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Sample records for cat-scratch disease

  1. Cat Scratch Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cat scratch disease (CSD) is an illness caused by the bacterium Bartonella henselae. Almost half of all cats carry ... infection does not make cats sick. However, the scratch or bite of an infected cat can cause ...

  2. Cat-Scratch Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bites and scratches well with soap and running water. Do not allow cats to lick your wounds. Contact your doctor if you develop any symptoms of cat-scratch disease or infection. CSD is caused by a bacterium called Bartonella henselae . About 40% ...

  3. Cat-scratch disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... scratch or bite from a cat, your health care provider may suspect cat-scratch disease. A physical examination may also reveal an enlarged spleen . Sometimes, an infected lymph node may form a tunnel ( fistula ) through the skin and drain (leak fluid). This ...

  4. Cat scratch disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozhkov, V; Madjov, R; Plachkov, I; Arnaudov, P; Chernopolsky, P; Krasnaliev, I

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 24,000 people are infected with cat scratch disease (CSD) every year. CSD is caused by the bacteria Bartonella henselae, a gram-negative bacteria most often transmitted to humans through a bite or scratch from an infected cat or kitten. Although CSD is often a benign and self-limiting condition, it can affect any major organ system in the body, manifesting in different ways and sometimes leading to lifelong sequelae. It is a disease that is often overlooked in primary care because of the wide range of symptom presentation and relative rarity of serious complications. It is important for health care providers to recognize patients at risk for CSD, know what laboratory testing and treatments are available, and be aware of complications that may arise from this disease in the future.

  5. Systemic Cat Scratch Disease

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    Hui-Min Liao

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic cat scratch disease (CSD is often associated with prolonged fever and microabscesses in the liver and/or spleen. We report a case of systemic CSD with hepatic, splenic and renal involvement in an aboriginal child in Taiwan. A previously healthy 9-year-old girl had an intermittent fever for about 17 days, and complained of abdominal pain, headache and weight loss. Abdominal computed tomography showed multiple tiny hypodense nodular lesions in the spleen and both kidneys. Laparotomy revealed multiple soft, whitishtan lesions on the surface of the liver and spleen. Histopathologic examination of a biopsy specimen of the spleen showed necrotizing granulomatous inflammation with central necrosis surrounded by epithelioid cells and occasional Langhans' giant cells, strongly suggestive of Bartonella henselae infection. History revealed close contact with a cat. B. henselae DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction in the tissue specimen, and the single antibody titer against B. henselae was greater than 1:2048. These results confirmed the diagnosis of visceral CSD caused by B. henselae. The patient's symptoms resolved after treatment with rifampin and tetracycline. This case illustrates the need for inclusion of systemic CSD in patients with fever of unknown origin and abdominal pain.

  6. Cat Scratch Disease (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lymph nodes are the main symptom of the disease, and the illness often is mild. If kids have other general ... Prevention If you're concerned about cat scratch disease, you do not need to get rid of the family pet . The illness is not common and usually is mild, and ...

  7. Cat Scratch Disease: Expanded Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Hassan A.; Plesec, Thomas P.; Sabella, Camille; Udayasankar, Unni K.; Singh, Arun D.

    2016-01-01

    Background To expand the spectrum of ophthalmic manifestations in cat scratch disease. Methods Case report. Results A 7-year-old male was referred for evaluation of his left optic disc after failing vision screening test at school. His visual acuity was 20/20 OD and light perception OS. Fundus examination showed a left optic disc lesion associated with an exudative retinal detachment and vitreous seeding. Ultrasonography revealed a 7 × 7.5 × 3.8 mm lesion with a possible 6.3 mm of retrolaminar extension into the substance of the optic nerve. Brain MRI did not show evidence of optic nerve involvement but revealed a 6-mm nodule of the pineal gland suggestive of a pineoblastoma. Enucleation was performed and histopathology revealed a suppurative granulomatous inflammation suggestive of Bartonella infection. Upon further questioning, the patient had recent exposure to kittens with areas of cat scratches along both of his arms. He was subsequently referred to and treated with a 2-week course of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and rifampin by the pediatric infectious disease specialist. Repeat brain MRI showed interval total resolution of enlarged pineal gland. Conclusion: Optic nerve granulomas are a rare presentation of cat scratch disease and could potentially masquerade as retinoblastoma. PMID:27843905

  8. Cat Scratch Disease: The Story Continues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Anne Opavsky

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To present a perspective on the current state of knowledge of cat scratch disease (CSD, including the evidence for Bartonella henselae as the etiological agent, epidemiological and clinical characteristics of the disease, available diagnostic tests and current therapeutic options.

  9. Abdominal (liver, spleen) and bone manifestations of cat scratch disease

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    Larsen, C.E.; Patrick, L.E. (Egleston Children' s Hospital, Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States). Dept. of Radiology)

    1992-09-01

    Cat scratch disease is usually a self-limiting illness. Patients may develop systemic complications including hepatic granulomas, splenic abscesses, mesenteric adenitis, osteolytic lesions, as well as dermatologic and CNS complications. In this paper the literature is reviewed and two cases are discussed which present the imaging findings in patients with hepatic, splenic, mesenteric, and bony manifestations of cat scratch disease. (orig.).

  10. Cat-scratch disease causing status epilepticus in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easley, R B; Cooperstock, M S; Tobias, J D

    1999-01-01

    Status epilepticus from cat-scratch encephalopathy is often recalcitrant to usual therapies, causing treatment to focus on critical care management of the patient that may require aggressive interventions, such as continuous pentobarbital administration. We describe two children whose initial clinical presentation of cat-scratch disease was status epilepticus with normal cerebrospinal fluid studies. A history of cat exposure (specifically, kitten and/or fleas), regional lymphadenopathy, and a papule or inoculation site should be sought, but are not essential for diagnosis. The presumptive diagnosis of cat-scratch disease can be made by serology alone even in the absence of classic diagnostic criteria. Our two cases and other reports in the literature show a favorable prognosis in most cases, despite the occurrence of status epilepticus. The diagnosis of cat-scratch disease should be strongly considered in all children with unexplained status epilepticus or encephalopathy and serologic testing for Bartonella henselae should be done.

  11. Optic neuropathy secondary to cat scratch disease: case report

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    Ricardo Evangelista Marrocos de Aragão

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Optic neuropathy due to cat scratch disease is a relatively infrequent occurrence associated with macular star formation and is characterized by sudden painless loss of vision mostly unilateral. Bartonella henselae is well recognized as the etiologic agent in cat scratch disease. Ocular complications of the disease occur in up to 10% of patients and include neuroretinitis. Ocular bartonelosis is usually self-limited with complete or near-complete recovery of vision in otherwise healthy patients. A case of a boy with neuroretinitis caused by B. henselae is reported.

  12. Vertebral osteomyelitis associated with cat-scratch disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulzebos, CV; Koetse, HA; Kimpen, JLL; Wolfs, TFW

    1999-01-01

    We describe a patient with vertebral osteomyelitis and paravertebral soft-tissue collections associated with cat-scratch disease (CSD). Diagnosis was established on the basis of histologic examination and serological and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests. Treatment consisted of administration of

  13. Atypical form of cat scratch disease in immunocompetent patient

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    Kojić Miroslav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Cat scratch disease (CSD is an acute infectious disease with benign course caused by the bacteria Bartonella henselae. Clinically, it is usually manifested as regional lymphadenopathy and mild infective syndrome. Rare forms of the disease which usually occur in immunocompromised presons are: encephalitis, transverse myelitis, neuroretinitis, granulomatosus conjunctivitis, arthritis, hepatitis etc. Case report. We presented an atypical form of cat scratch disease in a young immunocompetent female person. The disease was manifested with prolonged fever, rash, purulent lymphadenitis and hepatitis. The diagnosis was based on characteristic patohystological finding and exclusion of the other causes of lymphadenopathy. The patient was treated by antibiotics for a few weeks, with surgical incision and drainage of the purulent lymphadenitis. Conclusion. Atypical forms of CSD could be an important differential-diagnostic problem, especially if there is no opportunity for serological confirmation of the disease.

  14. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in patients with cat-scratch disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, R.; Schnedl, W.J.; Hoier, S. [Div. of Infectious Diseases, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Univ. Graz (Austria); Piswanger-Soelkner, C.; Lipp, R.W. [Div. of Nuclear Medicine, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Univ. Graz (Austria); Daxboeck, F. [Clinical Inst. for Hygiene and Medical Microbiology, Div. of Hospital Hygiene, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Reisinger, E.C. [Div. of Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Univ. Rostock (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    Aim: somatostatin receptor scintigraphy images various neoplastic, granulomatous, and auto-immun diseases. Cat-scratch disease in an infectious granulomatous disease usually affecting the lymphnodes. It is not known whether cat-scratch disease provides positive somatostatin receptor scintigrams. Patients, methods: twelve patients with lymphadenitis and suspected cat-scratch disease were investigated by immunofluorescence antibody testing and somatostatin receptor scintigraphy. Suppurated lymphnodes were extracted or drained and Bartonella henselae specific PCR was then performed. Results: eleven of 12 patients showed IgG antibodies against B. henselea. SRS showed positive scintigraphic results in 6 of 11 patients with CSD. B. henselae DNA was detected in tissue of lymphnodes from 4 of 5 patients with lymphnode extraction or lymphnode drainage. SRS demonstrated positive scintigrams in all patients with a positive PCR. In one patient with suspected CSD SRS was negative as well as antibody testing. Conclusion: somatostatin receptor scintigraphy correlated with positive Bartonella henselae specific PCR tests and positive Bartonella henselae specific antibody tests in patients with CSD. (orig.)

  15. Diverse Clinical Signs of Ocular Involvement in Cat Scratch Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oray, Merih; Önal, Sumru; Koç Akbay, Aylin; Tuğal Tutkun, İlknur

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To describe ocular manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of cat scratch disease. Materials and Methods: Clinical records of patients with ocular cat scratch disease were reviewed. Results: Thirteen eyes of 10 patients (7 female, 3 male) with a mean age of 26.9±18.5 years were included. Nine patients had a history of cat contact and had systemic symptoms associated with cat scratch disease 2-90 days prior to the ocular symptoms. Ocular signs were: neuroretinitis in 4 eyes (associated with serous retinal detachment in the inferior quadrant in 1 eye), optic neuropathy in 2 eyes (1 papillitis and optic disc infiltration, 1 optic neuritis), retinal infiltrates in 6 eyes, retinochoroiditis in 1 eye, branch retinal arteriolar occlusion in 3 eyes, and endophthalmitis in 1 eye. Visual acuities at presentation were 1.0 in 7 eyes, 0.3 in 1 eye, ≤0.1 in 4 eyes, and light perception in 1 eye. Bartonella henselae immunoglobulin (Ig) M and/or IgG were positive in all patients. Systemic antibiotic therapy was administered in all patients. Systemic corticosteroid treatment (15-40 mg/day) was added to the therapy in 4 patients, following 5 days of intravenous pulse methylprednisolone in 2 patients. Treatment was ongoing for 1 patient and the mean treatment duration of the other 9 patients was 47±14.5 days. Visual acuities at final visit were 1.0 in 9 eyes, 0.8 in 1 eye, 0.4 in 1 eye, and no light perception in 1 eye. Conclusion: Cat scratch disease may present with different ocular signs and should be considered in the differential diagnosis in patients with such presentations. PMID:28182175

  16. Cat scratch disease during infliximab therapy: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yi; Yin, Geng; Tan, Chunyu; Liu, Yi

    2015-05-01

    Cat scratch disease may occur during etanercept therapy, but there has been no report on infliximab-associated cat scratch disease. We report a case of a 23-year-old woman who developed right inguinal lymph node enlargement following a cat scratch. The patient had received infliximab therapy for spondyloarthropathy. She was successfully managed by discontinuing infliximab and by treatment with moxifloxacin and amikacin.

  17. Cat scratch disease complicated with aseptic meningitis and neuroretinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Laerte Pinto Jr.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Cat scratch disease (CSD is a self limited condition characterized by fever, lymph node enlargement and less often eye involvement. Central nervous system involvement by Bartonella henselae infection is possibly an important cause of morbidity; its role as an agent of aseptic meningitis is unknown. We report a case of a 40 years-old man with CSD accompanied by aseptic meningitis and neuroretinitis. Serum indirect immmunofluorescence (IFI assays for B. henselae were positive and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF analysis showed mononuclear pleocytosis and increased level of protein. Serological tests for other etiologies were negative. The patient responded well to antibiotic therapy with oral doxycicline plus rifampin and in the 12th day of hospitalization evolved to total regression of the headache and partial regression of the visual loss. Clinicians should consider CSD as a differential diagnosis when assessing previously healthy patients with aseptic meningitis associated with regional lymphadenopathy and epidemiological history of feline contact.

  18. Cat-scratch disease%猫抓病

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    单爱兰

    2005-01-01

    猫抓病(cat-scratch disease CSD)是由汉氏巴尔通体(bartonella henselae)经猫抓、咬后引起的急性自限性传染性疾病,典型表现为淋巴结炎,一般以儿童多见,常在2~3个月内自愈。近年来随着宠物饲养的增多,与之相关的疾病也有增多趋势,猫抓病就是其中之一。该病是被猫抓伤或咬伤后,由于机体免疫功能低下而引发的多种多样的临床表现。

  19. Cat scratch encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, B E; Bean, C S

    1991-06-01

    Cat scratch disease is usually benign, self-limited and without sequelae. Margileth has established four clinical criteria, three of which must be satisfied to make the diagnosis: 1) a history of animal exposure, usually kitten, with primary skin or ocular lesions; 2) regional chronic adenopathy without other apparent cause; 3) a positive cat scratch disease antigen skin test; and 4) lymph node biopsy demonstrating noncaseating granulomas and germinal center hyperplasia. Central nervous system involvement in cat scratch disease has been previously reported, although it is extremely uncommon. In a several-month period, we encountered two cases of cat scratch disease complicated by encephalopathy. The intents of this paper are twofold: 1) to briefly review the current literature on cat scratch disease, 2) to demonstrate that cat scratch disease complicated by encephalopathy presents acutely with seizures, posturing and coma and resolves rapidly with supportive care.

  20. [Bartonella henselae infection-cat-scratch disease in children (case report)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the 11 year old patient with cat scratch disease. The diagnoes of this infection was based on detailed history, physical examenination and para-clinical data analyses. In case of cat-scratch disease (because it is rare diagnosis), a different approach is required to every specific occaison. A series of investigations (most informative is intrinsic factor antibody - IFA) should be conducted to determain the cat-scratch disease from the various reasons of the lymphocytic leukaemoid reaction.

  1. Cat-Scratch disease in Crete: an update

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    Georgios Minadakis

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available There are few epidemiological and clinical studies about the presence of cat scratch disease (CSD on the island of Crete. The objective of this study was to analyze a large number of patients with suspected CSD to define the frequency of Bartonella infections in Crete. From January 2005 to October 2008, we studied patients with suspected CSD from hospitals in Crete. Sera of the referred patients were tested by immunofluorescence assay (IFA. For some patients, we also received lymph nodes and blood samples that we tested for the presence of Bartonella henselae by molecular assays. Overall, we tested 507 serum samples and we found 56 (11% cases of CSD. PCR assay was positive for 2 patients; one had a B. henselae positive lymph node and the other a positive whole blood sample. Significantly more CSD cases (62.5%, 35 of 56 were reported in children than in infants and adults (P<0.05. Moreover, we identified that most cases of CSD occurred between May and September (P=0.002 and December and January. CSD is prevalent in Crete and is mostly associated with an increase in outdoor activity.

  2. Serous labyrinthitis as a manifestation of cat scratch disease: a case report

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    Kantas Ilias

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Cat scratch disease is an infectious disease transmitted by young cats, in which the principal causative factor is Bartonella henselae. The typical course of cat scratch disease is usually benign and self-limited and requires only supportive therapy. However, cases lasting up to 2 years have been reported, and more serious complications may occur. Many manifestations of the disease have been reported by different medical disciplines. Case presentation A case of cat scratch disease in a 71-year-old Greek woman with an unusual clinical course is presented here. Serous otitis media was combined with rotational vertigo due to labyrinthitis. The invaded ear was ipsilateral to the inoculation site. Conclusion Cervicofacial lymphadenopathy has been demonstrated as the most common otolaryngologic manifestation of cat scratch disease. Manifestation in the middle and inner ear has, to the best of our knowledge, not been reported before. Our report presents a patient with cat scratch disease with clinical signs and symptoms in the middle and inner ear.

  3. [Osteomyelitis in cat scratch disease: a case report and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusser, P; Eyssette-Guerreau, S; Koné-Paut, I

    2013-06-01

    Cat scratch disease is the most common zoonosis in humans and its typical expression is a persistent benign regional adenopathy. In some rare cases, mono- or multifocal osteomyelitis is described. In this paper, we report the case of bone lesions in a 13-year-old girl infected with cat scratch disease. We have also undertaken a literature review and analyzed 60 other such cases. The manifestation of a bone lesion associated with cat scratch disease was characterized by a mono- or multifocal infectious osteomyelitis, fever, and a general alteration of the patient's health. The most frequent location of osteomyelitis was in the spine. Magnetic resonance imaging appeared the most sensitive test to highlight the bone lesions. Serological findings help reinforce the diagnosis of cat scratch disease caused by Bartonella henselae infection. Osteomyelitis in cat scratch disease is rare but not exceptional. Therefore, it is essential to think about this hypothesis in case of osteomyelitis associated with a general alteration of the patient's health, especially if the lesions are multifocal and if there is a known history of cat contact.

  4. Retinal Arterial Occlusive Diseasein a Young Patient with Cat Scratch Disease

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    Georgios Batsos

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report an unusual case of a branch retinal arterial occlusion and bilateral multifocal retinitis in a young woman with cat scratch disease. Methods: A 23-year-old woman was referred to our clinic complaining of a sudden scotoma in the upper part of the visual field of her left eye. Fundoscopy revealed occlusion of an inferior temporal branch of the retinal artery in the left eye and bilateral multifocal retinitis, which was confirmed by fluorescein angiography. Subsequent indocyanine angiography did not reveal choroidal involvement. Laboratory analysis showed rising IgG titers for Bartonellahenselae. Results: Cat scratch disease was diagnosed, and a 4-week course of doxycycline was initiated. The patient responded well to the antibiotics. Both retinitis and arterial occlusion were resolved, the visual field was regained and the patient reported elimination of her symptoms. Conclusions: Cat scratch disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis in young patients with retinal occlusive disease.

  5. Cat scratch disease in an immunosuppressed patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Hitos, J A; Sabio, J M; Navarrete-Navarrete, N; Arenas-Miras, M del M; Zamora-Pasadas, M; Jiménez-Alonso, J

    2016-03-01

    Cat scratch disease is an infectious disorder transmitted by cats that typically affects children and young adults. Immunosuppression is a well-known risk factor for the development of severe and atypical forms of the disease; hence it is under-diagnosed in patients with compromised immunity. We are reporting the first case of cat scratch disease, which presented as fever and fatigue, in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus while receiving immunosuppressant therapy after a kidney transplant. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Cat Scratch Disease in kidney transplant receptors: is it a rare or underdiagnosed pathology?

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    Ana Maria Teixeira Verçoza

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cat Scratch Disease (CSD is an infectious disorder which appears after cat scratching particularly in children and adolescents. Bartonella henselae is the etiologic agent more frequently involved. There are only a few recent reports demonstrating the disease after transplantation, although the illness is not infrequent in immunologically competent people. Indeed CSD in transplant receptors has only been recently emphasized in the literature and it was concluded that fever and lymphadenopathy in patients who had been exposed to cats should prompt clinicians to maintain a suspicion for the infection. In this report CSD infecting a renal transplanted adolescent complaining of headache, blurred vision and fever, presenting a cat scratching lesion in the right arm, with a bilateral painful cervical lymphadenopathy was related. He also presented indirect immunofluorescency identifying that the two subtype's titles of Bartonella-henselae and quintana- were elevated. Treatment with doxicicline e rifampicin was introduced and the patient became asymptomatic in about 3 weeks.

  7. Persistent cat scratch disease requiring surgical excision in a patient with MPGN.

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    King, Katherine Y; Hicks, M John; Mazziotti, Mark V; Eldin, Karen W; Starke, Jeffrey R; Michael, Mini

    2015-06-01

    We present the case of a 13-year-old immunosuppressed patient with unrelenting cat scratch disease despite 9 months of antibiotic therapy. The patient was being treated with mycophenolate and prednisone for membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (type 1) diagnosed 13 months before the onset of cat scratch disease. Cat scratch disease was suspected due to epitrochlear lymphadenitis and an inoculation papule on the ipsilateral thumb, and the diagnosis was confirmed by the use of acute and convalescent titers positive for Bartonella henselae. The patient experienced prolonged lymphadenitis despite azithromycin and rifampin therapy, and she developed a draining sinus tract ∼4 months after initial inoculation while receiving antibiotics. Acute exacerbation of the primary supratrochlear node prompted incision and drainage of the area, with no improvement in the disease course. Ultimately, excision of all affected nodes and the sinus tract 9 months after the initial diagnosis was required to achieve resolution. Bartonella was detected at a high level according to a polymerase chain reaction assay in the excised nodes. Persistent treatment with oral antibiotics may have prevented disseminated infection in this immunosuppressed patient. Surgical excision of affected nodes should be considered in patients with cat scratch disease that persists beyond 16 weeks.

  8. Cat-scratch disease with severe pleuritis in a 6-year-old girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Sasagu; Hasegawa, Shunji; Yanagihara, Masashi; Inoue, Hirofumi; Matsushige, Takeshi; Tsuneoka, Hidehiro; Ichiyama, Takashi; Ohga, Shouichi

    2015-06-01

    We present the case of a 6-year-old girl with cat-scratch disease (CSD), who developed severe pleuritis without lymphadenitis. Bartonella henselae DNA was detected on real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of whole blood. This is the first report of CSD diagnosed on real-time PCR using whole blood.

  9. Case Reports of Cat Scratch Disease with Typical and Atypical Clinical Manifestations: A Literature Review

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    Gulshan Umbreen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cat scratch disease (CSD is the most well-known zoonotic disease spread by domestic animals like cats. Cats are the source of Bartonella henselae. Most patients more than ninety percent 3-12 days after a scratch from a cat, undoubtedly a little cat with insects present with one or more erythematous injuries at the site of inoculation, the sore is typically a crusted papule or, once in a while, a pustule. More than half of cases in one study show that the systemic indications went with the lymphadenopathy. These may incorporate fever, discomfort, migraine and anorexia and frequently happen in immunocompromised patients. Atypically clinical manifestations happen are altered mental status, perplexity, prolonged fever, respiratory protestations (atypical pneumonitis, Joint pain, synovitis, Back agony is uncommon. The hypothesis of the study to find out that cat scratch disease cause typical and atypical clinical manifestation. Study was conducted July 2015 to September 2015. The methodology sections of a review article are listed all of the databases and citation indexes that were searched such as Web of Science and PubMed and any individual journals that were searched. Various case reports were mentioned in the study. Case reports of cat scratch diseases with typical and atypical clinical manifestation included in the study. The objective of review of these reporting cases is to make physicians aware about cat scratch diseases and also need to create awareness about cat scratch disease in pet owner. Although it is self-limiting needs to report to health authorities. There are few cases reported in which mostly cases reported in twain, japan, Brazil, Texas, United States, Dhaka, Spain with typical and atypical clinical manifestation

  10. Retinal Arterial Occlusive Disease in a Young Patient with Cat Scratch Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Georgios Batsos; Kabanarou, Stamatina A.; Pantelis Fotiou; Alexandros Rouvas; Tina Xirou

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report an unusual case of a branch retinal arterial occlusion and bilateral multifocal retinitis in a young woman with cat scratch disease. Methods: A 23-year-old woman was referred to our clinic complaining of a sudden scotoma in the upper part of the visual field of her left eye. Fundoscopy revealed occlusion of an inferior temporal branch of the retinal artery in the left eye and bilateral multifocal retinitis, which was confirmed by fluorescein angiography. Subsequent indocyan...

  11. [Cat-scratch disease. A report of 4 cases and a review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, F; de la Viuda, J M; Urkijo, J C; Mendoza, F

    1997-01-01

    Four cases of cat-scratch diseases are here reported and a review of the literature is made. The disease, apart from its typical presentation form as a usually self-limited regional lymph node enlargement, can occasionally spread and involve several organs systems. Indirect immunofluorescence serological tests have been of help for its diagnosis and should be included among the diagnostic criteria for the disease. In particular cases, nuclear magnetic resonance can be useful to suggests the diagnosis.

  12. Cat scratch disease in 9-year-old patient – a case report

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Cat scratch disease (CSD) – bartonellosis, is zoonosis caused by the intracellular gram negativebacterium Bartonellahenselae or Bartonellaquintana. The pathogens of this disease enter the human body usually as a consequence of a bite or scratch by young cats which are the natural source of such bacteria. The illness proceeds asymptomatically or with topical symptoms of infection such as a lump, spot or blister. Within 14 days a high fever and topical lymphadenopathy are observed. Lymph nodes ...

  13. Cat scratch disease in 9-year-old patient - a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świątkowski, Wojciech; Rahnama, Mansur; Strzelczyk, Katarzyna; Baszak, Jakub; Sierocińska-Sawa, Jadwiga

    2016-03-01

    Cat scratch disease (CSD) - bartonellosis, is zoonosis caused by the intracellular gram negativebacterium Bartonellahenselae or Bartonellaquintana. The pathogens of this disease enter the human body usually as a consequence of a bite or scratch by young cats which are the natural source of such bacteria. The illness proceeds asymptomatically or with topical symptoms of infection such as a lump, spot or blister. Within 14 days a high fever and topical lymphadenopathy are observed. Lymph nodes are sore and start suppurating. In half of patients, these symptoms may resemble malignancy, and in single cases there are symptoms associated with the musculoskeletal system, such as: osteitis, arthitis and myositis. In paper presented case of 9 year-old girl patients, treated in Oral Surgery Unit due to odema and lymphadenopathy in right submandibular space. Primary surgical treatment of deciduous teeth was conducted without recovery. In few months follow-up, biopsy of lymph node of submandibular group was taken and provisional diagnosis of cat scratch disease was set. Patient was referred to the Infectious Diseases Unit where serological test confirmed cat scratch disease, and pharmacological treatment was conducted with success and recovery of young patient.

  14. [Spasmodic left waist pain in a six years old child--cat scratch disease].

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    Barkai, Galia; Gutman, Gabriel; Sherr-Lurie, Nir; Hoffmann, Chen; Schpirer, Zvi

    2012-08-01

    Cat scratch disease is caused by Bartonella henselae, a bacterium transmitted to humans from cats through a scratch or by fleas. In 90% of cases, the clinical presentation is that of classical cat scratch disease where an adjacent lymph node is infected. Atypical manifestations include prolonged fever, liver and spleen abscesses, infective endocarditis, central nervous system involvement etc. We present a 6 years old girl who suffered from L2 vertebral osteomyelitis and epidural abscess, initially presenting as colic left waist pain, with no back pain or high fevers. During the process of diagnosis, she recovered without surgical intervention or antibiotic treatment. A review of the literature indicates that among the wide spectrum of clinical manifestations of cat scratch disease, skeletal involvement is rare. However, in cases of osteomyelitis, vertebrae are a common site as well as formation of a contiguous phlegmon. Although no studies have investigated the efficacy of different treatment regimens, all patients presented were treated with antimicrobial combinations and recovery rates were high. In view of the patient presented here, it is questioned whether the high recovery rates are a result of efficient antibiotic treatment or due to a benign natural course of the disease.

  15. Thoracic osteomyelitis and epidural abscess formation due to cat scratch disease: case report.

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    Dornbos, David; Morin, Jocelyn; Watson, Joshua R; Pindrik, Jonathan

    2016-12-01

    Osteomyelitis of the spine with associated spinal epidural abscess represents an uncommon entity in the pediatric population, requiring prompt evaluation and diagnosis to prevent neurological compromise. Cat scratch disease, caused by the pathogen Bartonella henselae, encompasses a wide spectrum of clinical presentations; however, an association with osteomyelitis and epidural abscess has been reported in only 4 other instances in the literature. The authors report a rare case of multifocal thoracic osteomyelitis with an epidural abscess in a patient with a biopsy-proven pathogen of cat scratch disease. A 5-year-old girl, who initially presented with vague constitutional symptoms, was diagnosed with cat scratch disease following biopsy of an inguinal lymph node. Despite appropriate antibiotics, she presented several weeks later with recurrent symptoms and back pain. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed 2 foci of osteomyelitis at T-8 and T-11 with an associated anterior epidural abscess from T-9 to T-12. Percutaneous image-guided vertebral biopsy revealed B. henselae by polymerase chain reaction analysis, and she was treated conservatively with doxycycline and rifampin with favorable clinical outcome.

  16. Cat scratch disease in 9-year-old patient – a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Świątkowski Wojciech

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cat scratch disease (CSD – bartonellosis, is zoonosis caused by the intracellular gram negativebacterium Bartonellahenselae or Bartonellaquintana. The pathogens of this disease enter the human body usually as a consequence of a bite or scratch by young cats which are the natural source of such bacteria. The illness proceeds asymptomatically or with topical symptoms of infection such as a lump, spot or blister. Within 14 days a high fever and topical lymphadenopathy are observed. Lymph nodes are sore and start suppurating. In half of patients, these symptoms may resemble malignancy, and in single cases there are symptoms associated with the musculoskeletal system, such as: osteitis, arthitis and myositis.

  17. Bartonella and Cat Scratch disease%巴尔通体菌和猫抓病

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨发莲; 白鹤鸣; 杨慧

    2008-01-01

    巴尔通体菌(Battonella)是一群广泛寄生于哺乳动物体内的革兰氏阴性,变形球杆菌(Pleomorphic coccobacillus),已证实其中汉赛巴尔通体(Bartonella henselae)是猫抓病(Cat Scratch disease,CSD)的病原体.针对目前对巴尔通体菌和猫抓病的认识进行了阐述.

  18. Disseminated cat-scratch disease in an adult with selective IgA deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Rohr, MD, MS

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A 51-year-old man with history of undiagnosed pulmonary nodules 4 years prior, presented with right-sided chest pain. Acute cardiac workup was negative, and a chest computed tomography examination demonstrated marked improvement in bilateral pulmonary nodules. A concordant abdominal computed tomography examination showed new subcentimeter hypodense lesions throughout the liver and spleen, mild progressive abdominopelvic lymphadenopathy, and new small lytic lesions of T11 and L4 vertebrae. A positron emission tomography examination demonstrated hypermetabolic activity of these abdominopelvic lesions suggesting metastatic disease. Extensive laboratory workup was negative, aside from IgA deficiency. Eventually, biopsy of a hepatic lesion was performed and compatible with Bartonella species. An elevated Bartonella IgG titer was noted, consistent with Bartonella Hensalae infection, or “cat-scratch disease.” Radiographic findings showed marked improvement after clinically appropriate antibiotic therapy.

  19. Cat scratch disease during etanercept therapy in a rheumatoid arthritis patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orden, Alberto O; Nardi, Norma N; Vilaseca, Alicia B; Colombini, Ana C; Barrios, Nora G; Vijnovich Barón, Anahí

    2017-02-27

    Cat scratch disease (CSD) is an infectious disorder caused by Bartonella henselae and characterized by fever and granulomatous lymphadenopathy. Immunosuppression is a risk factor for the development of atypical forms of the disease. We report the case of a 52-year-old woman who presented with fever and bilateral inguinal lymph node enlargement. She did not have apparent contact with animals. The patient was receiving etanercept therapy for rheumatoid arthritis. Lymph node biopsy demonstrated granulomatous lymphadenitis. She was successfully managed by discontinuing etanercept and by treatment with minocycline. She developed clinical remission and typical seroconversion. Infection with Bartonella should be considered in the differential diagnosis in rheumatoid arthritis patients with lymphadenopathy of unknown origin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  20. Atypical Cat-Scratch Disease in Children: Report of Seven Presentations Ranging From Hepatosplenic Disease to Horner Syndrome

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    Gilliaux

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Cat scratch disease (CSD is an infectious disease caused by the Gram-negative rod Bartonella henselae (BH. It usually leads to subacute loco-regional lymphadenitis occasionally associated with fever. In most of the cases, it resolves spontaneously within 4 - 6 weeks. However, CSD has also been associated with other atypical presentations. Case Presentation We reported a series of seven children with unusual symptoms of CSD. In particular, we described the case of a child with ptosis, miosis and enophtalmy, suggesting Horner syndrome, associated with cervical lymphadenitis. Cat scratch was mentioned in only one patient, while four of them mentioned a recent contact with cats. We reviewed and discussed the incidence of these atypical presentations of CSD as well as the therapeutic approaches recommended and the available diagnostic tools. Conclusions This paper highlighted the need to exclude CSD in children with unexplained symptoms such as prolonged fever, hepatosplenic lesion and osteomyelitis.

  1. Cat-scratch disease presenting as multiple hepatic lesions: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Mariana Andrade; Lo, Denise Swei; Hein, Noely; Hirose, Maki; Yoshioka, Cristina Ryoka Miyao; Ragazzi, Selma Lopes Betta; Gilio, Alfredo Elias; Ferronato, Angela Esposito

    2014-01-01

    Although infectious diseases are the most prevalent cause of fevers of unknown origin (FUO), this diagnosis remains challenging in some pediatric patients. Imaging exams, such as computed tomography (CT) are frequently required during the diagnostic processes. The presence of multiple hypoattenuating scattered images throughout the liver associated with the history of cohabitation with cats should raise the suspicion of the diagnosis of cat-scratch disease (CSD), although the main etiologic agent of liver abscesses in childhood is Staphylococcus aureus. Differential diagnosis by clinical and epidemiological data with Bartonella henselae is often advisable. The authors report the case of a boy aged 2 years and 9 months with 16-day history of daily fever accompanied by intermittent abdominal pain. Physical examination was unremarkable. Abdominal ultrasound performed in the initial work up was unrevealing, but an abdominal CT that was performed afterwards disclosed multiple hypoattenuating hepatic images compatible with the diagnosis of micro abscesses. Initial antibiotic regimen included cefotaxime, metronidazole, and oxacillin. Due to the epidemiology of close contact with kittens, diagnosis of CSD was considered and confirmed by serologic tests. Therefore, the initial antibiotics were replaced by clarithromycin orally for 14 days followed by fever defervescence and clinical improvement. The authors call attention to this uncommon diagnosis in a child presenting with FUO and multiple hepatic images suggestive of micro abscesses.

  2. Cat-scratch disease presenting as multiple hepatic lesions: case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Andrade Baptista

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Although infectious diseases are the most prevalent cause of fevers of unknown origin (FUO, this diagnosis remains challenging in some pediatric patients. Imaging exams, such as computed tomography (CT are frequently required during the diagnostic processes. The presence of multiple hypoattenuating scattered images throughout the liver associated with the history of cohabitation with cats should raise the suspicion of the diagnosis of cat-scratch disease (CSD, although the main etiologic agent of liver abscesses in childhood is Staphylococcus aureus. Differential diagnosis by clinical and epidemiological data with Bartonella henselae is often advisable. The authors report the case of a boy aged 2 years and 9 months with 16-day history of daily fever accompanied by intermittent abdominal pain. Physical examination was unremarkable. Abdominal ultrasound performed in the initial work up was unrevealing, but an abdominal CT that was performed afterwards disclosed multiple hypoattenuating hepatic images compatible with the diagnosis of micro abscesses. Initial antibiotic regimen included cefotaxime, metronidazole, and oxacillin. Due to the epidemiology of close contact with kittens, diagnosis of CSD was considered and confirmed by serologic tests. Therefore, the initial antibiotics were replaced by clarithromycin orally for 14 days followed by fever defervescence and clinical improvement. The authors call attention to this uncommon diagnosis in a child presenting with FUO and multiple hepatic images suggestive of micro abscesses.

  3. Cat-Scratch Disease in the United States, 2005–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Shubhayu; Mead, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    Cat-scratch disease (CSD) is mostly preventable. More information about the epidemiology and extent of CSD would help direct prevention efforts to those at highest risk. To gain such information, we reviewed the 2005–2013 MarketScan national health insurance claims databases and identified patients <65 years of age with an inpatient admission or outpatient visit that included a CSD code from the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification. Incidence of CSD was highest among those who lived in the southern United States (6.4 cases/100,000 population) and among children 5–9 years of age (9.4 cases/100,000 population). Inpatients were significantly more likely than outpatients to be male and 50–64 years of age. We estimate that each year, 12,000 outpatients are given a CSD diagnosis and 500 inpatients are hospitalized for CSD. Prevention measures (e.g., flea control for cats) are particularly helpful in southern states and in households with children. PMID:27648778

  4. Parainfectious meningo-encephalo-radiculo-myelitis (cat scratch disease, Lyme borreliosis, brucellosis, botulism, legionellosis, pertussis, mycoplasma).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenblatt, Daniel; Krupp, Lauren B; Belman, Anita L

    2013-01-01

    Parainfectious disorders of the nervous system encompass those meningo-encephalo-radiculomyelitic conditions that are temporally associated with a systemic infection, antigenic stimuli, or toxin exposure, in the absence of evidence of direct neuronal infection or invasion of the central nervous system (CNS) or peripheral nervous system (PNS). Pathogenetic mechanisms can be due to immune-mediated processes (such as bystander activation, molecular mimicy) or the inciting insult can be due to toxic factors, as in the case of botulism. A myriad of clinical manifestations can occur including headache, seizures, and mental status changes, ranging from mood and behavioral disturbances to varying levels of alteration in consciousness. Focal neurological deficits can include aphasia, hemiparesis, or paraparesis. The PNS can also be affected leading to cranial nerve involvement, focal or multifocal neuropathies, and dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system. Diagnosis is based not only on the history, examination, laboratory, and neuroimaging data but also on epidemiological factors. The parainfectious disorders covered in this review are cat scratch disease, Lyme borreliosis, legionellosis, brucellosis, botulism, pertussis, and mycoplasma. Each is associated with a distinct organism, has both systemic and neurological manifestations, and has a different epidemiological profile. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A prospective study of cat-scratch disease in Lima-Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUARCAYA Erick

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cat-Scratch Disease (CSD is a benign lymphadenitis that may progress to severe or recurrent forms, and it is occasionally associated with morbidity. Between January of 1998 and March of 1999, forty-three suspected CSD patients were assessed in the Hospital Cayetano Heredia and the Instituto de Salud del Niño, in Lima, Peru. Twelve patients had a confirmed diagnosis, 8 of whom were women, and the mean age was 10 years old. The majority (53% of the cases were encountered in the summer. All patients reported having had contact with cats. Fever, malaise, lymphadenopathy and skin lesions were the most frequent clinical features. Twelve patients had indirect immunofluorescence antibody test titers of between 1/50 and 1/800 for Bartonella henselae and Bartonella clarridgeiae. Two lymph node biopsies were histologically compatible with CSD. No positive blood cultures could be obtained. This is the first Peruvian prospective study able to identify B. henselae and B. clarridgeiae in pediatric patients.

  6. Cat scratch disease, a rare cause of hypodense liver lesions, lymphadenopathy and a protruding duodenal lesion, caused by Bartonella henselae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ierland-van Leeuwen, Marloes; Peringa, Jan; Blaauwgeers, Hans; van Dam, Alje

    2014-10-29

    A 46-year-old woman presented with right upper abdominal pain and fever. At imaging, enlarged peripancreatic and hilar lymph nodes, as well as hypodense liver lesions, were detected, suggestive of malignant disease. At endoscopy, the mass adjacent to the duodenum was seen as a protruding lesion through the duodenal wall. A biopsy of this lesion, taken through the duodenal wall, showed a histiocytic granulomatous inflammation with necrosis. Serology for Bartonella henselae IgM was highly elevated a few weeks after presentation, consistent with the diagnosis of cat scratch disease. Clinical symptoms subsided spontaneously and, after treatment with azithromycin, the lymphatic masses, liver lesions and duodenal ulceration disappeared completely.

  7. 猫抓病研究进展%Review of cat scratch disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何卫平; 李跃旗

    2004-01-01

    巴尔通体病是一类近年来才受到重视的传染病,包括描抓病(cat scratch disease,CSD)、战壕热、杆菌性血管瘤.组织培养阴性的心内膜炎等。猫抓病是由汉森巴尔通体(Bartonella hens—elae)感染引起的急性白限性疾病,典型表现为淋巴结痫,患者以儿童为多见,一般存2~3个月内自愈。本文仅对近年来猫抓病的研究状况作一综述。

  8. Cat scratch colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Rebollo, M Lourdes; Velayos-Jiménez, Benito; Prieto de Paula, José María; Alvarez Quiñones, María; González Hernández, José Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Over the past few years, we have read several publications regarding the term "cat scratch colon." This neologism was developed to define some bright red linear markings seen in the colonic mucosa that resemble scratches made by a cat. We would like to communicate a recent case attended at our institution.

  9. Cat Scratch Colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lourdes Ruiz-Rebollo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few years, we have read several publications regarding the term “cat scratch colon.” This neologism was developed to define some bright red linear markings seen in the colonic mucosa that resemble scratches made by a cat. We would like to communicate a recent case attended at our institution.

  10. Visceral cat scratch disease with endocarditis in an immunocompetent adult: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shasha, David; Gilon, Dan; Vernea, Fiona; Moses, Allon E; Strahilevitz, Jacob

    2014-03-01

    Infective endocarditis and hepatosplenic abscesses are rare manifestations of cat scratch disease (CSD), especially among immunocompetent adults. An otherwise healthy woman who presented with fever and abdominal pain was diagnosed with multiple abscesses in the spleen and the liver, as well as a mitral valve vegetation. PCR on spleen tissue was positive for Bartonella henselae. Prolonged treatment with doxycycline and gentamicin led to complete recovery. Review of the literature revealed 18 cases of hepatosplenic CSD in immunocompetent adults; the majority presented with fever of unknown origin and abdominal pain. In most cases the causative organism was B. henselae and the pathological findings were necrotizing granulomas, similar to the pathological features in classic CSD. Concomitant endocarditis was diagnosed in one case. Because Bartonella is one of the leading pathogens of culture-negative endocarditis, we raise the question of whether a comprehensive evaluation for endocarditis is needed in cases of systemic CSD.

  11. 猫抓病的护理进展%Nursing advances in nursing of patients with cat-scratch disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁素娥; 李映兰

    2008-01-01

    猫抓病(cat scratch disease,CSD)是由汉赛巴尔通体(Bartonella henselae)感染所致的世界性散发性急性传染病,发病相对集中于秋冬季,多数患者为2-14岁儿童。潜伏期一般自抓伤至出现皮疹为3-10d,至局部淋巴结肿大约2周。典型临床特征有原发性皮肤损害、淋巴结肿大,50%患者出现发热,常在39℃以下,一般呈良性自限性。少数患者可出现严重全身性损害,整个病程1-4个月,也有少数长达1-64年,提示慢性CSD的存在。本病一次感染可获终生免疫。

  12. Cat-scratch disease in Northern Italy: atypical clinical manifestations in humans and prevalence of Bartonella infection in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti, E; Fabbi, M; Ferraioli, G; Prati, P; Filice, C; Sassera, D; Dalla Valle, C; Bandi, C; Vicari, N; Marone, P

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we report an investigation on cat-scratch disease (CSD) in Northern Italy. Seventy-four cases of CSD were diagnosed at the San Matteo hospital, Pavia, during the period 2005-2010. Of these 74 patients, 18 (24.3 %) reported atypical clinical manifestations such as ocular papillitis, maculopapular eruptions, vertebral infection, pulmonary infiltrates, and granulomatous hepatitis. Contact with cats was documented for 61 patients (82.4 %), while cat-related trauma was reported for 49 patients (66.2 %). We subsequently investigated the presence of Bartonella infection in cats belonging to the above patients and in other domestic and stray cats from three provinces of Northern Italy. Among the 27 domestic cats tested, nine of the 11 belonging to the CSD patients and two of the remaining 16 were infected by B. henselae (81.8 % vs. 12.5 %). Out of over 1,300 stray cats examined, 23.1 % were seropositive for B. henselae; after culturing and genotyping, 17 % were found to be infected by B. henselae (15.5 %) or B. clarridgeiae (1.5 %).

  13. [Cat Scratch Disease as a differential diagnosis in a patient with swelling in the groin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makki, Ahmad; Murra, May; Sommer, Thorbjørn

    2014-08-11

    at Scratch Disease is caused by the bacteria Bartonella henselae and presents in patients exposed to a scratch/bite from cats. We present a case with a 12-year-old boy with an enlarged inguinal lymph node, initially suspected to be a femoral hernia by ultrasonography. Histologic examination of an inguinal lymph node showed necrosis and B. henselae infection. It is important with a thorough anamnesis including any history of animal bites/scratch and it should be kept in mind as a differential diagnosis in patients with swelling in the groin, despite the rare diagnosis of this disease.

  14. 猫抓病性淋巴结炎伴高热1例报告%Cat scratch disease with deradenoncus and high fever: report of one case

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王兴; 孟箭

    2013-01-01

    猫抓病(cat scratch disease,CSD)是一种由汉赛巴尔通体(Bartonella henselae,BH)引起的以自限性淋巴结肿大为主要症状的细菌感染性疾病,患者多有被猫抓、咬伤史.本文报告1例伴淋巴结肿大及全身高热的猫抓病性颈淋巴结炎患者,并通过相关文献复习,介绍CSD的病原学及发病机制、流行病学、病理及临床特征、诊断和治疗方法等.%Cat scratch disease (CSD) is a bacterial disease caused by Bartonella henselae. It is mainly characterized by self-limiting lymphadenopathy in the draining site after cat scratch or bite. This paper reported a case of cat scratch disease with deradenoncus and high fever,and discussed the etiology, pathogenesis, epidemiology, pathology,clinical characteristics, diagnosis and treatment methods of CSD.

  15. 罕见猫抓病致死亡1例报告%Report of a cat scratch disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邝继文; 潘伟; 黄琼宝

    2007-01-01

    猫抓病(Cat scratch disease)是一种动物源性传染病。对本病的认识距今只有40多年的历史,是由巴尔通体(Bartonella)感染引起的一种良性自限性感染性疾病,在机体免疫功能正常者常表现为皮肤或头面部淋巴结病变,而在免疫功能低下者可发生严重的全身性病变。临床较少见,在骨科更为少见。2005年2月收治了1例全身浅表淋巴结肿大、腰痛,外院疑为结核的患者,经过全身仔细检查和病理活检,确诊为猫抓病,于2005年3月突发呼吸衰竭死亡。现报告如下。

  16. New-onset refractory status epilepticus in an adult with an atypical presentation of cat-scratch disease: successful treatment with high-dose corticosteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laswell, Emily M; Chambers, Kasandra D; Whitsel, Danielle R; Poudel, Kiran

    2015-06-01

    New-onset refractory status epilepticus (NORSE) is defined as a sudden onset of refractory status epilepticus in patients who do not have a history of epilepsy. It is a neurologic emergency, and determining the underlying etiology is an important factor for effectively managing and predicting the prognosis of NORSE. We describe the case of a 28-year-old woman who was hospitalized with NORSE secondary to an unknown etiology. She did not respond to traditional anticonvulsant therapy, including benzodiazepines, fosphenytoin, propofol, and levetiracetam. The patient was placed on continuous electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring and was treated further with multiple antiepileptics, which were titrated aggressively based on EEG readings and therapeutic drug levels; despite this treatment, EEG monitoring revealed continued seizures. Thus, high-dose corticosteroids were started for seizure control. Her workup included computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the head, a lumbar puncture, toxicology screening, and extensive testing for multiple infectious and inflammatory etiologies. The patient's history revealed recent exposure to a new cat. Serologic results were positive for Bartonella henselae, and she was diagnosed with cat-scratch disease (CSD). She did not have the typical presentation of symptoms of lymphadenopathy, however, which is common in CSD. Doxycycline 100 mg and rifampin 300 mg twice daily were added to the patient's anticonvulsant and corticosteroid therapy. She was hospitalized for a total of 26 days and discharged with only minor neurologic impairment (short-term memory deficits and minor cognitive problems). The patient was discharged receiving antiepileptics, antibiotics, and a corticosteroid taper. To our knowledge, this is the first clinically known case of NORSE secondary to CSD without typical CSD symptoms in the adult population. The patient failed to respond to traditional anticonvulsant therapy alone. With the addition of high

  17. Conjuntivite granulomatosa atípica causada pela doença da arranhadura do gato: relato de caso Cat-scratch disease causing atypical granulomatous conjunctivitis: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Hassler Príncipe de Oliveira

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Relatamos caso de paciente do sexo feminino, brasileira, 23 anos, residente na Alemanha, que cursou com quadro de conjuntivite granulomatosa bilateral crônica, sem acometimento ganglionar, não responsiva a tratamento tópico. A pesquisa laboratorial confirmou diagnóstico de conjuntivite por Bartonella henselae. O caso demonstra que a ausência de acometimento ganglionar não exclui o diagnóstico de doença da arranhadura do gato.We report a case of a 23-year-old female patient, Brazilian, resident of Germany, who presented with a bilateral chronic granulomatous conjunctivitis, without lymphoadenopathy and irresponsive to topical treatment. Laboratorial work-up confirmed Bartonella henselae as the etiologic agent. The case shows that the absence of lymphoadenopathy does not exclude the diagnosis of cat-scratch disease.

  18. "Cat scratch colon" in a patient with ischemic colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eui Ju; Lee, Joon Seong; Lee, Tae Hee; Choi, Dae Han; Kim, Eui Bae; Jeon, Seong Ran; Hong, Su Jin; Kim, Jin-Oh

    2015-03-01

    "Cat scratch colon" is a gross finding characterized by hemorrhagic mucosal scratches on colonoscopy. It is usually associated with a normal colon and is rarely associated with collagenous colitis. In a previous report, cat scratch colon was noted in the cecum and ascending colon, but has also been observed in the distal transverse colon. The patient in this study was also diagnosed with ischemic colitis that may have played a role in the development of cat scratch colon.

  19. Cat Scratch Can Sometimes Lead to Serious Illness: CDC

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161086.html Cat Scratch Can Sometimes Lead to Serious Illness: CDC But ... Fluffy the cat gets out of sorts and scratches you, it's possible you could get a bacterial ...

  20. Warthin-Starry特殊染色、免疫组织化学和透射电镜在猫抓病病理诊断中的作用%Application of Warthin-Starry stain,immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy in diagnosis of cat scratch disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄娟; 董丹丹; 徐纲; 辜正策; 郝冀玲; 华平; 何磊; 段芳蕾; 代琳; 雷松; 廖殿英; 王晓卿; 罗添友; 陈昱; 杭振镳; 李甘地

    2010-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the diagnostic utility of Warthin-Starry silver stain,immunohiatochemistry and transmission electron microscopy in the detection of human Bartonella henselae infection and pathologic diagnosis of cat scratch disease(CSD).Metbotis The paraffin-embedded lymph node tissues of 77 histologically.defined cases of cat scratch disease collected during the period from January,1998 to December,2008 were retrieved and studied using Warthin-Starry silver stain(WS stain)and mouse monoclonal antibody against Bartonella henselae(BhmAB stain).Five cases rich in bacteria were selected for transmission electron microscopy.Results Under electron microscope,the organisms Bartonella henselae appeared polymorphic,round,elliptical,short rod or bacilliform shapes,ranged from 0.489 to 1.110 μm by 0.333 to 0.534 μm and often clustered together.Black short rod-shaped bacilli arranged in chains or clumps were demonstrated in 61.0%(47/77)of CSD by WS stain.The organisms were located outside the cells and lie mainly in the necrotic debris,especially near the nodal capsule.In 72.7%(56/77)of the cases,dot-like,granular as well as few linear positive signals were observed using BhmAB immunostain and showed similar localization.Positive results for both stains were identified in 59.7%(46/77)of the cases.When applying both stains together,Bartonella henselae was observed in 74.0%(57/77)of the earle.The difference between the results obtained by WS stain and BhmAB immunostain was of statistical significance(P<0.05).Conclusions Bartonella henselae is the causative pathogen of cat scratch disease.WS stain,BhmAB immunostain and transmission electron microscopy are helpful in confirming the histologic diagnosis.Immunostaining using BhmAB can be a better alternative than WS stain in demonstrating the organisms.%目的 探讨Warthin-Starry银染色法、抗汉赛巴尔通体单克隆抗体和电镜在检测人巴尔通体感染、确诊猫抓病中的实用价值.方法 收集1998

  1. [Tetanus after cat scratch and bites in a previously immunized patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fica, Alberto; Gaínza, Daniela; Ortigosa, Pablo

    2017-04-01

    Tetanus is declining due to vaccination, professional labor management and appropriate wound care. Tetanus cases have been reported despite immunization. We report the case of a previously healthy 21 years old female patient that presented a mild generalized tetanus requiring admission after mild and recurrent cat scratch and bites. She had received six vaccine shots during childhood, and a booster dose five years earlier after a rabbit bite. Symptoms appeared seven weeks after the last contact, and included headache, muscle spasms and mild opisthotonus. Laboratory evaluation, including CSF analysis and microbiological investigation, as well as imaging studies were all normal. The patient received 6,000 IU of human antitoxin immunoglobulin. No autonomic manifestations or respiratory compromise were registered. Symptoms resolved rapidly and she was discharge after seven days with an order to complete a tetanus toxoid immunization schedule with three doses. Tetanus is possible in urban settings with a declining epidemiologic curve of disease in previously immunized patients. Severity of disease is modulated by previous vaccination.

  2. Cat-scratch disease causing atypical granulomatous conjunctivitis: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandre Hassler Príncipe de Oliveira; Carlos Alberto Pires Pereira; Luciene Barbosa de Sousa; Denise de Freitas

    2004-01-01

    Relatamos caso de paciente do sexo feminino, brasileira, 23 anos, residente na Alemanha, que cursou com quadro de conjuntivite granulomatosa bilateral crônica, sem acometimento ganglionar, não responsiva a tratamento tópico. A pesquisa laboratorial confirmou diagnóstico de conjuntivite por Bartonella henselae. O caso demonstra que a ausência de acometimento ganglionar não exclui o diagnóstico de doença da arranhadura do gato.We report a case of a 23-year-old female patient, Brazilian, residen...

  3. Hepatosplenic Cat-Scratch Disease in Children and the Positive Contribution of F-18-FDG Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraft, Karianne E.; Doedens, Rienus A.; Slart, Riemer H. J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Two patients were referred to our hospital because of suspected malignancy. In patient 1, a 4-year-old boy, a F-18-FDG PET scan showed an enlarged liver with multiple FDG-positive nodular lesions. In patient 2, a 16-year-old boy, a FDG PET-(low-dose) CT showed an enlarged liver and spleen with multi

  4. An abscess due to Pasteurella multocida after a cat scratch: Case report and evaluation of antibiotic prophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeşim Alpay

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pasteurella multocida has been isolated from 50% to 70% of healthy cats and most commonly associated with acute skin and soft tissue infections following an animal bite or scratch. As the zone and depth of injury can lead to more serious infections such as deep tissue infections, septic arthritis, osteomyelitis. However, no predictive factor showing which wound would be infected. In our case, patient whom applied with abscess after a cat scratch and P. multocida was found as a causative agent. This situation has caused to review us, once more, that which cases should be taken antibiotic pro­phylaxis in addition to immunoprophylaxis (for rabies post-exposure prophylaxis, and anti-tetanus prophylaxis in the first admission. Antibiotic prophylaxis should be used for 3-5 days in selected cases if they include; moderate to severe crushing injuries especially edematous form, less than 8 hours old, bone or joint penetration, hand wounds, especially emphasizes the importance of hand injuries and deep penetrations. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2014; 4(4: 159-161

  5. 猫抓病诊断与鉴别诊断%The diagnosis and differential diagnosis of cat scratch disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾冰艺; 陆柳婷; 韦玛丽

    2007-01-01

    目的 探讨猫抓病漏诊及误诊的原因.方法 回顾性分析10例CSD患者资料,有猫抓伤史并作淋巴结活检作HE,PAS,抗酸,革兰氏染色及Warthin-Starry染色作诊断及鉴别诊断.结果 10例中有7例查到革兰氏阴性,W-S阳性Bartonella杆菌,病理改变多为中央化脓的肉芽肿性炎症,并排除了结核,深部真菌及淋巴瘤,确诊CSD.结论 病史及淋巴结病理合检可以确诊CSD,减少漏诊及误诊.

  6. Cat-scratch disease%猫抓病(附1例报告及文献复习)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江刚; 郭梦和; 文忠

    2005-01-01

    目的:探讨猫抓病(CSD)的病原学、流行病学、临床病理特征、诊断和治疗.方法:结合文献复习,报告1例CSD患者的临床资料.结果:汉氏巴尔通体(Bartonella henselae) 是CSD的主要病原体;CSD患者有动物接触史(常为猫或狗) ;均有自限性局部淋巴结肿大,可有发热;病理特点是淋巴结内坏死性肉芽样微脓肿形成;Warthin-Starry染色和Brown-Hopp染色可见革兰阴性、嗜银性、多形性杆菌.结论:CSD是一种自限性细菌性传染病, 其临床特点、淋巴结活体组织检查和特殊染色有助于确诊;治疗以庆大霉素、利福平、环丙氟哌酸、克拉霉素、复方新诺明和阿奇霉素效果较好, 必要时也可手术切除肿大的淋巴结.

  7. Pathological characteristics of 8 cases with cat scratch disease%猫抓病八例病理特点分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓卓霖; 陆海霞; 韦义萍

    2007-01-01

    目的 分析猫抓病的病理形态特点,提高对该病的认识.方法 收集广西壮族自治区及海南省8例曾被猫抓伤者的临床资料及淋巴结石蜡包埋组织块,行苏木精-伊红、Warthin-Starry(W-S)、抗酸和PAS染色,观察病理改变和查病原菌及排除结核与真菌病.结果 猫抓病主要病原为W-S阳性Bartonella菌属,抗酸和PAS染色均阴性.病理检查发现:浆细胞样单核细胞(PMO)和单核样B淋巴细胞(MBC)增生加中性粒细胞渗出于淋巴窦2例;富于MBC的肉芽肿和微脓肿3例;肉芽肿中星形脓肿3例,在形成星形脓肿的晚期病变中,杆菌明显减少以至消失.结论 Bartonellahenselae菌主要经猫传播,有猫接触史和淋巴结肿大可提示猫抓病,W-S阳性菌和富于MBC的肉芽肿和化脓性炎可确诊猫抓病.

  8. 猫巴尔通体病和猫抓病研究进展%Progress on Feline Bartonellosis and Cat Scratch Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈琦; 夏炉明; 俞向前; 刘佩红; 李维功; 孙泉云

    2011-01-01

    巴尔通体是一种人兽共患病的病原,其传播情况比较复杂.牛、犬、人、啮齿类动物和野生动物都是其宿主,蝇、跳蚤、虱子、蛉等节肢动物都是其储存宿主.猫可以感染5种巴尔通体,包括Bartonella henselae、B.bovis、B.clarridgeae、B.koehlerae和B.quintana.研究表明,猫抓病主要是由B.henselae和B.clarridgeae感染所引起.巴尔通体感染后可以引起菌血症、淋巴结炎症、肝炎、脾炎、中枢神经系统紊乱、关节炎等症状,并出现血小板减少、淋巴细胞增多、中性粒白细胞减少、嗜酸性粒细胞增多的现象.血清学检测、PCR方法和分离培养可以诊断猫巴尔通体病.

  9. Radiological diagnostic in cat stratch disease and bone lesions - a case report; Doenca da arranhadura do gato e lesoes osseas - relato de um caso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Marcelo Rodrigues de [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina; Abreu, Armando de; Santos, Leandro Durval dos [Hospital Mae de Deus, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Servico de Radiologia; Scharnovski, Alvaro [Hospital de Taquara, RS (Brazil)

    1999-02-01

    Cat scratch disease is not a common disease in immunocompetent patients. Its association with bone lesions is rare. A patient with bone complain and radiologic alterations of bone lesion must be investigated for this disease. A simple story can make the differential diagnosis with more complex disease like Ewing sarcoma or eosinophilic granuloma. (author)

  10. 猫抓病性淋巴结炎的临床病理特征与鉴别诊断%The Clinicopathologic Features and Differential Diagnosis of Cat-scratch Lymphadenitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李吉满; 汤梅; 杨红; 候俊; 王影

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To summary the clinicopathological features of cat-scratch lymphadenitis and discuss it’ s pathological diagnosis and differential diagnosis. Methods:Clinicopathological data of 66 cases of cat-scratch lymphadeni-tis in our hospital from May 2005 to Jan 2014 were studied retrospectively. HE and special stain ( Warthin-starry) were conducted. Results:Thirty-nine males and 27 females(M∶F=1. 44∶1)were included in this study and their ages ranged from 6Y to 72Y(median 40Y) . Forty-one cases had the history of having been bitten or scratched by small animals such as mouses, cats and dogs. The history ranged from 10d to 3M. Eighteen cases had got a fever. The lymphonode sites involved included elbow, axilla, and cervix,et al. The short pleomorphic bacllis were found in 39 cases with Warthin-starry stain. Conclusion:It is easy to misdiagnose cat-scratch lymphadenitis as other tumors or inflammatory lesions. Clinical physi-cians should get detailed history if the patient had lymphadenopathy. To make diagnosis and differential diagnosis, HE, WS staining or other special staining should be conducted.%目的:总结猫抓病性淋巴结炎的临床病理特征,探讨其病理诊断及鉴别诊断。方法:收集我院病理科2005年5月到2014年1月的猫抓病性淋巴结炎66例,对其临床病理资料进行回顾性分析,所有病例均行HE染色及Warthin-Starry(W-S)染色。结果:本组66例患者中男性39例,女性27例(男∶女=1.44∶1),年龄分布从6~72岁(中位年龄40岁),41例患者有被猫、狗、老鼠等小动物抓伤或咬伤的病史,病史从10天到3月不等。18例患者有发热,累及淋巴结的部位包括肘部、腋窝、颈部等。39例患者W-S染色查见阳性杆菌。结论:猫抓病性淋巴结炎容易被临床误诊肿瘤性或其它炎性病变。对于淋巴结肿大的患者临床医生须详细询问病史,病理诊断须结合HE及WS染色及其它特殊染色进行诊断及鉴别诊断。

  11. Research Advances on Cat Scratch Disease and other Zoonosis Associated with Bartonella Infections%猫抓病及其他与巴尔通氏体感染有关的人畜共患病的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    瞿浩生; 俞向前; 陈琦; 叶承荣

    2007-01-01

    猫抓病是一种由巴尔通体属细菌引起的人畜共患病,在世界范围内广泛流行.猫是巴尔通体的主要宿主,通过猫蚤在猫之间传播.猫抓伤或咬伤是该病从猫传播到人的主要途径.文章就该病的病原学、流行病学、临床表现、实验室检查、病变特点、诊断及治疗方法等作一综述.

  12. The emerging disease occurrence of pet animals in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umma Habiba

    2016-12-01

    Results: Among the most general pet animals in Bangladesh (dog, cat, rabbit, the mostly occured diseases were scabies (23.07%, feline ascariasis (37.14% and rabbit mange (34.61%, while the less frequent diseases were canine parvovirus enteritis (2.19%, cat scratch disease (5.71% and overgrown teeth (7.69%. Conclusion: The study provides basic information about the current status and the percentage (% of disease occurrence considering the emerging diseases of pet animals in Bangladesh. [J Adv Vet Anim Res 2016; 3(4.000: 413-419

  13. Human bubonic plague transmitted by a domestic cat scratch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weniger, B G; Warren, A J; Forseth, V; Shipps, G W; Creelman, T; Gorton, J; Barnes, A M

    1984-02-17

    Bubonic plague was transmitted to a 10-year-old girl in Oregon by a scratch wound inflicted by a domestic cat. The cat probably was infected by contact with infected wild rodents or their fleas. Yersinia pestis was identified in Diamanus montanus fleas collected from an abandoned burrow near the patient's home. Domestic cats may infect humans with Y pestis by inoculation from a scratch.

  14. Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease: an unusual association with acute renal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Feliciano da Silva

    Full Text Available Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease, also known as histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis of unknown etiopathogenesis, is a self-limited disease which frequently appears as feverish lymphadenomegaly, thus creating the need for differential diagnosis with lymphoma, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, infectious mononucleosis, cat-scratch disease, and toxoplasmosis with lymphonodal impairment. However, there are cases in which it may evolve with complications such as aseptic meningitis, cerebellar ataxia, and aseptic myocarditis. We are presenting a case of a 24-year-old man who had an initial picture of arthralgia, evening fever and adenomegaly. Kikuchi disease was diagnosed through lymph node biopsy with immunohistochemistry and evolves with severe systemic manifestations, such as pericarditis with cardiac tamponade, pneumonitis, hepatitis, and acute kidney failure - the latter has not been reported in literature yet. There was significant improvement of the clinical picture with prednisone

  15. Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease: an unusual association with acute renal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Feliciano da Silva

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease, also known as histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis of unknown etiopathogenesis, is a self-limited disease which frequently appears as feverish lymphadenomegaly, thus creating the need for differential diagnosis with lymphoma, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, infectious mononucleosis, cat-scratch disease, and toxoplasmosis with lymphonodal impairment. However, there are cases in which it may evolve with complications such as aseptic meningitis, cerebellar ataxia, and aseptic myocarditis. We are presenting a case of a 24-year-old man who had an initial picture of arthralgia, evening fever and adenomegaly. Kikuchi disease was diagnosed through lymph node biopsy with immunohistochemistry and evolves with severe systemic manifestations, such as pericarditis with cardiac tamponade, pneumonitis, hepatitis, and acute kidney failure - the latter has not been reported in literature yet. There was significant improvement of the clinical picture with prednisone

  16. Enfermedad por arañazo de gato: Características clínicas y de laboratorio en pacientes adultos hospitalizados por fiebre o adenopatías

    OpenAIRE

    Eymin L,Gonzalo; Zapata P,Antonio; Andrade A,Maricarmen; Aizman S,Andrés; Rojas O,Luis; Rabagliati B.,Ricardo

    2006-01-01

    Background: Cat-scratch disease is common among children. Among adults the disease is less often considered in the differential diagnosis of enlarged lymph nodes and fever. Aim: To report the clinical and laboratory features of eight patients with cat-scratch disease. Material and methods: Review of the medical records of eight patients (aged 22 to 57 years, six males) with a serological diagnosis of cat-scratch disease (an IgG titer over 1:256, by immunofluorescence). Results: Only five pati...

  17. Pediatric cervicofacial lymphadenitis caused by Bartonella henselae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindeboom, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic cervicofacial lymphadenitis in children is often caused by nontuberculous mycobacterium or Bartonella henselae species (known as cat scratch disease). Methods Bartonella henselae infection was diagnosed in 53 of 427 children with cervicofacial lymphadenopathy by polymerase chain r

  18. Absence of zoonotic Bartonella species in questing ticks: First detection of Bartonella clarridgeiae and Rickettsia felis in cat fleas in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijsse-Klasen, E.; Fonville, M.; Gassner, F.; Nijhof, A.M.; Hovius, E.K.; Jongejan, F.; Takken, F.; Reimerink, J.R.; Overgaauw, P.A.M.; Sprong, H.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Awareness for flea- and tick-borne infections has grown in recent years and the range of microorganisms associated with these ectoparasites is rising. Bartonella henselae, the causative agent of Cat Scratch Disease, and other Bartonella species have been reported in fleas and ticks. The

  19. Detection of Bartonella spp. DNA in clinical specimens using an internally controlled real-time PCR assay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmans, Anneke M C; Rossen, John W A

    2013-01-01

    Bartonella henselae is the causative agent of cat-scratch disease (CSD), usually presenting itself as a -self-limiting lymphadenopathy. In this chapter an internally controlled Taqman probe-based real-time PCR targeting the groEL gene of Bartonella spp. is described. This assay allows for the rapid,

  20. Absence of zoonotic Bartonella species in questing ticks: First detection of Bartonella clarridgeiae and Rickettsia felis in cat fleas in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijsse-Klasen, E.; Fonville, M.; Gassner, F.; Nijhof, A.M.; Hovius, E.K.E.; Jongejan, F.; Takken, W.; Reimerink, J.R.; Overgaauw, P.A.M.; Sprong, H.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Awareness for flea-and tick-borne infections has grown in recent years and the range of microorganisms associated with these ectoparasites is rising. Bartonella henselae, the causative agent of Cat Scratch Disease, and other Bartonella species have been reported in fleas and ticks. The r

  1. DISEASES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pletscher-Frankild, Sune; Pallejà, Albert; Tsafou, Kalliopi;

    2015-01-01

    Text mining is a flexible technology that can be applied to numerous different tasks in biology and medicine. We present a system for extracting disease-gene associations from biomedical abstracts. The system consists of a highly efficient dictionary-based tagger for named entity recognition...... of human genes and diseases, which we combine with a scoring scheme that takes into account co-occurrences both within and between sentences. We show that this approach is able to extract half of all manually curated associations with a false positive rate of only 0.16%. Nonetheless, text mining should...... not stand alone, but be combined with other types of evidence. For this reason, we have developed the DISEASES resource, which integrates the results from text mining with manually curated disease-gene associations, cancer mutation data, and genome-wide association studies from existing databases...

  2. Manifestaciones retinianas de las enfermedades infecciosas Retinal manifestations of infectious diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pérez de Arcelus

    2008-01-01

    important cause of choroidal neovascularisation. The viruses that most frequently affect the retina are of the herpes type and can produce devastating symptoms in immunoincompetent patients, named acute retinal necrosis syndrome. Retinitis due to cytomegalovirus is more frequent in immunodepressed patients, as in the case of AIDS, but it must also be contemplated in patients with lymphoma and immunomodulatory treatment. The most frequent bacterial diseases that affect the retina are syphilis and tuberculosis. Disease due to cat scratches, caused by a borrelia, can produce a neuroretinitis. Toxoplasmosis is the most common of the infectious diseases caused by a parasite and gives rise to chorioretinitis. Toxocariasis, also caused by a parasite, is second in importance, giving rise to choroidal granulomas and retinal tractions.

  3. Bartonella Henselae: A New Pathogen for Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Cornejo Medina, William; Departamento Académico de Microbiología Facultad de Medicina Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos Lima, Perú; Vizcarra, Hugo; Programa Especial de Bartolenosis Instituto de Medicina Tropical "Daniel A. Carrión" Facultad de Medicina Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    Bartonella henselae has recently been recognized as etiological agent of four clinical syndromes: bacillary angiomatosis, bacillary peliosis hepatis, relapsing fever with bacteremia, and cat-scratch disease. The bacterium has been isolated and fully characterized. Application of newer technologies that isolate, amplify and analyze the B. henselae DNA has helped to solve identification and diagnostic problems, and they are redefining our understanding of a few of the clinical syndromes caused ...

  4. The Bartonella henselae SitABCD transporter is required for confronting oxidative stress during cell and flea invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, MaFeng; Bouhsira, Emilie; Boulouis, Henri-Jean; Biville, Francis

    2013-10-01

    Bartonella henselae is a zoonotic pathogen that possesses a flea-cat-flea transmission cycle and causes cat scratch disease in humans via cat scratches and bites. In order to establish infection, B. henselae must overcome oxidative stress damage produced by the mammalian host and arthropod vector. B. henselae encodes for putative Fe²⁺ and Mn²⁺ transporter SitABCD. In B. henselae, SitAB knockdown increases sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide. We consistently show that SitAB knockdown decreases the ability of B. henselae to survive in both human endothelial cells and cat fleas, thus demonstrating that the SitABCD transporter plays an important role during the B. henselae infection cycle. Copyright © 2013 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. 对猫抓病的临床认识

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔速南; 赵秀华; 汪明明

    2000-01-01

    @@ 猫抓病(cat scratch disease)是一种动物源性传染病.对本病的认识距今只有40多年的历史[1].目前已明确病原体是汉森巴尔通体(Bartonella henselae),其为纤细、多形态的棒状小杆菌,约(0.3~1.0)μm×(0.6~3.0)μm大小,革兰氏染色阴性,在培养基中生长缓慢[2].

  6. Neuroretinitis in ocular bartonellosis: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raihan AR

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Abdul-Rahim Raihan,1 Embong Zunaina,1,2 Wan-Hitam Wan-Hazabbah,1,2 Hussein Adil,1,2 Thavaratnam Lakana-Kumar1 1Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia; 2Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, MalaysiaAbstract: We report a case series of neuroretinitis in ocular bartonellosis and describe the serologic verification for Bartonella henselae. This is a retrospective interventional case series of four patients who presented in the ophthalmology clinic of Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia from June 2012 to March 2013. All four patients had a history of contact with cats and had fever prior to ocular symptoms. Each patient presented with neuroretinitis characterized by optic disc swelling with macular star. Serology analysis showed strongly positive for B. henselae in all of the patients. All patients were treated with oral azithromycin (except case 4, who was treated with oral doxycycline, and two patients (case 1 and case 3 had poor vision at initial presentation that warranted the use of oral prednisolone. All patients showed a good visual outcome except case 3. Vision-threatening ocular manifestation of cat scratch disease can be improved with systemic antibiotics and steroids.Keyword: cat scratch disease

  7. Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... type of heart disease you have. Symptoms of heart disease in your blood vessels (atherosclerotic disease) Cardiovascular disease ... can sometimes be found early with regular evaluations. Heart disease symptoms caused by abnormal heartbeats (heart arrhythmias) A ...

  8. Infezione da Bartonella henselae: caso clinico e supporto diagnostico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Nisticò

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Cat scratch disease is due to a bacterial infection sustained by Bartonella strains, transmitted to the human through the bite, scratch or lick of cats.We report a case about a young man who showed up to the Pediatrics outpatient clinic after he noticed a growing mass in his left armpit, preceded by malaise, fatigue and mild fever. The detection of the scar as a consequence of a cat scratch suggested the Bartonella infection diagnosis. Thus the patient had a blood test, the erythrocyte sedimentation velocity and specific antibodies assay: the measurement of serum Bartonella specific antibodies yelded high levels of IgM and IgG which confirmed the diagnosis.The patient was treated with a course of oral antibiotic, specifically Claritromicin 250 mg tablets BID for two weeks.After 30 days the axillary nodal mass downsized.The serum immunoglobulin assay cut down the time required for the formulation of the causative diagnosis and allowed for a prompt and aimed antimicrobial therapy. Compared with the blood culture, the antibodies test screening is quicker and highly reliable.

  9. Lung disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000066.htm Lung disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... fibrosis and sarcoidosis are examples of lung tissue disease. Lung circulation diseases -- These diseases affect the blood vessels ...

  10. Gaucher disease

    OpenAIRE

    POSPÍŠILOVÁ, Iva

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is about the disease called Gaucher disease, or Morbus Gaucher. There is described the history of the disease, various forms of disease, effect of bones, visceral organs, hematological changes, changes in metabolism etc.; differential diagnosis, diagnosis and therapy.

  11. What do we (not know about the human bartonelloses?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velho Paulo Eduardo Neves Ferreira

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The human bartonelloses are a group of diseases with a rapidly increasing clinical spectrum. Well known manifestations such as Carrion's disease, trench fever, cat-scratch disease, and bacillary angiomatosis are examples of Bartonella spp. infection. Along with these diseases, recurrent bacteremia, endocarditis, septicemia, erythema nodosum, erythema multiforme, trombocytopenic purpura and other syndromes have been reported having been caused by bacteria of this genus. The infectious process and the pathogenesis of these microorganisms are poorly understood. The bartonelloses may have a benign and self-limited evolution in a host, or a potentially fatal one. These bacteria can provoke a granulomatous or an angioproliferative histopathologic response. As these diseases are not yet well defined, we have reviewed the four main human bartonelloses and have examined unclear points about these emergent diseases.

  12. Hashimoto's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is Hashimoto’s disease? Hashimoto’s disease, also called chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis or autoimmune thyroiditis, is an autoimmune disease. An ... Points to Remember • Hashimoto’s disease, also called chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis or autoimmune thyroiditis, is an autoimmune disease. • Hashimoto’s ...

  13. Kawasaki Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki disease is a rare childhood disease. It makes the walls of the blood vessels in the ... veins, and capillaries. No one knows what causes Kawasaki disease. Symptoms include High fever that lasts longer ...

  14. Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CPR: A Real Lifesaver Kids Talk About: Coaches Alzheimer Disease KidsHealth > For Kids > Alzheimer Disease Print A A ... slow it down. When Someone You Love Has Alzheimer Disease You might feel sad or angry — or both — ...

  15. Crohn's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crohn's disease causes inflammation of the digestive system. It is one of a group of diseases called inflammatory ... small intestine called the ileum. The cause of Crohn's disease is unknown. It may be due to an ...

  16. Crohn disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from doing your everyday activities. You have side effects from medicines you are taking for your condition. Alternative Names Crohn's disease; Inflammatory bowel disease - Crohn's disease; Regional enteritis; Ileitis; ...

  17. Meniere's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Meniere's disease can affect your social life, your productivity and the overall quality of your life. Learn ... www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/menieres-disease/basics/definition/CON-20028251 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and ...

  18. Kawasaki disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lymph node syndrome; Infantile polyarteritis Images Kawasaki's disease - edema of the hand Kawasaki's disease, peeling of the fingertips References Dominguez SR, Anderson MS. Advances in the treatment of Kawasaki disease. Curr Opin Pediatr . 2013;25( ...

  19. Gaucher's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of developing the most common variety of Gaucher's disease. Gaucher's disease may increase the risk of: Growth delays ... illness can be difficult, but having a rare disease like Gaucher's may be even harder. Few people know about ...

  20. Huntington's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited disease that causes certain nerve cells in the brain to waste ... express emotions. If one of your parents has Huntington's disease, you have a 50 percent chance of ...

  1. Sever's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... take place on hard surfaces, such as track, basketball, soccer, and gymnastics. Sever's disease also can result ... diagnosing Sever's disease, some doctors order them to rule out other problems, such as fractures. Sever's disease ...

  2. Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... digestive problems called inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) or lactose intolerance . And in some cases, a kid won't ... for Kids With Celiac Disease Inflammatory Bowel Disease Lactose Intolerance Are Your Bowels Moving? Indigestion Nut and Peanut ...

  3. Ribbing disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukkada Philson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ribbing disease is a rare sclerosing dysplasia that involves long tubular bones, especially the tibia and femur. It occurs after puberty and is reported to be more common in women. In this article we describe how Ribbing disease can be differentiated from diseases like Engelmann-Camurati disease, van Buchem disease, Erdheim-Chester disease, osteoid osteoma, chronic osteomyelitis, stress fracture, etc.

  4. Bladder Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... frequent, urgent urination Bladder cancer Doctors diagnose bladder diseases using different tests. These include urine tests, x- ... National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  5. Fifth Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... roseola. Fifth disease is sometimes called “slapped cheek disease.” The illness’s bright red rash on the face looks like ... disease Most children and adults who get fifth disease experience only mild illness. They recover completely and have no complications. But ...

  6. Heart Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you're like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the U.S. ... of disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease is ...

  7. Whipple's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more common conditions with similar symptoms, including inflammatory rheumatic disease—characterized by inflammation and loss of function in ... Management Liver Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition Blood Diseases Diagnostic Tests La información de la salud en ...

  8. Occurrence of Bartonella henselae and Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato co-infections in ticks collected from humans in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mietze, A; Strube, C; Beyerbach, M; Schnieder, T; Goethe, R

    2011-06-01

    Bartonella (B.) henselae is the zoonotic agent of cat scratch disease. B. henselae has been associated with therapy-resistant Lyme disease in humans suggesting that B. henselae and Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato might be transmitted concurrently by ticks. In the present study we found that 16 (6.9%) of 230 Ixodes ricinus collected from humans harboured DNA of Bartonella spp. Fifteen positive ticks were infected with B. henselae and one tick with B. clarridgeiae. Twenty-five percent of the 16 Bartonella positive ticks were co-infected with Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato. Our data show that B. henselae is present in Ixodes ricinus and that ticks may serve as source of infection for humans.

  9. Host cell modulation by human, animal and plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Siv G E; Kempf, Volkhard A J

    2004-04-01

    Members of the alpha-proteobacteria display a broad range of interactions with higher eukaryotes. Some are pathogens of humans, such as Rickettsia and Bartonella that are associated with diseases like epidemic typhus, trench fever, cat scratch disease and bacillary angiomatosis. Others like the Brucella cause abortions in pregnant animals. Yet other species have evolved elaborate interactions with plants; in this group we find both plant symbionts and parasites. Despite radically different host preferences, extreme genome size variations and the absence of toxin genes, similarities in survival strategies and host cell interactions can be recognized among members of the alpha-proteobacteria. Here, we review some of these similarities, with a focus on strategies for modulation of the host target cell.

  10. Addison disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... amounts of some or all of its hormones ( hypopituitarism ) Autoimmune disorder that affects the nerves and the ... disease) Dermatitis herpetiformis Diabetes Graves disease Hyperthyroidism Hypoparathyroidism Hypopituitarism Immune response Myasthenia gravis Ovarian hypofunction Pernicious anemia ...

  11. Fifth disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvovirus B19; Erythema infectiosum; Slapped cheek rash ... Fifth disease is caused by human parvovirus B19. It often affects preschoolers or school-age children during the spring. The disease spreads through the fluids in the nose and ...

  12. Rh Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss > Birth defects & other health conditions > Rh disease Rh disease E-mail to a friend Please fill ... Rh-negative with a blood test. What is Rh factor? Rh factor is a protein that’s found ...

  13. Binswanger's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  14. Batten Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  15. Behcet's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  16. Krabbe Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  17. Crohn's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prognosis of Crohn's disease in adults. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed June 2, 2014. Smoking and ... cancer surveillance in inflammatory bowel disease. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed June 9, 2014. Inflammatory bowel ...

  18. Addison Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your blood pressure and water and salt balance. Addison disease happens if the adrenal glands don't make ... A problem with your immune system usually causes Addison disease. The immune system mistakenly attacks your own tissues, ...

  19. Liver Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your liver is the largest organ inside your body. It helps your body digest food, store energy, and remove poisons. There are many kinds of liver diseases: Diseases caused by viruses, such as hepatitis ...

  20. Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart valves, valve insufficiency, valve regurgitation, valve stenosis, valvular heart disease Every time your heart beats, blood flows into, ... removed from the market after being linked to heart valve disease. An infection in the lining of the heart's ...

  1. Wilson Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson disease is a rare inherited disorder that prevents your body from getting rid of extra copper. You ... extra copper into bile, a digestive fluid. With Wilson disease, the copper builds up in your liver, and ...

  2. Gaucher disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... doesn't have the disease is called a silent carrier. The lack of the glucocerebrosidase enzyme causes ... liver Fatigue Heart valve problems Lung disease (rare) Seizures Severe swelling at birth Skin changes

  3. Legionnaire disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Legionnaire disease is an infection of the lungs and airways. It is caused by Legionella bacteria. Causes The bacteria that cause Legionnaire disease have ...

  4. Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... messages it needs to move normally. continue What Causes Parkinson's Disease? Experts agree that low dopamine levels in ... or other chemicals. No one knows the exact cause of Parkinson's disease, but we do know that it has ...

  5. Fabry Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Foundation National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) National Tay-Sachs and Allied Diseases Association See all related ... Foundation National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) National Tay-Sachs and Allied Diseases Association See all related ...

  6. Canavan Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Foundation, Inc. Canavan Research Foundation Genetic Alliance National Tay-Sachs and Allied Diseases Association See all related ... Foundation, Inc. Canavan Research Foundation Genetic Alliance National Tay-Sachs and Allied Diseases Association See all related ...

  7. Digestive Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Celiac Disease Bowel Control Problems (Fecal Incontinence) Gas Lactose Intolerance Diarrhea Diverticulosis & Diverticulitis Acid Reflux (GER & GERD) More Digestive Disease Topics Children and Teens Acid Reflux (GER & GERD) in Infants Acid Reflux (GER & GERD) in Children & Teens Chronic ...

  8. Gaucher Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaucher disease is a rare, inherited disorder. It is a type of lipid metabolism disorder. If you have ... affected. It usually starts in childhood or adolescence. Gaucher disease has no cure. Treatment options for types 1 ...

  9. Liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000205.htm Liver disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The term "liver disease" applies to many conditions that stop the ...

  10. Wilson Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in copper, such as –shellfish –liver –mushrooms –nuts –chocolate • A person cannot prevent Wilson disease; however, people with a family history of Wilson disease, especially those with an affected ...

  11. Chagas Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagas disease is caused by a parasite. It is common in Latin America but not in the United ... There are no vaccines or medicines to prevent Chagas disease. If you travel to areas where it occurs, ...

  12. Legionnaires' Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Sources Investigation Protocol Outbreak Response What is Legionella? Exposure and Transmission Disease Symptoms Incidence and Risk ... form of pneumonia. More than 43 species of Legionella have been identified and more than 20 linked ...

  13. Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... daily aspirin to prevent heart attack? Does taking birth control pills increase my risk for heart disease? Does using ... tells you to. Return to top Does taking birth control pills increase my risk for heart disease? Taking birth ...

  14. Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stay still. Liver disease has many causes. Infection Parasites and viruses can infect the liver, causing inflammation ... beyond. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/pubs/ ...

  15. Kidney Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... until you go to the bathroom. Most kidney diseases attack the nephrons. This damage may leave kidneys ... medicines. You have a higher risk of kidney disease if you have diabetes, high blood pressure, or ...

  16. Eye Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the back of the eye Macular degeneration - a disease that destroys sharp, central vision Diabetic eye problems ... defense is to have regular checkups, because eye diseases do not always have symptoms. Early detection and ...

  17. Parasitic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... water, a bug bite, or sexual contact. Some parasitic diseases are easily treated and some are not. Parasites ... can be seen with the naked eye. Some parasitic diseases occur in the United States. Contaminated water supplies ...

  18. Kawasaki Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Life7. Questions8. Resources What is Kawasaki disease? Kawasaki disease is a rare illness. It can occur in infants and children younger ... may have diarrhea, vomiting, and stomach pain. Kawasaki disease might make your child irritable. The illness can last for a few weeks. What causes ...

  19. Lyme Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, George C.

    1991-01-01

    This overview of the public health significance of Lyme disease includes the microbiological specifics of the infectious spirochete, the entomology and ecology of the ticks which are the primary disease carrier, the clinical aspects and treatment stages, the known epidemiological patterns, and strategies for disease control and for expanded public…

  20. [Gaucher Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Torayuki

    2015-09-01

    Gaucher disease is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by congenital deficiency of lysosomal glucocerebrosidase. Gaucher disease is classified into three types. In addition to enzyme replacement therapy, substrate reduction therapy, chemical chaperon therapy, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation therapy are considered for the effective treatment of Gaucher disease.

  1. Menetrier's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... producing cells in the stomach, which decreases stomach acid. Ménétrier’s disease is also called Ménétrier disease or hypoproteinemic hypertrophic ... Alternate Versions PDF Version (102 KB) Additional Links Peptic Ulcer Disease Upper GI Endoscopy This content is provided as ...

  2. Glomerular Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Mineral & Bone Disorder Diabetes Inspidus Glomerular Diseases Goodpasture Syndrome Henoch-Schönlein Purpura IgA Nephropathy Kidney Disease in ... effective as cyclophosphamide and has milder side effects. Goodpasture's Syndrome involves an autoantibody that specifically targets the kidneys ...

  3. 猫抓病10例临床分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋丙潭; 李玉明; 于兴泉; 吴峰阶

    2010-01-01

    @@ 猫抓病(cat scratch disease)是由汉赛巴通体(Bartonella henselae)经猫抓伤或咬伤引起的以皮肤原发病变和局部淋巴结肿大为特征的一种亚急性、自限性立克次体传染病.近年来,随着养猫、狗等宠物人数的增多,本病的发病率有增高的趋势,且其临床和病理均易被漏诊或误诊为其他淋巴结病.

  4. Experimental infection of cats with Afipia felis and various Bartonella species or subspecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomel, Bruno B; Kasten, Rickie W; Stuckey, Matthew J; Breitschwerdt, Edward B; Maggi, Ricardo G; Henn, Jennifer B; Koehler, Jane E; Chang, Chao-chin

    2014-08-27

    Based upon prior studies, domestic cats have been shown to be the natural reservoir for Bartonella henselae, Bartonella clarridgeiae and Bartonella koehlerae. However, other Bartonella species, such as Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii, Bartonella quintana or Bartonella bovis (ex weissii) have been either isolated from or Bartonella DNA sequences PCR amplified and sequenced. In the late 1980s, before B. henselae was confirmed as the etiological agent of cat scratch disease, Afipia felis had been proposed as the causative agent. In order to determine the feline susceptibility to A. felis, B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii, Bartonella rochalimae, B. quintana or B. bovis, we sought to detect the presence of bacteremia and seroconversion in experimentally-inoculated cats. Most of the cats seroconverted, but only the cats inoculated with B. rochalimae became bacteremic, indicating that cats are not natural hosts of A. felis or the other Bartonella species or subspecies tested in this study.

  5. 猫抓病及其眼部表现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑曰忠; 王思慧

    2000-01-01

    @@ 猫抓病(cat scratch disease)是由巴尔通体(Bartonella)感染引起的一种良性自限性感染性疾病,在机体免疫功能正常者常表现为皮肤或头面部淋巴结病变,而在免疫功能低下者可发生严重的全身性病变[1,2].由于猫抓病在眼部主要引起视神经视网膜病变,而国内在此方面的文献报道较少.为使广大眼科同道认识此病,现将猫抓病及眼部表现作一简要综述.

  6. Identification of Novel Zoonotic Activity of Bartonella spp., France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel; Moutailler, Sara; Féménia, Françoise; Raymond, Philippe; Croce, Olivier; La Scola, Bernard; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Raoult, Didier

    2016-03-01

    Certain Bartonella species are known to cause afebrile bacteremia in humans and other mammals, including B. quintana, the agent of trench fever, and B. henselae, the agent of cat scratch disease. Reports have indicated that animal-associated Bartonella species may cause paucisymptomatic bacteremia and endocarditis in humans. We identified potentially zoonotic strains from 6 Bartonella species in samples from patients who had chronic, subjective symptoms and who reported tick bites. Three strains were B. henselae and 3 were from other animal-associated Bartonella spp. (B. doshiae, B. schoenbuchensis, and B. tribocorum). Genomic analysis of the isolated strains revealed differences from previously sequenced Bartonella strains. Our investigation identifed 3 novel Bartonella spp. strains with human pathogenic potential and showed that Bartonella spp. may be the cause of undifferentiated chronic illness in humans who have been bitten by ticks.

  7. 疑诊为淋巴瘤的猫抓病2例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾冰艺; 张义; 邓卓霖

    2007-01-01

    猫抓病(cat scratch disease,CSD)是动物源性病. 通常在猫抓伤或与猫密切接触后患病,少数与狗接触有关. 以往由于屡次染色与培养不成功,曾怀疑病毒或衣原体是本病的病原体,1983年美国病理学家Wear 用Warthin-Starry (W-S)银染色法才发现其病原为一种嗜银染色的杆菌, 是一种巴尔通菌(Bartonella sp.).

  8. GENERALIZED POST-VACCINAL COMPLICATION AFTER BCG REVACCINATION. SKIN AND HYPODERMIC TUBERCULOSIS, CICATRIZATION STAGE. CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Pilguy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a case of a rare post-vaccinal complication, which appeared after BCG revaccination in the setting of insignificant catarrhal phenomena in a girl of 7 years 6 months of age. An ulcerous defect started to form on the 2nd-3rd day on the vaccine administration site. Similar ulcerous lesions started to form on facial skin on sites of cat scratches within the first week. Later, the ulceration spread on all cutaneous coverings. Multiple deep drawn-in cicatrical defects remained on the girl’s skin after long-term treatment at various inpatient hospitals. The developed generalization of the infectious process may have resulted not only from violating the vaccination technique, but also from untimely diagnostics and incorrect disease treatment tactics. The article throws light upon clinical forms and differential diagnostics of various skin tuberculosis forms and presents modern tuberculosis vaccinal prevention issues, classification and causes of post-vaccinal complications.

  9. Periorbital cellulits--a mistaken diagnosis!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fozard, Julia; Pandya, Nikila; Pulikot, Ashok; Fish, David; Malhotra, Raman; Lake, Damian

    2011-08-17

    A 12-year-old girl presented with a 1 week history of orbital swelling associated with granuloma, purulent discharge from the eye and preauricular and submandibular lymphadenopathy. Initial conventional treatment for presumed preseptal cellulitis was unsuccessful. Despite treatment with broad spectrum antibiotics, the preseptal cellulitis progressed to orbital cellulitis with restriction of eye movements in addition to the marked conjunctival chemosis and haemorrhage. A detailed history revealed she had been in close contact with newborn kittens at home and biopsy of the granuloma demonstrated Bartonella species, confirming the diagnosis of cat scratch disease. The child received a course of appropriate oral and topical antibiotics and steroids. Unfortunately eyesight in the right eye remains poor on follow-up.

  10. Morgellons Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ohn, Jungyoon; Park, Seon Yong; Moon, Jungyoon; Choe, Yun Seon; Kim, Kyu Han

    2017-01-01

    Morgellons disease is a rare disease with unknown etiology. Herein, we report the first case of Morgellons disease in Korea. A 30-year-old woman presented with a 2-month history of pruritic erythematous patches and erosions on the arms, hands, and chin. She insisted that she had fiber-like materials under her skin, which she had observed through a magnifying device. We performed skin biopsy, and observed a fiber extruding from the dermal side of the specimen. Histopathological examination sho...

  11. Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hero Brokalaki

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is a small intestine disease caused by the immunological response to gluten, a component of wheat, rye and barley. The worldwide prevalence of celiac disease ranges between 0.2% and 2.2 %. The clinical features of celiac disease includes diarrhea, steatorrhea, flatulence, abdominal pain and weight loss. The asymptomatic type of celiac disease is characterized by soft or normally shaped stool, weakness, lassitude and moderate weight loss. In children, celiac disease usually arises between the first and the third year of age, with diarrhea, flatulence and low weight. The malabsorption in small intestine causes many extaintestinal manifestations, such us anemia, bone abnormalities, hemorrhage and neuropathy. Celiac disease is diagnosed by histological examination of tissue samples taken by duodenum due gastroscopy and by the detection of certain antibodies in blood (anti-GL-IgG, anti-GL-IgA, ΕΜΑ-IgA και anti-tTg-IgA. The only therapeutic approach to celiac disease is a gluten-free diet and, if it is necessary, the administration of iron, folic acid, calcium and vitamins (K, B12. The prognosis of celiac disease is excellent, if there is an early diagnosis and the patient keeps for life a gluten free diet.

  12. Celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holtmeier Wolfgang

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Celiac disease is a chronic intestinal disease caused by intolerance to gluten. It is characterized by immune-mediated enteropathy, associated with maldigestion and malabsorption of most nutrients and vitamins. In predisposed individuals, the ingestion of gluten-containing food such as wheat and rye induces a flat jejunal mucosa with infiltration of lymphocytes. The main symptoms are: stomach pain, gas, and bloating, diarrhea, weight loss, anemia, edema, bone or joint pain. Prevalence for clinically overt celiac disease varies from 1:270 in Finland to 1:5000 in North America. Since celiac disease can be asymptomatic, most subjects are not diagnosed or they can present with atypical symptoms. Furthermore, severe inflammation of the small bowel can be present without any gastrointestinal symptoms. The diagnosis should be made early since celiac disease causes growth retardation in untreated children and atypical symptoms like infertility or neurological symptoms. Diagnosis requires endoscopy with jejunal biopsy. In addition, tissue-transglutaminase antibodies are important to confirm the diagnosis since there are other diseases which can mimic celiac disease. The exact cause of celiac disease is unknown but is thought to be primarily immune mediated (tissue-transglutaminase autoantigen; often the disease is inherited. Management consists in life long withdrawal of dietary gluten, which leads to significant clinical and histological improvement. However, complete normalization of histology can take years.

  13. Leigh's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Related Dementias Bioengineering Epilepsy Health Disparities Neural Interfaces Parkinson's Disease Spinal Cord Injury Stem Cells Traumatic Brain Injury Trans-Agency Activities Interagency Research ...

  14. Celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radlović Nedeljko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is a multysystemic autoimmune disease induced by gluten in wheat, barley and rye. It is characterized by polygenic predisposition, high prevalence (1%, widely heterogeneous expression and frequent association with other autoimmune diseases, selective deficit of IgA and Down, Turner and Williams syndrome. The basis of the disease and the key finding in its diagnostics is symptomatic or asymptomatic inflammation of the small intestinal mucosa which resolves by gluten-free diet. Therefore, the basis of the treatment involves elimination diet, so that the disorder, if timely recognized and adequately treated, also characterizes excellent prognosis.

  15. Is "Parkinson's disease" one disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Calne, D B

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to how and why categories of ill health are divided into diseases. Aetiology is a fundamental criterion for the delineation of individual diseases. The same clinical and pathological picture may have many different causes; for example meningococcal meningitis and pneumococcal meningitis are distinct diseases that may display the same symptoms and signs. On the other hand, a single aetiology may lead to quite separate clinical and pathological phenomena; for example, neu...

  16. Endocrine Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... high or too low, you may have an endocrine disease or disorder. Endocrine diseases and disorders also occur if your body does not respond to hormones the way it is supposed to. Featured Topics Adrenal Insufficiency ... Topics Research Discoveries & News Children with Cushing ...

  17. Batten Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children with Batten disease who were treated with vitamins C and E and with diets low in vitamin A. However, these treatments did not prevent the ... Complications of AIDS Information Page Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease ... Page Neuromyelitis Optica Information Page Neuronal Migration ...

  18. Myocardial disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    970309 Myocardial injury of Keshan disease andapoptosis. ZHONG Xuekuan(钟学宽), et al. KeshanDis Instit, Harbin Med Univ, Harbin, 150086. Chin JEndemiol 1997, 16(2): 81-82. Objective: To discuss the relationship between my-ocardial injury Of Keshan disease and apoptosis. Meth-

  19. Wilson Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... individuals with WD is liver disease, appearing in late childhood or early adolescence as acute hepatitis, liver failure, or progressive chronic ... individuals with WD is liver disease, appearing in late childhood or early adolescence as acute hepatitis, liver failure, or progressive chronic ...

  20. Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Kidney Disease What is Kidney Disease? What the Kidneys Do Click for more information You have two ... damaged, wastes can build up in the body. Kidney Function and Aging Kidney function may be reduced ...

  1. Hartnup disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerajani Hemangi

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available A rare case of Hartnup disease is presented - the patient being an 11 year old school girl suffering from a typically pellagroid rash in the absence of any other signs of malnutrition. No accompanying neurological or psychiatric features are seen, but electro-encephalography revealed abnormal baseline activity. Investigations and management are detailed and the literature on Hartnup disease reviewed.

  2. Disease Lab

    OpenAIRE

    Powell, Jim; Lewis, Matt

    2016-01-01

    Students use transparencies and dry erase markers to simulate the spread of a zombie virus among a fixed population. Students are then challenged to create their own "disease" and develop an ODE model for the resulting data. From this exercise students gain greater understanding of population and SIR models, disease dynamics, parameter estimation and compartment modeling.

  3. Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to note that Alzheimer's disease is not a normal part of aging. What Is Alzheimer's Disease? Video length: 2 min 29 sec Click to watch this video The course of Alzheimer’s disease—which symptoms appear and how quickly changes occur—varies from person to person. The time ...

  4. Facioscapulohumeral disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Padberg, George Waltherus Adrianus Maria

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to discuss several aspects of facioscapulohumeral disease, also called "autosomal dominant facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy" or "Landouzy-Dejerine type of muscular dystrophy" or "Landouzy-Dejerine' s disease" . We consider this disorder well defined and

  5. Whipple Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more common conditions with similar symptoms, including • inflammatory rheumatic disease— characterized by inflammation and loss of function in ... way to prevent Whipple disease. Eating, Diet, and Nutrition A person with Whipple disease and malabsorption may need • a diet high in ...

  6. Krabbe Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... books/NBK1238/. Accessed Feb. 28, 2014. Krabbe disease. Genetics Home Reference. http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/krabbe-disease. Accessed Feb, 28. 2014. Ropper AH, et al. Adams & Victor's Principles of Neurology. 9th ed. New York, N.Y.: ...

  7. Absence of zoonotic Bartonella species in questing ticks: First detection of Bartonella clarridgeiae and Rickettsia felis in cat fleas in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reimerink Johan R

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Awareness for flea- and tick-borne infections has grown in recent years and the range of microorganisms associated with these ectoparasites is rising. Bartonella henselae, the causative agent of Cat Scratch Disease, and other Bartonella species have been reported in fleas and ticks. The role of Ixodes ricinus ticks in the natural cycle of Bartonella spp. and the transmission of these bacteria to humans is unclear. Rickettsia spp. have also been reported from as well ticks as also from fleas. However, to date no flea-borne Rickettsia spp. were reported from the Netherlands. Here, the presence of Bartonellaceae and Rickettsiae in ectoparasites was investigated using molecular detection and identification on part of the gltA- and 16S rRNA-genes. Results The zoonotic Bartonella clarridgeiae and Rickettsia felis were detected for the first time in Dutch cat fleas. B. henselae was found in cat fleas and B. schoenbuchensis in ticks and keds feeding on deer. Two Bartonella species, previously identified in rodents, were found in wild mice and their fleas. However, none of these microorganisms were found in 1719 questing Ixodes ricinus ticks. Notably, the gltA gene amplified from DNA lysates of approximately 10% of the questing nymph and adult ticks was similar to that of an uncultured Bartonella-related species found in other hard tick species. The gltA gene of this Bartonella-related species was also detected in questing larvae for which a 16S rRNA gene PCR also tested positive for "Candidatus Midichloria mitochondrii". The gltA-gene of the Bartonella-related species found in I. ricinus may therefore be from this endosymbiont. Conclusions We conclude that the risk of acquiring Cat Scratch Disease or a related bartonellosis from questing ticks in the Netherlands is negligible. On the other hand fleas and deer keds are probable vectors for associated Bartonella species between animals and might also transmit Bartonella spp. to humans.

  8. Periodontal Disease and Systemic Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gum Disease and Other Diseases Gum Disease and Diabetes Gum Disease and Heart Disease Gum Disease and Other Systemic ... Gum Disease and Other Diseases Gum Disease and Diabetes Gum Disease and Heart Disease Gum Disease and Other Systemic ...

  9. Vascular Disease Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Us Vascular Disease What is Vascular Disease? Education and Awareness Vascular Diseases Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Aortic Dissection Arteriovenous Malformation Atherosclerosis Buerger's Disease Carotid Artery Disease ...

  10. What Is Vascular Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Us Vascular Disease What is Vascular Disease? Education and Awareness Vascular Diseases Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Aortic Dissection Arteriovenous Malformation Atherosclerosis Buerger's Disease Carotid Artery Disease ...

  11. Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoochehr Karjoo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease also known as gluten-sensitive enteropathy is characterized by intestinal mucosal damage and malabsorption from dietary intake of wheat, rye or barley. Symptoms may appear with introduction of cereal in the first 3 years of life. A second peak in symptoms occurs in adults during the third or forth decade and even as late as eight decade of life. The prevalence of this disease is approximately 1 in 250 adults. The disease is more prevalent in Ireland as high as 1 in 120 adults. The disorder occurs in Arab, Hispanics, Israeli Jews, Iranian and European but is rare in Chinese and African American. To have celiac disease the patient should have the celiac disease genetic markers as HLA DQ 2 and HLA DQ 8. Patient with celiac disease may have 95 per cent for DQ 2 and the rest is by DQ 8. Someone may have the genetic marker and never develops the disease. In general 50 percent with markers may develop celiac disease. To develop the disease the gene needs to become activated. This may happen with a viral or bacterial infection, a surgery, delivery, accident, or psychological stress. After activation of gene cause the tight junction to opens with the release of Zonulin This results in passage of gluten through the tight junction and formation of multiple antibodies and autoimmune disease. This also allows entrance of other proteins and development of multiple food allergies. As a result is shortening, flattening of intestinal villi resulting in food, vitamins and minerals malabsorption.

  12. Pompe's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ploeg, Ans T; Reuser, Arnold J J

    2008-10-11

    Pompe's disease, glycogen-storage disease type II, and acid maltase deficiency are alternative names for the same metabolic disorder. It is a pan-ethnic autosomal recessive trait characterised by acid alpha-glucosidase deficiency leading to lysosomal glycogen storage. Pompe's disease is also regarded as a muscular disorder, but the generalised storage of glycogen causes more than mobility and respiratory problems. The clinical spectrum is continuous and broad. First symptoms can present in infants, children, and adults. Cardiac hypertrophy is a key feature of classic infantile Pompe's disease. For a long time, there was no means to stop disease progression, but the approval of enzyme replacement therapy has substantially changed the prospects for patients. With this new development, the disease is now among the small but increasing number of lysosomal storage disorders, for which treatment has become a reality. This review is meant to raise general awareness, to present and discuss the latest insights in disease pathophysiology, and to draw attention to new developments about diagnosis and care. We also discuss the developments that led to the approval of enzyme replacement therapy with recombinant human alpha-glucosidase from Chinese hamster ovary cells (alglucosidase alfa) by the US Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency in 2006, and review clinical practice.

  13. Refractory disease in autoimmune diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasconcelos, Carlos; Kallenberg, Cees; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2011-01-01

    Refractory disease (RD) definition has different meanings but it is dynamic, according to knowledge and the availability of new drugs. It should be differentiated from severe disease and damage definitions and it must take into account duration of adequate therapy and compliance of the patient. It c

  14. Kummell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickell, Larry T; Schucany, William G; Opatowsky, Michael J

    2013-07-01

    Kummell disease, or avascular necrosis of a vertebral body, presents as vertebral osteonecrosis typically affecting a thoracic vertebra with compression deformity, intravertebral vacuum cleft, and exaggerated kyphosis weeks to months after a minor traumatic injury. This rare disease is increasing in prevalence secondary to an aging population and the associated rise in osteoporosis. Treatment with vertebroplasty or surgical decompression and fusion is often required. We present a classic case of Kummell disease to illustrate the salient features of the condition, with associated imaging findings on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

  15. Crohn's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, Fergus

    2012-02-03

    Crohn\\'s disease is a disorder mediated by T lymphocytes which arises in genetically susceptible individuals as a result of a breakdown in the regulatory constraints on mucosal immune responses to enteric bacteria. Regulation of immune reactivity to enteric antigens has improved understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of Crohn\\'s disease, and has expanded therapeutic options for patients with this disorder. Disease heterogeneity is probable, with various underlying defects associated with a similar pathophysiological outcome. Although most conventional drug treatments are directed at modification of host response, therapeutic manipulation of the enteric flora is becoming a realistic option.

  16. Fahr's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tezcan Caliskan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Fahr's disease refers to sporadic or familial idiopathic basal ganglia, cerebral and cerebellar calcification. Patients may remain symptom-free but approximately two-thirds of the patients are symptomatic. Typical presentation starts in the 4th to 5th decades of life. Patients present with pyramidal, extrapyramidal, cerebellar, psychiatric and cognitive manifestations. Various diagnostic studies can be used to detect Fahr's disease and associated abnormalities. There is no specific treatment other than symptomatic support. In this review, clinical features and different types of presentations of Fahr's disease are discussed under the light of current literature. [J Contemp Med 2013; 3(2.000: 133-135

  17. [Fabry disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggio, Paula; Luna, Paula Carolina; Abad, María Eugenia; Larralde, Margarita

    2009-01-01

    Fabry disease is an uncommon, X-linked lysosomal storage disorder, caused by partial or complete deficiency of the enzyme a-galactosidase A. The defect leads to accumulation of uncleaved globotriaosylceramide on the vascular endothelium and visceral tissues, being the skin, heart, kidneys and central nervous system the most affected organs. We performed review of the literature related to the disease and emphasized that early recognition of angiokeratomas and hypohidrosis are key diagnostic signs of this serious disease. We also addressed the need of multidisciplinary assessment of these patients.

  18. Morgellons Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohn, Jungyoon; Park, Seon Yong; Moon, Jungyoon; Choe, Yun Seon; Kim, Kyu Han

    2017-04-01

    Morgellons disease is a rare disease with unknown etiology. Herein, we report the first case of Morgellons disease in Korea. A 30-year-old woman presented with a 2-month history of pruritic erythematous patches and erosions on the arms, hands, and chin. She insisted that she had fiber-like materials under her skin, which she had observed through a magnifying device. We performed skin biopsy, and observed a fiber extruding from the dermal side of the specimen. Histopathological examination showed only mild lymphocytic infiltration, and failed to reveal evidence of any microorganism. The polymerase chain reaction for Borrelia burgdorferi was negative in her serum.

  19. Stargardt Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Low Vision Specialists Retinal Physicians My Retina Tracker Registry Genetic Testing Clinical Trials Join the Fight ... of lipofuscin, a fatty byproduct of normal cell activity. In Stargardt disease, lipofuscin accumulates abnormally. The Foundation ...

  20. Pick disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in behavior Failure to show emotional warmth, concern, empathy, sympathy Inappropriate mood Not caring about events or ... and steadily becomes worse. The person becomes totally disabled early in the course of the disease. Pick ...

  1. Vaginal Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaginal problems are some of the most common reasons women go to the doctor. They may have ... that affect the vagina include sexually transmitted diseases, vaginal cancer, and vulvar cancer. Treatment of vaginal problems ...

  2. Legionnaires' Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legionnaires' disease is a type of pneumonia caused by bacteria. You usually get it by breathing in mist from water that contains the bacteria. The mist may come from hot tubs, showers, or air-conditioning units for ...

  3. Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people worldwide than any other single cause. Infectious diseases are caused by germs. Germs are tiny living things that are found everywhere - in air, soil and water. You can get infected by touching, eating, drinking ...

  4. Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sleep behavior disorder, which involves acting out your dreams. Medications may help your sleep problems. Bladder problems. ... will diagnose Parkinson's disease based on your medical history, a review of your signs and symptoms, and ...

  5. Gaucher Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Translational Research Research at NINDS Focus on Research Alzheimer's & Related Dementias Bioengineering Epilepsy Health Disparities Neural Interfaces Parkinson's Disease Spinal Cord Injury Stem Cells Traumatic Brain Injury Trans-Agency Activities Interagency Research ...

  6. Alexander Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Translational Research Research at NINDS Focus on Research Alzheimer's & Related Dementias Bioengineering Epilepsy Health Disparities Neural Interfaces Parkinson's Disease Spinal Cord Injury Stem Cells Traumatic Brain Injury Trans-Agency Activities Interagency Research ...

  7. Menkes Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Translational Research Research at NINDS Focus on Research Alzheimer's & Related Dementias Bioengineering Epilepsy Health Disparities Neural Interfaces Parkinson's Disease Spinal Cord Injury Stem Cells Traumatic Brain Injury Trans-Agency Activities Interagency Research ...

  8. Tickborne Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Award Clinical Terms of Award Restriction for China Clinical Terms Guidance Compliance Sample Letter Inclusion Codes ... Division of AIDS Division of Allergy, Immunology, and Transplantation Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Division of ...

  9. Prion Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Award Clinical Terms of Award Restriction for China Clinical Terms Guidance Compliance Sample Letter Inclusion Codes ... Division of AIDS Division of Allergy, Immunology, and Transplantation Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Division of ...

  10. [Prion diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarranz, J J

    2006-10-01

    Prion diseases are one of the paradigms of modern neurological nosology founded on molecular grounds. Their incidence is low, however the public health challenges derived from their transmissibility, especially due to the appearance of a variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) confers them a preferential place among health care authority concerns. The evolution of data from the European surveillance systems suggests a generalized underdiagnosis of prion diseases and casts doubts about their ability to detect a possible second wave of atypical vCJD, especially if their clinical-pathological characteristics change. Recent data also challenge the feasibility of a subclassification of prion diseases according to their genetic-molecular features

  11. Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gluten and to certain other proteins in the intestinal lining — a sign that the person could have celiac disease — then the doctor may order a biopsy of the small intestine to confirm the diagnosis. In the case of ...

  12. Autoinflammatory Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease. Colchicine – a medication also approved to treat gout (a form of arthritis) – has been used successfully as a treatment for FMF. Colchicine reduces inflammation throughout the body. ...

  13. Behcet's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Jagdish R; Moots, Robert J

    2017-02-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a chronic relapsing and remitting vasculitis of unknown aetiology. It has the capacity to affect almost all organ systems because of its potential to involve both arteries and veins of all sizes, resulting in significant organ-threatening morbidity and mortality. Traditionally known as the 'silk road' disease, it has a worldwide occurrence. The aetiopathological mechanisms of disease development in BD remain poorly understood, but genome wide studies show human leukocyte antigen and non-human leukocyte antigen associations. Environmental influences and genetic factors may have a role in the aetiopathogenetic mechanisms that lead to development of the disease, indicating the autoimmune and auto-inflammatory nature of BD. The evidence base for treatment is limited but new knowledge is emerging and current treatment options range from symptomatic treatment, through to non-biological and biological immunosuppressive drugs, to cover the spectrum of clinical manifestations.

  14. Parkinson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... control movement. Surgery to destroy brain tissue that causes Parkinson symptoms. Stem cell transplant and other procedures are ... in brain function and early death. Possible Complications Parkinson disease may cause problems such as: Difficulty performing daily activities Difficulty ...

  15. Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Atherosclerosis is also the most common cause of cardiovascular disease. It can be caused by correctable problems, such as an unhealthy diet, lack of exercise, being overweight and smoking. Causes of heart arrhythmia ...

  16. Lyme Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can also spread to the nervous system, causing facial paralysis ( Bell_s_palsy ), or meningitis. The last stage of ... symptoms, joint pain or a swollen joint, or facial paralysis. Can I Prevent Lyme Disease? There's no surefire ...

  17. Endocrine Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your endocrine system includes eight major glands throughout your body. These glands make hormones. Hormones are chemical messengers. They ... levels. In the United States, the most common endocrine disease is diabetes. There are many others. They ...

  18. Hashimoto's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... use a combination of x rays and computer technology to create images. For a CT scan, a ... than men. Although the disease often occurs in adolescent or young women, it more commonly appears between ...

  19. Gum Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... away from the teeth. This is known as periodontitis (pronounced: pair-ee-oh-don-TY-tus), a more advanced form of gum disease. With periodontitis, gums become weakened and form pockets around the ...

  20. Planning Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabel, Medard

    1984-01-01

    To solve societal problems, both local and global, a global approach is needed. Serious diseases that are crippling present-day problem solving and planning are discussed, and the characteristics of a healthy, effective planning approach are described. (RM)

  1. [Lyme disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portillo, Aránzazu; Santibáñez, Sonia; Oteo, José A

    2014-02-01

    Lyme disease (LD) is a worldwide-distributed multisystemic process caused by Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.) and transmitted by hard ticks. In fact, it is the most common tick-borne infectious disease in the northern hemisphere. In Spain it is transmitted by Ixodes ricinus ticks and Borrelia garinii is the genoespecies of B. burgdorferi s.l. mostly involved in our area. LD is known as "the last great imitator" due to the broad clinical spectrum that may cause. Except in the case of erythema migrans (pathognomonic feature of the disease), the remaining clinical manifestations should be confirmed using microbiological tests. This review is intended to provide readers a current vision of the etiology, epidemiology, clinical manifestations, laboratory diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease in our environment. Controversial aspects arising from the use of non-validated microbiological tests that are being used without scientific rigor are highlighted.

  2. Extrapyramidal disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008119 Therapeutic effect of neuropeptide PACAP27 on Parkinson′s disease in mice. WANG Gang(王刚), et al.Dept Neurol & Neurol Instit, Ruijin Hosp, Shanghai Jiaotong Univ, Med Sch, Shanghai 200025. Chin J Neurol 2007;40(12):837-841. Objective To investigate the effects of different doses of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) on the functional and morphological outcome in a mice model of Parkinson′s disease (PD) re

  3. Muscular disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930186 The diagnostic value of MRI on neuro-muscular disease.CHEN Qingtang(陈清棠),etal.Dept Neurol,1st Hosp,Beijing Med Univ,100034.Chin J Neurol & Psychiat 1992;25(5):267-269.The article concentrated on the study ofskeletal muscles of four extremities in 12 casesof different kinds of neuromuscular diseases and4 volunteers with MRI.The results revealed:MRI could clearly display individual muscle,muscle groups or abnormal muscles morphologi-

  4. [Ledderhose's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardelli, M; D'Arienzo, M; Veneziani, C

    1991-01-01

    The authors describe the clinical appearance of Ledderhose disease and emphasize the association with Dupuytren disease. They report on a series of patients treated at the 2nd Orthopedic Unit of University of Florence and describe the operating technique used. They believe that the procedure of removal of nodules must always be performed in association with careful exeresis of normal tissue, employing total aponeurectomy only in revision surgery.

  5. Bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008069 The application of Montreal classification in inflammatory bowel disease. YANG Chuanhua(杨川华), et al. Renji Hosp, Shanghai Instit, Shanghai Jiaotong Univ Med Coll, Shanghai 200001. Chin J Intern Med 2008;47(1):7-10. Objective To investigate the clinical features of Crohn′s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) according to the Montreal classification. Methods The clinical data of 110 cases of CD or UC were reviewed. The age at

  6. Extrapyramidal disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008486 Neuropsychiatric problems in patients with Parkinson’s disease. ZHOU Mingzhu(周明珠), et al. Dept Neurol, Xinhua Hosp Shanghai Jiaotong Univ, Sch Med, Shanghai 200092.Natl Med J China 2008;88(21):1442-1445. Objective To survey the prevalence and distribution of neuropsychiatric problems in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD), and to investigate their effects on life quality and the interactions among different neuropsychiatric problems.

  7. Huntington's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bates, G P; Dorsey, R.; Gusella, J F; Hayden, M. R.; Kay, C; Leavitt, B. R.; Nance, M; Ross, C A; Scahill, R. I.; Wetzel, R.; Wild, E. J.; Tabrizi, S.J.

    2015-01-01

    Huntington’s disease is devastating to patients and their families — with autosomal dominant inheritance, onset typically in the prime of adult life, progressive course and combination of motor, cognitive and behavioural features. The disease is caused by an expanded CAG trinucleotide repeat (of variable length) in HTT, the gene which encodes the protein huntingtin. In mutation carriers, huntingtin is produced with abnormally long polyglutamine sequences that confers toxic gains of function a...

  8. [Kawasaki's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, J; Martínez, B; Montini, C; Barraza, P; Reyes, A

    1989-08-01

    We described a case of Kawasaki's disease in a chilean girl, one year and 5 months old of age, who presented the oral characteristics, cutaneous and systemic manifestation of the condition, that is not very common for the dentist but that it is necessary to know due to the heart complications and the mortality associated with the disease, and it is necessary that the dentist recognize early this condition.

  9. HIRAYAMA DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaik Sulaiman

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hirayama’s disease, also known as Monomelic Amyotrophy (MMA, juvenile non-progressive amyotrophy, Sobue disease. It is rare and benign condition. It is a focal, lower motor neuron type of disorder, which occurs mainly in young males. Age of onset, it is first seen most commonly in people in their second and third decades. Geographically, it is seen most commonly in Asian countries like India and Japan. Cause of this disease is unknown in most cases. MRI of cervical spine in flexion is the investigation of choice, which will reveal the cardinal features of Hirayama disease. CASE REPORT 20 years old male came with the complaints of tremors of both hands more of right hand and weakness and wasting of right hand, which is slowly progressive for past 6 months. Lower limbs had no abnormality with normal deep tendon reflexes. On examination, there was wasting and weakness of hypothenar and interosseous muscles of right hand. MRI showed thinning of cord from C5 to C7 level. Proximal epidural fat and tiny flow voids with anterior migration of the posterior dural layer at C5-7 level on flexion MRI. Based on these features a diagnosis of focal amyotrophy was made. A cervical collar was prescribed and patient is under regular follow-up. CONCLUSION Hirayama disease is a rare self-limiting disease. Early diagnosis is necessary as the use of a simple cervical collar which will prevent neck flexion, has been shown to stop the progression.

  10. Combined MLST and AFLP typing of Bartonella henselae isolated from cats reveals new sequence types and suggests clonal evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mietze, A; Morick, D; Köhler, H; Harrus, S; Dehio, C; Nolte, I; Goethe, R

    2011-03-24

    Bartonella species are Gram-negative, fastidious bacteria. Bartonella henselae is found in cats and transmitted to humans via cat scratches or bites causing cat-scratch disease, characterized by clinical symptoms with varying severity. The prevalence of bartonellosis among humans in Germany appears to be high, and severe clinical cases have been described. However, epidemiological data of B. henselae in cats are rare. In this study we determined the detection rates of Bartonella ssp. in cats by culture and real-time PCR. Furthermore, B. henselae isolates were genetically characterized by highly discriminatory amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Bartonella spp. were isolated by culture from 11 (2.2%) of 507 blood samples. Out of 169 blood samples additionally analyzed by PCR, 28 (16.6%) were found positive for Bartonella spp., illustrating the advantage of PCR in Bartonella spp. detection. PCR-REA identified B. henselae in 27 cats and Bartonella clarridgeiae in one cat. B. henselae isolates from different geographical regions in Germany were genetically characterized by AFLP and MLST. Both methods confirmed genetic diversity of B. henselae on the strain level. MLST identified 11 new sequence types, all of them assigned to three clonal complexes as determined by eBURST. AFLP typing revealed genetic relation among the B. henselae isolates from the same geographical region. Combining AFLP typing and MLST/eBURST analyses revealed that B. henselae of the same AFLP subcluster belonged to the same clonal complex. Altogether these results indicate that B. henselae may evolve clonally.

  11. Learning about Crohn's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... genetic terms used on this page. Learning About Crohn's Disease What is Crohn's disease? What are the symptoms ... disease Additional Resources for Crohn's Disease What is Crohn's disease? Crohn's disease, an idiopathic (of unknown cause), chronic ...

  12. HIV and Rheumatic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Patient / Caregiver Diseases & Conditions HIV & Rheumatic Diseases HIV and Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts Rheumatic diseases related ... knows he or she has HIV. What are HIV-associated rheumatic diseases? Some diseases of the joints ...

  13. HIV and Rheumatic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Patient / Caregiver Diseases & Conditions HIV & Rheumatic Diseases HIV and Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts Rheumatic diseases related ... knows he or she has HIV. What are HIV-associated rheumatic diseases? Some diseases of the joints ...

  14. Niemann-Pick Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease] National Niemann-Pick Disease Foundation, Inc. National Tay-Sachs and Allied Diseases Association See all related ... Disease] National Niemann-Pick Disease Foundation, Inc. National Tay-Sachs and Allied Diseases Association See all related ...

  15. [Dupuytren disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Pablo; Román, Javier A; Vergara, Jorge

    2012-09-01

    Dupuytren disease (DD) is a connective tissue disorder that consists in fibromatosis of the palmar and digital fascia (in form of nodules or flanges) that leads to the development of flexion contractures of the palm and fingers. The little and ring finger are particularly affected. The disease can limit hand function, reducing the quality of life. The disease can have a traumatic origin and is also associated with conditions such as diabetes mellitus, alcoholism, dyslipidemia, epilepsy and AIDS, among others. However, none of these conditions can fully explain the genesis of DD. A hereditary component is described in 40% of patients and is attributed to an autosomal dominant gene of variable penetrance, probably related to collagen synthesis. However there are also spontaneous and recessive inheritance cases. The diagnosis is clinical and based on physical examination. Treatment ranges from observation or use of injectable collagenase to the surgical option in cases with significant functional limitations.

  16. Celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Christian Lodberg; Jensen, Michael Dam; Reimer, Maria Christina;

    2015-01-01

    , which are found in wheat, rye, and barley. The disease prevalence is 0.5-1.0%, but CD remains under-diagnosed. The diagnosis relies on the demonstration of lymphocyte infiltration, crypt hyperplasia, and villous atrophy in duodenal biopsies. Serology, malabsorption, biochemical markers......This national clinical guideline approved by the Danish Society for Gastroenterology and Hepatology describes the diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease (CD) in adults. CD is a chronic immunemediated enteropathy of the small intestine triggered by the ingestion of gluten-containing proteins...... the small intestinal mucosa and absorption. Adherence to a GFD usually requires dietary advice from a clinical dietician. The monitoring of antibody levels and malabsorption markers is crucial during follow-up and allows for early treatment of disease complications. Important complications include...

  17. Myocardial disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930497 Ectopic expression and the significanceof HLA—class II antigens in the myocardium ofpatients with dilated cardiomyopathy.LI Yunyou(李运友),et al.lst Affili Hosp,Nanjing MedCoil,Nanjing,210029.Chin J Cardiol 1993;21(1):15—16.Expression of HLA—class II antigens(DQ,DP)in the myocardium of patients with differentheart diseases and normal controls was studiedwith indirect immunofluorescence(IIF).Thepositive rates in different groups were observedas follows:dilated cardiomyopathy(DCM,12/13,+++),rheumatic heart disease(2/4,++),congenital heart diseases(1/14,+),left a-trial myxoma(0/1)and normal controls(1/8,

  18. Celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Christian Lodberg; Jensen, Michael Dam; Reimer, Maria Christina

    2015-01-01

    This national clinical guideline approved by the Danish Society for Gastroenterology and Hepatology describes the diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease (CD) in adults. CD is a chronic immunemediated enteropathy of the small intestine triggered by the ingestion of gluten-containing proteins......, which are found in wheat, rye, and barley. The disease prevalence is 0.5-1.0%, but CD remains under-diagnosed. The diagnosis relies on the demonstration of lymphocyte infiltration, crypt hyperplasia, and villous atrophy in duodenal biopsies. Serology, malabsorption, biochemical markers...... the small intestinal mucosa and absorption. Adherence to a GFD usually requires dietary advice from a clinical dietician. The monitoring of antibody levels and malabsorption markers is crucial during follow-up and allows for early treatment of disease complications. Important complications include...

  19. Dent's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thakker Rajesh V

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dent's disease is a renal tubular disorder characterized by manifestations of proximal tubule dysfunction, including low-molecular-weight proteinuria, hypercalciuria, nephrolithiasis, nephrocalcinosis, and progressive renal failure. These features are generally found in males only, and may be present in early childhood, whereas female carriers may show a milder phenotype. Prevalence is unknown; the disorder has been reported in around 250 families to date. Complications such as rickets or osteomalacia may occur. The disease is caused by mutations in either the CLCN5 (Dent disease 1 or OCRL1 (Dent disease 2 genes that are located on chromosome Xp11.22 and Xq25, respectively. CLCN5 encodes the electrogenic Cl-/H+ exchanger ClC-5, which belongs to the CLC family of Cl- channels/transporters. OCRL1 encodes a phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2 5-phosphatase and mutations are also associated with Lowe Syndrome. The phenotype of Dent's disease is explained by the predominant expression of ClC-5 in the proximal tubule segments of the kidney. No genotype-phenotype correlation has been described thus far, and there is considerable intra-familial variability in disease severity. A few patients with Dent's disease do not harbour mutations in CLCN5 and OCRL1, pointing to the involvement of other genes. Diagnosis is based on the presence of all three of the following criteria: low-molecular-weight proteinuria, hypercalciuria and at least one of the following: nephrocalcinosis, kidney stones, hematuria, hypophosphatemia or renal insufficiency. Molecular genetic testing confirms the diagnosis. The differential diagnosis includes other causes of generalized dysfunction of the proximal tubules (renal Fanconi syndrome, hereditary, acquired, or caused by exogenous substances. Antenatal diagnosis and pre-implantation genetic testing is not advised. The care of patients with Dent's disease is supportive, focusing on the treatment of hypercalciuria and

  20. Celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Christian Lodberg; Jensen, Michael Dam; Reimer, Maria Christina;

    2015-01-01

    the small intestinal mucosa and absorption. Adherence to a GFD usually requires dietary advice from a clinical dietician. The monitoring of antibody levels and malabsorption markers is crucial during follow-up and allows for early treatment of disease complications. Important complications include......This national clinical guideline approved by the Danish Society for Gastroenterology and Hepatology describes the diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease (CD) in adults. CD is a chronic immunemediated enteropathy of the small intestine triggered by the ingestion of gluten-containing proteins...

  1. Hansen's disease: a vanishing disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinésio Talhari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The introduction, implementation, successes and failures of multidrug therapy (MDT in all Hansen's disease endemic countries are discussed in this paper. The high efficacy of leprosy treatment with MDT and the global reduction of prevalence led the World Health Organization, in 1991, to establish the goal of elimination of Hansen's disease (less than 1 patient per 10,000 inhabitants to be accomplished by the year 2000. Brazil, Nepal and East Timor are among the few countries that didn't reach the elimination goal by the year 2000 or even 2005. The implications of these aspects are highlighted in this paper. Current data from endemic and previously endemic countries that carry a regular leprosy control programme show that the important fall in prevalence was not followed by the reduction of the incidence. This means that transmission of Mycobacterium leprae is still an issue. It is reasonable to conclude that we are still far from the most important goal of Hansen's disease control: the interruption of transmission and reduction of incidence. It is necessary to emphasize to health managers the need of keeping Hansen's disease control activities to better develop control programmes in the future. The recent international proposal to interrupt the transmission of leprosy by the year 2020 seems to unrealistic and it is discussed in this paper. The possibility of epidemiological impact related to the human immunodeficiency virus/Hansen's disease coinfection is also considered.

  2. Hansen's disease: a vanishing disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talhari, Sinésio; Grossi, Maria Aparecida de Faria; Oliveira, Maria Leide W D R de; Gontijo, Bernardo; Talhari, Carolina; Penna, Gerson Oliveira

    2012-12-01

    The introduction, implementation, successes and failures of multidrug therapy (MDT) in all Hansen's disease endemic countries are discussed in this paper. The high efficacy of leprosy treatment with MDT and the global reduction of prevalence led the World Health Organization, in 1991, to establish the goal of elimination of Hansen's disease (less than 1 patient per 10,000 inhabitants) to be accomplished by the year 2000. Brazil, Nepal and East Timor are among the few countries that didn't reach the elimination goal by the year 2000 or even 2005. The implications of these aspects are highlighted in this paper. Current data from endemic and previously endemic countries that carry a regular leprosy control programme show that the important fall in prevalence was not followed by the reduction of the incidence. This means that transmission of Mycobacterium leprae is still an issue. It is reasonable to conclude that we are still far from the most important goal of Hansen's disease control: the interruption of transmission and reduction of incidence. It is necessary to emphasize to health managers the need of keeping Hansen's disease control activities to better develop control programmes in the future. The recent international proposal to interrupt the transmission of leprosy by the year 2020 seems to unrealistic and it is discussed in this paper. The possibility of epidemiological impact related to the human immunodeficiency virus/Hansen's disease coinfection is also considered.

  3. Myocardial disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1992-01-01

    920666 Immunocytochemical study ofCuZn superoxide dismutase in the myocardi-um of normal subjects and patients ofrheumatic heart disease.ZHENG Yi(郑毅),et al. Dept Intern Med, Navy General Hosp,PLA, Beijing. 100037. Natl Med J China 1992;72(4): 225-227. By using the methods of immunocytochemistry

  4. Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astradsson, Arnar; Aziz, Tipu Z

    2015-01-01

    -derived therapy in people with Parkinson's disease? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to September 2014 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from...

  5. Wilson Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prevent organ damage. Changes in Eating, Diet, and Nutrition People with Wilson disease should reduce their dietary copper intake by avoiding foods that are high in copper, such as shellfish liver mushrooms nuts chocolate People should not eat these foods during the ...

  6. Mitochondrial Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fats) that come from your food. When the mitochondria are defective, the cells do not have enough energy. The unused oxygen ... disease can vary. It depends on how many mitochondria are defective, and where ... organ, tissue, or cell type is affected. But often the problem affects ...

  7. Behcet's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to stop taking the medicine suddenly, because the medicine alters the body’s production of the natural corticosteroid hormones. Long-term use of these medications can have side effects such as osteoporosis (a disease that leads to bone fragility), weight gain, delayed ...

  8. Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjermind, Lena Elisabeth; Law, Ian; Jønch, Aia

    2011-01-01

    In this open-label pilot study, the authors evaluated the effect of memantine on the distribution of brain glucose metabolism in four Huntington's disease (HD) patients as determined by serial 18-fluoro-deoxyglucose [F(18)]FDG-PET scans over a period of 3-4 months (90-129 days, with one patient...

  9. Parkinson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    In Parkinson disease, dopamine production becomes irregular and inadequate and nerve cells cannot properly transmit messages. This results in the loss of muscle function. By providing an even, adequate supply of medication that the body converts into dopamine, neurons are able to transmit ...

  10. Meningococcal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Koyfman

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The first cases of meningococcal meningitis were described in Geneva in 1805 and in New England in 1806, the causative agent finally being identified by Anton Weichselbaum in 1887. The first meningococcal epidemics occurred in sub-Saharan Africa in the early 1900s and periodic outbreaks continue to occur worldwide today. Neisseria meningitidis colonizes the naso-oropharyngeal mucosa in approximately 10–20% of healthy individuals. When it invades the bloodstream, meningococcus has the potential to cause devastating disease. It can affect people of any age, but primarily infects children and adolescents. Meningococcemia classically follows an upper respiratory illness consisting of myalgias, fever, headache, and nausea. It can present as an indolent infection with rapid recovery or progress within a few hours into a fulminant illness affecting multiple organ systems. As such, meningococcemia is one of the important causes of sepsis. Prior to antibiotic therapy, the disease carried a 70% mortality rate. Despite advances in early diagnosis and treatment, 10–15% of affected patients die from the disease and another 10–20% are left with severe morbidities (neurologic disability, hearing loss, loss of a limb. Meningococcal disease remains a significant global health threat.

  11. Lung Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    When you breathe, your lungs take in oxygen from the air and deliver it to the bloodstream. The cells in your body need oxygen to ... you breathe nearly 25,000 times. People with lung disease have difficulty breathing. Millions of people in ...

  12. INFECTIOUS DISEASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    2.1 Viral disease2003263 Isolation, identification and sequence analyses of dengue virus type 2 strain GD19/2001. REN Rui-wen(任瑞文), et al. Milit Med Instit Guangzhou Milit District, Guangzhou 510507. Chin J Epidemiol 2003; 24 (4):288-290. Objective:To identify the virus isolated from patients

  13. INFECTIOUS DISEASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    3.1 Viral disease2004310 One-step simultaneous detection of G-genotype of human group a rotaviruses by multiplex RT-PCR. TANG Shaowen (唐少文) , et al. Dept Epidemiol, Tongji Med Coll Huozhong Univ Sci & Technol, Wuhan 430030. Chin J Lab Med 2004; 27 (4):234-236

  14. INFECTIOUS DISEASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    4. 1 Viral disease2004174 Study on the seropositive prevalence of humanimmunodeficiency virus in a village residents living in rural region of central China. CHENG Hua (程华), et al. Public Health Sch, Fudan Univ, Shanghai 200032. Chin J Epidemiol 2004;25(4):317 -321.

  15. Huntington's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... seizures. More than 30,000 Americans have HD. Huntington’s disease is caused by a mutation in the gene for a protein called huntingtin. The defect causes the cytosine, adenine, and guanine (CAG) building blocks of DNA to repeat many more ...

  16. Huntington disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... President of the Florida Society of Neurology (FSN). Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Huntington's Disease Read more Latest Health News Read more Health ...

  17. Prionic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abelardo Q-C Araujo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are neurodegenerative illnesses due to the accumulation of small infectious pathogens containing protein but apparently lacking nucleic acid, which have long incubation periods and progress inexorably once clinical symptoms appear. Prions are uniquely resistant to a number of normal decontaminating procedures. The prionopathies [Kuru, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD and its variants, Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker (GSS syndrome and fatal familial insomnia (FFI] result from accumulation of abnormal isoforms of the prion protein in the brains of normal animals on both neuronal and non-neuronal cells. The accumulation of this protein or fragments of it in neurons leads to apoptosis and cell death. There is a strong link between mutations in the gene encoding the normal prion protein in humans (PRNP - located on the short arm of chromosome 20 – and forms of prion disease with a familial predisposition (familial CJD, GSS, FFI. Clinically a prionopathy should be suspected in any case of a fast progressing dementia with ataxia, myoclonus, or in individuals with pathological insomnia associated with dysautonomia. Magnetic resonance imaging, identification of the 14-3-3 protein in the cerebrospinal fluid, tonsil biopsy and genetic studies have been used for in vivo diagnosis circumventing the need of brain biopsy. Histopathology, however, remains the only conclusive method to reach a confident diagnosis. Unfortunately, despite numerous treatment efforts, prionopathies remain short-lasting and fatal diseases.

  18. INFECTIOUS DISEASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    3.1 Viral disease2003162 The clinical and epidemiological analysis on 46 patients with epidemic hemorrhagic fever in Huainan areas. WANG Kexia(王克霞). Sch Med, An-hui Univ Sci & Tehnol, Huainan 232001. Chin J En-demiol 2003;22(1):48-50.

  19. Extraphyramidal disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    2009250 Effects of bilateral deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus on depression in patients with parkinson’s disease. WANG Xuelian(王学廉),et al.Dept Neurosurg,Tangdu Hosp,4th Milit Med Univ,Xi’an,710038.Chin J Nerv Ment Dis,2009;35(2):88-92.

  20. Chagas Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... contact with an infected triatomine bug also called “kissing bug,”“benchuca,” “vinchuca,”“chinche,”or “barbeiro” Who can ... get Chagas disease? ■ Usually from contact with a kissing bug ■ After the kissing bug bites, it poops. ...

  1. Neurodegenerative disorders: Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hague, S; Klaffke, S; Bandmann, O

    2005-01-01

    Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease are both model diseases. Parkinson's disease is the most common of several akinetic-rigid syndromes and Huntington's disease is only one of an ever growing number of trinucleotide repeat disorders. Molecular genetic studies and subsequent molecular biological studies have provided fascinating new insights into the pathogenesis of both disorders and there is now real hope for disease modifying treatment in the not too distant future for patients with Parkinson's disease or Huntington's disease. PMID:16024878

  2. Neurodegenerative disorders: Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hague, S M; Klaffke, S; Bandmann, O

    2005-08-01

    Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease are both model diseases. Parkinson's disease is the most common of several akinetic-rigid syndromes and Huntington's disease is only one of an ever growing number of trinucleotide repeat disorders. Molecular genetic studies and subsequent molecular biological studies have provided fascinating new insights into the pathogenesis of both disorders and there is now real hope for disease modifying treatment in the not too distant future for patients with Parkinson's disease or Huntington's disease.

  3. Infectious Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    3.1 Viral disease2007149 Study on platelet β3 integrin expression levels and their relationships with disease severity in patients with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome.GAO Maicang(高麦仓), et al. Dept Infect Dis, 1st Affili Hosp, Sch Med, Xi′an Jiaotong Univ , Xi′an 710061. Chin J Infect Dis 2007;25(3):152-153. Objective To investigate the relationship between the expression level of platelet membrane glycoprotein 133(GP Ⅲa, CD61) and the severity of disease in patients with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome(HFRS). Methods One hundred and four patients with HFRS and 30 healthy individuals were recruited. The percentage of CD61 positive platelets and the mean fluorescence intensities (MFI) of platelet membrane glycoprotein β3 were determined by flow cytometry (FCM). The 104 patients studied were divided into three groups based on their expression levels of platelet membrane glycoprotein β3 at oliguric phase. Clinical data and laboratory parameters in different groups were compared and analyzed. Results The expression levels of CD61 in patients with HFRS were significantly higher than those in control group, although no significant difference in the percentage of CD61 positive platelets between patients with HFRS and controls was detected. The MFI of CD61 expression in patients with HFRS at fever phase, oliguric phase and polyuric phase was 19. 75±2.57, 17.46±1.48 and 15. 55±0.60, respectively, which was significantly higher than that in control group (3. 20±0.12). The expression level of CD61 in patients with HFRS at oliguric phase was negatively correlated with platelet count and serum albumin(r=-0.637 and -0. 695. respectively) and positively correlated with white blood cell count, blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine and alanine aminotransferase(r= 0.945, 0. 904, 0.956 and 0. 891, respectively). When the patients were compared according to the expression levels of CD61, it was indicated that the higher the expression level of CD61, the

  4. Celiac disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luis Rodrigo

    2006-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a common autoimmune disorder,induced by the intake of gluten proteins present in wheat, barley and rye. Contrary to common belief,this disorder is a protean systemic disease, rather than merely a pure digestive alteration. CD is closely associated with genes that code HLA-Ⅱ antigens, mainly of DQ2 and DQ8 classes. Previously, it was considered to be a rare childhood disorder, but is actually considered a frequent condition, present at any age, which may have multiple complications. Tissue transglutaminase-2(tTG), appears to be an important component of this disease, both, in its pathogenesis and diagnosis. Active CD is characterized by intestinal and/or extra-intestinal symptoms, villous atrophy and crypt hyperplasia, and strongly positive tTG auto-antibodies. The duodenal biopsy is considered to be the "gold standard" for diagnosis, but its practice has significant limitations in its interpretation, especially in adults. Occasionally, it results in a false-negative because of patchy mucosal changes and the presence of mucosal villous atrophy is often more severe in the proximal jejunum, usually not reached by endoscopic biopsies. CD is associated with increased rates of several diseases, such as iron deficiency anemia, osteoporosis, dermatitis herpetiformis,several neurologic and endocrine diseases, persistent chronic hypertransami-nasemia of unknown origin,various types of cancer and other autoimmune disorders.Treatment of CD dictates a strict, life-long gluten-free diet, which results in remission for most individuals,although its effect on some associated extraintestinal manifestations remains to be established.

  5. Bacterial disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930445 A report on investigation of an outbreakof legionnaires’disease in a hotel in Beijing.DENG Changying(邓长英),et al.Beijing ArmedForce General Hosp,Beijing,100027.Chin J Epi-demiol 1993;14(2):78—79.During the period from February to March,1992,an outbreak of upper respiratory infection(influenza—like syndrome)took place in a hotelin Beijing.An epidemiological investigation andbacteriological examination were carried out inthis hotel.The results showed that it was anoutbreak of Legionnaires’disease caused by Le-gionella pneumophila serogroup 10(Lpl0).Theincidence was 13.51%(5/37).This is the firstreport on Lp10 infection in China.

  6. Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astradsson, Arnar; Aziz, Tipu Z

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The mean age of onset of Parkinson's disease is about 65 years, with a median time of 9 years between diagnosis and death. METHODS AND OUTCOMES: We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of fetal cell or stem cell......-derived therapy in people with Parkinson's disease? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to September 2014 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from...... relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). RESULTS: We found two studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. CONCLUSIONS...

  7. Menkes disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tümer, Zeynep; Møller, Lisbeth B

    2010-05-01

    Menkes disease (MD) is a lethal multisystemic disorder of copper metabolism. Progressive neurodegeneration and connective tissue disturbances, together with the peculiar 'kinky' hair are the main manifestations. MD is inherited as an X-linked recessive trait, and as expected the vast majority of patients are males. MD occurs due to mutations in the ATP7A gene and the vast majority of ATP7A mutations are intragenic mutations or partial gene deletions. ATP7A is an energy dependent transmembrane protein, which is involved in the delivery of copper to the secreted copper enzymes and in the export of surplus copper from cells. Severely affected MD patients die usually before the third year of life. A cure for the disease does not exist, but very early copper-histidine treatment may correct some of the neurological symptoms.

  8. Morgellons disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accordino, Robert E; Engler, Danielle; Ginsburg, Iona H; Koo, John

    2008-01-01

    Morgellons disease, a pattern of dermatologic symptoms very similar, if not identical, to those of delusions of parasitosis, was first described many centuries ago, but has recently been given much attention on the internet and in the mass media. The present authors present a history of Morgellons disease, in addition to which they discuss the potential benefit of using this diagnostic term as a means of building trust and rapport with patients to maximize treatment benefit. The present authors also suggest "meeting the patient halfway" and creating a therapeutic alliance when providing dermatologic treatment by taking their cutaneous symptoms seriously enough to provide both topical ointments as well as antipsychotic medications, which can be therapeutic in these patients.

  9. Lyme Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Linden T

    2016-05-03

    This issue provides a clinical overview of Lyme disease, focusing on prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  10. Ledderhose Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fausto de Souza, Dominique; Micaelo, Lilian; Cuzzi, Tullia

    2010-01-01

    Plantar fibromatosis, or Ledderhose disease, is a rare hyperproliferative disorder of the plantar aponeurosis. It may occur at any age with the greatest prevalence at middle age and beyond. This disorder is more common in men than woman and it is sometimes associated with other forms of fibromatosis. A 28-year-old Brazilian woman with a six-year history of painless bilateral plantar nodules is described in this article. PMID:20877526

  11. INFECTIOUS DISEASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    4.1 Viral disease2003021 Analysis on the epidemiologic features of Dengue fever in Guangdong province, 1990 - 2000. LUO Huiming(罗会明), et al. Dis Contr & Prev Center Guangdong Prov, Guangzhou 510300. Chin J Epi-demiol 2002;23(6):427-430.Objective: To determine the epidemiological characteristics and risk factors of Dengue fever in Guangdong province in 1990 - 2000, and to develop the strategy for

  12. Fungal disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930031 Experimental studies on lung lesionsof rabbits caused by streptomyces thermohy-groscopicus.LIU Fang(刘仿),et al.Dept Mi-crobiol,Hubei Med Coll,Xianning Branch,437100.Chin J Tuberc & Respir Dis 1992;15(4):207—208.Imitating the natural way of infection ofFarmer’s lung disease,we succeeded in inducingChina Medical Abstracts(Internal Medicine)

  13. Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loudianos, G; Gitlin, J D

    2000-01-01

    Wilson's disease is an autosomal recessive disorder of copper metabolism resulting from the absence or dysfunction of a copper transporting P-type ATPase encoded on chromosome 13. This ATPase is expressed in hepatocytes where it is localized to the trans-Golgi network and transports copper into the secretory pathway for incorporation into ceruloplasmin and excretion into the bile. Under physiologic circumstances, biliary excretion represents the sole mechanism for copper excretion, and thus affected individuals have progressive copper accumulation in the liver. When the capacity for hepatic storage is exceeded, cell death ensues with copper release into the plasma, hemolysis, and tissue deposition. Presentation in childhood may include chronic hepatitis, asymptomatic cirrhosis, or acute liver failure. In young adults, neuropsychiatric symptoms predominate and include dystonia, tremor, personality changes, and cognitive impairments secondary to copper accumulation in the central nervous system. The laboratory diagnosis of Wilson's disease is confirmed by decreased serum ceruloplasmin, increased urinary copper content, and elevated hepatic copper concentration. Molecular genetic analysis is complex as more than 100 unique mutations have been identified and most individuals are compound heterozygotes. Copper chelation with penicillamine is an effective therapy in most patients and hepatic transplantation is curative in individuals presenting with irreversible liver failure. Elucidation of the molecular genetic basis of Wilson's disease has permitted new insights into the mechanisms of cellular copper homeostasis.

  14. Polycystic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kidney Disease Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD) Related Topics Section Navigation Kidney Disease Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease Amyloidosis & ... for a Child with Kidney Disease Ectopic Kidney Medullary Sponge Kidney Kidney Dysplasia Kidney Failure Choosing a ...

  15. Coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... slow down or stop. A risk factor for heart disease is something that increases your chance of getting ...

  16. Parkinson's Disease Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find your local chapter Join our online community Parkinson's Disease Dementia Parkinson's disease dementia is an impairment in ... disease. About Symptoms Diagnosis Causes & risks Treatments About Parkinson's disease dementia The brain changes caused by Parkinson's disease ...

  17. [Goodpasture disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomegné, G; Dratwa, M; Wens, R; Mesquita, M; Van der Straaten, M; Vanden Haute, K; Fosso, C

    2006-01-01

    We report one case of acute renal failure with oliguria, microscopic haematuria and normocytic anemia in a 86-year old Swedish woman. A full investigation led to the diagnosis of Goodpasture disease, an isolated form of Goodpasture syndrome. Goodpasture disease is and autoimmune disorder characterized by the development of autoantibodies to the NC1 domain of the alpha3 chain of type IV collagen, found mainly in glomerular basement membranes (GBM). When the disease affects both the lung and the kidney, it is called Goodpasture syndrome but the pulmonary or renal involvement can be isolated or separated in years. Its pathogenesis is not well known. It occurs essentially in Caucasian subjects, preferentially from Nordic and Anglo-Saxon countries (higher prevalence of HLA DR B1-15 and B1-4 group). Are also mentioned, the exposure to hydrocarbons, rustproof, insecticides and greasy solvents. The annual incidence of Goodpasture syndrome is rare and has been estimated in Europe to be about 0.5 to 1 case per million inhabitants. The isolated renal form represents about 1/3 of the cases. The clinical presentation is characterized by rapidly progressive renal failure with oliguria or anuria and in case of lung involvement, pulmonary hemorrhage responsible of hemoptysis, sometimes massive. Renal biopsy and immunofluorescence analysis play a key role in the diagnosis. The presence of both linear deposits of IgG along the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) and circulating anti-GBM antibodies is of paramount importance. The treatment, which depends on the degree of renal involvement, is based on the association of corticosteroids, cyclophosphamide and plasma exchanges.

  18. Celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Christian Lodberg; Jensen, Michael Dam; Reimer, Maria Christina

    2015-01-01

    This national clinical guideline approved by the Danish Society for Gastroenterology and Hepatology describes the diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease (CD) in adults. CD is a chronic immunemediated enteropathy of the small intestine triggered by the ingestion of gluten-containing proteins......, and identification of specific HLA haplotypes may contribute to CD diagnosis. Classical CD presents with diarrhoea and weight loss, but non-classical CD with vague or extraintestinal symptoms is common. The treatment for CD is a lifelong gluten-free diet (GFD), which, in the majority of patients, normalises...

  19. Menkes disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tümer, Zeynep; Møller, Lisbeth B

    2010-01-01

    of patients are males. MD occurs due to mutations in the ATP7A gene and the vast majority of ATP7A mutations are intragenic mutations or partial gene deletions. ATP7A is an energy dependent transmembrane protein, which is involved in the delivery of copper to the secreted copper enzymes and in the export......Menkes disease (MD) is a lethal multisystemic disorder of copper metabolism. Progressive neurodegeneration and connective tissue disturbances, together with the peculiar 'kinky' hair are the main manifestations. MD is inherited as an X-linked recessive trait, and as expected the vast majority...

  20. Menkes disease

    OpenAIRE

    Tümer, Zeynep; Møller, Lisbeth B

    2009-01-01

    Menkes disease (MD) is a lethal multisystemic disorder of copper metabolism. Progressive neurodegeneration and connective tissue disturbances, together with the peculiar ‘kinky' hair are the main manifestations. MD is inherited as an X-linked recessive trait, and as expected the vast majority of patients are males. MD occurs due to mutations in the ATP7A gene and the vast majority of ATP7A mutations are intragenic mutations or partial gene deletions. ATP7A is an energy dependent transmembrane...

  1. Celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco, Isabel

    2008-08-01

    Celiac disease is an immunologically mediated enteropathy of the small intestine, characterized by lifelong intolerance to the gliadin and related prolamines from wheat and other cereals, that occurs in genetically predisposed individuals. Symptoms result from structural damage to the mucosa of the small intestine, which may cause malabsorption with positive autoantibodies in the sera. Normal mucosal architecture is restored after the use of a gluten-free diet and the normalization of the autoantibodies. Villous atrophy and high levels of autoantibodies reappear when gluten is reintroduced into the diet (gluten challenge).

  2. Infectious Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    2.1 Viral disease 2006009 Correlation analysis of type A influenza virus genetic variation characteristic with survival selective pressure ZHOU xiao -ming(周晓明 ) ,et al. Sch Pub Health,Fudan Univ. Shanghai 200032. China J Infect Dis 2005;23(4) :221 -224 Objective:To study the relationship betweer. type A influenza virus genetic variation with survival selective pressure to find possible vaccine conserved antigen target. Methods:Seven strains of same HA (Hemagglutinin) serotype, regional and isolation time closely related type A influenza virus were selected with full HA gene coding sequence , Blast2 program was used to calculate the param-

  3. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Disease Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Disease Risk Factors Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table of ... or habits may raise your risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). These conditions are known as risk factors. ...

  4. Crohn disease - children - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inflammatory bowel disease in children - Crohn disease; IBD in children - Crohn disease; Regional enteritis - children; Ileitis - children; Granulomatous ileocolitis - children; Colitis in children; CD - children

  5. Infectious diseases and arthropods

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goddard, Jerome

    2000-01-01

    .... His book covers mosquito-, tick-, and flea-borne diseases, and a variety of other miscellaneous vector-borne diseases, including Chagas' disease, African sleeping sickness, onchocerciasis, scrub...

  6. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Parkinson's Disease OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Managing Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis OHSU - Therapeutic ...

  7. Hirayama disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul T Tayade

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 17-year-old male, who gave up his favorite sport cricket and started playing football, presented with one-year history of slowly progressive atrophic weakness of forearms and hands. Neurological examination showed weak and wasted arms, forearms and hand but no evidence of pyramidal tract, spinothalmic tract and posterior column lesions. Plain cervical spine radiographs showed no abnormal findings. Cervical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed asymmetric cord atrophy; images obtained with neck flexed showed the anterior shifting of the posterior wall of the lower cervical dural sac resulting in cord compression. These findings suggest Hirayama disease, a kind of cervical myelopathy related to the flexion movements of the neck.

  8. [Bone disease in Gaucher's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca Espiau, Mercedes

    2011-09-01

    The exposition aims, is to review the pathophysiological mechanisms of bone marrow involvement and the patterns of marrow infiltration by Gaucher cells. We have reviewed the different methods of assessment of bone marrow infiltration and its temporal development. Qualitative methods include simple radiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT) and radioisotope. The simple radiography is the basic element, but its sensitivity is limited and only allows for assessing changes and trabecular bone remodeling MRI allows us to appreciate the bone marrow infiltration, detection of complications and response to therapy. Radioisotopes can contribute to the differential diagnosis of osteomyelitis and bone crises. Among the quantitative methods are the QCSI (quantitative chemical shift imaging) and the dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), as well as new quantitative techniques of CT, MRI and ultrasound densitometry. The QCSI performed an assessment of fat content of bone marrow in the spine. DEXA quantifies bone density by measuring the attenuation coefficient. The semiquantitative methods have various "scores" to establish criteria for generalized bone disease endpoints of disease progression and response to therapy.

  9. Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Conditions Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease (UCTD) Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease (UCTD) Make an Appointment Find a Doctor ... L. Goldstein, MD, MMSc (February 01, 2016) Undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD) is a systemic autoimmune disease. This ...

  10. Associated Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gland in the neck, thick and coarse hair. Addison’s Disease Arare disease involving the adrenal gland. The prevalence of celiac disease in people with addison’s disease is significant. Symptoms of Addison’s may include weight ...

  11. Genetics and Rheumatic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Well with Rheumatic Disease Genetics and Rheumatic Disease Genetics and Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts Studying twins has ... 70%, and for non-identical pairs, even lower. Genetics and ankylosing spondylitis Each rheumatic disease has its ...

  12. Chronic Beryllium Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Science Education & Training Home Conditions Chronic Beryllium Disease Chronic Beryllium Disease Make an Appointment Find a Doctor ... MD, MSPH, FCCP (February 01, 2016) What is chronic beryllium disease (CBD)? Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is ...

  13. Heart disease - risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease - prevention; CVD - risk factors; Cardiovascular disease - risk factors; Coronary artery disease - risk factors; CAD - risk ... a certain health condition. Some risk factors for heart disease you cannot change, but some you can. ...

  14. Inflammation and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Inflammation and Heart Disease Updated:Oct 12,2016 Understand the risks of ... inflammation causes cardiovascular disease, inflammation is common for heart disease and stroke patients and is thought to be ...

  15. Lipid Storage Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... age 2, usually from lung disease. Children with Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff diseases often die at an ... age 2, usually from lung disease. Children with Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff diseases often die at an ...

  16. Heart disease and women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007188.htm Heart disease and women To use the sharing features on ... please enable JavaScript. People often DO NOT consider heart disease a woman's disease. Yet cardiovascular disease is the ...

  17. Men and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pressure Salt Cholesterol Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Men and Heart Disease Fact Sheet Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Source: Interactive Atlas of Heart Disease and Stroke Heart Disease Facts in Men Heart disease is the leading ...

  18. American Lyme Disease Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Infectious Diseases, 35: 451-464, 2002) What is Lyme Disease? Lyme disease (LD) is an infection caused by ... mission with your own tax-deductible contribution. American Lyme Disease Foundation, Inc. PO Box 466 Lyme, CT 06371 ...

  19. Thyroid Disease (for Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teaching Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Thyroid Disease KidsHealth > For Parents > Thyroid Disease Print A ... many other parts of the body. What Is Thyroid Disease? Thyroid disease is when the thyroid gland ...

  20. Thyroid Disease and Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery? Choosing the Right Sport for You Shyness Thyroid Disease KidsHealth > For Teens > Thyroid Disease Print A ... other parts of your body. continue What Is Thyroid Disease? Thyroid disease occurs when the thyroid gland ...

  1. Genetics and Rheumatic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Well with Rheumatic Disease Genetics and Rheumatic Disease Genetics and Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts Studying twins has ... 70%, and for non-identical pairs, even lower. Genetics and ankylosing spondylitis Each rheumatic disease has its ...

  2. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) Home For Patients Search FAQs Pelvic Inflammatory ... Inflammatory Disease (PID) FAQ077, September 2015 PDF Format Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) Gynecologic Problems What is pelvic inflammatory disease ( ...

  3. Thyroid Disease (for Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Thyroid Disease KidsHealth > For Parents > Thyroid Disease A A ... many other parts of the body. What Is Thyroid Disease? Thyroid disease is when the thyroid gland ...

  4. Thyroid Disease and Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Thyroid Disease KidsHealth > For Teens > Thyroid Disease A A ... other parts of your body. continue What Is Thyroid Disease? Thyroid disease occurs when the thyroid gland ...

  5. Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sickle cell disease?Sickle cell disease, also called sickle cell anemia, is a hereditary condition (which means it runs ... disease, hemoglobin SS disease, hemoglobin synthesis, hemoglobinopathies, ... cell anemia, sickle cell crisis, vaso-occlusive crisis Family Health, ...

  6. Gaucher Disease in Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from your health care provider. What is Gaucher disease? Gaucher disease is a genetic disorder. People with Gaucher ... severe and depend on the type of Gaucher disease. Gaucher disease occurs in approximately 1 in 60,000 ...

  7. Aortic Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tricuspid Valve Disease Cardiac Rhythm Disturbances Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Heart abnormalities that are ... Transplantation End-stage Lung Disease Adult Lung Transplantation Pediatric Lung ... Aortic Aneurysm Aortic Valve Disease Overview The human heart has ...

  8. What Is Vascular Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Donors Corporate Sponsors Donor Privacy Policy What Is Vascular Disease? What Is Vascular Disease? Vascular disease is any abnormal condition of ... steps to prevent vascular disease here. Understanding the Vascular System Your vascular system – the highways of the ...

  9. Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benninger, David H

    2013-01-01

    In advanced Parkinson's disease (PD), the emergence of symptoms refractory to conventional therapy poses therapeutic challenges. The success of deep brain stimulation (DBS) and advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of PD have raised interest in noninvasive brain stimulation as an alternative therapeutic tool. The rationale for its use draws from the concept that reversing abnormalities in brain activity and physiology thought to cause the clinical deficits may restore normal functioning. Currently the best evidence in support of this concept comes from DBS, which improves motor deficits, and modulates brain activity and motor cortex physiology, although whether a causal interaction exists remains largely undetermined. Most trials of noninvasive brain stimulation in PD have applied repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), targeting the motor cortex. Current studies suggest a possible therapeutic potential for rTMS and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), but clinical effects so far have been small and negligible with regard to functional independence and quality of life. Approaches to potentiate the efficacy of rTMS include increasing stimulation intensity and novel stimulation parameters that derive their rationale from studies on brain physiology. These novel parameters are intended to simulate normal firing patterns or to act on the hypothesized role of oscillatory activity in the motor cortex and basal ganglia with regard to motor control and its contribution to the pathogenesis of motor disorders. Noninvasive brain stimulation studies will enhance our understanding of PD pathophysiology and might provide further evidence for potential therapeutic applications.

  10. [Castleman disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belletti, Gerardo A; Savio, Verónica; Minoldo, Daniel; Caminos, Susana; Yorio, Marcelo A

    2004-01-01

    A 66 years female, who was since last year under astenia, arthralgias, pimply lesions in spread plates and tests showing eritrosedimentation over 100 mm, anemi, leucocitosis with neutrofilia, policlonal hypergammaglobulinemia, slight proteinuria and IgE on 900. This patient was sporadically treated with corticoids. When made the medical consult had lost 34lb., was under anorexy, as well as dyspepsia. Hemoglobyn 6.9 gr/dl, leucocytes 20000/mm3, neutrofils at 90%, proteinogram the same as former, with hypoalbuminemia. She was taking prednisona, 16 mg/day. When examined showed depress of conscience, astenia, and dermic lesions already quoted. 4 cm nonpainful right axillary adenopaty adhered to deep planes. Medulogram with increased iron, hyperegenerative. Ganglionar biopsia: linfoid hyperplasic process linked to inmune response. Toracoabdominal tomography with adenomegalia in torax and retroperitoneo. Skin biopsia: neutrofilic vasculitis. The patient suspends the 16 mg of prednisona and fever as well as generalized adenopatias come up. After laying aside other ethiologies, and understanding as Castleman Multicentric disease, it is started to supply prednisona 1 mg/kg of weight with a clinical and biochemical fast and outstanding response. After 7 months it was progressively suspended the esteroids and 60 days later, the process fall back; for that, corticoids are restarted, with a good evolution. The illness of Castleman although it is not very frequent, it should be considered as differential diagnosis in those clinical cases that are accompanied with important general commitment, linphadenopaties and respons to steroid therapy.

  11. Blood and Lymph Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Disease [Internet]. Bethesda (MD): National Center for Biotechnology Information (US); 1998-. Blood and Lymph Diseases. PDF version of this page ( ... On Blood and Lymph Diseases - Genes and Disease Blood and Lymph Diseases - Genes and Disease Your browsing ... Biotechnology Information , U.S. National Library of Medicine 8600 Rockville ...

  12. Muscle disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Chang-Yong

    2014-02-01

    On the basis of strong research evidence, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the most common severe childhood form of muscular dystrophy, is an X-linked recessive disorder caused by out-of-frame mutations of the dystrophin gene. Thus, it is classified asa dystrophinopathy. The disease onset is before age 5 years. Patients with DMD present with progressive symmetrical limb-girdle muscle weakness and become wheelchair dependent after age 12 years. (2)(3). On the basis of some research evidence,cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure are usually seen in the late teens in patients with DMD. Progressive scoliosis and respiratory in sufficiency often develop once wheelchair dependency occurs. Respiratory failure and cardiomyopathy are common causes of death, and few survive beyond the third decade of life. (2)(3)(4)(5)(6)(7). On the basis of some research evidence, prednisone at 0.75 mg/kg daily (maximum dose, 40 mg/d) or deflazacort at 0.9 mg/kg daily (maximum dose, 39 mg/d), a derivative of prednisolone (not available in the United States), as a single morning dose is recommended for DMD patients older than 5 years, which may prolong independent walking from a few months to 2 years. (2)(3)(16)(17). Based on some research evidence, treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, b-blockers, and diuretics has been reported to be beneficial in DMD patients with cardiac abnormalities. (2)(3)(5)(18). Based on expert opinion, children with muscle weakness and increased serum creatine kinase levels may be associated with either genetic or acquired muscle disorders (Tables 1 and 3). (14)(15)

  13. Alzheimer disease: An interactome of many diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaji S Rao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer Disease (AD is an outcome as well as source of many diseases. Alzheimer is linked with many other diseases like Diabetes type 2, cholesterolemia, hypertension and many more. But how each of these diseases affecting other is still unknown to scientific community. Signaling Pathways of one disease is interlinked with other disease. But to what extent healthy brain is affected when any signaling in human body is disturbed is the question that matters. There is a need of Pathway analysis, Protein-Protein interaction (PPI and the conserved interactome study in AD and linked diseases. It will be helpful in finding the potent drug or vaccine target in conscious manner. In the present research the Protein-Protein interaction of all the proteins involved in Alzheimer Disease is analyzed using ViSANT and osprey tools and pathway analysis further reveals the significant genes/proteins linking AD with other diseases.

  14. Association between periodontal diseases and systemic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidlich, Patrícia; Cimões, Renata; Pannuti, Claudio Mendes; Oppermann, Rui Vicente

    2008-01-01

    Current evidence suggests that periodontal disease may be associated with systemic diseases. This paper reviewed the published data about the relationship between periodontal disease and cardiovascular diseases, adverse pregnancy outcomes, diabetes and respiratory diseases, focusing on studies conducted in the Brazilian population. Only a few studies were found in the literature focusing on Brazilians (3 concerning cardiovascular disease, 7 about pregnancy outcomes, 9 about diabetes and one regarding pneumonia). Although the majority of them observed an association between periodontitis and systemic conditions, a causal relationship still needs to be demonstrated. Further studies, particularly interventional well-designed investigations, with larger sample sizes, need to be conducted in Brazilian populations.

  15. Inflammatory bowel disease and airway diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vutcovici, Maria; Brassard, Paul; Bitton, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Airway diseases are the most commonly described lung manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, the similarities in disease pathogenesis and the sharing of important environmental risk factors and genetic susceptibility suggest that there is a complex interplay between IBD and airway diseases. Recent evidence of IBD occurrence among patients with airway diseases and the higher than estimated prevalence of subclinical airway injuries among IBD patients support the hypothesis of a two-way association. Future research efforts should be directed toward further exploration of this association, as airway diseases are highly prevalent conditions with a substantial public health impact. PMID:27678355

  16. Association between periodontal diseases and systemic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Weidlich

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Current evidence suggests that periodontal disease may be associated with systemic diseases. This paper reviewed the published data about the relationship between periodontal disease and cardiovascular diseases, adverse pregnancy outcomes, diabetes and respiratory diseases, focusing on studies conducted in the Brazilian population. Only a few studies were found in the literature focusing on Brazilians (3 concerning cardiovascular disease, 7 about pregnancy outcomes, 9 about diabetes and one regarding pneumonia. Although the majority of them observed an association between periodontitis and systemic conditions, a causal relationship still needs to be demonstrated. Further studies, particularly interventional well-designed investigations, with larger sample sizes, need to be conducted in Brazilian populations.

  17. Skin Diseases: Skin Health and Skin Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Skin Health and Skin Diseases Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents ... acne to wrinkles Did you know that your skin is the largest organ of your body? It ...

  18. Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kidney Disease (CKD) What Is Chronic Kidney Disease? Causes of CKD Tests & Diagnosis Managing CKD Eating Right Preventing CKD ... as polycystic kidney disease (PKD), another disease that causes the kidneys to ... chronic kidney disease (CKD)—a condition that develops over many years ...

  19. Lyme Disease (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teaching Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Lyme Disease KidsHealth > For Parents > Lyme Disease Print A A ... en español La enfermedad de Lyme What Is Lyme Disease? Lyme disease is the leading tick-borne disease ...

  20. Virus diseases of fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Stanley W.

    1954-01-01

    Viruses are probably the cause of a wide spectrum of fish diseases. Although relatively few virus diseases of fish are known today, some of the diseases of unknown etiology, as well as some diseases presently accepted as due to bacteria, protozoa, fungi or nutritional deficiencies, possibly will be recognized eventually as virus diseases.

  1. KEGG DISEASE / Acute encephalitis [KEGG DISEASE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DISEASE: H01417 Entry H01417Disease Name Acute encephalitis Description Acute encep...ns Infections caused by dsDNA viruses H01417Acute encephalitis Human diseases in ICD-10 classification [BR:b...of the central nervous system G04Encephalitis, myelitis and encephalomyelitis H01417Acute encephalitis Patho...elines for management. Journal Eur J Neurol 12:331-43 (2005) KEGG DISEASE / Acute encephalitis ...

  2. Coronary Artery Disease - Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... result of coronary artery disease, or CAD, said Edward A. Fisher, M.D., Ph.D., M.P. ... Problems and Disease • High Blood Pressure (HBP) • Metabolic Syndrome • Pericarditis • Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) • Stroke • Vascular Health • ...

  3. KEGG DISEASE / Acute alcohol sensitivity [KEGG DISEASE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DISEASE: H01071 Entry H01071Disease Name Acute alcohol sensitivity Description Alde...bolism Congenital disorders of carbohydrate metabolism H01071Acute alcohol sensit...eases. Journal Cardiovasc Res 88:51-7 (2010) KEGG DISEASE / Acute alcohol sensitivity ...

  4. Lysosomal storage disease 2 - Pompe's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ploeg, Ans T.; Reuser, Arnold J. J.

    2008-01-01

    Pompe's disease, glycogen-storage disease type II, and acid maltase deficiency are alternative names for the same metabolic disorder. It is a pan-ethnic autosomal recessive trait characterised by acid alpha-glucosidase deficiency leading to lysosomal glycogen storage. Pompe's disease is also

  5. Anemia of chronic disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease Long-term infections, such as bacterial endocarditis, osteomyelitis (bone infection), HIV/AIDS , hepatitis B or hepatitis ... disease Crohn disease Erythropoietin test Juvenile idiopathic arthritis Osteomyelitis Rheumatic fever Ulcerative colitis Review Date 2/1/ ...

  6. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Parkinson's Disease Cognition: A Mind Guide to Parkinson’s Disease Nutrition Matters Speech and Swallowing Psychosis: A Mind Guide to Parkinson's Disease Guide to Deep Brain Stimulation You Can Make ...

  7. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Social Network? How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect Memory? How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect the Urinary System? ... Parkinson's Disease Patients with a Depression Diagnosis? What Type of Exercise or Exercise Programs Are Recommended? What ...

  8. Newcastle Disease Virus (PDQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Newcastle Disease Virus (PDQ®)–Patient Version Overview Go to ... cancer (see Question 8 ). Questions and Answers About Newcastle Disease Virus What is Newcastle disease virus? Newcastle ...

  9. Learn About Neuromuscular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Inherited and Endocrine Myopathies Metabolic Diseases of Muscle Mitochondrial Myopathies (MM) Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy (MMD) Spinal-Bulbar Muscular ... Deficient Congenital Muscular Dystrophy Metabolic Diseases of Muscle Mitochondrial Myopathy Miyoshi Distal Myopathy Motor Neurone Disease Muscle-Eye- ...

  10. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver disease test panel - autoimmune ... Autoimmune disorders are a possible cause of liver disease. The most common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cholangitis (formerly called primary biliary cirrhosis). This group of tests ...

  11. Liver Disease and IBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Resources > Liver Disease and IBD Go Back Liver Disease and IBD Email Print + Share Several complications ... be necessary to make the definitive diagnosis. FATTY LIVER DISEASE (HEPATCI STEATOSIS) This is the most common ...

  12. Leprosy (Hansen's Disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with facebook share with twitter share with linkedin Leprosy (Hansen's Disease) Leprosy (Hansen's Disease) is a chronic ... as Mycobacterium leprae . Why Is the Study of Leprosy (Hansen's Disease) a Priority for NIAID? At the ...

  13. Reflux and Lung Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy Eating Reflux and Lung Disease Reflux and Lung Disease Make an Appointment Ask a Question Find a Doctor Many people with chronic lung disease also suffer from gastroesophageal reflux (GERD). In this ...

  14. Tay-Sachs Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay-Sachs disease is a rare, inherited disease. It is a type of lipid metabolism disorder. It ... cells, causing mental and physical problems. . Infants with Tay-Sachs disease appear to develop normally for the ...

  15. Diabetic Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be coronary heart disease (CHD), heart failure, and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Diabetes by itself puts you at risk for heart disease. Other risk factors include Family history of heart disease Carrying extra ...

  16. Heart Disease (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CPR: A Real Lifesaver Kids Talk About: Coaches Heart Disease KidsHealth > For Kids > Heart Disease Print A A ... chest pain, heart attacks, and strokes . What Is Heart Disease? The heart is the center of the cardiovascular ...

  17. Heart Diseases and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Heart Diseases & Disorders Back to Patient Resources Heart Diseases & Disorders Millions of people experience irregular heartbeats, called ... harmless and happen in healthy people free of heart disease. However, some abnormal heart rhythms can be serious ...

  18. Parkinson disease - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your doctor has told you that you have Parkinson disease . This disease affects the brain and leads to ... have you take different medicines to treat your Parkinson disease and many of the problems that may come ...

  19. What Is Parkinson's Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resources & more. Order Free Materials Today What is Parkinson’s Disease? Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic and progressive movement disorder, ... million people in the US are living with Parkinson's disease. The cause is unknown, and although there is ...

  20. Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes Updated:Apr 14,2017 The following statistics speak ... disease. This content was last reviewed August 2015. Diabetes • Home • About Diabetes • Why Diabetes Matters Introduction Cardiovascular ...

  1. Heart Disease Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hearts® WISEWOMAN Program Other Chronic Disease Topics Diabetes Nutrition Obesity Physical Activity Stroke Heart Disease Risk Factors Recommend ... Hearts® WISEWOMAN Program Other Chronic Disease Topics Diabetes Nutrition Obesity Physical Activity Stroke File Formats Help: How do ...

  2. Lyme disease (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyme disease is an acute inflammatory disease characterized by skin changes, joint inflammation and symptoms similar to the ... that is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi . Lyme disease is transmitted by the bite of a deer ...

  3. Kidney Disease (Nephropathy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Kidney Disease (Nephropathy) Kidneys are remarkable organs. Inside them ... resulting in kidney disease. How Does Diabetes Cause Kidney Disease? When our bodies digest the protein we ...

  4. Learning about Dercum Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Dercum Disease Specific Genetic Disorders Specific Genetic Disorders Learning About Prostate Cancer See Also: Talking Glossary of ... Definitions for genetic terms used on this page. Learning About Dercum Disease What is Dercum disease? What are the symptoms ...

  5. Learning about Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Parkinson's Disease Specific Genetic Disorders Specific Genetic Disorders Learning About Prostate Cancer See Also: Talking Glossary of ... diseases Journal of Biological Chemistry , June 9, 2011 Learning About Parkinson's Disease What do we know about heredity and Parkinson's ...

  6. Pediatric Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition Nurses Print Share Celiac Disease Many kids have sensitivities to certain foods, and ... protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. Pediatric Celiac Disease If your child has celiac disease, consuming gluten ...

  7. Eye Disease Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... USAJobs Home > Eye Health Information > Eye Disease Simulations Eye Disease Simulations Age-Related Macular Degeneration Cataract Diabetic ... information page Back to top Diabetic Retinopathy Diabetic Eye Disease information page Back to top Glaucoma Glaucoma ...

  8. Diabetic Eye Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Diabetic Eye Disease What is diabetic eye disease? Diabetic eye disease is a group of ... loss can occur. How does diabetes affect my eyes? Diabetes affects your eyes when your blood glucose, ...

  9. Understanding cardiovascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000759.htm Understanding cardiovascular disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... lead to heart attack or stroke. Types of Cardiovascular Disease Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the most common ...

  10. Menopause and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Menopause and Heart Disease Updated:Jun 23,2017 Heart ... can become more evident after the onset of menopause. Menopause does not cause cardiovascular diseases . However, certain ...

  11. Cholestatic liver disease masquerading as Wilson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Vikrant; Rawat, Dinesh; Khanna, Rajeev; Alam, Seema

    2015-03-01

    Wilson disease and cholestatic liver diseases may present as a diagnostic dilemma if standard guidelines incorporating markers of copper overload are followed. We hereby present a series of four cases of sclerosing cholangitis masquerading as Wilson disease. True Wilson disease cases had significantly lower ceruloplasmin (6 vs. 16 mg/dL) and higher 24-hour urinary copper (322.3 vs. 74.5 μg/day) as compared to mimickers. Initial low serum ceruloplasmin levels normalized in mimickers on follow up, and this may used as a diagnostic indicator. Standard Wilson disease diagnostic criteria thus need further modification especially in developing countries to help avoid mismanagement.

  12. Disease cycle approach to plant disease prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wolf, Erick D; Isard, Scott A

    2007-01-01

    Plant disease cycles represent pathogen biology as a series of interconnected stages of development including dormancy, reproduction, dispersal, and pathogenesis. The progression through these stages is determined by a continuous sequence of interactions among host, pathogen, and environment. The stages of the disease cycle form the basis of many plant disease prediction models. The relationship of temperature and moisture to disease development and pathogen reproduction serve as the basis for most contemporary plant disease prediction systems. Pathogen dormancy and inoculum dispersal are considered less frequently. We found extensive research efforts evaluating the performance of prediction models as part of operation disease management systems. These efforts appear to be greater than just a few decades ago, and include novel applications of Bayesian decision theory. Advances in information technology have stimulated innovations in model application. This trend must accelerate to provide the disease management strategies needed to maintain global food supplies.

  13. Rheumatoid lung disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung disease - rheumatoid arthritis; Rheumatoid nodules; Rheumatoid lung ... They often cause no symptoms. The cause of lung disease associated with rheumatoid arthritis is unknown. Sometimes, the ...

  14. Liver in systemic disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Potential causes of abnormal liver function tests include viral hepatitis, alcohol intake, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, autoimmune liver diseases, hereditary diseases, hepatobiliary malignancies or infection, gallstones and drug-induced liver injury. Moreover, the liver may be involved in systemic diseases that mainly affect other organs. Therefore, in patients without etiology of liver injury by screening serology and diagnostic imaging, but who have systemic diseases, the abnormal liver function test results might be caused by the systemic disease. In most of these patients, the systemic disease should be treated primarily. However, some patients with systemic disease and severe liver injury or fulminant hepatic failure require intensive treatments of the liver.

  15. Biomarker for Glycogen Storage Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-03

    Fructose Metabolism, Inborn Errors; Glycogen Storage Disease; Glycogen Storage Disease Type I; Glycogen Storage Disease Type II; Glycogen Storage Disease Type III; Glycogen Storage Disease Type IV; Glycogen Storage Disease Type V; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VI; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VII; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VIII

  16. [Wilson's disease: clinical spectrum of liver disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa Palominos, Alejandra; Ibáñez Samaniego, Luis; Catalina Rodríguez, María-Vega; Pajares Díaz, José; Clemente Ricote, Gerardo

    2013-02-01

    Wilson's disease is a hereditary autosomal recessive disorder of copper metabolism,characterized by copper accumulation in the liver and brain. This rare entity, which has a broad clinical spectrum, is often difficult to diagnose and should therefore always be suspected in patients with liver disease of unclear cause. We describe two types of manifestation of liver disease in two patients; the first developed fulminant hepatic failure requiring urgent liver transplantation and the second showed advanced chronic liver disease and received standard medical treatment. The objective of this clinical observation is to analyze the diagnosis of Wilson's disease in two patients with distinct onset, illustrating the broad clinical spectrum of the disease, and its treatment.

  17. Interstitial Lung Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interstitial lung disease is the name for a large group of diseases that inflame or scar the lungs. The inflammation and scarring make it hard to ... air is responsible for some types of interstitial lung diseases. Specific types include Black lung disease among ...

  18. What Causes Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Heart Disease? Research suggests that coronary heart disease (CHD) begins with damage to the lining and ... causing coronary microvascular disease (MVD). Coronary MVD is heart disease that affects the heart's tiny arteries. The cause ...

  19. PERIANAL CROHNS-DISEASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HOEDEMAKER, HOT

    1994-01-01

    Perianal disease in Crohn's disease is a difficult matter to deal with. The indication for therapy is not always clear in this disease with a relatively mild natural course. More confusion is caused by the fact that not all disease in the perianal region in a patient with Crohn's has to be Crohn-rel

  20. Occupational skin diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahler, Vera; Aalto-Korte, Kristiina; Alfonso, Jose Hernan

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Work-related skin diseases (WSD) are caused or worsened by a professional activity. Occupational skin diseases (OSD) need to fulfil additional legal criteria which differ from country to country. OSD range amongst the five most frequently notified occupational diseases (musculoskeletal...... diseases, neurologic diseases, lung diseases, diseases of the sensory organs, skin diseases) in Europe. OBJECTIVE: To retrieve information and compare the current state of national frameworks and pathways to manage patients with occupational skin disease with regard to prevention, diagnosis, treatment...... in Science and Technology (COST) Action TD 1206 (StanDerm) (www.standerm.eu). RESULTS: Besides a national health service or a statutory health insurance, most European member states implemented a second insurance scheme specifically geared at occupational diseases [insurance against occupational risks...

  1. [Periodontal disease in pediatric rheumatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabri, Gisele M C; Savioli, Cynthia; Siqueira, José T; Campos, Lucia M; Bonfá, Eloisa; Silva, Clovis A

    2014-01-01

    Gingivitis and periodontitis are immunoinflammatory periodontal diseases characterized by chronic localized infections usually associated with insidious inflammation This narrative review discusses periodontal diseases and mechanisms influencing the immune response and autoimmunity in pediatric rheumatic diseases (PRD), particularly juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (C-SLE) and juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). Gingivitis was more frequently observed in these diseases compared to health controls, whereas periodontitis was a rare finding. In JIA patients, gingivitis and periodontitis were related to mechanical factors, chronic arthritis with functional disability, dysregulation of the immunoinflammatory response, diet and drugs, mainly corticosteroids and cyclosporine. In C-SLE, gingivitis was associated with longer disease period, high doses of corticosteroids, B-cell hyperactivation and immunoglobulin G elevation. There are scarce data on periodontal diseases in JDM population, and a unique gingival pattern, characterized by gingival erythema, capillary dilation and bush-loop formation, was observed in active patients. In conclusion, gingivitis was the most common periodontal disease in PRD. The observed association with disease activity reinforces the need for future studies to determine if resolution of this complication will influence disease course or severity.

  2. Huntington’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    New advances in disease testing and diagnosis, such as genetic testing , now provide increased means for disease diagnosis but also possible therapeutic...treatments. Indeed, according to some experts, genetic testing and therapy may be key to future disease detection, therapy, and even prevention. In...associated with its long-term management. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Neurological disease , genetic testing , aeromedical concerns, Huntington’s disease 16

  3. Genetic diseases in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolettis, Peter N

    2003-02-01

    Genetic diseases that do not primarily affect the genitourinary tract may have urologic manifestations. These urologic manifestations range from benign and malignant renal disease to infertility. Thus, the practicing urologist may be involved in the care of these patients and should have knowledge of these diseases. Continued improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of these genetic diseases will likely result in improved survival and will increase the number of patients who may develop urologic manifestations of these diseases.

  4. Pregnancy and periodontal disease

    OpenAIRE

    SAĞLAM, Ebru; SARUHAN, Nesrin; Çanakçı, Cenk Fatih

    2015-01-01

    Some maternal immunological changes due to pregnancy increases susceptibility to infections. Periodontal disease, the main cause is plaque, is a common disease which is seen multifactorial and varying severity. There are many clinical criteria for diagnosis of periodontal disease. Correlation between pregnancy and periodontal inflammation is known for many years. Periodontal disease affects pregnant’s systemic condition and also has negative effects on fetus. Periodontal disease increases the...

  5. The Relationship Between Fatty Liver Disease and Periodontal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-22

    Periodontitis is a highly prevalent and destructive chronic disease. Numerous studies support an association between periodontal disease and other...systemic diseases ( diabetes , cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, adverse pregnancy outcome, etc.). Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is a...destruction seen in periodontal disease. The association between the two diseases has never been investigated. A reasonable mechanism in which periodontal

  6. Enfermedad por arañazo de gato: Presentación de un caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ileana Alvarez Lam

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available La enfermedad por arañazo de gato (EAG es un proceso infeccioso benigno, relativamente frecuente en niños y adolescentes producido por Bartonella henselae. La manifestación más frecuente de la enfermedad es la presencia de una lesión de inoculación seguida de linfadenopatía regional con presencia de fiebre u otros síntomas generales o sin estos. Se reporta el caso de un paciente de 13 años de edad que la afección se inició con adenopatía axilar izquierda y cuadro febril de 37,5 °C - 38,5 °C de 3 días de evolución con aparición más tardía de lesión similar en región interescapular, en la cual se planteaba la posibilidad de un proceso linfoproliferativo. Una vez esclarecida la historia clinicoepidemiológica del paciente se realizaron un grupo de exámenes complementarios y se indicó practicar exéresis de la lesión inicial. El estudio histopatológico mostró una linfadenitis crónica con focos pionecrotizantes compatibles con EAG. Se indicó tratamiento con eritromicina oral durante 10 días con resolución total del cuadro adénico.The cat-scratch disease (CSD is a bening infectious process, relatively common in children and adolescents, produced by Bartonella henselae.The most frequent manifestations of the disease is the presence of an innoculation injury followed by regional lymphoadenopathy with fever or other general symptoms, or without them. A case of a 13-year-old male patient, whose affection began with left axillary adenopathy and febrile picture of 37.5°C-38.5°C of 3 days of evolution with the later appearance of a similar injury in the interscapular region, where a lymphoproliferative process may occur, is presented. Once the clinicoepidemiological history of the patient was determined, a series of complementary tests was made and the exeresis of the initial injury was indicated. The histopathological study showed a chronic lymphadenitis with pyonecrotizing focuses compatible with the cat-scratch disease

  7. Tay-Sachs Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  8. Infantile Refsum Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  9. What Is Kawasaki Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ANSWERS by heart Cardiovascular Conditions What is Kawasaki Disease? Kawasaki disease is a children’s illness. It’s also known as Kawasaki syndrome or mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome. About 75 percent of people ...

  10. Mitral Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for more information on procedures, news, and pre- & post-operative care. Section Navigation Select Topic Aortic Valve Disease ... is most commonly caused by inflammation from rheumatic fever, a disease that is related to strep infections; ...

  11. Treatments for Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 3900 Find your chapter: search by state Home > Alzheimer's Disease > Treatments Overview What Is Dementia? What Is Alzheimer's? ... and move closer to a cure. Treatments for Alzheimer's disease Currently, there is no cure for Alzheimer's. But ...

  12. Heart Diseases--Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you have a close family member who had heart disease at an early age. Fortunately, there are many things you can do reduce your chances of getting heart disease. You should Know your blood pressure and keep ...

  13. Lyme disease antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... JavaScript. The Lyme disease blood test looks for antibodies in the blood to the bacteria that causes ... needed. A laboratory specialist looks for Lyme disease antibodies in the blood sample using the ELISA test . ...

  14. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Care: Real Stories Betsaida Cruz, PT, Long Beach Memorial Medicinal: “Terapia fisica para el Parkinson” Building a ... and Social Network? How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect Memory? How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect the Urinary System? ...

  15. Addison's Disease: Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addison's disease Diagnosis Your doctor will talk to you first about your medical history and your signs and ... If your doctor thinks that you may have Addison's disease, you may undergo some of the following tests: ...

  16. Alcoholic liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver disease due to alcohol; Cirrhosis or hepatitis - alcoholic; Laennec's cirrhosis ... Alcoholic liver disease occurs after years of heavy drinking. Over time, scarring and cirrhosis can occur. Cirrhosis is the ...

  17. Chronic granulomatous disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    CGD; Fatal granulomatosis of childhood; Chronic granulomatous disease of childhood; Progressive septic granulomatosis ... In chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), immune system cells called phagocytes are unable to kill some types of bacteria and ...

  18. Valvular heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Gelson, E; Gatzoulis, M; Johnson, M.

    2007-01-01

    Valvular disease may be unmasked in pregnancy when physiological changes increase demands on the heart. Women with valvular heart disease require close follow-up during pregnancy, delivery, and postpartum

  19. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Use for Freezing? Are There Any Ways to Control the Rate of Progression of the Disease? Ask ... Memory? How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect the Urinary System? How Does Speech Therapy Help Parkinson's Patients? How ...

  20. Celiac disease - nutritional considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002443.htm Celiac disease - nutritional considerations To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Celiac disease is an immune disorder passed down through families. ...

  1. Hypothyroidism and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Balance › Hypothyroidism and Heart Disease Fact Sheet Hypothyroidism and Heart Disease January 2014 Download PDFs English ... nervous system, body temperature, and weight. What is hypothyroidism and what are its symptoms? Hypothyroidism, also called ...

  2. Genetic Disease Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mission to help prevent, manage and treat inherited genetic diseases. View our latest News Brief here . You can ... contributions to the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of genetic diseases. Learn how advances at Mount Sinai have impacted ...

  3. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Sexual Functioning? How Does Depression Affect the Patient's Family and Social Network? How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect Memory? How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect the Urinary System? How Does Speech Therapy Help Parkinson's Patients? How ...

  4. Pediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Karen A Diefenbach; Christopher K Breuer

    2006-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is an important cause of gastrointestinal pathology in children and adolescents.The incidence of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease is increasing; therefore, it is important for the clinician to be aware of the presentation of this disease in the pediatric population. Laboratory tests, radiology studies,and endoscopic procedures are helpful in diagnosing inflammatory bowel disease and differentiating between Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Once diagnosed,the goal of medical management is to induce remission of disease while minimizing the side effects of the medication. Specific attention needs to be paid to achieving normal growth in this susceptible population.Surgical management is usually indicated for failure of medical management, complication, or malignancy.Algorithms for diagnostic evaluation and treatment of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease are presented.The specific psychosocial issues facing these patients are also discussed in this review as are the future goals of research in the complex problem of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease.

  5. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Disease Nutrition Matters Speech and Swallowing Psychosis: A Mind Guide to Parkinson's Disease Guide to Deep Brain Stimulation You Can Make A Difference Your donation to the National Parkinson Foundation goes ...

  6. American Behcet's Disease Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Behcet's Awareness Day Behcet's Disease Awareness Share your story and educate others about Behcet's: www.rareconnect.org/en/community/behcet-s-syndrome Upcoming Events American Behcet's Disease Association PO BOX 80576 Rochester, MI ...

  7. What Is Parkinson's Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... million people in the US are living with Parkinson's disease. The cause is unknown, and although there is presently no ... a Diagnosis What is Parkinson’s Disease? ... Trials Statistics on Parkinson's What's New In Parkinson's Research? What's in the ...

  8. Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Us Overview of CDC’s work. Advancements in Sickle Cell Disease New supplement from the American Journal of Preventive Medicine describes the state of sickle cell disease related care in the United States. Read Supplement ...

  9. Learning about Huntington's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mouse Models Of Huntington's Disease 1998 News Release Learning About Huntington's Disease What do we know about ... and treatment information. Hosted by the Dolan DNA Learning Center at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. Huntington's Outreach ...

  10. Congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001114.htm Congenital heart disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a problem with the heart's structure ...

  11. Aspirin and heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000092.htm Aspirin and heart disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... healthy people who are at low risk for heart disease. You provider will consider your overall medical condition ...

  12. Cyanotic heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001104.htm Cyanotic heart disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cyanotic heart disease refers to a group of many different heart ...

  13. Managing Your Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Advocates Sign Up for Funding News npj Parkinson's Disease Scientific Advisory Board Understanding Parkinson's Coping with a Diagnosis What is Parkinson’s Disease? National HelpLine Educational Publications Online Seminars Parkinson's News ...

  14. Pain in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Advocates Sign Up for Funding News npj Parkinson's Disease Scientific Advisory Board Understanding Parkinson's Coping with a Diagnosis What is Parkinson’s Disease? National HelpLine Educational Publications Online Seminars Parkinson's News ...

  15. Parkinson's Disease Foundation Newsletter

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Advocates Sign Up for Funding News npj Parkinson's Disease Scientific Advisory Board Understanding Parkinson's Coping with a Diagnosis What is Parkinson’s Disease? National HelpLine Educational Publications Online Seminars Parkinson's News ...

  16. Parkinson's Disease Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Advocates Sign Up for Funding News npj Parkinson's Disease Scientific Advisory Board Understanding Parkinson's Coping with a Diagnosis What is Parkinson’s Disease? National HelpLine Educational Publications Online Seminars Parkinson's News ...

  17. Diabetes and Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease of diabetes, or diabetic nephropathy. How does diabetes cause kidney disease? High blood glucose , also called ... I keep my kidneys healthy if I have diabetes? The best way to slow or prevent diabetes- ...

  18. Pediatric Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Free Diet Guide Eosinophilic Esophagitis Inflammatory Bowel Disease Nutrition & Obesity Reflux & GERD Search Keyword Connect with Facebook Additional ... Nutrition (NASPGHAN) Celiac Disease Eosinophilic Esophagitis Pediatric IBD Nutrition & Obesity Reflux & GERD Research & Grants Our Supporters Site Map © ...

  19. Chronic Kidney Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Chronic Kidney Diseases KidsHealth > For Kids > Chronic Kidney Diseases Print ... re talking about your kidneys. What Are the Kidneys? Your kidneys are tucked under your lower ribs ...

  20. Polycystic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cysts - kidneys; Kidney - polycystic; Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease; ADPKD ... Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is passed down through families (inherited). The 2 inherited forms of PKD are autosomal dominant ...

  1. Kidney Disease Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Links Take the first step Alternate Language URL Kidney Disease Basics Page Content Your kidneys filter extra ... blood pressure are the most common causes of kidney disease. ​These conditions can slowly damage the kidneys ...

  2. Diet - chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002442.htm Diet - chronic kidney disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... make changes to your diet when you have chronic kidney disease. These changes may include limiting fluids, eating a ...

  3. Feline corneal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Phillip Anthony

    2005-05-01

    The cornea is naturally transparent. Anything that interferes with the cornea's stromal architecture, contributes to blood vessel migration, increases corneal pigmentation, or predisposes to corneal edema, disrupts the corneas transparency and indicates corneal disease. The color, location, and shape and pattern of a corneal lesion can help in determining the underlying cause for the disease. Corneal disease is typically divided into congenital or acquired disorders. Congenital disorders, such as corneal dermoids are rare in cats, whereas acquired corneal disease associated with nonulcerative or ulcerative keratitis is common. Primary ocular disease, such as tear film instability, adenexal disease (medial canthal entropion, lagophthalmus, eyelid agenesis), and herpes keratitis are associated with the majority of acquired corneal disease in cats. Proliferative/eosinophilic keratitis, acute bullous keratopathy, and Florida keratopathy are common feline nonulcerative disorders. Nonprogressive ulcerative disease in cats, such as chronic corneal epithelial defects and corneal sequestration are more common than progressive corneal ulcerations.

  4. Carotid Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kawasaki Disease Long Q-T Syndrome Marfan Syndrome Metabolic Syndrome Mitral Valve Prolapse Myocardial Bridge Myocarditis Obstructive Sleep Apnea Pericarditis Peripheral Vascular Disease Rheumatic Fever Sick Sinus Syndrome Silent Ischemia Stroke Sudden ...

  5. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... part of a funeral ritual) Scrapie (found in sheep) Other very rare inherited human diseases, such as ... markers that sometimes occur with the disease CT scan of the brain Electroencephalogram (EEG) MRI of the ...

  6. Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find an ENT Doctor Near You Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease Patient Health Information ... with a hearing loss. How Does the Healthy Ear Work? The ear has three main parts: the ...

  7. [Depression and neurological diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piber, D; Hinkelmann, K; Gold, S M; Heesen, C; Spitzer, C; Endres, M; Otte, C

    2012-11-01

    In many neurological diseases a depressive syndrome is a characteristic sign of the primary disease or is an important comorbidity. Post-stroke depression, for example, is a common and relevant complication following ischemic brain infarction. Approximately 4 out of every 10 stroke patients develop depressive disorders in the course of the disease which have a disadvantageous effect on the course and the prognosis. On the other hand depression is also a risk factor for certain neurological diseases as was recently demonstrated in a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies which revealed a much higher stroke risk for depressive patients. Furthermore, depression plays an important role in other neurological diseases with respect to the course and quality of life, such as Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis and epilepsy. This article gives a review of the most important epidemiological, pathophysiological and therapeutic aspects of depressive disorders as a comorbidity of neurological diseases and as a risk factor for neurological diseases.

  8. Sickle Cell Disease Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Websites About Us Information For... Media Policy Makers Sickle Cell Disease Quiz Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... 1. True or False: Only African Americans get sickle cell disease. A True B False 2. True or ...

  9. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many of these diseases are genetic. Sometimes the cause is a medical ...

  10. Sexually Transmitted Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are infections that are passed from one person to another through sexual contact. The causes of STDs ... often help with the symptoms and keep the disease under control. Correct usage of latex condoms greatly ...

  11. Celiac disease - sprue

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gluten intolerance; Gluten-sensitive enteropathy; Gluten-free diet celiac disease ... The exact cause of celiac disease is unknown. The lining of the intestines have small areas called villi which project outward into the opening of the ...

  12. Celiac Disease Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Celiac Disease Antibody Tests Share this page: Was this page ... else I should know? How is it used? Celiac disease antibody tests are primarily used to help diagnose ...

  13. Coronary Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of heart disease. It is the leading cause of death ... happens when the arteries that supply blood to heart muscle become hardened and narrowed. This is due ...

  14. Women and Parasitic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources How to Find A Physician Diagnosis of Parasitic Diseases Statistics More Information Get Email Updates To receive ... often need special consideration when being treated for parasitic diseases in order to avoid harm to the fetus, ...

  15. Diagnosis of Parasitic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Laboratory Diagnostic Assistance [DPDx] Parasites Home Diagnosis of Parasitic Diseases Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this ... the United States cannot diagnose parasites? How are parasitic diseases diagnosed? Many kinds of lab tests are available ...

  16. Collagen vascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001223.htm Collagen vascular disease To use the sharing features on this ... previously said to have "connective tissue" or "collagen vascular" disease. We now have names for many specific ...

  17. Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diseases associated with PLP1, which also includes Spastic Paraplegia Type 2 (SPG2). The PLP1-related disorders span ... diseases associated with PLP1, which also includes Spastic Paraplegia Type 2 (SPG2). The PLP1-related disorders span ...

  18. Lewy Body Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewy body disease is one of the most common causes of dementia in the elderly. Dementia is the loss ... enough to affect normal activities and relationships. Lewy body disease happens when abnormal structures, called Lewy bodies, ...

  19. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Parkinson's Disease Affect the Urinary System? How Does Speech Therapy Help Parkinson's Patients? How Does the DBS ... A Mind Guide to Parkinson’s Disease Nutrition Matters Speech and Swallowing Psychosis: A Mind Guide to Parkinson's ...

  20. APOE Genotyping, Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? APOE Genotyping, Cardiovascular Disease Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... of choice to decrease the risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) . However, there is a wide variability in ...

  1. [Emerging noninfectious diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consiglio, Ezequiel

    2008-11-01

    In recent years, emerging diseases were defined as being infectious, acquiring high incidence, often suddenly, or being a threat or an unexpected phenomenon. This study discusses the hallmarks of emerging diseases, describing the existence of noninfectious emerging diseases, and elaborating on the advantages of defining noninfectious diseases as emerging ones. From the discussion of various mental health disorders, nutritional deficiencies, external injuries and violence outcomes, work injuries and occupational health, and diseases due to environmental factors, the conclusion is drawn that a wide variety of noninfectious diseases can be defined as emergent. Noninfectious emerging diseases need to be identified in order to improve their control and management. A new definition of "emergent disease" is proposed, one that emphasizes the pathways of emergence and conceptual traits, rather than descriptive features.

  2. Sniffing out disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, R.M.C.

    2007-01-01

    Research from Holland on early identification on plant disease from odours, provides a potential disease managment tool in glasshouses. Combined with precision technology could these techniques be of relevance to paddock production?

  3. Lyme Disease Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lyme disease FAQ Health care providers Educational materials Data and Statistics Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... in the northeast and upper Midwest. Lyme Disease Data File To facilitate the public health and research ...

  4. Self Inflicted Dermatological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertuğrul H. Aydemir

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This group of diseases are characterised with the aggravated types of stress releasing behaviors like scratching, picking, squeezing, and sucking. Lichen simplex chronicus, prurigo nodularis, neurotic excoriations, trichotillomani, and onychotillomani are the diseases in this group. Depression, anxiety, and obsesif compulsive disease are the main underlying psychologic diseases. They need a skillfull psychiatric approach in addition to dermatologic treatment, and should be treated with patience in a long duration.

  5. Functional bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Gudmand-Høyer, E

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with functional bowel disease were given fructose, sorbitol, fructose-sorbitol mixtures, and sucrose. The occurrence of malabsorption was evaluated by means of hydrogen breath tests and the gastrointestinal symptoms, if any, were recorded. One patient could not be evaluated...... with functional bowel disease. The findings may have direct influence on the dietary guidance given to a major group of patients with functional bowel disease and may make it possible to define separate entities in this disease complex....

  6. Genetics of complex diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motulsky, Arno G

    2006-02-01

    Approaches to the study of the genetic basis of common complex diseases and their clinical applications are considered. Monogenic Mendelian inheritance in such conditions is infrequent but its elucidation may help to detect pathogenic mechanisms in the more common variety of complex diseases. Involvement by multiple genes in complex diseases usually occurs but the isolation and identification of specific genes so far has been exceptional. The role of common polymorphisms as indicators of disease risk in various studies is discussed.

  7. Spinal Cord Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... damages the vertebrae or other parts of the spine, this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include Tumors Infections such as meningitis and polio Inflammatory diseases Autoimmune diseases Degenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal ...

  8. Kawasaki Disease (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teaching Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Kawasaki Disease KidsHealth > For Parents > Kawasaki Disease Print A A A What's in this ... Complications Diagnosis Treatment en español La enfermedad de Kawasaki Kawasaki disease is an illness that involves the ...

  9. What Is Crohn's Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What are Crohn's & Colitis? > What is Crohn’s Disease? Crohn’s Disease is a Chronic Condition By understanding your body ... live a full and rewarding life What is Crohn’s Disease? Email Print + Share Named after Dr. Burrill B. ...

  10. Lung Diseases and Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Lung Diseases and Conditions Breathing is a complex process. If ... to a disease called COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). COPD prevents proper airflow in and out of your lungs and can hinder gas exchange in the air ...

  11. Bacterial diseases affecting apple

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial diseases of plants are usually difficult to control and often require a combination of control measures to successfully manage the disease. There are often stark differences between the means available to control bacterial diseases in annual crops versus a woody tree crop, such as apple. ...

  12. Pompe disease: clinical perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabello JF

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Juan Francisco Cabello,1 Deborah Marsden21Genetics and Metabolic Disease Laboratory, Nutrition and Food Technology Institute (INTA, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile; 2Division of Genetics and Genomics, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Pompe disease (acid alpha-glucosidase deficiency, OMIM 232300 is a rare lysosomal storage disorder due to autosomal recessive mutations in the GAA gene. It has also been called acid maltase deficiency and glycogen storage disease type II. There is a broad clinical presentation: the most severe form that presents in the first few months of life with cardiomyopathy and generalized muscle weakness that rapidly progresses to death from cardio-respiratory failure in the first year of life (infant-onset Pompe disease. A more slowly progressive disease, with little or no cardiac involvement, presents with proximal myopathy and/or pulmonary insufficiency, from the second year of life to late adulthood (late-onset Pompe disease. The recent development and introduction of enzyme replacement therapy with intravenous infusion of recombinant human acid alpha-glucosidase have made a major improvement in the morbidity and mortality of this disease. New therapies are also in development. With the availability of treatment, diagnostic methods have also improved, allowing for earlier recognition and potential early therapeutic intervention. The advent of newborn screening for Pompe disease may identify patients who can be treated before significant irreversible disease has occurred. Keywords: Pompe disease, glycogen storage disease, lysosomal storage disease, enzyme replacement therapy, gene therapy, chaperone therapy, genotype/phenotype, newborn screening

  13. Venereal Disease Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lama, Jerry

    This speech on venereal disease education uses as its focus this quotation from George Santayana, "Those who cannot remember the past are doomed to repeat it." The author presents a brief history of venereal disease education and statistics on the present rate of venereal disease. He concludes that past research and experience indicate that…

  14. Research Areas: Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and C, or by genetic mutations. Other liver diseases can be triggered by autoimmune reactions or drug toxicity. The rise in obesity in the United States has led to a rise in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Many liver diseases place individuals at higher risk ...

  15. Heart Disease in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... United States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease in both men and women is narrowing or ... It's the major reason people have heart attacks. Heart diseases that affect women more than men include Coronary ...

  16. Living with Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Heart Disease If you have coronary heart disease (CHD), you can take steps to control its ... the section of this article titled "How Is Heart Disease Treated?" You also can visit the Health Topics ...

  17. Huntington's disease phenocopy syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Edward J; Tabrizi, Sarah J

    2007-12-01

    Patients presenting with features of Huntington's disease but lacking the causative genetic expansion can be challenging diagnostically. The differential diagnosis of such Huntington's disease phenocopy syndromes has not recently been reviewed. Cohort studies have established the relative frequencies of known Huntington's disease phenocopy syndromes, whereas newly described ones have been characterized genetically, clinically, radiologically and pathologically. About 1% of suspected Huntington's disease cases emerge as phenocopy syndromes. Such syndromes are clinically important in their own right but may also shed light on the pathogenesis of Huntington's disease. Huntington's disease produces a range of clinical phenotypes, and the range of syndromes that may be responsible for Huntington's disease phenocopies is correspondingly wide. Cohort studies have established that, while the majority of phenocopy patients remain undiagnosed, in those patients where a genetic diagnosis is reached the commonest causes are SCA17, Huntington's disease-like syndrome 2 (HDL2), familial prion disease and Friedreich's ataxia. We review the features of the reported genetic causes of Huntington's disease phenocopy syndromes, including HDL1-3, SCA17, familial prion disease, spinocerebellar ataxias, dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy, chorea-acanthocytosis and iron-accumulation disorders. We present an evidence-based framework for the genetic testing of Huntington's disease phenocopy cases.

  18. Epilepsy is a disease!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Oleschko Arruda

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available According to the definition of disease, epilepsy shall not be considered neither a symptom nor a syndrome. Epilepsy is a generic term for a group of diseases characterized by seizures. It implies a state quite distinct from health. Therefore it seems worthy to keep epilepsy as such in the International Classification of Diseases (ICD.

  19. Acid Lipase Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Page You are here Home » Disorders » All Disorders Acid Lipase Disease Information Page Acid Lipase Disease Information Page What research is being ... research to understand lipid storage diseases such as acid lipase deficiency. Additional research studies hope to identify ...

  20. Glycation in Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente Miranda, Hugo; El-Agnaf, Omar M A; Outeiro, Tiago Fleming

    2016-06-01

    Glycation is a spontaneous age-dependent posttranslational modification that can impact the structure and function of several proteins. Interestingly, glycation can be detected at the periphery of Lewy bodies in the brain in Parkinson's disease. Moreover, α-synuclein can be glycated, at least under experimental conditions. In Alzheimer's disease, glycation of amyloid β peptide exacerbates its toxicity and contributes to neurodegeneration. Recent studies establish diabetes mellitus as a risk factor for several neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. However, the mechanisms underlying this connection remain unclear. We hypothesize that hyperglycemia might play an important role in the development of these disorders, possibly by also inducing protein glycation and thereby dysfunction, aggregation, and deposition. Here, we explore protein glycation as a common player in Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases and propose it may constitute a novel target for the development of strategies for neuroprotective therapeutic interventions. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  1. Multi-locus sequence typing of Bartonella henselae isolates from three continents reveals hypervirulent and feline-associated clones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mardjan Arvand

    Full Text Available Bartonella henselae is a zoonotic pathogen and the causative agent of cat scratch disease and a variety of other disease manifestations in humans. Previous investigations have suggested that a limited subset of B. henselae isolates may be associated with human disease. In the present study, 182 human and feline B. henselae isolates from Europe, North America and Australia were analysed by multi-locus sequence typing (MLST to detect any associations between sequence type (ST, host species and geographical distribution of the isolates. A total of 14 sequence types were detected, but over 66% (16/24 of the isolates recovered from human disease corresponded to a single genotype, ST1, and this type was detected in all three continents. In contrast, 27.2% (43/158 of the feline isolates corresponded to ST7, but this ST was not recovered from humans and was restricted to Europe. The difference in host association of STs 1 (human and 7 (feline was statistically significant (P< or =0.001. eBURST analysis assigned the 14 STs to three clonal lineages, which contained two or more STs, and a singleton comprising ST7. These groups were broadly consistent with a neighbour-joining tree, although splits decomposition analysis was indicative of a history of recombination. These data indicate that B. henselae lineages differ in their virulence properties for humans and contribute to a better understanding of the population structure of B. henselae.

  2. Rapidly progressive Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Christian; Wolff, Martin; Weitz, Michael; Bartlau, Thomas; Korth, Carsten; Zerr, Inga

    2011-09-01

    Different rates of progression have been observed among patients with Alzheimer disease. Risk factors that accelerate deterioration have been identified and some are being discussed, such as genetics, comorbidity, and the early appearance of Alzheimer disease motor signs. Progressive forms of Alzheimer disease have been reported with rapid cognitive decline and disease duration of only a few years. This short review aims to provide an overview of the current knowledge of rapidly progressive Alzheimer disease. Furthermore, we suggest that rapid, in this context, should be defined as a Mini-Mental State Examination score decrease of 6 points per year.

  3. Meditation and neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newberg, Andrew B; Serruya, Mijail; Wintering, Nancy; Moss, Aleezé Sattar; Reibel, Diane; Monti, Daniel A

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases pose a significant problem for the healthcare system, doctors, and patients. With an aging population, more and more individuals are developing neurodegenerative diseases and there are few treatment options at the present time. Meditation techniques present an interesting potential adjuvant treatment for patients with neurodegenerative diseases and have the advantage of being inexpensive, and easy to teach and perform. There is increasing research evidence to support the application of meditation techniques to help improve cognition and memory in patients with neurodegenerative diseases. This review discusses the current data on meditation, memory, and attention, and the potential applications of meditation techniques in patients with neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. Human Environmental Disease Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taboureau, Olivier; Audouze, Karine

    2017-01-01

    During the past decades, many epidemiological, toxicological and biological studies have been performed to assess the role of environmental chemicals as potential toxicants for diverse human disorders. However, the relationships between diseases based on chemical exposure have been rarely studied...... by computational biology. We developed a human environmental disease network (EDN) to explore and suggest novel disease-disease and chemical-disease relationships. The presented scored EDN model is built upon the integration on systems biology and chemical toxicology using chemical contaminants information...

  5. Genetics of complex diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellerup, Erling; Møller, Gert Lykke; Koefoed, Pernille

    2012-01-01

    A complex disease with an inheritable component is polygenic, meaning that several different changes in DNA are the genetic basis for the disease. Such a disease may also be genetically heterogeneous, meaning that independent changes in DNA, i.e. various genotypes, can be the genetic basis...... for the disease. Each of these genotypes may be characterized by specific combinations of key genetic changes. It is suggested that even if all key changes are found in genes related to the biology of a certain disease, the number of combinations may be so large that the number of different genotypes may be close...

  6. Radiotherapy of benign diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haase, W.

    1982-10-11

    Still today radiotherapy is of decisive relevance for several benign diseases. The following ones are briefly described in this introductory article: 1. Certain inflammatory and degenerative diseases as furuncles in the face, acute thrombophlebitis, recurrent pseudoriparous abscesses, degenerative skeletal diseases, cervical syndrome and others; 2. rheumatic joint diseases; 3. Bechterew's disease; 4. primary presenile osteoporosis; 5. syringomyelia; 6. endocrine ophthalmopathy; 7. hypertrophic processes of the connective tissue; 8. hemangiomas. A detailed discussion and a profit-risk analysis is provided in the individual chapters of the magazine.

  7. Parkinson's disease and osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaserman, Nathalie

    2005-12-01

    Parkinson's disease is associated with an increased risk of falls. The risk is greatest in patients with advanced disease. Because Parkinson's disease usually occurs late in life, the risk factors related to the neurological impairments add to those associated with aging. The incidence of fractures is high in patients with Parkinson's disease, with femoral neck fractures in older women being particularly common. Risk factors for fractures include a low body mass index, limited exposure to sunlight, an inadequate vitamin D intake with low 25-OH vitamin D levels, and bone loss. Several studies found decreased bone mineral density values at the femoral neck and lumbar spine in patients with Parkinson's disease. Although this decrease is ascribable in part to factors unrelated with Parkinson's disease, such as older age and female gender, Parkinson's disease itself also plays a role, most notably in patients with severe neurological impairments (Hoehn and Yahr stages III and IV).

  8. [Coeliac disease and dentistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gils, T; de Boer, N K H; Bouma, G

    2015-09-01

    Coeliac disease is a chronic autoimmune enteropathy, which is caused by exposure to dietary gluten in genetically pre-disposed individuals. -Approximately 0.5-1% of the Dutch population has coeliac disease, diag-nosed at both younger and older age. Treatment consists of a strict gluten-free diet. Symptoms can be diverse, including dental and oral manifestations. These dental and oral manifestations are often seen in patients with coeliac disease, although most of them are nonspecific. This is not the case for the symmetric enamel defects described by Aine and colleagues, which are very specific for coeliac disease. Early diagnosing of coeliac disease is important to prevent complications by (vitamin) deficiencies or rare (pre) malignant forms of coeliac disease. There seems to be a role for dentists in early diagnosing of coeliac disease.

  9. Pregnancy and rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayed, M; Gordon, C

    2007-11-01

    Pregnancy is an issue that should be discussed with all patients with rheumatic diseases who are in the reproductive age group. Infertility is rarely due to the disease but can be associated with cyclophosphamide therapy. Most rheumatic diseases that are well controlled prior to pregnancy do not deteriorate in pregnancy, providing that the patient continues with appropriate disease-modifying therapy. Some patients with inflammatory arthritis go in to remission during pregnancy. Patients with renal involvement may be at increased risk of disease flare. This needs to be distinguished from pre-eclampsia. Intrauterine growth restriction is more likely in patients with active systemic disease, hypertension, a history of thrombosis and renal involvement. Premature delivery may need to be planned to reduce the risks of stillbirth and can be associated with a variety of neonatal complications. Post-partum flare is common in all the rheumatic diseases.

  10. Legionella (Legionnaires' Disease and Pontiac Fever): History and Disease Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Legionnaires’ Disease Surveillance Network (ELDSNet) History and Disease Patterns Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... that the same bacterium causes both diseases. Disease Patterns Illness caused by Legionella continues to be detected, ...

  11. [The Idiopathic Parkinson's disease: A metabolic disease?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieu, I; Boirie, Y; Morio, B; Derost, P; Ulla, M; Marques, A; Debilly, B; Bannier, S; Durif, F

    2010-10-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder clinically characterized by motor impairments (tremor, bradykinesia, rigidity and postural instability) associated or not with non-motor complications (cognitive disorders, dysautonomia). Most of patients loose weight during evolution of their disease. Dysregulations of hypothalamus, which is considered as the regulatory center of satiety and energy metabolism, could play a major role in this phenomenon. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (NST) is an effective method to treat patients with advanced Parkinson's disease providing marked improvement of motor impairments. This chirurgical procedure also induces a rapid and strong body weight gain and sometimes obesity. This post-operative weight gain, which exceeds largely weight lost recorded in non-operated patient, could be responsible of metabolic disorders (such as diabetes) and cardiovascular diseases. This review describes body weight variations generated by Parkinson' disease and deep brain stimulation of the NST, and focuses on metabolic disorders capable to explain them. Finally, this review emphasizes on the importance of an adequate nutritional follow up care for parkinsonian patient.

  12. Advances in coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, Knut E A; Sollid, Ludvig M

    2014-03-01

    To summarize the recent advances in coeliac disease. Details of the polygenic nature of coeliac disease with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) locus as the dominating genetic element have been uncovered. The existence of a large number of non-HLA coeliac disease genes, only partly shared by each individual patient, suggests the genetic heterogeneity of the disease. The critical role for HLA-DQ-restricted CD4 T cells recognizing antigenic gluten peptides is further substantiated. Involvement of CD8 T cells has received new attention. Other components of wheat than gluten, in particular the amylase trypsin inhibitors, may also play a role. The disease is becoming more prevalent. New guidelines state that coeliac disease diagnosis in children can be made on the basis of clinical signs, serology and genetics without the need of biopsy. The clinical entity 'noncoeliac gluten sensitivity' has received much attention, but diagnostic and pathophysiological definitions are still elusive. The risk for mortality and morbidity in coeliac disease is less than previously thought. Our understanding of the basic and clinical aspects of coeliac disease increases. Coeliac disease stands out as a major health problem of almost global occurrence. Case finding, distinguishing coeliac disease from other gluten-sensitive conditions, better care and balanced use of resources are the current challenges.

  13. Multiple cystic lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Angélica Ferreira Francisco

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Multiple cystic lung disease represents a diverse group of uncommon disorders that can present a diagnostic challenge due to the increasing number of diseases associated with this presentation. High-resolution computed tomography of the chest helps to define the morphological aspects and distribution of lung cysts, as well as associated findings. The combination of appearance upon imaging and clinical features, together with extrapulmonary manifestations, when present, permits confident and accurate diagnosis of the majority of these diseases without recourse to open-lung biopsy. The main diseases in this group that are discussed in this review are lymphangioleiomyomatosis, pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis and folliculin gene-associated syndrome (Birt–Hogg–Dubé; other rare causes of cystic lung disease, including cystic metastasis of sarcoma, are also discussed. Disease progression is unpredictable, and understanding of the complications of cystic lung disease and their appearance during evolution of the disease are essential for management. Correlation of disease evolution and clinical context with chest imaging findings provides important clues for defining the underlying nature of cystic lung disease, and guides diagnostic evaluation and management.

  14. Genetics of Proteasome Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldrin V. Gomes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The proteasome is a large, multiple subunit complex that is capable of degrading most intracellular proteins. Polymorphisms in proteasome subunits are associated with cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, neurological diseases, and cancer. One polymorphism in the proteasome gene PSMA6 (−8C/G is associated with three different diseases: type 2 diabetes, myocardial infarction, and coronary artery disease. One type of proteasome, the immunoproteasome, which contains inducible catalytic subunits, is adapted to generate peptides for antigen presentation. It has recently been shown that mutations and polymorphisms in the immunoproteasome catalytic subunit PSMB8 are associated with several inflammatory and autoinflammatory diseases including Nakajo-Nishimura syndrome, CANDLE syndrome, and intestinal M. tuberculosis infection. This comprehensive review describes the disease-related polymorphisms in proteasome genes associated with human diseases and the physiological modulation of proteasome function by these polymorphisms. Given the large number of subunits and the central importance of the proteasome in human physiology as well as the fast pace of detection of proteasome polymorphisms associated with human diseases, it is likely that other polymorphisms in proteasome genes associated with diseases will be detected in the near future. While disease-associated polymorphisms are now readily discovered, the challenge will be to use this genetic information for clinical benefit.

  15. Coeliac disease and epilepsy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, C C

    2012-02-03

    Whether there is an association between coeliac disease and epilepsy is uncertain. Recently, a syndrome of coeliac disease, occipital lobe epilepsy and cerebral calcification has been described, mostly in Italy. We measured the prevalence of coeliac disease in patients attending a seizure clinic, and investigated whether cerebral calcification occurred in patients with both coeliac disease and epilepsy. Screening for coeliac disease was by IgA endomysial antibody, measured by indirect immunofluorescence using sections of human umbilical cord. Of 177 patients screened, four patients were positive. All had small-bowel histology typical of coeliac disease. The overall frequency of coeliac disease in this mixed patient sample was 1 in 44. In a control group of 488 pregnant patients, two serum samples were positive (1 in 244). Sixteen patients with both coeliac disease and epilepsy, who had previously attended this hospital, were identified. No patient had cerebral calcification on CT scanning. Coeliac disease appears to occur with increased frequency in patients with epilepsy, and a high index of suspicion should be maintained. Cerebral calcification is not a feature of our patients with epilepsy and coeliac disease, and may be an ethnically-or geographically-restricted finding.

  16. Celiac disease and gluten-associated diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, Steve

    2005-09-01

    Celiac disease develops from an autoimmune response to specific dietary grains that contain gluten. Diagnosis can be made based on the classical presentation of diarrhea, fatty stools, and abdominal bloating and cramping, as well as the presence of specific serum antibodies. In addition, gluten ingestion has increasingly been found to be associated with other conditions not usually correlated with gluten intolerance. The subsequent diversity of the clinical presentation in these cases can complicate decision-making and delay treatment initiation in conditions such as ataxia, headaches, arthritis, neuropathy, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and others. This review explores the etiology and pathology of celiac disease, presents support for the relationship between gluten and other diseases, and provides effective screening and treatment protocols.

  17. Diagnosis of Pompe disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, John; Lukacs, Zoltan; Straub, Volker

    2013-01-01

    of the methods used in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of late-onset Pompe disease. Muscle biopsy is commonly used as an early diagnostic tool in the evaluation of muscle disease. However, experience has shown that relying solely on visualizing a periodic acid-Schiff-positive vacuolar myopathy...... will improve patient outcomes as care standards including enzyme replacement therapy can be applied and complications can be anticipated. Increased awareness of the clinical phenotype of Pompe disease is therefore warranted to expedite diagnostic screening for this condition with blood-based enzymatic assays.......The diagnosis of Pompe disease (acid maltase deficiency, glycogen storage disease type II) in children and adults can be challenging because of the heterogeneous clinical presentation and considerable overlap of signs and symptoms found in other neuromuscular diseases. This review evaluates some...

  18. Viral Disease Networks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulbahce, Natali; Yan, Han; Vidal, Marc; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2010-03-01

    Viral infections induce multiple perturbations that spread along the links of the biological networks of the host cells. Understanding the impact of these cascading perturbations requires an exhaustive knowledge of the cellular machinery as well as a systems biology approach that reveals how individual components of the cellular system function together. Here we describe an integrative method that provides a new approach to studying virus-human interactions and its correlations with diseases. Our method involves the combined utilization of protein - protein interactions, protein -- DNA interactions, metabolomics and gene - disease associations to build a ``viraldiseasome''. By solely using high-throughput data, we map well-known viral associated diseases and predict new candidate viral diseases. We use microarray data of virus-infected tissues and patient medical history data to further test the implications of the viral diseasome. We apply this method to Epstein-Barr virus and Human Papillomavirus and shed light into molecular development of viral diseases and disease pathways.

  19. Spectrum of cardiorenal disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter A. McCullough

    2005-01-01

    @@ Cardiorenal disease The modern day,worldwide epidemics of obesity and hypertension (HTN) are central drivers of a secondary epidemic of type 2 diabetes with combined chronic kidney disease (CKD)and cardiovascular disease (CVD).1 Approximately half of those with diabetes will develop CKD.2 Conversely,half of all cases of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are due to diabetic nephropathy.With the aging of the general population and cardiovascular care shifting towards the elderly,an understanding of why decreasing levels of renal function act as a major adverse prognostic factor after a variety of cardiac events is imperative.The heart and kidney are inextricably linked via hemodynamic and neurohumoral function (Fig.1).Considerable evidence shows that CKD accelerates atherosclerosis,myocardial disease,valvular disease,and promotes an array of cardiac arrhythmias.3

  20. Dynamics of interacting diseases

    CERN Document Server

    Sanz, Joaquín; Meloni, Sandro; Moreno, Yamir

    2014-01-01

    Current modeling of infectious diseases allows for the study of complex and realistic scenarios that go from the population to the individual level of description. Most epidemic models however assume that the spreading process takes place on a single level (be it a single population, a meta-population system or a network of contacts). The latter is in part a consequence of our still limited knowledge about the interdependency of the many mechanisms and factors involved in disease spreading. In particular, interdependent contagion phenomena can only be addressed if we go beyond the scheme one pathogen-one network. In this paper, we study a model that allows describing the spreading dynamics of two concurrent diseases and apply it to a paradigmatic case of disease-disease interaction: the interaction between AIDS and Tuberculosis. Specifically, we characterize analytically the epidemic thresholds of the two diseases for different scenarios and also compute the temporal evolution characterizing the unfolding dyn...

  1. [Physical diseases in alcoholism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takase, Kojiro

    2015-09-01

    Rapid excessive alcohol drinking frequently causes disturbance of consciousness due to head trauma, brain edema, hypoglycemia, hyponatremia, hepatic coma and so on, provoked by acute alcohol intoxication. Rapid differential diagnosis and management are extremely important to save a life. On the other hands, the chronic users of alcohol so called alcoholism has many kinds of physical diseases such as liver diseases (i.e., fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis, alcoholic liver cirrhosis and miscellaneous liver disease), diabetes mellitus, injury to happen in drunkenness, pancreas disease (i.e., acute and chronic pancreatitis and deterioration of chronic pancreatitis), gastrontestinal diseases (i.e., gastroduodenal ulcer), and so on. Enough attention should be paid to above mentioned diseases, otherwise they would turn worse more with continuation and increase in quantity of the alcohol. It should be born in its mind that the excessive drinking becomes the weapon threatening life.

  2. Genetics of Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankratz, Nathan; Foroud, Tatiana

    2007-12-01

    During the past decade five genes have been identified that are important in autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive forms of Parkinson disease. The identification of these genes has increased our understanding of the likely pathogenic mechanisms resulting in disease. However, mutations in these genes likely contribute to disease in fewer than 5% of all cases of Parkinson disease. Thus, researchers have continued to search for genes that may influence disease susceptibility. Molecular diagnostic testing is currently available for four of the genes mutated in Parkinson disease. Evidence for reduced penetrance, possible effects of haploinsufficiency, and the identification of nondisease causing polymorphisms within several of these genes has made genetic counseling challenging. Current recommendations are to limit molecular testing only to those individuals who are symptomatic. Furthermore, because treatment is unaltered by the presence or absence of mutations in these genes, restraint is recommended when considering the value of screening for mutations in a clinical setting.

  3. Update on Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siderowf, Andrew; Stern, Matthew

    2003-04-15

    This Update reviews developments in the pathophysiology and treatment of Parkinson disease during the past several years. In the area of pathophysiology, studies have addressed the contribution of environmental factors such as caffeine and pesticides. Large-scale epidemiologic studies have also expanded the role genetic factors are thought to play. Detailed studies of kindreds with familial Parkinson disease due to alpha-synuclein and parkin have catalyzed basic science investigations into the pathologic mechanisms of the disease. These studies have led to the development of a pathophysiologic model of Parkinson disease that emphasizes abnormal protein aggregation. Studies of treatment have clarified the relative roles of l-dopa and dopamine agonists in early Parkinson disease and shown the potential for surgical interventions, particularly deep-brain stimulation, to relieve the symptoms of advanced, medically refractory disease.

  4. Parkinson's disease and genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Jacobo; Otero-Siliceo, Enrique

    2006-09-01

    Idiopathic Parkinson disease (IPD) is a condition of unknown cause. Several factors are believed to contribute to its onset, and many studies have been conducted in search of the possible etiology of Parkinson disease. Genetic factors have become relevant when trying to explain the onset of Parkinson disease. The studies are divided into 2 categories: epidemiological and studies that analyze twins from families with members suffering from Parkinson disease, thus looking for the responsible genetic mutations. In this article we address this controversial topic, reviewing some of the most significant studies trying to provide evidence which relates genetics to Parkinson disease. We present current epidemiological studies and the most important genetic factors related to Parkinson disease, including the latest information currently available on each issue.

  5. Castleman disease (literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Melikyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Castleman disease (angiofollicular hyperplasia of lymph nodes – a rare benign lymphoproliferative disease with prolonged asymptomatic course, associated with a wide variety of autoimmune and oncological diseases and the risk of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. The rare occurrence of this disease and a variety of clinical course did not allow for a complete and consistent research on the etiology and pathogenesis and the standard therapies development. In recent years, the number of patients with Castleman disease in the Russian Federation has increased, which requires its recognition among non-neoplastic and neoplastic lymphadenopathy. The article provides an overview about clinical and histological variants of Castleman’s disease, its pathogenesis concepts, classification and treatment.

  6. Hereditary neuromuscular diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oezsarlak, O. E-mail: ozkan.ozsarlak@uza.be; Schepens, E.; Parizel, P.M.; Goethem, J.W. van; Vanhoenacker, F.; Schepper, A.M. de; Martin, J.J

    2001-12-01

    This article presents the actual classification of neuromuscular diseases based on present expansion of our knowledge and understanding due to genetic developments. It summarizes the genetic and clinical presentations of each disorder together with CT findings, which we studied in a large group of patients with neuromuscular diseases. The muscular dystrophies as the largest and most common group of hereditary muscle diseases will be highlighted by giving detailed information about the role of CT and MRI in the differential diagnosis. The radiological features of neuromuscular diseases are atrophy, hypertrophy, pseudohypertrophy and fatty infiltration of muscles on a selective basis. Although the patterns and distribution of involvement are characteristic in some of the diseases, the definition of the type of disease based on CT scan only is not always possible.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: Ollier disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information & Resources MedlinePlus (1 link) Health Topic: Bone Diseases Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Ollier disease Educational Resources (5 links) Atlas of Genetics and Cytogenetics in Oncology and Haematology Disease InfoSearch: ...

  8. Disease: H00921 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available terion to establish the diagnosis. Congenital disorder; Eye disease; Hematologic disease; Skin and connective tissue disea...se; Nervous system disease TINF2 [HSA:26277] [KO:K11112] Dyskeratos

  9. Genetics Home Reference: Alzheimer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Alzheimer disease Alzheimer disease Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Alzheimer disease is a degenerative disease of the brain ...

  10. Congenital Heart Disease in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and genetics may play a role. Why congenital heart disease resurfaces in adulthood Some adults may find that ... in following adults with congenital heart disease. Congenital heart disease and pregnancy Women with congenital heart disease who ...

  11. Illegal Drugs and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Illegal Drugs and Heart Disease Updated:May 17,2017 Most illegal drugs can ... www.dea.gov/druginfo/factsheets.shtml Alcohol and Heart Disease Caffeine and Heart Disease Tobacco and Heart Disease ...

  12. Bladder Control and Nerve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... procedure at regular intervals, a practice called clean intermittent catheterization. Some patients cannot place their own catheters ... Weight Management Liver Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition Blood Diseases Diagnostic Tests La información de ...

  13. [Rheumatic diseases in pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Märker-Hermann, E; Bauer, H; Gromnica-Ihle, E

    2008-11-01

    Rheumatic diseases can influence the reproduction, the course of pregnancy and the development of the fetus. The inflammatory rheumatic disease itself can be modulated in its activity in terms of amelioration or exacerbation of the rheumatic symptoms. The associations between rheumatic diseases and pregnancy will be illustrated with rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, and systemic lupus erythematosus as examples. Antirheumatic drug therapy during pregnancy and the breast feeding period has to be adapted critically.

  14. Disease Management Update

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The rapid expansion of disease management continues. A multitude of stakeholders and marketplaces are now involved in providing cost-effective quality healthcare for individuals and populations. To help you keep up to date with the very latest developments in disease management, this section of the journal brings you information selected from the disease management and pharmacoeconomic reporting servicePharmacoeconomics & Outcomes News. The following reports are selected from the very latest ...

  15. Disease Management Update

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The rapid expansion of disease management continues. A multitude of stakeholders and marketplaces are now involved in providing cost-effective quality healthcare for individuals and populations. To help you keep up to date with the very latest developments in disease management, this section of the journal brings you information selected from the disease management and pharmacoeconomic reporting service Pharmacoeconomics & Outcomes News. The following reports are selected from the very latest...

  16. Disease Management Update

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The rapid expansion of disease management continues. A multitude of stakeholders and marketplaces are now involved in providing cost-effective quality healthcare for individuals and populations. To help you keep up to date with the very latest developments in disease management, this section of the journal brings you information selected from the disease management and pharmacoeconomic reporting service Pharmacoeconomics & Outcomes News. The following reports are selected from the very latest...

  17. Disease Management Update

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    The rapid expansion of disease management continues. A multitude of stakeholders and marketplaces are now involved in providing cost effective quality healthcare for individuals and populations. To help you keep up-to-date with the very latest developments in disease management, this section of the journal brings you information selected from the disease management and pharmacoeconomic reporting service Pharmacoeconomics & Outcomes News . The following reports are selected from the very lates...

  18. Disease Management Update

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    The rapid expansion of disease management continues. A multitude of stakeholders and marketplaces are now involved in providing cost-effective quality healthcare for individuals and populations. To help you keep up-to-date with the very latest developments in disease management, this section of the journal brings you information selected from the disease management and pharmacoeconomic reporting service PharmacoEconomics & Outcomes News Weekly. The following reports are selected from the very...

  19. Disease Management Update

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    The rapid expansion of disease management continues. A multitude of stakeholders and marketplaces are now involved in providing cost-effective quality healthcare for individuals and populations. To help you keep up-to-date with the very latest developments in disease management, this section of the journal brings you information selected from the disease management and pharmacoeconomic reporting service Pharmacoeconomics & Outcomes News Weekly . The following reports are selected from the ver...

  20. Wetlands and infectious diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Robert H. Zimmerman

    2001-01-01

    There is a historical association between wetlands and infectious disease that has led to the modification of wetlands to prevent disease. At the same time there has been the development of water resources projects that increase the risk of disease. The demand for more water development projects and the increased pressure to make natural wetlands economically beneficial creates the need for an ecological approach to wetland management and health assessment. The environmental and health intera...

  1. NAFLD: A multisystem disease

    OpenAIRE

    Byrne, Christopher D.; Targher, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in Western countries that is predicted to become also the most frequent indication for liver transplantation by 2030. Over the last decade, it has been shown that the clinical burden of NAFLD is not only confined to liver-related morbidity and mortality, but there is now growing evidence that NAFLD is a multisystem disease, affecting extra-hepatic organs and regulatory pathways. For example, NAFLD incr...

  2. CDC Disease Detective Camp

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-08-02

    The CDC Disease Detective Camp gives rising high school juniors and seniors exposure to key aspects of the CDC, including basic epidemiology, infectious and chronic disease tracking, public health law, and outbreak investigations. The camp also helps students explore careers in public health.  Created: 8/2/2010 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 8/2/2010.

  3. [Crohn's disease surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kala, Zdeněk; Marek, Filip; Válek, Vlastimil A; Bartušek, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Surgery of Crohns disease is an important part of the general treatment algorithm. The role of surgery is changing with the development of conservative procedures. The recent years have seen the return to early treatment of patients with Crohns disease. Given the character of the disease and its intestinal symptoms, a specific approach to these patients is necessary, especially regarding the correct choice of surgery. The paper focuses on the luminal damage of the small and large intestine including complications of the disease. We describe the individual indications for a surgical solution, including the choice of anastomosis or multiple / repeated surgeries.

  4. History of Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Tomisaku; Naoe, Shiro

    2014-04-01

    We describe a short history of Kawasaki disease. In 1967, we published a paper entitled 'Infantile acute febrile mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome with specific desquamation of the fingers and toes. Clinical observation of 50 cases'; this was the first report on what is now called Kawasaki disease. Since then, many reports on cardiology, treatment, epidemiology, pathology and etiology of Kawasaki disease have been published. Furthermore, a recent Chapel Hill Consensus Statement on Kawasaki disease in the classification of vasculitis is given, along with a figure on the relationship and classification of childhood vasculitis by autopsy material.

  5. Disease drivers of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodes, Richard J; Sierra, Felipe; Austad, Steven N; Epel, Elissa; Neigh, Gretchen N; Erlandson, Kristine M; Schafer, Marissa J; LeBrasseur, Nathan K; Wiley, Christopher; Campisi, Judith; Sehl, Mary E; Scalia, Rosario; Eguchi, Satoru; Kasinath, Balakuntalam S; Halter, Jeffrey B; Cohen, Harvey Jay; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Ahles, Tim A; Barzilai, Nir; Hurria, Arti; Hunt, Peter W

    2016-12-01

    It has long been known that aging, at both the cellular and organismal levels, contributes to the development and progression of the pathology of many chronic diseases. However, much less research has examined the inverse relationship-the contribution of chronic diseases and their treatments to the progression of aging-related phenotypes. Here, we discuss the impact of three chronic diseases (cancer, HIV/AIDS, and diabetes) and their treatments on aging, putative mechanisms by which these effects are mediated, and the open questions and future research directions required to understand the relationships between these diseases and aging. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  6. Pregnancy and Rheumatic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diseases vary by condition. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) , systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) typically are modified by pregnancy. For example, RA symptoms often improve in pregnant ...

  7. [Rheumatic diseases during pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer-Betz, R

    2012-09-01

    The treatment of inflammatory rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, spondylitis ankylosans and systemic lupus erythematosus, is improving continuously. This has lead to an increasing number of young patients with a wish to have children. Greater insight into the course of rheumatic diseases during pregnancy and post partum has enabled optimized support for women with rheumatic diseases wishing to have children. To ensure a favorable outcome, pregnancy should be started during a period of disease stability and should be monitored closely. A careful assessment of possible risks and the justified use of antirheumatic drugs before, during and after pregnancy are key issues for success.

  8. Emerging zoonotic viral diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L-F; Crameri, G

    2014-08-01

    Zoonotic diseases are infectious diseases that are naturally transmitted from vertebrate animals to humans and vice versa. They are caused by all types of pathogenic agents, including bacteria, parasites, fungi, viruses and prions. Although they have been recognised for many centuries, their impact on public health has increased in the last few decades due to a combination of the success in reducing the spread of human infectious diseases through vaccination and effective therapies and the emergence of novel zoonotic diseases. It is being increasingly recognised that a One Health approach at the human-animal-ecosystem interface is needed for effective investigation, prevention and control of any emerging zoonotic disease. Here, the authors will review the drivers for emergence, highlight some of the high-impact emerging zoonotic diseases of the last two decades and provide examples of novel One Health approaches for disease investigation, prevention and control. Although this review focuses on emerging zoonotic viral diseases, the authors consider that the discussions presented in this paper will be equally applicable to emerging zoonotic diseases of other pathogen types.

  9. Interstitial lung disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diffuse parenchymal lung disease; Alveolitis; Idiopathic pulmonary pneumonitis (IPP) ... The lungs contain tiny air sacs (alveoli), which is where oxygen is absorbed. These air sacs expand with each ...

  10. Ageing and neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chia-Wei; Chen, Yu-Chih; Hsieh, Wan-Ling; Chiou, Shih-Hwa; Kao, Chung-Lan

    2010-11-01

    Ageing, which all creatures must encounter, is a challenge to every living organism. In the human body, it is estimated that cell division and metabolism occurs exuberantly until about 25 years of age. Beyond this age, subsidiary products of metabolism and cell damage accumulate, and the phenotypes of ageing appear, causing disease formation. Among these age-related diseases, neurodegenerative diseases have drawn a lot of attention due to their irreversibility, lack of effective treatment, and accompanied social and economical burdens. In seeking to ameliorate ageing and age-related diseases, the search for anti-ageing drugs has been of much interest. Numerous studies have shown that the plant polyphenol, resveratrol (3,5,4'-trihydroxystilbene), extends the lifespan of several species, prevents age-related diseases, and possesses anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer properties. The beneficial effects of resveratrol are believed to be associated with the activation of a longevity gene, SirT1. In this review, we discuss the pathogenesis of age-related neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and cerebrovascular disease. The therapeutic potential of resveratrol, diet and the roles of stem cell therapy are discussed to provide a better understanding of the ageing mystery.

  11. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Anxiety & Psychosis OHSU - Therapeutic Approaches for PD: Depression, Anxiety & ... Parkinson's Disease? Are There Disorders That Have Similar Symptoms? What Are the Common ...

  12. Lyme disease and conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, H.

    1994-01-01

    Lyme disease is a tick-borne illness that is wide-spread in North America, especially in the northeastern and northcentral United States. This disease could negatively influence efforts to conserve natural populations in two ways: (1) the disease could directly affect wild animal health; and (2) tick control efforts could adversely affect natural populations and communities. Lyme disease affects several domestic animals, but symptoms have been reported in only a few wild species. Direct effects of Lyme disease on wild animal populations have not been reported, but the disease should be considered as a possible cause in cases of unexplained population declines in endemic areas. Methods available to manage ticks and Lyme disease include human self-protection techniques, manipulation of habitats and hosts species populations, biological control, and pesticide applications. The diversity of available techniques allows selection of approaches to minimize environmental effects by (1) emphasizing personal protection techniques, (2) carefully targeting management efforts to maximize efficiency, and (3) integrating environmentally benign techniques to improve management while avoiding broad-scale environmentally destructive approaches. The environmental effects of Lyme disease depend, to a large extent, on the methods chosen to minimize human exposure to infected ticks. Conservation biologists can help design tick management programs that effectively lower the incidence of human Lyme disease while simultaneously minimizing negative effects on natural populations.

  13. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis OHSU - Therapeutic Approaches for PD: Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis Out of the Park for Parkinson's: ...

  14. Epigenetics in neonatal diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xue-feng; DU Li-zhong

    2010-01-01

    Objective To review the role of epigenetic regulation in neonatal diseases and better understand Barker's "fetal origins of adult disease hypothesis".Data sources The data cited in this review were mainly obtained from the articles published in Medline/PubMed between January 1953 and December 2009.Study selection Articles associated with epigenetics and neonatal diseases were selected.Results There is a wealth of epidemiological evidence that lower birth weight is strongly correlated with an increased risk of adult diseases, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. This phenomenon of fetal origins of adult disease is strongly associated with fetal insults to epigenetic modifications of genes. A potential role of epigenetic modifications in congenital disorders, transient neonatal diabetes mellitus (TNDM), intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), and persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) have been studied.Conclusions Acknowledgment of the role of these epigenetic modifications in neonatal diseases would be conducive to better understanding the pathogenesis of these diseases, and provide new insight for improved treatment and prevention of later adult diseases.

  15. Meditation and neurodegenerative diseases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Newberg, Andrew B; Serruya, Mijail; Wintering, Nancy; Moss, Aleezé Sattar; Reibel, Diane; Monti, Daniel A

    2014-01-01

    .... Meditation techniques present an interesting potential adjuvant treatment for patients with neurodegenerative diseases and have the advantage of being inexpensive, and easy to teach and perform...

  16. Inhaled dust and disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, P.F.

    1987-01-01

    This book discusses the following: the respiratory system; respirable dust; the fate of inhaled dust; translocation and some general effects of inhaled dust; silicosis; experimental research on silica-related disease; natural fibrous silicates; asbestos dust levels and dust sources; asbestos-related diseases - asbestosis, lung cancer, mesothelioma and other diseases, cancers at sites other than lung and pleura; experimental research relating to asbestos-related diseases; asbestos hazard - mineral types and hazardous occupations, neighbourhood and domestic hazard; silicates other than asbestos-man-made mineral fibres, mineral silicates and cement; metals; coal mine dust, industrial carbon and arsenic; natural and synthetic organic substances; dusts that provoke allergic alveolitis; tobacco smoke.

  17. Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heneka, Michael T; Carson, Monica J; Khoury, Joseph El

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis is not restricted to the neuronal compartment, but includes strong interactions with immunological mechanisms in the brain. Misfolded and aggregated proteins bind to pattern recognition receptors on microglia and astroglia......, and trigger an innate immune response characterised by release of inflammatory mediators, which contribute to disease progression and severity. Genome-wide analysis suggests that several genes that increase the risk for sporadic Alzheimer's disease encode factors that regulate glial clearance of misfolded...... therapeutic or preventive strategies for Alzheimer's disease....

  18. Pneumococcal Disease Fast Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Streptococcus pneumoniae Transmission Clinical Features Risk Factors Diagnosis & Management Prevention For Laboratorians Drug Resistance Surveillance & Reporting Global Pneumococcal Disease and Vaccine Resources ...

  19. Immunologic lung disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harman, E.M.

    1985-07-01

    The term immunologic lung disease comprises a broad spectrum of disease. The authors have covered a few entities in which recent studies have been particularly helpful in elucidating pathophysiology though not in uncovering the inciting cause. Common to all of these entities is the problem of finding appropriate methods of defining disease activity and response to treatment. As exemplified by the improved outlook for Goodpasture's syndrome with elucidation of its underlying immunopathology, it is likely that better understanding of the immunologic basis of sarcoid and interstitial disease may be helpful in planning more effective treatment strategies. 44 references.

  20. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Managing Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis OHSU - Therapeutic Approaches for PD: Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis Out of the ...

  1. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Anxiety & Psychosis OHSU - Parkinson's Disease: Pharmacological Management of Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis OHSU - Therapeutic Approaches for PD: Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis Out of ...

  2. Alphabetical Index of Parasitic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sickness (African trypanosomiasis) Alveolar Echinococcosis (Echinococcosis, Hydatid Disease) Amebiasis ( Entamoeba histolytica Infection) American Trypanosomiasis (Chagas Disease) Ancylostomiasis ( ...

  3. Falls in Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grimbergen, Yvette Anna Maria

    2012-01-01

    Falls in Parkinson’s (PD) and Huntington’s disease (HD) are common. 50 % of moderately affected PD patients sustained two or more falls during a prospective follow-up of 6 months. During a 3 month period 40 % of HD patients reported one or more fall. Many falls resulted in minor injuries and 42 % of

  4. The neurological disease ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mark; Cox, Alexander P; Chaudhry, Naveed; Ng, Marcus; Sule, Donat; Duncan, William; Ray, Patrick; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Smith, Barry; Ruttenberg, Alan; Szigeti, Kinga; Diehl, Alexander D

    2013-12-06

    We are developing the Neurological Disease Ontology (ND) to provide a framework to enable representation of aspects of neurological diseases that are relevant to their treatment and study. ND is a representational tool that addresses the need for unambiguous annotation, storage, and retrieval of data associated with the treatment and study of neurological diseases. ND is being developed in compliance with the Open Biomedical Ontology Foundry principles and builds upon the paradigm established by the Ontology for General Medical Science (OGMS) for the representation of entities in the domain of disease and medical practice. Initial applications of ND will include the annotation and analysis of large data sets and patient records for Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, and stroke. ND is implemented in OWL 2 and currently has more than 450 terms that refer to and describe various aspects of neurological diseases. ND directly imports the development version of OGMS, which uses BFO 2. Term development in ND has primarily extended the OGMS terms 'disease', 'diagnosis', 'disease course', and 'disorder'. We have imported and utilize over 700 classes from related ontology efforts including the Foundational Model of Anatomy, Ontology for Biomedical Investigations, and Protein Ontology. ND terms are annotated with ontology metadata such as a label (term name), term editors, textual definition, definition source, curation status, and alternative terms (synonyms). Many terms have logical definitions in addition to these annotations. Current development has focused on the establishment of the upper-level structure of the ND hierarchy, as well as on the representation of Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, and stroke. The ontology is available as a version-controlled file at http://code.google.com/p/neurological-disease-ontology along with a discussion list and an issue tracker. ND seeks to provide a formal foundation for the representation of clinical and research data

  5. Seroprevalence of Bartonella spp. infection in HIV patients in Catalonia, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cervantes Manuel

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the first clinical descriptions of Bartonella infection were associated with immunocompromised patient with bacillary angiomatosis, we currently know that this organism is directly involved in diseases affecting a large number of patients, regardless of their immune status. Cat scratch disease, hepatic peliosis, and some cases of bacteraemia and endocarditis, are directly caused by some species of the genus Bartonella. The purpose of this study was to determinate the prevalence of IgG antibodies against Bartonella henselae and B. quintana in HIV patients and to identify the epidemiological factors involved. Methods Serum samples were collected from HIV patients treated at Hospital de Sabadell. Antibodies to B. henselae and B. quintana from 340 patients were examined by indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA. Significance levels for univariate statistical test were determined by the Mann-Whitney U test and χ2 test. Results Of 340 patients, 82 were women and 258 men, with a median age of 42.21 ± 10.35 years (range 16–86 years. Seventy-six (22.3% patients reacted with one or more Bartonella antigens. Of all the factors concerning the seroprevalence rate being studied (age, sex, intravenous drugs use, alcohol consumption, CD4 levels, AIDS, HCV, HBV, residential area, only age was statistically significant. Conclusion A high percentage of HIV patients presents antibodies to Bartonella and is increasing with age.

  6. NEURORETINITIS : A RARE CASE REPORT OF SUDDEN LOSS OF VISION IN YOUNG ADULT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmini

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Neuro retinitis (NR though a rare disease occurring in young adults , mostly unilateral is an inflammatory disorder characterized by swelling of optic nerve head and adjoining retinal nerve fibre layer resulting in a typical Macular star configuration due to lipid exudation within macula and fovea. Neuroretinitis can be due to an infectious process involving the disc , a post viral event , of an autoimmune inflammatory mechanism or sometimes idiopathic in nature resulting in a sudden loss of vision in affected eye along with multiple pupillary defects in form of Anisokoria ( dilated on affected side , Marcus Gunn pupil or ill sustained pupillary reactions . Patients may also present with painful ocular movements mostly adduction and elevation of the eye . Features common to above all 3 groups included age , absence of pain and fundus findings . Preceding systemic symptoms and visual field loss are more common in patient with Cat scratch disease and Multiple Sclerosis and uncommon in those with recurrences . With today’s technological advances , decision making regarding evaluation and treatment of NR is made accurately to reduce the incidence of optic atrophy which leads to total loss of vision

  7. Adhesins of Bartonella spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Fiona; Schmidgen, Thomas; Kaiser, Patrick O; Linke, Dirk; Kempf, Volkhard A J

    2011-01-01

    Adhesion to host cells represents the first step in the infection process and one of the decisive features in the pathogenicity of Bartonella spp. B. henselae and B. quintana are considered to be the most important human pathogenic species, responsible for cat scratch disease, bacillary angiomatosis, trench fever and other diseases. The ability to cause vasculoproliferative disorders and intraerythrocytic bacteraemia are unique features of the genus Bartonella. Consequently, the interaction with endothelial cells and erythrocytes is a focus in Bartonella research. The genus harbours a variety of trimeric autotransporter adhesins (TAAs) such as the Bartonella adhesin A (BadA) of B. henselae and the variably expressed outer-membrane proteins (Vomps) of B. quintana, which display remarkable variations in length and modular construction. These adhesins mediate many of the biologically-important properties of Bartonella spp. such as adherence to endothelial cells and extracellular matrix proteins and induction of angiogenic gene programming. There is also significant evidence that the laterally acquired Trw-conjugation systems of Bartonella spp. mediate host-specific adherence to erythrocytes. Other potential adhesins are the filamentous haemagglutinins and several outer membrane proteins. The exact molecular functions of these adhesins and their interplay with other pathogenicity factors (e.g., the VirB/D4 type 4 secretion system) need to be analysed in detail to understand how these pathogens adapt to their mammalian hosts.

  8. Emerging and Re-Emerging Zoonoses of Dogs and Cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno B. Chomel

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Since the middle of the 20th century, pets are more frequently considered as “family members” within households. However, cats and dogs still can be a source of human infection by various zoonotic pathogens. Among emerging or re-emerging zoonoses, viral diseases, such as rabies (mainly from dog pet trade or travel abroad, but also feline cowpox and newly recognized noroviruses or rotaviruses or influenza viruses can sicken our pets and be transmitted to humans. Bacterial zoonoses include bacteria transmitted by bites or scratches, such as pasteurellosis or cat scratch disease, leading to severe clinical manifestations in people because of their age or immune status and also because of our closeness, not to say intimacy, with our pets. Cutaneous contamination with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Leptospira spp., and/or aerosolization of bacteria causing tuberculosis or kennel cough are also emerging/re-emerging pathogens that can be transmitted by our pets, as well as gastro-intestinal pathogens such as Salmonella or Campylobacter. Parasitic and fungal pathogens, such as echinococcosis, leishmaniasis, onchocercosis, or sporotrichosis, are also re-emerging or emerging pet related zoonoses. Common sense and good personal and pet hygiene are the key elements to prevent such a risk of zoonotic infection.

  9. Respiratory Diseases of Poultry

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new Respiratory Diseases of Poultry CRIS will be established effective October 1, 2006. Initially, the disease agents to be studied will include Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale (ORT), Bordetella avium (BART) and Pasteurella multocida. The research will focus on development of more effective vacc...

  10. [Hypertension and renal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, A.L.; Pedersen, E.B.; Strandgaard, S.

    2009-01-01

    hypertension. Mild degrees of chronic kidney disease (CKD) can be detected in around 10% of the population, and detection is important as CKD is an important risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Conversely, heart failure may cause an impairment of renal function. In chronic progressive...

  11. Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the feet and ankles Causes & Risk FactorsWhat causes CKD?The most common causes of CKD are high blood pressure, diabetes and heart disease. ... caused by CKD.How else is CKD treated?Chronic kidney disease can cause other problems. Talk with your doctor about how ...

  12. Plant Diseases & Chemicals

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Sherm

    2008-01-01

    This course discusses the use of chemicals for plant disease control. Specifically, pesticides that can be used both in commercial or home/yard sitautions. This course also teaches how to determine plant diseases that may have caused a plant to die.

  13. Eosinophils in Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Čiháková

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophils are multifunctional granulocytes that contribute to initiation and modulation of inflammation. Their role in asthma and parasitic infections has long been recognized. Growing evidence now reveals a role for eosinophils in autoimmune diseases. In this review, we summarize the function of eosinophils in inflammatory bowel diseases, neuromyelitis optica, bullous pemphigoid, autoimmune myocarditis, primary biliary cirrhosis, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and other autoimmune diseases. Clinical studies, eosinophil-targeted therapies, and experimental models have contributed to our understanding of the regulation and function of eosinophils in these diseases. By examining the role of eosinophils in autoimmune diseases of different organs, we can identify common pathogenic mechanisms. These include degranulation of cytotoxic granule proteins, induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, release of proteases degrading extracellular matrix, immune modulation through cytokines, antigen presentation, and prothrombotic functions. The association of eosinophilic diseases with autoimmune diseases is also examined, showing a possible increase in autoimmune diseases in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis, hypereosinophilic syndrome, and non-allergic asthma. Finally, we summarize key future research needs.

  14. Paget’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Bertoldi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Paget’s disease of bone is the most common metabolic bone disease after osteoporosis and affects 2-4% of adults over 55 years of age. Its etiology is only partly understood and includes both genetic and environmental factors. The disease may be asymptomatic and can be uncovered incidentally on x-ray or in biochemical tests performed for another condition. It can also manifest itself with bone pain, deformity, fracture or other complications. Paget’s disease is diagnosed by x-rays and in general has very typical radiological features, but occasionally the clinical picture may be unusual and a differential diagnosis of sclerotic or lytic metastases needs to be considered. Plasma total alkaline phosphatase activity is the most clinically useful indicator of disease activity. It is elevated in most untreated patients, but may be within the normal range in patients with monostotic or limited disease. Bisphosphonate therapy is indicated for patients with symptoms and should also be considered in patients with disease sites that suggest a risk of complications, such as long bones, vertebrae or base of the skull. Orthopedic surgery in Paget’s disease patients includes almost exclusively the correction of fractures and arthroplasty.

  15. [Infectious diseases research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carratalà, Jordi; Alcamí, José; Cordero, Elisa; Miró, José M; Ramos, José Manuel

    2008-12-01

    There has been a significant increase in research activity into infectious diseases in Spain in the last few years. The Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC) currently has ten study groups, with the cooperation of infectious diseases specialists and microbiologists from different centres, with significant research activity. The program of Redes Temáticas de Investigación Cooperativa en Salud (Special Topics Cooperative Health Research Networks) is an appropriate framework for the strategic coordination of research groups from the Spanish autonomous communities. The Spanish Network for Research in Infectious Diseases (REIPI) and the Network for Research in AIDS (RIS) integrate investigators in Infectious Diseases from multiple groups, which continuously perform important research projects. Research using different experimental models in infectious diseases, in numerous institutions, is an important activity in our country. The analysis of the recent scientific production in Infectious Diseases shows that Spain has a good position in the context of the European Union. The research activity in Infectious Diseases carried out in our country is a great opportunity for the training of specialists in this area of knowledge.

  16. Tick-Borne Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Topics Tick-Borne Disease Hazards to Outdoor Workers Physical Hazards Heat Stress Cold Stress Sun Exposure Noise Biological Hazards Insects ... No Longer Available Lyme Disease Hazards to Outdoor Workers Physical Hazards Heat Stress Cold Stress Sun Exposure Noise Biological Hazards Insects ...

  17. Parkinson's Disease Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rarer) forms of Parkinson's disease. See also: familial Parkinson's disease Stem cells Very immature cells with potential to differentiate into ... mutations in UCH-L1 may increase risk of Parkinson's onset. See also: protein handling , ... stem cells Undifferentiated cells taken from umbilical cord blood. These ...

  18. Oxysterols and Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björkhem, Ingemar; Lövgren-Sandblom, Anita; Leoni, Valerio

    2013-01-01

    Oxysterols are important for cholesterol homeostasis in the brain and may be affected in neurodegenerative diseases. The levels of the brain-derived oxysterol 24S-hydroxycholesterol (24S-OH) have been reported to be markedly reduced in the circulation of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) (Lee...

  19. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... How Does Depression Affect the Patient's Family and Social Network? How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect Memory? How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect the Urinary System? How Does Speech Therapy Help Parkinson's ... our Helpline: 1-800-4PD-INFO (473-4636) Staffed by nurses, social workers and therapists, our Helpline is here to ...

  20. AUTOINFLAMMATORY PUSTULAR NEUTROPHILIC DISEASES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Haley B.; Cowen, Edward W.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS The inflammatory pustular dermatoses constitute a spectrum of non-infectious conditions ranging from localized involvement to generalized disease with associated acute systemic inflammation and multi-organ involvement. Despite the variability in extent and severity of cutaneous presentation, each of these diseases is characterized by non-infectious neutrophilic intra-epidermal microabscesses. Many share systemic findings including fever, elevated inflammatory markers, inflammatory bowel disease and/or osteoarticular involvement, suggesting potential common pathogenic links (Figure 1). The recent discoveries of several genes responsible for heritable pustular diseases have revealed a distinct link between pustular skin disease and regulation of innate immunity. These genetic advances have led to a deeper exploration of common pathways in pustular skin disease and offer the potential for a new era of biologic therapy which targets these shared pathways. This chapter provides a new categorization of inflammatory pustular dermatoses in the context of recent genetic and biologic insights. We will discuss recently-described monogenic diseases with pustular phenotypes, including deficiency of IL-1 receptor antagonist (DIRA), deficiency of the IL-36 receptor antagonist (DITRA), CARD14-associated pustular psoriasis (CAMPS), and pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, acne (PAPA). We will then discuss how these new genetic advancements may inform how we view previously described pustular diseases, including pustular psoriasis and its clinical variants, with a focus on historical classification by clinical phenotype. PMID:23827244