WorldWideScience

Sample records for cat phenomenon effects

  1. Fatal Attraction Phenomenon in Humans – Cat Odour Attractiveness Increased for Toxoplasma-Infected Men While Decreased for Infected Women

    OpenAIRE

    Jaroslav Flegr; Pavlína Lenochová; Zdeněk Hodný; Marta Vondrová

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Latent toxoplasmosis, a lifelong infection with the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii, has cumulative effects on the behaviour of hosts, including humans. The most impressive effect of toxoplasmosis is the "fatal attraction phenomenon," the conversion of innate fear of cat odour into attraction to cat odour in infected rodents. While most behavioural effects of toxoplasmosis were confirmed also in humans, neither the fatal attraction phenomenon nor any toxoplasmosis-associated changes i...

  2. Fatal attraction phenomenon in humans: cat odour attractiveness increased for toxoplasma-infected men while decreased for infected women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Flegr

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Latent toxoplasmosis, a lifelong infection with the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii, has cumulative effects on the behaviour of hosts, including humans. The most impressive effect of toxoplasmosis is the "fatal attraction phenomenon," the conversion of innate fear of cat odour into attraction to cat odour in infected rodents. While most behavioural effects of toxoplasmosis were confirmed also in humans, neither the fatal attraction phenomenon nor any toxoplasmosis-associated changes in olfactory functions have been searched for in them. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Thirty-four Toxoplasma-infected and 134 noninfected students rated the odour of urine samples from cat, horse, tiger, brown hyena and dog for intensity and pleasantness. The raters were blind to their infection status and identity of the samples. No signs of changed sensitivity of olfaction were observed. However, we found a strong, gender dependent effect of toxoplasmosis on the pleasantness attributed to cat urine odour (p = 0.0025. Infected men rated this odour as more pleasant than did the noninfected men, while infected women rated the same odour as less pleasant than did noninfected women. Toxoplasmosis did not affect how subjects rated the pleasantness of any other animal species' urine odour; however, a non-significant trend in the same directions was observed for hyena urine. CONCLUSIONS: The absence of the effects of toxoplasmosis on the odour pleasantness score attributed to large cats would suggest that the amino acid felinine could be responsible for the fatal attraction phenomenon. Our results also raise the possibility that the odour-specific threshold deficits observed in schizophrenia patients could be caused by increased prevalence of Toxoplasma-infected subjects in this population rather than by schizophrenia itself. The trend observed with the hyena urine sample suggests that this carnivore, and other representatives of the Feliformia suborder, should be studied

  3. Nothingness and the placebo effect phenomenon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tine

    a posthuman angle, applying Karen Barad’s concept of agential realism to tackle the issue of nothingness. I argue that the placebo effect produces specific agencies in the placebo effect phenomenon – that is, both the subject under treatment and the placebo emerge in the placebo effect in the act of measuring it...

  4. Is iloprost effective in secondary Raynaud's phenomenon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustig, Nicole; Rada, Gabriel

    2015-03-09

    Patients with systemic sclerosis frequently have Raynaud's phenomenon and digital ischemic ulcers. Iloprost, a synthetic prostacyclin analogue, may be effective in these cases. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 20 databases, we identified three systematic reviews including seven randomized trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded iloprost may lead to little or no difference in the frequency or severity of secondary Raynaud, and it is associated to adverse effects and important costs.

  5. Effects of experimental amitraz intoxication in cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.F. Andrade

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available This work studied the effects of experimental amitraz intoxication in cats. Sixteen cats were randomly divided equally into two groups: amitraz group - animals received 1.5% amitraz at 1mg/kg IV; and the control group - animals without amitraz. Physiological parameters from blood, cardiorespiratory system, and sedation indicators were quantified over time up to 360 minutes. Blood profile, urea, creatinine, alananine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase were not affected by amitraz. Sedation, loss of reflexes, hypothermia, bradycardia, bradyarrhythmia, hypotension, bradypnea, mydriasis, besides transitory hyperglycemia, hypoinsulinemia and decrease of cortisol levels were observed in cats experimentally exposed to amitraz. The alpha2-adrenergic effects induced by amitraz intoxication in cats are very similar to the same effects reported in others species, contributing with more information about this type of intoxication to veterinary toxicology.

  6. Effective generation of cat and kitten states

    CERN Document Server

    Stobi'nska, M; Wodkiewicz, K; Stobi\\'nska, Magdalena; W\\'odkiewicz, Krzysztof

    2006-01-01

    We present an effective method of coherent state superposition (cat state) generation using single trapped ion in a Paul trap. The method is experimentally feasible for coherent states with amplitude $\\alpha \\le 2$ using available technology. It works both in and beyond the Lamb-Dicke regime.

  7. The antihypertensive effect of amlodipine in cats

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    D. Morar,

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effect of amlodipine on blood pressure and renal function in cats with arterial hypertension secondary to chronic renal failure. The research was conducted on 11 cats, aged between 7 and 14.5 years, diagnosed with arterial hypertension secondary to chronic renal failure. Systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP, mean arterial pressure (MBP and pulse rate were determined by oscillometric method, before and after 7, 30 or 120 days of treatment with amlodipine. At the beginning of treatment, all cats were receiving 0.625 mg amlodipine once daily and after 7 days oftreatment, in five cats, the dose was increased to 1.25 mg amlodipine, once daily. Before amlodipine administration the mean values of SBP/DBP were 175 ± 13.2 mmHg/119 ± 7.2 mmHg and after 30 days of treatment, the mean values of the SBP/DBP were reduced by 27.9/25.4 mmHg (p<0,001. After 120 days of treatment with amlodipine mean values of SBP/DBP were lower with 32/31 mmHg compared with baseline values (p<0.001. The treatment with amlodipine did not significantly affect the values of blood biochemical parameters of renal profile.

  8. Lesions of structures showing FOS expression to cat presentation: effects on responsivity to a Cat, Cat odor, and nonpredator threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, D Caroline; Canteras, Newton S; Markham, Chris M; Pentkowski, Nathan S; Blanchard, Robert J

    2005-01-01

    Exposure of rats to a cat elicits Fos activity in a number of brain areas or structures. Based on hodological relationships of these, Canteras has proposed a medial hypothalamic defense system, with input from several forebrain sites. Both electrolytic and neurotoxic lesions of the dorsal premammillary nucleus, which shows the strongest Fos response to cat exposure, produce striking decrements in a number of defensive behaviors to a cat or to cat odor stimuli, but do not have a major effect on either postshock freezing, or responsivity to the odor of a female in estrus. Neurotoxic lesions of the medial amygdala produce decrements in defensiveness to predator stimuli, particularly odor stimuli, that are consistent with a view of this structure as involved with allomonal cues. While dorsal hippocampal lesions had little effect on responsivity to predator stimuli, neurotoxic lesions of the ventral hippocampus reduced freezing and enhanced a variety of nondefensive behaviors to both cat odor and footshock, with similar reductions in defensiveness during context conditioning tests for cat odor, cat exposure and footshock. These results support the view that the dorsal premammillary nucleus is strongly and selectively involved in control of responsivity to predator stimuli. Structures with important input into the medial hypothalamic defense system appear also to be functionally involved with antipredator defensive behaviors, and these lesion studies may suggest specific hypotheses as to the particular defense functions of different areas.

  9. Is iloprost effective in secondary Raynaud's phenomenon?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lustig, Nicole; Rada, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    .... Iloprost, a synthetic prostacyclin analogue, may be effective in these cases. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 20 databases, we identified three systematic reviews including seven randomized trials...

  10. Body condition of feral cats and the effect of neutering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Karen C; Levy, Julie K; Gorman, Shawn P; Newell, Susan M

    2002-01-01

    Considerable debate exists regarding the most appropriate methods for controlling feral cat populations, both from humane and logistical points of view. The physical condition of feral cats has not been reported, and it is not known if these cats benefit from neutering. This study investigates the body condition of feral cats by measuring body weight (BW), body condition score (BCS; Burkholder, 2000; Laflamme, Kealy, & Schmidt, 1994), and falciform fat pad. The study includes lateral abdominal radiographs taken at the time of neutering of 105 adult feral cats for measurement of falciform fat pad depth and area. At that time we also assessed BW and BCS. One year later we assessed the effects of neutering on body condition by evaluating a subsample of 14 cats. At the time of surgery, the cats were lean but not emaciated (BW 3.1 +/- 0.9 kg; BCS 4 +/- 1; based on a 1 to 9 scale ranging from 1 [emaciated] to 9 [grossly obese]). Falciform fat pad depth and area averaged 7.1 mm and 197.4 mm2, respectively, indicating a small amount of fat. Fourteen cats, reevaluated 1 year after neutering, increased 260% + 90% in falciform fat pad depth, 420% +/- 390% in fat pad area, 40% +/- 4% in BW, and 1 level in BCS ranking (1 to 9 scale; all differences p cats, feral cats gained significant weight and body fat after neutering.

  11. Effect of advection on transient ion concentration-polarization phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosentsvit, Leon; Park, Sinwook; Yossifon, Gilad

    2017-08-01

    Here, we studied the effect of advection on the transient ion concentration-polarization phenomenon in microchannel-membrane systems. Specifically, the temporal evolution of the depletion layer in a system that supports net flow rates with varying Péclet values was examined. Experiments complemented with simplified analytical one-dimensional semi-infinite modeling and numerical simulations demonstrated either suppression or enhancement of the depletion layer propagation against or with the direction of the net flow, respectively. Of particular interest was the third-species fluorescent dye ion concentration-polarization dynamics which was further explained using two-dimensional numerical simulations that accounted for the device complex geometry.

  12. THE GENERATING AND COMPLEMENTARY EFFECTS OF THE UNDERGROUND ECONOMY PHENOMENON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corneliu Sorin BAICU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available For a comprehensive understanding of the informal sector, an analysis addressing the relationships and links between the morphology and etiology of the underground economy, on the one hand, and its effects on the economic, social or legal, on the other hand is required. The double identity, that of cause phenomenon and effect phenomenon, that the underground economy has, gives it a special status in explaining certain phenomena which vitiates the economic and social life. The generating and complementary effects of the underground area covered in this study are analyzed in terms of the following vectors of analysis: tax evasion, illegal work and money laundering. Tax evasion represents the central core of the underground economy and faithfully expresses the fiscal monetary policies ,the fiscal mortality and the degree of compliance of the taxpayer. Undeclared work is an indicator of the labor market in the informal economy and is a good barometer for analyzing the demand and supply of labor in the visible economy. Money laundering defines the level of economic and financial crime and reflects the level of illegal use of capital on the black market. Tax evasion, money laundering and illegal work can only develop on a framework provided by illicit markets for goods, services and labor. Beyond the, unidirectional or bidirectional relationships between phenomena, the paper consists in a plea for an interdependent, multi-causal analysis of the phenomena and operating mechanisms of the relationships within and outside the underground economy.

  13. The God effect quantum entanglement, science’s strangest phenomenon

    CERN Document Server

    Clegg, Brian

    2006-01-01

    The phenomenon that Einstein thought too spooky and strange to be true What is entanglement? It's a connection between quantum particles, the building blocks of the universe. Once two particles are entangled, a change to one of them is reflected---instantly---in the other, be they in the same lab or light-years apart. So counterintuitive is this phenomenon and its implications that Einstein himself called it "spooky" and thought that it would lead to the downfall of quantum theory. Yet scientists have since discovered that quantum entanglement, the "God Effect," was one of Einstein's few---and perhaps one of his greatest---mistakes. What does it mean? The possibilities offered by a fuller understanding of the nature of entanglement read like something out of science fiction: communications devices that could span the stars, codes that cannot be broken, computers that dwarf today's machines in speed and power, teleportation, and more. In The God Effect, veteran science writer Brian Clegg has written an ex...

  14. The small-world effect is a modern phenomenon

    CERN Document Server

    Marvel, Seth A; Doering, Charles R; Lusseau, David; Newman, M E J

    2013-01-01

    The "small-world effect" is the observation that one can find a short chain of acquaintances, often of no more than a handful of individuals, connecting almost any two people on the planet. It is often expressed in the language of networks, where it is equivalent to the statement that most pairs of individuals are connected by a short path through the acquaintance network. Although the small-world effect is well-established empirically for contemporary social networks, we argue here that it is a relatively recent phenomenon, arising only in the last few hundred years: for most of mankind's tenure on Earth the social world was large, with most pairs of individuals connected by relatively long chains of acquaintances, if at all. Our conclusions are based on observations about the spread of diseases, which travel over contact networks between individuals and whose dynamics can give us clues to the structure of those networks even when direct network measurements are not available. As an example we consider the s...

  15. Load and speed effects on the cervical flexion relaxation phenomenon

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    Descarreaux Martin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The flexion relaxation phenomenon (FRP represents a well-studied neuromuscular response that occurs in the lumbar and cervical spine. However, the cervical spine FRP has not been investigated extensively, and the speed of movement and loading effects remains to be characterized. The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the influence of load and speed on cervical FRP electromyographic (EMG and kinematic parameters and to assess the measurement of cervical FRP kinematic and EMG parameter repeatability. Methods Eighteen healthy adults (6 women and 12 men, aged 20 to 39 years, participated in this study. They undertook 2 sessions in which they had to perform a standardized cervical flexion/extension movement in 3 phases: complete cervical flexion; the static period in complete cervical flexion; and extension with return to the initial position. Two different rhythm conditions and 3 different loading conditions were applied to assess load and speed effects. Kinematic and EMG data were collected, and dependent variables included angles corresponding to the onset and cessation of myoelectric silence as well as the root mean square (RMS values of EMG signals. Repeatability was examined in the first session and between the 2 sessions. Results Statistical analyses revealed a significant load effect (P Conclusions The load increase evoked augmented FRP onset and cessation angles as well as heightened muscle activation. Such increments may reflect the need to enhance spinal stability under loading conditions. The kinematic and EMG parameters showed promising repeatability. Further studies are needed to assess kinematic and EMG differences between healthy subjects and patients with neck pain.

  16. Effect of high-impact targeted trap-neuter-return and adoption of community cats on cat intake to a shelter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, J K; Isaza, N M; Scott, K C

    2014-09-01

    Approximately 2-3 million cats enter animal shelters annually in the United States. A large proportion of these are unowned community cats that have no one to reclaim them and may be too unsocialized for adoption. More than half of impounded cats are euthanased due to shelter crowding, shelter-acquired disease or feral behavior. Trap-neuter-return (TNR), an alternative to shelter impoundment, improves cat welfare and reduces the size of cat colonies, but has been regarded as too impractical to reduce cat populations on a larger scale or to limit shelter cat intake. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of TNR concentrated in a region of historically high cat impoundments in a Florida community. A 2-year program was implemented to capture and neuter at least 50% of the estimated community cats in a single 11.9 km(2) zip code area, followed by return to the neighborhood or adoption. Trends in shelter cat intake from the target zip code were compared to the rest of the county. A total of 2366 cats, representing approximately 54% of the projected community cat population in the targeted area, were captured for the TNR program over the 2-year study period. After 2 years, per capita shelter intake was 3.5-fold higher and per capita shelter euthanasia was 17.5-fold higher in the non-target area than in the target area. Shelter cat impoundment from the target area where 60 cats/1000 residents were neutered annually decreased by 66% during the 2-year study period, compared to a decrease of 12% in the non-target area, where only 12 cats/1000 residents were neutered annually. High-impact TNR combined with the adoption of socialized cats and nuisance resolution counseling for residents is an effective tool for reducing shelter cat intake. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of soil moisture content on the splash phenomenon reproducibility.

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    Magdalena Ryżak

    Full Text Available One of the methods for testing splash (the first phase of water erosion may be an analysis of photos taken using so-called high-speed cameras. The aim of this study was to determine the reproducibility of measurements using a single drop splash of simulated precipitation. The height from which the drops fell resulted in a splash of 1.5 m. Tests were carried out using two types of soil: Eutric Cambisol (loamy silt and Orthic Luvisol (sandy loam; three initial pressure heads were applied equal to 16 kPa, 3.1 kPa, and 0.1 kPa. Images for one, five, and 10 drops were recorded at a rate of 2000 frames per second. It was found that (i the dispersion of soil caused by the striking of the 1st drop was significantly different from the splash impact caused by subsequent drops; (ii with every drop, the splash phenomenon proceeded more reproducibly, that is, the number of particles of soil and/or water that splashed were increasingly close to each other; (iii the number of particles that were detached during the splash were strongly correlated with its surface area; and (iv the higher the water film was on the surface the smaller the width of the crown was.

  18. Effectiveness of different process conditions in hydrotreating cat cracker feed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pivovarova, N.A.; Khadzhiev, S.N.; Zhorov, Yu.M.

    1987-11-01

    Comparative data on the effectiveness of various process conditions in hydrotreating cat cracker feed, with due regard for the hydrogen consumption, was presented. Vacuum oil from West Siberian crude was hydrotreated at a pressure of 5 MPa, circulation ratio of 400 m/sup 3//m/sup 3/, hydrogen concentration in gas 80%, Al-Co-Mo catalyst; runs were made at different temperatures and feedstock space velocities. The product yield obtained in catalytic cracking of the feed is shown. Data shows that the lowest costs are obtained when the heavy aromatic compounds are removed from the feed down to a level of 10-20% by weight.

  19. Effective metastability of Halpern iterates in CAT(0) spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Kohlenbach, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides an effective uniform rate of metastability (in the sense of Tao) on the strong convergence of Halpern iterations of nonexpansive mappings in CAT(0) spaces. The extraction of this rate from an ineffective proof due to Saejung is an instance of the general proof mining program which uses tools from mathematical logic to uncover hidden computational content from proofs. This methodology is applied here for the first time to a proof that uses Banach limits and hence makes a substantial reference to the axiom of choice.

  20. Effect of GnRH analogs in postnatal domestic cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, A; Faya, M; Merlo, M Lopez; Batista, P; Gobello, C

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to reproductively assess the clinical and hormonal effects of a GnRH agonist (AG) and an antagonist (AN) administered during the postnatal period in domestic cats. Forty-eight male and female postnatal kittens were randomly assigned to deslorelin acetate 1.6 mg subcutaneous (AG; n = 16), acyline 33 μg/100 g subcutaneous weekly for 3 months (AN; n = 16), or control (CO; n = 16) which remained untreated. The cats were followed up (behavioral observation, physical examination, fecal sexual steroid determinations, mating test, and pregnancy diagnosis) up to puberty. Puberty was delayed (weeks) in the AG animals (62.9 ± 3.5; P  0.05) when they were compared with CO kittens (13.4 ± 0.4). Fifteen (15/16) of the AN and CO animals, and only 11 of 16 cats of the AG group were fertile (P > 0.1). No differences were found in body weight (P > 0.1) and measurements (P > 0.1), libido (P > 0.1) and in the appearance of side effects (P > 0.1; except a pyometra in an AG female) among groups. In both AG- and AN-treated males (testosterone; P < 0.01) and females (estradiol-17β; P < 0.01) fecal hormone concentrations were lower than in CO group during the first five postnatal weeks but not later. It is concluded that the neonatal administration of these AG and AN decreased fecal sexual steroids during the first postnatal weeks causing, the agonists but not the antagonist, a significant, reversible delay in puberty appearance.

  1. Comparison of gastrointestinal adverse effects of ketoprofen between adult and young cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, Kenji; Hikasa, Yoshiaki; Satoh, Hiroshi

    2012-12-01

    This study elucidated differences in predisposition to the gastrointestinal adverse effects of ketoprofen between young and adult cats. Ketoprofen was administered subcutaneously (2.0 mg/kg, s.c.) once a day for 3 days. The animals were sacrificed 24 hr after final injection to allow examination of gastrointestinal mucosal lesions. Ketoprofen caused gastric lesions in adult cats (>6 months) but not in young cats (Ketoprofen caused more severe small intestinal lesions in adult cats than in young cats. In the study of prevention of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced hyperthermia using ketoprofen, young and adult cats of both sexes were administered LPS (0.3 μg/kg, intravenously), and body temperature was measured 24 hr later. Ketoprofen was administered subcutaneously 30 min before LPS injection. LPS-induced hyperthermia was almost completely inhibited by pretreatment with ketoprofen in both adult and young cats. In the pharmacokinetics of ketoprofen, plasma concentrations were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. No significant differences were observed in plasma concentrations of two mirror-image R(-) and S(+) ketoprofen between young and adult cats from 0.5-4 hr after injection. As observed in a previous study using flunixin, the degree of gastrointestinal damage was unrelated to plasma concentrations of ketoprofen. The results of this study demonstrated that ketoprofen is safer for use in young cats than in adult cats from the viewpoint of gastrointestinal adverse effects.

  2. The quantum Hall's effect:A quantum electrodynamic phenomenon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.I. Arbab

    2012-01-01

    We have applied Maxwell's equations to study the physics of quantum Hall's effect.The electromagnetic properties of this system are obtained.The Hall's voltage,VH =2πh2ns/e rn,where ns is the electron number density,for a 2-dimensional system,and h =2πh is the Planck's constant,is found to coincide with the voltage drop across the quantum capacitor.Consideration of the cyclotronic motion of electrons is found to give rise to Hall's resistance.Ohmic resistances in the horizontal and vertical directions have been found to exist before equilibrium state is reached.At a fundamental level,the Hall's effect is found to be equivalent to a resonant LCR circuit with LH =2π m/e2ns and CH =me2/2πh2ns satisfying the resonance condition with resonant frequency equal to the inverse of the scattering (relaxation) time,Ts.The Hall's resistance is found to be RH =√LH/CH.The Hall's resistance may be connected with the impedance that the electron wave experiences when it propagates in the 2-dimeasional gas.

  3. Acceptance and effects of a therapeutic renal food in pet cats with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsch, Dale A; Jewell, Dennis E; Leventhal, P S; Brejda, J; Ahle, N W; Schiefelbein, H M; Forrester, S D

    2015-01-01

    Renal foods are used to manage chronic kidney disease (CKD) in dogs and cats, but their effectiveness may be limited by the ability to transition animals to them. In a prospective study, pet cats with previously undiagnosed kidney disease (20 International Renal Interest Society (IRIS) 1, 61 IRIS 2, 14 IRIS 3/4, 33 at risk for CKD) were transitioned to a renal food. Markers of renal function were measured and owners answered questionnaires about their pet over one year. All but eight cats (120/128; 94 per cent) successfully transitioned to the renal food. Most of the time, cats moderately or extremely liked the food (89 per cent), ate at least half (73 per cent) and were moderately or extremely enthusiastic while eating (68 per cent). Cats rarely disliked the food (2 per cent) or refused to eat it (1 per cent). Markers of renal function were unchanged in IRIS 1 and 2 cats and changed little in IRIS 3/4 cats. In all groups, owner-assessed quality of life improved initially and then remained stable. Mean bodyweight did not change in cats with CKD. Most cats with CKD successfully transitioned to the renal food. The results also support previous studies that the renal food can help stabilise cats with CKD.

  4. COMPANION ANIMALS SYMPOSIUM: Sustainable Ecosystems: Domestic cats and their effect on wildlife populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitts-Morgan, S E

    2015-03-01

    Domestic cats are estimated to kill billions of small mammals and birds each year. In certain areas of the world, it is not uncommon for either feral or free-ranging cats to have high population densities, creating concern regarding their level of hunting. Many cats are considered to be subsidized predators, as they receive care and food from humans. Arguments abound regarding the presence of cats in the habitats of native small mammals and birds and whether or not local ecosystems can sustain this predator-prey relationship. The effects of cats on native wildlife can depend on several factors, including cat classification (feral vs. free ranging vs. indoor-outdoor), geographical location (islands vs. mainland), and type of habitat (rural vs. suburban vs. urban). Feral and free-ranging cats may have a greater impact on native species on islands because habitat is severely limited. Continued urbanization and development of rural areas also creates fragmented habitats, and native species may struggle to survive with the added pressure of hunting by domestic cats. Additionally, cats in rural areas are frequently fed by humans, which can support high population densities and intensify pressure on native species. Species targeted by cats may also vary based on prey availability in different areas, but small mammals are generally preferred over birds, reptiles, or invertebrates. Domestic cats certainly have the potential to roam and hunt in very large areas inhabited by native species and loss of biodiversity is a major concern. Therefore, it is possible that ecosystems may not be able to sustain hunting by domestic cats. Because this predator-prey relationship is probably not sustainable, it is necessary to responsibly manage outdoor domestic cats.

  5. Effect of sennosides on colon motility in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienbeck, M; Kortenhaus, E; Wallenfels, M; Karaus, M

    1988-01-01

    The actions of sennosides on colonic motility are incompletely understood. We therefore studied the effects of sennosides A + B on colonic myoelectric activity and transit of a radio-opaque meal in 7 conscious cats. Intraduodenal application of sennosides (2 mg/kg body weight) accelerated the half colon transit time from 60 +/- 10 (SEM) to 43 +/- 7 min. At the same time the ratio of long-spike bursts to short-spike bursts was changed from 0.22 to 10.1. Loperamide, an antidiarrheal agent, had the opposite effect. The overall spike activity was not altered by sennosides, but increased by loperamide. It is concluded that the propulsive action of sennosides in the colon is reflected by myoelectric patterns and not by the total number of spikes.

  6. Therapeutic and adverse effects of flunixin-meglumine in adult and young cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, Kenji; Hikasa, Yoshiaki; Satoh, Hiroshi

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we elucidated the difference in nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug sensitivities between young and adult cats on therapeutic and adverse effects. In the prevention of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced hyperthermia using flunixin-meglumine, young (12 months old) cats of both sexes were given LPS (0.3 µg/kg, i.v.), and body temperature was measured 24 hr later. Flunixin (1 mg/kg, s.c.) was administered 30 min before the LPS injection. LPS-induced hyperthermia was almost completely inhibited by pre-treatment with flunixin in both adult and young cats. In addition, flunixin showed almost the same antipyretic effects in both young and adult cats. The animals were administered flunixin (1 mg/kg, s.c.) once a day for 3 days, and sacrificed 24 hr later to examine the gastrointestinal mucosal lesions. In adult cats, flunixin caused many severe lesions in the small intestine. In contrast, very few gastrointestinal lesions were produced by flunixin in young cats. In the pharmacokinetics of flunixin, plasma concentrations of flunixin were analysed using a high performance liquid chromatography. There were no significant differences in plasma concentration of flunixin between young and adult cats from 0.5 to 4 hr after the injection. These results demonstrated that NSAIDs could be used more safely in young than in adult cats from the points of gastrointestinal adverse effects. Furthermore, this difference in gastrointestinal lesions between adult and young cats was not related with the plasma concentration of flunixin.

  7. Effectiveness of feeding large kibbles with mechanical cleaning properties in cats with gingivitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, HE; Theyse, LFH; van Winkelhoff, AJ; Dijkshoorn, NA; Logan, EI; Picovet, P

    2005-01-01

    Effectiveness of feeding large kibbles with mechanical cleaning properties in cats with gingivitis periodontal disease is the most common acquired oral disease in cats. it starts with plaque accumulation and gingivitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of different types of

  8. Effectiveness of feeding large kibbles with mechanical cleaning properties in cats with gingivitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, HE; Theyse, LFH; van Winkelhoff, AJ; Dijkshoorn, NA; Logan, EI; Picovet, P

    2005-01-01

    Effectiveness of feeding large kibbles with mechanical cleaning properties in cats with gingivitis periodontal disease is the most common acquired oral disease in cats. it starts with plaque accumulation and gingivitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of different types of ki

  9. Effectiveness of feeding large kibbles with mechanical cleaning properties in cats with gingivitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, HE; Theyse, LFH; van Winkelhoff, AJ; Dijkshoorn, NA; Logan, EI; Picovet, P

    2005-01-01

    Effectiveness of feeding large kibbles with mechanical cleaning properties in cats with gingivitis periodontal disease is the most common acquired oral disease in cats. it starts with plaque accumulation and gingivitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of different types of ki

  10. EMPIRICAL REFLECTIONS ON MIGRATION PHENOMENON. MAJOR EFFECTS OF MIGRATION ON THE HUMAN CAPITAL

    OpenAIRE

    Simona BUTA; Rozalia Iuliana KICSI

    2013-01-01

    The paper Empirical reflections on migration phenomenon. Major effects of migration on the human capital analyzes the migration flows of the workforce (as part of the human capital) globally/regionally, especially the highly qualified workforce migration. The qualified manpower processes of attracting on the work market have not been always well understood and, in some cases, have generated a series of difficulties. This is the reason why we will focus on the „waste of brains” phenomenon, whi...

  11. Effects of an iodine-restricted food on client-owned cats with hyperthyroidism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kooij, M.; Becvárová, Iveta; Meyer, H.P.; Teske, E.; Kooistra, H.S.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this prospective, multicentre, non-controlled, open-label study was to evaluate the effects of an iodine-restricted food on circulating total thyroxine (TT4) concentrations and clinical parameters in client-owned cats with hyperthyroidism. Two hundred and twenty-five cats were enrol

  12. Cats Have Nine Lives, but Only One Liver: The Effects of Acetaminophen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewprashad, Brahmadeo

    2009-01-01

    This case recounts the story of a student who gave her cat half of a Tylenol tablet not knowing its potential harmful effects. The cat survives, but the incident motivates the student to learn more about the reaction mechanism underlying the liver toxicity of acetaminophen. The case outlines three possible reaction schemes that would explain the…

  13. The Urban Heat Island Phenomenon: How Its Effects Can Influence Environmental Decision Making in Your Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Quattrochi, Dale; Stasiak, Elizabeth

    2003-01-01

    Reinvestment in urban centers is breathing new life into neighborhoods that have been languishing as a result of explosive suburban development over the past several decades. In cities all over the country, adaptive reuse, brownfields redevelopment, transforming urban landscapes, economies, and quality of life. However, the way in which this development occurs has the potential to exacerbate the urban heat island (UHI) phenomenon, an existing problem in many areas and one which poses a threat to the long-term sustainability and environmental quality of cities. The UHI phenomenon is rooted in the science of how the land covers respond to solar heating and can adversely effect the environment. This phenomenon is responsible for urban centers having higher air temperatures and poorer air quality than suburban areas. In addition, the UHI phenomenon causes metrological occurrences, degrades water quality, increases energy demands, poses threats to public health and contributes to global warming. While the name of the phenomenon implies that is solely an urban issue, research has shown that the effects of the UHI are becoming prevalent in suburbs, as well. The UHI phenomenon can plague regions - urban centers and their suburbs. Furthermore, heat islands have been found to exist in both city centers and suburban communities. As suburban areas increasingly develop using land covers and building materials common to urban areas, they are inheriting urban problems - such as heat islands. In this way, it may be necessary for non-urban communities to engage in heat island mitigation. The good news is that through education and planning, the effects of the UHI phenomenon can be prevented and mitigated. Heat islands are more a product of urban design rather than the density of development. Therefore, cities can continue to grow and develop without exacerbating the UHI by employing sustainable development strategies.

  14. The Cheshire Cat revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Vento, V

    1998-01-01

    The concept of effective field theory leads in a natural way to a construction principle for phenomenological sensible models known under the name of the Cheshire Cat Principle. We review its formulation in the chiral bag scenario and discuss its realization for the flavor singlet axial charge. Quantum effects inside the chiral bag induce a color anomaly which requires a compensating surface term to prevent breakdown of color gauge invariance. The presence of this surface term allows one to derive in a gauge-invariant way a chiral-bag version of the Shore-Veneziano two-component formula for the flavor-singlet axial charge of the proton. We show that one can obtain a striking Cheshire-Cat phenomenon with a negligibly small singlet axial charge.

  15. The effect of cat Felis catus predation on three breeding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1987-05-08

    May 8, 1987 ... Breeding success of all three species was significantly higher in the combined cat-free areas ..... Table 3 Number of nest visits/nest of three Procellariidae species on Marion Island ..... (Carnivora: Felidae) on Macquarie Island.

  16. The Mozart Effect: Musical Phenomenon or Musical Preference? A More Ecologically Valid Reconsideration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassity, Hope Daniels; Henley, Tracy B.; Markley, Robert P.

    2007-01-01

    The "Mozart effect" is the reported phenomenon of increased spatial abilities after listening to that composer's music. However, subsequent research suggests that the Mozart effect may be an artifactual consequence of heightened arousal and mood rather than the music of Mozart per se (e.g., Thompson, Schellenberg, & Husain, 2001). The present…

  17. The Mozart Effect: Musical Phenomenon or Musical Preference? A More Ecologically Valid Reconsideration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassity, Hope Daniels; Henley, Tracy B.; Markley, Robert P.

    2007-01-01

    The "Mozart effect" is the reported phenomenon of increased spatial abilities after listening to that composer's music. However, subsequent research suggests that the Mozart effect may be an artifactual consequence of heightened arousal and mood rather than the music of Mozart per se (e.g., Thompson, Schellenberg, & Husain, 2001). The present…

  18. Boiling Delay phenomenon in a Thermosyphon Heat Sink and Its Effect on Device Performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WeilinHu; YihuiZhou; 等

    1994-01-01

    A new kind of thermosyphon heat sink has been studied and developed,its peformance being measured.It was found that a remarkable boiling delay phenomenon occurs during its work.The phenomenon is described and explained and its effects on thermoresistance performance at both steady and transient states are discussed.The thermoresistance of this sink is found to be 0.029℃/W at air velocity 5m/s.THis heat sink will satisfy the needs of cooling rectifier diodes and thyristors of rated currents up to 1000 amperes.

  19. Effect of a Limited Iodine Diet on Iodine Uptake by Thyroid Glands in Hyperthyroid Cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott-Moncrieff, J C; Heng, H G; Weng, H Y; Dimeo, D; Jones, M D

    2015-01-01

    The effect of feeding a limited iodine diet on radioactive iodine uptake in the thyroid glands of hyperthyroid cats is unknown. To determine how feeding limited dietary iodine affects radioactive iodine uptake by the thyroid glands of hyperthyroid cats. Eight geriatric cats with spontaneous hyperthyroidism. Prospective study of eight client owned hyperthyroid cats fed a commercially available iodine limited diet for 6 months. Clinical signs were evaluated and TT4 and fT4 were measured during consumption of the diet. Uptake of (123)I was determined before and 8-16 weeks after exclusive consumption of the diet. Clinical signs of hyperthyroidism resolved in all cats, but there was no significant increase in body weight. TT4 and fT4 decreased into the reference range by 8-16 weeks in all cats. Mean TT4 before consumption of the diet was 9.7 μg/dL (SD 5.2) and after consumption of the diet was 3.1 μg/dL (SD 0.9). Scintigraphy revealed unilateral uptake of isotope in 5 cats and bilateral uptake in 3 cats. Mean percentage uptake of (123)I by the thyroid gland at 8 hours after isotope administration was 16.2 (SD 11.8) before diet consumption and 34.6 (SD 11.7) 8-16 weeks after exclusive consumption of the diet. The percentage increase was variable between cats (38-639%). Limited iodine diets increase iodine uptake in the autonomous thyroid glands of hyperthyroid cats. Further studies are necessary to determine if consumption of a limited iodine diet changes sensitivity of the thyroid gland to (131)I treatment. Copyright © 2015 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  20. The effects of feral cats on insular wildlife: the Club-Med syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Steve C.; Danner, Raymond M.; Timm, R.M.

    2012-01-01

    Domestic cats have been introduced to many of the world‘s islands where they have been particularly devastating to insular wildlife which, in most cases, evolved in the absence of terrestrial predatory mammals and feline diseases. We review the effects of predation, feline diseases, and the life history characteristics of feral cats and their prey that have contributed to the extirpation and extinction of many insular vertebrate species. The protozoan Toxoplasma gondii is a persistent land-based zoonotic pathogen hosted by cats that is known to cause mortality in several insular bird species. It also enters marine environments in cat feces where it can cause the mortality of marine mammals. Feral cats remain widespread on islands throughout the world and are frequently subsidized in colonies which caretakers often assert have little negative effect on native wildlife. However, population genetics, home range, and movement studies all suggest that there are no locations on smaller islands where these cats cannot penetrate within two generations. While the details of past vertebrate extinctions were rarely documented during contemporary time, a strong line of evidence is emerging that the removal of feral cats from islands can rapidly facilitate the recolonization of extirpated species, particularly seabirds. Islands offer unique, mostly self-contained ecosystems in which to conduct controlled studies of the effects of feral cats on wildlife, having implications for continental systems. The response of terrestrial wildlife such as passerine birds, small mammals, and herptiles still needs more thorough long-term monitoring and documentation after the removal of feral cats.

  1. [Raynaud's phenomenon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piérard-Franchimont, C; Piérard, G E; Hermanns-Lê, T

    2012-12-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon is a vascular acrosyndrome caused by a variety of diseases. There is a distinction between the idiopathic Raynaud's disease, the secondary types and the suspicious idiopathic Raynaud's phenomenon.

  2. Sedative and physiological effects of brimonidine tartrate ophthalmic solution in healthy cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Niwako; Kanda, Teppei; Kawahata, Mizuki; Ichikawa, Takayasu; Matsumoto, Yuki; Morimitsu, Waka; Nishino, Yukiko; Itoi, Takamasa; Furumoto, Kayo

    2017-07-03

    To determine the effects of brimonidine tartrate ophthalmic solution on sedation, heart rate (HR), respiratory frequency (fR), rectal temperature (RT) and noninvasive mean arterial pressure (MAP) in healthy cats. Randomized, blinded crossover study, with 1 week washout between treatments. Six healthy purpose-bred cats. Brimonidine tartrate ophthalmic solution 0.1% (one or two drops; 58.6 ± 3.3 μg per drop) or a control solution (artificial tear solution) was administered to six healthy cats. Behavioural observations and measurements of HR, fR, RT and MAP were recorded before and at 30, 60, 90, 120, 180, 240, 300 and 360 minutes after topical administration. Behavioural scores were analysed using Friedman's test for repeated measures to evaluate the time effect in each treatment and treatment effect at each time point. Physiological variables (HR, fR, RT and MAP) were analysed using two-way analysis of variance for repeated measures to evaluate the time and treatment effects. The level of significance was set at p < 0.05. Dose-dependent behavioural and physiological responses were noted. A dose of two drops of brimonidine resulted in sedation in the cats and decreased HR and MAP. Significant sedative effects occurred between 30 and 120 minutes and for physiological responses up to 360 minutes. The most frequent adverse reaction was vomiting, occurring within 40 minutes in all six cats administered two drops and five of the six cats administered one drop of brimonidine. The results demonstrated that ocular administration of brimonidine 0.1% ophthalmic solution induced sedation in cats and some cardiovascular effects usually associated with α2-adrenoceptor agonists. Further studies should be performed to determine clinical applications for this agent in cats. Copyright © 2017 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of dietary sodium chloride on health parameters in mature cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hui; Laflamme, Dorothy P L; Long, Grace L

    2009-06-01

    High sodium diets have been shown to enhance water intake and urine output, a potential benefit in the management of lower urinary tract diseases. However, one study suggested that high salt (sodium chloride) diets might have adverse effects on the kidneys [Kirk CA, Jewell DE, Lowry SR. Effects of sodium chloride on selected parameters in cats. Vet Ther 2006; 7: 333-46]. Therefore, the objective of this controlled, prospective study was to evaluate the effects of diets with different salt content (1.11% sodium and 1.78% chloride versus 0.55% sodium and 1.02% chloride, dry matter (dm)) when fed to mature cats (mean age 7.0 years; 12 cats per group) over a 6-month period. Food intake, body weight, bone mineral content, total body hydration status, blood pressure, and markers of renal function were unaffected by salt intake, and no adverse effects were observed. When a subset of cats (n=9) with an initial serum creatinine > or =1.6mg/dl was evaluated separately, there remained no evidence of adverse effects associated with increased salt intake. These results are consistent with the majority of other studies evaluating sodium intake in cats, as well as with the National Research Council's assessment, all of which indicate that sodium at 1.5% of the diet dm is not harmful to healthy cats.

  4. ["Placebo effect", from personal convictions to collective representations: A psychosocial reading of a pharmacodynamic phenomenon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balez, R; Couturaud, F; Touffet, L

    2015-11-01

    After starting with a brief historical account of the placebo effect organized around the elaboration of clinical trials and around sham therapy as a method, we will offer a psychosocial point of view on the placebo phenomenon. The placebo effect is at the heart of medicine and particularly of therapeutic trials from theoretical research on a drug to its acceptance and its use in every-day clinical practice. The placebo effect intermingles biology, relationships and the context of therapeutic interactions. This type of phenomenon originates as much from biology as from human psychology. Our article puts more precisely into question the part that psychology has in the placebo phenomenon and suggests a chart to address it. This chart refers both to the pharmacodynamic effect given to drugs in a subjective way, and to the collective representations and social interactions depending on them. What can we say about the psychosociological dimensions of the placebo effect? How is it possible to organize the scope of these dimensions to base systematic studies on them in the field of clinical trials? We try to give elements of response to these questions by suggesting the study of the placebo effect as an original field of study by necessarily mobilizing both health sciences and the human and social sciences. Copyright © 2015 Académie Nationale de Pharmacie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. A review of over three decades of research on cat-human and human-cat interactions and relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Dennis C

    2017-01-22

    This review article covers research conducted over the last three decades on cat-human and human-cat interactions and relationships, especially from an ethological point of view. It includes findings on cat-cat and cat-human communication, cat personalities and cat-owner personalities, the effects of cats on humans, and problems caused by cats.

  6. Effect of the slow transient phenomenon of a synaptic modification on vestibulo-ocular reflex adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsusaka, K.

    1998-05-01

    According to the experimental studies, the duration of the transient phenomenon of the synaptic modification involved in vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) adaptation lasts considerably long after the synaptic inputs. In the present article, effect of the transient phenomenon on VOR adaptation is studied by incorporating the transient phenomenon into the cerebellar model proposed by Fujita. In the present extended model, it is assumed that the synaptic modification is a modification of the concentrations of reactants and products for a certain reaction. The synaptic efficacy is given by the concentration of products. The model of reaction includes the supply of reactants and flux of reactants and products out of the reaction system. The supply of reactants is induced by correlation between two different types of input signals, which has been considered to be proportional to the amount of the synaptic modification at the moment. The flux produces natural recovery of the synaptic modification, which was observed in experiments. The simulation results suggest that VOR adaptation takes two types of courses according to the efficiency of the reactant supply to the synaptic inputs under the slow transient phenomenon of the synaptic modification. The present extended model gives approaches to control mechanisms of VOR adaptation.

  7. Vacuum phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagawa, Youichi; Ohsaka, Hiromichi; Jitsuiki, Kei; Yoshizawa, Toshihiko; Takeuchi, Ikuto; Omori, Kazuhiko; Oode, Yasumasa; Ishikawa, Kouhei

    2016-08-01

    This article describes the theory of the formation of the vacuum phenomenon (VP), the detection of the VP, the different medical causes, the different locations of the presentation of the VP, and the differential diagnoses. In the human body, the cavitation effect is recognized on radiological studies; it is called the VP. The mechanism responsible for the formation of the VP is as follows: if an enclosed tissue space is allowed to expand as a rebound phenomenon after an external impact, the volume within the enclosed space will increase. In the setting of expanding volume, the pressure within the space will decrease. The solubility of the gas in the enclosed space will decrease as the pressure of the space decreases. Decreased solubility allows a gas to leave a solution. Clinically, the pathologies associated with the VP have been reported to mainly include the normal joint motion, degeneration of the intervertebral discs or joints, and trauma. The frequent use of CT for trauma patients and the high spatial resolution of CT images might produce the greatest number of chances to detect the VP in trauma patients. The VP is observed at locations that experience a traumatic impact; thus, an analysis of the VP may be useful for elucidating the mechanism of an injury. When the VP is located in the abdomen, it is important to include perforation of the digestive tract in the differential diagnosis. The presence of the VP in trauma patients does not itself influence the final outcome.

  8. Effects of remifentanil on measures of anesthetic immobility and analgesia in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosnan, Robert J; Pypendop, Bruno H; Siao, Kristine T; Stanley, Scott D

    2009-09-01

    To evaluate effects of various doses of remifentanil on measures of analgesia in anesthetized cats. 6 healthy adult cats. Minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) for isoflurane and thermal threshold responses were evaluated in anesthetized cats. Remifentanil infusions of 0 (baseline), 0.0625, 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 microg/kg/min were administered; after a 45-minute equilibration period, isoflurane MAC and responses were determined. Isoflurane MAC was determined in anesthetized cats once for each remifentanil infusion rate by use of a standard tail clamp technique. Thermal threshold was measured in awake cats by use of a commercially available analgesiometric probe placed on the lateral portion of the thorax; remifentanil infusions were administered in randomized order to anesthetized cats, and thermal threshold determinations were made by an investigator who was unaware of the infusion rate. Mean +/- SEM median effective concentration (EC(50)) for remifentanil and its active metabolite, GR90291, for the thermal threshold test was 1.00 +/- 0.35 ng/mL and 307 +/- 28 ng/mL of blood, respectively. Dysphoria was detected in all awake cats at the 2 highest remifentanil infusion rates. However, isoflurane MAC during remifentanil infusions was unchanged from baseline values, even at blood opioid concentrations approximately 75 times the analgesic EC(50). Immobility and analgesia as reflected by thermal threshold testing were independent anesthetic end points in the cats. Results of MAC-sparing evaluations should not be used to infer analgesic potency without prior validation of an MAC-analgesia relationship for specific drugs and species.

  9. Risk factors and effect of selective removal on retroviral infections prevalence in Belgian stray cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garigliany, M; Jolly, S; Dive, M; Bayrou, C; Berthemin, S; Robin, P; Godenir, R; Petry, J; Dahout, S; Cassart, D; Thiry, E; Desmecht, D; Saegerman, C

    2016-01-09

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of several risk/protective factors and predictors on the prevalence of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) infections in 302 stray cats captured during a trap-neuter-release programme in a mixed urban-rural area from Belgium, from 2010 to 2012. The impact of selective removal of FIV-positive cats on the apparent prevalence in the remaining population over this three-year period was also assessed. The seroprevalences over three years were 18.8 per cent for FIV and 0.7 per cent for FeLV. For FIV, the seroprevalence decreased significantly from the first year of the programme (2010; 30.5 per cent) to the last (2012; 13.1 per cent). Sex (male) and age (adult and old cats) were risk factors, while the year of sampling (years 2011 and 2012) was a protective factor. Age, sex and location were the most relevant predictors of FIV status. The data presented in this study revealed a very high FIV seroprevalence in Belgian stray cats, while FeLV was almost absent. The selective removal of positive cats had a drastic effect on the FIV seroprevalence in the remaining cat population.

  10. L-Tryptophan's effects on brain chemistry and sleep in cats and rats: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radulovacki, M

    1982-01-01

    In this review I shall discuss published and unpublished work from my laboratory dealing with L-tryptophan's effects on brain monoamines and sleep in cats and rats. From our work it appears that normal animals may not be suitable subjects for testing sleep-inducing effect of tryptophan since their slow-wave sleep (SWS) latency is relatively short. In polyphasic sleepers like cats, we did not observe tryptophan's hypnotic effect with any dosage used (10, 30 or 135 mg/kg). However, we found small, but statistically significant, sleep-inducing effect of tryptophan (30 mg/kg, IP) in normal rats. We have tried, therefore, to create insomniac cats with long sleep latencies by using methysergide, a serotonin receptor blocker. The results show that in insomniac cats hypnotic effect of tryptophan, a precursor to brain serotonin, was observed. It involved not only reduction of sleep latencies but also an increase in SWS. It seems likely that tryptophan's partial reversal of methysergide's effect in cats occurred via a dual mechanism of serotonergic activation and catecholaminergic deactivation, while its sleep-inducing effect in normal rats may have been due to the attenuation of the activity of brain catecholamines.

  11. Managing feral cats on a university's campuses: how many are there and is sterilization having an effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Amanda L; Downs, Colleen T

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide domestic and feral cat (Felis catus) numbers have increased. Concerns regarding high populations of feral cats in urban areas include wildlife predation, public nuisance, and disease. This study aimed to estimate the size of the feral cat population on 5 campuses of the University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, to determine whether sterilization has an effect and to make management recommendations. The study used both the total count and mark-recapture methods to estimate the feral cat population on each campus. The study chose a noninvasive method of taking photographs to "mark" individuals and record those who were sterilized. The study estimated a total of 186 cats on all campuses and density at 161 cats km(-2). There was a negative relationship between sterilization and numbers. Sites with higher sterilization showed a lower proportion of younger cats. At the average sterilization of 55%, the population, according to predictions, would remain stable at fecundity, survival, and immigration rates reported by cat caretakers. However, caretakers underestimated cat abundance by 7 ± 37 SD%. Caretakers' feral cat sterilization and feeding programs appear to provide a service to the university community. Key management recommendations were to increase sterilization to 90% to reduce the population over the long term and to raise funds to support the costs incurred by voluntary cat caretakers.

  12. Antagonistic effects of atipamezole, yohimbine and prazosin on medetomidine-induced diuresis in healthy cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murahata, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Asami; Miki, Yuya; Hikasa, Yoshiaki

    2014-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate and compare the antagonistic effects of atipamezole, yohimbine and prazosin on medetomidine-induced diuresis in healthy cats. Five cats were repeatedly used in each of the 9 groups. One group was not medicated. Cats in the other groups received 40 µg/kg medetomidine intramuscularly and saline (as the control), 160 µg/kg prazosin, or 40, 160 or 480 µg/kg atipamezole or yohimbine intravenously 0.5 hr later. Volume, pH and specific gravity of urine; plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) level; and creatinine, osmolality and electrolyte levels in both urine and plasma were measured. Both atipamezole and yohimbine, but not prazosin, antagonized medetomidine-induced diuresis. The antidiuretic effect of atipamezole was more potent than that of yohimbine, but was not dose dependent, in contrast to the effect of yohimbine at the tested doses. Both atipamezole and yohimbine reversed medetomidine-induced decreases in both urine specific gravity and osmolality and increases in plasma osmolality and free-water clearance. Antidiuresis of either atipamezole or yohimbine was not related to the area under the curve for AVP level, although the highest dose of both atipamezole and yohimbine initially and temporarily increased plasma AVP levels, suggesting that this may partly influence the antidiuretic effects of both agents. The diuretic effect of medetomidine in cats may be mediated by α2-adrenoceptors, but not α1-adrenoceptors. Atipamezole and yohimbine can be used as antagonistic agents against medetomidine-induced diuresis in healthy cats.

  13. Raynaud's phenomenon in a child with medulloblastoma as a late effect of chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atas, Erman; Korkmazer, Nadir; Artik, Hatice A; Babacan, Oguzhan; Kesik, Vural

    2015-01-01

    There are a lot of early or late side effects of chemotherapies. One of them is Raynaud's phenomenon (RP). Vascular toxicity associated with antineoplastic agents is notified in bleomycin alone therapy or in combination with cisplatin, vinblastine, and vincristine. The mechanism of RP associated with antineoplastic agents is unknown. All children receiving vinblastine, vincristine, bleomycin and cisplatin therapy, are followed and questioned about their complaint on RP. Long-term follow-up of surviving patients is recommended. Oncologists should be aware of the potential late toxic effects of antineoplastic drugs.

  14. Study of the peak effect phenomenon in single crystals of 2H-NbSe2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C V Tomy; D Pal; S S Banerjee; S Ramakrishnan; A K Grover; S Bhattacharya; M Higgins; G Balakrishnan; McK Paul

    2002-05-01

    The weakly pinned single crystals of the hexagonal 2H-NbSe2 compound have emerged as prototypes for determining and characterizing the phase boundaries of the possible order–disorder transformations in the vortex matter. We present here a status report based on the ac and dc magnetization measurements of the peak effect phenomenon in three crystals of 2H-NbSe2, in which the critical current densities vary over two orders of magnitude. We sketch the generic vortex phase diagram of a weakly pinned superconductor, which also utilizes theoretical proposals. We also establish the connection between the metastability effects and pinning.

  15. The effects of body weight, body condition score, sex, and age on serum fructosamine concentrations in clinically healthy cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilor, Chen; Graves, Thomas K; Lascelles, B Duncan X; Thomson, Andrea E; Simpson, Wendy; Halpern, David S

    2010-09-01

    Serum fructosamine (SF) concentrations depend on plasma glucose concentrations and are used to evaluate glycemic control in animals with diabetes mellitus (DM). Despite the strong association between obesity and DM, the effects of body weight (BW) and body condition on SF concentrations in clinically healthy cats have not been reported. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of BW, body condition score (BCS), sex, and age on SF concentrations in healthy cats. BW, BCS, and SF concentrations were determined in 84 clinically healthy client-owned cats (50 neutered males, 33 spayed females, and 1 intact female) of known age. The cats were enrolled prospectively in the study. Mean BW, median BCS, and mean SF concentrations for the 84 cats were 5.4 kg, 5/9, and 268.7 ± 45.5 μmol/L (range 197-399), respectively. BW was weakly but significantly correlated with SF (r=.26; P=.02), whereas BCS was not. Cats weighing >5.4 kg and cats with BCS>5/9 had higher mean SF concentrations compared with cats weighing <5.4 kg and cats with BCS <5/9, respectively. Cats categorized as normal weight to obese by BW (BW ≥ 4.0 kg) had higher mean SF concentrations compared with cats categorized as lean (BW< 4.0 kg). For domestic shorthair cats, the same was true for BCS: cats with BCS ≥ 4/9 had higher mean fructosamine concentrations than those with BCS<4/9. Male cats had significantly higher mean SF concentrations compared with female cats (285.1 ± 45.3 vs 244.5 ± 33.9 μmol/L, P<.001). Age did not affect mean SF concentrations. BW is positively correlated with SF concentration, and lean cats have lower SF concentrations than normal and obese cats. In contrast to previous reports, mean SF concentrations were higher in male cats than in female cats, even when males and females were matched based on BW, BCS, and age. ©2010 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  16. Designing a Qualitative Model of Doping Phenomenon Effect on Sport Marketing in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasem Manouchehri

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available There a number of factors effecting consumers' purchase behavior. It is believed that celebrities can effect selling positively by transferring their popular image to the endorsed product. But, it is heard lots about excommunicate behaviors in the sport world today. Disclosure of the recent doping affairs relating to Lance Armstrong's seven wins in Tour De France is just one among many spectacular and also negative cases. The main aim of the present paper was to explore the effect of doping phenomenon on sport marketing. Depth interviews data were analyzed in three phases: open coding, axial coding, and selective coding. 297 open codes were achieved by 18 interviews. Grouping axial codes in each case and comparing, all gained codes can be divided in five groups: brand image (athlete and endorsed product brands images, moral reasoning (moral coupling, moral decoupling, and moral rationalization, consumer behavioral consequences (word of mouth, purchasing intention, and brand loyalty, attitude change (attitudes change toward athlete and brand, and moral emotions (moral evaluation, contempt, anger, disgust, and sympathy. The proposed qualitative model for the effect of doping phenomenon on sport marketing in Iran illustrated that moral emotions and product brand image affected by the doped athlete brand image and it resulted in attitudes change toward endorser athlete and endorsed brand and negative consumer behavioral consequences, however, moral reasoning strategies emerged by cognitive dissonance might protect consumers behavior from negative effects.

  17. Raynaud's phenomenon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S L; Christensen, N J; Olsen, N

    1980-01-01

    The reaction to body and finger cooling was recorded in seven patients with relapse of primary Raynaud's phenomenon after sufficiently performed bilateral upper thoracic sympathectomy and for comparison in eight young women with primary Raynaud's phenomenon as well as in seven normal women......,05). There was no significant correlation between the vasoconstrictor response to cooling of a finger and the noradrenaline concentration probably due to the fact that skin vasoconstriction impeded release of noradrenaline from the skin. The relapse of Raynaud's phenomenon after surgically sufficient sympathectomy could...

  18. [Raynaud's phenomenon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra Salinas, Miguel Ángel; Carrillo Vázquez, Sandra Miriam

    2006-11-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon is characterized by repeated daily attacks of ischemia followed by reperfusion at the acrallevel. It is a frequent syndrome found in medical practice; and it can be considered as primary or secondary to other conditions, including rheumatic autoimmune diseases. Current classification had clinical and therapeutic implications. Careful clinical evaluation is the most reliable and reproducible method in the diagnosis of Raynaud's phenomenon. Several risk factors had been associated in the genesis of Raynaud's phenomenon; however, its pathogenesis remains elusive although recently, considerable progress in disease mechanism had been described. Such advances are directing new lines of therapy.

  19. Non-equilibrium Phenomenon between Electron and Lattice Systems Induced by the Peltier Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Hideo; Hori, Hidenobu; Sasaki, Shosuke

    2005-08-01

    Temperature distributions of the electron and lattice systems induced by the Peltier effect have been precisely measured by improved Harman method, where the temperature differences (Δ Tel and Δ Tla) have been independently evaluated for several terminal lengths (LV) in thermoelectric materials (Bi,Sb)2Te3. Both temperature distributions have different behaviors in the stationary state, that is, the LV dependences of Δ Tel and Δ Tla show positive and negative curvatures, respectively. It is also indicated that the temperature difference has a linear relation to LV in the whole system and the observed non-equilibrium phenomenon is consistent with a law of the conservation of heat quantity.

  20. The effects of roscovitine on cumulus cell apoptosis and the developmental competence of domestic cat oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sananmuang, T; Techakumphu, M; Tharasanit, T

    2010-01-15

    The developmental competence of cat oocytes matured in vitro is relatively poor when compared with that of in vivo oocytes. The study aimed to investigate the effect of roscovitine on the developmental competence of cat Felis catus oocytes matured in vitro. Cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) were classified as Grade I and II to III. Groups of COCs were cultured in 0, 12.5, 25, 50, 100, and 200 microM roscovitine for 24h and were either fixed to assess the stages of nuclear maturation (Experiment 1) or additionally matured in vitro for 24h before fixation (Experiment 2). In Experiment 3, cumulus cells from the COCs treated with roscovitine were examined for apoptosis. Experiment 4 examined the developmental competence of cat oocytes after roscovitine treatment and in vitro fertilization in terms of cleavage and morula and blastocyst formation rates. Roscovitine reversibly arrested cat oocytes at an immature stage in a dose-dependent manner. Roscovitine at 12.5 and 25 microM demonstrated less efficiency compared with that of other doses. However, higher doses of roscovitine induced cumulus cell apoptosis and resulted in a high number of degenerated oocytes after in vitro maturation. Roscovitine at 12.5 and 25 microM were therefore used to evaluate their effect on embryo development. Pretreatment with 12.5 and 25 microM roscovitine prior to in vitro maturation decreased the developmental competence of cat oocytes compared with that of non-roscovitine-treated controls. In conclusion, roscovitine reversibly maintained cat oocytes at the germinal vesicle stage without detrimental effect on nuclear maturation. However, it negatively affected cumulus cell viability and developmental competence.

  1. Strength of evidence for the effects of feral cats on insular wildlife: The Club Med Syndrome Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Various types of evidence have been promulgated as proof for the effects of feral cats on wildlife, typically including numerous studies on predation inferred from diet, mortality attributed to pathogens, and photographic or videographic documentation. The strength of these types of evidence is often short of conclusive. For example, studies of predation inferred from diet provide weak evidence for two reasons: 1) they cannot differentiate depredation from scavenging by feral cats, and 2) they cannot address population-level effects on wildlife because it is rarely understood if mortality acts in compensatory or additive manner. Likewise, pathogens may cause mortality of individuals, but population-level effects of pathogens are rarely known. Photographic or videographic documentation provides direct ‘smoking gun’ evidence that may be useful for positive identification of depredation by cats, or identification of prey designated as threatened or endangered species. However, the most direct and compelling evidence comes from examples where feral cats have been entirely removed from islands. In many cases, several species of seabirds as well as other wildlife have recovered after the complete removal of cats. Where possible, the experimental removal of cats would provide the most conclusive proof of effects on wildlife populations. In other cases where cat removal is not feasible, modeling based on predation rates and life history parameters of species may be the only means of assessing population-level effects on wildlife. Understanding population-level effects of feral cats on wildlife will ultimately be necessary to resolve long-standing wildlife management issues.

  2. Effects of preinfarction angina on no-reflow phenomenon after percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王荣英

    2003-01-01

    Effects of preinfarction angina on no-reflow phenomenon after percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with acute myocardial infarction@王荣英$河北医科大学第二医院!石家庄050000 0311-70469016011

  3. The bullwhip effect phenomenon in automotive supply chains in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Naude

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of the article is to report on research that was completed to explore the concept of the bullwhip effect in supply chains and to illustrate empirically the presence of the bullwhip effect in automotive supply chains in South Africa. Problem Investigated: This article investigates the presence of the bullwhip effect - which was identified through an empirical study - and its causes and implications for supply chain management in the South African automotive component industry. Methodology: A literature study was conducted on the causes and implications of the bullwhip effect phenomenon. This was followed by an empirical study in the form of a survey among South African automotive component manufacturers. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to determine the significant supply chain problems relating to the bullwhip effect in automotive supply chains. Findings and Implications: The results indicate that automotive component manufacturers are dependent on demand-forecasting information from their customers. They experience long lead times, fluctuating orders, cancellation of orders, excess and slow moving inventory and a lack of integration with suppliers and customers. There are also signs of relationship problems and a possible silo mentality. The mentioned results indicate the presence of the bullwhip effect in South African automotive supply chains. Since the bullwhip effect can have a major impact on organisations' costs, knowing where to invest effort and resources should be a high priority for supply chain managers. Value of the Research: Since the field of supply chain management is extremely dynamic, this article contributes to the body of knowledge and provides new insight into the bullwhip effect phenomenon. The results included in this article could assist parties in automotive supply chains to focus their attention on problems that might be within their control and if solved could lead to improved

  4. Effect of cyclosporine, dexamethasone, and human CTLA4-Ig on production of cytokines in lymphocytes of clinically normal cats and cats undergoing renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, Lillian R; Stumhofer, Jason S; Drobatz, Kenneth J; Hunter, Christopher A

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate effects of cyclosporine, dexamethasone, and the immunosuppressive agent human CTLA4-Ig on cytokine production by feline lymphocytes in vitro and to assess patterns of cytokine production for 5 immunosuppressed renal transplant recipient cats. 21 clinically normal cats and 5 immunosupressed renal transplant recipient cats. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from clinically normal cats and stimulated with concanavalin A (Con A; 10 μg/mL) alone or Con A with cyclosporine (0.05 μg/mL), dexamethasone (1 × 10(-7)M), a combination of cyclosporine-dexamethasone, or human CTLA4-Ig (10 g/mL). Cells from transplant recipients were stimulated with Con A alone. An ELISA was performed to measure production of interferon (IFN)-γ, granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, and IL-10. Proliferation of CD4+ and CD8+T cells from immunosuppressed cats were also evaluated. Pairwise comparisons were performed via a Wilcoxon signed rank test or Wilcoxon rank sum test. Cyclosporine, dexamethasone, cyclosporine-dexamethasone combination, and CTLA4-Ig caused a significant decrease in IL-2, IFN-γ, and GM-CSF production. Cyclosporine and cyclosporine-dexamethasone, but not human CTLA4-Ig, caused a significant decrease in IL-10 production. High basal concentrations of IL-2 and IL-10 were identified in transplant recipients, and IL-10 was significantly increased in stimulated cultures. In immunosuppressed cats, there was a decrease in frequency of responders and proliferative capacity of CD4+ and CD8+T cells. CTLA4-Ig successfully inhibited proinflammatory cytokines while sparing cytokines critical for allograft tolerance. These data may be useful for developing better strategies to prevent rejection while sparing other immune functions.

  5. Metabolic Profiling Reveals Effects of Age, Sexual Development and Neutering in Plasma of Young Male Cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaway, David; Gilham, Matthew S.; Colyer, Alison; Jönsson, Thomas J.; Swanson, Kelly S.; Morris, Penelope J.

    2016-01-01

    Neutering is a significant risk factor for obesity in cats. The mechanisms that promote neuter-associated weight gain are not well understood but following neutering, acute changes in energy expenditure and energy consumption have been observed. Metabolic profiling (GC-MS and UHPLC-MS-MS) was used in a longitudinal study to identify changes associated with age, sexual development and neutering in male cats fed a nutritionally-complete dry diet to maintain an ideal body condition score. At eight time points, between 19 and 52 weeks of age, fasted blood samples were taken from kittens neutered at either 19 weeks of age (Early Neuter (EN), n = 8) or at 31 weeks of age (Conventional Neuter (CN), n = 7). Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to compare plasma metabolites (n = 370) from EN and CN cats. Age was the primary driver of variance in the plasma metabolome, including a developmental change independent of neuter group between 19 and 21 weeks in lysolipids and fatty acid amides. Changes associated with sexual development and its subsequent loss were also observed, with differences at some time points observed between EN and CN cats for 45 metabolites (FDR p<0.05). Pathway Enrichment Analysis also identified significant effects in 20 pathways, dominated by amino acid, sterol and fatty acid metabolism. Most changes were interpretable within the context of male sexual development, and changed following neutering in the CN group. Felinine metabolism in CN cats was the most significantly altered pathway, increasing during sexual development and decreasing acutely following neutering. Felinine is a testosterone-regulated, felid-specific glutathione derivative secreted in urine. Alterations in tryptophan, histidine and tocopherol metabolism observed in peripubertal cats may be to support physiological functions of glutathione following diversion of S-amino acids for urinary felinine secretion. PMID:27942045

  6. Effects of a medetomidine-ketamine combination on Schirmer tear test I results of clinically normal cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pietro, Simona; Macrì, Francesco; Bonarrigo, Tiziana; Giudice, Elisabetta; Palumbo Piccionello, Angela; Pugliese, Antonio

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the effects of a medetomidine-ketamine combination on tear production of clinically normal cats by use of the Schirmer tear test (STT) 1 before and during anesthesia and after reversal of medetomidine with atipamezole. 40 client-owned crossbred domestic shorthair cats (23 males and 17 females; age range, 6 to 24 months). A complete physical examination, CBC, and ophthalmic examination were performed on each cat. Cats with no abnormalities on physical and ophthalmic examinations were included in the study. Cats were allocated into 2 groups: a control group (n = 10 cats) anesthetized by administration of a combination of medetomidine hydrochloride (80 μg/kg) and ketamine hydrochloride (5 mg/kg), and an experimental group (30) anesthetized with the medetomidine-ketamine combination and reversal by administration of atipamezole. Tear production of both eyes of each cat was measured by use of the STT I before anesthesia, 15 minutes after the beginning of anesthesia, and 15 minutes after administration of atipamezole. Anesthesia with a medetomidine-ketamine combination of cats with no ophthalmic disease caused a significant decrease in tear production. The STT I values returned nearly to preanesthetic values within 15 minutes after reversal with atipamezole, whereas the STT I values for the control group were still low at that point. Results indicated that a tear substitute should be administered to eyes of cats anesthetized with a medetomidine-ketamine combination from the time of anesthetic administration until at least 15 minutes after administration of atipamezole.

  7. Effects of lumbosacral epidural ketamine and lidocaine inxylazine-sedated cats : article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. DeRossi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine the analgesic and cardiovascular effects of the combination of epidural ketamine and lidocaine, 6 sedated cats were studied. Six healthy, young cats were used in a prospective randomised study. Each cat underwent 3 treatments, at least 1 week apart, via epidural injection: (1 ketamine (2.5 mg/kg, (2 lidocaine (4.0 mg/kg, and (3 ketamine (2.5 mg/kg plus lidocaine (4.0 mg/kg. Epidural injections were administered through the lumbosacral space. Analgesia, motor block, sedation, heart rate, arterial blood pressure, respiratory rate and arterial oxygen saturation were measured. Rectal temperature was compared before and after sedation as well as after epidural administration of the drugs. Epidural administration of the ketamine/lidocaine combination induced prolonged analgesia extending from the coccygeal to the T13-L1 dermatomes, leading to severe ataxia. Cardiovascular effects were significant in all treatments: heart rate decreased, but there was a minimal reduction in arterial pressure. It was concluded that adding a dose of ketamine to epidural lidocaine in cats is feasible and effective.

  8. Effect of medullary cavity in cancellous bone on two-wave phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachiken, Takuma; Nakanishi, Shoko; Matsukawa, Mami

    2016-07-01

    Osteoporotic patients have a larger medullary cavity in their cancellous bone than healthy people. In this study, the effect of the medullary cavity on the two-wave phenomenon was experimentally investigated using a cancellous bone model and a radius bone model. In the cancellous bone model, with the increase in hole (medullary cavity) diameter, the amplitudes of the fast waves became smaller, whereas the amplitudes of the slow waves became larger. In the radius bone model, the fast wave overlapped with the circumferential wave. The slow wave became larger with increasing hole diameter. The analysis of the slow wave thus seems to be useful for the in vivo diagnosis of the degree of osteoporosis.

  9. Antagonistic effects of atipamezole, yohimbine, and prazosin on xylazine-induced diuresis in clinically normal cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murahata, Yusuke; Miki, Yuya; Hikasa, Yoshiaki

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate and compare the antagonistic effects of atipamezole, yohimbine, and prazosin on xylazine-induced diuresis in clinically normal cats. Five cats were repeatedly used in each of the 9 groups. One group was not medicated. Cats in the other groups received 2 mg/kg BW xylazine intramuscularly, and saline (as the control); 160 μg/kg BW prazosin; or 40, 160, or 480 μg/kg BW atipamezole or yohimbine intravenously 0.5 h later. Urine and blood samples were collected 10 times over 8 h. Urine volume, pH, and specific gravity; plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) concentration; and creatinine, osmolality, and electrolyte values in both urine and plasma were measured. Both atipamezole and yohimbine antagonized xylazine-induced diuresis, but prazosin did not. The antidiuretic effect of atipamezole was more potent than that of yohimbine but not dose-dependent, in contrast to the effect of yohimbine at the tested doses. Both atipamezole and yohimbine reversed xylazine-induced decreases in both urine specific gravity and osmolality, and the increase in free water clearance. Glomerular filtration rate, osmolar clearance, and plasma electrolyte concentrations were not significantly altered. Antidiuresis of either atipamezole or yohimbine was not related to the area under the curve for AVP concentration, although the highest dose of both atipamezole and yohimbine increased plasma AVP concentration initially and temporarily, suggesting that this may in part influence antidiuretic effects of both agents. The diuretic effect of xylazine in cats may be mediated by α2-adrenoceptors but not α1-adrenoceptors. Atipamezole and yohimbine can be used as antagonistic agents against xylazine-induced diuresis in clinically normal cats.

  10. Dose- and duration-dependent effects of betahistine dihydrochloride treatment on histamine turnover in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tighilet, Brahim; Trottier, Suzanne; Lacour, Michel

    2005-10-31

    Drugs interacting with the histaminergic system are currently used for vertigo treatment and it was shown in animal models that structural analogues of histamine like betahistine improved the recovery process after vestibular lesion. This study was aimed at determining the possible dose and duration effects of betahistine treatment on histamine turnover in normal adult cats, as judged by the level of messenger RNA for histidine decarboxylase (enzyme synthesizing histamine) in the tuberomammillary nuclei. Experiments were conducted on betahistine-treated cats receiving daily doses of 2, 5, 10, or 50 mg/kg during 1 week, 3 weeks, 2 months, or 3 months. The 1-week, 3-week, and 2- and 3-month treatments correspond to the acute, compensatory, and sustained compensatory stages of vestibular compensation, respectively. The lowest dose (2 mg/kg) given the longest time (3 months) was close to the dosage for vestibular defective patients. Data from the experimental groups were compared to control, untreated cats and to placebo-treated animals. The results clearly show that betahistine dihydrochloride administered orally in the normal cat interferes with histamine turnover by increasing the basal expression level of histidine decarboxylase mRNA of neurons located in the tuberomammillary nuclei of the posterior hypothalamus. The effects were both dose- and time-dependent. In conclusion, compensation of both static and dynamic deficits is subtended by long-term adaptive mechanisms that could be facilitated pharmacologically using betahistine dihydrochloride.

  11. Effect of the Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Analogue Exenatide Extended Release in Cats with Newly Diagnosed Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riederer, A; Zini, E; Salesov, E; Fracassi, F; Padrutt, I; Macha, K; Stöckle, T M; Lutz, T A; Reusch, C E

    2016-01-01

    Exenatide extended release (ER) is a glucagon-like peptide-1 analogue that increases insulin secretion, inhibits glucagon secretion and induces satiation in humans with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The use of exenatide ER is safe and stimulates insulin secretion in healthy cats. The objective of this study is to assess the safety of exenatide ER and its effect on body weight, remission and metabolic control in newly diagnosed diabetic cats receiving insulin and a low-carbohydrate diet. Thirty client-owned cats. Prospective placebo-controlled clinical trial. Cats were treated with exenatide ER or 0.9% saline, administered SC, once weekly. Both groups received insulin glargine and a low-carbohydrate diet. Exenatide ER was administered for 16 weeks, or in cats that achieved remission it was given for 4 weeks after discontinuing insulin treatment. Nonparametric tests were used for statistical analysis. Cats in the exenatide ER and placebo groups had transient adverse signs including decreased appetite (60% vs. 20%, respectively, P = .06) and vomiting (53% vs. 40%, respectively, P = .715). Body weight increased significantly in the placebo group (P = .002), but not in cats receiving exenatide ER. Cats on exenatide ER achieved remission or good metabolic control in 40% or 89%, respectively, whereas in control cats percentages were 20% or 58% (P = .427 and P = .178, respectively). Exenatide ER is safe in diabetic cats and does not result in weight gain. Our pilot study suggests that, should there be an additional clinically relevant beneficial effect of exenatide ER in insulin-treated cats on rate of remission and good metabolic control, it would likely approximate 20% and 30%, respectively. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  12. black cat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜铁梅

    2016-01-01

    The black cat is a masterpiece of short fiction of Poe. He successfully solved the problem of creating of the horror effect by using scene description, symbol, repetition and first-person narrative methods. And created a complete and unified mysterious terror, achieved the effect of shocking. This paper aims to discuss the mystery in-depth and to enrich the research system in Poe’s novels.

  13. Effect of benazepril, robenacoxib and their combination on glomerular filtration rate in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jonathan N; Panteri, Alessandro; Graille, Melanie; Seewald, Wolfgang; Friton, Gabriele; Desevaux, Cyril

    2016-06-23

    Combined use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may induce acute kidney injury in humans, especially when combined with diuretics. The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the effects of benazepril, robenacoxib and their combination in healthy cats. In each of two studies (study 1 followed by study 2), 32 healthy cats were randomised to one of four groups (n = 4 male and 4 female cats per group) in a parallel-group design. The groups received orally once daily for 7 days either placebo (control group), benazepril, robenacoxib or benazepril plus robenacoxib. In study 2, all groups received in addition 0.5 mg/kg furosemide twice daily by subcutaneous injection for 7 days. Benazepril, robenacoxib and their combination were well tolerated as evidenced from lack of clinical signs and no negative effects on body weight, feed consumption and clinical chemistry, haematology and urinalysis variables. The primary endpoint of the study was the glomerular filtration rate (GFR), which was estimated from the plasma clearance of iohexol. In the absence of furosemide, GFR was significantly higher in cats receiving the combination of benazepril plus robenacoxib compared to the other three groups, and was also significantly higher in females receiving only benazepril compared to the control. Administration of furosemide induced diuresis, reduced GFR and activated the renin-aldosterone-angiotensin system, evidenced from increased plasma renin activity and plasma aldosterone concentrations. Compared to the control group in cats treated with furosemide, GFR was increased by benazepril (females only) but decreased by robenacoxib (males only). Benazepril, robenacoxib and their combination significantly inhibited the increase in plasma aldosterone induced by furosemide. The combination of benazepril and robenacoxib was well tolerated and either increased or had a neutral effect on GFR in healthy cats without or with

  14. Effects of stressors on the behavior and physiology of domestic cats

    OpenAIRE

    Stella, Judi; Croney, Candace; Buffington, Tony

    2012-01-01

    Feline interstitial cystitis (FIC) is a chronic pain syndrome of domestic cats. Cats with FIC have chronic, recurrent lower urinary tract signs (LUTS) and other comorbid disorders that are exacerbated by stressors. The aim of this study was to evaluate behavioral and physiological responses of healthy cats and cats diagnosed with FIC after exposure to a five day stressor. Ten healthy cats and 18 cats with FIC were housed at The Ohio State University Veterinary Medical Center (OSUVMC) vivarium...

  15. Effects of hypercapnia on variability of normal respiratory behavior in awake cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szlyk, P C; Jennings, D B

    1987-03-01

    Resting quiet awake cats breathing air in a steady state have a range of respiratory behavior, and this encompasses nonpurring and purring (D. B. Jennings and P. C. Szlyk, Can. J. Physiol. Pharmacol. 63: 148-154, 1985). On a given study day, individual cats usually breathed in a limited part of their potential respiratory range. Respiratory pattern, such as average breath frequency (f) and average tidal volume (VT) utilized for a given level of ventilation (V), could be predicted when cats breathed air; as well, inspiratory (TI) and expiratory (TE) times were specific for a given breath f. Inhalation of 2% and 4% CO2 in air caused an average increase in ventilation of 16 and 100%, respectively but breath-to-breath variability of V, f, and VT persisted at each fractional concentration of inspired CO2 (FICO2). The range of different V utilized breath to breath when breathing 2% CO2 overlapped with V during air control studies. Substantial overlap with control V also occurred in three of six cats when breathing 4% CO2. The most consistent effect of progressive hypercapnia was to increase VT and decrease f at a given level of V; increase in V during hypercapnia was accounted for by an increase in mean inspiratory flow (VT/TI). Hypercapnia also caused the fraction of breathing cycle devoted to inspiration (TI/TT) to increase at low f but not at high f.

  16. Effect of lingual gauze swab placement on pulse oximeter readings in anaesthetised dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, A; Martinez-Taboada, F; Nitzan, M

    2017-01-14

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of lingual gauze swab placement on pulse oximeter readings in anaesthetised dogs and cats. Following anaesthetic induction, the following pulse oximeter probe configurations were performed: no gauze swab (control), placement of a gauze swab between the tongue and the probe, placement of different thicknesses of gauze swab, placement of red cotton fabric, placement of a sheet of white paper and placement of the probe and gauze swab on different locations on the tongue. Oxygen saturation (SpO2) and peripheral perfusion index (PI) were recorded. Placement of a gauze swab between the pulse oximeter probe and the tongue in anaesthetised dogs and cats resulted in significantly higher SpO2 values compared with the control group. In dogs, PI values were significantly higher than the control in all groups except the quarter thickness swab group. In cats, PI was significantly higher in the double thickness swab and white paper groups compared with the control. Cats had significantly higher SpO2 and lower PI values than dogs. The authors propose that increased contact pressure is responsible for significantly higher SpO2 and PI readings with the use of a lingual gauze swab resulting from changes in transmural pressure and arterial compliance. British Veterinary Association.

  17. Effect of renal denervation on the compensatory renal growth following nephrectomy in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, T; Matsukawa, K; Murata, J; Matsumoto, M; Nakashima, K

    1999-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of denervation on the mass of the remaining kidney with or without unilateral nephrectomy using adult cats. The animals were divided into 4 groups: (1) control group, the weights of the right and left kidneys were measured intact in 5 cats; (2) nephrectomy group (Nx, n = 5 cats), the right kidney was removed and the left kidney was weighed 3-5 d after nephrectomy; (3) nephrectomy and denervation group (Nx+Dx, n = 7 cats), the left kidney was weighed on the 7th day after surgery in which the left kidney was denervated and the right kidney was removed; and (4) denervation group (Dx+Dx, n = 5 cats), both kidneys were weighed on the 7th day after denervation of the kidneys. In the control group, the left and right kidney weights per body weight (LKW and RKW) were the same (LKW, 0.74 +/- 0.06%; RKW, 0. 74 +/- 0.07%). In the Nx group, LKW increased to 0.90 +/- 0.03% 3-5 d after nephrectomy, although RKW of the removed kidney was 0.66 +/- 0.01%. In the Nx+Dx group, LKW increased to 0.97 +/- 0.15%, which was similar to that of the Nx group. In the Dx+Dx group, LKW (0.56 +/- 0.05%) and RKW (0.54 +/- 0.05%) were significantly less than those in the control group. We conclude that the renal nerves may contribute to maintaining the renal mass and that the neural effect on compensatory growth following nephrectomy may be covered by other growth factors.

  18. Effects of clopidogrel therapy on whole blood platelet aggregation, the Plateletworks® assay and coagulation parameters in cats with asymptomatic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Toom, M L; van Leeuwen, M W; Szatmári, V; Teske, E

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although scientific evidence is limited, clopidogrel is frequently used as prophylaxis for arterial thromboembolism in cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). OBJECTIVES: Evaluating effects of clopidogrel therapy in asymptomatic cats with HCM on (1) conventional whole blood aggregat

  19. Effect of acid and temperature on the discontinuous shear thickening phenomenon of silica nanoparticle suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuangbing; Wang, Jixiao; Cai, Wei; Zhao, Song; Wang, Zhi; Wang, Shichang

    2016-08-01

    The discontinuous shear thickening (DST) phenomenon of silica nanoparticle suspensions was investigated in this article. First, the non-aggregated silica nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized. The results indicate that the silica nanoparticles are spherical particles with a narrow size distribution with a diameter of approximately 90 nm. Next, the influence of nitric acid concentration and temperature on the DST phenomenon of shear thickening fluids (STFs) was investigated. The results indicate that the concentrated fluids with nitric acid concentration below 8.50 mmol/L and at a temperature below 40 °C exhibit a readily noticeable DST phenomenon.

  20. Direct effect of cadmium on blood pressure and adrenergic system in the cat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Revis, N.W.; Bingham, G.

    1984-01-01

    The dose-response effect of cadmium on systolic and diastolic pressure were measured in the cat after injecting a bolus of cadmium intravenously. In animals treated with 100, 125, or 150 ug cadmium/kg BW systolic and diastolic pressure were both significantly increased. These increases were gradual as the dose Cd was increased from 75 to 125 ug. In an attempt to determine the mechanism associated with cadmium-induced hypertension in the cat the effect of this element on the adrenergic system was studied. The effect of ..cap alpha.. and BETA agonists on cadmium-induced increase in blood pressure were determined by the injection of either propranolol or phentolamine at 20 mg/kg BW. The hypertensive effect of 125 ug Cd was abolished by phentolamine but not by propranolol suggesting, that Cd may induce the release of norepinephrine from storage sites. In support of this suggestion we observed in cats treated with 125 ug Cd a significant increase in plasma norepinephrine which was not affected by propranolol or phentolamine injections. However reserpine pretreatment abolished both the increase in plasma norepinephrine and the cadmium-induced hypertensive effect. The data suggest that the associated mechanism of cadmium-induced hypertension may be related to the effect of this element of the release of norepinephrine. Increases in the extracellular levels of this neurotransmitter in turn provokes a rise in blood pressure through its interaction with the receptors of vascular smooth muscle cells. 38 references, 7 figures, 1 table.

  1. Effects of some tobacco smoke constituents on foreign compound metabolism in the cat and the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, D.M.

    1977-03-01

    The effects of chronic nicotine administration on its own metabolism have been studied in the cat and the rat. Nicotine administration caused an increase in the in vitro metabolism in the liver of both species and in cat kidney. Cotinine production from nicotine was enhanced in both species by pretreatment with nicotine. The magnitude of the increase in enzyme activity was relatively small but of the same order as that produced, in the rat, by phenobarbital treatment. 3-methylcholanthrene pretreatment stimulated rat liver nicotine metabolism but was without effect on cotinine production. Chronic exposure of rats to relatively low levels of carbon monoxide inhibited the in vitro aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity but did not affect nicotine metabolism. The data are discussed in relation to the observed enzyme inductive effects of tobacco smoke.

  2. Effects of lumbar stabilization exercises on the flexion-relaxation phenomenon of the erector spinae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, San-Seong; Choi, Bo-Ram

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated the differences in the flexion-relaxation phenomenon (FRP) of the right and left erector spinae muscles in asymptomatic subjects and the effect of lumbar stabilization exercises on these differences. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-six participants (12 in the exercise group and 14 in the control group) with a difference in the FRP in the right and left erector spinae muscles were recruited from among healthy students attending Silla University. The exercise group performed two lumbar stabilization exercises (back bridge exercise and hand-knee exercise) for 4 weeks. The control group did not exercise. [Results] No significant group-by-exercise interaction was found. The right and left erector spinae muscles did show a difference in FRP between the control and exercise groups (119.2 ± 69.2 and 131.1 ± 85.2 ms, respectively). In addition, the exercise group showed a significant decrease in post-exercise (50.0 ± 27.0 ms) compared to pre-exercise (112.3 ± 41.5 ms) differences in the right and left FRP. [Conclusion] These results suggest that lumbar stabilization exercises may counter asymmetry of the FRP in the erector spinae muscles, possibly preventing low back pain in the general population.

  3. Evaluation of the effect of formalin fixation on skin specimens in dogs and cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaimie L. Miller

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Skin and subcutaneous tissues are the origin of most common neoplasms affecting dogs, accounting for approximately one third of all tumors encountered in the species. Surgical excision is frequently the best chance for a cure; determining factors influencing the success of excision are vital for surgical management of cases. This work examined the shrinkage of skin of various lengths from three sites in formalin for both dogs and cats. Tissues were measured on the animal (initial measurement, at the time of excision (post-removal, and after formalin fixation (post-fixation. While shrinkage after tissue removal was found in samples from the thorax, abdomen, and rear leg in dogs and from the rear leg in cats, no significant shrinkage due to formalin fixation was detected in any sample except for the thoracic samples from the dog. Therefore, when determining where to make incisions to effect a surgical cure, initial measurements should take into account tissue shrinkage effects.

  4. Estimation of effectiveness of three methods of feral cat population control by use of a simulation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Robert J; Levine, Stephen H; Reed, J Michael

    2013-08-15

    To predict effectiveness of 3 interventional methods of population control for feral cat colonies. Population model. Estimates of vital data for feral cats. Data were gathered from the literature regarding the demography and mating behavior of feral cats. An individual-based stochastic simulation model was developed to evaluate the effectiveness of trap-neuter-release (TNR), lethal control, and trap-vasectomy-hysterectomy-release (TVHR) in decreasing the size of feral cat populations. TVHR outperformed both TNR and lethal control at all annual capture probabilities between 10% and 90%. Unless > 57% of cats were captured and neutered annually by TNR or removed by lethal control, there was minimal effect on population size. In contrast, with an annual capture rate of ≥ 35%, TVHR caused population size to decrease. An annual capture rate of 57% eliminated the modeled population in 4,000 days by use of TVHR, whereas > 82% was required for both TNR and lethal control. When the effect of fraction of adult cats neutered on kitten and young juvenile survival rate was included in the analysis, TNR performed progressively worse and could be counterproductive, such that population size increased, compared with no intervention at all. TVHR should be preferred over TNR for management of feral cats if decrease in population size is the goal. This model allowed for many factors related to the trapping program and cats to be varied and should be useful for determining the financial and person-effort commitments required to have a desired effect on a given feral cat population.

  5. Experimental study on "cat-eye" effect with defocusing condition%离焦状态下“猫眼”效应的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘秉琦; 周斌; 张瑜; 武东生

    2011-01-01

    Retro-reflected wave power of "cat-eye" target is an important index for active laser detection system,which can evaluate high or low "cat-eye" effect of photoelectrical device and provide reference for detector's optimal design.A mathematical model of positive and negative defocusing distance on retro-reflected wave power of"cat-eye" target is built.Effect of defocusing distance on retro-reflected wave power of"cat-eye"target is simulated.Experimental research on typical "cat-eye" target is realized by using the active laser detection system and an inverted telescope.Theoretical simulation result and experimental result show that retro-reflected wave power will be rapidly decline with defocusing distance's increase in finite defocusing condition and this phenomenon is more notable in negative defocusing condition,which can provide experimental basis for research on applicable conditions of active laser detection system and stealth technology of"cat-eye" targets.%“猫眼”目标回波功率是激光主动探测系统的重要指标,可用米评估光电装备“猫眼”效应的强弱,并为探测器的优化设计提供参考。分别建立了正负离焦状态下“猫眼”目标回波功率数学模型,仿真分析了离焦量对“猫眼”目标回波功率的影响,利用搭建的激光主动探测系统及倒置的望远系统,实现了离焦状态下典型“猫眼”效应的实验。理论仿真结果与实验结果表明,激光在有限离焦下,“猫眼”目标回波功率将随离焦量的增大而显著下降,特别是负离焦状态的影响更加明显。这为进~步研究基于“猫眼”效应的激光主动探测适用条件及探讨“猫眼”目标隐身技术提供必要的实验依据。

  6. Effect of cognitive enrichment on behavior, mucosal immunity and upper respiratory disease of shelter cats rated as frustrated on arrival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourkow, Nadine; Phillips, Clive J C

    2016-09-01

    Acquisition of resources and opportunity to engage in natural behaviors has been shown to reduce frustration-related behaviors and enhance health in nondomestic felids kept in zoos, but little is known about whether there are similar effects in domestic cats living in confinement in animal shelters. Fifteen cats rated as Frustrated during the first hour of confinement to a cage at an animal shelter were assigned to either a Treatment (n=7) or Control (n=8) group. Treatment cats were taken from their cages to a separate room four times daily for 10min each time over a 10 d period, where they took part in training sessions to learn a novel behavior (paw-hand contact with a researcher). Changes in emotional states and mucosal immune response were evaluated over 10days. Infectious status was determined upon admission and incidence of upper respiratory was determined up to day 40 based on clinical signs. Treated cats were more likely to be rated as Content than Control cats and had greater concentrations of S-IgA (537μg/g) in feces than Control cats (101μg/g). Within the Treatment group, cats that responded positively had greater concentrations of S-IgA (925μg/g) than those that responded negatively (399μg/g). Control cats were more likely to develop respiratory disease over time compared to cats that received treatment (Hazard Ratio: 2.37, Confidence Interval: 1.35-4.15). It is concluded that there is prima facie evidence that cognitive enrichment of cats exhibiting frustration-related behaviors can elicit positive affect (contentment), stimulate secretion of IgA and reduce incidence of respiratory disease, which is worthy of further study.

  7. [Raynaud's phenomenon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomčík, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) is a very common sign which can usually be seen across all medical specialties. It is characterized by episodic color changes of acral parts of the body (palor, cyanosis, rubor) lasting from a few minutes to hours, which are usually triggered by cold temperature and/or stress. The primary RP occurs alone, without concomitant diseases, is usually benign and has favorable prognosis. Secondary RP occurs in a variety of diseases with a very variable progression and prognosis, mostly unfavorable one due to the development of ischemic tissue necrosis and gangrene. This work provides a comprehensive overview of the history, current knowledge about the epidemiology and pathogenesis and the recommended evaluation and treatment of RP.

  8. [Raynaud's phenomenon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprynger, M

    2004-06-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) is a common vascular disorder characterized by a recurrent transient vasospasm of the fingers and toes on exposure to cold or with emotional stress. Clinical criteria are used to distinguish patients with primary or idiopathic RP (formely Raynaud's disease) from those with secondary RP (formely Raynaud's syndrome). They include history, general physical examination, capillaroscopy, test for antinuclear antibody and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. More specific exams may be needed in selective cases. Excluding RP of occupational origin, the most common cause of secondary RP is a connective tissue disease (particularly scleroderma). RP may precede other clinical symptoms by several years, but most patients with RP will not progress to systemic disease. Nevertheless, primary RP may cause significant disability. We review the pathophysiology and clinical criteria of the disorder. Unfortunately, management of PR is still empirical and largely supportive.

  9. The relevance of Critical Accounting Theory (CAT) to effectiveness of public financial accountability in emerging economies

    OpenAIRE

    Oluwadare, E; Samy, M

    2015-01-01

    In the past, researchers of financial accountability have relied on Agency and Stewardship theories to explain the phenomena that may hinder the exchange of financial information in the accountability process. This article examines the relevance of CAT to effective public financial accountability.Public sector in developing countries has accountability mechanism that is based onagency model. Accountability mechanism following the assumptions of principal-agent theory will most likely focus on...

  10. Effects of sedation on echocardiographic variables of left atrial and left ventricular function in healthy cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jessica L; Schober, Karsten E; Fuentes, Virginia Luis; Bonagura, John D

    2012-10-01

    Although sedation is frequently used to facilitate patient compliance in feline echocardiography, the effects of sedative drugs on echocardiographic variables have been poorly documented. This study investigated the effects of two sedation protocols on echocardiographic indices in healthy cats, with special emphasis on the assessment of left atrial size and function, as well as left ventricular diastolic performance. Seven cats underwent echocardiography (transthoracic two-dimensional, spectral Doppler, color flow Doppler and tissue Doppler imaging) before and after sedation with both acepromazine (0.1 mg/kg IM) and butorphanol (0.25 mg/kg IM), or acepromazine (0.1 mg/kg IM), butorphanol (0.25 mg/kg IM) and ketamine (1.5 mg/kg IV). Heart rate increased significantly following acepromazine/butorphanol/ketamine (mean±SD of increase, 40±26 beats/min) and non-invasive systolic blood pressure decreased significantly following acepromazine/butorphanol (mean±SD of decrease, 12±19 mmHg). The majority of echocardiographic variables were not significantly different after sedation compared with baseline values. Both sedation protocols resulted in mildly decreased left ventricular end-diastolic dimension and mildly increased left ventricular end-diastolic wall thickness. This study therefore failed to demonstrate clinically meaningful effects of these sedation protocols on echocardiographic measurements, suggesting that sedation with acepromazine, butorphanol and/or ketamine can be used to facilitate echocardiography in healthy cats.

  11. Evaluation of analgesic effect and absorption of buprenorphine after buccal administration in cats with oral disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stathopoulou, Thaleia-Rengina; Kouki, Maria; Pypendop, Bruno H; Johnston, Atholl; Papadimitriou, Serafeim; Pelligand, Ludovic

    2017-09-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to evaluate the analgesic effect and absorption of buprenorphine after buccal administration in cats with oral disease. Methods Six adult client-owned cats with chronic gingivostomatitis (weighing 5.1 ± 1.1 kg) were recruited for a randomised, prospective, blinded, saline-controlled, crossover study. Pain scores, dental examination, stomatitis score and buccal pH measurement were conducted on day 1 under sedation in all cats. On day 2, animals were randomised into two groups and administered one of the two treatments buccally (group A received buprenorphine 0.02 mg/kg and group B received 0.9% saline) and vice versa on day 3. Pain scores and food consumption were measured at 30, 90 and 360 mins after the administration of buprenorphine. Blood samples were taken at the same time and plasma buprenorphine concentration was measured by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Data were statistically analysed as non-parametric and the level of significance was set as P gingivostomatitis produces an analgesic effect and low inter-individual variability in plasma concentration, and it can be incorporated in their multimodal analgesia plan.

  12. The effects of stance width and foot posture on lumbar muscle flexion-relaxation phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Boyi; Shan, Xinhai; Zhou, Jie; Ning, Xiaopeng

    2014-03-01

    Characterizing the lumbar muscle flexion-relaxation phenomenon is a clinically relevant approach in understanding the neuromuscular alternations of low back pain patients. Previous studies have indicated that changes in stance posture could directly influence trunk kinematics and potentially change the lumbar tissue synergy. In this study, the effects of stance width and foot posture on the lumbar muscle relaxation responses during trunk flexion were investigated. Thirteen volunteers performed trunk flexion using three different stance widths and 'toe-forward' or 'toe-out' foot postures (six conditions in total). Lumbar muscle electromyography was collected from the L3 and L4 level paraspinals; meanwhile three magnetic motion sensors were placed over the S1, T12, and C7 vertebrae to track lumbar and trunk kinematics. The lumbar angle at which muscle activity diminished to a near resting level was recorded. At the systemic level, the boundary where the internal moment started to shift from active to passive tissues was identified. For the L3 paraspinals, the flexion relaxation lumbar angle reduced 1.3° with the increase of stance width. When changed from 'toe-forward' to 'toe-out' foot posture, the flexion relaxation lumbar angle reduced 1.4° and 1.1° for the L3 and L4 paraspinals respectively. However, the active and passive lumbar tissue load shifting boundary was not affected. Findings of this study suggest that changes in stance width and foot posture altered the lumbar tissue load sharing mechanism. Therefore, in a clinical setting, it is critical to maintain consistent stance postures when examining the characteristics of lumbar tissue synergy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Mesopredator Management: Effects of Red Fox Control on the Abundance, Diet and Use of Space by Feral Cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molsher, Robyn; Newsome, Thomas M.; Dickman, Christopher R.

    2017-01-01

    Apex predators are subject to lethal control in many parts of the world to minimize their impacts on human industries and livelihoods. Diverse communities of smaller predators—mesopredators—often remain after apex predator removal. Despite concern that these mesopredators may be 'released' in the absence of the apex predator and exert negative effects on each other and on co-occurring prey, these interactions have been little studied. Here, we investigate the potential effects of competition and intraguild predation between red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and feral cats (Felis catus) in south-eastern Australia where the apex predator, the dingo (Canis dingo), has been extirpated by humans. We predicted that the larger fox would dominate the cat in encounters, and used a fox-removal experiment to assess whether foxes affect cat abundance, diet, home-range and habitat use. Our results provide little indication that intraguild predation occurred or that cats responded numerically to the fox removal, but suggest that the fox affects some aspects of cat resource use. In particular, where foxes were removed cats increased their consumption of invertebrates and carrion, decreased their home range size and foraged more in open habitats. Fox control takes place over large areas of Australia to protect threatened native species and agricultural interests. Our results suggest that fox control programmes could lead to changes in the way that cats interact with co-occurring prey, and that some prey may become more vulnerable to cat predation in open habitats after foxes have been removed. Moreover, with intensive and more sustained fox control it is possible that cats could respond numerically and alter their behaviour in different ways to those documented herein. Such outcomes need to be considered when estimating the indirect impacts of fox control. We conclude that novel approaches are urgently required to control invasive mesopredators at the same time, especially in areas

  14. Mesopredator Management: Effects of Red Fox Control on the Abundance, Diet and Use of Space by Feral Cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molsher, Robyn; Newsome, Alan E; Newsome, Thomas M; Dickman, Christopher R

    2017-01-01

    Apex predators are subject to lethal control in many parts of the world to minimize their impacts on human industries and livelihoods. Diverse communities of smaller predators-mesopredators-often remain after apex predator removal. Despite concern that these mesopredators may be 'released' in the absence of the apex predator and exert negative effects on each other and on co-occurring prey, these interactions have been little studied. Here, we investigate the potential effects of competition and intraguild predation between red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and feral cats (Felis catus) in south-eastern Australia where the apex predator, the dingo (Canis dingo), has been extirpated by humans. We predicted that the larger fox would dominate the cat in encounters, and used a fox-removal experiment to assess whether foxes affect cat abundance, diet, home-range and habitat use. Our results provide little indication that intraguild predation occurred or that cats responded numerically to the fox removal, but suggest that the fox affects some aspects of cat resource use. In particular, where foxes were removed cats increased their consumption of invertebrates and carrion, decreased their home range size and foraged more in open habitats. Fox control takes place over large areas of Australia to protect threatened native species and agricultural interests. Our results suggest that fox control programmes could lead to changes in the way that cats interact with co-occurring prey, and that some prey may become more vulnerable to cat predation in open habitats after foxes have been removed. Moreover, with intensive and more sustained fox control it is possible that cats could respond numerically and alter their behaviour in different ways to those documented herein. Such outcomes need to be considered when estimating the indirect impacts of fox control. We conclude that novel approaches are urgently required to control invasive mesopredators at the same time, especially in areas where

  15. The effect of monosialylganglioside mix modifying the PEGylated liposomal epirubicin on the accelerated blood clearance phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Zhang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available PEGylated liposomes are potential candidates to improve the pharmacokinetic characteristics of encapsulated drugs, to extend their circulation half-life and facilitate their passive accumulation at tumour sites. However, PEG-modified liposomes can induce accelerated blood clearance (ABC upon repeated administration, and the extent of ABC phenomenon on the cytotoxic drugs-containing PEGylated liposomes is related to the dose of the cytotoxic drugs. In this study, EPI served as a model cytotoxic drug, a hydrophilic surfactant molecule, monosialylganglioside (GM1 was chosen and modified on the liposomes together with PEG. It was shown that upon mixed modification, when GM1 contents reached 10% or 15% mol, the ABC phenomenon of the PEGylated liposomal EPI significantly reduced. We also found that GM1 played an important role in abrogating the ABC phenomenon in both the induction phase and the effectuation phase. The results suggested that GM1 incorporation unfortunately did not avoid occurrence of ABC phenomenon completely, but GM1 modification on PEGylated liposomes may provide a significant improvement in clinical practice of PEGylated liposomes. Further study must be necessary.

  16. Short term effects of increasing dietary salt concentrations on urine composition in healthy cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paßlack, N; Burmeier, H; Brenten, T; Neumann, K; Zentek, J

    2014-09-01

    High dietary salt (NaCl) concentrations are assumed to be beneficial in preventing the formation of calcium oxalate (CaOx) uroliths in cats, since increased water intake and urine volume have been observed subsequent to intake. In human beings, dietary NaCl restriction is recommended for the prevention of CaOx urolith formation, since high NaCl intake is associated with increased urinary Ca excretion. The aim of the present study was to clarify the role of dietary NaCl in the formation of CaOx uroliths in cats. Eight cats received four diets that differed in Na and Cl concentrations (0.38-1.43% Na and 0.56-2.52% Cl dry matter, DM). Each feeding period consisted of a 21 day adaptation period, followed by a 7 day sampling period for urine collection. Higher dietary NaCl concentrations were associated with increased urine volume and renal Na excretion. Urinary Ca concentration was constant, but renal Ca excretion increased from 0.62 to 1.05 mg/kg bodyweight (BW)/day with higher dietary NaCl concentrations (P ≤ 0.05). Urinary oxalate (Ox), citrate, P and K concentrations decreased when NaCl intake was high (P ≤ 0.05), and urinary pH was low in all groups (6.33-6.45; P > 0.05). Relative supersaturation of CaOx in the urine was unaffected by dietary NaCl concentrations. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated several beneficial effects of high dietary NaCl intake over a relatively short time period. In particular, urinary Ca concentration remained unchanged because of increased urine volume. Decreased urinary Ox concentrations might help to prevent the formation of CaOx uroliths, but this should be verified in future studies in diseased or predisposed cats.

  17. Pathogenesis of Raynaud's phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, A L

    2005-05-01

    The pathogenesis of Raynaud's phenomenon is not fully understood. However, the last 20 yr have witnessed enormous increases in our understanding of different mechanisms which, singly or in combination, may contribute. A key point is that Raynaud's phenomenon can be either primary (idiopathic) or secondary to a number of underlying conditions, and that the pathogenesis and pathophysiology vary between these conditions. This review concentrates upon those subtypes of Raynaud's phenomenon of most interest to rheumatologists: systemic sclerosis-related Raynaud's phenomenon, primary Raynaud's phenomenon and Raynaud's phenomenon secondary to hand-arm vibration syndrome. In this review, I shall discuss the main mechanisms thought to be important in pathophysiology under the three broad headings of 'vascular', 'neural' and 'intravascular'. While these are false distinctions because all interrelate, they facilitate discussion of the key elements: the blood vessel wall (particularly the endothelium), the neural control of vascular tone, and the many circulating factors which can impair blood flow and/or cause endothelial injury. Vascular abnormalities include those of both structure and function. Neural abnormalities include deficiency of the vasodilator calcitonin gene-related peptide (released from sensory afferents), alpha(2)-adrenoreceptor activation (possibly with up-regulation of the normally 'silent' alpha(2C)-adrenoreceptor) and a central nervous system component. Intravascular abnormalities include platelet activation, impaired fibrinolysis, increased viscosity and probably oxidant stress. As our understanding of the pathophysiology of Raynaud's phenomenon increases, so do our possibilities for identifying effective treatments.

  18. Effect of mitomycin on normal dermal fibroblast and HaCat cell: an in vitro study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao-wen WANG; Ji-hao REN; Kun XIA; Shu-hui WANG; Tuan-fang YIN; Ding-hua XIE; Li-hua LI

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of mitomycin on the growth of human dermal fibroblast and immortalized human keratinocyte line (HaCat cell),particularly the effect of mitomycin on intracellular messenger RNA (mRNA) synthesis of collagen and growth factors of fibroblast.Methods: The normal dermal fibroblast and HaCat cell were cultured in vitro.Cell cultures were exposed to 0.4 and 0.04 mg/ml of mitomycin solution,and serum-free culture medium was used as control.The cellular morphology change,growth characteristics,cell proliferation,and apoptosis were observed at different intervals.For the fibroblasts,the mRNA expression changes of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1,basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF),procollagen Ⅰ,and Ⅲ were detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).Results: The cultured normal human skin fibroblast and HaCat cell grew exponentially.A 5-min exposure to mitomycin at either 0.4 or 0.04 mg/ml caused marked dose-dependent cell proliferation inhibition on both fibroblasts and HaCat cells.Cell morphology changed,cell density decreased,and the growth curves were without an exponential phase.The fibroblast proliferated on the 5th day after the 5-min exposure of mitomycin at 0.04 mg/ml.Meanwhile,5-min application of mitomycin at either 0.04 or 0.4 mg/ml induced fibroblast apoptosis but not necrosis.The apoptosis rate of the fibroblast increased with a higher concentration of mytomycin (p<0.05).A 5-min exposure to mitomycin at 0.4 mg/ml resulted in a marked decrease in the mRNA production of TGF-β1,procollagen Ⅰ and Ⅲ,and a marked increase in the mRNA production of bFGF.Conclusions: Mitomycin can inhibit fibroblast proliferation,induce fibroblast apoptosis,and regulate intracellular protein expression on mRNA levels.In additon,mitomycin can inhibit HaCat cell proliferation,so epithelial cell needs more protecting to avoid mitomycin's side effect when it is applied clinically.

  19. The Effect of Doppler Phenomenon on the Speed of Blood Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghaidaa Abdulrahman Khalid

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This research studying the phenomenon of Doppler (frequency Doppler as a method through which the direction and speed of the blood cells flows in blood vessels wear measured. This Doppler frequency is relied upon in medicine for measuring the speed of blood flow, because the blood flow is an important concept from the concepts of medicine. It represents the function and efficient of the heart and blood vessels in the body so any defect in this function will appear as a change in the speed of blood flow from the normal value assumed. As this speed changes alot in cases of disease and morbidity of the heart, so in order to identify the effect of changing the Doppler frequency on the speed of blood flow and the relationship of this frequency with the angles of transitions and receptions and the effect of changing the ultrasound transmitted frequencies on the measured velocities .The Doppler ultrasound system has been used which is more efficient and easier to be widely used as a practical application in Al Yarmouk Teaching Hospital on two subjects. The normal had a natural medical history in the blood vessels, and abnormal had carotid artery stenosis. This device will give the flow velocity of blood in the blood vessels which is useful to the examiner, the equation of Doppler as a mathematical model in the research is adopted the measured speed to clarify the amount of change in the frequency (shift in frequency. This speed was measured in five different blood vessels, large arteries (abdominal aorta and carotid artery in the neck and large veins (the inferior vena cava across the abdomen and the external Jugular vein in the neck and capillaries in the hand and fingers. Then using the measured velocities in these vessels the Doppler frequency was calculated from this mathematical model using MATLAB program, was found that as velocity of the blood increases, so does the Doppler frequency and vice versa. The greater the value of the Doppler angle

  20. Exploring the Response Shift Phenomenon in Childhood Patients With Cancer and Its Effect on Health-Related Quality of Life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinksma, Aeltsje; Tissing, Wim J. E.; Sulkers, Esther; Kamps, Willem A.; Roodbol, Petrie F.; Sanderman, Robbert

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: To explore the response shift phenomenon in pediatric patients with cancer and to determine its effects on ratings of health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Design: Retrospective pre- and post-test design. Setting: Pediatric oncology department in the northern part of the Nether

  1. Exploring the Response Shift Phenomenon in Childhood Patients With Cancer and Its Effect on Health-Related Quality of Life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinksma, Aeltsje; Tissing, Wim J. E.; Sulkers, Esther; Kamps, Willem A.; Roodbol, Petrie F.; Sanderman, Robbert

    Purpose/Objectives: To explore the response shift phenomenon in pediatric patients with cancer and to determine its effects on ratings of health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Design: Retrospective pre- and post-test design. Setting: Pediatric oncology department in the northern part of the

  2. On the mechanism of the relaxing adrenaline effect on cat jejunum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkov, V; Radomirov, R

    1975-01-01

    The effect of propranolol, phentolamine, papaverine, theophyline and Ca++, administered in different combinations of their threshold doses, on the relaxing effect of adrenaline was studied on an isolated segment of proximal jejunum of male cats. It was established that phentolamine weakened the relaxing effect of adrenaline, while propranolol had no effect on it. Papaverine potentiated the relaxinf effects of adrenaline both when administered alone and in combination with propranolol or with phentolamine. Theophylline weakened the relaxing effect of adfrenaline and of the combination phentolamine-adrenaline. Ca++ increased the smooth-muscle tone. The interpretation of the results obtained leads to the fundamental conclusions that the relaxing effect of adrenaline on cat jejunum is more alpha- than beta-adrenergically determined and that the system of the cyclic AMP participates in its realization. At the smae time, however, the possibility of participation of other mechanisms is not excluded. The smooth-muscle effect of papaverine and theophylline is not determined only by their inhibitory effect on phosphodiesterase.

  3. Effects of various factors on Doppler ultrasonographic measurements of radial and coccygeal arterial blood pressure in privately owned, conscious cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittemore, Jacqueline C; Nystrom, Michael R; Mawby, Dianne I

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the effects of age, body condition score (BCS), and muscle condition score (MCS) on radial and coccygeal systolic arterial blood pressure (SAP) in cats. DESIGN Prospective randomized trial. ANIMALS 66 privately owned cats enrolled between May and December 2010. PROCEDURES BCS and MCS of cats were assessed by 2 investigators; SAP was measured via Doppler ultrasonic flow detector, with cats positioned in right lateral or sternal recumbency for measurements at the radial or coccygeal artery, respectively, with order of site randomized. Associations among variables were assessed through correlation coefficients, partial correlation coefficients, and ANCOVA. RESULTS Interrater reliability for BCS and MCS assessment was high (correlation coefficients, 0.95 and 0.83, respectively). No significant effect was identified for order of SAP measurement sites. Coccygeal and radial SAP were positively correlated (ρ = 0.45). The median difference in coccygeal versus radial SAP was 19 mm Hg, but differences were not consistently positive or negative. Radial SAP was positively correlated with age (ρ = 0.48) and negatively correlated with MCS (ρ = -0.30). On the basis of the correlation analysis, the association between radial SAP and MCS reflected the confounding influence of age. Coccygeal SAP was not significantly correlated with age, BCS, or MCS. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Use of the coccygeal artery is recommended to reduce the confounding effects of age and sarcopenia on Doppler ultrasonographic SAP measurements in cats. Additionally, monitoring for changes in MCS is recommended for cats undergoing serial SAP measurement.

  4. Effect of static neck flexion in cervical flexion-relaxation phenomenon in healthy males and females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi-Khatir, Roghayeh; Talebian, Saeed; Maroufi, Nader; Olyaei, Gholam Reza

    2016-04-01

    Neck pain is a common musculoskeletal disorder, especially among skilled workers who must keep their necks in a flexed position frequently during the day. The present study investigated changes in cervical flexion-relaxation phenomenon parameters after sustained neck flexion. The participants were 40 healthy subjects grouped by gender (20 females, 20 males). They were exposed to static neck flexion at the full angle of cervical flexion for 10 min. Each subject underwent three trials of cervical flexion and re-extension before and after this period. Differences in onset and cessation angle of flexion-relaxation phenomenon, maximum neck flexion angle, amplitude of neck muscle activation and flexion-relaxation ratio were evaluated. The maximum neck flexion angle significantly increased after sustained flexion. The onset of flexion-relaxation was significantly delayed during flexion, but cessation angle remained unchanged. Myoelectric activity of the cervical erector spinae muscles increased significantly after maintaining flexion, especially in female subjects. The flexion-relaxation ratio also decreased significantly. It was concluded that 10 min of static flexion results in a delay in flexion-relaxation phenomenon and a shortened silence period. Also the cervical erector spinae muscles are required to be active longer and generate more activity. These neuromuscular changes may be a risk factor for neck pain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of deafness and cochlear implant use on temporal response characteristics in cat primary auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallon, James B; Shepherd, Robert K; Nayagam, David A X; Wise, Andrew K; Heffer, Leon F; Landry, Thomas G; Irvine, Dexter R F

    2014-09-01

    We have previously shown that neonatal deafness of 7-13 months duration leads to loss of cochleotopy in the primary auditory cortex (AI) that can be reversed by cochlear implant use. Here we describe the effects of a similar duration of deafness and cochlear implant use on temporal processing. Specifically, we compared the temporal resolution of neurons in AI of young adult normal-hearing cats that were acutely deafened and implanted immediately prior to recording with that in three groups of neonatally deafened cats. One group of neonatally deafened cats received no chronic stimulation. The other two groups received up to 8 months of either low- or high-rate (50 or 500 pulses per second per electrode, respectively) stimulation from a clinical cochlear implant, initiated at 10 weeks of age. Deafness of 7-13 months duration had no effect on the duration of post-onset response suppression, latency, latency jitter, or the stimulus repetition rate at which units responded maximally (best repetition rate), but resulted in a statistically significant reduction in the ability of units to respond to every stimulus in a train (maximum following rate). None of the temporal response characteristics of the low-rate group differed from those in acutely deafened controls. In contrast, high-rate stimulation had diverse effects: it resulted in decreased suppression duration, longer latency and greater jitter relative to all other groups, and an increase in best repetition rate and cut-off rate relative to acutely deafened controls. The minimal effects of moderate-duration deafness on temporal processing in the present study are in contrast to its previously-reported pronounced effects on cochleotopy. Much longer periods of deafness have been reported to result in significant changes in temporal processing, in accord with the fact that duration of deafness is a major factor influencing outcome in human cochlear implantees.

  6. The effect of exercise and antioxidant enzyme levels in syndrome X and coronary slow flow phenomenon: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Ozgür; Meriç, Murat; Acar, Zeydin; Kale, Abdurrahman; Demircan, Sabri; Yılmaz, Ozcan; Demircan, Günnur; Yılmaz Miroğlu, Yeliz

    2013-11-01

    In this study the antioxidant enzyme [catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) ] levels at rest in patients with syndrome X and coronary slow flow are measured. Then it has been investigated whether there is any enzymatic difference between the normal controls and syndrome X patients or patients with coronary slow flow and ascertain if exercise has any effects on the antioxidant enzyme levels. Fifty-five patients were included in this prospective observational controlled study. Patients were divided into 3 groups: Group 1- normal controls (n=20); Group 2-patients with coronary slow flow (n=20); and Group 3-patients diagnosed with syndrome X (n=15). In all patients, blood samples were collected at rest and after maximal exercise. The antioxidant enzymes (SOD, CAT, Gpx) in the erythrocytes were studied for these three groups of blood sample. Statistical analysis was performed using Student t-test, Mann-Whitney U and Chi-square tests, Kruskal-Wallis variance analysis and ANOVA. Under basal conditions the lowest SOD and GPx levels were measured in the 2nd Group, whereas significant differences in paired comparisons were observed only between the 2nd and 3rd Groups (p=0.024 vs. plevels were decreased significantly in the 3rd Groups when compared with the basal concentrations (p=0.014), however no significant pre- and post-exercise differences were observed in the CAT and GPx concentrations (p>0.05). The post-exercise SOD level when compared with basal SOD levels were decreased significantly in the syndrome X group, however no differences were observed between the other groups. This can be interpreted as the reduction in the exercise related symptoms and ischemic findings are resulting from the decrease of SOD activity.

  7. Cat parasites

    OpenAIRE

    Vošická, Kristýna

    2016-01-01

    The content of this bachelor thesis describes a different variety of cat parasites. This study discovers that the most infected group of the outdoor cats due to the fact that these animals are not provided with the same care as the household pets. Those cats are usually not vaccinated, not rid of worms, no one takes care of their fur and so they tend to become a host for the parasites. There are several kinds of parasites which attack cats. Among those belong the skin parasites like a cat fle...

  8. Effect of cold storage on immediate graft function in an experimental model of renal transplantation in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csomos, Rebecca A; Hardie, Robert J; Schmiedt, Chad W; Delaney, Fern A; McAnulty, Jonathan F

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the effect of cold storage (CS) on immediate posttransplantation function of renal autografts in cats. ANIMALS 15 healthy 1-year-old cats. PROCEDURES Cats were assigned to 2 groups and underwent autotransplantation of the left kidney followed by nephrectomy of the right kidney. The left kidney was autotransplanted either immediately (IT group; n = 6) or after being flushed with a cold sucrose phosphate solution and stored on ice while the implant site was prepared (CS group; 9). Serum creatinine and BUN concentrations were monitored daily and autografts were ultrasonographically examined intermittently for 14 days after surgery. RESULTS Mean duration of CS was 24 minutes for the CS group. Posttransplantation serum creatinine and BUN concentrations for the CS group had lower peak values, returned to the respective reference ranges quicker, and were generally significantly lower than those for the IT group. Mean posttransplantation autograft size for the CS group was smaller than that for the IT group. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that immediate posttransplantation function of renal autografts following a short period of CS was better than that of renal autografts that did not undergo CS, which suggested CS protected grafts from ischemic injury and may decrease perioperative complications, speed recovery, and improve the long-term outcome for cats with renal transplants. IMPACT FOR HUMAN MEDICINE Cats metabolize immunosuppressive drugs in a manner similar to humans; therefore, renal transplantation in cats may serve as a desirable model for investigating the effects of renal transplantation in human patients.

  9. Study of the effect on shelter cat intakes and euthanasia from a shelter neuter return project of 10,080 cats from March 2010 to June 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Karen L; Jon Cicirelli

    2014-01-01

    Cat impoundments were increasing at the municipal San Jose animal shelter in 2009, despite long-term successful low cost sterilization programs and attempts to lower the euthanasia rate of treatable-rehabilitatable impounds beginning in 2008. San Jose Animal Care and Services implemented a new strategy designed to control overall feral cat reproduction by altering and returning feral cats entering the shelter system, rather than euthanizing the cats. The purpose of this case study was to dete...

  10. An ecological approach to learning with technology: responding to tensions within the "wow-effect" phenomenon in teaching practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herro, Danielle

    2016-02-01

    This review explores Anne Kamstrupp's "The Wow-effect in Science Teacher Education" by examining her theorized "wow-effect" as a teaching enactment that may serve to engage students, but often fails to provide deep understanding of science content. My response extends her perspective of socio-materiality as means to understand the "wow-effect" by suggesting social constructivism provides a more accurate lens to disentangle the phenomenon. I react to her position that tension fields within the phenomenon include the relationship between new and old technologies, boredom and engagement, and active and sedentary learning. In this conversation, I point to a new way of conceptualizing using digital media in the classroom as ecology of learning that may serve to decrease problems associated with the "wow-effect".

  11. An ecological approach to learning with technology: responding to tensions within the "wow-effect" phenomenon in teaching practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herro, Danielle

    2016-12-01

    This review explores Anne Kamstrupp's "The Wow-effect in Science Teacher Education" by examining her theorized "wow-effect" as a teaching enactment that may serve to engage students, but often fails to provide deep understanding of science content. My response extends her perspective of socio-materiality as means to understand the "wow-effect" by suggesting social constructivism provides a more accurate lens to disentangle the phenomenon. I react to her position that tension fields within the phenomenon include the relationship between new and old technologies, boredom and engagement, and active and sedentary learning. In this conversation, I point to a new way of conceptualizing using digital media in the classroom as ecology of learning that may serve to decrease problems associated with the "wow-effect".

  12. Study of the effect on shelter cat intakes and euthanasia from a shelter neuter return project of 10,080 cats from March 2010 to June 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen L. Johnson

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cat impoundments were increasing at the municipal San Jose animal shelter in 2009, despite long-term successful low cost sterilization programs and attempts to lower the euthanasia rate of treatable-rehabilitatable impounds beginning in 2008. San Jose Animal Care and Services implemented a new strategy designed to control overall feral cat reproduction by altering and returning feral cats entering the shelter system, rather than euthanizing the cats. The purpose of this case study was to determine how the program affected the shelter cat intakes over time. In just over four years, 10,080 individual healthy adult feral cats, out of 11,423 impounded at the shelter during this time frame, were altered and returned to their site of capture. Included in the 11,423 cats were 862 cats impounded from one to four additional times for a total of 958 (9.5% recaptures of the previously altered 10,080 cats. The remaining 385 healthy feral cats were euthanized at the shelter from March 2010 to June 2014. Four years into the program, researchers observed cat and kitten impounds decreased 29.1%; euthanasia decreased from over 70% of intakes in 2009, to 23% in 2014. Euthanasia in the shelter for Upper Respiratory Disease decreased 99%; dead cat pick up off the streets declined 20%. Dog impounds did not similarly decline over the four years. No other laws or program changes were implemented since the beginning of the program.

  13. Study of the effect on shelter cat intakes and euthanasia from a shelter neuter return project of 10,080 cats from March 2010 to June 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicirelli, Jon

    2014-01-01

    Cat impoundments were increasing at the municipal San Jose animal shelter in 2009, despite long-term successful low cost sterilization programs and attempts to lower the euthanasia rate of treatable-rehabilitatable impounds beginning in 2008. San Jose Animal Care and Services implemented a new strategy designed to control overall feral cat reproduction by altering and returning feral cats entering the shelter system, rather than euthanizing the cats. The purpose of this case study was to determine how the program affected the shelter cat intakes over time. In just over four years, 10,080 individual healthy adult feral cats, out of 11,423 impounded at the shelter during this time frame, were altered and returned to their site of capture. Included in the 11,423 cats were 862 cats impounded from one to four additional times for a total of 958 (9.5%) recaptures of the previously altered 10,080 cats. The remaining 385 healthy feral cats were euthanized at the shelter from March 2010 to June 2014. Four years into the program, researchers observed cat and kitten impounds decreased 29.1%; euthanasia decreased from over 70% of intakes in 2009, to 23% in 2014. Euthanasia in the shelter for Upper Respiratory Disease decreased 99%; dead cat pick up off the streets declined 20%. Dog impounds did not similarly decline over the four years. No other laws or program changes were implemented since the beginning of the program. PMID:25374785

  14. Study of the effect on shelter cat intakes and euthanasia from a shelter neuter return project of 10,080 cats from March 2010 to June 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Karen L; Cicirelli, Jon

    2014-01-01

    Cat impoundments were increasing at the municipal San Jose animal shelter in 2009, despite long-term successful low cost sterilization programs and attempts to lower the euthanasia rate of treatable-rehabilitatable impounds beginning in 2008. San Jose Animal Care and Services implemented a new strategy designed to control overall feral cat reproduction by altering and returning feral cats entering the shelter system, rather than euthanizing the cats. The purpose of this case study was to determine how the program affected the shelter cat intakes over time. In just over four years, 10,080 individual healthy adult feral cats, out of 11,423 impounded at the shelter during this time frame, were altered and returned to their site of capture. Included in the 11,423 cats were 862 cats impounded from one to four additional times for a total of 958 (9.5%) recaptures of the previously altered 10,080 cats. The remaining 385 healthy feral cats were euthanized at the shelter from March 2010 to June 2014. Four years into the program, researchers observed cat and kitten impounds decreased 29.1%; euthanasia decreased from over 70% of intakes in 2009, to 23% in 2014. Euthanasia in the shelter for Upper Respiratory Disease decreased 99%; dead cat pick up off the streets declined 20%. Dog impounds did not similarly decline over the four years. No other laws or program changes were implemented since the beginning of the program.

  15. Effects of isradipine and other calcium antagonists on arteriovenous-shunt flow in anesthetized rabbits and cats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hof, R.P.

    1989-04-17

    The effects of vasodilators on arteriovenous (AV)-shunt flow was investigated in anesthetized cats and rabbits, using the tracer microsphere method. In cats, the calcium antagonist isradipine reduced AV-shunt flow; verapamil showed a similar tendency and nicardipine was without effect. Dihydralazine strongly increased, but nitroglycerin and dipyridamole decreased AV-shunt flow. In rabbits, the effects of isradipine and verapamil were similar to those seen in cats. Sodium nitroprusside had no effect, whereas prazosin, minoxidil, and the potassium-channel activator cromakalim increased AV-shunt flow. The contrasting effects of drugs sharing the same mechanism of action suggest that target-tissue selectivity is more important than the mechanism of action. An increase of AV-shunt flow is unlikely to be beneficial but could be associated with a number of undesirable side effects. It might negatively affect migraine sufferers and, if AV-shunt dilatation shows no tolerance development, it represents an unnecessary hemodynamic burden for the heart.

  16. Effects of stressors on the behavior and physiology of domestic cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, Judi; Croney, Candace; Buffington, Tony

    2013-01-31

    Feline interstitial cystitis (FIC) is a chronic pain syndrome of domestic cats. Cats with FIC have chronic, recurrent lower urinary tract signs (LUTS) and other comorbid disorders that are exacerbated by stressors. The aim of this study was to evaluate behavioral and physiological responses of healthy cats and cats diagnosed with FIC after exposure to a five day stressor. Ten healthy cats and 18 cats with FIC were housed at The Ohio State University Veterinary Medical Center (OSUVMC) vivarium. All cats were housed in enriched cages for at least one year prior to the experiment. Cats had daily play time and socialization outside of the cage, food treats and auditory enrichment. The daily husbandry schedule was maintained at a consistent time of day and cats were cared for by two familiar caretakers. During the test days, cats were exposed to multiple unpredictable stressors which included exposure to multiple unfamiliar caretakers, an inconsistent husbandry schedule, and discontinuation of play time, socialization, food treats, and auditory enrichment. Sickness behaviors (SB), including vomiting, diarrhea, anorexia or decreased food and water intake, fever, lethargy, somnolence, enhanced pain-like behaviors, decreased general activity, body care activities (grooming), and social interactions, were recorded daily. Blood samples were collected in the morning, before and after the stress period, for measurement of serum cortisol concentration, leukocytes, lymphocytes, neutrophils, neutrophil: lymphocyte (N:L) ratio and mRNA for the cytokines interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Overall, the short term stressors led to a significant increase in SB in both healthy cats and cats with FIC, whereas lymphopenia and N:L changes occurred only in FIC cats. Daily monitoring of cats for SB may be a noninvasive and reliable way to assess stress responses and overall welfare of cats housed in cages.

  17. Effects of combined midazolam and propofol in anesthesia induction and recovery of cats undergoing ovariohisterectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Gorayeb de Castro

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the effects of propofol and midazolam on induction of anesthesia in cats undergoing ovariohysterectomy, measured in terms of the quality of tracheal intubation, anesthesia induction, cardiorespiratory effects, and recuperation period. Thirty healthy adult cats were pretreated with acepromazine and morphine. After 30 min, they were divided into three groups: PG (n = 10, in which induction was performed with only intravenous propofol at doses required for intubation; MPG (n = 8, in which animals received intravenous midazolam (0.3 mg kg-1 administered over 30 s, followed by administration of propofol as in PG; and PMG (n = 9, in which propofol was first administered at a rate of 4 mg kg-1 min-1, after which midazolam was administered (0.3 mg/kg, followed by re-administration of propofol. In order to perform a blinded study, the PG and PMG received a 0.9% NaCl solution volume similar to the midazolam dose before induction (0.06 mL/kg. Similar to the other groups, the PG and MPG received (0.06 mL kg-1 saline 30 s after administration of propofol. In order to mimic the administration of midazolam, the saline solution was administered for 30s. The PG received 11.0 ± 1.38 mg kg-1 propofol, a greater dose than that administered to the PMG (p < 0.001 and MPG (p < 0.01, which received 7.9 ± 1.92 and 9.1 ± 2.20 mg kg-1, respectively. There were no differences in the intubation scores between groups. Previous use of midazolam did not affect agitation or excitement in cats; both sequences of propofol-midazolam administration are feasible, but the propofol-midazolam sequence was superior due to the lower propofol dose.

  18. Effects of stimulation of vesical afferents on colonic motility in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvier, M; Grimaud, J C; Abysique, A

    1990-05-01

    The effects of distension and isovolumetric contraction of urinary bladder on colonic motility were studied in anesthetized cats. Distension and contraction of the urinary bladder induced an inhibition of spontaneous colonic electromyographic activity and a decrease in the amplitudes of the excitatory junction potentials evoked in the colon by stimulation of the distal end of the parasympathetic nerve fibers. This inhibition was blocked by guanethidine and phentolamine. Reversely, vesical emptying resulted in an increase in colonic motility, abolished by atropine, and an increase in the amplitude of the excitatory junction potentials. Both excitatory and inhibitory reflexes disappeared after hexamethonium. The inhibitory effects of bladder distension were abolished by bilateral section of the lumbar ventral or dorsal spinal roots and after bilateral section of the lumbar colonic or hypogastric nerves. These results indicate (a) that the vesical afferents responsible for the inhibitory and excitatory reflexes run in the hypogastric and pelvic nerves respectively and (b) that the inhibitory and excitatory effects are caused by the activation of sympathetic and parasympathetic efferent nerve fibers, respectively. The supraspinal nervous structures were not implicated in these reflexes because they persisted in spinal cats.

  19. Spinning process variables and polymer solution effects in the die-swell phenomenon during hollow fiber membranes formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira C.C.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available During hollow fiber spinning many variables are involved whose effects are still not completely clear. However, its understanding is of great interest because the control of these variables may originate membranes with the desired morphologies and physical properties. In this work, the phase inversion process induced by the immersion precipitation technique was applied to prepare hollow fibers membranes. It was verified that some of the variables involved, can promote a visco-elastic polymer solution expansion, called die-swell phenomenon, which is undesired since it may lead to low reproducibility of the permeation properties. The effects of the distance between spinneret and precipitation bath, the bore liquid composition, and the polymer solution composition were analyzed and discussed in order to avoid this phenomenon. According to the results, it was verified that the parameters investigated might promote a delay precipitation, which restrained the visco-elastic expansion.

  20. Effects of propylene glycol-containing diets on acetaminophen-induced methemoglobinemia in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, D J; McClay, C B; Christopher, M M; Murphy, M; Perman, V

    1990-06-01

    Soft-moist cat foods contain 7 to 13% propylene glycol (PG) on a dry-weight basis. These diets induce Heinz body formation in feline RBC. In this study, we evaluated cats on a control diet and on a commercial diet containing 8.3% PG. All cats on the PG diet developed an increase in the number of circulating Heinz bodies. We then administered acetaminophen to cats on each diet to determine whether RBC from cats on PG diets were more susceptible to oxidant stress. Methemoglobin concentrations were significantly greater in cats in PG diets after acetaminophen administration. These data indicate that RBC from cats fed PG diets are more susceptible to oxidative stress.

  1. Investigating the effects of teaching with Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs on the success of teacher candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zekeriya Nartgün

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to investigate the effects of teaching with Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs on the success of teacher candidates regarding the test and item statistics of measurement and assessment courses. In context with this purpose the questions below were examined:1.Regarding the test and item statistics, is there a statistically significant difference between pre-test and post-test means of success of the experimental group of candidate teachers who were subjected to classes utilizing CATs and the control group of candidate teachers who did not experience CATs in the classroom?. 2.Is there a statistically significant difference between the post test success means related to competence in problem solving regarding the test and item statistics for the experimental group of candidate teachers who were subjected to classes utilizing CATs and the control group of candidate teachers who did not experience CATs in the classroom?.3.Is there a statistically significant difference between the post test success means related to interpretation of results of different problems regarding the test and item statistics for the experimental group of candidate teachers who were subjected to classes utilizing CATs and the control group of candidate teachers who did not experience CATs in the classroom?. CATs provide various important benefits in the teaching-learning process for both teachers and students. Some of these benefits are providing the competence to plan changes and make decisions that can develop the teachers and the students; achieving student participation in classes to motivate them for learning (Harwood, 1998; providing the students with useful feedback related to their learning (Soetaert, 1998; Steadman 1998 and ensuring that students express themselves more easily (Cuttic et.al, 1999.This study is considered important in identifying the contribution of CATs to the success of learning and in teaching specific subjects that are regarded

  2. Investigating the effects of teaching with Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs on the success of teacher candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zekeriya Nartgün

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Classroom Assessment Techniques (CAT’s provide substantial benefits for students and instructors in the process of teaching and learning. This study investigates the contribution of these techniques on the success of teacher candidates in the context of test and item statistics in measurement and evaluation courses. The study, utilized pretest-posttests control group experimental design, showed that the success levels of the teacher candidates in the experimental group who experienced CAT’s in classroom use were higher than those of the control group who had no experience of CAT’s. Extended SummaryThe study aims to investigate the effects of teaching with Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs on the success of teacher candidates regarding the test and item statistics of measurement and assessment courses. In context with this purpose the questions below were examined:1.    Regarding the test and item statistics, is there a statistically significant  difference between pre-test and post-test means of success of the experimental  group of candidate teachers who were subjected to classes utilizing CATs and the control group of candidate teachers who did not experience CATs in the classroom?. 2.    Is there a statistically significant  difference between the post test success means related to competence in problem solving regarding the test and item statistics for the experimental  group of candidate teachers who were subjected to classes utilizing CATs and the control group of candidate teachers who did not experience CATs in the classroom?.3.    Is there a statistically significant  difference between the post test success means related to interpretation of results of different problems regarding the test and item statistics for the experimental  group of candidate teachers who were subjected to classes utilizing CATs and the control group of candidate teachers who did not experience CATs in the classroom?. CATs provide

  3. Potential adverse effects of omega-3 Fatty acids in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenox, C E; Bauer, J E

    2013-01-01

    Fish oil omega-3 fatty acids, mainly eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, are used in the management of several diseases in companion animal medicine, many of which are inflammatory in nature. This review describes metabolic differences among omega-3 fatty acids and outlines potential adverse effects that may occur with their supplementation in dogs and cats with a special focus on omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil. Important potential adverse effects of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation include altered platelet function, gastrointestinal adverse effects, detrimental effects on wound healing, lipid peroxidation, potential for nutrient excess and toxin exposure, weight gain, altered immune function, effects on glycemic control and insulin sensitivity, and nutrient-drug interactions.

  4. Assessment of the effects of dalteparin on coagulation variables and determination of a treatment schedule for use in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönig, Jette C; Mischke, Reinhard H

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine a treatment protocol for SC administration of dalteparin to cats on the basis of currently available detailed pharmacokinetic data and to assess the effect of SC administration of dalteparin to cats on coagulation variables such as activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), thrombin time, and results for thromboelastometry, compared with effects on anti-activated coagulation factor X (anti-Xa) activity. ANIMALS 6 healthy domestic shorthair cats. PROCEDURES Cats received 14 injections of dalteparin (75 anti-Xa U/kg, SC) at 6-hour intervals. Blood samples were collected before and 2 hours after the first and second injections on days 1, 2, and 4. Anti-Xa activity was measured by use of a chromogenic substrate assay, aPTT and thrombin time were measured by use of an automated coagulometer, and viscoelastic measurements were obtained with thromboelastrometry. RESULTS 2 hours after the second injection, the target peak anti-Xa activity range of 0.5 to 1.0 U/mL was achieved in all cats, whereas median trough values remained below this range. Peak anti-Xa activity had only minimal effects on coagulation variables; the maximum median ratio for aPTT (in relationship to the value before the first dalteparin injection) was 1.23. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results of this study indicated that this treatment protocol resulted in reproducible anti-Xa activity in cats that was mostly within the targeted peak range of anti-Xa activity recommended for humans. Treatment in accordance with this protocol may not require routine coagulation monitoring of cats, but this must be confirmed in feline patients.

  5. Phenomenon of "contact guidance" on the surface with nano-micro-groove-like pattern and cell physiological effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Feng; YUAN Lin; HUANG He; CHEN Hong

    2009-01-01

    The topography of material surface has important influence on cell behavior and physiological functions. Groove-like pattern has drawn much attention among various patterns,due to the phenomenon of "contact guidance" induced by this kind of topography. This review mainly focuses on "contact guidance" formation as well as its influence on cell behavior and physiological effects. The possible mechanisms of "contact guidance" formation were discussed. The research trend and the potential applications were also suggested.

  6. Hyperadrenocorticism in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerbe, C A; Nachreiner, R F; Dunstan, R W; Dalley, J B

    1987-03-01

    A diabetic cat with hyperadrenocorticism had polydipsia, polyuria, ventral abdominal alopecia, thin dry skin, and a pendulous abdomen. Results of laboratory testing indicated persistent resting hypercortisolemia, hyperresponsiveness of the adrenal glands (increased cortisol concentration) to ACTH gel, and no suppression of cortisol concentrations after administration of dexamethasone at 0.01 or 1.0 mg/kg of body weight. Necropsy revealed a pituitary gland tumor, bilateral adrenal hyperplasia, hepatic neoplasia, and demodicosis. Adrenal gland function was concurrently assessed in 2 cats with diabetes mellitus. One cat had resting hypercortisolemia, and both had hyperresponsiveness to ACTH gel (increased cortisol concentration) at one hour. After administration of dexamethasone (0.01 and 1.0 mg/kg), the diabetic cats appeared to have normal suppression of cortisol concentrations. The effects of mitotane were investigated in 4 clinically normal cats. Adrenocortical suppression of cortisol production occurred in 2 of 4 cats after dosages of 25, 37, and 50 mg/kg. Three cats remained clinically normal throughout the study. One cat experienced vomiting, diarrhea, and anorexia.

  7. Giardia infection in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janeczko, Stephanie; Griffin, Brenda

    2010-08-01

    The protozoon Giardia duodenalis is a common gastrointestinal parasite of cats. While most Giardia-infected cats are asymptomatic, acute small bowel diarrhea, occasionally with concomitant weight loss, may occur. Giardia poses a diagnostic challenge, but newer tests, including a commercially available ELISA kit, have improved clinicians' ability to obtain an accurate diagnosis. Several treatment options have been reported, and although none has been shown to be universally effective, most cases can be successfully managed with drug therapy, supportive measures, and environmental control. Current recommendations suggest that combination therapy with fenbendazole and metronidazole may be the safest, most effective treatment option for symptomatic cats.

  8. Effect of deslorelin on testicular function, serum dihydrotestosterone and oestradiol concentrations during and after suppression of sexual activity in tom cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gültiken, Nilgün; Aslan, Selim; Ay, Serhan Serhat; Gülbahar, Mustafa Yavuz; Thuróczy, Julianna; Koldaş, Ece; Kaya, Duygu; Fındık, Murat; Schäfer-Somi, Sabine

    2017-02-01

    Objectives The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of a 4.7 mg deslorelin implant in tom cats. Methods Nine mature male cats were included in the deslorelin group and five cats in the control group. Before the study started, all cats were confirmed to have distinct sexually dimorphic behaviour. Blood samples were taken on the implantation day, at day 7 and at day 15, then monthly, in order to measure serum dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and 17beta(β)-oestradiol concentrations. The deslorelin group (n = 9) was divided into two subgroups: five cats (cats 1-5) were neutered in the postimplantation period during suppression of sexually dimorphic behaviour, and four cats (cats 6-9) were neutered after re-expression of sexually dimorphic behaviour. The control group cats (n = 5) were castrated without administration of the implant. Results Sexually dimorphic behaviours ceased within a mean ± SD of 13-58 days (23.30 ± 14.17) after implantation. DHT concentration decreased within 30 days. The mean duration of suppression was 26.5 ± 7.42 months and reactivation coincided with increased DHT values reaching preimplantation concentrations within 1 month. 17β-oestradiol concentrations significantly correlated with DHT concentrations ( P tom cats without any side effects and with full reversibility; however, duration of suppression is highly individual.

  9. Simpson's Paradox, Lord's Paradox, and Suppression Effects are the same phenomenon – the reversal paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Yu-Kang; Gunnell, David; Gilthorpe, Mark S

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses three statistical paradoxes that pervade epidemiological research: Simpson's paradox, Lord's paradox, and suppression. These paradoxes have important implications for the interpretation of evidence from observational studies. This article uses hypothetical scenarios to illustrate how the three paradoxes are different manifestations of one phenomenon – the reversal paradox – depending on whether the outcome and explanatory variables are categorical, continuous or a combination of both; this renders the issues and remedies for any one to be similar for all three. Although the three statistical paradoxes occur in different types of variables, they share the same characteristic: the association between two variables can be reversed, diminished, or enhanced when another variable is statistically controlled for. Understanding the concepts and theory behind these paradoxes provides insights into some controversial or contradictory research findings. These paradoxes show that prior knowledge and underlying causal theory play an important role in the statistical modelling of epidemiological data, where incorrect use of statistical models might produce consistent, replicable, yet erroneous results. PMID:18211676

  10. Evaluation of Prophylactic and Therapeutic Effects of Silymarin on Diazepam-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Cats

    OpenAIRE

    Bahman Mosallanejad; Reza Avizeh; Hossien Najafzadeh

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: Diazepam is commonly administered for seizure control and appetite stimulant in cats. Cats may develop acute fatal hepatic necrosis after receiving oral diazepam for several days. The aim of this study was to detect the protective action of silymarin on diazepam-induced hepatotoxicity in cats. Approach: About 25 healthy cats were randomly allotted to five equal groups. Animals in Group A were given diazepam (repeated dose 2.5 mg kg-1, p.o. q 12 h for 4 days); Group B consis...

  11. Effect of kibble size, shape and additives on plaque in cats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clarke, D.E.; Servet, E.; Hendriks, W.H.; Thomas, D.G.; Weidgraaf, K.; Biourge, V.C.

    2010-01-01

    Forty mixed-breed cats completed a parallel-group, clinical study to compare supragingival plaque accumulation using a triangular or rectangular shaped dry-expanded diet, with or without an anti-calculus agent (sodium tripolyphosphate) or an anti-plaque agent (plaquereducing nutrient). The cats were

  12. Cat Ownership Perception and Caretaking Explored in an Internet Survey of People Associated with Cats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Zito

    Full Text Available People who feed cats that they do not perceive they own (sometimes called semi-owners are thought to make a considerable contribution to unwanted cat numbers because the cats they support are generally not sterilized. Understanding people's perception of cat ownership and the psychology underlying cat semi-ownership could inform approaches to mitigate the negative effects of cat semi-ownership. The primary aims of this study were to investigate cat ownership perception and to examine its association with human-cat interactions and caretaking behaviours. A secondary aim was to evaluate a definition of cat semi-ownership (including an association time of ≥1 month and frequent feeding, revised from a previous definition proposed in the literature to distinguish cat semi-ownership from casual interactions with unowned cats. Cat owners and semi-owners displayed similar types of interactions and caretaking behaviours. Nevertheless, caretaking behaviours were more commonly displayed towards owned cats than semi-owned cats, and semi-owned cats were more likely to have produced kittens (p<0.01. All interactions and caretaking behaviours were more likely to be displayed towards cats in semi-ownership relationships compared to casual interaction relationships. Determinants of cat ownership perception were identified (p<0.05 and included association time, attachment, perceived cat friendliness and health, and feelings about unowned cats, including the acceptability of feeding unowned cats. Encouraging semi-owners to have the cats they care for sterilized may assist in reducing the number of unwanted kittens and could be a valuable alternative to trying to prevent semi-ownership entirely. Highly accessible semi-owner "gatekeepers" could help to deliver education messages and facilitate the provision of cat sterilization services to semi-owners. This research enabled semi-ownership to be distinguished from casual interaction relationships and can assist

  13. Effect of feeding a weight loss food beyond a caloric restriction period on body composition and resistance to weight gain in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floerchinger, Amanda M; Jackson, Matthew I; Jewell, Dennis E; MacLeay, Jennifer M; Hahn, Kevin A; Paetau-Robinson, Inke

    2015-08-15

    To determine the effect of feeding a food with coconut oil and supplemental L-carnitine, lysine, leucine, and fiber on weight loss and maintenance in cats. Prospective clinical study. 50 overweight cats. The study consisted of 2 trials. During trial 1, 30 cats were allocated to 3 groups (10 cats/group) to be fed a dry maintenance cat food to maintain body weight (group 1) or a dry test food at the same amount on a mass (group 2) or energy (group 3) basis as group 1. During trial 2, each of 20 cats was fed the test food and caloric intake was adjusted to maintain a weight loss rate of 1%/wk (weight loss phase). Next, each cat was fed the test food in an amount calculated to maintain the body weight achieved at the end of the weight loss phase (weight maintenance phase). Cats were weighed and underwent dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry monthly. Metabolomic data were determined before (baseline) and after each phase. During trial 1, cats in groups 2 and 3 lost significantly more weight than did those in group 1. During trial 2, cats lost a significant amount of body weight and fat mass but retained lean body mass during the weight loss phase and continued to lose body weight and fat mass but gained lean body mass during the weight maintenance phase. Evaluation of metabolomic data suggested that fat metabolism was improved from baseline for cats fed the test food. Results suggested that feeding overweight cats the test food caused weight loss and improvements in body condition during the weight maintenance phase, possibly because the food composition improved energy metabolism.

  14. What Is Raynaud's Phenomenon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Phenomenon PDF Version Size: 59 KB November 2014 What Is Raynaud’s Phenomenon? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... use tools that vibrate, such as a jackhammer. What Are the Symptoms of Raynaud’s Phenomenon? The body ...

  15. Curvature Effect and the Spectral Softening Phenomenon Detected in GRB Afterglows

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Y.-P. Qin

    2011-03-01

    Detection of radiation from a relativistic fireball would be affected by the so-called curvature effect. I illustrate the expected temporal and spectral behaviours of this effect and show that it can well explain the observed spectral softening in the early GRB afterglows.

  16. A critically appraised topic (CAT) to compare the effects of single and multi-cat housing on physiological and behavioural measures of stress in domestic cats in confined environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Domestic cats have evolved from solitary, asocial predators and whilst they may display social behaviours, they can still exist as solitary survivors. Over-population and relinquishment of pet cats are ubiquitous problems worldwide, and rehoming centres (also known as rescues/ shelters) aim to ameliorate this by holding cats in confinement for a variable period until a new home is found. The provision of optimal housing for large numbers of cats in close confinement, such as in rehoming centres, is therefore inherently difficult. Under these conditions there is the potential for individuals to develop signs of physical and psychological ill health, and thus experience compromised welfare. Available information regarding housing practices that maximise welfare currently provides conflicting results, and as a consequence there are no unanimous housing recommendations. The aim of this study was therefore to review the evidence on the impact of single housing compared to multi-cat housing on stress in confined cats, as measured by physiological and/or behavioural outcomes. The review was conducted using a Critically Appraised Topic (CAT) format. A systematic search of electronic databases (CAB Abstracts, Zoological Records and Medline) was carried out to identify peer-reviewed literature comparing single and multi-cat housing in confined environments. Results A total of 959 papers were initially identified, six of which met sufficient criteria based on their relevance to be included within this review. All of the studies had significant limitations in design and methodology, including a lack of information on how groups were assigned, inconsistent handling and enrichment provision between groups, and lack of information on the socialisation status of cats. Conclusions Whilst some studies suggested that single housing may be less stressful for cats, others suggested group housing was less stressful. Several other important factors were however identified as

  17. Effects of tumor necrosis factor α on leptin-sensitive intestinal vagal mechanoreceptors in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinson, Nathalie; Vitton, Véronique; Bouvier, Michel; Grimaud, Jean-Charles; Abysique, Anne

    2013-11-01

    The involvement of tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been established, and anti-TNF-α has been suggested as a therapeutic approach for the treatment of these pathologies. We studied the effects of TNF-α on leptin-sensitive intestinal vagal units to determine whether TNF-α exerts its effects through the intestinal vagal mechanoreceptors and to investigate its interactions with substances regulating food intake. The activity of intestinal vagal mechanoreceptors was recorded via microelectrodes implanted into the nodose ganglion in anesthetized cats. TNF-α (1 μg, i.a.) increased the discharge frequency of leptin-activated units (type 1 units; P < 0.05) and had no effect on the discharge frequency of leptin-inhibited units (type 2 units). When TNF-α was administered 20 min after sulfated cholecystokinin-8 (CCK), its excitatory effects on type 1 units were significantly enhanced (P < 0.0001) and type 2 units were significantly (P < 0.05) activated. Pre-treatment with Il-1ra (250 μg, i.a.) blocked the excitatory effects of TNF-α on type 1 units whereas the excitatory effects of TNF-α administration after CCK treatment on type 2 units were not modified. The activation of leptin-sensitive units by TNF-α may explain, at least in part, the weight loss observed in IBD.

  18. Cat Scan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正> A man takes his motionless dog to the vet."Doc,I think my dog is dead.”The vet looks the dog over, goes into a backroom,and comes out with a cat.He places the caton the table next to the dog.The cat walks aroundand sniffs at the dog.The dog does not move.The

  19. Numerical Research on a Special Fluid Phenomenon:. Ranque-Hilsch Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J. Y.; Gong, M. Q.; Zhang, Y.; Hong, H.; Wu, J. F.

    An application of CFD model for the simulation of a strongly swirling and high speed flow in the vortex tube is presented in this paper. A partly modified standard K-ɛ turbulent model has been used to investigate the flow characteristics and energy separation effect in the vortex tube. It is found that there is an obvious energy separation effect in the vortex tube and the numerical solutions of the flow and temperature fields agree well with the experiments. More detailed flow features are obtained by the CFD calculation. Based on the validated numerical model, the influence of the cold flow fraction on the energy separation effect is also investigated and compared with experimental results.

  20. Effect of portal hypertension and duct ligature on pancreatic fluid pressures in cats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbehøj, N; Borly, L; Heyeraas, K J

    1990-01-01

    In two groups of cats recordings were performed, during laparotomy, of pancreatic tissue fluid pressure measured by a needle technique, interstitial fluid pressure measured by micropipette technique, pancreatic intraductal pressure, and portal vein pressure. In one group of cats the pressures were...... measured before and after acutely induced portal hypertension; in the other group of cats the pressures were measured after an overnight ligature of the pancreatic main duct. At rest the needle pressure was equal to duct pressure but significantly lower than interstitial fluid pressure and portal pressure...

  1. External field effects on aging phenomenon of acceptor-doped BaTiO3 ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Y. Guo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Our experiments on ferroelectric aging phenomena of a series of acceptor-doped BaTiO3 ceramics demonstrate that after well-aging, all samples show a similar double hysteresis loop under smaller applied electric field, regardless of ionic radius or ionic valence of the acceptor. However, with increasing the applied electric field, the completely constricted loops gradually start to open, indicating the aging effect becomes weak under larger electric field. The unified microscopic mechanism responsible for the similar aging behavior in different acceptor-doped BaTiO3 ceramics may be that the larger field is considered to kinetically facilitate a part of oxygen vacancies short-range hopping. As a result, the defect dipole field provided by oxygen vacancies and the associated defect dipoles frozen in the original states decreases, thus contributing to the weaker aging effect.

  2. Salt Effect on the Cloud Point Phenomenon of Amphiphilic Drug-Hydroxypropylmethyl Cellulose System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd. Sajid Ali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of two amphiphilic drugs (tricyclic antidepressant, nortriptyline hydrochloride (NORT, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, sodium salt of ibuprofen (IBF on the cloud point of biopolymer hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose (HPMC was studied. Effect of NaCl was also seen on the CP of HPMC-drug system. CP of HPMC increases uniformly on increasing the (drug. Both drugs, though one being anionic (IBF and other cationic (NORT, affect the CP in almost the same manner but with different extent implying the role of hydrophobicity in the interaction between drug and polymer. Salt affects the CP of the drug in a dramatic way as low concentration of salt was only able to increase the value of the CP, though not affecting the pattern. However, in presence of high concentration of salts, minimum was observed on CP versus (drug plots. Various thermodynamic parameters were evaluated and discussed on the basis of the observed results.

  3. The year-class phenomenon and the storage effect in marine fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secor, David H.

    2007-02-01

    Factors contributing to population growth through strong year-class formation have driven a century of directed research in fisheries science. A central discovery of Hjort's paradigm was that multiple generations overlap and longevity is matched with frequency of strong recruitments. Here, I elaborate on this tenet by examining how intra-population modalities in spawning and early habitat use favour population resiliency. A modern theory that has application is the storage effect [Warner, R.R., Chesson, P.L., 1985. Coexistence mediated by recruitment fluctuations - a field guide to the storage effect. Am. Nat. 125, 769-787], whereby spawning stock biomass accumulates each year so that when early survival conditions are favourable, stored egg production can result in explosive population growth. I review two early life history behaviours that contribute to the storage effect: split cohorts (i.e., seasonal pulses of eggs and larvae) and contingent behaviour (i.e., dispersive and retentive patterns in early dispersal). Episodic and pulsed production of larvae is a common feature for marine fishes, well documented through otolith microstructure and hatch-date analyses. In temperate and boreal fishes, early and late spawned cohorts of larvae and juveniles may have differing fates dependent upon seasonal and inter-annual fluctuations in weather and climate. Often, a coastal fish may spawn for a protracted period, yet only a few days' egg production will result in successful recruitment. In these and other instances, it is clear that diversity in spawning behaviour can confer resilience against temporal variations in early survival conditions. Although many factors contribute to intra-population spawning modalities, size and age structure of adults play an important role. Contingent structure, an idea dating to Hjort (herring contingents) and Gilbert (salmon contingents), has been resurrected to describe the diversity of intra-population modalities observed through

  4. Anomalous quantum and isotope effects in water clusters: Physical phenomenon, model artifact, or bad approximation?

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Sandra E

    2014-01-01

    Free energy differences $\\Delta F:=F-F_{\\text{prism}}$ are computed for several isomers of water hexamer relative to the "prism" isomer using the self-consistent phonons method. %$\\Delta F:=F-F({prism})$ We consider the isotope effect defined by the quantity $\\delta F_{D_2O}:=\\Delta F_{\\rm D_2O}-\\Delta F_{\\rm H_2O}$, and the quantum effect, $\\delta F_{\\hbar=0}:=\\Delta F_{\\hbar=0}-\\Delta F_{\\rm H_2O}$, and evaluate them using different flexible water models. While both $\\delta F_{D_2O}$ and $\\delta F_{\\hbar=0}$ are found to be rather small for all of the potentials, they are especially small for two of the empirical models, q-TIP4P/F and TTM3-F, compared to q-SPC/Fw and the two {\\it abinitio}-based models, WHBB and HBB2-pol. This qualitative difference in the properties of different water models cannot be explained by one being "more accurate" than the other. We speculate as to whether the observed anomalies are caused by the special properties of water systems, or are an artifact of either the potential energ...

  5. Predicting molecular scale skin-effect in electrochemical impedance due to anomalous subdiffusion mediated adsorption phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushagra, Arindam

    2016-02-01

    Anomalous subdiffusion governs the processes which are not energetically driven, on a molecular scale. This paper proposes a model to predict the response of electrochemical impedance due to such diffusion process. Previous works considered the use of fractional calculus to predict the impedance behaviour in response to the anomalous diffusion. Here, we have developed an expression which predicts the skin-effect, marked by an increase in the impedance with increasing frequency, in this regime. Negative inductances have also been predicted as a consequence of the inertial response of adsorbed species upon application of frequency-mediated perturbations. It might help the researchers in the fields of impedimetric sensors to choose the working frequency and those working in the field of batteries to choose the parameters, likewise. This work would shed some light into the molecular mechanisms governing the impedance when exposed to frequency-based perturbations like electromagnetic waves (microwaves to ionizing radiations) and in charge storage devices like batteries etc.

  6. Fiber fermentability effects on energy and macronutrient digestibility, fecal traits, postprandial metabolite responses, and colon histology of overweight cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, M M; Kessler, A M; de Sá, L R M; Vasconcellos, R S; Filho, F O Roberti; Nogueira, S P; Oliveira, M C C; Carciofi, A C

    2012-07-01

    Considering the different potential benefits of divergent fiber ingredients, the effect of 3 fiber sources on energy and macronutrient digestibility, fermentation product formation, postprandial metabolite responses, and colon histology of overweight cats (Felis catus) fed kibble diets was compared. Twenty-four healthy adult cats were assigned in a complete randomized block design to 2 groups of 12 animals, and 3 animals from each group were fed 1 of 4 of the following kibble diets: control (CO; 11.5% dietary fiber), beet pulp (BP; 26% dietary fiber), wheat bran (WB; 24% dietary fiber), and sugarcane fiber (SF; 28% dietary fiber). Digestibility was measured by the total collection of feces. After 16 d of diet adaptation and an overnight period without food, blood glucose, cholesterol, and triglyceride postprandial responses were evaluated for 16 h after continued exposure to food. On d 20, colon biopsies of the cats were collected under general anesthesia. Fiber addition reduced food energy and nutrient digestibility. Of all the fiber sources, SF had the least dietary fiber digestibility (P fiber solubility and fermentation rates, fiber sources can induce different physiological responses in cats, reduce energy digestibility, and favor glucose metabolism (SF), or improve gut health (BP).

  7. The effects of clomipramine hydrochloride in cats with psychogenic alopecia: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Petra A; Torres, Sheila; Jessen, Carl

    2006-01-01

    A double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted to determine the efficacy of clomipramine hydrochloride in cats with psychogenic alopecia. Twenty-five cats were randomly assigned to receive clomipramine hydrochloride (0.5 mg/kg orally q 24 hours) or placebo for 56 days. Eleven cats in each group completed the trial. The results of this study showed that clomipramine hydrochloride failed to demonstrate significant changes in the number of grooming bouts, hair regrowth, and the area of alopecia in cats with psychogenic alopecia when compared to a placebo. It was uncertain whether these results reflected a lack of drug efficacy, insufficient treatment duration, or an insufficient number of cases enrolled.

  8. Effects of 4-aminopyridine on synaptic transmission in the cat spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowska, E; Lundberg, A; Rudomin, P; Sykova, E

    1982-05-20

    An analysis was made of effects of 0.1-1.0 mg/kg 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) i.v. on excitatory and inhibitory spinal reflex pathways in lightly anaesthetized or decerebrated cats. The effects appeared within the first minutes of the injection, reached maximum after about 10-15 min and remained stable during at least several hours. 4-AP enhanced the following synaptic actions on motoneurones: monosynaptic excitation from Ia afferents and descending tracts, disynaptic and polysynaptic excitation from group Ib, group II, cutaneous and high threshold muscle afferents, disynaptic inhibition from Ia and Ib afferents and recurrent and polysynaptic inhibition from different afferents. 4-AP also increased primary afferent depolarization and excitation of ascending tract cells by peripheral stimuli. In the case of the disynaptic inhibitory pathways it has been shown that 4-AP may enhance the excitation of the interposed interneurones but it also increases the action of these interneurones on the motoneurones; monosynaptic inhibition evoked in motoneurones by electrical stimulation of the axons of the inhibitory interneurones was used as a test response in these experiments. No indications were found of direct effects of 4-AP on excitability of afferent fibres or motoneurones to electrical stimuli. No systematic changes were either found in the membrane potential of motoneurones or in the duration of action potentials of these neurones or primary afferents. It is therefore concluded that small doses of 4-AP enhance synaptic transmission in the spinal cord by an action at a presynaptic level.

  9. Effect of nitrogen narcosis on cortical and subcortical evoked responses in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartus, R T; Kinney, J S

    1975-03-01

    Four cats were chronically implanted with gross, monopolar electrodes in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), pretectum-superior colliculus (P-SC), primary visual cortex (VI), and secondary visual cortex (VII). Following recovery and preliminary testing, the animals were dived in a dry hyperbaric chamber to the sea water equivalent of 103 m (i.e. 340 ft.) where visual evoked responses were recorded. No decrements in the amplitude of the visual evoked response were found at the LGN, but significant decreases did occur at the other three sites. These data suggested: 1) that the effects of nitrogen narcosis on the visual system are primarily central, and not simply peripheral in nature; 2) that these effects are not limited to the visual cortical mantle; and 3) that the narcosis apparently influences structures involving different anatomical levels of the brain which presumably mediate various types of visual processes. The findings were discussed as they relate to current ideas concerning the underlying neurological causes and behavioral effects of nitrogen narcosis.

  10. Primary Phenomenon in the Network Formation of Endothelial Cells: Effect of Charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Shunto

    2015-12-07

    Blood vessels are essential organs that are involved in the supply of nutrients and oxygen and play an important role in regulating the body's internal environment, including pH, body temperature, and water homeostasis. Many studies have examined the formation of networks of endothelial cells. The results of these studies have revealed that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) affects the interactions of these cells and modulates the network structure. Though almost all previous simulation studies have assumed that the chemoattractant VEGF is present before network formation, vascular endothelial cells secrete VEGF only after the cells bind to the substrate. This suggests VEGF is not essential for vasculogenesis especially at the early stage. Using a simple experiment, we find chain-like structures which last quite longer than it is expected, unless the energetically stable cluster should be compact. Using a purely physical model and simulation, we find that the hydrodynamic interaction retard the compaction of clusters and that the chains are stabilized through the effects of charge. The charge at the surface of the cells affect the interparticle potential, and the resulting repulsive forces prevent the chains from folding. The ions surrounding the cells may also be involved in this process.

  11. Predicting molecular scale skin-effect in electrochemical impedance due to anomalous subdiffusion mediated adsorption phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arindam Kushagra

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Anomalous subdiffusion governs the processes which are not energetically driven, on a molecular scale. This paper proposes a model to predict the response of electrochemical impedance due to such diffusion process. Previous works considered the use of fractional calculus to predict the impedance behaviour in response to the anomalous diffusion. Here, we have developed an expression which predicts the skin-effect, marked by an increase in the impedance with increasing frequency, in this regime. Negative inductances have also been predicted as a consequence of the inertial response of adsorbed species upon application of frequency-mediated perturbations. It might help the researchers in the fields of impedimetric sensors to choose the working frequency and those working in the field of batteries to choose the parameters, likewise. This work would shed some light into the molecular mechanisms governing the impedance when exposed to frequency-based perturbations like electromagnetic waves (microwaves to ionizing radiations and in charge storage devices like batteries etc.

  12. Initial time-dependent current growth phenomenon in n-type organic transistors induced by interfacial dipole effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Sheng; Yeh, Bo-Liang; Tsai, Min-Ruei; Cheng, Horng-Long; Liu, Shyh-Jiun; Tang, Fu-Ching; Chou, Wei-Yang

    2015-03-01

    We describe an unusual phenomenon of time-dependent current growth in organic transistors, particularly n-type transistors. For an organic transistor based on N,N-ditridecyl-3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic diimide with a polyimide dielectric layer, the time-dependent increase in the drain current and an approximately hysteresis-free electricity were obtained under dc-bias stress. These phenomena could be attributed to (a) reduction in the trap-state density located at the interface between polyimide and semiconductor, (b) gate field effect enhanced by electric dipoles within polyimide, and (c) a low interface trap lifetime. This study reveals that polymer dielectrics with moderate polar groups are suitable for application in stable organic devices.

  13. Cat Ownership Perception and Caretaking Explored in an Internet Survey of People Associated with Cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zito, Sarah; Vankan, Dianne; Bennett, Pauleen; Paterson, Mandy; Phillips, Clive J C

    2015-01-01

    People who feed cats that they do not perceive they own (sometimes called semi-owners) are thought to make a considerable contribution to unwanted cat numbers because the cats they support are generally not sterilized. Understanding people's perception of cat ownership and the psychology underlying cat semi-ownership could inform approaches to mitigate the negative effects of cat semi-ownership. The primary aims of this study were to investigate cat ownership perception and to examine its association with human-cat interactions and caretaking behaviours. A secondary aim was to evaluate a definition of cat semi-ownership (including an association time of ≥1 month and frequent feeding), revised from a previous definition proposed in the literature to distinguish cat semi-ownership from casual interactions with unowned cats. Cat owners and semi-owners displayed similar types of interactions and caretaking behaviours. Nevertheless, caretaking behaviours were more commonly displayed towards owned cats than semi-owned cats, and semi-owned cats were more likely to have produced kittens (pcats in semi-ownership relationships compared to casual interaction relationships. Determinants of cat ownership perception were identified (pcat friendliness and health, and feelings about unowned cats, including the acceptability of feeding unowned cats. Encouraging semi-owners to have the cats they care for sterilized may assist in reducing the number of unwanted kittens and could be a valuable alternative to trying to prevent semi-ownership entirely. Highly accessible semi-owner "gatekeepers" could help to deliver education messages and facilitate the provision of cat sterilization services to semi-owners. This research enabled semi-ownership to be distinguished from casual interaction relationships and can assist welfare and government agencies to identify cat semi-owners in order to develop strategies to address this source of unwanted cats.

  14. Cat Ownership Perception and Caretaking Explored in an Internet Survey of People Associated with Cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zito, Sarah; Vankan, Dianne

    2015-01-01

    People who feed cats that they do not perceive they own (sometimes called semi-owners) are thought to make a considerable contribution to unwanted cat numbers because the cats they support are generally not sterilized. Understanding people’s perception of cat ownership and the psychology underlying cat semi-ownership could inform approaches to mitigate the negative effects of cat semi-ownership. The primary aims of this study were to investigate cat ownership perception and to examine its association with human-cat interactions and caretaking behaviours. A secondary aim was to evaluate a definition of cat semi-ownership (including an association time of ≥1 month and frequent feeding), revised from a previous definition proposed in the literature to distinguish cat semi-ownership from casual interactions with unowned cats. Cat owners and semi-owners displayed similar types of interactions and caretaking behaviours. Nevertheless, caretaking behaviours were more commonly displayed towards owned cats than semi-owned cats, and semi-owned cats were more likely to have produced kittens (pcats in semi-ownership relationships compared to casual interaction relationships. Determinants of cat ownership perception were identified (pcat friendliness and health, and feelings about unowned cats, including the acceptability of feeding unowned cats. Encouraging semi-owners to have the cats they care for sterilized may assist in reducing the number of unwanted kittens and could be a valuable alternative to trying to prevent semi-ownership entirely. Highly accessible semi-owner “gatekeepers” could help to deliver education messages and facilitate the provision of cat sterilization services to semi-owners. This research enabled semi-ownership to be distinguished from casual interaction relationships and can assist welfare and government agencies to identify cat semi-owners in order to develop strategies to address this source of unwanted cats. PMID:26218243

  15. Comparison of the effects of propofol or alfaxalone for anaesthesia induction and maintenance on respiration in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagna, Ivo; Schwarz, Andrea; Keller, Stefanie; Bettschart-Wolfensberger, Regula; Mosing, Martina

    2015-09-01

    To compare the effects of propofol and alfaxalone on respiration in cats. Randomized, 'blinded', prospective clinical trial. Twenty cats undergoing ovariohysterectomy. After premedication with medetomidine 0.01 mg kg(-1) intramuscularly and meloxicam 0.3 mg kg(-1) subcutaneously, the cats were assigned randomly into two groups: group A (n = 10) were administered alfaxalone 5 mg kg(-1)  minute(-1) followed by 10 mg kg(-1)  hour(-1) intravenously (IV) and group P (n = 10) were administered propofol 6 mg kg(-1 ) minute(-1) followed by 12 mg kg(-1) hour(-1) IV for induction and maintenance of anaesthesia, respectively. After endotracheal intubation, the tube was connected to a non-rebreathing system delivering 100% oxygen. The anaesthetic maintenance drug rate was adjusted (± 0.5 mg kg(-1) hour(-1) ) every 5 minutes according to a scoring sheet based on physiologic variables and clinical signs. If apnoea > 30 seconds, end-tidal carbon dioxide (Pe'CO2 ) > 7.3 kPa (55 mmHg) or arterial haemoglobin oxygen saturation (SpO2 ) cats in group A and P, respectively (p = 0.02). Two cats in both groups showed apnoea. Pe'CO2  > 7.3 kPa was recorded in zero versus four and SpO2  cats in groups A and P respectively. Induction and maintenance dose rates (mean ± SD) were 11.6 ± 0.3 mg kg(-1) and 10.7 ± 0.8 mg kg(-1)  hour(-1) for alfaxalone and 11.7 ± 2.7 mg kg(-1) and 12.4 ± 0.5 mg kg(-1) hour(-1) for propofol. Alfaxalone had less adverse influence on respiration than propofol in cats premedicated with medetomidine. Alfaxalone might be better than propofol for induction and maintenance of anaesthesia when artificial ventilation cannot be provided. © 2014 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  16. Effects of midbrain and medullary stimulation on spinomesencephalic tract cells in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yezierski, R P

    1990-02-01

    1. The effects of electrical stimulation at different rostrocaudal levels of the midbrain, and at sites in the rostral medulla ipsilateral and contralateral to spinal recording sites, were evaluated against the responses of 46 cells belonging to the cat spinomesencephalic tract (SMT). 2. Inhibitory and/or excitatory effects of brain stem stimulation were observed on SMT cells that responded best (26 cells) or exclusively (12 cells) to noxious mechanical or thermal stimuli, as well as on 7 cells responding only to tap and/or stimulation of deep tissues. Recording sites for 32 cells were located in laminae V-VIII (27 cells) and laminae I-III (5 cells). 3. Midbrain stimulation sites were located in the superior colliculus, central gray (CG), red nucleus, and the midbrain reticular formation. Both inhibitory-only and excitatory-only effects were observed, although the most common effect of midbrain stimulation was excitation followed by inhibition (mixed effects). The effects of stimulation at different midbrain levels were determined for each cell. Stimulation in the caudal, middle, or rostral midbrain was often found to exert different effects on the same SMT cell. 4. Stimulation in the rostral medulla at sites located in nucleus raphe magnus (NRM), nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis, and nucleus reticularis magnocellularis produced the same complement of effects observed with midbrain stimulation. Excitation followed by inhibition was the most common effect observed. 5. Stimulus intensities required to produce excitatory or inhibitory effects from midbrain were 114 +/- 85 (SD) microA and 210 +/- 91 microA, respectively. Stimulus currents required to produce excitatory or inhibitory effects from medullary stimulation sites were 124 +/- 56 microA and 70 +/- 60 microA, respectively. The mean currents required to produce mixed effects were 221 +/- 120 microA (midbrain) and 127 +/- 71 microA (medulla). Increasing the stimulus intensity used to evaluate brain stem

  17. Cat and Dog Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention and Wellness Staying Healthy Pets and Animals Cat and Dog Bites Cat and Dog Bites Pets and AnimalsPrevention and WellnessStaying Healthy Share Cat and Dog Bites Cat and dog bites are ...

  18. Cat Scratch Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cat scratch disease (CSD) is an illness caused by the bacterium Bartonella henselae. Almost half of all cats carry ... infection does not make cats sick. However, the scratch or bite of an infected cat can cause ...

  19. Early effects of neutering on energy expenditure in adult male cats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfreda Wei

    Full Text Available The initial cause of post-neutering weight gain in male cats is not entirely known. There is evidence that energy intake (EI increases rapidly post-neutering, but it is not clear if neutering also decreases energy expenditure (EE prior to weight gain. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine if a decrease in EE contributes to the initial shift toward positive energy balance in neutered male cats. To determine the influence of neutering on EE independent of changes in EI and body weight (BW, male cats were fed at their pre-neutering maintenance EI and EE was measured at 4 days pre-neutering, 3-4 days post-neutering, and 9 days post- neutering. Ad libitum food access was then provided for 6 months. Body composition was measured and blood samples collected for serum chemistry at pre-neutering and 7 days, 13 days and 6 months post-neutering. Total energy expenditure (TEE adjusted for lean body mass (LBM did not change in cats from pre-neutering to 9 days post-neutering. However, TEE adjusted for BW and resting energy expenditure adjusted for either LBM or BW showed a small, but significant (P<0.05 increase from pre-neutering to 9 days post-neutering. When allowed free choice food access, cats showed significant increases of food intake (FI and BW. Circulating concentrations of ghrelin increased, while adiponectin levels decreased following neutering. The results of this study indicate that initial post-neutering weight gain in male cats results from increased FI and not decreased EE. Long-term control of FI should be initiated after neutering to prevent hyperphagia and weight gain in male cats.

  20. Effects of diazepam on orthodontic tooth movement and alveolar bone cAMP levels in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrow, S J; Sammon, P J; Tuncay, O C

    1986-08-01

    Cyclic AMP has been suggested as a possible intracellular mediator in bone remodeling during tooth movement. Accordingly, an increase in the level of this nucleotide should result in faster tooth movement. Breakdown of cAMP was inhibited by administration of diazepam in eight cats undergoing orthodontic tooth movement; another matched group of eight animals served as controls. Orthodontic appliances consisted of coil springs stretching between the right side maxillary and mandibular canines and third premolars. The data for tooth movement and cAMP concentrations were analyzed by repeated measures factorial analyses of variance. The results indicated that administration of diazepam increased the rate of tooth movement at P less than 0.0005 and, interestingly, although diazepam had no effect on undisturbed tissues, it lowered the cAMP levels in the periodontal tissues of orthodontically moved teeth at P less than 0.01. On the basis of these results, it was concluded that the concentration of cAMP did not correlate with bone remodeling in this model and perhaps should not be used as an index of periodontal-tissue response during orthodontic tooth movement.

  1. Interferons beta have vasoconstrictive and procoagulant effects: a woman who developed livedo reticularis and Raynaud phenomenon in association with interferon beta treatment for multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rot, Uroš; Ledinek, Alenka Horvat

    2013-12-01

    A 31-year-old woman with MS developed livedo reticularis and secondary Raynaud phenomenon 2.5 years after introduction of interferon beta-1b. The symptoms disappeared after withdrawal of the drug. Livedo reticularis and Raynaud phenomenon as well as pulmonary arterial hypertension, venous sinus thrombosis, pulmonary embolism and renal thrombotic microangiopathy have all been described in association with interferon beta therapy. These complications strongly suggest that type I interferons have vasoconstrictive and procoagulant effects with potentially serious systemic complications.

  2. Pharmacokinetics of buprenorphine following intravenous and buccal administration in cats, and effects on thermal threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedges, A R; Pypendop, B H; Shilo-Benjamini, Y; Stanley, S D; Ilkiw, J E

    2014-06-01

    This study reports the pharmacokinetics of buprenorphine, following i.v. and buccal administration, and the relationship between buprenorphine concentration and its effect on thermal threshold. Buprenorphine (20 μg/kg) was administered intravenously or buccally to six cats. Thermal threshold was determined, and arterial blood sampled prior to, and at various times up to 24 h following drug administration. Plasma buprenorphine concentration was determined using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Compartment models were fitted to the time-concentration data. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic models were fitted to the concentration-thermal threshold data. Thermal threshold was significantly higher than baseline 44 min after buccal administration, and 7, 24, and 104 min after i.v. administration. A two- and three-compartment model best fitted the data following buccal and i.v. administration, respectively. Following i.v. administration, mean ± SD volume of distribution at steady-state (L/kg), clearance (mL·min/kg), and terminal half-life (h) were 11.6 ± 8.5, 23.8 ± 3.5, and 9.8 ± 3.5. Following buccal administration, absorption half-life was 23.7 ± 9.1 min, and terminal half-life was 8.9 ± 4.9 h. An effect-compartment model with a simple effect maximum model best predicted the time-course of the effect of buprenorphine on thermal threshold. Median (range) ke0 and EC50 were 0.003 (0.002-0.018)/min and 0.599 (0.073-1.628) ng/mL (i.v.), and 0.017 (0.002-0.023)/min and 0.429 (0.144-0.556) ng/mL (buccal).

  3. Effect of interferon or Propionibacterium acnes on the course of experimentally induced feline infectious peritonitis in specific-pathogen-free and random-source cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, R C; Cox, N R; Oostrom-Ram, T

    1990-05-01

    Seventy-four cats (52 treated and 22 untreated) were evaluated in efficacy studies of interferon (IFN), Propionibacterium acnes, or a combination of these drugs against experimentally induced feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). Cats were given doses of recombinant human leukocyte (alpha) IFN (rHuIFN-alpha), feline fibroblastic (beta) IFN (FIFN-beta) or P acnes at regular intervals before and after inoculation of virulent FIP virus (FIPV). Prophylactic and therapeutic administration of high doses (10(6) U/kg of body weight) or moderate doses (10(4) U/kg) of rHuIFN-alpha, FIFN-beta (10(3) u/kg), or P acnes (0.4 or 4 mg) did not significantly reduce mortality in treated vs untreated cats. However, the mean survival time in cats treated with 10(6) U of rHuIFN-alpha-/kg alone or combined with doses of P acnes was significantly (P = 0.03) increased after inoculation of highly lethal amounts (200 LD100) of FIPV vs survival time in untreated cats. Although P acnes alone was ineffective, there was some indication that a combination of P acnes and high doses of rHuIFN-alpha was more effective than rHuIFN-alpha alone. Seemingly, the efficacy of rHuIFn-alpha treatment was improved in cats challenge-exposed with less FIPV; in 1 trial, 4 of 5 cats (80%) treated with high doses of rHuIFN-alpha survived after inoculation of minimal lethal amounts (0.6 LD100) of FIPV, whereas only 2 of 5 untreated cats (40%) survived. Pretreatment of cats with 10(6) U of rHuIFN-alpha/kg resulted in detectable serum IFN activity 24 hours later; serum IFN activity was not detected in cats pretreated with P acnes, FIFN-beta, or 10(4) U of rHuIFn-alpha/kg.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Metabolic Profiling Reveals Effects of Age, Sexual Development and Neutering in Plasma of Young Male Cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaway, David; Gilham, Matthew S; Colyer, Alison; Jönsson, Thomas J; Swanson, Kelly S; Morris, Penelope J

    2016-01-01

    Neutering is a significant risk factor for obesity in cats. The mechanisms that promote neuter-associated weight gain are not well understood but following neutering, acute changes in energy expenditure and energy consumption have been observed. Metabolic profiling (GC-MS and UHPLC-MS-MS) was used in a longitudinal study to identify changes associated with age, sexual development and neutering in male cats fed a nutritionally-complete dry diet to maintain an ideal body condition score. At eight time points, between 19 and 52 weeks of age, fasted blood samples were taken from kittens neutered at either 19 weeks of age (Early Neuter (EN), n = 8) or at 31 weeks of age (Conventional Neuter (CN), n = 7). Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to compare plasma metabolites (n = 370) from EN and CN cats. Age was the primary driver of variance in the plasma metabolome, including a developmental change independent of neuter group between 19 and 21 weeks in lysolipids and fatty acid amides. Changes associated with sexual development and its subsequent loss were also observed, with differences at some time points observed between EN and CN cats for 45 metabolites (FDR pcats was the most significantly altered pathway, increasing during sexual development and decreasing acutely following neutering. Felinine is a testosterone-regulated, felid-specific glutathione derivative secreted in urine. Alterations in tryptophan, histidine and tocopherol metabolism observed in peripubertal cats may be to support physiological functions of glutathione following diversion of S-amino acids for urinary felinine secretion.

  5. A Catalogue of Anatomical Fugitive Sheets: Cat. 49-62

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    Images Cat. 50 Cat. 51 Cat. 53 Cat. 54 Cat. 55 (a) Cat. 55 (b) Cat. 56 Cat. 57: 1 Cat. 57: 2 Cat. 57: 3 Cat. 57: 4 Cat. 59: 1 Cat. 59: 2 Cat. 59: 3 Cat. 59: 4 Cat. 60 Cat. 61 Cat. 62: 1 (a) Cat. 62: 1 (b) Cat. 62: 2 (a) Cat. 62: 2 (b)

  6. My Cat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王悦; 李成梅

    2002-01-01

    The name of my cat is Naty. This year he is one year old. He isvery fat, but he is very nice. He has a big round white head. His mouth and nose are small. His eyes are interesting. In the day,they are small and black,but at night they are big and blue.

  7. Serotonin has different effects on two classes of Betz cells from the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spain, W J

    1994-10-01

    1. Intracellular recording from cat Betz cells in vitro revealed a strong correlation between the dominant effect of serotonin (5-HT) and the Betz cell subtype in which it occurred. In large Betz cells that show posthyperpolarization excitation (termed PHE cells), 5-HT evoked a long-lasting membrane depolarization, whereas 5-HT evoked an initial hyperpolarization of variable duration in smaller Betz cells that show posthyperpolorization inhibition (termed PHI cells). 2. Voltage-clamp studies revealed that 5-HT caused a depolarizing shift of activation of the cation current Ih, which resulted in the depolarization in PHE cells, whereas the hyperpolarization in PHI cells is caused by an increase in a resting potassium conductance. 3. The effect of 5-HT on firing properties during constant current stimulation also differed consistently in the two types of Betz cells. In PHE cells the initial firing rate increased after 5-HT application, but the steady firing was unaffected. The depolarizing shift of Ih activation caused the increase of initial firing rate. 4. In PHI cells 5-HT caused a decrease in spike frequency adaptation. The decrease in adaptation was caused by a combination of two conductance changes. First, 5-HT caused a slow afterdepolarization in PHI cells that could trigger repetitive firing in the absence of further stimulation. The sADP depended on calcium entry through voltage-gated channels and was associated with a decrease in membrane conductance. Second, 5-HT caused reduction of a slow calcium-dependent potassium current that normally contributes to slow adaptation. 5. In conclusion, the effect of 5-HT on excitability differs systematically in Betz cell subtypes in part because they have different dominant ionic mechanisms that are modulated. If we assume that PHE cells and PHI cells represent fast and slow pyramidal tract (PT) neurons respectively, 5-HT will cause early recruitment of fast PT cells and delay recruitment of slow PT cells during low

  8. The effect of a cholecystokinin agonist on masseter muscle activity in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitthisomwong, P; Weiner, S; Levin, L; Reisman, S; Siegel, A

    2000-10-01

    The CCK(B) agonist, pentagastrin, has been shown to induce anxiety in human subjects. Similarly, in the cat model, pentagastrin facilitates the expression of hypothalamically activated emotional behavior. Because hypothalamically mediated emotional behavior is also accompanied by increased EMG activity in the jaw muscles, these experiments were designed to examine the combined effects of administration of pentagastrin with activation of hypothalamically mediated emotional behavior upon jaw muscle EMG activity. Electrodes were carefully lowered through previously placed guide tubes overlying the hypothalamus until a behavioral site was identified. Following the establishment of a stable threshold current for eliciting an emotional behavioral response, the skin overlying the ipsilateral masseter muscle was shaved and cleaned with alcohol, and surface electrodes were attached. The EMG was recorded, amplified, digitized, and stored in a microcomputer for analysis. Mean power frequencies (MPF) and latencies for behavior were calculated for baseline prior to infusion of all drugs. Following this, the effects of intravenous administration of pentagastrin and the CCK(B) antagonist LY288513 on the MPF were determined. The infusion of the CCK(B) agonist, pentagastrin (0.77, 1.92, and 3.84 microg/kg), decreased MPF in a time-related manner. The effects of pentagastrin 1.92 microg/kg were blocked by the CCK(B) antagonist, LY288513 (6.54 microg/kg). In addition, the infusion of LY288513 alone increased MPF. These results are surprising in that pentagastrin's anxiogenic properties would appear to make it likely to facilitate motor activity, not suppress it.

  9. Effect of portal hypertension and duct ligature on pancreatic fluid pressures in cats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbehøj, N; Borly, L; Heyeraas, K J

    1990-01-01

    In two groups of cats recordings were performed, during laparotomy, of pancreatic tissue fluid pressure measured by a needle technique, interstitial fluid pressure measured by micropipette technique, pancreatic intraductal pressure, and portal vein pressure. In one group of cats the pressures were...... measured before and after acutely induced portal hypertension; in the other group of cats the pressures were measured after an overnight ligature of the pancreatic main duct. At rest the needle pressure was equal to duct pressure but significantly lower than interstitial fluid pressure and portal pressure....... Acute portal hypertension caused no significant changes in micropipette, needle, or duct pressures. Pancreatic duct ligature increased duct pressure, interstitial fluid pressure, and needle pressure. We conclude that the fluid pressure in the pancreas is probably influenced by the production...

  10. A Catalogue of Anatomical Fugitive Sheets: Cat. 26-48

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    Images Cat. 26: 1 (a) Cat. 26: 1 (b) Cat. 26: 2 (a) Cat. 26: 2(b) Cat. 27: 1 (a) Cat. 27: 1 (b) Cat. 27: 2 (a) Cat. 27: 2 (b) Cat. 28 Cat. 29: 2 (a) Cat. 29: 2 (b) Cat. 30: 1 Cat. 30: 2 Cat. 30: 3 Cat. 33 Cat. 34: 1 Cat. 34: 2 Cat. 35: 1 Cat. 35: 2 Cat. 35: 3 Cat. 36 Cat. 37 Cat. 38: 1 Cat. 38: 2 Cat. 40 Cat. 42 Cat. 43 Cat. 44 Cat. 45: 1 Cat. 45: 2 Cat. 46 Cat. 47: 1 Cat. 47: 2 Cat. 47: 3 Cat. 48: 1 Cat. 48: 2 Cat. 48: 3

  11. Effect of diethylcarbamazine on serum antibodies to feline infectious peritonitis in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, L W

    1988-02-01

    In preceding studies by the author, use of the immunomodulator drug diethylcarbamazine resulted in the detection of antibodies to feline oncornavirus-associated cell membrane antigen in nine feline leukaemia virus infected cats that had previously given negative results to this antibody. In the present report, seven diethylcarbamazine-treated cats developed higher serum antibody titres to feline infectious peritonitis more frequently than did seven untreated controls. Since feline infectious peritonitis is caused by a coronavirus, these results suggest that diethylcarbamazine treatment could be exploited for vaccination and treatment strategies for non-retroviral in addition to retroviral infections.

  12. Clinical efficacy and cardiorespiratory effects of intramuscular administration of alfaxalone alone or in combination with dexmedetomidine in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo-Mocholí, Diego; Belda, Eliseo; Bosmans, Tim; Laredo, Francisco G

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the sedative, anaesthetic and cardiorespiratory effects of intramuscular (IM) administration of alfaxalone alone or in combination with dexmedetomidine in cats. Blinded, randomized crossover study with a washout period of 15 days. Seven adult cats, weighing 3.5 ± 0.7 kg. Cats were assigned randomly to each of three treatments: A5 (alfaxalone 5 mg kg(-1) ), D20 A5 (dexmedetomidine 20 μg kg(-1) and alfaxalone 5 mg kg(-1) ) and D40 A5 (dexmedetomidine 40 μg kg(-1) and alfaxalone 5 mg kg(-1) ). Drugs were administered IM into the epaxial muscles. Sedation or anaesthesia scores were evaluated by a modified numerical rating scale. Times to extubation, head-lift, sternal recumbency and standing were recorded. Heart and respiratory rates, systolic arterial pressure, arterial oxygen saturation of haemoglobin, end-tidal carbon dioxide tension and rectal temperature were measured at 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120 and 150 minutes after drug administration. Adverse events were recorded. Data were analysed by one-way anova with Tukey's post-hoc test for parametric values and, for non-normally distributed parameters, a Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U-test for two independent samples (p Cats in A5 were deeply sedated, whereas cats administered dexmedetomidine were anaesthetized. The onset of action and the duration of anaesthesia were related to the dose of dexmedetomidine. Cardiorespiratory parameters remained stable in the A5 group. Lower heart rates, higher systolic blood pressures and occasional low pulse oximetry readings were observed in the dexmedetomidine groups. A limited number of adverse events (hyperkinesia, emesis) occurred during recovery. Alfaxalone administered IM induced sedation in cats. The addition of dexmedetomidine to alfaxalone induced general anaesthesia with a mild decrease in the heart rate and arterial oxygen saturation of haemoglobin. © 2015 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of

  13. Effects of superoxide generating systems on muscle tone, cholinergic and NANC responses in cat airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, V; Nakajima, T; Pucovsky, V; Onoue, H; Ito, Y

    2000-02-14

    To study the possible role of reactive oxygen species in airway hyperreactivity, we examined the effects of the superoxide anion radical (O(2)(-)) generating systems, pyrogallol and xanthine with xanthine oxidase, on muscle tone, excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in the cat airway. Smooth muscle contraction or non-adrenergic non-cholinergic (NANC) relaxation evoked by electrical field stimulation (EFS) were measured before or after O(2)(-) generating systems with or without diethydithiocarbamic acid (DEDTCA), an inhibitor of endogenous superoxide dismutase (SOD). Resting membrane potential or excitatory junction potential (EJP) were also measured in vitro. Both pyrogallol and xanthine/xanthine oxidase produced biphasic changes in basal and elevated (by 5-HT) muscle tone. After SOD pretreatment, both systems consistently produced a prolonged contraction, thereby indicating that O(2)(-) was converted to H(2)O(2) by the action of SOD and as a result the actions of O(2)(-) were lost but those of H(2)O(2) introduced. The O(2)(-) showed no significant effect on smooth muscle contraction or EJP evoked by EFS, however after DEDTCA pretreatment, it evoked initial enhancement followed by suppression of the contraction and EJP. DEDTCA pretreatment ameliorated the inhibitory action of pyrogallol and xanthine/xanthine oxidase on the NANC relaxation, probably because O(2)(-) could combine with endogenous NO to form peroxynitrite. These results indicate that the O(2)(-) generating systems have multiple actions, presumably due to the presence and simultaneous action of at least two different reactive oxygen species (O(2)(-) and H(2)O(2)). While H(2)O(2) seems to be responsible for elevation of muscle tone and augmentation of smooth muscle contraction by EFS, O(2)(-) inhibits muscle tone, cholinergic and NANC neurotransmission.

  14. The effect of reducing dietary energy density via the addition of water to a dry diet, on body weight, energy intake and physical activity in adult neutered cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Janet E; Colyer, Alison; Morris, Penelope J

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly domestic cats live in an overfeeding and underexercising environment where obesity is a major health concern. One strategy to aid healthy body weight maintenance is dietary energy dilution. Published data indicate that increasing dietary moisture content leads to a reduction in energy intake and increased activity. However, a number of different methodologies were employed in these studies and associated changes in physical activity have only been measured once. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of diets of three different moisture contents offered in excess of energy requirements, on body weight, energy intake and physical activity in adult neutered cats. Sixty-nine adult cats randomised into three groups, received 100 % of their daily individual maintenance energy requirements (IMER) of dry diet or dry diet hydrated to 40 or 80 % total moisture content (tmc). Baseline activity, intake, body weight and body composition were measured. Following this baseline phase, the cats received the same diets at 200 % of daily IMER and the measurements repeated over the next 28 d. When offered the diets at 200 % IMER, cats fed the dry diet significantly increased body weight and percentage of body fat (P  0·01). The levels of physical activity in cats offered the hydrated 80 % tmc diet were significantly (P healthy body weight maintenance in overfed cats.

  15. Effects of consuming diets containing various fats or citrus flavanones on plasma lipid and urinary F2-isoprostane concentrations in overweight cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeusette, Isabelle; Torre, Celina; Salas, Anna; Iraculis, Neus; Compagnucci, Marco; Romano, Victor; Kirschvink, Nathalie

    2010-09-01

    To compare in overweight cats the effects of feeding moderate-energy diets with moderate fat content but with saturated fat (beef tallow), saturated fat plus citrus flavanones, or monounsaturated fat (olive oil) on plasma lipids and urinary F2-isoprostane concentrations. 20 overweight cats with mean+/-SD body weight of 5.2+/-0.2 kg and mean body condition score of 7.8+/-0.2 (9-point scale). Body weight, plasma total cholesterol and triacylglycerol concentrations, and urinary F2-isoprostane concentration (as marker of oxidative stress) were measured at the beginning of the study, when the cats were fed a maintenance diet, and after 1, 3, and 5 months of consuming test diets. In overweight cats, citrus flavanones supplementation of the saturated fat diet was associated with lower energy intake and with lower plasma lipids and urinary F2-isoprostane concentrations than in cats fed the saturated fat alone. Monounsaturated fat feeding resulted in lower food intake than in cats fed saturated fat. However, plasma lipids concentrations remained within reference limits throughout the study. Although the clinical relevance of these findings is unknown, the significant differences detected indicated that lower energy intake with citrus flavanones supplementation or with substitution of saturated fat for monounsaturated fat could be good strategies for decreasing plasma lipids concentration and oxidative stress in overweight cats, even before considerable loss of body weight is observed.

  16. Beneficial effect of botulinum toxin A on Raynaud's phenomenon in Japanese patients with systemic sclerosis: A prospective, case series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motegi, Sei-ichiro; Yamada, Kazuya; Toki, Sayaka; Uchiyama, Akihiko; Kubota, Yuka; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there is no satisfactory treatment for Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) in systemic sclerosis (SSc). Recently, it has been reported that botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) injection was effective for the treatment of RP in SSc patients. The objective was to assess the efficacy and safety of BTX-A on RP in Japanese SSc patients. In the prospective, case series study, 10 Japanese SSc patients with RP received 10 U of BTX-A injections into the hand. The change in severity of RP, including the frequency of attacks/pain, color changes, duration time of RP and the severity of pain, was assessed by Raynaud's score and pain visual analog scale (VAS) at each visit during 16 weeks. The recovery of skin temperature 20 min after cold water stimulation was examined by thermography at baseline and 4 weeks after injection. The number of digital ulcers (DU) and adverse effects were assessed at each visit. BTX-A injection decreased Raynaud's score and pain VAS from 2 weeks after injection, and the suppressive effect was continued until 16 weeks after injection. Skin temperature recovery after cold water stimulation at 4 weeks after injection was significantly enhanced compared with that before injection. All DU in five patients were healed within 12 weeks after injection. Neither systemic nor local adverse effects were observed in all cases. We conclude that BTX-A injection significantly improved the activity of RP in SSc patients without any adverse events, suggesting that BTX-A may have possible long-term preventive and therapeutic potentials for RP in Japanese SSc patients.

  17. Effects of obesity, energy restriction and neutering on the faecal microbiota of cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Manuela M; Kessler, Alexandre M; Kieffer, Dorothy A; Knotts, Trina A; Kim, Kyoungmi; Wei, Alfreda; Ramsey, Jon J; Fascetti, Andrea J

    2017-09-29

    Surveys report that 25-57 % of cats are overweight or obese. The most evinced cause is neutering. Weight loss often fails; thus, new strategies are needed. Obesity has been associated with altered gut bacterial populations and increases in microbial dietary energy extraction, body weight and adiposity. This study aimed to determine whether alterations in intestinal bacteria were associated with obesity, energy restriction and neutering by characterising faecal microbiota using 16S rRNA gene sequencing in eight lean intact, eight lean neutered and eight obese neutered cats before and after 6 weeks of energy restriction. Lean neutered cats had a bacterial profile similar to obese rodents and humans, with a greater abundance (Penergy restriction (PEnergy reduction was concurrent with significant shifts in two low-abundance bacterial genera and trends in four additional genera. The greatest change was a reduction in the Firmicutes genus, Sarcina, from 4·54 to 0·65 % abundance after energy restriction. The short duration of energy restriction may explain why few bacterial changes were observed in the obese cats. Additional work is needed to understand how neutering, obesity and weight loss are related to changes in feline microbiota and how these microbial shifts affect host physiology.

  18. Effects of CNS Manipulations on Seizures Induced by Monomethylhydrazine Administration in the Cat: Spinal Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-01

    according to the "Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals, "Instithni’ of .aboratory Annnimal Reson rees, National Research Council. This report...somatotopic organization in sensory neocortex of newborn kittens and adult cats. (1971). J. Comp. Neurol. 143(4): 447-480. Shouse, M. N. and Sterman, M

  19. Cytogenetic Effects of Low Dose Radiation in Mammalian Cells Analysis of the Phenomenon Hypersensitivity and Induced Radioresistence

    CERN Document Server

    Shmakova, N L; Nasonova, E A; Krasavin, E A; Rsjanina, A V

    2001-01-01

    The induction of cytogenetic damage after irradiation of chinese hamster cells and human melanoma cells within dose range 1-200 cGy was studied. The anaphase and metaphase analysis of chromosome damage and micronuclei test were applied. The hypersensitivity (HRS) at doses below 20 cGy and the increased radioresistence at higher doses (IR) were shown with all cytogenetic criteria for both cell lines. The phenomenon of HRS/IR was reproduced in synchronic as well as in asynchronic population of chinese hamster cells. This fact shows that HRS was caused by high radiosensitivity of all cells and can not be explained by any differential sensitivity of cells in different phases of the cell cycle. So it was supposed that the increasing radioresistence is determined by the inclusion of the inducible repair processes in all cells. This conclusion agress with the fact that there was no evidence of HRS on dose-effect curves and that some part of pre-existent damage was repaired after preliminary irradiation with low dose...

  20. Nuclear Glory Phenomenon

    CERN Document Server

    Kopeliovich, V B; Potashnikova, I K

    2014-01-01

    Analytical explanation of the nuclear glory effect, which is similar to the known optical (atmospheric) glory phenomenon, is presented. It is based on the small phase space method for the multiple interaction processes probability estimates and leads to the characteristic angular dependence of the production cross section $d\\sigma \\sim 1/ \\sqrt {\\pi - \\theta}$ in the vicinity of the strictly backward direction, for any number of interactions $N\\geq 3$, either elastic or inelastic. Rigorous proof of this effect is given for the case of the optimal kinematics, as well as for arbitrary polar scattering angles in the case of the light particle rescattering, but the arguments in favor of the backward azimuthal (axial) focusing are quite general and hold for any kind of the multiple interaction processes. Such behaviour of the cross section near the backward direction agrees qualitatively with available data. In the small interval of final angles including the value $\\theta =\\pi$ the angular dependence of the cumul...

  1. [Raynaud's phenomenon, disease or syndrome?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiessinger, Jean-Noël

    2011-09-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon is a common symptom. More often it is usually an idiopathic and benign condition. But it can be an early manifestation of a connective tissue disease especially scleroderma and primary Sjogren's syndrom. Thus it is necessary to develop reasonable screening model. If the vasomotor symptoms are localized, a diagnosis of secondary Raynaud's phenomenon is highly probable and the main etiology is an arterial disease. Occupational arterial lesions are a particularly aspect of secondary Raynaud's phenomenon. Calcium channel blockers are the reference for the symptomatic treatment of Raynaud's phenomenon. In severe secondary forms, intravenous iloprost infusion is effective. New drugs as endothelin antagonist and phospodiesterase type 5 inhibitors are still to be evaluated.

  2. Effects of ovariohysterectomy on intra-abdominal pressure and abdominal perfusion pressure in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, L; Rivera del Álamo, M M; Andaluz, A; Monreal, L; Torrente, C; García-Arnas, F; Fresno, L

    2012-12-15

    Intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) and abdominal perfusion pressure (APP) have shown clinical relevance in monitoring critically ill human beings submitted to abdominal surgery. Only a few studies have been performed in veterinary medicine. The aim of this study was to assess how pregnancy and abdominal surgery may affect IAP and APP in healthy cats. For this purpose, pregnant (n=10) and non-pregnant (n=11) queens undergoing elective spaying, and tomcats (n=20, used as controls) presented for neutering by scrotal orchidectomy were included in the study. IAP, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), APP, heart rate and rectal temperature (RT) were determined before, immediately after, and four hours after surgery. IAP increased significantly immediately after abdominal surgery in both female groups when compared with baseline (PPregnancy did not seem to affect IAP in this population of cats, possibly due to subjects being in early stages of pregnancy.

  3. Effects of lead on central nervous system development of the cat and rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick, G.W.

    1980-01-01

    This study utilizes the kitten as an experimental model because the neuroanatomical development of the cat more closely resembles that of the human, more so than the rat. Each kitten, except one control per litter, was given 20 mg/kg lead acetate daily by esophageal intubation for 35 days. At 35 days of age the kittens were sacrificed and prepared by standard methods for light or Golgi analysis. Body weight, but not brain weight, was reduced in lead-treated cats. However, Golgi-Cox stained material revealed a significant reduction in size and density of the Purkinje cell dendritic arborization in lead-treated animals. The width of the molecular layer was reduced reflecting this reduction in Purkinje cell dendritic field. The granule cell layer was reduced in width, while granule cell density was increased, indicating no reduction in cell number. The pyramidal cells from the motor cortex of lead-treated cats showed a reduction in secondary dendritic branching and a phenomenal increase in spine density on apical and basal dendrites. A series of studies using rats was also performed similar to those described by Pentschew and Garro (1966) for comparative purposes. Exposure to lead pre- and postnatally only caused changes in Purkinje cells similar to those seen in the lead-treated kittens. Histological changes were seen in pre- and postnatally exposed rat pups only. Esophageal intubation of high doses of lead solutions in newborn rat pups produced hemorrhagic lesions in both cerebellar and cerebral hemispheres within 24 hours after lead treatment.

  4. A case report of the beneficial effects of botulinum toxin type A on Raynaud phenomenon in a patient with lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Lei, Qi-song; Liu, Yu-ying; Song, Guan-jie; Song, Chun-ling

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Raynaud phenomenon is a vasospastic disorder affecting the hands and feet, and the efficacies of traditional treatments, such as pharmacological therapies and sympathectomy, are not uniform. Patients with paraneoplastic Raynaud phenomenon do not benefit from the traditional treatments. The use of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) for Raynaud phenomenon has been reported for several years; however, there are few reports regarding botulinum toxin type A in the treatment of paraneoplastic Raynaud phenomenon. We describe a case report of the beneficial effects of botulinum toxin type A on Raynaud phenomenon in a patient with lung cancer. Methods: A 63-year-old male complained of pain and discoloration of his fingers and indicated that oral nifedipine and low-dose aspirin were not effective. After approximately 8 months, he was diagnosed with lung cancer. Chemotherapy partially reduced the pain and discoloration of his fingers; however, no significant changes occurred in his fingers after the fourth cycle. We used BTX-A to treat this patient with paraneoplastic RP. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to assess the clinical response. Results: After approximately 2 months, the patient reported relief from pain, stiffness, numbness, and cold sensation. Furthermore, no local or general adverse effects were exhibited by the patient. Conclusion: This study used botulinum toxin type A for a patient with paraneoplastic Raynaud phenomenon. Botulinum toxin type A significantly improved the patient's clinical symptoms without significant complications. These findings suggest that BTX-A may represent a good option for the treatment of paraneoplastic RP. PMID:27749585

  5. Segmental and supraspinal control of synaptic effectiveness of functionally identified muscle afferents in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enríquez, M; Jiménez, I; Rudomin, P

    1996-01-01

    The present investigation documents the patterns of primary afferent depolarization (PAD) of single, functionally identified muscle afferents from the medial gastrocnemius nerve in the intact, anesthetized cat. Classification of the impaled muscle afferents as from muscle spindles or from tendon organs was made according to several criteria, which comprised measurement of conduction velocity and electrical threshold of the peripheral axons, and the maximal frequency followed by the afferent fibers during vibration, as well as the changes in discharge frequency during longitudinal stretch, the projection of the afferent fiber to the motor pool, and, in unparalyzed preparations, the changes in afferent activity during a muscle twitch. In confirmation of a previous study, we found that most muscle spindle afferents (46.1-66.6%, depending on the combination of criteria utilized for receptor classification) had a type A PAD pattern. That is, they were depolarized by stimulation of group I fibers of the posterior biceps and semitendinosus (PBSt) nerve, but not by stimulation of cutaneous nerves (sural and superficial peroneus) or the bulbar reticular formation (RF), which in many cases inhibited the PBSt-induced PAD. In addition, we found a significant fraction of muscle spindle primaries that were depolarized by stimulation of group I PBSt fibers and also by stimulation of the bulbar RF. Stimulation of cutaneous nerves produced PAD in 9.1-31.2% of these fibers (type B PAD pattern) and no PAD in 8.2-15.4% (type C PAD pattern). In contrast to muscle spindle afferents, only the 7.7-15.4% of fibers from tendon organs had a type A PAD pattern, 23-46.1% had a type B and 50-61.5% a type C PAD pattern. These observations suggest that the neuronal circuitry involved in the control of the synaptic effectiveness of muscle spindles and tendon organs is subjected to excitatory as well as to inhibitory influences from cutaneous and reticulospinal fibers. As shown in the accompanying

  6. Short-term effect of cold provocation on single-breath carbon monoxide diffusing capacity in subjects with and without Raynaud's phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastaud, M; Dolisi, C; Bermon, S; Gaudin, P; Defauw, G; Ardisson, J L

    1995-01-01

    The lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide was determined by the single breath method (DLCOsb) before, during, and after immersion of the left hand in cold water in four groups of subjects: (i) normal individuals; (ii) subjects with idiopathic Raynaud's disease; (iii) patients with progressive systemic sclerosis without associated Raynaud's phenomenon; and (iv) patients with connective tissue disease associated with Raynaud's phenomenon. Our results showed significant differences in the evolution of DLCOsb after cold stimulation between the groups. Control subjects (group one) showed a transient but significant reduction in DLCOsb at the end of two minutes of cold stimulation, normalizing ten minutes later. Subjects with primary Raynaud's phenomenon (group two) showed on the contrary a transient but significant rise in DLCOsb after 2 minutes, while subjects with an isolated connective tissue disease without Raynaud's phenomenon (group three) showed a significant decrease in DLCOsb at both observation times. Patients with Raynaud's phenomenon associated with a connective tissue disease (group four) showed a delayed decrease in DLCOsb ten minutes after cold stimulation. This latter result appeared as an addition to the effects of cold stimulation observed in groups two and three.

  7. The effects of implementing a feral cat spay/neuter program in a Florida county animal control service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Kathy L; Slater, Margaret R; Haller, Linda

    2002-01-01

    In 1995, a county animal control service implemented a feral cat sterilization program with the goal of reducing the number of healthy cats euthanized, complaints, and the county's costs. The service collected data from a 6-year period both before and after the program's implementation. The service totaled the numbers of both cat and dog impoundments, surgeries, adoptions, euthanasias, and complaints for each year; standardized both sets of numbers on a per- 10,000-person basis to compare trends between dogs and cats; and calculated estimated costs for neutering versus impounding and euthanizing the feral cats. Changing from a policy of euthanasia of feral cats to support for trap-neuter-return did not result in an increase in the number of complaints or cat impoundments. The percentage of impounded cats euthanized decreased between the periods before and after the program began, and the percentage adopted increased. The ratio of complaints to impounds decreased between the 2 periods, and the ratio of surgeries to impounds increased. Impoundments of cats were relatively steady in spite of the continually increasing human population. Euthanasias decreased for both cats and dogs since 1997. Since 1996, complaints decreased for both. Surgeries for both cats and dogs increased over the 12 years. Adoptions for cats and dogs increased greatly in fiscal year 1998/1999.

  8. Effects of potassium chloride and potassium bicarbonate in the diet on urinary pH and mineral excretion of adult cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passlack, Nadine; Brenten, Thomas; Neumann, Konrad; Zentek, Jürgen

    2014-03-14

    Low dietary K levels have been associated with increasing renal Ca excretion in humans, indicating a higher risk of calcium oxalate (CaOx) urolith formation. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate whether dietary K also affects the urine composition of cats. A total of eight adult cats were fed diets containing 0·31 % native K and 0·50, 0·75 and 1·00 % K from KCl or KHCO₃ and were evaluated for the effects of dietary K. High dietary K levels were found to elevate urinary K concentrations (P<0·001). Renal Ca excretion was higher in cats fed the KCl diets than in those fed the KHCO₃ diets (P=0·026), while urinary oxalate concentrations were generally lower in cats fed the KCl diets and only dependent on dietary K levels in cats fed the KHCO₃ diets (P<0·05). Fasting urine pH increased with higher dietary K levels (P=0·022), reaching values of 6·38 (1·00 % KCl) and 7·65 (1·00 % KHCO₃). K retention was markedly negative after feeding the cats with the basal diet (-197 mg/d) and the 0·50 % KCl diet (-131 mg/d), while the cats tended to maintain their balance on being fed the highest-KCl diet (-23·3 mg/d). In contrast, K from KHCO₃ was more efficiently retained (P=0·018), with K retention being between -82·5 and 52·5 mg/d. In conclusion, the dietary inclusion of KHCO₃ instead of KCl as K source could be beneficial for the prevention of CaOx urolith formation in cats, since there is an association between a lower renal Ca excretion and a generally higher urine pH. The utilisation of K is distinctly influenced by the K salt, which may be especially practically relevant when using diets with low K levels.

  9. Comparison of the effects of bicuculline and strychnine on brain stem auditory evoked potentials in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, M. R.; Penix, L. P.

    1983-01-01

    1 Experiments were performed to determine the effects of intravenously applied bicuculline and strychnine on the click-evoked brain stem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP) of cats. 2 The BAEP was not affected by bicuculline (0.5 mg/kg, i.v.) administration. Strychnine (0.2 mg/kg, i.v.) administration caused a significant increase in the amplitude of peak 4, which is thought to be produced by potentials in the superior olive, lateral lemniscus and inferior colliculus. 3 These results suggest that strychnine blocks glycinergic inhibitory inputs to these auditory structures. PMID:6824818

  10. The effect of activation of central adrenergic receptors by clonidine on the excitability of the solitary tract neurons in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipski, J; Solnicka, E

    1976-01-01

    The effect of i.v. administered clonidine (10-15 mug/kg) on the evoked potential recorded in the dosal part of medulla oblongata, during carotid sinus nerve stimulation, was studied in chloralose-urethane anaesthetized cats. Clonidine influenced the amplitude and configuration of the evoked potential and the changes were parallel to the blood pressure depressor response. However, the blood pressure drops, evoked by i.v. infusion of papaverine, did not influence the potential. It is concluded that the synaptic transmission from the carotid sinus nerve to the second order neurons in the solatary tract area can be modulated by the clonidine-induced activation of central adrenergic receptors.

  11. Effect of Head Position on Cerebrospinal Fluid Pressure in Cats: Comparison with Artificial Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klarica, Marijan; Radoš, Milan; Draganić, Pero; Erceg, Gorislav; Orešković, Darko; Maraković, Jurica; Bulat, Marin

    2006-01-01

    Aim To demonstrate that changes in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure in the cranial cavity and spinal canal after head elevation from the horizontal level occur primarily due to the biophysical characteristics of the CSF system, ie, distensibility of the spinal dura. Methods Experiments in vivo were performed on cats and a new artificial model of the CSF system with dimensions similar to the CSF system in cats, consisting of non-distensible cranial and distensible spinal part. Measurements of the CSF pressure in the cranial and spinal spaces were performed in chloralose-anesthetized cats (n = 10) in the horizontal position on the base of a stereotaxic apparatus (reference zero point) and in the position in which the head was elevated to 5 cm and 10 cm above that horizontal position. Changes in the CSF pressure in the cranial and spinal part of the model were measured in the cranial part positioned in the same way as the head in cats (n = 5). Results When the cat was in the horizontal position, the values of the CSF pressure in the cranial (11.9 ± 1.1 cm H2O) and spinal (11.8 ± 0.6 cm H2O) space were not significantly different. When the head was elevated 5 cm or 10 cm above the reference zero point, the CSF pressure in the cranium significantly decreased to 7.7 ± 0.6 cm H2O and 4.7 ± 0.7 cm H2O, respectively, while the CSF pressure in the spinal space significantly increased to 13.8 ± 0.7 cm H2O and 18.5 ± 1.6 cm H2O, respectively (P<0.001 for both). When the artificial CSF model was positioned in the horizontal level and its cranial part elevated by 5 cm and 10 cm, the changes in the pressure were the same as those in the cats when in the same hydrostatic position. Conclusions The new model of the CSF system used in our study faithfully mimicked the changes in the CSF pressure in cats during head elevation in relation to the body. Changes in the pressure in the model were not accompanied by the changes in fluid volume in

  12. No significant effect of ginkgo biloba special extract EGb 761 in the treatment of primary Raynaud phenomenon: a randomized controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bredie, S.J.H.; Jong, M.C.J. de

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Medicinal treatment of vasospastic Raynaud phenomenon is limited to primarily vasodilator medicines. OBJECTIVE: To explore the possible beneficial effects and tolerability of 120 mg two times a day of Ginkgo Biloba special extract EGb 761 in patients suffering from Raynaud disease (RD) (

  13. The cardiopulmonary effects and quality of anesthesia after induction with alfaxalone in 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin in dogs and cats: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, K W; Robson, S; Devi, J L; Woodward, A; Whittem, T

    2016-12-01

    To systematically review the quality of evidence comparing the cardiopulmonary effects and quality of anesthesia after induction with alfaxalone vs. other anesthetic agents in dogs and cats. Studies published from 2001 until 20th May 2013 were identified with the terms 'alfaxan' OR 'alfaxalone' OR 'alphaxalone' in electronic databases: Discovery, PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Wiley Interscience. The study design and risk of bias of all included studies were assessed. Twenty-two studies from 408 (22 of 408, 5.39%) satisfied the inclusion criteria. Fourteen studies (14 of 22, 64%) focused on dogs and nine (9 of 22, 40%) on cats. One study had both dogs and cats as subjects. (Hunt et al., 2013) Twelve studies were rated an LOE1, and six of these as ROB1. One, seven, and two studies were rated as LOE2, LOE3, and LOE5, respectively. In dogs, strong evidence shows that induction quality with either alfaxalone-HPCD or propofol is smooth. Moderate evidence supports this finding in cats. In dogs, moderate evidence shows that there is no significant change in heart rate after induction with either alfaxalone-HPCD or propofol. In cats, moderate evidence shows no significant difference in postinduction respiratory rate and heart rate between alfaxalone-HPCD and propofol induction. Strong evidence shows dogs and cats have smooth recoveries after induction using either alfaxalone-HPCD or propofol, before reaching sternal recumbency. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The effect of micro-particles of linoleic acid emulsion on the blood-brain barrier in cats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hak Jin; Lee, Chang Hun; Lee, Tae Hong [College of Medicine, Pusan National Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Pyun, Yong Seon [Daedong Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the permeability change of the blood-brain barrier and the reversibility of the embolized lesions induced with a fat-emulsion technique by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and we also wished to evaluate the resultant histologic findings in cat brains. MR imaging was scheduled serially at 1 hour, day 1, day 4 and day 7 after infusion of linoleic acid-emulsion (0.05 ml linoleic acid + 20 ml saline) to the internal carotid artery in 12 cats. Abnormal signal intensity or contrast enhancement was evaluated on diffusion-weighted images (DWIs), the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps, and gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted images (Gd-T1WIs) at the stated times. MR imaging was stopped if the lesion shows isointensity and no contrast enhancement was observed at the acquisition time, and then brain tissue was harvested and examined. Light microscopic (LM) and electron microscopic (EM) examinations were performed. The embolized lesions appeared as isointensities (n = 7) or mild hyperintensities (n = 5) on DWIs, as isointensities (n = 12) on the ADC maps, and as contrast enhancements (n = 12) on Gd-T1WIs at 1 hour. The lesions showed isointensity on DWIs and the ADC maps, and as no contrast enhancement for all cats at day 1. The LM findings revealed small (< 1 cm) focal necrosis and demyelination in three cats. EM examinations showed minimal findings of small (< 3 {mu}m) fat globules within the endothelial wall (n = 10) and mild swelling of the neuropils (< 5 {mu}m). Widening of the interstitium or morphologic disruption of the endothelial wall was not seen. Cerebral fat embolism induced by linoleic acid emulsion revealed vasogenic edema and reversible changes as depicted on the MR images. These results might help us to understand the mechanisms of fat on the blood-brain barrier, and this technique could be used as a basic model for research of the effects of drugs on the disrupted blood-brain barrier, and also as a

  15. The effects of time, luminance, and high contrast targets: revisiting grating acuity in the domestic cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Daria L; Clark, Robert A

    2013-11-01

    Based on optical clarity and retinal cone density, the cat has a potential acuity of 20-30 cycles per degree (cpd), yet most behavioral studies estimate feline acuity between 3 and 9 cpd. Those studies, however, were limited by restrictive experimental conditions that may have inadvertently lowered the estimated grating acuity. Two domestic cats previously trained on a two-choice visual discrimination task were retrained on a grating detection/discrimination task with unlimited time, high luminance, high contrast targets, and adequate space to prevent poor accommodation from affecting the results. Initially, vertical gratings of increasing cpd were tested until failure. Then, horizontal gratings of increasing cpd were tested until failure. Finally, the finest horizontal grating resolved was confirmed with a third test requiring 24 correct out of 36 consecutive trials, yielding a binomial probability less than 0.02 of non-random occurrence. M1, a 7-year-old male gray tabby with +2.00 OU refraction, tested for a grating detection acuity of 15 cpd for both vertical and horizontal gratings (binomial probability = 0.009). F1, a 2-year-old female gray tabby with +0.25 OU refraction, tested for a grating orientation discrimination acuity of 20 cpd for both vertical and horizontal gratings (binomial probability = 0.004). These results demonstrate that a young cat with good focus is capable of discriminating 20 cpd, in close agreement with the physiologic maximum. Uncorrected focusing errors appear to degrade visual performance. Optimum experimental conditions resulted in better grating acuity measurements than previously reported, emphasizing the importance of environmental factors in feline behavioral testing.

  16. The effects of diazepam or midazolam on the dose of propofol required to induce anaesthesia in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Rebecca; Borer-Weir, Kate

    2015-09-01

    Assess effects of benzodiazepine administration on the propofol dose required to induce anaesthesia in healthy cats, investigate differences between midazolam and diazepam, and determine an optimal benzodiazepine dose for co-induction. Prospective, randomised, blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Ninety client-owned cats (ASA I and II) with a median (interquartile range) body mass of 4.0 (3.4-4.9) kg. All cats received 0.01 mg kg(-1) acepromazine and 0.2 mg kg(-1) methadone intravenously (IV). Fifteen minutes later, sedation was scored on a scale of 1-5, with 5 indicating greatest sedation. Propofol, 2 mg kg(-1) , administered IV, was followed by either midazolam or diazepam at 0.2, 0.3, 0.4 or 0.5 mg kg(-1) or saline 0.1 mL kg(-1) . Further propofol was administered until endotracheal intubation was possible. Patient signalment, sedation score, propofol dosage and adverse reactions were recorded. Midazolam and diazepam (all doses) significantly reduced the propofol dose required compared with saline (p midazolam and diazepam in propofol dose reduction (p = 0.488). All individual doses of midazolam reduced propofol requirement compared with saline (0.2 mg kg(-1) , p = 0.028; 0.3 mg kg(-1) , p = 0.006; 0.4 mg kg(-1) , p Midazolam (0.2-0.5 mg kg(-1) ) and diazepam (0.3-0.5 mg kg(-1) ) administered IV after 2 mg kg(-1) propofol significantly reduced the propofol dose required for tracheal intubation. © 2015 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  17. Effects of serum vitamin E levels on skin vitamin E levels in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewell, Dennis E; Yu, Shiguang; Joshi, Dinesh K

    2002-01-01

    Skin problems are common in small animal practice. Oxidative stress, or the imbalance between prooxidants and the body's antioxidant defense system, likely plays a role in the development of skin disease. According to this study, increasing amounts of vitamin E in foods for dogs and cats increases serum and cutaneous concentrations of vitamin E. Based on available scientific data, these increases in vitamin E concentration are likely to be beneficial. However, the relationship between increases in serum and skin vitamin E concentrations and the prevention, development, and treatment of skin disease remains to be elucidated by intervention studies.

  18. The development of cat testicular sperm cryopreservation protocols: Effects of tissue fragments or sperm cell suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatdarong, Kaywalee; Thuwanut, Paweena; Morrell, Jane M

    2016-01-15

    In endangered animals that have been found dead or sterilized for medical reasons, testis is the ultimate source of haploid DNA or sperm. Thus, preservation of testicular sperm may be performed to rescue their genetics. The aim of this study was to evaluate protocols for testicular sperm freezing: as tissue fragments or cell suspension in domestic cats as a model. A pair of testes from each cat (n = 9) were cut into eight equal pieces. Four randomly selected pieces were cryopreserved as: (1) tissue pieces using two-step freezing; (2) tissue pieces using a slow passive cooling device (CoolCell); (3) sperm suspension after single-layer centrifugation (SLC) through colloids; and (4) sperm suspension without being processed through SLC. A testicular piece from each cat served as fresh control. Testicular sperm membrane and DNA integrity were evaluated before, and after, the cryopreservation process. In addition, spermatogenic cell types (testicular sperm, spermatogonia, spermatocyte, and spermatid) present in the suspension samples were counted before and after SLC. The results found that testicular sperm membrane integrity in the suspension after SLC process was higher than that in the fragment form neither using the two-step nor CoolCell freezing, both before and after freezing (before freezing: 92.3 ± 3.4 vs. 81 ± 4.5 and 80.0 ± 7.0; after freezing: 84.5 ± 4.6 vs. 71.2 ± 12 and 76.2 ± 4.6; P ≤ 0.05). Testicular sperm DNA integrity was, however, not different among groups. Furthermore, the samples processed through the SLC had higher ration of sperm cells: other spermatogenic cells than those were not processed through the SLC (88.9 ± 3.8 vs. 30 ± 7.9; P ≤ 0.05). In summary, testicular sperm cryopreserved as a minced suspension is considered suitable in terms of preventing sperm membrane integrity, and SLC is considered a selection tool for enriching haploid sperm cells from castrated or postmortem cats.

  19. A new phenomenon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganci, S.

    2017-03-01

    This letter describes an interesting optical phenomenon engaging the reflected images of a new tube LED lamp (an array of high luminosity LEDs substituting the old fluorescent lamps) on any convex glossy black surface.

  20. The Root Pressure Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, A. R.

    1972-01-01

    Describes experiments demonstrating that root pressure in plants is probably controlled by a circadian rhythm (biological clock). Root pressure phenomenon plays significant part in water transport in contradiction with prevalent belief. (PS)

  1. Treatment of Raynaud's phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Carrasco, Mario; Jiménez-Hernández, Mario; Escárcega, Ricardo O; Mendoza-Pinto, Claudia; Pardo-Santos, Rodrigo; Levy, Roger; Maldonado, Claudio Galarza; Chávez, Gonzalo Pérez; Cervera, Ricard

    2008-10-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon is an episodic vasospasm of the peripheral arteries, causing pallor followed by cyanosis and redness with pain and sometimes paraesthesia, and, rarely, ulceration of the fingers and toes. Primary or idiopathic Raynaud's phenomenon (Raynaud's disease) occurs without an underlying disease. Secondary Raynaud's phenomenon (Raynaud's syndrome) occurs in association with an underlying disease. Initially conservative, non-pharmacologic approach is important for these patients, although pharmacologic therapy may ultimately be necessary. Advances in vascular physiology have showed the role of the endothelium as well as endothelium-independent mechanisms in the altered vasoregulation of Raynaud's phenomenon. This has opened promising therapeutic avenues, and it is likely that therapies targeted towards specific pathophysiologic steps become available in the near future.

  2. Asphalts’ aging phenomenon

    OpenAIRE

    Xiomara Vargas; Freddy Reyes

    2010-01-01

    This work presents a state of the art revision of the results from studies of asphalt aging found by researchers aimed at deepening understanding of this complex phenomenon. The background shows the evolution of asphalt aging, initially considering it as physical hardening and progressively ecognizing it as a complex phenomenon having repercussions on asphalt durability and physical-chemical properties. This document aims to be a guide for understanding future investigations for developing ne...

  3. The superosmic phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpott, C M; Goonetilleke, P; Goodenough, P C; Clark, A; Murty, G E

    2008-08-01

    Olfaction studies in the institution of Department of Otorhinolaryngology at Leicester Royal Infirmary have detected a previously unreported, variable phenomenon--'superosmia'--in which subjects' olfaction threshold concentrations are up to 100,000 smaller than the average value. The aim of this report is to define and quantify this phenomenon. Two hundred and thirty subjects, who had been screened for active nasal pathology (age range 20-60 years), underwent individual olfactory threshold tests for phenylethyl alcohol or eucalyptol, using a computer-driven olfactometer in a controlled laboratory setting. Some tests were single tests and others were repeated on a small cohort. Two per cent of subjects demonstrated the superosmic phenomenon on single testing, and 10 per cent demonstrated this phenomenon on variable occasions during repeated testing. The superosmic phenomenon was defined by: (1) confident olfactory perception of a threshold at least equal to if not greater than three threshold levels below the subject's average threshold; (2) repeated perception of the odour at this level for at least 10 responses (1:1024 probability of chance finding); and (3) (where time permitted) a sudden, rapid loss of superosmia. Superosmia is a distinct phenomenon, the stimulus or mechanism of which is currently the subject of further research. The enhancement of olfactory ability may be possible through activation of an accessory pathway or modulation of the existing olfactory apparatus.

  4. The Lazarus phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahni, Vaibhav

    2016-08-01

    The Lazarus phenomenon or the unassisted return of spontaneous circulation after cardiac arrest is a grossly underreported phenomenon in medical literature which essentially implies the 'resurrection' of an individual after cardiac arrest. Although there have been a handful of such cases reported, the clinical incidence and significance may be underestimated. Because of the presumed infrequency of this condition, there are no studies specifically researching Lazarus phenomenon in scientific literature. This review intends to systematically present current and past knowledge on this rare but definitive phenomenon. Research databases namely Google Scholar, Science Direct, Medline and PubMed were utilized. Only articles which identified cases where the return of spontaneous circulation occurred after cessation of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR), and review articles on the entity were included. The mentioned databases were searched using the terms 'Lazarus phenomenon', 'cardiopulmonary resuscitation' and 'return of spontaneous circulation'. A literature review was synthesised based on articles meeting the eligibility criteria to better understand the phenomenon of return of spontaneous circulation.

  5. Biotin deficiency in the cat and the effect on hepatic propionyl CoA carboxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, C J; Morris, J G

    1977-02-01

    Biotin deficiency was produced in growing kittens by feeding a diet containing dried, raw egg white. After receiving either an 18.5% egg white diet for 25 weeks, or a 32% egg white diet for 12 weeks, they exhibited dermal lesions characterized by alopecia, scaly dermatitis and achromotrichia, which increased in severity with the deficiency. Females developed accumulations of dried salivary, nasal and lacrymal secretions in the facial region although a male did not. There was a loss of body weight in all cats as the deficiency progressed. Hepatic propionyl CoA carboxylase activities were measured on biopsy samples of liver during biotin deficiency and after biotin supplementation. In the deficient state, activities were 4% and 24% of that following biotin supplementation. Propionyl carboxylase activity in the liver of the cat was comparable to that reported in the rat and chick in the deficient and normal states. Subcutaneous injection of 0.25 mg biotin every other day while continuing to receive the egg white diet caused remission of clinical signs, a body weight gain and increased food intake.

  6. “猫眼"效应在激光侦听中的应用研究%Research on laser interception of the "cat-eye" effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘玉华; 李广林

    2012-01-01

    光电设备或光学瞄准设备的光学窗口对入射激光具有较强的反射特性,该特性被称为”猫眼”效应。”猫眼”效应具有2个特点:1)能使反射光线沿入射光的方向返回;2)可以获得高质量的反射光。因此,”猫眼”效应能够很好的解决激光侦听中高质量信号光的获取问题。本文从理论上分析了”猫眼”效应的产生机理,论述了基于”猫眼”效应的激光侦听技术原理,并对”猫眼”效应应用中的一些问题做了讨论。%The realization of active laser ce is based the fact that the optical windows of electro-optical equipment have a strong reflect character towards incident laser beam, which is called "cat-eye" effect. The "cat-eye" effect has two characteristics. One is that it can make the reflected light go back alone with the initial light. The other is that it can obtain a high quality reflected light. Therefore, "cat-eye" effect can solve the problem that it can obtain high quality signal light of laser detective. In this paper, we have analyzed the theory of "cat-eye" effect production mechanism, discussed the effect of the laser based on the "cat-eye" effect protected reliably agait tective technology principle, and some problems of the cat-eye effect in application are discussed.

  7. Resurrecting Dead-water Phenomenon

    CERN Document Server

    Mercier, Matthieu; Dauxois, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    We revisit experimental studies performed by Ekman on dead-water using modern techniques in order to present new insights on this peculiar phenomenon. We extend its description to more general situations such as a three-layer fluid or a linearly stratified fluid in presence of a pycnocline, showing the robustness of dead-water phenomenon. We observe large amplitude nonlinear internal waves which are coupled to the boat dynamics, and we emphasize that the modeling of the wave-induced drag requires more analysis, taking into account nonlinear effects.

  8. Effects of feral cats on the evolution of anti-predator behaviours in island reptiles: insights from an ancient introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Binbin; Belasen, Anat; Pafilis, Panayiotis; Bednekoff, Peter; Foufopoulos, Johannes

    2014-08-07

    Exotic predators have driven the extinction of many island species. We examined impacts of feral cats on the abundance and anti-predator behaviours of Aegean wall lizards in the Cyclades (Greece), where cats were introduced thousands of years ago. We compared populations with high and low cat density on Naxos Island and populations on surrounding islets with no cats. Cats reduced wall lizard populations by half. Lizards facing greater risk from cats stayed closer to refuges, were more likely to shed their tails in a standardized assay, and fled at greater distances when approached by either a person in the field or a mounted cat decoy in the laboratory. All populations showed phenotypic plasticity in flight initiation distance, suggesting that this feature is ancient and could have helped wall lizards survive the initial introduction of cats to the region. Lizards from islets sought shelter less frequently and often initially approached the cat decoy. These differences reflect changes since islet isolation and could render islet lizards strongly susceptible to cat predation. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Substantia nigra dopaminergic unit activity in behaving cats: effect of arousal on spontaneous discharge and sensory evoked activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strecker, R E; Jacobs, B L

    1985-12-30

    Single-unit activity of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra was recorded in freely moving cats during a variety of conditions designed to shed light on the hypotheses that these neurons are involved in the regulation of arousal-stress and/or selective attention. Both aversive and non-aversive arousing experimental conditions were used, including tail pinch, immersion of feet in ice-water, white noise, inaccessible food, feeding, grooming, inaccessible rats, and somatosensory stimulation. None of these conditions had an effect on tonic neuronal discharge rate. However, these neurons did exhibit brief excitatory and inhibitory responses to phasic auditory or visual stimuli presented when the cat was sitting quietly. These responses were dramatically attenuated if these stimuli were presented during the aforementioned conditions of behavioral arousal. This sharply contrasts with the inability of these same conditions to influence spontaneous discharge rate. The sensitivity of this neuronal sensory response to the concurrent behavioral condition supports the hypothesis that these neurons are involved in attentional processes or selective responding. The lack of responsiveness of these neurons to a variety of arousal/stress manipulations supports the hypothesis that dopaminergic neurons play a permissive, rather than an active, role in these processes.

  10. Evaluation of the Cerebral State Index in Cats under Isoflurane Anaesthesia: Dose-Effect Relationship and Prediction of Clinical Signs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana R. Sousa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of the cerebral state index (CSI in reflecting different levels of isoflurane anaesthesia was evaluated in ten cats subjected to four end-tidal isoflurane concentrations (EtIso, each maintained for 15 minutes (0.8%, 1.2%, 1.6%, or 2.0% EtIso. The CSI, hemodynamic data, ocular reflexes, and eye position were recorded for each EtIso concentration. Pharmacodynamic analysis of CSI with EtIso was performed, as well as prediction probability analysis with a clinical scale based on the eye reflexes. The CSI values showed great variability. Between all parameters, burst suppression ratio showed the better fitting with the sigmoidal concentration-effect model (R2=0.93 followed by CSI (R2=0.82 and electromyographic activity (R2=0.79. EtIso was the variable with better prediction of the clinical scale of anaesthesia (prediction probability value of 0.94. Although the CSI values decrease with increasing isoflurane concentrations, the huge variability in CSI values may be a strong limitation for its use in cats and it seems to be no better than EtIso as a predictor of clinical signs.

  11. Electrophysiological characterization of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in cat petrosal ganglion neurons in culture: effects of cytisine and its bromo derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varas, Rodrigo; Valdés, Viviana; Iturriaga-Vásquez, Patricio; Cassels, Bruce K; Iturriaga, Rodrigo; Alcayaga, Julio

    2006-02-09

    Petrosal ganglion neurons are depolarized and fire action potentials in response to acetylcholine and nicotine. However, little is known about the subtype(s) of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors involved, although alpha4 and alpha7 subunits have been identified in petrosal ganglion neurons. Cytisine, an alkaloid unrelated to nicotine, and its bromo derivatives are agonists exhibiting different affinities, potencies and efficacies at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing alpha4 or alpha7 subunits. To characterize the receptors involved, we studied the effects of these agonists and the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists hexamethonium and alpha-bungarotoxin in isolated petrosal ganglion neurons. Petrosal ganglia were excised from anesthetized cats and cultured for up to 16 days. Using patch-clamp technique, we recorded whole-cell currents evoked by 5-10 s applications of acetylcholine, cytisine or its bromo derivatives. Agonists and antagonists were applied by gravity from a pipette near the neuron surface. Neurons responded to acetylcholine, cytisine, 3-bromocytisine and 5-bromocytisine with fast inward currents that desensitized during application of the stimuli and were reversibly blocked by 1 microM hexamethonium or 10 nM alpha-bungarotoxin. The order of potency of the agonists was 3-bromocytisine > acetylcholine approximately = cytisine > 5-bromocytisine, suggesting that homomeric alpha7 neuronal nicotinic receptors predominate in cat petrosal ganglion neurons in culture.

  12. Inhibitory effects of putative peptidic urotensin-II receptor antagonists on urotensin-II-induced contraction of cat isolated respiratory smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behm, David J; Ao, Zhaohui; Camarda, Valeria; Aiyar, Nambi V; Johns, Douglas G; Douglas, Stephen A

    2005-06-15

    Urotensin-II is purported to influence pulmonary function by modulating smooth muscle tone/growth. In the present study, Northern blot and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis indicated the presence of UT receptor mRNA in cat trachea, bronchi and lung parenchyma. Urotensin-II contracted cat isolated trachea and bronchi with similar potencies (pEC(50)s 8.61+/-0.07-8.81+/-0.10). Contractile efficacies ranged from 19+/-9% to 63+/-11% KCl in the primary and secondary bronchi. The peptidic UT receptor antagonists BIM-23127, SB-710411 and GSK248451 (7.18+/-0.12, 7.52+/-0.08 and 9.05+/-0.16 cat recombinant UT pK(i)s) inhibited urotensin-II-induced contraction of cat isolated trachea with pK(b)s 6.36+/-0.11, 6.74+/-0.07 and 9.27+/-0.12, respectively. As such, feline lung contains significant amounts of UT mRNA and this receptor appears to be functionally coupled to bronchoconstriction (the peptidic tool compound GSK248451 representing a sub-nanomolar inhibitor of such effects). These findings suggest that the cat represents a suitable species for future studies designed to assess the effects of the urotensin-II receptor on pulmonary (patho)physiology.

  13. Effect of Overaging on Solute Distributions and Bake Hardening Phenomenon in Bake Hardening Steels%Effect of Overaging on Solute Distributions and Bake Hardening Phenomenon in Bake Hardening Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hua; SHI Wen; HE Yan-lin; LU Xiao-gang; LI Lin

    2012-01-01

    Specimens of two different kinds of bake hardening steels (BH-Mn and BH-P) were prepared and treated with different annealing processes (water quenching and overaging). A novel technique of three dimensional atom probe was used to investigate solute distributions in these steels. The results indicate that C concentration decreases, whereas V increases during overaging in both bake hardening steels. The conclusion that no vanadium carbides pre- cipitate during the overaging is therefore originally obtained by microanalysis in bake hardening steels. Moreover, bake hardening values of all the specimens were tested by tensile experiments with 2 0/~ pre-deformation. However, those of overaged specimens were further measured with higher levels of pre-deformation because no bake hardening phenomenon was present at 2% pre-deformation. As the pre-deformation increases from 2% to 6% and 8%, both overaged steels show bake hardening values, and the value data are almost the same.

  14. Mineral metabolism in cats

    OpenAIRE

    Pineda Martos, Carmen María

    2014-01-01

    The present Doctoral Thesis wa metabolism in the feline species. Through a series of studies, the relationship between calcium metabolism and the main hormones involved in it has been determined metabolism during the juvenile stage of growing cats effects linked to feeding calculolytic diets on feline mineral metabolism. The first part of the work was aimed the quantification of intact (I-PTH) and whole PTH) and to characterize the dynamics of PTH secretion, including ...

  15. The Lazarus phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The Lazarus phenomenon or the unassisted return of spontaneous circulation after cardiac arrest is a grossly underreported phenomenon in medical literature which essentially implies the ‘resurrection’ of an individual after cardiac arrest. Although there have been a handful of such cases reported, the clinical incidence and significance may be underestimated. Because of the presumed infrequency of this condition, there are no studies specifically researching Lazarus phenomenon in scientific literature. This review intends to systematically present current and past knowledge on this rare but definitive phenomenon. Research databases namely Google Scholar, Science Direct, Medline and PubMed were utilized. Only articles which identified cases where the return of spontaneous circulation occurred after cessation of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR), and review articles on the entity were included. The mentioned databases were searched using the terms ‘Lazarus phenomenon’, ‘cardiopulmonary resuscitation’ and ‘return of spontaneous circulation’. A literature review was synthesised based on articles meeting the eligibility criteria to better understand the phenomenon of return of spontaneous circulation. PMID:27540490

  16. Effect of Polyprenyl Immunostimulant on the survival times of three cats with the dry form of feline infectious peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legendre, Alfred M; Bartges, Joseph W

    2009-08-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is considered a fatal disease. Three cats with dry form FIP were treated with Polyprenyl Immunostimulant. Two of the three cats are still on treatment and are alive and well 2 years after diagnosis. The third cat survived 14 months but was treated for only 4.5 months. Further studies are necessary to assess the potential of the Polyprenyl Immunostimulant.

  17. Effect of vagus nerve stimulation on electrical kindling in different stages of seizure severity in freely moving cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdaleno-Madrigal, Víctor Manuel; Valdés-Cruz, Alejandro; Martínez-Vargas, David; Almazán-Alvarado, Salvador; Fernández-Mas, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is an adjunctive therapy for treating pharmacoresistant epilepsy. The present study analyze the effect of VNS on the epileptic activity of amygdala kindling (AK) in different seizure severity stages in freely moving cats. Fourteen adult male cats were used and were stereotaxically implanted in both amygdalae, in thalamic reticular nuclei and in prefrontal cortices. AK was developed by the application of 60Hz pulse trains that were one second in duration. VNS was applied the following day after the first stages were reached. This stimulation consisted of 10 pulse trains in the one-hour period (1min on/5min off) prior to AK. AK stimulation continued until all animals reached stage VI. The behavioral changes induced by VNS were transient and bearable. The animals showed relaxation of the nictitating membrane, ipsilateral anisocoria, swallowing and licking. Intermittent VNS application in stage I induced a delay in AK progression. The effect of VNS on the amygdala afterdischarge duration (AD) did not change progressively. VNS in stages II, III, and IV does not have an inhibitory effect on AK, and the AD further exhibited a progressive development. At the end of the generalized seizures, the animals presented with synchronized bilateral discharges of the spike-wave type (3Hz) and a behavioral "staring spell". Our results show that VNS applied during the different stages of seizure severity exerts an anti-epileptogenic effect in stage I but no anti-epileptogenic effect in stages II, III, and IV. These results suggest that VNS applied at stage I of kindling induces a delay of generalized convulsive activity.

  18. Study on the noncoincidence effect phenomenon using matrix isolated Raman spectra and the proposed structural organization model of acetone in condense phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenwen; Wu, Fengqi; Zhao, Yanying; Zhou, Ran; Wang, Huigang; Zheng, Xuming; Ni, Bukuo

    2017-03-01

    The isotropic and anisotropic Raman spectra of acetone and deuterated acetone isolated in an argon matrix have been recorded for the understanding of noncoincidence effect (NCE) phenomenon. According to the matrix isolated Raman spectra and DFT calculations, we proposed aggregated model for the explanations of the acetone C=O vibration NCE phenomenon and its concentration effect. The experimental data were in consistence with the DFT calculations performed at the B3LYP-D3/6-311 G (d,p) levels based on the proposed model. The experimental identification of the monomer, dimer and trimer are reported here, and the dynamic of the transformation from monomer to aggregated structure can be easily controlled by tuning annealing temperature.

  19. Is effective a prior multiparametric magnetic resonance scan in patients candidates to prostate biopsy? CAT Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos Rodríguez, J R; Molinero Pérez, M; Herrera Imbroda, B; Domínguez Pinos, M D

    2016-01-01

    We carried out a critically appraised topic (CAT)-type study to determine whether the relevant scientific evidence supports the recommendation of doing a multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging study of the prostate in all patients who are candidates for prostate biopsy with the aim of improving the detection of clinically significant prostate cancer and stratifying patients to receive active surveillance or treatment. After a formal literature search and an analysis of the two most relevant articles it found, we reached the conclusion that, despite promising results that point to the potential usefulness of this approach, there is still not enough clear scientific evidence to endorse it categorically. Before this approach can be endorsed, we need evidence from well-designed prospective randomized trials using widely agreed upon criteria and including large numbers of patients at multiple centers.

  20. The fecal microbiome in cats with diarrhea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan S Suchodolski

    Full Text Available Recent studies have revealed that microbes play an important role in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal (GI diseases in various animal species, but only limited data is available about the microbiome in cats with GI disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the fecal microbiome in cats with diarrhea. Fecal samples were obtained from healthy cats (n = 21 and cats with acute (n = 19 or chronic diarrhea (n = 29 and analyzed by sequencing of 16S rRNA genes, and PICRUSt was used to predict the functional gene content of the microbiome. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA effect size (LEfSe revealed significant differences in bacterial groups between healthy cats and cats with diarrhea. The order Burkholderiales, the families Enterobacteriaceae, and the genera Streptococcus and Collinsella were significantly increased in diarrheic cats. In contrast the order Campylobacterales, the family Bacteroidaceae, and the genera Megamonas, Helicobacter, and Roseburia were significantly increased in healthy cats. Phylum Bacteroidetes was significantly decreased in cats with chronic diarrhea (>21 days duration, while the class Erysipelotrichi and the genus Lactobacillus were significantly decreased in cats with acute diarrhea. The observed changes in bacterial groups were accompanied by significant differences in functional gene contents: metabolism of fatty acids, biosynthesis of glycosphingolipids, metabolism of biotin, metabolism of tryptophan, and ascorbate and aldarate metabolism, were all significantly (p<0.001 altered in cats with diarrhea. In conclusion, significant differences in the fecal microbiomes between healthy cats and cats with diarrhea were identified. This dysbiosis was accompanied by changes in bacterial functional gene categories. Future studies are warranted to evaluate if these microbial changes correlate with changes in fecal concentrations of microbial metabolites in cats with diarrhea for the identification of potential diagnostic or

  1. Effects of an oral superoxide dismutase enzyme supplementation on indices of oxidative stress, proviral load, and CD4:CD8 ratios in asymptomatic FIV-infected cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Craig B; Lehman, Tracy L; McCord, Kelly W

    2008-10-01

    This study was designed to test the effect of antioxidant supplementation on feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-infected felines. Six acutely FIV-infected cats (> or =16 weeks post-inoculation) were given a propriety oral superoxide dismutase (SOD) supplement (Oxstrin; Nutramax Laboratories) for 30 days. Following supplementation, the erythrocyte SOD enzyme concentration was significantly greater in the supplemented FIV-infected group than the uninfected control group or the unsupplemented FIV-infected group. The CD4+ to CD8+ ratio increased significantly (0.66-0.88) in the SOD supplemented FIV-infected cats but not in the unsupplemented FIV-infected cats. Proviral load and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels in leukocyte cell types did not change significantly following supplementation. Antioxidant supplementation resulted in an increase in SOD levels, confirming the oral bioavailability of the compound in FIV-infected cats. This result warrants further investigation with trials of antioxidant therapy in FIV-infected cats that are showing clinical manifestations of their disease, as well as in other feline patients where oxidative stress likely contributes to disease pathogenesis, such as diabetes mellitus and chronic renal failure.

  2. Asphalts’ aging phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiomara Vargas

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a state of the art revision of the results from studies of asphalt aging found by researchers aimed at deepening understanding of this complex phenomenon. The background shows the evolution of asphalt aging, initially considering it as physical hardening and progressively ecognizing it as a complex phenomenon having repercussions on asphalt durability and physical-chemical properties. This document aims to be a guide for understanding future investigations for developing new types and mixtures of asphalt having improved properties.

  3. [Phenomenon of dental fear].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R; Birn, H

    1990-01-01

    Odontophobia is a rather unique phobia with special psychosomatic components that impact on the dental health of odontophobic persons. It also has psychosocial components largely as a result of destruction of the teeth and subsequent embarrassment that can affect a person and cause a vicious cycle of dental fear. The phenomenon is facilitated by misunderstandings and myths generated by both patients and dentists. The most common reasons given in the literature for such strong fears of dental treatment are: 1) bad experiences in childhood for 85% of cases, 2) feeling of powerlessness and lack of control over personal emotional reactions and over the social situation in the dental chair, 3) social learning processes in which the image of the dentist is cast in a negative light by the mass media or by the person's relatives or friends and 4) that the person has other psychologic problems (in 20% of cases), such as serious phobias and/or neuroses. A strategy of researching and thus tackling the problem is presented which focuses on three essential targets that require studying and change: 1) the community at large and their image of the dentist, 2) the patient role and 3) the dentist role. Various model projects are presented along with their diagnostic systems. These are seen to focus in varying degrees on different elements of the target groups that effect the dentist-patient relationship but the need to come out into the community and make the social environment right for these patients is an important factor in all strategies.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Effects in cats of atipamezole, flumazenil and 4-aminopyridine on stress-related neurohormonal and metabolic responses induced by medetomidine, midazolam and ketamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueoka, Naotami; Hikasa, Yoshiaki

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the antagonistic effects of a fixed dose of atipamezole (ATI), flumazenil (FLU) and 4-aminopyridine (4AP), both alone and in various combinations, on key stress-related neurohormonal and metabolic changes induced by medetomidine (MED), midazolam (MID) and ketamine (KET) in healthy cats. Seven cats were used consistently in eight investigation groups. Cats were administered a mixture of 0.05 mg/kg MED and 0.5 mg/kg MID followed 10 mins later by 10 mg/kg KET intramuscularly. Twenty minutes after KET injection, the cats were intravenously injected with either a physiological saline solution at 0.1 ml/kg (control) or one of the seven variations of experimental drugs, alone or in combination: ATI, FLU, 4AP, ATI + FLU, FLU + 4AP, ATI + 4AP and ATI + FLU + 4AP. Blood samples were collected 10 times during the 24 h test period. Plasma glucose, insulin, cortisol, epinephrine, norepinephrine and non-esterified fatty acid levels were measured. The administration of MED + MID + KET resulted in hyperglycaemia and decreases in epinephrine, norepinephrine, cortisol and non-esterified fatty acid levels. FLU or 4AP alone or FLU + 4AP did not effectively antagonise the effects induced by MED + MID + KET but enhanced the hyperglycaemia. ATI alone was effective in antagonising these effects. Compared with non-ATI regimens, combinations with ATI were more effective in antagonising the effects induced by MED + MID + KET; however, ATI + FLU + 4AP caused large increases in cortisol, epinephrine and norepinephrine concentrations. ATI, both alone and in combination, is effective in antagonising the neurohormonal and metabolic effects of MED + MID + KET in cats. However, ATI + FLU + 4AP is not suitable because of large stress-related hormonal responses.

  5. Mask Phenomenon in Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郎丽璇

    2013-01-01

    People sometimes wear masks. Abusive expression may be used to convey love while polite words can be exchanged among enemies. This essay describes and discusses this special phenomenon in communication and analyzes the elements that con-tribute to the success of a mask communication.

  6. Opinions from the front lines of cat colony management conflict.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Nils Peterson

    Full Text Available Outdoor cats represent a global threat to terrestrial vertebrate conservation, but management has been rife with conflict due to differences in views of the problem and appropriate responses to it. To evaluate these differences we conducted a survey of opinions about outdoor cats and their management with two contrasting stakeholder groups, cat colony caretakers (CCCs and bird conservation professionals (BCPs across the United States. Group opinions were polarized, for both normative statements (CCCs supported treating feral cats as protected wildlife and using trap neuter and release [TNR] and BCPs supported treating feral cats as pests and using euthanasia and empirical statements. Opinions also were related to gender, age, and education, with females and older respondents being less likely than their counterparts to support treating feral cats as pests, and females being less likely than males to support euthanasia. Most CCCs held false beliefs about the impacts of feral cats on wildlife and the impacts of TNR (e.g., 9% believed feral cats harmed bird populations, 70% believed TNR eliminates cat colonies, and 18% disagreed with the statement that feral cats filled the role of native predators. Only 6% of CCCs believed feral cats carried diseases. To the extent the beliefs held by CCCs are rooted in lack of knowledge and mistrust, rather than denial of directly observable phenomenon, the conservation community can manage these conflicts more productively by bringing CCCs into the process of defining data collection methods, defining study/management locations, and identifying common goals related to caring for animals.

  7. The effect of changing the moisture levels of dry extruded and wet canned diets on physical activity in cats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, D.G.; Post, M.; Bosch, G.

    2017-01-01

    Obesity levels in cats are increasing and the main causative factor is higher energy intake v. energy expenditure over time. Therefore, altering energy expenditure by enhancing physical activity of the cat could be a strategy to reduce obesity. Hydrating commercial dry diets with water increased

  8. The effects of surfactants on the lateral migration of bubbles and the bubble clustering phenomenon in a bubbly channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Shu; Ogasawara, Toshiyuki; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2004-11-01

    The behaviors of bubbles in an upward channel flow are experimentally investigated. Two kinds of surfactant, 3-pentanol and Triton X-100 are added in the bubbly flow. Addition of surfactant prevents the bubble coalescence and mono-dispersed 1mm spherical bubbles were obtained, although these surfactants do not modify the single-phase turbulence statistics. At the condition of high Reynolds number (Re=8200) with 20-60ppm 3-Pentanol, bubbles migrated towards the wall. These bubbles highly accumulated near the wall and formed crescent like shaped horizontal bubble clusters of 10-40mm length. On the other hand, bubble clusters did not appear in the 2ppm Triton-X100 aqueous solution. By the addition of the small amount of Triton-X100, bubble coalescences were also preventable and the bubble size and its distribution became almost the same as in the case of 60ppm 3-Pentanol aqueous solution. However, the tendency of the lateral migration of bubbles towards the wall weakened and the bubbles did not accumulated near the wall. And this is the main reason of the disapperance of bubble cluster. We discuss this phenomenon, related to the lift force acting on bubbles and particles.

  9. Effect of Contrast on Visual Spatial Summation in Different Cell Categories in Cat Primary Visual Cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Chen

    Full Text Available Multiple cell classes have been found in the primary visual cortex, but the relationship between cell types and spatial summation has seldom been studied. Parvalbumin-expressing inhibitory interneurons can be distinguished from pyramidal neurons based on their briefer action potential durations. In this study, we classified V1 cells into fast-spiking units (FSUs and regular-spiking units (RSUs and then examined spatial summation at high and low contrast. Our results revealed that the excitatory classical receptive field and the suppressive non-classical receptive field expanded at low contrast for both FSUs and RSUs, but the expansion was more marked for the RSUs than for the FSUs. For most V1 neurons, surround suppression varied as the contrast changed from high to low. However, FSUs exhibited no significant difference in the strength of suppression between high and low contrast, although the overall suppression decreased significantly at low contrast for the RSUs. Our results suggest that the modulation of spatial summation by stimulus contrast differs across populations of neurons in the cat primary visual cortex.

  10. The effect of cumulus cells on domestic cat (Felis catus) oocytes during in vitro maturation and fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowińska, N; Frankowska, K; Filipczyk, A; Adamaszek, A; Nalik, K; Fic, K; Pietsch-Fulbiszewska, A

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of co-culture of denuded oocytes with cumulus cells (CC) or cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) on in vitro maturation (IVM) and in vitro fertilization (IVF). Immature oocytes were collected from ovaries of domestic cats following a routine ovariectomy. Oocytes were matured in vitro for 24 hr within four groups: (i) denuded oocytes (DO), (ii) DO co-cultured with CC, (iii) DO co-cultured with COC and (iv) COC as a control group. In further experiments, COCs were matured in vitro for 24 hr, and then, oocytes were randomly divided into four groups as previously described and fertilized in vitro. Embryos were cultured for up to 7 days. At the end of each experiment, oocytes/embryos were stained with Hoechst 33342 solution and observed under an inverted fluorescence microscope. The results of oocyte maturation showed that their meiotic competence decreased significantly in all experimental groups, compared to the control group. The maturation rates were approximately 45%, 24%, 43% and 76% in experiment 1, and 21%, 14%, 33% and 50% in experiment 2 in groups (i), (ii), (iii) and (iv), respectively. Examination of in vitro fertilization revealed that embryos developed up to the morula stage in all experimental groups. DO and oocytes cultured with COC during fertilization showed a lower cleavage rate-36% and 25% as opposed to those co-cultured with loose CC and the control group-43% and 42%, respectively. Results of this study indicate that cumulus cells connected with an oocyte into a cumulus-oocyte complex are irreplaceable for the maturation of domestic cat oocyte, but that the addition of loose CC may be beneficial for IVF. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. Sedative and analgesic effects of buprenorphine, combined with either acepromazine or dexmedetomidine, for premedication prior to elective surgery in cats and dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, James R; Grint, Nicola J; Taylor, Polly M; Murrell, Joanna C

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate the sedative and analgesic effects of intramuscular buprenorphine with either dexmedetomidine or acepromazine, administered as premedication to cats and dogs undergoing elective surgery. Prospective, randomized, blinded clinical study. Forty dogs and 48 cats. Animals were assigned to one of four groups, according to anaesthetic premedication and induction agent: buprenorphine 20 μg kg(-1) with either dexmedetomidine (dex) 250 μg m(-2) or acepromazine (acp) 0.03 mg kg(-1), followed by alfaxalone (ALF) or propofol (PRO). Meloxicam was administered preoperatively to all animals and anaesthesia was always maintained using isoflurane. Physiological measures and assessments of pain, sedation and mechanical nociceptive threshold (MNT) were made before and after premedication, intraoperatively, and for up to 24 hours after premedication. Data were analyzed with one-way, two-way and mixed between-within subjects anova, Kruskall-Wallis analyses and Chi squared tests. Results were deemed significant if p ≤ 0.05, except where multiple comparisons were performed (p ≤ 0.005). Cats premedicated with dex were more sedated than cats premedicated with acp (p cats (1.2 ± 1.0 mg kg(-1) ) than acp cats (2.5 ± 1.9 mg kg(-1)) (p = 0.041). There were no differences in sedation in dogs however PRO doses were lower in dex dogs (1.5 ± 0.8 mg kg(-1) ) compared to acp dogs (3.3 ± 1.1 mg kg(-1) ) (p cats or dogs. Choice of dex or acp, when given with buprenorphine, caused minor, clinically detectable, differences in various characteristics of anaesthesia, but not in the level of analgesia. A combination of buprenorphine with either acp or dex, followed by either PRO or ALF, and then isoflurane, accompanied by an NSAID, was suitable for anaesthesia in dogs and cats undergoing elective surgery. Choice of sedative agent may influence dose of anaesthetic induction agent. © 2012 The Authors. Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia © 2012 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists

  12. Raynaud's phenomenon in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega Vicente, Elena; Garrido Redondo, Mercedes

    Raynaud's Phenomenon is caused by spasm of the small arteries and arterioles of the fingers. It is triggered by various stimuli including exposure to cold or a stressful event. It may be symmetrical or wrap one end. The appearance of this entity in children is rare. We report the case of a 4 year old male consultation health center by episodes of coldness, pallor and pain in both feet.

  13. Effect of histologic processing on dimensions of skin samples obtained from cat cadavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyakumar, Sakthila; Smith, Annette N; Schleis, Stephanie E; Cattley, Russell C; Tillson, D Michael; Henderson, Ralph A

    2015-11-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine changes in dimensions of feline skin samples as a result of histologic processing and to identify factors that contributed to changes in dimensions of skin samples after sample collection. SAMPLE Cadavers of 12 clinically normal cats. PROCEDURES Skin samples were obtained bilaterally from 3 locations (neck, thorax, and tibia) of each cadaver; half of the thoracic samples included underlying muscle. Length, width, and depth were measured at 5 time points (before excision, after excision, after application of ink to mark tissue margins, after fixation in neutral-buffered 10% formalin for 36 hours, and after completion of histologic processing and staining with H&E stain). Measurements obtained after sample collection were compared with measurements obtained before excision. RESULTS At the final time point, tissue samples had decreased in length (mean decrease, 32.40%) and width (mean decrease, 34.21%) and increased in depth (mean increase, 54.95%). Tissue from the tibia had the most shrinkage in length and width and that from the neck had the least shrinkage. Inclusion of underlying muscle on thoracic skin samples did not affect the degree of change in dimensions. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In this study, each step during processing from excision to formalin fixation and histologic processing induced changes in tissue dimensions, which were manifested principally as shrinkage in length and width and increase in depth. Most of the changes occured during histologic processing. Inclusion of muscle did not affect thoracic skin shrinkage. Shrinkage should be a consideration when interpreting surgical margins in clinical cases. 945).

  14. Ricinoleic acid and loperamide have opposite motor effects in the small and large intestine of the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienbeck, M; Wallenfels, M; Kortenhaus, E

    1987-07-01

    The actions of laxatives and antidiarrheal agents in the gut are incompletely understood. Therefore, the effects of Na ricinoleate 10(-4)-10(-2) g/kg b. w. and of loperamide 10(-4) g/kg b. w. on myoelectric activity and marker propulsion were studied in the small and large intestine of 7 unanesthetized cats. Intraduodenal application of ricinoleate briefly increased and then decreased spike activity in the small intestine; marker transit was delayed (92 +/- 18 min vs. 55 +/- 14 min in controls). Ricinoleate also initiated spike complexes of 10-215 sec duration. Transit from the right to the left colon was sometimes accelerated and sometimes delayed. The number of uncoupled slow waves was increased to 278% of control. Loperamide accelerated small intestinal transit to 17 +/- 6 min and markedly delayed it in the colon. At the same time it caused a strong and prolonged rise in colonic spike activity. When ricinoleate and loperamide were given together, their effects almost compensated for each other. The resulting net effect was similar to the data in the control experiments. It is concluded that laxatives and antidiarrheal agents alter not only transit, but also myoelectric activity in the small and large intestine. The effects are largely in opposite direction. Loperamide may, therefore, antagonize motor effects of ricinoleate in the gut.

  15. Born to roam? Surveying cat owners in Tasmania, Australia, to identify the drivers and barriers to cat containment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Lynette J; Hine, Donald W; Bengsen, Andrew J

    2015-12-01

    Free-roaming domestic cats, Felis catus, are a major public nuisance in neighbourhoods across the world, and have been linked to biodiversity loss and a host of community health problems. Owners who let their cats roam, also place their cats at risk of serious injury. One management strategy that is gaining considerable support involves encouraging cat owners to contain their pets within their property. Contemporary behaviour change models highlight the importance of identifying drivers and barriers that encourage and discourage target behaviours such as cat containment. Results from a random dial phone survey of 356 cat owners in northern Tasmania identified four distinct cat containment profiles: owners who contained their cat all the time, owners who only contained their cat at night, owners who sporadically contained their cat with no set routine, and owners who made no attempt to contain their pet. Our results indicated that cat-owners' decisions to contain or not contain their cats were guided by a range of factors including owners' beliefs about their ability to implement an effective containment strategy and their views about the physical and psychological needs of their cats. The results are discussed in terms of improving the behavioural effectiveness of cat containment interventions by selecting appropriate behavioural change tools for the identified drivers and barriers, and developing targeted engagement strategies and messaging.

  16. Comparison of the effects of stimulating groups of static gamma axons with different conduction velocity ranges on cat spindles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emonet-Dénand, F; Laporte, Y; Petit, J

    2001-07-01

    In cat peroneus tertius muscles, static gamma axons were prepared in groups of three to four according to the conduction velocity of their axons (fast, intermediate, or slow). Effects of stimulating these groups (at 20, 30, and 50 Hz) on spindle ensemble discharges during sinusoidal stretch (peak-to-peak amplitude, 0.5 mm; frequency linearly increasing from 0.5 to 8 Hz in 10 s) were compared. Ensemble discharges were obtained by digital treatment of the discharges in afferent fibers from all the spindles in peroneus tertius as recorded from the muscle nerve. Stimulation of each group prevented ensemble discharges from falling to very low levels during shortening phases. However, this effect was clearly larger when the group of fast-conducting axons was stimulated. In view of the known effects of the activation of bag(2) and chain fibers (either separately or together) on single primary ending discharges during comparable sinusoidal stretches, this stronger effect supports the view that static gamma axons with faster conduction velocities are more likely to supply more bag(2) fibers than slower ones. Possibly the proportions of bag(2) and chain fibers activated during motor activity are determined by a recruitment of static gamma motoneurons related to their size.

  17. Effect of biofeedback and deep oscillation on Raynaud's phenomenon secondary to systemic sclerosis: results of a controlled prospective randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporbeck, Birte; Mathiske-Schmidt, Kirsten; Jahr, Silke; Huscher, Dörte; Becker, Mike; Riemekasten, Gabriela; Taufmann, Ines; Burmester, Gerd-Rüdiger; Pögel, Stephanie; Reisshauer, Anett

    2012-05-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the effect of deep oscillation and biofeedback on Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) secondary to systemic sclerosis (SSc). A prospective randomized study was performed in SSc patients receiving either deep oscillation (n = 10) or biofeedback (n = 8) thrice a week for 4 weeks, or patients were randomized into the waiting group untreated for vasculopathy (n = 10) in time of running the study interventions. Biofeedback resulted in an improvement of RP as determined by score reduction of visual analogue scale compared with patients of the control group (P physiotherapy for the treatment of SSc-related RP.

  18. A Placebo-Controlled Study on the Effects of the Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Mimetic, Exenatide, on Insulin Secretion, Body Composition and Adipokines in Obese, Client-Owned Cats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoelmkjaer, Kirsten M.; Albrechtsen, Nicolai J. Wewer; Holst, Jens J.;

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like Peptide-1 mimetics increase insulin secretion and reduces body weight in humans. In lean, healthy cats, short-term treatment has produced similar results, whereas the effect in obese cats or with extended duration of treatment is unknown. Here, prolonged (12 weeks) treatment...... with the Glucagon-like Peptide-1 mimetic, exenatide, was evaluated in 12 obese, but otherwise healthy, client-owned cats. Cats were randomized to exenatide (1.0 μg/kg) or placebo treatment twice daily for 12 weeks. The primary endpoint was changes in insulin concentration; the secondary endpoints were glucose...... by exenatide (P>0.05). Twelve weeks of exenatide was well-tolerated, with only two cases of mild, self-limiting gastrointestinal signs and a single case of mild hypoglycemia. The long-term insulinotropic effect of exenatide appeared less pronounced in obese cats compared to previous short-term studies in lean...

  19. A Placebo-Controlled Study on the Effects of the Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Mimetic, Exenatide, on Insulin Secretion, Body Composition and Adipokines in Obese, Client-Owned Cats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoelmkjaer, Kirsten M.; Albrechtsen, Nicolai Jacob Wewer; Holst, Jens Juul

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like Peptide-1 mimetics increase insulin secretion and reduces body weight in humans. In lean, healthy cats, short-term treatment has produced similar results, whereas the effect in obese cats or with extended duration of treatment is unknown. Here, prolonged (12 weeks) treatment...... with the Glucagon-like Peptide-1 mimetic, exenatide, was evaluated in 12 obese, but otherwise healthy, client-owned cats. Cats were randomized to exenatide (1.0 μg/kg) or placebo treatment twice daily for 12 weeks. The primary endpoint was changes in insulin concentration; the secondary endpoints were glucose...... by exenatide (P>0.05). Twelve weeks of exenatide was well-tolerated, with only two cases of mild, self-limiting gastrointestinal signs and a single case of mild hypoglycemia. The long-term insulinotropic effect of exenatide appeared less pronounced in obese cats compared to previous short-term studies in lean...

  20. Birds be safe: Can a novel cat collar reduce avian mortality by domestic cats (Felis catus?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.K. Willson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The domestic cat (Felis catus has been described as the largest anthropogenic threat to songbird populations in North America. We examined the effectiveness of a novel cat collar in reducing avian and small mammal mortality by cats. The 2-inch wide Birdsbesafe® collar cover (CC is worn over a nylon quick-release collar, and the bright colors and patterns of the CC are hypothesized to warn birds of approaching cats. We conducted two seasonal trials, each lasting 12 weeks, in autumn 2013 (n=54 cats and spring 2014 (n=19 cats. Cats were randomly assigned to two groups, and CCs with interior collars were removed or put on every two weeks, to control for weather fluctuations and seasonal change. Cats wearing Birdsbesafe® CCs killed 19 times fewer birds than uncollared cats in the spring trial, and 3.4 times fewer birds in the fall. Birdsbesafe® CCs were extremely effective at reducing predation on birds. Small mammal data were less clear, but did decrease predation by half in the fall. The Birdsbesafe® CC is a highly effective device for decreasing bird predation, especially in the spring season. We suggest that the CCs be used as a conservation tool for owned as well as feral cats.

  1. Incidence of pyometra in Swedish insured cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagman, Ragnvi; Ström Holst, Bodil; Möller, Lotta; Egenvall, Agneta

    2014-07-01

    Pyometra is a clinically relevant problem in intact female cats and dogs. The etiology is similar in both animal species, with the disease caused by bacterial infection of a progesterone-sensitized uterus. Here, we studied pyometra in cats with the aim to describe the incidence and probability of developing pyometra based on age and breed. The data used were reimbursed claims for veterinary care insurance or life insurance claims or both in cats insured in a Swedish insurance database from 1999 to 2006. The mean incidence rate (IR) for pyometra was about 17 cats per 10,000 cat years at risk (CYAR). Cats with pyometra were diagnosed at a median age of 4 years and a significant breed effect was observed. The breed with the highest IR (433 cats per 10,000 CYAR) was the Sphynx, and other breeds with IR over 60 cats per 10,000 CYAR were Siberian cat, Ocicat, Korat, Siamese, Ragdoll, Maine coon, and Bengal. Pyometra was more commonly diagnosed with increasing age, with a marked increase in cats older than 7 years. The mean case fatality rate in all cats was 5.7%, which is slightly higher than corresponding reports in dogs of 3% to 4%. Geographical location (urban or rural) did not affect the risk of developing the disease. The present study provides information of incidence and probability of developing pyometra based on age, breed, and urban or rural geographical location. These data may be useful for designing cat breeding programs in high-risk breeds and for future studies of the genetic background of the disease. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of Speech Intensity on the Callsign Acquisition Test (CAT) and Modified Rhyme Test (MRT) Presented in Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    research and practice. One of the more recent English language SI tests is the Callsign Acquisition Test (CAT) developed by the United States Army...reliable scores (Rao, Letowski, 2006; Howes, 1957). The CAT combines two-syllable words based on the phonetic alphabet with one syllable numeric digits...were made at the U.S. Army Research Labora- tory by the same native English male talker speaking with a Midwestern accent. The listeners were familiar

  3. An Ecological Approach to Learning with Technology: Responding to Tensions within the "Wow-Effect" Phenomenon in Teaching Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herro, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    This review explores Anne Kamstrupp's "The Wow-effect in Science Teacher Education" by examining her theorized "wow-effect" as a teaching enactment that may serve to engage students, but often fails to provide deep understanding of science content. My response extends her perspective of socio-materiality as means to understand…

  4. Effects of age at cordotomy and subsequent exercise on contraction times of motor units in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L A; Eldred, E; Edgerton, V R

    1993-12-01

    The contraction times (CTs) of functionally isolated motor units (MUs) in the soleus (SOL) and medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscles were determined in cats that had been spinalized at ages 2 (n = 15) or 12 (n = 9) wk and then either subjected to exercise on a treadmill or simply given manipulative care of the hindlimbs. The MUs were tested approximately 12 wk after the low-thoracic cordotomy, and comparisons were made with data from control animals. The CT of 50.9 ms obtained for SOL units (n = 163) in the spinal cats was 22% shorter than the mean of 65.0 ms for MUs (n = 57) from control cats (n = 4). Contrary to expectation, the CT in animals spinalized at 12 wk was significantly shorter than that in the 2-wk group. The CT for MG units (n = 105) in spinal cats was also significantly shorter (11%) than that in controls cats (n = 66, 6 cats), and those units identified by their high fatigue index as being of slow or fatigue-resistant type had a shorter CT than units with a low index. No distinction in CT of exercised and nonexercised groups was detected for either muscle. These findings are discussed in relation to the bearing influences of supraspinal and segmental origin have on CT duration in SOL and MG muscles during growth of the kitten. A slight, significant decrease (6%) in the fatigue index of SOL MUs (n = 144) was detected, but the values remained high (mean 0.87).

  5. Quantum Computer Games: Schrodinger Cat and Hounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

    2012-01-01

    The quantum computer game "Schrodinger cat and hounds" is the quantum extension of the well-known classical game fox and hounds. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. "Schrodinger cat and hounds" demonstrates the effects of superposition, destructive and constructive interference, measurements and…

  6. Quantum Computer Games: Schrodinger Cat and Hounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

    2012-01-01

    The quantum computer game "Schrodinger cat and hounds" is the quantum extension of the well-known classical game fox and hounds. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. "Schrodinger cat and hounds" demonstrates the effects of superposition, destructive and constructive interference, measurements and…

  7. A Catalogue of Anatomical Fugitive Sheets: Cat. 1-10

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    Images Cat. 1 Cat. 2 (a) Cat. 2 (b) Cat. 2 (c) Cat. 2 (d) Cat. 2 (e) Cat. 2 (f) Cat. 3: 1 (a) Cat. 3: 1 (b) Cat. 3: 2 (a) Cat. 3: 2 (b) Cat. 4: 1 Cat. 4: 2 Cat. 6: 1 (a) Cat. 6: 1 (b) Cat. 6: 2 (a) Cat. 6: 2 (b) Cat. 7: 1 (a) Cat. 7: 1 (b) Cat. 7: 2 (a) Cat. 7: 2 (b) Cat. 8: 1 Cat. 9: 1 Cat. 9: 2 Cat. 10: 1 Cat. 10: 2

  8. Provocation of aspiration reflexes and their effects on the pattern of cough and reflex apnea in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poliacek, I; Tomori, Z; Simera, M; Barani, H; Visnovcova, N; Halasova, E; Donic, V; Jakus, J

    2009-11-01

    Aspiration reflexes (AspRs) manifesting as reflex spasmodic inspirations and their effects on motor pattern of tracheobronchial cough and reflex apnea were studied on 22 spontaneously breathing pentobarbitone-anesthetized cats. AspRs induced during cough inspiration enhanced peak inspiratory (P<0.01) and expiratory (P<0.02) esophageal pressures, amplitudes of diaphragm (P<0.01) and abdominal muscles (P<0.05) EMG activity, and prolonged the entire expiratory period (P<0.01) and total cycle duration (P<0.05) of cough. Transient inhibitions and splits of cough expiration frequently occurred with AspR within active cough expiratory period; however, cough spatiotemporal characteristics were not altered significantly. Sub-threshold nasopharyngeal stimulation failing to provoke AspR had no significant effects on coughing. Hering-Breuer inflation apnea was moderately prolonged by AspRs (20%; P<0.05), unlike the apnea produced by continual mechanical laryngeal stimulation. AspRs are inducible during tested behaviors interacting with their motor pattern. Central mechanisms involving pulmonary stretch receptor stimulation is suggested for modulation of cough and inflation apnea by AspR.

  9. Harmful Algal Blooms in Asia: an insidious and escalating water pollution phenomenon with effects on ecological and human health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia M Glibert

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs, those proliferations of algae that causeenvironmental, economic, or human health problems, are increasing in frequency,duration, and geographic extent due to nutrient pollution. The scale of the HABproblem in Asia has escalated in recent decades in parallel with the increase in useof agricultural fertilizer, the development of aquaculture, and a growing population.Three examples, all from China but illustrative of the diversity of events and theirecological, economic, and human health effects throughout Asia, are highlightedhere. These examples include inland (Lake Tai or Taihu as well as offshore (EastChina Sea and Yellow Sea waters. The future outlook for controlling these bloomsis bleak. The effects of advancing industrialized agriculture and a continually growingpopulation will continue to result in more nutrient pollution and more HABs—-and more effects - in the foreseeable future.

  10. The Effect of the Microstructure on Trap-Assisted Recombination and Light Soaking Phenomenon in Hybrid Perovskite Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shao, Shuyan; Abdu-Aguye, Mustapha; Sherkar, Tejas S.; Fang, Hong-Hua; Adjokatse, Sampson; ten Brink, Gert; Kooi, Bart J.; Koster, L. Jan Anton; Loi, Maria Antonietta

    2016-01-01

    Despite the rich experience gained in controlling the microstructure of perovskite films over the past several years, little is known about how the microstructure affects the device properties of perovskite solar cells (HPSCs). In this work, the effects of the perovskite film microstructure on the c

  11. The Effect of the Microstructure on Trap-Assisted Recombination and Light Soaking Phenomenon in Hybrid Perovskite Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shao, Shuyan; Abdu-Aguye, Mustapha; Sherkar, Tejas S.; Fang, Hong-Hua; Adjokatse, Sampson; ten Brink, Gert; Kooi, Bart J.; Koster, L. Jan Anton; Loi, Maria Antonietta

    2016-01-01

    Despite the rich experience gained in controlling the microstructure of perovskite films over the past several years, little is known about how the microstructure affects the device properties of perovskite solar cells (HPSCs). In this work, the effects of the perovskite film microstructure on the c

  12. The flicker phenomenon: causes, effects, limits, evaluation and correction; O fenomeno da cintilacao (flicker): causas, efeitos, limites, avaliacao e correcao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wierda, Rene [Schneider Electric (France)

    2003-08-01

    This paper analyzes the light flicker, and describes the voltage fluctuations induced by power variable loads in the lamps luminosity. The paper defines the visual discomfort and presents flicker measurement methods imposed by the normalization, including two calculation examples. The paper also shows the possible corrective actions for diminishing the effects.

  13. Negative Effects of Reward on Intrinsic Motivation--A Limited Phenomenon: Comment on Deci, Koestner, and Ryan (2001).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Judy

    2001-01-01

    Prior meta analyses by J. Cameron and other researchers suggested that the negative effects of extrinsic reward on intrinsic motivation were limited and avoidable. E. Deci and others (2001) suggested that the analyses were flawed. This commentary makes the case that there is no inherent negative property of reward. (SLD)

  14. Negative Effects of Reward on Intrinsic Motivation--A Limited Phenomenon: Comment on Deci, Koestner, and Ryan (2001).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Judy

    2001-01-01

    Prior meta analyses by J. Cameron and other researchers suggested that the negative effects of extrinsic reward on intrinsic motivation were limited and avoidable. E. Deci and others (2001) suggested that the analyses were flawed. This commentary makes the case that there is no inherent negative property of reward. (SLD)

  15. Photo-controllable thermoelectric properties with reversibility and photo-thermoelectric effects of tungsten trioxide accompanied by its photochromic phenomenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azuma, Chiori [Faculty of Engineering, University of Yamanashi, 4-3-11 Takeda, Kofu, Yamanashi 400-8511 (Japan); Kawano, Takuto [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, University of Yamanashi, 4-3-11 Takeda, Kofu, Yamanashi 400-8511 (Japan); Kakemoto, Hirofumi; Irie, Hiroshi, E-mail: hirie@yamanashi.ac.jp [Clean Energy Research Center, University of Yamanashi, 4-3-11 Takeda, Kofu, Yamanashi 400-8511 (Japan)

    2014-11-07

    The addition of photo-controllable properties to tungsten trioxide (WO{sub 3}) is of interest for developing practical applications of WO{sub 3} as well as for interpreting such phenomena from scientific viewpoints. Here, a sputtered crystalline WO{sub 3} thin film generated thermoelectric power due to ultraviolet (UV) light-induced band-gap excitation and was accompanied by a photochromic reaction resulting from generating W{sup 5+} ions. The thermoelectric properties (electrical conductivity (σ) and Seebeck coefficient (S)) and coloration of WO{sub 3} could be reversibly switched by alternating the external stimulus between UV light irradiation and dark storage. After irradiating the film with UV light, σ increased, whereas the absolute value of S decreased, and the photochromic (coloration) reaction was detected. Notably, the opposite behavior was exhibited by WO{sub 3} after dark storage, and this reversible cycle could be repeated at least three times. Moreover, photo-thermoelectric effects (photo-conductive effect (photo-conductivity, σ{sub photo}) and photo-Seebeck effect (photo-Seebeck coefficient, S{sub photo})) were also detected in response to visible-light irradiation of the colored WO{sub 3} thin films. Under visible-light irradiation, σ{sub photo} and the absolute value of S{sub photo} increased and decreased, respectively. These effects are likely attributable to the excitation of electrons from the mid-gap visible light absorption band (W{sup 5+} state) to the conduction band of WO{sub 3}. Our findings demonstrate that the simultaneous, reversible switching of multiple properties of WO{sub 3} thin film is achieved by the application of an external stimulus and that this material exhibits photo-thermoelectric effects when irradiated with visible-light.

  16. The statistical stability phenomenon

    CERN Document Server

    Gorban, Igor I

    2017-01-01

    This monograph investigates violations of statistical stability of physical events, variables, and processes and develops a new physical-mathematical theory taking into consideration such violations – the theory of hyper-random phenomena. There are five parts. The first describes the phenomenon of statistical stability and its features, and develops methods for detecting violations of statistical stability, in particular when data is limited. The second part presents several examples of real processes of different physical nature and demonstrates the violation of statistical stability over broad observation intervals. The third part outlines the mathematical foundations of the theory of hyper-random phenomena, while the fourth develops the foundations of the mathematical analysis of divergent and many-valued functions. The fifth part contains theoretical and experimental studies of statistical laws where there is violation of statistical stability. The monograph should be of particular interest to engineers...

  17. Modeling the effect of the stress demagnetization phenomenon on the magnetic properties in a no Fe-Si 3% sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakhlef Malika

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is the modeling of the stress demagnetization effect on the magnetic properties in a non-oriented Fe-Si 3% sheet under different external stresses. The magneto-mechanical model used for magnetic hysteresis is based on a model originally formulated by Sablik-Jiles-Atherthon (S.J.A.. This latter has been modified by including both the stress demagnetization factor and the eddy current effects. The influence of the stress demagnetization term SDT on the magnetostrictive behavior of the material is also modeled. The proposed model has been validated by extensive simulations at different stresses, namely compressive and tensile stresses. Simulation results obtained by this model are very close to those published in the literature. Using the proposed model, very satisfactory performance has been achieved.

  18. Role of twins in peak effect phenomenon observed at microwave frequencies in high Tc superconductor thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banerjee, Tamalika; Bagwe, V.C.; John, J.; Pai, S.P.; Kumara, K. Ganesh

    2004-01-01

    Measurements of microwave surface resistance, Rs, at subcritical currents as a function of temperature with varying dc magnetic field upto 0.8 T have shown peak effect (PE) in epitaxial DyBa2Cu3O7-δ (DBCO) and YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition on LaAlO3 substrates. Micro

  19. Coupled gas flow-plasma model for a gliding arc: investigations of the back-breakdown phenomenon and its effect on the gliding arc characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, S. R.; Kolev, St.; Wang, H. X.; Bogaerts, A.

    2017-01-01

    We present a 3D and 2D Cartesian quasi-neutral plasma model for a low current argon gliding arc discharge, including strong interactions between the gas flow and arc plasma column. The 3D model is applied only for a short time of 0.2 ms due to its huge computational cost. It mainly serves to verify the reliability of the 2D model. As the results in 2D compare well with those in 3D, they can be used for a better understanding of the gliding arc basic characteristics. More specifically, we investigate the back-breakdown phenomenon induced by an artificially controlled plasma channel, and we discuss its effect on the gliding arc characteristics. The back-breakdown phenomenon, or backward-jump motion of the arc, as observed in the experiments, results in a drop of the gas temperature, as well as in a delay of the arc velocity with respect to the gas flow velocity, allowing more gas to pass through the arc, and thus increasing the efficiency of the gliding arc for gas treatment applications.

  20. A Catalogue of Anatomical Fugitive Sheets: Cat. 11-25

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    Images Cat. 11 (a) Cat. 11 (b) Cat. 11 (c) Cat. 11 (d) Cat. 12: 1 (a) Cat. 12: 1 (b) Cat. 12: 2 (a) Cat. 12: 2 (b) Cat. 13 Cat. 14 (a) Cat. 14 (b) Cat. 14 (c) Cat. 15 (a) Cat. 15 (b) Cat. 17: 1 Cat. 17: 2 Cat. 18: 1 Cat. 18: 2 Cat. 19: 1 (a) Cat. 19: 1 (b) Cat. 19: 2 (a) Cat. 19: 2 (b) Cat. 20: 1 Cat. 20: 2 (a) Cat. 20: 2 (b) Cat. 21 (a) Cat. 21 (b) Cat. 21 (c) Cat. 21 (d) Cat. 21 (e) Cat. 22 Cat. 24: 1 and 2 Cat. 25: 1 Cat. 25: 2 Cat. 25: 3 Cat. 25: 4

  1. The effects of background noise on the neural responses to natural sounds in cat primary auditory cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Bar-Yosef

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Animal vocalizations in natural settings are invariably accompanied by an acoustic background with a complex statistical structure. We have previously demonstrated that neuronal responses in primary auditory cortex of halothane-anesthetized cats depend strongly on the natural background. Here, we study in detail the neuronal responses to the background sounds and their relationships to the responses to the foreground sounds. Natural bird chirps as well as modifications of these chirps were used. The chirps were decomposed into three components: the clean chirps, their echoes, and the background noise. The last two were weaker than the clean chirp by 13 and 29 dB on average respectively. The test stimuli consisted of the full natural stimulus, the three basic components, and their three pairwise combinations. When the level of the background components (echoes and background noise presented alone was sufficiently loud to evoke neuronal activity, these background components had an unexpectedly strong effect on the responses of the neurons to the main bird chirp. In particular, the responses to the original chirps were more similar on average to the responses evoked by the two background components than to the responses evoked by the clean chirp, both in terms of the evoked spike count and in terms of the temporal pattern of the responses. These results suggest that some of the neurons responded specifically to the acoustic background even when presented together with the substantially louder main chirp, and may imply that neurons in A1 already participate in auditory source segregation.

  2. Protective effect of bradykinin antagonist Hoe-140 during in vivo myocardial ischemic-reperfusion injury in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Rashmi; Maulik, Mohua; Manchanda, Subhash Chandra; Maulik, Subir Kumar

    2003-10-15

    The effect of icatibant (Hoe-140), a selective bradykinin receptor (B(2)) antagonist on myocardial ischemic-reperfusion injury was studied in open chest barbiturate anaesthetized cats. The left anterior descending coronary artery was occluded for 15 min, followed by 60 min of reperfusion. Saline or icatibant (200 microg/kg) was administered intravenously slowly over 2 min, 5 min before reperfusion. In the saline-treated group, myocardial ischemic-reperfusion injury was evidenced by depressed MAP, depressed peak positive and negative dP/dt and elevated left ventricular end-diastolic pressure and enhanced oxidative stress [elevated plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS; a marker for lipid peroxidation), depressed myocardial GSH (reduced glutathione), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase] and depletion of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) along with rise in plasma creatine phosphokinase (CPK). Administration of icatibant resulted in complete hemodynamic recovery together with repletion of ATP and reduction in plasma TBARS without any significant change in myocardial SOD, catalase and GSH. The results of the present study suggest a protective role of icatibant in myocardial ischemic-reperfusion injury.

  3. The beneficial effects of exercise in rodents are preserved after detraining: a phenomenon unrelated to GLUT4 expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Angelis Kátia

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although exercise training has well-known cardiorespiratory and metabolic benefits, low compliance with exercise training programs is a fact, and the harmful effects of physical detraining regarding these adaptations usually go unnoticed. We investigated the effects of exercise detraining on blood pressure, insulin sensitivity, and GLUT4 expression in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR and normotensive Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY. Methods Studied animals were randomized into sedentary, trained (treadmill running/5 days a week, 60 min/day for 10 weeks, 1 week of detraining, and 2 weeks of detraining. Blood pressure (tail-cuff system, insulin sensitivity (kITT, and GLUT4 (Western blot in heart, gastrocnemius and white fat tissue were measured. Results Exercise training reduced blood pressure (19%, improved insulin sensitivity (24%, and increased GLUT4 in the heart (+34%; gastrocnemius (+36% and fat (+22% in SHR. In WKY no change in either blood pressure or insulin sensitivity were observed, but there was an increase in GLUT4 in the heart (+25%, gastrocnemius (+45% and fat (+36% induced by training. Both periods of detraining did not induce any change in neither blood pressure nor insulin sensitivity in SHR and WKY. One-week detraining reduced GLUT4 in SHR (heart: -28%; fat: -23% and WKY (heart: -19%; fat: -22%; GLUT4 in the gastrocnemius was reduced after a 2-week detraining (SHR: -35%; WKY: -25%. There was a positive correlation between GLUT4 (gastrocnemius and the maximal velocity in the exercise test (r = 0.60, p = 0.004. Conclusions The study findings show that in detraining, despite reversion of the enhanced GLUT4 expression, cardiorespiratory and metabolic beneficial effects of exercise are preserved.

  4. Multicomponent DFT study of geometrical H/D isotope effect on hydrogen-bonded organic conductor, κ-H3(Cat EDT-ST)2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kaichi; Kanematsu, Yusuke; Nagashima, Umpei; Ueda, Akira; Mori, Hatsumi; Tachikawa, Masanori

    2017-04-01

    We theoretically investigated a significant contraction of the hydrogen-bonding O⋯O distance upon H/D substitution in our recently developed purely organic crystals, κ-H3(Cat-EDT-ST)2 (H-ST) and its isotopologue κ-D3(Cat-EDT-ST)2 (D-ST), having π-electron systems coupled with hydrogen-bonding fluctuation. The origin of this geometrical H/D isotope effect was elucidated by using the multicomponent DFT method, which takes the H/D nuclear quantum effect into account. The optimized O⋯O distance in H-ST was found to be longer than that in D-ST due to the anharmonicity of the potential energy curve along the Osbnd H bond direction, which was in reasonable agreement with the experimental trend.

  5. Spectroscopic characterization of phenazinium dye aggregates in water and acetonitrile media: effect of methyl substitution on the aggregation phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Deboleena; Das, Paramita; Girigoswami, Agnishwar; Chattopadhyay, Nitin

    2008-10-09

    Absorption, fluorescence, and fluorescence excitation spectral studies of two planar, cationic phenazinium dyes, namely, phenosafranin (PSF) and safranin-T (ST), have been performed in protic and aprotic polar solvents. The studies reveal the formation of both J- and H-aggregates in concentrated solutions. The planarity of the phenazinium skeleton and the presence of a positive charge are attributed to be the driving force for this aggregation behavior. The aggregates are established to be dimers only. The positive inductive effect of the methyl substituents in safranin-T augments the aggregation process. The experiments reveal that for both dyes, the polar protic solvent favors the aggregation process more than the aprotic solvent.

  6. Peak experiences and the afterglow phenomenon: when and how do therapeutic effects of hallucinogens depend on psychedelic experiences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majić, Tomislav; Schmidt, Timo T; Gallinat, Jürgen

    2015-03-01

    Interest in the therapeutic potential of psychedelic substances has recently resumed. During an early phase of human psychedelic research, their therapeutic application in different pathologies had been suggested, and the first evidence for efficacy was provided. The range of recent clinical applications of psychedelics spans from cluster headaches and obsessive-compulsive disorder to addiction and the treatment of fear and anxiety in patients suffering from terminal illness, indicating potentially different therapeutic mechanisms. A variety of approaches in psychotherapy emphasize subjective experiences, such as so-called peak experiences or afterglow phenomena, as differentially mediating therapeutic action. This review aims to re-evaluate earlier and recent concepts of how psychedelic substances may exert beneficial effects. After a short outline of neurophenomenological aspects, we discuss different approaches to how psychedelics are used in psychotherapy. Finally, we summarize evidence for the relationship between subjective experiences and therapeutic success. While the distinction between pharmacological and psychological action obviously cannot be clear-cut, they do appear to contribute differently from each other when their effects are compared with regard to pathologies. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. [Absence of effect of the change of food context in the activity-based anorexia phenomenon in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez Domínguez, María Teresa; Pellón, Ricardo

    2008-08-01

    The goal of this study was to analyse how the context in which animals remain during the period of access to food modulates the development of activity-based anorexia in rats. For this purpose, the effect of changing the context of the activity period and the eating period was measured in terms of body weight loss, reduction in food intake and increase in physical activity. A 2 yen 2 factorial design was implemented, by having or not having access to a running wheel, and by being exposed or not exposed to a context change. Results showed that exposure to different contexts for the wheel and for the food did not affect weight loss, food intake or activity levels. These results are in line with the theoretical position of Epling and Pierce (1992) that activity is induced by the food restriction regime.

  8. Effect of an hydro-alcoholic extract of Uncaria tomentosa (cat's claw) over dendritic cell subsets and HLA-DR/CD86 molecules by lipopolysacarides stimulus

    OpenAIRE

    Lozada-Requena, Ivan; Sección Inmunología. Departamento de Microbiología, facultad de Ciencias y filosofía, universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. Biólogo.; Núñez, César; Sección Inmunología. Departamento de Microbiología, facultad de Ciencias y filosofía, universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. Médico Cirujano.; Álvarez, Yubell; Sección Inmunología. Departamento de Microbiología, facultad de Ciencias y filosofía, universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. Estudiante de Biología.; Aguilar, José Luis; Sección Inmunología. Departamento de Microbiología, facultad de Ciencias y filosofía, universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. Médico Inmuno-reumatólogo.

    2009-01-01

    Objective. To determine the effect of an hydro-alcoholic extract of cat´s claw Uncaria tomentosa (uG) over lipopolysaccharides – treated dendritic cells (DC) and HLA-DR and CD86 molecules expression of peripheral blood samples obtained from healthy individuals. Materials and methods. Peripheral blood samples were collected from healthy individuals. Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMC) were isolated by centrifugation over density gradient, pre-treated with and without the addition of ...

  9. Higgs CAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passarino, Giampiero [Universita di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica Teorica, Turin (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Torino, Turin (Italy)

    2014-05-15

    Higgs Computed Axial Tomography, an excerpt. The Higgs boson lineshape (..and the devil hath power to assume a pleasing shape, Hamlet, Act II, scene 2) is analyzed for the gg → ZZ process, with special emphasis on the off-shell tail which shows up for large values of the Higgs virtuality. The effect of including background and interference is also discussed. The main focus of this work is on residual theoretical uncertainties, discussing how much-improved constraint on the Higgs intrinsic width can be revealed by an improved approach to analysis. (orig.)

  10. Cozen's phenomenon: a reminder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorman, S; Jariwala, A; Campbell, D

    2013-08-01

    A four-year-old child attended Accident and Emergency following a fall from a slide with a displaced and angulated proximal tibial metaphyseal fracture. Treatment included closed manipulation under anaesthesia and an above knee cast for seven weeks. Serial radiographs over the following few months were satisfactory demonstrating good alignment and evidence of healing. However, at four-months review new-onset genu valgum with mechanical axis deviation was noted. No evidence of spontaneous resolution was noted over the following 12 months and hence a corrective hemi-epiphysiodesis was performed. At 12-months post-operatively, there was marked clinical and radiographical improvement in alignment. Classically Cozen's phenomenon is described as the late-onset post-traumatic valgus deformity associated with proximal tibial metaphyseal fractures in children. We want to reemphasise the early recognition of children at risk of this unique complication. In addition, we wish to highlight the progression of the late-onset valgus and its subsequent management.

  11. The Offshoring Phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mery Patricia Tamayo Plata

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper explains some definitions which are necessary in order to understand the offshoring concept, going through the most relevant works about the development of the offshoring phenomenon and its impact on the demand for labor and on the most skilled workers' income. It is evidenced that the offshoring processes not only deal with the purchase and sale of goods anymore, but that the service sector has an increasingly important role, and that the lower cost is not the only aspect that matters when offshoring, but aspects such as the language and culture are also considered. It is also found that technology and research related services flow not only from the parent companies towards its subsidiaries, but from firms in less developed countries to other companies in advanced countries. It concludes with a review of the works that explores the relationship between offshoring, employment and wages, from both, a macro and microeconomic outlook. In the latter case, special consideration is given to the work carried out by Amity and Wei (2006, Crinó (2010, and Geishecker and Görg (2013.

  12. Cat scratch encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, B E; Bean, C S

    1991-06-01

    Cat scratch disease is usually benign, self-limited and without sequelae. Margileth has established four clinical criteria, three of which must be satisfied to make the diagnosis: 1) a history of animal exposure, usually kitten, with primary skin or ocular lesions; 2) regional chronic adenopathy without other apparent cause; 3) a positive cat scratch disease antigen skin test; and 4) lymph node biopsy demonstrating noncaseating granulomas and germinal center hyperplasia. Central nervous system involvement in cat scratch disease has been previously reported, although it is extremely uncommon. In a several-month period, we encountered two cases of cat scratch disease complicated by encephalopathy. The intents of this paper are twofold: 1) to briefly review the current literature on cat scratch disease, 2) to demonstrate that cat scratch disease complicated by encephalopathy presents acutely with seizures, posturing and coma and resolves rapidly with supportive care.

  13. Anesthetic and physiologic effects of tiletamine, zolazepam, ketamine, and xylazine combination (TKX) in feral cats undergoing surgical sterilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cistola, Alexis M; Golder, Francis J; Centonze, Lisa A; McKay, Lindsay W; Levy, Julie K

    2004-10-01

    Tiletamine (12.5 mg), zolazepam (12.5 mg), ketamine (20 mg), and xylazine (5 mg) (TKX; 0.25 ml, IM) combination was evaluated as an anesthetic in 22 male and 67 female adult feral cats undergoing sterilization at high-volume sterilization clinics. Cats were not intubated and breathed room air. Oxygen saturation (SpO(2)), mean blood pressure (MBP), heart rate (HR), respiration rate (RR), and core body temperature were recorded. Yohimbine (0.25 ml, 0.5 mg, IV) was administered at the completion of surgery. TKX produced rapid onset of lateral recumbency (4+/-1 min) and surgical anesthesia of sufficient duration to complete surgical procedures in 92% of cats. SpO(2) measured via a lingual pulse oximeter probe averaged 92+/-3% in male cats and 90+/-4% in females. SpO(2) fell below 90% at least once in most cats. MBP measured by oscillometry averaged 136+/-30 mm Hg in males and 113+/-29 mm Hg in females. MBP increased at the onset of surgical stimulation suggesting incomplete anti-nociceptive properties. HR averaged 156+/-19 bpm, and RR averaged 18+/-8 bpm. Neither parameter varied between males and females or over time. Body temperature decreased significantly over time, declining to 38.0+/-0.8 degrees C at the time of reversal in males and 36.6+/-0.8 degrees C at the time of reversal in females. Time from anesthetic reversal to sternal recumbency was prolonged (72+/-42 min). Seven cats (8%) required an additional dose of TKX to maintain an adequate plane of anesthesia at the onset of surgery, and this was associated with significantly longer recovery times (108+/-24 min).

  14. Light intensity at the return place and encirclement power ratio for the distorted reflected beam based on cat-eye effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yan-zhong; SUN Hua-yan; ZHANG Lai-xian; ZHENG Yong-hui

    2011-01-01

    Based on the definition of second order moment and the approximate three-dimensional analytical formula for probe detected laser beam passing through a cat-eye optical lens with center shelter and oblique detector,the analytical expression of the encirclement power ratio of the cat-eye effect reflected light under far-field condition has been deduced.Variable laws of light intensity at the return place and encirclement power ratio are performed by numerical calculation,and are analyzed physically.The results show that the light intensity at the return place decreases monotonically with the increases of the diameter,incidence angle,tilted angle of the detector and the center shelter ratio,but the relationships between these parameters and the encirclement power ratio are all nonmonotonic.The reasonable choice of the focal shift size would result in the largest light intensity at the return place and the largest erirclenent power ratio.

  15. Changes in synaptic effectiveness of myelinated joint afferents during capsaicin-induced inflammation of the footpad in the anesthetized cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudomin, P; Hernández, E

    2008-05-01

    The present series of experiments was designed to examine, in the anesthetized cat, the extent to which the synaptic efficacy of knee joint afferents is modified during the state of central sensitization produced by the injection of capsaicin into the hindlimb plantar cushion. We found that the intradermic injection of capsaicin increased the N2 and N3 components of the focal potentials produced by stimulation of intermediate and high threshold myelinated fibers in the posterior articular nerve (PAN), respectively. This facilitation lasted several hours, had about the same time course as the paw inflammation and was more evident for the N2 and N3 potentials recorded within the intermediate zone in the L6 than in the L7 spinal segments. The capsaicin-induced facilitation of the N2 focal potentials, which are assumed to be generated by activation of fibers signaling joint position, suggests that nociception may affect the processing of proprioceptive and somato-sensory information and, probably also, movement. In addition, the increased effectiveness of these afferents could activate, besides neurons in the intermediate region, neurons located in the more superficial layers of the dorsal horn. As a consequence, normal joint movements could produce pain representing a secondary hyperalgesia. The capsaicin-induced increased efficacy of the PAN afferents producing the N3 focal potentials, together with the reduced post-activation depression that follows high frequency autogenetic stimulation of these afferents, could further contribute to the pain sensation from non-inflamed joints during skin inflammation in humans. The persistence, after capsaicin, of the inhibitory effects produced by stimulation of cutaneous nerves innervating non-inflamed skin regions may account for the reported reduction of the articular pain sensations produced by trans-cutaneous stimulation.

  16. Effect of cardiac glycosides on action potential characteristics and contractility in cat ventricular myocytes: role of calcium overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruch, Stuart R; Nishio, Manabu; Wasserstrom, J Andrew

    2003-10-01

    There is increasing evidence that cardiac glycosides act through mechanisms distinct from inhibition of the sodium pump but which may contribute to their cardiac actions. To more fully define differences between agents indicative of multiple sites of action, we studied changes in contractility and action potential (AP) configuration in cat ventricular myocytes produced by six cardiac glycosides (ouabain, ouabagenin, dihydroouabain, actodigin, digoxin, and resibufogenin). AP shortening was observed only with ouabain and actodigin. There was extensive inotropic variability between agents, with some giving full inotropic effects before automaticity occurred whereas others produced minimal inotropy before toxicity. AP shortening was not a result of alterations in calcium current or the inward rectifier potassium current, but correlated with an increase in steady-state outward current (Iss), which was sensitive to KB-R7943, a Na+-Ca2+ exchange (NCX) inhibitor. Interestingly, Iss was observed following exposure to ouabain and dihydroouabain, suggesting that an additional mechanism is operative with dihydroouabain that prevents AP shortening. Further investigation into differences in inotropy between ouabagenin, dihydroouabain and ouabain revealed almost identical responses under AP voltage clamp. Thus all agents appear to act on the sodium pump and thereby secondarily increase the outward reverse mode NCX current, but the extent of AP duration shortening and positive inotropy elicited by each agent is limited by development of their toxic actions. The quantitative differences between cardiac glycosides suggest that mechanisms independent of sodium pump inhibition may result from an altered threshold for calcium overload possibly involving direct or indirect effects on calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum.

  17. Comparative Study of the Effects of ENSO Phenomenon (El Niño, La Niña on Temperature and Precipitation of Mashhad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    vajiheh mohammadi sabet

    2017-03-01

    occurring high ENSO, these three indexes (ENSO index, standardized rainfall and anomalies temperature were compared. The co-variation of these indexes was compared. Also, the correlation and cross correlation for each period of occurring ENSO, with rain and temperature of Mashhad was calculated. Results and Discussion: Mashhad monthly temperature and precipitation were compared with the extreme values of ENSO index in periods of the occurrence this phenomenon (1950-2016. In addition, the correlation and cross-correlation between ENSO-Rainfall index and ENSO-temperature index for this period were calculated.Forecasted temperature for 2016 by ARMA (1,1 was 13.2 Degrees Celsius, which has 0.2 degree increase in comparison to last year. Results showed thatthere is no an obvious relation between ENSO-Temperature and ENSO-Rainfall in interval (-1, +1. But there are good relation between ENSO-Temperature and ENSO-Rainfall beyond of (-1,+1. The results of Elnino showed that the monthly precipitation and temperature increase with a lag of 2 to 5 months and 0 to 4 months, respectively. The results of Lanina showed that the monthly precipitation and temperature decrease with a lag of 3 to 5 months and 1 to 4 months, respectively. Also when ENSO index is located in the interval (-1, +1, there is no certain harmony with temperature and precipitation of Mashhad. Conclusions: The aim of this study was evaluating the effect of the ENSO phenomenon on monthly temperature and precipitation of Mashhad.Mashhad monthly temperature and precipitation, respectively, for 132 and 124 years were available.Precipitation was static and has no trend, but temperature was not static and has two changed (jumped point in 1976 and 2000. MARS regression was used for patterning the process. Removing the trend was done by MARS model and the data was obtained without trend. Monthly ENSO index since 1950 from reliable websites worldwide (NOAA was obtained. Mashhad monthly temperature data was animalized and

  18. Raynaud’s phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Ingegnoli

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Raynaud’s phenomenon (RP is a vasospastic disorder characterized by episodic color changes of blanching, cyanosis, and hyperemia in response to cold and/or emotional stress. Although most typically noted in the fingers, the circulation of the toes, ears, nose and tongue is also frequently affected. Population studies have shown that RP in adults is more common in women than men, with prevalence estimates ranging from 4% to 30%. Geographic variations in the prevalence reflect differences in climate. RP may be a primary or a secondary process. LeRoy and Medsger suggested criteria for primary RP: symmetric attacks, the absence of tissue necrosis, ulceration or gangrene, the absence of a secondary cause, negative antinuclear antibodies, normal nailfold capillaroscopy and a normal erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Secondary RP is characterized by an age of onset of more than 30 years, painful and asymmetric attacks, ischemic skin lesions, positive autoautoantibodies, capillaroscopic abnormalities and/or clinical features suggestive of connective tissue diseases (CTDs. Among the CTDs, systemic sclerosis has the highest frequency of RP. Finding a cause for RP requires a knowledge of the patient’s occupational, smoking, drug history, physical examination, nailfold capillaroscopy, routine laboratory tests and autoantibodies. Furthermore, RP should be distinguished from acrocyanosis, a condition characterized by continuous cyanosis of the hands or feet that is aggravated by cold temperature. The most important instruction to the patient is abstinence from any smoking, offending drugs should be discontinued, and abrupt changes in temperature. If these measures are inadequate, calcium-channel blockers are the most widely used (nifedipine 30 mg up to 90 mg daily. Alternatively, sympatholytic agent (prazosin, angiotensin II -receptor type I antagonist (losartan, selective sertonin-reuptake inhibitor (fluoxetine may be useful. In the severe cases the role of

  19. Effect of chronic metoprolol and coronary occlusion (CO) on cardiac beta receptor density in cats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lathers, C.M.; Spivey, W.H.; Levin, R.M.

    1986-03-05

    The effect of metoprolol (M) on beta receptor density (BRD) was examined. M (5 mg/kg, p.o., b.i.d.) was given for 2 and 8 wks prior to CO of the left anterior descending artery (LAD) at its origin. BRD, determined by binding of /sup 3/H-dihydroalprenol, was examined in the myocardium (LA = left atrium, RA = right atrium, LV1 = proximal LAD distribution, LV = 2 distal LAD distribution, LV3 = posterior left ventricle, RV = right ventricle, and S = septum. A 2 factor ANOVA followed by simple effect and Newman-Keuls post hoc tests revealed that M produced no effect in BRD in LA, RA, LV2, or S. M increased BRD in LV1, LV3, and RV after 2 wk when compared to no M. In addition, BRD in LV3 and RV were also greater at 2 wk than after 8 wk M. The data indicate that there are regional differences in the beta adrenergic receptor densities among the areas of the heart and within the left ventricle. Chronic dosing with M produced increased BRD in only some of the areas of the heart. These differences may be related to functional differences in the various areas of the heart after CO.

  20. Effects of Scale Transformation and Test Termination Rule on the Precision of Ability Estimates in CAT. ACT Research Report Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Qing; Wang, Tianyou; Ban, Jae-Chun

    Error indices (bias, standard error of estimation, and root mean square error) obtained on different scales of measurement under different test termination rules in a computerized adaptive test (CAT) context were examined. Four ability estimation methods were studied: (1) maximum likelihood estimation (MLE); (2) weighted likelihood estimation…

  1. Evaluation of prophylactic and therapeutic effects of silymarin and N-acetylcysteine in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avizeh, R; Najafzadeh, H; Razijalali, M; Shirali, S

    2010-02-01

    Cats most commonly receive toxic amounts of acetaminophen (APAP) because owners medicate them without consulting a veterinarian. The aim of this study was to compare the hepatoprotective action of silymarin and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) against APAP poisoning. Twenty healthy cats were randomly allotted to five equal groups. Animals in group A were given APAP (single dose 150 mg/kg, p.o.); groups B and C consisted of cats that received NAC (100 mg/kg, p.o.) or silymarin (30 mg/kg, p.o.) concurrent with APAP administration respectively; groups D and E were treated like groups B and C, respectively, but 4 h after APAP administration. The serum concentrations of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), methemoglobin, and total and direct bilirubin were measured before APAP administration and 4, 24, and 72 h later. A single oral administration of APAP significantly elevated serum concentrations of ALT, AST, ALP, LDH, methemoglobin, and total and direct bilirubin. In both the groups receiving APAP plus NAC or silymarin, levels of serum enzyme activities, methemoglobin, and total and direct bilirubin remained within the normal values. It was concluded that silymarin as well as NAC can protect liver tissue against oxidative stress in cats with an APAP intoxication.

  2. Effect of subarachnoid hemorrhage on contractile responses and noradrenaline release evoked in cat cerebral arteries by histamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobato, R.D.; Marin, J.; Salaices, M.; Rico, M.L.; Sanchez, C.F.

    1981-10-01

    This study analyzes the changes induced by subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) on the contractile responses and the noradrenaline release evoked in cat cerebral arteries by histamine. The dose-dependent vasoconstriction induced by histamine on the cerebral arteries of normal cats was significantly reduced by diphenhydramine and phentolamine. When SAH was produced 3 and 7 days before the experiment, the histamine-induced vasoconstriction also decreased. Thereafter, a tendency to normalization in the contractile vascular responses was observed such that in 15 days after the hemorrhage it was not significantly different from that found in controls animals. The decrease in the contractile responses to histamine provoked by SAH was similar to that seen after pretreatment with intracisternal injections of 6-hydroxydopamine. The amount of radioactivity released by histamine following preincubation with /sup 3/H-noradrenaline from the cerebral arteries of cats exposed to SAH 3, 7, and 15 days before the experiment was significantly reduced when compared with controls. Moreover, the basal level of tritium release and the radioactivity retained at the end of the experiment were also decreased after SAH. Results indicate histamine releases noradrenaline from cat cerebral arteries, and SAH produce a transient denervation of the perivascular adrenergic nerve endings, which explained by the impairment of the indirect adrenergic mechanism involved in the overall contractile response elicited by this amine in cerebral arteries. Histamine does not seem to play a significant role in the production of the cerebral vasospasm occurring after SAH.

  3. Exposure to cats and dogs as risk factors for wheezing in preschool children: are their effects modified by removal?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia García Marcos

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To define the relationship between current wheezing in preschoolers and exposure to dogs and cats at home, and to find out to what extent their removal modifies the associations.Methods: Previously validated questionnaires were completed by parents of 1784 preschoolers (mean age 4.08±0.8 years. Children were stratified according to the presence (20.0 % or absence of wheezing in the previous year. Information regarding cat or dog exposure currently and during the first year of life was collected, as well as information about the removal of the pets.Results: A higher proportion of families owning a cat in the first year of the child’s life, as well as in the previous year, was found in the wheezing group. The proportion of families owning a dog was marginally higher in this group. Cat exposure was shown to be a significant risk factor when present in the first year of the child’s life (Adjusted Odds Ratio [aOR] 1.73, 95 % CI 1.04-2.88, and an even higher association was found with current exposure (aOR 2.00, 95 % CI 1.22-3.26. The association was highest (aOR 2.68, 95 % CI 1.32-5.44 among the wheezing group for the subset of families that had removed a cat from the home. Dog exposure did not appear to be a significant risk factor, neither during the first year of life (aOR 1.24, 95 % CI 0.88-1.76 nor with current ownership (aOR 1.04, 95 % CI 0.73-1.50. However, a significant association was found in the group that had removed a dog from the home (aOR 5.88, 95 % CI 2.62-13.17.Conclusions: Exposure to cat allergens is a risk factor for asthma, when exposure occurs during the first 12 months of life. However, this factor is of limited influence beyond the first year. It is likely that children who are prone to developing an allergy would benefit from control of environmental allergen exposure, including cat avoidance. 

  4. Cat-Scratch Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bites and scratches well with soap and running water. Do not allow cats to lick your wounds. Contact your doctor if you develop any symptoms of cat-scratch disease or infection. CSD is caused by a bacterium called Bartonella henselae . About 40% ...

  5. That Fat Cat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Phyllis Gilchrist

    2012-01-01

    This activity began with a picture book, Nurit Karlin's "Fat Cat On a Mat" (HarperCollins; 1998). The author and her students started their project with a 5-inch circular template for the head of their cats. They reviewed shapes as they drew the head and then added the ears and nose, which were triangles. Details to the face were added when…

  6. Cat-scratch disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... scratch or bite from a cat, your health care provider may suspect cat-scratch disease. A physical examination may also reveal an enlarged spleen . Sometimes, an infected lymph node may form a tunnel ( fistula ) through the skin and drain (leak fluid). This ...

  7. Cat scratch colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Rebollo, M Lourdes; Velayos-Jiménez, Benito; Prieto de Paula, José María; Alvarez Quiñones, María; González Hernández, José Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Over the past few years, we have read several publications regarding the term "cat scratch colon." This neologism was developed to define some bright red linear markings seen in the colonic mucosa that resemble scratches made by a cat. We would like to communicate a recent case attended at our institution.

  8. Cat Scratch Colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lourdes Ruiz-Rebollo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few years, we have read several publications regarding the term “cat scratch colon.” This neologism was developed to define some bright red linear markings seen in the colonic mucosa that resemble scratches made by a cat. We would like to communicate a recent case attended at our institution.

  9. Contraceptive effect of Uncaria tomentosa (cat's claw) in rats with experimental endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira Neto, João; Cavalcante, Frederico Lucas Lima Paiva; Carvalho, Rafael Antonio Freire; Rodrigues, Taciana Gabrielle Pinheiro de Moura; Xavier, Mariana Santana; Furtado, Pablo Gustavo Ribeiro; Schor, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    Evaluate the histological changes in parenchyma's epithelial layer of the uterus and ovarian of rats with induced endometriosis, treated with Uncaria tomentosa extract. 29 rats with experimental endometriosis, were selected and divided in three groups: The uncaria group received 32 mg/ml of Uncaria tomentosa extract, 1 ml administered daily and the placebo group received 1 ml of saline 0.9% per day, during for 14 days (both groups); the leuprolide group received leuprolide acetate 1mg/kg body weight applied single subcutaneous dose. In the 15th day of treatment the uterine horn and ovaries were removed for histopathological analysis. The uncaria group presented nine samples (90%) with immature ovarian follicles, whereas the placebo group did not present any case and in the leuprolide group there were eight rats (88%) with the same change. The placebo group showed mature corpus luteum in all animals, occurring less frequent in uncaria (10%) and leuprolide (22%) groups. The uterine epithelium showed weak proliferative in nine (90%) samples of the uncaria group, in two (20%) animals in the placebo group and seven (77.8%) rats in the leuprolide group. The findings suggest that Uncaria tomentosa has contraceptive effect.

  10. Validation of the Impostor Phenomenon Among Managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja eRohrmann

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Following up on earlier investigations, the present research aims to validate the construct impostor phenomenon by taking personality correlates into account and to examine whether the impostor phenomenon is a construct in its own right. In addition, gender effects as well as effects on working style and stress or strain are examined. In an online study we surveyed a sample of N = 242 individuals occupying leadership positions in different sectors. Confirmatory factor analyses provide empirical evidence for the discriminant validity of the impostor phenomenon. In accord with earlier studies we show that the impostor phenomenon is accompanied by higher levels of anxiety, dysphoric moods, emotional instability and a generally negative self-evaluation. The study does not reveal any gender differences concerning the impostor phenomenon. With respect to working styles, persons with an impostor self-concept tend to show perfectionist as well as procrastinating behaviors. Moreover, they report being more stressed and strained by their work. In sum, the findings show that the impostor phenomenon constitutes a dysfunctional personality style. Practical implications are discussed.

  11. State of cat genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Stephen J; Johnson, Warren; Driscoll, Carlos; Pontius, Joan; Pecon-Slattery, Jill; Menotti-Raymond, Marilyn

    2008-06-01

    Our knowledge of cat family biology was recently expanded to include a genomics perspective with the completion of a draft whole genome sequence of an Abyssinian cat. The utility of the new genome information has been demonstrated by applications ranging from disease gene discovery and comparative genomics to species conservation. Patterns of genomic organization among cats and inbred domestic cat breeds have illuminated our view of domestication, revealing linkage disequilibrium tracks consequent of breed formation, defining chromosome exchanges that punctuated major lineages of mammals and suggesting ancestral continental migration events that led to 37 modern species of Felidae. We review these recent advances here. As the genome resources develop, the cat is poised to make a major contribution to many areas in genetics and biology.

  12. Comparative study of aural microflora in healthy cats, allergic cats and cats with systemic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressanti, Charline; Drouet, Clémence; Cadiergues, Marie-Christine

    2014-12-01

    Twenty healthy cats (group 1) with clinically normal ears, 15 cats with systemic disease (group 2) and 15 allergic cats (group 3) were included in a prospective study. The experimental unit was the ear. A clinical score was established for each ear canal after otoscopic examination. Microbial population was assessed on cytological examination of smears performed with the cotton-tipped applicator smear technique. Fungal population was significantly more prominent in allergic cats (P cats compared with healthy cats (P cats than in healthy cats (P cats suffering from systemic disease (P cats with systemic disease than healthy cats. In cats from group 2, only fungal overgrowth was associated with otitis severity. In group 3, only bacterial overgrowth was associated with otitis severity.

  13. HOOLIGANISM – CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL PHENOMENON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIA LULESCU

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The proposed scientific theme is going to approach and study the hooliganism phenomenon as a contemporary social matter, in terms of conceptual and etiological. The present work has four main purposes: (1- that of explaining the meaning of hooliganism social phenomenon; (2- that of discovering the origins of hooliganism; (3- that of knowing which are the causes that encourages the occurence of the hooliganism; (4- that of knowing how to control and minimize this phenomenon.

  14. [Raynaud's phenomenon: pathogenesis and prevalence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulska, Danuta

    2010-01-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon is defined as occasional ischemia of the distal parts of the extremities. Ischemia may be idiopathic as in primary Raynaud's disease or instigated by a comorbidity as in Raynaud's syndrome. Opinions on the etiopathogenesis of Raynaud's phenomenon have changed during recent years. Research has shown that enhanced vascular reactivity is attributable more to local factors and less to abnormalities in the central nervous system. Local factors are classified as vascular, nervous, and intravascular. Changes in our understanding of the etiopathogenesis of Raynaud's phenomenon have resulted in modified therapeutic guidelines. The present work reviews current opinions on the etiopathogenesis of Raynaud's phenomenon.

  15. Reentrant phenomenon and inverse magnetocaloric effect in a generalized spin-(1/2,  s) Fisher's super-exchange antiferromagnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálisová, Lucia

    2016-11-30

    The thermodynamic and magnetocaloric properties of a generalized spin-(1/2,  s) Fisher's super-exchange antiferromagnet are investigated precisely by using the decoration-iteration mapping transformation. Besides the critical temperature, sublattice magnetization, total magnetization, entropy and specific heat, the isothermal entropy change and adiabatic temperature change are also rigorously calculated in order to examine the cooling efficiency of the model in the vicinity of the first- and second-order phase transitions. It is shown that an enhanced inverse magnetocaloric effect occurs around the temperature interval [Formula: see text] for any magnetic-field change [Formula: see text]. The most pronounced inverse magnetocaloric effect can be found nearby the critical field, which corresponds to the zero-temperature phase transition from the long-range ordered ground state to the paramagnetic one. The observed phenomenon increases with an increasing value of decorating spins. Furthermore, sufficiently high values of decorating spins have also been linked to the possibility of observing reentrant phase transitions at finite temperatures.

  16. Effect of Cr and Si Contents on Expulsion Phenomenon in Electric-Resistance Spot Welding of Advanced High-Strength Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Jong-Pan; Kang, Chung-Yun [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    An expulsion phenomenon occurred during resistance spot welding of advanced high-strength steel sheets, and the effects of the Cr and Si contents on the expulsion limit current (C{sub E}xp) were investigated. The correlation between C{sub E}xp and the steel properties (e.g., resistivity, melting point, coefficient of thermal expansion, high-temperature yield-strength and viscosity), were evaluated, as were the qualities of the alloying elements. The C{sub E}xp decreased with increasing Si contents. This resulted in a narrow range of acceptable welding current, as well as poor suitability for spot welding. On the other hand, the effects of Cr-contents on the C{sub E}xp, and on the acceptable range of welding current were minimal (with content of 3 wt%). Thus, the suitability for spot welding was not affected by the Cr-Contents (at the experimental concentration). As Si-Contents increased, resistivity also increased and the melting point decreased. This resulted in easy melting of the base metal at a low welding current (low heat input) and in the rapid increase of the pressure due to the increased coefficient of expansion. However, the high-temperature yield-strength of the corona bond, which blocked the expulsion of the molten melt, also decreased. Consequently, the C{sub E}xp of steel containing additional Si was lower than that containing Cr.

  17. Effect of extracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate on cryopreserved epididymal cat sperm intracellular ATP concentration, sperm quality, and in vitro fertilizing ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuwanut, Paweena; Arya, Nlin; Comizzoli, Pierre; Chatdarong, Kaywalee

    2015-09-15

    Intracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) is essential for supporting sperm function in the fertilization process. During cryopreservation, damage of sperm mitochondrial membrane usually leads to compromised production of intracellular ATP. Recently, extracellular ATP (ATPe) was introduced as a potent activator of sperm motility and fertilizing ability. This study aimed to evaluate (1) levels of intracellular ATP in frozen-thawed epididymal cat sperm after incubation with ATPe and (2) effects of ATPe on epididymal cat sperm parameters after freezing and thawing. Eighteen male cats were included. For each replicate, epididymal sperm from two cats were pooled to one sample (N = 9). Each pooled sample was cryopreserved with the Tris-egg yolk extender into three straws. After thawing, the first and second straws were incubated with 0-, 1.0-, or 2.5-mM ATPe for 10 minutes and evaluated for sperm quality at 10 minutes, 1, 3, and 6 hours after thawing and fertilizing ability. The third straw was evaluated for intracellular ATP concentration in control and with 2.5-mM ATPe treatment. Higher concentration of intracellular sperm ATP was observed in the samples treated with 2.5-mM ATPe compared to the controls (0.339 ± 0.06 μg/2 × 10(6) sperm vs. 0.002 ± 0.003 μg/2 × 10(6) sperm, P ≤ 0.05). In addition, incubation with 2.5-mM ATPe for 10 minutes promoted sperm motility (56.7 ± 5.0 vs. 53.3 ± 4.4%, P ≤ 0.05) and progressive motility (3.1 ± 0.2 vs. 2.8 ± 0.4, P ≤ 0.05), mitochondrial membrane potential (36.4 ± 5.5 vs. 28.7 ± 4.8%, P ≤ 0.05), and blastocyst rate (36.1 ± 7.0 and 28.8 ± 7.4%, P ≤ 0.05) compared with the controls. In contrast, ATPe remarkably interfered acrosome integrity after 6 hours of postthawed incubation. In sum, the present finding that optimal incubation time of postthaw epididymal cat sperm under proper ATPe condition might constitute a rationale for the studies on other endangered wild felids regarding sperm quality and embryo

  18. Validation of the Impostor Phenomenon among Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrmann, Sonja; Bechtoldt, Myriam N; Leonhardt, Mona

    2016-01-01

    Following up on earlier investigations, the present research aims at validating the construct impostor phenomenon by taking other personality correlates into account and to examine whether the impostor phenomenon is a construct in its own right. In addition, gender effects as well as associations with dispositional working styles and strain are examined. In an online study we surveyed a sample of N = 242 individuals occupying leadership positions in different sectors. Confirmatory factor analyses provide empirical evidence for the discriminant validity of the impostor phenomenon. In accord with earlier studies we show that the impostor phenomenon is accompanied by higher levels of anxiety, dysphoric moods, emotional instability, a generally negative self-evaluation, and perfectionism. The study does not reveal any gender differences concerning the impostor phenomenon. With respect to working styles, persons with an impostor self-concept tend to show perfectionist as well as procrastinating behaviors. Moreover, they report being more stressed and strained by their work. In sum, the findings show that the impostor phenomenon constitutes a dysfunctional personality style. Practical implications are discussed.

  19. The Blazhko phenomenon

    CERN Document Server

    Kovacs, Geza

    2015-01-01

    In spite of the accumulating high quality data on RR Lyrae stars, the underlying cause of the (quasi)periodic light curve modulation (the so-called Blazhko effect) of these objects remains as mysterious as it was more than hundred years ago when the first RR Lyrae observations were made. In this review we briefly summarize the current observational status of the Blazhko stars, discuss the failure of all currently available ideas attempting to explain the Blazhko effect and finally, we contemplate on various avenues, including massive 2-3D modeling to make progress. Somewhat unconventionally to a review, we present some new results, including the estimate of the true incidence rate of the fundamental mode Blazhko stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud, and tests concerning the effect of the aspect angle on the observed distribution of the modulation amplitudes for Blazhko models involving nonradial modes.

  20. Ringing phenomenon in silica microspheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunhua Dong; Changling Zou; Jinming Cui; Yong Yang; Zhengfu Han; Guangcan Guo

    2009-01-01

    Whispering gallery modes in silica microspheres are excited by a tunable continuous-wave laser through the fiber taper. Ringing phenomenon can be observed with high frequency sweeping speed. The thermal nonlinearity in the microsphere can enhance this phenomenon. Our measurement results agree very well with the theoretical predictions by the dynamic equation.

  1. The Harry Potter Phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comber, Barbara; Nixon, Helen

    2001-01-01

    Notes that while many adults seem to be rejoicing in the fact that the Harry Potter books have brought the pleasures of book reading to a new generation of young readers, Harry Potter is also entering the realm of popular media culture. Discusses and analyses the effect Harry Potter books have on children and on society. (SG)

  2. The Harry Potter Phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comber, Barbara; Nixon, Helen

    2001-01-01

    Notes that while many adults seem to be rejoicing in the fact that the Harry Potter books have brought the pleasures of book reading to a new generation of young readers, Harry Potter is also entering the realm of popular media culture. Discusses and analyses the effect Harry Potter books have on children and on society. (SG)

  3. Effect of second to first normal stress difference ratio at the die exit on neck-in phenomenon in polymeric flat film production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barborik, Tomas; Zatloukal, Martin

    2017-05-01

    In this study, viscoelastic modeling of the extrusion film casting process, based on the lD membrane model and modified Leonov constitutive equation, was conducted and the effect of the viscoelastic stress state at the die exit (captured here via second to first normal stress difference ratio) on the unwanted neck-in phenomenon has been analyzed for wide range of Deborah numbers and materials having different level of uniaxial and planar extensional strain hardening. Relevant experimental data for LDPE and theoretical predictions based on multimode eXtended Pom-Pom model acquired from the open literature were used for the validation purposes. It was found that firstly, the predicting capabilities of both constitutive equations for given material and processing conditions are comparable even if the single mode modified Leonov model was used and secondly, the agreement between theoretical and experimental data on neck-in is fairly good. Results of the theoretical study revealed that the viscoelastic stress state at the die exit (i.e. -N2/N1 ratio) increases the level of neck-in if uniaxial extensional strain hardening, planar to uniaxial extensional viscosity ratio and Deborah number increases. It has also been revealed that there exists threshold value for Deborah number and extensional strain hardening below which the neck-in becomes independent on the die exit stress state.

  4. Effect of short-term application of kinesio tape on the flexion-relaxation phenomenon, trunk postural control and trunk repositioning in healthy females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Sara A; Frost, Lydia R; Vallis, Lori Ann; Brown, Stephen H M

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the potential effects of kinesio tape on the flexion-relaxation phenomenon, trunk postural control and trunk position sense when applied for a short period (30 min) to the low back of healthy female participants. Twenty-four participants were assigned to one of two groups: kinesio tape applied in either the recommended stretched or non-stretched (control) manner over the low back. Tests were performed at three time points (pre-tape, with tape, post-tape) to assess low-back muscle flexion-relaxation, position sense during active trunk repositioning and trunk postural control during seated balance. Results demonstrated that wearing kinesio tape did not affect the angle at which the erector spinae muscles became silent during trunk flexion (flexion-relaxation). Trunk repositioning error increased when wearing kinesio tape in both the stretched and non-stretched manner, and this increased error persisted after the tape was removed. Seated balance control improved when wearing kinesio tape in both the stretched and non-stretched manner, and these improvements persisted after the tape was removed. In conclusion, these findings do not support the general suggestions that short-term use of kinesio tape on the low-back region alter low-back muscle activation and enhance tasks related to proprioception, at least under these taping conditions in a group of healthy females.

  5. Raynaud's phenomenon: pathogenesis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakst, Richard; Merola, Joseph F; Franks, Andrew G; Sanchez, Miguel

    2008-10-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon is a common clinical disorder for which patients frequently seek the expertise and care of dermatologists. It is manifested by recurrent vasospasm of the fingers and toes, often associated with exposure to cold temperature or emotional stress. The phenomenon is named after Maurice Raynaud, who, as a medical student, defined the first case in 1862 as episodic, symmetric, acral vasospasm characterized by pallor, cyanosis, suffusion, and a sense of fullness or tautness, which may be painful. Despite more than 140 years of research, the pathophysiology of Raynaud's phenomenon continues to elude investigators. Accordingly, although many pharmacologic treatments have been reported, there is still no cure or gold standard therapy. Further, response to treatment varies and is difficult to predict. Recently, there has been renewed interest in finding the pathogenetic mechanisms of Raynaud's phenomenon, an effort that has led to more potential targeted therapeutics. The purpose of this review is to discuss recent breakthroughs in the pathogenesis and treatment of Raynaud's phenomenon.

  6. The Synthetic Cannabinoids Phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karila, Laurent; Benyamina, Amine; Blecha, Lisa; Cottencin, Olivier; Billieux, Joël

    2016-01-01

    « Spice » is generally used to describe the diverse types of herbal blends that encompass synthetic cannabinoids on the market. The emergence of smokable herbal products containing synthetic cannabinoids, which mimic the effects of cannabis, appears to become increasingly popular, in the new psychoactive substances landscape. In 2014, the existence of 134 different types of synthetic cannabinoids were reported by the European Union Early Warning System. These drugs are mainly sold online as an alternative to controlled and regulated psychoactive substances. They appear to have a life cycle of about 1-2 years before being replaced by a next wave of products. Legislation controlling these designer drugs has been introduced in many countries with the objective to limit the spread of existing drugs and control potential new analogs. The majority of the synthetic cannabinoids are full agonists at the CB1 receptor and do not contain tobacco or cannabis. They are becoming increasingly popular in adolescents, students and clubbers as an abused substance. Relatively high incidence of adverse effects associated with synthetic cannabinoids use has been documented in the literature. Numerous fatalities linked with their use and abuse have been reported. In this paper, we will review the available data regarding the use and effects of synthetic cannabinoids in humans in order to highlight their impact on public health. To reach this objective, a literature search was performed on two representative databases (Pubmed, Google Scholar), the Erowid Center website (a US non-profit educational organization that provides information about psychoactive plants and chemicals), and various governmental websites. The terms used for the database search were: "synthetic cannabinoids", "spice", "new psychoactive substances", and/or "substance use disorder", and/or "adverse effects", and/or "fatalities". The search was limited to years 2005 to 2016 due to emerging scientific literature at

  7. Ototoxicity in dogs and cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Naoki; Talaska, Andra E.; Schacht, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis A variety of drugs in veterinary use have side effects that can potentially damage the senses of hearing or balance in animals. A large body of literature exists on the incidence and mechanisms of “ototoxicity” in experimental animals and in humans, but little is documented in domestic dogs and cats. However, the generality of these adverse actions across species allows us to extrapolate and provide the veterinarian with insight into possible complications of chemotherapy. PMID:23122180

  8. Short-Term Estrogen Replacement Effects on Insulin Sensitivity and Glucose Tolerance in At-Risk Cats for Feline Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wara, Allison; Hunsucker, Sara; Bove, Krystal; Backus, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Male domestic cats that are neutered and overweight are at an increased risk for developing a type-2-like diabetes mellitus. Beneficial effects of 17β-estradiol (E2) on glucose homeostasis may be lost with neutering and thereby account for increased diabetes risk. To evaluate this, adult male neutered overweight cats (n=6) were given daily E2 (1.0 μg/kg) or vehicle (Vh; ethanol, 1.0 μL/kg) in a single crossover trial of 14-day periods with a 7-day washout. The E2 and Vh were voluntarily ingested on food. The E2 dosage was determined in a pre-trial to significantly and transiently reduce food intake with no measurable change in plasma E2 concentration. During treatments, physical activity was assessed with collar-mounted accelerometers on days 9-11, and tests of intravenous insulin tolerance and intravenous glucose tolerance were conducted on days 13 and 14, respectively. Over the 14 days, E2 compared to Vh treatment reduced (p=0.03) food intake (- 22%) but not enough to significantly reduce body weight; activity counts were not significantly changed. With E2 compared to Vh treatment, the late-phase plasma insulin response of the glucose tolerance test was less (p=0.03) by 31%, while glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity indexes were not significantly changed. The results indicate that oral E2 at a dosage that moderately affects food intake may reduce insulin requirement for achieving glucose homeostasis in neutered male cats. Further investigation is needed to identify the mechanism underlying the E2 effect.

  9. Short-Term Estrogen Replacement Effects on Insulin Sensitivity and Glucose Tolerance in At-Risk Cats for Feline Diabetes Mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Wara

    Full Text Available Male domestic cats that are neutered and overweight are at an increased risk for developing a type-2-like diabetes mellitus. Beneficial effects of 17β-estradiol (E2 on glucose homeostasis may be lost with neutering and thereby account for increased diabetes risk. To evaluate this, adult male neutered overweight cats (n=6 were given daily E2 (1.0 μg/kg or vehicle (Vh; ethanol, 1.0 μL/kg in a single crossover trial of 14-day periods with a 7-day washout. The E2 and Vh were voluntarily ingested on food. The E2 dosage was determined in a pre-trial to significantly and transiently reduce food intake with no measurable change in plasma E2 concentration. During treatments, physical activity was assessed with collar-mounted accelerometers on days 9-11, and tests of intravenous insulin tolerance and intravenous glucose tolerance were conducted on days 13 and 14, respectively. Over the 14 days, E2 compared to Vh treatment reduced (p=0.03 food intake (- 22% but not enough to significantly reduce body weight; activity counts were not significantly changed. With E2 compared to Vh treatment, the late-phase plasma insulin response of the glucose tolerance test was less (p=0.03 by 31%, while glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity indexes were not significantly changed. The results indicate that oral E2 at a dosage that moderately affects food intake may reduce insulin requirement for achieving glucose homeostasis in neutered male cats. Further investigation is needed to identify the mechanism underlying the E2 effect.

  10. Cat tongue Velcro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Alexis; Martinez, Andrea; Jung, Hyewon; Tsai, Ting-Wen; Hu, David

    2016-11-01

    A cat's tongue is covered in an array of spines called papillae. These spines are thought to be used in grooming and rasping meat from bones of prey, although no mechanism has been given. We use high-speed video to film a cat removing cat food deeply wedged into a 3-D printed fur mat. We show that the spines on the tongue act as Velcro for particles. The tongue itself is highly elastic. As the cat presses it against a substrate, the tongue flattens and the spines separate. When the tongue is removed from the substrate the spines come together, wedging particles between them. This elasticity-driven entrapment permits the surface of the tongue to act as a carrier for hard to reach particles, and to increase the efficacy of grooming and feeding.

  11. StreamCat

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The StreamCat Dataset provides summaries of natural and anthropogenic landscape features for ~2.65 million streams, and their associated catchments, within the...

  12. IndexCat

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — IndexCat provides access to the digitized version of the printed Index-Catalogue of the Library of the Surgeon General's Office; eTK for medieval Latin texts; and...

  13. Suppression of fertility in adult cats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goericke-Pesch, Sandra Kathrin; Wehrend, A.; Georgiev, P.

    2014-01-01

    Contents: Cats are animals with highly efficient reproduction, clearly pointing to a need for suppression of fertility. Although surgical contraception is highly effective, it is not always the method of choice. This is predominantly because it is cost-intensive, time-consuming and irreversible......, with the latter being of major importance for cat breeders. This article reviews the use of progestins, scleroting agents, immunocontraception, melatonin, GnRH antagonists and finally, GnRH agonists, in adult male and female cats in detail, according to the present state of the art. By now, various scientific...... and clinical options are available for the suppression of fertility in adult cats and the decision as to which should be chosen - independent of the legal registration of any state - depends on different facts: (i) feral or privately owned animal? (ii) temporary or permanent suppression of fertility wanted...

  14. Prozone phenomenon in secondary syphilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Sidana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Prozone phenomenon is a false negative response resulting from high antibody titer which interferes with formation of antigen- antibody lattice, necessary to visualize a positive flocculation test. We present a case of secondary syphilis who presented to us with features of contact irritant dermatitis. She initially tested non- reactive for VDRL testing but tested positive with higher dilution. The prozone phenomenon is attaining importance because of increasing prevalence of Acquired immune deficiency syndrome. So one needs to be familiar with the occurrence of prozone phenomenon.

  15. [Methylphenidate and secondary Raynaud's phenomenon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias Otero, M; Portela Romero, M; Bugarín González, R; Ventura Victoria, M A

    2013-09-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon is a clinical disease characterized by episodic attacks of vasoconstriction of the arteries and arterioles of the extremities such as fingers and toes, sometimes the ears and nose, in response to cold or emotional stimuli. A classic attack is the pallor of the distal extremity, followed by cyanosis and redness, accompanied by paresthesia, usually as heat. When it occurs without apparent cause is called primary Raynaud's phenomenon. When associated with other disease, is called secondary Raynaud's phenomenon. The secondary table is associated with increased frequency of rheumatic diseases of collagen. They can also present certain drugs that cause vasoconstriction, such as ergotamine, beta-adrenergic antagonists, contraception and sympathomimetic drugs. Regarding the latter, we present a case of Raynaud's phenomenon secondary to methylphenidate in a 14 years.

  16. Effect of tooth displacement and vibration on frictional force and stick-slip phenomenon in conventional brackets: a preliminary in vitro mechanical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yu-Jin; Lim, Bum-Soon; Park, Young Guk; Yang, Il-Hyung; Ahn, Seok-Joon; Kim, Tae-Woo; Baek, Seung-Hak

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the effects of tooth displacement and vibration on frictional force and stick-slip phenomenon (SSP) when conventional brackets were used with a levelling/alignment wire. The samples consisted of six groups (n = 10 per group) with combinations of tooth displacement (2mm lingual displacement [LD], 2mm gingival displacement [GD], and no displacement [control]) and vibration conditions (absence and presence at 30 Hz and 0.25 N). A stereolithographically made typodont system was used with conventional brackets and elastomeric ligatures. After application of artificial saliva, static/kinetic frictional forces (SFF/KFF) and frequency/amplitude of SSP were measured while drawing a 0.018-inch copper nickel-titanium (Cu-NiTi) archwire at a speed of 0.5mm/min for 5 minutes at 36.5 degree celsius. Two-way analysis of variance and independent t-test were performed. Tooth displacement increased SFF and KFF (control [LD, GD], P < 0.01). Vibration reduced SFF, KFF, and SSP amplitude in the control group (P < 0.05, P < 0.05, and P < 0.001, respectively), but not in the LD and GD groups. SSP frequency was increased by vibration in the control, LD, and GD groups (all P < 0.001), and it was lower in the LD and GD groups than in the control group (P < 0.01). When conventional brackets and a 0.018-inch Cu-NiTi archwire were used in the tooth displacement conditions (LD and GD), vibration did not significantly reduce SFF, KFF, or SSP amplitude. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Hysteresis phenomenon in nuclear reactor dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirayesh, Behnam; Pazirandeh, Ali [Islamic Azad Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Science and Research Branch; Akbari, Monireh [Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Mathematics

    2017-05-15

    This paper applies a nonlinear analysis method to show that hysteresis phenomenon, due to the Saddle-node bifurcation, may occur in the nuclear reactor. This phenomenon may have significant effects on nuclear reactor dynamics and can even be the beginning of a nuclear reactor accident. A system of four dimensional nonlinear ordinary differential equations was considered to study the hysteresis phenomenon in a typical nuclear reactor. It should be noted that the reactivity was considered as a nonlinear function of state variables. The condition for emerging hysteresis was investigated using Routh-Hurwitz criterion and Sotomayor's theorem for saddle node bifurcation. A numerical analysis is also provided to illustrate the analytical results.

  18. Methods to Minimize Zero-Missing Phenomenon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Silva, Filipe Miguel Faria; Bak, Claus Leth; Gudmundsdottir, Unnur Stella

    2010-01-01

    With the increasing use of high-voltage AC cables at transmission levels, phenomena such as current zero-missing start to appear more often in transmission systems. Zero-missing phenomenon can occur when energizing cable lines with shunt reactors. This may considerably delay the opening of the ci......With the increasing use of high-voltage AC cables at transmission levels, phenomena such as current zero-missing start to appear more often in transmission systems. Zero-missing phenomenon can occur when energizing cable lines with shunt reactors. This may considerably delay the opening...... of the circuit breaker, leaving the system unprotected and vulnerable to failures. Methods to prevent zero-missing phenomenon are still being studied and compared in order to identify effective countermeasures. This paper contributes to these efforts, by presenting several countermeasures that can be applied...

  19. Efferents and afferents in an intact muscle nerve: background activity and effects of sural nerve stimulation in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessou, P; Joffroy, M; Pagès, B

    1981-11-01

    1. The background activity was observed in gamma and alpha efferent fibres and in group I and II fibres innervating the muscle gastrocnemius lateralis or medialis. The reflex effects of ipsilateral and contralateral sural nerve stimulations on the muscle efferents were analysed together with their consequences upon the afferents of the same muscle. The observations were made in the decerebrated cat without opening the neural loops between the muscle and the spinal cord.2. The multi-unit discharges of each category of fibres were obtained, on line, by an original electronic device (Joffroy, 1975, 1980) that sorted the action potentials from the whole electrical activity of a small branch of gastrocnemius lateralis or medialis nerve according to the direction and velocity of propagation of the potentials.3. The small nerve may be regarded as a representative sample of different functional groups of fibres conducting faster than 12 m.sec(-1) and supplying gastrocnemius muscles.4. Some gamma efferents were always tonically firing except when a transient flaccid state developed. Usually the alpha efferents were silent, probably because the muscle was fixed close to the minimal physiological length.5. Separate and selective stimulations of Abeta, Adelta and C fibres of ipsilateral and contralateral sural nerve showed that each group could induce the excitation of gamma neurones. The reciprocal inhibition period of alpha efferents during a flexor reflex was only once accompanied by a small decrease in gamma-firing.6. The reflex increase of over-all frequency of gamma efferents resulted from an increased firing rate of tonic gamma neurones and from the recruitment of gamma neurones previously silent. When the gamma efferents in the small nerve naturally occurred in two subgroups, the slower-conducting subgroup (mainly composed of tonic gamma axons) was activated before the faster-conducting subgroup (mostly composed by gamma axons with no background discharge). Some rare

  20. Kaolin-activated thromboelastography in echocardiographically normal cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Daniel J; Rush, John E; deLaforcade, Armelle M; Shaw, Scott P

    2012-06-01

    To determine reference values for kaolin-activated thromboelastography in echocardiographically normal cats. 30 healthy cats without evidence of cardiomyopathy on echocardiographic examination. All cats underwent echocardiographic examination, the findings of which were reviewed by a board-certified cardiologist. Cats that struggled (n = 10) received mild sedation with butorphanol and midazolam IM to permit phlebotomy without interruption in jugular venous blood flow. Blood samples were collected for analysis of thromboelastography variables, PCV, total solids concentration, platelet count, activated partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time, fibrinogen concentration, and antithrombin concentration. All 4 thromboelastography variables had Kaolin-activated thromboelastography was a reliable test with unremarkable intra-assay variability in echocardiographically normal cats. Sedation may affect certain thromboelastography variables, but the effect is unlikely to be clinically important. It remains unknown whether subclinical cardiomyopathy has a significant effect on thromboelastography variables in cats.

  1. Abnormal Raman spectral phenomenon of silicon nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The Raman spectra of two one-dimensional silicon nanowire samples with different excitation wavelengths were measured and an abnormal phenomenon was discovered that the Raman spectral features change with the wavelengths of excitation. Closer analysis of the crystalline structure of samples and the changes in Raman spectral features showed that the abnormal behavior is the result of resonance Raman scattering selection effect.

  2. A Phenomenon of Overqualification in Personnel Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Saul; Nevo, Baruch

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the concept of overqualification as a phenomenon of nonlinearity in the upper deciles of the ability-performance relationship. In three job contexts (military, academic, and industrial), the ability-performance relationship is characterized by a strong linear component below the mean and a ceiling effect at various points above…

  3. The Feline Mystique: Dispelling the Myth of the Independent Cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltow, Willow

    1984-01-01

    Describes learning activities about cats for primary and intermediate grades. Primary grade activity subjects include cat behavior, needs, breeds, storybook cats, and celestial cats. Intermediate grade activity subjects include cat history, care, language, literary cats, and cats in art. (BC)

  4. Rabies prevention and management of cats in the context of trap-neuter-vaccinate-release programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roebling, A D; Johnson, D; Blanton, J D; Levin, M; Slate, D; Fenwick, G; Rupprecht, C E

    2014-06-01

    Domestic cats are an important part of many Americans' lives, but effective control of the 60-100 million feral cats living throughout the country remains problematic. Although trap-neuter-vaccinate-return (TNVR) programmes are growing in popularity as alternatives to euthanizing feral cats, their ability to adequately address disease threats and population growth within managed cat colonies is dubious. Rabies transmission via feral cats is a particular concern as demonstrated by the significant proportion of rabies post-exposure prophylaxis associated with exposures involving cats. Moreover, TNVR has not been shown to reliably reduce feral cat colony populations because of low implementation rates, inconsistent maintenance and immigration of unsterilized cats into colonies. For these reasons, TNVR programmes are not effective methods for reducing public health concerns or for controlling feral cat populations. Instead, responsible pet ownership, universal rabies vaccination of pets and removal of strays remain integral components to control rabies and other diseases. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. [The effect of halothane and enflurane as well as of propanidid and ketamin on the aortic baroreceptor discharge of decerebrated cats (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagenau, W; Pietsch, D; Arndt, J O

    1976-07-01

    The effect of halothane, enflurane, propanidid and ketamine on the sensitivity of the aortic baroreceptors and its quantitative relationship with arterial pressure were studied in decerebrated cats. Receptor response curves (single baroreceptor fibres of the depressor nerve) were constructed by plotting the average discharge rate (spikes/sec) against the aortic mean pressure and the effect of the anaesthetics on them was analysed. The blood pressure was changed over wide ranges by inflating a balloon placed in the thoracic part of the descending aorta through a femoral artery. Receptor sensitivity increased with halothane and enflurane, yet it decreased with propanidid. It remained uneffected duringanesthesia with ketamine. Thus, different anesthetics act differently on the afferent impulse traffic of baroreceptors. The possible role of these effects on blood pressure control during anaesthesia is discussed.

  6. Behavioral, sleep-waking and EEG power spectral effects following the two specific 5-HT uptake inhibitors zimeldine and alaproclate in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerfelt, L; Ursin, R

    1991-11-26

    Sleep, waking and EEG power spectra were studied in cats for 15 h following peroral administration of placebo or 10 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg of the 5-HT reuptake inhibitors zimeldine and alaproclate. Behavior was also observed during the initial period following drug administration. Both drugs had effects on motor behavior and initiated hallucinatory like behavior. Zimeldine increased latency to stable sleep and to SWS-2. Alaproclate increased latency to SWS-1. Both drugs increased SWS (NREM sleep) and particularly SWS-2. REM sleep latency was increased and REM sleep was reduced following both drugs. EEG slow wave activity was increased following zimeldine. It is concluded that the 5-HT stimulation caused by the drugs yields complex effects on the sleep-waking axis, both sleep incompatible and sleep promoting effects.

  7. Weak Cat-Operads

    CERN Document Server

    Dosen, K

    2010-01-01

    An operad (this paper deals with non-symmetric operads) may be conceived as a partial algebra with a family of insertion operations, Gerstenhaber's circle-i products, which satisfy two kinds of associativity, one of them involving commutativity. A Cat-operad is an operad enriched over the category Cat of small categories, as a 2-category with small hom-categories is a category enriched over Cat. The notion of weak Cat-operad is to the notion of Cat-operad what the notion of bicategory is to the notion of 2-category. The equations of operads like associativity of insertions are replaced by isomorphisms in a category. The goal of this paper is to formulate conditions concerning these isomorphisms that ensure coherence, in the sense that all diagrams of canonical arrows commute. This is the sense in which the notions of monoidal category and bicategory are coherent. The coherence proof in the paper is much simplified by indexing the insertion operations in a context-independent way, and not in the usual manner. ...

  8. Koebner Phenomenon and Mycosis Fungoides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eve Lebas

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Mycosis fungoides (MF is the most frequent type of primary cutaneous T-cell/NK-cell lymphoma. The Koebner phenomenon is defined as the appearance of cutaneous lesions on previously noninvolved skin following trauma and is observed in a series of cutaneous diseases including psoriasis, lichen planus, viral warts, molluscum contagiosum, etc. In this case report, 3 patients with longstanding MF are presented, the 1st with the appearance of a circumscribed early-stage type MF lesion rapidly following a surgical excision of an infundibular cyst, the 2nd with the appearance of a unique unilateral palmar tumoral MF lesion at the pressure site of a crutch, and the 3rd presented localized MF early stage lesions at the friction site of a belt. This report suggests that some MF patients may experience Koebner phenomenon-induced MF lesions and that MF should be added to the long list of skin diseases potentially exhibiting the Koebner phenomenon.

  9. Effects of bicarbonate buffer on acetylcholine-, adenosine 5'triphosphate-, and cyanide-induced responses in the cat petrosal ganglion in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Carolina R; Arroyo, Jorge; Alcayaga, Julio

    2002-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh), adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) and sodium cyanide (NaCN) activate petrosal ganglion (PG) neurons in vitro, and evoke ventilatory reflexes in situ, which are abolished after bilateral chemosensory denervation. Because in our previous experiments we superfused the isolated PG with solutions free of CO2/HCO3- buffer, we studied its effects on the PG responses evoked in vitro. PGs from adult cats were superfused at a constant pH, with HEPES-supplemented (5 mM) saline with or without CO2/HCO3- (5%/26.2 mM) buffer, and carotid (sinus) nerve frequency discharge (fCN) recorded. Increases in fCN evoked by ACh, ATP and NaCN in CO2- free saline were significantly reduced (P buffer appears to reduce PG neurons sensitivity to ACh, ATP and NaCN, an effect that may underlie the lack of ventilatory reflexes after bilateral chemodenervation.

  10. Gastrointestinal parasites of cats in Denmark assessed by necropsy and concentration McMaster technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takeuchi-Storm, Nao; Mejer, H.; Al-Sabi, Mohammad Nafi Solaiman

    2015-01-01

    The large population of feral cats in Denmark may potentially transmit pathogens to household cats and zoonotic parasites to humans. A total of 99 euthanized cats; feral cats (n = 92) and household cats with outdoor access (n = 7), were collected from March to May 2014 from the Zealand region...... was the second most common gastrointestinal nematode of cats but had the highest intensity of infection. For T. cati, prevalence and worm burden were significantly higher in feral than household cats. No juvenile cats were infected with H. taeniaeformis, and age thus had a significant effect on prevalence......, Denmark. The sedimentation and counting technique (SCT) was used to isolate helminths and coproscopy was done by concentration McMaster technique (c-McMaster). Overall, 90.1% of the cats were infected and a total of 10 species were recorded by SCT: 5 nematode species: Toxocara cati (84.8%). , Ollulanus...

  11. Examining the tsetse teneral phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L R eHaines

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Tsetse flies are the most important vectors of African trypanosomiasis but, surprisingly, are highly refractory to trypanosome parasite infection. In populations of wild caught flies, it is rare to find mature salivarian and mouthpart parasite infection rates exceeding 1% and 15%, respectively. This inherent refractoriness persists throughout the lifespan of the fly, although extreme starvation and suboptimal environmental conditions can cause a reversion to the susceptible phenotype. The teneral phenomenon is a phenotype unique to newly emerged, previously unfed tsetse, and is evidenced by a profound susceptibility to trypanosome infection. This susceptibility persists for only a few days post emergence and decreases with fly age and bloodmeal acquisition. Researchers investigating trypanosome-tsetse interactions routinely exploit this phenomenon by using young, unfed (teneral flies to naturally boost trypanosome establishment and maturation rates. A suite of factors may contribute, at least in part, to this unusual parasite permissive phenotype. These include the physical maturity of midgut barriers, the activation of immunoresponsive tissues and their effector molecules, and the role of the microflora within the midgut of the newly emerged fly. However, at present, the molecular mechanisms that underpin the teneral phenomenon still remain unknown. This review will provide a historical overview of the teneral phenomenon and will examine immune-related factors that influence, and may help us better understand, this unusual phenotype.

  12. Effect of pre-cardiac and adult stages of Dirofilaria immitis in pulmonary disease of cats: CBC, bronchial lavage cytology, serology, radiographs, CT images, bronchial reactivity, and histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray Dillon, A; Tillson, D M; Wooldridge, A; Cattley, R; Hathcock, J; Brawner, W R; Cole, R; Welles, B; Christopherson, P W; Lee-Fowler, T; Bordelon, S; Barney, S; Sermersheim, M; Garbarino, R; Wells, S Z; Diffie, E B; Schachner, E R

    2014-11-15

    A controlled, blind study was conducted to define the initial inflammatory response and lung damage associated with the death of precardiac stages of Dirofilaria immitis in cats as compared to adult heartworm infections and normal cats. Three groups of six cats each were used: UU: uninfected untreated controls; PreS I: infected with 100 D. immitis L3 by subcutaneous injection and treated topically with selamectin 32 and 2 days pre-infection and once monthly for 8 months); IU: infected with 100 D. immitis L3 and left untreated. Peripheral blood, serum, bronchial lavage, and thoracic radiographic images were collected from all cats on Days 0, 70, 110, 168, and 240. CT images were acquired on Days 0, 110, and 240. Cats were euthanized, and necropsies were conducted on Day 240 to determine the presence of heartworms. Bronchial rings were collected for in vitro reactivity. Lung, heart, brain, kidney, and liver tissues were collected for histopathology. Results were compared for changes within each group. Pearson and Spearman correlations were performed for association between histologic, radiographic, serologic, hematologic and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) results. Infected cats treated with selamectin did not develop radiographically evident changes throughout the study, were heartworm antibody negative, and were free of adult heartworms and worm fragments at necropsy. Histologic lung scores and CT analysis were not significantly different between PreS I cats and UU controls. Subtle alveolar myofibrosis was noted in isolated areas of several PreS I cats and an eosinophilic BAL cytology was noted on Days 75 and 120. Bronchial ring reactivity was blunted in IU cats but was normal in PreS I and UU cats. The IU cats became antibody positive, and five cats developed adult heartworms. All cats with heartworms were antigen positive at one time point; but one cat was antibody positive, antigen negative, with viable adult females at necropsy. The CT revealed early involvement

  13. Effect of intracoronary administration of anisodamine on slow reflow phenomenon following primary percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Xiang-hua; XUE Ling; FAN Wei-ze; GU Xin-shun; WEI Yong-yun; JIANG Yun-fa; WU Wei-li; LI Shi-qiang; HAO Guo-zhen; WEI Qing-min

    2007-01-01

    Background Many basic and clinical studies have proved that anisodamine can produce significant effect on relieving microvascular spasm, improving and dredging the coronary microcirculation. It may be beneficial to the improvement of slow-reflow phenomenon (SRP) following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for acute myocardial infarction (AMI).So we investigated the effect of intracoronary administration of anisodamine on SRP of infarct related artery (IRA)following primary PCI in patients with ST segment elevated acute myocardial infarction (STEAMI).Methods Twenty-one patients with SRP from a total of 148 STEAMI patients accepted primary PCI were enrolled into this study from September 2004 to December 2005. When SRP happened, nitroglycerin (200 μg) was "bolus" injected firstly into IRA to exclude the spasm of epicardial artery and identify SRP as well as a baseline and self-control agent following PCI. Ten minutes later, 1000 μg of anisodamine was injected into IRA with SRP at 200 μg/s, while the coronary angiography (CAG) was taken before and at 1st, 3rd and 10th minute after administration of nitroglycerin or anisodamine,respectively. The corrected TIMI frame count (cTFC), TIMI myocardial perfusion grade (TMPG) and the diameter of IRA were calculated and analyzed by Gibson's TIMI frame count method using quantitative computer angiography (QCA)system to evaluate the influence of anisodamine on coronary flow and vessel lumen. In the meantime the invasive hemodynamic parameters of intracoronary and systemic artery (systolic, diastolic and mean pressure) and electrocardiogram (ECG) were measured and monitored. The changes of ventricular performance parameters and the adverse reaction were evaluated and followed-up at 1 month post-PCI.Results No significant changes in cTFCs and TMPGs were found at 1st, 3rd and 10th minute after intracoronary administration of nitroglycerin as compared with the baseline control (P>0.05). cTFCs were decreased by 58.3%, 56

  14. Effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and electrical stimulation on survival and function of cochlear spiral ganglion neurons in deafened, developing cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leake, Patricia A; Stakhovskaya, Olga; Hetherington, Alexander; Rebscher, Stephen J; Bonham, Ben

    2013-04-01

    Both neurotrophic support and neural activity are required for normal postnatal development and survival of cochlear spiral ganglion (SG) neurons. Previous studies in neonatally deafened cats demonstrated that electrical stimulation (ES) from a cochlear implant can promote improved SG survival but does not completely prevent progressive neural degeneration. Neurotrophic agents combined with an implant may further improve neural survival. Short-term studies in rodents have shown that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) promotes SG survival after deafness and may be additive to trophic effects of stimulation. Our recent study in neonatally deafened cats provided the first evidence of BDNF neurotrophic effects in the developing auditory system over a prolonged duration Leake et al. (J Comp Neurol 519:1526-1545, 2011). Ten weeks of intracochlear BDNF infusion starting at 4 weeks of age elicited significant improvement in SG survival and larger soma size compared to contralateral. In the present study, the same deafening and BDNF infusion procedures were combined with several months of ES from an implant. After combined BDNF + ES, a highly significant increase in SG numerical density (>50 % improvement re: contralateral) was observed, which was significantly greater than the neurotrophic effect seen with ES-only over comparable durations. Combined BDNF + ES also resulted in a higher density of myelinated radial nerve fibers within the osseous spiral lamina. However, substantial ectopic and disorganized sprouting of these fibers into the scala tympani also occurred, which may be deleterious to implant function. EABR thresholds improved (re: initial thresholds at time of implantation) on the chronically stimulated channels of the implant. Terminal electrophysiological studies recording in the inferior colliculus (IC) revealed that the basic cochleotopic organization was intact in the midbrain in all studied groups. In deafened controls or after ES-only, lower IC

  15. Leptin and ghrelin concentration in hyperthyroid cats before and after radioactive iodine therapy compared to euthyroid control cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsilio, Sina; Glanemann, Barbara; Martin, Lucile; Szladovits, Balazs; Neiger, Reto

    2017-04-19

    Leptin and ghrelin, two peptide hormones with antagonistic effects on satiety and energy balance, could be involved in the pathogenesis of weight loss and polyphagia in cats with hyperthyroidism. Leptin generally decreases appetite and increases energy expenditure, while ghrelin exerts the opposite effects. Leptin and ghrelin were measured in 42 client owned hyperthyroid cats with a body condition score (BCS) ≤ 5/9 before (T0) and 4 weeks after radioactive iodine treatment (RAIT) (T1). Dependent on the serum total thyroxine concentration concentration at T1, cats were sub-classified as still hyperthyroid (ht-ht) (n = 4), euthyroid (ht-eu) (n = 10) or hypothyroid (ht-hypo) (n = 28). Results were compared to those of 22 healthy, euthyroid control cats with a comparable BCS (≤ 5/9) and age (≥ 8 years) to hyperthyroid cats. At T0, there were no significant differences between hyperthyroid and control cats for leptin (p = 0.06) or ghrelin concentrations (p = 0.27). At T1, leptin significantly decreased in ht-hypo cats compared to T0 (p = 0.0008) despite a significantly increased body weight in this group (p = 0.0001). Serum ghrelin concentrations did not differ between hyperthyroid cats with a history of polyphagia compared to non-polyphagic cats (p = 0.42). After RAIT, ghrelin concentration significantly increased in all hyperthyroid cats (p cats with thyroid dysfunction. Leptin fluctuations occurred independently of body weight in different states of thyroid dysfunction; increasing ghrelin concentrations after RAIT suggest a ghrelin-independent mechanism for polyphagia in hyperthyroid cats.

  16. Resistive index for kidney evaluation in normal and diseased cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipisca, Vlad; Murino, Carla; Cortese, Laura; Mennonna, Giuseppina; Auletta, Luigi; Vulpe, Vasile; Meomartino, Leonardo

    2016-06-01

    The objectives were to determine the resistive index (RI) in normal cats and in cats with various renal diseases, and to evaluate the effect of age on RI. The subjects were cats that had ultrasonography (US) of the urinary tract and RI measurement at our centre between January 2003 and April 2014. Based on clinical evaluation, biochemical and haematological tests, urinalysis and US, the cats were classified as healthy or diseased. RI measurements were made from the interlobar or arcuate arteries. Data were analysed for differences between the right and the left kidney, the two sexes, different age groups in healthy cats, and between healthy and diseased cats. A total of 116 cats (68 males, 48 females) were included: 24 healthy and 92 diseased. In the healthy cats, RI (mean ± SD) differed significantly (P = 0.02) between the right kidney (0.54 ± 0.07) and the left kidney (0.59 ± 0.08). For the left kidney, RI was significantly higher in cats with chronic kidney disease (0.73 ± 0.12) and acute kidney injury (0.72 ± 0.08) (P = 0.0008). For the right kidney, RI was significantly higher in cats with chronic kidney disease (0.72 ± 0.11), acute kidney injury (0.74 ± 0.08), polycystic kidney disease (0.77 ± 0.11) and renal tumour (0.74 ± 0.001) (P cats, useful in the differential diagnosis of diffuse renal diseases. While it does not change with the age of the cat, ultrasonographers should be aware that RI may differ between the two kidneys. © ISFM and AAFP 2015.

  17. Tetrathyridiosis in a domestic shorthair cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothee Dahlem

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Case summary This report describes the clinical and parasitological findings in a domestic shorthair cat with isolated thoracic tetrathyridiosis. The cat was a stray from Malta that had lived in Germany for several years since as an indoor-only cat. Therefore, the process of infection remains very unusual. In this case it must be considered that the cat had been infected years previously while in Malta, and had lived at least 4 years without any clinical signs. It was possible to diagnose this uncommon disease and initiate an effective treatment with fenbendazole, praziquantel and supportive care. Clinical signs, as well as radiographic findings, were regressive with this treatment. Relevance and novel information Tetrathyridiosis is a rare finding in cats, especially in Germany, but it seems to be a potential differential diagnosis of pleural effusion. Mesocestoides corti, which was the causative parasite in this case, has not previously been isolated in Germany. Because tetrathyridiosis is only diagnosed post mortem in most cases, little is known about effective therapeutic options. Furthermore, clinical signs of this disease can be absent for several years and can potentially be triggered by neoplastic conditions or immunosuppression. Tetrathyridiosis seems to be a treatable disease that can be controlled by adequate antiparasitic therapy.

  18. Vibrational Schroedinger Cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis, Z.; Janszky, J.; Vinogradov, An. V.; Kobayashi, T.

    1996-01-01

    The optical Schroedinger cat states are simple realizations of quantum states having nonclassical features. It is shown that vibrational analogues of such states can be realized in an experiment of double pulse excitation of vibrionic transitions. To track the evolution of the vibrational wave packet we derive a non-unitary time evolution operator so that calculations are made in a quasi Heisenberg picture.

  19. The Fishing Cat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙雅飞; 乐伟国

    2008-01-01

    @@ 一、故事内容 A cat goes fishing every day. He wants to eat fish, but he can't catch any fish. One day, he goes to the river as usual. Suddenly, a fish comes out. He catches the fish and putsthe fish in the basket. He's very happy, but he forgest to put the lid on the basket.

  20. A tortoiseshell male cat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A. S.; Berg, Lise Charlotte; Almstrup, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    . Immunostaining using anti-vimentin and anti-VASA (DDX4) showed that only Sertoli cells and no germ cells were observed in the testicular tubules. As no sign of spermatogenesis was detected, we conclude that this is a classic case of a sterile, male tortoiseshell cat with a 39,XXY chromosome complement. © 2013 S...

  1. Systemic uptake of buprenorphine by cats after oral mucosal administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, S A; Taylor, P M; Sear, J W

    2003-05-31

    The plasma concentration of buprenorphine was measured by radioimmunoassay in six female cats after the administration of 0.01 mg/kg (0.033 ml/kg) buprenorphine hydrochloride solution into the side of the cat's mouth. Blood samples were taken through a preplaced jugular catheter before and one, two, four, six, 10, 15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes, and two, four, six, 12 and 24 hours after the dose was administered. The buprenorphine was accepted well by all the cats and did not cause salivation or vomiting. Its median peak plasma concentration was 7.5 ng/ml and was reached after 15 minutes. The pharmacokinetic data were similar to the pharmacokinetic data obtained after the intramuscular and intravenous administration of buprenorphine to cats from the same colony, suggesting that the mucosal route of administration should be as effective as intravenous and intramuscular injections. In addition, the pH of the oral cavity of 26 cats was measured with pH paper, and 100 cat owners were asked their preferred method of administering drugs to cats. The pH of the cats' mouths was between 8 and 9, and the technique preferred by the cat owners was the use of drops placed in the mouth.

  2. Monitoring the effect of cat removal on reproductive success in Red-billed Tropicbird colonies on Saba, 2013 - 2014: first season of results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terpstra, M.; Woude, van der E.; Wulf, K.; Rijn, van J.; Debrot, A.O.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most deleterious invasive introduced predators worldwide is the domestic cat which has been found responsible for many island extinctions worldwide. Cats can live off both natural prey and garbage and can be a particularly serious threat to ground-nesting bird populations. Saba is an

  3. Monitoring the effect of cat removal on reproductive success in Red-billed Tropicbird colonies on Saba, 2013 - 2014: first season of results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terpstra, M.; Woude, van der E.; Wulf, K.; Rijn, van J.; Debrot, A.O.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most deleterious invasive introduced predators worldwide is the domestic cat which has been found responsible for many island extinctions worldwide. Cats can live off both natural prey and garbage and can be a particularly serious threat to ground-nesting bird populations. Saba is an impo

  4. Local Dependence in an Operational CAT: Diagnosis and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommerich, Mary; Segall, Daniel O.

    2008-01-01

    The accuracy of CAT scores can be negatively affected by local dependence if the CAT utilizes parameters that are misspecified due to the presence of local dependence and/or fails to control for local dependence in responses during the administration stage. This article evaluates the existence and effect of local dependence in a test of…

  5. Feline hepatic biotransformation of diazepam: Differences between cats and dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beusekom, Cyrina D; van den Heuvel, Jeroen J M W; Russel, Frans G M; Schrickx, Johannes A

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to humans and dogs, diazepam has been reported to induce severe hepatic side effects in cats, particularly after repeated dosing. With the aim to elucidate the mechanisms underlying this apparent sensitivity of cats to drug-induced liver injury, in a series of in vitro experiments, the

  6. Recent achievements in the management of Raynaud's phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumhäkel, Magnus; Böhm, Michael

    2010-04-15

    Raynaud's phenomenon is a clinical disorder with episodic digital ischemic vasospasm triggered by cold- or emotional-stress. It was first mentioned by Maurice Raynaud in 1862 describing "a local asphyxia of the extremities" and was further divided into primary Raynaud's disease and secondary Raynaud's phenomenon, which is often related to connective tissue diseases, but also physical or chemical strain. Though pathophysiology of Raynaud's phenomenon is still poorly understood, systemic and local vascular effects are most likely to be involved in primary Raynaud's disease. In secondary Raynaud's phenomenon additional abnormalities in vascular structure and function may play the major role. Thus, medical treatment of Raynaud's phenomenon remains unsatisfactory, due to limited understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms. This review addresses current evidence for medical treatment of primary and secondary Raynaud's phenomenon with regard to pathophysiological mechanisms as well as future perspectives.

  7. Wellness as a worldwide phenomenon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Heather; Bernstein, Jennifer; Bowman, Diana M

    2014-10-01

    This article examines the concept of wellness through a comparative political economy and legal framework. It asks whether wellness, an increasingly defined term within US federal and state legislative instruments including, for example, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, is primarily a US-centric phenomenon. Or is wellness, in its various different guises, a worldwide phenomenon? By focusing on three distinctly different jurisdictions - the United States, Germany, and Australia - this article examines wellness through the lens of employers, the health care system, employment and tort law, and the greater political economy. It notes that while improving employee health, well-being, and productivity is common across the three countries and their respective cultures, the focus on wellness as a distinct legal concept is unique to the United States. Copyright © 2014 by Duke University Press.

  8. Genetic testing in domestic cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Leslie A

    2012-12-01

    Varieties of genetic tests are currently available for the domestic cat that support veterinary health care, breed management, species identification, and forensic investigations. Approximately thirty-five genes contain over fifty mutations that cause feline health problems or alterations in the cat's appearance. Specific genes, such as sweet and drug receptors, have been knocked-out of Felidae during evolution and can be used along with mtDNA markers for species identification. Both STR and SNP panels differentiate cat race, breed, and individual identity, as well as gender-specific markers to determine sex of an individual. Cat genetic tests are common offerings for commercial laboratories, allowing both the veterinary clinician and the private owner to obtain DNA test results. This article will review the genetic tests for the domestic cat, and their various applications in different fields of science. Highlighted are genetic tests specific to the individual cat, which are a part of the cat's genome.

  9. Efecto del tratamiento con acetonida de triamcinolona sobre la glucemia en gatos Effect of triamcinolone acetonide treatment on glycemia in cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Colla

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available El gato ha demostrado ser más resistente a la presentación de reacciones adversas a los glucocorticoides aunque su particular sensibilidad a desarrollar hiperglucemia podría signifi car un mayor efecto diabetogénico en esta especie, principalmente durante tratamientos prolongados. Los datos bibliográfi cos en esta área son escasos, por lo que nos propusimos estudiar las modifi caciones en la glucemia de gatos (n=8 tratados con una dosis (0,22 mg/kg por vía subcutánea de acetonida de triamcinolona. Los niveles de glucemia se valoraron indirectamente a través de la medición de fructosamina en plasma inmediatamente antes de la administración del preparado y luego a los 15 días. No se detectaron diferencias signifi cativas entre los valores pre y post administración, sugiriendo este hallazgo un control normal de la glucemia luego de una sola dosis parenteral del glucocorticoide de depósito.Cats have shown to be more resistant to the presentation of adverse reactions to glucocorticoids, although their particular sensibility to develop hyperglycemia could mean a greater diabetogenic effect on this species mainly during prolonged treatments. As bibliography on this area is scarce it was proposed to study the modifi cations on glycemia in cats (n=8 treated with a SC dose of triamcinolone acetonide (0.22 mg/kg. Glycemia levels were indirectly measured by plasma fructosamine immediately before the administration of the drug and on the 15th day. No signifi cant differences were detected between pre and post administration values; this fi nding suggests a normal control of glycemia after a parenteral single dose of the depot glucocorticoid.

  10. PHENOMENON OF CARVED DRIVING WHEELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xianghua; ZHANG Jianwu

    2007-01-01

    A newly found phenomenon of carved driving wheels of a rea-wheel-drive tractor used in an airport is discussed. The circum of every driving wheel is damaged at three regions, which distribute regularly and uniformly. Everyday, the tractor tows a trailer which are times heavier than the tractor, and moves on the same road in the airport. The phenomenon is explained by the torsional self-excited vibration system of the powertrain. The simplified torsional vibration system is discribed by a 2-order ordinary differential equation, which has a limit circle. Experiments and numerical simulations show the followings: Because of the heavy trailer, the slip ratio of the tractor's driving wheels is very large. Therefore, there is severe torsional self-excited vibration in the tractor's drivetrain, and the self-excited vibration results in severe and regular fluctuations of the rear wheel's velocity. The severe fluctuations in velocity fastens the damage of the driving wheels. At the same time, the time interval in which an arbitrary point in the circum of the driving wheel contacts with the road twice is two times more than the period of the torsional self-excited vibration, and this times explained the existence of three damaged regions. At last, it points out that the phenomenon can be avoided when the torsional damping is large enough.

  11. Effect of interactions with humans on behaviour, mucosal immunity and upper respiratory disease of shelter cats rated as contented on arrival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourkow, Nadine; Phillips, Clive J C

    2015-10-01

    Sustained positive affect may decrease vulnerability to upper respiratory infections in cats admitted to a shelter. Incidence of upper respiratory infections was examined in cats rated as Content upon admission to an animal shelter when provided with or without treatment to sustain contentment. Ninety-six cats rated as Content upon admission were provided with either human interaction, including petting, playing, and grooming, in four 10min sessions/d for 10 days or were exposed to a control treatment of a human standing in front of the cage with eyes averted for the same period. Changes in emotional state and mucosal immune responses were measured daily in treated and control groups. Infectious status was determined upon admission and on days 4 and 10 using combined conjunctival and oropharyngeal swab specimens tested by quantitative real-time PCR for feline herpes virus type 1, feline calicivirus, Mycoplasma felis, Chlamydophila felis, and Bordetella bronchiseptica. The onset of upper respiratory disease (URD) was determined by veterinary staff based on clinical signs, including ocular or nasal discharge. Treated cats were more likely to remain Content (Incident Rate Ratio [IRR]:1.13, Confidence Interval: 0.98-1.30, P <0.0001) and less likely to be rated as Anxious or Frustrated than Control cats over a 10 day period (IRR: 0.61, 95% CI: 0.42-0.88, P =0.007). Feline secretory IgA (S-IgA) quantified in faeces by ELISA techniques, was greater for Treated than Control cats (1451 Vs 846μg/g). Within the Treatment group, S-IgA was greater for cats that sustained Contentment throughout the study period compared to cats that became Anxious or Frustrated (1846 Vs 1394μg/g). An increasing proportion of Control than Treated cats shed pathogens over time (Control 22%, 36%, 61%; Treated 35%, 26%, 32% on d 1, 4 and 10, respectively; P =0.006). Control cats were more likely to develop URD than Treated cats (HR 2.9, CI: 1.30-6.67, P =0.01). Cats that responded positively to

  12. Cognitive activation theory of stress (CATS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursin, Holger; Eriksen, Hege R

    2010-05-01

    The cognitive activation theory of stress (CATS) is based on a long series of experiments on animals and on humans, in the laboratory, and in real life situations. From the common sense coping concept formulated by Seymour Levine; coping is when my "tommy" does not hurt, we have advanced to a systematic theory for what is behind the relaxed and happy coping rat (and cat). We also cover the translational leap to humans, starting with the now classic parachutist study. The bridge is based on formal and symbolic definitions, a theoretical short cut that Levine actually never really accepted. The essential pathophysiological concept is the potential pathological effects of sustained activation, which may occur in the absence of coping (positive response outcome expectancy). We review the current status of CATS in Behavioural Medicine by discussing its potential explanatory power in epidemiology, prevention and treatment of "subjective health complaints".

  13. Dissymmetric flow phenomenon in a multistrand tundish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The dissymmetric flow phenomenon exists in a symmetric multistrand tundish. It was studied by the physical simulation experiment. The fundamental flow characteristic of dissymmetry was analyzed. The asymmetry of the flow field, the temperature field, and the inclusions distribution without flow-control devices (FCDs) were compared with those with FCDs. It is proved that the asymmetry of the flow and temperature field along the outlets at the long range is more obvious. The symmetric FCDs installation has a slight effect on the dissymmetric temperature field, simultaneously, the symmetry of the average residence time and the fluid flow pattern has improved, and the fluid flow in the tundish has been more reasonable. In case of a symmetric multistrand tundish having a large volume, the influence of the dissymmetric phenomenon should be considered and the flow behaviors in the whole tundish should be studied completely.

  14. Multiple steady state phenomenon in martensitic transformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Based on the basic facts that the martensitic transformation is a physical phenomenon which occurs in non-equilibrium conditions and there exists the feedback mechanism in the martensitic transformation, the dynamical processes of the isothermal and athermal martensitic transformations were analyzed by using nonlinear theory and a bifurcation theory model was established. It is shown that a multiple steady state phenomenon can take place as austenite is cooled, and the transitions of the steady state temperature between the branches of stable steady states can be considered the transformation from austenite to martensite. This model can estimate the starting temperature of the martensitic transformation and explain some experimental features of the martensitic transformation such as the effects of cooling rate, fluctuation and austenitic grain size on the martensitic transformation.

  15. Cat scratch disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozhkov, V; Madjov, R; Plachkov, I; Arnaudov, P; Chernopolsky, P; Krasnaliev, I

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 24,000 people are infected with cat scratch disease (CSD) every year. CSD is caused by the bacteria Bartonella henselae, a gram-negative bacteria most often transmitted to humans through a bite or scratch from an infected cat or kitten. Although CSD is often a benign and self-limiting condition, it can affect any major organ system in the body, manifesting in different ways and sometimes leading to lifelong sequelae. It is a disease that is often overlooked in primary care because of the wide range of symptom presentation and relative rarity of serious complications. It is important for health care providers to recognize patients at risk for CSD, know what laboratory testing and treatments are available, and be aware of complications that may arise from this disease in the future.

  16. Religion as a Natural Phenomenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennett, Daniel (Tufts University)

    2006-02-15

    Religion is a costly human activity that has evolved over the millennia. Why does it exist and how does it foster such powerful allegiances? To undertake a serious scientific study of religious practices and attitudes we must set aside a traditional exemption from scrutiny which religions have enjoyed. Religious adherents may not welcome this attention, but we should press ahead with it, since if we don't come to understand religion as a natural phenomenon, our attempts to deal with the problems that loom in the twenty-first century will likely be counterproductive.

  17. Antioxidant prevention of Heinz body formation and oxidative injury in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, A S; O'Neill, S; Rogers, Q R; Christopher, M M

    2001-03-01

    To determine the effectiveness of 3 antioxidants in preventing Heinz body anemia in cats. Prospective study. 44 specific-pathogen-free healthy cats. Cats were housed individually, divided randomly into 4 groups, and given the following orally every 12 hours: empty gelcaps (control cats), N-acetylcysteine (NAC, 100 mg/kg of body weight), vitamin E (d,l-alpha-tocopherol; 400 IU), or ascorbate (250 mg). After 2 weeks, Heinz bodies were induced by dietary onion powder (OP; 1% or 3% of dry matter) or propylene glycol (PG, 8% wt/vol in drinking water) for an additional 3 weeks. Intake of treated water or food was recorded daily. Body weight, PCV, Heinz body and reticulocyte percentages, reduced glutathione concentration, and total antioxidant status were measured twice weekly in all cats. Heinz body percentage and degree of anemia did not differ significantly among cats receiving antioxidants and control cats except in cats that ingested water containing PG, in which antioxidant supplementation was associated with a decrease in water intake. Of cats that were fed a diet that contained OP, cats that received NAC had significantly higher reduced glutathione concentrations, compared with other cats in the experiment. Total antioxidant status did not consistently correlate with antioxidant supplementation or type of oxidant administered (ie, OP or PG). Although the effect of antioxidant supplementation on Heinz body anemia in cats was minimal, antioxidants may have subclinical biochemical effects such as GSH sparing that may be important against milder forms of oxidative stress.

  18. A Flea on Schrödinger's Cat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsman, N. P. (Klaas); Reuvers, Robin

    2013-03-01

    We propose a technical reformulation of the measurement problem of quantum mechanics, which is based on the postulate that the final state of a measurement is classical; this accords with experimental practice as well as with Bohr's views. Unlike the usual formulation (in which the post-measurement state is a unit vector in Hilbert space), our version actually opens the possibility of admitting a purely technical solution within the confines of conventional quantum theory (as opposed to solutions that either modify this theory, or introduce unusual and controversial interpretative rules and/or ontologies). To that effect, we recall a remarkable phenomenon in the theory of Schrödinger operators (discovered in 1981 by Jona-Lasinio, Martinelli, and Scoppola), according to which the ground state of a symmetric double-well Hamiltonian (which is paradigmatically of Schrödinger's Cat type) becomes exponentially sensitive to tiny perturbations of the potential as ħ→0. We show that this instability emerges also from the textbook wkb approximation, extend it to time-dependent perturbations, and study the dynamical transition from the ground state of the double well to the perturbed ground state (in which the cat is typically either dead or alive, depending on the details of the perturbation). Numerical simulations show that adiabatically arising perturbations may (quite literally) cause the collapse of the wave-function in the classical limit. Thus, at least in the context of a simple mathematical model, we combine the technical and conceptual virtues of decoherence (which fails to solve the measurement problem but launches the key idea that perturbations may come from the environment) with those of dynamical collapse models à la grw (which do solve the measurement problem but are ad hoc), without sharing their drawbacks: single measurement outcomes are obtained (instead of merely diagonal reduced density matrices), and no modification of quantum mechanics is needed.

  19. Extraterritorial hunting expeditions to intense fire scars by feral cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Hugh W.; Legge, Sarah; Jones, Menna E.; Johnson, Christopher N.

    2016-03-01

    Feral cats are normally territorial in Australia’s tropical savannahs, and hunt intensively with home-ranges only two to three kilometres across. Here we report that they also undertake expeditions of up to 12.5 km from their home ranges to hunt for short periods over recently burned areas. Cats are especially likely to travel to areas burned at high intensity, probably in response to vulnerability of prey soon after such fires. The movements of journeying cats are highly directed to specific destinations. We argue that the effect of this behaviour is to increase the aggregate impact of cats on vulnerable prey. This has profound implications for conservation, considering the ubiquity of feral cats and global trends of intensified fire regimes.

  20. Extraterritorial hunting expeditions to intense fire scars by feral cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Hugh W; Legge, Sarah; Jones, Menna E; Johnson, Christopher N

    2016-03-02

    Feral cats are normally territorial in Australia's tropical savannahs, and hunt intensively with home-ranges only two to three kilometres across. Here we report that they also undertake expeditions of up to 12.5 km from their home ranges to hunt for short periods over recently burned areas. Cats are especially likely to travel to areas burned at high intensity, probably in response to vulnerability of prey soon after such fires. The movements of journeying cats are highly directed to specific destinations. We argue that the effect of this behaviour is to increase the aggregate impact of cats on vulnerable prey. This has profound implications for conservation, considering the ubiquity of feral cats and global trends of intensified fire regimes.

  1. Contact to cat or dog, allergies and parental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apfelbacher, Christian Joachim; Ollert, Markus; Ring, Johannes; Behrendt, Heidrun; Krämer, Ursula

    2010-03-01

    Whether or not associations between animal contact and allergy/atopy are homogeneous across social strata has not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to estimate the association between animal contact (cat, dog) and allergy/atopy in 6-yr-old school beginners, stratified by parental educational level. A total of 30794, 6-yr old children participated in cross-sectional studies between 1991 and 2000 in Germany. Allergic sensitization to common aeroallergens and symptoms and diagnoses of atopic diseases (asthma, eczema, hay fever) were the dependent variables. Contact with dog/cat were the independent variables. Logistic regression was used to adjust for confounding. Analyses were stratified for parental education. Prevalences of hay fever, eczema, specific sensitization to pollen and house dust mite increased, while the prevalence of contact to cat and dog decreased with parental educational level. Globally significant positive associations between cat contact and sensitization to cat (interaction significant) and between dog contact and wheezing remained significant in the highest and medium/highest educational strata respectively. A globally significant inverse association between cat contact and hay fever remained significant in the highest educational stratum only. The inverse association of contact to dog with eczema was globally significant, but not in the strata. When estimating the associations between animal contact and allergy/atopy in children, effect modification by social status should be considered. Cat contact seems to increase the odds of sensitization to cat only in children whose parents have a high level of education.

  2. The effects of zimeldine and alaproclate combined with a small dose of 5-HTP on waking and sleep stages in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerfelt, L; Ursin, R

    1987-04-01

    Sleep and waking stages in cats were studied 8 h following administration of zimeldine and alaproclate, in combination with saline or 5-hydroxy-1-tryptophan (5-HTP). Both drugs in combination with saline reduced rapid eye movement sleep and ponto-geniculo-occipital wave activity, and the effects were potentiated with 5-HTP. After administration of zimeldine in combination with 5-HTP there was an increase in synchronized waking (W-2), followed by an increase in slow wave sleep (SWS), at first SWS-1 with spindles and then highly synchronized SWS-2. The changes were interpreted as reflecting a serotonergic deactivating effect expressed by an electroencephalographic synchronizing effect. This is consistent with earlier studies following serotonin depletion and serotonin precursor loading. After alaproclate in combination with 5-HTP there were changes in W-2 and SWS-1 suggestive of the same process but much less pronounced. The difference between the two serotonin uptake inhibitors is interpreted as being due to regional differences in their uptake inhibition.

  3. Antitumoral and antioxidant effects of a hydroalcoholic extract of cat's claw (Uncaria tomentosa) (Willd. Ex Roem. & Schult) in an in vivo carcinosarcoma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreifuss, Arturo Alejandro; Bastos-Pereira, Amanda Leite; Avila, Thiago Vinicius; Soley, Bruna da Silva; Rivero, Armando J; Aguilar, José Luis; Acco, Alexandra

    2010-07-06

    The present work intended to study the antitumoral and antioxidant effects of Uncaria tomentosa (UT) hydroalcoholic extract in the Walker-256 cancer model. Walker-256 cells were subcutaneously inoculated in the pelvic limb of male Wistar rats. Daily gavage with UT extract (10, 50 or 100 mg kg(-1), Groups UT) or saline solution (Control, Group C) was subsequently initiated, until 14 days afterwards. For some parameters, a group of healthy rats (Baseline, Group B) was added. At the end of treatment the following parameters were evaluated: (a) tumor volume and mass; (b) plasmatic concentration of urea, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH); (c) hepatic and tumoral activity of catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), as well as the rate of lipid peroxidation (LPO) and gluthatione (GSH); and (d) hepatic glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity. The reactivity of UT extract with the stable free radical 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) was assessed in parallel. UT hydroalcoholic extract successfully reduced the tumor growth. In addition, treatment with UT reduced the activity of AST, which had been increased as a result of tumor inoculation, thus attempting to return it to normal levels. UT did not reverse the increase of LDH and GGT plasma levels, although all doses were remarkably effective in reducing urea plasma levels. An important in vitro free radical-scavenging activity was detected at various concentrations of UT extract (1-300 microg mL(-1)). Treatment also resulted in increased CAT activity in liver, while decreasing it in tumor tissue. SOD activity was reduced in liver as well as in tumor, compared to Group C. No statistical significance concerning ALT, GST, LPO or GSH were observed. This data represent an in vivo demonstration of both antitumoral and antioxidant effects of UT hydroalcoholic extract. The antineoplastic activity may result, partially at least

  4. Cell phenomenology: The first phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattee, H H

    2015-12-01

    As a broad academic discipline phenomenology may be summarized as the study from a first person point of view of what appears to subjective human conscious experience. As a historical philosophical movement phenomenology was often motivated by the belief that subjective human experience is the proper foundation of all philosophy. I explore phenomena from a broader evolutionary and physical point of view. I consider a phenomenon as the subjective consequence of a physical interaction with an individual organism. In physical terms, a phenomenon requires some form of detection or measurement. What is detected is determined by the organism, and is potentially functional for the organism as a self or subject. The concept of function has meaning only for living organisms. The classical human mind-body problem is an ill-defined complicated case of the more general epistemic subject-object problem, which at the origin of life I reduce to the primitive symbol-matter problem. I argue that the first memory-based self-replicating unit, like a cell, is the most primitive case of a necessary symbol-matter distinction. The first phenomena, which include all forms or sensing, detection, and measurement, require a subject-object distinction, called the epistemic cut. It is only because of such a subject-object distinction that populations of individual subjects can selectively adapt to their environment by heritable variations. This basic evolutionary process requires distinguishing the individual's subjective phenomena from the objective events of inexorable physical laws.

  5. Effects of preactivated MC540 in the treatment of lymphocytic plasmacytic stomatitis in feline leukemia virus and feline immunodeficiency virus positive cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggs, R B; Lobprise, H B; Matthews, J L; Gulliya, K S

    1993-03-01

    Photoactive compounds and drugs are used therapeutically as antibacterial, antiviral and antitumor agents. This report examines the use of a photoactive compound, preactivated merocyanine 540 (pMC540), in the treatment of stomatitis in two cats that are both feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) positive. One of the cats was also feline leukemia virus (FeLV) positive. Dramatic short term improvement is reported with the dosage regimen and complications.

  6. Dystocia in the cat evaluated using an insurance database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst, Bodil Ström; Axnér, Eva; Öhlund, Malin; Möller, Lotta; Egenvall, Agneta

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to describe the incidence of feline dystocia with respect to breed. Methods The data used were reimbursed claims for veterinary care insurance and/or life insurance claims in cats registered in a Swedish insurance database from 1999-2006. Results The incidence rates for dystocia were about 22 cats per 10,000 cat-years at risk, 67 per 10,000 for purebred cats and seven per 10,000 for domestic shorthair cats. The median age was 2.5 years. A significant effect of breed was seen. An incidence rate ratio (IRR) that was significantly higher compared with other purebred cats was seen in the British Shorthair (IRR 2.5), the Oriental group (IRR 2.2), Birman (IRR 1.7), Ragdoll (IRR 1.5) and the Abyssinian group (IRR 1.5). A significantly lower IRR was seen in the Norwegian Forest Cat (IRR 0.38), the Maine Coon (IRR 0.48), the Persian/Exotic group (IRR 0.49) and the Cornish Rex (IRR 0.50). No common factor among the high-risk breeds explained their high risk for dystocia. There was no effect of location; that is, the incidence rate did not differ depending on whether the cat lived in an urban or rural area. Caesarean section was performed in 56% of the cats with dystocia, and the case fatality was 2%. Conclusions and relevance The incidence rate for dystocia was of a similar magnitude in purebred cats as in dogs. The IRR varied significantly among breeds, and the main cause for dystocia should be identified separately for each breed. A selection for easy parturitions in breeding programmes is suggested.

  7. Contraceptive vaccines for the humane control of community cat populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Julie K

    2011-07-01

    Free-roaming unowned stray and feral cats exist throughout the world, creating concerns regarding their welfare as well as their impact on the environment and on public health. Millions of healthy cats are culled each year in an attempt to control their numbers. Surgical sterilization followed by return to the environment is an effective non-lethal population control method but is limited in scope because of expense and logistical impediments. Immunocontraception has the potential to be a more practical and cost-effective method of control. This is a review of current research in immunocontraception in domestic cats. Functional characteristics of an ideal immunocontraceptive for community cats would include a wide margin of safety for target animals and the environment, rapid onset and long duration of activity following a single treatment in males and females of all ages, and sex hormone inhibition. In addition, product characteristics should include stability and ease of use under field conditions, efficient manufacturing process, and low cost to the user. Two reproductive antigens, zona pellucida and GnRH, have been identified as possible targets for fertility control in cats. Zona pellucida, which is used successfully in multiple wildlife species, has achieved little success in cats. In contrast, immunization against GnRH has resulted in long-term contraception in both male and female cats following a single dose. GnRH is an ideal contraceptive target because it regulates pituitary and gonadal hormone responses in both males and females, thus suppressing nuisance behaviors associated with sex hormones in addition to preventing pregnancy. The responsiveness of cats to fertility control via GnRH suppression should encourage researchers and cat control stakeholders to continue efforts to optimize vaccines that induce multiyear contraception following a single dose in a high proportion of treated cats.

  8. The effect of K(+) cations on the phase transitions, and structural, dielectric and luminescence properties of [cat][K0.5Cr0.5(HCOO)3], where cat is protonated dimethylamine or ethylamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptak, Maciej; Gągor, Anna; Sieradzki, Adam; Bondzior, Bartosz; Dereń, Przemysław; Ciupa, Aneta; Trzebiatowska, M; Mączka, Mirosław

    2017-05-17

    We report the synthesis, crystal structure, and dielectric, vibrational and emission spectra of two novel heterometallic perovskite-type metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) of the following formula: [(CH3)2NH2][K0.5Cr0.5(HCOO)3] (DMAKCr) and [C2H5NH3][K0.5Cr0.5(HCOO)3] (EtAKCr). DMAKCr crystallizes in a trigonal structure (R3[combining macron] space group) and undergoes an order-disorder phase transition to the monoclinic system (P1[combining macron] space group) at about 190 K. The dielectric studies confirm the presence of first-order relaxor-like structural transformation. In the high-temperature phase, the dimethylammonium cations are dynamically disordered over three equal positions and upon cooling the dynamical disorder evolves into a two-fold one. This partial ordering is accompanied by a small distortion of the metal-formate framework. EtAKCr crystallizes in a monoclinic structure (P21/n space group) with ordered EtA(+) cations and does not experience any phase transition. The differences in the thermal behavior caused by the substitution of Na(+) ions by larger K(+) ions in the [cat]M(I)M(III) (cat = DMA(+), EtA(+), M(I) = Na(+), K(+) and M(III) = Cr(3+) and Fe(3+)) heterometallic MOF family are discussed taking into account the impact of the hydrogen bond (HB) pattern and other factors affecting the stability of metal-formate frameworks. The optical studies show that DMANaCr and EtAKCr exhibit Cr(3+)-based emission characteristics for intermediate ligand field strength.

  9. Factors affecting urine specific gravity in apparently healthy cats presenting to first opinion practice for routine evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rishniw, Mark; Bicalho, Rodrigo

    2015-04-01

    Evidence suggests that apparently healthy cats presenting for routine evaluation should have a randomly sampled urine specific gravity (USG) >1.035. A USG cats presenting to first opinion practice in an observational study, using either in-clinic refractometers or measurements provided by reference laboratories, and examined factors that might affect USG. In-clinic refractometers were calibrated using distilled water (specific gravity = 1.000). The USG was >1.030 in 91% of cats and >1.035 in 88% of cats; 121 adult cats (⩾6 months old) and five young cats (cats, a pathological cause was identified in 27 adult cats - of these, 26 were >9 years old - but no young cats. No cause was identified in 43 adult cats, and further investigation was not pursued in 51 adult cats. Factors that affected USG included age, diet type, sex, fasting status, drinking avidity, refractometer type, and the interaction between sex and diet - increasing dietary moisture content lowered USG only in female cats. Most factors minimally affected USG. The odds of having a USG cats presenting to first-opinion practice should have a USG >1.035. Dietary management strategies to lower USG might be less effective than anticipated, and warrant monitoring of USG to determine efficacy. Older cats with USG cats for possible pathology. A lack of stringent refractometer calibration could have caused some errors in estimates of USG by some observers, but would be unlikely to alter markedly the findings.

  10. Relationship between the Presence of Bartonella Species and Bacterial Loads in Cats and Cat Fleas (Ctenocephalides felis) under Natural Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Ricardo; Nachum-Biala, Yaarit; Harrus, Shimon

    2015-08-15

    Cats are considered the main reservoir of three zoonotic Bartonella species: Bartonella henselae, Bartonella clarridgeiae, and Bartonella koehlerae. Cat fleas (Ctenocephalides felis) have been experimentally demonstrated to be a competent vector of B. henselae and have been proposed as the potential vector of the two other Bartonella species. Previous studies have reported a lack of association between the Bartonella species infection status (infected or uninfected) and/or bacteremia levels of cats and the infection status of the fleas they host. Nevertheless, to date, no study has compared the quantitative distributions of these bacteria in both cats and their fleas under natural conditions. Thus, the present study explored these relationships by identifying and quantifying the different Bartonella species in both cats and their fleas. Therefore, EDTA-blood samples and fleas collected from stray cats were screened for Bartonella bacteria. Bacterial loads were quantified by high-resolution melt real-time quantitative PCR assays. The results indicated a moderate correlation between the Bartonella bacterial loads in the cats and their fleas when both were infected with the same Bartonella species. Moreover, a positive effect of the host infection status on the Bartonella bacterial loads of the fleas was observed. Conversely, the cat bacterial loads were not affected by the infection status of their fleas. Our results suggest that the Bartonella bacterial loads of fleas are positively affected by the presence of the bacteria in their feline host, probably by multiple acquisitions/accumulation and/or multiplication events.

  11. Effects of the. cap alpha. -adrenoceptor antagonists phentolamine, phenoxybenzamine, and Idazoxan on sympathetic blood flow control in the periodontal ligament of the cat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwall, B.; Gazelius, B.

    1988-01-01

    Blood flow changes in the periodontal ligament (PDL) were measured indirectly by monitoring the local clearance of /sup 125/I/sup -/ during electric sympathetic nerve stimulation or close intra-arterial infusions of either noradrenaline (NA) or adrenaline (ADR) before and after administration of phentolamine (PA), phenoxybenzamine (PBZ) or Idazoxan (RX). At the doses used in the present study, PA was the only antagonist that significantly reduced the blood flow decrease seen on activation of sympathetic fibers, although PBZ also reduced this response. Idazoxan, however, did not induce the consistent effect on blood flow decreases seen on sympathetic activation. All three ..cap alpha..-adrenoceptor antagonists almost abolished the effects of exogenously administered NA and ADR. The results suggest the presence of functional post-junctional adrenoceptors of both the ..cap alpha.. 1 and ..cap alpha.. 2 subtypes in the sympathetic regulation of the blood flow in the PDL of the cat. A component of the response elicited by electrical sympathetic stimulation appeared to be resistant to ..cap alpha..-adrenoceptor blockade. Administration of guanethidine (which inhibits further release of NA and neuropeptide Y) after PA abolished this residual sympathetic response. 32 refs.

  12. [Effects of solcoseryl on the cerebral blood flow, intracranial pressure, systemic blood pressure and EEG in acute intracranial hypertensive cats (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, S; Asakura, T; Kitamura, K

    1976-02-01

    The experiment was performed on 86 cases under intraperitoneal pentobarbital anesthesia. One balloon was placed in the extradural space of right frontal region, and the other balloon was placed in the left extradural space and the intracranial pressure was measured. A needle was stereotaxically inserted into the subcortical area in order to measure the cerebral blood flow. Systemic blood pressure was recorded by inserting a catheter into the femoral artery, and electrocorticogram was also recorded. An expanding intracranial lesion was made by inflating the extradural balloon with physiological saline. The animals were arbitrarily divided into two groups.: 1) light or moderate groups which intracranial pressure before the injection of drug was below 400 mmH2O. 2) severe groups above 400 mmH2O. After the maintenance of the pressure, Solcoseryl was infused intravenously. The investigation was focused to observe whether Solcoseryl reveales any potent effect on cerebral blood flow, intracranial pressure, systemic blood pressure and on electroencephalogram in acute intracranial hypertension. Results 1) Intravenous injection of Solcoseryl had the effect of lowering intracranial pressure in the light or moderate and severe groups. Particularly, dose of 80 mg/kg showed the marked effect, though with a rebound phenomenon in the light or moderate groups. Furthermore, the effect was more marked and lasting by drip infusion of Solcoseryl and also by intravenous injection of Solcoseryl after pretreatment with hydrocortisone, and at this time no rebound phenomenon was recognized. 2) Solcoseryl had the effect of increasing the cerebral blood flow accompained with the lowering of intracranial pressure. 3) Systemic blood pressure was transiently lowered by the injection of Solcoseryl 20 mg/kg or 80 mg/kg and recovered immediately. 4) Solcoseryl had no effect on electroencephalogram in the severe groups. Conclusion On the basis of these results, it is rational to conclude that

  13. Desires and management preferences of stakeholders regarding feral cats in the Hawaiian islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohr, Cheryl A; Lepczyk, Christopher A

    2014-04-01

    Feral cats are abundant in many parts of the world and a source of conservation conflict. Our goal was to clarify the beliefs and desires held by stakeholders regarding feral cat abundance and management. We measured people's desired abundance of feral cats in the Hawaiian Islands and identified an order of preference for 7 feral cat management techniques. In 2011 we disseminated a survey to 5407 Hawaii residents. Approximately 46% of preidentified stakeholders and 20% of random residents responded to the survey (1510 surveys returned). Results from the potential for conflict index revealed a high level of consensus (86.9% of respondents) that feral cat abundance should be decreased. The 3 most common explanatory variables for respondents' stated desires were enjoyment from seeing feral cats (84%), intrinsic value of feral cats (12%), and threat to native fauna (73%). The frequency with which respondents saw cats and change in the perceived abundance of cats also affected respondent's desired abundance of cats; 41.3% of respondents stated that they saw feral cats daily and 44.7% stated that the cat population had increased in recent years. Other potential environmental impacts of feral cats had little affect on desired abundance. The majority of respondents (78%) supported removing feral cats from the natural environment permanently. Consensus convergence models with data from 1388 respondents who completed the relevant questions showed live capture and lethal injection was the most preferred technique and trap-neuter-release was the least preferred technique for managing feral cats. However, the acceptability of each technique varied among stakeholders. Our results suggest that the majority of Hawaii's residents would like to see effective management that reduces the abundance of feral or free-roaming cats. © 2013 Society for Conservation Biology.

  14. The Phenomenon of Dental Fear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod

    Odontophobia is a rather unique phobia with special psychosomatic components that impact on the dental health of odontophobic persons. It also has psychosocial components largely as a result of destruction of the teeth and subsequent embarrassment that can affect a person and cause a vicious cycle...... of dental fear (see fig. 1). The phenomenon is facilitated by misunderstandings and myths generated by both patients and dentists (see table 1 for examples). The most common reasons given in the literature for such strong fears of dental treatment are: 1) bad experiences in childhood for 85% of cases, 2......) feeling of powerlessness and lack of control over personal emotional reactions and over the social situation in the dental chair, 3) social learning processes in which the image of the dentist is cast in a negative light by the mass media or by the person's relatives or friends and 4) that the person has...

  15. New Phenomenon of Commercial Corruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Nowakowski

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This article is about increase corruption in private sector as commercial corruption. This establishes a wide understanding of that phenomenon in social science and law. Corruption and bribery are types of fraud and are linked with the private sector too. Although certain types of corruption will decline as the private sector grows and consolidates, other new types involving private sector firms may increase. The commercial corruption can be described as relation inside of an organization and as relation between firms. Corruption in private sector in Poland is connected with social distrust and specific organizational culture, too. Commercial corruption is a familiar feature of their societies and has been the focus of law enforcement and institutional reform. Many others problems do not change the fact that such corruption is a new important problem and causes lost of competitiveness and creates a substitute for fair market and competition in Polish economy and abroad.

  16. Are Earthquakes a Critical Phenomenon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, O.

    2014-12-01

    Earthquakes, granular avalanches, superconducting vortices, solar flares, and even stock markets are known to evolve through power-law distributed events. During decades, the formalism of equilibrium phase transition has coined these phenomena as critical, which implies that they are also unpredictable. This work revises these ideas and uses earthquakes as the paradigm to demonstrate that slowly driven systems evolving through uncorrelated and power-law distributed avalanches (UPLA) are not necessarily critical systems, and therefore not necessarily unpredictable. By linking the correlation length to the pdf of the distribution, and comparing it with the one obtained at a critical point, a condition of criticality is introduced. Simulations in the classical Olami-Feder-Christensen (OFC) earthquake model confirm the findings, showing that earthquakes are not a critical phenomenon. However, one single catastrophic earthquake may show critical properties and, paradoxically, the emergence of this temporal critical behaviour may eventually carry precursory signs of catastrophic events.

  17. Urinary cortisol/cortisone ratios in hypertensive and normotensive cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, David J; Elliott, Jonathan; Syme, Harriet M

    2009-06-01

    Hypertension is a common problem in older cats, particularly associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Reduced activity of 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 predisposes to hypertension in human patients by allowing excessive stimulation of the mineralocorticoid receptor by cortisol. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that reduced conversion of cortisol to cortisone contributes to the development of systemic hypertension in some cats with CKD and idiopathic hypertension (iHT). The study included 60 client-owned cats: 21 clinically normal, 16 normotensive cats with CKD (NTCKD), 14 hypertensive cats with CKD (HTCKD) and nine iHTs. Urine cortisol and cortisone were extracted into dichloromethane and chloroform, respectively, prior to analysis by radioimmunoassay. Data are reported as median and range. The Kruskall-Wallis test was used to compare cortisol:cortisone ratios between groups with post-hoc testing using the Mann-Whitney U test. Wilcoxon signed-ranks test was used to compare results before and after treatment of hypertensive cats with amlodipine. The urinary cortisol:cortisone ratio was significantly higher in clinically normal cats (0.87; 0.46-1.39) when compared to NTCKD (0.60; 0.35-1.20; Pcortisone ratio was detected (P=0.327). Reduced urinary cortisol to cortisone conversion does not appear to be associated with systemic hypertension in cats. In fact, the cortisol to cortisone shuttle appears to be more effective in cats with CKD (hypertensive and normotensive) and iHT than clinically normal cats. The mechanism for this potentially adaptive response to kidney disease is not clear.

  18. ServCat Document Selection Guidelines

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The ServCat document selection guidelines were developed for selecting appropriate documents to upload into ServCat. When beginning to upload documents into ServCat,...

  19. Effects of PAD on conduction of action potentials within segmental and ascending branches of single muscle afferents in the cat spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomelí, J; Castillo, L; Linares, P; Rudomin, P

    2000-11-01

    In anesthetized and paralyzed cats under artificial respiration, we examined the extent to which primary afferent depolarization (PAD) might affect invasion of action potentials in intraspinal axonal and/or terminal branches of single muscle afferents. To this end, one stimulating micropipette was placed at the L6 spinal level within the intermediate or motor nucleus, and another one at the L3 level, in or close to Clarke's column. Antidromically conducted responses produced in single muscle afferents by stimulation at these two spinal levels were recorded from fine lateral gastrocnemius nerve filaments. In all fibers examined, stimulation of one branch, with strengths producing action potentials, increased the intraspinal threshold of the other branch when applied at short conditioning testing stimulus intervals (<1.5-2.0 ms), because of the refractoriness produced by the action potentials invading the tested branch. Similar increases in the intraspinal threshold were found in branches showing tonic PAD and also during the PAD evoked by stimulation of group I afferent fibers in muscle nerves. It is concluded that during tonic or evoked PAD, axonal branches in the dorsal columns and myelinated terminals of muscle afferents ending deep in the L6 and L3 segmental levels continue to be invaded by action potentials. These findings strengthen the view that presynaptic inhibition of muscle afferents produced by activation of GABAergic mechanisms is more likely to result from changes in the synaptic effectiveness of the afferent terminals than from conduction failure because of PAD.

  20. Effects of acute administration of omeprazole or ranitidine on basal and vagally stimulated gastric acid secretion and alkalinization of the duodenum in anaesthetized cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fändriks, L; Jönson, C

    1990-02-01

    Experiments were performed on acutely vagotomized cats during chloralose anaesthesia. In order to avoid sympathoadrenergic influences, the adrenal glands were ligated and the splanchnic nerves were cut bilaterally in all animals. The gastric lumen was perfused with saline and the H+ secretion was calculated from pH measurements in the perfusate. HCO3- secretion by the duodenal mucosa was titrated in situ. Omeprazole (4 mg kg-1 i.v., dissolved in PEG400, 40% w/v) did not influence basal or vagally induced HCO3- secretions, but inhibited by about 80% the H+ secretory response induced by electric vagal stimulation. Acute administration of ranitidine (5 mg kg-1 i.v.) transiently lowered arterial pressure, an effect which was followed by a sustained compensatory tachycardia. Ranitidine raised basal duodenal HCO3- secretion by 50% and inhibited vagally induced gastric H+ secretion by about 70%, whereas vagally induced HCO3- secretion was not influenced. The results suggest that vagal nerve stimulation raises the duodenal bicarbonate secretion via a mechanism independent of the level of gastric H+ secretion.

  1. CAT — EDRN Public Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CAT gene product, catalase, occurs in the peroxisome of almost all respiring organismÃÆ'¢â‚¬â„¢s cells. Catalase is a heme enzyme that converts the reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide to water and oxygen, diminishing the toxic effects of hydrogen peroxide on the cell. Catalase promotes growth of cells including T-cells, B-cells, myeloid leukemia cells, melanoma cells, mastocytoma cells and normal and transformed fibroblast cells. Polymorphisms in this gene have been associated with decreases in catalase activity but, to date, acatalasemia is the only disease known to be caused by this gene.

  2. Systemic Cat Scratch Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Min Liao

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic cat scratch disease (CSD is often associated with prolonged fever and microabscesses in the liver and/or spleen. We report a case of systemic CSD with hepatic, splenic and renal involvement in an aboriginal child in Taiwan. A previously healthy 9-year-old girl had an intermittent fever for about 17 days, and complained of abdominal pain, headache and weight loss. Abdominal computed tomography showed multiple tiny hypodense nodular lesions in the spleen and both kidneys. Laparotomy revealed multiple soft, whitishtan lesions on the surface of the liver and spleen. Histopathologic examination of a biopsy specimen of the spleen showed necrotizing granulomatous inflammation with central necrosis surrounded by epithelioid cells and occasional Langhans' giant cells, strongly suggestive of Bartonella henselae infection. History revealed close contact with a cat. B. henselae DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction in the tissue specimen, and the single antibody titer against B. henselae was greater than 1:2048. These results confirmed the diagnosis of visceral CSD caused by B. henselae. The patient's symptoms resolved after treatment with rifampin and tetracycline. This case illustrates the need for inclusion of systemic CSD in patients with fever of unknown origin and abdominal pain.

  3. The orexin-1 receptor antagonist SB-334867 attenuates anxiety in rats exposed to cat odor but not the elevated plus maze: an investigation of Trial 1 and Trial 2 effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staples, Lauren G; Cornish, Jennifer L

    2014-03-01

    The orexins are hypothalamic neuropeptides most well known for their roles in regulating feeding and sleeping behaviors. Recent findings suggest that orexin-A may also modulate anxiety, although how and when the orexin system is involved remains unclear. To address this, we investigated the dose-dependent effects of the orexin-1 receptor antagonist SB-334867 in two rodent models of anxiety: the cat odor avoidance model and the elevated plus maze. In both models we tested the effects of SB-334867 when anxiety is novel (Trial 1) and familiar (Trial 2). In the first experiment, Wistar rats were treated with vehicle or SB-334867 (5, 10 or 20mg/kg, i.p.) prior to their first or second exposure to cat odor. During Trial 1, rats treated with 10mg/kg of SB-334867 approached the cat odor stimulus more than vehicle-treated rats. During Trial 2 the effects were more marked, with 10mg/kg of SB-334867 increasing approach times, increasing the number of times rats exited the hide box to engage in exploratory behavior, and decreasing overall hide times. In addition, the 20mg/kg dose decreased general activity during Trial 2. In the second experiment, the effects of SB-334867 (10 and 20mg/kg) were tested in the elevated plus maze. There were no significant differences produced by drug treatment during either Trial 1 or Trial 2. Results suggest that SB-334867 decreases anxiety induced by some, but not all, stressors.

  4. CONTRACT ADMINISTRATIVE TRACKING SYSTEM (CATS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Contract Administrative Tracking System (CATS) was developed in response to an ORD NHEERL, Mid-Continent Ecology Division (MED)-recognized need for an automated tracking and retrieval system for Cost Reimbursable Level of Effort (CR/LOE) Contracts. CATS is an Oracle-based app...

  5. Oral masses in two cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, P; Hach, V; Baumgärtner, W

    2011-07-01

    Incisional biopsies from the oral cavity of 2 adult cats were submitted for histological investigation. Cat No. 1 showed a solitary well-circumscribed neoplasm in the left mandible. Cat No. 2 demonstrated a diffusely infiltrating neoplasm in the left maxilla. Both tumors consisted of medium-size epithelial cells embedded in a fibrovascular stroma. The mitotic index was 0 to 1 mitosis per high-power field. The epithelial cells showed an irregular arrangement forming nests or streams in cat No. 1, whereas a palisading growth was noted in cat No. 2. Both tumors, especially that of cat No. 1, showed multifocal accumulations of amyloid as confirmed by Congo red staining and a distinct green birefringence under polarized light, which lacked cytokeratin immunoreactivity as well as and AL and AA amyloid immunoreactivity. In addition, the amyloid in cat No. 2 was positive for the odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein, formerly termed APin. In sum, both cats suffered from an amyloid-producing odontogenic tumor, but their tumors varied with respect to morphology and type of amyloid produced.

  6. College Students and Their Cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Lawrence; Alexander, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-two Siamese and 32 mixed breed cats' personalities were rated by their respective college student owners and compared. Further, the owners' self rated personality traits were correlated with the pets'; significant Siamese and Mixed differences and correlations were obtained. These are the first data to examine breed of cat on a personality…

  7. CONTRACT ADMINISTRATIVE TRACKING SYSTEM (CATS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Contract Administrative Tracking System (CATS) was developed in response to an ORD NHEERL, Mid-Continent Ecology Division (MED)-recognized need for an automated tracking and retrieval system for Cost Reimbursable Level of Effort (CR/LOE) Contracts. CATS is an Oracle-based app...

  8. College Students and Their Cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Lawrence; Alexander, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-two Siamese and 32 mixed breed cats' personalities were rated by their respective college student owners and compared. Further, the owners' self rated personality traits were correlated with the pets'; significant Siamese and Mixed differences and correlations were obtained. These are the first data to examine breed of cat on a personality…

  9. Lumbosacral agenesis in a cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielle C Hybki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Case summary Lumbosacral agenesis is a rare congenital condition reported in children. We report a 17-week-old female domestic shorthair cat with lumbosacral agenesis on whole-body radiographs. The cat was euthanized shortly thereafter presentation. A necropsy was not permitted. Relevance and novel information This is the first reported feline case of lumbosacral agenesis.

  10. Safety of oral and intravenous mycophenolate mofetil in healthy cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovak, Jennifer E; Villarino, Nicolas F

    2017-02-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and clinical effects of intravenous (IV) and oral mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) in healthy cats. Methods A total of 24 healthy adult cats weighing >3.5 kg were either administered IV MMF (over a 2 h infusion) or oral MMF. The dosages used were as follows: 5 mg/kg IV once (n = 2), 10 mg/kg q12h IV for 1 day (n = 1), 20 mg/kg q12h IV for 1 day (n = 6) and 10 mg/kg q12h IV for 3 days (n = 5). Blood was collected from each cat at intervals of up to 12 h from the last dose for analysis purposes. Oral MMF was given at 10 mg/kg q12h for 7 days (n = 3), 15 mg/kg q12h for 7 days (n = 3) and 15 mg/kg q8h for 7 days (n = 4). Results Side effects to MMF were minimal. There was no anorexia or vomiting noted in any of the cats during or after IV medication administration. Only 4/14 cats had diarrhea from 12-48 h after IV administration. There was hyporexia in 1/10 cats given oral MMF and no vomiting noted. In 5/10 cats given oral MMF, there was diarrhea between days 2 and 7 of the study. Conclusions and relevance Cats tolerate MMF at an IV dose of 10 mg/kg q12h for 3 days and an oral dose ⩽15 mg/kg q12h for up to 7 days. There seems to be a dose-dependent incidence of gastrointestinal side effects. MMF may be a useful alternative immunosuppressant to be considered for use in some cats.

  11. CAT-generation of ideals

    CERN Document Server

    Ueckerdt, Torsten

    2010-01-01

    We consider the problem of generating all ideals of a poset. It is a long standing open problem, whether or not the ideals of any poset can be generated in constant amortized time, CAT for short. We refine the tree traversal, a method introduced by Pruesse and Ruskey in 1993, to obtain a CAT-generator for two large classes of posets: posets of interval dimension at most two and so called locally planar posets. This includes all posets for which a CAT-generator was known before. Posets of interval dimension at most two generalize both, interval orders and 2-dimensional posets. Locally planar posets generalize for example posets with a planar cover graph. We apply our results to CAT-generate all $c$-orientations of a planar graph. As a special case this is a CAT-generator for many combinatorial objects like domino and lozenge tilings, planar spanning trees, planar bipartite perfect matchings, Schnyder woods, and others.

  12. The Use of Refuges by Communally Housed Cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicuto de Oliveira, Adriana; Terçariol, César Augusto Sangaletti; Genaro, Gelson

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary Captive domestic cats frequently suffer from the lack of physical space and opportunities to perform species-typical behaviors, such as climbing or hiding. Environmental enrichment is a technique that helps transform the space available to animals into a more appropriate habitat. In this study, we tested horizontal and vertical refuge boxes as environmental enrichment for cats living communally in a cat rescue shelter. The provision of boxes in the environment increases the use of available space by the cats. We suggest this improves the cats’ welfare while in communally-housed rescue shelters. Abstract The increase of domestic animals kept in shelters highlights the need to ensure animal welfare. Environmental enrichment can improve animal welfare in many ways, such as encouraging captive animals to use all the space available to them. The effects of physical environmental enrichment on the spatial distribution and behavioral repertoire of 35 neutered domestic cats housed communally were analyzed. The provision of boxes in the environment increases the use of available space by the cats. We suggest this improves the cats’ welfare while in communally-housed rescue shelters. The frequencies of active and especially inactive behaviors also increased in the enriched condition. In a test with vertical environmental enrichment, the animals showed an increased length of stay in refuges located at a height of 0.5 m compared to those on the ground (0.0 m). However, the entry frequency was higher in refuges at 0.0 m. Both horizontal and vertical environmental enrichment increased the use of available space, demonstrating that box refuges as enrichment are effective in providing a refuge when at a height, or a place to explore at ground level. We suggest it enhances the welfare of cats in communally housed shelters. This information adds to the body of evidence relating to cat enrichment and can be useful in designing cat housing in veterinary clinics

  13. Systematic review of ground reaction force measurements in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabl, E; Bockstahler, B

    2015-10-01

    Although orthopaedic abnormalities in cats are frequently observed radiographically, they remain clinically underdiagnosed, and kinetic motion analysis, a fundamental aspect of orthopaedic research in dogs and horses, is not commonly performed. More information obtained with non-invasive measurement techniques to assess normal and abnormal gait in cats would provide a greater insight into their locomotion and biomechanics and improve the objective measurement of disease alterations and treatment modalities. In this systematic review, 12 previously performed studies that investigated ground reaction force measurements in cats during locomotion were evaluated. The aims of these studies, the measurement methods and equipment used, and the outcomes of parameters used to assess both sound and diseased cats are summarised and discussed. All reviewed studies used pressure sensitive walkways to gain data and all provided an acclimatisation period as a prerequisite for measurements. In sound cats during walking, the forelimb peak vertical force was greater than in the hindlimb and the peak vertical force in the hindlimb was greater in cats than in dogs. This review confirms that ground reaction forces can be used to evaluate lameness and treatment effects in the cat.

  14. Alternate-day dosing of itraconazole in healthy adult cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, S M; Kubier, A; Dirikolu, L; Papich, M G; Mitchell, M A; Rubin, S I

    2016-02-01

    The current available formulations of itraconazole are not ideal for dosing in cats. The capsular preparation often does not allow for accurate dosing, the oral solution is difficult to administer and poorly tolerated, and the bioavailability of compounded formulations has been shown to be poor in other species. The aim of this study was to evaluate every other day dosing of 100 mg itraconazole capsule in healthy adult cats. Ten healthy adult cats received a 100 mg capsule of itraconazole orally every 48 h for 8 weeks. Peak and trough serum concentrations of itraconazole were measured weekly using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Physical examination, complete blood count (CBC), and chemistry profiles were performed weekly. The dosage regimen achieved average therapeutic trough concentrations (>0.5 μg/mL) within 3 weeks. The protocol yielded no adverse effects in 8 of the 10 study cats, with affected cats recovering fully with discontinuation of the drug and supportive care. At 8 weeks, an average peak concentration of 1.79 ± 0.952 μg/mL (95% CI: 0.996-2.588) and an average trough concentration of 0.761 ± 0.540 μg/mL (95% CI: 0.314-1.216) were achieved. Overall, a 100 mg every other day oral dosage regimen for itraconazole in cats yielded serum concentrations with minimal fluctuation and with careful monitoring may be considered for treatment of cats with systemic fungal disease. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Toxoplasmosis : Beware of Cats !!!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubina Kumari Baithalu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Anthropozoonotic parasite Toxoplasma gondii causes widespread human and animal diseases, mostly involving central nervous system. Human acquires toxoplasmosis from cats, from consuming raw or undercooked meat and from vertical transmission to the fetus through placenta from mother during pregnancy. Socio-epidemiological as well as unique environmental factors also plays a significant role in transmission of this infection. Preventive measures should be taken into account the importance of culture, tradition, and beliefs of people in various communities more than solving poverty and giving health education. Therefore the focus of this article is to create public awareness regarding sense of responsibility of looking after pets to prevent such an important zoonotic disease. [Vet. World 2010; 3(5.000: 247-249

  16. Placement of subcutaneous ureteral bypasses without fluoroscopic guidance in cats with ureteral obstruction: 19 cases (2014-2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livet, Véronique; Pillard, Paul; Goy-Thollot, Isabelle; Maleca, David; Cabon, Quentin; Remy, Denise; Fau, Didier; Viguier, Éric; Pouzot, Céline; Carozzo, Claude; Cachon, Thibaut

    2016-09-30

    The purpose of this study was to describe the perioperative and postoperative complications as well as short-term and long-term outcomes in cats with ureteral obstructions treated by placement of a subcutaneous ureteral bypass (SUB) device without imaging control. The second objective of this study was to compare cats treated by SUB device with cats treated by traditional surgical intervention. Data were obtained retrospectively from the medical records (2014-2016) of cats that underwent SUB placement (SUB cats) and cats that underwent traditional ureteral surgery (C cats). Nineteen SUB devices were placed without fluoroscopic, radiographic or ultrasonographic guidance in 13 cats. Fifteen traditional interventions (ureterotomy and neoureterocystostomy) were performed in 11 cats. Successful placement of the SUB device was achieved in all cats with only one major intraoperative complication (kinking of the kidney catheter) and one minor intraoperative complication (misplacement of the kidney catheter). Eleven SUB cats recovered from the surgical procedure; two SUB cats and three C cats died during the anaesthesia recovery period. Postoperative SUB complications included anaemia (n = 2), urinary tract infection (UTI) (n = 4), non-infectious cystitis (n = 5) and SUB device obstruction (n = 1). Postoperative traditional surgery complications included anaemia (n = 7), UTIs (n = 6), non-infectious cystitis (n = 1), re-obstruction (n = 4) and ureteral stricture (n = 1). Median postoperative duration of hospitalisation (3 days) was significantly shorter for SUB cats than for C cats (P = 0.013). Ten SUB cats (76.9%) and four C cats (40%) were still alive at a median follow-up of 225 days and 260 days, respectively. Owners were completely (90%) or mostly (10%) satisfied with the SUB device placement. SUB device placement appears to be an effective and safe option for treating ureteral obstruction in cats, and this study has shown that fluoroscopic guidance is not essential in

  17. Monte Carlo study of the electrothermal phenomenon in silicon-on-insulator and silicon-germanium-on-insulator metal-oxide field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadi, Toufik; Kelsall, Robert W.

    2010-03-01

    Self-heating effects are investigated in silicon-on-insulator (SOI), silicon-germanium-on-insulator (SGOI), and strained-silicon-directly-on-insulator (SSDOI) metal-oxide field-effect transistors (MOSFETs), using a Monte Carlo simulator self-consistently coupled with the solution of the heat diffusion equation. Although the influence of thermal effects is in general higher in these structures, as compared to bulk Si MOSFETs, its impact is much more important in SGOI and SSDOI FET structures incorporating ultrathin Si channels, with SGOI FETs giving the worst thermal performance. A study of the dependence of the extent of self-heating on the buried-oxide thickness is also performed, showing that this parameter is important in designing SOI structures with better thermal management.

  18. A Process Model of the Signal Duration Phenomenon of Vigilance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    A Process Model of the Signal Duration Phenomenon of Vigilance Daniel Gartenberg1, Bella Veksler2, Glenn Gunzelmann2, J. Gregory Trafton3...REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Process Model of the Signal Duration Phenomenon of Vigilance 5a...with shorter signal durations (see Figure 1). There is currently no process model that explains the signal duration effect found in vigilance

  19. Inbreeding rate and genetic structure of cat populations in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucha, S; Wolc, A; Gradowska, A; Szwaczkowski, T

    2011-02-01

    The objective of the study was to analyze effective population size and inbreeding level in populations of cat breeds registered in the Polish Studbook. The Association of Purebred Cat Breeders in Poland provided access to pedigrees of 26725 cats from seven breeds. The most frequent breed was Persian, however increasing tendency in numbers of registered animals from other breeds was recorded in later years. Although the percentage of inbred individuals was increasing over time, mating of close relatives was avoided by most of the breeders, and the average inbreeding coefficient exceeded 5% only for Siberian and Russian breeds. Current analysis suggests that the Polish pedigree cat populations are not threatened by negative effects of inbreeding.

  20. The happy victimizer phenomenon: Not found here

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jevtić Ana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Children’s attribution of emotions to a moral transgressor is an important research topic in the psychology of moral and emotional development. This is especially because of the so-called Happy Victimizer Phenomenon (HVP where younger children attribute positive emotions to a moral transgressor described in a story. In the two studies that we have conducted (children aged 5, 7 and 9, 20 of each age; 10 of each age in the second study we have tested the possible influence of the fear of sanctions and the type of transgression (stealing and inflicting body injuries on the attribution of emotions. Children were presented with stories that described transgressions and they were asked to answer how the transgressor felt. The fear of sanctions did not make a significant difference in attribution but the type of transgression did - more negative emotions were attributed for inflicting body injuries than for stealing. Positive emotions were explained with situational-instrumental explanations in 84% of cases while negative emotions were explained with moral explanations in 63,5%. Girls attributed more positive emotions (61% than boys (39%. However, our main finding was that, for the aforementioned age groups, we did not find the HVP effect although it has regularly been registered in foreign studies. This finding denies the generalizability of the phenomenon and points to the significance of disciplining styles and, even more so, culture for children’s attribution of emotions to moral transgressors.

  1. The Level of Understanding of the Photoelectric Phenomenon in Prospective Teachers and the Effects of "Writing with Learning" on Their Success Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Ali; Buyukkasap, Erdogan

    2011-01-01

    This study examines prospective teachers' levels of understanding the photoelectric effect, and the impact of writing activities for learning purposes on the success of prospective teachers. These prospective teachers study in the science teaching program of the faculty of education and take the course Introduction to Modern Physics. In this…

  2. Pemphigus foliaceus in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofod, H

    1993-01-16

    The author's cat started to develop the signs of pemphigus foliaceus one month after he returned home after six months absence. The initial signs included dry coughing and difficulty with purring and swallowing, followed by typical changes of the skin. The cat was treated by a combination of chrysotherapy and systemic glucocorticoid injections, and remained free of clinical signs for one and a half years. The cat then relapsed and showed the initial signs except that coughing was not observed. It was treated as before but after a second relapse and the same treatment it slowly developed a general weakness and was euthanased.

  3. Unilateral Sensory-Motor-Rhythm (SMR) Training in Cats: A Basis for Testing Neurophysiological and Behavioral Effects of Monomethylhydrazine (MMH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-07-01

    this rhythm on one side of the brain and then employ the evoked neuro -electric responses. We have previously studied the effects of MMH on these...facilitation of sensory transmission in the first synapse of the somatosensory pathway (the dorsal column nuclei) during production of the SMR (Howe and...rewards, have resulted in a significant reduction in the EEG and clinical manifestations of epilepsy . Assessment of the functional state of soma

  4. The electrosmog phenomenon. Effects of low-frequency EM fields on human health; Das Phaenomen `Elektrosmog`. Wirkung niederfrequenter EM-Felder auf den Menschen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schierz, C. [Inst fuer Hygiene und Arbeitsphysiologie, ETH-Zentrum, Zuerich (Switzerland); Krueger, H. [Inst fuer Hygiene und Arbeitsphysiologie, ETH-Zentrum, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    1996-12-13

    In spite of the close link between electricity and quality of life, there have been misgivings during the past few years concerning the potential harmful effects of electromagnetic fields. From the scientific point of view, there are four different categories of problems: 1. The daily exposure level; 2. Biological effects of electromagnetic fields; 3. Public opinion and acceptance; 4. Establishment of limiting values on the basis of scientific findings. (orig.) [Deutsch] Trotz der engen Verbindung von Lebensqualitaet und elektrischer Energie breitet sich in den letzten Jahren ein Gefuehl der Betroffenheit ueber vorhandene oder moegliche Schaedigungen durch elektromagnetische Felder aus. Aus wissenschaftlicher Sicht stellen sich vier Problemfelder: Wie hoch ist die taegliche Exposition? Was ist ueber biologische Wirkungen elektromagnetischer Felder bekannt? Welche Bedeutung hat eine Attributierung fuer die Bewertung in der Oeffentlichkeit? Welche Bedeutung kommt der Erforschung der biologischen Wirkung elektromagnetischer Felder bei der Festlegung von Grenzwerten zu? (orig.)

  5. Chlamydophila felis in cats--are the stray cats dangerous source of infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halánová, M; Sulinová, Z; Cisláková, L; Trbolová, A; Páleník, L; Weissová, T; Halán, M; Kalinová, Z; Holičková, M

    2011-11-01

    Chlamydophila felis is a causative agent of acute or chronic conjunctivitis, and pneumonia in cats. Natural transmission mostly occurs consequently to close contact with other infected cats, their aerosol and fomites. We have examined 93 cats with symptoms of acute or chronic conjunctivitis, from Košice region in Slovakia, during the period of 2 years. Conjunctival samples were obtained from 55 domestic cats (59.14%) and 38 stray cats (40.86%). Of the total number of 93 examined animals, 42 cats were positive, which represents 45.16% overall positivity. Out of the 42 positive cats, 25 cats were stray and 17 positive cats were classified as domestic, which means that of 38 stray cats, 25 were positive (which represented 65.78% positivity) and of 55 domestic cats, 17 were positive (positivity was 30.90%). Our results showed that cats, especially stray cats, could be a dangerous source of chlamydiosis for humans.

  6. The effect of position on the precision of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and correlation with body condition score in dogs and cats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnvad, Charlotte R.; Nielsen, Mie E.; Hansen, Susanna E.M.

    2017-01-01

    during DEXA scanning influences results. Dogs and cats that were brought to the University Hospital for Companion Animals for euthanasia during the period 15 September–6 November 2015 were consecutively recruited if owners signed a written consent. Following euthanasia and before rigor mortis...

  7. Snake remedies and eosinophilic granuloma complex in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboutboul, Ronit

    2006-01-01

    Eosinophilic granuloma complex (EGC) is a syndrome occurring in cats, characterized by lesions affecting the skin and the oral cavity. Conventional treatment is mainly symptomatic and may have undesirable side effects. This paper summarizes homeopathic treatment with snake remedies of cats suffering from EGC. Snake remedies were chosen by individual repertorizations and administered in different dilutions. Reactions were mostly quick, leading to significant improvements, including complete recoveries.

  8. Effect of preservative removal from fixed-combination bimatoprost/timolol on intraocular pressure lowering: a potential timolol dose–response phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jie; Bejanian, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Many patients with glaucoma require combination therapies to achieve target intraocular pressure (IOP) and preserve visual function. Ocular hypotensives often contain a preservative (eg, benzalkonium chloride [BAK]), but preservative-free (PF) formulations have been developed for patients with sensitivity. A Phase III study found the efficacy of bimatoprost 0.03%/timolol 0.5% (bim/tim, Ganfort®) PF to be equivalent to that of preserved bim/tim, although a trend favoring bim/tim PF was observed. As BAK is a corneal penetration enhancer, this literature review aims to explain these findings by exploring the relationship between timolol concentration and its IOP-lowering effect. Methods Systematic searches were performed in Scopus and PubMed for clinical trials published in English between 1960 and July 2014 using the keywords “timolol”, “intraocular pressure”, and the concentrations “1%, 0.5%, OR 0.25%”. Articles that directly compared IOP-lowering effects of ≥2 concentrations of timolol were identified by manual screening, and cross-checked for duplication. Results Seventeen studies that included 10–371 patients were evaluated; the majority were randomized (16/17), double-masked (14/17), and enrolled patients with open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension (12/17). All studies investigated timolol in preserved formulations. Timolol concentrations tested ranged from 0.008% to 1.5%. Of 13 studies comparing timolol 0.25% versus 0.5%, two found the 0.25% dose to have greater IOP-lowering effects, and three reported the opposite; eight reported similar IOP lowering. Results also indicate that timolol 0.5% may be more effective than higher concentrations. Conclusion The evidence suggests that timolol may have an inverted U-shaped dose–response curve, and that its optimal IOP-lowering concentration is between 0.25% and 0.5%. Compared with bim/tim, removal of the permeability enhancer BAK in bim/tim PF could have resulted in a lower timolol

  9. Effect of preservative removal from fixed-combination bimatoprost/timolol on intraocular pressure lowering: a potential timolol dose–response phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen J

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Jie Shen,1 Marina Bejanian2 1Department of Translational Sciences, 2Department of Ophthalmology Clinical Development, Allergan plc, Irvine, CA, USA Purpose: Many patients with glaucoma require combination therapies to achieve target intraocular pressure (IOP and preserve visual function. Ocular hypotensives often contain a preservative (eg, benzalkonium chloride [BAK], but preservative-free (PF formulations have been developed for patients with sensitivity. A Phase III study found the efficacy of bimatoprost 0.03%/timolol 0.5% (bim/tim, Ganfort® PF to be equivalent to that of preserved bim/tim, although a trend favoring bim/tim PF was observed. As BAK is a corneal penetration enhancer, this literature review aims to explain these findings by exploring the relationship between timolol concentration and its IOP-lowering effect. Methods: Systematic searches were performed in Scopus and PubMed for clinical trials published in English between 1960 and July 2014 using the keywords “timolol”, “intraocular pressure”, and the concentrations “1%, 0.5%, OR 0.25%”. Articles that directly compared IOP-lowering effects of ≥2 concentrations of timolol were identified by manual screening, and cross-checked for duplication. Results: Seventeen studies that included 10–371 patients were evaluated; the majority were randomized (16/17, double-masked (14/17, and enrolled patients with open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension (12/17. All studies investigated timolol in preserved formulations. Timolol concentrations tested ranged from 0.008% to 1.5%. Of 13 studies comparing timolol 0.25% versus 0.5%, two found the 0.25% dose to have greater IOP-lowering effects, and three reported the opposite; eight reported similar IOP lowering. Results also indicate that timolol 0.5% may be more effective than higher concentrations. Conclusion: The evidence suggests that timolol may have an inverted U-shaped dose–response curve, and that its optimal IOP

  10. Biochemical effects of glyphosate based herbicide, Excel Mera 71 on enzyme activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), lipid peroxidation (LPO), catalase (CAT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and protein content on teleostean fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Palas; Pal, Sandipan; Mukherjee, Aloke Kumar; Ghosh, Apurba Ratan

    2014-09-01

    Effects of glyphosate based herbicide, Excel Mera 71 at a dose of 17.20mg/l on enzyme activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), lipid peroxidation (LPO), catalase (CAT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and protein content were measured in different tissues of two Indian air-breathing teleosts, Anabas testudineus (Bloch) and Heteropneustes fossilis (Bloch) during an exposure period of 30 days under laboratory condition. AChE activity was significantly increased in all the investigated tissues of both fish species and maximum elevation was observed in brain of H. fossilis, while spinal cord of A. testudineus showed minimum increment. Fishes showed significant increase LPO levels in all the tissues; highest was observed in gill of A. testudineus but lowest LPO level was observed in muscle of H. fossilis. CAT was also enhanced in both the fishes, while GST activity in liver diminished substantially and minimum was observed in liver of A. testudineus. Total protein content showed decreased value in all the tissues, maximum reduction was observed in liver and minimum in brain of A. testudineus and H. fossilis respectively. The results indicated that Excel Mera 71 caused serious alterations in the enzyme activities resulting into severe deterioration of fish health; so, AChE, LPO, CAT and GST can be used as suitable indicators of herbicidal toxicity.

  11. Reentrant phenomenon and inverse magnetocaloric effect in a generalized spin-(1/2,  s) Fisher’s super-exchange antiferromagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálisová, Lucia

    2016-11-01

    The thermodynamic and magnetocaloric properties of a generalized spin-(1/2,  s) Fisher’s super-exchange antiferromagnet are investigated precisely by using the decoration-iteration mapping transformation. Besides the critical temperature, sublattice magnetization, total magnetization, entropy and specific heat, the isothermal entropy change and adiabatic temperature change are also rigorously calculated in order to examine the cooling efficiency of the model in the vicinity of the first- and second-order phase transitions. It is shown that an enhanced inverse magnetocaloric effect occurs around the temperature interval {{T}\\text{c}}(B\

  12. Implementation of Effective Stealth for "Cat-eye" Target by Dielectric High Reflectivity Mirror%利用介质膜高反镜实现“猫眼”目标有效隐身

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘秉琦; 周斌; 张瑜

    2012-01-01

    A new project was put forward to realize the effective stealth of "cat-eye" target by dielectric high reflectivity mirror.For the main wavelength of active laser detection system being 1 064 nm and considering the reflectivity characteristics of dielectric high reflectivity mirror with single wavelength,a high reflectivity mirror was assembled at a certain angle with optical axis of "cat-eye" target.The echo power model of ideal "cat-eye" target with high reflectivity mirror was deduced and typical example was made.The reflectivity characteristics of dielectric high reflectivity mirror were analyzed experimentally and the average reflectivity value with incident angle of 45° was modified to 99.6%.The field experimental results show that "cat-eye" effect of typical "cat-eye" target can be reduced enormously by high reflectivity mirror and stealth can be implemented effectively with finite loss of imaging quality.%针对激光主动探测系统的主要工作波长为1 064nm,提出了一种利用介质膜高反镜实现"猫眼"目标隐身的方案。利用单波长介质膜高反镜的反射率特性,将介质膜高反镜与"猫眼"目标光轴以一定角度装配,推导了加载介质膜高反镜的理想"猫眼"目标回波功率模型,并给出了典型算例。通过实验方法分析了介质膜高反镜的反射率特性,修正了45°激光入射角的平均反射率值。典型"猫眼"目标的外场实验表明,在有限"牺牲"成像质量的前提下,介质膜高反镜可大大降低"猫眼"目标的"猫眼"效应,实现光电装备的有效隐身。

  13. Polymorphism of clotting factors in Hungarian patients with Raynaud's phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemirani, Amir-Houshang; Szomják, Edit; Balogh, Emese; András, Csilla; Kovács, Dóra; Acs, Judit; Csiki, Zoltán

    2011-01-01

    Patients with primary Raynaud's phenomenon may have a genetically determined risk for clotting factors that predispose them to aberrant microvascular thrombosis. We investigated the prevalence of factor V substitution of G to A at position 1691 (FVLeiden), prothrombin G20210A, and methyltetrahydrofolate reductase C677T mutations in these patients. Two hundred (158 women, 42 men, mean age of 42.4 ± 13.7 years) consecutive patients with primary Raynaud's phenomenon and 200 age-sex-matched healthy controls of Hungarian origin were included in a case-control study. The prevalence of methyltetrahydrofolate reductase C677T homozygous among patients was significantly lower than in the control group (odds ratio 0.4, 95% confidence interval 0.2-0.9, P Raynaud's phenomenon and control subjects. FVLeiden, prothrombin G20210A, and polymorphism, prothrombin G20210A mutations have no apparent effect on the etiology of primary Raynaud's phenomenon.

  14. EFEITO ANALGÉSICO DO BUTORFANOL NA DOR SOMÁTICA EM GATOS ANESTESIADOS COM PROPOFOL ANALGESIC EFFECT OF BUTORPHANOL ON SOMATIC PAIN IN CATS ANESTHETIZED WITH PROPOFOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabela Ciniello Araujo

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available O propofol é um agente anestésico intravenoso usado para indução e manutenção da anestesia, mas produz analgesia limitada, havendo a necessidade do uso concomitante de analgésicos. Avaliou-se o efeito analgésico do butorfanol na dor somática em gatos anestesiados com doses fracionadas de propofol. Foram utilizados 16 animais, distribuídos aleatoriamente em dois grupos. Os animais do grupo controle foram pré-tratados com 0,2mg/kg de acepromazina por via IM e, após 15 minutos, receberam 6mg/kg de propofol por via IV. Os animais do grupo tratamento foram pré-medicados com uma combinação de acepromazina (0,2mg/kg e butorfanol (0,8mg/kg, administrados na mesma seringa por via IM, e, após 15 minutos, receberam 6mg/kg de propofol por via IV. Em ambos os grupos, a manutenção da anestesia foi feita com administrações de propofol, na dose de 3mg/kg, por via IV, sempre que necessário, durante 60 minutos. A necessidade de readministração de propofol foi verificada pela resposta apresentada ao pinçamento cutâneo, através de uma pinça de Kocher. Avaliaram-se também as freqüências cardíaca e respiratória, pressão arterial média, saturação de oxiemoglobina e temperatura retal. A administração de butorfanol causou apenas redução nas freqüências cardíaca e respiratória e na saturação de oxiemoglobina, em comparação com o grupo controle,sem exercer influência significativa sobre o período hábil, a dose total administrada e o período de recuperação do propofol. Concluiu-se que a adição de butorfanol não produziu analgesia somática em gatos anestesiados com doses fracionadas de propofol.Propofol is an intravenous anesthetic agent used for induction and maintenance of anesthesia but produces limited analgesia, and concomitant use of analgesics is necessary. The analgesic effect of butorphanol in somatic pain in cats anesthetized with intermittent doses of propofol was evaluated. Sixteen animals were randomly

  15. Nutritional Management of Overweight and Obesity in Dogs and Cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorana Teodora MATEI

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Some of the most common nutritional disorders are overweight and obesity, a proportion of approximately 59% of dogs and cats being affected. A permanent challenge for vets is weight management, including the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity. Corporeal score and body-weight loss in dogs and cats have been monitored by feeding various diets. The study was conducted on a total of 10 animals (6 dogs and 4 cats, monitoring the effect of three types of food for dogs and two types for cats suffering from overweight and obesity.  Cooked food, dry food diet and premium dry food were investigated. We determined the quality and gross chemical composition of food and we measured corporeal score, weekly weight loss percentage and the number of calories consumed daily. We also appreciated the quality of life and activity level of the animals at the beginning and at the end of the trial. Nutritional management of investigated diets for overweight and obesity in dogs and cats revealed that through the smallest caloric restriction, dry food diet presented the highest efficiency, dogs and cats loosing weight steadily without losing muscle mass. Although the satiety effect occurs when the animals reach their ideal weight, the Rebound effect was not present.

  16. Effect of the interaction conditions of the probe of an atomic-force microscope with the n-GaAs surface on the triboelectrization phenomenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baklanov, A. V., E-mail: baklanov@mail.ioffe.ru [St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University, Institute of Physics, Nanotechnology, and Telecommunications (Russian Federation); Gutkin, A. A.; Kalyuzhnyy, N. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Institute (Russian Federation); Brunkov, P. N. [St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University, Institute of Physics, Nanotechnology, and Telecommunications (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-15

    Triboelectrization as a result of the scanning of an atomic-force-microscope probe over an n-GaAs surface in the contact mode is investigated. The dependences of the local potential variation on the scanning rate and the pressing force of the probe are obtained. The results are explained by point-defect formation in the surface layers of samples under the effect of deformation of these layers during probe scanning. The charge localized at these defects in the case of equilibrium changes the potential of surface, which is subject to triboelectrization. It is shown that, for qualitative explanation of the observed dependences, it is necessary to take into account both the generation and annihilation of defects in the region experiencing deformation.

  17. Fundamentals of ServCat

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This training manual for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Catalog (ServCat) provides detailed instructions on searching for records, creating records, and managing...

  18. NRPC ServCat priorities

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document lists the Natural Resource Program Center’s priority ServCat documents. It is recommended that these documents- which include annual narrative reports,...

  19. Monostotic fibrous dysplasia with Raynaud's phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, K V S Hari; Aravinda, K; Narayanan, K

    2015-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) is a benign bone disorder characterized by alteration in bone morphology. Monostotic FD is the commonest variant and affects the craniofacial bones. Raynaud's phenomenon is recurrent vasospasm of the fingers and toes due to cold exposure. The disease is usually idiopathic or secondary to connective tissue disorders. Raynaud's phenomenon is not described previously with FD. We recently encountered two interesting patients of craniofacial monostotic FD with Raynaud's phenomenon and report the same in this report.

  20. Induction of a Tumor-Metastasis-Receptive Microenvironment as an Unwanted Side Effect After Radio/Chemotherapy and In Vitro and In Vivo Assays to Study this Phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Gabriela; Sellers, Zachariah Payne; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z

    2016-01-01

    Besides surgical removal of tumor tissue, chemotherapy and radiotherapy are the most important and efficient treatment modalities employed to treat therapy-susceptible malignancies. The main aim of this treatment-to destroy tumor cells-is unfortunately usually associated with toxicity to nontumor cells and different degrees of tissue and organ damage. In damaged tissues several chemoattractants are upregulated and released that may attract tumor cells. Moreover, highly migratory radio/chemotherapy treatment may endow cells with several properties of cancer stem cells which survive and respond to these chemoattractants upregulated in collateral tissues. Based on this, one of the unwanted and underappreciated side effects of chemotherapy or radiotherapy is the creation of a metastasis-receptive microenvironment in bones as well as in other organs of the body. Herein we describe methods and assays that can be employed to study migratory properties of cancer cells in in vitro (chemotaxis) and in vivo (seeding efficiency assay) conditions in response to the induction of pro-metastatic microenvironments in various organs and tissues.

  1. Collective Order within Family; An Axial Phenomenon regarding the Effect of Islamic Teachings on the ‎Economic Action of Family: A Study Based on the Grounded Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ‎ V. Arshadi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The present article aims to identify the intermediate factors regarding the effect of Islamic teachings on family economic action through an interpretative and multifactorial approach. The method is qualitative and is based on grounded theory method”. Due to the interdisciplinary nature of the matter, a semi-structured interview with 16 experts on Islamic economy, Muslim consumer behavior, educational sciences, psychology and sociology and the issue of values and actions has served as the main research tool. The samples were selected through purposive sampling and snowball method, and interviews were conducted to the point of theoretical saturation. Findings of data analysis in this three steps show that factors such as the synergy of the high quality of transfer of teachings from formal and informal education institutes, high quality of the perception of teachings by family members, high quality of family income resources, and faith and belief in the accountability in the Hereafter can create collective order within family based on the subjective value of Islamic economic teaching. The collective order is influenced by "underlying" and "structural" factors and leads to discretion behavior. This paper is also innovative in terms of its profound look into the formation of economic behavior within the family.

  2. Schrodinger's cat: much ado about nothing

    CERN Document Server

    Ionicioiu, Radu

    2016-01-01

    In this note I briefly discuss the Schrodinger's cat Gedankenexperiment. By analysing the information flow in the system I show that no entanglement exists between the atom and the cat. The atom and the cat are connected only through a classical information channel (detector clicks $\\rightarrow$ poison is released $\\rightarrow$ cat is dead). No amount of local operations and classical communication can entangle the atom and the cat. Consequently, the paradox disappears.

  3. Food hypersensitivity in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medleau, L; Latimer, K S; Duncan, J R

    1986-09-15

    Food hypersensitivity was diagnosed in a 4-year-old Siamese cat. Clinical signs included intense erythema, with alopecia, excoriations, erosions, and crusts involving the ventral portion of the abdomen, inguinal region, medial aspect of each thigh, and cranial and lateral aspects of all 4 limbs. The cat was intensely pruritic. Histologically, there was cutaneous mast cell hyperplasia and diffuse infiltration of eosinophils in the dermis. Blood eosinophilia also was found. Clinical signs resolved after exclusive feeding of a hypoallergenic diet.

  4. Gravity as an emergent phenomenon: experimental signatures

    CERN Document Server

    Consoli, M

    2013-01-01

    According to some authors, gravity might be an emergent phenomenon in a fundamentally flat space-time. In this case the speed of light in the vacuum would not coincide exactly with the basic parameter "c" entering Lorentz transformations and, for an apparatus placed on the Earth's surface, light should exhibit a tiny fractional anisotropy at the level 10^{-15}. We argue that, most probably, this effect is now observed in many room-temperature ether-drift experiments and, in particular, in a very precise cryogenic experiment where this level of signal is about 100 times larger than the designed short-term stability. To fully appreciate what is going on, however, one should consider the vacuum as a true physical medium whose fundamental quantum nature gives rise to the irregular, non-deterministic pattern which characterizes the observed signal.

  5. Statistical analysis of the migration phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina - Andreea CRUCERU

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of economic conditions being devalued in Romania, more and more persons were forced to find a work place – be it temporary or permanent – outside of the country’s borders. This phenomenon of international migration has, as a main effect, the emergence of a special category of persons, respectively that of children left behind under the care of one of the parents or of other people. The situation of these minors is extremely difficult because, lacking the careful supervision of their evolution by their parents, they arefrequently confronted with problems of social adaptation, with learning difficulties and even with situations of willful breaking of legal norms.

  6. Interference Phenomenon for Different Chiral Bosonization Schemes

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, Everton M C; Abreu, Everton M C; Wotzasek, Clovis

    1998-01-01

    We study the relationship between different chiral bosonization schemes (CBS) in the context of the soldering formalism\\cite{MS}, that considers the phenomenon of interference in the quantum field theory\\cite{ABW}. This analysis is done in the framework put forward by Siegel\\cite{WS} and by Floreanini and Jackiw\\cite{FJ} (FJ). We propose a field redefinition that discloses the presence of a noton, a non dynamical field, in Siegel's formulation for chiral bosons. The presence of a noton in the Siegel CBS is a new and surprising result, that separates dynamics from symmetry by diagonalising the Siegel action into the FJ and the noton action. While the first describes the chiral dynamics, the noton carries the symmetry contents, acquiring dynamics upon quantization and is fully responsible for the Siegel anomaly. The diagonal representation proposed here is used to study the effect of quantum interference between gauged rightons and leftons.

  7. Experimental study on "Cat-eye" effect with Laser's oblique incident condition%激光斜入射条件下“猫眼”效应的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘秉琦; 周斌; 张瑜; 武东生

    2012-01-01

    Retro-refleeted wave power of "cat-eye" target is an important index for active laser detection system,which can evaluate high or low "cat-eye" effect of photoelectricai device and provide reference for detector's optimal design.A mathematical model of oblique incident angle on retro-reflected wave power of "cat-eye" target is built.Effect of laser's incident angle on retro-reflected wave power of "cat-eye" target is simulated.Experimental research on typical "cat-eye" target is realized by using the active laser detection system.Theoretical simulation result and experimental result show that retro-refiected wave power will be rapidly decline with incident angle's increase in fnite oblique incident condition,which can provide experimental basis for research on applicable conditions of active laser detection system.%"猫眼"目标回波功率是激光主动探测系统的重要指标,可用来评估光电装备"猫眼"效应的强弱,并为探测器的优化设计提供参考。依据所建立的斜入射条件下"猫眼"目标回波功率数学模型,仿真分析了入射角对"猫眼"目标回波功率的影响,利用搭建的激光主动探测系统对典型"猫眼"目标进行了实验研究,理论仿真结果与实验结果表明,激光在有限斜入射条件下,"猫眼"目标回波功率将随入射角的增大而迅速下降,并很快湮没于噪声之中。这为进一步研究基于"猫眼"效应的激光主动探测适用条件提供必要的实验依据。

  8. Detached phenomenon: Its effect on the crystal quality of Ga{sub (1−x)}In{sub x}Sb bulk crystal grown by the VDS technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadkari, Dattatray, E-mail: db.gadkari@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Mithibai College, Mumbai 400056 (India)

    2013-05-15

    Vertical directional solidification (VDS) technique is used on the combined growth principals of the conventional methods since 1994, which leads to the detached growth. For evaluation of the detached growth, five bulk ingots of indium doped gallium–antimonide GaSb:In (In = 0.5, 0.25, 0.15) have been grown – without the seed, without contact to the ampoule wall, without coating and without external pressure. The gap is attributed to compensate the differential thermal dilatation that is grown with the reduced diameter than the diameter of the ampoule. VDS experiments have been proved that the sum of the contact angle and growth angle is large enough to allow detachment without any additional pressure difference under the melt to offset hydrostatic pressure. A meniscus forms at the bottom of the melt, the capillarity effect establishes due to which spontaneous gap could be created by the melt free surface, thus no thermal shear stress and thermo-mechanical stresses at the interface. Detached grown bulk GaSb:In crystals showed superior crystal quality with the highest physical properties and mobility than the crystals grown ever. The axial and radial composition profile of the grown GaSb:In ingots showed variation ≤10%. From the conical region, dislocation density decreases in the growth direction and reaches less than 10{sup 3} cm{sup −2}. - Highlights: ► Detachment: without seed, without ampoule contact, without coating, without external pressure. ► Detached ingot growth samples showed the highest physical properties and the carrier mobility. ► Initial to final transition: in detached growth, dislocations decreases and less than 10{sup 3} cm{sup −2}. ► Detached samples: Raman spectrum shows only TO phonon (110) direction of single orientation. ► Detached ingot: FTIR shows highest transmissions % but decreases on increase doping in samples.

  9. Hepcidin and 1,25(OH)2D3 effectively restore Ca2+ transport in β-thalassemic mice: reciprocal phenomenon of Fe2+ and Ca2+ absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraidith, Kamonshanok; Svasti, Saovaros; Teerapornpuntakit, Jarinthorn; Vadolas, Jim; Chaimana, Rattana; Lapmanee, Sarawut; Suntornsaratoon, Panan; Krishnamra, Nateetip; Fucharoen, Suthat; Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol

    2016-07-01

    Previously, β-thalassemia, an inherited anemic disorder with iron overload caused by loss-of-function mutation of β-globin gene, has been reported to induce osteopenia and impaired whole body calcium metabolism, but the pathogenesis of aberrant calcium homeostasis remains elusive. Herein, we investigated how β-thalassemia impaired intestinal calcium absorption and whether it could be restored by administration of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] or hepcidin, the latter of which was the liver-derived antagonist of intestinal iron absorption. The results showed that, in hemizygous β-globin knockout (BKO) mice, the duodenal calcium transport was lower than that in wild-type littermates, and severity was especially pronounced in female mice. Both active and passive duodenal calcium fluxes in BKO mice were found to be less than those in normal mice. This impaired calcium transport could be restored by 7-day 1,25(OH)2D3 treatment. The 1,25(OH)2D3-induced calcium transport was diminished by inhibitors of calcium transporters, e.g., L-type calcium channel, NCX1, and PMCA1b, as well as vesicular transport inhibitors. Interestingly, the duodenal calcium transport exhibited an inverse correlation with transepithelial iron transport, which was markedly enhanced in thalassemic mice. Thus, 3-day subcutaneous hepcidin injection and acute direct hepcidin exposure in the Ussing chamber were capable of restoring the thalassemia-associated impairment of calcium transport; however, the positive effect of hepcidin on calcium transport was completely blocked by proteasome inhibitors MG132 and bortezomib. In conclusion, both 1,25(OH)2D3 and hepcidin could be used to alleviate the β-thalassemia-associated impairment of calcium absorption. Therefore, our study has shed light on the development of a treatment strategy to rescue calcium dysregulation in β-thalassemia.

  10. Support for Lateralization of the Whorf Effect beyond the Realm of Color Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Aubrey L.; Regier, Terry; Kay, Paul; Ivry, Richard B.

    2008-01-01

    Recent work has shown that Whorf effects of language on color discrimination are stronger in the right visual field than in the left. Here we show that this phenomenon is not limited to color: The perception of animal figures (cats and dogs) was more strongly affected by linguistic categories for stimuli presented to the right visual field than…

  11. 接种摩西球囊霉对盐胁迫条件下盐地碱蓬叶片SOD和CAT活性的影响%Effects of Inoculation of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Glomus mosseae on SOD and CAT Activity in Suaeda salsa Seedlings under Salt Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李涛; 段迪; 杨青; 王宝山

    2008-01-01

    [Objective] Under salt stress condition, effects of inoculation of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi Clomus mosseae on SOD and CAT activity in Suaeda salsa seedlings under salt stress were studied. [Method] There were 2 NaCl levels, namely 0 and 400 mmol/L and each NaCl contained 2 treat-ments, one is inoculated by Glomus mosseae and the other is control. The growths of Suaeda salsa, SOD and CAT activities as well as MDA content in leav-es was determined. [Result] Under salt stress condition, Glomus mosseae could increase the growths of Suaeda salsa, SOD and CAT activities in leaves and decreased MDA content in leaves. [Conclusion] It preliminarily demonstrated that Arbuscular Mycorrhizal (AM) Fungi could increase salt resistance of Suaecla salsa by increasing the activities of SOD and CAT as well as alleviating membrane injury.

  12. 抗菌药在犬、猫临床上的合理应用%Antibacterial Drugs on the Rational Use of Clinical in Dogs and Cats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    涂文姬; 王生奎; 曹五八

    2011-01-01

    Antibacterial drug is currently the most widely used of clinically and most important anti-infective drugs in dogs and cats, which play a huge role on the control of dogs and cats diseases.But unreasonable use, especially the phenomenon of abuse is more serious, not only resulted in wastage of drugs, but also lead to increase of dogs and cats side effects, bacterial drug resistance, damage to animals, and even lead to the occurrence of such incidents.In this paper, combining the dogs and cats experience and understanding of clinical disease control, and make a summary and conclusion of used for clinical antimicrobial drugs, as to provide a reference of correct use of antibiotics in dog and cat.%抗菌药在犬、猫临床上使用最广泛和最重要的抗感染药物,对控制犬、猫疾病起着巨大的作用,但目前不合理使用尤其是滥用的现象较为严重,不仅造成药品的浪费,而且导致犬、猫的不良反应增多,产生细菌耐药性,对动物造成伤害,甚至导致医疗事故的发生等.作者针对犬、猫疾病特点,结合犬、猫临床疾病防治经验和体会,对用于犬、猫临床上的常见抗菌药物进行了概括与总结,为在犬、猫临床上正确使用抗菌药物提供一个参考.

  13. Binaural interaction in low-frequency neurons in inferior colliculus of the cat. II. Effects of changing rate and direction of interaural phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, T C; Kuwada, S

    1983-10-01

    We used the binaural beat stimulus to study the interaural phase sensitivity of inferior colliculus (IC) neurons in the cat. The binaural beat, produced by delivering tones of slightly different frequencies to the two ears, generates continuous and graded changes in interaural phase. Over 90% of the cells that exhibit a sensitivity to changes in the interaural delay also show a sensitivity to interaural phase disparities with the binaural beat. Cells respond with a burst of impulses with each complete cycle of the beat frequency. The period histogram obtained by binning the poststimulus time histogram on the beat frequency gives a measure of the interaural phase sensitivity of the cell. In general, there is good correspondence in the shapes of the period histograms generated from binaural beats and the interaural phase curves derived from interaural delays and in the mean interaural phase angle calculated from them. The magnitude of the beat frequency determines the rate of change of interaural phase and the sign determines the direction of phase change. While most cells respond in a phase-locked manner up to beat frequencies of 10 Hz, there are some cells tht will phase lock up to 80 Hz. Beat frequency and mean interaural phase angle are linearly related for most cells. Most cells respond equally in the two directions of phase change and with different rates of change, at least up to 10 Hz. However, some IC cells exhibit marked sensitivity to the speed of phase change, either responding more vigorously at low beat frequencies or at high beat frequencies. In addition, other cells demonstrate a clear directional sensitivity. The cells that show sensitivity to the direction and speed of phase changes would be expected to demonstrate a sensitivity to moving sound sources in the free field. Changes in the mean interaural phase of the binaural beat period histograms are used to determine the effects of changes in average and interaural intensity on the phase sensitivity

  14. Terrorism as a Social and Legal Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebrennikova, Anna; Mashkova, Yekaterina

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the concept of terrorism as a social and legal phenomenon, its international legal and criminal-legal characteristics. Highlighted are the main aspects of cooperation of the states and the international community to counter terrorist activities. Terrorism as a social phenomenon is determined by paragraph 1 of article 3 of the…

  15. Prussian phenomenon and its historical distortion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Y. Plenkov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the phenomenon of Prussia. Once, Prussia had been the largest continental Protestant state in Europe. The main issue of this phenomenon is that upon the tragic events of the World War II Prussian history and heritage had been considerably distorted, in order to compensate somehow for the dreadful casualties suffered by the victorious powers. The common European misconception implied that Prussia had been the bulwark of militarism, and therefore had to bear all the responsibility for the atrocities of war. Unfortunately, the majority of modern German historians share such misinterpretation of Prussian heritage in order to please false political correctness, perhaps, as an act of contrition for National Socialism and its crimes. However, the Prussian tradition and history go far beyond this militarism, and this article explains what ways. The authors believe that there should not be any prejudices and biases, that any subject should be examined sine ira et studio. Moreover, given that it is possible to characterize the Great French Revolution as a juristic one, and the Great October revolution – as a social one, the Prussian revolution “from above”, led by the first representatives of the Hohenzollern family, may be well considered as a pedagogical revolution. This revolution did bring definitely positive changes; they are surveyed in the article. The French Revolution has not eliminated the covetousness of the bourgeoisie after 1789; despotism of the authorities and people’s passiveness similarly have remained unaltered in Russia after 1917. On the contrary, Federal Republic of Germany of nowadays, distinctive for its law, order and effective responsible government is unthinkable without Prussian heritage.

  16. An intriguing oscillating combustion phenomenon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corbel, J.M.L.; Lingen, J.N.J.; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Gijzeman, O.L.J.; Meijerink, A.

    2012-01-01

    Strobes are pyrotechnic compositions that emit bright flashes of white or colored light at regular time intervals. The strobe effect has applications in various fields, most notably in the fireworks industry and in the military area (signaling – missile decoys – crowd control). However, the chemical

  17. MOBBING PHENOMENON - FACTORS OF DISCRIMINATION AND STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROMANESCU MARCEL LAURENTIU

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on exemplifying the features of discrimination phenomenon in the workplace, a phenomenon that has appeared in the Romanian social studies only in the last 4 years. Mobbing phenomenon has been analyzed by several countries in Europe such as England, France, Germany; after these analyzes it has been found that this phenomenon refers only to actions of intense psychological pressure. Actions are geared to a single employee, in order to cause it to leave its job. Without these measures, dismissal of the employee would lead to numerous legal problems on the employer. In conclusion, employee who is the subject of mobbing phenomenon must endure a long period of time a series of injustices focused on himself, but also extremely high humiliation, which determines him to mentally give up and take the decision to resign.

  18. Prevention of pregnancy in cats using aglepristone on days 5 and 6 after mating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goericke-Pesch, Sandra; Georgiev, Plamen; Wehrend, Axel

    2010-07-15

    The aim of this study was to test for the efficacy of aglepristone treatment for prevention of early pregnancy in the cat. Eleven cats (Gr. 1) were treated with 10 mg/kg aglepristone on days 5 and 6 after mating, 17 cats (Gr. 2) were used as untreated controls. Blood samples for progesterone (P4) determination were collected from 6 cats of Gr. 1 and 9 cats of Gr. 2, respectively. Ultrasound examination on day 25 revealed no pregnancy in any of the treated cats. In both groups, P4 concentrations increased from day 5 (before treatment) to day 20 (P pregnancy was 56.4 (4.7) d, ranging from 5-325 d. Pregnancy rates after the next estrus following treatment were 64 and 82% after the first and second estrus, respectively. No major treatment-related side effects were observed. In conclusion, treatment was found to be highly effective for prevention of early pregnancy.

  19. Mucopolysaccharidosis VI in cats - clarification regarding genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Leslie A; Grahn, Robert A; Genova, Francesca; Beccaglia, Michela; Hopwood, John J; Longeri, Maria

    2016-07-02

    The release of new DNA-based diagnostic tools has increased tremendously in companion animals. Over 70 different DNA variants are now known for the cat, including DNA variants in disease-associated genes and genes causing aesthetically interesting traits. The impact genetic tests have on animal breeding and health management is significant because of the ability to control the breeding of domestic cats, especially breed cats. If used properly, genetic testing can prevent the production of diseased animals, causing the reduction of the frequency of the causal variant in the population, and, potentially, the eventual eradication of the disease. However, testing of some identified DNA variants may be unwarranted and cause undo strife within the cat breeding community and unnecessary reduction of gene pools and availability of breeding animals. Testing for mucopolysaccharidosis Type VI (MPS VI) in cats, specifically the genetic testing of the L476P (c.1427T>C) and the D520N (c.1558G>A) variants in arylsulfatase B (ARSB), has come under scrutiny. No health problems are associated with the D520N (c.1558G>A) variant, however, breeders that obtain positive results for this variant are speculating as to possible correlation with health concerns. Birman cats already have a markedly reduced gene pool and have a high frequency of the MPS VI D520N variant. Further reduction of the gene pool by eliminating cats that are heterozygous or homozygous for only the MPS VI D520N variant could lead to more inbreeding depression effects on the breed population. Herein is debated the genetic testing of the MPS VI D520N variant in cats. Surveys from different laboratories suggest the L476P (c.1427T>C) disease-associated variant should be monitored in the cat breed populations, particularly breeds with Siamese derivations and outcrosses. However, the D520N has no evidence of association with disease in cats and testing is not recommended in the absence of L476P genotyping. Selection

  20. Feline hepatic biotransformation of diazepam: Differences between cats and dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beusekom, Cyrina D; van den Heuvel, Jeroen J M W; Koenderink, Jan B; Russel, Frans G M; Schrickx, Johannes A

    2015-12-01

    In contrast to humans and dogs, diazepam has been reported to induce severe hepatic side effects in cats, particularly after repeated dosing. With the aim to elucidate the mechanisms underlying this apparent sensitivity of cats to drug-induced liver injury, in a series of in vitro experiments, the feline-specific biotransformation of diazepam was studied with liver microsomes obtained from cats and dogs and the possible inhibition of the bile salt export pump (Bsep) was measured in isolated membrane vesicles overexpressing feline and canine Bsep. In line with previous in vivo studies, the phase I metabolites nordiazepam, temazepam and oxazepam were measurable in microsomal incubations, although enzyme velocity of demethylases and hydroxylases differed significantly between cats and dogs. In cats, the main metabolite was temazepam, which also could be glucuronidated. In contrast to dogs, no other glucuronidated metabolites could be observed. In addition, in the membrane vesicles an inhibition of the transport of the Bsep substrate taurocholic acid could be observed in the presence of diazepam and its metabolites. It was concluded that both mechanisms, the slow biotransformation of diazepam as well the inhibition of the bile acid efflux that results in an accumulation of bile acids in the hepatocytes, seem to contribute to the liver injury observed in cats following repetitive treatment with diazepam. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Electromagnetic Fields and Bioenergy Phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlhan Koşalay

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic energy is defined in the large frequency range and it shows its existence in different manners for every frequency range. When considering history of mankind, discovery of the electricity and presence of electrical and electronics based equipments is not very old. Human beings are exposed to electromagnetic fields and waves which they aren't used to live with those fields for ages. In this connection, lots of studies were done for the thesis of that these fields can produce harmful effects on people. Although results of the studies which were done in this area point out important subjects, sufficient outputs and judgments haven't been appeared yet in general meaning. This study was done to introduce findings which support that electromagnetic energy in some frequency can have beneficial effects on the living being.

  2. Prevalence of feline immunodeficiency virus infection in domesticated and feral cats in eastern Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Jacqueline M; Bell, Erin T; Hales, Louise; Toribio, Jenny-Ann L M L; White, Joanna D; Wigney, Denise I; Baral, Randolph M; Malik, Richard

    2007-08-01

    Serum samples from 340 pet cats presented to three inner city clinics in Sydney Australia, 68 feral cats from two separate colonies in Sydney, and 329 cattery-confined pedigree and domestic cats in eastern Australia, were collected over a 2-year period and tested for antibodies directed against feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) using immunomigration (Agen FIV Rapid Immunomigration test) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods (Snap Combo feline leukaemia virus antigen/FIV antibody test kit, IDEXX Laboratories). Western blot analysis was performed on samples in which there was discrepancy between the results. Information regarding breed, age, gender, housing arrangement and health status were recorded for all pet and cattery-confined cats, while the estimated age and current physical condition were recorded for feral cats. The FIV prevalence in the two feral cat populations was 21% and 25%. The majority of FIV-positive cats were male (60-80%). The FIV prevalence in cattery-confined cats was nil. The prevalence of FIV in the pet cat sample population was 8% (27/340) with almost equal prevalence in 'healthy' (13/170) and 'systemically unwell' (14/170) cats. The age of FIV-positive pet cats ranged from 3 to 19 years; all FIV-positive cats were domestic shorthairs with outside access. The median age of FIV-positive pet cats (11 years) was significantly greater than the median age of FIV-negative pet cats (7.5 years: Pcats (21/172; 12%) was three times that in female pet cats (6/168; 4%; Pcat population given outside access and continued FIV infection present in the feral population, this study highlights the need to develop rapid, accurate and cost-effective diagnostic methods that are not subject to false positives created by concurrent vaccination against FIV. This is especially important in re-homing stray cats within animal shelters and monitoring the efficacy of the new vaccine, which has not been challenged against Australian strains. The absence of FIV

  3. Subnormal concentrations of serum cobalamin (vitamin B12) in cats with gastrointestinal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, K W; Fyfe, J; Cornetta, A; Sachs, A; Strauss-Ayali, D; Lamb, S V; Reimers, T J

    2001-01-01

    The present study sought to determine the spectrum of diseases associated with subnormal concentrations of serum cobalamin in cats undergoing investigation of suspected gastrointestinal problems. The solid-phase boil radioassay (RA) for cobalamin employed in the present study was immunologically specific, precise, and accurate, with a sensitivity of 15 pg/mL. The RA yielded results that strongly correlated with those obtained by bioassay (Spearmann rho = .805; P cats (range 900-2,800 pg/mL; mean +/- SD, 1,775 +/- 535 pg/mL; n = 33). Cats with subnormal cobalamin concentrations (mean +/- SD; 384 +/- 272 pg/mL, range 3-883 pg/mL) were middle-aged or older and were presented for weight loss. diarrhea, vomiting, anorexia, and thickened intestines. Definitive diagnoses in 22 cats included inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), intestinal lymphoma, cholangiohepatitis or cholangits, and pancreatic inflammation. Serum concentrations of cobalamin were particularly low in cats with intestinal lymphoma, three-fifths of whom also had subnormal serum concentrations of folate (disease in the intestines, pancreas, or hepatobiliary system in many cats made it difficult to determine the cause of subnormal cobalamin concentrations. The circulating half-life of parenteral cyanocobalamin was shorter in 2 cats with IBD (5 days) than in 4 healthy cats (12.75 days). The presence of subnormal serum concentrations of cobalamin in 49 of 80 cats evaluated suggests that the measurement of serum cobalamin may be a useful indirect indicator of enteric or pancreatic disease in cats. The rapid depletion of circulating cobalamin in cats suggests that cats may be highly susceptible to cobalamin deficiency. However, the relationship of subnormal serum cobalamin concentrations to cobalamin deficiency and the effect of cobalamin deficiency on cats remain to be determined.

  4. What makes a feline fatal in Toxoplasma gondii's fatal feline attraction? Infected rats choose wild cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, M; Knowles, S C L; Webster, J P

    2014-07-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an indirectly transmitted protozoan parasite, of which members of the cat family (Felidae) are the only definitive hosts and small mammals such as rats serve as intermediate hosts. The innate aversion of rodents to cat odor provides an obstacle for the parasite against successful predation by the feline definitive host. Previous research has demonstrated that T. gondii appears to alter a rat's perception of the risk of being preyed upon by cats. Although uninfected rats display normal aversion to cat odor, infected rats show no avoidance and in some cases even show attraction to cat odor, which we originally termed the "Fatal Feline Attraction." In this study, we tested for the first time whether the "Fatal Feline Attraction" of T. gondii-infected rats differed according to the type of feline odor used, specifically whether it came from domestic cats (Felis silvestris catus) or wild cats-cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) or pumas (Felis concolor). In two-choice odor trials, where wild and domestic cat odors were competed against one another, consistent with previous findings we demonstrated that infected rats spent more time in feline odor zones compared with uninfected rats. However, we further demonstrated that all cat odors are not equal: infected rats had a stronger preference for wild cat odor over that of domestic cats, an effect that did not differ significantly according to the type of wild cat odor used (cheetah or puma). We discuss these results in terms of the potential mechanism of action and their implications for the current and evolutionary role of wild, in addition to domestic, cats in transmission of T. gondii.

  5. Priming intelligent behavior: an elusive phenomenon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R Shanks

    Full Text Available Can behavior be unconsciously primed via the activation of attitudes, stereotypes, or other concepts? A number of studies have suggested that such priming effects can occur, and a prominent illustration is the claim that individuals' accuracy in answering general knowledge questions can be influenced by activating intelligence-related concepts such as professor or soccer hooligan. In 9 experiments with 475 participants we employed the procedures used in these studies, as well as a number of variants of those procedures, in an attempt to obtain this intelligence priming effect. None of the experiments obtained the effect, although financial incentives did boost performance. A Bayesian analysis reveals considerable evidential support for the null hypothesis. The results conform to the pattern typically obtained in word priming experiments in which priming is very narrow in its generalization and unconscious (subliminal influences, if they occur at all, are extremely short-lived. We encourage others to explore the circumstances in which this phenomenon might be obtained.

  6. Efectividad clínica en el cuidado del orificio de salida del catéter peritoneal Clinical effectiveness in peritoneal catheter exit orifice care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Gil Gil

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Existe una gran variedad de procedimientos y métodos, seguidos por los profesionales para realizar las curas y el cuidado del orificio de salida del catéter peritoneal. Averiguamos que todos ellos eran fundamentados y con resultados efectivos. Pero, nos preguntamos, ¿Cuál de entre ellos sería el más adecuado utilizar en nuestra unidad? Optamos por utilizar las recomendaciones de la literatura científica, incluyendo variables como las necesidades específicas de cada paciente, según las condiciones medioambientales de nuestra comunidad y las estaciones del año. El objetivo principal de nuestro estudio fue evaluar la validez y efectividad del protocolo que establecimos para nuestros pacientes. Realizamos un estudio epidemiológico descriptivo y longitudinal de 2 años y 8 meses de duración. Calculamos la tasa de incidencia de infecciones del orificio de salida del catéter y de peritonitis por paciente y para cada uno de los años de estudio (2008-2009-2010. Evaluamos los resultados comparándolos con los índices de normalidad marcados por la Sociedad Española de Nefrología, en el año 2007. Desglosamos el total de infecciones según estaciones y calculamos el porcentaje. Diferenciamos entre las infecciones provocadas por bacterias gram+ y aquellas producidas por bacterias gram-. Los resultados obtenidos revelaron que nuestro protocolo es válido y adecuado para nuestros pacientes, obteniendo una tasa de incidencia global de peritonitis de 0.72 por cada 24 paciente-mes y una tasa de infección del orificio de salida de 0.61 paciente-año, ambas por debajo del estándar establecido por la Sociedad Española de Nefrología (2007. Se demostró una mayor incidencia de infecciones en el periodo estival, concretamente el 46%. La clorhexidina al 1% abarca la cobertura de las bacterias gram+, bacterias gram-, esporas, virus y hongos pero se comprueba su mayor efectividad con los microorganismos gram+.There is a great variety of procedures and

  7. Measurement of cold challenge responses in primary Raynaud's phenomenon and Raynaud's phenomenon associated with systemic sclerosis.

    OpenAIRE

    O'Reilly, D; Taylor, L.; el-Hadidy, K; Jayson, M I

    1992-01-01

    Using computed thermography continuous temperature recordings were made before and after cold challenge of the fingers of control subjects and patients with primary Raynaud's phenomenon and Raynaud's phenomenon associated with systemic sclerosis. Basal skin temperature measurements (Tpre) were significantly lower in patients with primary Raynaud's phenomenon and Raynaud's phenomenon associated with systemic sclerosis than in the controls. Temperatures immediately after cold challenge (T0) wer...

  8. Energy requirements of adult cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermingham, Emma N; Thomas, David G; Morris, Penelope J; Hawthorne, Amanda J

    2010-04-01

    A meta-analysis was carried out in order to establish the energy requirements of adult cats. Publications that identified cat body weight (BW) were used to generate allometric relationships between energy requirements and BW of healthy adult cats, using log-log linear regression. Energy requirements were expressed in kcal/kg BW to be consistent with those reported by the National Research Council. Mean maintenance energy requirements were 55.1 (se 1.2) kcal/kg BW (115 treatment groups). Three allometric equations were identified to predict the energy requirements for maintenance of BW in the cat based on BW: light (53.7 kcal/kg BW- 1.061), normal (46.8 kcal/kg BW- 1.115) and heavy (131.8 kcal/kg BW- 0 .366). When reported on lean mass, the allometric equation revealed maintenance requirements were 58.4 kcal/kg lean mass- 1.140 (adjusted R2 0.694; thirty-six treatment groups). The present review suggests that values for maintenance energy requirements based on BW alone may not be an accurate prediction and more detailed information on the age, sex and neuter status, BW and composition would enhance the ability to interpret the maintenance energy requirements of cats.

  9. Seizures and epilepsy in cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore SA

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sarah A Moore Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA Abstract: Seizures are a common presenting complaint in cats, although causes and options for the treatment of seizures in this species have been historically poorly described in the veterinary literature. Seizure manifestation in cats may be different than what is typically seen in dogs, but the underlying causes of seizure activity are the same. These include primary epilepsies, structural epilepsies, and reactive seizures. Although primary epilepsy was once believed to be rare in cats, we now commonly appreciate this syndrome, albeit at a lower frequency than in dogs. Because of this, a complete diagnostic work-up is recommended for all cats presenting for initial evaluation of seizures. Symptomatic treatment of seizures in cats is similar to dogs, with only a few limitations related to species-specific antiepileptic drug toxicities. The goal of this review is to summarize the recent veterinary literature related to feline seizures, with a focus on seizure classification, clinical manifestation, diagnostic evaluation, and treatment options. Keywords: antiepileptic drug, seizure classification, levetiracetam, zonisamide, phenobarbital

  10. The Overeducation Phenomenon in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budría, Santiago

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The overeducation literature has typically assumed that the effect of overeducation on wages is constant across the conditional wage distribution. In this paper we use quantile regression and data from a group of European countries to show that differences across segments of the distribution are indeed large. We find significant differences between sexes, in the sense that it is not true that in countries where men are penalised more severely, women are also severely penalised. Moreover, different trends are observed depending on the country and sex. For example in Germany, the wage penalty for overeducation is higher among women than men. Furthermore, while the wage penalty for men increases from decile 10 to decile 90, the wage penalty decreases for women. In Spain, women are more severely penalised for overeducation than men and the effect of overeducation is quite homogeneous across deciles for both men and women.

    En la literatura relacionada con la sobre-educación, es tradicional asumir que el impacto de dicha sobreeducación en los salarios es común a toda la distribución de salarios. En este artículo, con datos de un grupo de países europeos y utilizando la regresión cuantílica se demuestra que, de hecho, el impacto de la sobreeducación es diferente en los distintos segmentos de la distribución de salarios. Las diferencias de género y por país son también significativas. Así por ejemplo en Alemania, la penalización salarial de los sobreeducados es mayor entre las mujeres que entre los hombres, pero mientras para los hombres la penalización es mayor en los deciles superiores, para las mujeres la penalización es mayor en los deciles inferiores. En España, las mujeres son más severamente penalizadas por estar sobre-educadas que los hombres, siendo constante dicha penalización salarial a lo largo de la distribución de salarios.

  11. Overcrowded ERs: analysis of the phenomenon and managing proposals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranco Cervellin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The “overcrowding” in Emergency Departments (EDs and its potentially negative consequences, is a well known phenomenon in western countries. The causes of this phenomenon in this area are: constantly decreased number of hospital beds, increased number of ED visits and demographic changes (increasing prevalence of elderly people and migrants. Overcrowding in EDs accounts different timing of various care-paths (e.g. door-to-balloon time in STEMI and also influences the degree of care given to patients. Moreover overcrowding has also been considered as a first-line cause of doctor’s and nurse’s burnout and of verbal or physical assault. The overcrowding phenomenon seems to be more effectively influenced by interventions directed to improve patient’s output from ED to wards; by contrast interventions directed to limit ED visits failed to be effective.

  12. THE BUREAUCRATIC PHENOMENON: CLASSICAL CONCEPTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Дама Ибрагима

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this article - to analyze Hegel and Karl Marx’s classic bureaucracy theories and also Max Weber’s concept of rational bureaucracy and its development in the works of Herbert Simon, Robert Merton, Peter Blau and Michel Crozier. It shows that the above listed researchers only undertook a change of terminology within the same theoretical tradition. The article describes different approaches to the bureaucratic system of administrative schools of the late 1950s and early 1980s. Major conclusions in the article include the following: administering the state apparatus consists in the organization of government on the basis of regulated rights, mandatory procedures that are invoked to ensure balance in the interest of man and society; bad effectiveness of government, infringement of the rights and freedoms of the individual is the result of dysfunction in the state apparatus; the struggle against it can be carried out with the help of administrative, economical and legal methods.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-6-45

  13. Creating cat states in one-dimensional quantum walks using delocalized initial states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei-Wei; Goyal, Sandeep K.; Gao, Fei; Sanders, Barry C.; Simon, Christoph

    2016-09-01

    Cat states are coherent quantum superpositions of macroscopically distinct states and are useful for understanding the boundary between the classical and the quantum world. Due to their macroscopic nature, cat states are difficult to prepare in physical systems. We propose a method to create cat states in one-dimensional quantum walks using delocalized initial states of the walker. Since the quantum walks can be performed on any quantum system, our proposal enables a platform-independent realization of the cat states. We further show that the linear dispersion relation of the effective quantum walk Hamiltonian, which governs the dynamics of the delocalized states, is responsible for the formation of the cat states. We analyze the robustness of these states against environmental interactions and present methods to control and manipulate the cat states in the photonic implementation of quantum walks.

  14. Optimal control of nonholonomic motion planning for a flee-falling cat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Xin-sheng; CHEN Li-qun

    2007-01-01

    The nonholonomic motion phnning of a free-falling cat is investigated.Nonholonomicity arises in a free-falling cat subject to nonintegrable angle velocity constraints or nonintegrable conservation laws.When the total angular momentum is zero,the motion equation of a free-falling cat is established based on the model of two symmetric rigid bodies and conservation of angular momentum.The control of system can be converted to the problem of nonholonomic motion planning for a free-falling cat.Based on Ritz approximation theory,the Gauss-Newton method for motion planning by a falling cat is proposed.The effectiveness of the numerical algorithm is demonstrated through simulation on model of a free-falling cat.

  15. 阿片样肽类的微离子透入对猫小脑浦肯野氏细胞的作用%Effects of microiontophoretically-applied opioid peptides on Purkinje cells in the cat cerebellum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kyoji TAGUCHI; Kenji ABE; Touichiro CHYUMA; Masatoshi KATO; Toshiro SHIGENAGA; Kazuki KUSHIDA; Toshiyuki CHIKUMA

    2000-01-01

    AIM: The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of microiontophoretically-applied opioid peptides on Purkinje cell of the cerebellum. METHODS:The effects of microiontophoretically-applied morphine,leucine-enkephalin ( Leu-Enk ), methionine-enkephalin (Met-Enk), and dynorphin 1- 13 (Dyn) on the spontaneous discharge of Purkinje cells in the cerebellum of the anesthetized cat were examined. RESULTS: Microiontophoretic applications of Leu-Enk and morphine produced inhibitory and excitatory responses, respectively in Purkinje cells. Application of both morphine and Leu-Enk induced dose-dependent responses. The excitatory responses were antagonized by naloxone, whereas the inhibitory responses were not. Bicuculline, a GABA-Aantagonist, completely abolished both the Leu-Enk-and morphine-induced-inhibitory responses. Iontophoretic application of Met-Enk and dyn produced inhibitory responses only. Met-enk- and dyn-induced inhibition was antagonized by naloxone. CONCLUSION: In Purkinje cell activity, microiontophoretically applied Leu-Enk-and morphine-induced excitation is connected with opiate receptors, whereas inhibition is related to the GABA receptor. However, Met-Enk and dyn produced only inhibitory effects via an opiate receptor in the cerebellum of cats.

  16. A classical case of the Gasul phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabnis, Girish R; Phadke, Milind S; Kerkar, Prafulla G

    2016-02-01

    This case demonstrates the development of secondary infundibular stenosis in a 10-year-old male child with documented large non-restrictive perimembranous ventricular septal defect in infancy - the classical Gasul phenomenon.

  17. Professor Nambu, String Theory and Moonshine Phenomenon

    CERN Document Server

    Eguchi, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    I first recall the last occasion of meeting the late Professor Yoichiro Nambu in a hospital in Osaka. I then present a brief introduction to the moonshine phenomenon in string theory which is under recent investigations.

  18. CHINCHIRISI: THE PHENOMENON OF "SPIRIT CHILDREN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    religio-cultural phenomenon a challenge to euthanasia, human rights and ..... Other ways for confinning these cases as chinchirisi include divination or ..... bound by its terms, but the international legal obligations assumed by a state under ...

  19. Degenerative mucinotic mural folliculitis in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, T L; Olivry, T; Vitale, C B; Power, H T

    2001-10-01

    A novel form of mural folliculitis is described in seven cats. Clinically, all cats exhibited generalized alopecia with scaling or crusting that was more pronounced over the head, neck, and shoulders. The face and muzzle of all cats was unusually thickened. Six of seven cats were progressively lethargic but did not demonstrate any other consistent systemic abnormalities. Histologically, there was severe mixed inflammation of the wall of the follicular isthmus in all cats, accompanied by some follicular destruction in five cats. Sebaceous glands were not affected. All cats had variable, but often striking, follicular mucin deposition, as well as epidermal hyperkeratosis and crusting. The cause of the severe mural folliculitis was not identified, and all cats responded poorly to immunomodulating therapy. Follicular mucinosis may be a nonspecific finding, likely reflective of the follicular lymphocytic milieu, and does not always herald follicular lymphoma.

  20. Cerebral cysticercosis in a cat : clinical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Schwan

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The metacestode of Taenia solium, Cysticercus cellulosae, was recovered from the brain of a cat showing central nervous clinical signs ante mortem. This is the first record of cerebral cysticercosis in a cat in South Africa.

  1. Critical assessment of claims regarding management of feral cats by trap-neuter-return.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longcore, Travis; Rich, Catherine; Sullivan, Lauren M

    2009-08-01

    Many jurisdictions have adopted programs to manage feral cats by trap-neuter-return (TNR), in which cats are trapped and sterilized, then returned to the environment to be fed and cared for by volunteer caretakers. Most conservation biologists probably do not realize the extent and growth of this practice and that the goal of some leading TNR advocates is that cats ultimately be recognized and treated as "protected wildlife." We compared the arguments put forth in support of TNR by many feral cat advocates with the scientific literature. Advocates promoting TNR often claim that feral cats harm wildlife only on islands and not on continents; fill a natural or realized niche; do not contribute to the decline of native species; and are insignificant vectors or reservoirs of disease. Advocates also frequently make claims about the effectiveness of TNR, including claims that colonies of feral cats are eventually eliminated by TNR and that managed colonies resist invasion by other cats. The scientific literature contradicts each of these claims. TNR of feral cats is primarily viewed and regulated as an animal welfare issue, but it should be seen as an environmental issue, and decisions to implement it should receive formal environmental assessment. Conservation scientists have a role to play by conducting additional research on the effects of feral cats on wildlife and by communicating sound scientific information about this problem to policy makers.

  2. Low-dose megestrol acetate revisited: a viable adjunct to surgical sterilization in free roaming cats?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Michael; Lawler, Dennis; Zawistowski, Stephen; Jöchle, Wolfgang

    2013-06-01

    Approximately 2-3 million cats are euthanased in animal shelters across the United States annually. Preventing pregnancy in cats is a key step to reducing this number. While surgery is generally a safe and effective tool for curbing reproduction in cats, it is not a practical method to achieve the reduction in numbers required for an appreciable impact on the cat population as a whole. Low-dose megestrol acetate (MA) is a synthetic progestin that has been used for the management of reproduction in free roaming cat populations; however, there has been no regulatory oversight regarding the use of this product for this purpose. Additionally, there is a paucity of data regarding the safety and efficacy of the product for the management of reproduction in free roaming cats. The purpose of this review is: (1) to outline the need for a non-surgical contraceptive in cats; (2) to discuss the uses of MA in domestic cats; (3) to consider potential adverse effects of the drug, and (4) to discuss regulatory challenges associated with the use of MA in free roaming cat populations. In order to answer the questions posed in this review, more data will need to be collected in laboratory and field studies.

  3. Spatially discontinuous ionization phenomenon in inhomogeneous soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    By using X-ray film imaging technology,a phenomenon of discontinuous ionization was observed in the inhomogeneous soil around the grounding electrode on which a surge voltage was applied.A simplified two-phase solid-gas model was built to study the electric field distribution in the soil to explain the discontinuous ionization phenomenon.Analysis showed the differences of the dielectric properties,the shapes and sizes of soil particles can cause discontinuous ionization in the soil.

  4. Open source innovation phenomenon, participant behaviour, impact

    CERN Document Server

    Herstatt, Cornelius

    2015-01-01

    Open Source Innovation (OSI) has gained considerable momentum within the last years. Academic and management practice interest grows as more and more end-users consider and even participate in Open Source product development like Linux, Android, or Wikipedia. Open Source Innovation: Phenomenon, Participant Behaviour, Impact brings together rigorous academic research and business importance in scrutinizing OCI from three perspectives: The Phenomenon, Participants' Behavior, and Business Implications. The first section introduces OCI artefacts, including who is participating and why, and provide

  5. Koebner phenomenon of the ear canal skin.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Young, O

    2009-02-01

    The Koebner phenomenon originally described the appearance of psoriatic lesions in the uninvolved skin of patients with psoriasis as a consequence of trauma. We describe a case of concurrent lichen planus and sarcoidosis in the auditory canal, which represents an unusual manifestation of the Koebner phenomenon. This is the first case of concurrent lichen planus and sarcoidosis in the head and neck region and highlights the need for biopsy to allow accurate histopathological diagnosis and treatment.

  6. Koebner phenomenon of the ear canal skin.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Young, O

    2012-02-01

    The Koebner phenomenon originally described the appearance of psoriatic lesions in the uninvolved skin of patients with psoriasis as a consequence of trauma. We describe a case of concurrent lichen planus and sarcoidosis in the auditory canal, which represents an unusual manifestation of the Koebner phenomenon. This is the first case of concurrent lichen planus and sarcoidosis in the head and neck region and highlights the need for biopsy to allow accurate histopathological diagnosis and treatment.

  7. Job Insecurity as a Social Psychological Phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuykova T.S.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper addresses a relatively new phenomenon of job insecurity. It provides an analysis of the various interpretations of the phenomenon given by Russian and foreign researchers, focuses on its social economical determinants and consequences for individuals and organizations. The paper concludes with an outline of some possible ways of overcoming the negative consequences of job insecurity — as for individuals, as for organizations, as for the society as a whole.

  8. PG和CAT在花瓣衰老中的作用研究%Research of Effect of PG & CAT in Petal Fading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘占才; 张莉丽

    2004-01-01

    紫叶桃(A.persica f. alropurpurea soheid)、月季(R.chinensis jaca)的花瓣在自然衰老过程中,过氧化氢酶(CAT)活性下降,脂质过氧化产物丙二醛(MDA)含量上升;丙基没食子酸(PG)处理可以减缓花瓣中MDA的积累.另外,本文就脂质过氧化引起花瓣衰老的机理作了一些探讨.

  9. Enhancing Micro-Cathode Arc Thruster (muCAT) Plasma Generation to Analyze Magnetic Field Angle Effects on Sheath Formation in Hall Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukas, Joseph Nicholas

    Using a Delta IV or Atlas V launch vehicle to send a payload into Low Earth Orbit can cost between 13,000 and 14,000 per kilogram. With payloads that utilize a propulsion system, maximizing the efficiency of that propulsion system would not only be financially beneficial, but could also increase the range of possible missions and allow for a longer mission lifetime. This dissertation looks into efficiency increases in the Micro-Cathode Arc Thruster (muCAT) and Hall Thruster. The muCAT is an electric propulsion device that ablates solid cathode material, through an electrical arc discharge, to create plasma and ultimately produce thrust. About 90% of the arc discharge current is conducted by electrons, which go toward heating the anode and contribute very little to thrust, with only the remaining 10% going toward thrust in the form of ion current. I will discuss the results of an experiment in which electron heating on a low melting point anode was shown to increase ion current, which theoretically should increase thrust levels at low frequencies. Another feature of the muCAT is the use of an external magnetic solenoid which increases thrust, ion current, and causes uniform cathode erosion. An experiment has shown that efficiency can also be increased by removing the external magnetic field power supply and, instead, utilizing the residual arc current to power the magnetic solenoid. A Hall Thruster is a type of electric propulsion device that accelerates ions across an electric potential between an anode and magnetically trapped electrons. The limiting factor in Hall Thruster operation is the lifetime of the wall material. During operation, a positively charged layer forms over the surface of the walls, known as a plasma sheath, which contributes to wall erosion. Therefore, by reducing or eliminating the sheath layer, Hall Thruster operational lifetime can increase. Computational modeling has shown that large magnetic field angles and large perpendicular electric

  10. 尾加压素Ⅱ对大鼠血管外膜阳离子氨基酸转运体的影响%Effect of Urotendin Ⅱ on Cationic Amino Acid Transporter ( CAT - 1 and CAT -2B) in Isolated Aortic Adventitia of Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫琳; 梁颖; 薛立华; 黎济荣; 贾月霞

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess the gene expression of cationic amino acid transporter - 1 ( CAT - 1 ), CAT2B and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in urotensin Ⅱ (UⅡ) - stimulated rat vascular adventitia.Methods The aortic adventitia were incubated in vitro.24 rats were randomly divided into normal group ,2U Ⅱ groups and LPS group.The aortic adventitia NO production was determined.Semi -quantitative RT- PCR was used to determine the mRNA concentrations of iNOS and CAT - 1 and CAT - 2B in aortic adventitia.Resuits After incubation of aorta for 6 hours, nitrite production in U Ⅱ group significantly increased (27% ,P < 0.05,49%, P <0.01 ).UⅡ - induced CAT - 1 、CAT -2B and iNOS mRNA increased significantly in aortic adventitia.Conclusion The results illustrate that U Ⅱ induces the transcription of high - affinity CAT - 1 and CAT-2B in aortic adventitia.Transcription of CAT- 1 and CAT-2B are correlated well with aortic NO biosynthesis.%目的:观察尾加压素Ⅱ(UⅡ)对大鼠主动脉血管外膜阳离子氨基酸转运体(CAT-1、CAT-2B)和诱导型一氧化氮合酶(iNOS)基因表达影响.方法:SD大鼠24只,250-3009,随机分为空白对照组、UⅡ组(10(-9)和10(-8)mol·L(-1))和脂多糖(LPS)阳性对照组,每组6只.分离雄性SD大鼠胸主动脉外膜,分别加入单纯孵育液、不同浓度UⅡ和LPS孵育6h.测定孵育液中亚硝酸盐(NO2)含量;RT-PCR方法测定CAT-1、CAT-2B和iNOS mRNA基因表达.结果:与对照组比较UⅡ(10(-9)-10(-8)·L(-1))刺激血管外膜NO2;生成增加(27%,P<0.05,和49%,P<0.01);UⅡ组血管外膜阳离子氨基酸转运体(CAT-1和CAT-2B)mRNA水平增加(均P<0.01),iNOS mRNA表达增加(P<0.01).结论:UⅡ可激活血管外膜CAT-1和CAT-2B基因表达,其变化可能参与了NO释放从而引起血管的扩张.

  11. CAT-ASVAB Technical Bulletin Number 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (NTIS No. AD-A115 334). Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins Uni- versity, Department of Psychology. Lord, F. M...two camps produced an adaptive testing battery (CAT- ASVAB) that achieved a remarkable balance between scientific empiricism and the drive to...of a CAT and placed CAT- Chapter 10 - CAT-ASVAB Operational Test and Evaluation 10-2 ASVAB in the 1980s’ group-paced, lock -step processing

  12. Optical switch phenomenon in a self-defocusing medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huagang Li; Zhihua Luo

    2009-01-01

    A spatial optical switch phenomenon caused by the induced focusing of a weak probe beam occurring in self-defocusing nonlinear media is discussed theoretically.A weak beam is induced to focus when it copropagates with an intense pump beam under the conditions that the probe and pump beams peak at different positions and propagate in different directions.Due to the effect of cross-phase modulation,the weak beam can not only be focused but also be deflected.The phenomenon is discussed by numerically solving the coupled amplitude equations.

  13. Cd2+胁迫对文蛤鳃组织SOD、CAT活性及MDA含量的影响%Effects of Cd2 + on SOD activity CAT activity, and MDA content in the gill of Meretrix mere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宜奎; 宋秀凯; 刘爱英; 任利华; 马建新

    2011-01-01

    为了解不同质量浓度的Cd2+对水生动物的超氧化物歧化酶(SOD)、过氧化氢酶(CAT)活性和脂质过氧化的影响,以文蛤为研究材料,采用室内模拟试验的方法,依据Cd2+对文蛤96h半致死质量浓度(LC50),设置4个Cd2+胁迫组,胁迫质量浓度分别为0.41 mg/L( 1/32LC50)、0.82 mg/L(1/16 LC50)、1.65 mg/L(1/8 LC50)、3.30 mg/L( 1/4LC50),并设置对照组,每组3个平行.研究不同质量浓度的Cd2+对文蛤鳃组织SOD、CAT活性和MDA含量的影响.结果表明:文蛤鳃组织SOD活性在0.41 mg/L和0.82 mg/L胁迫下,试验前期(0~48 h)呈现诱导效应,试验后期(48~96 h)呈现抑制效应,其余胁迫质量浓度在试验过程中均对文蛤鳃组织SOD活性呈现抑制效应;CAT活性在低质量浓度(0.41 mg/L)胁迫下出现阶段性抑制效应,接着呈现诱导-抑制过程,中高质量浓度在整个过程呈现诱导-抑制的过程;经过96h的胁迫试验,各胁迫组文蛤鳃组织中MDA含量显著上升(p<0.05),Cd2+对MDA的诱导作用显著且存在剂量-效应关系.%The article is intended to present findings on the effects of Cd2+ on the activities of SOD, CAT and content of MDA in the gill tissues of Meretrix meretrix. SOD and CAT are very important antioxi-dant enzymes which widely exist in nature and can remove excessive O2-free radical to prevent cellular damage. Some researches show that SOD and CAT are cooperative when removing O2-free radical. MDA is a kind of product of lipid per-oxidation, which indirectly reflect lipid per-oxidation in living organism. There were one control group and four exposed groups of Cd2+ which is 0.41 mg/L and 0.82 mg/L and 1.65 mg/L and 3.30 mg/L, respectively, according the values of 96 h half-lethal concentration (LC50) of Cd2+ on Meretrix meretrix . The effect of different Cd2 + concentrations on SOD activity, CAT activity, and content of MDA in the gill of Meretrix meretrix were investigated. The results showed that SOD activity was

  14. Statistical Agent Based Modelization of the Phenomenon of Drug Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Clemente, Riccardo; Pietronero, Luciano

    2012-07-01

    We introduce a statistical agent based model to describe the phenomenon of drug abuse and its dynamical evolution at the individual and global level. The agents are heterogeneous with respect to their intrinsic inclination to drugs, to their budget attitude and social environment. The various levels of drug use were inspired by the professional description of the phenomenon and this permits a direct comparison with all available data. We show that certain elements have a great importance to start the use of drugs, for example the rare events in the personal experiences which permit to overcame the barrier of drug use occasionally. The analysis of how the system reacts to perturbations is very important to understand its key elements and it provides strategies for effective policy making. The present model represents the first step of a realistic description of this phenomenon and can be easily generalized in various directions.

  15. Statistical Agent Based Modelization of the Phenomenon of Drug Abuse

    CERN Document Server

    Di Clemente, Riccardo; 10.1038/srep00532

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a statistical agent based model to describe the phenomenon of drug abuse and its dynamical evolution at the individual and global level. The agents are heterogeneous with respect to their intrinsic inclination to drugs, to their budget attitude and social environment. The various levels of drug use were inspired by the professional description of the phenomenon and this permits a direct comparison with all available data. We show that certain elements have a great importance to start the use of drugs, for example the rare events in the personal experiences which permit to overcame the barrier of drug use occasionally. The analysis of how the system reacts to perturbations is very important to understand its key elements and it provides strategies for effective policy making. The present model represents the first step of a realistic description of this phenomenon and can be easily generalized in various directions.

  16. Association of CAT-262C/T with the concentration of catalase in seminal plasma and the risk for male infertility in Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousnane, Nour El Houda; May, Sadiq; Yahia, Mouloud; Abu Alhaija, Abed Alkarem

    2017-10-01

    Catalase (CAT) plays a central role in the protection of different cell types against the deleterious effects of hydrogen peroxide. In human, CAT is implicated in many physiological and pathological conditions including idiopathic male infertility. In this study we examined the association between CAT levels in seminal plasma with different sperm parameters and with CAT-262 C/T polymorphism and their risk for idiopathic male infertility in Algeria. Semen and blood samples were obtained from 111 infertile males and 104 fertile controls from the region of Eastern Algeria following informed consent. Standard semen parameters, DNA integrity, and CAT concentration in seminal plasma were evaluated. CAT-262C/T genotypes were screened using allele specific PCR. Seminal CAT activity was significantly different (pinfertile males and controls, it was also markedly decreased in oligo-astheno-teratozoospermia (pdirect association between CAT-262C/T polymorphism and general male infertility. However, the results presented in this study showed that CAT activity is remarkably associated with the CAT-262T allele (p=0.001) and the different CAT-262C/T genotypes. This study highlighted the major differences in the seminal plasma CAT content between infertile and fertile males and the differences of CAT concentration between different CAT-262C/T genotypes carriers.

  17. Cats & Dogs%猫狗大战

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阿萌

    2003-01-01

    @@ ( Dogs and cats are permanent enemies. A dog named Bubby is catnapped by the cats. The whole cats' world is shocked and alert. ) Dog Chairman: Gentlemen, a few moments ago I received word of the gravest nature. The key agent working the Brody case has been catnapped. Although he is safe, new must replace him as soon as possible.

  18. Toxoplasmosis: An Important Message for Cat Owners

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a s t is O : wAnneIrmsportant What role do cats play in the spread of toxoplasmosis? Cats get Toxoplasma infection by eating infected rodents, birds ... animals, or anything contaminated with feces from another cat that is shedding the microscopic parasite in its ...

  19. Getting a CAT Scan (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What Happens in the Operating Room? Getting a CAT Scan (Video) KidsHealth > For Kids > Getting a CAT Scan (Video) A A A en español Obtención de una tomografía computada (video) CAT stands for "computerized axial tomography." Translated, that means ...

  20. Getting a CAT Scan (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Know About Puberty Train Your Temper Getting a CAT Scan (Video) KidsHealth > For Kids > Getting a CAT Scan (Video) Print A A A en español Obtención de una tomografía computada (video) CAT stands for "computerized axial tomography." Translated, that means ...

  1. ONCE DAILY FELODIPINE IN PATIENTS WITH PRIMARY RAYNAUDS-PHENOMENON

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KALLENBERG, CGM; WOUDA, AA; WESSELING, H

    1991-01-01

    The symptomatic effects of felodipine (Plendil(R)) have been assessed in 10 patients with primary Raynaud's phenomenon in a single blind study. After 2 weeks on placebo, the patients were treated for 6 weeks with felodipine, the dose being titrated stepwise every 2 weeks, starting with 5 mg, and inc

  2. Methods of fertility control in cats: Owner, breeder and veterinarian behavior and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Jane K; Mosteller, Jill R; Loberg, Jenny M; Andersson, Maria; Benka, Valerie A W

    2015-09-01

    Fertility control is important for population management of owned and unowned cats, provides health benefits at the individual level and can reduce unwanted sexually dimorphic behaviors such as roaming, aggression, spraying and calling. This article reviews the available evidence regarding European and American veterinarian, owner and pedigree cat breeder attitudes toward both surgical sterilization and non-surgical fertility control. It additionally presents new data on veterinarians' and pedigree cat breeders' use of, and attitudes toward, alternative modalities of fertility control. Within the United States and Europe, the proportion of cats reported to be sterilized varies widely. Published estimates range from 27-93% for owned cats and 2-5% for cats trapped as part of a trap-neuter-return (TNR) program. In some regions and populations of cats, non-surgical fertility control is also used. Social context, cultural norms, individual preferences, economic considerations, legislation and professional organizations may all influence fertility control decisions for cats. Particularly in Europe, a limited number of non-surgical temporary contraceptives are available for cats; these include products with regulatory approval for cats as well as some used 'off label'. Non-surgical methods remove the risk of complications related to surgery and offer potential to treat more animals in less time and at lower cost; they may also appeal to pedigree cat breeders seeking temporary contraception. However, concerns over efficacy, delivery methods, target species safety, duration and side effects exist with current non-surgical options. Research is under way to develop new methods to control fertility in cats without surgery. US and European veterinarians place high value on three perceived benefits of surgical sterilization: permanence, behavioral benefits and health benefits. Non-surgical options will likely need to share these benefits to be widely accepted by the veterinary

  3. The Use of Refuges by Communally Housed Cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Sicuto de Oliveira

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The increase of domestic animals kept in shelters highlights the need to ensure animal welfare. Environmental enrichment can improve animal welfare in many ways, such as encouraging captive animals to use all the space available to them. The effects of physical environmental enrichment on the spatial distribution and behavioral repertoire of 35 neutered domestic cats housed communally were analyzed. The provision of boxes in the environment increases the use of available space by the cats. We suggest this improves the cats’ welfare while in communally-housed rescue shelters. The frequencies of active and especially inactive behaviors also increased in the enriched condition. In a test with vertical environmental enrichment, the animals showed an increased length of stay in refuges located at a height of 0.5 m compared to those on the ground (0.0 m. However, the entry frequency was higher in refuges at 0.0 m. Both horizontal and vertical environmental enrichment increased the use of available space, demonstrating that box refuges as enrichment are effective in providing a refuge when at a height, or a place to explore at ground level. We suggest it enhances the welfare of cats in communally housed shelters. This information adds to the body of evidence relating to cat enrichment and can be useful in designing cat housing in veterinary clinics, research laboratories, shelters and domestic homes.

  4. A multivariate model of stakeholder preference for lethal cat management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, Dara M; Jacobson, Susan K

    2014-01-01

    Identifying stakeholder beliefs and attitudes is critical for resolving management conflicts. Debate over outdoor cat management is often described as a conflict between two groups, environmental advocates and animal welfare advocates, but little is known about the variables predicting differences among these critical stakeholder groups. We administered a mail survey to randomly selected stakeholders representing both of these groups (n=1,596) in Florida, where contention over the management of outdoor cats has been widespread. We used a structural equation model to evaluate stakeholder intention to support non-lethal management. The cognitive hierarchy model predicted that values influenced beliefs, which predicted general and specific attitudes, which in turn, influenced behavioral intentions. We posited that specific attitudes would mediate the effect of general attitudes, beliefs, and values on management support. Model fit statistics suggested that the final model fit the data well (CFI=0.94, RMSEA=0.062). The final model explained 74% of the variance in management support, and positive attitudes toward lethal management (humaneness) had the largest direct effect on management support. Specific attitudes toward lethal management and general attitudes toward outdoor cats mediated the relationship between positive (pstakeholder intention to support non-lethal cat management. Our findings suggest that stakeholders can simultaneously perceive both positive and negative beliefs about outdoor cats, which influence attitudes toward and support for non-lethal management.

  5. Cat Scratch Disease (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lymph nodes are the main symptom of the disease, and the illness often is mild. If kids have other general ... Prevention If you're concerned about cat scratch disease, you do not need to get rid of the family pet . The illness is not common and usually is mild, and ...

  6. A strange cat in Dublin

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Raifeartaigh, Cormac

    2012-11-01

    Not many life stories in physics involve Nazis, illicit sex, a strange cat and the genetic code. Thus, a new biography of the great Austrian physicist Erwin Schrödinger is always of interest, and with Erwin Schrödinger and the Quantum Revolution, veteran science writer John Gribbin does not disappoint.

  7. On new media weighting effect--Take"grassroots"cultural phenomenon as an example%浅议新媒体赋权效果--以“草根”文化现象为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王慧玲

    2014-01-01

    The field of western social science is discussed on theory, research and application, empowerment naturally have marginalized groups of social concern, small group communication attention and have a strong social practice. Along with the Internet as the representative of the rapid development of new media interactive, new media to empower the public to get more right to speak, and provide morespace for the individual"voice". This paper will take the"grassroots"cultural phenomenon as an example using western empowerment theory to explore new mediaweight effect.%西方社会科学领域对赋权理论、研究和应用进行了深入的探讨,赋权天然地具有对社会边缘群体的关怀、对小团体沟通的重视并有着强烈的社会实践性。随着以互联网为代表的具有互动性的新媒体迅猛发展,新媒体赋权让公众获得更多话语权,并为个体提供更大的“发声”空间。本文将以“草根”文化现象为例运用西方赋权理论探究新媒体赋权效果。

  8. Differences between antigenic determinants of pig and cat zona pellucida proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewgenow, K; Rohleder, M; Wegner, I

    2000-05-01

    Despite many efforts, the control of reproduction in feral cat populations is still a problem in urban regions around the world. Immunocontraception is a promising approach; thus the present study examined the suitability of the widely used pig zona pellucida proteins (pZP) for contraception in feral domestic cats. Purified zona pellucida proteins obtained from pig and cat ovaries were used to produce highly specific antisera in rabbits. Antibodies against pZP raised in rabbits or lions were not effective inhibitors of either in vitro sperm binding (cat spermatozoa to cat oocytes) or in vitro fertilization in cats, whereas antibodies against feline zona pellucida proteins (fZP) raised in rabbits showed a dose-dependent inhibition of in vitro fertilization. Immunoelectrophoresis, ELISA and immunohistology of ovaries confirmed these results, showing crossreactivity of anti-fZP sera to fZP and to a lesser extent to pZP, but no interaction of anti-pZP sera with fZP. It is concluded that cat and pig zonae pellucidae express a very small number of shared antigenic determinants, making the use of pZP vaccine in cats questionable. A contraceptive vaccine based on feline zona pellucida determinants will be a better choice for the control of reproduction in feral cats if immunogenity can be achieved.

  9. Teaching A-level Genetics: The Coat Colours of the Domestic Cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, D. J.; Talbot, C. D.

    1992-01-01

    The authors provide an introduction to the inheritance of coat colors in cats and suggest strategies designed to integrate the domestic cat (Felis domesticus or catus) into the teaching of genetics. Provides examples to illustrate dominance, recessiveness, epistasis, multiple allelism, environmental effect of phenotype, incomplete dominance,…

  10. My Experience of Feeding a Cat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乔琳

    2006-01-01

    I liked cat very much. In my old opinion, cat was cute and gentle. One day, my friend asked me to feed the cat for him. So I went to his house in order to take care of his cat. His neighbor was an old woman. When I was doing some cleaning, the old woman asked me if I needed some help. Suddenly, the cat stretched out its sharp claws, and clawed me and bit me with its sharp teeth. WowA It was too abrupt. The old woman got scared. “It goes crazyA” I said and asked her to get out of the room, otherwise she woul...

  11. Positive Impact of Nutritional Interventions on Serum Symmetric Dimethylarginine and Creatinine Concentrations in Client-Owned Geriatric Cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jean A; MacLeay, Jennifer; Yerramilli, Maha; Obare, Edward; Yerramilli, Murthy; Schiefelbein, Heidi; Paetau-Robinson, Inke; Jewell, Dennis E

    2016-01-01

    A prospective study was conducted in client-owned geriatric cats to evaluate the short- term effects of a test food on serum symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) and creatinine (Cr) concentrations. Test food contained functional lipids (fish oil), antioxidants (vitamins C and E), L-carnitine, botanicals (vegetables), highly bioavailable protein, and amino acid supplements. Cats (n = 80) were fed either test food or owner's-choice foods (non-nutritionally controlled cohort). Cats were included based on age (≥ 9 years), indoor only, neutered, and free of chronic disease. At baseline, all cats had serum Cr concentrations within the reference interval. Renal function biomarkers and urinalysis results at baseline and after consuming test food or owner's-choice foods for 3 and 6 months were evaluated. Cats consuming test food showed significant decreases in serum Cr and BUN concentrations across time. Overall, cats consuming owner's-choice foods showed significant increases in serum SDMA concentrations at 3 and 6 months compared with baseline (P ≤ 0.05), whereas in cats consuming test food serum SDMA concentrations did not change. At baseline or during the 6-month feeding trial, 23 (28.8%) cats had increased serum SDMA, but normal serum Cr consistent with IRIS Stage 1 chronic kidney disease. This included 6 cats fed test food and 17 cats fed owner's-choice foods. In the 6 cats fed test food, serum SDMA decreased in 3 cats and remained stable in 1 cat, whereas in the 17 cats fed owner's-choice foods, serum SDMA increased in 13 cats and decreased or remained stable in 4 cats. The increase in serum SDMA concentration was significant (P = 0.02) only for cats fed owner's-choice foods. These results suggest that nonazotemic cats with elevated serum SDMA (early renal insufficiency) when fed a food designed to promote healthy aging are more likely to demonstrate stable renal function compared with cats fed owner's-choice foods. Cats fed owner's-choice foods were more likely to

  12. Retention performance of a learned delayed-alternation task after chemical lesions of the cats mediodorsal nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitsch, H J

    1982-03-01

    The mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus was lesioned in cats, which had learned a spatial delayed-alternation task. Lesions were carried out with kainic acid or ibotenic acid. From altogether 29 cats, 9 cats with bilateral and 6 cats with unilateral lesions of the mediodorsal nucleus together with a control group of 4 cats, were included in the final data analysis. Lesions in the operated cats destroyed variable portions of the mediodorsal nucleus. Consistently, however, neither the midline nuclei, situated next to the damaged mediodorsal nucleus, nor fiber tracts traversing or by-passing the mediodorsal nucleus, were damaged. Furthermore, remote lesion effects were not detected either in the diazepam-pretreated cats with kainic acid-induced lesions or in the ibotenic acid-lesioned animals. Cats injected with ibotenic acid at a concentration 8-fold higher than the kainic acid solution, showed smaller thalamic lesions than kainic acid-injected cats. A direct correlation was found between the extent of neuronal damage within the mediodorsal nucleus and the degree of the behavioral impairment. Cats with complete or almost complete bilateral lesions of the mediodorsal nucleus manifested severe deficits in retention of the delayed-alternation task, while cats with small, bilateral lesions of the mediodorsal nucleus or with unilateral lesions were impaired less severely or even not at all.

  13. Oxidative stress during acute FIV infection in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Craig; Lehman, Tracy; McCord, Kelly; Avery, Paul; Dow, Steven

    2008-03-15

    Oxidative stress is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of HIV infection in humans. For example, CD4(+) T cells are particularly affected in HIV patients and oxidative stress may also contribute to impairment of neutrophil function in HIV/AIDS patients. Since cats infected with FIV develop many of the same immunological abnormalites as HIV-infected humans, we investigated effects of acute FIV infection on oxidative stress in cats. Cats were infected with a pathogenic strain of FIV and viral load, changes in neutrophil number, total blood glutathione, malondiadehye, antioxidant enzyme concentrations, and reduced glutathione (GSH) concentration in leukocytes were measured sequentially during the first 16 weeks of infection. We found that superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase concentrations in whole blood increased significantly during acute FIV infection. In addition, neutrophil numbers increased significantly during this time period, though their intracellular GSH concentrations did not change. In contrast, the numbers of CD4(+) T cells decreased significantly and their intracellular GSH concentration increased significantly, while intracellular GSH concentrations were unchanged in CD8(+) T cells. However, by 16 weeks of infection, many of the abnormalities in oxidative balance had stabilized or returned to pre-inoculation values. These results suggest that acute infection with FIV causes oxidative stress in cats and that CD4(+) T cells appear to be preferentially affected. Further studies are required to determine whether early treatment with anti-oxidants may help ameliorate the decline in CD4(+) T cell number and function associated with acute FIV infection in cats.

  14. Devil declines and catastrophic cascades: is mesopredator release of feral cats inhibiting recovery of the eastern quoll?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fancourt, Bronwyn A; Hawkins, Clare E; Cameron, Elissa Z; Jones, Menna E; Nicol, Stewart C

    2015-01-01

    The eastern quoll (Dasyurus viverrinus) is a medium-sized Australian marsupial carnivore that has recently undergone a rapid and severe population decline over the 10 years to 2009, with no sign of recovery. This decline has been linked to a period of unfavourable weather, but subsequent improved weather conditions have not been matched by quoll recovery. A recent study suggested another mechanism: that declines in Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) populations, due to the spread of the fatal Devil Facial Tumour Disease, have released feral cats (Felis catus) from competitive suppression, with eastern quoll declines linked to a subsequent increase in cat sightings. Yet current evidence of intraguild suppression among devils, cats and quolls is scant and equivocal. We therefore assessed the influences of top-down effects on abundance and activity patterns among devils, feral cats and eastern quolls. Between 2011 and 2013, we monitored four carnivore populations using longitudinal trapping and camera surveys, and performed camera surveys at 12 additional sites throughout the eastern quoll's range. We did not find evidence of a negative relationship between devil and cat abundance, nor of higher cat abundance in areas where devil populations had declined the longest. Cats did not appear to avoid devils spatially; however, there was evidence of temporal separation of cat and devil activity, with reduced separation and increasing nocturnal activity observed in areas where devils had declined the longest. Cats and quolls used the same areas, and there was no evidence that cat and quoll abundances were negatively related. Temporal overlap in observed cat and quoll activity was higher in summer than in winter, but this seasonal difference was unrelated to devil declines. We suggest that cats did not cause the recent quoll decline, but that predation of juvenile quolls by cats could be inhibiting low density quoll populations from recovering their former abundance

  15. THE NEGATIVE EFFECTS OF "MEDIA MANAGEMENT" PHENOMENON AND ITS COUNTERMEASURES%“媒治”现象的负面效应及其治理对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    向长艳

    2011-01-01

    "媒治"一词由媒体所创。"媒治"现象的实质乃是人治传统的历史延伸,其负面效应表现在:有让事后监督的弊病扩大之势;有让严重个案事件被雪藏之嫌;助推行政人员的危情公关;阻碍媒体监督职能的正确发挥。要让"媒治"作用得到有效发挥,制度建设是关键:制定舆论监督法律,拓展舆论监督空间;建立网络舆论规范机制;完善行政系统的内部运行体制。%The essence of the phenomenon of "media management" is just an extension of the traditional rule by men and its negative effects find expression in the following aspects: the trend of expanding the malpractice of post-supervision;the likeliness of concealing serious cases and events;wheting executives' PR abilities in a crisis;impeding the media to play supervisory function well.To ensure that "media management "can play its role effectively,the key lies in system construction: making relevant law for supervision by public opinion;expanding the space of supervision;establishing regulatory mechanisms of network public opinion;perfecting the internal operating system of administrative system.

  16. Historical Aspects in Tolerance Phenomenon Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janat A. Karmanova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the historical aspect of the tolerance phenomenon research, particularly the study of tolerance in the age of Antiquity, Middle Ages, New Times, Enlightenment. It is remarkable that the problem of tolerance, emerged in Western civilization on religious grounds, laid the foundation for all other freedoms, attained in many countries. Besides, the article attaches special attention to the researchers of the East, such as Abu Nasr al-Farabi, Khoja Ahmed Yasawi, studies the historical aspect of works by Kazakhstan thinkers A. Kunanbayev, C. Valikhanova, K.B. Zharikbayev, S.K. Kaliyev, A.N. Nysanbayev, A.I. Artemev and others. The analysis of historical research of the tolerance phenomenon brings the author to the conclusion that religious freedom was the starting point for the emergence of new areas of tolerance display. The content of this phenomenon changed according to the historical peculiarities of the societies’ development

  17. Improving the feline veterinary consultation: the usefulness of Feliway spray in reducing cats' stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Joana Soares; Fragoso, Sara; Beck, Alexandra; Lavigne, Stephane; Varejão, Artur Severo; da Graça Pereira, Gonçalo

    2016-12-01

    Going to the veterinary clinic is a stressful experience for most cats as they feel threatened when entering a new and confined environment. The aim of this research was to investigate if Feliway spray, when used on the table in the consultation room, can decrease cats' stress and ease their handling. A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was developed, using a total sample of 87 cats of both sexes, castrated or intact, of any breed, aged >26 weeks. A Feliway spray and a placebo solution spray were tested in two different consultation rooms. During the first phase, Feliway spray was applied to the examination table of one room and the placebo spray in the other. After a washout period of 15 days the spray allocation was switched. After the first 15 mins of general questioning and physical examination carried out by the veterinarian, the observer assessed the stress levels of the cats based on a seven-level 'cat stress score', and the ease of handling based on a five-point 'scale of handling' developed by the authors. The study demonstrated that the use of Feliway spray leads to significant (P = 0.01) differences in cats' usual behaviour, according to their owners. With regard to stress, animals exposed to Feliway spray showed significantly lower stress levels than those treated with placebo (P = 0.02). Regarding the scale of handling, the scoring did not differ significantly between cats under the effect of Feliway spray and cats receiving placebo (P = 0.01). This research shows that the use of Feliway spray on the examination table improves the welfare of cats by reducing their stress during veterinary consultations. Feliway spray significantly changed the behaviour of the cats in this study, and offers a simple and effective way to help decrease stress in cats during the consultation. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Orthostatic proteinuria with nutcracker phenomenon: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Noh Hyuck; Song, Soon Young; Lee, En Ja; Kim, Mi Sung; Kim, Byung Gil [College of Medicine, Kwandong Univ., Koyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Orthostatic proteinuria has been recognized as a benign condition with a good prognosis and has not been associated with any underlying glomerular disease. The pathogenesis of orthostatic proteinuria is unclear. Recently, a few foreign reports suggested that the nutcracker phenomenon, which is known as a cause of asymptomatic hematuria, may also be a major cause of orthostatic proteinuria. We report a case of a 12-year-old female patient presenting only with orthostatic proteinuria, who was diagnosed as having nutcracker phenomenon by Doppler study and venography.

  19. Phenomenon of Plenty: Theory and diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Uzhegov

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Present study theoretically explores and empirically diagnoses the Phenomenon of Plenty - paradox of below-potential economic performance of nations generously endowed with natural resources, focusing on oil-rich CIS members: Russia, Azerbaijan, and Kazakhstan. Extending theoretical structure to proposed Four-Component Process it reports existence of direct de-servisation finding previously overlooked cause of oil paradox - downturn of non-tradable sector long-time lacking production forces. Application of elaborated 5-Sign Algorithm for Diagnosis of the Phenomenon of Plenty elicits its presence across evaluated nations.

  20. Social Media: A Phenomenon to be Analyzed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    danah boyd

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of “social media” has more to do with its cultural positioning than its technological affordances. Rooted in the broader “Web 2.0” landscape, social media helped engineers, entrepreneurs, and everyday people reimagine the role that technology could play in information dissemination, community development, and communication. While the technologies invoked by the phrase social media have a long history, what unfolded in the 2000s reconfigured socio-technical practices in significant ways. Reflecting on the brief history of social media, this essay argues for the need to better understand this phenomenon.