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Sample records for cat scratch disease

  1. Cat scratch disease (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cat scratch disease is an infectious illness associated with cat scratches, bites, or exposure to cat saliva, causing chronic swelling of the lymph nodes. Cat scratch disease is possibly the most common cause of ...

  2. Cat Scratch Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cat scratch disease (CSD) is an illness caused by the bacterium Bartonella henselae. Almost half of all cats carry the infection ... symptoms of CSD, call your doctor. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  3. Cat Scratch Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cat scratch disease (CSD) is an illness caused by the bacterium Bartonella henselae. Almost half of all cats carry the infection at some ... Poor appetite For people with weak immune systems, CSD may cause more serious problems. The best way ...

  4. Cat Scratch Disease (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth Cat Scratch Disease KidsHealth > For Parents > Cat Scratch Disease Print A A A Text Size ... Doctor en español Enfermedad por arañazo de gato Cat scratch disease is a bacterial infection that a ...

  5. Cat-scratch disease osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on a patient who presented with osteomyelitis of a rib and adjacent abscess as a rare and atypical manifestation of cat-scratch disease. Radiographic findings showed an osteolytic lesion with adjacent mass. Biopsy, serology and polymerase chain reaction technique are essential for the final diagnosis. Prognosis is excellent with full recovery. (orig.)

  6. Cat scratch disease in Greece

    OpenAIRE

    Karpathios, T; Golphinos, C; Psychou, P; Garoufi, A; Papadimitriou, A; Nicolaidou, P

    1998-01-01

    An indirect fluorescent antibody test for Bartonella henselae, B quintana, and B elizabethae was performed in all 18 children who presented to our paediatric outpatient clinic with cat scratch disease over a six year period. Serum samples were taken on admission, after 15 days, and after six months. Diagnosis was confirmed in 15 patients (83%) and was based on seroconversion or a fourfold change of the antibody titre to B henselae in 12 patients and on a single high titre...

  7. Cat scratch disease from a domestic dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tun-Chieh; Lin, Wei-Ru; Lu, Po-Liang; Lin, Chun-Yu; Chen, Yen-Hsu

    2007-02-01

    Cat scratch disease (CSD), caused by Bartonella henselae, is a zoonosis and characterized by self-limited lymphadenopathy. It is transmitted commonly by scratch or bite from cats or kitten. We report an unusual case of CSD caused by a domestic dog scratch that we believe is the first report in Taiwan. A 23-year-old healthy woman developed cervical lymphadenopathy, mild fever, headache, and malaise 3 days after dog scratch. Her symptoms improved after azithromycin treatment. Serology proved B. henselae infection. The owners of a domestic dog might be at risk of "cat" scratch disease. PMID:17493900

  8. Cat scratch disease: magnetic resonance imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cat scratch disease is an infectious lymphadenitis frequently occurring in children and adolescents. We present the magnetic resonance imaging findings of two patients with this disease. In both cases, lymphadenopathy was characterized by extensive stranding of the surrounding soft tissues, consistent with the inflammatory nature of this condition. Magnetic resonance imaging can be diagnostic and may obviate the need for invasive means of evaluation in patients suspected of having cat scratch disease. (orig.)

  9. Cat-Scratch Disease With Bone Involvemnet

    OpenAIRE

    Maia, R; Brito, MJ; Sousa, R.; Gouveia, C.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Bartonella henselae infection typically presents as a self-limiting regional lymphadenopathy. Bone involvement is a very rare form of the disease. Aims: To describe bone infection associated to cat-scratch disease (CSD) in a portuguese pediatric hospital. Methods: Clinical records of children admitted at the hospital with the diagnosis of CSD associated bone infection, during 2010, were reviewed. Diagnosis was confirmed by serology using indirect fluorescence assay ...

  10. Hepatosplenic Cat Scratch Disease in Immunocompetent Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Juan C.; Núñez, Manuel J.; Castro, Begoña; Fernández, Jesús M.; Portillo, Aránzazu; Oteo, José A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Cat-scratch disease (CSD) is the most frequent presentation of Bartonella henselae infection. It has a worldwide distribution and is associated with a previous history of scratch or bite from a cat or dog. CSD affects children and teenagers more often (80%) than adults, and it usually has a self-limiting clinical course. Atypical clinical course or systemic symptoms are described in 5%–20% of patients. Among them, hepatosplenic (HS) forms (abscess) have been described. The majority of published cases have affected children or immunosuppressed patients. Few cases of HS forms of CSD in immunocompetent adult hosts have been reported, and data about the management of this condition are scarce. Herein, we present 3 new cases of HS forms of CSD in immunocompetent adults and review 33 other cases retrieved from the literature. We propose an approach to clinical diagnosis and treatment with oral azithromycin. PMID:25398062

  11. Abdominal (liver, spleen) and bone manifestations of cat scratch disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cat scratch disease is usually a self-limiting illness. Patients may develop systemic complications including hepatic granulomas, splenic abscesses, mesenteric adenitis, osteolytic lesions, as well as dermatologic and CNS complications. In this paper the literature is reviewed and two cases are discussed which present the imaging findings in patients with hepatic, splenic, mesenteric, and bony manifestations of cat scratch disease. (orig.)

  12. A Rare Case Misinterpreted as Breast Cancer: Cat Scratch Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Böyük, Abdullah; ÜSTÜN, Cemal; SOLMAZ, Özgen Arslan; Altinsoy, Hasan Baki; Banli, Oktay

    2009-01-01

    Cat scratch disease is slow progressing disease that is mostly seen in children and young adults and is characterized with regional lymphadenopathy. It is caused by Bartonella henseleae. The causative agent is commonly transmitted from cats to human. The disease is presented with regional lymphadenopathy, fever, fatigue and weakness. A 44-year-old woman admitted to General Surgery Policlinic with right axillary mass was interned. Axillary lymphadenopathy was detected in her physical examin...

  13. Atypical form of cat scratch disease in immunocompetent patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kojić Miroslav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Cat scratch disease (CSD is an acute infectious disease with benign course caused by the bacteria Bartonella henselae. Clinically, it is usually manifested as regional lymphadenopathy and mild infective syndrome. Rare forms of the disease which usually occur in immunocompromised presons are: encephalitis, transverse myelitis, neuroretinitis, granulomatosus conjunctivitis, arthritis, hepatitis etc. Case report. We presented an atypical form of cat scratch disease in a young immunocompetent female person. The disease was manifested with prolonged fever, rash, purulent lymphadenitis and hepatitis. The diagnosis was based on characteristic patohystological finding and exclusion of the other causes of lymphadenopathy. The patient was treated by antibiotics for a few weeks, with surgical incision and drainage of the purulent lymphadenitis. Conclusion. Atypical forms of CSD could be an important differential-diagnostic problem, especially if there is no opportunity for serological confirmation of the disease.

  14. Imaging Manifestations in Systemic Cat Scratch Disease: Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cat scratch disease is a zoonosis caused by Bartonella henselae, which is transmitted by scratches, bites or exposition to cats saliva (1). The disease typically manifests with local lymphadenitis after bacterial inoculation in the skin, however, there is an atypical systemic presentation in 5 to 10% of patients, which causes unspecific symptoms. There are several imaging findings that lead the radiologist to consider this diagnosis, in order to prevent an invasive procedure, especially if we consider that the majority of cases occur in the pediatric population (2,3). Although in the majority of cases the symptoms and imaging findings resolve spontaneously, there are specific indications like the systemic form of the disease,which requires antibiotic treatment. In the present article we are exposing a case report from Fundacion Cardioinfantil; we will review some epidemiologic aspects, clinical manifestations, diagnostic methods as well as imaging findings in Ultrasonography, Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance and Nuclear Medicine.

  15. Imaging Manifestations in Systemic Cat Scratch Disease: Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cat scratch disease is a zoonosis caused by Bartonella henselae, which is transmitted by scratches, bites or exposition to cats saliva (1). The disease typically manifests with local lymphadenitis after bacterial inoculation in the skin, however, there is an atypical systemic presentation in 5 to 10% of patients, which causes unspecific symptoms. There are several imaging findings that lead the radiologist to consider this diagnosis, in order to prevent an invasive procedure, especially if we consider that the majority of cases occur in the pediatric population (2,3). Although in the majority of cases the symptoms and imaging findings resolve spontaneously, there are specific indications like the systemic form of the disease, which requires antibiotic treatment. In the present article we are exposing a case report from Fundacion Cardio infantil; we will review some epidemiologic aspects, clinical manifestations, diagnostic methods as well as imaging findings in Ultrasonography, Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance and Nuclear Medicine.

  16. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in patients with cat-scratch disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: somatostatin receptor scintigraphy images various neoplastic, granulomatous, and auto-immun diseases. Cat-scratch disease in an infectious granulomatous disease usually affecting the lymphnodes. It is not known whether cat-scratch disease provides positive somatostatin receptor scintigrams. Patients, methods: twelve patients with lymphadenitis and suspected cat-scratch disease were investigated by immunofluorescence antibody testing and somatostatin receptor scintigraphy. Suppurated lymphnodes were extracted or drained and Bartonella henselae specific PCR was then performed. Results: eleven of 12 patients showed IgG antibodies against B. henselea. SRS showed positive scintigraphic results in 6 of 11 patients with CSD. B. henselae DNA was detected in tissue of lymphnodes from 4 of 5 patients with lymphnode extraction or lymphnode drainage. SRS demonstrated positive scintigrams in all patients with a positive PCR. In one patient with suspected CSD SRS was negative as well as antibody testing. Conclusion: somatostatin receptor scintigraphy correlated with positive Bartonella henselae specific PCR tests and positive Bartonella henselae specific antibody tests in patients with CSD. (orig.)

  17. Cat-Scratch disease in Crete: an update

    OpenAIRE

    Georgios Minadakis; Emmanouil Angelakis; Dimosthenis Chochlakis; Yannis Tselentis; Anna Psaroulaki

    2011-01-01

    There are few epidemiological and clinical studies about the presence of cat scratch disease (CSD) on the island of Crete. The objective of this study was to analyze a large number of patients with suspected CSD to define the frequency of Bartonella infections in Crete. From January 2005 to October 2008, we studied patients with suspected CSD from hospitals in Crete. Sera of the referred patients were tested by immunofluorescence assay (IFA). For some patients, we also received lymph nodes an...

  18. Cat-scratch disease in Crete: an update

    OpenAIRE

    Minadakis, Georgios; Angelakis, Emmanouil; Chochlakis, Dimosthenis; Tselentis, Yannis; Psaroulaki, Anna

    2011-01-01

    There are few epidemiological and clinical studies about the presence of cat scratch disease (CSD) on the island of Crete. The objective of this study was to analyze a large number of patients with suspected CSD to define the frequency of Bartonella infections in Crete. From January 2005 to October 2008, we studied patients with suspected CSD from hospitals in Crete. Sera of the referred patients were tested by immunofluorescence assay (IFA). For some patients, we also received lymph nodes an...

  19. Cat-scratch disease: a wide spectrum of clinical pictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mania, Anna; Kemnitz, Paweł; Figlerowicz, Magdalena; Służewski, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review is to present an emerging zoonotic disease caused by Bartonella henselae. The wide spectrum of diseases connected with these bacteria varies from asymptomatic cases, to skin inflammation, fever of unknown origin, lymphadenopathy, eye disorders, encephalitis and endocarditis. The reservoirs of B. henselae are domestic animals like cats, guinea pigs, rabbits and occasionally dogs. Diagnosis is most often based on a history of exposure to cats and a serologic test with high titres of the immunoglobulin G antibody to B. henselae. Most cases of cat-scratch disease are self-limited and do not require antibiotic treatment. If an antibiotic is chosen, however, azithromycin has been shown to speed recovery. PMID:26161064

  20. Cat-scratch disease: a wide spectrum of clinical pictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur-Melewska, Katarzyna; Mania, Anna; Kemnitz, Paweł; Figlerowicz, Magdalena; Służewski, Wojciech

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this review is to present an emerging zoonotic disease caused by Bartonella henselae. The wide spectrum of diseases connected with these bacteria varies from asymptomatic cases, to skin inflammation, fever of unknown origin, lymphadenopathy, eye disorders, encephalitis and endocarditis. The reservoirs of B. henselae are domestic animals like cats, guinea pigs, rabbits and occasionally dogs. Diagnosis is most often based on a history of exposure to cats and a serologic test with high titres of the immunoglobulin G antibody to B. henselae. Most cases of cat-scratch disease are self-limited and do not require antibiotic treatment. If an antibiotic is chosen, however, azithromycin has been shown to speed recovery. PMID:26161064

  1. Cat Scratch Disease: the Rare Role of Afipia felis

    OpenAIRE

    Giladi, Michael; Avidor, Boaz; Kletter, Yehudith; Abulafia, Suzy; Slater, Leonard N.; Welch, David F.; Brenner, Don J.; Steigerwalt, Arnold G.; Whitney, Anne M.; Ephros, Moshe

    1998-01-01

    Since its isolation in 1988, Afipia felis has been associated with cat scratch disease (CSD) in only one report and its role in CSD has been questioned. We have cultured A. felis from a lymph node of a patient with CSD. 16S rRNA gene sequencing, DNA relatedness studies, fatty acid analysis, and PCR of the A. felis ferredoxin gene showed that the isolate is identical to the previously reported A. felis isolate. To determine the role of A. felis in CSD, PCR of the 16S rRNA gene followed by hybr...

  2. Cat scratch disease and lymph node tuberculosis in a colon patient with cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Matias, M.; Marques, T.; Ferreira, M.A.; Ribeiro, L.

    2013-01-01

    A 71-year-old man operated for a sigmoid tumour remained in the surveillance after adjuvant chemotherapy. After 3 years, a left axillary lymph node was visible on CT scan. The biopsy revealed a necrotising and abscessed granulomatous lymphadenitis, suggestive of cat scratch disease. The patient confirmed having been scratched by a cat and the serology for Bartonella henselae was IgM+/IgG−. Direct and culture examinations for tuberculosis were negative. The patient was treated for cat scratch ...

  3. Isolation of Bartonella henselae DNA from the Peripheral Blood of a Patient with Cat Scratch Disease up to 4 Months after the Cat Scratch Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Arvand, Mardjan; Schäd, Susanne G.

    2006-01-01

    We report the case of a girl with cervical lymphadenitis and a persistent primary lesion of cat scratch disease (CSD). Bartonella henselae DNA was isolated from plasma samples collected 3 and 4 months after the cat scratch, indicating that recurrent and long-term shedding of Bartonella DNA into peripheral blood may occur in typical CSD.

  4. Cat scratch disease complicated with aseptic meningitis and neuroretinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Laerte Pinto Jr.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Cat scratch disease (CSD is a self limited condition characterized by fever, lymph node enlargement and less often eye involvement. Central nervous system involvement by Bartonella henselae infection is possibly an important cause of morbidity; its role as an agent of aseptic meningitis is unknown. We report a case of a 40 years-old man with CSD accompanied by aseptic meningitis and neuroretinitis. Serum indirect immmunofluorescence (IFI assays for B. henselae were positive and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF analysis showed mononuclear pleocytosis and increased level of protein. Serological tests for other etiologies were negative. The patient responded well to antibiotic therapy with oral doxycicline plus rifampin and in the 12th day of hospitalization evolved to total regression of the headache and partial regression of the visual loss. Clinicians should consider CSD as a differential diagnosis when assessing previously healthy patients with aseptic meningitis associated with regional lymphadenopathy and epidemiological history of feline contact.

  5. Osteolysis in cat-scratch fever

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The osteolysis associated with cat-scratch fever resembles more ominous conditions. The combination of osteolysis and unilateral regional adenopathy in a child or adolescent should suggest cat-scratch disease. Bone scans and CT verified the diagnosis

  6. Cat-Scratch disease in Crete: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Minadakis

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available There are few epidemiological and clinical studies about the presence of cat scratch disease (CSD on the island of Crete. The objective of this study was to analyze a large number of patients with suspected CSD to define the frequency of Bartonella infections in Crete. From January 2005 to October 2008, we studied patients with suspected CSD from hospitals in Crete. Sera of the referred patients were tested by immunofluorescence assay (IFA. For some patients, we also received lymph nodes and blood samples that we tested for the presence of Bartonella henselae by molecular assays. Overall, we tested 507 serum samples and we found 56 (11% cases of CSD. PCR assay was positive for 2 patients; one had a B. henselae positive lymph node and the other a positive whole blood sample. Significantly more CSD cases (62.5%, 35 of 56 were reported in children than in infants and adults (P<0.05. Moreover, we identified that most cases of CSD occurred between May and September (P=0.002 and December and January. CSD is prevalent in Crete and is mostly associated with an increase in outdoor activity.

  7. Cells with multiple micronuclei in cat scratch disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In several cytogenetic studies carried out in inhabitants of zones affected by Chernobyl accident cells with multiple aberrations have been detected. The presence of hot particles with beta and alpha activity in polluted zones has contributed to considering them as possible inductor agent. Even though the etiology of these cells has not been clearly established, viral infections are considered its most probable cause. As a part of evaluation of the radiological impact of the Chernobyl accident, chromosome aberrations and micronuclei in lymphocytes with blockade of the cytokinesis frequencies were established in 14 children of affected areas, with the preliminary diagnosis of oncohematological affection. The most outstanding cytogenetic finding was the presence of 4 cells that contained 7-11 micronuclei in a case, where 504 lymphocytes were analyzed and whose final diagnosis was cat scratch disease. The viral origin of this illness has been reported. This micronuclei distribution was not found in 6074 cells analyzed in the rest of the members of the group. (author)

  8. Cat Scratch Disease in kidney transplant receptors: is it a rare or underdiagnosed pathology?

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Maria Teixeira Verçoza; Carlos Abaeté de los Santos; José Amadeu Vargas

    2014-01-01

    Cat Scratch Disease (CSD) is an infectious disorder which appears after cat scratching particularly in children and adolescents. Bartonella henselae is the etiologic agent more frequently involved. There are only a few recent reports demonstrating the disease after transplantation, although the illness is not infrequent in immunologically competent people. Indeed CSD in transplant receptors has only been recently emphasized in the literature and it was concluded that fever and lymphadenopathy...

  9. CT diagnosis of colonic lymphadenitis in the cat-scratch disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To make a further understanding of CT manifestations of colonic lymphadenitis in the cat scratch disease (CSD). Methods: The clinical data and CT features of colonic lymphadenitis in two cases of CSD were analyzed retrospectively. Results: Both patients had cat contact history. The CT findings were colonic lymphadenitis with solid mass, and marked enhancement after contrast administration. There were no colon narrownest and necrosis of colonic mucous membranes, besides lymph node enlargement along the regional lymphatic drainage. Conclusion: Combination of the cat contact history, CT scanning is of great value in the cat scratch disease. (authors)

  10. Serous labyrinthitis as a manifestation of cat scratch disease: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kantas Ilias

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Cat scratch disease is an infectious disease transmitted by young cats, in which the principal causative factor is Bartonella henselae. The typical course of cat scratch disease is usually benign and self-limited and requires only supportive therapy. However, cases lasting up to 2 years have been reported, and more serious complications may occur. Many manifestations of the disease have been reported by different medical disciplines. Case presentation A case of cat scratch disease in a 71-year-old Greek woman with an unusual clinical course is presented here. Serous otitis media was combined with rotational vertigo due to labyrinthitis. The invaded ear was ipsilateral to the inoculation site. Conclusion Cervicofacial lymphadenopathy has been demonstrated as the most common otolaryngologic manifestation of cat scratch disease. Manifestation in the middle and inner ear has, to the best of our knowledge, not been reported before. Our report presents a patient with cat scratch disease with clinical signs and symptoms in the middle and inner ear.

  11. Cat-scratch disease: a wide spectrum of clinical pictures

    OpenAIRE

    Mazur-Melewska, Katarzyna; Mania, Anna; Kemnitz, Paweł; Figlerowicz, Magdalena; Służewski, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review is to present an emerging zoonotic disease caused by Bartonella henselae. The wide spectrum of diseases connected with these bacteria varies from asymptomatic cases, to skin inflammation, fever of unknown origin, lymphadenopathy, eye disorders, encephalitis and endocarditis. The reservoirs of B. henselae are domestic animals like cats, guinea pigs, rabbits and occasionally dogs. Diagnosis is most often based on a history of exposure to cats and a serologic test with hig...

  12. Cat Scratch Disease in kidney transplant receptors: is it a rare or underdiagnosed pathology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Teixeira Verçoza

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cat Scratch Disease (CSD is an infectious disorder which appears after cat scratching particularly in children and adolescents. Bartonella henselae is the etiologic agent more frequently involved. There are only a few recent reports demonstrating the disease after transplantation, although the illness is not infrequent in immunologically competent people. Indeed CSD in transplant receptors has only been recently emphasized in the literature and it was concluded that fever and lymphadenopathy in patients who had been exposed to cats should prompt clinicians to maintain a suspicion for the infection. In this report CSD infecting a renal transplanted adolescent complaining of headache, blurred vision and fever, presenting a cat scratching lesion in the right arm, with a bilateral painful cervical lymphadenopathy was related. He also presented indirect immunofluorescency identifying that the two subtype's titles of Bartonella-henselae and quintana- were elevated. Treatment with doxicicline e rifampicin was introduced and the patient became asymptomatic in about 3 weeks.

  13. Cat Scratch Disease in kidney transplant receptors: is it a rare or underdiagnosed pathology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verçoza, Ana Maria Teixeira; de los Santos, Carlos Abaeté; Vargas, José Amadeu

    2014-01-01

    Cat Scratch Disease (CSD) is an infectious disorder which appears after cat scratching particularly in children and adolescents. Bartonella henselae is the etiologic agent more frequently involved. There are only a few recent reports demonstrating the disease after transplantation, although the illness is not infrequent in immunologically competent people. Indeed CSD in transplant receptors has only been recently emphasized in the literature and it was concluded that fever and lymphadenopathy in patients who had been exposed to cats should prompt clinicians to maintain a suspicion for the infection. In this report CSD infecting a renal transplanted adolescent complaining of headache, blurred vision and fever, presenting a cat scratching lesion in the right arm, with a bilateral painful cervical lymphadenopathy was related. He also presented indirect immunofluorescency identifying that the two subtype's titles of Bartonella--henselae and quintana--were elevated. Treatment with doxicicline e rifampicin was introduced and the patient became asymptomatic in about 3 weeks. PMID:25317626

  14. Cat scratch disease in 9-year-old patient - a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świątkowski, Wojciech; Rahnama, Mansur; Strzelczyk, Katarzyna; Baszak, Jakub; Sierocińska-Sawa, Jadwiga

    2016-03-01

    Cat scratch disease (CSD) - bartonellosis, is zoonosis caused by the intracellular gram negativebacterium Bartonellahenselae or Bartonellaquintana. The pathogens of this disease enter the human body usually as a consequence of a bite or scratch by young cats which are the natural source of such bacteria. The illness proceeds asymptomatically or with topical symptoms of infection such as a lump, spot or blister. Within 14 days a high fever and topical lymphadenopathy are observed. Lymph nodes are sore and start suppurating. In half of patients, these symptoms may resemble malignancy, and in single cases there are symptoms associated with the musculoskeletal system, such as: osteitis, arthitis and myositis. In paper presented case of 9 year-old girl patients, treated in Oral Surgery Unit due to odema and lymphadenopathy in right submandibular space. Primary surgical treatment of deciduous teeth was conducted without recovery. In few months follow-up, biopsy of lymph node of submandibular group was taken and provisional diagnosis of cat scratch disease was set. Patient was referred to the Infectious Diseases Unit where serological test confirmed cat scratch disease, and pharmacological treatment was conducted with success and recovery of young patient. PMID:27213258

  15. Cat scratch disease: detection of Bartonella henselae DNA in archival biopsies from patients with clinically, serologically, and histologically defined disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, M. A.; McCurley, T. L.; Vnencak-Jones, C L; Hager, C; McCoy, J. A.; Anderson, B; Collins, R. D.; K.M. Edwards

    1996-01-01

    Serological and epidemiological studies suggest that Bartonella henselae is the etiological agent of cat scratch disease. We designed a study to detect B. henselae in archival biopsies by polymerase chain reaction amplification of the 16S rRNA gene followed by Southern blot hybridization. Forty-two histologically defined cat scratch disease biopsies and eighteen controls were selected for blinded analysis. After testing, charts were reviewed for clinical, immunological, and microbial evidence...

  16. Cat-scratch disease: pseudo tumoral presentation. Computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cat-scratch disease is usually a self-limiting illness but it can initially present as a tumor. A case of a lesion of the arm is described, with computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) findings. The radiologic appearance is not characteristic but the diagnosis can be suggested in a predisposing clinical setting. (authors). 19 refs., 2 figs

  17. Unraveling mysteries associated with cat-scratch disease, bacillary angiomatosis, and related syndromes.

    OpenAIRE

    Regnery, R; Tappero, J.

    1995-01-01

    The search for the infectious agents responsible for cat-scratch disease, bacillary angiomatosis, and related syndromes has a long and often circuitous history. Recognition of the etiologic agents and a new understanding of the fundamental features of the epidemiology and natural history of modern day Bartonella (formerly Rochalimaea)-associated diseases culminate a multipartite story that combines clinical medicine, traditional microbiology, and novel technological approaches to solve a long...

  18. Cervical Cat Scratch Disease Lymphadenitis in a Patient with Immunoglobulin M Antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii

    OpenAIRE

    Arvand, Mardjan; Kazak, Ilkay; Jovanovic, Sergije; Foss, Hans-Dieter; Liesenfeld, Oliver

    2002-01-01

    We report on a young patient with chronic cervical lymphadenopathy and serological and histological evidence for infection with Bartonella henselae and Toxoplasma gondii. Serological follow-up studies, including testing for avidity of Toxoplasma-specific immunoglobulin G antibodies, assisted in the determination of the cause of the acute lymphadenitis. Our results suggest that the clinical symptoms were most likely due to cat scratch disease rather than to acute toxoplasmosis.

  19. From cat scratch disease to endocarditis, the possible natural history of Bartonella henselae infection

    OpenAIRE

    Raoult Didier; Collart Frédéric; Habib Gilbert; Lepidi Hubert; Gouriet Frédérique

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Most patients with infectious endocarditis (IE) due to Bartonella henselae have a history of exposure to cats and pre-existing heart valve lesions. To date, none of the reported patients have had a history of typical cat scratch disease (CSD) which is also a manifestation of infection with B. henselae. Case presentation Here we report the case of a patient who had CSD and six months later developed IE of the mitral valve caused by B. henselae. Conclusion Based on this uniq...

  20. Molecular diagnosis of cat scratch disease: a two-step approach.

    OpenAIRE

    Avidor, B; Kletter, Y; Abulafia, S; Golan, Y.; Ephros, M; Giladi, M.

    1997-01-01

    Amplification of Bartonella henselae DNA has been proposed as a diagnostic test for cat scratch disease (CSD). The sensitivities of the following three PCR assays were compared. PCR/rRNA with universal primers amplifies part of the 16S rRNA gene, followed by hybridization with a specific B. henselae probe; PCR/CS and PCR/HSP amplify portions of the gltA and the htrA genes, respectively, each followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. The threshold of detection of B. hensel...

  1. Atypical Cat-Scratch Disease in Children: Report of Seven Presentations Ranging From Hepatosplenic Disease to Horner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilliaux

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Cat scratch disease (CSD is an infectious disease caused by the Gram-negative rod Bartonella henselae (BH. It usually leads to subacute loco-regional lymphadenitis occasionally associated with fever. In most of the cases, it resolves spontaneously within 4 - 6 weeks. However, CSD has also been associated with other atypical presentations. Case Presentation We reported a series of seven children with unusual symptoms of CSD. In particular, we described the case of a child with ptosis, miosis and enophtalmy, suggesting Horner syndrome, associated with cervical lymphadenitis. Cat scratch was mentioned in only one patient, while four of them mentioned a recent contact with cats. We reviewed and discussed the incidence of these atypical presentations of CSD as well as the therapeutic approaches recommended and the available diagnostic tools. Conclusions This paper highlighted the need to exclude CSD in children with unexplained symptoms such as prolonged fever, hepatosplenic lesion and osteomyelitis.

  2. Lymphadenopathy at the medial epitrochlear region in cat-scratch disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our objective was to describe the imaging features of lymphadenopathy at the medial epitrochlear region as frequently seen in cat-scratch disease (CSD) and to compare these features with those seen in non-CSD. Ten patients (four males and six females) presented with a subcutaneous soft tissue mass at the medial epitrochlear region. Three patients were younger than 15 years. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in all patients. All lesions turned out to be regional lymphadenopathy instead of soft tissue neoplasm. They were caused by benign disorders in eight cases, including seven CSD and one other infection, and in two cases by metastatic disease. All lesions, except for three benign ones, were solitary. On MRI, high signal intensity (SI) strands in the surrounding soft tissue on T2-weighted images (WI) were present in all cases. Three cases of CSD showed homogeneous SI on both T1- and T2WI. After contrast administration, a moderate, homogeneous enhancement was seen. The other seven lesions, except for one metastasis, had both solid and liquid components. Liquid components showed high SI on T2WI without enhancement, whereas solid components had intermediate SI on T2WI and marked enhancement after contrast administration. Pathological findings in seven patients, including four with CSD, supported the tentative diagnosis made on MRI. One of two patients with CSD had positive serological test. Cat-scratch disease is a major cause of a soft tissue swelling at the medial epitrochlear region. Identification of lymphadenopathy and its presentation on MRI may be helpful in eliciting an animal-scratch history and achieving diagnostic and therapeutic aims in patients without primary cancer. (orig.)

  3. Cat Scratch Disease Presenting as Breast Cancer: A Report of an Unusual Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Iannace

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Benign lymphoreticulosis (cat scratch disease, CSD may have a clinical course that varies from the most common lymphadenitis localized in the site of inoculation, preceded by the typical “primary lesion,” to a context of severe systemic involvement. Among these uncommon clinical aspects, there is mammarian granulomatous lymphadenitis which may appear as a mastitis or a solitary intraparenchymal mass, giving the impression of a breast tumor. In these cases, intensive clinical, instrumental, and laboratory investigations are necessary to exclude malignancy. Because of its rarity, in equivocal cases, it is reasonable to use surgical excision for accurate histological examination. We report a case of CSD of the breast in a 59-year-old woman, analyzing the clinical, histopathological, and instrumental appearance and also performing a literature review.

  4. Cat-scratch disease: report of a case with liver lesions and no lymphadenopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The usual presentation of cat-scratch disease (CSD) is a subacute regional lymphadenitis following cutaneous inoculation. We present the case of a 10-yr-old white female with a 4-wk history of abdominal pain and fever, without associated lymphadenopathy. A 67Ga scintigram showed inhomogenous uptake by the liver. An abdominal computed tomographic (CT) scan revealed multiple low density lesions in the liver and the spleen, that were confirmed at laparotomy. Stellate microabscesses were seen on a wedge biopsy of the liver and a CSD antigen skin test was positive. CSD should be considered in the differential diagnosis of liver lesions, even in the absence of lymphadenopathy. This case emphasizes the importance of inhomogeneous 67Ga uptake by the liver

  5. Cat-scratch disease presenting as multiple hepatic lesions: case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Andrade Baptista

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Although infectious diseases are the most prevalent cause of fevers of unknown origin (FUO, this diagnosis remains challenging in some pediatric patients. Imaging exams, such as computed tomography (CT are frequently required during the diagnostic processes. The presence of multiple hypoattenuating scattered images throughout the liver associated with the history of cohabitation with cats should raise the suspicion of the diagnosis of cat-scratch disease (CSD, although the main etiologic agent of liver abscesses in childhood is Staphylococcus aureus. Differential diagnosis by clinical and epidemiological data with Bartonella henselae is often advisable. The authors report the case of a boy aged 2 years and 9 months with 16-day history of daily fever accompanied by intermittent abdominal pain. Physical examination was unremarkable. Abdominal ultrasound performed in the initial work up was unrevealing, but an abdominal CT that was performed afterwards disclosed multiple hypoattenuating hepatic images compatible with the diagnosis of micro abscesses. Initial antibiotic regimen included cefotaxime, metronidazole, and oxacillin. Due to the epidemiology of close contact with kittens, diagnosis of CSD was considered and confirmed by serologic tests. Therefore, the initial antibiotics were replaced by clarithromycin orally for 14 days followed by fever defervescence and clinical improvement. The authors call attention to this uncommon diagnosis in a child presenting with FUO and multiple hepatic images suggestive of micro abscesses.

  6. A prospective study of cat-scratch disease in Lima-Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUARCAYA Erick

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cat-Scratch Disease (CSD is a benign lymphadenitis that may progress to severe or recurrent forms, and it is occasionally associated with morbidity. Between January of 1998 and March of 1999, forty-three suspected CSD patients were assessed in the Hospital Cayetano Heredia and the Instituto de Salud del Niño, in Lima, Peru. Twelve patients had a confirmed diagnosis, 8 of whom were women, and the mean age was 10 years old. The majority (53% of the cases were encountered in the summer. All patients reported having had contact with cats. Fever, malaise, lymphadenopathy and skin lesions were the most frequent clinical features. Twelve patients had indirect immunofluorescence antibody test titers of between 1/50 and 1/800 for Bartonella henselae and Bartonella clarridgeiae. Two lymph node biopsies were histologically compatible with CSD. No positive blood cultures could be obtained. This is the first Peruvian prospective study able to identify B. henselae and B. clarridgeiae in pediatric patients.

  7. Seronegative cat-scratch disease diagnosed by PCR detection of Bartonella henselae DNA in lymph node samples

    OpenAIRE

    Konstantinos Chondrogiannis; Antonios Vezakis; Michael Derpapas; Aikaterini Melemeni; Georgios Fragulidis

    2012-01-01

    Cat scratch disease (CSD), the typical clinical manifestation of Bartonella infections usually follows a typical benign self-limited course. Nevertheless, a variety of unusual clinical manifestations and confusing imaging features can lead to misinterpretations and render the disease a diagnostic dispute. Routine laboratory tests exhibit varying reported sensitivity and are usually unhelpful in diagnosis, as serology fails in terms of specificity and/or sensitivity. Herein we report a case of...

  8. Diagnosis of Cat Scratch Disease with Detection of Bartonella henselae by PCR: a Study of Patients with Lymph Node Enlargement

    OpenAIRE

    Hansmann, Yves; Demartino, Sylvie; Piémont, Yves; Meyer, Nicolas; Mariet, Philippe; Heller, Rémy; Christmann, Daniel; Jaulhac, Benoît

    2005-01-01

    Cat scratch disease (CSD) is mostly due to Bartonella henselae after inoculation of the organism through a skin injury. Since the causative bacteria cannot be easily cultured from human lymph node samples, the diagnosis usually relies on epidemiological, clinical, histological, and serological criteria (classical criteria). A study was performed to determine the diagnostic value of PCR analysis for the detection of B. henselae for the diagnosis of CSD and its place in the diagnostic strategy ...

  9. A star in the eye: cat scratch neuroretinitis

    OpenAIRE

    Gajula, Viswanath; Kamepalli, Ravi; Kalavakunta, Jagadeesh K.

    2013-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Neuroretinitis is one of the atypical presentations of Cat scratch disease (CSD). Fundoscopy showed star pattern macular exudates. CSD should be considered in patients who present with blurry vision and typical fundoscopic findings.

  10. Seroprevalence of Antibodies to Bartonella henselae in Patients with Cat Scratch Disease and in Healthy Controls: Evaluation and Comparison of Two Commercial Serological Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Sander, Anna; Posselt, Miriam; Oberle, Karin; Bredt, Wolfgang

    1998-01-01

    Serologic testing for the presence of antibodies to Bartonella henselae is a widely accepted diagnostic procedure for laboratory confirmation of the diagnosis of cat scratch disease (CSD). In this study a commercially available indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) based on B. henselae-infected human larynx carcinoma cells (test A) was evaluated. Sera from 42 patients with CSD (20 confirmed by PCR) and 270 sera from healthy controls (consisting of 63 cat owners, 65 individuals whose last cl...

  11. Evaluation of Indirect Fluorescence Antibody Assay for Detection of Bartonella clarridgeiae and Seroprevalence of B. clarridgeiae among Patients with Suspected Cat Scratch Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuneoka, Hidehiro; Umeda, Akiko; Tsukahara, Masato; Sasaki, Kohsuke

    2004-01-01

    The possibility of Bartonella clarridgeiae being a causative agent of cat scratch disease (CSD) was investigated by using indirect fluorescence antibody assays with 288 suspected CSD patients. Immunoglobulin G antibody to noncocultivated B. clarridgeiae was suitable only for detection of B. clarridgeiae antibody. Significant cross-reactivity between Bartonella henselae and B. clarridgeiae was noted, and no CSD case caused by B. clarridgeiae was detected.

  12. 16S rRNA sequences of Bartonella bacilliformis and cat scratch disease bacillus reveal phylogenetic relationships with the alpha-2 subgroup of the class Proteobacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connor, S P; Dorsch, M; Steigerwalt, A G; Brenner, D J; Stackebrandt, E

    1991-01-01

    The primary structures of 16S rRNAs of Bartonella bacilliformis, an isolate of the cat scratch disease (CSD) bacillus, and a strain phenotypically similar to the CSD bacillus were determined by reverse transcriptase sequencing. These microorganisms were found to be members of the alpha-2 subgroup of the class Proteobacteria. The sequence from B. bacilliformis was most closely related to the rRNA of Rochalimaea quintana (91.7% homology), the etiologic agent of trench fever. The sequence from t...

  13. Antibiotic therapy for cat-scratch disease: clinical study of therapeutic outcome in 268 patients and a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margileth, A M

    1992-06-01

    During 24 months in an uncontrolled, retrospective study of 268 patients with cat-scratch disease (CSD), 202 were treated with 18 different antimicrobial agents. Criteria for antibiotic effectiveness were established. One or two antibiotics were taken separately for at least 3 to 5 days by 202 patients with CSD. Outcome was determined by follow-up examinations and telephone. Effectiveness of antibiotic therapy was based upon 3 or more days of therapy and clinical improvement of the patient with absence of and/or a decrease in malaise, fatigue, fever, headache, anorexia, lymphadenopathy and, in 90 patients, a declining or normal sedimentation rate. Of 18 different antimicrobials prescribed, 14 commonly used antibiotics were judged to be of little or no value in treatment of CSD. Four antimicrobials were efficacious. Efficacy of the three oral drugs in decreasing order was: rifampin 87%, ciprofloxacin 84%, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole 58%. Gentamicin sulfate intramuscular was 73% effective. Antibiotic therapy can be considered for patients with severe cat scratch disease. Conservative, symptomatic treatment is recommended for the majority of patients with mild or moderate CSD. PMID:1608685

  14. Proposal of Afipia gen. nov., with Afipia felis sp. nov. (formerly the cat scratch disease bacillus), Afipia clevelandensis sp. nov. (formerly the Cleveland Clinic Foundation strain), Afipia broomeae sp. nov., and three unnamed genospecies.

    OpenAIRE

    Brenner, D. J.; Hollis, D G; Moss, C W; English, C K; Hall, G. S.; Vincent, J.; Radosevic, J; Birkness, K A; W.F. Bibb; Quinn, F D

    1991-01-01

    On the basis of phenotypic characterization and DNA relatedness determinations, the genus Afipia gen. nov., which contains six species, is described. The type species is Afipia felis sp. nov. (the cat scratch disease bacillus). Afipia clevelandensis sp. nov., Afipia broomeae sp. nov., and three unnamed not associated with cat-borne disease. All but one strain (Afipia genospecies 3) were isolated from human wound and respiratory sources. All Afipia species are gram-negative, oxidase-positive, ...

  15. Cowpox after a cat scratch – case report from Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Świtaj

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cowpox in humans is a rare zoonotic disease; its recognition is therefore problematic due to the lack of clinical experience. The differential diagnosis includes other poxvirus infections and also infections with herpesviruses or selected bacteria. The clinical course can be complicated and the improvement may take weeks. Late diagnosis is one of the causes of unnecessary combined antibiotic therapy or surgical intervention. A case of cowpox after a cat scratch in a 15-year-old girl is presented, with a summary of the available clinical data on cowpox infections.

  16. [Depolarization of primary afferents during real scratching in the cat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baev, K V; Esipenko, V B

    1985-01-01

    Changes in depolarization of primary afferents and their correlation with afferent impulsation and limb movement were studied in the lumbar spinal cord during real scratching of decerebrated cats. Two components in rhythmic dorsal root potential were observed. First--centrally evoked, retained during fictitive scratching after immobilization; second--evoked by afferent discharge, coming to the spinal cord during the scratching phase of the limb movement. PMID:3974754

  17. Utility of MR imaging in cat-scratch neuroretinitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    About 80% of cat-scratch disease (CSD) infections occur in children, and CSD neuroretinitis (optic neuropathy with retinal exudates in a ''macular star'' pattern) mostly occurs in children and young adults. A recent study suggested that CSD optic neuropathy has specific features on MR imaging. However, MR imaging findings in CSD neuroretinitis are not well described in the pediatric literature. We present a patient with CSD neuroretinitis in whom these specific MR imaging features preceded the macular star, a funduscopic finding strongly suggestive of neuroretinitis. This case demonstrates how knowledge of these features is important in the appropriate diagnostic work-up of optic neuropathy. MR imaging also incidentally revealed neuritis of another cranial nerve in the auditory canal - a rare manifestation of CSD. (orig.)

  18. Induction of scratching behaviour in cats: efficacy of synthetic feline interdigital semiochemical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzi, Alessandro; Lecuelle, Céline Lafont; Monneret, Philippe; Articlaux, Florence; Bougrat, Laurent; Mengoli, Manuel; Pageat, Patrick

    2013-10-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of synthetic feline interdigital semiochemical (FIS) on the induction of scratching behaviour in cats during a standardised behavioural test. The trial was a randomised blinded study on a single group of subjects, following a crossover design. The scratching behaviour of 19 cats was evaluated during a standardised test in which cats were introduced to an area with one scratching post. Each cat acted as its own control (receiving, at random, FIS then placebo or vice versa). The test lasted for 5 mins, after which the cat was left alone in the test area. Duration, frequency of scratching and latency of first scratching behaviour were noted. Two independent observers analysed the videos. Thirty-eight tests were recorded with a different scratching post each time (two tests per cat). The scratching post with the semiochemical was more scratched in duration and frequency by the cats involved in the study (intention to treat analysis). The same conclusion was found using per-protocol analysis, which included only cats that scratched during the test. Regarding latency, no significant difference was found between treatment and placebo. The results seem of interest in explaining the role of a FIS in inducing scratching behaviour on a scratching post. The semiochemical approach can modify the choice of areas selected spontaneously by cats, and could be used either as a preventive measure for a cat arriving at home or to control or change an inappropriate scratching behaviour. PMID:23428583

  19. Mapping and Characterization of ``Cat Scratches" on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boubin, G. M.; Reffet, E. G.; Lunine, J.; Radebaugh, J.; Lopes, R. M.; Cassini RADAR Team

    2005-08-01

    During the T3 Cassini spacecraft flyby on 15 February 2005, an image swath of the 5 degrees N, 125 degrees W to 5 degrees N, 10 degrees W region of Titan was obtained by the RADAR mapper operating in synthetic aperture mode (SAR)[1]. In many parts of the swath, big fields of large, longitudinal black stripes known as ``cat scratches" appear. They range in size from 1-10 km wide and from 10-100 km long, and are roughly E-W in orientation, with some variations. These features have the same RADAR properties as dunes on Earth, in particular in contrast, form, length and width. In the west part of the swath, the cat scratches look like snow dunes in Antarctica called megadunes [2] which need a strong, constant wind and a specific surface slope to be formed. In the east part they are similar to longitudinal sand dunes [3]. We seek to understand if Titan's surface is a good candidate for dune formation. In order to make dunes, there must be supply of material and wind. Materials could be fine organic or impact ejecta particles. Our study consists of making precise descriptions, measurements, and maps of the cat scratch fields and comparing these with models of Titan's winds [4], erosion [5] and surface properties [6] in terms of dune formation [3]. The presence of such scratches, and other features like possible wind streaks, would constrain the wind profile, topography and relief, origin and nature of transported particles, and weather on Titan. Acknowledgements: The authors acknowledge the support of LPL and thank the Cassini RADAR team. References: [1] Spaceborne Radar Observations NASA, JPL; [2] Frezotti e.a. Snow megadunes in Antartica. 2002; [3] Greeley and Iversen Wind as a geological process; [4] Tokano. Icarus. 2002; [5] Lorenz and Lunine. Icarus. 1995; [6] Lorenz e.a. Prediction of aeolian features on planets. 1995.

  20. Scratch responses in normal cats: hindlimb kinematics and muscle synergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhta, P C; Smith, J L

    1990-12-01

    1. Scratch responses evoked by a tactile stimulus applied to the outer ear canal were characterized in nine adult cats. Chronic electromyographic (EMG) electrodes were surgically implanted in selected flexor and extensor muscles of the hip, knee, and ankle joints to determine patterns of muscle activity during scratching. In some trials EMG records were synchronized with kinematic data obtained by digitizing high-speed ciné film, and in one cat, medial gastrocnemius (MG) tendon forces were recorded along with EMG. For analysis the response was divided into three components: the approach, cyclic, and return periods. Usually scratch responses were initiated with the cat in a sitting position, but in some trials the animal initiated the response from a standing or lying posture. 2. During the approach period the hindlimb ipsilateral to the stimulated ear was lifted diagonally toward the head by a combination of hip and ankle flexion with knee extension. Hindlimb motions during the approach period were associated with sustained EMG activity in hip-flexor, knee-extensor (occasionally), and ankle-flexor muscles. Initial hindlimb motions were typically preceded by head movements toward the hindpaw, and at the end of the approach period, the head was tilted downward with the stimulated pinna lower than the contralateral ear. During the return period movements were basically the reverse of the approach period, with the hindpaw returning to the ground and the head moving away from the hindlimb. 3. During the cyclic period the number of cycles per response varied widely from 1 to 60 cycles with an average of 13 cycles, and cycle frequency ranged from 4 to 8 cycles/s, with a mean of 5.6 cycles/s. During each cycle the paw trajectory followed a fairly circular path, and the cycle was defined by three phases: precontact, contact, and postcontact. On average the contact phase occupied approximately 50% of the cycle and was characterized by extensor muscle activity and extension

  1. [Interrelation of the kinematics of hindlimb movement and efferent activity in the decerebrate cat during scratching].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esipenko, V B

    1987-01-01

    Statistical dependence between parameters of hindlimb scratching movements and muscle electrical activity was studied in decerebrated cat during real scratching. Power of electrical signal to scratching and aiming muscles and duration of aiming muscle activity are determining factors of movement parameters (amplitude, velocity and phase duration). Experiments with limb deafferentation had shown that statistical dependences between movement parameters and muscle electrical activity reflect the peculiarities of the scratch generator functioning. Some investigated statistical dependences change under the afferent signal influence. PMID:3658041

  2. Conjuntivite granulomatosa atípica causada pela doença da arranhadura do gato: relato de caso Cat-scratch disease causing atypical granulomatous conjunctivitis: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Hassler Príncipe de Oliveira

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Relatamos caso de paciente do sexo feminino, brasileira, 23 anos, residente na Alemanha, que cursou com quadro de conjuntivite granulomatosa bilateral crônica, sem acometimento ganglionar, não responsiva a tratamento tópico. A pesquisa laboratorial confirmou diagnóstico de conjuntivite por Bartonella henselae. O caso demonstra que a ausência de acometimento ganglionar não exclui o diagnóstico de doença da arranhadura do gato.We report a case of a 23-year-old female patient, Brazilian, resident of Germany, who presented with a bilateral chronic granulomatous conjunctivitis, without lymphoadenopathy and irresponsive to topical treatment. Laboratorial work-up confirmed Bartonella henselae as the etiologic agent. The case shows that the absence of lymphoadenopathy does not exclude the diagnosis of cat-scratch disease.

  3. Paralytic rabies following cat scratch and intra-dermal anti-rabies vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    Gowda, Vykuntaraju K.; Basavaraja, G. V.; Reddy, Hamsa; Ramaswamy, Premalatha

    2014-01-01

    Only few reports of failure of intradermal postexposure prophylaxis for rabies following cat scratch exist in the published literature. We are reporting such a case in a 15-year-old girl. The child had category III cat scratch on her face. She presented with progressive paralysis, finally developing quadriplegia and respiratory paralysis. Typical hydrophobia and aerophobia were absent. She received intra-dermal anti-rabies cell culture vaccine. She did not receive anti-rabies immunoglobulin. ...

  4. Clinicopathological analysis of 23 cases of neck cat scratch disease lymphadenitis%颈部猫抓病性淋巴结炎23例临床病理分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王建瑞; 于宏亮; 王小杰

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical and pathological features of the neck cat scratch disease lymphadenitis. Methods From September 2011 to September 2015,23 patients with cat scratch disease were selected,the clinical and pathological features were analyzed. Results To observe the lymph nodes,the display quality was moderate,mild to moderate swelling,sallow little necrosis in section detection;microscope:the follicular hyperplasia as the main performance,sinus dilation structure was still there,neutrophils for interstitial infiltration with focal necrosis,or a piece of purulent surround-ing granulation tissue formation. Twenty-three cases addicted silver fiber staining results were positive, micro abscess surrounding lymph sinus see section showed granular,brown or pleomorphic,rod-shaped bacteria,both color positive. The group on the lymph nodes were removed by surgery,recovered. Con-clusions Head and neck cat scratch disease lymphadenitis lack of specific clinical manifestations,need to be diagnosed in time according to the pathological features,supportive treatment with surgery can a-chieve good prognosis,to ensure the quality of life of patients.%目的:探讨颈部猫抓病性淋巴结炎的临床病理特征。方法选取驻马店市中医院2011年9月至2015年9月收治的23例颈部猫抓病性淋巴结炎患者,分析其临床病理特点。结果巨检:观察淋巴结,质量呈中等显示,为轻中度肿大,有灰黄色小的坏死灶于切面检出;镜下观察:以淋巴滤泡增生为主要表现,窦扩张,结构仍存在,有中性粒细胞间质浸润,有灶性或成片化脓性坏死,周边形成有肉芽组织。23例嗜银纤维染色结果均呈阳性,微脓肿周边、淋巴窦内切片示见颗粒状、棕黑色或多形性、杆状的细菌,均为显色阳性。采用手术切除肿大淋巴结,所有患者均痊愈。结论头颈部猫抓病淋巴结炎缺乏特异性临床表现,需依据病理特点及

  5. Afferent control of central pattern generators: experimental analysis of scratching in the decerebrate cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baev, K V; Esipenko, V B; Shimansky, Y P

    1991-01-01

    Systematic quantitative analysis of changes in the spinal scratching generator motor activity evoked by tonic and phasic peripheral afferent signals during "fictitious" scratching was carried out in the cat. Correlations between the kinematics of hindlimb scratching movement, sensory inflow, and primary afferent depolarization were investigated. Reliable correlations between the parameters of generator motor activity during fictitious scratching were revealed: they depended on tonic peripheral afferent inflow. The functional role of these dependencies consists of providing stability for aiming the hindlimb to the itch site. It was shown that scratching generator reaction to a phasic sensory signal depended significantly on afferent input, signal intensity, and its arrival phase in the cycle of motor activity. Phase correction of "scratching" rhythm was performed by inhibition of the current stage of "scratching" cycle, the inhibition magnitude depending on the intensity of a sensory signal run along high threshold afferent fibers. The moments in the scratching cycle, in which the afferent signal caused no rearrangement in scratching generator activity, were discovered for all investigated afferent inputs. These moments corresponded to the transitions from one scratching cycle phase to another. Integral afferent activity was distributed unevenly in the cycle during real scratching. The main part of it was observed just in that scratching cycle part which included the above mentioned no rearrangement phase points. The data obtained allowed us to conclude that the scratching generator should be considered as a working program for the motor optimal control system containing the intrinsic model of the controlled object dynamics (e.g. hindlimb scratching movement dynamics), which produces an inner analog of peripheral flow. This inner flow interacts with peripheral afferent inflow just as one of the latter components. Centrally originated modulation of primary afferent

  6. Cat scratches, not bites, are associated with unipolar depression - cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Flegr, Jaroslav; Hodný, Zdeněk

    2016-01-01

    Background A recent study performed on 1.3 million patients showed a strong association between being bitten by a cat and probability of being diagnosed with depression. Authors suggested that infection with cat parasite Toxoplasma could be the reason for this association. Method A cross sectional internet study on a non-clinical population of 5,535 subjects was undertaken. Results The subjects that reported having been bitten by a dog and a cat or scratched by a cat have higher Beck depressi...

  7. Development of a Highly Specific IgM Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Bartonella henselae Using Refined N-Lauroyl-Sarcosine-Insoluble Proteins for Serodiagnosis of Cat Scratch Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuyama, Ken-Ichiro; Tsuneoka, Hidehiro; Kondou, Kaori; Yanagihara, Masashi; Tokuda, Nobuko; Shirasawa, Bungo; Ichihara, Kiyoshi

    2016-04-01

    The conventional anti-Bartonella henselaeIgM enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (IgM-ELISA) methods for diagnosing cat scratch disease (CSD) remain poor in both sensitivity and specificity. We sought to develop an IgM-ELISA with improved accuracy in the serodiagnosis of CSD by exploring the antigens that are most suitable for an ELISA. We prepared 5 different protein antigens: antigen I (sonicatedB. henselaewhole-cell antigen), antigen II (N-lauroyl-sarcosine-insoluble antigen), antigen III (processed sarcosine-soluble antigen), and antigen IV and antigen V (sarcosine-insoluble and sarcosine-soluble antigens refined by DEAE-Sepharose Fast Flow ion-exchange chromatography). The IgM antibodies in the sera of 47 patients with clinically suspected CSD (24 definite, 23 suspected) and of 85 healthy individuals were examined by ELISAs using the 5 antigens, and the results were compared with those of an IgM indirect fluorescent antibody assay (IgM-IFA). In a reference panel, which consisted of 5 positive and 5 negative sera, antigen I and antigen III failed to distinguish between the two statuses, whereas the other three antigens succeeded in distinguishing between them. When the cutoff value was set at the 98th percentile of the ELISA index for healthy individuals, the sensitivity of IgM-IFA for the 24 cases of definite CSD was 54%, whereas the sensitivities of the IgM-ELISAs with antigen II, IV, and V were 75%, 83%, and 75%, respectively. The sensitivities of these three IgM-ELISAs for all 47 of the clinically suspected cases were 49%, 64%, and 51%, respectively. In contrast, the sensitivity of IgM-IFA was 28%. These results indicate that the refined sarcosine-insoluble proteins (antigen IV), which possessed the highest specificity among the 5 antigens, are the most appropriate for developing an IgM-ELISA for the highly specific serodiagnosis of CSD. PMID:26865692

  8. Scratch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razvan BOLOGA

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is a brief introduction to the highly innovative product SCRATCH developed at MIT Media Lab by Professor Mitchell Resnick and his team. The product is intended to be used by young children with ages between 10 and 19 years in order to understand the programming basics. The key advantage of SCRATCH is the fact that it does not require any mathematical knowledge in order to use it.

  9. Scratch

    OpenAIRE

    Razvan BOLOGA

    2006-01-01

    The article is a brief introduction to the highly innovative product SCRATCH developed at MIT Media Lab by Professor Mitchell Resnick and his team. The product is intended to be used by young children with ages between 10 and 19 years in order to understand the programming basics. The key advantage of SCRATCH is the fact that it does not require any mathematical knowledge in order to use it.

  10. Scratching behaviour and its features: a questionnaire-based study in an Italian sample of domestic cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengoli, Manuel; Mariti, Chiara; Cozzi, Alessandro; Cestarollo, Elisa; Lafont-Lecuelle, Céline; Pageat, Patrick; Gazzano, Angelo

    2013-10-01

    Scratching behaviour in cats is described as a normal expression of the feline ethogram, having different possible purposes related to visual and chemical communication. During behavioural consultations owners often mention scratching as an additional problem. This preliminary study aimed to understand the characteristics of this complex behaviour by examining the variables displayed by a sample of the Italian feline population using multiple correspondence analysis. One hundred and twenty-eight cats were screened by means of a questionnaire to identify features of their scratching behaviour. Our data showed the importance of both the presence/absence of a scratching post in the cat's living area and its relationship to marking. When a scratching post is present in a cat's living area, the cat appears to use it. Some aspects related to sex, neutering, age and environmental characteristics may modify the expression of scratching as a marking behaviour. Research has led to increased knowledge of this behaviour and may help veterinarians in describing to owners why it is important for cats to express scratching behaviour in their environment. Such information could help veterinarians and owners to recognise normal and problematic scratching behaviours. PMID:23492353

  11. Activity of cerebellar Purkinje cells during fictitious scratch reflex in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshavsky YuI; Orlovsky, G N; Popova, L B

    1984-01-01

    The activity of Purkinje cells (PCs) was recorded in the anterior lobe (the vermis and pars intermedia) and in the paramedian lobule of the cerebellum during the fictitious scratch reflex in thalamic cats immobilized with Flaxedil. In the anterior lobe, the activity of many PCs was rhythmically modulated in relation to the scratch cycle: they generated bursts of impulses separated by periods of silence. Different PCs were active in different phases of the scratch cycle. In many cases the discharge modulation was irregular: the burst duration and the discharge rate in the burst varied considerably in subsequent cycles. The rhythmical activity of PCs was determined by modulation of the frequency of 'simple spikes' reflecting the mossy fiber input. Generation of 'complex spikes' reflecting the climbing fiber input in most PCs was not related with the scratch rhythm. In the paramedian lobule, rhythmical modulation of PCs was practically absent. Rhythmical modulation of PCs in immobilized cats is determined by signals coming from the central spinal mechanism of scratching via the ventral spinocerebellar tract (VSCT) and the spinoreticulocerebellar pathway (SRCP). Results of separate transections of these pathways demonstrated that the VSCT plays the crucial role in modulating the PCs. PMID:6692137

  12. Coordination between head and hindlimb motions during the cat scratch response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson-Kuhta, P; Smith, J L

    1994-01-01

    Coordination between motions of the head and the hindlimb paw ipsilateral to the stimulated pinna were assessed during the scratch cycle in freely moving cats. Motor patterns were determined by electromyographic (EMG) recordings made from epimysial-patch electrodes surgically implanted on the biventer cervicis (BC), complexus (CM), obliquus capitis inferior (OC), and splenius (SP) muscles and by fine-wire EMG electrodes implanted in two ankle muscles, medial gastrocnemius (MG), and tibialis anterior (TA). To assess head motions during the three phases of the scratch cycle (precontact, contact, postcontact), several responses were filmed, and in some cats an in vivo force transducer was implanted on an ankle extensor muscle (MG or plantaris, PL) to determine the tension profile during the scratch cycle. During the scratch cycle, the head's trajectory was usually characterized by a small oscillation in which the head was pushed away during paw contact (as hindlimb joints extended) and then repositioned during the noncontact phases (as hindlimb joints flexed). Neck muscle activity did not occur during all responses or during all cycles of a single multicycle scratch response, and when it occurred, neck muscle EMG was characterized as phasic (a single burst during the cycle) or tonic (low-level activity during the entire cycle). Neck muscles ipsilateral (i) to the scratching limb exhibited phasic bursts more than contralateral (c) muscles, and phasic activity was most frequently observed in the iBC, iSP, iOC, and cOC muscles. The cOC was reciprocally active with the ipsilateral muscles, and its burst coincided with the postcontact phase and the ankle flexor (TA) burst. The ipsilateral muscles (iOC, iSP, iBC) were active during paw contact, and the termination of all three bursts occurred synchronously just after peak tension of the ankle extensor was reached. The iBC was active before the onset of paw contact and may have been responsible for repositioning the head

  13. Pasteurella multocida peritonitis after cat scratch in a patient with cirrhotic ascites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshan Gunathilake

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pasteurella multocida, a zoonotic agent transmitted by canines and felines, has been very rarely reported to cause bacterial peritonitis in humans. Pasteurella multocida peritonitis is associated with high mortality even with appropriate treatment, therefore its early recognition is essential. We report a case of Pasteurella multocida peritonitis following cat scratch in a patient with Child Pugh Class C alcoholic cirrhosis, culminating in multiple organ failure and death.

  14. [Changes in the segmental reactions in the decerebrate cat during scratching and locomotion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baev, K V; Esipenko, V B

    1988-01-01

    Experiments on decerebrate cats have shown that N1 component potential of dorsal surface and dorsal root potential elicited by electrical stimulation of paw plantar surface tonically decrease during locomotion and scratching. Phase changes occur against a background of tonic changes in the rhythm of limb movements. The dynamics of the observed changes correlates well with that of primary afferent depolarization during these movements. It is concluded that presynaptic inhibition underlies the changes in segmental reactions. PMID:3173584

  15. [Relation between parameters of efferent activity and limb position during fictive scratching in the decerebrate cat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimanskiĭ, Iu P; Baev, K V

    1986-01-01

    The influence of tonic afferent inflow conditioned by ipsilateral hindlimb position on the spinal generator of scratching efferent activity parameters was investigated in immobilized decerebrated cats. When the afferent inflow was absent (after the hindlimb deafferentation) strong correlation between the motor activity parameters of successive "scratch" cycles was observed. In case of the intact afferentation this correlation was somewhat weaker and decreased with shifting the hindlimb from the aimed position to overaimed or deflecting backward. The discovered statistically significant correlations between the parameters of different motor activity phases and their dependence on the hindlimb position are organized in such a way that they can provide stability of the aimed position of the hindlimb carrying out oscillatory movements. According to the parameters of the efferent activity and their correlation type, the hindlimb deafferentation is most similar to the aimed position of the hindlimb. PMID:3774066

  16. Activity of rubrospinal neurons during locomotion and scratching in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshavsky, Y I; Orlovsky, G N; Perret, C

    1988-01-01

    It is now well established that locomotion and scratching in vertebrates can result from the activation of a spinal central generator. The possibility of control of these rhythmic motor activities by the red nucleus has been analyzed in the thalamic cat, in which efferent nerve discharges representing fictive locomotion or fictive scratching can still be recorded following paralysis by curarization. It was found that the discharge of lumbar-projecting rubrospinal neurons is modulated in relation to the intensity and frequency of the rhythmic efferent activity in the contralateral hindlimb. The average firing frequency was minimal at the transition between the extensor and flexor efferent bursts and increased progressively to reach a maximum in the second part of the flexor burst. Comparison of the rubrospinal activities during real and fictive rhythmic motor activities revealed only minor influences of phasic afferent inputs. Analysis of the relations between the rhythmic discharges found in rubrospinal neurons, cerebellar neurons (interpositus nucleus and paravermal Purkinje cells of the cerebellar anterior lobe) and neurons of an ascending pathway (ventral spinocerebellar tract) leads to the conclusion that the rubrospinal tract belongs to an internal loop between spinal and supraspinal centres. However, until now, the results do not allow the evaluation of its contribution to the motor performance, even in situations which, like those studied here, do not involve the complex motor control present in the intact cat. PMID:3382511

  17. Structure of a Nudix hydrolase (MutT) in the Mg2+-bound state from Bartonella henselae, the bacterium responsible for cat scratch fever

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    B. henselae is the etiological agent responsible for cat scratch fever (bartonellosis). The crystal structure of the smaller of the two Nudix hydrolases encoded in the genome of B. henselae, Bh-MutT, was determined to 2.1 Å resolution. Cat scratch fever (also known as cat scratch disease and bartonellosis) is an infectious disease caused by the proteobacterium Bartonella henselae following a cat scratch. Although the infection usually resolves spontaneously without treatment in healthy adults, bartonellosis may lead to severe complications in young children and immunocompromised patients, and there is new evidence suggesting that B. henselae may be associated with a broader range of clinical symptoms then previously believed. The genome of B. henselae contains genes for two putative Nudix hydrolases, BH02020 and BH01640 (KEGG). Nudix proteins play an important role in regulating the intracellular concentration of nucleotide cofactors and signaling molecules. The amino-acid sequence of BH02020 is similar to that of the prototypical member of the Nudix superfamily, Escherichia coli MutT, a protein that is best known for its ability to neutralize the promutagenic compound 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanosine triphosphate. Here, the crystal structure of BH02020 (Bh-MutT) in the Mg2+-bound state was determined at 2.1 Å resolution. As observed in all Nudix hydrolase structures, the α-helix of the highly conserved ‘Nudix box’ in Bh-MutT is one of two helices that sandwich a four-stranded mixed β-sheet with the central two β-strands parallel to each other. The catalytically essential divalent cation observed in the Bh-MutT structure, Mg2+, is coordinated to the side chains of Glu57 and Glu61. The structure is not especially robust; a temperature melt obtained using circular dichroism spectroscopy shows that Bh-MutT irreversibly unfolds and precipitates out of solution upon heating, with a Tm of 333 K

  18. Reciprocal Ia inhibition contributes to motoneuronal hyperpolarisation during the inactive phase of locomotion and scratching in the cat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geertsen, Svend Sparre; Stecina, Katinka; Meehan, Claire Francesca;

    2011-01-01

    of motoneurones during fictive locomotion (evoked either by electrical stimulation of the brainstem or by L-DOPA administration following a spinal transection at the cervical level) and fictive scratching (evoked by stimulation of the pinna) in decerebrate cats. Simultaneous extracellular recordings of Ia...

  19. Radiological diagnostic in cat stratch disease and bone lesions - a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cat scratch disease is not a common disease in immunocompetent patients. Its association with bone lesions is rare. A patient with bone complain and radiologic alterations of bone lesion must be investigated for this disease. A simple story can make the differential diagnosis with more complex disease like Ewing sarcoma or eosinophilic granuloma. (author)

  20. [Restructuring of the efferent activity of the scratching generator due to cyclic shifting of the position of the hindlimb in the decerebrate immobilized cat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimanskiĭ, Iu P

    1987-01-01

    The influence of the afferent inflow conditioned by passive cyclic movement of the ipsilateral hindlimb tip along a trajectory near to that of real scratching on the scratching generator activity was studied in decerebrated immobilized cat. This inflow caused significant rebuilding of the scratching generator efferent activity aimed to bring efferent activity into a definite phase correlation with the afferent inflow. Synchronization of fictitious scratching with passive moving occurred at the first movement cycle, the phase correlation between them being contrary to that of real scratching. PMID:3658036

  1. [Changes in the efferent activity of the scratching generator evoked by external mechanical force applied to a hindlimb in the decerebrate cat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigarev, Iu V

    1991-01-01

    Changes in the afferent inflow appeared with application of the external mechanical force to the rhythmically moving hindlimb have been studied for their scratching generator activity in decerebrate adult cats. Phasic relationship between violent hindlimb transference and efferent activity of the scratching generator was opposite to that found earlier during fictitious scratching, which is explained by difference between afferent activity during real scratching movement and passive movement of the hindlimb in the immobilized animal. Maximum redistribution in the relationship between flexor and extensor intensities in response to the stimulation corresponds to maximum rate of the violent hindlimb transference. PMID:1798420

  2. Modulation of oligosynaptic cutaneous and muscle afferent reflex pathways during fictive locomotion and scratching in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degtyarenko, A M; Simon, E S; Norden-Krichmar, T; Burke, R E

    1998-01-01

    We have compared state-dependent transmission through oligosynaptic (minimally disynaptic) reflex pathways from low-threshold cutaneous and muscle afferents to some flexor and extensor lumbosacral motoneurons during fictive locomotion and scratching in decerebrate unanesthetized cats. As reported in earlier work, oligosynaptic cutaneous excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) in flexor digitorum longus (FDL) and inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) in extensor digitorum (EDL) longus motoneurons were enhanced markedly during the early flexion phase of fictive locomotion. We show in this paper that, in contrast, these cutaneous reflex pathways were depressed markedly during all phases of fictive scratching. On the other hand, disynaptic EPSPs produced by homonymous and synergist group I muscle afferents in flexor (tibialis anterior and EDL) motoneurons were present and strongly modulated during both fictive locomotion and scratching. During both actions, these disynaptic group I EPSPs appeared or exhibited the largest amplitude when the motoneuron membrane potential was most depolarized and the parent motor pool was active. There was an interesting exception to the simple pattern of coincident group I EPSP enhancement and motoneuron depolarization. During locomotion, disynaptic group I EPSPs in both FDL and flexor hallucis longus (FHL) motoneurons cells were facilitated during the extension phase, although FDL motoneurons were relatively hyperpolarized whereas FHL cells were depolarized. The reverse situation was found during fictive scratching; group I EPSPs were facilitated in both FDL and FHL cells during the flexion phase when FDL motoneurons were depolarized and FHL cells were relatively hyperpolarized. These observations suggest that the disynaptic EPSPs in these two motor nuclei are produced by common interneurons. Reciprocal disynaptic inhibitory pathways from group Ia muscle afferents to antagonist motoneurons were also active and subject to phase

  3. [Changes in presynaptic processes during tonic subthreshold activation of the spinal center of scratching movements in the cat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavadskaia, T V; Degtiarenko, A M; Baev, K V

    1987-01-01

    In immobilized intercollicularly decerebrated cats tonic underthreshold activation of the spinal scratching generator (after application of tubocurarine or bicuculline on C1-C2 segments) is accompanied by an increase in primary different terminal depolarization, decrease in N1-component of cord dorsum potential evoked by stimulation of cutaneous afferents, decrease in the amplitude of DRP and early polysynaptic responses of motoneurons evoked by stimulation of cutaneous and muscle afferents; a respective rise and reduction in activity of intermediate nucleus interneurons which are mono- and di (oligo)-synaptically connected with afferent terminals. Spinalization of animal led to reverse changes. Injection of DOPA into spinal animals allowed comparing changes in the state of lumbar segmental apparatus during tonic underthreshold activation of spinal scratching and locomotor generators. PMID:3037395

  4. Warthin-Starry特殊染色、免疫组织化学和透射电镜在猫抓病病理诊断中的作用%Application of Warthin-Starry stain,immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy in diagnosis of cat scratch disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄娟; 董丹丹; 徐纲; 辜正策; 郝冀玲; 华平; 何磊; 段芳蕾; 代琳; 雷松; 廖殿英; 王晓卿; 罗添友; 陈昱; 杭振镳; 李甘地

    2010-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the diagnostic utility of Warthin-Starry silver stain,immunohiatochemistry and transmission electron microscopy in the detection of human Bartonella henselae infection and pathologic diagnosis of cat scratch disease(CSD).Metbotis The paraffin-embedded lymph node tissues of 77 histologically.defined cases of cat scratch disease collected during the period from January,1998 to December,2008 were retrieved and studied using Warthin-Starry silver stain(WS stain)and mouse monoclonal antibody against Bartonella henselae(BhmAB stain).Five cases rich in bacteria were selected for transmission electron microscopy.Results Under electron microscope,the organisms Bartonella henselae appeared polymorphic,round,elliptical,short rod or bacilliform shapes,ranged from 0.489 to 1.110 μm by 0.333 to 0.534 μm and often clustered together.Black short rod-shaped bacilli arranged in chains or clumps were demonstrated in 61.0%(47/77)of CSD by WS stain.The organisms were located outside the cells and lie mainly in the necrotic debris,especially near the nodal capsule.In 72.7%(56/77)of the cases,dot-like,granular as well as few linear positive signals were observed using BhmAB immunostain and showed similar localization.Positive results for both stains were identified in 59.7%(46/77)of the cases.When applying both stains together,Bartonella henselae was observed in 74.0%(57/77)of the earle.The difference between the results obtained by WS stain and BhmAB immunostain was of statistical significance(P<0.05).Conclusions Bartonella henselae is the causative pathogen of cat scratch disease.WS stain,BhmAB immunostain and transmission electron microscopy are helpful in confirming the histologic diagnosis.Immunostaining using BhmAB can be a better alternative than WS stain in demonstrating the organisms.%目的 探讨Warthin-Starry银染色法、抗汉赛巴尔通体单克隆抗体和电镜在检测人巴尔通体感染、确诊猫抓病中的实用价值.方法 收集1998

  5. An abscess due to Pasteurella multocida after a cat scratch: Case report and evaluation of antibiotic prophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeşim Alpay

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pasteurella multocida has been isolated from 50% to 70% of healthy cats and most commonly associated with acute skin and soft tissue infections following an animal bite or scratch. As the zone and depth of injury can lead to more serious infections such as deep tissue infections, septic arthritis, osteomyelitis. However, no predictive factor showing which wound would be infected. In our case, patient whom applied with abscess after a cat scratch and P. multocida was found as a causative agent. This situation has caused to review us, once more, that which cases should be taken antibiotic pro­phylaxis in addition to immunoprophylaxis (for rabies post-exposure prophylaxis, and anti-tetanus prophylaxis in the first admission. Antibiotic prophylaxis should be used for 3-5 days in selected cases if they include; moderate to severe crushing injuries especially edematous form, less than 8 hours old, bone or joint penetration, hand wounds, especially emphasizes the importance of hand injuries and deep penetrations. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2014; 4(4: 159-161

  6. [Changes in the intensity of integral afferent inflow from limb receptors and the level of polarization of primary afferent endings in the decerebrate cat during scratching].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baev, K V; Esipenko, V B

    1988-01-01

    The experiments performed on decerebrated cats have shown that afferent activity during scratching consisted of two components--tonic and periodic phasic ones. The first component was determined by the limb position, the second was closely related to the amplitude and velocity of joint angle changes. Maximum of integral afferent activity in the cycle coincided with the scratching jerk phase. These two components of afferent activity evoked corresponding depolarization changes in primary afferent terminals and these changes added to those elicited by central generator. Statistical correlations between the aforementioned parameters were studied. The afferent control mechanisms of scratching generator are under discussion. PMID:3380211

  7. [Changes in the excitability of motor neurons and synaptic effects on them during formation of the generator of scratching movements in the cat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavadskaia, T V; Degtiarenko, A M; Baev, K V

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that the state of the segmental apparatus of the lumbal spinal cord of immobilized intercollicularly decerebrated cats during formation of a scratching generator is essentially different from that of a spinal animal. The excitability of "aiming" and "scratching" motoneurons increases, recurrent and reciprocal Ia inhibition of motoneurons becomes stronger and influence of Ib afferents weaker. The flexor reflex afferents exert inhibitory influences on "aiming" motoneurons. After spinalization these influences become excitatory, and the inhibitory influences on "scratching" motoneurons become weaker. The functional role of described changes is discussed. PMID:3110635

  8. [Readjustment of the efferent activity of the scratching generator in response to stimulation of cutaneous afferents of the hindlimb of the decerebrate immobilized cat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimanskiĭ, Iu P; Baev, K V

    1987-01-01

    Rebuildings of the scratching generator efferent activity caused by the phasic electrical stimulation of ipsilateral hindlimb skin nerves during different hindlimb positions were studied in decerebrated immobilized cats. Stimulation was followed by short latency inhibition of the efferent activity. Stimulation did not cause correlation shifts in the common "aiming" and "scratching" activity. Changes in the efferent activity cycle duration and intensity depended on the stimulation phase. Inversion of intensity changes occurred with transition from the middle-force to strong stimulation. A functional role of the dependence of the efferent activity rebuilding on the stimulation phase is considered. The scratching generator is supposed to contain a model of the afferent inflow which enters the spinal cord during real scratching. PMID:3614458

  9. Reciprocal Ia inhibition contributes to motoneuronal hyperpolarisation during the inactive phase of locomotion and scratching in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geertsen, Svend S; Stecina, Katinka; Meehan, Claire F; Nielsen, Jens B; Hultborn, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the classical idea that 'reciprocal inhibition' is involved in the hyperpolarisation of motoneurones in their inactive phase during rhythmic activity is still under debate. Here, we investigated the contribution of reciprocal Ia inhibition to the hyperpolarisation of motoneurones during fictive locomotion (evoked either by electrical stimulation of the brainstem or by l-DOPA administration following a spinal transection at the cervical level) and fictive scratching (evoked by stimulation of the pinna) in decerebrate cats. Simultaneous extracellular recordings of Ia inhibitory interneurones and intracellular recordings of lumbar motoneurones revealed the interneurones to be most active when their target motoneurones were hyperpolarised (i.e. in the inactive phase of the target motoneurones). To date, these results are the most direct evidence that Ia inhibitory interneurones contribute to the hyperpolarisation of motoneurones during rhythmic behaviours. We also estimated the amount of Ia inhibition as the amplitude of Ia IPSC in voltage-clamp mode. In both flexor and extensor motoneurones, Ia IPSCs were always larger in the inactive phase than in the active phase during locomotion (n = 14) and during scratch (n = 11). Results obtained from spinalised animals demonstrate that the spinal rhythm-generating network simultaneously drives the motoneurones of one muscle group and the Ia interneurones projecting to motoneurones of the antagonist muscles in parallel. Our results thus support the classical view of reciprocal inhibition as a basis for relaxation of antagonist muscles during flexion-extension movements. PMID:21059756

  10. [Readjustment of the efferent activity of the scratching generator in response to stimulation of muscle afferents of the hindlimb of the decerebrate immobilized cat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimanskiĭ, Iu P; Baev, K V

    1987-01-01

    Rebuildings of the scratching generator activity caused by phasic electrical stimulation of ipsilateral hindlimb muscle nerves during different hindlimb positions were studied in decerebrated immobilized cats. Strong dependence of these rebuildings on the stimulation phase was observed. The character of the "scratch" cycle duration rebuilding was formed by the scratching generator tendency to bring efferent activity into such correlation with the stimulus that the stimulation moment coincided with the moment of efferent activity phase triggering. Phasic altering of the efferent activity intensity rebuilding was observed against a background of "aiming" and "scratching" activity correlation shift in the direction of strengthening activation of muscles innervated by the stimulated nerve. This rebuilding was intensified when the hindlimb deflects from the aimed position in the direction of corresponding muscles stretching. Physiological sense of "rebuilding absence phases" is discussed. It is postulated that absence of the duration and intensity changes can be achieved simultaneously only with definite correlation between phase and intensity of the afferent impulsation burst. PMID:3614457

  11. Laryngeal disease in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macphail, Catriona

    2014-01-01

    The most common disease process involving the larynx is laryngeal paralysis, which occurs much more frequently in dogs than in cats. Diagnosis of laryngeal paralysis requires close attention to anesthetic plane and coordination of respiratory effort with laryngeal motion. Surgical arytenoid lateralization improves respiration and quality of life in dogs with laryngeal paralysis; however, aspiration pneumonia is a recognized complication, and generalized neuropathy can progress. Laryngeal collapse can result from any cause of chronic upper airway obstruction, but is most often associated with unaddressed brachycephalic airway syndrome. Laryngeal neoplasia, while generally uncommon, occurs more frequently in cats than in dogs. PMID:24268331

  12. Clinical pathologic analysis of the eat-scratch diseases%猫抓病2例临床病理分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王琪

    2009-01-01

    目的 探讨猫抓病的临床病理学特征、诊断及鉴别诊断.方法 对2例猫抓病进行临床病理分析,应用Warthin-Starry嗜银纤维染色进行诊断和鉴别诊断.结果 2例猫抓病患者,1例有明确的被猫咬伤手指史,1例可疑被猫抓咬病史.镜下见大量淋巴结构破坏,多发性、大小不一的圆形结节性肉芽肿性病变.结节中央为含嗜中性粒细胞的中心性坏死,其间见少量类上皮细胞、多核巨细胞等.肉芽肿性结节为非干酪样坏死性.Warthin-Starry嗜银纤维染色发现结节内有大量阳性杆菌.结论 猫抓病常见的病原体为巴尔通氏体,其淋巴结肉芽肿的病理组织学变化酷似性病性淋巴肉芽肿、非干酪性结核等.可根据临床病史、特殊皮肤试验、病理组织学改变及嗜银纤维染色来加以诊断和鉴别诊断.%Objiective To explore clinical pathologic characteristics, diagnosis and differential diagnosis of the cat-scratch diseases. Methods 2 patients with cat-scratch diseases were analyzed by histological observation and Warthin-Starry argentaffine fibers stain. Results One patient had a clearly medical history bitten finger by a roam a-bout cat. Histologically, the nodular was composed of epithelioid cells, multinuclear giant cells with a central necrot-ic. Conclusions The common etiology of the cat-scratch disease were Bartonella hensellae. These lesions greagly re-semble those of lymphogranuloma venereum and non-caseous tuberculosis. The diagnosis and differential diagnosis was based on the history, a specific cutaneous test and Warthin-Starry argentaffine fibers stain.

  13. Concurrent Diseases and Conditions in Cats with Renal Infarcts

    OpenAIRE

    Hickey, M.C.; Jandrey, K.; Farrell, K.S.; Carlson‐Bremer, D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Renal infarcts identified without definitive association with any specific disease process. Objective Determine diseases associated with diagnosis of renal infarcts in cats diagnosed by sonography or necropsy. Animals 600 cats underwent abdominal ultrasonography, necropsy, or both at a veterinary medical teaching hospital. Methods Information obtained from electronic medical records. Cats classified as having renal infarct present based on results of sonographic evaluation or necro...

  14. Infectious diseases in large-scale cat hoarding investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, K C; Levy, J K; Crawford, P C; Leutenegger, C M; Moriello, K A

    2014-08-01

    Animal hoarders accumulate animals in over-crowded conditions without adequate nutrition, sanitation, and veterinary care. As a result, animals rescued from hoarding frequently have a variety of medical conditions including respiratory infections, gastrointestinal disease, parasitism, malnutrition, and other evidence of neglect. The purpose of this study was to characterize the infectious diseases carried by clinically affected cats and to determine the prevalence of retroviral infections among cats in large-scale cat hoarding investigations. Records were reviewed retrospectively from four large-scale seizures of cats from failed sanctuaries from November 2009 through March 2012. The number of cats seized in each case ranged from 387 to 697. Cats were screened for feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) in all four cases and for dermatophytosis in one case. A subset of cats exhibiting signs of upper respiratory disease or diarrhea had been tested for infections by PCR and fecal flotation for treatment planning. Mycoplasma felis (78%), calicivirus (78%), and Streptococcus equi subspecies zooepidemicus (55%) were the most common respiratory infections. Feline enteric coronavirus (88%), Giardia (56%), Clostridium perfringens (49%), and Tritrichomonas foetus (39%) were most common in cats with diarrhea. The seroprevalence of FeLV and FIV were 8% and 8%, respectively. In the one case in which cats with lesions suspicious for dermatophytosis were cultured for Microsporum canis, 69/76 lesional cats were culture-positive; of these, half were believed to be truly infected and half were believed to be fomite carriers. Cats from large-scale hoarding cases had high risk for enteric and respiratory infections, retroviruses, and dermatophytosis. Case responders should be prepared for mass treatment of infectious diseases and should implement protocols to prevent transmission of feline or zoonotic infections during the emergency response and when

  15. Zoonotic diseases associated with free-roaming cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhold, R W; Jessup, D A

    2013-05-01

    Free-roaming cat populations have been identified as a significant public health threat and are a source for several zoonotic diseases including rabies, toxoplasmosis, cutaneous larval migrans because of various nematode parasites, plague, tularemia and murine typhus. Several of these diseases are reported to cause mortality in humans and can cause other important health issues including abortion, blindness, pruritic skin rashes and other various symptoms. A recent case of rabies in a young girl from California that likely was transmitted by a free-roaming cat underscores that free-roaming cats can be a source of zoonotic diseases. Increased attention has been placed on trap-neuter-release (TNR) programmes as a viable tool to manage cat populations. However, some studies have shown that TNR leads to increased immigration of unneutered cats into neutered populations as well as increased kitten survival in neutered groups. These compensatory mechanisms in neutered groups leading to increased kitten survival and immigration would confound rabies vaccination campaigns and produce naïve populations of cats that can serve as source of zoonotic disease agents owing to lack of immunity. This manuscript is a review of the various diseases of free-roaming cats and the public health implications associated with the cat populations. PMID:22830565

  16. Scratch cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Milonovich, Brandon

    2013-01-01

    A practical approach with hands-on recipes to learn more about Scratch and its features.Scratch Cookbook is great for people who are still relatively new to programming but wish to learn more. It assumes you know the basics of computer operation. The methods of using Scratch are worked through quickly with a focus on more advanced topics, though readers can move at their own pace to learn all the techniques they need.

  17. Cardiopulmonary disease in the geriatric dog and cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incidence of cardiopulmonary disease increases with age. Degenerative valvular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and arrhythmias are common in the geriatric dog. Chronic bronchial disease, pulmonary neoplasia, and arrhythmias occur in the geriatric cat. Systemic diseases in both species often show cardiopulmonary manifestations. Medical management to treat the underlying disease and to control clinical signs is complicated by altered absorption, metabolism, and elimination of drugs

  18. Serum Beta Hydroxybutyrate Concentrations in Cats with Chronic Kidney Disease, Hyperthyroidism, or Hepatic Lipidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Gorman, L.; Sharkey, L.C.; Armstrong, P.J.; Little, K.; Rendahl, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Ketones, including beta hydroxybutyrate (BHB), are produced in conditions of negative energy balance and decreased glucose utilization. Serum BHB concentrations in cats are poorly characterized in diseases other than diabetes mellitus. Hypothesis Serum BHB concentrations will be increased in cats with chronic kidney disease (CKD), hyperthyroidism (HT), or hepatic lipidosis (HL). Animals Twenty‐eight client‐owned cats with CKD, 34 cats with HT, and 15 cats with HL; 43 healthy cats. ...

  19. Limited sampling pharmacokinetics of subcutaneous ondansetron in healthy geriatric cats, cats with chronic kidney disease, and cats with liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, R L; Wittenburg, L A; Hansen, R J; Gustafson, D L; Quimby, J M

    2016-08-01

    Ondansetron, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, is an effective anti-emetic in cats. The purpose of this study was to compare pharmacokinetics of subcutaneous (SQ) ondansetron in healthy geriatric cats to cats with chronic kidney disease (CKD) or liver disease using a limited sampling strategy. 60 cats participated; 20 per group. Blood was drawn 30 and 120 min following one 2 mg (mean 0.49 mg/kg, range 0.27-1.05 mg/kg) SQ dose of ondansetron. Ondansetron concentrations were measured by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. Drug exposure represented as area under the curve (AUC) was predicted using a limited sampling approach based on multiple linear regression analysis from previous full sampling studies, and clearance (CL/F) estimated using noncompartmental methods. Kruskal-Wallis anova was used to compare parameters between groups. Mean AUC (ng/mL·h) of subcutaneous ondansetron was 301.4 (geriatric), 415.2 (CKD), and 587.0 (liver). CL/F (L/h/kg) of SQ ondansetron was 1.157 (geriatric), 0.967 (CKD), and 0.795 (liver). AUC was significantly higher in liver and CKD cats when compared to geriatric cats (P < 0.05). CL/F in liver cats was significantly decreased (P < 0.05) compared to geriatric cats. In age-matched subset analysis, AUC and CL/F in liver cats remained significantly different from geriatric cats. PMID:26667224

  20. Disseminated cat-scratch disease in an adult with selective IgA deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Aaron Rohr, MD, MS; Ryan Ash, MD; John Vadaparampil, MD; Jacqueline Hill, MPH; Louis Wetzel, MD

    2016-01-01

    A 51-year-old man with history of undiagnosed pulmonary nodules 4 years prior, presented with right-sided chest pain. Acute cardiac workup was negative, and a chest computed tomography examination demonstrated marked improvement in bilateral pulmonary nodules. A concordant abdominal computed tomography examination showed new subcentimeter hypodense lesions throughout the liver and spleen, mild progressive abdominopelvic lymphadenopathy, and new small lytic lesions of T11 and L4 vertebrae. A p...

  1. Cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... those experienced by humans. Cats that hunt wild rodents and rabbits in the western, particularly the southwestern, ... caused by a fungus that can infect skin, hair, and nails of both people and animals. Ringworm ...

  2. Vestibular disease in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossmeisl, John H

    2010-01-01

    The vestibular system is the major sensory (special proprioceptive) system that, along with the general proprioceptive and visual systems, maintains balance. Clinical signs of vestibular disease include asymmetric ataxia, head tilt, and pathologic nystagmus. Neuroanatomic localization of observed vestibular signs to either the peripheral or central components of the vestibular system is paramount to the management of the patient with vestibular dysfunction, as the etiology, diagnostic approaches, and prognoses are dependent on the neuroanatomic diagnosis. This article reviews functional vestibular neuroanatomy as well as the diagnosis and treatment of common causes of small animal vestibular disease. PMID:19942058

  3. Mechanisms of supraspinal correction of scratching generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degtyarenko, A M; Zavadskaya, T V; Baev, K V

    1992-01-01

    The influences of signals in descending systems on the parameters of scratching generator activity were studied on decerebrate immobilized cats. It was shown that phasic electric stimulation of descending systems evoked certain phase-dependent reorganization of the parameters of scratching generator efferent activity. Maximum increase in scratching cycle duration during electric stimulation of Deiters' nucleus, red nucleus and pyramidal tract is observed during stimulation in the first half of aiming phase. Stimulation in the second half of aiming phase and at the beginning of scratching jerk phase virtually does not change the scratching cycle duration. Maximum increase in scratching cycle duration during electric stimulation of the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis is observed in the second half of aiming phase. Electric activation of descending pathways during aiming phase increases its intensity and decreases the intensity of scratching jerk phase. Activation of descending pathways during scratching jerk phase increases its intensity and virtually does not change the aiming phase intensity. Influences of electric activation of descending systems on scratching generator work reveal dependence on limb position. They are increased when the limb is deflected to the rear and are decreased during over-aimed position. Decerebellation leads to a decrease of scratching generator activity parameters rearrangement under influence of electric stimulation of the red nucleus and nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis, and to its increase during Deiters' nucleus stimulation. On the basis of these results the principles of supraspinal correction of scratching generator work are discussed. PMID:1594102

  4. Primary hyperaldosteronism, a mediator of progressive renal disease in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, S; Djajadiningrat-Laanen, S C; Kooistra, H S; van Dongen, A M; Voorhout, G; van Sluijs, F J; van den Ingh, T S G A M; Boer, W H; Rijnberk, A

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, there has been renewed interest in primary hyperaldosteronism, particularly because of its possible role in the progression of kidney disease. While most studies have concerned humans and experimental animal models, we here report on the occurrence of a spontaneous form of (non-tumorous) primary hyperaldosteronism in cats. At presentation, the main physical features of 11 elderly cats were hypokalemic paroxysmal flaccid paresis and loss of vision due to retinal detachment with hemorrhages. Primary hyperaldosteronism was diagnosed on the basis of plasma concentrations of aldosterone (PAC) and plasma renin activity (PRA), and the calculation of the PAC:PRA ratio. In all animals, PACs were at the upper end or higher than the reference range. The PRAs were at the lower end of the reference range, and the PAC:PRA ratios exceeded the reference range. Diagnostic imaging by ultrasonography and computed tomography revealed no or only very minor changes in the adrenals compatible with nodular hyperplasia. Adrenal gland histopathology revealed extensive micronodular hyperplasia extending from zona glomerulosa into the zona fasciculata and reticularis. In three cats, plasma urea and creatinine concentrations were normal when hyperaldosteronism was diagnosed but thereafter increased to above the upper limit of the respective reference range. In the other eight cats, urea and creatinine concentrations were raised at first examination and gradually further increased. Even in end-stage renal insufficiency, there was a tendency to hypophosphatemia rather than to hyperphosphatemia. The histopathological changes in the kidneys mimicked those of humans with hyperaldosteronism: hyaline arteriolar sclerosis, glomerular sclerosis, tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis. The non-tumorous form of primary hyperaldosteronism in cats has many similarities with "idiopathic" primary hyperaldosteronism in humans. The condition is associated with progressive renal disease

  5. Does a Feline Leukemia Virus Infection Pave the Way for Bartonella henselae Infection in Cats? ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Buchmann, Alexandra U.; Kershaw, Olivia; Kempf, Volkhard A. J.; Gruber, Achim D.

    2010-01-01

    Domestic cats serve as the reservoir hosts of Bartonella henselae and may develop mild clinical symptoms or none after experimental infection. In humans, B. henselae infection can result in self-limiting cat scratch disease. However, immunocompromised patients may suffer from more-severe courses of infection or may even develop the potentially lethal disease bacillary angiomatosis. It was reasoned that cats with immunocompromising viral infections may react similarly to B. henselae infection....

  6. Activity of the motor cortex during scratching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirota, Mikhail G; Pavlova, Galina A; Beloozerova, Irina N

    2006-02-01

    In awake cats sitting with the head restrained, scratching was evoked using stimulation of the ear. Cats scratched the shoulder area, consistently failing to reach the ear. Kinematics of the hind limb movements and the activity of ankle muscles, however, were similar to those reported earlier in unrestrained cats. The activity of single neurons in the hind limb representation of the motor cortex, including pyramidal tract neurons (PTNs), was examined. During the protraction stage of the scratch response, the activity in 35% of the neurons increased and in 50% decreased compared with rest. During the rhythmic stage, the motor cortex population activity was approximately two times higher compared with rest, because the activity of 53% of neurons increased and that of 33% decreased in this stage. The activity of 61% of neurons was modulated in the scratching rhythm. The average depth of frequency modulation was 12.1 +/- 5.3%, similar to that reported earlier for locomotion. The phases of activity of different neurons were approximately evenly distributed over the scratch cycle. There was no simple correlation between resting receptive field properties and the activity of neurons during the scratch response. We conclude that the motor cortex participates in both the protraction and the rhythmic stages of the scratch response. PMID:16236789

  7. Exposure to cats: update on risks for sensitization and allergic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmage, Shyamali C; Lodge, Caroline L; Matheson, Melanie C; Campbell, Brittany; Lowe, Adrian J

    2012-10-01

    Cats are the pets most commonly implicated in the etiology of asthma and allergic disease. However, systematic reviews have concluded that there is a lack of evidence to support the idea that cat exposure in early life increases the risk of allergic disease. Indeed, it appears most likely that cat exposure is protective against allergic diseases. Recent large prospective studies have shown that living with a cat during childhood, especially during the first year of a child's life, could be protective. However, any advice given to the parents should also incorporate how new acquisition of cats can affect other family members, especially those who are already sensitized. Research is urgently needed to determine whether the suggested impact of acquisition of cats in adult life is modified by the person's childhood pet ownership, to help parents who seek advice on whether or not to get a cat. PMID:22878928

  8. Persistent haematuria and proteinuria due to glomerular disease in related Abyssinian cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Joanna D; Norris, Jacqueline M; Bosward, Katrina L; Fleay, R; Lauer, Chris; Malik, Richard

    2008-07-01

    Eight cases of glomerular disease in young, related Abyssinian cats are described. Haematuria was the most consistent feature. Six cats developed the nephrotic syndrome. The short-term prognosis was good for cats with haematuria and fair for cats with the nephrotic syndrome as oedema resolved in three of the six cats. Light microscopic examination of renal biopsies from three cats was considered normal or revealed only mild abnormalities. In the three cases subjected to necropsy, histological abnormalities included mild mesangial hypercellularity and adhesions between the glomerular tuft and Bowman's capsule consistent with a focal proliferative glomerulopathy. Further investigation into this glomerulopathy will require ultrastructural and immunohistochemical studies to characterise the glomerular abnormality and genetic analyses to investigate its potential to be an inherited disease. Glomerular disease, potentially a familial one, should be considered in the investigation of persistent haematuria or proteinuria in Abyssinian and related cats. PMID:18455462

  9. Prospective evaluation of healthy Ragdoll cats for chronic kidney disease by routine laboratory parameters and ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paepe, Dominique; Bavegems, Valérie; Combes, Anaïs; Saunders, Jimmy H; Daminet, Sylvie

    2013-10-01

    Ragdoll breeder organisations often forewarn Ragdoll cat owners that renal problems may develop as a result of polycystic kidney disease (PKD), chronic interstitial nephritis, familial renal dysplasia or nephrocalcinosis. Healthy Ragdoll and non-Ragdoll cats were prospectively evaluated by measuring serum creatinine and urea concentrations, routine urinalysis and abdominal ultrasonography. All Ragdoll cats also underwent genetic PKD testing. One hundred and thirty-three Ragdoll and 62 control cats were included. Ragdoll cats had significantly lower serum urea concentrations and higher urinary specific gravity. However, median creatinine concentration, median urinary protein-to-creatinine ratio, and the proportion of cats with serum creatinine or urea concentration exceeding the reference interval did not differ. One or more renal ultrasonographical changes were detected in 66/133 (49.6%) Ragdoll and in 25/62 (40%) control cats. Ragdoll cats showed significantly more frequent segmental cortical lesions (7.5% versus 0%), abnormal renal capsule (19.5% versus 8%) and echogenic urine (51.9% versus 25.8%). Chronic kidney disease (CKD) was ultrasonographically suspected in 7/133 (5.3%) Ragdoll and in none of the control cats, which approached significance. Laboratory parameters confirmed kidney dysfunction only in 1/7 of these Ragdoll cats. All Ragdoll cats were PKD negative. In conclusion, first, breed-specific serum creatinine reference intervals are not likely required for Ragdoll cats. Second, renal ultrasonographical abnormalities are common, both in Ragdoll and non-Ragdoll cats. Third, healthy young Ragdoll cats are uncommonly affected by PKD and CKD, but an increased susceptibility of Ragdoll cats to develop CKD cannot be excluded. Finally, Ragdoll cats are predisposed to segmental cortical lesions, which may indicate renal infarction or cortical scarring. PMID:23413268

  10. Polycystic kidney disease in four British shorthair cats with successful treatment of bacterial cyst infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivy, R; Lyons, L A; Aroch, I; Segev, G

    2015-09-01

    Polycystic kidney disease is the most common inherited disorder in cats. Renal cysts progressively increase in size and number, resulting in a gradual decrease in kidney function. An autosomal dominant mutation in exon 29 of the polycystin-1 gene has been identified, mostly in Persian and Persian-related breeds. This case study describes polycystic kidney disease in four British shorthair cats, of which two had the same genetic mutation reported in Persian and Persian-related cats. This likely reflects introduction of this mutation into the British shorthair breeding line because of previous outcrossing with Persian cats. An infected renal cyst was diagnosed and successfully treated in one of the cats. This is a commonly reported complication in human polycystic kidney disease, and to the authors' knowledge has not previously been reported in cats with polycystic kidney disease. PMID:25677715

  11. Significance of Coronavirus Mutants in Feces and Diseased Tissues of Cats Suffering from Feline Infectious Peritonitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels C. Pedersen

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The internal FECV→FIPV mutation theory and three of its correlates were tested in four sibs/half-sib kittens, a healthy contact cat, and in four unrelated cats that died of FIP at geographically disparate regions. Coronavirus from feces and extraintestinal FIP lesions from the same cat were always >99% related in accessory and structural gene sequences. SNPs and deletions causing a truncation of the 3c gene product were found in almost all isolates from the diseased tissues of the eight cats suffering from FIP, whereas most, but not all fecal isolates from these same cats had intact 3c genes. Other accessory and structural genes appeared normal in both fecal and lesional viruses. Deliterious mutations in the 3c gene were unique to each cat, indicating that they did not originate in one cat and were subsequently passed horizontally to the others. Compartmentalization of the parental and mutant forms was not absolute; virus of lesional type was sometimes found in feces of affected cats and virus identical to fecal type was occasionally identified in diseased tissues. Although 3c gene mutants in this study were not horizontally transmitted, the parental fecal virus was readily transmitted by contact from a cat that died of FIP to its housemate. There was a high rate of mutability in all structural and accessory genes both within and between cats, leading to minor genetic variants. More than one variant could be identified in both diseased tissues and feces of the same cat. Laboratory cats inoculated with a mixture of two closely related variants from the same FIP cat developed disease from one or the other variant, but not both. Significant genetic drift existed between isolates from geographically distinct regions of the Western US.

  12. Lethal outbreak of disease associated with feline calicivirus infection in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, K P; Jones, B R D; Kipar, A; Chantrey, J; Porter, C J; Barber, P J; Dawson, S; Gaskell, R M; Radford, A D

    2006-04-22

    Recently, in the USA, virulent mutants of feline calicivirus (FCV) have been identified as the cause of a severe and acute virulent systemic disease, characterised by jaundice, oedema and high mortality in groups of cats. This severe manifestation of FCV disease has so far only been reported in the USA. However, in 2003, an outbreak of disease affected a household of four adult cats and an adult cat from a neighbouring household in the UK. Three of the adult cats in the household and the neighbouring cat developed clinical signs including pyrexia (39.5 to 40.5 degrees C), lameness, voice loss, inappetence and jaundice. One cat was euthanased in extremis, two died and one recovered. A postmortem examination of one of the cats revealed focal cellulitis around the right hock and right elbow joints. The principal finding of histopathological examinations of selected organs from two of the cats was disseminated hepatocellular necrosis with mild inflammatory infiltration. Immunohistology identified FCV antigen in parenchymal and Kupffer cells in the liver of both animals and in alveolar macrophages of one of them. In addition, calicivirus-like particles were observed by electron microscopy within the hepatocytes of one cat. FCV was isolated from two of the dead cats and from the two surviving cats. Sequence analysis showed that they were all infected with the same strain of virus, but that it was different from strains of FCV associated with the virulent systemic disease in cats in the USA. The outbreak was successfully controlled by quarantine in the owner's house. PMID:16632527

  13. Clinical, radiographic, and bronchial cytologic features of cats with bronchial disease: 65 cases (1980-1986)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medical records, radiographs, and bronchial cytologic abnormalities of 65 cats with bronchial disease were reviewed. Bronchial disease was defined as abnormality of the lower airways to the exclusion of disease originating or mainly involving the alveoli, interstitium, vasculature, or pleura. Cats with bronchial disease were more likely to be female and older. Siamese cats were over represented and had more chronic disease. In order of frequency, the following clinical signs were reported: coughing, dyspnea, occasional sneezing, wheezing, and vomiting. Radiography revealed prominent bronchial markings, with some cats having collapse of the middle lobe of the right lung (n = 7), overinflation of the lungs (n = 9), or aerophagia (n = 13). Of 65 bronchial washes, 58 were considered exudative, with the predominant cell type being eosinophil in 24%, neutrophil in 33%, macrophage in 22%, and mixed population of cells in 21%. Cultures for bacteria were considered positive in 24% of the cats. Circulating eosinophilia was not helpful in predicting the predominant cell type in bronchial cytologic exudates. Hyperproteinemia without dehydration was present in a third of the cats, indicating an immunologic response. Half the cats had resolution of clinical signs, whereas half the cats required continuing medication with bronchodilators, antimicrobial agents, or corticosteroids

  14. Animal models of disease: classification and etiology of diabetes in dogs and cats

    OpenAIRE

    R. W. Nelson; Reusch, C.E.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a common disease in dogs and cats. The most common form of diabetes in dogs resembles type 1 diabetes in humans. Studies suggest that genetics, an immune-mediated component, and environmental factors are involved in the development of diabetes in dogs. A variant of gestational diabetes also occurs in dogs. The most common form of diabetes in cats resembles type 2 diabetes in humans. A major risk factor in cats is obesity. Obese cats have altered expression of several insu...

  15. Cuts, Scratches, and Scrapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Cuts, Scratches, and Scrapes KidsHealth > For Teens > Cuts, Scratches, and Scrapes Print A A A Text Size ... is repaired. Signs of Infection Sometimes, a cut, scratch, or scrape starts out as no big deal, ...

  16. Feline scratching and destruction and the effects of declawing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsberg, G M

    1991-03-01

    Scratching is an inherited, normal behavior in cats that is used as a visual and olfactory territorial mark and as a stretching exercise for the forelegs. In addition, it serves to condition the claws by removing the old, worn-out external sheath and exposing the healthy, new claw. When scratching occurs indoors, it often is disruptive and undesirable unless it can be directed to an acceptable object such as a scratching post. During playing, jumping, climbing, and aggressive displays, cats also may injure people with their claws. With appropriate behavior modification techniques, most undesirable scratching can be prevented or eliminated. Although somewhat controversial, declawing is another alternative for those owners who are unwilling or unable to control the undesirable scratching. Declawing can successfully correct most scratching problems with no adverse behavioral effects; in fact, most owners of declawed cats indicate that there is an improved relationship (bonding) between cat and owner. On the other hand, declawing is often unnecessary, because appropriate behavior modification techniques can be used to correct most scratching problems successfully. PMID:2053250

  17. Disease transmission from companion parrots to dogs and cats: what is the real risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Jamie M; Speer, Brian; Opitz, Noel

    2011-11-01

    A number of common misconceptions exist regarding the degree of transmission from companion parrots to dogs and cats. Concern regarding bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic transmission is generally unfounded, because disease transmission between companion parrots and dogs and cats is not well-documented. Infections with Mycobacterium spp, Aspergillus spp, Giardia spp, Chlamydophila psittaci, Salmonella spp, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, Cryptococcus neoformans, Histoplasma capsulatum, Cryptosporidium spp, and avian influenza are often considered possible transmissible diseases, causing pet caregivers unwarranted concerns. PMID:22041215

  18. Naturally acquired feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection in cats from western Canada: Prevalence, disease associations, and survival analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ravi, Madhu; Wobeser, Gary A.; Taylor, Susan M.; Jackson, Marion L.

    2010-01-01

    This retrospective study evaluated epidemiologic features and disease associations of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection in client owned cats from western Canada. Among 1205 cats that were tested 66 (5.5%) were positive for FIV antibody (FIV+) with a higher prevalence in males than females. FIV+ cats were older than the overall population. Epidemiologic features and disease associations were compared between 58 FIV+, but feline leukemia virus negative (FeLV−) cats and 58 age and se...

  19. First report on seroepidemiological and clinical investigation of cat infection with Bartonella henselae in the area of Novi Sad, Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potkonjak A.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cat Scratch Disease (CSD is an infective disease of animals and humans caused with Bartonella henselae. Prevalence of infection varies between 0 and 68% depending on different population of cats and geographical region. Naturally infected cats are often clinically healthy and are inapparent germ carriers. In this investigation 40 cats from the area of Novi Sad were analyzed. After the epidemiological questionnaire was made, all cats were clinically investigated. To determine the presence of specific antibodies of class G on Bartonella henselae the method of indirect immunofluorescence was used. For the first time in Serbia, in the area of Novi Sad municipality the infection caused by Bartonella henselae in the population of cats was detected. Prevalence of specific antibodies of class IgG on Bartonella henselae antigen in the population of cats was 57%. The most common clinical manifestations in seropositive cats were gingivitis and lymphoadenopathy.

  20. First report of Polycystic kidney disease occurrence in Persian cats in Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vucicevic, Milos; Slijepcevic, Dajana; Davitkov, Darko; Avdalovic, Vladimir; Aleksic-Kovacevic, Sanja; Stevanovic, Jevrosima; Stanimirovic, Zoran

    2016-03-31

    Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is an inherited autosomal disorder in cats, mostly diagnosed in Persian cats. Renal cysts can be diagnosed by ultrasound, but cats must be at least 16 weeks old. The goals of this study were to assess the occurrence of PKD in Serbia using a randomly selected group of Persian cats, to compare the diagnostic e cacy of ultrasound and genetic tests, and to measure haematological and selected biochemical parameters. We examined 70 cats of Persian breed, between 4 months and 8 years of age. Complete blood count and selected biochemical parameters were measured, renal ultrasound was performed. Swabs of the oral cavity were obtained for genetic testing. Percentage of PKD positive cats identi ed by genetic testing was 48.6%, whilst only 18.6% were detected through ultrasound. Animals that were polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) positive and ultrasound negative ranged from 4 months to 3.5 years. All haematological and biochemical parameters were within the the normal range values in all examined cats. Genetic methods proved to be the most e ective for reliable and early diagnosis of PKD in Persian cats. DNA analysis can be used right after birth, and excludes the need for other diagnostic procedures, such as ultrasound. PMID:27033530

  1. Serum intact parathyroid hormone levels in cats with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano H. Giovaninni

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is frequently observed in cats and it is characterized as a multisystemic illness, caused by several underlying metabolic changes, and secondary renal hyperparathyroidism (SRHPT is relatively common; usually it is associated with the progression of renal disease and poor prognosis. This study aimed at determining the frequency of SRHPT, and discussing possible mechanisms that could contribute to the development of SRHPT in cats at different stages of CKD through the evaluation of calcium and phosphorus metabolism, as well as acid-base status. Forty owned cats with CKD were included and divided into three groups, according to the stages of the disease, classified according to the International Renal Interest Society (IRIS as Stage II (n=12, Stage III (n=22 and Stage IV (n=6. Control group was composed of 21 clinically healthy cats. Increased serum intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH concentrations were observed in most CKD cats in all stages, and mainly in Stage IV, which hyperphosphatemia and ionized hypocalcemia were detected and associated to the cause for the development of SRHPT. In Stages II and III, however, ionized hypercalcemia was noticed suggesting that the development of SRHPT might be associated with other factors, and metabolic acidosis could be involved to the increase of serum ionized calcium. Therefore, causes for the development of SRHPT seem to be multifactorial and they must be further investigated, mainly in the early stages of CKD in cats, as hyperphosphatemia and ionized hypocalcemia could not be the only factors involved.

  2. Association of Hirschsprung's disease and imperforate anus in a patient with (Cat-eye) syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Association of imperforate anus and Hirschsprung's disease is rare, the incidence of both events occurring together would be one child out of every 25 million live births. A case of (cat-eye) syndrome with association of high imperforate and long segment Hirschsprung's disease is presented. (orig.)

  3. Three pathogens in sympatric populations of pumas, bobcats, and domestic cats: implications for infectious disease transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah N Bevins

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic landscape change can lead to increased opportunities for pathogen transmission between domestic and non-domestic animals. Pumas, bobcats, and domestic cats are sympatric in many areas of North America and share many of the same pathogens, some of which are zoonotic. We analyzed bobcat, puma, and feral domestic cat samples collected from targeted geographic areas. We examined exposure to three pathogens that are taxonomically diverse (bacterial, protozoal, viral, that incorporate multiple transmission strategies (vector-borne, environmental exposure/ingestion, and direct contact, and that vary in species-specificity. Bartonella spp., Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV, and Toxoplasma gondii IgG were detected in all three species with mean respective prevalence as follows: puma 16%, 41% and 75%; bobcat 31%, 22% and 43%; domestic cat 45%, 10% and 1%. Bartonella spp. were highly prevalent among domestic cats in Southern California compared to other cohort groups. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus exposure was primarily associated with species and age, and was not influenced by geographic location. Pumas were more likely to be infected with FIV than bobcats, with domestic cats having the lowest infection rate. Toxoplasma gondii seroprevalence was high in both pumas and bobcats across all sites; in contrast, few domestic cats were seropositive, despite the fact that feral, free ranging domestic cats were targeted in this study. Interestingly, a directly transmitted species-specific disease (FIV was not associated with geographic location, while exposure to indirectly transmitted diseases--vector-borne for Bartonella spp. and ingestion of oocysts via infected prey or environmental exposure for T. gondii--varied significantly by site. Pathogens transmitted by direct contact may be more dependent upon individual behaviors and intra-specific encounters. Future studies will integrate host density, as well as landscape features, to better

  4. Three pathogens in sympatric populations of pumas, bobcats, and domestic cats: Implications for infectious disease transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevins, S.N.; Carver, S.; Boydston, E.E.; Lyren, L.M.; Alldredge, M.; Logan, K.A.; Riley, S.P.D.; Fisher, R.N.; Vickers, T.W.; Boyce, W.; Salman, M.; Lappin, M.R.; Crooks, K.R.; VandeWoude, S.

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic landscape change can lead to increased opportunities for pathogen transmission between domestic and non-domestic animals. Pumas, bobcats, and domestic cats are sympatric in many areas of North America and share many of the same pathogens, some of which are zoonotic. We analyzed bobcat, puma, and feral domestic cat samples collected from targeted geographic areas. We examined exposure to three pathogens that are taxonomically diverse (bacterial, protozoal, viral), that incorporate multiple transmission strategies (vector-borne, environmental exposure/ingestion, and direct contact), and that vary in species-specificity. Bartonella spp., Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV), and Toxoplasma gondii IgG were detected in all three species with mean respective prevalence as follows: puma 16%, 41% and 75%; bobcat 31%, 22% and 43%; domestic cat 45%, 10% and 1%. Bartonella spp. were highly prevalent among domestic cats in Southern California compared to other cohort groups. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus exposure was primarily associated with species and age, and was not influenced by geographic location. Pumas were more likely to be infected with FIV than bobcats, with domestic cats having the lowest infection rate. Toxoplasma gondii seroprevalence was high in both pumas and bobcats across all sites; in contrast, few domestic cats were seropositive, despite the fact that feral, free ranging domestic cats were targeted in this study. Interestingly, a directly transmitted species-specific disease (FIV) was not associated with geographic location, while exposure to indirectly transmitted diseases - vector-borne for Bartonella spp. and ingestion of oocysts via infected prey or environmental exposure for T. gondii - varied significantly by site. Pathogens transmitted by direct contact may be more dependent upon individual behaviors and intra-specific encounters. Future studies will integrate host density, as well as landscape features, to better understand the

  5. Three pathogens in sympatric populations of pumas, bobcats, and domestic cats: implications for infections disease transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevins, Sarah N.; Carver, Scott; Boydston, Erin E.; Lyren, Lisa M.; Alldredge, Mat; Logan, Kenneth A.; Riley, Seth P.D.; Fisher, Robert N.; Vickers, T. Winston; Boyce, Walter; Salman, Mo; Lappin, Michael R.; Crooks, Kevin R.; VandeWoude, Sue

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic landscape change can lead to increased opportunities for pathogen transmission between domestic and non-domestic animals. Pumas, bobcats, and domestic cats are sympatric in many areas of North America and share many of the same pathogens, some of which are zoonotic. We analyzed bobcat, puma, and feral domestic cat samples collected from targeted geographic areas. We examined exposure to three pathogens that are taxonomically diverse (bacterial, protozoal, viral), that incorporate multiple transmission strategies (vector-borne, environmental exposure/ingestion, and direct contact), and that vary in species-specificity. Bartonella spp., Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV), and Toxoplasma gondii IgG were detected in all three species with mean respective prevalence as follows: puma 16%, 41% and 75%; bobcat 31%, 22% and 43%; domestic cat 45%, 10% and 1%. Bartonella spp. were highly prevalent among domestic cats in Southern California compared to other cohort groups. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus exposure was primarily associated with species and age, and was not influenced by geographic location. Pumas were more likely to be infected with FIV than bobcats, with domestic cats having the lowest infection rate. Toxoplasma gondii seroprevalence was high in both pumas and bobcats across all sites; in contrast, few domestic cats were seropositive, despite the fact that feral, free ranging domestic cats were targeted in this study. Interestingly, a directly transmitted species-specific disease (FIV) was not associated with geographic location, while exposure to indirectly transmitted diseases - vectorborne for Bartonella spp. and ingestion of oocysts via infected prey or environmental exposure for T. gondii - varied significantly by site. Pathogens transmitted by direct contact may be more dependent upon individual behaviors and intra-specific encounters. Future studies will integrate host density, as well as landscape features, to better understand the

  6. Clinicopathologic findings associated with chronic renal disease in cats: 74 cases (1973-1984).

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBartola, S P; Rutgers, H C; Zack, P M; Tarr, M J

    1987-05-01

    The historic, physical, laboratory, and histologic findings for 74 cats with chronic renal disease were reviewed. Most cats were older, and no breed or sex predilection was detected. This most common clinical signs detected by owners were lethargy, anorexia, and weight loss. Dehydration and emaciation were common physical examination findings. Common laboratory findings were nonregenerative anemia, lymphopenia, azotemia, hypercholesterolemia, metabolic acidosis, hyperphosphatemia, and isosthenuria. The most common morphologic diagnosis was chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis of unknown cause. The other pathologic diagnoses were renal lymphosarcoma, renal amyloidosis, chronic pyelonephritis, chronic glomerulonephritis, polycystic renal disease, and pyogranulomatous nephritis secondary to feline infectious peritonitis. PMID:3583899

  7. Electrophysiological Representation of Scratching CPG Activity in the Cerebellum

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Silva, Lourdes; Manjarrez, Elias; Gutiérrez-Ospina, Gabriel; Quevedo, Jorge N.

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the electrical activity of neuronal populations in the cerebellum and the lumbar spinal cord during fictive scratching in adult decerebrate cats before and after selective sections of the Spino-Reticulo Cerebellar Pathway (SRCP) and the Ventral-Spino Cerebellar Tract (VSCT). During fictive scratching, we found a conspicuous sinusoidal electrical activity, called Sinusoidal Cerebellar Potentials (SCPs), in the cerebellar vermis, which exhibited smaller amplitude in the paravermal a...

  8. Comparative study of chronic kidney disease in dogs and cats: induction of myofibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabuki, A; Mitani, S; Fujiki, M; Misumi, K; Endo, Y; Miyoshi, N; Yamato, O

    2010-04-01

    We investigated the kidneys of dogs and cats to clarify whether renal myofibroblasts induction is associated with the severity of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Immunohistochemical expression of myofibroblast markers, alpha-smooth muscle actin (SMA) and vimentin, were evaluated quantitatively. The degrees of glomerulosclerosis, glomerular hypertrophy, interstitial cell infiltration, and interstitial fibrosis were also evaluated quantitatively. The plasma creatinine (pCre) concentrations correlated with glomerulosclerosis, cell infiltration, and fibrosis in dogs, and only with fibrosis in cats. The alpha-SMA expression correlated with pCre, glomerulosclerosis, cell infiltration, and fibrosis in dogs, and with pCre and fibrosis in cats. Tubular vimentin expression correlated with fibrosis in cats, but not in dogs. Interstitial vimentin expression correlated with pCre, glomerulosclerosis, cell infiltration, and fibrosis in dogs, but only with pCre in cats. In conclusion, it was suggested that the severity of CKD in dogs and cats was mediated by different pathways associated with myofibroblasts expression. PMID:19822338

  9. Reported cat bites in Dallas: characteristics of the cats, the victims, and the attack events.

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, J C

    1990-01-01

    Associated with the increased popularity of cats as pets in American households has been an increase in the number of cat bites reported to health departments. Bite reports from Dallas, TX, for 1985 were analyzed for different aspects of the cat bite event, including characteristics of the cats, the people bitten, the wounds, and the attack events. Cat bites and scratches constituted 25 percent of the 2,494 reported animal bites. Biting cats were typically stray females. People 21 to 35 years...

  10. A review of anaemia of inflammatory disease in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikazawa, S; Dunning, M D

    2016-07-01

    Anaemia of inflammatory disease is a common cause of anaemia in routine veterinary practice. It is most often mild to moderate, normocytic, normochromic and non-regenerative. Shortened red cell life span, inhibition of iron metabolism and impaired bone marrow response to erythropoietin all contribute to its development. Although anaemia of inflammatory disease is a well-known cause of anaemia in dogs and cats, there is a lack of epidemiological information because specific diagnostic criteria have not been established in veterinary species. Anaemia of inflammatory disease is associated with a poor outcome in various disease states in human medicine; however, its clinical significance and treatment in veterinary medicine are not well understood. This review article describes anaemia of inflammatory disease in dogs and cats and considers its potential significance. PMID:27385622

  11. Misdiagnosis Analysis in Cat-scratach Disease%猫抓病15例误诊分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王滕民; 王常玲

    2007-01-01

    目的 探讨猫抓病(Cat-scratch Disease,CSD)的诊断条件及误诊原因.方法 根据15例CSD患者的病因、症状、病理特征及鉴别诊断等临床资料总结CSD误诊原因及诊断条件.结果 (1)误诊情况:15例CSD患者误诊为淋巴炎9例、淋巴瘤4例、淋巴结核2例;误诊时间45~110 d,平均68 d;误诊原因为对CSD的临床认识不清,遗漏患者被猫、狗抓咬伤史及医生诊断中的习惯思维导致误诊为一些常见淋巴结疾病.(2)诊断CSD常用4条标准,即猫、狗抓咬、伤史;淋巴结肿大;淋巴结呈CSD的病理组织学改变;CSD特异抗原皮内试验阳性.具备其中3条即可诊断CSD.结论 前3条诊断标准较实用,可佐以淋巴组织抗酸染色和普通培养等检查,以利于CSD的诊断和鉴别.

  12. Exotic diseases of dogs and cats at risk of importation to Ireland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodfellow Mark

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Changes in legislation that facilitate movement of companion animals within the European Union will expose those animals to microbial and parasitic organisms currently exotic to Ireland. This paper reviewed information on the exotic diseases most likely to be introduced to Ireland by travelling dogs and cats: rabies, leishmaniosis, babesiosis, ehrlichiosis, anaplasmosis and dirofilariosis.

  13. Exotic diseases of dogs and cats at risk of importation to Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    Goodfellow Mark; Shaw Susan

    2005-01-01

    Changes in legislation that facilitate movement of companion animals within the European Union will expose those animals to microbial and parasitic organisms currently exotic to Ireland. This paper reviewed information on the exotic diseases most likely to be introduced to Ireland by travelling dogs and cats: rabies, leishmaniosis, babesiosis, ehrlichiosis, anaplasmosis and dirofilariosis.

  14. Heartworm (Dirofilaria immitis) disease and glomerulonephritis in a black-footed cat (Felis nigripes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deem, S L; Heard, D J; LaRock, R

    1998-06-01

    A 6-yr-old, 1.36-kg, intact female black-footed cat (Felis nigripes) was presented to the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, University of Florida, with a history of depression, lethargy, and anorexia. Cardiac dysfunction and renal failure were diagnosed on the basis of antemortem and postmortem findings. At necropsy, heartworms (Dirofilaria immitis), glomerulonephritis, and endometritis were present. The glomerulonephritis could have been immune mediated and may have been associated with the heartworm infection or the chronic endometritis or both. Heartworm disease should be included in the list of differential diagnoses for any exotic cat housed outdoors in an endemic heartworm region that dies peracutely or has suggestive gastrointestinal or respiratory signs. Heartworm prophylaxis and annual serologic testing in exotic cats housed outdoors in heartworm endemic regions are recommended. PMID:9732037

  15. Isolation and identification of Porphyromonas spp. and other putative pathogens from cats with periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Salcedo, L; Herrera, D; Esteban-Saltiveri, D; León, R; Jeusette, I; Torre, C; O'Connor, A; González, I; González, I

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the subgingival microbiota and determine the most prevalent periodontal pathogens implicated in feline periodontal disease and to correlate these findings with the clinical periodontal status. Subgingival microbiological samples were taken under sedation from 50 cats with clinical signs of periodontal disease. Pooled paper point samples from 4 selected subgingival sites were cultured on blood agar and on Dentaid-1 medium. Suspected pathogens were identified, subcultured, and preserved. The association between the microbiological findings and the clinical status was studied using correlation coefficients (CC). In addition, cats were stratified in subgroups according to presence of putative pathogens, and comparisons were carried out using unpaired t-test. Three bacterial species were frequently detected including Porphyromonas gulae (86%), Porphyromonas circumdentaria (70%) and Fusobacterium nucleatum (90%). The mean proportion of total flora was high for P. gulae (32.54%), moderate for P. circundentaria (8.82%), and low for F. nucleatum (3.96%). Among the clinical variables, tooth mobility was correlated (CC > 0.50, p Cats with more than 10% of P. gulae showed significantly more mobility (p = 0.014) and recession (p = 0.038), and a tendency for deeper probing pocket depths (p = 0.084) and attachment loss (p = 0.087). The results from this cross-sectional study confirmed that P. gulae is the most relevant pathogen in periodontal disease in cats. PMID:24660305

  16. Diseases of the retroperitoneal space in the dog and cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The retroperitoneal space (RPS) is an anatomical area bounded dorsally by the sublumbar musculature and ventrally by the peritoneal surface of the abdomen. The RPS communicates with the pelvic space and mediastinum and is subject to primary diseases of the RPS connective tissue and to extension of disease from organs lying within or adjacent to it. Primary diseases include retroperitonitis, pneumoretroperitoneum, non-neoplastic retroperitoneal space-occupying lesions, and primary neoplasms of the RPS. Primary diseases of kidneys, ureters, adrenal glands or retroperitoneal lymph nodes may extend into the RPS, and the RPS may be the site of metastatic neoplastic disease. Clinical signs suggestive of retroperitoneal disease include lumbar pain, pyrexia, lethargy, and signs referable to organs within the RPS

  17. Environmental Enrichment for Indoor Cats

    OpenAIRE

    Herron, Meghan E.; Buffington, C. A. Tony

    2010-01-01

    Recommendations to cat owners to house their cats indoors confer the responsibility to provide conditions that ensure good health and welfare. Cats maintain their natural behaviors, such as scratching, chewing, and elimination, while living indoors, and they may develop health and behavior problems when deprived of appropriate environmental outlets for these behaviors. This article divides the environment into five basic “systems” to enable identification of features that may benefit from imp...

  18. Prevalence of heart disease in symptomatic cats: an overview from 1998 to 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A total of 408 cats with various cardiovascular problems has been presented to two investigational clinics during the last 8 years. The number of yearly examinations has steadily increased during this period. Definitive cardiovascular disease was diagnosed in 287 cats, whereby hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) was the most common diagnosis with 67.6%. Congenital cardiovascular malformations were found in 11.8% of the cases. Ventricular septal defect (VSD) was the most frequent anomaly, in contrast to previously published studies. The ECG was found to be relatively non-specific and insensitive for the diagnosis of heart disease. Its usefulness lies in the recognition and diagnosis of cardiac arrhythmias. The radiographically recognized changes were also non-specific for certain heart diseases. Radiographs of the thorax are especially useful in the evaluation of cardiomegaly, and secondary signs of congestion

  19. Detection of serum antibodies against Bartonella species in cats with sporotrichosis from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitada, Amanda A B; Favacho, Alexsandra R M; Oliveira, Raquel V C; Pessoa, Adonai A; Gomes, Raphael; Honse, Carla O; Gremião, Isabella D F; Lemos, Elba R S; Pereira, Sandro A

    2014-04-01

    Cat scratch disease is a zoonosis caused by Bartonella species, transmitted to humans through scratches or bites from infected cats and via direct contact with infected feces. Sporotrichosis, caused by the fungal complex Sporothrix, is transmitted by traumatic inoculation of the fungus. Cats are important in zoonotic transmission. Serum samples from 112 domestic cats with sporotrichosis and 77 samples from healthy cats were analyzed by indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA), using the commercial kit Bartonella henselae IFA IgG (Bion). The presence of antibodies against feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) core antigens was detected using the commercial kit Snap Combo FIV-FeLV (Idexx). The group of animals with sporotrichosis contained 93 males with a median age of 22 months, eight (7.1%) of which were positive for FIV and 15 (13.4%) for FeLV. The group of animals without sporotrichosis contained 36 males with a median age 48 months, 10 (13.0%) of which were positive for FIV and eight (10.4%) for FeLV. Of the 112 cats with sporotrichosis and 77 cats without mycosis, 72 (64.3%) and 35 (45.5%), respectively, were IFA reactive. No association was found between age, sex, FIV/FeLV and the presence of antibodies to Bartonella species. The results suggest that the study population can be considered a potential source of zoonotic infection for both diseases. PMID:24127458

  20. Diseases associated with spontaneous feline leukemia virus (FeLV) infection in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinacher, M

    1989-05-01

    More than 2000 cats sent for necropsy in order to provide a diagnosis were investigated immunohistologically using paraffin sections for the presence of a persistent infection with feline leukemia virus (FeLV). The spectrum of neoplastic and non-neoplastic diseases associated significantly with FeLV infection was determined statistically. Three-quarters of the cats with persistent FeLV infections died of non-neoplastic diseases and about 23% died of tumors, nearly exclusively those of the leukemia/lymphoma disease complex. A strong association with liver degeneration, icterus and a FeLV-associated enteritis was found in addition to the known association with non-neoplastic diseases and conditions such as anemia, bacterial secondary infections and respiratory tract inflammations due to the immunosuppressive effect of FeLV, hemorrhages and feline infectious peritonitis. Surprisingly, diseases and conditions like feline infectious panleukopenia, enteritis (of other types than FeLV-associated enteritis and feline infectious panleukopenia), glomerulonephritis, uremia and hemorrhagic cystitis were not associated with persistent FeLV infection. Another unexpected finding was that most pathogenic infectious agents demonstrated in the cats were not FeLV-associated either. Thus, immunosuppression due to FeLV infection seems to make the animals susceptible to certain pathogenic infectious agents, but not to the majority. PMID:2549696

  1. Epidemiology of thyroid diseases of dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlett, J M

    1994-05-01

    Data regarding the epidemiology of the thyroid diseases in companion animals are sparse. Published studies providing information regarding the epidemiology of canine hypothyroidism and thyroid neoplasia and feline hyperthyroidism are summarized. Future studies should seek to refine diagnoses, include control animals for comparison, and target the elucidation of causes that may lead to preventative recommendations. PMID:8053107

  2. Neurological manifestations of ear disease in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garosi, Laurent S; Lowrie, Mark L; Swinbourne, Natalie F

    2012-11-01

    There are four major neuroanatomical structures associated with the ear that, when damaged, result in different neurologic clinical signs. These structures are the facial nerve, the ocular sympathetic tract, the vestibular receptors, and the cochlea. The clinical signs associated with disorders of each structure are discussed, followed by a summary of the diseases that should be considered in each case. The article begins with a description of the neuroanatomy of each of these structures. PMID:23122174

  3. Absence of zoonotic Bartonella species in questing ticks: First detection of Bartonella clarridgeiae and Rickettsia felis in cat fleas in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijsse-Klasen, E.; Fonville, M.; Gassner, F.; Nijhof, A.M.; Hovius, E.K.E.; Jongejan, F.; Takken, W.; Reimerink, J.R.; Overgaauw, P.A.M.; Sprong, H.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Awareness for flea-and tick-borne infections has grown in recent years and the range of microorganisms associated with these ectoparasites is rising. Bartonella henselae, the causative agent of Cat Scratch Disease, and other Bartonella species have been reported in fleas and ticks. The r

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of ocular and orbital disease in 5 dogs and a cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images were acquired in five dogs and one cat with ocular and orbital disease. MR images were obtained in the dorsal or oblique dorsal, and oblique sagittal planes. Pathologic changes identified in MR images included inflammatory lesions, cystic structures, and neoplasms. All abnormalities were readily apparent in TI-weighted images. MR findings in affected animals were often similar in signal intensity, location, and growth pattern to those found in people with comparable diseases. Although no MR changes were considered pathognomonic for a given disease, MR imaging provided detailed information on the homogeneity, extent and invasiveness of the lesions

  5. [Measurement of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) after administration of iodine contrast medium with the Renalyzer PRX90 in healthy cats and cats with kidney diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Lindenberg, A; Westhoff, A; Wohlsein, P; Pohlenz, J; Nolte, I

    1998-09-01

    In the present study, the measurement of the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in the cat with the aid of an iodine contrast medium clearance with the renalyzer PRX90 is introduced. Investigations on the accuracy of measurement showed that even repeated measurement of plasma samples after two days of storage at room temperature yielded reproducible clearance results. Also, partial dilution of the plasma sample (2 ml with 1 ml Aqua bidest.) to reduce the volume of blood withdrawn still produced reliable results. Further dilution of the plasma volume (1 ml with 2 ml Aqua bidest.) however did not allow for accurate measurements. A total of 59 cats of different age and sex were included in the study. 31 cats had healthy kidneys with urea and creatinine values within the reference range, unchanged urine findings and physiologic urine protein patterns (SDS-PAGE). These cats served as reference group. The GFR reference value ascertained for these animals was 2.1 ml/min/kg BW (mean = 3.45 ml/min/kg with s = +/- 1.0 ml/min/kg). 28 cats had elevated values of urea and creatinine in the blood, as well as partially changed urine findings. For further diagnosis of renal disease, separation of urine proteins was done with the SDS-PAGE in the PhastSystem, which in all cases yielded a pathologic urine protein pattern. In 11 cases the renal disease could be further confirmed by histological investigation. GFR in these patients was clearly lowered compared with healthy cats, with measured values between 0 and 1.8 ml/min/kg. It can be concluded that the renalyzer allows reliable determination of the GFR also in the cat. To what extent measurement of the GFR is also helpful to diagnose nephropathies in the stage of compensation needs to be further investigated. In cats with high grade uremia and a GFR below 1 ml/min however, an exact calculation is not possible, since the accuracy of measurement within this range is inadequate. Thus, in severe disease no correct assessment is possible

  6. Scratch encourages selective doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawrylo, F. Z.; Kressel, H.

    1980-01-01

    Dislocations induced by scratching produce deep narrow spikes of zinc diffused in gallium arsenide. Density of defects formed locally increases zinc diffusion coefficient. Enhancements by factor of 6 have been observed. Technique works for other dopants than zinc and for other semiconductors besides GaAs.

  7. A comparative study of chronic kidney disease in dogs and cats: induction of cyclooxygenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabuki, Akira; Mitani, Sawane; Sawa, Mariko; Mizukami, Keijiro; Fujiki, Makoto; Yamato, Osamu

    2012-10-01

    The present study investigated whether renal cyclooxygenase (COX) induction is associated with the severity of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in dogs and cats. The collected kidneys were examined histopathologically and immunohistochemically. The immunoreactivities of COX-1 and COX-2 were evaluated quantitatively, and the correlations to the plasma creatinine concentrations, glomerular size, glomerulosclerosis, interstitial fibrosis, and interstitial cell infiltration were evaluated statistically. Immunoreactivities for COX-1 were heterogeneously observed in the medullary distal tubules and collecting ducts; no correlations with the severity of renal damage were detected. Immunoreactivities for COX-2 were heterogeneously observed in the macula densa (MD) regions. In dogs, the percentage of COX-2-positive MD was significantly correlated with the glomerular size. In cats, glomeruli with COX-2-positive MD had significantly higher sclerosis scores than those with COX-2-negative MD. In conclusion, renal COX-2 is induced in canine and feline CKD, especially in relation to the glomerular changes. PMID:22244709

  8. Management of Proteinuria in Dogs and Cats with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaden, Shelly L; Elliott, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    Proteinuria is a negative prognostic indicator for dogs and cats with chronic kidney disease. A normal dog or cat should excrete very little protein and have a urine protein:creatinine ratio that is less than 0.4 or less than 0.2, respectively; persistent proteinuria above this magnitude warrants attention. Administration of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and/or angiotensin receptor blockers, blood pressure control and nutritional modification are considered a standard of care for renal proteinuria. Renal biopsy and administration of immunosuppressive agents should be considered in animals with glomerular proteinuria that have not responded to standard therapy. Targeted patient monitoring is essential when instituting management of proteinuria. PMID:27485278

  9. Relationship of glomerular filtration rate based on serum iodixanol clearance to IRIS staging in cats with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwama, Ryosuke; Sato, Tsubasa; Katayama, Masaaki; Shimamura, Shunsuke; Satoh, Hiroshi; Ichijo, Toshihiro; Furuhama, Kazuhisa

    2015-08-01

    We examined the correlation between the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) estimated from an equation based on the serum iodixanol clearance technique and International Renal Interest Society (IRIS) stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in cats. The equation included the injection dose, sampling time, serum concentration and estimated volume of distribution (Vd) of the isotonic, nonionic, contrast medium iodixanol as a test tracer. The percent changes in the median basal GFR values calculated from the equation in CKD cats resembled those of IRIS stages 1-3. These data validate the association between the GFR derived from the simplified equation and IRIS stages based on the serum creatinine concentration in cats with CKD. They describe the GFR ranges determined using single-sample iodixanol clearance for healthy cats and cats with various IRIS stages of CKD. PMID:25864431

  10. Effect of cognitive enrichment on behavior, mucosal immunity and upper respiratory disease of shelter cats rated as frustrated on arrival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourkow, Nadine; Phillips, Clive J C

    2016-09-01

    Acquisition of resources and opportunity to engage in natural behaviors has been shown to reduce frustration-related behaviors and enhance health in nondomestic felids kept in zoos, but little is known about whether there are similar effects in domestic cats living in confinement in animal shelters. Fifteen cats rated as Frustrated during the first hour of confinement to a cage at an animal shelter were assigned to either a Treatment (n=7) or Control (n=8) group. Treatment cats were taken from their cages to a separate room four times daily for 10min each time over a 10 d period, where they took part in training sessions to learn a novel behavior (paw-hand contact with a researcher). Changes in emotional states and mucosal immune response were evaluated over 10days. Infectious status was determined upon admission and incidence of upper respiratory was determined up to day 40 based on clinical signs. Treated cats were more likely to be rated as Content than Control cats and had greater concentrations of S-IgA (537μg/g) in feces than Control cats (101μg/g). Within the Treatment group, cats that responded positively had greater concentrations of S-IgA (925μg/g) than those that responded negatively (399μg/g). Control cats were more likely to develop respiratory disease over time compared to cats that received treatment (Hazard Ratio: 2.37, Confidence Interval: 1.35-4.15). It is concluded that there is prima facie evidence that cognitive enrichment of cats exhibiting frustration-related behaviors can elicit positive affect (contentment), stimulate secretion of IgA and reduce incidence of respiratory disease, which is worthy of further study. PMID:27544259

  11. Leptospirosis in dogs and cats: epidemiology, clinical disease, zoonotic implications and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Azócar-Aedo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease of worldwide distribution caused by spirochetes of the genus Leptospira. The genus includes a large number of serovars that may be sheed in the urine of infected animals creating a highly infectious source of transmission. Numerous species of wild and domestic mammals act as maintenance hosts and form reservoirs of the bacteria, with other species being incidental hosts that may develop the disease. In dogs and cats, the disease is caused by different serovars and while dogs act as maintenance host for some serovars, both species are incidental host for others. Dogs and cats may have frequent contact with wild and domestic farm animals, therefore they are an important link in the transmission route. Leptospira may survive in the environment which increases the complexity of the epidemiology. The presentation of the disease can be highly variable and, particularly for feline leptospirosis, not well described. Laboratory testing is essential for the diagnosis, however, it is complicated due to the need to discriminate between Leptospira infection in animals with clinical disease from leptospiral specific antibody responses in maintenance hosts, or in animals with subclinical infection. Infection in pets may have important economic and public health implications and because of the risk of transmission from pets to their owners and to other animals, preventive measures need to be applied and an increased awareness is adviced.

  12. Analysis of cat oocyte activation methods for the generation of feline disease models by nuclear transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herrick Jason R

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Somatic cell nuclear transfer in cats offers a useful tool for the generation of valuable research models. However, low birth rates after nuclear transfer hamper exploitation of the full potential of the technology. Poor embryo development after activation of the reconstructed oocytes seems to be responsible, at least in part, for the low efficiency. The objective of this study was to characterize the response of cat oocytes to various stimuli in order to fine-tune existing and possibly develop new activation methods for the generation of cat disease models by somatic cell nuclear transfer. Methods First, changes in the intracellular free calcium concentration [Ca2+]i in the oocytes induced by a number of artificial stimuli were characterized. The stimuli included electroporation, ethanol, ionomycin, thimerosal, strontium-chloride and sodium (Na+-free medium. The potential of the most promising treatments (with or without subsequent incubation in the presence of cycloheximide and cytochalasin B to stimulate oocyte activation and support development of the resultant parthenogenetic embryos was then evaluated. Finally, the most effective methods were selected to activate oocytes reconstructed during nuclear transfer with fibroblasts from mucopolysaccharidosis I- and alpha-mannosidosis-affected cats. Results All treatments were able to elicit a [Ca2+]i elevation in the ooplasm with various characteristics. Pronuclear formation and development up to the blastocyst stage was most efficiently triggered by electroporation (60.5 +/- 2.9 and 11.5 +/- 1.7% and the combined thimerosal/DTT treatment (67.7 +/- 1.8 and 10.6 +/- 1.9%; incubation of the stimulated oocytes with cycloheximide and cytochalasin B had a positive effect on embryo development. When these two methods were used to activate oocytes reconstructed during nuclear transfer, up to 84.9% of the reconstructed oocytes cleaved. When the 2 to 4-cell embryos (a total of 220 were

  13. [Urine protein analysis with the sodium-dodecyl-sulfate-polyacrylamide gel-electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) in healthy cats and cats with kidney diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Lindenberg, A; Wohlsein, P; Trautwein, G; Nolte, I

    1997-03-01

    In this investigation, the value of urine protein analysis by means of molecular-weight related sodium dodecyl-polyacryl gradient gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was examined with regard to its applicability and diagnostic significance in nephropathy in the cat. A total of 87 cats was included in the study, 30 of them that were clinically healthy served as the control group. The urine protein pattern of this group had, besides the band representing the market albumin, and additional broad band within the size of the marker transferrin. In some cases, weak bands were present within the range of the Tamm-Horsfall-protein and immunoglobulin G. Micromolecular protein bands were not demonstrable. The remaining 57 animals had a histologically proven nephropathy. Thirty-eight cats had elevated urea and/or creatinine values in the plasma (group 1), and 19 animals had values within the reference range (group 2). The urine protein pattern as evidenced by SDS-urine electrophoresis was altered in all cats with histologically proven nephropathy, and it is thus concluded that with this technique a nephropathy can be diagnosed very early and prior to changes of plasma urea and creatinine (group 2). Moreover, in most of the cases, the nephrological changes can be classified as glomerular or tubulo-interstitial (group 1 and group 2). However, it is not possible to draw exact conclusions concerning the underlying morphological changes, nor can the severity of the disease be correctly assessed. PMID:9123982

  14. Environmental enrichment for indoor cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herron, Meghan E; Buffington, C A Tony

    2010-12-01

    Recommendations to cat owners to house their cats indoors confer the responsibility to provide conditions that ensure good health and welfare. Cats maintain their natural behaviors, such as scratching, chewing, and elimination, while living indoors, and they may develop health and behavior problems when deprived of appropriate environmental outlets for these behaviors. This article divides the environment into five basic "systems" to enable identification of features that may benefit from improvement. It also addresses practical means of meeting cats' needs in each of these systems. PMID:21882164

  15. Fungal colonization - an additional risk factor for diseased dogs and cats?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biegańska, Małgorzata; Dardzińska, Weronika; Dworecka-Kaszak, Bożena

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the presented mini-review is to review the literature data referring to opportunistic mycoses in pet dogs and cats suffering from other concurrent diseases, comparable to human medical disorders with high risk of secondary mycoses. This review also presents the preliminary results of a project aimed at understanding the fungal colonization and occurrence of secondary mycoses in pets suffering from metabolic disorders, neoplasms and viral infections. The incidence of opportunistic mycoses is higher in such individuals, mostly because of their impaired immunity. The main risk factors are primary and secondary types of immunodeficiency connected with anti-cancer treatment or neoplastic disease itself. Moreover, literature data and the results of our investigations show that Candida yeasts are prevalent among diabetic animals and indicate that these fungi are the main etiological agents of secondary infections of the oral cavity, GI and urogenital tracts. Other important conditions possibly favoring the development of mycoses are concurrent infections of cats with FeLV and FIV viruses. Thus, in all cases of the mentioned underlying diseases, animals should be carefully monitored by repeated mycological examination, together with inspection of other parameters. Also, the prophylaxis of opportunistic mycoses should be carefully considered alike other factors influencing the prognosis and the outcome of primary diseases. PMID:25281810

  16. The Swedish breeding cat: population description, infectious diseases and reproductive performance evaluated by a questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ström Holst, Bodil; Frössling, Jenny

    2009-10-01

    The questionnaire based study gives a combined description of management, infectious diseases and reproductive performance in breeding catteries during 1 year. The mean number of cats per cattery was 6.1, and 25% of the breeders let some of their cats have free access to outdoors. Breeders reported that infection with feline panleukopenia virus, feline immunodeficiency virus or feline leukaemia virus was uncommon, but 8% of the breeders had sold or had themselves owned a cat that died of feline infectious peritonitis. Presence of conjunctivitis was reported by 33.3% of the breeders. Mean litter size was 3.7+/-1.5, with 9.7% stillbirths and 8.3% kitten mortality week 1-12. The percentage of stillborn kittens increased with the age of the queen and litter size, and also differed among breeds. Kitten mortality differed among breeds, but did not increase with age of the queen. Seven percent of the litters were delivered by caesarean section, significantly more during winter and positively associated with presence of stillborn kittens. PMID:19254857

  17. Teaching Programming with Scratch

    OpenAIRE

    Mihalič, Petra

    2014-01-01

    There are quite a few good programing languages and environments for teaching kids how to program. They help beginners learn basic programming constructs usually with help of interactive environment. In this thesis I will describe and compare a few of those languages and environments. Scratch is a language and programming environment that is also intended for learning programming using blocks that make writing complicated instructions easier and reduce beginners' difficulties with syntax erro...

  18. Relationship of orthopedic examination, goniometric measurements, and radiographic signs of degenerative joint disease in cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lascelles B Duncan X

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Available information suggests a mismatch between radiographic and orthopedic examination findings in cats with DJD. However, the extent of the discrepancy between clinical and radiographic signs of OA in companion animals has not been described in detail. This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between orthopedic examination findings, joint goniometry, and radiographic signs of DJD in 100 cats, in a prospective observational design. Cat temperament, pain response to palpation, joint crepitus, effusion and thickening were graded. Radiographs of appendicular joints and the axial skeleton were made under sedation. Joint motion was measured by use of a plastic goniometer before and after sedation. Associations between radiographic degenerative joint disease (DJD and examination findings were assessed to determine sensitivity, specificity and likelihood estimations. Results Pain response to palpation was elicited in 0-67% of the joints with DJD, with a specificity ranging from 62-99%; crepitus was detected in 0-56% of the joints and its specificity varied between 87 and 99%; for effusion, values ranged between 6 and 38% (specificity, 82-100%, and thickening, 0-59% (specificity, 74-99%. Joints with DJD tended to have a decreased range of motion. The presence of pain increased the odds of having DJD in the elbow (right: 5.5; left: 4.5; the presence of pain in the lower back increased the odds of spinal DJD being present (2.97 for lumbar; 4.67 for lumbo-sacral. Conclusions Radiographic DJD cannot be diagnosed with certainty using palpation or goniometry. However, negative findings tend to predict radiographically normal joints. Palpation and goniometry may be used as a tool to help to screen cats, mostly to rule out DJD.

  19. Plasma and Erythrocyte Glutathione Peroxidase Activity, Serum Selenium Concentration, and Plasma Total Antioxidant Capacity in Cats with IRIS Stages I–IV Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Krofič Žel, M.; Tozon, N.; Nemec Svete, A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Serum selenium concentrations and the activity of plasma glutathione peroxidase (GPx) decrease with the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in human patients. Selenium is considered a limiting factor for plasma GPx synthesis. Plasma total antioxidant capacity (TAC) is decreased in CKD cats in comparison to healthy cats. Hypothesis Serum selenium concentrations and plasma and erythrocyte GPx activity in cats with CKD are lower than in healthy cats. Serum selenium concentrati...

  20. Detection of Helicobacter felis in a cat with gastric disease in laboratory animal facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sunhwa; Chung, Yungho; Kang, Won-Guk

    2016-01-01

    A 3-month-old male cat in the animal facility was presented for investigation of anorexia and occasional vomiting. We collected the specimens from gastroscopic biopsy and stool collection. The gastroscopic biopsy specimens were tested using a rapid urease test, CLO Helicobacter-detection kits. Stool specimens were gathered and evaluated using the commercially available SD Bioline H. pylori Ag kit according to the manufacturer's instructions. Genomic DNAs from gastroscopic biopsy and stool specimens of the cat were extracted and submitted to the consensus PCR to amplify Helicobacter rpoB gene. Then the DNAs from gastroscopic biopsy and stool specimens were conducted a multiplex species-specific PCR to amplify urease B gene for H. heilmannii, H. pylori and H. felis. As the results, the rapid urease test with gastroscopic biopsy was revealed positive reaction. The result of H. pylori Stool Ag assay was one red line, negative for H. pylori. The gastroscopic biopsy and stool specimen were positive reactions by the consensus PCR reaction using the RNA polymerase beta-subunit-coding gene (rpoB) to detect Helicobacter species. By multiplex species-specific PCR with gastroscopic biopsy and stool specimens, no amplification products corresponding to either H. heilmannii or H. pylori were detected, but the specimens tested were positive for H. felis. This case was confirmed as gastroenteric disease induced by H. felis infection. On our knowledge, this is a very rare report about H. felis-induced gastroenteric disease in cat and may provide a valuable data on the study of feline Helicobacter infection. PMID:27382381

  1. Scratch – um primeiro olhar

    OpenAIRE

    Flávia Linhalis Arantes; José Michael Leandro da Silva Ferreira; Paula Eduarda Justino Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report the “Scratch, a first glance” activity, conducted with the aim of registering the impressions and the responses of students when they looked for the first time to Scratch programs. We present a review on the characterization of Scratch language and environment, trying to identify what a student who never had contact with programming can use to extract information from the programs. Different from other works in literature, we highlight the commands written in the moth...

  2. Scratch for Budding Computer Scientists

    OpenAIRE

    Malan, David; Leitner, Henry

    2007-01-01

    Scratch is a "media-rich programming environment" recently developed by MIT's Media Lab that "lets you create your own animations, games, and interactive art." Although Scratch is intended to "enhance the development of technological fluency [among youths] at after-school centers in economically disadvantaged communities," we find rarkable potential in this programming environment for higher education as well.We propose Scratch as a first language for first-time programmers in introductory co...

  3. Association between the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system and renal injury in chronic kidney disease of dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitani, Sawane; Yabuki, Akira; Taniguchi, Kazuyuki; Yamato, Osamu

    2013-02-01

    The association of renin and angiotensin II, which are potent components of the renin-angiotensin system, with the severity of chronic renal disease was investigated immunohistochemically in dogs and cats. Immunoreactivities of renin and angiotensin II were evaluated quantitatively, and their correlations with the degrees of glomerulosclerosis, glomerular hypertrophy, interstitial cell infiltration and interstitial fibrosis were statistically analyzed. Immunoreactivities for renin were detected in afferent arteries in both dogs and cats. The score of renin-positive signals showed no correlation with plasma creatinine concentration or any of the histopathological parameters, except for the diameter of glomeruli in dogs. Immunoreactivities for angiotensin II were detected in tubules (primarily proximal tubules) and interstitial mononuclear cells in both dogs and cats. The score of tubular angiotensin II correlated with glomerulosclerosis and cell infiltration in cats but not in dogs. The score of interstitial angiotensin II correlated with plasma creatinine concentration, glomerulosclerosis, cell infiltration and fibrosis in dogs and with glomerulosclerosis and cell infiltration in cats. In conclusion, the results of the study suggest that intrarenal renin-angiotensin system is correlated with the severity of kidney disease, with the underlying mechanism differing between dogs and cats. PMID:22986274

  4. Relationship between degenerative joint disease and hip joint laxity by use of distraction index and Norberg angle measurement in a group of cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the relationship between degenerative joint disease (DJD) and passive laxity of the hip joint in a group of cats. Design: Prospective study. Animals: A select (nonrandomized) group of 78 cats. Procedure: Standard hip-extended radiographic views and compression and distraction views of the pelvis were obtained from cats during sedation. Radiographs were evaluated, using an Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA)-like scoring system for dogs. Passive joint laxity was measured, using Norberg angle (NA) and distraction index (DI). Hip laxity in cats with DJD was compared with hip laxity in cats without DJD. Results: Hip dysplasia (HD) was subjectively diagnosed radiographically in 25 of 78 (32%) cats using the OFA-like scoring system. Nineteen cats had mild HD 4 had moderate HD, and 2 had severe HD. Fifteen of the 25 cats with HD had DJD. The NA ranged from 56 to 105. The mean NA in cats with DJD was (84 degrees) significantly lower than in cats without DJD (95 degrees). The DI ranged from 0.2 to 0.84. The mean DI for cats with DJD was (0.6) significantly higher than that for cats without DJD (0.49). Cats with a DI < 0.4 did not have DJD. Cats had an increased likelihood of having DJD with increased laxity in the coxofemoral joint, as measured by NA or DI. Clinical Implications: The mean NA for radiographically normal cats (92.4 degrees) was lower than that in radiographically normal dogs (103 degrees). The overall mean DI for cats in this group (0.51) is similar to dogs of breeds with high joint laxity, such as the Labrador Retriever (0.5). As in dogs, there is a relationship between DJD and laxity in the hip joint of cats

  5. PREVALENCE OF SOME DISEASES OF DOGS AND CATS AT THE STATE GOVERNMENT VETERINARY CLINIC IN MAIDUGURI (NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. William, S.U.R. Chaudhari1 and N.N. Atsandac2

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available A 3-year (retrospective study was conducted to determine the prevalence of diseases; clinical conditions of dogs and cats presented at the Government Veterinary Clinic, Maiduguri from January 1995 to December 1997. The prevalent diseases; conditions of dogs included helminthosis (19.19%, accidental injury (18.18%, tick infestation ( 15.15% , canine distemper (8.42% , diarrhoea ( 6.73%, mange ( 7.41%, rabies (5.05% and babesiosis (4.71%, Prevalent diseases/conditions of cats included helminthosis (26.67%. tick infestation ( 8.89%. diarrhea ( 16.67%, nutritional deficiencies ( 15.56% and respiratory infections ( 12.22%. Of highest prevalence in both dogs and cats was helminthosis (20.93%, followed by tick infestation (13. 70% and diarrhea (9.04% suggesting a poor husbandy of these pets in Maiduguri area. Cases of automobile accidental injury of dogs were also high, probably due to the same factors of poor husbandry.

  6. EFFECTS OF THERAPEUTIC NUTRITION WITH THE APITHERAPEUTIC PRODUCT APITER IN DOGS AND CATS IN RICKETS DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AGRIPINA SAPCALIU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to create the product APITER the researches were carried out in theInstitute for Beekeeping Research and Development - Bucharest and the product waspreclinical and clinical tested in the Medical Clinic of the Veterinary MedicineFaculty from Bucharest.The increasing interest in internationally context for nonconventionallytherapies and especially for the apitherapy and phitotherapy used inveterinary purpose determined us to study the effects of such therapies in bonediseases (rickets in dogs and cats using a new product -Apiter.The clinicalexperiments were done in the period - October 2004 – February 2006 using a lot of70 individuals (dogs and cats, of different ages between 6 weeks and 7 years withosteo-articulars disorders of rickety type for young individuals and osteomalacia(adult rickets, in treatment series of 10 and 30 days.The clinical investigations werecompleted by radiological exams and biochemical determinations (Ca, Mg, P andalkaline phosphatase, the resulted values being registered before and aftertreatment.The obtained results shown us that the tested methods with the newproduct APITER, applied on dogs and cats with rickets disease were as efficiently asthe classic nutrition methods.The therapeutic efficiency of the new product wasproved by the increased values of Calcium - from 4 mg/dl to 9,2-11,5 mg/dl,Phosphor –from 1,6-3,81 mg/dl to 4,1-5,7 mg/dl, the normalization of the Mg values(2,5-3 mg/dl, the decreasing of alkaline phosphatase (116-443 UI/l la 77-187 U/Iconcomitantly with the normalization of hepatic tests (ALT, GGT, AP, TBIL.

  7. Renal ultrasonographic and computed tomographic appearance, volume, and function of cats with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichle, Jean K; DiBartola, Stephen P; Léveillé, Renée

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the ultrasonographic (US) and computed tomographic (CT) appearance of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) in cats; to compare renal volume in cats with ADPKD (n = 5; mean age 59 +/- 10 months)) and normal cats (n = 5; mean age 66 +/- 10 months) using 2 imaging modalities, US and CT; and to calculate cyst volume using CT. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was determined by 2 methods: 99mTc-diethylene-triaminepentaacetic acid (99mTc-DPTA) scintigraphic uptake and 99-Tc-DTPA plasma clearance. Sonographically, ADPKD affected kidneys were characterized by multiple anechoic to hypoechoic, round to irregularly shaped structures with variation in size. Affected kidneys had indistinct corticomedullary junctions and foci of mineralization. Intravenous (IV) contrast medium administration allowed more definitive identification of cysts with CT, and identification of distortion of renal pelves by cysts. A significant difference (Welch ANOVA, P = 0.05) was detected between the US-estimated renal volumes of normal and affected cats. No statistically significant differences were detected in CT volume (between the normal and affected cats, or between US and CT volume measurements) or the 2 GFR methods. In this group of clinically normal, middle-aged ADPKD cats, renal function was within normal limits and not significantly different than normal. PMID:12175002

  8. Progression of glomerulonephritis to end-stage kidney disease in a cat with nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiie, Junichi; Haishima, Atsuko; Inoue, Kaoru; Ogihara, Kikumi; Ono, Mihoko; Yasuno, Kyohei; Kobayashi, Ryosuke; Aihara, Naoyuki; Ohmuro, Tamio; Shirota, Kinji

    2011-01-01

    A percutaneous renal biopsy was performed on a 3-year-old female Japanese domestic cat with pleural effusion, mild azotemia, hypoalbuminemia, hypercholesterolemia, and proteinuria. Glomerular lesions included mild diffuse hypercellularity and numerous capsular adhesions with segmental sclerosis/hyalinosis of glomerular tufts. Electron microscopy revealed many subendothelial dense deposits with characteristic outer protrusion of glomerular basement membrane. Diffuse and global granular deposits of IgG and C3 were detected along the capillary walls. Tubulo-interstitial changes were mild at the time of biopsy, but progression of the disease was predicted because of the many capsular adhesions of the glomerular tufts. The cat was fed a prescription diet without any other specific or symptomatic therapy after renal biopsy, and died 43 weeks after the biopsy. At necropsy, extensive tubulo-interstitial fibrosis and mononuclear cell infiltration had developed throughout the cortex and outer medulla, and most glomeruli had extensive global sclerosis or obsolescence with less prominent depositions of IgG and C3. PMID:20823662

  9. Checking Out Cuts, Scratches, and Abrasions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Checking Out Cuts, Scratches, and Abrasions KidsHealth > For Kids > Checking Out Cuts, ... weren't wearing kneepads. How Do Cuts and Scratches Heal? After getting a cut, scratch, or abrasion, ...

  10. Scratch-Resistant Lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Lewis Research Center developed a process for achieving diamond- hard coatings for aerospace systems. The technique involves coating the material with a film of diamond-like carbon (DLC) using direct ion deposition. An ion generator creates a stream of ions from a hydrocarbon gas source; the carbon ions impinge directly on the target substrate and 'grow' into a thin DLC film. In 1988, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. received a license to the NASA patent. Diamonex, an Air Products spinoff company, further developed the NASA process to create the DiamondHard technology used on the Bausch & Lomb Ray- Ban Survivors sunglasses. The sunglasses are scratch-resistant and shed water more easily, thus reducing spotting.

  11. Biomarkers in the assessment of acute and chronic kidney diseases in the dog and cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobrin, A R; Blois, S L; Kruth, S A; Abrams-Ogg, A C G; Dewey, C

    2013-12-01

    In both human and veterinary medicine, diagnosing and staging renal disease can be difficult. Measurement of glomerular filtration rate is considered the gold standard for assessing renal function but methods for its assessment can be technically challenging and impractical. The main parameters used to diagnose acute and chronic kidney disease include circulating creatinine and urea concentrations, and urine-specific gravity. However, these parameters can be insensitive. Therefore, there is a need for better methods to diagnose and monitor patients with renal disease. The use of renal biomarkers is increasing in human and veterinary medicine for the diagnosis and monitoring of acute and chronic kidney diseases. An ideal biomarker would identify site and severity of injury, and correlate with renal function, among other qualities. This article will review the advantages and limitations of renal biomarkers that have been used in dogs and cats, as well as some markers used in humans that may be adapted for veterinary use. In the future, measuring a combination of biomarkers will likely be a useful approach in the diagnosis of kidney disorders. PMID:24152019

  12. Influence of double-tip scratch and single-tip scratch on nano-scratching process via molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Peng [College of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130025 (China); Zhao, Hongwei, E-mail: hwzhao@jlu.edu.cn [College of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130025 (China); Shi, Chengli; Zhang, Lin; Huang, Hu [College of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130025 (China); Ren, Luquan [Key Laboratory of Bionic Engineering Ministry of Education, Jilin University, Changchun 130025 (China)

    2013-09-01

    A three-dimensional molecular dynamics model was proposed to study the influences of scratch feed, depth and crystal orientation on the shape and surface quality of the scratched groove during nano-scratching process. In this paper, comparisons were made between the results of double tips simultaneously scratching the surface and those of single tip successively scratching the surface with the same scratch feed, depth and crystal orientation. EAM potential was used to model the interaction of copper atoms, and Morse potential was used to model the interaction between copper and carbon atoms. The residual profiles of scratched grooves and scratching forces were recorded during the simulations. Simulational results show that when single tip scratches the surface at an extremely small feed, the second time scratch significantly influences the previous groove. The second time scratch has a significant influence on the previous groove by increasing scratch depth. Compared with scratching along crystal orientation [1 0 0], scratching along crystal orientation [0 1 1] and [1 1 1] are easy to obtain two parallel grooves. However, when double tips simultaneously scratch the surface regardless of scratch feed, depth and crystal orientation, two parallel grooves are always obtained. Thus, in order to obtain scratched grooves of high quality, it is quite beneficial to design and machine multiple-tip tools.

  13. Influence of double-tip scratch and single-tip scratch on nano-scratching process via molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A three-dimensional molecular dynamics model was proposed to study the influences of scratch feed, depth and crystal orientation on the shape and surface quality of the scratched groove during nano-scratching process. In this paper, comparisons were made between the results of double tips simultaneously scratching the surface and those of single tip successively scratching the surface with the same scratch feed, depth and crystal orientation. EAM potential was used to model the interaction of copper atoms, and Morse potential was used to model the interaction between copper and carbon atoms. The residual profiles of scratched grooves and scratching forces were recorded during the simulations. Simulational results show that when single tip scratches the surface at an extremely small feed, the second time scratch significantly influences the previous groove. The second time scratch has a significant influence on the previous groove by increasing scratch depth. Compared with scratching along crystal orientation [1 0 0], scratching along crystal orientation [0 1 1] and [1 1 1] are easy to obtain two parallel grooves. However, when double tips simultaneously scratch the surface regardless of scratch feed, depth and crystal orientation, two parallel grooves are always obtained. Thus, in order to obtain scratched grooves of high quality, it is quite beneficial to design and machine multiple-tip tools.

  14. Role of personality and expectations for itch and scratching induced by audiovisual itch stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schut, C; Rädel, A; Frey, L; Gieler, U; Kupfer, J

    2016-01-01

    Itch is an unpleasant, bodily sensation, which--similar to pain--evokes behavioral reactions. As a response to itch, people start scratching. There are different ways to provoke itch and subsequent scratching in experimental settings. A non-invasive method to induce itch and scratching is the presentation of itch-related (audio-) visual stimulus material, like slide-supported lectures on skin diseases or crawling insects. Also, watching videos showing other people scratching provokes itch and the desire to scratch. In this review, we focus on psychological factors, which were shown to be associated with itch and scratching provoked by (audio-) visual itch stimuli. First, we summarize the findings on the relationship between personality characteristics and (audio-) visually induced itch. Agreeableness and self-consciousness were shown to be associated with induced itch and scratching in patients with chronic skin diseases, while neuroticism was linked to induced itch in healthy subjects. Second, we present results of a recent study, in which we altered the expectations towards audio-visually induced itch and scratching by changing the information given on upcoming itch stimuli. It was shown that subjects being informed about itch stimuli in a neutral way displayed a shorter scratch duration in itch inducing situations than subjects having catastrophizing expectations. Also, the increase in scratch duration and in the number of scratch movements induced by audiovisual itch stimuli was higher when the patients were not informed about itch induction. Thus, in itch patients neither catastrophizing nor trivializing symptoms seems to be helpful. PMID:26416001

  15. Induction of fos expression by activity in the spinal rhythm generator for scratching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barajon, I; Gossard, J P; Hultborn, H

    1992-08-14

    Fos expression was evaluated immunohistochemically in L7-S1 spinal segments after inducing fictive scratching in paralysed, unanaesthetized, decerebrate cats. The activity was induced by cutaneous stimulation of the pinna on one side and recorded from peripheral nerves. A cumulative duration of scratching of 60 to 90 min was effective in inducing fos expression. Most Fos-positive neurones were found in the dorsolateral part of the ventral horn and in the intermediate region of the spinal cord on the scratching side. In sham-operated animals the finding of Fos-positive neurones in these areas was very rare. PMID:1393567

  16. Imported disease of dogs and cats exotic to Ireland: echinococcus multilocularis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodfellow Mark

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Changes in legislation that facilitate the movement of animals within the European Union may increase the risk that some microbial and parasitic organisms, currently exotic to Ireland, will be introduced by travelled pet animals. It is possible that the fox tapeworm, Echinococcus multilocularis, might be introduced in that manner from any of the several member states in which it is endemic. Red foxes are the principal definitive hosts of E. multilocularis but dogs and cats can also be infected. Infection in the definitive host is of little clinical significance, but aberrant infection of humans results in alveolar echinococcosis, a debilitating disease that has a high mortality rate. Humans acquire the organism by ingestion of Echinococcus multilocularis eggs excreted by definitive hosts; the larval metacestodes develop primarily in the liver, in the initial asymptomatic phase as small, well-encapsulated cysts. Over time, perhaps five to 15 years, progressive local infiltration and secondary cyst development at distant sites occur with resultant clinical signs. Patients with infiltrative liver disease present with cholestatic jaundice, epigastric pain, fatigue, weight loss and hepatomegaly. If left untreated, the disease can be fatal. This paper recounts the life cycle of the parasite, and discusses the control measures on which its exclusion from Ireland depend. Strict adherence to the routine worming of travelled dogs with praziquantel, at appropriate doses, 24 to 48 hours prior to entry into the country will minimise the likelihood of introduction of this zoonosis.

  17. Cardiac Biomarkers in Hyperthyroid Cats

    OpenAIRE

    Sangster, Jodi Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    Background: Hyperthyroidism has substantial effects on the circulatory system. The cardiac biomarkers NT-proBNP and troponin I (cTNI) have proven useful in identifying cats with myocardial disease but have not been as extensively investigated in hyperthyroidism.Hypothesis: Plasma NT-proBNP and cTNI concentrations are higher in cats with primary cardiac disease than in cats with hyperthyroidism and higher in cats with hyperthyroidism than in healthy control cats.Animals: Twenty-three hyperthyr...

  18. Cardiac Biomarkers in Hyperthyroid Cats

    OpenAIRE

    Sangster, J.K.; Panciera, D L; Abbott, J.A.; Zimmerman, K.C.; Lantis, A.C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Hyperthyroidism has substantial effects on the circulatory system. The cardiac biomarkers NT‐proBNP and troponin I (cTNI) have proven useful in identifying cats with myocardial disease but have not been extensively investigated in hyperthyroidism. Hypothesis Plasma NT‐proBNP and cTNI concentrations are higher in cats with primary myocardial disease than in cats with hyperthyroidism and higher in cats with hyperthyroidism than in healthy control cats. Animals Twenty‐three hyperthyro...

  19. To scratch or not to scratch – a reflection

    OpenAIRE

    Malie Zeeman

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the extent to which the Scratch programming language has been accepted as an electronic teaching tool among teachers in South Africa. Information Technology (IT) was identified as a scarce skill in the Birchwood Declaration (2007) released by the South African Department of Education, a problem compounded by the declining number of the students who enrol in IT-subjects at school. Scratch was introduced as an e-Learning tool in the IT curriculum as part of an effort to ...

  20. Renal alterations in feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-infected cats: a natural model of lentivirus-induced renal disease changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, Alessandro; Tozon, Natasa; Guidi, Grazia; Pistello, Mauro

    2012-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated with several renal syndromes including acute and chronic renal failures, but the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are unclear. HIV and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) share numerous biological and pathological features, including renal alterations. We investigated and compared the morphological changes of renal tissue of 51 experimentally and 21 naturally infected cats. Compared to the latter, the experimentally infected cats exhibited some mesangial widening and glomerulonephritis, milder proteinuria, and lower tubular and interstitial alterations. The numbers of giant protein tubular casts and tubular microcysts were also lower. In contrast, diffuse interstitial infiltrates and glomerular and interstitial amyloidosis were detected only in naturally infected cats. Similar alterations are found in HIV infected patients, thus supporting the idea of a causative role of FIV infection in renal disease, and underlining the relevance of the FIV and its natural host as an animal model for investigating lentivirus-associated nephropathy. PMID:23170163

  1. Renal Alterations in Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV-Infected Cats: A Natural Model of Lentivirus-Induced Renal Disease Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Pistello

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is associated with several renal syndromes including acute and chronic renal failures, but the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are unclear. HIV and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV share numerous biological and pathological features, including renal alterations. We investigated and compared the morphological changes of renal tissue of 51 experimentally and 21 naturally infected cats. Compared to the latter, the experimentally infected cats exhibited some mesangial widening and glomerulonephritis, milder proteinuria, and lower tubular and interstitial alterations. The numbers of giant protein tubular casts and tubular microcysts were also lower. In contrast, diffuse interstitial infiltrates and glomerular and interstitial amyloidosis were detected only in naturally infected cats. Similar alterations are found in HIV infected patients, thus supporting the idea of a causative role of FIV infection in renal disease, and underlining the relevance of the FIV and its natural host as an animal model for investigating lentivirus-associated nephropathy.

  2. Azodyl, a synbiotic, fails to alter azotemia in cats with chronic kidney disease when sprinkled onto food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rishniw, Mark; Wynn, Susan G

    2011-06-01

    The effect of probiotic therapy in chronic kidney disease (CKD) in cats is poorly defined, but gaining in popularity. However, cat owners often prefer to administer probiotics by combining them with food, rather than administering capsules intact, as is prescribed by the manufacturer. The efficacy of such non-recommended administration is unknown. In this double-blinded, controlled clinical trial, 10 cats with naturally-occurring CKD were randomized to receive either a probiotic-prebiotic combination (synbiotic) or psyllium husk (prebiotic only) for 2 months. Medications were sprinkled and mixed into food or given as a slurry. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine were measured twice prior to administration of medication, and then monthly for 2 months during the medication administration. Owners and clinicians were masked as to treatment. The maximal percentage change in BUN and creatinine was calculated for each cat. No differences in percentage change were detected between groups (P=0.8 for both BUN and creatinine). The synbiotic supplement used in this study, when applied to food or administered as a slurry fails to reduce azotemia in cats with CKD. Therefore, owners should not administer this synbiotic in this manner. PMID:21571563

  3. Systolic blood pressure and heart rate in cats with chronic kidney disease undergoing chemical restraint during hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Kleine Figueiredo dos Santos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Dialysis is one of the used methods for treatment of Acute Renal Injury (ARI and Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD to replace the function of the kidneys when refers to blood depuration. Hemodialysis removes toxins accumulated in the body directly from the blood, being a useful alternative therapy for dogs and cats with CKD in advanced stages. Because of the difficulty on handling the patient feline, this procedure requires sedation. However, few studies have been conducted to assess the safety of anesthesia in dogs and cats with CKD undergoing dialysis. The present study aimed to evaluate two different protocols of chemical restraint in cats with CKD and the effect of these on systolic blood pressure (SBP and heart rate (HR, since the procedure of extracorporeal circulation leads the patient to a hypotensive frame. Twelve adult cats were used, with an average weight of 4 kg, CKD, underwent two anesthetic protocols: Group GP (n = 6 using propofol, and group GCM (n = 6 using ketamine-midazolam association for the implantation procedure of central venous catheter (CVC and hemodialysis. Cats in GP as well as the GCM group showed statistical difference in the change in SBP and HR only from baseline compared to the other time points evaluated. The two protocols maintained SBP and HR within physiological values.

  4. Evaluation of intrarenal mesenchymal stem cell injection for treatment of chronic kidney disease in cats: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quimby, Jessica M; Webb, Tracy L; Gibbons, Debra S; Dow, Steven W

    2011-06-01

    The feasibility of autologous intrarenal mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy in cats with chronic kidney disease (CKD) was investigated. Six cats (two healthy, four with CKD) received a single unilateral intrarenal injection of autologous bone marrow-derived or adipose tissue-derived MSC (bmMSC or aMSC) via ultrasound guidance. Minimum database and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) via nuclear scintigraphy were determined pre-injection, at 7 days and at 30 days post-injection. Intrarenal injection did not induce immediate or long-term adverse effects. Two cats with CKD that received aMSC experienced modest improvement in GFR and a mild decrease in serum creatinine concentration. Despite the possible benefits of intrarenal MSC injections for CKD cats, the number of sedations and interventions required to implement this approach would likely preclude widespread clinical application. We concluded that MSC could be transferred safely by ultrasound-guided intrarenal injection in cats, but that alternative sources and routes of MSC therapy should be investigated. PMID:21334237

  5. Studies on viral respiratory disease in laboratory cats. I. Isolation of feline herpesvirus and choice of proper disinfectant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagami, K; Ando, S; Omata, Y; Furukawa, T; Fukui, M

    1982-01-01

    In the laboratory cat colony consisted of 14 Korats and 8 Japanese native cats, the disease characterized by upper respiratory signs occurred. Seven cytopathogenic agents were isolated from the oropharyngeal swabs and necropsy materials of affected cats by means of inoculation to primary feline kidney cell cultures. One of the isolates (KS-1 strain) was identical with feline herpesvirus (FHV), and appeared to be a causal agent of the trouble. Properties of the KS-1 strain were in general agreement with the known strains of FHV. Serologic examination and clinical analysis suggested that Japanese native cats became carriers, re-excreted the virus and spread it to susceptible cats. Virucidal activities of several disinfectants against FHV, comparing with a feline calicivirus (FCV), were studied and the following conclusions reached: 1) Sodium hypochlorite, iodine complex, benzethonium chloride and chlorhexidine were effective against FHV at commonly used concentrations. 2) Among chemicals tested sodium hypochlorite was most effective against FCV and followed by iodine complex. 3) Benzethonium chloride and chlorhexidine had little efficacy against FCV at commonly used doses. PMID:6281040

  6. Pulmonary thromboembolism in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermerhorn, Thomas; Pembleton-Corbett, Julie R; Kornreich, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    Pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) is rarely diagnosed in cats, and the clinical features of the disease are not well known. PTE was diagnosed at postmortem examination in 17 cats, a prevalence of 0.06% over a 24-year period. The age of affected cats ranged from 10 months to 18 years, although young (10 years) cats were more commonly affected than were middle-aged cats. Males and females were equally affected. The majority of cats with PTE (n = 16) had concurrent disease, which was often severe. The most common diseases identified in association with PTE were neoplasia, anemia of unidentified cause, and pancreatitis. Cats with glomerulonephritis, encephalitis, pneumonia, heart disease, and hepatic lipidosis were also represented in this study. Most cats with PTE demonstrated dyspnea and respiratory distress before death or euthanasia, but PTE was not recognized ante mortem in any cat studied. In conclusion, PTE can affect cats of any age and is associated with a variety of systemic and inflammatory disorders. It is recommended that the same clinical criteria used to increase the suspicion of PTE in dogs should also be applied to cats. PMID:15320593

  7. Relationship of orthopedic examination, goniometric measurements, and radiographic signs of degenerative joint disease in cats

    OpenAIRE

    Lascelles B Duncan X; Dong Yaa-Hui; Marcellin-Little Denis J; Thomson Andrea; Wheeler Simon; Correa Maria

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Available information suggests a mismatch between radiographic and orthopedic examination findings in cats with DJD. However, the extent of the discrepancy between clinical and radiographic signs of OA in companion animals has not been described in detail. This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between orthopedic examination findings, joint goniometry, and radiographic signs of DJD in 100 cats, in a prospective observational design. Cat temperament, pain response to...

  8. Controversies in Veterinary Nephrology: Renal Diets Are Indicated for Cats with International Renal Interest Society Chronic Kidney Disease Stages 2 to 4: The Con View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherk, Margie A; Laflamme, Dottie P

    2016-11-01

    Renal diets typically incorporate protein and phosphorus restriction, supplement with potassium and Omega-3 fatty acids, and address metabolic acidosis. Compared to "maintenance" diets, these modifications appear to benefit cats with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, there is limited data in cats justifying the specific amounts of the nutrients used in these diets, and there is little evidence supporting protein restriction in cats with CKD. Energy intake, maintenance of body weight, and muscle and body condition need to be addressed, and may take precedence over special diets. Further research is needed to better define optimum diets for cats with CKD. PMID:27593575

  9. Use of pentosan polysulphate in cats with idiopathic, non-obstructive lower urinary tract disease: a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallius, Barbro M; Tidholm, Anna E

    2009-06-01

    Idiopathic feline lower urinary tract disease (FLUTD) is a common clinical entity where different treatments, for example glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) such as pentosan polysulphate (PPS), are advocated. However, few treatments have been investigated by well-controlled clinical trials. This paper compares the use of PPS in FLUTD compared to placebo. Of the 18 cats in the experiment, nine were treated with PPS and nine were treated with placebo with subcutaneous injections of 3mg/kg PPS or placebo day 1, 2, 5 and 10. The study was double-blind, randomised and placebo-controlled. Revaluation was performed after 5 and 10 days, 2 weeks, 2, 6 and 12 months. There were no statistically significant differences concerning clinical signs between groups during treatment or at re-evaluation, except for pretreatment stressful events where PPS-treated cats had experienced significantly more stressful events compared to cats treated with placebo before entering the study. Six cats (33%) showed recurrence of clinical signs during the entire study period, and only one of these cats had more than one recurrent episode. One cat (placebo) was euthanased 7 days after initial treatment because of recurrence of clinical signs. Another cat (placebo) was euthanased due to other reasons after 6 months. At 2 weeks two cats (placebo and PPS) showed clinical signs. At 2 months re-evaluation one cat showed mild clinical signs. At 6 and 12 months all remaining 16 cats were healthy. Idiopathic, non-obstructive FLUTD is a self-limiting disease with good short-term and excellent long-term prognosis without treatment. Whether or not PPS may be beneficial in a subpopulation of cats with continuous or frequently recurring clinical signs may be elucidated in forthcoming double-blind, randomised and placebo-controlled trials including only this subpopulation of cats. PMID:18996037

  10. Emerging and Re-Emerging Zoonoses of Dogs and Cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno B. Chomel

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Since the middle of the 20th century, pets are more frequently considered as “family members” within households. However, cats and dogs still can be a source of human infection by various zoonotic pathogens. Among emerging or re-emerging zoonoses, viral diseases, such as rabies (mainly from dog pet trade or travel abroad, but also feline cowpox and newly recognized noroviruses or rotaviruses or influenza viruses can sicken our pets and be transmitted to humans. Bacterial zoonoses include bacteria transmitted by bites or scratches, such as pasteurellosis or cat scratch disease, leading to severe clinical manifestations in people because of their age or immune status and also because of our closeness, not to say intimacy, with our pets. Cutaneous contamination with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Leptospira spp., and/or aerosolization of bacteria causing tuberculosis or kennel cough are also emerging/re-emerging pathogens that can be transmitted by our pets, as well as gastro-intestinal pathogens such as Salmonella or Campylobacter. Parasitic and fungal pathogens, such as echinococcosis, leishmaniasis, onchocercosis, or sporotrichosis, are also re-emerging or emerging pet related zoonoses. Common sense and good personal and pet hygiene are the key elements to prevent such a risk of zoonotic infection.

  11. Emerging and Re-Emerging Zoonoses of Dogs and Cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomel, Bruno B

    2014-01-01

    Since the middle of the 20th century, pets are more frequently considered as "family members" within households. However, cats and dogs still can be a source of human infection by various zoonotic pathogens. Among emerging or re-emerging zoonoses, viral diseases, such as rabies (mainly from dog pet trade or travel abroad), but also feline cowpox and newly recognized noroviruses or rotaviruses or influenza viruses can sicken our pets and be transmitted to humans. Bacterial zoonoses include bacteria transmitted by bites or scratches, such as pasteurellosis or cat scratch disease, leading to severe clinical manifestations in people because of their age or immune status and also because of our closeness, not to say intimacy, with our pets. Cutaneous contamination with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Leptospira spp., and/or aerosolization of bacteria causing tuberculosis or kennel cough are also emerging/re-emerging pathogens that can be transmitted by our pets, as well as gastro-intestinal pathogens such as Salmonella or Campylobacter. Parasitic and fungal pathogens, such as echinococcosis, leishmaniasis, onchocercosis, or sporotrichosis, are also re-emerging or emerging pet related zoonoses. Common sense and good personal and pet hygiene are the key elements to prevent such a risk of zoonotic infection. PMID:26480316

  12. General procedures in diagnosis of malignant diseases in dogs and cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Milan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumors occur in all domestic and wild animals. They are most often diagnosed in dogs and cats, and their numbers increase from year to year. In the recent years, cancer is believed to be the most frequent cause of pet deaths. A speedy and reliable diagnosis is of paramount importance because it enables the veterinarian to begin therapy and make a prognosis. The objective of an early diagnosis is to enable the detection of neoplastic diseases before the tumor spreads throughout the organism, consequently enabling the timely administration of therapy and providing greater chances for curing the animal. A tumor is diagnosed on the grounds of the anamnesis, clinical picture, and special diagnostic procedures. The most frequently applied diagnostic procedures are laboratory diagnostics, cytology, biopsy and pathohistology, imaging diagnostics (roentgenography and roentgenoscopy, ultrasound diagnostics, endoscopy, computer tomography, magnetic resonance, and scintigraphy and molecular diagnostics. Each of these methods has its advantages and faults in connection with costs, availability, sensitivity, specificity and quality of anatomic vs functional pictures. Every one of these techniques has its own field of implementation and each one provides different and additional information in connection with the nature and position of the primary lesion and the presence of metastases.

  13. Systolic blood pressure and heart rate in cats with chronic kidney disease undergoing chemical restraint during hemodialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Karine Kleine Figueiredo dos Santos; Daniel Paulino Junior; Julio César Cambraia Veado; Juliana de Abreu Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Dialysis is one of the used methods for treatment of Acute Renal Injury (ARI) and Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) to replace the function of the kidneys when refers to blood depuration. Hemodialysis removes toxins accumulated in the body directly from the blood, being a useful alternative therapy for dogs and cats with CKD in advanced stages. Because of the difficulty on handling the patient feline, this procedure requires sedation. However, few studies have been conducted to assess the safety o...

  14. Relationship of glomerular filtration rate based on serum iodixanol clearance to IRIS staging in cats with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    IWAMA, Ryosuke; SATO, Tsubasa; Katayama, Masaaki; Shimamura, Shunsuke; SATOH, Hiroshi; ICHIJO, Toshihiro; FURUHAMA, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    We examined the correlation between the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) estimated from an equation based on the serum iodixanol clearance technique and International Renal Interest Society (IRIS) stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in cats. The equation included the injection dose, sampling time, serum concentration and estimated volume of distribution (Vd) of the isotonic, nonionic, contrast medium iodixanol as a test tracer. The percent changes in the median basal GFR values calculated ...

  15. Comparison of Serum Concentrations of Symmetric Dimethylarginine and Creatinine as Kidney Function Biomarkers in Cats with Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, J.A.; Obare, E.; Yerramilli, M.; Jewell, D.E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) has been shown to be an accurate and precise biomarker for calculating estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in humans, as well as a more sensitive biomarker than serum creatinine concentration (sCr) for assessing renal dysfunction. Objectives The purpose of this retrospective study was to report on the utility of measuring serum SDMA concentrations in cats for detection of chronic kidney disease (CKD) before diagnosis by conventional measurem...

  16. Seroprevalence of Bartonella henselae infection and correlation with disease status in cats in Switzerland.

    OpenAIRE

    Glaus, T; Hofmann-Lehmann, R.; Greene, C; Glaus, B; Wolfensberger, C; Lutz, H.

    1997-01-01

    The prevalence of infection with Bartonella henselae was investigated in cats from different areas of Switzerland. Serum samples of 728 cats were examined for antibodies to B. henselae by immunofluorescent antibody testing, and the results were analyzed with a view to a possible correlation between a positive titer and signalment, clinical signs, infection with feline leukemia virus (FeLV), feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), feline coronavirus (FCoV), or feline spumavirus (FeSFV), and the l...

  17. Scratch – um primeiro olhar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Linhalis Arantes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report the “Scratch, a first glance” activity, conducted with the aim of registering the impressions and the responses of students when they looked for the first time to Scratch programs. We present a review on the characterization of Scratch language and environment, trying to identify what a student who never had contact with programming can use to extract information from the programs. Different from other works in literature, we highlight the commands written in the mother tongue of the students as a great facilitator to the understanding of the programs by the beginners. The results of the experiments show that the ability to read the programs is of great importance in the understanding from those who never had previous contact with programming.

  18. Cat-transmitted Sporotrichosis, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Schubach, Armando; Schubach, Tânia Maria Pacheco; Barros, Mônica Bastos de Lima; Wanke, Bodo

    2005-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is an emerging zoonosis in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. From 1998 to 2003, 497 humans and 1,056 cats with culture-proven sporotrichosis were studied. A total of 421 patients, 67.4% with a history of a scratch or bite, reported contact with cats that had sporotrichosis.

  19. Transition of pattern generation: the phenomenon of post-scratching locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trejo, A; Tapia, J A; De la Torre Valdovinos, B; Huidobro, N; Flores, G; Flores-Hernandez, J; Flores, A; Manjarrez, E

    2015-03-12

    A fundamental problem in neurophysiology is the understanding of neuronal mechanisms by which the central nervous system produces a sequence of voluntary or involuntary motor acts from a diverse repertory of movements. These kinds of transitions between motor acts are extremely complex; however, they could be analyzed in a more simple form in decerebrate animals in the context of spinal central pattern generation. Here, we present for the first time a physiological phenomenon of post-scratching locomotion in which decerebrate cats exhibit a compulsory locomotor activity after an episode of scratching. We found flexor, extensor and intermediate single interneurons rhythmically firing in the same phase during both scratching and the subsequent post-scratching locomotion. Because no changes in phase of these neurons from scratching to post-scratching locomotion were found, we suggest that in the lumbar spinal cord there are neurons associated with both motor tasks. Moreover, because of its high reproducibility we suggest that the study of post-scratching fictive locomotion, together with the unitary recording of neurons, could become a useful tool to study neuronal mechanisms underlying transitions from one rhythmic motor task to another, and to study in more detail the central pattern generator circuitry in the spinal cord. PMID:25556832

  20. A magnifying scratch-gage force transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, C. E.

    1969-01-01

    Single-component scratch-gage transducer incorporates a unique motion magnification scheme to increase the magnitude of the load measuring scratch approximately 15 times over that of conventional models. It is small, load carrying and high in natural frequency.

  1. Bites and Scratches (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... was bitten or scratched by an unfamiliar or wild animal, note the location of the animal. Some animals may have to be captured, confined, and observed for rabies. But do not try to capture the animal yourself. Look in your phone book ...

  2. Molecular characterization and virus neutralization patterns of severe, non-epizootic forms of feline calicivirus infections resembling virulent systemic disease in cats in Switzerland and in Liechtenstein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willi, Barbara; Spiri, Andrea M; Meli, Marina L; Samman, Ayman; Hoffmann, Karolin; Sydler, Titus; Cattori, Valentino; Graf, Felix; Diserens, Kevin A; Padrutt, Isabelle; Nesina, Stefanie; Berger, Alice; Ruetten, Maja; Riond, Barbara; Hosie, Margaret J; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2016-01-15

    Feline calicivirus (FCV) infections are associated with oral ulceration, chronic stomatitis and a limping syndrome. Epizootic outbreaks of virulent systemic disease (VSD) have been reported in the USA and Europe. Here, the molecular characterization and neutralization patterns of FCV isolates from cases of severe, non-epizootic infection associated with skin ulceration and edema are presented. Samples from eleven symptomatic cats, four in-contact cats and 27 cats with no contact with symptomatic cats were collected and tested for FCV, feline herpesvirus-1 (FHV-1), feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). Phylogenetic analyses based on the capsid (VP1) gene of FCV and virus neutralization with antisera raised against four FCV vaccine strains were performed. Nine kittens and two adult cats in two shelters and two veterinary clinics in four geographically distinct locations in Switzerland and Liechtenstein were affected. The cats showed fever, tongue and skin ulceration, head and paw edema, and occasionally jaundice, generalized edema and dyspnea. All symptomatic cats tested FCV-positive but were negative for FHV-1, FeLV and FIV, with the exception of one FIV-positive kitten. All kittens of one litter and both adult cats died. The disease did not spread to cats in the environment. Cats in the environment displayed phylogenetically distinct, but related, FCV strains. Virus neutralization patterns suggested that some cases might have been potentially prevented by vaccination with the optimal vaccine strain. In conclusion, clinicians should be aware of severe, non-epizootic forms of FCV infections with initial clinical presentations similar to VSD. PMID:26711049

  3. Learning Computer Science Concepts with Scratch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerbaum-Salant, Orni; Armoni, Michal; Ben-Ari, Mordechai

    2013-01-01

    Scratch is a visual programming environment that is widely used by young people. We investigated if Scratch can be used to teach concepts of computer science (CS). We developed learning materials for middle-school students that were designed according to the constructionist philosophy of Scratch and evaluated them in a few schools during two…

  4. Discovery of new feline paramyxoviruses in domestic cats with chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieg, Michael; Heenemann, Kristin; Rückner, Antje; Burgener, Iwan; Oechtering, Gerhard; Vahlenkamp, Thomas W

    2015-01-01

    Paramyxoviruses constitute a large family of enveloped RNA viruses including important pathogens in veterinary and human medicine. Recently, feline paramyxoviruses, genus morbillivirus, were detected in cats from Hong Kong and Japan. Here we describe the discovery of several new feline paramyxovirus

  5. Comparison of upper gastrointestinal radiographic findings to histopathologic observations: a retrospective study of 41 dogs and cats with suspected small bowel infiltrative disease (1985 to 1990)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was the intent of this study to define which, if any, radiographic observations corresponded with specific causes of diffuse infiltrative small bowel disease and if radiographic findings could differentiate inflammatory disease from neoplastic disease and either of them from normal. Bowel spasticity, luminal narrowing, and thumb printing tend to indicate the presence of tumor more often than inflammatory disease. Increased bowel gas in cats and barium adhesion in dogs and cats suggest that a component of enteritis is present. Decreased bowel gas in dogs is more often associated with obstructive disease, but is not helpful in differentiating diffuse inflammatory disease from diffuse neoplastic disease. While several observations that can foster differentiation of neoplastic from inflammatory disease were found, this study also indicated that the UGI lacks a high degree of predictive value other than to indicate the presence of infiltrative small bowel disease

  6. [The restructuring of the efferent activity of the generator of scratching during the electrical activation of the descending systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degtiarenko, A M; Baev, K V; Zavadskaia, T V

    1990-01-01

    Rearrangement of the scratching generator activity evoked by phasic electrical stimulation of different descending systems has been investigated on decerebrated immobilized cats. This rearrangement heavily depends on the stimulation phase. Maximal increase of the scratching cycle duration by electrical stimulation of Deiters' nucleus, red nucleus and pyramidal tract takes place in the first half of an aiming phase. The electrical stimulation of structures mentioned above does not practically change duration of the scratching cycle in the second half of the aiming phase and at the beginning of the scratching phase. A maximal increase of the scratching cycle duration by electrical stimulation of reticular gigantocellular nucleus occurs in the second half of the aiming phase. The electrical activation of descending pathways during the aiming phase increases intensity of this phase and decreases intensity of the scratching phase. The electrical activation of descending pathways during the scratching phase increases its intensity and does not change practically the intensity of the aiming phase. Possible principles of the suprasegmental correction of the scratching generator activity are discussed. PMID:2398928

  7. Scratch direction and threshold force in nanoscale scratching using atomic force microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Ampere A.; Kuo, Chung-Feng Jeffrey; Jou, Shyankay; Nishimura, Shinya; Shirakashi, Jun-ichi

    2011-09-01

    The nanoscaled tip in an AFM (atomic force microscope) has become an effective scratching tool for material removing in nanofabrication. In this article, the characteristics of using a diamond-coated pyramidal tip to scratch Ni-Fe thin film surfaces was experimentally investigated with the focus on the evaluation of the influence of the scratch or scan direction on the final shape of the scratched geometry as well as the applied scratch force. Results indicated that both the scratched profile and the scratch force were greatly affected by the scratch direction. It has been found that, to minimize the formation of protuberances along the groove sides and to have a better control of the scratched geometry, the tip face should be perpendicular to the scratching direction, which is also known as orthogonal cutting condition. To demonstrate the present findings, three groove patterns have been scratched with the tip face perpendicular to the scratching direction and very little amount of protuberances was observed. The threshold scratch force was also predicted based on the Hertz contact theory. Without considering the surface friction and adhesive forces between the tip and substrate, the threshold force predicted was twice smaller than the measurement value. Finally, recommendations for technical improvement and research focuses are provided.

  8. Scratch direction and threshold force in nanoscale scratching using atomic force microscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nanoscaled tip in an AFM (atomic force microscope) has become an effective scratching tool for material removing in nanofabrication. In this article, the characteristics of using a diamond-coated pyramidal tip to scratch Ni-Fe thin film surfaces was experimentally investigated with the focus on the evaluation of the influence of the scratch or scan direction on the final shape of the scratched geometry as well as the applied scratch force. Results indicated that both the scratched profile and the scratch force were greatly affected by the scratch direction. It has been found that, to minimize the formation of protuberances along the groove sides and to have a better control of the scratched geometry, the tip face should be perpendicular to the scratching direction, which is also known as orthogonal cutting condition. To demonstrate the present findings, three groove patterns have been scratched with the tip face perpendicular to the scratching direction and very little amount of protuberances was observed. The threshold scratch force was also predicted based on the Hertz contact theory. Without considering the surface friction and adhesive forces between the tip and substrate, the threshold force predicted was twice smaller than the measurement value. Finally, recommendations for technical improvement and research focuses are provided.

  9. Experimental and numerical study on scratching test

    OpenAIRE

    Öpöz, Tahsin; Chen, Xun

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents recent investigation of the material removal mechanism in single grit grinding test. Single grit scratches were generated experimentally by using CBN grit on En24T steel and compared with numerical simulation by using finite element modelling (FEM). The material removal mechanism was observed along the scratch length to understand the effectiveness of ploughing and cutting mechanism throughout the scratch. Experiments showed that cutting is efficient at first half of the s...

  10. Scratch in special education: programming for all

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez Escribano, Carmen; Sánchez-Montoya, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of this paper is to encourage teachers and educators to use Scratch in their classrooms with special education students. Scratch is a visual, easy to use, and free programming language which promotes active and constructive learning. To encourage teachers to use this program we offer other teachers' experiences with different abilities and learning style students and a list of assistive technology resources to make Scratch accessible to all. We also suggest other ways to use this...

  11. Prostatic carcinoma in two cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinical, radiological and pathological features of two cats with prostatic carcinoma are reported. In both cats the presenting history included signs of lower urinary tract disease with haematuria and dysuria. Prostatomegaly was visible radiographically in one cat; an irregular intraprostatic urethra was seen on retrograde contrast urethrography in both cats. In one of the cats, neoplasia was suspected on the basis of a transurethral catheter biopsy. Following a poor response to palliative treatment in both cases, euthanasia was performed with histological confirmation of the diagnosis

  12. The Scratch Programming Language and Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, John; Resnick, Mitchel; Rusk, Natalie; Silverman, Brian; Eastmond, Evelyn

    2010-01-01

    Scratch is a visual programming environment that allows users (primarily ages 8 to 16) to learn computer programming while working on personally meaningful projects such as animated stories and games. A key design goal of Scratch is to support self-directed learning through tinkering and collaboration with peers. This article explores how the…

  13. Grooming reflexes and Brown-Séquard epilepsy in cats with pontile lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, W; Randall, S; Johnson, R F

    1985-02-01

    The literature on the relation between the scratch reflex and Brown-Séquard epilepsy in the guinea pig indicates that the scratch reflex is a stimulus-induced myoclonus that is the first component of a complete seizure. Cats with pontile lesions and cats with frontal neocortical lesions exhibit the scratch reflex and other grooming reflexes. The grooming reflexes in cats with pontile lesions develop over a period of a year or more into complete seizures that are similar to Brown-Séquard epilepsy as described for the guinea pig by Brown-Séquard and others. Cinematographic analyses revealed that the scratch reflex in cats with pontile lesions and in cats with frontal neocortical lesions has the same frequency and the same complex spatial and temporal pattern as normal scratching behavior. In addition, the myoclonus of the complete seizures is identified as the scratch reflex, representing a very vigorous and long-lasting afterdischarge. Reconstruction of the pontile lesions indicate that the lateral and rostral portions of the paralemniscal tegmental fields were destroyed along with portions of the pontile gray and pyramidal tract. PMID:3929802

  14. Role of Fine Needle Aspiration in the Diagnosis of the Rare Disease of Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis in a Child

    OpenAIRE

    Seema Lale; Daniel Soto; Patricia G. Wasserman

    2014-01-01

    Langerhan’s cell histiocytosis (LCH) results from the proliferation of immunophenotypically and functionally immature, morphologically rounded Langerhan’s cells along with eosinophils, macrophages, lymphocytes, and, commonly, multinucleated giant cells. Here we report a case in a 6-year-old boy of differential diagnoses including dermatopathic lymphadenitis (DL), parasitic infection, Kimura’s disease, hypersensitivity reactions, cat-scratch disease, sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphad...

  15. Domestic cat allergen and allergic sensitisation in young children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Chih-Mei; Gehring, Ulrike; Wickman, Magnus; Hoek, Gerard; Giovannangelo, Mariella; Nordling, Emma; Wijga, Alet; de Jongste, Johan; Pershagen, Goeran; Almqvist, Catarina; Kerkhof, Marjan; Bellander, Tom; Wichmann, H. -Erich; Brunekreef, Bert; Heinrich, Joachim

    2008-01-01

    Studies have presented conflicting associations between cat allergen exposure and sensitisation and atopic disease. We therefore investigated the association between the observed domestic cat allergen level and cat sensitisation in young children in four study populations from three European countri

  16. The epidemiology of bite and scratch injuries by vertebrate animals in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pet and wildlife populations are a potential source of various public health problems, and injuries and complications due to animal bites and scratches are the most obvious. As no population based data on the frequency of animal bites were available at a national level in Switzerland, a study was conducted by the Swiss Sentinel Surveillance Network. The objectives of this study were to estimate the incidence of medical consultations due to bite and scratch injuries in humans caused by vertebrate animals, to identify possible risk factors, and to assess bite management habits in primary health care. An annual bite and scratch incidence rate of 325 per 100,000 population was estimated. Consultations peaked during the summer months and geographical differences in the reported incidence were observed. Dogs accounted for more than 60% and cats for about 25% of all cases reported. Animal bites and scratches were frequent in persons under 20 years of age. In most ages, the incidence was higher among women than among men, but not in children under the age of ten years. The incidence of cat bites was especially high in adult women. Bites to the head and neck were most frequent in infants and young children and accounted for approximately one third of the reported cases in this age group. Patients sought medical care principally for primary wound care (52.0%) and for vaccination advice (29.6%). Rabies postexposure prophylaxis was initiated in 1.1% of patients. Wound infection was reported in 10.9% of cases, with cat bites/scratches being more often infected than injuries due to dogs. Hospitalization was reported in 0.3% of patients. Data from the emergency department of two district hospitals showed that head and neck injuries were more frequent in out-patients and a higher proportion of persons presented with wound infections (14.1%). The hospitalization rate for emergency department visits was 4.7%. Animal bites and scratches are common events in Switzerland. They

  17. Effect of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin on scratching behavior in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Rie; Kagawa, Yoto; Takahashi, Yuji; Akagi, Masaki; Kamei, Chiaki

    2010-03-01

    The present study was performed to study the effect of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on scratching behavior in hairless mice, which are highly sensitive to pruritogens (mediators causing itching), except for histamine, and are suitable for time-course studies due to their hairless skin. TCDD is a well-known environmental pollutant that causes skin diseases with itching; therefore, we examined whether TCDD induced itching. Oral administration of TCDD caused no increase in scratching behavior when used alone, whereas TCDD in combination with distilled water or acetone/olive oil application caused a significant increase in scratching behavior. Furthermore, nerve growth factor (NGF) content in the skin increased significantly. A single administration of chlorpheniramine (histamine H1 receptor antagonist), tranilast (chemical mediator release inhibitor) and olopatadine (histamine H1 receptor antagonist) had no effect on scratching behavior induced by TCDD in combination with acetone/olive oil application. With repeated administration for 7 days, chlorpheniramine and tranilast had no effect on scratching behavior, whereas olopatadine significantly inhibited scratching behavior. In addition, only olopatadine significantly inhibited NGF content in the skin. From these findings, it can be concluded that TCDD is not a pruritogen but causes alloknesis (itchy skin) with the simultaneous use of trivial external stimulation. In addition, it was found that drugs which decreased skin NGF contents may inhibit this scratching behavior. PMID:19969104

  18. Safety and efficacy of intravenous infusion of allogeneic cryopreserved mesenchymal stem cells for treatment of chronic kidney disease in cats: results of three sequential pilot studies

    OpenAIRE

    Quimby, Jessica M; Webb, Tracy L; Habenicht, Lauren M; Dow, Steven W.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Administration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been shown to improve renal function in rodent models of chronic kidney disease (CKD), in part by reducing intrarenal inflammation and suppressing fibrosis. CKD in cats is characterized by tubulointerstitial inflammation and fibrosis, and thus treatment with MSCs might improve renal function and urinary markers of inflammation in this disease. Therefore, a series of pilot studies was conducted to assess the safety and efficacy o...

  19. Scratch resistance of a polycarbonate + organoclay nanohybrid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A polycarbonate-based nanohybrid has been created containing 1 wt% of Bentone 2010, an organically modified montmorillonite. A micro-section on the nanohybrid obtained using focused ion beam (FIB and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM was employed to observe the orientation of the nanoclay inside a polycarbonate (PC matrix in the cross-section FIB-milled face. A micro-scratch tester was used to measure the scratch resistance in terms of residual (healing depth Rh under progressive load and in sliding wear. Effects of the number of scratches, normal load and scratch velocity have been evaluated as a function of nanoclay orientation. In sliding wear (multiple scratching along the same groove, our nanohybrid reaches residual depth values that remain constant after a certain number of scratches, a manifestation of strain hardening. The number of scratches to induce strain hardening decreases as the normal applied load increases. SEM was used to characterize deformation and wear mechanisms that operate on contacts and the results related to the wear data.

  20. Routine and specialized laboratory testing for the diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, G Diane

    2010-09-01

    The diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases can be challenging. The first step is recognition that the disease involves the neuromuscular system (muscle, neuromuscular junction, peripheral nerve, and ventral horn cells of the spinal cord). Many neuromuscular diseases share clinical signs and cannot be distinguished based on clinical examination. Routine laboratory screening, including a CBC, biochemical profile, and urinalysis, can identify some of the most common systemic abnormalities that cause muscle weakness and myalgia, such as hypo- and hyperglycemia, electrolyte disorders, or thyroid abnormalities, and may suggest a specific diagnosis, such as diabetes mellitus, hypo- or hyperadrenocorticism, renal failure, or hypothyroidism. Increased creatine kinase activity, increased cardiac troponin I concentration, and myoglobinuria are useful in detecting skeletal and cardiac muscle damage. Identification of acetylcholine receptor antibodies is diagnostic for acquired myasthenia gravis. For primary muscle or peripheral nerve diseases, tissue biopsy is the most direct way to determine specific pathology, correctly classify the disease, and determine the course of additional laboratory testing. For example, inflammatory, necrotizing, dystrophic, metabolic, or congenital myopathies require different laboratory testing procedures for further characterization. Many neuromuscular diseases are inherited or breed-associated, and DNA-based tests may already be established or may be feasible to develop after the disorder has been accurately characterized. This review focuses on both routine and specialized laboratory testing necessary to reach a definitive diagnosis and determine an accurate prognosis for neuromuscular diseases. PMID:20726955

  1. Congenital and inherited neurologic diseases in dogs and cats: Legislation and its effect on purchase in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passantino, Annamaria; Masucci, Marisa

    2016-05-01

    Many of the congenital neurologic diseases can result in incapacity or death of the animal. Some of them, such as idiopathic epilepsy and hydrocephalus, exhibit breed or familial predisposition and a genetic basis was proved or suggested. Some diseases can be presumptively diagnosed after a detailed signalment (breed predisposition), history (e.g. family history because many of these defects have familial tendencies), and through physical exam; other diagnostic methods (radiography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance, electrophysiologic tests, etc.) can provide supportive evidence for the congenital defect and help to confirm the diagnosis. Some cases can lead to civil law-suits when the lesions are congenital, but not easily recognizable, or when the lesions are hereditary but tend to became manifest only after some time (more than 12 months after the date of purchase, e.g., after the vice-free guarantee period has expired). Moreover, quite frequently an early diagnosis is not made because there are delays in consulting the veterinarian or the general practitioner veterinarian does not perceive subtle signs. This study was designed to focus on the medico-legal aspects concerning the buying and selling in Italy of dogs and cats affected by congenital and hereditary neurologic diseases that could constitute vice in these animals. While adequate provisions to regulate in detail the various aspects of pet sale have still to be drawn up by legislators, it may be helpful to involve breeders, by obliging them by contract to extend guarantees in the case of hereditary lesions, including neurologic diseases. PMID:27284217

  2. Isolation of Sporothrix schenkii from the nails of healthy cats Isolamento de Sporothrix schenckii de unhas de gatos sadios

    OpenAIRE

    Lorena Leonardo de Souza; Patrícia da Silva Nascente; Márcia de Oliveira Nobre; Ana Raquel Mano Meinerz; Mário Carlos Araújo Meireles

    2006-01-01

    Many cases of sporotrichosis in cats were diagnosed in the town of Rio Grande, RS, Brazil, caused mainly by inoculation due to scratches. In this work, we evaluated the frequency of Sporothrix schenckii in the nails of healthy cats living together with cats showing clinical sporotrichosis. The isolation of the fungus was carried out pressing unwashed nails of the forelimbs of 24 cats (48 paws) directly onto the surface of Mycobiotic Agar in Petri dishes. S. schenckii was isolated from seven (...

  3. Molecular identification and phylogenic analysis of Bartonella henselae isolated from Iranian cats based on gltA gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazaheri Nezhad Fard, Ramin; Vahedi, Seyed Milad; Ashrafi, Iraj; Alipour, Faranak; Sharafi, Golnaz; Akbarein, Hesam; Aldavood, Seyed Javid

    2016-01-01

    One of the most important species of the Bartonella genus is B. henselae that causes a zoonotic infection, cat scratch disease (CSD). The main source of the bacteria is cat and the carrier is Ctenocephalides felis flea. One hundred and forty nail and saliva samples were collected from 70 domestic cats. Positive samples for B. henselae were characterized by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing. Sequences of gltA gene were trimmed using BioEdit software and then compared with the sequences of the same gene from B. henselae isolated from cats and humans in GenBank database. Phylogenic tree was constructed using CLC Sequence Viewer software and unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) method. Molecular assessments showed that five samples out of 70 nail samples (7.14%) and one sample out of 70 saliva samples (1.42%) were genetically positive for B. henselae. At least an 87.00% similarity was seen between the gene sequences from the current study and the reference sequences from the GenBank database. Phylogenic analysis has shown that strains isolated in this study were grouped in a different haplo group, compared to other strains. Among the Asian countries, the prevalence of the bacteria in Iran was close to that in Japan and Turkey. In conclusion, findings of this study showed the prevalence of B. henselae in Iranian cats which is important due to its public health issues, especially for the immunocompromised pet owners.

  4. Misdiagnosis in normal radiographic anatomy: eight structural configurations simulating disease entities in dogs and cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiographic diagnosis is a combination of accurately identifying normal and abnormal variants, projecting anatomic structures, and describing abnormal findings. Disease conditions may easily be confused with normal structures. Eight conditions and normal counterparts that are presented illustrate the similarities and differences between normal and abnormal

  5. Fictive locomotion and scratching inhibit dorsal horn neurons receiving thin fiber afferent input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degtyarenko, A M; Kaufman, M P

    2000-08-01

    In decerebrate paralyzed cats, we examined the effects of two central motor commands (fictive locomotion and scratching) on the discharge of dorsal horn neurons receiving input from group III and IV tibial nerve afferents. We recorded the impulse activity of 74 dorsal horn neurons, each of which received group III input from the tibial nerve. Electrical stimulation of the mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR), which evoked fictive static contraction or fictive locomotion, inhibited the discharge of 44 of the 64 dorsal horn neurons tested. The mean depth from the dorsal surface of the spinal cord of the 44 neurons whose discharge was inhibited by MLR stimulation was 1.77 +/- 0.04 mm. Fictive scratching, evoked by topical application of bicuculline to the cervical spinal cord and irritation of the ear, inhibited the discharge of 22 of the 29 dorsal horn neurons tested. Fourteen of the twenty-two neurons whose discharge was inhibited by fictive scratching were found to be inhibited by MLR stimulation as well. The mean depth from the dorsal surface of the cord of the 22 neurons whose discharge was inhibited by fictive scratching was 1.77 +/- 0.06 mm. Stimulation of the MLR or the elicitation of fictive scratching had no effect on the activity of 22 dorsal horn neurons receiving input from group III and IV tibial nerve afferents. The mean depth from the dorsal surface of the cord was 1.17 +/- 0.07 mm, a value that was significantly (P scratching. We conclude that centrally evoked motor commands can inhibit the discharge of dorsal horn neurons receiving thin fiber input from the periphery. PMID:10938225

  6. PERIODONTAL DISEASE IN DOGS AND CATS REFERRED TO THE VETERINARY HOSPITAL OF UFMT, CAMPUS SINOP, MT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Camargo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Canine and feline oral cavity was examined, referred to the small animal surgery and obstetric classes of the school veterinary hospital, between 2013, August and December. The study was conducted using a dental chart developed to enable proper oral assessment. The data were compared to the information relayed by the owners, mostly based on the type of food that was given to their pets and used dental care to keep the oral health of their animals. The results showed a lack of owners interest and knowledge about their pets dental care and, additionally, that most animals was not receiving adequate pet meal, what caused accumulation of food between the teeth and the early onset of periodontal disease. Finally, it was concluded that age is an important predisposing factor for the disease.

  7. Maximizing the diagnostic utility of endoscopic biopsy in dogs and cats with gastrointestinal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jergens, Albert E; Willard, Michael D; Allenspach, Karin

    2016-08-01

    Flexible endoscopy has become a valuable tool for the diagnosis of many small animal gastrointestinal (GI) diseases, but the techniques must be performed carefully so that the results are meaningful. This article reviews the current diagnostic utility of flexible endoscopy, including practical/technical considerations for endoscopic biopsy, optimal instrumentation for mucosal specimen collection, the correlation of endoscopic indices to clinical activity and to histopathologic findings, and new developments in the endoscopic diagnosis of GI disease. Recent studies have defined endoscopic biopsy guidelines for the optimal number and quality of diagnostic specimens from different regions of the gut. They also have shown the value of ileal biopsy in the diagnosis of canine and feline chronic enteropathies, and have demonstrated the utility of endoscopic biopsy specimens beyond routine hematoxylin and eosin histopathological analysis, including their use in immunohistochemical, microbiological, and molecular studies. PMID:27387727

  8. Multi-micronucleus cells related with viral diseases, detected in the study of children affected by the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cells with multiple chromosome aberrations have been observed in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Different explanation have proposed, included hot particle induction in persons related to the Chernobyl accident. The frequency of chromosome aberration and micronuclei were established in 14 Ukrainian children with different hematological disorders. They arrived in Cuba thanks to the program by means of which medical attention is offered to children from areas affected by the Chernobyl accident. At least 500 metaphases and bi-nucleate cells were analyzed in each case. The detection of 4 cells with 7-11 micronuclei in a 14 year old boy with cat scratch disease was the most significant cytogenetical finding. The viral origin of the cat scratch disease has been reported, this suggested a viral etiology of the cells with multiple micronuclei. No rogue cells were detected. Cells with multiple micronuclei or rogue cells were not found in other patients from this group. (authors). 7 refs., 3 tabs

  9. Cat Scan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正> A man takes his motionless dog to the vet."Doc,I think my dog is dead.”The vet looks the dog over, goes into a backroom,and comes out with a cat.He places the caton the table next to the dog.The cat walks aroundand sniffs at the dog.The dog does not move.The

  10. Electrophysiological representation of scratching CpG activity in the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Silva, Lourdes; Manjarrez, Elias; Gutiérrez-Ospina, Gabriel; Quevedo, Jorge N

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the electrical activity of neuronal populations in the cerebellum and the lumbar spinal cord during fictive scratching in adult decerebrate cats before and after selective sections of the Spino-Reticulo Cerebellar Pathway (SRCP) and the Ventral-Spino Cerebellar Tract (VSCT). During fictive scratching, we found a conspicuous sinusoidal electrical activity, called Sinusoidal Cerebellar Potentials (SCPs), in the cerebellar vermis, which exhibited smaller amplitude in the paravermal and hemisphere cortices. There was also a significant spino-cerebellar coherence between these SCPs and the lumbar sinusoidal cord dorsum potentials (SCDPs). However, during spontaneous activity such spino-cerebellar coherence between spontaneous potentials recorded in the same regions decreased. We found that the section of the SRCP and the VSCT did not abolish the amplitude of the SCPs, suggesting that there are additional pathways conveying information from the spinal CPG to the cerebellum. This is the first evidence that the sinusoidal activity associated to the spinal CPG circuitry for scratching has a broad representation in the cerebellum beyond the sensory representation from hindlimbs previously described. Furthermore, the SCPs represent the global electrical activity of the spinal CPG for scratching in the cerebellar cortex. PMID:25350378

  11. Renal Alterations in Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV)-Infected Cats: A Natural Model of Lentivirus-Induced Renal Disease Changes

    OpenAIRE

    Mauro Pistello; Grazia Guidi; Natasa Tozon; Alessandro Poli

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated with several renal syndromes including acute and chronic renal failures, but the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are unclear. HIV and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) share numerous biological and pathological features, including renal alterations. We investigated and compared the morphological changes of renal tissue of 51 experimentally and 21 naturally infected cats. Compared to the latter, the experimentally infected cats exhibited some...

  12. Cats as a Risk for Transmission of Antimicrobial Drug-resistant Salmonella

    OpenAIRE

    Van Immerseel, Filip; Pasmans, Frank; De Buck, Jeroen; Rychlik, Ivan; Hradecka, Helena; Collard, Jean-Marc; Wildemauwe, Christa; Heyndrickx, Marc; Ducatelle, Richard; Haesebrouck, Freddy

    2004-01-01

    To determine whether cats were a risk for transmission of Salmonella to humans, we evaluated the excretion of Salmonella by pet cats. Rectal-swab specimens were taken from 278 healthy house cats, from 58 cats that died of disease, and from 35 group-housed cats. Group-housed cats were kept in one room with three cat trays and a common water and feed tray. Eighteen (51.4%) of 35 group-housed cats, 5 (8.6%) of 58 diseased cats (5/58), and 1 (0.36%) of 278 healthy house cats excreted Salmonella. ...

  13. Motoneurons have different membrane resistance during fictive scratching and weight support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perreault, Marie-Claude

    2002-09-15

    The passive membrane properties of motoneurons may be affected in a behavior-specific manner because of differences in synaptic drive during different motor behaviors. To explore this possibility, the changes in input resistance (R(in)) and membrane time constant (tau(m)) of single extensor motoneurons were compared during two different types of motor activities: fictive scratching and fictive weight support. These two activities were selected because the membrane potential of extensor motoneurons follows a very different trajectory during fictive scratching (multiphasic, mostly rhythmic trajectory) and fictive weight support (monophasic, tonic trajectory). The intracellular recordings were performed in vivo in the immobilized, decerebrate cat using QX-314-containing microelectrodes to block action potentials. The R(in) and tau(m) at rest (control) were reduced substantially during all phases of fictive scratching. In contrast, R(in) and tau(m) changed only little during fictive weight support. Such a differential effect on the membrane resistance was observed even in motoneurons in which the peak voltage of the rhythmic depolarization during scratching was similar to the peak voltage of the tonic depolarization during weight support. The differential effect was attributed mainly to a difference in synaptic drive and, in particular, to a larger amount of inhibitory synaptic activity during fictive scratching. The present study demonstrates how the same motoneuron can have a different membrane resistance while participating in two different behaviors. Such tuning of the membrane resistance may provide motoneurons with behavior-specific integrative capabilities that, in turn, could be used advantageously to increase motor performance. PMID:12223580

  14. Cat's Claw

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... R S T U V W X Y Z Cat's Claw Share: On This Page Introduction What the ... More Information Key References © Steven Foster Common Names: cat’s claw, uña de gato Latin Name: Uncaria tomentosa, ...

  15. Alice, Greenfoot, and Scratch--A Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utting, Ian; Cooper, Stephen; Kolling, Michael; Maloney, John; Resnick, Mitchel

    2010-01-01

    This article distills a discussion about the goals, mechanisms, and effects of three environments which aim to support the acquisition and development of computing concepts (problem solving and programming) in pre-University and non-technical students: Alice, Greenfoot, and Scratch. The conversation started in a special session on the topic at the…

  16. A Catalogue of Anatomical Fugitive Sheets: Cat. 49-62

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    Images Cat. 50 Cat. 51 Cat. 53 Cat. 54 Cat. 55 (a) Cat. 55 (b) Cat. 56 Cat. 57: 1 Cat. 57: 2 Cat. 57: 3 Cat. 57: 4 Cat. 59: 1 Cat. 59: 2 Cat. 59: 3 Cat. 59: 4 Cat. 60 Cat. 61 Cat. 62: 1 (a) Cat. 62: 1 (b) Cat. 62: 2 (a) Cat. 62: 2 (b)

  17. A Catalogue of Anatomical Fugitive Sheets: Cat. 26-48

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    Images Cat. 26: 1 (a) Cat. 26: 1 (b) Cat. 26: 2 (a) Cat. 26: 2(b) Cat. 27: 1 (a) Cat. 27: 1 (b) Cat. 27: 2 (a) Cat. 27: 2 (b) Cat. 28 Cat. 29: 2 (a) Cat. 29: 2 (b) Cat. 30: 1 Cat. 30: 2 Cat. 30: 3 Cat. 33 Cat. 34: 1 Cat. 34: 2 Cat. 35: 1 Cat. 35: 2 Cat. 35: 3 Cat. 36 Cat. 37 Cat. 38: 1 Cat. 38: 2 Cat. 40 Cat. 42 Cat. 43 Cat. 44 Cat. 45: 1 Cat. 45: 2 Cat. 46 Cat. 47: 1 Cat. 47: 2 Cat. 47: 3 Cat. 48: 1 Cat. 48: 2 Cat. 48: 3

  18. Programming by Choice: Urban Youth Learning Programming with Scratch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, John; Peppler, Kylie; Kafai, Yasmin B.; Resnick, Mitchel; Rusk, Natalie

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes Scratch, a visual, block-based programming language designed to facilitate media manipulation for novice programmers. We report on the Scratch programming experiences of urban youth ages 8-18 at a Computer Clubhouse--an after school center--over an 18-month period. Our analyses of 536 Scratch projects collected during this…

  19. Absence of zoonotic Bartonella species in questing ticks: First detection of Bartonella clarridgeiae and Rickettsia felis in cat fleas in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reimerink Johan R

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Awareness for flea- and tick-borne infections has grown in recent years and the range of microorganisms associated with these ectoparasites is rising. Bartonella henselae, the causative agent of Cat Scratch Disease, and other Bartonella species have been reported in fleas and ticks. The role of Ixodes ricinus ticks in the natural cycle of Bartonella spp. and the transmission of these bacteria to humans is unclear. Rickettsia spp. have also been reported from as well ticks as also from fleas. However, to date no flea-borne Rickettsia spp. were reported from the Netherlands. Here, the presence of Bartonellaceae and Rickettsiae in ectoparasites was investigated using molecular detection and identification on part of the gltA- and 16S rRNA-genes. Results The zoonotic Bartonella clarridgeiae and Rickettsia felis were detected for the first time in Dutch cat fleas. B. henselae was found in cat fleas and B. schoenbuchensis in ticks and keds feeding on deer. Two Bartonella species, previously identified in rodents, were found in wild mice and their fleas. However, none of these microorganisms were found in 1719 questing Ixodes ricinus ticks. Notably, the gltA gene amplified from DNA lysates of approximately 10% of the questing nymph and adult ticks was similar to that of an uncultured Bartonella-related species found in other hard tick species. The gltA gene of this Bartonella-related species was also detected in questing larvae for which a 16S rRNA gene PCR also tested positive for "Candidatus Midichloria mitochondrii". The gltA-gene of the Bartonella-related species found in I. ricinus may therefore be from this endosymbiont. Conclusions We conclude that the risk of acquiring Cat Scratch Disease or a related bartonellosis from questing ticks in the Netherlands is negligible. On the other hand fleas and deer keds are probable vectors for associated Bartonella species between animals and might also transmit Bartonella spp. to humans.

  20. Dense distributed processing in a hindlimb scratch motor network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guzulaitis, Robertas; Hounsgaard, Jørn Dybkjær

    2014-01-01

    elegans), we show that ventral horn interneurons in mid-thoracic spinal segments are functionally integrated in the hindlimb scratch network. First, mid-thoracic interneurons receive intense synaptic input during scratching and behave like neurons in the hindlimb enlargement. Second, some mid......-thoracic interneurons activated during scratching project descending axons toward the hindlimb enlargement. Third, elimination of mid-thoracic segments leads to a weakening of scratch rhythmicity. We conclude that densely innervated interneurons in mid-thoracic segments contribute to hindlimb scratching and may be part...

  1. Management of hypertension in a geriatric cat

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism and chronic renal disease occur commonly in geriatric cats, often in association with potentially life-threatening primary or secondary hypertension. Early treatment of hypertension minimizes damage to vital organs. This case illustrates the complexity of managing hypertension in a geriatric cat with both hyperthyroidism and renal disease.

  2. 猫抓病性淋巴结炎的病理诊断和鉴别诊断%The diagnosis of pathology and differentiation to lymphadenitis in cat scratch disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祁水琴; 平金良

    2004-01-01

    目的探讨猫抓病(CSD)临床病理特征和鉴别要点,以提高对CSD的认识.方法收集22例CSD淋巴结作活检,并进行Warthin-Starry银染法染色.结果镜下淋巴结内见星形微脓疡肉芽肿,Warthin-Starry染色17例阳性.结论病理学特征和临床病史密切结合,辅以Warthin-Starry染色是提高CSD诊断水平的关键.

  3. Optimization of cell motility evaluation in scratch assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gotsulyak N. Ya.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A scratch test is one of the most popular methods of classical cell migration assay in a monolayer culture. At the same time, the scratch assay has some disadvantages that can be easily corrected. Aim. Optimization the existent scratch assay on the base of detection of scratch wound surface area and the length of the field of observation which is more objective and less time consuming. Methods. Scratch assay. Results. The modification of scratch assay enables to perform measurement more accurately and rapidly. This approach is more simple and eliminates the main disadvantages of the classical method. Conclusions. The procedure of scratch wound width measurement calculated on the base of detection of cell free area and the length of the field of observation is more effective than the classical wound healing assay. It will be useful for the estimation of cell migration dynamics in monolayer culture for a wide range of live cell based experiments.

  4. Spinal neurons bursting in phase with fictive scratching are not related to spontaneous cord dorsum potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuellar, C A; Trejo, A; Linares, P; Delgado-Lezama, R; Jiménez-Estrada, I; Abyazova, L M; Baltina, T V; Manjarrez, E

    2014-04-25

    Spontaneous cord dorsum potentials (spontaneous CDPs) are produced by the activation of dorsal horn neurons distributed along the L4 to S1 spinal cord segments, in Rexed's laminae III-VI, in the same region in which there are interneurons rhythmically bursting during fictive scratching in cats. An interesting observation is that spontaneous CDPs are not rhythmically superimposed on the sinusoidal CDPs generated during fictive scratching episodes, thus suggesting that the interneurons producing both types of CDPs belong to different spinal circuits. In order to provide experimental data to support this hypothesis, we recorded unitary activity of neurons in the L6 spinal cord segment. We found that the neurons firing rhythmically during the sinusoidal CDPs associated with the extensor, flexor or intermediate phases of scratching were not synchronized with the spontaneous CDPs. Moreover, we found that the neurons firing during the spontaneous CDPs were not synchronized with the sinusoidal CDPs. These results suggest that the neurons involved in the occurrence of spontaneous CDPs are not part of the spinal cord central pattern generators (CPGs). This study will be relevant for understanding the relationships between the spinal cord neuronal populations firing spontaneously and the CPGs, in the intact and injured spinal cord. PMID:24530658

  5. Toe scratches cause scabby hip syndrome lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargis, B M; Moore, R W; Sams, A R

    1989-08-01

    Scabs and scratches in the hip region of chicken carcasses have become the single most common cause of downgrading and required trimming at processing in some areas of the United States. Repeatable correlations with microbiological agents, environment, and nutrition have not been observed. The present report provides evidence that scabs and scratches, present at processing, are the result of injuries inflicted by toenails of birds as they climb on one another. Onychectomy (removal of approximately two-thirds of the distal phalanx) of all four digits of each foot prior to chick placement resulted in 3.7 and 4.8-fold reduction in subjective lesion scores and 7 to 10-fold increases in the percentage of USDA Grade A carcasses at a commercial processing plant. PMID:2780490

  6. Alice, Greenfoot, and Scratch - A Discussion

    OpenAIRE

    Utting, Ian; Cooper, Stephen; Kölling, Michael; Maloney, John; Resnick, Mitchel

    2010-01-01

    This article distills a discussion about the goals, mechanisms, and effects of three environments which aim to support the acquisition and development of computing concepts (problem solving and programming) in pre-University and non-technical students: Alice, Greenfoot, and Scratch. The conversation started in a special session on the topic at the 2010 ACM SIGCSE Symposium on Computer Science Education and continued during the creation of the resulting Special Issue of the ACM Transactions on...

  7. Scratch evaluation on a high performance polymer

    OpenAIRE

    RODRIGUEZ, Vanessa; SUKUMARAN, Jacob; PEREZ DELGADO, Yeczain; STAIA, Mariana; IOST, Alain; DE BAETS, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    The authors wish to thank the participating communities, the Laboratory of Mechanics surfaces and materials processing, University Lille for the access and 84 usage of its research facility. Present research is financially sponsored by Found for Scientific Research of the Flemish Community (FWO) and the Ghent University Research Board. The scratching process is a well know concept and is usually defined as a kind of surface abrasion, where plastic deformation is promoted by relative fricti...

  8. Scratch type repassivation technique at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KAERI(Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) developed a repassivation rate test system which can be operated at 300 .deg. C. It consists of an autoclave, three electrodes for an electrochemical test and a scratch tip. Good repassivation curves of alloy 600 at 300 .deg. C were obtained. The system would be a good tool to evaluate a SCC susceptibility of alloy 600 at high temperature

  9. The fecal microbiome in cats with diarrhea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan S Suchodolski

    Full Text Available Recent studies have revealed that microbes play an important role in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal (GI diseases in various animal species, but only limited data is available about the microbiome in cats with GI disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the fecal microbiome in cats with diarrhea. Fecal samples were obtained from healthy cats (n = 21 and cats with acute (n = 19 or chronic diarrhea (n = 29 and analyzed by sequencing of 16S rRNA genes, and PICRUSt was used to predict the functional gene content of the microbiome. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA effect size (LEfSe revealed significant differences in bacterial groups between healthy cats and cats with diarrhea. The order Burkholderiales, the families Enterobacteriaceae, and the genera Streptococcus and Collinsella were significantly increased in diarrheic cats. In contrast the order Campylobacterales, the family Bacteroidaceae, and the genera Megamonas, Helicobacter, and Roseburia were significantly increased in healthy cats. Phylum Bacteroidetes was significantly decreased in cats with chronic diarrhea (>21 days duration, while the class Erysipelotrichi and the genus Lactobacillus were significantly decreased in cats with acute diarrhea. The observed changes in bacterial groups were accompanied by significant differences in functional gene contents: metabolism of fatty acids, biosynthesis of glycosphingolipids, metabolism of biotin, metabolism of tryptophan, and ascorbate and aldarate metabolism, were all significantly (p<0.001 altered in cats with diarrhea. In conclusion, significant differences in the fecal microbiomes between healthy cats and cats with diarrhea were identified. This dysbiosis was accompanied by changes in bacterial functional gene categories. Future studies are warranted to evaluate if these microbial changes correlate with changes in fecal concentrations of microbial metabolites in cats with diarrhea for the identification of potential diagnostic or

  10. Schroedinger's cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The issue is to seek quantum interference effects in an arbitrary field, in particular in psychology. For this a digest of quantum mechanics over finite-n-dimensional Hilbert space is invented. In order to match crude data not only von Neumann's mixed states are used but also a parallel notion of unsharp tests. The mathematically styled text (and earlier work on multibin tests, designated MB) deals largely with these new tests. Quantum psychology itself is only given a foundation. It readily engenders objections; its plausibility is developed gradually, in interlocking essays. There is also the empirically definite proposal that (state, test, outcome)-indexed counts be gathered to record data, then fed to a 'matrix format' (MF) search for quantum models. A previously proposed experiment in visual perception which has since failed to find significant quantum correlations, is discussed. The suspicion that quantum mechanics is all around goes beyond MF, and 'Schroedinger's cat' symbolizes this broader perspective. (author)

  11. Incidence of pyometra in Swedish insured cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagman, Ragnvi; Ström Holst, Bodil; Möller, Lotta; Egenvall, Agneta

    2014-07-01

    Pyometra is a clinically relevant problem in intact female cats and dogs. The etiology is similar in both animal species, with the disease caused by bacterial infection of a progesterone-sensitized uterus. Here, we studied pyometra in cats with the aim to describe the incidence and probability of developing pyometra based on age and breed. The data used were reimbursed claims for veterinary care insurance or life insurance claims or both in cats insured in a Swedish insurance database from 1999 to 2006. The mean incidence rate (IR) for pyometra was about 17 cats per 10,000 cat years at risk (CYAR). Cats with pyometra were diagnosed at a median age of 4 years and a significant breed effect was observed. The breed with the highest IR (433 cats per 10,000 CYAR) was the Sphynx, and other breeds with IR over 60 cats per 10,000 CYAR were Siberian cat, Ocicat, Korat, Siamese, Ragdoll, Maine coon, and Bengal. Pyometra was more commonly diagnosed with increasing age, with a marked increase in cats older than 7 years. The mean case fatality rate in all cats was 5.7%, which is slightly higher than corresponding reports in dogs of 3% to 4%. Geographical location (urban or rural) did not affect the risk of developing the disease. The present study provides information of incidence and probability of developing pyometra based on age, breed, and urban or rural geographical location. These data may be useful for designing cat breeding programs in high-risk breeds and for future studies of the genetic background of the disease. PMID:24726694

  12. The acoustics and performance of DJ scratching, Analysis and modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Falkenberg Hansen, Kjetil

    2010-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the analysis and modeling of scratching, in other words, the DJ (disk jockey) practice of using the turntable as a musical instrument. There has been experimental use of turntables as musical instruments since their invention, but the use is now mainly ascribed to the musical genre hip-hop and the playing style known as scratching. Scratching has developed to become a skillful instrument-playing practice with complex musical output performed by DJs. The impact on popula...

  13. Radio-iodine treatment of hyperthyroid cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty-two elderly domestic shorthaired cats (mean age 12.9 years) were treated with radioiodine (131I). The dose of 131I administered ranged from 39 mBq to 134 mBq. Twenty-eight cats became euthyroid after treatment, one became hypothyroid and three remained hyperthyroxaemic. Two of the hyperthyroxaemic cats were successfully re-treated with 131I. Five cats died from concurrent diseases within one year of treatment. The administration of a dose of 131I selected by assessing the severity of the clinical signs, the size of the thyroid gland(s) and the serum level of thyroxine was an effective treatment for hyperthyroidism

  14. The radiographic appearance of pulmonary histoplasmosis in the cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A retrospective study of 18 cats with pulmonary histoplasmosis was conducted to evaluate radiographic patterns of disease and to determine age, breed, and sex distributions. All cats had active disease confirmed by biopsy/aspiration cytology (lung, bone marrow, peripheral lymph nodes, pleural fluid) or necropsy examination. Cats 3 years of age or less had the highest incidence of disease; females outnumbered males 2 to 1. Radiographically, most cats had an interstitial pattern which appeared as a fine, diffuse or linear pattern, or as a more distinct nodular pattern. An alveolar pattern was an uncommon radiographic finding. Tracheobronchial lymphadenopathy and calcified lymph nodes or pulmonary parenchymal lesions were not identified in these cats

  15. Cat and Dog Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    MENU Return to Web version Cat and Dog Bites Cat and Dog Bites How should I take care of a bite from a cat or a dog? Whether from a family pet or a neighborhood stray, cat and dog bites are common. Here are some things you ...

  16. Experimental proliferative glomerulonephritis in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, S A; Stokes, C R; Lucke, V M

    1992-01-01

    A model of chronic serum sickness was used to induce immune-complex glomerulonephritis in seven experimental cats, by daily intravenous inoculation of an increasing dose (5 to 35 mg) of human serum albumin (HSA). At week four, two of the seven animals developed anterior uveitis. At week 23, two different animals developed the subcutaneous oedema characteristic of the nephrotic syndrome (NS), whilst the other five cats appeared clinically normal. The kidneys were examined at necropsy by light microscopy and by transmission electron microscopy. The glomeruli of four animals (three with both proteinuria and uraemia, and one with proteinuria only) showed morphological changes under light microscopy. The abnormalities suggested that a diffuse mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis (GN) had been induced in three cats and diffuse membranoproliferative GN induced in another. Ultrastructural studies revealed electron-dense deposits (immune-complexes) in six of the seven cats. Two cats without glomerular abnormalities by light microscopy had mesangial deposits and three cats with mesangial proliferative GN had deposits at mesangial, subendothelial and/or subepithelial sites. The single cat with membranoproliferative GN had deposits at mesangial, subendothelial, subepithelial and intramembranous sites. Immunohistological examination (peroxidase-antiperoxidase technique) showed that HSA and immunoglobulin (IgG and IgM) were deposited in the glomeruli of these cats. Deposits were the most dense in cats with more severe renal lesions. Deposits of IgM were most abundant. An extensive cellular infiltrate, comprising macrophages, neutrophils and plasma cells, was observed only in the four animals which showed abnormalities in glomerular ultrastructure. The disease induced in these cats thus appears to differ from the membranous nephropathy previously described in the cat and bears a close resemblance to immune complex (IC) disease in man. In view of the relatively few specific

  17. Nano-scratch evaluations of copper chemical mechanical polishing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanoscale scratches are applied using an atomic force microscope (AFM) to investigate the mechanical aspect of the material removal process in chemical–mechanical polishing. The scratching experiments are carried out with the AFM, whose probe has an SiO2 particle (radius ∼ 400 nm) bonded to it, at low normal forces in deionized (DI) water and a slurry. The experimental results show that the scratch depth increases with increasing normal force. Under a constant force, the scratch depth of the surface in the slurry is significantly larger than that in DI water. This is due to a soft passivation layer generated during chemical interactions on the copper surface. The passivation layer significantly affects the coefficient of friction (COF) and wear rate. At a low scratch depth (below 20 nm), the COF obtained in DI water is ∼ 1.74 times larger than that obtained in the slurry. The wear rate obtained in the slurry is larger than that obtained in the DI water. - Highlights: ► Material removal of chemical–mechanical polishing is explored by nano-scratch testing. ► Scratch profiles and applied forces depend on the generation of passivation layer. ► The scratch depths increase with the generation of passivation layer in the slurry. ► The coefficient of friction in the slurry is smaller than that in deionized (DI) water. ► The wear rate in the slurry is significantly larger than the wear rates in the DI water

  18. Computed Tomographic Findings in Cats with Mycobacterial Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Major, Alison; Holmes, Andrea; Warren-Smith, Christopher; Lalor, Stephanie; Littler, Rebecca; Schwarz, Tobias; Gunn-Moore, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to describe the CT imaging findings associated with confirmed mycobacterial infection in cats.Methods: CT images from 20 cats with confirmed mycobacterial disease were retrospectively reviewed. Five cats underwent conscious full-body CT in a VetMouseTrapTM device. All other cats had thoracic CT performed under general anaesthesia, with the addition of CT investigation of the head/neck, abdomen and limbs in some cases.Results: Mycobacterial infection...

  19. Experimental Infection of Cats and Dogs with West Nile Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Austgen, Laura E.; Bowen, Richard A.; Bunning, Michel L.; Davis, Brent S.; Mitchell, Carl J.; Chang, Gwong-Jen J.

    2004-01-01

    Domestic dogs and cats were infected by mosquito bite and evaluated as hosts for West Nile virus (WNV). Viremia of low magnitude and short duration developed in four dogs but they did not display signs of disease. Four cats became viremic, with peak titers ranging from 103.0 to 104.0 PFU/mL. Three of the cats showed mild, non-neurologic signs of disease. WNV was not isolated from saliva of either dogs or cats during the period of viremia. An additional group of four cats were exposed to WNV o...

  20. Comparison of activity of individual pyramidal tract neurons during balancing, locomotion, and scratching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beloozerova, Irina N; Sirota, Mikhail G; Orlovsky, Grigori N; Deliagina, Tatiana G

    2006-04-25

    Neuronal mechanisms of the spinal cord, brainstem, and cerebellum play a key role in the control of complex automatic motor behaviors-postural corrections, stepping, and scratching, whereas the role of the motor cortex is less clear. To assess this role, we recorded fore and hind limb-related pyramidal tract neurons (PTNs) in the cat during postural corrections and during locomotion; hind limb PTNs were also tested during scratching. The activity of nearly all PTNs was modulated in the rhythm of each of these motor patterns. The discharge frequency, averaged over the PTN population, was similar in different motor tasks, whereas the degree of frequency modulation was larger during locomotion. In individual PTNs, a correlation between analogous discharge characteristics (frequency or its modulation) in different tasks was very low, suggesting that input signals to PTNs in these tasks have a substantially different origin. In about a half of PTNs, their activity in different tasks was timed to the analogous (flexor/extensor) parts of the cycle, suggesting that these PTNs perform similar functions in these tasks (e.g., control of the value of muscle activity). In another half of PTNs, their activity was timed to opposite parts of the cycle in different tasks. These PTNs seem to perform different motor functions in different tasks, or their targets are active in different parts of the cycle in these tasks, or their effects are not directly related to the control of motor output (e.g., they modulate transmission of afferent signals). PMID:16445992

  1. Scratch resistance of brittle thin films on compliant substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There has been intensive interest in studying the behavior of hard and brittle thin films on compliant substrates under scratch action. The examples include sol-gel protective coatings on plastic optical lenses, safe windows, and flexible electronic devices and displays. Hard ceramic coatings have been widely used to prolong the life of cutting tools and biomedical implants. In this work, the scratch resistance of sol-gel coatings with different amount of colloidal silica on polycarbonate substrates was tested by the pencil scratch test following the ISO 15184 standard. The scratch failure was found to be tensile trailing cracking in the coating and substrate gouging. The indentation hardness, elasticity modulus and fracture toughness of the coatings were determined and correlated to the observed pencil scratch hardness. Based on the analysis, the main factors to improve the scratch resistance are the elasticity modulus, thickness and fracture toughness of the coatings. General consideration for the improvement of scratch resistance of hard coatings on compliant substrates was also discussed

  2. The Role of DmCatD, a Cathepsin D-Like Peptidase, and Acid Phosphatase in the Process of Follicular Atresia in Dipetalogaster maxima (Hemiptera: Reduviidae), a Vector of Chagas' Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyria, Jimena; Fruttero, Leonardo L.; Nazar, Magalí; Canavoso, Lilián E.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we have investigated the involvement of DmCatD, a cathepsin D-like peptidase, and acid phosphatase in the process of follicular atresia of Dipetalogaster maxima, a hematophagous insect vector of Chagas’ disease. For the studies, fat bodies, ovaries and hemolymph were sampled from anautogenous females at representative days of the reproductive cycle: pre-vitellogenesis, vitellogenesis as well as early and late atresia. Real time PCR (qPCR) and western blot assays showed that DmCatD was expressed in fat bodies and ovaries at all reproductive stages, being the expression of its active form significantly higher at the atretic stages. In hemolymph samples, only the immunoreactive band compatible with pro-DmCatD was observed by western blot. Acid phosphatase activity in ovarian tissues significantly increased during follicular atresia in comparison to pre-vitellogenesis and vitellogenesis. A further enzyme characterization with inhibitors showed that the high levels of acid phosphatase activity in atretic ovaries corresponded mainly to a tyrosine phosphatase. Immunofluorescence assays demonstrated that DmCatD and tyrosine phosphatase were associated with yolk bodies in vitellogenic follicles, while in atretic stages they displayed a different cellular distribution. DmCatD and tyrosine phosphatase partially co-localized with vitellin. Moreover, their interaction was supported by FRET analysis. In vitro assays using homogenates of atretic ovaries as the enzyme source and enzyme inhibitors demonstrated that DmCatD, together with a tyrosine phosphatase, were necessary to promote the degradation of vitellin. Taken together, the results strongly suggested that both acid hydrolases play a central role in early vitellin proteolysis during the process of follicular atresia. PMID:26091289

  3. Getting a CAT Scan

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Getting a CAT Scan (Video) KidsHealth > For Kids > Getting a CAT Scan (Video) Print A A A Text Size en español Obtención de una tomografía computada (video) CAT stands for "computerized axial tomography." Translated, that means ...

  4. Getting a CAT Scan

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Getting a CAT Scan (Video) KidsHealth > For Kids > Getting a CAT Scan (Video) Print A A A Text Size en español Obtención de una tomografía computada (video) CAT stands for "computerized axial tomography." Translated, that means ...

  5. Discospondylitis in a cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incidence and causative agents of discospondylitis in cats are unknown. This report describes a cat with radiologic changes consistent with discospondylitis and concurrent urinary tract infection. As in dogs, discospondylitis should be the primary rule out for vertebral end plate lysis in cats

  6. Getting a CAT Scan

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Crushes What's a Booger? Getting a CAT Scan (Video) KidsHealth > For Kids > Getting a CAT Scan (Video) Print A A A Text Size en español Obtención de una tomografía computada (video) CAT stands for "computerized axial tomography." Translated, that ...

  7. The Corynebacterium glutamicum aconitase repressor: scratching around for crystals

    OpenAIRE

    García-Nafría, Javier; Baumgart, Meike; Bott, Michael; Wilkinson, Anthony J; Wilson, Keith S.

    2010-01-01

    Crystallization of AcnR, a repressor of the aconitase gene in Corynebacterium glutamicum, is reported. Intentional manual scratching of the crystallization plates was applied to induce heterogeneous nucleation.

  8. Detecting fine scratches on smooth surfaces with multiscale wavelet representation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a set of image-processing algorithms for automatic detection of fine scratches on smooth surfaces, such as automobile paint surfaces. The scratches to be detected have random directions, inconspicuous gray levels and background noise. The multiscale wavelet transform was used to extract texture features, and a controlled edge fusion model was employed to merge the detailed (horizontal, vertical and diagonal) wavelet coefficient maps. Based on the fused detail map, multivariate statistics were applied to synthesize features in multiple scales and directions, and an optimal threshold was set to separate scratches from the background. The experimental results of 24 automobile paint surface showed that the presented algorithms can effectively suppress background noise and detect scratches accurately. (paper)

  9. A Catalogue of Anatomical Fugitive Sheets: Cat. 1-10

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    Images Cat. 1 Cat. 2 (a) Cat. 2 (b) Cat. 2 (c) Cat. 2 (d) Cat. 2 (e) Cat. 2 (f) Cat. 3: 1 (a) Cat. 3: 1 (b) Cat. 3: 2 (a) Cat. 3: 2 (b) Cat. 4: 1 Cat. 4: 2 Cat. 6: 1 (a) Cat. 6: 1 (b) Cat. 6: 2 (a) Cat. 6: 2 (b) Cat. 7: 1 (a) Cat. 7: 1 (b) Cat. 7: 2 (a) Cat. 7: 2 (b) Cat. 8: 1 Cat. 9: 1 Cat. 9: 2 Cat. 10: 1 Cat. 10: 2

  10. [Food allergy in dog and cat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vroom, M W

    1994-10-15

    Food allergy in the dog or cat can only be described as non-seasonal dermatitis accompanied by scratching. When the term 'food allergy' is used, an immune-mediated reaction is not always meant, although the term would suggest that it is. The frequency of occurrence of food allergy is unknown, with the literature giving widely differing percentages. Type I and type IV hypersensitivity reactions probably play a role in the pathogenesis, although a type III reaction is also thought to be involved. Gastrointestinal disturbances and skin complaints are symptoms of food allergy, and scratching is nearly always mentioned as the most common sign. The diagnosis can only be made by feeding the animal on a hypoallergic diet, which must be given for several weeks. Diagnostic tests are unreliable. The patient should not have been previously exposed to the ingredients of the hypoallergic diet. As 'home-made' diets may be deficient in minerals, vitamins, and essential amino acids, these ingredients must be supplemented if the diet is to be maintained for a long time. The prognosis of food allergy is good if the causative ingredient is identified. It is important the animals' owner is given through instruction. Medicines have little effect on food allergy. PMID:7974444

  11. Neuromuscular patterns of stereotypic hindlimb behaviors in the first two postnatal months. III. Scratching and the paw-shake response in kittens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, N S; Smith, J L

    1988-01-01

    Neuromuscular patterns of scratching and the paw-shake response were studied in normal kittens from birth to postnatal day 60. Onset of both behaviors coincided with the development of secure weight-bearing posture and occurred on postnatal day 21 for scratching and postnatal day 26 for paw shaking. At onset, cycle periods for scratching (5-6 Hz) and paw shaking (8-10 Hz) were similar to that for adult cats, and EMG patterns were adult-like. The scratch cycle consisted of reciprocal flexor and extensor bursts of equal duration, while the shake cycle consisted of coactive knee extensor and ankle flexor bursts alternately active with ankle extensor bursts. The lack of scratching and paw shaking during the first 3 postnatal weeks and the adult-like EMG patterns at onset are consistent with the hypothesis that pattern-generating circuits within lumbosacral segments are available early in development but inhibited by the rostral neuraxis until postural control is sufficient to accommodate the response. To eliminate rostral inputs, including descending input critical for postural control, kittens were spinalized at the T12 level, and onset of paw shaking was accelerated. In kittens spinalized at birth, paw-shake onset occurred on postnatal day 14, while in kittens spinalized on postnatal day 14, onset occurred 48 h after spinalization. In all spinal kittens, however, knee extensor activity was disrupted and not normal by postnatal day 60. Mature neuromuscular patterns for scratching and paw shaking are available at onset of the behavior during normal development. Spinalization hastens the onset of paw shaking but the normal neuromuscular synergy is disrupted as well as the temporal structure of the multi-cycle response. Disruptions following spinalization may be due to altered development of spinal pattern generators or aberrant feedback from atypical hindlimb motions due to a retardation of hindlimb growth and an alteration of muscle contractile properties in spinal

  12. A Catalogue of Anatomical Fugitive Sheets: Cat. 11-25

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    Images Cat. 11 (a) Cat. 11 (b) Cat. 11 (c) Cat. 11 (d) Cat. 12: 1 (a) Cat. 12: 1 (b) Cat. 12: 2 (a) Cat. 12: 2 (b) Cat. 13 Cat. 14 (a) Cat. 14 (b) Cat. 14 (c) Cat. 15 (a) Cat. 15 (b) Cat. 17: 1 Cat. 17: 2 Cat. 18: 1 Cat. 18: 2 Cat. 19: 1 (a) Cat. 19: 1 (b) Cat. 19: 2 (a) Cat. 19: 2 (b) Cat. 20: 1 Cat. 20: 2 (a) Cat. 20: 2 (b) Cat. 21 (a) Cat. 21 (b) Cat. 21 (c) Cat. 21 (d) Cat. 21 (e) Cat. 22 Cat. 24: 1 and 2 Cat. 25: 1 Cat. 25: 2 Cat. 25: 3 Cat. 25: 4

  13. Histamine H4 receptor antagonism reduces hapten-induced scratching behaviour but not inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossbach, Kristine; Wendorff, Stephanie; Sander, Kerstin; Stark, Holger; Gutzmer, Ralf; Werfel, Thomas; Kietzmann, Manfred; Bäumer, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Effects of the histamine H(4) receptor antagonist JNJ 7777120 (1-[(5-chloro-1H-indol-2-yl)carbonyl]-4-methylpiperazine) were tested in two models of allergic contact dermatitis. Dermatitis was induced by 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene and toluene-2,4-diisocyanate, which differ in their Th1-Th2 profile in that way that 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene is a classical contact allergen with a pronounced Th1-mediated inflammation, while the respiratory chemical allergen toluene-2,4-diisocyanate induces a Th2-dominated inflammation. JNJ 7777120 (15 mg/kg) administered 2 h and 30 min before and 1 h after challenge did not reduce the hapten-induced ear swelling determined 24 h after challenge. This was confirmed by histological evaluation of the ear skin. A repeated administration of the haptens to the rostral part of the back of sensitized animals resulted in a frequent scratching behaviour. An administration of JNJ 7777120 (15 mg/kg) 30 min before challenge reduced this hapten-induced scratching significantly. The H(1) receptor antagonist cetirizine also reduced the scratching bouts in sensitized mice. A combination of H(1) and H(4) receptor antagonists resulted in the strongest inhibition of scratching behaviour associated with allergic dermatitis. These results indicate that H(4) receptor antagonism fails to reduce the allergic inflammatory response but strongly inhibits allergen-induced itch. Thus, a combination of H(4) and H(1) receptor antagonism might be a new strategy to treat pruritus related to allergic diseases like atopic dermatitis. PMID:18647342

  14. Materiality of a simulation: Scratch reading machine, 1931

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Saper

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Using Bob Brown's reading machine and the prepared texts for his machine, called readies, both designed in 1930, as an example of scratch turntablist techniques, suggests an alternative to narrow definitions of literacy and new ways to appreciate the history of scratch techniques. Brown's machine resembles the turntablist’s ability to rapidly shift reading (its direction, speed, and repetition rather than slowly flipping the pages of a book. Punctuation marks, in the readies, become visual analogies. For movement we see em-dashes (— that also, by definition, indicate that the sentence was interrupted or cut short. The old uses of punctuation, such as employment of periods to mark the end of a sentence, disappear. The result looks like a script for a turntablist’s performance, and dj Herc starts to sound like a reading teacher. An online simulation of Brown's machine, http://www.readies.org, reproduce, or approximate, the motion, scratch, jerking, flickering, and visual effects produced or illuminated with the machine. Those supplemental aspects of reading are always already part of reading. The supplement (movement, visuality, mechanicity to traditional notions of literacy usually remain part of an implicate process. The reading machine and scratch techniques are not simply a new conduit for the same supposedly natural process. The scratch reading highlights what Jacques Derrida calls the "virtual multimedia" (of reading print on paper. The increasing prevalence, even omnipresent and [to some critics] epidemic, use of text(ing machines, something outside or beside traditional literacy, the scratch-meaning becomes foregrounded. Brown's machine puts the natural process of reading under erasure or scratch (simply by adjusting the speed, direction, and layout. dj Herc did the same for music.

  15. A tortoiseshell male cat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A. S.; Berg, Lise Charlotte; Almstrup, Kristian;

    2014-01-01

    Tortoiseshell coat color is normally restricted to female cats due to X-linkage of the gene that encodes the orange coat color. Tortoiseshell male cats do, however, occur at a low frequency among tortoiseshell cats because of chromosome aberrations similar to the Klinefelter syndrome in man...... tissue from a tortoiseshell male cat referred to us. Chromosome analysis using RBA-banding consistently revealed a 39,XXY karyotype. Histological examinations of testis biopsies from this cat showed degeneration of the tubules, hyperplasia of the interstitial tissue, and complete loss of germ cells....... Immunostaining using anti-vimentin and anti-VASA (DDX4) showed that only Sertoli cells and no germ cells were observed in the testicular tubules. As no sign of spermatogenesis was detected, we conclude that this is a classic case of a sterile, male tortoiseshell cat with a 39,XXY chromosome complement. © 2013 S...

  16. Prevalence of heartworm infection in cats with signs of cardiorespiratory abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine prevalence of heartworm infection in a population of pet cats with cardiorespiratory abnormalities and to determine relative usefulness of clinical signs and tests in diagnosis of heartworm disease. Prospective case series. 100 client-owned cats with clinical signs of cardiorespiratory abnormalities. Cats were evaluated using CBC, modified Knott test, ELISA for serologic detection of heartworm antigen and antibodies to heartworms, thoracic radiography, and echocardiography. Cats were considered infected if they had circulating microfilaria, heartworm antigens in serum, or if heartworms were detected by echocardiography or on necropsy. Cats were considered suspicious for infection if they had 2 of the following: serum antibodies to heartworms, eosinophilia or basophilia, or indicative radiographic findings. 9 cats were infected with heartworms, resulting in a prevalence of 9%; 26 cats had evidence of heartworm exposure (i.e., serum antibodies to heartworms). Twenty cats were considered suspicious for heartworm infection. Some outdoor exposure was reported twice as often in heartworm-infected cats, compared with noninfected and suspicious cats. However, a third of infected cats were reportedly housed totally indoors. Cough and dyspnea were strong indicators of heartworm disease. Eight of 9 infected cats had serum antibodies to heartworms and heartworm antigen in serum. Thoracic radiography and echocardiography indicated heartworm infection in 6 and 7 of the 9 cats, respectively. Cough or dyspnea may indicate heartworm disease in cats; serologic tests, echocardiography, and radiography are most useful diagnostic procedures. Although living indoors is protective, it may not preclude heartworm infection in cats

  17. On indentation and scratching of thin films on hard substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indentation and scratching of thin film/substrate structures, using sharp conical indenters, are studied theoretically and numerically and discussed in particular with material characterization in mind. For simplicity, but not out of necessity, the material behaviour is described by classical elastoplasticity accounting for large deformations. Explicit material parameters are chosen in order to arrive at representative results as regards material behaviour and indenter geometry. The main efforts are devoted towards an understanding of the influence from the film/substrate boundary on global indentation (scratching) properties at different material combinations. Global quantities to be investigated include indentation and scratching hardness, contact area and apparent coefficient of friction at scratching. A comparison of the mechanical behaviour at normal indentation and at scratching is also included. In addition, the behaviour of different field variables is studied and in this case the discussion is focused on fracture initiation governed by a critical stress criterion. The numerical investigation is performed using the finite element method and the numerical strategy is discussed in some detail. Throughout the analysis it is assumed that the substrate is considerably harder than the indented film and consequently the deformation of the substrate is neglected

  18. Localized corrosion behavior of scratches on nickel-base Alloy 690TT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Localized corrosion of scratched Alloy 690TT was studied using scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) in 10 wt.% NaOH solution and atomic force microscopy (AFM) after short-time oxidation tests in high temperature high pressure water at 250 oC. The results show that the scratches detected by SECM displayed more extensive electrochemical activity. The scratch groove and the whole deformed region caused by scratching as anode corresponded to the peak of tip current. The oxides formed in 250 oC high purity pressurized water nucleated preferentially at the scratch groove and grew faster than non-scratched surface. The nano-grained scratch groove has more electrochemical reactivity than mechanical twins at scratch banks. The intense localized corrosion could contribute to crack initiation at the bottom of scratch groove.

  19. Opinions from the front lines of cat colony management conflict.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Nils Peterson

    Full Text Available Outdoor cats represent a global threat to terrestrial vertebrate conservation, but management has been rife with conflict due to differences in views of the problem and appropriate responses to it. To evaluate these differences we conducted a survey of opinions about outdoor cats and their management with two contrasting stakeholder groups, cat colony caretakers (CCCs and bird conservation professionals (BCPs across the United States. Group opinions were polarized, for both normative statements (CCCs supported treating feral cats as protected wildlife and using trap neuter and release [TNR] and BCPs supported treating feral cats as pests and using euthanasia and empirical statements. Opinions also were related to gender, age, and education, with females and older respondents being less likely than their counterparts to support treating feral cats as pests, and females being less likely than males to support euthanasia. Most CCCs held false beliefs about the impacts of feral cats on wildlife and the impacts of TNR (e.g., 9% believed feral cats harmed bird populations, 70% believed TNR eliminates cat colonies, and 18% disagreed with the statement that feral cats filled the role of native predators. Only 6% of CCCs believed feral cats carried diseases. To the extent the beliefs held by CCCs are rooted in lack of knowledge and mistrust, rather than denial of directly observable phenomenon, the conservation community can manage these conflicts more productively by bringing CCCs into the process of defining data collection methods, defining study/management locations, and identifying common goals related to caring for animals.

  20. Opinions from the front lines of cat colony management conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, M Nils; Hartis, Brett; Rodriguez, Shari; Green, Matthew; Lepczyk, Christopher A

    2012-01-01

    Outdoor cats represent a global threat to terrestrial vertebrate conservation, but management has been rife with conflict due to differences in views of the problem and appropriate responses to it. To evaluate these differences we conducted a survey of opinions about outdoor cats and their management with two contrasting stakeholder groups, cat colony caretakers (CCCs) and bird conservation professionals (BCPs) across the United States. Group opinions were polarized, for both normative statements (CCCs supported treating feral cats as protected wildlife and using trap neuter and release [TNR] and BCPs supported treating feral cats as pests and using euthanasia) and empirical statements. Opinions also were related to gender, age, and education, with females and older respondents being less likely than their counterparts to support treating feral cats as pests, and females being less likely than males to support euthanasia. Most CCCs held false beliefs about the impacts of feral cats on wildlife and the impacts of TNR (e.g., 9% believed feral cats harmed bird populations, 70% believed TNR eliminates cat colonies, and 18% disagreed with the statement that feral cats filled the role of native predators). Only 6% of CCCs believed feral cats carried diseases. To the extent the beliefs held by CCCs are rooted in lack of knowledge and mistrust, rather than denial of directly observable phenomenon, the conservation community can manage these conflicts more productively by bringing CCCs into the process of defining data collection methods, defining study/management locations, and identifying common goals related to caring for animals. PMID:22970269

  1. Ultrastructural myocardial changes in seven cats with spontaneous hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Liselotte Bruun; Prats Gavalda, Clara; Hyttel, Poul;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common heart disease in cats and shares clinical and pathological characteristics with human HCM. Little is known about the pathogenic mechanisms underlying development of spontaneous feline HCM. ANIMALS: The study population consisted of...... seven cats diagnosed with HCM and eight age-matched cats with no evidence of cardiac disease. METHODS: Fresh myocardial biopsies taken from the middle of the left ventricular posterior free wall were obtained and examined with transmission electron microscopy. RESULTS: Electron microscopic examination...... showed ultrastructural aberrations of the myocardial cytoarchitecture and of the interstitium in the seven cats with HCM. In the most severely affected cats the myofibrils were disorganized and subsarcolemmal mitochondria were depleted. In control cats, contraction band artifacts were commonly seen...

  2. Computed tomography of nonanesthetized cats with upper airway obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Krystina; O'Brien, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Upper airway obstruction is a potentially life-threatening problem in cats and for which a noninvasive, sensitive method rapid diagnosis is needed. The purposes of this prospective study were to describe a computed tomography (CT) technique for nonanesthetized cats with upper airway obstruction, CT characteristics of obstructive diseases, and comparisons between CT findings and findings from other diagnostic tests. Ten cats with clinical signs of upper airway obstruction were recruited for the study. Four cats with no clinical signs of upper airway obstruction were recruited as controls. All cats underwent computed tomography imaging without sedation or anesthesia, using a 16-slice helical CT scanner and a previously described transparent positional device. Three-dimensional (3D) internal volume rendering was performed on all CT image sets and 3D external volume rendering was also performed on cats with evidence of mass lesions. Confirmation of upper airway obstruction was based on visual laryngeal examination, endoscopy, fine-needle aspirate, biopsy, or necropsy. Seven cats were diagnosed with intramural upper airway masses, two with laryngotracheitis, and one with laryngeal paralysis. The CT and 3D volume-rendered images identified lesions consistent with upper airway disease in all cats. In cats with mass lesions, CT accurately identified the mass and location. Findings from this study supported the use of CT imaging as an effective technique for diagnosing upper airway obstruction in nonanesthetized cats. PMID:23441677

  3. Mucopolysaccharidosis VI in cats – clarification regarding genetic testing

    OpenAIRE

    Lyons, L.A.; Grahn, R. A.; Genova, F; M. Beccaglia; Hopwood, J J; M. Longeri

    2016-01-01

    The release of new DNA-based diagnostic tools has increased tremendously in companion animals. Over 70 different DNA variants are now known for the cat, including DNA variants in disease-associated genes and genes causing aesthetically interesting traits. The impact genetic tests have on animal breeding and health management is significant because of the ability to control the breeding of domestic cats, especially breed cats. If used properly, genetic testing can prevent the production of dis...

  4. Effect of scratch on crack initiation of alloy 690TT in high temperature high pressure water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: This paper aims to investigate the effect of scratch on crack initiation of Alloy 690. The corrosion and stress corrosion of scratched Alloy 690 were studied using scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that scratch caused residual compressive stress underneath the scratch, dissolution was preferentially active at scratches and intergranular cracks initiated at the bottom of scratch after immersion in high temperature water. At the macro-compressive stressed area, localized tensile stress caused by oxide jacking could initiate crack. (authors)

  5. Exfoliated Graphite Reinforced PMMA Composite: A Study on Nano indentation and Scratch Behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work aims to compare the scratch hardness (Hs) with the indentation hardness (HIT) obtained from nano indentation measurements of exfoliated graphite/poly (methyl methacrylate) (EG/PMMA) composites. EG/PMMA composites with thickness 50 νm each were produced by in situ melt mixing method. Scratch hardness was measured from the scratch width formed at low applied load during the course of the scratch measurements. The measured scratch hardness values were compared with the indentation hardness. There is a good correlation between the scratch hardness and the indentation hardness at low indentation depths, with a linear relationship between hardness and the reinforcement content of exfoliated graphite

  6. That Fat Cat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Phyllis Gilchrist

    2012-01-01

    This activity began with a picture book, Nurit Karlin's "Fat Cat On a Mat" (HarperCollins; 1998). The author and her students started their project with a 5-inch circular template for the head of their cats. They reviewed shapes as they drew the head and then added the ears and nose, which were triangles. Details to the face were added when…

  7. Getting a CAT Scan

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading Movie: Digestive System Winter Sports: Sledding, ... Booger? Getting a CAT Scan (Video) KidsHealth > For Kids > Getting a CAT Scan (Video) Print A A ...

  8. Getting a CAT Scan

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Skiing, Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Getting a CAT Scan (Video) KidsHealth > For Kids > Getting a CAT Scan (Video) Print A A A Text Size en español Obtención de ...

  9. Disease: H00326 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available animal scratches and bites. Human bartonellosis is a group of diseases with a rap...idly increasing clinical spectrum. At least six Bartonella species are responsible for human diseases as well as zoonotic diseases

  10. CAT questions and answers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document, prepared in February 1993, addresses the most common questions asked by APS Collaborative Access Teams (CATs). The answers represent the best judgment on the part of the APS at this time. In some cases, details are provided in separate documents to be supplied by the APS. Some of the answers are brief because details are not yet available. The questions are separated into five categories representing different aspects of CAT interactions with the APS: (1) Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), (2) CAT Beamline Review and Construction, (3) CAT Beamline Safety, (4) CAT Beamline Operations, and (5) Miscellaneous. The APS plans to generate similar documents as needed to both address new questions and clarify answers to present questions

  11. Prevalence Of Igg Antibodies To Encephalitozoon Cuniculi, Toxoplasma Gondii, And Sarcocystis Neurona In Domestic Cats

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, Hsing-Ho Vasha

    2010-01-01

    Encephalitozoon cuniculi, Toxoplasma gondii and Sarcocystis neurona are intracellular parasites that infect a wide range of mammalian host species including domestic cats. The prevalence of antibodies to these parasites in cats was examined using an indirect immunofluorescence antibody assay. E. cuniculi targets the kidneys of rabbits but the prevalence of disease in cats is unknown. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a common cause of illness in cats. T. gondii is a widespread parasite of c...

  12. El Scratch com a eina de modelització computacional

    OpenAIRE

    López Simó, Víctor; Hernández Rodríguez, María Isabel

    2013-01-01

    La plataforma virtual Scratch, que compta amb un llenguatge de programació senzill i adaptat per alumnes de primària i secundària, té cada vegada més adeptes en els centres educatius, ja que representa una oportunitat com a eina per a que alumnat i professorat puguin construir models científics escolars i avaluar el seu comportament. En aquest article discutirem per què Scratch pot arribar a ser una bona eina per a la modelització computacional en els cursos de ciències de primària i secundàr...

  13. Calentamiento global con Scratch y escuelas eficientes con Arduino

    OpenAIRE

    Ainzua Cemborain, José Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Este trabajo final de máster está formado por dos proyectos con metodología de aprendizaje basado en proyectos (ABP). El primero de ellos se realiza en la asignatura de Tecnología y en coordinación con la asignatura de Ciencias Naturales, y el segundo únicamente para Tecnología. En la primera parte del proyecto se analiza la metodología ABP utilizada y se compara con la tradicional. Posteriormente se estudian las tres herramientas utilizadas en este proyecto como son; Scratch, Scratch for...

  14. Nanoindentation and scratch studies on magnetron sputtered Ti thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataria, S; Ramaseshan, R; Dash, S; Tyagi, A K

    2009-09-01

    Ti thin films sputter deposited on D9 steel at two different temperatures were studied for their mechanical behavior under static and sliding contact conditions using nanoindentation and scratch tests. The film hardness measured at the surface of the coatings exhibited a value of 2.5 GPa, for both conditions. From the scratch test, it is understood that coatings deposited at 200 degrees C substrate temperature showed superior adhesion strength. Critical load to failure for these coatings was evaluated at 2 N. PMID:19928247

  15. Process for repairing large scratches on fused silica optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormont, Philippe; Bourgeade, Antoine; Cavaro, Sandy; Doualle, Thomas; Gaborit, Gael; Gallais, Laurent; Rullier, Jean-Luc; Taroux, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    Scratches at the surface of fused silica optics can be detrimental for the performance of optical systems because they initiate damage on the optic but also they perturb the amplitude or phase of the transmitted laser light. Removing scratches by conventional polishing techniques can be time consuming as it is an iterative and long process, especially when hours of polishing time are required to obtain very high surface accuracy. So we have investigated ways to remove them with local laser processing. The silica is then heated at temperature higher than the softening point to heal the cracks.

  16. Dr. Scratch: Análisis Automático de Proyectos Scratch para Evaluar y Fomentar el Pensamiento Computacional

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno-León, Jesús; Robles, Gregorio; Román-González, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    Una de las barreras de entrada de la programación informática en las escuelas es la falta de herramientas que ayuden al profesorado en la evaluación de los proyectos del alumnado. Con el objetivo de resolver esta situación, este artículo presenta Dr. Scratch, una aplicación web que permite a educadores y alumnos analizar automáticamente proyectos Scratch, el lenguaje de programación más utilizado globalmente en educación primaria y secundaria, para comprobar si se han programado correctamente...

  17. Investigation on Scratch Resistance of Thin Films Coated on Resin Lens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wei; LIU Jin-long; WANG Qing-liang

    2004-01-01

    Resin lens are very popular in glasses market. Many technologies have been developed to coat different thin films on resin lens to strengthen its resistance to scratch or wear, but little of the scratch failure mechanism of such thin films are reported. This paper presented the results of several scratch tests performed on three resin lenses coated with different thin films at the normal loads of 98 mN and 49 mN and at sliding velocity of 0.003 3 m/s and 0.001 7 m/s, and the observation of the scratch tracks on the resin lens by SEM. It shows that the resin lenses coated with different thin films have different scratch resistance and different scratch failure mechanism, and the scratch resistance varies at the two different loads and sliding velocity. The experiment provides a new method to evaluate the scratch resistance of resin lens.

  18. Scratch's Third Body: Video Talks Back to Television

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goldsmith, Leo

    2015-01-01

    abstractEmerging in the UK in the 1980s, Scratch Video established a paradoxical union of mass-media critique, Left-wing politics, and music-video and advertising aesthetics with its use of moving-image appropriation in the medium of videotape. Enabled by innovative professional and consumer video t

  19. Scratch as a Computational Modelling Tool for Teaching Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Victor; Hernandez, Maria Isabel

    2015-01-01

    The Scratch online authoring tool, which features a simple programming language that has been adapted to primary and secondary students, is being used more and more in schools as it offers students and teachers the opportunity to use a tool to build scientific models and evaluate their behaviour, just as can be done with computational modelling…

  20. Synchronization in Scratch: A Case Study with Education Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolos, Dimitris; Komis, Vassilis

    2015-01-01

    The Scratch programming language is an introductory programming language for students. It is also a visual concurrent programming language, where multiple threads are executed simultaneously. Synchronization in concurrent languages is a complex task for novices to understand. Our research is focused on strategies and methods applied by novice…

  1. Acoustic emission generated during scratch test of various thin films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Boháč, Petr; Tomáštík, J.; Čtvrtlík, R.; Dráb, M.; Koula, V.; Cvrk, K.; Jastrabík, Lubomír

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 12 (2014), s. 16635. ISSN 1435-4934 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA03010743 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : acoustic emission * scratch test * thin films * AE data analysis * mechanical toughness Subject RIV: BI - Acoustic s

  2. New Ichnospecies of Scratching Traces from Phosphatic nodules (Cenomanian, England)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chumakov, N. M.; Dronov, A. V.; Mikuláš, Radek

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 3 (2013), s. 50-59. ISSN 0869-5938 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : trace fossils * Cenomanian * southern England * systems of scratches * biting traces * bioerosion * homodont * heterodont Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 0.714, year: 2013

  3. Scratch induced failure of plasma sprayed alumina based coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Scratch induced failure of alumina based coatings including nanostructured is reported. ► Ceramic is deposited on bond coat instead of steel, emulating a realistic situation. ► Lateral force data is supplemented with microscopy to observe coating failure. ► The failure mechanism during scratching has been identified. ► Critical load of failure has been calculated for each bond-top coat combination. -- Abstract: A set of plasma sprayed coatings were obtained from three alumina based top coat and two bond coat powders. Scratch test was undertaken on these coatings, under constant and linearly varying load. Test results include the lateral force data and scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. Failure occurred by large area spallation of the top coat and in most cases tensile cracks appeared on the exposed bond coat. The lateral force showed an increasing trend with an increase in normal load up to a certain point and beyond this, it assumed a steady average value. The locations of coating spallation and occurrence of maximum lateral force did not coincide. A bond coat did not show a significant role in determining the scratch adhesion strength.

  4. In vitro susceptibility of antifungal drugs against Sporothrix brasiliensis recovered from cats with sporotrichosis in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Rodrigues, Anderson Messias; Sidrim, José Júlio Costa; Rocha, Marcos Fábio Gadelha; Pereira, Sandro Antonio; Gremião, Isabella Dib Ferreira; Schubach, Tânia Maria Pacheco; de Camargo, Zoilo Pires

    2016-03-01

    Sporotrichosis is an important subcutaneous mycosis of humans and animals. Classically, the disease is acquired upon traumatic inoculation of Sporothrix propagules from contaminated soil and plant debris. In addition, the direct horizontal transmission of Sporothrix among animals and the resulting zoonotic infection in humans highlight an alternative and efficient rout of transmission through biting and scratching. Sporothrix brasiliensis is the most virulent species of the Sporothrix schenckii complex and is responsible for the long-lasting outbreak of feline sporotrichosis in Brazil. However, antifungal susceptibility data of animal-borne isolates is scarce. Therefore, this study evaluated the in vitro activity of amphotericin B, caspofungin, itraconazole, voriconazole, fluconazole, and ketoconazole against animal-borne isolates of S. brasiliensis. The susceptibility tests were performed through broth microdilution (M38-A2). The results show the relevant activity of itraconazole, amphotericin B, and ketoconazole against S. brasiliensis, with the following MIC ranges: 0.125-2, 0.125-4 and 0.0312-2 μg/ml, respectively. Caspofungin was moderately effective, displaying higher variation in MIC values (0.25-64 μg/ml). Voriconazole (2-64 μg/ml) and fluconazole (62.5-500 μg/ml) showed low activity against S. brasiliensis strains. This study contributed to the characterization of the in vitro antifungal susceptibility of strains of S. brasiliensis recovered from cats with sporotrichosis, which have recently been considered the main source of human infections. PMID:26591009

  5. Disease: H01059 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ted from humans infected by dog or cat bites, scratches or licks. The infection presents as fulminant sepsis, endocarditis...ion, env_factor) Sandoe JA Capnocytophaga canimorsus endocarditis. J Med Microbiol 53:245-8 (2004) PMID:7588

  6. European consensus statement on leptospirosis in dogs and cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease of worldwide distribution affecting most mammalian species. Clinical leptospirosis is common in dogs but seems to be rare in cats. Both dogs and cats however, can shed leptospires in the urine. This is problematic as it can lead to exposure of humans. The control ...

  7. Membranous nephropathy in the cat: a clinical and pathological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, A S; Wright, N G; Spencer, A J; Thompson, H; Fisher, E W

    1979-07-28

    A series of 13 cases of feline membranous nephropathy is presented. Two groups were distinguished clinically; eight cats had the nephrotic syndrome and five others were in renal failure but not nephrotic. The definitive diagnosis was based on histological, immunofluorescence and ultrastructural examinations of renal tissue obtained at renal biopsy or necropsy. Glomerular lesions were classified according to the degree of glomerular change into three distinct groups; mild, moderately severe and advanced. A relationship was established between the mild and moderately severe groups and cats with the nephrotic syndrome, and the advanced group and cats in renal failure. Diuretic therapy was satisfactory in initial control of oedema in the nephrotic cases. Monitoring of previously nephrotic cats for up to three years indicated that the disease is progressive, although in some cases it is sufficiently slow for a cat to live a relatively normal life without continuing treatment. The prognosis for cats presented in renal failure is hopeless. PMID:552741

  8. [Passive immunization in dogs and cats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Michèle; Friedl, Yvonne; Hartmann, Katrin

    2016-08-17

    Antibodies play an important role in the defense against infectious diseases. Passive immunization provides immediate protection through transfer of exogenous antibodies to a recipient. It is mainly used for prophylaxis in dogs and cats that failed to receive maternal antibodies through the colostrum or when there is an acute risk to acquire infectious diseases. Only a small number of placebo-controlled studies have been published regarding the therapeutic use of passive immunization in small animals. While positive effects were reported in cats with acute virus infections of the upper respiratory tract and in dogs with distemper, no statistically significant influence could be demonstrated in the treatment of canine parvovirosis. Prospective, double-blinded, and placebo-controlled studies using adequate numbers of patients are warranted for a definitive statement regarding the therapeutic and prophylactic use of passive immunization in dogs and cats. PMID:27410719

  9. Annotated features of domestic cat ??? Felis catus genome

    OpenAIRE

    Tamazian, Gaik; Simonov, Serguei; Dobrynin, Pavel; Makunin, Alexey; Logachev, Anton; Komissarov, Aleksey; Shevchenko, Andrey; Brukhin, Vladimir; Cherkasov, Nikolay; Svitin, Anton; Goldman, David B. (David Benjamin); Antunes, Agostinho; Quilez, Javier; Lorente-Gald??s, Bel??n, 1981-; Alkan, Can

    2014-01-01

    Background. Domestic cats enjoy an extensive veterinary medical surveillance which has described nearly 250 genetic diseases analogous to human disorders. Feline infectious agents offer powerful natural models of deadly human diseases, which include feline immunodeficiency virus, feline sarcoma virus and feline leukemia virus. A rich veterinary literature of feline disease pathogenesis and the demonstration of a highly conserved ancestral mammal genome organization make the cat genome annotat...

  10. Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease: an unusual association with acute renal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Feliciano da Silva

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease, also known as histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis of unknown etiopathogenesis, is a self-limited disease which frequently appears as feverish lymphadenomegaly, thus creating the need for differential diagnosis with lymphoma, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, infectious mononucleosis, cat-scratch disease, and toxoplasmosis with lymphonodal impairment. However, there are cases in which it may evolve with complications such as aseptic meningitis, cerebellar ataxia, and aseptic myocarditis. We are presenting a case of a 24-year-old man who had an initial picture of arthralgia, evening fever and adenomegaly. Kikuchi disease was diagnosed through lymph node biopsy with immunohistochemistry and evolves with severe systemic manifestations, such as pericarditis with cardiac tamponade, pneumonitis, hepatitis, and acute kidney failure - the latter has not been reported in literature yet. There was significant improvement of the clinical picture with prednisone

  11. A comparison study of scratch and wear properties using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The patterning technique that uses an AFM (atomic force microscopy) tip as a scratch tool, also known as AFM scratching, has been a vital technique for nanofabrication because of its low cost and potential to reach a resolution into the sub-nanometer domain. The AFM scratching technique was first used to study the scratch characteristics of silicon, with an emphasis on establishing its scratchability or the nanoscale machinability. The effects of the scratch parameters, including the applied tip force and number of scratches, on the size of the scratched geometry were specifically evaluated. The primary property that measures the scratchability was identified and assessed. To illustrate its suitability and reliability, the value of the scratchability, based on the present Si scratching experiments, was compared with the values based on the data available in the literatures for different scratching conditions or for materials other than Si. Since AFM scratching is in some aspects similar to the nanoscale wear test, the scratchability property identified is also compared with two major wear resistance indicators, wear coefficient and hardness. All comparison results indicate that the scratchability property identified, the scratch ratio, is an appropriate manufacturability indicator for measuring the degree of the ease or difficulty of a material scratched by an AFM tip and more suitable than the wear coefficient and hardness to gauge the nanoscale AFM scratchability.

  12. Effects of Using Alice and Scratch in an Introductory Programming Course for Corrective Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Kai

    2014-01-01

    Scratch, a visual programming language, was used in many studies in computer science education. Most of them reported positive results by integrating Scratch into K-12 computer courses. However, the object-oriented concept, one of the important computational thinking skills, is not represented well in Scratch. Alice, another visual programming…

  13. StreamCat

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The StreamCat Dataset provides summaries of natural and anthropogenic landscape features for ~2.65 million streams, and their associated catchments, within the...

  14. Haemobartonellosis in Van Cats

    OpenAIRE

    AKKAN, Hasan Altan; Karaca, Mehmet; TÜTÜNCÜ, Mehmet

    2005-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine prevalence of Haemobartonella felis in Van cats. 121 Van cats (82 female, 39 male, aged 1-9 years) were the materials of the study. To determine biochemical and haematological parameters, 2 ml blood with and without anticoagulant were taken according to technique from vena cephalica antebrachii. H. felis was detected in blood smears preparations of 18 (14.88%) by Papenheim staining. Among biochemical parameters aspartate amino transferase (AST), al...

  15. Resolving Schrodinger's cat

    OpenAIRE

    Hobson, Art

    2016-01-01

    Schrodinger's famous cat has long been misunderstood. According to quantum theory and experiments with entangled systems, an entangled state such as the Schrodinger's cat state is neither a superposition of states of either subsystem nor a superposition of compound states of the composite system, but rather a nonlocal superposition of correlations between pairs of states of the two subsystems. The entangled post-measurement state that results from an ideal measurement is not paradoxical, but ...

  16. Avian Influenza H5N1 in Naturally Infected Domestic Cat

    OpenAIRE

    Songserm, Thaweesak; Amonsin, Alongkorn; Jam-on, Rungroj; Sae-Heng, Namdee; Meemak, Noppadol; Pariyothorn, Nuananong; Payungporn, Sunchai; Theamboonlers, Apiradee; Poovorawan, Yong

    2006-01-01

    We report H5N1 virus infection in a domestic cat infected by eating a pigeon carcass. The virus isolated from the pigeon and the cat showed the same cluster as the viruses obtained during the outbreak in Thailand. Since cats are common house pets, concern regarding disease transmission to humans exists.

  17. Radiographic and 2-D echocardiographic findings in eighteen cats experimentally exposed to D. immitis via mosquito bites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eighteen cats were exposed to Dirofilaria immitis infected mosquitoes. Thoracic radiography was performed prior to exposure and at 5, 7, and 9 month intervals following exposure. Immunologic testing for adult heartworm antigen was performed on days 168, 195, 210, 224, 237, 254 and 271 post infection. Necropsies were performed on all cats. Adult heartworms were found in 61% of the exposed cats. Radiographic findings in heartworm positive cats included bronchointerstitial lung disease, lobar pulmonary arterial enlargement and pulmonary hyperinflation. In most heartworm positive cats, lobar arterial enlargement resolved as the disease progressed while pulmonary hyperinflation progressively became more common. Pulmonary patterns in heartworm positive cats remained abnormal throughout the study while abnormal pulmonary patterns resolved in over 50% of the heartworm negative cats. Cardiomegaly was seen in less than 50% of the cats with adult heartworms at necropsy. This study suggests that the radiographic appearance of heartworm disease is variable and radiographic changes are dependent on the time post infection at which cats are evaluated. Echocardiographic examinations were randomly performed on 16 of 18 cats. Heartworms were identified in 7 cats. No false positive identifications were made. Persistent pulmonary disease accompanied by resolving vascular disease in heartworm cats with pulmonary hyperinflation may be difficult to distinguish from cats with feline allergic lung. Echocardiograms may be helpful in identifying adult heartworms in cats in which the radiographic signs or immunodiagnostic data are insufficient to provide a diagnosis

  18. Management of obesity in cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoelmkjaer KM

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Kirsten M Hoelmkjaer, Charlotte R Bjornvad Department of Veterinary Clinical and Animal Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark Abstract: Obesity is a common nutritional disorder in cats, especially when they are neutered and middle-aged. Obesity predisposes cats to several metabolic and clinical disorders, including insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus, lameness, and skin disease. Prevention and treatment of obesity is therefore of great importance in veterinary practice. Correct assessment of body composition is important for recognizing early states of obesity and for monitoring success of weight-loss programs. Various methods for assessing body composition have been proposed, of which a 9-point body-condition score has been validated in cats, and is possibly the most simple to use in the clinic; however, for extremely obese individuals, it is less useful. When calculating the appropriate daily caloric intake for a weight-loss plan, the aim is to maintain a safe weight-loss rate, increasing the chance of preserving lean body mass and decreasing the risk of developing hepatic lipidosis, while also producing a sufficient weight-loss rate to keep owners motivated. A weight-loss rate of 0.5%–2% per week is recommended, which for a cat that needs to lose 3 kg body weight results in an anticipated time for reaching the target weight of 24–60 weeks. There are several purpose-made weight-loss diets available. The optimal composition of a weight-loss diet for cats is unknown, but most of the available products have lower caloric density, an increased nutrient:energy ratio, and higher protein and fiber content. Regular follow-up visits allow the caloric intake to be adjusted based on progress, and possibly increase the chance of success. This review discusses the risk factors for and consequences of obesity, and gives directions for formulating a weight-loss plan, including daily caloric

  19. Understanding public perceptions of risk regarding outdoor pet cats to inform conservation action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramza, Ashley; Teel, Tara; VandeWoude, Susan; Crooks, Kevin

    2016-04-01

    Free-ranging domestic cats (Felis catus) incur and impose risks on ecosystems and represent a complex issue of critical importance to biodiversity conservation and cat and human health globally. Prior social science research on this topic is limited and has emphasized feral cats even though owned cats often comprise a large proportion of the outdoor cat population, particularly in urban areas. To address this gap, we examined public risk perceptions and attitudes toward outdoor pet cats across varying levels of urbanization, including along the wildland-urban interface, in Colorado (U.S.A.), through a mail survey of 1397 residents. Residents did not view all types of risks uniformly. They viewed risks of cat predation on wildlife and carnivore predation on cats as more likely than disease-related risks. Additionally, risk perceptions were related to attitudes, prior experiences with cats and cat-wildlife interactions, and cat-owner behavior. Our findings suggest that changes in risk perceptions may result in behavior change. Therefore, knowledge of cat-related risk perceptions and attitudes could be used to develop communication programs aimed at promoting risk-aversive behaviors among cat owners and cat-management strategies that are acceptable to the public and that directly advance the conservation of native species. PMID:26379227

  20. Survey of Helicobacter infection in domestic and feral cats in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Ghil, Heh-Myung; Yoo, Jong-Hyeon; Jung, Woo-Sung; CHUNG, Tae-Ho; Youn, Hwa-Young; Hwang, Cheol-Yong

    2009-01-01

    Discovery of Helicobacter (H.) pylori has led to a fundamental change in our understanding of gastric diseases in humans. Previous studies have found various Helicobacter spp. in dogs and cats, and pets have been questioned as a zoonotic carrier. The present study surveyed the Helicobacter infections and investigated the presence of H. felis and H. pylori infections in domestic and feral cats in Korea. Sixty-four domestic cats and 101 feral cats were selected from an animal shelter. Saliva an...

  1. Relationship between Serum Symmetric Dimethylarginine Concentration and Glomerular Filtration Rate in Cats

    OpenAIRE

    Braff, J.; Obare, E.; Elliott, J.; Yerramilli, M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Direct measurement of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is the preferred method to assess renal function in cats, but it is not widely used in the diagnosis of chronic kidney disease (CKD). In cats with CKD, symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) has been shown to increase and to correlate with plasma creatinine concentrations. Hypothesis In cats, reduced GFR corresponds with increased serum SDMA concentration. Animals The study group consisted of ten client‐owned cats whose GFR had been...

  2. Wrist actigraphy for scratch detection in the presence of confounding activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerstein, Johanna; Austin, Daniel; Sack, Robert; Hayes, Tamara L

    2011-01-01

    Scratching is a symptom of many dermatological disorders, especially atopic dermatitis. For the development of anti-itch medications, there is a need for objective measures of scratching. Wrist actigraphy (monitoring wrist and hand movements with micro-accelerometers) is a promising method for assessing scratching; however, currently available technology has a limited capacity to discriminate scratching from other similar movements. In this study, we investigated methods to improve the specificity of actigraphy for scratch detection on movement data collected from subjects using the PAM-RL actigraph. A k-means cluster analysis was used to differentiate scratching from walking and restless sleep, which are potential confounds for nighttime scratching. Features used in the analysis include variance, peak frequency, autocorrelation value at one lag, and number of counts above 0.01 g's. The k-means cluster analysis exhibited a high sensitivity (0.90 ± 0.10) and specificity for walking (0.98 ± 0.05) and restless sleep (0.88 ± 0.06), respectively, demonstrating the separability of these activities. This work indicates that the features described here can be used to develop a classifier that discriminates scratch from other activities. The described method of scratch detection shows promise as an objective method for assessing scratching movements in clinical trials and longitudinal studies of scratch. PMID:22255131

  3. Brain's reward circuits mediate itch relief. a functional MRI study of active scratching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru D P Papoiu

    Full Text Available Previous brain imaging studies investigating the brain processing of scratching used an exogenous intervention mimicking scratching, performed not by the subjects themselves, but delivered by an investigator. In real life, scratching is a conscious, voluntary, controlled motor response to itching, which is directed to the perceived site of distress. In this study we aimed to visualize in real-time by brain imaging the core mechanisms of the itch-scratch cycle when scratching was performed by subjects themselves. Secondly, we aimed to assess the correlations between brain patterns of activation and psychophysical ratings of itch relief or pleasurability of scratching. We also compared the patterns of brain activity evoked by self-scratching vs. passive scratching. We used a robust tridimensional Arterial Spin Labeling fMRI technique that is less sensitive to motion artifacts: 3D gradient echo and spin echo (GRASE--Propeller. Active scratching was accompanied by a higher pleasurability and induced a more pronounced deactivation of the anterior cingulate cortex and insula, in comparison with passive scratching. A significant involvement of the reward system including the ventral tegmentum of the midbrain, coupled with a mechanism deactivating the periaqueductal gray matter (PAG, suggests that itch modulation operates in reverse to the mechanism known to suppress pain. Our findings not only confirm a role for the central networks processing reward in the pleasurable aspects of scratching, but also suggest they play a role in mediating itch relief.

  4. Ultrasonographic features of intestinal adenocarcinoma in five cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adenocarcinoma, followed by lymphosarcoma, are the most common feline intestinal neoplasms. Clinicopathological, survey radiographic, and ultrasonographic findings of five cats with intestinal adenocarcinoma are reported. An abdominal mass was palpable in all five cats, but the mass could be localized to bowel in only two cats. Radiographically an abdominal mass was detected in only one cat. Ultrasonographically there was a segmental intestinal mural mass in all five cats. The mass was characterized by circumferential bowel wall thickening with transmural loss of normal sonographic wall layers. In one cat, the circumferential symmetric hypoechoic bowel wall thickening was similar to that reported for segmental lymphoma. In the other four cats, the sonographic features of the thickened bowel wall were varied, being mixed echogenicity and asymmetric in 3 cats and mixed echogenicity and symmetric in one. The results of the present report suggest that sonographic observation of mixed echogenicity segmental intestinal wall thickening in the cat represents adenocarcinoma rather than lymphosarcoma, although other infiltrative diseases should be considered

  5. Orientation and the extent of exfoliation of clay on scratch damage in polyamide 6 nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major objectives of this work are to understand the effects of organoclay, its extent of exfoliation and orientation, and indenter geometry on the scratch characteristics of polyamide 6/organoclay nanocomposites. Two different organically treated clays are used for this purpose and their structural parameters in a polyamide 6 matrix quantified. It is shown that, while the material properties are important for scratching resistance, they are not the only determinants of the scratch performance of materials. Further, despite proving beneficial to scratch resistance, in terms of residual depth, the presence (and exfoliation) of organoclay promotes the formation of brittle cracks during scratching. But with no organoclay layers, plastic flow controls the scratch damage in neat polyamide 6 with large residual depths. Factors such as orientation of clay layers and variations of indenter tip geometry also exert dominant effects on scratch penetration resistance and damage. Additionally, significant plastic flow and rotation of organoclay layers from the original configuration are observed underneath the sliding indenter

  6. Cat infected by a variant of bat rabies virus in a 29-year disease-free urban area of southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivien Midori Morikawa

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: After 29 years, rabies was detected in a cat in Curitiba, southern Brazil. METHODS: The fluorescent antibody test (FAT and mouse inoculation test (MIT were performed on central nervous system (CNS samples. RESULTS: Direct immunofluorescence was negative, but the biological test was positive and rabies virus was characterized as variant 4 (from Tadarida brasiliensis. CONCLUSIONS: Reappearance of rabies in domestic animals warns of sylvatic-aerial risk of infection and the necessity of monitoring bats in historically rabies-free areas.

  7. Influenza A Virus (H5N1) Infection in Cats Causes Systemic Disease with Potential Novel Routes of Virus Spread within and between Hosts

    OpenAIRE

    Rimmelzwaan, Guus F.; van Riel, Debby; Baars, Marianne; Bestebroer, Theo M.; van Amerongen, Geert; Fouchier, Ron A. M.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Kuiken, Thijs

    2006-01-01

    The ongoing outbreak of avian influenza A virus (subtype H5N1) infection in Asia is of great concern because of the high human case fatality rate and the threat of a new influenza pandemic. Case reports in humans and felids suggest that this virus may have a different tissue tropism from other influenza viruses, which are normally restricted to the respiratory tract in mammals. To study its pathogenesis in a mammalian host, domestic cats were inoculated with H5N1 virus intratracheally (n = 3)...

  8. Adherence and scratching resistance of nanometric titania films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TiO2 films has been used to extend the wear resistance in bearing, seals for pumps and bone prostheses. In this study was analyzed the conventional hardness and scratch toughness. The scratching test equipment used was developed at the Laboratory of materials Labmat / UFSC. The tests were performed on Titania films deposited on glass plates and ceramics via reactive DC magnetron sputtering. The films were deposited by 10, 15 and 60 min. One of the samples has a titanium metal film of a few nanometers thick between the substrate and the Titania film, the oxide has been deposited for 30 min. At this rang of tests loads the deposited films show good adhesion to substrate, there was no cracking or spalling of the film. (author)

  9. The Corynebacterium glutamicum aconitase repressor: scratching around for crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystallization of AcnR, a repressor of the aconitase gene in Corynebacterium glutamicum, is reported. Intentional manual scratching of the crystallization plates was applied to induce heterogeneous nucleation. Imperfections on the surfaces of crystallization containers are known to influence crystal formation and are thought to do so by helping to overcome the nucleation barrier. The intentional creation of imperfections has been widely applied to induce crystallization of small molecules, but has not been reported for protein crystallization. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the TetR-type aconitase repressor are reported. This regulator was the first transcription factor to be identified in the regulation of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in Corynebacterium glutamicum, an organism that is of special industrial interest and is an emerging model organism for Corynebacterineae. Successful crystallization involved introducing manual scratches on the surface of standard commercial plates, which led to a substantial improvement in crystal nucleation and quality

  10. Nanoscale patterning of Si surface using SPM scratching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanolithography of Si surface using scanning probe microscopy (SPM) scratching with a diamond-coated tip was systematically investigated at a low force regime below 9 μN. The groove patterns with controlled width and depth could be achieved by adjusting the applied force, scan direction and the number of scan cycles. There was no effect of scan speed on the groove size. The minimum groove width of 10 nm was obtained on Si surfaces. Furthermore, more complex nanostructures such as line and space patterns of 30 nm pith and dot arrays of 2.6x1010 cm-2 density were realized. SPM scratching with a diamond-coated tip allows nanoscale patterning of Si surfaces to be performed simply

  11. UV/EB cured nanocomposites with scratch and abrasion properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was compare the effect of ultraviolet (UV) and electron beam (EB) on the properties of cured nanocomposites. Surface hardness of the cured materials was increased with the increased number of exposure (radiation doses) until optimum dose was achieved. This was due to the crosslinking during free radical polymerization process. Pendulum hardness, gel content (by soxhlet extraction) and thumb twist results were used to monitor the curing process and to characterize all the coating materials. Optimum dose was derived from the experiment and then was used to cure the coating materials for scratch and abrasion resistance study. It was found that the UV cured products showed excellent abrasion property than EB cured products. For scratch resistance property, EB curing process could provide the solution. (Author)

  12. Utilization of acoustic emission in scratch test evaluation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomáštík, J.; Čtvrtlík, Radim; Boháč, Petr; Dráb, M.; Koula, V.; Cvrk, K.; Jastrabík, Lubomír

    Pfafficon: Trans Tech Publications Ltd, 2015 - (Kovalčíková, A.; Lofaj, F.), s. 119-122 ISBN 978-3-03835-555-7. ISSN 1662-9795. [Conference on Local Mechanical Properties (LMP 2014) /11./. Stará Lesná (SK), 12.11.2014-14.11.2014] R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA03010743 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : acoustic emission * scratch test * thin films Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials

  13. Viscoelastic-Viscoplastic Modelling of the Scratch Response of PMMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kermouche

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at understanding how to model the time-dependent behavior of PMMA during a scratch loading at a constant speed and at middle strain levels. A brief experimental study is first presented, consisting of the analysis of microscratches carried out at various scratching velocities and normal loads. The loading conditions have been chosen in such a way that neither (viscoelasticity nor (viscoplasticity of the PMMA may be neglected a priori. The main analyzed parameter is the tip penetration depth measured during the steady state. Then, a finite element model is used to investigate the potential of classical elastic-viscoplastic constitutive models to reproduce these experimental results. It is mainly shown that these models lead to unsatisfying results. More specifically, it is pointed out here that the time-independent Young modulus used in such models is not suitable. To take into account this feature, a viscoelastic-viscoplastic model based on the connection in series of a viscoelastic part with a viscoplastic part is proposed. It is shown that it leads to more acceptable results, which points out the importance of viscoelasticity in the scratch behavior of solid polymers.

  14. Fat digestibility is reduced in old cats with subnormal cobalamin concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Salas, Anna; Manuelian, Carmen-Loreto; Garganté, Marta; Sanchez, Núria; Fernández, Sonia; Compagnucci, Marco; Cerón, Jose Joaquín; Jeusette, Isabelle; Vilaseca, Lluís; Torre, Celina

    2014-01-01

    Fat digestibility is decreased in old cats for unknown reasons. Subclinical gastrointestinal diseases and pancreatic dysfunction, both related to ageing, can affect food digestibility. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the prevalence of subnormal cobalamin concentration and pancreatic disease in old cats and study the relationship between both markers and fat digestibility. A total of sixty-four cats without evident signs of gastrointestinal disease were included and grouped accor...

  15. [Treatment of inter-specific aggression in cats with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluvoxamine. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprauer, S

    2012-01-01

    The article describes the redirected, inter-specific aggression of a Maine Coon cat, which was principally directed towards the owners. The cat reacted towards different, nonspecific sounds with abrupt aggressive behaviour and injured the victims at this juncture with moderate scratching and biting. Exclusively using behaviour therapy did not achieve the desired result, thus the therapy was supported with pharmaceuticals. The cat orally received the selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor fluvoxamine at an initial dosage of 0.5mg/kg BW once daily. After 4 weeks the application rate was increased to 1.0 mg/kg BW once daily. The medication did not cause any side effects. Together with the behaviour-modulating therapy, carried out parallel to the medication therapy, the aggressive behaviour problem of the cat was resolved. After administration for a period of 63 weeks the fluvoxamine therapy was discontinued by gradually reducing the dose without recurrence of the aggressive behaviour. PMID:23242225

  16. Study of Giardia Infection in Cats

    OpenAIRE

    Zarebavani, M; A Pezeshki; Sh. Jamshidi; M Rezaeian

    2006-01-01

    Giardiasis caused by the intestinal flagellate Giardia duodenalis. It is postulated that animals may be a reservoir for human infection and vice versa, thus, giardiasis classified as a zooanthroponotic disease. Therefore, accurate information about the Giardia infection in animals can help the control and prevention of disease in human. With respect to considerable population of cats in Iran and close relation to human, in the current study we tried to determine the infection rate of Giardia ...

  17. ATYPICAL ANTIPSYCHOTICS FROM SCRATCH TO THE PRESENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Chauhan*, Amit Mittal, Pradeep Kumar Arora

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mental illness constitutes the second-largest disease burden in the United States. Psychosis is one of the most common and severe mental illnesses. It is an extremely devastating condition characterised by delusions, hallucinations, distortion of thoughts and deteriorating social functioning experiences. Psychosis in all human societies has approximately same incidence of occurrence as in accordance to “anthropo-parity principle.” It has large economic impact on various aspects of cognition, health, and quality of life which has devastated effects on its sufferers and facing them large economic burden. Psychosis (Schizophrenia is associated with an imbalance of the dopaminergic system, entailing hyper-stimulation of dopamine function in the brain, particularly in the mesolimbic pathway. Consequences of antipsychotic treatment are far reaching and expensive. Detrimental extrapyramidal side effects associated with conventional antipsychotics and non-compliance among patients limits long term treatment with conventional antipsychotics. It gives rise to a new class, atypical antipsychotics owning low propensity to cause EPS, efficacy against refractory cases and better control over negative symptoms, better tolerance and compliance along with lower relapse rate and safer adverse effect profile. Atypical antipsychotics have revolutionized the treatment of psychosis, now being the treatment of choice for patients with psychosis. The positive therapeutic experience with the atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of psychosis and their favourable effects outweighs their unfavourable adverse effects. Though atypical antipsychotics are widely prescribed in the treatment of schizophrenia, however not a single atypical antipsychotic drug having any exceptional efficacy and safety profile. Thus, there is still a lot of research needed to be carried out in the development of novel atypical antipsychotics. This review is comprehensive appraisal about

  18. Study of the effect on shelter cat intakes and euthanasia from a shelter neuter return project of 10,080 cats from March 2010 to June 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen L. Johnson

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cat impoundments were increasing at the municipal San Jose animal shelter in 2009, despite long-term successful low cost sterilization programs and attempts to lower the euthanasia rate of treatable-rehabilitatable impounds beginning in 2008. San Jose Animal Care and Services implemented a new strategy designed to control overall feral cat reproduction by altering and returning feral cats entering the shelter system, rather than euthanizing the cats. The purpose of this case study was to determine how the program affected the shelter cat intakes over time. In just over four years, 10,080 individual healthy adult feral cats, out of 11,423 impounded at the shelter during this time frame, were altered and returned to their site of capture. Included in the 11,423 cats were 862 cats impounded from one to four additional times for a total of 958 (9.5% recaptures of the previously altered 10,080 cats. The remaining 385 healthy feral cats were euthanized at the shelter from March 2010 to June 2014. Four years into the program, researchers observed cat and kitten impounds decreased 29.1%; euthanasia decreased from over 70% of intakes in 2009, to 23% in 2014. Euthanasia in the shelter for Upper Respiratory Disease decreased 99%; dead cat pick up off the streets declined 20%. Dog impounds did not similarly decline over the four years. No other laws or program changes were implemented since the beginning of the program.

  19. On the combined use of scratch tests and CLA profilometry for the characterization of polyester powder coatings: Influence of scratch load and speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barletta, M.; Gisario, A.; Lusvarghi, L.; Bolelli, G.; Rubino, G.

    2008-09-01

    The prediction of the mechanical properties of polyester powder coatings is of paramount importance, as they have to undergo a wide variety of forces and deformations during their service life. Determine the response of polymeric coatings to the actual loading conditions can be, however, very troublesome as their properties are function of the material physical state, rate-dependence and yield and break behaviour. Further, the characterization of soft, contaminated organic surfaces such as polymers can often cause severe problems with reliability and imaging accuracy due to instrumental artefacts. This is therefore the context in which this paper investigates the capability of multiple parameters scratch tests joined with non-contact CLA profilometry and FE-SEM to detect the scratch response of polyester powder coatings for protective and decorative outdoor applications. Scratch tests with blunt contact geometry were used to evaluate the response of polyester coatings baked at different time-temperature programs and, so, at different stages of their curing process. In particular, being such coatings highly non-linear in their response to mechanical stress or strain, the influence from scratch load and speed was carefully taken into account. Analytical evaluations of the experimental results led to good correlations between the extent of the deformed zone after scratch, scratch parameters and curing operational settings. This allows mapping the scratch response of the polyester topcoats to broad ranges of both scratch parameters and curing conditions.

  20. E-Z-CAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new barium sulphate suspension, E-Z-CAT, for use as an oral contrast medium at computed tomography of the abdomen has been compared with the commonly used water-soluble iodinated contrast medium Gastrografin as regards patient tolerance and diagnostic information. The investigation was conducted as an unpaired randomized single-blind study in 100 consecutive patients. E-Z-CAT seems to be preferred because of its better taste, its lesser tendency to cause diarrhoea, and for usage in patients who are known to be hypersensitive to iodinated contrast media. The diagnostic information was the same for both contrast media. (Auth.)

  1. ServCat Sensitivity Guidelines

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This guide covers sensitivity in ServCat. This document provides technical guidance on how sensitivity fields work in ServCat, and provides suggestions on what...

  2. Scratch-induced microplasticity and microcracking in zirconium diboride-silicon carbide composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A ZrB2-5 wt.%SiC composite, consolidated using the plasma pressure compaction technique, was subjected to scratch loads in the range of 50-250 mN using a Berkovich nanoindenter. Microstructural analysis revealed that the scratch grooves consisted of numerous slip bands oriented at random angles to the scratch direction and microcracks oriented perpendicular to the scratch direction. The observed features were rationalized using an elastic stress field due to the combined Boussinesq- and Cerruti-field solutions. The analysis revealed that maximum shear stress occurs ahead of the scratch tool whereas the maximum principal tensile stress occurs in the wake of the scratch tool. Accordingly, it was argued that the slip bands occurred first in the region ahead of the scratch tool due to maximum shear stress while the microcracks developed later due to maximum tensile stress in the wake of the scratch tool. This result was further confirmed by the existence of slip bands ahead of the scratch tip at the exit end of the scratch grooves

  3. Instrumented indentation and scratch testing evaluation of tribological properties of tin-based bearing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a study of some fundamental tribological behavior of two different tin-based bearing materials using scratch and Martens hardness techniques. The scratch test results obtained from the two different tin-based bearing materials were correlated with a function of scratch hardness and coefficient of friction. It is easily observed that the friction coefficients of WM5 are lower than those of WM2 under all scratch test conditions. Beside this, it is clearly distinguished that both materials give higher friction coefficients at higher normal loads and scratch velocities. Also it is found that scratch hardness values of the WM5 materials are higher than WM2 generally. Moreover, optical microscopy was used to determine the scratch hardness of two different tin-based bearing materials by examining the scratch widths. Scanning electron microscopic observations of two different tin-based bearing materials were performed in order to identify the scratch-deformation mechanisms and trace morphology. Beside scratch tests, Martens hardness tests were carried out to evaluate the indentation of materials by considering both the force and displacement during plastic and elastic deformation. By monitoring the complete cycle of increasing and removal of the test force, hardness values were determined.

  4. Renal leiomyosarcoma in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Dawn; Fowlkes, Natalie

    2016-05-01

    Renal leiomyosarcoma was diagnosed in a 10-year-old Domestic Shorthair cat with a 3-year history of clinically managed, chronic renal disease. Sudden death was preceded by a brief episode of mental dullness and confusion. At postmortem examination, the gross appearance of the left kidney was suggestive of hydronephrosis, and a nephrolith was present in the contralateral kidney. However, histology revealed an infiltrative, poorly differentiated, spindle cell sarcoma bordering the grossly cavitated area. Neoplastic cells were immunoreactive for vimentin and smooth muscle actin, which led to a diagnosis of renal leiomyosarcoma; neoplastic cells were not immunoreactive for desmin. Leiomyosarcoma arising in the kidney is a rare occurrence in humans and an even rarer occurrence in veterinary medicine with no prior cases being reported in cats in the English literature. The macroscopic appearance of the tumor at postmortem examination was misleadingly suggestive of hydronephrosis as a result of the large cavitation and may be similar to particularly unusual cases of renal leiomyosarcomas in humans that have a cystic or cavitated appearance. PMID:26975352

  5. Tracheal collapse in two cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two cats examined bronchoscopically to discover the cause of tracheal collapse were found to have tracheal obstruction cranial to the collapse. Cats with this unusual sign should be examined bronchoscopically to ascertain whether there is an obstruction, as the cause in these 2 cats was distinct from the diffuse airway abnormality that causes tracheal collapse in dogs

  6. Membranous nephropathy in sibling cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, A S; Wright, N G

    1983-08-20

    Membranous nephropathy was diagnosed in two sibling cats from the same household. Both cases presented with the nephrotic syndrome but 33 months elapsed before the second cat became ill, by which time the first cat had been in full clinical remission for over a year. PMID:6623883

  7. Taxonomy Icon Data: domestic cat [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available domestic cat ... Felis silvestris cat us Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/Carnivora Felis ... _silvestris_cat us_L.png Felis_silvestris_cat us_NL.png Felis_silves ... tris_cat us_S.png Felis_silvestris_cat us_NS.png http://biosc ...

  8. Getting a CAT Scan

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... More Quizzes Kids' Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading Back-to-School ... Video) Print A A A Text Size en español Obtención de una tomografía computada (video) CAT stands ...

  9. Chemodectoma in a cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 10-year-old, spayed female, domestic shorthair cat was presented for evaluation of a thoracic mass. Radiographs demonstrated a 4 by 5-cm mass dorsal to the heart. Cytology of specimens obtained by ultrasound-guided needle aspiration was compatible with a neuroendocrine tumor. Scintigraphy, thoracic exploratory, and histology were used to identify the mass as an aortic body chemodectoma

  10. Coxofemoral luxations in cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a retrospective study, 79 untreated luxations of the coxofemoral joint in cats were recorded over a 12-year period. Twenty-nine of these cases were available for follow-up, of which 13 were re-examined clinically and radiologically. It was found that the maximum incidence of the injury occurred from one to three years of age. Follow-up radiographs showed that the cats had developed nearthroses of various degrees located dorsally on the ilium. The degree of nearthrosis formation was not consistently correlated with the length of the observation time. Radiological signs of decreased bone density of the proximal femur may be caused by reduced weightbearing related to changes in biomechanical function and altered blood supply in the luxated limb. Almost two-thirds of the re-examined animals presented some kind of locomotor dysfunction on clinical examination. Limb function improved with time. The best clinical results appeared to be in cats that were immature at the time of injury and developed nearthrosis similar to a normal coxofemoral joint. All the cats available to this study showed acceptable functional results and had a normal level of activity according to the owners

  11. Getting a CAT Scan

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... More Quizzes Kids' Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading Movie: Digestive System ... Video) Print A A A Text Size en español Obtención de una tomografía computada (video) CAT stands ...

  12. The Fishing Cat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙雅飞; 乐伟国

    2008-01-01

    @@ 一、故事内容 A cat goes fishing every day. He wants to eat fish, but he can't catch any fish. One day, he goes to the river as usual. Suddenly, a fish comes out. He catches the fish and putsthe fish in the basket. He's very happy, but he forgest to put the lid on the basket.

  13. Oligopsonistic Cats and Dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Dewit, Dr. Gerda; Leahy, Dr. Dermot

    2005-01-01

    We study the strategic investment behaviour of oligopsonistic rivals in the labour market. Under wage competition, firms play "puppy dog" with productivityaugmenting investment and "fat cat" with supply-enhancing investment. Under employment competition, investing strategically always involves playing "top dog".

  14. Development of a scratch electrode system in high temperature high pressure water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A rapid scratch electrode system in high temperature water has been built. • Repassivation kinetics of Alloy 690 was studied in high temperature water. • The slope of log i(t) vs. 1/Q(t) shows stress corrosion cracking susceptibility. - Abstract: The scratch electrode system in high temperature high pressure (HTHP) water has been built. The design temperature and design pressure of this system are 350 °C and 20 MPa respectively, and the maximum scratch speed is 3.3 m/s. By using this scratch electrode system, the repassivation kinetics of Alloy 690 in high temperature pressurized water with different dissolved hydrogen (DH) at 300 °C is studied. The research results justify that the scratch electrode system is valid and the scratch technique in HTHP water is a new effective and reliable method to study the SCC susceptibility of nuclear materials

  15. Electrochemical response of scratched Alloy 600 in simulated primary water and its influence with hydrogen entry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of scratches on oxidation evolution of Alloy 600 was monitored by EIS in 290℃ simulated primary water. EIS result indicates that oxide film reached a stable condition until 7 days' immersion. The scratched Alloy 600 possessed almost the same evolution of oxide film with plain specimens. Anodic polarization was performed to study combined effect of scratches and changed hydrogen. The anodic current changes of scratched Alloy 600 after hydrogen charging were not the simple superimposition between that of scratched and charged plain Alloy 600. Alloy 600 after scratching was supposed to trap more hydrogen because of introduction of cold work. The trapped hydrogen could accelerate the oxidation by enhancing dissolution of chromium oxides. Thus, the oxides became less protective and anodic current increased considerably over more noble potential range. (author)

  16. The Cat nRules

    CERN Document Server

    Mould, R A

    2004-01-01

    The nRules that are developed in another paper are applied to two versions of the Schrodinger cat experiment. In version I the initially conscious cat is made unconscious by a mechanism that is initiated by a radioactive decay. In version II the initially unconscious cat is awakened by a mechanism that is initiated by a radioactive decay. In both cases an observer is permitted to check the statues of the cat at any time during the experiment. In all cases the nRules correctly and unambiguously predict the conscious experience of the cat and the observer. Keywords: brain states of observer, stochastic choice, state reduction, wave collapse.

  17. Stories from the scratch community: connecting with ideas, interests, and people

    OpenAIRE

    Resnick, Mitchel; Brennan, Karen Ann

    2013-01-01

    This special session aims to provoke discussion about new strategies for engaging young people in computer programming, drawing on experiences of educators and young people using the Scratch programming environment and online communities. The session will combine several different formats, including research presentations and analysis by two members of the team that develops and supports Scratch, short presentations and demonstrations by five educators and young people working with Scratch, a...

  18. Lateralized Scratching in Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes): Evidence of a Functional Asymmetry During Arousal

    OpenAIRE

    Hopkins, William D.; Russell, Jamie L; Freeman, Hani; Reynolds, Elizabeth A. M.; GRIFFIS, CAROLINE; Leavens, David A.

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated laterality in scratching by chimpanzees (n = 89) during socially arousing circumstances. Hand use and the side of the body scratched was recorded during a baseline and experimental condition. In the experimental condition, chimpanzees were shown a video of other conspecifics sharing, fighting over, and consuming a watermelon. Self-touches were categorized as either rubs or scratches. The chimpanzees showed a significant right hand bias for rubbing and also significantly d...

  19. A certified reference material for the scratch test

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobs, R.; Meneve, J.; Dyson, G.; Teer, D. G.; Jennett, N.M.; P Harris; Stebut, J. von; Comte, C.; Feuchter, P.; Cavaleiro, A; Ronkainen, H.; Holmberg, K; Beck, U.; Reiners, G.; Ingelbrecht, C. D.

    2003-01-01

    Adhesion and other mechanical behaviour of coatings is at present routinely tested in industry and research organisations using the scratch test. The test has been the subject of a European Standard prEN 1071-3:2000 established by the European Standards Committee CEN TC184 WG5. A previous European project on the development and validation of test methods for thin hard coatings--FASTE--revealed that uncertainties in the Rockwell C stylus tip shape represent a major source of error for the scra...

  20. A Simple Strategy to Start Domain Ontology from Scratch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Wolff Gersberg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming the usage of Domain Ontology as an educational tool for neophyte students and focusing in a fast and easy way to start Domain Ontology from scratch, the semantics are set aside to identify contexts of concepts (terms to build the ontology. Text Mining, Link Analysis and Graph Analysis create an abstract rough sketch of interactions between terms. This first rough sketch is presented to the expert providing insights into and inspires him to inform or communicate knowledge, through assertive sentences. Those assertive sentences subsidize the creation of the ontology. A web prototype tool to visualize the ontology and retrieve book contents is also presented.

  1. Scratch + ABP, como estrategia para el desarrollo del pensamiento computacional

    OpenAIRE

    R??os Mu????z, Gloria Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Este proyecto plantea una estrategia metodol??gica basada en el uso del programa Scratch1 + A.B.P (aprendizaje basado en problemas), como alternativa para el desarrollo de competencias de pensamiento computacional -- Partiendo del an??lisis del contexto e implementaci??n en la Instituci??n Educativa Gabriel Garc??a M??rquez, ubicada en el barrio Caicedo Villa Lilian, en la ciudad de Medell??n ??? Colombia -- Los resultados del an??lisis del contexto institucional en los grados sexto, indican ...

  2. Genetic testing in domestic cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Leslie A

    2012-12-01

    Varieties of genetic tests are currently available for the domestic cat that support veterinary health care, breed management, species identification, and forensic investigations. Approximately thirty-five genes contain over fifty mutations that cause feline health problems or alterations in the cat's appearance. Specific genes, such as sweet and drug receptors, have been knocked-out of Felidae during evolution and can be used along with mtDNA markers for species identification. Both STR and SNP panels differentiate cat race, breed, and individual identity, as well as gender-specific markers to determine sex of an individual. Cat genetic tests are common offerings for commercial laboratories, allowing both the veterinary clinician and the private owner to obtain DNA test results. This article will review the genetic tests for the domestic cat, and their various applications in different fields of science. Highlighted are genetic tests specific to the individual cat, which are a part of the cat's genome. PMID:22546621

  3. Systematic review of ground reaction force measurements in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabl, E; Bockstahler, B

    2015-10-01

    Although orthopaedic abnormalities in cats are frequently observed radiographically, they remain clinically underdiagnosed, and kinetic motion analysis, a fundamental aspect of orthopaedic research in dogs and horses, is not commonly performed. More information obtained with non-invasive measurement techniques to assess normal and abnormal gait in cats would provide a greater insight into their locomotion and biomechanics and improve the objective measurement of disease alterations and treatment modalities. In this systematic review, 12 previously performed studies that investigated ground reaction force measurements in cats during locomotion were evaluated. The aims of these studies, the measurement methods and equipment used, and the outcomes of parameters used to assess both sound and diseased cats are summarised and discussed. All reviewed studies used pressure sensitive walkways to gain data and all provided an acclimatisation period as a prerequisite for measurements. In sound cats during walking, the forelimb peak vertical force was greater than in the hindlimb and the peak vertical force in the hindlimb was greater in cats than in dogs. This review confirms that ground reaction forces can be used to evaluate lameness and treatment effects in the cat. PMID:26118478

  4. Feline leukaemia virus and its clinical effects in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, L

    1975-01-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) infection is common among cats where contact is high. The virus can be transmitted readily between cats. It causes a variety of haemopoietic and lymphoid neoplasms; the most common types are alimentary, multicentric and thymic lymphosarcoma and lymphatic leukaemia. The virus is involved in the aetiology of certain other diseases including anaemia, glomerulonephritis and an immunosuppressive syndrome which predisposes cats to intercurrent infections. Many infected cats mount an immune response and do not suffer from any of these. The immune status is shown by serum antibody levels to feline leukaemia virus associated cell membrane antigens. Cats with a titre of 32 or more are most unlikely to suffer any ill effects and may eliminate the virus infection. The outcome of infection in an individual cat depends on the immunological competence of the cat, the dose of virus received and its ability to induce immunosuppression. FeLV infection can be detected by examination of tissues by electron microscopy, and by culture of virus from plasma and other tissues. In the United States, a method is now in use for the detection of leukaemia virus antigen in peripheral blood leukocytes; this is carried out on ordinary blood films. Successful prototype vaccines have been developed against FeLV. This paper describes the natural history of the virus, the diseases in which it is implicated and discusses recently developed diagnostic methods. PMID:163515

  5. Scratch resistance anisotropy in biaxially oriented polypropylene and poly(ethylene terephthalate) films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a diamond-tipped stylus, scratch tests were conducted on biaxially oriented polypropylene and poly(ethylene terephthalate) films in the two draw directions, i.e., the machine-direction (MD) and the transverse-direction (TD) along which the draw ratios are different. Atomic force microscopy study of those scratches revealed a significant anisotropy in the scratch resistance between the MD and TD for both of the polymer films. We confirmed that the scratch resistance of polymer strands is closely related to the draw ratios, which determine the mechanical strength and optical clarity of biaxially oriented polymer films

  6. Congenital factor XI deficiency in a domestic shorthair cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troxel, Mark T; Brooks, Marjory B; Esterline, Meredith L

    2002-01-01

    A 6-month-old, female, domestic shorthair cat was examined after onychectomy and ovariohysterectomy because of bleeding from the paws. Prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time was discovered, Coagulation factor analyses revealed deficiency of factor XI coagulant activity. Plasma mixing studies indicated factor deficiency or dysfunction rather than factor inhibition. Feline factor XI deficiency in one adult cat has been previously reported but was attributed to factor XI inhibitors. The signalment, lack of primary disease, and the finding of persistent factor XI deficiency in the absence of coagulation inhibitors were considered compatible with congenital factor XI deficiency in the cat of this report. PMID:12428887

  7. Bartonella and Toxoplasma Infections in Stray Cats from Iraq

    OpenAIRE

    Switzer, Alexandra D.; McMillan-Cole, Audrey C.; Kasten, Rickie W.; Stuckey, Matthew J.; Kass, Philip H.; Chomel, Bruno B.

    2013-01-01

    Because of overpopulation, stray/feral cats were captured on military bases in Iraq as part of the US Army Zoonotic Disease Surveillance Program. Blood samples were collected from 207 cats, mainly in Baghdad but also in North and West Iraq, to determine the prevalence of Bartonella and Toxoplasma infections. Nine (4.3%) cats, all from Baghdad, were bacteremic with B. henselae type I. Seroprevalence was 30.4% for T. gondii, 15% for B. henselae, and 12.6% for B. clarridgeiae. Differences in Bar...

  8. Epidemiology of the eye worm Thelazia callipaeda in cats from southern Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta, B; Nägeli, F; Nägeli, C; Solari-Basano, F; Schiessl, B; Deplazes, P; Schnyder, M

    2014-07-14

    Thelazia callipaeda is a spiruroid nematode of dogs, cats and wild carnivores transmitted by zoophilic drosophilid Phortica flies and found in an increasing number of European countries. In cats the disease is diagnosed sporadically. This study presents an epidemiological investigation of feline thelaziosis, performed in southern Ticino, Switzerland, an endemic area for T. callipaeda. Between January 2009 and July 2011 2171 cats, having outdoor access and presenting for various reasons, were examined by in-depth eye examinations, and clinical and anamnestic data were collected. The overall prevalence of T. callipaeda in the study area was 0.8% (17/2171 cats, 95% confidence interval: 0.5-1.3%). Among cats showing ocular illness, the prevalence was 9.2% (11/120, CI: 4.7-15.8%). Cats with eye worms had no international travel history and were significantly more often diagnosed between June and December than during other months. With one exception, one single eye per cat was infested, each harboring between 1 and 10 eye worms (arithmetic mean: 2.8 per cat). One cat presented with conjunctivitis and ulcers, seven with conjunctivitis only and 3 with a mildly increased lacrimation, while 6 cats were asymptomatic. Significantly more male than female cats had eye worms and cats older than one year were overrepresented. No pure-bred cats were infested. This study confirms the establishment of this potentially zoonotic parasite in cats from the study area. Due to the clinical relevance and pain caused by the infestations, increased disease awareness and in depth eye examination for the detection of T. callipaeda in cats are recommended, even in absence of obvious clinical signs, in order to initiate appropriate anthelmintic treatment. PMID:24810375

  9. The Cheshire Cat revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Vento, V

    1998-01-01

    The concept of effective field theory leads in a natural way to a construction principle for phenomenological sensible models known under the name of the Cheshire Cat Principle. We review its formulation in the chiral bag scenario and discuss its realization for the flavor singlet axial charge. Quantum effects inside the chiral bag induce a color anomaly which requires a compensating surface term to prevent breakdown of color gauge invariance. The presence of this surface term allows one to derive in a gauge-invariant way a chiral-bag version of the Shore-Veneziano two-component formula for the flavor-singlet axial charge of the proton. We show that one can obtain a striking Cheshire-Cat phenomenon with a negligibly small singlet axial charge.

  10. Fifth Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fifth disease is a viral infection caused by parvovirus B19. The virus only infects humans; it's not the same parvovirus that dogs and cats can get. Fifth disease mostly affects children. Symptoms can include a low ...

  11. Diagnosis of pancreatitis in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xenoulis, P G

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatitis is the most common disorder of the exocrine pancreas in both dogs and cats. Ante-mortem diagnosis of canine and feline pancreatitis can be challenging. The clinical picture of dogs and cats with pancreatitis varies greatly (from very mild to severe or even fatal) and is characterised by non-specific findings. Complete blood count, serum biochemistry profile and urinalysis should always be performed in dogs and cats suspected of having pancreatitis, although findings are not-specific for pancreatitis. Serum amylase and lipase activities and trypsin-like immunoreactivity (TLI) concentrations have no or only limited clinical value for the diagnosis of pancreatitis in either dogs or cats. Conversely, serum pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity (PLI) concentration is currently considered to be the clinicopathological test of choice for the diagnosis of canine and feline pancreatitis. Abdominal radiography is a useful diagnostic tool for the exclusion of other diseases that may cause similar clinical signs to those of pancreatitis. Abdominal ultrasonography can be very useful for the diagnosis of pancreatitis, but this depends largely on the clinician's experience. Histopathological examination of the pancreas is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis and classification of pancreatitis, but it is not without limitations. In clinical practice, a combination of careful evaluation of the animal's history, serum PLI concentration and abdominal ultrasonography, together with pancreatic cytology or histopathology when indicated or possible, is considered to be the most practical and reliable means for an accurate diagnosis or exclusion of pancreatitis compared with other diagnostic modalities. PMID:25586803

  12. Adhesion scratch testing - A round-robin experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, A. J.; Valli, J.; Steinmann, P. A.

    1988-01-01

    Six sets of samples, TiN coated by chemical or physical vapor deposition methods (CVD or PVD) onto cemented carbide or high-speed steel (HSS), and TiC coated by CVD onto cemented carbide have been scratch tested using three types of commercially available scratch adhesion tester. With exception of one cemented carbide set, the reproducibility of the critical loads for any given set with a given stylus is excellent, about + or - 5 percent, and is about + or - 20 percent for different styli. Any differences in critical loads recorded for any given sample set can be attributed to the condition of the stylus (clean, new, etc.), the instrument used, the stylus itself (friction coefficient, etc.), and the sample set itself. One CVD set showed remarkably large differences in critical loads for different styli, which is thought to be related to a mechanical interaction between stylus and coating which is enhanced by a plastic deformability in the film related to the coating microstructure. The critical load for TiN on HSS increases with coating thickness, and differences in frictional conditions led to a systematic variation in the critical loads depending on the stylus used.

  13. Subsurface Damage in Scratch Testing of Potassium Dihydrogen Phosphate Crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ben; WU Dongjiang; GAO Hang; KANG Renke; GUO Dongming

    2009-01-01

    Potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) is an important electro-optic crystal, often used for frequency conversion and Pockels cells in large aperture laser systems. To investigate the influence of anisotropy to the depth of subsurface damage and the profiles of cracks in subsurface of KDP crystal, an experimental study was made to obtain the form of subsurface damage produced by scratches on KDP crystal in [100], [120] and [110] crystal directions on (001) crystal plane. The results indicated that there were great differences between depth and crack shape in different directions. For many slip planes in KDP, the plastic deformation and cracks generated under pressure in the subsurfacewerecomplex. Fluctuations of subsurface damage depth at transition point were attributed to the deformation of the surface which consumed more energy when the surface deformation changed from the mixed region of brittle and plastic to the complete brittle region along the scratch. Also, the process of subsurface damage from shallow to deep, from dislocation to big crack in KDP crystal with the increase of radial force and etch pit on different crystal plane were obtained. Because crystallographic orientation and processing orientation was different, etching pits on (100) crystal plane were quadrilateral while on (110) plane and (120) plane were trapezoidal and triangular, respectively.

  14. Luxation of the radial carpal bone in a cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case of radial carpal bone luxation in the cat and its management is described. Open reduction was performed and surgically maintained, in combination with repair of rupture of the short radial collateral ligament and joint capsule. The carpus was supported for one month following surgery by application of transarticular external fixation. Four months after treatment the cat was sound, despite evidence of degenerative joint disease. The mechanism of luxation appears to be analogous to that seen in the dog

  15. Immunomodulatory nutraceuticals with potential clinical use for dogs and cats

    OpenAIRE

    Leandro Zaine; Mariana Monti; Ricardo Souza Vasconcellos; Aulus Cavalieri Carciofi

    2014-01-01

    The use of nutraceuticals in veterinary medicine is growing and is assumed that they could aid in clinical treatment. This review aims to describe some nutraceuticals that act on the immunity of dogs and cats and show the possible benefits as an adjuvant treatment for some diseases. The action of some yeast derivates as immunomodulators, especially the beta-glucan fraction, was already proved to occur in dogs and cats, being beneficial as an adjuvant therapy in many clinical conditions. Omega...

  16. Mucopolysaccharidosis VI in cats - clarification regarding genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Leslie A; Grahn, Robert A; Genova, Francesca; Beccaglia, Michela; Hopwood, John J; Longeri, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The release of new DNA-based diagnostic tools has increased tremendously in companion animals. Over 70 different DNA variants are now known for the cat, including DNA variants in disease-associated genes and genes causing aesthetically interesting traits. The impact genetic tests have on animal breeding and health management is significant because of the ability to control the breeding of domestic cats, especially breed cats. If used properly, genetic testing can prevent the production of diseased animals, causing the reduction of the frequency of the causal variant in the population, and, potentially, the eventual eradication of the disease. However, testing of some identified DNA variants may be unwarranted and cause undo strife within the cat breeding community and unnecessary reduction of gene pools and availability of breeding animals. Testing for mucopolysaccharidosis Type VI (MPS VI) in cats, specifically the genetic testing of the L476P (c.1427T>C) and the D520N (c.1558G>A) variants in arylsulfatase B (ARSB), has come under scrutiny. No health problems are associated with the D520N (c.1558G>A) variant, however, breeders that obtain positive results for this variant are speculating as to possible correlation with health concerns. Birman cats already have a markedly reduced gene pool and have a high frequency of the MPS VI D520N variant. Further reduction of the gene pool by eliminating cats that are heterozygous or homozygous for only the MPS VI D520N variant could lead to more inbreeding depression effects on the breed population. Herein is debated the genetic testing of the MPS VI D520N variant in cats. Surveys from different laboratories suggest the L476P (c.1427T>C) disease-associated variant should be monitored in the cat breed populations, particularly breeds with Siamese derivations and outcrosses. However, the D520N has no evidence of association with disease in cats and testing is not recommended in the absence of L476P genotyping. Selection

  17. Effectiveness of feeding large kibbles with mechanical cleaning properties in cats with gingivitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, HE; Theyse, LFH; van Winkelhoff, AJ; Dijkshoorn, NA; Logan, EI; Picovet, P

    2005-01-01

    Effectiveness of feeding large kibbles with mechanical cleaning properties in cats with gingivitis periodontal disease is the most common acquired oral disease in cats. it starts with plaque accumulation and gingivitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of different types of ki

  18. HEMANGIOMA HEPÁTICO PRIMÁRIO EM GATA PERSA COM DOENÇA RENAL POLICÍSTICA PRIMARY HEPATIC HEMANGIOMA IN PERSIAN CAT WITH POLYCYSTIC KIDNEY DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdemiro Amaro da Silva Júnior

    2008-07-01

    great possibility of the rupture, hipovolemic shock and death. Because of its rarity in felines, the aim of case report was describes a primary hepatic hemangioma in a female Persian cat aged ten which the clinical symptoms initially observed were: abdominal volume increase, intermittent vomiting, apathy, anorexia and irregular ruts. Radiographic exam revealed the presence of radiopaque tissues in the liver. The hepatic ultrasound exhibited irregular shape, heterogeneous and hyperechogenic parenchyma, presenting hollowed areas which suggests neoplasm and cysts. Macroscopically it was observed ascite, hepatic steatosis and a neoplastic mass measuring about 12 x 8 cm, in addition to a considerable number of cysts. Polycystic kidneys and ovaries and cystic endometrial hyperplasia were also noticed. Microscopically was diagnosed in the liver: cysts limited by endothelial cells and delicate capsule of connective tissue, steatosis and periportal mononuclear linfocitary hepatitis with biliar ducts proliferation. The tumoral mass rose from the hepatic capsule of the conjunctive tissue. It was characterized by vascular sprouts originated from the endothelial cells with anastomosis and vessels expansion begin on superficial areas. Primary hepatic hemangioma cavernous/capillary was diagnosed. PD was diagnosed in ovarian, uterine and renal tissue.

    KEY WORDS: Cat, liver, vascular tumor.

  19. Feline infectious peritonitis with neurologic involvement: clinical and pathological findings in 24 cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The medical records of 24 cats with histopathologically diagnosed feline infectious peritonitis involving the nervous system were reviewed. Seventeen cats had historical, clinical, and pathological findings of systemic disease. Twelve cats had focal signs of central nervous system dysfunction. Twelve cats had multifocal signs including seizures, nystagmus, head tilt, vestibular or cerebellar ataxia, paresis, and proprioceptive loss with a preponderance of caudal fossa signs. Computed tomography of the brain revealed hydrocephalus in two cats. Examination of cerebrospinal fluid revealed pyogranulomatous pleocytosis in fivecats; the tap was nonproductive in five cats. Findings on histopathological examination of appropriate tissues included nephritis, hepatitis, and pleuritis. Neuropathological findings included ependymitis, choroid plexitis, meningitis, encephalitis, and myelitis. Hydrocephalus was seen in 18 cats on necropsy

  20. Local cloning of CAT states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this Letter we analyze the (im)possibility of the exact cloning of orthogonal three-qubit CAT states under local operation and classical communication (LOCC) with the help of a restricted entangled state. We also classify the three-qubit CAT states that can (not) be cloned under LOCC restrictions and extend the results to the n-qubit case. -- Highlights: → We analyze the (im)possibility of exact cloning of orthogonal CAT states under LOCC. → We also classify the set of CAT states that can(not) be cloned by LOCC. → No set of orthogonal CAT states can be cloned by LOCC with help of similar CAT state. → Any two orthogonal n-qubit GHZ-states can be cloned by LOCC with help of a GHZ state.

  1. Changes in renal function in cats following treatment of hyperthyroidism using 131I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, W H; Daniel, G B; Legendre, A M; Gompf, R E; Grove, C A

    1997-01-01

    BUN, serum creatinine, and urine specific gravity values. It was concluded that significant declines in renal function occur after treatment of hyperthyroidism and this decline is clinically important in cats with renal disease. Pretreatment measurement of GFR is valuable in detecting subclinical renal disease and in predicting which cats may have clinically important declines in renal function following treatment. PMID:9238796

  2. Genetic susceptibility to feline infectious peritonitis in Birman cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovko, Lyudmila; Lyons, Leslie A; Liu, Hongwei; Sørensen, Anne; Wehnert, Suzanne; Pedersen, Niels C

    2013-07-01

    Genetic factors are presumed to influence the incidence of feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), especially among pedigreed cats. However, proof for the existence of such factors has been limited and mainly anecdotal. Therefore, we sought evidence for genetic susceptibility to FIP using feline high density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays in a genome-wide association study (GWAS). Birman cats were chosen for GWAS because they are highly inbred and suffer a high incidence of FIP. DNA from 38 Birman cats that died of FIP and 161 healthy cats from breeders in Denmark and USA were selected for genotyping using 63K SNPs distributed across the feline genome. Danish and American Birman cats were closely related and the populations were therefore combined and analyzed in two manners: (1) all cases (FIP) vs. all controls (healthy) regardless of age, and (2) cases 1½ years of age and younger (most susceptible) vs. controls 2 years of age and older (most resistant). GWAS of the second cohort was most productive in identifying significant genome-wide associations between case and control cats. Four peaks of association with FIP susceptibility were identified, with two being identified on both analyses. Five candidate genes ELMO1, RRAGA, TNFSF10, ERAP1 and ERAP2, all relevant to what is known about FIP virus pathogenesis, were identified but no single association was fully concordant with the disease phenotype. Difficulties in doing GWAS in cats and interrogating complex genetic traits were discussed. PMID:23619280

  3. Hypereosinophilic syndrome in two cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Yoshinori; Matsuura, Shinobu; Fujino, Yasuhito; Nakajima, Mayumi; Takahashi, Masashi; Nakashima, Ko; Sakai, Yusuke; Uetsuka, Koji; Ohno, Koichi; Nakayama, Hiroyuki; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2008-10-01

    Two cats showing chronic vomiting, diarrhea and weight loss were found to have leukocytosis with marked eosinophilia. Both cats were diagnosed with hypereosinophilic syndrome by the findings of increased eosinophils and their precursors in the bone marrow, eosinophilic infiltration into multiple organs, and exclusion of other causes for eosinophilia. Although cytoreductive chemotherapy with hydroxycarbamide and prednisolone was performed, these two cats died 48 days and 91 days after the initial presentation. PMID:18981665

  4. Effects of Annotations and Homework on Learning Achievement: An Empirical Study of Scratch Programming Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Addison Y. S.; Huang, Chester S. J.; Yang, Stephen J. H.; Ding, T. J.; Hsieh, Y. Z.

    2015-01-01

    In Taiwan elementary schools, Scratch programming has been taught for more than four years. Previous studies have shown that personal annotations is a useful learning method that improve learning performance. An annotation-based Scratch programming (ASP) system provides for the creation, share, and review of annotations and homework solutions in…

  5. Using Scratch: An Integrated Problem-Solving Approach to Mathematical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, Nigel

    2010-01-01

    "Scratch" is a media-rich digital environment that utilises a building block command structure to manipulate graphic, audio, and video aspects. It incorporates elements of Logo including "tinkerability" in the programming process. In "Scratch" students use geometric and measurement concepts such as coordinates, angle, and length measurements. It…

  6. Determination of the Effusivity of Different Scratched Coaxial Temperature Sensors Under Hypersonic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, H. A.; Salleh, H.; Yusoff, M. Z.

    2010-12-01

    This paper presents an experimental method for determining the effusivity values of different scratched coaxial temperature sensors. These sensors have a response time on the order of microseconds (50 μs) with a rise time of less than 0.3 μs. Two types of scratch were used, mainly abrasive papers with different grit sizes and scalpel blades with different thicknesses to form the sensor junctions. The effect of the scratch technique on the sensor's effusivity is also investigated. The sensors were tested and calibrated in the test section of a shock-tube facility at different operating conditions. It was observed that the effusivity of a particular sensor depends on the Mach number, scratch technique, scratch direction, junction location, as well as on the enthalpy condition. It was also noticed that a scratched sensor using the scalpel blade technique does not require an individual calibration. However, for a sensor scratched using the abrasive paper technique, a calibration for each sensor is likely to be required. The present results have provided useful and practical data of the effusivity values for different scratched temperature sensors. These data are beneficial to experimentalists in the field, and can be used for accurate transient heat transfer rate measurements.

  7. A method for predicting critical load evaluating adhesion of coatings in scratch testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xi-fang(陈溪芳); YAN Mi(严密); YANG De-ren(杨德人); HIROSE Yukio

    2003-01-01

    In this paper based on the experiment principle of evaluating adhesion property by scratch testing, the peeling mechanism of thin films is discussed by applying contact theory and surface physics theory. A mathematical model predicting the critical load is proposed for calculating critical load as determined by scratch testing. The factors for correctly evaluating adhesion of coatings according to the experimental data are discussed.

  8. The Cat nRules

    OpenAIRE

    Mould, Richard A

    2004-01-01

    The nRules that are developed in another paper are applied to two versions of the Schrodinger cat experiment. In version I the initially conscious cat is made unconscious by a mechanism that is initiated by a radioactive decay. In version II the initially unconscious cat is awakened by a mechanism that is initiated by a radioactive decay. In both cases an observer is permitted to check the statues of the cat at any time during the experiment. In all cases the nRules correctly and unambiguousl...

  9. Characterization of scratches on fused silica optics and a way to remove them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormont, P.; Corbineau, T.; Gallais, Laurent; Hecquet, C.; Lamaignère, Laurent; Rullier, J. L.

    2012-11-01

    Various scratches on fused silica optics after polishing have been characterized with confocal microscopy and then tested with nanosecond UV laser. Scratches are identified as a major contributor to laser damage even if they are only a few micrometers wide. We propose a process in order to remove these scratches whose depth ranges from 2 to 16 μm. We use a CO2 laser to heat the scratched areas at high temperature which will heal fractures due to viscous flow. The characterizations were completed by laser damage tests that finally prove the effectiveness of the repair. We conclude also that this repair process proves to be fast, localized to the scratch and clean because no debris are generated.

  10. Influence of mechanical scratch on the recorded magnetization stability of perpendicular recording media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stability of recorded magnetization of hard disk drives (HDDs) is influenced by external environments, such as temperature, magnetic field, etc. Small scratches are frequently formed on HDD medium surface upon contacts with the magnetic head. Influence of temperature and mechanical scratch on the magnetization structure stability of perpendicular recording media was investigated by using a magnetic force microscope. The magnetic bit shape started to change at around 300 0C for an area with no scratches, whereas for the area near a shallow mechanical scratch it started to change at a lower temperature around 250 0C. An analysis of magnetization structure under an influence of temperature and mechanical scratch is carried out for the magnetization structure variation and recorded magnetization strength.

  11. Characterization of scratches on fused silica optics and a way to remove them

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various scratches on fused silica optics after polishing have been characterized with confocal microscopy and then tested with nanosecond UV laser. Scratches are identified as a major contributor to laser damage even if they are only a few micrometers wide. We propose a process in order to remove these scratches whose depth ranges from 2 to 16 μm. We use a CO2- laser to heat the scratched areas at high temperature which will heal fractures due to viscous flow. The characterizations were completed by laser damage tests that finally prove the effectiveness of the repair. We conclude also that this repair process proves to be fast, localized to the scratch and clean because no debris are generated. (authors)

  12. cats and dogs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    颜玉秀

    2003-01-01

    有这样一则英语成语:“To rain cats anddogs.”如果望文生义,则会被译为“下猫下狗”,因而会弄出许多笑话来,这应当是值得引以为戒的。其实这句成语的真正含义是:“下倾盆大雨”。那么下雨为什么会与cats和dogs联系在一起呢?

  13. Simulation of SU-8 frequency-driven scratch drive actuators

    KAUST Repository

    Conchouso, David

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents the simulation of Scratch Drive Actuators (SDAs) for micro-robotic applications. SDAs use electrostatic forces to generate motion on top of an interdigitated electrode array. The purpose of this investigation is to evaluate several design geometries and micro-actuator configurations using ConventorWare®\\'s finite element analysis module. The study performed investigates the SDAs modal and electrostatic behavior and the effects of linking two or more SDAs together in a microrobot device. In addition, the interdigitated electrode array performance, used for power delivery, was studied by changing the thickness of its dielectric layer. We present our observations based on these studies, which will aid in the understanding and development of future SDA designs. © 2013 IEEE.

  14. Development of untethered SU-8 polymer scratch drive microrobots

    KAUST Repository

    Valencia, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the design, simulation, fabrication and testing of novel, untethered SU-8 polymer microrobots based on scratch drive actuators (SDAs). The design consists of two 100×120×10μm linked SDAs, individually operated close to their resonant frequencies. The resonant frequency and deflection behavior of an individual SDA can be controlled by its shape, thickness, and stiffening design features. As a result, paired SDAs can be actuated individually or simultaneously by a multifrequency driving signal, allowing for two-dimensional displacement. The fabrication process uses SU-8 as structural material and PMGI as sacrificial material. The SU-8 provides a flexible material for the SDA\\'s plates as well as the bushing. Finally, a Cr/Au layer is blanket deposited to provide electrical conductivity.

  15. The Corynebacterium glutamicum aconitase repressor: scratching around for crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Nafría, Javier; Baumgart, Meike; Bott, Michael; Wilkinson, Anthony J.; Wilson, Keith S.

    2010-01-01

    Imperfections on the surfaces of crystallization containers are known to influence crystal formation and are thought to do so by helping to overcome the nucleation barrier. The intentional creation of imperfections has been widely applied to induce crystallization of small molecules, but has not been reported for protein crystallization. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the TetR-type aconitase repressor are reported. This regulator was the first transcription factor to be identified in the regulation of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in Corynebacterium glutamicum, an organism that is of special industrial interest and is an emerging model organism for Corynebacterineae. Successful crystallization involved introducing manual scratches on the surface of standard commercial plates, which led to a substantial improvement in crystal nucleation and quality. PMID:20823530

  16. Optically transparent, scratch-resistant, diamond-like carbon coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiao-Ming; Lee, Deok-Hyung; Nastasi, Michael A.; Walter, Kevin C.; Tuszewski, Michel G.

    2003-06-03

    A plasma-based method for the deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings is described. The process uses a radio-frequency inductively coupled discharge to generate a plasma at relatively low gas pressures. The deposition process is environmentally friendly and scaleable to large areas, and components that have geometrically complicated surfaces can be processed. The method has been used to deposit adherent 100-400 nm thick DLC coatings on metals, glass, and polymers. These coatings are between three and four times harder than steel and are therefore scratch resistant, and transparent to visible light. Boron and silicon doping of the DLC coatings have produced coatings having improved optical properties and lower coating stress levels, but with slightly lower hardness.

  17. Standardization of a Volumetric Displacement Measurement for Two-Body Abrasion Scratch Test Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, K. W. Jr.; Kobrick, R. L.; Klaus, D. M.

    2011-01-01

    A limitation has been identified in the existing test standards used for making controlled, two-body abrasion scratch measurements based solely on the width of the resultant score on the surface of the material. A new, more robust method is proposed for analyzing a surface scratch that takes into account the full three-dimensional profile of the displaced material. To accomplish this, a set of four volume- displacement metrics was systematically defined by normalizing the overall surface profile to denote statistically the area of relevance, termed the Zone of Interaction. From this baseline, depth of the trough and height of the plowed material are factored into the overall deformation assessment. Proof-of-concept data were collected and analyzed to demonstrate the performance of this proposed methodology. This technique takes advantage of advanced imaging capabilities that allow resolution of the scratched surface to be quantified in greater detail than was previously achievable. When reviewing existing data analysis techniques for conducting two-body abrasive scratch tests, it was found that the ASTM International Standard G 171 specified a generic metric based only on visually determined scratch width as a way to compare abraded materials. A limitation to this method was identified in that the scratch width is based on optical surface measurements, manually defined by approximating the boundaries, but does not consider the three-dimensional volume of material that was displaced. With large, potentially irregular deformations occurring on softer materials, it becomes unclear where to systematically determine the scratch width. Specifically, surface scratches on different samples may look the same from a top view, resulting in an identical scratch width measurement, but may vary in actual penetration depth and/or plowing deformation. Therefore, two different scratch profiles would be measured as having identical abrasion properties, although they differ

  18. EzCatDB: M00143 [EzCatDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://ezcatdb.cbrc.jp/EzCatDB/search/get.do?dbcode=M00143 EzCatDB M00143 0) { response = "?" + ... 1995 Volume 34 Pages 955-64 Authors Mimeault M, De Lean ... A, Lafleur M, Bonenfant D, Fournier A Title Evalua ...

  19. Feasibility of radial and circumferential strain analysis using 2D speckle tracking echocardiography in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Hiroshi; Isogai, Tomomi; Aoki, Takuma; Wakao, Yoshito; Fujii, Yoko

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate the feasibility of strain analysis using speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) in cats and to evaluate STE variables in cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Sixteen clinically healthy cats and 17 cats with HCM were used. Radial and circumferential strain and strain rate variables in healthy cats were measured using STE to assess the feasibility. Comparisons of global strain and strain variables between healthy cats and cats with HCM were performed. Segmental assessments of left ventricle (LV) wall for strain and strain rate variables in cats with HCM were also performed. As a result, technically adequate images were obtained in 97.6% of the segments for STE analysis. Sedation using buprenorphine and acepromazine did not affect any global strain nor strain rate variable. In LV segments of cats with HCM, reduced segmental radial strain and strain rate variables had significantly related with segmental LV hypertrophy. It is concluded that STE analysis using short axis images of LV appeared to be clinically feasible in cats, having the possibility to be useful for detecting myocardial dysfunctions in cats with diseased heart. PMID:25373881

  20. Granulomatous disease in the head and neck: developing a differential diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwawka, O Kenechi; Nadgir, Rohini; Fujita, Akifumi; Sakai, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    Granulomatous diseases have a varied etiology that includes autoimmune, infectious, idiopathic, and hereditary causes. The unifying factor in these diseases is the formation of granulomas, which histologically are mononuclear inflammatory cells or macrophages surrounded by lymphocytes. Granulomatous diseases often have systemic manifestations that affect organs throughout the body. Granulomatous diseases with head and neck manifestations include granulomatosis with polyangiitis, Churg-Strauss syndrome, Behçet disease, chronic granulomatous disease, and sarcoidosis. Infectious causes include tuberculosis, cat-scratch disease, syphilis, leprosy, actinomycosis, rhinoscleroma, and fungal infections. In the head and neck, granulomatous disease may affect the orbits, sinonasal cavities, salivary glands, aerodigestive tract, temporal bone, or skull base. Imaging findings include sinonasal opacification, ocular and other soft-tissue masses, osseous erosion, airway narrowing, lymphadenopathy, and salivary gland infiltration. Vascular involvement may also be evident, with displacement, narrowing, or occlusion of arteries and veins. Some radiologic findings of granulomatous processes have a considerable overlap with findings of malignancy, and a radiologic differential diagnosis inclusive of both is critical to avoid incorrect clinical treatment. Without the benefit of a prior clinical diagnosis, laboratory findings, or suggestive clinical signs and symptoms, granulomatous diseases may be difficult to differentiate radiologically. Although individual granulomatous diseases may have overlapping findings at imaging, certain radiologic findings should prompt the inclusion of granulomatous diseases in the differential diagnosis, thus facilitating appropriate clinical management. PMID:25208278

  1. Allium species poisoning in dogs and cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BS Salgado

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dogs and cats are the animals that owners most frequently seek assistance for potential poisonings, and these species are frequently involved with toxicoses due to ingestion of poisonous food. Feeding human foodstuff to pets may prove itself dangerous for their health, similarly to what is observed in Allium species toxicosis. Allium species toxicosis is reported worldwide in several animal species, and the toxic principles present in them causes the transformation of hemoglobin into methemoglobin, consequently resulting in hemolytic anemia with Heinz body formation. The aim of this review is to analyze the clinicopathologic aspects and therapeutic approach of this serious toxicosis of dogs and cats in order to give knowledge to veterinarians about Allium species toxicosis, and subsequently allow them to correctly diagnose this disease when facing it; and to educate pet owners to not feed their animals with Allium-containg food in order to better control this particular life-threatening toxicosis.

  2. Toxoplasmosis: An Important Message for Cat Owners

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... role do cats play in the spread of toxoplasmosis? Cats get Toxoplasma infection by eating infected rodents, ... an infected cat may have defecated. What is toxoplasmosis? Toxoplasmosis is an infection caused by a microscopic ...

  3. Accelerator programme at CAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Accelerator Programme at the Centre for Advanced Technology (CAT), Indore, has very broad based concept under which all types of accelerators are to be taken up for design and fabrication. This centre will be housing a wide variety of accelerators to serve as a common facility for the universities, national laboratories in addition to laboratories under the Department of Atomic Energy. In the first phase of the programme, a series of electron accelerators are designed and fabricated. They are synchrotron radiation sources of 450 MeV (INDUS-I) and of 2 GeV (INDUS-II), microtron upto energy of 20 MeV, linear accelerator upto 20 MeV, and DC Accelerator for industrial irradiation upto 750 KeV and 20 KW. A proton accelerator of 300 MeV with 20 MeV linac injector is also designed. CAT is also developing a strong base for support technologies like ultra high vacuum, radio frequency and microwaves, DC pulsed and superconducting magnets, power supplies and controls etc. These technologies are very useful for other industrial applications also. To develop user groups to utilise INDUS-II synchrotron radiation source, a batch production of rotating Anode X-ray generators with power supplies has been initiated. So also, the sputter ion pumps, electron guns, turbo molecular pumps are brought into batch production. (author)

  4. Population Ecology of Free-Roaming Cats and Interference Competition by Coyotes in Urban Parks

    OpenAIRE

    Gehrt, Stanley D.; Evan C Wilson; Brown, Justin L.; Chris Anchor

    2013-01-01

    Free-roaming cats are a common element of urban landscapes worldwide, often causing controversy regarding their impacts on ecological systems and public health. We monitored cats within natural habitat fragments in the Chicago metropolitan area to characterize population demographics, disease prevalence, movement patterns and habitat selection, in addition to assessing the possible influence of coyotes on cats. The population was dominated by adults of both sexes, and 24% of adults were in re...

  5. Frequency of Piroplasms Babesia microti and Cytauxzoon felis in Stray Cats from Northern Italy

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Emerging diseases caused by piroplasms pose a health risk for man and other animals, and domestic cats have been proposed as potential reservoirs for some piroplasm infections. The aim of this study was to identify the frequency of the piroplasms Babesia microti and Cytauxzoon felis in stray cats from northern Italy and to identify possible risk factors associated with these infections. Blood samples from 260 stray cats enrolled in a trap-neuter-release (TNR) program in northern Italy were ex...

  6. Efficacy of secnidazole in the treatment of giardiasis in a cat

    OpenAIRE

    Sevgisunar, Necmettin Sarp; Şahinduran, Şima; Adanır, Ramazan

    2013-01-01

    A 6 month old, 2-kg, female cat was referred to the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Mehmet Akif Ersoy in Burdur province with bloody diarrhea and dehydration. The cat had a history of more than 1 week of disease. Faecal sample was taken for parasitological examinations and analyzed by zinc sulfate (%33 ZnSO4) centrifugal flotation and native techniques. Giardia duodenalis (G. lamblia) cysts and trophozoits were detected from cat faeces...

  7. Are Cats and Dogs the Major Source of Endotoxin in Homes?

    OpenAIRE

    Ownby, Dennis R.; Peterson, Edward L.; Wegienka, Ganesa; Woodcroft, Kimberley J.; Nicholas, Charlotte; Zoratti, Edward; Johnson, Christine C.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that exposure to cats and dogs during early childhood reduces the risk of allergic disease, possibly by increasing home endotoxin exposure. This study asked the question of whether cats and dogs are the dominant influence on dust endotoxin concentrations in homes after considering other variables reportedly associated with endotoxin. The presence of cats or dogs in homes, household and home characteristics, and dust endotoxin concentrations from 5 locations wer...

  8. CONTRACT ADMINISTRATIVE TRACKING SYSTEM (CATS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Contract Administrative Tracking System (CATS) was developed in response to an ORD NHEERL, Mid-Continent Ecology Division (MED)-recognized need for an automated tracking and retrieval system for Cost Reimbursable Level of Effort (CR/LOE) Contracts. CATS is an Oracle-based app...

  9. College Students and Their Cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Lawrence; Alexander, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-two Siamese and 32 mixed breed cats' personalities were rated by their respective college student owners and compared. Further, the owners' self rated personality traits were correlated with the pets'; significant Siamese and Mixed differences and correlations were obtained. These are the first data to examine breed of cat on a personality…

  10. [Glomerulonephritis in dogs and cats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinacher, M; Frese, K

    1991-04-01

    Immunohistology and special staining of plastic sections allow diagnosis and differentiation of subtypes of glomerulonephritis in dogs. Frequency and clinical importance of these forms of glomerulonephritis vary significantly. In cats, glomerulonephritis occurs frequently in FIV-positive cats but is rare in animals suffering from persistent FeLV infection or FIP. PMID:2068715

  11. Peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia in cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia in a cat is often an incidental finding on a routine thoracic or abdominal radiograph. Clinical signs are nonspecific-usually respiratory (dyspnea) or gastrointestinal(vomiting or diarrhea). Some of the cats with this anomaly are asymptomatic. The physical examination may be normal: muffled heart sounds are the most common abnormality noted during a physical examination. Cats of many breeds are affected, although 26% of reported cases were inPersians. Age of the cat at diagnosis ranged from 6 days to 14 years. Thirty of the 52 reported cases were in females. Diagnostic studies used to confirm the diagnosis included echocardiography, upper gastrointestinal study, ultrasonography, angiography, positive-contrast peritoneography, and laparotomy. Surgical correction was reportedly successful in 22 of 25 cats

  12. Medical treatment of neuro diseases of dogs and cats / Fármacos utilizados no tratamento das afecções neurológicas de cães e gatos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Cassimiro da Costa

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A revision of the current literature regarding medical management of neurological diseases of dogs and cats is presented. The indications, doses, and duration of the recommended treatment of several medications are reviewed. The authors have reviewed analgesic, antibiotic, anticonvulsants, barbiturates, anticolinesterasics, antifungals, antifibrinolytics, steroidal and non-steroidal antiinflammatory, antineoplastics, antipsychotics, anxiolytics, antidepressants, free radical scavengers, diuretics, drugs used in the treatment of micturition disorders, phytotherapeutics, nutraceuticals, muscle relaxant and vitamins.Este trabalho compreende uma revisão da literatura, dos diferentes fármacos utilizados na terapêutica das afecções neurológicas de cães e gatos, assim como sua indicação, dosagens, e duração do tratamento. Nesse contexto incluíram-se analgésicos, antibióticos, anticonvulsivantes, barbitúricos, anticolinesterásicos, antifúngicos, antifibrinolíticos, antiinflamatórios esteróides e não esteróides, antineoplásicos, antipsicóticos, ansiolíticos, antidepressivos, antioxidantes e varredores de radicais livres, diuréticos, fármacos utilizados nos distúrbios da micção, fitoterápicos, modificadores do metabolismo articular (nutracêuticos, relaxantes musculares e vitaminas.

  13. Evaluation of the scratch collapse test for the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makanji, H S; Becker, S J E; Mudgal, C S; Jupiter, J B; Ring, D

    2014-02-01

    This prospective study measured and compared the diagnostic performance characteristics of various clinical signs and physical examination manoeuvres for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), including the scratch collapse test. Eighty-eight adult patients that were prescribed electrophysiological testing to diagnose CTS were enrolled in the study. Attending surgeons documented symptoms and results of standard clinical manoeuvres. The scratch collapse test had a sensitivity of 31%, which was significantly lower than the sensitivity of Phalen's test (67%), Durkan's test (77%), Tinel's test (43%), CTS-6 lax (88%), and CTS-6 stringent (54%). The scratch test had a specificity of 61%, which was significantly lower than the specificity of thenar atrophy (96%) and significantly higher than the specificity of Durkan's test (18%) and CTS-6 lax (13%). The sensitivity of the scratch collapse test was not superior to other clinical signs and physical examination manoeuvers for CTS, and the specificity of the scratch collapse test was superior to that of Durkan's test and CTS-6 lax. Further studies should seek to limit the influence of a patient's clinical presentation on scratch test performance and assess the scratch test's inter-rater reliability. PMID:23855039

  14. Chloroquine-induced scratching is mediated by NO/cGMP pathway in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroutan, Arash; Haddadi, Nazgol Sadat; Ostadhadi, Sattar; Sistany, Narges; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2015-07-01

    Chloroquine (CQ), a 4-aminoquinoline drug, has long been used in the treatment and prevention of malaria. However its side effect generalized pruritus contributes to treatment failures, and consequently results in the development of chloroquine resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum. It was proposed that the administration of CQ correlated with increase in nitric oxide (NO) production. Nitric oxide is involved in some pruritic disorders such as atopic dermatitis, psoriasis and scratching behavior evoked by pruritogens like substance P. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of NO/cGMP pathway in CQ-induced scratching in mice. Scratching behaviors were recorded by a camera after intradermal (ID) injection of CQ in the shaved rostral back of the mice. The results obtained show that CQ elicited scratching in a dose-dependent manner with a peak effective dose of 400μg/site. Injection of non-specific NOS inhibitor, N-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester or neuronal NOS selective inhibitor and 7-nitroindazole, reduced CQ-induced scratching significantly. On the other hand, administration of aminoguanidine as inducible NOS inhibitor has no inhibitory effect on this behavior. Also, injection of l-arginine as a precursor of NO significantly increased this response. Conversely, accumulation of cGMP by sildenafil as a selective phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor, potentiated the scratching behavior by CQ. This study therefore shows that CQ-induced scratching behavior is mediated by the NO/cGMP pathway. PMID:25957523

  15. Validation of Proposed Metrics for Two-Body Abrasion Scratch Test Analysis Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobrick, Ryan L.; Klaus, David M.; Street, Kenneth W., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate a set of standardized metrics proposed for characterizing a surface that has been scratched from a two-body abrasion test. This is achieved by defining a new abrasion region termed Zone of Interaction (ZOI). The ZOI describes the full surface profile of all peaks and valleys, rather than just measuring a scratch width as currently defined by the ASTM G 171 Standard. The ZOI has been found to be at least twice the size of a standard width measurement, in some cases considerably greater, indicating that at least half of the disturbed surface area would be neglected without this insight. The ZOI is used to calculate a more robust data set of volume measurements that can be used to computationally reconstruct a resultant profile for detailed analysis. Documenting additional changes to various surface roughness parameters also allows key material attributes of importance to ultimate design applications to be quantified, such as depth of penetration and final abraded surface roughness. Data are presented to show that different combinations of scratch tips and abraded materials can actually yield the same scratch width, but result in different volume displacement or removal measurements and therefore, the ZOI method is more discriminating than the ASTM method scratch width. Furthermore, by investigating the use of custom scratch tips for our specific needs, the usefulness of having an abrasion metric that can measure the displaced volume in this standardized manner, and not just by scratch width alone, is reinforced. This benefit is made apparent when a tip creates an intricate contour having multiple peaks and valleys within a single scratch. This work lays the foundation for updating scratch measurement standards to improve modeling and characterization of three-body abrasion test results.

  16. Radiographic patterns of pulmonary metastasis in 25 cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoracic radiographs of 25 cats with pulmonary metastatic disease and confirmed primary tumors were reviewed retrospectively. Pulmonary patterns of metastasis were divided into three categories, described as well-defined interstitial nodules, ill-defined interstitial nodules or a diffuse pulmonary pattern. The latter consisted of an alveolar pattern with or without ill-defined pulmonary nodules and/or pleural effusion. More cats presented with pulmonary metastatic disease in the category of either ill-defined nodules (n = 10) or a diffuse pattern (n = 7). Within this group, the most commonly represented primary tumor was mammary gland adenocarcinoma

  17. Like herding cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller-Smith, P

    1997-12-01

    In an effort to be a good manager, it is easy to lose sight of the fact that knowledge workers require a unique approach from their manager. Because nurses are independent and capable individuals that prosper in an environment that recognizes them as knowledge workers, nurse managers often find that traditional management techniques are not sufficient. Trying to manage all of the nurses on a unit as a single group is much like trying to herd cats. It might be less frustrating for the nurse manager to lead gently rather than manage with a firm hand. Warren Bennis suggests that this approach may provide a valuable key to successfully managing in a world of constant change. PMID:9464034

  18. Material Removal and Specific Energy in the Dynamic Scratching of Gamma Titanium Aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, H.; Lin, H.-T.; Wereszczak, A.A.

    2006-11-30

    Mechanical responses of three gamma titanium aluminides (TiAls) (denoted as Alloy A, Alloy B and Alloy C) subjected to dynamic scratching were studied by using a single-grit pendulum (rotating) scratch tester. The maximum depth of groove was {approx} 0.07 mm, and the scratch velocity was {approx} 1.0 m/s. Normal and tangential forces were monitored. The material removal mechanisms were examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the scratches were measured by using a laser profilometer. The mechanical properties of the tested TiAls were characterized by the instantaneous specific energy, scratch resistance and scratch hardness as related to the groove depth. Extensive thermal softening was observed in the dynamic scratch test of the TiAls, which facilitated both the detachment of developing chips and pile-up of material on side ridges. Sizable fractures were observed in the transverse direction in the tested TiAls; these fractures tended to participate in the chip formation, depending on the microstructure of the TiAl and the size of the scratch groove. Specific energy and scratch hardness are depth-dependent to various degrees for the TiAls tested. The material removal might be subjected to different mechanisms, but the overall material response can be effectively characterized by the HEM (Hwang, Evans and Malkin) model and the PSR (proportional specimen resistance) model. The depth-independent specific energy and scratch hardness can be used to screen candidate materials for the applications that are scratch-dominated versus impact-dominated. Among the three tested TiAls, the TiAl with larger colony or grain size exhibits a stronger capability of energy dissipation during material removal (higher depth-independent specific energy), while the TiAl with smaller colony size shows a higher resistance to indentation (higher depth-independent scratch hardness). The observations and conclusions in this study can serve as a base line for the further

  19. Material Removal and Specific Energy in the Dynamic Scratching of Gamma Titanium Aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hong [ORNL; Lin, Hua-Tay [ORNL; Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL

    2006-11-01

    Mechanical responses of three gamma titanium aluminides (TiAls) (denoted as Alloy A, Alloy B and Alloy C) subjected to dynamic scratching were studied by using a single-grit pendulum (rotating) scratch tester. The maximum depth of groove was ~ 0.07 mm, and the scratch velocity used was ~ 1.0 m/s. Normal and tangential forces were monitored. The material removal mechanisms were examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the scratches were measured by using a laser profilometer. The mechanical properties of the tested TiAls were characterized by the instantaneous specific energy, scratch resistance and scratch hardness as related to the depth of groove. Extensive thermal softening was observed in the dynamic scratch of the tested TiAls, which facilitated both the detachments of developing chips and the pile-ups of materials on side ridges. Sizable fractures were observed in the transverse direction on the tested TiAls; these fractures tended to participate in the chip formation, depending on the microstructure of the TiAl and the size of the scratch groove. Specific energy and scratch hardness are depth-dependent to various degrees for the tested TiAls. The materiel removal might be subjected to different mechanisms, but the overall response of materials can be effectively characterized by the HEM (Hwang, Evans and Malkin) model and the PSR (proportional specimen resistance) model. The obtained depth-independent specific energy and scratch hardness can be used to screen the candidate materials for the specific purpose depending on whether the application is scratch-dominant or impact-dominant. Among the three tested TiAls, the TiAl with larger colony or grain size exhibits a stronger capability of energy dissipation in the material loss or material removal (higher depth-independent specific energy), while the TiAl with smaller colony size show a higher resistance against the indentation (higher depth-independent scratch hardness). The observations and

  20. Zyklophin, a short-acting kappa opioid antagonist, induces scratching in mice

    OpenAIRE

    DiMattio, K.M.; T.V. Yakovleva; Aldrich, J V; Cowan, A; Liu-Chen, L.Y.

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown previously that norbinaltorphimine (norBNI) and 5΄-guanidinonaltrindole (5΄-GNTI), long-acting kappa opioid receptor (KOPR) antagonists, cause frenzied scratching in mice [1;2]. In the current study, we examined if zyklophin, a short-acting cyclic peptide KOPR antagonist, also elicited scratching behavior. When injected s.c. in the nape of the neck of male Swiss-Webster mice, zyklophin at doses of 0.1, 0.3 and 1 mg/kg induced dose-related hindleg scratching of the neck betwe...

  1. The role of a zinc phosphate pigment in the corrosion of scratched epoxy-coated steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The roles of a zinc phosphate pigment in the corrosion of scratched epoxy-coated steel were studied by means of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, electrochemical noise measurement and scanning electrochemical microscopy. The experimental results of electrochemical noise measurement and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy revealed that zinc phosphate exhibited inhibition effect on the corrosion of the scratched epoxy-coated steel. The scanning electrochemical microscopy results implied that the scratched surface under zinc phosphate coating was re-healed by an insulating film. The mechanism of the inhibition effect of a zinc phosphate pigment was analyzed based upon the combined stochastic theory and shot noise theory using the Weibull distribution and Gumbel distribution function

  2. Scratched-XY Universality and Phase Diagram of Disordered 1D Bosons in Optical Lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhiyuan; Pollet, Lode; Prokof'ev, Nikolay; Svistunov, Boris

    The superfluid-insulator quantum phase transition in a 1D system with weak links belongs to the so-called scratched-XY universality class, provided the irrenormalizable exponent ζ characterizing the distribution of weak links is smaller than 2 / 3 . With a combination of worm-algorithm Monte Carlo simulations and asymptotically exact analytics, we accurately trace the position of the scratched-XY critical line on the ground-state phase diagram of bosonic Hubbard model at unity filling. In particular, we reveal the location of the tricritical point separating the scratched-XY criticality from the Giamarchi-Schulz one.

  3. Cat Ownership Perception and Caretaking Explored in an Internet Survey of People Associated with Cats

    OpenAIRE

    Zito, Sarah; Vankan, Dianne; Bennett, Pauleen; Paterson, Mandy; Phillips, Clive J. C.

    2015-01-01

    People who feed cats that they do not perceive they own (sometimes called semi-owners) are thought to make a considerable contribution to unwanted cat numbers because the cats they support are generally not sterilized. Understanding people’s perception of cat ownership and the psychology underlying cat semi-ownership could inform approaches to mitigate the negative effects of cat semi-ownership. The primary aims of this study were to investigate cat ownership perception and to examine its ass...

  4. Newcastle Disease Virus-Vectored Rabies Vaccine Is Safe, Highly Immunogenic, and Provides Long-Lasting Protection in Dogs and Cats

    OpenAIRE

    Ge, Jinying; Wang, Xijun; Tao, Lihong; Wen, Zhiyuan; Feng, Na; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu; Yang, Chinglai; Chen, Hualan; Bu, Zhigao

    2011-01-01

    Effective, safe, and affordable rabies vaccines are still being sought. Newcastle disease virus (NDV), an avian paramyxovirus, has shown promise as a vaccine vector for mammals. Here, we generated a recombinant avirulent NDV La Sota strain expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein (RVG) and evaluated its potential to serve as a vaccine against rabies. The recombinant virus, rL-RVG, retained its high-growth property in chicken eggs, with titers of up to 109.8 50% egg infective doses (EID50)/ml ...

  5. Texture, residual strain, and plastic deformation around scratches in alloy 600 using synchrotron X-ray Laue micro-diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deformation around two scratches in Alloy 600 (A600) was studied nondestructively using synchrotron Laue differential aperture X-ray microscopy. The orientation of grains and elastic strain distribution around the scratches were measured. A complex residual deviatoric elastic strain state was found to exist around the scratches. Heavy plastic deformation was observed up to a distance of 20 μm from the scratches. In the region 20-30 μm from the scratches the diffraction spots were heavily streaked and split indicating misoriented dislocation cell structures

  6. Prevalence of selected rickettsial infections in cats in Southern Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Michèle; Englert, Theresa; Stuetzer, Bianca; Hawley, Jennifer R; Lappin, Michael R; Hartmann, Katrin

    2015-10-01

    Prevalence of Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, Neorickettsia, and Wolbachia DNA in blood of 479 cats collected in different veterinary clinics in Southern Germany was determined using a previously published conventional PCR using 16S-23S intergenic spacer primers (5' CTG GGG ACT ACG GTC GCA AGA C 3' - forward; 5' CTC CAG TTT ATC ACT GGA AGT T 3' - reverse). Purified amplicons were sequenced to confirm genus and species. Associations between rickettsial infections, and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), as well as feline leukemia virus (FeLV) status were evaluated. Rickettsial prevalence was 0.4% (2/479; CI: 0.01-1.62%). In the two infected cats, Anaplasma phagocytophilum DNA was amplified. These cats came from different environment and had outdoor access. Both were ill with many of their problems likely related to other diseases. However, one cat had neutrophilia with left shift and the other thrombocytopenia potentially caused by their A. phagocytophilum infection. There was no significant difference in the FIV and FeLV status between A. phagocytophilum-negative and -positive cats. A. phagocytophilum can cause infection in cats in Southern Germany, and appropriate tick control is recommended. PMID:26387062

  7. Quarantine protects Falkland Islands (Malvinas) cats from feline coronavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addie, Diane D; McDonald, Mike; Audhuy, Stéphane; Burr, Paul; Hollins, Jonathan; Kovacic, Rémi; Lutz, Hans; Luxton, Zoe; Mazar, Shlomit; Meli, Marina L

    2012-02-01

    Feline coronavirus (FCoV) causes feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). Since 2002, when 20 cats on the Falkland Islands were found to be FCoV seronegative, only seronegative cats could be imported. Between 2005-2007, 95 pet and 10 feral cats tested negative by indirect immunofluorescence antibody (IFA) analysis using two strains of type II FCoV, two transmissible gastroenteritis virus assays, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and rapid immunomigration test. Twenty-four samples (23%) showed non-specific fluorescence, mostly attributable to anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA). The reason for ANA was unclear: reactive samples were negative for Erhlichia canis antibodies; seven were feline immunodeficiency virus positive, but 15 were negative. It was not possible to determine retrospectively whether the cats had autoimmune disease, hyperthyroidism treatment, or recent vaccination which may also cause ANA. The FCoV/ FIP-free status of the Falkland Islands cats should be maintained by FCoV testing incoming cats. However, ANA can complicate interpretation of IFA tests. PMID:22314098

  8. The interaction between histamine H1 receptor and μ- opioid receptor in scratching behavior in ICR mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakasone, Tasuku; Sugimoto, Yumi; Kamei, Chiaki

    2016-04-15

    In this study, we examined the interaction between histamine H1 receptor and μ-opioid receptor in scratching behavior in ICR mice. Both histamine and morphine caused scratching and simultaneous injection of histamine and morphine had an additive effect. Chlorpheniramine and naloxone inhibited histamine-induced scratching behavior. These two drugs also inhibited morphine-induced scratching behavior. Simultaneous injection of chlorpheniramine and naloxone caused a significant inhibition of histamine-induced scratching compared with separate injections. The same findings were also noted for morphine-induced scratching. These results strongly indicate a close relationship between histamine H1 receptor and μ-opioid receptor in scratching behavior in ICR mice. PMID:26948312

  9. Outbreak of dysautonomia (Key-Gaskell syndrome) in a closed colony of pet cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cave, T A; Knottenbelt, C; Mellor, D J; Nunn, F; Nart, P; Reid, S W J

    2003-09-27

    Six of eight pet cats in a closed colony developed overt signs of dysautonomia over a period of seven days; two of them died and one was euthanased. Dysautonomia was confirmed histopathologically in two of these cats, and in the others the diagnosis was based on the characteristic clinical and radiographic findings. In the two apparently unaffected cats abnormal oesophageal motility was demonstrated by fluoroscopy, suggesting that there may be a subclinical form of the disease. The surviving cats had higher and more variable heart rates (mean 165 bpm) than the non-survivors (mean 121 bpm). PMID:14567662

  10. Short colon in a cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An 11-year-old male Japanese domestic cat was referred to the veterinary hospital with a chronic diarrhea and signs of pain and vocalization when defecating. The cat has discharged unformed feces throughout his life. Morphological diagnosis of short colon was made radiographically after barium enema. The ileocolic junction and cecum was located to the left of the midline at the proximal end of the descending colon. Additional endoscopic examination demonstrated the difference in visual structures of the mucosal surface and in histological structures on mucosal biopsy specimens, between the colon and ileum. This is the first report of short colon in a cat in Japan

  11. A spectrum of hypereosinophilic syndromes exemplified by six cats with eosinophilic enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrick, M

    1981-03-01

    Of six cats with eosinophilic enteritis, two had lesions confined to the intestinal tract, and four had varied disseminated eosinophilic infiltration of other organs. The lesions in these cats are similar to those of the hypereosinophilic syndrome in man. A feline hypereosinophilic syndrome is proposed, consisting of eosinophilic enteritis, disseminated eosinophilic disease, and eosinophilic leukemia. PMID:7467078

  12. Afferent control of central pattern generators: experimental analysis of locomotion in the decerebrate cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baev, K V; Esipenko, V B; Shimansky YuP

    1991-01-01

    Changes in the motor activity of the spinal locomotor generator evoked by tonic and phasic peripheral afferent signals during fictitious locomotion of both slow and fast rhythms were analysed in the cat. The tonic afferent inflow was conditioned by the position of the hindlimb. The phasic afferent signals were imitated by electrical stimulation of hindlimb nerves. The correlation between the kinematics of hindlimb locomotor movement and sensory inflow was investigated during actual locomotion. Reliable correlations between motor activity parameters during fictitious locomotion were revealed in cases of both slow and fast "locomotor" rhythms. The main difference between these cases was that correlations "duration-intensity" were positive in the first and negative in the second case. The functional role of "locomotor" pattern dependence on tonic sensory inflow consisted of providing stability for planting the hindlimb on the ground. For any investigated afferent input the phase moments in the "locomotor" cycle were found, in which an afferent signal caused no rearrangement in locomotor generator activity. These moments corresponded to the transitions between "flexion" and "extension" phases and to the bursts of integral afferent activity observed during real locomotion. The data obtained are compared with the results previously described for the scratching generator. The character of changes in "locomotor" activity in response to tonic and phasic sensory signals was similar to that of such changes in "scratching" rhythm in the case of fast "locomotion". Intensification of the "flexion" phase caused by phasic high-intensity stimulation of cutaneous afferents during low "locomotor" rhythm was changed to inhibition (such as observed during "scratching") when this rhythm was fast. It is concluded that the main regularities of peripheral afferent control for both the locomotor and scratching generators are the same. Moreover, these central pattern generators are just

  13. Correlation of lung function and CAT score to nutritional status of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease%慢性阻塞性肺疾病肺功能、CAT 评分等与营养状况的相关性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄潘文; 文红; 张平

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨慢阻肺患者肺功能、血气分析、CAT 评分与营养状况的关系。方法将我院2012年6月-2014年6月间收治的500例慢阻肺患者按微型营养评定法进行营养状况评定,分为营养良好组、营养不良危险组、营养不良组,比较不同营养状况下慢阻肺患者的肺功能及 CAT 评分,探讨慢阻肺肺功能、血气分析、CAT 评分与营养状况的相关性。结果营养状况越好的患者,肺功能各项指标越好,FVC%、FEV1%、MVV%、MMF%越高(P <0.01);患者营养状况越好,血气分析越好,PaO2、SaO2越高,PaCO2越低(P <0.01);CAT 评分也越低(P <0.01);通过对各指标与 MNA 值的 Pearson 相关分析得出,FEV1%、MVV%、MMF%、PaO2与 MNA 值呈正相关,PaCO2、CAT 与 MNA 值呈负相关。结论慢阻肺患者的肺功能、血气分析、CAT 评分与营养状况间存在显著相关性,提高患者的营养状况可有效改善患者的病情与预后。%Objective To investigate the correlation of lung function and CAT score to nutritional status of COPD patients. Methods 500 COPD patients were given nutritional status assessment according to mini nutritional assessment method, and then they were divided into the good nutrition group, the malnutrition risk group, and the malnutrition group. Their lung function and CAT scores were compared among the three groups. Results The pa-tients with better nutritional status had higher value of FVC% , FEV1% , MVV% and MMF% , better blood gas anal-ysis and lower CAT scores (P < 0. 01). Pearson correlation analysis of each index and MNA value showed that MNA was positively correlated with FEV1% , MVV% , MMF% and PaO2 , and negatively correlated with PaCO2 and CAT. Conclusion The nutritional status of COPD patients is closely related with lung function, blood gas analysis and CAT scores, it can effectively improve the condition and prognosis by improving their nutritional status.

  14. Osteoma of the oral and maxillofacial regions in cats: 7 cases (1999-2009).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiani, Nadine; Arzi, Boaz; Johnson, Eric G; Murphy, Brian; Verstraete, Frank J M

    2011-06-01

    Objective-To describe clinical features of oral and maxillofacial osteomas in cats. Design-Retrospective case series. Animals-7 cats with oral or maxillofacial osteoma or both. Procedures-Medical records were reviewed for information on signalment, history, clinical signs, physical examination findings, diagnostic imaging findings, results of serum biochemical analyses and histologic testing, surgical procedures performed, and perioperative complications. Outcome was determined on the basis of follow-up telephone interviews of owners. Results-Cats ranged from 1 to 23 years of age. Clinical signs were observed in 5 cats and were attributed to the presence of the mass. Diagnostic imaging (radiography and computed tomography) and histologic examination confirmed the diagnosis of osteoma. Three cats were euthanatized; 1 cat was treated by mandibulectomy, 1 was treated by maxillectomy, and 2 were treated by debulking. At the time of follow-up at least 1 year after surgery, all 4 treated cats were alive, with owners reporting an acceptable quality of life. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Osteoma of the oral and maxillofacial regions is an uncommon tumor in cats. Most cats are examined during an advanced stage of the disease, when treatment options may be limited. Although osteoma is a benign tumor, the recommendation is to perform a clinical evaluation, diagnostic imaging, biopsy, and treatment early in the disease process, when less invasive surgical approaches may be feasible. PMID:21627511

  15. Physiological and Behavioral Responses of Horses to Wither Scratching and Patting the Neck When Under Saddle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorbergson, Zoë W; Nielsen, Sharon G; Beaulieu, Rodney J; Doyle, Rebecca E

    2016-01-01

    Riding is considered to be an arousing activity for horses. It has been suggested that wither scratching may be a more useful tool for relaxation compared with the common practice of neck patting. In the current study, 18 horses were exposed to 3 treatments, including control or no interaction, neck patting, and wither scratching, for 1 min each following a short obstacle course. Heart rate, heart rate variability, and a variety of behaviors were measured in the horses. Wither scratching produced a significantly longer duration of relaxed-type behaviors. Wither scratching could be a useful tool to help a horse relax while under saddle. Additionally, the study identified 2 ear positions that may be useful for future research in horse behavior. PMID:26958705

  16. The scratch test - Different critical load determination techniques. [adhesive strength of thin hard coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekler, J.; Hintermann, H. E.; Steinmann, P. A.

    1988-01-01

    Different critical load determination techniques such as microscopy, acoustic emission, normal, tangential, and lateral forces used for scratch test evaluation of complex or multilayer coatings are investigated. The applicability of the scratch test to newly developed coating techniques, systems, and applications is discussed. Among the methods based on the use of a physical measurement, acoustic emission detection is the most effective. The dynamics ratio between the signals below and above the critical load for the acoustic emission (much greater than 100) is well above that obtained with the normal, tangential, and lateral forces. The present commercial instruments are limited in load application performance. A scratch tester able to apply accurate loads as low as 0.01 N would probably overcome most of the actual limitations and would be expected to extend the scratch testing technique to different application fields such as optics and microelectronics.

  17. Comparison of material structures and scratch strength of thin films of glass mirrors and automobile windscreens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several types of European and Asian automobile windscreens coated with single and multilayer fixing fluxes and silver thin films were studied, and their material structures and their scratch properties were compared with glass mirrors' by the authors. The realized laboratory tests had shown very strong influences of cracks and bubbles in the microstructures of fixing thin film layers and silver coatings on scratch resistance, acoustic emission and micro-hardness of the coatings both on glass mirrors and automobile windscreens. To examine the material structure of flux thin film layers and silver coatings scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used. The scratch resistance, acoustic emission, nucleation and propagation of cracks were studied by an optical digital mechanical scratch tester

  18. Raman characterization of damaged layers of 4H-SiC induced by scratching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Shin-ichi; Mitani, Takeshi; Tomobe, Masaru; Kato, Tomohisa; Okumura, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    Recent development of device fabrication of SiC is awaiting detailed study of the machining of the surfaces. We scratched 4H-SiC surfaces with a sliding microindenter made of a SiC chip, and characterized machining affected layers by micro-Raman spectroscopy. The results of the Raman measurement of the scratching grooves revealed that there were residual stress, defects, and stacking faults. Furthermore, with heavy scratching load, we found clusters of amorphous SiC, Si, amorphous carbon, and graphite in the scratching grooves. Analysis of the Raman spectra showed that SiC amorphization occurs first and surface graphitization (carbonization) is subsequently generated through the phase transformation of SiC. We expect that the Raman characterization of machined surfaces provides information on the machining mechanism for compound semiconductors.

  19. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Lysate Increases Re-Epithelialization of Keratinocyte Scratch Assays by Promoting Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Walaa Mohammedsaeed; Sheena Cruickshank; Andrew J. McBain; Catherine A. O’Neill

    2015-01-01

    A limited number of studies have investigated the potential of probiotics to promote wound healing in the digestive tract. The aim of the current investigation was to determine whether probiotic bacteria or their extracts could be beneficial in cutaneous wound healing. A keratinocyte monolayer scratch assay was used to assess re-epithelialization; which comprises keratinocyte proliferation and migration. Primary human keratinocyte monolayers were scratched then exposed to lysates of Lactobaci...

  20. Rate-dependent toughness in soft materials via microscopic scratch testing

    OpenAIRE

    Akono, Ange-Therese; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2014-01-01

    Although fracture processes are rate-sensitive in a wide variety of biological and engineering systems, such as protein materials and bulk metallic glasses, the exact contribution of the prescribed mechanical loading rate to the measured fracture resistance is not fully understood. In this study, we formulate a novel energy-based framework for crack propagation in nonlinear viscous solids, using microscopic scratch tests. The scratch test consists in pushing a tool across the surface of a wea...

  1. FRICTION ANALYSIS ON SCRATCH DEFORMATION MODES OF VISCO-ELASTIC-PLASTIC MATERIALS

    OpenAIRE

    Budi Setiyana; Imam Syafaat; Jamari Jamari; DikJoe Schipper

    2013-01-01

    Understanding of abrasion resistance and associated surfaces deformation mechanisms is of primary importance in materials engineering and design. Instrumented scratch testing has proven to be a useful tool for characterizing the abrasion resistance of materials. Using a conical indenter in a scratch test may result in different deformation modes, like as elastic deformation, ironing, ductile ploughing and cutting. This paper presents the friction analysis of some deformation modes of visco-el...

  2. High temperature scratch testing of hard PVD coatings deposited on surface treated tool steel

    OpenAIRE

    Pujante, Jaume; Vilaseca, Montserrat; Casellas, Daniel; Riera Colom, María Dolores

    2014-01-01

    Scratch testing is one of the most usual characterisation techniques for systems with thin hard coatings. Scratch tests are performed at run at room temperature, due to the risk of degradation of the indenter diamond tip at high temperature and added test complexity. However, results obtained at room temperature may differ from the final system performance in high temperature applications, due to factors such as substrate thermal softening. In this work, a simple and a robust test for the...

  3. Conditions for Multi-functionality in a Rhythm Generating Network Inspired by Turtle Scratching

    OpenAIRE

    Snyder, Abigail C.; Rubin, Jonathan E

    2015-01-01

    Rhythmic behaviors such as breathing, walking, and scratching are vital to many species. Such behaviors can emerge from groups of neurons, called central pattern generators, in the absence of rhythmic inputs. In vertebrates, the identification of the cells that constitute the central pattern generator for particular rhythmic behaviors is difficult, and often, its existence has only been inferred. For example, under experimental conditions, intact turtles generate several rhythmic scratch moto...

  4. Diagnosis of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Interobserver Reliability of the Blinded Scratch-Collapse Test

    OpenAIRE

    Blok, Robin D.; Becker, Stéphanie J. E.; Ring, David C.

    2013-01-01

    The reliability of the scratch-collapse test for diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) has not been tested by independent investigators. This study measured the reliability of the scratch-collapse test comparing the treating hand surgeon and blinded evaluators. We performed a prospective observational study of 41 patients with a provisional diagnosis of CTS or a combination of CTS and cubital tunnel syndrome and prescribed electrodiagnostic testing. The treating hand surgeon performed the...

  5. In-situ electrochemical investigations of a scratched galvanized steel during a climatic test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An approach is proposed allowing to perform electrochemical measurements on a corrosion cell reproducing an atmospheric corrosion test after scratching a painted galvanized steel. The sample preparation is described and emphasis is put on impedance studies. Steel and zinc contributions are separated in the overall response of the cell to various climatic parameters. An electrical model and simulated data account for the spatial distribution of impedance in the scratched area. (author) 6 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Renal effects of Dirofilaria immitis in experimentally and naturally infected cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, C E; Vaden, S L; Arther, R G; Ciszewski, D K; Davis, W L; Ensley, S M; Chopade, N H

    2011-03-22

    Canine heartworm infection has been associated with glomerular disease and proteinuria. We hypothesized that proteinuria, likely due to glomerular damage, would also be found in cats experimentally and naturally infected with Dirofilaria immitis. Two populations of cats were evaluated, including 80 that were each experimentally infected with 60 infective heartworm larvae as part of a drug safety study, and 31 that were naturally infected with D. immitis. Each had a control population with which to be compared. In the experimentally infected group, we evaluated urine from 64 cats. Ten of these cats were shown to have microalbuminuria 8 months post infection. No cat refractory to infection with larvae and no cats from the control group demonstrated microalbuminuria. All 10 microalbuminuric cats were shown to have significant proteinuria, as measured by the urine protein:creatinine ratio. There was a subtle, but significant, association between worm burden and proteinuria, and although the presence of adult heartworms was required for the development of proteinuria, both microfilaremic and amicrofilaremic cats were affected. Neither the presence of circulating heartworm antibodies and antigen nor the presence of antigenuria predicted the development of proteinuria. Both heavily infected cats (5-25 adult heartworms) and cats with worm burdens compatible with natural infections (1-4 adult heartworms) developed proteinuria, and the relative numbers of cats so affected were similar between heavily and more lightly infected cats. Naturally infected cats, for which only dipstick protein determinations were available, were shown to have a significantly greater incidence of proteinuria (90% vs 35%) than did those in an age- and gender-matched control population. Additionally, the proteinuria in heartworm-infected cats was 3- to 5-fold greater in severity. We conclude that cats infected with mature adult heartworms are at risk for developing proteinuria and that this is

  7. Fundamentals of ServCat

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This training manual for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Catalog (ServCat) provides detailed instructions on searching for records, creating records, and...

  8. NRPC ServCat priorities

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document lists the Natural Resource Program Centers priority ServCat documents. It is recommended that these documents which include annual narrative reports,...

  9. Sarcocystis sp. encephalomyelitis in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisby, Tricia M; Holman, Patricia J; Pitoc, George A; Packer, Rebecca A; Thompson, Craig A; Raskin, Rose E

    2010-03-01

    A 5-month-old male neutered domestic shorthair cat was evaluated for spinal pain, ataxia, and anisocoria. Neuroanatomic localization indicated diffuse or multifocal central nervous system disease. On cerebrospinal fluid analysis, neutrophilic pleocytosis and intracellular protozoal merozoites were observed. The merozoites were oval, 2-4 microm in width and 4-6 microm in length, and had linear arrays of nuclear material concentrated at one pole. Serum was positive for Sarcocystis sp. antibodies and negative for Toxoplasma gondii antibodies. The organism was determined to be either Sarcocystis neurona or Sarcocystis dasypi based on sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer 1 ribosomal RNA genomic region. Clinical disease resolved following treatment with 3 different protocols for protozoal infection. This case is the first to demonstrate the antemortem diagnosis and survival of a domestic cat with Sarcocystis sp.-associated encephalomyelitis. Clinicians and cytopathologists should include Sarcocystis sp. as a differential for feline inflammatory central nervous system disease characterized by neutrophilic pleocytosis. PMID:19548967

  10. Properties of squeezed Schroedinger cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article we investigate some statistical properties of the even and odd squeezed (squeezed Schroedinger cat) states. The quasi-probability distribution functions especially W(α) and Q(α) are calculated and discussed for these states. The phase distribution function is discussed. A generation scheme is proposed for either the squeezed generalized Schroedinger cat, or the squeezed number state. (author). 35 refs, 5 figs

  11. Seizures and epilepsy in cats

    OpenAIRE

    Moore SA

    2014-01-01

    Sarah A Moore Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA Abstract: Seizures are a common presenting complaint in cats, although causes and options for the treatment of seizures in this species have been historically poorly described in the veterinary literature. Seizure manifestation in cats may be different than what is typically seen in dogs, but the underlying causes of seizure activity are the same. These include primary epilepsies, structura...

  12. [Feline leishmaniasis: what's the epidemiological role of the cat?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancianti, F

    2004-06-01

    Feline leishmaniasis (FL) is a quite uncommon feature. Clinical disease has been described in cats since nineties begin. More than 40 reports in world literature have been referred, but the clinical cases have been only recently well defined. Most of the reports focus on infected cats living in endemic areas, even if, more recently FL due to Leishmania infantum was found in Sao Paulo State, in Brazil where autochthonous human or canine leishmaniasis cases have never reported. In Europe clinical cases of FL have been described from Portugal, France, Spain and Italy from 1996 to 2002. When a typing of the etiological agent was performed L. infantum was identified in all reported cases. In some endemic areas serological surveys have also been carried out in cats, using IHAT in Egypt, Western blot in France or IFAT in Italy. Sixty Egyptian cats had low serological antibody titers, from 1/32 to 1/128, in the endemic focus of canine leishmaniasis of Alpes Maritimes 12 out of 97 (12.5%) cats showed antibodies versus antigens 14 and/or 18 kDa of L. infantum. A previous survey by means of IFAT in Liguria and Toscana on 110 and 158 feline sera respectively reports a seroprevalence of 0.9% with low titer, while sera from Sicily seem to be positive at higher dilutions. Animals living in an endemic area can develop specific antibodies against leishmania and, in our experience, they can be evidentiated by means of IFAT. The antibody titers appear to be lower in affected cats than in dogs, even if the number of clinical cases is very scanty. PCR tests on feline blood samples are in progress, but preliminary results confirm the presence of leishmania DNA in such specimens. Cutaneous leishmaniasis is the more frequent form in cats and it was reported from several countries. Typical signs include nodular to ulcer or crusty lesions on the nose, lips, ears, eyelids, alopecia: clinical signs of cutaneous FL are unspecific and in endemic area this infection must be taken into account

  13. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE FRACTURE WORK FOR DUCTILE FILM UNDERGOING THE MICRO-SCRATCH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏悦广; 赵满洪; 唐山

    2002-01-01

    The interface adhesion strength (or interface toughness) of a thinfilm/substrate system is often assessed by the micro-scratch test. For a brittle filmmaterial, the interface adhesion strength is easily obtained through measuring thescratch driving forces. However, to measure the interface adhesion strength (or in-terface toughness) for a metal thin film material (the ductile material) by the micro-scratch test is very difficult, because intense plastic deformation is involved and theproblem is a three-dimensional elastic-plastic one. In the present research, usinga double-cohesive zone model, the failure characteristics of the thin film/substratesystem can be described and further simulated. For a steady-state scratching pro-cess, a three-dimensional elastic-plastic finite element method based on the doublecohesive zone model is developed and adopted, and the steady-state fracture workof the total system is calculated. The parameter relations between the horizontaldriving forces (or energy release rate of the scratching process) and the separationstrength of thin film/substrate interface, and the material shear strength, as well asthe material parameters are developed. Furthermore, a scratch experiment for theAl/Si film/substrate system is carried out and the failure mechanisms are explored.Finally, the prediction results are applied to a scratch experiment for the Pt/NiOmaterial system given in the literature.

  14. Enhanced scratch resistance of polycarbonate by low temperature plasma-polymerized organosilica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was conducted into enhancing scratch resistance of flexible polycarbonate (PC) substrates by low temperature plasma-polymerized organosilica (SiOxCy) with various O2 flow rates. Low temperature plasma-polymerized SiOxCy by tetramethylsilane (TMS) and O2 plasmas at room temperature (23 oC) was proven to highly improve scratch resistance of flexible PC substrates. Scratch resistance of PC substrates was greatly enhanced from 75% scratching of un-treated PC substrates to no scratching of plasma-polymerized SiOxCy on PC substrates using steel wool of 300 cycles at 200 g loading. Scratch resistance of PC substrates was strongly dependent on their surface characteristics. Surface hardness of PC substrates was determined by the pencil test. Surface morphology of PC substrate was monitored by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and field emitted scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The atomic compositions and chemical bondings of TMS-oxygen plasma-polymerized SiOxCy were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

  15. A novel approach of high speed scratching on silicon wafers at nanoscale depths of cut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Guo, Dongming; Wang, Bo; Kang, Renke; Zhang, Bi

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a novel approach of high speed scratching is carried out on silicon (Si) wafers at nanoscale depths of cut to investigate the fundamental mechanisms in wafering of solar cells. The scratching is conducted on a Si wafer of 150 mm diameter with an ultraprecision grinder at a speed of 8.4 to 15 m/s. Single-point diamonds of a tip radius of 174, 324, and 786 nm, respectively, are used in the study. The study finds that at the onset of chip formation, an amorphous layer is formed at the topmost of the residual scratch, followed by the pristine crystalline lattice beneath. This is different from the previous findings in low speed scratching and high speed grinding, in which there is an amorphous layer at the top and a damaged layer underneath. The final width and depth of the residual scratch at the onset of chip formation measured vary from 288 to 316 nm, and from 49 to 62 nm, respectively. High pressure phases are absent from the scratch at the onset of either chip or crack formation.

  16. Echocardiographic Findings in 11 Cats with Acromegaly

    OpenAIRE

    Myers, J A; Lunn, K.F.; Bright, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Information regarding cardiac changes in domestic cats with acromegaly is limited. Hypothesis/Objectives The objective of this study was to describe the echocardiographic findings in cats with acromegaly. Animals Eighteen cats diagnosed with acromegaly at Colorado State University between 2008 and 2012. Of these 18 cats, 11 had echocardiography performed. Methods A retrospective review of medical records was made to identify cats with acromegaly that also had echocardiography perfo...

  17. Schrodinger's cat: much ado about nothing

    CERN Document Server

    Ionicioiu, Radu

    2016-01-01

    In this note I briefly discuss the Schrodinger's cat Gedankenexperiment. By analysing the information flow in the system I show that no entanglement exists between the atom and the cat. The atom and the cat are connected only through a classical information channel (detector clicks $\\rightarrow$ poison is released $\\rightarrow$ cat is dead). No amount of local operations and classical communication can entangle the atom and the cat. Consequently, the paradox disappears.

  18. Acquired retinal folds in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMillan, A D

    1976-06-01

    Retinal folds were found in 5 cats. The apparent cause of the folding was varied: in 1 cat the folds appeared after a localized retinal detachment; in 2 cats the condition accompanied other intraocular abnormalities associated with feline infectious peritonitis; 1 cat had active keratitis, and the retinal changes were thought to have been injury related; and 1 cat, bilaterally affected, had chronic glomerulonephritis. PMID:945253

  19. Primary hypoadrenocorticism in ten cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, M E; Greco, D S; Orth, D N

    1989-01-01

    Primary hypoadrenocorticism was diagnosed in ten young to middle-aged cats of mixed breeding. Five of the cats were male, and five were female. Historic signs included lethargy (n = 10), anorexia (n = 10), weight loss (n = 9), vomiting (n = 4), and polyuria (n = 3). Dehydration (n = 9), hypothermia (n = 8), prolonged capillary refill time (n = 5), weak pulse (n = 5), collapse (n = 3), and sinus bradycardia (n = 2) were found on physical examination. Results of initial laboratory tests revealed anemia (n = 3), absolute lymphocytosis (n = 2), absolute eosinophilia (n = 1), and azotemia and hyperphosphatemia (n = 10). Serum electrolyte changes included hyponatremia (n = 10), hyperkalemia (n = 9), hypochloremia (n = 9), and hypercalcemia (n = 1). The diagnosis of primary adrenocortical insufficiency was established on the basis of results of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) stimulation tests (n = 10) and endogenous plasma ACTH determinations (n = 7). Initial therapy for hypoadrenocorticism included intravenous administration of 0.9% saline and dexamethasone and intramuscular administration of desoxycorticosterone acetate in oil. Three cats were euthanatized shortly after diagnosis because of poor clinical response. Results of necropsy examination were unremarkable except for complete destruction of both adrenal cortices. Seven cats were treated chronically with oral prednisone or intramuscular methylprednisolone acetate for glucocorticoid supplementation and with oral fludrocortisone acetate or intramuscular injections of repository desoxycorticosterone pivalate for mineralocorticoid replacement. One cat died after 47 days of therapy from unknown causes; the other six cats are still alive and well after 3 to 70 months of treatment. PMID:2469793

  20. Validation of Proposed Metrics for Two-Body Abrasion Scratch Test Analysis Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Kenneth W., Jr.; Kobrick, Ryan L.; Klaus, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Abrasion of mechanical components and fabrics by soil on Earth is typically minimized by the effects of atmosphere and water. Potentially abrasive particles lose sharp and pointed geometrical features through erosion. In environments where such erosion does not exist, such as the vacuum of the Moon, particles retain sharp geometries associated with fracturing of their parent particles by micrometeorite impacts. The relationship between hardness of the abrasive and that of the material being abraded is well understood, such that the abrasive ability of a material can be estimated as a function of the ratio of the hardness of the two interacting materials. Knowing the abrasive nature of an environment (abrasive)/construction material is crucial to designing durable equipment for use in such surroundings. The objective of this work was to evaluate a set of standardized metrics proposed for characterizing a surface that has been scratched from a two-body abrasion test. This is achieved by defining a new abrasion region termed Zone of Interaction (ZOI). The ZOI describes the full surface profile of all peaks and valleys, rather than just measuring a scratch width. The ZOI has been found to be at least twice the size of a standard width measurement; in some cases, considerably greater, indicating that at least half of the disturbed surface area would be neglected without this insight. The ZOI is used to calculate a more robust data set of volume measurements that can be used to computationally reconstruct a resultant profile for de tailed analysis. Documenting additional changes to various surface roughness par ameters also allows key material attributes of importance to ultimate design applications to be quantified, such as depth of penetration and final abraded surface roughness. Further - more, by investigating the use of custom scratch tips for specific needs, the usefulness of having an abrasion metric that can measure the displaced volume in this standardized

  1. Identification of the presence of the mutation of the gene of PKD not associated with mutation of MYBPC3-A31P of HCM in Persian cats – Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Vanesa Kutz de Arruda; Mariana Isa Poci Palumbo; Priscilla Macedo de Souza; José Paes de Oliveira-Filho; Alexandre Secorun Borges; Maria Lucia Gomes Lourenço

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is a hereditary autosomal dominant disorder that mainly affects Persian cats; it is an important cause of chronic kidney disease in this species. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common heart disease in cats, and there is evidence of a genetic origin in some breeds. Although neither of these disorders is rare in cats, according to our literature review, this is the first report of the concomitant occurrence of PKD and HCM in Persian cats in Brazil.

  2. Major Parasitic Zoonoses Associated with Dogs and Cats in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baneth, G.; Thamsborg, S M; Otranto, D;

    2016-01-01

    Some of the most important zoonotic infectious diseases are associated with parasites transmitted from companion animals to man. This review describes the main parasitic zoonoses in Europe related to dogs and cats, with particular emphasis on their current epidemiology. Toxoplasmosis, leishmaniosis...

  3. Will a hiding box provide stress reduction for shelter cats?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vinke, Claudia; Godijn, L.M.; van der Leij, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Domestic cats (Felis sylvestris catus) can experience serious stress in shelters. Stressful experiences can have a major impact on the cats’ welfare and may cause higher incidences of infectious diseases in the shelters due to raised cortisol levels causing immuno deficiency.Though several studies s

  4. Cat Ownership Perception and Caretaking Explored in an Internet Survey of People Associated with Cats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Zito

    Full Text Available People who feed cats that they do not perceive they own (sometimes called semi-owners are thought to make a considerable contribution to unwanted cat numbers because the cats they support are generally not sterilized. Understanding people's perception of cat ownership and the psychology underlying cat semi-ownership could inform approaches to mitigate the negative effects of cat semi-ownership. The primary aims of this study were to investigate cat ownership perception and to examine its association with human-cat interactions and caretaking behaviours. A secondary aim was to evaluate a definition of cat semi-ownership (including an association time of ≥1 month and frequent feeding, revised from a previous definition proposed in the literature to distinguish cat semi-ownership from casual interactions with unowned cats. Cat owners and semi-owners displayed similar types of interactions and caretaking behaviours. Nevertheless, caretaking behaviours were more commonly displayed towards owned cats than semi-owned cats, and semi-owned cats were more likely to have produced kittens (p<0.01. All interactions and caretaking behaviours were more likely to be displayed towards cats in semi-ownership relationships compared to casual interaction relationships. Determinants of cat ownership perception were identified (p<0.05 and included association time, attachment, perceived cat friendliness and health, and feelings about unowned cats, including the acceptability of feeding unowned cats. Encouraging semi-owners to have the cats they care for sterilized may assist in reducing the number of unwanted kittens and could be a valuable alternative to trying to prevent semi-ownership entirely. Highly accessible semi-owner "gatekeepers" could help to deliver education messages and facilitate the provision of cat sterilization services to semi-owners. This research enabled semi-ownership to be distinguished from casual interaction relationships and can assist

  5. Positive Impact of Nutritional Interventions on Serum Symmetric Dimethylarginine and Creatinine Concentrations in Client-Owned Geriatric Cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jean A.; MacLeay, Jennifer; Yerramilli, Maha; Obare, Edward; Yerramilli, Murthy; Schiefelbein, Heidi; Paetau-Robinson, Inke; Jewell, Dennis E.

    2016-01-01

    A prospective study was conducted in client-owned geriatric cats to evaluate the short- term effects of a test food on serum symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) and creatinine (Cr) concentrations. Test food contained functional lipids (fish oil), antioxidants (vitamins C and E), L-carnitine, botanicals (vegetables), highly bioavailable protein, and amino acid supplements. Cats (n = 80) were fed either test food or owner’s-choice foods (non-nutritionally controlled cohort). Cats were included based on age (≥ 9 years), indoor only, neutered, and free of chronic disease. At baseline, all cats had serum Cr concentrations within the reference interval. Renal function biomarkers and urinalysis results at baseline and after consuming test food or owner’s-choice foods for 3 and 6 months were evaluated. Cats consuming test food showed significant decreases in serum Cr and BUN concentrations across time. Overall, cats consuming owner’s-choice foods showed significant increases in serum SDMA concentrations at 3 and 6 months compared with baseline (P ≤ 0.05), whereas in cats consuming test food serum SDMA concentrations did not change. At baseline or during the 6-month feeding trial, 23 (28.8%) cats had increased serum SDMA, but normal serum Cr consistent with IRIS Stage 1 chronic kidney disease. This included 6 cats fed test food and 17 cats fed owner’s-choice foods. In the 6 cats fed test food, serum SDMA decreased in 3 cats and remained stable in 1 cat, whereas in the 17 cats fed owner’s-choice foods, serum SDMA increased in 13 cats and decreased or remained stable in 4 cats. The increase in serum SDMA concentration was significant (P = 0.02) only for cats fed owner’s-choice foods. These results suggest that nonazotemic cats with elevated serum SDMA (early renal insufficiency) when fed a food designed to promote healthy aging are more likely to demonstrate stable renal function compared with cats fed owner’s-choice foods. Cats fed owner’s-choice foods were

  6. Feeders of free-roaming cats: personal characteristics, feeding practices and data on cat health and welfare in an urban setting of Israel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idit eGunther

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cat feeders serve as an important source of available food for free-roaming cats (FRC and can play a central role in providing data on FRC distribution, welfare, and health. Data on cat feeder personalities as well as a better understanding of their feeding practices offer relevance for decision making concerning FRC population control strategies. The current study surveyed 222 FRC feeders who responded to a municipal trap-neuter-return (TNR campaign in an Israeli central urban setting. The aim of the study was to describe their personal characteristics, feeding practices and the FRC populations they feed. Feeders were divided into four groups according to the number of cats they claimed to feed per day (group 1: fed up to five cats; group 2: fed six to 10 cats; group 3: fed 11-20 cats; group 4: fed ≥21 cats. Most feeders were women (81%, with a median age of 58 years (range 18-81. The feeders reported an overall feeding of 3,337 cats in 342 different feeding locations. Feeders of group 4 comprised of 15.31% (n=34 of all feeders, but fed 56% (n=1869 of the FRC in 37.42% (n=128 of the feeding locations. 'Heavy' feeders (groups 3 and 4 reported that they traveled significantly longer distances in order to feed the cats. Commercial dry food consisted of 90% of the food they provided, with 66% of them feeding once a day, with less food per cat per day than the other feeder groups. Interestingly, 'heavy' feeders were usually singles, had on average fewer siblings, a clear preference for owning cats as pets and lived in lower income neighborhoods. According to the feeders' reports on the FRC populations they fed, 69.7% (2325/3337 cats were neutered and 11.8% (395/3337 were kittens. In addition, they reported that 1.6% (54/3337 of the cats were limping, 2% (67/3337 suffered from a systemic disease, 4% (135/3337 had skin lesions, and 3.9% (130/3337 were suffering from a chronic disability. Abundance of kittens and morbidity rate were significantly and

  7. Feeders of Free-Roaming Cats: Personal Characteristics, Feeding Practices, and Data on Cat Health and Welfare in an Urban Setting of Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunther, Idit; Raz, Tal; Even Zor, Yehonatan; Bachowski, Yuval; Klement, Eyal

    2016-01-01

    Cat feeders serve as an important source of available food for free-roaming cats (FRCs) and can play a central role in providing data on FRC distribution, welfare, and health. Data on cat feeder personalities as well as a better understanding of their feeding practices offer relevance for decision making concerning FRC population control strategies. The current study surveyed 222 FRC feeders who responded to a municipal trap-neuter-return (TNR) campaign in an Israeli central urban setting. The aim of the study was to describe their personal characteristics, feeding practices, and the FRC populations they feed. Feeders were divided into four groups according to the number of cats they claimed to feed per day (group 1: fed up to 5 cats, group 2: fed 6-10 cats, group 3: fed 11-20 cats, and group 4: fed ≥21 cats). Most feeders were women (81%), with a median age of 58 years (range 18-81). The feeders reported an overall feeding of 3337 cats in 342 different feeding locations. Feeders of group 4 comprised 15.31% (n = 34) of all feeders but fed 56% (n = 1869) of the FRC in 37.42% (n = 128) of the feeding locations. "Heavy" feeders (groups 3 and 4) reported that they traveled significantly longer distances in order to feed the cats. Commercial dry food consisted of 90% of the food they provided, with 66% of them feeding once a day, with less food per cat per day than the other feeder groups. Interestingly, "heavy" feeders were usually singles, had on average fewer siblings, a clear preference for owning cats as pets, and lived in lower income neighborhoods. According to the feeders' reports on the FRC populations they fed, 69.7% (2325/3337) cats were neutered and 11.8% (395/3337) were kittens. In addition, they reported that 1.6% (54/3337) of the cats were limping, 2% (67/3337) suffered from a systemic disease, 4% (135/3337) had skin lesions, and 3.9% (130/3337) were suffering from a chronic disability. Abundance of kittens and morbidity rate were

  8. Survey of Helicobacter infection in domestic and feral cats in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghil, Heh-Myung; Yoo, Jong-Hyeon; Jung, Woo-Sung; Chung, Tae-Ho; Youn, Hwa-Young; Hwang, Cheol-Yong

    2009-03-01

    Discovery of Helicobacter (H.) pylori has led to a fundamental change in our understanding of gastric diseases in humans. Previous studies have found various Helicobacter spp. in dogs and cats, and pets have been questioned as a zoonotic carrier. The present study surveyed the Helicobacter infections and investigated the presence of H. felis and H. pylori infections in domestic and feral cats in Korea. Sixty-four domestic cats and 101 feral cats were selected from an animal shelter. Saliva and feces were evaluated by Helicobacter genus-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Genus-specific PCR positive samples were further evaluated for H. felis and H. pylori using specific primer pairs. Thirty-six of 64 (56.3%) samples from domestic cats and 92 of 101 (91.1%) samples from feral cats were PCR positive; the positive rate of feces samples was higher than that of saliva samples in both groups. H. felis and H. pylori species-specific PCR was uniformly negative. The prevalence of Helicobacter spp. in feral cats was approximately two-fold higher than that of domestic cats. The fecal-oral route may be more a common transmission route not only between cats but also in humans. PMID:19255526

  9. Tissue distribution of amyloid deposits in Abyssinian cats with familial amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBartola, S P; Tarr, M J; Benson, M D

    1986-07-01

    The tissue distribution of amyloid deposits was studied in 15 related Abyssinian cats with familial amyloidosis. There was interstitial medullary amyloidosis in the kidneys of all 15 cats but only 11 had detectable glomerular involvement. The thyroid glands, stomach and colon were affected in all cats examined. Most of the cats also had amyloid deposits in the small intestine, spleen, heart, adrenals, pancreas, liver, lymph nodes and bladder. In 50 per cent or fewer of the cats examined, there was involvement of the parathyroids, lung and gonads. The central nervous system was not involved in any of the 3 cats evaluated. In 8 of the cats, no concurrent inflammatory disease could be detected. The tissue distribution of amyloid deposits resembled that found in other breeds of domestic cats with systemic amyloidosis. Despite the wide tissue distribution of amyloid deposits, clinical signs were related to renal amyloidosis. Familial amyloidosis in the Abyssinian cat may represent a valuable spontaneous animal model for the study of Familial Mediterranean Fever in man and the pathogenesis of reactive amyloidosis in general. PMID:3734172

  10. Epidemiology of systemic inflammatory response syndrome and sepsis in cats hospitalized in a veterinary teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babyak, Jonathan M; Sharp, Claire R

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the epidemiology of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and sepsis in cats hospitalized in a veterinary teaching hospital. DESIGN Observational study. ANIMALS 246 client-owned cats. PROCEDURES During a 3-month period, daily treatment records were evaluated for all hospitalized cats. Information extracted included signalment, temperature, heart rate, respiratory rate, diagnostic test results, diagnosis, duration of hospitalization, and outcome (survival or death). Cats were classified into 1 of 4 disease categories (sepsis [confirmed infection and SIRS], infection [confirmed infection without SIRS], noninfectious SIRS [SIRS without a confirmed infection], and no SIRS [no SIRS or infection]). RESULTS Of the 246 cats, 26 and 3 were hospitalized 2 and 3 times, respectively; thus, 275 hospitalizations were evaluated. When SIRS was defined as the presence of ≥ 2 of 4 SIRS criteria, 17 cats had sepsis, 16 had infections, 81 had noninfectious SIRS, and 161 were classified in the no SIRS category at hospital admission. The prevalence of sepsis at hospital admission was 6.2 cases/100 admissions. Four cats developed sepsis while hospitalized, resulting in a sepsis incidence rate of 1.5 cases/100 hospital admissions. Four of 17 cats with sepsis at hospital admission and 3 of 4 cats that developed sepsis while hospitalized died or were euthanized, resulting in a mortality rate of 33.3% for septic cats; 239 hospitalizations resulted in survival, 28 resulted in euthanasia, and 8 resulted in death. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that many hospitalized cats have evidence of SIRS and some have sepsis. In cats, sepsis is an important clinical entity with a high mortality rate. PMID:27308883

  11. Effect of tool profile and fatigue loading on the local hardness around scratches in clad and unclad aluminium alloy 2024

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanoindentation has been used to study the hardness changes produced by scratching of aluminium alloy AA2024, with and without a clad layer of pure aluminium. The hardness was mapped around scratches made with diamond tools of different profiles. One tool produced significant plastic damage with associated hardening at the scratch root, whilst the other produced a 'cleaner' cut with no hardening. The different behaviours are attributed to whether the tool makes the scratch by a 'cutting' or a 'ploughing' mechanism. The degree of plastic damage around the scratches has been correlated with peak broadening data obtained using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. There was no change observed in the local hardness around the scratch with fatigue loading.

  12. Influence of Temperature and Mechanical Scratch on the Recorded Magnetization Stability of Longitudinal and Perpendicular Recording Media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stability of recorded magnetization of hard disk drive (HDD) is influenced by external environments, such as temperature and magnetic field. Small scratches are frequently formed on HDD medium surface upon contacts with the magnetic head. The influences of temperature and mechanical scratch on the magnetization structure stability are investigated for longitudinal and perpendicular recording media by using a magnetic force microscope. PMR media remained almost unchanged up to about 300 deg. C for the area with no scratches, whereas the areas near and under mechanical scratches started to change around 250 deg. C. The magnetization structure of LMR media started to change at about 100 degrees lower temperature under mechanical scratches when compared with no scratch areas. A quantitative analysis of magnetization structure variation is carried out by measuring the recorded magnetization strength difference estimated from the MFM images observed for a same sample area before and after exposing the sample to different temperatures.

  13. Actinomyces endogenous endophthalmitis in a cat following multiple dental extractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westermeyer, Hans D; Ward, Daniel A; Whittemore, Jacqueline C; Lyons, Jeremiah A

    2013-11-01

    An 8-year-old, brachycephalic, mixed breed cat underwent full mouth tooth extractions for the treatment of tooth root abscessation. Subsequently, the cat developed anterior uveitis refractory to topical therapy that eventually necessitated enucleation. Actinomyces species were isolated from both the tooth root abscesses and the anterior chamber after enucleation. Histopathology of the enucleated eye revealed panophthalmitis with abundant intralesional bacteria morphologically consistent with Actinomyces. Between the time of tooth root extraction and enucleation (20 weeks), the cat was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism and treated with oral steroids for inflammatory bowel syndrome. We believe this report represents a rare case of endogenous endophthalmitis secondary to dental disease, possibly precipitated by concurrent immunosuppression. PMID:23281798

  14. [A case of human infection with brucellosis from a cat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repina, L P; Nikulina, A I; Kosilov, I A

    1993-01-01

    The epidemiological study of a focus of Brucella infection revealed that an outbreak of brucellosis occurred in a small town, and the source of this infection was a domestic cat. As the result of contacts with this cat, six persons, among them three children aged 3, 8 and 12 years, had brucellosis. In all these patients acute brucellosis was diagnosed. Simultaneously with the clinical manifestations of the disease, a rise in antibody titer from 1:50 to 1:1,600 was observed. Brucella cultures isolated from the blood of one of the patients and from the internal organs of the cat exhibited the properties, similar to those of "rodent" strains, i. e. their differential signs permit their classification with B. suis, serovar 5. PMID:8067119

  15. Epidemiological survey of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in domestic owned cats from the tropical southeast of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Coello, M; Acosta-Viana, K Y; Guzman-Marin, E; Gomez-Rios, A; Ortega-Pacheco, A

    2012-09-01

    American trypanosomiasis is an infectious disease of importance for public health and caused by the protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi mainly transmitted by triatomine bugs. The precise role of cats in the peridomestic transmission of T. cruzi and the mechanism by which cats become infected remain uncertain. The objective of this work was to determine the prevalence of T. cruzi infection in domestic cats from an urban area of tropical Mexico by serological and molecular methods and evaluate associated risk factors. A total of 220 domestic cats from Merida Yucatan, Mexico, were studied. Animals older than 3 months were blood sampled. Serum and DNA were obtained. Specific T. cruzi IgG antibodies were detected using a commercial indirect ELISA with an anti-cat antibody HRP labelled. Positive cases were confirmed by Western blot (WB). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was also performed using the primers TC1 and TC2. From the 220 cats, 8.6% had antibodies against T. cruzi using ELISA test and later confirmed by WB. In 75 cats (34%), the sequence of ADNk of T. cruzi was amplified. The bad-regular body condition was the only risk factor associated with PCR positive to T.cruzi (P FIV, FeLV or others). It is necessary to monitor PCR-positive patients and conduct further studies for better understanding of the epidemiology and pathogenesis of Chagas disease in domestic cats. PMID:22958254

  16. Mucolipidosis type II in a domestic shorthair cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A seven-month-old, female domestic shorthair cat was presented to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital, University of Zurich, with abnormal facial features, retarded growth and progressive hindlimb paresis. On physical examination the cat had a flat, broad face with hypertelorism, frontal bossing, small ears and thickened upper and lower eyelids. The corneas of both eyes were clear and the pupils were dilated. The skin was generally thickened, most prominently on the dorsal aspect of the neck. Radiography of the entire skeleton revealed a severely deformed spinal column, bilateral hip luxation with hip dysplasia, an abnormally shaped skull and generalised decreased bone opacity. The clinical features and radiographic changes were suggestive of mucopolysaccharidosis. The toluidine blue spot test on a urine sample, however, was negative for glycosaminoglycans. Further biochemical investigations revealed a deficiency of the enzyme N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase (GlcNAc-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.8.17) in peripheral leukocytes and an elevation of many lysosomal enzymes in the serum of the cat which is diagnostic for mucolipidosis type II. Histology and electron microscopy of different tissues are briefly summarised. The findings of this cat, the first reported case of mucolipidosis type II are compared with other similar storage diseases described in the cat

  17. Urine-marking and ground-scratching by free-ranging Arctic Wolves, Canis lupus arctos, in summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mech, L.D.

    2006-01-01

    Urine-marking and ground-scratching were observed in an Arctic Wolf (Canis lupus) pack on Ellesmere Island, Nunavut, Canada, during 16 summers between 1986 and 2005. All previously known urination postures and ground-scratching by breeding males and females were seen, and incidence of marking and scratching was greatest when non-pack wolves were present. Observations of urine-marking of food remains supported the conclusion from a captive Wolf study that such marking signals lack of edible food.

  18. Výuka základů programování v prostředí Scratch

    OpenAIRE

    Krejsa, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The work deals with programming education on primary schools in Scratch programme. Investigation was carried out by questionnaire on primary school in theoretic part. The investigation shows the facts relating to teaching programming. Scratch is compared with Baltík and Imagine Logo, which are the most commonly used on primary schools. The work also includes an analysis of teaching materials that are available for teaching Scratch. Results of the analysis of teaching materials are shown in a ...

  19. A review of feline leukemia virus and feline immunodeficiency virus seroprevalence in cats in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Susan

    2011-10-15

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) are common and important infectious diseases of cats in Canada. Prevalence data are necessary to define prophylactic, management, and therapeutic measures for stray, feral and owned cats. Recently, comprehensive data on the seroprevalence of retrovirus infections of cats in Canada have become available and are reviewed. Further investigation into geographic variations in retrovirus seroprevalence within Canada is warranted, and may provide information to improve recommendations for testing and prevention. As well, more information is needed on FIV subtypes in Canada to improve diagnostics and vaccines, as well as to provide information on disease outcomes. PMID:21757241

  20. Radiographic Evaluation of Pulmonary Pattern Changes in 27 Cats and 58 Dogs

    OpenAIRE

    TEMİZSOYLU, Mustafa Doğa

    2003-01-01

    This study sought to determine the roles and effectiveness of findings obtained from radiographic examinations of lungs in the diagnosis of pulmonary diseases and to place radiographic findings into routine practice in dogs and cats. Fifty-eight dogs and 27 cats of different breeds, sexes and ages suspected of having pulmonary disease were used as the study materials after clinical examination and anamnesis. The pulmonary radiographies of these cases were appropriately taken and radiographic ...

  1. On Schr\\"odinger's cat

    CERN Document Server

    de Silva, Nalin

    2010-01-01

    Schr\\"odinger's cat appears to have been harassed in a chamber during the past eighty years or so by interpreting the role of the observer as a person, who sets an experiment and then observes results, may be after some time. The realist position tells us that the physical processes would take place independent of the observer with well defined properties, whereas the positivist position wants us to believe that nothing can be said of a system when it is not being observed. In this paper we question both these positions and also the assumption that the atom and the cat are entangled and further whether the atom could be considered to be in a state of decay and not decay. We let the cat either out of the bag (chamber) or rest in peace with or without the atom or the observer.

  2. Cat Ownership Perception and Caretaking Explored in an Internet Survey of People Associated with Cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zito, Sarah; Vankan, Dianne; Bennett, Pauleen; Paterson, Mandy; Phillips, Clive J C

    2015-01-01

    People who feed cats that they do not perceive they own (sometimes called semi-owners) are thought to make a considerable contribution to unwanted cat numbers because the cats they support are generally not sterilized. Understanding people's perception of cat ownership and the psychology underlying cat semi-ownership could inform approaches to mitigate the negative effects of cat semi-ownership. The primary aims of this study were to investigate cat ownership perception and to examine its association with human-cat interactions and caretaking behaviours. A secondary aim was to evaluate a definition of cat semi-ownership (including an association time of ≥1 month and frequent feeding), revised from a previous definition proposed in the literature to distinguish cat semi-ownership from casual interactions with unowned cats. Cat owners and semi-owners displayed similar types of interactions and caretaking behaviours. Nevertheless, caretaking behaviours were more commonly displayed towards owned cats than semi-owned cats, and semi-owned cats were more likely to have produced kittens (pcats in semi-ownership relationships compared to casual interaction relationships. Determinants of cat ownership perception were identified (pcat friendliness and health, and feelings about unowned cats, including the acceptability of feeding unowned cats. Encouraging semi-owners to have the cats they care for sterilized may assist in reducing the number of unwanted kittens and could be a valuable alternative to trying to prevent semi-ownership entirely. Highly accessible semi-owner "gatekeepers" could help to deliver education messages and facilitate the provision of cat sterilization services to semi-owners. This research enabled semi-ownership to be distinguished from casual interaction relationships and can assist welfare and government agencies to identify cat semi-owners in order to develop strategies to address this source of unwanted cats. PMID:26218243

  3. A nanometric cushion for enhancing scratch and wear resistance of hard films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katya Gotlib-Vainshtein

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Scratch resistance and friction are core properties which define the tribological characteristics of materials. Attempts to optimize these quantities at solid surfaces are the subject of intense technological interest. The capability to modulate these surface properties while preserving both the bulk properties of the materials and a well-defined, constant chemical composition of the surface is particularly attractive. We report herein the use of a soft, flexible underlayer to control the scratch resistance of oxide surfaces. Titania films of several nm thickness are coated onto substrates of silicon, kapton, polycarbonate, and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS. The scratch resistance measured by scanning force microscopy is found to be substrate dependent, diminishing in the order PDMS, kapton/polycarbonate, Si/SiO2. Furthermore, when PDMS is applied as an intermediate layer between a harder substrate and titania, marked improvement in the scratch resistance is achieved. This is shown by quantitative wear tests for silicon or kapton, by coating these substrates with PDMS which is subsequently capped by a titania layer, resulting in enhanced scratch/wear resistance. The physical basis of this effect is explored by means of Finite Element Analysis, and we suggest a model for friction reduction based on the "cushioning effect” of a soft intermediate layer.

  4. Characteristics of scratching behavior in ADJM mice (atopic dermatitis from Japanese mice).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakasone, Tasuku; Sato, Takumi; Matsushima, Yoshibumi; Inoue, Toshio; Kamei, Chiaki

    2015-04-01

    In order to elucidate the characteristics of scratching behavior in atopic dermatitis from Japanese mice (ADJM) mice, the effects of some antagonists of pruritogens on this behavior were studied. Both male and female ADJM mice showed frequent scratching behavior around the face, abdomen and back. The number of scratching behavior around the face was greater than on the abdomen and back, and scratching behavior in female mice was significantly more frequent than in male mice. Histamine H1 antagonist, chlorpheniramine, p.o., inhibited this behavior potently and dose-dependently. Histamine H1 antagonist with serotonin 5-TH(5-hydroxytryptamine)2 antagonist, cyproheptadine, also inhibited this behavior. However, NK1 antagonist, aprepitant, p.o., had no significant inhibitory effect even at a dose of 100 mg/kg, p.o., Mu antagonist, naloxone, and kappa agonist, nalfurafine, significantly inhibited this behavior at doses of 0.3 mg/kg, s.c., and 0.01 mg/kg, p.o., respectively. Histamine contents in the skin of ADJM mice were significantly higher than in BALB/c mice. These results strongly indicate that scratching behavior in ADJM mice is related with histamine H1, opioid mu and opioid kappa receptors. PMID:25578901

  5. Diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome: interobserver reliability of the blinded scratch-collapse test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blok, Robin D; Becker, Stéphanie J E; Ring, David C

    2014-06-01

    The reliability of the scratch-collapse test for diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) has not been tested by independent investigators. This study measured the reliability of the scratch-collapse test comparing the treating hand surgeon and blinded evaluators. We performed a prospective observational study of 41 patients with a provisional diagnosis of CTS or a combination of CTS and cubital tunnel syndrome and prescribed electrodiagnostic testing. The treating hand surgeon performed the scratch-collapse test. Next, the test was administered by one of the six observers, unaware of the patient's symptoms and the diagnosis made by treating hand surgeon. The kappa statistic (κ) was used to calculate the interrater reliability between the treating hand surgeons and blinded scratchers. The agreement between the blinded observers and the hand surgeons on the scratch-collapse test was substantial 0.63 (95 % CI, 0.34-0.87; p scratch test in our sample was 32 %. In a small study with a spectrum bias favoring electrophysiologically confirmed CTS the reliability was lower than that reported by the inventors of the test, but was still substantial. We propose a larger study of patients with a greater variety of electrodiagnostic test results using fewer observers with more experience. PMID:24876682

  6. Assessment of adhesion between thin film and silicon based on a scratch test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thin film coatings are commonly utilized to prevent wear, modify surface properties, and manipulate the frictional behavior of various mechanical systems. The behavior of a coating has a direct effect on the life as well as performance of the system. However, the coating itself is subject to damage, and the quality of the coating is related to the adhesion characteristics between the coating and the substrate. Therefore, a quantitative assessment of the adhesion properties of thin film is important to guarantee the reliability of not only the thin film but also the mechanical system. In this study, ramp loading scratch tests were performed to assess the adhesion characteristics of Ag and ZnO thin films coated on a silicon wafer. Silver thin film, deposited by sputtering, and ZnO thin film, fabricated by a sol-gel method, were used as scratch specimens. Scratch tests using a diamond tip were performed with a continuously increasing normal force. During the scratch test, the normal and frictional forces were monitored to assess the integrity of the film. The Benjamin and Weaver model commonly used for obtaining the horizontal force during the scratching of films coated on a substrate showed large discrepancies with the experimental results. In this work, the model was modified with a plowing term to minimize the difference between the experimental and theoretical results. Using the modified model, the experimental results could be predicted with an accuracy of about 10%

  7. Influence of surface roughness and contact load on friction coefficient and scratch behavior of thermoplastic olefins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Han; Browning, Robert; Fincher, Jason; Gasbarro, Anthony; Jones, Scooter; Sue, Hung-Jue

    2008-05-01

    To study the effects of surface roughness and contact load on the friction behavior and scratch resistance of polymers, a set of model thermoplastic olefins (TPO) systems with various surface roughness ( Ra) levels were prepared and evaluated. It is found that a higher Ra corresponds to a lower surface friction coefficient ( μs). At each level of Ra, μs gets larger as contact load increases, with a greater increase in μs as Ra level increases. It is also observed that with increasing contact load and increasing Ra, the μs tend to level off. In evaluating TPO scratch resistance, a lower μs would delay the onset of ductile drawing-induced fish-scale surface deformation feature, thereby raising the load required to cause scratch visibility. However, as the contact load is further increased, the μs evolves to become scratch coefficient of friction (SCOF) as significant sub-surface deformation and tip penetration occur and material displacement begins, i.e., ploughing. No dependence of Ra and μs on the critical load for the onset of ploughing is observed. In this work, the distinction between μs and SCOF will be illustrated. Approaches for improving scratch resistance of polymers via control of Ra are also discussed.

  8. Spatial Stream Segregation by Cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javier, Lauren K; McGuire, Elizabeth A; Middlebrooks, John C

    2016-06-01

    Listeners can perceive interleaved sequences of sounds from two or more sources as segregated streams. In humans, physical separation of sound sources is a major factor enabling such stream segregation. Here, we examine spatial stream segregation with a psychophysical measure in domestic cats. Cats depressed a pedal to initiate a target sequence of brief sound bursts in a particular rhythm and then released the pedal when the rhythm changed. The target bursts were interleaved with a competing sequence of bursts that could differ in source location but otherwise were identical to the target bursts. This task was possible only when the sources were heard as segregated streams. When the sound bursts had broad spectra, cats could detect the rhythm change when target and competing sources were separated by as little as 9.4°. Essentially equal levels of performance were observed when frequencies were restricted to a high, 4-to-25-kHz, band in which the principal spatial cues presumably were related to sound levels. When the stimulus band was restricted from 0.4 to 1.6 kHz, leaving interaural time differences as the principal spatial cue, performance was severely degraded. The frequency sensitivity of cats in this task contrasts with that of humans, who show better spatial stream segregation with low- than with high-frequency sounds. Possible explanations for the species difference includes the smaller interaural delays available to cats due to smaller sizes of their heads and the potentially greater sound-level cues available due to the cat's frontally directed pinnae and higher audible frequency range. PMID:26993807

  9. Self Inflicted Dermatological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertuğrul H. Aydemir

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This group of diseases are characterised with the aggravated types of stress releasing behaviors like scratching, picking, squeezing, and sucking. Lichen simplex chronicus, prurigo nodularis, neurotic excoriations, trichotillomani, and onychotillomani are the diseases in this group. Depression, anxiety, and obsesif compulsive disease are the main underlying psychologic diseases. They need a skillfull psychiatric approach in addition to dermatologic treatment, and should be treated with patience in a long duration.

  10. Self Inflicted Dermatological Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Ertuğrul H. Aydemir

    2010-01-01

    This group of diseases are characterised with the aggravated types of stress releasing behaviors like scratching, picking, squeezing, and sucking. Lichen simplex chronicus, prurigo nodularis, neurotic excoriations, trichotillomani, and onychotillomani are the diseases in this group. Depression, anxiety, and obsesif compulsive disease are the main underlying psychologic diseases. They need a skillfull psychiatric approach in addition to dermatologic treatment, and should be treated with patien...

  11. The Nucleon as a Holographic Cheshire Cat

    OpenAIRE

    Zahed, Ismail

    2014-01-01

    The Cheshire cat principle emerges naturally from the holographic approach of the nucleon in terms of a bulk instanton. The cat hides in the holographic direction. I briefly review the one-nucleon problem in the holographic limit.

  12. The nucleon as a holographic Cheshire cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cheshire cat principle emerges naturally from the holographic approach of the nucleon in terms of a bulk instanton. The cat hides in the holographic direction. I briefly review the one-nucleon problem in the holographic limit

  13. Cerebral cysticercosis in a cat : clinical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Schwan

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The metacestode of Taenia solium, Cysticercus cellulosae, was recovered from the brain of a cat showing central nervous clinical signs ante mortem. This is the first record of cerebral cysticercosis in a cat in South Africa.

  14. Dipylidium (Dog and Cat Flea Tapeworm) FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if my pet has a tapeworm infection? Although cats and dogs are rarely ill as a result of a ... and outdoor environments. Have your veterinarian treat your dogs and cats promptly if they have tapeworms. Clean up after ...

  15. ServCat Document Selection Guidelines

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The ServCat document selection guidelines were developed for selecting appropriate documents to upload into ServCat. When beginning to upload documents into...

  16. Efficacy and longevity of nitenpyram against adult cat fleas (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust, M K; Waggoner, M M; Hinkle, N C; Stansfield, D; Barnett, S

    2003-09-01

    Nitenpyram (Capstar) is a fast acting, orally administered flea treatment that is absorbed into the blood of the host animal and is readily available for uptake by feeding fleas. We examined the efficacy of a single dose of nitenpyram against adult cat fleas, Ctenocephalides felis (Bouché), over several days. We recorded adult flea mortality and flea egg production on treated and untreated cats. Nitenpyram provided 100% kill of all fleas on the host at the time of treatment and for up to 24 h after treatment. Between 24 and 48 h after treatment, there was a 98.6% reduction in adult flea numbers. From 48 to 72 h, there was a 5% reduction in adult fleas. There was a 97% reduction and 95.2% reduction in the number of flea eggs collected from treated versus untreated animals during the first 48 h and from 48 to 72 h, respectively. In addition, we quantified three distinct behavioral responses of infested adult cats treated with nitenpyram to determine the extent of any immediate, overt behavioral responses in treated animals. A significant increase in scratching, biting, licking, and twitching occurred for 5 h. The biting and licking continued for 7 h after treatment. Administration of nitenpyram provides an effective mechanism to eliminate adult fleas from hosts for up to 48 h after treatment. PMID:14596282

  17. Dirac Cat States in Relativistic Landau Levels

    OpenAIRE

    Bermudez, A.; Martin-Delgado, M. A.; Solano, E.

    2007-01-01

    We show that a relativistic version of Schrodinger cat states, here called Dirac cat states, can be built in relativistic Landau levels when an external magnetic field couples to a relativistic spin 1/2 charged particle. Under suitable initial conditions, the associated Dirac equation produces unitarily Dirac cat states involving the orbital quanta of the particle in a well defined mesoscopic regime. We demonstrate that the proposed Dirac cat states have a purely relativistic origin and cease...

  18. Halal Cat Food for the World Market

    OpenAIRE

    Amir H.M.S; Razauden Z; Harisun Y; Ida I.M; Mona Z

    2014-01-01

    Currently, University Technology Malaysia (UTM) is engaged with a well-known private company in Malaysia to develop halal cat food for the world. A team of scientists from UTM was formed for the development of cat food from preparing palatants to producing canned cat and kibbled cat food formulation on a commercial scale to fulfil the vast market demand, as well as to act as contract manufacturer for this private company. Financial aid is made available by the university and Malaysian governm...

  19. Removal of scratches on fused silica optics by using a CO₂laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormont, P; Combis, P; Gallais, L; Hecquet, C; Lamaignère, L; Rullier, J L

    2013-11-18

    We investigate the efficiency of local CO₂laser processing of scratches on silica optics in order to enhance the nanosecond UV-laser damage resistance. The surface deformations induced by the process have been measured for different CO₂laser parameters and then the pulse duration and the beam diameter have been chosen accordingly to limit those deformations below 1 µm. From the study of the laser damage resistance as a function of different material modifications we identify a range of optimal radiation parameters allowing a complete elimination of scratches associated with a high threshold of laser damage. Calculation of the temperature of silica using a two-dimensional axi-symmetric code was compared with experiment, supporting an optimization of the laser parameter as a function of the maximal dimensions of scratches that could be removed by this process. PMID:24514338

  20. The effect of Scratch environment on student’s achievement in teaching algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Tekerek

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect of Scratch environment in teaching algorithm in elementary school 6th grade Information and Communication Technologies course was examined. The research method was experimental method. Control group, pretest-posttest design of experimental research method and a convenience sample consisting of 60 6th grade students were used. The research instrument was achievement test to determine the effect of Scratch on learning algorithm. During the implementation process experiment group studied using Scratch and control group studied with traditional methods. The data was analyzed using independent-samples t-test, paired-samples t-test and ANCOVA statistics. According to findings there is no statically significant difference between posttest achievement scores of experiment and control groups. Similarly, In terms of gender there isn’t a statically significant difference between posttest scores of experiment and control groups.