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Sample records for catalepsy

  1. Post-trial dopaminergic modulation of conditioned catalepsy: A single apomorphine induced increase/decrease in dopaminergic activation immediately following a conditioned catalepsy response can reverse/enhance a haloperidol conditioned and sensitized catalepsy response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Lucas Rangel; Dias, Flávia Regina Cruz; Santos, Breno Garone; Silva, Jade Leal Loureiro; Carey, Robert J; Carrera, Marinete Pinheiro

    2016-09-15

    Haloperidol can induce catalepsy and this drug effect can be conditioned as well as sensitized to contextual cues. We used a paired/unpaired Pavlovian conditioning protocol to establish haloperidol catalepsy conditioned and sensitized responses. Groups of rats were given 10 daily catalepsy tests following administration of vehicle (n=24) or haloperidol (1.0mg/kg) either paired (n=18) or unpaired (n=18) to testing. Subsequently, testing for conditioning was conducted and conditioning and sensitization of catalepsy were observed selectively in the paired group. Immediately following a second test for catalepsy conditioning, the groups were subdivided into 4 vehicle groups, 3 unpaired haloperidol groups and 3 paired haloperidol groups and were given one of three post-trial treatments (vehicle, 0.05mg/kg or 2.0mg/kg apomorphine). One day later the conditioned catalepsy test 3 was carried out and on the next day, a haloperidol challenge test was performed. The post-trial apomorphine treatments had major effects on the paired groups upon both conditioning and the haloperidol challenge test. The low dose apomorphine post-trial treatment enhanced both the conditioned and the haloperidol sensitized catalepsy responses. The high dose apomorphine post-trial treatment eliminated conditioned catalepsy and eliminated the initial acute catalepsy response to haloperidol that was induced in the vehicle control groups. These results demonstrate the sensitivity of conditioned drug cues to modification by increases/decreases in activity of the dopamine system in the immediate post-trial interval after a conditioning trial. This demonstration that post-trial dopaminergic drug treatments can modify conditioned drug behavior has broad implications for conditioned drug effects.

  2. Post-trial dopaminergic modulation of conditioned catalepsy: A single apomorphine induced increase/decrease in dopaminergic activation immediately following a conditioned catalepsy response can reverse/enhance a haloperidol conditioned and sensitized catalepsy response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Lucas Rangel; Dias, Flávia Regina Cruz; Santos, Breno Garone; Silva, Jade Leal Loureiro; Carey, Robert J; Carrera, Marinete Pinheiro

    2016-09-15

    Haloperidol can induce catalepsy and this drug effect can be conditioned as well as sensitized to contextual cues. We used a paired/unpaired Pavlovian conditioning protocol to establish haloperidol catalepsy conditioned and sensitized responses. Groups of rats were given 10 daily catalepsy tests following administration of vehicle (n=24) or haloperidol (1.0mg/kg) either paired (n=18) or unpaired (n=18) to testing. Subsequently, testing for conditioning was conducted and conditioning and sensitization of catalepsy were observed selectively in the paired group. Immediately following a second test for catalepsy conditioning, the groups were subdivided into 4 vehicle groups, 3 unpaired haloperidol groups and 3 paired haloperidol groups and were given one of three post-trial treatments (vehicle, 0.05mg/kg or 2.0mg/kg apomorphine). One day later the conditioned catalepsy test 3 was carried out and on the next day, a haloperidol challenge test was performed. The post-trial apomorphine treatments had major effects on the paired groups upon both conditioning and the haloperidol challenge test. The low dose apomorphine post-trial treatment enhanced both the conditioned and the haloperidol sensitized catalepsy responses. The high dose apomorphine post-trial treatment eliminated conditioned catalepsy and eliminated the initial acute catalepsy response to haloperidol that was induced in the vehicle control groups. These results demonstrate the sensitivity of conditioned drug cues to modification by increases/decreases in activity of the dopamine system in the immediate post-trial interval after a conditioning trial. This demonstration that post-trial dopaminergic drug treatments can modify conditioned drug behavior has broad implications for conditioned drug effects. PMID:27173428

  3. Histamine Potentiates Cyclosomatostatin-Induced Catalepsy in Old Rats

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    Ionov

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background The decreased level of somatostatin and increased level of histamine are detected in the Parkinsonian brain. In old Wistar rats, the brain somatostatin deficiency can initiate catalepsy that suggests the pathogenic significance of this abnormality in Parkinson’s disease (PD. The ability of histamine to affect the somatostatin deficiency action is not studied. Objectives The current study aimed to examine if histamine alters the cataleptogenic activity of the brain somatostatin deficiency in Wistar rats. Materials and Methods The animals used in the study were 100 - 110 and 736 - 767 days old. Catalepsy was evaluated by the bar test. The inhibition of the brain somatostatin activity was simulated by I.C.V. administration of cyclosomatostatin (cycloSOM, a somatostatin receptor antagonist. Results CycloSOM (0.2, 1.0, and 5.0 µg and histamine (1.0 and 10.0 µg alone were ineffective in both young and old animals. In combination, however, cycloSOM and histamine initiated cataleptic response in old rats. Effect of the combination was inhibited by H1 and H2 but not H3 antagonists. Conclusions CycloSOM and histamine synergistically exert catalepsy in old rats. In light of these data, the combination of the decreased brain level of somatostatin and increased brain level of histamine may be of pathogenic relevance for extrapyramidal signs in PD.

  4. Effect of Different Drugs Influencing Monoamine Neurotransmission on Haloperidol-Induced Catalepsy in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    ABDEL-SALAM, Omar Mohamed

    2007-01-01

    Aim: Catalepsy occurs following high dopamine D2 receptor blockade by the typical antipsychotic drug haloperidol. The present study investigated the effect of different drugs affecting monoamine neurotransmission in this animal model of Parkinson's disease in mice. Materials and Methods: Drugs were intraperitoneally administered with haloperidol 30 min prior to testing. Catalepsy was measured using the bar test. Results: Catalepsy duration was reduced by the non-selective noradrena...

  5. Effect of Tribulus terrestris on haloperidol-induced catalepsy in mice

    OpenAIRE

    B S Nishchal; Rai, S.; Prabhu, M. N.; Sheetal D Ullal; S. Rajeswari; Gopalakrishna, H. N.

    2014-01-01

    Haloperidol, an antipsychotic drug, leads to the development of a behavioural state called catalepsy, in which the animal is not able to correct an externally imposed posture. In the present study we have attempted to evaluate the anticataleptic effect of Tribulus terrestris on haloperidol-induced catalepsy in albino mice. Mice were allocated to four groups, each group containing six animals. Both, the test drug, Tribulus terrestris and the standard drug trihexyphenidyl were uniformly suspend...

  6. Haloperidol, but not clozapine, produces dramatic catalepsy in Δ9-THC-treated rats: possible clinical implications

    OpenAIRE

    Marchese, Giorgio; Casti, Paola; Ruiu, Stefania; Saba, Pierluigi; Sanna, Angela; Casu,Gianluca; Pani, Luca

    2003-01-01

    The effect on rat catalepsy induced by Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) in association with haloperidol (HP) or clozapine (CLOZ) administration was investigated.Δ9-THC dose-dependently increased HP (0.05–1 mg kg−1, s.c.)-induced rat catalepsy, while no catalepsy was observed after CLOZ (1–20 mg kg−1, s.c.) or Δ9-THC+CLOZ administration.The CB1 antagonist SR141716A (0.5–5 mg kg−1, i.p.) reversed the increase mediated by Δ9-THC on HP-induced catalepsy.The D2 agonist quinpirole completely revers...

  7. Effect of Tribulus terrestris on haloperidol-induced catalepsy in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B S Nishchal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Haloperidol, an antipsychotic drug, leads to the development of a behavioural state called catalepsy, in which the animal is not able to correct an externally imposed posture. In the present study we have attempted to evaluate the anticataleptic effect of Tribulus terrestris on haloperidol-induced catalepsy in albino mice. Mice were allocated to four groups, each group containing six animals. Both, the test drug, Tribulus terrestris and the standard drug trihexyphenidyl were uniformly suspended in 1% gum acacia solution. Catalepsy was induced in mice with haloperidol (1.0 mg/kg, intraperitoneally. The first group received the vehicle (10 ml/kg, orally, the second group received trihexyphenidyl (10 mg/kg, orally and the remaining two groups received Tribulus terrestris (100, 200 mg/kg, orally. The animals were assessed after single and repeated dose administration for ten days, 30 min prior to haloperidol, using standard bar test. The result of the present study demonstrates Tribulus terrestris has a protective effect against haloperidol-induced catalepsy, which is comparable to the standard drug used for the same purpose. Our study indicates Tribulus terrestris can be used to prevent haloperidol-induced extrapyramidal side effects.

  8. Effect of Tribulus terrestris on Haloperidol-induced Catalepsy in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishchal, B S; Rai, S; Prabhu, M N; Ullal, Sheetal D; Rajeswari, S; Gopalakrishna, H N

    2014-01-01

    Haloperidol, an antipsychotic drug, leads to the development of a behavioural state called catalepsy, in which the animal is not able to correct an externally imposed posture. In the present study we have attempted to evaluate the anticataleptic effect of Tribulus terrestris on haloperidol-induced catalepsy in albino mice. Mice were allocated to four groups, each group containing six animals. Both, the test drug, Tribulus terrestris and the standard drug trihexyphenidyl were uniformly suspended in 1% gum acacia solution. Catalepsy was induced in mice with haloperidol (1.0 mg/kg, intraperitoneally). The first group received the vehicle (10 ml/kg, orally), the second group received trihexyphenidyl (10 mg/kg, orally) and the remaining two groups received Tribulus terrestris (100, 200 mg/kg, orally). The animals were assessed after single and repeated dose administration for ten days, 30 min prior to haloperidol, using standard bar test. The result of the present study demonstrates Tribulus terrestris has a protective effect against haloperidol-induced catalepsy, which is comparable to the standard drug used for the same purpose. Our study indicates Tribulus terrestris can be used to prevent haloperidol-induced extrapyramidal side effects. PMID:25593394

  9. Effects of Cannabis sativa extract on haloperidol-induced catalepsy and oxidative stress in the mice

    OpenAIRE

    Abdel-Salam, Omar M.E.; El-Din M. Gaafar, Alaa; El Sayed El-Shamarka, Marawa; Salem, Neveen A.

    2012-01-01

    Haloperidol is a classic antipsychotic drug known for its propensity to cause extrapyramidal symptoms due to blockade of dopamine D2 receptors in the striatum. Interest in medicinal uses of cannabis is growing. Cannabis sativa has been suggested as a possible adjunctive in treatment of Parkinson's disease. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of repeated administration of an extract of Cannabis sativa on catalepsy and brain oxidative stress induced by haloperidol administration i...

  10. Epilepsy and catalepsy in Anglo-American literature between romanticism and realism: Tennyson, Poe, Eliot and Collins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, P

    2000-12-01

    Epilepsy and catalepsy were not clearly separated in the minds of people in the early 19th century, and catalepsy may have been used as a diagnostic euphemism for epilepsy. Tennyson, in "The Princess" describes, under the diagnosis of catalepsy, probable temporal lobe epileptic dreamy states with derealization which serve as a metaphor of sexual and moral ambivalence, the poem's central theme. It seems that Tennyson knew such seizures from his own father who had been given a diagnosis of catalepsy. Poe gave his Berenice in the novella of the same title a diagnosis of epilepsy as a reason for a premature burial. However, there was a good deal of unlikelyhood in this, and when he came to this theme in "The Fall of the House of Usher" and in "The Premature Burial" he chose instead a diagnosis of catalepsy which fitted better with the plot. The fits of the title character in George Eliot's Silas Marner, diagnosed as catalepsy, would today rather be seen as epileptic twilight states. It would seem that this author drew from contemporary dictionary descriptions which described conditions similar to Marner's fits under the heading of catalepsy. In Eliot's "legend with a realistic treatment", the twilight states are a central factor in the plot and explain Marner's reclusion and passivity. In Poor Miss Finch by English realist Wilkie Collins, the post-traumatic seizures of Oscar, one of the main characters, their cause, their treatment with silver nitrate, and the subsequent discoloration of his skin are central supporting elements of a perfectly constructed plot. Collins gives an exact description of a right versive seizure with secondary generalisation, and how to deal with it. In none of these works seizures are seen in a negative light. They rather evoke reactions of sympathy and support. PMID:11232370

  11. Epilepsy and catalepsy in Anglo-American literature between romanticism and realism: Tennyson, Poe, Eliot and Collins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, P

    2000-12-01

    Epilepsy and catalepsy were not clearly separated in the minds of people in the early 19th century, and catalepsy may have been used as a diagnostic euphemism for epilepsy. Tennyson, in "The Princess" describes, under the diagnosis of catalepsy, probable temporal lobe epileptic dreamy states with derealization which serve as a metaphor of sexual and moral ambivalence, the poem's central theme. It seems that Tennyson knew such seizures from his own father who had been given a diagnosis of catalepsy. Poe gave his Berenice in the novella of the same title a diagnosis of epilepsy as a reason for a premature burial. However, there was a good deal of unlikelyhood in this, and when he came to this theme in "The Fall of the House of Usher" and in "The Premature Burial" he chose instead a diagnosis of catalepsy which fitted better with the plot. The fits of the title character in George Eliot's Silas Marner, diagnosed as catalepsy, would today rather be seen as epileptic twilight states. It would seem that this author drew from contemporary dictionary descriptions which described conditions similar to Marner's fits under the heading of catalepsy. In Eliot's "legend with a realistic treatment", the twilight states are a central factor in the plot and explain Marner's reclusion and passivity. In Poor Miss Finch by English realist Wilkie Collins, the post-traumatic seizures of Oscar, one of the main characters, their cause, their treatment with silver nitrate, and the subsequent discoloration of his skin are central supporting elements of a perfectly constructed plot. Collins gives an exact description of a right versive seizure with secondary generalisation, and how to deal with it. In none of these works seizures are seen in a negative light. They rather evoke reactions of sympathy and support.

  12. Cannabidiol attenuates haloperidol-induced catalepsy and c-Fos protein expression in the dorsolateral striatum via 5-HT1A receptors in mice.

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    Sonego, Andreza B; Gomes, Felipe V; Del Bel, Elaine A; Guimaraes, Francisco S

    2016-08-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is a major non-psychoactive compound from Cannabis sativa plant. Given that CBD reduces psychotic symptoms without inducing extrapyramidal motor side-effects in animal models and schizophrenia patients, it has been proposed to act as an atypical antipsychotic. In addition, CBD reduced catalepsy induced by drugs with distinct pharmacological mechanisms, including the typical antipsychotic haloperidol. To further investigate this latter effect, we tested whether CBD (15-60mg/kg) would attenuate the catalepsy and c-Fos protein expression in the dorsal striatum induced by haloperidol (0.6mg/kg). We also evaluated if these effects occur through the facilitation of 5-HT1A receptor-mediated neurotransmission. For this, male Swiss mice were treated with CBD and haloperidol systemically and then subjected to the catalepsy test. Independent groups of animals were also treated with the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY100635 (0.1mg/kg). As expected, haloperidol induced catalepsy throughout the experiments, an effect that was prevented by systemic CBD treatment 30min before haloperidol administration. Also, CBD, administered 2.5h after haloperidol, reversed haloperidol-induced catalepsy. Haloperidol also increased c-Fos protein expression in the dorsolateral striatum, an effect attenuated by previous CBD administration. CBD effects on catalepsy and c-Fos protein expression induced by haloperidol were blocked by the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist. We also evaluated the effects of CBD (60nmol) injection into the dorsal striatum on haloperidol-induced catalepsy. Similar to systemic administration, this treatment reduced catalepsy induced by haloperidol. Altogether, these results suggest that CBD acts in the dorsal striatum to improve haloperidol-induced catalepsy via postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptors. PMID:27131780

  13. [Comparison of behavioral effects of fluoxetine, imipramine and new psychotropic drug TC-2153 on mice with hereditary predisposition to catalepsy].

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    Kulikova, E A; Tikhonova, M A; Volcho, K P; Khomenko, T M; Salakhutdinov, N F; Kulikov, A V; Popova, N K

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral effects of classic antidepressants, fluoxetine and imipramine, and new psychotropic benzopentathiepin TC-2153 (20 mg/kg, per os) were studied on mice differing in the predisposition to catalepsy-noncataleptic AKR strain and cataleptic strains CBA and AKR.CBA-D13Mit76 (D13). Mice of D13 strain was created by transferring the CBA-allele of major locus of catalepsy to AKR genome. In the forced swim test (FST) fluoxetine showed antidepressant effect on mice of all three strains, imipramine was effective only in D13 mice, while TC-2153 produced antidepressant effect on AKR and D13 mice. Unlike to imipramine and fluoxetine, TC-2153 did not produce negative side effects in the open field and elevated plus-maze tests. Thus, TC-2153 produces antidepressant effects similar to imipramine and fluoxetine, without any visible negative side effect on locomotory activity and anxiety. The D13 mice in the FST showed high sensitivity to the studied drugs in comparison to the parent strains and can be used as new genetic model for investigation of the mechanism of antidepressant effects.

  14. Comparison of isomers of ketamine on catalepsy in the rat and electrical activity of the brain and behavior in the cat.

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    Benthuysen, J L; Hance, A J; Quam, D D; Winters, W D

    1989-10-01

    The present study compared the relative potency and efficacy of the two isomers of ketamine on the duration of catalepsy (loss of righting reflex) in female rats and on the behavior and electroencephalogram of cats. In the rat, at small doses, the S(+) isomer was more potent than the R(-) isomer or racemic ketamine, while at larger doses, the S(+) isomer and the racemate were equipotent and the R(-) isomer was significantly less potent. Tolerance developed rapidly to the effects of either isomer and both were equally cross-tolerant to racemic ketamine. Sub-effective doses of morphine significantly increased the potency of S(+), R(-) and racemic ketamine on the duration of catalepsy. Sub-effective doses of either isomer augmented the duration of catalepsy, induced by small doses of morphine, but reduced that of large doses. In cats, there was a parallel time course and progression of behavioral and electroencephalographic states in response to equal total doses of either racemic ketamine, an artificial 50:50 mixture of S(+) and R(-) isomers, or the S(+) isomer alone; approximately equivalent effects required twice the dose of the R(-) isomer. It is concluded that there is a common site of action for the two isomers, but there is also a stereospecific difference in potency, as regards the induction of catalepsy in the rat and behavioral and electroencephalographic effects in the cat. Stereospecificity was not apparent in the development of tolerance, cross-tolerance or the augmentation of the response to morphine. PMID:2812279

  15. Learning and extinction of a passive avoidance response in mice with high levels of predisposition to catalepsy.

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    Dubrovina, N I; Zinov'ev, D R; Zinov'eva, D V; Kulikov, A V

    2009-06-01

    This report presents results obtained from comparative analysis of learning and the dynamics of extinction of a conditioned passive avoidance response in ASC mice, which were bred for a high level of predisposition to catalepsy, and in CBA and AKR mice. The following findings were obtained: 1) impairments to the extinction of the memory of fear represent an important symptom of depression in ASC mice; 2) extinction is delayed in CBA mice; and 3) new inhibitory learning occurs quickly in AKR mice. Prolonged retention of the fear memory in ASC mice appears to be related to increased anxiety on prolonged testing without a punishment. The deficit of inhibition of the fear reaction in ASC mice allows this strain to be regarded as a genetic model of depression.

  16. Learning and extinction of a passive avoidance response in mice with high levels of predisposition to catalepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrovina, N I; Zinov'ev, D R; Zinov'eva, D V; Kulikov, A V

    2009-06-01

    This report presents results obtained from comparative analysis of learning and the dynamics of extinction of a conditioned passive avoidance response in ASC mice, which were bred for a high level of predisposition to catalepsy, and in CBA and AKR mice. The following findings were obtained: 1) impairments to the extinction of the memory of fear represent an important symptom of depression in ASC mice; 2) extinction is delayed in CBA mice; and 3) new inhibitory learning occurs quickly in AKR mice. Prolonged retention of the fear memory in ASC mice appears to be related to increased anxiety on prolonged testing without a punishment. The deficit of inhibition of the fear reaction in ASC mice allows this strain to be regarded as a genetic model of depression. PMID:19430979

  17. Comparative study of equimolar doses of gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), 1,4-butanediol (1,4-BD) and gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) on catalepsy after acute and chronic administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towiwat, Pasarapa; Phattanarudee, Siripan; Maher, Timothy J

    2013-01-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), and its precursors 1,4-butanediol (1,4-BD) and gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) are known drugs of abuse. The ability of acute and chronic administration of equimolar doses of GHB (200mg/kg), 1,4-BD (174mg/kg) and GBL (166mg/kg) to produce catalepsy in male Swiss Webster mice was examined. GHB, 1,4-BD, GBL produced catalepsy when injected acutely. Drug treatment was then continued for 14days. Tolerance development was determined on days 6, 14, and challenged with a higher dose on day 15 in those chronically pretreated mice, and compared with naïve mice. Chronic GHB produced tolerance to catalepsy, as evidenced from area under the curve (AUC) of catalepsy versus time (min-sec) on days 6 (678±254), 14 (272±247), which were less than those on day 1 (1923±269). However, less tolerance was seen from GBL or 1,4-BD, as AUCs on days 6 and 14 were not significantly lower than that of day 1. In conclusion, although equimolar doses were used, expecting similar levels of GHB in the body, 1,4-BD and GBL shared only some of the in vivo effects of GHB. The rate of metabolic conversion of 1,4-BD and GBL into GHB might be responsible for the differences in the tolerance development to these drugs.

  18. Gene networks and haloperidol-induced catalepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Iancu, O. D.; Darakjian, P.; Malmanger, B.; Walter, N. A. R.; McWeeney, S.; Hitzemann, R

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined the changes in striatal gene network structure induced by short-term selective breeding from a heterogeneous stock for haloperidol response. Brain (striatum) gene expression data were obtained using the Illumina WG 8.2 array, and the datasets from responding and non-responding selected lines were independently interrogated using a weighted gene coexpression network analysis (WGCNA). We detected several gene modules (groups of coexpressed genes) in each dataset; the ...

  19. Antipsychotic-induced catalepsy is attenuated in mice lacking the M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink-Jensen, Anders; Schmidt, Lene S; Dencker, Ditte;

    2011-01-01

    A delicate balance exists between the central dopaminergic and cholinergic neurotransmitter systems with respect to motor function. An imbalance can result in motor dysfunction as observed in Parkinson's disease patients and in patients treated with antipsychotic compounds. Cholinergic receptor a...

  20. Antipsychotic-induced catalepsy is attenuated in mice lacking the M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Fink-Jensen, Anders; Schmidt, Lene S.; Dencker, Ditte; Schülein, Christina; Wess, Jürgen; Wörtwein, Gitta; Woldbye, David P.D.

    2011-01-01

    A delicate balance exists between the central dopaminergic and cholinergic neurotransmitter systems with respect to motor function. An imbalance can result in motor dysfunction as observed in Parkinson’s disease patients and in patients treated with antipsychotic compounds. Cholinergic receptor antagonists can alleviate extrapyramidal symptoms in Parkinson’s disease and motor side effects induced by antipsychotics. The effects of anticholinergics are mediated by muscarinic receptors of which ...

  1. Antihistaminic activity of Clitoria ternatea L. roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taur, Dnyaneshwar J; Patil, Ravindra Y

    2010-12-01

    Clonidine, a α2 adrenoreceptor agonist induces dose dependent catalepsy in mice, which was inhibited by histamine H1 receptor antagonists but not by H2 receptor antagonist. Clonidine releases histamine from mast cells which is responsible for different asthmatic conditions. Clitoria ternatea L. (Family: Fabaceae) is a perimial twing herb. The roots have anti-inflammatory properties and are useful in severe bronchitis, asthma. In present study ethanol extract of Clitoria ternatea root (ECTR) at doses 100, 125 and 150 mg/kg i.p were evaluated for antihistaminic activity using clonidine and haloperidol induced catalepsy in mice. Finding of investigation showed that chlorpheniramine maleate (CPM) and ECTR inhibit clonidine induced catalepsy significantly P < 0.001 when compare to control group, while CPM and ECTR fail to inhibit haloperidol induced catalepsy. Present study concludes that ECTR possesses antihistaminic activity. PMID:24826001

  2. Psychotropic Activity of Sphaeranthus indicus Linn. In Experimental Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V J Galani

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Sphaeranthus indicus Linn. (Asteraceae is a branched herb with purple color flowers, distributed in wet places. The present study evaluated the neuropharmacological effects of the hydroalcoholic extract of S. indicus (SIE in rats and mice. Effect of SIE (100, 200 and 500 mg/kg, p.o. on spontaneous motor activity, pentobarbital-induced sleeping time, motor coordination, exploratory behaviour and apomorphine-induced stereotypy were investigated in mice. SIE (100, 200 and 500 mg/kg, p.o. induced catalepsy and effect of SIE on haloperidol induced catalepsy were studied in rats. The SIE showed significant reduction of spontaneous motor activity, exploratory behaviour and prolonged pentobarbital sleeping time in the mice. Neuroleptic potential of SIE was observed by the results in which SIE antagonized apomorphine-induced stereotypy in mice, produced catalepsy and potentiated haloperidol-induced catalepsy in rats. Further, SIE had no effect on motor-coordination as determined by the rota rod test. These results provide evidence that the hydroalcoholic extract of Sphaeranthus indicus may contain psychoactive substances that are sedative in nature with possible neuroleptic properties.

  3. Central effects of angiotensin II, its fragment and analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, V P; Klousha, V E; Petkov, V D; Markovska, V L; Svirskis, S V; Mountsinietse, R K; Anouans, Z E

    1984-01-01

    The effects of the octapeptide angiotensin II (AT II), its fragment Ile8 AT3-8 and the analogues Sar1 Ala8 AT II, Ala8 AT II and Ile8 AT II were studied with respect to: the level of biogenic amines (DA, 5-HT and their metabolites HVA and 5-HIAA) in the forebrain; the behaviour of the animals--haloperidol catalepsy, apomorphine stereotypy, unconditioned jumping reaction (UJR), convulsive threshold. Good correlation was found between the biochemical and behavioural effects. The fragment of AT II where phenylalanine is substituted at the C-terminal by Ile reduces the haloperidol-increased content of HVA, potentiates apomorphine stereotypy and reduces catalepsy, whereas the AT II analogues (where the C-terminal phenylalanine is substituted by Ala, and the N-terminal--by Sar) potentiate the effect of haloperidol increasing the HVA content, reduce apomorphine stereotypy and potentiate catalepsy; saralasine independently applied induces brief catalepsy; AT II, its fragment and analogues inhibit UJR, in combination with amphetamine and PTZ this effect becomes deeper; the duration of hexobarbital sleep is increased. The peptides investigated increase the convulsive threshold. The results show that the hexapeptide fragment has preserved the effects of AT II, whereas in the analogues (with changed C- and N-terminals) they are changed. The results obtained may be explained with the modulating influence of AT II-receptors on the DA-ergic receptors in the brain structures with which AT II and its fragment and analogues enter in contact.

  4. Evaluations of antidepressant activity of Anacyclus pyrethrum root extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badhe S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to screen antidepressant activity of Anacyclus pyrethrum (AP root extract. An experiment was designed by different method such as Locomotor activity, Haloperidol-induced catalepsy, Forced swim test (FST, Tail suspension test (TST, Clonidine-induced hypothermia and Reserpine-induced hypothermia on Swiss male albino mice. Standard root extract of Anacyclus pyrethrum (AP root extract showed an increase in ambulatory behaviour indicating a stimulant effect of the photoactometer. AP root extract produces a significant antidepressant effect in both FST and TST as they reduced the immobility. AP root extract was found to be effective in reversing hypothermia produced by clonidine and reserpine. In our study, we found that AP root extract inhibited haloperidol-induced catalepsy. These study suggest that AP root extract might produce antidepressant effect by interaction with adrenergic and dopamine receptor thereby increasing the level of noradrenaline and dopamine in brains of mice.

  5. Cataleptic postures in thalamic hemorrhage: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saposnik Gustavo

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of catalepsy associated with thalamic hemorrhage. A 72 year-old hypertensive woman had acute onset of right-sided weakness and speech disturbances. She was on anticoagulants because of aortic valve replacement. When postures were imposed, the patient maintained the left upper limb raised for several minutes, even in uncomfortable or bizarre positions. A CT scan of the head revealed a left thalamic hemorrhage. Cataleptic postures have been reported in few cases with acute stroke.

  6. Motor activity following the administration of selective D-1 and D-2 dopaminergic drugs to normal common marmosets

    OpenAIRE

    Löschmann, P A; Smith, L A; Klaus W. Lange; Jaehnig, P.; Jenner, P.; Marsden, C. D.

    1991-01-01

    In normal common marmosets administration of the D-1/D-2 agonist apomorphine or the selective D-2 agonist quinpirole caused a dose-dependent increase in motor activity and induced stereotyped behaviour. Both the selective D-2 antagonist raclopride and the selective D-1 antagonist SCH 23390 inhibited normal locomotor activity and induced catalepsy. Quinpirole- and apomorphine-induced motor activity were potently inhibited by pretreatment with raclopride. The effects of quinpirole, but not apom...

  7. Systemic administration of the neurotensin NTS1 receptor agonist PD149163 improves performance on a memory task in naturally deficient male Brown Norway rats

    OpenAIRE

    Keiser, Ashley A.; Matazel, Katelin S.; Esser, Melissa K.; Feifel, David; Prus, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    Agonists for neurotensin NTS1 receptor consistently exhibit antipsychotic effects in animal models without producing catalepsy, suggesting that NTS1 receptor agonists may be a novel class of drugs to treat schizophrenia. Moreover, studies utilizing NTS1 agonists have reported improvements in some aspects of cognitive functioning, including prepulse inhibition and learning procedures, that suggest an ability of NTS1 receptor agonists to diminish neurocognitive deficits. The present study sough...

  8. Anxiolytic Effects of Royal Sun Medicinal Mushroom, Agaricus brasiliensis (Higher Basidiomycetes) on Ischemia-Induced Anxiety in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunjing; Gao, Xiulan; Sun, Yan; Sun, Xiaojie; Wu, Yanmin; Liu, Ying; Yu, Haitao; Cui, Guangcheng

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the anxiolytic effects Agaricus brasiliensis extract (AbSE) on ischemia-induced anxiety using the plus-maze test and the social interaction test. The animals were treated orally with AbSE (4, 8, and 10 mg/kg/d, respectively) for 30 d, followed by middle cerebral artery occlusion-induced cerebral ischemia. Levels of noradrenaline, dopamine, and serotonin in the cerebral cortex of rats, as well as oxidative stress and plasma corticosterone levels were analyzed, respectively. The rota-rod test was carried out to exclude any false positive results in experimental procedures related to anxiety disorders, and the catalepsy test was carried out to investigate whether AbSE induces catalepsy. Our results demonstrate that oral administration of AbSE presented anxiolytic-like effects in the elevated plus-maze test and the social interaction test. Furthermore, AbSE did not induce extrapyramidal symptoms in the catalepsy test. The mechanism underlying the anxiolytic effect of AbSE might be increased brain monoamine levels and plasma corticosterone levels and decreased oxidative stress in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion rats.

  9. Cinnarizine has an atypical antipsychotic profile in animal models of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Igna, Oscar P; Tort, Adriano B L; Souza, Diogo O; Lara, Diogo R

    2005-07-01

    Cinnarizine, a drug known as a calcium channel blocker, is currently used for the treatment of migraine and vertigo. Induction of extrapyramidal signs by cinnarizine has been reported in the elderly, which is related to its moderate antagonistic properties at dopamine D2 receptors, resembling the mechanism of action of most antipsychotic drugs. Despite this effect, cinnarizine has never been tested as a putative antipsychotic drug. Here we evaluate the potential effect of cinnarizine in two pharmacological models of psychosis, namely amphetamine- and MK-801-induced hyperlocomotion, as well as its ability to induce catalepsy. Cinnarizine significantly counteracted MK-801 (0.25 mg/kg) and amphetamine (5mg/kg) locomotor effects at doses as low as 20mg/kg, having no incremental effect at 60 or 180 mg/kg. Regarding side-effects, cinnarizine induced no catalepsy in mice at the effective dose of 20 mg/kg, inducing only mild catalepsy at the doses of 60 and 180 mg/kg. Based on these results and on the antagonist effect of cinnarizine on dopamine D2 receptors, we suggest that it has a potential antipsychotic effect with an atypical profile that should be evaluated clinically. PMID:15982988

  10. Egg white hydrolysate promotes neuroprotection for neuropathic disorders induced by chronic exposure to low concentrations of mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzetti, Danize Aparecida; Fernandez, Francisca; Moreno, Silvia; Uranga Ocio, José Antonio; Peçanha, Franck Maciel; Vera, Gema; Vassallo, Dalton Valentim; Castro, Marta Miguel; Wiggers, Giulia Alessandra

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to investigate whether the egg white hydrolysate (EWH) acts on the neuropathic disorders associated with long-term Mercury (Hg) exposure in rats. 8- week-old male Wistar rats were treated for 60 days with: a) Control - saline solution (i.m.); b) Mercury - HgCl2 (1st dose 4.6μg/kg, subsequent doses 0.07μg/kg/day, i.m.); c) Hydrolysate - EWH (1g/kg/day, gavage); d) Mercury and Hydrolysate. Mechanical allodynia was assessed using Von Frey Hairs test; heat hyperalgesia by the plantar test; catalepsy by a modification of the "ring test" and spontaneous locomotor activity by a photocell activity chambers. Analyses were performed at 0, 30 and 60 days of treatment. Brain and plasma MDA, plasma NPSH and TNF-α determination and skin immunohistochemistry were performed at 60 days. Hg induced a reduction in mechanical sensitivity threshold at 30 and 60 days and in thermal sensitivity threshold at 60 days. At the end of treatment catalepsy was developed, but there was not significant alteration in spontaneous locomotor activity. Hg also increased brain and plasma MDA, plasma NPSH and TNF-α levels and the number of Merkel cell-neurite complex in the skin. EWH prevented the development of mechanical allodynia, thermal hyperalgesia and catalepsy induced by Hg and the increase in MDA concentration in brain and plasma and in the number of Merkel cell-neurite complex in the skin. In conclusion, EWH promotes neuroprotection against the toxic effects caused by Hg, demonstrating a beneficial therapeutic potential. PMID:27350078

  11. Pharmacological evaluation of bee venom and melittin

    OpenAIRE

    Camila G. Dantas; Tássia L.G.M. Nunes; Tâmara L.G.M. Nunes; Ailma O. da Paixão; Francisco P. Reis; Waldecy de L. Júnior; Juliana C. Cardoso; Kátia P. Gramacho; Gomes, Margarete Z

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the pharmacological effects of bee venom and its major component, melittin, on the nervous system of mice. For the pharmacological analysis, mice were treated once with saline, 0.1 or 1.2 mg/kg of bee venom and 0.1 mg/kg of melittin, subcutaneously, 30 min before being submitted to behavioral tests: locomotor activity and grooming (open-field), catalepsy, anxiety (elevated plus-maze), depression (forced swimming test) and apomorphine-induced stereot...

  12. Psychoactive-drug response is affected by acute low-level microwave irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, H.; Horita, A.; Chou, C.K.; Guy, A.W.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of various psychoactive drugs were studied in rats exposed for 45 min in a circularly polarized, pulsed microwave field (2450 MHz; SAR 0.6 W/kg; 2-microseconds pulses, 500 pps). Apomorphine-induced hypothermia and stereotypy were enhanced by irradiation. Amphetamine-induced hyperthermia was attenuated while stereotypy was unaffected. Morphine-induced catalepsy and lethality were enhanced by irradiation at certain dosages of the drug. Since these drugs have different modes of action on central neural mechanisms and the effects of microwaves depend on the particular drug studied, these results show the complex nature of the effect of microwave irradiation on brain functions.

  13. Preliminary screening of five ethnomedicinal plants of Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, C; Gomez-Serranillos, M P; Iglesias, I; Villar, A M; Cáceres, A

    2001-01-01

    We performed the Irwin test on some different extracts of the aerial parts of Tridax procumbens L., of the leaves of Neurolaena lobata (L.) R. Br., of the bark and leaves of Byrsonima crassifolia (L.) Kunth. and Gliricidia sepium Jacq. Walp. and of the root and leaves of Petiveria alliacea L. At a dosage of 1.25 g extract/100 g dried plant, the aqueous extracts of bark and leaves of Byrsonima crassifolia (L.) Kunth. and G. sepium Jacq. Walp. showed higher activity: decrease in motor activity, back tonus, reversible parpebral ptosis. catalepsy and strong hypothermia. PMID:11482789

  14. Anti-Parkinson Activity of Petroleum Ether Extract of Ficus religiosa (L. Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra O. Bhangale

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we evaluated anti-Parkinson’s activity of petroleum ether extract of Ficus religiosa (PEFRE leaves in haloperidol and 6 hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA induced experimental animal models. In this study, effects of Ficus religiosa (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg, p.o. were studied using in vivo behavioral parameters like catalepsy, muscle rigidity, and locomotor activity and its effects on neurochemical parameters (MDA, CAT, SOD, and GSH in rats. The experiment was designed by giving haloperidol to induce catalepsy and 6-OHDA to induce Parkinson’s disease-like symptoms. The increased cataleptic scores (induced by haloperidol were significantly (p<0.001 found to be reduced, with the PEFRE at a dose of 200 and 400 mg/kg (p.o.. 6-OHDA significantly induced motor dysfunction (muscle rigidity and hypolocomotion. 6-OHDA administration showed significant increase in lipid peroxidation level and depleted superoxide dismutase, catalase, and reduced glutathione level. Daily administration of PEFRE (400 mg/kg significantly improved motor performance and also significantly attenuated oxidative damage. Thus, the study proved that Ficus religiosa treatment significantly attenuated the motor defects and also protected the brain from oxidative stress.

  15. Anti-Parkinson Activity of Petroleum Ether Extract of Ficus religiosa (L.) Leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhangale, Jitendra O; Acharya, Sanjeev R

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we evaluated anti-Parkinson's activity of petroleum ether extract of Ficus religiosa (PEFRE) leaves in haloperidol and 6 hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induced experimental animal models. In this study, effects of Ficus religiosa (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg, p.o.) were studied using in vivo behavioral parameters like catalepsy, muscle rigidity, and locomotor activity and its effects on neurochemical parameters (MDA, CAT, SOD, and GSH) in rats. The experiment was designed by giving haloperidol to induce catalepsy and 6-OHDA to induce Parkinson's disease-like symptoms. The increased cataleptic scores (induced by haloperidol) were significantly (p < 0.001) found to be reduced, with the PEFRE at a dose of 200 and 400 mg/kg (p.o.). 6-OHDA significantly induced motor dysfunction (muscle rigidity and hypolocomotion). 6-OHDA administration showed significant increase in lipid peroxidation level and depleted superoxide dismutase, catalase, and reduced glutathione level. Daily administration of PEFRE (400 mg/kg) significantly improved motor performance and also significantly attenuated oxidative damage. Thus, the study proved that Ficus religiosa treatment significantly attenuated the motor defects and also protected the brain from oxidative stress. PMID:26884755

  16. Cannabidiol Prevents Motor and Cognitive Impairments Induced by Reserpine in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peres, Fernanda F.; Levin, Raquel; Suiama, Mayra A.; Diana, Mariana C.; Gouvêa, Douglas A.; Almeida, Valéria; Santos, Camila M.; Lungato, Lisandro; Zuardi, Antônio W.; Hallak, Jaime E. C.; Crippa, José A.; Vânia, D’Almeida; Silva, Regina H.; Abílio, Vanessa C.

    2016-01-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is a non-psychotomimetic compound from Cannabis sativa that presents antipsychotic, anxiolytic, anti-inflammatory, and neuroprotective effects. In Parkinson’s disease patients, CBD is able to attenuate the psychotic symptoms induced by L-DOPA and to improve quality of life. Repeated administration of reserpine in rodents induces motor impairments that are accompanied by cognitive deficits, and has been applied to model both tardive dyskinesia and Parkinson’s disease. The present study investigated whether CBD administration would attenuate reserpine-induced motor and cognitive impairments in rats. Male Wistar rats received four injections of CBD (0.5 or 5 mg/kg) or vehicle (days 2–5). On days 3 and 5, animals received also one injection of 1 mg/kg reserpine or vehicle. Locomotor activity, vacuous chewing movements, and catalepsy were assessed from day 1 to day 7. On days 8 and 9, we evaluated animals’ performance on the plus-maze discriminative avoidance task, for learning/memory assessment. CBD (0.5 and 5 mg/kg) attenuated the increase in catalepsy behavior and in oral movements – but not the decrease in locomotion – induced by reserpine. CBD (0.5 mg/kg) also ameliorated the reserpine-induced memory deficit in the discriminative avoidance task. Our data show that CBD is able to attenuate motor and cognitive impairments induced by reserpine, suggesting the use of this compound in the pharmacotherapy of Parkinson’s disease and tardive dyskinesia.

  17. Magnesium Supplementation Prevents and Reverses Experimentally Induced Movement Disturbances in Rats: Biochemical and Behavioral Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronbauer, Maikel; Segat, Hecson J; De David Antoniazzi, Caren Tatiane; Roversi, Karine; Roversi, Katiane; Pase, Camila S; Barcelos, Raquel C S; Burger, Marilise E

    2015-08-01

    Reserpine administration results in a predictable animal model of orofacial dyskinesia (OD) that has been largely used to access movement disturbances related to extrapyramidal oxidative damage. Here, OD was acutely induced by reserpine (two doses of 0.7 mg/kg subcutaneous (s.c.)), every other day for 3 days), which was administered after (experiment 1) and before (experiment 2) magnesium (Mg) supplementation (40 mg/kg/mL, peroral (p.o.)). In experiment 1, Mg was administered for 28 days before reserpine treatment, while in experiment 2, it was initiated 24 h after the last reserpine administration and was maintained for 10 consecutive days. Experiment 1 (prevention) showed that Mg supplementation was able to prevent reserpine-induced OD and catalepsy development. Mg was also able to prevent reactive species (RS) generation, thus preventing increase of protein carbonyl (PC) levels in both cortex and substantia nigra, but not in striatum. Experiment 2 (reversion) showed that Mg was able to decrease OD and catalepsy at all times assessed. In addition, Mg was able to decrease RS generation, with lower levels of PC in both cortex and striatum, but not in substantia nigra. These outcomes indicate that Mg is an important metal that should be present in the diet, since its intake is able to prevent and minimize the development of movement disorders closely related to oxidative damage in the extrapyramidal brain areas, such as OD.

  18. Antipsychotic-like effects of zolpidem in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierzejewski, Pawel; Kolaczkowski, Marcin; Marcinkowska, Monika; Wesolowska, Anna; Samochowiec, Jerzy; Pawlowski, Maciej; Bienkowski, Przemyslaw

    2016-02-15

    Aside from their use in the treatment of anxiety disorders and insomnia, benzodiazepines and other GABAA receptor positive modulators are widely used as add-on treatments in schizophrenic and non-schizophrenic psychoses. However, there is relatively little direct clinical or pre-clinical evidence for antipsychotic effects of GABAergic medications. Previous studies have indicated that zolpidem, a GABAergic drug acting preferentially at α1-containing GABAA receptors, may produce catalepsy through interactions with dopaminergic neurotransmission. The aim of the present study was to investigate effects of zolpidem in experimental models of antipsychotic activity and extrapyramidal side effects in Wistar rats. Effects of zolpidem were compared with that of a classic benzodiazepine drug, diazepam and a second-generation antipsychotic medication, risperidone. High doses of risperidone (10.0mg/kg, i.p.) and zolpidem (10.0mg/kg, i.p.), but not diazepam, induced relatively short-lasting cataleptic responses in the bar test. Zolpidem and risperidone, but not diazepam, produced some antipsychotic-like effects at doses, which produced no catalepsy and did not inhibit spontaneous locomotor activity and apomorphine-induced stereotypies. The present results tend to indicate that zolpidem exerts some neuroleptic-like effects at doses, which do not produce motor side effects. Our findings may provide further rationale for the development of new subtype-selective GABAA receptor modulators for the treatment of psychotic symptoms. PMID:26825544

  19. Antipsychotic Potentials of Ocimum sanctum Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renu Kadian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken to evaluate the antipsychotic potential of Ocimum sanctum in experimental animal models. Male Wistar rats (180-220 g and albino mice (25-30 g were used for the study. The antipsychotic effect of the Ocimum sanctum was evaluated on haloperidol induced catalepsy, cooks pole climbing apparatus, locomotor activity on actophotometer, ketamine induced stereotype behavior. Different groups of rats were fed orally with a specially prepared diet containing various concentrations (2% w/w, 4% w/w and 8% w/w of Ocimum sanctum leaves paste (OCLP for 15 consecutive days. Further, the biochemical estimations were done by estimating brain dopamine levels. The OCLP produced significant dose dependent potentiation of haloperidol (1mg/kg, i.p. induced catalepsy in rats, significantly increased the time taken by the rat to climb the pole in dose dependent manner, significantly decreased the locomotor activity. The OCLP significantly decreased ketamine (50 mg/kg, i.p. induced stereotyped behavior in a dose dependent manner. Ocimum sanctum leaves paste (OCLP significantly decreased the brain dopamine levels. The results suggest that OCLP posse’s antipsychotic activity. Further neurochemical investigation can explore the mechanism of action of the plant drug with respect to anti-dopaminergic functions and help to establish the plant as an antipsychotic agent.

  20. Mast Cell Stabilizing,Antianaphylactic and Antihistaminic Activity of Coccinia grandis Fruits in Asthma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dnyaneshwar J Taur; Ravindra Y Patil

    2011-01-01

    Coccinia grandis Linn(Curcubitaceae)is a climber herb cultivated throughout India.In traditional medicine fruits have been used to treat leprosy,fever,asthma,bronchitis and jaundice.In present study,ethanol extract of C.grandis fruit(ECGF)at 100,125 and 150 mg·kg-1,i.p.,was evaluated for mast cell stabilizing,antianaphylactic and antihistaminic activity using egg albumin induced mast cell degranulation in mice;passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in rats and clonidine induced catalepsy in mice respectively.ECGF at(100-150 mg·kg-1,i.p.)significantly protected egg albumin induced degranulations of mast cells and caused reduction of blue dye leakage in passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in dose dependently.The treatment ECGF also inhibited clonidine induced catalepsy in dose dependent manner.Phytochemical studies observed presence of saponin,steroids,alkaloids,flavonoids and glycosides.In conclusion ECGF possesses mast cell stabilizing;anti anaphylactic and antihistaminic potential which might be used in treatment of asthma.

  1. Atypical neuroleptic properties of l-stepholidine -Electrophysiological and behavioral studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张雪翔; 孙宝存; 金国章

    1997-01-01

    Intravenous administration of l-stepholidine (SPD), a dopamine (DA) receptor antagonist, in-creased the firing rate of DA neurons located in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra pars compacta (SNC) in both anaesthetized and paralyzed rats. However, with the increase of dose, SPD selectively inhibited the fir-ing activity of DA neurons in the VTA but not in the SNC. The inhibition was reversed by the DA agonist apomor-phine (APO), suggesting that it may be via the mechanism of depolarization inactivation (DI). In rats, chronic admin-istration of SPD for 21 d dose-dependently decreased the number of spontaneously active DA neurons in the VTA, of which effect was reversed by APO (i. v. ). In contrast, the same treatment failed to affect the population of DA neu-rons in the SNC. Similarly, the acute treatment of SPD also decreased the number of spontaneously firing DA neurons in the VTA, but not in the SNC. SPD per se only induced very weak catalepsy. Its catalepsy which was not in pro-port

  2. Renal Failure in Dementia with Lewy Bodies Presenting as Catatonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Fekete

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Catatonia, originally described by Karl Kahlbaum in 1874, may be regarded as a set of clinical features found in a subtype of schizophrenia, but the syndrome may also stem from organic causes including vascular parkinsonism, brain masses, globus pallidus lesions, metabolic derangements, and pharmacologic agents, especially first generation antipsychotics. Catatonia may include paratonia, waxy flexibility (cerea flexibilitas, stupor, mutism, echolalia, and catalepsy (abnormal posturing. A case of catatonia as a result of acute renal failure in a patient with dementia with Lewy bodies is described. This patient recovered after intravenous fluid administration and reinstitution of the atypical dopamine receptor blocking agent quetiapine, but benzodiazepines and amantadine are additional possible treatments. Recognition of organic causes of catatonia leads to timely treatment and resolution of the syndrome.

  3. Movement disorders in catatonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijemanne, Subhashie; Jankovic, Joseph

    2015-08-01

    Catatonia is a complex neuropsychiatric syndrome characterised by a broad range of motor, speech and behavioural abnormalities. 'Waxy flexibility', 'posturing' and 'catalepsy' are among the well-recognised motor abnormalities seen in catatonia. However, there are many other motor abnormalities associated with catatonia. Recognition of the full spectrum of the phenomenology is critical for an accurate diagnosis. Although controlled trials are lacking benzodiazepines are considered first-line therapy and N-Methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonists also appears to be effective. Electroconvulsive therapy is used in those patients who are resistant to medical therapy. An underlying cause of the catatonia should be identified and treated to ensure early and complete resolution of symptoms.

  4. Electroconvulsive therapy for catatonia in juvenile neuropsychiatric lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, T; Aguirre, A; Pesce, C; Sanhueza, P; Toro, P

    2014-09-01

    Neuropsychiatric manifestations are serious and frequent complications of systemic lupus erythematous (SLE). Catatonia is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by motor disturbance (including waxy flexibility and catalepsy), stupor, excitement, negativism, mutism, echopraxia and echolalia. Catatonia associated with SLE has been only rarely reported, especially in children. Here we present a case of a 14-year-old patient encountered in consultation-liaison psychiatry who presented catatonia associated with SLE. Her catatonia was refractory to treatment with pulse methylprednisolone, intravenous cyclophosphamide and rituximab. The patient responded to a combined therapy of electroconvulsive therapy and benzodiazepines. The present case suggests that although rarely reported, catatonia seen in the background of SLE should be promptly identified and treated to reduce the morbidity.

  5. Pharmacological evaluation of bee venom and melittin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila G. Dantas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to identify the pharmacological effects of bee venom and its major component, melittin, on the nervous system of mice. For the pharmacological analysis, mice were treated once with saline, 0.1 or 1.2 mg/kg of bee venom and 0.1 mg/kg of melittin, subcutaneously, 30 min before being submitted to behavioral tests: locomotor activity and grooming (open-field, catalepsy, anxiety (elevated plus-maze, depression (forced swimming test and apomorphine-induced stereotypy. Haloperidol, imipramine and diazepam were administered alone (positive control or as a pre-treatment (haloperidol.The bee venom reduced motor activity and promoted cataleptic effect, in a similar manner to haloperidol.These effects were decreased by the pretreatment with haloperidol. Both melittin and bee venom decreased the apomorphine-induced stereotypies. The data indicated the antipsychotic activity of bee venom and melittin in a murine model.

  6. Synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of piperidine (piperazine)-substituted benzoxazole derivatives as multi-target antipsychotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ling; Zhang, Wenjun; Zhang, Xiaohua; Yin, Lei; Chen, Bangyin; Song, Jinchun

    2015-11-15

    The present study describes the optimization of a series of novel benzoxazole-piperidine (piperazine) derivatives combining high dopamine D2 and serotonin 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A receptor affinities. Of these derivatives, the pharmacological features of compound 29 exhibited high affinities for the DA D2, 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors, but low affinities for the 5-HT2C and histamine H1 receptors and human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) channels. Furthermore, compound 29 reduced apomorphine-induced climbing and 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (DOI)-induced head twitching without observable catalepsy, even at the highest dose tested. Thus, compound 29 is a promising candidate as a multi-target antipsychotic treatment. PMID:26483200

  7. Investigations on behavioral effects of an extract of Cannabis sativa L. in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, S; Costa, G; Murari, G; Panico, A M; Rapisarda, E; Speroni, E; Arrigo-Reina, R

    1981-01-01

    The behavioral responses of the rat to an extract of Cannabis sativa were examined after IP injection of 5, 15 and 30 mg/kg (expressed as delta 9 tetrahydrocannabinol). The lowest dose of the extract induced stereotyped behavior (rhythmic head movements, intermittent gnawing and sniffing) together with hypersensitivity to stimuli and hyperthermia. The administration of higher doses of the extract resulted, initially, in similar behavioral effects but of greater intensity, followed by a cataleptic state alternating with atonic muscular prostration; rectal temperature was decreased. Pre-treatment with 6-hydoxydopamine (6-OHDA, which produces degeneration of catecholamine-containing nerve terminals)or pimozide (blocker of dopamine receptors) significantly reduced both stereotype and hyperreactivity. Thermic effects were also antagonized by 6-OHDA pre-treatment. Cannabis-induced catalepsy was enhanced by pimozide but reduced by atropine (3 mg/kg SC). These results support the hypothesis that catecholamines play an important role in the complex behavioral effects of cannabis. PMID:6798604

  8. Effects of age on behavioral and physiological responses to carbaryl in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, R N; Poli, A; Morato, G S; Lima, T C; Zanin, M

    1991-01-01

    Motor, sensory and thermoregulatory functions were examined in young (3 months) and mature (12 months) rats following PO administration of single low doses (10 and 50 mg/kg) of carbaryl, a carbamate insecticide, and these effects were related to blood cholinesterase activity. Carbaryl 50 mg/kg decreased the frequency of ambulation in the open-field arena within 30 min while it enhanced the duration of haloperidol-induced catalepsy in both young and mature rats. Administration of carbaryl also resulted in an increased nociceptive threshold to thermic stimuli mainly in mature rats. An age-related reduction in body temperature was observed at 30, 60 and 90 min after injection. Activity of blood cholinesterase was reduced in young and mature rats at 30 and 60 min following carbaryl exposure. These results indicate that carbaryl can induce an age-related impairment on some behavioral and autonomic functions in rats correlated to the inhibition of cholinesterase activity. PMID:1904531

  9. SYNTHESIS, COMPUTATIONAL STUDY AND PRELIMINARY PHARMACOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF 2-[4-(2-CHLOROBENZYL/BENZOYL SUBSTITUTED PIPERAZIN-1-YL]-N-PHENYLACETAMIDE: POTENTIAL ANTIPSYCHOTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomar Amita

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Benzyl and benzoyl substituted acetamides have been synthesized and evaluated as potential antipsychotic agents. The target compounds (4a-b were prepared by reaction of substituted anilines with chloroacetylchloride which further treated with 2-chlorobenzyl or 2-chlorobenzoyl piperazine in presence of potassium carbonate and potassium iodide as catalyst in acetonitrile. The structures of the target compounds (4a-b were characterized on the basis of their M.P., TLC, IR and 1H-NMR data. Computational studies of target compounds (4a-b were carried out by using software programs. The target compounds showed good similarity with respect to standard drugs. The target compounds (4a-b showed inhibition of 5-HTP induced head twitches behavior and low induction of catalepsy in mice.

  10. Neuropharmacological profile of ethnomedicinal plants of Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Cifuentes, C; Gómez-Serranillos, M P; Iglesias, I; Villar del Fresno, A M; Morales, C; Paredes, M E; Cáceres, A

    2001-08-01

    We carried out the Irwin's test with some different extracts of the aerial parts of Thidax procumbens L., the leaves of Neurolaena lobata (L.) R. Br., bark and leaves of Byrsonima crassifolia (L.) Kunth. and Gliricidia sepium Jacq. Walp., and root and leaves of Petiveria alliacea L. At dosage of 1.25 g dried plant/kg weight aqueous extracts of bark and leaves of Byrsonima crassifolia (L.) Kunth. and Gliricidia sepium Jacq. Walp. demonstrated the most activity: decrease in motor activity, back tonus, reversible parpebral ptosis, catalepsy and strong hypothermia. These extracts of both plants were assayed for effects on CNS and they caused very significant reductions in spontaneous locomotor activity, exploratory behavior and rectal temperature and they increased the sodium pentobarbital-induced sleeping time. PMID:11448542

  11. Evaluation of the antipsychotic potential of aqueous fraction of Securinega virosa root bark extract in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaji, M G; Mohammed, M; Magaji, R A; Musa, A M; Abdu-Aguye, I; Hussaini, I M

    2014-03-01

    Securinega virosa (Roxb ex. Willd) Baill. is a plant which is commonly used in African traditional medicine in management of mental illness. Previous study showed that the crude methanolic root bark extract of the plant possesses antipsychotic activity. In this study, the antipsychotic potential of the residual aqueous fraction of the plant was evaluated using two experimental models, apomorphine induced stereotypic climbing behaviour and swim induced grooming, all in mice. The effect of the fraction on haloperidol-induced catalepsy was also evaluated. The fraction significantly reduced the mean climbing score at the highest dose tested (500 mg/kg). In the swim-induced grooming test, the fraction significantly and dose-dependently (125-500 mg/kg) decreased the mean number and mean duration of swim-induced grooming activity in mice. Similarly, the standard haloperidol (1 mg/kg) significantly (p bark extract of Securinega virosa contains biological active principle with antipsychotic potential.

  12. Functionality of colinergic systems in rats pre-treatment with triiodothyronine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to investigate the influence of experimental hiperthyroidism in the colinergic activity, rats were injected daily, during 1, 5, 19 or 20 days, with triiodothyronine (0 to 100 ug/kg, s.c.). The hiperthyroidism was evaluated by the decrease of the body weight and the increase of the body temperature and serum hormonal levels (T3). After the administration of the cholinergic agonists (pilocarpine and oxotremorine) or a anticholinesterase drug (eserine), the cholinergic behavioural and pharmacologic activity was evaluated recording the rectal temperature, locomotor activity, catalepsy, tremor and cromodacryorrhea. The results suggests that T3 pre-treatment may induce in rats changes in the functionality of the central cholinergic post-sinaptic receptors. However, the administration of this hormone does not seem to induce any alterations in the periferic cholinergic receptors, implicated in cromodacryorrhea effect. (author)

  13. Synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of piperidine (piperazine)-substituted benzoxazole derivatives as multi-target antipsychotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ling; Zhang, Wenjun; Zhang, Xiaohua; Yin, Lei; Chen, Bangyin; Song, Jinchun

    2015-11-15

    The present study describes the optimization of a series of novel benzoxazole-piperidine (piperazine) derivatives combining high dopamine D2 and serotonin 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A receptor affinities. Of these derivatives, the pharmacological features of compound 29 exhibited high affinities for the DA D2, 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors, but low affinities for the 5-HT2C and histamine H1 receptors and human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) channels. Furthermore, compound 29 reduced apomorphine-induced climbing and 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (DOI)-induced head twitching without observable catalepsy, even at the highest dose tested. Thus, compound 29 is a promising candidate as a multi-target antipsychotic treatment.

  14. Differential control of dopamine ascending pathways by serotonin2B receptor antagonists: New opportunities for the treatment of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devroye, Céline; Cathala, Adeline; Haddjeri, Nasser; Rovera, Renaud; Vallée, Monique; Drago, Filippo; Piazza, Pier Vincenzo; Spampinato, Umberto

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies suggest that the central serotonin2B receptor (5-HT2BR) could be an interesting pharmacological target for treating neuropsychiatric disorders related to dopamine (DA) dysfunction, such as schizophrenia. Thus, the present study was aimed at characterizing the role of 5-HT2BRs in the control of ascending DA pathway activity. Using neurochemical, electrophysiological and behavioral approaches, we assessed the effects of two selective 5-HT2BR antagonists, RS 127445 and LY 266097, on in vivo DA outflow in DA-innervated regions, on mesencephalic DA neuronal firing, as well as in behavioral tests predictive of antipsychotic efficacy and tolerability, such as phencyclidine (PCP)-induced deficit in novel object recognition (NOR) test, PCP-induced hyperlocomotion and catalepsy. Both RS 127445 (0.16 mg/kg, i.p.) and LY 266097 (0.63 mg/kg, i.p.) increased DA outflow in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). RS 127445, devoid of effect in the striatum, decreased DA outflow in the nucleus accumbens, and potentiated haloperidol (0.1 mg/kg, s.c.)-induced increase in mPFC DA outflow. Also, RS 127445 decreased the firing rate of DA neurons in the ventral tegmental area, but had no effect in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Finally, both RS 127445 and LY 266097 reversed PCP-induced deficit in NOR test, and reduced PCP-induced hyperlocomotion, without inducing catalepsy. These results demonstrate that 5-HT2BRs exert a differential control on DA pathway activity, and suggest that 5-HT2BR antagonists could represent a new class of drugs for improved treatment of schizophrenia, with an ideal profile of effects expected to alleviate cognitive and positive symptoms, without eliciting extrapyramidal symptoms. PMID:27260325

  15. Dopaminergic profile of new heterocyclic N-phenylpiperazine derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Neves

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine constitutes about 80% of the content of central catecholamines and has a crucial role in the etiology of several neuropsychiatric disorders, including Parkinson's disease, depression and schizophrenia. Several dopaminergic drugs are used to treat these pathologies, but many problems are attributed to these therapies. Within this context, the search for new more efficient dopaminergic agents with less adverse effects represents a vast research field. The aim of the present study was to report the structural design of two N-phenylpiperazine derivatives, compound 4: 1-[1-(4-chlorophenyl-1H-4-pyrazolylmethyl]-4-phenylhexahydropyrazine and compound 5: 1-[1-(4-chlorophenyl-1H-1,2,3-triazol-4-ylmethyl]-4-phenylhexahydropyrazine, planned to be dopamine ligands, and their dopaminergic action profile. The two compounds were assayed (dose range of 15-40 mg/kg in three experimental models: 1 blockade of amphetamine (30 mg/kg, ip-induced stereotypy in rats; 2 the catalepsy test in mice, and 3 apomorphine (1 mg/kg, ip-induced hypothermia in mice. Both derivatives induced cataleptic behavior (40 mg/kg, ip and a hypothermic response (30 mg/kg, ip which was not prevented by haloperidol (0.5 mg/kg, ip. Compound 5 (30 mg/kg, ip also presented a synergistic hypothermic effect with apomorphine (1 mg/kg, ip. Only compound 4 (30 mg/kg, ip significantly blocked the amphetamine-induced stereotypy in rats. The N-phenylpiperazine derivatives 4 and 5 seem to have a peculiar profile of action on dopaminergic functions. On the basis of the results of catalepsy and amphetamine-induced stereotypy, the compounds demonstrated an inhibitory effect on dopaminergic behaviors. However, their hypothermic effect is compatible with the stimulation of dopaminergic function which seems not to be mediated by D2/D3 receptors.

  16. Neuroprotective potential of Beta vulgaris L. in Parkinson′s disease

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    Vandana S Nade

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective was to investigate the neuroprotective role of Beta vulgaris in Parkinson′s disease (PD. Materials and Methods: PD was induced by administration of reserpine (5 mg/kg/day, i.p for 5 consecutive days, haloperidol (1 mg/kg, i.p., and tacrine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p. in experimental animals. The symptoms of PD such as tremors, akinesia, rigidity, catalepsy, and vacuous chewing movements (VCMs were evaluated. Foot shock-induced aggression (FSIA model was used to confirm anti-parkinsonian activity. The methanolic extract of Beta vulgaris (MEBV was administered at doses of 100, 200, and 300 mg/kg, p.o. The combination of L-dopa and carbidopa was used as a standard drug. Behavioral studies such as locomotor activity and grip strength were determined, and oxidative stress was evaluated in FSIA model in rat brain. Results: Pretreatment with MEBV (200 and 300 mg/kg significantly reduced the intensity of muscular rigidity, duration of catalepsy, akinesia, the number of tremors, VCMs, and increase fighting behavior. The locomotor activity and grip strength were significantly increased by MEBV. In FSIA, the biochemical analysis of brain revealed the increased level of lipid peroxidation (LPO and decreased levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT. MEBV significantly reduced LPO level and restored the defensive antioxidant enzymes SOD and CAT in rat brain. Conclusions: The results indicated the protective role of B. vulgaris against PD. The mechanism of protection may be due to augmentation of cellular antioxidants.

  17. Involvement of Basal Ganglia network in motor disabilities induced by typical antipsychotics.

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    Jonathan Chetrit

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clinical treatments with typical antipsychotic drugs (APDs are accompanied by extrapyramidal motor side-effects (EPS such as hypokinesia and catalepsy. As little is known about electrophysiological substrates of such motor disturbances, we investigated the effects of a typical APD, alpha-flupentixol, on the motor behavior and the neuronal activity of the whole basal ganglia nuclei in the rat. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The motor behavior was examined by the open field actimeter and the neuronal activity of basal ganglia nuclei was investigated using extracellular single unit recordings on urethane anesthetized rats. We show that alpha-flupentixol induced EPS paralleled by a decrease in the firing rate and a disorganization of the firing pattern in both substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr and subthalamic nucleus (STN. Furthermore, alpha-flupentixol induced an increase in the firing rate of globus pallidus (GP neurons. In the striatum, we recorded two populations of medium spiny neurons (MSNs after their antidromic identification. At basal level, both striato-pallidal and striato-nigral MSNs were found to be unaffected by alpha-flupentixol. However, during electrical cortico-striatal activation only striato-pallidal, but not striato-nigral, MSNs were found to be inhibited by alpha-flupentixol. Together, our results suggest that the changes in STN and SNr neuronal activity are a consequence of increased neuronal activity of globus pallidus (GP. Indeed, after selective GP lesion, alpha-flupentixol failed to induce EPS and to alter STN neuronal activity. CONCLUSION: Our study reports strong evidence to show that hypokinesia and catalepsy induced by alpha-flupentixol are triggered by dramatic changes occurring in basal ganglia network. We provide new insight into the key role of GP in the pathophysiology of APD-induced EPS suggesting that the GP can be considered as a potential target for the treatment of EPS.

  18. CB1 Knockout Mice Unveil Sustained CB2-Mediated Antiallodynic Effects of the Mixed CB1/CB2 Agonist CP55,940 in a Mouse Model of Paclitaxel-Induced Neuropathic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Liting; Cornett, Benjamin L; Mackie, Ken; Hohmann, Andrea G

    2015-07-01

    Cannabinoids suppress neuropathic pain through activation of cannabinoid CB1 and/or CB2 receptors; however, unwanted CB1-mediated cannabimimetic effects limit clinical use. We asked whether CP55,940 [(-)-3-[2-hydroxy-4-(1,1-dimethylheptyl)phenyl]-4-(3-hydroxypropyl)cyclohexanol], a potent cannabinoid that binds with similar affinity to CB1 and CB2 in vitro, produces functionally separable CB1- and CB2-mediated pharmacological effects in vivo. We evaluated antiallodynic effects, possible tolerance, and cannabimimetic effects (e.g., hypothermia, catalepsy, CB1-dependent withdrawal signs) after systemic CP55,940 treatment in a mouse model of toxic neuropathy produced by a chemotherapeutic agent, paclitaxel. The contribution of CB1 and CB2 receptors to in vivo actions of CP55,940 was evaluated using CB1 knockout (KO), CB2KO, and wild-type (WT) mice. Low-dose CP55,940 (0.3 mg/kg daily, i.p. ) suppressed paclitaxel-induced allodynia in WT and CB2KO mice, but not CB1KO mice. Low-dose CP55,940 also produced hypothermia and rimonabant-precipitated withdrawal in WT, but not CB1KO, mice. In WT mice, tolerance developed to CB1-mediated hypothermic effects of CP55,940 earlier than to antiallodynic effects. High-dose CP55,940 (10 mg/kg daily, i.p.) produced catalepsy in WT mice, which precluded determination of antiallodynic efficacy but produced sustained CB2-mediated suppression of paclitaxel-induced allodynia in CB1KO mice; these antiallodynic effects were blocked by the CB2 antagonist 6-iodopravadoline (AM630). High-dose CP55,940 did not produce hypothermia or rimonabant-precipitated withdrawal in CB1KO mice. Our results using the mixed CB1/CB2 agonist CP55,940 document that CB1 and CB2 receptor activations produce mechanistically distinct suppression of neuropathic pain. Our study highlights the therapeutic potential of targeting cannabinoid CB2 receptors to bypass unwanted central effects associated with CB1 receptor activation.

  19. Ameliorative effect of Sida cordifolia in rotenone induced oxidative stress model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Navneet; Gajbhiye, Asmita

    2013-12-01

    Present study focused on the evaluation of aqueous extract of Sida cordifolia (AESC), and its different fractions; hexane (HFSC), chloroform (CFSC) and aqueous (AFSC), against rotenone induced biochemical, neurochemical, histopathological and behavioral alterations in a rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD). An estimation of the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), glutathione (GSH) and catalase (CAT) along with superoxide anion generation (SAG) in different brain regions (cortex, midbrain and cerebellum) was carried out to assess biochemical changes. Behavioral evaluation tests (catalepsy, rearing behavior and posture instability) and neurochemical estimations (norepinephrine, dopamine and serotonin level) along with histopathological evaluations of different brain regions were also performed. The varying doses (50, 100, 250mg/kg; p.o.) of different test treatments (AESC, HFSC, CFSC and AFSC) were co-administered along with rotenone (2mg/kg; s.c.), for a period of 35 days to rats of various groups and compared with rotenone per se (negative control) and l-deprenyl (positive control; 10mg/kg; p.o.) treated groups for the above mentioned parameters. The increase in catalepsy and posture instability along with decrease in rearing behavior observed due to rotenone treatment was significantly attenuated by co-treatment with varying doses of AESC and AFSC. Results of the histopathological studies of different brain regions of rats showed eosinophilic lesions in the mid brain region due to rotenone treatment. The eosinophilic lesions were significantly attenuated in co-treated groups of AESC-100mg/kg and AFSC-100mg/kg. Rotenone induced oxidative damage, revealed by increased level of TBARS, SAG and decreased level of GSH and CAT in mid brain region of rats, was attenuated by the co-treatment of AESC and AFSC. The rotenone induced decrease of dopamine level in the midbrain region of rats was also attenuated by co-treatment of AESC-100mg/kg and AFSC

  20. The potent opioid agonist, (+)-cis-3-methylfentanyl binds pseudoirreversibly to the opioid receptor complex in vitro and in vivo: Evidence for a novel mechanism of action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Band, L.; Xu, Heng; Bykov, V.; Rothman, R.B.; Kim, Chongho; Newman, A.; Jacobson, A.E.; Rice, K.C. (NIDDK, Bethesda, MD (USA)); Greig, N. (NIA, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The present study demonstrates that pretreatment of rat brain membranes with (+)-cis-3-methylfentanyl ((+)-cis-MF), followed by extensive washing of the membranes, produces a wash-resistant decreasing in the binding of ({sup 3}H)-(D-ala{sup 2}, D-leu{sup 5})enkephalin to the d binding site of the opioid receptor complex ({delta}{sub cx} binding site). Intravenous administration of (+)-cis-MF (50 {mu}g/kg) to rats produced a pronounced catalepsy and also produced a wash-resistant masking of {delta}{sub cx} and {mu} binding sites in membranes prepared 120 min post-injection. Administration of 1 mg/kg i.v. of the opioid antagonist, 6-desoxy-6{beta}-fluoronaltrexone (cycloFOXY), 100 min after the injection of (+)-cis-MF (20 min prior to the preparation of membranes) completely reversed the catatonia and restored masked {delta}{sub cx} binding sites to control levels. This was not observed with (+)-cycloFOXY. The implications of these and other findings for the mechanism of action of (+)-cis-MF and models of the opioid receptors are discussed.

  1. Wax on, wax off: a rare case of catatonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Karen; D'Ambrosio, Michael; Liebman, Kenneth M; Veznedaroglu, Erol

    2014-10-01

    Catatonia was first described by a German psychiatrist, Karl Kahlbaum, in 1874. It is a behavioral syndrome marked by an inability to move normally, which can occur in the context of many underlying general medical and psychiatric disorders. A wide variety of neurologic, metabolic, drug-induced, and psychiatric causes of catatonia have been reported. We present a unique case of late onset catatonia in a 56-year-old man with no prior medical or psychiatric history initially presenting with stroke-like symptoms. The patient was awake and alert, with spontaneous eye opening, but completely nonverbal and not following any commands. Specifically, the patient demonstrated stupor, catalepsy, mutism, and negativism. After extensive emergency department testing, including negative computed tomography head, negative magnetic resonance imaging brain, negative electroencephalogram, and normal laboratory results, the patient was diagnosed with new-onset bipolar disorder with depressive features presenting as catatonia. Recognizing catatonia is important because it may be caused or exacerbated by treatment of the underlying disorder. Failure to institute treatment early in the course of catatonia is associated with a poor prognosis.

  2. The Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Aspidosperma tomentosum (Apocynaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anansa Bezerra de Aquino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of the crude ethanolic extract (CEE, its fractions, and the flavonoid isorhamnetin from Aspidosperma tomentosum using models of nociception and inflammation in mice. In the writhing test, the CEE and its fractions (except for soluble phase, CHCl3 100% and EtAcO 100% at 100 mg/kg p.o. induced antinociceptive activity. Isorhamnetin (100 μmol/kg, p.o. was also active. In the hot plate test, only the treatment with the fractions Hex : CHCl3 50%, CHCl3 100%, and CHCl3 : MeOH 5% (100 mg/kg, p.o. increased the latency time, reversed by the opioid antagonist naloxone. Fractions that were active in the hot plate test did not show catalepsy condition. It was observed that CEE, all fractions, and isorhamnetin reduced the formalin effects in the neurogenic phase. In the inflammatory phase, only CEE, isorhamnetin, and CHCl3 100% and CHCl3 : MeOH 5% fractions were active. CEE and all fractions, except for CHCl3 : MeOH 10% fraction, isorhamnetin, and soluble fraction were able to produce an antioedematogenic activity in the ear capsaicin-induced edema test. In the thioglycolate-induced peritonitis, only EtAcO 100% fraction was not active. The results demonstrate that A. tomentosum has antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities in animal models.

  3. Evaluating the effects and safety of intravenous lipid emulsion on haloperidol-induced neurotoxicity in rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshiri, Mohammad; Mohammadpour, Amir Hooshang; Vahabzadeh, Maryam; Etemad, Leila; Memar, Bahram; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    There are many reports on the effect of intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE) as an antidote in drugs related toxicities. We determined the effects of ILE on neurotoxicity of haloperidol (HA), a highly lipophilic antipsychotic, as a model of antipsychotics poisoning. We used six groups of five male rabbits. Two groups received distilled water intravenously followed by infusions of either 18 mL/kg of normal saline or ILE 20%, after 30 minutes. The third group received 18 mL/kg of normal saline after HA (2.6 mg/kg) administration. The three other groups received ILE 20% solution (6, 12, and 18 mL/kg) following HA injection. Catalepsy scores, temperature, pupil size, and mortality rate were measured at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, and 24 hours after HA administration began. Blood and tissue samples were taken from all animals at 24 hours or at death time for biochemical, cell count, and pathological studies. ILE reversed cataleptic scores, miotic pupils, and hypothermia of HA intoxication much faster than normal saline (P < 0.001). Biochemical complications and mortality rate of the animals were significantly higher in the HA + 18 mL/Kg ILE group. ILE reversed sings of HA neurotoxicity; however, synergistic effect of high dose of ILE and HA increased complications and mortality. PMID:24971362

  4. Evaluating the Effects and Safety of Intravenous Lipid Emulsion on Haloperidol-Induced Neurotoxicity in Rabbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Moshiri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many reports on the effect of intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE as an antidote in drugs related toxicities. We determined the effects of ILE on neurotoxicity of haloperidol (HA, a highly lipophilic antipsychotic, as a model of antipsychotics poisoning. We used six groups of five male rabbits. Two groups received distilled water intravenously followed by infusions of either 18 mL/kg of normal saline or ILE 20%, after 30 minutes. The third group received 18 mL/kg of normal saline after HA (2.6 mg/kg administration. The three other groups received ILE 20% solution (6, 12, and 18 mL/kg following HA injection. Catalepsy scores, temperature, pupil size, and mortality rate were measured at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, and 24 hours after HA administration began. Blood and tissue samples were taken from all animals at 24 hours or at death time for biochemical, cell count, and pathological studies. ILE reversed cataleptic scores, miotic pupils, and hypothermia of HA intoxication much faster than normal saline (P<0.001. Biochemical complications and mortality rate of the animals were significantly higher in the HA + 18 mL/Kg ILE group. ILE reversed sings of HA neurotoxicity; however, synergistic effect of high dose of ILE and HA increased complications and mortality.

  5. Absence of the GPR37/PAEL receptor impairs striatal Akt and ERK2 phosphorylation, DeltaFosB expression, and conditioned place preference to amphetamine and cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marazziti, Daniela; Di Pietro, Chiara; Mandillo, Silvia; Golini, Elisabetta; Matteoni, Rafaele; Tocchini-Valentini, Glauco P

    2011-06-01

    The orphan G-protein-coupled receptor 37 (GPR37) colocalizes with the dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) in mouse nigrostriatal presynaptic membranes, and its genetic ablation in homozygous null-mutant (GPR37-KO) mice provokes the marked increase of plasma membrane expression of DAT, alteration of psychostimulant-induced locomotor activity, and reduction of catalepsy induced by DA-receptor antagonists. We report that extracts from GPR37-KO mice displayed biochemical alterations of the nigrostriatal signaling pathways mediated by D1 and D2 dopaminergic receptors. Null-mutant mice showed an increase of the basal phosphorylation level of the D2-regulated Akt kinase. The basal phosphorylation of the D1-activated ERK2 kinase was not altered, but acute treatments with amphetamine or cocaine failed to produce its specific increase, as detected in samples from wild-type littermates. Furthermore, the chronic administration of cocaine to GPR37-KO mice did not increase the expression of the ΔFosB transcription factor isoforms. Consistently, behavioral analysis showed that null-mutant animals did not respond to the incentive properties of amphetamine or cocaine, in conditioned place preference tests. Thus, the lack of GPR37 affects both ERK2- and Akt-mediated striatal signaling pathways, impairing the biochemical and behavioral responses typically induced by acute and chronic administration of psychostimulant drugs. PMID:21372109

  6. Synthesis and evaluation of fluorinated derivatives of fentanyl as candidates for opiate receptor studies using positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahren Hwang; Feliu, A.L.; Wolf, A.P.; MacGregor, R.R.; Fowler, J.S.; Arnett, C.D.

    1986-03-01

    Three fluorinated derivatives of fentanyl, fluorofentanyl (3), keto-fluorofentanyl (5), and fluorofentanol (6), were synthesized and their abilities to compete with /sup 3/diprenorphine for binding sites in guinea pig brain membranes were determined. The relative potencies were fentanyl > 3 approx.= 6 >> 5. On the basis of its apparent affinity for opiate receptors and its relative ease of synthesis, 6 was selected for further study. Fentanyl was slightly better than 6 in its ability to compete with (/sup 3/H)naltrexone for binding sites in rat brain membranes. Both fentayl and 6 exhibited a similar high ''sodium ratio'' (quotient of the IC/sub 50/'s against (/sup 3/H)naltrexone in the presence and absence of sodium chloride) generally characteristic of opiate agonists. The analgesic potencies of fentanyl and 6 were determined in rats by measuring suppression of locomotion and vocalization responses to footshock. 6 appeared slightly less potent than fentanyl, but produced a similar analgesia and catalepsy which was entirely blocked by pretreatment of rats with naloxone, an opiate antagonist. A rapid synthesis of (/sup 18/F)-6 was developed and the tissue distribution of (/sup 18/F)-6 in mice was determined 5, 60, and 120 minutes after intravenous injection. The use of this general route to /sup 18/F-labeled derivatives of fentanyl for studies of the opiate receptor using positron emission tomography is planned.

  7. Fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibition for the symptomatic relief of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celorrio, Marta; Fernández-Suárez, Diana; Rojo-Bustamante, Estefanía; Echeverry-Alzate, Víctor; Ramírez, María J; Hillard, Cecilia J; López-Moreno, José A; Maldonado, Rafael; Oyarzábal, Julen; Franco, Rafael; Aymerich, María S

    2016-10-01

    Elements of the endocannabinoid system are strongly expressed in the basal ganglia where they suffer profound rearrangements after dopamine depletion. Modulation of the levels of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl-glycerol by inhibiting monoacylglycerol lipase alters glial phenotypes and provides neuroprotection in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease. In this study, we assessed whether inhibiting fatty acid amide hydrolase could also provide beneficial effects on the time course of this disease. The fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor, URB597, was administered chronically to mice treated with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine and probenecid (MPTPp) over 5weeks. URB597 (1mg/kg) prevented MPTPp induced motor impairment but it did not preserve the dopamine levels in the nigrostriatal pathway or regulate glial cell activation. The symptomatic relief of URB597 was confirmed in haloperidol-induced catalepsy assays, where its anti-cataleptic effects were both blocked by antagonists of the two cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2), and abolished in animals deficient in these receptors. Other fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitors, JNJ1661010 and TCF2, also had anti-cataleptic properties. Together, these results demonstrate an effect of fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibition on the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease in two distinct experimental models that is mediated by cannabinoid receptors. PMID:27318096

  8. 2-Aminopyrimidines as dual adenosine A1/A2A antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Sarel J; Petzer, Jacobus P; Terre'Blanche, Gisella; Petzer, Anél; van der Walt, Mietha M; Bergh, Jacobus J; Lourens, Anna C U

    2015-11-01

    In this study thirteen 2-aminopyrimidine derivatives were synthesised and screened as potential antagonists of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors in order to further investigate the structure activity relationships of this class of compounds. 4-(5-Methylfuran-2-yl)-6-[3-(piperidine-1-carbonyl)phenyl]pyrimidin-2-amine (8m) was identified as a compound with high affinities for both receptors, with an A2AKi value of 6.34 nM and an A1Ki value of 9.54 nM. The effect of selected compounds on the viability of cultured cells was assessed and preliminary results indicate low cytotoxicity. In vivo efficacy at A2A receptors was illustrated for compounds 8k and 8m since these compounds attenuated haloperidol-induced catalepsy in rats. A molecular docking study revealed that the interactions between the synthesised compounds and the adenosine A2A binding site most likely involve Phe168 and Asn253, interactions which are similar for structurally related adenosine A2A receptor antagonists. PMID:26462195

  9. Safety and side effects of cannabidiol, a Cannabis sativa constituent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamaschi, Mateus Machado; Queiroz, Regina Helena Costa; Zuardi, Antonio Waldo; Crippa, José Alexandre S

    2011-09-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD), a major nonpsychotropic constituent of Cannabis, has multiple pharmacological actions, including anxiolytic, antipsychotic, antiemetic and anti-inflammatory properties. However, little is known about its safety and side effect profile in animals and humans. This review describes in vivo and in vitro reports of CBD administration across a wide range of concentrations, based on reports retrieved from Web of Science, Scielo and Medline. The keywords searched were "cannabinoids", "cannabidiol" and "side effects". Several studies suggest that CBD is non-toxic in non-transformed cells and does not induce changes on food intake, does not induce catalepsy, does not affect physiological parameters (heart rate, blood pressure and body temperature), does not affect gastrointestinal transit and does not alter psychomotor or psychological functions. Also, chronic use and high doses up to 1,500 mg/day of CBD are reportedly well tolerated in humans. Conversely, some studies reported that this cannabinoid can induce some side effects, including inhibition of hepatic drug metabolism, alterations of in vitro cell viability, decreased fertilization capacity, and decreased activities of p-glycoprotein and other drug transporters. Based on recent advances in cannabinoid administration in humans, controlled CBD may be safe in humans and animals. However, further studies are needed to clarify these reported in vitro and in vivo side effects. PMID:22129319

  10. Peripherally Selective Cannabinoid 1 Receptor (CB1R) Agonists for the Treatment of Neuropathic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltzman, Herbert H; Shiner, Craig; Hirt, Erin E; Gilliam, Anne F; Thomas, Brian F; Maitra, Rangan; Snyder, Rod; Black, Sherry L; Patel, Purvi R; Mulpuri, Yatendra; Spigelman, Igor

    2016-08-25

    Alleviation of neuropathic pain by cannabinoids is limited by their central nervous system (CNS) side effects. Indole and indene compounds were engineered for high hCB1R affinity, peripheral selectivity, metabolic stability, and in vivo efficacy. An epithelial cell line assay identified candidates with <1% blood-brain barrier penetration for testing in a rat neuropathy induced by unilateral sciatic nerve entrapment (SNE). The SNE-induced mechanical allodynia was reversibly suppressed, partially or completely, after intraperitoneal or oral administration of several indenes. At doses that relieve neuropathy symptoms, the indenes completely lacked, while the brain-permeant CB1R agonist HU-210 (1) exhibited strong CNS side effects, in catalepsy, hypothermia, and motor incoordination assays. Pharmacokinetic findings of ∼0.001 cerebrospinal fluid:plasma ratio further supported limited CNS penetration. Pretreatment with selective CB1R or CB2R blockers suggested mainly CB1R contribution to an indene's antiallodynic effects. Therefore, this class of CB1R agonists holds promise as a viable treatment for neuropathic pain. PMID:27482723

  11. Animal models for predicting the efficacy and side effects of antipsychotic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro H. Gobira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of antipsychotic drugs represents an important approach for the treatment of schizophrenia. However, their efficacy is limited to certain symptoms of this disorder, and they induce serious side effects. As a result, there is a strong demand for the development of new drugs, which depends on reliable animal models for pharmacological characterization. The present review discusses the face, construct, and predictive validity of classical animal models for studying the efficacy and side effects of compounds for the treatment of schizophrenia. These models are based on the properties of antipsychotics to impair the conditioned avoidance response and reverse certain behavioral changes induced by psychotomimetic drugs, such as stereotypies, hyperlocomotion, and deficit in prepulse inhibition of the startle response. Other tests, which are not specific to schizophrenia, may predict drug effects on negative and cognitive symptoms, such as deficits in social interaction and memory impairment. Regarding motor side effects, the catalepsy test predicts the liability of a drug to induce Parkinson-like syndrome, whereas vacuous chewing movements predict the liability to induce dyskinesia after chronic treatment. Despite certain limitations, these models may contribute to the development of more safe and efficacious antipsychotic drugs.

  12. Dopamine-glutamate interactions in the basal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, W J

    1998-01-01

    In an attempt to formulate a working hypothesis of basal-ganglia functions, arguments are considered suggesting that the basal ganglia are involved in a process of response selection i.e. in the facilitation of "wanted" and in the suppression of "unwanted" behaviour. The meso-accumbal dopamine-system is considered to mediate natural and drug-induced reward and sensitization. The meso-striatal dopamine-system seems to fulfill similar functions: It may mediate reinforcement which strengthens a given behaviour when elicited subsequently, but which is not experienced as reward or hedonia. Glutamate as the transmitter of the corticofugal projections to the basal ganglia nuclei and of the subthalamic neurons is critically involved in basal ganglia functions and dysfunctions; for example Parkinson's disease can be considered to be a secondary hyperglutamatergic disease. Additionally, glutamate is an essential factor in the plasticity response of the basal-ganglia. However, opposite to previous suggestions, the NMDA-receptor blocker MK-801 does not prevent psychostimulant- nor morphine-induced day to day increase (sensitization) of locomotion. Also the day to day increase of haloperidol-induced catalepsy was not prevented by MK-801. PMID:9871434

  13. Systemic administration of the neurotensin NTS₁-receptor agonist PD149163 improves performance on a memory task in naturally deficient male brown Norway rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiser, Ashley A; Matazel, Katelin S; Esser, Melissa K; Feifel, David; Prus, Adam J

    2014-12-01

    Agonists for the neurotensin NTS₁ receptor consistently exhibit antipsychotic effects in animal models without producing catalepsy, suggesting that NTS₁-receptor agonists may be a novel class of drugs to treat schizophrenia. Moreover, studies utilizing NTS₁ agonists have reported improvements in some aspects of cognitive functioning, including prepulse inhibition and learning procedures, which suggest an ability of NTS₁-receptor agonists to diminish neurocognitive deficits. The present study sought to assess both baseline delay-induced memory performance and the effects of NTS₁-receptor activation on learning and memory consolidation in male Long-Evans and Brown Norway rats using a delayed nonmatch-to-position task radial arm-maze task. In the absence of drugs, Brown Norway rats displayed a significant increase in spatial memory errors following 3-, 7-, and 24-hr delay, whereas Long-Evans rats exhibited an increase in spatial memory errors following only a 7-, and 24-hr delay. With Brown Norway rats, administration of PD149163 before or after an information trial significantly reduced errors during a retention trial after a 24 hr delay. Administration of the NTS(1/2)-receptor antagonist SR142948 prior to the information trial did not affect retention-trial errors. These data are consistent with previous findings that Brown Norway rats have natural cognitive deficits and that they may be useful for assessing putative antipsychotic drugs for cognitive efficacy. Moreover, the results of this study support previous findings suggesting that NTS₁-receptor agonists may improve some aspects of cognitive functioning.

  14. Narcolepsy:review of clinical manifestation,etiology,diagnosis and treat ment%发作性睡病:临床表现,发病机制及治疗手段的探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶枫

    2014-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a rare neurologic sleep disorder characterized by a classic tetrad of excessive daytime sleep with irresistible sleep attacks,catalpexy(sudden bilateral loss of muscle tone),hypnogogic hallucination,and sleep paralysis.Not all symptoms are presented in all patients and these may vary in frequency and intensity over time.There are two distinct groups of the patients,ie,those having narcolepsy with catalepsy and those having narcolepsy without catalepsy based on the difference in genetic background.The exact cause of the disease remains unknown,however,there are significant evidences showing that hypo-cretin deficiency and HLA haplotype both play integral roles.Diagnosis relies on patient history,and objective data gathered from multiple sleep latency test(MSLT),polysomnography,and serum levels of hypocretin.Currently,there is no cure for narcolepsy, and the present mainstay of treatment is pharmacological treatment combined with lifestyle changes.Also,traditional Chinese med-icine is considered to be helpful in our country.In this thesis,we will mainly focus on the clinical manifestation,etiology,diagno-sis and treatment of narcolepsy as discussed below.%发作性睡病,又称发作性嗜睡症,是一种较为罕见的睡眠障碍。临床表现上,发作性睡病以经典的四联征为特点,即日间过度睡眠伴有不可抗拒的睡意;猝倒(突发性肌张力丧失);入睡性幻觉;睡瘫症。患者很少有四联征同时存在,通常表现为其中的一或几种。发作性嗜睡症分为两型,一是伴发猝倒的发作性睡病,二是不伴发猝倒的发作性睡病,两者在基因背景上有所不同,故以此作为分类依据。研究表明,该病与下丘脑分泌素和改为人类白细胞抗原(HLA)表型共同相关。发作性睡病的诊断主要依据临床表现,多种睡眠潜伏期实验(MSLT)和多导睡眠描记法(polysomnography),以及脑脊液下丘脑分泌素水平。

  15. A Cannabinoid CB1 Receptor-Positive Allosteric Modulator Reduces Neuropathic Pain in the Mouse with No Psychoactive Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatowska-Jankowska, Bogna M; Baillie, Gemma L; Kinsey, Steven; Crowe, Molly; Ghosh, Sudeshna; Owens, Robert A; Damaj, Imad M; Poklis, Justin; Wiley, Jenny L; Zanda, Matteo; Zanato, Chiara; Greig, Iain R; Lichtman, Aron H; Ross, Ruth A

    2015-12-01

    The CB1 receptor represents a promising target for the treatment of several disorders including pain-related disease states. However, therapeutic applications of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and other CB1 orthosteric receptor agonists remain limited because of psychoactive side effects. Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) offer an alternative approach to enhance CB1 receptor function for therapeutic gain with the promise of reduced side effects. Here we describe the development of the novel synthetic CB1 PAM, 6-methyl-3-(2-nitro-1-(thiophen-2-yl)ethyl)-2-phenyl-1H-indole (ZCZ011), which augments the in vitro and in vivo pharmacological actions of the CB1 orthosteric agonists CP55,940 and N-arachidonoylethanolamine (AEA). ZCZ011 potentiated binding of [(3)H]CP55,940 to the CB1 receptor as well as enhancing AEA-stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS binding in mouse brain membranes and β-arrestin recruitment and ERK phosphorylation in hCB1 cells. In the whole animal, ZCZ011 is brain penetrant, increased the potency of these orthosteric agonists in mouse behavioral assays indicative of cannabimimetic activity, including antinociception, hypothermia, catalepsy, locomotor activity, and in the drug discrimination paradigm. Administration of ZCZ011 alone was devoid of activity in these assays and did not produce a conditioned place preference or aversion, but elicited CB1 receptor-mediated antinociceptive effects in the chronic constriction nerve injury model of neuropathic pain and carrageenan model of inflammatory pain. These data suggest that ZCZ011 acts as a CB1 PAM and provide the first proof of principle that CB1 PAMs offer a promising strategy to treat neuropathic and inflammatory pain with minimal or no cannabimimetic side effects.

  16. Antinociceptive Activity of Trichilia catigua Hydroalcoholic Extract: New Evidence on Its Dopaminergic Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice F. Viana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Trichilia catigua is a native plant of Brazil; its barks are used by some local pharmaceutical companies to prepare tonic drinks, such as Catuama. The present study was addressed to evaluate the effects of T. catigua hydroalcoholic extract in mouse nociception behavioral models, and to evaluate the possible mechanisms involved in its actions. Male Swiss mice were submitted to hot-plate, writhing and von Frey tests, after oral treatment with T. catigua extract (200 mg kg−1, p.o.. The extract displayed antinociceptive effect in all three models. For characterization of the mechanisms involved in the antinociceptive action of the extract, the following pharmacological treatments were done: naloxone (2.5 mg kg−1, s.c., SR141716A (10 mg kg−1, i.p., SCH23390 (15 μg kg−1, i.p., sulpiride (50 mg kg−1, i.p., prazosin (1 mg kg−1, i.p., bicuculline (1 mg kg−1, i.p. or dl-p-chlorophenylalanine methyl ester (PCPA, 100 mg kg−1, i.p.. In these experiments, the action of T. catigua extract was evaluated in the hot-plate test. The treatment with SCH23390 completely prevented the antinociceptive effect, while naloxone partially prevented it. The possible involvement of the dopaminergic system in the actions of T. catigua extract was substantiated by data showing the potentiation of apomorphine-induced hypothermia and by the prevention of haloperidol-induced catalepsy. In conclusion, the antinociceptive effects of T. catigua extract seem to be mainly associated with the activation of dopaminergic system and, to a lesser extent, through interaction with opioid pathway.

  17. Prenatal exposure to integerrimine N-oxide enriched butanolic residue from Senecio brasiliensis affects behavior and striatal neurotransmitter levels of rats in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandini, Thaísa M; Udo, Mariana S B; Reis-Silva, Thiago M; Sanches, Daniel; Bernardi, Maria Martha; Flório, Jorge Camilo; Spinosa, Helenice de S

    2015-12-01

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are toxins that are exclusively biosynthesized by plants and are commonly present in foods and herbs. PAs are usually associated with poisoning events in livestock and human beings. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the behavioral and neurochemical effects of prenatal exposure to PA integerrimine N-oxide of rats in adulthood. Pregnant Wistar rats received integerrimine N-oxide from the butanolic residue of Senecio brasiliensis by gavage on gestational days 6-20 at doses of 3, 6 and 9 mg/kg. During adulthood of the offspring, the following behavioral tests were performed: open-field, plus-maze, forced swimming, catalepsy and stereotypy. Histological analyses and monoamine levels were measured. Male offspring from dams that were exposed to 9 mg/kg showed an increase in locomotion in the open-field test, an increased frequency of entries and time spent in open arms in elevated plus-maze test, as well as decreased swimming time. In the female offspring from dams that were exposed to 9 mg/kg, there was an increased time of climbing in forced swimming and intensity of stereotyped behavior. The histological study indicates an increase in the number of multinucleated cells in the liver (6 and 9 mg/kg). In neurotransmitter analysis, specifically in the striatum, we observed change in dopamine and serotonin levels in the middle dose. Thus, our results indicate that prenatal exposure to integerrimine N-oxide changed behavior in adulthood and neurotransmitter levels in the striatum. Our results agree with previous studies, which showed that integerrimine N-oxide impaired physical and neurobehavioral development in childhood that can persist until adulthood. PMID:26416213

  18. Bee Venom Alleviates Motor Deficits and Modulates the Transfer of Cortical Information through the Basal Ganglia in Rat Models of Parkinson's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Maurice

    Full Text Available Recent evidence points to a neuroprotective action of bee venom on nigral dopamine neurons in animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD. Here we examined whether bee venom also displays a symptomatic action by acting on the pathological functioning of the basal ganglia in rat PD models. Bee venom effects were assessed by combining motor behavior analyses and in vivo electrophysiological recordings in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr, basal ganglia output structure in pharmacological (neuroleptic treatment and lesional (unilateral intranigral 6-hydroxydopamine injection PD models. In the hemi-parkinsonian 6-hydroxydopamine lesion model, subchronic bee venom treatment significantly alleviates contralateral forelimb akinesia and apomorphine-induced rotations. Moreover, a single injection of bee venom reverses haloperidol-induced catalepsy, a pharmacological model reminiscent of parkinsonian akinetic deficit. This effect is mimicked by apamin, a blocker of small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK channels, and blocked by CyPPA, a positive modulator of these channels, suggesting the involvement of SK channels in the bee venom antiparkinsonian action. In vivo electrophysiological recordings in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (basal ganglia output structure showed no significant effect of BV on the mean neuronal discharge frequency or pathological bursting activity. In contrast, analyses of the neuronal responses evoked by motor cortex stimulation show that bee venom reverses the 6-OHDA- and neuroleptic-induced biases in the influence exerted by the direct inhibitory and indirect excitatory striatonigral circuits. These data provide the first evidence for a beneficial action of bee venom on the pathological functioning of the cortico-basal ganglia circuits underlying motor PD symptoms with potential relevance to the symptomatic treatment of this disease.

  19. Atypical antipsychotic properties of AD-6048, a primary metabolite of blonanserin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatara, Ayaka; Shimizu, Saki; Masui, Atsushi; Tamura, Miyuki; Minamimoto, Shoko; Mizuguchi, Yuto; Ochiai, Midori; Mizobe, Yusuke; Ohno, Yukihiro

    2015-11-01

    Blonanserin is a new atypical antipsychotic drug that shows high affinities to dopamine D2 and 5-HT2 receptors; however, the mechanisms underlying its atypicality are not fully understood. In this study, we evaluated the antipsychotic properties of AD-6048, a primary metabolite of blonanserin, to determine if it contributes to the atypicality of blonanserin. Subcutaneous administration of AD-6048 (0.3-1mg/kg) significantly inhibited apomorphine (APO)-induced climbing behavior with an ED50 value of 0.200mg/kg, the potency being 1/3-1/5 times that of haloperidol (HAL). AD-6048 did not cause extrapyramidal side effects (EPS) even at high doses (up to 10mg/kg, s.c.), whereas HAL at doses of 0.1-3mg/kg (s.c.) significantly induced bradykinesia and catalepsy in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, the therapeutic index (potency ratios of anti-APO action to that of EPS induction) of AD-6048 was much higher than that of haloperidol, illustrating that AD-6048 per se possesses atypical antipsychotic properties. In addition, immunohistochemical analysis of Fos protein expression revealed that both AD-6048 and HAL significantly increased Fos expression in the shell part of the nucleus accumbens and the striatum. However, in contrast to HAL which preferentially enhanced striatal Fos expression, AD-6048 showed a preferential action to the nucleus accumbens. These results indicate that AD-6048 acts as an atypical antipsychotic, which seems to at least partly contribute to the atypicality of blonanserin. PMID:26363311

  20. Design Expert® supported optimization and predictive analysis of selegiline nanoemulsion via the olfactory region with enhanced behavioural performance in Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Shobhit; Ali, Javed; Baboota, Sanjula

    2016-10-01

    Selegiline is a monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) inhibitor and is used in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. The main problem associated with its oral administration is its low oral bioavailability (10%) due to its poor aqueous solubility and extensive first pass metabolism. The aim of the present research work was to develop a nanoemulsion loaded with selegiline for direct nose-to-brain delivery for the better management of Parkinson’s disease. A quality by design (QbD) approach was used in a statistical multivariate method for the preparation and optimization of nanoemulsion. In this study, four independent variables were chosen, in which two were compositions and two were process variables, while droplet size, transmittance, zeta potential and drug release were selected as response variables. The optimized formulation was assessed for efficacy in Parkinson’s disease using behavioural studies, namely forced swimming, locomotor, catalepsy, muscle coordination, akinesia and bradykinesia or pole test in Wistar rats. The observed droplet size, polydispersity index (PDI), refractive index, transmittance, zeta potential and viscosity of selegiline nanoemulsion were found to be 61.43 ± 4.10 nm, 0.203 ± 0.005, 1.30 ± 0.01, 99.80 ± 0.04%, -34 mV and 31.85 ± 0.24 mPas respectively. Surface characterization studies demonstrated a spherical shape of nanoemulsion which showed 3.7 times enhancement in drug permeation as compared to drug suspension. The results of behaviour studies showed that treatment of haloperidol induced Parkinson’s disease in rats with selegiline nanoemulsion (administered intranasally) showed significant improvement in behavioural activities in comparison to orally administered drug. These findings demonstrate that nanoemulsion could be a promising new drug delivery carrier for intranasal delivery of selegiline in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease.

  1. Effect of JWH-250, JWH-073 and their interaction on "tetrad", sensorimotor, neurological and neurochemical responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossato, Andrea; Canazza, Isabella; Trapella, Claudio; Vincenzi, Fabrizio; De Luca, Maria Antonietta; Rimondo, Claudia; Varani, Katia; Borea, Pier Andrea; Serpelloni, Giovanni; Marti, Matteo

    2016-06-01

    JWH-250 and JWH-073 are two synthetic cannabinoid agonists with nanomolar affinity at CB1 and CB2 receptors. They are illegally marketed within "herbal blend" for theirs psychoactive effects greater than those produced by Cannabis. Recently, we analyzed an "herbal" preparation containing a mixture of both JWH-250 and JWH-073. The present study was aimed at investigating the in vitro and in vivo pharmacological activity of JWH-250 and JWH-073 in male CD-1 mice. In vitro competition binding experiments performed on mouse and human CB1 and CB2 receptors revealed a nanomolar affinity and potency of the JWH-250 and JWH-073. In vivo studies showed that JWH-250 and JWH-073, administered separately, induced a marked hypothermia, increased pain threshold to both noxious mechanical and thermal stimuli, caused catalepsy, reduced motor activity, impaired sensorimotor responses (visual, acoustic and tactile), caused seizures, myoclonia, hyperreflexia and promote aggressiveness in mice. Moreover, microdialysis study in freely moving mice showed that systemic administration of JWH-250 and JWH-073 stimulated dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens in a dose-dependent manner. Behavioral, neurological and neurochemical effects were fully prevented by the selective CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist AM 251. Co-administration of ineffective doses of JWH-250 and JWH-073 impaired visual sensorimotor responses, improved mechanical pain threshold and stimulated mesolimbic DA transmission in mice, living unchanged all other behavioral and physiological parameters. For the first time the present study demonstrates the overall pharmacological effects induced by the administration of JWH-250 and JWH-073 in mice and it reveals their potentially synergistic action suggesting that co-administration of different synthetic cannabinoids may potentiate the detrimental effects of individual compounds increasing their dangerousness and abuse potential. PMID:26780169

  2. Despite strong behavioral disruption, Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol does not affect cell proliferation in the adult mouse dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochman, Linda J; dos Santos, Angela Amancio; Fornal, Casimir A; Jacobs, Barry L

    2006-10-01

    Marijuana is a widely abused illicit drug known to cause significant cognitive impairments. Marijuana has been hypothesized to target neurons in the hippocampus because of the abundance of cannabinoid receptors present in this structure. While there is no clear evidence of neuropathology in vivo, suppression of brain mitogenesis, and ultimately neurogenesis, may provide a sensitive index of marijuana's more subtle effects on neural mechanisms subserving cognitive functions. We examined the effects of different doses and treatment regimens of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main active ingredient in marijuana, on cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus of adult male mice. Following drug treatment, the thymidine analog 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU; 200 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered two hours prior to sacrifice to assess cell proliferation, the first step in neurogenesis. Administration of THC produced dose-dependent catalepsy and suppression of motor activity. The number of BrdU-labeled cells was not significantly changed from vehicle control levels following either acute (1, 3, 10, 30 mg/kg, i.p.), sequential (two injections of 10 or 30 mg/kg, i.p., separated by 5 h), or chronic escalating (20 to 80 mg/kg, p.o.; for 3 weeks) drug administration. Furthermore, acute administration of the potent synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonist R-(+)-WIN 55,212-2 (WIN; 5 mg/kg, i.p.) also had no significant effect on cell proliferation. These findings provide no evidence for an effect of THC on hippocampal cell proliferation, even at doses producing gross behavioral intoxication. Whether marijuana or THC affects neurogenesis remains to be explored.

  3. Antinociceptive effects of the selective CB2 agonist MT178 in inflammatory and chronic rodent pain models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Targa, Martina; Corciulo, Carmen; Tabrizi, Mojgan Aghazadeh; Merighi, Stefania; Gessi, Stefania; Saponaro, Giulia; Baraldi, Pier Giovanni; Borea, Pier Andrea; Varani, Katia

    2013-06-01

    Cannabinoid CB(2) receptor activation by selective agonists has been shown to produce analgesic effects in preclinical models of inflammatory, neuropathic, and bone cancer pain. In this study the effect of a novel CB(2)agonist (MT178) was evaluated in different animal models of pain. First of all, in vitro competition binding experiments performed on rat, mouse, or human CB receptors revealed a high affinity, selectivity, and potency of MT178. The analgesic properties of the novel CB(2) agonist were evaluated in various in vivo experiments, such as writhing and formalin assays, showing a good efficacy comparable with that produced by the nonselective CB agonist WIN 55,212-2. A dose-dependent antiallodynic effect of the novel CB(2) compound in the streptozotocin-induced diabetic neuropathy was found. In a bone cancer pain model and in the acid-induced muscle pain model, MT178 was able to significantly reduce mechanical hyperalgesia in a dose-related manner. Notably, MT178 failed to provoke locomotor disturbance and catalepsy, which were observed following the administration of WIN 55,212-2. CB(2) receptor mechanism of action was investigated in dorsal root ganglia where MT178 mediated a reduction of [(3)H]-d-aspartate release. MT178 was also able to inhibit capsaicin-induced substance P release and NF-κB activation. These results demonstrate that systemic administration of MT178 produced a robust analgesia in different pain models via CB(2) receptors, providing an interesting approach to analgesic therapy in inflammatory and chronic pain without CB(1)-mediated central side effects.

  4. Stimulation of in vivo dopamine transmission and intravenous self-administration in rats and mice by JWH-018, a Spice cannabinoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, M A; Bimpisidis, Z; Melis, M; Marti, M; Caboni, P; Valentini, V; Margiani, G; Pintori, N; Polis, I; Marsicano, G; Parsons, L H; Di Chiara, G

    2015-12-01

    The synthetic cannabinoid 1-pentyl-3-(1-naphthoyl)-indole (JWH-018) has been detected in about 140 samples of a smokable herbal mixture termed "Spice". JWH-018 is a CB1 and CB2 agonist with a higher affinity than Δ9-THC. In order to investigate the neurobiological substrates of JWH-018 actions, we studied by microdialysis in freely moving rats the effect of JWH-018 on extracellular dopamine (DA) levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell and core and in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). JWH-018, at the dose of 0.25 mg/kg i.p., increased DA release in the NAc shell but not in the NAc core and mPFC. Lower (0.125 mg/kg) and higher doses (0.50 mg/kg) were ineffective. These effects were blocked by CB1 receptor antagonists (SR-141716A and AM 251) and were absent in mice lacking the CB1 receptor. Ex vivo whole cell patch clamp recordings from rat ventral tegmental area (VTA) DA neurons showed that JWH-018 decreases GABAA-mediated post-synaptic currents in a dose-dependent fashion suggesting that the stimulation of DA release observed in vivo might result from disinhibition of DA neurons. In addition, on the "tetrad" paradigm for screening cannabinoid-like effects (i.e., hypothermia, analgesia, catalepsy, hypomotility), JWH-018, at doses of 1 and 3 mg/kg i.p., produced CB1 receptor-dependent behavioural effects in rats. Finally, under appropriate experimental conditions, rats (20 μg/kg/inf i.v., FR3; nose-poking) and mice (30 μg/kg/inf i.v., FR1; lever-pressing) self-administer intravenously JWH-018. In conclusion, JWH-018 shares with the active ingredient of Marijuana, Δ9-THC, CB1-dependent reinforcing and DA stimulant actions.

  5. A behavioural comparison of acute and chronic Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol in C57BL/6JArc mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Leonora E; Chesworth, Rose; Huang, Xu-Feng; McGregor, Iain S; Arnold, Jonathon C; Karl, Tim

    2010-08-01

    Cannabis contains over 70 unique compounds and its abuse is linked to an increased risk of developing schizophrenia. The behavioural profiles of the psychotropic cannabis constituent Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta9-THC) and the non-psychotomimetic constituent cannabidiol (CBD) were investigated with a battery of behavioural tests relevant to anxiety and positive, negative and cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia. Male adult C57BL/6JArc mice were given 21 daily intraperitoneal injections of vehicle, Delta9-THC (0.3, 1, 3 or 10 mg/kg) or CBD (1, 5, 10 or 50 mg/kg). Delta9-THC produced the classic cannabinoid CB1 receptor-mediated tetrad of hypolocomotion, analgesia, catalepsy and hypothermia while CBD had modest hyperthermic effects. While sedative at this dose, Delta9-THC (10 mg/kg) produced locomotor-independent anxiogenic effects in the open-field and light-dark tests. Chronic CBD produced moderate anxiolytic-like effects in the open-field test at 50 mg/kg and in the light-dark test at a low dose (1 mg/kg). Acute and chronic Delta9-THC (10 mg/kg) decreased the startle response while CBD had no effect. Prepulse inhibition was increased by acute treatment with Delta9-THC (0.3, 3 and 10 mg/kg) or CBD (1, 5 and 50 mg/kg) and by chronic CBD (1 mg/kg). Chronic CBD (50 mg/kg) attenuated dexamphetamine (5 mg/kg)-induced hyperlocomotion, suggesting an antipsychotic-like action for this cannabinoid. Chronic Delta9-THC decreased locomotor activity before and after dexamphetamine administration suggesting functional antagonism of the locomotor stimulant effect. These data provide the first evidence of anxiolytic- and antipsychotic-like effects of chronic but not acute CBD in C57BL/6JArc mice, extending findings from acute studies in other inbred mouse strains and rats.

  6. Design Expert(®) supported optimization and predictive analysis of selegiline nanoemulsion via the olfactory region with enhanced behavioural performance in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Shobhit; Ali, Javed; Baboota, Sanjula

    2016-10-28

    Selegiline is a monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) inhibitor and is used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. The main problem associated with its oral administration is its low oral bioavailability (10%) due to its poor aqueous solubility and extensive first pass metabolism. The aim of the present research work was to develop a nanoemulsion loaded with selegiline for direct nose-to-brain delivery for the better management of Parkinson's disease. A quality by design (QbD) approach was used in a statistical multivariate method for the preparation and optimization of nanoemulsion. In this study, four independent variables were chosen, in which two were compositions and two were process variables, while droplet size, transmittance, zeta potential and drug release were selected as response variables. The optimized formulation was assessed for efficacy in Parkinson's disease using behavioural studies, namely forced swimming, locomotor, catalepsy, muscle coordination, akinesia and bradykinesia or pole test in Wistar rats. The observed droplet size, polydispersity index (PDI), refractive index, transmittance, zeta potential and viscosity of selegiline nanoemulsion were found to be 61.43 ± 4.10 nm, 0.203 ± 0.005, 1.30 ± 0.01, 99.80 ± 0.04%, -34 mV and 31.85 ± 0.24 mPas respectively. Surface characterization studies demonstrated a spherical shape of nanoemulsion which showed 3.7 times enhancement in drug permeation as compared to drug suspension. The results of behaviour studies showed that treatment of haloperidol induced Parkinson's disease in rats with selegiline nanoemulsion (administered intranasally) showed significant improvement in behavioural activities in comparison to orally administered drug. These findings demonstrate that nanoemulsion could be a promising new drug delivery carrier for intranasal delivery of selegiline in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. PMID:27655136

  7. Pyrrolo[1,3]benzothiazepine-based atypical antipsychotic agents. Synthesis, structure-activity relationship, molecular modeling, and biological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campiani, Giuseppe; Butini, Stefania; Gemma, Sandra; Nacci, Vito; Fattorusso, Caterina; Catalanotti, Bruno; Giorgi, Gianluca; Cagnotto, Alfredo; Goegan, Mara; Mennini, Tiziana; Minetti, Patrizia; Di Cesare, M Assunta; Mastroianni, Domenico; Scafetta, Nazzareno; Galletti, Bruno; Stasi, M Antonietta; Castorina, Massimo; Pacifici, Licia; Ghirardi, Orlando; Tinti, Ornella; Carminati, Paolo

    2002-01-17

    The prototypical dopamine and serotonin antagonist (+/-)-7-chloro-9-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)-9,10-dihydropyrrolo[2,1-b][1,3]benzothiazepine (5) was resolved into its R and S enantiomers via crystallization of the diastereomeric tartaric acid salts. Binding studies confirmed that the (R)-(-)-enantiomer is a more potent D(2) receptor antagonist than the (S)-(+)-enantiomer, with almost identical affinity at the 5-HT(2) receptor ((S)-(+)-5, log Y = 4.7; (R)-(-)-5, log Y = 7.4). These data demonstrated a significant stereoselective interaction of 5 at D(2) receptors. Furthermore, enantiomer (S)-(+)-5 (ST1460) was tested on a panel of receptors; this compound showed an intriguing binding profile characterized by high affinity for H(1) and the alpha(1) receptor, a moderate affinity for alpha(2) and D(3) receptors, and low affinity for muscarinic receptors. Pharmacological and biochemical investigation confirmed an atypical pharmacological profile for (S)-(+)-5. This atypical antipsychotic lead has low propensity to induce catalepsy in rat. It has minimal effect on serum prolactin levels, and it has been selected for further pharmacological studies. (S)-(+)-5 increases the extracellular levels of dopamine in the rat striatum after subcutaneous administration. By use of 5 as the lead compound, a novel series of potential atypical antipsychotics has been developed, some of them being characterized by a stereoselective interaction at D(2) receptors. A number of structure-activity relationships trends have been identified, and a possible explanation is advanced in order to account for the observed stereoselectivity of the enantiomer of (+/-)-5 for D(2) receptors. The molecular structure determination of the enantiomers of 5 by X-ray diffraction and molecular modeling is reported. PMID:11784139

  8. In Vitro and In Vivo Characterization of the Alkaloid Nuciferine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martilias S Farrell

    Full Text Available The sacred lotus (Nelumbo nucifera contains many phytochemicals and has a history of human use. To determine which compounds may be responsible for reported psychotropic effects, we used in silico predictions of the identified phytochemicals. Nuciferine, an alkaloid component of Nelumbo nucifera and Nymphaea caerulea, had a predicted molecular profile similar to antipsychotic compounds. Our study characterizes nuciferine using in vitro and in vivo pharmacological assays.Nuciferine was first characterized in silico using the similarity ensemble approach, and was followed by further characterization and validation using the Psychoactive Drug Screening Program of the National Institute of Mental Health. Nuciferine was then tested in vivo in the head-twitch response, pre-pulse inhibition, hyperlocomotor activity, and drug discrimination paradigms.Nuciferine shares a receptor profile similar to aripiprazole-like antipsychotic drugs. Nuciferine was an antagonist at 5-HT2A, 5-HT2C, and 5-HT2B, an inverse agonist at 5-HT7, a partial agonist at D2, D5 and 5-HT6, an agonist at 5-HT1A and D4 receptors, and inhibited the dopamine transporter. In rodent models relevant to antipsychotic drug action, nuciferine blocked head-twitch responses and discriminative stimulus effects of a 5-HT2A agonist, substituted for clozapine discriminative stimulus, enhanced amphetamine induced locomotor activity, inhibited phencyclidine (PCP-induced locomotor activity, and rescued PCP-induced disruption of prepulse inhibition without induction of catalepsy.The molecular profile of nuciferine was similar but not identical to that shared with several approved antipsychotic drugs suggesting that nuciferine has atypical antipsychotic-like actions.

  9. Evaluation of anti-parkinson’s activity of gentisic acid in different animal models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kabra MP; Bhandari SS; Sharma A; Gupta RB

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the neuroprotective activity ofGentisic acid inPD.The study was conducted on swiss albinFo mice(20-25 g) & wistar rats(200-250 g).Methods:Three behavioural models namely,Haloperidol induced catalepsy,Reserpine antagonism andHaloperidol induce orofacial dyskinesia were employed in this study,SwissAlbino mice(20-25 g) were used in first two models whileWistar rats(200-250 g) used in last one model.There are five group(n=6) in each animal model.Various behavior activity/parameter(cataleptic behavior, horizontal movements, rearing & grooming frequencies andDyskinesia activity like vacuous chewing & tongue protrusion) in different animal models were used to evaluate the anti-Parkinson’s activity ofGentisic acid.Results:Gentisic acid showed a significant(P<0.01) reduction in the duration of cataleptic behavior dose dependently when compared to haloperidol control group.Gentisic acid shows dose dependant increase in the frequency of horizontal movement and rearing behavior when compared to theReserpine control group.But, the effect ofGentisic acid on the frequency of grooming behavior was found to be insignificant.Gentisic acid(80 mg/kg) showed a significant (P<0.05) decrease in the frequency of vacuous chewing & tongue protrusion but the other dose tested were found to be insignificant in this respect.Conclusions:Results shows that the Gentisic acid produced dose dependent neuroprotective activity in different animal models ofPD.

  10. Evaluation of agonist-antagonist properties of nitrogen mustard and cyano derivatives of delta 8-tetrahydrocannabinol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, J L; Compton, D R; Gordon, P M; Siegel, C; Singer, M; Dutta, A; Lichtman, A H; Balster, R L; Razdan, R K; Martin, B R

    1996-01-01

    delta 8-Tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 8-THC) is a naturally occurring cannabinoid with a characteristic pharmacological profile of in vivo effects. Previous studies have shown that modification of the structure of delta 8-THC by inclusion of a nitrogen-containing functional group alters this profile and may alkylate the cannabinoid receptor, similar to the manner in which beta-funaltrexamine (beta-FNA) alkylates the micro-opioid receptor. Two novel analogs of delta 8-THC were synthesized: a nitrogen mustard analog with a dimethylheptyl side chain (NM-delta 8-THC) and a cyano analog with a dimethylpentyl side chain (CY-delta 8-THC). Both analogs showed high affinity for brain cannabinoid receptors and when administered acutely, produced characteristic delta 9-THC-like effects in mice, including locomotor suppression, hypothermia, antinociception and catalepsy. CY-delta 8-THC shared discriminative stimulus effects with CP 55,940; for NM-delta 8-THC, these effects also occurred, but were delayed. Although both compounds attenuated the effects of delta 9-THC in the mouse behavioral tests, evaluation of potential antagonist effects of these compounds was complicated by the fact that two injections of delta 9-THC produced similar results, suggesting that acute tolerance or desensitization might account for the observations. NM-delta 8-THC, but not CY-delta 8-THC, attenuated the discriminative stimulus effects of CP 55,940 in rats several days following injection. Hence, addition of a nitrogen-containing functional group to a traditional cannabinoid structure does not eliminate agonist effects and may produce delayed attenuation of cannabinoid-induced pharmacological effects. PMID:9076759

  11. Effects of substance P in globus pallidus on haloperidol-induced Parkinsonian model rats%苍白球P物质对帕金森病僵直模型大鼠的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑长民; 薛雁; 陈蕾

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the effects of substance P in globus pallidus on haloperidol-induced Parkinson's disease model rat.Methods In behavioral experiments,guide cannulae constructed from stainless steel were implanted into the globus pallidus.After five days recovery,0.5 μl drugs(normal saline,SMSP,SR140333B,SR140333B + SMSP)were bilaterally microinjected into the globus pallidus in awake rats with haloperidol administration intraperitoneally.The catalepsy was then observed within 60 min.In electrophysiological study,an in vivo extracellular recording was performed to observe the effects of substance P on the firing rate of pallidal neurons.Resuits Haloperidol induced catalepsy in rats with intrapallidal saline microinjection.The maximum average latency was(259.8±34.8)s at the time point of 30th min.The minimum average latency was(145.2±54.8)s at 50th min.Bilateral microinjection of SMSP into globus pallidus significantly attenuated haloperidol-induced catalepsy (The average latency was(10.4±3.4)s at lOth rain and(58.4±38.8)s at 60th min,P<0.01).This anticataleptic effect was completely counteracted by selective NK-1 receptors antagonist SR140333B(The average latency was(176.4±64.4)s at 10th min and(139.2±59.7)s at 60th rain,P<0.01).Furthermore,micropressure ejection of SMSP significantly increased the firing rate of pallidal neurons(Basal:(13.4±4.2)Hz,SMSP:(17.5±5.6)Hz).The average increase was(29.4±8.6)%(P<0.05,n=13).SR140333 B completely blocked SMSPinduced increase in firing rate(SR140333B:(10.3±2.5)Hz,SR140333 B + SMSP:(11.3±3.0)Hz,P>0.05,n=8).Conclusion Based on the action of substance P in globus pallidus of parkinsonian rats,it is we hypothesized that activation of substance P receptor in globus pallidus may play a role in the treatment of Parkinson's disease.%目的 观察苍白球P物质对氟哌啶醇帕金森病僵直模型大鼠的影响.方法 行为学实验采用大鼠腹腔注射氟哌啶醇诱发帕金森病僵直模犁,苍白球分

  12. 发作性睡病与癫(癎)共患的诊断与治疗分析%Diagnosis and treatment of epilepsy and narcolepsy comorbid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨志仙; 韩芳; 秦炯; 刘晓燕

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze the clinical diagnosis and treatment process of narcolepsy and epilepsy co-existence,and thereby to improve awareness of such cases.Method The clinical manifestations of 2 cases were observed,and video-electroencephalogram (VEEG),multiple sleep latency tests (MSLT) were performed.Hypocretin 1 level in cerebrospinal fluid was examined in one case.Result The onset of disease of case one was started with epilepsy with myoclonic seizure.After half a year,catalepsy induced by emotion especially laughing and excessive daytime sleepiness appeared.MSLT was positive and hypocretin 1 level decreased.Narcolepsy-cataplexy was definitely diagnosed in this case.Valproate was given and seizure was controlled completely,but the excessive daytime sleepiness was aggravated.Combination of valproate,methylphenidate and clomipramine treatment improved the symptoms of narcolepsy and the patient was still free of epileptic seizures.The onset symptoms of case 2 were catalepsy and excessive daytime sleepiness.MSLT was positive.The treatment was ineffective because of bad compliance.After 2 years,episodes of impairment of consciousness with automatism occurred.VEEG showed slow waves and spikes in right temporal area.Complex partial seizure was determined.Oxcarbazepine was used and then the patients became seizures free,but the symptoms of narcolepsy were still obvious.Conclusion Comorbidity of narcolepsy and epilepsy is a rare phenomenon.Clinical symptoms,predisposing factor,VEEG and MSLT can help diagnosis and differential diagnosis.The antiepileptic drugs might aggravate drowsiness.Based on therapy of epilepsy by using antiepileptic drugs,low dosage of central nervous system stimulants might improve the drowsiness and catalepsy symptoms of narcolepsy.%目的 观察发作性睡病与癫(癎)共患的临床诊断及治疗过程,提高对此类共患病例的认识.方法 分析2例发作性睡病与癫(癎)共患患儿临床资料、视频脑电图监测(VEEG)及多次

  13. 高血糖对6-OHDA诱导的PD模型大鼠行为学的影响%The Effect of Hyperglycemia on the Ethology of 6-OHDA Induced PD Rat Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    买尔哈巴; 孙景兰; 杨新玲; 贾玉敏; 耿飞飞

    2015-01-01

    Objective On the base of diabetic SD rat model, establish the Parkinson's disease(PD) rat model by two-spot u-nilaterally injection of 6-hydroxydopamine(6-OHDA) into the medial forebrain and evaluate this model in ethology. Meth-ods Ninety SD rats were randomly divided into five groups:normal group (n=5), physiological saline control group (n=10), diabetic group (n=20), PD group (n=20), and hyperglycemia-PD group (n=35). Establish diabetic rat model by high fat and high glucose diet and the intraperitoncal injection of streptozotocin. Establish PD hyperglycemia rat model by two-spot uni-laterally injection with 6-OHDA into the substanianigta parscompact(SNc) and ventral tegmental(VTA) stereotactically. And then ethology analysis (spontaneous behavioral lateralization, posture asymmetry, catalepsy test, revolving test) was conduct-ed at different time (the 7th, 14th, 21st and 28th day). Results There were significant differences in the parameters of spon-taneous behavioral lateralization, posture asymmetry, catalepsy test, revolving test between the PD group, hyperglycemia-PD group and normal group, physiological saline control group, diabetic group(P<0.01). There were significant differences in the parameters of spontaneous behavioral lateralization, catalepsy test between PD group and hyperglycemia-PD group. And the severity of spontaneous behavioral lateralization and rotating ring in PD group and hyperglycemia-PD group increased gradually with time. High blood sugar can not affect the re-volving test. Conclusion The ethological change of rats induced by injection of 6-OHDA increased with hyperglycemia and increased with time.%目的:在建立糖尿病SD大鼠模型的基础上,6-OHDA单侧毁损法建立高血糖-PD大鼠模型,探讨高血糖对PD大鼠行为学的影响。方法90只SD大鼠随机分为正常对照组(n=5),假手术组(n=10),糖尿病组(n=20),PD组(n=20)及高血糖-PD组(n=35)。采用高糖高脂饮食联合一次性腹腔注射链脲

  14. The effect of Ginkgo biloba extract on parkinsonisminduced biochemical changes in brain of irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neuro degenerative disorder after Alzheimer's disease. In the present study, neuro modulatory effects of standardized ginkgo biloba extract (EGb 761) and low dose whole-body γ-irradiation in a reserpine model of rat Parkinsonism were investigated. Male Wistar rats were pretreated orally with EGb 761 (100 mg/kg BW/day for 3 weeks) or low dose whole-body γ-irradiation (0.25 Gy once a week for 6 weeks) and their combination (EGb 761 was received during the last three weeks of the irradiation period) and then subjected to intraperitoneal injection of reserpine (5 mg/kg BW dissolved in 1% acetic acid) 24h after last dose of EGb761or radiation. All rats were sacrificed 24h after reserpine injection. Depletion of striatal dopamine (DA) level, increased oxidative stress indicated via depletion of glutathione (GSH), increased malondialdehyde (MDA) and iron levels; decrease of dopamine metabolites metabolizing enzymes; indicated by decrease of glutathione-S transferase (GST) and NADPH-quinone oxidoreductase (NQO) activities; mitochondrial dysfunction; indicated by decline of complex I activity and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) level and increased apoptosis; indicated by the decrease of mitochondrial B cell lymphoma-2 protein (Bcl-2) level and as shown by transmission electron microscope (TEM) were observed in brain of reserpine-induced PD model group, along with behavioral study indicated by increased catalepsy score. Moreover, the level of GSH was correlated with the levels of both DA (r = 0.78) and MDA (r = -0.93). The level of Bcl-2 was correlated with the complex I activity (r = 0.94) and ATP level (r = 0.98). Results revealed that either EGb 761 or irradiation and their combination ameliorated most of the biochemical and behavioral changes induced by reserpine possibly via replenishment of normal glutathione levels. This study revealed that EGb 761, which is a widely used herbal medicine and low dose of whole-body

  15. Ethanolic extracts of Alstonia Scholaris and Bacopa Monniera possess neuroleptic activity due to anti-dopaminergic effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Jash

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: An increased inclination has been observed for the use of herbal drugs in chronic and incurable diseases. Treatment of psychiatric diseases like schizophrenia is largely palliative and more importantly, a prominent adverse effect prevails with the majority of anti-psychotic drugs, which are the extrapyramidal motor disorders. Existing anti-psychotic drug therapy is not so promising, and their adverse effect is a matter of concern for continuing the therapy for long duration. Objective: This experimental study was done to evaluate the neuroleptic activity of the ethanolic extracts of two plants Alstonia Scholaris and Bacopa Monnieri with different anti-psychotic animal models with a view that these plant extracts shall have no or at least reduced adverse effect so that it can be used for long duration. Materials and Methods: Two doses of both the extracts (100 and 200 mg/kg and also standard drug haloperidol (0.2 mg/kg were administered to their respective groups once daily with 5 different animal models. After that, the concentration of the dopamine neurotransmitter was estimated in two different regions of the brain viz. frontal cortex and striatum. Results: The result of the study indicated a significant reduction of amphetamine-induced stereotype and conditioned avoidance response for both the extracts compared with the control group, but both did not have any significant effect in phencyclidine-induced locomotor activity and social interaction activity. However, both the extracts showed minor signs of catalepsy compared to the control group. The study also revealed that the neuroleptic effect was due to the reduction of the dopamine concentration in the frontal cortex region of the rat brain. The results largely pointed out the fact that both the extract may be having the property to alleviate the positive symptoms of schizophrenia by reducing the dopamine levels of dopaminergic neurons of the brain. Conclusion: The estimation of

  16. The glycine transporter-1 inhibitors NFPS and Org 24461: a pharmacological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harsing, Laszlo G; Gacsalyi, Istvan; Szabo, Geza; Schmidt, Eva; Sziray, Nora; Sebban, Claude; Tesolin-Decros, Brigitte; Matyus, Peter; Egyed, Andras; Spedding, Michael; Levay, Gyorgy

    2003-03-01

    The in vitro and in vivo pharmacology of two glycine transporter-1 (GlyT1) inhibitors, N[3-(4'-fluorophenyl)-3-(4'-phenylphenoxy)-propyl]sarcosine (NFPS) and R,S-(+/-)N-methyl-N-[(4-trifluoromethyl)phenoxy]-3-phenyl-propylglycine (Org 24461), was studied. NFPS and Org 24461 inhibited the uptake of [3H]glycine in hippocampal synaptosomal preparation with IC(50) values of 0.022 and 2.5 microM. Neither NFPS nor Org 24461 (0.1 microM) showed significant binding to alpha-1, alpha-2, and beta-adrenoceptors, D(1) and D(2) dopamine receptors, and 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A) serotonin receptors in membranes prepared from rat brain or to cloned 5-HT(6) and 5-HT(7) receptors. At 10 microM concentrations, binding affinity was measured for NFPS to 5-HT(2A) and 5-HT(2C) serotonin receptors and alpha-2 adrenoceptors and for NFPS and Org 24461 to 5-HT(7) serotonin receptors. Glycine (0.1 mM) and sarcosine (5 mM) increased [3H]glycine efflux from superfused rat hippocampal slices preloaded with [3H]glycine. NFPS and Org 24461 (0.1 mM) did not influence [3H]glycine efflux, however, they inhibited glycine-induced [3H]glycine release. These findings indicate that NFPS and Org 24461 selectively inhibit glycine uptake without being substrates of the transporter protein. Several antipsychotic tests were used to characterize antipsychotic effects of NFPS and Org 24461 in vivo. These compounds did not alter apomorphine-induced climbing and stereotypy in a dose of 10 mg/kg p.o. in mice and did not induce catalepsy in a dose of 10 mg/kg i.p. in rats. The ID(50) values of NFPS were 21.4 mg/kg and higher than 30 mg/kg i.p. for inhibition of phencyclidine (PCP)- and D-amphetamine-induced hypermotility in mice and these values were 2.5 and 8.6 mg/kg i.p. for Org 24461. NFPS and Org 24461 did not exhibit anxiolytic effects in light-dark test in mice, in the meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (mCPP)-induced anxiety test (minimal effective dose or MED was higher than 3 mg/kg i.p.) and in the Vogel conflict

  17. Pyrrolo[1,3]benzothiazepine-based serotonin and dopamine receptor antagonists. Molecular modeling, further structure-activity relationship studies, and identification of novel atypical antipsychotic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campiani, Giuseppe; Butini, Stefania; Fattorusso, Caterina; Catalanotti, Bruno; Gemma, Sandra; Nacci, Vito; Morelli, Elena; Cagnotto, Alfredo; Mereghetti, Ilario; Mennini, Tiziana; Carli, Miriana; Minetti, Patrizia; Di Cesare, M Assunta; Mastroianni, Domenico; Scafetta, Nazzareno; Galletti, Bruno; Stasi, M Antonietta; Castorina, Massimo; Pacifici, Licia; Vertechy, Mario; Di Serio, Stefano; Ghirardi, Orlando; Tinti, Ornella; Carminati, Paolo

    2004-01-01

    . Compound 9d, whose synthesis is easier and whose binding profile is atypical (log Y score similar to that of olanzapine, 3.89), was selected for further biological investigation. Pharmacological and biochemical studies confirmed an atypical antipsychotic profile in vivo. The compound was active on conditioned avoidance response at 1.1 mg/kg, a dose 100-times lower than that required to cause catalepsy (ED(50) >90 mg/kg), it induced a negligible increase of prolactin serum levels after single and multiple doses, and antagonized the cognitive impairment induced by phencyclidine. In conclusion, the pharmacological profile of 9d proved better than clozapine and olanzapine, making this compound a potential clinical candidate. PMID:14695828

  18. [Catatonia: resurgence of a concept. A review of the international literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommepuy, N; Januel, D

    2002-01-01

    Catatonia was first described in 1874 by Kahlbaum as being a cyclic disease mixing motor features and mood variations. Because most cases ended in dementia, Kraepelin recognized catatonia as a form of dementia praecox and Bleuler included it within his wide group of schizophrenias. This view influenced the psychiatric practice for more than 70 years. But catatonia was recently reconsidered and this because of the definition of more precise diagnosis criteria, the discovery of a striking association with mood disorders, and the emphasis on effective therapeutics. Peralta et al empirically developed a performant diagnostic instrument with the 11 most discriminant signs among catatonic features. Diagnostic threshold is three or more signs with sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 99%. These signs are: immobility/stupor (extreme passivity, marked hypokinesia); mutism (includes inaudible whisper); negativism (resistance to instructions, contrary comportment to whose asked); oppositionism, other called gegenhalten (resistance to passive movement which increases with the force exerted); posturing (patient adopts spontaneously odd postures); catalepsy (patient retains limb positions passively imposed during examination; waxy flexibility); automatic obedience (exaggerated co-operation to instructed movements); echo phenomena (movements, mimic and speech of the examiner are copied with modification and amplifications); rigidity (increased muscular tone); verbigeration (continuous and directionless repetition of single words or phrases); withdrawal/refusal to eat or drink (turning away from examiner, no eye contact, refusal to take food or drink when offered). Using this diagnostic tool, prevalence of catatonic syndrome appears to be close to 8% of psychiatric admissions. Other signs are also common but less specific: staring, ambitendance, iterations, stereotypes, mannerism, overactivity/excitement, impulsivity, combativeness. Some authors complete this description by

  19. 左旋金黄紫堇碱抗精神分裂症作用研究%On antipsychotic effects of l-Scoulerine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高赟赟; 米桂芸; 刘帅; 杨征

    2016-01-01

    -bition and cognitive impairment induced by MK-801 (0. 2 mg · kg - 1 , ip), which proposed that l-SLR could improve the negative symptoms and cognitive im-pairment by MK-801. Catalepsy in mice could be caused by the treatment dose of haloperidol (0. 8 mg· kg - 1 , ip), not by that of l-SLR(30 mg·kg - 1 , ip). Conclusion I-SLR has significant effects on the posi-tive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia and cogni-tive impairment and, the effect of l-SLR under effective dose on extrapyramidal system is obviously much less than that of haloperidol and l-SPD.

  20. Study on Anti-depression Effect of Tanshinone%丹参酮的抗抑郁作用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张忠东; 曹莉; 程灶火

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study anti-depression effect of tanshinone. METHODS: Intragastric administration of Tanshinone. Depression model was induced by injection of reserpine (2 mg·kg-1) via tail vein, and the number of heavy-lidded eyes and akine-sia were observed and rectal temperature was determined. Depression model was induced by intraperitoneal injection of tetrabena-zine (40 mg·kg-1), and the number of catalepsy was observed. Mice was injected with reserpine (2 mg·kg-1) via tail vein to conduct tail suspension test and forced swimming test. The time of tail suspension immobility and swimming immobility were observed. The convusion of rats was induced by intravenous injection of MAO inhibitor (tryamine hydrochloride) to observe average value of rat's action and duration of slapping ,and beat. RESULTS: Tanshinone 60,30,20 mg·kg-1 could improve heavy-lidded eyes and swimming immobility and rised rectal temperature in depression symptoms of mice induced by reserpine(P<0.05). Tanshinone 60,30 mg·kg-1 could improve heavy-lidded eyes and swimming immobility in depression symptoms of mice induced by tet-rabenazine(P<0.01,P<0.05). It also shortened the time of tail suspension immobility and swimming immobility in despair symptoms of mice(P<0.01). Tanshinone 42,21,14 mg·kg-1 could depressed actin point in convusions symptoms of rats induced by try-pamine hydrochloride. Tanshinone 42,21 mg·kg-1 could shortened pat duriation in convusions symptoms model rats.CONCLU-SION: Tanshinone have certain anti-depressant effect.%目的:研究丹参酮的抗抑郁作用.方法:丹参酮灌胃给药.通过尾静脉注射利血平(2 mg·kg-1)复制小鼠抑郁模型,观察眼帘下垂动物数、运动不能动物数,测肛温;腹腔注射丁苯那嗪(40 mg·kg-1)复制小鼠抑郁模型,观察眼帘下垂动物数和僵住动物数;尾静脉注射利血平(2 mg·kg-1)后进行悬尾、强迫游泳实验,复制小鼠获得性绝望模型,观察小鼠悬尾不动时间和游泳不