerated differences in motor behavior compared to WT mice. To gain insight into these differences, we challenged WT and Leu9'Ala mice with the α4β2 nAChR antagonist dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHβE). Interestingly, in Leu9'Ala mice, DHβE elicited a robust, reversible motor impairment characterized by hypolocomotion, akinesia, catalepsy, clasping, and tremor; whereas the antagonist had little effect in WT mice at all doses tested. Pre-injection of nicotine (0.1 mg/kg) blocked DHβE-induced motor impairment in Leu9'Ala mice confirming that the phenotype was mediated by antagonism of nAChRs. In addition, SKF82958 (1 mg/kg) and amphetamine (5 mg/kg) prevented the motor phenotype. DHβE significantly activated more neurons within striatum and substantia nigra pars reticulata in Leu9'Ala mice compared to WT animals, suggesting activation of the indirect motor pathway as the circuit underlying motor dysfunction. ACh evoked DA release from Leu9'Ala striatal synaptosomes revealed agonist hypersensitivity only at α4(non-α6)* nAChRs. Similarly, α6 nAChR subunit deletion in an α4 hypersensitive nAChR (Leu9'Ala/α6 KO) background had little effect on the DHβE-induced phenotype, suggesting an α4(non-α6)* nAChR-dependent mechanism. Together, these data indicate

  16. Synergy between L-DOPA and a novel positive allosteric modulator of metabotropic glutamate receptor 4: implications for Parkinson's disease treatment and dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennouar, Khaled-Ezaheir; Uberti, Michelle A; Melon, Christophe; Bacolod, Maria D; Jimenez, Hermogenes N; Cajina, Manuel; Kerkerian-Le Goff, Lydia; Doller, Darío; Gubellini, Paolo

    2013-03-01

    Group III metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors are localized in presynaptic terminals within basal ganglia (BG) circuitry that become hyperactive due to dopamine depletion in Parkinson's disease (PD). For this reason, group III mGlu receptors, in particular mGlu4, have been considered as key strategic targets for non-dopaminergic pharmacological treatments aimed at modulating these synapses, without producing the well known side-effects of l-DOPA, in particular the highly disabling l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID). Herein we add physiological and functional support to this hypothesis using Lu AF21934, a novel selective and brain-penetrant mGlu4 receptor positive allosteric modulator (PAM) tool compound. By in vitro electrophysiological recordings we demonstrate that Lu AF21934 inhibits corticostriatal synaptic transmission and enhances the effect of the orthosteric mGlu4 receptor-preferred agonist LSP1-2111. In naïve rats, Lu AF21934 dose-dependently (10 and 30 mg/kg) alleviated haloperidol-induced catalepsy. In hemiparkinsonian rats (unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion of the substantia nigra pars compacta), Lu AF21934 alone did not affect akinesia at the doses tested (10 and 30 mg/kg). However, when Lu AF21934 was combined with sub-threshold doses of l-DOPA (1 and 5 mg/kg), it acted synergistically in alleviating akinesia in a dose-dependent manner and, notably, also reduced the incidence of LID but not its severity. Interestingly, these effects occurred at Lu AF21934 brain free concentrations that showed functional activity in in vitro screens (calcium flux and electrophysiology assays). These results support the potential for antiparkinsonian clinical use of a combined treatment consisting in l-DOPA and a mGlu4 receptor PAM to reduce efficacious l-DOPA doses (generally known as l-DOPA sparing), while maintaining the same benefit on PD motor troubles, and at the same time minimizing the development of LID. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled

  17. The effect of Ginkgo biloba extract on parkinsonisminduced biochemical changes in brain of irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd El-Aziz, E.R.

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neuro degenerative disorder after Alzheimer's disease. In the present study, neuro modulatory effects of standardized ginkgo biloba extract (EGb 761) and low dose whole-body γ-irradiation in a reserpine model of rat Parkinsonism were investigated. Male Wistar rats were pretreated orally with EGb 761 (100 mg/kg BW/day for 3 weeks) or low dose whole-body γ-irradiation (0.25 Gy once a week for 6 weeks) and their combination (EGb 761 was received during the last three weeks of the irradiation period) and then subjected to intraperitoneal injection of reserpine (5 mg/kg BW dissolved in 1% acetic acid) 24h after last dose of EGb761or radiation. All rats were sacrificed 24h after reserpine injection. Depletion of striatal dopamine (DA) level, increased oxidative stress indicated via depletion of glutathione (GSH), increased malondialdehyde (MDA) and iron levels; decrease of dopamine metabolites metabolizing enzymes; indicated by decrease of glutathione-S transferase (GST) and NADPH-quinone oxidoreductase (NQO) activities; mitochondrial dysfunction; indicated by decline of complex I activity and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) level and increased apoptosis; indicated by the decrease of mitochondrial B cell lymphoma-2 protein (Bcl-2) level and as shown by transmission electron microscope (TEM) were observed in brain of reserpine-induced PD model group, along with behavioral study indicated by increased catalepsy score. Moreover, the level of GSH was correlated with the levels of both DA (r = 0.78) and MDA (r = -0.93). The level of Bcl-2 was correlated with the complex I activity (r = 0.94) and ATP level (r = 0.98). Results revealed that either EGb 761 or irradiation and their combination ameliorated most of the biochemical and behavioral changes induced by reserpine possibly via replenishment of normal glutathione levels. This study revealed that EGb 761, which is a widely used herbal medicine and low dose of whole-body

  18. Antipsychotic and sedative effects of the leaf extract of Crassocephalum bauchiense (Hutch.) Milne-Redh (Asteraceae) in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotoing Taïwe, Germain; Ngo Bum, Elisabeth; Talla, Emmanuel; Dawe, Amadou; Okomolo Moto, Fleur Clarisse; Temkou Ngoupaye, Gwladys; Sidiki, Neteydji; Dabole, Bernard; Djomeni Dzeufiet, Paul Désiré; Dimo, Théophile; De Waard, Michel

    2012-08-30

    Crassocephalum bauchiense (Hutch.) Milne-Redh (Asteraceae) has been used as a medicine for the treatment of epilepsy, insomnia, dementia and psychotic disorders in Cameroonian traditional medicine. This study was designed to examine whether the aqueous extract and the alkaloid fraction prepared from the leaves of Crassocephalum bauchiense possess antipsychotic and sedative properties in rodents. The rectal temperature of mice was recorded with a probe thermometer at a constant depth. Novelty-induced rearing behavior is used to evaluate a central excitatory locomotor behavior in mice. The antipsychotic effects of the extracts were assessed using the apomorphine animal model of psychosis. The catalepsy test was tested based on the ability of the leaves extracts of Crassocephalum bauchiense to alter the duration of akinesia by placing the naive mice with both forelegs over a horizontal bar. The extracts of Crassocephalum bauchiense effects were evaluated on sodium pentobarbital-induced sleeping time. In addition, gamma-aminobutyric acid concentrations in the brain treated mice were also estimated. The aqueous extract and the alkaloid fraction from Crassocephalum bauchiense caused dose-dependent inhibition of novelty-induced rearing behavior, decreased the apomorphine-induced stereotypy and fighting, and had significant fall of the body temperature. The aqueous extract prolonged the sodium pentobarbital sleeping time. This prolongation was not reversed by bicuculline, a light-sensitive competitive antagonist of GABA(A) receptors complex. However, the effect of the aqueous extract on sodium pentobarbital-induced sleeping time was blocked by N-methyl-β-carboline-3-carboxamide, a partial inverse agonist of the benzodiazepine site in the GABA(A) receptor complex and flumazenil, a specific antagonist of the benzodiazepine site in the GABAA receptor complex. In biochemical experiments, the concentration of the inhibitory amino acid, gamma-aminobutyric acid, was

  19. Pharmacological characterization of LY233053: A structurally novel tetrazole-substituted competitive N-methyl-D-aspartic acid antagonist with a short duration of action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoepp, D.D.; Ornstein, P.L.; Leander, J.D.; Lodge, D.; Salhoff, C.R.; Zeman, S.; Zimmerman, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    This study reports the activity of a structurally novel excitatory amino acid receptor antagonist, LY233053 [cis-(+-)-4-[(2H-tetrazol-5-yl)methyl]piperidine-2-carboxylic acid], the first tetrazole-containing competitive N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) antagonist. LY233053 potently inhibited NMDA receptor binding to rat brain membranes as shown by the in vitro displacement of [3H] CGS19755 (IC50 = 107 +/- 7 nM). No appreciable affinity in [3H]alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) or [3H]kainate binding assays was observed (IC50 values greater than 10,000 nM). In vitro NMDA receptor antagonist activity was further demonstrated by selective inhibition of NMDA-induced depolarization in cortical wedges (IC50 = 4.2 +/- 0.4 microM vs. 40 microM NMDA). LY233053 was effective after in vivo systemic administration in a number of animal models. In neonatal rats, LY233053 selectively blocked NMDA-induced convulsions (ED50 = 14.5 mg/kg i.p.) with a relatively short duration of action (2-4 hr). In pigeons, LY233053 potently antagonized (ED50 = 1.3 mg/kg i.m.) the behavioral suppressant effects of 10 mg/kg of NMDA. However, a dose of 160 mg/kg, i.m., was required to produce phencyclidine-like catalepsy in pigeons. In mice, LY233053 protected against maximal electroshock-induced seizures at lower doses (ED50 = 19.9 mg/kg i.p.) than those that impaired horizontal screen performance (ED50 = 40.9 mg/kg i.p.). Cholinergic and GABAergic neuronal degenerations after striatal infusion of NMDA were prevented by single or multiple i.p. doses of LY233053. In summary, the antagonist activity of LY233053 after systemic administration demonstrates potential therapeutic value in conditions of neuronal cell loss due to NMDA receptor excitotoxicity