WorldWideScience

Sample records for catacarb carbon dioxide removal process

  1. Experimental Analysis and Process Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Removal Using Tuff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuele Bonamente

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Removal of carbon dioxide via selective adsorption is a key process to obtain consumer-grade natural gas from biogas and, more generally, CO2 capture and sequestration from gaseous mixtures. The aim of this work is the characterization and classification of a natural alternative to synthetic zeolites that could be used as a carbon dioxide adsorbent. Tuff particulate, easily available as a byproduct of the construction industry, was tested with different laboratory procedures to verify its suitability for CO2 removal applications. Relevant physical and adsorption properties were measured during an intensive experimental campaign. Porosity, pore size distribution, and specific surface area were obtained with mercury intrusion porosimetry. Adsorption isotherms and saturation curves were obtained using two custom experimental apparatuses. The selective adsorption was finally modeled using an original phenomenological parameterization, and a simplified simulation of the process was performed using a computational fluid dynamic approach, validated against observed data. Results show that natural zeolites represent a very promising and sustainable alternative to synthetic zeolites in pressure swing adsorption processes for CO2 removal.

  2. Implementations of advisory system for the solvent selection of carbon dioxide removal processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, C.; Lau, P. [Regina Univ., SK (Canada)

    1997-12-31

    The Solvent Selection Advisory System (SSAS) is a decision support system for aiding users in the preliminary selection of optimal solvents for carbon dioxide removal processes given different user specification and plant conditions. This paper describes an inference-network representation of the Solvent Selection Advisory System which has been previously implemented as a rule-based system. Two expert system shells, G2 and GDA from Gensym Corp. are used, and the implementations on a two shell are compared. Some advantages and disadvantages in the two representation approaches are discussed. (Author)

  3. Carbon Dioxide Removal via Passive Thermal Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Michael; Hanford, Anthony; Conger, Bruce; Anderson, Molly

    2011-01-01

    A paper describes a regenerable approach to separate carbon dioxide from other cabin gases by means of cooling until the carbon dioxide forms carbon dioxide ice on the walls of the physical device. Currently, NASA space vehicles remove carbon dioxide by reaction with lithium hydroxide (LiOH) or by adsorption to an amine, a zeolite, or other sorbent. Use of lithium hydroxide, though reliable and well-understood, requires significant mass for all but the shortest missions in the form of lithium hydroxide pellets, because the reaction of carbon dioxide with lithium hydroxide is essentially irreversible. This approach is regenerable, uses less power than other historical approaches, and it is almost entirely passive, so it is more economical to operate and potentially maintenance- free for long-duration missions. In carbon dioxide removal mode, this approach passes a bone-dry stream of crew cabin atmospheric gas through a metal channel in thermal contact with a radiator. The radiator is pointed to reject thermal loads only to space. Within the channel, the working stream is cooled to the sublimation temperature of carbon dioxide at the prevailing cabin pressure, leading to formation of carbon dioxide ice on the channel walls. After a prescribed time or accumulation of carbon dioxide ice, for regeneration of the device, the channel is closed off from the crew cabin and the carbon dioxide ice is sublimed and either vented to the environment or accumulated for recovery of oxygen in a fully regenerative life support system.

  4. A regenerative process for carbon dioxide removal and hydrogen production in IGCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzadeh Khayyat, Armin

    Advanced power generation technologies, such as Integrated Gasification-Combined Cycles (IGCC) processes, are among the leading contenders for power generation conversion because of their significantly higher efficiencies and potential environmental advantages, compared to conventional coal combustion processes. Although the increased in efficiency in the IGCC processes will reduce the emissions of carbon dioxide per unit of power generated, further reduction in CO2 emissions is crucial due to enforcement of green house gases (GHG) regulations. In IGCC processes to avoid efficiency losses, it is desirable to remove CO2 in the temperature range of 300° to 500°C, which makes regenerable MgO-based sorbents ideal for such operations. In this temperature range, CO2 removal results in the shifting of the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction towards significant reduction in carbon monoxide (CO), and enhancement in hydrogen production. However, regenerable, reactive and attrition resistant sorbents are required for such application. In this work, a highly reactive and attrition resistant regenerable MgO-based sorbent is prepared through dolomite modification, which can simultaneously remove carbon dioxide and enhance hydrogen production in a single reactor. The results of the experimental tests conducted in High-Pressure Thermogravimetric Analyzer (HP-TGA) and high-pressure packed-bed units indicate that in the temperature range of 300° to 500°C at 20 atm more than 95 molar percent of CO2 can be removed from the simulated coal gas, and the hydrogen concentration can be increased to above 70 percent. However, a declining trend is observed in the capacity of the sorbent exposed to long-term durability analysis, which appears to level off after about 20 cycles. Based on the physical and chemical analysis of the sorbent, a two-zone expanding grain model was applied to obtain an excellent fit to the carbonation reaction rate data at various operating conditions. The modeling

  5. Enriching blast furnace gas by removing carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chongmin; Sun, Zhimin; Chen, Shuwen; Wang, Baohai

    2013-12-01

    Blast furnace gas (BF gas) produced in the iron making process is an essential energy resource for a steel making work. As compared with coke oven gas, the caloric value of BF gas is too low to be used alone as fuel in hot stove because of its high concentrations of carbon dioxide and nitrogen. If the carbon dioxide in BF gas could be captured efficiently, it would meet the increasing need of high caloric BF gas, and develop methods to reusing and/or recycling the separated carbon dioxide further. Focused on this, investigations were done with simple evaluation on possible methods of removing carbon dioxide from BF gas and basic experiments on carbon dioxide capture by chemical absorption. The experimental results showed that in 100 minutes, the maximum absorbed doses of carbon dioxide reached 20 g/100 g with ionic liquid as absorbent.

  6. Carbon dioxide removal with inorganic membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judkins, R.R.; Fain, D.E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases, particularly carbon dioxide, in the atmosphere has sparked a great deal of interest in the removal of CO{sub 2} from flue gases of fossil fueled plants. Presently, several techniques for the removal of CO{sub 2} are considered to have potential, but are lacking in practicality. For example, amine scrubbing of flue gas streams is potential, but are lacking in practically. For example, amine scrubbing of flue gas streams is effective in removing CO{sub 2}, but costs are high; efficiency suffers; and other acid gases must be removed prior to amine stripping. Membrane systems for CO{sub 2} removal are held in high regard, and inorganic, particularly ceramic, membranes offer the potential for high temperature, thus energy saving, removal.

  7. Carbon dioxide reducing processes; Koldioxidreducerande processer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensson, Fredrik

    1999-12-01

    This thesis discusses different technologies to reduce or eliminate the carbon dioxide emissions, when a fossil fuel is used for energy production. Emission reduction can be accomplished by separating the carbon dioxide for storage or reuse. There are three different ways of doing the separation. The carbon dioxide can be separated before the combustion, the process can be designed so that the carbon dioxide can be separated without any energy consumption and costly systems or the carbon dioxide can be separated from the flue gas stream. Two different concepts of separating the carbon dioxide from a combined cycle are compared, from the performance and the economical point of view, with a standard natural gas fired combined cycle where no attempts are made to reduce the carbon dioxide emissions. One concept is to use absorption technologies to separate the carbon dioxide from the flue gas stream. The other concept is based on a semi-closed gas turbine cycle using carbon dioxide as working fluid and combustion with pure oxygen, generated in an air-separating unit. The calculations show that the efficiency (power) drop is smaller for the first concept than for the second, 8.7 % points compared to 13.7 % points, when power is produced. When both heat and power are produced, the relation concerning the efficiency (power) remains. Regarding the overall efficiency (heat and power) the opposite relation is present. A possible carbon dioxide tax must exceed 0.21 SEK/kg CO{sub 2} for it to be profitable to separate carbon dioxide with any of these technologies.

  8. Biochemical Capture and Removal of Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trachtenberg, Michael C.

    1998-01-01

    We devised an enzyme-based facilitated transport membrane bioreactor system to selectively remove carbon dioxide (CO2) from the space station environment. We developed and expressed site-directed enzyme mutants for CO2 capture. Enzyme kinetics showed the mutants to be almost identical to the wild type save at higher pH. Both native enzyme and mutant enzymes were immobilized to different supports including nylons, glasses, sepharose, methacrylate, titanium and nickel. Mutant enzyme could be attached and removed from metal ligand supports and the supports reused at least five times. Membrane systems were constructed to test CO2 selectivity. These included proteic membranes, thin liquid films and enzyme-immobilized teflon membranes. Selectivity ratios of more than 200:1 were obtained for CO2 versus oxygen with CO2 at 0.1%. The data indicate that a membrane based bioreactor can be constructed which could bring CO2 levels close to Earth.

  9. Carbon dioxide removal and the futures market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, D.’Maris; Lockley, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Futures contracts are exchange-traded financial instruments that enable parties to fix a price in advance, for later performance on a contract. Forward contracts also entail future settlement, but they are traded directly between two parties. Futures and forwards are used in commodities trading, as producers seek financial security when planning production. We discuss the potential use of futures contracts in Carbon Dioxide Removal (CDR) markets; concluding that they have one principal advantage (near-term price security to current polluters), and one principal disadvantage (a combination of high price volatility and high trade volume means contracts issued by the private sector may cause systemic economic risk). Accordingly, we note the potential for the development of futures markets in CDR, but urge caution about the prospects for market failure. In particular, we consider the use of regulated markets: to ensure contracts are more reliable, and that moral hazard is minimised. While regulation offers increased assurances, we identify major insufficiencies with this approach—finding it generally inadequate. In conclusion, we suggest that only governments can realistically support long-term CDR futures markets. We note existing long-term CDR plans by governments, and suggest the use of state-backed futures for supporting these assurances.

  10. Conventional processes and membrane technology for carbon dioxide removal from natural gas: A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zee Ying Yeo; Thiam Leng Chew; Peng Wei Zhu; Abdul Rahman Mohamed; Siang-Piao Chai

    2012-01-01

    Membrane technology is becoming more important for CO2 separation from natural gas in the new era due to its process simplicity,relative ease of operation and control,compact,and easy to scale up as compared with conventional processes.Conventional processes such as absorption and adsorption for CO2 separation from natural gas are generally more energy demanding and costly for both operation and maintenance.Polymeric membranes are the current commercial membranes used for CO2 separation from natural gas.However,polymeric membranes possess drawbacks such as low permeability and selectivity,plasticization at high temperatures,as well as insufficient thermal and chemical stability.The shortcomings of commercial polymeric membranes have motivated researchers to opt for other alternatives,especially inorganic membranes due to their higher thermal stability,good chemical resistance to solvents,high mechanical strength and long lifetime.Surface modifications can be utilized in inorganic membranes to further enhance the selectivity,permeability or catalytic activities of the membrane.This paper is to provide a comprehensive review on gas separation,comparing membrane technology with other conventional methods of recovering CO2 from natural gas,challenges of current commercial polymeric membranes and inorganic membranes for CO2 removal and membrane surface modification for improved selectivity.

  11. Carbon dioxide removal by alkanolamines in aqueous organic solvents. A method for enhancing the desorption process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamborg, Espen S.; Derks, Peter W.J.; Elk, Edwin P. van; Versteeg, Geert F.

    2011-01-01

    Process concepts of using alkanolamines in aqueous organic solvents have been evaluated by experimental work and process simulations using the Procede Process Simulator. N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), methanol, and ethanol were chosen as the respective alkanolamine and organic compounds in the curre

  12. Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion gas and other gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.

    2010-11-09

    A novel method and system of separating carbon dioxide from flue gas is introduced. Instead of relying on large temperature or pressure changes to remove carbon dioxide from a solvent used to absorb it from flue gas, the ion pump method, as disclosed herein, dramatically increases the concentration of dissolved carbonate ion in solution. This increases the overlying vapor pressure of carbon dioxide gas, permitting carbon dioxide to be removed from the downstream side of the ion pump as a pure gas. The ion pumping may be obtained from reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, thermal desalination methods, or an ion pump system having an oscillating flow in synchronization with an induced electric field.

  13. Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion gas and other gas mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.

    2014-08-19

    A novel method and system of separating carbon dioxide from flue gas is introduced. Instead of relying on large temperature or pressure changes to remove carbon dioxide from a solvent used to absorb it from flue gas, the ion pump method, as disclosed herein, dramatically increases the concentration of dissolved carbonate ion in solution. This increases the overlying vapor pressure of carbon dioxide gas, permitting carbon dioxide to be removed from the downstream side of the ion pump as a pure gas. The ion pumping may be obtained from reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, thermal desalination methods, or an ion pump system having an oscillating flow in synchronization with an induced electric field.

  14. Chemisorptive removal of carbon dioxide from process streams using a reactive bubble column with simultaneous production of usable materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, P.; Ewert, G.; Roehm, H.J. [Department of Process and Environmental Engineering, Ruhr-University, Bochum (Germany)

    2006-09-15

    In the context of attempts to improve the protection of the environment, a novel process where the carbon dioxide reacts rapidly with almost 100 % conversion under mild conditions, is proposed. The chemisorptive process takes place in a slurry bubble column which operates with countercurrent flow, utilizing special solutions of primary long chain amines in a nonaqueous media. The product obtained is insoluble and separated by filtration. Because of its molecular structure, this product possesses tenside properties and can be used as an industrial additive. Typically the liquid phase consists of a mixture of hexadecylamine (C{sub 16}H{sub 33}NH{sub 2}) or dodecylamine (C{sub 12}H{sub 25}NH{sub 2}) in various concentrations with methanol or other alcohols as the solvent. Numerous parameters have been studied including different column heights, gas inlet compositions, gas flow rates and solvent type. Efficiencies of up to 99 % are achievable for CO{sub 2} absorption with methanol as the solvent. The second solvent examined, isopropanol, shows lower CO{sub 2} conversion rates. This can be attributed to its physical properties, mainly higher viscosity and hence, smaller mass transfer coefficient. In order to simulate real gas conditions, the influence of other sour gases, e.g., SO{sub 2} was also investigated experimentally. Because of coabsorption of the two gases, the CO{sub 2} efficiency was lower in this instance. In both solvents, the absorption efficiency with respect to SO{sub 2} is more than 99 % due to its high solubility and reactivity. A complex mathematical model has been developed and applied to describe the mass and enthalpy transport in the reactive bubble column. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  15. Slurried solid media for simultaneous water purification and carbon dioxide removal from gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Viani, Brian

    2013-01-29

    A slurried solid media for simultaneous water purification and carbon dioxide removal from gas mixtures includes the steps of dissolving the gas mixture and carbon dioxide in water providing a gas, carbon dioxide, water mixture; adding a porous solid media to the gas, carbon dioxide, water mixture forming a slurry of gas, carbon dioxide, water, and porous solid media; heating the slurry of gas, carbon dioxide, water, and porous solid media producing steam; and cooling the steam to produce purified water and carbon dioxide.

  16. Removal of Carbon Dioxide Gas From the Exhaust Gases Generated at the Takoradi Thermal Power Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Charles

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Takoradi Thermal Power Station (TTPS generates electricity by burning fossil-fuel and hence it also generates greenhouse gases especially carbon dioxide, which is vented into the atmosphere. These greenhouse gases are pollutants known to cause global warming. A method for the removal of carbon dioxide gas from the exhaust gases generated at TTPS is proposed in this research. It aims at reducing the plant’s carbon dioxide emission into the atmosphere and hence reducing the plant’s rate of pollution into the atmosphere. The method employed is a modification of a method known as the Fluor Daniel ECONAMINE FG process. This method removes carbon dioxide from exhaust gas by using an amine solution which comes into “contact” with the exhaust gas in a counter-current manner. This method has been applied by 23 companies which produce CO2 on a large scale. However, before TTPS apply this method a cost feasibility study is recommended.

  17. A regenerable carbon dioxide removal and oxygen recovery system for the Japanese experiment module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuji, K.; Hirao, M.; Satoh, S.

    The Japanese Space Station Program is now under Phase B study by the National Space Development Agency of Japan in participation with the U.S. Space Station Program. A Japanese Space Station participation will be a dedicated pressurized module to be attached to the U.S. Space Station, and is called Japanese Experiment Module (JEM). Astronaut scientists will conduct various experimental operations there. Thus an environment control and life support system is required. Regenerable carbon dioxide removal and collection technique as well as oxygen recovery technique has been studied and investigated for several years. A regenerable carbon dioxide removal subsystem using steam desorbed solid amine and an oxygen recovery subsystem using Sabatier methane cracking have a good possibility for the application to the Japanese Experiment Module. Basic performance characteristics of the carbon dioxide removal and oxygen recovery subsystem are presented according to the results of a fundamental performance test program. The trace contaminant removal process is also investigated and discussed. The solvent recovery plant for the regeneration of various industrial solvents, such as hydrocarbons, alcohols and so on, utilizes the multi-bed solvent adsorption and steam desorption process, which is very similar to the carbon dioxide removal subsystem. Therefore, to develop essential components including adsorption tank (bed), condensor, process controller and energy saving system, the technology obtained from the experience to construct solvent recovery plant can be easily and effectively applicable to the carbon dioxide removal subsystem. The energy saving efficiency is evaluated for blower power reduction, steam reduction and waste heat utilization technique. According to the above background, the entire environment control and life support system for the Japanese Experiment Module including the carbon dioxide removal and oxygen recovery subsystem is evaluated and proposed.

  18. Electrocatalytic process for carbon dioxide conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masel, Richard I.; Salehi-Khojin, Amin

    2017-01-31

    An electrocatalytic process for carbon dioxide conversion includes combining a Catalytically Active Element and Helper Catalyst in the presence of carbon dioxide, allowing a reaction to proceed to produce a reaction product, and applying electrical energy to said reaction to achieve electrochemical conversion of said reactant to said reaction product. The Catalytically Active Element can be a metal in the form of supported or unsupported particles or flakes with an average size between 0.6 nm and 100 nm. the reaction products comprise at least one of CO, HCO.sup.-, H.sub.2CO, (HCO.sub.2).sup.-, H.sub.2CO.sub.2, CH.sub.3OH, CH.sub.4, C.sub.2H.sub.4, CH.sub.3CH.sub.2OH, CH.sub.3COO.sup.-, CH.sub.3COOH, C.sub.2H.sub.6, (COOH).sub.2, (COO.sup.-).sub.2, and CF.sub.3COOH.

  19. Effects of Carbon Dioxide on Astringency Removal in Mopanshi Persimmon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LENG Ping; LI Bao; ZHANG Wen; JIA Ke-gong

    2003-01-01

    Fruits of persimmon (Diospyros kaki cv. Mopanshi) were used to investigate the effects of different concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) gas on removing astringency after harvest. Treatment of 95 % concentration of CO2 gas gave the best results; fruits turned non-astringent after 20 h, and kept the fruit firm for 7 d at room temperature. Fruits, treated with 85 and 90 % concentration of CO2 gas, turned non-astringent after 24 - 28 h, and the firmness-keeping stage was 5 - 6 d at room temperature. While the CO2 gas was at 80, 70 and 60%, the de-astringency period was 48, 72 and 96 h, and the corresponding firmness-keeping stage was 3, 2 and 1 d, respectively. Fruits, treated with 50 % concentration of CO2 gas,remained astringent.

  20. Efficiency of water removal from water/ethanol mixtures using supercritical carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Rodrigues

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Techniques involving supercritical carbon dioxide have been successfully used for the formation of drug particles with controlled size distributions. However, these processes show some limitations, particularly in processing aqueous solutions. A diagram walking algorithm based on available experimental data was developed to evaluate the effect of ethanol on the efficiency of water removal processes under different process conditions. Ethanol feeding was the key parameter resulting in a tenfold increase in the efficiency of water extraction.

  1. Apparatus and method for removing solvent from carbon dioxide in resin recycling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2009-01-06

    A two-step resin recycling system and method solvent that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material. The system and method includes one or more solvent wash vessels to expose resin particles to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles in the one or more solvent wash vessels to substantially remove contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is provided to separate the solvent from the resin particles after removal from the one or more solvent wash vessels. The resin particles are next exposed to carbon dioxide in a closed loop carbon dioxide system. The closed loop system includes a carbon dioxide vessel where the carbon dioxide is exposed to the resin, substantially removing any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation. A separation vessel is also provided to separate the solvent from the solvent laden carbon dioxide. Both the carbon dioxide and the solvent are reused after separation in the separation vessel.

  2. Development of Carbon Dioxide Removal Systems for Advanced Exploration Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, James C.; Trinh, Diep; Gostowski, Rudy; King, Eric; Mattox, Emily M.; Watson, David; Thomas, John

    2012-01-01

    "NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program is pioneering new approaches for rapidly developing prototype systems, demonstrating key capabilities, and validating operational concepts for future human missions beyond Earth orbit" (NASA 2012). These forays beyond the confines of earth's gravity will place unprecedented demands on launch systems. They must not only blast out of earth's gravity well as during the Apollo moon missions, but also launch the supplies needed to sustain a crew over longer periods for exploration missions beyond earth's moon. Thus all spacecraft systems, including those for the separation of metabolic carbon dioxide and water from a crewed vehicle, must be minimized with respect to mass, power, and volume. Emphasis is also placed on system robustness both to minimize replacement parts and ensure crew safety when a quick return to earth is not possible. Current efforts are focused on improving the current state-of-the-art systems utilizing fixed beds of sorbent pellets by seeking more robust pelletized sorbents, evaluating structured sorbents, and examining alternate bed configurations to improve system efficiency and reliability. These development efforts combine testing of sub-scale systems and multi-physics computer simulations to evaluate candidate approaches, select the best performing options, and optimize the configuration of the selected approach, which is then implemented in a full-scale integrated atmosphere revitalization test. This paper describes the carbon dioxide (CO2) removal hardware design and sorbent screening and characterization effort in support of the Atmosphere Resource Recovery and Environmental Monitoring (ARREM) project within the AES program. A companion paper discusses development of atmosphere revitalization models and simulations for this project.

  3. Ecological Limits to Terrestrial Carbon Dioxide Removal Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L. J.; Torn, M. S.; Jones, A. D.

    2011-12-01

    Carbon dioxide removal from the atmosphere through terrestrial carbon sequestration and bioenergy (biological CDR) is a proposed climate change mitigation strategy. Biological CDR increases the carbon storage capacity of soils and biomass through changes in land cover and use, including reforestation, afforestation, conversion of land to agriculture for biofuels, conversion of degraded land to grassland, and alternative management practices such as conservation tillage. While biological CDR may play a valuable role in future climate change mitigation, many of its proponents fail to account for the full range of biological, biophysical, hydrologic, and economic complexities associated with proposed land use changes. In this analysis, we identify and discuss a set of ecological limits and impacts associated with terrestrial CDR. The capacity of biofuels, soils, and other living biomass to sequester carbon may be constrained by nutrient and water availability, soil dynamics, and local climate effects, all of which can change spatially and temporally in unpredictable ways. Even if CDR is effective at sequestering CO2, its associated land use and land cover changes may negatively impact ecological resources by compromising water quality and availability, degrading soils, reducing biodiversity, displacing agriculture, and altering local climate through albedo and evapotranspiration changes. Measures taken to overcome ecological limitations, such as fertilizer addition and irrigation, may exacerbate these impacts even further. The ecological considerations and quantitative analyses that we present highlight uncertainties introduced by ecological complexity, disagreements between models, perverse economic incentives, and changing environmental factors. We do not reject CDR as a potentially valuable strategy for climate change mitigation; ecosystem protection, restoration, and improved management practices could enhance soil fertility and protect biodiversity while reducing

  4. Cryogenic Heat-Exchanger Design for Freeze-out Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Landfill Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ho-Myung; Chung, Myung Jin; Park, Seong Bum

    A cryogenic heat exchanger to remove carbon dioxide from landfill gas (LFG) is proposed and designed for applications to LNG production in distributed-scale. Since the major components of LFG are methane and carbon dioxide, CO2 removal is a significant pre-process in the liquefaction systems. A new and simple approach is proposed to directly remove carbon dioxide as frost on the surface wall along the cooling passage in a liquefying heat exchanger and to install two identical heat exchangers in parallel for alternative switching. As a first step of feasibility study, combined heat and mass transfer analysis is performed on the freeze-out process of CO2 in a counterflow heat exchanger, where CH4-CO2 mixture is cooled below its frost temperature in thermal contact with cold refrigerant. Engineering correlations for the analogy of heat and mass transfer are incorporated into numerical heat exchanger analysis with detailed fluid properties. The developed analytical model is used to estimate the distribution of CO2 accumulation and the required heat exchanger size with latent thermal load for the cryogenic CO2 removal in various operating conditions.

  5. Research progress in removal of trace carbon dioxide from closed spaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yatao; FAN Lihai; ZHANG Lin; CHEN Huanlin

    2007-01-01

    In this paper,the removal of trace carbon dioxide from closed spaces through membrane process and biotransformation are introduced in detail.These methods include the microalgae photobioreactor,membrane microalgae photobioreactor,supported liquid membrane,membrane gas-liquid contactor,hydrogel membrane,and enzyme membrane bioreactor.The advantages and disadvantages of these methods are compared.It is found that higher CO2 removal efficiency can be obtained in biotransformation and membrane process.However,a large volume and high energy consumption are needed in biotransformation,while the low permeability and stability must be solved in the membrane process.

  6. Experimental studies on removal of carbon dioxide by aqueous ammonia fine spray

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Experimental studies on carbon dioxide capture in a spray scrubber were carried out.Fine spray of aqueous ammonia was used as CO2 absorbent.Effects of different operating and design parameters on CO2 removal efficiency including concentration of aqueous ammonia,liquid flow rate,total gas flow rate,initial temperature and concentration of carbon dioxide were investigated.

  7. Heliox Improves Carbon Dioxide Removal during Lung Protective Mechanical Ventilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beurskens, Charlotte J; Brevoord, Daniel; Lagrand, Wim K; van den Bergh, Walter M; Vroom, Margreeth B; Preckel, Benedikt; Horn, Janneke; Juffermans, Nicole P

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Helium is a noble gas with low density and increased carbon dioxide (CO2) diffusion capacity. This allows lower driving pressures in mechanical ventilation and increased CO2 diffusion. We hypothesized that heliox facilitates ventilation in patients during lung-protective mechanical ven

  8. Bio-Electrochemical Carbon Dioxide Removal for Air Revitalization in Exploration Life Support Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An important aspect of the ISS air revitalization system for life support is the removal of carbon dioxide from cabin air and retrieves oxygen from CO2. The current...

  9. Bench to bedside review: Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal, past present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cove, Matthew E; MacLaren, Graeme; Federspiel, William J; Kellum, John A

    2012-09-21

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has a substantial mortality rate and annually affects more than 140,000 people in the USA alone. Standard management includes lung protective ventilation but this impairs carbon dioxide clearance and may lead to right heart dysfunction or increased intracranial pressure. Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal has the potential to optimize lung protective ventilation by uncoupling oxygenation and carbon dioxide clearance. The aim of this article is to review the carbon dioxide removal strategies that are likely to be widely available in the near future. Relevant published literature was identified using PubMed and Medline searches. Queries were performed by using the search terms ECCOR, AVCO2R, VVCO2R, respiratory dialysis, and by combining carbon dioxide removal and ARDS. The only search limitation imposed was English language. Additional articles were identified from reference lists in the studies that were reviewed. Several novel strategies to achieve carbon dioxide removal were identified, some of which are already commercially available whereas others are in advanced stages of development.

  10. Systemic effects of geoengineering by terrestrial carbon dioxide removal on carbon related planetary boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Vera; Donges, Jonathan; Lucht, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    The planetary boundaries framework as proposed by Rockström et al. (2009) provides guidelines for ecological boundaries, the transgression of which is likely to result in a shift of Earth system functioning away from the relatively stable Holocene state. As the climate change boundary is already close to be transgressed, several geoengineering (GE) methods are discussed, aiming at a reduction of atmospheric carbon concentrations to control the Earth's energy balance. One of the proposed GE methods is carbon extraction from the atmosphere via biological carbon sequestration. In case mitigation efforts fail to substantially reduce greenhouse gas emissions, this form of GE could act as potential measure to reduce atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. We here study the possible influences of human interactions in the Earth system on carbon related planetary boundaries in the form of geoengineering (terrestrial carbon dioxide removal). We use a conceptual model specifically designed to investigate fundamental carbon feedbacks between land, ocean and atmosphere (Anderies et al., 2013) and modify it to include an additional geoengineering component. With that we analyze the existence and stability of a safe operating space for humanity, which is here conceptualized in three of the 9 proposed dimensions, namely climate change, ocean acidification and land-use. References: J. M. Anderies et al., The topology of non-linear global carbon dynamics: from tipping points to planetary boundaries. Environ. Res. Lett., 8(4):044048 (2013) J. Rockström et al., A safe operating space for humanity. Nature 461 (7263), 472-475 (2009)

  11. Entrainment process of carbon dioxide in the atmospheric boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Gioli, B.; Miglietta, F.; Jonker, H.J.J.; Klein Baltink, H.; Hutjes, R.W.A.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    Aircraft and surface measurements of turbulent thermodynamic variables and carbon dioxide (CO2) were taken above a grassland in a convective atmospheric boundary layer. The observations were analyzed to assess the importance of the entrainment process for the distribution and evolution of carbon dio

  12. Carbon dioxide capture processes: Simulation, design and sensitivity analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaman, Muhammad; Lee, Jay Hyung; Gani, Rafiqul

    2012-01-01

    performance of the process to the L/G ratio to the absorber, CO2 lean solvent loadings, and striper pressure are presented in this paper. Based on the sensitivity analysis process optimization problems have been defined and solved and, a preliminary control structure selection has been made.......Carbon dioxide is the main greenhouse gas and its major source is combustion of fossil fuels for power generation. The objective of this study is to carry out the steady-state sensitivity analysis for chemical absorption of carbon dioxide capture from flue gas using monoethanolamine solvent. First...

  13. Drying of supercritical carbon dioxide with membrane processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohaus, Theresa; Scholz, Marco; Koziara, Beata T.; Benes, N.E.; Wessling, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    In supercritical extraction processes regenerating the supercritical fluid represents the main cost constraint. Membrane technology has potential for cost efficient regeneration of water-loaded supercritical carbon dioxide. In this study we have designed membrane-based processes to dehydrate water-l

  14. Systematic framework for carbon dioxide capture and utilization processes to reduce the global carbon dioxide emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frauzem, Rebecca; Plaza, Cristina Calvera; Gani, Rafiqul

    In the year 2013, 9.5 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide gas was emitted into the air, and each year this amount is increasing [1]. Carbon dioxide emissions are of particular concern as they represent 80% of greenhouse gas emissions and therefore are a large contributor to global warming. Among...... the two approaches that are currently being investigated, carbon capture and storage (CCS) and carbon capture and utilization (CCU) [1] to address this issue, the later approach is more promising as it reuses captured carbon dioxide, as a fuel, reactant, solvent, and others, to produce valuable products....... There is not only a need for technologies for capture and utilization, via conversion, but also there are numerous questions that need to be resolved. For example, which higher value chemicals can be produced, what are their current demands and costs of production, and, how much of the captured carbon dioxide would...

  15. Supercritical carbon dioxide process for pasteurization of fruit juices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2) nonthermal processing inactivates microorganisms in juices using non-toxic and non-reactive CO2. However, data is lacking on the inactivation of E. coli K12 and L. plantarum in apple cider using pilot plant scale SCCO2 equipment. For this study, pasteurized pres...

  16. A Virtual Laboratory for the 4 Bed Molecular Sieve of the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, Robert; Knox, James; O'Connor, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Ongoing work to improve water and carbon dioxide separation systems to be used on crewed space vehicles combines sub-scale systems testing and multi-physics simulations. Thus, as part of NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program and the Life Support Systems Project (LSSP), fully predictive COMSOL Multiphysics models of the Four Bed Molecular Sieve (4BMS) of the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) on the International Space Station (ISS) have been developed. This Virtual Laboratory is being used to help reduce mass, power, and volume requirements for exploration missions. In this paper we describe current and planned modeling developments in the area of carbon dioxide removal to support future missions as well as the resolution of anomalies observed in the ISS CDRA.

  17. Heliox Improves Carbon Dioxide Removal during Lung Protective Mechanical Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte J. Beurskens

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Helium is a noble gas with low density and increased carbon dioxide (CO2 diffusion capacity. This allows lower driving pressures in mechanical ventilation and increased CO2 diffusion. We hypothesized that heliox facilitates ventilation in patients during lung-protective mechanical ventilation using low tidal volumes. Methods. This is an observational cohort substudy of a single arm intervention study. Twenty-four ICU patients were included, who were admitted after a cardiac arrest and mechanically ventilated for 3 hours with heliox (50% helium; 50% oxygen. A fixed protective ventilation protocol (6 mL/kg was used, with prospective observation for changes in lung mechanics and gas exchange. Statistics was by Bonferroni post-hoc correction with statistical significance set at P<0.017. Results. During heliox ventilation, respiratory rate decreased (25±4 versus 23±5 breaths min−1, P=0.010. Minute volume ventilation showed a trend to decrease compared to baseline (11.1±1.9 versus 9.9±2.1 L min−1, P=0.026, while reducing PaCO2 levels (5.0±0.6 versus 4.5±0.6 kPa, P=0.011 and peak pressures (21.1±3.3 versus 19.8±3.2 cm H2O, P=0.024. Conclusions. Heliox improved CO2 elimination while allowing reduced minute volume ventilation in adult patients during protective mechanical ventilation.

  18. The removal of carbon dioxide with activated solutions of methyl-diethanol-amine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Elk, E. P.; Versteeg, G. F.; van Loo, S.

    2007-01-01

    The (bulk) removal of carbon-dioxide (CO2) from industrial gases, e.g. natural gas, is usually realized with a reactive absorption technique in which (non-)aqueous solutions of alkanolamines are used. From the absorption rate point of view, primary or secondary amines are preferred. However, in case

  19. The removal of carbon dioxide with activated solutions of methyl-diethanol-amine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loo, van S.; Elk, van E.P.; Versteeg, G.F.

    2007-01-01

    The (bulk) removal of carbon-dioxide (CO2) from industrial gases, e.g. natural gas, is usually realized with a reactive absorption technique in which (non-)aqueous solutions of alkanolamines are used. From the absorption rate point of view, primary or secondary amines are preferred. However, in cas

  20. Carbonate effects on hexavalent uranium removal from water by nanocrystalline titanium dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wazne, Mahmoud; Meng, Xiaoguang; Korfiatis, George P; Christodoulatos, Christos

    2006-08-10

    A novel nanocrystalline titanium dioxide was used to treat depleted uranium (DU)-contaminated water under neutral and alkaline conditions. The novel material had a total surface area of 329 m(2)/g, total surface site density of 11.0 sites/nm(2), total pore volume of 0.415 cm(3)/g and crystallite size of 6.0 nm. It was used in batch tests to remove U(VI) from synthetic solutions and contaminated water. However, the capacity of the nanocrystalline titanium dioxide to remove U(VI) from water decreased in the presence of inorganic carbonate at pH > 6.0. Adsorption isotherms, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and surface charge measurements were used to investigate the causes of the reduced capacity. The surface charge and the FTIR measurements suggested that the adsorbed U(VI) species was not complexed with carbonate at neutral pH values. The decreased capacity of titanium dioxide to remove U(VI) from water in the presence of carbonate at neutral to alkaline pH values was attributed to the aqueous complexation of U(VI) by inorganic carbonate. The nanocrystalline titanium dioxide had four times the capacity of commercially available titanium dixoide (Degussa P-25) to adsorb U(VI) from water at pH 6 and total inorganic carbonate concentration of 0.01 M. Consequently, the novel material was used to treat DU-contaminated water at a Department of Defense (DOD) site.

  1. Simultaneous Hydrogen Sulphide and Carbon Dioxide Removal from Biogas by Water-Swollen Reverse Osmosis Membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Dolejš, P. (Petr); Poštulka, V. (Václav); Sedláková, Z. (Zuzana); Jandová, V. (Věra); Vejražka, J. (Jiří); Esposito, E.; Jansen, J.C.; Izák, P. (Pavel)

    2014-01-01

    Biogas is a suitable alternative fuel if unwanted impurities are removed to avoid corrosion of the inner parts of an engine. A recent breakthrough in biogas purification showed that a thin hydrophilic composite membrane can create the selective water swollen barrier able to remove unwanted sour gases such as carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulphide owing to significantly higher water solubility of the latter in comparison to methane. This work presents the use of water–swollen membranes for the...

  2. Removal of residual chlorine from Indiana 5 coal by supercritical carbon dioxide extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocher, B.S.; Azzam, F.O.; Lee, S. (University of Akron, Akron, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1994-01-01

    The perchloroethylene coal desulfurization process has unique advantages as a precombustion coal cleaning process, that include high cleaning efficiencies, mild process conditions, minimal output of undesirable byproducts, and cost effectiveness. However, the use of perchloroethylene in the process renders an important process engineering problem of complete recovery and reuse of perchloroethylene, thus requiring a 'zero discharge' condition of the solvent. Therefore, the treated coal must be stripped of any residual perchloroethylene. Carbon dioxide (CO[sub 2]) in its supercritical state has been investigated for its ability to remove chlorine from Indiana 5 coal, that has been desulfurized by the perchloroethylene (PCE) process. The reduction of Cl content from a PCE treated and filtered coal has been as high as 78% by mass. The experiments have been carried out following a statistical experimental design and the discerning characteristics of the process have been identified. The solvent density and extraction conditions can be tailored in such a way as to optimally remove C from the coal without any detrimental effects on the coal matrix. The supercritical CO[sub 2] extraction process can be successfully implemented to the PCE coal cleaning process by replacing energy intensive steps of steam stripping and vacuum drying. 6 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Cyclic process for producing methane from carbon monoxide with heat removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Albert C.; Yang, Chang-lee

    1982-01-01

    Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams are converted to methane by a cyclic, essentially two-step process in which said carbon monoxide is disproportionated to form carbon dioxide and active surface carbon deposited on the surface of a catalyst, and said carbon is reacted with steam to form product methane and by-product carbon dioxide. The exothermic heat of reaction generated in each step is effectively removed during each complete cycle so as to avoid a build up of heat from cycle-to-cycle, with particularly advantageous techniques being employed for fixed bed, tubular and fluidized bed reactor operations.

  4. Carbon dioxide capture and nutrients removal utilizing treated sewage by concentrated microalgae cultivation in a membrane photobioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Ryo; Boonnorat, Jarungwit; Chiemchaisri, Chart; Chiemchaisri, Wilai; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2012-12-01

    A highly efficient microalgae cultivation process was developed for carbon dioxide capture using nutrients from treated sewage. A submerged-membrane filtration system was installed in a photobioreactor to achieve high nutrient loading and to maintain a high concentration and production of microalgae. Chlorella vulgaris, Botryococcus braunii and Spirulina platensis were continuously cultivated with simulated treated sewage and 1%-CO(2) gas. The optimum hydraulic retention time (HRT) and solids retention time (SRT) were explored to achieve the maximum CO(2) capture rate, nutrient removal rate and microalgae biomass productivity. The carbon dioxide capture rate and volumetric microalgae productivity were high when the reactor was operated under 1-day (HRT) and 18-days (SRT) conditions. The independent control of HRT and SRT is effective for efficient microalgae cultivation and carbon dioxide capture using treated sewage.

  5. Carbon dioxide utilization in a microalga-based biorefinery: Efficiency of carbon removal and economic performance under carbon taxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesberg, Igor Lapenda; Brigagão, George Victor; de Medeiros, José Luiz; de Queiroz Fernandes Araújo, Ofélia

    2017-03-08

    Coal-fired power plants are major stationary sources of carbon dioxide and environmental constraints demand technologies for abatement. Although Carbon Capture and Storage is the most mature route, it poses severe economic penalty to power generation. Alternatively, this penalty is potentially reduced by Carbon Capture and Utilization, which converts carbon dioxide to valuable products, monetizing it. This work evaluates a route consisting of carbon dioxide bio-capture by Chlorella pyrenoidosa and use of the resulting biomass as feedstock to a microalgae-based biorefinery; Carbon Capture and Storage route is evaluated as a reference technology. The integrated arrangement comprises: (a) carbon dioxide biocapture in a photobioreactor, (b) oil extraction from part of the produced biomass, (b) gasification of remaining biomass to obtain bio-syngas, and (c) conversion of bio-syngas to methanol. Calculation of capital and operational expenditures are estimated based on mass and energy balances obtained by process simulation for both routes (Carbon Capture and Storage and the biorefinery). Capital expenditure for the biorefinery is higher by a factor of 6.7, while operational expenditure is lower by a factor of 0.45 and revenues occur only for this route, with a ratio revenue/operational expenditure of 1.6. The photobioreactor is responsible for one fifth of the biorefinery capital expenditure, with footprint of about 1000 ha, posing the most significant barrier for technical and economic feasibility of the proposed biorefinery. The Biorefinery and Carbon Capture and Storage routes show carbon dioxide capture efficiency of 73% and 48%, respectively, with capture cost of 139$/t and 304$/t. Additionally, the biorefinery has superior performance in all evaluated metrics of environmental impacts.

  6. Effect of carbon dioxide and ammonium removal on pH changes in polishing ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, P F F; van Haandel, A; Lettinga, G

    2002-01-01

    If nutrient removal is to be obtained in ponds treating sewage, the pH must be raised so that ammonia can desorb and phosphates can precipitate. In this paper it is shown that the pH increase in ponds can be predicted quantitatively from simple stoichiometry, taking into consideration physical and biological carbon dioxide removal, ammonia stripping and calcium carbonate precipitation. Biological CO2 removal by photosynthesis is identified as the main process to effect pH increase in ponds. The rate of pH increase and consequently the required retention time depend on the net rate of CO2 consumption, the extent of ammonium stripping, the characteristics of the influent (alkalinity and pH) as well as factors concerning the environment (temperature) and dimensions (depth) of the pond. A high pH (range 9 to 10) can be obtained in about 5 days if digested sewage is used (low organic material concentration), climate conditions are favourable and the pond is shallow (< 0.5 m deep).

  7. Maximising biohydrogen yields via continuous electrochemical hydrogen removal and carbon dioxide scrubbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massanet-Nicolau, Jaime; Jones, Rhys Jon; Guwy, Alan; Dinsdale, Richard; Premier, Giuliano; Mulder, Martijn J J

    2016-10-01

    The use of electrochemical hydrogen removal (EHR) together with carbon dioxide removal (CDR) was demonstrated for the first time using a continuous hydrogen producing fermenter. CDR alone was found to increase hydrogen yields from 0.07molH2molhexose to 0.72molH2molhexose. When CDR was combined with EHR, hydrogen yields increased further to 1.79molH2molhexose. The pattern of carbohydrate utilisation and volatile fatty acid (VFA) production are consistent with the hypothesis that increased yields are the result of relieving end product inhibition and inhibition of microbial hydrogen consumption. In situ removal of hydrogen and carbon dioxide as demonstrated here not only increase hydrogen yield but also produces a relatively pure product gas and unlike other approaches can be used to enhance conventional, mesophilic, CSTR type fermentation of low grade/high solids biomass.

  8. Biofilm Removal Using Carbon Dioxide Aerosols without Nitrogen Purge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seongkyeol; Jang, Jaesung

    2016-11-06

    Biofilms can cause serious concerns in many applications. Not only can they cause economic losses, but they can also present a public health hazard. Therefore, it is highly desirable to remove biofilms from surfaces. Many studies on CO2 aerosol cleaning have employed nitrogen purges to increase biofilm removal efficiency by reducing the moisture condensation generated during the cleaning. However, in this study, periodic jets of CO2 aerosols without nitrogen purges were used to remove Pseudomonas putida biofilms from polished stainless steel surfaces. CO2 aerosols are mixtures of solid and gaseous CO2 and are generated when high-pressure CO2 gas is adiabatically expanded through a nozzle. These high-speed aerosols were applied to a biofilm that had been grown for 24 hr. The removal efficiency ranged from 90.36% to 98.29% and was evaluated by measuring the fluorescence intensity of the biofilm as the treatment time was varied from 16 sec to 88 sec. We also performed experiments to compare the removal efficiencies with and without nitrogen purges; the measured biofilm removal efficiencies were not significantly different from each other (t-test, p > 0.55). Therefore, this technique can be used to clean various bio-contaminated surfaces within one minute.

  9. Combustion systems and power plants incorporating parallel carbon dioxide capture and sweep-based membrane separation units to remove carbon dioxide from combustion gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijmans, Johannes G.; Merkel, Timothy C; Baker, Richard W.

    2011-10-11

    Disclosed herein are combustion systems and power plants that incorporate sweep-based membrane separation units to remove carbon dioxide from combustion gases. In its most basic embodiment, the invention is a combustion system that includes three discrete units: a combustion unit, a carbon dioxide capture unit, and a sweep-based membrane separation unit. In a preferred embodiment, the invention is a power plant including a combustion unit, a power generation system, a carbon dioxide capture unit, and a sweep-based membrane separation unit. In both of these embodiments, the carbon dioxide capture unit and the sweep-based membrane separation unit are configured to be operated in parallel, by which we mean that each unit is adapted to receive exhaust gases from the combustion unit without such gases first passing through the other unit.

  10. Carbon Dioxide Absorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    1950-05-17

    carbondioxide content of the solution was then determined. A gas mixture containing 2.6% carbon dioxide and 97.4% nitrogen was prepared in the...which carbon dioxide is removed by heat0 Since this step is usually carried out by "steam stripping ", that is, contacting the solution at its boiling...required to produce the steam required for stripping the carbon dioxide from the s olution. The method ueed in this investigation for determining the

  11. Made-to-order metal-organic frameworks for trace carbon dioxide removal and air capture

    KAUST Repository

    Shekhah, Osama

    2014-06-25

    Direct air capture is regarded as a plausible alternate approach that, if economically practical, can mitigate the increasing carbon dioxide emissions associated with two of the main carbon polluting sources, namely stationary power plants and transportation. Here we show that metal-organic framework crystal chemistry permits the construction of an isostructural metal-organic framework (SIFSIX-3-Cu) based on pyrazine/copper(II) two-dimensional periodic 4 4 square grids pillared by silicon hexafluoride anions and thus allows further contraction of the pore system to 3.5 versus 3.84 for the parent zinc(II) derivative. This enhances the adsorption energetics and subsequently displays carbon dioxide uptake and selectivity at very low partial pressures relevant to air capture and trace carbon dioxide removal. The resultant SIFSIX-3-Cu exhibits uniformly distributed adsorption energetics and offers enhanced carbon dioxide physical adsorption properties, uptake and selectivity in highly diluted gas streams, a performance, to the best of our knowledge, unachievable with other classes of porous materials. 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited.

  12. Early Implementation of Large Scale Carbon Dioxide Removal Projects through the Cement Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeman, F. S.

    2014-12-01

    The development of large-scale carbon dioxide reduction projects requires high purity CO2and a reactive cation source. A project seeking to provide both of these requirements will likely face cost barriers with current carbon prices. The cement industry is a suitable early implementation site for such projects by virtue of the properties of its exhaust gases and those of waste concrete. Cement plants are the second largest source of industrial CO2 emissions, globally. It is also the second largest commodity after water, has no ready substitute and is literally the foundation of society. Finally, half of the CO2 emissions originate from process reactions rather than fossil fuel combustion resulting in higher flue gas CO2concentrations. These properties, with the co-benefits of oxygen combustion, create a favorable environment for spatially suitable projects. Oxygen combustion involves substituting produced oxygen for air in a combustion reaction. The absence of gaseous N2 necessitates the recirculation of exhaust gases to maintain kiln temperatures, which increase the CO2 concentrations from 28% to 80% or more. Gas exit temperatures are also elevated (>300oC) and can reach higher temperatures if the multi stage pre-heater towers, that recover heat, are re-designed in light of FGR. A ready source of cations can be found in waste concrete, a by-product of construction and demolition activities. These wastes can be processed to remove cations and then reacted with atmospheric CO2 to produce carbonate minerals. While not carbon negative, they represent a demonstration opportunity for binding atmospheric CO2while producing a saleable product (precipitated calcium carbonate). This paper will present experimental results on PCC production from waste concrete along with modeling results for oxygen combustion at cement facilities. The results will be presented with a view to mineral sequestration process design and implementation.

  13. Carbon dioxide capture processes: Simulation, design and sensitivity analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaman, Muhammad; Lee, Jay Hyung; Gani, Rafiqul

    2012-01-01

    Carbon dioxide is the main greenhouse gas and its major source is combustion of fossil fuels for power generation. The objective of this study is to carry out the steady-state sensitivity analysis for chemical absorption of carbon dioxide capture from flue gas using monoethanolamine solvent. First...

  14. Carbon-Based Regenerable Sorbents for the Combined Carbon Dioxide and Ammonia Removal for the Primary Life Support System (PLSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtowicz, Marek A.; Cosgrove, Joseph E.; Serio, Michael A.; Manthina, Venkata; Singh, Prabhakar; Chullen, Cinda

    2014-01-01

    Results are presented on the development of reversible sorbents for the combined carbon dioxide and trace-contaminant (TC) removal for use in Extravehicular Activities (EVAs). Since ammonia is the most important TC to be captured, data on TC sorption presented in this paper are limited to ammonia, with results relevant to other TCs to be reported at a later time. The currently available life support systems use separate units for carbon dioxide, trace contaminants, and moisture control, and the long-term objective is to replace the above three modules with a single one. Furthermore, the current TC-control technology involves the use of a packed bed of acid-impregnated granular charcoal, which is non-regenerable, and the carbon-based sorbent under development in this project can be regenerated by exposure to vacuum at room temperature. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of using carbon sorbents for the reversible, concurrent sorption of carbon dioxide and ammonia. Several carbon sorbents were fabricated and tested, and multiple adsorption/vacuum-regeneration cycles were demonstrated at room temperature, and also a carbon surface conditioning technique that enhances the combined carbon dioxide and ammonia sorption without impairing sorbent regeneration.

  15. Application of a systematic methodology for sustainable carbon dioxide utilization process design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plaza, Cristina Calvera; Frauzem, Rebecca; Gani, Rafiqul

    gases are carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide, of which carbon dioxide is the highest constituent at 82%. Furthermore, the amount of carbon dioxide emissions is growing with time. These trends make it evident that there is a need for methods to reduce these greenhouse gases emissions. While...... there are two methods of reducing carbon dioxide emissions, carbon capture and storage (CCS) and carbon capture and utilization (CCU), CCU is considered promising as it makes further use of the carbon dioxide as a solvent, raw material, and reagent to produce valuable products [1]. Using such utilization...... processes, the emissions can be reduced as they are being utilized and profit can be obtained, or the cost of operation for the carbon dioxide treatment can be returned, through this utilization process. In order to systematically reduce such emissions, carbon capture and utilization is considered rather...

  16. Removal of hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide by carbons impregnated with triethylenediamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li-Chun; Chang, Tsu-Hua; Chung, Ying-Chien

    2007-12-01

    Activated carbon (AC) adsorption has long been considered to be a readily available technology for providing protection against exposure to acutely toxic gases. However, ACs without chemical impregnation have proven to be much less efficient than impregnated ACs in terms of gas removal. The impregnated ACs in current use are usually modified with metalloid impregnation agents (ASC-carbons; copper, chromium, or silver) to simultaneously enhance the chemical and physical properties of the ACs in removing specific poisonous gases. These metalloid agents, however, can cause acute poisoning to both humans and the environment, thereby necessitating the search for organic impregnation agents that present a much lower risk. The aim of the study reported here was to assess AC or ASC-carbon impregnated with triethylenediamine (TEDA) in terms of its adsorption capability for simulated hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) gases. The investigation was undergone in a properly designed laboratory-scale and industrial fume hood evaluation. Using the system reported here, we obtained a significant adsorption: the removal capability for H2S and SO2 was 375 and 229 mg/g-C, respectively. BET measurements, element analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectrometry identified the removal mechanism for TEDA-impregnated AC to be both chemical and physical adsorption. Chemical adsorption and oxidation were the primary means by which TEDA-impregnated ASC-carbons removed the simulated gases.

  17. Trade-offs between solar radiation management, carbon dioxide removal, emissions mitigation and adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Naomi; Lenton, Timothy

    2010-05-01

    The possible use of solar radiation control strategies to counteract global warming is explored through a number scenarios of different anthropogenic CO2 emission reduction pathways and carbon dioxide removal interventions. Using a simple Earth system model, we illustrate the trade-offs between CO2 emission reduction, the use of carbon dioxide removal geoengineering interventions (‘negative emissions') and solar radiation management (SRM). These relationships are illustrated over a multi-centennial timescale, allowing sufficient time for the carbon-cycle to respond to the anthropogenic perturbation. The anthropogenic CO2 emission scenarios (focussing on those from fossil fuel combustion) range from more to less stringent mitigation of emissions and includes the scenario assumed in our previous work on the maximum cooling potential of different geoengineering options. Results are presented in terms of transient atmospheric CO2 concentration and global mean temperature from year 1900 to year 2500. Implementation of solar radiation control strategies requires an understanding of the timing and effect of terminating such an intervention, a so called ‘exit strategy'. The results illustrate a number of considerations regarding exit strategies, including the inherent commitment to either carbon dioxide removal interventions, or the length of time the solar radiation control mechanism must be maintained for. The impacts of the various trade-offs are also discussed in the context of adaptation and adaptive resilience. The results have a bearing on policy and long term planning by illustrating some of the important assumptions regarding implementation of solar radiation management. These include baseline assumptions about emission mitigation efforts, timescale of intervention maintenance and impacts on adaptation.

  18. Space Station Freedom carbon dioxide removal assembly two-stage rotary sliding vane pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteau, Dennis

    1992-07-01

    The design and development of a positive displacement pump selected to operate as an essential part of the carbon dioxide removal assembly (CDRA) are described. An oilless two-stage rotary sliding vane pump was selected as the optimum concept to meet the CDRA application requirements. This positive displacement pump is characterized by low weight and small envelope per unit flow, ability to pump saturated gases and moderate amount of liquid, small clearance volumes, and low vibration. It is easily modified to accommodate several stages on a single shaft optimizing space and weight, which makes the concept ideal for a range of demanding space applications.

  19. Foliage plants for indoor removal of the primary combustion gases carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolverton, B. C.; Mcdonald, R. C.; Mesick, H. H.

    1985-01-01

    Foliage plants were evaluated for their ability to sorb carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide, the two primary gases produced during the combustion of fossil fuels and tobacco. The spider plant (Chlorophytum elatum var. vittatum) could sorb 2.86 micrograms CO/sq cm leaf surface in a 6 h photoperiod. The golden pothos (Scindapsus aureus) sorbed 0.98 micrograms CO/sq cm leaf surface in the same time period. In a system with the spider plant, greater than or equal to 99 percent of an initial concentration of 47 ppm NO2 could be removed in 6 h from a void volume of approximately 0.35 cu m. One spider plant potted in a 3.8 liter container can sorb 3300 micrograms CO and effect the removal of 8500 micrograms NO2/hour, recognizing the fact that a significant fraction of NO2 at high concentrations will be lost by surface sorption, dissolving in moisture, etc.

  20. An evaluation of autotrophic microbes for the removal of carbon dioxide from combustion gas streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, W.A.; Walton, M.R.; Dugan, P.R. (EG G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Center for Biological Processing Technology)

    1994-11-01

    Carbon dioxide is a greenhouse gas that is believed to be a major contributor to global warming. Studies have shown that significant amounts of CO[sub 2] are released into the atmosphere as a result of fossil fuels combustion. Therefore, considerable interest exists in effective and economical technologies for the removal of CO[sub 2] from fossil fuel combustion gas streams. This work evaluated the use of autotrophic microbes for the removal of CO[sub 2] from coal fired power plant combustion gas streams. The CO[sub 2] removal rates of the following autotrophic microbes were determined: [ital Chlorella pyrenoidosa], [ital Euglena gracilis], [ital Thiobacillus ferrooxidans], [ital Aphanocapsa delicatissima], [ital Isochrysis galbana], [ital Phaodactylum tricornutum], [ital Navicula tripunctata schizonemoids], [ital Gomphonema parvulum], [ital Surirella ovata ovata], and four algal consortia. Of those tested, [ital Chlorella pyrenoidosa] exhibited the highest removal rate with 2.6 g CO[sub 2] per day per g dry weight of biomass being removed under optimized conditions. Extrapolation of these data indicated that to remove CO[sub 2] from the combustion gases of a coal fired power plant burning 2.4 x 10[sup 4] metric tons of coal per day would require a bioreactor 386 km[sup 2] x 1m deep and would result in the production of 2.13 x 10[sup 5] metric tons (wet weight) of biomass per day. Based on these calculations, it was concluded that autotrophic CO[sub 2] removal would not be feasible at most locations, and as a result, alternate technologies for CO[sub 2] removal should be explored. 14 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Mixed Matrix Composite Membranes Containing POSS Molecules for Carbon Dioxide Removal Application

    KAUST Repository

    Rini, Eki Listya

    2011-05-10

    CO2 removal by membrane processes is considerably potential for several applications such as natural gas and synthesis gas purification, enhanced oil recovery application, and carbon dioxide capture in combat against global warming. Dense polymeric membranes are commonly utilized for these type of gas separation applications. Nevertheless, the intrinsic properties of dense polymeric membranes, which commonly characterize by the low gas permeability versus high gas selectivity trade–off or vice versa, is less desirable. In order to meet the increased demand of CO2 removal, a strategy to improve the gas separation performance of a polymeric membrane is investigated in this study. With this regard, mixed matrix membranes in which inorganic non porous fillers are incorporated into a polymeric matrix were prepared to achieve the aforementioned objective. The mixed matrix membranes were prepared from Pebax® block copolymers and PEG POSS® molecules. These hybrid membranes were formed as both dense and multilayer composite membranes. The dense transparent membranes with well–dispersed fillers could be obtained by variation of the solvent mixture. The DSC analyses showed that incorporation of PEG POSS® into Pebax® matrix altered the thermal properties of the matrix. The multilayer composite membranes were then prepared from a PTMSP gutter layer deposited on a PAN porous support and an adjacent hybrid Pebax®/PEG POSS® as the top layer. These hybrid multilayer composite membranes exhibited an enhanced CO2 selectiv4 ity by a factor of two relative to the pure Pebax®. In these hybrid systems, the CO2 separation was presumably enhanced by the high ether oxides content from PEG POSS® that has high affinities for CO2. For particular composition of Pebax® and PEG POSS® concentrations, the PTMSP gutter layer harnessed the CO2 selectivity without losing the CO2 permeation rate. At the same time, these membrane, however, suffered severe adhesion between the gutter layer

  2. Collateral transgression of planetary boundaries due to climate engineering by terrestrial carbon dioxide removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Vera; Donges, Jonathan F.; Lucht, Wolfgang

    2016-10-01

    The planetary boundaries framework provides guidelines for defining thresholds in environmental variables. Their transgression is likely to result in a shift in Earth system functioning away from the relatively stable Holocene state. As the climate system is approaching critical thresholds of atmospheric carbon, several climate engineering methods are discussed, aiming at a reduction of atmospheric carbon concentrations to control the Earth's energy balance. Terrestrial carbon dioxide removal (tCDR) via afforestation or bioenergy production with carbon capture and storage are part of most climate change mitigation scenarios that limit global warming to less than 2 °C. We analyse the co-evolutionary interaction of societal interventions via tCDR and the natural dynamics of the Earth's carbon cycle. Applying a conceptual modelling framework, we analyse how the degree of anticipation of the climate problem and the intensity of tCDR efforts with the aim of staying within a "safe" level of global warming might influence the state of the Earth system with respect to other carbon-related planetary boundaries. Within the scope of our approach, we show that societal management of atmospheric carbon via tCDR can lead to a collateral transgression of the planetary boundary of land system change. Our analysis indicates that the opportunities to remain in a desirable region within carbon-related planetary boundaries only exist for a small range of anticipation levels and depend critically on the underlying emission pathway. While tCDR has the potential to ensure the Earth system's persistence within a carbon-safe operating space under low-emission pathways, it is unlikely to succeed in a business-as-usual scenario.

  3. Carbon dioxide removal system for closed loop atmosphere revitalization, candidate sorbents screening and test results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattox, E. M.; Knox, J. C.; Bardot, D. M.

    2013-05-01

    Due to the difficulty and expense it costs to resupply manned-spacecraft habitats, a goal is to create a closed loop atmosphere revitalization system, in which precious commodities such as oxygen, carbon dioxide, and water are continuously recycled. Our aim is to test other sorbents for their capacity for future spacecraft missions, such as on the Orion spacecraft, or possibly lunar or Mars mission habitats to see if they would be better than the zeolite sorbents on the 4-bed molecular sieve. Some of the materials being tested are currently used for other industry applications. Studying these sorbents for their specific spacecraft application is different from that for applications on earth because in space, there are certain power, mass, and volume limitations that are not as critical on Earth. In manned-spaceflight missions, the sorbents are exposed to a much lower volume fraction of CO2 (0.6% volume CO2) than on Earth. LiLSX was tested for its CO2 capacity in an atmosphere like that of the ISS. Breakthrough tests were run to establish the capacities of these materials at a partial pressure of CO2 that is seen on the ISS. This paper discusses experimental results from benchmark materials, such as results previously obtained from tests on Grade 522, and the forementioned candidate materials for the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) system.

  4. Development of Carbon Dioxide Removal Systems for Advanced Exploration Systems 2014-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, James C.; Coker, Robert; Huff, Timothy L.; Gatens, Robyn; Miller, Lee A.; Stanley, Christine

    2015-01-01

    A long-term goal for NASA is to enable crewed missions to Mars: first to the vicinity of Mars, and then to the Mars surface. These missions present new challenges for all aspects of spacecraft design in comparison with the International Space Station, as resupply is unavailable in the transit phase, and early return is not possible. Additionally, mass, power, and volume must be minimized for all phases to reduce propulsion needs. Mass reduction is particularly crucial for Mars surface landing and liftoff due to the challenges inherent in these operations for even much smaller payloads. In this paper we describe current and planned developments in the area of carbon dioxide removal to support future crewed Mars missions. Activities are also described that apply to both the resolution of anomalies observed in the ISS CDRA and the design of life support systems for future missions.

  5. Process systems engineering issues and applications towards reducing carbon dioxide emissions through conversion technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roh, Kosan; Frauzem, Rebecca; Gani, Rafiqul

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews issues and applications for design of sustainable carbon dioxide conversion processes, specifically through chemical conversion, and the integration of the conversion processes with other systems from a process systems engineering (PSE) view-point. Systematic and computer...... conversion processes with other systems including coexisting infrastructure and carbon dioxide sources is described.Then, the importance of PSE based studies for such application is discussed. Finally, some perspectives on the status and future directions of carbon dioxide conversion technology...... and the development and use of PSE approaches are given....

  6. Application of Vacuum Swing Adsorption for Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor Removal from Manned Spacecraft Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, J.; Howard, D.

    2007-01-01

    In NASA's Vision for Space Exploration (Bush, 2004), (Griffin, 2007), humans will once again travel beyond the confines of earth's gravity, this time to remain there for extended periods. These forays will place unprecedented demands on launch systems. They must not only blast out of earth's gravity well as during the Apollo moon missions, but also liftoff the supplies needed to sustain a larger crew over much longer periods. Thus all spacecraft systems, including those for the separation of metabolic carbon dioxide and water from a crewed vehicle, must be minimized with respect to mass, power, and volume. Emphasis is also placed on system robustness both to minimize replacement parts and ensure crew safety when a quick return to earth is not possible. For short-term phases of manned space exploration, such as transit from the earth to the moon, venting of metabolic carbon dioxide and water to space is more efficient than the inclusion of large recycling systems on the spacecraft. The baseline system for the Orion spacecraft is an amine-based vacuum swing system (Smith, Perry et aI., 2006). As part of the development of an alternative approach, a sorbent-based CO2 and H2O removal system (Knox, Adams et aI., 2006), subscale testing was conducted to evaluate potential performance improvements obtainable by recuperating the heat of adsorption to aid in vacuum desorption. This bed design is shown in Figure 1, is depicted here with a lattice structure instead of reticulated foam for heat transfer. The slot widths are approximately 1.2 mm wide and 8.5 mm long. Bed depth is approximately 4.7 mm. Headers (not shown) were produced by the stereo lithography apparatus at MSFC.

  7. Carbon Dioxide Removal and Conversion to Ocean Alkalinity: Why and How

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, G. H.

    2014-12-01

    Drastic reduction in anthropogenic CO2 emissions is the most obvious way to stabilize atmospheric CO2. However, there is growing risk that effective emissions reduction policies and technologies will not engage soon enough to avoid significant CO2-induced climate and ocean acidification impacts. This realization has lead to increased interest (e.g., IPCC AR5, 2014; NRC/NAS, 2014) in the possibility of pro-actively increasing CO2 removal (CDR) from the atmosphere above the 55% of our emissions that are already removed from air by natural land and ocean processes. While a variety of biotic, abiotic, and hybrid CDR methods have been proposed, those involving geochemistry have much to recommend them. These methods employ the same geochemical reactions that naturally and effectively remove excess planetary CO2 and neutralize ocean acidity on geologic time scales. These reactions proceed when the hydrosphere, acidified by excess air CO2, contacts and reacts with carbonate and silicate minerals (>90% of the Earth's crust), producing dissolved bicarbonates and carbonates, i.e., ocean alkalinity. This alkalinity is eventually removed and the excess carbon stored via carbonate precipitation. So while the importance and global effectiveness of such reactions are not in question, it remains to be seen if this very slow, natural CDR could be safely and cost-effectively accelerated to help manage air CO2 levels on human rather than geologic time scales. Various terrestrial and marine, geochemistry-based CDR methods will be reviewed including: 1) the addition of minerals to soils and the ocean, 2) removal of CO2 from waste streams, esp. from biomass energy, via wet mineral contacting, and 3) the production and use of mineral derivatives, e.g. oxides or hydroxides, as CDR agents. The additional potential environmental benefits (e.g., reversal of ocean carbonate saturation loss) and impacts (e.g., increased mineral extraction), as well as potential economics will also be discussed.

  8. Membrane loop process for separating carbon dioxide for use in gaseous form from flue gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijmans, Johannes G; Baker, Richard W; Merkel, Timothy C

    2016-09-06

    The invention is a process involving membrane-based gas separation for separating and recovering carbon dioxide emissions from combustion processes in partially concentrated form, and then transporting the carbon dioxide and using or storing it in a confined manner without concentrating it to high purity. The process of the invention involves building up the concentration of carbon dioxide in a gas flow loop between the combustion step and a membrane separation step. A portion of the carbon dioxide-enriched gas can then be withdrawn from this loop and transported, without the need to liquefy the gas or otherwise create a high-purity stream, to a destination where it is used or confined, preferably in an environmentally benign manner.

  9. Removal of diclofenac by conventional drinking water treatment processes and granular activated carbon filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigobello, Eliane Sloboda; Dantas, Angela Di Bernardo; Di Bernardo, Luiz; Vieira, Eny Maria

    2013-06-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the efficiency of conventional drinking water treatment processes with and without pre-oxidation with chlorine and chlorine dioxide and the use of granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration for the removal of diclofenac (DCF). Water treatment was performed using the Jar test with filters on a lab scale, employing nonchlorinated artesian well water prepared with aquatic humic substances to yield 20HU true color, kaolin turbidity of 70 NTU and 1mgL(-1) DCF. For the quantification of DCF in water samples, solid phase extraction and HPLC-DAD methods were developed and validated. There was no removal of DCF in coagulation with aluminum sulfate (3.47mgAlL(-1) and pH=6.5), flocculation, sedimentation and sand filtration. In the treatment with pre-oxidation and disinfection, DCF was partially removed, but the concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was unchanged and byproducts of DCF were observed. Chlorine dioxide was more effective than chorine in oxidizing DCF. In conclusion, the identification of DCF and DOC in finished water indicated the incomplete elimination of DCF through conventional treatments. Nevertheless, conventional drinking water treatment followed by GAC filtration was effective in removing DCF (⩾99.7%). In the oxidation with chlorine, three byproducts were tentatively identified, corresponding to a hydroxylation, aromatic substitution of one hydrogen by chlorine and a decarboxylation/hydroxylation. Oxidation with chlorine dioxide resulted in only one byproduct (hydroxylation).

  10. Reliability and Maintainability Analysis for the Amine Swingbed Carbon Dioxide Removal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Tyler

    2016-01-01

    I have performed a reliability & maintainability analysis for the Amine Swingbed payload system. The Amine Swingbed is a carbon dioxide removal technology that has gone through 2,400 hours of International Space Station on-orbit use between 2013 and 2016. While the Amine Swingbed is currently an experimental payload system, the Amine Swingbed may be converted to system hardware. If the Amine Swingbed becomes system hardware, it will supplement the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) as the primary CO2 removal technology on the International Space Station. NASA is also considering using the Amine Swingbed as the primary carbon dioxide removal technology for future extravehicular mobility units and for the Orion, which will be used for the Asteroid Redirect and Journey to Mars missions. The qualitative component of the reliability and maintainability analysis is a Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA). In the FMEA, I have investigated how individual components in the Amine Swingbed may fail, and what the worst case scenario is should a failure occur. The significant failure effects are the loss of ability to remove carbon dioxide, the formation of ammonia due to chemical degradation of the amine, and loss of atmosphere because the Amine Swingbed uses the vacuum of space to regenerate the Amine Swingbed. In the quantitative component of the reliability and maintainability analysis, I have assumed a constant failure rate for both electronic and nonelectronic parts. Using this data, I have created a Poisson distribution to predict the failure rate of the Amine Swingbed as a whole. I have determined a mean time to failure for the Amine Swingbed to be approximately 1,400 hours. The observed mean time to failure for the system is between 600 and 1,200 hours. This range includes initial testing of the Amine Swingbed, as well as software faults that are understood to be non-critical. If many of the commercial parts were switched to military-grade parts, the expected

  11. Photocatalytic oxidation and removal of arsenite by titanium dioxide supported on granular activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shu Hua; Jia, Yong Feng; Zhao, Shan Lin

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic contamination in drinking water is a worldwide concern. Photocatalysis can rapidly oxidize arsenite, i.e. As(III), to less labile arsenate, i.e. As(V), which then can be removed by adsorption on to various adsorbents. This study investigated the photocatalytic oxidation of arsenite in aqueous solution by granular activated carbon supporting a titanium dioxide photocatalyst (GAC-TiO2). The effects of photocatalyst dosage, solution pH values, initial concentration of As(III) and co-anions (SO4(2-), PO4(3-), SiO3(2-) and Cl-) on the oxidation of As(III) were studied. The photocatalytic oxidation of As(III) took place in minutes and followed first-order kinetics. The presence of phosphate and silicate significantly decreased As(III) oxidation, while the effect of sulphate, chloride was insignificant. The oxidation efficiency of As(III) was observed to increase with increasing pH. The results suggest that the supported photocatalyst developed in this study is an ideal candidate for pre-oxidation treatment of arsenic-contaminated water.

  12. Hydrocarbon Synthesis from Carbon Dioxide and Hydrogen: A Two-Step Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-14

    with an immersion cooler (SP Scientific) in a water bath, and the product gas stream was first dried over a bed of 3 Å molecular sieves prior to GC...Commonwealth realm Crown government in the course of their duties. Article Hydrocarbon Synthesis from Carbon Dioxide and Hydrogen: A Two-Step Process...AUG 2013 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2013 to 00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Hydrocarbon Synthesis from Carbon Dioxide and Hydrogen: A

  13. Modelling of tetrahydrofuran promoted gas hydrate systems for carbon dioxide capture processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herslund, Peter Jørgensen; Thomsen, Kaj; Abildskov, Jens

    2014-01-01

    accurate descriptions of both fluid- and hydrate phase equilibria in the studied system and its subsystems. The developed model is applied to simulate two simplified, gas hydrate-based processes for post-combustion carbon dioxide capture from power station flue gases. The first process, an unpromoted...... hydrate process, operates isothermally at a temperature of 280. K. Applying three consecutive hydrate formation/dissociation stages (three-stage capture process), a carbon dioxide-rich product (97. mol%) is finally delivered at a temperature of 280. K and a pressure of 3.65. MPa. The minimum pressure...... requirement of the first stage is estimated to be 24.9. MPa, corresponding to the incipient hydrate dissociation pressure at 280. K for the considered flue gas. A second simulated carbon dioxide capture process uses tetrahydrofuran as a thermodynamic promoter to reduce the pressure requirements. By doing so...

  14. SEMICONDUCTOR TECHNOLOGY Supercritical carbon dioxide process for releasing stuck cantilever beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hui; Chaoqun, Gao; Lei, Wang; Yupeng, Jing

    2010-10-01

    The multi-SCCO2 (supercritical carbon dioxide) release and dry process based on our specialized SCCO2 semiconductor process equipment is investigated and the releasing mechanism is discussed. The experiment results show that stuck cantilever beams were held up again under SCCO2 high pressure treatment and the repeatability of this process is nearly 100%.

  15. Simultaneous removal of sulfur dioxide and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from incineration flue gas using activated carbon fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen-Shu; Li, Wen-Kai; Hung, Ming-Jui

    2014-09-01

    Incineration flue gas contains polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and sulfur dioxide (SO2). The effects of SO2 concentration (0, 350, 750, and 1000 ppm), reaction temperature (160, 200, and 280 degrees C), and the type of activated carbon fibers (ACFs) on the removal of SO2 and PAHs by ACFs were examined in this study. A fluidized bed incinerator was used to simulate practical incineration flue gas. It was found that the presence of SO2 in the incineration flue gas could drastically decrease removal of PAHs because of competitive adsorption. The effect of rise in the reaction temperature from 160 to 280 degrees C on removal of PAHs was greater than that on SO2 removal at an SO2 concentration of 750 ppm. Among the three ACFs studied, ACF-B, with the highest microporous volume, highest O content, and the tightest structure, was the best adsorbent for removing SO2 and PAHs when these gases coexisted in the incineration flue gas. Implications: Simultaneous adsorption of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) emitted from incineration flue gas onto activated carbon fibers (ACFs) meant to devise a new technique showed that the presence of SO2 in the incineration flue gas leads to a drastic decrease in removal of PAHs because of competitive adsorption. Reaction temperature had a greater influence on PAHs removal than on SO2 removal. ACF-B, with the highest microporous volume, highest O content, and tightest structure among the three studied ACFs, was found to be the best adsorbent for removing SO2 and PAHs.

  16. Aspects of carbon dioxide utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omae, Iwao [Omae Research Laboratories, 335-23 Mizuno, Sayama, Saitama 350-1317 (Japan)

    2006-06-30

    Carbon dioxide reacts with hydrogen, alcohols, acetals, epoxides, amines, carbon-carbon unsaturated compounds, etc. in supercritical carbon dioxide or in other solvents in the presence of metal compounds as catalysts. The products of these reactions are formic acid, formic acid esters, formamides, methanol, dimethyl carbonate, alkylene carbonates, carbamic acid esters, lactones, carboxylic acids, polycarbonate (bisphenol-based engineering polymer), aliphatic polycarbonates, etc. Especially, the productions of formic acid, formic acid methyl ester and dimethylformamide with a ruthenium catalyst; dimethyl carbonate and urethanes with a dialkyltin catalyst; 2-pyrone with a nickel-phosphine catalyst; diphenyl carbonate with a lead phenoxide catalyst; the alternating copolymerization of carbon dioxide and epoxides with a zinc catalyst has attracted attentions as the industrial utilizations of carbon dioxide. The further development of these production processes is expected. (author)

  17. Carbon dioxide capture from a cement manufacturing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blount, Gerald C.; Falta, Ronald W.; Siddall, Alvin A.

    2011-07-12

    A process of manufacturing cement clinker is provided in which a clean supply of CO.sub.2 gas may be captured. The process also involves using an open loop conversion of CaO/MgO from a calciner to capture CO.sub.2 from combustion flue gases thereby forming CaCO.sub.3/CaMg(CO.sub.3).sub.2. The CaCO.sub.3/CaMg(CO.sub.3).sub.2 is then returned to the calciner where CO.sub.2 gas is evolved. The evolved CO.sub.2 gas, along with other evolved CO.sub.2 gases from the calciner are removed from the calciner. The reactants (CaO/MgO) are feed to a high temperature calciner for control of the clinker production composition.

  18. Fractionation of whey protein isolate with supercritical carbon dioxideprocess modeling and cost estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    An economical and environmentally friendly whey protein fractionation process was developed using supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) as an acid to produce enriched fractions of alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-La) and beta-lactoglobulin (beta-Lg) from a commercial whey protein isolate (WPI) containing 55% ...

  19. Removals of aqueous sulfur dioxide and hydrogen sulfide using CeO2-NiAl-LDHs coating activated carbon and its mix with carbon nano-tubes

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jing

    2015-07-01

    Ce-doped NiAl/layered double hydroxide was coated at activated carbon by urea hydrolysis method (CeO2-NiAl-LDHs/AC) in one pot, which was characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectra, field emission scanning electron microscope and electrochemical techniques. CeO2-NiAl-LDHs/AC shows good uptake for aqueous sulfur dioxide (483.09mg/g) and hydrogen sulfide (181.15mg/g), respectively at 25°C. Meanwhile, the electrochemical removals of aqueous sulfur dioxide and hydrogen sulfide were respectively investigated at the mix of CeO2-NiAl-LDHs/AC and carbon nano-tubes modified homed paraffin-impregnated electrode. Both sulfur dioxide and hydrogen sulfide could be effectively oxidized to sulfuric acid at 1.0V in alkaline aqueous solution. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.

  20. Removal of SU-8 photoresist using buckling-driven delamination assisted with a carbon dioxide snow jet for microfluidics fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sheng-Chung; Lin, Yu-Cheng

    2007-12-01

    A new, environmentally friendly, inexpensive and non-destructive method for removing SU-8 after being an electroplating mold in microfluidic fabrication is demonstrated in this paper. A controllable thermal delaminating method assisted by an efficient high-speed aerosol jet consisting of two major steps, delamination followed by removal by lifting, is presented. Experiments with the thermal process, operated at a rising temperature ΔT of 340 °C for 30 min, were carried out. Four delaminations were observed and the critical buckling stresses were calculated to be 38.98, 35.24, 42.04 and 41.26 MPa, respectively. The results show that these delaminations occurred at a rising temperature ΔT of 290, 260.5, 314.7 and 308.5 °C, respectively. The morphology of the thermal buckling-driven delamination was edge initiated and straight sided. The effects of the carbon dioxide (CO2) snow jet at a distance of 10 mm from the nozzle exit as well as the lift force Fdp, drag force Fd and impact force Fi were determined to be 79 × 10-3 N, 0.625 × 10-3 N and (1.65-4.95) × 10-3 N, respectively. Based on the analysis of the lift, drag and impact forces, the lifting force dominates the effects of the CO2 snow jet and is tens of times larger than the others. The experiments and analyses showed that the best distance for the CO2 snow jet to the nozzle exit was 6-10 mm.

  1. Utilization of the cyanobacteria Anabaena sp CH1 in biological carbon dioxide mitigation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, C.L.; Lee, C.M.; Chen, P.C. [Hungkuang University, Taichung (Taiwan)

    2011-05-15

    Before switching totally to alternative fuel stage, CO{sub 2} mitigation process has considered a transitional strategy for combustion of fossil fuels inevitably. In comparison to other CO{sub 2} mitigation options, such as oceanic or geologic injection, the biological photosynthetic process would present a far superior and sustainable solution under both environmental and social considerations. The utilization of the cyanobacteria Anabaena sp. CH1 in carbon dioxide mitigation processes is analyzed in our research. It was found that an original developed photobioreactor with internal light source exhibits high light utilization. Anabaena sp. CH1 demonstrates excellent CO{sub 2} tolerance even at 15% CO{sub 2} level. This enables flue gas from power plant to be directly introduced to Anabaena sp. CH1 culture. Double light intensity and increased 47% CO{sub 2} bubble retention time could enhance CO{sub 2} removal efficiencies by 79% and 67%, respectively. A maximum CO{sub 2} fixation rate of 1.01 g CO{sub 2} L{sup -1} day{sup -1} was measured experimentally.

  2. CARBON DIOXIDE REDUCTION SYSTEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CARBON DIOXIDE , *SPACE FLIGHT, RESPIRATION, REDUCTION(CHEMISTRY), RESPIRATION, AEROSPACE MEDICINE, ELECTROLYSIS, INSTRUMENTATION, ELECTROLYTES, VOLTAGE, MANNED, YTTRIUM COMPOUNDS, ZIRCONIUM COMPOUNDS, NICKEL.

  3. Carbon Dioxide Fountain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seong-Joo; Ryu, Eun-Hee

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the development of a carbon dioxide fountain. The advantages of the carbon dioxide fountain are that it is odorless and uses consumer chemicals. This experiment also is a nice visual experiment that allows students to see evidence of a gaseous reagent being consumed when a pressure sensor is available. (Contains 3 figures.)…

  4. Carbon Dioxide and Climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Peter G.

    1978-01-01

    The amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is increasing at a rate that could cause significant warming of the Earth's climate in the not too distant future. Oceanographers are studying the role of the ocean as a source of carbon dioxide and as a sink for the gas. (Author/BB)

  5. Mini-Review:Green sustainable processes using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RAMSEY Edward; SUN Qiubai; ZHANG Zhiqiang; ZHANG Chongmin; GOU Wei

    2009-01-01

    Environmentally benign carbon dioxide offers significant potential in its supercritical fluid phase to replace current reliance on a range of hazardous,relatively expensive and environmentally damaging organic solvents that are used on an extensive global basis.The unique combination of the physical properties of supercritical fluids are being exploited and further researched to continue the development and establishment of high efficiency,compact plant to provide energy and water efficient manufacturing processes.This mini-review is focused on the use and potential applications of supercritical fluid carbon dioxide for a selected range of key and emerging industrial processes as a sustainable alternative to totally eliminate or greatly reduce the requirement of numerous conventional organic solvents.Examples of the industries include:chemical extraction and purification,synthetic chemical reactions including polymerization and inorganic catalytic processes.Biochemical reactions involving enzymes,particle size engineering,textile dyeing and advanced material manufacture provide further illustrations of vital industrial activities where supercritical fluid technology processes are being implemented or developed.Some aspects relating to the economics of sustainable supercritical fluid carbon dioxide processes are also considered.

  6. Mini-review: green sustainable processes using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Edward; Sun, Qiubai; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Chongmin; Gou, Wei

    2009-01-01

    Environmentally benign carbon dioxide offers significant potential in its supercritical fluid phase to replace current reliance on a range of hazardous, relatively expensive and environmentally damaging organic solvents that are used on an extensive global basis. The unique combination of the physical properties of supercritical fluids are being exploited and further researched to continue the development and establishment of high efficiency, compact plant to provide energy and water efficient manufacturing processes. This mini-review is focused on the use and potential applications of supercritical fluid carbon dioxide for a selected range of key and emerging industrial processes as a sustainable alternative to totally eliminate or greatly reduce the requirement of numerous conventional organic solvents. Examples of the industries include: chemical extraction and purification, synthetic chemical reactions including polymerization and inorganic catalytic processes. Biochemical reactions involving enzymes, particle size engineering, textile dyeing and advanced material manufacture provide further illustrations of vital industrial activities where supercritical fluid technology processes are being implemented or developed. Some aspects relating to the economics of sustainable supercritical fluid carbon dioxide processes are also considered.

  7. The removal of carbon dioxide in biogas by propylene carbonate in packed column%填料塔中碳酸丙烯酯脱除沼气中的CO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    聂红; 江皓; 种道文; 吴全贵; 徐春明; 周红军

    2013-01-01

    Utilizing biogas from fermentation of cassava residues as raw gas, the effects of removing carbon dioxide by propylene carbonate was studied on a decarburization test device with processing capacity of 10 m3/d. The influence factors of absorption gas liquid ratio, absorption pressure, absorption temperature, air stripping gas liquid ratio and concentration of hydrogen sulfide on the carbon dioxide removal process were investigated respectively. Results showed that when absorption gas liquid ratio was 55, absorption pressure was 800 kPa, absorption temperature was 15℃ and air stripping gas liquid ratio was 10, the concentration of carbon dioxide in product gas reached(6.44 ± 0.34) % and the removal rate of carbon dioxide attained(92.48 ± 0.39)%. Existence of hydrogen sulfide in biogas had a significant impact on the carbon dioxide removal. When the concentration of hydrogen sulfide increased to 0.4% in raw gas, carbon dioxide content in product gas increased by 1.66% comparing with the experiment using desulfurized biogas.%以木薯渣发酵产生的沼气为原料气,采用10 m3/d脱碳工艺试验装置,以碳酸丙烯酯为吸收剂脱除沼气中的CO2,分别考察了吸收气液比、吸收压力、吸收温度、空气气提气液比、原料沼气中硫化氢浓度对脱碳效果的影响.试验结果表明,吸收气液比为55、吸收压力为800 kPa、吸收温度15℃、空气气提气液比为10时,净化气中CO2浓度为(6.44±0.34)%,CO2脱除率为(92.48±0.39)%.原料沼气中H2S浓度对碳酸丙烯酯的脱碳效果影响显著,当H2S浓度增加到0.4%时,与以脱硫后沼气为原料气时的脱碳情况相比,净化气中CO2浓度增加了1.66%.

  8. Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal for patients with acute respiratory failure secondary to the acute respiratory distress syndrome: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Marianne; Millar, Jonathan; Blackwood, Bronagh; Davies, Andrew; Brett, Stephen J; McAuley, Daniel F; McNamee, James J

    2014-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) continues to have significant mortality and morbidity. The only intervention proven to reduce mortality is the use of lung-protective mechanical ventilation strategies, although such a strategy may lead to problematic hypercapnia. Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (ECCO₂R) devices allow uncoupling of ventilation from oxygenation, thereby removing carbon dioxide and facilitating lower tidal volume ventilation. We performed a systematic review to assess efficacy, complication rates, and utility of ECCO₂R devices. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), case-control studies and case series with 10 or more patients. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS (Literatura Latino Americana em Ciências da Saúde), and ISI Web of Science, in addition to grey literature and clinical trials registries. Data were independently extracted by two reviewers against predefined criteria and agreement was reached by consensus. Outcomes of interest included mortality, intensive care and hospital lengths of stay, respiratory parameters and complications. The review included 14 studies with 495 patients (two RCTs and 12 observational studies). Arteriovenous ECCO₂R was used in seven studies, and venovenous ECCO₂R in seven studies. Available evidence suggests no mortality benefit to ECCO₂R, although post hoc analysis of data from the most recent RCT showed an improvement in ventilator-free days in more severe ARDS. Organ failure-free days or ICU stay have not been shown to decrease with ECCOvR. Carbon dioxide removal was widely demonstrated as feasible, facilitating the use of lower tidal volume ventilation. Complication rates varied greatly across the included studies, representing technological advances. There was a general paucity of high-quality data and significant variation in both practice and technology used among studies, which confounded analysis. ECCO₂R is a rapidly evolving technology and is an efficacious treatment

  9. Continuous Process for the Etching, Rinsing and Drying of MEMS Using Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Seon Ki; Han, Gap Su; You, Seong-sik [Korea University of Technology and Education, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The previous etching, rinsing and drying processes of wafers for MEMS (microelectromechanical system) using SC-CO{sub 2} (supercritical-CO{sub 2}) consists of two steps. Firstly, MEMS-wafers are etched by organic solvent in a separate etching equipment from the high pressure dryer and then moved to the high pressure dryer to rinse and dry them using SC-CO{sub 2}. We found that the previous two step process could be applied to etch and dry wafers for MEMS but could not confirm the reproducibility through several experiments. We thought the cause of that was the stiction of structures occurring due to vaporization of the etching solvent during moving MEMS wafer to high pressure dryer after etching it outside. In order to improve the structure stiction problem, we designed a continuous process for etching, rinsing and drying MEMS-wafers using SC-CO{sub 2} without moving them. And we also wanted to know relations of states of carbon dioxide (gas, liquid, supercritical fluid) to the structure stiction problem. In the case of using gas carbon dioxide (3 MPa, 25 .deg. C) as an etching solvent, we could obtain well-treated MEMS-wafers without stiction and confirm the reproducibility of experimental results. The quantity of rinsing solvent used could be also reduced compared with the previous technology. In the case of using liquid carbon dioxide (3 MPa, 5 .deg. C), we could not obtain well-treated MEMS-wafers without stiction due to the phase separation of between liquid carbon dioxide and etching co-solvent(acetone). In the case of using SC-CO{sub 2} (7.5 Mpa, 40 .deg. C), we had as good results as those of the case using gas-CO{sub 2}. Besides the processing time was shortened compared with that of the case of using gas-CO{sub 2}.

  10. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Green; Thomas Nelson; Brian S. Turk; Paul Box; Weijiong Li; Raghubir P. Gupta

    2005-07-01

    This report describes research conducted between April 1, 2005 and June 30, 2005 on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide from flue gas from coal combustion and synthesis gas from coal gasification. Supported sodium carbonate sorbents removed up to 76% of the carbon dioxide from simulated flue gas in a downflow cocurrent flow reactor system, with an approximate 15 second gas-solid contact time. This reaction proceeds at temperatures as low as 25 C. Lithium silicate sorbents remove carbon dioxide from high temperature simulated flue gas and simulated synthesis gas. Both sorbent types can be thermally regenerated and reused. The lithium silicate sorbent was tested in a thermogravimetric analyzer and in a 1-in quartz reactor at atmospheric pressure; tests were also conducted at elevated pressure in a 2-in diameter high temperature high pressure reactor system. The lithium sorbent reacts rapidly with carbon dioxide in flue gas at 350-500 C to absorb about 10% of the sorbent weight, then continues to react at a lower rate. The sorbent can be essentially completely regenerated at temperatures above 600 C and reused. In atmospheric pressure tests with synthesis gas of 10% initial carbon dioxide content, the sorbent removed over 90% of the carbon dioxide. An economic analysis of a downflow absorption process for removal of carbon dioxide from flue gas with a supported sodium carbonate sorbent suggests that a 90% efficient carbon dioxide capture system installed at a 500 MW{sub e} generating plant would have an incremental capital cost of $35 million ($91/kWe, assuming 20 percent for contingencies) and an operating cost of $0.0046/kWh. Assuming capital costs of $1,000/kW for a 500 MWe plant the capital cost of the down flow absorption process represents a less than 10% increase, thus meeting DOE goals as set forth in its Carbon Sequestration Technology Roadmap and Program Plan.

  11. Advances in carbon dioxide compression and pipeline transportation processes

    CERN Document Server

    Witkowski, Andrzej; Majkut, Mirosław; Rulik, Sebastian; Stolecka, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Providing a comprehensive analysis of CO2 compression, transportation processes and safety issues for post combustion CO2 capture applications for a 900 MW pulverized hard coal-fired power plant, this book assesses techniques for boosting the pressure of CO2 to pipeline pressure values with a minimal amount of energy. Four different types of compressors are examined in detail: a conventional multistage centrifugal compressor, integrally geared centrifugal compressor, supersonic shock wave compressor, and pump machines. The study demonstrates that the total compression power is closely related

  12. Apneic oxygenation combined with extracorporeal arteriovenous carbon dioxide removal provides sufficient gas exchange in experimental lung injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niels Dalsgaard; Kjærgaard, Benedict; Nielsen, Jakob Koefoed

    injury was induced by repeated lung lavage. Thereafter the tracheal tube was, after a lung recruitment maneuver, connected to 20 cmH2O continuous positive airway pressure (FiO2 = 1.0) for oxygenation of the blood. A pumpless membrane lung (Interventional Lung Assist, NovaLung, Germany) was connected......Background and aim of study We hypothesized that continuous high airway pressure without ventilatory movements (apneic oxygenation), using an open lung approach, combined with extracorporeal, pumpless, arterio-venous, carbon dioxide (CO2) removal would provide adequate gas exchange in acute lung...... injury. The aim of this study was to test this hypothesis in a lung injury model using pigs of human adult size, to mimic the O2 consumption and the CO2 production of adult patients.   Materials and methods In eight anesthetized, tracheally intubated and mechanically ventilated pigs (85-95 kg), lung...

  13. Carbon dioxide mineralization process design and evaluation: concepts, case studies, and considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Yeo Tze; Sharratt, Paul N; Jie, Bu

    2016-11-01

    Numerous carbon dioxide mineralization (CM) processes have been proposed to overcome the slow rate of natural weathering of silicate minerals. Ten of these proposals are mentioned in this article. The proposals are described in terms of the four major areas relating to CM process design: pre-treatment, purification, carbonation, and reagent recycling operations. Any known specifics based on probable or representative operating and reaction conditions are listed, and basic analysis of the strengths and shortcomings associated with the individual process designs are given in this article. The processes typically employ physical or chemical pseudo-catalytic methods to enhance the rate of carbon dioxide mineralization; however, both methods have its own associated advantages and problems. To examine the feasibility of a CM process, three key aspects should be included in the evaluation criteria: energy use, operational considerations as well as product value and economics. Recommendations regarding the optimal level of emphasis and implementation of measures to control these aspects are given, and these will depend very much on the desired process objectives. Ultimately, a mix-and-match approach to process design might be required to provide viable and economic proposals for CM processes.

  14. Pilot-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farnum, Rachel; Perry, Robert; Wood, Benjamin

    2014-12-31

    GE Global Research is developing technology to remove carbon dioxide (CO 2) from the flue gas of coal-fired powerplants. A mixture of 3-aminopropyl end-capped polydimethylsiloxane (GAP-1m) and triethylene glycol (TEG) is the preferred CO2-capture solvent. GE Global Research was contracted by the Department of Energy to test a pilot-scale continuous CO2 absorption/desorption system using a GAP-1m/TEG mixture as the solvent. As part of that effort, an Environmental, Health, and Safety (EH&S) assessment for a CO2-capture system for a 550 MW coal-fired powerplant was conducted. Five components of the solvent, CAS#2469-55-8 (GAP-0), CAS#106214-84-0 (GAP-1-4), TEG, and methanol and xylene (minor contaminants from the aminosilicone) are included in this assessment. One by-product, GAP- 1m/SOX salt, and dodecylbenzenesulfonicacid (DDBSA) were also identified foranalysis. An EH&S assessment was also completed for the manufacturing process for the GAP-1m solvent. The chemicals associated with the manufacturing process include methanol, xylene, allyl chloride, potassium cyanate, sodium hydroxide (NaOH), tetramethyldisiloxane (TMDSO), tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide, Karstedt catalyst, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), Aliquat 336, methyl carbamate, potassium chloride, trimethylamine, and (3-aminopropyl) dimethyl silanol. The toxicological effects of each component of both the CO2 capture system and the manufacturing process were defined, and control mechanisms necessary to comply with U.S. EH&S regulations are summarized. Engineering and control systems, including environmental abatement, are described for minimizing exposure and release of the chemical components. Proper handling and storage recommendations are made for each chemical to minimize risk to workers and the surrounding community.

  15. High capacity carbon dioxide sorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietz, Steven Dean; Alptekin, Gokhan; Jayaraman, Ambalavanan

    2015-09-01

    The present invention provides a sorbent for the removal of carbon dioxide from gas streams, comprising: a CO.sub.2 capacity of at least 9 weight percent when measured at 22.degree. C. and 1 atmosphere; an H.sub.2O capacity of at most 15 weight percent when measured at 25.degree. C. and 1 atmosphere; and an isosteric heat of adsorption of from 5 to 8.5 kilocalories per mole of CO.sub.2. The invention also provides a carbon sorbent in a powder, a granular or a pellet form for the removal of carbon dioxide from gas streams, comprising: a carbon content of at least 90 weight percent; a nitrogen content of at least 1 weight percent; an oxygen content of at most 3 weight percent; a BET surface area from 50 to 2600 m.sup.2/g; and a DFT micropore volume from 0.04 to 0.8 cc/g.

  16. Carbon dioxide stripping in aquaculture. part 1: terminology and reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colt, John; Watten, Barnaby; Pfeiffer, Tim

    2012-01-01

    The removal of carbon dioxide gas in aquacultural systems is much more complex than for oxygen or nitrogen gas because of liquid reactions of carbon dioxide and their kinetics. Almost all published carbon dioxide removal information for aquaculture is based on the apparent removal value after the CO2(aq) + HOH ⇔ H2CO3 reaction has reached equilibrium. The true carbon dioxide removal is larger than the apparent value, especially for high alkalinities and seawater. For low alkalinity freshwaters (carbon dioxide removal.

  17. Perspectives in the use of carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aresta Michele

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The mitigation of carbon dioxide is one of the scientific and technological challenges of the 2000s. Among the technologies that are under assessment, the recovery of carbon dioxide from power plants or industrial flue gases plays a strategic role. Recovered carbon dioxide can be either disposed in natural fields or used. The availability of large amounts of carbon dioxide may open new routes to its utilisation in biological, chemical and innovative technological processes. In this paper, the potential of carbon dioxide utilisation in the short-, medium-term is reviewed.

  18. Carbon dioxide sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Prabir K. (Worthington, OH); Lee, Inhee (Columbus, OH); Akbar, Sheikh A. (Hilliard, OH)

    2011-11-15

    The present invention generally relates to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor that incorporates lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3). In another embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor has a reduced sensitivity to humidity due to a sensing electrode with a layered structure of lithium carbonate and barium carbonate. In still another embodiment, the present invention relates to a method of producing carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors having lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3).

  19. Nitrogen removal from coal gasification wastewater by activated carbon technologies combined with short-cut nitrogen removal process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qian; Han, Hongjun; Hou, Baolin; Zhuang, Haifeng; Jia, Shengyong; Fang, Fang

    2014-11-01

    A system combining granular activated carbon and powdered activated carbon technologies along with shortcut biological nitrogen removal (GAC-PACT-SBNR) was developed to enhance total nitrogen (TN) removal for anaerobically treated coal gasification wastewater with less need for external carbon resources. The TN removal efficiency in SBNR was significantly improved by introducing the effluent from the GAC process into SBNR during the anoxic stage, with removal percentage increasing from 43.8%-49.6% to 68.8%-75.8%. However, the TN removal rate decreased with the progressive deterioration of GAC adsorption. After adding activated sludge to the GAC compartment, the granular carbon had a longer service-life and the demand for external carbon resources became lower. Eventually, the TN removal rate in SBNR was almost constant at approx. 43.3%, as compared to approx. 20.0% before seeding with sludge. In addition, the production of some alkalinity during the denitrification resulted in a net savings in alkalinity requirements for the nitrification reaction and refractory chemical oxygen demand (COD) degradation by autotrophic bacteria in SBNR under oxic conditions. PACT showed excellent resilience to increasing organic loadings. The microbial community analysis revealed that the PACT had a greater variety of bacterial taxons and the dominant species associated with the three compartments were in good agreement with the removal of typical pollutants. The study demonstrated that pre-adsorption by the GAC-sludge process could be a technically and economically feasible method to enhance TN removal in coal gasification wastewater (CGW).

  20. Removal of oxyanions from synthetic wastewater via carbonation process of calcium hydroxide: applied and fundamental aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes-Hernandez, G; Concha-Lozano, N; Renard, F; Quirico, E

    2009-07-30

    Removal of oxyanions (selenite, selenate, arsenate, phosphate and nitrate) during calcite formation was experimentally studied using aqueous carbonation of calcium hydroxide under moderate pressure (P(CO2) congruent with 20 bar) and temperature (30 degrees C). The effects of Ca(OH)(2) dose (10 and 20 g), Ca(OH)(2) source (commercial pure material or alkaline paper mill waste) and oxyanion initial concentration (from 0 to 70 mg atom/L) were investigated for this anisobaric gas-liquid-solid system. The Ca(OH)(2) carbonation reaction allowed successfully the removal of selenite (>90%), arsenate (>78%) and phosphate (congruent with 100%) from synthetic solutions. Conversely, nitrate and selenate had not any physicochemical affinity/effect during calcite formation. The rate of CO(2) transfer during calcite formation in presence of oxyanions was equal or slower than for an oxyanion-free system, allowing to define a retarding kinetic factor RF that can vary between 0 (no retarding effect) to 1 (total inhibition). For selenite and phosphate RF was quite high, close to 0.3. A small retarding effect was detected for arsenate (RF approximately 0.05) and no retarding effect was detected for selenate and nitrate (RF approximately 0). In general, RF depends on the oxyanion initial concentration, oxyanion nature and Ca(OH)(2) dose. The presence of oxyanions could also influence the crystal morphology and aggregation/agglomeration process. For example, a c-axis elongation of calcite crystals was clearly observed at the equilibrium, for calcite formation in presence of selenite and phosphate. The oxyanions removal process proposed herein was inspired on the common physicochemical treatment of wastewater using calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)(2)). The particularity, for this novel method is the simultaneous calcium hydroxide carbonation with compressed carbon dioxide in order to stabilise the solid matter. This economical and ecological method could allow the removal of various oxyanions

  1. Carbon Dioxide Removal from Flue Gas Using Microporous Metal Organic Frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesch, David A

    2010-06-30

    UOP LLC, a Honeywell Company, in collaboration with Professor Douglas LeVan at Vanderbilt University (VU), Professor Adam Matzger at the University of Michigan (UM), Professor Randall Snurr at Northwestern University (NU), and Professor Stefano Brandani at the University of Edinburgh (UE), supported by Honeywell's Specialty Materials business unit and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), have completed a three-year project to develop novel microporous metal organic frameworks (MOFs) and an associated vacuum-pressure swing adsorption (vPSA) process for the removal of CO{sub 2} from coal-fired power plant flue gas. The project leveraged the team's complementary capabilities: UOP's experience in materials development and manufacturing, adsorption process design and process commercialization; LeVan and Brandani's expertise in high-quality adsorption measurements; Matzger's experience in syntheis of MOFs and the organic components associated with MOFs; Snurr's expertise in molecular and other modeling; Honeywell's expertise in the manufacture of organic chemicals; and, EPRI's knowledge of power-generation technology and markets. The project was successful in that a selective CO{sub 2} adsorbent with good thermal stability and reasonable contaminant tolerance was discovered, and a low cost process for flue gas CO{sub 2} capture process ready to be evaluated further at the pilot scale was proposed. The team made significant progress toward the current DOE post-combustion research targets, as defined in a recent FOA issued by NETL: 90% CO{sub 2} removal with no more than a 35% increase in COE. The team discovered that favorable CO{sub 2} adsorption at more realistic flue gas conditions is dominated by one particular MOF structure type, M/DOBDC, where M designates Zn, Co, Ni, or Mg and DOBDC refers to the form of the organic linker in the resultant MOF structure, dioxybenzenedicarboxylate. The structure of the M/DOBDC MOFs

  2. A generic methodology for the design of sustainable carbon dioxide utilization processes using superstructure optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frauzem, Rebecca; Gani, Rafiqul

    ) is the primary greenhouse gas that is targeted via carbon capture and storage (CCS) as well as carbon capture and utilization (CCU) [1]. Carbon capture and utilization is showing promise because, in contrast with carbon capture and storage, it takes the captured carbon dioxide and makes further use of it......Global warming and other environmental concerns are fueling increased focus on sustainability resulting in new and stringent guidelines, especially with regard to emissions [1]. Greenhouse gases are prevalent and among harmful emissions that are targeted to be reduced; carbon dioxide (CO2......, including as an extractive agent or raw material. Chemical conversion, an important element of utilization, involves the use of carbon dioxide as a reactant in the production of chemical compounds [2]. However, for feasible implementation, a systematic methodology is needed for the design of the utilization...

  3. Methods and apparatus for carbon dioxide removal from a fluid stream

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Wei (Mission Viejo, CA); Ruud, James Anthony (Delmar, NY); Ku, Anthony Yu-Chung (Rexford, NY); Ramaswamy, Vidya (Niskayuna, NY); Liu, Ke (Rancho Santa Margrita, CA)

    2010-01-19

    An apparatus for producing hydrogen gas wherein the apparatus includes a reactor. In one embodiment, the reactor includes at least two conversion-removal portions. Each conversion-removal portion comprises a catalyst section configured to convert CO in the stream to CO.sub.2 and a membrane section located downstream of and in flow communication with the catalyst section. The membrane section is configured to selectively remove the CO.sub.2 from the stream and to be in flow communication with a sweep gas.

  4. CFD Simulations of a Regenerative Process for Carbon Dioxide Capture in Advanced Gasification Based Power Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arastoopour, Hamid [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Abbasian, Javad [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2014-07-31

    This project describes the work carried out to prepare a highly reactive and mechanically strong MgO based sorbents and to develop a Population Balance Equations (PBE) approach to describe the evolution of the particle porosity distribution that is linked with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to perform simulations of the CO2 capture and sorbent regeneration. A large number of MgO-based regenerable sorbents were prepared using low cost and abundant dolomite as the base material. Among various preparation parameters investigated the potassium/magnesium (K/Mg) ratio was identified as the key variable affecting the reactivity and CO2 capacity of the sorbent. The optimum K/Mg ratio is about 0.15. The sorbent formulation HD52-P2 was identified as the “best” sorbent formulation and a large batch (one kg) of the sorbent was prepared for the detailed study. The results of parametric study indicate the optimum carbonation and regeneration temperatures are 360° and 500°C, respectively. The results also indicate that steam has a beneficial effect on the rate of carbonation and regeneration of the sorbent and that the reactivity and capacity of the sorbent decreases in the cycling process (sorbent deactivation). The results indicate that to achieve a high CO2 removal efficiency, the bed of sorbent should be operated at a temperature range of 370-410°C which also favors production of hydrogen through the WGS reaction. To describe the carbonation reaction kinetics of the MgO, the Variable Diffusivity shrinking core Model (VDM) was developed in this project, which was shown to accurately fit the experimental data. An important advantage of this model is that the changes in the sorbent conversion with time can be expressed in an explicit manner, which will significantly reduce the CFD computation time. A Computational Fluid Dynamic/Population Balance Equations (CFD/PBE) model was developed that accounts for the particle (sorbent) porosity distribution and a new version of

  5. Carbon dioxide separation using adsorption with steam regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Jeannine Elizabeth; Copeland, Robert James; Leta, Daniel P.; McCall, Patrick P.; Bai, Chuansheng; DeRites, Bruce A.

    2016-11-29

    A process for separating a carbon dioxide from a gas stream is disclosed. The process can include passing the gas stream over a sorbent that adsorbs the carbon dioxide by concentration swing adsorption and adsorptive displacement. The sorbent can be regenerated and the carbon dioxide recaptured by desorbing the carbon dioxide from the sorbent using concentration swing adsorption and desorptive displacement. A carbon dioxide separation system is also disclosed. Neither the system nor the process rely on temperature swing or pressure swing adsorption.

  6. Effect of carbon dioxide and ammonium removal on pH changes in polishing ponds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cavalcanti, P.F.F.; Haandel, van A.; Lettinga, G.

    2002-01-01

    If nutrient removal is to be obtained in ponds treating sewage, the pH must be raised so that ammonia can desorb and phosphates can precipitate. In this paper it is shown that the pH increase in ponds can be predicted quantitatively from simple stoichiometry, taking into consideration physical and b

  7. Sorbent Structural Impacts Due to Humidity on Carbon Dioxide Removal Sorbents for Advanced Exploration Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, David; Knox, James C.; West, Phillip; Stanley, Christine M.; Bush, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The Life Support Systems Project (LSSP) under the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program builds upon the work performed under the AES Atmosphere Resource Recovery and Environmental Monitoring (ARREM) project focusing on the numerous technology development areas. The CO2 removal and associated air drying development efforts are focused on improving the current state-of-the-art system on the International Space Station (ISS) utilizing fixed beds of sorbent pellets by seeking more robust pelletized sorbents, evaluating structured sorbents, and examining alternate bed configurations to improve system efficiency and reliability. A component of the CO2 removal effort encompasses structural stability testing of existing and emerging sorbents. Testing will be performed on dry sorbents and sorbents that have been conditioned to three humidity levels. This paper describes the sorbent structural stability screening efforts in support of the LSS Project within the AES Program.

  8. Bioelectrochemical removal of carbon dioxide (CO2): an innovative method for biogas upgrading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Heng; Wang, Kaijun; Holmes, Dawn E

    2014-12-01

    Innovative methods for biogas upgrading based on biological/in-situ concepts have started to arouse considerable interest. Bioelectrochemical removal of CO2 for biogas upgrading was proposed here and demonstrated in both batch and continuous experiments. The in-situ biogas upgrading system seemed to perform better than the ex-situ one, but CO2 content was kept below 10% in both systems. The in-situ system's performance was further enhanced under continuous operation. Hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis and alkali production with CO2 absorption could be major contributors to biogas upgrading. Molecular studies showed that all the biocathodes associated with biogas upgrading were dominated by sequences most similar to the same hydrogenotrophic methanogen species, Methanobacterium petrolearium (97-99% sequence identity). Conclusively, bioelectrochemical removal of CO2 showed great potential for biogas upgrading.

  9. Modelling of cyclopentane promoted gas hydrate systems for carbon dioxide capture processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herslund, Peter Jørgensen; Thomsen, Kaj; Abildskov, Jens

    2014-01-01

    amount of reliable LLE data exist for the binary system of water and cyclopentane. Additional water-in-oil data in particular are desired for this system.An unpromoted hydrate-based capture process, operating isothermally at a temperature of 280. K is simulated. The minimum pressure requirement...... behaviour and hydrate phase behaviour is presented. Cycloalkanes ranging from cyclopropane to cyclohexane, represents a challenge for CPA, both in the description of the pure component densities and for liquid-liquid equilibrium (LLE) in the binary systems with water. It is concluded that an insufficient...... of the first stage is estimated to be 24.9. MPa. Applying three consecutive hydrate formation/dissociation stages (three-stage capture process), a carbon dioxide-rich product (97. mol%) may be delivered at a temperature of 280. K and a pressure of 3.65. MPa.A second capture process, where cyclopentane...

  10. 深冷轻烃中CO2脱除工艺模拟分析%Simulation analysis of removal process for carbon dioxide from deep cooling light hydrocarbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘龙; 何英华; 李洪涛; 姜道华; 赵晶莹; 宋杰萍

    2011-01-01

    The removal of CO2 was designed by Aspen Plus software with the deep cooling light hydrocarbons from oil field as the raw material. The results showed that under the optimum operating pressure( 1.6 MPa), the stripping tower could remove 90% CO2 (mass fraction) from the light hydrocarbons, the treated product could be used as cracking feedstock.%以油田深冷轻烃为原料,利用Aspen Plus工艺模拟软件,对原料脱除二氧化碳进行模拟设计.结果表明,采用提馏塔分离方案,在提馏塔最佳操作压力为1.6 MPa的条件下,可脱除深冷轻烃中质量分数为90%的二氧化碳,满足裂解装置对原料的要求.

  11. CARBON DIOXIDE SEPARATION BY SELECTIVE PERMEATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CARBON DIOXIDE , SEPARATION), (*PERMEABILITY, CARBON DIOXIDE ), POROUS MATERIALS, SILICON COMPOUNDS, RUBBER, SELECTION, ADSORPTION, TEMPERATURE, PRESSURE, POLYMERS, FILMS, PLASTICS, MEMBRANES, HUMIDITY.

  12. Is extensive terrestrial carbon dioxide removal a 'green' form of geoengineering? A global modelling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Vera; Gerten, Dieter; Lucht, Wolfgang; Boysen, Lena R.

    2016-02-01

    Biological carbon sequestration through implementation of biomass plantations is currently being discussed as an option for climate engineering (CE) should mitigation efforts fail to substantially reduce greenhouse gas emissions. As it is a plant-based CE option that extracts CO2 from the atmosphere, it might be considered a 'green' CE method that moves the biosphere closer to its natural, i.e. pre-Neolithic, state. Here, we test this hypothesis by comparing the biogeochemical (water- and carbon-related) changes induced by biomass plantations compared to those induced by historical human land cover and land use change. Results indicate that large-scale biomass plantations would produce a biogeochemical shift in the terrestrial biosphere which is, in absolute terms, even larger than that already produced by historical land use change. However, the nature of change would differ between a world dominated by biomass plantations and the current world inheriting the effects of historical land use, highlighting that large-scale tCDR would represent an additional distinct and massive human intervention into the biosphere. Contrasting the limited possibilities of tCDR to reduce the pressure on the planetary boundary for climate change with the potential negative implications on the status of other planetary boundaries highlights that tCDR via biomass plantations should not be considered a 'green' CE method but a full scale engineering intervention.

  13. Enzyme inactivation in food processing using high pressure carbon dioxide technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wanfeng; Zhou, Linyan; Xu, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Yan; Liao, Xiaojun

    2013-01-01

    High pressure carbon dioxide (HPCD) is an effective non-thermal processing technique for inactivating deleterious enzymes in liquid and solid food systems. This processing method avoids high temperatures and exerts a minimal impact on the nutritional and sensory properties of foods, but extends shelf life by inhibiting or killing microorganisms and enzymes. Indigenous enzymes in food such as polyphenol oxidase (PPO), pectin methylesterase (PME), and lypoxygenase (LOX) may cause undesirable chemical changes in food attributes, showing the loss in color, texture, and flavor. For more than two decades, HPCD has proved its effectiveness in inactivating these enzymes. The HPCD-induced inactivation of some microbial enzymes responsible for microbial metabolism is also included. This review presents a survey of the published knowledge regarding the use of HPCD for the inactivation of these enzymes, and analyzes the factors controlling the efficiency of HPCD and speculates on the underlying mechanism that leads to enzyme inactivation.

  14. Carbon dioxide-selective membranes and their applications in hydrogen processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jian

    process consisting of a CO2-removal membrane module followed by a conventional low-temperature WGS reactor. A third option is to use methanation after the CO2-removal, one of the most widely used processes for the CO clean-up step. Experimental results showed that CO concentration was reduced to below 10 ppm with all three approaches. In the membrane reactor, a CO concentration of less than 10 ppm and a H 2 concentration of greater than 50% (on the dry basis) were achieved at various flow rates of a simulated autothermal reformate. In the proposed CO2-removal/WGS process, with more than 99.5 % CO2 removed from the synthesis gas, the reversible WGS was shifted forward so that the CO concentration was decreased from 1.2% to less than 10 ppm (dry), which is the requirement for PEMFC. The WGS reactor had a gas hourly space velocity of 7650 h-1 at 150°C and the H2 concentration in the outlet was more than 54.7% (dry). The applications of the synthesized CO2-selective membranes for high-pressure synthesis gas purification were also studied. Synthesis gas is the primary source for hydrogen as well as an intermediate for a broad range of chemicals. The separation of CO2 from synthesis gas is a critical step to obtain high purity hydrogen in many industrial plants, especially refinery plants. We studied the synthesized polymeric CO2 -selective membranes for synthesis gas purification at feed pressures higher than 200 psia and temperatures ranging from 100 to 150°C. The effects of feed pressure, microporous support, temperature, and permeate pressure were investigated using a simulated synthesis gas containing 20% carbon dioxide and 80% hydrogen. The membranes synthesized showed best CO2 permeability and CO2/H2 selectivity at 110°C. At a feed pressure of 220 psia, the CO2 permeability and CO2/H2 selectivity reached 756 Barrers and 42, respectively, whereas at a feed pressure of 440 psia, the CO2 permeability was 391 Barrers and the CO 2/H2 selectivity was about 25.

  15. Carbon Dioxide/Methane Separation by Adsorption on Sepiolite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    José A.Delgado; María A.Uguina; José L.Sotelo; Beatriz Ruíz; Marcio Rosário

    2007-01-01

    In this work,the use of sepiolite for the removal of carbon dioxide from a carbon dioxide/methane mixture by a pressure swing adsorption (PSA) process has been researched.Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics have been measured in a fixed-bed.and the adsorption equilibrium parameters of carbon dioxide and methane on sepiolite have been obtained.A model based on the LDF approximation has been employed to simulate the fixed-bed kinetics.using the Langmuir equation to describe the adsotption equilibrium isotherm.The functioning of a PSA cycle for separating carbon dioxide/methane mixtures using sepiolite as adsorbent has also been studied.The experimental results were compared with the ones predicted by the model adapted to a PSA system.Methane with purity higher than 97% can be obtained from feeds containing carbon dioxide with concentrations ranging from 34% to 56% with the proposed PSA cycle.These results suggest that sepiolite is an adsorbent with good properties for its employment in a PSA cycle for carbon dioxide removal from landfill gases.

  16. Mechanistic investigation of industrial wastewater naphthenic acids removal using granular activated carbon (GAC) biofilm based processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Shahinoor; Zhang, Yanyan; McPhedran, Kerry N; Liu, Yang; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2016-01-15

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) found in oil sands process-affected waters (OSPW) have known environmental toxicity and are resistant to conventional wastewater treatments. The granular activated carbon (GAC) biofilm treatment process has been shown to effectively treat OSPW NAs via combined adsorption/biodegradation processes despite the lack of research investigating their individual contributions. Presently, the NAs removals due to the individual processes of adsorption and biodegradation in OSPW bioreactors were determined using sodium azide to inhibit biodegradation. For raw OSPW, after 28 days biodegradation and adsorption contributed 14% and 63% of NA removal, respectively. For ozonated OSPW, biodegradation removed 18% of NAs while adsorption reduced NAs by 73%. Microbial community 454-pyrosequencing of bioreactor matrices indicated the importance of biodegradation given the diverse carbon degrading families including Acidobacteriaceae, Ectothiorhodospiraceae, and Comamonadaceae. Overall, results highlight the ability to determine specific processes of NAs removals in the combined treatment process in the presence of diverse bacteria metabolic groups found in GAC bioreactors.

  17. Solid Sorbents for Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Gas Streams at Low Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirwardane, Ranjani V.

    2005-06-21

    New low-cost CO2 sorbents are provided that can be used in large-scale gas-solid processes. A new method is provided for making these sorbents that involves treating substrates with an amine and/or an ether so that the amine and/or ether comprise at least 50 wt. percent of the sorbent. The sorbent acts by capturing compounds contained in gaseous fluids via chemisorption and/or physisorption between the unit layers of the substrate's lattice where the polar amine liquids and solids and/or polar ether liquids and solids are located. The method eliminates the need for high surface area supports and polymeric materials for the preparation of CO2 capture systems, and provides sorbents with absorption capabilities that are independent of the sorbents' surface areas. The sorbents can be regenerated by heating at temperatures in excess of 35 degrees C.

  18. Solid sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide from gas streams at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirwardane, Ranjani V.

    2005-06-21

    New low-cost CO.sub.2 sorbents are provided that can be used in large-scale gas-solid processes. A new method is provided for making these sorbents that involves treating substrates with an amine and/or an ether so that the amine and/or ether comprise at least 50 wt. percent of the sorbent. The sorbent acts by capturing compounds contained in gaseous fluids via chemisorption and/or physisorption between the unit layers of the substrate's lattice where the polar amine liquids and solids and/or polar ether liquids and solids are located. The method eliminates the need for high surface area supports and polymeric materials for the preparation of CO.sub.2 capture systems, and provides sorbents with absorption capabilities that are independent of the sorbents' surface areas. The sorbents can be regenerated by heating at temperatures in excess of 35.degree. C.

  19. A review of chemical absorption of carbon dioxide for biogas upgrading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fouad RH Abdeen; Maizirwan Mel; Mohammed Saedi Jami; Sany Izan Ihsan; Ahmad Faris Ismail

    2016-01-01

    Significant attention has been given to biogas production, purification and upgrading as a renewable and clean fuel supplement. Biogas is a product of an anaerobic digestion process comprising methane, carbon dioxide, and trace amounts of other gases. Biogas purification removes trace gases in biogas for safe utilisation. Biogas upgrading produces methane-rich biogas by removing bulk carbon dioxide from the gas mixture. Several carbon dioxide removal techniques can be applied for biogas upgrading. However, chemical absorption of carbon dioxide for biogas upgrading is of special significance due to its operation at ambient or near ambient temperature and pressure, thus reducing energy consumption. This paper reviews the chemical absorption of carbon dioxide using amine scrubbing, caustic solvent scrubbing, and amino acid salt solution scrubbing. Each of these tech-niques for biogas upgrading is discussed. The paper concludes that an optimised implementation of the chemical absorption techniques for biogas upgrading requires further research.

  20. Interglacials, Milankovitch Cycles, and Carbon Dioxide

    CERN Document Server

    Marsh, Gerald E

    2010-01-01

    The existing understanding of interglacial periods is that they are initiated by Milankovitch cycles enhanced by rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. During interglacials, global temperature is also believed to be primarily controlled by carbon dioxide concentrations, modulated by internal processes such as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and the North Atlantic Oscillation. Recent work challenges the fundamental basis of these conceptions.

  1. CARBON DIOXIDE FIXATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FUJITA,E.

    2000-01-12

    Solar carbon dioxide fixation offers the possibility of a renewable source of chemicals and fuels in the future. Its realization rests on future advances in the efficiency of solar energy collection and development of suitable catalysts for CO{sub 2} conversion. Recent achievements in the efficiency of solar energy conversion and in catalysis suggest that this approach holds a great deal of promise for contributing to future needs for fuels and chemicals.

  2. Pilot-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Surinder; Spiry, Irina; Wood, Benjamin; Hancu, Dan; Chen, Wei

    2014-07-01

    This report presents system and economicanalysis for a carbon-capture unit which uses an aminosilicone-based solvent for CO₂ capture in a pulverized coal (PC) boiler. The aminosilicone solvent is a 60/40 wt/wt mixture of 3-aminopropyl end-capped polydimethylsiloxane (GAP-1m) with tri-ethylene glycol (TEG) as a co-solvent. Forcomparison purposes, the report also shows results for a carbon-capture unit based on a conventional approach using mono-ethanol amine (MEA). The first year removal cost of CO₂ for the aminosilicone-based carbon-capture process is $46.04/ton of CO₂ as compared to $60.25/ton of CO₂ when MEA is used. The aminosilicone- based process has <77% of the CAPEX of a system using MEA solvent. The lower CAPEX is due to several factors, including the higher working capacity of the aminosilicone solvent compared the MEA, which reduces the solvent flow rate required, reducing equipment sizes. If it is determined that carbon steel can be used in the rich-lean heat exchanger in the carbon capture unit, the first year removal cost of CO₂ decreases to $44.12/ton. The aminosilicone-based solvent has a higherthermal stability than MEA, allowing desorption to be conducted at higher temperatures and pressures, decreasing the number of compressor stages needed. The aminosilicone-based solvent also has a lowervapor pressure, allowing the desorption to be conducted in a continuous-stirred tank reactor versus a more expensive packed column. The aminosilicone-based solvent has a lowerheat capacity, which decreases the heat load on the desorber. In summary, the amino-silicone solvent has significant advantages overconventional systems using MEA.

  3. Sulphur dioxide removal using activated sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warmuzinski, K.; Jaschik, M.; Jaschik, J.; Wasilewski, W.; Mrozowski, J. [Inst. Inzynierii Chemical PAN, Gliwice (Poland)

    2001-07-01

    Results are presented of experimental investigation of the dry flue gas desulphurisation (FGD) process at low temperatures using activated sorbents. Solid wastes (ashes) from the dry (with humidification) FGD plant are used as a sorbent. The influence of basic operating parameters on the efficiency of SO{sub 2} removal is determined. More than twofold sulphur dioxide removal efficiency is obtained using activated sorbents in comparison with the efficiency obtained in the process with dry sorbents. The possibility of reduction of sorbent consumption in the dry method of FGD with humidification is found.

  4. A Method for Sustainable Carbon Dioxide Utilization Process Synthesis and Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frauzem, Rebecca; Fjellerup, Kasper; Roh, Kosan

    As a result of increasing regulations and concern about the impact of greenhouse gases on the environment, carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions are a primary focus for reducing emissions and improving global sustainability. One method to achieve reduced emissions, is the conversion of CO2 to useful...

  5. Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas: Development and Evaluation of Existing and Novel Process Concepts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abu Zahra, M.R.M.

    2009-01-01

    One of the main global challenges in the years to come is to reduce the CO2 emissions in view of the apparent contribution to global warming. Carbon dioxide capture, transport, and storage (CCS) from fossil fuel fired power plants is drawing increased interest as an intermediate solution towards sus

  6. Quantitative Assessment of the Potential of Afforestation for Carbon Dioxide Removal: Evaluating carbon sequestration and biogeophysical impacts in a dynamic global vegetation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littleton, E. W.

    2015-12-01

    This study presents a new method for representing permanent afforestation in Earth System models. Afforestation has attracted interest as an option to help to slow or reverse the growth of atmospheric carbon dioxide during the next century. However, its potential is poorly constrained with regard to land availability, rates of tree growth and carbon accumulation, and potential side effects. This study aims to provide quantitative assessment of the carbon removal potential and side effects of 21st century afforestation using a dynamic global vegetation model, in contrast to the majority of previous estimates which have used bookkeeping methods. The land surface model JULES was used to simulate needleleaf afforestation on abandoned agricultural land during the 21st century under two future pathways (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5). These results are compared to a control scenario in which natural succession is allowed to act on the same area of land. This study finds considerable spatial variation in the final carbon sequestration potential of afforestation sites. In addition to dieback and marginal growth in many regions, many sites showed minimal additionality of forest areas compared to natural succession. The most suitable sites were in Eastern Europe, central China and central North America. There was no major difference in the general spatial pattern of suitability between RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 by 2100. Overall, this study produced a significantly smaller estimate of the CDR potential of permanent afforestation than previous studies have. The additional carbon stored in suitable sites by 2100 was only 19 Pg C (RCP4.5) and 2.1 Pg C (RCP8.5), a mean of 68 tC/ha. This research also explored the biogeophysical impacts of afforestation on surface energy balance and hydrological cycles. The decrease in albedo caused by afforestation significantly offset the radiative forcing benefits of the carbon removal, although this effect was very sensitive to input assumptions. Flooding results

  7. Replacement of hazardous chromium impregnating agent from silver/copper/chromium-impregnated active carbon using triethylenediamine to remove hydrogen sulfide, trichloromethane, ammonia, and sulfur dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li-Chun; Chung, Ying-Chien

    2009-03-01

    Activated carbon (AC) is widely used as an effective adsorbent in many applications, including industrial-scale air purification systems and air filter systems in gas masks. In general, ACs without chemical impregnation are good adsorbents of organic vapors but poor adsorbents of low-molecular-weight or polar gases such as chlorine, sulfur dioxide (SO2), formaldehyde, and ammonia (NH3). Impregnated ACs modified with metallic impregnating agents (ASC-carbons; e.g., copper, chromium, and silver) enhance the adsorbing properties of the ACs for simultaneously removing specific poisonous gases, but disposal of the chromium metal salt used to impregnate the ACs has the potential to result in situations that are toxic to both humans and the environment, thereby necessitating the search for replaceable organic impregnating agents that represent a much lower risk. The aim of this study was to assess the gas removal efficiency of an AC in which the organic impregnating agent triethylenediamine (TEDA) largely replaced the metallic impregnating agent chromium. We assessed batch and continuous adsorption capacities in situ for removing simulated hydrogen sulfide (H2S), trichloromethane (CHCl3), NH3, and SO2 gases. Brunauer-Emmet-Teller measurements and scanning electron microscopy analyses identified the removal mechanism by which TEDA-impregnated AS-carbon (dechromium ASC-carbon) adsorbs gases and determined the removal capacity for H2S, CHCl3, NH3, and SO2 to be 311, 258, 272, and 223 mg/g-C, respectively. These results demonstrate that TEDA-impregnated AS-carbon is significantly more efficient than ASC-carbon in adsorbing these four gases. Organic TEDA-impregnating agents have also been proven to be a reliable and environmental friendly agent and therefore a safe replacement of the hazardous chromium found in conventional ASC-carbon used in removing toxic gases from the airstream.

  8. External Carbon Source Addition as a Means to Control an Activated Sludge Nutrient Removal Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaacs, Steven Howard; Henze, Mogens; Søeberg, Henrik;

    1994-01-01

    In alternating type activated sludge nutrient removal processes, the denitrification rate can be limited by the availability of readily-degradable carbon substrate. A control strategy is proposed by which an easily metabolizable COD source is added directly to that point in the process at which...

  9. Process for separating carbon dioxide from flue gas using sweep-based membrane separation and absorption steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijmans, Johannes G.; Baker, Richard W.; Merkel, Timothy C.

    2012-08-21

    A gas separation process for treating flue gases from combustion processes, and combustion processes including such gas separation. The invention involves routing a first portion of the flue gas stream to be treated to an absorption-based carbon dioxide capture step, while simultaneously flowing a second portion of the flue gas across the feed side of a membrane, flowing a sweep gas stream, usually air, across the permeate side, then passing the permeate/sweep gas to the combustor.

  10. Designing and Demonstrating a Master Student Project to Explore Carbon Dioxide Capture Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asherman, Florine; Cabot, Gilles; Crua, Cyril; Estel, Lionel; Gagnepain, Charlotte; Lecerf, Thibault; Ledoux, Alain; Leveneur, Sebastien; Lucereau, Marie; Maucorps, Sarah; Ragot, Melanie; Syrykh, Julie; Vige, Manon

    2016-01-01

    The rise in carbon dioxide (CO[subscript 2]) concentration in the Earth's atmosphere, and the associated strengthening of the greenhouse effect, requires the development of low carbon technologies. New carbon capture processes are being developed to remove CO[subscript 2] that would otherwise be emitted from industrial processes and fossil fuel…

  11. Physical Removal of Metallic Carbon Nanotubes from Nanotube Network Devices Using a Thermal and Fluidic Process

    OpenAIRE

    Ford, Alexandra C.; Shaughnessy, Michael; Wong, Bryan M.; Kane, Alexander A.; Kuznetsov, Oleksandr V.; Krafcik, Karen L.; Billups, W. E.; Hauge, Robert H.; Léonard, François

    2013-01-01

    Electronic and optoelectronic devices based on thin films of carbon nanotubes are currently limited by the presence of metallic nanotubes. Here we present a novel approach based on nanotube alkyl functionalization to physically remove the metallic nanotubes from such network devices. The process relies on preferential thermal desorption of the alkyls from the semiconducting nanotubes and the subsequent dissolution and selective removal of the metallic nanotubes in chloroform. The approach is ...

  12. An Integrated, Low Temperature Process to Capture and Sequester Carbon Dioxide from Industrial Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendlandt, R. F.; Foremski, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Laboratory experiments show that it is possible to integrate (1) the chemistry of serpentine dissolution, (2) capture of CO2 gas from the combustion of natural gas and coal-fired power plants using aqueous amine-based solvents, (3) long-term CO2 sequestration via solid phase carbonate precipitation, and (4) capture solvent regeneration with acid recycling in a single, continuous process. In our process, magnesium is released from serpentine at 300°C via heat treatment with ammonium sulfate salts or at temperatures as low as 50°C via reaction with sulfuric acid. We have also demonstrated that various solid carbonate phases can be precipitated directly from aqueous amine-based (NH3, MEA, DMEA) CO2 capture solvent solutions at room temperature. Direct precipitation from the capture solvent enables regenerating CO2 capture solvent without the need for heat and without the need to compress the CO2 off gas. We propose that known low-temperature electrochemical methods can be integrated with this process to regenerate the aqueous amine capture solvent and recycle acid for dissolution of magnesium-bearing mineral feedstocks and magnesium release. Although the direct precipitation of magnesite at ambient conditions remains elusive, experimental results demonstrate that at temperatures ranging from 20°C to 60°C, either nesquehonite Mg(HCO3)(OH)●2H2O or a double salt with the formula [NH4]2Mg(CO3)2●4H2O or an amorphous magnesium carbonate precipitate directly from the capture solvent. These phases are less desirable for CO2 sequestration than magnesite because they potentially remove constituents (water, ammonia) from the reaction system, reducing the overall efficiency of the sequestration process. Accordingly, the integrated process can be accomplished with minimal energy consumption and loss of CO2 capture and acid solvents, and a net generation of 1 to 4 moles of H2O/6 moles of CO2 sequestered (depending on the solid carbonate precipitate and amount of produced H2

  13. Optimization of the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA-4EU) in Support of the International Space System and Advanced Exploration Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, James C.; Stanley, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    The Life Support Systems Project (LSSP) under the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program builds upon the work performed under the AES Atmosphere Resource Recovery and Environmental Monitoring (ARREM) project focusing on the numerous technology development areas. The Carbon Dioxide (CO2) removal and associated air drying development efforts are focused on improving the current state-of-the-art system on the International Space Station (ISS) utilizing fixed beds of sorbent pellets by seeking more robust pelletized sorbents, evaluating structured sorbents, and examining alternate bed configurations to improve system efficiency and reliability. A component of the CO2 removal effort utilizes a virtual Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly, revision 4 (CDRA-4) test bed to test a large number of potential operational configurations with independent variations in flow rate, cycle time, heater ramp rate, and set point. Initial ground testing will provide prerequisite source data and provide baseline data in support of the virtual CDRA. Once the configurations with the highest performance and lowest power requirements are determined by the virtual CDRA, the results will be confirmed by testing these configurations with the CDRA-4EU ground test hardware. This paper describes the initial ground testing of select configurations. The development of the virtual CDRA under the AES-LSS Project will be discussed in a companion paper.

  14. An innovative carbonate coprecipitation process for the removal of zinc and manganese from mining impacted waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibrell, P.L.; Chambers, M.A.; Deaguero, A.L.; Wildeman, T.R.; Reisman, D.J.

    2007-01-01

    Although mine drainage is usually thought of as acidic, there are many cases where the water is of neutral pH, but still contains metal species that can be harmful to human or aquatic animal health, such as manganese (Mn) and zinc (Zn). Typical treatment of mine drainage waters involves pH adjustment, but this often results in excessive sludge formation and removal of nontoxic species such as magnesium and calcium. Theoretical consideration of the stability of metal carbonate species suggests that the target metals could be removed from solution by coprecipitation with calcium carbonate. The U.S. Geological Survey has developed a limestone-based process for remediation of acid mine drainage that increases calcium carbonate saturation. This treatment could then be coupled with carbonate coprecipitation as an innovative method for removal of toxic metals from circumneutral mine drainage waters. The new process was termed the carbonate coprecipitation (CCP) process. The CCP process was tested at the laboratory scale using a synthetic mine water containing 50 mg/L each of Mn and Zn. Best results showed over 95% removal of both Mn and Zn in less than 2 h of contact in a limestone channel. The process was then tested on a sample of water from the Palmerton zinc superfund site, near Palmerton, Pennsylvania, containing over 300 mg/L Zn and 60 mg/L Mn. Treatment of this water resulted in removal of over 95% of the Zn and 40% of the Mn in the limestone channel configuration. Because of the potential economic advantages of the CCP process, further research is recommended for refinement of the process for the Palmerton water and for application to other mining impacted waters as well. ?? Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  15. Bioprocesses for removal of carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxide by microalgae for the utilization of gas generated during coal burning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morais, Michele Greque de; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira [Fundacao Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Rio Grande (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this work was to study the removal of CO{sub 2} and NO by microalgae and to evaluate the kinetic characteristics of the cultures. Spirulina sp. showed {mu}{sub max} and X{sub max} (0.11 d{sup -1}, 1.11 g L{sup -1} d{sup -1}) when treated with CO{sub 2} and NaNO{sub 3}. The maximum CO{sub 2} removal was 22.97% for S. obliquus treated with KNO{sub 3} and atmospheric CO{sub 2}. The S. obliquus showed maximum NO removal (21.30%) when treated with NO and CO{sub 2}. Coupling the cultivation of these microalgae with the removal of CO{sub 2} and NO has the potential not only to reduce the costs of culture media but also to offset carbon and nitrogen emissions. 19 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Measurement and Image Processing Techniques for Particle Image Velocimetry Using Solid-Phase Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    form above this temperature. CO2 can easily be stored as a liquid in a high- pressure tank and injected as solid particles, which can be used as seed...Technology AFRL Air Force Research Lab Al2O3 Aluminum Oxide BBO Bassett Boussinesq-Oseen CO2 Carbon Dioxide CCD Charge-coupled device CFD ...Another advantage is that results can be directly compared with computational fluid dynamics ( CFD ). Challenges facing PIV stem from the development of

  17. Carbon dioxide sequestration by mineral carbonation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijgen, W.J.J.

    2007-01-01

    The increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, mainly caused by fossil fuel combustion, has lead to concerns about global warming. A possible technology that can contribute to the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions is CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation. The basic concept beh

  18. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Assisted Processing of Silica/PMMA Nanocomposite Foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rende, Deniz; Schadler, Linda S.; Ozisik, Rahmi

    2012-02-01

    Polymer nanocomposite foams receive considerable attention in both scientific and industrial communities. These structures are defined as closed or open cells (pores) surrounded by bulk material and are widely observed in nature in the form of bone structure, sponge, corals and natural cork. Inspired by these materials, polymer nanocomposite foams are widely used in advanced applications, such as bone scaffolds, food packaging and transportation materials due to their lightweight and enhanced mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties compared to bulk polymer foams. The presence of the nanosized fillers facilitates heterogeneous bubble nucleation as a result, the number of bubbles increases while the average bubble size decreases. Therefore, the foam morphology can be controlled by the size, concentration, and surface chemistry of the nanofiller. In the current study, we used supercritical carbon dioxide as a foaming agent for silica/poly(methyl methacrylate), PMMA, foams. The silica nanoparticles were chemically modified by fluoroalkane chains to make them CO2-philic. The surface coverage was controlled via tethering density, and the effect of silica surface coverage and concentration on foam morphology was investigated through scanning electron microscopy and image processing. Results indicated that nanofiller concentration and filler surface chemistry (CO2-philicity) had tremendous effect on foam morphology but surface coverage did not have any effect.

  19. Supercritical carbon dioxide-processed resorbable polymer nanocomposites for bone graft substitute applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Kevin C.

    Numerous clinical situations necessitate the use of bone graft materials to enhance bone formation. While autologous and allogenic materials are considered the gold standards in the setting of fracture healing and spine fusion, their disadvantages, which include donor site morbidity and finite supply have stimulated research and development of novel bone graft substitute materials. Among the most promising candidate materials are resorbable polymers, composed of lactic and/or glycolic acid. While the characteristics of these materials, such as predictable degradation kinetics and biocompatibility, make them an excellent choice for bone graft substitute applications, they lack mechanical strength when synthesized with the requisite porous morphology. As such, porous resorbable polymers are often reinforced with filler materials. In the presented work, we describe the use of supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) processing to create porous resorbable polymeric constructs reinforced by nanostructured, organically modified Montmorillonite clay (nanoclay). scCO2 processing simultaneously disperses the nanoclay throughout the polymeric matrix, while imparting a porous morphology to the construct conducive to facilitating cellular infiltration and neoangiogenesis, which are necessary components of bone growth. With the addition of as little as 2.5wt% of nanoclay, the compressive strength of the constructs nearly doubles putting them on par with human cortico-cancellous bone. Rheological measurements indicate that the dominant mode of reinforcement of the nanocomposite constructs is the restriction of polymer chain mobility. This restriction is a function of the positive interaction between polymer chains and the nanoclay. In vivo inflammation studies indicate biocompatibility of the constructs. Ectopic osteogenesis assays have determined that the scCO2-processed nanocomposites are capable of supporting growth-factor induced bone formation. scCO 2-processed resorbable

  20. Carbon dioxide and climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-10-01

    Scientific and public interest in greenhouse gases, climate warming, and global change virtually exploded in 1988. The Department's focused research on atmospheric CO{sub 2} contributed sound and timely scientific information to the many questions produced by the groundswell of interest and concern. Research projects summarized in this document provided the data base that made timely responses possible, and the contributions from participating scientists are genuinely appreciated. In the past year, the core CO{sub 2} research has continued to improve the scientific knowledge needed to project future atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations, to estimate climate sensitivity, and to assess the responses of vegetation to rising concentrations of CO{sub 2} and to climate change. The Carbon Dioxide Research Program's goal is to develop sound scientific information for policy formulation and governmental action in response to changes of atmospheric CO{sub 2}. The Program Summary describes projects funded by the Carbon Dioxide Research Program during FY 1990 and gives a brief overview of objectives, organization, and accomplishments.

  1. Laboratory differential simulation design method of pressure absorbers for carbonization of phenolate solution by carbon dioxide in coal-tar processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linek, V.; Sinkule, J.; Moucha, T.; Rejl, J.F. [Prague Institute for Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2009-01-15

    A laboratory differential simulation method is used for the design of carbonization columns at coal-tar processing in which phenols are regenerated from phenolate solution by carbon dioxide absorption. The design method is based on integration of local absorption rates of carbon dioxide along the column. The local absorption rates into industrial phenolate mixture are measured in a laboratory model contactor for various compositions of the gas and liquid phases under the conditions that ensure the absorption rates in the laboratory absorber simulate the local rates in the industrial column. On the bases of the calculations, two-step carbonization columns were designed for 30000 t/year of the phenolate solution treatment by carbon dioxide. The absorption proceeds at higher pressure of 500 kPa and temperatures from 50 to 65 C, pure carbon dioxide is used and toluene is added. These conditions have the following favourable effects: (I) significant size reduction of the columns, (ii) it is possible to process more concentrated solutions without danger of silting the columns by crystallization of NaHCO{sub 3} on the packing. (iii) small amount of inert gas is released, (iv) lower alkalinity and better separability of the organic phase (phenols with toluene) from water phase (soda or bicarbonate solution) in separators.

  2. An economic analysis of the Jim Bridger Power Plant carbon dioxide mineralization process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Mikol Hans

    Concerns for rising levels of CO2 in the atmosphere have lead to a myriad of schemes to reduce emissions. Many of these are complicated, expensive, and untried. Coal-fired electrical generation accounts for about 49 percent of U.S. electricity generation. Shifting generation capacity away from coal is the goal of many, yet as this statistic shows, the U.S. has a heavy dependency on coal-fired base-load generation. What is needed is a way to retrofit existing coal fired power plants to mitigate at least some of the giga-tonnes of CO2 released annually. Carbon Capture and Storage in association with greenhouse gases are a major concern in the world today. This thesis is an outgrowth of a research partnership between the University of Wyoming and the Jim Bridger Power Plant (Rocky Mountain Power) to develop a process for capture and mineralization of flue gas carbon dioxide (CO 2) using an accelerated mineral carbonization process with fly ash particles as the absorbent. This process may have several advantages over other approaches because it is an environmentally acceptable, single step process occurring at near ambient pressures and temperatures that can compliment conventional CCS processes. In addition the use of fly ash particles as an absorbent avoids the costs of processing or engineering an absorbent. The purpose of this thesis is to evaluate the capture costs and economic feasibility of the mineralization process. Two models were used to estimate the capture costs and economic feasibility of the Jim Bridger Power Plant CO2 Mineralization Project (JBP). The first was a cost of capture model which was used to estimate CO2 capture costs and how changes in the CO2 to ash capture ratio and quantities of CO2 captured affect capture costs. The second was a financial feasibility model which considered the time value of money. This second model considered the net present value (NPV) and internal rate of return (IRR) for the process using different pricing scenarios

  3. Influence of carbon source and temperature on the denitrifying phosphorus removal process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yayi; WANG Shuying; PENG Yongzhen; Zhu Guibing; LING Yunfang

    2007-01-01

    To supply the valuable operating parameters for the popular usage of the new denitrifying phosphors removal process,it is essential to study the dominant biochemical reactions and the characteristics of denitriflying phosphorus removing bacteria(DPB).Thus,parallel batch experiments using DPB sludge were carried out to assess the effect of substrates(sewage,HAc,and endogenous carbon source)on denitriflying dephosphorus removal efficiency in this study.The results showed that the initial specific phosphorus release rate increased with the high concentration of the short-chain volatile fatty acids ratio in the influent,and sufficient phosphorus was released by DPB.This improved the subsequent denitrification and phosphorus uptake efficiency.The specific endogenous denitrification mainly relies on the internal carbon source(PHB)stored by poly-P bacteria.Denitrifying phosphorus removing bacteria were very hungry when the internal PHB was consumed.Consequently,the specific endogenous denitrification rate was low and the phosphorus uptake did not happen.On the other hand,in the experiment,the denitrifying phosphorus removal performance under two temperature conditions(8-10℃ and 25-26℃)was also investigated and analyzed.It was found that the lower temperature decreased the specific phosphorus release and uptake rate,but did not inhibit the denitrifying phosphorus removal completely.Therefore,the negative influence of the low temperature on the overall phosphorus removal was not significant.

  4. Forecasting carbon dioxide emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaobing; Du, Ding

    2015-09-01

    This study extends the literature on forecasting carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by applying the reduced-form econometrics approach of Schmalensee et al. (1998) to a more recent sample period, the post-1997 period. Using the post-1997 period is motivated by the observation that the strengthening pace of global climate policy may have been accelerated since 1997. Based on our parameter estimates, we project 25% reduction in CO2 emissions by 2050 according to an economic and population growth scenario that is more consistent with recent global trends. Our forecasts are conservative due to that we do not have sufficient data to fully take into account recent developments in the global economy.

  5. Carbon Capture by a Continuous, Regenerative Ammonia-Based Scrubbing Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resnik, K.P.; Yeh, J.T.; Pennline, H.W.

    2006-10-01

    Overview: To develop a knowledge/data base to determine whether an ammonia-based scrubbing process is a viable regenerable-capture technique that can simultaneously remove carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, nitric oxides, and trace pollutants from flue gas.

  6. Effect of pressure of supercritical carbon dioxide on morphology of wool fibers during dyeing process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Lai-Jiu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effect of pressure release rate on dyeing of wool fibers was studied in the supercritical carbon dioxide dyeing. Surface morphology, chemical composition and color difference at different pressure release rates were investigated by employing scanning electron microscope, color matching, and measuring instrument. Experiment data reveal that wool fibers are easy to be damaged with increasing pressure release rate. Fiber’s surface brightness varies also with the pressure release rate. The phenomena are theoretically explained using Bernoulli's principle.

  7. Environmental Performance of Hypothetical Canadian Pre-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture Processes Using Life-Cycle Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakkana Piewkhaow

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The methodology of life-cycle assessment was applied in order to evaluate the environmental performance of a hypothetical Saskatchewan lignite-fueled Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC electricity generation, with and without pre-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2 capture from a full life-cycle perspective. The emphasis here is placed on environmental performance associated with air contaminants of the comparison between IGCC systems (with and without CO2 capture and a competing lignite pulverized coal-fired electricity generating station in order to reveal which technology offers the most positive environmental effects. Moreover, ambient air pollutant modeling was also conducted by using American Meteorological Society/Environmental Protection Agency Regulatory Model (AERMOD air dispersion modeling to determine the ground-level concentration of pollutants emitted from four different electricity generating stations. This study assumes that all stations are located close to Estevan. The results showed a significant reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG emissions and acidification potential by applying both post-combustion and pre-combustion CO2 capture processes. The GHG emissions were found to have reduced by 27%–86%, and IGCC systems were found to compare favorably to pulverized coal systems. However, in other environmental impact categories, there are multiple environmental trade-offs depending on the capture technology used. In the case of post-combustion capture, it was observed that the environmental impact category of eutrophication potential, summer smog, and ozone depletion increased due to the application of the CO2 capture process and the surface mining coal operation. IGCC systems, on the other hand, showed the same tendency as the conventional coal-fired electricity generation systems, but to a lesser degree. This is because the IGCC system is a cleaner technology that produces lower pollutant emission levels than the electricity

  8. Carbon dioxide production during cardiopulmonary bypass: pathophysiology, measure and clinical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranucci, Marco; Carboni, Giovanni; Cotza, Mauro; de Somer, Filip

    2017-01-01

    Carbon dioxide production during cardiopulmonary bypass derives from both the aerobic metabolism and the buffering of lactic acid produced by tissues under anaerobic conditions. Therefore, carbon dioxide removal monitoring is an important measure of the adequacy of perfusion and oxygen delivery. However, routine monitoring of carbon dioxide removal is not widely applied. The present article reviews the main physiological and pathophysiological sources of carbon dioxide, the available techniques to assess carbon dioxide production and removal and the clinically relevant applications of carbon dioxide-related variables as markers of the adequacy of perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass.

  9. Combined Extraction Processes of Lipid from Chlorella vulgaris Microalgae: Microwave Prior to Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Chemat

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Extraction yields and fatty acid profiles from freeze-dried Chlorella vulgaris by microwave pretreatment followed by supercritical carbon dioxide (MW-SCCO2 extraction were compared with those obtained by supercritical carbon dioxide extraction alone (SCCO2. Work performed with pressure range of 20–28 Mpa and temperature interval of 40–70 °C, gave the highest extraction yield (w/w dry weight at 28 MPa/40 °C. MW-SCCO2 allowed to obtain the highest extraction yield (4.73% compared to SCCO2 extraction alone (1.81%. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of microalgae oil showed that palmitic, oleic, linoleic and α-linolenic acid were the most abundant identified fatty acids. Oils obtained by MW-SCCO2 extraction had the highest concentrations of fatty acids compared to SCCO2 extraction without pretreatment. Native form, and microwave pretreated and untreated microalgae were observed by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM. SEM micrographs of pretreated microalgae present tearing wall agglomerates. After SCCO2, microwave pretreated microalgae presented several micro cracks; while native form microalgae wall was slightly damaged.

  10. The Wood-Growth-and-Burial Process (WGBP) Permanent Wood Sequestration to Solve the Global Carbon Dioxide Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, F.; Hasse, U.

    2008-12-01

    Among all global environmental problems there is one which dominates over all others: this is the excessive release of carbon dioxide due to burning of fossil fuels like coal, oil, and gas. The only way to achieve a permanent removal of anthropogenic CO2 must make use of photosynthesis since, so-far, no other technology is able to bind the necessary huge amounts of carbon. Therefore, we propose to grow wood on any available areas, and to bury the wood under anaerobic conditions, e.g., in emptied open pits of coal mining, any other available pits, and possibly also in emptied underground mines. At these places the wood will keep for practically unlimited times, undergoing only very slow carbonization reactions. Simple calculations allow concluding that humans could already now scavenge even all the released CO2, but a more realistic goal may be to bind 20, 30, or 60 percent. This is more a political question than a scientific one. General features of the WGBP are: The growth of woods will transform deforested areas and fallow land to some kind of natural vegetation with the accompanying positive side effects of restoring biotopes, improving the water balance and thus also improving the climate. The growth of woods will produce enormous amounts of oxygen and thus it will add to a sound oxygen balance. It will improve the air quality because of the filtering effect of woods. The growth of woods will improve the soil quality because leaves and roots will stay on and in the ground when the wood is harvested. The WGBP will create jobs in areas where there is an urgent demand for these. The WGBP will offer the opportunity to re-cultivate open pit mining areas. The WGBP will offer the possibility to fill underground mines in a way to prevent earth quakes caused by collapsing mine shafts. The WGBP will enable mankind to survive the time span ahead of us in which mankind will still use fossil fuels. The WGBP can be easily financed by societies via very small additional taxes

  11. Stoichiometric deduction of activated sludge process for organic carbon and nitrogen removal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jian-yong; ZOU Lian-pei

    2009-01-01

    The activated sludge process (ASP) is the most generally applied biological wastewater treatment method. The ASP for the removal of organic carbon and nitrogen can be looked as the combination of eight processes. In order to set up an ASP model, the stoichiometric coefficients should be deduced so that the stoichiometric matrix can be presented. The important assumptions and simplifications behind the model for ASP are enumerated. Using the matrix, mass balance equation and consistent units, the stoichiometric coefficients in the eight processes are exclusively deduced one by one.

  12. CFD Simulations of a Regenerative Process for Carbon Dioxide Capture in Advanced Gasification Based Power Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arastoopour, Hamid [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Abbasian, Javad [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2014-07-31

    This project describes the work carried out to prepare a highly reactive and mechanically strong MgO based sorbents and to develop a Population Balance Equations (PBE) approach to describe the evolution of the particle porosity distribution that is linked with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to perform simulations of the CO2 capture and sorbent regeneration. A large number of MgO-based regenerable sorbents were prepared using low cost and abundant dolomite as the base material. Among various preparation parameters investigated the potassium/magnesium (K/Mg) ratio was identified as the key variable affecting the reactivity and CO2 capacity of the sorbent. The optimum K/Mg ratio is about 0.15. The sorbent formulation HD52-P2 was identified as the “best” sorbent formulation and a large batch (one kg) of the sorbent was prepared for the detailed study. The results of parametric study indicate the optimum carbonation and regeneration temperatures are 360° and 500°C, respectively. The results also indicate that steam has a beneficial effect on the rate of carbonation and regeneration of the sorbent and that the reactivity and capacity of the sorbent decreases in the cycling process (sorbent deactivation). The results indicate that to achieve a high CO2 removal efficiency, the bed of sorbent should be operated at a temperature range of 370-410°C which also favors production of hydrogen through the WGS reaction. To describe the carbonation reaction kinetics of the MgO, the Variable Diffusivity shrinking core Model (VDM) was developed in this project, which was shown to accurately fit the experimental data. An important advantage of this model is that the changes in the sorbent conversion with time can be expressed in an explicit manner, which will significantly reduce the CFD computation time. A Computational Fluid Dynamic/Population Balance Equations (CFD/PBE) model was developed that accounts for the particle (sorbent) porosity distribution and a new version of

  13. Reducing carbon dioxide to products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Emily Barton; Sivasankar, Narayanappa; Parajuli, Rishi; Keets, Kate A

    2014-09-30

    A method reducing carbon dioxide to one or more products may include steps (A) to (C). Step (A) may bubble said carbon dioxide into a solution of an electrolyte and a catalyst in a divided electrochemical cell. The divided electrochemical cell may include an anode in a first cell compartment and a cathode in a second cell compartment. The cathode may reduce said carbon dioxide into said products. Step (B) may adjust one or more of (a) a cathode material, (b) a surface morphology of said cathode, (c) said electrolyte, (d) a manner in which said carbon dioxide is bubbled, (e), a pH level of said solution, and (f) an electrical potential of said divided electrochemical cell, to vary at least one of (i) which of said products is produced and (ii) a faradaic yield of said products. Step (C) may separate said products from said solution.

  14. Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory — The Southern Great Plains (SGP) carbon dioxide flux (CO2 flux) measurement systems provide half-hour average fluxes of CO2, H2O (latent heat), and sensible heat. The...

  15. Recuperative supercritical carbon dioxide cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Sprouse, Kenneth M; Subbaraman, Ganesan; O'Connor, George M; Johnson, Gregory A

    2014-11-18

    A power plant includes a closed loop, supercritical carbon dioxide system (CLS-CO.sub.2 system). The CLS-CO.sub.2 system includes a turbine-generator and a high temperature recuperator (HTR) that is arranged to receive expanded carbon dioxide from the turbine-generator. The HTR includes a plurality of heat exchangers that define respective heat exchange areas. At least two of the heat exchangers have different heat exchange areas.

  16. Molecular Dynamics Simulation Studies of Piperazine Activated MDEA Absorption Solution with Methane and Carbon Dioxide

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Regenerative chemical absorption process is widely used in industry for removal of carbon dioxide from natural gas, with activated aqueous solutions of alkanolamines considered a beneficial blend. One of the most promising blends is the aqueous mixture of methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) activated by small amount of piperazine, due to the fairly high rate of reaction of piperazine as a cyclic diamine with carbon dioxide and the low heat of regeneration of MDEA as a te...

  17. Preparation of a manganese dioxide/carbon fiber electrode for electrosorptive removal of copper ions from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chengzhi; Liu, Fangyuan; Lan, Huachun; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2015-05-15

    MnO2 is an effective adsorbent for many metal ions and a promising electrode material for electrochemical supercapacitors. In this paper, we successfully combined the two functions through preparing a MnO2/carbon fiber (CF) composite as an electrosorptive electrode. The thin MnO2 film was deposited onto CF by an anodic eletrodeposition method. The MnO2/CF electrodes had ideal pseudocapacitive behavior and high capacitive reversibility. The specific capacitance of the MnO2/CF electrode reached a maximum value of 387 F/g, which is quite competitive compared with literature values. At 0.8 V applied potential, the maximum Cu(2+) adsorption capacity of the MnO2/CF electrode was 172.88 mg/g, which is more than 2 times higher than common MnO2 adsorbents without an electric field imposed. SEM images showed that MnO2 nanoflowers with several "petals" were uniformly distributed on the CF surface. Enhancement of adsorption by the polarization potential and the unique microstructure of the deposited MnO2 may be the source of the outstanding adsorption ability of the MnO2/CF electrode. The MnO2/CF electrode could be regenerated quickly by reversing the voltage. The deposition time of 1000 s was optimum for achieving maximum capacitance and Cu(2+) removal performance. The MnO2/CF composite electrosorptive electrode is a promising candidate for Cu(2+) removal from aqueous solution.

  18. Fuzzy Control of Nitrate Recirculation and External Carbon Addition in A/O Nitrogen Removal Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马勇; 彭永臻; 王淑莹; 王晓莲

    2005-01-01

    Nitrogen and phosphorous concentrations of effluent water must be taken into account for the design and operation of wastewater treatment plants. In addition, the requirement for effluent quality is becoming strict.Therefore, intelligent control approaches are recently required in removing biological nutrient. In this study, fuzzy control has been successfully applied to improve the nitrogen removal. Experimental results showed that a close relationship between nitrate concentration and oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) at the end of anoxic zone was found for anoxic/oxic (A/O) nitrogen removal process treating synthetic wastewater. ORP can be used as online fuzzy control parazneter of nitrate recirculation and external carbon addition. The established fuzzy logic controller that includes two inputs and one output can maintain ORP value at-86 mV and -90 mV by adjusting the nitrate recirculation flow and external carbon dosage respectively to realize the optimal control of nitrogen removal, improving the effluent quality and reducing the operating cost.

  19. Nitrogen removal for low-carbon wastewater in reversed A~2/O process by regulation technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张智; 陈杰云; 谢丽华; 范功端; 尹晓静; 李勇

    2009-01-01

    Full scale experimental study on nitrogen removal for low-carbon wastewater was conducted in reversed A2/O process in Jiguanshi waste water treatment plant in Chongqing,in order to aid the operation and maintenance of similar WWTP. When the proposed measures,such as using 0.1% (volume fraction of wastewater) landfill leachate,shortening HRT by 2/3 in the primary sedimentation tank and controlling DO at 0.5 mg/L in the 3rd section of aerobic zone,are applied,15% of the carbon source can be complemented,the favorable property of activated sludge is achieved,and the nitrogen removal effect is significantly improved. The effluent NH3-N is 2 mg/L and the removal rate is 90%. The effluent TN is 17 mg/L and the removal rate is 54%. The up-to-standard discharge of the effluent is achieved. And after the optimization,the unit electricity consumption also reaches 0.21 kW/h and saves 20%.

  20. CO_2在炼钢工艺的应用及发展%Application and Development of Carbon Dioxide in the Steelmaking Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱荣; 毕秀荣; 吕明

    2012-01-01

    The emission of carbon dioxide in the iron and steelmaking process is about 16% of that in the industrial system.How to reduce the emission of carbon dioxide and take use of carbon dioxide is one of main problems that has attracted many steel engineers' attention.In order to take the utilization of carbon dioxide as a resource in steelmaking process,application of carbon dioxide as stirring gas,reaction media and protection gas was analyzed at home and abroad,and previous research on the application of carbon dioxide in steelmaking process was introduced.%钢铁生产过程CO2排放占工业CO2排放量的16%左右。如何降低CO2排放并使CO2进行资源化利用是钢铁工作者关心的重要问题。以CO2在炼钢过程中的资源化利用为出发点,分析了国内外CO2作为炼钢过程的搅拌气源、反应介质及保护气源的应用情况,并介绍了笔者在炼钢应用CO2方面所做的前期研究工作的进展。

  1. TiO2 Processed by pressurized hot solvents as a novel photocatalyst for photocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reli, Martin; Kobielusz, Marcin; -->Matějová, Lenka; Daniš, Stanislav; Macyk, Wojciech; Obalová, Lucie; Kuśtrowski, Piotr; Rokicińska, Anna; Kočí, Kamila

    2017-01-01

    Anatase-brookite TiO2 photocatalysts were prepared by the sol-gel process controlled within reverse micelles and processing by pressurized hot solvents-water/methanol/water (TiO2(M)) and water/ethanol/water (TiO2(E)), as an unconventional alternative to common calcination. The main goal of this work was to prepare anatase-brookite mixtures by processing by two different alcohols (methanol and ethanol) and evaluate the influence of the alcohol on the photocatalytic activity. Prepared photocatalysts were characterized by organic elemental analysis, nitrogen physisorption, XRD, UV-vis, photoelectrochemical and spectroelectrochemical measurements and XPS. The prepared photocatalysts efficiency was tested on the photocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide and compared with commercial TiO2 Evonik P25. Both prepared nanocomposites were more efficient towards methane production but Evonik P25 was the most efficient towards hydrogen generated through water splitting. The higher performance of anatase-brookite mixture towards methane production can be explained by (i) a higher photocatalytic activity of brookite than rutile; (ii) a large surface area of anatase-brookite composites enabling better carbon dioxide adsorption; (iii) the photoinduced electron transfer from the brookite conduction band to the anatase conduction band. On the other hand, a higher production of hydrogen in the presence of Evonik P25 is caused by a better charge separation in anatase-rutile than anatase-brookite phase compositions. TiO2(M) appeared more active than TiO2(E) in the photocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide due to a lower density of defects created in the crystal lattice.

  2. Biofixation of Carbon dioxide by Chlamydomonas sp. in a Tubular Photobioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Hadiyanto

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The biogas production from anaerobic digestion is a potential fuel for power generators application, if biogas can be upgraded to the same standards as fossil natural gas by CO2, H2S, and other non-combustible component removal. Microalgae Chlamydomonas sp. has potency to biofix the carbon dioxide and can be used as an additional food ingredient. The variations of flow rate and carbon dioxide concentration in the process resulting different value of biomass production and carbon dioxide biofixation. Biomass production at 40% carbon dioxide concentration obtained 5.685 gr/dm3 at 10% carbon dioxide concentration obtained 4.892 gr/dm3. The greatest value of carbon dioxide absorption occurs at a 40% concentration amounting to 12.09%. The rate of growth and productivity of microalgae tend to rise in 10% and 20% (%v carbon dioxide concentration, but began started a constant at 30% and 40% (%v carbon dioxide concentration. Biomass production tends to increase in light conditions while a constant in dark conditions. This study used Chlamydomonas sp. as media culture and performed on bubble column and tubular reactor with 6 litres of culture medium at a temperature of 28oC and atmospheric pressure.

  3. Biofixation of Carbon dioxide by Chlamydomonas sp. in a Tubular Photobioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Hadiyanto

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The biogas production from anaerobic digestion is a potential fuel for power generators application, if biogas can be upgraded to the same standards as fossil natural gas by CO2, H2S, and other non-combustible component removal. Microalgae Chlamydomonas sp. has potency to biofix the carbon dioxide and can be used as an additional food ingredient. The variations of flow rate and carbon dioxide concentration in the process resulting different value of biomass production and carbon dioxide biofixation. Biomass production at 40% carbon dioxide concentration obtained 5.685 gr/dm3 at 10% carbon dioxide concentration obtained 4.892 gr/dm3. The greatest value of carbon dioxide absorption occurs at a 40% concentration amounting to 12.09%. The rate of growth and productivity of microalgae tend to rise in 10% and 20% (%v carbon dioxide concentration, but began started a constant at 30% and 40% (%v carbon dioxide concentration. Biomass production tends to increase in light conditions while a constant in dark conditions. This study used Chlamydomonas sp. as media culture and performed on bubble column and tubular reactor with 6 litres of culture medium at a temperature of 28oC and atmospheric pressure.

  4. Electrocatalysts for carbon dioxide conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masel, Richard I; Salehi-Khojin, Amin

    2015-04-21

    Electrocatalysts for carbon dioxide conversion include at least one catalytically active element with a particle size above 0.6 nm. The electrocatalysts can also include a Helper Catalyst. The catalysts can be used to increase the rate, modify the selectivity or lower the overpotential of electrochemical conversion of CO.sub.2. Chemical processes and devices using the catalysts also include processes to produce CO, HCO.sup.-, H.sub.2CO, (HCO.sub.2).sup.-, H.sub.2CO.sub.2, CH.sub.3OH, CH.sub.4, C.sub.2H.sub.4, CH.sub.3CH.sub.2OH, CH.sub.3COO.sup.-, CH.sub.3COOH, C.sub.2H.sub.6, (COOH).sub.2, or (COO.sup.-).sub.2, and a specific device, namely, a CO.sub.2 sensor.

  5. Outstanding field emission properties of wet-processed titanium dioxide coated carbon nanotube based field emission devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Jinzhuo; Ou-Yang, Wei, E-mail: ouyangwei@phy.ecnu.edu.cn; Chen, Xiaohong; Guo, Pingsheng; Piao, Xianqing; Sun, Zhuo [Engineering Research Center for Nanophotonics and Advanced Instrument, Ministry of Education, Department of Physics, East China Normal University, 3663 North Zhongshan Road, Shanghai 200062 (China); Xu, Peng; Wang, Miao [Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, 38 ZheDa Road, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Li, Jun [Department of Electronic Science and Technology, Tongji University, 4800 Caoan Road, Shanghai 201804 (China)

    2015-02-16

    Field emission devices using a wet-processed composite cathode of carbon nanotube films coated with titanium dioxide exhibit outstanding field emission characteristics, including ultralow turn on field of 0.383 V μm{sup −1} and threshold field of 0.657 V μm{sup −1} corresponding with a very high field enhancement factor of 20 000, exceptional current stability, and excellent emission uniformity. The improved field emission properties are attributed to the enhanced edge effect simultaneously with the reduced screening effect, and the lowered work function of the composite cathode. In addition, the highly stable electron emission is found due to the presence of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on the carbon nanotubes, which prohibits the cathode from the influence of ions and free radical created in the emission process as well as residual oxygen gas in the device. The high-performance solution-processed composite cathode demonstrates great potential application in vacuum electronic devices.

  6. Textile Dry Cleaning Using Carbon Dioxide: Process, Apparatus and Mechanical Action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sutanto, S.

    2014-01-01

    Fabrics that are sensitive to water, may wrinkle or shrink when washed in regular washing machines and are usually cleaned by professional dry cleaners. Dry cleaning is a process of removing soils from substrate, in this case textile, using a non-aqueous solvent. The most common solvent in conventio

  7. Nonthermal processing of orange juice using a pilot-plant scale supercritical carbon dioxide system with a gas-liquid metal contactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    To evaluate the effect of pilot-plant scale, non-thermal supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2) processing on the safety and the quality of orange juice (OJ), SCCO2 processed juice was compared with untreated fresh juice and equivalently thermal processed juice in terms of lethality. SCCO2 processing ...

  8. Carbon dioxide utilisation in the chemical industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aresta, M.; Tommasi, I. [Universita di Bari (Italy). Centro METEA e Dipartimento di Chimica

    1997-12-31

    The amount of carbon dioxide available for industrial utilisation may expand to unprecedented levels if the recovery of carbon dioxide from energy plants flue gases is implemented. The potential of each of the three possible uses (technological, chemical, and biological) is far from being clearly defined. The chemical utilisation option, that has intrinsic thermodynamic and kinetic constraints, may raise controversial positions, depending on the criteria used for the analysis. The estimate of its real potential demands a thorough comparative analysis, using the Life Cycle Assessment methodology, of existing processes/products with the new ones based on CO{sub 2}, in order to establish whether, or not, the latter avoid carbon dioxide (either directly or indirectly) and their economics. The rejection/consideration assessment methodology will produce reliable results only if an exhaustive number of parameters is used. The analysis cannot be limited to practiced industrial processes, but must be extended to an exhaustive inventory of cases. (Author)

  9. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Extraction of Bioactive Compounds from Ampelopsis grossedentata Stems: Process Optimization and Antioxidant Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da Sun

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2 extraction of bioactive compounds including flavonoids and phenolics from Ampelopsis grossedentata stems was carried out. Extraction parameters such as pressure, temperature, dynamic time and modifier, were optimized using an orthogonal array design of L9 (34, and antioxidant activities of the extracts were evaluated by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH free radical scavenging assay and ferrous ion chelating (FIC assay. The best conditions obtained for SC-CO2 extraction of flavonoids was 250 bar, 40 °C, 50 min, and with a modifier of methanol/ethanol (1:3, v/v, and that for phenolics extraction was 250 bar, 40 °C, 50 min, and with a modifier of methanol/ethanol (1:1, v/v. Meantime, flavonoids and phenolics were found to be mainly responsible for the DPPH scavenging activity of the extracts, but not for the chelating activity on ferrous ion according to Pearson correlation analysis. Furthermore, several unreported flavonoids such as apigenin, vitexin, luteolin, etc., have been detected in the extracts from A. grossedentata stems.

  10. Ammonia removal in the carbon contactor of a hybrid membrane process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoquart, Céline; Servais, Pierre; Barbeau, Benoit

    2014-12-15

    The hybrid membrane process (HMP) coupling powdered activated carbon (PAC) and low-pressure membrane filtration is emerging as a promising new option to remove dissolved contaminants from drinking water. Yet, defining optimal HMP operating conditions has not been confirmed. In this study, ammonia removal occurring in the PAC contactor of an HMP was simulated at lab-scale. Kinetics were monitored using three PAC concentrations (1-5-10 g L(-1)), three PAC ages (0-10-60 days), two temperatures (7-22 °C), in ambient influent condition (100 μg N-NH4 L(-1)) as well as with a simulated peak pollution scenario (1000 μg N-NH4L(-1)). The following conclusions were drawn: i) Using a colonized PAC in the HMP is essential to reach complete ammonia removal, ii) an older PAC offers a higher resilience to temperature decrease as well as lower operating costs; ii) PAC concentration inside the HMP reactor is not a key operating parameter as under the conditions tested, PAC colonization was not limited by the available surface; iii) ammonia flux limited biomass growth and iv) hydraulic retention time was a critical parameter. In the case of a peak pollution, the process was most probably phosphate-limited but a mixed adsorption/nitrification still allowed reaching a 50% ammonia removal. Finally, a kinetic model based on these experiments is proposed to predict ammonia removal occurring in the PAC reactor of the HMP. The model determines the relative importance of the adsorption and biological oxidation of ammonia on colonized PAC, and demonstrates the combined role of nitrification and residual adsorption capacity of colonized PAC.

  11. Carbon Dioxide Absorption Heat Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A carbon dioxide absorption heat pump cycle is disclosed using a high pressure stage and a super-critical cooling stage to provide a non-toxic system. Using carbon dioxide gas as the working fluid in the system, the present invention desorbs the CO2 from an absorbent and cools the gas in the super-critical state to deliver heat thereby. The cooled CO2 gas is then expanded thereby providing cooling and is returned to an absorber for further cycling. Strategic use of heat exchangers can increase the efficiency and performance of the system.

  12. Combined Partial Oxidation and Carbon Dioxide Reforming Process: A Thermodynamic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sompop Jarungthammachote

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: CO2 reforming is one of the methods to utilize a greenhouse gas to produce syngas, an important feed for methanol and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. However, CO2 reforming is strong endothermic reaction requiring large amount of supplied energy. Partial oxidation, an exothermic reaction, is combined with CO2 reforming to serve the energy requirement. Thus, the optimum ranges of O2 and CO2 fed to the process corresponding to feedstock are needed to find. Moreover, one of the most important problems found in this process is solid carbon formation. Therefore, the operating range in which the carbon formation can be avoided is also required to study. Approach: In this study CH4 was used as feedstock. The optimum rage of O2 and CO2 fed to the process was found by using thermodynamic equilibrium method based on minimization of Gibbs free energy. The Lagrange multiplier method was conducted to form the equations and they were solved by the Newton-Raphson method. The solid carbon formation zone was also simulated. Results: The simulation showed that higher reaction temperature caused higher CH4 and CO2 conversions. Syngas production increased with increasing temperature. Operating the process with high temperature or high O2/CH4 and CO2/CH4 rations could eliminate solid carbon formation. Increase of O2/CH4 ration higher than 0.1 led decreasing syngas while increase of CO2/CH4 ration caused increasing H2 and CO. However, when CO2/CH4 ration was higher than 0.85, increasing CO2/CH4 ration showed insignificant change of syngas concentration. Conclusion: The combined partial oxidation and CO2 reforming of method should be operated with reaction temperature of 1050 K. The optimum range of CH4:CO2:O2 for this process is 1: 0.85-1.0:0.1-0.2.

  13. Carbon dioxide absorbent and method of using the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, Robert James; O' Brien, Michael Joseph

    2015-12-29

    In accordance with one aspect, the present invention provides a composition which contains the amino-siloxane structures I, or III, as described herein. The composition is useful for the capture of carbon dioxide from process streams. In addition, the present invention provides methods of preparing the amino-siloxane composition. Another aspect of the present invention provides methods for reducing the amount of carbon dioxide in a process stream employing the amino-siloxane compositions of the invention, as species which react with carbon dioxide to form an adduct with carbon dioxide.

  14. Carbon dioxide absorbent and method of using the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Robert James; O'Brien, Michael Joseph

    2014-06-10

    In accordance with one aspect, the present invention provides a composition which contains the amino-siloxane structures I, or III, as described herein. The composition is useful for the capture of carbon dioxide from process streams. In addition, the present invention provides methods of preparing the amino-siloxane composition. Another aspect of the present invention provides methods for reducing the amount of carbon dioxide in a process stream employing the amino-siloxane compositions of the invention, as species which react with carbon dioxide to form an adduct with carbon dioxide.

  15. Removal effect on Mesocyclops leukarti and mutagenicity with chlorine dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZUO Jin-long; CUI Fu-yi; QU Bo; ZHU Gui-bing

    2006-01-01

    Mesocyclops leukarti of zooplankton propagates excessively in eutrophic water body and it cannot be effectively inactivated by the conventional drinking water treatment process. In order to tackle this problem, a study of removal effect on Mesocyclops leukarti with chlorine dioxide in a waterworks was performed. The results showed that Mesocyclops leukarti could be effectively removed from water by 1.0 mg/L chlorine dioxide preoxidation combined with the conventional drinking water treatment process.Higher oxidizability and molecular state of chlorine dioxide in water is the key to the inactivation of Mesocyclops leukarti. The chlorite, disinfection by-products (DBPs) of chlorine dioxide, was stable at 0.45 mg/L, which is lower than that critical value of the USEPA. GC-MS examination showed that the quantity of organic substance in the water treated by chlorine dioxide obviously decreased. Ames test further revealed that the mutagenicity was reduced by chlorine dioxide with respect to prechlorine. The propagation ofMesocyclops leukarti can be inactivated effectively and safely by chlorine dioxide pre-oxidation.

  16. Selective removal of carbon dioxide contained in the effluent from ion chromatography suppressors using a new non-vacuum device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masunaga, Hiroto; Higo, Yuji; Ishii, Mizuo; Maruyama, Noboru; Yamazaki, Shigeo

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a new CO2 gas removal device optimized to selectively remove CO2 gas contained in the effluent from suppressors used in ion chromatography (IC) under non-vacuum conditions is described. This device consists of a closed vessel equipped with gas permeable tubing (GPT) and a CO2 adsorbent. During operation, the CO2 adsorbent adsorbs CO2 gas in the vessel, creating CO2 partial pressure difference between the inside of the GPT and the vessel. The CO2 gas contained in the effluent being pumped into the GPT is selectively removed from the effluent based on the diffusion of the CO2 associated with the CO2 partial pressure difference. The purpose of this study is to optimize the IC operating conditions with the aim of selectively removing HCO3(-) (CO3(2-)) contained in the effluent and reducing the electrical conductivity of the effluent under non-vacuum conditions. The electrical conductivity of the effluent and the signal intensity of the water dip is decreased by approximately 25 μS/cm (from 30 to 5 μS/cm) and by approximately twentieth, respectively, using the optimized CO2 remover. In addition, the anion detection limit achieved in IC instruments with a CO2 remover is on the order of a few ppb.

  17. Modelling Sublimation of Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, Brian

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author reports results in their efforts to model sublimation of carbon dioxide and the associated kinetics order and parameter estimation issues in their model. They have offered the reader two sets of data and several approaches to determine the rate of sublimation of a piece of solid dry ice. They presented several models…

  18. Electrocatalytic carbon dioxide reduction - a mechanistic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, Klaas Jan Schouten

    2013-01-01

    This thesis presents new insights into the reduction of carbon dioxide to methane and ethylene on copper electrodes. This electrochemical process has great potential for the storage of surplus renewable electrical energy in the form of hydrocarbons. The research described in this thesis focuses on t

  19. 21 CFR 582.1240 - Carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carbon dioxide. 582.1240 Section 582.1240 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1240 Carbon dioxide. (a) Product. Carbon dioxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  20. A Method for Sustainable Carbon Dioxide Utilization Process Synthesis and Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frauzem, Rebecca; Fjellerup, Kasper; Roh, Kosan;

    for the process synthesis, design and more sustainable design. Using a superstructure-based approach a network of utilization alternatives is created linking CO2 and other raw materials with various products using processing blocks. This will then be optimized and verified for sustainability. Detailed design has...... also been performed for various case studies. These case studies include multiple pathways for the production of methanol and the production of dimethyl carbonate (DMC). From detailed design and analysis, CO2 conversion processes show promise as an additional method for the sustainable reduction of CO2...... compounds via chemical reactions. However, conversion is still in its infancy and requires work for implementation at an industrial level. One aspect of this is the development of a methodology for the formulation and optimization of sustainable conversion processes. This methodology follows three stages...

  1. Combined reactions and separations using ionic liquids and carbon dioxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, M.C.

    2006-01-01

    A new and general type of process for the chemical industry is presented using ionic liquids and supercritical carbon dioxide as combined reaction and separation media. In this process, the carbon dioxide pressure controls the miscibility of reactants, products, catalyst and ionic liquid, enabling f

  2. PALM KERNEL OIL SOLUBITY EXAMINATION AND ITS MODELING IN EXTRACTION PROCESS USING SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyu Bahari Setianto

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Application of  supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2 to vegetable oil extraction became an attractive technique due to its high solubility, short extraction time and simple purification. The method is considered as earth friendly technology due to the absence of chemical usage. Solubility of solute-SC-CO2 is an important data for application of the SC-CO2 extraction. In this work, the equilibrium solubility of the palm kernel oil (PKO in SC-CO2 has been examined using extraction curve analysis. The examinations were performed at temperature and pressure ranges of  323.15 K to 353.15 K and 20.7 to 34.5 MPa respectively. It was obtained that the experimental solubility were from 0.0160 to 0.0503 g oil/g CO2 depend on the extraction condition. The experimental solubility data was well correlated with a solvent density based model with absolute percent deviation of 0.96. PENENTUAN KELARUTAN MINYAK INTI KELAPA SAWIT DAN PEMODELAN EKSTRAKSI DENGAN KARBON DIOKSIDA SUPERKRITIK. Sehubungan dengan kelarutan yang tinggi, waktu ekstraksi yang pendek dan pemurnian hasil yang mudah, aplikasi karbon dioksida superkritis (SC-CO2 pada ekstraksi minyak nabati menjadi sebuah teknik ekstraksi yang menarik. Karena tanpa penggunaan bahan kimia, metode ekstraksi ini dianggap sebagai teknologi yang ramah lingkungan. Kelarutan zat terlarut pada SC-CO2 merupakan data yang penting dalam aplikasi SC-CO2 pada proses ekstraksi.  Pada penelitian ini,  kelarutan kesetimbangan dari minyak biji sawit (PKO dalam SC-CO2 telah diuji dengan mengunakan analisa kurva proses ekstraksi. Pengujian kelarutan tersebut dilakukan pada rentang suhu 323,15 K sampai 353,15 K dan rentang tekanan 20,7 MPa sampai 34,5 MPa. Hasil analisa menunjukkan bahwa kelarutan kesetimbangan hasil percobaan  PKO pada SC-CO2 adalah 0.0160 g minyak/g CO2 sampai 0,0503 g minyak/g CO2 tergantung pada kondisi ekstraksi. Data kelarutan kesetimbangan hasil percobaan  telah dikorelasaikan dengan baik menggunakan

  3. A tenuous carbon dioxide atmosphere on Jupiter's moon Callisto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, R. W.

    1999-01-01

    An off-limb scan of Callisto was conducted by the Galileo near-infrared mapping spectrometer to search for a carbon dioxide atmosphere. Airglow in the carbon dioxide nu3 band was observed up to 100 kilometers above the surface and indicates the presence of a tenuous carbon dioxide atmosphere with surface pressure of 7.5 x 10(-12) bar and a temperature of about 150 kelvin, close to the surface temperature. A lifetime on the order of 4 years is suggested, based on photoionization and magnetospheric sweeping. Either the atmosphere is transient and was formed recently or some process is currently supplying carbon dioxide to the atmosphere.

  4. Method for carbon dioxide splitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, James E.; Diver, Jr., Richard B.; Siegel, Nathan P.

    2017-02-28

    A method for splitting carbon dioxide via a two-step metal oxide thermochemical cycle by heating a metal oxide compound selected from an iron oxide material of the general formula A.sub.xFe.sub.3-xO.sub.4, where 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1 and A is a metal selected from Mg, Cu, Zn, Ni, Co, and Mn, or a ceria oxide compound of the general formula M.sub.aCe.sub.bO.sub.c, where 0carbon dioxide, and heating to a temperature less than approximately 1400 C, thereby producing carbon monoxide gas and the original metal oxide compound.

  5. CARBON DIOXIDE AS A FEEDSTOCK.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CREUTZ,C.; FUJITA,E.

    2000-12-09

    This report is an overview on the subject of carbon dioxide as a starting material for organic syntheses of potential commercial interest and the utilization of carbon dioxide as a substrate for fuel production. It draws extensively on literature sources, particularly on the report of a 1999 Workshop on the subject of catalysis in carbon dioxide utilization, but with emphasis on systems of most interest to us. Atmospheric carbon dioxide is an abundant (750 billion tons in atmosphere), but dilute source of carbon (only 0.036 % by volume), so technologies for utilization at the production source are crucial for both sequestration and utilization. Sequestration--such as pumping CO{sub 2} into sea or the earth--is beyond the scope of this report, except where it overlaps utilization, for example in converting CO{sub 2} to polymers. But sequestration dominates current thinking on short term solutions to global warming, as should be clear from reports from this and other workshops. The 3500 million tons estimated to be added to the atmosphere annually at present can be compared to the 110 million tons used to produce chemicals, chiefly urea (75 million tons), salicylic acid, cyclic carbonates and polycarbonates. Increased utilization of CO{sub 2} as a starting material is, however, highly desirable, because it is an inexpensive, non-toxic starting material. There are ongoing efforts to replace phosgene as a starting material. Creation of new materials and markets for them will increase this utilization, producing an increasingly positive, albeit small impact on global CO{sub 2} levels. The other uses of interest are utilization as a solvent and for fuel production and these will be discussed in turn.

  6. Safety Control on the Chocking Process of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Pipeline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Zhao

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Transportation safety of supercritical CO2 pipeline is a key aspect of carbon capture and storage (CCS. For reducing the high pressure in supercritical pipeline when accidental cases arise, man-made release will be applied using chocking process. The downstream parameters of chocking process can be predicted based on the adiabatic process assumption. In the critical chocking process, the critical velocity at outlet is sonic. A chocking pipe can be designed for buffering between different chocking orifices according to the length of turbulence area produced by jetting momentum. For the effect of noise hazard produced by large jetting velocity, a muffler can be applied at the outlet of final stage orifice to atmosphere. For the influence of impurities on the chocking process of anthropogenic CO2 pipeline, the presence of SO2 as an impurity is helpful for increasing the downstream temperatures through the chocking device to prevent the frozen hazard, whereas the presence of N2 as an impurity indicates a lower downstream temperature. The higher initial temperature can prevent the dry ice formation at the outlet of vent pipe when the multistage chocking is applied.

  7. Process Design for the Biocatalysis of Value-Added Chemicals from Carbon Dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Eiteman

    2007-07-31

    This report describes results toward developing a process to sequester CO{sub 2} centered on the enzymes PEP carboxylase and pyruvate carboxylase. The process involves the use of bacteria to convert CO{sub 2} and glucose as a co-substrate and generates succinic acid as a commodity chemical product. The study reports on strain development and process development. In the area of strain development, knockouts in genes which divert carbon from the enzymatic steps involved in CO{sub 2} consumption were completed, and were shown not to affect significantly the rate of CO{sub 2} sequestration and succinic acid generation. Furthermore, the pyc gene encoding for pyruvate carboxylase proved to be unstable when integrated onto the chromosome. In the area of process development, an optimal medium, pH and base counterion were obtained, leading to a sequestration rate as great as 800 mg/Lh. Detailed studies of gas phase composition demonstrated that CO{sub 2} composition has a significant affect on CO{sub 2} sequestration, while the presence of 'toxic' compounds in the gas, including NO{sub 2}, CO and SO{sub 2} did not have a detrimental effect on sequestration. Some results on prolonging the rate of sequestration indicate that enzyme activities decrease with time, suggesting methods to prolong enzyme activity may benefit the overall process.

  8. CARBON DIOXIDE REDUCTION CONTACTORS IN SPACE VEHICLES AND OTHER ENCLOSED STRUCTURES,

    Science.gov (United States)

    CONTROLLED ATMOSPHERES, CARBON DIOXIDE , REMOVAL, LIFE SUPPORT SYSTEMS, SPACE ENVIRONMENTS, CONFINED ENVIRONMENTS, OXYGEN CONSUMPTION, REGENERATION(ENGINEERING), CHEMISORPTION, MASS TRANSFER, FLUID MECHANICS, CENTRIFUGES.

  9. GEOLOGICAL STORAGE OF CARBON DIOXIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Kolenković

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide geological storage represents a key segment of the carbon capture and storage system (CCS expected to significantly contribute to the reduction of its emissions, primarily in the developed countries and in those that are currently being industrialised. This approach to make use of the subsurface is entirely new meaning that several aspects are still in research phase. The paper gives a summary of the most important recent results with a short overview the possibilities in the Republic of Croatia. One option is to construct underground carbon dioxide storage facilities in deep coal seams or salt caverns. Another would be to use the CO2 in enhanced oil and gas recovery projects relying on the retention of the carbon dioxide in the deep reservoir because a portion of the injected gas is not going be produced together with hydrocarbons. Finally, the greatest potential estimated lies in depleted hydrocarbon reservoirs with significantly reduced reservoir pressure, as well as in the large regional units - layers of deep saline aquifers that extend through almost all sedimentary basins (the paper is published in Croatian.

  10. Method to remove poisonous chlorine compounds using supercritical carbon dioxide. Chorinkai tansan gas wo mochiita yudoku enso kagobutsu no jokyoho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikushima, Y. (Government Industrial Research Institute, Tohoku, Sendai (Japan))

    1989-12-15

    This paper describes a method to extract and remove selectively poisonous chlorine compounds from aqueous solution using supercritical CO2. This method is characterized in that it extracts and separates only chlorine compounds in short time under a moderate condition, and removes it without a need of whatever post-treatment. The supercritical CO2 pressure was 80 kg/cm[sup 2], and the extraction temperature was 40[degree]C. The supercritical CO2 extracted 70% to 80% by weight of trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene in 15 to 30 minutes, almost all of 1,2-dichloroethane and 1,1,1-trichloroethane in one hour, and about 70% by weight of benzil chloride after 90 minutes. When the supercritical CO2 extraction was carried out for a dilute chlorine compound at 1000 ppm for three hours, the concentrations of trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene in the aqueous solution decreased down to several ppm, with no other substances than chlorine compounds detected in the extracts. This proves that no water has been extracted at all. 5 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Performance of separation processes for precipitated calcium carbonate produced with an innovative method from steelmaking slag and carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian eTeir

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, experiments were performed to determine the filterability of calcium carbonate produced with an alternative calcium carbonate production concept. The concept uses steelmaking slag as raw material and has potential to fix CO2 emissions and utilize steelmaking slag, simultaneously. As calcium carbonate is precipitated in a solution containing ammonium chloride, calcium chloride and ammonia, the product needs to be washed and hence filtered. In this work different separation processes, including washing, filtering and drying, were tested on two calcium carbonate slurries produced from steel converter slag and CO2 by a laboratory-scale pilot facility, with the aim of obtaining a solid product with a low chloride content using a minimum amount of washing water. The order of maximum filtration rates achievable of the calcium carbonate slurries was determined by experimental work. The tests included pressure filtration and vacuum filtration and the test series contained altogether 21 different filtration cycles with varying combinations of filtering, washing, and drying steps. The filtered cakes were analyzed by their residual moisture content, chloride content and conductivity, and the filtrates by their residual solids content, chloride content and conductivity. Pressure filtration gave a high capacity (400-460 kg/m2h and a low cake residual moisture content (12-14 wt-%. Vacuum filtration gave slightly higher filtration rates (500-610 kg/m2h at the lowest residual chloride contents of the cakes, but the cake residual moisture also stayed higher (25-26 wt-%. As the vacuum filtration tests used a filter cloth with higher permeability than that of the pressure filtration tests, a slightly higher filtration rate was expected. However, both filtration technologies seem suitable for filtering and washing calcium carbonate prepared with the studied method as a residual chloride content as low as 10 ppm of the filtered solids can be achieved

  12. Enhanced biological nutrient removal in modified carbon source division anaerobic anoxic oxic process with return activated sludge pre-concentration☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin Lu; Haiyan Wu; Haoyan Li; Dianhai Yang

    2015-01-01

    A pilot-scale modified carbon source division anaerobic anoxic oxic (AAO) process with pre-concentration of returned activated sludge (RAS) was proposed in this study for the enhanced biological nutrient removal (BNR) of municipal wastewater with limited carbon source. The influent carbon source was fed in step while a novel RAS pre-concentration tank was adopted to improve BNR efficiency, and the effects of an influent carbon source distribution ratio and a RAS pre-concentration ratio were investigated. The results show that the removal efficiency of TN is mainly influenced by the carbon source distribution ratio while the TP removal relies on the RAS pre-concentration ratio. The optimum carbon source distribution ratio and RAS pre-concentration ratio are 60%and 50%, respectively, with an inner recycling ratio of 100%under the optimum steady operation of pilot test, reaching an average effluent TN concentration of 9.8 mg·L−1 with a removal efficiency of 63%and an average TP removal efficiency of 94%. The mechanism of nutrient removal is discussed and the kinetics is analyzed. The results reveal that the optimal carbon source distribution ratio provides sufficient denitrifying carbon source to each anoxic phase, reducing nitrate accumulation while the RAS pre-concentration ratio improves the condition of anaerobic zone to ensure the phosphorus release due to less nitrate in the returned sludge. Therefore, nitrifying bacteria, denitrifying bacteria and phosphorus accumulation organisms play an important role under the optimum condition, enhancing the performance of nutrient removal in this test.

  13. Carbon dioxide conversion over carbon-based nanocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavarian, Mehrnoush; Chai, Siang-Piao; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman

    2013-07-01

    The utilization of carbon dioxide for the production of valuable chemicals via catalysts is one of the efficient ways to mitigate the greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. It is known that the carbon dioxide conversion and product yields are still low even if the reaction is operated at high pressure and temperature. The carbon dioxide utilization and conversion provides many challenges in exploring new concepts and opportunities for development of unique catalysts for the purpose of activating the carbon dioxide molecules. In this paper, the role of carbon-based nanocatalysts in the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide and direct synthesis of dimethyl carbonate from carbon dioxide and methanol are reviewed. The current catalytic results obtained with different carbon-based nanocatalysts systems are presented and how these materials contribute to the carbon dioxide conversion is explained. In addition, different strategies and preparation methods of nanometallic catalysts on various carbon supports are described to optimize the dispersion of metal nanoparticles and catalytic activity.

  14. Interglacials, Milankovitch Cycles, Solar Activity, and Carbon Dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald E. Marsh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The existing understanding of interglacial periods is that they are initiated by Milankovitch cycles enhanced by rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. During interglacials, global temperature is also believed to be primarily controlled by carbon dioxide concentrations, modulated by internal processes such as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and the North Atlantic Oscillation. Recent work challenges the fundamental basis of these conceptions.

  15. Interglacials, Milankovitch Cycles, Solar Activity, and Carbon Dioxide

    OpenAIRE

    Marsh, Gerald E.

    2014-01-01

    The existing understanding of interglacial periods is that they are initiated by Milankovitch cycles enhanced by rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. During interglacials, global temperature is also believed to be primarily controlled by carbon dioxide concentrations, modulated by internal processes such as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and the North Atlantic Oscillation. Recent work challenges the fundamental basis of these conceptions.

  16. Carbon dioxide retention in divers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florio, J.T.; Mackenzie, D.A.R.; McKenzie, R.S. [ARE Physiological Laboratory, Gosport (United Kingdom)

    1998-04-01

    This report summarises the work carried out at the ARE Physiological Laboratory (ARE(PL)) between July 1978 and December 1983. The work was intended to examine the proposition that some divers have a low ventilatory response to carbon dioxide; that this results in a low ventilatory response to exercise with consequent hypercapnia; and that these characteristics put the diver at a greater-than-normal risk by increasing the individual`s susceptibility to oxygen toxicity and to other hazards associated with diving (e.g. nitrogen narcosis, decompression sickness and hypothermia). The specific aims of the project can be summarised as follows: (a) to demonstrate the existence of divers who exhibit the tendency to `retain carbon dioxide` when working in hyperbaric conditions; (b) to define the circumstances under which such individuals are at risk; (c) to assess the magnitude of the risk; and (d) to recommend ways to eliminate or to reduce the risk. (author)

  17. Pilot-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide Capture Preliminary Techno-Economic Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Surinder; Spiry, Irina; Wood, Benjamin; Hance, Dan; Chen, Wei; Kehmna, Mark; McDuffie, Dwayne

    2014-03-31

    This report presents system and economic analysis for a carbon-capture unit which uses an aminosilicone-based solvent for CO{sub 2} capture in a pulverized coal (PC) boiler. The aminosilicone solvent is a 60/40 wt/wt mixture of 3-aminopropyl end-capped polydimethylsiloxane (GAP-1m) with tri-ethylene glycol (TEG) as a co-solvent. For comparison purposes, the report also shows results for a carbon-capture unit based on a conventional approach using mono-ethanol amine (MEA). The first year removal cost of CO{sub 2} for the aminosilicone-based carbon-capture process is $46.04/ton of CO2 as compared to $60.25/ton of CO{sub 2} when MEA is used. The aminosilicone-based process has <77% of the CAPEX of a system using MEA solvent. The lower CAPEX is due to several factors, including the higher working capacity of the aminosilicone solvent compared the MEA, which reduces the solvent flow rate required, reducing equipment sizes. If it is determined that carbon steel can be used in the rich-lean heat exchanger in the carbon capture unit, the first year removal cost of CO{sub 2} decreases to $44.12/ton. The aminosilicone-based solvent has a higher thermal stability than MEA, allowing desorption to be conducted at higher temperatures and pressures, decreasing the number of compressor stages needed. The aminosilicone-based solvent also has a lower vapor pressure, allowing the desorption to be conducted in a continuous-stirred tank reactor versus a more expensive packed column. The aminosilicone-based solvent has a lower heat capacity, which decreases the heat load on the desorber. In summary, the amino-silicone solvent has significant advantages over conventional systems using MEA.

  18. Factors affecting pH change in alkaline waste water treatment - II: Carbon dioxide production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lijklema, L.

    1971-01-01

    The carbon dioxide produced during biological oxidation of wastewater has a pronounced influence upon the pH that is attained in the activated sludge process. The quantity produced is proportional to the COD removed, its degree of oxidation and depends also on the oxidation level of the substrate. A

  19. Water in supercritical carbon dioxide dyeing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Lai-Jiu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the effect of water serving as entrainer on the dyeing of wool fabrics in supercritical carbon dioxide. Compared with previous supercritical dyeing methods, addition of water makes the dyeing process more effective under low temperature and low pressure. During dyeing process, dyestuff can be uniformly distributed on fabrics’s surface due to water interaction, as a result coloration is enhanced while color difference is decreased.

  20. Dynamics of Intracellular Polymers in Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal Processes under Different Organic Carbon Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizhen Xing

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR may deteriorate or fail during low organic carbon loading periods. Polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs in EBPR were acclimated under both high and low organic carbon conditions, and then dynamics of polymers in typical cycles, anaerobic conditions with excess organic carbons, and endogenous respiration conditions were examined. After long-term acclimation, it was found that organic loading rates did not affect the yield of PAOs and the applied low organic carbon concentrations were advantageous for the enrichment of PAOs. A low influent organic carbon concentration induced a high production of extracellular carbohydrate. During both anaerobic and aerobic endogenous respirations, when glycogen decreased to around 80 ± 10 mg C per gram of volatile suspended solids, PAOs began to utilize polyphosphate significantly. Regressed by the first-order reaction model, glycogen possessed the highest degradation rate and then was followed by polyphosphate, while biomass decay had the lowest degradation rate.

  1. Processes regulating progressive nitrogen limitation under elevated carbon dioxide: a meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Junyi; Qi, Xuan; Souza, Lara; Luo, Yiqi

    2016-05-01

    The nitrogen (N) cycle has the potential to regulate climate change through its influence on carbon (C) sequestration. Although extensive research has explored whether or not progressive N limitation (PNL) occurs under CO2 enrichment, a comprehensive assessment of the processes that regulate PNL is still lacking. Here, we quantitatively synthesized the responses of all major processes and pools in the terrestrial N cycle with meta-analysis of CO2 experimental data available in the literature. The results showed that CO2 enrichment significantly increased N sequestration in the plant and litter pools but not in the soil pool, partially supporting one of the basic assumptions in the PNL hypothesis that elevated CO2 results in more N sequestered in organic pools. However, CO2 enrichment significantly increased the N influx via biological N fixation and the loss via N2O emission, but decreased the N efflux via leaching. In addition, no general diminished CO2 fertilization effect on plant growth was observed over time up to the longest experiment of 13 years. Overall, our analyses suggest that the extra N supply by the increased biological N fixation and decreased leaching may potentially alleviate PNL under elevated CO2 conditions in spite of the increases in plant N sequestration and N2O emission. Moreover, our syntheses indicate that CO2 enrichment increases soil ammonium (NH4+) to nitrate (NO3-) ratio. The changed NH4+/NO3- ratio and subsequent biological processes may result in changes in soil microenvironments, above-belowground community structures and associated interactions, which could potentially affect the terrestrial biogeochemical cycles. In addition, our data synthesis suggests that more long-term studies, especially in regions other than temperate ones, are needed for comprehensive assessments of the PNL hypothesis.

  2. Membrane Separation Processes for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture: State of the Art and Critical Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belaissaoui Bouchra

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Membrane processes have been initially seldom considered within a post-combustion carbon dioxide capture framework. More traditional processes, particularly gas-liquid absorption in chemical solvents, are often considered as the most appropriate solution for the first generation of technologies. In this paper, a critical state of the art of gas separation membranes for CO2 capture is proposed. In a first step, the key performances (selectivity, permeability of different membrane materials such as polymers, inorganic membranes, hybrid matrices and liquid membranes, including recently reported results, are reviewed. In a second step, the process design characteristics of a single stage membrane unit are studied. Purity and energy constraints are analysed as a function of operating conditions and membrane materials performances. The interest of multistage and hybrid systems, two domains which have not sufficiently investigated up to now, are finally discussed. The importance of technico-economical analyses is highlighted in order to better estimate the optimal role of membranes for CCS applications.

  3. Efficient utilization of greenhouse gas in a gas-to-liquids process combined with carbon dioxide reforming of methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Kyoung-Su; Bae, Jong Wook; Woo, Kwang-Jae; Jun, Ki-Won

    2010-02-15

    A process model for a gas-to-liquids (GTL) process mainly producing Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthetic oils has been developed to assess the effects of reforming methods, recycle ratio of unreacted syngas mixture on the process efficiency and the greenhouse gas (GHG) emission. The reforming unit of our study is composed of both steam reforming of methane (SRM) and carbon dioxide reforming of methane (CDR) to form syngas, which gives composition flexibility, reduction in GHG emission, and higher cost-competitiveness. With recycling, it is found that zero emission of CO(2) from the process can be realized and the required amount of natural gas (NG) can be significantly reduced. This GTL process model has been built by using Aspen Plus software, and it is mainly composed of a feeding unit, a reforming unit, an FT synthesis unit, several separation units and a recycling unit. The composition flexibility of the syngas mixture due to the two different types of reforming reactions raises an issue that in order to attain the optimized feed composition of FT synthesis the amount of flow rate of each component in the fresh feed mixture should be determined considering the effects of the recycle and its split ratio. In the FT synthesis unit, the 15 representative reactions for the chain growth and water gas shift on the cobalt-based catalyst are considered. After FT synthesis, the unreacted syngas mixture is recycled to the reforming unit or the FT synthesis unit or both to enhance process efficiency. The effect of the split ratio, the recycle flow rate to the FT reactor over the recycle flow rate to the reforming unit, on the efficiency of the process was also investigated. This work shows that greater recycle to the reforming unit is less effective than that to the FT synthesis unit from the standpoint of the net heat efficiency of the process, since the reforming reactions are greatly endothermic and greater recycle to the reformer requires more energy.

  4. 气提法去除油田污水中二氧化碳气体的实验研究%Experiment research on removal of carbon dioxide in oily wastewater by nitrogen gas stripping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨向平; 曲虎; 刘静; 马梓涵

    2011-01-01

    Nitrogen gas stripper is used to remove the carbon dioxide from oily wastewater in this paper. The effects of gas-liquid ratio,pH value,temperature and oil content on the removal efficiency of carbon dioxide are carried out. The optimal condition is shown as follows;5: 1 of the gas-liquid ratio,301 of the temperature and 5 of the pH value. The removal rate of carbon dioxide from wastewater can be over 98%. The relative higher temperature and lower oil content help to enhance the carbon dioxide removal rate for the nitrogen gas stripper. The quality of the wastewater treated by nitrogen gas stripping is greatly improved. The carbon dioxide mass content can be decreased to 2 mg /L. The pH value of the stripped wastewater can be over 7. The corrosion rate of the carbon steel can be decreased to less than 0.02 mm/a.%采用氮气气提装置处理油田污水中溶解的CO2气体,考察了气液比、温度、pH及含油量对CO2去除效果的影响.结果表明,气提法去除油田污水中的CO2效果明显,在气液比为5:1、温度为30℃、pH为5条件下,污水中的CO2去除率可达98%以上;升高温度、降低污水中的含油量有助于增强氮气气提对CO2的去除效果;处理后的污水CO2质量浓度降到2 mg/L,pH升高到7,碳钢的腐蚀速率降到0.02 mm/a以下.

  5. Nanostructured membrane material designed for carbon dioxide separation

    KAUST Repository

    Yave, Wilfredo

    2010-03-15

    In this work carbon dioxide selective membrane materials from a commercially available poly(amide-b-ethylene oxide) (Pebax (R), Arkema) blended with polyethylene glycol ethers are presented. The preferred PEG-ether was PEG-dimethylether (PEG-DME). PEG-DME is well known as a physical solvent for acid gas absorption. It is used under the trade name Genosorb (R) in the Selexol (R) process (UOP) for acid gas removal from natural gas and synthesis gas. The combination of the liquid absorbent with the multiblock copolymer resulted in mechanically stable films with superior CO(2) separation properties. The addition of 50 wt.% PEG-DME to the copolymer resulted in a 8-fold increase of the carbon dioxide permeability; the CO(2)/H(2)-selectivity increased simultaneously from 9.1 to 14.9. It is shown that diffusivity as well as solubility of carbon dioxide is strongly increased by the blending of the copolymer with PEG-ethers. (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Dye solubility in supercritical carbon dioxide fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Jun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Supercritical carbon dioxide fluid is an alternative solvent for the water of the traditional dyeing. The solubility of dyestuff affects greatly the dyeing process. A theoretical model for predicting the dye solubility is proposed and verified experimentally. The paper concludes that the pressure has a greater impact on the dyestuff solubility than temperature, and an optimal dyeing condition is suggested for the highest distribution coefficient of dyestuff.

  7. 21 CFR 184.1240 - Carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Carbon dioxide. 184.1240 Section 184.1240 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1240 Carbon dioxide. (a) Carbon dioxide (empirical formula CO2, CAS Reg. No.... The solid form, dry ice, sublimes under atmospheric pressure at a temperature of −78.5 °C....

  8. Cyclic process for producing methane in a tubular reactor with effective heat removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Albert C.; Yang, Chang-Lee

    1986-01-01

    Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams are converted to methane by a cyclic, essentially two-step process in which said carbon monoxide is disproportionated to form carbon dioxide and active surface carbon deposited on the surface of a catalyst, and said carbon is reacted with steam to form product methane and by-product carbon dioxide. The exothermic heat of reaction generated in each step is effectively removed during each complete cycle so as to avoid a build up of heat from cycle-to-cycle, with particularly advantageous techniques being employed for fixed bed, tubular and fluidized bed reactor operations.

  9. Volcanic versus anthropogenic carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, T.

    2011-01-01

    Which emits more carbon dioxide (CO2): Earth's volcanoes or human activities? Research findings indicate unequivocally that the answer to this frequently asked question is human activities. However, most people, including some Earth scientists working in fields outside volcanology, are surprised by this answer. The climate change debate has revived and reinforced the belief, widespread among climate skeptics, that volcanoes emit more CO2 than human activities [Gerlach, 2010; Plimer, 2009]. In fact, present-day volcanoes emit relatively modest amounts of CO2, about as much annually as states like Florida, Michigan, and Ohio.

  10. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide-Assisted Process for Well-Dispersed Silicon/Graphene Composite as a Li ion Battery Anode

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The silicon (Si)/graphene composite has been touted as one of the most promising anode materials for lithium ion batteries. However, the optimal fabrication method for this composite remains a challenge. Here, we developed a novel method using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) to intercalate Si nanoparticles into graphene nanosheets. Silicon was modified with a thin layer of polyaniline, which assisted the dispersion of graphene sheets by introducing π-π interaction. Using scCO2, well-disp...

  11. Evaluation of a membrane based carbon dioxide absorber for spacecraft ECLS applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feron, P.H.M.; Eckhard, F.; Witt, J.

    1996-01-01

    In an on-going harmonized ESA/NIVR project, performed by Stork Comprimo and TNO-MEP, the removal of the carbon dioxide with membranes is studied. The use of membrane gas absorption for carbon dioxide removal is currently hampered by the fact that the commonly used alkanolamines result in leakage pro

  12. Optimization for Dwarf Banana with Microwave Low Temperature Carbon Dioxide Flash Puffing Process by Response Surface Methodology and Factor Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Bao-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A three factors quadratic regression rotation combination design was adopted to optimize the technical conditions of microwave low temperature carbon dioxide flash puffing (MLTCDFP process for dwarf banana in the single factor’s foundation. This paper analyzed the effect of puffing temperature, puffing pressure, vacuum drying temperature and the interaction of the three factors on color, crispness, and the effect of hardness and water content. Based on the experimental data, the quadratic regression model of four indexes was deduced, then variables were analyzed with response surface methodology (RSM. The weights of four evaluation indexes was determined by factor analysis. The regression square was obtained by the comprehensive score as follow: Y=0.955+0.109X1+0.16X3−0.09X12+0.015X22 −0.15X32−0.018X1X2−0.056X1X3+0.016X2X3(R2=0.837.Through factor analysis, the range of the optimal technical conditions of MLTCDFP for dwarf banana obtained. The result indicated the four indexes were affected significantly by the puffing temperature and vacuum drying temperature, and the interactions of the three factors did not affect the product obviously. The optimal technical parameters were as follows: puffing temperature 91~95°C, puffing pressure 0.11~0.19MPa, vacuum temperature 81~85°C.

  13. Biodiesel production with continuous supercritical process: non-catalytic transesterification and esterification with or without carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yu-Ting; Lin, Ho-mu; Lee, Ming-Jer

    2013-10-01

    The non-catalytic transesterification of refined sunflower oil with supercritical methanol, in the presence of carbon dioxide, was conducted in a tubular reactor at temperatures from 553.2 to 593.2K and pressures up to 25.0 MPa. The FAME yield can be achieved up to about 0.70 at 593.2 K and 10.0 MPa in 23 min with methanol:oil of 25:1 in molar ratio. The effect of adding CO2 on the FAME yield is insignificant. The kinetic behavior of the non-catalytic esterification and transesterification of oleic acid or waste cooking oil (WCO) with supercritical methanol was also investigated. By using the supercritical process, the presence of free fatty acid (FFA) in WCO gives positive contribution to FAME production. The FAME yield of 0.90 from WCO can be achieved in 13 min at 573.2K. The kinetic data of supercritical transesterification and esterifaication were correlated well with a power-law model.

  14. 分子筛CO2去除系统研究%Study on Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly Using Molecular Sieve Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩永强; 吴宝治; 杨润泽; 卞强; 李小委

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the feasibility of using molecular sieve technology in a carbon dioxide removal assembly in the future space station.Methods The design/operating principle of four beds molecular sieve (4BMS) adsorption-regeneration system developed for space station was systematically analyzed.Under the simulated space station work load conditions,the prototype was tested in a closed demonstration cabin of the environmental control and life support system for consecutive 120 d.Results The CO2 concentration in the sealed cabin was controlled below 0.5% with the metabolism load of 3 persons,the air dew point was always below-33 ℃ and the average power consumption of the system was less than 800 W.Conclusion The prototype 4BMS device can satisfy the CO2 control requirements of the future space station.%目的 探索分子筛CO2去除技术应用于空间站系统的可行性.方法 系统分析了空间站分子筛CO2去除系统(4BMS)原理样机设计和工作原理,在模拟空间站真实负荷的条件下对该原理样机进行了连续120 d密闭舱试验研究.结果 在3人CO2代谢量条件下,该原理样机能有效控制密闭舱内的CO2浓度在0.5%以下,并保证空气露点在-33℃以下,系统功耗不高于800 W.结论 该原理样机满足未来空间站系统对CO2浓度控制的要求.

  15. Monthly Carbon Dioxide in Troposphere (AIRS on AQUA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Carbon dioxide (CO2) is an important greenhouse gas released through natural processes such as respiration and volcano eruptions and through huma activities such as...

  16. Robust optical carbon dioxide isotope analyzer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Isotopic analysis of carbon dioxide is an important tool for characterization of the exchange and transformation of carbon between the biosphere and the atmosphere....

  17. Hydrogenation of carbon dioxide by hybrid catalysts, direct synthesis of aromatic from carbon dioxide and hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuei Chikung; Lee Mindar (National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan))

    1991-02-01

    To improve climatic conditions and to solve the carbon resource problem, it is desirable to develop techniques whereby carbon dioxide can be converted to valuable liquid hydrocarbons which can be used either as fuels or industrial raw materials. Direct synthesis of aromatics from carbon dioxide hydrogenation was investigated in a single stage reactor using hybrid catalysts composed of iron catalysts and HZSM-5 zeolite. Carbon dioxide was first converted to CO by the reverse water gas shift reaction, followed by the hydrogenation of CO to hydrocarbons on iron catalyst, and finally the hydrocarbons were converted to aromatics in HZSM-5. Under the operating conditions of 350{degree}C, 2100 kilopascals and CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}={1/2} the maximum aromatic selectivity obtained was 22% with a CO{sub 2} conversion of 38% using fused iron catalyst combined with the zeolite. Together with the kinetic studies, thermodynamic analysis of the CO{sub 2} hydrogenation was also conducted. It was found that unlike Fischer Tropsch synthesis, the formation of hydrocarbons from CO{sub 2} may not be thermodynamically favored at higher temperature. However, the sufficiently high yields of aromatics possible with this process provides a route for the direct synthesis of high-octane gasoline from carbon dioxide. 24 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Carbon dioxide makes heat therapy work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, H.

    1987-01-01

    Scientists can now propagate healthy blueberry and raspberry plants from virus-infected stock by treating it with heat and carbon dioxide. Plants are grown at 100/sup 0/F, which makes them develop faster than the virus can spread. Then cuttings are taken of the new growth - less than an inch long - and grown into full-sized, virus-free plants. But in this race to outdistance the virus, some plant species are not able to take the heat. Some even die. Chemical reactions double for every 14/sup 0/F rise in temperature. So, if you try to grow a plant at 100/sup 0/F that was originally growing at 86/sup 0/F, it will double its respiration rate. Adding carbon dioxide increases the rate of photosynthesis in plants, which increases the plant's food reserves. What carbon dioxide does to allow some plants to grow at temperatures at which they would otherwise not survive and it allows other plants to grow for longer periods at 100/sup 0/F. One problem with the process, says Converse, is that the longer plants are exposed to heat the greater the mutation rate. So, resulting clones should be closely examined for trueness to horticultural type.

  19. Enhanced nitrogen removal in a wastewater treatment process characterized by carbon source manipulation with biological adsorption and sludge hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongbo; Zhao, Fang; Mao, Boyang; Wen, Xianghua

    2012-06-01

    An innovative adsorption/nitrification/denitrification/sludge-hydrolysis wastewater treatment process (ENRS) characterized by carbon source manipulation with a biological adsorption unit and a sludge hydrolysis unit was developed to enhance nitrogen removal and reduce sludge production for municipal wastewater treatment. The system presented good performance in pollutants removal, yielding the effluent with average COD, NH(4)(+)-N, TN and TP of 48.5, 0.6, 13.2 and 1.0 mg/L, respectively. Sixty percent of the total carbon source in the influent was concentrated and separated by the quick adsorption of activated sludge, providing the possibilities of reusing waste carbon source in the denitrification tank and accumulating nitrobacteria in the nitrification tank. Low temperature of 6-15 °C and high hydraulic loading rate of 3.0-15.0 m(3)/d did not affect NH(4)(+)-N removal performance, yielding the NH(4)(+)-N of lower 1.0 mg/L in the effluent. Furthermore, 50% of the residual sludge in the ENRS system could be transformed into soluble COD (SCOD) by alkaline thermal hydrolysis with temperature of 60 °C and pH of 11, and the hydrolyzed carbon could completely substitute methanol as a good quality carbon to support high efficient denitrification.

  20. Process Design for the Biocatalysis of Value-Added Chemicals from Carbon Dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark A. Eiteman

    2006-07-31

    This report describes results toward developing a process to sequester CO{sub 2} centered on the enzyme pyruvate carboxylase. The process involves the use of bacteria to convert CO{sub 2} and glucose as a co-substrate and generates succinic acid as a commodity chemical product. The phases of research have included strain development and process development. Though we continue to work on one important component of strain development, the research has principally focused on process development. In the previous year we constructed several strains which would serve as templates for the CO{sub 2} sequestration, including the knock-out of genes involved in the formation of undesirable byproducts. This project period the focus has been on the integration of the pyruvate carboxylase gene (pyc) onto the E. coli chromosome. This has proven to be a difficult task because of relatively low expression of the gene and resulting low enzyme activity when only one copy of the gene is present on the chromosome. Several molecular biology techniques have been applied, with some success, to improve the level of protein activity as described herein. Progress in process development has come as a result of conducting numerous fermentation experiments to select optimal conditions for CO{sub 2} sequestration. This process-related research has progressed in four areas. First, we have clarified the range of pH which results in the optimal rate of sequestration. Second, we have determined how the counterion used to control the pH affects the sequestration rate. Third, we have determined how CO{sub 2} gas phase composition impacts sequestration rate. Finally, we have made progress in determining the affect of several potential gaseous impurities on CO{sub 2} sequestration; in particular we have completed a study using NO{sub 2}. Although the results provide significant guidance as to process conditions for CO{sub 2} sequestration and succinate production, in some cases we do not yet understand

  1. Process Design for the Biocatalysis of Value-Added Chemicals from Carbon Dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark A. Eiteman

    2005-11-01

    This report describes results toward developing a process to sequester CO{sub 2} centered on the enzyme pyruvate carboxylase. The process involves the use of bacteria to convert CO{sub 2} and glucose as a co-substrate and generates succinic acid as a commodity chemical product. The first phase of this research has focused on strain development and on process development. Progress in strain development has been made in three areas. The gene encoding for alcohol dehydrogenase has been ''knocked out'' of the bacteria, and thereby eliminating the synthesis of the by-product ethanol. The gene for glucokinase has been overexpressed in the production strain with the goal of faster utilization of glucose (and hence CO{sub 2}). Efforts have continued toward integrating pyruvate carboxylase gene (pyc) onto the E. coli chromosome. Progress in process development has come in conducting several dozen fermentation experiments to find a defined medium that would be successful for the growth of the bacteria, while permitting a high rate of CO{sub 2} utilization in a subsequent prolonged production phase. Using this defined medium, the strains that continue to be constructed are being compared for CO{sub 2} utilization, so that we may understand the factors that govern the biological sequestration process.

  2. New candidate for biofuel feedstock beyond terrestrial biomass for thermo-chemical process (pyrolysis/gasification) enhanced by carbon dioxide (CO2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Eilhann E; Jeon, Young Jae; Yi, Haakrho

    2012-11-01

    The enhanced thermo-chemical process (i.e., pyrolysis/gasification) of various macroalgae using carbon dioxide (CO(2)) as a reaction medium was mainly investigated. The enhanced thermo-chemical process was achieved by expediting the thermal cracking of volatile chemical species derived from the thermal degradation of the macroalgae. This process enables the modification of the end products from the thermo-chemical process and significant reduction of the amount of condensable hydrocarbons (i.e., tar, ∼50%), thereby directly increasing the efficiency of the gasification process.

  3. Evaluation of Performance Catalytic Ozonation Process with Activated Carbon in the Removal of Humic Acids from Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gh. Asgari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: In recent years, the use of alternative disinfectants and the control of natural organic matters are two approaches that are typically applied in water treatment utilities to reduce the formation of chlorinated disinfection by-products. Catalytic ozonation is a new technology used to promote the efficiency of ozonation. The goal of this study was to survey the feasibility application of activated carbon as a catalyst in ozonation process for removal of humic acids from aqueous solution. Materials & Methods: This experimental study has been done in laboratory of water and wastewater chemistry, Tarbiat Modarres University. The solid structure and chemical composition of activated carbon were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence (XRF. Ozonation and catalytic ozonation experiments were performed in a semi-batch reactor and the mass of ozone produced was measured by iodometric titration methods. Concentration changes of humic acid in samples with a concentration of 15 mg/l were determined by using spectrophotometer at an absorbance wavelength of 254 nm. To evaluate the performance of catalytic ozonation in humic acid removal, total organic carbon and trihalomethane formation potential were evaluated and the results were analyzed by Excel software. Results: Catalytic ozone results showed that using activated carbon as a catalyst increased humic acid decomposition up to 11 times and removal efficiency increased with increasing pH (4-12 and catalyst dosage (0.25-1.5 g/250cc. The experimental results showed that catalytic ozonation was most effective in less time (10 min with considerable efficiency (95% compared to the sole ozonation process (SOP. Conclusion: The results indicated that the catalytic ozonation process, compared to SOP, was less affected by radical scavenger, and total organic carbon, and trihalomethane formation potential removal achieved were 30% and 83%, respectively. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2011;17(4:25-33

  4. Carbon dioxide production in animal houses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Søren; Blanes-Vidal, Victoria; Joergensen, H.

    2008-01-01

    This article deals with carbon dioxide production from farm animals; more specifically, it addresses the possibilities of using the measured carbon dioxide concentration in animal houses as basis for estimation of ventilation flow (as the ventilation flow is a key parameter of aerial emissions from...... animal houses). The investigations include measurements in respiration chambers and in animal houses, mainly for growing pigs and broilers. Over the last decade a fixed carbon dioxide production of 185 litres per hour per heat production unit, hpu (i.e. 1000 W of the total animal heat production at 20o......C) has often been used. The article shows that the carbon dioxide production per hpu increases with increasing respiration quotient. As the respiration quotient increases with body mass for growing animals, the carbon dioxide production per heat production unit also increases with increased body mass...

  5. Encapsulated liquid sorbents for carbon dioxide capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vericella, John J; Baker, Sarah E; Stolaroff, Joshuah K; Duoss, Eric B; Hardin, James O; Lewicki, James; Glogowski, Elizabeth; Floyd, William C; Valdez, Carlos A; Smith, William L; Satcher, Joe H; Bourcier, William L; Spadaccini, Christopher M; Lewis, Jennifer A; Aines, Roger D

    2015-02-05

    Drawbacks of current carbon dioxide capture methods include corrosivity, evaporative losses and fouling. Separating the capture solvent from infrastructure and effluent gases via microencapsulation provides possible solutions to these issues. Here we report carbon capture materials that may enable low-cost and energy-efficient capture of carbon dioxide from flue gas. Polymer microcapsules composed of liquid carbonate cores and highly permeable silicone shells are produced by microfluidic assembly. This motif couples the capacity and selectivity of liquid sorbents with high surface area to facilitate rapid and controlled carbon dioxide uptake and release over repeated cycles. While mass transport across the capsule shell is slightly lower relative to neat liquid sorbents, the surface area enhancement gained via encapsulation provides an order-of-magnitude increase in carbon dioxide absorption rates for a given sorbent mass. The microcapsules are stable under typical industrial operating conditions and may be used in supported packing and fluidized beds for large-scale carbon capture.

  6. Carbon dioxide: A substitute for phosgene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aresta, M.; Quaranta, E. [Univ. of Bari (Italy)

    1997-03-01

    One of the many goals of the green chemistry movement is to eliminate the use of phosgene (COCl{sub 2}), an extremely hazardous compound used in many syntheses, including the production of carbamates, organic carbonates, and polymers. One of the most interesting options for eliminating this compound is to replace it with CO{sub 2}. In addition to carbon dioxide`s abundance and benign nature, it has the benefits of recycling carbon and of reducing the amount of CO{sub 2} released into the atmosphere when its use is linked with other processes that emit CO{sub 2}. Several synthetic strategies that do not use phosgene are under development. The authors briefly review the most interesting ones and then expand on the use of CO{sub 2} as a potential building block for organic carbamates, carbonates, and isocyanates. One of these routes, polycarbonate synthesis, is already in industrial-scale operation: PAC Polymers Inc. currently produces CO{sub 2}-epoxide copolymers. The synthesis of carbamates and substituted ureas has been developed, and this process awaits industrial exploitation.

  7. A high-altitude balloon platform for determining exchange of carbon dioxide over agricultural landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouche, Angie; Beck-Winchatz, Bernhard; Potosnak, Mark J.

    2016-11-01

    The exchange of carbon dioxide between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere is a key process in the global carbon cycle. Given emissions from fossil fuel combustion and the appropriation of net primary productivity by human activities, understanding the carbon dioxide exchange of cropland agroecosystems is critical for evaluating future trajectories of climate change. In addition, human manipulation of agroecosystems has been proposed as a technique of removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere via practices such as no-tillage and cover crops. We propose a novel method of measuring the exchange of carbon dioxide over croplands using a high-altitude balloon (HAB) platform. The HAB methodology measures two sequential vertical profiles of carbon dioxide mixing ratio, and the surface exchange is calculated using a fixed-mass column approach. This methodology is relatively inexpensive, does not rely on any assumptions besides spatial homogeneity (no horizontal advection) and provides data over a spatial scale between stationary flux towers and satellite-based inversion calculations. The HAB methodology was employed during the 2014 and 2015 growing seasons in central Illinois, and the results are compared to satellite-based NDVI values and a flux tower located relatively near the launch site in Bondville, Illinois. These initial favorable results demonstrate the utility of the methodology for providing carbon dioxide exchange data over a large (10-100 km) spatial area. One drawback is its relatively limited temporal coverage. While recruiting citizen scientists to perform the launches could provide a more extensive dataset, the HAB methodology is not appropriate for providing estimates of net annual carbon dioxide exchange. Instead, a HAB dataset could provide an important check for upscaling flux tower results and verifying satellite-derived exchange estimates.

  8. Toward the Development and Deployment of Large-Scale Carbon Dioxide Capture and Conversion Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Zhihong; Eden, Mario R.; Gani, Rafiqul

    2016-01-01

    In light of the depletion of fossil fuels and the increased daily requirements for liquid fuels and chemicals, CO2 should indeed be regarded as a valuable C-1. additional feedstock for sustainable manufacturing of liquid fuels and chemicals. Development and deployment of CO2 capture and chemical...... conversion processes are among the grand challenges faced by today's scientists and engineers. Very few of the reported CO2 capture and conversion technologies have been employed for industrial installations on a large scale, where high-efficiency, cost/energy-effectiveness, and environmental friendliness...... are three keys factors. The CO2 capture technologies from stationary sources and ambient air based on solvents, solid sorbents, and membranes are discussed first. Transforming CO2 to liquid fuels and chemicals, which are presently produced from petroleum, through thermochemical, electrochemical...

  9. Microporous metal-organic framework with potential for carbon dioxide capture at ambient conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiang, S.C.; He, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Wu, H.; Zhou, W.; Krishna, R.; Chen, B.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon dioxide capture and separation are important industrial processes that allow the use of carbon dioxide for the production of a range of chemical products and materials, and to minimize the effects of carbon dioxide emission. Porous metal-organic frameworks are promising materials to achieve s

  10. Adsorption of Carbon Dioxide on Activated Carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Guo; Liping Chang; Kechang Xie

    2006-01-01

    The adsorption of CO2 on a raw activated carbon A and three modified activated carbon samples B, C, and D at temperatures ranging from 303 to 333 K and the thermodynamics of adsorption have been investigated using a vacuum adsorption apparatus in order to obtain more information about the effect of CO2 on removal of organic sulfur-containing compounds in industrial gases. The active ingredients impregnated in the carbon samples show significant influence on the adsorption for CO2 and its volumes adsorbed on modified carbon samples B, C, and D are all larger than that on the raw carbon sample A. On the other hand, the physical parameters such as surface area, pore volume, and micropore volume of carbon samples show no influence on the adsorbed amount of CO2. The Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) equation was the best model for fitting the adsorption data on carbon samples A and B, while the Freundlich equation was the best fit for the adsorption on carbon samples C and D. The isosteric heats of adsorption on carbon samples A, B, C, and D derived from the adsorption isotherms using the Clapeyron equation decreased slightly increasing surface loading. The heat of adsorption lay between 10.5 and 28.4 kJ/mol, with the carbon sample D having the highest value at all surface coverages that were studied. The observed entropy change associated with the adsorption for the carbon samples A, B, and C (above the surface coverage of 7 ml/g) was lower than the theoretical value for mobile adsorption. However, it was higher than the theoretical value for mobile adsorption but lower than the theoretical value for localized adsorption for carbon sample D.

  11. 超临界条件下烯烃氢甲酰化的研究进展%The Process of Hydroformylation of Olefins in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周海军; 张业; 谢鲜梅; 陈小平

    2011-01-01

    综述了超临界CO2下烯烃氢甲酰化反应的研究进展,分析比较了均相和多相体系下催化反应的特点,并结合分离以及催化剂的回收利用等内容,对于该反应技术的未来发展与应用提出展望。%The Process of Hydroformylation of Olefins in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide. In this work, taking the reactions of homogeneous catalysis and heterogeneous catalysis, recent research progress about the catalyst recovery and utilization in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide were reviewed. Finally, the developing trends are discussed.

  12. A review: Potential and challenges of biologically activated carbon to remove natural organic matter in drinking water purification process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotta-Gamage, Shashika Madushi; Sathasivan, Arumugam

    2017-01-01

    The use of biologically activated carbon (BAC) in drinking water purification is reviewed. In the past BAC is seen mostly as a polishing treatment. However, BAC has the potential to provide solution to recent challenges faced by water utilities arising from change in natural organic matter (NOM) composition in drinking water sources - increased NOM concentration with a larger fraction of hydrophilic compounds and ever increasing trace level organic pollutants. Hydrophilic NOM is not removed by traditional coagulation process and causes bacterial regrowth and increases disinfection by-products (DBPs) formation during disinfection. BAC can offer many advantages by removing hydrophilic fraction and many toxic and endocrine compounds which are not otherwise removed. BAC can also aid the other downstream processes if used as a pre-treatment. Major drawback of BAC was longer empty bed contact time (EBCT) required for an effective NOM removal. This critical review analyses the strategies that have been adopted to enhance the biological activity of the carbon by operational means and summarises the surface modification methods. To maximize the benefit of the BAC, a rethink of current treatment plant configuration is proposed. If the process can be expedited and adopted appropriately, BAC can solve many of the current problems.

  13. Phenol removal pretreatment process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hames, Bonnie R.

    2004-04-13

    A process for removing phenols from an aqueous solution is provided, which comprises the steps of contacting a mixture comprising the solution and a metal oxide, forming a phenol metal oxide complex, and removing the complex from the mixture.

  14. Beneficial Use of Carbon Dioxide in Precast Concrete Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Yixin [McGill Univ., Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2014-06-26

    The feasibility of using carbon dioxide as feedstock in precast concrete production is studied. Carbon dioxide reacts with calcium compounds in concrete, producing solid calcium carbonates in binding matrix. Two typical precast products are examined for their capacity to store carbon dioxide during the production. They are concrete blocks and fiber-cement panels. The two products are currently mass produced and cured by steam. Carbon dioxide can be used to replace steam in curing process to accelerate early strength, improve the long-term durability and reduce energy and emission. For a reaction within a 24-hour process window, the theoretical maximum possible carbon uptake in concrete is found to be 29% based on cement mass in the product. To reach the maximum uptake, a special process is developed to promote the reaction efficiency to 60-80% in 4-hour carbon dioxide curing and improve the resistance to freeze-thaw cycling and sulfate ion attack. The process is also optimized to meet the project target of $10/tCO2 in carbon utilization. By the use of self-concentrating absorption technology, high purity CO2 can be produced at a price below $40/t. With low cost CO2 capture and utilization technologies, it is feasible to establish a network for carbon capture and utilization at the vicinity of carbon sources. If all block produces and panel producers in United States could adopt carbon dioxide process in their production in place of steam, carbon utilization in these two markets alone could consume more than 2 Mt CO2/year. This capture and utilization process can be extended to more precast products and will continue for years to come.

  15. Carbon Dioxide Photodissociation on Iapetus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Eric; Brown, R. H.

    2009-09-01

    Carbon dioxide has been detected on Iapetus (Buratti et al., 2005) and is correlated with the dark material, mostly at mid-latitudes on the leading face of Iapetus (Palmer and Brown, in preparation). The average absorption feature of CO2 in the dark region is 24.7%; if it were a thin veneer of CO2 ice, it would be 14 um thick. Estimating the surface area of dark material and extrapolating gives a total CO2 budget of 8 x 107 kg on the surface of Iapetus. Volatile studies indicate that the surface of Iapetus is too hot to have CO2 ice remain on the surface for more than a few hundred years (Palmer and Brown, 2008). It has been suggested that complexing of volatiles, such as in clathrates, fluid or gas inclusions, or adsorption, would increase the stability on the Jovian and Saturnian satellites, increasing their residence times (McCord; et al., 1998; Hibbitts et al., 2001, 2002, 2007). While complexing would increase carbon dioxide's thermal stability, the resident time of CO2 on Iapetus would remain short due to the effect of UV radiation. We calculated the photodissociation rate for CO2 and found that the entire budget of CO2 on Iapetus would be destroyed in less than one Earth year. If we assume a steady-state system on Iapetus (photodissociation equal to photo-generation) approx. 108 kg will be destroyed and produced every Earth year. Unless the complexing mechanism provides some shielding from UV radiation while still allowing the detection of the 4.26-micron CO2 band, then a source of CO2 is required. We suggest that the source of CO2 is photolytic production from water ice and carbonaceous material.

  16. Use of supercritical carbon dioxide extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taniguchi, Masayuki (Niigata Univ., Faculty of Engineering, Niigata, (Japan))

    1989-09-25

    Supercritical fluid extraction is a novel diffusion and separation technique which exploits simultaneously the increase of vapor pressure and the difference of chemical affinities of fluids near the critical point. A solvent which is used as the supercritical fluid has the following features: the critical point exists in the position of relatively ease of handling, the solvent is applicable to the extraction of a physiological active substance of thermal instability. Carbon dioxide as the solvent is non-flammable, non-corrosive, non-toxic, cheap, and readily available of high purity. The results of studies on the use of supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO{sub 2}) as a solvent for natural products in the fermentation and food industries, were collected. SC-CO{sub 2} extraction are used in many fields, examples for the application are as follows: removal of organic solvents from antibiotics; extraction of vegetable oils contained in wheat germ oil, high quality mustard seeds, rice bran and so on; brewing of sake using rice and rice-koji; use as a non-aqueous medium for the synthesis of precursors of the Aspartame; and use in sterilization. 66 refs., 17 figs., 21 tabs.

  17. Sustainable production of green feed from carbon dioxide and hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Miron V; Vidruk, Roxana; Herskowitz, Moti

    2014-03-01

    Carbon dioxide hydrogenation to form hydrocarbons was conducted on two iron-based catalysts, prepared according to procedures described in the literature, and on a new iron spinel catalyst. The CO2 conversion measured in a packed-bed reactor was limited to about 60% because of excessive amounts of water produced in this process. Switching to a system of three packed-bed reactors in series with interim removal of water and condensed hydrocarbons increased CO2 conversion to as much as 89%. The pure spinel catalyst displayed a significantly higher activity and selectivity than those of the other iron catalysts. This process produces a product called green feed, which is similar in composition to the product of a high-temperature, iron-based Fischer–Tropsch process from syngas. The green feed can be readily converted into renewable fuels by well-established technologies.

  18. Kinetic study of coals gasification into carbon dioxide atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Korotkikh A.G.; Slyusarskiy K.V.

    2015-01-01

    The solid fuel gasification process was investigated to define chemical reactions rate and activation energy for a gas-generator designing and regime optimizing. An experimental procedure includes coal char samples of Kuznetskiy and Kansko-Achinskiy deposits consequent argon pyrolysis into argon and oxidating into carbon dioxide with different temperatures. The thermogravimetric analysis data of coal char gasification into carbon dioxide was obtained in the temperature range 900–1200 ºC. The ...

  19. Carbon dioxide utilization in the chemical industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aresta, M.; Quaranta, E.; Tommasi, I. [Univ. of Bari (Italy)

    1996-12-31

    Carbon dioxide as a raw material for the Chemical Industry is receiving growing attention because: (i) if recovery of CO{sub 2} from flue gases will be implemented, huge amounts of CO{sub 2} will be available; (ii) environmental issues urge to develop new processes/products, avoiding toxic materials. Several uses of CO{sub 2} appear to be responding to both (i) and (ii), i.e. use as a solvent (supplanting organic solvents) use as a building block for carboxylates/carbonates (supplanting phosgene); use as carbon-source in the synthesis of fuels (supplanting CO or coal/hydrocarbons). These options will be evaluated and their potentiality discussed.

  20. [Evaluation of potentiality of combined SHF- and glow discharge in intensification of carbon dioxide and hydrogen processing within life support system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimarev, S I

    2011-01-01

    The article reports an experimental carbon dioxide hydration process in combined SHF- and glow discharge, and describes a design of SHF plasmatrones for CO2 processing at air pressure and in an integrated unit. Maximal transformation of 80% CO2 per a run was reached with the total input power of no more than 0.9 kW. Thermal zero lag of plasma forming, essentially instant and timely engagement and disengagement of thermal action on CO2-H2 mixture renders SHF-energy applicable to intensification of next generation life support technologies, processing of these gases within atmosphere regeneration system specifically.

  1. The kinetics of binding carbon dioxide in magnesium carbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butt, D.P.; Lackner, K.S.; Wendt, C.H.; Vaidya, R.; Pile, D.L.; Park, Y.; Holesinger, T.; Harradine, D.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Nomura, Koji [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Div.]|[Chichibu Onada Cement Co., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-08-01

    Humans currently consume about 6 Gigatons of carbon annually as fossil fuel. In some sense, the coal industry has a unique advantage over many other anthropogenic and natural emitters of CO{sub 2} in that it owns large point sources of CO{sub 2} from which this gas could be isolated and disposed of. If the increased energy demands of a growing world population are to be satisfied from coal, the implementation of sequestration technologies will likely be unavoidable. The authors` method of sequestration involves binding carbon dioxide as magnesium carbonate, a thermodynamically stable solid, for safe and permanent disposal, with minimal environmental impact. The technology is based on extracting magnesium hydroxide from common ultramafic rock for thermal carbonation and subsequent disposition. The economics of the method appear to be promising, however, many details of the proposed process have yet to be optimized. Realization of a cost effective method requires development of optimal technologies for efficient extraction and thermal carbonation.

  2. Carbon Dioxide Reforming of Methane to Syngas by Thermal Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙艳朋; 聂勇; 吴昂山; 姬登祥; 于凤文; 计建炳

    2012-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on syngas preparation from dry reforming of methane by carbon dioxide with a DC arc plasma at atmospheric pressure. In all experiments, nitrogen gas was used as the working gas for thermal plasma to generate a high-temperature jet into a horizontal tube reactor. A mixture of methane and carbon dioxide was fed vertically into the jet. In order to obtain a higher conversion rate of methane and carbon dioxide, chemical energy efficiency and fuel production efficiency, parametric screening studies were conducted, in which the volume ratio of carbon dioxide to methane in fed gases and the total flux of fed gases were taken into account. Results showed that carbon dioxide reforming of methane to syngas by thermal plasma exhibited a larger processing capacity, higher conversion of methane and carbon dioxide and higher chemical energy efficiency and fuel production efficiency. In addition, thermodynamic simulation for the reforming process was conducted. Experimental data agreed well with the thermodynamic results, indicating that high thermal efficiency can be achieved with the thermal plasma reforming process.

  3. Mechanism of SO2 removal by carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizzio, Anthony A.; DeBarr, Joseph A.

    1997-01-01

    The reaction of SO2 with carbon (C) in the presence of O2 and H2O involves a series of reactions that leads to the formation of sulfuric acid as the final product. The rate-determining step in the overall process is the oxidation of SO2 to SO3. Three SO2 oxidation reactions are possible. Adsorbed SO2 (C−SO2) can react either with gas phase O2 or with adsorbed oxygen (C−O complex) to form sulfur trioxide (SO3), or gas phase SO2 can react directly with the C−O complex. In optimizing the SO2 removal capabilities of carbon, most studies only assume a given mechanism for SO2 adsorption and conversion to H2SO4 to be operable. The appropriate SO2 oxidation step and role of the C−O complex in this mechanism remain to be determined. The ultimate goal of this study was to prepare activated char from Illinois coal with optimal properties for low-temperature (80−150°C) removal of sulfur dioxide from coal combustion flue gas. The SO2 adsorption capacity of activated char was found to be inversely proportional to the amount of oxygen adsorbed on its surface. A temperature-programmed desorption technique was developed to titrate those sites responsible for adsorption of SO2 and conversion to H2SO4. On the basis of these results, a mechanism for SO2 removal by carbon was proposed. The derived rate expression showed SO2 adsorption to be dependent only on the fundamental rate constant and concentration of carbon atoms designated as free sites. Recent studies indicate a similar relationship exists between the rate of carbon gasification (in CO2 or H2O) and the number of reactive sites as determined by transient kinetics experiments. Utilizing the concept of active or free sites, it was possible to produce a char from Illinois coal having an SO2 adsorption capacity surpassing that of a commercial catalytic activated carbon.

  4. CHEMICAL FIXATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE USING SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    OpenAIRE

    SASAMOTO, Naoki; MASHIMO, Miki; MATSUMOTO, Shigeno; Yamamoto, Hideki; SHIBATA, Junji

    1996-01-01

    Investigations were carried out to create a chemical fixation process,where carbon dioxide and sodium chloride solution are converted to sodium hydrogen carbonate and hydrochloric acid. Because the reaction has a large and positive free energy change,it does not proceed unless a suitable condition is established.The reaction is able to proceed if hydrochloric acid,which is one of the reaction products,is removed from the reaction system by extraction with amine.Stripping of hydrochloric acid ...

  5. 46 CFR 193.15-20 - Carbon dioxide storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide storage. 193.15-20 Section 193.15-20... PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 193.15-20 Carbon dioxide storage. (a...), consisting of not more than 300 pounds of carbon dioxide, may have cylinders located within the...

  6. 49 CFR 173.217 - Carbon dioxide, solid (dry ice).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide, solid (dry ice). 173.217 Section... Class 7 § 173.217 Carbon dioxide, solid (dry ice). (a) Carbon dioxide, solid (dry ice), when offered for... permit the release of carbon dioxide gas to prevent a buildup of pressure that could rupture...

  7. 46 CFR 108.627 - Carbon dioxide alarm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide alarm. 108.627 Section 108.627 Shipping... EQUIPMENT Equipment Markings and Instructions § 108.627 Carbon dioxide alarm. Each carbon dioxide alarm must be identified by marking: “WHEN ALARM SOUNDS VACATE AT ONCE. CARBON DIOXIDE BEING RELEASED” next...

  8. 46 CFR 169.732 - Carbon dioxide alarm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide alarm. 169.732 Section 169.732 Shipping... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment Markings § 169.732 Carbon dioxide alarm. Each carbon dioxide alarm must be conspicuously identified: “WHEN ALARM SOUNDS—VACATE AT ONCE. CARBON DIOXIDE BEING RELEASED.”...

  9. 46 CFR 196.37-9 - Carbon dioxide alarm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide alarm. 196.37-9 Section 196.37-9 Shipping... Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, etc. § 196.37-9 Carbon dioxide alarm. (a) All carbon dioxide alarms shall be conspicuously identified: “WHEN ALARM SOUNDS—VACATE AT ONCE. CARBON DIOXIDE...

  10. 46 CFR 78.47-9 - Carbon dioxide alarm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide alarm. 78.47-9 Section 78.47-9 Shipping... and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-9 Carbon dioxide alarm. (a) All carbon dioxide alarms shall be conspicuously identified: “WHEN ALARM SOUNDS—VACATE AT ONCE. CARBON DIOXIDE BEING RELEASED.” (b)...

  11. 46 CFR 97.37-9 - Carbon dioxide alarm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide alarm. 97.37-9 Section 97.37-9 Shipping... Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 97.37-9 Carbon dioxide alarm. (a) All carbon dioxide alarms shall be conspicuously identified: “WHEN ALARM SOUNDS—VACATE AT ONCE. CARBON DIOXIDE...

  12. 46 CFR 95.15-20 - Carbon dioxide storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide storage. 95.15-20 Section 95.15-20... PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 95.15-20 Carbon dioxide storage. (a... of not more than 300 pounds of carbon dioxide, may have the cylinders located within the...

  13. 46 CFR 76.15-20 - Carbon dioxide storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide storage. 76.15-20 Section 76.15-20... EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide Extinguishing Systems, Details § 76.15-20 Carbon dioxide storage. (a) Except as... than 300 pounds of carbon dioxide, may have the cylinders located within the space protected. If...

  14. Chemical technologies for exploiting and recycling carbon dioxide into the value chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Martina; Köhler, Burkhard; Kuckshinrichs, Wilhelm; Leitner, Walter; Markewitz, Peter; Müller, Thomas E

    2011-09-19

    While experts in various fields discuss the potential of carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies, the utilization of carbon dioxide as chemical feedstock is also attracting renewed and rapidly growing interest. These approaches do not compete; rather, they are complementary: CCS aims to capture and store huge quantities of carbon dioxide, while the chemical exploitation of carbon dioxide aims to generate value and develop better and more-efficient processes from a limited part of the waste stream. Provided that the overall carbon footprint for the carbon dioxide-based process chain is competitive with conventional chemical production and that the reaction with the carbon dioxide molecule is enabled by the use of appropriate catalysts, carbon dioxide can be a promising carbon source with practically unlimited availability for a range of industrially relevant products. In addition, it can be used as a versatile processing fluid based on its remarkable physicochemical properties.

  15. Ordered mesoporous silica (OMS) as an adsorbent and membrane for separation of carbon dioxide (CO2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Thiam-Leng; Ahmad, Abdul L; Bhatia, Subhash

    2010-01-15

    Separation of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) from gaseous mixture is an important issue for the removal of CO(2) in natural gas processing and power plants. The ordered mesoporous silicas (OMS) with uniform pore structure and high density of silanol groups, have attracted the interest of researchers for separation of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) using adsorption process. These mesoporous silicas after functionalization with amino groups have been studied for the removal of CO(2). The potential of functionalized ordered mesoporous silica membrane for separation of CO(2) is also recognized. The present paper reviews the synthesis of mesoporous silicas and important issues related to the development of mesoporous silicas. Recent studies on the CO(2) separation using ordered mesoporous silicas (OMS) as adsorbent and membrane are highlighted. The future prospectives of mesoporous silica membrane for CO(2) adsorption and separation are also presented and discussed.

  16. Long-term ocean oxygen depletion in response to carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaffer, G.; Olsen, S.M.; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke

    2009-01-01

    Ongoing global warming could persist far into the future, because natural processes require decades to hundreds of thousands of years to remove carbon dioxide from fossil-fuel burning from the atmosphere(1-3). Future warming may have large global impacts including ocean oxygen depletion and assoc......Ongoing global warming could persist far into the future, because natural processes require decades to hundreds of thousands of years to remove carbon dioxide from fossil-fuel burning from the atmosphere(1-3). Future warming may have large global impacts including ocean oxygen depletion...... solubility from surface-layer warming accounts for most of the enhanced oxygen depletion in the upper 500 m of the ocean. Possible weakening of ocean overturning and convection lead to further oxygen depletion, also in the deep ocean. We conclude that substantial reductions in fossil-fuel use over the next...

  17. Aesthetic Depigmentation of Gingival Smoker's Melanosis Using Carbon Dioxide Lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Luis Silva; Costa, José Adriano; da Câmara, Marco Infante; Albuquerque, Rui; Martins, Marco; Pacheco, José Júlio; Salazar, Filomena; Figueira, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Melanic pigmentation results from melanin produced by the melanocytes present in the basal layer of the oral epithelium. One of the most common causes of oral pigmentation is smoker melanosis, a condition associated with the melanocyte stimulation caused by cigarette smoke. This paper aims to illustrate the use of a carbon dioxide laser in the removal of the gingival melanic pigmentation for aesthetic reasons in a 27-year-old female patient with history of a smoking habit. The carbon dioxide laser vaporisation was performed on the gingival mucosa with effective and quick results and without any complications or significant symptoms after the treatment. We conclude that a carbon dioxide laser could be a useful, effective, and safe instrument to treat the aesthetic complications caused by oral smoker melanosis.

  18. Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry, Regenerable Sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Green; Thomas O. Nelson; Brian S. Turk; Paul D. Box Raghubir P. Gupta

    2006-09-30

    This report describes research conducted between July 1, 2006 and September 30, 2006 on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal combustion flue gas. Modifications to the integrated absorber/ sorbent regenerator/ sorbent cooler system were made to improve sorbent flow consistency and measurement reliability. Operation of the screw conveyor regenerator to achieve a sorbent temperature of at least 120 C at the regenerator outlet is necessary for satisfactory carbon dioxide capture efficiencies in succeeding absorption cycles. Carbon dioxide capture economics in new power plants can be improved by incorporating increased capacity boilers, efficient flue gas desulfurization systems and provisions for withdrawal of sorbent regeneration steam in the design.

  19. Reactive Capture of Carbon Dioxide Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase I SBIR, Reactive Innovations, LLC (RIL) proposes to develop a compact and lightweight electrochemical to capture carbon dioxide in the martian...

  20. Carbon Dioxide Collection and Pressurization Technology Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Reactive Innovations, LLC, proposes a Phase I SBIR program to develop a compact and lightweight electrochemical reactor to separate and pressurize carbon dioxide...

  1. Efficient volatile metal removal from low rank coal in gasification, combustion, and processing systems and methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bland, Alan E.; Sellakumar, Kumar Muthusami; Newcomer, Jesse D.

    2017-03-21

    Efficient coal pre-processing systems (69) integrated with gasification, oxy-combustion, and power plant systems include a drying chamber (28), a volatile metal removal chamber (30), recirculated gases, including recycled carbon dioxide (21), nitrogen (6), and gaseous exhaust (60) for increasing the efficiencies and lowering emissions in various coal processing systems.

  2. Carbon Dioxide Absorbers: An Engaging Experiment for the General Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ticich, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    A simple and direct method for measuring the absorption of carbon dioxide by two different substances is described. Lithium hydroxide has been used for decades to remove the gas from enclosed living spaces, such as spacecraft and submarines. The ratio of the mass of carbon dioxide absorbed to the mass of lithium hydroxide used obtained from this…

  3. Gas transfer rates from airlifts used for concurrent aeration, carbon dioxide stripping, and recirculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airlifts simplify recirculating aquaculture systems and can potentially reduce capital costs and minimize maintenance issues. Airlifts have the ability to move and aerate water as well as degass the water of any carbon dioxide. This study evaluated the oxygen transfer and carbon dioxide removal abil...

  4. Atmospheric CO2 capture by algae: Negative carbon dioxide emission path.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Diana; Pires, José C M

    2016-09-01

    Carbon dioxide is one of the most important greenhouse gas, which concentration increase in the atmosphere is associated to climate change and global warming. Besides CO2 capture in large emission point sources, the capture of this pollutant from atmosphere may be required due to significant contribution of diffuse sources. The technologies that remove CO2 from atmosphere (creating a negative balance of CO2) are called negative emission technologies. Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Storage may play an important role for CO2 mitigation. It represents the combination of bioenergy production and carbon capture and storage, keeping carbon dioxide in geological reservoirs. Algae have a high potential as the source of biomass, as they present high photosynthetic efficiencies and high biomass yields. Their biomass has a wide range of applications, which can improve the economic viability of the process. Thus, this paper aims to assess the atmospheric CO2 capture by algal cultures.

  5. Carbon Dioxide Capture Adsorbents: Chemistry and Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Hasmukh A; Byun, Jeehye; Yavuz, Cafer T

    2016-12-21

    Excess carbon dioxide (CO2 ) emissions and their inevitable consequences continue to stimulate hard debate and awareness in both academic and public spaces, despite the widespread lack of understanding on what really is needed to capture and store the unwanted CO2 . Of the entire carbon capture and storage (CCS) operation, capture is the most costly process, consisting of nearly 70 % of the price tag. In this tutorial review, CO2 capture science and technology based on adsorbents are described and evaluated in the context of chemistry and methods, after briefly introducing the current status of CO2 emissions. An effective sorbent design is suggested, whereby six checkpoints are expected to be met: cost, capacity, selectivity, stability, recyclability, and fast kinetics.

  6. Cobalt carbonyl catalyzed olefin hydroformylation in supercritical carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathke, Jerome W.; Klingler, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    A method of olefin hydroformylation is provided wherein an olefin reacts with a carbonyl catalyst and with reaction gases such as hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the presence of a supercritical reaction solvent, such as carbon dioxide. The invention provides higher yields of n-isomer product without the gas-liquid mixing rate limitation seen in conventional Oxo processes using liquid media.

  7. Removal and recovery of carbon disulfide emitted by the viscose process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIntosh, M.J.

    1992-02-01

    Teepak, Inc., which manufactures cellulose food casings by means of the viscose process, has a plant in Danville, Illinois, that emits approximately 400,000 cubic feet per minute (cfm) of water-saturated air containing approximately 100 parts per million (ppm) of carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2}). Both Teepak and the state of Illinois desire to reduce these emissions as soon as possible; however, the large air flow and very small CS{sub 2} concentration result in a difficult and costly separations problem without an obvious economically viable solution. One possibility is to incinerate the CS{sub 2}, but a more environmentally and economically acceptable alternative is to recover the CS{sub 2} for recycle to the process. The recovered CS{sub 2} would be worth about $700,000 annually to Teepak. Teepak has sponsored, with the Hazardous Waste Research and Information Center (HWRIC) of the Illinois Department of Natural Resources, a research project at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to evaluate current gas- purification and recovery technology and to suggest a route of development that will lead to a CS{sub 2} recovery process. The Illinois Department of Commerce and Community Affairs later provided on Illinois Challenge Grant to allow laboratory studies to supplement this effort. This report is a result of all those studies.

  8. Removal and recovery of carbon disulfide emitted by the viscose process. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIntosh, M.J.

    1992-02-01

    Teepak, Inc., which manufactures cellulose food casings by means of the viscose process, has a plant in Danville, Illinois, that emits approximately 400,000 cubic feet per minute (cfm) of water-saturated air containing approximately 100 parts per million (ppm) of carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2}). Both Teepak and the state of Illinois desire to reduce these emissions as soon as possible; however, the large air flow and very small CS{sub 2} concentration result in a difficult and costly separations problem without an obvious economically viable solution. One possibility is to incinerate the CS{sub 2}, but a more environmentally and economically acceptable alternative is to recover the CS{sub 2} for recycle to the process. The recovered CS{sub 2} would be worth about $700,000 annually to Teepak. Teepak has sponsored, with the Hazardous Waste Research and Information Center (HWRIC) of the Illinois Department of Natural Resources, a research project at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to evaluate current gas- purification and recovery technology and to suggest a route of development that will lead to a CS{sub 2} recovery process. The Illinois Department of Commerce and Community Affairs later provided on Illinois Challenge Grant to allow laboratory studies to supplement this effort. This report is a result of all those studies.

  9. Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry Regenerable Sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Nelson; David Green; Paul Box; Raghubir Gupta; Gennar Henningsen

    2007-06-30

    Regenerable sorbents based on sodium carbonate (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) can be used to separate carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal-fired power plant flue gas. Upon thermal regeneration and condensation of water vapor, CO{sub 2} is released in a concentrated form that is suitable for reuse or sequestration. During the research project described in this report, the technical feasibility and economic viability of a thermal-swing CO{sub 2} separation process based on dry, regenerable, carbonate sorbents was confirmed. This process was designated as RTI's Dry Carbonate Process. RTI tested the Dry Carbonate Process through various research phases including thermogravimetric analysis (TGA); bench-scale fixed-bed, bench-scale fluidized-bed, bench-scale co-current downflow reactor testing; pilot-scale entrained-bed testing; and bench-scale demonstration testing with actual coal-fired flue gas. All phases of testing showed the feasibility of the process to capture greater than 90% of the CO{sub 2} present in coal-fired flue gas. Attrition-resistant sorbents were developed, and these sorbents were found to retain their CO{sub 2} removal activity through multiple cycles of adsorption and regeneration. The sodium carbonate-based sorbents developed by RTI react with CO{sub 2} and water vapor at temperatures below 80 C to form sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) and/or Wegscheider's salt. This reaction is reversed at temperatures greater than 120 C to release an equimolar mixture of CO{sub 2} and water vapor. After condensation of the water, a pure CO{sub 2} stream can be obtained. TGA testing showed that the Na{sub 2}CO3 sorbents react irreversibly with sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and hydrogen chloride (HCl) (at the operating conditions for this process). Trace levels of these contaminants are expected to be present in desulfurized flue gas. The sorbents did not collect detectable quantities of mercury (Hg). A process was designed for the Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-based sorbent that

  10. Biological denitrification process based on the Fe(0)-carbon micro-electrolysis for simultaneous ammonia and nitrate removal from low organic carbon water under a microaerobic condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Shihai; Li, Desheng; Yang, Xue; Xing, Wei; Li, Jinlong; Zhang, Qi

    2016-11-01

    A combined process between micro-electrolysis and biological denitrification (MEBD) using iron scraps and an activated carbon-based micro-electrolysis carrier was developed for nitrogen removal under a microaerobic condition. The process provided NH4(+)-N and total nitrogen (TN) removal efficiencies of 92.6% and 95.3%, respectively, and TN removal rate of 0.373±0.11kgN/(m(3)d) at corresponding DO of 1.0±0.1mg/L and HRT of 3h, and the optimal pH of 7.6-8.4. High-throughput sequencing analysis verified that dominant classes belonged to β-, α-, and γ-Proteobacteria, and Nitrospira. The dominant genera Hydrogenophaga and Sphaerotilus significantly increased during the operation, covering 13.2% and 6.1% in biofilms attached to the carrier in the middle of the reactor, respectively. Autotrophic denitrification contributed to >80% of the TN removal. The developed MEBD achieved efficient simultaneous nitrification and autotrophic denitrification, presenting significant potential for application in practical low organic carbon water treatment.

  11. Supply of carbon dioxide for enhanced oil recovery. Final report, October 15, 1976--September 1, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rump, W.M.; Hare, M.; Porter, R.E.

    1977-09-01

    Results are presented from a study of the carbon dioxide supply situation for miscible flooding operations to enhance oil recovery. Candidate oil reservoirs were identified, and the carbon dioxide requirements and the potential recoverable oil for some of these were estimated. A survey of carbon dioxide sources has been conducted within the geographic areas where candidate oil reservoirs exist. Sources considered were both high and low quality gases from combustion vents, chemical process stacks, and naturally occurring gas deposits. The survey shows more than enough carbon dioxide is available from above-ground sources alone to meet expected demands. Systems to purify and deliver the carbon dioxide were designed and the costs of the delivered carbon dioxide estimated. Lowest cost is carbon dioxide from natural source with credit for by-product methane. A more comprehensive survey of above-ground and natural sources is recommended.

  12. Carbon dioxide emissions from biochar in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, S; Clauson-Kaas, S; Bobul'ská, L

    2014-01-01

    The stability of biochar in soil is of importance if it is to be used for carbon sequestration and long-term improvement of soil properties. It is well known that a significant fraction of biochar is highly stable in soil, but carbon dioxide (CO2) is also released immediately after application...

  13. Carbon dioxide neutral, integrated biofuel facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, E.E.; Hill, G.A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, 57 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, S7N 5A9 (Canada)

    2010-12-15

    Algae are efficient biocatalysts for both capture and conversion of carbon dioxide in the environment. In earlier work, we have optimized the ability of Chlorella vulgaris to rapidly capture CO{sub 2} from man-made emission sources by varying environmental growth conditions and bioreactor design. Here we demonstrate that a coupled biodiesel-bioethanol facility, using yeast to produce ethanol and photosynthetic algae to produce biodiesel, can result in an integrated, economical, large-scale process for biofuel production. Each bioreactor acts as an electrode for a coupled complete microbial fuel cell system; the integrated cultures produce electricity that is consumed as an energy source within the process. Finally, both the produced yeast and spent algae biomass can be used as added value byproducts in the feed or food industries. Using cost and revenue estimations, an IRR of up to 25% is calculated using a 5 year project lifespan. (author)

  14. Method for Extracting and Sequestering Carbon Dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rau, Gregory H.; Caldeira, Kenneth G.

    2005-05-10

    A method and apparatus to extract and sequester carbon dioxide (CO2) from a stream or volume of gas wherein said method and apparatus hydrates CO2, and reacts the resulting carbonic acid with carbonate. Suitable carbonates include, but are not limited to, carbonates of alkali metals and alkaline earth metals, preferably carbonates of calcium and magnesium. Waste products are metal cations and bicarbonate in solution or dehydrated metal salts, which when disposed of in a large body of water provide an effective way of sequestering CO2 from a gaseous environment.

  15. Spatiotemporal variation of radon and carbon dioxide concentrations in an underground quarry: coupled processes of natural ventilation, barometric pumping and internal mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrier, Frédéric; Richon, Patrick

    2010-04-01

    Radon-222 and carbon dioxide concentrations have been measured during several years at several points in the atmosphere of an underground limestone quarry located at a depth of 18 m in Vincennes, near Paris, France. Both concentrations showed a seasonal cycle. Radon concentration varied from 1200 to 2000 Bq m(-3) in summer to about 800-1400 Bq m(-3) in winter, indicating winter ventilation rates varying from 0.6 to 2.5 x 10(-6) s(-1). Carbon dioxide concentration varied from 0.9 to 1.0% in summer, to about 0.1-0.3% in winter. Radon concentration can be corrected for natural ventilation using temperature measurements. The obtained model also accounts for the measured seasonal variation of carbon dioxide. After correction, radon concentrations still exhibit significant temporal variation, mostly associated with the variation of atmospheric pressure, with coupling coefficients varying from -7 to -26 Bq m(-3) hPa(-1). This variation can be accounted for using a barometric pumping model, coupled with natural ventilation in winter, and including internal mixing as well. After correction, radon concentrations exhibit residual temporal variation, poorly correlated between different points, with standard deviations varying from 3 to 6%. This study shows that temporal variation of radon concentrations in underground cavities can be understood to a satisfactory level of detail using non-linear and time-dependent modelling. It is important to understand the temporal variation of radon concentrations and the limitations in their modelling to monitor the properties of natural or artificial underground settings, and to be able to assess the existence of new processes, for example associated with the preparatory phases of volcanic eruptions or earthquakes.

  16. Adsorption of Carbon Dioxide, Ammonia, Formaldehyde, and Water Vapor on Regenerable Carbon Sorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtowicz, Marek A.; Cosgrove, Joseph E.; Serio, Michael A.; Wilburn, Monique

    2015-01-01

    Results are presented on the development of reversible sorbents for the combined carbon dioxide, moisture, and trace-contaminant (TC) removal for use in Extravehicular Activities (EVAs), and more specifically in the Primary Life Support System (PLSS). The currently available life support systems use separate units for carbon dioxide, trace contaminants, and moisture control, and the long-term objective is to replace the above three modules with a single one. Furthermore, the current TC-control technology involves the use of a packed bed of acid-impregnated granular charcoal, which is nonregenerable, and the carbon-based sorbent under development in this project can be regenerated by exposure to vacuum at room temperature. In this study, several carbon sorbents were fabricated and tested for simultaneous carbon dioxide, ammonia, formaldehyde, and water sorption. Multiple adsorption/vacuum-regeneration cycles were demonstrated at room temperature, and also the enhancement of formaldehyde sorption by the presence of ammonia in the gas mixture.

  17. SEQUESTERING CARBON DIOXIDE IN COALBEDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.A.M. Gasem; R.L. Robinson, Jr.; L.R. Radovic

    2003-03-10

    The authors' long-term goal is to develop accurate prediction methods for describing the adsorption behavior of gas mixtures on solid adsorbents over complete ranges of temperature, pressure and adsorbent types. The originally-stated, major objectives of the current project are to (1) measure the adsorption behavior of pure CO{sub 2}, methane, nitrogen, and their binary and ternary mixtures on several selected coals having different properties at temperatures and pressures applicable to the particular coals being studied, (2) generalize the adsorption results in terms of appropriate properties of the coals to facilitate estimation of adsorption behavior for coals other than those studied experimentally, (3) delineate the sensitivity of the competitive adsorption of CO{sub 2}, methane and nitrogen to the specific characteristics of the coal on which they are adsorbed; establish the major differences (if any) in the nature of this competitive adsorption on different coals, and (4) test and/or develop theoretically-based mathematical models to represent accurately the adsorption behavior of mixtures of the type for which measurements are made. As this project has developed, an important additional objective has been added to the above original list. Namely, we have been encouraged to interact with industry and/or governmental agencies to utilize our expertise to advance the state of the art in coalbed adsorption science and technology. As a result of this additional objective, we have participated with the Department of Energy and industry in the measurement and analysis of adsorption behavior as part of two distinct investigations. These include (a) Advanced Resources International (ARI) DOE Project DE-FC26-00NT40924, ''Adsorption of Pure Methane, Nitrogen, and Carbon Dioxide and Their Mixtures on Wet Tiffany Coal'', and (b) the DOE-NETL Project, ''Round Robin: CO{sub 2} Adsorption on Selected Coals''. These activities

  18. SEQUESTERING CARBON DIOXIDE IN COALBEDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.A.M. Gasem; R.L. Robinson, Jr.; J.E. Fitzgerald; Z. Pan; M. Sudibandriyo

    2003-04-30

    The authors' long-term goal is to develop accurate prediction methods for describing the adsorption behavior of gas mixtures on solid adsorbents over complete ranges of temperature, pressure, and adsorbent types. The originally-stated, major objectives of the current project are to: (1) measure the adsorption behavior of pure CO{sub 2}, methane, nitrogen, and their binary and ternary mixtures on several selected coals having different properties at temperatures and pressures applicable to the particular coals being studied, (2) generalize the adsorption results in terms of appropriate properties of the coals to facilitate estimation of adsorption behavior for coals other than those studied experimentally, (3) delineate the sensitivity of the competitive adsorption of CO{sub 2}, methane, and nitrogen to the specific characteristics of the coal on which they are adsorbed; establish the major differences (if any) in the nature of this competitive adsorption on different coals, and (4) test and/or develop theoretically-based mathematical models to represent accurately the adsorption behavior of mixtures of the type for which measurements are made. As this project developed, an important additional objective was added to the above original list. Namely, we were encouraged to interact with industry and/or governmental agencies to utilize our expertise to advance the state of the art in coalbed adsorption science and technology. As a result of this additional objective, we participated with the Department of Energy and industry in the measurement and analysis of adsorption behavior as part of two distinct investigations. These include (a) Advanced Resources International (ARI) DOE Project DE-FC26-00NT40924, ''Adsorption of Pure Methane, Nitrogen, and Carbon Dioxide and Their Mixtures on Wet Tiffany Coal'', and (b) the DOE-NETL Project, ''Round Robin: CO{sub 2} Adsorption on Selected Coals''. These activities, contributing

  19. Bench and Full Scale Study of Removal Effect and Mutagenicity on Mesocyclops Leukarti with Chlorine Dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZUO Jin-long; YANG Wei; LIU Yan-an; LIN Tao

    2006-01-01

    Mesocyclops Leukarti of zooplankton propagates excessively in eutrophic water body and it can not be effectively inactivated by the conventional process in drinking waterworks for its special surface structure. In this paper, a study of removal efficiency on Mesocyclops Leukarti with chlorine dioxide in a drinking waterworks was performed.Bench scale results showed that chlorine dioxide is more effective against Mesocyclops Leukarti. And Mesocyclops Leukarti could be effectively removed from water by 1.0 mg/L chlorine dioxide preoxidation cooperated with the conventional process during the full scale study. The chlorite, by-preduct of prechlorine dioxide, was constant at 0.45 mg/L after filtration, which was lower than the critical value of the USEPA. GC-MS examination and Ames test showed that the quantity of organics and the mutagenicity in the water treated by chlorine dioxide is obviously less than that of prechlorination.

  20. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide-Assisted Process for Well-Dispersed Silicon/Graphene Composite as a Li ion Battery Anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Ha; Park, Sengyoen; Kim, Min; Yoon, Dohyeon; Chanthad, Chalathorn; Cho, Misuk; Kim, Jaehoon; Park, Jong Hyeok; Lee, Youngkwan

    2016-01-01

    The silicon (Si)/graphene composite has been touted as one of the most promising anode materials for lithium ion batteries. However, the optimal fabrication method for this composite remains a challenge. Here, we developed a novel method using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) to intercalate Si nanoparticles into graphene nanosheets. Silicon was modified with a thin layer of polyaniline, which assisted the dispersion of graphene sheets by introducing π-π interaction. Using scCO2, well-dispersed Si/graphene composite was successfully obtained in a short time under mild temperature. The composite showed high cycle performance (1,789 mAh/g after 250 cycles) and rate capability (1,690 mAh/g at a current density of 4,000 mA/g). This study provides a new approach for cost-effective and scalable preparation of a Si/graphene composite using scCO2 for a highly stable lithium battery anode material. PMID:27535108

  1. SEPARATION OF HYDROGEN AND CARBON DIOXIDE USING A NOVEL MEMBRANE REACTOR IN ADVANCED FOSSIL ENERGY CONVERSION PROCESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamsuddin Illias

    2002-06-10

    Inorganic membrane reactors offer the possibility of combining reaction and separation in a single operation at high temperatures to overcome the equilibrium limitations experienced in conventional reactor configurations. Such attractive features can be advantageously utilized in a number of potential commercial opportunities, which include dehydrogenation, hydrogenation, oxidative dehydrogenation, oxidation and catalytic decomposition reactions. However, to be cost effective, significant technological advances and improvements will be required to solve several key issues which include: (a) permselective thin solid film, (b) thermal, chemical and mechanical stability of the film at high temperatures, and (c) reactor engineering and module development in relation to the development of effective seals at high temperature and high pressure. In this project, we are working on the development and application of palladium and palladium-silver alloy thin-film composite membranes in membrane reactor-separator configuration for simultaneous production and separation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide at high temperature. From our research on Pd-composite membrane, we have demonstrated that the new membrane has significantly higher hydrogen flux with very high perm-selectivity than any of the membranes commercially available. The steam reforming of methane by equilibrium shift in Pd-composite membrane reactor is being studied to demonstrate the potential application this new development. We designed and built a membrane reactor to study the reforming reaction. A two-dimensional pseudo-homogeneous reactor model was developed to study the performance of the membrane reactor parametrically. The important results are presented in this report.

  2. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide-Assisted Process for Well-Dispersed Silicon/Graphene Composite as a Li ion Battery Anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Ha; Park, Sengyoen; Kim, Min; Yoon, Dohyeon; Chanthad, Chalathorn; Cho, Misuk; Kim, Jaehoon; Park, Jong Hyeok; Lee, Youngkwan

    2016-08-01

    The silicon (Si)/graphene composite has been touted as one of the most promising anode materials for lithium ion batteries. However, the optimal fabrication method for this composite remains a challenge. Here, we developed a novel method using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) to intercalate Si nanoparticles into graphene nanosheets. Silicon was modified with a thin layer of polyaniline, which assisted the dispersion of graphene sheets by introducing π-π interaction. Using scCO2, well-dispersed Si/graphene composite was successfully obtained in a short time under mild temperature. The composite showed high cycle performance (1,789 mAh/g after 250 cycles) and rate capability (1,690 mAh/g at a current density of 4,000 mA/g). This study provides a new approach for cost-effective and scalable preparation of a Si/graphene composite using scCO2 for a highly stable lithium battery anode material.

  3. Designed amyloid fibers as materials for selective carbon dioxide capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Deng, Hexiang; Liu, Cong; Yaghi, Omar M; Eisenberg, David S

    2014-01-07

    New materials capable of binding carbon dioxide are essential for addressing climate change. Here, we demonstrate that amyloids, self-assembling protein fibers, are effective for selective carbon dioxide capture. Solid-state NMR proves that amyloid fibers containing alkylamine groups reversibly bind carbon dioxide via carbamate formation. Thermodynamic and kinetic capture-and-release tests show the carbamate formation rate is fast enough to capture carbon dioxide by dynamic separation, undiminished by the presence of water, in both a natural amyloid and designed amyloids having increased carbon dioxide capacity. Heating to 100 °C regenerates the material. These results demonstrate the potential of amyloid fibers for environmental carbon dioxide capture.

  4. Effective removal of tetracycline from aqueous solution using activated carbon prepared from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) industrial processing waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayğılı, Hasan; Güzel, Fuat

    2016-09-01

    Activated carbon (TAC) prepared under optimized conditions with ZnCl2 activation from a new precursor; tomato industrial processing waste (TW), was applied as an adsorbent to remove tetracycline (TC) from aqueous solution. The factors (TAC dosage, initial TC concentration, contact time, ionic strength and solution temperature) affecting the adsorption process were examined at natural pH (5.7) of TAC-TC system in aqueous solution. Kinetic data was found to be best complied by the pseudo-second order model. The isotherm analysis indicated that the equilibrium data could be represented by the Langmuir model. The maximum adsorption capacity was identified as 500.0mgg(-1) at 308K.

  5. Carbon Dioxide Management on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlingame, Katie

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is a manned laboratory operating in orbit around the Earth that was built and is currently operated by several countries across the world. The ISS is a platform for novel scientific research as well as a testbed for technologies that will be required for the next step in space exploration. In order for astronauts to live on ISS for an extended period of time, it is vital that on board systems consistently provide a clean atmosphere. One contaminant that must be removed from the atmosphere is carbon dioxide (CO2). CO2 levels on ISS are higher than those on Earth and can cause crew members to experience symptoms such as headaches, lethargy and mental slowness. A variety of systems exist on ISS to remove carbon dioxide, including adsorbent technologies which can be reused and testbed technologies for future space vehicles.

  6. Green dyeing of cotton fabrics by supercritical carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Juan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Green dyeing process with zero waste water emission is a hot topic recently. This paper reveals that supercritical carbon dioxide is the best candidate for this purpose. Effects of thermodynamic parameters, such as enthalpy and entropy of activation, on dyeing process are studied experimentally.

  7. 21 CFR 868.1400 - Carbon dioxide gas analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. 868.1400 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1400 Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of carbon...

  8. Carbon dioxide sequestration by direct aqueous mineral carbonation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Connor, William K.; Dahlin, David C.; Nilsen, David N.; Walters, Richard P.; Turner, Paul C.

    2000-01-01

    Carbon dioxide sequestration by an ex-situ, direct aqueous mineral carbonation process has been investigated over the past two years. This process was conceived to minimize the steps in the conversion of gaseous CO2 to a stable solid. This meant combining two separate reactions, mineral dissolution and carbonate precipitation, into a single unit operation. It was recognized that the conditions favorable for one of these reactions could be detrimental to the other. However, the benefits for a combined aqueous process, in process efficiency and ultimately economics, justified the investigation. The process utilizes a slurry of water, dissolved CO2, and a magnesium silicate mineral, such as olivine [forsterite end member (Mg2SiO4)], or serpentine [Mg3Si2O5(OH)4]. These minerals were selected as the reactants of choice for two reasons: (1) significant abundance in nature; and (2) high molar ratio of the alkaline earth oxides (CaO, MgO) within the minerals. Because it is the alkaline earth oxide that combines with CO2 to form the solid carbonate, those minerals with the highest ratio of these oxides are most favored. Optimum results have been achieved using heat pretreated serpentine feed material, sodium bicarbonate and sodium chloride additions to the solution, and high partial pressure of CO2 (PCO2). Specific conditions include: 155?C; PCO2=185 atm; 15% solids. Under these conditions, 78% conversion of the silicate to the carbonate was achieved in 30 minutes. Future studies are intended to investigate various mineral pretreatment options, the carbonation solution characteristics, alternative reactants, scale-up to a continuous process, geochemical modeling, and process economics.

  9. Carbon Dioxide Extraction from Air: Is It An Option?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lackner, Klaus; Ziock, Hans-Joachim; Grimes, Patrick

    1999-02-01

    Controlling the level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere without limiting access to fossil energy resources is only possible if carbon dioxide is collected and disposed of away from the atmosphere. While it may be cost-advantageous to collect the carbon dioxide at concentrated sources without ever letting it enter the atmosphere, this approach is not available for the many diffuse sources of carbon dioxide. Similarly, for many older plants a retrofit to collect the carbon dioxide is either impossible or prohibitively expensive. For these cases we investigate the possibility of collecting the carbon dioxide directly from the atmosphere. We conclude that there are no fundamental obstacles to this approach and that it deserves further investigation. Carbon dioxide extraction directly from atmosphere would allow carbon management without the need for a completely changed infrastructure. In addition it eliminates the need for a complex carbon dioxide transportation infrastructure, thus at least in part offsetting the higher cost of the extraction from air.

  10. Thermodynamical effects during carbon dioxide release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A. K.; Böttcher, N.; Görke, U.-J.; Kolditz, O.

    2012-04-01

    Pruess [1] investigated the risk of carbon dioxide leakage from shallow storage sites by modeling scenarios. Such a fluid release is associated with mechanical work performed by formation fluid against expansion without taking heat from ambient environment. Understanding of heat related to mechanical work is essential to predict the temperature at the leak. According to the first law of thermodynamics, internal energy of working fluid decreases with an amount which is equivalent to this work hence, working fluid lost its own heat. Such kind of heat loss depends strongly on whether the expansion process is adiabatic or isothermal. Isothermal expansion allows the working fluid to interact thermally with the solid matrix. Adiabatic expansion is an isenthalpic process that takes heat from the working fluid and the ambient environment remains unchanged. This work is part of the CLEAN research project [6]. In this study, thermodynamic effects of mechanical work during eventual carbon dioxide leakage are investigated numerically. In particular, we are interested to detect the temperature at leakage scenarios and its deviation with different thermodynamic processes. Finite element simulation is conducted with a two-dimensional rectangular geometry representing a shallow storage site which bottom was located at -300m below the land surface. A fully saturated porous medium is assumed where the pore space is filled completely with carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide accumulated in the secondary trap at 30 Bar and 24 °C is allowed to leak from top right point of rectangle with atmospheric pressure. With (i) adiabatic and (ii) isothermal compressibility factors, temperature around leakage area has been calculated which show a significant difference. With some simplification, this study detects leak temperature which is very close with [1]. Temporal evaluation at the leaky area shows that the working fluid temperature can be reduced to -20 °C when the leakage scenario is performed

  11. Carbon Dioxide in Arable Soil Profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chirinda, Ngoni; Plauborg, Finn; Heckrath, Goswin Johann

    2014-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations in arable soil profiles are influenced by autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration as well as soil physical properties that regulate gas transport. Whereas different methods have been used to assess dynamics of soil CO2 concentrations, our understanding......). In a winter wheat field in Denmark, soil CO2 concentrations were measured from 29 November 2011 to 14 June 2012 at upslope and footslope positions of a short catena (25 m). Carbon dioxide was measured at 20 and 40 cm soil depths (i.e., within and below the nominal plough layer) using the two measurement...

  12. Predator-induced reduction of freshwater carbon dioxide emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Trisha B.; Hammill, Edd; Greig, Hamish S.; Kratina, Pavel; Shurin, Jonathan B.; Srivastava, Diane S.; Richardson, John S.

    2013-03-01

    Predators can influence the exchange of carbon dioxide between ecosystems and the atmosphere by altering ecosystem processes such as decomposition and primary production, according to food web theory. Empirical knowledge of such an effect in freshwater systems is limited, but it has been suggested that predators in odd-numbered food chains suppress freshwater carbon dioxide emissions, and predators in even-numbered food chains enhance emissions. Here, we report experiments in three-tier food chains in experimental ponds, streams and bromeliads in Canada and Costa Rica in the presence or absence of fish (Gasterosteus aculeatus) and invertebrate (Hesperoperla pacifica and Mecistogaster modesta) predators. We monitored carbon dioxide fluxes along with prey and primary producer biomass. We found substantially reduced carbon dioxide emissions in the presence of predators in all systems, despite differences in predator type, hydrology, climatic region, ecological zone and level of in situ primary production. We also observed lower amounts of prey biomass and higher amounts of algal and detrital biomass in the presence of predators. We conclude that predators have the potential to markedly influence carbon dioxide dynamics in freshwater systems.

  13. Novel carbon dioxide gas sensor based on infrared absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guangjun; Lui, Junfang; Yuan, Mei

    2000-08-01

    The feasibility of sensing carbon dioxide with a IR single- beam optical structure is studied, and a novel carbon dioxide gas sensor based on IR absorption is achieved. Applying the Lambert-Beer law and some key techniques such as current stabilization for IR source, using a high-quality IR detector, and data compensation for the influences of ambience temperature and atmosphere total pressure, the sensor can measure carbon dioxide with high precision and efficiency. The mathematical models for providing temperature and pressure compensation for the sensor are established. Moreover the solutions to the models are proposed. Both the models and the solutions to the models are verified via experiments. The sensor possesses the advantages of small volume, light weight, low power consumption, and high reliability. Therefore it can be used in many associated fields, such as environmental protection, processing control, chemical analysis, medical diagnosis, and space environmental and control systems.

  14. Kinetic study of coals gasification into carbon dioxide atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korotkikh A.G.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The solid fuel gasification process was investigated to define chemical reactions rate and activation energy for a gas-generator designing and regime optimizing. An experimental procedure includes coal char samples of Kuznetskiy and Kansko-Achinskiy deposits consequent argon pyrolysis into argon and oxidating into carbon dioxide with different temperatures. The thermogravimetric analysis data of coal char gasification into carbon dioxide was obtained in the temperature range 900–1200 ºC. The mass loss and gasification time dependencies from temperature were defined to calculate chemical reaction frequency factor and activation energy. Two coal char gasification physico-mathematical models were proposed and recommendations for them were formed.

  15. Heat transfer coefficient for boiling carbon dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Hans Jørgen Høgaard; Jensen, Per Henrik

    1998-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop for boiling carbon dioxide (R744) flowing in a horizontal pipe has been measured. The calculated heat transfer coeeficient has been compared with the Chart correlation of Shah. The Chart Correlation predits too low heat transfer coefficient but the ratio...

  16. Diiodination of Alkynes in supercritical Carbon dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李金恒; 谢叶香; 尹笃林; 江焕峰

    2003-01-01

    A general,green and efficient method for the synthesis of transdiiodoalkenes in CO2(sc) has been developed.Trans-diiodoalkenes were obtained stereospecifically in quantitative yields via diiodination of both electron-rich and electron-deficient alkynes in the presence of KI,Ce(SO4)2 and water in supercritical carbon dioxide [CO2(sc)]at 40℃.

  17. Immobilized Ruthenium Catalyst for Carbon Dioxide Hydrogenation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Min YU; Jin Hua FEI; Yi Ping ZHANG; Xiao Ming ZHENG

    2006-01-01

    Three kinds of cross linked polystyrene resin (PS) supported ruthenium complexes were developed as catalysts for the synthesis of formic acid from carbon dioxide hydrogenation. Many factors, such as the functionalized supports, solvents and ligands, could influence their activities and reuse performances greatly. These immobilized catalysts also offer the industrial advantages such as easy separation.

  18. Cooperative redox activation for carbon dioxide conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lian, Zhong; Nielsen, Dennis U.; Lindhardt, Anders T.

    2016-01-01

    A longstanding challenge in production chemistry is the development of catalytic methods for the transformation of carbon dioxide into useful chemicals. Silane and borane promoted reductions can be fined-tuned to provide a number of C1-building blocks under mild conditions, but these approaches...

  19. Heat transfer coeffcient for boiling carbon dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Hans Jørgen Høgaard; Jensen, Per Henrik

    1997-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop for boiling carbon dioxide (R744) flowing in a horizontal pipe has been measured. The pipe is heated by condensing R22 outside the pipe. The heat input is supplied by an electrical heater wich evaporates the R22. With the heat flux assumed constant over...

  20. Carbon dioxide sensing with sulfonated polyaniline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doan, D.C.T.; Ramaneti, R.; Baggerman, J.; Bent, van der J.; Marcelis, A.T.M.; Tong, H.D.; Rijn, van C.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    The use of polyaniline and especially sulfonated polyaniline (SPAN) is explored for sensing carbon dioxide (CO2) at room temperature. Frequency-dependent AC measurements were carried out to detect changes in impedance of the polymer, drop casted on interdigitated electrodes, when exposed to CO2 gas.

  1. Carbon dioxide foaming of glassy polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessling, M.; Borneman, Z.; Boomgaard, van den Th.; Smolders, C.A.

    1994-01-01

    The mechanism of foaming a glassy polymer using sorbed carbon dioxide is studied in detail. A glassy polymer supersaturated with nitrogen forms a microcellular foam, if the polymer is quickly heated above its glass transition temperature. A glassy polymer supersaturated with CO2 forms this foam-like

  2. Tourism Transport, Technology, and Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, P.M.

    2010-01-01

    Technological development from horse-drawn carriages to the new Airbus A380 has led to a remarkable increase in both the capacity and speed of tourist travel. This development has an endogenous systemic cause and will continue to increase carbon dioxide emissions/energy consumption if left unchecked

  3. Synthesis of fatty acid starch esters in supercritical carbon dioxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muljana, Henky; van der Knoop, Sjoerd; Keijzer, Danielle; Picchioni, Francesco; Janssen, Leon P. B. M.; Heeres, Hero J.

    2010-01-01

    This manuscript describes an exploratory study on the synthesis of fatty acid/potato starch esters using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO(2)) as the solvent. The effects of process variables such as pressure (6-25 MPa), temperature (120-150 degrees C) and various basic catalysts and fatty acid der

  4. Fluxes of Methane and Carbon Dioxide from a Subarctic Lake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jammet, Mathilde Manon

    ) and carbon dioxide (CO2) with the atmosphere. Yet uncertainties in the magnitude and drivers of these fluxes remain, partly due to a lack of direct observations covering all seasons of the year, but also because of the diversity in measurement methods that often miss components of the transport processes...

  5. Solubilities of sub- and supercritical carbon dioxide in polyester resins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nalawade, SP; Picchioni, F; Janssen, LPBM; Patil, VE; Keurentjes, JTF; Staudt, R; Nalawade, Sameer P.; Patil, Vishal E.; Keurentjes, Jos T.F.

    2006-01-01

    In supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) assisted polymer processes the solubility of CO2 in a polymer plays a vital role. The higher the amount of CO2 dissolved in a polymer the higher is the viscosity reduction of the polymer. Solubilities Of CO2 in polyester resins based on propoxylated bisphenol (P

  6. Carbon dioxide concentration in Mediterranean greenhouses : how much lost production?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stanghellini, C.; Incrocci, L.; Gazquez, J.C.; Dimauro, B.

    2008-01-01

    In the absence of artificial supply of carbon dioxide in the greenhouse environment, the CO2 absorbed in the process of photosynthesis must ultimately come from the external ambient through the ventilation openings. This requires that the CO2 concentration within the house must be lower than the ext

  7. Trade, production fragmentation, and China's carbon dioxide emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietzenbacher, Erik; Pei, Jiansuo; Yang, Cuihong

    2012-01-01

    An input-output framework is adopted to estimate China's carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions as generated by its exports in 2002. More than one half of China's exports are related to international production fragmentation. These processing exports generate relatively little value added but also relativel

  8. 21 CFR 868.5300 - Carbon dioxide absorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorbent. 868.5300 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5300 Carbon dioxide absorbent. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide absorbent is a device intended for medical purposes that consists of...

  9. 9 CFR 313.5 - Chemical; carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Chemical; carbon dioxide. 313.5... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION HUMANE SLAUGHTER OF LIVESTOCK § 313.5 Chemical; carbon dioxide. The slaughtering of sheep, calves and swine with the use of carbon dioxide gas and the handling in...

  10. 46 CFR 169.565 - Fixed carbon dioxide system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fixed carbon dioxide system. 169.565 Section 169.565... Lifesaving and Firefighting Equipment Firefighting Equipment § 169.565 Fixed carbon dioxide system. (a) The number of pounds of carbon dioxide required for each space protected must be equal to the gross volume...

  11. 40 CFR 90.320 - Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration... Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.320 Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration. (a) Prior to its initial... carbon dioxide analyzer as follows: (1) Follow good engineering practices for instrument start-up...

  12. 46 CFR 108.431 - Carbon dioxide systems: General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide systems: General. 108.431 Section 108.431... AND EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Fixed Carbon Dioxide Fire Extinguishing Systems § 108.431 Carbon dioxide systems: General. (a) Sections 108.431 through 108.457 apply to high pressure...

  13. 40 CFR 89.322 - Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration... Test Equipment Provisions § 89.322 Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration. (a) Prior to its introduction... carbon dioxide analyzer shall be calibrated on all normally used instrument ranges. New...

  14. 27 CFR 24.319 - Carbon dioxide record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carbon dioxide record. 24..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Records and Reports § 24.319 Carbon dioxide record. A proprietor who uses carbon dioxide in still wine shall maintain a record of the laboratory tests conducted...

  15. 27 CFR 26.52 - Still wines containing carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... carbon dioxide. 26.52 Section 26.52 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... ISLANDS Formulas for Products From Puerto Rico § 26.52 Still wines containing carbon dioxide. (a) General. Still wines may contain not more than 0.392 gram of carbon dioxide per 100 milliliters of wine;...

  16. 21 CFR 868.5310 - Carbon dioxide absorber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorber. 868.5310 Section 868.5310...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5310 Carbon dioxide absorber. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide absorber is a device that is intended for medical purposes and that is used in...

  17. 27 CFR 26.222 - Still wines containing carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... carbon dioxide. 26.222 Section 26.222 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... ISLANDS Formulas for Products From the Virgin Islands § 26.222 Still wines containing carbon dioxide. (a) General. Still wines may contain not more than 0.392 gram of carbon dioxide per 100 milliliters of...

  18. Controlling Foam Morphology of Poly(methyl methacrylate via Surface Chemistry and Concentration of Silica Nanoparticles and Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Process Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Rende

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymer nanocomposite foams have received considerable attention because of their potential use in advanced applications such as bone scaffolds, food packaging, and transportation materials due to their low density and enhanced mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties compared to traditional polymer foams. In this study, silica nanofillers were used as nucleating agents and supercritical carbon dioxide as the foaming agent. The use of nanofillers provides an interface upon which CO2 nucleates and leads to remarkably low average cell sizes while improving cell density (number of cells per unit volume. In this study, the effect of concentration, the extent of surface modification of silica nanofillers with CO2-philic chemical groups, and supercritical carbon dioxide process conditions on the foam morphology of poly(methyl methacrylate, PMMA, were systematically investigated to shed light on the relative importance of material and process parameters. The silica nanoparticles were chemically modified with tridecafluoro-1,1,2,2-tetrahydrooctyl triethoxysilane leading to three different surface chemistries. The silica concentration was varied from 0.85 to 3.2% (by weight. The supercritical CO2 foaming was performed at four different temperatures (40, 65, 75, and 85°C and between 8.97 and 17.93 MPa. By altering the surface chemistry of the silica nanofiller and manipulating the process conditions, the average cell diameter was decreased from 9.62±5.22 to 1.06±0.32 μm, whereas, the cell density was increased from 7.5±0.5×108 to 4.8±0.3×1011 cells/cm3. Our findings indicate that surface modification of silica nanoparticles with CO2-philic surfactants has the strongest effect on foam morphology.

  19. RESEARCH ON ELECTRIC ARC REDUCTION OF CARBON DIOXIDE,

    Science.gov (United States)

    CARBON DIOXIDE , REDUCTION(CHEMISTRY), ELECTRIC ARCS, CHEMICAL REACTIONS, HEAT OF REACTION, GAS FLOW, OXYGEN, CARBON COMPOUNDS, MONOXIDES, ELECTRODES, LABORATORY EQUIPMENT, HIGH TEMPERATURE, PLASMAS(PHYSICS), ENERGY.

  20. Application of adsorption process by activated carbon derived from scrap tires for Pb+2 removal from aqueous solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Edris Hoseinzadeh; Ali Reza Rahmani; Ghorban Asgari; Mohamad Taghi Samadi; Ghodratollah Roshanaei; Mohammad Reza Zare

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aim: Heavy metals have been recognized as very poisonous elements and their discharge into water sources can cause damaging effects on human and environmental health. The present study aimed at producing activated carbon from scrap tires and using it in removing Pb+2 from synthetic aqueous solutions. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, activated carbon powder was derived from scrap tires under laboratory conditions. The effect of Pb (II) ions wi...

  1. Photoreduction of Carbon Dioxide to Formic Acid in Aqueous Suspension: A Comparison between Phthalocyanine/TiO2 and Porphyrin/TiO2 Catalysed Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Mele

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Composite materials prepared by loading polycrystalline TiO2 powders with lipophilic highly branched Cu(II- and metal-free phthalocyanines or porphyrins, which have been used in the past as photocatalysts for photodegradative processes, have been successfully tested for the efficient photoreduction of carbon dioxide in aqueous suspension affording significant amounts of formic acid. The results indicated that the presence of the sensitizers is beneficial for the photoactivity, confirming the important role of Cu(II co-ordinated in the middle of the macrocycles. A comparison between Cu(II phthalocyanines and Cu(II porphyrins indicated that the Cu(II- phthalocyanine sensitizer was more efficient in the photoreduction of CO2 to formic acid, probably due to its favorable reduction potential.

  2. Packed-Bed Reactor Study of NETL Sample 196c for the Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Simulated Flue Gas Mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, James S.; Hammache, Sonia; Gray, McMahan L.; Fauth Daniel J.; Pennline, Henry W.

    2012-04-24

    An amine-based solid sorbent process to remove CO2 from flue gas has been investigated. The sorbent consists of polyethylenimine (PEI) immobilized onto silica (SiO2) support. Experiments were conducted in a packed-bed reactor and exit gas composition was monitored using mass spectrometry. The effects of feed gas composition (CO2 and H2O), temperature, and simulated steam regeneration were examined for both the silica support as well as the PEI-based sorbent. The artifact of the empty reactor was also quantified. Sorbent CO2 capacity loading was compared to thermogravimetric (TGA) results to further characterize adsorption isotherms and better define CO2 working capacity. Sorbent stability was monitored by periodically repeating baseline conditions throughout the parametric testing and replacing with fresh sorbent as needed. The concept of the Basic Immobilized Amine Sorbent (BIAS) Process using this sorbent within a system where sorbent continuously flows between the absorber and regenerator was introduced. The basic tenet is to manipulate or control the level of moisture on the sorbent as it travels around the sorbent circulation path between absorption and regeneration stages to minimize its effect on regeneration heat duty.

  3. Monitoring carbon dioxide in mechanically ventilated patients during hyperbaric treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregård, Asger; Jansen, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Measurement of the arterial carbon dioxide (P(a)CO(2)) is an established part of the monitoring of mechanically ventilated patients. Other ways to get information about carbon dioxide in the patient are measurement of end-tidal carbon dioxide (P(ET)CO(2)) and transcutaneous carbon dioxide (PTCCO2......). Carbon dioxide in the blood and cerebral tissue has great influence on vasoactivity and thereby blood volume of the brain. We have found no studies on the correlation between P(ET)CO(2) or P(TC)CO(2), and P(a)CO(2) during hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT)....

  4. Preparation of calcium carbonate particles coated with titanium dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai Lin; Ying-bo Dong; Le-yong Jiang

    2009-01-01

    The preparation of a new mineral composite material, calcium carbonate particles coated with titanium dioxide, was stud-ied. The mechanism of the preparation process was proposed. The new mineral composite material was made by the mechanochemi-eal method under the optimum condition that the mass ratio of calcium carbonate particles to titanium dioxide was 6.5:3.5. The mass ratios of two different types of titanium dioxide (anatase to rutile) and grinding media to grinded materials were 8:2 and 4:1 respec-tively, and the modified density was 60%. Under this condition, the new material was capable of forming after 120-min modification.The hiding power and oil absorption of this new material were 29.12 g/m~2 and 23.30%, respectively. The results show that the modi-fication is based on surface hydroxylation. After coating with titanium dioxide, the hiding power of calcium carbonate can be im-proved greatly. The new mineral composite materials can be used as the substitute for titanium dioxide.

  5. Materials for carbon dioxide separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Qingqing

    2014-10-01

    The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at room temperature have been investigated by comparing carbon nanotubes, fullerene, graphenes, graphite and granular activated carbons. It turned out that the amount of the micropore surface area was dominating the CO{sub 2} adsorption ability. Another promising class of materials for CO{sub 2} capture and separation are CaO derived from the eggshells. Two aspects were studied in present work: a new hybrid materials synthesized by doping the CaTiO{sub 3} and the relationship between physisorption and chemisorption properties of CaO-based materials.

  6. Reducing the chlorine dioxide demand in final disinfection of drinking water treatment plants using activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorlini, Sabrina; Biasibetti, Michela; Collivignarelli, Maria Cristina; Crotti, Barbara Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide is one of the most widely employed chemicals in the disinfection process of a drinking water treatment plant (DWTP). The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of the adsorption process with granular activated carbon (GAC) on the chlorine dioxide consumption in final oxidation/disinfection. A first series of tests was performed at the laboratory scale employing water samples collected at the outlet of the DWTP sand filter of Cremona (Italy). The adsorption process in batch conditions with seven different types of GAC was studied. A second series of tests was performed on water samples collected at the outlet of four GAC columns installed at the outlet of the DWTP sand filter. The results showed that the best chlorine dioxide demand (ClO2-D) reduction yields are equal to 60-80% and are achieved in the first 30 min after ClO2 addition, during the first 16 days of the column operation using a mineral, coal-based, mesoporous GAC. Therefore, this carbon removes organic compounds that are more rapidly reactive with ClO2. Moreover, a good correlation was found between the ClO2-D and UV absorbance at wavelength 254 nm using mineral carbons; therefore, the use of a mineral mesoporous GAC is an effective solution to control the high ClO2-D in the disinfection stage of a DWTP.

  7. SEPARATION OF HYDROGEN AND CARBON DIOXIDE USING A NOVEL MEMBRANE REACTOR IN ADVANCED FOSSIL ENERGY CONVERSION PROCESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamsuddin Ilias

    2005-02-03

    Inorganic membrane reactors offer the possibility of combining reaction and separation in a single operation at high temperatures to overcome the equilibrium limitations experienced in conventional reactor configurations. Such attractive features can be advantageously utilized in a number of potential commercial opportunities, which include dehydrogenation, hydrogenation, oxidative dehydrogenation, oxidation and catalytic decomposition reactions. However, to be cost effective, significant technological advances and improvements will be required to solve several key issues which include: (a) permselective thin solid film, (b) thermal, chemical and mechanical stability of the film at high temperatures, and (c) reactor engineering and module development in relation to the development of effective seals at high temperature and high pressure. In this project, we are working on the development and application of palladium and palladium-silver alloy thin-film composite membranes in membrane reactor-separator configuration for simultaneous production and separation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide at high temperature. From our research on Pd-composite membrane, we have demonstrated that the new membrane has significantly higher hydrogen flux with very high perm-selectivity than any of the membranes commercially available. The steam reforming of methane by equilibrium shift in Pd-composite membrane reactor is being studied to demonstrate the potential application of this new development. A two-dimensional, pseudo-homogeneous membrane-reactor model was developed to investigate the steam-methane reforming (SMR) reactions in a Pd-based membrane reactor. Radial diffusion was taken into consideration to account for the concentration gradient in the radial direction due to hydrogen permeation through the membrane. With appropriate reaction rate expressions, a set of partial differential equations was derived using the continuity equation for the reaction system. The equations were

  8. Treatment of ranula using carbon dioxide laser--case series report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, J B; Poon, C Y

    2009-10-01

    Ranulas are mucus extravasation phenomenon formed after trauma to the sublingual gland or mucus retention from the obstruction of the sublingual ducts. There are various methods for treating ranulas, including marsupialization with or without open packing, excision of ranula with or without removal of sublingual gland, and laser excision and vaporization of ranula. The authors present a case series report on the use of carbon dioxide laser treatment for ranula and a literature review of cases treated using carbon dioxide laser. The authors' experience and reports in the literature indicate that carbon dioxide laser excision of ranula is safe with minimal or no recurrence.

  9. Aesthetic Depigmentation of Gingival Smoker’s Melanosis Using Carbon Dioxide Lasers

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Melanic pigmentation results from melanin produced by the melanocytes present in the basal layer of the oral epithelium. One of the most common causes of oral pigmentation is smoker melanosis, a condition associated with the melanocyte stimulation caused by cigarette smoke. This paper aims to illustrate the use of a carbon dioxide laser in the removal of the gingival melanic pigmentation for aesthetic reasons in a 27-year-old female patient with history of a smoking habit. The carbon dioxide ...

  10. Carbon dioxide capture and use: organic synthesis using carbon dioxide from exhaust gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung Hyo; Kim, Kwang Hee; Hong, Soon Hyeok

    2014-01-13

    A carbon capture and use (CCU) strategy was applied to organic synthesis. Carbon dioxide (CO2) captured directly from exhaust gas was used for organic transformations as efficiently as hyper-pure CO2 gas from a commercial source, even for highly air- and moisture-sensitive reactions. The CO2 capturing aqueous ethanolamine solution could be recycled continuously without any diminished reaction efficiency.

  11. Sequestering ADM ethanol plant carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, R.J.; Riddle, D.

    2008-01-01

    Archer Daniels Midland Co. (ADM) and the Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS) are collaborating on a project in confirming that a rock formation can store carbon dioxide from the plant in its pores. The project aimed to sequester the gas underground permanently to minimize release of the greenhouse gas into the atmosphere. It is also designed to store one million tons of carbon dioxide over a three-year period. The project is worth $84.3M, funded by $66.7M from the US Department Energy, supplemented by co-funding from ADM and other corporate and state resources. The project will start drilling of wells to an expected depth over 6500 feet into the Mount Simon Sandstone formation.

  12. Recycling technology of emitted carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arakawa, Hironori [National Inst. of Materials and Chemical Research (NIMC), Ibaraki (Japan)

    1993-12-31

    Ways to halt global warming are being discussed worldwide. Global warming is an energy problem which is mainly attributed to the large volumes of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) released into the atmosphere from the rapid increase in energy consumption since the Industrial Revolution. The basic solution to the problem, therefore, is to cut consumption of fossil fuels. To this end, it is important to promote energy conservation by improving the fuel efficiency of machines, as well as shift to energy sources that do not emit carbon dioxide and develop related technologies. If current trends in economic growth continue in the devloping world as well as the developed countries, there can be no doubt that energy consumption will increase. Therefore, alongside energy conservation and the development of alternative energies, the importance of technologies to recover and fix CO{sub 2} will increase in the fight against global warming.

  13. Statistical optimization of adsorption processes for removal of 2,4-dichlorophenol by activated carbon derived from oil palm empty fruit bunches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Md. Zahangir ALAM; Suleyman A. MUYIBI; Juria TORAMAE

    2007-01-01

    The adsorption capacity of activated carbon produced from oil palm empty fruit bunches through removal of 2,4-dichlorophenol from aqueous solution was carried out in the laboratory. The activated carbon was produced by thermal activation at 800℃ with 30 min of activation time. The adsorption process conditions were determined with the statistical optimization followed by central composite design. A developed polynomial model for operating conditions of adsorption process indicated that the optimum conditions for maximum adsorption of phenolic compound were: agitation rate of 100 r/min, contact time of 8 h, initial adsorbate concentration of 250 mg/L and pH 4. Adsorption isotherms were conducted to evaluate biosorption process. Langmuir isotherm was more favorable (R2=0.93) for removal of 2,4-dichlorophenol by the activated carbon produced rather than the Freundlich isotherm (R2=0.88).

  14. Pulsed discharge plasmas in supercritical carbon dioxide

    OpenAIRE

    Kiyan, Tsuyoshi; Uemura, A.; Tanaka, K.; Zhang, C. H.; Namihira, Takao; Sakugawa, Takashi; Katsuki, Sunao; Akiyama, Hidenori; Roy, B.C.; Sasaki, M.; Goto, M.; キヤン, ツヨシ; ナミヒラ, タカオ; サクガワ, タカシ; カツキ, スナオ

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, several studies about electrical discharge plasma in supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) have been carried out. One of the unique characteristics of supercritical fluid is a large density fluctuation near the critical point that can result in marked dramatic changes of thermal conductivity. Therefore, the electrical discharge plasma produced in supercritical fluid has unique features and reactions unlike those of normal plasma produced in gas phase. In our experiments, two typ...

  15. Acute carbon dioxide avoidance in Caenorhabditis elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Hallem, Elissa A.; Sternberg, Paul W.

    2008-01-01

    Carbon dioxide is produced as a by-product of cellular respiration by all aerobic organisms and thus serves for many animals as an important indicator of food, mates, and predators. However, whether free-living terrestrial nematodes such as Caenorhabditis elegans respond to CO2 was unclear. We have demonstrated that adult C. elegans display an acute avoidance response upon exposure to CO2 that is characterized by the cessation of forward movement and the rapid initiation of backward movement....

  16. SEPARATION OF SATURED AND UNSATURATED FATTY ACIDS FROM PALM FATTY ACIDS DISTILLATES IN CONTINUOUS MULTISTAGE COUNTERCURRENT COLUMNS WITH SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE AS SOLVENT: A PROCESS DESIGN METHODOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nélio Teixeira MACHADO

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work the separation of multicomponent mixtures in counter-current columns with supercritical carbon dioxide has been investigated using a process design methodology. First the separation task must be defined, then phase equilibria experiments are carried out, and the data obtained are correlated with thermodynamic models or empirical functions. Mutual solubilities, Ki-values, and separation factors aij are determined. Based on this data possible operating conditions for further extraction experiments can be determined. Separation analysis using graphical methods are performed to optimize the process parameters. Hydrodynamic experiments are carried out to determine the flow capacity diagram. Extraction experiments in laboratory scale are planned and carried out in order to determine HETP values, to validate the simulation results, and to provide new materials for additional phase equilibria experiments, needed to determine the dependence of separation factors on concetration. Numerical simulation of the separation process and auxiliary systems is carried out to optimize the number of stages, solvent-to-feed ratio, product purity, yield, and energy consumption. Scale-up and cost analysis close the process design. The separation of palmitic acid and (oleic+linoleic acids from PFAD-Palm Fatty Acids Distillates was used as a case study.

  17. Conversion of carbon dioxide to valuable petrochemicals:An approach to clean development mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Farnaz Tahriri Zangeneh; Saeed Sahebdelfar; Maryam Takht Ravanchi

    2011-01-01

    The increase of atmospheric carbon dioxide and the global warming due to its greenhouse effect resulted in worldwide concerns. On the other hand, carbon dioxide might be considered as a valuable and renewable carbon source. One approach to reduce carbon dioxide emissions could be its capture and recycle via transformation into chemicals using the technologies in C1 chemistry. Despite its great interest, there are difficulties in CO2 separation on the one hand, and thermodynamic stability of carbon dioxide molecule rendering its chemical activity low on the other hand. Carbon dioxide has been already used in petrochemical industries for production of limited chemicals such as urea.The utilization of carbon dioxide does not necessarily involve development of new processes, and in certain processes such as methanol synthesis and methane steam reforming, addition of CO2 into the feed results in its utilization and increases carbon efficiency. In other cases,modifications in catalyst and/or processes, or even new catalysts and processes, are necessary. In either case, catalysis plays a crucial role in carbon dioxide conversion and effective catalysts are required for commercial realization of the related processes. Technologies for CO2 utilization are emerging after many years of research and development efforts.

  18. Irreversible climate change due to carbon dioxide emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Susan; Plattner, Gian-Kasper; Knutti, Reto; Friedlingstein, Pierre

    2009-02-10

    The severity of damaging human-induced climate change depends not only on the magnitude of the change but also on the potential for irreversibility. This paper shows that the climate change that takes place due to increases in carbon dioxide concentration is largely irreversible for 1,000 years after emissions stop. Following cessation of emissions, removal of atmospheric carbon dioxide decreases radiative forcing, but is largely compensated by slower loss of heat to the ocean, so that atmospheric temperatures do not drop significantly for at least 1,000 years. Among illustrative irreversible impacts that should be expected if atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations increase from current levels near 385 parts per million by volume (ppmv) to a peak of 450-600 ppmv over the coming century are irreversible dry-season rainfall reductions in several regions comparable to those of the "dust bowl" era and inexorable sea level rise. Thermal expansion of the warming ocean provides a conservative lower limit to irreversible global average sea level rise of at least 0.4-1.0 m if 21st century CO(2) concentrations exceed 600 ppmv and 0.6-1.9 m for peak CO(2) concentrations exceeding approximately 1,000 ppmv. Additional contributions from glaciers and ice sheet contributions to future sea level rise are uncertain but may equal or exceed several meters over the next millennium or longer.

  19. Full-scale study of removal effect on Cyclops of zooplankton with chlorine dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Tao; CUI Fu-yi; LIU Dong-mei; AN Dong

    2004-01-01

    Cyclops of zooplankton propagated excessively in eutrophic water body and could not be effectively inactivated by the conventional disinfections process like chlorination due to its stronger resistance to oxidation. In this paper, a full-scale study of chlorine dioxide preoxidation cooperating with routine clarification process for Cyclops removal was conducted in a waterworks. The experimental results were compared with that of the existing prechlorination process in several aspects: including the Cyclops removal efficiencies of water samples taken from the outlets of sedimentation tank and sand filter and the security of drinking water etc. The results showed that chlorine dioxide might be more effective to inactivate Cyclops than chlorine and Cyclops could be thoroughly removed from water by pre-dosing chlorine dioxide process. The GC-MS examination and Ames test further showed that the sort and amount of organic substance in the treated water by chlorine dioxide preoxidation were evidently less than that of prechlorination and the mutagenicity of drinking water treated by pre-dosing chlorine dioxide was substantially reduced compared with prechlorination.

  20. Pilot-scale study of removal effect on Chironomid larvae with chlorine dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Chironomid larvae propagated excessively in eutrophic water body and could not be effectively inactivated by the conventional disinfection process like chlorination due to its stronger resistance to oxidation. In this paper, a pilot-scale study of chlorine dioxide preoxidation cooperating with routine clarification process for Chironomid larvae removal was conducted in Shenzhen Waterworks in Guangdong Province, China. The experimental results were compared with that of the existing prechlorination process in several aspects, including the Chironomid larvae removal efficiencies of water samples taken from the outlets of sedimentation tank, sand filter, the security of drinking water and so on. The results showed that chlorine dioxide might be more effective to inactivate Chironomid larvae than chlorine and Chironomid larvae could be thoroughly removed from water by pre-dosing chlorine dioxide process. The GC-MS examination and Ames test further showed that the sort and amount of organic substance in the treated water by chlorine dioxide preoxidation were evidently less than that ofprechlorination and the mutagenicity of drinking water treated by pre-dosing chlorine dioxide was substantially reduced compared with prechlorination.

  1. Laboratory Testing of a Fluidized Bed Dry Scrubbing Process for Removal of Sulfur Dioxide and Phosphorous Pentoxide from an Inert Carrier Gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-01

    from vent gas streams in a bench-scale packed bed reactor using quicklime at 135 to 3000C. 4 A 99% HF removal rate was reported at calcium utiliza...Fan et al., "Limestone/Dolomite Sulfation in a Vertical Pneu- matic Transport Reactor ," Ind. Eng. Chem. Process Des. Dev., 23(3), 539-45, 1984. 6. G. A...Vol. II, June 1986. 7. D. Kunni and 0. Levenspiel , Fluidization Engineering, Robert E. % Krieger Publishing Company, Inc., Huntington, N.Y., 1977. 8. R

  2. Carbon dioxide: A new material for energy storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Amouroux

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Though carbon dioxide is the main green house gas due to burning of fossil resource or miscellaneous chemical processes, we propose here that carbon dioxide be a new material for energy storage. Since it can be the key to find the solution for three critical issues facing the world: food ecosystems, the greenhouse issue and energy storage. We propose to identify the carbon recovery through a circular industrial revolution in the first part, and in the second part we present the starting way of three business plants to do that from industrial examples. By pointing out all the economic constraints and the hidden competitions between energy, water and food, we try to qualify the phrase “sustainable development” and open the way of a huge circular economy.

  3. 气提装置低压回收系统运行探讨%Runing discussion of low pressure recovery system in carbon dioxide stripping process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牛斌

    2012-01-01

    Low pressure recovery system, running of which is actually a standard to measure the reasonableness of the whole process, is a key link in urea production with carbon dioxide stripping process. Condensation and absorption efficiency is ensured by correctly configuration of the technological process, while the operation states of low pressure recovery system is affected by operating results of high pressure loop. The degree of openness of low-pressure vent valve and the effective components in the vent should be controlled to guarantee the system running under a high-efficiency and low-consumption condition.%CO2气提法生产尿素工艺中,低压回收系统起着承前启后的作用,运行的优劣实际上是衡量尿素装置生产经济合理的标准。低调水流程的设备要合理才能保证冷凝吸收的效率;高压圈的运行效果也影响低压系统的操作。生产中要控制低压放空阀开度和放空气体中的有效组分,保证系统在高效、低耗的情况下运行。

  4. Heterogeneous saline formations for carbon dioxide disposal. Impact of varying heterogeneity on containment and trapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flett, Matthew [Chevron Australia Pty. Ltd. Perth (Australia); Department of Petroleum Engineering, Curtin University of Technology, Perth (Australia); Gurton, Randal [Chevron Australia Pty. Ltd. Perth (Australia); Weir, Geoff [Department of Petroleum Engineering, Curtin University of Technology, Perth (Australia)

    2007-05-15

    Natural gas fields often contain carbon dioxide in their reservoir fluids. Exploitation of these resources requires the removal of carbon dioxide from produced fluids to meet quality standards for sale into a domestic market or for the processing of the gas into LNG. To limit the atmospheric emissions of carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse gas, it has been proposed that one method of abatement could be to inject the CO{sub 2} into deep saline formations. This study shows that the selection process for identifying appropriate saline formations should not only consider their size and permeability but should also consider their degree of heterogeneity. To this end, notional yet realistic geological marine sand models were constructed, on an areal scale of 50 km{sup 2}, to examine the effects of reservoir heterogeneity on the migration and storage of a 50 million tonne plume over a time scale of 1000 yrs. The models were identical in geometry and in their distribution of porosity and permeability but were individually populated with facies realisations for different net-to-gross ratios. Standard geostatistical techniques were used to generate the various distributions. With regard to the shale content, the ratio of sand to shale was varied from 100:0 (i.e. homogeneous) to 40:60. A radial shale variogram, with a length of 300 m, was used. The models were up-scaled, using flow-based methods, to make the computation feasible. A set of metrics were developed and used to compare plume migration (both vertically and laterally) and containment (through dissolution and residual phase trapping) between the various scenarios. The study showed that heterogeneity had a significant impact on the subsurface behaviour of the carbon dioxide. Increasing the shale content, corresponding to a gradual decrease in reservoir quality, progressively inhibited vertical flow of the plume whilst promoting its lateral flow. This increase in the tortuosity of the carbon dioxide migration pathways

  5. Modification of pure oxygen absorption equipment for concurrent stripping of carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watten, B.J.; Sibrell, P.L.; Montgomery, G.A.; Tsukuda, S.M.

    2004-01-01

    The high solubility of carbon dioxide precludes significant desorption within commercial oxygen absorption equipment. This operating characteristic of the equipment limits its application in recirculating water culture systems despite its ability to significantly increase allowable fish loading rates (kg/(L min)). Carbon dioxide (DC) is typically removed by air stripping. This process requires a significant energy input for forced air movement, air heating in cold climates and water pumping. We developed a modification for a spray tower that provides for carbon dioxide desorption as well as oxygen absorption. Elimination of the air-stripping step reduces pumping costs while allowing dissolved nitrogen to drop below saturation concentrations. This latter response provides for an improvement in oxygen absorption efficiency within the spray tower. DC desorption is achieved by directing head-space gases from the spray tower (O2, N2, CO2) through a sealed packed tower scrubber receiving a 2 N NaOH solution. Carbon dioxide is selectively removed from the gas stream, by chemical reaction, forming the product Na 2CO3. Scrubber off-gas, lean with regard to carbon dioxide but still rich with oxygen, is redirected through the spray tower for further stripping of DC and absorption of oxygen. Make-up NaOH is metered into the scrubbing solution sump on an as needed basis as directed by a feedback control loop programmed to maintain a scrubbing solution pH of 11.4-11.8. The spent NaOH solution is collected, then regenerated for reuse, in a batch process that requires relatively inexpensive hydrated lime (Ca(OH)2). A by-product of the regeneration step is an alkaline filter cake, which may have use in bio-solids stabilization. Given the enhanced gas transfer rates possible with chemical reaction, the required NaOH solution flow rate through the scrubber represents a fraction of the spray tower water flow rate. Further, isolation of the water being treated from the atmosphere (1

  6. Gas-saturated solution process to obtain microcomposite particles of alpha lipoic acid/hydrogenated colza oil in supercritical carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishima, Kenji; Honjo, Masatoshi; Sharmin, Tanjina; Ito, Shota; Kawakami, Ryo; Kato, Takafumi; Misumi, Makoto; Suetsugu, Tadashi; Orii, Hideaki; Kawano, Hiroyuki; Irie, Keiichi; Sano, Kazunori; Mishima, Kenichi; Harada, Takunori; Ouchi, Mikio

    2016-09-01

    Alpha lipoic acid (ALA), an active substance in anti-aging products and dietary supplements, need to be masked with an edible polymer to obscure its unpleasant taste. However, the high viscosity of the ALA molecules prevents them from forming microcomposites with masking materials even in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2). Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate and develop a novel production method for microcomposite particles for ALA in hydrogenated colza oil (HCO). Microcomposite particles of ALA/HCO were prepared by using a novel gas-saturated solution (PGSS) process in which the solid-dispersion method is used along with stepwise temperature control (PGSS-STC). Its high viscosity prevents the formation of microcomposites in the conventional PGSS process even under strong agitation. Here, we disperse the solid particles of ALA and HCO in scCO2 at low temperatures and change the temperature stepwise in order to mix the melted ALA and HCO in scCO2. As a result, a homogeneous dispersion of the droplets of ALA in melted HCO saturated with CO2 is obtained at high temperatures. After the rapid expansion of the saturated solution through a nozzle, microcomposite particles of ALA/HCO several micrometers in diameter are obtained.

  7. Oxygen Atom Recombination in Carbon Dioxide Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, Corey; Garcia, R. M.; Pejakovic, D. A.; Kalogerakis, K. S.

    2009-09-01

    Understanding processes involving atomic oxygen is crucial for the study and modeling of composition, energy transfer, airglow, and transport dynamics in planetary atmospheres. Significant gaps and uncertainties exist in our understanding of the above processes, and often the relevant input from laboratory measurements is missing or outdated. We are conducting experiments to measure the rate coefficients for O + O + CO2 and O + O2 + CO2 recombination and investigate the O2 excited states produced following O-atom recombination. These laboratory measurements are key input for a quantitative understanding and reliable modeling of the atmospheres of the CO2 planets and their airglow. An ArF excimer laser with 193-nm pulsed output radiation is employed to partially photodissociate carbon dioxide. In an ambient-pressure (760 Torr) background of CO2, the O atoms produced recombine in a time scale of a few milliseconds. Detection of laser-induced fluorescence at 845 nm following two-photon excitation near 226 nm monitors the decay of the oxygen atom population. From the temporal evolution of the signal we can extract the rate coefficients for recombination of O + O and O + O2 in the presence of CO2. We also use fluorescence and resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionization techniques to detect the products of the O-atom recombination and subsequent relaxation in CO2. This work is supported by the US National Science Foundation's (NSF) Planetary Astronomy Program. Rosanne Garcia's participation was funded by the NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program.

  8. Syneresis of Vitreous by Carbon Dioxide Laser Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, T. J.; Patel, C. K. N.; Strnad, A. R.; Wood, O. R.; Brewer, E. S.; Karlin, D. B.

    1983-03-01

    In carbon dioxide laser surgery of the vitreous a process of vaporization has been advocated. In this report syneresis, a thermal liquefaction of gel, is shown to be over ten times more efficient on an energy basis than vaporization. Syneresis of vitreous is experimentally shown to be a first-order kinetic process with an activation energy of 41 ± 0.5 kilocalories per mole. A theory of laser surgery in which this figure is used agrees closely with results from laser experiments on human eye-bank vitreous. The syneresis of vitreous by carbon dioxide laser radiation could lead to a more delicate form of ocular microsurgery, and application to other biological systems may be possible.

  9. Effects of carbon dioxide on Penicillium chrysogenum: an autoradiographic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, A.G.; Ho, C.S.

    1988-06-20

    Previous research has shown that dissolved carbon dioxide causes significant changes in submerged penicillin fermentations, such as stunted, swollen hyphae, increased branching, lower growth rates, and lower penicillin productivity. Influent carbon dioxide levels of 5 and 10% were shown through the use of autoradiography to cause an increase in chitin synthesis in submerged cultures of Penicillium chrysogenum. At an influent 5% carbon dioxide level, chitin synthesis is ca. 100% greater in the subapical region of P. chrysogenum hyphae than that of the control, in which there was no influent carbon dioxide. Influent carbon dioxide of 10% caused an increase of 200% in chitin synthesis. It is believed that the cell wall must be plasticized before branching can occur and that high amounts of dissolved carbon dioxide cause the cell to lose control of the plasticizing effect, thus the severe morphological changes occur.

  10. Interaction of carbon dioxide with Cu overlayers on Pt(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schumacher, N.; Andersson, Klas Jerker; Grabow, L.C.

    2008-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies on the interaction of carbon dioxide with pseudomorphic and rough copper layers deposited on a platinum (111) single crystal are reported. Evidence for carbon dioxide dissociation and carbonate formation is presented and the relevance to methanol synthesis...

  11. 40 CFR 91.320 - Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration... Provisions § 91.320 Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration. (a) Prior to its introduction into service, and monthly thereafter, or within one month prior to the certification test, calibrate the NDIR carbon...

  12. Study on EOR by carbon Dioxide Injection Process in R11 Carbonate Reservoir%任11碳酸盐岩油藏注CO2提高采收率研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭平; 周耐强; 张茂林; 张晓辉

    2012-01-01

    许多碳酸盐岩油藏进入高含水开发期,如何挖潜,进一步提高采收率是目前的主要工作方向.目前任11碳酸盐岩油藏存在单井产油量低,注入水利用系数低,水驱效率越来越差的问题.因此需要探索新途径,以便进一步发挥油藏生产潜力.分析了任11油藏注CO2提高采收率的机理,开展了任11油藏注CO2提高采收率的数值模拟研究.针对研究区块的地质及开发特点,建立了相应的三维数值模型,在水驱历史拟合的基础上,应用数值模拟技术从注气强度、注气方式、注气部位,生产气油比控制等方面进行了优化研究.油藏注CO2方案模拟计算20年,产油量显著上升,采用注CO2可比目前开发方式提高采收率3.5%左右.%Many carbonate reservoir have been into high water-cut development stage. How to dig the remaining oil potential and enhancing oil recovery further is dominant work target now. There are many problems in carbonate reservoir of Rl 1, such as low oil production of single well, inefficient utilization of injected water, and worsening of the water-flood efficiency. Therefore it is necessary to find a new way to dig reservoir production potential. The EOR mechanism by Carbon dioxide injection process in Rl 1 is analyzed and the numerical simulation research on EQR by Carbon dioxide injection process in Rl 1 reservoir is completed. Aimed at reservoir properties and development characteristic the three-dimensional numerical model is setup. Based on the fitting history of water flooding, the gas injection rate, gas injection mode, gas injection position and the gas-oil ratio control are optimized. The plan of Carbon dioxide injection is predicted for 20 years and the result shows that oil production rise obviously and it can enhance oil recovery about 3.5% more than the current exploitation mode.

  13. Removal of dyes using immobilized titanium dioxide illuminated by fluorescent lamps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zainal, Zulkarnain [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)]. E-mail: zulkar@fsas.upm.edu.my; Hui, Lee Kong [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)]. E-mail: gs11613@hotmail.com; Hussein, Mohd Zobir [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia); Taufiq-Yap, Yun Hin [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia); Abdullah, Abdul Halim [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia); Ramli, Irmawati [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)

    2005-10-17

    The photodegradation of various dyes in aqueous solution was studied. Experiments were carried out using glass coated titanium dioxide thin film as photocatalyst. Photodegradation processes of methylene blue (MB), methyl orange (MO), indigo carmine (IC), chicago sky blue 6B (CSB), and mixed dye (MD, mixture of the four mentioned single dye) were reported. As each photodegradation system is pH dependent, the photodegradation experiment was carried out in each dye photodegradation reactive pH range at {approx}28 deg C. The dyes removal efficiency was studied and compared using UV-vis spectrophotometer analysis. The total removal of each dye was: methylene blue (90.3%), methyl orange (98.5%), indigo carmine (92.4%), chicago sky blue 6B (60.3%), and mixed dyes (70.1%), respectively. The characteristic of the photocatalyst was investigated using X-ray diffractometer (XRD). The amount of each dye intermediate produced in the photodegradation process was also determined with the help of total organic carbon (TOC) analysis.

  14. Carbon dioxide emission from bamboo culms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariah, E J; Sabulal, B; Nair, D N K; Johnson, A J; Kumar, C S P

    2016-05-01

    Bamboos are one of the fastest growing plants on Earth, and are widely considered to have high ability to capture and sequester atmospheric carbon, and consequently to mitigate climate change. We tested this hypothesis by measuring carbon dioxide (CO2 ) emissions from bamboo culms and comparing them with their biomass sequestration potential. We analysed diurnal effluxes from Bambusa vulgaris culm surface and gas mixtures inside hollow sections of various bamboos using gas chromatography. Corresponding variations in gas pressure inside the bamboo section and culm surface temperature were measured. SEM micrographs of rhizome and bud portions of bamboo culms were also recorded. We found very high CO2 effluxes from culm surface, nodes and buds of bamboos. Positive gas pressure and very high concentrations of CO2 were observed inside hollow sections of bamboos. The CO2 effluxes observed from bamboos were very high compared to their carbon sequestration potential. Our measurements suggest that bamboos are net emitters of CO2 during their lifespan.

  15. The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis IX. Photosynthesis, Photoreduction, and the Hydrogen-Oxygen-Carbon Dioxide Dark Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badin, E. J.; Calvin, M.

    1950-02-01

    A comparison of the rates of fixation of Carbon 14 dioxide in algae for the processes of photosynthesis, photoreduction and the hydrogen-oxygen-carbon dioxide dark reaction has been made. For the same series of experiments, rates of incorporation of tracer carbon into the separate soluble components using the radiogram method have been determined. The mechanism of carbon dioxide uptake has been shown to occur via two distinct paths. In all cases studied, essentially the same compounds appear radioactive. The distribution with time, however, differs markedly.

  16. Effect of temperature on carbon dioxide absorption in monoethanolamine solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocio Maceira; Estrella Alvarez; M. Angeles Cancela [University of Vigo, Vigo (Spain). Chemical Engineering Department

    2008-05-01

    The effect of temperature on volumetric mass transfer coefficient was studied during the absorption process of carbon dioxide in monoethanolamine aqueous solutions, using a square bubble column. Our studies provide an empirical correlation type Boltzmann to estimate the temperature operated, at different amine concentrations and gas flow rates. An excellent agreement has been shown between predicted and experimental data (r{sup 2} {gt} 0.991).

  17. Supercritical carbon dioxide: a solvent like no other

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocelyn Peach

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2 could be one aspect of a significant and necessary movement towards green chemistry, being a potential replacement for volatile organic compounds (VOCs. Unfortunately, carbon dioxide has a notoriously poor solubilising power and is famously difficult to handle. This review examines attempts and breakthroughs in enhancing the physicochemical properties of carbon dioxide, focusing primarily on factors that impact solubility of polar and ionic species and attempts to enhance scCO2 viscosity.

  18. PREPARATION OF MESOPOROUS CARBON BY CARBON DIOXIDE ACTIVATION WITH CATALYST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W.Z.Shen; A.H.Lu; J.T.Zheng

    2002-01-01

    A mesoporous activated carbon (AC) can be successfully prepared by catalytic activa-tion with carbon dioxide. For iron oxide as catalyst, there were two regions of mesoporesize distribution, i.e. 2-5nm and 30-70nm. When copper oxide or magnesium oxidecoexisted with iron oxide as composite catalyst, the content of pores with sizes of 2-5nm was decreased, while the pores with 30 70nm were increased significantly. Forcomparison, AC reactivated by carbon dioxide directly was also investigated. It wasshown that the size of mesopores of the resulting AC concentrated in 2-5nm with lessvolume. The adsorption of Congo red was tested to evaluate the property of the result-ing AC. Furthermore, the factors affecting pore size distribution and the possibility ofmesopore formation were discussed.

  19. Changes in plasma potassium concentration during carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, A; Bugge, K; Lyng, K M

    1999-01-01

    Hyperkalaemia with ECG changes had been noted during prolonged carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum in pigs. We have compared plasma potassium concentrations during surgery in 11 patients allocated randomly to undergo either laparoscopic or open appendectomy and in another 17 patients allocated randomly...... to either carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum or abdominal wall lifting for laparoscopic colectomy. Despite an increasing metabolic acidosis, prolonged carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum resulted in only a slight increase in plasma potassium concentrations, which was both statistically and clinically insignificant....... Thus hyperkalaemia is unlikely to develop in patients with normal renal function undergoing carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum for laparoscopic surgery....

  20. Preparation of perlite-based carbon dioxide absorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, H; Wu, L; Zhu, J; Yu, B

    1994-02-01

    A new highly efficient carbon dioxide absorbent consisting of sodium hydroxide, expanded perlite and acid-base indicator was prepared. The absorption efficiency, absorption capacity, flow resistance and color indication for the absorbent were tested and compared with some commercial products. The absorbent can reduce the carbon dioxide content in gases to 3.3 ppb (v/v) and absorbs not less than 35% of its weight of carbon dioxide. Besides its large capacity and sharp color indication, the absorbent has an outstanding advantage of small flow resistance in comparison with other commercial carbon dioxide absorbents. Applications in gas analysis and purification were also investigated.

  1. Capture and storage of Carbon dioxid: a method for countering climatic changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benea, L. M.

    2017-01-01

    One of the options aimed at preventing climatic changes is the capture and storage of carbon dioxide, a method with a great potential for reducing greenhouse gases. Capturing and storing carbon dioxide in the soil involves new benefits for the communities in the respective areas. Those benefits also follow from the fact that the organic compound has an essential factor in the soil, determining its properties. The paper presents several results concerning the determination of the quantity of carbon dioxide in different types of soil and it is intended to be the beginning of the process of data collection and the analysis of the reserves and the flow of carbon.

  2. Six-fold Coordinated Carbon Dioxide VI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iota, V; Yoo, C; Klepeis, J; Jenei, Z

    2006-03-01

    Under standard conditions, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is a simple molecular gas and an important atmospheric constituent while silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) is a covalent solid, and represents one of the fundamental minerals of the planet. The remarkable dissimilarity between these two group IV oxides is diminished at higher pressures and temperatures as CO{sub 2} transforms to a series of solid phases, from simple molecular to a fully covalent extended-solid V, structurally analogous to SiO{sub 2} tridymite. Here, we present the discovery of a new extended-solid phase of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}): a six-fold coordinated stishovite-like phase VI, obtained by isothermal compression of associated CO{sub 2}-II above 50GPa at 530-650K. Together with the previously reported CO{sub 2}-V and a-carbonia, this new extended phase indicates a fundamental similarity between CO{sub 2}--a prototypical molecular solid, and SiO{sub 2}--one of Earth's fundamental building blocks. The phase diagram suggests a limited stability domain for molecular CO{sub 2}-I, and proposes that the conversion to extended-network solids above 40-50 GPa occurs via intermediate phases II, III, and IV. The crystal structure of phase VI suggests strong disorder along the caxis in stishovite-like P4{sub 2}/mnm, with carbon atoms manifesting an average six-fold coordination within the framework of sp{sup 3} hybridization.

  3. Possible use of the carbohydrates present in tomato pomace and in byproducts of the supercritical carbon dioxide lycopene extraction process as biomass for bioethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenucci, Marcello S; Durante, Miriana; Anna, Montefusco; Dalessandro, Giuseppe; Piro, Gabriella

    2013-04-17

    This study provides information about the carbohydrate present in tomato pomace (skins, seeds, and vascular tissues) as well as in the byproducts of the lycopene supercritical carbon dioxide extraction (SC-CO₂) such as tomato serum and exhausted matrix and reports their conversion into bioethanol. The pomace, constituting approximately 4% of the tomato fruit fresh weight, and the SC-CO₂-exhausted matrix were enzyme saccharified with 0.1% Driselase leading to sugar yields of ~383 and ~301 mg/g dw, respectively. Aliquots of the hydrolysates and of the serum (80% tomato sauce fw) were fermented by Saccharomyces cerevisiae . The bioethanol produced from each waste was usually >50% of the calculated theoretical amount, with the exception of the exhausted matrix hydolysate, where a sugar concentration >52.8 g/L inhibited the fermentation process. Furthermore, no differences in the chemical solubility of cell wall polysaccharides were evidenced between the SC-CO₂-lycopene extracted and unextracted matrices. The deduced glycosyl linkage composition and the calculated amount of cell wall polysaccharides remained similar in both matrices, indicating that the SC-CO₂ extraction technology does not affect their structure. Therefore, tomato wastes may well be considered as potential alternatives and low-cost feedstock for bioethanol production.

  4. Recycling of carbon dioxide and acetate as lactic acid by the hydrogen-producing bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Ippolito, Giuliana; Dipasquale, Laura; Fontana, Angelo

    2014-09-01

    The heterotrophic bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana produces hydrogen by fermentation of sugars. Under capnophilic (carbon dioxide requiring) conditions, the process is preferentially associated with the production of lactic acid, which, as shown herein, is synthesized by reductive carboxylation of acetyl coenzyme A. The enzymatic coupling is dependent on the carbon dioxide stimulated activity of heterotetrameric pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase. Under the same culture conditions, T. neapolitana also operates the unfavorable synthesis of lactic acid from an exogenous acetate supply. This process, which requires carbon dioxide (or carbonate) and an unknown electron donor, allows for the conversion of carbon dioxide into added-value chemicals without biomass deconstruction.

  5. The effects of urea modification and heat treatment on the process of NO2 removal by wood-based activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashkova, Svetlana; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2009-05-01

    The removal of NO(2) on urea-modified and heat-treated wood-based activated carbons was studied. From the obtained results it was found that these modifications, especially when done at 950 degrees C, have a positive effect on NO(2) adsorption and on the retention of NO (the product of NO(2) reduction by carbon). The presence of moisture in the system enhances the removal of NO(2) but negatively affects the retention of NO. It is possible that the formation of active centers on the carbon surface and some increase in the volume of supermicropores during the high temperature treatment play a significant role in these removal processes. The surface of the carbons was analyzed in terms of the pK(a) distributions. The qualitative and quantitative analyses of the NO(2) adsorption products were carried out by means of FTIR and TA techniques, respectively. The main products found on the carbon surface were the NO(3) and NO(2) species.

  6. Carbon dioxide detection in adult Odonata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piersanti, Silvana; Frati, Francesca; Rebora, Manuela; Salerno, Gianandrea

    2016-04-01

    The present paper shows, by means of single-cell recordings, responses of antennal sensory neurons of the damselfly Ischnura elegans when stimulated by air streams at different CO2 concentrations. Unlike most insects, but similarly to termites, centipedes and ticks, Odonata possess sensory neurons strongly inhibited by CO2, with the magnitude of the off-response depending upon the CO2 concentration. The Odonata antennal sensory neurons responding to CO2 are also sensitive to airborne odors; in particular, the impulse frequency is increased by isoamylamine and decreased by heptanoic and pentanoic acid. Further behavioral investigations are necessary to assign a biological role to carbon dioxide detection in Odonata.

  7. Carbon Dioxide Mitigation by Microalgal Photosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Mijeong Lee; Gillis, James M.; Hwang, Jiann Yang [Michigan Technological University, Houghton (United States)

    2003-12-15

    Algal growth studies of Chlorella strains were conducted in a batch mode with bench type experiments. Carbon dioxide fixation rates of the following green microalgae were determined: Chlorella sp. H84, Chlorella sp. A2, Chlorella sorokiniana UTEX 1230, Chlorella vulgaris, and Chlorella pyrenoidosa. C. vulgaris, among other strains of microalgae, showed the highest growth rate (1.17 optical density/5 days). Cultivating conditions for C. vulgaris that produced the highest growth rate were at concentrations of 243 μg CO{sub 2}/mL, 10 mM ammonia, and 1 mM phosphate, with an initial pH range of 7-8.

  8. A Vortex Contactor for Carbon Dioxide Separations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raterman, Kevin Thomas; Mc Kellar, Michael George; Turner, Terry Donald; Podgorney, Anna Kristine; Stacey, Douglas Edwin; Stokes, B.; Vranicar, J.

    2001-05-01

    Many analysts identify carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and separation as a major roadblock in efforts to cost effectively mitigate greenhouse gas emissions via sequestration. An assessment 4 conducted by the International Energy Agency (IEA) Greenhouse Gas Research and Development Programme cited separation costs from $35 to $264 per tonne of CO2 avoided for a conventional coal fired power plant utilizing existing capture technologies. Because these costs equate to a greater than 40% increase in current power generation rates, it appears obvious that a significant improvement in CO2 separation technology is required if a negative impact on the world economy is to be avoided.

  9. Combined effect of sulfur dioxide and carbon dioxide gases on mold fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kochurova, A.I.; Karpova, T.N.

    1974-01-01

    Sulfur dioxide at 0.08% killed Penicillium expansum, Stemphylium macrosporium, and Botrytis cinerea within 24 hours. At 0.2%, it killed P. citrinum, Alternaria tenuis, and Fusarium moniliforme. Sulfur dioxide (at 0.04%) and Sulfur dioxide-carbon dioxide mixtures (at 0.02 and 5% respectively) completely suppressed the growth of P. citrinum, P. expansum, P. rubrum, A. tenuis, S. macrosporium, B. cinerea, and F. moniliforme in laboratory experiments. 1 table.

  10. LOW-PRESSURE MEMBRANE CONTACTORS FOR CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Richard; Kniep, Jay; Hao, Pingjiao; Chan, Chi Cheng; Nguyen, Vincent; Huang, Ivy; Amo, Karl; Freeman, Brice; Fulton, Don; Ly, Jennifer; Lipscomb, Glenn; Lou, Yuecun; Gogar, Ravikumar

    2014-09-30

    This final technical progress report describes work conducted by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) for the Department of Energy (DOE NETL) on development of low-pressure membrane contactors for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture from power plant flue gas (award number DE-FE0007553). The work was conducted from October 1, 2011 through September 30, 2014. The overall goal of this three-year project was to build and operate a prototype 500 m2 low-pressure sweep membrane module specifically designed to separate CO2 from coal-fired power plant flue gas. MTR was assisted in this project by a research group at the University of Toledo, which contributed to the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of module design and process simulation. This report details the work conducted to develop a new type of membrane contactor specifically designed for the high-gas-flow, low-pressure, countercurrent sweep operation required for affordable membrane-based CO2 capture at coal power plants. Work for this project included module development and testing, design and assembly of a large membrane module test unit at MTR, CFD comparative analysis of cross-flow, countercurrent, and novel partial-countercurrent sweep membrane module designs, CFD analysis of membrane spacers, design and fabrication of a 500 m2 membrane module skid for field tests, a detailed performance and cost analysis of the MTR CO2 capture process with low-pressure sweep modules, and a process design analysis of a membrane-hybrid separation process for CO2 removal from coal-fired flue gas. Key results for each major task are discussed in the report.

  11. Killing wild geese with carbon dioxide or a mixture of carbon dioxide and argon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritzen, M.A.; Reimert, H.G.M.; Lourens, A.; Bracke, M.B.M.; Verhoeven, M.T.W.

    2013-01-01

    The killing of animals is the subject of societal and political debate. Wild geese are caught and killed on a regular basis for fauna conservation and damage control. Killing geese with carbon dioxide (CO2) is commonly practiced, but not listed in legislation on the protection of flora and fauna, an

  12. Selection of Sustainable Processes using Sustainability Footprint Method: A Case Study of Methanol Production from Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical products can be obtained by process pathways involving varying amounts and types of resources, utilities, and byproduct formation. When such competing process options such as six processes for making methanol as are considered in this study, it is necessary to identify t...

  13. Simulation of the interaction of methane, carbon dioxide and coal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nie Baisheng; Wang Longkang; Li Xiangchun; Wang Chao; Li Li

    2013-01-01

    Gas adsorption has an important influence on gas flow in a coal body. Research on the characteristics of coal and gas adsorption is the theoretical basis for studying gas flow in coal. In this paper, the interaction between methane, carbon dioxide and surface molecules of anthracite was simulated using the quantum chemistry method. Adsorption energy and adsorption configurations of different quantities of gas mole-cules absorbed on the coal surface were calculated. The results show that adsorption between coal and the two kinds of gas molecules is a physical adsorption process and there is an optimal configuration. Gas molecules are more easily adsorbed in the hydroxyl-containing side chain, while it is difficult for them to be adsorbed at the position of the benzene ring. Besides, carbon dioxide molecules are more readily adsorbed on the coal surface than methane molecules. The findings have an important signifi-cance in revealing the nature of gas adsorption in coal.

  14. Measuring of carbon dioxide in water/steam cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daucik, Karol

    2004-12-01

    Prevention of corrosion of the water/steam cycle caused by anionic contamination is based on control of acid conductivity. The contribution of carbon dioxide to the corrosion is very limited and yet it contributes considerably to the acid conductivity as one of the most common contaminants. Monitoring of the dangerous anionic contamination has therefore been on the agenda for many years. Commercial monitors for this purpose are based on separation of carbon dioxide from stronger acids due to its high volatility. A systematic error in these monitors comes from high volatility of other anionic contaminants, e.g. formic and acetic acid. The aim of this investigation was to show that the separation could be made on a weak base anion exchanger working on the basis of differences in the strength of acids. This simple method was expected to give reliable results with low investment and low operating costs. The results showed that the separation is indeed effective. However, reliable data are received only if the anion exchange resin is in equilibrium with the actual concentration of carbon dioxide in the sample. It may take several hours to reach this equilibrium by natural flow of the sample through the anion exchange column. Changes in the concentration of carbon dioxide in the sample will therefore temporarily give false results until a new equilibrium is achieved. The simple monitoring method can be used only in places, where verification of carbon dioxide contamination is required by long-term operation with elevated and stable acid conductivity in the steam. For future design it is suggested to install a forced achievement of the new equilibrium by conditioning of the resin by means of short-lived additions of carbon dioxide or sodium hydroxide to the sample. In these periods the output from the monitor will be suspended. Output close to the equilibrium is expected to be reached within 10 minutes. This new suggested procedure will complicate the monitoring to such a

  15. Liquid extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal: use of THAM (tris-hydroxymethyl aminomethane) coupled to hemofiltration to control hypercapnic acidosis in a porcine model of protective mechanical ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Pablo; Lillo, Felipe; Soto, Dagoberto; Escobar, Leslie; Simon, Felipe; Hernández, Karina; Alegría, Leyla; Bruhn, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    A promising approach to facilitate protective mechanical ventilation is the use of extracorporeal CO2 removal techniques. Several strategies based on membrane gas exchangers have been developed. However, these techniques are still poorly available. The goal of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of THAM infusion coupled to hemofiltration for the management of hypercapnic acidosis. A severe respiratory acidosis was induced in seven anesthetized pigs. Five of them were treated with THAM 8-mmol·kg-1·h-1 coupled to hemofiltration (THAM+HF group) at 100 mL·kg-1·h-1. After 18-hours of treatment the THAM infusion was stopped but hemofiltration was kept on until 24-hours. The 2 other animals were treated with THAM but without hemofiltration. After 1-hour of treatment in THAM+HF, PaCO2 rapidly decreased from a median of 89.0 (IQR) (80.0, 98.0) to 71.3 (65.8, 82.0) mmHg (P<0.05), while pH increased from 7.12 (7.01, 7.15) to 7.29 (7.27, 7.30) (P<0.05). Thereafter PaCO2 remained stable between 60-70 mmHg, while pH increased above 7.4. After stopping THAM at 18 hours of treatment a profound rebound effect was observed with severe hypercapnic acidosis. The most important side effect we observed was hyperosmolality, which reached a maximum of 330 (328, 332) mOsm·kg H2O-1 at T18. The animals treated only with THAM developed severe hypercapnia, despite the fact that pH returned to normal values, and died after 12 hours. Control-group had an uneven evolution until the end of the experiment. A combined treatment with THAM coupled to hemofiltration may be an effective treatment to control severe hypercapnic acidosis. PMID:27648139

  16. Carbon dioxide research plan. A summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivelpiece, Alvin W.; Koomanoff, F. A.; Suomi, Verner E.

    1983-11-01

    The Department of Energy is the lead federal agency for research related to atmospheric carbon dioxide. Its responsibility is to sponsor a program of relevant research, and to coordinate this research with that of others. As part of its responsibilities, the Department of Energy has prepared a research plan. The plan documented in this Summary delineated the logic, objectives, organization, background and current status of the research activities. The Summary Plan is based on research subplans in four specific areas: global carbon cycle, climate effects, vegetative response and indirect effects. These subplans have emanated from a series of national and international workshops, conferences, and from technical reports. The plans have been peer reviewed by experts in the relevant scientific fields. Their execution is being coordinated between the responsible federal and international government agencies and the involved scientific community.

  17. Cooperative redox activation for carbon dioxide conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Zhong; Nielsen, Dennis U.; Lindhardt, Anders T.; Daasbjerg, Kim; Skrydstrup, Troels

    2016-12-01

    A longstanding challenge in production chemistry is the development of catalytic methods for the transformation of carbon dioxide into useful chemicals. Silane and borane promoted reductions can be fined-tuned to provide a number of C1-building blocks under mild conditions, but these approaches are limited because of the production of stoichiometric waste compounds. Here we report on the conversion of CO2 with diaryldisilanes, which through cooperative redox activation generate carbon monoxide and a diaryldisiloxane that actively participate in a palladium-catalysed carbonylative Hiyama-Denmark coupling for the synthesis of an array of pharmaceutically relevant diarylketones. Thus the disilane reagent not only serves as the oxygen abstracting agent from CO2, but the silicon-containing `waste', produced through oxygen insertion into the Si-Si bond, participates as a reagent for the transmetalation step in the carbonylative coupling. Hence this concept of cooperative redox activation opens up for new avenues in the conversion of CO2.

  18. A carbon dioxide stripping model for mammalian cell culture in manufacturing scale bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Zizhuo; Lewis, Amanda M; Borys, Michael C; Li, Zheng Jian

    2016-12-06

    Control of carbon dioxide within the optimum range is important in mammalian bioprocesses at the manufacturing scale in order to ensure robust cell growth, high protein yields, and consistent quality attributes. The majority of bioprocess development work is done in laboratory bioreactors, in which carbon dioxide levels are more easily controlled. Some challenges in carbon dioxide control can present themselves when cell culture processes are scaled up, because carbon dioxide accumulation is a common feature due to longer gas-residence time of mammalian cell culture in large scale bioreactors. A carbon dioxide stripping model can be used to better understand and optimize parameters that are critical to cell culture processes at the manufacturing scale. The prevailing carbon dioxide stripping models in literature depend on mass transfer coefficients and were applicable to cell culture processes with low cell density or at stationary/cell death phase. However, it was reported that gas bubbles are saturated with carbon dioxide before leaving the culture, which makes carbon dioxide stripping no longer depend on a mass transfer coefficient in the new generation cell culture processes characterized by longer exponential growth phase, higher peak viable cell densities, and higher specific production rate. Here, we present a new carbon dioxide stripping model for manufacturing scale bioreactors, which is independent of carbon dioxide mass transfer coefficient, but takes into account the gas-residence time and gas CO2 saturation time. The model was verified by CHO cell culture processes with different peak viable cell densities (7 to 12 × 10(6)  cells mL(-1) ) for two products in 5,000-L and 25,000-L bioreactors. The model was also applied to a next generation cell culture process to optimize cell culture conditions and reduce carbon dioxide levels at manufacturing scale. The model provides a useful tool to understand and better control cell culture carbon dioxide

  19. Pharmaceutical applications of supercritical carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, C S; Römpp, H; Schmidt, P C

    2001-12-01

    The appearance of a supercritical state was already observed at the beginning of the 19th century. Nevertheless, the industrial extraction of plant and other natural materials started about twenty years ago with the decaffeination of coffee. Today carbon dioxide is the most common gas for supercritical fluid extraction in food and pharmaceutical industry. Since pure supercritical carbon dioxide is a lipophilic solvent, mixtures with organic solvents, especially alcohols, are used to increase the polarity of the extraction fluid; more polar compounds can be extracted in this way. The main fields of interest are the extraction of vegetable oils from plant material in analytical and preparative scale, the preparation of essential oils for food and cosmetic industry and the isolation of substances of pharmaceutical relevance. Progress in research was made by the precise measurement of phase equilibria data by means of different methods. Apart from extraction, supercritical fluid chromatography was introduced in the field of analytics, as well as micro- and nanoparticle formation using supercritical fluids as solvent or antisolvent. This review presents pharmaceutical relevant literature of the last twenty years with special emphasis on extraction of natural materials.

  20. Using the carbon dioxide laser for tonsillotomy in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, A; Markström, A; Hultcrantz, E

    1999-10-15

    Carbon dioxide laser tonsillotomies were performed on 33 children aged 1-12 years for the relief of obstructive symptoms due to tonsillar hyperplasia. As opposed to conventional tonsillectomy, only the protruding part of each tonsil was removed. A carbon dioxide laser delivering 20 W was used for the excision. Twenty-one children were seen in active short-term follow-up and the records of all the children were checked for possible surgery related events up to 20-33 months after surgery. Laser tonsillotomy was uniformly effective in relieving the obstruction, with good hemostasis. The tonsillar remnants healed completely within 2 weeks. No major adverse events occurred. Post-operative pain appeared slight and easily controlled. There was no gain in operating time compared with conventional tonsillectomy. The laser tonsillotomies were in most cases done in day surgery. No recurrence of obstructive problems was reported up to 20-33 months after surgery. It was concluded that tonsillotomy, using a carbon dixoide laser, is a valid treatment for obstructive symptoms caused by enlarged tonsils, which can be performed with little bleeding and post-operative pain. The improved hemostasis may enable a shift from in-patient to day surgery.

  1. Bench-Scale Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Using a Phase-Changing Absorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westendorf, Tiffany; Caraher, Joel; Chen, Wei; Farnum, Rachael; Perry, Robert; Spiry, Irina; Wilson, Paul; Wood, Benjamin

    2015-03-31

    The objective of this project is to design and build a bench-scale process for a novel phase-changing aminosilicone-based CO2-capture solvent. The project will establish scalability and technical and economic feasibility of using a phase-changing CO2-capture absorbent for post-combustion capture of CO2 from coal-fired power plants with 90% capture efficiency and 95% CO2 purity at a cost of $40/tonne of CO2 captured by 2025 and a cost of <$10/tonne of CO2 captured by 2035. In the first budget period of this project, the bench-scale phase-changing CO2 capture process was designed using data and operating experience generated under a previous project (ARPA-e project DE-AR0000084). Sizing and specification of all major unit operations was completed, including detailed process and instrumentation diagrams. The system was designed to operate over a wide range of operating conditions to allow for exploration of the effect of process variables on CO2 capture performance.

  2. Development of a Steel-Slag-Based, Iron-Functionalized Sorbent for an Autothermal Carbon Dioxide Capture Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Sicong; Jiang, Jianguo; Hosseini, Davood; Kierzkowska, Agnieszka M; Imtiaz, Qasim; Broda, Marcin; Müller, Christoph R

    2015-11-01

    We propose a new class of autothermal CO2 -capture process that relies on the integration of chemical looping combustion (CLC) into calcium looping (CaL). In the new process, the heat released during the oxidation of a reduced metallic oxide is utilized to drive the endothermic calcination of CaCO3 (the regeneration step in CaL). Such a process is potentially very attractive (both economically and technically) as it can be applied to a variety of oxygen carriers and CaO is not in direct contact with coal (and the impurities associated with it) in the calciner (regeneration step). To demonstrate the practical feasibility of the process, we developed a low-cost, steel-slag-based, Fe-functionalized CO2 sorbent. Using this material, we confirm experimentally the feasibility to heat-integrate CaCO3 calcination with a Fe(II)/Fe(III) redox cycle (with regards to the heat of reaction and kinetics). The autothermal calcination of CaCO3 could be achieved for a material that contained a Ca/Fe ratio of 5:4. The uniform distribution of Ca and Fe in a solid matrix provides excellent heat transfer characteristics. The cyclic CO2 uptake and redox stability of the material is good, but there is room for further improvement.

  3. High oxygen and high carbon dioxide modified atmospheres for shelf-life extension of minimally processed carrots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amanatidou, A.; Slump, R.A.; Gorris, L.G.M.; Smid, E.J.

    2000-01-01

    The impact of high O2 + high CO2 modified atmospheres (MA), on the preservation of minimally processed carrots was studied. A combination of 50% O2 + 30% CO2 prolonged the shelf life of sliced carrots compared to storage in air by 2 to 3 d. When the carrots received a pre-treatment with a 0.1% citri

  4. 40 CFR 86.1524 - Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration. 86.1524 Section 86.1524 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Test Procedures § 86.1524 Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration. (a) The calibration requirements for...

  5. Carbon Dioxide and Global Warming: A Failed Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Global warming is a current environmental issue that has been linked to an increase in anthropogenic carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. To raise awareness of the problem, various simple experiments have been proposed to demonstrate the effect of carbon dioxide on the planet's temperature. This article describes a similar experiment, which…

  6. Flexible substrates as basis for photocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jacob; Mikkelsen, Mette; Krebs, Frederik C

    2011-01-01

    A photocatalytic system for converting carbon dioxide into carbon monoxide was designed and constructed. The system relies on thin films of the photocatalyst prepared at low temperature using spray coating. We formulated inks based on the well-known photocatalyst titanium dioxide and characterized...

  7. Changes in plasma potassium concentration during carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, A; Bugge, K; Lyng, K M

    1999-01-01

    Hyperkalaemia with ECG changes had been noted during prolonged carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum in pigs. We have compared plasma potassium concentrations during surgery in 11 patients allocated randomly to undergo either laparoscopic or open appendectomy and in another 17 patients allocated randomly....... Thus hyperkalaemia is unlikely to develop in patients with normal renal function undergoing carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum for laparoscopic surgery....

  8. Promising flame retardant textile in supercritical carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since carbon dioxide is non-toxic, non-flammable and cost-effective, supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) is widely used in textile dyeing applications. Due to its environmentally benign character, scCO2 is considered in green chemistry as a substitute for organic solvents in chemical reactions. O...

  9. Kinetics of absorption of carbon dioxide in aqueous piperazine solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derks, P. W. J.; Kleingeld, T.; van Aken, C.; Hogendoorn, J. A.; Versteeg, G. F.

    2006-01-01

    In the present work the absorption of carbon dioxide into aqueous piperazine (PZ) solutions has been studied in a stirred cell, at low to moderate temperatures, piperazine concentrations ranging from 0.6 to 1.5 kmol m- 3, and carbon dioxide pressures up to 500 mbar, respectively. The obtained experi

  10. Sequestering carbon dioxide in industrial polymers: Building materials for the 21st century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molton, P.M.; Nelson, D.A.

    1993-06-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the possibility of developing beneficial uses for carbon dioxide as a key component for a large-volume building product. Such a use may provide an alternative to storing the gas in oceanic sinks or clathrates as a way to slow the rate of global warming. The authors investigated the concept that carbon dioxide might be used with other chemicals to make carbon-dioxide-based polymers which would be lightweight, strong, and economical alternatives to some types of wood and silica-based building materials. As a construction-grade material, carbon dioxide would be fixed in a solid, useful form where it would not contribute to global warming. With the probable imposition of a fuel carbon tax in industrialized countries, this alternative would allow beneficial use of the carbon dioxide and could remove it from the tax basis if legislation were structured appropriately. Hence, there would be an economic driver towards the use of carbon-dioxide-based polymers which would enhance their future applications. Information was obtained through literature searches and personal contacts on carbon dioxide polymers which showed that the concept (1) is technically feasible, (2) is economically defensible, and (3) has an existing industrial infrastructure which could logically develop it. The technology exists for production of building materials which are strong enough for use by industry and which contain up to 90% by weight of carbon dioxide, both chemically and physically bound. A significant side-benefit of using this material would be that it is self-extinguishing in case of fire. This report is the first stage in the investigation. Further work being proposed will provide details on costs, specific applications and volumes, and potential impacts of this technology.

  11. Activation of Carbon Dioxide and Synthesis of Propylene Carbonate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Cycloaddition of carbon dioxide and propylene oxide to propylene carbonate catalyzed by tetra-tert-butyl metal phthalocyanine in the presence of tributylamine (TBA) shows higher yield than catalyzed by unsubstituted metal phthalocyanine. Comparing different catalysts of diverse metals, (t-Bu)4PcMg is more active than (t-Bu)4PcFe. But (t-Bu)4PcCo and (t-Bu)4PcNi only have low catalytic activities towards the reaction. Moreover, the yield will increase as the temperature increases.

  12. Removal of surfactants from water by adsorption on activated carbon and advanced oxidation process; Eliminacion de surfactantes de las aguas mediante adsorcion sobre carbon activado y oxidacion avanzada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendez Diaz, J. D.; Sanchez Polo, M.; Rivera Utrilla, J.; Bautista, M. I.

    2007-07-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the elimination process of surfactants from water, using sodium dode-cilbencenesulfonate (SDBS) as model compound, by means of adsorption on activated carbons as well as different processes of advanced oxidation (O{sub 3}, O{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and O{sub 3}/activated carbon). Results obtained have shown that the activated carbons used have a high efficiency to eliminate SDBS from waters which was enhanced when the adsorption process was carried out in the presence of bacteria. With regard to the oxidation processes studied, the results have indicated that the efficiency in the elimination of SDBS from water of the system based on the simultaneous use of O{sub 3} and powder activated carbon (PAC) is much higher than those of the other systems studied (O{sub 3},O{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). (Author) 15 refs.

  13. The carbon-nitrogen balance of the nodule and its regulation under elevated carbon dioxide concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libault, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Legumes have developed a unique way to interact with bacteria: in addition to preventing infection from pathogenic bacteria like any other plant, legumes also developed a mutualistic symbiotic relationship with one gender of soil bacteria: rhizobium. This interaction leads to the development of a new root organ, the nodule, where the differentiated bacteria fix for the plant the atmospheric dinitrogen (atmN2). In exchange, the symbiont will benefit from a permanent source of carbon compounds, products of the photosynthesis. The substantial amounts of fixed carbon dioxide dedicated to the symbiont imposed to the plant a tight regulation of the nodulation process to balance carbon and nitrogen incomes and outcomes. Climate change including the increase of the concentration of the atmospheric carbon dioxide is going to modify the rates of plant photosynthesis, the balance between nitrogen and carbon, and, as a consequence, the regulatory mechanisms of the nodulation process. This review focuses on the regulatory mechanisms controlling carbon/nitrogen balances in the context of legume nodulation and discusses how the change in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration could affect nodulation efficiency.

  14. Carbon Dioxide Detection and Indoor Air Quality Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonino, Steve

    2016-04-01

    When building ventilation is reduced, energy is saved because it is not necessary to heat or cool as much outside air. Reduced ventilation can result in higher levels of carbon dioxide, which may cause building occupants to experience symptoms. Heating or cooling for ventilation air can be enhanced by a DCV system, which can save energy while providing a comfortable environment. Carbon dioxide concentrations within a building are often used to indicate whether adequate fresh air is being supplied to the building. These DCV systems use carbon dioxide sensors in each space or in the return air and adjust the ventilation based on carbon dioxide concentration; the higher the concentration, the more people occupy the space relative to the ventilation rate. With a carbon dioxide sensor DCV system, the fresh air ventilation rate varies based on the number ofpeople in the space, saving energy while maintaining a safe and comfortable environment.

  15. The oxidative and adsorptive effectiveness of hydrous manganese dioxide for arsenite removal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Ruiping; Yuan Baoling; Li Xing; Xia Shengji; Yang Yanling; Li Guibai

    2006-01-01

    This study focuses on the effectiveness of hydrous manganese dioxides (δMnO2) removing arsenite (As(Ⅲ)) from aqueous solution. Effects of such factors as permanganate oxidation, pH, humic acid and Ca2+ on As removal and possible mechanisms involved in have been investigated. Permanganate oxidation increases As removal to a certain extent; the higher pH results in the formation of more easily adsorbed As species, contributing to higher As removal; humic acid occupies adsorbing sites and decreases ζ potential of δMnO2, therefore inhibiting As removal; Ca2+ facilitates As adsorption on δMnO2, mainly through increasing ζ potential and decreasing repulsive forces between As and surface sites. δMnO2 exhibits oxidative and adsorptive potential for As(Ⅲ), and may be employed as adsorbents or filter coating for As removal in water treatment process.

  16. Critical processing parameters of carbon dioxide spray drying for the production of dried protein formulations: A study with myoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuchuchua, O; Every, H A; Jiskoot, W

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to gain fundamental insight into protein destabilization induced by supercritical CO2 spray drying processing parameters. Myoglobin was used as a model protein (5mg/ml with 50mg/ml trehalose in 10mM phosphate buffer, pH 6.2). The solution was exposed to sub- and supercritical CO2 conditions (65-130bar and 25-50°C), and CO2 spray drying under those conditions. The heme binding of myoglobin was determined by UV/Vis, fluorescence, and circular dichroism spectroscopy, while myoglobin aggregation was studied by using size-exclusion chromatography and flow imaging microscopy. It was found that pressure and temperature alone did not influence myoglobin's integrity. However, when pressurized CO2 was introduced into myoglobin solutions at any condition, the pH of the myoglobin formulation shifted to about 5 (measured after depressurization), resulting in heme binding destabilization and aggregation of myoglobin. When exposed to CO2, these degradation processes were enhanced by increasing temperature. Heme binding destabilization and myoglobin aggregation were also seen after CO2 spray drying, and to a greater extent. Moreover, the CO2 spray drying induced the partial loss of heme. In conclusion, pressurized CO2 destabilizes the myoglobin, leading to heme loss and protein aggregation upon spray drying.

  17. Carbon Dioxide Capture and Separation Techniques for Gasification-based Power Generation Point Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennline, H.W.; Luebke, D.R.; Jones, K.L.; Morsi, B.I. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA); Heintz, Y.J. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA); Ilconich, J.B. (Parsons)

    2007-06-01

    The capture/separation step for carbon dioxide (CO2) from large-point sources is a critical one with respect to the technical feasibility and cost of the overall carbon sequestration scenario. For large-point sources, such as those found in power generation, the carbon dioxide capture techniques being investigated by the in-house research area of the National Energy Technology Laboratory possess the potential for improved efficiency and reduced costs as compared to more conventional technologies. The investigated techniques can have wide applications, but the research has focused on capture/separation of carbon dioxide from flue gas (post-combustion from fossil fuel-fired combustors) and from fuel gas (precombustion, such as integrated gasification combined cycle or IGCC). With respect to fuel gas applications, novel concepts are being developed in wet scrubbing with physical absorption; chemical absorption with solid sorbents; and separation by membranes. In one concept, a wet scrubbing technique is being investigated that uses a physical solvent process to remove CO2 from fuel gas of an IGCC system at elevated temperature and pressure. The need to define an ideal solvent has led to the study of the solubility and mass transfer properties of various solvents. Pertaining to another separation technology, fabrication techniques and mechanistic studies for membranes separating CO2 from the fuel gas produced by coal gasification are also being performed. Membranes that consist of CO2-philic ionic liquids encapsulated into a polymeric substrate have been investigated for permeability and selectivity. Finally, dry, regenerable processes based on sorbents are additional techniques for CO2 capture from fuel gas. An overview of these novel techniques is presented along with a research progress status of technologies related to membranes and physical solvents.

  18. 21 CFR 868.2480 - Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2) monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... relative changes in a hemodynamically stable patient's cutaneous carbon dioxide tension as an adjunct to arterial carbon dioxide tension measurement. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The...

  19. Photobiological hydrogen production and carbon dioxide sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berberoglu, Halil

    Photobiological hydrogen production is an alternative to thermochemical and electrolytic technologies with the advantage of carbon dioxide sequestration. However, it suffers from low solar to hydrogen energy conversion efficiency due to limited light transfer, mass transfer, and nutrient medium composition. The present study aims at addressing these limitations and can be divided in three parts: (1) experimental measurements of the radiation characteristics of hydrogen producing and carbon dioxide consuming microorganisms, (2) solar radiation transfer modeling and simulation in photobioreactors, and (3) parametric experiments of photobiological hydrogen production and carbon dioxide sequestration. First, solar radiation transfer in photobioreactors containing microorganisms and bubbles was modeled using the radiative transport equation (RTE) and solved using the modified method of characteristics. The study concluded that Beer-Lambert's law gives inaccurate results and anisotropic scattering must be accounted for to predict the local irradiance inside a photobioreactor. The need for accurate measurement of the complete set of radiation characteristics of microorganisms was established. Then, experimental setup and analysis methods for measuring the complete set of radiation characteristics of microorganisms have been developed and successfully validated experimentally. A database of the radiation characteristics of representative microorganisms have been created including the cyanobacteria Anabaena variabilis, the purple non-sulfur bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides and the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii along with its three genetically engineered strains. This enabled, for the first time, quantitative assessment of the effect of genetic engineering on the radiation characteristics of microorganisms. In addition, a parametric experimental study has been performed to model the growth, CO2 consumption, and H 2 production of Anabaena variabilis as functions of

  20. Self-Assembled Enzyme Nanoparticles for Carbon Dioxide Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanbhag, Bhuvana Kamath; Liu, Boyin; Fu, Jing; Haritos, Victoria S; He, Lizhong

    2016-05-11

    Enzyme-based processes have shown promise as a sustainable alternative to amine-based processes for carbon dioxide capture. In this work, we have engineered carbonic anhydrase nanoparticles that retain 98% of hydratase activity in comparison to their free counterparts. Carbonic anhydrase was fused with a self-assembling peptide that facilitates the noncovalent assembly of the particle and together were recombinantly expressed from a single gene construct in Escherichia coli. The purified enzymes, when subjected to a reduced pH, form 50-200 nm nanoparticles. The CO2 capture capability of enzyme nanoparticles was demonstrated at ambient (22 ± 2 °C) and higher (50 °C) temperatures, under which the nanoparticles maintain their assembled state. The carrier-free enzymatic nanoparticles demonstrated here offer a new approach to stabilize and reuse enzymes in a simple and cost-effective manner.

  1. Adding value to carbon dioxide from ethanol fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yixiang; Isom, Loren; Hanna, Milford A

    2010-05-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO(2)) from ethanol production facilities is increasing as more ethanol is produced for alternative transportation fuels. CO(2) produced from ethanol fermentation processes is of high purity and is nearly a saturated gas. Such highly-concentrated source of CO(2) is a potential candidate for capture and utilization by the CO(2) industry. Quantity, quality and capture of CO(2) from ethanol fermentations are discussed in this review. The established and emerging value-added opportunities and markets for CO(2) from ethanol plants also are reviewed. The majority of CO(2) applications are dedicated to serving carbonated beverage and food processing and preservation markets. Beyond traditional merchant markets, the potential for exploring some fresh and profitable markets are discussed including carbon sources in chemical industries for the following: enhanced oil recovery; production of chemicals, fuels, and polymers; and production of algae-based biofuels through CO(2) fixation by microalgae.

  2. Hot gas stripping of ammonia and carbon dioxide from simulated and actual in situ retort waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, C.L.

    1979-01-01

    This study proved that ammonia and carbon dioxide could be removed from retort water by hot gas stripping and that overall transfer rates were slower than for physical desorption alone. The ammonia in solution complexed with the carbonate species with the result that the CO/sub 2/ transfer rates were linked to the relatively slower desorption of NH/sub 3/ from solution. Ionic reactions in the liquid phase limited the quantity of free NH/sub 3/ and CO/sub 2/, thus decreasing the driving forces for mass transfer. The retort water exhibited foaming tendencies that affected the interfacial area which should be taken into account if a stripping tower is considered on a larger scale. Transfer unit heights were calculated for the process conditions studied and correlated such that scaleup to increased capacities is possible.

  3. The fixation of carbon dioxide in inorganic and organic chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aresta, M. (Universita degli Studi, Bari (Italy). Dispartimento di Chemica e Centro CNR-MISO)

    1993-01-01

    The recovery of carbon dioxide from concentrated sources is currently under evaluation as a technology for the control of the emission into the atmosphere. In order for this option to be operative it is necessary to define the fate of recovered carbon dioxide. Two ways forward are open: disposal in natural fields (oceans, aquifers, deep geological cavities); - utilisation (technological use or chemical conversion). The fixation in chemicals can contribute both to reduce the use of fossil carbon and to cut the emission of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. 6 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  4. Carbon dioxide stripping in aquaculture -- part II: development of gas transfer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colt, John; Watten, Barnaby; Pfeiffer, Tim

    2012-01-01

    The basic mass transfer equation for gases such as oxygen and carbon dioxide can be derived from integration of the driving force equation. Because of the physical characteristics of the gas transfer processes, slightly different models are used for aerators tested under the non steady-state procedures, than for packed columns, or weirs. It is suggested that the standard condition for carbon dioxide should be 20 °C, 1 atm, CCO2=20 mg/kg, and XCO2=0.000285. The selection of the standard condition for carbon dioxide based on a fixed mole fraction ensures that standardized carbon dioxide transfer rates will be comparable even though the value of C*CO2 in the atmosphere is increasing with time. The computation of mass transfer for carbon dioxide is complicated by the impact of water depth and gas phase enrichment on the saturation concentration within the unit, although the importance of either factor depends strongly on the specific type of aerator. For some types of aerators, the most accurate gas phase model remains to be determined for carbon dioxide. The assumption that carbon dioxide can be treated as a non-reactive gas in packed columns may apply for cold acidic waters but not for warm alkaline waters.

  5. Calculations of Gas-liquid Equilibrium in Wellbore with High Carbon dioxide Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiaming; Wu, Xiaodong; Wang, Bo; Liu, Kai; Gao, Yue

    2014-05-01

    Carbon dioxide injection not only enhances the oil recovery dramatically, but also it will reduce the greenhouse effect, therefore, Carbon dioxide injection technique is applied extensively. During the process of carbon dioxide displacement, when carbon dioxide breaks though into oil production wells, carbon dioxide content will impacts the phase state and physical properties of the mixed liquor in the wellbore, as a result, it will affect the calculation of temperature and pressure in oil production wells. Applying the conventional black-oil model to calculate the phase state of the miscible fluids is unacceptable. To tackle the problem, this paper uses the gas-liquid flash theory and component model to program software, so that the phase state (gas, liquid or gas-liquid) and physical properties of the mixed liquor (including hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide and hydrocarbon) under initial conditions is calculated, moreover, the impact of carbon dioxide content on the physical properties(mainly including density, viscosity, specific heat at const pressure, surface tension, etc) of mixed liquor in oil production wells is analyzed in this paper. The comparison of the results shows that this model can meet the engineering needs with high accuracy.

  6. Global carbon dioxide emissions from inland waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Peter A.; Hartmann, Jens; Lauerwald, Ronny; Sobek, Sebastian; McDonald, Cory P.; Hoover, Mark; Butman, David; Striegl, Robert G.; Mayorga, Emilio; Humborg, Christoph; Kortelainen, Pirkko; Durr, Hans H.; Meybeck, Michel; Ciais, Philippe; Guth, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) transfer from inland waters to the atmosphere, known as CO2 evasion, is a component of the global carbon cycle. Global estimates of CO2 evasion have been hampered, however, by the lack of a framework for estimating the inland water surface area and gas transfer velocity and by the absence of a global CO2 database. Here we report regional variations in global inland water surface area, dissolved CO2 and gas transfer velocity. We obtain global CO2 evasion rates of 1.8   petagrams of carbon (Pg C) per year from streams and rivers and 0.32  Pg C yr−1 from lakes and reservoirs, where the upper and lower limits are respectively the 5th and 95th confidence interval percentiles. The resulting global evasion rate of 2.1 Pg C yr−1 is higher than previous estimates owing to a larger stream and river evasion rate. Our analysis predicts global hotspots in stream and river evasion, with about 70 per cent of the flux occurring over just 20 per cent of the land surface. The source of inland water CO2 is still not known with certainty and new studies are needed to research the mechanisms controlling CO2 evasion globally.

  7. Experimental and molecular modeling study of the three-phase behavior of (n-decane + carbon dioxide + Water) at reservoir conditions

    OpenAIRE

    E. Forte; Galindo, A.; Trusler, JPM

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of the phase behavior of mixtures of oil with carbon dioxide and water is essential for reservoir engineering, especially in the processes of enhanced oil recovery and geological storage of carbon dioxide. However, for a comprehensive understanding, the study of simpler systems needs to be completed. In this work the system (n-decane + carbon dioxide + water) was studied as a model (oil + carbon dioxide + water) mixture. To accomplish our aim, a new analytical apparatus to measure p...

  8. Oxygen and carbon dioxide monitoring during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaddeo, Alessandro; Fauroux, Brigitte

    2016-09-01

    Monitoring of oxygen and carbon dioxide (CO2) is of crucial importance during sleep-disordered breathing in order to assess the consequences of respiratory events on gas exchange. Pulse oximetry (SpO2) is a simple and cheap method that is used routinely for the recording of oxygen levels and the diagnosis of hypoxemia. CO2 recording is necessary for the diagnosis of alveolar hypoventilation and can be performed by means of the end-tidal (PetCO2) or transcutaneous CO2 (PtcCO2). However, the monitoring of CO2 is not performed on a routine basis due to the lack of simple, cheap and reliable CO2 monitors. This short review summarizes some technical aspects of gas exchange recording during sleep in children before discussing the different definitions of alveolar hypoventilation and the importance of CO2 recording.

  9. Layered solid sorbents for carbon dioxide capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bingyun; Jiang, Bingbing; Gray, McMahan L; Fauth, Daniel J; Pennline, Henry W; Richards, George A

    2013-02-25

    A solid sorbent for the capture and the transport of carbon dioxide gas is provided having at least one first layer of a positively charged material that is polyethylenimine or poly(allylamine hydrochloride), that captures at least a portion of the gas, and at least one second layer of a negatively charged material that is polystyrenesulfonate or poly(acryclic acid), that transports the gas, wherein the second layer of material is in juxtaposition to, attached to, or crosslinked with the first layer for forming at least one bilayer, and a solid substrate support having a porous surface, wherein one or more of the bilayers is/are deposited on the surface of and/or within the solid substrate. A method of preparing and using the solid sorbent is provided.

  10. Evaluation of 2,4-D removal via activated carbon from pomegranate husk/polymer composite hydrogel: Optimization of process parameters through face centered composite design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taktak, Fulya; Ilbay, Zeynep [Usak Univ, Usak (Turkmenistan); Sahin, Selin [Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkmenistan)

    2015-09-15

    A new type of polymer composite hydrogel was prepared by introducing activated carbons from pomegranate husk into poly ((2-dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate) network. The removal of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) from aqueous solution was studied with respect to pH of the media, initial 2,4-D concentration and activated carbon content into the polymeric network. Face centered composite design (FCCD) through response surface methodology (RSM) was used for designing the experiments as well as for studying the effects of the process parameters. A quadratic model and a two factor interaction design model were developed for the removal of 2,4-D and adsorption capacity, respectively. The optimum pH of the pesticide solution, activated carbon content into the polymeric network and initial concentration of 2,4-D were found as 3, 2.5 wt% and 100mg/L. 63.245% and 68.805 (mg/g) for the removal of 2,4-D and adsorption capacity were obtained by using Simplex optimization method. Furthermore, the surface characteristics of the adsorbent prepared under optimized conditions were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR).

  11. Carbon dioxide absorbents for rebreather diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennefather, John

    2016-09-01

    Firstly I would like to thank SPUMS members for making me a Life Member of SPUMS; I was surprised and greatly honoured by the award. I also want to confirm and expand on the findings on carbon dioxide absorbents reported by David Harvey et al. For about 35 years, I was the main player in deciding which absorbent went into Australian Navy and Army diving sets. On several occasions, suppliers of absorbents to the anaesthesia market tried to supply the Australian military market. On no occasion did they provide absorbent that came close to the minimum absorbent capacity required, generally being 30-40% less efficient than diving-grade absorbents. Because I regard lives as being more important than any likely dollar saving, the best absorbent was always selected unless two suppliers provided samples with the same absorbent capacity. On almost every occasion, there was a clear winner and cost was never considered. I suggest the same argument for the best absorbent should be used by members and their friends who dive using rebreather sets. I make this point because of my findings on a set that was brought to me after the death of its owner. The absorbent was not the type or grain size recommended by the manufacturer of the set and did not resemble any of the diving grade absorbents I knew of. I suspected by its appearance that it was anaesthetic grade absorbent. When I tested the set, the absorbent system failed very quickly so it is likely that carbon dioxide toxicity contributed to his death. The death was not the subject of an inquest and I have no knowledge of how the man obtained the absorbent. Possibly there was someone from an operating theatre staff who unintentionally caused their friend's death by supplying him with 'borrowed absorbent'. I make this point as I would like to discourage members from making a similar error.

  12. Does carbon dioxide pool or stream in the subsurface?

    CERN Document Server

    Cardoso, Silvana S S

    2014-01-01

    Pools of carbon dioxide are found in natural geological accumulations and in engineered storage in saline aquifers. It has been thought that once this CO2 dissolves in the formation water, making it denser, convection streams would transport it efficiently to depth, but this may not be so. Here, we assess the impact of natural chemical reactions between the dissolved CO2 and the rock formation on the convection streams in the subsurface. We show that, while in carbonate rocks the streaming of dissolved carbon dioxide persists, the chemical interactions in silicate-rich rocks may curb this transport drastically and even inhibit it altogether. New laboratory experiments confirm the curtailing of convection by reaction. Wide and narrow streams of dense carbon-rich water are shut-off gradually as reaction strength increases until all transport of the pooled carbon dioxide occurs by slow molecular diffusion. These results show that the complex fluid dynamic and kinetic interactions between pooled carbon dioxide an...

  13. Carbon dioxide-based supercritical fluids as IC manufacturing solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, J.B.; Davenhall, L.B.; Taylor, C.M.V.; Sivils, L.D.; Pierce, T.; Tiefert, K.

    1999-05-11

    The production of integrated circuits (IC's) involves a number of discrete steps which utilize hazardous or regulated solvents and generate large waste streams. ES&H considerations associated with these chemicals have prompted a search for alternative, more environmentally benign solvent systems. An emerging technology for conventional solvent replacement is the use of supercritical fluids based on carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). Research work, conducted at Los Alamos in conjunction with the Hewlett-Packard Company, has lead to the development of a CO{sub 2}-based supercritical fluid treatment system for the stripping of hard-baked photoresists. This treatment system, known as Supercritical CO{sub 2} Resist Remover, or CORR, uses a two-component solvent composed of a nonhazardous, non-regulated compound, dissolved in supercritical CO{sub 2}. The solvent/treatment system has been successfully tested on metallized Si wafers coated with negative and positive photoresist, the latter both before and after ion-implantation. A description of the experimental data will be presented. Based on the initial laboratory results, the project has progressed to the design and construction of prototype, single-wafer photoresist-stripping equipment. The integrated system involves a closed-loop, recirculating cycle which continuously cleans and regenerates the CO{sub 2}, recycles the dissolved solvent, and separates and concentrates the spent resist. The status of the current design and implementation strategy of a treatment system to existing IC fabrication facilities will be discussed. Additional remarks will be made on the use of a SCORR-type system for the cleaning of wafers prior to processing.

  14. Counter-current carbon dioxide purification of partially deacylated sunflower oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    High oleic sunflower oil was partially deacylated by propanolysis to produce a mixture of diglycerides and triglycerides. To remove by-product fatty acid propyl esters (FAPEs) from this reaction mixture, a liquid carbon dioxide (L-CO2) counter-current fractionation method was developed. The fracti...

  15. Effect of supercritical carbon dioxide decaffeination on volatile components of green teas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S; Park, M K; Kim, K H; Kim, Y-S

    2007-09-01

    Volatile components in regular and decaffeinated green teas were isolated by simultaneous steam distillation and solvent extraction (SDE), and then analyzed by GC-MS. A total of 41 compounds, including 8 alcohols, 15 terpene-type compounds, 10 carbonyls, 4 N-containing compounds, and 4 miscellaneous compounds, were found in regular and decaffeinated green teas. Among them, linalool and phenylacetaldehyde were quantitatively dominant in both regular and decaffeinated green teas. By a decaffeination process using supercritical carbon dioxide, most volatile components decreased. The more caffeine was removed, the more volatile components were reduced in green teas. In particular, relatively nonpolar components such as terpene-type compounds gradually decreased according to the decaffeination process. Aroma-active compounds in regular and decaffeinated green teas were also determined and compared by aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA). Most greenish and floral flavor compounds such as hexanal, (E)-2-hexenal, and some unknown compounds disappeared or decreased after the decaffeination process.

  16. Experimental fractionation of stable carbon isotopes during degassing of carbon dioxide and precipitation of calcite from aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, K.; Winde, V.; Escher, P.; von Geldern, R.; Böttcher, M. E.

    2012-04-01

    Processes in the carbonate system of surface waters are in particular sensitive to variations of boundary conditions as, for instance, the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and the aqueous solution. Examples range from streams, rivers, to coastal marine waters. The flux of carbon dioxide from continental flowing waters was recently included into calculations of the global carbon budget (Butman & Raymond, 2011, Nature Geo.). These solutions, are often supersaturated in carbon dioxide with respect to the atmosphere. The degassing of carbon dioxide is associated with a kinetically controlled fractionation of the stable carbon isotopes, which has to be considered in balancing water-air carbon dioxide fluxes. The degassing process additionally leads to the super-saturation of the aqueous solution with respect to calcium carbonate. Stable isotope fractionation is of particular value to identify and quantify processes at the water-gas phase interface and link these non-equilibrium processes to the formation mechanisms of calcite and the hydrodynamics of surface waters. Experiments were carried out with or without inert N2 gas flow to degas carbon dioxide from initially supersaturated solutions. Natural solutions used are from different stations of the Elbe estuary, the Jade Bay, the backbarrier tidal area of Spiekeroog Island, carbonate springs of Rügen Island, and the Baltic Sea coastline. Results are compared experiments using bottled mineral waters. By following the (physico) chemical changes in the solutions (pH, TA, Ca PHREEQC modeling) it was found, that two evolutionary stages can be differentiated. Reaction progress led to the preferential liberation of carbon dioxide containing the light carbon isotope, following a Rayleigh-type process. After an induction period, where only degassing of carbon dioxide took place, a second stage was observed where calcite began to form from the highly supersaturated solutions. In this stage the carbonate

  17. The Formation of Ethane from Carbon Dioxide under Cold Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Pulsed-corona plasma has been used as a new method for ethane dehydrogenation at low temperature and normal pressure using carbon dioxide as an oxidant in this paper. The effect of carbon dioxide content in the feed, power input, and flow rate of the reactants on the ethane dehydrogenation has been investigated. The experimental results show that the conversion of ethane increases with the increase in the amount of carbon dioxide in the feed. The yield of ethylene and acetylene decreases with the increase in the yield of carbon monoxide, indicating that the increased carbon dioxide leads to the part of ethylene and acetylene being oxidized to carbon monoxide. Power input is primarily an electrical parameter in pulsed-corona plasma, which plays an important role in reactant conversion and product formation. When the power input reaches 16 W, ethane conversion is 41.0% and carbon dioxide conversion is 26.3%. The total yield of ethylene and acetylene is 15.6%. The reduced flow rate of feed improves the conversion of ethane,carbon dioxide and the yield of acetylene, and induces carbon deposit as well.

  18. Clean Hydrogen Production. Carbon Dioxide Free Alternatives. Project Phisico2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Fierro, J. L.; Gonzalez, C.; Serrano, D.; Penelas, G.; Romero, M.; Marcos, M. J.; Rodriguez, C.

    2006-07-01

    The main goal of the PHISICO2 project, funded and promoted by Comunidad de Madrid, is the evaluation and optimisation of three different processes for the clean hydrogen production without carbon dioxide emission. Solar energy and associated Technologies are proposed to be jointly employed with the aim of improving the process efficiency and reducing the production costs. As a transition to the non-fossil fuel hydrogen economy, the thermocatalytic CO2-free production of hydrogen from natural gas will be considered. One of the most promising alternatives of this process is to develop a cheap and stable carbon-based catalyst able to efficiently decompose methane into a CO2-free hydrogen stream and solid carbon. Thus, not only pure hydrogen can be obtained through but also carbon with specific properties and commercial value can be produced. Another option to be explored is the splitting of water by means of solar light by means of two different approaches: (i) photodissociation promoted by semiconductor catalysts and (ii) thermochemical cycles in which a specific mixed oxide is first thermally reduced by sunlight and then reoxidized by steam in a second step with the parallel production of hydrogen. Indeed, option (i) implies necessarily the development of semiconductors with appropriate band-gap able to decompose water into hydrogen and oxygen in an efficient manner. Another critical issue will be the development of a strategy/concept that allows efficient separation of hydrogen and oxygen within the cell. In option (ii), the development of stable ferrites which act as the redox element of the cycle is also an important challenge. Finally, a 5 kW prototype solar engine water splitting, based on the mentioned thermochemical cycle, will developed and tested using concentrated solar light as an energy source. Moreover, thermodynamic and kinetic studies, reactor design, process optimisation, economical studies and comparison with conventional hydrogen production systems

  19. Histidine-catalyzed synthesis of cyclic carbonates in supercritical carbon dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The coupling reaction of carbon dioxide with epoxides was investigated using naturally occurring α-amino acids as the catalyst in supercritical carbon dioxide and it was found that L-histidine is the most active catalyst.In the presence of 0.8 mol% of L-histidine at 130°C under 8 MPa of CO2,the reaction of carbon dioxide with epoxides proceeded smoothly,affording corresponding cyclic carbonates in good to excellent yields.

  20. Forest management techniques for carbon dioxide storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimori, Takao [Forestry and Forest Products Research Inst., Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1993-12-31

    In the global ecosystem concerning carbon dioxide content in the atmosphere, the forest ecosystem plays an important role. In effect, the ratio of forest biomass to total terrestrial biomass is about 90%, and the ratio of carbon stored in the forest biomass to that in the atmosphere is two thirds. When soils and detritus of forests are added, there is more C stored in forests than in the atmosphere, about 1.3 times or more. Thus, forests can be regarded as the great holder of C on earth. If the area of forest land on the earth is constantly maintained and forests are in the climax stage, the uptake of C and the release of C by and from the forests will balance. In this case, forests are neither sinks nor sources of CO{sub 2} although they store a large amount of C. However, when forests are deforested, they become a source of C; through human activities, forests have become a source of C. According to a report by the IPCC, 1.6{+-}1.2 PgC is annually added to the atmosphere by deforestation. According to the FAO (1992), the area of land deforested annually in the tropics from 1981 to 1990 was 16.9 x 10{sup 6} ha. This value is nearly half the area of Japanese land. The most important thing for the CO{sub 2} environment concerning forests is therefore how to reduce deforestation and to successfully implement a forestation or reforestation.

  1. New and future developments in catalysis activation of carbon dioxide

    CERN Document Server

    Suib, Steven L

    2013-01-01

    New and Future Developments in Catalysis is a package of books that compile the latest ideas concerning alternate and renewable energy sources and the role that catalysis plays in converting new renewable feedstock into biofuels and biochemicals. Both homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts and catalytic processes will be discussed in a unified and comprehensive approach. There will be extensive cross-referencing within all volumes. This volume presents a complete picture of all carbon dioxide (CO2) sources, outlines the environmental concerns regarding CO2, and critica

  2. Carbon dioxide and nisin act synergistically on Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Lilian; Chen, Y.H.; Chikindas, M.L.

    2000-01-01

    This paper examines the synergistic action of carbon dioxide and nisin on Listeria monocytogenes Scott A wild-type and nisin-resistant (Nis(r)) cells grown in broth at 4 degrees C. Carbon dioxide extended the lag phase and decreased the specific growth rate of both strains, but to a greater degree...... for cultures in CO2. This synergism between nisin and CO2 was examined mechanistically by following the leakage of carboxyfluorescein (CF) from listerial liposomes. Carbon dioxide enhanced nisin-induced CF leakage, indicating that the synergistic action of CO2 and nisin occurs at the cytoplasmic membrane...

  3. Solubility of the sesquiterpene alcohol patchoulol in supercritical carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hybertson, Brooks M

    2007-01-01

    The solubility of the sesquiterpene alcohol patchoulol in supercritical carbon dioxide was measured at P ranging from 10.0 MPa to 25.0 MPa and T of 40.0 and 50.0 °C using a simple microsampling type apparatus with a 100.5 µL sample loop to remove aliquots for off-line analysis. The system was first validated using vanillin with off-line spectrophotometric analysis, then utilized for patchoulol measurements with off-line GC-MS analysis. The measured solubility of patchoulol in supercritical CO(2) ranged from mole fractions of 0.43 × 10(-3) at 10.0 MPa and 50.0 °C to 9.45 × 10(-3) at 25.0 MPa and 40.0 °C.

  4. FINAL REPORT: A Study of the Abundance and 13C/12C Ratio of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide to Advance the Scientific Understanding of Terrestrial Processes Regulating the GCC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keeling, R. F.; Piper, S. C.

    2008-12-23

    The main objective of this project was to continue research to develop carbon cycle relationships related to the land biosphere based on remote measurements of atmospheric CO2 concentration and its isotopic composition. The project continued time-series observations of atmospheric carbon dioxide and isotopic composition begun by Charles D. Keeling at remote sites, including Mauna Loa, the South Pole, and eight other sites. The program also included the development of methods for measuring radiocarbon content in the collected CO2 samples and carrying out radiocarbon measurements in collaboration with Tom Guilderson of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LLNL). The radiocarbon measurements can provide complementary information on carbon exchange rates with the land and oceans and emissions from fossil-fuel burning. Using models of varying complexity, the concentration and isotopic measurements were used to establish estimates of the spatial and temporal variations in the net CO2 exchange with the atmosphere, the storage of carbon in the land and oceans, and variable isotopic discrimination of land plants.

  5. Recycling Carbon Dioxide into Sustainable Hydrocarbon Fuels: Electrolysis of Carbon Dioxide and Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Christopher Ronald

    Great quantities of hydrocarbon fuels will be needed for the foreseeable future, even if electricity based energy carriers begin to partially replace liquid hydrocarbons in the transportation sector. Fossil fuels and biomass are the most common feedstocks for production of hydrocarbon fuels. However, using renewable or nuclear energy, carbon dioxide and water can be recycled into sustainable hydrocarbon fuels in non-biological processes which remove oxygen from CO2 and H2O (the reverse of fuel combustion). Capture of CO2 from the atmosphere would enable a closed-loop carbon-neutral fuel cycle. The purpose of this work was to develop critical components of a system that recycles CO2 into liquid hydrocarbon fuels. The concept is examined at several scales, beginning with a broad scope analysis of large-scale sustainable energy systems and ultimately studying electrolysis of CO 2 and H2O in high temperature solid oxide cells as the heart of the energy conversion, in the form of three experimental studies. The contributions of these studies include discoveries about electrochemistry and materials that could significantly improve the overall energy use and economics of the CO2-to-fuels system. The broad scale study begins by assessing the sustainability and practicality of the various energy carriers that could replace petroleum-derived hydrocarbon fuels, including other hydrocarbons, hydrogen, and storage of electricity on-board vehicles in batteries, ultracapacitors, and flywheels. Any energy carrier can store the energy of any energy source. This sets the context for CO2 recycling -- sustainable energy sources like solar and wind power can be used to provide the most energy-dense, convenient fuels which can be readily used in the existing infrastructure. The many ways to recycle CO2 into hydrocarbons, based on thermolysis, thermochemical loops, electrolysis, and photoelectrolysis of CO2 and/or H 2O, are critically reviewed. A process based on high temperature co

  6. Carbon Dioxide-Water Emulsions for Enhanced Oil Recovery and Permanent Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, David; Golomb, Dan; Shi, Guang; Shih, Cherry; Lewczuk, Rob; Miksch, Joshua; Manmode, Rahul; Mulagapati, Srihariraju; Malepati, Chetankurmar

    2011-09-30

    This project involves the use of an innovative new invention Particle Stabilized Emulsions (PSEs) of Carbon Dioxide-in-Water and Water-in-Carbon Dioxide for Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) and Permanent Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide. The EOR emulsion would be injected into a semi-depleted oil reservoir such as Dover 33 in Otsego County, Michigan. It is expected that the emulsion would dislocate the stranded heavy crude oil from the rock granule surfaces, reduce its viscosity, and increase its mobility. The advancing emulsion front should provide viscosity control which drives the reduced-viscosity oil toward the production wells. The make-up of the emulsion would be subsequently changed so it interacts with the surrounding rock minerals in order to enhance mineralization, thereby providing permanent sequestration of the injected CO{sub 2}. In Phase 1 of the project, the following tasks were accomplished: 1. Perform laboratory scale (mL/min) refinements on existing procedures for producing liquid carbon dioxide-in-water (C/W) and water-in-liquid carbon dioxide (W/C) emulsion stabilized by hydrophilic and hydrophobic fine particles, respectively, using a Kenics-type static mixer. 2. Design and cost evaluate scaled up (gal/min) C/W and W/C emulsification systems to be deployed in Phase 2 at the Otsego County semi-depleted oil field. 3. Design the modifications necessary to the present CO{sub 2} flooding system at Otsego County for emulsion injection. 4. Design monitoring and verification systems to be deployed in Phase 2 for measuring potential leakage of CO{sub 2} after emulsion injection. 5. Design production protocol to assess enhanced oil recovery with emulsion injection compared to present recovery with neat CO{sub 2} flooding. 6. Obtain Federal and State permits for emulsion injection. Initial research focused on creating particle stabilized emulsions with the smallest possible globule size so that the emulsion can penetrate even low-permeability crude

  7. Understanding how individuals perceive carbon dioxide. Implications for acceptance of carbon dioxide capture and storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itaoka, K.; Saito, A. [Mizuho Information and Research Institute, Tokyo (Japan); Paukovic, M.; De Best-Waldhober, M. [ECN Policy Studies, Petten (Netherlands); Dowd, A.M.; Jeanneret, T.; Ashworth, P.; James, M. [The Global CCS Institute, Canberra (Australia)

    2012-06-15

    Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) presents one potential technological solution for mitigating the atmospheric emission of carbon dioxide sources. However, CCS is a relatively new technology with associated uncertainties and perceived risks. For this reason, a growing body of research now focuses on public perceptions and potential for societal acceptance of CCS technology. Almost all explanations of CCS technology make reference to carbon dioxide, with an assumption that the general public understands CO2. It has become apparent that the general public’s knowledge and understanding of CO2’s properties influences how they engage with CO2 emitting industries and CCS technologies. However, surprisingly little research has investigated public perceptions, knowledge, and understanding of CO2. This investigation attempts to fill that gap. This report describes an investigation of how citizens of three countries (Japan, Australia, and the Netherlands) perceive CO2. Furthermore, it attempts to relate individual perceptions of CO2 to perceptions of CCS, and to determine how information provision about the underlying properties and characteristics of CO2 influences individual attitudes towards low carbon energy options, particularly CCS. In brief, the research had four ultimate aims. It aimed to: Explore the public’s knowledge and understanding of the properties of CO2; Examine the influence of that knowledge on their perceptions of CO2 and CCS; Investigate how information provision about the underlying properties and characteristics of CO2 influences individual attitudes towards CCS; and Identify if any differences between countries exist in relation to values and beliefs, knowledge of CO2’s properties, and CCS perceptions.

  8. Carbon Dioxide in Exoplanetary Atmospheres: Rarely Dominant Compared to Carbon Monoxide and Water

    CERN Document Server

    Heng, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the abundance of carbon dioxide in exoplanetary atmospheres. We construct analytical models of systems in chemical equilibrium that include carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, water, methane and acetylene and relate the equilibrium constants of the chemical reactions to temperature and pressure via the tabulated Gibbs free energies. We prove that such chemical systems may be described by a quintic equation for the mixing ratio of methane. By examining the abundances of these molecules across a broad range of temperatures (spanning equilibrium temperatures from 600 to 2500 K), pressures (via temperature-pressure profiles that explore albedo and opacity variations) and carbon-to-oxygen ratios (from 0.1 to 100), we conclude that carbon dioxide is subdominant compared to carbon monoxide and water. Atmospheric mixing does not alter this conclusion if carbon dioxide is subdominant everywhere in the atmosphere. Carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide may attain comparable abundances if th...

  9. A metal-free electrocatalyst for carbon dioxide reduction to multi-carbon hydrocarbons and oxygenates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jingjie; Ma, Sichao; Sun, Jing; Gold, Jake I.; Tiwary, Chandrasekhar; Kim, Byoungsu; Zhu, Lingyang; Chopra, Nitin; Odeh, Ihab N.; Vajtai, Robert; Yu, Aaron Z.; Luo, Raymond; Lou, Jun; Ding, Guqiao; Kenis, Paul J. A.; Ajayan, Pulickel M.

    2016-12-01

    Electroreduction of carbon dioxide into higher-energy liquid fuels and chemicals is a promising but challenging renewable energy conversion technology. Among the electrocatalysts screened so far for carbon dioxide reduction, which includes metals, alloys, organometallics, layered materials and carbon nanostructures, only copper exhibits selectivity towards formation of hydrocarbons and multi-carbon oxygenates at fairly high efficiencies, whereas most others favour production of carbon monoxide or formate. Here we report that nanometre-size N-doped graphene quantum dots (NGQDs) catalyse the electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide into multi-carbon hydrocarbons and oxygenates at high Faradaic efficiencies, high current densities and low overpotentials. The NGQDs show a high total Faradaic efficiency of carbon dioxide reduction of up to 90%, with selectivity for ethylene and ethanol conversions reaching 45%. The C2 and C3 product distribution and production rate for NGQD-catalysed carbon dioxide reduction is comparable to those obtained with copper nanoparticle-based electrocatalysts.

  10. A metal-free electrocatalyst for carbon dioxide reduction to multi-carbon hydrocarbons and oxygenates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jingjie; Ma, Sichao; Sun, Jing; Gold, Jake I; Tiwary, ChandraSekhar; Kim, Byoungsu; Zhu, Lingyang; Chopra, Nitin; Odeh, Ihab N; Vajtai, Robert; Yu, Aaron Z; Luo, Raymond; Lou, Jun; Ding, Guqiao; Kenis, Paul J A; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2016-12-13

    Electroreduction of carbon dioxide into higher-energy liquid fuels and chemicals is a promising but challenging renewable energy conversion technology. Among the electrocatalysts screened so far for carbon dioxide reduction, which includes metals, alloys, organometallics, layered materials and carbon nanostructures, only copper exhibits selectivity towards formation of hydrocarbons and multi-carbon oxygenates at fairly high efficiencies, whereas most others favour production of carbon monoxide or formate. Here we report that nanometre-size N-doped graphene quantum dots (NGQDs) catalyse the electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide into multi-carbon hydrocarbons and oxygenates at high Faradaic efficiencies, high current densities and low overpotentials. The NGQDs show a high total Faradaic efficiency of carbon dioxide reduction of up to 90%, with selectivity for ethylene and ethanol conversions reaching 45%. The C2 and C3 product distribution and production rate for NGQD-catalysed carbon dioxide reduction is comparable to those obtained with copper nanoparticle-based electrocatalysts.

  11. Synthesis pf dimethyl carbonate in supercritical carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballivet-Tkatchenko, D.; Plasseraud, L. [Universite de Bourgogne-UFR Sciences et Techniques, Dijon (France). Lab. de Synthese et Electrosynthese Organometalliques]. E-mail: ballivet@u-bourgogne.fr; Ligabue, R.A. [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica Pura

    2006-01-15

    The reactivity of carbon dioxide with methanol to form dimethyl carbonate was studied in the presence of the n-butylmethoxytin compounds n-Bu{sub 3}SnOCH{sub 3}, n-Bu{sub 2}Sn(OCH{sub 3}){sub 2}, and [n-Bu{sub 2}(CH{sub 3}O)Sn]{sub 2}O. The reaction occurred under solventless conditions at 423 K and was produced by an increase in CO{sub 2} pressure. This beneficial effect is primarily attributed to phase behavior. The mass transfer under liquid-vapor biphasic conditions was not limiting when the system reached the supercritical state for a CO{sub 2} pressure higher than 16 MPa. Under these conditions, CO{sub 2} acted as a reactant and a solvent. (author)

  12. Synthesis of dimethyl carbonate in supercritical carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Ballivet-Tkatchenko

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The reactivity of carbon dioxide with methanol to form dimethyl carbonate was studied in the presence of the n-butylmethoxytin compounds n-Bu3SnOCH3, n-Bu2Sn(OCH32 , and [n-Bu2(CH3OSn]2 O. The reaction occurred under solventless conditions at 423 K and was produced by an increase in CO2 pressure. This beneficial effect is primarily attributed to phase behavior. The mass transfer under liquid-vapor biphasic conditions was not limiting when the system reached the supercritical state for a CO2 pressure higher than 16 MPa. Under these conditions, CO2 acted as a reactant and a solvent.

  13. Carbon dioxide utilization: Bridging the GHG mitigation with environmentally friendly technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aresta, M. [Univ. of Bari (Italy)

    1997-12-31

    The recovery of carbon dioxide from power plants, flue gases, or industrial processes has been proposed as a technology for its mitigation. The end fate of recovered CO{sub 2} is either disposal in natural fields or gainful utilization (biological, technological, or chemical). The latter option deserves careful consideration as it would be doubly beneficial, helping to control the carbon dioxide emission and to save natural resources through the recycling of carbon. The economical aspects of the utilization option need thorough analysis to determine its feasibility. Another major point to consider is the amount of avoided carbon dioxide. This will define the extent of mitigation possible via the utilization option. To assess the potential of carbon dioxide utilization in the short-, medium-, and long-term is an exercise of great value from both the environmental and economical points of view. In this paper, criteria for the assessment be discussed as well as the current status of industrial carbon dioxide utilization. Furthermore, the perspectives for carbon dioxide utilization will be framed within the research needed for its implementation.

  14. 75 FR 75059 - Mandatory Reporting of Greenhouse Gases: Injection and Geologic Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    ... Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 75 , No. 230 / Wednesday, December 1... sequestration of carbon dioxide and all other facilities that conduct injection of carbon dioxide. This rule... may determine''). These regulations will affect owners or operators of carbon dioxide (CO...

  15. 46 CFR 35.40-7 - Carbon dioxide alarm-T/ALL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide alarm-T/ALL. 35.40-7 Section 35.40-7... Requirements-TB/ALL. § 35.40-7 Carbon dioxide alarm—T/ALL. Adjacent to all carbon dioxide fire extinguishing... AT ONCE. CARBON DIOXIDE BEING RELEASED.”...

  16. 49 CFR 195.4 - Compatibility necessary for transportation of hazardous liquids or carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... hazardous liquids or carbon dioxide. 195.4 Section 195.4 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... necessary for transportation of hazardous liquids or carbon dioxide. No person may transport any hazardous liquid or carbon dioxide unless the hazardous liquid or carbon dioxide is chemically compatible with...

  17. Evidence for Carbonate Surface Complexation during Forsterite Carbonation in Wet Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loring, John S.; Chen, Jeffrey; Benezeth Ep Gisquet, Pascale; Qafoku, Odeta; Ilton, Eugene S.; Washton, Nancy M.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Martin, Paul F.; McGrail, B. Peter; Rosso, Kevin M.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2015-07-14

    Continental flood basalts are attractive formations for geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide because of their reactive divalent-cation containing silicates, such as forsterite (Mg2SiO4), suitable for long-term trapping of CO2 mineralized as metal carbonates. The goal of this study was to investigate at a molecular level the carbonation products formed during the reaction of forsterite with supercritical CO2 (scCO2) as a function of the concentration of H2O adsorbed to the forsterite surface. Experiments were performed at 50 °C and 90 bar using an in situ IR titration capability, and post-reaction samples were examined by ex situ techniques, including SEM, XPS, FIB-TEM, TGA-MS, and MAS-NMR. Carbonation products and reaction extents varied greatly with adsorbed H2O. We show for the first time evidence of Mg-carbonate surface complexation under wet scCO2 conditions. Carbonate is found to be coordinated to Mg at the forsterite surface in a predominately bidentate fashion at adsorbed H2O concentrations below 27 µmol/m2. Above this concentration and up to 76 µmol/m2, monodentate coordinated complexes become dominant. Beyond a threshold adsorbed H2O concentration of 76 µmol/m2, crystalline carbonates continuously precipitate as magnesite, and the particles that form are hundreds of times larger than the estimated thicknesses of the adsorbed water films of about 7 to 15 Å. At an applied level, these results suggest that mineral carbonation in scCO2 dominated fluids near the wellbore and adjacent to caprocks will be insignificant and limited to surface complexation, unless adsorbed H2O concentrations are high enough to promote crystalline carbonate formation. At a fundamental level, the surface complexes and their dependence on adsorbed H2O concentration give insights regarding forsterite dissolution processes and magnesite nucleation and growth.

  18. Mineralization of Carbon Dioxide: Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanov, V; Soong, Y; Carney, C; Rush, G; Nielsen, B; O' Connor, W

    2015-01-01

    CCS research has been focused on CO2 storage in geologic formations, with many potential risks. An alternative to conventional geologic storage is carbon mineralization, where CO2 is reacted with metal cations to form carbonate minerals. Mineralization methods can be broadly divided into two categories: in situ and ex situ. In situ mineralization, or mineral trapping, is a component of underground geologic sequestration, in which a portion of the injected CO2 reacts with alkaline rock present in the target formation to form solid carbonate species. In ex situ mineralization, the carbonation reaction occurs above ground, within a separate reactor or industrial process. This literature review is meant to provide an update on the current status of research on CO2 mineralization. 2

  19. Membranes for separation of carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Anthony Yu-Chung; Ruud, James Anthony; Ramaswamy, Vidya; Willson, Patrick Daniel; Gao, Yan

    2011-03-01

    Methods for separating carbon dioxide from a fluid stream at a temperature higher than about 200.degree. C. with selectivity higher than Knudsen diffusion selectivity include contacting a porous membrane with the fluid stream to preferentially transport carbon dioxide. The porous membrane includes a porous support and a continuous porous separation layer disposed on a surface of the porous support and extending between the fluid stream and the porous support layer. The porous support comprises alumina, silica, zirconia, stabilized zirconia, stainless steel, titanium, nickel-based alloys, aluminum-based alloys, zirconium-based alloys or a combination thereof. Median pore size of the porous separation layer is less than about 10 nm, and the porous separation layer comprises titania, MgO, CaO, SrO, BaO, La.sub.2O.sub.3, CeO.sub.2, HfO.sub.2, Y.sub.2O.sub.3, VO.sub.z, NbO.sub.z, TaO.sub.z, ATiO.sub.3, AZrO.sub.3, AAl.sub.2O.sub.4, A.sup.1FeO.sub.3, A.sup.1MnO.sub.3, A.sup.1CoO.sub.3, A.sup.1NiO.sub.3, A.sup.2HfO.sub.3, A.sup.3 CeO.sub.3, Li.sub.2ZrO.sub.3, Li.sub.2SiO.sub.3, Li.sub.2TiO.sub.3, Li.sub.2HfO.sub.3, A.sup.4N.sup.1.sub.yO.sub.z, Y.sub.xN.sup.1.sub.yO.sub.z, La.sub.xN.sup.1.sub.yO.sub.z, HfN.sup.2.sub.yO.sub.z, or a combination thereof; wherein A is La, Mg, Ca, Sr or Ba; A.sup.1 is La, Ca, Sr or Ba; A.sup.2 is Ca, Sr or Ba; A.sup.3 is Sr or Ba; A.sup.4 is Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, Ti or Zr; N.sup.1 is V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, W, Mn, Si or Ge; N.sup.2 is V, Mo, W or Si; x is 1 or 2; y ranges from 1 to 3; and z ranges from 2 to 7.

  20. Past explosive outbursts of entrapped carbon dioxide in salt mines provide a new perspective on the hazards of carbon dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedlund, Frank Huess

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on a source of past carbon dioxide accidents which so far has only been sporadically mentioned in the literature. Violent and highly destructive outbursts of hundreds of tons of CO2 occurred regularly, if not routinely, in the now closed salt mines of the former DDR....... The Menzengraben mine experienced an extreme outburst in 1953, possibly involving a several thousand tons of carbon dioxide. This source of accidents fills an important gap in the available carbon dioxide accident history and may provide a unique empirical perspective on the hazards of handling very large amounts...

  1. CARBON DIOXIDE MITIGATION THROUGH CONTROLLED PHOTOSYNTHESIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2000-10-01

    This research was undertaken to meet the need for a robust portfolio of carbon management options to ensure continued use of coal in electrical power generation. In response to this need, the Ohio Coal Research Center at Ohio University developed a novel technique to control the emissions of CO{sub 2} from fossil-fired power plants by growing organisms capable of converting CO{sub 2} to complex sugars through the process of photosynthesis. Once harvested, the organisms could be used in the production of fertilizer, as a biomass fuel, or fermented to produce alcohols. In this work, a mesophilic organism, Nostoc 86-3, was examined with respect to the use of thermophilic algae to recycle CO{sub 2} from scrubbed stack gases. The organisms were grown on stationary surfaces to facilitate algal stability and promote light distribution. The testing done throughout the year examined properties of CO{sub 2} concentration, temperature, light intensity, and light duration on process viability and the growth of the Nostoc. The results indicate that the Nostoc species is suitable only in a temperature range below 125 F, which may be practical given flue gas cooling. Further, results indicate that high lighting levels are not suitable for this organism, as bleaching occurs and growth rates are inhibited. Similarly, the organisms do not respond well to extended lighting durations, requiring a significant (greater than eight hour) dark cycle on a consistent basis. Other results indicate a relative insensitivity to CO{sub 2} levels between 7-12% and CO levels as high as 800 ppm. Other significant results alluded to previously, relate to the development of the overall process. Two processes developed during the year offer tremendous potential to enhance process viability. First, integration of solar collection and distribution technology from Oak Ridge laboratories could provide a significant space savings and enhanced use of solar energy. Second, the use of translating slug flow

  2. Phase Behaviour, Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Clathrate Hydrate Systems of Carbon Dioxide in Presence of Tetrahydrofuran and Electrolytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohamad Sabil, K. Bin

    2009-01-01

    In view of the possibilities for new development of carbon dioxide hydrate processes, this study focused on experimental measurements to obtain fundamental insight into the phase behaviour and the kinetic of formation of carbon dioxide hydrate forming systems. These data are essential for the develo

  3. Aesthetic Depigmentation of Gingival Smoker’s Melanosis Using Carbon Dioxide Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Silva Monteiro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Melanic pigmentation results from melanin produced by the melanocytes present in the basal layer of the oral epithelium. One of the most common causes of oral pigmentation is smoker melanosis, a condition associated with the melanocyte stimulation caused by cigarette smoke. This paper aims to illustrate the use of a carbon dioxide laser in the removal of the gingival melanic pigmentation for aesthetic reasons in a 27-year-old female patient with history of a smoking habit. The carbon dioxide laser vaporisation was performed on the gingival mucosa with effective and quick results and without any complications or significant symptoms after the treatment. We conclude that a carbon dioxide laser could be a useful, effective, and safe instrument to treat the aesthetic complications caused by oral smoker melanosis.

  4. Electrochemical Reactor for Producing Oxygen From Carbon Dioxide Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An electrochemical reactor is proposed by MicroCell Technologies, LLC to electrochemically reduce carbon dioxide to oxygen. In support of NASA's advanced life...

  5. Heterogeneously Catalysed Chemical Reactions in Carbon Dioxide Medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musko, Nikolai E.

    studies of catalytic chemical reactions in dense and supercritical carbon dioxide have been complemented by the theoretical calculations of phase equilibria using advanced thermodynamic models. In the recent years, the use of compressed carbon dioxide as innovative, non-toxic and non-flammable, cheap...... is discussed more extensively. Heterogeneously catalysed hydrogenation reactions are considered to be quite well studied and established. However, the catalyst performance can alter significantly when the reaction is performed in carbon dioxide medium. This effect was studied with the example of the selective...... the selective hydrogenation of unsaturated aldehydes in carbon dioxide medium. It was found that supported tungstosilicic acid catalysts and acidic resin Amberlyst-15 are very effective for performing aldol reactions. The positive influence of temperature and CO2-content on catalyst activity was studied...

  6. Miniature Carbon Dioxide Sensor for Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There is a growing need to develop improved technologies for precise airborne measurements of carbon dioxide, CO2. CO2 measurements are of great importance to many...

  7. Comment on "An optimized potential for carbon dioxide"

    OpenAIRE

    Merker, T.; Vrabec, J.; Hasse, H.

    2009-01-01

    A molecular model for carbon dioxide is assessed regarding vapor-liquid equilibrium properties. Large deviations, being above 15 %, are found for vapor pressure and saturated vapor density in the entire temperature range.

  8. Carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide in the North Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DileepKumar, M.; Naqvi, S.W.A.; Jayakumar, D.A.; George, M.D.; Narvekar, P.V.; DeSousa, S.N.

    The understanding of biogeochemical cycling of carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide in the oceans is essential for predicting the fate of anthropogenically emitted components. The North Indian Ocean, with its diverse regimes, provides us with a natural...

  9. Miniature Carbon Dioxide Sensor for Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Phase 1 has seen the development of a revolutionary new type of sensor for making carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements from small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) and...

  10. Use of the electrosurgical unit in a carbon dioxide atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culp, William C; Kimbrough, Bradly A; Luna, Sarah; Maguddayao, Aris J; Eidson, Jack L; Paolino, David V

    2016-01-01

    The electrosurgical unit (ESU) utilizes an electrical discharge to cut and coagulate tissue and is often held above the surgical site, causing a spark to form. The voltage at which the spark is created, termed the breakdown voltage, is governed by the surrounding gaseous environment. Surgeons are now utilizing the ESU laparoscopically with carbon dioxide insufflation, potentially altering ESU operating characteristics. This study examines the clinical implications of altering gas composition by measuring the spark gap distance as a marker of breakdown voltage and use of the ESU on a biologic model, both in room air and carbon dioxide. Paschen's Law predicted a 35% decrease in gap distance in carbon dioxide, while testing revealed an average drop of 37-47% as compared to air. However, surgical model testing revealed no perceivable clinical difference. Electrosurgery can be performed in carbon dioxide environments, although surgeons should be aware of potentially altered ESU performance.

  11. Precision remote sensor for oxygen and carbon dioxide Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Mesa Photonics proposes development of a passive optical sensor for simultaneous high-precision measurement of oxygen and carbon dioxide profiles within the full...

  12. Carbon dioxide laser treatment of balanitis xerotica obliterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratz, J L

    1984-05-01

    A case of balanitis xerotica obliterans unresponsive to topical therapy is presented. The condition was successfully corrected following epithelial vaporization with the carbon dioxide laser, the patient remaining free of recurrence for 21 months postoperatively.

  13. Multiphase flow of carbon dioxide and brine in dual porosity carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentland, Christopher; Oedai, Sjaam; Ott, Holger

    2014-05-01

    The storage of carbon dioxide in subsurface formations presents a challenge in terms of multiphase flow characterisation. Project planning requires an understanding of multiphase flow characteristics such as the relationship between relative permeability and saturation. At present there are only a limited number of relative permeability relations for carbon dioxide-brine fluid systems, most of which are measured on sandstone rocks. In this study coreflood experiments are performed to investigate the relative permeability of carbon dioxide and brine in two dual porosity carbonate systems. Carbon dioxide is injected into the brine saturated rocks in a primary drainage process. The rock fluid system is pre-equilibrated to avoid chemical reactions and physical mass transfer between phases. The pressure drop across the samples, the amount of brine displaced and the saturation distribution within the rocks are measured. The experiments are repeated on the same rocks for the decane-brine fluid system. The experimental data is interpreted by simulating the experiments with a continuum scale Darcy solver. Selected functional representations of relative permeability are investigated, the parameters of which are chosen such that a least squares objective function is minimised (i.e. the difference between experimental observations and simulated response). The match between simulation and measurement is dependent upon the form of the functional representations. The best agreement is achieved with the Corey [Brooks and Corey, 1964] or modified Corey [Masalmeh et al., 2007] functions which best represent the relative permeability of brine at low brine saturations. The relative permeability of carbon dioxide is shown to be lower than the relative permeability of decane over the saturation ranges investigated. The relative permeability of the brine phase is comparable for the two fluid systems. These observations are consistent with the rocks being water-wet. During the experiment

  14. Carbon dioxide heat pump for dual-temperature drinking fountain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨大章; 吕静; 何哲彬; 黄秀芝

    2009-01-01

    Carbon dioxide trans-critical heat pump system for heating and cooling water was designed,and its thermodynamic steady-state concentration model was established. Based on the steady-state model,parameters of the carbon dioxide trans-critical heat pump were calculated by computer programming. According to these parameters,the effects and application prospect of the heat pump system were analyzed for dual-temperature drinking fountains.

  15. Seawater pH and Anthropogenic Carbon Dioxide

    CERN Document Server

    Marsh, Gerald E

    2008-01-01

    In 2005, the Royal Society published a report titled "Ocean acidification due to increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide". The report's principal conclusion-that average ocean pH could decrease by 0.5 units by 2100-is demonstrated here to be consistent with a linear extrapolation of very limited data. It is also shown that current understanding of ocean mixing, and of the relationship between pH and atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration, cannot justify such an extrapolation.

  16. Carbon Dioxide Effects under Conditions of Raised Environmental Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-12-26

    the inspiratory muscles might have contributed to the elevated carbon dioxide tensions in the trained underwater swimmer because it was shown that...alveolar carbon dioxide tensions increase linearly with the work- load on the inspiratory muscles (Milic- Emili & Tyler 1962). Lanphier (1963...Submarine Escape Training Tank, U.S. Naval Submarine Base New London, in dives to 90 ft (3.7 ATA) (Sehaefer 1955; Schaefer & Carey 1962). During

  17. Mycorrhizal mediation of soil organic carbon decomposition under elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Significant effort in global change research has recently been directed towards assessing the potential of soil as a carbon sink under future atmospheric carbon dioxide scenarios. Attention has focused on the impact of elevated carbon dioxide on plant interactions with mycorrhizae, a symbiotic soil...

  18. Fixation of carbon dioxide into dimethyl carbonate over titanium-based zeolitic thiophene-benzimidazolate framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    A titanium-based zeolitic thiophene-benzimidazolate framework has been designed for the direct synthesis of dimethyl carbonate (DMC) from methanol and carbon dioxide. The developed catalyst activates carbon dioxide and delivers over 16% yield of DMC without the use of any dehydra...

  19. Carbon dioxide grows as recovery tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byars, C.

    1972-08-07

    Two more companies, Shell Oil Co. and Atlantic Richfield Co., are starting up COD2U injection projects in W. Texas. Miscible recovery projects using carbon dioxide are being started in Crossett Field and Wasson Field. Announcement of similar projects in North Cowden and Slaughter-Leveland fields to be conducted by Amoco Production Co. is expected. Shell, which is supplying some of the gas from its deep wells in the JM and East Brown Bassett fields, is taking 20 MMcfd of the COD2U as the line goes through the North Cross unit on its way to Sacroc. The North Cross project expects to recover an additional 8,851,000 bbl of oil. Original oil-in-place is estimated at 51 million bbl. Cumulative production has been 6.9 million bbl and current output is 1,600 bpd from 18 wells. Atlantic Richfield Co. (ARCO) will start injecting COD2U in mid-September at their project in the Willard unit of Wasson Field in Yoakum County. The project area has produced about 85.8 million bbl of 33$ gravi regenerated scrubbing solution to ste (10 claims)

  20. Suppressing bullfrog larvae with carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Jackson A.; Ray, Andrew; Sepulveda, Adam J.; Watten, Barnaby J.; Densmore, Christine L.; Layhee, Megan J.; Mark Abbey-Lambert,; ,

    2014-01-01

    Current management strategies for the control and suppression of the American Bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus = Rana catesbeiana Shaw) and other invasive amphibians have had minimal effect on their abundance and distribution. This study evaluates the effects of carbon dioxide (CO2) on pre- and prometamorphic Bullfrog larvae. Bullfrogs are a model organism for evaluating potential suppression agents because they are a successful invader worldwide. From experimental trials we estimated that the 24-h 50% and 99% lethal concentration (LC50 and LC99) values for Bullfrog larvae were 371 and 549 mg CO2/L, respectively. Overall, larvae that succumbed to experimental conditions had a lower body condition index than those that survived. We also documented sublethal changes in blood chemistry during prolonged exposure to elevated CO2. Specifically, blood pH decreased by more than 0.5 pH units after 9 h of exposure and both blood partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) and blood glucose increased. These findings suggest that CO2 treatments can be lethal to Bullfrog larvae under controlled laboratory conditions. We believe this work represents the necessary foundation for further consideration of CO2 as a potential suppression agent for one of the most harmful invaders to freshwater ecosystems.

  1. Vibrations of the carbon dioxide dimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hua; Light, J. C.

    2000-03-01

    Fully coupled four-dimensional quantum-mechanical calculations are presented for intermolecular vibrational states of rigid carbon dioxide dimer for J=0. The Hamiltonian operator is given in collision coordinates. The Hamiltonian matrix elements are evaluated using symmetrized products of spherical harmonics for angles and a potential optimized discrete variable representation (PO-DVR) for the intermolecular distance. The lowest ten or so states of each symmetry are reported for the potential energy surface (PES) given by Bukowski et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 110, 3785 (1999)]. Due to symmetries, there is no interconversion tunneling splitting for the ground state. Our calculations show that there is no tunneling shift of the ground state within our computation precision (0.01 cm-1). Analysis of the wave functions shows that only the ground states of each symmetry are nearly harmonic. The van der Waals frequencies and symmetry adapted force constants are found and compared to available experimental values. Strong coupling between the stretching coordinates and the bending coordinates are found for vibrationally excited states. The interconversion tunneling shifts are discussed for the vibrationally excited states.

  2. Some Organic Reactions in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Huan-feng; YANG Xiao-yue; LI Guo-ping; ZOU Gang

    2004-01-01

    Organic reactions in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) have facilitated great progress in recent years 1. ScCO2, as an environmentally friendly reaction medium, may be a substitute for volatile and toxic organic solvents and show some special advantages. Firstly, CO2 is inexpensive,nonflammable, nontoxic and chemical inert under many conditions. Secondly, scCO2 possesses hybrid properties of both liquid and gas, to the advantage of some reactions involving gaseous reagents. Control of the solvent density by variation of the temperature and pressure enables the solvent properties to be "tuned" to reactants. Finally, separating of CO2 from the reaction mixture is energy-efficient and simple. Here we disclose our new work on some organic reactions involving small molecules in scCO2.The results showed that the upper reactions in scCO2 could be carried out smoothly and thepressure of CO2 had a remarkable effect on the conversion and selectivity.

  3. Acute carbon dioxide avoidance in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallem, Elissa A; Sternberg, Paul W

    2008-06-10

    Carbon dioxide is produced as a by-product of cellular respiration by all aerobic organisms and thus serves for many animals as an important indicator of food, mates, and predators. However, whether free-living terrestrial nematodes such as Caenorhabditis elegans respond to CO2 was unclear. We have demonstrated that adult C. elegans display an acute avoidance response upon exposure to CO2 that is characterized by the cessation of forward movement and the rapid initiation of backward movement. This response is mediated by a cGMP signaling pathway that includes the cGMP-gated heteromeric channel TAX-2/TAX-4. CO2 avoidance is modulated by multiple signaling molecules, including the neuropeptide Y receptor NPR-1 and the calcineurin subunits TAX-6 and CNB-1. Nutritional status also modulates CO2 responsiveness via the insulin and TGFbeta signaling pathways. CO2 response is mediated by a neural circuit that includes the BAG neurons, a pair of sensory neurons of previously unknown function. TAX-2/TAX-4 function in the BAG neurons to mediate acute CO2 avoidance. Our results demonstrate that C. elegans senses and responds to CO2 using multiple signaling pathways and a neural network that includes the BAG neurons and that this response is modulated by the physiological state of the worm.

  4. Euthanasia of neonatal mice with carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchett, K.; Corrow, D.; Stockwell, J.; Smith, A.

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to carbon dioxide (CO2) is the most prevalent method used to euthanize rodents in biomedical research. The purpose of this study was to determine the time of CO2 exposure required to euthanize neonatal mice (0 to 10 days old). Multiple groups of mice were exposed to 100% CO 2 for time periods between 5 and 60 min. Mice were placed in room air for 10 or 20 min after CO2 exposure, to allow for the chance of recovery. If mice recovered at one time point, a longer exposure was examined. Inbred and outbred mice were compared. Results of the study indicated that time to death varied with the age of the animals and could be as long as 50 min on the day of birth and differed between inbred and outbred mice. Institutions euthanizing neonatal mice with CO2 may wish to adjust their CO 2 exposure time periods according the age of the mice and their genetic background. Copyright 2005 by the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science.

  5. Carbon dioxide balneotherapy and cardiovascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagourelias, Efstathios D.; Zorou, Paraskevi G.; Tsaligopoulos, Miltiadis; Athyros, Vasilis G.; Karagiannis, Asterios; Efthimiadis, Georgios K.

    2011-09-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) balneotherapy is a kind of remedy with a wide spectrum of applications which have been used since the Middle Ages. However, its potential use as an adjuvant therapeutic option in patients with cardiovascular disease is not yet fully clarified. We performed a thorough review of MEDLINE Database, EMBASE, ISI WEB of Knowledge, COCHRANE database and sites funded by balneotherapy centers across Europe in order to recognize relevant studies and aggregate evidence supporting the use of CO2 baths in various cardiovascular diseases. The three main effects of CO2 hydrotherapy during whole body or partial immersion, including decline in core temperature, an increase in cutaneous blood flow, and an elevation of the score on thermal sensation, are analyzed on a pathophysiology basis. Additionally, the indications and contra-indications of the method are presented in an evidence-based way, while the need for new methodologically sufficient studies examining the use of CO2 baths in other cardiovascular substrates is discussed.

  6. Evidence for Carbonate Surface Complexation during Forsterite Carbonation in Wet Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loring, John S.; Chen, Jeffrey; Benezeth, Pascale; Qafoku, Odeta; Ilton, Eugene S.; Washton, Nancy M.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Martin, Paul F.; McGrail, B. Peter; Rosso, Kevin M.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2015-06-16

    Continental flood basalts are attractive formations for geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide because of their reactive divalent-cation containing silicates, such as forsterite (Mg2SiO4), suitable for long-term trapping of CO2 mineralized as metal carbonates. The goal of this study was to investigate at a molecular level the carbonation products formed during the reaction of forsterite with supercritical CO2 (scCO2) as a function of the concentration of H2O adsorbed to the forsterite surface. Experiments were performed at 50 °C and 90 bar using an in situ IR titration capability, and post-reaction samples were examined by ex situ techniques, including SEM, XPS, FIB-TEM, TGA-MS, and MAS-NMR. Carbonation products and reaction extents varied greatly with adsorbed H2O. We show for the first time evidence of Mg-carbonate surface complexation under wet scCO2 conditions. Carbonate is found to be coordinated to Mg at the forsterite surface in a predominately bidentate fashion at adsorbed H2O concentrations below 27 µmol/m2. Above this concentration and up to 76 µmol/m2, monodentate coordinated complexes become dominant. Beyond a threshold adsorbed H2O concentration of 76 µmol/m2, crystalline carbonates continuously precipitate as magnesite, and the particles that form are hundreds of times larger than the estimated thicknesses of the adsorbed water films of about 7 to 15 Å. At an applied level, the implication of these results is that mineral trapping in scCO2 dominated fluids will be insignificant and limited to surface complexation unless adsorbed H2O concentrations are high enough to promote crystalline carbonate formation. At a fundamental level, the surface complexes and their dependence on adsorbed H2O concentration give insights regarding forsterite dissolution processes and magnesite nucleation and growth.

  7. The vitiation effects of water vapor and carbon dioxide on the autoignition characteristics of kerosene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jin-Hu; Wang, Su; Zhang, Sheng-Tao; Yue, Lian-Jie; Fan, Bing-Cheng; Zhang, Xin-Yu; Cui, Ji-Ping

    2014-08-01

    In ground tests of hypersonic scramjet, the high-enthalpy airstream produced by burning hydrocarbon fuels often contains contaminants of water vapor and carbon dioxide. The contaminants may change the ignition characteristics of fuels between ground tests and real flights. In order to properly assess the influence of the contaminants on ignition characteristics of hydrocarbon fuels, the effect of water vapor and carbon dioxide on the ignition delay times of China RP-3 kerosene was studied behind reflected shock waves in a preheated shock tube. Experiments were conducted over a wider temperature range of 800-1 500K, at a pressure of 0.3 MPa, equivalence ratios of 0.5 and 1, and oxygen concentration of 20%. Ignition delay times were determined from the onset of the excited radical OH emission together with the pressure profile. Ignition delay times were measured for four cases: (1) clean gas, (2) gas vitiated with 10% and 20% water vapor in mole, (3) gas vitiated with 10% carbon dioxide in mole, and (4) gas vitiated with 10% water vapor and 10% carbon dioxide, 20% water vapor and 10% carbon dioxide in mole. The results show that carbon dioxide produces an inhibiting effect at temperatures below 1 300 K when ϕ = 0.5, whereas water vapor appears to accelerate the ignition process below a critical temperature of about 1 000 K when ϕ = 0.5. When both water vapor and carbon dioxide exist together, a minor inhibiting effect is observed at ϕ = 0.5, while no effect is found at ϕ = 1.0. The results are also discussed preliminary by considering both the combustion reaction mechanism and the thermophysics properties of the fuel mixtures. The current measurements demonstrate vitiation effects of water vapor and carbon dioxide on the autoignition characteristics of China RP-3 kerosene at air-like O2 concentration. It is important to account for such effects when data are extrapolated from ground testing to real flight conditions.

  8. Dissolution-rate enhancement of fenofibrate by adsorption onto silica using supercritical carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanganwar, Ganesh P; Gupta, Ram B

    2008-08-06

    Dissolution rate of a poorly water-soluble drug, fenofibrate, is increased by adsorbing the drug onto silica. The adsorption is achieved by first dissolving the drug in supercritical carbon dioxide and then depressurizing the solution onto silica. Loadings of up to 27.5 wt.% drug onto silica are obtained. Since solvents are not used in the loading process, the fenofibrate/silica formulation is free of any residual solvent, and carbon dioxide is freely removed upon depressurization. The formulation is characterized using infrared spectroscopy, ultraviolet spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and scanning electron microscopy. Based on in vitro dissolution study, a significant increase in the dissolution rate (approximately 80% drug release in 20 min) of drug-silica formulation is observed as compared to micronized fenofibrate (approximately 20% drug release in 20 min), which can be attributed to increase in the surface area and decrease in the crystallinity of drug after adsorption onto silica. Two different formulations are compared: (A) amorphous fenofibrate/silica and (B) slightly crystalline fenofibrate/silica. The second formulation is found to be more stable on storage.

  9. Epoxide-functionalization of polyethyleneimine for synthesis of stable carbon dioxide adsorbent in temperature swing adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woosung; Min, Kyungmin; Kim, Chaehoon; Ko, Young Soo; Jeon, Jae Wan; Seo, Hwimin; Park, Yong-Ki; Choi, Minkee

    2016-08-01

    Amine-containing adsorbents have been extensively investigated for post-combustion carbon dioxide capture due to their ability to chemisorb low-concentration carbon dioxide from a wet flue gas. However, earlier studies have focused primarily on the carbon dioxide uptake of adsorbents, and have not demonstrated effective adsorbent regeneration and long-term stability under such conditions. Here, we report the versatile and scalable synthesis of a functionalized-polyethyleneimine (PEI)/silica adsorbent which simultaneously exhibits a large working capacity (2.2 mmol g-1) and long-term stability in a practical temperature swing adsorption process (regeneration under 100% carbon dioxide at 120 °C), enabling the separation of concentrated carbon dioxide. We demonstrate that the functionalization of PEI with 1,2-epoxybutane reduces the heat of adsorption and facilitates carbon dioxide desorption (>99%) during regeneration compared with unmodified PEI (76%). Moreover, the functionalization significantly improves long-term adsorbent stability over repeated temperature swing adsorption cycles due to the suppression of urea formation and oxidative amine degradation.

  10. Catalytic conversion of methane: Carbon dioxide reforming and oxidative coupling

    KAUST Repository

    Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Natural gas conversion remains one of the essential technologies for current energy needs. This review focuses on the mechanistic aspects of the development of efficient and durable catalysts for two reactions, carbon dioxide reforming and the oxidative coupling of methane. These two reactions have tremendous technological significance for practical application in industry. An understanding of the fundamental aspects and reaction mechanisms of the catalytic reactions reviewed in this study would support the design of industrial catalysts. CO 2 reforming of methane utilizes CO 2, which is often stored in large quantities, to convert as a reactant. Strategies to eliminate carbon deposition, which is the major problem associated with this reaction, are discussed. The oxidative coupling of methane directly produces ethylene in one reactor through a slightly exothermic reaction, potentially minimizing the capital cost of the natural gas conversion process. The focus of discussion in this review will be on the attainable yield of C 2 products by rigorous kinetic analyses.

  11. The role of renewable bioenergy in carbon dioxide sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, C.M. [Hawaii Natural Energy Inst., Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The use of renewable resources represents a sound approach to producing clean energy and reducing the dependence on diminishing reserves of fossil fuels. Unfortunately, the widespread interest in renewable energy in the 1970s, spurred by escalating fossil fuel prices, subsided with the collapse of energy prices in the mid 1980s. Today, it is largely to reverse alarming environmental trends, particularly the buildup of atmospheric carbon dioxide, rather than to reduce the cost of energy, that renewable energy resources are being pursued. This discussion focuses on a specific class of renewable energy resources - biomass. Unlike most other classes of renewable energy touted for controlling atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations, e.g., hydro, direct solar, wind, geothermal, and ocean thermal, which produce usable forms of energy while generating little or no carbon dioxide emissions, bioenergy almost always involves combustion and therefore generates carbon dioxide; however, if used on a sustained basis, bio-energy would not contribute to the build-up of atmospheric carbon dioxide because the amount released in combustion would be balanced by that taken up via photosynthesis. It is in that context, i.e., sustained production of biomass as a modern energy carrier, rather than reforestation for carbon sequestration, that biomass is being discussed here, since biomass can play a much greater role in controlling global warming by displacing fossil fuels than by being used strictly for carbon sequestration (partly because energy crop production can reduce fossil carbon dioxide emissions indefinitely, whereas under the reforestation strategy, carbon dioxide abatement ceases at forest maturity).

  12. Carbon Dioxide Reduction Technology Trade Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, Frank F.; Anderson, Molly S.; Abney, Morgan B.

    2011-01-01

    For long-term human missions, a closed-loop atmosphere revitalization system (ARS) is essential to minimize consumables. A carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction technology is used to reclaim oxygen (O2) from metabolic CO2 and is vital to reduce the delivery mass of metabolic O2. A key step in closing the loop for ARS will include a proper CO2 reduction subsystem that is reliable and with low equivalent system mass (ESM). Sabatier and Bosch CO2 reduction are two traditional CO2 reduction subsystems (CRS). Although a Sabatier CRS has been delivered to International Space Station (ISS) and is an important step toward closing the ISS ARS loop, it recovers only 50% of the available O2 in CO2. A Bosch CRS is able to reclaim all O2 in CO2. However, due to continuous carbon deposition on the catalyst surface, the penalties of replacing spent catalysts and reactors and crew time in a Bosch CRS are significant. Recently, technologies have been developed for recovering hydrogen (H2) from Sabatier-product methane (CH4). These include methane pyrolysis using a microwave plasma, catalytic thermal pyrolysis of CH4 and thermal pyrolysis of CH4. Further, development in Sabatier reactor designs based on microchannel and microlith technology could open up opportunities in reducing system mass and enhancing system control. Improvements in Bosch CRS conversion have also been reported. In addition, co-electrolysis of steam and CO2 is a new technology that integrates oxygen generation and CO2 reduction functions in a single system. A co-electrolysis unit followed by either a Sabatier or a carbon formation reactor based on Bosch chemistry could improve the overall competitiveness of an integrated O2 generation and CO2 reduction subsystem. This study evaluates all these CO2 reduction technologies, conducts water mass balances for required external supply of water for 1-, 5- and 10-yr missions, evaluates mass, volume, power, cooling and resupply requirements of various technologies. A system

  13. Carbon Dioxide-Water Emulsions for Enhanced Oil Recovery and Permanent Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, David; Golomb, Dan; Shi, Guang; Shih, Cherry; Lewczuk, Rob; Miksch, Joshua; Manmode, Rahul; Mulagapati, Srihariraju; Malepati, Chetankurmar

    2011-09-30

    This project involves the use of an innovative new invention Particle Stabilized Emulsions (PSEs) of Carbon Dioxide-in-Water and Water-in-Carbon Dioxide for Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) and Permanent Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide. The EOR emulsion would be injected into a semi-depleted oil reservoir such as Dover 33 in Otsego County, Michigan. It is expected that the emulsion would dislocate the stranded heavy crude oil from the rock granule surfaces, reduce its viscosity, and increase its mobility. The advancing emulsion front should provide viscosity control which drives the reduced-viscosity oil toward the production wells. The make-up of the emulsion would be subsequently changed so it interacts with the surrounding rock minerals in order to enhance mineralization, thereby providing permanent sequestration of the injected CO{sub 2}. In Phase 1 of the project, the following tasks were accomplished: 1. Perform laboratory scale (mL/min) refinements on existing procedures for producing liquid carbon dioxide-in-water (C/W) and water-in-liquid carbon dioxide (W/C) emulsion stabilized by hydrophilic and hydrophobic fine particles, respectively, using a Kenics-type static mixer. 2. Design and cost evaluate scaled up (gal/min) C/W and W/C emulsification systems to be deployed in Phase 2 at the Otsego County semi-depleted oil field. 3. Design the modifications necessary to the present CO{sub 2} flooding system at Otsego County for emulsion injection. 4. Design monitoring and verification systems to be deployed in Phase 2 for measuring potential leakage of CO{sub 2} after emulsion injection. 5. Design production protocol to assess enhanced oil recovery with emulsion injection compared to present recovery with neat CO{sub 2} flooding. 6. Obtain Federal and State permits for emulsion injection. Initial research focused on creating particle stabilized emulsions with the smallest possible globule size so that the emulsion can penetrate even low-permeability crude

  14. Effects of carbon dioxide hydration kinetics and evaporative convection on pH profile development during interfacial mass transfer of ammonia and carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, Sasha D.; Sommer, Sven G.; Petersen, Valdemar; Markfoged, Rikke

    2016-09-01

    Interfacial mass transfer of NH_3 and CO_2 are important in processes as diverse as NH_3 emission from animal manure and gas scrubbing for removal of carbon dioxide. Predicting transfer rates is complicated by bidirectional interactions between solution pH and emission rates, which may be affected by physical, chemical, and biological processes. We studied the effects of CO_2 hydration kinetics and evaporative convection on the development of pH profiles in solutions undergoing simultaneous emission of NH_3 and CO_2 . Profiles of pH were measured at a 0.1 mm resolution over 15 h, and interpreted using a reaction-transport model. Under high humidity, surface pH increased quickly (>0.2 units in 8 min) and an increase gradually extended to deeper depths. An increase in CO_2 hydration and carbonic acid dehydration rates by addition of carbonic anhydrase increased the elevation of surface pH and the depth to which an increase extended, due to an increase in CO_2 emission. Results show that unless carbonic anhydrase is present, the equilibrium approach typically used for modeling interfacial transport of CO_2 and NH_3 will be inaccurate. Evaporation and resulting convection greatly increased mass transfer rates below an apparent surface film about 1 mm thick. Emission or absorption of CO_2 can produce steep gradients in pH over small distances (20 mm) in systems with and without convective mixing, and the resulting surface pH, in turn, strongly affects NH_3 transfer. Both convection and the rate of hydration/dehydration reactions are likely to affect pH profile development and rates of NH_3 and CO_2 transfer in many systems. Accurately predicting mass transfer rates for these systems will require an understanding of these processes in the systems.

  15. Controlled Carbon Source Addition to an Alternating Nitrification-Denitrification Wastewater Treatment Process Including Biological P Removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaacs, Steven Howard; Henze, Mogens

    1995-01-01

    experiments performed in 5 liter bottles indicated that the denitrification rate can be instantaneously increased through the addition of either carbon source. The amount by which the rate was increased depended on the amount of carbon added. In the main experiments performed in a pilot scale alternating...

  16. It is time to put carbon dioxide to work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipinsky, E.S. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The need to control emissions of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere is the subject of vigorous debate at this time. There is growing evidence that rising levels of carbon dioxide increase global warming, with perhaps highly adverse impacts for the human economy. There are calls for carbon taxes and other harsh measures. Japan has established a national goal of holding carbon dioxide emissions in the year 2000 to 1990 levels. I hope that this conference will be a turning point in the United States position on this issue. The current major end uses for CO{sub 2} include refrigeration, beverage carbonation, soda ash production, fire fighting, and urea fertilizer production. They are all based on chemistry that would not surprise a good chemist of the 19th century. Consumption of carbon dioxide in synthesis of industrial chemicals is limited. Usually one explains low production of chemicals from a candidate feedstock in terms of poor availability, price, purity, or reactivity. We can eliminate the first three as the causes of the underutilization of carbon dioxide.

  17. 高密度二氧化碳技术在食品加工中的应用研究%Research of the application of dense phase carbon dioxide in food processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘文营; 黄丽燕; 卢晓明; 张强; 赵维高; 王旭清; 韩兆鹏; 刘旭明

    2011-01-01

    As an important non-thermal processing technique,Dense Phase Carbon Dioxide(DPCD)has become one of the most active technologies for the inactivation of microorganisms,enzymes and ameliorate characters. The research progress of the application of DPCD in food processing was focused on,in the hope of providing serviceable message for intensive study and extensive use.%作为一项重要的非热加工技术,高密度二氧化碳(Dense Phase Carbon Dioxide,DPCD)技术已经成为目前食品杀菌、钝酶和改善食品品质上较为活跃的研究方向之一。对DPCD在食品加工领域的研究进展进行了综述,以期为DPCD技术的深入研究与广泛应用提供参考。

  18. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal with different carbon sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Nan; Zhou, Yan

    2016-06-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) process is one of the most economical and sustainable methods for phosphorus removal from wastewater. However, the performance of EBPR can be affected by available carbon sources types in the wastewater that may induce different functional microbial communities in the process. Glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) and polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) are commonly found by coexisting in the EBPR process. Predominance of GAO population may lead to EBPR failure due to the competition on carbon source with PAO without contributing phosphorus removal. Carbon sources indeed play an important role in alteration of PAOs and GAOs in EBPR processes. Various types of carbon sources have been investigated for EBPR performance. Certain carbon sources tend to enrich specific groups of GAOs and/or PAOs. This review summarizes the types of carbon sources applied in EBPR systems and highlights the roles of these carbon sources in PAO and GAO competition. Both single (e.g., acetate, propionate, glucose, ethanol, and amino acid) and complex carbon sources (e.g., yeast extract, peptone, and mixed carbon sources) are discussed in this review. Meanwhile, the environmental friendly and economical carbon sources that are derived from waste materials, such as crude glycerol and wasted sludge, are also discussed and compared.

  19. 46 CFR 147.65 - Carbon dioxide and halon fire extinguishing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon dioxide and halon fire extinguishing systems. 147... dioxide and halon fire extinguishing systems. (a) Carbon dioxide or halon cylinders forming part of a...) Carbon dioxide or halon cylinders must be rejected for further service when they— (1) Leak; (2)...

  20. Short and Long Term Impacts of Forest Bioenergy Production on Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudiburg, T.; Law, B. E.; Luyssaert, S.; Thornton, P. E.

    2011-12-01

    Temperate forest annual net uptake of CO2 from the atmosphere is equivalent to ~16% of the annual fossil fuel emissions in the United States. Mitigation strategies to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide have lead to investigation of alternative sources of energy including forest biomass. The prospect of forest derived bioenergy has led to implementation of new forest management strategies based on the assumption that they will reduce total CO2 emissions to the atmosphere by simultaneously reducing the risk of wildfire and substituting for fossil fuels. The benefit of managing forests for bioenergy substitution of fossil fuels versus potential carbon sequestration by reducing harvest needs to be evaluated. This study uses a combination of Federal Forest Inventory data (FIA), remote sensing, and a coupled carbon-nitrogen ecosystem process model (CLM4-CN) to predict net atmospheric CO2 emissions from forest thinning for bioenergy production in Oregon under varying future management and climate scenarios. We use life-cycle assessment (LCA) incorporating both the forest and forest product sinks and sources of carbon dioxide. Future modeled results are compared with a reduced harvest scenario to determine the potential for increased carbon sequestration in forest biomass. We find that Oregon forests are a current strong sink of 7.5 ± 1.7 Tg C yr-1 or 61 g C m-2 yr-1. (NBP; NEP minus removals from fire and harvest). In the short term, we find that carbon dynamics following harvests for fire prevention and large-scale bioenergy production lead to 2-15% higher emissions over the next 20 years compared to current management, assuming 100% effectiveness of fire prevention. Given the current sink strength, analysis of the forest sector in Oregon demonstrates that increasing harvest levels by all practices above current business-as-usual levels increases CO2 emissions to the atmosphere as long as the region's sink persists. In the long-term, we find that projected changes in

  1. Recent Progress in the Synthesis of Polymers Based on Carbon Dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. Sugimoto; S. Inoue

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction Carbon dioxide is the most fundamental carbon resource indispensable for all living systems including human being via photosynthesis by green plants. On the other hand, chemical utilization of carbon dioxide has been rather limited.

  2. [Effects of two typical substrates as the sole carbon source on biological phosphorus removal with a single-stage oxic process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi-Lin; Wang, Dong-Bo; Li, Xiao-Ming; Yang, Qi; Zou, Gao-Long; Jia, Bin; Zeng, Tian-Jing; Ding, Yan; Zeng, Guang-Ming

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the performances of phosphorus removal in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) with single-stage oxic process using synthetical wastewater, glucose (R1) and acetate (R2) were fed to two SBRs as the sole carbon source, respectively. The operation run mode was determined to be: influent --> aeration (4 h) --> settling (8 h) --> effluent. The results showed that the performance of phosphorus removal in R1 was higher than that in R2 after steady-operation. Total phosphorus (TP) removed per MLVSS in R1 and R2 were 7.2-7.7 and 3.8-4.6 mg x g(-1) during aeration, respectively, but the rate of phosphorus release at the two reactors were 3.6-3.8 and 2.7-3.1 mg x g(-1) during the idle zone, respectively. The energy storage of poly-beta-hydroxyalkanoates (PHA) was constant nearly in R1 during the whole period, but glycogen was accumulated to the maximum value at 30 minutes of aeration, and then was decreased to the initial level. However in R2, PHA and glycogen were both accumulated at about 45 minutes of aeration. This phenomenon suggested that glycogen is the main energy source for metabolism during aerobic period in R1, and the main energy resource come from the decomposition of PHA and the hydrolysis of glycogen in R2. The facts showed that glycogen could replace PHAs to supply energy for phosphate uptake and polyphosphate accumulation in such a single-stage oxic process. Since glycogen accumulated in R1 was more than that in R2, the efficiency of phosphorus removal in R1 was higher than that in R2.

  3. Fluid Dynamics of Carbon Dioxide Disposal into Saline Aquifers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Julio Enrique

    2003-12-18

    Injection of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) into saline aquifers has been proposed as a means to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (geological carbon sequestration). Large-scale injection of CO{sub 2} will induce a variety of coupled physical and chemical processes, including multiphase fluid flow, fluid pressurization and changes in effective stress, solute transport, and chemical reactions between fluids and formation minerals. This work addresses some of these issues with special emphasis given to the physics of fluid flow in brine formations. An investigation of the thermophysical properties of pure carbon dioxide, water and aqueous solutions of CO{sub 2} and NaCl has been conducted. As a result, accurate representations and models for predicting the overall thermophysical behavior of the system CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-NaCl are proposed and incorporated into the numerical simulator TOUGH2/ECO{sub 2}. The basic problem of CO{sub 2} injection into a radially symmetric brine aquifer is used to validate the results of TOUGH2/ECO2. The numerical simulator has been applied to more complex flow problem including the CO{sub 2} injection project at the Sleipner Vest Field in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea and the evaluation of fluid flow dynamics effects of CO{sub 2} injection into aquifers. Numerical simulation results show that the transport at Sleipner is dominated by buoyancy effects and that shale layers control vertical migration of CO{sub 2}. These results are in good qualitative agreement with time lapse surveys performed at the site. High-resolution numerical simulation experiments have been conducted to study the onset of instabilities (viscous fingering) during injection of CO{sub 2} into saline aquifers. The injection process can be classified as immiscible displacement of an aqueous phase by a less dense and less viscous gas phase. Under disposal conditions (supercritical CO{sub 2}) the viscosity of carbon dioxide can be less than the viscosity of the aqueous

  4. Carbon Dioxide Effects Research and Assessment Program. Carbon Dioxide Research Progress Report, fiscal year 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlman, R. C.; Gross, T.; Machta, L.; Elliott, W.; MacCracken, M.

    1980-04-01

    Research on the global carbon cycle and the effects of increased carbon dioxide on the global climate system is reported. Environmental and societal effects related to CO/sub 2/ and environmental control technology for CO/sub 2/ are also discussed. Lists of research projects and reports and publications of the Carbon Dioxide and Climate Research Program are included. An expanded CO/sub 2/ monitoring network is providing increased coverage for interpretation of patterns of sources and sinks seasonal variability, and documentation of the global growth of CO/sub 2/. Modeling studies emphasized that knowledge of the transport and mixing of surface ocean waters is important in understanding deep oceanic circulation. Initial studies in the equatorial Pacific are helping quantify estimates of the amount of outgassing CO/sub 2/ from tropical waters. During fiscal year 1979, there was a substantial increase in appreciation of the role of the ocean in controlling not only atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentrations but also the climatic response to changes in concentration. Model simulations of the effect of doubled CO/sub 2/ concentration carried out with fixed ocean temperatures a situation that is possible during perhaps the next 20 years, showed relatively small summer heating over land areas. On the other hand, simulations in which the oceanic temperatures could come into instantaneous equilibrium with atmospheric conditions continued to show global temperature increases of 3 +- 1.5/sup 0/C, accentuated at high latitudes. To improve understanding of possible regional climate changes, there were increased efforts to reconstruct regional climatic patterns prevailing during past warm periods that might serve as analogs of future climatic conditions. Particular attention was directed to the climates of the United States and other countries bordering the North Atlantic Ocean during the warm period 5000 to 7000 years ago.

  5. Efficiency of a Photoreactor Packed with Immobilized Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in the Removal of Acid Orange 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheidaei, Behnaz; Behnajady, Mohammad A

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the removal efficiency of Color Index Acid Orange 7 (AO7) as a model contaminant was investigated in a batch-recirculated photoreactor packed with immobilized titanium dioxide type P25 nanoparticles on glass beads. The effects of different operational parameters such as the initial concentration of AO7, the volume of solution, the volumetric flowrate, and the light source power in the photoreactor were investigated. The results indicate that the removal percent increased with the rise in volumetric flowrate and power of the light source, but decreased with the rise of the initial concentration of AO7 and the volume of solution. The AO7 degradation was followed through total organic carbon, gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS), and mineralization products analysis. The ammonium and sulfate ions were analyzed as mineralization products of nitrogen and sulfur heteroatoms, respectively. The results of GC/MS revealed the production of 1-indanone, 1-phthalanone, and 2-naphthalenol as intermediate products for the removal of AO7 in this process.

  6. Stimulating nitrate removal processes of restored wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballantine, Kate A; Groffman, Peter M; Lehmann, Johannes; Schneider, Rebecca L

    2014-07-01

    The environmental and health effects caused by nitrate contamination of aquatic systems are a serious problem throughout the world. A strategy proposed to address nitrate pollution is the restoration of wetlands. However, although natural wetlands often remove nitrate via high rates of denitrification, wetlands restored for water quality functions often fall below expectations. This may be in part because key drivers for denitrification, in particular soil carbon, are slow to develop in restored wetlands. We added organic soil amendments that range along a gradient of carbon lability to four newly restored wetlands in western New York to investigate the effect of carbon additions on denitrification and other processes of the nitrogen cycle. Soil carbon increased by 12.67-63.30% with the use of soil amendments (p ≤ 0.0001). Soil nitrate, the carbon to nitrogen ratio, and microbial biomass nitrogen were the most significant predictors of denitrification potential. Denitrification potential, potential net nitrogen nitrification and mineralization, and soil nitrate and ammonium, were highest in topsoil-amended plots, with increases in denitrification potential of 161.27% over control plots. While amendment with topsoil more than doubled several key nitrogen cycling processes, more research is required to determine what type and level of amendment application are most effective for stimulating removal of exogenous nitrate and meeting functional goals within an acceptable time frame.

  7. Single Membrane Reactor Configuration for Separation of Hydrogen, Carbon Dioxide and Hydrogen Sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Micheal Roberts; Robert Zabransky; Shain Doong; Jerry Lin

    2008-05-31

    The objective of the project was to develop a novel complementary membrane reactor process that can consolidate two or more downstream unit operations of a coal gasification system into a single module for production of a pure stream of hydrogen and a pure stream of carbon dioxide. The overall goals were to achieve higher hydrogen production efficiencies, lower capital costs and a smaller overall footprint than what could be achieved by utilizing separate components for each required unit process/operation in conventional coal-to-hydrogen systems. Specifically, this project was to develop a novel membrane reactor process that combines hydrogen sulfide removal, hydrogen separation, carbon dioxide separation and water-gas shift reaction into a single membrane configuration. The carbon monoxide conversion of the water-gas-shift reaction from the coal-derived syngas stream is enhanced by the complementary use of two membranes within a single reactor to separate hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Consequently, hydrogen production efficiency is increased. The single membrane reactor configuration produces a pure H{sub 2} product and a pure CO{sub 2} permeate stream that is ready for sequestration. This project focused on developing a new class of CO{sub 2}-selective membranes for this new process concept. Several approaches to make CO{sub 2}-selective membranes for high-temperature applications have been tested. Membrane disks using the technique of powder pressing and high temperature sintering were successfully fabricated. The powders were either metal oxide or metal carbonate materials. Experiments on CO{sub 2} permeation testing were also performed in the temperature range of 790 to 940 C for the metal carbonate membrane disks. However, no CO{sub 2} permeation rate could be measured, probably due to very slow CO{sub 2} diffusion in the solid state carbonates. To improve the permeation of CO{sub 2}, one approach is to make membranes containing liquid or molten carbonates

  8. Assessing Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Energy Use at a University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddell, William; Bhatia, Krishan Kumar; Parisi, Matthew; Foote, Jessica; Imperatore, John, III

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to assess the carbon dioxide emissions associated with electric, HVAC, and hot water use from a US university. Design/methodology/approach: First, the total on-campus electrical, natural gas and oil consumption for an entire year was assessed. For each category of energy use, the carbon associated with…

  9. Capturing carbon dioxide as a polymer from natural gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Chih-Chau; Tour, Josiah J; Kittrell, Carter; Espinal, Laura; Alemany, Lawrence B; Tour, James M

    2014-06-03

    Natural gas is considered the cleanest and recently the most abundant fossil fuel source, yet when it is extracted from wells, it often contains 10-20 mol% carbon dioxide (20-40 wt%), which is generally vented to the atmosphere. Efforts are underway to contain this carbon dioxide at the well-head using inexpensive and non-corrosive methods. Here we report nucleophilic porous carbons are synthesized from simple and inexpensive carbon-sulphur and carbon-nitrogen precursors. Infrared, Raman and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance signatures substantiate carbon dioxide fixation by polymerization in the carbon channels to form poly(CO2) under much lower pressures than previously required. This growing chemisorbed sulphur- or nitrogen-atom-initiated poly(CO2) chain further displaces physisorbed hydrocarbon, providing a continuous carbon dioxide selectivity. Once returned to ambient conditions, the poly(CO2) spontaneously depolymerizes, leading to a sorbent that can be easily regenerated without the thermal energy input that is required for traditional sorbents.

  10. 40 CFR 86.224-94 - Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carbon dioxide analyzer calibration. 86.224-94 Section 86.224-94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... New Medium-Duty Passenger Vehicles; Cold Temperature Test Procedures § 86.224-94 Carbon...

  11. Regeneration of oxygen from carbon dioxide and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissbart, J.; Smart, W. H.; Wydeven, T.

    1972-01-01

    In a closed ecological system it is necessary to reclaim most of the oxygen required for breathing from respired carbon dioxide and the remainder from waste water. One of the advanced physicochemical systems being developed for generating oxygen in manned spacecraft is the solid electrolyte-electrolysis system. The solid electrolyte system consists of two basic units, an electrolyzer and a carbon monoxide disproportionator. The electrolyzer can reclaim oxygen from both carbon dioxide and water. Electrolyzer preparation and assembly are discussed together with questions of reactor design and electrolyzer performance data.

  12. Amine reclaiming technologies in post-combustion carbon dioxide capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tielin; Hovland, Jon; Jens, Klaus J

    2015-01-01

    Amine scrubbing is the most developed technology for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture. Degradation of amine solvents due to the presence of high levels of oxygen and other impurities in flue gas causes increasing costs and deterioration in long term performance, and therefore purification of the solvents is needed to overcome these problems. This review presents the reclaiming of amine solvents used for post combustion CO2 capture (PCC). Thermal reclaiming, ion exchange, and electrodialysis, although principally developed for sour gas sweetening, have also been tested for CO2 capture from flue gas. The three technologies all have their strengths and weaknesses, and further development is needed to reduce energy usage and costs. An expected future trend for amine reclamation is to focus on process integration of the current reclaiming technologies into the PCC process in order to drive down costs.

  13. Amine reclaiming technologies in post-combustion carbon dioxide capture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tielin Wang; Jon Hovland; KlauS J.Jens

    2015-01-01

    Amine scrubbing is the most developed technology for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture.Degradation of amine solvents due to the presence of high levels of oxygen and other impurities in flue gas causes increasing costs and deterioration in long term performance,and therefore purification of the solvents is needed to overcome these problems.This review presents the reclaiming of amine solvents used for post combustion CO2 capture (PCC).Thermal reclaiming,ion exchange,and electrodialysis,although principally developed for sour gas sweetening,have also been tested for CO2 capture from flue gas.The three technologies all have their strengths and weaknesses,and further development is needed to reduce energy usage and costs.An expected future trend for amine reclamation is to focus on process integration of the current reclaiming technologies into the PCC process in order to drive down costs.

  14. Automatic Carbon Dioxide-Methane Gas Sensor Based on the Solubility of Gases in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl O. Cadena-Pereda

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Biogas methane content is a relevant variable in anaerobic digestion processing where knowledge of process kinetics or an early indicator of digester failure is needed. The contribution of this work is the development of a novel, simple and low cost automatic carbon dioxide-methane gas sensor based on the solubility of gases in water as the precursor of a sensor for biogas quality monitoring. The device described in this work was used for determining the composition of binary mixtures, such as carbon dioxide-methane, in the range of 0–100%. The design and implementation of a digital signal processor and control system into a low-cost Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA platform has permitted the successful application of data acquisition, data distribution and digital data processing, making the construction of a standalone carbon dioxide-methane gas sensor possible.

  15. Automatic carbon dioxide-methane gas sensor based on the solubility of gases in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadena-Pereda, Raúl O; Rivera-Muñoz, Eric M; Herrera-Ruiz, Gilberto; Gomez-Melendez, Domingo J; Anaya-Rivera, Ely K

    2012-01-01

    Biogas methane content is a relevant variable in anaerobic digestion processing where knowledge of process kinetics or an early indicator of digester failure is needed. The contribution of this work is the development of a novel, simple and low cost automatic carbon dioxide-methane gas sensor based on the solubility of gases in water as the precursor of a sensor for biogas quality monitoring. The device described in this work was used for determining the composition of binary mixtures, such as carbon dioxide-methane, in the range of 0-100%. The design and implementation of a digital signal processor and control system into a low-cost Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) platform has permitted the successful application of data acquisition, data distribution and digital data processing, making the construction of a standalone carbon dioxide-methane gas sensor possible.

  16. Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Adsorbed in a Slit Carbon Pore

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Both the grand canonical Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulation methods are used to investigate the adsorption and diffusion of carbon dioxide confined in a 1.86 nm slit carbon pore at 4 temperatures from subcritical (120 K) to supercritical (313 K) conditions. Layering transition, capillary condensation and adsorption hysteresis are found at 120 K. The microstructure of carbon dioxide fluid in the slit carbon pore is analyzed. The diffusion coefficients of carbon dioxide parallel to the slit wall are significantly larger than those normal to the slit wall.

  17. Sequestration of carbon dioxide with hydrogen to useful products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Michael W. W.; Kelly, Robert M.; Hawkins, Aaron B.; Menon, Angeli Lal; Lipscomb, Gina Lynette Pries; Schut, Gerrit Jan

    2017-03-07

    Provided herein are genetically engineered microbes that include at least a portion of a carbon fixation pathway, and in one embodiment, use molecular hydrogen to drive carbon dioxide fixation. In one embodiment, the genetically engineered microbe is modified to convert acetyl CoA, molecular hydrogen, and carbon dioxide to 3-hydroxypropionate, 4-hydroxybutyrate, acetyl CoA, or the combination thereof at levels greater than a control microbe. Other products may also be produced. Also provided herein are cell free compositions that convert acetyl CoA, molecular hydrogen, and carbon dioxide to 3-hydroxypropionate, 4-hydroxybutyrate, acetyl CoA, or the combination thereof. Also provided herein are methods of using the genetically engineered microbes and the cell free compositions.

  18. TREATMENT OF HYDROCARBON, ORGANIC RESIDUE AND PRODUCTION CHEMICAL DAMAGE MECHANISMS THROUGH THE APPLICATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE IN NATURAL GAS STORAGE WELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence J. Pekot; Ron Himes

    2004-05-31

    Core specimens and several material samples were collected from two natural gas storage reservoirs. Laboratory studies were performed to characterize the samples that were believed to be representative of a reservoir damage mechanism previously identified as arising from the presence of hydrocarbons, organic residues or production chemicals. A series of laboratory experiments were performed to identify the sample materials, use these materials to damage the flow capacity of the core specimens and then attempt to remove or reduce the induced damage using either carbon dioxide or a mixture of carbon dioxide and other chemicals. Results of the experiments showed that pure carbon dioxide was effective in restoring flow capacity to the core specimens in several different settings. However, in settings involving asphaltines as the damage mechanism, both pure carbon dioxide and mixtures of carbon dioxide and other chemicals provided little effectiveness in damage removal.

  19. Kinetic separation of carbon dioxide and methane on a copper metal-organic framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Zongbi; Alnemrat, Sufian; Yu, Liang; Vasiliev, Igor; Ren, Qilong; Lu, Xiuyang; Deng, Shuguang

    2011-05-15

    Separation of carbon dioxide and methane is an important issue in upgrading low-quality natural gas. Adsorption equilibria and kinetics of CO(2) and CH(4) on a copper metal-organic framework (MOF), Cu(hfipbb)(H(2)hfipbb)(0.5) [H(2)hfipbb=4,4'-(hexafluoroisopropylidene) bis(benzoic acid)], were investigated to evaluate the feasibility of removing CO(2) from CH(4) in a pressure swing adsorption process using this new MOF adsorbent. The heat of adsorption of CO(2) on the Cu-MOF at zero-coverage (29.7 kJ/mol) is much lower than those on a carbon molecular sieve and a zeolite 5A adsorbent; and the heat of adsorption of CH(4) on the Cu-MOF (21.4 kJ/mol) is similar to that on the zeolite 5A adsorbent and smaller than that on a carbon molecular sieve. The Cu-MOF being investigated has apertures of (~3.5 × 3.5 Å), which favors the kinetically controlled separation of CO(2) and CH(4). The kinetic selectivity is found to be 26 at 298 K, and the overall selectivity (combining the equilibrium and kinetic effects) is about 25 for an adsorption separation process. These results suggest that the Cu-MOF adsorbent is an attractive alternative adsorbent for the CO(2)/CH(4) separation.

  20. Comparison of large scale purification processes of naproxen enantiomers by chromatography using methanol-water and methanol-supercritical carbon dioxide mobile phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamarei, Fahimeh; Vajda, Péter; Guiochon, Georges

    2013-09-20

    This paper compares two methods used for the preparative purification of a mixture of (S)-, and (R)-naproxen on a Whelk-O1 column, using either high performance liquid chromatography or supercritical fluid chromatography. The adsorption properties of both enantiomers were measured by frontal analysis, using methanol-water and methanol-supercritical carbon dioxide mixtures as the mobile phases. The measured adsorption data were modeled, providing the adsorption isotherms and their parameters, which were derived from the nonlinear fit of the isotherm models to the experimental data points. The model used was a Bi-Langmuir isotherm, similar to the model used in many enantiomeric separations. These isotherms were used to calculate the elution profiles of overloaded elution bands, assuming competitive Bi-Langmuir behavior of the two enantiomers. The analysis of these profiles provides the basis for a comparison between supercritical fluid chromatographic and high performance liquid chromatographic preparative scale separations. It permits an illustration of the advantages and disadvantages of these methods and a discussion of their potential performance.