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Sample records for catabolic plasmid pal1

  1. Bioaugmentation of DDT-contaminated soil by dissemination of the catabolic plasmid pDOD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chunming; Jin, Xiangxiang; Ren, Jingbei; Fang, Hua; Yu, Yunlong

    2015-01-01

    A plasmid transfer-mediated bioaugmentation method for the enhancement of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) degradation in soil was developed using the catabolic plasmid pDOD from Sphingobacterium sp. D-6. The pDOD plasmid could be transferred to soil bacteria, such as members of Cellulomonas, to form DDT degraders and thus accelerate DDT degradation. The transfer efficiency of pDOD was affected by the donor, temperature, moisture, and soil type. Approximately 50.7% of the DDT in the contaminated field was removed 210 days after the application of Escherichia coli TG I (pDOD-gfp). The results suggested that seeding pDOD into soil is an effective bioaugmentation method for enhancing the degradation of DDT.

  2. Complete nucleotide sequence of the self-transmissible TOL plasmid pD2RT provides new insight into arrangement of toluene catabolic plasmids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jutkina, Jekaterina; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg; Li, Lili

    2013-01-01

    In the present study we report the complete nucleotide sequence of the toluene catabolic plasmid pD2RT of Pseudomonas migulae strain D2RT isolated from Baltic Sea water. The pD2RT is 129,894 base pairs in size with an average G+ C content of 53.75%. A total of 135 open reading frames (ORFs) were ...

  3. NahY, a Catabolic Plasmid-Encoded Receptor Required for Chemotaxis of Pseudomonas putida to the Aromatic Hydrocarbon Naphthalene

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida G7 exhibits chemotaxis to naphthalene, but the molecular basis for this was not known. A new gene, nahY, was found to be cotranscribed with meta cleavage pathway genes on the NAH7 catabolic plasmid for naphthalene degradation. The nahY gene encodes a 538-amino-acid protein with a membrane topology and a C-terminal region that resemble those of chemotaxis transducer proteins. A P. putida G7 nahY mutant grew on naphthalene but was not chemotactic to this aromatic hydrocarbon....

  4. VE-cadherin interacts with cell polarity protein Pals1 to regulate vascular lumen formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, Benjamin F; Steinbacher, Tim; Hartmann, Christian; Kummer, Daniel; Pajonczyk, Denise; Mirzapourshafiyi, Fatemeh; Nakayama, Masanori; Weide, Thomas; Gerke, Volker; Ebnet, Klaus

    2016-09-15

    Blood vessel tubulogenesis requires the formation of stable cell-to-cell contacts and the establishment of apicobasal polarity of vascular endothelial cells. Cell polarity is regulated by highly conserved cell polarity protein complexes such as the Par3-aPKC-Par6 complex and the CRB3-Pals1-PATJ complex, which are expressed by many different cell types and regulate various aspects of cell polarity. Here we describe a functional interaction of VE-cadherin with the cell polarity protein Pals1. Pals1 directly interacts with VE-cadherin through a membrane-proximal motif in the cytoplasmic domain of VE-cadherin. VE-cadherin clusters Pals1 at cell-cell junctions. Mutating the Pals1-binding motif in VE-cadherin abrogates the ability of VE-cadherin to regulate apicobasal polarity and vascular lumen formation. In a similar way, deletion of the Par3-binding motif at the C-terminus of VE-cadherin impairs apicobasal polarity and vascular lumen formation. Our findings indicate that the biological activity of VE-cadherin in regulating endothelial polarity and vascular lumen formation is mediated through its interaction with the two cell polarity proteins Pals1 and Par3.

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Pal1-I elemental equivalent widths and abundances (Monaco+, 2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco, L.; Saviane, I.; Correnti, M.; Bonifacio, P.; Geisler, D.

    2010-11-01

    Table A1. reports the line list and atomic parameters adopted for the Palomar 1 giant Pal1-I and the Sun. For the Mn and Co lines we adopted the hyperfine structures (HFS) tabulated by Prochaska et al. (2000AJ....120.2513P). The measured equivalent width and the corresponding abundance obtained for each line are also reported. (1 data file).

  6. PUF-8 suppresses the somatic transcription factor PAL-1 expression in C. elegans germline stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainpal, Rana; Priti, Agarwal; Subramaniam, Kuppuswamy

    2011-12-01

    RNA-binding proteins of the PUF family are well conserved post-transcriptional regulators that control a variety of developmental processes. The C. elegans protein PUF-8 is essential for several aspects of germ cell development including the maintenance of germline stem cells (GSCs). To explore the molecular mechanisms underlying its function, we have identified 160 germline-expressed mRNAs as potential targets of PUF-8. We generated GFP::H2B-3' UTR fusions for 17 mRNAs to assay their post-transcriptional regulation in germ cells. Twelve transgenes were not expressed in the mitotic germ cells, and depletion of PUF-8 led to misexpression of six of them in these cells. In contrast, the expression of 3' UTR fusion of hip-1, which encodes the HSP-70 interacting protein, was dependent on PUF-8. These results indicate that PUF-8 may regulate the expression of its targets both negatively as well as positively. We investigated the PUF-8-mediated post-transcriptional control of one mRNA, namely pal-1, which encodes a homeodomain transcription factor responsible for muscle development. Our results show that PUF-8 binds in vitro to specific sequences within pal-1 3' UTR that are critical for post-transcriptional suppression in GSCs. Removal of PUF-8 resulted in PAL-1 misexpression, and PAL-1-dependent misexpression of the myogenic promoter HLH-1 in germ cells. We propose that PUF-8 protects GSCs from the influence of somatic differentiation factors such as PAL-1, which are produced in the maternal germline but meant for embryogenesis.

  7. Participation of the cell polarity protein PALS1 to T-cell receptor-mediated NF-κB activation.

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    Gabrielle Carvalho

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Beside their established function in shaping cell architecture, some cell polarity proteins were proposed to participate to lymphocyte migration, homing, scanning, as well as activation following antigen receptor stimulation. Although PALS1 is a central component of the cell polarity network, its expression and function in lymphocytes remains unknown. Here we investigated whether PALS1 is present in T cells and whether it contributes to T Cell-Receptor (TCR-mediated activation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By combining RT-PCR and immunoblot assays, we found that PALS1 is constitutively expressed in human T lymphocytes as well as in Jurkat T cells. siRNA-based knockdown of PALS1 hampered TCR-induced activation and optimal proliferation of lymphocyte. We further provide evidence that PALS1 depletion selectively hindered TCR-driven activation of the transcription factor NF-κB. CONCLUSIONS: The cell polarity protein PALS1 is expressed in T lymphocytes and participates to the optimal activation of NF-κB following TCR stimulation.

  8. The apical complex protein Pals1 is required to maintain cerebellar progenitor cells in a proliferative state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun Young; Hughes, Lucinda J; Moon, Uk Yeol; Park, Raehee; Kim, Sang-Bae; Tran, Khoi; Lee, Ju-Seog; Cho, Seo-Hee; Kim, Seonhee

    2016-01-01

    Through their biased localization and function within the cell, polarity complex proteins are necessary to establish the cellular asymmetry required for tissue organization. Well-characterized germinal zones, mitogenic signals and cell types make the cerebellum an excellent model for addressing the crucial function of polarity complex proteins in the generation and organization of neural tissues. Deletion of the apical polarity complex protein Pals1 in the developing cerebellum results in a remarkably undersized cerebellum with disrupted layers in poorly formed folia and strikingly reduced granule cell production. We demonstrate that Pals1 is not only essential for cerebellum organogenesis, but also for preventing premature differentiation and thus maintaining progenitor pools in cerebellar germinal zones, including cerebellar granule neuron precursors in the external granule layer. In the Pals1 mouse mutants, the expression of genes that regulate the cell cycle was diminished, correlating with the loss of the proliferating cell population of germinal zones. Furthermore, enhanced Shh signaling through activated Smo cannot overcome impaired cerebellar cell generation, arguing for an epistatic role of Pals1 in proliferation capacity. Our study identifies Pals1 as a novel intrinsic factor that regulates the generation of cerebellar cells and Pals1 deficiency as a potential inhibitor of overactive mitogenic signaling.

  9. Tight junction protein Par6 interacts with an evolutionarily conserved region in the amino terminus of PALS1/stardust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Hurd, Toby W; Margolis, Ben

    2004-07-16

    Tight junctions are the structures in mammalian epithelial cells that separate the apical and basolateral membranes and may also be important in the establishment of cell polarity. Two evolutionarily conserved multiprotein complexes, Crumbs-PALS1 (Stardust)-PATJ and Cdc42-Par6-Par3-atypical protein kinase C, have been implicated in the assembly of tight junctions and in polarization of Drosophila melanogaster epithelia. These two complexes have been linked physically and functionally by an interaction between PALS1 and Par6. Here we identify an evolutionarily conserved region in the amino terminus of PALS1 as the Par6 binding site and identify valine and aspartic acid residues in this region as essential for interacting with the PDZ domain of Par6. We have also characterized, in more detail, the amino terminus of Drosophila Stardust and demonstrate that the interaction mechanism between Stardust and Drosophila Par6 is evolutionarily conserved. Par6 interferes with PATJ in binding PALS1, and these two interactions do not appear to function synergistically. Taken together, these results define the molecular mechanisms linking two conserved polarity complexes.

  10. Regulation of carbon catabolism in Lactococcus lactis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aleksandrzak, T; Kowalczyk, M; Kok, J; Bardowski, J; Bielecki, S; Tramper, J; Polak, J

    2000-01-01

    The Lactococcus lactis IL1403 is a lactose negative, plasmid free strain. Nevertheless, it is able to hydrolyze lactose in the presence of cellobiose. In this work we describe identification of a gene involved in this process. The gene was found to be homologous to the sugar catabolism regulator, cc

  11. Structures of the human Pals1 PDZ domain with and without ligand suggest gated access of Crb to the PDZ peptide-binding groove

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanova, Marina E.; Fletcher, Georgina C.; O’Reilly, Nicola; Purkiss, Andrew G.; Thompson, Barry J. [Cancer Research UK, 44 Lincoln’s Inn Fields, London WC2A 3LY (United Kingdom); McDonald, Neil Q., E-mail: neil.mcdonald@cancer.org.uk [Cancer Research UK, 44 Lincoln’s Inn Fields, London WC2A 3LY (United Kingdom); Birkbeck College, University of London, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HX (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-01

    This study characterizes the interaction between the carboxy-terminal (ERLI) motif of the essential polarity protein Crb and the Pals1/Stardust PDZ-domain protein. Structures of human Pals1 PDZ with and without a Crb peptide are described, explaining the highly conserved nature of the ERLI motif and revealing a sterically blocked peptide-binding groove in the absence of ligand. Many components of epithelial polarity protein complexes possess PDZ domains that are required for protein interaction and recruitment to the apical plasma membrane. Apical localization of the Crumbs (Crb) transmembrane protein requires a PDZ-mediated interaction with Pals1 (protein-associated with Lin7, Stardust, MPP5), a member of the p55 family of membrane-associated guanylate kinases (MAGUKs). This study describes the molecular interaction between the Crb carboxy-terminal motif (ERLI), which is required for Drosophila cell polarity, and the Pals1 PDZ domain using crystallography and fluorescence polarization. Only the last four Crb residues contribute to Pals1 PDZ-domain binding affinity, with specificity contributed by conserved charged interactions. Comparison of the Crb-bound Pals1 PDZ structure with an apo Pals1 structure reveals a key Phe side chain that gates access to the PDZ peptide-binding groove. Removal of this side chain enhances the binding affinity by more than fivefold, suggesting that access of Crb to Pals1 may be regulated by intradomain contacts or by protein–protein interaction.

  12. Molecular cloning and promoter analysis of the specific salicylic acid biosynthetic pathway gene phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (AaPAL1) from Artemisia annua.

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    Zhang, Ying; Fu, Xueqing; Hao, Xiaolong; Zhang, Lida; Wang, Luyao; Qian, Hongmei; Zhao, Jingya

    2016-07-01

    Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) is the key enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of salicylic acid (SA). In this study, a full-length cDNA of PAL gene (named as AaPAL1) was cloned from Artemisia annua. The gene contains an open reading frame of 2,151 bps encoding 716 amino acids. Comparative and bioinformatics analysis revealed that the polypeptide protein of AaPAL1 was highly homologous to PALs from other plant species. Southern blot analysis revealed that it belonged to a gene family with three members. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of various tissues of A. annua showed that AaPAL1 transcript levels were highest in the young leaves. A 1160-bp promoter region was also isolated resulting in identification of distinct cis-regulatory elements including W-box, TGACG-motif, and TC-rich repeats. Quantitative RT-PCR indicated that AaPAL1 was upregulated by salinity, drought, wounding, and SA stresses, which were corroborated positively with the identified cis-elements within the promoter region. AaPAL1 was successfully expressed in Escherichia. coli and the enzyme activity of the purified AaPAL1 was approximately 287.2 U/mg. These results substantiated the involvement of AaPAL1 in the phenylalanine pathway.

  13. Isolation and Functional Characterization of a Phenylalanine Ammonia-Lyase Gene (SsPAL1 from Coleus (Solenostemon scutellarioides (L. Codd

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    Qinlong Zhu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL is the first enzyme involved in the phenylpropanoid pathway and plays important roles in the secondary metabolisms, development and defense of plants. To study the molecular function of PAL in anthocyanin synthesis of Coleus (Solenostemon scutellarioides (L. Codd, a Coleus PAL gene designated as SsPAL1 was cloned and characterized using a degenerate oligonucleotide primer PCR and RACE method. The full-length SsPAL1 was 2450 bp in size and consisted of one intron and two exons encoding a polypeptide of 711 amino acids. The deduced SsPAL1 protein showed high identities and structural similarities with other functional plant PAL proteins. A series of putative cis-acting elements involved in transcriptional regulation, light and stress responsiveness were found in the upstream regulatory sequence of SsPAL1. Transcription pattern analysis indicated that SsPAL1 was constitutively expressed in all tissues examined and was enhanced by light and different abiotic factors. The recombinant SsPAL1 protein exhibited high PAL activity, at optimal conditions of 60 °C and pH 8.2. Although the levels of total PAL activity and total anthocyanin concentration have a similar variation trend in different Coleus cultivars, there was no significant correlation between them (r = 0.7529, p > 0.1, suggesting that PAL was not the rate-limiting enzyme for the downstream anthocyanin biosynthetic branch in Coleus. This study enables us to further understand the role of SsPAL1 in the phenylpropanoid (flavonoids, anthocyanins biosynthesis in Coleus at the molecular level.

  14. Cis-and Trans-Cinnamic Acids Have Different Effects on the Catalytic Properties of Arabidopsis Phenylalanine Ammonia Lyases PAL1, PAL2, PAL4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-Jie CHEN; Veerappan VIJAYKUMAR; Bing-Wen LU; Bing XIA; Ning LI

    2005-01-01

    Cis-cinnamic acid (CA) is a naturally occurring compound, presumably converted from transCA in higher plants. To investigate the effect of cis-CA on the activity of Arabidopsis phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), AtPAL1, AtPAL2, and AtPAL4 genes were isolated using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. These genes were fused to a glutathione S-transferase gene and overexpressed in a heterologous prokaryotic system of Escherichia coli. The purified PAL1, PAL2 and PAL4 enzymes were characterized biochemically to determine the effects of cis-CA on the kinetic parameter Km. The results showed that cis-CA is a competitive inhibitor for PAL1, but not PAL2 and PAL4, whereas trans-CA acts as a competitive inhibitor for all three PAL isomers, suggesting that cis- and trans-CA have different effects on the catalytic activity of PAL.

  15. A phenylalanine ammonia-lyase ortholog (PkPAL1) from Picrorhiza kurrooa Royle ex. Benth: molecular cloning, promoter analysis and response to biotic and abiotic elicitors.

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    Bhat, Wajid Waheed; Razdan, Sumeer; Rana, Satiander; Dhar, Niha; Wani, Tariq Ahmad; Qazi, Parvaiz; Vishwakarma, Ram; Lattoo, Surrinder K

    2014-09-01

    Picrorhiza kurrooa Royle ex Benth. is a highly reputed medicinal herb utilised in the preparation of a number of herbal drug formulations, principally due to the presence of novel monoterpene iridoid glycosides kenned as picrosides. Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase catalyses an important rate-limiting step in phenylpropanoid pathway and supplies precursors like cinnamic acid, vanillic acid, ferulic acid, etc., to a variety of secondary metabolites including picrosides. The imperilled status of P. kurrooa coupled with lack of information regarding biogenesis of picrosides necessitates deciphering the biosynthetic pathway for picrosides. In the present study, a PAL gene, designated PkPAL1 was isolated from P. kurrooa. The cDNA is 2312 bp in length, consisting of an ORF of 2142 bp encoding for a 713 amino acid protein having a predicted molecular weight of 77.66 kDa and an isoelectric point of pH 6.82. qRT-PCR analysis of various tissues of P. kurrooa showed that PkPAL1 transcript levels were highest in the leaves, consistent with picroside accumulation pattern. Using Genome walking, a 718 bp promoter region was also isolated resulting in identification of distinct cis-regulatory elements including TGA-element, TGACG-motif, CGTCA-motif, etc. qRT-PCR indicated up-regulation of PkPAL1 by methyl jasmonate, salicylic acid, 2,4-dicholorophenoxy acetic acid and UV-B elicitations that corroborated positively with the identified cis-elements within the promoter region. Moreover, altitude was found to have a positive effect on the PkPAL1 transcript levels, driving the expression of PkPAL1 abundantly. Based on docking analysis, we identified eight residues as potentially essential for substrate binding in PkPAL1.

  16. Polycystin-2 activity is controlled by transcriptional coactivator with PDZ binding motif and PALS1-associated tight junction protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duning, Kerstin; Rosenbusch, Deike; Schlüter, Marc A; Tian, Yuemin; Kunzelmann, Karl; Meyer, Nina; Schulze, Ulf; Markoff, Arseni; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Weide, Thomas

    2010-10-29

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most frequent monogenic cause of kidney failure, characterized by the development of renal cysts. ADPKD is caused by mutations of the polycystin-1 (PC1) or polycystin-2 (PC2) genes. PC2 encodes a Ca(2+)-permeable cation channel, and its dysfunction has been implicated in cyst development. The transcriptional coactivator with PDZ binding motif (TAZ) is required for the integrity of renal cilia. Its absence results in the development of renal cysts in a knock-out mouse model. TAZ directly interacts with PC2, and it has been suggested that another yet unidentified PDZ domain protein may be involved in the TAZ/PC2 interaction. Here we describe a novel interaction of TAZ with the multi-PDZ-containing PALS1-associated tight junction protein (PATJ). TAZ interacts with both the N-terminal PDZ domains 1-3 and the C-terminal PDZ domains 8-10 of PATJ, suggesting two distinct TAZ binding domains. We also show that the C terminus of PC2 strongly interacts with PDZ domains 8-10 and to a weaker extent with PDZ domains 1-3 of PATJ. Finally, we demonstrate that both TAZ and PATJ impair PC2 channel activity when co-expressed with PC2 in oocytes of Xenopus laevis. These results implicate TAZ and PATJ as novel regulatory elements of the PC2 channel and might thus be involved in ADPKD pathology.

  17. Plasmid Biopharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prazeres, Duarte Miguel F; Monteiro, Gabriel A

    2014-12-01

    Plasmids are currently an indispensable molecular tool in life science research and a central asset for the modern biotechnology industry, supporting its mission to produce pharmaceutical proteins, antibodies, vaccines, industrial enzymes, and molecular diagnostics, to name a few key products. Furthermore, plasmids have gradually stepped up in the past 20 years as useful biopharmaceuticals in the context of gene therapy and DNA vaccination interventions. This review provides a concise coverage of the scientific progress that has been made since the emergence of what are called today plasmid biopharmaceuticals. The most relevant topics are discussed to provide researchers with an updated overview of the field. A brief outline of the initial breakthroughs and innovations is followed by a discussion of the motivation behind the medical uses of plasmids in the context of therapeutic and prophylactic interventions. The molecular characteristics and rationale underlying the design of plasmid vectors as gene transfer agents are described and a description of the most important methods used to deliver plasmid biopharmaceuticals in vivo (gene gun, electroporation, cationic lipids and polymers, and micro- and nanoparticles) is provided. The major safety issues (integration and autoimmunity) surrounding the use of plasmid biopharmaceuticals is discussed next. Aspects related to the large-scale manufacturing are also covered, and reference is made to the plasmid products that have received marketing authorization as of today.

  18. Polyamine catabolism and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casero, Robert A; Pegg, Anthony E

    2009-07-15

    In addition to polyamine homoeostasis, it has become increasingly clear that polyamine catabolism can play a dominant role in drug response, apoptosis and the response to stressful stimuli, and contribute to the aetiology of several pathological states, including cancer. The highly inducible enzymes SSAT (spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase) and SMO (spermine oxidase) and the generally constitutively expressed APAO (N1-acetylpolyamine oxidase) appear to play critical roles in many normal and disease processes. The dysregulation of polyamine catabolism frequently accompanies several disease states and suggests that such dysregulation may both provide useful insight into disease mechanism and provide unique druggable targets that can be exploited for therapeutic benefit. Each of these enzymes has the potential to alter polyamine homoeostasis in response to multiple cell signals and the two oxidases produce the reactive oxygen species H2O2 and aldehydes, each with the potential to produce pathological states. The activity of SSAT provides substrates for APAO or substrates for the polyamine exporter, thus reducing the intracellular polyamine concentration, the net effect of which depends on the magnitude and rate of any increase in SSAT. SSAT may also influence cellular metabolism via interaction with other proteins and by perturbing the content of acetyl-CoA and ATP. The goal of the present review is to cover those aspects of polyamine catabolism that have an impact on disease aetiology or treatment and to provide a solid background in this ever more exciting aspect of polyamine biology.

  19. Isolation and screening of plasmids from the epilithon which mobilize recombinant plasmid pD10.

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, K E; A. J. Weightman; Fry, J C

    1992-01-01

    This study examined the potential of bacteria from river epilithon to mobilize a recombinant catabolic plasmid, pD10, encoding 3-chlorobenzoate degradation and kanamycin resistance. Fifty-four mobilizing plasmids were exogenously isolated by triparental matings between strains of Pseudomonas putida and epilithic bacteria from the River Taff (South Wales, United Kingdom). Frequencies for mobilization ranged from 1.7 x 10(-8) to 4.5 x 10(-3) per recipient at 20 degrees C. The sizes of the mobil...

  20. Amino Acid Catabolism in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Tatjana M; Nunes Nesi, Adriano; Araújo, Wagner L; Braun, Hans-Peter

    2015-11-02

    Amino acids have various prominent functions in plants. Besides their usage during protein biosynthesis, they also represent building blocks for several other biosynthesis pathways and play pivotal roles during signaling processes as well as in plant stress response. In general, pool sizes of the 20 amino acids differ strongly and change dynamically depending on the developmental and physiological state of the plant cell. Besides amino acid biosynthesis, which has already been investigated in great detail, the catabolism of amino acids is of central importance for adjusting their pool sizes but so far has drawn much less attention. The degradation of amino acids can also contribute substantially to the energy state of plant cells under certain physiological conditions, e.g. carbon starvation. In this review, we discuss the biological role of amino acid catabolism and summarize current knowledge on amino acid degradation pathways and their regulation in the context of plant cell physiology.

  1. Chemotherapy of Bacterial Plasmids

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-29

    render them non-susceptible to K: z plasmid-encoded enzymes. (3) Development of drugs which are selective inhibitor! 1 4, of plasmid DNA replication. (4... Development of drugs which inhibit phenotypic as expression of plasmid genes, and (5) Development of drugs which are inhibitors o, drug-inactivating...Barnes [2] them non-susceptible to plasmid-encoded enzymes, tabulated data on the incidence of Gram-negative 3) development of drugs which are

  2. Plasmid segregation mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebersbach, Gitte; Gerdes, Kenn; Charbon, Gitte Ebersbach

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial plasmids encode partitioning (par) loci that ensure ordered plasmid segregation prior to cell division. par loci come in two types: those that encode actin-like ATPases and those that encode deviant Walker-type ATPases. ParM, the actin-like ATPase of plasmid R1, forms dynamic filaments ...

  3. 洋葱花青素合成相关基因(AcPAL1)的克隆和表达分析%Cloning and Expression Analysis of an Anthocyanin Bio-synthesis-related Gene(AcPAL1) in Onion(Allium cepa L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁毅; 刘小义; 张洪伟; 谭武平

    2014-01-01

    苯丙氨酸解氨酶(PAL)作为植物苯丙烷类代谢途径中的关键酶,在其生长发育、抗病抗逆等多种生命进程中起重要作用,是花青素生物合成途径中的第一个酶.为了研究洋葱(Allium cepa L.) PAL基因的生物学功能及其与花青素合成之间的关系,利用不同植物PAL基因设计简并引物,通过RT-PCR和RACE技术克隆洋葱PAL基因全长cDNA序列(GenBank登录号:KF421110),并对该基因进行序列分析和Real-time PCR表达分析.结果表明,该序列全长2 363 bp,编码包含708个氨基酸残基的蛋白质多肽;Blast分析和系统进化分析表明,该多肽与大蒜(Allium.sativum)、石蒜(Lycoris radiate)PAL蛋白相似性很高,因此被命名为AcPAL1.Real-time PCR表达分析结果表明,AcPALI基因在白皮、黄皮和红皮洋葱中表达量依次增加;而随着鳞茎的不断膨大,其表达量却不断降低.本实验初步证实了所克隆的洋葱AcPAL1基因与花青素合成相关联,为研究洋葱PAL基因同花青素合成积累之间的关系提供了依据.

  4. Degradative Plasmid and Heavy Metal Resistance Plasmid Naturally Coexist in Phenol and Cyanide Assimilating Bacteria

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    Bahig E.  Deeb

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Heavy metals are known to be powerful inhibitors of xenobiotics biodegradation activities. Alleviation the inhibitory effect of these metals on the phenol biodegradation activities in presence of heavy metals resistant plasmid was investigated. Approach: Combination of genetic systems of degradation of xenobiotic compound and heavy metal resistance was one of the approaches to the creation of polyfunctional strains for bioremediation of soil after co-contamination with organic pollutants and heavy metals. Results: A bacterial strain Pseudomonas putida PhCN (pPhCN1, pPhCN2 had been obtained. This bacterium contained two plasmids, a 120 Kb catabolic plasmid that encode for breakdown of phenol (pPhCN1 and pPhCN2 plasmid (100 Kb that code for cadmium and copper resistant. Cyanide assimilation by this bacterium was encoded by chromosomal genes. The inhibitory effect of cadmium (Cd2+ or copper (Cu2+ on the degradation of phenol and cyanide by P. putida strains PhCN and PhCN1 (contained pPhCN1 were investigated. The resistant strain PhCN showed high ability to degrade phenol and cyanide in presence of Cd2+ or Cu2+ comparing with the sensitive strain PhCN1. In addition, Cd2+ or Cu2+ was also found to exert a strong inhibitory effect on the C23O dioxygenase enzyme activity in the presence of cyanide as a nitrogen source. Conclusion: The presence of heavy metal resistance plasmid alleviated the inhibitory effect of metals on the phenol and cyanide assimilation by resistant strain.

  5. Chlamydial plasmids and bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlikowska-Warych, Małgorzata; Śliwa-Dominiak, Joanna; Deptuła, Wiesław

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydia are absolute pathogens of humans and animals; despite being rather well recognised, they are still open for discovery. One such discovery is the occurrence of extrachromosomal carriers of genetic information. In prokaryotes, such carriers include plasmids and bacteriophages, which are present only among some Chlamydia species. Plasmids were found exclusively in Chlamydia (C.) trachomatis, C. psittaci, C. pneumoniae, C. suis, C. felis, C. muridarum and C. caviae. In prokaryotic organisms, plasmids usually code for genes that facilitate survival of the bacteria in the environment (although they are not essential). In chlamydia, their role has not been definitely recognised, apart from the fact that they participate in the synthesis of glycogen and encode proteins responsible for their virulence. Furthermore, in C. suis it was evidenced that the plasmid is integrated in a genomic island and contains the tetracycline-resistance gene. Bacteriophages specific for chlamydia (chlamydiaphages) were detected only in six species: C. psittaci, C. abortus, C. felis, C. caviae C. pecorum and C. pneumoniae. These chlamydiaphages cause inhibition of the developmental cycle, and delay transformation of reticulate bodies (RBs) into elementary bodies (EBs), thus reducing the possibility of infecting other cells in time. Plasmids and bacteriophages can be used in the diagnostics of chlamydioses; although especially in the case of plasmids, they are already used for detection of chlamydial infections. In addition, bacteriophages could be used as therapeutic agents to replace antibiotics, potentially addressing the problem of increasing antibiotic-resistance among chlamydia.

  6. The RpiR-like repressor IolR regulates inositol catabolism in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Petra R A; Choong, Ee-Leng; Rossbach, Silvia

    2011-10-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti, the nitrogen-fixing symbiont of alfalfa, has the ability to catabolize myo-, scyllo-, and D-chiro-inositol. Functional inositol catabolism (iol) genes are required for growth on these inositol isomers, and they play a role during plant-bacterium interactions. The inositol catabolism genes comprise the chromosomally encoded iolA (mmsA) and the iolY(smc01163)RCDEB genes, as well as the idhA gene located on the pSymB plasmid. Reverse transcriptase assays showed that the iolYRCDEB genes are transcribed as one operon. The iol genes were weakly expressed without induction, but their expression was strongly induced by myo-inositol. The putative transcriptional regulator of the iol genes, IolR, belongs to the RpiR-like repressor family. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that IolR recognized a conserved palindromic sequence (5'-GGAA-N6-TTCC-3') in the upstream regions of the idhA, iolY, iolR, and iolC genes. Complementation assays found IolR to be required for the repression of its own gene and for the downregulation of the idhA-encoded myo-inositol dehydrogenase activity in the presence and absence of inositol. Further expression studies indicated that the late pathway intermediate 2-keto-5-deoxy-D-gluconic acid 6-phosphate (KDGP) functions as the true inducer of the iol genes. The iolA (mmsA) gene encoding methylmalonate semialdehyde dehydrogenase was not regulated by IolR. The S. meliloti iolA (mmsA) gene product seems to be involved in more than only the inositol catabolic pathway, since it was also found to be essential for valine catabolism, supporting its more recent annotation as mmsA.

  7. Catabolism and detoxification of 1-aminoalkylphosphonic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; McSorley, Fern R.; Zechel, David L.

    2012-01-01

    In Escherichia coli uptake and catabolism of organophosphonates are governed by the phnCDEFGHIJKLMNOP operon. The phnO cistron is shown to encode aminoalkylphosphonate N-acetyltransferase, which utilizes acetylcoenzyme A as acetyl donor and aminomethylphosphonate, (S)- and (R)-1-aminoethylphospho...

  8. Body weight independently affects articular cartilage catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, W Matt; Winward, Jason G; Pardo, Michael Becker; Hopkins, J Ty; Seeley, Matthew K

    2015-06-01

    Although obesity is associated with osteoarthritis, it is unclear whether body weight (BW) independently affects articular cartilage catabolism (i.e., independent from physiological factors that also accompany obesity). The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the independent effect of BW on articular cartilage catabolism associated with walking. A secondary purpose was to determine how decreased BW influenced cardiovascular response due to walking. Twelve able-bodied subjects walked for 30 minutes on a lower-body positive pressure treadmill during three sessions: control (unadjusted BW), +40%BW, and -40%BW. Serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) was measured immediately before (baseline) and after, and 15 and 30 minutes after the walk. Heart rate (HR) and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured every three minutes during the walk. Relative to baseline, average serum COMP concentration was 13% and 5% greater immediately after and 15 minutes after the walk. Immediately after the walk, serum COMP concentration was 14% greater for the +40%BW session than for the -40%BW session. HR and RPE were greater for the +40%BW session than for the other two sessions, but did not differ between the control and -40%BW sessions. BW independently influences acute articular cartilage catabolism and cardiovascular response due to walking: as BW increases, so does acute articular cartilage catabolism and cardiovascular response. These results indicate that lower-body positive pressure walking may benefit certain individuals by reducing acute articular cartilage catabolism, due to walking, while maintaining cardiovascular response. Key pointsWalking for 30 minutes with adjustments in body weight (normal body weight, +40% and -40% body weight) significantly influences articular cartilage catabolism, measured via serum COMP concentration.Compared to baseline levels, walking with +40% body weight and normal body weight both elicited significant increases in

  9. Arginine Catabolism and the Arginine Succinyltransferase Pathway in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, Barbara L.; Kiupakis, Alexandros K.; Reitzer, Lawrence J.

    1998-01-01

    Arginine catabolism produces ammonia without transferring nitrogen to another compound, yet the only known pathway of arginine catabolism in Escherichia coli (through arginine decarboxylase) does not produce ammonia. Our aims were to find the ammonia-producing pathway of arginine catabolism in E. coli and to examine its function. We showed that the only previously described pathway of arginine catabolism, which does not produce ammonia, accounted for only 3% of the arginine consumed. A search...

  10. Mechanisms of plasmid segregation: have multicopy plasmids been overlooked?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Million-Weaver, Samuel; Camps, Manel

    2014-09-01

    Plasmids are self-replicating pieces of DNA typically bearing non-essential genes. Given that plasmids represent a metabolic burden to the host, mechanisms ensuring plasmid transmission to daughter cells are critical for their stable maintenance in the population. Here we review these mechanisms, focusing on two active partition strategies common to low-copy plasmids: par systems type I and type II. Both involve three components: an adaptor protein, a motor protein, and a centromere, which is a sequence area in the plasmid that is recognized by the adaptor protein. The centromere-bound adaptor nucleates polymerization of the motor, leading to filament formation, which can pull plasmids apart (par I) or push them towards opposite poles of the cell (par II). No such active partition mechanisms are known to occur in high copy number plasmids. In this case, vertical transmission is generally considered stochastic, due to the random distribution of plasmids in the cytoplasm. We discuss conceptual and experimental lines of evidence questioning the random distribution model and posit the existence of a mechanism for segregation in high copy number plasmids that moves plasmids to cell poles to facilitate transmission to daughter cells. This mechanism would involve chromosomally-encoded proteins and the plasmid origin of replication. Modulation of this proposed mechanism of segregation could provide new ways to enhance plasmid stability in the context of recombinant gene expression, which is limiting for large-scale protein production and for bioremediation.

  11. Plasmid-to-plasmid recombination in Haemophilus influenzae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balganesh, M.; Setlow, J.K.

    1986-01-01

    No recombination between plasmids was observed after conjugal transfer of a plasmid into a cell carrying another plasmid. Two types of such recombination took place after transformation, one type being Rec/sup +/ dependent and suggesting a preferred site of recombination. The other much rarer type was at least partially Rec/sup +/ independent.

  12. Location and PCR analysis of catabolic genes in a novel Streptomyces sp. DUT_AHX capable of degrading nitrobenzene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AI Haixin; ZHOU Jiti; LV Hong; WANG Jing; GUO Jianbo; LIU Guangfei; QU Yuanyuan

    2008-01-01

    A novel strain of Streptomyces sp. DUT_AHX was isolated from sludge contaminated with nitrobenzene and identified on the basis of physiological and biochemical tests and 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequence analysis. The optimal degradation conditions were as follows: temperature 30℃, pH 7.0-8.0, shaking speed 150-180 r/min and inocula 10% (V/V). The strain, which possessed a partial reductive pathway with the release of ammonia, was also able to grow on mineral salts basal (MSB) medium plates with 2-aminophenol, phenol, or toluene as the sole carbon source. Furthermore, the enzyme activity tests showed crude extracts of nitrobenzene-grown DUT_AHX contained 2-aminophenol 1,6-dioxygenase activity. The 17-kb plasmid was isolated by the modified alkaline lysis method and was further cured by sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) together with 37℃. As a result, the cured derivative strain DUT_AHX-4 lost the 2-aminophenol 1,6-dioxygenase activity. The results suggested that the catabolic genes encoding the nitrobenzene-degrading enzymes were plasmid-associated. Moreover, the plasmid DNA was amplified with degenerate primers by touchdown PCR and an expected size fragment (471 bp) was generated. The Blast results revealed that the gene encoding a 157 amino acid polypeptide was 39% to 76% identical to YHS domain protein. The further examination of the plasmid would demonstrate the molecular basis of nitrobenzene catabolism in Streptomyces, such as regulation and genetic organization of the catabolic genes.

  13. Plasmid interference for curing antibiotic resistance plasmids in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamruzzaman, Muhammad; Shoma, Shereen; Thomas, Christopher M.; Partridge, Sally R.

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance increases the likelihood of death from infection by common pathogens such as Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae in developed and developing countries alike. Most important modern antibiotic resistance genes spread between such species on self-transmissible (conjugative) plasmids. These plasmids are traditionally grouped on the basis of replicon incompatibility (Inc), which prevents coexistence of related plasmids in the same cell. These plasmids also use post-segregational killing (‘addiction’) systems, which poison any bacterial cells that lose the addictive plasmid, to guarantee their own survival. This study demonstrates that plasmid incompatibilities and addiction systems can be exploited to achieve the safe and complete eradication of antibiotic resistance from bacteria in vitro and in the mouse gut. Conjugative ‘interference plasmids’ were constructed by specifically deleting toxin and antibiotic resistance genes from target plasmids. These interference plasmids efficiently cured the corresponding antibiotic resistant target plasmid from different Enterobacteriaceae in vitro and restored antibiotic susceptibility in vivo to all bacterial populations into which plasmid-mediated resistance had spread. This approach might allow eradication of emergent or established populations of resistance plasmids in individuals at risk of severe sepsis, enabling subsequent use of less toxic and/or more effective antibiotics than would otherwise be possible, if sepsis develops. The generalisability of this approach and its potential applications in bioremediation of animal and environmental microbiomes should now be systematically explored. PMID:28245276

  14. Control of hydroxyproline catabolism in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Catharine E; Gavina, Jennilee M A; Morton, Richard; Britz-McKibbin, Philip; Finan, Turlough M

    2012-09-01

    Hydroxyproline (Hyp) in decaying organic matter is a rich source of carbon and nitrogen for microorganisms. A bacterial pathway for Hyp catabolism is known; however, genes and function relationships are not established. In the pathway, trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline (4-L-Hyp) is epimerized to cis-4-hydroxy-D-proline (4-D-Hyp), and then, in three enzymatic reactions, the D-isomer is converted via Δ-pyrroline-4-hydroxy-2-carboxylate (HPC) and α-ketoglutarate semialdehyde (KGSA) to α-ketoglutarate (KG). Here a transcriptional analysis of cells growing on 4-L-Hyp, and the regulation and functions of genes from a Hyp catabolism locus of the legume endosymbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti are reported. Fourteen hydroxyproline catabolism genes (hyp), in five transcripts hypR, hypD, hypH, hypST and hypMNPQO(RE)XYZ, were negatively regulated by hypR. hypRE was shown to encode 4-hydroxyproline 2-epimerase and a hypRE mutant grew with 4-D-Hyp but not 4-L-Hyp. hypO, hypD and hypH are predicted to encode 4-D-Hyp oxidase, HPC deaminase and α-KGSA dehydrogenase respectively. The functions for hypS, hypT, hypX, hypY and hypZ remain to be determined. The data suggest 4-Hyp is converted to the tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate α-ketoglutarate via the pathway established biochemically for Pseudomonas. This report describes the first molecular characterization of a Hyp catabolism locus.

  15. Characterization of genes involved in erythritol catabolism in Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, Christopher K; Rath, Amber M; Noel, Tanya C; Hynes, Michael F

    2006-07-01

    A genetic locus encoding erythritol uptake and catabolism genes was identified in Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae, and shown to be plasmid encoded in a wide range of R. leguminosarum strains. A Tn5-B22 mutant (19B-3) unable to grow on erythritol was isolated from a mutant library of R. leguminosarum strain VF39SM. The mutated gene eryF was cloned and partially sequenced, and determined to have a high homology to permease genes of ABC transporters. A cosmid complementing the mutation (pCos42) was identified and was shown to carry all the genes necessary to restore the ability to grow on erythritol to a VF39SM strain cured of pRleVF39f. In the genomic DNA sequence of strain 3841, the gene linked to the mutation in 19B-3 is flanked by a cluster of genes with high homology to the known erythritol catabolic genes from Brucella spp. Through mutagenesis studies, three distinct operons on pCos42 that are required for growth on erythritol were identified: an ABC-transporter operon (eryEFG), a catabolic operon (eryABCD) and an operon (deoR-tpiA2-rpiB) that encodes a gene with significant homology to triosephosphate isomerase (tpiA2). These genes all share high sequence identity to genes in the erythritol catabolism region of Brucella spp., and clustalw alignments suggest that horizontal transfer of the erythritol locus may have occurred between R. leguminosarum and Brucella. Transcription of the eryABCD operon is repressed by EryD and is induced by the presence of erythritol. Mutant 19B-3 was impaired in its ability to compete against wild-type for nodulation of pea plants but was still capable of forming nitrogen-fixing nodules.

  16. Novel inositol catabolic pathway in Thermotoga maritima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodionova, Irina A; Leyn, Semen A; Burkart, Michael D; Boucher, Nathalie; Noll, Kenneth M; Osterman, Andrei L; Rodionov, Dmitry A

    2013-08-01

    myo-inositol (MI) is a key sugar alcohol component of various metabolites, e.g. phosphatidylinositol-based phospholipids that are abundant in animal and plant cells. The seven-step pathway of MI degradation was previously characterized in various soil bacteria including Bacillus subtilis. Through a combination of bioinformatics and experimental techniques we identified a novel variant of the MI catabolic pathway in the marine hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima. By using in vitro biochemical assays with purified recombinant proteins we characterized four inositol catabolic enzymes encoded in the TM0412-TM0416 chromosomal gene cluster. The novel catabolic pathway in T. maritima starts as the conventional route using the myo-inositol dehydrogenase IolG followed by three novel reactions. The first 2-keto-myo-inositol intermediate is oxidized by another, previously unknown NAD-dependent dehydrogenase TM0412 (named IolM), and a yet unidentified product of this reaction is further hydrolysed by TM0413 (IolN) to form 5-keto-l-gluconate. The fourth step involves epimerization of 5-keto-l-gluconate to d-tagaturonate by TM0416 (IolO). T. maritima is unable to grow on myo-inositol as a single carbon source. The determined in vitro specificity of the InoEFGK (TM0418-TM0421) transporter to myo-inositol-phosphate suggests that the novel pathway in Thermotoga utilizes a phosphorylated derivative of inositol.

  17. TOL plasmid transfer during bacterial conjugation in vitro and rhizoremediation of oil compounds in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jussila, Minna M. [Department of Applied Chemistry and Microbiology, Viikki Biocenter, P.O. Box 56 (Viikinkaari 9), FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland)]. E-mail: minna.m.jussila@helsinki.fi; Zhao, Ji [Department of Applied Chemistry and Microbiology, Viikki Biocenter, P.O. Box 56 (Viikinkaari 9), FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Suominen, Leena [Department of Applied Chemistry and Microbiology, Viikki Biocenter, P.O. Box 56 (Viikinkaari 9), FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Lindstroem, Kristina [Department of Applied Chemistry and Microbiology, Viikki Biocenter, P.O. Box 56 (Viikinkaari 9), FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland)

    2007-03-15

    Molecular profiling methods for horizontal transfer of aromatics-degrading plasmids were developed and applied during rhizoremediation in vivo and conjugations in vitro. pWW0 was conjugated from Pseudomonas to Rhizobium. The xylE gene was detected both in Rhizobium galegae bv. officinalis and bv. orientalis, but it was neither stably maintained in orientalis nor functional in officinalis. TOL plasmids were a major group of catabolic plasmids among the bacterial strains isolated from the oil-contaminated rhizosphere of Galega orientalis. A new finding was that some Pseudomonas migulae and Pseudomonas oryzihabitans strains harbored a TOL plasmid with both pWW0- and pDK1-type xylE gene. P. oryzihabitans 29 had received the archetypal TOL plasmid pWW0 from Pseudomonas putida PaW85. As an application for environmental biotechnology, the biodegradation potential of oil-polluted soil and the success of bioremediation could be estimated by monitoring changes not only in the type and amount but also in transfer of degradation plasmids. - Horizontal transfer of degradation plasmids in the oil-contaminated rhizosphere reveals the dynamic nature of the intrinsic biodegradation potential.

  18. 牡丹和芍药次生木质部导管的解剖学结构%Anatomy of Vessel Elements in the Secondary Xylem of Paeonia lactiflora Pal1. and Paeonia suffruticosa Andr

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑玲; 姚琳琳; 程彦伟

    2014-01-01

    对牡丹和芍药的次生木质部离析材料进行了观察,结果表明,牡丹和芍药的次生木质部具有螺纹、环纹、梯纹和孔纹4种类型的导管,穿孔板具有孔状穿孔板、梯状穿孔板和网状穿孔板3种类型,并具有大孔状穿孔板、混合穿孔板等特殊类型的导管。芍药科植物导管形态特征的多样性及特殊性对进一步研究芍药科植物的系统发育有所启示。%The vessel elements of secondary xylem in Paeonia suffruticosa Andr. and Paeonia lactiflora Pal1. were observed by micrography. The results showed that there were 4 types of vessel elements including ringed vessel,reticulated vessel,scalari-form vessel and pitted vessel. The perforation plates had three types of scalarforms and reticulate plates, pitted perforation plates and coarse-pored perforation plates. The diverse and distinctive characters of vessel elements are useful for the phylo-genic study of Paeoniaceae.

  19. The large universal Pantoea plasmid LPP-1 plays a major role in biological and ecological diversification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Maayer Pieter

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pantoea spp. are frequently isolated from a wide range of ecological niches and have various biological roles, as plant epi- or endophytes, biocontrol agents, plant-growth promoters or as pathogens of both plant and animal hosts. This suggests that members of this genus have undergone extensive genotypic diversification. One means by which this occurs among bacteria is through the acquisition and maintenance of plasmids. Here, we have analyzed and compared the sequences of a large plasmid common to all sequenced Pantoea spp. Results and discussion The Large PantoeaPlasmids (LPP-1 of twenty strains encompassing seven different Pantoea species, including pathogens and endo-/epiphytes of a wide range of plant hosts as well as insect-associated strains, were compared. The LPP-1 plasmid sequences range in size from ~281 to 794 kb and carry between 238 and 750 protein coding sequences (CDS. A core set of 46 proteins, encompassing 2.2% of the total pan-plasmid (2,095 CDS, conserved among all LPP-1 plasmid sequences, includes those required for thiamine and pigment biosynthesis. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that these plasmids have arisen from an ancestral plasmid, which has undergone extensive diversification. Analysis of the proteins encoded on LPP-1 also showed that these plasmids contribute to a wide range of Pantoea phenotypes, including the transport and catabolism of various substrates, inorganic ion assimilation, resistance to antibiotics and heavy metals, colonization and persistence in the host and environment, pathogenesis and antibiosis. Conclusions LPP-1 is universal to all Pantoea spp. whose genomes have been sequenced to date and is derived from an ancestral plasmid. LPP-1 encodes a large array of proteins that have played a major role in the adaptation of the different Pantoea spp. to their various ecological niches and their specialization as pathogens, biocontrol agents or benign saprophytes found in many diverse

  20. Persistence Mechanisms of Conjugative Plasmids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahl, Martin Iain; Hansen, Lars H.; Sørensen, Søren Johannes

    2009-01-01

    Are plasmids selfish parasitic DNA molecules or an integrated part of the bacterial genome? This chapter reviews the current understanding of the persistence mechanisms of conjugative plasmids harbored by bacterial cells and populations. The diversity and intricacy of mechanisms affecting...... the successful propagation and long-term continued existence of these extra-chromosomal elements is extensive. Apart from the accessory genetic elements that may provide plasmid-harboring cells a selective advantage, special focus is placed on the mechanisms conjugative plasmids employ to ensure their stable...... maintenance in the host cell. These importantly include the ability to self-mobilize in a process termed conjugative transfer, which may occur across species barriers. Other plasmid stabilizing mechanisms include the multimer resolution system, active partitioning, and post-segregational-killing of plasmid...

  1. Catabolism of volatile organic compounds influences plant survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikawa, Patricia Y; Lerdau, Manuel T

    2013-12-01

    Plants emit a diverse array of phytogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The production and emission of VOCs has been an important area of research for decades. However, recent research has revealed the importance of VOC catabolism by plants and VOC degradation in the atmosphere for plant growth and survival. Specifically, VOC catabolism and degradation have implications for plant C balance, tolerance to environmental stress, plant signaling, and plant-atmosphere interactions. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of VOC catabolism and degradation, propose experiments for investigating VOC catabolism, and suggest ways to incorporate catabolism into VOC emission models. Improving our knowledge of VOC catabolism and degradation is crucial for understanding plant metabolism and predicting plant survival in polluted environments.

  2. Catabolism of hyaluronan: involvement of transition metals

    OpenAIRE

    Šoltés, Ladislav; Kogan, Grigorij

    2009-01-01

    One of the very complex structures in the vertebrates is the joint. The main component of the joint is the synovial fluid with its high-molar-mass glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan, which turnover is approximately twelve hours. Since the synovial fluid does not contain any hyaluronidases, the fast hyaluronan catabolism is caused primarily by reductive-oxidative processes. Eight transition metals – V23, Mn25, Fe26, Co27, Ni28, Cu29, Zn30, and Mo42 – naturally occurring in living organism are essent...

  3. Tryptophan catabolizing enzymes – party of three

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen J Ball

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO are tryptophan-degrading enzymes that have independently evolved to catalyze the first step in tryptophan catabolism via the kynurenine pathway. The depletion of tryptophan and formation of kynurenine pathway metabolites modulates the activity of the mammalian immune, reproductive and central nervous systems. IDO and TDO enzymes can have overlapping or distinct functions depending on their expression patterns. The expression of TDO and IDO enzymes in mammals differs not only by tissue/cellular localization but also by their induction by distinct stimuli. To add to the complexity, these genes also have undergone duplications in some organisms leading to multiple isoforms of IDO or TDO. For example, many vertebrates, including all mammals, have acquired two IDO genes via gene duplication, although the IDO1-like gene has been lost in some lower vertebrate lineages. Gene duplications can allow the homologs to diverge and acquire different properties to the original gene. There is evidence for IDO enzymes having differing enzymatic characteristics, signaling properties and biological functions. This review analyses the evolutionary convergence of IDO and TDO enzymes as tryptophan-catabolizing enzymes and the divergent evolution of IDO homologs to generate an enzyme family with diverse characteristics not possessed by TDO enzymes, with an emphasis on the immune system.

  4. Contribution of Asparagine Catabolism to Salmonella Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Patrick A; McClelland, Michael; Yang, Hee-Jeong; Porwollik, Steffen; Bogomolnaya, Lydia; Chen, Juei-Suei; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene; van der Velden, Adrianus W M

    2017-02-01

    Salmonellae are pathogenic bacteria that cause significant morbidity and mortality in humans worldwide. Salmonellae establish infection and avoid clearance by the immune system by mechanisms that are not well understood. We previously showed that l-asparaginase II produced by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S Typhimurium) inhibits T cell responses and mediates virulence. In addition, we previously showed that asparagine deprivation such as that mediated by l-asparaginase II of S Typhimurium causes suppression of activation-induced T cell metabolic reprogramming. Here, we report that STM3997, which encodes a homolog of disulfide bond protein A (dsbA) of Escherichia coli, is required for l-asparaginase II stability and function. Furthermore, we report that l-asparaginase II localizes primarily to the periplasm and acts together with l-asparaginase I to provide S Typhimurium the ability to catabolize asparagine and assimilate nitrogen. Importantly, we determined that, in a murine model of infection, S Typhimurium lacking both l-asparaginase I and II genes competes poorly with wild-type S Typhimurium for colonization of target tissues. Collectively, these results indicate that asparagine catabolism contributes to S Typhimurium virulence, providing new insights into the competition for nutrients at the host-pathogen interface.

  5. Conjugative plasmids of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Pachulec

    Full Text Available Many clinical isolates of the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae contain conjugative plasmids. The host range of these plasmids is limited to Neisseria species, but presence of a tetracycline (tetM determinant inserted in several of these plasmids is an important cause of the rapid spread of tetracycline resistance. Previously plasmids with different backbones (Dutch and American type backbones and with and without different tetM determinants (Dutch and American type tetM determinants have been identified. Within the isolates tested, all plasmids with American or Dutch type tetM determinants contained a Dutch type plasmid backbone. This demonstrated that tetM determinants should not be used to differentiate between conjugal plasmid backbones. The nucleotide sequences of conjugative plasmids with Dutch type plasmid backbones either not containing the tetM determinant (pEP5233 or containing Dutch (pEP5289 or American (pEP5050 type tetM determinants were determined. Analysis of the backbone sequences showed that they belong to a novel IncP1 subfamily divergent from the IncP1alpha, beta, gamma, delta and epsilon subfamilies. The tetM determinants were inserted in a genetic load region found in all these plasmids. Insertion was accompanied by the insertion of a gene with an unknown function, and rearrangement of a toxin/antitoxin gene cluster. The genetic load region contains two toxin/antitoxins of the Zeta/Epsilon toxin/antitoxin family previously only found in Gram positive organisms and the virulence associated protein D of the VapD/VapX toxin/antitoxin family. Remarkably, presence of VapX of pJD1, a small cryptic neisserial plasmid, in the acceptor strain strongly increased the conjugation efficiency, suggesting that it functions as an antitoxin for the conjugative plasmid. The presence of the toxin and antitoxin on different plasmids might explain why the host range of this IncP1 plasmid is limited to Neisseria species. The isolated plasmids

  6. Phenotypic plasticity in bacterial plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Paul E

    2004-01-01

    Plasmid pB15 was previously shown to evolve increased horizontal (infectious) transfer at the expense of reduced vertical (intergenerational) transfer and vice versa, a key trade-off assumed in theories of parasite virulence. Whereas the models predict that susceptible host abundance should determine which mode of transfer is selectively favored, host density failed to mediate the trade-off in pB15. One possibility is that the plasmid's transfer deviates from the assumption that horizontal spread (conjugation) occurs in direct proportion to cell density. I tested this hypothesis using Escherichia coli/pB15 associations in laboratory serial culture. Contrary to most models of plasmid transfer kinetics, my data show that pB15 invades static (nonshaking) bacterial cultures only at intermediate densities. The results can be explained by phenotypic plasticity in traits governing plasmid transfer. As cells become more numerous, the plasmid's conjugative transfer unexpectedly declines, while the trade-off between transmission routes causes vertical transfer to increase. Thus, at intermediate densities the plasmid's horizontal transfer can offset selection against plasmid-bearing cells, but at high densities pB15 conjugates so poorly that it cannot invade. I discuss adaptive vs. nonadaptive causes for the phenotypic plasticity, as well as potential mechanisms that may lead to complex transfer dynamics of plasmids in liquid environments. PMID:15166133

  7. Plasmid Rolling-Circle Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Masó, J A; MachóN, C; Bordanaba-Ruiseco, L; Espinosa, M; Coll, M; Del Solar, G

    2015-02-01

    Plasmids are DNA entities that undergo controlled replication independent of the chromosomal DNA, a crucial step that guarantees the prevalence of the plasmid in its host. DNA replication has to cope with the incapacity of the DNA polymerases to start de novo DNA synthesis, and different replication mechanisms offer diverse solutions to this problem. Rolling-circle replication (RCR) is a mechanism adopted by certain plasmids, among other genetic elements, that represents one of the simplest initiation strategies, that is, the nicking by a replication initiator protein on one parental strand to generate the primer for leading-strand initiation and a single priming site for lagging-strand synthesis. All RCR plasmid genomes consist of a number of basic elements: leading strand initiation and control, lagging strand origin, phenotypic determinants, and mobilization, generally in that order of frequency. RCR has been mainly characterized in Gram-positive bacterial plasmids, although it has also been described in Gram-negative bacterial or archaeal plasmids. Here we aim to provide an overview of the RCR plasmids' lifestyle, with emphasis on their characteristic traits, promiscuity, stability, utility as vectors, etc. While RCR is one of the best-characterized plasmid replication mechanisms, there are still many questions left unanswered, which will be pointed out along the way in this review.

  8. Genomics of high molecular weight plasmids isolated from an on-farm biopurification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, María C; Wibberg, Daniel; Lozano, Mauricio; Torres Tejerizo, Gonzalo; Albicoro, Francisco J; Jaenicke, Sebastian; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Petroni, Alejandro; Garcillán-Barcia, M Pilar; de la Cruz, Fernando; Schlüter, Andreas; Pühler, Alfred; Pistorio, Mariano; Lagares, Antonio; Del Papa, María F

    2016-06-20

    The use of biopurification systems (BPS) constitutes an efficient strategy to eliminate pesticides from polluted wastewaters from farm activities. BPS environments contain a high microbial density and diversity facilitating the exchange of information among bacteria, mediated by mobile genetic elements (MGEs), which play a key role in bacterial adaptation and evolution in such environments. Here we sequenced and characterized high-molecular-weight plasmids from a bacterial collection of an on-farm BPS. The high-throughput-sequencing of the plasmid pool yielded a total of several Mb sequence information. Assembly of the sequence data resulted in six complete replicons. Using in silico analyses we identified plasmid replication genes whose encoding proteins represent 13 different Pfam families, as well as proteins involved in plasmid conjugation, indicating a large diversity of plasmid replicons and suggesting the occurrence of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) events within the habitat analyzed. In addition, genes conferring resistance to 10 classes of antimicrobial compounds and those encoding enzymes potentially involved in pesticide and aromatic hydrocarbon degradation were found. Global analysis of the plasmid pool suggest that the analyzed BPS represents a key environment for further studies addressing the dissemination of MGEs carrying catabolic genes and pathway assembly regarding degradation capabilities.

  9. Plasmid recombination in Haemophilus influenzae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, D.

    1982-01-01

    DNA recombination in exponential phase and competent Haemophilus influenzae was measured by an electron microscopic assay that relies on the conversion of plasmid RSF0885 monomers into multimeric forms. Dimer circles were present at a frequency of 2% in plasmid preparations from competent Rd (wild-type) cells; multimers were present at a frequency of 0.2% in preparations from exponential phase cells. Thus, plasmid recombination was stimulated in competent cells. Multimer formation occurred efficiently in cells of the transformation defective mutant rec2, implying that the rec2 gene product is not required for plasmid recombination. However, the absence of multimer plasmids in preparations from competent cells of the transformation defective mutant rec1 suggests that the rec1 gene product is required. Digestion of purified plasmids with restriction endonuclease PvuII, which makes a single cut in the monomer, revealed the presence of recombination intermediates composed of two linear plasmids joined to form two pairs of arms resembling the Greek letter chi. Length measurements of these arms taken from a population of recombination intermediates gave evidence that the plasmids were joined at sites of homology. The distributions of individual DNA strands, at the intersections of the four arms, could be resolved in some recombination intermediates and were of two types. The first type of junction appeared as a single-stranded arm appended to each corner. The second type of junction consisted of a single strand of DNA linking the two linear plasmids at a site of homology. The single-stranded linker was frequently situated at the edge of a short gap on one of the plasmids in the pair. The fine structures of the recombinational joints have been interpreted in terms of previously proposed models of recombination.

  10. Bone marrow: its contribution to heme catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mähönen, Y; Anttinen, M; Vuopio, P; Tenhunen, R

    1976-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) and biliverdin reductase (BR), the two NADPH-dependent enzymes involved in the degradation of hemoglobin and its derivatives, were measured in bone marrow aspirates from 5 hematologically normal persons, 4 patients with chronic leucemia (CL), 11 patients with acute leucemia (AL), 8 patients with refractory sideroblastic anemia (RA), 7 patients with iron-deficiency anemia (IA), 5 patients with hemolytic anemia (HA), and 7 patients with secondary anemia (SA) to determine the enzymatic capacity of the bone marrow in different hematologic disorders for heme catabolism. HO activity in the bone marrow of normal persons was 0.42 +/- 0.28 (SD) nmoles bilirubin/10 mg protein/min; in CL, 2.15 +/- 1.34; in AL, 0.39 +/- 0.25; in RA, 0.58 +/- 0.37; in IA, 0.41 +/- 0.28; in HA, 2.56 +/- 1.40; and in SA, 1.72 +/- 1.06. BR activity, respectively, was in normal persons 8.7 +/- 2.4 (SD) nmoles bilirubin/10 mg protein/min; in CL, 13.6 +/- 9.1; in AL, 3.8 +/- 3.1 in RA, 5.1 +/- 2.7; in IA, 5.5 +/- 3.7; in HA, 17.0 +/- 7.2; and in SA, 10.5 +/- 4.2. On the basis of these findings it seems evident that both oxygenase and biliverdin reductase activities of the bone marrow are capable of adaptive regulation. The physiologic role of bone marrow in heme catabolism seems to be of significant importance.

  11. In Silico Detection and Typing of Plasmids using PlasmidFinder and Plasmid Multilocus Sequence Typing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carattoli, Alessandra; Zankari, Ea; García-Fernández, Aurora;

    2014-01-01

    In the work presented here, we designed and developed two easy-to-use Web tools for in silico detection and characterization of whole-genome sequence (WGS) and whole-plasmid sequence data from members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. These tools will facilitate bacterial typing based on draft...... genomes of multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae species by the rapid detection of known plasmid types. Replicon sequences from 559 fully sequenced plasmids associated with the family Enterobacteriaceae in the NCBI nucleotide database were collected to build a consensus database for integration...

  12. Plasmid and chromosome partitioning: surprises from phylogeny

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, Kenn; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Bugge Jensen, Rasmus

    2000-01-01

    Plasmids encode partitioning genes (par) that are required for faithful plasmid segregation at cell division. Initially, par loci were identified on plasmids, but more recently they were also found on bacterial chromosomes. We present here a phylogenetic analysis of par loci from plasmids and chr...

  13. Catabolism of host-derived compounds during extracellular bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Jamie A; Wargo, Matthew J

    2014-02-01

    Efficient catabolism of host-derived compounds is essential for bacterial survival and virulence. While these links in intracellular bacteria are well studied, such studies in extracellular bacteria lag behind, mostly for technical reasons. The field has identified important metabolic pathways, but the mechanisms by which they impact infection and in particular, establishing the importance of a compound's catabolism versus alternate metabolic roles has been difficult. In this review we will examine evidence for catabolism during extracellular bacterial infections in animals and known or potential roles in virulence. In the process, we point out key gaps in the field that will require new or newly adapted techniques.

  14. Basal autophagy is required for the efficient catabolism of sialyloligosaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seino, Junichi; Wang, Li; Harada, Yoichiro; Huang, Chengcheng; Ishii, Kumiko; Mizushima, Noboru; Suzuki, Tadashi

    2013-09-13

    Macroautophagy is an essential, homeostatic process involving degradation of a cell's own components; it plays a role in catabolizing cellular components, such as protein or lipids, and damaged or excess organelles. Here, we show that in Atg5(-/-) cells, sialyloligosaccharides specifically accumulated in the cytosol. Accumulation of these glycans was observed under non-starved conditions, suggesting that non-induced, basal autophagy is essential for their catabolism. Interestingly, once accumulated in the cytosol, sialylglycans cannot be efficiently catabolized by resumption of the autophagic process, suggesting that functional autophagy is important for preventing sialyloligosaccharides from accumulating in the cytosol. Moreover, knockdown of sialin, a lysosomal transporter of sialic acids, resulted in a significant reduction of sialyloligosaccharides, implying that autophagy affects the substrate specificity of this transporter. This study thus provides a surprising link between basal autophagy and catabolism of N-linked glycans.

  15. Pathway and Enzyme Redundancy in Putrescine Catabolism in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, Barbara L.; Reitzer, Larry

    2012-01-01

    Putrescine as the sole carbon source requires a novel catabolic pathway with glutamylated intermediates. Nitrogen limitation does not induce genes of this glutamylated putrescine (GP) pathway but instead induces genes for a putrescine catabolic pathway that starts with a transaminase-dependent deamination. We determined pathway utilization with putrescine as the sole nitrogen source by examining mutants with defects in both pathways. Blocks in both the GP and transaminase pathways were requir...

  16. [Biochemical methods for the determination of a clinical protein catabolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, E; Funovics, J; Schulz, F; Karner, J

    1980-12-01

    1. 20 patients before surgery received enteral nutrition for three days (12 g nitrogen, 1800 Kcal). Nitrogen and urea excretions in urine during the second and third day were determined. Eleven patients had a negative nitrogen balance (-2,7 and -2,4 g/day). In these patients urea production rates were 21,1 and 20,1 g/day. An urea production rate exceeding 15 g urea/day is probable an indication for a protein catabolism. The reason for this catabolic state seems to be a decreased protein utilisation (49 and 47 percent) as the result of a metabolic stress situation. This metabolic stress was determined according the stress index (Bistrian). The patients were in a stress situation comparable to postoperative stress (+3,7 and +3,9). The determination of urea production rate and catabolic index seems a suitable tool for defining a catabolic state. 2. 3-met-histidine excretion in urine were measured in seven patients postoperatively. In different periods saline or aminoacids solutions (5% alanine) were infused. During alanine administration protein (+49%)--and 3-met-histidine excretions (+50%) increased. It is not possible to state a catabolic situation out of the 3-met-histidine excretion, because an increased excretion may result from a stimulated protein synthesis in muscle tissue or from an increased muscleprotein wasting. 3. Free amino acid pools in plasma and muscle tissue were analysed in patients with severe illness of liver and pancreas. The free amino acid pattern differed from healthy volunteers. In patients with liver disease significantly increased concentrations of phenylalanine, tyrosine and methionine were found. In patients with acute pancreatitis highly abnormal pattern of intracellular amino acids occurred with decreased concentrations of glutamine, cysteine, histidine, lysine, arginine and ornithine. The highly significant decreased concentrations of glutamine (p less than 0,01) indicate a catabolic situation of these patients. A quantification of the

  17. Isolation of a Pseudomonas Stutzeri strain that degrades1, 2, 4-trichlorobenzene and characterization of its degradative plasmid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei SONG; Hui WANG; Hanchang SHI; Hongying HU

    2008-01-01

    The genetic information encoding metabolic pathways for xenobiotic compounds in bacteria often resides on catabolic plasmids. The aim of the present work was to know the location of the genes for degrading 1, 2, 4-trichlorobenzen. In this paper a 1, 2, 4-trichlorobenzene-degrading strain THSL-1 was isolated from the soil of Tianjin Chemical Plant using 1, 2, 4-trichlorobenzene as the sole carbon source. The strain was identified as Pseudomonas stutzeri through morphologic survey and 16S rDNA sequence determination. A plasmid was discovered from strain THSL-1 by using the alkali lysis method. When the plasmid was transformed into E. coli. JM109 by the CaCl2 method, the transformant could grow using 1, 2, 4-trichlorobenzene as the sole carbon source and had the degradation function of 1, 2, 4-trichlorobenzene. Therefore, it could be deemed that the plasmid carried the degradative genes of 1, 2, 4-trichlorobenzene. The average size of the plasmid was finally determined to be 40.2 Kb using selectively three kinds of restricted inscribed enzymes (HindIII, BamHI, and XholI) for single cutting and double cutting the plasmid pTHSL-1, respectively.

  18. Small-molecule inhibition of choline catabolism in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other aerobic choline-catabolizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimmons, Liam F; Flemer, Stevenson; Wurthmann, A Sandy; Deker, P Bruce; Sarkar, Indra Neil; Wargo, Matthew J

    2011-07-01

    Choline is abundant in association with eukaryotes and plays roles in osmoprotection, thermoprotection, and membrane biosynthesis in many bacteria. Aerobic catabolism of choline is widespread among soil proteobacteria, particularly those associated with eukaryotes. Catabolism of choline as a carbon, nitrogen, and/or energy source may play important roles in association with eukaryotes, including pathogenesis, symbioses, and nutrient cycling. We sought to generate choline analogues to study bacterial choline catabolism in vitro and in situ. Here we report the characterization of a choline analogue, propargylcholine, which inhibits choline catabolism at the level of Dgc enzyme-catalyzed dimethylglycine demethylation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We used genetic analyses and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance to demonstrate that propargylcholine is catabolized to its inhibitory form, propargylmethylglycine. Chemically synthesized propargylmethylglycine was also an inhibitor of growth on choline. Bioinformatic analysis suggests that there are genes encoding DgcA homologues in a variety of proteobacteria. We examined the broader utility of propargylcholine and propargylmethylglycine by assessing growth of other members of the proteobacteria that are known to grow on choline and possess putative DgcA homologues. Propargylcholine showed utility as a growth inhibitor in P. aeruginosa but did not inhibit growth in other proteobacteria tested. In contrast, propargylmethylglycine was able to inhibit choline-dependent growth in all tested proteobacteria, including Pseudomonas mendocina, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas putida, Burkholderia cepacia, Burkholderia ambifaria, and Sinorhizobium meliloti. We predict that chemical inhibitors of choline catabolism will be useful for studying this pathway in clinical and environmental isolates and could be a useful tool to study proteobacterial choline catabolism in situ.

  19. Polyamine catabolism in carcinogenesis: potential targets for chemotherapy and chemoprevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Valentina; DeStefano Shields, Christina; Murray-Stewart, Tracy; Casero, Robert A

    2014-03-01

    Polyamines, including spermine, spermidine, and the precursor diamine, putrescine, are naturally occurring polycationic alkylamines that are required for eukaryotic cell growth, differentiation, and survival. This absolute requirement for polyamines and the need to maintain intracellular levels within specific ranges require a highly regulated metabolic pathway primed for rapid changes in response to cellular growth signals, environmental changes, and stress. Although the polyamine metabolic pathway is strictly regulated in normal cells, dysregulation of polyamine metabolism is a frequent event in cancer. Recent studies suggest that the polyamine catabolic pathway may be involved in the etiology of some epithelial cancers. The catabolism of spermine to spermidine utilizes either the one-step enzymatic reaction of spermine oxidase (SMO) or the two-step process of spermidine/spermine N (1)-acetyltransferase (SSAT) coupled with the peroxisomal enzyme N (1)-acetylpolyamine oxidase. Both catabolic pathways produce hydrogen peroxide and a reactive aldehyde that are capable of damaging DNA and other critical cellular components. The catabolic pathway also depletes the intracellular concentrations of spermidine and spermine, which are free radical scavengers. Consequently, the polyamine catabolic pathway in general and specifically SMO and SSAT provide exciting new targets for chemoprevention and/or chemotherapy.

  20. Persistence of Antibiotic Resistance Plasmids in Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    wounds, facilitates the persistence of MDR plasmids in Acinetobacter baumannii , a problematic wound pathogen. Moreover, we have shown that plasmids...which plasmid persistence can improve in Acinetobacter baumannii and other wound pathogens when grown in biofilm environments. This project has the... Acinetobacter * baumannii ,!Klebsiella*pneumoniae,!Enterobacter*sp.,! and! Escherichia* coli! (Eardley! et! al.,! 2011;! Gaynes! &! Edwards,! 2005;! Murray

  1. Metabolic control analysis of xylose catabolism in Aspergillus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prathumpai, Wai; Gabelgaard, J.B.; Wanchanthuek, P.

    2003-01-01

    A kinetic model for xylose catabolism in Aspergillus is proposed. From a thermodynamic analysis it was found that the intermediate xylitol will accumulate during xylose catabolism. Use of the kinetic model allowed metabolic control analysis (MCA) of the xylose catabolic pathway to be carried out......, and flux control was shown to be dependent on the metabolite levels. Due to thermodynamic constraints, flux control may reside at the first step in the pathway, i.e., at the xylose reductase, even when the intracellular xylitol concentration is high. On the basis of the kinetic analysis, the general dogma...... specifying that flux control often resides at the step following an intermediate present at high concentrations was, therefore, shown not to hold. The intracellular xylitol concentration was measured in batch cultivations of two different strains of Aspergillus niger and two different strains of Aspergillus...

  2. Renal catabolism of albumin – current views and controversies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Gburek

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Albumin is the main protein of blood plasma, lymph, cerebrospinal fluid and interstitial fluid. The protein assists in many important body functions, including maintenance of proper colloidal osmotic pressure, transport of important metabolites and antioxidant action. Synthesis of albumin takes place mainly in the liver, and its catabolism occurs mostly in vascular endothelium of muscle, skin and liver as well as in the kidney tubular epithelium. Renal catabolism of albumin consists of glomerular filtration and tubular reabsorption. The tubular processes include endocytosis via the multiligand scavenger receptor tandem megalin and cubilin-amnionless complex. Possible ways of further catabolism of this protein are lysosomal proteolysis to amino acids and short peptides, recycling of degradation products into the bloodstream and tubular lumen or transcytosis of whole molecules. The article discusses the molecular aspects of these processes and presents the controversies arising in the light of the last decade of research.

  3. Bioanalytical approaches for characterizing catabolism of antibody-drug conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Ola M; Shen, Ben-Quan; Xu, Keyang; Khojasteh, S Cyrus; Girish, Sandhya; Kaur, Surinder

    2015-01-01

    The in vivo stability and catabolism of antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) directly impact their PK, efficacy and safety, and metabolites of the cytotoxic or small molecule drug component of an ADC can further complicate these factors. This perspective highlights the importance of understanding ADC catabolism and the associated bioanalytical challenges. We evaluated different bioanalytical approaches to qualitatively and quantitatively characterize ADC catabolites. Here we review and discuss the rationale and experimental strategies used to design bioanalytical assays for characterization of ADC catabolism and supporting ADME studies during ADC clinical development. This review covers both large and small molecule approaches, and uses examples from Kadcyla® (T-DM1) and a THIOMAB™ antibody-drug conjugate to illustrate the process.

  4. Pathway and enzyme redundancy in putrescine catabolism in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Barbara L; Reitzer, Larry

    2012-08-01

    Putrescine as the sole carbon source requires a novel catabolic pathway with glutamylated intermediates. Nitrogen limitation does not induce genes of this glutamylated putrescine (GP) pathway but instead induces genes for a putrescine catabolic pathway that starts with a transaminase-dependent deamination. We determined pathway utilization with putrescine as the sole nitrogen source by examining mutants with defects in both pathways. Blocks in both the GP and transaminase pathways were required to prevent growth with putrescine as the sole nitrogen source. Genetic and biochemical analyses showed redundant enzymes for γ-aminobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase (PatD/YdcW and PuuC), γ-aminobutyrate transaminase (GabT and PuuE), and succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (GabD and PuuC). PuuC is a nonspecific aldehyde dehydrogenase that oxidizes all the aldehydes in putrescine catabolism. A puuP mutant failed to use putrescine as the nitrogen source, which implies one major transporter for putrescine as the sole nitrogen source. Analysis of regulation of the GP pathway shows induction by putrescine and not by a product of putrescine catabolism and shows that putrescine accumulates in puuA, puuB, and puuC mutants but not in any other mutant. We conclude that two independent sets of enzymes can completely degrade putrescine to succinate and that their relative importance depends on the environment.

  5. Variable carbon catabolism among Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lay Ching Chai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi is strictly a human intracellular pathogen. It causes acute systemic (typhoid fever and chronic infections that result in long-term asymptomatic human carriage. S. Typhi displays diverse disease manifestations in human infection and exhibits high clonality. The principal factors underlying the unique lifestyle of S. Typhi in its human host during acute and chronic infections remain largely unknown and are therefore the main objective of this study. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To obtain insight into the intracellular lifestyle of S. Typhi, a high-throughput phenotypic microarray was employed to characterise the catabolic capacity of 190 carbon sources in S. Typhi strains. The success of this study lies in the carefully selected library of S. Typhi strains, including strains from two geographically distinct areas of typhoid endemicity, an asymptomatic human carrier, clinical stools and blood samples and sewage-contaminated rivers. An extremely low carbon catabolic capacity (27% of 190 carbon substrates was observed among the strains. The carbon catabolic profiles appeared to suggest that S. Typhi strains survived well on carbon subtrates that are found abundantly in the human body but not in others. The strains could not utilise plant-associated carbon substrates. In addition, α-glycerolphosphate, glycerol, L-serine, pyruvate and lactate served as better carbon sources to monosaccharides in the S. Typhi strains tested. CONCLUSION: The carbon catabolic profiles suggest that S. Typhi could survive and persist well in the nutrient depleted metabolic niches in the human host but not in the environment outside of the host. These findings serve as caveats for future studies to understand how carbon catabolism relates to the pathogenesis and transmission of this pathogen.

  6. The D-galacturonic acid catabolic pathway in Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lisha; Thiewes, Harry; van Kan, Jan A L

    2011-10-01

    D-galacturonic acid is the most abundant component of pectin, one of the major polysaccharide constituents of plant cell walls. Galacturonic acid potentially is an important carbon source for microorganisms living on (decaying) plant material. A catabolic pathway was proposed in filamentous fungi, comprising three enzymatic steps, involving D-galacturonate reductase, L-galactonate dehydratase, and 2-keto-3-deoxy-L-galactonate aldolase. We describe the functional, biochemical and genetic characterization of the entire D-galacturonate-specific catabolic pathway in the plant pathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea. The B. cinerea genome contains two non-homologous galacturonate reductase genes (Bcgar1 and Bcgar2), a galactonate dehydratase gene (Bclgd1), and a 2-keto-3-deoxy-L-galactonate aldolase gene (Bclga1). Their expression levels were highly induced in cultures containing GalA, pectate, or pectin as the sole carbon source. The four proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and their enzymatic activity was characterized. Targeted gene replacement of all four genes in B. cinerea, either separately or in combinations, yielded mutants that were affected in growth on D-galacturonic acid, pectate, or pectin as the sole carbon source. In Aspergillus nidulans and A. niger, the first catabolic conversion only involves the Bcgar2 ortholog, while in Hypocrea jecorina, it only involves the Bcgar1 ortholog. In B. cinerea, however, BcGAR1 and BcGAR2 jointly contribute to the first step of the catabolic pathway, albeit to different extent. The virulence of all B. cinerea mutants in the D-galacturonic acid catabolic pathway on tomato leaves, apple fruit and bell peppers was unaltered.

  7. Hormonal regulation of leucine catabolism in mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jian; Feng, Dingyuan; Zhang, Yongliang; Dahanayaka, Sudath; Li, Xilong; Yao, Kang; Wang, Junjun; Wu, Zhenlong; Dai, Zhaolai; Wu, Guoyao

    2013-09-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) are actively taken up and catabolized by the mammary gland during lactation for syntheses of glutamate, glutamine and aspartate. Available evidence shows that the onset of lactation is associated with increases in circulating levels of cortisol, prolactin and glucagon, but decreases in insulin and growth hormone. This study determined the effects of physiological concentrations of these hormones on the catabolism of leucine (a representative BCAA) in bovine mammary epithelial cells. Cells were incubated at 37 °C for 2 h in Krebs buffer containing 3 mM D-glucose, 0.5 mM L-leucine, L-[1-14C]leucine or L-[U-14C]leucine, and 0-50 μU/mL insulin, 0-20 ng/mL growth hormone 0-200 ng/mL prolactin, 0-150 nM cortisol or 0-300 pg/mL glucagon. Increasing extracellular concentrations of insulin did not affect leucine transamination or oxidative decarboxylation, but decreased the rate of oxidation of leucine carbons 2-6. Elevated levels of growth hormone dose dependently inhibited leucine catabolism, α-ketoisocaproate (KIC) production and the syntheses of glutamate plus glutamine. In contrast, cortisol and glucagon increased leucine transamination, leucine oxidative decarboxylation, KIC production, the oxidation of leucine 2-6 carbons and the syntheses of glutamate plus glutamine. Prolactin did not affect leucine catabolism in the cells. The changes in leucine degradation were consistent with alterations in abundances of BCAA transaminase and phosphorylated levels of branched-chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase. Reductions in insulin and growth hormone but increases in cortisol and glucagon with lactation act in concert to stimulate BCAA catabolism for glutamate and glutamine syntheses. These coordinated changes in hormones may facilitate milk production in lactating mammals.

  8. Survival and catabolic activity of natural and genetically engineered bacteria in a laboratory-scale activated-sludge unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClure, N.C.; Fry, J.C.; Weightman, A.J. (Univ. of Wales College of Cardiff (Wales))

    1991-02-01

    The survival of selected naturally occurring and genetically engineered bacteria in a fully functional laboratory-scale activated-sludge unit (ASU) was investigated. The effect of the presence of 3-chlorobenzoate (3CB) on the survival of Pseudomonas putida UWC1, with or without a chimeric plasmid, pD10, which encodes 3CB catabolism, was determined. P. putida UWC1(pD10) did not enhance 3CB breakdown in the ASU, even following inoculation at a high concentration (3 x 10(8) CFU/ml). The emergence of a natural, 3CB-degrading population appeared to have a detrimental effect on the survival of strain UWC1 in the ASU. The fate of two 3CB-utilizing bacteria, derived from activated-sludge microflora, was studied in experiments in which these strains were inoculated into the ASU. Both strains, AS2, an unmanipulated natural isolate which flocculated readily in liquid media, and P. putida ASR2.8, a transconjugant containing the recombinant plasmid pD10, survived for long periods in the ASU and enhanced 3CB breakdown at 15 degrees C. The results reported in this paper illustrate the importance of choosing strains which are well adapted to environmental conditions if the use of microbial inoculants for the breakdown of target pollutants is to be successful.

  9. Plasmid profiles of Moraxella bovis isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, T J; Pugh, G W

    1986-04-01

    Two-hundred isolates of Moraxella bovis were selected at random and examined for the presence of plasmid DNA by a rapid alkaline-detergent lysis method. All isolates contained from 1 to 6 plasmids, with varying agarose-gel electrophoretic migration patterns. Most (80%) isolates carried 2 to 4 plasmids, which ranged in molecular weight from 2.6 to 80 megadaltons. Seemingly, plasmid profiles can be used as a simple, reliable epizootiologic tool to establish a strain identification scheme for M bovis.

  10. Plasmid transfer systems in the rhizobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hao; Hynes, Michael F

    2009-08-01

    Rhizobia are agriculturally important bacteria that can form nitrogen-fixing nodules on the roots of leguminous plants. Agricultural application of rhizobial inoculants can play an important role in increasing leguminous crop yields. In temperate rhizobia, genes involved in nodulation and nitrogen fixation are usually located on one or more large plasmids (pSyms) or on symbiotic islands. In addition, other large plasmids of rhizobia carry genes that are beneficial for survival and competition of rhizobia in the rhizosphere. Conjugative transfer of these large plasmids thus plays an important role in the evolution of rhizobia. Therefore, understanding the mechanism of conjugative transfer of large rhizobial plasmids provides foundations for maintaining, monitoring, and predicting the behaviour of these plasmids during field release events. In this minireview, we summarize two types of known rhizobial conjugative plasmids, including quorum sensing regulated plasmids and RctA-repressed plasmids. We provide evidence for the existence of a third type of conjugative plasmid, including pRleVF39c in Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae strain VF39SM, and we provide a comparison of the different types of conjugation genes found in members of the rhizobia that have had their genomes sequenced so far.

  11. Effect of chromosome homology an plasmid transformation and plasmid conjugal transfer in Haemophilus influenzae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balganesh, M.; Setlow, J.K.

    1984-05-14

    The pairing between plasmid and the homologous part of the chromosome associated with plasmid establishment may differ from the pairing which results from integration of a homologous region of the plasmid into the chromosome. Thus the rate of novobiocin transformation decreases with duplication of the chromosomal portion in pMB2, but the rate of establishment of the plasmid increases with this duplication. A model to explain these data is given. 17 references, 5 figures, 4 tables.

  12. Amino acid catabolism by Lactobacillus helveticus in cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kananen, Soila Kaarina

    Amino acid catabolism is the final step in the conversion of caseins to flavour compounds and a part of a complex combination of biochemical pathways in cheese flavour formation. Lactobacillus helveticus is a thermophilic lactic acid bacterium that is used in cheese manufacture as a primary starter...... culture or as an adjunct culture. It has shown high proteolytic activities in conversion of caseins to peptides and further to amino acids and flavour compounds. Better understanding of the enzyme activity properties and the influence of different properties on final cheese flavour is favourable...... for developing new cheese products with enhanced flavour. The aim of this Ph.D. study was to investigate the importance of strain variation of Lb. helveticus in relation flavour formation in cheese related to amino acid catabolism. Aspects of using Lb. helveticus as starter as well as adjunct culture in cheese...

  13. Serine one-carbon catabolism with formate overflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiser, Johannes; Tumanov, Sergey; Maddocks, Oliver; Labuschagne, Christiaan Fred; Athineos, Dimitris; Van Den Broek, Niels; Mackay, Gillian M.; Gottlieb, Eyal; Blyth, Karen; Vousden, Karen; Kamphorst, Jurre J.; Vazquez, Alexei

    2016-01-01

    Serine catabolism to glycine and a one-carbon unit has been linked to the anabolic requirements of proliferating mammalian cells. However, genome-scale modeling predicts a catabolic role with one-carbon release as formate. We experimentally prove that in cultured cancer cells and nontransformed fibroblasts, most of the serine-derived one-carbon units are released from cells as formate, and that formate release is dependent on mitochondrial reverse 10-CHO-THF synthetase activity. We also show that in cancer cells, formate release is coupled to mitochondrial complex I activity, whereas in nontransformed fibroblasts, it is partially insensitive to inhibition of complex I activity. We demonstrate that in mice, about 50% of plasma formate is derived from serine and that serine starvation or complex I inhibition reduces formate synthesis in vivo. These observations transform our understanding of one-carbon metabolism and have implications for the treatment of diabetes and cancer with complex I inhibitors.

  14. Neanderthal ancestry drives evolution of lipid catabolism in contemporary Europeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrameeva, Ekaterina E; Bozek, Katarzyna; He, Liu; Yan, Zheng; Jiang, Xi; Wei, Yuning; Tang, Kun; Gelfand, Mikhail S; Prufer, Kay; Kelso, Janet; Paabo, Svante; Giavalisco, Patrick; Lachmann, Michael; Khaitovich, Philipp

    2014-04-01

    Although Neanderthals are extinct, fragments of their genomes persist in contemporary humans. Here we show that while the genome-wide frequency of Neanderthal-like sites is approximately constant across all contemporary out-of-Africa populations, genes involved in lipid catabolism contain more than threefold excess of such sites in contemporary humans of European descent. Evolutionally, these genes show significant association with signatures of recent positive selection in the contemporary European, but not Asian or African populations. Functionally, the excess of Neanderthal-like sites in lipid catabolism genes can be linked with a greater divergence of lipid concentrations and enzyme expression levels within this pathway, seen in contemporary Europeans, but not in the other populations. We conclude that sequence variants that evolved in Neanderthals may have given a selective advantage to anatomically modern humans that settled in the same geographical areas.

  15. Mediated Electrochemical Measurements of Intracellular Catabolic Activities of Yeast Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Sheng ZHAO; Zhen Yu YANG; Yao LU; Zheng Yu YANG

    2005-01-01

    Coupling with the dual mediator system menadione/ferricyanide, microelectrode voltammetric measurements were undertaken to detect the ferrocyanide accumulations arising from the mediated reduction of ferricyanide by yeast cells. The results indicate that the dual mediator system menadione/ferricyanide could be used as a probe to detect cellular catabolic activities in yeast cells and the electrochemical response has a positive relationship with the specific growth rate of yeast cells.

  16. Threshold Acetate Concentrations for Acetate Catabolism by Aceticlastic Methanogenic Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Westermann, Peter; Ahring, Birgitte K.; Mah, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    Marked differences were found for minimum threshold concentrations of acetate catabolism by Methanosarcina barkeri 227 (1.180 mM), Methanosarcina mazei S-6 (0.396 mM), and a Methanothrix sp. (0.069 mM). This indicates that the aceticlastic methanogens responsible for the conversion of acetate to methane in various ecosystems might be different, depending on the prevailing in situ acetate concentrations.

  17. Anaerobic catabolism of aromatic compounds: a genetic and genomic view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, Manuel; Zamarro, María Teresa; Blázquez, Blas; Durante-Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Juárez, Javier F; Valderrama, J Andrés; Barragán, María J L; García, José Luis; Díaz, Eduardo

    2009-03-01

    Aromatic compounds belong to one of the most widely distributed classes of organic compounds in nature, and a significant number of xenobiotics belong to this family of compounds. Since many habitats containing large amounts of aromatic compounds are often anoxic, the anaerobic catabolism of aromatic compounds by microorganisms becomes crucial in biogeochemical cycles and in the sustainable development of the biosphere. The mineralization of aromatic compounds by facultative or obligate anaerobic bacteria can be coupled to anaerobic respiration with a variety of electron acceptors as well as to fermentation and anoxygenic photosynthesis. Since the redox potential of the electron-accepting system dictates the degradative strategy, there is wide biochemical diversity among anaerobic aromatic degraders. However, the genetic determinants of all these processes and the mechanisms involved in their regulation are much less studied. This review focuses on the recent findings that standard molecular biology approaches together with new high-throughput technologies (e.g., genome sequencing, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metagenomics) have provided regarding the genetics, regulation, ecophysiology, and evolution of anaerobic aromatic degradation pathways. These studies revealed that the anaerobic catabolism of aromatic compounds is more diverse and widespread than previously thought, and the complex metabolic and stress programs associated with the use of aromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions are starting to be unraveled. Anaerobic biotransformation processes based on unprecedented enzymes and pathways with novel metabolic capabilities, as well as the design of novel regulatory circuits and catabolic networks of great biotechnological potential in synthetic biology, are now feasible to approach.

  18. Pyridine metabolism in tea plants: salvage, conjugate formation and catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashihara, Hiroshi; Deng, Wei-Wei

    2012-11-01

    Pyridine compounds, including nicotinic acid and nicotinamide, are key metabolites of both the salvage pathway for NAD and the biosynthesis of related secondary compounds. We examined the in situ metabolic fate of [carbonyl-(14)C]nicotinamide, [2-(14)C]nicotinic acid and [carboxyl-(14)C]nicotinic acid riboside in tissue segments of tea (Camellia sinensis) plants, and determined the activity of enzymes involved in pyridine metabolism in protein extracts from young tea leaves. Exogenously supplied (14)C-labelled nicotinamide was readily converted to nicotinic acid, and some nicotinic acid was salvaged to nicotinic acid mononucleotide and then utilized for the synthesis of NAD and NADP. The nicotinic acid riboside salvage pathway discovered recently in mungbean cotyledons is also operative in tea leaves. Nicotinic acid was converted to nicotinic acid N-glucoside, but not to trigonelline (N-methylnicotinic acid), in any part of tea seedlings. Active catabolism of nicotinic acid was observed in tea leaves. The fate of [2-(14)C]nicotinic acid indicates that glutaric acid is a major catabolite of nicotinic acid; it was further metabolised, and carbon atoms were finally released as CO(2). The catabolic pathway observed in tea leaves appears to start with the nicotinic acid N-glucoside formation; this pathway differs from catabolic pathways observed in microorganisms. Profiles of pyridine metabolism in tea plants are discussed.

  19. Geochemical Energy for Catabolism and Anabolism in Hydrothermal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amend, J. P.; McCollom, T. M.; Bach, W.

    2008-12-01

    Chemically reduced deep-sea vent fluids mixed with oxidized seawater can generate redox disequilibria that serve as energy sources for chemolithoautotrophic (catabolism) and biomass synthesis (anabolism) reactions. Numerical models can be used to evaluate Gibbs energies of such processes on the early Earth and in present-day systems. Here, geochemical data from compositionally diverse vent fluids (Lost City, Rainbow, Logatchev, TAG, 21 °N EPR) are combined with several seawater chemistries to yield a wide range of mixed hydrothermal solutions; this is the starting point for our thermodynamic calculations. In ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal systems, such as Rainbow or Lost City, aerobic chemolithotrophic catabolisms (oxidation of H2, FeII, CH4) are the most energy-yielding at low temperatures (catabolic reaction energetics can then be used to put constraints on the amount of primary biomass production. Under putative early Earth conditions, for example, the net chemoautotrophic synthesis of cellular building blocks is thermodynamically most favorable at moderate temperatures (~50°C), where the energy contributions from HCO3- and H+ in cool seawater coupled to the reducing power in hot vent fluid are optimized. At these conditions, and counter to conventional wisdom, the synthesis of amino acids may even yield small amounts of energy.

  20. Catabolism of Phenol and Its Derivatives in Bacteria: Genes, Their Regulation, and Use in the Biodegradation of Toxic Pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nešvera, Jan; Rucká, Lenka; Pátek, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Phenol and its derivatives (alkylphenols, halogenated phenols, nitrophenols) are natural or man-made aromatic compounds that are ubiquitous in nature and in human-polluted environments. Many of these substances are toxic and/or suspected of mutagenic, carcinogenic, and teratogenic effects. Bioremediation of the polluted soil and water using various bacteria has proved to be a promising option for the removal of these compounds. In this review, we describe a number of peripheral pathways of aerobic and anaerobic catabolism of various natural and xenobiotic phenolic compounds, which funnel these substances into a smaller number of central catabolic pathways. Finally, the metabolites are used as carbon and energy sources in the citric acid cycle. We provide here the characteristics of the enzymes that convert the phenolic compounds and their catabolites, show their genes, and describe regulatory features. The genes, which encode these enzymes, are organized on chromosomes and plasmids of the natural bacterial degraders in various patterns. The accumulated data on similarities and the differences of the genes, their varied organization, and particularly, an astonishingly broad range of intricate regulatory mechanism may be read as an exciting adventurous book on divergent evolutionary processes and horizontal gene transfer events inscribed in the bacterial genomes. In the end, the use of this wealth of bacterial biodegradation potential and the manipulation of its genetic basis for purposes of bioremediation is exemplified. It is envisioned that the integrated high-throughput techniques and genome-level approaches will enable us to manipulate systems rather than separated genes, which will give birth to systems biotechnology.

  1. Plasmid typing of Shigella sonnei epidemic strains and molecular relationship of their R-plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, M C; Gonzalez, A J; Mendez, F J; Hardisson, C

    1988-06-01

    We conducted a surveillance program on epidemic and/or endemic Shigella strains in Asturias (Spain), their frequency and dispersion in our community, and their R-plasmids. We analyzed initial isolates of Shigella sonnei from two epidemic outbreaks using antibiotic resistance patterns and plasmid profile analysis as epidemiological markers. We found that the 2 outbreaks were caused by different S. sonnei strains, which respectively carried one and two R-plasmids together with other plasmids. The molecular relationship among these and three other R-plasmids from two S. sonnei strains isolated during a previous outbreak, were studied by restriction enzyme analysis and DNA-DNA hybridizations. We were able to establish different levels of relationship among the six R-plasmids.

  2. Identification of the First Riboflavin Catabolic Gene Cluster Isolated from Microbacterium maritypicum G10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hui; Chakrabarty, Yindrila; Philmus, Benjamin; Mehta, Angad P; Bhandari, Dhananjay; Hohmann, Hans-Peter; Begley, Tadhg P

    2016-11-04

    Riboflavin is a common cofactor, and its biosynthetic pathway is well characterized. However, its catabolic pathway, despite intriguing hints in a few distinct organisms, has never been established. This article describes the isolation of a Microbacterium maritypicum riboflavin catabolic strain, and the cloning of the riboflavin catabolic genes. RcaA, RcaB, RcaD, and RcaE were overexpressed and biochemically characterized as riboflavin kinase, riboflavin reductase, ribokinase, and riboflavin hydrolase, respectively. Based on these activities, a pathway for riboflavin catabolism is proposed.

  3. Plasmid and chromosome segregation in prokaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Bugge Jensen, Rasmus; Gerdes, Kenn

    2000-01-01

    Recent major advances in the understanding of prokaryotic DNA segregation have been achieved by using fluorescence microscopy to visualize the localization of cellular components. Plasmids and bacterial chromosomes are partitioned in a highly dynamic fashion, suggesting the presence of a mitotic......-like apparatus in prokaryotes. The identification of chromosomal homologues of the well-characterized plasmid partitioning genes indicates that there could be a general mechanism of bacterial DNA partitioning. Udgivelsesdato: July 1...

  4. Protein diversity confers specificity in plasmid segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fothergill, Timothy J G; Barillà, Daniela; Hayes, Finbarr

    2005-04-01

    The ParG segregation protein (8.6 kDa) of multidrug resistance plasmid TP228 is a homodimeric DNA-binding factor. The ParG dimer consists of intertwined C-terminal domains that adopt a ribbon-helix-helix architecture and a pair of flexible, unstructured N-terminal tails. A variety of plasmids possess partition loci with similar organizations to that of TP228, but instead of ParG homologs, these plasmids specify a diversity of unrelated, but similarly sized, partition proteins. These include the proteobacterial pTAR, pVT745, and pB171 plasmids. The ParG analogs of these plasmids were characterized in parallel with the ParG homolog encoded by the pseudomonal plasmid pVS1. Like ParG, the four proteins are dimeric. No heterodimerization was detectable in vivo among the proteins nor with the prototypical ParG protein, suggesting that monomer-monomer interactions are specific among the five proteins. Nevertheless, as with ParG, the ParG analogs all possess significant amounts of unordered amino acid residues, potentially highlighting a common structural link among the proteins. Furthermore, the ParG analogs bind specifically to the DNA regions located upstream of their homologous parF-like genes. These nucleoprotein interactions are largely restricted to cognate protein-DNA pairs. The results reveal that the partition complexes of these and related plasmids have recruited disparate DNA-binding factors that provide a layer of specificity to the macromolecular interactions that mediate plasmid segregation.

  5. Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons: catabolic genes, microbial communities, and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Sebastián; Méndez, Valentina; Aguila, Patricia; Seeger, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Bioremediation is an environmental sustainable and cost-effective technology for the cleanup of hydrocarbon-polluted soils and coasts. In spite of that longer times are usually required compared with physicochemical strategies, complete degradation of the pollutant can be achieved, and no further confinement of polluted matrix is needed. Microbial aerobic degradation is achieved by the incorporation of molecular oxygen into the inert hydrocarbon molecule and funneling intermediates into central catabolic pathways. Several families of alkane monooxygenases and ring hydroxylating dioxygenases are distributed mainly among Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes and Fungi strains. Catabolic routes, regulatory networks, and tolerance/resistance mechanisms have been characterized in model hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria to understand and optimize their metabolic capabilities, providing the basis to enhance microbial fitness in order to improve hydrocarbon removal. However, microbial communities taken as a whole play a key role in hydrocarbon pollution events. Microbial community dynamics during biodegradation is crucial for understanding how they respond and adapt to pollution and remediation. Several strategies have been applied worldwide for the recovery of sites contaminated with persistent organic pollutants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and petroleum derivatives. Common strategies include controlling environmental variables (e.g., oxygen availability, hydrocarbon solubility, nutrient balance) and managing hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms, in order to overcome the rate-limiting factors that slow down hydrocarbon biodegradation.

  6. Structural Organization of Enzymes of the Phenylacetate Catabolic Hybrid Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey M. Grishin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aromatic compounds are the second most abundant class of molecules on the earth and frequent environmental pollutants. They are difficult to metabolize due to an inert chemical structure, and of all living organisms, only microbes have evolved biochemical pathways that can open an aromatic ring and catabolize thus formed organic molecules. In bacterial genomes, the phenylacetate (PA utilization pathway is abundant and represents the central route for degradation of a variety of organic compounds, whose degradation reactions converge at this pathway. The PA pathway is a hybrid pathway and combines the dual features of aerobic metabolism, i.e., usage of both oxygen to open the aromatic ring and of anaerobic metabolism—coenzyme A derivatization of PA. This allows the degradation process to be adapted to fluctuating oxygen conditions. In this review we focus on the structural and functional aspects of enzymes and their complexes involved in the PA degradation by the catabolic hybrid pathway. We discuss the ability of the central PaaABCE monooxygenase to reversibly oxygenate PA, the controlling mechanisms of epoxide concentration by the pathway enzymes, and the similarity of the PA utilization pathway to the benzoate utilization Box pathway and β-oxidation of fatty acids.

  7. Structural Organization of Enzymes of the Phenylacetate Catabolic Hybrid Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishin, Andrey M; Cygler, Miroslaw

    2015-06-12

    Aromatic compounds are the second most abundant class of molecules on the earth and frequent environmental pollutants. They are difficult to metabolize due to an inert chemical structure, and of all living organisms, only microbes have evolved biochemical pathways that can open an aromatic ring and catabolize thus formed organic molecules. In bacterial genomes, the phenylacetate (PA) utilization pathway is abundant and represents the central route for degradation of a variety of organic compounds, whose degradation reactions converge at this pathway. The PA pathway is a hybrid pathway and combines the dual features of aerobic metabolism, i.e., usage of both oxygen to open the aromatic ring and of anaerobic metabolism-coenzyme A derivatization of PA. This allows the degradation process to be adapted to fluctuating oxygen conditions. In this review we focus on the structural and functional aspects of enzymes and their complexes involved in the PA degradation by the catabolic hybrid pathway. We discuss the ability of the central PaaABCE monooxygenase to reversibly oxygenate PA, the controlling mechanisms of epoxide concentration by the pathway enzymes, and the similarity of the PA utilization pathway to the benzoate utilization Box pathway and β-oxidation of fatty acids.

  8. Curing of plasmid pXO1 from Bacillus anthracis using plasmid incompatibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiankai Liu

    Full Text Available The large plasmid pXO1 encoding the anthrax toxin is important for the virulence of Bacillus anthracis. It is essential to cure pXO1 from B. anthracis to evaluate its role in the pathogenesis of anthrax infection. Because conventional methods for curing plasmids (e.g., curing agents or growth at elevated temperatures can induce mutations in the host chromosomal DNA, we developed a specific and reliable method to eliminate pXO1 from B. anthracis using plasmid incompatibility. Three putative replication origins of pXO1 were inserted into a temperature-sensitive plasmid to generate three incompatible plasmids. One of the three plasmids successfully eliminated the large plasmid pXO1 from B. anthracis vaccine strain A16R and wild type strain A16. These findings provided additional information about the replication/partitioning of pXO1 and demonstrated that introducing a small incompatible plasmid can generate plasmid-cured strains of B. anthracis without inducing spontaneous mutations in the host chromosome.

  9. Historical Events That Spawned the Field of Plasmid Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kado, Clarence I

    2014-10-01

    This chapter revisits the historical development and outcome of studies focused on the transmissible, extrachromosomal genetic elements called plasmids. Early work on plasmids involved structural and genetic mapping of these molecules, followed by the development of an understanding of how plasmids replicate and segregate during cell division. The intriguing property of plasmid transmission between bacteria and between bacteria and higher cells has received considerable attention. The utilitarian aspects of plasmids are described, including examples of various plasmid vector systems. This chapter also discusses the functional attributes of plasmids needed for their persistence and survival in nature and in man-made environments. The term plasmid biology was first conceived at the Fallen Leaf Lake Conference on Promiscuous Plasmids, 1990, Lake Tahoe, California. The International Society for Plasmid Biology was established in 2004 (www.ISPB.org).

  10. Insights into the evolution of sialic acid catabolism among bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almagro-Moreno Salvador

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sialic acids comprise a family of nine-carbon amino sugars that are prevalent in mucus rich environments. Sialic acids from the human host are used by a number of pathogens as an energy source. Here we explore the evolution of the genes involved in the catabolism of sialic acid. Results The cluster of genes encoding the enzymes N-acetylneuraminate lyase (NanA, epimerase (NanE, and kinase (NanK, necessary for the catabolism of sialic acid (the Nan cluster, are confined 46 bacterial species, 42 of which colonize mammals, 33 as pathogens and 9 as gut commensals. We found a putative sialic acid transporter associated with the Nan cluster in most species. We reconstructed the phylogenetic history of the NanA, NanE, and NanK proteins from the 46 species and compared them to the species tree based on 16S rRNA. Within the NanA phylogeny, Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria do not form distinct clades. NanA from Yersinia and Vibrio species was most closely related to the NanA clade from eukaryotes. To examine this further, we reconstructed the phylogeny of all NanA homologues in the databases. In this analysis of 83 NanA sequences, Bacteroidetes, a human commensal group formed a distinct clade with Verrucomicrobia, and branched with the Eukaryotes and the Yersinia/Vibrio clades. We speculate that pathogens such as V. cholerae may have acquired NanA from a commensal aiding their colonization of the human gut. Both the NanE and NanK phylogenies more closely represented the species tree but numerous incidences of incongruence are noted. We confirmed the predicted function of the sialic acid catabolism cluster in members the major intestinal pathogens Salmonella enterica, Vibrio cholerae, V. vulnificus, Yersinia enterocolitica and Y. pestis. Conclusion The Nan cluster among bacteria is confined to human pathogens and commensals conferring them the ability to utilize a ubiquitous carbon source in mucus rich surfaces of the human body

  11. The 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid catabolon, a catabolic unit for degradation of biogenic amines tyramine and dopamine in Pseudomonas putida U.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcos, Mario; Olivera, Elías R; Arias, Sagrario; Naharro, Germán; Luengo, José M

    2010-06-01

    Degradation of tyramine and dopamine by Pseudomonas putida U involves the participation of twenty one proteins organized in two coupled catabolic pathways, Tyn (tynABFEC tynG tynR tynD, 12 338 bp) and Hpa (hpaR hpaBC hpaHI hpaX hpaG1G2EDF hpaA hpaY, 12 722 bp). The Tyn pathway catalyses the conversion of tyramine and dopamine into 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (4HPA) and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (3,4HPA) respectively. Together, the Tyn and Hpa pathways constitute a complex catabolic unit (the 3,4HPA catabolon) in which 3,4HPA is the central intermediate. The genes encoding Tyn proteins are organized in four consecutive transcriptional units (tynABFEC, tynG, tynR and tynD), whereas those encoding Hpa proteins constitute consecutive operons (hpaBC, hpaG1G2EDF, hpaX, hpaHI) and three independent units (hpaA, hpaR and hpaY). Genetic engineering approaches were used to clone tyn and hpa genes and then express them, either individually or in tandem, in plasmids and/or bacterial chromosomes, resulting in recombinant bacterial strains able to eliminate tyramine and dopamine from different media. These results enlarge our biochemical and genetic knowledge of the microbial catabolic routes involved in the degradation of aromatic bioamines. Furthermore, they provide potent biotechnological tools to be used in food processing and fermentation as well as new strategies that could be used for pharmacological and gene therapeutic applications in the near future.

  12. Distinct Tryptophan Catabolism and Th17/Treg Balance in HIV Progressors and Elite Controllers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jenabian, Mohammad-Ali; Patel, Mital; Kema, Ido; Kanagaratham, Cynthia; Radzioch, Danuta; Thebault, Pamela; Lapointe, Rejean; Tremblay, Cecile; Gilmore, Norbert; Ancuta, Petronela; Routy, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Tryptophan (Trp) catabolism into immunosuppressive kynurenine (Kyn) by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) was previously linked to Th17/Treg differentiation and immune activation. Here we examined Trp catabolism and its impact on Th17/Treg balance in uninfected healthy subjects (HS) and a large cohor

  13. Bacteriophage selection against a plasmid-encoded sex apparatus leads to the loss of antibiotic-resistance plasmids

    OpenAIRE

    Jalasvuori, Matti; Friman, Ville-Petri; Nieminen, Anne; Jaana K.H. Bamford; Buckling, Angus

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistance genes are often carried by conjugative plasmids, which spread within and between bacterial species. It has long been recognized that some viruses of bacteria (bacteriophage; phage) have evolved to infect and kill plasmid-harbouring cells. This raises a question: can phages cause the loss of plasmid-associated antibiotic resistance by selecting for plasmid-free bacteria, or can bacteria or plasmids evolve resistance to phages in other ways? Here, we show that multiple ant...

  14. Metabolic control analysis of Aspergillus niger L-arabinose catabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Groot, M.J.L.; Prathumpai, Wai; Visser, J.

    2005-01-01

    -arabinose, a level that resulted in realistic intermediate concentrations in the model, flux control coefficients for L-arabinose reductase, L-arabitol dehydrogenase and L-xylulose reductase were 0.68, 0.17 and 0.14, respectively. The analysis can be used as a guide to identify targets for metabolic engineering......, and their kinetic properties were characterized. For the other enzymes of the pathway the kinetic data were available from the literature. The metabolic model was used to analyze flux and metabolite concentration control of the L-arabinose catabolic pathway. The model demonstrated that flux control does not reside...... at the enzyme following the intermediate with the highest concentration, L-arabitol, but is distributed over the first three steps in the pathway, preceding and following L-arabitol. Flux control appeared to be strongly dependent on the intracellular L-arabinose concentration. At 5 mM intracellular L...

  15. Identification of a gene cluster associated with triclosan catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagle, Jeanne M; Paxson, Clayton; Johnstone, Precious; Hay, Anthony G

    2015-06-01

    Aerobic degradation of bis-aryl ethers like the antimicrobial triclosan typically proceeds through oxygenase-dependent catabolic pathways. Although several studies have reported on bacteria capable of degrading triclosan aerobically, there are no reports describing the genes responsible for this process. In this study, a gene encoding the large subunit of a putative triclosan oxygenase, designated tcsA was identified in a triclosan-degrading fosmid clone from a DNA library of Sphingomonas sp. RD1. Consistent with tcsA's similarity to two-part dioxygenases, a putative FMN-dependent ferredoxin reductase, designated tcsB was found immediately downstream of tcsA. Both tcsAB were found in the midst of a putative chlorocatechol degradation operon. We show that RD1 produces hydroxytriclosan and chlorocatechols during triclosan degradation and that tcsA is induced by triclosan. This is the first study to report on the genetics of triclosan degradation.

  16. Regulation and evolution of malonate and propionate catabolism in proteobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvorova, I A; Ravcheev, D A; Gelfand, M S

    2012-06-01

    Bacteria catabolize malonate via two pathways, encoded by the mdc and mat genes. In various bacteria, transcription of these genes is controlled by the GntR family transcription factors (TFs) MatR/MdcY and/or the LysR family transcription factor MdcR. Propionate is metabolized via the methylcitrate pathway, comprising enzymes encoded by the prp and acn genes. PrpR, the Fis family sigma 54-dependent transcription factor, is known to be a transcriptional activator of the prp genes. Here, we report a detailed comparative genomic analysis of malonate and propionate metabolism and its regulation in proteobacteria. We characterize genomic loci and gene regulation and identify binding motifs for four new TFs and also new regulon members, in particular, tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic (TRAP) transporters. We describe restructuring of the genomic loci and regulatory interactions during the evolution of proteobacteria.

  17. Epigenetic Regulation of Chondrocyte Catabolism and Anabolism in Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeonkyeong; Kang, Donghyun; Cho, Yongsik; Kim, Jin-Hong

    2015-08-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most prevalent forms of joint disorder, associated with a tremendous socioeconomic burden worldwide. Various non-genetic and lifestyle-related factors such as aging and obesity have been recognized as major risk factors for OA, underscoring the potential role for epigenetic regulation in the pathogenesis of the disease. OA-associated epigenetic aberrations have been noted at the level of DNA methylation and histone modification in chondrocytes. These epigenetic regulations are implicated in driving an imbalance between the expression of catabolic and anabolic factors, leading eventually to osteoarthritic cartilage destruction. Cellular senescence and metabolic abnormalities driven by OA-associated risk factors appear to accompany epigenetic drifts in chondrocytes. Notably, molecular events associated with metabolic disorders influence epigenetic regulation in chondrocytes, supporting the notion that OA is a metabolic disease. Here, we review accumulating evidence supporting a role for epigenetics in the regulation of cartilage homeostasis and OA pathogenesis.

  18. The Atg1-Tor pathway regulates yolk catabolism in Drosophila embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Hallie; Sopko, Richelle; Coughlin, Margaret; Perrimon, Norbert; Mitchison, Tim

    2015-11-15

    Yolk provides an important source of nutrients during the early development of oviparous organisms. It is composed mainly of vitellogenin proteins packed into membrane-bound compartments called yolk platelets. Catabolism of yolk is initiated by acidification of the yolk platelet, leading to the activation of Cathepsin-like proteinases, but it is unknown how this process is triggered. Yolk catabolism initiates at cellularization in Drosophila melanogaster embryos. Using maternal shRNA technology we found that yolk catabolism depends on the Tor pathway and on the autophagy-initiating kinase Atg1. Whereas Atg1 was required for a burst of spatially regulated autophagy during late cellularization, autophagy was not required for initiating yolk catabolism. We propose that the conserved Tor metabolic sensing pathway regulates yolk catabolism, similar to Tor-dependent metabolic regulation on the lysosome.

  19. Cysteine catabolism: a novel metabolic pathway contributing to glioblastoma growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Antony; Sarcar, Bhaswati; Kahali, Soumen; Yuan, Zhigang; Johnson, Joseph J; Adam, Klaus-Peter; Kensicki, Elizabeth; Chinnaiyan, Prakash

    2014-02-01

    The relevance of cysteine metabolism in cancer has gained considerable interest in recent years, largely focusing on its role in generating the antioxidant glutathione. Through metabolomic profiling using a combination of high-throughput liquid and gas chromatography-based mass spectrometry on a total of 69 patient-derived glioma specimens, this report documents the discovery of a parallel pathway involving cysteine catabolism that results in the accumulation of cysteine sulfinic acid (CSA) in glioblastoma. These studies identified CSA to rank as one of the top metabolites differentiating glioblastoma from low-grade glioma. There was strong intratumoral concordance of CSA levels with expression of its biosynthetic enzyme cysteine dioxygenase 1 (CDO1). Studies designed to determine the biologic consequence of this metabolic pathway identified its capacity to inhibit oxidative phosphorylation in glioblastoma cells, which was determined by decreased cellular respiration, decreased ATP production, and increased mitochondrial membrane potential following pathway activation. CSA-induced attenuation of oxidative phosphorylation was attributed to inhibition of the regulatory enzyme pyruvate dehydrogenase. Studies performed in vivo abrogating the CDO1/CSA axis using a lentiviral-mediated short hairpin RNA approach resulted in significant tumor growth inhibition in a glioblastoma mouse model, supporting the potential for this metabolic pathway to serve as a therapeutic target. Collectively, we identified a novel, targetable metabolic pathway involving cysteine catabolism contributing to the growth of aggressive high-grade gliomas. These findings serve as a framework for future investigations designed to more comprehensively determine the clinical application of this metabolic pathway and its contributory role in tumorigenesis.

  20. Characterization of genes for chitin catabolism in Haloferax mediterranei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jing; Han, Jing; Cai, Lei; Zhou, Jian; Lü, Yang; Jin, Cheng; Liu, Jingfang; Xiang, Hua

    2014-02-01

    Chitin is the second most abundant natural polysaccharide after cellulose. But degradation of chitin has never been reported in haloarchaea. In this study, we revealed that Haloferax mediterranei, a metabolically versatile haloarchaeon, could utilize colloidal or powdered chitin for growth and poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) accumulation, and the gene cluster (HFX_5025-5039) for the chitin catabolism pathway was experimentally identified. First, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction results showed that the expression of the genes encoding the four putative chitinases (ChiAHme, ChiBHme, ChiCHme, and ChiDHme, HFX_5036-5039), the LmbE-like deacetylase (DacHme, HFX_5027), and the glycosidase (GlyAHme, HFX_5029) was induced by colloidal or powdered chitin, and chiA Hme, chiB Hme, and chiC Hme were cotranscribed. Knockout of chiABC Hme or chiD Hme had a significant effect on cell growth and PHBV production when chitin was used as the sole carbon source, and the chiABCD Hme knockout mutant lost the capability to utilize chitin. Knockout of dac Hme or glyA Hme also decreased PHBV accumulation on chitin. These results suggested that ChiABCDHme, DacHme, and GlyAHme were indeed involved in chitin degradation in H. mediterranei. Additionally, the chitinase assay showed that each chitinase possessed hydrolytic activity toward colloidal or powdered chitin, and the major product of colloidal chitin hydrolysis by ChiABCDHme was diacetylchitobiose, which was likely further degraded to monosaccharides by DacHme, GlyAHme, and other related enzymes for both cell growth and PHBV biosynthesis. Taken together, this study revealed the genes and enzymes involved in chitin catabolism in haloarchaea for the first time and indicated the potential of H. mediterranei as a whole-cell biocatalyst in chitin bioconversion.

  1. Catabolism and safety of supplemental L-arginine in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhenlong; Hou, Yongqing; Hu, Shengdi; Bazer, Fuller W; Meininger, Cynthia J; McNeal, Catherine J; Wu, Guoyao

    2016-07-01

    L-arginine (Arg) is utilized via multiple pathways to synthesize protein and low-molecular-weight bioactive substances (e.g., nitric oxide, creatine, and polyamines) with enormous physiological importance. Furthermore, Arg regulates cell signaling pathways and gene expression to improve cardiovascular function, augment insulin sensitivity, enhance lean tissue mass, and reduce obesity in humans. Despite its versatile roles, the use of Arg as a dietary supplement is limited due to the lack of data to address concerns over its safety in humans. Data from animal studies are reviewed to assess arginine catabolism and the safety of long-term Arg supplementation. The arginase pathway was responsible for catabolism of 76-85 and 81-96 % Arg in extraintestinal tissues of pigs and rats, respectively. Dietary supplementation with Arg-HCl or the Arg base [315- and 630-mg Arg/(kg BW d) for 91 d] had no adverse effects on male or female pigs. Similarly, no safety issues were observed for male or female rats receiving supplementation with 1.8- and 3.6-g Arg/(kg BW d) for at least 91 d. Intravenous administration of Arg-HCl to gestating sheep at 81 and 180 mg Arg/(kg BW d) is safe for at least 82 and 40 d, respectively. Animals fed conventional diets can well tolerate large amounts of supplemental Arg [up to 630-mg Arg/(kg BW d) in pigs or 3.6-g Arg/(kg BW d) in rats] for 91 d, which are equivalent to 573-mg Arg/(kg BW d) for humans. Collectively, these results can help guide studies to determine the safety of long-term oral administration of Arg in humans.

  2. Distribution of small native plasmids in Streptococcus pyogenes in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, René; Nerlich, Andreas; Chhatwal, Gursharan S; Nitsche-Schmitz, D Patric

    2014-05-01

    Complete characterization of a Streptococcus pyogenes population from a defined geographic region comprises information on the plasmids that circulate in these bacteria. Therefore, we determined the distribution of small plasmids (pyogenes isolates from India, where diversity of strains and incidence rates of S. pyogenes infections are high. The collection comprised 77 emm-types. For plasmid detection and discrimination, we developed PCRs for different plasmid replication initiation protein genes, the putative repressor gene copG and bacteriocin genes dysA and scnM57. Plasmid distribution was limited to 13 emm-types. Co-detection analysis using aforementioned PCRs revealed four distinct plasmid sub-types, two of which were previously unknown. Representative plasmids pA852 and pA996 of the two uncharacterized plasmid sub-types were sequenced. These two plasmids could be assigned to the pMV158 and the pC194/pUB110 family of rolling-circle plasmids, respectively. The majority of small plasmids found in India belonged to the two newly characterized sub-types, with pA852- and pA996-like plasmids amounting to 42% and 22% of all detected plasmids, respectively. None of the detected plasmids coded for a known antibiotic resistance gene. Instead, all of the four plasmid sub-types carried known or potential bacteriocin genes. These genes may have influence on the evolutionary success of certain S. pyogenes genotypes. Notably, pA852-like plasmids were found in all isolates of the most prevalent emm-type 11.0. Together, a priori fitness of this genotype and increased fitness due to the acquired plasmids may have rendered type emm11.0 successful and caused the prevalence of pA852-like plasmids in India.

  3. The effects of acetaldehyde and acrolein on muscle catabolism in C2 myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rom, Oren; Kaisari, Sharon; Aizenbud, Dror; Reznick, Abraham Z

    2013-12-01

    The toxic aldehydes acetaldehyde and acrolein were previously suggested to damage skeletal muscle. Several conditions in which exposure to acetaldehyde and acrolein is increased were associated with muscle wasting and dysfunction. These include alcoholic myopathy, renal failure, oxidative stress, and inflammation. A main exogenous source of both acetaldehyde and acrolein is cigarette smoking, which was previously associated with increased muscle catabolism. Recently, we have shown that exposure of skeletal myotubes to cigarette smoke stimulated muscle catabolism via increased oxidative stress, activation of p38 MAPK, and upregulation of muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligases. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of acetaldehyde and acrolein on catabolism of skeletal muscle. Skeletal myotubes differentiated from the C2 myoblast cell line were exposed to acetaldehyde or acrolein and their effects on signaling pathways related to muscle catabolism were studied. Exposure of myotubes to acetaldehyde did not promote muscle catabolism. However, exposure to acrolein caused increased generation of free radicals, activation of p38 MAPK, upregulation of the muscle-specific E3 ligases atrogin-1 and MuRF1, degradation of myosin heavy chain, and atrophy of myotubes. Inhibition of p38 MAPK by SB203580 abolished acrolein-induced muscle catabolism. Our findings demonstrate that acrolein but not acetaldehyde activates a signaling cascade resulting in muscle catabolism in skeletal myotubes. Although within the limitations of an in vitro study, these findings indicate that acrolein may promote muscle wasting in conditions of increased exposure to this aldehyde.

  4. Stress responses and replication of plasmids in bacterial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wegrzyn Alicja

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Plasmids, DNA (or rarely RNA molecules which replicate in cells autonomously (independently of chromosomes as non-essential genetic elements, play important roles for microbes grown under specific environmental conditions as well as in scientific laboratories and in biotechnology. For example, bacterial plasmids are excellent models in studies on regulation of DNA replication, and their derivatives are the most commonly used vectors in genetic engineering. Detailed mechanisms of replication initiation, which is the crucial process for efficient maintenance of plasmids in cells, have been elucidated for several plasmids. However, to understand plasmid biology, it is necessary to understand regulation of plasmid DNA replication in response to different environmental conditions in which host cells exist. Knowledge of such regulatory processes is also very important for those who use plasmids as expression vectors to produce large amounts of recombinant proteins. Variable conditions in large-scale fermentations must influence replication of plasmid DNA in cells, thus affecting the efficiency of recombinant gene expression significantly. Contrary to extensively investigated biochemistry of plasmid replication, molecular mechanisms of regulation of plasmid DNA replication in response to various environmental stress conditions are relatively poorly understood. There are, however, recently published studies that add significant data to our knowledge on relations between cellular stress responses and control of plasmid DNA replication. In this review we focus on plasmids derived from bacteriophage λ that are among the best investigated replicons. Nevertheless, recent results of studies on other plasmids are also discussed shortly.

  5. Plasmid mediated quinolone resistance in Enterobacteriaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldman, K.T.; LS Klinisch Onderzoek Wagenaar

    2014-01-01

    This thesis describes the occurrence of Plasmid Mediated Quinolone Resistance (PMQR) in Salmonella and E. coli from The Netherlands and other European countries. Furthermore, the genetic background of these genes was characterized. Fluoroquinolones are widely used antibiotics in both human and veter

  6. Endogenous mutagenesis in recombinant sulfolobus plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakofsky, Cynthia J; Grogan, Dennis W

    2013-06-01

    Low rates of replication errors in chromosomal genes of Sulfolobus spp. demonstrate that these extreme thermoacidophiles can maintain genome integrity in environments with high temperature and low pH. In contrast to this genetic stability, we observed unusually frequent mutation of the β-D-glycosidase gene (lacS) of a shuttle plasmid (pJlacS) propagated in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. The resulting Lac(-) mutants also grew faster than the Lac(+) parent, thereby amplifying the impact of the frequent lacS mutations on the population. We developed a mutant accumulation assay and corrections for the effects of copy number and differential growth for this system; the resulting measurements and calculations yielded a corrected rate of 5.1 × 10(-4) mutational events at the lacS gene per plasmid replication. Analysis of independent lacS mutants revealed three types of mutations: (i) G · C-to-A · T transitions, (ii) slipped-strand events, and (iii) deletions. These mutations were frequent in plasmid-borne lacS expressed at a high level but not in single-copy lacS in the chromosome or at lower levels of expression in a plasmid. Substitution mutations arose at only two of 12 potential priming sites of the DNA primase of the pRN1 replicon, but nearly all these mutations created nonsense (chain termination) codons. The spontaneous mutation rate of plasmid-borne lacS was 175-fold higher under high-expression than under low-expression conditions. The results suggest that important DNA repair or replication fidelity functions are impaired or overwhelmed in pJlacS, with results analogous to those of the "transcription-associated mutagenesis" seen in bacteria and eukaryotes.

  7. Plasmid DNA entry into postmitotic nuclei of primary rat myotubes.

    OpenAIRE

    Dowty, M E; Williams, P.; G. Zhang; Hagstrom, J E; Wolff, J A

    1995-01-01

    These studies were initiated to elucidate the mechanism of DNA nuclear transport in mammalian cells. Biotin- or gold-labeled plasmid and plasmid DNA expression vectors for Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase or firefly luciferase were microinjected into the cytoplasm of primary rat myotubes in culture. Plasmid DNA was expressed in up to 70% of the injected myotubes, which indicates that it entered intact, postmitotic nuclei. The nuclear transport of plasmid DNA occurred through the nuclear po...

  8. Plasmid-mediated tetracycline resistance in Haemophilus ducreyi.

    OpenAIRE

    Albritton, W L; Maclean, I W; Slaney, L A; Ronald, A. R.; Deneer, H G

    1984-01-01

    Clinical isolates of Haemophilus ducreyi were shown to be resistant to tetracycline. Resistance was associated in some strains with a 30-megadalton plasmid capable of transferring resistance in conjugative matings with other strains of H. ducreyi and other species of Haemophilus. Restriction endonuclease digestion patterns suggest a relationship between H. ducreyi plasmids and other tetracycline resistance plasmids in Haemophilus. The presence of plasmid-mediated resistance to the tetracyclin...

  9. Replication of plasmids in gram-negative bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    Replication of plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is dependent on three stages: initiation, elongation, and termination. The first stage, initiation, depends on plasmid-encoded properties such as the replication origin and, in most cases, the replication initiation protein (Rep protein). In recent years the understanding of initiation and regulation of plasmid replication in Escherichia coli has increased considerably, but it is only for the ColE1-type plasmids that significant biochemical d...

  10. A product of heme catabolism modulates bacterial function and survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher L Nobles

    Full Text Available Bilirubin is the terminal metabolite in heme catabolism in mammals. After deposition into bile, bilirubin is released in large quantities into the mammalian gastrointestinal (GI tract. We hypothesized that intestinal bilirubin may modulate the function of enteric bacteria. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of bilirubin on two enteric pathogens; enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC, a Gram-negative that causes life-threatening intestinal infections, and E. faecalis, a Gram-positive human commensal bacterium known to be an opportunistic pathogen with broad-spectrum antibiotic resistance. We demonstrate that bilirubin can protect EHEC from exogenous and host-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS through the absorption of free radicals. In contrast, E. faecalis was highly susceptible to bilirubin, which causes significant membrane disruption and uncoupling of respiratory metabolism in this bacterium. Interestingly, similar results were observed for other Gram-positive bacteria, including B. cereus and S. aureus. A model is proposed whereby bilirubin places distinct selective pressure on enteric bacteria, with Gram-negative bacteria being protected from ROS (positive outcome and Gram-positive bacteria being susceptible to membrane disruption (negative outcome. This work suggests bilirubin has differential but biologically relevant effects on bacteria and justifies additional efforts to determine the role of this neglected waste catabolite in disease processes, including animal models.

  11. Identification of possible cigarette smoke constituents responsible for muscle catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rom, Oren; Kaisari, Sharon; Aizenbud, Dror; Reznick, Abraham Z

    2012-08-01

    The age-related loss of muscle mass and strength also known as sarcopenia is significantly influenced by life style factors such as physical inactivity and impaired nutrition. Cigarette smoking is another life style habit that has been shown to be associated with sarcopenia and to affect skeletal muscle. Even today, smoking is still prevalent worldwide and is probably the most significant source of toxic chemicals exposure to humans. Cigarette smoke (CS) is a complex aerosol consisting of thousands of various constituents including reactive oxygen and nitrogen free radicals, toxic aldehydes and more. Previous epidemiological studies have identified tobacco smoking as a risk factor for sarcopenia. Clinical, in vivo and in vitro studies have revealed CS-induced skeletal muscle damage due to impaired muscle metabolism, increased inflammation and oxidative stress, over-expression of atrophy related genes and activation of various intracellular signaling pathways. This review aims to discuss and identify the components of CS that may promote catabolism of skeletal muscle.

  12. Tryptophan and tyrosine catabolic pattern in neuropsychiatric disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravikumar A

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Catabolism of tryptophan and tyrosine in relation to the isoprenoid pathway was studied in neurological and psychiatric disorders. The concentration of trytophan, quinolinic acid, kynurenic acid, serotonin and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid was found to be higher in the plasma of patients with all these disorders; while that of tyrosine, dopamine, epinephrine and norepinephrine was lower. There was increase in free fatty acids and decrease in albumin (factors modulating tryptophan transport in the plasma of these patients. Concentration of digoxin, a modulator of amino acid transport, and the activity of HMG CoA reductase, which synthesizes digoxin, were higher in these patients; while RBC membrane Na+-K+ ATPase activity showed a decrease. Concentration of plasma ubiquinone (part of which is synthesised from tyrosine and magnesium was also lower in these patients. No morphine could be detected in the plasma of these patients except in MS. On the other hand, strychnine and nicotine were detectable. These results indicate hypercatabolism of tryptophan and hypocatabolism of tyrosine in these disorders, which could be a consequence of the modulating effect of hypothalamic digoxin on amino acid transport.

  13. Lipid catabolism of invertebrate predator indicates widespread wetland ecosystem degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anteau, Michael J.; Afton, Alan D.

    2011-01-01

    Animals frequently undergo periods when they accumulate lipid reserves for subsequent energetically expensive activities, such as migration or breeding. During such periods, daily lipid-reserve dynamics (DLD) of sentinel species can quantify how landscape modifications affect function, health, and resilience of ecosystems. Aythya affinis (Eyton 1838; lesser scaup; diving duck) are macroinvertebrate predators; they migrate through an agriculturally dominated landscape in spring where they select wetlands with the greatest food density to refuel and accumulate lipid reserves for subsequent reproduction. We index DLD by measuring plasma-lipid metabolites of female scaup (n = 459) that were refueling at 75 spring migration stopover areas distributed across the upper Midwest, USA. We also indexed DLD for females (n = 44) refueling on a riverine site (Pool 19) south of our upper Midwest study area. We found that mean DLD estimates were significantly (Plipid reserves throughout the upper Midwest. Moreover, levels of lipid catabolism are alarming, because scaup use the best quality wetlands available within a given stopover area. Accordingly, these results provide evidence of wetland ecosystem degradation across this large agricultural landscape and document affects that are carried-up through several trophic levels. Interestingly, storing of lipids by scaup at Pool 19 likely reflects similar ecosystem perturbations as observed in the upper Midwest because wetland drainage and agricultural runoff nutrifies the riverine habitat that scaup use at Pool 19. Finally, our results underscore how using this novel technique to monitor DLD, of a carefully selected sentinel species, can index ecosystem health at a landscape scale.

  14. Catabolism of citronellol and related acyclic terpenoids in pseudomonads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster-Fromme, Karin; Jendrossek, Dieter

    2010-07-01

    Terpenes are a huge group of natural compounds characterised by their predominantly pleasant smell. They are built up by isoprene units in cyclic or acyclic form and can be functionalised by carbonyl, hydroxyl or carboxyl groups and by presence of additional carbon-carbon double bonds (terpenoids). Currently, much more than 10,000 terpenoid compounds are known, and many thereof are present in different iso- and stereoforms. Terpenoids are secondary metabolites and can have important biological functions in living organisms. In many cases, the biological functions of terpenoids are not known at all. Nevertheless, terpenoids are used in large quantities as perfumes and aroma compounds for food additives. Terpenoids can be also precursors and building blocks for synthesis of complex chiral compounds in chemical and pharmaceutical industry. Unfortunately, only few terpenoids are available in large quantities at reasonable costs. Therefore, characterisation of suited biocatalysts specific for terpenoid compounds and development of biotransformation processes of abundant terpenoids to commercially interesting derivates becomes more and more important. This minireview summarises knowledge on catabolic pathways and biotransformations of acyclic monoterpenes that have received only little attention. Terpenoids with 20 or more carbon atoms are not a subject of this study.

  15. Catabolism of coffee chlorogenic acids by human colonic microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Iziar A; Paz de Peña, Maria; Concepción, Cid; Alan, Crozier

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have indicated potential health benefits associated with coffee consumption. These benefits might be ascribed in part to the chlorogenic acids (CGAs), the main (poly)phenols in coffee. The impact of these dietary (poly)phenols on health depends on their bioavailability. As they pass along the gastrointestinal tract, CGAs are metabolized extensively and it is their metabolites rather than the parent compounds that predominate in the circulatory system. This article reports on a study in which after incubation of espresso coffee with human fecal samples, high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were used to monitor CGA breakdown and identify and quantify the catabolites produced by the colonic microflora. The CGAs were rapidly degraded by the colonic microflora and over the 6-h incubation period, 11 catabolites were identified and quantified. The appearance of the initial degradation products, caffeic and ferulic acids, was transient, with maximum quantities at 1 h. Dihydrocaffeic acid, dihydroferulic acid, and 3-(3'-hydroxyphenyl)propionic acid were the major end products, comprising 75-83% of the total catabolites, whereas the remaining 17-25% consisted of six minor catabolites. The rate and extent of the degradation showed a clear influence of the composition of the gut microbiota of individual volunteers. Pathways involved in colonic catabolism of CGAs are proposed and comparison with studies on the bioavailability of coffee CGAs ingested by humans helped distinguish between colonic catabolites and phase II metabolites of CGAs.

  16. Allantoin catabolism influences the production of antibiotics in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navone, Laura; Casati, Paula; Licona-Cassani, Cuauhtémoc; Marcellin, Esteban; Nielsen, Lars K; Rodriguez, Eduardo; Gramajo, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    Purines are a primary source of carbon and nitrogen in soil; however, their metabolism is poorly understood in Streptomyces. Using a combination of proteomics, metabolomics, and metabolic engineering, we characterized the allantoin pathway in Streptomyces coelicolor. When cells grew in glucose minimal medium with allantoin as the sole nitrogen source, quantitative proteomics identified 38 enzymes upregulated and 28 downregulated. This allowed identifying six new functional enzymes involved in allantoin metabolism in S. coelicolor. From those, using a combination of biochemical and genetic engineering tools, it was found that allantoinase (EC 3.5.2.5) and allantoicase (EC 3.5.3.4) are essential for allantoin metabolism in S. coelicolor. Metabolomics showed that under these growth conditions, there is a significant intracellular accumulation of urea and amino acids, which eventually results in urea and ammonium release into the culture medium. Antibiotic production of a urease mutant strain showed that the catabolism of allantoin, and the subsequent release of ammonium, inhibits antibiotic production. These observations link the antibiotic production impairment with an imbalance in nitrogen metabolism and provide the first evidence of an interaction between purine metabolism and antibiotic biosynthesis.

  17. Inactivity amplifies the catabolic response of skeletal muscle to cortisol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, A. A.; Stuart, C. A.; Sheffield-Moore, M.; Wolfe, R. R.

    1999-01-01

    Severe injury or trauma is accompanied by both hypercortisolemia and prolonged inactivity or bed rest (BR). Trauma and BR alone each result in a loss of muscle nitrogen, albeit through different metabolic alterations. Although BR alone can result in a 2-3% loss of lean body mass, the effects of severe trauma can be 2- to 3-fold greater. We investigated the combined effects of hypercortisolemia and prolonged inactivity on muscle protein metabolism in healthy volunteers. Six males were studied before and after 14 days of strict BR using a model based on arteriovenous sampling and muscle biopsy. Fractional synthesis and breakdown rates of skeletal muscle protein were also directly calculated. Each assessment of protein metabolism was conducted during a 12-h infusion of hydrocortisone sodium succinate (120 microg/kg x h), resulting in blood cortisol concentrations that mimic severe injury (approximately 31 microg/dL). After 14 days of strict BR, hypercortisolemia increased phenylalanine efflux from muscle by 3-fold (P catabolic effects of hypercortisolemia. Furthermore, these effects on healthy volunteers are analogous to those seen after severe injury.

  18. Thyroid hormone stimulates hepatic lipid catabolism via activation of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Rohit Anthony; You, Seo-Hee; Zhou, Jin; Siddique, Mobin M; Bay, Boon-Huat; Zhu, Xuguang; Privalsky, Martin L; Cheng, Sheue-Yann; Stevens, Robert D; Summers, Scott A; Newgard, Christopher B; Lazar, Mitchell A; Yen, Paul M

    2012-07-01

    For more than a century, thyroid hormones (THs) have been known to exert powerful catabolic effects, leading to weight loss. Although much has been learned about the molecular mechanisms used by TH receptors (TRs) to regulate gene expression, little is known about the mechanisms by which THs increase oxidative metabolism. Here, we report that TH stimulation of fatty acid β-oxidation is coupled with induction of hepatic autophagy to deliver fatty acids to mitochondria in cell culture and in vivo. Furthermore, blockade of autophagy by autophagy-related 5 (ATG5) siRNA markedly decreased TH-mediated fatty acid β-oxidation in cell culture and in vivo. Consistent with this model, autophagy was altered in livers of mice expressing a mutant TR that causes resistance to the actions of TH as well as in mice with mutant nuclear receptor corepressor (NCoR). These results demonstrate that THs can regulate lipid homeostasis via autophagy and help to explain how THs increase oxidative metabolism.

  19. Increase in sphingolipid catabolic enzyme activity during aging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Santosh J SACKET; Hae-young CHUNG; Fumikazu OKAJIMA; Dong-soon IM

    2009-01-01

    Aim:To understand the contribution of sphingolipid metabolism and its metabolites to development and aging.Methods: A systemic analysis on the changes in activity of sphingolipid metabolic enzymes in kidney, liver and brain tissues during development and aging was conducted. The study was conducted using tissues from 1-day-old to 720-day-old rats.Results: Catabolic enzyme activities as well as the level of sphingomyelinase (SMase) and ceramidase (CDase) were higher than that of anabolic enzyme activities, sphingomyelin synthase and ceramide synthase. This suggested an accumulation of ceramide and sphingosine during development and aging. The liver showed the highest neutral-SMase activity among the tested enzymes while the kidney and brain exhibited higher neutral-SMase and ceramidase activities, indicating a high production of ceramide in liver and ceramide/sphingosine in the kidney and brain. The activities of sphingolipid metabolic enzymes were significantly elevated in all tested tissues during development and aging, although the onset of significant increase in activity varied on the tissue and enzyme type. During aging, 18 out of 21 enzyme activities were further increased on day 720 compared to day 180.Conclusion: Differential increases in sphingolipid metabolic enzyme activities suggest that sphingolipids including ceramide and sphingosine might play important and dynamic roles in proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis during development and aging.

  20. Hepatic Fatty Acid Oxidation Restrains Systemic Catabolism during Starvation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieun Lee

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The liver is critical for maintaining systemic energy balance during starvation. To understand the role of hepatic fatty acid β-oxidation on this process, we generated mice with a liver-specific knockout of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 (Cpt2L−/−, an obligate step in mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid β-oxidation. Fasting induced hepatic steatosis and serum dyslipidemia with an absence of circulating ketones, while blood glucose remained normal. Systemic energy homeostasis was largely maintained in fasting Cpt2L−/− mice by adaptations in hepatic and systemic oxidative gene expression mediated in part by Pparα target genes including procatabolic hepatokines Fgf21, Gdf15, and Igfbp1. Feeding a ketogenic diet to Cpt2L−/− mice resulted in severe hepatomegaly, liver damage, and death with a complete absence of adipose triglyceride stores. These data show that hepatic fatty acid oxidation is not required for survival during acute food deprivation but essential for constraining adipocyte lipolysis and regulating systemic catabolism when glucose is limiting.

  1. Amino Acid Catabolism in Alzheimer's Disease Brain: Friend or Foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    There is a dire need to discover new targets for Alzheimer's disease (AD) drug development. Decreased neuronal glucose metabolism that occurs in AD brain could play a central role in disease progression. Little is known about the compensatory neuronal changes that occur to attempt to maintain energy homeostasis. In this review using the PubMed literature database, we summarize evidence that amino acid oxidation can temporarily compensate for the decreased glucose metabolism, but eventually altered amino acid and amino acid catabolite levels likely lead to toxicities contributing to AD progression. Because amino acids are involved in so many cellular metabolic and signaling pathways, the effects of altered amino acid metabolism in AD brain are far-reaching. Possible pathological results from changes in the levels of several important amino acids are discussed. Urea cycle function may be induced in endothelial cells of AD patient brains, possibly to remove excess ammonia produced from increased amino acid catabolism. Studying AD from a metabolic perspective provides new insights into AD pathogenesis and may lead to the discovery of dietary metabolite supplements that can partially compensate for alterations of enzymatic function to delay AD or alleviate some of the suffering caused by the disease. PMID:28261376

  2. Characterization of purine catabolic pathway genes in coelacanths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forconi, Mariko; Biscotti, Maria Assunta; Barucca, Marco; Buonocore, Francesco; De Moro, Gianluca; Fausto, Anna Maria; Gerdol, Marco; Pallavicini, Alberto; Scapigliati, Giuseppe; Schartl, Manfred; Olmo, Ettore; Canapa, Adriana

    2014-09-01

    Coelacanths are a critically valuable species to explore the gene changes that took place in the transition from aquatic to terrestrial life. One interesting and biologically relevant feature of the genus Latimeria is ureotelism. However not all urea is excreted from the body; in fact high concentrations are retained in plasma and seem to be involved in osmoregulation. The purine catabolic pathway, which leads to urea production in Latimeria, has progressively lost some steps, reflecting an enzyme loss during diversification of terrestrial species. We report the results of analyses of the liver and testis transcriptomes of the Indonesian coelacanth Latimeria menadoensis and of the genome of Latimeria chalumnae, which has recently been fully sequenced in the framework of the coelacanth genome project. We describe five genes, uricase, 5-hydroxyisourate hydrolase, parahox neighbor B, allantoinase, and allantoicase, each coding for one of the five enzymes involved in urate degradation to urea, and report the identification of a putative second form of 5-hydroxyisourate hydrolase that is characteristic of the genus Latimeria. The present data also highlight the activity of the complete purine pathway in the coelacanth liver and suggest its involvement in the maintenance of high plasma urea concentrations.

  3. Plasmid Segregation: Spatial Awareness at the Molecular Level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Gerdes, Kenn

    2007-01-01

    In bacteria, low-copy number plasmids ensure their stable inheritance by partition loci (par), which actively distribute plasmid replicates to each side of the cell division plane. Using time-lapse fluorescence microscopic tracking of segregating plasmid molecules, a new study provides novel insi...

  4. Aerobic bacterial catabolism of persistent organic pollutants - potential impact of biotic and abiotic interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jong-Rok; Murugesan, Kumarasamy; Baldrian, Petr; Schmidt, Stefan; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2016-04-01

    Several aerobic bacteria possess unique catabolic pathways enabling them to degrade persistent organic pollutants (POPs), including polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/furans (PCDD/Fs), polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The catabolic activity of aerobic bacteria employed for removal of POPs in the environment may be modulated by several biotic (i.e. fungi, plants, algae, earthworms, and other bacteria) and abiotic (i.e. zero-valent iron, advanced oxidation, and electricity) agents. This review describes the basic biochemistry of the aerobic bacterial catabolism of selected POPs and discusses how biotic and abiotic agents enhance or inhibit the process. Solutions allowing biotic and abiotic agents to exert physical and chemical assistance to aerobic bacterial catabolism of POPs are also discussed.

  5. Changes in substrate utilisation and protein catabolism during multiday cycling in well-trained cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosthuyse, Tanja; Avidon, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of studies that have evaluated substrate utilisation and protein catabolism during multiday strenuous exercise in athletes. Eleven well-trained male cyclists completed 3 h of race-simulated cycling on 4 consecutive days. Cyclist exercised 2 h postprandially and with carbohydrate supplementation (~50 g · h(-1)) during exercise. Whole body substrate utilisation was measured by indirect calorimetry, protein catabolism from sweat and urine urea excretion, and blood metabolite concentration was evaluated. Protein catabolism during exercise was significantly greater on days 2-4 (29.9 ± 8.8; 34.0 ± 11.2; 32.0 ± 7.3 g for days 2, 3, and 4, respectively) compared to day 1 (23.3 ± 7.6 g), P catabolism on all successive days.

  6. Characterization of a collection of plasmid-containing bacteria isolated from an on-farm biopurification system used for pesticide removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, María Carla; Albicoro, Francisco Javier; Nour, Eman; Schlüter, Andreas; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Springael, Dirk; Smalla, Kornelia; Pistorio, Mariano; Lagares, Antonio; Del Papa, María Florencia

    2015-07-01

    Biopurification systems (BPS) are complex soil-related and artificially-generated environments usually designed for the removal of toxic compounds from contaminated wastewaters. The present study has been conducted to isolate and characterize a collection of cultivable plasmid-carrying bacterial isolates recovered from a BPS established for the decontamination of wastewater generated in a farmyard. Out of 1400 isolates, a collection of 75 plasmid-containing bacteria was obtained, of which 35 representative isolates comprising in total at least 50 plasmids were chosen for further characterization. Bacterial hosts were taxonomically assigned by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing and phenotypically characterized according to their ability to grow in presence of different antibiotics and heavy metals. The study demonstrated that a high proportion of the isolates was tolerant to antibiotics and/or heavy metals, highlighting the on-farm BPS enrichment in such genetic traits. Several plasmids conferring such resistances in the bacterial collection were detected to be either mobilizable or selftransmissible. Occurrence of broad host range plasmids of the incompatibility groups IncP, IncQ, IncN and IncW was examined with positive results only for the first group. Presence of the IS1071 insertion sequence, frequently associated with xenobiotics degradation genes, was detected in DNA obtained from 24 of these isolates, strongly suggesting the presence of yet-hidden catabolic activities in the collection of isolates. The results showed a remarkable diversity in the plasmid mobilome of cultivable bacteria in the BPS with the presence of abundant resistance markers of different types, thus providing a suitable environment to investigate the genetic structure of the mobile genetic pool in a model on-farm biofilter for wastewater decontamination in intensive agricultural production.

  7. Occurrence of Arginine Deiminase Pathway Enzymes in Arginine Catabolism by Wine Lactic Acid Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Liu., S; Pritchard, G. G.; Hardman, M. J.; Pilone, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    l-Arginine, an amino acid found in significant quantities in grape juice and wine, is known to be catabolized by some wine lactic acid bacteria. The correlation between the occurrence of arginine deiminase pathway enzymes and the ability to catabolize arginine was examined in this study. The activities of the three arginine deiminase pathway enzymes, arginine deiminase, ornithine transcarbamylase, and carbamate kinase, were measured in cell extracts of 35 strains of wine lactic acid bacteria....

  8. House sparrows (Passer domesticus) increase protein catabolism in response to water restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerson, Alexander R; Guglielmo, Christopher G

    2011-04-01

    Birds primarily rely on fat for energy during fasting and to fuel energetically demanding activities. Proteins are catabolized supplemental to fat, the function of which in birds remains poorly understood. It has been proposed that birds may increase the catabolism of body protein under dehydrating conditions as a means to maintain water balance, because catabolism of wet protein yields more total metabolic and bound water (0.155·H(2)O(-1)·kJ(-1)) than wet lipids (0.029 g·H(2)O(-1)·kJ(-1)). On the other hand, protein sparing should be important to maintain function of muscles and organs. We used quantitative magnetic resonance body composition analysis and hygrometry to investigate the effect of water restriction on fat and lean mass catabolism during short-term fasting at rest and in response to a metabolic challenge (4-h shivering) in house sparrows (Passer domesticus). Water loss at rest and during shivering was compared with water gains from the catabolism of tissue. At rest, water-restricted birds had significantly greater lean mass loss, higher plasma uric acid concentration, and plasma osmolality than control birds. Endogenous water gains from lean mass catabolism offset losses over the resting period. Water restriction had no effect on lean mass catabolism during shivering, as water gains from fat oxidation appeared sufficient to maintain water balance. These data provide direct evidence supporting the hypothesis that water stress can increase protein catabolism at rest, possibly as a metabolic strategy to offset high rates of evaporative water loss.

  9. Bacteriophage selection against a plasmid-encoded sex apparatus leads to the loss of antibiotic-resistance plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalasvuori, Matti; Friman, Ville-Petri; Nieminen, Anne; Bamford, Jaana K H; Buckling, Angus

    2011-12-23

    Antibiotic-resistance genes are often carried by conjugative plasmids, which spread within and between bacterial species. It has long been recognized that some viruses of bacteria (bacteriophage; phage) have evolved to infect and kill plasmid-harbouring cells. This raises a question: can phages cause the loss of plasmid-associated antibiotic resistance by selecting for plasmid-free bacteria, or can bacteria or plasmids evolve resistance to phages in other ways? Here, we show that multiple antibiotic-resistance genes containing plasmids are stably maintained in both Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica in the absence of phages, while plasmid-dependent phage PRD1 causes a dramatic reduction in the frequency of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The loss of antibiotic resistance in cells initially harbouring RP4 plasmid was shown to result from evolution of phage resistance where bacterial cells expelled their plasmid (and hence the suitable receptor for phages). Phages also selected for a low frequency of plasmid-containing, phage-resistant bacteria, presumably as a result of modification of the plasmid-encoded receptor. However, these double-resistant mutants had a growth cost compared with phage-resistant but antibiotic-susceptible mutants and were unable to conjugate. These results suggest that bacteriophages could play a significant role in restricting the spread of plasmid-encoded antibiotic resistance.

  10. Plasmid flux in Escherichia coli ST131 sublineages, analyzed by plasmid constellation network (PLACNET, a new method for plasmid reconstruction from whole genome sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Val F Lanza

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial whole genome sequence (WGS methods are rapidly overtaking classical sequence analysis. Many bacterial sequencing projects focus on mobilome changes, since macroevolutionary events, such as the acquisition or loss of mobile genetic elements, mainly plasmids, play essential roles in adaptive evolution. Existing WGS analysis protocols do not assort contigs between plasmids and the main chromosome, thus hampering full analysis of plasmid sequences. We developed a method (called plasmid constellation networks or PLACNET that identifies, visualizes and analyzes plasmids in WGS projects by creating a network of contig interactions, thus allowing comprehensive plasmid analysis within WGS datasets. The workflow of the method is based on three types of data: assembly information (including scaffold links and coverage, comparison to reference sequences and plasmid-diagnostic sequence features. The resulting network is pruned by expert analysis, to eliminate confounding data, and implemented in a Cytoscape-based graphic representation. To demonstrate PLACNET sensitivity and efficacy, the plasmidome of the Escherichia coli lineage ST131 was analyzed. ST131 is a globally spread clonal group of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC, comprising different sublineages with ability to acquire and spread antibiotic resistance and virulence genes via plasmids. Results show that plasmids flux in the evolution of this lineage, which is wide open for plasmid exchange. MOBF12/IncF plasmids were pervasive, adding just by themselves more than 350 protein families to the ST131 pangenome. Nearly 50% of the most frequent γ-proteobacterial plasmid groups were found to be present in our limited sample of ten analyzed ST131 genomes, which represent the main ST131 sublineages.

  11. Plasmid flux in Escherichia coli ST131 sublineages, analyzed by plasmid constellation network (PLACNET), a new method for plasmid reconstruction from whole genome sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, Val F; de Toro, María; Garcillán-Barcia, M Pilar; Mora, Azucena; Blanco, Jorge; Coque, Teresa M; de la Cruz, Fernando

    2014-12-01

    Bacterial whole genome sequence (WGS) methods are rapidly overtaking classical sequence analysis. Many bacterial sequencing projects focus on mobilome changes, since macroevolutionary events, such as the acquisition or loss of mobile genetic elements, mainly plasmids, play essential roles in adaptive evolution. Existing WGS analysis protocols do not assort contigs between plasmids and the main chromosome, thus hampering full analysis of plasmid sequences. We developed a method (called plasmid constellation networks or PLACNET) that identifies, visualizes and analyzes plasmids in WGS projects by creating a network of contig interactions, thus allowing comprehensive plasmid analysis within WGS datasets. The workflow of the method is based on three types of data: assembly information (including scaffold links and coverage), comparison to reference sequences and plasmid-diagnostic sequence features. The resulting network is pruned by expert analysis, to eliminate confounding data, and implemented in a Cytoscape-based graphic representation. To demonstrate PLACNET sensitivity and efficacy, the plasmidome of the Escherichia coli lineage ST131 was analyzed. ST131 is a globally spread clonal group of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC), comprising different sublineages with ability to acquire and spread antibiotic resistance and virulence genes via plasmids. Results show that plasmids flux in the evolution of this lineage, which is wide open for plasmid exchange. MOBF12/IncF plasmids were pervasive, adding just by themselves more than 350 protein families to the ST131 pangenome. Nearly 50% of the most frequent γ-proteobacterial plasmid groups were found to be present in our limited sample of ten analyzed ST131 genomes, which represent the main ST131 sublineages.

  12. Defective tryptophan catabolism underlies inflammation in mouse chronic granulomatous disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Luigina; Fallarino, Francesca; De Luca, Antonella; Montagnoli, Claudia; D'Angelo, Carmen; Zelante, Teresa; Vacca, Carmine; Bistoni, Francesco; Fioretti, Maria C; Grohmann, Ursula; Segal, Brahm H; Puccetti, Paolo

    2008-01-10

    Half a century ago, chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) was first described as a disease fatally affecting the ability of children to survive infections. Various milestone discoveries have since been made, from an insufficient ability of patients' leucocytes to kill microbes to the underlying genetic abnormalities. In this inherited disorder, phagocytes lack NADPH oxidase activity and do not generate reactive oxygen species, most notably superoxide anion, causing recurrent bacterial and fungal infections. Patients with CGD also suffer from chronic inflammatory conditions, most prominently granuloma formation in hollow viscera. The precise mechanisms of the increased microbial pathogenicity have been unclear, and more so the reasons for the exaggerated inflammatory response. Here we show that a superoxide-dependent step in tryptophan metabolism along the kynurenine pathway is blocked in CGD mice with lethal pulmonary aspergillosis, leading to unrestrained Vgamma1(+) gammadelta T-cell reactivity, dominant production of interleukin (IL)-17, defective regulatory T-cell activity and acute inflammatory lung injury. Although beneficial effects are induced by IL-17 neutralization or gammadelta T-cell contraction, complete cure and reversal of the hyperinflammatory phenotype are achieved by replacement therapy with a natural kynurenine distal to the blockade in the pathway. Effective therapy, which includes co-administration of recombinant interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), restores production of downstream immunoactive metabolites and enables the emergence of regulatory Vgamma4(+) gammadelta and Foxp3(+) alphabeta T cells. Therefore, paradoxically, the lack of reactive oxygen species contributes to the hyperinflammatory phenotype associated with NADPH oxidase deficiencies, through a dysfunctional kynurenine pathway of tryptophan catabolism. Yet, this condition can be reverted by reactivating the pathway downstream of the superoxide-dependent step.

  13. Morphine enhances purine nucleotide catabolism in rive and in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang LIU; Jian-kai LIU; Mu-jie KAN; Lin GAO; Hai-ying FU; Hang ZHOU; Min HONG

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect and mechanism of morphine on purine nucleotide catabolism. Methods: The rat model of morphine dependence and withdrawal and rat C6 glioma cells in culture were used. Concentrations of uric acid in the plasma were measured by the uricase-rap method, adenosine deaminase (ADA) and xan- thine oxidase (XO) in the plasma and tissues were measured by the ADA and XO test kit. RT-PCR and RT-PCR-Southern blotting were used to examine the relative amount of ADA and XO gene transcripts in tissues and C6 cells. Results: (i) the concentration of plasma uric acid in the morphine-administered group was signifi-cantly higher (P<0.05) than the control group; (ii) during morphine administration and withdrawal periods, the ADA and XO concentrations in the plasma increased significantly (P<0.05); (iii) the amount of ADA and XO in the parietal lobe, liver, small intestine, and skeletal muscles of the morphine-administered groups increased, while the level of ADA and XO in those tissues of the withdrawal groups decreased; (iv) the transcripts of the ADA and XO genes in the parietal lobe, liver, small intestine, and skeletal muscles were higher in the morphine-administered group. The expression of the ADA and XO genes in those tissues returned to the control level during morphine withdrawal, with the exception of the skeletal muscles; and (v) the upregulation of the expression of the ADA and XO genes induced by morphine treatment could be reversed by naloxone. Conclusion: The effects of morphine on purine nucleotide metabolism might be an important, new biochemical pharmacological mechanism of morphine action.

  14. Genetic diversity of arginine catabolic mobile element in Staphylococcus epidermidis.

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    Maria Miragaia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clone USA300 contains a novel mobile genetic element, arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME, that contributes to its enhanced capacity to grow and survive within the host. Although ACME appears to have been transferred into USA300 from S. epidermidis, the genetic diversity of ACME in the latter species remains poorly characterized. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To assess the prevalence and genetic diversity of ACME, 127 geographically diverse S. epidermidis isolates representing 86 different multilocus sequence types (STs were characterized. ACME was found in 51% (65/127 of S. epidermidis isolates. The vast majority (57/65 of ACME-containing isolates belonged to the predominant S. epidermidis clonal complex CC2. ACME was often found in association with different allotypes of staphylococcal chromosome cassette mec (SCCmec which also encodes the recombinase function that facilities mobilization ACME from the S. epidermidis chromosome. Restriction fragment length polymorphism, PCR scanning and DNA sequencing allowed for identification of 39 distinct ACME genetic variants that differ from one another in gene content, thereby revealing a hitherto uncharacterized genetic diversity within ACME. All but one ACME variants were represented by a single S. epidermidis isolate; the singular variant, termed ACME-I.02, was found in 27 isolates, all of which belonged to the CC2 lineage. An evolutionary model constructed based on the eBURST algorithm revealed that ACME-I.02 was acquired at least on 15 different occasions by strains belonging to the CC2 lineage. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: ACME-I.02 in diverse S. epidermidis isolates were nearly identical in sequence to the prototypical ACME found in USA300 MRSA clone, providing further evidence for the interspecies transfer of ACME from S. epidermidis into USA300.

  15. Role of Plasmid in Production of Acetobacter Xylinum Biofilms

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    Abbas Rezaee

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Acetobacter xylinum has the ability to produce cellulotic biofilms. Bacterial cellulose is expected to be used in many industrial or biomedical materials for its unique characteristics. A. xylinum contains a complex system of plasmid DNA molecules. A 44 kilobases (kb plasmid was isolated in wild type of A. xylinum. To improve the cellulose producing ability of A. xylinum, role of the plasmid in production of cellulose was studied. The comparisons between wild type and cured cells of A. xylinum showed that there is considerably difference in cellulose production. In order to study the relationship between plasmid and the rate of cellulose production, bacteria were screened for plasmid profile by a modified method for preparation of plasmid. This method yields high levels of pure plasmid DNA that can be used for common molecular techniques, such as digestion and transformation, with high efficiency.

  16. Modeling sRNA-Regulated Plasmid Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klumpp, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    We study a theoretical model for the toxin-antitoxin (hok/sok) mechanism for plasmid maintenance in bacteria. Toxin-antitoxin systems enforce the maintenance of a plasmid through post-segregational killing of cells that have lost the plasmid. Key to their function is the tight regulation of expression of a protein toxin by an sRNA antitoxin. Here, we focus on the nonlinear nature of the regulatory circuit dynamics of the toxin-antitoxin mechanism. The mechanism relies on a transient increase in protein concentration rather than on the steady state of the genetic circuit. Through a systematic analysis of the parameter dependence of this transient increase, we confirm some known design features of this system and identify new ones: for an efficient toxin-antitoxin mechanism, the synthesis rate of the toxin’s mRNA template should be lower that of the sRNA antitoxin, the mRNA template should be more stable than the sRNA antitoxin, and the mRNA-sRNA complex should be more stable than the sRNA antitoxin. Moreover, a short half-life of the protein toxin is also beneficial to the function of the toxin-antitoxin system. In addition, we study a therapeutic scenario in which a competitor mRNA is introduced to sequester the sRNA antitoxin, causing the toxic protein to be expressed. PMID:28085919

  17. Modeling sRNA-regulated Plasmid Maintenance

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Chen Chris

    2016-01-01

    We study a theoretical model for the toxin-antitoxin (hok/sok) mechanism for plasmid maintenance in bacteria. Toxin-antitoxin systems enforce the maintenance of a plasmid through post-segregational killing of cells that have lost the plasmid. Key to their function is the tight regulation of expression of a protein toxin by an sRNA antitoxin. Here, we focus on the nonlinear nature of the regulatory circuit dynamics of the toxin-antitoxin mechanism. The mechanism relies on a transient increase in protein concentration rather than on the steady state of the genetic circuit. Through a systematic analysis of the parameter dependence of this transient increase, we confirm some known design features of this system and identify new ones: for an efficient toxin-antitoxin mechanism, the synthesis rate of the toxin's mRNA template should be lower that of the sRNA antitoxin, the mRNA template should be more stable than the sRNA antitoxin, and the mRNA-sRNA complex should be more stable than the sRNA antitoxin. Moreover, ...

  18. Imbalanced protein expression patterns of anabolic, catabolic, anti-catabolic and inflammatory cytokines in degenerative cervical disc cells: new indications for gene therapeutic treatments of cervical disc diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demissew S Mern

    Full Text Available Degenerative disc disease (DDD of the cervical spine is common after middle age and can cause loss of disc height with painful nerve impingement, bone and joint inflammation. Despite the clinical importance of these problems, in current publications the pathology of cervical disc degeneration has been studied merely from a morphologic view point using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, without addressing the issue of biological treatment approaches. So far a wide range of endogenously expressed bioactive factors in degenerative cervical disc cells has not yet been investigated, despite its importance for gene therapeutic approaches. Although degenerative lumbar disc cells have been targeted by different biological treatment approaches, the quantities of disc cells and the concentrations of gene therapeutic factors used in animal models differ extremely. These indicate lack of experimentally acquired data regarding disc cell proliferation and levels of target proteins. Therefore, we analysed proliferation and endogenous expression levels of anabolic, catabolic, ant-catabolic, inflammatory cytokines and matrix proteins of degenerative cervical disc cells in three-dimensional cultures. Preoperative MRI grading of cervical discs was used, then grade III and IV nucleus pulposus (NP tissues were isolated from 15 patients, operated due to cervical disc herniation. NP cells were cultured for four weeks with low-glucose in collagen I scaffold. Their proliferation rates were analysed using 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazolyl-2-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide. Their protein expression levels of 28 therapeutic targets were analysed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. During progressive grades of degeneration NP cell proliferation rates were similar. Significantly decreased aggrecan and collagen II expressions (P<0.0001 were accompanied by accumulations of selective catabolic and inflammatory cytokines (disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs 4

  19. CARTOGRAPHIE DU PLASMIDE pSU100, PLASMIDE CRYPTIQUE DE LACTOBACILLUS CASEI

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    F BENSALAH

    2003-06-01

    Ce plasmide appelé pSU100 a été cloné dans le vecteur de transformation pUC18 au site EcoRI chez E. coli JM103. Les profils électrophorétiques de restriction obtenus par des digestions simples, doubles et triples sous l’action de 33 endonucléases, ont contribué à l’élaboration d’une carte de restriction de ce plasmide. Cinq sites uniques ont été identifiés, ainsi que d’autres sites doubles et multiples. Une étude préliminaire du rôle physiologique de ce plasmide a permis de déceler une résistance à la kanamycine.

  20. PLASMID-ENCODED PHTHALATE CATABOLIC PATHWAY IN ARTHROBACTER KEYSERI 12B: BIOTRANSFORMATIONS OF 2-SUBSTITUTED BENZOATES AND THEIR USE IN CLONING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF PHTHALATE CATABOLISM GENES AND GENE PRODUCTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several 2-substituted benzoates (including 2-trifluoromethyl-, 2-chloro-, 2-bromo-, 2-iodo-, 2-nitro-, 2-methoxy-, and 2-acetyl-benzoates) were converted by phthalate-grown Arthrobacter keyseri 12B to the corresponding 2-substituted 3,4-dihydroxybenzoates (protocatechuates)...

  1. Methanesulfonate (MSA) Catabolic Genes from Marine and Estuarine Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, Ana C; De Marco, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Quantitatively, methanesulfonate (MSA) is a very relevant compound in the global biogeochemical sulfur cycle. Its utilization by bacteria as a source of carbon and energy has been described and a specific enzyme, methanesulfonate monooxygenase (MSAMO), has been found to perform the first catabolic step of its oxidation. Other proteins seemingly involved in the import of MSA into bacterial cells have been reported. In this study, we obtained novel sequences of genes msmA and msmE from marine, estuary and soil MSA-degraders (encoding the large subunit of the MSAMO enzyme and the periplasmic component of the import system, respectively). We also obtained whole-genome sequences of two novel marine Filomicrobium strains, Y and W, and annotated two full msm operons in these genomes. Furthermore, msmA and msmE sequences were amplified from North Atlantic seawater and analyzed. Good conservation of the MsmA deduced protein sequence was observed in both cultured strains and metagenomic clones. A long spacer sequence in the Rieske-type [2Fe-2S] cluster-binding motif within MsmA was found to be conserved in all instances, supporting the hypothesis that this feature is specific to the large (α) subunit of the MSAMO enzyme. The msmE gene was more difficult to amplify, from both cultivated isolates and marine metagenomic DNA. However, 3 novel msmE sequences were obtained from isolated strains and one directly from seawater. With both genes, our results combined with previous metagenomic analyses seem to imply that moderate to high-GC strains are somehow favored during enrichment and isolation of MSA-utilizing bacteria, while the majority of msm genes obtained by cultivation-independent methods have low levels of GC%, which is a clear example of the misrepresentation of natural populations that culturing, more often than not, entails. Nevertheless, the data obtained in this work show that MSA-degrading bacteria are abundant in surface seawater, which suggests ecological

  2. Plasmid transfer between bacteria in soil microcosms and the field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Smit

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available In ibis review factors influencing conjugal plasmid transfer between bacteria and the possible role of naturally occurring selftransmissible plasmide for the dissemination of recombinant DNA in soil will be discussed. In microcosm studies, plasmid transfer between various species of introduced bacteria has been detected. Moreover, plamid transfer to indigenous soil micoorganisms was observed. Soil is an oligotrophic environment and plasmid transfer occurred mainly under conditions which were nutritionally favourable for bacteria, such as in the plant rhizosphere and in the presence of clay minerais or added nutrients. Mobilizable plasmids, lacking the ability to transfer themselves, have been reported to be transferred in the presence of selftransmissible plasmids. A study comparing conjugal transfer in microcosme with those in the field revealed that the transfer rates found in microcosme and in the field were similar. Transfer of chromosomal DNA by plasmid RP4 could only be shown on filters and was not observed in soil. Transfer of plasmids carrying biodegradative genes appeared to be favoured in the presence of the compound that can be degraded. Evidence was found for the presence of naturally-occurring selftransmissible plasmids in bacteria in the rhizosphere which could mobilize recombinant plasmids.

  3. Xylan catabolism is improved by blending bioprospecting and metabolic pathway engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun-Mi; Jellison, Taylor; Alper, Hal S

    2015-04-01

    Complete utilization of all available carbon sources in lignocellulosic biomass still remains a challenge in engineering Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Even with efficient heterologous xylose catabolic pathways, S. cerevisiae is unable to utilize xylose in lignocellulosic biomass unless xylan is depolymerized to xylose. Here we demonstrate that a blended bioprospecting approach along with pathway engineering and evolutionary engineering can be used to improve xylan catabolism in S. cerevisiae. Specifically, we perform whole genome sequencing-based bioprospecting of a strain with remarkable pentose catabolic potential that we isolated and named Ustilago bevomyces. The heterologous expression of xylan catabolic genes enabled S. cerevisiae to grow on xylan as a single carbon source in minimal medium. A combination of bioprospecting and metabolic pathway evolution demonstrated that the xylan catabolic pathway could be further improved. Ultimately, engineering efforts were able to achieve xylan conversion into ethanol of up to 0.22 g/L on minimal medium compositions with xylan. This pathway provides a novel starting point for improving lignocellulosic conversion by yeast.

  4. Substrate uptake and subcellular compartmentation of anoxic cholesterol catabolism in Sterolibacterium denitrificans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ching-Wen; Wang, Po-Hsiang; Ismail, Wael; Tsai, Yu-Wen; El Nayal, Ashraf; Yang, Chia-Ying; Yang, Fu-Chun; Wang, Chia-Hsiang; Chiang, Yin-Ru

    2015-01-09

    Cholesterol catabolism by actinobacteria has been extensively studied. In contrast, the uptake and catabolism of cholesterol by Gram-negative species are poorly understood. Here, we investigated microbial cholesterol catabolism at the subcellular level. (13)C metabolomic analysis revealed that anaerobically grown Sterolibacterium denitrificans, a β-proteobacterium, adopts an oxygenase-independent pathway to degrade cholesterol. S. denitrificans cells did not produce biosurfactants upon growth on cholesterol and exhibited high cell surface hydrophobicity. Moreover, S. denitrificans did not produce extracellular catabolic enzymes to transform cholesterol. Accordingly, S. denitrificans accessed cholesterol by direction adhesion. Cholesterol is imported through the outer membrane via a putative FadL-like transport system, which is induced by neutral sterols. The outer membrane steroid transporter is able to selectively import various C27 sterols into the periplasm. S. denitrificans spheroplasts exhibited a significantly higher efficiency in cholest-4-en-3-one-26-oic acid uptake than in cholesterol uptake. We separated S. denitrificans proteins into four fractions, namely the outer membrane, periplasm, inner membrane, and cytoplasm, and we observed the individual catabolic reactions within them. Our data indicated that, in the periplasm, various periplasmic and peripheral membrane enzymes transform cholesterol into cholest-4-en-3-one-26-oic acid. The C27 acidic steroid is then transported into the cytoplasm, in which side-chain degradation and the subsequent sterane cleavage occur. This study sheds light into microbial cholesterol metabolism under anoxic conditions.

  5. Amino acid catabolism: a pivotal regulator of innate and adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaha, Tracy L; Huang, Lei; Lemos, Henrique; Metz, Richard; Mautino, Mario; Prendergast, George C; Mellor, Andrew L

    2012-09-01

    Enhanced amino acid catabolism is a common response to inflammation, but the immunologic significance of altered amino acid consumption remains unclear. The finding that tryptophan catabolism helped maintain fetal tolerance during pregnancy provided novel insights into the significance of amino acid metabolism in controlling immunity. Recent advances in identifying molecular pathways that enhance amino acid catabolism and downstream mechanisms that affect immune cells in response to inflammatory cues support the notion that amino acid catabolism regulates innate and adaptive immune cells in pathologic settings. Cells expressing enzymes that degrade amino acids modulate antigen-presenting cell and lymphocyte functions and reveal critical roles for amino acid- and catabolite-sensing pathways in controlling gene expression, functions, and survival of immune cells. Basal amino acid catabolism may contribute to immune homeostasis that prevents autoimmunity, whereas elevated amino acid catalytic activity may reinforce immune suppression to promote tumorigenesis and persistence of some pathogens that cause chronic infections. For these reasons, there is considerable interest in generating novel drugs that inhibit or induce amino acid consumption and target downstream molecular pathways that control immunity. In this review, we summarize recent developments and highlight novel concepts and key outstanding questions in this active research field.

  6. Isolation of clinical strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa harboring different plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar, R; Owlia, P; Saderi, H; Bameri, Z; Izadi, M; Jonaidi, N; Morovvati, S

    2007-09-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate the presence of plasmids among the strains of P. aeruginosa isolated from clinically diagnosed cases in Tehran in 2006. A total of 38 strains of P. aeruginosa were isolated. With the exception of one isolate, all P. aeruginosa strains harbored at least one plasmid band. The electrophoretic analysis of plasmid DNAs showed different number of plasmid bands among the strains tested. The DNA band of 1.4 kbp was evident in 84.2% of the strains. Approximately 71 and 21% of the isolates harbored concomitantly two and three plasmids, respectively. Isolation of strains with diverse types of plasmids suggests the different cluster of P. aeruginosa might be disseminated during the current study period.

  7. Transformation of Haemophilus influenzae by plasmid RSF0885

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Notani, N.K.; Setlow, J.K.; McCarthy, D.; Clayton, N.L.

    1981-12-01

    Plasmid RSF0885, which conferred ampicillin resistance, transformed competent Haemophilus influenzae cells with low efficiency (maximun, less than 0.01%). As judged by competition experiments and uptake of radioactivity, plasmid RSF0885 deoxyribonucleic acid was taken up into competent H. influenzae cells several orders of magnitude less efficiently than H. influenzae chromosomal deoxyribonucleic acid. Plasmid RSF0885 transformed cells with even lower efficiency than could be accounted for by the low uptake. Transformation was not affected by rec-1 and rec-2 mutations in the recipient, and strains cured of the plasmid did not show increased transformation. Plasmid molecules cut once with a restriction enzyme that made blunt ends did not transform. Transformation was favored by the closed circular form of the plasmid.

  8. Conjugative botulinum neurotoxin-encoding plasmids in Clostridium botulinum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin M Marshall

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clostridium botulinum produces seven distinct serotypes of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs. The genes encoding different subtype neurotoxins of serotypes A, B, F and several dual neurotoxin-producing strains have been shown to reside on plasmids, suggesting that intra- and interspecies transfer of BoNT-encoding plasmids may occur. The objective of the present study was to determine whether these C. botulinum BoNT-encoding plasmids are conjugative. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: C. botulinum BoNT-encoding plasmids pBotCDC-A3 (strain CDC-A3, pCLJ (strain 657Ba and pCLL (strain Eklund 17B were tagged with the erythromycin resistance marker (Erm using the ClosTron mutagenesis system by inserting a group II intron into the neurotoxin genes carried on these plasmids. Transfer of the tagged plasmids from the donor strains CDC-A3, 657Ba and Eklund 17B to tetracycline-resistant recipient C. botulinum strains was evaluated in mating experiments. Erythromycin and tetracycline resistant transconjugants were isolated from donor:recipient mating pairs tested. Transfer of the plasmids to the transconjugants was confirmed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and Southern hybridizations. Transfer required cell-to-cell contact and was DNase resistant. This indicates that transfer of these plasmids occurs via a conjugation mechanism. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first evidence supporting conjugal transfer of native botulinum neurotoxin-encoding plasmids in C. botulinum, and provides a probable mechanism for the lateral distribution of BoNT-encoding plasmids to other C. botulinum strains. The potential transfer of C. botulinum BoNT-encoding plasmids to other bacterial hosts in the environment or within the human intestine is of great concern for human pathogenicity and necessitates further characterization of these plasmids.

  9. Plasmid P1 replication: negative control by repeated DNA sequences.

    OpenAIRE

    Chattoraj, D; Cordes, K.; Abeles, A

    1984-01-01

    The incompatibility locus, incA, of the unit-copy plasmid P1 is contained within a fragment that is essentially a set of nine 19-base-pair repeats. One or more copies of the fragment destabilizes the plasmid when present in trans. Here we show that extra copies of incA interfere with plasmid DNA replication and that a deletion of most of incA increases plasmid copy number. Thus, incA is not essential for replication but is required for its control. When cloned in a high-copy-number vector, pi...

  10. Bacteriophages Limit the Existence Conditions for Conjugative Plasmids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, A. Jamie; Dytham, Calvin; Pitchford, Jonathan W.; Truman, Julie; Spiers, Andrew; Paterson, Steve; Brockhurst, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteriophages are a major cause of bacterial mortality and impose strong selection on natural bacterial populations, yet their effects on the dynamics of conjugative plasmids have rarely been tested. We combined experimental evolution, mathematical modeling, and individual-based simulations to explain how the ecological and population genetics effects of bacteriophages upon bacteria interact to determine the dynamics of conjugative plasmids and their persistence. The ecological effects of bacteriophages on bacteria are predicted to limit the existence conditions for conjugative plasmids, preventing persistence under weak selection for plasmid accessory traits. Experiments showed that phages drove faster extinction of plasmids in environments where the plasmid conferred no benefit, but they also revealed more complex effects of phages on plasmid dynamics under these conditions, specifically, the temporary maintenance of plasmids at fixation followed by rapid loss. We hypothesized that the population genetic effects of bacteriophages, specifically, selection for phage resistance mutations, may have caused this. Further mathematical modeling and individual-based simulations supported our hypothesis, showing that conjugative plasmids may hitchhike with phage resistance mutations in the bacterial chromosome. PMID:26037122

  11. Plasmid genes required for microcin B17 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Millán, J L; Kolter, R; Moreno, F

    1985-09-01

    The production of the antibiotic substance microcin B17 (Mcc) is determined by a 3.5-kilobase DNA fragment from plasmid pMccB17. Several Mcc- mutations on plasmid pMccB17 were obtained by both transposon insertion and nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis. Plasmids carrying these mutations were tested for their ability to complement Mcc- insertion or deletion mutations on pMM102 (pMM102 is a pBR322 derivative carrying the region encoding microcin B17). Results from these experiments indicate that at least four plasmid genes are required for microcin production.

  12. [Isolation of the R'his plasmids of Vibrio cholerae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusina, O Iu; Tiganova, I G; Aleshkin, G I; Andreeva, I V; Skavronskaia, A G

    1987-06-01

    V. cholerae strain VT5104 capable of donor activity in conjugation has been constructed by the genetic technique based on plasmid RP4::Mucts62 integration into V. cholerae chromosome due to plasmid homology with Mucts62 inserted into the chromosome. The gene for histidine synthesis has been mobilized and transferred into the recipient cells from VT5104 donor. The conjugants obtained are able to efficiently transfer his+ gene included into the plasmid structure in conjugation with eltor recipient. Thus, the constructed strain VT5104 generates R' plasmids carrying V. cholerae chromosomal genes.

  13. Mammalian polyamine catabolism: a therapeutic target, a pathological problem, or both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanlin; Casero, Robert A

    2006-01-01

    With the recent discovery of the polyamine catabolic enzyme spermine oxidase (SMO/PAOh1), the apparent complexity of the polyamine metabolic pathway has increased considerably. Alone or in combination with the two other known members of human polyamine catabolism, spermidine/spermine N(1)-acetyltransferase, and N(1)-acetylpolyamine oxidase (PAO), SMO/PAOh1 expression has the potential to alter polyamine homeostasis in response to normal cellular signals, drug treatment and environmental and/or cellular stressors. The activity of the oxidases producing toxic aldehydes and the reactive oxygen species (ROS) H(2)O(2), suggest a mechanism by which these oxidases can be exploited as an antineoplastic drug target. However, inappropriate activation of the pathways may also lead to pathological outcomes, including DNA damage that can lead to cellular transformation. The most recent data suggest that the two polyamine catabolic pathways exhibit distinct properties and understanding these properties should aid in their exploitation for therapeutic and/or chemopreventive strategies.

  14. Understanding Sugar Catabolism in Unicellular Cyanobacteria Toward the Application in Biofuel and Biomaterial Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osanai, Takashi; Iijima, Hiroko; Hirai, Masami Yokota

    2016-01-01

    Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is a model species of the cyanobacteria that undergo oxygenic photosynthesis, and has garnered much attention for its potential biotechnological applications. The regulatory mechanism of sugar metabolism in this cyanobacterium has been intensively studied and recent omics approaches have revealed the changes in transcripts, proteins, and metabolites of sugar catabolism under different light and nutrient conditions. Several transcriptional regulators that control the gene expression of enzymes related to sugar catabolism have been identified in the past 10 years, including a sigma factor, transcription factors, and histidine kinases. The modification of these genes can lead to alterations in the primary metabolism as well as the levels of high-value products such as bioplastics and hydrogen. This review summarizes recent studies on sugar catabolism in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, emphasizing the importance of elucidating the molecular mechanisms of cyanobacterial metabolism for biotechnological applications.

  15. [A novel Salmonella Typhimurium plasmid, pAnkS: an example for plasmid evolution in antibiotic resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Fikret; Karasartova, Djursun; Gerçeker, Devran; Aysev, A Derya; Erdem, Birsel

    2008-07-01

    In this study, a plasmid, carrying ampicillin resistance (ampR) gene, isolated from a clinical isolate of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium presenting ACSSuT (ampicilin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulphonamide, tetracycline) resistance phenotype, was defined. The length of complete sequence of this plasmid was 8271 base pairs (bp), and it was named as pAnkS owing to its isolation place (plasmid-Ankara- Salmonella). The plasmid was analyzed for potential reading frames and structural features indicative of transposons and transposon relics. The Xmnl enzyme restriction fragments of pAnkS were cloned into E. coli plasmid vectors (pBSK), sequenced and analyzed with the BLAST programs. Plasmid pAnkS has contained a previously defined enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) plasmid p4821 as a core region and also contained a complete Tn3-like transposon of 4950 bp consisting of the left terminal repeat, Tn3-related tnpR and tnpA genes for transposition functions, ampicillin resistance gene bla(TEM), and the right terminal repeats, pAnkS showed strong homology with another Salmonella plasmid, pNTP16, for sequences that belong to p4821 and partial Tn3 segments. It was found that pNTP16 also carries kanamycin resistance gene (kanR) in addition to ampR gene. Plasmid pAnkS is one of the few completely sequenced plasmids from Salmonella Typhimurium and is in the middle of the pathway of evolution of plasmid from p4821 to pNTP16. The identification of pAnkS might help better understanding of plasmid evolution.

  16. Catabolism of pyrimidines in yeast: A tool to understand degradation of anticancer drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Gorm; Merico, A.; Bjornberg, O.

    2006-01-01

    The pyrimidine catabolic pathway is of crucial importance in cancer patients because it is involved in degradation of several chemotherapeutic drugs, such as 5-fluorouracil; it also is important in plants, unicellular eukaryotes, and bacteria for the degradation of pyrimidine-based biocides....../antibiotics. During the last decade we have developed a yeast species, Saccharomyces kluyveri, as a model and tool to study the genes and enzymes of the pyrimidine catabolic pathway. In this report, we studied degradation of uracil and its putative degradation products in 38 yeasts and showed that this pathway...

  17. Isolation of a mutation resulting in constitutive synthesis of L-fucose catabolic enzymes.

    OpenAIRE

    Bartkus, J. M.; Mortlock, R P

    1986-01-01

    A ribitol-positive transductant of Escherichia coli K-12, JM2112, was used to facilitate the isolation and identification of mutations affecting the L-fucose catabolic pathway. Analysis of L-fucose-negative mutants of JM2112 enabled us to confirm that L-fucose-1-phosphate is the apparent inducer of the fucose catabolic enzymes. Plating of an L-fuculokinase-negative mutant of JM2112 on D-arabinose yielded an isolate containing a second fucose mutation which resulted in the constitutive synthes...

  18. Catabolism of pyrimidines in yeast: a tool to understand degradation of anticancer drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, G; Merico, A; Björnberg, O;

    2006-01-01

    The pyrimidine catabolic pathway is of crucial importance in cancer patients because it is involved in degradation of several chemotherapeutic drugs, such as 5-fluorouracil; it also is important in plants, unicellular eukaryotes, and bacteria for the degradation of pyrimidine-based biocides....../antibiotics. During the last decade we have developed a yeast species, Saccharomyces kluyveri, as a model and tool to study the genes and enzymes of the pyrimidine catabolic pathway. In this report, we studied degradation of uracil and its putative degradation products in 38 yeasts and showed that this pathway...

  19. Effect of plasmid R391 and other IncJ plasmids on the survival of Escherichia coli after UV irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pembroke, J.T.; Stevens, E. (University Coll., Galway (Ireland))

    1984-07-01

    The presence of the IncJ plasmids R391, R997, R705, R706, R748, and R749 was shown to sensitize Escherichia coli AB1157 and both its uvr A and lexA derivatives to UV irradiation. No alteration in post-irradiation survival was observed in a recA mutant containing these plasmids, compared with the non-plasmid-containing recA strain. Analysis of recombination frequency in Hfr crosses to recA/sup +/ cells containing plasmid R391 indicated a reduction in recombination frequency compared with that obtained in similar crosses to a non-plasmid-containing strain. This effect was not due to plasmid-encoded restriction or entry exclusion systems and therefore must be considered as a real block in recombination. When cells containing plasmid R391 were irradiated and allowed to photoreactivate, an increase in survival was observed which was comparable to that observed in the non-plasmid-containing derivative. This indicated that post-irradiation processing of UV-induced damage, or lack of such processing, by mechanisms other than photoreactivation was responsible for the UV sensitivity associated with plasmid R391.

  20. Insulin-like growth factor-I fails to reverse corticosteroid-induced protein catabolism in growing piglets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellstern, G; Reijngoud, DJ; Stellaard, F; Okken, A

    1996-01-01

    Corticosteroids such as dexamethasone (DEX) increase leucine turnover and oxidation in humans and animals, indicating whole body protein catabolism. Recently, interest has been growing in the use of recombinant polypeptides such as GH and IGF-I in reversing various states of catabolism. The aim of o

  1. Production and pharmaceutical formulation of plasmid DNA vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, I.

    2013-01-01

    Research leading to the thesis ‘Production and pharmaceutical formulation of plasmid DNA vaccines‘ can be divided into two parts. The first part describes the development of a Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) compliant plasmid DNA production process of pDNA vaccines for the treatment of Human papil

  2. Homology of plasmids in strains of unicellular cyanobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den; Keegstra, W.; Borrias, W.E.; Arkel, G.A. van

    1979-01-01

    Six strains of unicellular cyanobacteria were examined for the presence of plasmids. Analysis of lysates of these strains by CsCl-ethidium bromide density centrifugation yielded a major chromosomal DNA band and a minor band containing covalently closed circular plasmid DNA, as shown by electron micr

  3. Multilocus sequence typing of IncN plasmids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    García-Fernández, Aurora; Villa, Laura; Moodley, Arshnee;

    2011-01-01

    in different countries from both animals and humans belonged to ST1, suggesting dissemination of an epidemic plasmid through the food chain. Fifteen of 17 plasmids carrying blaVIM-1 from Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli, isolated during a 5year period in Greece were assigned to ST10, suggesting...

  4. Examination of uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains conferring large plasmids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUHARTONO

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Suhartono (2010 Examination of uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains conferring large plasmids. Biodiversitas 11: 59-64. Of major uropathogens, Escherichia coli has been widely known as a main pathogen of UTIs globally and has considerable medical and financial consequences. A strain of UPEC, namely E. coli ST131, confers a large plasmid encoding cephalosporinases (class C β-lactamase or AmpC that may be disseminated through horizontal transfer among bacterial populations. Therefore, it is worth examining such large plasmids by isolating, purifying, and digesting the plasmid with restriction enzymes. The examination of the large plasmids was conducted by isolating plasmid DNA visualized by agarose gel electrophoresis as well as by PFGE. The relationship of plasmids among isolates was carried out by HpaI restriction enzyme digestion. Of 36 isolates of E. coli ST 131, eight isolates possessed large plasmids, namely isolates 3, 9, 10, 12, 17, 18, 26 and 30 with the largest molecular size confirmed by agarose gel electrophoresis and PFGE was ~42kb and ~118kb respectively. Restriction enzyme analysis revealed that isolates 9, 10, 12, 17 and 18 have the common restriction patterns and those isolates might be closely related.

  5. Chromosomal targeting of replicating plasmids in the yeast Hansenula polymorpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, Klaas Nico; Swaving, Gert Jan; Faber, Folkert; Ab, Geert; Harder, Willem; Veenhuis, Marten; Haima, Pieter

    1992-01-01

    Using an optimized transformation protocol we have studied the possible interactions between transforming plasmid DNA and the Hansenula polymorpha genome. Plasmids consisting only of a pBR322 replicon, an antibiotic resistance marker for Escherichia coli and the Saccharomyces cerevisiae LEU2 gene we

  6. Plasmid cloning vehicle for Haemophilus influenzae and Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, D.; Clayton, N.L.; Setlow, J.K.

    1982-09-01

    A new plasmid cloning vehicle (pDM2) was used to introduce a library of Haemophilus influenzae chromosomal fragments into H. influenzae. Transformants of the higly recombination-defective rec-1 mutant were more likely to contain exclusively recombinant plasmids after exposure to ligated DNA mixtures than was the wild type. pDM2 could replicate in Escherichia coli K-12.

  7. Functional analysis of three plasmids from Lactobacillus plantarum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranenburg, R. van; Golic, N.; Bongers, R.; Leer, R.J.; Vos, W.M. de; Siezen, R.J.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2005-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 harbors three plasmids, pWCFS101, pWCFS102, and pWCFS103, with sizes of 1,917, 2,365, and 36,069 bp, respectively. The two smaller plasmids are of unknown function and contain replication genes that are likely to function via the rolling-circle replication mechanism. Th

  8. Identification of IncA/C Plasmid Replication and Maintenance Genes and Development of a Plasmid Multilocus Sequence Typing Scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Steven J; Phan, Minh-Duy; Peters, Kate M; Forde, Brian M; Chong, Teik Min; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan; Paterson, David L; Walsh, Timothy R; Beatson, Scott A; Schembri, Mark A

    2017-02-01

    Plasmids of incompatibility group A/C (IncA/C) are becoming increasingly prevalent within pathogenic Enterobacteriaceae They are associated with the dissemination of multiple clinically relevant resistance genes, including blaCMY and blaNDM Current typing methods for IncA/C plasmids offer limited resolution. In this study, we present the complete sequence of a blaNDM-1-positive IncA/C plasmid, pMS6198A, isolated from a multidrug-resistant uropathogenic Escherichia coli strain. Hypersaturated transposon mutagenesis, coupled with transposon-directed insertion site sequencing (TraDIS), was employed to identify conserved genetic elements required for replication and maintenance of pMS6198A. Our analysis of TraDIS data identified roles for the replicon, including repA, a toxin-antitoxin system; two putative partitioning genes, parAB; and a putative gene, 053 Construction of mini-IncA/C plasmids and examination of their stability within E. coli confirmed that the region encompassing 053 contributes to the stable maintenance of IncA/C plasmids. Subsequently, the four major maintenance genes (repA, parAB, and 053) were used to construct a new plasmid multilocus sequence typing (PMLST) scheme for IncA/C plasmids. Application of this scheme to a database of 82 IncA/C plasmids identified 11 unique sequence types (STs), with two dominant STs. The majority of blaNDM-positive plasmids examined (15/17; 88%) fall into ST1, suggesting acquisition and subsequent expansion of this blaNDM-containing plasmid lineage. The IncA/C PMLST scheme represents a standardized tool to identify, track, and analyze the dissemination of important IncA/C plasmid lineages, particularly in the context of epidemiological studies.

  9. Expansion of the IncX plasmid family for improved identification and typing of novel plasmids in drug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Bielak, Eliza Maria; Fortini, Daniela;

    2012-01-01

    and biofilm formation. Previous plasmid-based replicon typing procedures have indicated that the prevalence of IncX plasmids is low among members of the Enterobacteriaceae. However, examination of a number of IncX-like plasmid sequences and their occurrence in various organisms suggests that IncX plasmid...

  10. Permissiveness of soil microbial communities towards broad host range plasmids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klümper, Uli

    larger than previously assumed. I was able to show abundant plasmid transfer from the Gram negative donor strains to a wide diversity of Gram positive soil bacteria, formerly thought to constitute distinct clusters of gene transfer. Moreover, among the observed transconjugants, I identified a core super...... environmental factors that modulate plasmid transfer in soil microbial communities. In order to attain these goals, I developed a high-throughput method that enabled me to evaluate the permissiveness of bacterial communities towards introduced plasmids. This new approach is based on the introduction...... fraction of soil the bacteria (up to 1 in 10,000) were able to take up any of these broad host range conjugal plasmids. The transconjugal pools comprised 11 bacterial phyla. This finding indicates that the realized transfer range of broad host range plasmids in environmental microbial communities is much...

  11. Putrescine catabolism is a metabolic response to several stresses in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Barbara L; Hernandez, V James; Reitzer, Larry

    2013-05-01

    Genes whose products degrade arginine and ornithine, precursors of putrescine synthesis, are activated by either regulators of the nitrogen-regulated (Ntr) response or σ(S) -RNA polymerase. To determine if dual control regulates a complete putrescine catabolic pathway, we examined expression of patA and patD, which specify the first two enzymes of one putrescine catabolic pathway. Assays of PatA (putrescine transaminase) activity and β-galactosidase from cells with patA-lacZ transcriptional and translational fusions indicate dual control of patA transcription and putrescine-stimulated patA translation. Similar assays for PatD indicate that patD transcription required σ(S) -RNA polymerase, and Nac, an Ntr regulator, enhanced the σ(S) -dependent transcription. Since Nac activation via σ(S) -RNA polymerase is without precedent, transcription with purified components was examined and the results confirmed this conclusion. This result indicates that the Ntr regulon can intrude into the σ(S) regulon. Strains lacking both polyamine catabolic pathways have defective responses to oxidative stress, high temperature and a sublethal concentration of an antibiotic. These defects and the σ(S) -dependent expression indicate that polyamine catabolism is a core metabolic response to stress.

  12. Comparing how land use change impacts soil microbial catabolic respiration in Southwestern Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzetto, Andre Mancebo; Feigl, Brigitte Josefine; Cerri, Carlos Eduardo Pellegrino; Cerri, Carlos Clemente

    2016-01-01

    Land use changes strongly impact soil functions, particularly microbial biomass diversity and activity. We hypothesized that the catabolic respiration response of the microbial biomass would differ depending on land use and that these differences would be consistent at the landscape scale. In the present study, we analyzed the catabolic response profile of the soil microbial biomass through substrate-induced respiration in different land uses over a wide geographical range in Mato Grosso and Rondônia state (Southwest Amazon region). We analyzed the differences among native areas, pastures and crop areas and within each land use and examined only native areas (Forest, Dense Cerrado and Cerrado), pastures (Nominal, Degraded and Improved) and crop areas (Perennial, No-Tillage, Conventional Tillage). The metabolic profile of the microbial biomass was accessed using substrate-induced respiration. Pasture soils showed significant responses to amino acids and carboxylic acids, whereas native areas showed higher responses to malonic acid, malic acid and succinic acid. Within each land use category, the catabolic responses showed similar patterns in both large general comparisons (native area, pasture and crop areas) and more specific comparisons (biomes, pastures and crop types). The results showed that the catabolic responses of the microbial biomass are highly correlated with land use, independent of soil type or climate. The substrate induced respiration approach is useful to discriminate microbial communities, even on a large scale.

  13. Chronic Drought Decreases Anabolic and Catabolic BVOC Emissions of Quercus pubescens in a Mediterranean Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunier, Amélie; Ormeño, Elena; Wortham, Henri; Temime-Roussel, Brice; Lecareux, Caroline; Boissard, Christophe; Fernandez, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) emitted by plants can originate from both anabolism (metabolite production through anabolic processes) and catabolism (metabolite degradation by oxidative reactions). Drought can favor leaf oxidation by increasing the oxidative pressure in plant cells. Thus, under the precipitation decline predicted for the Mediterranean region, it can be expected both strong oxidation of anabolic BVOC within leaves and, as a result, enhanced catabolic BVOC emissions. Using an experimental rain exclusion device in a natural forest, we compared the seasonal course of the emissions of the main anabolic BVOC released by Q. pubescens (isoprene and methanol) and their catabolic products (MACR+MVK+ISOPOOH and formaldehyde, respectively) after 3 years of precipitation restriction (−30% of rain). Thus, we assume that this repetitive amplified drought promoted a chronic drought. BVOC emissions were monitored, on-line, with a PTR-ToF-MS. Amplified drought decreased all BVOC emissions rates in spring and summer by around 40–50 %, especially through stomatal closure, with no effect in autumn. Moreover, ratios between catabolic and anabolic BVOC remained unchanged with amplified drought, suggesting a relative stable oxidative pressure in Q. pubescens under the water stress applied. Moreover, these results suggest a quite good resilience of this species under the most severe climate change scenario in the Mediterranean region. PMID:28228762

  14. Ischemic nucleotide breakdown increases during cardiac development due to drop in adenosine anabolism/catabolism ratio

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W. de Jong (Jan Willem); E. Keijzer (Elisabeth); T. Huizer (Tom); B. Schoutsen

    1990-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Our earlier work on reperfusion showed that adult rat hearts released almost twice as much purine nucleosides and oxypurines as newborn hearts did [Am J Physiol 254 (1988) H1091]. A change in the ratio anabolism/catabolism of adenosine could be responsible for this effect.

  15. Mechanical ventilation induces myokine expression and catabolism in peripheral skeletal muscle in pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endotoxin (LPS)-induced sepsis increases circulating cytokines which have been associated with skeletal muscle catabolism. During critical illness, it has been postulated that muscle wasting associated with mechanical ventilation (MV) occurs due to inactivity. We hypothesize that MV and sepsis promo...

  16. A previously unknown oxalyl-CoA synthetase is important for oxalate catabolism in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxalate is produced by several catabolic pathways in plants. The best characterized pathway for subsequent oxalate degradation is via oxalate oxidase, but some species, such as Arabidopsis thaliana, have no oxalate oxidase activity. Previously, an alternative pathway was proposed in which oxalyl-CoA...

  17. Branched-chain amino acid catabolism fuels adipocyte differentiation and lipogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Courtney R; Wallace, Martina; Divakaruni, Ajit S; Phillips, Susan A; Murphy, Anne N; Ciaraldi, Theodore P; Metallo, Christian M

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue plays important roles in regulating carbohydrate and lipid homeostasis, but less is known about the regulation of amino acid metabolism in adipocytes. Here we applied isotope tracing to pre-adipocytes and differentiated adipocytes to quantify the contributions of different substrates to tricarboxylic acid (TCA) metabolism and lipogenesis. In contrast to proliferating cells, which use glucose and glutamine for acetyl-coenzyme A (AcCoA) generation, differentiated adipocytes showed increased branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) catabolic flux such that leucine and isoleucine from medium and/or from protein catabolism accounted for as much as 30% of lipogenic AcCoA pools. Medium cobalamin deficiency caused methylmalonic acid accumulation and odd-chain fatty acid synthesis. Vitamin B12 supplementation reduced these metabolites and altered the balance of substrates entering mitochondria. Finally, inhibition of BCAA catabolism compromised adipogenesis. These results quantitatively highlight the contribution of BCAAs to adipocyte metabolism and suggest that BCAA catabolism has a functional role in adipocyte differentiation.

  18. The activation of hepatic and muscle polyamine catabolism improves glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koponen, Taina; Cerrada-Gimenez, Marc; Pirinen, Eija; Hohtola, Esa; Paananen, Jussi; Vuohelainen, Susanna; Tusa, Maija; Pirnes-Karhu, Sini; Heikkinen, Sami; Virkamäki, Antti; Uimari, Anne; Alhonen, Leena; Laakso, Markku

    2012-02-01

    The mitochondrial biogenesis and energy expenditure regulator, PGC-1α, has been previously reported to be induced in the white adipose tissue (WAT) and liver of mice overexpressing spermidine/spermine N (1)-acetyltransferase (SSAT). The activation of PGC-1α in these mouse lines leads to increased number of mitochondria, improved glucose homeostasis, reduced WAT mass and elevated basal metabolic rate. The constant activation of polyamine catabolism produces a futile cycle that greatly reduces the ATP pools and induces 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which in turn activates PGC-1α in WAT. In this study, we have investigated the effects of activated polyamine catabolism on the glucose and energy metabolisms when targeted to specific tissues. For that we used a mouse line overexpressing SSAT under the endogenous SSAT promoter, an inducible SSAT overexpressing mouse model using the metallothionein I promoter (MT-SSAT), and a mouse model with WAT-specific SSAT overexpression (aP2-SSAT). The results demonstrated that WAT-specific SSAT overexpression was sufficient to increase the number of mitochondria, reduce WAT mass and protect the mice from high-fat diet-induced obesity. However, the improvement in the glucose homeostasis is achieved only when polyamine catabolism is enhanced at the same time in the liver and skeletal muscle. Our results suggest that the tissue-specific targeting of activated polyamine catabolism may reveal new possibilities for the development of drugs boosting mitochondrial metabolism and eventually for treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  19. Phytochemicals that modulate amino acid and peptide catabolism by caprine rumen microbes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Microbe-derived ionophores and macrolide antibiotics are often added to ruminant diets, and growth promotion and feed efficiency are among the benefits. One mechanism is inhibition of microbes that catabolize amino acids or peptides and produce ammonia. Plants also produce antimicrobial ...

  20. CLONING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE PHTHALATE CATABOLISM REGION OF PRE1 OF ARTHROBACTER KEYSERI 12B

    Science.gov (United States)

    o-Phthalate (benzene-1,2-dicarboxylate) is a central intermediate in the bacterial degradation of phthalate ester plasticizers as well as of a number of fused-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons found in fossil fuels. In Arthrobacter keyseri 12B, the genes encoding catabolism o...

  1. Comparing how land use change impacts soil microbial catabolic respiration in Southwestern Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Mancebo Mazzetto

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Land use changes strongly impact soil functions, particularly microbial biomass diversity and activity. We hypothesized that the catabolic respiration response of the microbial biomass would differ depending on land use and that these differences would be consistent at the landscape scale. In the present study, we analyzed the catabolic response profile of the soil microbial biomass through substrate-induced respiration in different land uses over a wide geographical range in Mato Grosso and Rondônia state (Southwest Amazon region. We analyzed the differences among native areas, pastures and crop areas and within each land use and examined only native areas (Forest, Dense Cerrado and Cerrado, pastures (Nominal, Degraded and Improved and crop areas (Perennial, No-Tillage, Conventional Tillage. The metabolic profile of the microbial biomass was accessed using substrate-induced respiration. Pasture soils showed significant responses to amino acids and carboxylic acids, whereas native areas showed higher responses to malonic acid, malic acid and succinic acid. Within each land use category, the catabolic responses showed similar patterns in both large general comparisons (native area, pasture and crop areas and more specific comparisons (biomes, pastures and crop types. The results showed that the catabolic responses of the microbial biomass are highly correlated with land use, independent of soil type or climate. The substrate induced respiration approach is useful to discriminate microbial communities, even on a large scale.

  2. Antibiotic resistance of vibrio cholerae: special considerations of R-plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, S

    1978-09-01

    Studies on the transmission of R plasmid by conjugation between enterobacteria and vibrio or related bacteria were reviewed. The majority of the reports confirmed successful transmission from enterobacteria to Vibrio cholerae and related species, although the transmission frequencies were extremely low and the transmitted R plasmid was very unstable except for thermosensitive kanamycin plasmid and usual R plasmid coexisting with P plasmid. Strains of V. cholerae and Aeromonas liquefaciens as well as A. salmonicida bearing R plasmid were detected in nature. R plasmid was relatively unstable in V. cholerae strains with which transmission of R plasmid to enterobacteria was confirmed. At present, only 3 R plasmids have been obtained from naturally occurring strains of V. cholerae. Although the 2 European plasmids belong to the C incompatibility group with 98 megadalton closed covalent circular DNA molecule, one plasmid belongs to the J group with more than 25 megadalton molecular weight, and no CCC of satelite DNA was detected in bacteria harboring this plasmid.

  3. Complex nature of enterococcal pheromone-responsive plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardal, Ewa; Sadowy, Ewa; Hryniewicz, Waleria

    2010-01-01

    Pheromone-responsive plasmids constitute a unique group of approximately 20 plasmids identified, as yet, only among enterococcal species. Several of their representatives, e.g. pAD1, pCF10, pPD1 and pAM373 have been extensively studied. These plasmids possess a sophisticated conjugation mechanism based on response to sex pheromones--small peptides produced by plasmid-free recipient cells. Detailed analysis of regulation and function of the pheromone response process revealed its great complexity and dual role--in plasmid conjugation and modulation of enterococcal virulence. Among other functional modules identified in pheromone plasmids, the stabilization/partition systems play a crucial role in stable maintenance of the plasmid molecule in host bacteria. Among them, the par locus of pAD1 is one of the exceptional RNA addiction systems. Pheromone-responsive plasmids contribute also to enterococcal phenotype being an important vehicle of antibiotic resistance in this genus. Both types of acquired vancomycin resistance determinants, vanA and vanB, as well many other resistant phenotypes, were found to be located on these plasmids. They also encode two basic agents of enterococcal virulence, i.e. aggregation substance (AS) and cytolysin. AS participates in mating-pair formation during conjugation but can also facilitate the adherence ofenterococci to human tissues during infection. The second protein, cytolysin, displays hemolytic activity and helps to invade eukaryotic cells. There are still many aspects of the nature of pheromone plasmids that remain unclear and more detailed studies are needed to understand their uniqueness and complexity.

  4. Actinobacterial acyl coenzyme A synthetases involved in steroid side-chain catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casabon, Israël; Swain, Kendra; Crowe, Adam M; Eltis, Lindsay D; Mohn, William W

    2014-02-01

    Bacterial steroid catabolism is an important component of the global carbon cycle and has applications in drug synthesis. Pathways for this catabolism involve multiple acyl coenzyme A (CoA) synthetases, which activate alkanoate substituents for β-oxidation. The functions of these synthetases are poorly understood. We enzymatically characterized four distinct acyl-CoA synthetases from the cholate catabolic pathway of Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 and the cholesterol catabolic pathway of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Phylogenetic analysis of 70 acyl-CoA synthetases predicted to be involved in steroid metabolism revealed that the characterized synthetases each represent an orthologous class with a distinct function in steroid side-chain degradation. The synthetases were specific for the length of alkanoate substituent. FadD19 from M. tuberculosis H37Rv (FadD19Mtb) transformed 3-oxo-4-cholesten-26-oate (kcat/Km = 0.33 × 10(5) ± 0.03 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1)) and represents orthologs that activate the C8 side chain of cholesterol. Both CasGRHA1 and FadD17Mtb are steroid-24-oyl-CoA synthetases. CasG and its orthologs activate the C5 side chain of cholate, while FadD17 and its orthologs appear to activate the C5 side chain of one or more cholesterol metabolites. CasIRHA1 is a steroid-22-oyl-CoA synthetase, representing orthologs that activate metabolites with a C3 side chain, which accumulate during cholate catabolism. CasI had similar apparent specificities for substrates with intact or extensively degraded steroid nuclei, exemplified by 3-oxo-23,24-bisnorchol-4-en-22-oate and 1β(2'-propanoate)-3aα-H-4α(3″-propanoate)-7aβ-methylhexahydro-5-indanone (kcat/Km = 2.4 × 10(5) ± 0.1 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) and 3.2 × 10(5) ± 0.3 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1), respectively). Acyl-CoA synthetase classes involved in cholate catabolism were found in both Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria. Overall, this study provides insight into the physiological roles of acyl-CoA synthetases in steroid

  5. Bacterial Mitosis: ParM of Plasmid R1 Moves Plasmid DNA by an Actin-like Insertional Polymerization Mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Borch, Jonas; Dam, Mette

    2003-01-01

    Bacterial DNA segregation takes place in an active and ordered fashion. In the case of Escherichia coli plasmid R1, the partitioning system (par) separates paired plasmid copies and moves them to opposite cell poles. Here we address the mechanism by which the three components of the R1 par system...

  6. Detection of catabolic genes in indigenous microbial consortia isolated from a diesel-contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milcic-Terzic, J.; Saval, S. [National University of Mexico, Coyocan (Mexico). Institute of Engineering; Lopez-Vidal, Y. [National University of Mexico (Mexico). FAculty of Medicine; Vrvic, M.M. [University of Belgrade (Yugoslavia). Faculty of Chemistry

    2001-05-01

    Bioremediation is often used for in situ remediation of petroleum-contaminated sites. The primary focus of this study was on understanding the indigenous microbial community which can survive in contaminated environment and is responsible for the degradation. Diesel, toluene and naphthalene-degrading microbial consortia were isolated from diesel-contaminated soil by growing on selective hydrocarbon substrates. The presence and frequency of the catabolic genes responsible for aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation (xylE, ndoB) within the isolated consortia were screened using polymerase chain reaction PCR and DNA-DNA colony hybridization. The diesel DNA-extract possessed both the xylE catabolic gene for toluene, and the nah catabolic gene for polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon degradation. The toluene DNA-extract possessed only the xylE catabolic gene, while the naphthalene DNA-extract only the ndoB gene. Restriction enzyme analysis with HaeIII indicated similar restriction patterns for the xylE gene fragment between toluene DNA-extract and a type strain, Pseudomonas putida ATCC 23973. A substantial proportion (74%) of the colonies from the diesel-consortium possessed the xylE gene, and the ndoB gene (78%), while a minority (29%) of the toluene-consortium harbored the xylE gene. 59% of the colonies from the naphthalene-consortium had the ndoB gene, and did not have the xylE gene. These results indicate that the microbial population has been naturally enriched in organisms carrying genes for aromatic hydrocarbon degradation and that significant aromatic biodegradative potential exists at the site. Characterization of the population genotype constitutes a molecular diagnosis which permits the determination of the catabolic potential of the site to degrade the contaminant present. (author)

  7. Defective branched chain amino acid catabolism contributes to cardiac dysfunction and remodeling following myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Zhang, Fuyang; Xia, Yunlong; Zhao, Shihao; Yan, Wenjun; Wang, Helin; Lee, Yan; Li, Congye; Zhang, Ling; Lian, Kun; Gao, Erhe; Cheng, Hexiang; Tao, Ling

    2016-11-01

    Cardiac metabolic remodeling is a central event during heart failure (HF) development following myocardial infarction (MI). It is well known that myocardial glucose and fatty acid dysmetabolism contribute to post-MI cardiac dysfunction and remodeling. However, the role of amino acid metabolism in post-MI HF remains elusive. Branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) are an important group of essential amino acids and function as crucial nutrient signaling in mammalian animals. The present study aimed to determine the role of cardiac BCAA metabolism in post-MI HF progression. Utilizing coronary artery ligation-induced murine MI models, we found that myocardial BCAA catabolism was significantly impaired in response to permanent MI, therefore leading to an obvious elevation of myocardial BCAA abundance. In MI-operated mice, oral BCAA administration further increased cardiac BCAA levels, activated the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, and exacerbated cardiac dysfunction and remodeling. These data demonstrate that BCAAs act as a direct contributor to post-MI cardiac pathologies. Furthermore, these BCAA-mediated deleterious effects were improved by rapamycin cotreatment, revealing an indispensable role of mTOR in BCAA-mediated adverse effects on cardiac function/structure post-MI. Of note, pharmacological inhibition of branched chain ketoacid dehydrogenase kinase (BDK), a negative regulator of myocardial BCAA catabolism, significantly improved cardiac BCAA catabolic disorders, reduced myocardial BCAA levels, and ameliorated post-MI cardiac dysfunction and remodeling. In conclusion, our data provide the evidence that impaired cardiac BCAA catabolism directly contributes to post-MI cardiac dysfunction and remodeling. Moreover, improving cardiac BCAA catabolic defects may be a promising therapeutic strategy against post-MI HF.

  8. A role for TNFα in intervertebral disc degeneration: A non-recoverable catabolic shift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purmessur, D.; Walter, B.A. [Leni and Peter W. May Department of Orthopaedics, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Roughley, P.J. [Shriners Hospital for Children, Montreal, QC (Canada); Laudier, D.M.; Hecht, A.C. [Leni and Peter W. May Department of Orthopaedics, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Iatridis, James, E-mail: james.iatridis@mssm.edu [Leni and Peter W. May Department of Orthopaedics, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029 (United States)

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► TNFα induced catabolic changes similar to human intervertebral disc degeneration. ► The metabolic shift induced by TNFα was sustained following removal. ► TNFα induced changes suggestive of cell senescence without affecting cell viability. ► Interventions are required to stimulate anabolism and increase cell proliferation. -- Abstract: This study examines the effect of TNFα on whole bovine intervertebral discs in organ culture and its association with changes characteristic of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) in order to inform future treatments to mitigate the chronic inflammatory state commonly found with painful IDD. Pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNFα contribute to disc pathology and are implicated in the catabolic phenotype associated with painful IDD. Whole bovine discs were cultured to examine cellular (anabolic/catabolic gene expression, cell viability and senescence using β-galactosidase) and structural (histology and aggrecan degradation) changes in response to TNFα treatment. Control or TNFα cultures were assessed at 7 and 21 days; the 21 day group also included a recovery group with 7 days TNFα followed by 14 days in basal media. TNFα induced catabolic and anti-anabolic shifts in the nucleus pulposus (NP) and annulus fibrosus (AF) at 7 days and this persisted until 21 days however cell viability was not affected. Data indicates that TNFα increased aggrecan degradation products and suggests increased β-galactosidase staining at 21 days without any recovery. TNFα treatment of whole bovine discs for 7 days induced changes similar to the degeneration processes that occur in human IDD: aggrecan degradation, increased catabolism, pro-inflammatory cytokines and nerve growth factor expression. TNFα significantly reduced anabolism in cultured IVDs and a possible mechanism may be associated with cell senescence. Results therefore suggest that successful treatments must promote anabolism and cell proliferation in

  9. Intracellular growth is dependent on tyrosine catabolism in the dimorphic fungal pathogen Penicillium marneffei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Kylie J; McLauchlan, Alisha; Schreider, Lena; Andrianopoulos, Alex

    2015-03-01

    During infection, pathogens must utilise the available nutrient sources in order to grow while simultaneously evading or tolerating the host's defence systems. Amino acids are an important nutritional source for pathogenic fungi and can be assimilated from host proteins to provide both carbon and nitrogen. The hpdA gene of the dimorphic fungus Penicillium marneffei, which encodes an enzyme which catalyses the second step of tyrosine catabolism, was identified as up-regulated in pathogenic yeast cells. As well as enabling the fungus to acquire carbon and nitrogen, tyrosine is also a precursor in the formation of two types of protective melanin; DOPA melanin and pyomelanin. Chemical inhibition of HpdA in P. marneffei inhibits ex vivo yeast cell production suggesting that tyrosine is a key nutrient source during infectious growth. The genes required for tyrosine catabolism, including hpdA, are located in a gene cluster and the expression of these genes is induced in the presence of tyrosine. A gene (hmgR) encoding a Zn(II)2-Cys6 binuclear cluster transcription factor is present within the cluster and is required for tyrosine induced expression and repression in the presence of a preferred nitrogen source. AreA, the GATA-type transcription factor which regulates the global response to limiting nitrogen conditions negatively regulates expression of cluster genes in the absence of tyrosine and is required for nitrogen metabolite repression. Deletion of the tyrosine catabolic genes in the cluster affects growth on tyrosine as either a nitrogen or carbon source and affects pyomelanin, but not DOPA melanin, production. In contrast to other genes of the tyrosine catabolic cluster, deletion of hpdA results in no growth within macrophages. This suggests that the ability to catabolise tyrosine is not required for macrophage infection and that HpdA has an additional novel role to that of tyrosine catabolism and pyomelanin production during growth in host cells.

  10. Genetic examination of initial amino acid oxidation and glutamate catabolism in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokooji, Yuusuke; Sato, Takaaki; Fujiwara, Shinsuke; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Atomi, Haruyuki

    2013-05-01

    Amino acid catabolism in Thermococcales is presumed to proceed via three steps: oxidative deamination of amino acids by glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) or aminotransferases, oxidative decarboxylation by 2-oxoacid:ferredoxin oxidoreductases (KOR), and hydrolysis of acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) by ADP-forming acyl-CoA synthetases (ACS). Here, we performed a genetic examination of enzymes involved in Glu catabolism in Thermococcus kodakarensis. Examination of amino acid dehydrogenase activities in cell extracts of T. kodakarensis KUW1 (ΔpyrF ΔtrpE) revealed high NADP-dependent GDH activity, along with lower levels of NAD-dependent activity. NADP-dependent activities toward Gln/Ala/Val/Cys and an NAD-dependent threonine dehydrogenase activity were also detected. In KGDH1, a gene disruption strain of T. kodakarensis GDH (Tk-GDH), only threonine dehydrogenase activity was detected, indicating that all other activities were dependent on Tk-GDH. KGDH1 could not grow in a medium in which growth was dependent on amino acid catabolism, implying that Tk-GDH is the only enzyme that can discharge the electrons (to NADP(+)/NAD(+)) released from amino acids in their oxidation to 2-oxoacids. In a medium containing excess pyruvate, KGDH1 displayed normal growth, but higher degrees of amino acid catabolism were observed compared to those for KUW1, suggesting that Tk-GDH functions to suppress amino acid oxidation and plays an anabolic role under this condition. We further constructed disruption strains of 2-oxoglutarate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase and succinyl-CoA synthetase. The two strains displayed growth defects in both media compared to KUW1. Succinate generation was not observed in these strains, indicating that the two enzymes are solely responsible for Glu catabolism among the multiple KOR and ACS enzymes in T. kodakarensis.

  11. Plasmid-associated sensitivity of Bacillus thuringiensis to UV light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benoit, T.G.; Wilson, G.R.; Bull, D.L.; Aronson, A.I. (Department of Agriculture, College Station, TX (USA))

    1990-08-01

    Spores and vegetative cells of Bacillus thuringiensis were more sensitive to UV light than were spores or cells of plasmid-cured B. thuringiensis strains or of the closely related Bacillus cereus. Introduction of B. thuringiensis plasmids into B. cereus by cell mating increased the UV sensitivity of the cells and spores. Protoxins encoded by one or more B. thuringiensis plasmids were not involved in spore sensitivity, since a B. thuringiensis strain conditional for protoxin accumulation was equally sensitive at the permissive and nonpermissive temperatures. In addition, introduction of either a cloned protoxin gene, the cloning vector, or another plasmid not containing a protoxin gene into a plasmid-cured strain of B. thuringiensis all increased the UV sensitivity of the spores. Although the variety of small, acid-soluble proteins was the same in the spores of all strains examined, the quantity of dipicolinic acid was about twice as high in the plasmid-containing strains, and this may account for the differences in UV sensitivity of the spores. The cells of some strains harboring only B. thuringiensis plasmids were much more sensitive than cells of any of the other strains, and the differences were much greater than observed with spores.

  12. Diversity and role of plasmids in adaptation of bacteria inhabiting the Lubin copper mine in Poland, an environment rich in heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziewit, Lukasz; Pyzik, Adam; Szuplewska, Magdalena; Matlakowska, Renata; Mielnicki, Sebastian; Wibberg, Daniel; Schlüter, Andreas; Pühler, Alfred; Bartosik, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    The Lubin underground mine, is one of three mining divisions in the Lubin-Glogow Copper District in Lower Silesia province (Poland). It is the source of polymetallic ore that is rich in copper, silver and several heavy metals. Black shale is also significantly enriched in fossil organic matter in the form of long-chain hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, organic acids, esters, thiophenes and metalloporphyrins. Biological analyses have revealed that this environment is inhabited by extremophilic bacteria and fungi. Kupfershiefer black shale and samples of water, bottom and mineral sediments from the underground (below 600 m) Lubin mine were taken and 20 bacterial strains were isolated and characterized. All exhibited multi-resistant and hypertolerant phenotypes to heavy metals. We analyzed the plasmidome of these strains in order to evaluate the diversity and role of mobile DNA in adaptation to the harsh conditions of the mine environment. Experimental and bioinformatic analyses of 11 extrachromosomal replicons were performed. Three plasmids, including a broad-host-range replicon containing a Tn3 family transposon, carried genes conferring resistance to arsenic, cadmium, cobalt, mercury and zinc. Functional analysis revealed that the resistance modules exhibit host specificity, i.e., they may increase or decrease tolerance to toxic ions depending on the host strain. The other identified replicons showed diverse features. Among them we identified a catabolic plasmid encoding enzymes involved in the utilization of histidine and vanillate, a putative plasmid-like prophage carrying genes responsible for NAD biosynthesis, and two repABC-type plasmids containing virulence-associated genes. These findings provide an unique molecular insight into the pool of extrachromosomal replicons and highlight their role in the biology and adaptation of extremophilic bacteria inhabiting terrestrial deep subsurface.

  13. Diversity and role of plasmids in adaptation of bacteria inhabiting the Lubin copper mine in Poland, an environment rich in heavy metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukasz eDziewit

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Lubin underground mine, is one of three mining divisions in the Lubin-Glogow Copper District in Lower Silesia province (Poland. It is the source of polymetallic ore that is rich in copper, silver and several heavy metals. Black shale is also significantly enriched in fossil organic matter in the form of long-chain hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, organic acids, esters, thiophenes and metalloporphyrins. Biological analyses have revealed that this environment is inhabited by extremophilic bacteria and fungi. Kupfershiefer black shale and samples of water, bottom and mineral sediments from the underground (below 600 m Lubin mine were taken and twenty bacterial strains were isolated and characterized. All exhibited multi-resistant and hypertolerant phenotypes to heavy metals. We analyzed the plasmidome of these strains in order to evaluate the diversity and role of mobile DNA in adaptation to the harsh conditions of the mine environment. Experimental and bioinformatic analyses of 11 extrachromosomal replicons were performed. Three plasmids, including a broad-host-range replicon containing a Tn3 family transposon, carried genes conferring resistance to arsenic, cadmium, cobalt, mercury and zinc. Functional analysis revealed that the resistance modules exhibit host specificity, i.e. they may increase or decrease tolerance to toxic ions depending on the host strain. The other identified replicons showed diverse features. Among them we identified a catabolic plasmid encoding enzymes involved in the utilization of histidine and vanillate, a putative plasmid-like prophage carrying genes responsible for NAD biosynthesis, and two repABC-type plasmids containing virulence-associated genes. These findings provide an unique molecular insight into the pool of extrachromosomal replicons and highlight their role in the biology and adaptation of extremophilic bacteria inhabiting terrestrial deep subsurface.

  14. Diversity and role of plasmids in adaptation of bacteria inhabiting the Lubin copper mine in Poland, an environment rich in heavy metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziewit, Lukasz; Pyzik, Adam; Szuplewska, Magdalena; Matlakowska, Renata; Mielnicki, Sebastian; Wibberg, Daniel; Schlüter, Andreas; Pühler, Alfred; Bartosik, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    The Lubin underground mine, is one of three mining divisions in the Lubin-Glogow Copper District in Lower Silesia province (Poland). It is the source of polymetallic ore that is rich in copper, silver and several heavy metals. Black shale is also significantly enriched in fossil organic matter in the form of long-chain hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, organic acids, esters, thiophenes and metalloporphyrins. Biological analyses have revealed that this environment is inhabited by extremophilic bacteria and fungi. Kupfershiefer black shale and samples of water, bottom and mineral sediments from the underground (below 600 m) Lubin mine were taken and 20 bacterial strains were isolated and characterized. All exhibited multi-resistant and hypertolerant phenotypes to heavy metals. We analyzed the plasmidome of these strains in order to evaluate the diversity and role of mobile DNA in adaptation to the harsh conditions of the mine environment. Experimental and bioinformatic analyses of 11 extrachromosomal replicons were performed. Three plasmids, including a broad-host-range replicon containing a Tn3 family transposon, carried genes conferring resistance to arsenic, cadmium, cobalt, mercury and zinc. Functional analysis revealed that the resistance modules exhibit host specificity, i.e., they may increase or decrease tolerance to toxic ions depending on the host strain. The other identified replicons showed diverse features. Among them we identified a catabolic plasmid encoding enzymes involved in the utilization of histidine and vanillate, a putative plasmid-like prophage carrying genes responsible for NAD biosynthesis, and two repABC-type plasmids containing virulence-associated genes. These findings provide an unique molecular insight into the pool of extrachromosomal replicons and highlight their role in the biology and adaptation of extremophilic bacteria inhabiting terrestrial deep subsurface. PMID:26074880

  15. Phenylalanine induces Burkholderia cenocepacia phenylacetic acid catabolism through degradation to phenylacetyl-CoA in synthetic cystic fibrosis sputum medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudistira, Harry; McClarty, Leigh; Bloodworth, Ruhi A M; Hammond, Sydney A; Butcher, Haley; Mark, Brian L; Cardona, Silvia T

    2011-09-01

    Synthetic cystic fibrosis sputum medium (SCFM) is rich in amino acids and supports robust growth of Burkholderia cenocepacia, a member of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc). Previous work demonstrated that B. cenocepacia phenylacetic acid (PA) catabolic genes are up-regulated during growth in SCFM and are required for full virulence in a Caenorhabditis elegans host model. In this work, we investigated the role of phenylalanine, one of the aromatic amino acids present in SCFM, as an inducer of the PA catabolic pathway. Phenylalanine degradation intermediates were used as sole carbon sources for growth and gene reporter experiments. In addition to phenylalanine and PA, phenylethylamine, phenylpyruvate, and 2-phenylacetamide were usable as sole carbon sources by wild type B. cenocepacia K56-2, but not by a PA catabolism-defective mutant. EMSA analysis showed that the binding of PaaR, the negative regulator protein of B. cenocepacia PA catabolism, to PA regulatory DNA could only be relieved by phenylacetyl-Coenzyme A (PA-CoA), but not by any of the putative phenylalanine degradation intermediates. Taken together, our results show that in B. cenocepacia, phenylalanine is catabolized to PA and induces PA catabolism through PA activation to PA-CoA. Thus, PaaR shares the same inducer with PaaX, the regulator of PA catabolism in Escherichia coli, despite belonging to a different protein family.

  16. Effect of Plasmid Incompatibility on DNA Transfer to Streptococcus cremoris

    OpenAIRE

    Van Der Lelie, Daniel; Vossen, Jos M.B.M. van der; Venema, Gerard

    1988-01-01

    Several Streptococcus cremoris strains were used in protoplast transformation and interspecific protoplast fusion experiments with Streptococcus lactis and Bacillus subtilis, with pGKV110, pGKV21, and ΔpAMβ1 as the marker plasmids. ΔpAMβ1 is a 15.9-kilobase nonconjugative, deletion derivative of pAMβ1, which is considerably larger than the pGKV plasmids (approximately 4.5 kilobases). In general, ΔpAMβ1 was transferred more efficiently than the pGKV plasmids. Using electroporation, we were abl...

  17. [Epidemiologic study of 2 S. typhimurium outbreaks using plasmid fingerprints].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, A; Breer, C; Schopfer, K

    1989-04-05

    An outbreak of salmonellosis in an old people's home is reported. The infectious agent, S. typhi-murium, was isolated not only from several inmates but also from sick cows of the farm belonging to the home, in animal feed, from employees of the local butcher's shop, and finally in sludge from the local sewage plant. Plasmid analysis provided evidence of a common origin for the isolated S. typhi-murium strains. The incriminated strains harboured, together with two low-molecular-weight plasmids, a plasmid of approximately 50 Mdal, which was also demonstrated in some other S. typhi-murium strains isolated from clinical cases in the area around St. Gallen.

  18. Plasmid-determined resistance to fosfomycin in Serratia marcescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, C; Garcia, J M; Llaneza, J; Mendez, F J; Hardisson, C; Ortiz, J M

    1980-08-01

    Multiple-antibiotic-resistant strains of Serratia marcescens isolated from hospitalized patients were examined for their ability to transfer antibiotic resistance to Escherichia coli by conjugation. Two different patterns of linked transferable resistance were found among the transconjugants. The first comprised resistance to carbenicillin, streptomycin, and fosfomycin; the second, and more common, pattern included resistance to carbenicillin, streptomycin, kanamycin, gentamicin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, sulfonamide, and fosfomycin. The two types of transconjugant strains carried a single plasmid of either 57 or 97 megadaltons in size. Both of these plasmids are present in parental S. marcescens strains resistant to fosfomycin. The 57-megadalton plasmid was transformed into E. coli.

  19. Influenza Plasmid DNA Vaccines: Progress and Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicho, Diana; Queiroz, João António; Tomaz, Cândida Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    Current influenza vaccines have long been used to fight flu infectious; however, recent advances highlight the importance of produce new alternatives. Even though traditional influenza vaccines are safe and usually effective, they need to be uploaded every year to anticipate circulating flu viruses. This limitation together with the use of embryonated chicken eggs as the substrate for vaccine production, is time-consuming and could involve potential biohazards in growth of new virus strains. Plasmid DNA produced by prokaryote microorganisms and encoding foreign proteins had emerged as a promising therapeutic tool. This technology allows the expression of a gene of interest by eukaryotic cells in order to induce protective immune responses against the pathogen of interest. In this review, we discuss the strategies to choose the best DNA vaccine to be applied in the treatment and prevention of influenza. Specifically, we give an update of influenza DNA vaccines developments, all involved techniques, their main characteristics, applicability and technical features to obtain the best option against influenza infections.

  20. Construction and Identification of Plasmid pTA-TUB2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    An about 1.40 Kb target gene fragment was yielded by PCR amplification with the plasmid pRB 129,which was identified by restriction enzyme digestion that the PCR product was TU B2 gene.The gene was digested by the restriction enzyme and was linked with pTA plasmid to construct pTA-TU B2 plasmid.The plasmid was transformed into Chaetomium spp.by PEG method and the transformation rate was 27/(2×105) and it is nine times higher than that of pRB 129.The transformants can grow on the PDA containing 1 000 μg*mL-1 carbendazim,which is 1 000 times higher than the original Chaetomium spp.The resistance was stable after 10 times transfer on non-selective medium.

  1. Mechanisms of Evolution in High-Consequence Drug Resistance Plasmids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susu He

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The dissemination of resistance among bacteria has been facilitated by the fact that resistance genes are usually located on a diverse and evolving set of transmissible plasmids. However, the mechanisms generating diversity and enabling adaptation within highly successful resistance plasmids have remained obscure, despite their profound clinical significance. To understand these mechanisms, we have performed a detailed analysis of the mobilome (the entire mobile genetic element content of a set of previously sequenced carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE from the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center. This analysis revealed that plasmid reorganizations occurring in the natural context of colonization of human hosts were overwhelmingly driven by genetic rearrangements carried out by replicative transposons working in concert with the process of homologous recombination. A more complete understanding of the molecular mechanisms and evolutionary forces driving rearrangements in resistance plasmids may lead to fundamentally new strategies to address the problem of antibiotic resistance.

  2. Amyloid beta-protein and lipid rafts: focused on biogenesis and catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Wataru; Tamaoka, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral accumulation of amyloid β-protein (Aβ) is thought to play a key role in the molecular pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Three secretases (β-, γ-, and α-secretase) are proteases that control the production of Aβ from amyloid precursor protein. Increasing evidence suggests that cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains termed 'lipid rafts' are involved in the biogenesis and accumulation of Aβ as well as Aβ-mediated neurotoxicity. γ-Secretase is enriched in lipid rafts, which are considered an important site for Aβ generation. Additionally, Aβ-degrading peptidases located in lipid rafts, such as neprilysin, appear to play a role in Aβ catabolism. This mini-review focuses on the roles of lipid rafts in the biogenesis and catabolism of Aβ, covering recent research on the relationship between lipid rafts and the three secretases or Aβ-degrading peptidases. Furthermore, the significance of lipid rafts in Aβ aggregation and neurotoxicity is briefly summarized.

  3. Induced superficial chondrocyte death reduces catabolic cartilage damage in murine posttraumatic osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minjie; Mani, Sriniwasan B; He, Yao; Hall, Amber M; Xu, Lin; Li, Yefu; Zurakowski, David; Jay, Gregory D; Warman, Matthew L

    2016-08-01

    Joints that have degenerated as a result of aging or injury contain dead chondrocytes and damaged cartilage. Some studies have suggested that chondrocyte death precedes cartilage damage, but how the loss of chondrocytes affects cartilage integrity is not clear. In this study, we examined whether chondrocyte death undermines cartilage integrity in aging and injury using a rapid 3D confocal cartilage imaging technique coupled with standard histology. We induced autonomous expression of diphtheria toxin to kill articular surface chondrocytes in mice and determined that chondrocyte death did not lead to cartilage damage. Moreover, cartilage damage after surgical destabilization of the medial meniscus of the knee was increased in mice with intact chondrocytes compared with animals whose chondrocytes had been killed, suggesting that chondrocyte death does not drive cartilage damage in response to injury. These data imply that chondrocyte catabolism, not death, contributes to articular cartilage damage following injury. Therefore, therapies targeted at reducing the catabolic phenotype may protect against degenerative joint disease.

  4. Invasive Acacia longifolia induce changes in the microbial catabolic diversity of sand dunes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marchante, Elizabete; Kjøller, Annelise; Struwe, Sten

    2008-01-01

    of invasion, carbon (C) content, nitrogen (N) content, C/N ratio, pH, and litter quantity explained 39.6% of the variance of catabolic responses. It is concluded that invasion by A. longifolia has substantial effects on the catabolic diversity of the soil microbial communities. These effects may have wider......Acacia longifolia is one of the main plant species invading Portuguese dune ecosystems. Areas invaded by this exotic tree have reduced plant diversity and altered soil microbial processes and nutrient pools, but the impacts on microbial functional diversity in the soil have been little explored...... diversity. Five substrate groups were tested: amino acids, carbohydrates, carboxylic acids, plant litters, and plant polymers. CRP clearly discriminated between the three different areas. Respiratory responses to the individual substrates a-ketoglutaric acid, oxalic acid, starch, citric acid, and xylose...

  5. Transfer of conjugative plasmids among bacteria under environmentally relevant conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musovic, Sanin

    at spredningskapacitet af en konjugerbare plasmid, der koder for kviksølv resistens via merA genet, finder sted under substrat begrænsede forhold til syntetisk bakterielt samfund. Plasmid overførsel var meget forhøjet ved kontinuert udsættelse af mikrokosms for en høj koncentration af kviksølv. De forskellige vækstrater...

  6. The Native Plasmid pML21 Plays a Role in Stress Tolerance in Enterococcus faecalis ML21, as Analyzed by Plasmid Curing Using Plasmid Incompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Fang-Lei; Chen, Li-Li; Zeng, Zhu; Feng, Xiu-Juan; Yu, Rui; Lu, Xiao-Ming; Ma, Hui-Qin; Chen, Shang-Wu

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the role of the native plasmid pML21 in Enterococcus faecalis ML21's response to abiotic stresses, the plasmid pML21 was cured based on the principle of plasmid incompatibility and segregational instability, generating E. faecalis mutant strain ML0. The mutant and the wild strains were exposed to abiotic stresses: bile salts, low pH, H2O2, ethanol, heat, and NaCl, and their survival rate was measured. We found that curing of pML21 lead to reduced tolerance to stress in E. faecalis ML0, especially oxidative and osmotic stress. Complementation analysis suggested that the genes from pML21 played different role in stress tolerance. The result indicated that pML21 plays a role in E. faecalis ML21's response to abiotic stresses.

  7. Prediction and Biochemical Demonstration of a Catabolic Pathway for the Osmoprotectant Proline Betaine

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Ritesh; Zhao, Suwen; Vetting, Matthew W.; Wood, B. McKay; Sakai, Ayano; Cho, Kyuil; Solbiati, José; Steven C Almo; Jonathan V Sweedler; Matthew P Jacobson; Gerlt, John A.; Cronan, John E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Through the use of genetic, enzymatic, metabolomic, and structural analyses, we have discovered the catabolic pathway for proline betaine, an osmoprotectant, in Paracoccus denitrificans and Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Genetic and enzymatic analyses showed that several of the key enzymes of the hydroxyproline betaine degradation pathway also function in proline betaine degradation. Metabolomic analyses detected each of the metabolic intermediates of the pathway. The proline betaine catab...

  8. Formaldehyde catabolism is essential in cells deficient for the Fanconi anemia DNA-repair pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado, Ivan V; Langevin, Frédéric; Crossan, Gerry P; Takata, Minoru; Patel, Ketan J

    2011-11-13

    Metabolism is predicted to generate formaldehyde, a toxic, simple, reactive aldehyde that can damage DNA. Here we report a synthetic lethal interaction in avian cells between ADH5, encoding the main formaldehyde-detoxifying enzyme, and the Fanconi anemia (FA) DNA-repair pathway. These results define a fundamental role for the combined action of formaldehyde catabolism and DNA cross-link repair in vertebrate cell survival.

  9. A Program for the Study of Skeletal Muscle Catabolism Following Physical Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-06

    amino acids ( BCAA - leucine, isoleucine, and valine) are the only essential amino acids that are primarily oxidized in skeletal muscle (16). The amino...it is clear that BCAA (primarily leucine) can reduce net protein degradation in vitro, the effect of amino acid formulas supplemented with additional... BCAA on skeletal muscle breakdown in catabolic patients remains controversial. For example, Freund and Cerra have administered solutions containing up

  10. Amino Acid Catabolism in Staphylococcus aureus and the Function of Carbon Catabolite Repression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsey, Cortney R.; Lei, Shulei; Wax, Jacqueline K.; Lehman, Mckenzie K.; Nuxoll, Austin S.; Steinke, Laurey; Sadykov, Marat

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Staphylococcus aureus must rapidly adapt to a variety of carbon and nitrogen sources during invasion of a host. Within a staphylococcal abscess, preferred carbon sources such as glucose are limiting, suggesting that S. aureus survives through the catabolism of secondary carbon sources. S. aureus encodes pathways to catabolize multiple amino acids, including those that generate pyruvate, 2-oxoglutarate, and oxaloacetate. To assess amino acid catabolism, S. aureus JE2 and mutants were grown in complete defined medium containing 18 amino acids but lacking glucose (CDM). A mutation in the gudB gene, coding for glutamate dehydrogenase, which generates 2-oxoglutarate from glutamate, significantly reduced growth in CDM, suggesting that glutamate and those amino acids generating glutamate, particularly proline, serve as the major carbon source in this medium. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies confirmed this supposition. Furthermore, a mutation in the ackA gene, coding for acetate kinase, also abrogated growth of JE2 in CDM, suggesting that ATP production from pyruvate-producing amino acids is also critical for growth. In addition, although a functional respiratory chain was absolutely required for growth, the oxygen consumption rate and intracellular ATP concentration were significantly lower during growth in CDM than during growth in glucose-containing media. Finally, transcriptional analyses demonstrated that expression levels of genes coding for the enzymes that synthesize glutamate from proline, arginine, and histidine are repressed by CcpA and carbon catabolite repression. These data show that pathways important for glutamate catabolism or ATP generation via Pta/AckA are important for growth in niches where glucose is not abundant, such as abscesses within skin and soft tissue infections. PMID:28196956

  11. Plasmid copy number noise in monoclonal populations of bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong Ng, Jérôme; Chatenay, Didier; Robert, Jérôme; Poirier, Michael Guy

    2010-01-01

    Plasmids are extra chromosomal DNA that can confer to their hosts’ supplementary characteristics such as antibiotic resistance. Plasmids code for their copy number through their own replication frequency. Even though the biochemical networks underlying the plasmid copy number (PCN) regulation processes have been studied and modeled, no measurement of the heterogeneity in PCN within a whole population has been done. We have developed a fluorescent-based measurement system, which enables determination of the mean and noise in PCN within a monoclonal population of bacteria. Two different fluorescent protein reporters were inserted: one on the chromosome and the other on the plasmid. The fluorescence of these bacteria was measured with a microfluidic flow cytometry device. We show that our measurements are consistent with known plasmid characteristics. We find that the partitioning system lowers the PCN mean and standard deviation. Finally, bacterial populations were allowed to grow without selective pressure. In this case, we were able to determine the plasmid loss rate and growth inhibition effect.

  12. Construction and Use of Flow Cytometry Optimized Plasmid-Sensor Strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahl, Martin Iain; Oregaard, Gunnar; Sørensen, Søren Johannes;

    2009-01-01

    stability of the plasmid is high. The method presented here relies on a phenotypic (green fluorescence protein) marker, which is switched on if the host bacteria loses the residing plasmid. The incorporation of flow cytometry for single-cell detection and discrimination between plasmid-free and plasmid...

  13. Effects of Zinc Magnesium Aspartate (ZMA Supplementation on Training Adaptations and Markers of Anabolism and Catabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almada Anthony

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study examined whether supplementing the diet with a commercial supplement containing zinc magnesium aspartate (ZMA during training affects zinc and magnesium status, anabolic and catabolic hormone profiles, and/or training adaptations. Forty-two resistance trained males (27 ± 9 yrs; 178 ± 8 cm, 85 ± 15 kg, 18.6 ± 6% body fat were matched according to fat free mass and randomly assigned to ingest in a double blind manner either a dextrose placebo (P or ZMA 30–60 minutes prior to going to sleep during 8-weeks of standardized resistance-training. Subjects completed testing sessions at 0, 4, and 8 weeks that included body composition assessment as determined by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, 1-RM and muscular endurance tests on the bench and leg press, a Wingate anaerobic power test, and blood analysis to assess anabolic/catabolic status as well as markers of health. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA. Results indicated that ZMA supplementation non-significantly increased serum zinc levels by 11 – 17% (p = 0.12. However, no significant differences were observed between groups in anabolic or catabolic hormone status, body composition, 1-RM bench press and leg press, upper or lower body muscular endurance, or cycling anaerobic capacity. Results indicate that ZMA supplementation during training does not appear to enhance training adaptations in resistance trained populations.

  14. Enzyme IIANtr Regulates Salmonella Invasion Via 1,2-Propanediol And Propionate Catabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Woongjae; Kim, Dajeong; Yoon, Hyunjin; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2017-01-01

    Many Proteobacteria possess a nitrogen-metabolic phosphotransferase system (PTSNtr) consisting of EINtr, NPr, and EIIANtr (encoded by ptsP, ptsO, and ptsN, respectively). The PTSNtr plays diverse regulatory roles, but the substrate phosphorylated by EIIANtr and its primary functions have not yet been identified. To comprehensively understand the roles of PTSNtr in Salmonella Typhimurium, we compared the whole transcriptomes of wild-type and a ΔptsN mutant. Genome-wide RNA sequencing revealed that 3.5% of the annotated genes were up- or down-regulated by three-fold or more in the absence of EIIANtr. The ΔptsN mutant significantly down-regulated the expression of genes involved in vitamin B12 synthesis, 1,2-propanediol utilization, and propionate catabolism. Moreover, the invasiveness of the ΔptsN mutant increased about 5-fold when 1,2-propanediol or propionate was added, which was attributable to the increased stability of HilD, the transcriptional regulator of Salmonella pathogenicity island-1. Interestingly, an abundance of 1,2-propanediol or propionate promoted the production of EIIANtr, suggesting the possibility of a positive feedback loop between EIIANtr and two catabolic pathways. These results demonstrate that EIIANtr is a key factor for the utilization of 1,2-propanediol and propionate as carbon and energy sources, and thereby modulates the invasiveness of Salmonella via 1,2-propanediol or propionate catabolism. PMID:28333132

  15. Exercise promotes BCAA catabolism: effects of BCAA supplementation on skeletal muscle during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimomura, Yoshiharu; Murakami, Taro; Nakai, Naoya; Nagasaki, Masaru; Harris, Robert A

    2004-06-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are essential amino acids that can be oxidized in skeletal muscle. It is known that BCAA oxidation is promoted by exercise. The mechanism responsible for this phenomenon is attributed to activation of the branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKDH) complex, which catalyzes the second-step reaction of the BCAA catabolic pathway and is the rate-limiting enzyme in the pathway. This enzyme complex is regulated by a phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle. The BCKDH kinase is responsible for inactivation of the complex by phosphorylation, and the activity of the kinase is inversely correlated with the activity state of the BCKDH complex, which suggests that the kinase is the primary regulator of the complex. We found recently that administration of ligands for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARalpha) in rats caused activation of the hepatic BCKDH complex in association with a decrease in the kinase activity, which suggests that promotion of fatty acid oxidation upregulates the BCAA catabolism. Long-chain fatty acids are ligands for PPARalpha, and the fatty acid oxidation is promoted by several physiological conditions including exercise. These findings suggest that fatty acids may be one of the regulators of BCAA catabolism and that the BCAA requirement is increased by exercise. Furthermore, BCAA supplementation before and after exercise has beneficial effects for decreasing exercise-induced muscle damage and promoting muscle-protein synthesis; this suggests the possibility that BCAAs are a useful supplement in relation to exercise and sports.

  16. Adaptation of phenylalanine and tyrosine catabolic pathway to hibernation in bats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hsuan Pan

    Full Text Available Some mammals hibernate in response to harsh environments. Although hibernating mammals may metabolize proteins, the nitrogen metabolic pathways commonly activated during hibernation are not fully characterized. In contrast to the hypothesis of amino acid preservation, we found evidence of amino acid metabolism as three of five key enzymes, including phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH, homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase (HGD, fumarylacetoacetase (FAH, involved in phenylalanine and tyrosine catabolism were co-upregulated during hibernation in two distantly related species of bats, Myotis ricketti and Rhinolophus ferrumequinum. In addition, the levels of phenylalanine in the livers of these bats were significantly decreased during hibernation. Because phenylalanine and tyrosine are both glucogenic and ketogenic, these results indicate the role of this catabolic pathway in energy supply. Since any deficiency in the catabolism of these two amino acids can cause accumulations of toxic metabolites, these results also suggest the detoxification role of these enzymes during hibernation. A higher selective constraint on PAH, HPD, and HGD in hibernators than in non-hibernators was observed, and hibernators had more conserved amino acid residues in each of these enzymes than non-hibernators. These conserved amino acid residues are mostly located in positions critical for the structure and activity of the enzymes. Taken together, results of this work provide novel insights in nitrogen metabolism and removal of harmful metabolites during bat hibernation.

  17. Plant-bacteria partnership: phytoremediation of hydrocarbons contaminated soil and expression of catabolic genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamna Saleem

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum hydrocarbons are harmful to living organisms when they are exposed in natural environment. Once they come in contact, it is not an easy to remove them because many of their constituents are persistent in nature. To achieve this target, different approaches have been exploited by using plants, bacteria, and plant-bacteria together. Among them, combined use of plants and bacteria has gained tremendous attention as bacteria possess set of catabolic genes which produce catabolic enzymes to decontaminate hydrocarbons. In return, plant ooze out root exudates containing nutrients and necessary metabolites which facilitate the microbial colonization in plant rhizosphere. This results into high gene abundance and gene expression in the rhizosphere and, thus, leads to enhanced degradation. Moreover, high proportions of beneficial bacteria helps plant to gain more biomass due to their plant growth promoting activities and production of phytohromones. This review focuses functioning and mechanisms of catabolic genes responsible for degradation of straight chain and aromatic hydrocarbons with their potential of degradation in bioremediation. With the understanding of expression mechanisms, rate of degradation can be enhanced by adjusting environmental factors and acclimatizing plant associated bacteria in plant rhizosphere.

  18. Sesamin inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation and extracellular matrix catabolism in rat intervertebral disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kang; Li, Yan; Xu, Bo; Mao, Lu; Zhao, Jie

    2016-09-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration contributes to most spinal degenerative diseases, while treatment inhibiting IVD degeneration is still in the experimental stage. Sesamin, a bioactive component extracted from sesame, has been reported to exert chondroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects. Here, we analyzed the anti-inflammatory and anti-catabolic effects of sesamin on rat IVD in vitro and ex vivo. Results show that sesamin significantly inhibits the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced expression of catabolic enzymes (MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-13, ADAMTS-4, ADAMTS-5) and inflammation factors (IL-1β, TNF-α, iNOS, NO, COX-2, PGE2) in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. It is also proven that migration of macrophages induced by LPS can be inhibited by treatment with sesamin. Organ culture experiments demonstrate that sesamin protects the IVD from LPS-induced depletion of the extracellular matrix ex vivo. Moreover, sesamin suppresses LPS-induced activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway through inhibiting phosphorylation of JNK, the common downstream signaling pathway of LPS and IL-1β, which may be the potential mechanism of the effects of sesamin. In light of our results, sesamin protects the IVD from inflammation and extracellular matrix catabolism, presenting positive prospects in the treatment of IVD degenerative diseases.

  19. The effect of CreA in glucose and xylose catabolism in Aspergillus nidulans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prathumpai, Wai; Mcintyre, Mhairi; Nielsen, Jens

    2004-01-01

    The catabolism of glucose and xylose was studied in a wild type and creA deleted (carbon catabolite de-repressed) strain of Aspergillus nidulans. Both strains were cultivated in bioreactors with either glucose or xylose as the sole carbon source, or in the presence of both sugars. In the cultivat......The catabolism of glucose and xylose was studied in a wild type and creA deleted (carbon catabolite de-repressed) strain of Aspergillus nidulans. Both strains were cultivated in bioreactors with either glucose or xylose as the sole carbon source, or in the presence of both sugars...... of key enzymes in the xylose utilisation pathway revealed that xylose metabolism was occurring in the creA deleted strain, even at high glucose concentrations. Conversely, in the wild type strain, activities of the key enzymes for xylose metabolism increased only when the effects of glucose repression...... had been relieved. Xylose was both a repressor and an inducer of xylanases at the same time. The creA mutation seemed to have pleiotropic effects on carbohydratases and carbon catabolism....

  20. Salicylic acid 3-hydroxylase regulates Arabidopsis leaf longevity by mediating salicylic acid catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kewei; Halitschke, Rayko; Yin, Changxi; Liu, Chang-Jun; Gan, Su-Sheng

    2013-09-01

    The plant hormone salicylic acid (SA) plays critical roles in plant defense, stress responses, and senescence. Although SA biosynthesis is well understood, the pathways by which SA is catabolized remain elusive. Here we report the identification and characterization of an SA 3-hydroxylase (S3H) involved in SA catabolism during leaf senescence. S3H is associated with senescence and is inducible by SA and is thus a key part of a negative feedback regulation system of SA levels during senescence. The enzyme converts SA (with a Km of 58.29 µM) to both 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,3-DHBA) and 2,5-DHBA in vitro but only 2,3-DHBA in vivo. The s3h knockout mutants fail to produce 2,3-DHBA sugar conjugates, accumulate very high levels of SA and its sugar conjugates, and exhibit a precocious senescence phenotype. Conversely, the gain-of-function lines contain high levels of 2,3-DHBA sugar conjugates and extremely low levels of SA and its sugar conjugates and display a significantly extended leaf longevity. This research reveals an elegant SA catabolic mechanism by which plants regulate SA levels by converting it to 2,3-DHBA to prevent SA overaccumulation. The research also provides strong molecular genetic evidence for an important role of SA in regulating the onset and rate of leaf senescence.

  1. Novel Route for Agmatine Catabolism in Aspergillus niger Involves 4-Guanidinobutyrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunil; Saragadam, Tejaswani; Punekar, Narayan S

    2015-08-15

    Agmatine, a significant polyamine in bacteria and plants, mostly arises from the decarboxylation of arginine. The functional importance of agmatine in fungi is poorly understood. The metabolism of agmatine and related guanidinium group-containing compounds in Aspergillus niger was explored through growth, metabolite, and enzyme studies. The fungus was able to metabolize and grow on l-arginine, agmatine, or 4-guanidinobutyrate as the sole nitrogen source. Whereas arginase defined the only route for arginine catabolism, biochemical and bioinformatics approaches suggested the absence of arginine decarboxylase in A. niger. Efficient utilization by the parent strain and also by its arginase knockout implied an arginase-independent catabolic route for agmatine. Urea and 4-guanidinobutyrate were detected in the spent medium during growth on agmatine. The agmatine-grown A. niger mycelia contained significant levels of amine oxidase, 4-guanidinobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase, 4-guanidinobutyrase (GBase), and succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase, but no agmatinase activity was detected. Taken together, the results support a novel route for agmatine utilization in A. niger. The catabolism of agmatine by way of 4-guanidinobutyrate to 4-aminobutyrate into the Krebs cycle is the first report of such a pathway in any organism. A. niger GBase peptide fragments were identified by tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The corresponding open reading frame from the A. niger NCIM 565 genome was located and cloned. Subsequent expression of GBase in both Escherichia coli and A. niger along with its disruption in A. niger functionally defined the GBase locus (gbu) in the A. niger genome.

  2. Increased glutamine catabolism mediates bone anabolism in response to WNT signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karner, Courtney M; Esen, Emel; Okunade, Adewole L; Patterson, Bruce W; Long, Fanxin

    2015-02-01

    WNT signaling stimulates bone formation by increasing both the number of osteoblasts and their protein-synthesis activity. It is not clear how WNT augments the capacity of osteoblast progenitors to meet the increased energetic and synthetic needs associated with mature osteoblasts. Here, in cultured osteoblast progenitors, we determined that WNT stimulates glutamine catabolism through the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and consequently lowers intracellular glutamine levels. The WNT-induced reduction of glutamine concentration triggered a general control nonderepressible 2-mediated (GCN2-mediated) integrated stress response (ISR) that stimulated expression of genes responsible for amino acid supply, transfer RNA (tRNA) aminoacylation, and protein folding. WNT-induced glutamine catabolism and ISR were β-catenin independent, but required mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activation. In a hyperactive WNT signaling mouse model of human osteosclerosis, inhibition of glutamine catabolism or Gcn2 deletion suppressed excessive bone formation. Together, our data indicate that glutamine is both an energy source and a protein-translation rheostat that is responsive to WNT and suggest that manipulation of the glutamine/GCN2 signaling axis may provide a valuable approach for normalizing deranged protein anabolism associated with human diseases.

  3. SKN-1 and Nrf2 couples proline catabolism with lipid metabolism during nutrient deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Shanshan; Lynn, Dana A; Lo, Jacqueline Y; Paek, Jennifer; Curran, Sean P

    2014-10-06

    Mechanisms that coordinate different metabolic pathways, such as glucose and lipid, have been recognized. However, a potential interaction between amino acid and lipid metabolism remains largely elusive. Here we show that during starvation of Caenorhabditis elegans, proline catabolism is coupled with lipid metabolism by SKN-1. Mutation of alh-6, a conserved proline catabolic enzyme, accelerates fat mobilization, enhances the expression of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation and reduces survival in response to fasting. This metabolic coordination is mediated by the activation of the transcription factor SKN-1/Nrf2, possibly due to the accumulation of the alh-6 substrate P5C, and also requires the transcriptional co-regulator MDT-15. Constitutive activation of SKN-1 induces a similar transcriptional response, which protects animals from fat accumulation when fed a high carbohydrate diet. In human cells, an orthologous alh-6 enzyme, ALDH4A1, is also linked to the activity of Nrf2, the human orthologue of SKN-1, and regulates the expression of lipid metabolic genes. Our findings identify a link between proline catabolism and lipid metabolism, and uncover a physiological role for SKN-1 in metabolism.

  4. Polyamine catabolism is involved in response to salt stress in soybean hypocotyls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campestre, María Paula; Bordenave, Cesar Daniel; Origone, Andrea Cecilia; Menéndez, Ana Bernardina; Ruiz, Oscar Adolfo; Rodríguez, Andrés Alberto; Maiale, Santiago Javier

    2011-07-15

    The possible relationship between polyamine catabolism mediated by copper-containing amine oxidase and the elongation of soybean hypocotyls from plants exposed to NaCl has been studied. Salt treatment reduced values of all hypocotyl growth parameters. In vitro, copper-containing amine oxidase activity was up to 77-fold higher than that of polyamine oxidase. This enzyme preferred cadaverine over putrescine and it was active even under the saline condition. On the other hand, saline stress increased spermine and cadaverine levels, and the in vivo copper-containing amine oxidase activity in the elongation zone of hypocotyls. The last effect was negatively modulated by the addition of the copper-containing amine oxidase inhibitor N,N'-diaminoguanidine. In turn, plants treated with the inhibitor showed a significant reduction of reactive oxygen species in the elongation zone, even in the saline situation. In addition, plants grown in cadaverine-amended culture medium showed increased hypocotyl length either in saline or control conditions and this effect was also abolished by N,N'-diaminoguanidine. Taken together, our results suggest that the activity of the copper-containing amine oxidase may be partially contributing to hypocotyl growth under saline stress, through the production of hydrogen peroxide by polyamine catabolism and reinforce the importance of polyamine catabolism and hydrogen peroxide production in the induction of salt tolerance in plants.

  5. Adaptation of phenylalanine and tyrosine catabolic pathway to hibernation in bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yi-Hsuan; Zhang, Yijian; Cui, Jie; Liu, Yang; McAllan, Bronwyn M; Liao, Chen-Chung; Zhang, Shuyi

    2013-01-01

    Some mammals hibernate in response to harsh environments. Although hibernating mammals may metabolize proteins, the nitrogen metabolic pathways commonly activated during hibernation are not fully characterized. In contrast to the hypothesis of amino acid preservation, we found evidence of amino acid metabolism as three of five key enzymes, including phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH), homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase (HGD), fumarylacetoacetase (FAH), involved in phenylalanine and tyrosine catabolism were co-upregulated during hibernation in two distantly related species of bats, Myotis ricketti and Rhinolophus ferrumequinum. In addition, the levels of phenylalanine in the livers of these bats were significantly decreased during hibernation. Because phenylalanine and tyrosine are both glucogenic and ketogenic, these results indicate the role of this catabolic pathway in energy supply. Since any deficiency in the catabolism of these two amino acids can cause accumulations of toxic metabolites, these results also suggest the detoxification role of these enzymes during hibernation. A higher selective constraint on PAH, HPD, and HGD in hibernators than in non-hibernators was observed, and hibernators had more conserved amino acid residues in each of these enzymes than non-hibernators. These conserved amino acid residues are mostly located in positions critical for the structure and activity of the enzymes. Taken together, results of this work provide novel insights in nitrogen metabolism and removal of harmful metabolites during bat hibernation.

  6. Simple generic model for dynamic experiments with Saccharomyces cerevisiae in continuous culture. Decoupling between anabolism and catabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duboc, Philippe Jean; von Stockar, U.; Villadsen, John

    1998-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of a continuous culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae subjected to a sudden increase in the dilution rate has been successfully modelled for anaerobic growth on glucose, and for aerobic growth on acetate, on ethanol, and on glucose. The catabolism responded by an immediate jump...... whereas biosynthesis did not. Thus catabolism was in excess to anabolism. The model considers the decoupling between biosynthesis and catabolism, both types of reactions being modelled by first-order kinetic expressions evolving towards maximal values. Yield parameters and maximal reaction rates were...... identified in steady state continuous cultures or during batch experiments. Only the time constant of biosynthesis regeneration, tau(x), and the time constant of catabolic capacity regeneration, tau(cat), had to be identified during transient experiments. In most experiments 7, was around 3 h, and tau...

  7. The influence of environmental parameters on the catabolism of branched-chain amino acids by Staphylococcus xylosus and Staphylococcus carnosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Pelle Thonning; Stahnke, Louise Heller

    2004-01-01

    detection (GC/FID). Main volatile catabolic products of leucine, isoleucine and valine were 3-methylbutanoic, 2-methylbutanoic and 2-methylpropanoic acids, respectively. The generation of branched flavour compounds was influenced significantly by most of the investigated environmental parameters...

  8. Allelopathy of plasmid-bearing and plasmid-free organisms competing for two complementary resources in a chemostat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Joydeb; Smith, Hal L; Pal, Samares

    2012-01-01

    We consider a model of competition between plasmid-bearing and plasmid-free organisms for two complementary nutrients in a chemostat. We assume that the plasmid-bearing organism produces an allelopathic agent at the cost of its reproductive abilities which is lethal to plasmid-free organism. Our analysis leads to different thresholds in terms of the model parameters acting as conditions under which the organisms associated with the system cannot thrive even in the absence of competition. Local stability of the system is obtained in the absence of one or both the organisms. Also, global stability of the system is obtained in the presence of both the organisms. Computer simulations have been carried out to illustrate various analytical results.

  9. The phn Genes of Burkholderia sp. Strain RP007 Constitute a Divergent Gene Cluster for Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Catabolism

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    Cloning and molecular ecological studies have underestimated the diversity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) catabolic genes by emphasizing classical nah-like (nah, ndo, pah, and dox) sequences. Here we report the description of a divergent set of PAH catabolic genes, the phn genes, which although isofunctional to the classical nah-like genes, show very low homology. This phn locus, which contains nine open reading frames (ORFs), was isolated on an 11.5-kb HindIII fragment from phenant...

  10. Transfer of a Catabolic Pathway for Chloromethane in Methylobacterium Strains Highlights Different Limitations for Growth with Chloromethane or with Dichloromethane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Michener

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Chloromethane is an ozone-depleting gas, produced predominantly from natural sources, that provides an important carbon source for microbes capable of consuming it. Chloromethane catabolism has been difficult to study owing to the challenging genetics of its native microbial hosts. Since the pathways for chloromethane catabolism show evidence of horizontal gene transfer, we reproduced this transfer process in the laboratory to generate new chloromethane-catabolizing strains in tractable hosts. We demonstrate that six putative accessory genes improve chloromethane catabolism, though heterologous expression of only one of the six is strictly necessary for growth on chloromethane. In contrast to growth of Methylobacterium strains with the closely-related compound dichloromethane, we find that chloride export does not limit growth on chloromethane and, in general, that the ability of a strain to grow on dichloromethane is uncorrelated with its ability to grow on chloromethane. This heterologous expression system allows us to investigate the components required for effective chloromethane catabolism and the factors that limit effective catabolism after horizontal transfer.

  11. Altered Murine Tissue Colonization by Borrelia burgdorferi following Targeted Deletion of Linear Plasmid 17-Carried Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Casselli, Timothy; Tourand, Yvonne; Bankhead, Troy

    2012-01-01

    The causative agent of Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, possesses a segmented genome comprised of a single linear chromosome and upwards of 23 linear and circular plasmids. Much of what is known about plasmid-borne genes comes from studying laboratory clones that have spontaneously lost one or more plasmids during in vitro passage. Some plasmids, including the linear plasmid lp17, are never or rarely reported to be lost during routine culture; therefore, little is known about the requireme...

  12. Plasmids and rickettsial evolution: insight from Rickettsia felis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph J Gillespie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The genome sequence of Rickettsia felis revealed a number of rickettsial genetic anomalies that likely contribute not only to a large genome size relative to other rickettsiae, but also to phenotypic oddities that have confounded the categorization of R. felis as either typhus group (TG or spotted fever group (SFG rickettsiae. Most intriguing was the first report from rickettsiae of a conjugative plasmid (pRF that contains 68 putative open reading frames, several of which are predicted to encode proteins with high similarity to conjugative machinery in other plasmid-containing bacteria. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using phylogeny estimation, we determined the mode of inheritance of pRF genes relative to conserved rickettsial chromosomal genes. Phylogenies of chromosomal genes were in agreement with other published rickettsial trees. However, phylogenies including pRF genes yielded different topologies and suggest a close relationship between pRF and ancestral group (AG rickettsiae, including the recently completed genome of R. bellii str. RML369-C. This relatedness is further supported by the distribution of pRF genes across other rickettsiae, as 10 pRF genes (or inactive derivatives also occur in AG (but not SFG rickettsiae, with five of these genes characteristic of typical plasmids. Detailed characterization of pRF genes resulted in two novel findings: the identification of oriV and replication termination regions, and the likelihood that a second proposed plasmid, pRFdelta, is an artifact of the original genome assembly. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Altogether, we propose a new rickettsial classification scheme with the addition of a fourth lineage, transitional group (TRG rickettsiae, that is unique from TG and SFG rickettsiae and harbors genes from possible exchanges with AG rickettsiae via conjugation. We offer insight into the evolution of a plastic plasmid system in rickettsiae, including the role plasmids may have played in

  13. Proteomic characterization of plasmid pLA1 for biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the marine bacterium, Novosphingobium pentaromativorans US6-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Sung Ho; Choi, Chi-Won; Lee, Sang-Yeop; Lee, Yeol Gyun; Kwon, Joseph; Leem, Sun Hee; Chung, Young Ho; Kahng, Hyung-Yeel; Kim, Sang Jin; Kwon, Kae Kyoung; Kim, Seung Il

    2014-01-01

    Novosphingobium pentaromativorans US6-1 is a halophilic marine bacterium able to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Genome sequence analysis revealed that the large plasmid pLA1 present in N. pentaromativorans US6-1 consists of 199 ORFs and possess putative biodegradation genes that may be involved in PAH degradation. 1-DE/LC-MS/MS analysis of N. pentaromativorans US6-1 cultured in the presence of different PAHs and monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs) identified approximately 1,000 and 1,400 proteins, respectively. Up-regulated biodegradation enzymes, including those belonging to pLA1, were quantitatively compared. Among the PAHs, phenanthrene induced the strongest up-regulation of extradiol cleavage pathway enzymes such as ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase, putative biphenyl-2,3-diol 1,2-dioxygenase, and catechol 2,3-dioxygenase in pLA1. These enzymes lead the initial step of the lower catabolic pathway of aromatic hydrocarbons through the extradiol cleavage pathway and participate in the attack of PAH ring cleavage, respectively. However, N. pentaromativorans US6-1 cultured with p-hydroxybenzoate induced activation of another extradiol cleavage pathway, the protocatechuate 4,5-dioxygenase pathway, that originated from chromosomal genes. These results suggest that N. pentaromativorans US6-1 utilizes two different extradiol pathways and plasmid pLA1 might play a key role in the biodegradation of PAH in N. pentaromativorans US6-1.

  14. Proteomic characterization of plasmid pLA1 for biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the marine bacterium, Novosphingobium pentaromativorans US6-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Ho Yun

    Full Text Available Novosphingobium pentaromativorans US6-1 is a halophilic marine bacterium able to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs. Genome sequence analysis revealed that the large plasmid pLA1 present in N. pentaromativorans US6-1 consists of 199 ORFs and possess putative biodegradation genes that may be involved in PAH degradation. 1-DE/LC-MS/MS analysis of N. pentaromativorans US6-1 cultured in the presence of different PAHs and monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs identified approximately 1,000 and 1,400 proteins, respectively. Up-regulated biodegradation enzymes, including those belonging to pLA1, were quantitatively compared. Among the PAHs, phenanthrene induced the strongest up-regulation of extradiol cleavage pathway enzymes such as ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase, putative biphenyl-2,3-diol 1,2-dioxygenase, and catechol 2,3-dioxygenase in pLA1. These enzymes lead the initial step of the lower catabolic pathway of aromatic hydrocarbons through the extradiol cleavage pathway and participate in the attack of PAH ring cleavage, respectively. However, N. pentaromativorans US6-1 cultured with p-hydroxybenzoate induced activation of another extradiol cleavage pathway, the protocatechuate 4,5-dioxygenase pathway, that originated from chromosomal genes. These results suggest that N. pentaromativorans US6-1 utilizes two different extradiol pathways and plasmid pLA1 might play a key role in the biodegradation of PAH in N. pentaromativorans US6-1.

  15. Dcm methylation is detrimental to plasmid transformation in Clostridium thermocellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guss Adam M

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Industrial production of biofuels and other products by cellulolytic microorganisms is of interest but hindered by the nascent state of genetic tools. Although a genetic system for Clostridium thermocellum DSM1313 has recently been developed, available methods achieve relatively low efficiency and similar plasmids can transform C. thermocellum at dramatically different efficiencies. Results We report an increase in transformation efficiency of C. thermocellum for a variety of plasmids by using DNA that has been methylated by Escherichia coli Dam but not Dcm methylases. When isolated from a dam+dcm+E. coli strain, pAMG206 transforms C. thermocellum 100-fold better than the similar plasmid pAMG205, which contains an additional Dcm methylation site in the pyrF gene. Upon removal of Dcm methylation, transformation with pAMG206 showed a four- to seven-fold increase in efficiency; however, transformation efficiency of pAMG205 increased 500-fold. Removal of the Dcm methylation site from the pAMG205 pyrF gene via silent mutation resulted in increased transformation efficiencies equivalent to that of pAMG206. Upon proper methylation, transformation efficiency of plasmids bearing the pMK3 and pB6A origins of replication increased ca. three orders of magnitude. Conclusions E. coli Dcm methylation decreases transformation efficiency in C. thermocellum DSM1313. The use of properly methylated plasmid DNA should facilitate genetic manipulation of this industrially relevant bacterium.

  16. Transcription-replication collision increases recombination efficiency between plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jialiang, Li; Feng, Chen; Zhen, Xu; Jibing, Chen; Xiang, Lv; Lingling, Zhang; Depei, Liu

    2013-11-01

    It has been proposed that the stalling of the replication forks can induce homologous recombination in several organisms, and that arrested replication forks may offer nuclease targets, thereby providing a substrate for proteins involved in double-strand repair. In this article, we constructed a plasmid with the potential for transcription-replication collision (TRC), in which DNA replication and RNA transcription occur on the same DNA template simultaneously. Theoretically, transcription will impede DNA replication and increase homologous recombination. To validate this hypothesis, another plasmid was constructed that contained a homologous sequence with the exception of some mutated sites. Co-transfection of these two plasmids into 293T cells resulted in increased recombination frequency. The ratio of these two plasmids also affected the recombination frequency. Moreover, we found high expression levels of RAD51, which indicated that the increase in the recombination rate was probably via the homologous recombination pathway. These results indicate that mutant genes in plasmids can be repaired by TRC-induced recombination.

  17. Dcm methylation is detrimental to plasmid transformation in Clostridium thermocellum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guss, Adam M [ORNL; Olson, Daniel G. [Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth; Caiazza, Nicky [Mascoma Corporation; Lynd, Lee R [Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Industrial production of biofuels and other products by cellulolytic microorganisms is of interest but hindered by the nascent state of genetic tools. Although a genetic system for Clostridium thermocellum DSM1313 has recently been developed, available methods achieve relatively low efficiency and similar plasmids can transform C. thermocellum at dramatically different efficiencies. RESULTS: We report an increase in transformation efficiency of C. thermocellum for a variety of plasmids by using DNA that has been methylated by Escherichia coli Dam but not Dcm methylases. When isolated from a dam+ dcm+ E. coli strain, pAMG206 transforms C. thermocellum 100-fold better than the similar plasmid pAMG205, which contains an additional Dcm methylation site in the pyrF gene. Upon removal of Dcm methylation, transformation with pAMG206 showed a four- to seven-fold increase in efficiency; however, transformation efficiency of pAMG205 increased 500-fold. Removal of the Dcm methylation site from the pAM205 pyrF gene via silent mutation resulted in increased transformation efficiencies equivalent to that of pAMG206. Upon proper methylation, transformation efficiency of plasmids bearing the pMK3 and pB6A origins of replication increased ca. three orders of magnitude. CONCLUSION: E. coli Dcm methylation decreases transformation efficiency in C. thermocellum DSM1313. The use of properly methylated plasmid DNA should facilitate genetic manipulation of this industrially relevant bacterium.

  18. Functional amyloids as inhibitors of plasmid DNA replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-García, Laura; Gasset-Rosa, Fátima; Moreno-del Álamo, María; Fernández-Tresguerres, M. Elena; Moreno-Díaz de la Espina, Susana; Lurz, Rudi; Giraldo, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    DNA replication is tightly regulated to constrain the genetic material within strict spatiotemporal boundaries and copy numbers. Bacterial plasmids are autonomously replicating DNA molecules of much clinical, environmental and biotechnological interest. A mechanism used by plasmids to prevent over-replication is ‘handcuffing’, i.e. inactivating the replication origins in two DNA molecules by holding them together through a bridge built by a plasmid-encoded initiator protein (Rep). Besides being involved in handcuffing, the WH1 domain in the RepA protein assembles as amyloid fibres upon binding to DNA in vitro. The amyloid state in proteins is linked to specific human diseases, but determines selectable and epigenetically transmissible phenotypes in microorganisms. Here we have explored the connection between handcuffing and amyloidogenesis of full-length RepA. Using a monoclonal antibody specific for an amyloidogenic conformation of RepA-WH1, we have found that the handcuffed RepA assemblies, either reconstructed in vitro or in plasmids clustering at the bacterial nucleoid, are amyloidogenic. The replication-inhibitory RepA handcuff assembly is, to our knowledge, the first protein amyloid directly dealing with DNA. Built on an amyloid scaffold, bacterial plasmid handcuffs can bring a novel molecular solution to the universal problem of keeping control on DNA replication initiation. PMID:27147472

  19. Unravelling the complete genome sequence of Advenella mimigardefordensis strain DPN7T and novel insights in the catabolism of the xenobiotic polythioester precursor 3,3'-dithiodipropionate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wübbeler, Jan Hendrik; Hiessl, Sebastian; Schuldes, Jörg; Thürmer, Andrea; Daniel, Rolf; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2014-07-01

    Advenella mimigardefordensis strain DPN7(T) is a remarkable betaproteobacterium because of its extraordinary ability to use the synthetic disulfide 3,3'-dithiodipropionic acid (DTDP) as the sole carbon source and electron donor for aerobic growth. One application of DTDP is as a precursor substrate for biotechnically synthesized polythioesters (PTEs), which are interesting non-degradable biopolymers applicable for plastics materials. Metabolic engineering for optimization of PTE production requires an understanding of DTDP conversion. The genome of A. mimigardefordensis strain DPN7(T) was sequenced and annotated. The circular chromosome was found to be composed of 4,740,516 bp and 4112 predicted ORFs, whereas the circular plasmid consisted of 23,610 bp and 24 predicted ORFs. The genes participating in DTDP catabolism had been characterized in detail previously, but knowing the complete genome sequence and with support of Tn5: :mob-induced mutants, putatively involved transporter proteins and a transcriptional regulator were also identified. Most probably, DTDP is transported into the cell by a specific tripartite tricarboxylate transport system and is then cleaved by the disulfide reductase LpdA, sulfoxygenated by the 3-mercaptopropionate dioxygenase Mdo, activated by the CoA ligase SucCD and desulfinated by the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase-like desulfinase AcdA. Regulation of this pathway is presumably performed by a transcriptional regulator of the xenobiotic response element family. The excessive sulfate that is inevitably produced is secreted by the cells by a unique sulfate exporter of the CPA (cation : proton antiporter) superfamily.

  20. Resolution of Multimeric Forms of Circular Plasmids and Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crozat, Estelle; Fournes, Florian; Cornet, François; Hallet, Bernard; Rousseau, Philippe

    2014-10-01

    One of the disadvantages of circular plasmids and chromosomes is their high sensitivity to rearrangements caused by homologous recombination. Odd numbers of crossing-over occurring during or after replication of a circular replicon result in the formation of a dimeric molecule in which the two copies of the replicon are fused. If they are not converted back to monomers, the dimers of replicons may fail to correctly segregate at the time of cell division. Resolution of multimeric forms of circular plasmids and chromosomes is mediated by site-specific recombination, and the enzymes that catalyze this type of reaction fall into two families of proteins: the serine and tyrosine recombinase families. Here we give an overview of the variety of site-specific resolution systems found on circular plasmids and chromosomes.

  1. Effects of human growth hormone on the catabolic state after surgical trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vara-Thorbeck, R; Ruiz-Requena, E; Guerrero-Fernández, J A

    1996-01-01

    The aims of our studies were: (1) to determine if the protein catabolic response after a major or moderate surgical trauma can be restrained by the administration of exogenous human growth hormone (hGH); (2) to determine if the administration of hGH can improve systemic host defenses, thus reducing the risk of infection, and (3) given that the postoperative fatigue syndrome (POF) is mediated by the endocrino-metabolic response to surgery we attempt to determine if the administration of hGH can prevent or reduce POF. Therefore, we performed three placebo-controlled randomized double-blind trials on 216 patients. Major gastrointestinal surgery was treated only with total parenteral nutrition (TPN; n = 20) or TPN plus 4 IU hGH (n = 18). Patients with moderate surgical trauma received either hypocaloric parenteral nutrition (HPN; n = 93) or HPN and 8 IU hGH (n = 87). In this study, we also determined the evolution of the systemic host defenses and thereby the risk of infection. In 48 patients who underwent cholecystectomy treated (n = 26) either with HPN or HPN plus 8 IU hGH, we measured the protein catabolic response, postoperative fatigue and anthropometric modifications. The treatment with hGH together with HPN or TPN (1) overcomes the protein catabolic effects of the trauma response induced by major or moderate surgery by increasing protein synthesis, (2) improves humoral and cellular systemic host defenses, thus reducing the risk of infection, (3) preserves or increases lean body mass and reduces adipose tissue and (4) minimizes POF.

  2. Involvement of Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase in the regulation of proline catabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Sophie eLeprince

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant adaptation to abiotic stresses such as drought and salinity involves complex regulatory processes. Deciphering the signalling components that are involved in stress signal transduction and cellular responses is of importance to understand how plants cope with salt stress. Accumulation of osmolytes such as proline is considered to participate in the osmotic adjustment of plant cells to salinity. Proline accumulation results from a tight regulation between its biosynthesis and catabolism. Lipid signal components such as phospholipases C and D have previously been shown to be involved in the regulation of proline metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, we demonstrate that proline metabolism is also regulated by class-III Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K, VPS34, which catalyses the formation of phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI3P from phosphatidylinositol. Using pharmacological and biochemical approaches, we show that the PI3K inhibitor, LY294002, affects PI3P levels in vivo and that it triggers a decrease in proline accumulation in response to salt treatment of A. thaliana seedlings. The lower proline accumulation is correlated with a lower transcript level of Pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase 1 biosynthetic enzyme and higher transcript and protein levels of Proline dehydrogenase 1 (ProDH1, a key-enzyme in proline catabolism. We also found that the ProDH1 expression is induced in a pi3k-hemizygous mutant, further demonstrating that PI3K is involved in the regulation of proline catabolism through transcriptional regulation of ProDH1. A broader metabolomic analysis indicates that LY294002 also reduced other metabolites, such as hydrophobic and aromatic amino acids and sugars like raffinose.

  3. A novel plasmid pEA68 of Erwinia amylovora and the description of a new family of plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Emadeldeen; Blom, Jochen; Bultreys, Alain; Ivanović, Milan; Obradović, Aleksa; van Doorn, Joop; Bergsma-Vlami, Maria; Maes, Martine; Willems, Anne; Duffy, Brion; Stockwell, Virginia O; Smits, Theo H M; Puławska, Joanna

    2014-12-01

    Recent genome analysis of Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of fire blight disease on Rosaceae, has shown that the chromosome is highly conserved among strains and that plasmids are the principal source of genomic diversity. A new circular plasmid, pEA68, was found in E. amylovora strain 692 (LMG 28361), isolated in Poland from Sorbus (mountain ash) with fire blight symptoms. Annotation of the 68,763-bp IncFIIa-type plasmid revealed that it contains 79 predicted CDS, among which two operons (tra, pil) are associated with mobility. The plasmid is maintained stably in E. amylovora and does not possess genes associated with antibiotic resistance or known virulence genes. Curing E. amylovora strain 692 of pEA68 did not influence its virulence in apple shoots nor amylovoran synthesis. Of 488 strains of E. amylovora from seventeen countries, pEA68 was only found in two additional strains from Belgium. Although the spread of pEA68 is currently limited to Europe, pEA68 comprises, together with pEA72 and pEA78 both found in North America, a new plasmid family that spans two continents.

  4. Conjugation of plasmids of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to other Neisseria species: potential reservoirs for the beta-lactamase plasmid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genco, C A; Knapp, J S; Clark, V L

    1984-09-01

    The discovery that penicillinase production in Neisseria gonorrhoeae was plasmid mediated and the spread of the beta-lactamase encoding plasmids in gonococcal isolates since 1976, raise the possibility that a nonpathogenic indigenous bacterium could serve as a reservoir for these plasmids. We initiated studies to define the ability of commensal Neisseria species and Branhamella catarrhalis strains, as well as strains of the pathogen Neisseria meningitidis, to serve as recipients in conjugation with Neisseria gonorrhoeae. We found that with N. gonorrhoeae as the donor, 3 of 5 Neisseria cinerea, 2 of 5 Neisseria flava, 0 of 1 Neisseria flavescens, 1 of 3 Neisseria subflava, 0 of 6 B. catarrhalis, 0 of 7 Neisseria lactamica, 1 of 5 Neisseria mucosa, 1 of 7 Neisseria perflava/sicca, and 0 of 13 N. meningitidis strains gave detectable conjugation frequencies (greater than 10(-8). N. cinerea was the only species found to maintain the gonococcal conjugal plasmid (pLE2451). A N. cinerea transconjugant containing pLE2451 was observed to transfer both the beta-lactamase plasmid and pLE2451 to N. gonorrhoeae at high frequency.

  5. Anion exchange purification of plasmid DNA using expanded bed adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, G N; Cabral, J M; Prazeres, D M

    2000-01-01

    Recent developments in gene therapy with non-viral vectors and DNA vaccination have increased the demand for large amounts of pharmaceutical-grade plasmid DNA. The high viscosity of process streams is of major concern in the purification of plasmids, since it can cause high back pressures in column operations, thus limiting the throughput. In order to avoid these high back pressures, expanded bed anion exchange chromatography was evaluated as an alternative to fixed bed chromatography. A Streamline 25 column filled with 100 ml of Streamline QXL media, was equilibrated with 0.5 M NaCl in TE (10 mM Tris, 1 mM EDTA, pH = 8.0) buffer at an upward flow of 300 cmh-1, E. coli lysates (obtained from up to 3 liters of fermentation broth) were injected in the column. After washing out the unbound material, the media was allowed to sediment and the plasmid was eluted with 1 M NaCl in TE buffer at a downward flow of 120 cmh-1. Purification factors of 36 +/- 1 fold, 26 +/- 0.4 plasmid purity, and close to 100% yields were obtained when less than one settled column volume of plasmid feed was injected. However, both recovery yield and purity abruptly decreased when larger amounts were processed-values of 35 +/- 2 and 5 +/- 0.7 were obtained for the recovery yield and purity, respectively, when 250 ml of feedstock were processed. In these cases, gel clogging and expansion collapse were observed. The processing of larger volumes, thus larger plasmid quantities, was only possible by performing an isopropanol precipitation step prior to the chromatographic step. This step led to an enhancement of the purification step.

  6. Effects of Zinc Magnesium Aspartate (ZMA) Supplementation on Training Adaptations and Markers of Anabolism and Catabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Almada Anthony; Greenwood Mike C; Rasmussen Christopher J; Marcello Brandon M; Taylor Lem W; Campbell Bill I; Kerksick Chad M; Wilborn Colin D; Kreider Richard B

    2004-01-01

    Abstract This study examined whether supplementing the diet with a commercial supplement containing zinc magnesium aspartate (ZMA) during training affects zinc and magnesium status, anabolic and catabolic hormone profiles, and/or training adaptations. Forty-two resistance trained males (27 ± 9 yrs; 178 ± 8 cm, 85 ± 15 kg, 18.6 ± 6% body fat) were matched according to fat free mass and randomly assigned to ingest in a double blind manner either a dextrose placebo (P) or ZMA 30–60 minutes prior...

  7. Biochemical and Structural Characterization of a Ureidoglycine Aminotransferase in the Klebsiella pneumoniae Uric Acid Catabolic Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, Jarrod B.; Ealick, Steven E. (Cornell)

    2010-09-03

    Many plants, fungi, and bacteria catabolize allantoin as a mechanism for nitrogen assimilation. Recent reports have shown that in plants and some bacteria the product of hydrolysis of allantoin by allantoinase is the unstable intermediate ureidoglycine. While this molecule can spontaneously decay, genetic analysis of some bacterial genomes indicates that an aminotransferase may be present in the pathway. Here we present evidence that Klebsiella pneumoniae HpxJ is an aminotransferase that preferentially converts ureidoglycine and an {alpha}-keto acid into oxalurate and the corresponding amino acid. We determined the crystal structure of HpxJ, allowing us to present an explanation for substrate specificity.

  8. Phenotype MicroArray™ system in the study of fungal functional diversity and catabolic versatility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzari, Flavia; Ceci, Andrea; Abu-Samra, Nadir; Canfora, Loredana; Maggi, Oriana; Persiani, Annamaria

    Fungi cover a range of important ecological functions associated with nutrient and carbon cycling in leaf litter and soil. As a result, research on existing relationships between fungal functional diversity, decomposition rates and competition is of key interest. Indeed, availability of nutrients in soil is largely the consequence of organic matter degradation dynamics. The Biolog(®) Phenotype MicroArrays™ (PM) system allows for the testing of fungi against many different carbon sources at any one time. The use and potential of the PM system as a tool for studying niche overlap and catabolic versatility of saprotrophic fungi is discussed here, and examples of its application are provided.

  9. Osthole Inhibits Proliferation and Induces Catabolism in Rat Chondrocytes and Cartilage Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqing Du

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Cartilage destruction is thought to be the major mediator of osteoarthritis. Recent studies suggest that inhibition of subchrondral bone loss by anti-osteoporosis (OP drug can protect cartilige erosion. Osthole, as a promising agent for treating osteoporosis, may show potential in treating osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether Osthole affects the proliferation and catabolism of rat chondrocytes, and the degeneration of cartilage explants. Methods: Rat chondrocytes were treated with Osthole (0 μM, 6.25 μM, 12.5 μM, and 25 μM with or without IL1-β (10ng/ml for 24 hours. The expression levels of type II collagen and MMP13 were detected by western Blot. Marker genes for chondrocytes (A-can and Sox9, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, aggrecanases (ADAMTS5 and genes implicated in extracellular matrix catabolism were evaluated by qPCR. Cell proliferation was assessed by measuring proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA expression and fluorescence activated cell sorter. Wnt7b/β-catenin signaling was also investigated. Cartilage explants from two-week old SD rats were cultured with IL-1β, Osthole and Osthole plus IL-1β for four days and glycosaminoglycan (GAG synthesis was assessed with toluidine blue staining and Safranine O/Fast Green FCF staining, collagen type II expression was detected by immunofuorescence. Results: Osthole reduced expression of chondrocyte markers and increased expression of MMP13, ADAMTS5 and MMP9 in a dose-dependent manner. Catabolic gene expression levels were further improved by Osthole plus IL-1β. Osthole inhibited chondrocyte proliferation. GAG synthesis and type II collagen were decreased in both the IL-1β groups and the Osthole groups, and significantly reduced by Osthole plus IL-1β. Conclusions: Our data suggested that Osthole increases the catabolism of rat chondrocytes and cartilage explants, this effect might be mediated through inhibiting Wnt7b

  10. D-Allose catabolism of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Tim S.; Chang, Ying-Ying; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1999-01-01

    Genes involved in allose utilization of Escherichia coli K-12 are organized in at least two operons, alsRBACE and alsI, located next to each other on the chromosome but divergently transcribed. Mutants defective in alsI (allose 6-phosphate isomerase gene) and alsE (allulose 6-phosphate epimerase...... gene) were Als-. Transcription of the two allose operons, measured as β-galactosidase activity specified by alsI-lacZ+ or alsE-lacZ+ operon fusions, was induced by allose. Ribose also caused derepression of expression of the regulon under conditions in which ribose phosphate catabolism was impaired....

  11. Catabolism of exogenous lactate reveals it as a legitimate metabolic substrate in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Kelly M; Scarbrough, Peter M; Ribeiro, Anthony; Richardson, Rachel; Yuan, Hong; Sonveaux, Pierre; Landon, Chelsea D; Chi, Jen-Tsan; Pizzo, Salvatore; Schroeder, Thies; Dewhirst, Mark W

    2013-01-01

    Lactate accumulation in tumors has been associated with metastases and poor overall survival in cancer patients. Lactate promotes angiogenesis and metastasis, providing rationale for understanding how it is processed by cells. The concentration of lactate in tumors is a balance between the amount produced, amount carried away by vasculature and if/how it is catabolized by aerobic tumor or stromal cells. We examined lactate metabolism in human normal and breast tumor cell lines and rat breast cancer: 1. at relevant concentrations, 2. under aerobic vs. hypoxic conditions, 3. under conditions of normo vs. hypoglucosis. We also compared the avidity of tumors for lactate vs. glucose and identified key lactate catabolites to reveal how breast cancer cells process it. Lactate was non-toxic at clinically relevant concentrations. It was taken up and catabolized to alanine and glutamate by all cell lines. Kinetic uptake rates of lactate in vivo surpassed that of glucose in R3230Ac mammary carcinomas. The uptake appeared specific to aerobic tumor regions, consistent with the proposed "metabolic symbiont" model; here lactate produced by hypoxic cells is used by aerobic cells. We investigated whether treatment with alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate (CHC), a MCT1 inhibitor, would kill cells in the presence of high lactate. Both 0.1 mM and 5 mM CHC prevented lactate uptake in R3230Ac cells at lactate concentrations at ≤ 20 mM but not at 40 mM. 0.1 mM CHC was well-tolerated by R3230Ac and MCF7 cells, but 5 mM CHC killed both cell lines ± lactate, indicating off-target effects. This study showed that breast cancer cells tolerate and use lactate at clinically relevant concentrations in vitro (± glucose) and in vivo. We provided additional support for the metabolic symbiont model and discovered that breast cells prevailingly take up and catabolize lactate, providing rationale for future studies on manipulation of lactate catabolism pathways for therapy.

  12. Lysosomal glycosphingolipid catabolism by acid ceramidase: formation of glycosphingoid bases during deficiency of glycosidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz, Maria J; Marques, André R A; Appelman, Monique D; Verhoek, Marri; Strijland, Anneke; Mirzaian, Mina; Scheij, Saskia; Ouairy, Cécile M; Lahav, Daniel; Wisse, Patrick; Overkleeft, Herman S; Boot, Rolf G; Aerts, Johannes M

    2016-03-01

    Glycosphingoid bases are elevated in inherited lysosomal storage disorders with deficient activity of glycosphingolipid catabolizing glycosidases. We investigated the molecular basis of the formation of glucosylsphingosine and globotriaosylsphingosine during deficiency of glucocerebrosidase (Gaucher disease) and α-galactosidase A (Fabry disease). Independent genetic and pharmacological evidence is presented pointing to an active role of acid ceramidase in both processes through deacylation of lysosomal glycosphingolipids. The potential pathophysiological relevance of elevated glycosphingoid bases generated through this alternative metabolism in patients suffering from lysosomal glycosidase defects is discussed.

  13. blaCMY-2-positive IncA/C plasmids from Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica are a distinct component of a larger lineage of plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, Douglas R; Singer, Randall S; Meng, Da; Broschat, Shira L; Orfe, Lisa H; Anderson, Janet M; Herndon, David R; Kappmeyer, Lowell S; Daniels, Joshua B; Besser, Thomas E

    2010-02-01

    Large multidrug resistance plasmids of the A/C incompatibility complex (IncA/C) have been found in a diverse group of Gram-negative commensal and pathogenic bacteria. We present three completed sequences from IncA/C plasmids that originated from Escherichia coli (cattle) and Salmonella enterica serovar Newport (human) and that carry the cephamycinase gene blaCMY-2. These large plasmids (148 to 166 kbp) share extensive sequence identity and synteny. The most divergent plasmid, peH4H, has lost several conjugation-related genes and has gained a kanamycin resistance region. Two of the plasmids (pAM04528 and peH4H) harbor two copies of blaCMY-2, while the third plasmid (pAR060302) harbors a single copy of the gene. The majority of single-nucleotide polymorphisms comprise nonsynonymous mutations in floR. A comparative analysis of these plasmids with five other published IncA/C plasmids showed that the blaCMY-2 plasmids from E. coli and S. enterica are genetically distinct from those originating from Yersinia pestis and Photobacterium damselae and distal to one originating from Yersinia ruckeri. While the overall similarity of these plasmids supports the likelihood of recent movements among E. coli and S. enterica hosts, their greater divergence from Y. pestis or Y. ruckeri suggests less recent plasmid transfer among these pathogen groups.

  14. Mitochondrial pAL2-1 plasmid homologs are senescence factors in Podospora anserina independent of intrinsic senescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diepeningen, van A.D.; Debets, A.J.M.; Slakhorst-Wandel, S.M.; Hoekstra, R.F.

    2008-01-01

    Since the first description of a linear mitochondrial plasmid in Podospora anserina, pAL2-1, and homologous plasmids have gone from being considered beneficial longevity plasmids, via neutral genetic elements, toward mutator plasmids causing senescence. The plasmid has an invertron structure, with t

  15. Recombinogenic engineering of conjugative plasmids with fluorescent marker cassettes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reisner, A.; Molin, Søren; Zechner, E.L.

    2002-01-01

    An efficient approach for the insertion of fluorescent marker genes with sequence specificity into conjugative plasmids in Escherichia coli is described. For this purpose, homologous recombination of linear double-stranded targeting DNA was mediated by the bacteriophage lambda recombination...... resistance genes and fluorescent markers. The choice of 5' non-homologous extensions in primer pairs used for amplifying the marker cassettes determines the site specificity of the targeting DNA. This methodology is applicable to the modification of all plasmids that replicate in E coli and is not restricted...

  16. Ribonucleases, antisense RNAs and the control of bacterial plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saramago, Margarida; Bárria, Cátia; Arraiano, Cecília M; Domingues, Susana

    2015-03-01

    In the last decade regulatory RNAs have emerged as powerful tools to regulate the expression of genes both in prokaryotes and in eukaryotes. RNases, by degrading these RNA molecules, control the right amount of regulatory RNAs, which is fundamental for an accurate regulation of gene expression in the cell. Remarkably the first antisense RNAs identified were plasmid-encoded and their detailed study was crucial for the understanding of prokaryotic antisense RNAs. In this review we highlight the role of RNases in the precise modulation of antisense RNAs that control plasmid replication, maintenance and transfer.

  17. Survival and evolution of a large multidrug resistance plasmid in new clinical bacterial hosts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porse, Andreas; Schønning, Kristian; Munck, Christian;

    2016-01-01

    of these plasmids within pathogenic hosts are poorly understood. Here we study plasmid-host adaptations following transfer of a 73 kb conjugative multidrug resistance plasmid to naïve clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli We use experimental evolution, mathematical modelling and population...... of costly regions from the plasmid backbone, effectively expanding the host-range of the plasmid. Although these adaptations were also beneficial to plasmid persistence in a naïve K. pneumoniae host, they were never observed in this species, indicating that differential evolvability can limit opportunities...

  18. DNA sequence analysis of plasmids from multidrug resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Heidelberg isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Han

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg is among the most detected serovars in swine and poultry, ranks among the top five serotypes associated with human salmonellosis and is disproportionately associated with invasive infections and mortality in humans. Salmonella are known to carry plasmids associated with antimicrobial resistance and virulence. To identify plasmid-associated genes in multidrug resistant S. enterica serovar Heidelberg, antimicrobial resistance plasmids from five isolates were sequenced using the 454 LifeSciences pyrosequencing technology. Four of the isolates contained incompatibility group (Inc A/C multidrug resistance plasmids harboring at least eight antimicrobial resistance genes. Each of these strains also carried a second resistance plasmid including two IncFIB, an IncHI2 and a plasmid lacking an identified Inc group. The fifth isolate contained an IncI1 plasmid, encoding resistance to gentamicin, streptomycin and sulfonamides. Some of the IncA/C plasmids lacked the full concert of transfer genes and yet were able to be conjugally transferred, likely due to the transfer genes carried on the companion plasmids in the strains. Several non-IncA/C resistance plasmids also carried putative virulence genes. When the sequences were compared to previously sequenced plasmids, it was found that while all plasmids demonstrated some similarity to other plasmids, they were unique, often due to differences in mobile genetic elements in the plasmids. Our study suggests that Salmonella Heidelberg isolates harbor plasmids that co-select for antimicrobial resistance and virulence, along with genes that can mediate the transfer of plasmids within and among other bacterial isolates. Prevalence of such plasmids can complicate efforts to control the spread of S. enterica serovar Heidelberg in food animal and human populations.

  19. Genetic Characterization of ExPEC-Like Virulence Plasmids among a Subset of NMEC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryon A Nicholson

    Full Text Available Neonatal Meningitis Escherichia coli (NMEC is one of the most common causes of neonatal bacterial meningitis in the US and elsewhere resulting in mortality or neurologic deficits in survivors. Large plasmids have been shown experimentally to increase the virulence of NMEC in the rat model of neonatal meningitis. Here, 9 ExPEC-like plasmids were isolated from NMEC and sequenced to identify the core and accessory plasmid genes of ExPEC-like virulence plasmids in NMEC and create an expanded plasmid phylogeny. Results showed sequenced virulence plasmids carry a strongly conserved core of genes with predicted functions in five distinct categories including: virulence, metabolism, plasmid stability, mobile elements, and unknown genes. The major functions of virulence-associated and plasmid core genes serve to increase in vivo fitness by adding multiple iron uptake systems to the genetic repertoire to facilitate NMEC's survival in the host's low iron environment, and systems to enhance bacterial resistance to host innate immunity. Phylogenetic analysis based on these core plasmid genes showed that at least two lineages of ExPEC-like plasmids could be discerned. Further, virulence plasmids from Avian Pathogenic E. coli and NMEC plasmids could not be differentiated based solely on the genes of the core plasmid genome.

  20. Conjugal transfer of group B streptococcal plasmids and comobilization of Escherichia coli-Streptococcus shuttle plasmids to Lactobacillus plantarum.

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    The antibiotic resistance group B streptococcal plasmids, pIP501 and pVA797, were conjugally transferred from Streptococcus faecalis to Lactobacillus plantarum. The Escherichia coli-Streptococcus shuttle plasmids, pVA838 and pSA3, were mobilized from S. sanguis to L. plantarum by pVA797 via cointegrate formation. pVA838 readily resolved from pVA797 and was present in L. plantarum as deletion derivatives. The pVA797::pSA3 cointegrate failed to resolve in L. plantarum.

  1. Polyamine catabolism contributes to enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis-induced colon tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Andrew C; Destefano Shields, Christina E; Wu, Shaoguang; Huso, David L; Wu, XinQun; Murray-Stewart, Tracy R; Hacker-Prietz, Amy; Rabizadeh, Shervin; Woster, Patrick M; Sears, Cynthia L; Casero, Robert A

    2011-09-13

    It is estimated that the etiology of 20-30% of epithelial cancers is directly associated with inflammation, although the direct molecular events linking inflammation and carcinogenesis are poorly defined. In the context of gastrointestinal disease, the bacterium enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) is a significant source of chronic inflammation and has been implicated as a risk factor for colorectal cancer. Spermine oxidase (SMO) is a polyamine catabolic enzyme that is highly inducible by inflammatory stimuli resulting in increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA damage. We now demonstrate that purified B. fragilis toxin (BFT) up-regulates SMO in HT29/c1 and T84 colonic epithelial cells, resulting in SMO-dependent generation of ROS and induction of γ-H2A.x, a marker of DNA damage. Further, ETBF-induced colitis in C57BL/6 mice is associated with increased SMO expression and treatment of mice with an inhibitor of polyamine catabolism, N(1),N(4)-bis(2,3-butandienyl)-1,4-butanediamine (MDL 72527), significantly reduces ETBF-induced chronic inflammation and proliferation. Most importantly, in the multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min) mouse model, treatment with MDL 72527 reduces ETBF-induced colon tumorigenesis by 69% (P < 0.001). The results of these studies indicate that SMO is a source of bacteria-induced ROS directly associated with tumorigenesis and could serve as a unique target for chemoprevention.

  2. Polyamine catabolism contributes to enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis-induced colon tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Andrew C.; Shields, Christina E. Destefano; Wu, Shaoguang; Huso, David L.; Wu, XinQun; Murray-Stewart, Tracy R.; Hacker-Prietz, Amy; Rabizadeh, Shervin; Woster, Patrick M.; Sears, Cynthia L.; Casero, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    It is estimated that the etiology of 20–30% of epithelial cancers is directly associated with inflammation, although the direct molecular events linking inflammation and carcinogenesis are poorly defined. In the context of gastrointestinal disease, the bacterium enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) is a significant source of chronic inflammation and has been implicated as a risk factor for colorectal cancer. Spermine oxidase (SMO) is a polyamine catabolic enzyme that is highly inducible by inflammatory stimuli resulting in increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA damage. We now demonstrate that purified B. fragilis toxin (BFT) up-regulates SMO in HT29/c1 and T84 colonic epithelial cells, resulting in SMO-dependent generation of ROS and induction of γ-H2A.x, a marker of DNA damage. Further, ETBF-induced colitis in C57BL/6 mice is associated with increased SMO expression and treatment of mice with an inhibitor of polyamine catabolism, N1,N4-bis(2,3-butandienyl)-1,4-butanediamine (MDL 72527), significantly reduces ETBF-induced chronic inflammation and proliferation. Most importantly, in the multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min) mouse model, treatment with MDL 72527 reduces ETBF-induced colon tumorigenesis by 69% (P < 0.001). The results of these studies indicate that SMO is a source of bacteria-induced ROS directly associated with tumorigenesis and could serve as a unique target for chemoprevention. PMID:21876161

  3. Membrane lipids regulate ganglioside GM2 catabolism and GM2 activator protein activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anheuser, Susi; Breiden, Bernadette; Schwarzmann, Günter; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2015-09-01

    Ganglioside GM2 is the major lysosomal storage compound of Tay-Sachs disease. It also accumulates in Niemann-Pick disease types A and B with primary storage of SM and with cholesterol in type C. Reconstitution of GM2 catabolism with β-hexosaminidase A and GM2 activator protein (GM2AP) at uncharged liposomal surfaces carrying GM2 as substrate generated only a physiologically irrelevant catabolic rate, even at pH 4.2. However, incorporation of anionic phospholipids into the GM2 carrying liposomes stimulated GM2 hydrolysis more than 10-fold, while the incorporation of plasma membrane stabilizing lipids (SM and cholesterol) generated a strong inhibition of GM2 hydrolysis, even in the presence of anionic phospholipids. Mobilization of membrane lipids by GM2AP was also inhibited in the presence of cholesterol or SM, as revealed by surface plasmon resonance studies. These lipids also reduced the interliposomal transfer rate of 2-NBD-GM1 by GM2AP, as observed in assays using Förster resonance energy transfer. Our data raise major concerns about the usage of recombinant His-tagged GM2AP compared with untagged protein. The former binds more strongly to anionic GM2-carrying liposomal surfaces, increases GM2 hydrolysis, and accelerates intermembrane transfer of 2-NBD-GM1, but does not mobilize membrane lipids.

  4. Catabolism of haemoglobin-haptoglobin complexes in haemolytic uraemia-like syndromes of different etiologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandslund, I; Petersen, P H; Brinkløv, M M; Andersen, P K; Parlev, E

    1982-10-01

    The catabolism of haemoglobin-haptoglobin complexes was studied in four patients with increased vascular haemolysis as part of acute or subacute haemolytic uraemic syndromes. The apparent volumic substance elimination rates for haemoglobin (Fe) bound to haptoglobin in plasma were 1.1 mumol/h/l and 2.9 mumol/h/l in two patients suffering from sublimate and hydrochloric acid poisoning, respectively. This is estimated to correspond to a normal catabolism, when the increased haptoglobin synthesis is taken into account. In the other two patients suffering from serum-sickness there was reduced clearance and thereby an accumulation of haemoglobin-haptoglobin complexes in plasma during penicillin administration. When the offending drug was withdrawn the plasma concentration of haemoglobin bound to haptoglobin remained high for about three days and then fell rapidly (approximately with 3.8 mumol/l/h and 1.9 mumol/l/h). Thus, also in these patients the clearance capacity could be normalized after discontinuation of the drug.

  5. Membrane lipids regulate ganglioside GM2 catabolism and GM2 activator protein activity[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anheuser, Susi; Breiden, Bernadette; Schwarzmann, Günter; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2015-01-01

    Ganglioside GM2 is the major lysosomal storage compound of Tay-Sachs disease. It also accumulates in Niemann-Pick disease types A and B with primary storage of SM and with cholesterol in type C. Reconstitution of GM2 catabolism with β-hexosaminidase A and GM2 activator protein (GM2AP) at uncharged liposomal surfaces carrying GM2 as substrate generated only a physiologically irrelevant catabolic rate, even at pH 4.2. However, incorporation of anionic phospholipids into the GM2 carrying liposomes stimulated GM2 hydrolysis more than 10-fold, while the incorporation of plasma membrane stabilizing lipids (SM and cholesterol) generated a strong inhibition of GM2 hydrolysis, even in the presence of anionic phospholipids. Mobilization of membrane lipids by GM2AP was also inhibited in the presence of cholesterol or SM, as revealed by surface plasmon resonance studies. These lipids also reduced the interliposomal transfer rate of 2-NBD-GM1 by GM2AP, as observed in assays using Förster resonance energy transfer. Our data raise major concerns about the usage of recombinant His-tagged GM2AP compared with untagged protein. The former binds more strongly to anionic GM2-carrying liposomal surfaces, increases GM2 hydrolysis, and accelerates intermembrane transfer of 2-NBD-GM1, but does not mobilize membrane lipids. PMID:26175473

  6. Nodule carbohydrate catabolism is enhanced in the Medicago truncatula A17-Sinorhizobium medicae WSM419 symbiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estibaliz eLarrainzar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The symbiotic association between Medicago truncatula and Sinorhizobium meliloti is a well-established model system in the legume-Rhizobium community. Despite its wide use, the symbiotic efficiency of this model has been recently questioned and an alternative microsymbiont, S. medicae, has been proposed. However, little is known about the physiological mechanisms behind the higher symbiotic efficiency of S. medicae WSM419. In the present study, we inoculated M. truncatula Jemalong A17 with either S. medicae WSM419 or S. meliloti 2011 and compared plant growth, photosynthesis, N2-fixation rates, and plant nodule carbon and nitrogen metabolic activities in the two systems. M. truncatula plants in symbiosis with S. medicae showed increased biomass and photosynthesis rates per plant. Plants grown in symbiosis with S. medicae WSM419 also showed higher N2-fixation rates, which were correlated with a larger nodule biomass, while nodule number was similar in both systems. In terms of plant nodule metabolism, M. truncatula-S. medicae WSM419 nodules showed increased sucrose-catabolic activity, mostly associated with sucrose synthase, accompanied by a reduced starch content, whereas nitrogen-assimilation activities were comparable to those measured in nodules infected with S. meliloti 2011. Taken together, these results suggest that S. medicae WSM419 is able to enhance plant carbon catabolism in M. truncatula nodules, which allows for the maintaining of high symbiotic N2-fixation rates, better growth and improved general plant performance.

  7. The ygeW encoded protein from Escherichia coli is a knotted ancestral catabolic transcarbamylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yongdong; Jin, Zhongmin; Yu, Xiaolin; Allewell, Norma M.; Tuchman, Mendel; Shi, Dashuang (Maryland); (GWU); (Georgia)

    2012-06-28

    Purine degradation plays an essential role in nitrogen metabolism in most organisms. Uric acid is the final product of purine catabolism in humans, anthropoid apes, birds, uricotelic reptiles, and almost all insects. Elevated levels of uric acid in blood (hyperuricemia) cause human diseases such as gout, kidney stones, and renal failure. Although no enzyme has been identified that further degrades uric acid in humans, it can be oxidized to produce allantoin by free-radical attack. Indeed, elevated levels of allantoin are found in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, chronic lung disease, bacterial meningitis, and noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In other mammals, some insects and gastropods, uric acid is enzymatically degraded to the more soluble allantoin through the sequential action of three enzymes: urate oxidase, 5-hydroxyisourate (HIU) hydrolase and 2-oxo-4-hydroxy-4-carboxy-5-ureidoimidazoline (OHCU) decarboxylase. Therefore, an elective treatment for acute hyperuricemia is the administration of urate oxidase. Many organisms, including plants, some fungi and several bacteria, are able to catabolize allantoin to release nitrogen, carbon, and energy. In Arabidopsis thaliana and Eschrichia coli, S-allantoin has recently been shown to be degraded to glycolate and urea by four enzymes: allantoinase, allantoate amidohydrolase, ureidoglycine aminohydrolase, and ureidoglycolate amidohydrolase.

  8. Calcium-dependent phospholipid catabolism and arachidonic acid mobilization in cerebral minces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damron, D.S.; Dorman, R.V. (Kent State Univ., OH (USA))

    1990-06-01

    Cerebral minces were used to investigate the role of calcium influx on trauma-induced alterations of brain lipid metabolism. Cerebral phospholipids, nonpolar lipids, and free fatty acids were radiolabeled in vivo with ({sup 3}H)arachidonic acid. Tissue incubation stimulated the time-dependent catabolism of choline and inositol glycerophospholipids, and resulted in the accumulation of ({sup 3}H)free fatty acids. These effects were attenuated in Ca{sup 2}{sup +}-free incubations, and when EGTA or verapamil were present. The inhibition of calcium influx also reduced the labeling of diglycerides, whereas ethanolamine and serine glycerophospholipids were not affected by incubation or treatments. Replacing Ca{sup 2}{sup +} with other cations also attenuated the incubation-dependent alterations in lipid metabolism. However, only cadmium was able to compete with calcium and reduce the accumulation of ({sup 3}H)free fatty acids. It appeared that about half of the observed phospholipid catabolism was dependent on Ca{sup 2}{sup +} influx and that at least 80% of the ({sup 3}H)free fatty acid accumulation required calcium.

  9. Correlating denitrifying catabolic genes with N2O and N2 emissions from swine slurry composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angnes, G; Nicoloso, R S; da Silva, M L B; de Oliveira, P A V; Higarashi, M M; Mezzari, M P; Miller, P R M

    2013-07-01

    This work evaluated N dynamics that occurs over time within swine slurry composting piles. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) analyzes were conducted to estimate concentrations of bacteria community harboring specific catabolic nitrifying-ammonium monooxygenase (amoA), and denitrifying nitrate- (narG), nitrite- (nirS and nirG), nitric oxide- (norB) and nitrous oxide reductases (nosZ) genes. NH3-N, N2O-N, N2-N emissions represented 15.4 ± 1.9%, 5.4 ± 0.9%, and 79.1 ± 2.0% of the total nitrogen losses, respectively. Among the genes tested, temporal distribution of narG, nirS, and nosZ concentration correlated significantly (pcompost pile. Considering our current empirical limitations to accurately measure N2 emissions from swine slurry composting at field scale the use of these catabolic genes could represent a promising monitoring tool to aid minimize our uncertainties on biological N mass balances in these systems.

  10. Insulin signaling regulates fatty acid catabolism at the level of CoA activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojun Xu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The insulin/IGF signaling pathway is a highly conserved regulator of metabolism in flies and mammals, regulating multiple physiological functions including lipid metabolism. Although insulin signaling is known to regulate the activity of a number of enzymes in metabolic pathways, a comprehensive understanding of how the insulin signaling pathway regulates metabolic pathways is still lacking. Accepted knowledge suggests the key regulated step in triglyceride (TAG catabolism is the release of fatty acids from TAG via the action of lipases. We show here that an additional, important regulated step is the activation of fatty acids for beta-oxidation via Acyl Co-A synthetases (ACS. We identify pudgy as an ACS that is transcriptionally regulated by direct FOXO action in Drosophila. Increasing or reducing pudgy expression in vivo causes a decrease or increase in organismal TAG levels respectively, indicating that pudgy expression levels are important for proper lipid homeostasis. We show that multiple ACSs are also transcriptionally regulated by insulin signaling in mammalian cells. In sum, we identify fatty acid activation onto CoA as an important, regulated step in triglyceride catabolism, and we identify a mechanistic link through which insulin regulates lipid homeostasis.

  11. High-resolution phenotypic profiling defines genes essential for mycobacterial growth and cholesterol catabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer E Griffin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The pathways that comprise cellular metabolism are highly interconnected, and alterations in individual enzymes can have far-reaching effects. As a result, global profiling methods that measure gene expression are of limited value in predicting how the loss of an individual function will affect the cell. In this work, we employed a new method of global phenotypic profiling to directly define the genes required for the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A combination of high-density mutagenesis and deep-sequencing was used to characterize the composition of complex mutant libraries exposed to different conditions. This allowed the unambiguous identification of the genes that are essential for Mtb to grow in vitro, and proved to be a significant improvement over previous approaches. To further explore functions that are required for persistence in the host, we defined the pathways necessary for the utilization of cholesterol, a critical carbon source during infection. Few of the genes we identified had previously been implicated in this adaptation by transcriptional profiling, and only a fraction were encoded in the chromosomal region known to encode sterol catabolic functions. These genes comprise an unexpectedly large percentage of those previously shown to be required for bacterial growth in mouse tissue. Thus, this single nutritional change accounts for a significant fraction of the adaption to the host. This work provides the most comprehensive genetic characterization of a sterol catabolic pathway to date, suggests putative roles for uncharacterized virulence genes, and precisely maps genes encoding potential drug targets.

  12. Specific and Quantitative Assessment of Naphthalene and Salicylate Bioavailability by Using a Bioluminescent Catabolic Reporter Bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzer, Armin; Webb, Oren F.; Thonnard, Janeen E.; Sayler, Gary S.

    1992-01-01

    A bioassay was developed and standardized for the rapid, specific, and quantitative assessment of naphthalene and salicylate bioavailability by use of bioluminescence monitoring of catabolic gene expression. The bioluminescent reporter strain Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44, which carries a transcriptional nahG-luxCDABE fusion for naphthalene and salicylate catabolism, was used. The physiological state of the reporter cultures as well as the intrinsic regulatory properties of the naphthalene degradation operon must be taken into account to obtain a high specificity at low target substrate concentrations. Experiments have shown that the use of exponentially growing reporter cultures has advantages over the use of carbon-starved, resting cultures. In aqueous solutions for both substrates, naphthalene and salicylate, linear relationships between initial substrate concentration and bioluminescence response were found over concentration ranges of 1 to 2 orders of magnitude. Naphthalene could be detected at a concentration of 45 ppb. Studies conducted under defined conditions with extracts and slurries of experimentally contaminated sterile soils and identical uncontaminated soil controls demonstrated that this method can be used for specific and quantitative estimations of target pollutant presence and bioavailability in soil extracts and for specific and qualitative estimations of napthalene in soil slurries. PMID:16348717

  13. In vitro catabolism of rutin by human fecal bacteria and the antioxidant capacity of its catabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaganath, Indu B; Mullen, William; Lean, Michael E J; Edwards, Christine A; Crozier, Alan

    2009-10-15

    The role of colonic microflora in the breakdown of quercetin-3-O-rutinoside (rutin) was investigated. An in vitro fermentation model was used and (i) 28 micromol of rutin and (ii) 55 micromol of quercetin plus 18 x 10(6) dpm of [4-(14)C]quercetin (60 nmol) were incubated with fresh fecal samples from three human volunteers, in the presence and absence of glucose. The accumulation of quercetin during in vitro fermentation demonstrated that deglycosylation is the initial step in the breakdown of rutin. The subsequent degradation of quercetin was dependent upon the interindividual composition of the bacterial microflora and was directed predominantly toward the production of either hydroxyphenylacetic acid derivatives or hydroxybenzoic acids. Possible catabolic pathways for these conversions are proposed. The presence of glucose as a carbon source stimulated the growth and production of bacterial microflora responsible for both the deglycosylation of rutin and the catabolism of quercetin. 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylacetic acid accumulated in large amounts in the fecal samples and was found to possess significant reducing power and free radical scavenging activity. This catabolite may play a key role in the overall antioxidant capacity of the colonic lumen after the ingestion of quercetin-rich foods.

  14. Ergosteryl-β-glucosidase (Egh1) involved in sterylglucoside catabolism and vacuole formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takashi; Tani, Motohiro; Ishibashi, Yohei; Endo, Ikumi; Okino, Nozomu; Ito, Makoto

    2015-10-01

    Sterylglucosides (SGs) are composed of a glucose and sterol derivatives, and are distributed in fungi, plants and mammals. We recently identified EGCrP1 and EGCrP2 (endoglycoceramidase-related proteins 1 and 2) as a β-glucocerebrosidase and steryl-β-glucosidase, respectively, in Cryptococcus neoformans. We herein describe an EGCrP2 homologue (Egh1; ORF name, Yir007w) involved in SG catabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The purified recombinant Egh1 hydrolyzed various β-glucosides including ergosteryl β-glucoside (EG), cholesteryl β-glucoside, sitosteryl β-glucoside, para-nitrophenyl β-glucoside, 4-methylumberifellyl β-glucoside and glucosylceramide. The disruption of EGH1 in S. cerevisiae BY4741 (egh1Δ) resulted in the accumulation of EG and fragmentation of vacuoles. The expression of EGH1 in egh1Δ (revertant) reduced the accumulation of EG, and restored the morphology of vacuoles. The accumulation of EG was not detected in EGH1 and UGT51(ATG26) double-disrupted mutants (ugt51Δegh1Δ), indicating that EG was synthesized by Ugt51(Atg26) and degraded by Egh1 in vivo. These results clearly demonstrated that Egh1 is an ergosteryl-β-glucosidase that is functionally involved in the EG catabolic pathway and vacuole formation in S. cerevisiae.

  15. Glibenclamide Induces Collagen IV Catabolism in High Glucose-Stimulated Mesangial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liping Zhu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We have shown the full prevention of mesangial expansion in insulin-deficient diabetic rats by treatment with clinically-relevant dosages of glibenclamide (Glib. Studies in mesangial cells (MCs also demonstrated reduction in the high glucose (HG-induced accumulation of collagens, proposing that this was due to increased catabolism. In the present study, we investigated the signaling pathways that may be implicated in Glib action. Rat primary MCs were exposed to HG for 8 weeks with or without Glib in therapeutic (0.01 μM or supratherapeutic (1.0 μM concentrations. We found that HG increased collagen IV protein accumulation and PAI-1 mRNA and protein expression, in association with decreased cAMP generating capacity and decreased PKA activity. Low Glib increased collagen IV mRNA but fully prevented collagen IV protein accumulation and PAI-1 overexpression while enhancing cAMP formation and PKA activity. MMP2 mRNA, protein expression and gelatinolytic activity were also enhanced. High Glib was, overall, ineffective. In conclusion, low dosage/concentration Glib prevents HG-induced collagen accumulation in MC by enhancing collagen catabolism in a cAMP-PKA-mediated PAI-1 inhibition.

  16. Characterization of a Unique Pathway for 4-Cresol Catabolism Initiated by Phosphorylation in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lei; Ma, Li; Qi, Feifei; Zheng, Xianliang; Jiang, Chengying; Li, Ailei; Wan, Xiaobo; Liu, Shuang-Jiang; Li, Shengying

    2016-03-18

    4-Cresol is not only a significant synthetic intermediate for production of many aromatic chemicals, but also a priority environmental pollutant because of its toxicity to higher organisms. In our previous studies, a gene cluster implicated to be involved in 4-cresol catabolism, creCDEFGHIR, was identified in Corynebacterium glutamicum and partially characterized in vivo. In this work, we report on the discovery of a novel 4-cresol biodegradation pathway that employs phosphorylated intermediates. This unique pathway initiates with the phosphorylation of the hydroxyl group of 4-cresol, which is catalyzed by a novel 4-methylbenzyl phosphate synthase, CreHI. Next, a unique class I P450 system, CreJEF, specifically recognizes phosphorylated intermediates and successively oxidizes the aromatic methyl group into carboxylic acid functionality via alcohol and aldehyde intermediates. Moreover, CreD (phosphohydrolase), CreC (alcohol dehydrogenase), and CreG (aldehyde dehydrogenase) were also found to be required for efficient oxidative transformations in this pathway. Steady-state kinetic parameters (Km and kcat) for each catabolic step were determined, and these results suggest that kinetic controls serve a key role in directing the metabolic flux to the most energy effective route.

  17. Bleached Porites compressa and Montipora capitata corals catabolize δ13C-enriched lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grottoli, Andréa G.; Rodrigues, Lisa J.

    2011-09-01

    Corals rely on stored energy reserves (i.e., lipids, carbohydrates, and protein) to survive bleaching events. To better understand the physiological implications of coral bleaching on lipid catabolism and/or synthesis, we measured the δ13C of coral total lipids (δ13CTL) in experimentally bleached (treatment) and non-bleached (control) Porites compressa and Montipora capitata corals immediately after bleaching and after 1.5 and 4 months of recovery on the reef. Overall δ13CTL values in treatment corals were significantly lower than in control corals because of a 1.9 and 3.4‰ decrease in δ13CTL immediately after bleaching in P. compressa and M. capitata, respectively. The decrease in δ13CTL coincided with decreases in total lipid concentration, indicating that corals catabolized δ13C-enriched lipids. Since storage lipids are primarily depleted during bleaching, we hypothesize that they are isotopically enriched relative to other lipid classes. This work further helps clarify our understanding of changes to coral metabolism and biogeochemistry when bleached and helps elucidate how lipid classes may influence recovery from bleaching and ultimately coral survival.

  18. Catabolism and Deactivation of the Lipid-derived Hormone Jasmonoyl-isoleucine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham JK Koo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The oxylipin hormone jasmonate controls myriad processes involved in plant growth, development and immune function. The discovery of jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine (JA-Ile as the major bioactive form of the hormone highlights the need to understand biochemical and cell biological processes underlying JA-Ile homeostasis. Among the major metabolic control points governing the accumulation of JA-Ile in plant tissues are the availability of jasmonic acid, the immediate precursor of JA-Ile, and oxidative enzymes involved in catabolism and deactivation of the hormone. Recent studies indicate that JA-Ile turnover is mediated by a ω-oxidation pathway involving members of the CYP94 family of cytochromes P450. This discovery opens new opportunities to genetically manipulate JA-Ile levels for enhanced resistance to environmental stress, and further highlights ω-oxidation as a conserved pathway for catabolism of lipid-derived signals in plants and animals. Functional characterization of the full complement of CYP94 P450s promises to reveal new pathways for jasmonate metabolism and provide insight into the evolution of oxylipin signaling in land plants.

  19. Copper suppresses abscisic acid catabolism and catalase activity, and inhibits seed germination of rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Nenghui; Li, Haoxuan; Zhu, Guohui; Liu, Yinggao; Liu, Rui; Xu, Weifeng; Jing, Yu; Peng, Xinxiang; Zhang, Jianhua

    2014-11-01

    Although copper (Cu) is an essential micronutrient for plants, a slight excess of Cu in soil can be harmful to plants. Unfortunately, Cu contamination is a growing problem all over the world due to human activities, and poses a soil stress to plant development. As one of the most important biological processes, seed germination is sensitive to Cu stress. However, little is known about the mechanism of Cu-induced inhibition of seed germination. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between Cu and ABA which is the predominant regulator of seed germination. Cu at a concentration of 30 µM effectively inhibited germination of rice caryopsis. ABA content in germinating seeds under copper stress was also higher than that under control conditions. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) revealed that Cu treatment reduced the expression of OsABA8ox2, a key gene of ABA catabolism in rice seeds. In addition, both malondialdehyde (MDA) and H2O2 contents were increased by Cu stress in the germinating seeds. Antioxidant enzyme assays revealed that only catalase activity was reduced by excess Cu, which was consistent with the mRNA profile of OsCATa during seed germination under Cu stress. Together, our results demonstrate that suppression of ABA catabolism and catalase (CAT) activity by excess Cu leads to the inhibition of seed germination of rice.

  20. The abundant marine bacterium Pelagibacter simultaneously catabolizes dimethylsulfoniopropionate to the gases dimethyl sulfide and methanethiol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Jing; Todd, Jonathan D.; Thrash, J. Cameron; Qian, Yanping; Qian, Michael C.; Temperton, Ben; Guo, Jiazhen; Fowler, Emily K.; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.; De Leenheer, Patrick; Payne, Samuel H.; Johnston, Andrew W. B.; Davie-Martin, Cleo L.; Halsey, Kimberly H.; Giovannoni, Stephen J.

    2016-05-16

    Marine phytoplankton produce ~109 tons of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) per year1,2, an estimated 10% of which is catabolized by bacteria through the DMSP cleavage pathway to the climatically active gas dimethyl sulfide (DMS)3,4. SAR11 Alphaproteobacteria (order Pelagibacterales), the most abundant chemoorganotrophic bacteria in the oceans, have been shown to assimilate DMSP into biomass, thereby supplying this cell’s unusual requirement for reduced sulfur5,6. Here we report that Pelagibacter HTCC1062 produces the gas methanethiol (MeSH) and that simultaneously a second DMSP catabolic pathway, mediated by a DMSP lyase, shunts as much as 59% of DMSP uptake to DMS production. We propose a model in which the allocation of DMSP between these pathways is kinetically controlled to release increasing amounts of DMS as the supply of DMSP exceeds cellular sulfur demands for biosynthesis. These findings suggest that DMSP supply and demand relationships in Pelagibacter metabolism are important to determining rates of oceanic DMS production.

  1. Phylogeny of culturable estuarine bacteria catabolizing riverine organic matter in the northern Baltic Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisand, Veljo; Cuadros, Rocio; Wikner, Johan

    2002-01-01

    The objective of our study was to isolate and determine the phylogenetic affiliation of culturable estuarine bacteria capable of catabolizing riverine dissolved organic matter (RDOM) under laboratory conditions. Additions of RDOM consistently promoted the growth of estuarine bacteria in carbon-limited dilution cultures, with seasonal variation in growth rates and yields. At least 42 different taxa were culturable on solid agar media and, according to quantitative DNA-DNA hybridizations, constituted 32 to 89% of the total bacterial number in the enriched treatments. Five species in the Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides group and one in the gamma-proteobacteria phylogenetic group (Marinomonas sp.) were numerically dominant during the stationary phase of the RDOM-enriched dilution cultures but not in the control cultures. Four of the isolates in Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides group were putatively affiliated with the genus FLAVOBACTERIUM: All dominating isolates were determined to be new species based on comparison to the current databases. The same group of species dominated independently of the season investigated, suggesting a low diversity of bacteria catabolizing RDOM in the estuary. It also suggested a broad tolerance of the dominating species to seasonal variation in hydrography, chemistry, and competition with other species. Taken together, our results suggest that a limited group of bacteria, mainly in the Flavobacterium genus, played an important role in introducing new energy and carbon to the marine system in the northern Baltic Sea.

  2. Microbial diversity and PAH catabolic genes tracking spatial heterogeneity of PAH concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, Göran; Törneman, Niklas; De Lipthay, Julia R; Sørensen, Søren J

    2013-01-01

    We analyzed the within-site spatial heterogeneity of microbial community diversity, polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) catabolic genotypes, and physiochemical soil properties at a creosote contaminated site. Genetic diversity and community structure were evaluated from an analysis of denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified sequences of 16S rRNA gene. The potential PAH degradation capability was determined from PCR amplification of a suit of aromatic dioxygenase genes. Microbial diversity, evenness, and PAH genotypes were patchily distributed, and hot and cold spots of their distribution coincided with hot and cold spots of the PAH distribution. The analyses revealed a positive covariation between microbial diversity, biomass, evenness, and PAH concentration, implying that the creosote contamination at this site promotes diversity and abundance. Three patchily distributed PAH-degrading genotypes, NAH, phnA, and pdo1, were identified, and their abundances were positively correlated with the PAH concentration and the fraction of soil organic carbon. The covariation of the PAH concentration with the number and spatial distribution of catabolic genotypes suggests that a field site capacity to degrade PAHs may vary with the extent of contamination.

  3. Impaired adiponectin signaling contributes to disturbed catabolism of branched-chain amino acids in diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Kun; Du, Chaosheng; Liu, Yi; Zhu, Di; Yan, Wenjun; Zhang, Haifeng; Hong, Zhibo; Liu, Peilin; Zhang, Lijian; Pei, Haifeng; Zhang, Jinglong; Gao, Chao; Xin, Chao; Cheng, Hexiang; Xiong, Lize; Tao, Ling

    2015-01-01

    The branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) accumulated in type 2 diabetes are independent contributors to insulin resistance. The activity of branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKD) complex, rate-limiting enzyme in BCAA catabolism, is reduced in diabetic states, which contributes to elevated BCAA concentrations. However, the mechanisms underlying decreased BCKD activity remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that mitochondrial phosphatase 2C (PP2Cm), a newly identified BCKD phosphatase that increases BCKD activity, was significantly downregulated in ob/ob and type 2 diabetic mice. Interestingly, in adiponectin (APN) knockout (APN(-/-)) mice fed with a high-fat diet (HD), PP2Cm expression and BCKD activity were significantly decreased, whereas BCKD kinase (BDK), which inhibits BCKD activity, was markedly increased. Concurrently, plasma BCAA and branched-chain α-keto acids (BCKA) were significantly elevated. APN treatment markedly reverted PP2Cm, BDK, BCKD activity, and BCAA and BCKA levels in HD-fed APN(-/-) and diabetic animals. Additionally, increased BCKD activity caused by APN administration was partially but significantly inhibited in PP2Cm knockout mice. Finally, APN-mediated upregulation of PP2Cm expression and BCKD activity were abolished when AMPK was inhibited. Collectively, we have provided the first direct evidence that APN is a novel regulator of PP2Cm and systematic BCAA levels, suggesting that targeting APN may be a pharmacological approach to ameliorating BCAA catabolism in the diabetic state.

  4. Central Role of Pyruvate Kinase in Carbon Co-catabolism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noy, Tahel; Vergnolle, Olivia; Hartman, Travis E; Rhee, Kyu Y; Jacobs, William R; Berney, Michael; Blanchard, John S

    2016-03-25

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) displays a high degree of metabolic plasticity to adapt to challenging host environments. Genetic evidence suggests thatMtbrelies mainly on fatty acid catabolism in the host. However,Mtbalso maintains a functional glycolytic pathway and its role in the cellular metabolism ofMtbhas yet to be understood. Pyruvate kinase catalyzes the last and rate-limiting step in glycolysis and theMtbgenome harbors one putative pyruvate kinase (pykA, Rv1617). Here we show thatpykAencodes an active pyruvate kinase that is allosterically activated by glucose 6-phosphate (Glc-6-P) and adenosine monophosphate (AMP). Deletion ofpykApreventsMtbgrowth in the presence of fermentable carbon sources and has a cidal effect in the presence of glucose that correlates with elevated levels of the toxic catabolite methylglyoxal. Growth attenuation was also observed in media containing a combination of short chain fatty acids and glucose and surprisingly, in media containing odd and even chain fatty acids alone. Untargeted high sensitivity metabolomics revealed that inactivation of pyruvate kinase leads to accumulation of phosphoenolpyruvate (P-enolpyruvate), citrate, and aconitate, which was consistent with allosteric inhibition of isocitrate dehydrogenase by P-enolpyruvate. This metabolic block could be relieved by addition of the α-ketoglutarate precursor glutamate. Taken together, our study identifies an essential role of pyruvate kinase in preventing metabolic block during carbon co-catabolism inMtb.

  5. Empagliflozin, via Switching Metabolism Toward Lipid Utilization, Moderately Increases LDL Cholesterol Levels Through Reduced LDL Catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briand, François; Mayoux, Eric; Brousseau, Emmanuel; Burr, Noémie; Urbain, Isabelle; Costard, Clément; Mark, Michael; Sulpice, Thierry

    2016-07-01

    In clinical trials, a small increase in LDL cholesterol has been reported with sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors. The mechanisms by which the SGLT2 inhibitor empagliflozin increases LDL cholesterol levels were investigated in hamsters with diet-induced dyslipidemia. Compared with vehicle, empagliflozin 30 mg/kg/day for 2 weeks significantly reduced fasting blood glucose by 18%, with significant increase in fasting plasma LDL cholesterol, free fatty acids, and total ketone bodies by 25, 49, and 116%, respectively. In fasting conditions, glycogen hepatic levels were further reduced by 84% with empagliflozin, while 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase activity and total cholesterol hepatic levels were 31 and 10% higher, respectively (both P catabolism of (3)H-cholesteryl oleate-labeled LDL injected intravenously by 20%, indicating that empagliflozin raises LDL levels through reduced catabolism. Unexpectedly, empagliflozin also reduced intestinal cholesterol absorption in vivo, which led to a significant increase in LDL- and macrophage-derived cholesterol fecal excretion (both P < 0.05 vs. vehicle). These data suggest that empagliflozin, by switching energy metabolism from carbohydrate to lipid utilization, moderately increases ketone production and LDL cholesterol levels. Interestingly, empagliflozin also reduces intestinal cholesterol absorption, which in turn promotes LDL- and macrophage-derived cholesterol fecal excretion.

  6. Multiscale investigation of USPIO nanoparticles in atherosclerotic plaques and their catabolism and storage in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraloiu, Valentin-Adrian; Appaix, Florence; Broisat, Alexis; Le Guellec, Dominique; Teodorescu, Valentin Serban; Ghezzi, Catherine; van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Blanchin, Marie-Genevieve

    2016-01-01

    The storage and catabolism of Ultrasmall SuperParamagnetic Iron Oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles were analyzed through a multiscale approach combining Two Photon Laser Scanning Microscopy (TPLSM) and High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) at different times after intravenous injection in an atherosclerotic ApoE(-/-) mouse model. The atherosclerotic plaque features and the USPIO heterogeneous biodistribution were revealed down from organ's scale to subcellular level. The biotransformation of the nanoparticle iron oxide (maghemite) core into ferritin, the non-toxic form of iron storage, was demonstrated for the first time ex vivo in atherosclerotic plaques as well as in spleen, the iron storage organ. These results rely on an innovative spatial and structural investigation of USPIO's catabolism in cellular phagolysosomes. This study showed that these nanoparticles were stored as non-toxic iron compounds: maghemite oxide or ferritin, which is promising for MRI detection of atherosclerotic plaques in clinics using these USPIOs. From the Clinical Editor: Advance in nanotechnology has brought new contrast agents for clinical imaging. In this article, the authors investigated the use and biotransformation of Ultrasmall Super-paramagnetic Iron Oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles for analysis of atherosclerotic plagues in Two Photon Laser Scanning Microscopy (TPLSM) and High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). The biophysical data generated from this study could enable the possible use of these nanoparticles for the benefits of clinical patients.

  7. Argininosuccinate synthetase regulates hepatic AMPK linking protein catabolism and ureagenesis to hepatic lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madiraju, Anila K; Alves, Tiago; Zhao, Xiaojian; Cline, Gary W; Zhang, Dongyan; Bhanot, Sanjay; Samuel, Varman T; Kibbey, Richard G; Shulman, Gerald I

    2016-06-14

    A key sensor of cellular energy status, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), interacts allosterically with AMP to maintain an active state. When active, AMPK triggers a metabolic switch, decreasing the activity of anabolic pathways and enhancing catabolic processes such as lipid oxidation to restore the energy balance. Unlike oxidative tissues, in which AMP is generated from adenylate kinase during states of high energy demand, the ornithine cycle enzyme argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) is a principle site of AMP generation in the liver. Here we show that ASS regulates hepatic AMPK, revealing a central role for ureagenesis flux in the regulation of metabolism via AMPK. Treatment of primary rat hepatocytes with amino acids increased gluconeogenesis and ureagenesis and, despite nutrient excess, induced both AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) phosphorylation. Antisense oligonucleotide knockdown of hepatic ASS1 expression in vivo decreased liver AMPK activation, phosphorylation of ACC, and plasma β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations. Taken together these studies demonstrate that increased amino acid flux can activate AMPK through increased AMP generated by ASS, thus providing a novel link between protein catabolism, ureagenesis, and hepatic lipid metabolism.

  8. Streptococcus pyogenes arginine and citrulline catabolism promotes infection and modulates innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusumano, Zachary T; Watson, Michael E; Caparon, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    A bacterium's ability to acquire nutrients from its host during infection is an essential component of pathogenesis. For the Gram-positive pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes, catabolism of the amino acid arginine via the arginine deiminase (ADI) pathway supplements energy production and provides protection against acid stress in vitro. Its expression is enhanced in murine models of infection, suggesting an important role in vivo. To gain insight into the function of the ADI pathway in pathogenesis, the virulence of mutants defective in each of its enzymes was examined. Mutants unable to use arginine (ΔArcA) or citrulline (ΔArcB) were attenuated for carriage in a murine model of asymptomatic mucosal colonization. However, in a murine model of inflammatory infection of cutaneous tissue, the ΔArcA mutant was attenuated but the ΔArcB mutant was hyperattenuated, revealing an unexpected tissue-specific role for citrulline metabolism in pathogenesis. When mice defective for the arginine-dependent production of nitric oxide (iNOS(-/-)) were infected with the ΔArcA mutant, cutaneous virulence was rescued, demonstrating that the ability of S. pyogenes to utilize arginine was dispensable in the absence of nitric oxide-mediated innate immunity. This work demonstrates the importance of arginine and citrulline catabolism and suggests a novel mechanism of virulence by which S. pyogenes uses its metabolism to modulate innate immunity through depletion of an essential host nutrient.

  9. Piperine mediates LPS induced inflammatory and catabolic effects in rat intervertebral disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Li, Kang; Hu, Yiqin; Xu, Bo; Zhao, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Piperine is an exact of the active phenolic component from Black pepper. It has been reported to have many biological activities including anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor effects. Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is a degenerative disease closely relate to inflammation of nucleus pulposus (NP) cells. This study aimed to assess the anti-inflammatory and anti-catabolic effects of piperine in rat intervertebral disc using in vitro and ex vivo analyzes. We demonstrated that piperine could inhibit LPS induced expression and production of inflammatory factors and catabolic proteases in NP cells culture model. It significantly inhibited multiple inflammatory factors and oxidative stress-associated genes (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, iNOS), MMPs (MMP-3, MMP-13), ADAMTS (ADAMTS-4, ADAMTS-5) mRNA expression and NO production in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, piperine could reverse the LPS-induced inhibition of gene expression of aggrecan and collagen-II. Histologic and dimethylmethylene blue analysis indicated piperine could also against LPS induced proteoglycan (PG) depletion in a rat intervertebral disc culture model. Western blot results showed that piperine inhibited the LPS-mediated phosphorylation of JNK and activation of NF-κB. Finally, our results demonstrated the ability of piperine to antagonize LPS-mediated inflammation of NP cells and suppression of PG in rat intervertebral disc, suggesting a potential agent for treatment of IDD in future.

  10. The development of phenanthrene catabolism in soil amended with transformer oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Philip H; Doick, Kieron J; Semple, Kirk T

    2003-11-21

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants frequently associated with light non-aqueous-phase liquids (LNAPLs) in soil. Microbial degradation comprises a major loss process for PAHs in the environment. Various laboratory studies, using known degraders, have shown reduced or enhanced mineralisation of PAHs when dissolved in different LNAPLs. Effects due to the presence of LNAPLs on indigenous micro-organisms, however, are not fully understood. A pristine pasture soil was spiked with [14C]phenanthrene and transformer oil to 0, 0.01 and 0.1%, and incubated for 180 days. The catabolic potential of the soil towards phenanthrene was assessed periodically during ageing. The extent of the lag phase (prior to >5% mineralisation), maximum rates and overall extents of mineralisation observed during the course of a 14-day bioassay appeared to be dependent upon phenanthrene concentration, the presence of transformer oil, and soil-contaminant contact time. Putatively, transformer oil enhanced acclimation and facilitated the development of measurable catabolic activity towards phenanthrene in a previously uncontaminated pasture soil. Exact mechanisms for the observed enhancement, longer-term fate/degradation of the oil and residual phenanthrene, and effects of the presence of the oil on the indigenous microbes over extended time frames warrant further investigation.

  11. Effects of maternal plasmid GHRH treatment on offspring growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    To differentiate prenatal effects of plasmid growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) treatment from maternal effects mediated by lactation on long-term growth of offspring, a cross-fostering study was designed. Pregnant sows (n = 12) were untreated (n = 6), or received either a Wt-GHRH (n = 2), or H...

  12. Pharmaceutical development of the plasmid DNA vaccine pDERMATT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quaak, S.G.L.

    2009-01-01

    The discovery of tumor specific antigens and self tolerance mechanisms against these antigens led to the assumption that antigens circulating at sufficient concentration levels could break this self tolerance mechanism and evoke immunological antitumor effects. pDERMATT (plasmid DNA encoding recombi

  13. Use of plasmid DNA for induction of protective immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Niels

    2004-01-01

    Vaccines based on plasmid DNA have been tested for a number of fish pathogens but so far it is only in case of the rhabdoviruses, where the technology has been a real break through in vaccine research. Aspects of dose, time-course and mechanisms of protection, as well as practical use are discussed....

  14. Plasmid containing a DNA ligase gene from Haemophilus influenzae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, D.; Griffin, K.; Setlow, J.K.

    1984-05-01

    A ligase gene from Haemophilus influenzae was cloned into the shuttle vector pDM2. Although the plasmid did not affect X-ray sensitivity, it caused an increase in UV sensitivity of the wild-type but not excision-defective H. influenzae and a decrease in UV sensitivity of the rec-1 mutant. 14 references, 2 figures.

  15. The replication origin of a repABC plasmid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cevallos Miguel A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background repABC operons are present on large, low copy-number plasmids and on some secondary chromosomes in at least 19 α-proteobacterial genera, and are responsible for the replication and segregation properties of these replicons. These operons consist, with some variations, of three genes: repA, repB, and repC. RepA and RepB are involved in plasmid partitioning and in the negative regulation of their own transcription, and RepC is the limiting factor for replication. An antisense RNA encoded between the repB-repC genes modulates repC expression. Results To identify the minimal region of the Rhizobium etli p42d plasmid that is capable of autonomous replication, we amplified different regions of the repABC operon using PCR and cloned the regions into a suicide vector. The resulting vectors were then introduced into R. etli strains that did or did not contain p42d. The minimal replicon consisted of a repC open reading frame under the control of a constitutive promoter with a Shine-Dalgarno sequence that we designed. A sequence analysis of repC revealed the presence of a large A+T-rich region but no iterons or DnaA boxes. Silent mutations that modified the A+T content of this region eliminated the replication capability of the plasmid. The minimal replicon could not be introduced into R. etli strain containing p42d, but similar constructs that carried repC from Sinorhizobium meliloti pSymA or the linear chromosome of Agrobacterium tumefaciens replicated in the presence or absence of p42d, indicating that RepC is an incompatibility factor. A hybrid gene construct expressing a RepC protein with the first 362 amino acid residues from p42d RepC and the last 39 amino acid residues of RepC from SymA was able to replicate in the presence of p42d. Conclusions RepC is the only element encoded in the repABC operon of the R. etli p42d plasmid that is necessary and sufficient for plasmid replication and is probably the initiator protein. The ori

  16. Characterization of the Lactobacillus plantarum plasmid pCD033 and generation of the plasmid free strain L. plantarum 3NSH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, Silvia; Grabherr, Reingard; Heinl, Stefan

    2015-09-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum CD033, a strain isolated from grass silage in Austria, harbors a 7.9 kb plasmid designated pCD033. Sequence analysis identified 14 open reading frames and 8 of these were supposed to be putative coding sequences. Gene annotation revealed no putative essential genes being plasmid encoded, but a plasmid addiction system based on a PemI/PemK-like toxin-antitoxin system, able to stabilize plasmid maintenance. Absence of a replication initiation protein, a double strand origin as well as a single strand origin on plasmid pCD033 suggests replication via a new type of theta mechanism, whereby plasmid replication is potentially initiated and regulated by non-coding RNA. Detailed examination of segregational stability of plasmid vectors consisting of pCD033-fragments, combined with a selection marker, resulted in definition of a stably maintained minimal replicon. A gene encoding a RepB/OrfX-like protein was found to be not essential for plasmid replication. Alignment of the amino acid sequence of this protein with related proteins unveiled a highly conserved amino acid motif (LLDQQQ). L. plantarum CD033 was cured of pCD033 resulting in the novel plasmid free strain L. plantarum 3NSH. Plasmid curing demonstrated that no essential features are provided by pCD033 under laboratory conditions.

  17. Transfer of plasmid-mediated ampicillin resistance from Haemophilus to Neisseria gonorrhoeae requires an intervening organism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNicol, P J; Albritton, W L; Ronald, A R

    1986-01-01

    Haemophilus species have been implicated as the source of plasmid-mediated ampicillin resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Previous attempts to transfer conjugally the resistance plasmids from Haemophilus species to N. gonorrhoeae have met with limited success. Using both biparental and triparental mating systems, it was found that transfer will occur if the commensal Neisseria species, Neisseria cinerea, is used as a transfer intermediate. This organism stably maintains resistance plasmids of Haemophilus and facilitates transfer of these plasmids to N. gonorrhoeae, in a triparental mating system, at a transfer frequency of 10(-8). Both Haemophilus ducreyi and N. gonorrhoeae carry mobilizing plasmids capable of mediating conjugal transfer of the same resistance plasmids. However, restriction endonuclease mapping and DNA hybridization studies indicate that the mobilizing plasmids are distinctly different molecules. Limited homology is present within the transfer region of these plasmids.

  18. Regulation of myo-inositol catabolism by a GntR-type repressor SCO6974 in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lingjun; Li, Shuxian; Gao, Wenyan; Pan, Yuanyuan; Tan, Huarong; Liu, Gang

    2015-04-01

    Myo-inositol is important for Streptomyces growth and morphological differentiation. Genomic sequence analysis revealed a myo-inositol catabolic gene cluster in Streptomyces coelicolor. Disruption of the corresponding genes in this cluster abolished the bacterial growth on myo-inositol as a single carbon source. The transcriptions of these genes were remarkably enhanced by addition of myo-inositol in minimal medium. A putative regulatory gene SCO6974, encoding a GntR family protein, is situated in the cluster. Disruption of SCO6974 significantly enhanced the transcription of myo-inositol catabolic genes. SCO6974 was shown to interact with the promoter regions of myo-inositol catabolic genes using electrophoretic mobility shift assays. DNase I footprinting assays demonstrated that SCO6974 recognized a conserved palindromic sequence (A/T)TGT(A/C)N(G/T)(G/T)ACA(A/T). Base substitution of the conserved sequence completely abolished the binding of SCO6974 to the targets demonstrating that SCO6974 directly represses the transcriptions of myo-inositol catabolic genes. Furthermore, the disruption of SCO6974 was correlated with a reduced sporulation of S. coelicolor in mannitol soya flour medium and with the overproduction of actinorhodin and calcium-dependent antibiotic. The addition of myo-inositol suppressed the sporulation deficiency of the mutant, indicating that the effect could be related to a shortage in myo-inositol due to its enhanced catabolism in this strain. This enhanced myo-inositol catabolism likely yields dihydroxyacetone phosphate and acetyl-CoA that are indirect or direct precursors of the overproduced antibiotics.

  19. Biaxial stress relaxation of semilunar heart valve leaflets during simulated collagen catabolism: Effects of collagenase concentration and equibiaxial strain state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Siyao; Huang, Hsiao-Ying Shadow

    2015-10-01

    Heart valve leaflet collagen turnover and remodeling are innate to physiological homeostasis; valvular interstitial cells routinely catabolize damaged collagen and affect repair. Moreover, evidence indicates that leaflets can adapt to altered physiological (e.g. pregnancy) and pathological (e.g. hypertension) mechanical load states, tuning collagen structure and composition to changes in pressure and flow. However, while valvular interstitial cell-secreted matrix metalloproteinases are considered the primary effectors of collagen catabolism, the mechanisms by which damaged collagen fibers are selectively degraded remain unclear. Growing evidence suggests that the collagen fiber strain state plays a key role, with the strain-dependent configuration of the collagen molecules either masking or presenting proteolytic sites, thereby protecting or accelerating collagen proteolysis. In this study, the effects of equibiaxial strain state on collagen catabolism were investigated in porcine aortic valve and pulmonary valve tissues. Bacterial collagenase (0.2 and 0.5 mg/mL) was utilized to simulate endogenous matrix metalloproteinases, and biaxial stress relaxation and biochemical collagen concentration served as functional and compositional measures of collagen catabolism, respectively. At a collagenase concentration of 0.5 mg/mL, increasing the equibiaxial strain imposed during stress relaxation (0%, 37.5%, and 50%) yielded significantly lower median collagen concentrations in the aortic valve (p = 0.0231) and pulmonary valve (p = 0.0183), suggesting that relatively large strain magnitudes may enhance collagen catabolism. Collagen concentration decreases were paralleled by trends of accelerated normalized stress relaxation rate with equibiaxial strain in aortic valve tissues. Collectively, these in vitro results indicate that biaxial strain state is capable of affecting the susceptibility of valvular collagens to catabolism, providing a basis for further investigation of

  20. Catabolic and anabolic energy for chemolithoautotrophs in deep-sea hydrothermal systems hosted in different rock types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amend, Jan P.; McCollom, Thomas M.; Hentscher, Michael; Bach, Wolfgang

    2011-10-01

    Active deep-sea hydrothermal vents are hosted by a range of different rock types, including basalt, peridotite, and felsic rocks. The associated hydrothermal fluids exhibit substantial chemical variability, which is largely attributable to compositional differences among the underlying host rocks. Numerical models were used to evaluate the energetics of seven inorganic redox reactions (potential catabolisms of chemolithoautotrophs) and numerous biomolecule synthesis reactions (anabolism) in a representative sampling of these systems, where chemical gradients are established by mixing hydrothermal fluid with seawater. The wide ranging fluid compositions dictate demonstrable differences in Gibbs energies (Δ G r) of these catabolic and anabolic reactions in three peridotite-hosted, six basalt-hosted, one troctolite-basalt hybrid, and two felsic rock-hosted systems. In peridotite-hosted systems at low to moderate temperatures (10), hydrogen oxidation yields the most catabolic energy, but the oxidation of methane, ferrous iron, and sulfide can also be moderately exergonic. At higher temperatures, and consequent SW:HF mixing ratios catabolic energy source at all temperatures (and SW:HF ratios) considered. The energetics of catabolism at the troctolite-basalt hybrid system were intermediate to these extremes. Reaction energetics for anabolism in chemolithoautotrophs—represented here by the synthesis of amino acids, nucleotides, fatty acids, saccharides, and amines—were generally most favorable at moderate temperatures (22-32 °C) and corresponding SW:HF mixing ratios (˜15). In peridotite-hosted and the troctolite-basalt hybrid systems, Δ G r for primary biomass synthesis yielded up to ˜900 J per g dry cell mass. The energetics of anabolism in basalt- and felsic rock-hosted systems were far less favorable. The results suggest that in peridotite-hosted (and troctolite-basalt hybrid) systems, compared with their basalt (and felsic rock) counterparts, microbial

  1. Summer-to-Winter Phenotypic Flexibility of Fatty Acid Transport and Catabolism in Skeletal Muscle and Heart of Small Birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yufeng; King, Marisa O; Harmon, Erin; Swanson, David L

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged shivering in birds is mainly fueled by lipids. Consequently, lipid transport and catabolism are vital for thermogenic performance and could be upregulated along with thermogenic capacity as part of the winter phenotype. We investigated summer-to-winter variation in lipid transport and catabolism by measuring mRNA expression, protein levels, and enzyme activities for several key steps of lipid transport and catabolic pathways in pectoralis muscle and heart in two small temperate-zone resident birds, American goldfinches (Spinus tristis) and black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus). Cytosolic fatty acid binding protein (FABPc; a key component of intramyocyte lipid transport) mRNA and/or protein levels were generally higher in winter for pectoralis muscle and heart for both species. However, seasonal variation in plasma membrane lipid transporters, fatty acyl translocase, and plasma membrane fatty acid binding protein in pectoralis and heart differed between the two species, with winter increases for chickadees and seasonal stability or summer increases for goldfinches. Catabolic enzyme activities generally showed limited seasonal differences for both tissues and both species. These data suggest that FABPc is an important target of upregulation for the winter phenotype in pectoralis and heart of both species. Plasma membrane lipid transporters and lipid catabolic capacity were also elevated in winter for chickadees but not for goldfinches. Because the two species show differential regulation of distinct aspects of lipid transport and catabolism, these data are consistent with other recent studies documenting that different bird species or populations employ a variety of strategies to promote elevated winter thermogenic capacity.

  2. Plasmid profiling of bacterial isolates from confined environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Houdt, Rob; Provoost, Ann; Coninx, Ilse; Leys, Natalie; Mergeay, Max

    Plasmid profiling of bacterial isolates from confined environments R. Van Houdt, I. Coninx, A. Provoost, N. Leys, and M. Mergeay Expertise group for Molecular and Cellular Biology, Institute for Environment, Health and Safety, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK•CEN), Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol, Belgium. Human exploration of extreme and isolated hostile environments such as space requires special confined small volume habitats to protect and house the crew. However, human confinement in such small volume habitats has restrictions on waste disposal and personal hygiene and inevitably generates a particular community of microorganisms within the habitat. These microorganisms are mainly originating from the crew (skin, mucous membranes, upper respiratory tract, mouth, and gastrointestinal tract) but also include the residing environmental microorganisms. Earth-based confined habitats such as the Antarctic Research Station Concordia are used as test beds for long-duration spaceflights to study the physiologic and psychological adaptation to isolated environments. The dynamics of the environmental microbial population in such a test bed could render additional insights in assessing the potential health risks in long-duration space missions. Not only total bacterial contamination levels are important, but it is essential to identify also the predominant microbial taxa and their mobile genetic elements (MGE). These MGEs could be exchanged between bacteria by horizontal gene transfer and may alter the pathogenic potential since they often carry antibiotic resistance or more in general adaptation-enhancing traits. In this study several bacterial strains isolated in the Concordia research station were examined for their plasmid content. An optimized protocol for extraction of large plasmids showed the present of at least one plasmid in 50% of the strains. For all strains the minimal inhibitory concentration of a range of antibiotics was determined indicating resistance to

  3. Enhanced brain targeting efficiency of intranasally administered plasmid DNA: an alternative route for brain gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, In-Kwon; Kim, Mi Young; Byun, Hyang-Min; Hwang, Tae Sun; Kim, Jung Mogg; Hwang, Kwang Woo; Park, Tae Gwan; Jung, Woon-Won; Chun, Taehoon; Jeong, Gil-Jae; Oh, Yu-Kyoung

    2007-01-01

    Recently, nasal administration has been studied as a noninvasive route for delivery of plasmid DNA encoding therapeutic or antigenic genes. Here, we examined the brain targeting efficiency and transport pathways of intranasally administered plasmid DNA. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) measurements of plasmid DNA in blood and brain tissues revealed that intranasally administered pCMVbeta (7.2 kb) and pN2/CMVbeta (14.1 kb) showed systemic absorption and brain distribution. Following intranasal administration, the beta-galactosidase protein encoded by these plasmids was significantly expressed in brain tissues. Kinetic studies showed that intranasally administered plasmid DNA reached the brain with a 2,595-fold higher efficiency than intravenously administered plasmid DNA did, 10 min post-dose. Over 1 h post-dose, the brain targeting efficiencies were consistently higher for intranasally administered plasmid DNA than for intravenously administered DNA. To examine how plasmid DNA enters the brain and moves to the various regions, we examined tissues from nine brain regions, at 5 and 10 min after intranasal or intravenous administration of plasmid DNA. Intravenously administered plasmid DNA displayed similar levels of plasmid DNA in the nine different regions, whereas, intranasally administered plasmid DNA exhibited different levels of distribution among the regions, with the highest plasmid DNA levels in the olfactory bulb. Moreover, plasmid DNA was mainly detected in the endothelial cells, but not in glial cells. Our results suggest that intranasally applied plasmid DNA may reach the brain through a direct route, possibly via the olfactory bulb, and that the nasal route might be an alternative method for efficiently delivering plasmid DNA to the brain.

  4. Participation of the lytic replicon in bacteriophage P1 plasmid maintenance.

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    P1 bacteriophage carries at least two replicons: a plasmid replicon and a viral lytic replicon. Since the isolated plasmid replicon can maintain itself stably at the low copy number characteristic of intact P1 prophage, it has been assumed that this replicon is responsible for driving prophage replication. We provide evidence that when replication from the plasmid replicon is prevented, prophage replication continues, albeit at a reduced rate. The residual plasmid replication is due to incomp...

  5. Conservation of Plasmid-Encoded Traits among Bean-Nodulating Rhizobium Species

    OpenAIRE

    Brom, Susana; Girard, Lourdes; García-de los Santos, Alejandro; Sanjuan-Pinilla, Julio M.; Olivares, José; Sanjuan, Juan

    2002-01-01

    Rhizobium etli type strain CFN42 contains six plasmids. We analyzed the distribution of genetic markers from some of these plasmids in bean-nodulating strains belonging to different species (Rhizobium etli, Rhizobium gallicum, Rhizobium giardinii, Rhizobium leguminosarum, and Sinorhizobium fredii). Our results indicate that independent of geographic origin, R. etli strains usually share not only the pSym plasmid but also other plasmids containing symbiosis-related genes, with a similar organi...

  6. Effect of plasmid pKM101 in ultraviolet irradiated uvr+ and uvr- Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slezáriková, V; Sedliaková, M; Andreeva, I V; Rusina OYu; Skavronskaya, A G

    1992-11-16

    The effect of plasmid pKM101 on UV irradiated excision proficient and excision deficient cells was investigated. The plasmid increased the survival of excision proficient cells while partially inhibiting thymine dimer excision. The frequency of mutations was almost unchanged. In excision deficient cells the effect of the plasmid on survival was less pronounced while cell mutability was increased. Our data indicate that the mucAB genes (carried by the plasmid) influence the two types of cells in a different way.

  7. Application of p-toluidine in chromogenic detection of catechol and protocatechuate, diphenolic intermediates in catabolism of aromatic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parke, D. (Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States))

    1992-08-01

    In the presence of p-toluidine and iron, protocatechuate and catechols yield color. Inclusion of p-toluidine in media facilities the screening of microbial strains for alterations affecting aromatic catabolism. Such strains include mutants affected in the expression of oxygenases and Escherichia coli colonies carrying cloned or subcloned aromatic catabolic genes which encode enzymes giving rise to protocatechuate or catechol. The diphenolic detection system can also be applied to the creation of vectors relying on insertion of cloned DNA into one of the latter marker genes.

  8. Influence of black gram (Vigna mungo) trypsin inhibitory fraction on the hepatic protein catabolism in male albino mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalakannan, V; Sathyamoorthy, A V; Motlag, D B

    1984-01-01

    The effect of black gram and black gram trypsin inhibitor on the protein catabolism of male albino mice has been investigated. Group 1 was given autoclaved black gram (control), Group II raw black gram and Group III the autoclaved black gram incorporated with 1% black gram trypsin inhibitor. Blood as well as urinary urea and creatine were found to be elevated in Groups II and III. Increased levels of arginase, ornithine transcarbamylase and transaminases were noted in Groups II and III. The results suggested an enhanced catabolism of proteins evoked by the native black gram trypsin inhibitor.

  9. Novel plasmid conferring kanamycin and tetracycline resistance in turkey-derived Campylobacter jejuni strain 11601MD

    Science.gov (United States)

    In Campylobacter spp., resistance to the antibiotics kanamycin and tetracycline is frequently associated with plasmid-borne genes. However, relatively few plasmids of Campylobacter jejuni have been fully characterized to date. A novel plasmid (p11601MD; 44,095 bp.) harboring tet(O) was identified in...

  10. Studies on the expression of plasmid-borne genes in the endosymbiotic state of Rhizobium leguminosarum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krol, A.J.M.

    1982-01-01

    The subject matter of the research reported in this thesis is the role of plasmid-borne genes of Rhizobium in symbiosis and nitrogen fixation. Plasmid DNA was isolated from Rhizobium leguminosarum strain PRE and the expression of plasmid DNA in nitrogen fixing nodules was investigated by hybridizati

  11. Occurrence and persistence of indigenous transconjugants carrying conjugative plasmids in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Daisuke; Soda, Satoshi; Tsutsui, Hirofumi; Yamazaki, Yuji; Murashige, Katsushi; Sei, Kazunari; Fujita, Masanori; Ike, Michihiko

    2009-09-01

    The transfer of the self-transmissible plasmids, RP4 and pJP4, from introduced bacteria to indigenous bacteria was examined in soil and slurry microcosms. The introduced plasmids persisted in indigenous transconjugants despite the low survival of introduced donors. The potential of the transconjugants for growth and conjugation affects the persistence of introduced plasmids in soil.

  12. Presence and analysis of plasmids in human and animal associated Arcobacter species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douidah, Laid; De Zutter, Lieven; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip;

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we report the screening of four Arcobacter species for the presence of small and large plasmids. Plasmids were present in 9.9% of the 273 examined strains. One Arcobacter cryaerophilus and four Arcobacter butzleri plasmids were selected for further sequencing. The size of three sma...

  13. A Bipolar Spindle of Antiparallel ParM Filaments Drives Bacterial Plasmid Segregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gayathri, P; Fujii, T; Møller-Jensen, Jakob;

    2012-01-01

    To ensure their stable inheritance by daughter cells during cell division, bacterial low copy-number plasmids make simple DNA segregating machines that use an elongating protein filament between sister plasmids. In the ParMRC system of Escherichia coli R1 plasmid, ParM, an actin-like protein, forms...

  14. A mass spectrometric method to determine activities of enzymes involved in polyamine catabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriya, Shunsuke; Iwasaki, Kaori [Department of Molecular Medicine, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, 2-1-6 Kami-kitazawa, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan); Samejima, Keijiro, E-mail: samejima-kj@igakuken.or.jp [Department of Molecular Medicine, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, 2-1-6 Kami-kitazawa, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan); Takao, Koichi [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Josai University, 1-1 Keyakidai, Sakado, Saitama 350-0295 (Japan); Kohda, Kohfuku [Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Musashino University, 1-1-20 Shinmachi, Nishitokyo, Tokyo 202-8585 (Japan); Hiramatsu, Kyoko; Kawakita, Masao [Department of Molecular Medicine, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, 2-1-6 Kami-kitazawa, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan)

    2012-10-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compounds in polyamine catabolic pathway were determined by a column-free ESI-TOF MS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N{sup 1}- and N{sup 8}-acetylspermidine were determined by a column-free ESI-MS/MS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method was applied to determine activities of APAO, SMO, and SSAT in the pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The assay method contained stable isotope-labeled natural substrates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is applicable to biological samples containing natural substrate and product. - Abstract: An analytical method for the determination of three polyamines (putrescine, spermidine, and spermine) and five acetylpolyamines [N{sup 1}-acetylspermidine (N{sup 1}AcSpd), N{sup 8}-acetylspermidine (N{sup 8}AcSpd), N{sup 1}-acetylspermine, N{sup 1},N{sup 8}-diacetylspermidine, and N{sup 1},N{sup 12}-diacetylspermine] involved in the polyamine catabolic pathway has been developed using a hybrid tandem mass spectrometer. Heptafluorobutyryl (HFB) derivatives of these compounds and respective internal standards labeled with stable isotopes were analyzed simultaneously by TOF MS, based on peak areas appearing at appropriate m/z values. The isomers, N{sup 1}AcSpd and N{sup 8}AcSpd were determined from their fragment ions, the acetylamidopropyl and acetylamidobutyl groups, respectively, using MS/MS with {sup 13}C{sub 2}-N{sup 1}AcSpd and {sup 13}C{sub 2}-N{sup 8}AcSpd which have the {sup 13}C{sub 2}-acetyl group as an internal standard. The TOF MS method was successfully applied to measure the activity of enzymes involved in polyamine catabolic pathways, namely N{sup 1}-acetylpolyamine oxidase (APAO), spermine oxidase (SMO), and spermidine/spermine N{sup 1}-acetyltransferase (SSAT). The following natural substrates and products labeled with stable isotopes considering the application to biological samples were identified; for APAO, [4,9,12-{sup 15}N{sub 3}]-N{sup 1}-acetylspermine and [1,4,8-{sup 15}N{sub 3

  15. Overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary structural studies of catabolic ornithine transcarbamylase from Lactobacillus hilgardii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivas, Blanca de las; Rodríguez, Héctor [Instituto de Fermentaciones Industriales, CSIC, Juan de la Cierva 3, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Angulo, Iván [Grupo de Cristalografía Macromolecular y Biología Estructural, Instituto Rocasolano, CSIC, Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Muñoz, Rosario [Instituto de Fermentaciones Industriales, CSIC, Juan de la Cierva 3, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Mancheño, José M., E-mail: xjosemi@iqfr.csic.es [Grupo de Cristalografía Macromolecular y Biología Estructural, Instituto Rocasolano, CSIC, Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Fermentaciones Industriales, CSIC, Juan de la Cierva 3, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    The catabolic ornithine transcarbamylase (cOTC) from L. hilgardii has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized under two different experimental conditions. The structure has been solved by the molecular-replacement method using the atomic coordinates of catabolic ornithine transcarbamylase from P. aeruginosa as the search model. The catabolic ornithine transcarbamylase (cOTC; EC 2.1.3.3) from the lactic acid bacteria Lactobacillus hilgardii is a key protein involved in the degradation of arginine during malolactic fermentation. cOTC containing an N-terminal His{sub 6} tag has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized under two different experimental conditions using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Crystals obtained from a solution containing 8%(w/v) PEG 4000, 75 mM sodium acetate pH 4.6 belong to the trigonal space group P321 and have unit-cell parameters a = b = 157.04, c = 79.28 Å. Conversely, crystals grown in 20%(v/v) 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol, 7.5%(w/v) PEG 4000, 100 mM HEPES pH 7.8 belong to the monoclinic space group C2 and have unit-cell parameters a = 80.06, b = 148.90, c = 91.67 Å, β = 100.25°. Diffraction data were collected in-house to 3.00 and 2.91 Å resolution for trigonal and monoclinic crystals, respectively. The estimated Matthews coefficient for the crystal forms were 2.36 and 2.24 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}, respectively, corresponding to 48% and 45% solvent content. In both cases, the results are consistent with the presence of three protein subunits in the asymmetric unit. The structure of cOTC has been determined by the molecular-replacement method using the atomic coordinates of cOTC from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PDB code) as the search model.

  16. Determination of plasmid copy number reveals the total plasmid DNA amount is greater than the chromosomal DNA amount in Bacillus thuringiensis YBT-1520.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunying Zhong

    Full Text Available Bacillus thuringiensis is the most widely used bacterial bio-insecticide, and most insecticidal crystal protein-coding genes are located on plasmids. Most strains of B. thuringiensis harbor numerous diverse plasmids, although the plasmid copy numbers (PCNs of all native plasmids in this host and the corresponding total plasmid DNA amount remains unknown. In this study, we determined the PCNs of 11 plasmids (ranging from 2 kb to 416 kb in a sequenced B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki strain YBT-1520 using real-time qPCR. PCNs were found to range from 1.38 to 172, and were negatively correlated to plasmid size. The amount of total plasmid DNA (∼8.7 Mbp was 1.62-fold greater than the amount of chromosomal DNA (∼5.4 Mbp at the mid-exponential growth stage (OD(600 = 2.0 of the organism. Furthermore, we selected three plasmids with different sizes and replication mechanisms to determine the PCNs over the entire life cycle. We found that the PCNs dynamically shifted at different stages, reaching their maximum during the mid-exponential growth or stationary phases and remaining stable and close to their minimum after the prespore formation stage. The PCN of pBMB2062, which is the smallest plasmid (2062 bp and has the highest PCN of those tested, varied in strain YBT-1520, HD-1, and HD-136 (172, 115, and 94, respectively. These findings provide insight into both the total plasmid DNA amount of B. thuringiensis and the strong ability of the species to harbor plasmids.

  17. DETERMINATION OF PROTEIN CATABOLIC RATE IN PATIENTS ON CHRONIC INTERMITTENT HEMODIALYSIS - UREA OUTPUT MEASUREMENTS COMPARED WITH DIETARY-PROTEIN INTAKE AND WITH CALCULATION OF UREA GENERATION RATE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    STEGEMAN, CA; HUISMAN, RM; DEROUW, B; JOOSTEMA, A; DEJONG, PE

    1995-01-01

    We assessed the agreement between different methods of determining protein catabolic rate (PCR) in hemodialysis patients and the possible influence of postdialysis urea rebound and the length of the interdialytic interval on the PCR determination. Protein catabolic rate derived from measured total u

  18. Remarkable stability of an instability-prone lentiviral vector plasmid in Escherichia coli Stbl3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Allaf, Faisal A; Tolmachov, Oleg E; Zambetti, Lia Paola; Tchetchelnitski, Viktoria; Mehmet, Huseyin

    2013-02-01

    Large-scale production of plasmid DNA to prepare therapeutic gene vectors or DNA-based vaccines requires a suitable bacterial host, which can stably maintain the plasmid DNA during industrial cultivation. Plasmid loss during bacterial cell divisions and structural changes in the plasmid DNA can dramatically reduce the yield of the desired recombinant plasmid DNA. While generating an HIV-based gene vector containing a bicistronic expression cassette 5'-Olig2cDNA-IRES-dsRed2-3', we encountered plasmid DNA instability, which occurred in homologous recombination deficient recA1 Escherichia coli strain Stbl2 specifically during large-scale bacterial cultivation. Unexpectedly, the new recombinant plasmid was structurally changed or completely lost in 0.5 L liquid cultures but not in the preceding 5 mL cultures. Neither the employment of an array of alternative recA1 E. coli plasmid hosts, nor the lowering of the culture incubation temperature prevented the instability. However, after the introduction of this instability-prone plasmid into the recA13E. coli strain Stbl3, the transformed bacteria grew without being overrun by plasmid-free cells, reduction in the plasmid DNA yield or structural changes in plasmid DNA. Thus, E. coli strain Stbl3 conferred structural and maintenance stability to the otherwise instability-prone lentivirus-based recombinant plasmid, suggesting that this strain can be used for the faithful maintenance of similar stability-compromised plasmids in large-scale bacterial cultivations. In contrast to Stbl2, which is derived wholly from the wild type isolate E. coli K12, E. coli Stbl3 is a hybrid strain of mixed E. coli K12 and E. coli B parentage. Therefore, we speculate that genetic determinants for the benevolent properties of E. coli Stbl3 for safe plasmid propagation originate from its E. coli B ancestor.

  19. Coupling between the Basic Replicon and the Kis-Kid Maintenance System of Plasmid R1: Modulation by Kis Antitoxin Levels and Involvement in Control of Plasmid Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan López-Villarejo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available kis-kid, the auxiliary maintenance system of plasmid R1 and copB, the auxiliary copy number control gene of this plasmid, contribute to increase plasmid replication efficiency in cells with lower than average copy number. It is thought that Kis antitoxin levels decrease in these cells and that this acts as the switch that activates the Kid toxin; activated Kid toxin reduces copB-mRNA levels and this increases RepA levels that increases plasmid copy number. In support of this model we now report that: (i the Kis antitoxin levels do decrease in cells containing a mini-R1 plasmid carrying a repA mutation that reduces plasmid copy number; (ii kid-dependent replication rescue is abolished in cells in which the Kis antitoxin levels or the CopB levels are increased. Unexpectedly we found that this coordination significantly increases both the copy number of the repA mutant and of the wt mini-R1 plasmid. This indicates that the coordination between plasmid replication functions and kis-kid system contributes significantly to control plasmid R1 replication.

  20. Type 3 Fimbriae Encoded on Plasmids Are Expressed from a Unique Promoter without Affecting Host Motility, Facilitating an Exceptional Phenotype That Enhances Conjugal Plasmid Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jonas Stenlokke; Riber, Leise; Kot, Witold;

    2016-01-01

    on plasmids is systematically different, as MrkH, a c-di-GMP dependent transcriptional activator is not needed for strong expression of the fimbriae. MrkH is required for expression of type 3 fimbriae of the Klebsiella pneumoniae chromosome, wherefrom the fimbriae operon (mrkABCDF) of plasmids is believed...... to have originated. We find that mrkABCDFs of plasmids are highly expressed via a unique promoter that differs from the original Klebsiella promoter resulting in fundamental behavioral consequences. Plasmid associated mrkABCDFs did not influence the swimming behavior of the host, that hereby acquired...

  1. Sugar catabolism in Aspergillus and other fungi related to the utilization of plant biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi, Claire; Benocci, Tiziano; Battaglia, Evy; Benoit, Isabelle; de Vries, Ronald P

    2015-01-01

    Fungi are found in all natural and artificial biotopes and can use highly diverse carbon sources. They play a major role in the global carbon cycle by decomposing plant biomass and this biomass is the main carbon source for many fungi. Plant biomass is composed of cell wall polysaccharides (cellulose, hemicellulose, pectin) and lignin. To degrade cell wall polysaccharides to different monosaccharides, fungi produce a broad range of enzymes with a large variety in activities. Through a series of enzymatic reactions, sugar-specific and central metabolic pathways convert these monosaccharides into energy or metabolic precursors needed for the biosynthesis of biomolecules. This chapter describes the carbon catabolic pathways that are required to efficiently use plant biomass as a carbon source. It will give an overview of the known metabolic pathways in fungi, their interconnections, and the differences between fungal species.

  2. Coordinated regulation of ammonium assimilation and carbon catabolism by glyoxylate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, A; Rodríguez, L; Folch, J; Soberón, M; Olivera, H

    1987-09-01

    The activities of citrate synthase (EC 4.1.3.7) and NADP+-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) (EC 1.4.1.4) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were inhibited in vitro by glyoxylate. In the presence of glyoxylate, pyruvate and glyoxylate pools increased, suggesting that glyoxylate was efficiently transported and catabolized. Pyruvate accumulation also indicates that citrate synthase was inhibited. A decrease in the glutamate pool was also observed under these conditions. This can be attributed to an increased transamination rate and to the inhibitory effect of glyoxylate on NADP+-dependent GDH. Furthermore, the increase in the ammonium pool in the presence of glyoxylate suggests that NADP+-dependent GDH was being inhibited in vivo, since the activity of glutamine synthetase did not decrease under these conditions. We propose that the inhibition of both citrate synthase and NADP+-dependent GDH could form part of a mechanism that regulates the internal 2-oxoglutarate concentration.

  3. Products of Leishmania braziliensis glucose catabolism: release of D-lactate and, under anaerobic conditions, glycerol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darling, T.N.; Davis, D.G.; London, R.E.; Blum, J.J.

    1987-10-01

    Leishmania braziliensis panamensis promastigotes were incubated with glucose as the sole carbon source. About one-fifth of the glucose consumed under aerobic conditions was oxidized to CO/sub 2/. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies with (1-/sup 13/C)glucose showed that the other products released were succinate, acetate, alanine, pyruvate, and lactate. Under anaerobic conditions, lactate output increased, glycerol became a major product, and, surprisingly, glucose consumption decreased. Enzymatic assays showed that the lactate formed was D(-)-lactate. The release of alanine during incubation with glucose as the sole carbon source suggested that appreciable proteolysis occurred, consistent with our observation that a large amount of ammonia was released under these conditions. The discoveries that D-lactate is a product of L. braziliensis glucose catabolism, that glycerol is produced under anaerobic conditions, and that the cells exhibit a reverse Pasteur effect open the way for detailed studies of the pathways of glucose metabolism and their regulation in this organism.

  4. Addiction to Coupling of the Warburg Effect with Glutamine Catabolism in Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley Smith

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic reprogramming is critical to oncogenesis, but the emergence and function of this profound reorganization remain poorly understood. Here we find that cooperating oncogenic mutations drive large-scale metabolic reprogramming, which is both intrinsic to cancer cells and obligatory for the transition to malignancy. This involves synergistic regulation of several genes encoding metabolic enzymes, including the lactate dehydrogenases LDHA and LDHB and mitochondrial glutamic pyruvate transaminase 2 (GPT2. Notably, GPT2 engages activated glycolysis to drive the utilization of glutamine as a carbon source for TCA cycle anaplerosis in colon cancer cells. Our data indicate that the Warburg effect supports oncogenesis via GPT2-mediated coupling of pyruvate production to glutamine catabolism. Although critical to the cancer phenotype, GPT2 activity is dispensable in cells that are not fully transformed, thus pinpointing a metabolic vulnerability specifically associated with cancer cell progression to malignancy.

  5. Branched-chain and aromatic amino acid catabolism into aroma volatiles in Cucumis melo L. fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonda, Itay; Bar, Einat; Portnoy, Vitaly; Lev, Shery; Burger, Joseph; Schaffer, Arthur A; Tadmor, Ya'akov; Gepstein, Shimon; Giovannoni, James J; Katzir, Nurit; Lewinsohn, Efraim

    2010-02-01

    The unique aroma of melons (Cucumis melo L., Cucurbitaceae) is composed of many volatile compounds biosynthetically derived from fatty acids, carotenoids, amino acids, and terpenes. Although amino acids are known precursors of aroma compounds in the plant kingdom, the initial steps in the catabolism of amino acids into aroma volatiles have received little attention. Incubation of melon fruit cubes with amino acids and alpha-keto acids led to the enhanced formation of aroma compounds bearing the side chain of the exogenous amino or keto acid supplied. Moreover, L-[(13)C(6)]phenylalanine was also incorporated into aromatic volatile compounds. Amino acid transaminase activities extracted from the flesh of mature melon fruits converted L-isoleucine, L-leucine, L-valine, L-methionine, or L-phenylalanine into their respective alpha-keto acids, utilizing alpha-ketoglutarate as the amine acceptor. Two novel genes were isolated and characterized (CmArAT1 and CmBCAT1) encoding 45.6 kDa and 42.7 kDa proteins, respectively, that displayed aromatic and branched-chain amino acid transaminase activities, respectively, when expressed in Escherichia coli. The expression of CmBCAT1 and CmArAT1 was low in vegetative tissues, but increased in flesh and rind tissues during fruit ripening. In addition, ripe fruits of climacteric aromatic cultivars generally showed high expression of CmBCAT1 and CmArAT1 in contrast to non-climacteric non-aromatic fruits. The results presented here indicate that in melon fruit tissues, the catabolism of amino acids into aroma volatiles can initiate through a transamination mechanism, rather than decarboxylation or direct aldehyde synthesis, as has been demonstrated in other plants.

  6. Designed Inhibitors of Insulin-Degrading Enzyme Regulate the Catabolism and Activity of Insulin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leissring, Malcolm A.; Malito, Enrico; Hedouin, Sabrine; Reinstatler, Lael; Sahara, Tomoko; Abdul-Hay, Samer O.; Choudhry, Shakeel; Maharvi, Ghulam M.; Fauq, Abdul H.; Huzarska, Malwina; May, Philip S.; Choi, Sungwoon; Logan, Todd P.; Turk, Benjamin E.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Manolopoulou, Marika; Tang, Wei-Jen; Stein, Ross L.; Cuny, Gregory D.; Selkoe, Dennis J. (Harvard-Med); (BWH); (Yale-MED); (Scripps); (UC); (Mayo)

    2010-09-20

    Insulin is a vital peptide hormone that is a central regulator of glucose homeostasis, and impairments in insulin signaling cause diabetes mellitus. In principle, it should be possible to enhance the activity of insulin by inhibiting its catabolism, which is mediated primarily by insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE), a structurally and evolutionarily distinctive zinc-metalloprotease. Despite interest in pharmacological inhibition of IDE as an attractive anti-diabetic approach dating to the 1950s, potent and selective inhibitors of IDE have not yet emerged. We used a rational design approach based on analysis of combinatorial peptide mixtures and focused compound libraries to develop novel peptide hydroxamic acid inhibitors of IDE. The resulting compounds are {approx} 10{sup 6} times more potent than existing inhibitors, non-toxic, and surprisingly selective for IDE vis-a-vis conventional zinc-metalloproteases. Crystallographic analysis of an IDE-inhibitor complex reveals a novel mode of inhibition based on stabilization of IDE's 'closed,' inactive conformation. We show further that pharmacological inhibition of IDE potentiates insulin signaling by a mechanism involving reduced catabolism of internalized insulin. Conclusions/Significance: The inhibitors we describe are the first to potently and selectively inhibit IDE or indeed any member of this atypical zinc-metalloprotease superfamily. The distinctive structure of IDE's active site, and the mode of action of our inhibitors, suggests that it may be possible to develop inhibitors that cross-react minimally with conventional zinc-metalloproteases. Significantly, our results reveal that insulin signaling is normally regulated by IDE activity not only extracellularly but also within cells, supporting the longstanding view that IDE inhibitors could hold therapeutic value for the treatment of diabetes.

  7. Designed inhibitors of insulin-degrading enzyme regulate the catabolism and activity of insulin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm A Leissring

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insulin is a vital peptide hormone that is a central regulator of glucose homeostasis, and impairments in insulin signaling cause diabetes mellitus. In principle, it should be possible to enhance the activity of insulin by inhibiting its catabolism, which is mediated primarily by insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE, a structurally and evolutionarily distinctive zinc-metalloprotease. Despite interest in pharmacological inhibition of IDE as an attractive anti-diabetic approach dating to the 1950s, potent and selective inhibitors of IDE have not yet emerged. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used a rational design approach based on analysis of combinatorial peptide mixtures and focused compound libraries to develop novel peptide hydroxamic acid inhibitors of IDE. The resulting compounds are approximately 10(6 times more potent than existing inhibitors, non-toxic, and surprisingly selective for IDE vis-à-vis conventional zinc-metalloproteases. Crystallographic analysis of an IDE-inhibitor complex reveals a novel mode of inhibition based on stabilization of IDE's "closed," inactive conformation. We show further that pharmacological inhibition of IDE potentiates insulin signaling by a mechanism involving reduced catabolism of internalized insulin. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The inhibitors we describe are the first to potently and selectively inhibit IDE or indeed any member of this atypical zinc-metalloprotease superfamily. The distinctive structure of IDE's active site, and the mode of action of our inhibitors, suggests that it may be possible to develop inhibitors that cross-react minimally with conventional zinc-metalloproteases. Significantly, our results reveal that insulin signaling is normally regulated by IDE activity not only extracellularly but also within cells, supporting the longstanding view that IDE inhibitors could hold therapeutic value for the treatment of diabetes.

  8. The coupling of the plant and microbial catabolisms of phenanthrene in the rhizosphere of Medicago sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratova, Anna; Dubrovskaya, Ekaterina; Golubev, Sergey; Grinev, Vyacheslav; Chernyshova, Marina; Turkovskaya, Olga

    2015-09-01

    We studied the catabolism of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon phenanthrene by four rhizobacterial strains and the possibility of enzymatic oxidation of this compound and its microbial metabolites by the root exudates of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) in order to detect the possible coupling of the plant and microbial metabolisms under the rhizospheric degradation of the organic pollutant. A comparative study of phenanthrene degradation pathways in the PAH-degrading rhizobacteria Ensifer meliloti, Pseudomonas kunmingensis, Rhizobium petrolearium, and Stenotrophomonas sp. allowed us to identify the key metabolites from the microbial transformation of phenanthrene, including 9,10-phenanthrenequinone, 2-carboxybenzaldehyde, and 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic, salicylic, and o-phthalic acids. Sterile alfalfa plants were grown in the presence and absence of phenanthrene (0.03 g kg(-1)) in quartz sand under controlled environmental conditions to obtain plant root exudates. The root exudates were collected, concentrated by ultrafiltration, and the activity of oxidoreductases was detected spectrophotometrically by the oxidation rate for various substrates. The most marked activity was that of peroxidase, whereas the presence of oxidase and tyrosinase was detected on the verge of the assay sensitivity. Using alfalfa root exudates as a crude enzyme preparation, we found that in the presence of the synthetic mediator, the plant peroxidase could oxidize phenanthrene and its microbial metabolites. The results indicate the possibility of active participation of plants in the rhizospheric degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and their microbial metabolites, which makes it possible to speak about the coupling of the plant and microbial catabolisms of these contaminants in the rhizosphere.

  9. Microbial life in frozen boreal soils-environmental constraints on catabolic and anabolic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oquist, M. G.; Sparrman, T.; Haei, M.; Segura, J.; Schleucher, J.; Nilsson, M. B.

    2013-12-01

    Microbial activity in frozen soils has recently gained increasing attention and the fact that soil microorganisms can perform significant metabolic activity at temperatures below freezing is apparent. However, to what extent microbial activity is constrained by the environmental conditions prevailing in a frozen soil matrix is still very uncertain. This presentation will address how the fundamental environmental factors of temperature, liquid water availability and substrate availability combine to regulate rates of catabolic and anabolic microbial processes in frozen soils. The presented results are gained from investigations of the surface layers of boreal forest soils with seasonal freezing. We show that the amount and availability of liquid water is an integral factor regulating rates of microbial activity in the frozen soil matrix and can also explain frequently observed deviations in the temperature responses of biogenic CO2 production in frozen soils, as compared to unfrozen soils. In turn, the capacity for a specific soil to retain liquid water at sub-zero temperatures is controlled by the structural composition of the soil, and especially the soil organic matter is of integral importance. We also show that the partitioning of substrate carbon, in the form of monomeric sugar (glucose), for catabolic and anabolic metabolism remain constant in the temperature range of -4C to 9C. This confirms that microbial growth may proceed even when soils are frozen. In addition we present corresponding data for organisms metabolizing polymeric substrates (cellulose) requiring exoenzymatic activity. We conclude that the metabolic response of soil microorganism to controlling factors may change substantially across the freezing point of soil water, and also the patterns of interaction among controlling factors are affected. Thus, it is evident that metabolic response functions derived from investigations of unfrozen soils cannot be superimposed on frozen soils. Nonetheless

  10. Interaction between glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and L-leucine catabolic enzymes: intersecting metabolic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutson, Susan M; Islam, Mohammad Mainul; Zaganas, Ioannis

    2011-09-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) catabolism follows sequential reactions and their metabolites intersect with other metabolic pathways. The initial enzymes in BCAA metabolism, the mitochondrial branched-chain aminotransferase (BCATm), which deaminates the BCAAs to branched-chain α-keto acids (BCKAs); and the branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase enzyme complex (BCKDC), which oxidatively decarboxylates the BCKAs, are organized in a supramolecular complex termed metabolon. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH1) is found in the metabolon in rat tissues. Bovine GDH1 binds to the pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate (PMP)-form of human BCATm (PMP-BCATm) but not to pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-BCATm in vitro. This protein interaction facilitates reamination of the α-ketoglutarate (αKG) product of the GDH1 oxidative deamination reaction. Human GDH1 appears to act like bovine GDH1 but human GDH2 does not show the same enhancement of BCKDC enzyme activities. Another metabolic enzyme is also found in the metabolon is pyruvate carboxylase (PC). Kinetic results suggest that PC binds to the E1 decarboxylase of BCKDC but does not effect BCAA catabolism. The protein interaction of BCATm and GDH1 promotes regeneration of PLP-BCATm which then binds to BCKDC resulting in channeling of the BCKA products from BCATm first half reaction to E1 and promoting BCAA oxidation and net nitrogen transfer from BCAAs. The cycling of nitrogen through glutamate via the actions of BCATm and GDH1 releases free ammonia. Formation of ammonia may be important for astrocyte glutamine synthesis in the central nervous system. In peripheral tissue association of BCATm and GDH1 would promote BCAA oxidation at physiologically relevant BCAA concentrations.

  11. Training reduces catabolic and inflammatory response to a single practice in female volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliakim, Alon; Portal, Shawn; Zadik, Zvi; Meckel, Yoav; Nemet, Dan

    2013-11-01

    We examined the effect of training on hormonal and inflammatory response to a single volleyball practice in elite adolescent players. Thirteen female, national team level, Israeli volleyball players (age 16.0 ± 1.4 years, Tanner stage 4-5) participated in the study. Blood samples were collected before and immediately after a typical 60 minutes of volleyball practice, before and after 7 weeks of training during the initial phase of the season. Training involved tactic and technical drills (20% of time), power and speed drills (25% of time), interval sessions (25% of time), endurance-type training (15% of time), and resistance training (15% of time). To achieve greater training responses, the study was performed during the early phase (first 7 weeks) of the volleyball season. Hormonal measurements included the anabolic hormones growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and IGF-binding protein-3, the catabolic hormone cortisol, the proinflammatory marker interleukin-6 (IL-6), and the anti-inflammatory marker IL-1 receptor antagonist. Training led to a significant improvement of vertical jump, anaerobic properties (peak and mean power by the Wingate Anaerobic Test), and predicted VO2max (by the 20-m shuttle run). Volleyball practice, both before and after the training intervention, was associated with a significant increase of serum lactate, GH, and IL-6. Training resulted in a significantly reduced cortisol response ([INCREMENT]cortisol: 4.2 ± 13.7 vs. -4.4 ± 12.3 ng · ml, before and after training, respectively; p volleyball practice. The results suggest that along with the improvement of power and anaerobic and aerobic characteristics, training reduces the catabolic and inflammatory response to exercise.

  12. Genetic and metabolic analysis of the carbofuran catabolic pathway in Novosphingobium sp. KN65.2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thi Phi Oanh; Helbling, Damian E; Bers, Karolien; Fida, Tekle Tafese; Wattiez, Ruddy; Kohler, Hans-Peter E; Springael, Dirk; De Mot, René

    2014-10-01

    The widespread agricultural application of carbofuran and concomitant contamination of surface and ground waters has raised health concerns due to the reported toxic effects of this insecticide and its degradation products. Most bacteria that degrade carbofuran only perform partial degradation involving carbamate hydrolysis without breakdown of the resulting phenolic metabolite. The capacity to mineralize carbofuran beyond the benzofuran ring has been reported for some bacterial strains, especially sphingomonads, and some common metabolites, including carbofuran phenol, were identified. In the current study, the catabolism of carbofuran by Novosphingobium sp. KN65.2 (LMG 28221), a strain isolated from a carbofuran-exposed Vietnamese soil and utilizing the compound as a sole carbon and nitrogen source, was studied. Several KN65.2 plasposon mutants with diminished or abolished capacity to degrade and mineralize carbofuran were generated and characterized. Metabolic profiling of representative mutants revealed new metabolic intermediates, in addition to the initial hydrolysis product carbofuran phenol. The promiscuous carbofuran-hydrolyzing enzyme Mcd, which is present in several bacteria lacking carbofuran ring mineralization capacity, is not encoded by the Novosphingobium sp. KN65.2 genome. An alternative hydrolase gene required for this step was not identified, but the constitutively expressed genes of the unique cfd operon, including the oxygenase genes cfdC and cfdE, could be linked to further degradation of the phenolic metabolite. A third involved oxygenase gene, cfdI, and the transporter gene cftA, encoding a TonB-dependent outer membrane receptor with potential regulatory function, are located outside the cfd cluster. This study has revealed the first dedicated carbofuran catabolic genes and provides insight in the early steps of benzofuran ring degradation.

  13. Role of Myofibrillar Protein Catabolism in Development of Glucocorticoid Myopathy: Aging and Functional Activity Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teet Seene

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Muscle weakness in corticosteroid myopathy is mainly the result of the destruction and atrophy of the myofibrillar compartment of fast-twitch muscle fibers. Decrease of titin and myosin, and the ratio of nebulin and MyHC in myopathic muscle, shows that these changes of contractile and elastic proteins are the result of increased catabolism of the abovementioned proteins in skeletal muscle. Slow regeneration of skeletal muscle is in good correlation with a decreased number of satellite cells under the basal lamina of muscle fibers. Aging causes a reduction of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK activity as the result of the reduced function of the mitochondrial compartment. AMPK activity increases as a result of increased functional activity. Resistance exercise causes anabolic and anticatabolic effects in skeletal muscle: muscle fibers experience hypertrophy while higher myofibrillar proteins turn over. These changes are leading to the qualitative remodeling of muscle fibers. As a result of these changes, possible maximal muscle strength is increasing. Endurance exercise improves capillary blood supply, increases mitochondrial biogenesis and muscle oxidative capacity, and causes a faster turnover rate of sarcoplasmic proteins as well as qualitative remodeling of type I and IIA muscle fibers. The combination of resistance and endurance exercise may be the fastest way to prevent or decelerate muscle atrophy due to the anabolic and anticatabolic effects of exercise combined with an increase in oxidative capacity. The aim of the present short review is to assess the role of myofibrillar protein catabolism in the development of glucocorticoid-caused myopathy from aging and physical activity aspects.

  14. Imaging B. anthracis heme catabolism in mice using the IFP1.4 gene reporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Banghe; Robinson, Holly; Wilganowski, Nathaniel; Nobles, Christopher L.; Sevick-Muraca, Eva; Maresso, Anthony

    2012-03-01

    B. anthracis is a gram-positive, spore-forming bacterium which likes all pathogenic bacteria, survive by sequestering heme from its host. To image B. anthracis heme catabolism in vivo, we stably transfect new red excitable fluorescent protein, IFP1.4, that requires the heme catabolism product biliverdin (BV). IFP1.4 reporter has favorable excitation and emission characteristics, which has an absorption peak at 685 nm and an emission peak at 708 nm. Therefore, IFP1.4 reporter can be imaged deeply into the tissue with less contamination from tissue autofluorescence. However, the excitation light "leakage" through optical filters can limit detection and sensitivity of IFP1.4 reporter due to the small Stoke's shift of IFP1.4 fluorescence. To minimize the excitation light leakage, an intensified CCD (ICCD) based infrared fluorescence imaging device was optimized using two band pass filters separated by a focus lens to increase the optical density at the excitation wavelength. In this study, a mouse model (DBA/J2) was first injected with B. anthracis bacteria expressing IFP1.4, 150 μl s.c., on the ventral side of the left thigh. Then mouse was given 250 μl of a 1mM BV solution via I.V. injection. Imaging was conducted as a function of time after infection under light euthanasia, excised tissues were imaged and IFP1.4 fluorescence correlated with standard culture measurements of colony forming units (CFU). The work demonstrates the use of IFP1.4 as a reporter of bacterial utilization of host heme and may provide an important tool for understanding the pathogenesis of bacterial infection and developing new anti-bacterial therapeutics.

  15. Role of Myofibrillar Protein Catabolism in Development of Glucocorticoid Myopathy: Aging and Functional Activity Aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seene, Teet; Kaasik, Priit

    2016-05-13

    Muscle weakness in corticosteroid myopathy is mainly the result of the destruction and atrophy of the myofibrillar compartment of fast-twitch muscle fibers. Decrease of titin and myosin, and the ratio of nebulin and MyHC in myopathic muscle, shows that these changes of contractile and elastic proteins are the result of increased catabolism of the abovementioned proteins in skeletal muscle. Slow regeneration of skeletal muscle is in good correlation with a decreased number of satellite cells under the basal lamina of muscle fibers. Aging causes a reduction of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity as the result of the reduced function of the mitochondrial compartment. AMPK activity increases as a result of increased functional activity. Resistance exercise causes anabolic and anticatabolic effects in skeletal muscle: muscle fibers experience hypertrophy while higher myofibrillar proteins turn over. These changes are leading to the qualitative remodeling of muscle fibers. As a result of these changes, possible maximal muscle strength is increasing. Endurance exercise improves capillary blood supply, increases mitochondrial biogenesis and muscle oxidative capacity, and causes a faster turnover rate of sarcoplasmic proteins as well as qualitative remodeling of type I and IIA muscle fibers. The combination of resistance and endurance exercise may be the fastest way to prevent or decelerate muscle atrophy due to the anabolic and anticatabolic effects of exercise combined with an increase in oxidative capacity. The aim of the present short review is to assess the role of myofibrillar protein catabolism in the development of glucocorticoid-caused myopathy from aging and physical activity aspects.

  16. Metabolic profiling of hypoxic cells revealed a catabolic signature required for cell survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Frezza

    Full Text Available Hypoxia is one of the features of poorly vascularised areas of solid tumours but cancer cells can survive in these areas despite the low oxygen tension. The adaptation to hypoxia requires both biochemical and genetic responses that culminate in a metabolic rearrangement to counter-balance the decrease in energy supply from mitochondrial respiration. The understanding of metabolic adaptations under hypoxia could reveal novel pathways that, if targeted, would lead to specific death of hypoxic regions. In this study, we developed biochemical and metabolomic analyses to assess the effects of hypoxia on cellular metabolism of HCT116 cancer cell line. We utilized an oxygen fluorescent probe in anaerobic cuvettes to study oxygen consumption rates under hypoxic conditions without the need to re-oxygenate the cells and demonstrated that hypoxic cells can maintain active, though diminished, oxidative phosphorylation even at 1% oxygen. These results were further supported by in situ microscopy analysis of mitochondrial NADH oxidation under hypoxia. We then used metabolomic methodologies, utilizing liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS, to determine the metabolic profile of hypoxic cells. This approach revealed the importance of synchronized and regulated catabolism as a mechanism of adaptation to bioenergetic stress. We then confirmed the presence of autophagy under hypoxic conditions and demonstrated that the inhibition of this catabolic process dramatically reduced the ATP levels in hypoxic cells and stimulated hypoxia-induced cell death. These results suggest that under hypoxia, autophagy is required to support ATP production, in addition to glycolysis, and that the inhibition of autophagy might be used to selectively target hypoxic regions of tumours, the most notoriously resistant areas of solid tumours.

  17. Remarkable stability of an instability-prone lentiviral vector plasmid in Escherichia coli Stbl3

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Allaf, Faisal A.; Tolmachov, Oleg E.; Zambetti, Lia Paola; Tchetchelnitski, Viktoria; Mehmet, Huseyin

    2012-01-01

    Large-scale production of plasmid DNA to prepare therapeutic gene vectors or DNA-based vaccines requires a suitable bacterial host, which can stably maintain the plasmid DNA during industrial cultivation. Plasmid loss during bacterial cell divisions and structural changes in the plasmid DNA can dramatically reduce the yield of the desired recombinant plasmid DNA. While generating an HIV-based gene vector containing a bicistronic expression cassette 5′-Olig2cDNA-IRES-dsRed2-3′, we encountered ...

  18. Presence of Glycopeptide-Encoding Plasmids in Enterococcal Isolates from Food and Humans in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Migura, Lourdes Garcia; Valenzuela, Antonio Jesus Sanchez; Jensen, Lars Bogø

    2011-01-01

    elements (MGE) such as plasmids and transposons. Presence of MGE was tested in all GRE isolated from food in Denmark in 2005–2007 including the first vanA mediated Enterococcus faecalis isolated from food. The ability of these plasmids to transfer and persist among enterococci was investigated using newly...... developed techniques for classification of plasmids. Replicons associated with sex pheromone-inducible plasmids were detected in all GR E. faecalis, whereas GR Enterococcus faecium contained plasmids known to be widely distributed among enterococci. vanA resistance is common in E. faecium isolates from meat...

  19. Investigation of diversity of plasmids carrying the blaTEM-52 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bielak, Eliza Maria; Bergenholtz, Rikke D.; Jørgensen, Mikael Skaanning;

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the diversity of plasmids that carry blaTEM-52 genes among Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica originating from animals, meat products and humans. METHODS: A collection of 22 blaTEM-52-encoding plasmids was characterized by restriction fragment length polymorphism...... of self-transfer to a plasmid-free E. coli recipient. CONCLUSIONS: The blaTEM-52 gene found in humans could have been transmitted on transferable plasmids originating from animal sources. Some of the blaTEM-52 plasmids carry replicons that differ from the classical ones. Two novel replicons were detected...

  20. Large plasmids of Escherichia coli and Salmonella encode highly diverse arrays of accessory genes on common replicon families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Laura E; Wireman, Joy; Hilliard, Valda C; Summers, Anne O

    2013-01-01

    Plasmids are important in evolution and adaptation of host bacteria, yet we lack a comprehensive picture of their own natural variation. We used replicon typing and RFLP analysis to assess diversity and distribution of plasmids in the ECOR, SARA, SARB and SARC reference collections of Escherichia coli and Salmonella. Plasmids, especially large (≥30 kb) plasmids, are abundant in these collections. Host species and genotype clearly impact plasmid prevalence; plasmids are more abundant in ECOR than SAR, but, within ECOR, subgroup B2 strains have the fewest large plasmids. The majority of large plasmids have unique RFLP patterns, suggesting high variation, even within dominant replicon families IncF and IncI1. We found only four conserved plasmid types within ECOR, none of which are widely distributed. Within SAR, conserved plasmid types are primarily serovar-specific, including a pSLT-like plasmid in 13 Typhimurium strains. Conservation of pSLT contrasts with variability of other plasmids, suggesting evolution of serovar-specific virulence plasmids is distinct from that of most enterobacterial plasmids. We sequenced a conserved serovar Heidelberg plasmid but did not detect virulence or antibiotic resistance genes. Our data illustrate the high degree of natural variation in large plasmids of E. coli and Salmonella, even among plasmids sharing backbone genes.

  1. H2O2 mediates the regulation of ABA catabolism and GA biosynthesis in Arabidopsis seed dormancy and germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yinggao; Ye, Nenghui; Liu, Rui; Chen, Moxian; Zhang, Jianhua

    2010-06-01

    H(2)O(2) is known as a signal molecule in plant cells, but its role in the regulation of aqbscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellic acid (GA) metabolism and hormonal balance is not yet clear. In this study it was found that H(2)O(2) affected the regulation of ABA catabolism and GA biosynthesis during seed imbibition and thus exerted control over seed dormancy and germination. As seen by quantitative RT-PCR (QRT-PCR), H(2)O(2) up-regulated ABA catabolism genes (e.g. CYP707A genes), resulting in a decreased ABA content during imbibition. This action required the participation of nitric oxide (NO), another signal molecule. At the same time, H(2)O(2) also up-regulated GA biosynthesis, as shown by QRT-PCR. When an ABA catabolism mutant, cyp707a2, and an overexpressing plant, CYP707A2-OE, were tested, ABA content was negatively correlated with GA biosynthesis. Exogenously applied GA was able to over-ride the inhibition of germination at low concentrations of ABA, but had no obvious effect when ABA concentrations were high. It is concluded that H(2)O(2) mediates the up-regulation of ABA catabolism, probably through an NO signal, and also promotes GA biosynthesis. High concentrations of ABA inhibit GA biosynthesis but a balance of these two hormones can jointly control the dormancy and germination of Arabidopsis seeds.

  2. Functional myo-inositol catabolic genes of Bacillus subtilis Natto are involved in depletion of pinitol in Natto (fermented soybean).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morinaga, Tetsuro; Yamaguchi, Masanori; Makino, Yuki; Nanamiya, Hideaki; Takahashi, Kiwamu; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Kawamura, Fujio; Ashida, Hitoshi; Yoshida, Ken-Ichi

    2006-08-01

    Soybeans are rich in pinitol (PI; 3-O-methyl-D-chiro-inositol), which improves health by treating conditions associated with insulin resistance, such as diabetes mellitus and obesity. Natto is a food made from soybeans fermented by strains of Bacillus subtilis natto. In the chromosome of natto strain OK2, there is a putative promoter region almost identical to the iol promoter for myo-inositol (MI) catabolic genes of B. subtilis 168. In the presence of MI, the putative iol promoter functioned to induce inositol dehydrogenase, the enzyme for the first-step reaction in the MI catabolic pathway. PI also induced inositol dehydrogenase and the promoter was indispensable for the utilization of PI as well as MI, suggesting that PI might be an alternative carbon source metabolized in a way involving the MI catabolic genes. Natto fermentation studies have revealed that the parental natto strain consumed PI while a mutant defective in the iol promoter did not do so at all. These results suggest that inactivating the MI catabolic genes might prevent PI consumption, retaining it in natto for enrichment of possible health-promoting properties.

  3. Repression of nitrogen catabolic genes by ammonia and glutamine in nitrogen-limited continuous cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Schure, E G; Silljé, H H; Vermeulen, E E; Kalhorn, J W; Verkleij, A J; Boonstra, J; Verrips, C T

    1998-01-01

    Growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on ammonia and glutamine decreases the expression of many nitrogen catabolic genes to low levels. To discriminate between ammonia- and glutamine-driven repression of GAP1, PUT4, GDH1 and GLN1, a gln1-37 mutant was used. This mutant is not able to convert ammonia in

  4. Increased VLDL in nephrotic patients results from a decreased catabolism while increased LDL results from increased synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Sain-van der Velden, M; Kaysen, GA; Barrett, HA; Stellaard, F; Gadellaa, MM; Voorbij, HA; Reijngoud, DJ; Rabelink, TJ

    1998-01-01

    Increased very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) in nephrotic patients results from a decreased catabolism while increased low density lipoprotein (LDL) results from increased synthesis. Hyperlipidemias a hallmark of nephrotic syndrome that has been associated with increased risk for ischemic heart dis

  5. 2-Methylbutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency: functional and molecular studies on a defect in isoleucine catabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sass, Jörn Oliver; Ensenauer, Regina; Röschinger, Wulf;

    2007-01-01

    individuals showed clinical symptoms attributable to MBD deficiency although the defect in isoleucine catabolism was demonstrated both in vivo and in vitro. Several mutations in the ACADSB gene were identified, including a novel one. MBD deficiency may be a harmless metabolic variant although significant...

  6. CsPAO4 of Citrus sinensis functions in polyamine terminal catabolism and inhibits plant growth under salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Ji-Hong

    2016-08-18

    Polyamine oxidase (PAO) is a key enzyme catalyzing polyamine catabolism leading to H2O2 production. We previously demonstrated that Citrus sinensis contains six putative PAO genes, but their functions are not well understood. In this work, we reported functional elucidation of CsPAO4 in polyamine catabolism and salt stress response. CsPAO4 was localized to the apoplast and used both spermidine (Spd) and spermine (Spm) as substrates for terminal catabolism. Transgenic plants overexpressing CsPAO4 displayed prominent increase in PAO activity, concurrent with marked decrease of Spm and Spd and elevation of H2O2. Seeds of transgenic lines displayed better germination when compared with wild type (WT) under salt stress. However, both vegetative growth and root elongation of the transgenic lines were prominently inhibited under salt stress, accompanied by higher level of H2O2 and more conspicuous programmed cell death (PCD). Exogenous supply of catalase (CAT), a H2O2 scavenger, partially recovered the vegetative growth and root elongation. In addition, spermine inhibited root growth of transgenic plants. Taken together, these data demonstrated that CsPAO4 accounts for production of H2O2 causing oxidative damages under salt stress and that down-regulation of a PAO gene involved in polyamine terminal catabolism may be an alternative approach for improving salt stress tolerance.

  7. Essential amino acid leucine and proteasome inhibitor MG132 attenuate cigarette smoke induced catabolism in C2 myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rom, Oren; Kaisari, Sharon; Aizenbud, Dror; Reznick, A Z

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to cigarette smoke (CS) and cigarette smoking have been shown to promote catabolism of skeletal muscle. Previous studies and recent findings from our laboratory have demonstrated the involvement of the ubiquitin proteasome system and the muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligases MAFbx/atrogin-1 and MuRF1 in CS induced skeletal muscle catabolism. The essential amino acid leucine is a known anticatabolic agent that improves skeletal muscle metabolism in various atrophic conditions. To examine the protective effect of leucine and proteasome inhibition in CS induced muscle catabolism, C2 myotubes, from an in vitro skeletal muscle cell line, were exposed to CS in the presence or absence of leucine and a proteasome inhibitor, MG132. Diameter of myotubes, levels of the main contractile proteins - myosin heavy chain and actin, expression of MAFbx/atrogin-1 and MuRF1 were studied by microscopy, Western blotting, and qPCR. Leucine pretreatment prevented the CS-induced reduction in diameter of myotubes and degradation of myosin heavy chain by suppressing the upregulation of MAFbx/atrogin-1 and MuRF1. MG132 also attenuated the CS-induced decrease in diameter of myotubes and degradation of myosin heavy chain. Our findings demonstrate that supplementation with the essential amino acid leucine and inhibition of the proteasome may protect skeletal muscle from CS induced catabolism.

  8. Wounding of potato tubers induces increases in ABA biosynthesis and catabolism and alters expression of ABA metabolic genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of physical wounding on ABA biosynthesis and catabolism and expression of genes encoding key ABA metabolic enzymes were determined in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers. An increase in ABA and ABA metabolite content was observed 48 h after wounding and remained elevated through 96 h. ...

  9. White-to-brite conversion in human adipocytes promotes metabolic reprogramming towards fatty acid anabolic and catabolic pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Barquissau

    2016-05-01

    Conclusions: Conversion of human white fat cells into brite adipocytes results in a major metabolic reprogramming inducing fatty acid anabolic and catabolic pathways. PDK4 redirects glucose from oxidation towards triglyceride synthesis and favors the use of fatty acids as energy source for uncoupling mitochondria.

  10. Dataset of plasmid DNA extraction using different magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Rahnama

    2016-12-01

    MNPs were characterized by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Finally, the overall efficiency of different MNPs (Fe3O4, Fe3O4/SiO2, Fe3O4/SiO2/TiO2 in plasmid DNA isolation was compared using gel electrophoresis analysis. The data supplied in this article supports the accompanying publication “Comparative study of three magnetic nano-particles (FeSO4, FeSO4/SiO2, FeSO4/SiO2/TiO2 in plasmid DNA extraction” (H. Rahnama, A. Sattarzadeh, F. Kazemi, N. Ahmadi, F. Sanjarian, Z. Zand, 2016 [1].

  11. Current trends in separation of plasmid DNA vaccines: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanem, Ashraf; Healey, Robert; Adly, Frady G

    2013-01-14

    Plasmid DNA (pDNA)-based vaccines offer more rapid avenues for development and production if compared to those of conventional virus-based vaccines. They do not rely on time- or labour-intensive cell culture processes and allow greater flexibility in shipping and storage. Stimulating antibodies and cell-mediated components of the immune system are considered as some of the major advantages associated with the use of pDNA vaccines. This review summarizes the current trends in the purification of pDNA vaccines for practical and analytical applications. Special attention is paid to chromatographic techniques aimed at reducing the steps of final purification, post primary isolation and intermediate recovery, in order to reduce the number of steps necessary to reach a purified end product from the crude plasmid.

  12. Liquid-Crystalline Mesophases of Plasmid DNA in Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Ziv; Wachtel, Ellen J.; Minsky, Abraham

    1994-06-01

    Bacterial plasmids may often reach a copy number larger than 1000 per cell, corresponding to a total amount of DNA that may exceed the amount of DNA within the bacterial chromosome. This observation highlights the problem of cellular accommodation of large amounts of closed-circular nucleic acids, whose interwound conformation offers negligible DNA compaction. As determined by x-ray scattering experiments conducted on intact bacteria, supercoiled plasmids segregate within the cells into dense clusters characterized by a long-range order. In vitro studies performed at physiological DNA concentrations indicated that interwound DNA spontaneously forms liquid crystalline phases whose macroscopic structural properties are determined by the features of the molecular supercoiling. Because these features respond to cellular factors, DNA supercoiling may provide a sensitive regulatory link between cellular parameters and the packaging modes of interwound DNA in vivo.

  13. Plasmids and packaging cell lines for use in phage display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2012-07-24

    The invention relates to a novel phagemid display system for packaging phagemid DNA into phagemid particles which completely avoids the use of helper phage. The system of the invention incorporates the use of bacterial packaging cell lines which have been transformed with helper plasmids containing all required phage proteins but not the packaging signals. The absence of packaging signals in these helper plasmids prevents their DNA from being packaged in the bacterial cell, which provides a number of significant advantages over the use of both standard and modified helper phage. Packaged phagemids expressing a protein or peptide of interest, in fusion with a phage coat protein such as g3p, are generated simply by transfecting phagemid into the packaging cell line.

  14. Cationic lipids delay the transfer of plasmid DNA to lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattiaux, R; Jadot, M; Laurent, N; Dubois, F; Wattiaux-De Coninck, S

    1996-10-14

    Plasmid 35S DNA, naked or associated with different cationic lipid preparations was injected to rats. Subcellular distribution of radioactivity in the liver one hour after injection, was established by centrifugation methods. Results show that at that time, 35S DNA has reached lysosomes. On the contrary, when 35S DNA was complexed with lipids, radioactivity remains located in organelles whose distribution after differential and isopycnic centrifugation, is clearly distinct from that of arylsulfatase, lysosome marker enzyme. Injection of Triton WR 1339, a specific density perturbant of lysosomes, four days before 35S DNA injection causes a density decrease of radioactivity bearing structures, apparent one hour after naked 35S DNA injection but visible only after more than five hours, when 35S DNA associated with a cationic lipid is injected. These observations show that cationic lipids delay the transfer to lysosomes, of plasmid DNA taken up by the liver.

  15. Replisome Assembly at Bacterial Chromosomes and Iteron Plasmids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Ewa Wegrzyn

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The proper initiation and occurrence of DNA synthesis depends on the formation and rearrangements of nucleoprotein complexes within the origin of DNA replication. In this review article, we present the current knowledge on the molecular mechanism of replication complex assembly at the origin of bacterial chromosome and plasmid replicon containing direct repeats (iterons within the origin sequence. We describe recent findings on chromosomal and plasmid replication initiators, DnaA and Rep proteins, respectively, and their sequence-specific interactions with double and single stranded DNA. Also, we discuss the current understanding of the activities of DnaA and Rep proteins required for replisome assembly that is fundamental to the duplication and stability of genetic information in bacterial cells.

  16. Characterization of two novel plasmids from Geobacillus sp. 610 and 1121 strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kananavičiūtė, Rūta; Butaitė, Elena; Citavičius, Donaldas

    2014-01-01

    We describe two cryptic low molecular weight plasmids, pGTD7 (3279bp) and pGTG5 (1540bp), isolated from Geobacillus sp. 610 and 1121 strains, respectively. Homology analysis of the replication protein (Rep) sequences and detection of ssDNA indicate that both of them replicate via rolling circle mechanism. As revealed by sequence similarities of dso region and Rep protein, plasmid pGTD7 belongs to pC194/pUB110 plasmid family. The replicon of pGTD7 was proved to be functional in another Geobacillus host. For this purpose, a construct pUCK7, containing a replicon of the analyzed plasmid, was created and transferred to G. stearothermophilus NUB3621R strain by electroporation. Plasmid pGTG5, based on Rep protein sequence similarity, was found to be related mostly to some poorly characterized bacterial plasmids. Rep proteins encoded by these plasmids contain conservative motifs that are most similar to those of Microviridae phages. This feature suggests that pGTG5, together with other plasmids containing the same motifs, could constitute a new family of bacterial plasmids. To date, pGTG5 is the smallest plasmid identified in bacteria belonging to the genus Geobacillus. The two plasmids described in this study can be used for the construction of new vectors suitable for biotechnologically important bacteria of the genus Geobacillus.

  17. Presence and analysis of plasmids in human and animal associated arcobacter species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laid Douidah

    Full Text Available In this study, we report the screening of four Arcobacter species for the presence of small and large plasmids. Plasmids were present in 9.9% of the 273 examined strains. One Arcobacter cryaerophilus and four Arcobacter butzleri plasmids were selected for further sequencing. The size of three small plasmids isolated from A. butzleri and the one from A. cryaerophilus strains ranged between 4.8 and 5.1 kb, and the size of the large plasmid, isolated from A. butzleri, was 27.4 kbp. The G+C content of all plasmids ranged between 25.4% and 26.2%. A total of 95% of the large plasmid sequence represents coding information, which contrasts to the 20 to 30% for the small plasmids. Some of the open reading frames showed a high homology to putative conserved domains found in other related organisms, such as replication, mobilization and genes involved in type IV secretion system. The large plasmid carried 35 coding sequences, including seven genes in a contiguous region of 11.6 kbp that encodes an orthologous type IV secretion system found in the Wolinella succinogenes genome, Helicobacter pylori and Campylobacter jejuni plasmids, which makes this plasmid interesting for further exploration.

  18. Presence and analysis of plasmids in human and animal associated arcobacter species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douidah, Laid; De Zutter, Lieven; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Deforce, Dieter; Ingmer, Hanne; Vandenberg, Olivier; Van den Abeele, Anne-Marie; Houf, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we report the screening of four Arcobacter species for the presence of small and large plasmids. Plasmids were present in 9.9% of the 273 examined strains. One Arcobacter cryaerophilus and four Arcobacter butzleri plasmids were selected for further sequencing. The size of three small plasmids isolated from A. butzleri and the one from A. cryaerophilus strains ranged between 4.8 and 5.1 kb, and the size of the large plasmid, isolated from A. butzleri, was 27.4 kbp. The G+C content of all plasmids ranged between 25.4% and 26.2%. A total of 95% of the large plasmid sequence represents coding information, which contrasts to the 20 to 30% for the small plasmids. Some of the open reading frames showed a high homology to putative conserved domains found in other related organisms, such as replication, mobilization and genes involved in type IV secretion system. The large plasmid carried 35 coding sequences, including seven genes in a contiguous region of 11.6 kbp that encodes an orthologous type IV secretion system found in the Wolinella succinogenes genome, Helicobacter pylori and Campylobacter jejuni plasmids, which makes this plasmid interesting for further exploration.

  19. Efficient transformation of Bacillus thuringiensis requires nonmethylated plasmid DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Macaluso, A; Mettus, A M

    1991-01-01

    The transformation efficiency of Bacillus thuringiensis depends upon the source of plasmid DNA. DNA isolated from B. thuringiensis, Bacillus megaterium, or a Dam- Dcm- Escherichia coli strain efficiently transformed several B. thuringiensis strains, B. thuringiensis strains were grouped according to which B. thuringiensis backgrounds were suitable sources of DNA for transformation of other B. thuringiensis strains, suggesting that B. thuringiensis strains differ in DNA modification and restri...

  20. Plasmid Isolation in Legionella pneumophila and Legionella-like Organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-22

    834. 14. Macrina, F. L., D. J. Kopecko, K. R. Jones, D. J. Ayers, and S. M. McCowen. 1978. A multiple plasmic-containing Escherichi coli strain...smaller 20 Mdal cryptic plasmid and was used as a control marker with the screening procedure. Escherichia coli V517 was supplied by E. M. Lederberg...Tris-borate buffer. This purified preparation was suitable for electrophoresis. Molecular weight estimates. Escherichia coli V517 was employed as an

  1. Differences in the stability of the plasmids of Yersinia pestis cultures in vitro: impact on virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TC Leal-Balbino

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Plasmid and chromosomal genes encode determinants of virulence for Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague. However, in vitro, Y. pestis genome is very plastic and several changes have been described. To evaluate the alterations in the plasmid content of the cultures in vitro and the impact of the alterations to their pathogenicity, three Y. pestis isolates were submitted to serial subculture, analysis of the plasmid content, and testing for the presence of characteristic genes in each plasmid of colonies selected after subculture. Different results were obtained with each strain. The plasmid content of one of them was shown to be stable; no apparent alteration was produced through 32 subcultures. In the other two strains, several alterations were observed. LD50 in mice of the parental strains and the derived cultures with different plasmid content were compared. No changes in the virulence plasmid content could be specifically correlated with changes in the LD50.

  2. Growth dependence of conjugation explains limited plasmid invasion in biofilms: an individual‐based modelling study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merkey, Brian; Lardon, Laurent; Seoane, Jose Miguel;

    2011-01-01

    . By extending an individual‐based model of microbial growth and interactions to include the dynamics of plasmid carriage and transfer by individual cells, we were able to conduct in silico tests of this and other hypotheses on the dynamics of conjugal plasmid transfer in biofilms. For a generic model plasmid...... and scan speed) and spatial reach (EPS yield, conjugal pilus length) are more important for successful plasmid invasion than the recipients' growth rate or the probability of segregational loss. While this study identifies one factor that can limit plasmid invasion in biofilms, the new individual......Plasmid invasion in biofilms is often surprisingly limited in spite of the close contact of cells in a biofilm. We hypothesized that this poor plasmid spread into deeper biofilm layers is caused by a dependence of conjugation on the growth rate (relative to the maximum growth rate) of the donor...

  3. Scaling-up recombinant plasmid DNA for clinical trial: current concern, solution and status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Ruzila; Allaudin, Zeenathul Nazariah; Lila, Mohd-Azmi Mohd

    2012-09-07

    Gene therapy and vaccines are rapidly developing field in which recombinant nucleic acids are introduced in mammalian cells for enhancement, restoration, initiation or silencing biochemical function. Beside simplicity in manipulation and rapid manufacture process, plasmid DNA-based vaccines have inherent features that make them promising vaccine candidates in a variety of diseases. This present review focuses on the safety concern of the genetic elements of plasmid such as propagation and expression units as well as their host genome for the production of recombinant plasmid DNA. The highlighted issues will be beneficial in characterizing and manufacturing plasmid DNA for save clinical use. Manipulation of regulatory units of plasmid will have impact towards addressing the safety concerns raised in human vaccine applications. The gene revolution with plasmid DNA by alteration of their plasmid and production host genetics will be promising for safe delivery and obtaining efficient outcomes.

  4. Partition-associated incompatibility caused by random assortment of pure plasmid clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebersbach, Gitte; Sherratt, David J; Gerdes, Kenn;

    2005-01-01

    Summary Bacterial plasmids and chromosomes encode centromere-like partition loci that actively segregate DNA before cell division. The molecular mechanism behind DNA segregation in bacteria is largely unknown. Here we analyse the mechanism of partition-associated incompatibility for plasmid pB171......-lived pairing of plasmids. Instead, pure R1 and F foci were positioned along the length of the cell, and in a random order. Thus, our results raise the possibility that partition-mediated plasmid incompatibility is not caused by pairing of heterologous plasmids but instead by random positioning of pure plasmid...... clusters along the long axis of the cell. The strength of the incompatibility was correlated with the capability of the plasmids to compete for the mid-cell position....

  5. Identification of two replicons in phage-plasmid P4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocchetti, A; Serina, S; Terzano, S; Dehò, G; Ghisotti, D

    1998-06-05

    DNA replication of phage-plasmid P4 proceeds bidirectionally from the ori1 site (previously named ori), but requires a second cis-acting region, crr. Replication depends on the product of the P4 alpha gene, a protein with primase and helicase activity, that binds both ori1 and crr. A negative regulator of P4 DNA replication, the Cnr protein, is required for copy number control of plasmid P4. Using a plasmid complementation test for replication, we found that two replicons, both dependent on the alpha gene product, coexist in P4. The first replicon is made by the cnr and alpha genes and the ori1 and crr sites. The second is limited to the alpha and crr region. Thus, in the absence of the ori1 region, replication can initiate at a different site. By deletion mapping, a cis-acting region, ori2, essential for replication of the alpha-crr replicon was mapped within a 270-bp fragment in the first half of the alpha gene. The ori2 site was found to be dispensable in a replicon that contains ori1. A construct that besides crr and alpha carries also the cnr gene was unable to replicate, suggesting that Cnr not only controls replication from ori1, but also silences ori2.

  6. Sialic acid transport and catabolism are cooperatively regulated by SiaR and CRP in nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnston Jason W

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transport and catabolism of sialic acid, a critical virulence factor for nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae, is regulated by two transcription factors, SiaR and CRP. Results Using a mutagenesis approach, glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN-6P was identified as a co-activator for SiaR. Evidence for the cooperative regulation of both the sialic acid catabolic and transport operons suggested that cooperativity between SiaR and CRP is required for regulation. cAMP was unable to influence the expression of the catabolic operon in the absence of SiaR but was able to induce catabolic operon expression when both SiaR and GlcN-6P were present. Alteration of helical phasing supported this observation by uncoupling SiaR and CRP regulation. The insertion of one half-turn of DNA between the SiaR and CRP operators resulted in the loss of SiaR-mediated repression of the transport operon while eliminating cAMP-dependent induction of the catabolic operon when GlcN-6P was present. SiaR and CRP were found to bind to their respective operators simultaneously and GlcN-6P altered the interaction of SiaR with its operator. Conclusions These results suggest multiple novel features for the regulation of these two adjacent operons. SiaR functions as both a repressor and an activator and SiaR and CRP interact to regulate both operons from a single set of operators.

  7. Competing ParA structures space bacterial plasmids equally over the nucleoid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Ietswaart

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Low copy number plasmids in bacteria require segregation for stable inheritance through cell division. This is often achieved by a parABC locus, comprising an ATPase ParA, DNA-binding protein ParB and a parC region, encoding ParB-binding sites. These minimal components space plasmids equally over the nucleoid, yet the underlying mechanism is not understood. Here we investigate a model where ParA-ATP can dynamically associate to the nucleoid and is hydrolyzed by plasmid-associated ParB, thereby creating nucleoid-bound, self-organizing ParA concentration gradients. We show mathematically that differences between competing ParA concentrations on either side of a plasmid can specify regular plasmid positioning. Such positioning can be achieved regardless of the exact mechanism of plasmid movement, including plasmid diffusion with ParA-mediated immobilization or directed plasmid motion induced by ParB/parC-stimulated ParA structure disassembly. However, we find experimentally that parABC from Escherichia coli plasmid pB171 increases plasmid mobility, inconsistent with diffusion/immobilization. Instead our observations favor directed plasmid motion. Our model predicts less oscillatory ParA dynamics than previously believed, a prediction we verify experimentally. We also show that ParA localization and plasmid positioning depend on the underlying nucleoid morphology, indicating that the chromosomal architecture constrains ParA structure formation. Our directed motion model unifies previously contradictory models for plasmid segregation and provides a robust mechanistic basis for self-organized plasmid spacing that may be widely applicable.

  8. Mechanistic basis of plasmid-specific DNA binding of the F plasmid regulatory protein, TraM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yun; Lu, Jun; Wong, Joyce J W; Edwards, Ross A; Frost, Laura S; Mark Glover, J N

    2014-11-11

    The conjugative transfer of bacterial F plasmids relies on TraM, a plasmid-encoded protein that recognizes multiple DNA sites to recruit the plasmid to the conjugative pore. In spite of the high degree of amino acid sequence conservation between TraM proteins, many of these proteins have markedly different DNA binding specificities that ensure the selective recruitment of a plasmid to its cognate pore. Here we present the structure of F TraM RHH (ribbon-helix-helix) domain bound to its sbmA site. The structure indicates that a pair of TraM tetramers cooperatively binds an underwound sbmA site containing 12 base pairs per turn. The sbmA is composed of 4 copies of a 5-base-pair motif, each of which is recognized by an RHH domain. The structure reveals that a single conservative amino acid difference in the RHH β-ribbon between F and pED208 TraM changes its specificity for its cognate 5-base-pair sequence motif. Specificity is also dictated by the positioning of 2-base-pair spacer elements within sbmA; in F sbmA, the spacers are positioned between motifs 1 and 2 and between motifs 3 and 4, whereas in pED208 sbmA, there is a single spacer between motifs 2 and 3. We also demonstrate that a pair of F TraM tetramers can cooperatively bind its sbmC site with an affinity similar to that of sbmA in spite of a lack of sequence similarity between these DNA elements. These results provide a basis for the prediction of the DNA binding properties of the family of TraM proteins.

  9. Characterization of Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli by Plasmid Replicon Typing and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Characterization of plasmids has particular clinical significance because genes encoding important traits such as antimicrobial resistance are frequently present in plasmids. Plasmid replicon typing is a multiplex PCR based method that can be used to classify 18 of the 26 known plasmid t...

  10. A Site-Specific Integrative Plasmid Found in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Isolate HS87 along with A Plasmid Carrying an Aminoglycoside-Resistant Gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dexi Bi

    Full Text Available Plasmids play critical roles in bacterial fitness and evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here two plasmids found in a drug-resistant P. aeruginosa clinical isolate HS87 were completely sequenced. The pHS87b plasmid (11.2 kb carries phage-related genes and function-unknown genes. Notably, pHS87b encodes an integrase and has an adjacent tRNAThr-associated attachment site. A corresponding integrated form of pHS87b at the tRNAThr locus was identified on the chromosome of P. aeruginosa, showing that pHS87b is able to site-specifically integrate into the 3'-end of the tRNAThr gene. The pHS87a plasmid (26.8 kb displays a plastic structure containing a putative replication module, stability factors and a variable region. The RepA of pHS87a shows significant similarity to the replication proteins of pPT23A-family plasmids. pHS87a carries a transposon Tn6049, a truncated insertion sequence ΔIS1071 and a Tn402-like class 1 integron which contains an aacA4 cassette that may confer aminoglycoside resistance. Thus, pHS87b is a site-specific integrative plasmid whereas pHS87a is a plastic antibiotic resistance plasmid. The two native plasmids may promote the fitness and evolution of P. aeruginosa.

  11. Molecular cloning with bifunctional plasmid vectors in Bacillus subtilis: isolation of a spontaneous mutant of Bacillus subtilis with enhanced transformability for Escherichia coli-propagated chimeric plasmid DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Ostroff, G. R.; Pène, J. J.

    1983-01-01

    Hybrid plasmid DNA cloned in Escherichia coli undergoes deletions when returned to competent Bacillus subtilis, even in defined restriction and modification mutants of strain 168. We have isolated a mutant of B. subtilis MI112 which is stably transformed at high frequency by chimeric plasmid DNA propagated in E. coli.

  12. Type 3 Fimbriae Encoded on Plasmids Are Expressed from a Unique Promoter without Affecting Host Motility, Facilitating an Exceptional Phenotype That Enhances Conjugal Plasmid Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Jonas Stenløkke; Riber, Leise; Kot, Witold; Basfeld, Alrun; Burmølle, Mette; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg; Sørensen, Søren Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT), the transmission of genetic material to a recipient that is not the progeny of the donor, is fundamental in bacterial evolution. HGT is often mediated by mobile genetic elements such as conjugative plasmids, which may be in conflict with the chromosomal elements of the genome because they are independent replicons that may petition their own evolutionary strategy. Here we study differences between type 3 fimbriae encoded on wild type plasmids and in chromosomes. Using known and newly characterized plasmids we show that the expression of type 3 fimbriae encoded on plasmids is systematically different, as MrkH, a c-di-GMP dependent transcriptional activator is not needed for strong expression of the fimbriae. MrkH is required for expression of type 3 fimbriae of the Klebsiella pneumoniae chromosome, wherefrom the fimbriae operon (mrkABCDF) of plasmids is believed to have originated. We find that mrkABCDFs of plasmids are highly expressed via a unique promoter that differs from the original Klebsiella promoter resulting in fundamental behavioral consequences. Plasmid associated mrkABCDFs did not influence the swimming behavior of the host, that hereby acquired an exceptional phenotype being able to both actively swim (planktonic behavior) and express biofilm associated fimbriae (sessile behavior). We show that this exceptional phenotype enhances the conjugal transfer of the plasmid. PMID:27627107

  13. Type 3 fimbriae encoded on plasmids are expressed from a unique promoter without affecting host motility, facilitating an exceptional phenotype that enhances conjugal plasmid transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jonas Stenløkke; Riber, Leise; Kot, Witold Piotr;

    2016-01-01

    of the genome because they are independent replicons that may petition their own evolutionary strategy. Here we study differences between type 3 fimbriae encoded on wild type plasmids and in chromosomes. Using known and newly characterized plasmids we show that the expression of type 3 fimbriae encoded...

  14. Conjugative transferability of the A/C plasmids from Salmonella enterica isolates that possess or lack blaCMY in the A/C plasmid backbone

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to gain a better understanding of the conjugative transfer of antimicrobial resistance plasmids from 205 Salmonella enterica strains, isolated from cattle to E. coli or Salmonella recipients. PCR-based replicon typing (PBRT) was used to type incompatibility plasmid r...

  15. Expansion of a plasmid classification system for Gram-positive bacteria and determination of the diversity of plasmids in Staphylococcus aureus strains of human, animal, and food origins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lozano, C.; Garcia-Migura, L.; Aspiroz, C.

    2012-01-01

    An expansion of a previously described plasmid classification was performed and used to reveal the plasmid content of a collection of 92 Staphylococcus aureus strains of different origins. rep genes of other genera were detected in Staphylococcus. S1 pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) hybrid...

  16. Polar Fixation of Plasmids during Recombinant Protein Production in Bacillus megaterium Results in Population Heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münch, Karin M; Müller, Johannes; Wienecke, Sarah; Bergmann, Simone; Heyber, Steffi; Biedendieck, Rebekka; Münch, Richard; Jahn, Dieter

    2015-09-01

    During the past 2 decades, Bacillus megaterium has been systematically developed for the gram-per-liter scale production of recombinant proteins. The plasmid-based expression systems employed use a xylose-controlled promoter. Protein production analyses at the single-cell level using green fluorescent protein as a model product revealed cell culture heterogeneity characterized by a significant proportion of less productive bacteria. Due to the enormous size of B. megaterium, such bistable behavior seen in subpopulations was readily analyzed by time lapse microscopy and flow cytometry. Cell culture heterogeneity was not caused simply by plasmid loss: instead, an asymmetric distribution of plasmids during cell division was detected during the exponential-growth phase. Multicopy plasmids are generally randomly distributed between daughter cells. However, in vivo and in vitro experiments demonstrated that under conditions of strong protein production, plasmids are retained at one of the cell poles. Furthermore, it was found that cells with accumulated plasmids and high protein production ceased cell division. As a consequence, the overall protein production of the culture was achieved mainly by the subpopulation with a sufficient plasmid copy number. Based on our experimental data, we propose a model whereby the distribution of multicopy plasmids is controlled by polar fixation under protein production conditions. Thereby, cell lines with fluctuating plasmid abundance arise, which results in population heterogeneity. Our results provide initial insights into the mechanism of cellular heterogeneity during plasmid-based recombinant protein production in a Bacillus species.

  17. RK2 plasmid dynamics in Caulobacter crescentus cells--two modes of DNA replication initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegrzyn, Katarzyna; Witosinska, Monika; Schweiger, Pawel; Bury, Katarzyna; Jenal, Urs; Konieczny, Igor

    2013-06-01

    Undisturbed plasmid dynamics is required for the stable maintenance of plasmid DNA in bacterial cells. In this work, we analysed subcellular localization, DNA synthesis and nucleoprotein complex formation of plasmid RK2 during the cell cycle of Caulobacter crescentus. Our microscopic observations showed asymmetrical distribution of plasmid RK2 foci between the two compartments of Caulobacter predivisional cells, resulting in asymmetrical allocation of plasmids to progeny cells. Moreover, using a quantitative PCR (qPCR) method, we estimated that multiple plasmid particles form a single fluorescent focus and that the number of plasmids per focus is approximately equal in both swarmer and predivisional Caulobacter cells. Analysis of the dynamics of TrfA-oriV complex formation during the Caulobacter cell cycle revealed that TrfA binds oriV primarily during the G1 phase, however, plasmid DNA synthesis occurs during the S and G2 phases of the Caulobacter cell cycle. Both in vitro and in vivo analysis of RK2 replication initiation in C. crescentus cells demonstrated that it is independent of the Caulobacter DnaA protein in the presence of the longer version of TrfA protein, TrfA-44. However, in vivo stability tests of plasmid RK2 derivatives suggested that a DnaA-dependent mode of plasmid replication initiation is also possible.

  18. Insights into dynamics of mobile genetic elements in hyperthermophilic environments from five new Thermococcus plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupovic, Mart; Gonnet, Mathieu; Hania, Wajdi Ben; Forterre, Patrick; Erauso, Gaël

    2013-01-01

    Mobilome of hyperthermophilic archaea dwelling in deep-sea hydrothermal vents is poorly characterized. To gain insight into genetic diversity and dynamics of mobile genetic elements in these environments we have sequenced five new plasmids from different Thermococcus strains that have been isolated from geographically remote hydrothermal vents. The plasmids were ascribed to two subfamilies, pTN2-like and pEXT9a-like. Gene content and phylogenetic analyses illuminated a robust connection between pTN2-like plasmids and Pyrococcus abyssi virus 1 (PAV1), with roughly half of the viral genome being composed of genes that have homologues in plasmids. Unexpectedly, pEXT9a-like plasmids were found to be closely related to the previously sequenced plasmid pMETVU01 from Methanocaldococcus vulcanius M7. Our data suggests that the latter observation is most compatible with an unprecedented horizontal transfer of a pEXT9a-like plasmid from Thermococcales to Methanococcales. Gene content analysis revealed that thermococcal plasmids encode Hfq-like proteins and toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems of two different families, VapBC and RelBE. Notably, although abundant in archaeal genomes, to our knowledge, TA and hfq-like genes have not been previously found in archaeal plasmids or viruses. Finally, the plasmids described here might prove to be useful in developing new genetic tools for hyperthermophiles.

  19. Exploring Antibiotic Resistance Genes and Metal Resistance Genes in Plasmid Metagenomes from Wastewater Treatment Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An-Dong eLi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Plasmids operate as independent genetic elements in microorganism communities. Through horizontal gene transfer, they can provide their host microorganisms with important functions such as antibiotic resistance and heavy metal resistance. In this study, six metagenomic libraries were constructed with plasmid DNA extracted from influent, activated sludge and digested sludge of two wastewater treatment plants. Compared with the metagenomes of the total DNA extracted from the same sectors of the wastewater treatment plant, the plasmid metagenomes had significantly higher annotation rates, indicating that the functional genes on plasmids are commonly shared by those studied microorganisms. Meanwhile, the plasmid metagenomes also encoded many more genes related to defense mechanisms, including ARGs. Searching against an antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs database and a metal resistance genes (MRGs database revealed a broad-spectrum of antibiotic (323 out of a total 618 subtypes and metal resistance genes (23 out of a total 23 types on these plasmid metagenomes. The influent plasmid metagenomes contained many more resistance genes (both ARGs and MRGs than the activated sludge and the digested sludge metagenomes. Sixteen novel plasmids with a complete circular structure that carried these resistance genes were assembled from the plasmid metagenomes. The results of this study demonstrated that the plasmids in wastewater treatment plants could be important reservoirs for resistance genes, and may play a significant role in the horizontal transfer of these genes.

  20. Exploring antibiotic resistance genes and metal resistance genes in plasmid metagenomes from wastewater treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, An-Dong; Li, Li-Guan; Zhang, Tong

    2015-01-01

    Plasmids operate as independent genetic elements in microorganism communities. Through horizontal gene transfer (HGT), they can provide their host microorganisms with important functions such as antibiotic resistance and heavy metal resistance. In this study, six metagenomic libraries were constructed with plasmid DNA extracted from influent, activated sludge (AS) and digested sludge (DS) of two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Compared with the metagenomes of the total DNA extracted from the same sectors of the wastewater treatment plant, the plasmid metagenomes had significantly higher annotation rates, indicating that the functional genes on plasmids are commonly shared by those studied microorganisms. Meanwhile, the plasmid metagenomes also encoded many more genes related to defense mechanisms, including ARGs. Searching against an antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) database and a metal resistance genes (MRGs) database revealed a broad-spectrum of antibiotic (323 out of a total 618 subtypes) and MRGs (23 out of a total 23 types) on these plasmid metagenomes. The influent plasmid metagenomes contained many more resistance genes (both ARGs and MRGs) than the AS and the DS metagenomes. Sixteen novel plasmids with a complete circular structure that carried these resistance genes were assembled from the plasmid metagenomes. The results of this study demonstrated that the plasmids in WWTPs could be important reservoirs for resistance genes, and may play a significant role in the horizontal transfer of these genes.

  1. Insights into dynamics of mobile genetic elements in hyperthermophilic environments from five new Thermococcus plasmids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mart Krupovic

    Full Text Available Mobilome of hyperthermophilic archaea dwelling in deep-sea hydrothermal vents is poorly characterized. To gain insight into genetic diversity and dynamics of mobile genetic elements in these environments we have sequenced five new plasmids from different Thermococcus strains that have been isolated from geographically remote hydrothermal vents. The plasmids were ascribed to two subfamilies, pTN2-like and pEXT9a-like. Gene content and phylogenetic analyses illuminated a robust connection between pTN2-like plasmids and Pyrococcus abyssi virus 1 (PAV1, with roughly half of the viral genome being composed of genes that have homologues in plasmids. Unexpectedly, pEXT9a-like plasmids were found to be closely related to the previously sequenced plasmid pMETVU01 from Methanocaldococcus vulcanius M7. Our data suggests that the latter observation is most compatible with an unprecedented horizontal transfer of a pEXT9a-like plasmid from Thermococcales to Methanococcales. Gene content analysis revealed that thermococcal plasmids encode Hfq-like proteins and toxin-antitoxin (TA systems of two different families, VapBC and RelBE. Notably, although abundant in archaeal genomes, to our knowledge, TA and hfq-like genes have not been previously found in archaeal plasmids or viruses. Finally, the plasmids described here might prove to be useful in developing new genetic tools for hyperthermophiles.

  2. Conservation of plasmids among Escherichia coli K1 isolates of diverse origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, A A; Morelli, G; Heuzenroeder, M; Kamke, M; Achtman, M

    1984-12-01

    Escherichia coli K1 isolates of various O types were previously assigned to different clonal groups. Members of the two clones defined by membrane pattern 9 (MP9) and serotypes O18:K1 and O1:K1 had been found to be very similar to each other. The plasmid contents of these bacteria confirmed this conclusion. Both groups carried a self-transmissible plasmid of the FI incompatibility group that coded for colicin production and a major outer membrane protein called the plasmid-coded protein (PCP). The size of this plasmid varied from 76 to 96 megadaltons, but restriction endonuclease digestion and DNA heteroduplex analysis revealed that these plasmids were highly related. O18:K1 bacteria of MP6 had previously been determined to represent a subclone, related to but different from O18:K1 MP9 bacteria. These MP6 bacteria carried a different, smaller IncFI plasmid which did not code for colicin production or the PCP protein. This smaller plasmid was primarily related to the larger plasmid within the regions of DNA encoding incompatibility, replication, and conjugation. O1:K1 bacteria of MP5 contained other unrelated plasmids in agreement with the previous conclusion that they are unrelated to O1:K1 bacteria of MP9. The bacteria examined had been isolated from two continents over a time span of 38 years, and the results attest to conservative inheritance of plasmids within bacteria of common descent.

  3. Conservation of plasmids among Escherichia coli K1 isolates of diverse origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, A A; Morelli, G; Heuzenroeder, M; Kamke, M; Achtman, M

    1984-01-01

    Escherichia coli K1 isolates of various O types were previously assigned to different clonal groups. Members of the two clones defined by membrane pattern 9 (MP9) and serotypes O18:K1 and O1:K1 had been found to be very similar to each other. The plasmid contents of these bacteria confirmed this conclusion. Both groups carried a self-transmissible plasmid of the FI incompatibility group that coded for colicin production and a major outer membrane protein called the plasmid-coded protein (PCP). The size of this plasmid varied from 76 to 96 megadaltons, but restriction endonuclease digestion and DNA heteroduplex analysis revealed that these plasmids were highly related. O18:K1 bacteria of MP6 had previously been determined to represent a subclone, related to but different from O18:K1 MP9 bacteria. These MP6 bacteria carried a different, smaller IncFI plasmid which did not code for colicin production or the PCP protein. This smaller plasmid was primarily related to the larger plasmid within the regions of DNA encoding incompatibility, replication, and conjugation. O1:K1 bacteria of MP5 contained other unrelated plasmids in agreement with the previous conclusion that they are unrelated to O1:K1 bacteria of MP9. The bacteria examined had been isolated from two continents over a time span of 38 years, and the results attest to conservative inheritance of plasmids within bacteria of common descent. Images PMID:6094355

  4. Comparative genomics of the IncA/C multidrug resistance plasmid family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, W Florian; Welch, Timothy J; McDermott, Patrick F; Mammel, Mark K; LeClerc, J Eugene; White, David G; Cebula, Thomas A; Ravel, Jacques

    2009-08-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) plasmids belonging to the IncA/C plasmid family are widely distributed among Salmonella and other enterobacterial isolates from agricultural sources and have, at least once, also been identified in a drug-resistant Yersinia pestis isolate (IP275) from Madagascar. Here, we present the complete plasmid sequences of the IncA/C reference plasmid pRA1 (143,963 bp), isolated in 1971 from the fish pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila, and of the cryptic IncA/C plasmid pRAx (49,763 bp), isolated from Escherichia coli transconjugant D7-3, which was obtained through pRA1 transfer in 1980. Using comparative sequence analysis of pRA1 and pRAx with recent members of the IncA/C plasmid family, we show that both plasmids provide novel insights into the evolution of the IncA/C MDR plasmid family and the minimal machinery necessary for stable IncA/C plasmid maintenance. Our results indicate that recent members of the IncA/C plasmid family evolved from a common ancestor, similar in composition to pRA1, through stepwise integration of horizontally acquired resistance gene arrays into a conserved plasmid backbone. Phylogenetic comparisons predict type IV secretion-like conjugative transfer operons encoded on the shared plasmid backbones to be closely related to a group of integrating conjugative elements, which use conjugative transfer for horizontal propagation but stably integrate into the host chromosome during vegetative growth. A hipAB toxin-antitoxin gene cluster found on pRA1, which in Escherichia coli is involved in the formation of persister cell subpopulations, suggests persistence as an early broad-spectrum antimicrobial resistance mechanism in the evolution of IncA/C resistance plasmids.

  5. Plasmids of the pRM/pRF family occur in diverse Rickettsia species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldridge, Gerald D; Burkhardt, Nicole Y; Felsheim, Roderick F; Kurtti, Timothy J; Munderloh, Ulrike G

    2008-02-01

    The recent discoveries of the pRF and pRM plasmids of Rickettsia felis and R. monacensis have contravened the long-held dogma that plasmids are not present in the bacterial genus Rickettsia (Rickettsiales; Rickettsiaceae). We report the existence of plasmids in R. helvetica, R. peacockii, R. amblyommii, and R. massiliae isolates from ixodid ticks and in an R. hoogstraalii isolate from an argasid tick. R. peacockii and four isolates of R. amblyommii from widely separated geographic locations contained plasmids that comigrated with pRM during pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and larger plasmids with mobilities similar to that of pRF. The R. peacockii plasmids were lost during long-term serial passage in cultured cells. R. montanensis did not contain a plasmid. Southern blots showed that sequences similar to those of a DnaA-like replication initiator protein, a small heat shock protein 2, and the Sca12 cell surface antigen genes on pRM and pRF were present on all of the plasmids except for that of R. massiliae, which lacked the heat shock gene and was the smallest of the plasmids. The R. hoogstraalii plasmid was most similar to pRM and contained apparent homologs of proline/betaine transporter and SpoT stringent response genes on pRM and pRF that were absent from the other plasmids. The R. hoogstraalii, R. helvetica, and R. amblyommii plasmids contained homologs of a pRM-carried gene similar to a Nitrobacter sp. helicase RecD/TraA gene, but none of the plasmids hybridized with a probe derived from a pRM-encoded gene similar to a Burkholderia sp. transposon resolvase gene.

  6. Effect of excessive cadmium chloride on the plasmids of E. coli HB 101 in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    After Escherichia coli HB101 with plasmid pWH58, pWH98, or pTBa5 were cultered respectively in amp LB broth which contained 50 mg/L CdCl2 constantly for 24 h, these plasmids were isolated from E. coli, and the effect of excessive CdCl2 on the E. coli HB101 and plasmid DNA was studied by surveying the growth of E. coli HB101 and plasmid, argarose gel electrophoresis and analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of plasmids, and plasmid transformation. The results showed that 50 mg/L CdCl2 treatment lagged the growth of E. coli HB101 for at least 4h, but after grown for 24h there were not significant differences in the growths of E. coli HB101s and the productions of plasmids between the treatment and control. These results implified that E. coli HB101 have induced adaptability to cadmium stress and excessive CdCl2 did not inhibit the replication and amp+ gene's expression of plasmid DNA in vivo of E. coli significantly. 50 mg/L CdCl2 treatment for 24 hours might cause the sequence's change of plasmid DNA, but could not lead to the random breakage of plasmid DNA strands. Moreover, after 50 mg/L of CdCl2 treatment in vivo the transformation activities of plasmid did not altered, implied excessive CdCl2 could not affect the superhelical structure of plasmid and also not break the loop of plasmid DNA evidently.

  7. Dual-Replicon Plasmids for Elimination of Resistant Plasmids%双复制子质粒消除耐药质粒的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    莫冰; 余克花; 黎帆; 李蓉; 宋矿余

    2014-01-01

    Objective To observe the eliminating effect of dual-replicon plasmids on resistant plasmids.Methods The dual-replicon plasmids pKT230-oriV were constructed and transferred into bacteria with resistant plasmids pRK290 through the transformation and conjugational trans-fer pathways.The eliminating effect of dual-replicon plasmids on resistant plasmids was ob-served.Results The bacteria were cultured for 5 generations after the transfer of dual-replicon plasmids,and resistant plasmids pRK290 in bacteria were eliminated.Conclusion The conjuga-tional transfer of dual-replicon plasmids is a pathway to eliminate resistant plasmids.%目的:观察双复制子质粒对耐药质粒的消除作用。方法构建双复制子质粒 pKT230-oriV,并通过转化或接合转移途径转入带有 pRK290质粒的细菌中,观察双复制子质粒对耐药质粒的消除作用。结果转入双复制子质粒菌培养5代后,细菌中的 pRK290耐药质粒被消除。结论双复制子利用接合转移途径是消除耐药质粒的一个途径。

  8. Biomimetic molecules lower catabolic expression and prevent chondroitin sulfate degradation in an osteoarthritic ex vivo model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shaili; Vazquez-Portalatin, Nelda; Calve, Sarah; Panitch, Alyssa

    2016-02-08

    Aggrecan, the major proteoglycan in cartilage, serves to protect cartilage tissue from damage and degradation during the progression of osteoarthritis (OA). In cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) aggrecan exists in an aggregate composed of several aggrecan molecules that bind to a single filament of hyaluronan. Each molecule of aggrecan is composed of a protein core and glycosaminoglycan sides chains, the latter of which provides cartilage with the ability to retain water and resist compressive loads. During the progression of OA, loss of aggrecan is considered to occur first, after which other cartilage matrix components become extremely susceptible to degradation. Proteolytic cleavage of the protein core of aggrecan by enzymes such as aggrecanases, prevent its binding to HA and lower cartilage mechanical strength. Here we present the use of HA-binding or collagen type II-binding molecules that functionally mimic aggrecan but lack known cleavage sites, protecting the molecule from proteolytic degradation. These molecules synthesized with chondroitin sulfate backbones conjugated to hyaluronan- or collagen type II- binding peptides, are capable of diffusing through a cartilage explant and adhering to the ECM of this tissue. The objective of this study was to test the functional efficacy of these molecules in an ex vivo osteoarthritic model to discern the optimal molecule for further studies. Different variations of chondroitin sulfate conjugated to the binding peptides were diffused through aggrecan depleted explants and assessed for their ability to enhance compressive stiffness, prevent CS degradation, and modulate catabolic (MMP-13 and ADAMTS-5) and anabolic (aggrecan and collagen type II) gene expression. A pilot in vivo study assessed the ability to retain the molecule within the joint space of an osteoarthritic guinea pig model. The results indicate chondroitin sulfate conjugated to hyaluronan-binding peptides is able to significantly restore equilibrium

  9. Plasmid DNA Supercoiling and Gyrase Activity in Escherichia coli Wild-Type and rpoS Stationary-Phase Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Domínguez, Yazmid; Contreras-Ferrat, Gabriel; Ramírez-Santos, Jesús; Membrillo-Hernández, Jorge; Gómez-Eichelmann, M. Carmen

    2003-01-01

    Stationary-phase cells displayed a distribution of relaxed plasmids and had the ability to recover plasmid supercoiling as soon as nutrients became available. Preexisting gyrase molecules in these cells were responsible for this recovery. Stationary-phase rpoS cells showed a bimodal distribution of plasmids and failed to supercoil plasmids after the addition of nutrients, suggesting that rpoS plays a role in the regulation of plasmid topology during the stationary phase. PMID:12533486

  10. Multiple drug resistant carbapenemases producing Acinetobacter baumannii isolates harbours multiple R-plasmids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajagopalan Saranathan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: The nosocomial human pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii has high propensity to develop resistance to antimicrobials and to become multidrug resistant (MDR, consequently complicating the treatment. This study was carried out to investigate the presence of resistant plasmids (R-plasmids among the clinical isolates of A. baumannii. In addition, the study was performed to check the presence of common β-lactamases encoding genes on these plasmids. Methods: A total of 55 clinical isolates of A. baumannii were included in the study and all were subjected to plasmid DNA isolation, followed by PCR to check the presence of resistance gene determinants such as blaOXA-23 , blaOXA-51, blaOXA-58 and blaIMP-1 on these plasmids that encode for oxacillinase (OXA and metallo-β-lactamase (MBL type of carbapenemases. Plasmid curing experiments were carried out on selected isolates using ethidium bromide and acridine orange as curing agents and the antibiotic resistance profiles were evaluated before and after curing. Results: All the isolates were identified as A. baumannii by 16SrDNA amplification and sequencing. Plasmid DNA isolated from these isolates showed the occurrence of multiple plasmids with size ranging from 500bp to ≥ 25 kb. The percentage of blaOXA-51 and blaOXA-23 on plasmids were found to be 78 and 42 per cent, respectively and 20 isolates (36% carried blaIMP-1 gene on plasmids. Significant difference was observed in the antibiograms of plasmid cured isolates when compared to their parental ones. The clinical isolates became susceptible to more than two antibiotic classes after curing of plasmids indicating plasmid borne resistance. Interpretation & conclusions: Our study determined the plasmid mediated resistance mechanisms and occurrence of different resistance genes on various plasmids isolated from MDR A. baumannii. The present findings showed the evidence for antibiotic resistance mediated through multiple plasmids in

  11. IncA/C plasmids: An emerging threat to human and animal health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Timothy J; Lang, Kevin S

    2012-01-01

    Incompatibility group IncA/C plasmids are large, low copy, theta-replicating plasmids that have been described in the literature for over 40 years. However, they have only recently been intensively studied on the genomic level because of their associations with the emergence of multidrug resistance in enteric pathogens of humans and animals. These plasmids are unique among other enterobacterial plasmids in many aspects, including their modular structure and gene content. While the IncA/C plasmid genome structure has now been well defined, many questions remain pertaining to their basic biological mechanisms of dissemination and regulation. Here, we discuss the history of IncA/C plasmids in light of our recent understanding of their population distribution, genomics, and effects on host bacteria.

  12. Survival and evolution of a large multidrug resistance plasmid in new clinical bacterial hosts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porse, Andreas; Schønning, Kristian; Munck, Christian;

    2016-01-01

    Large conjugative plasmids are important drivers of bacterial evolution and contribute significantly to the dissemination of antibiotic resistance. Although plasmid borne multidrug resistance is recognized as one of the main challenges in modern medicine, the adaptive forces shaping the evolution...... sequencing to show that the long-term persistence and molecular integrity of the plasmid is highly influenced by multiple factors within a 25 kb plasmid region constituting a host-dependent burden. In the E. coli hosts investigated here, improved plasmid stability readily evolves via IS26 mediated deletions...... consistently followed by all evolved E. coli lineages exposes a trade-off between horizontal and vertical transmission that may ultimately limit the dissemination potential of clinical multidrug resistance plasmids in these hosts....

  13. Strategies and approaches in plasmidome studies—uncovering plasmid diversity disregarding of linear elements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dib, Julián R.; Wagenknecht, Martin; Farías, María E.; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2015-01-01

    The term plasmid was originally coined for circular, extrachromosomal genetic elements. Today, plasmids are widely recognized not only as important factors facilitating genome restructuring but also as vehicles for the dissemination of beneficial characters within bacterial communities. Plasmid diversity has been uncovered by means of culture-dependent or -independent approaches, such as endogenous or exogenous plasmid isolation as well as PCR-based detection or transposon-aided capture, respectively. High-throughput-sequencing made possible to cover total plasmid populations in a given environment, i.e., the plasmidome, and allowed to address the quality and significance of self-replicating genetic elements. Since such efforts were and still are rather restricted to circular molecules, here we put equal emphasis on the linear plasmids which—despite their frequent occurrence in a large number of bacteria—are largely neglected in prevalent plasmidome conceptions. PMID:26074886

  14. Long- term manure exposure increases soil bacterial community potential for plasmid uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musovic, Sanin; Klümper, Uli; Dechesne, Arnaud;

    2014-01-01

    Microbial communities derived from soils subject to different agronomic treatments were challenged with three broad host range plasmids, RP4, pIPO2tet and pRO101, via solid surface filter matings to assess their permissiveness. Approximately 1 in 10 000 soil bacterial cells could receive and main......Microbial communities derived from soils subject to different agronomic treatments were challenged with three broad host range plasmids, RP4, pIPO2tet and pRO101, via solid surface filter matings to assess their permissiveness. Approximately 1 in 10 000 soil bacterial cells could receive...... and maintain the plasmids. The community permissiveness increased up to 100% in communities derived from manured soil. While the plasmid transfer frequency was significantly influenced by both the type of plasmid and the agronomic treatment, the diversity of the transconjugal pools was purely plasmid dependent...

  15. Brazilian purpuric fever caused by Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius strains lacking the 3031 plasmid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tondella, M L; Quinn, F D; Perkins, B A

    1995-01-01

    Brazilian purpuric fever (BPF) is a life-threatening pediatric infection caused by Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius (Hae), an organism formerly associated with only self-limited purulent conjunctivitis. Strains of Hae causing BPF have a 24-MDa plasmid with a specific AccI restriction pattern designated 3031. This plasmid was thought to code for a virulence factor because it had been detected only among Hae strains isolated from BPF cases or their contacts. From 3 typical BPF cases recently identified in São Paulo State, sterile-site Hae isolates were obtained; these isolates were similar to earlier BPF-associated Hae except they did not possess a 3031 plasmid. HindIII restricted chromosomal DNA from these strains was probed with purified 3031 plasmid DNA under high-stringency conditions. There was no evidence that 3031 plasmid DNA had become chromosomally integrated. It appears that the 3031 plasmid does not code for BPF-specific virulence factors.

  16. pTAR-Encoded Proteins in Plasmid Partitioning

    OpenAIRE

    Kalnin, Kirill; Stegalkina, Svetlana; Yarmolinsky, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Partition cassettes, essential for the segregational stability of low-copy-number bacterial plasmids, typically encode two autoregulated proteins and an adjacent cis-acting centromere analog to which one or perhaps both proteins bind. The diminutive partition region of pTAR of Agrobacterium spp. was reported to be exceptional, encoding only a single protein, ParA (D. R. Gallie and C. I. Kado, J. Mol. Biol. 193:465–478, 1987). However, resequencing of the region revealed two small downstream g...

  17. Effects of a block in cysteine catabolism on energy balance and fat metabolism in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewiadomski, Julie; Zhou, James Q; Roman, Heather B; Liu, Xiaojing; Hirschberger, Lawrence L; Locasale, Jason W; Stipanuk, Martha H

    2016-01-01

    To gain further insights into the effects of elevated cysteine levels on energy metabolism and the possible mechanisms underlying these effects, we conducted studies in cysteine dioxygenase (Cdo1)-null mice. Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) catalyzes the first step of the major pathway for cysteine catabolism. When CDO is absent, tissue and plasma cysteine levels are elevated, resulting in enhanced flux of cysteine through desulfhydration reactions. When Cdo1-null mice were fed a high-fat diet, they gained more weight than their wild-type controls, regardless of whether the diet was supplemented with taurine. Cdo1-null mice had markedly lower leptin levels, higher feed intakes, and markedly higher abundance of hepatic stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1) compared to wild-type control mice, and these differences were not affected by the fat or taurine content of the diet. Thus, reported associations of elevated cysteine levels with greater weight gain and with elevated hepatic Scd1 expression are also seen in the Cdo1-null mouse model. Hepatic accumulation of acylcarnitines suggests impaired mitochondrial β-oxidation of fatty acids in Cdo1-null mice. The strong associations of elevated cysteine levels with excess H2 S production and impairments in energy metabolism suggest that H2 S signaling could be involved.

  18. Redundancy in putrescine catabolism in solvent tolerant Pseudomonas putida S12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandounas, Luaine; Ballerstedt, Hendrik; de Winde, Johannes H; Ruijssenaars, Harald J

    2011-06-10

    Pseudomonas putida S12 is a promising platform organism for the biological production of substituted aromatic compounds due to its extreme tolerance towards toxic chemicals. Solvent or aromatic stress tolerance may be due to membrane modifications and efflux pumps; however in general, polyamines have also been implicated in stressed cells. Previous transcriptomics results of P. putida strains producing an aromatic compound, or being exposed to the solvent toluene, indicated differentially expressed genes involved in polyamine transport and metabolism. Therefore, the metabolism of the polyamine, putrescine was investigated in P. putida S12, as no putrescine degradation pathways have been described for this strain. Via transcriptome analysis various, often redundant, putrescine-induced genes were identified as being potentially involved in putrescine catabolism via oxidative deamination and transamination. A series of knockout mutants were constructed in which up to six of these genes were sequentially deleted, and although putrescine degradation was affected in some of these mutants, complete elimination of putrescine degradation in P. putida S12 was not achieved. Evidence was found for the presence of an alternative pathway for putrescine degradation involving γ-glutamylation. The occurrence of multiple putrescine degradation routes in the solvent-tolerant P. putida S12 is indicative of the importance of controlling polyamine homeostasis, as well as of the high metabolic flexibility exhibited by this microorganism.

  19. Ubiquity and quantitative significance of detoxification catabolism of chlorophyll associated with protistan herbivory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiyama, Yuichiro; Yokoyama, Akiko; Kinoshita, Yusuke; Shoji, Sunao; Miyashiya, Hideaki; Shiratori, Takashi; Suga, Hisami; Ishikawa, Kanako; Ishikawa, Akira; Inouye, Isao; Ishida, Ken-ichiro; Fujinuma, Daiki; Aoki, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Masami; Nomoto, Shinya; Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2012-10-23

    Chlorophylls are essential components of the photosynthetic apparati that sustain all of the life forms that ultimately depend on solar energy. However, a drawback of the extraordinary photosensitizing efficiency of certain chlorophyll species is their ability to generate harmful singlet oxygen. Recent studies have clarified the catabolic processes involved in the detoxification of chlorophylls in land plants, but little is understood about these strategies in aquatic ecosystem. Here, we report that a variety of heterotrophic protists accumulate the chlorophyll a catabolite 13(2),17(3)-cyclopheophorbide a enol (cPPB-aE) after their ingestion of algae. This chlorophyll derivative is nonfluorescent in solution, and its inability to generate singlet oxygen in vitro qualifies it as a detoxified catabolite of chlorophyll a. Using a modified analytical method, we show that cPPB-aE is ubiquitous in aquatic environments, and it is often the major chlorophyll a derivative. Our findings suggest that cPPB-aE metabolism is one of the most important, widely distributed processes in aquatic ecosystems. Therefore, the herbivorous protists that convert chlorophyll a to cPPB-aE are suggested to play more significant roles in the modern oceanic carbon flux than was previously recognized, critically linking microscopic primary producers to the macroscopic food web and carbon sequestration in the ocean.

  20. Early reversal cells in adult human bone remodeling: osteoblastic nature, catabolic functions and interactions with osteoclasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelgawad, Mohamed Essameldin; Delaisse, Jean-Marie; Hinge, Maja; Jensen, Pia Rosgaard; Alnaimi, Ragad Walid; Rolighed, Lars; Engelholm, Lars H; Marcussen, Niels; Andersen, Thomas Levin

    2016-06-01

    The mechanism coupling bone resorption and formation is a burning question that remains incompletely answered through the current investigations on osteoclasts and osteoblasts. An attractive hypothesis is that the reversal cells are likely mediators of this coupling. Their nature is a big matter of debate. The present study performed on human cancellous bone is the first one combining in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry to demonstrate their osteoblastic nature. It shows that the Runx2 and CD56 immunoreactive reversal cells appear to take up TRAcP released by neighboring osteoclasts. Earlier preclinical studies indicate that reversal cells degrade the organic matrix left behind by the osteoclasts and that this degradation is crucial for the initiation of the subsequent bone formation. To our knowledge, this study is the first addressing these catabolic activities in adult human bone through electron microscopy and analysis of molecular markers. Periosteoclastic reversal cells show direct contacts with the osteoclasts and with the demineralized resorption debris. These early reversal cells show (1) ¾-collagen fragments typically generated by extracellular collagenases of the MMP family, (2) MMP-13 (collagenase-3) and (3) the endocytic collagen receptor uPARAP/Endo180. The prevalence of these markers was lower in the later reversal cells, which are located near the osteoid surfaces and morphologically resemble mature bone-forming osteoblasts. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that reversal cells colonizing bone surfaces right after resorption are osteoblast-lineage cells, and extends to adult human bone remodeling their role in rendering eroded surfaces osteogenic.

  1. Seasonal dynamics of flight muscle fatty acid binding protein and catabolic enzymes in a migratory shorebird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglielmo, Christopher G; Haunerland, Norbert H; Hochachka, Peter W; Williams, Tony D

    2002-05-01

    We developed an ELISA to measure heart-type fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) in muscles of the western sandpiper (Calidris mauri), a long-distance migrant shorebird. H-FABP accounted for almost 11% of cytosolic protein in the heart. Pectoralis H-FABP levels were highest during migration (10%) and declined to 6% in tropically wintering female sandpipers. Premigratory birds increased body fat, but not pectoralis H-FABP, indicating that endurance flight training may be required to stimulate H-FABP expression. Juveniles making their first migration had lower pectoralis H-FABP than adults, further supporting a role for flight training. Aerobic capacity, measured by citrate synthase activity, and fatty acid oxidation capacity, measured by 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA-dehydrogenase and carnitine palmitoyl transferase activities, did not change during premigration but increased during migration by 6, 12, and 13%, respectively. The greater relative induction of H-FABP (+70%) with migration than of catabolic enzymes suggests that elevated H-FABP is related to the enhancement of uptake of fatty acids from the circulation. Citrate synthase, 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA-dehydrogenase, and carnitine palmitoyl transferase were positively correlated within individuals, suggesting coexpression, but enzyme activities were unrelated to H-FABP levels.

  2. Hypoxia-inducible factor-2α is an essential catabolic regulator of inflammatory rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Je-Hwang Ryu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a systemic autoimmune disorder that manifests as chronic inflammation and joint tissue destruction. However, the etiology and pathogenesis of RA have not been fully elucidated. Here, we explored the role of the hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs, HIF-1α (encoded by HIF1A and HIF-2α (encoded by EPAS1. HIF-2α was markedly up-regulated in the intimal lining of RA synovium, whereas HIF-1α was detected in a few cells in the sublining and deep layer of RA synovium. Overexpression of HIF-2α in joint tissues caused an RA-like phenotype, whereas HIF-1α did not affect joint architecture. Moreover, a HIF-2α deficiency in mice blunted the development of experimental RA. HIF-2α was expressed mainly in fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS of RA synovium and regulated their proliferation, expression of RANKL (receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand and various catabolic factors, and osteoclastogenic potential. Moreover, HIF-2α-dependent up-regulation of interleukin (IL-6 in FLS stimulated differentiation of TH17 cells-crucial effectors of RA pathogenesis. Additionally, in the absence of IL-6 (Il6-/- mice, overexpression of HIF-2α in joint tissues did not cause an RA phenotype. Thus, our results collectively suggest that HIF-2α plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of RA by regulating FLS functions, independent of HIF-1α.

  3. Mitochondrial Carriers Link the Catabolism of Hydroxyaromatic Compounds to the Central Metabolism in Candida parapsilosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeman, Igor; Neboháčová, Martina; Gérecová, Gabriela; Katonová, Kornélia; Jánošíková, Eva; Jakúbková, Michaela; Centárová, Ivana; Dunčková, Ivana; Tomáška, L'ubomír; Pryszcz, Leszek P.; Gabaldón, Toni; Nosek, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic yeast Candida parapsilosis metabolizes hydroxyderivatives of benzene and benzoic acid to compounds channeled into central metabolism, including the mitochondrially localized tricarboxylic acid cycle, via the 3-oxoadipate and gentisate pathways. The orchestration of both catabolic pathways with mitochondrial metabolism as well as their evolutionary origin is not fully understood. Our results show that the enzymes involved in these two pathways operate in the cytoplasm with the exception of the mitochondrially targeted 3-oxoadipate CoA-transferase (Osc1p) and 3-oxoadipyl-CoA thiolase (Oct1p) catalyzing the last two reactions of the 3-oxoadipate pathway. The cellular localization of the enzymes indicates that degradation of hydroxyaromatic compounds requires a shuttling of intermediates, cofactors, and products of the corresponding biochemical reactions between cytosol and mitochondria. Indeed, we found that yeast cells assimilating hydroxybenzoates increase the expression of genes SFC1, LEU5, YHM2, and MPC1 coding for succinate/fumarate carrier, coenzyme A carrier, oxoglutarate/citrate carrier, and the subunit of pyruvate carrier, respectively. A phylogenetic analysis uncovered distinct evolutionary trajectories for sparsely distributed gene clusters coding for enzymes of both pathways. Whereas the 3-oxoadipate pathway appears to have evolved by vertical descent combined with multiple losses, the gentisate pathway shows a striking pattern suggestive of horizontal gene transfer to the evolutionarily distant Mucorales. PMID:27707801

  4. Catabolism of exogenously supplied thymidine to thymine and dihydrothymine by platelets in human peripheral blood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pero, R.W.; Johnson, D.; Olsson, A.

    1984-11-01

    The interference of platelets with the estimation of unscheduled DNA synthesis in human peripheral mononuclear leukocytes following genotoxic exposure was studied. A 96% reduction in the unscheduled DNA synthesis value was achieved by incubating (/sup 3/H)thymidine with platelet-rich plasma for 5 hr at 37 degrees. Using radioactive thymine-containing compounds, together with quantitative analyses based on thin-layer and ion-exchange chromatographies, we have shown that thymidine was converted to thymine which, in turn, was converted to dihydrothymine in platelet-rich plasma. The enzymes responsible were separated from platelet lysates by gel filtration and were identified as thymidine phosphorylase and dihydrothymine dehydrogenase. The phosphorylase reversibly catalyzed the formation of thymine from thymidine and converted bromodeoxyuridine to bromouracil. The dehydrogenase reversibly catalyzed the interconversion of thymine and dihydrothymine in a reaction dependent on NADP(H), and it was inhibited by diazouracil and by thymine. Nearly all the thymidine-catabolizing activity found in whole blood samples supplied exogenously with thymidine was accounted for by the platelets. Since most genetic toxicological tests that use blood samples do not involve removing platelets from the blood cell cultures, then it is concluded that precautions should be taken in the future to determine the influence of platelets on these test systems. This is particularly true for methods dependent on thymidine pulses such as unscheduled DNA synthesis, or those dependent on bromodeoxyuridine, such as sister chromatid exchanges, since this nucleoside is also a substrate for thymidine phosphorylase.

  5. Opposing effects of apolipoprotein m on catabolism of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins and atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Christina; Pedersen, Tanja Xenia; Gordts, Philip L S M;

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Plasma apolipoprotein (apo)M is mainly associated with high-density lipoprotein (HDL). HDL-bound apoM is antiatherogenic in vitro. However, plasma apoM is not associated with coronary heart disease in humans, perhaps because of a positive correlation with plasma low-density lipoprotein...... (LDL). Objective: We explored putative links between apoM and very-low-density (VLDL)/LDL metabolism and the antiatherogenic potential of apoM in vivo. Methods and Results: Plasma apoM was increased approximately 2.1 and approximately 1.5 fold in mice lacking LDL receptors (Ldlr(-/-)) and expressing...... dysfunctional LDL receptor-related protein 1 (Lrp1(n2/n2)), respectively, but was unaffected in apoE-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice. Thus, pathways controlling catabolism of VLDL and LDL affect plasma apoM. Overexpression ( approximately 10-fold) of human apoM increased (50% to 70%) and apoM deficiency decreased...

  6. A proteomic and transcriptomic view of amino acids catabolism in the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Soulaf; Bailly, Julie; Delettre, Jérôme; Bonnarme, Pascal

    2009-10-01

    The yeast Yarrowia lipolytica has to develop dynamic metabolic adaptation mechanisms to survive within the cheese habitat. The availability of amino acids (AAs) is of major importance for microbial development and/or aroma production during cheese ripening. Using 2-D protein gel electrophoresis, we analyzed the adaptation mechanisms of Y. lipolytica for AAs limitation or supplementation in a batch culture containing lactate as a carbon source. Proteome analyses allow the identification of 34 differentially expressed proteins between the culture conditions. These analyses demonstrated that prior to the AAs addition, mainly proteins involved in the oxidative stress of the yeast were induced. Following the AAs addition, yeast cells reorganize their metabolism toward AAs catabolism and also generate a higher induction of proteins related to carbon metabolism and proteins biosynthesis. Using real-time reverse transcription PCR, we re-evaluated the expression of genes encoding proteins involved in these processes. The expression levels of the genes were in accordance with the proteomic results, with the up-regulation of genes encoding a branched-chain amino transferase BAT2, a pyruvate decarboxylase PDC6 and an Hsp70 protein SSZ1 involved in protein biosynthesis. A volatile compound analysis was also performed, and increased production of dimethyldisulfide from methionine and 3-methyl-butanal from leucine was observed in media supplemented with AAs.

  7. [Protein catabolism and malnutrition in liver cirrhosis - impact of oral nutritional therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, K; Valentini, L; Lochs, H; Pirlich, M

    2010-07-01

    Malnutrition with loss of muscle is common in patients with liver cirrhosis and has negative impact on morbidity and mortality. The aetiology of malnutrition is multifactorial and includes inflammation, early onset of gluconeogenesis due to impaired glycogen storage and sometimes hypermetabolism. Reduced nutritional intake, however, plays the most important role in the pathogenesis of malnutrition. There is, however, ample evidence that nutritional intake and therapy are inadequate in liver cirrhosis although studies have clearly shown that dietary counselling and nutritional therapy with oral supplements improve intake in these patients. Protein requirement is considered to be increased in liver cirrhosis and high protein intake has been shown to be well tolerated and associated with an improvement of liver function and nutritional status. Protein intolerance on the other hand is uncommon and hepatic encephalopathy can thus rarely be attributed to high protein consumption. Recommendations for general protein restriction must therefore be considered obsolete and rather a risk factor for an impaired clinical outcome. Furthermore, the administration of late evening meals is highly beneficial in patients with liver disease since the rapid onset of the overnight catabolic state is counteracted. The serum concentration of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) is decreased in patients with liver cirrhosis and long-term supplementation of BCAA has been shown to improve nutritional status and prolong event-free survival and quality of life.

  8. Engineering Bacteria to Catabolize the Carbonaceous Component of Sarin: Teaching E. coli to Eat Isopropanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Margaret E; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Keasling, Jay D

    2016-12-16

    We report an engineered strain of Escherichia coli that catabolizes the carbonaceous component of the extremely toxic chemical warfare agent sarin. Enzymatic decomposition of sarin generates isopropanol waste that, with this engineered strain, is then transformed into acetyl-CoA by enzymatic conversion with a key reaction performed by the acetone carboxylase complex (ACX). We engineered the heterologous expression of the ACX complex from Xanthobacter autotrophicus PY2 to match the naturally occurring subunit stoichiometry and purified the recombinant complex from E. coli for biochemical analysis. Incorporating this ACX complex and enzymes from diverse organisms, we introduced an isopropanol degradation pathway in E. coli, optimized induction conditions, and decoupled enzyme expression to probe pathway bottlenecks. Our engineered E. coli consumed 65% of isopropanol compared to no-cell controls and was able to grow on isopropanol as a sole carbon source. In the process, reconstitution of this large ACX complex (370 kDa) in a system naïve to its structural and mechanistic requirements allowed us to study this otherwise cryptic enzyme in more detail than would have been possible in the less genetically tractable native Xanthobacter system.

  9. Novel insights into the diversity of catabolic metabolism from ten haloarchaeal genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iain Anderson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The extremely halophilic archaea are present worldwide in saline environments and have important biotechnological applications. Ten complete genomes of haloarchaea are now available, providing an opportunity for comparative analysis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report here the comparative analysis of five newly sequenced haloarchaeal genomes with five previously published ones. Whole genome trees based on protein sequences provide strong support for deep relationships between the ten organisms. Using a soft clustering approach, we identified 887 protein clusters present in all halophiles. Of these core clusters, 112 are not found in any other archaea and therefore constitute the haloarchaeal signature. Four of the halophiles were isolated from water, and four were isolated from soil or sediment. Although there are few habitat-specific clusters, the soil/sediment halophiles tend to have greater capacity for polysaccharide degradation, siderophore synthesis, and cell wall modification. Halorhabdus utahensis and Haloterrigena turkmenica encode over forty glycosyl hydrolases each, and may be capable of breaking down naturally occurring complex carbohydrates. H. utahensis is specialized for growth on carbohydrates and has few amino acid degradation pathways. It uses the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway instead of the oxidative pathway, giving it more flexibility in the metabolism of pentoses. CONCLUSIONS: These new genomes expand our understanding of haloarchaeal catabolic pathways, providing a basis for further experimental analysis, especially with regard to carbohydrate metabolism. Halophilic glycosyl hydrolases for use in biofuel production are more likely to be found in halophiles isolated from soil or sediment.

  10. Catabolic effects of FGF-1 on chondrocytes and its possible role in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Seoudi, Abdellatif; El Kader, Tarek Abd; Nishida, Takashi; Eguchi, Takanori; Aoyama, Eriko; Takigawa, Masaharu; Kubota, Satoshi

    2017-03-25

    Fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF-1) is a classical member of the FGF family and is produced by chondrocytes cultured from osteoarthritic patients. Also, this growth factor was shown to bind to CCN family protein 2 (CCN2), which regenerates damaged articular cartilage and counteracts osteoarthritis (OA) in an animal model. However, the pathophysiological role of FGF-1 in cartilage has not been well investigated. In this study, we evaluated the effects of FGF-1 in vitro and its production in vivo by use of an OA model. Treatment of human chondrocytic cells with FGF-1 resulted in marked repression of genes for cartilaginous extracellular matrix components, whereas it strongly induced matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP-13), representing its catabolic effects on cartilage. Interestingly, expression of the CCN2 gene was dramatically repressed by FGF-1, which repression eventually caused the reduced production of CCN2 protein from the chondrocytic cells. The results of a reporter gene assay revealed that this repression could be ascribed, at least in part, to transcriptional regulation. In contrast, the gene expression of FGF-1 was enhanced by exogenous FGF-1, indicating a positive feedback system in these cells. Of note, induction of FGF-1 was observed in the articular cartilage of a rat OA model. These results collectively indicate a pathological role of FGF-1 in OA development, which includes an insufficient cartilage regeneration response caused by CCN2 down regulation.

  11. Catabolism of Branched Chain Amino Acids Supports Respiration but Not Volatile Synthesis in Tomato Fruits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrej Kochevenko; Wagner L.Araújo; Gregory S.Maloney; Denise M.Tieman; Phuc Thi Do; Mark G.Taylor; Harry J.Klee; Alisdair R.Fernie

    2012-01-01

    The branched-chain amino acid transaminases (BCATs) have a crucial role in metabolism of the branched-chain amino acids leucine,isoleucine,and valine.These enzymes catalyze the last step of synthesis and the initial step of degradation of these amino acids.Although the biosynthetic pathways of branched chain amino acids in plants have been extensively investigated and a number of genes have been characterized,their catabolism in plants is not yet completely understood.We previously characterized the branched chain amino acid transaminase gene family in tomato,revealing both the subcellular localization and kinetic properties of the enzymes encoded by six genes.Here,we examined possible functions of the enzymes during fruit development.We further characterized transgenic plants differing in the expression of branched chain amino acid transaminases 1 and 3,evaluating the rates of respiration in fruits deficient in BCAT1 and the levels of volatiles in lines overexpressing either BCAT1 or BCAT3.We quantitatively tested,via precursor and isotope feeding experiments,the importance of the branched chain amino acids and their corresponding keto acids in the formation of fruit volatiles.Our results not only demonstrate for the first time the importance of branched chain amino acids in fruit respiration,but also reveal that keto acids,rather than amino acids,are the likely precursors for the branched chain flavor volatiles.

  12. Novel Insights into the Diversity of Catabolic Metabolism from Ten Haloarchaeal Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Iain; Scheuner, Carmen; Goker, Markus; Mavromatis, Kostas; Hooper, Sean D.; Porat, Iris; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2011-05-03

    The extremely halophilic archaea are present worldwide in saline environments and have important biotechnological applications. Ten complete genomes of haloarchaea are now available, providing an opportunity for comparative analysis. We report here the comparative analysis of five newly sequenced haloarchaeal genomes with five previously published ones. Whole genome trees based on protein sequences provide strong support for deep relationships between the ten organisms. Using a soft clustering approach, we identified 887 protein clusters present in all halophiles. Of these core clusters, 112 are not found in any other archaea and therefore constitute the haloarchaeal signature. Four of the halophiles were isolated from water, and four were isolated from soil or sediment. Although there are few habitat-specific clusters, the soil/sediment halophiles tend to have greater capacity for polysaccharide degradation, siderophore synthesis, and cell wall modification. Halorhabdus utahensis and Haloterrigena turkmenica encode over forty glycosyl hydrolases each, and may be capable of breaking down naturally occurring complex carbohydrates. H. utahensis is specialized for growth on carbohydrates and has few amino acid degradation pathways. It uses the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway instead of the oxidative pathway, giving it more flexibility in the metabolism of pentoses. These new genomes expand our understanding of haloarchaeal catabolic pathways, providing a basis for further experimental analysis, especially with regard to carbohydrate metabolism. Halophilic glycosyl hydrolases for use in biofuel production are more likely to be found in halophiles isolated from soil or sediment.

  13. Estimating fermentative amino acid catabolism in the small intestine of growing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Columbus, D A; Cant, J P; de Lange, C F M

    2015-11-01

    Fermentative catabolism (FAAC) of dietary and endogenous amino acids (AA) in the small intestine contributes to loss of AA available for protein synthesis and body maintenance functions in pigs. A continuous isotope infusion study was performed to determine whole body urea flux, urea recycling and FAAC in the small intestine of ileal-cannulated growing pigs fed a control diet (CON, 18.6% CP; n=6), a high fibre diet with 12% added pectin (HF, 17.7% CP; n = 4) or a low-protein diet (LP, 13.4% CP; n = 6). (15)N-ammonium chloride and (13)C-urea were infused intragastrically and intravenously, respectively, for 4 days. Recovery of ammonia at the distal ileum was increased by feeding additional fibre when compared with the CON (P > 0.05) but was not affected by dietary protein (0.24, 0.39 and 0.14 mmol nitrogen/kg BW/day for CON, HF and LP, respectively; P 0.05)compared with CON. The two-pool model developed in the present study allows for estimation of FAAC but still has limitations. Quantifying FAAC in the small intestine of pigs, as well as other non-ruminants and humans, offers a number of challenges but warrants further investigation.

  14. Experimental evidence of a xylose-catabolic pathway on the pAO1 megaplasmid of Arthrobacter nicotinovorans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Mihasan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The pAO1 megaplasmid of A. nicotinovorans consists of 165 ORF's related mainly to nicotine degradation, uptake and utilization of carbohydrates, amino acids and sarcosine. A putative sugar catabolic pathway consisting of 11 ORF's organized as a single operon were previously described. The current work brings experimental data supporting the existence of a D-Xylose catabolic pathway on the pAO1 megaplasmid. When grown on D-xylose containing media, the cells harboring the pAO1 megaplasmid grow to higher cell densities and also express the OxRe protein coded by the megaplasmid. A putative pathway similar to Weimberg pentose pathway is postulated, in which D-xylose is transported in the cell by the ABC-type transport system and then transformed using the putative sugar-dehidrogenase OxRe to D-xylonate, which is further degrated to 2-ketoglutarate and integrated into the general metabolism of the cell

  15. Regulation of glutamate dehydrogenase activity in relation to carbon limitation and protein catabolism in carrot cell suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, S A; Stewart, G R; Phillips, R

    1992-03-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) specific activity and function have been studied in cell suspension cultures of carrot (Daucus carota L. cv Chantenay) in response to carbon and nitrogen supply in the culture medium. The specific activity of GDH was derepressed in sucrose-starved cells concomitant with protein catabolism, ammonium excretion, and the accumulation of metabolically active amino acids. The addition of sucrose led to a rapid decrease in GDH specific activity, an uptake of ammonium from the medium, and a decrease in amino acid levels. The extent of GDH derepression was correlated positively with cellular glutamate concentration. These findings strengthen the view that the function of GDH is the catabolism of glutamate, which under conditions of carbon stress provides carbon skeletons for tricarboxylic acid cycle activity.

  16. Role of plasmids in Lactobacillus brevis BSO 464 hop tolerance and beer spoilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergsveinson, Jordyn; Baecker, Nina; Pittet, Vanessa; Ziola, Barry

    2015-02-01

    Specific isolates of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) can grow in the harsh beer environment, thus posing a threat to brew quality and the economic success of breweries worldwide. Plasmid-localized genes, such as horA, horC, and hitA, have been suggested to confer hop tolerance, a trait required for LAB survival in beer. The presence and expression of these genes among LAB, however, do not universally correlate with the ability to grow in beer. Genome sequencing of the virulent beer spoilage organism Lactobacillus brevis BSO 464 revealed the presence of eight plasmids, with plasmids 1, 2, and 3 containing horA, horC, and hitA, respectively. To investigate the roles that these and the other five plasmids play in L. brevis BSO 464 growth in beer, plasmid curing with novobiocin was used to derive 10 plasmid variants. Multiplex PCRs were utilized to determine the presence or absence of each plasmid, and how plasmid loss affected hop tolerance and growth in degassed (noncarbonated) beer was assessed. Loss of three of the eight plasmids was found to affect hop tolerance and growth in beer. Loss of plasmid 2 (horC and 28 other genes) had the most dramatic effect, with loss of plasmid 4 (120 genes) and plasmid 8 (47 genes) having significant, but smaller, impacts. These results support the contention that genes on mobile genetic elements are essential for bacterial growth in beer and that beer spoilage ability is not dependent solely on the three previously described hop tolerance genes or on the chromosome of a beer spoilage LAB isolate.

  17. Cefotaxime resistant Escherichia coli collected from a healthy volunteer; characterisation and the effect of plasmid loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranda Kirchner

    Full Text Available In this study 6 CTX-M positive E. coli isolates collected during a clinical study examining the effect of antibiotic use in a human trial were analysed. The aim of the study was to analyse these isolates and assess the effect of full or partial loss of plasmid genes on bacterial fitness and pathogenicity. A DNA array was utilised to assess resistance and virulence gene carriage. Plasmids were characterised by PCR-based replicon typing and addiction system multiplex PCR. A phenotypic array and insect virulence model were utilised to assess the effect of plasmid-loss in E. coli of a large multi-resistance plasmid. All six E. coli carrying bla CTX-M-14 were detected from a single participant and were identical by pulse field gel electrophoresis and MLST. Plasmid profiling and arrays indicated absence of a large multi-drug resistance (MDR F-replicon plasmid carrying blaTEM, aadA4, strA, strB, dfrA17/19, sul1, and tetB from one isolate. Although this isolate partially retained the plasmid it showed altered fitness characteristics e.g. inability to respire in presence of antiseptics, similar to a plasmid-cured strain. However, unlike the plasmid-cured or plasmid harbouring strains, the survival rate for Galleria mellonella infected by the former strain was approximately 5-times lower, indicating other possible changes accompanying partial plasmid loss. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that an apparently healthy individual can harbour bla CTX-M-14 E. coli strains. In one such strain, isolated from the same individual, partial absence of a large MDR plasmid resulted in altered fitness and virulence characteristics, which may have implications in the ability of this strain to infect and any subsequent treatment.

  18. Cefotaxime resistant Escherichia coli collected from a healthy volunteer; characterisation and the effect of plasmid loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, Miranda; Abuoun, Manal; Mafura, Muriel; Bagnall, Mary; Hunt, Theresa; Thomas, Christopher; Weile, Jan; Anjum, Muna F

    2013-01-01

    In this study 6 CTX-M positive E. coli isolates collected during a clinical study examining the effect of antibiotic use in a human trial were analysed. The aim of the study was to analyse these isolates and assess the effect of full or partial loss of plasmid genes on bacterial fitness and pathogenicity. A DNA array was utilised to assess resistance and virulence gene carriage. Plasmids were characterised by PCR-based replicon typing and addiction system multiplex PCR. A phenotypic array and insect virulence model were utilised to assess the effect of plasmid-loss in E. coli of a large multi-resistance plasmid. All six E. coli carrying bla CTX-M-14 were detected from a single participant and were identical by pulse field gel electrophoresis and MLST. Plasmid profiling and arrays indicated absence of a large multi-drug resistance (MDR) F-replicon plasmid carrying blaTEM, aadA4, strA, strB, dfrA17/19, sul1, and tetB from one isolate. Although this isolate partially retained the plasmid it showed altered fitness characteristics e.g. inability to respire in presence of antiseptics, similar to a plasmid-cured strain. However, unlike the plasmid-cured or plasmid harbouring strains, the survival rate for Galleria mellonella infected by the former strain was approximately 5-times lower, indicating other possible changes accompanying partial plasmid loss. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that an apparently healthy individual can harbour bla CTX-M-14 E. coli strains. In one such strain, isolated from the same individual, partial absence of a large MDR plasmid resulted in altered fitness and virulence characteristics, which may have implications in the ability of this strain to infect and any subsequent treatment.

  19. [PAL-1 5G/4G polymorphism in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savov, A; Andonova, S; Tanev, D; Robeva, R; Marincheva, Ts; Tomova, A; Kumanov, Ph; Rashkov, R; Kolarov, Zl

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a connective tissue disease affecting predominantly women that has been widely associated with obstetric complications. Inherited thrombophilias are significant risk factors for pregnancy loss, but their role in patients with SLE, and especially in those without concomitant secondary antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) has not been clarified. The aim of the present study was to study PAI-1 5G/4G polymorphism in women with lupus. A total of 103 SLE patients as well as 69 healthy volunteers were genotyped for PAI-1 5G/4G (rs1799889). No significant differences in the PAI-1 5G/4G genotype prevalence between patients and controls were found. After exclusion of the women with secondary APS, the frequency of pregnancies and spontaneous abortions, as well as the number of live births were similar in the studied patients with different PAI-1 genotype (p> 0.05). PAI-1 5G/4G polymorphism was not significantly related to any of the lupus ACR criteria or disease activity (p > 0.05), but it could influence the platelet number in the studied patients (263.52 ± 91.10 [5G/5G genotype] versus 210.12 ± 71.79 [4G/4G genotype], p = 0.023). In conclusion, our results showed that PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism did not worsen the reproductive outcome in SLE women without secondary APS.

  20. Aerobic exercise training prevents heart failure-induced skeletal muscle atrophy by anti-catabolic, but not anabolic actions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo W A Souza

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Heart failure (HF is associated with cachexia and consequent exercise intolerance. Given the beneficial effects of aerobic exercise training (ET in HF, the aim of this study was to determine if the ET performed during the transition from cardiac dysfunction to HF would alter the expression of anabolic and catabolic factors, thus preventing skeletal muscle wasting. METHODS AND RESULTS: We employed ascending aortic stenosis (AS inducing HF in Wistar male rats. Controls were sham-operated animals. At 18 weeks after surgery, rats with cardiac dysfunction were randomized to 10 weeks of aerobic ET (AS-ET or to an untrained group (AS-UN. At 28 weeks, the AS-UN group presented HF signs in conjunction with high TNF-α serum levels; soleus and plantaris muscle atrophy; and an increase in the expression of TNF-α, NFκB (p65, MAFbx, MuRF1, FoxO1, and myostatin catabolic factors. However, in the AS-ET group, the deterioration of cardiac function was prevented, as well as muscle wasting, and the atrophy promoters were decreased. Interestingly, changes in anabolic factor expression (IGF-I, AKT, and mTOR were not observed. Nevertheless, in the plantaris muscle, ET maintained high PGC1α levels. CONCLUSIONS: Thus, the ET capability to attenuate cardiac function during the transition from cardiac dysfunction to HF was accompanied by a prevention of skeletal muscle atrophy that did not occur via an increase in anabolic factors, but through anti-catabolic activity, presumably caused by PGC1α action. These findings indicate the therapeutic potential of aerobic ET to block HF-induced muscle atrophy by counteracting the increased catabolic state.

  1. Essential role of tissue-specific proline synthesis and catabolism in growth and redox balance at low water potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sandeep; Villamor, Joji Grace; Verslues, Paul E

    2011-09-01

    To better define the still unclear role of proline (Pro) metabolism in drought resistance, we analyzed Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase1 (p5cs1) mutants deficient in stress-induced Pro synthesis as well as proline dehydrogenase (pdh1) mutants blocked in Pro catabolism and found that both Pro synthesis and catabolism were required for optimal growth at low water potential (ψ(w)). The abscisic acid (ABA)-deficient mutant aba2-1 had similar reduction in root elongation as p5cs1 and p5cs1/aba2-1 double mutants. However, the reduced growth of aba2-1 but not p5cs1/aba2-1 could be complemented by exogenous ABA, indicating that Pro metabolism was required for ABA-mediated growth protection at low ψ(w). PDH1 maintained high expression in the root apex and shoot meristem at low ψ(w) rather than being repressed, as in the bulk of the shoot tissue. This, plus a reduced oxygen consumption and buildup of Pro in the root apex of pdh1-2, indicated that active Pro catabolism was needed to sustain growth at low ψ(w). Conversely, P5CS1 expression was most highly induced in shoot tissue. Both p5cs1-4 and pdh1-2 had a more reduced NADP/NADPH ratio than the wild type at low ψ(w). These results indicate a new model of Pro metabolism at low ψ(w) whereby Pro synthesis in the photosynthetic tissue regenerates NADP while Pro catabolism in meristematic and expanding cells is needed to sustain growth. Tissue-specific differences in Pro metabolism and function in maintaining a favorable NADP/NADPH ratio are relevant to understanding metabolic adaptations to drought and efforts to enhance drought resistance.

  2. The regulatory logic of m-xylene biodegradation by Pseudomonas putida mt-2 exposed by dynamic modelling of the principal node Ps/Pr of the TOL plasmid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutinas, Michalis; Lam, Ming-Chi; Kiparissides, Alexandros; Silva-Rocha, Rafael; Godinho, Miguel; Livingston, Andrew G; Pistikopoulos, Efstratios N; de Lorenzo, Victor; Dos Santos, Vitor A P Martins; Mantalaris, Athanasios

    2010-06-01

    The structure of the extant transcriptional control network of the TOL plasmid pWW0 born by Pseudomonas putida mt-2 for biodegradation of m-xylene is far more complex than one would consider necessary from a mere engineering point of view. In order to penetrate the underlying logic of such a network, which controls a major environmental cleanup bioprocess, we have developed a dynamic model of the key regulatory node formed by the Ps/Pr promoters of pWW0, where the clustering of control elements is maximal. The model layout was validated with batch cultures estimating parameter values and its predictive capability was confirmed with independent sets of experimental data. The model revealed how regulatory outputs originated in the divergent and overlapping Ps/Pr segment, which expresses the transcription factors XylS and XylR respectively, are computed into distinct instructions to the upper and lower catabolic xyl operons for either simultaneous or stepwise consumption of m-xylene and/or succinate. In this respect, the model reveals that the architecture of the Ps/Pr is poised to discriminate the abundance of alternative and competing C sources, in particular m-xylene versus succinate. The proposed framework provides a first systemic understanding of the causality and connectivity of the regulatory elements that shape this exemplary regulatory network, facilitating the use of model analysis towards genetic circuit optimization.

  3. Cloning, sequencing, and sequence analysis of two novel plasmids from the thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Anaerocellum thermophilum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Anders; Mikkelsen, Marie Just; Schrøder, I.

    2004-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of two novel plasmids isolated from the extreme thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Anaerocellum thermophilum DSM6725 (A. thermophilum), growing optimally at 70degreesC, has been determined. pBAS2 was found to be a 3653 bp plasmid with a GC content of 43%, and the sequence...... was found, but no single stranded intermediates, characteristic of rolling circle replication, were found on Southern blots. The larger plasmid, pBAL, was found to be a 8294 bp plasmid with a GC content of 39%. It revealed 17 ORFs, of which three showed similarity at the amino acid (aa) level to known...

  4. Mechanism of acquisition of chromosomal markers by plasmids in Haemophilus influenzae.

    OpenAIRE

    Setlow, J K; Cabrera-Juárez, E; Griffin, K

    1984-01-01

    The hybrid plasmid pNov1 readily acquired genetic information from the chromosome of wild-type, but not rec-2, cells. Most of the recombination had taken place 1 h after entrance of the plasmid into the cell, as judged by transformation of rec-2 by lysates made from wild-type cells exposed to pNov1. Measurement of physical transfer from radioactively labeled cellular DNA to plasmids recombining in wild-type cells failed, since there was little more radioactivity in plasmids from such cells th...

  5. High instability of a nematicidal Cry toxin plasmid in Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Anna E; Nakad, Rania; Saebelfeld, Manja; Masche, Anna C; Dierking, Katja; Schulenburg, Hinrich

    2016-01-01

    In bacterial pathogens, virulence factors are often carried on plasmids and other mobile genetic elements, and as such, plasmid evolution is central in understanding pathogenicity. Bacillus thuringiensis is an invertebrate pathogen that uses plasmid-encoded crystal (Cry) toxins to establish infections inside the host. Our study aimed to quantify stability of two Cry toxin-encoding plasmids, BTI_23p and BTI_16p, under standard laboratory culturing conditions. These two plasmids are part of the genome of the B. thuringiensis strain MYBT18679, which is of particular interest because of its high pathogenicity towards nematodes. One of the plasmids, BTI_23p, was found to be highly unstable, with substantial loss occurring within a single growth cycle. Nevertheless, longer term experimental evolution in the absence of a host revealed maintenance of the plasmid at low levels in the bacterial populations. BTI_23p encodes two nematicidal Cry toxins, Cry21Aa2 and Cry14Aa1. Consistent with previous findings, loss of the plasmid abolished pathogenicity towards the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, which could be rescued by addition of Cry21Aa2-expressing Escherichia coli. These results implicate BTI_23p as a plasmid that is required for successful infection, yet unstable when present at high frequency in the population, consistent with the role of Cry toxins as public goods.

  6. Rapid plasmid library screening using RecA-coated biotinylated probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigas, B; Welcher, A A; Ward, D C; Weissman, S M

    1986-12-01

    A method for the rapid physical isolation of recombinant plasmids of interest from a mixture of plasmids such as a plasmid cDNA library is presented. This method utilizes the ability of RecA protein to form stable complexes between linear single-stranded and circular double-stranded DNA molecules sharing sequence homology, and procedures allowing isolation of biotinylated nucleic acid. Biotinylated linear DNA probes coated with RecA have been used to screen reconstituted plasmid libraries consisting of two plasmid species, one homologous and the other heterologous to the probe. When the link between biotin and the nucleotide base could be cleaved by reducing agents, the complex was purified by streptavidin-agarose chromatography and the recovered plasmid was propagated in Escherichia coli. When the link was not cleavable the complex was bound to avidin in solution and purified by cupric iminodiacetic acid-agarose chromatography. The complex was then dissociated and the plasmids were propagated in E. coli. With either protocol, homologous plasmid recovery was between 10% and 20%, and enrichment was between 10(4)- and 10(5)-fold. Potential applications and extensions of this method, such as plasmid, cosmid, and phage library screening and facilitation of physical mapping of macroregions of mammalian genomes are presented and discussed.

  7. Pheromone-responsive conjugative vancomycin resistance plasmids in Enterococcus faecalis isolates from humans and chicken feces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Suk-Kyung; Tanimoto, Koichi; Tomita, Haruyoshi; Ike, Yasuyoshi

    2006-10-01

    The drug resistances and plasmid contents of a total of 85 vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE) strains that had been isolated in Korea were examined. Fifty-four of the strains originated from samples of chicken feces, and 31 were isolated from hospital patients in Korea. Enterococcus faecalis KV1 and KV2, which had been isolated from a patient and a sample of chicken feces, respectively, were found to carry the plasmids pSL1 and pSL2, respectively. The plasmids transferred resistances to vancomycin, gentamicin, kanamycin, streptomycin, and erythromycin to E. faecalis strains at a high frequency of about 10(-3) per donor cell during 4 hours of broth mating. E. faecalis strains containing each of the pSL plasmids formed clumps after 2 hours of incubation in broth containing E. faecalis FA2-2 culture filtrate (i.e., the E. faecalis sex pheromone), and the plasmid subsequently transferred to the recipient strain in a 10-min short mating in broth, indicating that the plasmids are responsive to E. faecalis pheromones. The pSL plasmids did not respond to any of synthetic pheromones for the previously characterized plasmids. The pheromone specific for pSL plasmids has been designated cSL1. Southern hybridization analysis showed that specific FspI fragments from each of the pSL plasmids hybridized with the aggregation substance gene (asa1) of the pheromone-responsive plasmid pAD1, indicating that the plasmids had a gene homologous to asa1. The restriction maps of the plasmids were identical, and the size of the plasmids was estimated to be 128.1 kb. The plasmids carried five drug resistance determinants for vanA, ermB, aph(3'), aph(6'), and aac(6')/aph(2'), which encode resistance to vancomycin, erythromycin, kanamycin, streptomycin, and gentamicin/kanamycin, respectively. Nucleotide sequence analyses of the drug resistance determinants and their flanking regions are described in this report. The results described provide evidence for the exchange of genetic information

  8. Modular construction of plasmids by parallel assembly of linear vector components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, XinZheng; Yan, Pu; Shen, Wentao; Li, Xiaoying; Zhou, Peng; Li, Yuenan

    2013-06-15

    Construction of plasmids is the basic and pivotal technology in molecular biology. The common method for constructing plasmids is to cut DNA fragments by restriction enzymes and then join the resulting fragments using ligase. We present here a modified Golden Gate cloning method for modular construction of plasmids. Unlike the original Golden Gate cloning system for cloning from entry vector to expression vector, this method can be used to construct plasmids immediately from linear DNA fragments. After polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification for flanking with BsaI sites, multiple linear DNA components (modules) can be parallel assembled into a circle plasmid by a single restriction-ligation reaction using the method. This method is flexible to construct different types of plasmids because the modules can be freely selected and assembled in any combination. This method was applied successfully to construct a prokaryotic expression plasmid from four modules and a plant expression plasmid from five modules (fragments). The results suggest that this method provides a simple and flexible platform for modular construction of plasmids.

  9. Effects of medium composition on the production of plasmid DNA vector potentially for human gene therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Zhi-nan; SHEN Wen-he; CHEN Hao; CEN Pei-lin

    2005-01-01

    Plasmid vector is increasingly applied to gene therapy or gene vaccine. The production of plasmid pCMV-AP3 for cancer gene therapy was conducted in a modified MBL medium using a recombinant E. coli BL21 system. The effects of different MMBL components on plasmid yield, cell mass and specific plasmid DNA productivity were evaluated on shake-flask scale. The results showed that glucose was the optimal carbon source. High plasmid yield (58.3 mg/L) was obtained when 5.0 g/L glucose was added to MMBL. Glycerol could be chosen as a complementary carbon source because of the highest specific plasmid productivity (37.9 mg DNA/g DCW). After tests of different levels of nitrogen source and inorganic phosphate, a modified MMBL medium was formulated for optimal plasmid production. Further study showed that the initial acetate addition (less than 4.0 g/L) in MMBL improved plasmid production significantly, although it inhibited cell growth. The results will be useful for large-scale plasmid production using recombinant E. coli system.

  10. Postsymbiotic plasmid acquisition and evolution of the repA1-replicon in Buchnera aphidicola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ham, Roeland C. H. J.; González-Candelas, Fernando; Silva, Francisco J.; Sabater, Beatriz; Moya, Andrés; Latorre, Amparo

    2000-01-01

    Buchnera aphidicola is an obligate, strictly vertically transmitted, bacterial symbiont of aphids. It supplies its host with essential amino acids, nutrients required by aphids but deficient in their diet of plant phloem sap. Several lineages of Buchnera show adaptation to their nutritional role in the form of plasmid-mediated amplification of key-genes involved in the biosynthesis of tryptophan (trpEG) and leucine (leuABCD). Phylogenetic analyses of these plasmid-encoded functions have thus far suggested the absence of horizontal plasmid exchange among lineages of Buchnera. Here, we describe three new Buchnera plasmids, obtained from species of the aphid host families Lachnidae and Pemphigidae. All three plasmids belong to the repA1 family of Buchnera plasmids, which is characterized by the presence of a repA1-replicon responsible for replication initiation. A comprehensive analysis of this family of plasmids unexpectedly revealed significantly incongruent phylogenies for different plasmid and chromosomally encoded loci. We infer from these incongruencies a case of horizontal plasmid transfer in Buchnera. This process may have been mediated by secondary endosymbionts, which occasionally undergo horizontal transmission in aphids. PMID:10984505

  11. Enhancing yields of low and single copy number plasmid DNAs from Escherichia coli cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Whitney N; Smith, Kyle D; Ream, Jennifer A; Kevin Lewis, L

    2017-02-01

    Many plasmids used for gene cloning and heterologous protein expression in Escherichia coli cells are low copy number or single copy number plasmids. The extraction of these types of plasmids from small bacterial cell cultures produces low DNA yields. In this study, we have quantitated yields of low copy and single copy number plasmid DNAs after growth of cells in four widely used broths (SB, SOC, TB, and 2xYT) and compared results to those obtained with LB, the most common E. coli cell growth medium. TB (terrific broth) consistently generated the greatest amount of plasmid DNA, in agreement with its ability to produce higher cell titers. The superiority of TB was primarily due to its high levels of yeast extract (24g/L) and was independent of glycerol, a unique component of this broth. Interestingly, simply preparing LB with similarly high levels of yeast extract (LB24 broth) resulted in plasmid yields that were equivalent to those of TB. By contrast, increasing ampicillin concentration to enhance plasmid retention did not improve plasmid DNA recovery. These experiments demonstrate that yields of low and single copy number plasmid DNAs from minipreps can be strongly enhanced using simple and inexpensive media.

  12. Computational design and characterization of a temperature-sensitive plasmid replicon for gram positive thermophiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olson Daniel G

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Temperature-sensitive (Ts plasmids are useful tools for genetic engineering, but there are currently none compatible with the gram positive, thermophilic, obligate anaerobe, Clostridium thermocellum. Traditional mutagenesis techniques yield Ts mutants at a low frequency, and therefore requires the development of high-throughput screening protocols, which are also not available for this organism. Recently there has been progress in the development of computer algorithms which can predict Ts mutations. Most plasmids currently used for genetic modification of C. thermocellum are based on the replicon of plasmid pNW33N, which replicates using the RepB replication protein. To address this problem, we set out to create a Ts plasmid by mutating the gene coding for the RepB replication protein using an algorithm designed by Varadarajan et al. (1996 for predicting Ts mutants based on the amino-acid sequence of the protein. Results A library of 34 mutant plasmids was designed, synthesized and screened, resulting in 6 mutants which exhibited a Ts phenotype. Of these 6, the one with the most temperature-sensitive phenotype (M166A was compared with the original plasmid. It exhibited lower stability at 48°C and was completely unable to replicate at 55°C. Conclusions The plasmid described in this work could be useful in future efforts to genetically engineer C. thermocellum, and the method used to generate this plasmid may be useful for others trying to make Ts plasmids.

  13. Structural similarity and distribution of small cryptic plasmids of Lactobacillus curvatus and L. sake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, R F; Lohmann, M; Weller, A N; Hugas, M; Hammes, W P

    1991-11-15

    Plasmid profiles of strains of Lactobacillus curvatus and L. sake isolated from meat or sauerkraut were analysed to investigate plasmid homology and distribution in relation to the ecology of these organisms in fermenting foods. A hybridisation probe was constructed by cloning of pLc2, a cryptic, 2.6-kbp plasmid from L. curvatus LTH683, into the Escherichia coli plasmid pRV50. In Southern hybridisations with the digoxygenine labeled pLc2 probe, pLc2-related small plasmids were frequently detected in meat-borne strains of L. casei subsp. pseudoplantarum, L. curvatus, L. sake, L. alimentarius, L. farciminis and L. halotolerans and in L. curvatus and L. sake isolated from sauerkraut. Among 27 Lactobacillus type strains originally isolated from habitats other than meat this type of homology was detected only with plasmids of L. buchneri and L. mali. Restriction-enzyme mapping of six small cryptic plasmids from L. curvatus and L. sake revealed strong structural homology but no similarity to previously characterized plasmids of lactobacilli. The presence of a variable region in addition to a conserved one and the occurrence of deletions during cloning of pLc2 suggest that vectors derived from these plasmids are likely to be structurally unstable.

  14. The evolution of collective restraint: policing and obedience among non-conjugative plasmids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyriakos Kentzoglanakis

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The repression of competition by mechanisms of policing is now recognized as a major force in the maintenance of cooperation. General models on the evolution of policing have focused on the interplay between individual competitiveness and mutual policing, demonstrating a positive relationship between within-group diversity and levels of policing. We expand this perspective by investigating what is possibly the simplest example of reproductive policing: copy number control (CNC among non-conjugative plasmids, a class of extra-chromosomal vertically transmitted molecular symbionts of bacteria. Through the formulation and analysis of a multi-scale dynamical model, we show that the establishment of stable reproductive restraint among plasmids requires the co-evolution of two fundamental plasmid traits: policing, through the production of plasmid-coded trans-acting replication inhibitors, and obedience, expressed as the binding affinity of plasmid-specific targets to those inhibitors. We explain the intrinsic replication instabilities that arise in the absence of policing and we show how these instabilities are resolved by the evolution of copy number control. Increasing levels of policing and obedience lead to improvements in group performance due to tighter control of local population size (plasmid copy number, delivering benefits both to plasmids, by reducing the risk of segregational loss and to the plasmid-host partnership, by increasing the rate of cell reproduction, and therefore plasmid vertical transmission.

  15. Plasmid profile in oral Fusobacterium nucleatum from humans and Cebus apella monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Marcia O.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Fusobacterium nucleatum is a strict anaerobe and is indigenous of the human oral cavity. This organism is commonly recovered from different monomicrobial and mixed infections in humans and animals. In this study, the plasmid profile, the plasmid stability and the penicillin-resistance association in oral F. nucleatum isolated from periodontal patients, healthy subjects and Cebus apella monkeys were evaluated. Forty-five F. nucleatum strains from patients, 38 from healthy subjects and seven from C. apella were identified and analyzed. Plasmid extraction was performed in all the isolated strains. These elements were found in 26.7% strains from patients and one strain from C. apella. Strains from healthy subjects did not show any plasmid. Most of strains showed two plasmid bands ranging from 4 to 16 Kb, but digestions with endonucleases showed that they belonged to a single plasmid. The plasmid profile was similar and stable in human and monkey strains. Also, plasmids were classified into three groups according to size. Two strains were positive to beta-lactamase production and no plasmid DNA-hybridization with a beta-lactamase gene probe was observed, suggesting a chromosomal resistance.

  16. Quantifying and visualizing the transfer of exogenous plasmids to environmental microbial communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dechesne, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    of a community to take up exogenous plasmid should, however, be an important element affecting the fate of mobile genetic elements released in the environment. We have devised a method to evaluate the permissiveness of a bacterial community towards exogenous plasmids, both quantitatively (how many bacteria can......, our findings highlight the high potential for exogenous plasmids to be transferred to soil microbial communities and indicate that community permissiveness – as affected by environmental conditions- needs to be considered to predict the fate of plasmids in the environment....

  17. Construction of Recombinant Plasmid Containing S. Mutans F-ATPase β Subunit Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Dan-ni; JIANG Li

    2005-01-01

    objective: construct a homologous recombinant plasmid which was expected to be transformed into S. mutans Methods: a region at the 5' terminus of the S. mutans F-ATPase β subunit gene was amplified by PCR, the PCR product was inserted into vector pVA891, yielding recombinant plasmid. Results: the DNA sequence of the recombinant plasmid was identified correct in whole by restriction endonuclease and DNA sequence techniques. Conclusion: the recombinant plasmid of S. mutans DNA was cloned in effect ,it may assist in construction of homologues recombinant mutant.

  18. Molecular characterization of lysR-lysXE, gcdR-gcdHG and amaR-amaAB operons for lysine export and catabolism: a comprehensive lysine catabolic network in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhuri Indurthi, Sai; Chou, Han-Ting; Lu, Chung-Dar

    2016-05-01

    Among multiple interconnected pathways for l-Lysine catabolism in pseudomonads, it has been reported that Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 employs the decarboxylase and the transaminase pathways. However, up until now, knowledge of several genes involved in operation and regulation of these pathways was still missing. Transcriptome analyses coupled with promoter activity measurements and growth phenotype analyses led us to identify new members in l-Lys and d-Lys catabolism and regulation, including gcdR-gcdHG for glutarate utilization, dpkA, amaR-amaAB and PA2035 for d-Lys catabolism, lysR-lysXE for putative l-Lys efflux and lysP for putative l-Lys uptake. The gcdHG operon encodes an acyl-CoA transferase (gcdG) and glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase (gcdH) and is under the control of the transcriptional activator GcdR. Growth on l-Lys was enhanced in the mutants of lysX and lysE, supporting the operation of l-Lys efflux. The transcriptional activator LysR is responsible for l-Lys specific induction of lysXE and the PA4181-82 operon of unknown function. The putative operator sites of GcdR and LysR were deduced from serial deletions and comparative genomic sequence analyses, and the formation of nucleoprotein complexes was demonstrated with purified His-tagged GcdR and LysR. The amaAB operon encodes two enzymes to convert pipecolate to 2-aminoadipate. Induction of the amaAB operon by l-Lys, d-Lys and pipecolate requires a functional AmaR, supporting convergence of Lys catabolic pathways to pipecolate. Growth on pipecolate was retarded in the gcdG and gcdH mutants, suggesting the importance of glutarate in pipecolate and 2-aminoadipate utilization. Furthermore, this study indicated links in the control of interconnected networks of lysine and arginine catabolism in P. aeruginosa.

  19. Effects of vegetation type on soil microbial community structure and catabolic diversity assessed by polyphasic methods in North China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Soil microbes play a major role in ecological processes and are closely associated with the aboveground plant community. In order to understand the effects of vegetation type on the characteristics of soil microbial communities, the soil microbial communities were assessed by plate counts, phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) and Biolog microplate techniques in five plant communities, i.e., soybean field (SF), artificial turf (AT), artificial shrub (AS), natural shrub (NS), and maize field (MF) in Jinan, Shandong Province, North China. The results showed that plant diversity had little discernible effect on microbial biomass but a positive impact on the evennessof utilized substrates in Biolog microplate. Legumes could significantly enhance the number of cultural microorganisms, microbial biomass, and community catabolic diversity. Except for SF dominated by legumes, the biomass of fungi and the catabolic diversity of microbial community were higher in less disturbed soil beneath NS than in frequently disturbed soils beneath the other vegetation types. These results confirmed that high number of plant species, legumes, and natural vegetation types tend to support soil microbial communities with higher function. The present study also found a significant correlation between the number of cultured bacteria and catabolic diversity of the bacterial community. Different research methods led to varied results in this study. The combination of several approaches is recommended for accurately describing the characteristics of microbial communities in many respects.

  20. Metabolomic profiling of permethrin-treated Drosophila melanogaster identifies a role for tryptophan catabolism in insecticide survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinzer, Robert A; Henderson, Louise; Marchiondo, Alan A; Woods, Debra J; Davies, Shireen A; Dow, Julian A T

    2015-12-01

    Insecticides and associated synergists are rapidly losing efficacy in target insect pest populations making the discovery of alternatives a priority. To discover novel targets for permethrin synergists, metabolomics was performed on permethrin-treated Drosophila melanogaster. Changes were observed in several metabolic pathways including those for amino acids, glycogen, glycolysis, energy, nitrogen, NAD(+), purine, pyrimidine, lipids and carnitine. Markers for acidosis, ammonia stress, oxidative stress and detoxification responses were also observed. Many of these changes had not been previously characterized after permethrin exposure. From the altered pathways, tryptophan catabolism was selected for further investigation. The knockdown of some tryptophan catabolism genes (vermilion, cinnabar and CG6950) in the whole fly and in specific tissues including fat body, midgut and Malpighian tubules using targeted RNAi resulted in altered survival phenotypes against acute topical permethrin exposure. The knockdown of vermilion, cinnabar and CG6950 in the whole fly also altered survival phenotypes against chronic oral permethrin, fenvalerate, DDT, chlorpyriphos and hydramethylnon exposure. Thus tryptophan catabolism has a previously uncharacterized role in defence against insecticides, and shows that metabolomics is a powerful tool for target identification in pesticide research.

  1. Oxygen and nitrate in utilization by Bacillus licheniformis of the arginase and arginine deiminase routes of arginine catabolism and other factors affecting their syntheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broman, K; Lauwers, N; Stalon, V; Wiame, J M

    1978-09-01

    Bacillus licheniformis has two pathways of arginine catabolism. In well-aerated cultures, the arginase route is present, and levels of catabolic ornithine carbamoyltransferase were low. An arginase pathway-deficient mutant, BL196, failed to grow on arginine as a nitrogen source under these conditions. In anaerobiosis, the wild type contained very low levels of arginase and ornithine transaminase. BL196 grew normally on glucose plus arginine in anaerobiosis and, like the wild type, had appreciable levels of catabolic transferase. Nitrate, like oxygen, repressed ornithine carbamoyltransferase and stimulated arginase synthesis. In aerobic cultures, arginase was repressed by glutamine in the presence of glucose, but not when the carbon-energy source was poor. In anaerobic cultures, ammonia repressed catabolic ornithine carbamoyltransferase, but glutamate and glutamine stimulated its synthesis. A second mutant, derived from BL196, retained the low arginase and ornithine transaminase levels of BL196 but produced high levels of deiminase pathway enzymes in the presence of oxygen.

  2. Comparison of Catabolic Rates of sn-1, sn-2, and sn-3 Fatty Acids in Triacylglycerols Using (13)CO2 Breath Test in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beppu, Fumiaki; Kawamatsu, Takashi; Yamatani, Yoshio; Nagai, Toshiharu; Yoshinaga, Kazuaki; Mizobe, Hoyo; Yoshida, Akihiko; Kubo, Atsushi; Kanda, Jota; Gotoh, Naohiro

    2017-01-01

    Fatty acids in triacylglycerols (TAGs) are catabolized after digestion. However, the catabolic rates of the fatty acids at the sn-1, sn-2, and sn-3 positions of TAGs have not been compared. To elucidate the differences, we studied the catabolic rates of (13)C-labeled palmitic acid, oleic acid, and capric acid at the sn-1, sn-2, or sn-3 position of TAGs using isotope-ratio mass spectrometry. Specifically, we measured the (13)C-to-(12)C ratio in CO2 (Δ(13)C (‰)) exhaled by mice. For all analyzed fatty acids, we observed significant differences between sn-2 and other binding positions. In contrast, no significant difference was detected between the sn-1 and sn-3 positions. These results indicated that the catabolic rates of fatty acids are strongly influenced by their positions in TAGs.

  3. Using Plasmids as DNA Vaccines for Infectious Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tregoning, John S; Kinnear, Ekaterina

    2014-12-01

    DNA plasmids can be used to induce a protective (or therapeutic) immune response by delivering genes encoding vaccine antigens. That naked DNA (without the refinement of coat proteins or host evasion systems) can cross from outside the cell into the nucleus and be expressed is particularly remarkable given the sophistication of the immune system in preventing infection by pathogens. As a result of the ease, low cost, and speed of custom gene synthesis, DNA vaccines dangle a tantalizing prospect of the next wave of vaccine technology, promising individual designer vaccines for cancer or mass vaccines with a rapid response time to emerging pandemics. There is considerable enthusiasm for the use of DNA vaccination as an approach, but this enthusiasm should be tempered by the successive failures in clinical trials to induce a potent immune response. The technology is evolving with the development of improved delivery systems that increase expression levels, particularly electroporation and the incorporation of genetically encoded adjuvants. This review will introduce some key concepts in the use of DNA plasmids as vaccines, including how the DNA enters the cell and is expressed, how it induces an immune response, and a summary of clinical trials with DNA vaccines. The review also explores the advances being made in vector design, delivery, formulation, and adjuvants to try to realize the promise of this technology for new vaccines. If the immunogenicity and expression barriers can be cracked, then DNA vaccines may offer a step change in mass vaccination.

  4. Adsorption behavior of plasmid DNA onto perfusion chromatographic matrix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miladys LIMONTA; Lourdes ZUMALACARREGUI; Dayana SOLER

    2012-01-01

    Anion exchange chromatography is the most popular chromatographic method for plasmid separa-tion.POROS RI 50 is a perfusion chromatographic support which is a reversed phase matrix and is an alterna-tive to conventional ones due to its mass transfer properties.The adsorption and elution of the pIDKE2 plasmidonto reversed phase POROS RI 50 was studied.Langmuir isotherm model was adjusted in order to get the max-imum adsorption capacity and the dissociation constant for POROS RI 50-plasmid DNA (pDNA) system.Break-through curves were obtained for volumetric flows between 0.69-3.33mL/min,given dynamic capacity up to2.3 times higher than those reported for ionic exchange matrix used during the purification process of plasmidswith similar size to that of pIDKE2.The efficiency was less than 45% for the flow conditions and initial concen-tration studied,which means that the support will not be operated under saturation circumstances.

  5. pTAR-encoded proteins in plasmid partitioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalnin, K; Stegalkina, S; Yarmolinsky, M

    2000-04-01

    Partition cassettes, essential for the segregational stability of low-copy-number bacterial plasmids, typically encode two autoregulated proteins and an adjacent cis-acting centromere analog to which one or perhaps both proteins bind. The diminutive partition region of pTAR of Agrobacterium spp. was reported to be exceptional, encoding only a single protein, ParA (D. R. Gallie and C. I. Kado, J. Mol. Biol. 193:465-478, 1987). However, resequencing of the region revealed two small downstream genes, parB and orf-84, of which only parB was found to be essential for partitioning in A. tumefaciens. Purified ParA exhibited a weak ATPase activity that was modestly increased by nonspecific DNA. ParB bound in vitro to repeated sequences present in a region, parS, that possesses centromere and operator functions and within which we identified the primary transcription start site by primer extension. In certain respects the Par proteins behave normally in the foreign host Escherichia coli. In E. coli, as in A. tumefaciens, ParB repressed the partition operon; ParA, inactive alone, augmented this repression. Functional similarities between the partition system of pTAR and those of other plasmids and bacteria are prominent, despite differences in size, organization, and amino acid sequence.

  6. Roles of a sustained activation of NCED3 and the synergistic regulation of ABA biosynthesis and catabolism in ABA signal production in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN HuiBo; JIA WenSuo; FAN YiJian; GAO ZhiHui; WEI KaiFa; LI GuiFen; LIU Jing; CHEN Lin; LI BingBing; HU JianFang

    2007-01-01

    ABA, acting as a stress signal, plays crucial roles in plant resistance to water stress. Because ABA signal production is based on ABA biosynthesis, the regulation of NCED, a key enzyme in the ABA biosynthesis pathway, is normally thought of as the sole factor controlling ABA signal production. Here we demonstrate that ABA catabolism in combination with a synergistic regulation of ABA biosynthesis plays a crucial role in governing ABA signal production. Water stress induced a significant accumulation of ABA, which exhibited different patterns in detached and attached leaves. ABA catabolism followed a temporal trend of exponential decay for both basic and stress ABA, and there was little difference in the catabolic half-lives of basic ABA and stress ABA. Thus, the absolute rate of ABA catabolism, i.e. the amount of ABA catabolized per unit time, increases with increased ABA accumulation. From the dynamic processes of ABA biosynthesis and catabolism, it can be inferred that stress ABA accumulation may be governed by a synergistic regulation of all the steps in the ABA biosynthesis pathway. Moreover, to maintain an elevated level of stress ABA sustained activation of NCED3 should be required. This inference was supported by further findings that the genes encoding major enzymes in the ABA biosynthesis pathway, e.g. NCED3, AAO3 and ABA3 were all activated by water stress, and with ABA accumulation progressing, the expressions of NCED3, AAO3 and ABA3 remained activated. Data on ABA catabolism and gene expression jointly indicate that ABA signal production is controlled by a sustained activation of NCED3 and the synergistic regulation of ABA biosynthesis and catabolism.

  7. Plasmid Classification in an Era of Whole-Genome Sequencing: Application in Studies of Antibiotic Resistance Epidemiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlek, Alex; Stoesser, Nicole; Anjum, Muna F.; Doumith, Michel; Ellington, Matthew J.; Peto, Tim; Crook, Derrick; Woodford, Neil; Walker, A. Sarah; Phan, Hang; Sheppard, Anna E.

    2017-01-01

    Plasmids are extra-chromosomal genetic elements ubiquitous in bacteria, and commonly transmissible between host cells. Their genomes include variable repertoires of ‘accessory genes,’ such as antibiotic resistance genes, as well as ‘backbone’ loci which are largely conserved within plasmid families, and often involved in key plasmid-specific functions (e.g., replication, stable inheritance, mobility). Classifying plasmids into different types according to their phylogenetic relatedness provides insight into the epidemiology of plasmid-mediated antibiotic resistance. Current typing schemes exploit backbone loci associated with replication (replicon typing), or plasmid mobility (MOB typing). Conventional PCR-based methods for plasmid typing remain widely used. With the emergence of whole-genome sequencing (WGS), large datasets can be analyzed using in silico plasmid typing methods. However, short reads from popular high-throughput sequencers can be challenging to assemble, so complete plasmid sequences may not be accurately reconstructed. Therefore, localizing resistance genes to specific plasmids may be difficult, limiting epidemiological insight. Long-read sequencing will become increasingly popular as costs decline, especially when resolving accurate plasmid structures is the primary goal. This review discusses the application of plasmid classification in WGS-based studies of antibiotic resistance epidemiology; novel in silico plasmid analysis tools are highlighted. Due to the diverse and plastic nature of plasmid genomes, current typing schemes do not classify all plasmids, and identifying conserved, phylogenetically concordant genes for subtyping and phylogenetics is challenging. Analyzing plasmids as nodes in a network that represents gene-sharing relationships between plasmids provides a complementary way to assess plasmid diversity, and allows inferences about horizontal gene transfer to be made. PMID:28232822

  8. The steroid catabolic pathway of the intracellular pathogen Rhodococcus equi is important for pathogenesis and a target for vaccine development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R van der Geize

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus equi causes fatal pyogranulomatous pneumonia in foals and immunocompromised animals and humans. Despite its importance, there is currently no effective vaccine against the disease. The actinobacteria R. equi and the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis are related, and both cause pulmonary diseases. Recently, we have shown that essential steps in the cholesterol catabolic pathway are involved in the pathogenicity of M. tuberculosis. Bioinformatic analysis revealed the presence of a similar cholesterol catabolic gene cluster in R. equi. Orthologs of predicted M. tuberculosis virulence genes located within this cluster, i.e. ipdA (rv3551, ipdB (rv3552, fadA6 and fadE30, were identified in R. equi RE1 and inactivated. The ipdA and ipdB genes of R. equi RE1 appear to constitute the α-subunit and β-subunit, respectively, of a heterodimeric coenzyme A transferase. Mutant strains RE1ΔipdAB and RE1ΔfadE30, but not RE1ΔfadA6, were impaired in growth on the steroid catabolic pathway intermediates 4-androstene-3,17-dione (AD and 3aα-H-4α(3'-propionic acid-5α-hydroxy-7aβ-methylhexahydro-1-indanone (5α-hydroxy-methylhexahydro-1-indanone propionate; 5OH-HIP. Interestingly, RE1ΔipdAB and RE1ΔfadE30, but not RE1ΔfadA6, also displayed an attenuated phenotype in a macrophage infection assay. Gene products important for growth on 5OH-HIP, as part of the steroid catabolic pathway, thus appear to act as factors involved in the pathogenicity of R. equi. Challenge experiments showed that RE1ΔipdAB could be safely administered intratracheally to 2 to 5 week-old foals and oral immunization of foals even elicited a substantial protective immunity against a virulent R. equi strain. Our data show that genes involved in steroid catabolism are promising targets for the development of a live-attenuated vaccine against R. equi infections.

  9. Genetic dissection of methylcrotonyl CoA carboxylase indicates a complex role for mitochondrial leucine catabolism during seed development and germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Geng; Che, Ping; Ilarslan, Hilal; Wurtele, Eve S; Nikolau, Basil J

    2012-05-01

    3-methylcrotonyl CoA carboxylase (MCCase) is a nuclear-encoded, mitochondrial-localized biotin-containing enzyme. The reaction catalyzed by this enzyme is required for leucine (Leu) catabolism, and it may also play a role in the catabolism of isoprenoids and the mevalonate shunt. In Arabidopsis, two MCCase subunits (the biotinylated MCCA subunit and the non-biotinylated MCCB subunit) are each encoded by single genes (At1g03090 and At4g34030, respectively). A reverse genetic approach was used to assess the physiological role of MCCase in plants. We recovered and characterized T-DNA and transposon-tagged knockout alleles of the MCCA and MCCB genes. Metabolite profiling studies indicate that mutations in either MCCA or MCCB block mitochondrial Leu catabolism, as inferred from the increased accumulation of Leu. Under light deprivation conditions, the hyper-accumulation of Leu, 3-methylcrotonyl CoA and isovaleryl CoA indicates that mitochondrial and peroxisomal Leu catabolism pathways are independently regulated. This biochemical block in mitochondrial Leu catabolism is associated with an impaired reproductive growth phenotype, which includes aberrant flower and silique development and decreased seed germination. The decreased seed germination phenotype is only observed for homozygous mutant seeds collected from a parent plant that is itself homozygous, but not from a parent plant that is heterozygous. These characterizations may shed light on the role of catabolic processes in growth and development, an area of plant biology that is poorly understood.

  10. Decreased response to cAMP in the glucose and glycogen catabolism in perfused livers of Walker-256 tumor-bearing rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Morais, Hely; Cassola, Priscila; Moreira, Carolina Campos Lima; Bôas, Suéllen Kathiane Fernandes Vilas; Borba-Murad, Glaucia Regina; Bazotte, Roberto Barbosa; de Souza, Helenir Medri

    2012-09-01

    The hepatic response to cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and N6-monobutyryl-cAMP (N6-MB-cAMP) in the glucose and glycogen catabolism and hepatic glycogen levels were evaluated in Walker-256 tumor-bearing rats, on days 5 (WK5), 8 (WK8), and 11 (WK11) after the implantation of tumor. Rats without tumor fed ad libitum (fed control rats) or that received the same daily amount of food ingested by anorexics tumor-bearing rats (pair-fed control rats) or 24 h fasted (fasted control rats) were used as controls. Glucose and glycogen catabolism were measured in perfused liver. Hepatic glycogen levels were lower (p catabolism was lower (p catabolism, under condition of depletion of hepatic glycogen (24 h fast), was lower (p catabolism was lower (p catabolism in various stages of tumor development (days 5, 8 and 11), which was probably not due to the lower hepatic glycogen levels nor due to the increased activity of PDE3B.

  11. The catabolism of 2,4-xylenol and p-cresol share the enzymes for the oxidation of para-methyl group in Pseudomonas putida NCIMB 9866.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan-Fei; Chao, Hongjun; Zhou, Ning-Yi

    2014-02-01

    Pseudomonas putida NCIMB 9866 utilizes p-cresol or 2,4-xylenol as a sole carbon and energy source. Enzymes catalyzing the oxidation of the para-methyl group of p-cresol have been studied in detail. However, those responsible for the oxidation of the para-methyl group in 2,4-xylenol catabolism are still not reported. In this study, real-time quantitative PCR analysis indicated pchC- and pchF-encoded p-cresol methylhydroxylase (PCMH) and pchA-encoded p-hydroxybenzaldehyde dehydrogenase (PHBDD) in p-cresol catabolism were also likely involved in the catabolism of 2,4-xylenol. Enzyme activity assays and intermediate identification indicated that the PCMH and PHBDD catalyzed the oxidations of 2,4-xylenol to 4-hydroxy-3-methylbenzaldehyde and 4-hydroxy-3-methylbenzaldehyde to 4-hydroxy-3-methylbenzoic acid, respectively. Furthermore, the PCMH-encoding gene pchF was found to be necessary for the catabolism of 2,4-xylenol, whereas the PHBDD-encoding gene pchA was not essential for the catabolism by gene knockout and complementation. Analyses of the maximum specific growth rate (μ m) and specific activity of the gene-knockout strain to different intermediates revealed the presence of other enzyme(s) with PHBDD activity in strain 9866. However, PHBDD played a major role in the catabolism of 2,4-xylenol in contrast to the other enzyme(s).

  12. IncHI2 Plasmids Are Predominant in Antibiotic-Resistant Salmonella Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenyao; Fang, Tingzi; Zhou, Xiujuan; Zhang, Daofeng; Shi, Xianming; Shi, Chunlei

    2016-01-01

    The wide usage of antibiotics contributes to the increase in the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant Salmonella. Plasmids play a critical role in horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance markers in Salmonella. This study aimed to screen and characterize plasmid profiles responsible for antibiotic resistance in Salmonella and ultimately to clarify the molecular mechanism of transferable plasmid-mediated antibiotic resistance. A total of 226 Salmonella isolates were examined for antimicrobial susceptibility by a disk diffusion method. Thirty-two isolates (14.2%) were resistant to at least one antibiotic. The presence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes and β-lactamase genes were established by PCR amplification. PCR-based replicon typing revealed that these 32 isolates represented seven plasmid incompatibility groups (IncP, HI2, A/C, FIIs, FIA, FIB, and I1), and the IncHI2 (59.4%) was predominant. Antibiotic resistance markers located on plasmids were identified through plasmid curing. Fifteen phenotypic variants were obtained with the curing efficiency of 46.9% (15/32). The cured plasmids mainly belong to the HI2 incompatibility group. The elimination of IncHI2 plasmids correlated with the loss of β-lactamase genes (blaOXA-1 and blaTEM-1) and PMQR genes (qnrA and aac(6′)-Ib-cr). Both IncHI2 and IncI1 plasmids in a S. enterica serovar Indiana isolate SJTUF 10584 were lost by curing. The blaCMY -2-carrying plasmid pS10584 from SJTUF 10584 was fully sequenced. Sequence analysis revealed that it possessed a plasmid scaffold typical for IncI1 plasmids with the unique genetic arrangement of IS1294-ΔISEcp1-blaCMY -2-blc-sugE-ΔecnR inserted into the colicin gene cia. These data suggested that IncHI2 was the major plasmid lineage contributing to the dissemination of antibiotic resistance in Salmonella and the activity of multiple mobile genetic elements may contribute to antibiotic resistance evolution and dissemination between different plasmid

  13. Genetic diversity and composition of a plasmid metagenome from a wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlüter, Andreas; Krause, Lutz; Szczepanowski, Rafael; Goesmann, Alexander; Pühler, Alfred

    2008-08-31

    Plasmid metagenome nucleotide sequence data were recently obtained from wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) bacteria with reduced susceptibility to selected antimicrobial drugs by applying the ultrafast 454-sequencing technology. The sequence dataset comprising 36,071,493 bases (346,427 reads with an average read length of 104 bases) was analysed for genetic diversity and composition by using a newly developed bioinformatic pipeline based on assignment of environmental gene tags (EGTs) to protein families stored in the Pfam database. Short amino acid sequences deduced from the plasmid metagenome sequence reads were compared to profile hidden Markov models underlying Pfam. Obtained matches evidenced that many reads represent genes having predicted functions in plasmid replication, stability and plasmid mobility which indicates that WWTP bacteria harbour genetically stabilised and mobile plasmids. Moreover, the data confirm a high diversity of plasmids residing in WWTP bacteria. The mobile organic peroxide resistance plasmid pMAC from Acinetobacter baumannii was identified as reference plasmid for the most abundant replication module type in the sequenced sample. Accessory plasmid modules encode different transposons, insertion sequences, integrons, resistance and virulence determinants. Most of the matches to Transposase protein families were identified for transposases similar to the one of the chromate resistance transposon Tn5719. Noticeable are hits to beta-lactamase protein families which suggests that plasmids from WWTP bacteria encode different enzymes possessing beta-lactam-hydrolysing activity. Some of the sequence reads correspond to antibiotic resistance genes that were only recently identified in clinical isolates of human pathogens. EGT analysis thus proofed to be a very valuable method to explore genetic diversity and composition of the present plasmid metagenome dataset.

  14. Characterization and comparative analysis of antibiotic resistance plasmids isolated from a wastewater treatment plant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teddie O Rahube

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A wastewater treatment plant (WWTP is an environment high in nutrient concentration with diverse bacterial populations and can provide an ideal environment for the proliferation of mobile elements such as plasmids. WWTPs have also been identified as reservoirs for antibiotic resistance genes that are associated with human pathogens. The objectives of this study were to isolate and characterize self-transmissible or mobilizable resistance plasmids associated with effluent from wastewater treatment plant. An enrichment culture approach designed to capture plasmids conferring resistance to high concentrations of erythromycin was used to capture plasmids from an urban wastewater treatment plant servicing a population of ca. 210,000. DNA sequencing of the plasmids revealed diversity of plasmids represented by incompatibility groups IncU, col-E, IncFII and IncP-1β. Genes coding resistance to clinically relevant antibiotics (macrolide, tetracycline, beta-lactam, trimethoprim, chloramphenicol, sulphonamide, quaternary ammonium compounds and heavy metals were co-located on these plasmids, often within transposable and integrative mobile elements. Several of the plasmids were self-transmissible or mobilizable and could be maintained in the absence of antibiotic selection. The IncFII plasmid pEFC36a showed the highest degree of sequence identity to plasmid R1 which has been isolated in England more than fifty years ago from a patient suffering from a Salmonella infection. Functional conservation of key regulatory features of this F-like conjugation module were demonstrated by the finding that the conjugation frequency of pEFC36a could be stimulated by the positive regulator of plasmid R1 DNA transfer genes, TraJ.

  15. Characterization and comparative analysis of antibiotic resistance plasmids isolated from a wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahube, Teddie O; Viana, Laia S; Koraimann, Günther; Yost, Christopher K

    2014-01-01

    A wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) is an environment high in nutrient concentration with diverse bacterial populations and can provide an ideal environment for the proliferation of mobile elements such as plasmids. WWTPs have also been identified as reservoirs for antibiotic resistance genes that are associated with human pathogens. The objectives of this study were to isolate and characterize self-transmissible or mobilizable resistance plasmids associated with effluent from WWTP. An enrichment culture approach designed to capture plasmids conferring resistance to high concentrations of erythromycin was used to capture plasmids from an urban WWTP servicing a population of ca. 210,000. DNA sequencing of the plasmids revealed diversity of plasmids represented by incompatibility groups IncU, col-E, IncFII and IncP-1β. Genes coding resistance to clinically relevant antibiotics (macrolide, tetracycline, beta-lactam, trimethoprim, chloramphenicol, sulphonamide), quaternary ammonium compounds and heavy metals were co-located on these plasmids, often within transposable and integrative mobile elements. Several of the plasmids were self-transmissible or mobilizable and could be maintained in the absence of antibiotic selection. The IncFII plasmid pEFC36a showed the highest degree of sequence identity to plasmid R1 which has been isolated in England more than 50 years ago from a patient suffering from a Salmonella infection. Functional conservation of key regulatory features of this F-like conjugation module were demonstrated by the finding that the conjugation frequency of pEFC36a could be stimulated by the positive regulator of plasmid R1 DNA transfer genes, TraJ.

  16. Characterization of plasmids in extensively drug-resistant acinetobacter strains isolated in India and Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lim S; Carvalho, Maria J; Toleman, Mark A; White, P Lewis; Connor, Thomas R; Mushtaq, Ammara; Weeks, Janis L; Kumarasamy, Karthikeyan K; Raven, Katherine E; Török, M Estée; Peacock, Sharon J; Howe, Robin A; Walsh, Timothy R

    2015-02-01

    The blaNDM-1 gene is associated with extensive drug resistance in Gram-negative bacteria. This probably spread to Enterobacteriaceae from Acinetobacter spp., and we characterized plasmids associated with blaNDM-1 in Acinetobacter spp. to gain insight into their role in this dissemination. Four clinical NDM-1-producing Acinetobacter species strains from India and Pakistan were investigated. A plasmid harboring blaNDM-1, pNDM-40-1, was characterized by whole-genome sequencing of Acinetobacter bereziniae CHI-40-1 and comparison with related plasmids. The presence of similar plasmids in strains from Pakistan was sought by PCR and sequencing of amplicons. Conjugation frequency was tested and stability of pNDM-40-1 investigated by real-time PCR of isolates passaged with and without antimicrobial selection pressure. A. bereziniae and Acinetobacter haemolyticus strains contained plasmids similar to the pNDM-BJ01-like plasmids identified in Acinetobacter spp. in China. The backbone of pNDM-40-1 was almost identical to that of pNDM-BJ01-like plasmids, but the transposon harboring blaNDM-1, Tn125, contained two short deletions. Escherichia coli and Acinetobacter pittii transconjugants were readily obtained. Transconjugants retained pNDM-40-1 after a 14-day passage experiment, although stability was greater with meropenem selection. Fragments of pNDM-BJ01-like plasmid backbones are found near blaNDM-1 in some genetic contexts from Enterobacteriaceae, suggesting that cross-genus transfer has occurred. pNDM-BJ01-like plasmids have been described in isolates originating from a wide geographical region in southern Asia. In vitro data on plasmid transfer and stability suggest that these plasmids could have contributed to the spread of blaNDM-1 into Enterobacteriaceae.

  17. Plasmids of Carotenoid-Producing Paracoccus spp. (Alphaproteobacteria) - Structure, Diversity and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maj, Anna; Dziewit, Lukasz; Czarnecki, Jakub; Wlodarczyk, Miroslawa; Baj, Jadwiga; Skrzypczyk, Grazyna; Giersz, Dorota; Bartosik, Dariusz

    2013-01-01

    Plasmids are components of many bacterial genomes. They enable the spread of a large pool of genetic information via lateral gene transfer. Many bacterial strains contain mega-sized replicons and these are particularly common in Alphaproteobacteria. Considerably less is known about smaller alphaproteobacterial plasmids. We analyzed the genomes of 14 such plasmids residing in 4 multireplicon carotenoid-producing strains of the genus Paracoccus (Alphaproteobacteria): P. aestuarii DSM 19484, P. haeundaensis LG P-21903, P. marcusii DSM 11574 and P. marcusii OS22. Comparative analyses revealed mosaic structures of the plasmids and recombinational shuffling of diverse genetic modules involved in (i) plasmid replication, (ii) stabilization (including toxin-antitoxin systems of the relBE/parDE, tad-ata, higBA, mazEF and toxBA families) and (iii) mobilization for conjugal transfer (encoding relaxases of the MobQ, MobP or MobV families). A common feature of the majority of the plasmids is the presence of AT-rich sequence islets (located downstream of exc1-like genes) containing genes, whose homologs are conserved in the chromosomes of many bacteria (encoding e.g. RelA/SpoT, SMC-like proteins and a retron-type reverse transcriptase). The results of this study have provided insight into the diversity and plasticity of plasmids of Paracoccus spp., and of the entire Alphaproteobacteria. Some of the identified plasmids contain replication systems not described previously in this class of bacteria. The composition of the plasmid genomes revealed frequent transfer of chromosomal genes into plasmids, which significantly enriches the pool of mobile DNA that can participate in lateral transfer. Many strains of Paracoccus spp. have great biotechnological potential, and the plasmid vectors constructed in this study will facilitate genetic studies of these bacteria. PMID:24260361

  18. DNASU plasmid and PSI:Biology-Materials repositories: resources to accelerate biological research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Catherine Y; Park, Jin G; Sharma, Amit; Hunter, Preston; Surapaneni, Padmini; Sedillo, Casey; Field, James; Algar, Rhys; Price, Andrea; Steel, Jason; Throop, Andrea; Fiacco, Michael; LaBaer, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    The mission of the DNASU Plasmid Repository is to accelerate research by providing high-quality, annotated plasmid samples and online plasmid resources to the research community through the curated DNASU database, website and repository (http://dnasu.asu.edu or http://dnasu.org). The collection includes plasmids from grant-funded, high-throughput cloning projects performed in our laboratory, plasmids from external researchers, and large collections from consortia such as the ORFeome Collaboration and the NIGMS-funded Protein Structure Initiative: Biology (PSI:Biology). Through DNASU, researchers can search for and access detailed information about each plasmid such as the full length gene insert sequence, vector information, associated publications, and links to external resources that provide additional protein annotations and experimental protocols. Plasmids can be requested directly through the DNASU website. DNASU and the PSI:Biology-Materials Repositories were previously described in the 2010 NAR Database Issue (Cormier, C.Y., Mohr, S.E., Zuo, D., Hu, Y., Rolfs, A., Kramer, J., Taycher, E., Kelley, F., Fiacco, M., Turnbull, G. et al. (2010) Protein Structure Initiative Material Repository: an open shared public resource of structural genomics plasmids for the biological community. Nucleic Acids Res., 38, D743-D749.). In this update we will describe the plasmid collection and highlight the new features in the website redesign, including new browse/search options, plasmid annotations and a dynamic vector mapping feature that was developed in collaboration with LabGenius. Overall, these plasmid resources continue to enable research with the goal of elucidating the role of proteins in both normal biological processes and disease.

  19. The phn island: A new genomic island encoding catabolism of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William James Hickey

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria are key in the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH, which are widespread environmental pollutants. At least six genotypes of PAH-degraders are distinguishable via phylogenies of the ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase (RHD that initiates bacterial PAH metabolism, and a given genotype has a characteristic taxonomic distribution. The latter pattern implies each genotype may have distinct pathways for horizontal gene transfer (HGT. But, while such processes are important in the function of PAH-degrader communities, mechanisms of HGT for most RHD genotypes are unknown. Here, we report in silico and functional analyses of the phenanthrene-degrader Delftia sp. Cs1-4, a representative of the phnAFK2 RHD group. The phnAFK2 genotype predominates PAH degrader communities in some soils and sediments, but, until now, their genomic biology has not been explored. In the present studies, genes for the entire phenanthrene catabolic pathway were discovered on a novel ca. 232 kb genomic island (GEI, now termed the phn island. This GEI had characteristics of an integrative and conjugative element with a mobilization/stabilization system similar to that of SXT/R391-type GEI. But, it could not be grouped with any known GEI, and was the first member of a new GEI class. The island also carried genes predicted to encode: synthesis of quorum sensing signal molecules, fatty acid/polyhydroxyalkonate biosynthesis, a type IV secretory system, a PRTRC system, DNA mobilization functions and > 50 hypothetical proteins. The 50% G+C content of the phn gene cluster differed significantly from the 66.7% G+C level of the island as a whole and the strain Cs1-4 chromosome, indicating a divergent phylogenetic origin for the phn genes. Collectively, these studies added new insights into the genetic elements affecting the PAH biodegradation capacity of microbial communities specifically, and the potential vehicles of HGT in general.

  20. γ-Resorcylate Catabolic-Pathway Genes in the Soil Actinomycete Rhodococcus jostii RHA1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Daisuke; Araki, Naoto; Motoi, Kota; Yoshikawa, Shota; Iino, Toju; Imai, Shunsuke; Masai, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    The Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 gene cluster required for γ-resorcylate (GRA) catabolism was characterized. The cluster includes tsdA, tsdB, tsdC, tsdD, tsdR, tsdT, and tsdX, which encode GRA decarboxylase, resorcinol 4-hydroxylase, hydroxyquinol 1,2-dioxygenase, maleylacetate reductase, an IclR-type regulator, a major facilitator superfamily transporter, and a putative hydrolase, respectively. The tsdA gene conferred GRA decarboxylase activity on Escherichia coli. Purified TsdB oxidized NADH in the presence of resorcinol, suggesting that tsdB encodes a unique NADH-specific single-component resorcinol 4-hydroxylase. Mutations in either tsdA or tsdB resulted in growth deficiency on GRA. The tsdC and tsdD genes conferred hydroxyquinol 1,2-dioxygenase and maleylacetate reductase activities, respectively, on E. coli. Inactivation of tsdT significantly retarded the growth of RHA1 on GRA. The growth retardation was partially suppressed under acidic conditions, suggesting the involvement of tsdT in GRA uptake. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that the tsd genes constitute three transcriptional units, the tsdBADC and tsdTX operons and tsdR. Transcription of the tsdBADC and tsdTX operons was induced during growth on GRA. Inactivation of tsdR derepressed transcription of the tsdBADC and tsdTX operons in the absence of GRA, suggesting that tsd gene transcription is negatively regulated by the tsdR-encoded regulator. Binding of TsdR to the tsdR-tsdB and tsdT-tsdR intergenic regions was inhibited by the addition of GRA, indicating that GRA interacts with TsdR as an effector molecule. PMID:26319878

  1. Organic matter mineralization in frozen boreal soils-environmental constraints on catabolic and anabolic microbial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oquist, Mats G.; Sparrman, Tobias; Schleucher, Jürgen; Nilsson, Mats B.

    2014-05-01

    Heterotrophic microbial mineralization of soil organic matter (SOM) and associated production and emission of atmospheric trace gases proceed during the winter months in the frozen soils of high latitude ecosystems. However, in what ways this microbial activity is constrained by the environmental conditions prevailing in a frozen soil matrix is uncertain. This presentation will address how temperature, water availability and substrate availability combine to regulate rates of microbial activity at below freezing temperatures and the implications of this activity for SOM mineralization in the surface layers of boreal forest soils experiencing seasonal freezing. We show that the amount and availability of liquid water is an integral factor regulating rates of microbial activity in the frozen soil matrix and can also explain frequently observed deviations in the temperature responses of biogenic CO2 production in frozen soils, as compared to unfrozen soils. Using stable isotope labeling (13C) we also show that the partitioning of substrate carbon, in the form of monomeric sugar (glucose), for catabolic and anabolic metabolism remain constant in the temperature range of -4C to 9C. This confirms that microbial growth may proceed even when soils are frozen. In addition we present corresponding data for organisms metabolizing polymeric substrates (cellulose) requiring exoenzymatic activity prior to substrate uptake. We conclude that the metabolic response of soil microorganism to controlling factors may change substantially across the freezing point of soil water, and also the patterns of interaction among controlling factors are affected. Thus, it is evident that metabolic response functions derived from investigations of unfrozen soils cannot be superimposed on frozen soils. Nonetheless, the soil microbial population appear very adapted to seasonal freezing with respect to their metabolic performance.

  2. Vitamin A deficiency increases protein catabolism and induces urea cycle enzymes in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban-Pretel, Guillermo; Marín, M Pilar; Cabezuelo, Francisco; Moreno, Verónica; Renau-Piqueras, Jaime; Timoneda, Joaquín; Barber, Teresa

    2010-04-01

    Chronic vitamin A deficiency induces a substantial delay in the rates of weight and height gain in both humans and experimental animals. This effect has been associated with an impaired nutrient metabolism and loss of body protein. Therefore, we analyzed the effect of vitamin A deficiency on endogenous proteolysis and nitrogen metabolism and its reversibility with all-trans retinoic acid (RA). Male weanling rats, housed in pairs, were pair-fed a vitamin A-deficient (VAD) or control diet until they were 60 d old. A group of deficient rats were further treated with daily intraperitoneal injections of all-trans RA for 10 d. Final body and tissue (i.e. liver and heart) weights were significantly lower and tissue:body weight ratios were similar in VAD rats and in controls. Conversely, the epididymal white fat:body weight ratio and the plasma concentrations of alanine aminotransferase and adiponectin were significantly higher in VAD rats, which also had hepatic macrovesicular lipid accumulations. Plasma and gastrocnemius muscle 3-methylhistidine, urine nitrogen, and plasma and urine urea concentrations were all significantly higher in the VAD group. The expression of the genes encoding urea cycle enzymes and their activities increased in VAD livers. These changes were partially reverted by all-trans RA. We propose that fuel partitioning in vitamin A deficiency may shift from fatty acids to protein catabolism as an energy source. Our results emphasize the importance of vitamin A on the energy balance control system and they provide an explanation for the role of vitamin A in protein turnover, development, and growth.

  3. Specific structural probing of plasmid-coded ribosomal RNAs from Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, C; Rosendahl, G; Dam, M

    1991-01-01

    The preferred method for construction and in vivo expression of mutagenised Escherichia coli ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) is via high copy number plasmids. Transcription of wild-type rRNA from the seven chromosomal rrn operons in strains harbouring plasmid-coded mutant rRNAs leads to a heterogeneous...

  4. Characterization of the Ac/Ds behaviour in transgenic tomato plants using plasmid rescue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rommens, Caius M.T.; Rudenko, George N.; Dijkwel, Paul P.; Haaren, Mark J.J. van; Ouwerkerk, Pieter B.F.; Blok, Karin M.; Nijkamp, H. John J.; Hille, Jacques

    1992-01-01

    We describe the use of plasmid rescue to facilitate studies on the behaviour of Ds and Ac elements in transgenic tomato plants. The rescue of Ds elements relies on the presence of a plasmid origin of replication and a marker gene selective in Escherichia coli within the element. The position within

  5. Plasmid content of Erwinia amylovora in orchards in Washington and Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined the plasmid content of a collection of 305 isolates of Erwinia amylovora from Washington and Oregon in the Pacific Northwest of the United States with PCR assays and RFLP. Nearly all isolates of E. amylovora carried plasmid pEA29, which is not found in other species of bacteria, but 4% ...

  6. Comparative Genomics of the Conjugation Region of F-like Plasmids: Five Shades of F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Lopez, Raul; de Toro, Maria; Moncalian, Gabriel; Garcillan-Barcia, M. Pilar; de la Cruz, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The F plasmid is the foremost representative of a large group of conjugative plasmids, prevalent in Escherichia coli, and widely distributed among the Enterobacteriaceae. These plasmids are of clinical relevance, given their frequent association with virulence determinants, colicins, and antibiotic resistance genes. Originally defined by their sensitivity to certain male-specific phages, IncF plasmids share a conserved conjugative system and regulatory circuits. In order to determine whether the genetic architecture and regulation circuits are preserved among these plasmids, we analyzed the natural diversity of F-like plasmids. Using the relaxase as a phylogenetic marker, we identified 256 plasmids belonging to the IncF/ MOBF12group, present as complete DNA sequences in the NCBI database. By comparative genomics, we identified five major groups of F-like plasmids. Each shows a particular operon structure and alternate regulatory systems. Results show that the IncF/MOBF12 conjugation gene cluster conforms a diverse and ancient group, which evolved alternative regulatory schemes in its adaptation to different environments and bacterial hosts. PMID:27891505

  7. A Simple and Inexpensive Method for Sending Binary Vector Plasmid DNA by Mail

    Science.gov (United States)

    We describe a simple cost-effective technique for the transport of plasmid DNA by mail. Our results demonstrate that common multipurpose printing paper is a satisfactory substrate and superior to the more absorbent 3MM chromatography paper for the transport of plasmid DNA through the U.S. first clas...

  8. Diversity and stability of plasmids from glycopeptide resistant Enterococcus faecium isolated from pigs in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasman, H.; Villadsen, A. G.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2005-01-01

    was seen at the end of the 7-year period, coinciding with the ban in 1998 of the macrolide tylosin as growth promoter for pig production. The stability of the plasmid in its original host was compared with stability of the same plasmid in BM4105RF, when both strains were maintained in liquid cultures...

  9. Complete Nucleotide Sequence of a Citrobacter freundii Plasmid Carrying KPC-2 in a Unique Genetic Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yancheng; Imirzalioglu, Can; Hain, Torsten; Kaase, Martin; Gatermann, Soeren; Exner, Martin; Mielke, Martin; Hauri, Anja; Dragneva, Yolanta; Bill, Rita; Wendt, Constanze; Wirtz, Angela; Chakraborty, Trinad

    2014-01-01

    The complete and annotated nucleotide sequence of a 54,036-bp plasmid harboring a blaKPC-2 gene that is clonally present in Citrobacter isolates from different species is presented. The plasmid belongs to incompatibility group N (IncN) and harbors the class A carbapenemase KPC-2 in a unique genetic environment. PMID:25395635

  10. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the lactococcal EPS plasmid pNZ4000

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranenburg, van R.; Kleerebezem, M.; Vos, de W.M.

    2000-01-01

    The complete 42180-bp nucleotide sequence of the mobilization plasmid pNZ4000, coding for exopolysaccharide (EPS) production in Lactococcus lactis, was determined. This plasmid contains a region involved in EPS biosynthesis, four functional replicons, a region containing mobilization genes, and thre

  11. A classification system for plasmids from Enterococci and other Gram-positive bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Bogø; Garcia-Migura, Lourdes; Valenzuela, Antonio Jesus Sanchez

    2010-01-01

    A classification system for plasmids isolated from enterococci and other Gram-positive bacteria was developed based on 111 published plasmid sequences from enterococci and other Gram-positive bacteria; mostly staphylococci. Based on PCR amplification of conserved areas of the replication initiati...

  12. Application of a plasmid classification system to determine prevalence of replicon families among multidrug resistant enterococci

    Science.gov (United States)

    The presence and transfer of plasmids from commensal bacteria to more pathogenic bacteria may contribute to dissemination of antimicrobial resistance. However, prevalence of plasmids from commensal bacteria in food animals such as the enterococci remains largely unknown. In this study, the prevale...

  13. Complete genome sequences of Incl1 Plasmids carrying extended-spectrum B-Lactamase genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, M.S.M.; Bossers, A.; Harders, F.; Essen-Zandbergen, van A.; Mevius, D.J.; Smith, H.E.

    2014-01-01

    Extended spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) confer resistance to clinically relevant antibiotics. Often, the resistance genes are carried by conjugative plasmids which are responsible for dissemination. Five IncI1 plasmids carrying ESBLs from commensal and clinical Escherichia coli isolates were compl

  14. Characterization of plasmids that encode streptomycin-resistance in bacterial epiphytes of apple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, T C; Burr, T J

    1999-05-01

    Streptomycin resistance in strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv. papulans, Pantoea agglomerans and a yellow-pigmented, non-fluorescent Pseudomonas sp. (Py), isolated from apple orchards in New York and Washington states, is predominantly associated with strA-strB genes carried on conjugal plasmids (R plasmids). None of 128 resistant Erwinia amylovora strains from the eastern and western USA hybridized with a strA-strB probe, SMP3. Resistant Py strains transfered R plasmids to Ps. syringae pv. papulans and to Py in vitro at frequencies of 10(-1)-10(-2) per recipient cell whereas Ps. syringae pv. papulans transferred its plasmids at frequencies of 10(-2) to below detectable levels. Transfer of R plasmids to P. agglomerans was not detected and resistant P. agglomerans did not transfer their R plasmids to any recipients. R plasmids were found to be highly diverse as measured by DNA fingerprint analysis. Transfer-deficient transposon mutants of R plasmid pCPP519 were generated, and 3.9 kb EcoRI and 3.0 kb SmaI fragments that hybridized with a Tn5 probe were cloned and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequences of the 3.9 kb fragment were similar to proteins involved in replication, nicking at oriT, and piliation in other bacteria.

  15. Homology and repair of UV-irradiated plasmid DNA in Haemophilus influenzae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrea-Juarez, E.; Setlow, J.K.

    1983-02-01

    UV-irradiated plasmid pNov1 containing a cloned fragment of chromosomal DNA could be repaired by excision, but plasmid p2265 without homology to the chromosome could not. Establishment of pNov1 was more UV resistant in Rec/sup -/ than in Rec/sup +/ cells. 19 references, 2 figures.

  16. Conjugal plasmid transfer (pAM beta 1) in Lactobacillus plantarum.

    OpenAIRE

    Shrago, A W; Chassy, B M; Dobrogosz, W J

    1986-01-01

    The streptococcal plasmid pAM beta 1 (erythromycin resistance) was transferred via conjugation from Streptococcus faecalis to Lactobacillus plantarum and was transferred among L. plantarum strains. Streptococcus sanguis Challis was transformed with pAM beta 1 isolated from these transconjugants, and transformants harboring intact pAM beta 1 could conjugate the plasmid back to L. plantarum.

  17. "Curing" of plasmid DNA in acetogen using microwave or applying an electric pulse improves cell growth and metabolite production as compared to the plasmid-harboring strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzin, Vel; Kiriukhin, Michael; Tyurin, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Plasmid-free acetogen Clostridium sp. MT962 electrotransformed with a small cryptic plasmid pMT351 was used to develop time- and cost-effective methods for plasmid elimination. Elimination of pMT351 restored production of acetate and ethanol to the levels of the plasmid-free strain with no dry cell weight changes. Destabilizing cell membrane via microwave at 2.45 GHz, or exposure to a single 12 ms square electric pulse at 35 kV cm⁻¹, eliminated pMT351 in 42-47 % of cells. Plasmid elimination with a single square electric pulse required 10 versus 0.1 J needed to introduce the same 3,202-bp plasmid into the cells as calculated per cell sample of Clostridium sp. MT962. Microwave caused visible changes in repPCR pattern and increased ethanol production at the expense of acetate. This is the first report on microwave of microwave ovens, wireless routers, and mobile devices causing chromosomal DNA aberrations in microbes along with carbon flux change.

  18. Regular cellular distribution of plasmids by oscillating and filament-forming ParA ATPase of plasmid pB171

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebersbach, Gitte; Ringgaard, Simon; Møller-Jensen, Jakob;

    2006-01-01

    with each other in a bacterial two-hybrid assay but do not interact with FtsZ, eight other essential cell division proteins or MreB actin. Based on these observations, we propose a simple model for how oscillating ParA filaments can mediate regular cellular distribution of plasmids. The model functions......Centromere-like loci from bacteria segregate plasmids to progeny cells before cell division. The ParA ATPase (a MinD homologue) of the par2 locus from plasmid pB171 forms oscillating helical structures over the nucleoid. Here we show that par2 distributes plasmid foci regularly along the length...... of the cell even in cells with many plasmids. In vitro, ParA binds ATP and ADP and has a cooperative ATPase activity. Moreover, ParA forms ATP-dependent filaments and cables, suggesting that ParA can provide the mechanical force for the observed regular distribution of plasmids. ParA and ParB interact...

  19. Regular Cellular Distribution of Plasmids by Oscillating and Filament-forming ParA ATPase of Plasmid pB171

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebersbach, Gitte; Ringgaard, Simon; Møller-Jensen, Jakob;

    2006-01-01

    with each other in a bacterial two-hybrid assay but do not interact with FtsZ, eight other essential cell division proteins or MreB actin. Based on these observations, we propose a simple model for how oscillating ParA filaments can mediate regular cellular distribution of plasmids. The model functions......Centromere-like loci from bacteria segregate plasmids to progeny cells before cell division. The ParA ATPase (a MinD homologue) of the par2 locus from plasmid pB171 forms oscillating helical structures over the nucleoid. Here we show that par2 distributes plasmid foci regularly along the length...... of the cell even in cells with many plasmids. In vitro, ParA binds ATP and ADP and has a cooperative ATPase activity. Moreover, ParA forms ATP-dependent filaments and cables, suggesting that ParA can provide the mechanical force for the observed regular distribution of plasmids. ParA and ParB interact...

  20. Selection of a multidrug resistance plasmid by sublethal levels of antibiotics and heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullberg, Erik; Albrecht, Lisa M; Karlsson, Christoffer; Sandegren, Linus; Andersson, Dan I

    2014-10-07

    How sublethal levels of antibiotics and heavy metals select for clinically important multidrug resistance plasmids is largely unknown. Carriage of plasmids generally confers substantial fitness costs, implying that for the plasmid-carrying bacteria to be maintained in the population, the plasmid cost needs to be balanced by a selective pressure conferred by, for example, antibiotics or heavy metals. We studied the effects of low levels of antibiotics and heavy metals on the selective maintenance of a 220-kbp extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) plasmid identified in a hospital outbreak of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. The concentrations of antibiotics and heavy metals required to maintain plasmid-carrying bacteria, the minimal selective concentrations (MSCs), were in all cases below (almost up to 140-fold) the MIC of the plasmid-free susceptible bacteria. This finding indicates that the very low antibiotic and heavy metal levels found in polluted environments and in treated humans and animals might be sufficiently high to maintain multiresistance plasmids. When resistance genes were moved from the plasmid to the chromosome, the MSC decreased, showing that MSC for a specific resistance conditionally depends on genetic context. This finding suggests that a cost-free resistance could be maintained in a population by an infinitesimally low concentration of antibiotic. By studying the effect of combinations of several compounds, it was observed that for certain combinations of drugs each new compound added lowered the minimal selective concentration of the others. This combination effect could be a significant factor in the selection of multidrug resistance plasmids/bacterial clones in complex multidrug environments. Importance: Antibiotic resistance is in many pathogenic bacteria caused by genes that are carried on large conjugative plasmids. These plasmids typically contain multiple antibiotic resistance genes as well as genes that confer resistance to

  1. Genomic and Functional Characterization of qnr-Encoding Plasmids from Municipal Wastewater Biosolid Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Ella; Sela, Noa; Doron-Faigenboim, Adi; Navon-Venezia, Shiri; Jurkevitch, Edouard; Cytryn, Eddie

    2015-01-01

    Municipal wastewater treatment facilities are considered to be "hotspots" for antibiotic resistance, since they conjoin high densities of environmental and fecal bacteria with selective pressure in the form of sub-therapeutic concentrations of antibiotics. Discharged effluents and biosolids from these facilities can disseminate antibiotic resistant genes to terrestrial and aquatic environments, potentially contributing to the increasing global trend in antibiotic resistance. This phenomenon is especially pertinent when resistance genes are associated with mobile genetic elements such as conjugative plasmids, which can be transferred between bacterial phyla. Fluoroquinolones are among the most abundant antibiotic compounds detected in wastewater treatment facilities, especially in biosolids, where due to their hydrophobic properties they accumulate to concentrations that may exceed 40 mg/L. Although fluoroquinolone resistance is traditionally associated with mutations in the gyrA/topoisomerase IV genes, there is increasing evidence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance, which is primarily encoded on qnr genes. In this study, we sequenced seven qnr-harboring plasmids from a diverse collection of Klebsiella strains, isolated from dewatered biosolids from a large wastewater treatment facility in Israel. One of the plasmids, termed pKPSH-11XL was a large (185.4 kbp), multi-drug resistance, IncF-type plasmid that harbored qnrB and 10 additional antibiotic resistance genes that conferred resistance to five different antibiotic families. It was highly similar to the pKPN3-like plasmid family that has been detected in multidrug resistant clinical Klebsiella isolates. In contrast, the six additional plasmids were much smaller (7-9 Kbp) and harbored a qnrS -type gene. These plasmids were highly similar to each other and closely resembled pGNB2, a plasmid isolated from a German wastewater treatment facility. Comparative genome analyses of pKPSH-11XL and other pKPN3-like

  2. Frequency and diversity of small cryptic plasmids in the genus Rahnella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Summers David K

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rahnella is a widely distributed genus belonging to the Enterobacteriaceae and frequently present on vegetables. Although Rahnella has interesting agro-economical and industrial properties and several strains possess antibiotic resistances and toxin genes which might spread within microbial communities, little is known about plasmids of this genus. Thus, we isolated a number of Rahnella strains and investigated their complements of small plasmids. Results In total 53 strains were investigated and 11 plasmids observed. Seven belonged to the ColE1 family; one was ColE2-like and three shared homology to rolling circle plasmids. One of them belonged to the pC194/pUB110 family and two showed similarity to poorly characterised plasmid groups. The G+C content of two rolling circle plasmids deviated considerably from that of Rahnella, indicating that their usual hosts might belong to other genera. Most ColE1-like plasmids formed a subgroup within the ColE1 family that seems to be fairly specific for Rahnella. Intriguingly, the multimer resolution sites of all ColE1-like plasmids had the same orientation with respect to the origin of replication. This arrangement might be necessary to prevent inappropriate synthesis of a small regulatory RNA that regulates cell division. Although the ColE1-like plasmids did not possess any mobilisation system, they shared large parts with high sequence identity in coding and non-coding regions. In addition, highly homologous regions of plasmids isolated from Rahnella and the chromosomes of Erwinia tasmaniensis and Photorhabdus luminescens could be identified. Conclusions For the genus Rahnella we observed plasmid-containing isolates at a frequency of 19%, which is in the average range for Enterobacteriaceae. These plasmids belonged to diffent groups with members of the ColE1-family most frequently found. Regions of striking sequence homology of plasmids and bacterial chromosomes highlight the

  3. Gyrase-dependent stabilization of pSC101 plasmid inheritance by transcriptionally active promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaucage, S L; Miller, C A; Cohen, S N

    1991-09-01

    The pSC101 plasmid encodes a cis-acting genetic locus termed par that ensures the stable inheritance of plasmids in a population of dividing cells. In the absence of selection, par-defective plasmids are lost rapidly from the bacterial population. We report here that the stability of par-deleted pSC101 derivatives is restored by introducing certain adventitious bacterial promoters onto the plasmid. Stabilization requires active transcription from the inserted promoter and is affected by the site and orientation of the insertion, the length of the nascent transcript and DNA gyrase activity. While a promotor-associated overall increase in negative superhelicity of plasmid DNA was observed, stabilized inheritance appeared to be dependent on localized rather than generalized supercoiling. Our demonstration that promoter-induced DNA supercoiling can mimic the effects of the pSC101 par locus provides evidence that the previously reported superhelicity-generating effects of par are intrinsic to its function.

  4. Characterization of the replication and stability regions of Agrobacterium tumefaciens plasmid pTAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallie, D R; Zaitlin, D; Perry, K L; Kado, C I

    1984-03-01

    A 5.4-kilobase region containing the origin of replication and stability maintenance of the 44-kilobase Agrobacterium tumefaciens plasmid pTAR has been mapped and characterized. Within this region is a 1.3-kilobase segment that is capable of directing autonomous replication. The remaining segment contains the stability locus for maintenance of pTAR during nonselective growth. Approximately 35% of pTAR shares sequence homology with pAg119, a 44-kilobase cryptic plasmid in grapevine strain 1D1119. However, no homology was detected between pTAR DNA and several Ti plasmids or several other small cryptic plasmids in many A. tumefaciens strains. A recombinant plasmid containing the origin of replication and stability maintenance region of pTAR was compatible with pTiC58, pTi15955, and pTi119 and incompatible with pAg119. A new compatibility group, Inc Ag-1, is discussed.

  5. Molecular relationship among fosfomycin-resistant plasmids and clinical impact of fosfomycin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, M C; Teran, F J; Mendez, F J; Hardisson, C

    1988-10-01

    We have been carrying out a surveillance programme on plasmid-mediated fosfomycin resistance in our community over the last decade and have isolated and characterized several varieties of conjugative plasmids from different enterobacteriae. In this work we show that seven varieties of plasmids are related with the Inc M group, and carry the same For determinant which encodes a modifying enzyme. The comparative study on their R-phenotype, restriction analysis and DNA-DNA hybridization showed different degrees of molecular relationship among them. The spread of For-plasmids as well as the fosfomycin resistance by other mechanisms seems to be low in spite of the great For-plasmid diversity found.

  6. Mobilization of Bacillus thuringiensis plasmid pTX14-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrup, L; Bendixen, H H; Jensen, G B

    1995-05-01

    The Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) plasmid pTX14-3 has been reported to contain a gene, mob14-3, with considerable homology to genes encoding mobilization proteins from other gram-positive bacteria. We have used the aggregation-mediated conjugation system recently discovered in Bti to compare the mobilization kinetics of different derivatives of plasmid pTX14-3. Plasmid pTX14-3 has been found to replicate by the rolling-circle mechanism and to contain a locus suppressing the formation of high-molecular-weight DNA. We found that deleting a DNA fragment containing this locus increased the transfer frequency about twofold. The mobilization frequency of the plasmid containing the intact mob14-3 gene did not indicate a mobilization-enhancing activity of the encoded polypeptide. However, the presence of the mob14-3 gene seemed to increase the stability of the plasmid in exponential growth.

  7. An extranuclear expression system for analysis of cytoplasmic promoters of yeast linear killer plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schründer, J; Meinhardt, F

    1995-03-01

    Based on the cytoplasmically localized killer plasmids pGKL1 and pGKL2 of Kluyveromyces lactis two new linear hybrid plasmids were constructed which consist of pGKL1, into which in addition to the previously developed cytoplasmically expressible LEU2* selectable marker a glucose dehydrogenase-encoding bacterial gene (gdh A) has been integrated. One of the hybrid plasmids carries the bacterial gene preceded by an arbitrarily placed cytoplasmic promoter (upstream conserved sequence) in front of the coding region (pRKL121). The other plasmid was constructed in such a way that the ATG start codon of the gdh A gene was fused in frame to the ATG start codon of the killer plasmid's open reading frame 5 (pRKL122). The structures of both linear hybrid plasmids were confirmed by restriction analysis, Southern hybridization, and sequencing of the junction sites. Yeast strains carrying either of the plasmids expressed the glucose dehydrogenase gene; however, expression of the in phase fused gene was 40-fold higher compared to the arbitrarily placed cytoplasmic promoter. In general, an in phase fusion was not required for expression, but efficiency is dramatically enhanced when the 5' noncoding sequences in front of the heterologous genes are the same as those found on the native killer plasmids. The developed system can serve as a reporter for determining the efficiency of the different cytoplasmic promoters present on both linear plasmids. Hybrid plasmids were stably maintained without selective pressure in K. lactis and they were transferred and expressed also in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  8. New and Redesigned pRS Plasmid Shuttle Vectors for Genetic Manipulation of Saccharomycescerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Mark K; Haase, Steven B

    2012-05-01

    We have constructed a set of 42 plasmid shuttle vectors based on the widely used pRS series for use in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the bacterium Escherichia coli. This set of pRSII plasmids includes new shuttle vectors that can be used with histidine and adenine auxotrophic laboratory yeast strains carrying mutations in the genes HIS2 and ADE1, respectively. Our pRSII plasmids also include updated versions of commonly used pRS plasmids from which common restriction sites that occur within their yeast-selectable biosynthetic marker genes have been removed to increase the availability of unique restriction sites within their polylinker regions. Hence, our pRSII plasmids are a complete set of integrating, centromere and 2μ episomal plasmids with the biosynthetic marker genes ADE2, HIS3, TRP1, LEU2, URA3, HIS2, and ADE1 and a standardized selection of at least 16 unique restriction sites in their polylinkers. Additionally, we have expanded the range of drug selection options that can be used for PCR-mediated homologous replacement using pRS plasmid templates by replacing the G418-resistance kanMX4 cassette of pRS400 with MX4 cassettes encoding resistance to phleomycin, hygromycin B, nourseothricin, and bialaphos. Finally, in the process of generating the new plasmids, we have determined several errors in existing publicly available sequences for several commonly used yeast plasmids. Using our updated sequences, we constructed pRS plasmid backbones with a unique restriction site for inserting new markers to facilitate future expansion of the pRS series.

  9. Genome Stability of Lyme Disease Spirochetes: Comparative Genomics of Borrelia burgdorferi Plasmids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casjens S. R.; Dunn J.; Mongodin, E. F.; Qiu, W.-G.; Luft, B. J.; Schutzer, S. E.; Gilcrease, E. B.; Huang, W. M.; Vujadinovic, M.; Aron, J. K.; Vargas, L. C.; Freeman, S.; Radune, D.; Weidman, J. F.; Dimitrov, G. I.; Khouri, H. M.; Sosa, J. E.; Halpin, R. A.; Fraser, C. M.

    2012-03-14

    Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne human illness in North America. In order to understand the molecular pathogenesis, natural diversity, population structure and epizootic spread of the North American Lyme agent, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, a much better understanding of the natural diversity of its genome will be required. Towards this end we present a comparative analysis of the nucleotide sequences of the numerous plasmids of B. burgdorferi isolates B31, N40, JD1 and 297. These strains were chosen because they include the three most commonly studied laboratory strains, and because they represent different major genetic lineages and so are informative regarding the genetic diversity and evolution of this organism. A unique feature of Borrelia genomes is that they carry a large number of linear and circular plasmids, and this work shows that strains N40, JD1, 297 and B31 carry related but non-identical sets of 16, 20, 19 and 21 plasmids, respectively, that comprise 33-40% of their genomes. We deduce that there are at least 28 plasmid compatibility types among the four strains. The B. burgdorferi {approx}900 Kbp linear chromosomes are evolutionarily exceptionally stable, except for a short {le}20 Kbp plasmid-like section at the right end. A few of the plasmids, including the linear lp54 and circular cp26, are also very stable. We show here that the other plasmids, especially the linear ones, are considerably more variable. Nearly all of the linear plasmids have undergone one or more substantial inter-plasmid rearrangements since their last common ancestor. In spite of these rearrangements and differences in plasmid contents, the overall gene complement of the different isolates has remained relatively constant.

  10. Plasmid profile analysis in identification of epidemic strains of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miljković-Selimović Biljana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. As illness caused by Sallmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis occurs not only as sporadic cases but as outbreaks, to reveal the source and routes of spreading of infection it is necessary to identify epidemic strain by the use of some typing methods. To determine whether plasmid profile analysis, as genotyping method, could be applied for the investigation of epidemic strains, isolates of S. Enteritidis, recovered from patient's stools and food associated with outbreaks and those isolated from sporadic cases of diarrhea, were investigated. Methods. Investigation of antibiotic resistance was performed by Kirby - Bauer disc-diffusion method. Isolation of plasmid DNA was carried out by Birnboim and Dolly alkaline lysis method, modified by Ish-Horovitz. Results. Out of 276 izolates of S. Enteritidis 94 were isolated from patient's stools and food associated with outbreaks and 182 were isolated from sporadic cases of diarrhea. The presence of 12 plasmid profiles was established. An average correlation degree of plasmid profiles between the strains was 0.84, that implies high degree of similarity of plasmid profiles of epidemic and non- epidemic strains isolated at our geographic region for the given period of time. Conclusion. The strains of S. Enteritidis, isolated in outbreaks of enterocolitis as well as from spordic cases of diarrhea in the same period of time and at the same area, frequently exhibit the same plasmid profile characterized by a single plasmid of 38 MDa. Therefore, in most cases plasmid profile analysis is not valuable in the identification of epidemic strains of S. Enteritidis. However, for this purpose plasmid profile analysis could be used when drug-resistant strains of S. Enteritidis are isolated, as they often possess additional resistant plasmids what increases discrimination power of this method.

  11. Genome stability of Lyme disease spirochetes: comparative genomics of Borrelia burgdorferi plasmids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherwood R Casjens

    Full Text Available Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne human illness in North America. In order to understand the molecular pathogenesis, natural diversity, population structure and epizootic spread of the North American Lyme agent, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, a much better understanding of the natural diversity of its genome will be required. Towards this end we present a comparative analysis of the nucleotide sequences of the numerous plasmids of B. burgdorferi isolates B31, N40, JD1 and 297. These strains were chosen because they include the three most commonly studied laboratory strains, and because they represent different major genetic lineages and so are informative regarding the genetic diversity and evolution of this organism. A unique feature of Borrelia genomes is that they carry a large number of linear and circular plasmids, and this work shows that strains N40, JD1, 297 and B31 carry related but non-identical sets of 16, 20, 19 and 21 plasmids, respectively, that comprise 33-40% of their genomes. We deduce that there are at least 28 plasmid compatibility types among the four strains. The B. burgdorferi ∼900 Kbp linear chromosomes are evolutionarily exceptionally stable, except for a short ≤20 Kbp plasmid-like section at the right end. A few of the plasmids, including the linear lp54 and circular cp26, are also very stable. We show here that the other plasmids, especially the linear ones, are considerably more variable. Nearly all of the linear plasmids have undergone one or more substantial inter-plasmid rearrangements since their last common ancestor. In spite of these rearrangements and differences in plasmid contents, the overall gene complement of the different isolates has remained relatively constant.

  12. Transformation of indica rice with plasmid pBGll21 containing a tobacco endo-chitinase gene I

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ Several plasmids, which were suitable for cereals transformation, have been reported. In the study, rice was transformed by a new plasmid pBGll21 containing a tobacco endo-chitinase gene ( TchiB ).

  13. Characterization and restriction analysis of the P sex factor and the cryptic plasmid of Vibrio cholerae strain V58.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartowsky, E J; Morelli, G; Kamke, M; Manning, P A

    1987-07-01

    The P plasmid of Vibrio cholerae is a derepressed sex factor restricted to V. cholerae and has been shown to express surface exclusion. We have isolated the plasmids of strain V58 and have found that in addition to P, two further cryptic plasmids are also present. P has a size of 68 kb as determined by both electron microscopy and restriction endonuclease analysis. These other plasmids are 34 and 4.7 kb in size. Restriction maps of P and the larger cryptic plasmid have been determined. It has been demonstrated that P differs from the standard Inc group test plasmids and also expresses a surface exclusion system. The ability of the type Inc plasmids to be transferred to V. cholerae by either liquid or filter matings and the stability of these plasmids in V. cholerae have also been examined.

  14. Improvement of cellulose catabolism in Clostridium cellulolyticum by sporulation abolishment and carbon alleviation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yongchao [ORNL; Xu, Tao [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Engle, Nancy L [ORNL; Graham, David E [ORNL; He, Zhili [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma, Norman

    2014-01-01

    Background Clostridium cellulolyticum can degrade lignocellulosic biomass, and ferment the soluble sugars to produce valuable chemicals such as lactate, acetate, ethanol and hydrogen. However, the cellulose utilization efficiency of C. cellulolyticum still remains very low, impeding its application in consolidated bioprocessing for biofuels production. In this study, two metabolic engineering strategies were exploited to improve cellulose utilization efficiency, including sporulation abolishment and carbon overload alleviation. Results The spo0A gene at locus Ccel_1894, which encodes a master sporulation regulator was inactivated. The spo0A mutant abolished the sporulation ability. In a high concentration of cellulose (50 g/l), the performance of the spo0A mutant increased dramatically in terms of maximum growth, final concentrations of three major metabolic products, and cellulose catabolism. The microarray and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses showed that the valine, leucine and isoleucine biosynthesis pathways were up-regulated in the spo0A mutant. Based on this information, a partial isobutanol producing pathway modified from valine biosynthesis was introduced into C. cellulolyticum strains to further increase cellulose consumption by alleviating excessive carbon load. The introduction of this synthetic pathway to the wild-type strain improved cellulose consumption from 17.6 g/l to 28.7 g/l with a production of 0.42 g/l isobutanol in the 50 g/l cellulose medium. However, the spo0A mutant strain did not appreciably benefit from introduction of this synthetic pathway and the cellulose utilization efficiency did not further increase. A technical highlight in this study was that an in vivo promoter strength evaluation protocol was developed using anaerobic fluorescent protein and flow cytometry for C. cellulolyticum. Conclusions In this study, we inactivated the spo0A gene and introduced a heterologous synthetic pathway to manipulate the stress

  15. T cells stimulate catabolic gene expression by the stromal cells from giant cell tumor of bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowan, Robert W. [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L8 (Canada); Juravinski Cancer Centre, 699 Concession St., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8V 5C2 (Canada); Ghert, Michelle [Juravinski Cancer Centre, 699 Concession St., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8V 5C2 (Canada); Department of Surgery, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L8 (Canada); Singh, Gurmit, E-mail: gurmit.singh@jcc.hhsc.ca [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L8 (Canada); Juravinski Cancer Centre, 699 Concession St., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8V 5C2 (Canada)

    2012-03-23

    results suggest that T cells may potentiate the catabolic effect of GCT.

  16. Extended function of plasmid partition genes: the Sop system of linear phage-plasmid N15 facilitates late gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravin, Nikolai V; Rech, Jérôme; Lane, David

    2008-05-01

    The mitotic stability of the linear plasmid-prophage N15 of Escherichia coli depends on a partition system closely related to that of the F plasmid SopABC. The two Sop systems are distinguished mainly by the arrangement of their centromeric SopB-binding sites, clustered in F (sopC) and dispersed in N15 (IR1 to IR4). Because two of the N15 inverted repeat (IR) sites are located close to elements presumed (by analogy with phage lambda) to regulate late gene expression during the lytic growth of N15, we asked whether Sop partition functions play a role in this process. In N15, a putative Q antiterminator gene is located 6 kb upstream of the probable major late promoter and two intrinsic terminator-like sequences, in contrast to lambda, where the Q gene is adjacent to the late promoter. Northern hybridization and lacZ reporter activity confirmed the identity of the N15 late promoter (p52), demonstrated antiterminator activity of the Q analogue, and located terminator sequences between p52 and the first open reading frame. Following prophage induction, N15 mutated in IR2 (downstream from gene Q) or IR3 (upstream of p52) showed a pronounced delay in lysis relative to that for wild-type N15. Expression of ir3(-)-p52::lacZ during N15 wild-type lytic growth was strongly reduced relative to the equivalent ir3(+) fusion. The provision of Q protein and the IR2 and SopAB proteins in trans to ir3(+)-p52::lacZ increased expression beyond that seen in the absence of any one of these factors. These results indicate that the N15 Sop system has a dual role: partition and regulation of late gene transcription during lytic growth.

  17. Extended Function of Plasmid Partition Genes: the Sop System of Linear Phage-Plasmid N15 Facilitates Late Gene Expression▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravin, Nikolai V.; Rech, Jérôme; Lane, David

    2008-01-01

    The mitotic stability of the linear plasmid-prophage N15 of Escherichia coli depends on a partition system closely related to that of the F plasmid SopABC. The two Sop systems are distinguished mainly by the arrangement of their centromeric SopB-binding sites, clustered in F (sopC) and dispersed in N15 (IR1 to IR4). Because two of the N15 inverted repeat (IR) sites are located close to elements presumed (by analogy with phage λ) to regulate late gene expression during the lytic growth of N15, we asked whether Sop partition functions play a role in this process. In N15, a putative Q antiterminator gene is located 6 kb upstream of the probable major late promoter and two intrinsic terminator-like sequences, in contrast to λ, where the Q gene is adjacent to the late promoter. Northern hybridization and lacZ reporter activity confirmed the identity of the N15 late promoter (p52), demonstrated antiterminator activity of the Q analogue, and located terminator sequences between p52 and the first open reading frame. Following prophage induction, N15 mutated in IR2 (downstream from gene Q) or IR3 (upstream of p52) showed a pronounced delay in lysis relative to that for wild-type N15. Expression of ir3−-p52::lacZ during N15 wild-type lytic growth was strongly reduced relative to the equivalent ir3+ fusion. The provision of Q protein and the IR2 and SopAB proteins in trans to ir3+-p52::lacZ increased expression beyond that seen in the absence of any one of these factors. These results indicate that the N15 Sop system has a dual role: partition and regulation of late gene transcription during lytic growth. PMID:18359814

  18. Influence of Single Base Change in Shine-Dalgarno Sequence on the Stability of B.Subtilis Plasmid PSM604

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    B.Subtilis expression plasmids generally require a stringent Shine-Dalgarno Sequence(SDS). Site-directed-mutagenesis was explored to change the Shine-Dalgarno Sequence from AAAAATGGGG (mutant type) to AAAAAGGGGG (wild type) in recombinant plasmid PSM604. The single base substitution made the plasmid with wild SDS unstable in structure and segregation. The interaction of SDS with subtilisin leader sequence of PSM604 might be responsible for the instability of plasmid.

  19. Negative Regulation of Ectoine Uptake and Catabolism in Sinorhizobium meliloti: Characterization of the EhuR Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qinli; Cai, Hanlin; Zhang, Yanfeng; He, Yongzhi; Chen, Lincai; Merritt, Justin; Zhang, Shan; Dong, Zhiyang

    2017-01-01

    Ectoine has osmoprotective effects on Sinorhizobium meliloti that differ from its effects in other bacteria. Ectoine does not accumulate in S. meliloti cells; instead, it is degraded. The products of the ehuABCD-eutABCDE operon were previously discovered to be responsible for the uptake and catabolism of ectoine in S. meliloti However, the mechanism by which ectoine is involved in the regulation of the ehuABCD-eutABCDE operon remains unclear. The ehuR gene, which is upstream of and oriented in the same direction as the ehuABCD-eutABCDE operon, encodes a member of the MocR/GntR family of transcriptional regulators. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and promoter-lacZ reporter fusion experiments revealed that EhuR represses transcription of the ehuABCD-eutABCDE operon, but this repression is inhibited in the presence of ectoine. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and DNase I footprinting assays revealed that EhuR bound specifically to the DNA regions overlapping the -35 region of the ehuA promoter and the +1 region of the ehuR promoter. Surface plasmon resonance assays further demonstrated direct interactions between EhuR and the two promoters, although EhuR was found to have higher affinity for the ehuA promoter than for the ehuR promoter. In vitro, DNA binding by EhuR could be directly inhibited by a degradation product of ectoine. Our work demonstrates that EhuR is an important negative transcriptional regulator involved in the regulation of ectoine uptake and catabolism and is likely regulated by one or more end products of ectoine catabolism.

  20. Simultaneous catabolism of plant-derived aromatic compounds results in enhanced growth for members of the Roseobacter lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulvik, Christopher A; Buchan, Alison

    2013-06-01

    Plant-derived aromatic compounds are important components of the dissolved organic carbon pool in coastal salt marshes, and their mineralization by resident bacteria contributes to carbon cycling in these systems. Members of the roseobacter lineage of marine bacteria are abundant in coastal salt marshes, and several characterized strains, including Sagittula stellata E-37, utilize aromatic compounds as primary growth substrates. The genome sequence of S. stellata contains multiple, potentially competing, aerobic ring-cleaving pathways. Preferential hierarchies in substrate utilization and complex transcriptional regulation have been demonstrated to be the norm in many soil bacteria that also contain multiple ring-cleaving pathways. The purpose of this study was to ascertain whether substrate preference exists in S. stellata when the organism is provided a mixture of aromatic compounds that proceed through different ring-cleaving pathways. We focused on the protocatechuate (pca) and the aerobic benzoyl coenzyme A (box) pathways and the substrates known to proceed through them, p-hydroxybenzoate (POB) and benzoate, respectively. When these two substrates were provided at nonlimiting carbon concentrations, temporal patterns of cell density, gene transcript abundance, enzyme activity, and substrate concentrations indicated that S. stellata simultaneously catabolized both substrates. Furthermore, enhanced growth rates were observed when S. stellata was provided both compounds simultaneously compared to the rates of cells grown singly with an equimolar concentration of either substrate alone. This simultaneous-catabolism phenotype was also demonstrated in another lineage member, Ruegeria pomeroyi DSS-3. These findings challenge the paradigm of sequential aromatic catabolism reported for soil bacteria and contribute to the growing body of physiological evidence demonstrating the metabolic versatility of roseobacters.