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Sample records for catalase activity hydrogen

  1. Effect of menadione and hydrogen peroxide on catalase activity in Saccharomyces yeast strains

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    Nadejda EFREMOVA

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available It has been studied the possibility of utilization of two important oxidant factors as regulators of catalase activity in Saccharomyces yeasts. In this paper results of the screening of some Saccharomyces yeast strains for potential producers of catalase are presented. Results of the screening for potential catalase producer have revealed that Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNMN-Y-11 strain possesses the highest catalase activity (2900 U/mg protein compared with other samples. Maximum increase of catalase activity with 50-60% compared to the reference sample was established in the case of hydrogen peroxide and menadione utilization in optimal concentrations of 15 and 10 mM. This research has been demonstrated the potential benefits of application of hydrogen peroxide and menadione as stimulatory factors of catalase activity in Saccharomyces yeasts.

  2. Effect of menadione and hydrogen peroxide on catalase activity in Saccharomyces yeast strains

    OpenAIRE

    Nadejda EFREMOVA; Elena MOLODOI; Agafia USATÎI; Ludmila FULGA; Tamara BORISOVA

    2013-01-01

    It has been studied the possibility of utilization of two important oxidant factors as regulators of catalase activity in Saccharomyces yeasts. In this paper results of the screening of some Saccharomyces yeast strains for potential producers of catalase are presented. Results of the screening for potential catalase producer have revealed that Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNMN-Y-11 strain possesses the highest catalase activity (2900 U/mg protein) compared with other samples. Maximum increase of ...

  3. Influence of Foreign DNA Introduction and Periplasmic Expression of Recombinant Human Interleukin-2 on Hydrogen Peroxide Quantity and Catalase Activity in Escherichia coli

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    Lena Mahmoudi Azar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Oxidative stress is generated through imbalance between composing and decomposing of reactive oxygen species (ROS. This kind of stress was rarely discussed in connection with foreign protein production in Escherichia coli. Effect of cytoplasmic recombinant protein expression on Hydrogen peroxide concentration and catalase activity was previously reported. In comparison with cytoplasm, periplasmic space has different oxidative environment. Therefore, in present study we describe the effect of periplasmic expression of recombinant human interleukin-2 (hIL-2 on H2O2 concentration and catalase activity in Escherichia coli and their correlation with cell growth. Methods: Having constructed pET2hIL2 vector, periplasmic expression of hIL-2 was confirmed. Then, H2O2 concentration and catalase activity were determined at various ODs. Wild type and empty vector transformed cells were used as negative controls. Results: It was shown that H2O2 concentration in hIL-2 expressing cells was significantly higher than its concentration in wild type and empty vector transformed cells. Catalase activity and growth rate reduced significantly in hIL-2 expressing cells compared to empty vector transformed and wild type cells. Variation of H2O2 concentration and catalase activity is intensive in periplasmic hIL-2 expressing cells than empty vector containing cells. Correlation between H2O2 concentration elevation and catalase activity reduction with cell growth depletion are also demonstrated. Conclusion: Periplasmic expression of recombinant hIL-2 elevates the host cell’s hydrogen peroxide concentration possibly due to reduced catalase activity which has consequent suppressive effect on growth rate.

  4. Influence of Foreign DNA Introduction and Periplasmic Expression of Recombinant Human Interleukin-2 on Hydrogen Peroxide Quantity and Catalase Activity in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Lena Mahmoudi Azar; Elnaz Mehdizadeh Aghdam; Farrokh Karimi; Babak Haghshenas; Abolfazl Barzegari; Parichehr Yaghmaei; Mohammad Saeid Hejazi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Oxidative stress is generated through imbalance between composing and decomposing of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This kind of stress was rarely discussed in connection with foreign protein production in Escherichia coli. Effect of cytoplasmic recombinant protein expression on Hydrogen peroxide concentration and catalase activity was previously reported. In comparison with cytoplasm, periplasmic space has different oxidative environment. Therefore, in present study we describe t...

  5. Effect of the Ascorbic Acid, Pyridoxine and Hydrogen Peroxide Treatments on Germination, Catalase Activity, Protein and Malondialdehyde Content of Three Oil Seeds

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    Aria DOLATABADIAN

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Oil seed production has an important role in human nutrition and industry. Success in oil plant cultivation is related to seed production with high viability and rapid germination, because these seeds rapidly loose their viability by fats oxidation. Thus, in this work we studied the effects of ascorbic acid, pyridoxine and hydrogen peroxide solutions on germination quantitative traits, catalase activity, protein and malondialdehyde content of three old oil seeds (sunflower, rape seed and safflower. The results showed that ascorbic acid and pyridoxine stimulated significantly the sunflower and rape seed germination. These vitamins, however, didn't have any effect on safflower germination. Hydrogen peroxide strongly increased safflower germination. Ascorbic acid and pyridoxine decreased catalase activity in sunflower and rape seed, whereas hydrogen peroxide increased it. Ascorbic acid and pyridoxine prevented protein degradation and lipid peroxidation in germinated seeds. Consequently, we understand that ascorbic acid and pyridoxine can increase sunflower and rape seed germination and stimulate rate of growth. Also safflower germination increased due to germination inhibitor oxidation by hydrogen peroxide. In conclusion, this report shows that oil seeds treated with ascorbic acid, pyridoxine and hydrogen peroxide remarkably increase the capacity of germination. We suggest that treatments with such substances can improve the old oil seed germination during storage.

  6. INVOLVEMENT OF CATALASE IN SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE HORMETIC RESPONSE TO HYDROGEN PEROXIDE

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    Ruslana Vasylkovska

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the relationship between catalase activity and H2O2-induced hormetic response in budding yeast S. cerevisiae. In general, our data suggest that: (i hydrogen peroxide induces hormesis in a concentration- and time-dependent manner; and (ii the effect of hydrogen peroxide on yeast colony growth positively correlates with the activity of catalase that suggests the enzyme involvement in overall H2O2-induced stress response and hormetic response in yeast.

  7. INVOLVEMENT OF CATALASE IN SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE HORMETIC RESPONSE TO HYDROGEN PEROXIDE

    OpenAIRE

    Ruslana Vasylkovska; Nadia Burdylyuk; Halyna Semchyshyn

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the relationship between catalase activity and H2O2-induced hormetic response in budding yeast S. cerevisiae. In general, our data suggest that: (i) hydrogen peroxide induces hormesis in a concentration- and time-dependent manner; and (ii) the effect of hydrogen peroxide on yeast colony growth positively correlates with the activity of catalase that suggests the enzyme involvement in overall H2O2-induced stress response and hormetic response in yeast.

  8. Evolution of catalase activity during nystatin biosynthesis

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    Cristina Bota

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The research studies focused on the dynamics of catalase during nystatin biosynthesis by Streptomyces noursei. The catalase activity was determined by growing a pure culture of Streptomyces noursei from the strain collection owned by the company S.C. Antibiotice Iasi on biosynthesis medium. The test was performed on two experimental models of biosynthesis, one using sunflower oil, while the other soybean oil as basic nutrients. Special attention was paid to the connection between the evolution of the biomass and the level of catalase activity.

  9. Effects of cysteine on growth, protease production, and catalase activity of Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    OpenAIRE

    Himelbloom, B H; Hassan, H.M.

    1986-01-01

    Cysteine inhibits growth of and protease production by Pseudomonas fluorescens NC3. Catalase activity in P. fluorescens NC3 was increased by cysteine. The addition of exogenous hydrogen peroxide did not increase catalase activity, thus suggesting a role for the endogenous generation of hydrogen peroxide via the autoxidation of cysteine.

  10. Cytoplasmic expression of recombinant interleukin-2 and interleukin-4 proteins results in hydrogen peroxide accumulation and reduction in catalase activity in Escherichia coli

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    M.S Hejazi

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and the purpose of the study: The Reactive oxygen species (ROS is induced in the cells following various stresses but the effect of recombinant protein expression on ROS generation has not been studied yet. In this study, H2O2 concentration and catalase activity variations and their correlation with cell growth following cytoplasmic expression of human interleukin-2 (hIL-2 and mouse interleukin-4 (mIL-4 in Escherichia coli were investigated. Additionally, the effect of recombinant protein expression under different conditions was compared to the effect of foreign DNA introduction on these factors. Methods: Plasmids pEThIL-2 and pETmIL-4 were used for expression of human interleukin-2 (hIL-2 and mouse interleukin-4 (mIL-4 inside the cytoplasm of the cells. Having confirmed protein expression using SDS-PAGE analysis and ELISA assay, H2O2 concentration and catalase activity were measured at various ODs. Results and major conclusion: Empty vector introduction increased significantly H2O2 concentration of the cells. However, H2O2 concentration in hIL-2 and mIL-4 expressing cells was significantly higher than its concentration in empty vector transformed cells. Catalase activity was reduced in foreign DNA introduced cells. It was more lowered following expression of recombinant proteins. Results of this study revealed the relationship between foreign DNA introduction and protein expression with H2O2 elevation and catalase activity reduction. There was also correlation between H2O2 elevation and reduction in catalase activity with the cell growth depression.

  11. Cytoplasmic expression of recombinant interleukin-2 and interleukin-4 proteins results in hydrogen peroxide accumulation and reduction in catalase activity in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    M.S Hejazi; F Karimi; E Mehdizadeh Aghdam; Barzegari, A. (MSc); M Farshdosti Hagh; Parvizi, M.; L Mahmoodi Azar; Hejazi, M. A.

    2009-01-01

    Background and the purpose of the study: The Reactive oxygen species (ROS) is induced in the cells following various stresses but the effect of recombinant protein expression on ROS generation has not been studied yet. In this study, H2O2 concentration and catalase activity variations and their correlation with cell growth following cytoplasmic expression of human interleukin-2 (hIL-2) and mouse interleukin-4 (mIL-4) in Escherichia coli were investigated. Additionally, the effect of recombina...

  12. A gasometric method to determine erythrocyte catalase activity

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    A.J.S. Siqueira

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe a new gasometric method to determine erythrocyte catalase activity by the measurement of the volume of oxygen produced as a result of hydrogen peroxide decomposition in a system where enzyme and substrate are separated in a special reaction test tube connected to a manometer and the reagents are mixed with a motor-driven stirrer. The position of the reagents in the test tube permits the continuous measurement of oxygen evolution from the time of mixing, without the need to stop the reaction by the addition of acid after each incubation time. The enzyme activity is reported as KHb, i.e., mg hydrogen peroxide decomposed per second per gram of hemoglobin (s-1 g Hb-1. The value obtained for catalase activity in 28 samples of hemolyzed human blood was 94.4 ± 6.17 mg H2O2 s-1 g Hb-1. The results obtained were precise and consistent, indicating that this rapid, simple and inexpensive method could be useful for research and routine work.

  13. Development of a new biosensor for determination of catalase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teke, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Catalase is one of the major antioxidant enzymes that catalyzes the hydrolysis of H2O2. The aim of this study was to suggest a new method for the assay of catalase activity. For this purpose, an amperometric biosensor based on glucose oxidase for determination of catalase activity was developed. Immobilization of glucose oxidase was made by a cross-linking method with glutaraldehyde on a Clark-type electrode (dissolved oxygen probe). Optimization and characterization properties of the biosensor were studied and determination of catalase activity in defined conditions was investigated in artificial serum solution. The results were compared with a reference method. PMID:24499365

  14. Natural resistance to ascorbic acid induced oxidative stress is mainly mediated by catalase activity in human cancer cells and catalase-silencing sensitizes to oxidative stress

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    Klingelhoeffer Christoph

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ascorbic acid demonstrates a cytotoxic effect by generating hydrogen peroxide, a reactive oxygen species (ROS involved in oxidative cell stress. A panel of eleven human cancer cell lines, glioblastoma and carcinoma, were exposed to serial dilutions of ascorbic acid (5-100 mmol/L. The purpose of this study was to analyse the impact of catalase, an important hydrogen peroxide-detoxifying enzyme, on the resistance of cancer cells to ascorbic acid mediated oxidative stress. Methods Effective concentration (EC50 values, which indicate the concentration of ascorbic acid that reduced the number of viable cells by 50%, were detected with the crystal violet assay. The level of intracellular catalase protein and enzyme activity was determined. Expression of catalase was silenced by catalase-specific short hairpin RNA (sh-RNA in BT-20 breast carcinoma cells. Oxidative cell stress induced apoptosis was measured by a caspase luminescent assay. Results The tested human cancer cell lines demonstrated obvious differences in their resistance to ascorbic acid mediated oxidative cell stress. Forty-five percent of the cell lines had an EC50 > 20 mmol/L and fifty-five percent had an EC50 50 of 2.6–5.5 mmol/L, glioblastoma cells were the most susceptible cancer cell lines analysed in this study. A correlation between catalase activity and the susceptibility to ascorbic acid was observed. To study the possible protective role of catalase on the resistance of cancer cells to oxidative cell stress, the expression of catalase in the breast carcinoma cell line BT-20, which cells were highly resistant to the exposure to ascorbic acid (EC50: 94,9 mmol/L, was silenced with specific sh-RNA. The effect was that catalase-silenced BT-20 cells (BT-20 KD-CAT became more susceptible to high concentrations of ascorbic acid (50 and 100 mmol/L. Conclusions Fifty-five percent of the human cancer cell lines tested were unable to protect themselves

  15. Response of soil catalase activity to chromium contamination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zofia St(e)pniewska; Agnieszka Woli(n)ska; Joanna Ziomek

    2009-01-01

    The impact of chromium (III) and (VI) forms on soil catalase activity is presented.The Orthic Podzol, Haplic Phaeozem and Mollic Gleysol from different depths were used in the experiment.The soil samples were amended with solution of Cr(III) using CrCl3, and with Cr(VI) using K2Cr2O7 in the concentration range from 0 to 20 mg/kg, whereas the samples without the addition of chromium served as control.Catalase activity was assayed by one of the commonly used spectrophotometric methods.As it is demonstrated in the experiment, both Cr(III) and Cr(VI) forms have ability to reduce soil catalase activity.A chromium dose of 20 mg/kg caused the inhibition of catalase activity and the corresponding contamination levels ranged from 75% to 92% for Cr(III) and 68% to 76% for Cr(VI), with relation to the control.Catalase activity reached maximum in the soil material from surface layers (0-25 cm), typically characterized by the highest content of organic matter creating favorable conditions for microorganisms.

  16. Interference of a commercial catalase preparation in laccase and peroxidase activities

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    Nara Ballaminut

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The influence of commercial catalase preparations (fungal and bovine origin on laccase and peroxidase activity assays was evaluated using enzymatic extracts obtained from several basidiomycetes grown under different culture conditions. No hydrogen peroxide was detected in the extracts. Inhibition of laccase activity by 40 to 80% was related to the catalase source. In addition, oxidation of the substrate (ABTS by fungal catalase in the absence of the enzymatic extract from basidiomycetes was observed. The results demonstrated the need for the evaluation of interference of the commercial catalase preparation when its use was required in the reaction mixture.A influência da preparação comercial de catalase (origem fúngica e bovina nos ensaios de atividade absence and presence of a fungal or bovine de lacase e de peroxidases foi avaliada empregando-se extratos enzimáticos obtidos do crescimento de diversos basidiomicetos em diferentes condições de cultivo. Não foi detectado H2O2 nos extratos. Inibição de 40 a 80% da atividade de lacase foi relacionada à fonte de catalase. Além disso, foi observada oxidação do substrato (ABTS pela catalase fúngica, na ausência de extrato enzimático do basidiomiceto. Os resultados evidenciaram a necessidade de se proceder a uma avaliação da interferência da preparação comercial de catalase, quando o seu uso se fizer necessário na mistura reacional.

  17. Optimization of permeabilization process of yeast cells for catalase activity using response surface methodology

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    Trawczyńska, Ilona; Wójcik, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Biotransformation processes accompanied by whole yeast cells as biocatalyst are a promising area of food industry. Among the chemical sanitizers currently used in food technology, hydrogen peroxide is a very effective microbicidal and bleaching agent. In this paper, permeabilization has been applied to Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells aiming at increased intracellular catalase activity for decomposed H2O2. Ethanol, which is non-toxic, biodegradable and easily available, has been used as p...

  18. A Laboratory Experiment Investigating Different Aspects of Catalase Activity in an Inquiry - Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimbrough, Doris R.; Magoun, Mary Ann; Langfur, Meg

    1997-02-01

    The action of the enzyme catalase on aqueous hydrogen peroxide to generate oxygen gas is a well-established demonstration (1-3). Catalase is typically obtained by aqueous extraction of a potato, and the potato extract is mixed together with 3% hydrogen peroxide. The oxygen that is produced can be collected over water. Variations on the procedure can demonstrate the dependence of catalytic activity on temperature or the presence of inhibitors (1, 2). The University of Colorado at Denver has used a version of this procedure as a laboratory in its second-semester course for nonmajors. Recently, students have been allowed to expand upon the procedures prescribed in the laboratory handout in an open-ended project format. We explored some of these variations in detail, and the results provided here offer ideas, centered around this laboratory, for open-ended projects that can be used in an inquiry-based approach.

  19. Hepatic catalase activity after whole-body irradiation of the mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using biochemical techniques, the effect of irradiation on catalase rate of different tissues is studied. With cytochemistry, the decrease of catalase activity is studied in situ, after exposure to great ionizing radiation doses

  20. Reduction of hydrogen peroxide accumulation and toxicity by a catalase from Mycoplasma iowae.

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    Rachel E Pritchard

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma iowae is a well-established avian pathogen that can infect and damage many sites throughout the body. One potential mediator of cellular damage by mycoplasmas is the production of H2O2 via a glycerol catabolic pathway whose genes are widespread amongst many mycoplasma species. Previous sequencing of M. iowae serovar I strain 695 revealed the presence of not only genes for H2O2 production through glycerol catabolism but also the first documented mycoplasma gene for catalase, which degrades H2O2. To test the activity of M. iowae catalase in degrading H2O2, we studied catalase activity and H2O2 accumulation by both M. iowae serovar K strain DK-CPA, whose genome we sequenced, and strains of the H2O2-producing species Mycoplasma gallisepticum engineered to produce M. iowae catalase by transformation with the M. iowae putative catalase gene, katE. H2O2-mediated virulence by M. iowae serovar K and catalase-producing M. gallisepticum transformants were also analyzed using a Caenorhabditis elegans toxicity assay, which has never previously been used in conjunction with mycoplasmas. We found that M. iowae katE encodes an active catalase that, when expressed in M. gallisepticum, reduces both the amount of H2O2 produced and the amount of damage to C. elegans in the presence of glycerol. Therefore, the correlation between the presence of glycerol catabolism genes and the use of H2O2 as a virulence factor by mycoplasmas might not be absolute.

  1. Reduction of hydrogen peroxide accumulation and toxicity by a catalase from Mycoplasma iowae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Rachel E; Prassinos, Alexandre J; Osborne, John D; Raviv, Ziv; Balish, Mitchell F

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma iowae is a well-established avian pathogen that can infect and damage many sites throughout the body. One potential mediator of cellular damage by mycoplasmas is the production of H2O2 via a glycerol catabolic pathway whose genes are widespread amongst many mycoplasma species. Previous sequencing of M. iowae serovar I strain 695 revealed the presence of not only genes for H2O2 production through glycerol catabolism but also the first documented mycoplasma gene for catalase, which degrades H2O2. To test the activity of M. iowae catalase in degrading H2O2, we studied catalase activity and H2O2 accumulation by both M. iowae serovar K strain DK-CPA, whose genome we sequenced, and strains of the H2O2-producing species Mycoplasma gallisepticum engineered to produce M. iowae catalase by transformation with the M. iowae putative catalase gene, katE. H2O2-mediated virulence by M. iowae serovar K and catalase-producing M. gallisepticum transformants were also analyzed using a Caenorhabditis elegans toxicity assay, which has never previously been used in conjunction with mycoplasmas. We found that M. iowae katE encodes an active catalase that, when expressed in M. gallisepticum, reduces both the amount of H2O2 produced and the amount of damage to C. elegans in the presence of glycerol. Therefore, the correlation between the presence of glycerol catabolism genes and the use of H2O2 as a virulence factor by mycoplasmas might not be absolute. PMID:25127127

  2. Catalase and sodium fluoride mediated rehabilitation of enamel bleached with 37% hydrogen peroxide

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    Ruchi Thakur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bleaching agents bring about a range of unwanted changes in the physical structure of enamel which needs to be restored qualitatively and timely. Catalase being an antioxidant ensures the effective removal of free radicals and improvement in fluoride mediated remineralization from the enamel microstructure which if retained may harm the integrity and affect the hardness of enamel. Materials and Methods: Thirty freshly extracted incisors were sectioned to 6 slabs which were divided into 5 groups: Group A, control; Group B, treatment with 37% hydrogen peroxide (HP; Group C, treatment with 37% HP and catalase, Group D, treatment with 37% HP and 5% sodium fluoride application, Group E, treatment with 37% HP followed by catalase and 5% sodium fluoride. Scanning electron microscope and microhardness analysis were done for all slabs. One-way ANOVA test was applied among different groups. Results: Vicker′s microhardness number (VHN of Group B and C was significantly lower. No significant difference between VHN of Group B and C. VHN of Group D was significantly higher than Group A, B, and C; but significantly lower than Group E. VHN of Group E was significantly higher than any other experimental group. One-way ANOVA revealed a highly significant P value (P = 0.0001 and so Tukey′s post-hoc Test for the group comparisons was employed. Conclusion: Subsequent treatment of bleached enamel with catalase and fluoride varnish separately results in repairing and significantly increasing the microhardness.

  3. Murine and human b locus pigmentation genes encode a glycoprotein (gp75) with catalase activity

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    Halaban, R.; Moellmann, G. (Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (USA))

    1990-06-01

    Melanogenesis is regulated in large part by tyrosinase, and defective tyrosinase leads to albinism. The mechanisms for other pigmentation determinants (e.g., those operative in tyrosinase-positive albinism and in murine coat-color mutants) are not yet known. One murine pigmentation gene, the brown (b) locus, when mutated leads to a brown (b/b) or hypopigmentated (B{sup lt}/B{sup lt}) coat versus the wild-type black (B/B). The authors show that the b locus codes for a glycoprotein with the activity of a catalase (catalase B). Only the c locus protein is a tyrosinase. Because peroxides may be by-products of melanogenic activity and hydrogen peroxide in particular is known to destroy melanin precursors and melanin, they conclude that pigmentation is controlled not only by tyrosinase but also by a hydroperoxidase. The studies indicate that catalase B is identical with gp75, a known human melanosomal glycoprotein; that the b mutation is in a heme-associated domain; and that the B{sup lt} mutation renders the protein susceptible to rapid proteolytic degradation.

  4. Murine and human b locus pigmentation genes encode a glycoprotein (gp75) with catalase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melanogenesis is regulated in large part by tyrosinase, and defective tyrosinase leads to albinism. The mechanisms for other pigmentation determinants (e.g., those operative in tyrosinase-positive albinism and in murine coat-color mutants) are not yet known. One murine pigmentation gene, the brown (b) locus, when mutated leads to a brown (b/b) or hypopigmentated (Blt/Blt) coat versus the wild-type black (B/B). The authors show that the b locus codes for a glycoprotein with the activity of a catalase (catalase B). Only the c locus protein is a tyrosinase. Because peroxides may be by-products of melanogenic activity and hydrogen peroxide in particular is known to destroy melanin precursors and melanin, they conclude that pigmentation is controlled not only by tyrosinase but also by a hydroperoxidase. The studies indicate that catalase B is identical with gp75, a known human melanosomal glycoprotein; that the b mutation is in a heme-associated domain; and that the Blt mutation renders the protein susceptible to rapid proteolytic degradation

  5. Release time of residual oxygen after dental bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide: effect of a catalase-based neutralizing agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guasso, Bárbara; Salomone, Paloma; Nascimento, Paulo Cícero; Pozzobon, Roselaine Terezinha

    2016-01-01

    This article assessed the effect of a catalase-based agent on residual oxygen (O2) release from teeth exposed to 35% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The use of the catalase-based neutralizer agent for 2-3 minutes was able to release residual O2 5 days after exposure to a 35% H2O2-based bleaching gel. PMID:27148658

  6. Regulation of catalase activity in leaves of Nicotiana sylvestris by high CO sub 2

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    Havir, E.A.; McHale, N.A. (Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, New Haven (USA))

    1989-03-01

    The effect of high CO{sub 2} (1% CO{sub 2}/21% O{sub 2}) on the activity of specific forms of catalase (CAT-1, -2, and -3) in seedling leaves of tobacco (Nicotiana sylvestris, Nicotiana tabacum) was examined. In high CO{sub 2} total catalase activity decreased by 50% in the first 2 days, followed by a more gradual decline in the next 4 days. The loss of total activity resulted primarily from a decrease in CAT-1 catalase. In contrast, the activity of CAT-3 catalase, a form with enhanced peroxidatic activity, increased 3-fold in high CO{sub 2} relative to air controls after 4 days. Short-term exposure to high CO{sub 2} indicated that the 50% loss of total activity occurs in the firs 12 hours. Catalase levels increased to normal within 12 hours after seedlings were returned to air. When seedlings were transferred to air after prolonged exposure to high CO{sub 2} (13 days), the levels of CAT-1 catalase were partially restored while CAT-3 remained at its elevated level. Levels of superoxide dismutase activity and those of several peroxisomal enzymes were not affected by high CO{sub 2}. Total catalase levels did not decline when seedlings were exposed to atmospheres of 0.04% CO{sub 2}/5% O{sub 2} or 0.04% CO{sub 2}/1% O{sub 2}, indicating that regulation of catalase in high CO{sub 2} is not related directly to suppression of photorespiration. Antibodies prepared against CAT-1 catalase from N. tabacum reacted strongly against CAT-1 catalase from both N. sylvestris and N. tabacum but not against CAT-3 catalase from either species.

  7. Catalase activity in the soil of the wood biogeocenoses in the Samara-river region

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    A. F. Kulik

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Research of catalase activity changes in connection with the free-radical oxidation is soil of natural and artificial ecosystems is conducted. The catalase is a plants’ enzyme of antioxidative protection. The catalase activity is a marker of variety and improvement of soils. It is important for the problems solutions in applied soil science. The aberrations of catalase, peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase activities characterise not only the metabolizing of plants, microorganisms and soils, but the level of the environmental pollution. The general activity of enzymatic systems allows ascertaining their role in the forming of biota components’ resistance to the exogenous influence. The seasonal dynamics of the soils’ catalase activity subject to the type of a biogeocenosis is disclosed.

  8. Catalase and NO CATALASE ACTIVITY1 promote autophagy-dependent cell death in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hackenberg, Thomas; Andersen, Trine Juul; Auzina, Aija;

    2013-01-01

    Programmed cell death often depends on generation of reactive oxygen species, which can be detoxified by antioxidative enzymes, including catalases. We previously isolated catalase-deficient mutants (cat2) in a screen for resistance to hydroxyurea-induced cell death. Here, we identify an Arabidop......Programmed cell death often depends on generation of reactive oxygen species, which can be detoxified by antioxidative enzymes, including catalases. We previously isolated catalase-deficient mutants (cat2) in a screen for resistance to hydroxyurea-induced cell death. Here, we identify an......-induced autophagy appeared normal in the nca1 and cat2 mutants. By contrast, autophagic degradation induced by avrRpm1 challenge was compromised, indicating that catalase acted upstream of immunity-triggered autophagy. The direct interaction of catalase with reactive oxygen species could allow catalase to act as a...

  9. The utilization of some iron and zinc compounds as regulators of catalase activity at Saccharomyces cerevisiae

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    Efremova, N.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this study was to examine the impact of some zinc and iron compounds as oxidative stress factors on catalase activity, which is known to be important defense system of microorganisms to metal stress. For the investigation was used baker's yeast strain - Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNMN-Y-11 previously selected as a source of protein and catalase. The obtained results have revealed that compounds of iron and zinc with citrate and acetate contributes to the accumulation of yeast biomass and have beneficial effect on the catalase activity at selected yeast strain. The maximum increase of catalase activity in yeast biomass was established in case of iron and zinc citrate supplementation to the nutritive medium in optimal concentration of 15.0 mg/l. Results of the present study could be used for the elaboration of new procedures of catalase obtaining by directed synthesis with the utilization of selected metal compounds.

  10. Natural resistance to ascorbic acid induced oxidative stress is mainly mediated by catalase activity in human cancer cells and catalase-silencing sensitizes to oxidative stress

    OpenAIRE

    Klingelhoeffer Christoph; Kämmerer Ulrike; Koospal Monika; Mühling Bettina; Schneider Manuela; Kapp Michaela; Kübler Alexander; Germer Christoph-Thomas; Otto Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Ascorbic acid demonstrates a cytotoxic effect by generating hydrogen peroxide, a reactive oxygen species (ROS) involved in oxidative cell stress. A panel of eleven human cancer cell lines, glioblastoma and carcinoma, were exposed to serial dilutions of ascorbic acid (5-100 mmol/L). The purpose of this study was to analyse the impact of catalase, an important hydrogen peroxide-detoxifying enzyme, on the resistance of cancer cells to ascorbic acid mediated oxidative stress. ...

  11. Do Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) and Catalase (CAT) protect Cells from DNA Damage Induced by Active Arsenicals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) catalyzes the conversion of superoxide to hydrogen peroxide, which can be converted to water and oxygen through the action of catalase. Heterozygous mice of strain B6: 129S7-SodltmlLeb/J were obtained from Jackson Laboratories and bred to produce offspr...

  12. Comparative study on the catalase activity in grassy and forestry plants exposed to low gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since gamma rays level in atmosphere occasionally increases affecting biosphere,the radiation effect damages seriously certain plant species. This study was focused on a grassy species,Triticum aestivum, in comparison to a forestry species, namely Quercus robur. Young plantlets were exposed to weak gamma rays delivered by a laboratory 60 Co source, for different irradiation times. The enzymatic activity of catalase was evaluated using biochemical methods. Triticum aestivum presented a slight enhancing of catalase, both in caryopsides and leafs. Quercus robur revealed a rapid linear enhancing of catalase in saplings cultivated in laboratory while saplings grown in forestry were characterized by a reduced catalase activity. Concurrent phenomena of enzyme biosynthesis stimulation and enzyme structure damage are presumed to be the cause of such behavior. (authors)

  13. The utilization of some iron and zinc compounds as regulators of catalase activity at Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Efremova, N.; E. Molodoi; Usatîi, A.; Fulga, L.

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to examine the impact of some zinc and iron compounds as oxidative stress factors on catalase activity, which is known to be important defense system of microorganisms to metal stress. For the investigation was used baker's yeast strain - Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNMN-Y-11 previously selected as a source of protein and catalase. The obtained results have revealed that compounds of iron and zinc with citrate and acetate contributes to the accumulation of yeast bi...

  14. Effects of humic acid-metal complexes on hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase, carnitine acetyltransferase and catalase activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fungjou Lu; Youngshin Chen (National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Biochemistry); Tienshang Huang (National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Medicine)

    1994-03-01

    A significant increase in activities of hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase and carnitine acetyltransferase was observed in male Balb/c mice intraperitoneally injected for 40 d with 0.125 mg/0.1 ml/d humic acid-metal complexes. Among these complexes, the humic acid-As complex was relatively effective, whereas humic acid-25 metal complex was more effective, and humic acid-26 metal complex was most effective. However, humic acid or metal mixtures, or metal such as As alone, was not effective. Humic acid-metal complexes also significantly decreased hepatic catalase activity. A marked decrease of 60-kDa polypeptide in liver cytoplasm was also observed on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis after the mice had been injected with the complexes. Morphological analysis of a histopathological biopsy of such treated mice revealed several changes in hepatocytes, including focal necrosis and cell infiltration, mild fatty changes, reactive nuclei, and hypertrophy. Humic acid-metal complexes affect activities of metabolic enzymes of fatty acids, and this results in accumulation of hydrogen peroxide and increase of the lipid peroxidation. The products of lipid peroxidation may be responsible for liver damage and possible carcinogenesis. Previous studies in this laboratory had shown that humic acid-metal complex altered the coagulation system and that humic acid, per se, caused vasculopathy. Therefore, humic acid-metal complexes may be main causal factors of not only so-called blackfoot disease, but also the liver cancer prevailing on the southwestern coast of Taiwan.

  15. Arrhenius activation energy of damage to catalase during spray-drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Joachim; Lee, Geoffrey

    2015-07-15

    The inactivation of catalase during spray-drying over a range of outlet gas temperatures could be closely represented by the Arrhenius equation. From this an activation energy for damage to the catalase could be calculated. The close fit to Arrhenius suggests that the thermally-induced part of inactivation of the catalase during the complex drying and particle-formation processes takes place at constant temperature. These processes are rapid compared with the residence time of the powder in the collecting vessel of the cyclone where dried catalase is exposed to a constant temperature equal to approximately the drying gas outlet temperature. A lower activation energy after spray drying with the ultrasonic nozzle was found than with the 2-fluid nozzle under otherwise identical spray drying conditions. It is feasible that the ultrasonic nozzle when mounted in the lid of the spray dryer heats up toward the drying gas inlet temperature much more that the air-cooled 2-fluid nozzle. Calculation of the Arrhenius activation energy also showed how the stabilizing efficacy of trehalose and mannitol on the catalase varies in strength across the range of drying gas inlet and outlet temperatures examined. PMID:25940040

  16. Differential activation of catalase expression and activity by PPAR agonists: Implications for astrocyte protection in anti-glioma therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas K.H. Khoo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioma survival is dismal, in part, due to an imbalance in antioxidant expression and activity. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR agonists have antineoplastic properties which present new redox-dependent targets for glioma anticancer therapies. Herein, we demonstrate that treatment of primary cultures of normal rat astrocytes with PPAR agonists increased the expression of catalase mRNA protein, and enzymatic activity. In contrast, these same agonists had no effect on catalase expression and activity in malignant rat glioma cells. The increase in steady-state catalase mRNA observed in normal rat astrocytes was due, in part, to de novo mRNA synthesis as opposed to increased catalase mRNA stability. Moreover, pioglitazone-mediated induction of catalase activity in normal rat astrocytes was completely blocked by transfection with a PPARγ-dominant negative plasmid. These data suggest that defects in PPAR-mediated signaling and gene expression may represent a block to normal catalase expression and induction in malignant glioma. The ability of PPAR agonists to differentially increase catalase expression and activity in normal astrocytes but not glioma cells suggests that these compounds might represent novel adjuvant therapeutic agents for the treatment of gliomas.

  17. Computational study concerning the effect of some pesticides on the Proteus Mirabilis catalase activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isvoran, Adriana

    2016-03-01

    Assessment of the effects of the herbicides nicosulfuron and chlorsulfuron and the fungicides difenoconazole and drazoxlone upon catalase produced by soil microorganism Proteus mirabilis is performed using the molecular docking technique. The interactions of pesticides with the enzymes are predicted using SwissDock and PatchDock docking tools. There are correlations for predicted binding energy values for enzyme-pesticide complexes obtained using the two docking tools, all the considered pesticides revealing favorable binding to the enzyme, but only the herbicides bind to the catalytic site. These results suggest the inhibitory potential of chlorsulfuron and nicosulfuron on the catalase activity in soil.

  18. Decrease in catalase activity of Folsomia candida fed a Bt rice diet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here we report the effects of three Bt-rice varieties and their non-Bt conventional isolines on biological traits including survival, reproduction, and the activities of three antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxidase, in the Collembolan, Folsomia candida. The reproduction was significantly lower when fed Kemingdao and Huahui1 than those feeding on their non-GM near-isogenic varieties Xiushui and Minghui63 respectively, this can be explained by the differences of plant compositions depended on variety of rice. The catalase activity of F. candida was significantly lower when fed the Bt-rice variety Kemingdao compared to the near-isogenic non-Bt-rice variety Xiushui. This suggests that some Bt-rice varieties may impose environmental stress to collembolans. We emphasize that changes in activity of antioxidant enzymes of non-target organisms are important in understanding the ecological consequences for organisms inhabiting transgenic Bt-rice plantations. - Highlights: → We examine the effects of Bt-rice on Folsomia candida with laboratory test. → The reproduction of F. candida was decreased by two Bt-rice varieties. → Decreased reproduction caused by the differences of varieties or C/N ratio of rice. → The catalase activity was decreased by Bt-rice Kemingdao. → Some Bt-rice may impose environmental stress on NTOs. - The catalase of the collembolan (Folsomia candida) was decreased when fed Bt-rice, Kemingdao.

  19. Decrease in catalase activity of Folsomia candida fed a Bt rice diet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan Yiyang, E-mail: yuanyy@ioz.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Integrated Management of Pest and Rodents, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1 Beichen West Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101 (China); Graduate School, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Ke Xin, E-mail: xinke@sibs.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Plant Physiology and Ecology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 300 Fenglin Road, Shanghai 200032 (China); Chen Fajun, E-mail: fajunchen@njau.edu.cn [College of Plant Protection, Department of Entomology, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Krogh, Paul Henning, E-mail: phk@dmu.dk [Department of Bioscience, University of Aarhus, P.O. Box 314, Vejlsoevej 25, DK-8600 Silkeborg (Denmark); Ge Feng, E-mail: gef@ioz.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Integrated Management of Pest and Rodents, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1 Beichen West Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2011-12-15

    Here we report the effects of three Bt-rice varieties and their non-Bt conventional isolines on biological traits including survival, reproduction, and the activities of three antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxidase, in the Collembolan, Folsomia candida. The reproduction was significantly lower when fed Kemingdao and Huahui1 than those feeding on their non-GM near-isogenic varieties Xiushui and Minghui63 respectively, this can be explained by the differences of plant compositions depended on variety of rice. The catalase activity of F. candida was significantly lower when fed the Bt-rice variety Kemingdao compared to the near-isogenic non-Bt-rice variety Xiushui. This suggests that some Bt-rice varieties may impose environmental stress to collembolans. We emphasize that changes in activity of antioxidant enzymes of non-target organisms are important in understanding the ecological consequences for organisms inhabiting transgenic Bt-rice plantations. - Highlights: > We examine the effects of Bt-rice on Folsomia candida with laboratory test. > The reproduction of F. candida was decreased by two Bt-rice varieties. > Decreased reproduction caused by the differences of varieties or C/N ratio of rice. > The catalase activity was decreased by Bt-rice Kemingdao. > Some Bt-rice may impose environmental stress on NTOs. - The catalase of the collembolan (Folsomia candida) was decreased when fed Bt-rice, Kemingdao.

  20. Decrease in catalase activity of Folsomia candida fed a Bt rice diet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Yiyang; Ke, Xin; Chen, Fajun;

    2011-01-01

    Here we report the effects of three Bt-rice varieties and their non-Bt conventional isolines on biological traits including survival, reproduction, and the activities of three antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxidase, in the Collembolan, Folsomia candida. The reproduction...... was significantly lower when fed Kemingdao and Huahui1 than those feeding on their non-GM near-isogenic varieties Xiushui and Minghui63 respectively, this can be explained by the differences of plant compositions depended on variety of rice. The catalase activity of F. candida was significantly lower when fed...... the Bt-rice variety Kemingdao compared to the near-isogenic non-Bt-rice variety Xiushui. This suggests that some Bt-rice varieties may impose environmental stress to collembolans. We emphasize that changes in activity of antioxidant enzymes of non-target organisms are important in understanding...

  1. Reduction of Hydrogen Peroxide Accumulation and Toxicity by a Catalase from Mycoplasma iowae

    OpenAIRE

    Rachel E Pritchard; Prassinos, Alexandre J.; Osborne, John D.; Raviv, Ziv; Balish, Mitchell F.

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma iowae is a well-established avian pathogen that can infect and damage many sites throughout the body. One potential mediator of cellular damage by mycoplasmas is the production of H2O2 via a glycerol catabolic pathway whose genes are widespread amongst many mycoplasma species. Previous sequencing of M. iowae serovar I strain 695 revealed the presence of not only genes for H2O2 production through glycerol catabolism but also the first documented mycoplasma gene for catalase, which d...

  2. Catalase, superoxide dismutase, and hemolysin activities and heat susceptibility of Listeria monocytogenes after growth in media containing sodium chloride.

    OpenAIRE

    Dallmier, A W; Martin, S E

    1990-01-01

    The activities of catalase, superoxide dismutase, and a thiol-activated hemolysin produced by four strains of Listeria monocytogenes propagated in media containing various concentrations of sodium chloride were examined. L. monocytogenes 7644 showed an increase in catalase, superoxide dismutase, and thiol-activated hemolysin activities when grown in a medium containing 2.5% (wt/vol) NaCl followed by a decrease in activities when propagated in media containing salt concentrations higher than 2...

  3. Cytoplasmic superoxide dismutase and catalase activity and resistance to radiation lethality in murine tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reduced species of molecular oxygen are produced by the interaction of ionizing radiation with aqueous solutions containing molecular oxygen. The enzymes catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) are thought to function in vivo as scavengers of metabolically produced peroxide and superoxide respectively. SOD has been shown to protect against the lethal effects of ionizing radiation in vitro and in vivo. The authors have investigated the relationship between the cytosolic SOD catalase content and the sensitivity to radiation lethality of a number of murine cell lines (402AX, EL-4, MB-2T3, MB-4, MEL, P-815, SAI, SP-2, and SV-3T3). K/sub i/(CN-) for murine Cu-Zn-SOD was determined to be 6.8 x 10-6 M. No cytosolic Mn-SOD activity was found in any of the cell lines studied. No correlation was found between the cytosolic Cu-Zn-SOD or cytosolic catalase activity and the resistance to radiation lethality or the murine cell lines studied

  4. Change in the Content of Salicylic Acid and in the Activities of Phenylalanine Ammonia-Lyase and Catalase in Wheat Seedling Roots Under the Effect of Azospirillum Lectins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alen'kina S.A.

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the time course of changes in the endogenous content of salicylic acid, the ratio between the acid's free and bound forms, and changes in the activities of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and catalase in wheat seedling roots under the effect of the lectins of two strains of the associative nitrogen-fixing bacterium Azospirillum: A. brasilense Sp7 and its mutant defective in lectin activity, A. brasilense Sp7.2.3. Differences in plant response to the action of the lectins from these two strains were established. On the basis of the obtained data, a model was proposed for lectin-assisted induction of resistance, according to which the lectin effect on the roots of seedlings results in accumulation of free salicylic acid, which inhibits catalase activity, ultimately leading to accumulation of hydrogen peroxide and to formation of induced resistance.

  5. Cysteine-independent Catalase-like Activity of Vertebrate Peroxiredoxin 1 (Prx1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Cen-Cen; Dong, Wei-Ren; Zhao, Jing; Nie, Li; Xiang, Li-Xin; Zhu, Guan; Shao, Jian-Zhong

    2015-08-01

    Peroxiredoxins (Prxs) are a ubiquitous family of antioxidant proteins that are known as thioredoxin peroxidases. Here we report that Prx1 proteins from Tetraodon nigroviridis and humans also possess a previously unknown catalase-like activity that is independent of Cys residues and reductants but dependent on iron. We identified that the GVL motif was essential to the catalase (CAT)-like activity of Prx1 but not to the Cys-dependent thioredoxin peroxidase (POX) activity, and we generated mutants lacking POX and/or CAT activities for individually delineating their functional features. We discovered that the TnPrx1 POX and CAT activities possessed different kinetic features in reducing H2O2. The overexpression of wild-type TnPrx1 and mutants differentially regulated the intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species and p38 phosphorylation in HEK-293T cells treated with H2O2. These observations suggest that the dual antioxidant activities of Prx1 may be crucial for organisms to mediate intracellular redox homeostasis. PMID:26088136

  6. Low erythrocyte catalase enzyme activity is correlated with high serum total homocysteine levels in tunisian patients with acute myocardial infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Noichri, Yosri; Chalghoum, Abdelkader; Chkioua, Latifa; Baudin, Bruno; Ernez, Samia; Ferchichi, Salima; Miled, Abdelhédi

    2013-01-01

    Background An imbalance between pro-oxidants and antioxidant systems has been suggested to be implicated in the physiopathology of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). We aimed to evaluate the antioxidant capacity in Tunisian patients and to assess the possible relationship between erythrocyte catalase enzyme activity and hyperhomocysteinaemia. Methods 108 patients with AMI and 81 healthy subjects were enrolled in this study. Catalase erythrocyte enzyme activity was determined spectrophotometri...

  7. Mn(II) complexes with bipyridine, phenanthroline and benzoic acid: Biological and catalase-like activity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ibrahim Kani; Özlem Atlier; Kiymet Güven

    2016-04-01

    Five mononuclear Mn(II) complexes, [Mn(phen)2(ClO4)2] (1), [Mn(phen)3](ClO4)2(H2CO3)2(2), [Mn(bipy)2(ClO4)2] (3), [Mn(bipy)3](ClO4)2) (4), and Mn(phen)2(ba)(H2O)](ClO4)(CH3OH) (5), where bipy = 2,2’-bipyridine, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline, and ba = benzoic acid were prepared and characterized by Xray, IR and UV-Vis spectroscopies, and their catalase-like and biological activities were studied. The presence of two different types and the number of chelating NN-donor neutral ligands allowed for analysis of their effects on the catalase and biological activities. It was observed that the presence and number of phen ligands improved the activity more than the bipy ligand. Complexes 1 and 2, which contain more basic phen ligands, disproportionate H2O2 faster than complexes 3 and 4, which contain less basic bipy ligands. The in vitro antimicrobial activities of all the complexes were also tested against seven bacterial strains by microdilution tests. All the bacterial isolates demonstrated sensitivity to the complexes and the antifungal (anticandidal) activities of the Mn(II) complexes were remarkably higher than the reference drug ketoconazole.

  8. Highly Active and Stable Large Catalase Isolated from a Hydrocarbon Degrading Aspergillus terreus MTCC 6324.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatsyayan, Preety; Goswami, Pranab

    2016-01-01

    A hydrocarbon degrading Aspergillus terreus MTCC 6324 produces a high level of extremely active and stable cellular large catalase (CAT) during growth on n-hexadecane to combat the oxidative stress caused by the hydrocarbon degrading metabolic machinery inside the cell. A 160-fold purification with specific activity of around 66 × 10(5) U mg(-1) protein was achieved. The native protein molecular mass was 368 ± 5 kDa with subunit molecular mass of nearly 90 kDa, which indicates that the native CAT protein is a homotetramer. The isoelectric pH (pI) of the purified CAT was 4.2. BLAST aligned peptide mass fragments of CAT protein showed its highest similarity with the catalase B protein from other fungal sources. CAT was active in a broad range of pH 4 to 12 and temperature 25°C to 90°C. The catalytic efficiency (K cat/K m ) of 4.7 × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1) within the studied substrate range and alkaline pH stability (half-life, t 1/2 at pH 12~15 months) of CAT are considerably higher than most of the extensively studied catalases from different sources. The storage stability (t 1/2) of CAT at physiological pH 7.5 and 4°C was nearly 30 months. The haem was identified as haem b by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS/MS). PMID:27057351

  9. High catalase production by Rhizobium radiobacter strain 2-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Mami; Nakajima-Kambe, Toshiaki; Katayama, Hideki; Higuchi, Kazuhiko; Kawasaki, Yoshio; Fuji, Ryujiro

    2008-12-01

    To promote the application of catalase for treating wastewater containing hydrogen peroxide, bacteria exhibiting high catalase activity were screened. A bacterium, designated strain 2-1, with high catalase activity was isolated from the wastewater of a beverage factory that uses hydrogen peroxide. Strain 2-1 was identified as Rhizobium radiobacter (formerly known as Agrobacterium tumefaciens) on the basis of both phenotypic and genotypic characterizations. Although some strains of R. radiobacter are known plant pathogens, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis showed that strain 2-1 has no phytopathogenic factor. Compared with a type strain of R. radiobacter, the specific catalase activity of strain 2-1 was approximately 1000-fold. Moreover, Strain 2-1 grew faster and exhibited considerably higher catalase activity than other microorganisms that have been used for industrial catalase production. Strain 2-1 is harmless to humans and the environment and produces catalase efficiently, suggesting that strain 2-1 is a good resource for the mass production of catalase for the treatment of hydrogen peroxide-containing wastewater. PMID:19134550

  10. Ultraviolet influence on catalase activity and mineral content in eyeballs of gibel carp (Carassius auratus gibelio)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Formicki, Grzegorz [Cracow Pedagogical Academy, Institute of Biology, Department of Zoology, ul. Podbrzezie 3, 31-054 Cracow (Poland)]. E-mail: formicki@ap.krakow.pl; Stawarz, Robert [Cracow Pedagogical Academy, Institute of Biology, Department of Zoology, ul. Podbrzezie 3, 31-054 Cracow (Poland)

    2006-10-01

    UV radiation present in the environment may induce several eye disorders including inflammation and cataract. The aim of this work was to study catalase activity and Mg, Cu, Ca and Zn contents in the eyeballs of gibel carp exposed to ecologically relevant doses of UV radiation (0.09 kJ/m{sup 2} for UV-A and 0.98 kJ/m{sup 2} for UV-B) simulated in laboratory conditions. Ultraviolet exposure resulted in significant reduction of catalase activity in the eyeballs of tested fish. Reductions in Mg, Cu and Ca contents after UV exposure were also observed. The differences in Mg and Cu levels between control and UV exposed animals were statistically significant, whereas the reduction of Ca level was insignificant. Zinc level in the eyeballs of UV-exposed fish was significantly higher than in non-irradiated specimens. The results suggest that ultraviolet radiation affects prooxidant/antioxidant balance and Mg, Cu, Zn contents in the eyes of fish living in shallow habitats. These may lead to cataract formation.

  11. Effects of some environmental parameters on catalase activity measured in the mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) exposed to lindane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis), collected from the Bizerta lagoon, were acclimated for four days to various conditions of temperature, salinity, photoperiod and food supply and then exposed to lindane at a concentration of 40 μg l-1. Catalase activity, which is a biomarker of exposure to an oxidative stress, was measured in the whole soft tissues of control and assay groups. In control mussels, high temperature, high salinity and light duration significantly increased catalase activity whereas this activity decreased when food, composed of freeze-dried, algae was available. When mussels were treated with lindane, catalase activities were higher than in controls. This increase was significant with temperature, salinity and light duration. The food supply did not change catalase activity, which was always higher compared to controls. Oxidative stress was shown in mussels exposed to lindane. The results highlight the need of considering abiotic parameters in biomonitoring studies, and especially when using catalase as a biomarker. - Oxidative stress in mussels exposed to lindane was also influenced by a number of abiotic parameters

  12. Molecular Characterization of a Catalase from Hydra vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Bhagirathi; Phillips, Timothy D.

    2012-01-01

    Catalase, an antioxidant and hydroperoxidase enzyme protects the cellular environment from harmful effects of hydrogen peroxide by facilitating its degradation to oxygen and water. Molecular information on a cnidarian catalase and/or peroxidase is, however, limited. In this work an apparent full length cDNA sequence coding for a catalase (HvCatalase) was isolated from Hydra vulgaris using 3’- and 5’- (RLM) RACE approaches. The 1859 bp HvCatalase cDNA included an open reading frame of 1518 bp encoding a putative protein of 505 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 57.44 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence of HvCatalase contained several highly conserved motifs including the heme-ligand signature sequence RLFSYGDTH and the active site signature FXRERIPERVVHAKGXGA. A comparative analysis showed the presence of conserved catalytic amino acids [His(71), Asn(145), and Tyr(354)] in HvCatalase as well. Homology modeling indicated the presence of the conserved features of mammalian catalase fold. Hydrae exposed to thermal, starvation, metal and oxidative stress responded by regulating its catalase mRNA transcription. These results indicated that the HvCatalase gene is involved in the cellular stress response and (anti)oxidative processes triggered by stressor and contaminant exposure. PMID:22521743

  13. Tratamento pós-menopausa reduz a atividade da catalase e atenua o risco cardiovascular Postmenopausal therapy reduces catalase activity and attenuates cardiovascular risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera S. Castanho

    2012-11-01

    enzyme activities is limited. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of HT on catalase activity; concentrations of lipids and lipoprotein, cholesteryl ester transfer protein, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, nitrates, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and carotid thickness in postmenopausal women. METHODS: Ninety-four consecutive women were allocated to one of four groups, without HT and with HT. The latter group was subdivided into women using estrogen and those using estrogen plus progestogen therapy. Plasma biochemical parameters and common carotid intima-media thickness measurements were performed. RESULTS: HT antagonized the decrease in catalase activity after menopause, but had no effect on the levels of cholesteryl ester transfer protein, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, lipid peroxide, nitrate, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, or on the common carotid intima-media thickness. Multivariate analysis showed that estrogen-based HT attenuated the relationship between cardiovascular risk factors and the intima-media thickness of the common carotid. CONCLUSION: This study indicates that HT in postmenopausal women produces beneficial antioxidant and anti-atherosclerotic effects by ameliorating the plasma lipid and lipoprotein profiles, increasing plasma catalase activity and attenuating the association between cardiovascular risk factors and early atherosclerosis.

  14. Effect of γ-radiation on the activities of superoxide dimutase, catalase and peroxidase on the germinating wheat grain (Triticum aestivum,L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect of γ-radiation on several enzymes like catalase, peroxidase and superoxide dismutase in different parts of germinating wheat seeds has been studied. It was found that superoxide dismutase activity under the influence of γ-radiation was highest in the embryo part and showed maximum activity, 24 hours after germination. The activity exhibited a gradual decline with time. catalase and peroxidase, the stimulatory efect being maximum in the case of catalase activity. The catalase and peroxidase activities were found to be maximally localised in the embryo part and the highest value was attained after 72 hrs. in the case of catalase and after 48 hrs in the case of peroxidase activity. The results indicate that γ-radiation stimulates free radical generation in the embryo along with subsequent increase in the activities of superoside dismutase, catalase and peroxidase. (author)

  15. Effect of phenol on germination capacity and polyphenol oxidase, peroxidase and catalase activities in lettuce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadić Vojin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we examined the activities of polyphenol oxidase (PPO and antioxidant enzymes, peroxidase (POX and catalase (CAT during lettuce seed germination at different concentrations of phenol. Out of eleven varieties of lettuce, four were chosen according to their germination tolerance to phenol as follows: plants exhibiting high (Ljubljanska ledenka - LJL and Nansen - N and low toleranace (Little Gem - LG and Majska kraljica - MK. A decrease in germination efficiency after exposure to LD50 of phenol was determined for these four varieties. The effects of phenol treatment on POX, CAT and PPO activities were determined after 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 days of growth at LD50 concentrations. A trend of increased peroxidase activity was observed in seeds grown on LD50 of phenol compared to control seeds. A significant increase in CAT activity was observed at the beginning of treatment for MK, LG and N in seeds grown on phenol as well as in control seeds. A trend of increased PPO activity was observed in all control seeds. We also investigated the affinity of PPO for two different substrates that were used for the determination of enzyme activity. Our results show that LJL and N are the varieties most tolerant to growth on phenol. Here we report on the activities of their antioxidant enzymes and PPO during seed germination. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. ON173017

  16. Catalase immobilized on a functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes–gold nanocomposite as a highly sensitive bio-sensing system for detection of hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By immobilizing catalase on a nanocomposite containing functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes and L-cysteine modified gold nanoparticles, a third generation biosensor was developed for determination of the hydrogen peroxide. The cyclic voltammograms of catalase on the nanocomposite modified glassy carbon electrode showed a pair of well-defined quasi-reversible redox peaks with the formal potential of −441 ± 2 mV versus Ag/AgCl at a scan rate of 0.05 V/s. The heterogeneous electron transfer constant was calculated to be 8.72 s−1. The enzyme electrode response toward hydrogen peroxide was linear in the concentrations ranging from 1 nM to 1 μM, with a detection limit of 0.5 nM. The apparent Michaelis–Menten constant was calculated to be 0.34 μM

  17. Effects of sodium nitroprusside on mouse erythrocyte catalase activity and malondialdehyde status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sani, Mamane; Sebai, Hichem; Refinetti, Roberto; Mondal, Mohan; Ghanem-Boughanmi, Néziha; Boughattas, Naceur A; Ben-Attia, Mossadok

    2016-07-01

    There is controversy about the anti- or pro-oxidative effects of the nitric oxide (NO)-donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Hence, the activity of the antioxidant enzyme catalase (CAT) and the status of malondialdehyde (MDA) were investigated after a 2.5 mg/kg dose of SNP had been i.p. administered to different and comparable groups of mice (n =  48). The drug was administered at two different circadian times (1 and 13 h after light onset [HALO]). There were, irrespectively of sampling time, no significant differences in the means of CAT activity and MDA status between control and SNP-treated groups, no matter the treatment time. However, CAT activity was significantly (Student's t-test, p analysis of variance (ANOVA) detected a significant (F0.05(7,88)= 5.3; p < 0.0006) interaction between sampling time and treatment in mice injected at 1 HALO, suggesting the influence of treatment on sampling-time-related changes in CAT activity. However, ANOVA validated no interaction between the two factors in mice treated at 13 HALO, illustrating that the sampling-time differences in enzyme activity were greater. Furthermore, two-way ANOVA revealed no interaction in the variation of MDA status in animals treated either at 1 or 13 HALO. This study indicates that SNP significantly affected the anti-oxidant system. PMID:26738972

  18. Melanocortin 1 receptor agonist protects podocytes through catalase and RhoA activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvin, Johannes; Buvall, Lisa; Lindskog Jonsson, Annika; Granqvist, Anna; Lassén, Emelie; Bergwall, Lovisa; Nyström, Jenny; Haraldsson, Börje

    2016-05-01

    Drugs containing adrenocorticotropic hormone have been used as therapy for patients with nephrotic syndrome. We have previously shown that adrenocorticotropic hormone and a selective agonist for the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) exert beneficial actions in experimental membranous nephropathy with reduced proteinuria, reduced oxidative stress, and improved glomerular morphology and function. Our hypothesis is that MC1R activation in podocytes elicits beneficial effects by promoting stress fibers and maintaining podocyte viability. To test the hypothesis, we cultured podocytes and used highly specific agonists for MC1R. Podocytes were subjected to the nephrotic-inducing agent puromycin aminonucleoside, and downstream effects of MC1R activation on podocyte survival, antioxidant defense, and cytoskeleton dynamics were studied. To increase the response and enhance intracellular signals, podocytes were transduced to overexpress MC1R. We showed that puromycin promotes MC1R expression in podocytes and that activation of MC1R promotes an increase of catalase activity and reduces oxidative stress, which results in the dephosphorylation of p190RhoGAP and formation of stress fibers through RhoA. In addition, MC1R agonists protect against apoptosis. Together, these mechanisms protect the podocyte against puromycin. Our findings strongly support the hypothesis that selective MC1R-activating agonists protect podocytes and may therefore be useful to treat patients with nephrotic syndromes commonly considered as podocytopathies. PMID:26887829

  19. Two divergent catalase genes are differentially regulated during Aspergillus nidulans development and oxidative stress.

    OpenAIRE

    Kawasaki, L; Wysong, D; Diamond, R.; Aguirre, J.

    1997-01-01

    Catalases are ubiquitous hydrogen peroxide-detoxifying enzymes that are central to the cellular antioxidant response. Of two catalase activities detected in the fungus Aspergillus nidulans, the catA gene encodes the spore-specific catalase A (CatA). Here we characterize a second catalase gene, identified after probing a genomic library with catA, and demonstrate that it encodes catalase B. This gene, designated catB, predicts a 721-amino-acid polypeptide (CatB) showing 78% identity to an Aspe...

  20. Regulation of catalase in Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Effects of oxidant stress and exposure to human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, H Y; Hassett, D J; Bean, K; Cohen, M S

    1992-09-01

    We studied the effects of oxidant stress on the catalase activity and hydrogen peroxide sensitivity of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. N. gonorrhoeae is an obligate pathogen of man that evokes a remarkable but ineffective neutrophil response. Gonococci make no superoxide dismutase but express high catalase activity. Gonococcal catalase activity increased threefold when organisms were subjected to 1.0 mM hydrogen peroxide. This increase in catalase activity was marked by a parallel increase in protein concentration recognized by a rabbit polyclonal antibody raised against the purified gonococcal enzyme. Catalase was primarily localized to the gonococcal cytoplasm in the presence or absence of stress; only a single isoenzyme of catalase could be identified. Exposure of gonococci to neutrophil-derived oxidants was accomplished by stimulating neutrophils with phorbol myristate acetate or by using gonococcal Opa variants that interacted with neutrophils with different degrees of efficiency. Gonococci exposed to neutrophils demonstrated a twofold increase in catalase activity in spite of some reduction in viability. Exposure of gonococci to 1.0 mM hydrogen peroxide made the organisms significantly more resistant to higher concentrations of hydrogen peroxide and to neutrophils than control organisms. These results suggest that catalase is an important defense for N. gonorrhoeae during attack by human neutrophils. The rapid response of this enzyme to hydrogen peroxide should be taken into consideration in studies designed to evaluate the interaction between neutrophils and gonococci. PMID:1522209

  1. Catalase activity in Smicridea McLachlan, 1871 (Insecta, Trichoptera collected from natural and altered/impacted streams

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    Cristiane Biasus

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: We compare catalase activity in SmicrideaMcLachlan, 1871 (Insecta, Trichoptera collected in natural and agricultural streams and correlates the enzyme pattern with metal content in the water.MethodsOrganisms were collected in sites classified as natural (riparian vegetation in buffer zone and altered/impacted (agricultural land use in drainage area environments, located at Cravo River and Campo River sub-basins (RS, Brazil. Next the collected larvae were identified and used to proteins quantification and catalase activity measure. The concentration of Mg, Cr, Cu, Pb and Cd in the water was determined by atomic absorption spectrometry.ResultsCatalase activity in Smicridea ranged from 1.5 to 6 U, with mean values about 2.63 ± 0.096 U (SEM. The presence of metals was higher in the streams located at agricultural drainage area, except for Mg at the Cravo sub-basin and Cu at the Campo sub-basin. Catalase was higher in Smicridea collected in natural streams as compared to that agriculture streams and was correlated with Pb and Cd levels.ConclusionsThe data showed the potential of this biomarker as a useful tool for complementation of water quality biomonitoring studies using Smicridea as bioindicator.

  2. Amelioration of radiation induced decrease in activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase in mouse liver by Punica granatum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) in irradiated tissue. Cells of liver have their own defence system, the antioxidant system to deactivate ROS. Antioxidant system includes enzymatic and non-enzymatic components. Liver is rich in endogenous antioxidants and related enzymes. Catalase and Superoxide dismutase (SOD) are powerful antioxidant enzymes. In the present study Punica granatum fruit rind Ethanol extract (PGFRE) was tested against 60Co gamma radiation induced alteration in Swiss albino mouse. Healthy adult (25±2) Swiss albino mouse were selected and divided into four groups. The first group was sham irradiated. The second group was irradiated with 8 Gy 60Co gamma radiation only and served as control. The third group was administered with Ethanol extract of Punica granatum fruit rind one hour before irradiation at the dose rate of 10 mg/kg body weight orally. Animals were exposed to 8 Gy 60Co gamma radiation. Fourth group was administered with Ethanol extract of Punica granatum fruit rind at the dose rate of 10 mg/kg body weight. Mice were sacrificed at various post irradiation intervals and liver was removed, weighed and analysed biochemically for Catalase and SOD activity. Catalase and SOD activity decreased up till 7th post irradiation day in 8 Gy irradiated group than normal. In PGFRE pretreated irradiated group catalase and SOD activity were higher than the corresponding control group at all the intervals. These results indicate that PGFRE extract protects damage to the catalase and SOD activity in liver of Swiss albino mouse against lethal dose of gamma radiation. (author)

  3. Inherited catalase deficiency: is it benign or a factor in various age related disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Góth, László; Nagy, Teréz

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide was - and is still - considered toxic for a wide range of living organisms. Oxidative stress occurs when there is an excess of pro-oxidants over antioxidants and it has been implicated in several diseases. Catalase is involved in hydrogen peroxide catabolism and is important in defense against oxidative stress. Acatalasemia means the inherited near-total deficiency of catalase activity, usually in reference to red cell catalase. Acatalasemia was thought at first to be an asymptotic disorder. In the absence of catalase, neither the Japanese, or Hungarian acatalasemics nor acatalasemic mice had significantly increased blood glutathione peroxidase activity. In animal models, catalase deficient tissues show much slower rates of removal of extracellular hydrogen peroxide. In catalase knock-out mice, a decreased hydrogen peroxide removing capacity and increased reactive oxygen species formation were reported. Hydrogen peroxide may cause methemoglobinemia in patients with catalase deficiency. During anesthesia for a Japanese acatalasemic patient the disinfection with hydrogen peroxide solution caused severe methemoglobinemia. Patients with inherited catalase deficiency, who are treated with uric acid oxidase (rasburicase) may experience very high concentrations of hydrogen peroxide and may suffer from methemoglobinemia and hemolysis. The high (18.5%) prevalence of diabetes mellitus in inherited catalase deficient individuals and the earlier (10 years) manifestation of the disease may be attributed to the oxidative damage of oxidant sensitive, insulin producing pancreatic beta-cells. Ninety-seven of 114 acatalasemics had diseases related to oxidative stress and aging. The oxidative stress due to catalase deficiency could contribute to the manifestation of diabetes while for the other diseases it may be one of the factors in their causations. In summary, inherited catalase deficiency is associated with clinical features, pathologic laboratory test results

  4. Piper betle shows antioxidant activities, inhibits MCF-7 cell proliferation and increases activities of catalase and superoxide dismutase

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    Abrahim Noor

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer and the focus on finding chemotherapeutic agents have recently shifted to natural products. Piper betle is a medicinal plant with various biological activities. However, not much data is available on the anti-cancer effects of P. betle on breast cancer. Due to the current interest in the potential effects of antioxidants from natural products in breast cancer treatment, we investigated the antioxidant activities of the leaves of P. betle and its inhibitory effect on the proliferation of the breast cancer cell line, MCF-7. Methods The leaves of P. betle were extracted with solvents of varying polarities (water, methanol, ethyl acetate and hexane and their phenolic and flavonoid content were determined using colorimetric assays. Phenolic composition was characterized using HPLC. Antioxidant activities were measured using FRAP, DPPH, superoxide anion, nitric oxide and hyroxyl radical scavenging assays. Biological activities of the extracts were analysed using MTT assay and antioxidant enzyme (catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase assays in MCF-7 cells. Results Overall, the ethyl acetate extract showed the highest ferric reducing activity and radical scavenging activities against DPPH, superoxide anion and nitric oxide radicals. This extract also contained the highest phenolic content implying the potential contribution of phenolics towards the antioxidant activities. HPLC analyses revealed the presence of catechin, morin and quercetin in the leaves. The ethyl acetate extract also showed the highest inhibitory effect against the proliferation of MCF-7 cells (IC50=65 μg/ml. Treatment of MCF-7 cells with the plant extract increased activities of catalase and superoxide dismutase. Conclusions Ethyl acetate is the optimal solvent for the extraction of compounds with antioxidant and anti-proliferative activities. The increased activities of catalase and superoxide

  5. Further studies on O2-resistant photosynthesis and photorespiration in a tobacco mutant with enhanced catalase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increase in net photosynthesis in M4 progeny of an O2-resistant tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) mutant relative to wild-type plants at 21 and 42% O2 has been confirmed and further investigated. Self-pollination of an M3 mutant produced M4 progeny segregating high catalase phenotypes (average 40% greater than wild type) at a frequency of about 60%. The high catalase phenotype cosegregated precisely with O2-resistant photosynthesis. About 25% of the F1 progeny of reciprocal crosses between the same M3 mutant and wild type had high catalase activity, whether the mutant was used as the maternal or paternal parent, indicating nuclear inheritance. In high-catalase mutants the activity of NADH-hydroxypyruvate reductase, another peroxisomal enzyme, was the same as wild type. The mutants released 15% less photorespiratory CO2 as a percent of net photosynthesis in CO2-free 21% O2 and 36% less in CO2-free 42% O2 compared with wild type. The mutant leaf tissue also released less 14CO2 per [1-14C]glycolate metabolized than wild type in normal air, consistent with less photorespiration in the mutant. The O2-resistant photosynthesis appears to be caused by a decrease in photorespiration especially under conditions of high O2 where the stoichiometry of CO2 release per glycolate metabolized is expected to be enhanced. The higher catalase activity in the mutant may decrease the nonenzymatic peroxidation of keto-acids such as hydroxypyruvate and glyoxylate by photorespiratory H2O2

  6. Ultraviolet Light B-Mediated Inhibition of Skin Catalase Activity Promotes Gr-1+CD11b+ Myeloid Cell Expansion

    OpenAIRE

    Sullivan, Nicholas J.; Tober, Kathleen L.; Burns, Erin M.; Schick, Jonathan S.; Riggenbach, Judith A.; Mace, Thomas A.; Bill, Matthew A.; Gregory S. Young; Oberyszyn, Tatiana M.; Lesinski, Gregory B.

    2011-01-01

    Skin cancer incidence and mortality are higher in men compared to women, but the causes of this sex discrepancy remain largely unknown. Ultraviolet light exposure induces cutaneous inflammation and neutralizes cutaneous antioxidants. Gr-1+CD11b+ myeloid cells are heterogeneous bone marrow-derived cells that promote inflammation-associated carcinogenesis. Reduced activity of catalase, an antioxidant present within skin, has been associated with skin carcinogenesis. We utilized the outbred, imm...

  7. Influence of the lead ions and low dose radiation on the catalase activity in the maize germinant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Vasilyuk

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The experimental results of changes of the catalase activity in the maize germinants under the influence of the lead ions and low doses of radiation separately and simultaneously are presented. The consentration of the lead was 1 · 10 – 4 M and the radiation dozes were 2, 5, 10, and 15 R.

  8. Effects of Soy-Germ Protein on Catalase Activity of Plasma and Erythocyte of Metabolic Syndrome Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hery Winarsi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress always accompany patients with metabolic syndrome (MS. Several researchers reported that soy-protein is able to decrease oxidative stress level. However, there is no report so far about soy-germ protein in relation to its potential to the decrease oxidative stress level of MS patients. The aim of this study was to explore the potential of soy-germ protein on activity of catalase enzyme in blood’s plasma as well as erythrocytes of MS patients. Double-blind randomized clinical trial was used as an experimental study. Thirty respondents were included in this study with MS, normal level blood sugar, low-HDL cholesterol but high in triglyceride, 40-65 years old, Body Mass Index > 25 kg/m2, live in Purwokerto and agreed to sign the informed consent. They were randomly grouped into 3 different groups, 10 each: Group I, was given special milk that contains soy-germ protein and Zn; Group II, soy-germ protein, while Group III was placebo; for two consecutive months. Data were taken from blood samples in 3 different periods i.e. 0, 1, and 2 months after treatment. Two months after treatment, there was an increase from 5.36 to 20.17 IU/mg (P = 0.028 in activity of catalase enzyme in blood’s plasma respondents who consumed milk containing soy-germ protein with or without Zn. A similar trend of catalase activity, but at a lower level, was also noticed in erythrocyte; which increased from 88.31 to 201.11 IU/mg (P = 0.013. The increase in activity of catalase enzyme in blood’s plasma was 2.2 times higher than that in erythrocytes.

  9. Endogenous superoxide dismutase and catalase activities and radiation resistance in mouse cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between the endogenous cytoplasmic levels of the enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase and the inhibition of cell proliferation by γ-radiation has been studied in 11 mouse cell lines. The resistance of these mouse cell lines to radiation was found to vary by over 25-fold. No correlation was found between the cytoplasmic level of CuZn-superoxide dismutase or catalase and the resistance to radiation as measured by extrapolation number (EN), quasi-threshold dose (Dsub(q)), or Dsub(o). None of the cell lines had detectable cytoplasmic Mn-superoxide dismutase. The apparent Ksub(i) of potassium cyanide for mouse CuZn-superoxide dismutase was determined (Ksub(i) = 6.5 μmol dm-3). (author)

  10. Iron, copper, and manganese complexes with in vitro superoxide dismutase and/or catalase activities that keep Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells alive under severe oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Thales P; Fernandes, Christiane; Melo, Karen V; Ferreira, Sarah S; Lessa, Josane A; Franco, Roberto W A; Schenk, Gerhard; Pereira, Marcos D; Horn, Adolfo

    2015-03-01

    Due to their aerobic lifestyle, eukaryotic organisms have evolved different strategies to overcome oxidative stress. The recruitment of some specific metalloenzymes such as superoxide dismutases (SODs) and catalases (CATs) is of great importance for eliminating harmful reactive oxygen species (hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion). Using the ligand HPClNOL {1-[bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amino]-3-chloropropan-2-ol}, we have synthesized three coordination compounds containing iron(III), copper(II), and manganese(II) ions, which are also present in the active site of the above-noted metalloenzymes. These compounds were evaluated as SOD and CAT mimetics. The manganese and iron compounds showed both SOD and CAT activities, while copper showed only SOD activity. The copper and manganese in vitro SOD activities are very similar (IC50~0.4 μmol dm(-3)) and about 70-fold higher than those of iron. The manganese compound showed CAT activity higher than that of the iron species. Analyzing their capacity to protect Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells against oxidative stress (H2O2 and the O2(•-) radical), we observed that all compounds act as antioxidants, increasing the resistance of yeast cells mainly due to a reduction of lipid oxidation. Especially for the iron compound, the data indicate complete protection when wild-type cells were exposed to H2O2 or O2(•-) species. Interestingly, these compounds also compensate for both superoxide dismutase and catalase deficiencies; their antioxidant activity is metal ion dependent, in the order iron(III)>copper(II)>manganese(II). The protection mechanism employed by the complexes proved to be independent of the activation of transcription factors (such as Yap1, Hsf1, Msn2/Msn4) and protein synthesis. There is no direct relation between the in vitro and the in vivo antioxidant activities. PMID:25511255

  11. Cloning, characterization, and expression in Escherichia coli of a gene encoding Listeria seeligeri catalase, a bacterial enzyme highly homologous to mammalian catalases

    OpenAIRE

    Haas, Albert; Brehm, Klaus; Kreft, Jürgen; Goebel, Werner

    2011-01-01

    A gene coding for catalase (hydrogen-peroxide:hydrogen-peroxide oxidoreductase; EC 1.11.1.6) of the gram-positive bacterium Listeria seeligeri was cloned from a plasmid library of EcoRI-digested chromosomal DNA, with Escherichia coli DH5 alpha as a host. The recombinant catalase was expressed in E. coli to an enzymatic activity approximately 50 times that of the combined E. coli catalases. The nucleotide sequence was determined, and the deduced amino acid sequence revealed 43.2% amino acid se...

  12. Isolation of lactic acid bacteria exhibiting high scavenging activity for environmental hydrogen peroxide from fermented foods and its two scavenging enzymes for hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Akio; Kaneko, Chiaki; Hamada, Yasuhiro; Takeda, Kouji; Kimata, Shinya; Matsumoto, Takashi; Abe, Akira; Tanaka, Naoto; Okada, Sanae; Uchino, Masataka; Satoh, Junichi; Nakagawa, Junichi; Niimura, Youichi

    2016-01-01

    To obtain lactic acid bacteria that scavenge environmental hydrogen peroxide, we developed a specialized enrichment medium and successfully isolated Pediococcus pentosaceus Be1 strain from a fermented food. This strain showed vigorous environmental hydrogen peroxide scavenging activity over a wide range of hydrogen peroxide concentrations. High Mn-catalase and NADH peroxidase activities were found in the cell-free extract of the P. pentosaceus Be1 strain, and these two hydrogen peroxide scavenging enzymes were purified from the cell-free extract of the strain. Mn-catalase has been purified from several microorganisms by several researchers, and the NADH peroxidase was first purified from the original strain in this report. After cloning the genes of the Mn-catalase and the NADH peroxidase, the deduced amino acid sequences were compared with those of known related enzymes. PMID:27118075

  13. Oxidative DNA damage levels and catalase activity in the clam Ruditapes decussatus as pollution biomarkers of Tunisian marine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jebali, Jamel; Banni, Mohamed; de Almeida, Eduardo Alves; Boussetta, Hamadi

    2007-01-01

    Levels of the oxidative DNA damage 7, 8-dihydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) and catalase (CAT) activity were measured in the digestive gland and gills of clams Ruditapes decussatus, related to the presence of pollutants along Tunisian marine environment. Increased levels of CAT were observed in tissues of clams from all the sites studied, compared to control values, and elevated 8-oxodG levels were observed at specific sites. Results obtained in this work indicate that the measurement of 8-oxodG levels and CAT activity in tissues of R. decussatus is promising in pollution monitoring studies of the Tunisian marine environment. PMID:16897518

  14. Activity of Superoxide Dismutase and Catalase in Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) in Response to Carbendazim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangeetha, R

    2010-01-01

    Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) is an annual herb, used as a spice and traditionally as medicine. Fenugreek finds its uses in treating hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia and disorders of gastro-intestinal and cardiovascular systems. Fenugreek cultivation in India is affected by fungal diseases like root-rot and damping-off and fungicides like carbendazim are used to overcome these infections. Fungicides play both positive and negative role in plants; fungicides protect plants from diseases and also exert oxidative stress simultaneously. This report is on the response of antioxidants, superoxide dismutase and catalase in fenugreek seeds and plants treated to different concentrations of carbendazim. PMID:20582202

  15. Cu(II)-disulfide complexes with superoxide dismutase- and catalase-like activities protect mitochondria and whole cells against oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliaga, Margarita E; Sandoval-Acuña, Cristián; López-Alarcón, Camilo; Fuentes, Jocelyn; Speisky, Hernan

    2014-10-01

    Mitochondria are a major subcellular site of superoxide (O2(-)) formation. Conditions leading to an uncontrolled production, accumulation and/or conversion of O2(-) into hydrogen peroxide result in an increment in the intramitochondrial oxidative tone which, ultimately leads to the loss of cell viability. Recently, we reported on the ability of a series of Cu(II)-disulfide complexes to act simultaneously as SOD- and catalase-like molecules. In the present study, we addressed the potential of such compounds to protect mitochondria and cells against the oxidative stress and the cytolytic damage induced by diclofenac. Exposure of Caco-2 cells to diclofenac (250µM, 20min) led to a near 80% inhibition of mitochondrial complex I activity and almost doubled the rate of mitochondrial O2(-) production (assessed by Mitosox). A comparable increment was seen in whole cells when the oxidative tone was assessed through the largely hydrogen peroxide-dependent dichlorofluorescein (DCFH) oxidation. The increment in mitochondrial O2(-) production was totally and concentration-dependently prevented by the addition of the complexes formed between Cu(II) and the disulfides of glutathione, homocysteine, or a-dehydro-lipoic acid (20µM each); comparatively, the Cu(II)-cystine complex exerted a weaker protection. A comparable protection pattern was seen at the whole cell level, as these complexes were also effective in preventing the increment in DCFH oxidation. The mitochondrial and whole cell antioxidant protection also translated into a full protection against the cytolytic effects of diclofenac (45min). Results from the present study indicate that the here-tested Cu(II)-disulfides complexes are able to effectively protect cells against the oxidative and the lytic effects of O2(-)-overproducing mitochondria, suggesting a potential for these type of compounds to act as SOD- and catalase-like molecules under oxidative-stress conditions. Supported by FONDECYT #1110018. PMID:26461399

  16. Oxidative stress, hemoglobin content, superoxide dismutase and catalase activity influenced by sulphur baths and mud packs in patients with osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jokić Aleksandar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. It is weel-known that sulphur baths and mud paks demonstrate beneficial effects on patients suffering from degenerative knee and hip osteoarthritis (OA through the increased activity of protective antioxidant enzymes. The aim of this study was to assess lipid peroxidation level, i.e. malondialdehyde concetration, in individuals with knee and/or hip osteoarthritis (OA, as well as to determine the influence of sulphur baths and mud packs application on the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT in order to minimize or eliminate excessive free radical species production (oxidative stress. Methods. Thirty one patiens with knee and/or hip OA of both sexes were included in the study. All OA patients received mud pack and sulphur bath for 20 minutes a day, for 6 consecutive days a week, over 3 weeks. Blood lipid peroxidation, ie malondialdehyde concentration, superoxide dismutase and catalase activity were measured spectrophotometrically, before, on day 5 during the treatment and at the end of spa cure. Healthy volunteers (n = 31 were the controls. Results. The sulphur baths and mud packs treatment of OA patients caused a significant decrease in plasma malondialdehyde concentration compared to the controls ( p < 0.001. The mean SOD activity before the terapy was 1 836.24 U/gHb, on day 5 it rose to 1 942.15 U/gHb and after the spa cure dropped to 1 745.98 U/gHb. Catalase activity before the therapy was 20.56 kU/gHb and at the end of the terapy decreased to 16.16 kU/gHb. The difference in catalase activity before and after the therapy was significant (p < 0.001, and also significant as compared to control (p < 0.001. At the end of the treatment significant increase of hemoglobin level and significant decrease of pain intensity were noticed. Conclusion. A combined 3-week treatment by sulphur bath and mud packs led to a significant decrease of lipid peroxidation in plasma, as well as pain intensity in the patients with OA

  17. Francisella tularensis Catalase Restricts Immune Function by Impairing TRPM2 Channel Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakerley, Nicole L; Chandrasekaran, Akshaya; Trebak, Mohamed; Miller, Barbara A; Melendez, J Andrés

    2016-02-19

    As an innate defense mechanism, macrophages produce reactive oxygen species that weaken pathogens and serve as secondary messengers involved in immune function. The Gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis utilizes its antioxidant armature to limit the host immune response, but the mechanism behind this suppression is not defined. Here we establish that F. tularensis limits Ca(2+) entry in macrophages, thereby limiting actin reorganization and IL-6 production in a redox-dependent fashion. Wild type (live vaccine strain) or catalase-deficient F. tularensis (ΔkatG) show distinct profiles in their H2O2 scavenging rates, 1 and 0.015 pm/s, respectively. Murine alveolar macrophages infected with ΔkatG display abnormally high basal intracellular Ca(2+) concentration that did not increase further in response to H2O2. Additionally, ΔkatG-infected macrophages displayed limited Ca(2+) influx in response to ionomycin, as a result of ionophore H2O2 sensitivity. Exogenously added H2O2 or H2O2 generated by ΔkatG likely oxidizes ionomycin and alters its ability to transport Ca(2+). Basal increases in cytosolic Ca(2+) and insensitivity to H2O2-mediated Ca(2+) entry in ΔkatG-infected cells are reversed by the Ca(2+) channel inhibitors 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate and SKF-96365. 2-Aminoethyl diphenylborinate but not SKF-96365 abrogated ΔkatG-dependent increases in macrophage actin remodeling and IL-6 secretion, suggesting a role for H2O2-mediated Ca(2+) entry through the transient receptor potential melastatin 2 (TRPM2) channel in macrophages. Indeed, increases in basal Ca(2+), actin polymerization, and IL-6 production are reversed in TRPM2-null macrophages infected with ΔkatG. Together, our findings provide compelling evidence that F. tularensis catalase restricts reactive oxygen species to temper macrophage TRPM2-mediated Ca(2+) signaling and limit host immune function. PMID:26679996

  18. Catalase activity is stimulated by H2O2 in rich culture medium and is required for H2O2 resistance and adaptation in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorival Martins

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Catalases are efficient scavengers of H2O2 and protect cells against H2O2 stress. Examination of the H2O2 stimulon in Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed that the cytosolic catalase T (Ctt1 protein level increases 15-fold on H2O2 challenge in synthetic complete media although previous work revealed that deletion of the CCT1 or CTA1 genes (encoding peroxisomal/mitochondrial catalase A does not increase the H2O2 sensitivity of yeast challenged in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4. This we attributed to our observation that catalase activity is depressed when yeast are challenged with H2O2 in nutrient-poor media. Hence, we performed a systematic comparison of catalase activity and cell viability of wild-type yeast and of the single catalase knockouts, ctt1∆ and cta1∆, following H2O2 challenge in nutrient-rich medium (YPD and in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4. Ctt1 but not Cta1 activity is strongly induced by H2O2 when cells are challenged in YPD but suppressed when cells are challenged in buffer. Consistent with the activity results, exponentially growing ctt1∆ cells in YPD are more sensitive to H2O2 than wild-type or cta1∆ cells, whereas in buffer all three strains exhibit comparable H2O2 hypersensitivity. Furthermore, catalase activity is increased during adaptation to sublethal H2O2 concentrations in YPD but not in buffer. We conclude that induction of cytosolic Ctt1 activity is vital in protecting yeast against exogenous H2O2 but this activity is inhibited by H2O2 when cells are challenged in nutrient-free media.

  19. Oversynthesis of riboflavin in the yeast Pichia guilliermondii is accompanied by reduced catalase and superoxide dismutases activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokopiv, Tetyana M; Fedorovych, Dariya V; Boretsky, Yuriy R; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency causes oversynthesis of riboflavin in several yeast species, known as flavinogenic yeasts. Under iron deprivation conditions, Pichia guilliermondii cells increase production of riboflavin and malondialdehyde and the formation of protein carbonyl groups, which reflect increased intracellular content of reactive oxygen species. In this study, we found that P. guilliermondii iron deprived cells showed dramatically decreased catalase and superoxide dismutase activities. Previously reported mutations rib80, rib81, and hit1, which affect repression of riboflavin synthesis and iron accumulation by iron ions, caused similar drops in activities of the mentioned enzymes. These findings could explain the previously described development of oxidative stress in iron deprived or mutated P. guilliermondii cells that overproduce riboflavin. Similar decrease in superoxide dismutase activities was observed in iron deprived cells in the non-flavinogenic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:23053489

  20. Formation of chloroplast protrusions and catalase activity in alpine Ranunculus glacialis under elevated temperature and different CO2/O2 ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchner, Othmar; Moser, Tim; Karadar, Matthias; Roach, Thomas; Kranner, Ilse; Holzinger, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Chloroplast protrusions (CPs) have frequently been observed in plants, but their significance to plant metabolism remains largely unknown. We investigated in the alpine plant Ranunculus glacialis L. treated under various CO2 concentrations if CP formation is related to photorespiration, specifically focusing on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) metabolism. Immediately after exposure to different CO2 concentrations, the formation of CPs in leaf mesophyll cells was assessed and correlated to catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activities. Under natural irradiation, the relative proportion of chloroplasts with protrusions (rCP) was highest (58.7 %) after exposure to low CO2 (38 ppm) and was lowest (3.0 %) at high CO2 (10,000 ppm). The same relationship was found for CAT activity, which decreased from 34.7 nkat mg(-1) DW under low CO2 to 18.4 nkat mg(-1) DW under high CO2, while APX activity did not change significantly. When exposed to natural CO2 concentration (380 ppm) in darkness, CP formation was significantly lower (18.2 %) compared to natural solar irradiation (41.3 %). In summary, CP formation and CAT activity are significantly increased under conditions that favour photorespiration, while in darkness or at high CO2 concentration under light, CP formation is significantly lower, providing evidence for an association between CPs and photorespiration. PMID:25701381

  1. KatG, the Bifunctional Catalase of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, Responds to Hydrogen Peroxide and Contributes to Epiphytic Survival on Citrus Leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tondo, María Laura; Delprato, María Laura; Kraiselburd, Ivana; Fernández Zenoff, María Verónica; Farías, María Eugenia; Orellano, Elena G.

    2016-01-01

    Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc) is the bacterium responsible for citrus canker. This bacterium is exposed to reactive oxygen species (ROS) at different points during its life cycle, including those normally produced by aerobic respiration or upon exposition to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Moreover, ROS are key components of the host immune response. Among enzymatic ROS-detoxifying mechanisms, catalases eliminate H2O2, avoiding the potential damage caused by this specie. Xcc genome includes four catalase genes. In this work, we studied the physiological role of KatG, the only bifunctional catalase of Xcc, through the construction and characterization of a modified strain (XcckatG), carrying an insertional mutation in the katG gene. First, we evaluated the involvement of KatG in the bacterial adaptive response to H2O2. XcckatG cultures exhibited lower catalase activity than those of the wild-type strain, and this activity was not induced upon treatment with sub-lethal doses of H2O2. Moreover, the KatG-deficient mutant exhibited decreased tolerance to H2O2 toxicity compared to wild-type cells and accumulated high intracellular levels of peroxides upon exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of H2O2. To further study the role of KatG in Xcc physiology, we evaluated bacterial survival upon exposure to UV-A or UV-B radiation. In both conditions, XcckatG showed a high mortality in comparison to Xcc wild-type. Finally, we studied the development of bacterial biofilms. While structured biofilms were observed for the Xcc wild-type, the development of these structures was impaired for XcckatG. Based on these results, we demonstrated that KatG is responsible for Xcc adaptive response to H2O2 and a key component of the bacterial response to oxidative stress. Moreover, this enzyme plays an important role during Xcc epiphytic survival, being essential for biofilm formation and UV resistance. PMID:26990197

  2. KatG, the Bifunctional Catalase of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, Responds to Hydrogen Peroxide and Contributes to Epiphytic Survival on Citrus Leaves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Laura Tondo

    Full Text Available Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc is the bacterium responsible for citrus canker. This bacterium is exposed to reactive oxygen species (ROS at different points during its life cycle, including those normally produced by aerobic respiration or upon exposition to ultraviolet (UV radiation. Moreover, ROS are key components of the host immune response. Among enzymatic ROS-detoxifying mechanisms, catalases eliminate H2O2, avoiding the potential damage caused by this specie. Xcc genome includes four catalase genes. In this work, we studied the physiological role of KatG, the only bifunctional catalase of Xcc, through the construction and characterization of a modified strain (XcckatG, carrying an insertional mutation in the katG gene. First, we evaluated the involvement of KatG in the bacterial adaptive response to H2O2. XcckatG cultures exhibited lower catalase activity than those of the wild-type strain, and this activity was not induced upon treatment with sub-lethal doses of H2O2. Moreover, the KatG-deficient mutant exhibited decreased tolerance to H2O2 toxicity compared to wild-type cells and accumulated high intracellular levels of peroxides upon exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of H2O2. To further study the role of KatG in Xcc physiology, we evaluated bacterial survival upon exposure to UV-A or UV-B radiation. In both conditions, XcckatG showed a high mortality in comparison to Xcc wild-type. Finally, we studied the development of bacterial biofilms. While structured biofilms were observed for the Xcc wild-type, the development of these structures was impaired for XcckatG. Based on these results, we demonstrated that KatG is responsible for Xcc adaptive response to H2O2 and a key component of the bacterial response to oxidative stress. Moreover, this enzyme plays an important role during Xcc epiphytic survival, being essential for biofilm formation and UV resistance.

  3. KatG, the Bifunctional Catalase of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, Responds to Hydrogen Peroxide and Contributes to Epiphytic Survival on Citrus Leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tondo, María Laura; Delprato, María Laura; Kraiselburd, Ivana; Fernández Zenoff, María Verónica; Farías, María Eugenia; Orellano, Elena G

    2016-01-01

    Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc) is the bacterium responsible for citrus canker. This bacterium is exposed to reactive oxygen species (ROS) at different points during its life cycle, including those normally produced by aerobic respiration or upon exposition to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Moreover, ROS are key components of the host immune response. Among enzymatic ROS-detoxifying mechanisms, catalases eliminate H2O2, avoiding the potential damage caused by this specie. Xcc genome includes four catalase genes. In this work, we studied the physiological role of KatG, the only bifunctional catalase of Xcc, through the construction and characterization of a modified strain (XcckatG), carrying an insertional mutation in the katG gene. First, we evaluated the involvement of KatG in the bacterial adaptive response to H2O2. XcckatG cultures exhibited lower catalase activity than those of the wild-type strain, and this activity was not induced upon treatment with sub-lethal doses of H2O2. Moreover, the KatG-deficient mutant exhibited decreased tolerance to H2O2 toxicity compared to wild-type cells and accumulated high intracellular levels of peroxides upon exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of H2O2. To further study the role of KatG in Xcc physiology, we evaluated bacterial survival upon exposure to UV-A or UV-B radiation. In both conditions, XcckatG showed a high mortality in comparison to Xcc wild-type. Finally, we studied the development of bacterial biofilms. While structured biofilms were observed for the Xcc wild-type, the development of these structures was impaired for XcckatG. Based on these results, we demonstrated that KatG is responsible for Xcc adaptive response to H2O2 and a key component of the bacterial response to oxidative stress. Moreover, this enzyme plays an important role during Xcc epiphytic survival, being essential for biofilm formation and UV resistance. PMID:26990197

  4. Potential enzyme toxicity of oxytetracycline to catalase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi Zhenxing; Liu Rutao; Zhang Hao, E-mail: Trutaoliu@sdu.edu.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, China-America CRC for Environment and Health, Shandong Province, 27 Shanda South Road, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2010-10-15

    Oxytetracycline (OTC) is a kind of widely used veterinary drugs. The residue of OTC in the environment is potentially harmful. In the present work, the non-covalent toxic interaction of OTC with catalase was investigated by the fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-vis absorption and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy at physiological pH 7.4. OTC can interact with catalase to form a complex mainly by van der Waals' interactions and hydrogen bonds with one binding site. The association constants K were determined to be K{sub 293K} = 7.09 x 10{sup 4} L mol{sup -1} and K{sub 311K} = 3.31 x 10{sup 4} L mol{sup -1}. The thermodynamic parameters ({Delta}H{sup o}, {Delta}G{sup o} and {Delta}S{sup o}) of the interaction were calculated. Based on the Foerster theory of non-radiative energy transfer, the distance between bound OTC and the tryptophan residues of catalase was determined to be 6.48 nm. The binding of OTC can result in change of the micro-environment of the tryptophan residues and the secondary structure of catalase. The activity of catalase was also inhibited for the bound OTC. This work establishes a new strategy to probe the enzyme toxicity of veterinary drug residues and is helpful for clarifying the molecular toxic mechanism of OTC in vivo. The established strategy can be used to investigate the potential enzyme toxicity of other small organic pollutants and drugs.

  5. High level extracellular production of a recombinant alkaline catalase in E. coli BL21 under ethanol stress and its application in hydrogen peroxide removal after cotton fabrics bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhenxiao; Zheng, Hongchen; Zhao, Xingya; Li, Shufang; Xu, Jianyong; Song, Hui

    2016-08-01

    The effects of induction parameters, osmolytes and ethanol stress on the productivity of the recombinant alkaline catalase (KatA) in Escherichia coli BL21 (pET26b-KatA) were investigated. The yield of soluble KatA was significantly enhanced by 2% ethanol stress. And a certain amount of Triton X-100 supplementation could markedly improved extracellular ratio of KatA. A total soluble catalase activity of 78,762U/mL with the extracellular ratio of 92.5% was achieved by fed-batch fermentation in a 10L fermentor, which was the highest yield so far. The purified KatA showed high stability at 50°C and pH 6-10. Application of KatA for elimination of H2O2 after cotton fabrics bleaching led to less consumption of water, steam and electric power by 25%, 12% and 16.7% respectively without productivity and quality losing of cotton fabrics. Thus, the recombinant KatA is a promising candidate for industrial production and applications. PMID:27151682

  6. Formation of chloroplast protrusions and catalase activity in alpine Ranunculus glacialis under elevated temperature and different CO2/O2 ratios

    OpenAIRE

    Buchner, Othmar; Moser, Tim; Karadar, Matthias; Roach, Thomas; Kranner, Ilse; Holzinger, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Chloroplast protrusions (CPs) have frequently been observed in plants, but their significance to plant metabolism remains largely unknown. We investigated in the alpine plant Ranunculus glacialis L. treated under various CO2 concentrations if CP formation is related to photorespiration, specifically focusing on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) metabolism. Immediately after exposure to different CO2 concentrations, the formation of CPs in leaf mesophyll cells was assessed and correlated to catalase (C...

  7. Layer by layer assembly of catalase and amine-terminated ionic liquid onto titanium nitride nanoparticles modified glassy carbon electrode: Study of direct voltammetry and bioelectrocatalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saadati, Shagayegh [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salimi, Abdollah, E-mail: absalimi@uok.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Center for Nanotechnology, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hallaj, Rahman; Rostami, Amin [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-11-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Catalase and amine-terminated ionic liquid were immobilized to GC/TiNnp with LBL assembly method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First a thin layer of NH{sub 2}-IL is covalently attached to GC/TiNnp electrode using electro-oxidation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer With alternative assemble of IL and catalase with positive and negative charged, multilayer was formed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Immobilized catalase shows excellent electrocatalytic activity toward H{sub 2}O{sub 2} reduction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biosensor response is directly correlated to the number of bilayers. - Abstract: A novel, simple and facile layer by layer (LBL) approach is used for modification of glassy carbon (GC) electrode with multilayer of catalase and nanocomposite containing 1-(3-Aminopropyl)-3-methylimidazolium bromide (amine terminated ionic liquid (NH{sub 2}-IL)) and titanium nitride nanoparticles (TiNnp). First a thin layer of NH{sub 2}-IL is covalently attached to GC/TiNnp electrode using electro-oxidation method. Then, with alternative self assemble positively charged NH{sub 2}-IL and negatively charged catalase a sensitive H{sub 2}O{sub 2} biosensor is constructed, whose response is directly correlated to the number of bilayers. The surface coverage of active catalase per bilayer, heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant (k{sub s}) and Michaelis-Menten constant (K{sub M}) of immobilized catalase were 3.32 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12} mol cm{sup -2}, 5.28 s{sup -1} and 1.1 mM, respectively. The biosensor shows good stability, high reproducibility, long life-time, and fast amperometric response with the high sensitivity of 380 {mu}A mM{sup -1} cm{sup -2} and low detection limit of 100 nM at concentration range up to 2.1 mM.

  8. Modulatory effect of pineapple peel extract on lipid peroxidation, catalase activity and hepatic biomarker levels in blood plasma of alcohol-induced oxidative stressed rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Okafor OY; Erukainure OL; Ajiboye JA; Adejobi RO; Owolabi FO; Kosoko SB

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the ability of the methanolic extract of pineapple peel to modulate alcohol-induced lipid peroxidation, changes in catalase activities and hepatic biochemical marker levels in blood plasma. Methods: Oxidative stress was induced by oral administration of ethanol (20% w/v) at a dosage of 5 mL/kg bw in rats. After 28 days of treatment, the rats were fasted overnight and sacrificed by cervical dislocation. Blood was collected with a 2 mL syringe by cardiac puncture and was centrifuged at 3000 rpm for 10 min. The plasma was analyzed to evaluate malondialdehyde (MDA), catalase activity, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) concentrations. Results: Administration of alcohol caused a drastic increase (87.74%) in MDA level compared with the control. Pineapple peel extract significantly reduced the MDA level by 60.16% at 2.5 mL/kg bw. Rats fed alcohol only had the highest catalase activity, treatment with pineapple peel extract at 2.5 mL/kg bw however, reduced the activity. Increased AST, ALP and ALT activities were observed in rats fed alcohol only respectively, treatment with pineapple peel extract drastically reduced their activities. Conclusions: The positive modulation of lipid peroxidation, catalase activities as well as hepatic biomarker levels of blood plasma by the methanolic extract of pineapple peels under alcohol-induced oxidative stress is an indication of its protective ability in the management of alcohol-induced toxicity.

  9. Effects of total dissolved gas supersaturated water on lethality and catalase activity of Chinese sucker (Myxocyprinus asiaticus Bleeker)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shi-chao; Liu, Xiao-qing; Jiang, Wen; Li, Ke-feng; Du, Jun; Shen, Dan-zhou; Gong, Quan

    2012-01-01

    Total dissolved gas (TDG) supersaturation caused by dam sluicing can result in gas bubble trauma (GBT) in fish and threaten their survival. In the present study, Chinese suckers (Myxocyprinus asiaticus Bleeker) were exposed to TDG supersaturated water at levels ranging from 120% to 145% for 48 h. The median lethal concentration (LC50) and the median lethal time (LT50) were determined to evaluate acute lethal effects on Chinese suckers. The results showed that the LC50 values of 4, 6, 8, and 10 h were 142%, 137%, 135%, and 130%, respectively. The LT50 values were 3.2, 4.7, 7.8, 9.2, and 43.4 h, respectively, when TDG supersaturated levels were 145%, 140%, 135%, 130%, and 125%. Furthermore, the biological responses in Chinese suckers were studied by assaying the catalase (CAT) activities in gills and muscles at the supersaturation level of 140% within LT50. The CAT activities in the gills and muscle tissues exhibited a regularity of a decrease after an increase. CAT activities in the muscles were increased significantly at 3/5LT50 (P0.05), but the activities were significantly lower than the normal level at 4/5LT50 and LT50 (P<0.05). PMID:23024046

  10. Effects of total dissolved gas supersaturated water on lethality and catalase activity of Chinese sucker (Myxocyprinus asiaticus Bleeker).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shi-chao; Liu, Xiao-qing; Jiang, Wen; Li, Ke-feng; Du, Jun; Shen, Dan-zhou; Gong, Quan

    2012-10-01

    Total dissolved gas (TDG) supersaturation caused by dam sluicing can result in gas bubble trauma (GBT) in fish and threaten their survival. In the present study, Chinese suckers (Myxocyprinus asiaticus Bleeker) were exposed to TDG supersaturated water at levels ranging from 120% to 145% for 48 h. The median lethal concentration (LC(50)) and the median lethal time (LT(50)) were determined to evaluate acute lethal effects on Chinese suckers. The results showed that the LC(50) values of 4, 6, 8, and 10 h were 142%, 137%, 135%, and 130%, respectively. The LT(50) values were 3.2, 4.7, 7.8, 9.2, and 43.4 h, respectively, when TDG supersaturated levels were 145%, 140%, 135%, 130%, and 125%. Furthermore, the biological responses in Chinese suckers were studied by assaying the catalase (CAT) activities in gills and muscles at the supersaturation level of 140% within LT(50). The CAT activities in the gills and muscle tissues exhibited a regularity of a decrease after an increase. CAT activities in the muscles were increased significantly at 3/5LT(50) (P0.05), but the activities were significantly lower than the normal level at 4/5LT(50) and LT(50) (P<0.05). PMID:23024046

  11. Evaluation of the serum catalase and myeloperoxidase activities in chronic arsenic-exposed individuals and concomitant cytogenetic damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic arsenic exposure through contaminated drinking water is a major environmental health issue. Chronic arsenic exposure is known to exert its toxic effects by a variety of mechanisms, of which generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is one of the most important. A high level of ROS, in turn, leads to DNA damage that might ultimately culminate in cancer. In order to keep the level of ROS in balance, an array of enzymes is present, of which catalase (CAT) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) are important members. Hence, in this study, we determined the activities of these two enzymes in the sera and chromosomal aberrations (CA) in peripheral blood lymphocytes in individuals exposed and unexposed to arsenic in drinking water. Arsenic in drinking water and in urine was used as a measure of exposure. Our results show that individuals chronically exposed to arsenic have significantly higher CAT and MPO activities and higher incidence of CA. We found moderate positive correlations between CAT and MPO activities, induction of CA and arsenic in urine and water. These results indicate that chronic arsenic exposure causes higher CAT and MPO activities in serum that correlates with induction of genetic damage. We conclude that the serum levels of these enzymes might be used as biomarkers of early arsenic exposure induced disease much before the classical dermatological symptoms of arsenicosis begin to appear.

  12. Catalase activity as a biomarker for mild-stress-induced robustness in Bacillus weihenstephanensis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besten, den H.M.W.; Effraimidou, S.; Abee, T.

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms are able to survive and grow in changing environments by activating stress adaptation mechanisms which may enhance bacterial robustness. Stress-induced enhanced robustness complicates the predictability of microbial inactivation. Using psychrotolerant Bacillus weihenstephanensis strai

  13. The Role of Catalase in Pulmonary Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takigawa Tomoko

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Catalase is preferentially expressed in bronchiolar and alveolar epithelial cells, and acts as an endogenous antioxidant enzyme in normal lungs. We thus postulated epithelial damage would be associated with a functional deficiency of catalase during the development of lung fibrosis. Methods The present study evaluates the expression of catalase mRNA and protein in human interstitial pneumonias and in mouse bleomycin-induced lung injury. We examined the degree of bleomycin-induced inflammation and fibrosis in the mice with lowered catalase activity. Results In humans, catalase was decreased at the levels of activity, protein content and mRNA expression in fibrotic lungs (n = 12 compared to control lungs (n = 10. Immunohistochemistry revealed a decrease in catalase in bronchiolar epithelium and abnormal re-epithelialization in fibrotic areas. In C57BL/6J mice, catalase activity was suppressed along with downregulation of catalase mRNA in whole lung homogenates after bleomycin administration. In acatalasemic mice, neutrophilic inflammation was prolonged until 14 days, and there was a higher degree of lung fibrosis in association with a higher level of transforming growth factor-β expression and total collagen content following bleomycin treatment compared to wild-type mice. Conclusions Taken together, these findings demonstrate diminished catalase expression and activity in human pulmonary fibrosis and suggest the protective role of catalase against bleomycin-induced inflammation and subsequent fibrosis.

  14. Cytochemical Localization of Catalase Activity in Methanol-Grown Hansenula polymorpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijken, J.P. van; Veenhuis, M.; Vermeulen, C.A.; Harder, W.

    1975-01-01

    The localization of peroxidase activity in methanol-grown cells of the yeast Hansenula polymorpha has been studied by a method based on cytochemical staining with diaminobenzidine (DAB). The oxidation product of DAB occurred in microbodies, which characteristically develop during growth on methanol,

  15. Effect of drought stress and subsequent recovery on protein, carbohydrate contents, catalase and peroxidase activities in three chickpea (Cicer arietinum) cultivars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mafakheri, A.; Siosemardeh, A.; Bahramnejad, B.; Struik, P.C.; Sohrabi, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Drought stress is one of the major abiotic stresses in agriculture worldwide. This study was carried out to investigate the effects of drought stress and subsequent recovery on protein, carbohydrate content, catalase (CAT), and peroxidase (POX) activities in three varieties of chickpea (drought tole

  16. The effect of seedling chilling on glutathione content, catalase and peroxidase activity in Brassica oleracea L. var. italica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Wojciechowska

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The study was designed to determine the possible relationship between Brassica oleracea var. italica seedlings stored at 2°C in the dark for seven and fourteen days, respectively, and the level of certain antioxidant parameters in particular organs. A parallel objective of the experiment was to determine if the reaction of seedlings to low temperature might be persistent in fully developed plants until harvest time. After 14 days of chilling a significant increase in the glutathione content was observed in the seedling leaves in comparison to the non-chilled plants. During vegetation in field conditions this effect was maintained in leaves up to the stage of formation of flower buds. At harvest the highest content of glutathione was demonstrated in broccoli heads, obtained from plants, which were previously chilled in the seedling phase for two weeks. Peroxidase activity in broccoli seedlings increased each year of the three-year study due to the duration of the cooling time, whereas in the case of catalase the changes were not so distinct. At harvest time the activity of both enzymes in the leaves and flower buds fluctuated according to the particular year of study.

  17. Effects of total dissolved gas supersaturated water on lethality and catalase activity of Chinese sucker (Myxocyprinus asiaticus Bleeker)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-chao CHEN; Xiao-qing LIU; Wen JIANG; Ke-feng LI; Jun DU; Dan-zhou SHEN; Quan GONG

    2012-01-01

    Total dissolved gas (TDG) supersaturation caused by dam sluicing can result in gas bubble trauma (GBT) in fish and threaten their survival.In the present study,Chinese suckers (Myxocyprinus asiaticus Bleeker) were exposed to TDG supersaturated water at levels ranging from 120% to 145% for 48 h.The median lethal concentration (LC50) and the median lethal time (LT50) were determined to evaluate acute lethal effects on Chinese suckers.The results showed that the LC50 values of 4,6,8,and 10 h were 142%,137%,135%,and 130%,respectively.The LT50 values were 3.2,4.7,7.8,9.2,and 43.4 h,respectively,when TDG supersaturated levels were 145%,140%,135%,130%,and 125%.Furthermore,the biological responses in Chinese suckers were studied by assaying the catalase (CAT) activities in gills and muscles at the supersaturation level of 140% within LT50.The CAT activities in the gills and muscle tissues exhibited a regularity of a decrease after an increase.CAT activities in the muscles were increased significantly at 3/5LT50 (P<0.05) and then came back to the normal level.However,there were no significant differences between the treatment group (TDG level of 140%) and the control group (TDG level of 100%) on CAT activities in the gills before 3/5LT50 (P>0.05),but the activities were significantly lower than the normal level at 4/5LT50 and LT50 (P<0.05).

  18. Development of a simple bioelectrode for the electrochemical detection of hydrogen peroxide using Pichia pastoris catalase immobilized on gold nanoparticle nanotubes and polythiophene hybrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandini, Seetharamaiah; Nalini, Seetharamaiah; Sanetuntikul, Jakkid; Shanmugam, Sangaraju; Niranjana, Pathappa; Melo, Jose Savio; Suresh, Gurukar Shivappa

    2014-11-21

    In this paper, a simple and innovative electrochemical hydrogen peroxide biosensor has been proposed using catalase (CATpp) derived from Pichia pastoris as bioelectrocatalyst. The model biocomponent was immobilized on gold nanoparticle nanotubes (AuNPNTs) and polythiophene composite using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide and N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDC-NHS) coupling reagent. In this present work, we have successfully synthesized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) by ultrasonic irradiation. The tubular gold nanostructures containing coalesced AuNPs were obtained by sacrificial template synthesis. The assembly of AuNPNTs onto the graphite (Gr) electrode was achieved via S-Au chemisorption. The latter was pre-coated with electropolymerized thiophene (PTh) to enable S groups to bind AuNPNTs. The combination of AuNPNTs-PTh, i.e., an inorganic-organic hybrid, provides a stable enzyme immobilization platform. The physical morphology of the fabricated biosensor Gr/PTh/AuNPNTs/EDC-NHS/CATpp was investigated using scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive microscopy. The analytical performance of the bioelectrode was examined using cyclic voltammetry, differential pulse voltammetry and chronoamperometry. Operational parameters such as working potential, pH, and thermal stability of the modified electrode were examined. The beneficial analytical characteristics of the proposed electrode were demonstrated. Our results indicate that the Gr/PTh/AuNPNTs/EDC-NHS/CATpp bioelectrode exhibits a wide linear range from 0.05 mM to 18.5 mM of H2O2, fast response time of 7 s, excellent sensitivity of 26.2 mA mM(-1) cm(-2), good detection limit of 0.12 μM and good Michaelis-Menten constant of 1.4 mM. In addition, the bioelectrode displayed good repeatability, high stability and acceptable reproducibility, which can be attributed to the AuNPNTs-PTh composite that provides a biocompatible micro-environment. PMID:25208248

  19. The Effect of Alcohol and Hydrogen Peroxide on Liver Hepcidin Gene Expression in Mice Lacking Antioxidant Enzymes, Glutathione Peroxidase-1 or Catalase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duygu Dee Harrison-Findik

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the regulation of hepcidin, the key iron-regulatory molecule, by alcohol and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 in glutathione peroxidase-1 (gpx-1−/− and catalase (catalase−/− knockout mice. For alcohol studies, 10% ethanol was administered in the drinking water for 7 days. Gpx-1−/− displayed significantly higher hepatic H2O2 levels than catalase−/− compared to wild-type mice, as measured by 2'-7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA. The basal level of liver hepcidin expression was attenuated in gpx-1−/− mice. Alcohol increased H2O2 production in catalase−/− and wild-type, but not gpx-1−/−, mice. Hepcidin expression was inhibited in alcohol-fed catalase−/− and wild-type mice. In contrast, alcohol elevated hepcidin expression in gpx-1−/− mice. Gpx-1−/− mice also displayed higher level of basal liver CHOP protein expression than catalase−/− mice. Alcohol induced CHOP and to a lesser extent GRP78/BiP expression, but not XBP1 splicing or binding of CREBH to hepcidin gene promoter, in gpx-1−/− mice. The up-regulation of hepatic ATF4 mRNA levels, which was observed in gpx-1−/− mice, was attenuated by alcohol. In conclusion, our findings strongly suggest that H2O2 inhibits hepcidin expression in vivo. Synergistic induction of CHOP by alcohol and H2O2, in the absence of gpx-1, stimulates liver hepcidin gene expression by ER stress independent of CREBH.

  20. Catalase from the silkworm, Bombyx mori: gene sequence, distribution, and overexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kohji; Banno, Yutaka; Fujii, Hiroshi; Miake, Fumio; Kashige, Nobuhiro; Aso, Yoichi

    2005-04-01

    Living organisms require mechanisms regulating reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion. Catalase is one of the regulatory enzymes and facilitates the degradation of hydrogen peroxide to oxygen and water. Biochemical information on an insect catalase is, however, insufficient. Using mRNA from fat body of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, a cDNA encoding a putative catalase was amplified by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence comprised 507 residues with more than seventy residues forming a scaffold for a heme cofactor conserved. The sequence showed 71% and 66% identities to those of the Drosophila melanogaster and Apis mellifera catalases, respectively; the catalase from B. mori was estimated to be phylogenetically close to that from A. mellifera. The transcripts of the gene and the catalase activity were distributed in diverse tissues of B. mori, suggesting its ubiquitous nature. Using the gene, a recombinant catalase (rCAT) was functionally overexpressed in a soluble form using Escherichia coli, purified to homogeneity, and characterized. The pH-optimum of rCAT was broad around pH 8.0. More than 80% of the original rCAT activity was retained after incubation in the following conditions: at pH 8-11 and 4 degrees C for 24 h; at pH 7 and temperatures below 50 degrees C for 30 min. The Michaelis constant for hydrogen peroxide was evaluated to be 28 mM at pH 6.5 and 30 degrees C. rCAT was suggested to be a member of the typical catalase family. PMID:15763464

  1. Modulatory effect of pineapple peel extract on lipid peroxidation,catalase activity and hepatic biomarker levels in blood plasma of alcoholinduced oxidative stressed rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Okafor; OY; Erukainure; OL; Ajiboye; JA; Adejobi; RO; Owolabi; FO; Kosoko; SB

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the ability of the methanolic extract of pineapple peel to modulate alcohol-induced lipid peroxidation,changes in catalase activities and hepatic biochemical marker levels in blood plasma.Methods:Oxidative stress was induced by oral administration of ethanol(20%w/v) at a dosage of 5 niL/kg bw in rats.After 28 days of treatment,the rats were fasted overnight and sacrificed by cervical dislocation.Blood was collected with a 2 mL syringe by cardiac puncture and was centrifuged at 3000 rpm for 10 min.The plasma was analyzed to evaluate malondialdehyde(MDA),catalase activity,aspartate aminotransferase(AST),alkaline phosphatase(ALP) and alanine aminotransferase(ALT) concentrations.Results:Administration of alcohol caused a drastic increase(87.74%) in MDA level compared with the control.Pineapple peel extract significantly reduced the MDA level by 60.16%at 2.S mL/kg bw.Rats fed alcohol only had the highest catalase activity,treatment with pineapple peel extract at 2.5 mL/kg bw however, reduced the activity.Increased AST,ALP and ALT activities were observed in rats fed alcohol only respectively,treatment with pineapple peel extract drastically reduced their activities. Conclusions:The positive modulation of lipid peroxidation,catalase activities as well as hepatic biomarker levels of blood plasma by the methanolic extract of pineapple peels under alcoholinduced oxidative stress is an indication of its protective ability in the management of alcoholinduced toxicity.

  2. Electrospun Poly(acrylonitrile-co-acrylic acid) Nanofibrous Membranes for Catalase Immobilization:Effect of Porphyrin Filling on the Enzyme Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KE Bei-bei; WAN Ling-shu; HUANG Xiao-jun; XU Zhi-kang

    2011-01-01

    Porphyrin-filled nanofibrous membranes were facilely prepared by electrospinning of the mixtures of poly(acryionitrile-co-acrylic acid)(PANCAA) and porphyrins. 5,10,15,20-Tetraphenyiporphyrin(TPP) and its metalloderivatives(ZnTPP and CuTPP) were studied as filling mediators for the immobilization of redox enzyme. Results indicate that the introduction of TPP, ZnTPP and CuTPP improves the retention activity of the immobilized catalase.Among these three porphyrins, the ZnTPP-filled PANCAA nanofibrous membrane exhibits an activity retention of 93%, which is an exciting improvement. This improvement is attributed to both the strong catalase-porphyrin affinity and the possible facilitated electron transfer induced by the porphyrin as evidenced by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and fluorescence spectroscopy studies.

  3. Changes in the TBARs content and superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities in the lymphoid organs and skeletal muscles of adrenodemedullated rats

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira B.; Costa-Rosa L.F.B.P.; Bechara E.J.H.; Newsholme P.; Curi R.

    1998-01-01

    Thiobarbituric acid reactant substances (TBARs) content, and the activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDh), citrate synthase (CS), Cu/Zn- and Mn-superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) were measured in the lymphoid organs (thymus, spleen, and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN)) and skeletal muscles (gastrocnemius and soleus) of adrenodemedullated (ADM) rats. The results were compared with those obtained for sham-operated rats. TBARs content was reduced b...

  4. Novel developments in hydrogen storage, hydrogen activation and ionic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doroodian, Amir

    2010-12-03

    This dissertation is divided into three chapters. Recently, metal-free hydrogen activation using phosphorous compounds has been reported in science magazine. We have investigated the interaction between hydrogen and phosphorous compounds in presence of strong Lewis acids (chapter one). A new generation of metal-free hydrogen activation, using amines and strong Lewis acids with sterically demanding nature, was already developed in our group. Shortage of high storage capacity using large substitution to improve sterical effect led us to explore the amine borane derivatives, which are explained in chapter two. Due to the high storage capacity of hydrogen in aminoborane derivatives, we have explored these materials to extend hydrogen release. These compounds store hydrogen as proton and hydride on adjacent atoms or ions. These investigations resulted in developing hydrogen storage based on ionic liquids containing methyl guanidinium cation. Then we have continued to develop ionic liquids based on methyl guanidinium cation with different anions, such as tetrafluoro borate (chapter three). We have replaced these anions with transition metal anions to investigate hydrogen bonding and catalytic activity of ionic liquids. This chapter illustrates the world of ionic liquid as a green solvent for organic, inorganic and catalytic reactions and combines the concept of catalysts and solvents based on ionic liquids. The catalytic activity is investigated particularly with respect to the interaction with CO{sub 2}. (orig.)

  5. Caloric restriction or catalase inactivation extends yeast chronological lifespan by inducing H2O2 and superoxide dismutase activity

    OpenAIRE

    Mesquita, Ana; Weinberger, Martin; Silva, Alexandra; Sampaio-Marques, Belém; Almeida, Bruno; Leão, Cecília; Costa, Vítor; Rodrigues, Fernando; Burhans, William C.; Ludovico, Paula

    2010-01-01

    The free radical theory of aging posits oxidative damage to macromolecules as a primary determinant of lifespan. Recent studies challenge this theory by demonstrating that in some cases, longevity is enhanced by inactivation of oxidative stress defenses or is correlated with increased, rather than decreased reactive oxygen species and oxidative damage. Here we show that, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, caloric restriction or inactivation of catalases extends chronological lifespan by inducing el...

  6. Caloric restriction or catalase inactivation extends yeast chronological lifespan by inducing H₂O₂ and superoxide dismutase activity

    OpenAIRE

    Mesquita, Ana Maria Macedo; Weinberger, Martin; Silva, Alexandra; Marques, Belém Sampaio; Almeida, Bruno; Leão, Cecília; Costa, Vitor; Rodrigues, Fernando José dos Santos; Burhans, William C.; Ludovico, Paula

    2010-01-01

    The free radical theory of aging posits oxidative damage to macromolecules as a primary determinant of lifespan. Recent studies challenge this theory by demonstrating that in some cases, longevity is enhanced by inactivation of oxidative stress defenses or is correlated with increased, rather than decreased reactive oxygen species and oxidative damage. Here we show that, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, caloric restriction or inactivation of catalases extends chronological lifespan by inducing el...

  7. Catalase is a sink for H2O2 and is indispensable for stress defence in C3 plants.

    OpenAIRE

    Willekens, H; Chamnongpol, S; Davey, M; Schraudner, M; Langebartels, C; Van Montagu, M; Inzé, D; Van Camp, W

    1997-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) has been implicated in many stress conditions. Control of H2O2 levels is complex and dissection of mechanisms generating and relieving H2O2 stress is difficult, particularly in intact plants. We have used transgenic tobacco with approximately 10% wild-type catalase activity to study the role of catalase and effects of H2O2 stress in plants. Catalase-deficient plants showed no visible disorders at low light, but in elevated light rapidly developed white necrotic lesion...

  8. Progeric effects of catalase inactivation in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peroxisomes generate hydrogen peroxide, a reactive oxygen species, as part of their normal metabolism. A number of pathological situations exist in which the organelle's capacity to degrade the potentially toxic oxidant is compromised. It is the peroxidase, catalase, which largely determines the functional antioxidant capacity of the organelle, and it is this enzyme that is affected in aging, in certain diseases, and in response to exposure to specific chemical agents. To more tightly control the enzymatic activity of peroxisomal catalase and carefully document the effects of its impaired action on human cells, we employed the inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole. We show that by chronically reducing catalase activity to approximately 38% of normal, cells respond in a dramatic manner, displaying a cascade of accelerated aging reactions. Hydrogen peroxide and related reactive oxygen species are produced, protein and DNA are oxidatively damaged, import into peroxisomes and organelle biogenesis is corrupted, and matrix metalloproteinases are hyper-secreted from cells. In addition, mitochondria are functionally impaired, losing their ability to maintain a membrane potential and synthesize reactive oxygen species themselves. These latter results suggest an important redox-regulated connection between the two organelle systems, a topic of considerable interest for future study

  9. Atividade da catalase e da lactato desidrogenase em tilápias submetidas a estresse de confinamento: efeito da cor do ambiente Catalase and lactate dehydrogenase activity in tilapia subjected to contention stress: effect of the background color

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elyara Maria Pereira-da-Silva

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Avaliaram-se os efeitos da cor do ambiente sobre o crescimento e a atividade da enzima antioxidante catalase (CAT e da lactato desidrogenase (LDH em tilápias do Nilo (n=24; 36,2±3,6g. Oito exemplares foram mortos para determinação da atividade basal das enzimas e os demais permaneceram isolados durante 14 dias sob espectro de luz branca ou azul (n=8 peixes/tratamento. A seguir os peixes foram submetidos a um estresse diário de confinamento de 90 minutos (15° ao 28° dia e pesados semanalmente para cálculo da taxa de crescimento específico (TCE. A TCE negativa confirmou que o confinamento provocou estresse nos peixes, independentemente da cor do ambiente. O aumento da atividade da LDH no músculo vermelho dos peixes mantidos sob luz branca ou azul indicou mudança do metabolismo aeróbio para anaeróbio. O estresse reduziu a atividade da CAT no músculo branco dos peixes mantidos sob a luz branca ou azul. Na musculatura vermelha, esta redução ocorreu apenas nos animais mantidos sob a luz branca. O confinamento aumenta os processos metabólicos anaeróbios e é adequado para estudos sobre os efeitos do estresse. O espectro de luz azul não evita a redução do crescimento e a demanda energética anaeróbia em situações de estresse, mas preserva a atividade da CAT, contribuindo para o bem-estar da tilápia.We assess the effects of the background color on the growth and antioxidant enzyme catalase (CAT and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH in Nile tilapia (n=24; 36.2±3.6g. Eight fish were killed for assessment of basal activity of the enzymes and the others remained isolated for 14 days under white or blue light spectrum (n=8 fish/treatment. Then each animal were subjected to a daily stress of confinement of 90 minutes (15th to 28th day and weighed to calculate the specific growth rate (SGR. The negative SGR confirmed that the confinement stressed in fish, regardless of the background color. The increased activity of LDH in red muscle of fish

  10. Changing of Bacteria Catalase Activity Under the Influence of Electro-Magnetic Radiation on a Frequency of Nitric Oxide Absorption and Radiation Molecular Spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.M. Shub

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of catalase activity degree changing in Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa is described under the influence of electro-magnetic radiation on a frequency of nitric oxide absorption and radiation molecular spectrum. The panoramic spectrometric measuring complex, developed in Central Scientific Research Institute of measuring equipment Public corporation, Saratov, was used while carrying out the research. Electromagnetic vibrations of extremely high frequencies were stimulated in this complex imitating the structure of nitric oxide absorption and radiation molecular spectrum. The growth of activity of the mentioned enzyme of the strains under research was detected. The most significant changes were observed under 60-minutes exposure.

  11. The monofunctional catalase KatE of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri is required for full virulence in citrus plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Laura Tondo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac is an obligate aerobic phytopathogen constantly exposed to hydrogen peroxide produced by normal aerobic respiration and by the plant defense response during plant-pathogen interactions. Four putative catalase genes have been identified in silico in the Xac genome, designated as katE, catB, srpA (monofunctional catalases and katG (bifunctional catalase. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Xac catalase activity was analyzed using native gel electrophoresis and semi-quantitative RT-PCR. We demonstrated that the catalase activity pattern was regulated in different growth stages displaying the highest levels during the stationary phase. KatE was the most active catalase in this phase of growth. At this stage cells were more resistant to hydrogen peroxide as was determined by the analysis of CFU after the exposition to different H(2O(2 concentrations. In addition, Xac exhibited an adaptive response to hydrogen peroxide, displaying higher levels of catalase activity and H(2O(2 resistance after treatment with sub-lethal concentrations of the oxidant. In the plant-like medium XVM2 the expression of KatE was strongly induced and in this medium Xac was more resistant to H(2O(2. A XackatE mutant strain was constructed by insertional mutagenesis. We observed that catalase induction in stationary phase was lost meanwhile the adaptive response to peroxide was maintained in this mutant. Finally, the XackatE strain was assayed in planta during host plant interaction rendering a less aggressive phenotype with a minor canker formation. CONCLUSIONS: Our results confirmed that in contrast to other Xanthomonas species, Xac catalase-specific activity is induced during the stationary phase of growth in parallel with the bacterial resistance to peroxide challenge. Moreover, Xac catalases expression pattern is modified in response to any stimuli associated with the plant or the microenvironment it provides. The catalase Kat

  12. Studies on the catalase of Histoplasma capsulatum.

    OpenAIRE

    Howard, D H

    1983-01-01

    Factors which control the levels of catalase within yeast cells of Histoplasma capsulatum were studied. Only a small fraction of the total catalase activity could be detected in whole cells. The bulk of the activity was revealed in cell-free extracts or in cells permeabilized with acetone. The formation of the enzyme was regulated by glucose and by oxygen. There were large, consistent differences in the levels of catalase among strains of H. capsulatum. The sensitivity of the strains to H2O2 ...

  13. COMPARED ANALYSIS OF CATALASE AND PEROXIDASE ACTIVITY IN CELLULOLYTIC FUNGUS TRICHODERMA REESEI GROWN ON MEDIUM WITH DIFFERENT CONCENTRATIONS OF GRINDED WHEAT AND BARLEY STRAWS

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Ciornea; Tamara Barbaneagra; Alexandru Manoliu; Mihaela Cristica

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the evolution of catalase and peroxidase activity in Trichoderma reesei grown on medium containing grinded wheat and barley straws. Carbon source of cultivation medium - glucose was replaced by various concentrations of grinded wheat and barley straws, finally resulting three experimental variants as follows: V1 = 20 g/l, V2 = 30 g/l, V3 = 40 g/l. ĂŽn addition to these variants a control sample was added in which composition remainded unchanged. The cat...

  14. COMPARED ANALYSIS OF CATALASE AND PEROXIDASE ACTIVITY IN CELLULOLYTIC FUNGUS TRICHODERMA REESEI GROWN ON MEDIUM WITH DIFFERENT CONCENTRATIONS OF GRINDED WHEAT AND BARLEY STRAWS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Cristica

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess the evolution of catalase and peroxidase activity in Trichoderma reesei grown on medium containing grinded wheat and barley straws. Carbon source of cultivation medium - glucose was replaced by various concentrations of grinded wheat and barley straws, finally resulting three experimental variants as follows: V1 = 20 g/l, V2 = 30 g/l, V3 = 40 g/l. ĂŽn addition to these variants a control sample was added in which composition remainded unchanged. The catalase activity was determined by spectrophotometric Sinha method (Artenie et al., 2008 while peroxidase activity was assesed using the o-dianisidine method (Cojocaru, 2009. Enzymatic determinations were carried out at 7 and 14 days from inoculation, in both fungus mycelium and culture liquid. The enzymatic assay showed significant differences between determinations intervals and work variants. Enzyme activity is influenced by the age of fungus and by the different nature of the substrate used.

  15. Fungal catalases: function, phylogenetic origin and structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansberg, Wilhelm; Salas-Lizana, Rodolfo; Domínguez, Laura

    2012-09-15

    Most fungi have several monofunctional heme-catalases. Filamentous ascomycetes (Pezizomycotina) have two types of large-size subunit catalases (L1 and L2). L2-type are usually induced by different stressors and are extracellular enzymes; those from the L1-type are not inducible and accumulate in asexual spores. L2 catalases are important for growth and the start of cell differentiation, while L1 are required for spore germination. In addition, pezizomycetes have one to four small-size subunit catalases. Yeasts (Saccharomycotina) do not have large-subunit catalases and generally have one peroxisomal and one cytosolic small-subunit catalase. Small-subunit catalases are inhibited by substrate while large-subunit catalases are activated by H(2)O(2). Some small-subunit catalases bind NADPH preventing inhibition by substrate. We present a phylogenetic analysis revealing one or two events of horizontal gene transfers from Actinobacteria to a fungal ancestor before fungal diversification, as the origin of large-size subunit catalases. Other possible horizontal transfers of small- and large-subunit catalases genes were detected and one from bacteria to the fungus Malassezia globosa was analyzed in detail. All L2-type catalases analyzed presented a secretion signal peptide. Mucorales preserved only L2-type catalases, with one containing a secretion signal if two or more are present. Basidiomycetes have only L1-type catalases, all lacking signal peptide. Fungal small-size catalases are related to animal catalases and probably evolved from a common ancestor. However, there are several groups of small-size catalases. In particular, a conserved group of fungal sequences resemble plant catalases, whose phylogenetic origin was traced to a group of bacteria. This group probably has the heme orientation of plant catalases and could in principle bind NADPH. From almost a hundred small-subunit catalases only one fourth has a peroxisomal localization signal and in fact many fungi lack

  16. Effect of Orange (Citrus sinensis Peel Oil on Lipid Peroxidation, Catalase activity and Hepatic Biomarker levels in Blood Plasma of Normo Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ochuko L. Erukainure

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Dietary antioxidants are considered beneficial because of their potential protective role against oxidative stress, which is involved in the pathogenesis of multiple diseases such as cancer and coronary heart disease. The effect of feeding orange peel oil on lipid peroxidation, catalase and hepatic biomarkers in blood plasma of normo rats was investigated. Beside mouse chow, four diets were designed to contain 50% of energy as carbohydrate, 35% as fat, and 15% as protein, and one that was lipid-free diet which had distilled water substituted for fat. Groups of five rats were each fed one of these diets, while a fifth group was fed pelletized mouse chow. There was no significant difference in the amount of food consumed, though significant weight lost was observed in all groups except soybean oil. Feeding on orange peel oil led to significant (p<0.05 decrease in lipid peroxidation and catalase activities in comparison to soybean oil. Higher AST and lower ALT activities were observed in orange peel oil fed groups. These results suggest the oil from the orange peels possesses antioxidant potentials which could be protective against oxidative stress, thus useful in its treatment and management. However, the elevated levels of hepatic biomarkers pose a threat of hepatotoxicity thus suggesting that it should be consumed or used as a pharmaceutical ingredient at lower concentrations.

  17. Changes in the TBARs content and superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities in the lymphoid organs and skeletal muscles of adrenodemedullated rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira B.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Thiobarbituric acid reactant substances (TBARs content, and the activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDh, citrate synthase (CS, Cu/Zn- and Mn-superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase (GPX were measured in the lymphoid organs (thymus, spleen, and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN and skeletal muscles (gastrocnemius and soleus of adrenodemedullated (ADM rats. The results were compared with those obtained for sham-operated rats. TBARs content was reduced by adrenodemedullation in the lymphoid organs (MLN (28%, thymus (40% and spleen (42% and gastrocnemius muscle (67%. G6PDh activity was enhanced in the MLN (69% and reduced in the spleen (28% and soleus muscle (75%. CS activity was reduced in all tissues (MLN (75%, spleen (71%, gastrocnemius (61% and soleus (43%, except in the thymus which displayed an increment of 56%. Cu/Zn-SOD activity was increased in the MLN (126%, thymus (223%, spleen (80% and gastrocnemius muscle (360% and was reduced in the soleus muscle (31%. Mn-SOD activity was decreased in the MLN (67% and spleen (26% and increased in the thymus (142%, whereas catalase activity was reduced in the MLN (76%, thymus (54% and soleus muscle (47%. It is particularly noteworthy that in ADM rats the activity of glutathione peroxidase was not detectable by the method used. These data are consistent with the possibility that epinephrine might play a role in the oxidative stress of the lymphoid organs. Whether this fact represents an important mechanism for the establishment of impaired immune function during stress remains to be elucidated.

  18. New biologically active hydrogen sulfide donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Thomas; Raynaud, Francoise; Bouillaud, Frédéric; Ransy, Céline; Simonet, Serge; Crespo, Christine; Bourguignon, Marie-Pierre; Villeneuve, Nicole; Vilaine, Jean-Paul; Artaud, Isabelle; Galardon, Erwan

    2013-11-25

    Generous donors: The dithioperoxyanhydrides (CH3 COS)2 , (PhCOS)2 , CH3 COSSCO2 Me and PhCOSSCO2 Me act as thiol-activated hydrogen sulfide donors in aqueous buffer solution. The most efficient donor (CH3 COS)2 can induce a biological response in cells, and advantageously replace hydrogen sulfide in ex vivo vascular studies. PMID:24115650

  19. Antitumour Activity of Chitosan Hydrogen Selenites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Chitosans reacted with selenious acid to prepare chitosan hydrogen selenites, which were found to be growth-inhibitory against sarcoma 180 solid tumor. The results indicated that the activity also depended on the molecular weight of chitosan supports.

  20. Ascorbate Peroxidase and Catalase Activities and Their Genetic Regulation in Plants Subjected to Drought and Salinity Stresses

    OpenAIRE

    Adriano Sofo; Antonio Scopa; Maria Nuzzaci; Antonella Vitti

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), an important relatively stable non-radical reactive oxygen species (ROS) is produced by normal aerobic metabolism in plants. At low concentrations, H2O2 acts as a signal molecule involved in the regulation of specific biological/physiological processes (photosynthetic functions, cell cycle, growth and development, plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses). Oxidative stress and eventual cell death in plants can be caused by excess H2O2 accumulation. Since stress...

  1. Rapid catalase supplemental test for identification of members of the family Enterobacteriaceae.

    OpenAIRE

    Chester, B; Moskowitz, L B

    1987-01-01

    A simple, rapid, semiquantitative slide catalase test useful for differentiating members of the family Enterobacteriaceae is described. Judging by the time required for appearance of oxygen bubbles in 3% hydrogen peroxide, the immediate catalase reactors were Yersinia, Serratia, Proteus, Morganella, Providencia, Cedecea, and Hafnia spp. The delayed catalase reactors were Escherichia, Shigella, Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Salmonella, Citrobacter, Edwardsiella, Kluyvera, and Tatumella spp. This i...

  2. Caribbean yellow band disease compromises the activity of catalase and glutathione S-transferase in the reef-building coral Orbicella faveolata exposed to anthracene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montilla, Luis Miguel; Ramos, Ruth; García, Elia; Cróquer, Aldo

    2016-05-01

    Healthy and diseased corals are threatened by different anthropogenic sources, such as pollution, a problem expected to become more severe in the near future. Despite the fact that coastal pollution and coral diseases might represent a serious threat to coral reef health, there is a paucity of controlled experiments showing whether the response of diseased and healthy corals to xenobiotics differs. In this study, we exposed healthy and Caribbean yellow band disease (CYBD)-affected Orbicella faveolata colonies to 3 sublethal concentrations of anthracene to test if enzymatic responses to this hydrocarbon were compromised in CYBD-affected tissues. For this, a 2-factorial fully orthogonal design was used in a controlled laboratory bioassay, using tissue condition (2 levels: apparently healthy and diseased) and pollutant concentration (4 levels: experimental control, 10, 30 and 100 ppb concentration) as fixed factors. A permutation-based ANOVA (PERMANOVA) was used to test the effects of condition and concentration on the specific activity of 3 enzymatic biomarkers: catalase, glutathione S-transferase, and glutathione peroxidase. We found a significant interaction between the concentration of anthracene and the colony condition for catalase (Pseudo-F = 3.84, df = 3, p < 0.05) and glutathione S-transferase (Pseudo-F = 3.29, df = 3, p < 0.05). Moreover, our results indicated that the enzymatic response to anthracene in CYBD-affected tissues was compromised, as the activity of these enzymes decreased 3- to 4-fold compared to healthy tissues. These results suggest that under a potential scenario of increasing hydrocarbon coastal pollution, colonies of O. faveolata affected with CYBD might become more vulnerable to the deleterious effects of chemical pollution. PMID:27137073

  3. 紫外分光光度法测定土壤过氧化氢酶活性%Measurement of Catalase Activity in Soil by Ultraviolet Spectrophotometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨兰芳; 曾巧; 李海波; 闫静静

    2011-01-01

    土壤过氧化氢酶是土壤中非常重要酶类,为了探索一种测定土壤过氧化氢酶活性的简单、可靠而适用的测定方法,我们进行了利用紫外分光光度法测定土壤过氧化氢酶活性的方法研究.结果表明,紫外分光光度法重现性优于高锰酸钾容量法,溶液在240 nm处的吸光度可以稳定11小时以上,对4种土壤分析表明,紫外分光光度法的测定结果与高锰酸钾容量法之间无显著差异.传统高锰酸钾容量法加酸后再过滤容易导致溶液有颜色,过滤液易浑浊,过滤时间长.本试验表明,在过滤前加入饱和铝钾矾,然后直接将溶液过滤到盛有酸的容器内,既可以使溶液无色,又能使溶液澄清透明,还能使过滤速度大为加快.总之紫外分光光度法重现性好、稳定时间长,操作简单,不需要特殊试剂,避免了容量法的滴定误差,是一种值得推广普及的测定土壤过氧化氢酶活性的好方法.%Catalase is an important enzyme in soil. In order to find a simple, reliable and applicable method to measure the activity of soil catalase, the experiment to determine the catalase activity in soil by ultraviolet spectrophotometry was conducted. The results showed that the reproducibility of ultraviolet spectrophotometry was better than potassium permanganate volumetric method. The absorbency of solution of soil extract in 240 nm had no visible changes after stored 11 h. The results from 4 soils indicated that there was no significant difference between ultraviolet spectrophotometry and potassium permanganate volumetric method. The addition of sulfate acid before filtration in traditional volumetric method led to a colored and turbid solution, and long filtration time. The color and turbidity in soil extract was disadvantage to measure the absorbency. Adding alum saturated solution before filtration and then filtrating in a utensil with 5 mi sulfate acid (1.5 mol L-1) could gain a colorless and transparent

  4. Nanostructural activated carbons for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Suoding

    A series of nanostructured activated carbons have been synthesized from poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK), and its derivatives. These carbons, with surface area exceeding 3000 m2/g and with average pore diameters of ≤ 20 A, are proven to be superior hydrogen storage materials, with hydrogen storage capacities up to 5.5 wt% at 77 K and 45 atm. The porous texture of these carbons was controlled via optimizing three synthetic steps: thermo-oxidation of PEEK in air, pyrolysis or carbonization of the oxidized PEEK in an inert atmosphere, and activation of the pre-carbonized PEEK with metal hydroxide. Thermo-oxidation of PEEK and carbonization process were thoroughly studied. These processes have been investigated by MDSC, FTIR, TGA and Py-MS. The pyrolysis or carbonization of PEEK involves the degradation of PEEK chains in three stages. Carbon morphology, including crystallinity and porous texture, is readily controlled by adjusting carbonization temperature. Activation of PEEK carbons, using inorganic bases and other activation agents, produces microporous carbons having a very narrow pore size distribution and an average pore diameter of ≤ 20 A. The activation control parameters including activation agent, activation temperature, time and carbon morphology have been investigated extensively. High surface area activated carbon is obtained by activating a highly amorphous carbon with a high activation agent/carbon ratio at 800°C. Theoretical calculations show that the pores with smaller diameter, especially smaller than 7 A, favor hydrogen adsorption. The experimental results confirm this fact and show that: (1) the hydrogen adsorption capacity per unit surface area at 77 K and 1 bar is larger in the smaller pores, (2) gravimetric hydrogen storage capacity (W(H2)) is directly proportional to the ultramicropore (< 7 A) volume; and (3) the volumetric hydrogen storage capacity is directly proportional to the volume fraction of ultramicropores in carbon. Hydrogen

  5. Nickel in Soil Modifies Sensitivity to Diazinon Measured by the Activity of Acetylcholinesterase, Catalase, and Glutathione S-Transferase in Earthworm Eisenia fetida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Zawisza-Raszka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nickel in typical soils is present in a very low concentration, but in the contaminated soils it occurs in locally elevated concentrations. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of nickel in the concentrations of 300 (very high, close to LOEC for reproduction and 900 (extremely high, close to LOEC for mortality mg/kg dry soil on the life history and acetylcholinesterase, catalase, and glutathione S-transferase activities in earthworm Eisenia fetida and to establish how nickel modifies the sensitivity to organophosphorous pesticide—diazinon. Cocoons production and juveniles’ number were significantly lower only in groups exposed to Ni in the concentration of 900 mg/kg dry soil for two months. Diazinon administration diminished the AChE activity in the GI tract and in the body wall. The interaction between diazinon and nickel was observed, and, in consequence, the AChE activity after the pesticide treatment was similar to controls in worms preexposed to nickel. Both pesticide administration and exposure to nickel caused an increase in the GST activity in examined organs and CAT activity in body wall. Both biometric and development data and simple enzymatic analysis, especially the AChE and GST, show a Ni pretreatment effect on the subsequent susceptibility to pesticide.

  6. Structure–Function Relationships in Fungal Large-Subunit Catalases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, A.; Valdez, V; Rudino-Pinera, E; Horjales, E; Hansberg, W

    2009-01-01

    Neurospora crassa has two large-subunit catalases, CAT-1 and CAT-3. CAT-1 is associated with non-growing cells and accumulates particularly in asexual spores; CAT-3 is associated with growing cells and is induced under different stress conditions. It is our interest to elucidate the structure-function relationships in large-subunit catalases. Here we have determined the CAT-3 crystal structure and compared it with the previously determined CAT-1 structure. Similar to CAT-1, CAT-3 hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) saturation kinetics exhibited two components, consistent with the existence of two active sites: one saturated in the millimolar range and the other in the molar range. In the CAT-1 structure, we found three interesting features related to its unusual kinetics: (a) a constriction in the channel that conveys H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to the active site; (b) a covalent bond between the tyrosine, which forms the fifth coordination bound to the iron of the heme, and a vicinal cysteine; (c) oxidation of the pyrrole ring III to form a cis-hydroxyl group in C5 and a cis-{gamma}-spirolactone in C6. The site of heme oxidation marks the starts of the central channel that communicates to the central cavity and the shortest way products can exit the active site. CAT-3 has a similar constriction in its major channel, which could function as a gating system regulated by the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration before the gate. CAT-3 functional tyrosine is not covalently bonded, but has instead the electron relay mechanism described for the human catalase to divert electrons from it. Pyrrole ring III in CAT-3 is not oxidized as it is in other large-subunit catalases whose structure has been determined. Different in CAT-3 from these enzymes is an occupied central cavity. Results presented here indicate that CAT-3 and CAT-1 enzymes represent a functional group of catalases with distinctive structural characteristics that determine similar kinetics.

  7. Structure-function relationships in fungal large-subunit catalases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Adelaida; Valdés, Víctor-Julián; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Horjales, Eduardo; Hansberg, Wilhelm

    2009-02-13

    Neurospora crassa has two large-subunit catalases, CAT-1 and CAT-3. CAT-1 is associated with non-growing cells and accumulates particularly in asexual spores; CAT-3 is associated with growing cells and is induced under different stress conditions. It is our interest to elucidate the structure-function relationships in large-subunit catalases. Here we have determined the CAT-3 crystal structure and compared it with the previously determined CAT-1 structure. Similar to CAT-1, CAT-3 hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) saturation kinetics exhibited two components, consistent with the existence of two active sites: one saturated in the millimolar range and the other in the molar range. In the CAT-1 structure, we found three interesting features related to its unusual kinetics: (a) a constriction in the channel that conveys H(2)O(2) to the active site; (b) a covalent bond between the tyrosine, which forms the fifth coordination bound to the iron of the heme, and a vicinal cysteine; (c) oxidation of the pyrrole ring III to form a cis-hydroxyl group in C5 and a cis-gamma-spirolactone in C6. The site of heme oxidation marks the starts of the central channel that communicates to the central cavity and the shortest way products can exit the active site. CAT-3 has a similar constriction in its major channel, which could function as a gating system regulated by the H(2)O(2) concentration before the gate. CAT-3 functional tyrosine is not covalently bonded, but has instead the electron relay mechanism described for the human catalase to divert electrons from it. Pyrrole ring III in CAT-3 is not oxidized as it is in other large-subunit catalases whose structure has been determined. Different in CAT-3 from these enzymes is an occupied central cavity. Results presented here indicate that CAT-3 and CAT-1 enzymes represent a functional group of catalases with distinctive structural characteristics that determine similar kinetics. PMID:19109972

  8. Modulation of the Activities of Catalase, Cu-Zn, Mn Superoxide Dismutase, and Glutathione Peroxidase in Adipocyte from Ovariectomised Female Rats with Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Rebeca Cambray; Zuñiga-Muñoz, Alejandra; Guarner Lans, Verónica; Díaz-Díaz, Eulises; Tena Betancourt, Carlos Alberto; Pérez-Torres, Israel

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between estrogen removal, antioxidant enzymes, and oxidative stress generated by obesity in a MS female rat model. Thirty two female Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups: Control (C), MS, MS ovariectomized (Ovx), and MS Ovx plus estradiol (E2). MS was induced by administering 30% sucrose to drinking water for 24 weeks. After sacrifice, intra-abdominal fat was dissected; adipocytes were isolated and lipid peroxidation, non-enzymatic antioxidant capacity, and the activities of Cu-Zn and Mn superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were determined. There were no significant differences in the activities of Cu-Zn, Mn SOD, CAT, and GPx between the C and MS groups, but in the MS Ovx group there was a statistically significant decrease in the activities of these enzymes when compared to MS and MS Ovx+E2. The increased lipid peroxidation and nonenzymatic antioxidant capacity found in MS Ovx was significantly decreased when compared to MS and MS Ovx+E2. In conclusion, the removal of E2 by ovariectomy decreases the activity of the antioxidant enzymes in the intra-abdominal tissue of MS female rats; this is reflected by increased lipid peroxidation and decreased nonenzymatic antioxidant capacity. PMID:24987414

  9. Disruption of AtWNK8 Enhances Tolerance of Arabidopsis to Salt and Osmotic Stresses via Modulating Proline Content and Activities of Catalase and Peroxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Liao

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available With no lysine kinases (WNKs play important roles in plant growth and development. However, its role in salt and osmotic stress tolerance is unclear. Here, we report that AtWNK8 is mainly expressed in primary root, hypocotyl, stamen and pistil and is induced by NaCl and sorbitol treatment. Compared to the wild-type, the T-DNA knock-out wnk8 mutant was more tolerant to severe salinity and osmotic stresses, as indicated by 27% and 198% more fresh weight in the NaCl and sorbitol treatment, respectively. The wnk8 mutant also accumulated 1.43-fold more proline than the wild-type in the sorbitol treatment. Under NaCl and sorbitol stresses, catalase (CAT activity in wnk8 mutant was 1.92- and 3.7-times of that in Col-0, respectively. Similarly, under salt and osmotic stress conditions, peroxidase (POD activities in wnk8 mutant were 1.81- and 1.58-times of that in Col-0, respectively. Taken together, we revealed that maintaining higher CAT and POD activities might be one of the reasons that the disruption of AtWNK8 enhances the tolerance to salt stress, and accumulating more proline and higher activities of CAT and POD might result in the higher tolerance of WNK8 to osmotic stress.

  10. Catalase activity is stimulated by H2O2 in rich culture medium and is required for H2O2 resistance and adaptation in yeast ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Dorival Martins; English, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    Catalases are efficient scavengers of H2O2 and protect cells against H2O2 stress. Examination of the H2O2 stimulon in Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed that the cytosolic catalase T (Ctt1) protein level increases 15-fold on H2O2 challenge in synthetic complete media although previous work revealed that deletion of the CCT1 or CTA1 genes (encoding peroxisomal/mitochondrial catalase A) does not increase the H2O2 sensitivity of yeast challenged in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4). This we attributed to...

  11. Developmentally related responses of maize catalase genes to salicylic acid.

    OpenAIRE

    L. Guan; Scandalios, J G

    1995-01-01

    The response of the maize catalase genes (Cat1, Cat2, and Cat3) to salicylic acid (SA) was examined at two distinct developmental stages: embryogenesis and germination. A unique, germination-related differential response of each maize catalase gene to various doses of SA was observed. During late embryogenesis, total catalase activity in scutella increased dramatically with 1 mM SA treatment. The accumulation of Cat2 transcript and CAT-2 isozyme protein provided the major contribution to the ...

  12. Activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions and uses thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandrock, Gary; Reilly, James; Graetz, Jason; Wegrzyn, James E.

    2010-11-23

    In one aspect, the invention relates to activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions containing aluminum hydride in the presence of, or absence of, hydrogen desorption stimulants. The invention particularly relates to such compositions having one or more hydrogen desorption stimulants selected from metal hydrides and metal aluminum hydrides. In another aspect, the invention relates to methods for generating hydrogen from such hydrogen storage compositions.

  13. Activated magnesium for hydrogen energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen is the ideal means of storage, transport and conversion of energy for a comprehensive clean-energy concept because of its free emission. Hydrogen can be stored as an energy carrier in the form of gas, liquid, and in solid. Magnesium is the candidate material for on-board hydrogen storage in the form of solid metal hydride because of its safe and higher volumetric energy density, about 7.6 wt% of the metal. Previous experiment on the hydriding of magnesium with the particle size of <0.3 mm and <60 μm yields very poor hydrogen capacity due to the oxygen existence on the metal surface. To improve the hydrogen sorption properties, the magnesium with the particle size of <60 μm is activated by treating the metal with 0.15M NH4F solution for 1 hour. The hydriding experiment is conducted in a hydriding system that can be operated at a very high vacuum up to 1x10-7 mbar. Analyses on the experimental results of two cycles of hydriding show that the activated magnesium powder with the particle size of <60 mm absorbed hydrogen in the amount of 3.82 wt% of the metal in the first cycle, which increased to 5.15 wt% in the second cycle. The absorption process took respectively 312 and 221 seconds for the first and second cycle of hydriding. Experimental results show that the hydrogen capacity of the current experiment is still low likely due to the particle size of magnesium metal, i.e. it should be nano size. (author)

  14. Atividade da catalase no pulmão, rim e intestino delgado não isquemiado de ratos após reperfusão intestinal Catalase activity in lung, kidney and small bowel non-ischemic in rats after intestinal reperfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila de Oliveira Ferro

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a atividade catalase, após lesão por isquemia e reperfusão intestinal e estudar as alterações deste antioxidante em órgãos situados à distância do insulto inicial. MÉTODOS: Utilizaram-se 18 ratos do tipo Wistar, aleatoriamente distribuídos em três grupos. 1-Controle, 2-Simulação e 3-Isquemia/Reperfusão. Neste último, realizou-se isquemia no íleo, por 60 minutos, seguida de reperfusão por 30 minutos. No grupo 2 efetuou-se apenas uma laparotomia. Foram retirados, de todos os animais, segmentos do intestino com e sem reperfusão, além do pulmão e rim direitos para exame com microscopia óptica. A atividade da catalase foi aferida em espectrofotômetro ajustado para 240 nm. Utilizaram-se os testes estatísticos Mann e Whitney e Kruskal Wallis. RESULTADOS: Observou-se aumento significante (p OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to assess the catalase activity after ischemia and reperfusion and to study the changes of this antioxidant in organs located far from the initial insult. METHODS: Eighteen Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups. 1-Control, 2-Simulation and 3-Ischemia and Reperrfusion. In the latter it was done an ischemia of the ileum for 60 minutes followed by reperfusion for 30 minutes. In group 2 only laparotomy was performed. From all animals it was taken segments of the reperfused and non reperfused intestine, as well of the right kidney and lung to be evaluated under light microscopy. Catalase activity was measured in spectrophotometer with a wavelength set to 240 nm. It was used Mann Whitney and Kruskal Wallis statistical tests. RESULTS: There was a significant increase (p <0.05 in the catalase activity not only at small bowel ischemic and non-ischemic segments but also at lungs. However the enzymatic activity decreases in the kidney. In all organs studied at reperfusion group it was found a slight villi derangement, mild congestion and infiltration with inflammatory cells, and areas of

  15. Synthesis, characterization, and catalytic activity in Suzuki coupling and catalase-like reactions of new chitosan supported Pd catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Talat; Inanan, Tülden; Menteş, Ayfer

    2016-07-10

    The aim of this study is to analyze the synthesis of a new chitosan supported Pd catalyst and examination of its catalytic activity in: Pd catalyst was synthesized using chitosan as a biomaterial and characterized with FTIR, TG/DTG, XRD, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, SEM-EDAX, ICP-OES, Uv-vis spectroscopies, and magnetic moment, along with molar conductivity analysis. Biomaterial supported Pd catalyst indicated high activity and long life time as well as excellent turnover number (TON) and turnover frequency (TOF) values in Suzuki reaction. Biomaterial supported Pd catalyst catalyzed H2O2 decomposition reaction with considerable high activity using comparatively small loading catalyst (10mg). Redox potential of biomaterial supported Pd catalyst was still high without negligible loss (13% decrease) after 10 cycles in reusability tests. As a consequence, eco-friendly biomaterial supported Pd catalyst has superior properties such as high thermal stability, long life time, easy removal from reaction mixture and durability to air, moisture and high temperature. PMID:27106147

  16. Effect of Lead (Pb Exposure on the Activity of Superoxide Dismutase and Catalase in Battery Manufacturing Workers (BMW of Western Maharashtra (India with Reference to Heme biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusal K. Das

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to estimate the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase in erythrocytes and malondialdehyde (MDA in plasma of battery manufacturing workers (BMW of Western Maharashtra (India who were occupationally exposed to lead (Pb over a long period of time (about 15 years. This study was also aimed to determine the Pb intoxication resulted in a disturbance of heme biosynthesis in BMW group. The blood Pb level of BMW group (n = 28 was found to be in the range of 25.8 – 78.0 μg/dL (mean + SD, 53.63 + 16.98 whereas in Pb unexposed control group (n = 35 the range was 2.8 – 22.0 μg/dL (mean + SD, 12.52 + 4.08. The blood level (Pb-B and urinary lead level (Pb-U were significantly increased in BMW group as compared to unexposed control. Though activated d- aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD activities in BMW group did not show any significant change when compared to control group but activated / non activated erythrocyte – ALAD activities in BMW group showed a significant increase. Erythrocyte- zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP, urinary daminolevulinic acid (ALA-U and porphobilinogen (PBG-U of BMW groups elevated significantly as compared to control. A positive correlation (r = 0.66, p 1.0 were observed in control group. Hematological study revealed a significant decrease of hemoglobin concentration, packed cell volume (% and other blood indices and a significant increase of total leucocytes count in BMW group in comparison to control group. The serum MDA content was significantly increased (p< 0.001 and the activities of antioxidant enzymes such as erythrocyte- SOD (p< 0.001 and erythrocytecatalase (p< 0.001 were significantly reduced in BMW group as compared to control group. A positive correlation (r = 0.45, p<0.02 between Pb-B and serum MDA level was observed in BMW group (Pb-B range 25.8 – 78.0 μg / dL but such significant correlation did not notice in

  17. Hinokitiol Exerts Anticancer Activity through Downregulation of MMPs 9/2 and Enhancement of Catalase and SOD Enzymes: In Vivo Augmentation of Lung Histoarchitecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Hsun Huang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Melanoma is extremely resistant to chemotherapy and the death rate is increasing hastily worldwide. Extracellular matrix promotes the migration and invasion of tumor cells through the production of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 and -9. Evidence has shown that natural dietary antioxidants are capable of inhibiting cancer cell growth. Our recent studies showed that hinokitiol, a natural bioactive compound, inhibited vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and platelets aggregation. The present study is to investigate the anticancer efficacy of hinokitiol against B16-F10 melanoma cells via modulating tumor invasion factors MMPs, antioxidant enzymes in vitro. An in vivo mice model of histological investigation was performed to study the patterns of elastic and collagen fibers. Hinokitiol inhibited the expression and activity of MMPs-2 and -9 in B16-F10 melanoma cells, as measured by western blotting and gelatin zymography, respectively. An observed increase in protein expression of MMPs 2/9 in melanoma cells was significantly inhibited by hinokitiol. Notably, hinokitiol (1–5 μM increased the activities of antioxidant enzymes catalase (CAT and superoxide dismutase (SOD from the reduction in melanoma cells. Also, hinokitiol (2–10 µM concentration dependently reduced in vitro Fenton reaction induced hydroxyl radical (OH· formation. An in vivo study showed that hinokitiol treatment increased elastic fibers (EF, collagens dispersion, and improved alveolar alterations in the lungs of B16/F10 injected mice. Overall, our findings propose that hinokitiol may be a potent anticancer candidate through down regulation of MMPs 9/2, reduction of OH· production and enhancement of antioxidant enzymes SOD and CAT.

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a bifunctional catalase-phenol oxidase from Scytalidium thermophilum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bifunctional enzyme catalase-phenol oxidase from S. thermophilum was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method in space group P21 and diffraction data were collected to 2.8 Å resolution. Catalase-phenol oxidase from Scytalidium thermophilum is a bifunctional enzyme: its major activity is the catalase-mediated decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, but it also catalyzes phenol oxidation. To understand the structural basis of this dual functionality, the enzyme, which has been shown to be a tetramer in solution, has been purified by anion-exchange and gel-filtration chromatography and has been crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique. Streak-seeding was used to obtain larger crystals suitable for X-ray analysis. Diffraction data were collected to 2.8 Å resolution at the Daresbury Synchrotron Radiation Source. The crystals belonged to space group P21 and contained one tetramer per asymmetric unit

  19. Antibacterial Properties and Mechanism of Activity of a Novel Silver-Stabilized Hydrogen Peroxide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy L Martin

    Full Text Available Huwa-San peroxide (hydrogen peroxide; HSP is a NSF Standard 60 (maximum 8 mg/L(-1 new generation peroxide stabilized with ionic silver suitable for continuous disinfection of potable water. Experiments were undertaken to examine the mechanism of HSP against planktonic and biofilm cultures of indicator bacterial strains. Contact/kill time (CT relationships that achieve effective control were explored to determine the potential utility in primary disinfection. Inhibitory assays were conducted using both nutrient rich media and a medium based on synthetic wastewater. Assays were compared for exposures to three disinfectants (HSP, laboratory grade hydrogen peroxide (HP and sodium hypochlorite at concentrations of 20 ppm (therefore at 2.5 and 5 times the NSF limit for HP and sodium hypochlorite, respectively and at pH 7.0 and 8.5 in dechlorinated tap water. HSP was found to be more or equally effective as hypochlorite or HP. Results from CT assays comparing HSP and HP at different bacterial concentrations with neutralization of residual peroxide with catalase suggested that at a high bacterial concentration HSP, but not HP, was protected from catalase degradation possibly through sequestration by bacterial cells. Consistent with this hypothesis, at a low bacterial cell density residual HSP was more effectively neutralized as less HSP was associated with bacteria and therefore accessible to catalase. Silver in HSP may facilitate this association through electrostatic interactions at the cell surface. This was supported by experiments where the addition of mono (K(+ and divalent (Ca(+2 cations (0.005-0.05M reduced the killing efficacy of HSP but not HP. Experiments designed to distinguish any inhibitory effect of silver from that of peroxide in HSP were carried out by monitoring the metabolic activity of established P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms. Concentrations of 70-500 ppm HSP had a pronounced effect on metabolic activity while the equivalent

  20. Antibacterial Properties and Mechanism of Activity of a Novel Silver-Stabilized Hydrogen Peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Nancy L; Bass, Paul; Liss, Steven N

    2015-01-01

    Huwa-San peroxide (hydrogen peroxide; HSP) is a NSF Standard 60 (maximum 8 mg/L(-1)) new generation peroxide stabilized with ionic silver suitable for continuous disinfection of potable water. Experiments were undertaken to examine the mechanism of HSP against planktonic and biofilm cultures of indicator bacterial strains. Contact/kill time (CT) relationships that achieve effective control were explored to determine the potential utility in primary disinfection. Inhibitory assays were conducted using both nutrient rich media and a medium based on synthetic wastewater. Assays were compared for exposures to three disinfectants (HSP, laboratory grade hydrogen peroxide (HP) and sodium hypochlorite) at concentrations of 20 ppm (therefore at 2.5 and 5 times the NSF limit for HP and sodium hypochlorite, respectively) and at pH 7.0 and 8.5 in dechlorinated tap water. HSP was found to be more or equally effective as hypochlorite or HP. Results from CT assays comparing HSP and HP at different bacterial concentrations with neutralization of residual peroxide with catalase suggested that at a high bacterial concentration HSP, but not HP, was protected from catalase degradation possibly through sequestration by bacterial cells. Consistent with this hypothesis, at a low bacterial cell density residual HSP was more effectively neutralized as less HSP was associated with bacteria and therefore accessible to catalase. Silver in HSP may facilitate this association through electrostatic interactions at the cell surface. This was supported by experiments where the addition of mono (K(+)) and divalent (Ca(+2)) cations (0.005-0.05M) reduced the killing efficacy of HSP but not HP. Experiments designed to distinguish any inhibitory effect of silver from that of peroxide in HSP were carried out by monitoring the metabolic activity of established P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms. Concentrations of 70-500 ppm HSP had a pronounced effect on metabolic activity while the equivalent concentrations of

  1. Hydrogen activation by [NiFe]-hydrogenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Stephen B; Evans, Rhiannon M; Brooke, Emily J; Wehlin, Sara A M; Nomerotskaia, Elena; Sargent, Frank; Armstrong, Fraser A; Phillips, Simon E V

    2016-06-15

    Hydrogenase-1 (Hyd-1) from Escherichia coli is a membrane-bound enzyme that catalyses the reversible oxidation of molecular H2 The active site contains one Fe and one Ni atom and several conserved amino acids including an arginine (Arg(509)), which interacts with two conserved aspartate residues (Asp(118) and Asp(574)) forming an outer shell canopy over the metals. There is also a highly conserved glutamate (Glu(28)) positioned on the opposite side of the active site to the canopy. The mechanism of hydrogen activation has been dissected by site-directed mutagenesis to identify the catalytic base responsible for splitting molecular hydrogen and possible proton transfer pathways to/from the active site. Previous reported attempts to mutate residues in the canopy were unsuccessful, leading to an assumption of a purely structural role. Recent discoveries, however, suggest a catalytic requirement, for example replacing the arginine with lysine (R509K) leaves the structure virtually unchanged, but catalytic activity falls by more than 100-fold. Variants containing amino acid substitutions at either or both, aspartates retain significant activity. We now propose a new mechanism: heterolytic H2 cleavage is via a mechanism akin to that of a frustrated Lewis pair (FLP), where H2 is polarized by simultaneous binding to the metal(s) (the acid) and a nitrogen from Arg(509) (the base). PMID:27284053

  2. Immobilized glucose oxidase--catalase and their deactivation in a differential-bed loop reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prenosil, J E

    1979-01-01

    Glucose oxidase containing catalase was immobilized with a copolymer of phenylenediamine and glutaraldehyde on pumice and titania carrier to study the enzymatic oxidation of glucose in a differential-bed loop reactor. The reaction rate was found to be first order with respect to the concentration of limiting oxygen substrate, suggesting a strong external mass-transfer resistance for all the flow rates used. The partial pressure of oxygen was varied from 21.3 up to 202.6 kPa. The use of a differential-bed loop reactor for the determination of the active enzyme concentration in the catalyst with negligible internal pore diffusion resistance is shown. Catalyst deactivation was studied, especially with respect to the presence of catalase. It is believed that the hydrogen peroxide formed in the oxidation reaction deactivates catalase first; if an excess of catalase is present, the deactivation of glucose oxidase remains small. The mathematical model subsequently developed adequately describes the experimental results. PMID:427262

  3. Development of lyophilization cycle and effect of excipients on the stability of catalase during lyophilization

    OpenAIRE

    Lale, Shantanu V; Goyal, Monu; Bansal, Arvind K

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of the present study was to screen excipients such as amino acids and non-aqueous solvents for their stabilizing effect on catalase, a model protein, for lyophilization. The present study also includes optimization of lyophilization cycle for catalase formulations, which is essential from the commercial point of view, since lyophilization is an extremely costly process. Materials and Methods: Activity of catalase was determined using catalase activity assay. Differen...

  4. Effect of Orange (Citrus sinensis) Peel Oil on Lipid Peroxidation, Catalase activity and Hepatic Biomarker levels in Blood Plasma of Normo Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Erukainure, Ochuko L.

    2012-01-01

    Dietary antioxidants are considered beneficial because of their potential protective role against oxidative stress, which is involved in the pathogenesis of multiple diseases such as cancer and coronary heart disease. The effect of feeding orange peel oil on lipid peroxidation, catalase and hepatic biomarkers in blood plasma of normo rats was investigated. Beside mouse chow, four diets were designed to contain 50% of energy as carbohydrate, 35% as fat, and 15% as protein, and one that was lip...

  5. Radiation-induced inactivation of bovine liver catalase in nitrous oxide-saturated solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced inactivation of catalase by .OH/H. radicals was studied. It was found that inactivation yield of catalase depended on the dose. Optical spectrum of irradiated catalase showed that no redox processes in active site of enzyme occurred as a result of .OH/H. interaction. (author) 19 refs.; 3 figs

  6. Hydrogen peroxide generation and antioxidant enzyme activities in the leaves and roots of wheat cultivars subjected to long-term soil drought stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huseynova, Irada M; Aliyeva, Durna R; Mammadov, Alamdar Ch; Aliyev, Jalal A

    2015-08-01

    The dynamics of the activity of catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, guaiacol peroxidase, and benzidine peroxidase, as well as the level of hydrogen peroxide in the vegetative organs of durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) cultivars was studied under long-term soil drought conditions. It was established that hydrogen peroxide generation occurred at early stages of stress in the tolerant variety Barakatli-95, whereas in the susceptible variety Garagylchyg-2 its significant amounts were accumulated only at later stages. Garagylchyg-2 shows a larger reduction of photochemical activity of PS II in both genotypes at all stages of ontogenesis under drought stress than Barakatli-95. The highest activity of catalase which plays a leading role in the neutralization of hydrogen peroxide was observed in the leaves and roots of the drought-tolerant variety Barakatli-95. Despite the fact that the protection system also includes peroxidases, the activity of these enzymes even after synthesis of their new portions is substantially lower compared with catalase. Native PAGE electrophoresis revealed the presence of one isoform of CAT, seven isoforms of APX, three isoforms of GPO, and three isoforms of BPO in the leaves, and also three isoforms of CAT, four isoforms of APX, two isoforms of GPO, and six isoforms of BPO in the roots of wheat. One isoform of CAT was found in the roots when water supply was normal and three isoforms were observed under drought conditions. Stress associated with long-term soil drought in the roots of wheat has led to an increase in the heterogeneity due to the formation of two new sedentary forms of catalase: CAT2 and CAT3. PMID:26008794

  7. Wpływ nawożenia mineralnego i nawadniania na aktyumość peroksydazy, katalazy i fosfatazy kwaśnej w dwóch fazach wzrostu kapusty i porów [The influence of mineral fertilization and irrigation on the activity of peroxidase, catalase and acid phosphatase of cabbage and leek in two stages of growth

    OpenAIRE

    E. Gurgul; E. Kołota

    2015-01-01

    During the growth of plant, the very distinct increase of enzymatic activity of peroxidase and catalase was observed, but in case of acid phosphatase in smaller degree. An irrigation caused the decreasing of activity of all tested enzymes in both stages of cabbage growth. However, in case of leeks leaves sprinkling irrigation stimulated activity of catalase and acid phosphatase in both stages and peroxidase in the second stage of growth. The effectiveness of the mineral nutritive was differen...

  8. Innovative Strategy on Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Utilizing Activated Liquid Water

    OpenAIRE

    Bing-Joe Hwang; Hsiao-Chien Chen; Fu-Der Mai; Hui-Yen Tsai; Chih-Ping Yang; John Rick; Yu-Chuan Liu

    2015-01-01

    Splitting water for hydrogen production using light, or electrical energy, is the most developed ‘green technique’. For increasing efficiency in hydrogen production, currently, the most exciting and thriving strategies are focused on efficient and inexpensive catalysts. Here, we report an innovative idea for efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) utilizing plasmon-activated liquid water with reduced hydrogen-bonded structure by hot electron transfer. This strategy is effective for all HE...

  9. Cloning and Sequencing of a Candida albicans Catalase Gene and Effects of Disruption of This Gene†

    OpenAIRE

    Wysong, Deborah R.; Christin, Laurent; Sugar, Alan M.; Robbins, Phillips W.; Diamond, Richard D.

    1998-01-01

    Catalase plays a key role as an antioxidant, protecting aerobic organisms from the toxic effects of hydrogen peroxide, and in some cases has been postulated to be a virulence factor. To help elucidate the function of catalase in Candida albicans, a single C. albicans-derived catalase gene, designated CAT1, was isolated and cloned. Degenerate PCR primers based on highly conserved areas of other fungal catalase genes were used to amplify a 411-bp product from genomic DNA of C. albicans ATCC 102...

  10. Simultaneous co-immobilization of glucose oxidase and catalase in their substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozyilmaz, G; Tukel, S S

    2007-01-01

    Glucose oxidase (GOD) and catalase (CAT) were simultaneously co-immobilized onto magnesium silicate (florisil) by covalent coupling. Glucose was added in immobilization mixture and hydrogen peroxide which is the substrate of CAT was produced in coupling mixture during immobilization time. Therefore, co-immobilization of GOD and CAT was carried out in presence of both their substrate: glucose and hydrogen peroxide, respectively. The effect of glucose concentration in immobilization mixture on activities of GOD and CAT of co-immobilized samples were investigated. Maximum GOD and CAT activities were determined for samples co-immobilized in presence of 15 and 20 mM glucose, respectively. Co-immobilization of GOD and CAT in presence of their substrates highly improved the activity and reusability of both enzymes. PMID:17345856

  11. Hydrogen storage capacity of lithium-doped KOH activated carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The hydrogen adsorption of lithium-doped KOH activated carbons has been studied. • Lithium doping improves their hydrogen adsorption affinity. • Lithium doping is more effective for materials with micropores of 0.8 nm or smaller. • Lithium reagent can alter the pore structure, depending on the raw material. • Optimizing the pore size and functional group is needed for better hydrogen uptake. - Abstract: The authors have studied the hydrogen adsorption performance of several types of lithium-doped KOH activated carbons. In the case of activated cokes, lithium doping improves their hydrogen adsorption affinity from 5.02 kg/m3 to 5.86 kg/m3 at 303 K. Hydrogen adsorption density increases by around 17% after lithium doping, likely due to the fact that lithium doping is more effective for materials with micropores of 0.8 nm or smaller. The effects of lithium on hydrogen storage capacity vary depending on the raw material, because the lithium reagent can react with the material and alter the pore structure, indicating that lithium doping has the effect of plugging or filling the micropores and changing the structures of functional groups, resulting in the formation of mesopores. Despite an observed decrease in hydrogen uptake, lithium doping was found to improve hydrogen adsorption affinity. Lithium doping increases hydrogen uptake by optimizing the pore size and functional group composition

  12. Interaction with the Redox Cofactor MYW and Functional Role of a Mobile Arginine in Eukaryotic Catalase-Peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasselhuber, Bernhard; Graf, Michael M H; Jakopitsch, Christa; Zamocky, Marcel; Nicolussi, Andrea; Furtmüller, Paul G; Oostenbrink, Chris; Carpena, Xavi; Obinger, Christian

    2016-06-28

    Catalase-peroxidases (KatGs) are unique bifunctional heme peroxidases with an additional posttranslationally formed redox-active Met-Tyr-Trp cofactor that is essential for catalase activity. On the basis of studies of bacterial KatGs, controversial mechanisms of hydrogen peroxide oxidation were proposed. The recent discovery of eukaryotic KatGs with differing pH optima of catalase activity now allows us to scrutinize those postulated reaction mechanisms. In our study, secreted KatG from the fungus Magnaporthe grisea (MagKatG2) was used to analyze the role of a remote KatG-typical mobile arginine that was shown to interact with the Met-Tyr-Trp adduct in a pH-dependent manner in bacterial KatGs. Here we present crystal structures of MagKatG2 at pH 3.0, 5.5, and 7.0 and investigate the mobility of Arg461 by molecular dynamics simulation. Data suggest that at pH ≥4.5 Arg461 mostly interacts with the deprotonated adduct Tyr. Elimination of Arg461 by mutation to Ala slightly increases the thermal stability but does not alter the active site architecture or the kinetics of cyanide binding. However, the variant Arg461Ala lost the wild-type-typical optimum of catalase activity at pH 5.25 (kcat = 6450 s(-1)) but exhibits a broad plateau between pH 4.5 and 7.5 (kcat = 270 s(-1) at pH 5.5). Moreover, significant differences in the kinetics of interconversion of redox intermediates of wild-type and mutant protein mixed with either peroxyacetic acid or hydrogen peroxide are observed. These findings together with published data from bacterial KatGs allow us to propose a role of Arg461 in the H2O2 oxidation reaction of KatG. PMID:27293030

  13. The localization of catalase in the pulmonary alveolar macrophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, P; Drath, D B; Engel, E E; Huber, G L

    1979-02-01

    A combined biochemical and cytochemical study of catalase was performed on alveolar macrophages lavaged from the lungs of adult male rats. Biochemically, catalase activity was present in both a high-speed granule fraction and in the supernatant. The granule-associated activity exhibited latency. Two methods of cell breakage, sonication and homogenization, yielded similar levels and distributions of catalase activity. Catalase activity in whole cells was identified cytochemically by the alkaline diaminobenzidine method and was localized within membrane-lined cytoplasmic granules similar in size to microperoxisomes and associated with cisternae of smooth endoplasmic reticulum. Localization of the reaction product was inhibited by 0.04 M aminotriazole, by cyanide, and by boiling prior to incubation. The cytochemical reaction continued in the absence of exogenous peroxide, but could be prevented by addition of catalase or pyruvate to the peroxide-free medium. Enzyme activity was also localized within a portion of the membrane-bound granules present in the cell fractions used for the biochemical assays. PMID:431040

  14. Mitochondrial targeted catalase suppresses invasive breast cancer in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment of invasive breast cancer has an alarmingly high rate of failure because effective targets have not been identified. One potential target is mitochondrial generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) because ROS production has been associated with changes in substrate metabolism and lower concentration of anti-oxidant enzymes in tumor and stromal cells and increased metastatic potential. Transgenic mice expressing a human catalase gene (mCAT) were crossed with MMTV-PyMT transgenic mice that develop metastatic breast cancer. All mice (33 mCAT positive and 23 mCAT negative) were terminated at 110 days of age, when tumors were well advanced. Tumors were histologically assessed for invasiveness, proliferation and metastatic foci in the lungs. ROS levels and activation status of p38 MAPK were determined. PyMT mice expressing mCAT had a 12.5 per cent incidence of high histological grade primary tumor invasiveness compared to a 62.5 per cent incidence in PyMT mice without mCAT. The histological grade correlated with incidence of metastasis with 56 per cent of PyMT mice positive for mCAT showing evidence of pulmonary metastasis compared to 85.4 per cent of PyMT mice negative for mCAT with pulmonary metastasis (p ≤ 0.05). PyMT tumor cells expressing mCAT had lower ROS levels and were more resistant to hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress than wild type tumor cells, suggesting that mCAT has the potential of quenching intracellular ROS and subsequent invasive behavior. The metastatic tumor burden in PyMT mice expressing mCAT was 0.1 mm2/cm2 of lung tissue compared with 1.3 mm2/cm2 of lung tissue in PyMT mice expressing the wild type allele (p ≤ 0.01), indicating that mCAT could play a role in mitigating metastatic tumor progression at a distant organ site. Expression of mCAT in the lungs increased resistance to hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress that was associated with decreased activation of p38MAPK suggesting ROS signaling is dependent on p38MAPK for

  15. Mitochondrial targeted catalase suppresses invasive breast cancer in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morton John

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment of invasive breast cancer has an alarmingly high rate of failure because effective targets have not been identified. One potential target is mitochondrial generated reactive oxygen species (ROS because ROS production has been associated with changes in substrate metabolism and lower concentration of anti-oxidant enzymes in tumor and stromal cells and increased metastatic potential. Methods Transgenic mice expressing a human catalase gene (mCAT were crossed with MMTV-PyMT transgenic mice that develop metastatic breast cancer. All mice (33 mCAT positive and 23 mCAT negative were terminated at 110 days of age, when tumors were well advanced. Tumors were histologically assessed for invasiveness, proliferation and metastatic foci in the lungs. ROS levels and activation status of p38 MAPK were determined. Results PyMT mice expressing mCAT had a 12.5 per cent incidence of high histological grade primary tumor invasiveness compared to a 62.5 per cent incidence in PyMT mice without mCAT. The histological grade correlated with incidence of metastasis with 56 per cent of PyMT mice positive for mCAT showing evidence of pulmonary metastasis compared to 85.4 per cent of PyMT mice negative for mCAT with pulmonary metastasis (p ≤ 0.05. PyMT tumor cells expressing mCAT had lower ROS levels and were more resistant to hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress than wild type tumor cells, suggesting that mCAT has the potential of quenching intracellular ROS and subsequent invasive behavior. The metastatic tumor burden in PyMT mice expressing mCAT was 0.1 mm2/cm2 of lung tissue compared with 1.3 mm2/cm2 of lung tissue in PyMT mice expressing the wild type allele (p ≤ 0.01, indicating that mCAT could play a role in mitigating metastatic tumor progression at a distant organ site. Expression of mCAT in the lungs increased resistance to hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress that was associated with decreased activation of p38MAPK

  16. Enhanced stability of catalase covalently immobilized on functionalized titania submicrospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hong; Liang, Yanpeng; Shi, Jiafu; Wang, Xiaoli; Yang, Dong; Jiang, Zhongyi

    2013-04-01

    In this study, a novel approach combing the chelation and covalent binding was explored for facile and efficient enzyme immobilization. The unique capability of titania to chelate with catecholic derivatives at ambient conditions was utilized for titania surface functionalization. The functionalized titania was then used for enzyme immobilization. Titania submicrospheres (500-600 nm) were synthesized by a modified sol-gel method and functionalized with carboxylic acid groups through a facile chelation method by using 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl) propionic acid as the chelating agent. Then, catalase (CAT) was covalently immobilized on these functionalized titania submicrospheres through 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl] carbodiimide hydrochloride/N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS) coupling reaction. The immobilized CAT retained 65% of its free form activity with a loading capacity of 100-150 mg/g titania. The pH stability, thermostability, recycling stability and storage stability of the immobilized CAT were evaluated. A remarkable enhancement in enzyme stability was achieved. The immobilized CAT retained 90% and 76% of its initial activity after 10 and 16 successive cycles of decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, respectively. Both the Km and the Vmax values of the immobilized CAT (27.4 mM, 13.36 mM/min) were close to those of the free CAT (25.7 mM, 13.46 mM/min). PMID:23827593

  17. Purification and Characterization of Catalase from Marine Bacterium Acinetobacter sp. YS0810

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhua Fu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The catalase from marine bacterium Acinetobacter sp. YS0810 (YS0810CAT was purified and characterized. Consecutive steps were used to achieve the purified enzyme as follows: ethanol precipitation, DEAE Sepharose ion exchange, Superdex 200 gel filtration, and Resource Q ion exchange. The active enzyme consisted of four identical subunits of 57.256 kDa. It showed a Soret peak at 405 nm, indicating the presence of iron protoporphyrin IX. The catalase was not apparently reduced by sodium dithionite but was inhibited by 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, hydroxylamine hydrochloride, and sodium azide. Peroxidase-like activity was not found with the substrate o-phenylenediamine. So the catalase was determined to be a monofunctional catalase. N-terminal amino acid of the catalase analysis gave the sequence SQDPKKCPVTHLTTE, which showed high degree of homology with those of known catalases from bacteria. The analysis of amino acid sequence of the purified catalase by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry showed that it was a new catalase, in spite of its high homology with those of known catalases from other bacteria. The catalase showed high alkali stability and thermostability.

  18. Phospholipase A2 activation by hydrogen peroxide during in vitro capacitation of buffalo spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shit, Sanjoy; Atreja, S K

    2004-05-01

    Progressively motile, washed buffalo spermatozoa (50 x 10(6) cells in 0.5 ml) were in vitro capacitated in HEPES containing Bovine Gamete Medium 3 (BGM3) in presence of heparin (10 microg/ml), and different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (10 to 100 microM). Spermatozoa (60%) were capacitated in presence of heparin compared to 56% in presence of 25 microM H2O2 (optimally found suitable for capacitation). The extent of capacitation was measured in terms of acrosome reaction (AR) induced by lysophosphatidyl choline (100 microg/ml). The acrosome reacted cells were counted after triple staining. Catalase (100 microg/ml) significantly reduced the sperm capacitation to 16-18% when added with H2O2, or alone in the capacitation medium. Phospholipase A2 activity of spermatozoa increased linearly up to 50 microM H2O2 concentration included in the assay system. Moreover, significant increase in phospholipase A2 activity was observed after capacitation by both, the heparin and 25 microM H2O2. The activity was always higher in acrosome reacted cells. PMID:15233473

  19. [Activity of hydrogen sulfide production enzymes in kidneys of rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mel'nyk, A V; Pentiuk, O O

    2009-01-01

    An experimental research of activity and kinetic descriptions of enzymes participating in formation of hydrogen sulfide in the kidney of rats has been carried out. It was established that cystein, homocystein and thiosulphate are the basic substrates for hydrogen sulfide synthesis. The higest activity for hydrogen sulfide production belongs to thiosulfate-dithiolsulfurtransferase and cysteine aminotransferase, less activity is characteristic of cystathionine beta-synthase and cystathio-nine gamma-lyase. The highest affinity to substrate is registered for thiosulfate-dithiolsulfurtransferase and cystathionine gamma-lyase. It is discovered that the substrate inhibition is typical of all hydrogen sulfide formation enzymes, although this characteristic is the most expressed thiosulfat-dithiolsulfurtransferase. PMID:20387629

  20. Synthesis and Antiviral Activity of Hydrogenated Ferulic Acid Derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Can Cui; Zhi-Peng Wang; Xiu-jiang Du; Li-Zhong Wang; Shu-Jing Yu; Xing-Hai Liu; Zheng-Ming Li; Wei-Guang Zhao

    2013-01-01

    A series of hydrogenated ferulic acid amide derivatives 4 were synthesized. The molecular structures of the synthesized compounds were analyzed by H1 NMR and HRMS. The biological activity study showed that some of them displayed excellent protection activity and curative activity against TMV at 500 μg/mL.

  1. Wpływ nawożenia mineralnego i nawadniania na aktyumość peroksydazy, katalazy i fosfatazy kwaśnej w dwóch fazach wzrostu kapusty i porów [The influence of mineral fertilization and irrigation on the activity of peroxidase, catalase and acid phosphatase of cabbage and leek in two stages of growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Gurgul

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available During the growth of plant, the very distinct increase of enzymatic activity of peroxidase and catalase was observed, but in case of acid phosphatase in smaller degree. An irrigation caused the decreasing of activity of all tested enzymes in both stages of cabbage growth. However, in case of leeks leaves sprinkling irrigation stimulated activity of catalase and acid phosphatase in both stages and peroxidase in the second stage of growth. The effectiveness of the mineral nutritive was differentiated, and often correlated with a level of soil moisture, kind of plant and its stage of growth.

  2. Hydrogen Energy Storage (HES) Activities at NREL; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichman, J.

    2015-04-21

    This presentation provides an overview of hydrogen and energy storage, including hydrogen storage pathways and international power-to-gas activities, and summarizes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's hydrogen energy storage activities and results.

  3. Embryonic catalase protects against ethanol embryopathies in acatalasemic mice and transgenic human catalase-expressing mice in embryo culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller-Pinsler, Lutfiya [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Wells, Peter G., E-mail: pg.wells@utoronto.ca [Division of Biomolecular Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the mechanism of ethanol (EtOH) teratogenicity, but the protective role of the embryonic antioxidative enzyme catalase is unclear, as embryonic activity is only about 5% of maternal levels. We addressed this question in a whole embryo culture model. C57BL/6 mouse embryos expressing human catalase (hCat) or their wild-type (C57BL/6 WT) controls, and C3Ga.Cg-Cat{sup b}/J catalase-deficient, acatalasemic (aCat) mouse embryos or their wild-type C3HeB/FeJ (C3H WT) controls, were explanted on gestational day (GD) 9 (plug = GD 1), exposed for 24 h to 2 or 4 mg/mL EtOH or vehicle, and evaluated for functional and morphological changes. hCat and C57BL/6 WT vehicle-exposed embryos developed normally, while EtOH was embryopathic in C57BL/6 WT embryos, evidenced by decreases in anterior neuropore closure, somites developed, turning and head length, whereas hCat embryos were protected (p < 0.001). Maternal pretreatment of C57BL/6 WT dams with 50 kU/kg PEG-catalase (PEG-cat) 8 h prior to embryo culture, which increases embryonic catalase activity, blocked all EtOH embryopathies (p < 0.001). Vehicle-exposed aCat mouse embryos had lower yolk sac diameters compared to WT controls, suggesting that endogenous ROS are embryopathic. EtOH was more embryopathic in aCat embryos than WT controls, evidenced by reduced head length and somite development (p < 0.01), and trends for reduced anterior neuropore closure, turning and crown–rump length. Maternal pretreatment of aCat dams with PEG-Cat blocked all EtOH embryopathies (p < 0.05). These data suggest that embryonic catalase is a determinant of risk for EtOH embryopathies. - Highlights: • Ethanol (EtOH) exposure causes structural embryopathies in embryo culture. • Genetically enhanced catalase (hCat) protects against EtOH embryopathies. • Genetically deficient catalase (aCat) exacerbates EtOH embryopathies. • Embryonic catalase is developmentally important. • Et

  4. Embryonic catalase protects against ethanol embryopathies in acatalasemic mice and transgenic human catalase-expressing mice in embryo culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the mechanism of ethanol (EtOH) teratogenicity, but the protective role of the embryonic antioxidative enzyme catalase is unclear, as embryonic activity is only about 5% of maternal levels. We addressed this question in a whole embryo culture model. C57BL/6 mouse embryos expressing human catalase (hCat) or their wild-type (C57BL/6 WT) controls, and C3Ga.Cg-Catb/J catalase-deficient, acatalasemic (aCat) mouse embryos or their wild-type C3HeB/FeJ (C3H WT) controls, were explanted on gestational day (GD) 9 (plug = GD 1), exposed for 24 h to 2 or 4 mg/mL EtOH or vehicle, and evaluated for functional and morphological changes. hCat and C57BL/6 WT vehicle-exposed embryos developed normally, while EtOH was embryopathic in C57BL/6 WT embryos, evidenced by decreases in anterior neuropore closure, somites developed, turning and head length, whereas hCat embryos were protected (p < 0.001). Maternal pretreatment of C57BL/6 WT dams with 50 kU/kg PEG-catalase (PEG-cat) 8 h prior to embryo culture, which increases embryonic catalase activity, blocked all EtOH embryopathies (p < 0.001). Vehicle-exposed aCat mouse embryos had lower yolk sac diameters compared to WT controls, suggesting that endogenous ROS are embryopathic. EtOH was more embryopathic in aCat embryos than WT controls, evidenced by reduced head length and somite development (p < 0.01), and trends for reduced anterior neuropore closure, turning and crown–rump length. Maternal pretreatment of aCat dams with PEG-Cat blocked all EtOH embryopathies (p < 0.05). These data suggest that embryonic catalase is a determinant of risk for EtOH embryopathies. - Highlights: • Ethanol (EtOH) exposure causes structural embryopathies in embryo culture. • Genetically enhanced catalase (hCat) protects against EtOH embryopathies. • Genetically deficient catalase (aCat) exacerbates EtOH embryopathies. • Embryonic catalase is developmentally important. • EtOH developmental

  5. Investigation of the Electrocatalytic Activity of Rhodium Sulfide for Hydrogen Evolution and Hydrogen Oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the synthesis of unsupported and carbon-supported, mixed phase, rhodium sulfide, using both a hydrogen sulfide source and a solid sulfur source. Samples with several different distributions of rhodium sulfide phases (Rh2S3, Rh17S15, RhS2 and metallic Rh) were obtained by varying the temperature and exposure time to H2S or sulfur to rhodium ratio when using solid sulfur. Samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), and the unsupported rhodium sulfide compounds studied using Raman spectroscopy to link Raman spectra to catalyst phases. The electrocatalytic activity of the rhodium sulfide compounds for hydrogen evolution and oxidation was measured using rotating disk electrode measurements in acidic conditions to simulate use in a flow cell. The most active phases for hydrogen evolution were found to be Rh3S4 and Rh17S15 (−0.34 V vs. Ag/AgCl required for 20 mA/cm2), while Rh2S3 and RhS2 phases were relatively inactive (−0.46 V vs. Ag/AgCl required for 20 mA/cm2 using RhS2/C). The hydrogen oxidation activity of all rhodium sulfide phases is significantly lower than the hydrogen evolution activity and is not associated with conductivity limitations

  6. Molecular Characterization of a Catalase Null Allele at the Cat3 Locus in Maize

    OpenAIRE

    Wadsworth, G. J.; Scandalios, J G

    1990-01-01

    Previous analysis has identified line IDS28 of maize (Zea mays L.) as being homozygous for a Catalase-3 (Cat3) null allele. Catalase-3 (CAT-3) protein-specific antibodies could not detect CAT-3 in extracts of several tissues of IDS28, which in a typical maize line possess CAT-3. The absence of CAT-3 resulted in a significant decrease in total catalase activity in those tissues where CAT-3 is the predominant catalase isozyme. RNA blot analysis indicated that IDS28 does not accumulate Cat3 tran...

  7. Infusing sodium bicarbonate suppresses hydrogen peroxide accumulation and superoxide dismutase activity in hypoxic-reoxygenated newborn piglets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang-Qin Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The effectiveness of sodium bicarbonate (SB has recently been questioned although it is often used to correct metabolic acidosis of neonates. The aim of the present study was to examine its effect on hemodynamic changes and hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2 generation in the resuscitation of hypoxic newborn animals with severe acidosis. METHODS: Newborn piglets were block-randomized into a sham-operated control group without hypoxia (n = 6 and two hypoxia-reoxygenation groups (2 h normocapnic alveolar hypoxia followed by 4 h room-air reoxygenation, n = 8/group. At 10 min after reoxygenation, piglets were given either i.v. SB (2 mEq/kg, or saline (hypoxia-reoxygenation controls in a blinded, randomized fashion. Hemodynamic data and blood gas were collected at specific time points and cerebral cortical H(2O(2 production was continuously monitored throughout experimental period. Plasma superoxide dismutase and catalase and brain tissue glutathione, superoxide dismutase, catalase, nitrotyrosine and lactate levels were assayed. RESULTS: Two hours of normocapnic alveolar hypoxia caused cardiogenic shock with metabolic acidosis (PH: 6.99 ± 0.07, HCO(3(-: 8.5 ± 1.6 mmol/L. Upon resuscitation, systemic hemodynamics immediately recovered and then gradually deteriorated with normalization of acid-base imbalance over 4 h of reoxygenation. SB administration significantly enhanced the recovery of both pH and HCO(3- recovery within the first hour of reoxygenation but did not cause any significant effect in the acid-base at 4 h of reoxygenation and the temporal hemodynamic changes. SB administration significantly suppressed the increase in H(2O(2 accumulation in the brain with inhibition of superoxide dismutase, but not catalase, activity during hypoxia-reoxygenation as compared to those of saline-treated controls. CONCLUSIONS: Despite enhancing the normalization of acid-base imbalance, SB administration during resuscitation did not provide any beneficial

  8. Reactive oxygen species detoxification by catalase is a major determinant of fecundity in the mosquito Anopheles gambiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJong, Randall J; Miller, Lisa M; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Gupta, Lalita; Kumar, Sanjeev; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2007-02-13

    The mosquito Anopheles gambiae is a primary vector of Plasmodium parasites in Africa. The effect of aging on reproductive output in A. gambiae females from three strains that differ in their ability to melanize Plasmodium and in their systemic levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a reactive oxygen species (ROS), was analyzed. The number of eggs oviposited after the first blood meal decreases with age in all strains; however, this decline was much more pronounced in the G3 (unselected) and R (refractory to Plasmodium infection) strains than in the S (highly susceptible to Plasmodium) strain. Reduction of ROS levels in G3 and R females by administration of antioxidants reversed this age-related decline in fecundity. The S and G3 strains were fixed for two functionally different catalase alleles that differ at the second amino acid position (Ser2Trp). Biochemical analysis of recombinant proteins revealed that the Trp isoform has lower specific activity and higher Km than the Ser isoform, indicating that the former is a less efficient enzyme. The Trp-for-Ser substitution appears to destabilize the functional tetrameric form of the enzyme. Both alleles are present in the R strain, and Ser/Ser females had significantly higher fecundity than Trp/Trp females. Finally, a systemic reduction in catalase activity by dsRNA-mediated knockdown significantly reduced the reproductive output of mosquito females, indicating that catalase plays a central role in protecting the oocyte and early embryo from ROS damage. PMID:17284604

  9. Reactive oxygen species detoxification by catalase is a major determinant of fecundity in the mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJong, Randall J.; Miller, Lisa M.; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Gupta, Lalita; Kumar, Sanjeev; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2007-01-01

    The mosquito Anopheles gambiae is a primary vector of Plasmodium parasites in Africa. The effect of aging on reproductive output in A. gambiae females from three strains that differ in their ability to melanize Plasmodium and in their systemic levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a reactive oxygen species (ROS), was analyzed. The number of eggs oviposited after the first blood meal decreases with age in all strains; however, this decline was much more pronounced in the G3 (unselected) and R (refractory to Plasmodium infection) strains than in the S (highly susceptible to Plasmodium) strain. Reduction of ROS levels in G3 and R females by administration of antioxidants reversed this age-related decline in fecundity. The S and G3 strains were fixed for two functionally different catalase alleles that differ at the second amino acid position (Ser2Trp). Biochemical analysis of recombinant proteins revealed that the Trp isoform has lower specific activity and higher Km than the Ser isoform, indicating that the former is a less efficient enzyme. The Trp-for-Ser substitution appears to destabilize the functional tetrameric form of the enzyme. Both alleles are present in the R strain, and Ser/Ser females had significantly higher fecundity than Trp/Trp females. Finally, a systemic reduction in catalase activity by dsRNA-mediated knockdown significantly reduced the reproductive output of mosquito females, indicating that catalase plays a central role in protecting the oocyte and early embryo from ROS damage. PMID:17284604

  10. Layer-by-layer self-assembly immobilization of catalases on wool fabrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J; Wang, Q; Fan, X R; Sun, X J; Huang, P H

    2013-04-01

    A new immobilization strategy of catalases on natural fibers was reported in this paper. Catalase (CAT) from Bacillus subtilis was assembled into multiple layers together with poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) on wool fabrics via layer-by-layer (LBL) electrostatic self-assembly deposition. The mechanism and structural evaluation of LBL electrostatic self-assembly were studied in terms of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), surface zeta potential, and apparent color depth (K/S). The SEM pictures showed obvious deposits absorbed on the wool surfaces after LBL self-assembly. The surface zeta potential and dyeing depth of CAT/PDDA-assembled wool fabrics presented a regular layer-by-layer alternating trend along with the change of deposited materials, revealing the multilayer structure of the wool fiber immobilized catalases. The V(max) values were found to be 2,500±238 U/mg protein for the free catalase and 1,000±102 U/mg protein for the immobilized catalase. The K(m) value of free catalase (11.25±2.3 mM) was found to be lower than that of the immobilized catalase (222.2±36.5 mM). The immobilized catalase remained high enzymatic activity and showed a measureable amount of reusability, which proved that LBL electrostatic self-assembly deposition is a promising approach to immobilize catalases. PMID:23420488

  11. Purification and characterization of an intracellular catalase-peroxidase from Penicillium simplicissimum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraaije, Marco W.; Roubroeks, Hanno P.; Hagen, Wilfred R.; Berkel, Willem J.H. van

    1996-01-01

    The first dimeric catalase-peroxidase of eucaryotic origin, an intracellular hydroperoxidase from Penicillium simplicissimum which exhibited both catalase and peroxidase activities, has been isolated. The enzyme has an apparent molecular mass of about 170 kDa and is composed of two identical subunit

  12. Comprehensive Functional Analysis of the Catalase Gene Family in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Yan Du; Peng-Cheng Wang; Jia Chen; Chun-Peng Song

    2008-01-01

    In Arabidopsis, catalase (CAT) genes encode a small family of proteins including CAT1, CAT2 and CAT3, which catalyze the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and play an important role in controlling homeostasis of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here, we analyze the expression profiles and activities of three catalases under different treatments including drought, cold, oxidative stresses, abscisic acid and salicylic acid in Arabidopsis. Our results reveal that CAT1 is an important player in the removal of H2O2 generated under various environmental stresses. CAT2 and CAT3 are major H2O2 scavengers that contribute to ROS homeostasis in light or darkness, respectively. In addition, CAT2 is activated by cold and drought stresses and CAT3 is mainly enhanced by abscisic acid and oxidative treatments as well as at the senescence stage. These results, together with previous data, suggest that the network of transcriptional control explains how CATs and other scavenger enzymes such as peroxidase and superoxide dismutase may be coordinately regulated during development, but differentially expressed in response to different stresses for controlling ROS homeostasis.

  13. Scale-up activation of carbon fibres for hydrogen storage

    OpenAIRE

    Kunowsky, Mirko; Marco Lozar, Juan Pablo; Cazorla Amorós, Diego; Linares Solano, Ángel

    2009-01-01

    In a previous study, we investigated, at a laboratory scale, the chemical activation of two different carbon fibres (CF), their porosity characterization, and their optimization for hydrogen storage [1]. In the present work, this study is extended to: (i) a larger range of KOH activated carbon fibres, (ii) a larger range of hydrogen adsorption measurements at different temperatures and pressures (i.e. at room temperature, up to 20 MPa, and at 77 K, up to 4 MPa), and (iii) a scaling-up activat...

  14. Catalase from the white shrimp Penaeus (Litopenaeus) vannamei: molecular cloning and protein detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares-Sánchez, Olga L; Gómez-Anduro, Gracia A; Felipe-Ortega, Ximena; Islas-Osuna, Maria A; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Yepiz-Plascencia, Gloria

    2004-08-01

    Catalase is an antioxidant enzyme that plays a very important role in the protection against oxidative damage by breaking down hydrogen peroxide. It is a very highly conserved enzyme that has been identified from numerous species including bacteria, fungi, plants and animals, but the information about catalase in crustaceans is very limited. A cDNA containing the complete coding sequence for catalase from the shrimp Penaeus (Litopenaeus) vannamei was sequenced and the mRNA was detected by RT-PCR in selected tissues. Catalase was detected in hepatopancreas crude extracts by Western blot analysis with anti-human catalase polyclonal antibodies. The nucleotide sequence is 1692 bp long, including a 72-bp 5'-UTR, a coding sequence of 1515 bp and a 104-bp 3'-UTR. The deduced amino acid sequence corresponds to 505 amino acids with high identity to invertebrate, vertebrate and even bacterial catalases and contains the catalytic residues His71, Asn144, and Tyr354. The predicted protein has a calculated molecular mass of 57 kDa; which coincides with the size of the subunit (approximately 55 kDa) and the tetrameric protein (approximately 230 kDa) detected in hepatopancreas extracts under native conditions. Catalase mRNA level was higher in hepatopancreas, followed by gills and was not detected in muscle. PMID:15325332

  15. Correlating hydrogen oxidation and evolution activity on platinum at different pH with measured hydrogen binding energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, WC; Zhuang, ZB; Gao, MR; Zheng, J; Chen, JGG; Yan, YS

    2015-01-08

    The hydrogen oxidation/evolution reactions are two of the most fundamental reactions in distributed renewable electrochemical energy conversion and storage systems. The identification of the reaction descriptor is therefore of critical importance for the rational catalyst design and development. Here we report the correlation between hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity and experimentally measured hydrogen binding energy for polycrystalline platinum examined in several buffer solutions in a wide range of electrolyte pH from 0 to 13. The hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity obtained using the rotating disk electrode method is found to decrease with the pH, while the hydrogen binding energy, obtained from cyclic voltammograms, linearly increases with the pH. Correlating the hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity to the hydrogen binding energy renders a monotonic decreasing hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity with the hydrogen binding energy, strongly supporting the hypothesis that hydrogen binding energy is the sole reaction descriptor for the hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity on monometallic platinum.

  16. Correlating hydrogen oxidation and evolution activity on platinum at different pH with measured hydrogen binding energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Wenchao; Zhuang, Zhongbin; Gao, Minrui; Zheng, Jie; Chen, Jingguang G.; Yan, Yushan

    2015-01-01

    The hydrogen oxidation/evolution reactions are two of the most fundamental reactions in distributed renewable electrochemical energy conversion and storage systems. The identification of the reaction descriptor is therefore of critical importance for the rational catalyst design and development. Here we report the correlation between hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity and experimentally measured hydrogen binding energy for polycrystalline platinum examined in several buffer solutions in a wide range of electrolyte pH from 0 to 13. The hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity obtained using the rotating disk electrode method is found to decrease with the pH, while the hydrogen binding energy, obtained from cyclic voltammograms, linearly increases with the pH. Correlating the hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity to the hydrogen binding energy renders a monotonic decreasing hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity with the hydrogen binding energy, strongly supporting the hypothesis that hydrogen binding energy is the sole reaction descriptor for the hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity on monometallic platinum.

  17. Complete nucleotide sequence of cDNA and deduced amino acid sequence of rat liver catalase.

    OpenAIRE

    Furuta, S.; Hayashi, H; Hijikata, M; Miyazawa, S.; Osumi, T; Hashimoto, T.

    1986-01-01

    We have isolated five cDNA clones for rat liver catalase (hydrogen peroxide:hydrogen peroxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.11.1.6). These clones overlapped with each other and covered the entire length of the mRNA, which had been estimated to be 2.4 kilobases long by blot hybridization analysis of electrophoretically fractionated RNA. Nucleotide sequencing was carried out on these five clones and the composite nucleotide sequence of catalase cDNA was determined. The 5' noncoding region contained 83 b...

  18. Overexpression of Catalase Diminishes Oxidative Cysteine Modifications of Cardiac Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxiang Yao

    Full Text Available Reactive protein cysteine thiolates are instrumental in redox regulation. Oxidants, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, react with thiolates to form oxidative post-translational modifications, enabling physiological redox signaling. Cardiac disease and aging are associated with oxidative stress which can impair redox signaling by altering essential cysteine thiolates. We previously found that cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase (Cat, an enzyme that detoxifies excess H2O2, protected from oxidative stress and delayed cardiac aging in mice. Using redox proteomics and systems biology, we sought to identify the cysteines that could play a key role in cardiac disease and aging. With a 'Tandem Mass Tag' (TMT labeling strategy and mass spectrometry, we investigated differential reversible cysteine oxidation in the cardiac proteome of wild type and Cat transgenic (Tg mice. Reversible cysteine oxidation was measured as thiol occupancy, the ratio of total available versus reversibly oxidized cysteine thiols. Catalase overexpression globally decreased thiol occupancy by ≥1.3 fold in 82 proteins, including numerous mitochondrial and contractile proteins. Systems biology analysis assigned the majority of proteins with differentially modified thiols in Cat Tg mice to pathways of aging and cardiac disease, including cellular stress response, proteostasis, and apoptosis. In addition, Cat Tg mice exhibited diminished protein glutathione adducts and decreased H2O2 production from mitochondrial complex I and II, suggesting improved function of cardiac mitochondria. In conclusion, our data suggest that catalase may alleviate cardiac disease and aging by moderating global protein cysteine thiol oxidation.

  19. Porównanie aktywności peroksydazy, katalazy i fosfatazy kwaśnej w liściach pora w okresie intensywnego wzrostu i pod koniec wegetacji roślin w rożnych warunkach uprawy [Dynamics of the changes of peroxidase, catalase, and acid phosphatase activities in leeks under the influence of nitrogen fertilization and irrigation

    OpenAIRE

    E. Gurgul; E. Kołota; D. Ściążko

    2015-01-01

    Results obtained in a field experiment showed a high influence of irrigation and nitrogen fertilization on the activity of peroxidase, while acid phosphatase activity showed only small differences. The peroxidase activity depended to a large degree on the leeks growth stage. Maximum peroxidase, catalase and - in some cases – acid phosphatase activity were found at nitrogen doses higher than optimal for the plant growth and yield.

  20. Porównanie aktywności peroksydazy, katalazy i fosfatazy kwaśnej w liściach pora w okresie intensywnego wzrostu i pod koniec wegetacji roślin w rożnych warunkach uprawy [Dynamics of the changes of peroxidase, catalase, and acid phosphatase activities in leeks under the influence of nitrogen fertilization and irrigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Gurgul

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Results obtained in a field experiment showed a high influence of irrigation and nitrogen fertilization on the activity of peroxidase, while acid phosphatase activity showed only small differences. The peroxidase activity depended to a large degree on the leeks growth stage. Maximum peroxidase, catalase and - in some cases – acid phosphatase activity were found at nitrogen doses higher than optimal for the plant growth and yield.

  1. Fluctuations in peroxidase and catalase activities of resistant and susceptible black gram (Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper) genotypes elicited by Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) feeding

    OpenAIRE

    Taggar, Gaurav Kumar; Gill, Ranjit Singh; Gupta, Anil Kumar; Sandhu, Jeet Singh

    2012-01-01

    Whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleryrodidae), is a serious pest of black gram, (Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper), an important legume pulse crop grown in north India. This research investigated the potential role of selected plant oxidative enzymes in resistance/susceptibility to whitefly in nine black gram genotypes. Oxidative enzyme activity was estimated spectrophotometrically from leaf samples collected at 30 and 50 d after sowing (DAS) from whitefly infested and uninfested plan...

  2. Allosteric activation of coagulation factor VIIa visualized by hydrogen exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rand, Kasper Dyrberg; Jørgensen, Thomas; Olsen, Ole H; Persson, Egon; Jensen, Ole; Stennicke, Henning R; Andersen, Mette

    2006-01-01

    Coagulation factor VIIa (FVIIa) is a serine protease that, after binding to tissue factor (TF), plays a pivotal role in the initiation of blood coagulation. We used hydrogen exchange monitored by mass spectrometry to visualize the details of FVIIa activation by comparing the exchange kinetics of ...... provide novel insights into the cofactor-induced activation of this important protease and reveal the potential for allosteric regulation in the trypsin family of proteases....

  3. Innovative Strategy on Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Utilizing Activated Liquid Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Bing-Joe; Chen, Hsiao-Chien; Mai, Fu-Der; Tsai, Hui-Yen; Yang, Chih-Ping; Rick, John; Liu, Yu-Chuan

    2015-11-01

    Splitting water for hydrogen production using light, or electrical energy, is the most developed ‘green technique’. For increasing efficiency in hydrogen production, currently, the most exciting and thriving strategies are focused on efficient and inexpensive catalysts. Here, we report an innovative idea for efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) utilizing plasmon-activated liquid water with reduced hydrogen-bonded structure by hot electron transfer. This strategy is effective for all HERs in acidic, basic and neutral systems, photocatalytic system with a g-C3N4 (graphite carbon nitride) electrode, as well as in an inert system with an ITO (indium tin oxide) electrode. Compared to deionized water, the efficiency of HER increases by 48% based on activated water ex situ on a Pt electrode. Increase in energy efficiency from activated water is 18% at a specific current yield of -20 mA in situ on a nanoscale-granulated Au electrode. Moreover, the onset potential of -0.023 V vs RHE was very close to the thermodynamic potential of the HER (0 V). The measured current density at the corresponding overpotential for HER in an acidic system was higher than any data previously reported in the literature. This approach establishes a new vista in clean green energy production.

  4. Rationalizing the Hydrogen and Oxygen Evolution Reaction Activity of Two-Dimensional Hydrogenated Silicene and Germanene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Caroline J; Chakraborty, Sudip; Anversa, Jonas; Baierle, Rogério J; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2016-01-20

    We have undertaken first-principles electronic structure calculations to show that the chemical functionalization of two-dimensional hydrogenated silicene (silicane) and germanene (germanane) can become a powerful tool to increase the photocatalytic water-splitting activity. Spin-polarized density functional theory within the GGA-PBE and HSE06 types of exchange correlation functionals has been used to obtain the structural, electronic, and optical properties of silicane and germanane functionalized with a series of nonmetals (N, P, and S), alkali metals (Li, Na, and K) and alkaline-earth metals (Mg and Ca). The surface-adsorbate interaction between the functionalized systems with H2 and O2 molecules that leads to envisaged hydrogen and oxygen evolution reaction activity has been determined. PMID:26704530

  5. Evaluation of malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase and catalase activity and their diagnostic value in drug naïve, first episode, non-smoker major depression patients and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camkurt, Mehmet Akif; Fındıklı, Ebru; İzci, Filiz; Kurutaş, Ergül Belge; Tuman, Taha Can

    2016-04-30

    Major depression is a most frequent disorder, its diagnosis depends on patient interview, and yet we do not have a reliable biomarker for depression. Oxidative stress is defined as increase in oxidation or decrease is antioxidant defense mechanisms. Here, we aimed to investigate malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activity and their diagnostic performance in depressed patients and healthy controls. We collected blood samples from 50 patients and 50 controls. We found MDA levels were significantly higher in the patients than controls, with medians at 4.04nmol/mg and 1.64nmol/mg, respectively, p<0.001. SOD activity was significantly decreased in depressed patients than healthy controls, with means at 143.50U/mg and 298.12U/mg, respectively, p<0.001. CAT activity was similar in both groups, p=0.517. ROC analysis showed good diagnostic value for MDA and SOD, with the area under the curve at 1.0 for both. We found high correlation between SOD and Ham-D scores (r=0.747, p<0.0001) and between MDA and Ham-D scores (r=0.785, p<0.0001). Overall, these results demonstrate that oxidative stress is increased in depressed patients. MDA increase seem to be a common finding for major depression. We believe MDA could be a good biomarker candidate for major depression, but not SOD. Future studies should focus on the diagnostic value of MDA in larger samples. PMID:27086215

  6. HYDROGEN SULFIDE ADSORPTION BY ALKALINE IMPREGNATED COCONUT SHELL ACTIVATED CARBON

    OpenAIRE

    HUI SUN CHOO; LEE CHUNG LAU; ABDUL RAHMAN MOHAMED; KEAT TEONG LEE

    2013-01-01

    Biogas is one type of renewable energy which can be burnt to produce heat and electricity. However, it cannot be burnt directly due to the presence of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) which is highly corrosive to gas engine. In this study, coconut shell activated carbon (CSAC) was applied as a porous adsorbent for H2S removal. The effect of amount of activated carbon and flow rate of gas stream toward adsorption capacity were investigated. Then, the activated carbons were impregnated by three types of ...

  7. Hydrogen peroxide mediates Rac1 activation of S6K1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We previously reported that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) mediates mitogen activation of ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) which plays an important role in cell proliferation and growth. In this study, we investigated a possible role of H2O2 as a molecular linker in Rac1 activation of S6K1. Overexpression of recombinant catalase in NIH-3T3 cells led to the drastic inhibition of H2O2 production by PDGF, which was accompanied by a decrease in S6K1 activity. Similarly, PDGF activation of S6K1 was significantly inhibited by transient transfection or stable transfection of the cells with a dominant-negative Rac1 (Rac1N17), while overexpression of constitutively active Rac1 (Rac1V12) in the cells led to an increase in basal activity of S6K1. In addition, stable transfection of Rat2 cells with Rac1N17 dramatically attenuated the H2O2 production by PDGF as compared with that in the control cells. In contrast, Rat2 cells stably transfected with Rac1V12 produced high level of H2O2 in the absence of PDGF, comparable to that in the control cells stimulated with PDGF. More importantly, elimination of H2O2 produced in Rat2 cells overexpressing Rac1V12 inhibited the Rac1V12 activation of S6K1, indicating the possible role of H2O2 as a mediator in the activation of S6K1 by Rac1. However, H2O2 could be also produced via other pathway, which is independent of Rac1 or PI3K, because in Rat2 cells stably transfected with Rac1N17, H2O2 could be produced by arsenite, which has been shown to be a stimulator of H2O2 production. Taken together, these results suggest that H2O2 plays a pivotal role as a mediator in Rac1 activation of S6K1

  8. Homocysteine thiolactone induces apoptotic DNA damage mediated by increased intracellular hydrogen peroxide and caspase 3 activation in HL-60 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, R F; Huang, S M; Lin, B S; Wei, J S; Liu, T Z

    2001-05-11

    The cytotoxicity of homocysteine derivatives on chromosomal damage in somatic cells is not well established. The present study used reactive homocysteine derivative of homocysteine thiolactone (Hcy) to investigate its causal effect on apoptotic DNA injury in human promyeloid HL-60 cells. Our results demonstrated that Hcy induced cell death and features of apoptosis including increased phosphotidylserine exposure on the membrane surface, increased apoptotic cells with hypoploid DNA contents, and internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, all of which occurred in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Hcy treatment also significantly increased intracellular reactive oxygen species H2O2, which coincided with the elimination of caspase 3 proenzyme levels and increased caspase 3 activity at the time of the appearance of apoptotic DNA fragmentation. Preincubation of Hcy-treated HL-60 cells with catalase completely scavenged intracellular H2O2, thus inhibiting caspase 3 activity and protecting cells from apoptotic DNA damage. In contrast, superoxide dismutase failed to inhibit Hcy-induced DNA damage. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Hcy exerted its genotoxic effects on HL-60 cells through an apoptotic pathway, which is mediated by the activation of caspase 3 activity induced by an increase in intracellular hydrogen peroxide. PMID:11432446

  9. Hydrogen desorption reactions of Li-N-H hydrogen storage system: Estimation of activation free energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dehydrogenation reactions of the mixtures of lithium amide (LiNH2) and lithium hydride (LiH) were studied under an Ar atmosphere by means of temperature programmed desorption (TPD) technique. The dehydrogenation reaction of the LiNH2/LiH mixture was accelerated by addition of 1 mol% Ti(III) species (k = 3.1 x 10-4 s-1 at 493 K), and prolonged ball-milling time (16 h) further enhanced reaction rate (k = 1.1 x 10-3 s-1 at 493 K). For the hydrogen desorption reaction of Ti(III) doped samples, the activation energies estimated by Kissinger plot (95 kJ mol-1) and Arrhenius plot (110 kJ mol-1) were in reasonable agreement. The LiNH2/LiH mixture without Ti(III) species, exhibited slower hydrogen desorption process and the kinetic traces deviated from single exponential behavior. The results indicated the Ti(III) additives change the hydrogen desorption reaction mechanism of the LiNH2/LiH mixture

  10. Atividade da catalase no pulmão, rim e intestino delgado não isquemiado de ratos após reperfusão intestinal Catalase activity in lung, kidney and small bowel non-ischemic in rats after intestinal reperfusion

    OpenAIRE

    Camila de Oliveira Ferro; Vera Lucia Antunes Chagas; Marcus Fernandes de Oliveira; Pedro Lagerblad de Oliveira; Alberto Schanaider

    2010-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Avaliar a atividade catalase, após lesão por isquemia e reperfusão intestinal e estudar as alterações deste antioxidante em órgãos situados à distância do insulto inicial. MÉTODOS: Utilizaram-se 18 ratos do tipo Wistar, aleatoriamente distribuídos em três grupos. 1-Controle, 2-Simulação e 3-Isquemia/Reperfusão. Neste último, realizou-se isquemia no íleo, por 60 minutos, seguida de reperfusão por 30 minutos. No grupo 2 efetuou-se apenas uma laparotomia. Foram retirados, de todos os a...

  11. Hydrogen and fuel cell activity report - France 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report gathers the main outstanding facts which occurred in France in the field of hydrogen and fuel cells in 2009. After having noticed some initiatives (French commitment in renewable energy production, new role for the CEA, cooperation between different research and industrial bodies, development of electric vehicles, research programs), the report presents several projects and programs regarding hydrogen: ANR programs, creation of a national structure, basic research by the CEA and CNRS, demonstration projects (H2E), transport applications (a hybrid 307 by Peugeot, the Althytude project by GDF and Suez, the Hychain European project by Air Liquide, a dirigible airship, an ultra-light aviation project, a submarine), some stationary applications (the Myrte project, a wind energy project), activity in small and medium-sized enterprises, regional initiatives, colloquiums and meetings.

  12. Hydrogen and fuel cell activity report - France 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report gathers the main outstanding facts which occurred in France in the field of hydrogen and fuel cells in 2010. After having noticed some initiatives (the Grenelle II law, an investment package, the new role of the CEA, the new role of the IFP), the report presents several projects and programs regarding hydrogen: ANR programs, creation of a national structure (the HyPaC platform), regional initiatives and local actions, colloquiums and meetings in France and in the world, research projects (photo-synthesis as a new electric energy source), a technical-economic investigation (HyFrance3), demonstrator projects (the Althytude project by GDF and Suez, the Plathee hybrid locomotive by the SNCF, the H2E project, the Zero CO2 sailing boat, and the Myrte project), educational applications, activity in small and medium-sized enterprises (CETH, SAGIM, HYCAN, McPhy, N-GHY).

  13. Effects of pergolide mesylate on transduction efficiency of PEP-1-catalase protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Eun Jeong; Kim, Dae Won; Kim, Young Nam; Kim, So Mi [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Soon Sung [Department of Food Science and Nutrition and RIC Center, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Tae-Cheon [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Hyeok Yil [Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Duk-Soo [Department of Anatomy, College of Medicine, Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan-Si 330-090 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sung-Woo [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Kyu Hyung; Park, Jinseu; Eum, Won Sik [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Hyun Sook, E-mail: wazzup@hallym.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Soo Young, E-mail: sychoi@hallym.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-18

    Research highlights: {yields} We studied effects of pergolide mesylate (PM) on in vitro and in vivo transduction of PEP-1-catalase. {yields} PEP-1-catatase inhibited 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced inflammation. {yields} PM enhanced the transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT cells and skin tissue. {yields} PM increased anti-inflammatory activity of PEP-1-catalase. {yields} PM stimulated therapeutic action of anti-oxidant enzyme catalase in oxidative-related diseases. -- Abstract: The low transduction efficiency of various proteins is an obstacle to their therapeutic application. However, protein transduction domains (PTDs) are well-known for a highly effective tool for exogenous protein delivery to cells. We examined the effects of pergolide mesylate (PM) on the transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT human keratinocytes and mice skin and on the anti-inflammatory activity of PEP-1-catatase against 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced inflammation using Western blot and histological analysis. PM enhanced the time- and dose-dependent transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT cells without affecting the cellular toxicity. In a mouse edema model, PEP-1-catalase inhibited the increased expressions of inflammatory mediators and cytokines such as cyclooxygenase-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase, interleukin-6 and -1{beta}, and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} induced by TPA. On the other hand, PM alone failed to exert any significant anti-inflammatory effects. However, the anti-inflammatory effect of co-treatment with PEP-1-catalase and PM was more potent than that of PEP-1-catalase alone. Our results indicate that PM may enhance the delivery of PTDs fusion therapeutic proteins to target cells and tissues and has potential to increase their therapeutic effects of such drugs against various diseases.

  14. Hexose Oxidase-Mediated Hydrogen Peroxide as a Mechanism for the Antibacterial Activity in the Red Seaweed Ptilophora subcostata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Kimi; Yamada, Kenji; Hatsugai, Noriyuki; Imada, Chiaki; Nishimura, Mikio

    2016-01-01

    Marine algae have unique defense strategies against microbial infection. However, their mechanisms of immunity remain to be elucidated and little is known about the similarity of the immune systems of marine algae and terrestrial higher plants. Here, we suggest a possible mechanism underlying algal immunity, which involves hexose oxidase (HOX)-dependent production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). We examined crude extracts from five different red algal species for their ability to prevent bacterial growth. The extract from one of these algae, Ptilophora subcostata, was particularly active and prevented the growth of gram-positive and -negative bacteria, which was completely inhibited by treatment with catalase. The extract did not affect the growth of either a yeast or a filamentous fungus. We partially purified from P. subcostata an enzyme involved in its antibacterial activity, which shared 50% homology with the HOX of red seaweed Chondrus crispus. In-gel carbohydrate oxidase assays revealed that P. subcostata extract had the ability to produce H2O2 in a hexose-dependent manner and this activity was highest in the presence of galactose. In addition, Bacillus subtilis growth was strongly suppressed near P. subcostata algal fronds on GYP agar plates. These results suggest that HOX plays a role in P. subcostata resistance to bacterial attack by mediating H2O2 production in the marine environment. PMID:26867214

  15. Hexose Oxidase-Mediated Hydrogen Peroxide as a Mechanism for the Antibacterial Activity in the Red Seaweed Ptilophora subcostata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimi Ogasawara

    Full Text Available Marine algae have unique defense strategies against microbial infection. However, their mechanisms of immunity remain to be elucidated and little is known about the similarity of the immune systems of marine algae and terrestrial higher plants. Here, we suggest a possible mechanism underlying algal immunity, which involves hexose oxidase (HOX-dependent production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2. We examined crude extracts from five different red algal species for their ability to prevent bacterial growth. The extract from one of these algae, Ptilophora subcostata, was particularly active and prevented the growth of gram-positive and -negative bacteria, which was completely inhibited by treatment with catalase. The extract did not affect the growth of either a yeast or a filamentous fungus. We partially purified from P. subcostata an enzyme involved in its antibacterial activity, which shared 50% homology with the HOX of red seaweed Chondrus crispus. In-gel carbohydrate oxidase assays revealed that P. subcostata extract had the ability to produce H2O2 in a hexose-dependent manner and this activity was highest in the presence of galactose. In addition, Bacillus subtilis growth was strongly suppressed near P. subcostata algal fronds on GYP agar plates. These results suggest that HOX plays a role in P. subcostata resistance to bacterial attack by mediating H2O2 production in the marine environment.

  16. Dual targeting of yeast catalase A to peroxisomes and mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, Ventsislava Y; Drescher, Diane; Kujumdzieva, Anna V; Schmitt, Manfred J

    2004-06-01

    Yeast catalase A (Cta1p) contains two peroxisomal targeting signals (SSNSKF) localized at its C-terminus and within the N-terminal third of the protein, which both can target foreign proteins to peroxisomes. In the present study we demonstrated that Cta1p can also enter mitochondria, although the enzyme lacks a classical mitochondrial import sequence. Cta1p co-targeting was studied in a catalase A null mutant after growth on different carbon sources, and expression of a Cta1p-GFP (green fluorescent protein)-fusion protein or a Cta1p derivative containing either a c-Myc epitope (Cta1p(myc)) or a SKF-extended tag (Cta1p(myc-SKF)). Peroxisomal and mitochondrial co-import of catalase A were tested qualitatively by fluorescence microscopy and functional complementation of a Delta cta1 null mutation, and quantitatively by subcellular fractionation followed by Western blot analysis and enzyme activity assays. Efficient Cta1p import into peroxisomes was observed when cells were cultivated under peroxisome-inducing conditions (i.e. growth on oleate), whereas significant co-import of Cta1p-GFP into mitochondria occurred when cells were grown under respiratory conditions that favour oxygen stress and ROS (reactive oxygen species) accumulation within this organelle. In particular, when cells were grown on the non-fermentable carbon source raffinose, respiration is maximally enhanced, and catalase A was efficiently targeted to the mitochondrial matrix where it presumably functions as scavenger of H2O2 and mitochondrial-derived ROS. PMID:14998369

  17. Involvement of catalase in the protective benefits of metformin in mice with oxidative liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jie; Liu, Mingwei; Ai, Qing; Lin, Ling; Wu, Kunwei; Deng, Xinyu; Jing, Yuping; Jia, Mengying; Wan, Jingyuan; Zhang, Li

    2014-06-01

    Metformin is a commonly used anti-diabetic drug with AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent hypoglycemic activities. Recent studies have revealed its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties. In the present study, the anti-oxidative potential of metformin and its potential mechanisms were investigated in a mouse model with carbon tetrachloride (CCl₂)-induced severe oxidative liver injury. Our results showed that treatment with metformin significantly attenuated CCl₂-induced elevation of serum aminotransferases and hepatic histological abnormalities. The alleviated liver injury was associated with decreased hepatic contents of oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and malondialdehyde (MDA). In addition, metformin treatment dose-dependently enhanced the activities of catalase (CAT) and decreased CCl₄-induced elevation of hepatic H₂O₂ levels, but it had no obvious effects on the protein level of CAT. We also found that metformin increased the level of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), but treatment with AMPK activator AICAR had no obvious effects on CAT activity. A molecular docking analysis indicated that metformin might interact with CAT via hydrogen bonds. These data suggested that metformin effectively alleviated CCl₄-induced oxidative liver injury in mice and these hepatoprotective effects might be associated with CAT. PMID:24717679

  18. The maximum specific hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures: definition and determination

    OpenAIRE

    Mu, Yang; Yang, Hou-Yun; Wang, Ya-Zhou; He, Chuan-Shu; Zhao, Quan-Bao; Yi WANG; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Fermentative hydrogen production from wastes has many advantages compared to various chemical methods. Methodology for characterizing the hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures is essential for monitoring reactor operation in fermentative hydrogen production, however there is lack of such kind of standardized methodologies. In the present study, a new index, i.e., the maximum specific hydrogen-producing activity (SHAm) of anaerobic mixed cultures, was proposed, and consequent...

  19. Activated carbon becomes active for oxygen reduction and hydrogen evolution reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xuecheng; Jia, Yi; Odedairo, Taiwo; Zhao, Xiaojun; Jin, Zhao; Zhu, Zhonghua; Yao, Xiangdong

    2016-06-21

    We utilized a facile method for creating unique defects in the activated carbon (AC), which makes it highly active for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). The ORR activity of the defective AC (D-AC) is comparable to the commercial Pt/C in alkaline medium, and the D-AC also exhibits excellent HER activity in acidic solution. PMID:27277286

  20. HYDROGEN SULFIDE ADSORPTION BY ALKALINE IMPREGNATED COCONUT SHELL ACTIVATED CARBON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUI SUN CHOO

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Biogas is one type of renewable energy which can be burnt to produce heat and electricity. However, it cannot be burnt directly due to the presence of hydrogen sulfide (H2S which is highly corrosive to gas engine. In this study, coconut shell activated carbon (CSAC was applied as a porous adsorbent for H2S removal. The effect of amount of activated carbon and flow rate of gas stream toward adsorption capacity were investigated. Then, the activated carbons were impregnated by three types of alkaline (NaOH, KOH and K2CO3 with various ratios. The effects of various types of alkaline and their impregnation ratio towards adsorption capacity were analysed. In addition, H2S influent concentration and the reaction temperature on H2S adsorption were also investigated. The result indicated that adsorption capacity increases with the amount of activated carbon and decreases with flow rate of gas stream. Alkaline impregnated activated carbons had better performance than unimpregnated activated carbon. Among all impregnated activated carbons, activated carbon impregnated by K2CO3 with ratio 2.0 gave the highest adsorption capacity. Its adsorption capacity was 25 times higher than unimpregnated activated carbon. The result also indicated that the adsorption capacity of impregnated activated carbon decreased with the increment of H2S influent concentration. Optimum temperature for H2S adsorption was found to be 50˚C. In this study, the adsorption of H2S on K2CO3 impregnated activated carbon was fitted to the Langmuir isotherm. The fresh and spent K2CO3 impregnated activated carbon were characterized to study the adsorption process.

  1. Effect of a protease inhibitor on the stability of catalase in liver and blood from acatalasemic and normal mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki,Kazuhiko

    1991-10-01

    Full Text Available Effects of Gabexate mesilate (GM (([ethyl-4-(6-guanidino hexanoyloxy benzoate] methane sulfonate, a protease inhibitor, on the activities of catalase in liver, erythrocytes and reticulocytes from acatalasemic mice were examined. Preincubation without GM at 37 degrees C for 160 min lowered the catalase activities of liver, erythrocytes and reticulocytes from acatalasemic mice, to 24%, 40% and 10% of the initial levels, respectively. But, preincubation with GM at 37 degrees C for 160 min delayed the rapid decrease in activities of residual catalases in the liver, erythrocytes and reticulocytes of acatalasemic mice to 65%, 93% and 85% of the initial values, respectively. At 20 degrees C or below, no reduction in catalase activity of reticulocytes from acatalasemic mice occurred with or even without GM. At pH 5.0, the decrease in catalase activity of acatalasemic mice was small both in the presence and the absence of GM. In the alkaline range, the reduction in the enzyme activity of the mutant mice without GM was enhanced with increase in pH values up to 8.5. But the presence of GM during preincubation at pH 7.5, retained the catalase activity of acatalasemic mice, to 64% of the activity at pH 6.5. These data suggest that some factors affected by GM, might be responsible for the low stability and activity of catalase in the acatalasemic mice.

  2. Hydrogen bonds of anti-HIV active aminophenols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkov, M. V.; Ksendzova, G. A.; Skornyakov, I. V.; Sorokin, V. L.; Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Shadyro, O. I.

    2011-05-01

    Analysis of IR-Fourier spectra from solutions and crystals of antiviral sulfo-containing aminophenols has shown that various types of intramolecular and intermolecular interactions can occur in molecules of these compounds. Three types of intramolecular hydrogen bonds (O-HṡṡṡN, O-HṡṡṡO=S=O, and N-HṡṡṡO=S=O) are formed in CCl4 solutions of the sulfo-containing aminophenols. The formation of intermolecular H-bonds involving the NH- and OH-groups and the preservation of the intramolecular O-HṡṡṡO=S=O H-bond are characteristic of the anti-HIV active aminophenol crystals. Spectral attributes are determined in order to distinguish between the anti-HIV active and inactive sulfo-containing aminophenols.

  3. 21 CFR 184.1034 - Catalase (bovine liver).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Catalase (bovine liver). 184.1034 Section 184.1034... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1034 Catalase (bovine liver). (a) Catalase (bovine liver) (CAS Reg. No. 81457-95-6) is an enzyme preparation obtained from extracts of bovine liver. It...

  4. Heterolytic Activation of Hydrogen Promoted by Ruthenium Nanoparticles immobilized on Basic Supports and Hydrogenation of Aromatic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Minfeng

    Despite the aggressive development and deployment of new renewable and nuclear technologies, petroleum-derived transportation fuels---gasoline, diesel and jet fuels---will continue to dominate the markets for decades. Environmental legislation imposes severe limits on the tolerable proportion of aromatics, sulfur and nitrogen contents in transportation fuels, which is difficult to achieve with current refining technologies. Catalytic hydrogenation plays an important role in the production of cleaner fuels, both as a direct means to reduce the aromatics and as a key step in the hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) and hydrodesulfurization (HDS) processes. However, conventional catalysts require drastic conditions and/or are easily poisoned by S or N aromatics. Therefore, there is still a need for new efficient catalysts for hydrogenation reactions relevant to the production of cleaner fossil fuels. Our catalyst design involves metallic nanoparticles intimately associated with a basic support, with the aim of creating a nanostructure capable of promoting the heterolytic activation of hydrogen and ionic hydrogenation mechanisms, as a strategy to avoid catalyst poisoning and enhance catalytic activity. We have designed and prepared a new nanostructured catalytic material composed of RuNPs immobilized on the basic polymer P4VPy. We have demonstrated that the Ru/P4VPy catalyst can promote heterolytic hydrogen activation and a unique surface ionic hydrogenation mechanism for the efficient hydrogenation of N-aromatics. This is the first time these ionic hydrogenation pathways have been demonstrated on solid surfaces. For the RuNPs surfaces without basic sites in close proximity, the conventional homolytic H2 splitting is otherwise involved. Using the mechanistic concepts from Ru/P4VPy, we have designed and prepared the Ru/MgO catalyst, with the aim to improve the catalytic efficiency for the hydrogenation of heteroatom aromatics operating by the ionic hydrogenation mechanism. The Ru

  5. Antioxidant activity of honey samples from Trás-os-Montes and inhibitory effect of hydrogen peroxide on pathogenic yeast growth

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Ana Paula; Ferreira, Isabel C.F.R.; Leticia M. Estevinho

    2007-01-01

    Honey has been used since ancient times in the treatment of respiratory infections and to heal wounds. These effects are related to its physical and chemical properties. The major antibacterial factor in honey is hydrogen peroxide, which is produced by glucose oxidase originating from hypopharyngeal glands of honey bees, and by catalase, which a originates from pollen

  6. Lunar hydrogen: A resource for future use at lunar bases and space activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Everett K., Jr.; Bustin, Roberta; Mckay, David S.

    1988-01-01

    Hydrogen abundances were determined for grain size separates of five lunar soils and one soil breccia. The hydrogen abundance studies have provided important baseline information for engineering models undergoing study at the present time. From the studies is appears that there is sufficient hydrogen present in selected lunar materials which could be recovered to support future space activities. It is well known that hydrogen can be extracted from lunar soils by heating between 400 and 800 C. Recovery of hydrogen for regolith materials would involve heating with solar mirrors and collecting the released hydrogen. Current baseline models for the lunar base are requiring the production of 1000 metric tons of oxygen per year. From this requirement it follows that around 117 metric tons per year of hydrogen would be required for the production of water. The ability to obtain hydrogen from the lunar regolith would assist in lowering the operating costs of any lunar base.

  7. Hydrogen

    OpenAIRE

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-01-01

    The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the...

  8. Effect of activity differences on hydrogen migration in dissimilar titanium alloy welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of alloy composition on hydrogen activity was measured for seven titanium alloys as a means to determine the tendency for hydrogen migration within dissimilar metal welds. The alloys were: Ti-CP (unalloyed Ti), Ti-3Al-2.5V, Ti-3Al-2.5V-3Zr, Ti-3Al-2Nb-1Ta, Ti-6Al, Ti-6Al-4V, and Ti-6Al-2Nb-1Ta-0.8Mo. Hydrogen pressure-hydrogen concentration relationships were determined for temperatures from 600 C to 800 C and hydrogen concentrations up to approximately 3.5 at. pct (750 wppm). Fusion welds were made between Ti-CP and Ti-CP and between Ti-CP and Ti-6Al-4V to observe directly the hydrogen redistribution in similar and dissimilar metal couples. Hydrogen activity was found to be significantly affected by alloying elements, particularly Al in solid solution. At a constant Al content and temperature, an increase in the volume fraction of β reduced the activity of hydrogen in α-β alloys. Activity was also found to be strongly affected by temperature. The effect of temperature differences on hydrogen activity was much greater than the effects resulting from alloy composition differences at a given temperature. Thus, hydrogen redistribution should be expected within similar metal couples subjected to extreme temperature gradients, such as those peculiar to fusion welding. Significant hydrogen redistribution in dissimilar alloy weldments also can be expected for many of the compositions in this study. Hydride formation stemming from these driving forces was observed in the dissimilar couple fusion welds. In addition, a basis for estimating hydrogen migration in titanium welds, based on hydrogen activity data, is described

  9. Molecular Insights into the Potential Toxicological Interaction of 2-Mercaptothiazoline with the Antioxidant Enzyme—Catalase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhenxing; Huang, Ming; Mi, Chenyu; Wang, Tao; Chen, Dong; Teng, Yue

    2016-01-01

    2-mercaptothiazoline (2-MT) is widely used in many industrial fields, but its residue is potentially harmful to the environment. In this study, to evaluate the biological toxicity of 2-MT at protein level, the interaction between 2-MT and the pivotal antioxidant enzyme—catalase (CAT) was investigated using multiple spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling. The results indicated that the CAT fluorescence quenching caused by 2-MT should be dominated by a static quenching mechanism through formation of a 2-MT/CAT complex. Furthermore, the identifications of the binding constant, binding forces, and the number of binding sites demonstrated that 2-MT could spontaneously interact with CAT at one binding site mainly via Van der Waals’ forces and hydrogen bonding. Based on the molecular docking simulation and conformation dynamic characterization, it was found that 2-MT could bind into the junctional region of CAT subdomains and that the binding site was close to enzyme active sites, which induced secondary structural and micro-environmental changes in CAT. The experiments on 2-MT toxicity verified that 2-MT significantly inhibited CAT activity via its molecular interaction, where 2-MT concentration and exposure time both affected the inhibitory action. Therefore, the present investigation provides useful information for understanding the toxicological mechanism of 2-MT at the molecular level. PMID:27537873

  10. Antibacterial activity of hydrogen peroxide and the lactoperoxidase-hydrogen peroxide-thiocyanate system against oral streptococci.

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, E L; Milligan, T W; Joyner, R E; Jefferson, M M

    1994-01-01

    In secreted fluids, the enzyme lactoperoxidase (LP) catalyzes the oxidation of thiocyanate ion (SCN-) by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), producing the weak oxidizing agent hypothiocyanite (OSCN-), which has bacteriostatic activity. However, H2O2 has antibacterial activity in the absence of LP and thiocyanate (SCN-). Therefore, LP may increase antibacterial activity by using H2O2 to produce a more effective inhibitor of bacterial metabolism and growth, or LP may protect bacteria against the toxicity...

  11. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  12. The maximum specific hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures: definition and determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Yang; Yang, Hou-Yun; Wang, Ya-Zhou; He, Chuan-Shu; Zhao, Quan-Bao; Wang, Yi; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-06-01

    Fermentative hydrogen production from wastes has many advantages compared to various chemical methods. Methodology for characterizing the hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures is essential for monitoring reactor operation in fermentative hydrogen production, however there is lack of such kind of standardized methodologies. In the present study, a new index, i.e., the maximum specific hydrogen-producing activity (SHAm) of anaerobic mixed cultures, was proposed, and consequently a reliable and simple method, named SHAm test, was developed to determine it. Furthermore, the influences of various parameters on the SHAm value determination of anaerobic mixed cultures were evaluated. Additionally, this SHAm assay was tested for different types of substrates and bacterial inocula. Our results demonstrate that this novel SHAm assay was a rapid, accurate and simple methodology for determining the hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures. Thus, application of this approach is beneficial to establishing a stable anaerobic hydrogen-producing system.

  13. Purification and characterization of oxygen-inducible haem catalase from oxygen-tolerant Bifidobacterium asteroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kyohei; Maekawa, Itaru; Tanaka, Kunifusa; Ijyuin, Susumu; Shiwa, Yu; Suzuki, Ippei; Niimura, Youichi; Kawasaki, Shinji

    2013-01-01

    Bifidobacterium asteroides, originally isolated from honeybee intestine, was found to grow under 20% O(2) conditions in liquid shaking culture using MRS broth. Catalase activity was detected only in cells that were exposed to O(2) and grown in medium containing a haem source, and these cells showed higher viability on exposure to H(2)O(2). Passage through multiple column chromatography steps enabled purification of the active protein, which was identified as a homologue of haem catalase on the basis of its N-terminal sequence. The enzyme is a homodimer composed of a subunit with a molecular mass of 55 kDa, and the absorption spectrum shows the typical profile of bacterial haem catalase. A gene encoding haem catalase, which has an amino acid sequence coinciding with the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the purified protein, was found in the draft genome sequence data of B. asteroides. Expression of the katA gene was induced in response to O(2) exposure. The haem catalase from B. asteroides shows about 70-80% identity with those from lactobacilli and other lactic acid bacteria, and no homologues were found in other bifidobacterial genomes. PMID:23154971

  14. recA and catalase in H sub 2 O sub 2 -mediated toxicity in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassett, D.J.; Charniga, L.; Cohen, M.S. (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (USA))

    1990-12-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae cells defective in the biosynthesis of the recA gene product are no more sensitive to hydrogen peroxide than wild-type cells. Although gonococci possess nearly 100-fold-greater catalase levels than Escherichia coli, they are more susceptible to hydrogen peroxide than this organism. The natural niche of gonococci undoubtedly results in exposure to oxidant stress; however, they do not demonstrate particularly efficient antioxidant defense systems.

  15. Activated carbons from African oil palm waste shells and fibre for hydrogen storage

    OpenAIRE

    Liliana Giraldo; Maria Fernanda González-Navarro; Juan Carlos Moreno-Piraján

    2013-01-01

    We prepared a series of activated carbons by chemical activation with two strong bases in-group that few use, and I with waste from shell and fibers and oil-palm African. Activated carbons are obtained with relatively high surface areas (1605 m2/g). We study the textural and chemical properties and its effect on hydrogen storage. The activated carbons obtained from fibrous wastes exhibit a high hydrogen storage capacity of 6.0 wt % at 77 K and 12 bar.

  16. Ectopic catalase expression in mitochondria by adeno-associated virus enhances exercise performance in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejia Li

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is thought to compromise muscle contractility. However, administration of generic antioxidants has failed to convincingly improve performance during exhaustive exercise. One possible explanation may relate to the inability of the supplemented antioxidants to effectively eliminate excessive free radicals at the site of generation. Here, we tested whether delivering catalase to the mitochondria, a site of free radical production in contracting muscle, could improve treadmill performance in C57Bl/6 mice. Recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype-9 (AV.RSV.MCAT was generated to express a mitochondria-targeted catalase gene. AV.RSV.MCAT was delivered to newborn C57Bl/6 mouse circulation at the dose of 10(12 vector genome particles per mouse. Three months later, we observed a approximately 2 to 10-fold increase of catalase protein and activity in skeletal muscle and the heart. Subcellular fractionation western blot and double immunofluorescence staining confirmed ectopic catalase expression in the mitochondria. Compared with untreated control mice, absolute running distance and body weight normalized running distance were significantly improved in AV.RSV.MCAT infected mice during exhaustive treadmill running. Interestingly, ex vivo contractility of the extensor digitorum longus muscle was not altered. Taken together, we have demonstrated that forced catalase expression in the mitochondria enhances exercise performance. Our result provides a framework for further elucidating the underlying mechanism. It also raises the hope of applying similar strategies to remove excessive, pathogenic free radicals in certain muscle diseases (such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy and ameliorate muscle disease.

  17. Biological effects from a static magnetic field generated by a 0.5 T Magnetic Resonance system on the enzyme activity of catalase and creatin kinase in rodents; Effetti biologici del campo magnetico statico di un tomografo a Risonanza Magnetica da 0,5 T sull'attivita' enzimatica della catalasi e della creatinchinasi nel ratto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salerno, S. [Ist. di Radiologia P. Cignolini, Palermo (Italy); Ciaccio, M.; Bono, A. [Palermo Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Chimica Biologica; Lo Casto, A. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Palermo (Italy). Ist. per lo Studio di Metodologie Diagnostiche Avanzate; De Maria, M.; Lagalla, R.; Cardinale, A.E.

    1999-03-01

    The authors investigated possible alterations in the enzyme activity of catalase and isozyme MB-creatin kinase induced by prolonged exposure of laboratory rodents to a static magnetic field generated by a 0.5 T Magnetic Resonance unit. The results seems to exclude any alterations in the activity of catalase and MB-CK after exposure. However some homeostatic mechanism peculiar to multi cellular organisms might act 'in vivo' to adapt to the effects of the static magnetic field during exposure. [Italian] Scopo del presente lavoro e' indagere l'eventuale verificarsi di alterazioni dell'attivita' enzimatica della catalasi e dell'isoenzima MB della creatinchinasi, indotte dalla prolungata esposizione di animali da laboratorio al campo magnetico statico generato da un Tomografo a Risonanza Magnetica (RM) da 0,5 T. I risultati del lavoro porterebbero a escludere alterazioni dell'attivita' della catalasi e della MB-creatinchinasi conseguenti all'esposizione. Occorre tuttavia rilevare che 'in vivo' possono agire alcuni meccanismo omeospatici, peculiari degli organismi pluricellulari, di adattamento agli effetti dei campi magnetici, che potrebbero essere intervenuti durante l'esposizione.

  18. Hydrogen inventory and embrittlement in low activation steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results on hydrogen permeation and diffusion in virgin and preirradiated iron and martensitic MANET II are compared to literature data on iron and other ferritic/martensitic steels. Both permeability and diffusivity decrease with increasing alloying content. While preirradiation to 1.5 .10-3 dpa has negligible effect on permeation and diffusion, simultaneous irradiation enhances permeability in Fe and MANET II below ∼300 C. Diffusivity shows a strong pressure dependence and deviation from Arrhenius-type temperature dependence. Diffusion of implanted hydrogen shows a behaviour different from that derived from gas permeation. The hydrogen inventory in a fusion reactor blanket is roughly estimated and compared to the critical concentration for hydrogen embrittlement. Hardness of hydrogen implanted MANET II and F82H shows no pecularities compared to helium implantation and only slightly differs from irradiation without implantation. Tensile tests on F82H at 30 C and 200 C after implantation to hydrogen concentration above ∼10 wtppm show large variation, possibly due to formation of microcracks, while measurements at 350 C show no effect of implantation. (orig.)

  19. Layer-by-layer assembled multilayers using catalase-encapsulated gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We introduce a novel and versatile approach for the preparation of multilayers, based on catalase-encapsulated gold nanoparticles (CAT-AuNP), allowing electrostatic charge reversal and structural transformation through pH adjustment. CAT-AuNP, which are synthesized directly from CAT stabilizer, can be electrostatically assembled with anionic and cationic PEs as a result of the charge reversal of the catalase stabilizers through pH control. In particular, at pH 5.2, near the pI of catalase, dispersed CAT-AuNP are structurally transformed into colloidal or network CAT-AuNP nanocomposites. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the layer-by-layer assembled multilayers composed of PEs and CAT-AuNP induce an effective electron transfer between CAT and the electrode as well as a high loading of CAT and AuNP, and resultantly exhibit a highly catalytic activity toward H2O2.

  20. Influence of activated carbon amended ASBR on anaerobic fermentative hydrogen production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xie, Li; Wang, Lei; Zhou, Qi; Luo, Gang

    2013-01-01

    amended anazrobic seguencs batch reactor (ASBRs) was more stable than that of ASBRs without activated carbon addition regarding on hydrogen production and pH. Higher hydrogen yield(HY) and hydrogen producing rate(HPR) were observed in the activated carbon amended ASBRs, with 65%, 63%, 54%, 56% enhancement...... of hydrogen yield in smaller size activated carbon amended reactor under the tested HRT ranges, and the maximum HPR of (7.09±0.31)L·(L·d)-1 and HY of (1.42±0.03) mol·mol-1 was obtained at HRT of 12h. The major soluble products form hydrogen fermentation were n-butyric acid and acetic acid, accounting...

  1. Determination of catalase, peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase within the genus Legionella.

    OpenAIRE

    Pine, L; Hoffman, P S; Malcolm, G B; Benson, R F; Keen, M G

    1984-01-01

    We examined 40 strains of Legionella for reduced-oxygen scavenging enzymes. Using a simple reaction chamber with a Swinney filter for the Beers and Sizer assay, we determined the catalase activity of live cells grown on buffered charcoal-yeast extract agar. For 29 strains of Legionella pneumophila, the apparent first-order rate constants for catalase ranged from 0.000 to 0.005. Similarly, low values ranging from 0.001 to 0.005 were observed for Legionella wadsworthii, Legionella oakridgensis,...

  2. New evidence on the role of catalase in Escherichia coli-mediated biocorrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► MIC on stainless by catalase deficient Escherichia coli bacteria reveals the enzyme influence. ► The localized damage was greater in the presence of the wild E. coli. ► Catalase assists oxygen generation by disproportionation of H2O2 to H2O and O2. - Abstract: The role of catalase on the microbiologically influenced corrosion mechanism by Escherichia coli (E. coli) has been examined, employing wild type and catalase-deficient cells. The bacteria were cultured for different times in the presence of AISI 316L stainless steel samples. The morphologies of the metallic surfaces covered by biofilms were studied by optical microscopy. The localized corrosion catalyzed by the bacteria was followed by scanning electron microscopy after immersion in the bacterial culture for different times. Susceptibility to corrosion was further investigated by potentiodynamic measurements. It was found that wild type E. coli is more aggressive than the mutant one, suggesting a role for catalase in increasing the kinetics of the cathodic reaction and, consequently, the global corrosion process. This correlates with oxygen uptake kinetics, as determined by differential pulse voltammetry on a pyrolytic graphite electrode modified with cobalt phthalocyanine, which was higher in the presence of wild type E. coli. When H2O2 was deliberately added to the culture medium, wild type E. coli catalyzed oxygen disproportionation more efficiently than the mutant derivative, thus limiting H2O2 accumulation in the medium and, hence, bacterial poisoning. In fact, the reduced adhesion of mutant cells to the metal substrate is apparently the result of H2O2 accumulation in the culture broth. Thus, the rapid consumption of oxygen and peroxide in the presence of wild type E. coli is associated with the catalysis of H2O2 disproportionation to water and oxygen. On the stainless steel, however, a dual mechanism of oxygen reduction, i.e. through formation of hydrogen peroxide and by formation

  3. Improved human sperm recovery using superoxide dismutase and catalase supplementation in semen cryopreservation procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, T; Mazzilli, F; Delfino, M; Dondero, F

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of ROS scavenger supplementation in human semen samples undergoing cryopreservation procedures.After screening out andrological pathologies, we selected 25 male partners of infertile couples with the following semen profile: volume >/= 2.0 ml, normal viscosity, sperm count >/=20 x 10(6)/ml, straight progressive motility (classes 1 and 2) >/= 40% (Mazzilli, Rossi, Delfino and Nofroni (1999) Andrologia 31: 187-194), atypical forms semen analysis and the Hypoosmotic Viability Test (HVT) were carried out; the samples were then divided into 4 aliquots. The first was untreated as a control; 200 U/ml of superoxide dismutase (SOD) was added to the second, 200 U/ml of catalase to the third and both SOD (100 U/ml) and catalase (100 U/ml) were added to the fourth aliquot. Each aliquot was mixed (v/v) with TEST yolk buffer freezing medium (Irvine Scientific) and then frozen at -196 degrees C. The percent recovery of progressive motile and swollen spermatozoa was evaluated after thawing.No significant variation in the recovery of progressive motility was seen in the aliquots with added SOD or catalase alone, compared to the control group. On the other hand, a significant improvement in sperm parameter recovery was seen in the aliquot with both SOD and catalase supplementation; perhaps because of their combined and simultaneous action on superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide. These results suggest that, in some selected cases, SOD and catalase supplementation can contribute greatly to the prevention of sperm membrane lipid peroxidation by ROS and thus allow good sperm parameter recovery after freezing-thawing procedures. PMID:15256925

  4. Gold Supported on Graphene Oxide: An Active and Selective Catalyst for Phenylacetylene Hydrogenations at Low Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shao, Lidong; Huang, Xing; Teschner, Detre;

    2014-01-01

    A constraint to industrial implementation of gold-catalyzed alkyne hydrogenation is that the catalytic activity was always inferior to those of other noble metals. In this work, gold was supported on graphene oxide (Au/GO) and used in a hydrogenation application. A 99% selectivity toward styrene...

  5. Catalytic activity of Ni3S2 and effects of reactor wall in hydrogen production from water with hydrogen sulphide as a reducer under hydrothermal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalytic activity of Ni3S2 and the effects of reactor wall in the hydrogen production from water were investigated under hydrothermal conditions using hydrogen sulphide (H2S) as a reductant. It was found that Ni3S2 catalysed the hydrogen production from water and may act as a semi-conductor catalyst. In the case of addition of Ni3S2, the time required to achieve the maximum hydrogen yield significantly decreased and the maximum hydrogen yield increased. These results suggest that the Ni3S2 formed as a corrosion product of the reactor wall when using the Hastelloy C-276 lined reactor should play a catalytic role in the hydrogen production. These results could facilitate studies for the synthesis of highly active catalysts for the production of hydrogen under mild conditions

  6. 21 CFR 173.135 - Catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus... Micrococcus lysodeikticus. Bacterial catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus by a pure culture... cheese, in accordance with the following conditions. (a) The organism Micrococcus lysodeikticus...

  7. Activity of hydrogen in metal-hydrogen systems: strontium, thorium-nitrogen, and vanadium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dissolution of H gas has been studied using pressure-composition isotherms in Sr, Th-N and V alloys containing either Nb, Cr or Ti. Direct H equilibrium vapor pressure measurements were performed in the Sr-H and Th-N-H systems at 973 to 11730K and 623 to 11230K, respectively. Isopiestic solubility was used to measure the H equilibrium pressures for the V alloys at 223 to 4730K. In all the alloys studied, the reaction of hydrogen with the metal phase was exothermic and hydrogen followed Sieverts' law over a considerable range of hydrogen concentration. The enthalpy of solution of H in the Sr and the enthalpy of formation of ThNH/sub x/ are -14.3 +- 1.2 kcal;/mol H and -16.3 +- 1.5 kcal/mol H2, respectively. Enthalpies of solution of H for the V alloys ranged from -8.0 to -10.5 +- 0.3 kcal/mol H. Additions of T to V dramatically enhanced the isopiestic solubility of H, Cr significantly reduced the solubility and Nb moderately increased the solubility. Sieverts' law behavior for H in the V alloys showed that substitutional atoms did not act as deep traps for H

  8. Influence of ionizing radiation on synthesis and molecular heterogeneity of catalase in tissue culture of Rauwolfia serpentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in activity and molecular heterogeneity of catalase in tissue culture of Rauwolfia serpentina following irradiation in early growth period at the doses of 8 and 50 Gy has been studied. Ionizing radiation accelerate the synthesis and degradation rates of catalase and total protein. A comparative study of changes in enzyme and protein turnover during growth on irradiated and non-irradiated medium has been made

  9. Two step novel hydrogen system using additives to enhance hydrogen release from the hydrolysis of alane and activated aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidan, Ragaiy; Teprovich, Joseph A.; Motyka, Theodore

    2015-12-01

    A system for the generation of hydrogen for use in portable power systems is set forth utilizing a two-step process that involves the thermal decomposition of AlH.sub.3 (10 wt % H.sub.2) followed by the hydrolysis of the activated aluminum (Al*) byproduct to release additional H.sub.2. Additionally, a process in which water is added directly without prior history to the AlH.sub.3:PA composite is also disclosed.

  10. Analysis of near-term production and market opportunities for hydrogen and related activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauro, R.; Leach, S. [National Hydrogen Association, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This paper summarizes current and planned activities in the areas of hydrogen production and use, near-term venture opportunities, and codes and standards. The rationale for these efforts is to assess industry interest and engage in activities that move hydrogen technologies down the path to commercialization. Some of the work presented in this document is a condensed, preliminary version of reports being prepared under the DOE/NREL contract. In addition, the NHA work funded by Westinghouse Savannah River Corporation (WSRC) to explore the opportunities and industry interest in a Hydrogen Research Center is briefly described. Finally, the planned support of and industry input to the Hydrogen Technical Advisory Panel (HTAP) on hydrogen demonstration projects is discussed.

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a cold-adapted catalase from Vibrio salmonicida

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monoclinic (P21) crystals of a His-tagged form of V. salmonicida catalase without cofactor diffract X-rays to 1.96 Å. Catalase (EC 1.11.1.6) catalyses the breakdown of hydrogen peroxide to water and molecular oxygen. Recombinant Vibrio salmonicida catalase (VSC) possesses typical cold-adapted features, with higher catalytic efficiency, lower thermal stability and a lower temperature optimum than its mesophilic counterpart from Proteus mirabilis. Crystals of VSC were produced by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using ammonium sulfate as precipitant. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 98.15, b = 217.76, c = 99.28 Å, β = 110.48°. Data were collected to 1.96 Å and a molecular-replacement solution was found with eight molecules in the asymmetric unit

  12. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a cold-adapted catalase from Vibrio salmonicida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riise, Ellen Kristin [The Norwegian Structural Biology Centre, Faculty of Science, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø (Norway); Lorentzen, Marit Sjo [Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Institute of Medical Biology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø (Norway); Helland, Ronny [The Norwegian Structural Biology Centre, Faculty of Science, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø (Norway); Willassen, Nils Peder, E-mail: nilspw@fagmed.uit.no [The Norwegian Structural Biology Centre, Faculty of Science, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø (Norway); Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Institute of Medical Biology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø (Norway)

    2006-01-01

    Monoclinic (P2{sub 1}) crystals of a His-tagged form of V. salmonicida catalase without cofactor diffract X-rays to 1.96 Å. Catalase (EC 1.11.1.6) catalyses the breakdown of hydrogen peroxide to water and molecular oxygen. Recombinant Vibrio salmonicida catalase (VSC) possesses typical cold-adapted features, with higher catalytic efficiency, lower thermal stability and a lower temperature optimum than its mesophilic counterpart from Proteus mirabilis. Crystals of VSC were produced by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using ammonium sulfate as precipitant. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 98.15, b = 217.76, c = 99.28 Å, β = 110.48°. Data were collected to 1.96 Å and a molecular-replacement solution was found with eight molecules in the asymmetric unit.

  13. Catalase Induced by All-Trans Retinoic Acid Is Involved in Antiproliferation of 36B10 Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Woo Yoon [Chungbuk National University College of Medicine, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Jae Ran [Konkuk University College of Medicine, Chungju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) has antiproliferative effects against brain tumor cells. Recently, ATRA has been reported to induce catalase. We investigated whether catalase induction by ATRA is associated with its antiproliferative effects. 36B10 cells were exposed to 0-50{mu}M ATRA for 24 or 48 hours and mRNA, protein, and activity of catalase were measured. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured using 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate. A clonogenic assay was used to confirm the cytotoxic effect. The mRNA, protein, and activity of catalase were found to increase in a concentration- and incubation- time-dependent manner. The increase in catalase activity induced by ATRA was decreased by the addition of 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (ATZ). ROS was also increased with ATRA and decreased by the addition of ATZ. The decrease in cell survival induced by ATRA was partly rescued by ATZ. Catalase induction by ATRA is involved in ROS overproduction and thus inhibits the proliferation of 36B10 cells.

  14. Catalase inhibition accelerates dormancy release and sprouting in potato (Solanum tuberosum L. tubers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Bajji

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The involvement of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 metabolism in dormancy release and sprouting of potato (Solanum tuberosum L. tubers has been investigated using three complementary approaches. In the first approach, the evolution of the sprouting kinetics, H2O2 content and antioxidant enzyme activities were examined during tuber storage. The most important changes occurred at the « bud/sprout » level. In particular, dormancy release was accompanied by a transient but remarkable increase in H2O2 content. In the second approach, the effect of a catalase (CAT, EC 1.11.1.6 inhibitor (thiourea or of exogenous H2O2 application on tuber sprouting behaviour was assessed. Both treatments resulted in a reduction of the dormancy period and in rapid and synchronised sprouting of the treated tubers when compared to the control as well as in increased sprout number per tuber. In the third approach, the effect of CAT inhibition on potato tuber dormancy and sprouting was evaluated using the transgenic technology. Plants partially repressed in their CAT activity were produced and, once again, CAT inhibition resulted in acceleration of the sprouting kinetics and in increased sprout number of the transgenic tubers compared to those from the wild type. It thus appears that tuber dormancy and sprouting can be controlled in potato by the manipulation of H2O2 metabolism via the inhibition of CAT activity. The possible mechanisms whereby CAT inhibitors or H2O2 overcome dormancy and promote sprouting in the potato tuber are discussed in relation to what is known in other plant models (seeds and fruit tree buds.

  15. Hydrogen and fuel cell activity report - France 2009; Rapport d'activites Hydrogene et Piles a combustible - France 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    The report gathers the main outstanding facts which occurred in France in the field of hydrogen and fuel cells in 2009. After having noticed some initiatives (French commitment in renewable energy production, new role for the CEA, cooperation between different research and industrial bodies, development of electric vehicles, research programs), the report presents several projects and programs regarding hydrogen: ANR programs, creation of a national structure, basic research by the CEA and CNRS, demonstration projects (H2E), transport applications (a hybrid 307 by Peugeot, the Althytude project by GDF and Suez, the Hychain European project by Air Liquide, a dirigible airship, an ultra-light aviation project, a submarine), some stationary applications (the Myrte project, a wind energy project), activity in small and medium-sized enterprises, regional initiatives, colloquiums and meetings.

  16. Gamma irradiation induced disintegration of waste activated sludge for biological hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yanan; Wang, Jianlong

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, gamma irradiation was applied for the disintegration and dissolution of waste activated sludge produced during the biological wastewater treatment, and the solubilized sludge was used as substrate for bio-hydrogen production. The experimental results showed that the solubilization of waste activated sludge was 53.7% at 20 kGy and pH=12, and the SCOD, polysaccharides, protein, TN and TP contents in the irradiated sludge solutions was 3789.6 mg/L, 268.3 mg/L, 1881.5 mg/L, 132.3 mg/L and 80.4 mg/L, respectively. The irradiated sludge was used for fermentative hydrogen production, and the hydrogen yield was 10.5±0.7 mL/g SCODconsumed. It can be concluded that the irradiated waste activated sludge could be used as a low-cost substrate for fermentative hydrogen production.

  17. Partially Hydrogenated Graphene Materials Exhibit High Electrocatalytic Activities Related to Unintentional Doping with Metallic Impurities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovský, Ondřej; Libánská, Alena; Bouša, Daniel; Sedmidubský, David; Matějková, Stanislava; Sofer, Zdeněk

    2016-06-13

    Partially hydrogenated graphene materials, synthesized by the chemical reduction/hydrogenation of two different graphene oxides using zinc powder in acidic environment or aluminum powder in alkaline environment, exhibit high electrocatalytic activities, as well as electrochemical sensing properties. The starting graphene oxides and the resultant hydrogenated graphenes were characterized in detail. Their electrocatalytic activity was examined in the oxygen reduction reaction, whereas sensing properties towards explosives were tested by using picric acid as a redox probe. Findings indicate that the high electrocatalytic performance originates not only from the hydrogenation of graphene, but also from unintentional contamination of graphene with manganese and other metals during synthesis. A careful evaluation of the obtained data and a detailed chemical analysis are necessary to identify the origin of this anomalous electrocatalytic activity. PMID:27167069

  18. Quantum delocalization of protons in the hydrogen bond network of an enzyme active site

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Lu; Boxer, Steven G; Markland, Thomas E

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes utilize protein architectures to create highly specialized structural motifs that can greatly enhance the rates of complex chemical transformations. Here we use experiments, combined with ab initio simulations that exactly include nuclear quantum effects, to show that a triad of strongly hydrogen bonded tyrosine residues within the active site of the enzyme ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) facilitates quantum proton delocalization. This delocalization dramatically stabilizes the deprotonation of an active site tyrosine residue, resulting in a very large isotope effect on its acidity. When an intermediate analog is docked, it is incorporated into the hydrogen bond network, giving rise to extended quantum proton delocalization in the active site. These results shed light on the role of nuclear quantum effects in the hydrogen bond network that stabilizes the reactive intermediate of KSI, and the behavior of protons in biological systems containing strong hydrogen bonds.

  19. Swiss Hydrogen & Fuel Cell Activities : Opportunities, barriers and public support

    OpenAIRE

    Vuille, François; Hart, David; Lehner, Franz; Bertuccioli, Luca; Ripken, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Switzerland has a small but internationally recognised set of competences and actors in fuel cells and hydrogen, from fundamental research to technology and product development. Swiss organisations are prominent in a number of research partnerships, and some have either major international co-operation or are partly or fully owned by overseas companies. However, the sector in Switzerland remains somewhat fragmented, with many actors pursuing their own niches and relatively little cross-fertil...

  20. Effects of thermal activation conditions on the microstructure regulation of corncob-derived activated carbon for hydrogen storage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dabin Wang; Zhen Geng; Cunman Zhang; Xiangyang Zhou; Xupeng Liu

    2014-01-01

    Activated carbons derived from corncob (CACs) were prepared by pyrolysis carbonization and KOH activation. Through modifying activation conditions, samples with large pore volume and ultrahigh BET specific surface area could be obtained. The sample achieved the highest hydrogen uptake capacity of 5.80 wt%at 40 bar and -196◦C. The as-obtained samples were characterized by N2-sorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Besides, thermogravimetric analysis was also employed to investigate the activation behavior of CACs. Detailed investigation on the activation parameters reveals that moderate activation temperature and heating rate are favorable for preparing CACs with high surface area, large pore volume and optimal pore size distribution. Meanwhile, the micropore volume between 0.65 nm and 0.85 nm along with BET surface area and total pore volume has great effects on hydrogen uptake capacities. The present results indicate that CACs are the most promising materials for hydrogen storage application.

  1. Ford/BASF/UM Activities in Support of the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veenstra, Mike [Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States); Purewal, Justin [Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States); Xu, Chunchuan [Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States); Yang, Jun [Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States); Blaser, Rachel [Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States); Sudik, Andrea [Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States); Siegel, Don [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ming, Yang [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Liu, Dong' an [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Chi, Hang [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Gaab, Manuela [BASF SE, Ludwigshafen (Germany); Arnold, Lena [BASF SE, Ludwigshafen (Germany); Muller, Ulrich [BASF SE, Ludwigshafen (Germany)

    2015-06-30

    revealed cost gaps and opportunities that identified a storage system that was lower cost than a 700 bar compressed system. Finally, we led the HSECoE efforts devoted to characterizing and enhancing metal organic framework (MOF) storage materials. This report serves as a final documentation of the Ford-UM-BASF project contributions to the HSECoE during the 6-year timeframe of the Center. The activities of the HSECoE have impacted the broader goals of the DOE-EERE and USDRIVE, leading to improved understanding in the engineering of materials-based hydrogen storage systems. This knowledge is a prerequisite to the development of a commercially-viable hydrogen storage system.

  2. Activated carbons from African oil palm waste shells and fibre for hydrogen storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Giraldo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We prepared a series of activated carbons by chemical activation with two strong bases in-group that few use, and I with waste from shell and fibers and oil-palm African. Activated carbons are obtained with relatively high surface areas (1605 m2/g. We study the textural and chemical properties and its effect on hydrogen storage. The activated carbons obtained from fibrous wastes exhibit a high hydrogen storage capacity of 6.0 wt % at 77 K and 12 bar.

  3. Hydrogen behaviour in the aged low activation martensitic steel F82H for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A time dependent permeation method is used to measure the permeability, diffusivity and solubility of hydrogen in the low activation martensitic steel F82H aged for 2000 h under vacuum at 773 K. The measurements cover the temperature range from 373 to 723 K which includes the onset of hydrogen trapping effects on diffusivity and solubility. The results are interpreted using a trapping model. The number of trap sites and their average energies for hydrogen in the aged F82H steel are determined. These data are compared with those obtained for deuterium in F82H steel

  4. Surface adsorption and micropore filling of the hydrogen in activated MWCNTs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rather, Sami-ullah; Zacharia, Renju; Naik, Meraj-ud-din; Hwang, Sang Woon [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Chonbuk National University, Chonju 561-756 (Korea); Kim, Ae Rahn [Specialized Graduate School of Hydrogen and Fuel Cells, Chonbuk National University, Chonju 561-756 (Korea); Nahm, Kee Suk [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Chonbuk National University, Chonju 561-756 (Korea); Specialized Graduate School of Hydrogen and Fuel Cells, Chonbuk National University, Chonju 561-756 (Korea)

    2008-11-15

    Hydrogen uptake of KOH-activated MWCNTs measured at ambient temperature and moderate equilibrium pressures ranging 0.3-1.9 MPa is compared with that of the pristine nanotubes. In the pressure range considered, the hydrogen uptake of nanotubes stems from micropore volume filling and adsorption on the external and the mesoporous surfaces. Pristine nanotubes store 0.2 wt.% of hydrogen which increases to 0.32 wt.% upon activation, corresponding to an enhancement of 60%. The pore width in the micropore region derived using the Horvath-Kawazoe equation suggests no widening of micropores. The contributions of hydrogen adsorbed on the meso- and micropores are resolved by applying the Langmuir kinetics to the external surface and micropore surface areas and micropore volume; the latter are derived from BET, Dubinin-Astakhov, and Lippen's-de Boer's t-plot analysis. (author)

  5. Effect of polyhydroxyalkanoates on dark fermentative hydrogen production from waste activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongbo; Zeng, Guangming; Chen, Yinguang; Li, Xiaoming

    2015-04-15

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA), an intracellular energy and carbon storage polymer, can be accumulated in activated sludge in substantial quantities under wastewater dynamic treatment (i.e., substrate feast-famine) conditions. However, its influence on hydrogen production has never been investigated before. This study therefore evaluated the influences of PHA level and composition in waste activated sludge (WAS) on hydrogen production. The results showed that with the increase of sludge PHA content from 25 to 178 mg per gram volatile suspended solids (VSS) hydrogen production from WAS alkaline anaerobic fermentation increased from 26.5 to 58.7 mL/g VSS. The composition of PHA was also found to affect hydrogen production. When the dominant composition shifted from polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) to polyhydroxyvalerate (PHV), the amount of generated hydrogen decreased from 51.2 to 41.1 mL/g VSS even under the same PHA level (around 130 mg/g VSS). The mechanism studies exhibited that the increased PHA content accelerated both the cell solubilization and the hydrolysis process of solubilized substrates. Compared with the PHB-dominant sludge, the increased PHV fraction not only slowed the hydrolysis process but also caused more propionic acid production, with less theoretical hydrogen generation in this fermentation type. It was also found that the increased PHA content enhanced the soluble protein conversion of non-PHA biomass. Further investigations with enzyme analyses showed that both the key hydrolytic enzyme activities and hydrogen-forming enzyme activities were in the sequence of the PHB-dominant sludge > the PHV-dominant sludge > the low PHA sludge, which was in accord with the observed order of hydrogen yield. PMID:25697693

  6. Identification of intrinsic catalytic activity for electrochemical reduction of water molecules to generate hydrogen

    KAUST Repository

    Shinagawa, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Insufficient hydronium ion activities at near-neutral pH and under unbuffered conditions induce diffusion-limited currents for hydrogen evolution, followed by a reaction with water molecules to generate hydrogen at elevated potentials. The observed constant current behaviors at near neutral pH reflect the intrinsic electrocatalytic reactivity of the metal electrodes for water reduction. This journal is © the Owner Societies.

  7. PHENANTHROLINE-STABILIZED PALLADIUM NANOPARTICLES IN POLYETHYLENE GLYCOL—AN ACTIVE AND RECYCLABLE CATALYST SYSTEM FOR THE SELECTIVE HYDROGENATION OF OLEFINS USING MOLECULAR HYDROGEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    1,10-Phenanthroline-stabilized palladium nanoparticles dispersed in a polyethylene glycol (PEG) matrix is synthesized which is found to be a stable and active catalyst for the selective hydrogenation of olefins using molecular hydrogen under mild reaction conditions. A variety of...

  8. Isolation of the catalase T structural gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by functional complementation.

    OpenAIRE

    Spevak, W; Fessl, F; Rytka, J; Traczyk, A; Skoneczny, M; Ruis, H

    1983-01-01

    The catalase T structural gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was cloned by functional complementation of a mutation causing specific lack of the enzyme (cttl). Catalase T-deficient mutants were obtained by UV mutagenesis of an S. cerevisiae strain bearing the cas1 mutation, which causes insensitivity of catalase T to glucose repression. Since the second catalase protein of S. cerevisiae, catalase A, is completely repressed on 10% glucose, catalase T-deficient mutant colonies could be detected u...

  9. The Cryptococcus neoformans Catalase Gene Family and Its Role in Antioxidant Defense

    OpenAIRE

    Giles, Steven S.; Jason E. Stajich; Nichols, Connie; Gerrald, Quincy D.; Alspaugh, J. Andrew; Dietrich, Fred; Perfect, John R.

    2006-01-01

    In the present study, we sought to elucidate the contribution of the Cryptococcus neoformans catalase gene family to antioxidant defense. We employed bioinformatics techniques to identify four members of the C. neoformans catalase gene family and created mutants lacking single or multiple catalase genes. Based on a phylogenetic analysis, CAT1 and CAT3 encode putative spore-specific catalases, CAT2 encodes a putative peroxisomal catalase, and CAT4 encodes a putative cytosolic catalase. Only Ca...

  10. Peroxisomal catalase deficiency modulates yeast lifespan depending on growth conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Kawalek, Adam; Lefevre, Sophie D.; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J.

    2013-01-01

    We studied the role of peroxisomal catalase in chronological aging of the yeast Hansenula polymorpha in relation to various growth substrates. Catalase-deficient (cat) cells showed a similar chronological life span (CLS) relative to the wild-type control upon growth on carbon and nitrogen sources that are not oxidized by peroxisomal enzymes. However, when media contained methylamine, which is oxidized by peroxisomal amine oxidase, the CLS of cat cells was significantly reduced. Conversely, th...

  11. A facile and efficient method of enzyme immobilization on silica particles via Michael acceptor film coatings: immobilized catalase in a plug flow reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayramoglu, Gulay; Arica, M Yakup; Genc, Aysenur; Ozalp, V Cengiz; Ince, Ahmet; Bicak, Niyazi

    2016-06-01

    A novel method was developed for facile immobilization of enzymes on silica surfaces. Herein, we describe a single-step strategy for generating of reactive double bonds capable of Michael addition on the surfaces of silica particles. This method was based on reactive thin film generation on the surfaces by heating of impregnated self-curable polymer, alpha-morpholine substituted poly(vinyl methyl ketone) p(VMK). The generated double bonds were demonstrated to be an efficient way for rapid incorporation of enzymes via Michael addition. Catalase was used as model enzyme in order to test the effect of immobilization methodology by the reactive film surface through Michael addition reaction. Finally, a plug flow type immobilized enzyme reactor was employed to estimate decomposition rate of hydrogen peroxide. The highly stable enzyme reactor could operate continuously for 120 h at 30 °C with only a loss of about 36 % of its initial activity. PMID:26879642

  12. The size of active bubbles for the production of hydrogen in sonochemical reaction field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merouani, Slimane; Hamdaoui, Oualid

    2016-09-01

    The sonication of aqueous solution generates microscopic cavitation bubbles that may growth and violently collapse to produce highly reactive species (i.e. OH, HO2 and H2O2), hydrogen and emit light, sonoluminescence. The bubble size is a key parameter that influences the chemical activity of the system. This wok aims to study theoretically the size of active bubbles for the production of hydrogen in ultrasonic cavitation field in water using a single bubble sonochemistry model. The effect of several parameters such as frequency of ultrasound, acoustic intensity and liquid temperature on the range of sonochemically active bubbles for the production of hydrogen was clarified. The numerical simulation results showed that the size of active bubbles is an interval which includes an optimum value at which the production rate of H2 is maximal. It was shown that the range of ambient radius for an active bubble as well as the optimum bubble radius for the production of hydrogen increased with increasing acoustic intensity and decreased with increasing ultrasound frequency and bulk liquid temperature. It was found that the range of ambient bubble radius dependence of the operational conditions followed the same trend as those reported experimentally for sonoluminescing bubbles. Comparison with literature data showed a good agreement between the theoretical determined optimum bubble sizes for the production of hydrogen and the experimental reported sizes for sonoluminescing bubbles. PMID:27150777

  13. Determination of hydrogen in niobium by cold neutron prompt gamma ray activation analysis and neutron incoherent scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.L. Paul; H.H. Cheu-Maya; G.R. Myneni

    2002-11-01

    The presence of trace amounts of hydrogen in niobium is believed to have a detrimental effect on the mechanical and superconducting properties. Unfortunately, few techniques are capable of measuring hydrogen at these levels. We have developed two techniques for measuring hydrogen in materials. Cold neutron prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA) has proven useful for the determination of hydrogen and other elements in a wide variety of materials. Neutron incoherent scattering (NIS), a complementary tool to PGAA, has been used to measure trace hydrogen in titanium. Both techniques were used to study the effects of vacuum heating and chemical polishing on the hydrogen content of superconducting niobium.

  14. A coupled, pore-scale model for methanogenic microbial activity in underground hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebigbo, Anozie; Golfier, Fabrice; Quintard, Michel

    2013-11-01

    Underground hydrogen storage (UHS) as a means of energy storage is an efficient way of compensating for seasonal fluctuations in the availability of energy. One important factor which influences this technology is the activity of methanogenic microorganisms capable of utilising hydrogen and carbon dioxide for metabolism and leading to a change in the stored gas composition. A coupled, pore-scale model is presented which aids in the investigation of the mechanisms that govern the conversion of hydrogen to methane, i.e. advective hydrogen flow, its diffusion into microbial biofilms of multiple species, and its consumption within these biofilms. The model assumes that spherical grains are coated by a film of residual water and treats the biofilm development within each film in a quasi one-dimensional manner. A sample simulation using the presented model illustrates the biofilm growth process in these films as well as the competition between three different microbial species: methanogens, acetogens, and acetotrophs.

  15. Adsorption of triton X100 and potassium hydrogen phthalate on granular activated carbon from date pits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merzougui, Z.; Nedjah, S.; Azoudj, Y.; Addoun, F. [Laboratoire d' etude physic-chimique des materiaux et application a l' environnement, Faculte de Chimie, USTHB (Algeria)], E-mail: zmerzougi@yahoo.fr

    2011-07-01

    Activated carbons, thanks to their versatility, are being used in the water treatment sector to absorb pollutants. Several factors influence the adsorption capacity of activated carbon and the aim of this study was to assess the effects of the porous texture and chemical nature of activated carbons on the adsorption of triton X100 and potassium hydrogen phthalate. Activated carbons used in this study were prepared from date pits with ZnCl2, KOH and H3PO4 by carbonization without adjuvant and adsorption of triton X100 and potassium hydrogen phthalate was conducted at 298K. Results showed that activated carbons prepared from date pits have a great potential for removing organic and inorganic pollutants from water and that the adsorption potential depends on the degree of activation of the activated carbons and on the compounds to absorb. This study highlighted that an increase of the carbon surface area and porosity results in a better adsorption capacity.

  16. Nanoscale nickel oxide/nickel heterostructures for active hydrogen evolution electrocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Ming; Zhou, Wu; Tsai, Mon-Che; Zhou, Jigang; Guan, Mingyun; Lin, Meng-Chang; Zhang, Bo; Hu, Yongfeng; Wang, Di-Yan; Yang, Jiang; Pennycook, Stephen J; Hwang, Bing-Joe; Dai, Hongjie

    2014-01-01

    Active, stable and cost-effective electrocatalysts are a key to water splitting for hydrogen production through electrolysis or photoelectrochemistry. Here we report nanoscale nickel oxide/nickel heterostructures formed on carbon nanotube sidewalls as highly effective electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction with activity similar to platinum. Partially reduced nickel interfaced with nickel oxide results from thermal decomposition of nickel hydroxide precursors bonded to carbon nanotube sidewalls. The metal ion-carbon nanotube interactions impede complete reduction and Ostwald ripening of nickel species into the less hydrogen evolution reaction active pure nickel phase. A water electrolyzer that achieves ~20 mA cm(-2) at a voltage of 1.5 V, and which may be operated by a single-cell alkaline battery, is fabricated using cheap, non-precious metal-based electrocatalysts. PMID:25146255

  17. Thermally Activated Palm Kernel Based Carbon as a Support for Edible Oil Hydrogenation Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulmajid Alshaibani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbon has distinctive properties as a support for hydrogenation catalysts. Thermally activated carbon has been prepared from palm kernel shell at 1073 K and placed under nitrogen flow for 2 h. It was impregnated by palladium using toluene solution of Pd (acac2. The Pd/C was reduced using a water solution of potassium borohydride (KBH4. The Pd-B/C was characterized by the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area analysis (BET, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS. Pd-B/C was applied for sunflower oil hydrogenation at a temperature of 373 K, hydrogen pressure of 413.5 kPa and agitation of 1400 rpm for 1 h. Pd-B/C noticeably exhibited a higher overall catalyst activity in comparison to some recently published palladium catalysts.

  18. Activity and Stability of Rare Earth-Based Hydride Alloys as Catalysts of Hydrogen Absorption-Oxidation Reactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Taokai(应桃开); Gao Xueping(高学平); Hu Weikang(胡伟康); Noréus Dag

    2004-01-01

    Rare earth-based AB5-type hydrogen storage alloys as catalysts of hydrogen-diffusion electrodes for hydrogen absorption and oxidation reactions in alkaline fuel cells were investigated. It is demonstrated that the meta-hydride hydrogen-diffusion electrodes could be charged by hydrogen gas and electrochemically discharged at the same time to retain a stable oxidation potential for a long period. The catalytic activities and stability are almost comparable with a Pt catalyst on the active carbon. Further improvement of performances is expected via reduction of catalyst size into nanometers.

  19. A Review on Direct Electrochemistry of Catalase for Electrochemical Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Periasamy Arun Prakash

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Catalase (CAT is a heme enzyme with a Fe(III/II prosthetic group at its redox centre. CAT is present in almost all aerobic living organisms, where it catalyzes the disproportionation of H2O2 into oxygen and water without forming free radicals. In order to study this catalytic mechanism in detail, the direct electrochemistry of CAT has been investigated at various modified electrode surfaces with and without nanomaterials. The results show that CAT immobilized on nanomaterial modified electrodes shows excellent catalytic activity, high sensitivity and the lowest detection limit for H2O2 determination. In the presence of nanomaterials, the direct electron transfer between the heme group of the enzyme and the electrode surface improved significantly. Moreover, the immobilized CAT is highly biocompatible and remains extremely stable within the nanomaterial matrices. This review discusses about the versatile approaches carried out in CAT immobilization for direct electrochemistry and electrochemical sensor development aimed as efficient H2O2 determination. The benefits of immobilizing CAT in nanomaterial matrices have also been highlighted.

  20. Post-irradiation repairing processes of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and catalase from Hansenula Polymorpha yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The post-irradiation repairing mechanisms of two Hansenula Polymorpha yeast enzymes, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and catalase, were studied. The kinetic parameters of the selected enzymes were investigated over one month since the moment of γ-irradiation with different doses in the presence of oxygen. Dose dependent decrease of initial reaction rates was noticed for both enzymes. Small variation of initial reaction rate was recorded for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase over one month, with a decreasing tendency. No significant electrophoretic changes of molecular forms of this enzyme were observed after irradiation. Continuous strong decrease of catalase activity was evident for the first 20 days after irradiation. Partial recovery process of the catalytic activity was revealed by this study. (authors)

  1. Catalase protects HepG2 cells from apoptosis induced by DNA-damaging agents by accelerating the degradation of p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Jingxiang; Cederbaum, Arthur I

    2003-02-14

    Oxidants such as H(2)O(2) play a role in the toxicity of certain DNA-damaging agents, a process that often involves the tumor suppressor p53. H(2)O(2) is rapidly degraded by catalase, which protects cells against oxidant injury. To study the effect of catalase on apoptosis induced by DNA-damaging agents, HepG2 cells were infected with adenovirus containing the cDNA of catalase (Ad-Cat). Forty-eight hours after infection, catalase protein and activity was increased 7-10-fold compared with control cells infected with Ad-LacZ. After treatment with Vp16 or mitomycin C, control cells underwent apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner; however, overexpression of catalase inhibited this apoptosis. Basal levels as well as Vp16- or mitomycin C-stimulated levels of p53 and p21 protein were decreased in the catalase-overexpressing cells as compared with control cells; however, p53 mRNA levels were not decreased by catalase. There was no difference in p53 protein synthesis between catalase-overexpressing cells and control cells. However, pulse-chase experiments indicated that p53 protein degradation was enhanced in the catalase-overexpressing cells. Proteasome inhibitors but not calpeptin prevented the catalase-mediated decrease of p53 content. Whereas Vp16 increased, catalase overexpression decreased the phosphorylation of p53. The protein phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid did not prevent the catalase-mediated down-regulation of p53 or phosphorylated p53. These results demonstrate that catalase protects HepG2 cells from apoptosis induced by DNA-damaging agents in association with decreasing p53 phosphorylation; the latter may lead to an acceleration in the degradation of p53 protein by the proteasome complex. This suggests that the level of catalase may play a critical role in cell-induced resistance to the effects of anti-cancer drugs which up-regulate p53. PMID:12468545

  2. Hydrogen activities in the European Union work-programme; Activites liees a l'hydrogene dans le programme de travail de l'Union Europeenne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahbout, A.; Tartaglia, G.P. [Joint Research Centre, IHCP, Ispra (Italy)

    2000-07-01

    Growing concern over urban air pollution, global climatic change allegedly caused by rising levels of greenhouse gases and future energy security requirements demand a solution: a clean and sustainable energy supply. Hydrogen is seen as a promising clean fuel when integrated into a wide and long-term vision in which it provides, in parallel with electricity, a secondary energy carrier, ultimately derived from renewable energy sources. Europe has been a pioneer in promoting the wider use of hydrogen. Already in 1991, various demonstration projects were started with funds under the Euro-Quebec Hydro-Hydrogen Pilot Project (EQHPP). The European Commission, the European Industry, the Government of Quebec and the Canadian Industry made resources available so that hydrogen, from surplus in Canada, could be applied in various end-use technologies. Under this project, about thirty European industry/research centres/universities have been involved, working on a comprehensive set of hydrogen applications/uses. Innovative public transportation means (city buses, boats) equipped with internal combustion engines (ICE) or fuel cells and using either liquid or compressed hydrogen were put into demonstration service. Cogeneration (CHP) projects based on the use of phosphoric acid fuel cells (PAFC) were realised. In joint programs, aviation combustor test activities were carried out by Daimler Benz Aerospace, Airbus Industries and Pratt and Whitney. Investigation of hydrogen storage in zeolites, carbon and nano-tubes were started. Tests on compressed hydrogen gas storage tanks were also conducted. All these projects are now terminated. As intended, the initial momentum set by the EQHPP project has now been replaced by many private initiatives, especially in Germany. Only one specific project funded by the European Commission, the European Integrated Hydrogen Project (EIHP) remains. In the EIHP project, several companies which designed and constructed prototypes and demonstration

  3. In situ hydrogen consumption kinetics as an indicator of subsurface microbial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, S.H.; Smith, R.L.; Suflita, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    There are few methods available for broadly assessing microbial community metabolism directly within a groundwater environment. In this study, hydrogen consumption rates were estimated from in situ injection/withdrawal tests conducted in two geochemically varying, contaminated aquifers as an approach towards developing such a method. The hydrogen consumption first-order rates varied from 0.002 nM h-1 for an uncontaminated, aerobic site to 2.5 nM h-1 for a contaminated site where sulfate reduction was a predominant process. The method could accommodate the over three orders of magnitude range in rates that existed between subsurface sites. In a denitrifying zone, the hydrogen consumption rate (0.02 nM h-1) was immediately abolished in the presence of air or an antibiotic mixture, suggesting that such measurements may also be sensitive to the effects of environmental perturbations on field microbial activities. Comparable laboratory determinations with sediment slurries exhibited hydrogen consumption kinetics that differed substantially from the field estimates. Because anaerobic degradation of organic matter relies on the rapid consumption of hydrogen and subsequent maintenance at low levels, such in situ measures of hydrogen turnover can serve as a key indicator of the functioning of microbial food webs and may be more reliable than laboratory determinations. ?? 2007 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  4. Important role of catalase in the cellular response of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae exposed to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, Takuto; Furuta, Masakazu; Kataoka, Michihiko; Kishida, Masao

    2015-03-01

    Ionizing radiation indirectly causes oxidative stress in cells via reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as hydroxyl radicals (OH(-)) generated by the radiolysis of water. We investigated how the catalase function was affected by ionizing radiation and analyzed the phenotype of mutants with a disrupted catalase gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae exposed to radiation. The wild-type yeast strain and isogenic mutants with disrupted catalase genes were exposed to various doses of (60)Co gamma-rays. There was no difference between the wild-type strain and the cta1 disruption mutant following exposure to gamma-ray irradiation. In contrast, there was a significant decrease in the ctt1 disruption mutant, suggesting that this strain exhibited decreased survival on gamma-ray exposure compared with other strains. In all three strains, stationary phase cells were more tolerant to the exposure of gamma-rays than exponential phase cells, whereas the catalase activity in the wild-type strain and cta1 disruption mutant was higher in the stationary phase than in the exponential phase. These data suggest a correlation between catalase activity and survival following gamma-ray exposure. However, this correlation was not clear in the ctt1 disruption mutant, suggesting that other factors are involved in the tolerance to ROS induced by irradiation. PMID:25416226

  5. A rhodium/silicon co-electrocatalyst design concept to surpass platinum hydrogen evolution activity at high overpotentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lili; Lin, Haiping; Li, Youyong; Liao, Fan; Lifshitz, Yeshayahu; Sheng, Minqi; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Shao, Mingwang

    2016-01-01

    Currently, platinum-based electrocatalysts show the best performance for hydrogen evolution. All hydrogen evolution reaction catalysts should however obey Sabatier's principle, that is, the adsorption energy of hydrogen to the catalyst surface should be neither too high nor too low to balance between hydrogen adsorption and desorption. To overcome the limitation of this principle, here we choose a composite (rhodium/silicon nanowire) catalyst, in which hydrogen adsorption occurs on rhodium with a large adsorption energy while hydrogen evolution occurs on silicon with a small adsorption energy. We show that the composite is stable with better hydrogen evolution activity than rhodium nanoparticles and even exceeding those of commercial platinum/carbon at high overpotentials. The results reveal that silicon plays a key role in the electrocatalysis. This work may thus open the door for the design and fabrication of electrocatalysts for high-efficiency electric energy to hydrogen energy conversion. PMID:27447292

  6. Cardiac-specific catalase overexpression rescues anthrax lethal toxin-induced cardiac contractile dysfunction: role of oxidative stress and autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandadi Machender R

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lethal and edema toxins secreted by Bacillus anthracis during anthrax infection were found to incite serious cardiovascular complications. However, the underlying mechanisms in anthrax lethal toxin-induced cardiac anomalies remain unknown. This study was designed to evaluate the impact of antioxidant enzyme catalase in anthrax lethal toxin-induced cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction. Methods Wild type (WT and cardiac-specific catalase overexpression mice were challenged with lethal toxin (2 μg/g, intraperotineally (i.p.. Cardiomyocyte contractile and intracellular Ca2+ properties were assessed 18 h later using an IonOptix edge-detection system. Proteasome function was assessed using chymotrypsin-like and caspase-like activities. GFP-LC3 puncta and Western blot analysis were used to evaluate autophagy and protein ubiquitination. Results Lethal toxin exposure suppressed cardiomyocyte contractile function (suppressed peak shortening, maximal velocity of shortening/re-lengthening, prolonged duration of shortening/re-lengthening, and impaired intracellular Ca2+ handling, the effects of which were alleviated by catalase. In addition, lethal toxin triggered autophagy, mitochondrial and ubiquitin-proteasome defects, the effects of which were mitigated by catalase. Pretreatment of cardiomyocytes from catalase mice with the autophagy inducer rapamycin significantly attenuated or ablated catalase-offered protection against lethal toxin-induced cardiomyocyte dysfunction. On the other hand, the autophagy inhibitor 3-MA ablated or significantly attenuated lethal toxin-induced cardiomyocyte contractile anomalies. Conclusions Our results suggest that catalase is protective against anthrax lethal toxin-induced cardiomyocyte contractile and intracellular Ca2+ anomalies, possibly through regulation of autophagy and mitochondrial function.

  7. Highly Active Carbon Supported Pd-Ag Nanofacets Catalysts for Hydrogen Production from HCOOH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenhui; He, Ting; Liu, Xuehua; He, Weina; Cong, Hengjiang; Shen, Yangbin; Yan, Liuming; Zhang, Xuetong; Zhang, Jinping; Zhou, Xiaochun

    2016-08-17

    Hydrogen is regarded as a future sustainable and clean energy carrier. Formic acid is a safe and sustainable hydrogen storage medium with many advantages, including high hydrogen content, nontoxicity, and low cost. In this work, a series of highly active catalysts for hydrogen production from formic acid are successfully synthesized by controllably depositing Pd onto Ag nanoplates with different Ag nanofacets, such as Ag{111}, Ag{100}, and the nanofacet on hexagonal close packing Ag crystal (Ag{hcp}). Then, the Pd-Ag nanoplate catalysts are supported on Vulcan XC-72 carbon black to prevent the aggregation of the catalysts. The research reveals that the high activity is attributed to the formation of Pd-Ag alloy nanofacets, such as Pd-Ag{111}, Pd-Ag{100}, and Pd-Ag{hcp}. The activity order of these Pd-decorated Ag nanofacets is Pd-Ag{hcp} > Pd-Ag{111} > Pd-Ag{100}. Particularly, the activity of Pd-Ag{hcp} is up to an extremely high value, i.e., TOF{hcp} = 19 000 ± 1630 h(-1) at 90 °C (lower limit value), which is more than 800 times higher than our previous quasi-spherical Pd-Ag alloy nanocatalyst. The initial activity of Pd-Ag{hcp} even reaches (3.13 ± 0.19) × 10(6) h(-1) at 90 °C. This research not only presents highly active catalysts for hydrogen generation but also shows that the facet on the hcp Ag crystal can act as a potentially highly active catalyst. PMID:27454194

  8. Ultrasensitive fluorescence immunoassay for detection of ochratoxin A using catalase-mediated fluorescence quenching of CdTe QDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaolin; Zhan, Shengnan; Xu, Hengyi; Meng, Xianwei; Xiong, Yonghua; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2016-04-28

    Herein, for the first time we report an improved competitive fluorescent enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the ultrasensitive detection of ochratoxin A (OTA) by using hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced fluorescence quenching of mercaptopropionic acid-modified CdTe quantum dots (QDs). In this immunoassay, catalase (CAT) was labeled with OTA as a competitive antigen to connect the fluorescence signals of the QDs with the concentration of the target. Through the combinatorial use of H2O2-induced fluorescence quenching of CdTe QDs as a fluorescence signal output and the ultrahigh catalytic activity of CAT to H2O2, our proposed method could be used to perform a dynamic linear detection of OTA ranging from 0.05 pg mL(-1) to 10 pg mL(-1). The half maximal inhibitory concentration was 0.53 pg mL(-1) and the limit of detection was 0.05 pg mL(-1). These values were approximately 283- and 300-folds lower than those of horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-based conventional ELISA, respectively. The reported method is accurate, highly reproducible, and specific against other mycotoxins in agricultural products as well. In summary, the developed fluorescence immunoassay based on H2O2-induced fluorescence quenching of CdTe QDs can be used for the rapid and highly sensitive detection of mycotoxins or haptens in food safety monitoring. PMID:27093176

  9. Prediction of activation energies for hydrogen abstraction by cytochrome p450

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lars; Rydberg, Patrik; Rod, Thomas Holm; Ryde, Ulf

    2006-01-01

    We have estimated the activation energy for hydrogen abstraction by compound I in cytochrome P450 for a diverse set of 24 small organic substrates using state-of-the-art density functional theory (B3LYP). We then show that these results can be reproduced by computationally less demanding methods...

  10. Activity of iridium-ruthenium and iridium-rhodium adsorption catalysts in decomposition of hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental data for the activities of iridium-ruthenium and iridium-rhodium adsorption catalysts in the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide are considered and the results of magnetic susceptibility measurements are presented. It is concluded that surface structures (complexes) may be formed and that micro-electronic feaures play a role in heterogeneous catalysis

  11. Effects of Iron on Hydrogen-producing Capacity,Hydrogenase and NADH-fd Reductase Activities of a Fermentative Hydrogen-producing Bacterial Strain B49

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xiangjing(王相晶); Ren Nanqi; Xiang Wensheng

    2004-01-01

    Iron plays an important role in hydrogen production, cell growth, hydrogenase and NADH-fd reductase activities of hydrogen-producing bacterial strain B49 (AF481148 in EMBL). At the end of fermentation from 10 g/L glucose, for the culture containing 10 mg/L FeSO4*7H2O the cell growth in terms of optical density (OD) at 600nm was 1.13, the ratio of ethanol amount (mg/L) to acetate amount (mg/L) was 1.55, and the accumulated hydrogen volume was 1816.3 ml H2/L culture; whereas for the culture of 80 mg/L FeSO4*7H2O OD600nm was increased to 1.34, the accumulated hydrogen volume was increased to 2360.5 ml H2/L culture, and the ratio of ethanol amount (mg/L) to acetate amount (mg/L) decreased to 1.31. Moreover, the iron addition to the medium at different fermentation time could affect hydrogen-producing ability. However, the later the addition time of FeSO4*7H2O was postponed, the less the effect on hydrogen evolution was. In the course of fermentation, the specific activities of hydrogenase and NADH-fd reductase of hydrogen-producing bacterial strain B49 decreased with the consumption of iron.

  12. Hydrogen program overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronich, S. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Utility Technologies

    1997-12-31

    This paper consists of viewgraphs which summarize the following: Hydrogen program structure; Goals for hydrogen production research; Goals for hydrogen storage and utilization research; Technology validation; DOE technology validation activities supporting hydrogen pathways; Near-term opportunities for hydrogen; Market for hydrogen; and List of solicitation awards. It is concluded that a full transition toward a hydrogen economy can begin in the next decade.

  13. Theoretical hydrogen-line ratios for the narrow-line regions of active galactic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    H-alpha/H-beta (Ha/Hb) and other hydrogen line ratios for narrow line regions (NLR) of active galactic nuclei (AGN) were calculated, and their sensitivity to model parameters was investigated. The computations were performed with the photoionization code CLOUDY, with hydrogen treated as a seven-level plus continuum atom. Ha/Hb was sensitive to the ionization parameter and only weakly dependent on the electron density. Metallicity and the shape of the UV to X-ray continuum had the greatest impacts. It is recommended that Ha/Hb with a value of 3.0 be used as a reddening indicator for NLR of AGN. 21 references

  14. Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology. A Summary Report of Activities Completed at the National Center for Hydrogen Technology - Year 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, Michael [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    2012-08-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) located in Grand Forks, North Dakota, has operated the National Center for Hydrogen Technology (NCHT) since 2005 under a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The EERC has a long history of hydrogen generation and utilization from fossil fuels, and under the NCHT Program, the EERC has accelerated its research on hydrogen generation and utilization topics. Since the NCHT's inception, the EERC has received more than $65 million in funding for hydrogen-related projects ($24 million for projects in the NCHT, which includes federal and corporate partner development funds) involving more than 85 partners (27 with the NCHT). The NCHT Program's nine activities span a broad range of technologies that align well with the Advanced Fuels Program goals and, specifically, those described in the Hydrogen from Coal Program research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) plan that refers to realistic testing of technologies at adequate scale, process intensification, and contaminant control. A number of projects have been completed that range from technical feasibility of several hydrogen generation and utilization technologies to public and technical education and outreach tools. Projects under the NCHT have produced hydrogen from natural gas, coal, liquid hydrocarbons, and biomass. The hydrogen or syngas generated by these processes has also been purified in many of these instances or burned directly for power generation. Also, several activities are still undergoing research, development, demonstration, and commercialization at the NCHT. This report provides a summary overview of the projects completed in Year 6 of the NCHT. Individual activity reports are referenced as a source of detailed information on each activity.

  15. Development of a national center for hydrogen technology. A summary report of activities completed at the national center hydrogen technology from 2005 to 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, Michael J. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    2011-06-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) located in Grand Forks, North Dakota, has operated the National Center for Hydrogen Technology® (NCHT®) since 2005 under a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The EERC has a long history of hydrogen generation and utilization from fossil fuels, and under the NCHT Program, the EERC has accelerated its research of hydrogen generation and utilization topics. Since the NCHT's inception, the EERC has received more than $65 million in funding of hydrogen-related projects ($20 million for the NCHT project which includes federal and corporate development partner funds) involving more than 85 partners (27 with the NCHT). The NCHT project's 19 activities span a broad range of technologies that align well with the Advanced Fuels Program goals and, specifically, those described in the Hydrogen from Coal Program research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) plan. A number of projects have been completed which range from technical feasibility of several hydrogen generation and utilization technologies to public and technical education and outreach tools. Projects under the NCHT have produced hydrogen from natural gas, coal, liquid hydrocarbons, and biomass. The hydrogen or syngas generated by these processes has also been purified to transportation-grade quality in many of these instances or burned directly for power generation. Also, several activities are still undergoing research, development, demonstration, and commercialization at the NCHT. This report provides a summary overview of the projects completed in the first 5 years of the NCHT. Individual activity reports are referenced as a source of detailed information on each activity.

  16. Design Strategies for Redox Active Metalloenzymes: Applications in Hydrogen Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcala-Torano, R; Sommer, D J; Bahrami Dizicheh, Z; Ghirlanda, G

    2016-01-01

    The last decades have seen an increased interest in finding alternative means to produce renewable fuels in order to satisfy the growing energy demands and to minimize environmental impact. Nature can serve as an inspiration for development of these methodologies, as enzymes are able to carry out a wide variety of redox processes at high efficiency, employing a wide array of earth-abundant transition metals to do so. While it is well recognized that the protein environment plays an important role in tuning the properties of the different metal centers, the structure/function relationships between amino acids and catalytic centers are not well resolved. One specific approach to study the role of proteins in both electron and proton transfer is the biomimetic design of redox active peptides, binding organometallic clusters in well-understood protein environments. Here we discuss different strategies for the design of peptides incorporating redox active FeS clusters, [FeFe]-hydrogenase organometallic mimics, and porphyrin centers into different peptide and protein environments in order to understand natural redox enzymes. PMID:27586342

  17. PROCESS OPTIMIZATION OF TETRA ACETYL ETHYLENE DIAMINE ACTIVATED HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF POPULUS NIGRA CTMP

    OpenAIRE

    Qiang Zhao; Junwen Pu; Shulei Mao; Guibo Qi

    2010-01-01

    To enhance the bleaching efficiency, the activator of tetra acetyl ethylene diamine (TAED) was used in conventional H2O2 bleaching. The H2O2/TAED bleaching system can accelerate the reaction rate and shorten bleaching time at relative low temperature, which can reduce the production cost. In this research, the process with hydrogen peroxide activated by TAED bleaching of Populus nigra chemi-thermo mechanical pulp was optimized. Suitable bleaching conditions were confirmed as follows: pulp con...

  18. Re-Examining the Role of Hydrogen Peroxide in Bacteriostatic and Bactericidal Activities of Honey

    OpenAIRE

    Brudzynski, Katrina; Abubaker, Kamal; St-Martin, Laurent; Castle, Alan

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to critically analyze the effects of hydrogen peroxide on growth and survival of bacterial cells in order to prove or disprove its purported role as a main component responsible for the antibacterial activity of honey. Using the sensitive peroxide/peroxidase assay, broth microdilution assay and DNA degradation assays, the quantitative relationships between the content of H2O2 and honey’s antibacterial activity was established. The results showed that: (A) the average...

  19. Design optimization of a 0.1-ton/day active magnetic regenerative hydrogen liquefier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L.; Sherif, S. A.; DeGregoria, A. J.; Zimm, C. B.; Veziroglu, T. N.

    2000-04-01

    A design optimization procedure of a 0.1-ton/day active magnetic regenerative (AMR) hydrogen liquefier model is described. The liquefier is proposed for the industrial liquid hydrogen market with overall efficiency being the primary measure of performance. This performance is described here in terms of particle size, bed length, and inter-stage temperature. Efficiency comparable to larger gas cycle plants is predicted. The magnetic liquefier may be modified to operate as a two-stage magnetic refrigerator between 77 and 20 K with high efficiency. The paper describes an optimization method as applied to the design of a two-stage AMR hydrogen liquefier and presents the associated results. A five-parameter optimization process is performed since there are five changeable parameters; the low- and high-stage particle sizes, the low- and high-stage bed lengths, and the inter-stage temperature. Model results are presented and compared with experimental results of an actual liquefier.

  20. Catalase, glutathione peroxidase, metabolic syndrome, superoxide dismutase

    OpenAIRE

    Tarsikah; Herman Susanto; Herri S. Sastramihardja

    2012-01-01

    Labor pain is part of a normal process, which often causes physiological and psychological stress to mother. These stress have impact to both mother and fetus. Largely (90%) labor comes with pain and in some cases severe pain. Non-pharmacological approach is one of alternatives to reduce labor pain. This research aims to analyse the analgesic effect of lavender aromatherapy inhalation on labor pain in primigravida in the active phase. The study was pra-experimental by observing one group befo...

  1. Modeling of the thermal effects of hydrogen adsorption on activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard, M.-A.; Chahine, R. [Univ. du Quebec a Trois-Rivieres, Inst. de recherche sur l' hydrogene, Trois-Rivieres, Quebec (Canada)]. E-mail: marc-andre.richard@uqtr.ca

    2006-07-01

    'Full text:' Heat management is one of the most critical issues for the design of efficient adsorption-based storage of hydrogen. We present simulations of mass and energy balance for hydrogen and nitrogen adsorption on activated carbon over wide temperature and pressure ranges. First, the Dubinin-Astakhov (DA) model is adapted to model excess hydrogen and nitrogen adsorption isotherms at high pressures and supercritical temperatures assuming a constant microporous adsorption volume. The five parameter modified D-A adsorption model is shown to fit the experimental data over the temperature range (35 K-293 K) for hydrogen and (93 K-298 K) for nitrogen and pressure range (0-6 MPa) within the experimental uncertainties of the measurement system. We derive the thermodynamic properties of the adsorbed phase from this analytical expression of the measured data. The mass and energy rate balance equations in a microporous adsorbent/adsorbate system are then presented and validated with nitrogen desorption experiments. Finally, simulations of adiabatic and isothermal filling of adsorption-based hydrogen storage are presented and discussed. (author)

  2. Effect of pre-strain on susceptibility of Indian Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic Steel to hydrogen embrittlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonak, Sagar; Tiwari, Abhishek; Jain, Uttam; Keskar, Nachiket; Kumar, Sanjay; Singh, Ram N.; Dey, Gautam K.

    2015-10-01

    The role of pre-strain on hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of Indian Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic Steel was investigated using constant nominal strain-rate tension test. The samples were pre-strained to different levels of plastic strain and their mechanical behavior and mode of fracture under the influence of hydrogen was studied. The effect of plastic pre-strain in the range of 0.5-2% on the ductility of the samples was prominent. Compared to samples without any pre-straining, effect of hydrogen was more pronounced on pre-strained samples. Prior deformation reduced the material ductility under the influence of hydrogen. Up to 35% reduction in the total strain was observed under the influence of hydrogen in pre-strained samples. Hydrogen charging resulted in increased occurrence of brittle zones on the fracture surface. Hydrogen Enhanced Decohesion (HEDE) was found to be the dominant mechanism of fracture.

  3. A comparative study of hydrogen uptake features of Co, Ni and Pd modified nanofibres and activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Elia, Luis F.; Gonzalez, I.; Saavedra, K.; Gottberg, V. [Petroleos de Venezuela (PDVSA)-Intevep, Gerencia General de Refinacion e Industrializacion, Gerencia Tecnica de Refinacion, Apartado 76343, Caracas 1070-A (Venezuela)

    2009-02-15

    Hydrogen represents a notable R and D area due to its impact on short and middle term energy business. Implementation of the so-called hydrogen economy still faces some technological breakthroughs. The most predominant belongs to storage; its state of the art is mainly focused on solid-state phenomena through physisorption or chemisorption. It has been found that thermal and acid pre-treatments of carbon nanofibres and activated carbon have opposite effects on hydrogen uptake levels. Thermal pre-treatment enhances hydrogen uptake; nonetheless, acid pre-treatment does not favour hydrogen-carbon interactions. Pd modified thermally-acidic pre-treated carbon materials have reversible hydrogen uptakes at the evaluated condition. On the other hand, Ni and Co modified thermally-acidic pre-treated carbon materials certainly uptake hydrogen, but it is not solely released (H{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4} are produced). (author)

  4. The activity of nanocrystalline Fe-based alloys as electrode materials for the hydrogen evolution reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Christian Immanuel; Sellschopp, Kai; Tegel, Marcus; Rauscher, Thomas; Kieback, Bernd; Röntzsch, Lars

    2016-02-01

    In view of alkaline water electrolysis, the activities for the hydrogen evolution reaction of nanocrystalline Fe-based electrode materials were investigated and compared with the activities of polycrystalline Fe and Ni. Electrochemical methods were used to elucidate the overpotential value, the charge transfer resistance and the double layer capacity. Structural properties of the electrode surface were determined with SEM, XRD and XPS analyses. Thus, a correlation between electrochemical and structural parameters was found. In this context, we report on a cyclic voltammetric activation procedure which causes a significant increase of the surface area of Fe-based electrodes leading to a boost in effective activity of the activated electrodes. It was found that the intrinsic activity of activated Fe-based electrodes is very high due to the formation of a nanocrystalline surface layer. In contrast, the activation procedure influences only the intrinsic activity of the Ni electrodes without the formation of a porous surface layer.

  5. Respiration triggers heme transfer from cytochrome c peroxidase to catalase in yeast mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathiresan, Meena; Martins, Dorival; English, Ann M

    2014-12-01

    In exponentially growing yeast, the heme enzyme, cytochrome c peroxidase (Ccp1) is targeted to the mitochondrial intermembrane space. When the fermentable source (glucose) is depleted, cells switch to respiration and mitochondrial H2O2 levels rise. It has long been assumed that CCP activity detoxifies mitochondrial H2O2 because of the efficiency of this activity in vitro. However, we find that a large pool of Ccp1 exits the mitochondria of respiring cells. We detect no extramitochondrial CCP activity because Ccp1 crosses the outer mitochondrial membrane as the heme-free protein. In parallel with apoCcp1 export, cells exhibit increased activity of catalase A (Cta1), the mitochondrial and peroxisomal catalase isoform in yeast. This identifies Cta1 as a likely recipient of Ccp1 heme, which is supported by low Cta1 activity in ccp1Δ cells and the accumulation of holoCcp1 in cta1Δ mitochondria. We hypothesized that Ccp1's heme is labilized by hyperoxidation of the protein during the burst in H2O2 production as cells begin to respire. To test this hypothesis, recombinant Ccp1 was hyperoxidized with excess H2O2 in vitro, which accelerated heme transfer to apomyoglobin added as a surrogate heme acceptor. Furthermore, the proximal heme Fe ligand, His175, was found to be ∼ 85% oxidized to oxo-histidine in extramitochondrial Ccp1 isolated from 7-d cells, indicating that heme labilization results from oxidation of this ligand. We conclude that Ccp1 responds to respiration-derived H2O2 via a previously unidentified mechanism involving H2O2-activated heme transfer to apoCta1. Subsequently, the catalase activity of Cta1, not CCP activity, contributes to mitochondrial H2O2 detoxification. PMID:25422453

  6. Polarographic assay based on hydrogen peroxide scavenging in determination of antioxidant activity of strong alcohol beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorjanović, Stanislava Z; Novaković, Miroslav M; Vukosavljević, Predrag V; Pastor, Ferenc T; Tesević, Vele V; Suznjević, Desanka Z

    2010-07-28

    Total antioxidant (AO) activity of strong alcohol beverages such as wine and plum brandies, whiskeys, herbal and sweet fruit liqueurs have been assessed using a polarographic assay based on hydrogen peroxide scavenging (HPS). Rank of order of total AO activity, expressed as percentage of decrease of anodic oxidation current of hydrogen peroxide, was found analogous with total phenolic content estimated by Folin-Ciocalteau (FC) assay and radical scavenging capacity against the stable free radical 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH). Application of the assay for surveying of a quarter century long maturation of plum brandy in oak barrel was demonstrated. In addition, influence of different storage conditions on preservation of AO activity of some herbal liqueurs was surveyed. Wide area of application of this simple, fast, low cost and reliable assay in analysis and quality monitoring of various strong alcohol beverages was confirmed. PMID:20604507

  7. Stabilizing a Platinum1 Single-Atom Catalyst on Supported Phosphomolybdic Acid without Compromising Hydrogenation Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Asakura, Hiroyuki; Zhang, Jia; Zhang, Jiaguang; De, Sudipta; Yan, Ning

    2016-07-11

    In coordination chemistry, catalytically active metal complexes in a zero- or low-valent state often adopt four-coordinate square-planar or tetrahedral geometry. By applying this principle, we have developed a stable Pt1 single-atom catalyst with a high Pt loading (close to 1 wt %) on phosphomolybdic acid(PMA)-modified active carbon. This was achieved by anchoring Pt on the four-fold hollow sites on PMA. Each Pt atom is stabilized by four oxygen atoms in a distorted square-planar geometry, with Pt slightly protruding from the oxygen planar surface. Pt is positively charged, absorbs hydrogen easily, and exhibits excellent performance in the hydrogenation of nitrobenzene and cyclohexanone. It is likely that the system described here can be extended to a number of stable SACs with superior catalytic activities. PMID:27240266

  8. Carbon Sources for Yeast Growth as a Precondition of Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Hormetic Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruslana Vasylkovska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hormesis is a phenomenon of particular interest in biology, medicine, pharmacology, and toxicology. In this study, we investigated the relationship between H2O2-induced hormetic response in S. cerevisiae and carbon sources in yeast growth medium. In general, our data indicate that (i hydrogen peroxide induces hormesis in a concentration-dependent manner; (ii the effect of hydrogen peroxide on yeast reproductive ability depends on the type of carbon substrate in growth medium; and (iii metabolic and growth rates as well as catalase activity play an important role in H2O2-induced hormetic response in yeast.

  9. Carbon Sources for Yeast Growth as a Precondition of Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Hormetic Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasylkovska, Ruslana; Petriv, Natalia; Semchyshyn, Halyna

    2015-01-01

    Hormesis is a phenomenon of particular interest in biology, medicine, pharmacology, and toxicology. In this study, we investigated the relationship between H2O2-induced hormetic response in S. cerevisiae and carbon sources in yeast growth medium. In general, our data indicate that (i) hydrogen peroxide induces hormesis in a concentration-dependent manner; (ii) the effect of hydrogen peroxide on yeast reproductive ability depends on the type of carbon substrate in growth medium; and (iii) metabolic and growth rates as well as catalase activity play an important role in H2O2-induced hormetic response in yeast. PMID:26843865

  10. Isolation and Purification of Heterotetrameric Catalase from a Desiccation Tolerant Cyanobacterium Lyngbya arboricola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapoor, Shivali

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The desiccation tolerant cyanobacterium Lyngbya arboricola, isolated from bark surfaces of Mangifera indica, possessed up to four stable isoforms of catalase in addition to other antioxidative enzymes, for several years under a dry state. Purification of the two most persistent isoforms of catalase (Cat has been undertaken by employing acetone precipitation, ethanol: chloroform treatment, gel filtration and ion exchange chromatography. The two isoforms of catalase remained almost unchanged on varying matric and osmotic hydration levels of mats of the cyanobacterium. The purification procedures resulted in a 1.3 % yield of purified single isoform (0.22 mg mL-1 protein with 709 Units mg-1 specific activity and a purity index of 0.83. Five millimolar of dithiothreitol (DTT was observed to be pertinent in maintaining the optimum redox state of the enzyme. The purification procedures additionally facilitated the simultaneous elimination and procurement of phycoerythrins (PE and mycosporine-like amino acids (MAA. Each purified isoform gave a single band (~45kDa upon SDS-PAGE and denaturing urea isoelectric focusing (IEF depicted the presence of 2 subunits each of CatA and CatB. The monoisotopic mass and pI value of CatA and CatB as revealed by LC-MS analysis and internal amino acid sequencing was 78.96, 5.89 and 80.77, 5.92, respectively, showing resemblance with CatA of Erysiphe graminis subs. hordei and CatB of Ajellomyces capsulata. The heterotetrameric monofunctional catalase (~320 kDa, due to its stability in the form of resistance to ethanol: chloroform, its thermoalkaliphilic nature and the presence of innumerable hydrophobic amino acid residues (~40%, thus exhibited its potential for biotechnological applications.

  11. Metal and precursor effect during 1-heptyne selective hydrogenation using an activated carbon as support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederhos, Cecilia R; Badano, Juan M; Carrara, Nicolas; Coloma-Pascual, Fernando; Almansa, M Cristina; Liprandi, Domingo; Quiroga, Mónica

    2013-01-01

    Palladium, platinum, and ruthenium supported on activated carbon were used as catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of 1-heptyne, a terminal alkyne. All catalysts were characterized by temperature programmed reduction, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. TPR and XPS suggest that the metal in all catalysts is reduced after the pretreatment with H2 at 673 K. The TPR trace of the PdNRX catalyst shows that the support surface groups are greatly modified as a consequence of the use of HNO3 during the catalyst preparation. During the hydrogenation of 1-heptyne, both palladium catalysts were more active and selective than the platinum and ruthenium catalysts. The activity order of the catalysts is as follows: PdClRX>PdNRX>PtClRX≫RuClRX. This superior performance of PdClRX was attributed in part to the total occupancy of the d electronic levels of the Pd metal that is supposed to promote the rupture of the H2 bond during the hydrogenation reaction. The activity differences between PdClRX and PdNRX catalysts could be attributed to a better accessibility of the substrate to the active sites, as a consequence of steric and electronic effects of the superficial support groups. The order for the selectivity to 1-heptene is as follows: PdClRX=PdNRX>RuClRX>PtClRX, and it can be mainly attributed to thermodynamic effects. PMID:24348168

  12. Can Melatonin Act as an Antioxidant in Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Stress Model in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solaleh Emamgholipour

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We aimed to investigate the possible effects of melatonin on gene expressions and activities of MnSOD and catalase under conditions of oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. Materials and Methods. PBMCs were isolated from healthy subjects and treated as follows: (1 control (only with 0.1% DMSO for 12 h; (2 melatonin (1 mM for 12 h; (3 H2O2 (250 μM for 2 h; (4 H2O2 (250 μM for 2 h following 10 h pretreatment with melatonin (1 mM. The gene expression was evaluated by real-time PCR. MnSOD and catalase activities in PBMCs were determined by colorimetric assays. Results. Pretreatment of PBMCs with melatonin significantly augmented expression and activity of MnSOD which were diminished by H2O2. Melatonin treatment of PBMCs caused a significant upregulation of catalase by almost 2-fold in comparison with untreated cells. However, activity and expression of catalase increased by 1.5-fold in PBMCs under H2O2-induced oxidative stress compared with untreated cell. Moreover, pretreatment of PBMCs with melatonin resulted in a significant 1.8-fold increase in catalase expression compared to PBMCs treated only with H2O2. Conclusion. It seems that melatonin could prevent from undesirable impacts of H2O2-induced oxidative stress on MnSOD downregulation. Moreover, melatonin could promote inductive effect of H2O2 on catalase mRNA expression.

  13. Using superoxide dismutase/catalase mimetics to manipulate the redox environment of neural precursor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Past work has shown that neural precursor cells are predisposed to redox sensitive changes, and that oxidative stress plays a critical role in the acute and persistent changes that occur within the irradiated CNS. Irradiation leads to a marked rise in reactive oxygen species (ROS) that correlates with oxidative endpoints in vivo and reductions in neuro-genesis. To better understand the impact of oxidative stress on neural precursor cells, and to determine if radiation-induced oxidative damage and precursor cell loss after irradiation could be reduced, a series of antioxidant compounds (EUK-134, EUK-163, EUK-172, EUK-189) were tested, three of which possess both superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities and one (EUK-163) whose only significant activity is SOD. Our results show that these SOD/catalase mimetics apparently increase the oxidation of a ROS-sensitive fluorescent indicator dye, particularly after short (12 h) treatments, but that longer treatments (24 h) decrease oxidation attributable to radiation-induced ROS. Similarly, other studies found that cells incubated with CuZnSOD showed some increase in intracellular ROS levels. Subsequent data suggested that the dye-oxidising capabilities of the EUK compounds were linked to differences in their catalase activity and, most likely, their ability to catalyse per-oxidative pathways. In unirradiated mice, the EUK-134 analogue induced some decrease of proliferating precursor cells and immature neurons 48 h after radiation, an effect that may be attributable to cytotoxicity and/or inhibition of precursor proliferation. In irradiated mice, a single injection of EUK-134 was not found to be an effective radioprotector at acute times (48 h). The present results support continued development of our in vitro model as a tool for predicting certain in vivo responses, and suggest that in some biological systems the capability to scavenge superoxide but produce excess H2O2, as is known for CuZnSOD, may be potentially

  14. Activities of Nuclear Research Institute Rez in the area of hydrogen technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NRI is a research institution established in 1955. Nowadays, the Institute provides wide range of expertise and services for operators of the nuclear power plants in the Czech Republic and abroad, supports Czech central state institutions in the domains of strategic energy planning and development, management of radioactive waste (for the Ministry of Trade and Industry), provides independent expertise for the State Office of Nuclear Safety, performs activities in the area of exploitation of ionising radiation and irradiation services for basic and applied research, health service and industry, performs research and provides services for radioactive waste disposal, production of radiopharmaceuticals, education and training of experts and scientific specialists and performs many other activities. With the gradual changes in energy policy, hydrogen economy becomes one of the important topics related to nuclear energy. NRI is participating in the research and development in this area and as a member of the Czech Hydrogen Technology Platform is currently the leader in this area in the country. To promote hydrogen economy, NRI prepared and participated in several demonstration projects. Studies on production of hydrogen in current and future nuclear power plants are performed as well. (authors)

  15. Catalase, glutathione peroxidase, metabolic syndrome, superoxide dismutase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarsikah

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Labor pain is part of a normal process, which often causes physiological and psychological stress to mother. These stress have impact to both mother and fetus. Largely (90% labor comes with pain and in some cases severe pain. Non-pharmacological approach is one of alternatives to reduce labor pain. This research aims to analyse the analgesic effect of lavender aromatherapy inhalation on labor pain in primigravida in the active phase. The study was pra-experimental by observing one group before and after treatment. The group involved 30 parturients in RB Kasih Ibu Jatirogo district of Tuban, East Java. The sampling method was based on consecutive admission. The variables were measured by using numerical rating scales (NRS. Univariable quantitative analysis was applied to describe the pain before and after treatment. Wilcoxon signed ranks test bivariable quantitative analysis was used to investigate pain relief with significance level of p<0.05. The univariable analysis result revealed that mean pain score before treatment was 7.3 (SD 1.1 and after treatment 5.9 (SD 1.4. Wilcoxon signed ranks test result showed significant pain relief after lavender aromatherapy inhalation (Z=-4.338, p=0.000. The research shows that there is a reduction of labor pain after lavender aromatherapy inhalation.

  16. Influence of hydrogen annealing on the photocatalytic activity of diamond-supported gold catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navalon, Sergio; Sempere, David; Alvaro, Mercedes; Garcia, Hermenegildo

    2013-08-14

    Fenton-treated diamond nanoparticles have been submitted to hydrogen reduction at 500 °C with the purpose of modifying the nature of the functional groups present on the diamond surface. The nature of the functional groups on the diamond samples was characterized by a combination of spectroscopic and analytical techniques. In particular, Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy, temperature-programmed desorption, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) show the decrease in the population of carboxylic acids, esters, and anhydrides after hydrogen treatment. XPS also shows a decrease on the oxygen content after the hydrogen treatment of the diamond nanoparticles and lower electronegativity of the carbons as assessed by the lower binding energy values. Although Fenton-treated diamond colloids in water changes the zeta potential from positive to negative values as a function of the pH, hydrogen annealing and the disappearance of the carboxyl groups determines that the zeta potential of the resulting sample remains positive in the complete pH range. Deposition of gold nanoparticles was carried out by the polyol method consisting on the reduction of HAuCl4 by hot ethylene glycol in the presence of the support. TEM analysis shows a variation of the average gold nanoparticle size that decreases after hydrogen reduction of carboxylic groups and becomes smaller for low gold loadings. The catalytic activity of the diamond supported gold nanoparticles as a function of the surface annealing treatment and gold loading was evaluated for the natural sunlight-assisted peroxidation of phenol by H2O2. It was observed that the most efficient sample was the one having lower gold nanoparticle size that was obtained for diamond samples reduced by hydrogen at 500 °C after the Fenton treatment and having low gold loading (0.05 wt %). Turnover frequencies above 2400 and 940 h(-1) were obtained for phenol degradation and H2O2 decomposition, respectively. PMID:23815432

  17. Hydrogen sulfide and sodium nitroprusside compete to activate/deactivate MMPs in bone tissue homogenates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vacek TP

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Thomas P Vacek, Natia Qipshidze, Suresh C Tyagi Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY, USA Background: Bone microvascular remodeling is the primary predictor of bone structure and function. Remodeling by its very nature implies synthesis and degradation of the extracellular matrix. Normally, 50% of total protein in the vessel wall is elastin. During remodeling, elastin is degraded by specialized matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs. Because the turnover of elastin is 1000-fold slower than that of collagen, most of the elastin is replaced by stiffer collagen. Stiffer vessels impose pressure on the aortic valve, causing regurgitation and increased pulse pressure. On the other hand, high MMP activity will cause vascular dilatation, leading to aneurysm. Therefore, balanced constitutive remodeling is necessary for adequate bone structure and function. Interestingly, collagen-degrading MMPs are involved in various pathological conditions, including osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, and cardiovascular disease. Sodium nitroprusside is a nitric oxide donor that could potentially alter MMP activity via vasodilation in vivo, but can also produce peroxynitrite, which activates MMPs by combining with superoxide. Moreover, hydrogen sulfide is a known antioxidant as well as a vasodilator, and is also speculated to contribute directly to MMP activity. We hypothesized that hydrogen sulfide reduced activity of MMP in ex vivo bone tissue homogenates and that sodium nitroprusside would increase MMP activity in vitro. Methods: We surgically removed the tibia and femur from anesthetized mice, and prepared bone tissue homogenates using a mortar and pestle, measured the protein concentration with a spectrophotometer, and detected MMP activity using gelatin gel zymography. Results: Our data showed increased MMP activity at a sodium nitroprusside concentration of 1 µM, and MMP activity increased exponentially. There

  18. A highly active and stable hydrogen evolution catalyst based on pyrite-structured cobalt phosphosulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen; Hu, Enyuan; Jiang, Hong; Xiang, Yingjie; Weng, Zhe; Li, Min; Fan, Qi; Yu, Xiqian; Altman, Eric I; Wang, Hailiang

    2016-01-01

    Rational design and controlled synthesis of hybrid structures comprising multiple components with distinctive functionalities are an intriguing and challenging approach to materials development for important energy applications like electrocatalytic hydrogen production, where there is a great need for cost effective, active and durable catalyst materials to replace the precious platinum. Here we report a structure design and sequential synthesis of a highly active and stable hydrogen evolution electrocatalyst material based on pyrite-structured cobalt phosphosulfide nanoparticles grown on carbon nanotubes. The three synthetic steps in turn render electrical conductivity, catalytic activity and stability to the material. The hybrid material exhibits superior activity for hydrogen evolution, achieving current densities of 10 mA cm(-2) and 100 mA cm(-2) at overpotentials of 48 mV and 109 mV, respectively. Phosphorus substitution is crucial for the chemical stability and catalytic durability of the material, the molecular origins of which are uncovered by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and computational simulation. PMID:26892437

  19. A highly active and stable hydrogen evolution catalyst based on pyrite-structured cobalt phosphosulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen; Hu, Enyuan; Jiang, Hong; Xiang, Yingjie; Weng, Zhe; Li, Min; Fan, Qi; Yu, Xiqian; Altman, Eric I.; Wang, Hailiang

    2016-02-01

    Rational design and controlled synthesis of hybrid structures comprising multiple components with distinctive functionalities are an intriguing and challenging approach to materials development for important energy applications like electrocatalytic hydrogen production, where there is a great need for cost effective, active and durable catalyst materials to replace the precious platinum. Here we report a structure design and sequential synthesis of a highly active and stable hydrogen evolution electrocatalyst material based on pyrite-structured cobalt phosphosulfide nanoparticles grown on carbon nanotubes. The three synthetic steps in turn render electrical conductivity, catalytic activity and stability to the material. The hybrid material exhibits superior activity for hydrogen evolution, achieving current densities of 10 mA cm-2 and 100 mA cm-2 at overpotentials of 48 mV and 109 mV, respectively. Phosphorus substitution is crucial for the chemical stability and catalytic durability of the material, the molecular origins of which are uncovered by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and computational simulation.

  20. Dynamic Structural Changes During Complement C3 Activation Analyzed by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Schuster, Michael C.; Ricklin, Daniel; Papp, Krisztián; Molnar, Kathleen S.; Coales, Stephen J.; Hamuro, Yoshitomo; Sfyroera, Georgia; Chen, Hui; Winters, Michael S; Lambris, John D.

    2008-01-01

    Proteolytic cleavage of component C3 to C3b is a central step in the activation of complement. Whereas C3 is largely biologically inactive, C3b is directly involved in various complement activities. While the recently described crystal structures of C3 and C3b provide a molecular basis of complement activation, they do not reflect the dynamic changes that occur in solution. In addition, the available C3b structures diverge in some important aspects. Here we have utilized hydrogen/deuterium ex...

  1. Improvement of silicon direct bonding using surfaces activated by hydrogen plasma treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, W B; Lee Jae Sik; Sung, M Y

    2000-01-01

    The plasma surface treatment, using hydrogen gas, of silicon wafers was studied as a pretreatment for silicon direct bonding. Chemical reactions of the hydrogen plasma with the surfaces were used for both surface activation and removal of surface contaminants. Exposure of the silicon wafers to the plasma formed an active oxide layer on the surface. This layer was hydrophilic. The surface roughness and morphology were examined as functions of the plasma exposure time and power. The surface became smoother with shorter plasma exposure time and lower power. In addition, the plasma surface treatment was very efficient in removing the carbon contaminants on the silicon surface. The value of the initial surface energy, as estimated by using the crack propagation method, was 506 mJ/M sup 2 , which was up to about three times higher than the value for the conventional direct bonding method using wet chemical treatments.

  2. Passivation of electrically active centers by Hydrogen and Lithium in Semiconductors

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The hyperfine technique of Perturbed Angular Correlation Spectroscopy (PAC) has proven to be excellently suited for the microscopic investigation of impurity complexes in semiconductors. But this method is seriously limited by the small number of chemically different isotopes which are suitable for PAC measurements and represent electrically active centers in semiconductors. This bottleneck can be widely overcome by the ISOLDE facility which provides a great variety of shortliving PAC isotopes. The probe atom $^{111m}$Cd, provided by ISOLDE opened the first successful access to PAC investigations of III-V compounds and enabled also the first PAC experiments on double acceptors in silicon and germamum. \\\\ \\\\ At the new ISOLDE facility our experiments were concentrated on the passivation of electrically active centres by hydrogen and lithium in Si, Ge and III-V compounds. Experiments on $^{111m}$Cd in Ge revealed the formation of two different acceptor hydrogen and two different acceptor lithium complexes respe...

  3. The Activity of Ni-Based Catalysts on Steam Reforming of Glycerol for Hydrogen Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALI SALEM EBSHISH

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Glycerol, the readily available bio renewable material, is effectively utilized for hydrogen production by a steam reforming reaction. The experiments were carried out in a continuous flow fixed-bed reactor over Nickel supported alumina catalysts under atmospheric pressure at 600°C and three hours reaction time. 5%wt Ni was loaded over γ-Al2O3 and effect of promoter metals such as Fe and Co over Ni/γ-Al2O3 catalytic systems were evaluated. The catalysts were characterized by BET surface area, XRD and SEM techniques. The activity results showed that the addition of Co enhanced the catalyst performance. The catalysts exhibited a good activity and selectivity to hydrogen.

  4. VALORIZATION OF INORGANIC SOLID WASTES FROM INDUSTRIAL ACTIVITIES INTO ACTIVE MATERIALS FOR REMOVAL OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE IN GAS PHASE

    OpenAIRE

    Pham Xuan, Huynh; Pham Minh, Doan; Nzihou, Ange

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), which was formed from both natural and anthropogenic processes, is one of the most toxic contaminants affecting machine, people health, and ecosystem. Activated carbon and its derivatives (with metal oxides) are conventionally for H 2 S removal. However, they are expensive. Besides, the worldwide production of soda ash bases mostly on the Solvay Process ® (59% in 2000), which generates a large amounts of inorganic solid wastes with the main composition of CaCO 3. This ...

  5. Metal and Precursor Effect during 1-Heptyne Selective Hydrogenation Using an Activated Carbon as Support

    OpenAIRE

    Lederhos, Cecilia R.; Badano, Juan M.; Nicolas Carrara; Fernando Coloma-Pascual; M. Cristina Almansa; Domingo Liprandi; Mónica Quiroga

    2013-01-01

    Palladium, platinum, and ruthenium supported on activated carbon were used as catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of 1-heptyne, a terminal alkyne. All catalysts were characterized by temperature programmed reduction, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. TPR and XPS suggest that the metal in all catalysts is reduced after the pretreatment with H2 at 673 K. The TPR trace of the PdNRX catalyst shows that the support surface groups are g...

  6. Sphalerite is a geochemical catalyst for carbon−hydrogen bond activation

    OpenAIRE

    Shipp, Jessie A.; Gould, Ian R.; Shock, Everett L.; Williams, Lynda B.; Hartnett, Hilairy E.

    2014-01-01

    Organic compound transformations in the Earth commonly take place in the presence of minerals and aqueous solutions, but a mechanistic understanding of how minerals influence hydrothermal organic reactivity is virtually nonexistent. We present the first description of mineral catalysis of a fundamental organic reaction—carbon−hydrogen bond activation. The discovery that a common mineral, sphalerite (ZnS), can readily accomplish this reaction will interest not only geochemists but also the org...

  7. Efficient Method for the Determination of the Activation Energy of the Iodide-Catalyzed Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, William; Lee, James; Abid, Nauman; DeMeo, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    An experiment is described that determines the activation energy (E[subscript a]) of the iodide-catalyzed decomposition reaction of hydrogen peroxide in a much more efficient manner than previously reported in the literature. Hydrogen peroxide, spontaneously or with a catalyst, decomposes to oxygen and water. Because the decomposition reaction is…

  8. A Micro-fabricated Hydrogen Storage Module with Sub-atmospheric Activation and Durability in Air Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Xi; Payer, Joe H; Wainright, Jesse S; Dudik, Laurie

    2011-01-15

    The objective of this work was to develop a hydrogen storage module for onboard electrical power sources suitable for use in micro power systems and micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). Hydrogen storage materials were developed as thin-film inks to be compatible with an integrated manufacturing process. Important design aspects were (a) ready activation at sub-atmospheric hydrogen pressure and room temperature and (b) durability, i.e. capable of hundreds of absorption/desorption cycles and resistance to deactivation on exposure to air. Inks with palladium-treated intermetallic hydrogen storage alloys were developed and are shown here to be compatible with a thin-film micro-fabrication process. These hydrogen storage modules absorb hydrogen readily at atmospheric pressure, and the absorption/desorption rates remained fast even after the ink was exposed to air for 47 weeks. PMID:20967132

  9. Regulation of substantia nigra pars reticulata GABAergic neuron activity by hydrogen peroxide via flufenamic acid-sensitive channels and KATP channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian R Lee

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr GABAergic neurons are key output neurons of the basal ganglia. Given the role of these neurons in motor control, it is important to understand factors that regulate their firing rate and pattern. One potential regulator is hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, a reactive oxygen species that is increasingly recognized as a neuromodulator. We used whole-cell current clamp recordings of SNr GABAergic neurons in guinea-pig midbrain slices to determine how H2O2 affects the activity of these neurons and to explore the classes of ion channels underlying those effects. Elevation of H2O2 levels caused an increase in the spontaneous firing rate of SNr GABAergic neurons, whether by application of exogenous H2O2 or amplification of endogenous H2O2 through inhibition of glutathione peroxidase with mercaptosuccinate. This effect was reversed by flufenamic acid, implicating transient receptor potential (TRP channels. Conversely, depletion of endogenous H2O2 by catalase, a peroxidase enzyme, decreased spontaneous firing rate and firing precision of SNr neurons, demonstrating tonic control of firing rate by H2O2. Elevation of H2O2 in the presence of flufenamic acid revealed an inhibition of tonic firing that was prevented by blockade of ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP channels with glibenclamide. In contrast to guinea-pig SNr neurons, the dominant effect of H2O2 elevation in mouse SNr GABAergic neurons was hyperpolarization, indicating a species difference in H2O2-dependent regulation. Thus, H2O2 is an endogenous modulator of SNr GABAergic neurons, acting primarily through presumed TRP channels in guinea pig, with additional modulation via KATP channels to regulate SNr output.

  10. Hydrogen adsorption-mediated synthesis of concave Pt nanocubes and their enhanced electrocatalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bang-An; Du, Jia-Huan; Sheng, Tian; Tian, Na; Xiao, Jing; Liu, Li; Xu, Bin-Bin; Zhou, Zhi-You; Sun, Shi-Gang

    2016-06-01

    Concave nanocubes are enclosed by high-index facets and have negative curvature; they are expected to have enhanced reactivity, as compared to nanocubes with flat surfaces. Herein, we propose and demonstrate a new strategy for the synthesis of concave Pt nanocubes with {hk0} high-index facets, by using a hydrogen adsorption-mediated electrochemical square-wave potential method. It was found that Pt atoms prefer to deposit on edge sites rather than terrace sites on Pt surfaces with intensive hydrogen adsorption, resulting in the formation of concave structures. The as-prepared concave Pt nanocubes exhibit enhanced catalytic activity and stability towards oxidation of ethanol and formic acid in acidic solutions, compared to commercial Pt/C catalysts.Concave nanocubes are enclosed by high-index facets and have negative curvature; they are expected to have enhanced reactivity, as compared to nanocubes with flat surfaces. Herein, we propose and demonstrate a new strategy for the synthesis of concave Pt nanocubes with {hk0} high-index facets, by using a hydrogen adsorption-mediated electrochemical square-wave potential method. It was found that Pt atoms prefer to deposit on edge sites rather than terrace sites on Pt surfaces with intensive hydrogen adsorption, resulting in the formation of concave structures. The as-prepared concave Pt nanocubes exhibit enhanced catalytic activity and stability towards oxidation of ethanol and formic acid in acidic solutions, compared to commercial Pt/C catalysts. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of DFT calculation, SEM images of concave Pt nanocubes, mass activity and stability characterization of the catalysts. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02349e

  11. Hydrogen water deuterium exchange studies on palladium on activated charcoal hydrophobic catalyst (Preprint No. CA-20)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuterium exchange between hydrogen gas and water is one of the most promising processes for heavy water production. In production of heavy water, separation factor and energy cost are two main parameters which govern the economic effectiveness of a process. Out of the chemical exchange process, H2-H2O exchange has higher separation factor at a given temperature. Even though the separation factor is high, major disadvantage in the process is that a catalyst is required. Group VIII metals are most suitable catalysts for hydrogenation, dehydrogenation and hydrogenolysis because of their ability to chemisorb H2 dissociatively. Even among VIII2 triad, Pt has the highest activity. A highly active Pt catalyst has a reported half life of 4 seconds. As Pd is cheaper than Pt, studies have been carried out using active Pd as catalyst for H2-H2O exchange. It is observed that: (1)at metal concentration of 0.3%, Pd shows the optimum catalytic activity, (2)a highly active Pd is found to have a half life of 5 minutes, and (3)addition of α-alumina enhances the catalytic activity. (author). 6 refs., 5 figs

  12. Hydrogen evolution activity and electrochemical stability of selected transition metal carbides in concentrated phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The hydrogen evolution activity (HER) on five transition metal carbides was studied in concentrated phosphoric acid at different temperatures. • Carbides of Group 6 metals (Cr, Mo, W) showed significant HER activity; the Volmer-Heyrovsky mechanism was proposed for the HER reaction on these materials. • The electrochemical stability towards oxidation was studied in concentrated phosphoric acid, with Cr, Ta and W carbides showing passivating behavior, while Nb and Mo carbides showed corrosion. - Abstract: Alternative catalysts based on carbides of Group 5 (niobium and tantalum) and 6 (chromium, molybdenum and tungsten) metals were prepared as films on the metallic substrates. The electrochemical activities of these carbide electrodes towards the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in concentrated phosphoric acid were investigated in a temperature range from 80 to 170 °C. A significant dependence of the activities on temperature was observed for all five carbide samples. Through the entire temperature range Group 6 metal carbides showed higher activity than that of the Group 5 metal carbides, attributable to the different electronic structures. Tungsten carbide among the studied electrode samples exhibited the highest HER activity. Upon anodic potential scans in the presence of oxygen, chromium, tantalum and tungsten carbides displayed passivation due to the formation of stable surface layers whereas niobium and molybdenum carbides seemed to undergo corrosion

  13. Catalase Deficiency Accelerates Diabetic Renal Injury Through Peroxisomal Dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Inah; Lee, Jiyoun; Huh, Joo Young; Park, Jehyun; Lee, Hi Bahl; Ho, Ye-Shih; Ha, Hunjoo

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in diabetes complications, including diabetic nephropathy (DN). Plasma free fatty acids (FFAs) as well as glucose are increased in diabetes, and peroxisomes and mitochondria participate in FFA oxidation in an interconnected fashion. Therefore, we investigated whether deficiency of catalase, a major peroxisomal antioxidant, accelerates DN through peroxisomal dysfunction and abnormal renal FFA metabolism. Diabetes was induced by...

  14. Superoxide dismutase, catalase, and. alpha. -tocopherol content of stored potato tubers. [Solanum tuberosum L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spychalla, J.P.; Desborough, S.L. (Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul (USA))

    1990-11-01

    Activated oxygen or oxygen free radical mediated damage to plants has been established or implicated in many plant stress situations. The extent of activated oxygen damage to potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers during low temperature storage and long-term storage is not known. Quantitation of oxygen free radical mediated damage in plant tissues is difficult. However, it is comparatively easy to quantitate endogenous antioxidants, which detoxify potentially damaging forms of activated oxygen. Three tuber antioxidants, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and {alpha}-tocopherol were assayed from four potato cultivars stored at 3{degree}C and 9{degree}C for 40 weeks. Tubers stored at 3{degree}C demonstrated increased superoxide dismutase activities (up to 72%) compared to tubers stored at 9{degree}C. Time dependent increases in the levels of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and {alpha}-tocopherol occurred during the course of the 40 week storage. The possible relationship between these increases in antioxidants and the rate of activated oxygen production in the tubers is discussed.

  15. Biomimetic Mn-Catalases Based on Dimeric Manganese Complexes in Mesoporous Silica for Potential Antioxidant Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escriche-Tur, Luis; Corbella, Montserrat; Font-Bardia, Mercè; Castro, Isabel; Bonneviot, Laurent; Albela, Belén

    2015-11-01

    Two new structural and functional models of the Mn-catalase with formula [{Mn(III)(bpy)(H2O)}(μ-2-MeOC6H4CO2)2(μ-O){Mn(III)(bpy)(X)}]X, where X = NO3 (1) and ClO4 (2) and bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, were synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction. In both cases, a water molecule and an X ion occupy the monodentate positions. The magnetic properties of these compounds reveal a weak antiferromagnetic behavior (2J = -2.2 cm(-1) for 1 and -0.7 cm(-1) for 2, using the spin Hamiltonian H = -2J S1·S2) and negative zero-field splitting parameter DMn (-4.6 cm(-1) and -3.0 cm(-1) for 1 and 2, respectively). This fact, together with the nearly orthogonal orientation of the Jahn-Teller axes of the Mn(III) ions explain the unusual shape of χMT versus T plot at low temperature. Compound 1 presents a better catalase activity than 2 in CH3CN-H2O media, probably due to a beneficial interaction of the NO3(-) ion with the Mn complex in solution. These compounds were successfully inserted inside two-dimensional hexagonal mesoporous silica (MCM-41 type) leading to the same hybrid material ([Mn2O]@SiO2), without the X group. The manganese complex occupies approximately half of the available pore volume, keeping the silica's hexagonal array intact. Magnetic measurements of [Mn2O]@SiO2 suggest that most of the dinuclear unit is preserved, as a non-negligible interaction between Mn ions is still observed. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of the Mn 3s peak confirms that Mn remains as Mn(III) inside the silica. The catalase activity study of material [Mn2O]@SiO2 reveals that the complex is more active inside the porous silica, probably due to the surface silanolate groups of the pore wall. Moreover, the new material shows catalase activity in water media, while the coordination compounds are not active. PMID:26484833

  16. Activation of Hydrogen-Passivated Mg in GaN-Based Light Emitting Diode Annealing with Minority-Carrier Injection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ling; HAO Yue; LI Pei-Xian; ZHOU Xiao-Wei

    2009-01-01

    We discuss an issue on the activation of p-GaN material under different annealing conditions and study the mechanism for the p-GaN activation. Under annealing in nitrogen, it is found that hydrogen cannot be completely removed from p-GaN. The experiments also indicate that rudimental hydrogen can exist stably in a certain state where hydrogen does not passivate the Mg acceptor in the sample annealing under bias. However, making additional annealing in nitrogen, we find that the steady state hydrogen can be decomposed and the Mg-H complex could generate again. Hydrogen remaining in the layer seems to play a major role in this reversible phenomenon.

  17. Hydrogen Adsorption on Activated Carbon an Carbon Nanotubes Using Volumetric Differential Pressure Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple hydrogen adsorption measurement system utilizing the volumetric differential pressure technique has been designed, fabricated and calibrated. Hydrogen adsorption measurements have been carried out at temperatures 298 K and 77 K on activate carbon and carbon nanotubes with different surface areas. The adsorption data obtained will be helpful in understanding the adsorption property of the studied carbon materials using the fundamentals of adsorption theory. The principle of the system follows the Sievert-type method. The system measures a change in pressure between the reference cell, R1 and the sample cell S1, S2, S3 over a certain temperature range, R1, S1, S2, and S3 having known fixed volume. The sample temperatures will be monitored by thermocouple TC while the pressures in R1 an S1, S2, S3 will be measured using a digital pressure transducer. The maximum operating pressure of the pressure transducer is 20 bar and calibrated with an accuracy of ±0.01 bar. High purity hydrogen is being used in the system and the amount of samples for the study is between 1.0-2.0 grams. The system was calibrated using helium gas without any samples in S1, S2 an S3. This will provide a correction factor during the adsorption process providing an adsorption free reference point when using hydrogen gas resulting in a more accurate reading of the adsorption process by eliminating the errors caused by temperature expansion effects and other non-adsorption related phenomena. The ideal gas equation of state is applied to calculate the hydrogen adsorption capacity based on the differential pressure measurements. Activated carbon with a surface area of 644.87 m2/g showed a larger amount of adsorption as compared to multiwalled nanotubes (commercial) with a surface area of 119.68 m2/g. This study als indicated that there is a direct correlation between the amounts of hydrogen adsorbed an surface area of the carbon materials under the conditions studied and that the adsorption

  18. Ultrathin platinum nanowires grown on single-layered nickel hydroxide with high hydrogen evolution activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Huajie; Zhao, Shenlong; Zhao, Kun; Muqsit, Abdul; Tang, Hongjie; Chang, Lin; Zhao, Huijun; Gao, Yan; Tang, Zhiyong

    2015-03-01

    Design and synthesis of effective electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction in alkaline environments is critical to reduce energy losses in alkaline water electrolysis. Here we report a hybrid nanomaterial comprising of one-dimensional ultrathin platinum nanowires grown on two-dimensional single-layered nickel hydroxide. Judicious surface chemistry to generate the fully exfoliated nickel hydroxide single layers is explored to be the key for controllable growth of ultrathin platinum nanowires with diameters of about 1.8 nm. Impressively, this hybrid nanomaterial exhibits superior electrocatalytic activity for hydrogen evolution reaction in alkaline solution, which outperforms currently reported catalysts, and the obviously improved catalytic stability. We believe that this work may lead towards the development of single-layered metal hydroxide-based hybrid materials for applications in catalysis and energy conversion.

  19. Metal and Precursor Effect during 1-Heptyne Selective Hydrogenation Using an Activated Carbon as Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia R. Lederhos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Palladium, platinum, and ruthenium supported on activated carbon were used as catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of 1-heptyne, a terminal alkyne. All catalysts were characterized by temperature programmed reduction, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. TPR and XPS suggest that the metal in all catalysts is reduced after the pretreatment with H2 at 673 K. The TPR trace of the PdNRX catalyst shows that the support surface groups are greatly modified as a consequence of the use of HNO3 during the catalyst preparation. During the hydrogenation of 1-heptyne, both palladium catalysts were more active and selective than the platinum and ruthenium catalysts. The activity order of the catalysts is as follows: PdClRX > PdNRX > PtClRX ≫ RuClRX. This superior performance of PdClRX was attributed in part to the total occupancy of the d electronic levels of the Pd metal that is supposed to promote the rupture of the H2 bond during the hydrogenation reaction. The activity differences between PdClRX and PdNRX catalysts could be attributed to a better accessibility of the substrate to the active sites, as a consequence of steric and electronic effects of the superficial support groups. The order for the selectivity to 1-heptene is as follows: PdClRX = PdNRX > RuClRX > PtClRX, and it can be mainly attributed to thermodynamic effects.

  20. Hydrogen sulfide monitoring and the effects of oil and gas activities on migratory birds in southeastern New Mexico [draft

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This study examined the effects of hydrogen sulfide H2S, emitted by oil and gas activities, by focusing on migratory birds in southeastern New Mexico. Study sites...

  1. X-ray diffraction study of Penicillium Vitale catalase in the complex with aminotriazole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The three-dimensional structure of the enzyme catalase from Penicillium vitale in a complex with the inhibitor aminotriazole was solved and refined by protein X-ray crystallography methods. An analysis of the three-dimensional structure of the complex showed that the inhibition of the enzyme occurs as a result of the covalent binding of aminotriazole to the amino-acid residue His64 in the active site of the enzyme. An investigation of the three-dimensional structure of the complex resulted in the amino-acid residues being more precisely identified. The binding sites of saccharide residues and calcium ions in the protein molecule were found.

  2. Isonicotinic Acid Hydrazide Conversion to Isonicotinyl-NAD by Catalase-peroxidases*

    OpenAIRE

    Wiseman, Ben; Carpena, Xavi; Feliz, Miguel; Donald, Lynda J.; Pons, Miquel; Fita, Ignacio; Loewen, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    Activation of the pro-drug isoniazid (INH) as an anti-tubercular drug in Mycobacterium tuberculosis involves its conversion to isonicotinyl-NAD, a reaction that requires the catalase-peroxidase KatG. This report shows that the reaction proceeds in the absence of KatG at a slow rate in a mixture of INH, NAD+, Mn2+, and O2, and that the inclusion of KatG increases the rate by >7 times. Superoxide, generated by either Mn2+- or KatG-catalyzed reduction of O2, is an essential intermediate in the r...

  3. Immobilization of Genetically-Modified d-Amino Acid Oxidase and Catalase on Carbon Nanotubes to Improve the Catalytic Efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Rong Li; Jian Sun; Yaqi Fu; Kun Du; Mengsha Cai; Peijun Ji; Wei Feng

    2016-01-01

    d-amino acid oxidase (DAAO) and catalase (CAT) have been genetically modified by fusing them to an elastin-like polypeptide (ELP). ELP-DAAO and ELP-CAT have been separately immobilized on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). It has been found that the secondary structures of the enzymes have been preserved. ELP-DAAO catalyzed the oxidative deamination of d-alanine, and H2O2 was evolved continuously. When the MWNT-supported enzymes were used together, the generated hydrogen peroxide of ELP-D...

  4. 土壤加砷对大豆叶绿素、脯氨酸和过氧化氢酶活性的影响%Effects of soil arsenic additions on chlorophyll, proline and the catalase activity in soybean (Glycine max .L .)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牛昌美; 杨兰芳; 彭小兰; 裴艳艳

    2013-01-01

    为了认识土壤砷污染对大豆生理指标的影响,设置土壤加砷0、5、10、30、50和100 mg kg -1共6个水平的盆栽大豆试验,测定大豆生长期间叶片的叶绿素、脯氨酸含量和过氧化氢酶活性等生理指标.结果表明,土壤砷污染影响大豆的叶绿素、脯氨酸、过氧化氢酶等生理指标.土壤加砷对大豆叶绿素的影响随生长期而不同,在结荚期,土壤加砷对叶绿素含量的影响不显著,但是高砷水平降低了叶绿素a与b的比值;在鼓粒期,高砷水平增加了大豆的叶绿素含量,叶绿素a、叶绿素b、类胡萝卜素和叶绿素总量的最大增加率分别达119.8%、111.0%、105.6%和117.2%.在大豆结荚期,土壤加砷30~100 mg kg -1使大豆脯氨酸的含量降低了23.4%~31.4%,而所有加砷处理的过氧化氢酶活性都显著低于对照,土壤加砷使大豆过氧化氢酶活性降低了10.7%~46.6%.总之,土壤砷污染会通过影响叶绿素的构成和含量改变大豆光合作用、降低大豆抗逆性和破坏大豆抗氧化系统来妨碍大豆的生长.%In order to understand the effects of soil arsenic pollution on soybean (Glycine max . L .) physiological indexes ,a soil pot experiment cultivating soybean by soil arsenic additions of 0 ,5 , 10 ,30 ,50 and 100 mg kg -1 was conducted and the content of chlorophyll and proline and the activity of catalase was determined during the soybean growing .The results showed that soil arsenic additions had significant effects on chlorophyll ,proline and catalase in soybean leaves .The effects of arsenic on chlorophyll in soybean leaves varied with the growing stages . At the pod stage , the content of chlorophyll in soybean leaves was not significantly influenced by soil arsenic additions ,but the ratios of chlorophyll a to b in 50 and 100 mg kg -1 arsenic additions were significant lower than that in control .While at grain filling

  5. Organic matter and hydrogen as electron donor for SRB and IRB activities in a clayey medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. According to the French concept for the disposal of High-Level radioactive Waste (HLW), waste will be emplaced in an environment with multiple metallic components into a geological clay formation. The presence of microorganisms has recently been evidenced in deep clayey environment. Therefore, neither the introduction of microbial species during the construction and operational phases nor the survival of bacteria after the disposal closure can be excluded. Indeed, microbial species may be able to tolerate specific environment with few nutrients to sustain life under high temperature, dry and highly radioactive conditions. Moreover, despite the low porosity of clays, cracks in the excavated disturbed zone and remaining void spaces between disposal components may be favorable for bacterial growth. Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria (SRB) and Iron-Reducing Bacteria (IRB) activities are notably expected to influence iron-clay reactivity, including corrosion processes. Their potential development must be investigated in order to better assess their metabolism, which may in turn influence the evolution of metallic and clayey materials involved in a HLW disposal cell. More specifically, deep geological environments containing low amounts of biodegradable Organic Matter (OM) are generally nutrient poor for microbial development. However, the radiolysis of pore water and the corrosion of metallic components of HLW disposal cell in anoxic conditions will lead to the production of hydrogen, which may also be used as an electron donor for microbial activity. Thus, the purpose of the present work is to quantify the potential of bacterial growth stimulation due either to the production of hydrogen or the presence of OM. In a first step, characterization of DOM leached from Tournemire clay powder has been performed in order to identify and estimate the concentration of soluble organic matter available for bacteria activity which will

  6. The Synthesis and Electrocatalytic Activities of Molybdenum Sulfide for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Zhengxing

    2014-07-01

    In the context of the future hydrogen economy, effective production of hydrogen (H2) from readily available and sustainable resources is of crucial importance. Hydrogen generation via water splitting by solar energy or electricity has attracted great attention in recent years. In comparison with photocatalytic water-splitting directly using solar light, which is ideal but the relevant technologies are not yet mature, electrolysis of water with catalyst is more practical at the current stage. The Pt-group noble metals are the most effective electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) from water, but their high costs limit their applications. Due to the earth-abundance and low price, MoS2 is expected to be a good alternative of the Pt-group metals for HER. Plenty of researches have been conducted for improving the HER activities of MoS2 by optimizing its synthesis method. However, it remains challenging to prepare MoS2 catalysts with high and controllable activity, and more investigations are still needed to better understand the structure-performance correlation in this system. In this thesis, we report a new strategy for fabricating MoS2 eletrocatalysts which gives rise to much improved HER performance and allows us to tune the electrocatalytic activity by varying the preparation conditions. Specifically, we sulfurized molybdenum oxide on the surface of a Ti foil electrode via a facile chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, and directly used the electrode for HER testing. Depending on the CVD temperature, the MoO2-MoS2 nanocomposites show different HER activities. Under the optimal synthesis condition (400ºC), the resulting catalyst exhibited excellent HER activity: an onset potential (overpotential) of 0.095 V versus RHE and the Tafel slope of 40 mv/dec. Such a performance exceeds those of most reported MoS2 based HER electrocatalysts. We demonstrated that the CVD temperature has significant influence on the catalysts in crystallinity degree, particle

  7. The use of glucose oxidase and catalase for the enzymatic reduction of the potential ethanol content in wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röcker, Jessica; Schmitt, Matthias; Pasch, Ludwig; Ebert, Kristin; Grossmann, Manfred

    2016-11-01

    Due to the increase of sugar levels in wine grapes as one of the impacts of climate change, alcohol reduction in wines becomes a major focus of interest. This study combines the use of glucose oxidase and catalase activities with the aim of rapid conversion of glucose into non-fermentable gluconic acid. The H2O2 hydrolysing activity of purified catalase is necessary in order to stabilize glucose oxidase activity. After establishing the adequate enzyme ratio, the procedure was applied in large-scale trials (16L- and 220L-scale) of which one was conducted in a winery under industrial wine making conditions. Both enzyme activity and wine flavour were clearly influenced by the obligatory aeration in the different trials. With the enzyme treatment an alcohol reduction of 2%vol. was achieved after 30h of aeration. However the enzyme treated wines were significantly more acidic and less typical. PMID:27211694

  8. Multiple abiotic stress tolerance of the transformants yeast cells and the transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing a novel durum wheat catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feki, Kaouthar; Kamoun, Yosra; Ben Mahmoud, Rihem; Farhat-Khemakhem, Ameny; Gargouri, Ali; Brini, Faiçal

    2015-12-01

    Catalases are reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes involved in response to abiotic and biotic stresses. In this study, we described the isolation and functional characterization of a novel catalase from durum wheat, designed TdCAT1. Molecular Phylogeny analyses showed that wheat TdCAT1 exhibited high amino acids sequence identity to other plant catalases. Sequence homology analysis showed that TdCAT1 protein contained the putative calmodulin binding domain and a putative conserved internal peroxisomal targeting signal PTS1 motif around its C-terminus. Predicted three-dimensional structural model revealed the presence of four putative distinct structural regions which are the N-terminal arm, the β-barrel, the wrapping and the α-helical domains. TdCAT1 protein had the heme pocket that was composed by five essential residues. TdCAT1 gene expression analysis showed that this gene was induced by various abiotic stresses in durum wheat. The expression of TdCAT1 in yeast cells and Arabidopsis plants conferred tolerance to several abiotic stresses. Compared with the non-transformed plants, the transgenic lines maintained their growth and accumulated more proline under stress treatments. Furthermore, the amount of H2O2 was lower in transgenic lines, which was due to the high CAT and POD activities. Taken together, these data provide the evidence for the involvement of durum wheat catalase TdCAT1 in tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses in crop plants. PMID:26555900

  9. Final Report: Main Group Element Chemistry in Service of Hydrogen Storage and Activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Dixon; Anthony J. Arduengo, III

    2010-09-30

    goal was met in terms of reducing the number of costly experiments and helping to focus the experimental effort on the potentially optimal targets. We have used computational chemistry approaches to predict the thermodynamic properties of a wide range of compounds containing boron, nitrogen, hydrogen, and other elements as appropriate including carbon. These calculations were done in most cases with high level molecular orbital theory methods that have small error bars on the order of ± 1 to 2 kcal/mol. The results were used to benchmark more approximate methods such as density functional theory for larger systems and for database development. We predicted reliable thermodynamics for thousands of compounds for release and regeneration schemes to aid/guide materials design and process design and simulation. These are the first reliable computed values for these compounds and for many represent the only available values. Overall, the computational results have provided us with new insights into the chemistry of main group and organic-base chemical hydrogen systems from the release of hydrogen to the regeneration of spent fuel. A number of experimental accomplishments were also made in this project. The experimental work on hydrogen storage materials centered on activated polarized σ- or π-bonded frameworks that hold the potential for ready dihydrogen activation, uptake, and eventually release. To this end, a large number of non-traditional valence systems including carbenes, cyanocarbons, and C-B and and B-N systems were synthesized and examined. During the course of these studies an important lead arose from the novel valency of a class of stable organic singlet bi-radical systems. A synthetic strategy to an “endless” hydrogen storage polymer has been developed based on our cyanocarbon chemistry. A key issue with the synthetic efforts was being able to link the kinetics of release with the size of the substituents as it was difficult to develop a low molecular

  10. Activation of model nickel catalysts for hydrogenation of carbon dioxide to methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barcicki, J.; Grzegorczyk, W.; Borowiecki, T.; Nazimek, D.; Denis, A.

    1977-09-01

    In studies related to steam reforming of hydrocarbons and to hydrogenation, the reaction of hydrogen with carbon dioxide in a 5:1 ratio at 400/sup 0/C for ten hr in a Carberry differential reactor over reduced nickel catalyst containing 0-10% of cobalt, copper, or iron metal, or of an oxide of potassium, zinc, barium, calcium, magnesium, chromium, or aluminum gave the best results over catalysts containing one of the last three oxides. The results included respective activity losses of 24.2, 20.4, and 7.24%; respective initial selectivities of 98.3, 98.5, and 97.6; respective final selectivities of 93.6, 95.9, and 96.6; and much higher activities, which increased with increasing promoter content; alumina gave the highest activity. Catalyst preparation and the role of the most effective promoters in increasing the active surface via changes in crystallite structure, and in improving catalyst thermal stability are discussed. Graphs, tables, and 22 references.

  11. Water-containing hydrogen-bonding network in the active center of channelrhodopsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Shota; Kato, Hideaki E; Taniguchi, Reiya; Iwata, Tatsuya; Nureki, Osamu; Kandori, Hideki

    2014-03-01

    Channelrhodopsin (ChR) functions as a light-gated ion channel in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Passive transport of cations by ChR is fundamentally different from the active transport by light-driven ion pumps such as archaerhodopsin, bacteriorhodopsin, and halorhodopsin. These microbial rhodopsins are important tools for optogenetics, where ChR is used to activate neurons by light, while the ion pumps are used for neural silencing. Ion-transport functions by these rhodopsins strongly depend on the specific hydrogen-bonding networks containing water near the retinal chromophore. In this work, we measured protein-bound water molecules in a chimeric ChR protein of ChR1 (helices A to E) and ChR2 (helices F and G) of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using low-temperature FTIR spectroscopy at 77 K. We found that the active center of ChR possesses more water molecules (9 water vibrations) than those of other microbial (2-6 water vibrations) and animal (6-8 water vibrations) rhodopsins. We conclude that the protonated retinal Schiff base interacts with the counterion (Glu162) directly, without the intervening water molecule found in proton-pumping microbial rhodopsins. The present FTIR results and the recent X-ray structure of ChR reveal a unique hydrogen-bonding network around the active center of this light-gated ion channel. PMID:24512107

  12. Mesophilic and thermophilic alkaline fermentation of waste activated sludge for hydrogen production: Focusing on homoacetogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Jingjing; Jing, Yuhang; Zhang, Shicheng; Angelidaki, Irini; Luo, Gang

    2016-10-01

    The present study compared the mesophilic and thermophilic alkaline fermentation of waste activated sludge (WAS) for hydrogen production with focus on homoacetogenesis, which mediated the consumption of H2 and CO2 for acetate production. Batch experiments showed that hydrogen yield of WAS increased from 19.2 mL H2/gVSS at 37 °C and pH 10-80.1 mL H2/gVSS at 55 °C and pH 10. However, the production of volatile fatty acids (mainly acetate) was higher at 37 °C and pH 10 by comparison with 55 °C and pH 10. Hydrogen consumption due to homoacetogenesis was observed at 37 °C and pH 10 but not 55 °C and pH 10. Higher expression levels of genes relating with homoacetogenesis and lower expression levels of genes relating with hydrogen production were found at 37 °C and pH 10 compared to 55 °C and pH 10. The continuous experiment demonstrated the steady-state hydrogen yield of WAS was comparable to that obtained from batch experiments at 55 °C and pH 10, and homoacetogenesis was still inhibited. However, the steady-state hydrogen yield of WAS (6.5 mL H2/gVSS) was much lower than that (19.2 mL H2/gVSS) obtained from batch experiments at 37 °C and pH 10 due to the gradual enrichment of homoacetogens as demonstrated by qPCR analysis. The high-throughput sequencing analysis of 16S rRNA genes showed that the abundance of genus Clostridium, containing several homoacetogens, was 5 times higher at 37 °C and pH 10 than 55 °C and pH 10. PMID:27420808

  13. Ultrasensitive fluorescence immunoassay for detection of ochratoxin A using catalase-mediated fluorescence quenching of CdTe QDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaolin; Zhan, Shengnan; Xu, Hengyi; Meng, Xianwei; Xiong, Yonghua; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2016-04-01

    Herein, for the first time we report an improved competitive fluorescent enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the ultrasensitive detection of ochratoxin A (OTA) by using hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced fluorescence quenching of mercaptopropionic acid-modified CdTe quantum dots (QDs). In this immunoassay, catalase (CAT) was labeled with OTA as a competitive antigen to connect the fluorescence signals of the QDs with the concentration of the target. Through the combinatorial use of H2O2-induced fluorescence quenching of CdTe QDs as a fluorescence signal output and the ultrahigh catalytic activity of CAT to H2O2, our proposed method could be used to perform a dynamic linear detection of OTA ranging from 0.05 pg mL-1 to 10 pg mL-1. The half maximal inhibitory concentration was 0.53 pg mL-1 and the limit of detection was 0.05 pg mL-1. These values were approximately 283- and 300-folds lower than those of horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-based conventional ELISA, respectively. The reported method is accurate, highly reproducible, and specific against other mycotoxins in agricultural products as well. In summary, the developed fluorescence immunoassay based on H2O2-induced fluorescence quenching of CdTe QDs can be used for the rapid and highly sensitive detection of mycotoxins or haptens in food safety monitoring.Herein, for the first time we report an improved competitive fluorescent enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the ultrasensitive detection of ochratoxin A (OTA) by using hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced fluorescence quenching of mercaptopropionic acid-modified CdTe quantum dots (QDs). In this immunoassay, catalase (CAT) was labeled with OTA as a competitive antigen to connect the fluorescence signals of the QDs with the concentration of the target. Through the combinatorial use of H2O2-induced fluorescence quenching of CdTe QDs as a fluorescence signal output and the ultrahigh catalytic activity of CAT to H2O2, our proposed method could be used to

  14. Hydrogen sensing characteristics of an electrodeposited WO3 thin film gasochromic sensor activated by Pt catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hydrogen gas sensing performance of platinum (Pt) catalyst activated tungsten trioxide (WO3) thin films were investigated in the present study. The WO3 thin films exhibited a gasochromic effect; i.e., a reversible change in color from transparent when in air to blue when in hydrogen (H2). All processes proceeded rapidly at room temperature. The films were prepared by the electrodeposition method under ambient conditions. A layer of Pt was then sputtered onto the surface of WO3 film. The cycling of the coloration was obtained from UV-Vis spectra. The Pt catalyst dissociated H2 into H atoms, which then diffused into the WO3 thin film, which transformed from WO3 to HxW1-xVIWxVO3 and changed the color of the WO3 thin film. Therefore, we could detect the existence of H2 by the coloration of the WO3 thin film. Sensor properties of WO3/Pt films were investigated at room temperature in H2-N2 gas mixtures containing 0-50 mol% of H2. The results show that the transmittance change (ΔT) of the electrodeposited WO3 hydrogen sensor was ∼ 2% when the concentration of H2 was 5 mol%, and ∼ 20% when the concentration of H2 was 50 mol%. Coloration and bleaching had good response and recovery times in the range of 5-60 s, respectively

  15. Hydrogen activated axial inter-conversion in SiC nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A facile low pressure annealing route using NH3 as a hydrogen source for the structural and chemical modification of SiC nanowires (SiCNWs) is presented. The developed route transforms SiCNWs into tubular SiC nanostructures while coaxial SiO2/SiCNWs reverse their sheath/core structure. Our findings suggest a decomposition process induced via the preferential substitution of silicon by hydrogen and via the difference in diffusion rates of available atomic species, which leads to axial structural rearrangement. In addition to these effects, the procedure improves the crystallinity of the samples. The process could be exploited as a viable route to manipulate a variety of nanostructures and films for doping and etching and structural manipulation. - Graphical abstract: SiC and SiO2/SiCNWs are shown to be structurally modified through a hydrogen activated replacement route which can even lead to the axial inter-conversion of species. The process could be exploited as a viable route to manipulate a variety of nanostructures and films for doping and etching and structural manipulation

  16. Effects of hydrogen and surface dislocation on active dissolution of deformed 304 austenitic stainless steel in acid chloride solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → An active dissolution model was proposed by the stored strain energy and electron work function. → An significant effect of plastic deformation on active dissolution was observed. → The synergistic effect between the dissolved hydrogen and applied stress is negligible. → The change of surface morphology due to dislocation made the electron more active. - Abstract: The mechanochemical effects between dissolved hydrogen and deformation on active dissolution of 304 stainless steel in acid chloride solution were investigated by use of constant loading test method. A theoretical model was proposed in terms of the stored strain energy and electron work function. Results indicated that active dissolution was affected mainly by Gibbs free energy produced by the part of plastic deformation and surface dislocation structure. A good agreement between the prediction and test results revealed that the synergistic effect of stress and dissolved hydrogen only promoted the process of active dissolution.

  17. Main Group Element Chemistry in Service of Hydrogen Storage and Activation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    goal was met in terms of reducing the number of costly experiments and helping to focus the experimental effort on the potentially optimal targets. We have used computational chemistry approaches to predict the thermodynamic properties of a wide range of compounds containing boron, nitrogen, hydrogen, and other elements as appropriate including carbon. These calculations were done in most cases with high level molecular orbital theory methods that have small error bars on the order of ± 1 to 2 kcal/mol. The results were used to benchmark more approximate methods such as density functional theory for larger systems and for database development. We predicted reliable thermodynamics for thousands of compounds for release and regeneration schemes to aid/guide materials design and process design and simulation. These are the first reliable computed values for these compounds and for many represent the only available values. Overall, the computational results have provided us with new insights into the chemistry of main group and organic-base chemical hydrogen systems from the release of hydrogen to the regeneration of spent fuel. A number of experimental accomplishments were also made in this project. The experimental work on hydrogen storage materials centered on activated polarized σ- or π-bonded frameworks that hold the potential for ready dihydrogen activation, uptake, and eventually release. To this end, a large number of non-traditional valence systems including carbenes, cyanocarbons, and C-B and and B-N systems were synthesized and examined. During the course of these studies an important lead arose from the novel valency of a class of stable organic singlet bi-radical systems. A synthetic strategy to an 'endless' hydrogen storage polymer has been developed based on our cyanocarbon chemistry. A key issue with the synthetic efforts was being able to link the kinetics of release with the size of the substituents as it was difficult to develop a low molecular weight

  18. Two-dimensional gold nanostructures with high activity for selective oxidation of carbon–hydrogen bonds

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Liang

    2015-04-22

    Efficient synthesis of stable two-dimensional (2D) noble metal catalysts is a challenging topic. Here we report the facile synthesis of 2D gold nanosheets via a wet chemistry method, by using layered double hydroxide as the template. Detailed characterization with electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrates that the nanosheets are negatively charged and [001] oriented with thicknesses varying from single to a few atomic layers. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals unusually low gold–gold coordination numbers. These gold nanosheets exhibit high catalytic activity and stability in the solvent-free selective oxidation of carbon–hydrogen bonds with molecular oxygen.

  19. Hydrogen over helium enhancement in successive solar flare particle events from the same active region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, P. R.; Armstrong, T. P.; Krimigis, S. M.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis of all of the identified solar-flare-associated energetic particle events in the 1972-1975 period observed with instruments aboard the IMP 7 and IMP 8 satellites has revealed at least eight occasions when more than one particle-producing flare occurred within the same McMath active plage region during its transit of the visible solar disk. A strong tendency for second flares to produce hydrogen over helium (p/alpha) enhanced energetic particle fluxes when compared with the first flare in the 1.8-10.0 MeV per nucleon range emerged in these multiflare regions. The p/alpha enhancement is apparently transient, and for flares separated by at least about 100 hours the p/alpha ratio tends toward its preflare value. It is suggested that the substrate plasma in an active region may be enriched prior to a flare in elements heavier than hydrogen and the composition may not be significantly altered during subsequent acceleration, escape, and propagation. Thus, the preflare history of the active region must be added to the list of factors influencing observed solar-particle-event composition.

  20. Effect of pH and temperature on acidogenic and hydrogenic activities of glucose-degrading bio-granules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Series batch experiments were made to investigate the influences of pH and temperature on the activi-ty of acidogenus and acidogenus in glucose-degrading bacteria cultured in an UASB ( up-flow anaerobic sludgeblanket) reactor for glucose fermentation and hydrogen production. The bacteria exhibited different capability torecover to produce hydrogen at different initial pH and temperature. Hydrogen production, VFA production,COD removal and COD balance were measured at different pH and 20, 37℃ respectively with the same glucoseand VSS in vials. Results showed that there are different influences on the activity of acidogenic bacteria at var-ied pH and result in a variety of amount of hydrogen production, specific hydrogen production and VFA produc-tion, etc. Through the present study, when nonmalized to the weight of VSS, a maximal biogas and hydrogenproduction of 1 717.1 ml/g and 870.0 ml/g were obtained when pH equals 9 at 37 ℃ and 679.00 ml/g of bio-gas, 246. 35 ml/g of hydrogen were also got when pH equals 5 at 20 ℃ respectively. The maximal specific hy-drogen production (SHA) was 116. 56 ml/h, g around 8 of pH value at 37 ℃ and 6. 46 ml/h, g around 4 of pHvalue at 20 ℃, which were obtained by calculating the slope of the accumulated hydrogen gas via time. Butyricacid fermentation was important for hydrogen production. Large quantity of unknown COD was found in the vialswhen a small quantity of bio-gas was produced, but relative less unknown COD was determined when there waslarge quantity of hydrogen produced. This revealed a better engineering foreground for application of hydrogenbio-production.

  1. Final Report for the DOE-BES Program Mechanistic Studies of Activated Hydrogen Release from Amine-Boranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry G. Sneddon; R. Thomas Baker

    2013-01-13

    Effective storage of hydrogen presents one of the most significant technical gaps to successful implementation of the hydrogen economy, particularly for transportation applications. Amine boranes, such as ammonia borane H3NBH3 and ammonia triborane H3NB3H7, have been identified as promising, high-capacity chemical hydrogen storage media containing potentially readily released protic (N-H) and hydridic (B-H) hydrogens. At the outset of our studies, dehydrogenation of ammonia borane had been studied primarily in the solid state, but our DOE sponsored work clearly demonstrated that ionic liquids, base-initiators and/or metal-catalysts can each significantly increase both the rate and extent of hydrogen release from amine boranes under moderate conditions. Our studies also showed that depending upon the activation method, hydrogen release from amine boranes can occur by very different mechanistic steps and yield different types of spent-fuel materials. The fundamental understanding that was developed during this grant of the pathways and controlling factors for each of these hydrogen-release mechanisms is now enabling continuing discovery and optimization of new chemical-hydride based hydrogen storage systems.

  2. A superoxide dismutase/catalase mimetic nanomedicine for targeted therapy of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qixiong; Tao, Hui; Lin, Yongyao; Hu, Ying; An, Huijie; Zhang, Dinglin; Feng, Shibin; Hu, Houyuan; Wang, Ruibing; Li, Xiaohui; Zhang, Jianxiang

    2016-10-01

    Oxidative stress, resulting from excessive generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), plays a pivotal role in the initiation and progression of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). To develop an efficacious and safe nanotherapy against IBD, we designed and developed a superoxide dismutase/catalase mimetic nanomedicine comprising a hydrogen peroxide-eliminating nanomatrix and a free radical scavenger Tempol (Tpl). To this end, an oxidation-responsive β-cyclodextrin material (OxbCD) was synthesized, and a Tpl-loaded OxbCD nanoparticle (Tpl/OxbCD NP) was produced. Hydrolysis of OxbCD NP could be triggered by hydrogen peroxide, leading to on-demand release of loaded Tpl molecules from Tpl/OxbCD NP. OxbCD NP was able to efficiently accumulate in the inflamed colon in mice, thereby dramatically reducing nonspecific distribution after oral delivery. In three mouse colitis models, oral administration of Tpl/OxbCD NP notably mitigated manifestations relevant to colitis, and significantly suppressed expression of proinflammatory mediators, with the efficacy superior over free Tpl or a control nanomedicine based on poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA). Accordingly, by scavenging multiple components of ROS, Tpl/OxbCD NP may effectively reduce ulcerative colitis in mice, and it can be intensively developed as a translational nanomedicine for the management of IBD and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:27525680

  3. Molecular hydrogen: an energy source for bacterial activity in nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Hydrogen is a common product of microbial metabolism, large number of bacteria are able to use it as energetic substrate in subsurface ecosystems. Moreover H2 is known as one of the most energetic substrates for deep subsurface ecosystem. It could be produced in different ways mainly volcanic activity (basalts iron rich volcanic rocks) or natural radiolysis of water or even fermentation. The millimolar concentrations of H2 observed in the ground waters are consistent with the activity of a large variety of hydrogen-oxidising bacteria as described in the following Table. Electron acceptors are identified as O2, CO2, NO3, SO4 or Fe+++. Aerobic, anaerobic, obligate and facultative autotrophs are included. Numerous of these bacteria are thermophilic bacteria. This bacterial activity leads to the production of methane, acetate, nitrogen, hydrogen sulphur or ferrous oxides. In anoxic environments, H2 concentrations are governed by microbial metabolism. In most cases, H2 producing microorganisms are thermodynamically controlled by the abundance of H2, and survive thanks to H2 consumers, a metabolism called inter-species H2 transfer. Metabolism of H2 is catalysed by hydrogenase as cytoplasmic enzymes or membrane bound enzymes. Several situations of H2 production will occur in nuclear waste repository: - Radiolysis of water. - Radiolysis of organic matter (such as bitumen, in case of B waste), H2 production due to gamma radiolysis of bitumen is evaluated to 1 L H2 /kg of bitumen /MGy. - Corrosion of metal containers (in deaerated solutions). Large amount of H2 are predicted in some situations, and will select the development of hydrogen species. Then, aerobic hydrogen bacteria oxidising hydrogen could be found in basins containing irradiating waste, or during the oxic period of storage, denitrifying bacteria or sulfate reducing bacteria will develop near the bitumen waste. Groundwater of the Callovo-Oxfordian will support

  4. A novel endo-hydrogenase activity recycles hydrogen produced by nitrogen fixation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Ng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nitrogen (N(2 fixation also yields hydrogen (H(2 at 1:1 stoichiometric amounts. In aerobic diazotrophic (able to grow on N(2 as sole N-source bacteria, orthodox respiratory hupSL-encoded hydrogenase activity, associated with the cell membrane but facing the periplasm (exo-hydrogenase, has nevertheless been presumed responsible for recycling such endogenous hydrogen. METHODS AND FINDINGS: As shown here, for Azorhizobium caulinodans diazotrophic cultures open to the atmosphere, exo-hydrogenase activity is of no consequence to hydrogen recycling. In a bioinformatic analysis, a novel seven-gene A. caulinodans hyq cluster encoding an integral-membrane, group-4, Ni,Fe-hydrogenase with homology to respiratory complex I (NADH: quinone dehydrogenase was identified. By analogy, Hyq hydrogenase is also integral to the cell membrane, but its active site faces the cytoplasm (endo-hydrogenase. An A. caulinodans in-frame hyq operon deletion mutant, constructed by "crossover PCR", showed markedly decreased growth rates in diazotrophic cultures; normal growth was restored with added ammonium--as expected of an H(2-recycling mutant phenotype. Using A. caulinodans hyq merodiploid strains expressing beta-glucuronidase as promoter-reporter, the hyq operon proved strongly and specifically induced in diazotrophic culture; as well, hyq operon induction required the NIFA transcriptional activator. Therefore, the hyq operon is constituent of the nif regulon. CONCLUSIONS: Representative of aerobic N(2-fixing and H(2-recycling alpha-proteobacteria, A. caulinodans possesses two respiratory Ni,Fe-hydrogenases: HupSL exo-hydrogenase activity drives exogenous H(2 respiration, and Hyq endo-hydrogenase activity recycles endogenous H(2, specifically that produced by N(2 fixation. To benefit human civilization, H(2 has generated considerable interest as potential renewable energy source as its makings are ubiquitous and its combustion yields no greenhouse gases. As

  5. Iron- and Cobalt-Catalyzed Alkene Hydrogenation: Catalysis with Both Redox-Active and Strong Field Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirik, Paul J

    2015-06-16

    The hydrogenation of alkenes is one of the most impactful reactions catalyzed by homogeneous transition metal complexes finding application in the pharmaceutical, agrochemical, and commodity chemical industries. For decades, catalyst technology has relied on precious metal catalysts supported by strong field ligands to enable highly predictable two-electron redox chemistry that constitutes key bond breaking and forming steps during turnover. Alternative catalysts based on earth abundant transition metals such as iron and cobalt not only offer potential environmental and economic advantages but also provide an opportunity to explore catalysis in a new chemical space. The kinetically and thermodynamically accessible oxidation and spin states may enable new mechanistic pathways, unique substrate scope, or altogether new reactivity. This Account describes my group's efforts over the past decade to develop iron and cobalt catalysts for alkene hydrogenation. Particular emphasis is devoted to the interplay of the electronic structure of the base metal compounds and their catalytic performance. First generation, aryl-substituted pyridine(diimine) iron dinitrogen catalysts exhibited high turnover frequencies at low catalyst loadings and hydrogen pressures for the hydrogenation of unactivated terminal and disubstituted alkenes. Exploration of structure-reactivity relationships established smaller aryl substituents and more electron donating ligands resulted in improved performance. Second generation iron and cobalt catalysts where the imine donors were replaced by N-heterocyclic carbenes resulted in dramatically improved activity and enabled hydrogenation of more challenging unactivated, tri- and tetrasubstituted alkenes. Optimized cobalt catalysts have been discovered that are among the most active homogeneous hydrogenation catalysts known. Synthesis of enantiopure, C1 symmetric pyridine(diimine) cobalt complexes have enabled rare examples of highly enantioselective

  6. Active Sites Implanted Carbon Cages in Core-Shell Architecture: Highly Active and Durable Electrocatalyst for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huabin; Ma, Zuju; Duan, Jingjing; Liu, Huimin; Liu, Guigao; Wang, Tao; Chang, Kun; Li, Mu; Shi, Li; Meng, Xianguang; Wu, Kechen; Ye, Jinhua

    2016-01-26

    Low efficiency and poor stability are two major challenges we encounter in the exploration of non-noble metal electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in both acidic and alkaline environment. Herein, the hybrid of cobalt encapsulated by N, B codoped ultrathin carbon cages (Co@BCN) is first introduced as a highly active and durable nonprecious metal electrocatalysts for HER, which is constructed by a bottom-up approach using metal organic frameworks (MOFs) as precursor and self-sacrificing template. The optimized catalyst exhibited remarkable electrocatalytic performance for hydrogen production from both both acidic and alkaline media. Stability investigation reveals the overcoating of carbon cages can effectively avoid the corrosion and oxidation of the catalyst under extreme acidic and alkaline environment. Electrochemical active surface area (EASA) evaluation and density functional theory (DFT) calculations revealed that the synergetic effect between the encapsulated cobalt nanoparticle and the N, B codoped carbon shell played the fundamental role in the superior HER catalytic performance. PMID:26649629

  7. Simulation of heat and mass transfer in activated carbon tank for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Jinsheng [School of Automotive Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Hubei 430070 (China); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Progressing, Wuhan University of Technology, Hubei 430070 (China); Hydrogen Research Institute, Universite du Quebec a Trois-Rivieres, Trois-Rivieres, QC G9A 5H7 (Canada); Tong, Liang [School of Automotive Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Hubei 430070 (China); Department of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, Huaxia College, Wuhan University of Technology, Hubei 430070 (China); Deng, Caihua [School of Automotive Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Hubei 430070 (China); Benard, Pierre; Chahine, Richard [Hydrogen Research Institute, Universite du Quebec a Trois-Rivieres, Trois-Rivieres, QC G9A 5H7 (Canada)

    2010-08-15

    The charging process of hydrogen storage tank based on bed of activated carbon in a steel container at room temperature (295 K) and medium storage pressure (10 MPa) is simulated with an axisymmetric geometry model using the finite volume commercial solver Fluent. The mass flux profile at the entrance is established using user-defined functions (UDFs). The heat and mass transfer processes in the cylindrical steel tank packed with activated carbon are discussed considering the influence of viscous resistance and inertial resistance of the porous media. The velocity distribution and its effect on the temperature distribution are analyzed. The effects of the flow rate at the inlet and of the adsorption factor on the charging process are studied. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach based on finite volume simulations is used. Results show that the temperature near the bottom of the tank is higher than that at the entrance, temperature in the center of the tank is higher than that near the wall and rises somewhat faster along the axial compared to the radial direction. The highest hydrogen absolute adsorption occurs at the entrance of the tank. A good agreement is found between the simulation results and the available experimental data. The maximum magnitude of the axial velocity is much higher than that of the radial component, resulting in more heat energy transfer along the axial direction than radial direction. In addition, the pressure reaches equilibrium earlier when the mass flow is higher, and the temperature reaches a maximum value faster. (author)

  8. Hydrogen sulfide raises cytosolic calcium in neurons through activation of L-type Ca2+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Bereguiaín, Miguel Angel; Samhan-Arias, Alejandro Khalil; Martín-Romero, Francisco Javier; Gutiérrez-Merino, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) concentration can be maintained in cell cultures within the range reported for rat brain by repetitive pulses of sodium hydrogen sulfide. Less than 2 h exposure to H(2)S concentrations within 50 and 120 microM (i.e., within the upper segment of the reported physiological range of H(2)S in rat brain), produces a large shift of the intracellular calcium homeostasis in cerebellar granule neurons (CGN) in culture, leading to a large and sustained increase of cytosolic calcium concentration. Only 1 h exposure to H(2)S concentrations within 100 and 300 microM raises intracellular calcium to the neurotoxic range, with nearly 50% cell death after 2 h. L-type Ca(2+) channels antagonists nimodipine and nifedipine block both the H(2)S-induced rise of cytosolic calcium and cell death. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists (+)-MK-801 and DL-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid afforded a nearly complete protection against H(2)S-induced CGN death and largely attenuated the rise of cytosolic calcium. Thus, H(2)S-induced rise of cytosolic calcium eventually reaches the neurotoxic cytosolic calcium range, leading to glutamate-induced excitotoxic CGN death. The authors conclude that H(2)S is a major modulator of calcium homeostasis in neurons as it induces activation of Ca(2+) entry through L-type Ca(2+) channels, and thereby of neuronal activity. PMID:17956188

  9. Reversible Storage of Hydrogen and Natural Gas in Nanospace-Engineered Activated Carbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanos, Jimmy; Beckner, Matt; Rash, Tyler; Yu, Ping; Suppes, Galen; Pfeifer, Peter

    2012-02-01

    An overview is given of the development of advanced nanoporous carbons as storage materials for natural gas (methane) and molecular hydrogen in on-board fuel tanks for next-generation clean automobiles. High specific surface areas, porosities, and sub-nm/supra-nm pore volumes are quantitatively selected by controlling the degree of carbon consumption and metallic potassium intercalation into the carbon lattice during the activation process. Tunable bimodal pore-size distributions of sub-nm and supra-nm pores are established by subcritical nitrogen adsorption. Optimal pore structures for gravimetric and volumetric gas storage, respectively, are presented. Methane and hydrogen adsorption isotherms up to 250 bar on monolithic and powdered activated carbons are reported and validated, using several gravimetric and volumetric instruments. Current best gravimetric and volumetric storage capacities are: 256 g CH4/kg carbon and 132 g CH4/liter carbon at 293 K and 35 bar; 26, 44, and 107 g H2/kg carbon at 303, 194, and 77 K respectively and 100 bar. Adsorbed film density, specific surface area, and binding energy are analyzed separately using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation, Langmuir model, and lattice gas models.

  10. Nanocomposite of MoS2 on ordered mesoporous carbon nanospheres: A highly active catalyst for electrochemical hydrogen evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Bian, Xiaojun; Zhu, Jie; Liao, Lei; Scanlon, Micheál D.; Ge, Peiyu; JI, CHANG; Girault, Hubert H.; Liu, Baohong

    2012-01-01

    An efficient electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution has been developed based upon in situ reduction of MoS2 on ordered mesoporous carbon nanospheres (MoS2/MCNs). The properties of MoS2/MCNs were characterised by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Polarisation curves and electrochemical impedance measurements were obtained for MoS2/MCNs modified glassy carbon electrodes. The MoS2/MCNs exhibit high catalytic activity for hydrogen...

  11. Modulation of Na+/K+ ATPase Activity by Hydrogen Peroxide Generated through Heme in L. amazonensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathália Rocco-Machado

    Full Text Available Leishmania amazonensis is a protozoan parasite that occurs in many areas of Brazil and causes skin lesions. Using this parasite, our group showed the activation of Na+/K+ ATPase through a signaling cascade that involves the presence of heme and protein kinase C (PKC activity. Heme is an important biomolecule that has pro-oxidant activity and signaling capacity. Reactive oxygen species (ROS can act as second messengers, which are required in various signaling cascades. Our goal in this work is to investigate the role of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 generated in the presence of heme in the Na+/K+ ATPase activity of L. amazonensis. Our results show that increasing concentrations of heme stimulates the production of H2O2 in a dose-dependent manner until a concentration of 2.5 μM heme. To confirm that the effect of heme on the Na+/K+ ATPase is through the generation of H2O2, we measured enzyme activity using increasing concentrations of H2O2 and, as expected, the activity increased in a dose-dependent manner until a concentration of 0.1 μM H2O2. To investigate the role of PKC in this signaling pathway, we observed the production of H2O2 in the presence of its activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA and its inhibitor calphostin C. Both showed no effect on the generation of H2O2. Furthermore, we found that PKC activity is increased in the presence of H2O2, and that in the presence of calphostin C, H2O2 is unable to activate the Na+/K+ ATPase. 100 μM of Mito-TEMPO was capable of abolishing the stimulatory effect of heme on Na+/K+ ATPase activity, indicating that mitochondria might be the source of the hydrogen peroxide production induced by heme. The modulation of L. amazonensis Na+/K+ ATPase by H2O2 opens new possibilities for understanding the signaling pathways of this parasite.

  12. Modulation of Na+/K+ ATPase Activity by Hydrogen Peroxide Generated through Heme in L. amazonensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocco-Machado, Nathália; Cosentino-Gomes, Daniela; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania amazonensis is a protozoan parasite that occurs in many areas of Brazil and causes skin lesions. Using this parasite, our group showed the activation of Na+/K+ ATPase through a signaling cascade that involves the presence of heme and protein kinase C (PKC) activity. Heme is an important biomolecule that has pro-oxidant activity and signaling capacity. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can act as second messengers, which are required in various signaling cascades. Our goal in this work is to investigate the role of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generated in the presence of heme in the Na+/K+ ATPase activity of L. amazonensis. Our results show that increasing concentrations of heme stimulates the production of H2O2 in a dose-dependent manner until a concentration of 2.5 μM heme. To confirm that the effect of heme on the Na+/K+ ATPase is through the generation of H2O2, we measured enzyme activity using increasing concentrations of H2O2 and, as expected, the activity increased in a dose-dependent manner until a concentration of 0.1 μM H2O2. To investigate the role of PKC in this signaling pathway, we observed the production of H2O2 in the presence of its activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and its inhibitor calphostin C. Both showed no effect on the generation of H2O2. Furthermore, we found that PKC activity is increased in the presence of H2O2, and that in the presence of calphostin C, H2O2 is unable to activate the Na+/K+ ATPase. 100 μM of Mito-TEMPO was capable of abolishing the stimulatory effect of heme on Na+/K+ ATPase activity, indicating that mitochondria might be the source of the hydrogen peroxide production induced by heme. The modulation of L. amazonensis Na+/K+ ATPase by H2O2 opens new possibilities for understanding the signaling pathways of this parasite. PMID:26070143

  13. Universal dependence of hydrogen oxidation and evolution reaction activity of platinum-group metals on pH and hydrogen binding energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jie; Sheng, Wenchao; Zhuang, Zhongbin; Xu, Bingjun; Yan, Yushan

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how pH affects the activity of hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is key to developing active, stable, and affordable HOR/HER catalysts for hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cells and electrolyzers. A common linear correlation between hydrogen binding energy (HBE) and pH is observed for four supported platinum-group metal catalysts (Pt/C, Ir/C, Pd/C, and Rh/C) over a broad pH range (0 to 13), suggesting that the pH dependence of HBE is metal-independent. A universal correlation between exchange current density and HBE is also observed on the four metals, indicating that they may share the same elementary steps and rate-determining steps and that the HBE is the dominant descriptor for HOR/HER activities. The onset potential of CO stripping on the four metals decreases with pH, indicating a stronger OH adsorption, which provides evidence against the promoting effect of adsorbed OH on HOR/HER. PMID:27034988

  14. Pt3Co concave nanocubes: synthesis, formation understanding, and enhanced catalytic activity toward hydrogenation of styrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenyu; Lin, Cuikun; Zhang, Lihua; Quan, Zewei; Sun, Kai; Zhao, Bo; Wang, Feng; Porter, Nathan; Wang, Yuxuan; Fang, Jiye

    2014-02-01

    We report a facile synthesis route to prepare high-quality Pt3Co nanocubes with a concave structure, and further demonstrate that these concave Pt3Co nanocubes are terminated with high-index crystal facets. The success of this preparation is highly dependent on an appropriate nucleation process with a successively anisotropic overgrowth and a preservation of the resultant high-index planes by control binding of oleyl-amine/oleic acid with a fine-tuned composition. Using a hydrogenation of styrene as a model reaction, these Pt3Co concave nanocubes as a new class of nanocatalysts with more open structure and active atomic sites located on their high-index crystallographic planes exhibit an enhanced catalytic activity in comparison with low-indexed surface terminated Pt3Co nanocubes in similar size. PMID:24382713

  15. Catalytic enantioselective OFF ↔ ON activation processes initiated by hydrogen transfer: concepts and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintard, Adrien; Rodriguez, Jean

    2016-08-18

    Hydrogen transfer initiated processes are eco-compatible transformations allowing the reversible OFF ↔ ON activation of otherwise unreactive substrates. The minimization of stoichiometric waste as well as the unique activation modes provided by these transformations make them key players for a greener future for organic synthesis. Long limited to catalytic reactions that form racemic products, considerable progress on the development of strategies for controlling diastereo- and enantioselectivity has been made in the last decade. The aim of this review is to present the different strategies that enable enantioselective transformations of this type and to highlight how they can be used to construct key synthetic building blocks in fewer operations with less waste generation. PMID:27381644

  16. Platinum-coated copper nanowires with high activity for hydrogen oxidation reaction in base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alia, Shaun M; Pivovar, Bryan S; Yan, Yushan

    2013-09-11

    Platinum (Pt)-coated copper (Cu) nanowires (Pt/CuNWs) are synthesized by the partial galvanic displacement of CuNWs and have a 100 nm diameter and are 25-40 μm length. Pt/CuNWs are studied as a hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) catalyst in base along with Cu templated Pt nanotubes (PtNT (Cu)), a 5% Cu monolayer on a bulk polycrystalline Pt electrode (5% ML Cu/BPPt), BPPt, and carbon supported Pt (Pt/C). Comparison of these catalysts demonstrates that the inclusion of Cu benefited the HOR activity of Pt/CuNWs likely by providing compressive strain on Pt; surface Cu further aids in hydroxyl adsorption, thereby improving the HOR activity of Pt/CuNWs. Pt/CuNWs exceed the area and mass exchange current densities of carbon supported Pt by 3.5 times and 1.9 times. PMID:23952885

  17. Importance of surface carbide formation on the activity and selectivity of Pd surfaces in the selective hydrogenation of acetylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Burch, Robbie; Hardacre, Christopher; Hu, P.; Hughes, Philip

    2016-04-01

    A recent experimental investigation (Kim et al. J. Catal. 306 (2013) 146-154) on the selective hydrogenation of acetylene over Pd nanoparticles with different shapes concluded that Pd(100) showed higher activity and selectivity than Pd(111) for acetylene hydrogenation. However, our recent density functional calculations (Yang et al. J. Catal. 305 (2013) 264-276) observed that the clean Pd(111) surface should result in higher activity and ethylene selectivity compared with the clean Pd(100) surface for acetylene hydrogenation. In the current work, using density functional theory calculations, we find that Pd(100) in the carbide form gives rise to higher activity and selectivity than Pd(111) carbide. These results indicate that the catalyst surface is most likely in the carbide form under the experimental reaction conditions. Furthermore, the adsorption energies of hydrogen atoms as a function of the hydrogen coverage at the surface and subsurface sites over Pd(100) are compared with those over Pd(111), and it is found that the adsorption of hydrogen atoms is always less favoured on Pd(100) over the whole coverage range. This suggests that the Pd(100) hydride surface will be less stable than the Pd(111) hydride surface, which is also in accordance with the experimental results reported.

  18. Exploring the activity of a novel Au/TiC(001) model catalyst towards CO and CO2 hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asara, Gian Giacomo; Ricart, Josep M.; Rodriguez, Jose A.; Illas, Francesc

    2015-10-01

    Small metallic nanoparticles supported on transition metal carbides exhibit an unexpected high activity towards a series of chemical reactions. In particular, the Au/TiC system has proven to be an excellent catalyst for SO2 decomposition, thiophene hydrodesulfurization, O2 and H2 dissociation and the water gas shift reaction. Recent studies have shown that Au/TiC is a very good catalyst for the reverse water-gas shift (CO2 + H2 → CO + H2O) and CO2 hydrogenation to methanol. The present work further expands the range of applicability of this novel type of systems by exploring the catalytic activity of Au/TiC towards the hydrogenation of CO or CO2 with periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations on model systems. Hydrogen dissociates easily on Au/TiC but direct hydrogenation of CO to methanol is hindered by very high activation barriers implying that, on this model catalyst, methanol production from CO2 involves the hydrogenation of a HOCO-like intermediate. When dealing with mixtures of syngas (CO/CO2/H2/H2O), CO could be transformed into CO2 through the water gas shift reaction with subsequent hydrogenation of CO2 to methanol.

  19. A Visible-Light-Active Heterojunction with Enhanced Photocatalytic Hydrogen Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Shiba P; Hood, Zachary D; More, Karren L; Chen, Vincent W; Lachgar, Abdou

    2016-07-21

    A visible-light-active carbon nitride (CN)/strontium pyroniobate (SNO) heterojunction photocatalyst was fabricated by deposition of CN over hydrothermally synthesized SNO nanoplates by a simple thermal decomposition process. The microscopic study revealed that nanosheets of CN were anchored to the surface of SNO resulting in an intimate contact between the two semiconductors. Diffuse reflectance UV/Vis spectra show that the resulting CN/SNO heterojunction possesses intense absorption in the visible region. The structural and spectral properties endowed the CN/SNO heterojunction with remarkably enhanced photocatalytic activity. Specifically, the photocatalytic hydrogen evolution rate per mole of CN was found to be 11 times higher for the CN/SNO composite compared to pristine CN. The results clearly show that the composite photocatalyst not only extends the light absorption range of SNO but also restricts photogenerated charge-carrier recombination, resulting in significant enhancement in photocatalytic activity compared to pristine CN. The relative band positions of the composite allow the photogenerated electrons in the conduction band of CN to migrate to that of SNO. This kind of charge migration and separation leads to the reduction in the overall recombination rate of photogenerated charge carriers, which is regarded as one of the key factors for the enhanced activity. A plausible mechanism for the enhanced photocatalytic activity of the heterostructured composite is proposed based on observed activity, photoluminescence, time-resolved fluorescence emission decay, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and band position calculations. PMID:27282318

  20. Electronic structure and activity of the iron- and nickel-containing catalysts for the hydrogenation of coal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gyulmaliev

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper represents the theoretical investigation of the electronic structure of Fe- and Ni-containing catalysts and the consideration of their comparative activity at the hydrogenation of coal organic mass. The electronic structure of FeO, FeS, FeS2, NiO and NiS with the minimum number of atoms of iron and nickel and active complexes with a hydrogen molecule were calculated by non empirical method of Hartri-Fock in SRT 6-311G basis. The comparative catalytic activity of these complexes was evaluated.

  1. Catalase degradation in sunflower cotyledons during peroxisome transition from glyoxysomal to leaf peroxisomal function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    First order rate constant for the degradation (degradation constants) of catalase in the cotyledons of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) were determined by measuring the loss of catalase containing 14C-labeled heme. During greening of the cotyledons, a period when peroxisomes change from glyoxysomal to leaf peroxisomal function, the degradation of glyoxysomal catalase is significantly slower than during all other stages of cotyledon development in light or darkness. The degradation constant during the transition stage of peroxisome function amounts to 0.205 day-1 in contrast to the constants ranging from 0.304 day-1 to 0.515 day-1 during the other developmental stages. Density labeling experiments comprising labeling of catalase with 2H2O and its isopycnic centrifugation on CsCl gradients demonstrated that the determinations of the degradation constants were not substantially affected by reutilization of 14C-labeled compounds for catalase synthesis. The degradation constants for both glyoxysomal catalase and catalase synthesized during the transition of peroxisome function do not differ. This was shown by labeling the catalases with different isotopes and measuring the isotope ratio during the development of the cotyledons. The results are inconsistent with the concept that an accelerated and selective degradation of glyoxysomes underlies the change in peroxisome function. The data suggest that catalase degradation is at least partially due to an individual turnover of catalase and does not only result from a turnover of the whole peroxisomes

  2. Cellular Metabolic Activity and the Oxygen and Hydrogen Stable Isotope Composition of Intracellular Water and Metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuzer-Martin, H. W.; Hegg, E. L.

    2008-12-01

    Intracellular water is an important pool of oxygen and hydrogen atoms for biosynthesis. Intracellular water is usually assumed to be isotopically identical to extracellular water, but an unexpected experimental result caused us to question this assumption. Heme O isolated from Escherichia coli cells grown in 95% H218O contained only a fraction of the theoretical value of labeled oxygen at a position where the O atom was known to be derived from water. In fact, fewer than half of the oxygen atoms were labeled. In an effort to explain this surprising result, we developed a method to determine the isotope ratios of intracellular water in cultured cells. The results of our experiments showed that during active growth, up to 70% of the oxygen atoms and 50% of the hydrogen atoms in the intracellular water of E. coli are generated during metabolism and can be isotopically distinct from extracellular water. The fraction of isotopically distinct atoms was substantially less in stationary phase and chilled cells, consistent with our hypothesis that less metabolically-generated water would be present in cells with lower metabolic activity. Our results were consistent with and explained the result of the heme O labeling experiment. Only about 40% of the O atoms on the heme O molecule were labeled because, presumably, only about 40% of the water inside the cells was 18O water that had diffused in from the culture medium. The rest of the intracellular water contained 16O atoms derived from either nutrients or atmospheric oxygen. To test whether we could also detect metabolically-derived hydrogen atoms in cellular constituents, we isolated fatty acids from log-phase and stationary phase E. coli and determined the H isotope ratios of individual fatty acids. The results of these experiments showed that environmental water contributed more H atoms to fatty acids isolated in stationary phase than to the same fatty acids isolated from log-phase cells. Stable isotope analyses of

  3. Ability of recombinant human catalase to suppress inflammation of the murine lung induced by influenza A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xunlong; Shi, Zhihui; Huang, Hai; Zhu, Hongguang; Zhou, Pei; Zhu, Haiyan; Ju, Dianwen

    2014-06-01

    Influenza A virus pandemics and emerging antiviral resistance highlight the urgent need for novel generic pharmacological strategies that reduce both viral replication and inflammation of the lung. We have previously investigated the therapeutic efficacy of recombinant human catalase (rhCAT) against viral pneumonia in mice, but the protection mechanisms involved were not explored. In the present study, we have performed a more in-depth analysis covering survival, lung inflammation, immune cell responses, production of cytokines, and inflammation signaling pathways in mice. Male imprinting control region mice were infected intranasally with high pathogenicity (H1N1) influenza A virus followed by treatment with recombinant human catalase. The administration of rhCAT resulted in a significant reduction in inflammatory cell infiltration (e.g., macrophages and neutrophils), inflammatory cytokine levels (e.g., IL-2, IL-6, TNF-α, IFN-γ), the level of the intercellular adhesion molecule 1 chemokine and the mRNA levels of toll-like receptors TLR-4, TLR-7, and NF-κB, as well as partially maintaining the activity of the antioxidant enzymes system. These findings indicated that rhCAT might play a key protective role in viral pneumonia of mice via suppression of inflammatory immune responses. PMID:24385240

  4. Synergistic effect of helium and hydrogen for bubble swelling in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel under sequential helium and hydrogen irradiation at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Wenhui [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Guo, Liping, E-mail: guolp@whu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Chen, Jihong; Luo, Fengfeng; Li, Tiecheng [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Ren, Yaoyao [Center for Electron Microscopy, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Suo, Jinping; Yang, Feng [State Key Laboratory of Mould Technology, Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-04-15

    Highlights: • Helium/hydrogen synergistic effect can increase irradiation swelling of RAFM steel. • Hydrogen can be trapped to the outer surface of helium bubbles. • Too large a helium bubble can become movable. • Point defects would become mobile and annihilate at dislocations at high temperature. • The peak swelling temperature for RAFM steel is 450 °C. - Abstract: In order to investigate the synergistic effect of helium and hydrogen on swelling in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel, specimens were separately irradiated by single He{sup +} beam and sequential He{sup +} and H{sup +} beams at different temperatures from 250 to 650 °C. Transmission electron microscope observation showed that implantation of hydrogen into the specimens pre-irradiated by helium can result in obvious enhancement of bubble size and swelling rate which can be regarded as a consequence of hydrogen being trapped by helium bubbles. But when temperature increased, Ostwald ripening mechanism would become dominant, besides, too large a bubble could become mobile and swallow many tiny bubbles on their way moving, reducing bubble number density. And these effects were most remarkable at 450 °C which was the peak bubble swelling temperature for RAMF steel. When temperature was high enough, say above 450, point defects would become mobile and annihilate at dislocations or surface. As a consequence, helium could no longer effectively diffuse and clustering in materials and bubble formation was suppressed. When temperature was above 500, helium bubbles would become unstable and decompose or migrate out of surface. Finally no bubble was observed at 650 °C.

  5. Synergistic effect of helium and hydrogen for bubble swelling in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel under sequential helium and hydrogen irradiation at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Helium/hydrogen synergistic effect can increase irradiation swelling of RAFM steel. • Hydrogen can be trapped to the outer surface of helium bubbles. • Too large a helium bubble can become movable. • Point defects would become mobile and annihilate at dislocations at high temperature. • The peak swelling temperature for RAFM steel is 450 °C. - Abstract: In order to investigate the synergistic effect of helium and hydrogen on swelling in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel, specimens were separately irradiated by single He+ beam and sequential He+ and H+ beams at different temperatures from 250 to 650 °C. Transmission electron microscope observation showed that implantation of hydrogen into the specimens pre-irradiated by helium can result in obvious enhancement of bubble size and swelling rate which can be regarded as a consequence of hydrogen being trapped by helium bubbles. But when temperature increased, Ostwald ripening mechanism would become dominant, besides, too large a bubble could become mobile and swallow many tiny bubbles on their way moving, reducing bubble number density. And these effects were most remarkable at 450 °C which was the peak bubble swelling temperature for RAMF steel. When temperature was high enough, say above 450, point defects would become mobile and annihilate at dislocations or surface. As a consequence, helium could no longer effectively diffuse and clustering in materials and bubble formation was suppressed. When temperature was above 500, helium bubbles would become unstable and decompose or migrate out of surface. Finally no bubble was observed at 650 °C

  6. Investigation on the two-stage active magnetic regenerative refrigerator for liquefaction of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Inmyong; Park, Jiho; Jeong, Sangkwon [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Youngkwon [Institute for Basic Science, Daejeon 305-811 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-29

    An active magnetic regenerative refrigerator (AMRR) is expected to be useful for hydrogen liquefaction due to its inherent high thermodynamic efficiency. Because the temperature of the cold end of the refrigerator has to be approximately liquid temperature, a large temperature span of the active magnetic regenerator (AMR) is indispensable when the heat sink temperature is liquid nitrogen temperature or higher. Since magnetic refrigerants are only effective in the vicinity of their own transition temperatures, which limit the temperature span of the AMR, an innovative structure is needed to increase the temperature span. The AMR must be a layered structure and the thermophysical matching of magnetic field and flow convection effects is very important. In order to design an AMR for liquefaction of hydrogen, the implementation of multi-layered AMR with different magnetic refrigerants is explored with multi-staging. In this paper, the performance of the multi-layered AMR using four rare-earth compounds (GdNi{sub 2}, Gd{sub 0.1}Dy{sub 0.9}Ni{sub 2}, Dy{sub 0.85}Er{sub 0.15}Al{sub 2}, Dy{sub 0.5}Er{sub 0.5}Al{sub 2}) is investigated. The experimental apparatus includes two-stage active magnetic regenerator containing two different magnetic refrigerants each. A liquid nitrogen reservoir connected to the warm end of the AMR maintains the temperature of the warm end around 77 K. High-pressure helium gas is employed as a heat transfer fluid in the AMR and the maximum magnetic field of 4 T is supplied by the low temperature superconducting (LTS) magnet. The temperature span with the variation of parameters such as phase difference between magnetic field and mass flow rate of magnetic refrigerants in AMR is investigated. The maximum temperature span in the experiment is recorded as 50 K and several performance issues have been discussed in this paper.

  7. Investigation on the two-stage active magnetic regenerative refrigerator for liquefaction of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An active magnetic regenerative refrigerator (AMRR) is expected to be useful for hydrogen liquefaction due to its inherent high thermodynamic efficiency. Because the temperature of the cold end of the refrigerator has to be approximately liquid temperature, a large temperature span of the active magnetic regenerator (AMR) is indispensable when the heat sink temperature is liquid nitrogen temperature or higher. Since magnetic refrigerants are only effective in the vicinity of their own transition temperatures, which limit the temperature span of the AMR, an innovative structure is needed to increase the temperature span. The AMR must be a layered structure and the thermophysical matching of magnetic field and flow convection effects is very important. In order to design an AMR for liquefaction of hydrogen, the implementation of multi-layered AMR with different magnetic refrigerants is explored with multi-staging. In this paper, the performance of the multi-layered AMR using four rare-earth compounds (GdNi2, Gd0.1Dy0.9Ni2, Dy0.85Er0.15Al2, Dy0.5Er0.5Al2) is investigated. The experimental apparatus includes two-stage active magnetic regenerator containing two different magnetic refrigerants each. A liquid nitrogen reservoir connected to the warm end of the AMR maintains the temperature of the warm end around 77 K. High-pressure helium gas is employed as a heat transfer fluid in the AMR and the maximum magnetic field of 4 T is supplied by the low temperature superconducting (LTS) magnet. The temperature span with the variation of parameters such as phase difference between magnetic field and mass flow rate of magnetic refrigerants in AMR is investigated. The maximum temperature span in the experiment is recorded as 50 K and several performance issues have been discussed in this paper

  8. Active Hydrogenation Catalyst with a Structured, Peptide-Based Outer-Coordination Sphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Avijita; Buchko, Garry W.; Reback, Matthew L.; O' Hagan, Molly J.; Ginovska-Pangovska, Bojana; Linehan, John C.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2012-10-05

    The synthesis, catalytic activity, and structural features of a rhodium-based hydrogenation catalyst containing a phosphine ligand coupled to a 14-residue peptide are reported. Both CD and NMR spectroscopy show that the peptide adopts a helical structure in 1:1:1 TFE/MeCN/H2O that is maintained when the peptide is attached to the ligand and when the ligand is attached to the metal complex. The metal complex hydrogenates aqueous solutions of 3-butenol to 1-butanol at 360 ± 50 turnovers/Rh/h at 294 K. This peptide- based catalyst represents a starting point for developing and characterizing a peptide-based outer-coordination sphere that can be used to introduce enzyme-like features into molecular catalysts. This work was funded by the US DOE Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Geoscience and Biosciences Division (AJ, JCL and WJS), the Office of Science Early Career Research Program through the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (GWB, MLR and WJS). Part of the research was conducted at the W.R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Biolog-ical and Environmental Research (BER) program located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  9. Geometries and electronic structures of the hydrogenated diamond (100) surface upon exposure to active ions: A first principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng-Bin; Li, Jing-Lin; Chen, Wen-Bin; Cui, Yan; Jiao, Zhi-Wei; Yan, Hong-Juan; Qu, Min; Di, Jie-Jian

    2016-02-01

    To elucidate the effects of physisorbed active ions on the geometries and electronic structures of hydrogenated diamond films, models of HCO 3 - , H3O+, and OH- ions physisorbed on hydrogenated diamond (100) surfaces were constructed. Density functional theory was used to calculate the geometries, adsorption energies, and partial density of states. The results showed that the geometries of the hydrogenated diamond (100) surfaces all changed to different degrees after ion adsorption. Among them, the H3O+ ion affected the geometry of the hydrogenated diamond (100) surfaces the most. This is well consistent with the results of the calculated adsorption energies, which indicated that a strong electrostatic attraction occurs between the hydrogenated diamond (100) surface and H3O+ ions. In addition, electrons transfer significantly from the hydrogenated diamond (100) surface to the adsorbed H3O+ ion, which induces a downward shift in the HOMO and LUMO energy levels of the H3O+ ion. However, for active ions like OH- and HCO 3 - , no dramatic change appears for the electronic structures of the adsorbed ions.

  10. Commentary on the Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun: Insight Relative to Coronal Holes, Sunspots, and Solar Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available While mankind will always remain unable to sample the interior of the Sun, the presence of sunspots and coronal holes can provide clues as to its subsurface structure. Insight relative to the solar body can also be gained by recognizing that the Sun must exist in the condensed state and support a discrete lattice structure, as required for the production of its continuous spectrum. In this regard, the layered liquid metallic hydrogen lattice advanced as a condensed model of the Sun (Robitaille P.M. Liquid Metallic Hydrogen: A Building Block for the Liquid Sun. Progr. Phys ., 2011, v. 3, 60–74; Robitaille P.M. Liquid Metallic Hydrogen II: A Critical Assessment of Current and Primordial Helium Levels in Sun. Progr. Phys ., 2013, v. 2, 35–47; Robitaille J.C. and Robitaille P.M. Liquid Metallic Hydrogen III. Intercalation and Lattice Exclusion Versus Gravitational Settling and Their Consequences Relative to Internal Structure, Surface Activity, and Solar Winds in the Sun. Progr. Phys ., 2013, v. 2, in press provides the ability to add structure to the solar interior. This constitutes a significant advantage over the gaseous solar models. In fact, a layered liquid metallic hydrogen lattice and the associated intercalation of non-hydrogen elements can help to account for the position of sunspots and coronal holes. At the same time, this model provides a greater understanding of the mechanisms which drive solar winds and activity.

  11. Hydrogen and helium effects on reduced activation Fe-Cr ferrite-martensite and ODS steels

    OpenAIRE

    Malitckii, Evgenii

    2015-01-01

    Significant amounts of hydrogen and helium are generated in the structural materials of the nuclear reactor systems by the interaction of the alloying elements with both fast and thermal neutrons. Hydrogen can also be effectively absorbed by other environmental processes. Helium and hydrogen stabilize the small vacancy clusters and facilitate the further formation of the voids that causes the swelling of the structural steels. At the same time, hydrogen plays an important role in degradation ...

  12. Hydrogen production using thermocatalytic decomposition of methane on Ni30/activated carbon and Ni30/carbon black.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srilatha, K; Viditha, V; Srinivasulu, D; Ramakrishna, S U B; Himabindu, V

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogen is an energy carrier of the future need. It could be produced from different sources and used for power generation or as a transport fuel which mainly in association with fuel cells. The primary challenge for hydrogen production is reducing the cost of production technologies to make the resulting hydrogen cost competitive with conventional fuels. Thermocatalytic decomposition (TCD) of methane is one of the most advantageous processes, which will meet the future demand, hence an attractive route for COx free environment. The present study deals with the production of hydrogen with 30 wt% of Ni impregnated in commercially available activated carbon and carbon black catalysts (samples coded as Ni30/AC and Ni30/CB, respectively). These combined catalysts were not attempted by previous studies. Pure form of hydrogen is produced at 850 °C and volume hourly space velocity (VHSV) of 1.62 L/h g on the activity of both the catalysts. The analysis (X-ray diffraction (XRD)) of the catalysts reveals moderately crystalline peaks of Ni, which might be responsible for the increase in catalytic life along with formation of carbon fibers. The activity of carbon black is sustainable for a longer time compared to that of activated carbon which has been confirmed by life time studies (850 °C and 54 sccm of methane). PMID:26233751

  13. Hydrogen permeation measurement of the reduced activation ferritic steel F82H by the vacuum thermo-balance method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen permeation fluxes of the reduced activation ferritic steel F82H were quantitatively measured by a newly proposed method, vacuum thermo-balance method, for a precise estimation of tritium leakage in a fusion reactor. We prepared sample capsules made of F82H, which enclosed hydrogen gas. The hydrogen in the capsules permeated through the capsule wall, and subsequently desorbed from the capsule surface during isothermal heating. The vacuum thermo-balance method allows simultaneous measurement of the hydrogen permeation flux by two independent methods, namely, the net weight reduction of the sample capsule and exhaust gas analysis. Thus the simultaneous measurements by two independent methods increase the reliability of the permeability measurement. When the gas pressure of enclosed hydrogen was 0.8 atm at the sample temperature of 673 K, the hydrogen permeation flux of F82H obtained by the net weight reduction and the exhaust gas analysis was 0.75x1018 (H2/m2s) and 2.2x1018 (H2/m2s), respectively. The ratio of the hydrogen permeation fluxes obtained by the net weight reduction to that measured by the exhaust gas analysis was in the range from 1/4 to 1/1 in this experiment. The temperature dependence of the estimated permeation flux was similar in both methods. Taking the uncertainties of both measurements into consideration, both results are supposed to be consistent. The enhancement of hydrogen permeation flux was observed from the sample of which outer surface was mechanically polished. Through the present experiments, it has been demonstrated that the vacuum thermo-balance method is effective for the measurement of hydrogen permeation rate of F82H. (author)

  14. Species and Organ Diversity in the Effects of Hydrogen Peroxide on Superoxide Dismutase Activity In Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Yan Cheng; Song-Quan Song

    2006-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is ubiquitous in aerobic organisms and constitutes the first link in the enzyme scavenging system of reactive oxygen species. In the present study, species and organ diversity of SOD activity in a solution and in an in-gel assay system, as well as the effects of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on SOD activity, were investigated. In a solution assay system, SOD activity of jackfruit root, shoot, leaves, axes, and cotyledons, of maize embryos and endosperms, of mung bean leaves and seeds, of sacred lotus axes and cotyledons, and of rice and wheat leaves was increased by 1-15 mmol/L H2O2. However, SOD activity in rice root and seeds, maize roots and leaves, mung bean roots and shoots, and wheat seeds was decreased by 1-15 mmol/L H2O2. The SOD activity of wheat root and soybean roots, leaves, axes, and cotyledons was increased by 1-4 mmol/L H2O2, but was decreased by concentrations of H2O2 >4 mmol/L. The SOD activity of soybean shoots was not affected by 1-15 mmol/L H2O2. The SOD activity in crude mitochondria of jackfruit,maize, and upas seeds, as well as in purified mitochondria of jackfruit, was also increased by 1-15 mmol/L H2O2. In the in-gel assay system, the SOD in jackfruit cotyledons was comprised of Mn-SOD, Cu/Zn-SOD, and Fe-SOD, the crude mitochondria of jackfruit seeds and maizes embryo was comprised of Mn-SOD and Cu/Zn-SOD, and the crude mitochondria of maize seeds was comprised of Mn-SOD only. In the present study,H2O2 markedly inhibited Cu/Zn-SOD and Fe-SOD activity.

  15. Cold neutron prompt gamma activation analysis, a non-destructive technique for hydrogen level assessment in zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Cold Neutron Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis has been performed to detect hydrogen in various Zr alloys. ► CNPGAA is non-destructive and can precisely detect low levels of hydrogen (as low as 5 wt ppm). ► Hydrogen pick-up fraction of ZIRLO samples has been investigated using CNPGAA and Vacuum hot Extraction. ► It is shown that the hydrogen pick-up fraction undergoes significant increase slightly before the weight gain transition. - Abstract: We propose a novel use of a non-destructive technique to quantitatively assess hydrogen concentration in zirconium alloys. The technique, called Cold Neutron Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis (CNPGAA), is based on measuring prompt gamma rays following the absorption of cold neutrons, and comparing the rate of detection of characteristic hydrogen gamma rays to that of gamma rays from matrix atoms. Because the emission is prompt, this method has to be performed in close proximity to a neutron source such as the one at the National Institute of Technology (NIST) Center for Neutron Research. Determination shown here to be simple and accurate, matching the results given by usual destructive techniques such as Vacuum Hot Extraction (VHE), with a precision of ±2 mg kg−1 (or wt ppm). Very low levels of hydrogen (as low as 5 mg kg−1 (wt ppm)) can be detected. Also, it is demonstrated that CNPGAA can be applied sequentially on an individual corrosion coupon during autoclave testing, to measure a gradually increasing hydrogen concentration. Thus, this technique can replace destructive techniques performed on “sister” samples thereby reducing experimental uncertainties.

  16. 髓过氧化物酶和过氧化氢酶基因多态性及其酶活力与燃煤污染型地方性砷中毒关系的探讨%Relationship between myeloperoxidase and catalase genetic polymorphism and their activities with arsenic poisoning caused by coal-burning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁冰; 张爱华; 奚绪光; 张碧霞; 黄晓欣

    2009-01-01

    Objective To detect genetic polymorphism of myeloperoxidase (MPO) gene and catalase (CAT) gene and their activities, and to analyze their relationship with arsenic poisoning caused by coal-burning. Methods One hundred and thirty arsenic poisoning patients were chosen as case group in Jiaole Village, Xingren County, Guizhou Province(an endemic area). One hundred and forty healthy residents living in 13 km away were chosen as control group. Their blood was collected. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique(PCR-RFLP) was used to detect polymorphism of MPO-463G/A and CAT-262C/T. Ultraviolet spectmphotometer method was used to detect myeloperoxidase activity. Chromatometry method was used to detect catalase activity. Results The genotype frequency of MPO-463G/A at GG, GA, AA site was 47.24%(60/127), 44.09%(56/127),8.67% (11/127) in case group and 42.34% (58/137),48.17% (66/137)1,9.49% (13/137) in control group, respectively. The difference between the two groups was not significant(χ2 = 0.642, P > 0.05). The genotype frequency of CAT-262C/T, at CC, CT, TT site was 65.60%(82/125),28.80%(36/125),5.60%(7/125) in case group and 76.51%(101/132), 18.94% (25/132) ,4.55% (6/132) in control group, respectively, without significant difference (χ2 =3.845, P>0.05). The relationship between polymorphism of MPO-463G/A and CAT-262C/T and the risk of arsenic poisoning was not found in this study(ORadj= 1.36, 95%CI: 0.74-2.50 for MPO; ORadj=1.35, 95%CI: 0.69-2.63 for CAT). The activities of MPO and CAT were (25.30±8.70)U/L and (2.80± 1.09)×103 U/L in case group, while (22.76±7.59)U/L and (3.90±1.01)×103U/L in control group with a significant difference(F=0.760 for MPO, F=0.855 for CAT, all P 0.05). Conclusions Genetic polymorphism of MPO-463G/A and CAT-262C/T is not found to have relationship with arsenic poisoning. Arsenic can lead to the change of MPO and CAT activity, which, however, may not be affected by MPO-463G/A and CAT-262C

  17. Mechanism of Sporicidal Activity for the Synergistic Combination of Peracetic Acid and Hydrogen Peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggett, Mark J; Schwarz, J Spencer; Burke, Peter A; McDonnell, Gerald; Denyer, Stephen P; Maillard, Jean-Yves

    2016-02-01

    There is still great interest in controlling bacterial endospores. The use of chemical disinfectants and, notably, oxidizing agents to sterilize medical devices is increasing. With this in mind, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and peracetic acid (PAA) have been used in combination, but until now there has been no explanation for the observed increase in sporicidal activity. This study provides information on the mechanism of synergistic interaction of PAA and H2O2 against bacterial spores. We performed investigations of the efficacies of different combinations, including pretreatments with the two oxidizers, against wild-type spores and a range of spore mutants deficient in the spore coat or small acid-soluble spore proteins. The concentrations of the two biocides were also measured in the reaction vessels, enabling the assessment of any shift from H2O2 to PAA formation. This study confirmed the synergistic activity of the combination of H2O2 and PAA. However, we observed that the sporicidal activity of the combination is largely due to PAA and not H2O2. Furthermore, we observed that the synergistic combination was based on H2O2 compromising the spore coat, which was the main spore resistance factor, likely allowing better penetration of PAA and resulting in the increased sporicidal activity. PMID:26637595

  18. Hydrogen-Activation Mechanism of [Fe] Hydrogenase Revealed by Multi-Scale Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Finkelmann, Arndt Robert; Reiher, Markus

    2014-01-01

    When investigating the mode of hydrogen activation by [Fe] hydrogenases, not only the chemical reactivity at the active site is of importance but also the large-scale conformational change between the so-called open and closed conformations, which leads to a special spatial arrangement of substrate and iron cofactor. To study H2 activation, a complete model of the solvated and cofactor-bound enzyme in complex with the substrate methenyl-H4MPT+ was constructed. Both the closed and open conformations were simulated with classical molecular dynamics on the 100 ns time scale. Quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics calculations on snapshots then revealed the features of the active site that enable the facile H2 cleavage. The hydroxyl group of the pyridinol ligand can easily be deprotonated. With the deprotonated hydroxyl group and the structural arrangement in the closed conformation, H2 coordinated to the Fe center is subject to an ionic and orbital push-pull effect and can be rapidly cleaved with a concerted hydr...

  19. The role of cytoplasmic catalase in dehydration tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    França, Mauro Braga; Panek, Anita Dolly; Eleutherio, Elis Cristina Araujo

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the role played by cytoplasmic catalase (Ctt1) in resistance against water loss using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as eukaryotic cell model. Comparing a mutant possessing a specific lesion in CTT1 with its parental strain, it was observed that both control and ctt1 strains exhibited increased levels of lipid peroxidation after dehydration, suggesting that catalase does not protect membranes during drying. Although the ctt1 strain has only 1 catalase isofor...

  20. Active and Durable Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Catalyst Derived from Pd-Doped Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jitang; Xia, Guoliang; Jiang, Peng; Yang, Yang; Li, Ren; Shi, Ruohong; Su, Jianwei; Chen, Qianwang

    2016-06-01

    The water electrolysis is of critical importance for sustainable hydrogen production. In this work, a highly efficient and stable PdCo alloy catalyst (PdCo@CN) was synthesized by direct annealing of Pd-doped metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) under N2 atmosphere. In 0.5 M H2SO4 solution, PdCo@CN displays remarkable electrocatalytic performance with overpotential of 80 mV, a Tafel slope of 31 mV dec(-1), and excellent stability of 10 000 cycles. Our studies reveal that noble metal doped MOFs are ideal precursors for preparing highly active alloy electrocatalysts with low content of noble metal. PMID:27112733

  1. Metal doped carbon nanoneedles and effect of carbon organization with activity for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Rafael A; Rubira, Adley F; Asefa, Tewodros; Silva, Rafael

    2016-02-10

    Cellulose nanowhiskers (CNW) from cotton, was prepared by acid hydrolysis and purified using a size selection process to obtain homogeneous samples with average particle size of 270 nm and 85.5% crystallinity. Purified CNW was used as precursor to carbon nanoneedles (CNN) synthesis. The synthesis of CNN loaded with different metals dopants were carried out by a nanoreactor method and the obtained CNNs applied as electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). In the carbon nanoneedles synthesis, Ni, Cu, or Fe worked as graphitization catalyst and the metal were found present as dopants in the final material. The used metal appeared to have direct influence on the degree of organization of the particles and also in the surface density of polar groups. It was evaluated the influence of the graphitic organization on the general properties and nickel was found as the more appropriate metal since it leads to a more organized material and also to a high activity toward HER. PMID:26686184

  2. Enhanced electrocatalytic activity of MoSx on TCNQ-treated electrode for hydrogen evolution reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Chang, Yunghuang

    2014-10-22

    Molybdenum sulfide has recently attracted much attention because of its low cost and excellent catalytical effects in the application of hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). To improve the HER efficiency, many researchers have extensively explored various avenues such as material modification, forming hybrid structures or modifying geometric morphology. In this work, we reported a significant enhancement in the electrocatalytic activity of the MoSx via growing on Tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) treated carbon cloth, where the MoSx was synthesized by thermolysis from the ammonium tetrathiomolybdate ((NH4)2MoS4) precursor at 170 °C. The pyridinic N- and graphitic N-like species on the surface of carbon cloth arising from the TCNQ treatment facilitate the formation of Mo5+ and S2 2- species in the MoSx, especially with S2 2- serving as an active site for HER. In addition, the smaller particle size of the MoSx grown on TCNQ-treated carbon cloth reveals a high ratio of edge sites relative to basal plane sites, indicating the richer effective reaction sites and superior electrocatalytic characteristics. Hence, we reported a high hydrogen evolution rate for MoSx on TCNQ-treated carbon cloth of 6408 mL g-1 cm-2 h-1 (286 mmol g-1 cm-2 h-1) at an overpotential of V = 0.2 V. This study provides the fundamental concepts useful in the design and preparation of transition metal dichalcogenide catalysts, beneficial in the development in clean energy.

  3. Hydrogen activation, diffusion, and clustering on CeO₂(111): a DFT+U study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Torre, Delia; Carrasco, Javier; Ganduglia-Pirovano, M Verónica; Pérez, Rubén

    2014-07-01

    We present a comprehensive density functional theory+U study of the mechanisms underlying the dissociation of molecular hydrogen, and diffusion and clustering of the resulting atomic species on the CeO2(111) surface. Contrary to a widely held view based solely on a previous theoretical prediction, our results show conclusively that H2 dissociation is an activated process with a large energy barrier ~1.0 eV that is not significantly affected by coverage or the presence of surface oxygen vacancies. The reaction proceeds through a local energy minimum--where the molecule is located close to one of the surface oxygen atoms and the H-H bond has been substantially weaken by the interaction with the substrate--, and a transition state where one H atom is attached to a surface O atom and the other H atom sits on-top of a Ce(4+) ion. In addition, we have explored how several factors, including H coverage, the location of Ce(3+) ions as well as the U value, may affect the chemisorption energy and the relative stability of isolated OH groups versus pair and trimer structures. The trimer stability at low H coverages and the larger upward relaxation of the surface O atoms within the OH groups are consistent with the assignment of the frequent experimental observation by non-contact atomic force and scanning tunneling microscopies of bright protrusions on three neighboring surface O atoms to a triple OH group. The diffusion path of isolated H atoms on the surface goes through the adsorption on-top of an oxygen in the third atomic layer with a large energy barrier of ~1.8 eV. Overall, the large energy barriers for both, molecular dissociation and atomic diffusion, are consistent with the high activity and selectivity found recently in the partial hydrogenation of acetylene catalyzed by ceria at high H2/C2H2 ratios. PMID:25005299

  4. The relevance of the non-canonical PTS1 of peroxisomal catalase

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Chris; Aksam, Eda Bener; Gunkel, Katja; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J.

    2012-01-01

    Catalase is sorted to peroxisomes via a C-terminal peroxisomal targeting signal 1 (PTS1), which binds to the receptor protein Pex5. Analysis of the C-terminal sequences of peroxisomal catalases from various species indicated that catalase never contains the typical C-terminal PTS1 tripeptide-SKL, but invariably is sorted to peroxisomes via a non-canonical sorting sequence. We analyzed the relevance of the non-canonical PTS1 of catalase of the yeast Hansenula polymorpha (-SKI). Using isotherma...

  5. Cryo-adsorptive hydrogen storage on activated carbon. I: Thermodynamic analysis of adsorption vessels and comparison with liquid and compressed gas hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paggiaro, R.; Polifke, W. [Lehrstuhl fuer Thermodynamik, TU Muenchen, Boltzmannstr. 15, D-85747 Garching (Germany); Benard, P. [Institut de recherche sur l' hydrogene, Universite du Quebec, C.P. 500, Trois-Rivieres, Quebec G9A 5H7 (Canada)

    2010-01-15

    This paper presents a thermodynamic analysis of cryo-adsorption vessels for hydrogen storage. The analysis is carried out with an unsteady lumped model and gives a global assessment of the behavior of the storage system during operation (discharge), dormancy and filling. The adsorbent used is superactivated carbon AX-21 trademark. Cryogenic hydrogen storage, either by compression or adsorption, takes advantage of the effect of temperature on the storage density. In order to store 4.1 kg H{sub 2} in 100 L, a pressure of 750 bar at 298 K is necessary, but only 150 bar at 77 K. The pressure is further reduced to 60 bar if the container is filled with pellets of activated carbon. However, adsorption vessels are submitted to intrinsic thermal effects which considerably influence their dynamic behavior and due to which thermal management is required for smooth operation. In this analysis, among energy balances for filling and discharge processes, the influence of the intrinsic thermal effects during vessel operation is presented. Hydrogen losses during normal operation as well as during long periods of inactivity are also considered. The results are compared to those obtained in low-pressure and high-pressure insulated LH{sub 2} and CH{sub 2} tanks. (author)

  6. Controlled release and enhanced antibacterial activity of salicylic acid by hydrogen bonding with chitosan☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zujin Yang; Yanxiong Fang; Hongbing Ji

    2016-01-01

    Microcapsules of salicylic acid (SA) with chitosan were prepared by spray drying method. Various analytical methods were used to characterize the nature of microcapsules. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) confirmed the presence of intermolecular interactions between chitosan and SA. Particle size analysis showed that the average size of microcapsules ranged from 2 to 20μm. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies indicated that the microspheres were spherical and had a relatively smooth surface. Microbiological assay of antibacterial activity for SA and its microcapsules was measured using different bacterial strains. It was found that the antibacterial activity of SA was improved after the formation of microcapsules. The in vitro release profile showed that the microcapsules could control SA release from 1 h to 4 h. Kinetic studies revealed that the release pattern follows Korsmeyer–Peppas mechanism. Enhanced antibacterial activity of the SA micro-capsules was attributed to the synergistic effects of intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions N–H⋯O and O–H⋯O_C between SA and chitosan. It was also confirmed by quantum chemical calculation.

  7. Widely available active sites on Ni2P for electrochemical hydrogen evolution--insights from first principles calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Martin H; Stern, Lucas-Alexandre; Feng, Ligang; Rossmeisl, Jan; Hu, Xile

    2015-04-28

    We present insights into the mechanism and the active site for hydrogen evolution on nickel phosphide (Ni2P). Ni2P was recently discovered to be a very active non-precious hydrogen evolution catalyst. Current literature attributes the activity of Ni2P to a particular site on the (0001) facet. In the present study, using Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations, we show that several widely available low index crystal facets on Ni2P have better properties for a high catalytic activity. DFT calculations were used to identify moderately bonding nickel bridge sites and nickel hollow sites for hydrogen adsorption and to calculate barriers for the Tafel pathway. The investigated surfaces in this study were the (101̅0), (1̅1̅20), (112̅0), (112̅1) and (0001) facets of the hexagonal Ni2P crystal. In addition to the DFT results, we present experiments on Ni2P nanowires growing along the 〈0001〉 direction, which are shown as efficient hydrogen evolution catalysts. The experimental results add these nanowires to a variety of different morphologies of Ni2P, which are all active for HER. PMID:25812670

  8. Hydrogen inhalation reduced epithelial apoptosis in ventilator-induced lung injury via a mechanism involving nuclear factor-kappa B activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chien-Sheng [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Division of Thoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Taipei-Veterans General Hospital and National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Kawamura, Tomohiro; Peng, Ximei [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Tochigi, Naobumi [Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, PA (United States); Shigemura, Norihisa [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Billiar, Timothy R. [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Nakao, Atsunori, E-mail: anakao@imap.pitt.edu [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Toyoda, Yoshiya [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2011-05-06

    Highlights: {yields} Hydrogen is a regulatory molecule with antiinflammatory and antiapoptotic protective effects. {yields} There is very limited information on the pathways regulated in vivo by the hydrogen. {yields} Antiapoptotic abilities of hydrogen were explained by upregulation of the antiapoptotic gene. {yields} NF{kappa}B activation during hydrogen treatment was correlated with elevated antiapoptotic protein. {yields} NF{kappa}B activation associated with increase Bcl-2 may contribute to cytoprotection of hydrogen. -- Abstract: We recently demonstrated the inhalation of hydrogen gas, a novel medical therapeutic gas, ameliorates ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI); however, the molecular mechanisms by which hydrogen ameliorates VILI remain unclear. Therefore, we investigated whether inhaled hydrogen gas modulates the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF{kappa}B) signaling pathway. VILI was generated in male C57BL6 mice by performing a tracheostomy and placing the mice on a mechanical ventilator (tidal volume of 30 ml/kg or 10 ml/kg without positive end-expiratory pressure). The ventilator delivered either 2% nitrogen or 2% hydrogen in balanced air. NF{kappa}B activation, as indicated by NF{kappa}B DNA binding, was detected by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Hydrogen gas inhalation increased NF{kappa}B DNA binding after 1 h of ventilation and decreased NF{kappa}B DNA binding after 2 h of ventilation, as compared with controls. The early activation of NF{kappa}B during hydrogen treatment was correlated with elevated levels of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 and decreased levels of Bax. Hydrogen inhalation increased oxygen tension, decreased lung edema, and decreased the expression of proinflammatory mediators. Chemical inhibition of early NF{kappa}B activation using SN50 reversed these protective effects. NF{kappa}B activation and an associated increase in the expression of Bcl-2 may contribute, in part, to the

  9. Hydrogen inhalation reduced epithelial apoptosis in ventilator-induced lung injury via a mechanism involving nuclear factor-kappa B activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Hydrogen is a regulatory molecule with antiinflammatory and antiapoptotic protective effects. → There is very limited information on the pathways regulated in vivo by the hydrogen. → Antiapoptotic abilities of hydrogen were explained by upregulation of the antiapoptotic gene. → NFκB activation during hydrogen treatment was correlated with elevated antiapoptotic protein. → NFκB activation associated with increase Bcl-2 may contribute to cytoprotection of hydrogen. -- Abstract: We recently demonstrated the inhalation of hydrogen gas, a novel medical therapeutic gas, ameliorates ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI); however, the molecular mechanisms by which hydrogen ameliorates VILI remain unclear. Therefore, we investigated whether inhaled hydrogen gas modulates the nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB) signaling pathway. VILI was generated in male C57BL6 mice by performing a tracheostomy and placing the mice on a mechanical ventilator (tidal volume of 30 ml/kg or 10 ml/kg without positive end-expiratory pressure). The ventilator delivered either 2% nitrogen or 2% hydrogen in balanced air. NFκB activation, as indicated by NFκB DNA binding, was detected by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Hydrogen gas inhalation increased NFκB DNA binding after 1 h of ventilation and decreased NFκB DNA binding after 2 h of ventilation, as compared with controls. The early activation of NFκB during hydrogen treatment was correlated with elevated levels of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 and decreased levels of Bax. Hydrogen inhalation increased oxygen tension, decreased lung edema, and decreased the expression of proinflammatory mediators. Chemical inhibition of early NFκB activation using SN50 reversed these protective effects. NFκB activation and an associated increase in the expression of Bcl-2 may contribute, in part, to the cytoprotective effects of hydrogen against apoptotic and inflammatory signaling pathway

  10. Improved membrane filtration method incorporating catalase and sodium pyruvate for detection of chlorine-stressed coliform bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Calabrese, J P; Bissonnette, G K

    1990-01-01

    In vitro pure culture studies were conducted on three different strains of Escherichia coli (K-12, EPA 00244, and SWEI) to determine the effect of chlorination on catalase activity. In each case, stationary-phase cells exhibited significant (P less than 0.001) reductions in enzyme activity following exposure to chlorine. Mean differences in activity between control and chlorine-stressed cells ranged from 8.8 to 20.3 U/mg of protein for E. coli SWEI and EPA 00244, respectively. Following initi...

  11. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITY OF PEROXYDISUCCINIC ACID, HYDROGEN PEROXIDE AND THEIR MIXTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blazheyevskiy M.Ye.,

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. It is known that reactive oxygen species (ROS generated in vivo by cell aerobic metabolism cause multiple damage in different cell organelles and kill not only obligate anaerobes and microaerophilles, but also aerobes. ROS generated by phagocytes and representatives of normal microflora are an important component of macroorganism defense from most pathogens, which is explained by their ability to damage different biological structures. ROS have high reactivity and let us use them in vitro as effective biocides. Hydrogen peroxide is widely used in many industries, in particular, in medicine and veterinary as antiseptic and disinfectant agent due to its safety for environment and broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity including spore-forming bacteria. However, in the recent years certain decrease of background sensitivity of microorganisms to hydrogen peroxide and occurrence of resistant strains of pathogenic microorganisms to this agent has been noted. The aim of this work is to carry out a comparative study of antimicrobial activity of hydrogen peroxide, peroxydisuccinic acid (PDSA, monoperoxysuccinic acid (MPSA, and mixture of PDSA and hydrogen peroxide (Н2О2. Materials and methods. The substances of peroxydisuccinic acid (PDSA and monoperoxysuccinic acid (MPSA were prepared by well known methods. The following test-strains were used to assess antimicrobial activity of the agents: Staphylococcus aureus АТСС 25923, Escherichia coli АТСС 25922, Pseudomonas aeruginosa АТСС 27853, Pseudomonas aeruginosa АТСС 9027, Basillus сereus АТСС 10702, Basillus сereus АТСС 96, Basillus subtilis АТСС 6633, Proteus vulgaris ATCC 4636, Candida albicans АТСС 885/653, and Candida albicans АТСС 10231. All disinfectant agents were diluted in distilled water at 40 ºС and stirred. The microbial burden was 2∙109 CFU/ml of the medium, and for kinetic studies 105 CFU/ml of the medium, it was standardizing

  12. Effects and Mechanisms of Mechanical Activation on Hydrogen Sorption/ Desorption of Nanoscale Lithium Nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, Leon, L.; Yang, Gary, Z.; Crosby, Kyle; Wwan, Xufei. Zhong, Yang; Markmaitree, Tippawan; Osborn, William; Hu, Jianzhi; Kwak, Ja Hun

    2012-04-26

    The objective of this project is to investigate and develop novel, mechanically activated, nanoscale Li3N-based and LiBH4-based materials that are able to store and release {approx}10 wt% hydrogen at temperatures near 100 C with a plateau hydrogen pressure of less than 10 bar. Four (4) material systems have been investigated in the course of this project in order to achieve the project objective. These 4 systems are (i) LiNH2+LiH, (ii) LiNH2+MgH2, (iii) LiBH4, and (iv) LiBH4+MgH2. The key findings we have obtained from these 4 systems are summarized below. *The thermodynamic driving forces for LiNH2+LiH and LiBH4 systems are not adequate to enable H2 release at temperatures < 100 C. *Hydrogen release in the solid state for all of the four systems is controlled by diffusion, and thus is a slow process. *LiNH2+MgH2 and LiBH4+MgH2 systems, although possessing proper thermodynamic driving forces to allow for H2 release at temperatures < 100 C, have sluggish reaction kinetics because of their diffusion-controlled rate-limiting steps. *Reducing particles to the nanometer length scale (< 50 nm) can improve the thermodynamic driving force to enable H2 release at near ambient temperature, while simultaneously enhancing the reaction kinetics as well as changing the diffusion-controlled rate-limiting step to gas desorption-controlled rate-limiting step. This phenomenon has been demonstrated with LiBH4 and offers the hope that further work along this direction will make one of the material systems, i.e., LiBH4, LiBH4+MgH2 and LiNH2+MgH2, possess the desired thermodynamic properties and rapid H2 uptake/release kinetics for on-board applications. Many of the findings and knowledge gained from this project have been published in archival refereed journal articles [1-15] and are accessible by general public. Thus, to avoid a bulky final report, the key findings and knowledge gained from this project will be succinctly summarized, particularly for those findings and knowledge

  13. Hydrogen peroxide induces activation of insulin signaling pathway via AMP-dependent kinase in podocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► H2O2 activates the insulin signaling pathway and glucose uptake in podocytes. ► H2O2 induces time-dependent changes in AMPK phosphorylation. ► H2O2 enhances insulin signaling pathways via AMPK activation. ► H2O2 stimulation of glucose uptake is AMPK-dependent. -- Abstract: Podocytes are cells that form the glomerular filtration barrier in the kidney. Insulin signaling in podocytes is critical for normal kidney function. Insulin signaling is regulated by oxidative stress and intracellular energy levels. We cultured rat podocytes to investigate the effects of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on the phosphorylation of proximal and distal elements of insulin signaling. We also investigated H2O2-induced intracellular changes in the distribution of protein kinase B (Akt). Western blots showed that H2O2 (100 μM) induced rapid, transient phosphorylation of the insulin receptor (IR), the IR substrate-1 (IRS1), and Akt with peak activities at 5 min (Δ 183%, P 2O2>. Furthermore, H2O2 inhibited phosphorylation of the phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN; peak activity at 10 min; Δ −32%, P 2O2 on IR phosphorylation by about 40% (from 2.07 ± 0.28 to 1.28 ± 0.12, P 2O2 increased glucose uptake in podocytes (from 0.88 ± 0.04 to 1.29 ± 0.12 nmol/min/mg protein, P 2O2 activated the insulin signaling pathway and glucose uptake via AMPK in cultured rat podocytes. This signaling may play a potential role in the prevention of insulin resistance under conditions associated with oxidative stress.

  14. PGC-1α Serine 570 Phosphorylation and GCN5-mediated Acetylation by Angiotensin II Drive Catalase Down-regulation and Vascular Hypertrophy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Shiqin; Salazar, Gloria; San Martin, Alejandra; Ahmad, Mushtaq; Patrushev, Nikolay; Hilenski, Lula; Nazarewicz, Rafal Robert; Ma, Minhui; Ushio-Fukai, Masuko; Alexander, R. Wayne

    2010-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is a pleuripotential hormone that is important in the pathophysiology of multiple conditions including aging, cardiovascular and renal diseases, and insulin resistance. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important mediators of Ang II-induced signaling generally and have a well defined role in vascular hypertrophy, which is inhibited by overexpression of catalase, inferring a specific role of H2O2. The molecular mechanisms are understood incompletely. The transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) is a key regulator of energy metabolism and ROS-scavenging enzymes including catalase. We show that Ang II stimulates Akt-dependent PGC-1α serine 570 phosphorylation, which is required for the binding of the histone acetyltransferase GCN5 (general control nonderepressible 5) to PGC-1α and for its lysine acetylation. These sequential post-translational modifications suppress PGC-1α activity and prevent its binding to the catalase promoter through the forkhead box O1 transcription factor, thus decreasing catalase expression. We demonstrate that overexpression of the phosphorylation-defective mutant PGC-1α (S570A) prevents Ang II-induced increases in H2O2 levels and hypertrophy ([3H]leucine incorporation). Knockdown of PGC-1α by small interfering RNA promotes basal and Ang II-stimulated ROS and hypertrophy, which is reversed by polyethylene glycol-conjugated catalase. Thus, endogenous PGC-1α is a negative regulator of vascular hypertrophy by up-regulating catalase expression and thus reducing ROS levels. We provide novel mechanistic insights by which Ang II may mediate its ROS-dependent pathophysiologic effects on multiple cardiometabolic diseases. PMID:19940161

  15. Influence of nutritive substrate and pH on catalase and peroxidase production in saprophytic fungus Rhizopus nigricans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Barbaneagra

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Aerobic organisms are vulnerable to action of reactive oxygen species that are very noxious and may beresponsible for damage of all cellular constituents. Most organisms have developed defense mechanisms to protect cells from high levels of free radicals. The purpose of this paper is to determine the antioxidant response in fungus Rhizopus nigricans, materialized trough enzymatic activity of biochemical markers of oxidative stress – catalase and peroxidase.We followed the influence of culture medium pH and nutrient substrate on development of the two enzymes. Enzymaticassays were performed at intervals of 5, 10 and 15 days, using both fungus mycelium and culture liquid. Development of the fungus was completely inhibited at pH 2. Catalase and peroxidase production was mostly endocellular because in theculture liquid in most work variants enzymatic assay was not possible and in the remaining work variants were recordedlow values for catalase and extremely low, near to zero for peroxidase.

  16. Investigation on the toxic interaction of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with catalase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) have been investigated for various applications in targeted drug delivery and magnetic resonance imaging. Given their clinical relevance, there is a need to understand these particles' potential cytotoxic effects and possible mechanisms of cytotoxicity. Using a variety of spectroscopic techniques, we investigated the interaction of SPIONs with catalase (CAT) in an aqueous environment. Catalase is an important enzyme that protects cells and tissues from oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Therefore, in this work, CAT served as a model protein for examining the physiological effects of SPIONs due to is function in eliminating H2O2. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy results showed that SPIONs have little effect on tryptophan residues in CAT. Data from circular dichroism (CD) and UV–vis spectroscopies showed that CAT α-helical content decreased from 32.4% to 29.1% in the presence of SPIONs. Moreover, a ca. 10% decrease in CAT activity was observed in the presence of SPIONs at a 20:1 particle:protein ratio. These results show that SPIONs can interact with proteins to alter both their structure and function. Further studies with CAT or other toxicologically relevant enzymes may be used for elucidating the mechanisms of SPION cytotoxicity. - Highlights: • This work established the binding mode of SPIONs with CAT on molecular level. • The interaction mechanism was explored by multiple spectroscopic techniques. • SPIONs can loosen the skeleton of protein and increase the exposure of amide moieties in the hydrophobic pocket. • SPIONs can inhibit CAT activity and trigger conformational changes in CAT

  17. Investigation on the toxic interaction of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with catalase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Zehua [Shandong Key Laboratory of Water Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, China–America CRC for Environment and Health, Shandong Province, Shandong University, 27# Shanda South Road, Jinan 250100 (China); Liu, Hongwei [Shandong Key Laboratory of Water Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, China–America CRC for Environment and Health, Shandong Province, Shandong University, 27# Shanda South Road, Jinan 250100 (China); Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Hu, Xinxin; Song, Wei [Shandong Key Laboratory of Water Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, China–America CRC for Environment and Health, Shandong Province, Shandong University, 27# Shanda South Road, Jinan 250100 (China); Liu, Rutao, E-mail: rutaoliu@sdu.edu.cn [Shandong Key Laboratory of Water Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, China–America CRC for Environment and Health, Shandong Province, Shandong University, 27# Shanda South Road, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2015-03-15

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) have been investigated for various applications in targeted drug delivery and magnetic resonance imaging. Given their clinical relevance, there is a need to understand these particles' potential cytotoxic effects and possible mechanisms of cytotoxicity. Using a variety of spectroscopic techniques, we investigated the interaction of SPIONs with catalase (CAT) in an aqueous environment. Catalase is an important enzyme that protects cells and tissues from oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Therefore, in this work, CAT served as a model protein for examining the physiological effects of SPIONs due to is function in eliminating H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy results showed that SPIONs have little effect on tryptophan residues in CAT. Data from circular dichroism (CD) and UV–vis spectroscopies showed that CAT α-helical content decreased from 32.4% to 29.1% in the presence of SPIONs. Moreover, a ca. 10% decrease in CAT activity was observed in the presence of SPIONs at a 20:1 particle:protein ratio. These results show that SPIONs can interact with proteins to alter both their structure and function. Further studies with CAT or other toxicologically relevant enzymes may be used for elucidating the mechanisms of SPION cytotoxicity. - Highlights: • This work established the binding mode of SPIONs with CAT on molecular level. • The interaction mechanism was explored by multiple spectroscopic techniques. • SPIONs can loosen the skeleton of protein and increase the exposure of amide moieties in the hydrophobic pocket. • SPIONs can inhibit CAT activity and trigger conformational changes in CAT.

  18. Plasmonic Au nanoparticles embedding enhances the activity and stability of CdS for photocatalytic hydrogen evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guiyang; Wang, Xiang; Cao, Jungang; Wu, Shujie; Yan, Wenfu; Liu, Gang

    2016-02-01

    The activity and stability of CdS for visible-light-driven hydrogen evolution could be significantly enhanced by embedding plasmonic Au nanoparticles. The plasmon resonance energy field of Au nanoparticles could increase the formation rate and lifetime of e(-)/h(+) pairs in CdS semiconductors. PMID:26732587

  19. PROCESS OPTIMIZATION OF TETRA ACETYL ETHYLENE DIAMINE ACTIVATED HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF POPULUS NIGRA CTMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Zhao

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available To enhance the bleaching efficiency, the activator of tetra acetyl ethylene diamine (TAED was used in conventional H2O2 bleaching. The H2O2/TAED bleaching system can accelerate the reaction rate and shorten bleaching time at relative low temperature, which can reduce the production cost. In this research, the process with hydrogen peroxide activated by TAED bleaching of Populus nigra chemi-thermo mechanical pulp was optimized. Suitable bleaching conditions were confirmed as follows: pulp consistency 10%, bleaching temperature 70oC, bleaching time 60 min when the charge of H2O2 was 4%, NaOH charge 2%, and molar ratio of TAED to H2O2 0.3. The pulp brightness gain reached 23.6% ISO with the optimized bleaching conditions. FTIR analysis indicated that the H2O2/TAED bleaching system can decrease carbonyl group further than that of conventional H2O2 bleaching, which contributed to the higher bleaching efficiency and final brightness. The H2O2/TAED bleaching had stronger oxidation ability on lignin than that of H2O2 bleaching.

  20. Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Germanium Active Layer for Top Cell of a Multi Junction Cell Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jaehyun; Iftiquar, S M; Kim, Minbum; Park, Jinjoo; Jung, Junhee; Kim, Jiwoong; Yi, Junsin

    2016-05-01

    Intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon-germanium (a-SiGe:H) alloy is generally used in the bottom cell because of its low band gap. The a-SiGe:H has a higher photo conductivity in comparison to the a-Si:H; thus, it is expected that the a-SiGe:H can show better short circuit current density than that of the a-Si:H based solar cell. Therefore, we optimized a-SiGe:H active layer that can be a suitable choice for the front cell of a multi junction.solar cell. Furthermore, we carried out a comparative study of the solar cells that have a-SiGe:H and a-Si:H as respective active layers. The a-SiGe:H based solar cells show higher short circuit current density, while the a-Si:H based cells show higheropen circuit voltage. The current-voltage characteristics of these cells are as follows: (a) V(oc) = 770 mV, J(sc) = 15.0 mA/cm2, FF = 64.5%, and η = 7.47% for a-SiGe:H based cell; and (b) V(oc) = 826 mV, J(sc) = 13.63 mA/cm2, FF = 72.0%, and η = 8.1% for a-Si:H based cell. PMID:27483837

  1. The Effects of Acute Hydrogen Sulfide Poisoning on Cytochrome P450 Isoforms Activity in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianqin Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is the second leading cause of toxin related death (after carbon monoxide in the workplace. H2S is absorbed by the upper respiratory tract mucosa, and it causes histotoxic hypoxemia and respiratory depression. Cocktail method was used to evaluate the influences of acute H2S poisoning on the activities of cytochrome P450 isoforms CYP2B6, CYP2D6, CYP3A4, CYP1A2, CYP2C19, and CYP2C9, which were reflected by the changes of pharmacokinetic parameters of six specific probe drugs, bupropion, metoprolol, midazolam, phenacetin, omeprazole, and tolbutamide, respectively. The experimental rats were randomly divided into two groups, control group and acute H2S poisoning group (inhaling 300 ppm for 2 h. The mixture of six probes was given to rats by oral administration and the blood samples were obtained at a series of time points through the caudal vein. The concentrations of probe drugs in rat plasma were measured by LC-MS. The results for acute H2S poisoning and control groups were as follows: there was a statistically significant difference in the AUC and Cmax for bupropion, metoprolol, phenacetin, and tolbutamide, while there was no statistical pharmacokinetic difference for midazolam and omeprazole. Acute H2S poisoning could inhibit the activity of CYP2B6, CYP2D6, CYP1A2, and CYP2C9 in rats.

  2. Hydrogen peroxide sensing and cytotoxicity activity of Acacia lignin stabilized silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aadil, Keshaw Ram; Barapatre, Anand; Meena, Avtar Singh; Jha, Harit

    2016-01-01

    The study is aimed at detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) using Acacia lignin mediated silver nanoparticles (AGNPs). The synthesis of AGNPs was achieved at conditions optimized as, 3 ml of 0.02% lignin and 1mM silver nitrate incubated for 30 min at 80°C and pH 9. Initial screening of AGNPs was performed by measuring the surface plasmon resonance peak at 410-430 nm using UV-vis spectrophotometer. Transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction and particle size analysis confirmed the spherical shaped face centered cubic structure and 10-50 nm size of AGNPs. The infrared spectroscopy study further revealed that the active functional groups present in lignin were responsible for the reduction of silver ions (Ag(+)) to metallic silver (Ag(0)). Lignin stabilized silver nanoparticles showed good sensitivity and a linear response over wide concentrations of H2O2 (10(-1) to 10(-6)M). Further, the in vitrocytotoxicity activity of the lignin mediated AGNPs (5-500 μg/ml) demonstrated toxicity effects in MCF-7 and A375 cell lines. Thus, lignin stabilized silver nanoparticles based optical sensor for H2O2 could be potentially applied in the determination of reactive oxygen species and toxic chemicals which further expands the importance of lignin stabilized silver nanoparticles. PMID:26434518

  3. Energy Efficient Catalytic Activation of Hydrogen peroxide for Green Chemical Processes: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Terrence J.; Horwitz, Colin

    2004-11-12

    A new, highly energy efficient approach for using catalytic oxidation chemistry in multiple fields of technology has been pursued. The new catalysts, called TAML® activators, catalyze the reactions of hydrogen peroxide and other oxidants for the exceptionally rapid decontamination of noninfectious simulants (B. atrophaeus) of anthrax spores, for the energy efficient decontamination of thiophosphate pesticides, for the facile, low temperature removal of color and organochlorines from pulp and paper mill effluent, for the bleaching of dyes from textile mill effluents, and for the removal of recalcitrant dibenzothiophene compounds from diesel and gasoline fuels. Highlights include the following: 1) A 7-log kill of Bacillus atrophaeus spores has been achieved unambiguously in water under ambient conditions within 15 minutes. 2) The rapid total degradation under ambient conditions of four thiophosphate pesticides and phosphonate degradation intermediates has been achieved on treatment with TAML/peroxide, opening up potential applications of the decontamination system for phosphonate structured chemical warfare agents, for inexpensive, easy to perform degradation of stored and aged pesticide stocks (especially in Africa and Asia), for remediation of polluted sites and water bodies, and for the destruction of chemical warfare agent stockpiles. 3) A mill trial conducted in a Pennsylvanian bleached kraft pulp mill has established that TAML catalyst injected into an alkaline peroxide bleach tower can significantly lower color from the effluent stream promising a new, more cost effective, energy-saving approach for color remediation adding further evidence of the value and diverse engineering capacity of the approach to other field trials conducted on effluent streams as they exit the bleach plant. 4) Dibenzothiophenes (DBTs), including 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene, the most recalcitrant sulfur compounds in diesel and gasoline, can be completely removed from model gasoline

  4. Size-Dependent Catalytic Activity of Palladium Nanoparticles Fabricated in Porous Organic Polymers for Alkene Hydrogenation at Room Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, John; Trinh, Quang Thang; Jana, Avijit; Ng, Wilson Kwok Hung; Borah, Parijat; Hirao, Hajime; Zhao, Yanli

    2016-06-22

    Ultrafine palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs) with 8 and 3 nm sizes were effectively fabricated in triazine functionalized porous organic polymer (POP) TRIA that was developed by nonaqueous polymerization of 2,4,6-triallyoxy-1,3,5-triazine. The Pd NPs encapsulated POP (Pd-POP) was fully characterized using several techniques. Further studies revealed an excellent capability of Pd-POP for catalytic transfer hydrogenation of alkenes at room temperature with superior catalytic performance and high selectivity of desired products. Highly flammable H2 gas balloon at high pressure and temperature used in conventional hydrogenation reactions was not needed in the present synthetic system. Catalytic activity is strongly dependent on the size of encapsulated Pd NPs in the POP. The Pd-POP catalyst with Pd NPs of 8 nm in diameter exhibited higher catalytic activity for alkene hydrogenation as compared with the Pd-POP catalyst encapsulating 3 nm Pd NPs. Computational studies were undertaken to gain insights into different catalytic activities of these two Pd-POP catalysts. High reusability and stability as well as no Pd leaching of these Pd-POP catalysts make them highly applicable for hydrogenation reactions at room temperature. PMID:27258184

  5. 2009 Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities, Progress, and Plans: Report to Congress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-01-27

    The Department of Energy is conducting a comprehensive and focused program that fulfills the provisions of Title VIII of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT). The Department’s Hydrogen Program addresses the full range of barriers facing the development and deployment of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies.

  6. Characterization of hydrogen in concrete by cold neutron prompt gamma-ray activation analysis and neutron incoherent scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, R.L.; Chen-Mayer, H.H.; Lindstrom, R.M.; Blaauw, M.

    2000-07-01

    A combination of cold neutron prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA) and neutron incoherent scattering (NIS) has been used for nondestructive characterization of hydrogen as a function of position in slabs of wet concrete of different composition. Hydrogen was determined by PGAA by scanning each sample across of 5 mm diameter neutron beam in 10 mm increments, and measuring the 2223 keV prompt gamma ray. NIS measurements were performed by scanning the samples across a 5 mm diameter neutron beam at 5 mm increments and detecting scattered neutrons. The measurements demonstrate the feasibility of the techniques for 2D compositional mapping of hydrogen and other elements in materials, and indicate the potential of these methods for monitoring the uniformity of drying concrete.

  7. Catalytic activity of Pd-Ni in the oxidation of hydrogen for the safety of nuclear power plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łomot Dariusz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pd-Ni/Al2O3 systems were investigated in the reaction of hydrogen oxidation in terms of their possible application as catalysts used in passive autocatalytic recombiners (PARs used in nuclear power plants. Testing experiments were carried out in a flowing system at different temperatures and humidity of the reaction mixture. The bimetallic catalysts exhibited higher response to the increase of temperature and higher resistance to inhibit water than the monometallic palladium catalyst. They showed excellent stability during a few tens of hours, similarly, like their monometallic counterpart. Our bimetallic catalysts of hydrogen oxidation can be used as cheaper alternatives to catalysts based on the precious metals in the hydrogen oxidation without loss of their activity over time.

  8. Driving electrocatalytic activity by interface electronic structure control in a metalloprotein hybrid catalyst for efficient hydrogen evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Sushant Kumar; Deb, Pritam; Ghosh, Arghya

    2016-08-17

    The rational design of metalloprotein hybrid structures and precise calculations for understanding the role of the interfacial electronic structure in regulating the HER activity of water splitting sites and their microscopic effect for obtaining robust hydrogen evolution possess great promise for developing highly efficient nano-bio hybrid HER catalysts. Here, we employ high-accuracy linear-scaling density functional theory calculations using a near-complete basis set and a minimal parameter implicit solvent model within the self-consistent calculations, on silver (Ag) ions assimilated on bacteriorhodopsin (bR) at specific binding sites. Geometry optimization indicates the formation of active sites at the interface of the metalloprotein complex and the density of states reflects the metallic nature of the active sites. The reduced value of the canonical orbital gap indicates the state of dynamic nature after Ag ion assimilation on active sites and smooth electron transfer. These incorporated active protein sites are more efficient in electrolytic splitting of water than pristine sites due to their low value of Gibbs free energy for the HER in terms of hydrogen coverages. Volcano plot analysis and the free energy diagram are compared for understanding the hydrogen evolution efficiency. Moreover, the essential role of the interfacial electronic properties in regulating the HER catalytic activity of water splitting sites and enhancing the efficiency is elucidated. PMID:27499158

  9. Singlet oxygen treatment of tumor cells triggers extracellular singlet oxygen generation, catalase inactivation and reactivation of intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riethmüller, Michaela; Burger, Nils; Bauer, Georg

    2015-12-01

    Intracellular singlet oxygen generation in photofrin-loaded cells caused cell death without discrimination between nonmalignant and malignant cells. In contrast, extracellular singlet oxygen generation caused apoptosis induction selectively in tumor cells through singlet oxygen-mediated inactivation of tumor cell protective catalase and subsequent reactivation of intercellular ROS-mediated apoptosis signaling through the HOCl and the NO/peroxynitrite signaling pathway. Singlet oxygen generation by extracellular photofrin alone was, however, not sufficient for optimal direct inactivation of catalase, but needed to trigger the generation of cell-derived extracellular singlet oxygen through the interaction between H2O2 and peroxynitrite. Thereby, formation of peroxynitrous acid, generation of hydroxyl radicals and formation of perhydroxyl radicals (HO2(.)) through hydroxyl radical/H2O2 interaction seemed to be required as intermediate steps. This amplificatory mechanism led to the formation of singlet oxygen at a sufficiently high concentration for optimal inactivation of membrane-associated catalase. At low initial concentrations of singlet oxygen, an additional amplification step needed to be activated. It depended on singlet oxygen-dependent activation of the FAS receptor and caspase-8, followed by caspase-8-mediated enhancement of NOX activity. The biochemical mechanisms described here might be considered as promising principle for the development of novel approaches in tumor therapy that specifically direct membrane-associated catalase of tumor cells and thus utilize tumor cell-specific apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling. PMID:26225731

  10. 过氧化氢酶与糖尿病的研究进展%Catalase and diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵瑞娥; 刘丽梅

    2008-01-01

    Catalase(CAT)can decompose hydrogen peroxide(H2O2),a product of peroxide dismuted by superoxide dismutase,into oxygen and water,so as to reduce the generation of toxic reactive hydroxyl radicals and prevent damage and dysfunction of islet β cells.Previous studies have shown that two polymorphisms,C-262T and C1167T,of CAT gene were significantly associated with diabetes mellitus,and that their C alleles were risk factors of type 1 diabetes mellitus.Moreover,other ethnical studies demonstrated that both genetic defects and pelymorphisms of the CAT gene could reduce the activity of CAT,increase the concentration of the H2O2 and therefore aggravate the oxidative stress.These data suggested that genetic variation of CAT may be an important pathophysiological mechanism in the development of diabetes and its complications.%过氧化氢酶(CAT)能迅速将超氧化物歧化酶分解过氧化物产生的过氧化氢(H2O2)转化为氧气和水,从而减少更具氧化活性的羟自由基生成,防止氧化应激造成的胰岛β细胞损伤和功能异常.研究发现,CAT基因的两个多态位点C-262T及C1167T均与糖尿病发生显著相关,其C等位基因均为1型糖尿病发病的危险因子.此外,其他种族研究证实,CAT的遗传学缺陷及其基因多态性均可引起CAT活性下降,使机体H2O2浓度增加,加重氧化应激.提示CAT的遗传变异可能是促进糖尿病及其并发症发生和发展的重要病理生理机制之一.

  11. Hydrogen as an Indicator to Assess Biological Activity During Trace-Metal Bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, P. R.; Komlos, J.; Brown, D. G.; Lovley, D. R.

    2002-05-01

    The design and operation of a trace-metal or radionuclide bioremediation scheme requires that specific redox conditions be achieved at given zones of an aquifer for a predetermined duration. Tools are therefore needed to identify and quantify the terminal electron acceptor processes (TEAPs) that are being achieved during bioremediation in an aquifer, and that this is done at a high spatial resolution. Hydrogen holds the promise of being a key parameter that may be used to identify TEAPs. Theoretical analysis have shown that steady-state hydrogen levels in the subsurface are solely dependent upon the physiological parameters of the hydrogen-consuming microorganisms, and that hydrogen concentrations increase as each successive TEAP yields less energy for bacterial growth. The assumptions for this statement may not hold during a bioremediation scheme in which an organic substrate is injected into the subsurface and where organisms may consume hydrogen and carbon simultaneously. The objective of the research is to gain a basic understanding of the hydrogen dynamics in an aquifer during a trace metal/radionuclide bioremediation scheme. For this purpose, a series of batch studies have been conducted during the first year of this project. In these studies the utilization of acetate and hydrogen by geobacter sulfurreducens were studied. In all cases Fe(III) was the electron acceptor. Microcosms were set up to investigate the utilization of hydrogen and acetate when either of them is the sole electron donor and when both are present and utilized simultaneously as electron donor. These experiments were conducted for varying initial conditions of the hydrogen and acetate concentration, and the disappearance of these compounds plus the evolution of Fe(II) as well as biomass was monitored over time. The results of these studies indicate that the biokinetic coefficients describing the rate of hydrogen utilization are not affected by the simultaneous utilization of acetate. While

  12. STUDIES ON THE STATE OF PALLADIUM AND HYDROGENATION ACTIVITY OF RESIN SUPPORTED PALLADIUM—TIN OXIDE CATALYSTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HuWeibing; ZhangShengming; 等

    1994-01-01

    Sereral Pd-SnO2/D3520 and Pd-PbO/D3520 catalysts with Pd/D3520,SnO2/D3520 and PbO/D3520 catalysts as reference were studied by means of IR and XPS.Interaction between Pd and the second metal or between metal and support was observed.Results show that there is a strong interaction between Pd and the second metal,but there is not an obvious interaction between metal and support.The active constituent is Pd.Hydrogenation activity of the catalysts is altered because of the interaction between Pd and the second metal.The activity of the catalysis for hydrogenation has relation to outer layer valence electron density of Pd.

  13. A Comparative Evaluation of Dried Activated Sludge and Mixed Dried Activated Sudge with Rice Husk silica to Remove Hydrogen Sulfide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mahmoud Mehdinia

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of dried activated sludge (DAS and mixed dried activated sludge with rice husk silica (DAS & RHS for removal of hydrogen sulfide (H2S. Two laboratory-scale filter columns (packed one litter were operated. Both systems were operated under different conditions of two parameters, namely different inlet gas concentrations and different inlet flow rates. The DAS & RHS packed filter showed more than 99.96% removal efficiency (RE with empty bed residence time (EBRT of 45 to 90 s and 300 mg/L inlet concentration of H2S. However, the RE decreased to 96.87% with the EBRT of 30 s. In the same condition, the DAS packed filter showed 99.37% RE. Nonetheless, the RE was shown to have dropped to 82.09% with the EBRT of 30 s. The maximum elimination capacity (EC was obtained in the DAS & RHS packed filter up to 52.32 g/m3h, with the RE of 96.87% and H2S mass loading rate of 54 g/m3h. The maximum EC in the DAS packed filter was obtained up to 44.33 g/m3h with the RE of 82.09% and the H2S mass loading rate of 54 g/m3h. After 53 days of operating time and 54 g/m3h of loading rates, the maximum pressure drop reached to 3.0 and 8.0 (mm H2O for the DAS & RHS packed and DAS packed filters, respectively. Based on the findings of this study, the DAS & RHS could be considered as a more suitable packing material to remove H2S.

  14. Impedance approach to activity of hydrogen evolution reaction on spatially heterogeneous GC electrode surfaces: metal free vs. Ru catalysed case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activities of hydrogen evolution reaction, HER, on two differently modified metal-free GC electrodes and on the same electrodes supplied with ruthenium catalyst, have been studied in H2SO4 electrolyte solution. GC electrodes were gradually modified by electrochemical oxidation/reduction procedure, changing morphology properties and forming spatially heterogeneous surfaces. Ruthenium was deposited on the top of two differently modified GC electrodes in nearly the same specific mass of ∼25 μg cm−2 of active ruthenium, showing almost uniform dispersion of ruthenium particle clusters on less modified electrode and pronounced agglomeration on more modified electrode surface. Results of cyclic voltammetry and polarization experiments, aiding mostly in adjustments of the specific masses of active ruthenium on two GC electrodes and characteristic potential regions of “double-layer” vs. HER responses, were found strongly correlated with electrochemical impedance data. Evaluations of impedance data were done using standard regression procedure based on strictly postulated statistical criteria, in conditions of complex interfacial impedance/frequency functions accounting for: a) spatial surface heterogeneity, b) diffusion controlled hydrogen absorption and c) hydrogen evolution involving hydrogen adsorption. Activities for HER on bare GC electrodes were found much lower than on the corresponding Ru/GC electrodes, but increased with stage of surface modification. At Ru/GC electrodes, HER is proceeding exclusively on ruthenium particles with activity related to the mass of active ruthenium and total ruthenium utilization of ∼25%. Not any effect of the supporting GC electrode morphology has been observed for HER on Ru/GC electrodes

  15. The Nature of Activated Non-classical Hydrogen Bonds: A Case Study on Acetylcholinesterase-Ligand Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Lotta; Mishra, Brijesh Kumar; Andersson, C David; Ekström, Fredrik; Linusson, Anna

    2016-02-01

    Molecular recognition events in biological systems are driven by non-covalent interactions between interacting species. Here, we have studied hydrogen bonds of the CH⋅⋅⋅Y type involving electron-deficient CH donors using dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT) calculations applied to acetylcholinesterase-ligand complexes. The strengths of CH⋅⋅⋅Y interactions activated by a proximal cation were considerably strong; comparable to or greater than those of classical hydrogen bonds. Significant differences in the energetic components compared to classical hydrogen bonds and non-activated CH⋅⋅⋅Y interactions were observed. Comparison between DFT and molecular mechanics calculations showed that common force fields could not reproduce the interaction energy values of the studied hydrogen bonds. The presented results highlight the importance of considering CH⋅⋅⋅Y interactions when analysing protein-ligand complexes, call for a review of current force fields, and opens up possibilities for the development of improved design tools for drug discovery. PMID:26751405

  16. NOx-Catalyzed Gas-Phase Activation of Methane:the Formation of Hydrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chaoxian Xiao; Zhen Yan; Yuan Kou

    2003-01-01

    NOx-catalyzed oxidation of methane without a solid catalyst was investigated, and a hydrogen selectivity of 27% was obtained with an overall methane conversion of 34% and a free O2 concentration of 1.7% at 700 ℃.

  17. The effects of hydrogen bonds on metal-mediated O2 activation and related processes

    OpenAIRE

    Shook, Ryan L.; Borovik, A. S.

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen bonds stabilize and direct chemistry performed by metalloenzymes. With inspiration from enzymes, we will utilize an approach that incorporates intramolecular hydrogen bond donors to determine their effects on the stability and reactivity of metal complexes. Our premise is that control of secondary coordination sphere interactions will promote new function in synthetic metal complexes. Multidentate ligands have been developed that create rigid organic structures around metal ions. The...

  18. SYNTHESIS OF 8-HYDROXYQUINOLINE CHALCONES: TRANS CONFIGURATION, INTRAMOLECULAR HYDROGEN BONDS, BROMINATION, AND ANTIFUNGAL ACTIVITY

    OpenAIRE

    ALONSO J MARRUGO-GONZÁLEZ; VALERIE D ORLOV; ROBERTO FERNANDEZ-MAESTRE

    2012-01-01

    Nine (8-Hydroxyquinolin-5-yl)-arylpropenones were synthesized and their structures demonstrated by IR and NMRspectroscopy. These molecules showed transconfiguration and strong intramolecular hydrogen bonding; in the IR spectra of 5-formyl-8-hydroxyquinoline, 5-acetyl-8-hydroxyquinoline, 1-(8-hydroxyquinolin-5-yl)-3-phenylprop-2-en-1-one and 3-(8-hydroxyquinolin-5-yl)-1-phenylprop-2-en-1-one in CHCl3, besides the known intermolecular hydrogen band (~3180 cm-1), we identified the intramolecular...

  19. The catalase gene differentiates between some strains of Staphylococcus aureus ssp. anaerobius

    OpenAIRE

    Musa, N. O.; Eltom, K.; Gessler, F.; H. Böhnel; Babiker, A.; Sanousi, S. M.

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus ssp anaerobius strain S10 was isolated from an outbreak of sheep abscess disease. Sequence of the catalase gene of this strain showed 99 % identity to the catalase gene (katB) sequence of the reference strain (S. aureus ssp. anaerobius strain MVF213) with mismatching of three base pairs. An important substitution located 1036 nucleotides upstream of the initiation codon from “C” in katB to “T” in the catalase gene of strain S10 originated a stop codon. The de...

  20. Hydrogenation of Olefins Catalyzed by Highly Active Titanocene/NaH or n-BuLi Catalyst Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The effects of the substituents on the cyclopentadienyl ring and the reducing agents on the catalytic activity and the stability of titanocene/NaH or n-BuLi systems for the hydrogenation of olefins were investigated. For the catalyst systems composed of titanocene/NaH or n-BuLi, the nature and the number of the substituents on the cyclopentadienyl ring control the catalytic behavior of those two systems. The effect of the reducing agent on the catalytic activity is relatively small. In addition, the characters of the hydrogenation of various olefins catalyzed respectively by Cp2TiCl2/NaH or n-BuLi systems were compared.

  1. Maize seed coatings and seedling sprayings with chitosan and hydrogen peroxide: their influence on some phenological and biochemical behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Lizárraga-Paulín, Eva-Guadalupe; Miranda-Castro, Susana-Patricia; Moreno-Martínez, Ernesto; Lara-Sagahón, Alma-Virginia; Torres-Pacheco, Irineo

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of chitosan (CH) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) seed coatings and seedling sprinklings on two different maize varieties by measuring their phenology, the H2O2 presence, the catalase (CAT) activity, and the protein quantity. Methods: Seven groups of ten seeds for each maize variety were treated with CH (2% (20 g/L) and 0.2% (2 g/L)) or H2O2 (8 mmol/L) by coating, sprinkling, or both. Germination and seedling growth were measured. One month after germination, the...

  2. Recovery of a catalase-negative Staphylococcus epidermidis strain in blood and urine cultures from a patient with pyelonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallstrom, George; Chang, Tom; Albertson, Marc; Morilla, Daniel; Fisher, Mark A; Eberly, Bardwell

    2011-11-01

    This report describes a 60-year-old patient with bilateral nephrolithiasis. A catalase-negative Staphylococcus epidermidis strain was recovered from both urine and blood cultures. Although rare, isolates of catalase-negative Staphylococcus spp., including Staphylococcus aureus, have been reported. Here, we describe the first report of a catalase-negative S. epidermidis strain. PMID:21900516

  3. Recovery of a Catalase-Negative Staphylococcus epidermidis Strain in Blood and Urine Cultures from a Patient with Pyelonephritis ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallstrom, George; Chang, Tom; Albertson, Marc; Morilla, Daniel; Fisher, Mark A.; Eberly, Bardwell

    2011-01-01

    This report describes a 60-year-old patient with bilateral nephrolithiasis. A catalase-negative Staphylococcus epidermidis strain was recovered from both urine and blood cultures. Although rare, isolates of catalase-negative Staphylococcus spp., including Staphylococcus aureus, have been reported. Here, we describe the first report of a catalase-negative S. epidermidis strain. PMID:21900516

  4. Synergistic hydrogen desorption behavior of magnesium aluminum hydride synthesized by mechano-chemical activation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Mg(AlH4)2 could release 3.1 wt% H2 at initial temperature as low as 100 °C. ► The synergistic and mutual catalytic effects of NaAlH4 and Mg(AlH4)2 were noticed. ► In situ synchrotron XRD confirmed the two-step dehydrogenation process of Mg(AlH4)2. - Abstract: A mechano-chemical activation synthesis (MCAS) is employed to fabricate Mg(AlH4)2 via milling the precursors, specifically NaAlH4 and MgCl2. The corresponding dehydrogenation behavior of the synthesized powders is investigated. The experimental results showed that incomplete synthesis or premature dehydrogenation may occur if the milling process was not properly controlled. The hydrogen content of each synthesized powder is determined by using a thermal gravimetric analyzer (TGA). The dehydrogenation reactions of the synthesized powders are investigated by employing ex situ X-ray diffraction (XRD), in situ synchrotron XRD and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The results showed that the incompletely synthesized powder consisted of residual NaAlH4 in the synthesized Mg(AlH4)2, which demonstrated an initial dehydrogenation temperature as low as 100 °C and accompanied with a maximum amount (3.1 wt%) of H2 released below 350 °C. The mutual catalytic effect of both NaAlH4 and Mg(AlH4)2 on lowering their initial dehydrogenation temperature is confirmed.

  5. Influence of chemical activation of a 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching gel on its penetration and efficacy--in vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Torres, C R G; Wiegand, A.; Sener, B.; Attin, T.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of chemical activation of hydrogen peroxide (HP) gel on colour changes and penetration through the tooth structure. METHODS: One hundred and four bovine incisors were used. One dentine (CD) disc and one enamel-dentine (ED) disc were prepared from each tooth. They were positioned over artificial pulpal chambers and the bleaching was performed with an experimental 35% HP gel. Two control and six experimental groups were prepared. In ...

  6. Preparation of Dendritic Carbosilane-supported Palladium Catalyst and Its Catalytic Activity in Hydrogenation of Organic Compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The preparation of palladium complex from PdCl2·2H2O and earbosilane dendrimers with peripheral aminopropyl groups was described. The compound obtained was characterized by IR, 1H NMR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometric (ICP-AES) spectroscopy respectively. The metal complex was employed as catalyst in hydrogenation of organic compounds. The high activity of the complex was probably due to the formation of the eoordinatively unsaturated palladium.

  7. Gas- and plasma-driven hydrogen permeation through a reduced activation ferritic steel alloy F82H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Haishan, E-mail: zhou.haishan@LHD.nifs.ac.jp [The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Hirooka, Yoshi; Ashikawa, Naoko; Muroga, Takeo; Sagara, Akio [The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    The first wall of a magnetic fusion power reactor will be subjected to hydrogen isotope permeation by the two mechanisms: one is gas-driven and the other is plasma-driven. Hydrogen transport through a reduced activation ferritic steel alloy F82H has been investigated using a steady-state laboratory-scale plasma device. Permeation parameters including permeability, solubility and diffusivity have been measured in the temperature range from 150 to 520 °C. The surface recombination coefficient for hydrogen has also been estimated by a one-dimensional steady-state permeation model with the input data taken from experiments. Using these parameters, the hydrogen plasma-driven permeation flux and inventory for a 0.5 cm thick first wall around 500 °C are estimated to be ∼1.0 × 10{sup 13} atom cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} and ∼2 × 10{sup 16} atom cm{sup −3}, respectively. Also, the implications of all these data on reactor operation are discussed.

  8. Hydrogen Storage in Pristine and d10-Block Metal-Anchored Activated Carbon Made from Local Wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed F. Aly Aboud

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbon has been synthesized from local palm shell, cardboard and plastics municipal waste in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. It exhibits a surface area of 930 m2/g and total pore volume of 0.42 cm3/g. This pristine activated carbon has been further anchored with nickel, palladium and platinum metal particles by ultrasound-assisted impregnation. Deposition of nanosized Pt particles as small as 3 nm has been achieved, while for Ni and Pd their size reaches 100 nm. The solid-gas hydrogenation properties of the pristine and metal-anchored activated carbon have been determined. The pristine material exhibits a reversible hydrogen storage capacity of 2.3 wt% at 77 K and 3 MPa which is higher than for the doped ones. In these materials, the spillover effect due to metal doping is of minor importance in enhancing the hydrogen uptake compared with the counter-effect of the additional mass of the metal particles and pore blocking on the carbon surface.

  9. Characterization of OxyR as a negative transcriptional regulator that represses catalase production in Corynebacterium diphtheriae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ju-Sim; Holmes, Randall K

    2012-01-01

    Corynebacterium diphtheriae and Corynebacterium glutamicum each have one gene (cat) encoding catalase. In-frame Δcat mutants of C. diphtheriae and C. glutamicum were hyper-sensitive to growth inhibition and killing by H(2)O(2). In C. diphtheriae C7(β), both catalase activity and cat transcription decreased ~2-fold during transition from exponential growth to early stationary phase. Prototypic OxyR in Escherichia coli senses oxidative stress and it activates katG transcription and catalase production in response to H(2)O(2). In contrast, exposure of C. diphtheriae C7(β) to H(2)O(2) did not stimulate transcription of cat. OxyR from C. diphtheriae and C. glutamicum have 52% similarity with E. coli OxyR and contain homologs of the two cysteine residues involved in H(2)O(2) sensing by E. coli OxyR. In-frame ΔoxyR deletion mutants of C. diphtheriae C7(β), C. diphtheriae NCTC13129, and C. glutamicum were much more resistant than their parental wild type strains to growth inhibition by H(2)O(2). In the C. diphtheriae C7(β) ΔoxyR mutant, cat transcripts were about 8-fold more abundant and catalase activity was about 20-fold greater than in the C7(β) wild type strain. The oxyR gene from C. diphtheriae or C. glutamicum, but not from E. coli, complemented the defect in ΔoxyR mutants of C. diphtheriae and C. glutamicum and decreased their H(2)O(2) resistance to the level of their parental strains. Gel-mobility shift, DNaseI footprint, and primer extension assays showed that purified OxyR from C. diphtheriae C7(β) bound, in the presence or absence of DTT, to a sequence in the cat promoter region that extends from nucleotide position -55 to -10 with respect to the +1 nucleotide in the cat ORF. These results demonstrate that OxyR from C. diphtheriae or C. glutamicum functions as a transcriptional repressor of the cat gene by a mechanism that is independent of oxidative stress induced by H(2)O(2). PMID:22438866

  10. Characterization of OxyR as a negative transcriptional regulator that represses catalase production in Corynebacterium diphtheriae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Sim Kim

    Full Text Available Corynebacterium diphtheriae and Corynebacterium glutamicum each have one gene (cat encoding catalase. In-frame Δcat mutants of C. diphtheriae and C. glutamicum were hyper-sensitive to growth inhibition and killing by H(2O(2. In C. diphtheriae C7(β, both catalase activity and cat transcription decreased ~2-fold during transition from exponential growth to early stationary phase. Prototypic OxyR in Escherichia coli senses oxidative stress and it activates katG transcription and catalase production in response to H(2O(2. In contrast, exposure of C. diphtheriae C7(β to H(2O(2 did not stimulate transcription of cat. OxyR from C. diphtheriae and C. glutamicum have 52% similarity with E. coli OxyR and contain homologs of the two cysteine residues involved in H(2O(2 sensing by E. coli OxyR. In-frame ΔoxyR deletion mutants of C. diphtheriae C7(β, C. diphtheriae NCTC13129, and C. glutamicum were much more resistant than their parental wild type strains to growth inhibition by H(2O(2. In the C. diphtheriae C7(β ΔoxyR mutant, cat transcripts were about 8-fold more abundant and catalase activity was about 20-fold greater than in the C7(β wild type strain. The oxyR gene from C. diphtheriae or C. glutamicum, but not from E. coli, complemented the defect in ΔoxyR mutants of C. diphtheriae and C. glutamicum and decreased their H(2O(2 resistance to the level of their parental strains. Gel-mobility shift, DNaseI footprint, and primer extension assays showed that purified OxyR from C. diphtheriae C7(β bound, in the presence or absence of DTT, to a sequence in the cat promoter region that extends from nucleotide position -55 to -10 with respect to the +1 nucleotide in the cat ORF. These results demonstrate that OxyR from C. diphtheriae or C. glutamicum functions as a transcriptional repressor of the cat gene by a mechanism that is independent of oxidative stress induced by H(2O(2.

  11. Antioxidant activities of nano-bubble hydrogen-dissolved water assessed by ESR and 2,2′-bipyridyl methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Shinya [Laboratory of Cell-Death Control BioTechnology, Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences, Prefectural University of Hiroshima, Nanatsuka 562, Shobara, Hiroshima 727-0023 (Japan); Radio Isotope Facilities for Medical Science, Life Science Research Center, Mie University, Edobashi 2-174, Tsu, Mie 514-8507 (Japan); Matsuoka, Daigo [− 600 mV Co., Ltd. Matsuhama-cho 2-4-1, Fukuyama, Hiroshima 720-0802 (Japan); Miwa, Nobuhiko, E-mail: miwa@butsuryo.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cell-Death Control BioTechnology, Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences, Prefectural University of Hiroshima, Nanatsuka 562, Shobara, Hiroshima 727-0023 (Japan); Department of Radiological Technology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Butsuryo College of Osaka, Otorikitamachi 3-33, Nishi-ku, Sakai, Osaka 593-8328 (Japan)

    2015-08-01

    We prepared nano-bubble hydrogen-dissolved water (nano-H water) which contained hydrogen nano-bubbles of < 717-nm diameter for 54% of total bubbles. In the DMPO-spin trap electron spin resonance (ESR) method, the DMPO-OH:MnO ratio, being attributed to amounts of hydroxyl radicals (·OH), was 2.78 for pure water (dissolved hydrogen [DH] ≤ 0.01 ppm, oxidation-reduction potential [ORP] = + 324 mV), 2.73 for tap water (0.01 ppm, + 286 mV), 2.93 for commercially available hydrogen water (0.075 ppm, + 49 mV), and 2.66 for manufactured hydrogen water (0.788 ppm, − 614 mV), whereas the nano-H water (0.678 ppm, − 644 mV) exhibited 2.05, showing the superiority of nano-H water to other types of hydrogen water in terms of ·OH-scavenging activity. Then, the reduction activity of nano-H water was assessed spectrophotometrically by the 2,2′-bipyridyl method. Differential absorbance at 530 nm was in the order: 0.018 for pure water, 0.055 for tap water, 0.079 for nano-H water, 0.085 for commercially available hydrogen water, and 0.090 for manufactured hydrogen water, indicating a prominent reduction activity of hydrogen water and nano-H water against oxidation in ascorbate-coupled ferric ion–bipyridyl reaction. Thus, nano-H water has an improved antioxidant activity as compared to hydrogen water of similar DH-level, indicating the more marked importance of nano-bubbles rather than the concentration of hydrogen in terms of ·OH-scavenging. - Highlights: • We assessed the antioxidant activity of nano-bubble hydrogen-dissolved water (nano-H water). • Nano-H water exhibited superior ·OH-scavenging activity in DMPO-spin trap ESR. • A reduction ability of nano-H water was shown in 2,2′-bipyridyl reaction. • Nano-H water has an improved antioxidant activity as compared to hydrogen water of similar DH-level. • Results indicated the importance of nano-bubbles rather than the concentration of hydrogen.

  12. Dendritic Tip-on Polytriazine-Based Carbon Nitride Photocatalyst with High Hydrogen Evolution Activity

    KAUST Repository

    Bhunia, Manas Kumar

    2015-11-23

    Developing stable, ubiquitous and efficient water-splitting photocatalyst material that has extensive absorption in the visible-light range is desired for a sustainable solar energy-conversion device. We herein report a triazine-based carbon nitride (CN) material with different C/N ratios achieved by varying the monomer composition ratio between melamine (Mel) and 2,4,6-triaminopyrimidine (TAP). The CN material with a different C/N ratio was obtained through a two-step synthesis protocol: starting with the solution state dispersion of the monomers via hydrogen-bonding supramolecular aggregate, followed by a salt-melt high temperature polycondensation. This protocol ensures the production of a highly crystalline polytriazine imide (PTI) structure con-sisting of a copolymerized Mel-TAP network. The observed bandgap narrowing with an increasing TAP/Mel ratio is well simulated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations, revealing a positive shift in the valence band upon substitution of N with CH in the aromatic rings. Increasing the TAP amount could not maintain the crystalline PTI structure, consistent with DFT calculation showing the repulsion associated with additional C-H introduced in the aromatic rings. Due to the high exciton binding energy calculated by DFT for the obtained CN, the cocatalyst must be close to any portion of the material to assist the separation of excit-ed charge carriers for an improved photocatalytic performance. The photocatalytic activity was improved by providing a dendritic tip-on-like shape grown on a porous fibrous silica KCC-1 spheres, and highly dispersed Pt nanoparticles (<5 nm) were photodepos-ited to introduce heterojunction. As a result, the Pt/CN/KCC-1 photocatalyst exhibited an apparent quantum efficiency (AQE) as high as 22.1 ± 3% at 400 nm and the silica was also beneficial for improving photocatalytic stability. The results obtained by time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy measurements were consistent with

  13. Hydrogen peroxide induces activation of insulin signaling pathway via AMP-dependent kinase in podocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piwkowska, Agnieszka, E-mail: apiwkowska@cmdik.pan.pl [Mossakowski Medical Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Nephrology, Gdansk (Poland); Rogacka, Dorota; Angielski, Stefan [Mossakowski Medical Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Nephrology, Gdansk (Poland); Jankowski, Maciej [Mossakowski Medical Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Nephrology, Gdansk (Poland); Medical University of Gdansk, Department of Therapy Monitoring and Pharmacogenetics (Poland)

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} activates the insulin signaling pathway and glucose uptake in podocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} induces time-dependent changes in AMPK phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} enhances insulin signaling pathways via AMPK activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stimulation of glucose uptake is AMPK-dependent. -- Abstract: Podocytes are cells that form the glomerular filtration barrier in the kidney. Insulin signaling in podocytes is critical for normal kidney function. Insulin signaling is regulated by oxidative stress and intracellular energy levels. We cultured rat podocytes to investigate the effects of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) on the phosphorylation of proximal and distal elements of insulin signaling. We also investigated H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced intracellular changes in the distribution of protein kinase B (Akt). Western blots showed that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (100 {mu}M) induced rapid, transient phosphorylation of the insulin receptor (IR), the IR substrate-1 (IRS1), and Akt with peak activities at 5 min ({Delta} 183%, P < 0.05), 3 min ({Delta} 414%, P < 0.05), and 10 min ({Delta} 35%, P < 0.05), respectively. Immunostaining cells with an Akt-specific antibody showed increased intensity at the plasma membrane after treatment with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}>. Furthermore, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} inhibited phosphorylation of the phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN; peak activity at 10 min; {Delta} -32%, P < 0.05) and stimulated phosphorylation of the AMP-dependent kinase alpha subunit (AMPK{alpha}; 78% at 3 min and 244% at 10 min). The stimulation of AMPK was abolished with an AMPK inhibitor, Compound C (100 {mu}M, 2 h). Moreover, Compound C significantly reduced the effect of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on IR phosphorylation by about 40% (from 2.07 {+-} 0.28 to 1.28 {+-} 0.12, P < 0.05). In addition, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} increased glucose uptake in podocytes

  14. Inoculum pre-treatment affects the fermentative activity of hydrogen-producing communities in the presence of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellucci, Micol; Botticella, Giuseppe; Francavilla, Matteo; Beneduce, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    To enhance the productivity of mixed microbial cultures for fermentative bio-hydrogen production, chemical-physical pre-treatments of the original seed are needed to suppress the activity of hydrogen (H2)-consuming microbes. This approach might influence negatively the composition and diversity of the hydrogen-producing community with consequences on the functional stability of the H2-producing systems in case of perturbations. In this study, we aimed at investigating the effect of different types of pre-treatment on the performance of hydrogen production systems in the presence of an inhibitor, such as 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF). The efficiency and the microbial community structure of batch reactors amended with HMF and inoculated with non-pretreated and pretreated (acid, heat shock, and aeration) anaerobic sludge were evaluated and compared with control systems. The type of pre-treatments influenced the microbial community assembly and activity in inhibited systems, with significant effect on the performance. Cumulative H2 production tests showed that the pre-aerated systems (control and HMF inhibited) were the most efficient, while the difference of the lag phase of the pre-acidified control and HMF-added test was negligible. Analyses of the structure of the enriched microbial community in the systems through PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) followed by band sequencing revealed that the differences in performance were mostly related to shifts in the metabolic pathways rather than in the predominant species. In conclusion, the findings suggest that the use of specific inoculum pre-treatment could contribute to regulate the metabolic activity of the fermentative H2-producing bacteria in order to enhance the bio-energy production. PMID:26428244

  15. Action of ionizing radiation on catalase synthesis in the rat liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    3-amino-1,2,4-triazole was used to study the effect of total-body X-ray irradiation on the rates of catalase synthesis and breakdown in rat liver. It was found that in the interval between hour 22 and hour 144 of radiation sickness, the average rate of catalase synthesis in the liver was 2.6 times lower in rats that received a dose of 800 rads than in control rats

  16. katGI and katGII encode two different catalases-peroxidases in Mycobacterium fortuitum.

    OpenAIRE

    Menéndez, M C; Ainsa, J A; Martín, C.; García, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    It has been suggested that catalase-peroxidase plays an important role in several aspects of mycobacterial metabolism and is a virulence factor in the main pathogenic mycobacteria. In this investigation, we studied genes encoding for this protein in the fast-growing opportunistic pathogen Mycobacterium fortuitum. Nucleotide sequences of two different catalase-peroxidase genes (katGI and katGII) of M. fortuitum are described. They show only 64% homology at the nucleotide level and 55% identity...

  17. Peroxisomal Catalase in the Methylotrophic Yeast Candida boidinii: Transport Efficiency and Metabolic Significance

    OpenAIRE

    Horiguchi, Hirofumi; Yurimoto, Hiroya; Goh, Toh-Kheng; Nakagawa, Tomoyuki; Kato, Nobuo; Sakai, Yasuyoshi

    2001-01-01

    In this study we cloned CTA1, the gene encoding peroxisomal catalase, from the methylotrophic yeast Candida boidinii and studied targeting of the gene product, Cta1p, into peroxisomes by using green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion proteins. A strain from which CTA1 was deleted (cta1Δ strain) showed marked growth inhibition when it was grown on the peroxisome-inducing carbon sources methanol, oleate, and d-alanine, indicating that peroxisomal catalase plays an important nonspecific role in pe...

  18. Posttranscriptional Control Mediates Cell Type-Specific Localization of Catalase A during Aspergillus nidulans Development

    OpenAIRE

    Navarro, Rosa E.; Aguirre, Jesús

    1998-01-01

    Two differentially regulated catalase genes have been identified in the fungus Aspergillus nidulans. The catA gene belongs to a class whose transcripts are specifically induced during asexual sporulation (conidiation) and encodes a catalase accumulated in conidia. Using a developmental mutant affected in the brlA gene, which is unable to form conidia but capable of producing sexual spores (ascospores), we demonstrated that the catA mRNA accumulated during induction of conidiation but did not ...

  19. Enhanced hydrogen production from waste activated sludge by cascade utilization of organic matter in microbial electrolysis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lu; Xing, Defeng; Liu, Bingfeng; Ren, Nanqi

    2012-03-15

    Fermentative hydrogen production from waste activated sludge (WAS) has low H2 yield because WAS contains limited amounts of carbohydrate suitable for use by hydrogen-producing bacteria. Here, augmentation of hydrogen production from WAS by microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) was implemented. H2 yields of 3.89±0.39 mg-H2/g-DS (5.67±0.61 mg-H2/g-VSS) from raw WAS and 6.78±0.94 mg-H2/g-DS (15.08±1.41 mg-H2/g-VSS) from alkaline-pretreated WAS were obtained in the two-chamber MECs (TMECs). This was several times higher than yields obtained previously by fermentation. Single-chamber MECs (SMECs) with low internal resistance showed a H2 production rate that 13 times that of TMECs with similar H2 yield when alkaline-pretreated WAS was used. However, methanogenesis was detected after several batch cycles. A yield balance calculation revealed that carbohydrates were not the only substrates for electrohydrogenesis. Protein and its acidification products, such as volatile fatty acids are also responsible for a portion of H2 generation in MEC. Characterization of WAS in TMECs by three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy with parallel factor analysis indicated that electrohydrogenesis reacted on the extracellular polymeric substances and intracellular substances of WAS. Cascade utilization of organic matter in MECs increased hydrogen production from WAS. MECs showed high hydrogen yield from WAS, fewer H2 sinks, and insensitivity to temperature. Optimizing MEC configurations and operation conditions and improving the pretreatment processes of WAS are necessary before practical application can take place on a large scale. PMID:22197264

  20. Cloning of catalase and expression patterns of catalase and selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase fromExopalaemon carinicauda in response to low salinity stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Hai; LI Jian; LI Jitao; YING Yu; GE Hongxing; LI Dongli; YU Tianji

    2015-01-01

    Catalase (CAT) and selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase (Se-GPx) play a vital role in protecting organisms against various oxidative stresses by eliminating H2O2. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the roles of these antioxidant molecules in the ridgetail white prawnExopalaemon carinicauda in response to low salinity stress. A complementary DNA (cDNA) containing the complete coding sequence of CAT was cloned from the hepatopancreas using reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The full-length cDNA of CAT (2 649 bp) contains a 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of 78 bp, a 3'- UTR of 1 017 bp, with a poly (A) tail, and an open reading frame of 1 554 bp encoding a 517-amino-acid polypeptide with predicted molecular mass of 58.46 kDa and estimated isoelectric point of 6.64. This CAT sequence contained the proximal active site signature (60FDRERIPERVVHAKGAG76), proximal heme-ligand signature sequence (350RLFSYPDTH358) and three catalytic amino acid residues (His71, Asn144 and Tyr354). Sequence comparison showed that the CAT deduced amino acid sequence ofE.carinicauda shared 68%-92% of identities with those of other species. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that CAT mRNA was widely expressed in the hepatopancreas (highest), hemocyte, eyestalk, heart, gill, muscle, ovary and stomach. Under low salinity stress, CAT and GPx mRNA expression levels both in the gill and hepatopancreas increased significantly at the first 48 h and 6 h respectively, indicating a tissue- and time-dependent antioxidant response inE.carinicauda. All these results indicate thatE.carinicauda CAT is a member of the CAT family and might be involved in the acute response against low salinity stress.

  1. Dye-sensitized photocatalytic hydrogen production: distinct activity in a glucose derivative of a phenothiazine dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredi, N; Cecconi, B; Calabrese, V; Minotti, A; Peri, F; Ruffo, R; Monai, M; Romero-Ocaña, I; Montini, T; Fornasiero, P; Abbotto, A

    2016-05-19

    A thiophene-based donor-acceptor phenothiazine dye has been functionalized with a peripheral glucose unit (PTZ-GLU) to bust its affinity to water and enhance dye-sensitized photogeneration of hydrogen. Compared to the corresponding alkyl derivative (PTZ-ALK), as well as the common hydrophilic triethylene glycol substitution (PTZ-TEG), the sugar derivative shows a lower contact angle; PTZ-GLU performed twice more efficient than PTZ-TEG in the photogeneration of hydrogen in terms of evolved gas and turnover number. PMID:27063187

  2. Sol–gel synthesis of palladium nanoparticles supported on reduced graphene oxide: an active electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fereshteh Chekin

    2015-08-01

    In this work, the synthesis and characterization of palladium nanoparticle-reduced graphene oxide hybrid (Pd–rGO) material is reported. Techniques of X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray, FT-IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and cyclic voltammetry were used to characterize the structure and properties of the Pd–rGO. Results demonstrate the effect of Pd on the reduced GO. The average particle size of the Pd nanoparticles supported on rGO obtained from TEM is about 12–18 nm. Moreover, glassy carbon electrode (GCE) modified with palladium nanoparticle–graphene oxide hybrid (Pd–rGO/GCE) was prepared by casting of the Pd–rGO solution on GCE. The electrochemical and catalytic activity of the Pd–rGO/GCE was studied in 0.1 M H2SO4 solution. The Pd–rGO/GCE electrode exhibited remarkable electrocatalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). At potential more negative than −0.4 V vs. Ag|AgCl|KCl3M, the current is mainly due to hydrogen evolution reaction. Finally, the kinetic parameters of hydrogen evolution reaction are also discussed on the Pd–rGO/GCE.

  3. Catalytic De/hydrogenation in Mg by co-doped Ni and VO{sub x} on active carbon: extremely fast kinetics at low temperatures and high hydrogen capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Yi; Cheng, Lina [ARC Centre of Excellence for Functional Nanomaterials, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Pan, Nan [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China); Zou, Jin [School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Lu, Gaoqing (Max) [ARC Centre of Excellence for Functional Nanomaterials, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Yao, Xiangdong [ARC Centre of Excellence for Functional Nanomaterials, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Queensland Micro- and Nanotechnology Centre (QMNC), Griffith University, Brisbane (Australia)

    2011-05-15

    A multi-component catalyst Ni-VO{sub x}/AC (VO{sub x} is comprised of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} and VO{sub 2}, x = 2.18) was synthesized by a wet impregnation method. The synthesized Ni-VO{sub x}/AC shows a superior catalytic effect on de/hydrogenation of Mg. The MgH{sub 2}+Ni-VO{sub x}/AC composites can absorb 6.2 wt.-% hydrogen within only 1 min at 150 C under a hydrogen pressure of 2 MPa and desorb 6.5 wt.-% hydrogen within 10 min at 300 C under an initial hydrogen pressure of 1 KPa, which overcomes a critical barrier for practical use of Mg as a hydrogen storage material. A significant decrease of activation energy (E{sub a}) indicates that Ni-VO{sub x}/AC catalyst is highly efficient for Mg de/hydrogenation, which may be ascribed to the synergistic effect of bimetals (metal oxides) and nanocarbon. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Simultaneous and sequential co-immobilization of glucose oxidase and catalase onto florisil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozyilmaz, Gul; Tukel, S Seyhan

    2007-06-01

    The co-immobilization of Aspergillus niger glucose oxidase (GOD) with bovine liver catalase (CAT) onto florisil (magnesium silicate-based porous carrier) was investigated to improve the catalytic efficiency of GOD against H2O2 inactivation. The effect of the amount of bound CAT on the GOD activity was also studied for 12 different initial combinations of GOD and CAT, using simultaneous and sequential coupling. The sequentially co-immobilized GOD-CAT showed a higher efficiency than the simultaneously co-immobilized GOD-CAT in terms of the GOD activity and economic costs. The highest activity was shown by the sequentially co-immobilized GOD-CAT when the initial amounts of GOD and CAT were 10 mg and 5 mg per gram of carrier. The optimum pH, buffer concentration, and temperature for GOD activity for the same co-immobilized GOD-CAT sample were then determined as pH 6.5, 50 mM, and 30 degrees C, respectively. When compared with the individually immobilized GOD, the catalytic activity of the co-immobilized GOD-CAT was 70% higher, plus the reusability was more than two-fold. The storage stability of the co-immobilized GOD-CAT was also found to be higher than that of the free form at both 5 degrees C and 25 degrees C. The increased GOD activity and reusability resulting from the co-immobilization process may have been due to CAT protecting GOD from inactivation by H2O2 and supplying additional O2 to the reaction system. PMID:18050914

  5. Semimetallic MoP2: an active and stable hydrogen evolution electrocatalyst over the whole pH range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Zonghua; Saana Amiinu, Ibrahim; Wang, Min; Yang, Yushi; Mu, Shichun

    2016-04-01

    Developing efficient non-precious metal hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) electrocatalysts is a great challenge for sustainable hydrogen production from water. In this communication, for the first time, semimetallic MoP2 nanoparticle films on a metal Mo plate (MoP2 NPs/Mo) are fabricated through a facile two-step strategy. When used as a binder-free hydrogen evolution cathode, the as-prepared MoP2 NPs/Mo electrode exhibits superior HER catalytic activity at all pH values. At a current density of 10 mA cm-2, the catalyst displays overpotentials of 143, 211 and 194 mV in 0.5 M H2SO4, 1.0 M phosphate buffer solution and 1.0 M KOH, respectively. Furthermore, it exhibits excellent stability over a wide pH range. Thus, this in situ route opens up a new avenue for the fabrication of highly efficient, cost-effective and binder-free non-precious catalysts for water splitting and other electrochemical devices.Developing efficient non-precious metal hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) electrocatalysts is a great challenge for sustainable hydrogen production from water. In this communication, for the first time, semimetallic MoP2 nanoparticle films on a metal Mo plate (MoP2 NPs/Mo) are fabricated through a facile two-step strategy. When used as a binder-free hydrogen evolution cathode, the as-prepared MoP2 NPs/Mo electrode exhibits superior HER catalytic activity at all pH values. At a current density of 10 mA cm-2, the catalyst displays overpotentials of 143, 211 and 194 mV in 0.5 M H2SO4, 1.0 M phosphate buffer solution and 1.0 M KOH, respectively. Furthermore, it exhibits excellent stability over a wide pH range. Thus, this in situ route opens up a new avenue for the fabrication of highly efficient, cost-effective and binder-free non-precious catalysts for water splitting and other electrochemical devices. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental section and figures. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00820h

  6. Effects of various hydrogenated treatments on formation and photocatalytic activity of black TiO2 nanowire arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chih-Chieh; Chou, Po-Hsun

    2016-08-01

    The effects of hydrogen thermal and plasma treatment on the formation and photocatalytic activities of black TiO2 nanowire arrays were investigated and discussed. After either the hydrogen thermal or plasma treatment, the TiO2 nanowires remained. However, in contrast to the plasma treated nanowires, the diameter of the thermal treated TiO2 nanowires reduced more significantly, which was attributed to a thicker surface amorphous layer and more oxygen vacancies. A higher photoresponse in both UV and visible light regions and more hydroxide groups were also observed for the thermal treated nanowires. In addition, the black nanowires possessed greater carrier concentration, leading to a more efficient separation of electron–hole pairs. As a consequence, much enhanced photoelectrochemical water splitting and photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue were obtained.

  7. Cryo-adsorptive hydrogen storage on activated carbon. II: Investigation of the thermal effects during filling at cryogenic temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paggiaro, R.; Polifke, W. [Lehrstuhl fuer Thermodynamik, Boltzmannstr. 15, TU Muenchen, D-85747 Garching (Germany); Michl, F. [FutureCarbon GmbH, Bayreuth (Germany); Benard, P. [Institut de recherche sur l' hydrogene, Universite du Quebec, C.P. 500, Trois-Rivieres, Quebec, G9A 5H7 (Canada)

    2010-01-15

    This paper presents an investigation of the thermal effects during high pressure filling of a cryo-adsorptive hydrogen storage tank. The adsorbent is powdered activated carbon. A two-dimensional model is formulated, which describes hydrodynamics, heat transfer and adsorption phenomena in cylindrical tanks. Experiments with a tank containing about 10 kg of adsorbent were carried out to parameterize and validate the model. Good agreement between experiments and simulations could be obtained. Numerical results are then presented concerning filling processes. Two cooling concepts are investigated: a LN{sub 2} cooling jacket and a recirculation system which uses the hydrogen itself as the cooling fluid. The results show that short filling times can only be achieved with the recirculation system. (author)

  8. Mechanistic Switching by Hydronium Ion Activity for Hydrogen Evolution and Oxidation over Polycrystalline Platinum Disk and Platinum/Carbon Electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Shinagawa, Tatsuya

    2014-07-22

    Fundamental electrochemical reactions, namely the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR), are re-evaluated under various pH conditions over polycrystalline Pt disk electrodes and Pt/C electrodes to investigate the overpotential and Tafel relations. Kinetic trends are observed and can be classified into three pH regions: acidic (1-5), neutral (5-9), and alkaline (9-13). Under neutral conditions, in which H2O becomes the primary reactant, substantial overpotential, which is not affected by pH and the supporting electrolyte type, is required for electrocatalysis in both directions. This ion independence, including pH, suggests that HER/HOR performance under neutral conditions solely reflects the intrinsic electrocatalytic activity of Pt in the rate determining steps, which involve electron transfer with water molecules. A global picture of the HER/HOR, resulting from mechanistic switching accompanied by change in pH, is detailed.

  9. Substrate-mediated enhanced activity of Ru nanoparticles in catalytic hydrogenation of benzene

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Xin

    2012-01-01

    The impact of carbon substrate-Ru nanoparticle interactions on benzene and hydrogen adsorption that is directly related to the performance in catalytic hydrogenation of benzene has been investigated by first-principles based calculations. The stability of Ru 13 nanoparticles is enhanced by the defective graphene substrate due to the hybridization between the dsp states of the Ru 13 particle with the sp 2 dangling bonds at the defect sites. The local curvature formed at the interface will also raise the Ru atomic diffusion barrier, and prohibit the particle sintering. The strong interfacial interaction results in the shift of averaged d-band center of the deposited Ru nanoparticle, from -1.41 eV for a freestanding Ru 13 particle, to -1.17 eV for the Ru/Graphene composites, and to -1.54 eV on mesocellular foam carbon. Accordingly, the adsorption energies of benzene are increased from -2.53 eV for the Ru/mesocellular foam carbon composites, to -2.62 eV on freestanding Ru 13 particles, to -2.74 eV on Ru/graphene composites. A similar change in hydrogen adsorption is also observed, and all these can be correlated to the shift of the d-band center of the nanoparticle. Thus, Ru nanoparticles graphene composites are expected to exhibit both high stability and superior catalytic performance in hydrogenation of arenes. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  10. Effects of Saponin from Solanum anguivi Lam. Fruit on Heart and Kidney Superoxide Dismutase, Catalase and Malondialdehyde in Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.O. Elekofehinti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS are generated via normal metabolic processes or as the products of exogenous insults. They are capable of damaging essential biomolecules and accelerating cancer, cardiovascular diseases and neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, the effect saponin from Solanum anguivi (SAS fruits on Superoxide Dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT and Lipid Peroxidation (LPO in the homogenates of the hearts and kidney was evaluated. Thirty six male Wister rats of average weight125±12 g were divided into six groups of six animals each. Five treated groups received a daily dose of saponin at 20 40 60 80 and 100 mg/kg, respectively, while distilled water was administered to the control group for 3 weeks. Solanum anguivi saponin significantly increased (p<0.05 both catalase and SOD activities in the heart, There was also corresponding increase in activities of both enzymes in the kidney but was not significant. MDA concentration was reduced significantly (p<0.05 in both tissues. SAS exhibit both antioxidant and antiperoxidative properties. Saponin from Solanum anguivi could therefore be employed as sources of natural antioxidant boosters and for the treatment of some oxidative stress disorders in which free radicals are implicated.

  11. Hydrogen-Rich Water Intake Accelerates Oral Palatal Wound Healing via Activation of the Nrf2/Antioxidant Defense Pathways in a Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaki, Naofumi; Orihuela-Campos, Rita Cristina; Fukui, Makoto; Ito, Hiro-O

    2016-01-01

    The wound healing process attempts to restore the integrity and function of the injured tissue. Additionally, proinflammatory cytokines, growth factors, and oxidative stress play important roles in wound healing. The aim of this study was to determine whether hydrogen-rich water intake induces the activation of the Nrf2/antioxidant defense pathway in rat palatal tissue, thereby reducing systemic oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokine levels and promoting healing-associated genes. A circular excisional wound was created in the oral palatal region, and the wound healing process was observed. The rats were divided into two experimental groups in which either hydrogen-rich water or distilled water was consumed. In the drinking hydrogen-rich water, the palatal wound healing process was accelerated compared to that in the control group. As molecular hydrogen upregulated the Nrf2 pathway, systemic oxidative stresses were decreased by the activation of antioxidant activity. Furthermore, hydrogen-rich water intake reduced proinflammatory cytokine levels and promoted the expression of healing-associated factors in rat palatal tissue. In conclusion, hydrogen-rich water intake exhibited multiple beneficial effects through activation of the Nrf2/antioxidant defense pathway. The results of this study support the hypothesis that oral administration of hydrogen-rich water benefits the wound healing process by decreasing oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. PMID:26798423

  12. Evaluation of anti-apoptotic activity of different dietary antioxidants in renal cell carcinoma against hydrogen peroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Garg Neeraj K; Mangal Sharad; Sahu Tejram; Mehta Abhinav; Vyas Suresh P; Tyagi Rajeev K

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the anti-apoptotic and radical scavenging activities of dietary phenolics, namely ascorbic acid, -tocopherol acetate, citric acid, salicylic acid, and estimate H2O2-induced apoptosis in renal cell carcinoma cells. Methods: The intracellular antioxidant potency of antioxidants was investigated. H2O2-induced apoptosis in RCC-26 was assayed with the following parameters: cell viability (% apoptosis), nucleosomal damage and DNA fragmentation, bcl-2 levels and flow cytometery analysis (ROS production evaluation). Results: The anticancer properties of antioxidants such as ascorbic acid, - tocopherol acetate, citric acid, salicylic acid with perdurable responses were investigated. It was observed that these antioxidants had protective effect (anti-apoptotic activity) against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in renal cell carcinoma (RCC-26) cell line. Conclusions: This study reveals and proves the anticancer properties. However, in cancer cell lines anti-apoptotic activity can indirectly reflect the cancer promoter activity through radicals scavenging, and significantly protect nucleus and bcl-2.

  13. Understanding the Adsorption Interface of Polyelectrolyte Coating on Redox Active Nanoparticles Using Soft Particle Electrokinetics and Its Biological Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The application of cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs) for therapeutic purposes requires a stable dispersion of nanoparticles in a biological environment. The objective of this study is to tailor the properties of polyelectrolyte coated CNPs as a function of molecular weight to achieve a stable and catalytic active dispersion. The coating of CNPs with polyacrylic acid (PAA) has increased the dispersion stability of CNPs and enhanced the catalytic ability. The stability of PAA coating was analyzed using the change in the Gibbs free energy computed by the Langmuir adsorption model. The adsorption isotherms were determined using soft particle electrokinetics which overcomes the challenges presented by other techniques. The change in Gibbs free energy was highest for CNPs coated with PAA of 250 kg/mol indicating the most stable coating. The change in free energy for PAA of 100 kg/mol coated CNPs was 85% lower than the PAA of 250 kg/mol coated CNPs. This significant difference is caused by the strong adsorption of PAA of 100 kg/mol on CNPs. Catalytic activity of PAA-CNPs is assessed by the catalase enzymatic mimetic activity of nanoparticles. The catalase activity was higher for PAA coated CNPs as compared to bare CNPs which indicated preferential adsorption of hydrogen peroxide induced by coating. This indicates that the catalase activity is also affected by the structure of the coating layer. PMID:24673655

  14. Activated carbon/Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticle composite: fabrication, methyl orange removal and regeneration by hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Manh Huy; Phan, Ngoc Hoa; Nguyen, Thi Dung; Pham, Thi Thu Suong; Nguyen, Van Khoa; Vu, Thi Thuy Trang; Nguyen, Thi Kim Phuong

    2011-11-01

    In the water treatment field, activated carbons (ACs) have wide applications in adsorptions. However, the applications are limited by difficulties encountered in separation and regeneration processes. Here, activated carbon/Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticle composites, which combine the adsorption features of powdered activated carbon (PAC) with the magnetic and excellent catalytic properties of Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles, were fabricated by a modified impregnation method using HNO(3) as the carbon modifying agent. The obtained composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption isotherms and vibrating sample magnetometer. Their performance for methyl orange (MO) removal by adsorption was evaluated. The regeneration of the composite and PAC-HNO(3) (powdered activated carbon modified by HNO(3)) adsorbed MO by hydrogen peroxide was investigated. The composites had a high specific surface area and porosity and a superparamagnetic property that shows they can be manipulated by an external magnetic field. Adsorption experiments showed that the MO sorption process on the composites followed pseudo-second order kinetic model and the adsorption isotherm date could be simulated with both the Freundlich and Langmuir models. The regeneration indicated that the presence of the Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles is important for a achieving high regeneration efficiency by hydrogen peroxide. PMID:21840037

  15. A novel Pt-Co alloy hydrogen anode catalyst with superlative activity, CO-tolerance and robustness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, G. Y.; Yano, H.; Tryk, D. A.; Watanabe, M.; Iiyama, A.; Uchida, H.

    2016-07-01

    PtCo nanoparticles, having two atomic layers of stabilized Pt skin, supported on carbon black (Pt2AL-PtCo/C), exhibited superlative mass activity for the CO-tolerant hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR), together with high robustness with respect to air exposure, as a novel anode catalyst in reformate gas-based polymer electrolyte fuel cells. The high area-specific HOR activity and CO tolerance are consistent with DFT calculations.PtCo nanoparticles, having two atomic layers of stabilized Pt skin, supported on carbon black (Pt2AL-PtCo/C), exhibited superlative mass activity for the CO-tolerant hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR), together with high robustness with respect to air exposure, as a novel anode catalyst in reformate gas-based polymer electrolyte fuel cells. The high area-specific HOR activity and CO tolerance are consistent with DFT calculations. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, TEM images and particle size distribution histograms of all catalysts, and details of the DFT calculations. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00778c

  16. Hydrogenation of CO2 to Formic Acid with a Highly Active Ruthenium Acriphos Complex in DMSO and DMSO/Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohmann, Kai; Kothe, Jens; Haenel, Matthias W; Englert, Ulli; Hölscher, Markus; Leitner, Walter

    2016-07-25

    The novel [Ru(Acriphos)(PPh3 )(Cl)(PhCO2 )] [1; Acriphos=4,5-bis(diphenylphosphino)acridine] is an excellent precatalyst for the hydrogenation of CO2 to give formic acid in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and DMSO/H2 O without the need for amine bases as co-reagents. Turnover numbers (TONs) of up to 4200 and turnover frequencies (TOFs) of up to 260 h(-1) were achieved, thus rendering 1 one of the most active catalysts for CO2 hydrogenations under additive-free conditions reported to date. The thermodynamic stabilization of the reaction product by the reaction medium, through hydrogen bonds between formic acid and clusters of solvent or water, were rationalized by DFT calculations. The relatively low final concentration of formic acid obtained experimentally under catalytic conditions (0.33 mol L(-1) ) was shown to be limited by product-dependent catalyst inhibition rather than thermodynamic limits, and could be overcome by addition of small amounts of acetate buffer, thus leading to a maximum concentration of free formic acid of 1.27 mol L(-1) , which corresponds to optimized values of TON=16×10(3) and TOFavg ≈10(3)  h(-1) . PMID:27356513

  17. Investigation of cryogenic hydrogen storage on high surface area activated carbon. Equilibrium and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paggiaro, Ricardo Gaspar

    2008-11-29

    This thesis investigates cryo-adsorptive systems for hydrogen storage for mobile applications. By means of macroscopic and microscopic balance models, an extensive analysis is carried out, including among others the investigation of the thermal effects during high-pressure system filling, venting losses during normal operation and inactivity, time-course of system pressure and temperature and gas delivery under various operating conditions. Model results were compared with experimental data, good agreement was obtained. The analysis also includes a comparison to other storage technologies such as cryo-compressed gas and liquefaction storage. The results show that cryo-adsorptive systems have storage characteristics comparable to compressed gas systems, but at a much lower pressure. They are also energetically more efficient than liquid hydrogen systems. However, the necessity of cryotemperatures and thermal management during operation and filling might limit their application. (orig.)

  18. PECAM-1 (CD31) regulates a hydrogen peroxide–activated nonselective cation channel in endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Guangju; O'Brien, Christopher D.; Feldman, Morris; Manevich, Yefim; Lim, Poay; Sun, Jing; Albelda, Steven M.; Kotlikoff, Michael I.

    2002-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) released by neutrophils is an important mediator of endothelial cell (EC) injury and vascular inflammation via its effect on EC-free Ca2+, [Ca2+]i. Although the underlying mechanisms are not well understood, platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM)-1/CD-31 is a critical modulator of neutrophil–EC transmigration. PECAM-1 is also known to regulate EC calcium signals and to undergo selective tyrosine phosphorylation. Here, we report that PECAM-1 molecules tran...

  19. Improved sensing response of photo activated ZnO thin film for hydrogen peroxide detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathy, S; Nandhini, V; Jeyaprakash, B G

    2016-11-15

    The nanostructured ZnO thin films were deposited using spray pyrolysis technique. Formation of polycrystalinity with hexagonal wurtzite structure was observed from the structural study. Highly dense spherical shaped nanoparticles with fine crystallites were observed from the surface morphological studies. The light induced hydrogen peroxide vapour sensing was done using chemi-resistive method and its effect on the sensing response was studied and reported. PMID:27491004

  20. Hydrogen sulphide and mild hypothermia activate the CREB signaling pathway and prevent ischemia-reperfusion injury

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Hai-bin; Ji, Xiangjun; Zhu, Si-Hai; Hu, Yi-min; Zhang, Li-dong; Miao, Xiao-lei; Ma, Ru-Meng; Duan, Man-lin; Li, Wei-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Background Both hydrogen sulphide (H2S) and mild hypothermia have been reported to prevent brain damage caused by reperfusion assault through regulating the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). However, the relationship between the two treatments and how they exert neuro-protective effects through NMDARs remain to be elucidated. Methods Transient cerebral ischemia was induced using the Pulsinelli four-vessel occlusion method. We used sodium hydrosulphide (NaHS) as the H2S donor. We randomly...

  1. Investigation of hydrogen evolution activity for the nickel, nickel-molybdenum nickel-graphite composite and nickel-reduced graphene oxide composite coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinlong, Lv; Tongxiang, Liang; Chen, Wang

    2016-03-01

    The nickel, nickel-molybdenum alloy, nickel-graphite and nickel-reduced graphene oxide composite coatings were obtained by the electrodeposition technique from a nickel sulfate bath. Nanocrystalline molybdenum, graphite and reduced graphene oxide in nickel coatings promoted hydrogen evolution reaction in 0.5 M H2SO4 solution at room temperature. However, the nickel-reduced graphene oxide composite coating exhibited the highest electrocatalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction in 0.5 M H2SO4 solution at room temperature. A large number of gaps between 'cauliflower' like grains could decrease effective area for hydrogen evolution reaction in slight amorphous nickel-molybdenum alloy. The synergistic effect between nickel and reduced graphene oxide promoted hydrogen evolution, moreover, refined grain in nickel-reduced graphene oxide composite coating and large specific surface of reduced graphene oxide also facilitated hydrogen evolution reaction.

  2. Hydrogen energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book consists of seven chapters, which deals with hydrogen energy with discover and using of hydrogen, Korean plan for hydrogen economy and background, manufacturing technique on hydrogen like classification and hydrogen manufacture by water splitting, hydrogen storage technique with need and method, hydrogen using technique like fuel cell, hydrogen engine, international trend on involving hydrogen economy, technical current for infrastructure such as hydrogen station and price, regulation, standard, prospect and education for hydrogen safety and system. It has an appendix on related organization with hydrogen and fuel cell.

  3. Hydrogen sulfide prevents hydrogen peroxide-induced activation of epithelial sodium channel through a PTEN/PI(3,4,5P3 dependent pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianing Zhang

    Full Text Available Sodium reabsorption through the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC at the distal segment of the kidney plays an important role in salt-sensitive hypertension. We reported previously that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 stimulates ENaC in A6 distal nephron cells via elevation of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PI(3,4,5P3 in the apical membrane. Here we report that H2S can antagonize H2O2-induced activation of ENaC in A6 cells. Our cell-attached patch-clamp data show that ENaC open probability (PO was significantly increased by exogenous H2O2, which is consistent with our previous finding. The aberrant activation of ENaC induced by exogenous H2O2 was completely abolished by H2S (0.1 mM NaHS. Pre-treatment of A6 cells with H2S slightly decreased ENaC P(O; however, in these cells H2O2 failed to elevate ENaC PO . Confocal microscopy data show that application of exogenous H2O2 to A6 cells significantly increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS level and induced accumulation of PI(3,4,5P3 in the apical compartment of the cell membrane. These effects of exogenous H2O2 on intracellular ROS levels and on apical PI(3,4,5P3 levels were almost completely abolished by treatment of A6 cells with H2S. In addition, H2S significantly inhibited H2O2-induced oxidative inactivation of the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN which is a negative regulator of PI(3,4,5P3. Moreover, BPV(pic, a specific inhibitor of PTEN, elevated PI(3,4,5P3 and ENaC activity in a manner similar to that of H2O2 in A6 cells. Our data show, for the first time, that H2S prevents H2O2-induced activation of ENaC through a PTEN-PI(3,4,5P3 dependent pathway.

  4. The catalase gene differentiates between some strains of Staphylococcus aureus ssp. anaerobius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musa, N O; Eltom, K; Gessler, F; Böhnel, H; Babiker, A; El Sanousi, S M

    2010-05-01

    Staphylococcus aureus ssp anaerobius strain S10 was isolated from an outbreak of sheep abscess disease. Sequence of the catalase gene of this strain showed 99% identity to the catalase gene (katB) sequence of the reference strain (S. aureus ssp. anaerobius strain MVF213) with mismatching of three base pairs. An important substitution located 1036 nucleotides upstream of the initiation codon from "C" in katB to "T" in the catalase gene of strain S10 originated a stop codon. The deduced protein (345 amino acids) is 105 amino acids shorter than that of katB. Partial sequence of the catalase gene of other 8 local isolates in addition to another reference strain (DSM 20714/ATCC 35844) revealed the same mutations in all local (African) strains, whereas the sequence of the reference (European) strain was typical to that of katB. Sequence of the catalase gene of S. aureus ssp. anaerobius strain S10 was deposited in GenBank under accession no. EU281993. PMID:20526831

  5. A hydrogen peroxide biosensor based on direct electron transfer from hemoglobin to an electrode modified with Nafion and activated nanocarbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A biosensor for hydrogen peroxide (HP) was developed by immobilizing hemoglobin on a glassy carbon electrode modified with activated carbon nanoparticles/Nafion. The characteristics of the sensor were studied by UV-vis spectroscopy and electrochemical methods. The immobilized Hb retained its native secondary structure, undergoes direct electron transfer (with a heterogeneous rate constant of 3.37 ± 0.5 s-1), and displays excellent bioelectrocatalytic activity to the reduction of HP. Under the optimal conditions, its amperometric response varies linearly with the concentration of HP in the range from 0.9 μM to 17 μM. The detection limit is 0.4 μM (at S/N = 3). Due to the commercial availability and low cost of activated carbon nanoparticles, it can be considered as a useful supporting material for construction of other third-generation biosensors. (author)

  6. Distributed H2 Supply for Fuel Cell Utility Vehicles Year 6 - Activity 3.5 - Development fo a National Center for Hydrogen Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almlie, Jay

    2012-04-15

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has developed a high-pressure hydrogen production system that reforms a liquid organic feedstock and water at operating pressures up to 800 bar (~12,000 psig). The advantages of this system include the elimination of energy-intensive hydrogen compression, a smaller process footprint, and the elimination of gaseous or liquid hydrogen transport. This system could also potentially enable distributed hydrogen production from centralized coal. Processes have been investigated to gasify coal and then convert the syngas into alcohol or alkanes. These alcohols and alkanes could then be easily transported in bulk to distributed high-pressure water-reforming (HPWR)-based systems to deliver hydrogen economically. The intent of this activity was to utilize the EERC’s existing HPWR hydrogen production process, previously designed and constructed in a prior project phase, as a basis to improve operational and production performance of an existing demonstration unit. Parameters to be pursued included higher hydrogen delivery pressure, higher hydrogen production rates, and the ability to refill within a 5-minute time frame.

  7. Mushroom extract protects against hydrogen peroxide-induced toxicity in hepatic and neuronal human cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guizani, Nejib; Waly, Mostafa I

    2012-11-15

    Hydrogen peroxide is an oxidative stress agent that is associated with depletion of intracellular glutathione and inhibition of antioxidant enzymes in different cell lines. Consumption of antioxidant-rich foods reduces cellular oxidative stress and its related health problems. This study aimed to assess the antioxidant properties of mushroom, Agaricus bisporous cultivar extract, against hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative stress in cultured human hepatic (HepG2) and neuronal (SH-SY5Y) cells. In this study, hydrogen peroxide caused significant oxidative stress in HepG2 and SH-SY5Y cells as demonstrated by glutathione depletion, impairment of total antioxidant capacity and inhibition of antioxidant enzymes (glutathione peroxidase, catalase and superoxide dismutase). Agaricusbisporous extract ameliorated the observed hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative cellular insult as indicated by restoring the activity of glutathione and the assayed antioxidant enzymes to control levels. The results suggest that mushroom extract as antioxidant properties and protects against the oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide-in cultured human hepatic and neuronal cells. PMID:24261122

  8. Isolation and characterization of a catalase gene "HuCAT3" from pitaya (Hylocereus undatus) and its expression under abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Qiong; Gao, Guo-Li; Fan, Qing-jie; Qiao, Guang; Wen, Xiao-Peng; Liu, Tao; Peng, Zhi-Jun; Cai, Yong-Qiang

    2015-05-25

    Abiotic stresses usually cause H2O2 accumulation, with harmful effects, in plants. Catalase may play a key protective role in plant cells by detoxifying this excess H2O2. Pitaya (Hylocereus undatus) shows broad ecological adaptation due to its high tolerance to abiotic stresses, e.g. drought, heat and poor soil. However, involvement of the pitaya catalase gene (HuCAT) in tolerance to abiotic stresses is unknown. In the present study, a full-length HuCAT3 cDNA (1870 bp) was isolated from pitaya based on our previous microarray data and RACE method. The cDNA sequence and deduced amino acid sequence shared 73-77% and 75-80% identity with other plant catalases, respectively. HuCAT3 contains conserved catalase family domain and catalytic sites. Pairwise comparison and phylogenetic analysis indicated that HuCAT3 is most similar to Eriobotrya japonica CAT, followed by Dimocarpus longan CAT and Nicotiana tabacum CAT1. Expression profile analysis demonstrated that HuCAT3 is mainly expressed in green cotyledons and mature stems, and was regulated by H2O2, drought, cold and salt stress, whereas, its expression patterns and maximum expression levels varied with stress types. HuCAT activity increased as exposure to the tested stresses, and the fluctuation of HuCAT activity was consistent with HuCAT3 mRNA abundance (except for 0.5 days upon drought stress). HuCAT3 mRNA elevations and HuCAT activities changes under cold stress were also in conformity with the cold tolerances among the four genotypes. The obtained results confirmed a major role of HuCAT3 in abiotic stress response of pitaya. This may prove useful in understanding pitaya's high tolerance to abiotic stresses at molecular level. PMID:25752288

  9. Some Aspects of Catalase Induction in Baker's Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeland, P. W.

    1974-01-01

    Described are experiments for demonstrating essential features of substrate-induced enzyme synthesis based on the Jacob-Monod model, and for showing that the activity of certain genes can be modified by environmental temperature. (RH)

  10. Automation Activator of Hydrogen Gas Inlet Valve on Reduction Furnace ME-11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Operational of hydrogen inlet valve of the reduction furnace ME-11 was actuated manually by furnace operator if all its requirements have been fulfilled. Automation of the valve has been constructed as an additional option of the furnace operating system, in which any interruption by the existing manual system by the operator is still valid even though the automatic option is being used. This paper describes the information concerning the automation construction and its logical status of control in the form of its finite state machine. This automation system has been tested successfully. (author)

  11. Hydrogen countermeasures and activity retention by filtered venting for WWER-440/V230 NPP confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to prevent loss of confinement integrity caused by steam and hydrogen generation nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany as well as in most other European countries have been or will be back-fitted with a system for filtering the confinement atmosphere prior to release to the environment and a system for reducing and measuring the H2 concentration inside the confinement. For these tasks systems for confinement atmosphere control are presented, capable of: handling high H2 production rates and cleaning of high contaminated confinement atmosphere. (author)

  12. Enhanced photocatalytic hydrogen evolution activity of CuInS2 loaded TiO2 under solar light irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, p–n type CuInS2/TiO2 particles were prepared in ethylenediamine by the solvothermal method. The microstructural properties of the synthesized p–n type catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) in order to confirm the existence of crystalline CuInS2 on the surface of TiO2, which was also confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images provided the detailed morphological properties about the CuInS2/TiO2 heterostructure. UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV–vis DRS) was used to investigate the optical properties of the CuInS2/TiO2 particles. The DRS results indicated that both the p–n type structure and CuInS2 acting as a sensitizer can enhance significantly the absorption of UV and visible light. The photocatalytic activities of the CuInS2/TiO2 particles were evaluated by hydrogen evolution reactions using Xe-lamp irradiation as a simulated solar light source. The greatly enhanced photocatalytic activity of hydrogen evolution under simulated solar light is about ~7 fold higher than that of pure commercial TiO2 (Degussa P25). - Graphical abstract: The heterojunction structure of CuInS2/TiO2 promoted the efficiency of photoinduced charge carrier transfer and highly inherited the recombination of activated electrons and holes. - Highlight: • CuInS2/TiO2 was prepared by a one-step solvothermal method. • 2.5% CuInS2/TiO2 has the highest activity and keeps the activity stable. • Heterojunction structure of sample promoted the separation of electrons and holes

  13. Influence of hydrogen in the presence of organic matter on bacterial activity under radioactive waste disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the French design for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW), waste will be emplaced in an environment involving metallic materials into a geological clay formation. The presence of microorganisms has recently been evidenced in such environments. Therefore, based on current knowledge, the introduction of microbial species during the construction and operational phases, as well as the survival of bacteria after the disposal closure, have to be accounted for within the context of safety assessment. Sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) activity is notably expected to have an impact on corrosion processes, and thus influence the evolution of metallic and clay materials involved in a HLW disposal cell. The present work investigates the potential development of a SRB, Thermo-desulfovibrio hydrogeniphilus, in order to better assess its metabolism in the presence of dissolved organic matter (DOM) that is representative of the DOM present in an argillaceous pore water, as well as hydrogen that will be produced by the anaerobic corrosion of metallic materials. After 49 days of batch experiments, hydrogen enhances the bacterial development in presence of a low amount of DOM, whereas the DOM alone does not seem to sustain bacteria activities. (authors)

  14. Enhanced photocatalytic hydrogen evolution activity of CuInS2 loaded TiO2 under solar light irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changjiang; Xi, Zhenhao; Fang, Wenzhang; Xing, Mingyang; Zhang, Jinlong

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, p-n type CuInS2/TiO2 particles were prepared in ethylenediamine by the solvothermal method. The microstructural properties of the synthesized p-n type catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) in order to confirm the existence of crystalline CuInS2 on the surface of TiO2, which was also confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images provided the detailed morphological properties about the CuInS2/TiO2 heterostructure. UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV-vis DRS) was used to investigate the optical properties of the CuInS2/TiO2 particles. The DRS results indicated that both the p-n type structure and CuInS2 acting as a sensitizer can enhance significantly the absorption of UV and visible light. The photocatalytic activities of the CuInS2/TiO2 particles were evaluated by hydrogen evolution reactions using Xe-lamp irradiation as a simulated solar light source. The greatly enhanced photocatalytic activity of hydrogen evolution under simulated solar light is about ~7 fold higher than that of pure commercial TiO2 (Degussa P25).

  15. Nano Structured Activated Carbon for Hydrogen Storge. Project Final Technical Report (May 2, 2005-Dec. 31, 2012)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabasso, Israel; Yuan, Youxin

    2013-02-27

    Development of a nanostructured synthetic carbons materials that have been synthesized by thermal-decomposition of aromatic rich polyether such as poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) is reported. These polymers based nanostructured carbons efficacious for gas adsorption and storage and have Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area of more than 3000 m2/g, and with average pore diameter of < 2nm. Surface-area, pore characteristics, and other critical variables for selecting porous materials of high gas adsorption capacities are presented. Analysis of the fragments evolved under various carbonization temperatures, and the correlation between the activation and carbonization temperatures provides a mechanistic perspective of the pore evolution during activation. Correlations between gas (N2 and H2) adsorption capacity and porous texture of the materials have been established. The materials possess excellent hydrogen storage properties, with hydrogen storage capacity up to 7.4 wt% (gravimetric) and ~ 45 g H2 L-1 (volumetric) at -196oC and 6.0 MPa.

  16. Effect of Ni on the characteristics and hydrogenation activity of sulfide Mo/γ-Al2O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hydrogenation of phenanthrene was explored on sulfide Mo/γ-Al2O3 catalysts promoted with increasing concentrations of Ni. The characterization of the materials was done by N2-physisorption, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, temperature programmed sulfidation and NO adsorption experiments. Increasing loading of Ni improves the dispersion of MoS2 species; however, at Ni/(Mo+Ni) molar ratio higher than 0.5, segregation of Ni-sulfides is observed. The presence of Ni also facilitates the sulfidation of oxidic catalyst precursors by lowering the reduction temperature of Mo species. In the sulfide catalysts, Ni changes the structure of MoS2 leading to shorter slabs with higher stacking degree than on Mo/γ-Al2O3, and increases the concentration of coordinatively unsaturated sites. The kinetic results (increased hydrogenation rate and changed reaction network in the presence of Ni) suggest that a highly active kind of active site is created by Ni promotion. (orig.)

  17. L’INFLUENCE DE L’HERBICIDE GRAMOXONE SUR L’ACTIVITÉ DE LA CATALASE DANS LES GRAINS DE BLÉ ET DE HARICOT AU COURS DE LA GERMINATION

    OpenAIRE

    Anca Huma; Antoanela Patras; Vlad Artenie; Paula Amagdei

    2003-01-01

    Cet ouvrage présente l’étude de l’influence de l’herbicide Gramoxone dont la substance active est le paraquat (méthy le viologène) sur l’activité de la catalase (EC. 1.11.1.6) dans les grains de blé (Triticum aestivum) et d’haricot au cours de la germination. L’activité de la catalase dans les grains germinés des deux espèces des plantes est inhibée par toutes les concentrations de Gramoxone testées. L’effet inhibiteur de celui-ci s’accentue avec l’augmentation de sa concentration, e...

  18. Bile-acid-activated farnesoid X receptor regulates hydrogen sulfide production and hepatic microcirculation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Barbara Renga; Andrea Mencarelli; Marco Migliorati; Eleonora Distrutti; Stefano Fiorucci

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) regulates expression of liver cystathionase (CSE), a gene involved in hydrogen sulfide (H2S) generation. METHODS: The regulation of CSE expression in response to FXR ligands was evaluated in HepG2 cells and in wild-type and FXR null mice treated with 6-ethyl chenodeoxycholic acid (6E-CDCA), a synthetic FXR ligand. The analysis demonstrated an FXR responsive element in the 5'-flanking region of the human CSE gene. The function of this site was investigated by luciferase reporter assays, chromatin immunoprecipitation and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Livers obtained from rats treated with carbon tetrachloride alone, or in combination with 6-ethyl chenodeoxycholic acid, were studied for hydrogen sulphide generation and portal pressure measurement. RESULTS: Liver expression of CSE is regulated by bile acids by means of an FXR-mediated mechanism. Western blotting, qualitative and quantitative polymerase chain reaction, as well as immunohistochemical analysis, showed that expression of CSE in HepG2 cells and in mice is induced by treatment with an FXR ligand. Administration of 6E-CDCA to carbon tetrachloride treated rats protected against the down-regulation of CSE expression, increased H2S generation, reduced portal pressure and attenuated the endothelial dysfunction of isolated and perfused cirrhotic rat livers. CONCLUSION: These results demonstrate that CSE is an FXR-regulated gene and provide a new molecular explanation for the pathophysiology of portal hypertension.

  19. Hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, C.; Chirivella, J. E.; Fujita, T.; Jeffe, R. E.; Lawson, D.; Manvi, R.

    1975-01-01

    The state of hydrogen production technology is evaluated. Specific areas discussed include: hydrogen production fossil fuels; coal gasification processes; electrolysis of water; thermochemical production of hydrogen; production of hydrogen by solar energy; and biological production of hydrogen. Supply options are considered along with costs of hydrogen production.

  20. Translational control of catalase synthesis by hemin in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Hamilton, Barbara; Hofbauer, Reinhold; Ruis, Helmut

    1982-01-01

    mRNA-dependent cell-free protein synthesis systems were prepared from a heme-deficient ole3 mutant of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown either in the absence or in the presence of the heme precursor δ-aminolevulinate. When supplemented with total yeast mRNA, the two systems—from heme-deficient and from heme-containing cells—translate most mRNAs with comparable efficiencies. mRNAs coding for the hemoproteins catalase T and catalase A, however, are translated at a low rate by the system ...

  1. Activity of Ni–Cu–Al based catalyst for renewable hydrogen production from steam reforming of glycerol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Ni–Cu–Al catalyst for hydrogen production was synthesized by rising pH technique. • Experimental data were analyzed with non-stoichiometric thermodynamic calculation. • Catalyst deactivation due to carbon deposits in glycerol steam reforming was found. • Carbon removal was analyzed by TGA experiment during medium temperature oxidation. • Reforming was tested by separability kinetics of rate law and catalyst deactivation. - Abstract: In this study, the activity of Ni–Cu–Al based catalyst for renewable hydrogen production from glycerol steam reforming has been evaluated in a continuous flow fixed-bed reactor under atmospheric pressure at 500–600 °C. The catalyst synthesized by the co-precipitation method with rising pH technique was characterized by the elemental analysis, Brenauer–Emmett–Teller (N2-BET) adsorption method, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The thermodynamic analysis for glycerol steam reforming was conducted by using a non-stoichiometric methodology based on the minimization of Gibbs free energy. The obtained results revealed that the great quantity of hydrogen is produced at excess water and the formations of CH4 and CO in the glycerol steam reforming were almost negligible. The deactivation of catalyst due to the formation of carbon residues was observed. The carbons removal was measured by TGA experiment during medium temperature oxidation conditions. The kinetics on glycerol steam reforming was described by means of the separability concept of reaction rate law and deactivation model, and the kinetic parameters were calculated

  2. Synthesis of a highly active carbon-supported Ir-V/C catalyst for the hydrogen oxidation reaction in PEMFC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, B.; Qiao, J.; Yang, D.; Lv, H.; Zheng, J.; Ma, J. [Tongji Univ., Shanghai (China). School of Automotive Studies, Clean Energy Automotive Engineering Center; Zhang, J.; Wang, H. [National Research Council, Vancouver, BC (Canada). Inst. for Fuel Cell Innovation

    2009-07-01

    Non-platinum catalysts are interesting candidates for use in fuel cell systems, particularly for long-term consideration. Iridium-based catalysts such as IrSn, IrOx and IrCo have very good corrosion resistance, electrical conductivity, and resistance to carbon monoxide poisoning. They also have platinum-like behaviour for the chemisorptions of hydrogen and oxygen. The Ir-based catalysts are also less expensive than platinum. In this study, carbon-supported Ir and Ir-V nanoclusters were synthesized via an ethylene glycol (EG) method using IrCl3 and NH4 VO3 as the Ir and V precursors. The nanoparticle catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM). These carbon-supported catalysts had better characteristic for hydrogen oxidation reaction. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques were used to characterize the electrochemical properties of fuel cells by applying Ir/C and Ir-V/C as anode catalysts. According to the discharge characteristics of the fuel cell, the Ir/C and Ir-V/C catalysts affected the performance of electrocatalysts considerably. In this experiment, the catalyst Ir-V/C at 40 wt per cent exhibited the best catalytic activity to hydrogen oxidation reaction. A cell performance of 20 wt per cent higher than that for commercially available Pt/C catalysts was achieved. In addition, there was no significant deterioration in performance of the fuel cell following a 100 hour fuel cell life test at a constant current density of 1000 mA/cm{sup 2} in H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} conditions. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Eliminating methanogenic activity in hydrogen reactor to improve biogas production in a two-stage anaerobic digestion process co-digesting municipal food waste and sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Heguang; Parker, Wayne; Conidi, Daniela; Basnar, Robert; Seto, Peter

    2011-07-01

    Laboratory scale two-stage anaerobic digestion process model was operated for 280 days to investigate the feasibility to produce both hydrogen and methane from a mixture feedstock (1:1 (v/v)) of municipal food waste and sewage sludge. The maximum hydrogen and methane yields obtained in the two stages were 0.93 and 9.5 mL/mL feedstock. To eliminate methanogenic activity and obtain substantial hydrogen production in the hydrogen reactor, both feedstock and mixed liquor required treatment. The heat treatment (100°C, 10 min) for feedstock and a periodical treatment (every 2-5 weeks, either heating, removal of biomass particles or flushing with air) for mixed liquor were effective in different extent. The methane production in the second stage was significantly improved by the hydrogen production in the first stage. The maximum methane production obtained in the period of high hydrogen production was more than 2-fold of that observed in the low hydrogen production period. PMID:21592783

  4. Amorphous Molybdenum Sulfide on Graphene-Carbon Nanotube Hybrids as Highly Active Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Kien-Cuong; Chang, Yung-Huang; McPhail, David S; Mattevi, Cecilia; Wee, Andrew T S; Chua, Daniel H C

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we report on the deposition of amorphous molybdenum sulfide (MoSx, with x ≈ 3) on a high specific surface area conductive support of Graphene-Carbon Nanotube hybrids (GCNT) as the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction (HER) catalysts. We found that the high surface area GCNT electrode could support the deposition of MoSx at much higher loadings compared with simple porous carbon paper or flat graphite paper. The morphological study showed that MoSx was successfully deposited on and was in good contact with the GCNT support. Other physical characterization techniques suggested the amorphous nature of the deposited MoSx. With a typical catalyst loading of 3 mg cm(-2), an overpotential of 141 mV was required to obtain a current density of 10 mA cm(-2). A Tafel slope of 41 mV decade(-1) was demonstrated. Both measures placed the MoSx-deposited GCNT electrode among the best performing molybdenum sulfide-based HER catalysts reported to date. The electrode showed a good stability with only a 25 mV increase in overpotential required for a current density of 10 mA cm(-2), after undergoing 500 potential sweeps with vigorous bubbling present. The current density obtained at -0.5 V vs SHE (Standard Hydrogen Electrode potential) decreased less than 10% after the stability test. The deposition of MoSx on high specific surface area conductive electrodes demonstrated to be an efficient method to maximize the catalytic performance toward HER. PMID:26864503

  5. Comparison of the cytochrome c oxidase inherent catalase side-reaction from Paracoccus denitrificans in the wild type and recombinant form

    OpenAIRE

    Hilbers, Florian

    2015-01-01

    The four subunit (SU) aa3 cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) from Paracoccus denitrificans is one of the terminal enzymes of the respiratory chain. It uses electrons from cytochrome c to reduce molecular oxygen to water. Its binuclear active center, residing in SU I, contains hemeÊa3 and CuB, the latter being liganded by three histidine residues. Apart from its oxygen reductase activity, the protein possesses a peroxidase and a catalase activity. To compare variants and the wild type (WT) protein ...

  6. Moonlighting of Helicobacter pylori catalase protects against complement-mediated killing by utilising the host molecule vitronectin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Corinna; Mukherjee, Oindrilla; Ermert, David; Singh, Birendra; Su, Yu-Ching; Agarwal, Vaibhav; Blom, Anna M.; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is an important human pathogen and a common cause of peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. Despite H. pylori provoking strong innate and adaptive immune responses, the bacterium is able to successfully establish long-term infections. Vitronectin (Vn), a component of both the extracellular matrix and plasma, is involved in many physiological processes, including regulation of the complement system. The aim of this study was to define a receptor in H. pylori that binds Vn and determine the significance of the interaction for virulence. Surprisingly, by using proteomics, we found that the hydrogen peroxide-neutralizing enzyme catalase KatA is a major Vn-binding protein. Deletion of the katA gene in three different strains resulted in impaired binding of Vn. Recombinant KatA was generated and shown to bind with high affinity to a region between heparin-binding domain 2 and 3 of Vn that differs from previously characterised bacterial binding sites on the molecule. In terms of function, KatA protected H. pylori from complement-mediated killing in a Vn-dependent manner. Taken together, the virulence factor KatA is a Vn-binding protein that moonlights on the surface of H. pylori to promote bacterial evasion of host innate immunity. PMID:27087644

  7. Photocatalytically active colloidal platinum-decorated cadmium sulphide nanorods for hydrogen production; Photokatalytisch Aktive Kolloidale Platindekorierte Cadmiumsulfidnanostaebchen zur Wasserstoffproduktion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berr, Maximilian Josef

    2012-12-07

    This is the first study to have been successful in producing hydrogen by means of photocatalytically active colloidal semiconductor particles. Specifically, colloidal platinum-decorated cadmium sulphide nanorods were used to reduce water to hydrogen. Oxidation of water to oxygen was substituted by addition of a reducing agent (hole collector), e.g. sulphite, which itself is oxidised to sulphate by the photohole. During photochemical platinum decoration it was discovered that in addition to the expected platinum nanoparticles there had also formed platinum clusters in the subnanometer range. In spite of the small quantity of platinum deposited on the nanorods these clusters showed the same quantum efficiency as the intended product. [German] In dieser Arbeit wurde erstmals mit kolloidalen Halbleiternanopartikeln photokatalytische Wasserstoffproduktion erzielt. Im Detail wurde Wasser mit kolloidalen, platindekorierten Cadmiumsulfidnanostaebchen zu Wasserstoff reduziert. Die Oxidation des Wasser zu Sauerstoff wurde durch Zugabe eines Reduktionsmittels (Lochfaenger) substituiert, z.B. Sulfit, das durch das Photoloch zu Sulfat reduziert wird. Bei der photochemischen Platindekoration wurden neben den erwarteten Platinnanopartikeln mit 4 - 5 nm Durchmesser auch Subnanometer grosse Platincluster entdeckt, die trotz der geringeren Menge an deponierten Platin auf den Nanostaebchen die gleiche Quanteneffizienz demonstrieren.

  8. Subnanometer Molybdenum Sulfide on Carbon Nanotubes as a Highly Active and Stable Electrocatalyst for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Yang, Zhi; Shen, Juanxia; Nie, Huagui; Cai, Qiran; Li, Luhua; Ge, Mengzhan; Gu, Cancan; Chen, Xi'an; Yang, Keqin; Zhang, Lijie; Chen, Ying; Huang, Shaoming

    2016-02-10

    Electrochemically splitting water for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) has been viewed as a promising approach to produce renewable and clean hydrogen energy. However, searching for cheap and efficient HER electrocatalysts to replace the currently used Pt-based catalysts remains an urgent task. Herein, we develop a one-step carbon nanotube (CNT) assisted synthesis strategy with CNTs' strong adsorbability to mediate the growth of subnanometer-sized MoS(x) on CNTs. The subnanometer MoS(x)-CNT hybrids achieve a low overpotential of 106 mV at 10 mA cm(-2), a small Tafel slope of 37 mV per decade, and an unprecedentedly high turnover frequency value of 18.84 s(-1) at η = 200 mV among all reported non-Pt catalysts in acidic conditions. The superior performance of the hybrid catalysts benefits from the presence of a higher number of active sites and the abundant exposure of unsaturated S atoms rooted in the subnanometer structure, demonstrating a new class of subnanometer-scale catalysts. PMID:26765150

  9. Myosin light chain phosphatase activation is involved in the hydrogen sulfide-induced relaxation in mouse gastric fundus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaese, Ingeborg; Lefebvre, Romain A

    2009-03-15

    The relaxant effect of hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) in the vascular tree is well established but its influence and mechanism of action in gastrointestinal smooth muscle was hardly investigated. The influence of H(2)S on contractility in mouse gastric fundus was therefore examined. Sodium hydrogen sulfide (NaHS; H(2)S donor) was administered to prostaglandin F(2alpha) (PGF(2alpha))-contracted circular muscle strips of mouse gastric fundus, before and after incubation with interfering drugs. NaHS caused a concentration-dependent relaxation of the pre-contracted mouse gastric fundus strips. The K(+) channels blockers glibenclamide, apamin, charybdotoxin, 4-aminopyridin and barium chloride had no influence on the NaHS-induced relaxation. The relaxation by NaHS was also not influenced by L-NAME, ODQ and SQ 22536, inhibitors of the cGMP and cAMP pathway, by nerve blockers capsazepine, omega-conotoxin and tetrodotoxin or by several channel and receptor blockers (ouabain, nifedipine, 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate, ryanodine and thapsigargin). The myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) inhibitor calyculin-A reduced the NaHS-induced relaxation, but the Rho-kinase inhibitor Y-27632 had no influence. We show that NaHS is able to relax PGF(2alpha)-contracted mouse gastric fundus strips. The results suggest that in the mouse gastric fundus, H(2)S causes relaxation at least partially via activation of MLCP. PMID:19374871

  10. Synthesis of novel MoS2/g-C3N4 heterojunction photocatalysts with enhanced hydrogen evolution activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novel MoS2/g-C3N4 heterojunction photocatalysts were synthesized via a simple impregnation and heating methods. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectra. The photocatalytic activities of MoS2/g-C3N4 samples were evaluated based on the hydrogen evolution experiments under visible light irradiation (λ > 400 nm). The UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectra revealed that the MoS2/g-C3N4 photocatalysts had strong absorption in the visible light region. The photocatalytic results indicated that the highest H2 evolution rate of 23.10 μmol·h−1 was achieved on the 0.5 wt.% MoS2–g-C3N4 sample, which was enhanced by 11.3 times compared to pure g-C3N4. This study may provide an approach to the development of novel heterojunction photocatalysts for hydrogen production under visible light irradiation. - Highlights: • MoS2/g-C3N4 photocatalyst is obtained by simple impregnation and heating methods. • and determined by XRD, TEM, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra. • the photocatalysts had strong absorption in the visible light region. • the highest H2 evolution rate was achieved on the 0.5wt% samples

  11. Electrocatalytic activity and electrochemical hydrogen storage of Ni-La alloy prepared by electrodeposition from aqueous electrolyte

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈卫祥; 成旦红; 刘淑兰; 郭鹤桐

    2002-01-01

    Ni-La alloy coating was prepared by electrodeposition.The effect of cathodic current density on the La content of the alloy coatings was discussed.It is found that the content of La in the alloy increases with increasing the cathodic current density.The microstructures and codeposition mechanism of Ni-La alloy coatings were investigated by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and cyclic voltammetry (CV).The results demonstrate that the Ni-La alloy is FCC and codeposited by the induced mechanism.The hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) on the electrodeposited Ni-La alloy electrodes in alkaline solution was evaluated by Tafel polarization curves.It is found that La-Ni alloy coating exhibites much higher exchange current density for HER than pure Ni electrode,and that the exchange current density increases with increasing the La content of alloys.The good electrocatalytic activity for HER of this Ni-La alloy is attributed to the synergism of the electronic structure of La and Ni.The electrodeposited La-Ni alloys have a certain electrochemical hydrogen storage capacity of 34~143 mAh/g,which increases with increasing the La content of alloys.

  12. Photocatalytic activity and reusability of ZnO layer synthesised by electrolysis, hydrogen peroxide and heat treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmal Saadon, Syaiful; Sathishkumar, Palanivel; Mohd Yusoff, Abdull Rahim; Hakim Wirzal, Mohd Dzul; Rahmalan, Muhammad Taufiq; Nur, Hadi

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the zinc oxide (ZnO) layer was synthesised on the surface of Zn plates by three different techniques, i.e. electrolysis, hydrogen peroxide and heat treatment. The synthesised ZnO layers were characterised using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, UV-visible diffuse reflectance and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The photocatalytic activity of the ZnO layer was further assessed against methylene blue (MB) degradation under UV irradiation. The photocatalytic degradation of MB was achieved up to 84%, 79% and 65% within 1 h for ZnO layers synthesised by electrolysis, heat and hydrogen peroxide treatment, respectively. The reusability results show that electrolysis and heat-treated ZnO layers have considerable photocatalytic stability. Furthermore, the results confirmed that the photocatalytic efficiency of ZnO was directly associated with the thickness and enlarged surface area of the layer. Finally, this study proved that the ZnO layers synthesised by electrolysis and heat treatment had shown better operational stability and reusability. PMID:26732538

  13. Hydrogen sulfide promotes cell proliferation of oral cancer through activation of the COX2/AKT/ERK1/2 axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuai; Bian, Huan; Li, Xiaoxu; Wu, Huanhuan; Bi, Qingwei; Yan, Yingbin; Wang, Yixiang

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogen sulfide, the third gaseous transmitter, is one of the main causes of halitosis in the oral cavity. It is generally considered as playing a deleterious role in many oral diseases including oral cancer. However, the regulatory mechanisms involved in the effects of hydrogen sulfide on oral cancer growth remain largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the underlying mechanisms through CCK-8 assay, EdU incorporation, real-time PCR, western blot and pathway blockade assays. Our results showed that hydrogen sulfide promoted oral cancer cell proliferation through activation of the COX2, AKT and ERK1/2 pathways in a dose-dependent manner. Blocking any of the three above pathways inhibited hydrogen sulfide-induced oral cancer cell proliferation. Meanwhile, blockade of COX2 by niflumic acid downregulated NaHS-induced p-ERK and p-AKT expression. Inactivation of the AKT pathway by GSK690693 significantly decreased NaHS‑induced p-ERK1/2 expression, and inhibition of the ERK1/2 pathway by U0126 markedly increased NaHS-induced p-AKT expression. Either the AKT or ERK1/2 inhibitor did not significantly alter the COX2 expression level. Our data revealed, for the first time, that hydrogen sulfide promotes oral cancer cell proliferation through activation of the COX2/AKT/ERK1/2 axis, suggesting new potential targets to eliminate the effect of hydrogen sulfide on the development of oral cancer. PMID:26987083

  14. Effects of Radiofrequency Waves on the Catalase Content in Triticum Aestivum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The aim of the present study is to investigate the possible effects on enzyme biosynthesis in Triticum aestivum cariopsydes due to exposure to traveling radiofrequency (RF) waves. Triticum cariopsydes have been exposed to traveling RF waves inside a transverse electromagnetic (TEM) cell fed by a RF Power Generator. The frequency of the exposure field was 400 MHz. The TEM cell was excited with 2W RF power in order to obtain a power density of about 1 mW/cm2. Four sets of Triticum aestivum samples were placed in four Petri dishes. For each set of Triticum cariopsydes there has been chosen a daily exposure duration of 1, 2, 4 and 8 hours respectively. Experimental exposure was carried out for five consecutive days. After the electromagnetic treatment cariopsydes were let to germinate in Petri dishes on porous filter paper support. A couple of days later the catalase assay was performed. In comparison to the control samples, exposed samples revealed modified catalase content, significantly over the error level (five replays of every sample were assayed in identical experimental conditions in order to provide a reliable statistic result). All exposed samples presented higher catalase levels in comparison to the control samples. However, the experimental data do not suggest an evident analytical dependence between the catalase content and the exposure time duration. We presume that exposure to traveling RF waves seems to be a stimulatory factor of the enzyme biosynthesis being able to improve Triticum capacity of enzyme biosynthesis in the described experimental conditions. (author)

  15. Effects of peroxide and catalase on near ultraviolet radiation sensitivity in Escherichia coli strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of peroxide and catalase on NUV radiation sensitivity was examined in two repair competent E. coli strains, AB1157 and B/r. Exponential phase B/r is considerably more sensitive to NUV radiation than exponential phase AB1157. However, resistance to 5 mmol dm-3 H2O2 was induced in both AB1157 and B/r by pretreating growing cells with 30 μmol dm-3 H2O2. Pretreatment also induced resistance to broad-band NUV radiation in these strains. The addition of catalase to the post-irradiation plating medium increased survival to the same extent as that provided by pretreatment with 30 μmol dm-3 H2O2, in both strains. The NUV radiation sensitivity seen in B/r does not appear to be due to a deficiency in enzymes that scavenge H2O2, as a catalase deficient mutant, E. coli UM1, is more resistant to NUV radiation than B/r. Also, assays for H2O2 scavenging ability show little difference between AB1157 and B/r in this respect. Two hypotheses are put forward to account for the sensitivity of exponential phase B/r. Whilst it is apparent that peroxides and catalase do have a role in NUV radiation damage, it is clear that other factors also influence survival under certain conditions. (author)

  16. The Therapeutic Effects of a Medicinal Plant Mixture in Capsule Form on Catalase Levels in the Semen of Men with Oligospermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alizadeh Hasti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In the present study, the therapeutic effects of mixed herbs (onion, ginger, basil, cinnamon, orange peel, yellow and red watermelon seeds, and carrot seed on catalase levels in the semen of men with oligospermia were evaluated. About 50% of recognized infertility factors are male-related factors, and are mainly the result of oligospermia, astenospermia, and teratozoospermia. Materials and Methods: The study participants included 40 males with oligospermia and infertility. The studied medicine were 700 mg capsules containing onion, ginger, basil, cinnamon, orange peel, yellow and red watermelon seeds, and carrot seed (100 mg of each. Catalase activity was measured by Aebi method. Results: A significant increase was observed in catalase level in semen as a result of using the medicinal plant mixture (P < 0.001. Conclusion: Free radicals play an important role in male infertility. Antioxidants can prevent the damaging effects they have on sperm. Oxidative stress reduction can increase the chances of natural fertility or assisted reproductive technology (ART. Medicinal plants have low costs, complications, and easy availability, and cause an increase in semen plasma antioxidants and subsequent improvement in semen parameters. Thus, they can be the source of new hopes for the treatment of infertility.

  17. Effects of dissolved hydrogen and elastic and plastic deformation on active dissolution of pipeline steel in anaerobic groundwater of near-neutral pH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechano-electrochemical effects of deformation and hydrogen on active dissolution of pipeline steel in near-neutral pH groundwater are described. Thermodynamic analysis shows that the free energy increment due to elastic deformation is insufficient to alter active dissolution rate remarkably. The synergistic effect of stress field and dissolved hydrogen on active dissolution (corrosion) is negligible. The effect of plastic deformation on corrosion relies heavily on the heterogeneity of dislocation structures formed in the deformation. The plastic deformation cannot significantly change the corrosion rate at the open circuit potential. There is good agreement between these theoretical predictions and experimental observations, indicating that the stress corrosion cracking of pipeline steel in the anaerobic groundwater of near-neutral pH is unlikely to be related to the hydrogen-facilitated anodic dissolution mechanism

  18. Effects of dissolved hydrogen and elastic and plastic deformation on active dissolution of pipeline steel in anaerobic groundwater of near-neutral pH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, B.T. [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alta., T6G 2G6 (Canada); Luo, J.L. [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alta., T6G 2G6 (Canada)], E-mail: jingli.luo@ualberta.ca; Norton, P.R. [Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, London, Ont., N6A 5B7 (Canada); Ma, H.Y. [Department of Chemistry, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China)

    2009-01-15

    The mechano-electrochemical effects of deformation and hydrogen on active dissolution of pipeline steel in near-neutral pH groundwater are described. Thermodynamic analysis shows that the free energy increment due to elastic deformation is insufficient to alter active dissolution rate remarkably. The synergistic effect of stress field and dissolved hydrogen on active dissolution (corrosion) is negligible. The effect of plastic deformation on corrosion relies heavily on the heterogeneity of dislocation structures formed in the deformation. The plastic deformation cannot significantly change the corrosion rate at the open circuit potential. There is good agreement between these theoretical predictions and experimental observations, indicating that the stress corrosion cracking of pipeline steel in the anaerobic groundwater of near-neutral pH is unlikely to be related to the hydrogen-facilitated anodic dissolution mechanism.

  19. Inactivation of uptake hydrogenase leads to enhanced and sustained hydrogen production with high nitrogenase activity under high light exposure in the cyanobacterium Anabaena siamensis TISTR 8012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khetkorn Wanthanee

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biohydrogen from cyanobacteria has attracted public interest due to its potential as a renewable energy carrier produced from solar energy and water. Anabaena siamensis TISTR 8012, a novel strain isolated from rice paddy field in Thailand, has been identified as a promising cyanobacterial strain for use as a high-yield hydrogen producer attributed to the activities of two enzymes, nitrogenase and bidirectional hydrogenase. One main obstacle for high hydrogen production by A. siamensis is a light-driven hydrogen consumption catalyzed by the uptake hydrogenase. To overcome this and in order to enhance the potential for nitrogenase based hydrogen production, we engineered a hydrogen uptake deficient strain by interrupting hupS encoding the small subunit of the uptake hydrogenase. Results An engineered strain lacking a functional uptake hydrogenase (∆hupS produced about 4-folds more hydrogen than the wild type strain. Moreover, the ∆hupS strain showed long term, sustained hydrogen production under light exposure with 2–3 folds higher nitrogenase activity compared to the wild type. In addition, HupS inactivation had no major effects on cell growth and heterocyst differentiation. Gene expression analysis using RT-PCR indicates that electrons and ATP molecules required for hydrogen production in the ∆hupS strain may be obtained from the electron transport chain associated with the photosynthetic oxidation of water in the vegetative cells. The ∆hupS strain was found to compete well with the wild type up to 50 h in a mixed culture, thereafter the wild type started to grow on the relative expense of the ∆hupS strain. Conclusions Inactivation of hupS is an effective strategy for improving biohydrogen production, in rates and specifically in total yield, in nitrogen-fixing cultures of the cyanobacterium Anabaena siamensis TISTR 8012.

  20. Long-Term Demonstration of Hydrogen Production from Coal at Elevated Temperatures Year 6 - Activity 1.12 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanislowski, Joshua; Tolbert, Scott; Curran, Tyler; Swanson, Michael

    2012-04-30

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has continued the work of the National Center for Hydrogen Technology® (NCHT®) Program Year 6 Task 1.12 project to expose hydrogen separation membranes to coal-derived syngas. In this follow-on project, the EERC has exposed two membranes to coal-derived syngas produced in the pilot-scale transport reactor development unit (TRDU). Western Research Institute (WRI), with funding from the State of Wyoming Clean Coal Technology Program and the North Dakota Industrial Commission, contracted with the EERC to conduct testing of WRI’s coal-upgrading/gasification technology for subbituminous and lignite coals in the EERC’s TRDU. This gasifier fires nominally 200–500 lb/hour of fuel and is the pilot-scale version of the full-scale gasifier currently being constructed in Kemper County, Mississippi. A slipstream of the syngas was used to demonstrate warm-gas cleanup and hydrogen separation using membrane technology. Two membranes were exposed to coal-derived syngas, and the impact of coal-derived impurities was evaluated. This report summarizes the performance of WRI’s patent-pending coalupgrading/ gasification technology in the EERC’s TRDU and presents the results of the warm-gas cleanup and hydrogen separation tests. Overall, the WRI coal-upgrading/gasification technology was shown to produce a syngas significantly lower in CO2 content and significantly higher in CO content than syngas produced from the raw fuels. Warm-gas cleanup technologies were shown to be capable of reducing sulfur in the syngas to 1 ppm. Each of the membranes tested was able to produce at least 2 lb/day of hydrogen from coal-derived syngas.