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Sample records for cat phenomenon effects

  1. Fatal attraction phenomenon in humans: cat odour attractiveness increased for toxoplasma-infected men while decreased for infected women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Flegr

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Latent toxoplasmosis, a lifelong infection with the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii, has cumulative effects on the behaviour of hosts, including humans. The most impressive effect of toxoplasmosis is the "fatal attraction phenomenon," the conversion of innate fear of cat odour into attraction to cat odour in infected rodents. While most behavioural effects of toxoplasmosis were confirmed also in humans, neither the fatal attraction phenomenon nor any toxoplasmosis-associated changes in olfactory functions have been searched for in them.Thirty-four Toxoplasma-infected and 134 noninfected students rated the odour of urine samples from cat, horse, tiger, brown hyena and dog for intensity and pleasantness. The raters were blind to their infection status and identity of the samples. No signs of changed sensitivity of olfaction were observed. However, we found a strong, gender dependent effect of toxoplasmosis on the pleasantness attributed to cat urine odour (p = 0.0025. Infected men rated this odour as more pleasant than did the noninfected men, while infected women rated the same odour as less pleasant than did noninfected women. Toxoplasmosis did not affect how subjects rated the pleasantness of any other animal species' urine odour; however, a non-significant trend in the same directions was observed for hyena urine.The absence of the effects of toxoplasmosis on the odour pleasantness score attributed to large cats would suggest that the amino acid felinine could be responsible for the fatal attraction phenomenon. Our results also raise the possibility that the odour-specific threshold deficits observed in schizophrenia patients could be caused by increased prevalence of Toxoplasma-infected subjects in this population rather than by schizophrenia itself. The trend observed with the hyena urine sample suggests that this carnivore, and other representatives of the Feliformia suborder, should be studied for their possible role as definitive hosts in

  2. Nothingness and the placebo effect phenomenon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tine

    The placebo effect is a pharmacological conundrum, since it is a medical effect that is produced by “nothing” because no pharmacologically active substance is present in placebo. Placebo has, among other things, been defined as an inert substance, often a calcium pill. Simultaneously it presents...... a posthuman angle, applying Karen Barad’s concept of agential realism to tackle the issue of nothingness. I argue that the placebo effect produces specific agencies in the placebo effect phenomenon – that is, both the subject under treatment and the placebo emerge in the placebo effect in the act of measuring it...

  3. Effects of experimental amitraz intoxication in cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.F. Andrade

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available This work studied the effects of experimental amitraz intoxication in cats. Sixteen cats were randomly divided equally into two groups: amitraz group - animals received 1.5% amitraz at 1mg/kg IV; and the control group - animals without amitraz. Physiological parameters from blood, cardiorespiratory system, and sedation indicators were quantified over time up to 360 minutes. Blood profile, urea, creatinine, alananine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase were not affected by amitraz. Sedation, loss of reflexes, hypothermia, bradycardia, bradyarrhythmia, hypotension, bradypnea, mydriasis, besides transitory hyperglycemia, hypoinsulinemia and decrease of cortisol levels were observed in cats experimentally exposed to amitraz. The alpha2-adrenergic effects induced by amitraz intoxication in cats are very similar to the same effects reported in others species, contributing with more information about this type of intoxication to veterinary toxicology.

  4. Cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CDC.gov . Healthy Pets, Healthy People About Pets & People Pets & Other Animals Birds Cats Dogs Farm Animals Backyard ... pets CDC Podcasts Zoonoses in the Bedroom CDC People Can Catch Diseases from Their Pets CDC Helpful books and references Cat-associated outbreaks ...

  5. The antihypertensive effect of amlodipine in cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Morar,

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effect of amlodipine on blood pressure and renal function in cats with arterial hypertension secondary to chronic renal failure. The research was conducted on 11 cats, aged between 7 and 14.5 years, diagnosed with arterial hypertension secondary to chronic renal failure. Systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP, mean arterial pressure (MBP and pulse rate were determined by oscillometric method, before and after 7, 30 or 120 days of treatment with amlodipine. At the beginning of treatment, all cats were receiving 0.625 mg amlodipine once daily and after 7 days oftreatment, in five cats, the dose was increased to 1.25 mg amlodipine, once daily. Before amlodipine administration the mean values of SBP/DBP were 175 ± 13.2 mmHg/119 ± 7.2 mmHg and after 30 days of treatment, the mean values of the SBP/DBP were reduced by 27.9/25.4 mmHg (p<0,001. After 120 days of treatment with amlodipine mean values of SBP/DBP were lower with 32/31 mmHg compared with baseline values (p<0.001. The treatment with amlodipine did not significantly affect the values of blood biochemical parameters of renal profile.

  6. The Production Effect: Delineation of a Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Colin M.; Gopie, Nigel; Hourihan, Kathleen L.; Neary, Karen R.; Ozubko, Jason D.

    2010-01-01

    In 8 recognition experiments, we investigated the "production effect"--the fact that producing a word aloud during study, relative to simply reading a word silently, improves explicit memory. Experiments 1, 2, and 3 showed the effect to be restricted to within-subject, mixed-list designs in which some individual words are spoken aloud at study.…

  7. The effect of cat Felis catus predation on three breeding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Breeding success of Pterodroma macroptera, Procellaria aequinoctialis and Pachyptila vittata salvini in three cat-free and three control areas were used to evaluate the effects of cat Felis catus predation on the avifauna of Marion Island. Breeding success of all three species was significantly higher in the combined cat-free ...

  8. Effect of single-cat versus multi-cat home history on perceived behavioral stress in domestic cats (Felis silvestrus catus) in an animal shelter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadley, Heidi M; McCobb, Emily C; Slater, Margaret R

    2014-02-01

    This study investigates the effect of living with other cats in a prior home on stress levels of cats recently surrendered to an animal shelter. A total of 63 cats was evaluated using a Cat-Stress-Score and an approach test. Cats were categorized in terms of previous home history with or without other cats. No significant difference was found in stress scores between cats from single-cat households and those from multiple-cat households, although single cats that had been in the shelter less than 4 days demonstrated higher stress levels. No significant difference was found between the two groups in terms of approach results. Results of this study suggest that, in traditional individual cage settings, cats that are not accustomed to living with other cats may experience more stress in the initial few days of attempting to adjust to shelter existence. Through the use of such assessments, shelter personnel may develop an increased awareness to the needs of these cats and attempt to provide measures to improve their well-being within the shelter environment.

  9. Fatal attraction phenomenon in humans – cat odour attractiveness increased for Toxoplasma-infected men while decreased for infected women

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Flegr, J.; Lenochová, P.; Hodný, Zdeněk; Vondrová, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 11 (2011), e1389 ISSN 1935-2735 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : toxoplasmosis * fatal attraction phenomenon * urine odour Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.716, year: 2011

  10. Effects of Forgetting Phenomenon on Surveillance Test Interval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ho-Joong; Jang, Seung-Cheol

    2007-01-01

    Technical Specifications (TS) requirements for nuclear power plants (NPPs) define Surveillance Requirements (SRs) to assure safety during operation. SRs include surveillance test intervals (STIs) and the optimization of the STIs is one of the main issues in risk-informed applications. Surveillance tests are required in NPPs to detect failures in standby equipment to assure their availability in an accident. However, operating experience of the plants suggests that, in addition to the beneficial effects of detecting latent faults, the tests also may have adverse effects on plant operation or equipment; e.g., plant transient caused by the test and wear-out of safety system equipment due to repeated testing. Recent studies have quantitatively evaluated both the beneficial and adverse effects of testing to decide on an acceptable test interval. The purpose of this research is to investigate the effects of forgetting phenomenon on STI. It is a fundamental human characteristic that a person engaged in a repetitive task will improve his performance over time. The learning phenomenon is observed by the decrease in operation time per unit as operators gain experience by performing additional tasks. However, once there is a break of sufficient length, forgetting starts to take place. In surveillance tests, the most common factor to determine the amount of forgetting is the length of STI, where the longer the STI, the greater the amount of forgetting

  11. THE GENERATING AND COMPLEMENTARY EFFECTS OF THE UNDERGROUND ECONOMY PHENOMENON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corneliu Sorin BAICU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available For a comprehensive understanding of the informal sector, an analysis addressing the relationships and links between the morphology and etiology of the underground economy, on the one hand, and its effects on the economic, social or legal, on the other hand is required. The double identity, that of cause phenomenon and effect phenomenon, that the underground economy has, gives it a special status in explaining certain phenomena which vitiates the economic and social life. The generating and complementary effects of the underground area covered in this study are analyzed in terms of the following vectors of analysis: tax evasion, illegal work and money laundering. Tax evasion represents the central core of the underground economy and faithfully expresses the fiscal monetary policies ,the fiscal mortality and the degree of compliance of the taxpayer. Undeclared work is an indicator of the labor market in the informal economy and is a good barometer for analyzing the demand and supply of labor in the visible economy. Money laundering defines the level of economic and financial crime and reflects the level of illegal use of capital on the black market. Tax evasion, money laundering and illegal work can only develop on a framework provided by illicit markets for goods, services and labor. Beyond the, unidirectional or bidirectional relationships between phenomena, the paper consists in a plea for an interdependent, multi-causal analysis of the phenomena and operating mechanisms of the relationships within and outside the underground economy.

  12. The God effect quantum entanglement, science’s strangest phenomenon

    CERN Document Server

    Clegg, Brian

    2006-01-01

    The phenomenon that Einstein thought too spooky and strange to be true What is entanglement? It's a connection between quantum particles, the building blocks of the universe. Once two particles are entangled, a change to one of them is reflected---instantly---in the other, be they in the same lab or light-years apart. So counterintuitive is this phenomenon and its implications that Einstein himself called it "spooky" and thought that it would lead to the downfall of quantum theory. Yet scientists have since discovered that quantum entanglement, the "God Effect," was one of Einstein's few---and perhaps one of his greatest---mistakes. What does it mean? The possibilities offered by a fuller understanding of the nature of entanglement read like something out of science fiction: communications devices that could span the stars, codes that cannot be broken, computers that dwarf today's machines in speed and power, teleportation, and more. In The God Effect, veteran science writer Brian Clegg has written an ex...

  13. El Nino phenomenon, effects on the tree of coffee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaramillo Robledo, Alvaro; Baldion Rincon, Jose Vicente; Guzman Martinez, Orlando

    1998-01-01

    El Nino phenomenon is manifested in the coffee by a deficiency of water in the plant, that which affects its normal development in its fruits; the author describes other alterations that affect the plants of coffee due to El Nino phenomenon

  14. Curvature Effect and the Spectral Softening Phenomenon Detected ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    soft spectral evolution, indicating that this spectral softening is not a rare phenomenon .... of time, there exists a temporal steep decay phase accompanied by spectral softening. (d) In most cases, the temporal power law index α and the spectral.

  15. Load and speed effects on the cervical flexion relaxation phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Descarreaux Martin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The flexion relaxation phenomenon (FRP represents a well-studied neuromuscular response that occurs in the lumbar and cervical spine. However, the cervical spine FRP has not been investigated extensively, and the speed of movement and loading effects remains to be characterized. The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the influence of load and speed on cervical FRP electromyographic (EMG and kinematic parameters and to assess the measurement of cervical FRP kinematic and EMG parameter repeatability. Methods Eighteen healthy adults (6 women and 12 men, aged 20 to 39 years, participated in this study. They undertook 2 sessions in which they had to perform a standardized cervical flexion/extension movement in 3 phases: complete cervical flexion; the static period in complete cervical flexion; and extension with return to the initial position. Two different rhythm conditions and 3 different loading conditions were applied to assess load and speed effects. Kinematic and EMG data were collected, and dependent variables included angles corresponding to the onset and cessation of myoelectric silence as well as the root mean square (RMS values of EMG signals. Repeatability was examined in the first session and between the 2 sessions. Results Statistical analyses revealed a significant load effect (P Conclusions The load increase evoked augmented FRP onset and cessation angles as well as heightened muscle activation. Such increments may reflect the need to enhance spinal stability under loading conditions. The kinematic and EMG parameters showed promising repeatability. Further studies are needed to assess kinematic and EMG differences between healthy subjects and patients with neck pain.

  16. Raynaud's phenomenon: peripheral catecholamine concentration and effect of sympathectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, S L; Christensen, N J; Olsen, N; Lassen, N A

    1980-01-01

    The reaction to body and finger cooling was recorded in seven patients with relapse of primary Raynaud's phenomenon after sufficiently performed bilateral upper thoracic sympathectomy and for comparison in eight young women with primary Raynaud's phenomenon as well as in seven normal women. The forearm venous concentration of noradrenaline was lower and adrenaline concentration higher in the sympathectomized patients than in the other groups (p less than 0,05). Noradrenaline showed a significant increase during body cooling in normals and primary Raynaud's (p less than 0,05). There was no significant correlation between the vasoconstrictor response to cooling of a finger and the noradrenaline concentration probably due to the fact that skin vasoconstriction impeded release of noradrenaline from the skin. The relapse of Raynaud's phenomenon after surgically sufficient sympathectomy could not be treated by reserpine or alfa-adrenergic receptor blockers in two patients in whom this was tried.

  17. Effect of high-impact targeted trap-neuter-return and adoption of community cats on cat intake to a shelter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, J K; Isaza, N M; Scott, K C

    2014-09-01

    Approximately 2-3 million cats enter animal shelters annually in the United States. A large proportion of these are unowned community cats that have no one to reclaim them and may be too unsocialized for adoption. More than half of impounded cats are euthanased due to shelter crowding, shelter-acquired disease or feral behavior. Trap-neuter-return (TNR), an alternative to shelter impoundment, improves cat welfare and reduces the size of cat colonies, but has been regarded as too impractical to reduce cat populations on a larger scale or to limit shelter cat intake. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of TNR concentrated in a region of historically high cat impoundments in a Florida community. A 2-year program was implemented to capture and neuter at least 50% of the estimated community cats in a single 11.9 km(2) zip code area, followed by return to the neighborhood or adoption. Trends in shelter cat intake from the target zip code were compared to the rest of the county. A total of 2366 cats, representing approximately 54% of the projected community cat population in the targeted area, were captured for the TNR program over the 2-year study period. After 2 years, per capita shelter intake was 3.5-fold higher and per capita shelter euthanasia was 17.5-fold higher in the non-target area than in the target area. Shelter cat impoundment from the target area where 60 cats/1000 residents were neutered annually decreased by 66% during the 2-year study period, compared to a decrease of 12% in the non-target area, where only 12 cats/1000 residents were neutered annually. High-impact TNR combined with the adoption of socialized cats and nuisance resolution counseling for residents is an effective tool for reducing shelter cat intake. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. The effect of keeping pet dogs and cats on Toxocariasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    esmaeel Fallah

    2012-03-01

    Conclusion: According to the results of this study, much of the dogs and cats owners were exposed to parasite. Training of dogs and cats owners, promotion of their awareness about various ways of transmission and examination of the infections in dogs and cats and prevention of these infections are recommended.

  19. The SNARC effect is not a unitary phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso Moro, Sara; Dell'Acqua, Roberto; Cutini, Simone

    2018-04-01

    Models of the spatial-numerical association of response codes (SNARC) effect-faster responses to small numbers using left effectors, and the converse for large numbers-diverge substantially in localizing the root cause of this effect along the numbers' processing chain. One class of models ascribes the cause of the SNARC effect to the inherently spatial nature of the semantic representation of numerical magnitude. A different class of models ascribes the effect's cause to the processing dynamics taking place during response selection. To disentangle these opposing views, we devised a paradigm combining magnitude comparison and stimulus-response switching in order to monitor modulations of the SNARC effect while concurrently tapping both semantic and response-related processing stages. We observed that the SNARC effect varied nonlinearly as a function of both manipulated factors, a result that can hardly be reconciled with a unitary cause of the SNARC effect.

  20. Environmental effects monitoring at Cat Arm Hydraulic Development, Newfoundland, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, E.L.

    1988-01-01

    The Cat Arm Dam is located on a plateau of the Long Range Mountains on Newfoundland's Great Northern Peninsula, and the 127 MW unit uses a 387 m head to produce an average of 676 GWh annually. Newfoundland and Labrador Hydro is conducting an environmental effects monitoring program in Cat Arm Reservoir to evaluate environmental impacts of the project. In the addendum to the Environmental Impact Statement of 1981, the utility agreed to a number of actions to mitigate the impacts of construction on fish populations, and to monitor the effects of reservoir creation, including the following. The mercury content of fish flesh, sediments and water would be monitored, and sampling would be undertaken prior to flooding to obtain baseline data, and for at least five years after flooding. The brook trout population would be monitored at various stages in the life of the reservoir in order to detect negative changes for which mitigative strategies could be applied. Alternative spawning habitat would be provided by removing barriers on streams or creating spawning beds if the monitoring program showed that recruitment was falling, and if these methods were ineffective, a compensatory stocking program would be considered. Extensive monitoring would be undertaken of the littoral zones, primary production in the reservoir, and of a number of limnological parameters to document long term changes in the reservoir. Although of academic interest, certain unusual characteristics of the Cat Arm reservoir, such as its low pH and dark colour, reduce its utility as a predictor of changes due to reservoir formation elsewhere in Newfoundland. 15 refs., 1 fig

  1. [The "Werther effect". Historical origin and background of a phenomenon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, H

    1999-01-01

    Ever so often one can read about the "Werther effect" in psychiatric literature. Until now this term has not lost its imaginative power, and still has its impact as well as being the subject of controversial discussion. In order to clarify the "Werther effect", it seemed first of all necessary to illuminate the real biographical background of Goethe's "The sorrows of young Werther" and the extraordinarily eventful history of its reception. This essay also cites comments on this novel made by various personalities and authorities in an attempt to provide some hints on the real impact that Goethe's novel had at its time and showing the quarrels it brought about. Here the author comes to the conclusion that considering the ideologies prevailing at that time (late enlightenment and sentimentalism) the dispute about Goethe's work only aims at hiding the actual discussion about the people's right of self-determination.

  2. [Asymmetric confusability effect in recognition memory of cats pictures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, M; Hakoda, Y

    1999-06-01

    Performance superiority of the addition of features in the stimuli over the deletion on recognition (asymmetric confusability effect) has been shown in previous studies (Pezdek, Maki, Valencia-Laver, Whetstone, Stoeckert, & Dougherty, 1988; Ando & Hakoda, 1998). We investigated the same effect by using a familiar living thing (cat) as a stimulus. Ten subjects were given a recognition task using pictures of cats with feature changes (additions, deletions, or no change). Results showed that the picture with deletions were easier to recognize than those with additions, which was opposite to the previous studies. Then, we examined the possibility that performance superiority of the deletions over the additions was mediated by the factor of impression. Another group of 18 subjects was asked to rate the impression scales consisting of a "typicality-reality factor", a "stability-balance factor", and a "grotesque-disgust factor". Results showed that there was a significant difference in impression ratings for each factor between the additions and the deletions, and that impression ratings predicted recognition performance well. It was concluded that performance superiority of the deletions over the additions was mediated by the factor of impression.

  3. The quantum Hall's effect: A quantum electrodynamic phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbab, A. I.

    2012-01-01

    We have applied Maxwell's equations to study the physics of quantum Hall's effect. The electromagnetic properties of this system are obtained. The Hall's voltage, V H = 2πħ 2 n s /em, where n s is the electron number density, for a 2-dimensional system, and h = 2πħ is the Planck's constant, is found to coincide with the voltage drop across the quantum capacitor. Consideration of the cyclotronic motion of electrons is found to give rise to Hall's resistance. Ohmic resistances in the horizontal and vertical directions have been found to exist before equilibrium state is reached. At a fundamental level, the Hall's effect is found to be equivalent to a resonant LCR circuit with L H = 2π m/e 2 n s and C H = me 2 /2πħ 2 n s satisfying the resonance condition with resonant frequency equal to the inverse of the scattering (relaxation) time, τ s . The Hall's resistance is found to be R H = √L H /C H . The Hall's resistance may be connected with the impedance that the electron wave experiences when it propagates in the 2-dimensional gas. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  4. COMPANION ANIMALS SYMPOSIUM: Sustainable Ecosystems: Domestic cats and their effect on wildlife populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitts-Morgan, S E

    2015-03-01

    Domestic cats are estimated to kill billions of small mammals and birds each year. In certain areas of the world, it is not uncommon for either feral or free-ranging cats to have high population densities, creating concern regarding their level of hunting. Many cats are considered to be subsidized predators, as they receive care and food from humans. Arguments abound regarding the presence of cats in the habitats of native small mammals and birds and whether or not local ecosystems can sustain this predator-prey relationship. The effects of cats on native wildlife can depend on several factors, including cat classification (feral vs. free ranging vs. indoor-outdoor), geographical location (islands vs. mainland), and type of habitat (rural vs. suburban vs. urban). Feral and free-ranging cats may have a greater impact on native species on islands because habitat is severely limited. Continued urbanization and development of rural areas also creates fragmented habitats, and native species may struggle to survive with the added pressure of hunting by domestic cats. Additionally, cats in rural areas are frequently fed by humans, which can support high population densities and intensify pressure on native species. Species targeted by cats may also vary based on prey availability in different areas, but small mammals are generally preferred over birds, reptiles, or invertebrates. Domestic cats certainly have the potential to roam and hunt in very large areas inhabited by native species and loss of biodiversity is a major concern. Therefore, it is possible that ecosystems may not be able to sustain hunting by domestic cats. Because this predator-prey relationship is probably not sustainable, it is necessary to responsibly manage outdoor domestic cats.

  5. Effect of benazepril, robenacoxib and their combination on glomerular filtration rate in cats

    OpenAIRE

    King, Jonathan N.; Panteri, Alessandro; Graille, Melanie; Seewald, Wolfgang; Friton, Gabriele; Desevaux, Cyril

    2016-01-01

    Background Combined use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may induce acute kidney injury in humans, especially when combined with diuretics. The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the effects of benazepril, robenacoxib and their combination in healthy cats. In each of two studies (study 1 followed by study 2), 32 healthy cats were randomised to one of four groups (n?=?4 male and 4 female cats per group) in a parallel-group design...

  6. Effectiveness of feeding large kibbles with mechanical cleaning properties in cats with gingivitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, HE; Theyse, LFH; van Winkelhoff, AJ; Dijkshoorn, NA; Logan, EI; Picovet, P

    2005-01-01

    Effectiveness of feeding large kibbles with mechanical cleaning properties in cats with gingivitis periodontal disease is the most common acquired oral disease in cats. it starts with plaque accumulation and gingivitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of different types of

  7. Effectiveness of the Domestic Cat (Felis silvestris catus) Urine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The stored cat urine was then thawed and mixed with maize starch to form a thick dough and then granulated and dried at room temperature before being packed in a hermetically closed jar. Initially, rodent foot marks on tracking soot coat tiles were used to estimate the rat population before the cat urine extracts application.

  8. Effects of feeding frequency and dietary water content on voluntary physical activity in healthy adult cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, P; Iwazaki, E; Suchy, S A; Pallotto, M R; Swanson, K S

    2014-03-01

    Low physical activity has been identified as a major risk factor for the development of feline obesity and diabetes. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of increased meal frequency and dietary water content on voluntary physical activity in cats fed to maintain BW. Ten adult lean neutered male cats were used in 2 tests, both crossover studies composed of a 14-d adaptation period, followed by a 7-d measurement of physical activity from d 15 to d 22 using Actical activity collars. Cats were group housed for most of the day, except for times when they were individually housed in cages to access their diet under a 16:8 h light:dark cycle. In Exp. 1, the difference in voluntary physical activity among cats fed 1, 2, 4, or a random number of meals per day were tested in a 4 × 4 Latin square design in 4 individual rooms. In Exp. 2, the effect of increasing dietary water content on voluntary physical activity was tested in a crossover design including a 5-d phase for fecal and urine collection from d 22 to 27. Cats were randomly assigned to 2 rooms and fed a dry commercial diet with or without added water (70% hydrated) twice daily. Activity levels were expressed as "activity counts" per epoch (15 s). In Exp. 1, average daily activity level for 1-meal-fed cats was lower than 4-meal-fed (P = 0.004) and random-meal-fed (P = 0.02) cats, especially during the light period. The activity level of cats during the dark period was greater in 1-meal-fed cats compared with cats fed 2 meals (P = 0.008) or 4 meals (P = 0.007) daily. Two-hour food anticipatory activity (FAA) before scheduled meal times for 1-meal-fed cats was lower (P meal-fed cats. In Exp. 2, average daily activity level of cats fed the 70% hydrated diet tended to be higher (P = 0.06) than cats fed the dry diet, especially during the dark period (P = 0.007). Two-hour FAA before the afternoon meal for cats fed the 70% hydrated diet was lower (P frequency and dietary water content, without changing energy intake or

  9. Effects of an iodine-restricted food on client-owned cats with hyperthyroidism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kooij, M.; Becvárová, Iveta; Meyer, H.P.; Teske, E.; Kooistra, H.S.

    The objective of this prospective, multicentre, non-controlled, open-label study was to evaluate the effects of an iodine-restricted food on circulating total thyroxine (TT4) concentrations and clinical parameters in client-owned cats with hyperthyroidism. Two hundred and twenty-five cats were

  10. Comparison of the effects of long-term pimobendan and benazepril administration in normal cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagawa, Yuichi; Machida, Noboru; Toda, Noriko; Tominaga, Yoshinori; Takemura, Naoyuki

    2016-08-01

    Pimobendan (PIMO) can cause adverse effects, such as mitral valve degeneration, in dogs; however, it is unclear whether these effects occur in cats. Therefore, we aimed to determine whether PIMO or benazepril produces adverse cardiac effects in healthy cats. This was a blinded, randomized, prospective parallel study. Twelve cats were randomly divided into two groups of six cats, namely, an angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor group that received benazepril and a PIMO group. Cats were administered their respective treatments for 506 days, and we evaluated cardiac parameters, blood biochemistry and glomerular filtration rates during that time. At the end of the trial, the cats were euthanized, and histopathological examinations were performed by a pathologist who was blinded to the treatment groups. No significant changes were observed in any of the parameters measured in either of the groups. In particular, no significant cardiac lesions were observed in either of the groups. In healthy cats, neither PIMO nor benazepril appears to cause cardiac lesions, but future studies are needed to examine the effects of PIMO in cats with heart disease.

  11. The Mozart Effect: Musical Phenomenon or Musical Preference? A More Ecologically Valid Reconsideration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassity, Hope Daniels; Henley, Tracy B.; Markley, Robert P.

    2007-01-01

    The "Mozart effect" is the reported phenomenon of increased spatial abilities after listening to that composer's music. However, subsequent research suggests that the Mozart effect may be an artifactual consequence of heightened arousal and mood rather than the music of Mozart per se (e.g., Thompson, Schellenberg, & Husain, 2001). The present…

  12. EMPIRICAL REFLECTIONS ON MIGRATION PHENOMENON. MAJOR EFFECTS OF MIGRATION ON THE HUMAN CAPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona BUTA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper Empirical reflections on migration phenomenon. Major effects of migration on the human capital analyzes the migration flows of the workforce (as part of the human capital globally/regionally, especially the highly qualified workforce migration. The qualified manpower processes of attracting on the work market have not been always well understood and, in some cases, have generated a series of difficulties. This is the reason why we will focus on the „waste of brains” phenomenon, which appears when highly qualified individuals are neither employed in the source-country nor in the target country; and, if they are, their job is below their qualifications.

  13. The effects of feral cats on insular wildlife: the Club-Med syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Steve C.; Danner, Raymond M.; Timm, R.M.

    2012-01-01

    Domestic cats have been introduced to many of the world‘s islands where they have been particularly devastating to insular wildlife which, in most cases, evolved in the absence of terrestrial predatory mammals and feline diseases. We review the effects of predation, feline diseases, and the life history characteristics of feral cats and their prey that have contributed to the extirpation and extinction of many insular vertebrate species. The protozoan Toxoplasma gondii is a persistent land-based zoonotic pathogen hosted by cats that is known to cause mortality in several insular bird species. It also enters marine environments in cat feces where it can cause the mortality of marine mammals. Feral cats remain widespread on islands throughout the world and are frequently subsidized in colonies which caretakers often assert have little negative effect on native wildlife. However, population genetics, home range, and movement studies all suggest that there are no locations on smaller islands where these cats cannot penetrate within two generations. While the details of past vertebrate extinctions were rarely documented during contemporary time, a strong line of evidence is emerging that the removal of feral cats from islands can rapidly facilitate the recolonization of extirpated species, particularly seabirds. Islands offer unique, mostly self-contained ecosystems in which to conduct controlled studies of the effects of feral cats on wildlife, having implications for continental systems. The response of terrestrial wildlife such as passerine birds, small mammals, and herptiles still needs more thorough long-term monitoring and documentation after the removal of feral cats.

  14. Fast cat-eye effect target recognition based on saliency extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Ren, Jianlin; Wang, Xingbin

    2015-09-01

    Background complexity is a main reason that results in false detection in cat-eye target recognition. Human vision has selective attention property which can help search the salient target from complex unknown scenes quickly and precisely. In the paper, we propose a novel cat-eye effect target recognition method named Multi-channel Saliency Processing before Fusion (MSPF). This method combines traditional cat-eye target recognition with the selective characters of visual attention. Furthermore, parallel processing enables it to achieve fast recognition. Experimental results show that the proposed method performs better in accuracy, robustness and speed compared to other methods.

  15. Effect of Feeding an Iodine-Restricted Diet in Cats with Spontaneous Hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, T Y; Bruyette, D S; Moore, G E; Scott-Moncrieff, J C

    2015-01-01

    Exclusive feeding of an iodine-restricted diet has been proposed as a method for controlling clinical manifestations of hyperthyroidism in hyperthyroid cats. To determine the effect of feeding an iodine-restricted diet on TT4 concentrations and clinical signs in cats with spontaneous hyperthyroidism. Forty-nine client-owned cats with spontaneous hyperthyroidism. Retrospective case series. Hyperthyroid cats were exclusively fed a commercially available iodine-restricted diet. Clinical response was assessed by change in weight and heart rate and serum TT4, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and creatinine concentrations at various times during dietary management (21-60 days, 60-180 days). Serum TT4 normalized in 20/48 cats (42%) and 39/47 cats (83%) at 21-60 days and 61-180 days, respectively. Cats in which the TT4 concentrations were still above reference range at 21-60 days had a significantly higher starting TT4 than those that normalized their TT4 levels during the same time period (P = .038). Body weight did not significantly increase (P = .34) nor heart rate decrease (P = .64) during the study. There was a significant decrease in serum creatinine (P = .028). Cats in the low reference range for serum TT4 concentrations did not have a significant increase in body weight (P = .41) nor creatinine (P = .54) when compared to those with high reference range. Restricted-iodine diets were effective at maintaining serum TT4 concentrations within reference ranges for a majority of cats with spontaneous hyperthyroidism over 1 year, although not all clinical signs of hyperthyroidism improved. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  16. Bullwhip effect phenomenon and mitigation in logistic firm's supply chain: Adaptive approach by Transborder Agency, Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Faizan, Riffat; Haque, Adnan ul

    2015-01-01

    This case study explores the bullwhip effect phenomenon and mitigation in supply chain process at Transborder Logistic Canada. Despite being one of the largest logistic chains of Canada, for two years it was facing challenges and problem in shape of bullwhip effects. The theoretical framework for present case study is based on the theory of Lee (1977) to overcome the problems in the supply chain process. "Realism" is the research philosophy undertaken to develop a cross-sectional research...

  17. Determination of effect of aspirin and captopril on cat glomerular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four days later, renovascular hypertension was induced through renal-artery stenosis by clipping half of the left renalarteries. Renal scintigraphy was conducted after four days. After confirming the presence of hypertension, the cats were divided into two groups of 10 animals each (aspirin and captopril groups, respectively).

  18. ["Placebo effect", from personal convictions to collective representations: A psychosocial reading of a pharmacodynamic phenomenon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balez, R; Couturaud, F; Touffet, L

    2015-11-01

    After starting with a brief historical account of the placebo effect organized around the elaboration of clinical trials and around sham therapy as a method, we will offer a psychosocial point of view on the placebo phenomenon. The placebo effect is at the heart of medicine and particularly of therapeutic trials from theoretical research on a drug to its acceptance and its use in every-day clinical practice. The placebo effect intermingles biology, relationships and the context of therapeutic interactions. This type of phenomenon originates as much from biology as from human psychology. Our article puts more precisely into question the part that psychology has in the placebo phenomenon and suggests a chart to address it. This chart refers both to the pharmacodynamic effect given to drugs in a subjective way, and to the collective representations and social interactions depending on them. What can we say about the psychosociological dimensions of the placebo effect? How is it possible to organize the scope of these dimensions to base systematic studies on them in the field of clinical trials? We try to give elements of response to these questions by suggesting the study of the placebo effect as an original field of study by necessarily mobilizing both health sciences and the human and social sciences. Copyright © 2015 Académie Nationale de Pharmacie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Influence of Sound Source Location on the Behavior and Physiology of the Precedence Effect in Cats

    OpenAIRE

    Dent, Micheal L.; Tollin, Daniel J.; Yin, Tom C. T.

    2009-01-01

    Psychophysical experiments on the precedence effect (PE) in cats have shown that they localize pairs of auditory stimuli presented from different locations in space based on the spatial position of the stimuli and the interstimulus delay (ISD) between the stimuli in a manner similar to humans. Cats exhibit localization dominance for pairs of transient stimuli with |ISDs| from ∼0.4 to 10 ms, summing localization for |ISDs| 10 ms, which is the appro...

  20. Effects of tramadol and acepromazine on intraocular pressure and pupil diameter in young healthy cats

    OpenAIRE

    Schroder, Deise Cristine; Monteiro, Bianca Garay; Pytlak, Deborah Braga; Souza, Mayara Carvalho de; Mendonça, Adriane Jorge; Ribeiro, Alexandre Pinto

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT: This study aimed to investigate the effects of the systemic administration of acepromazine, tramadol and the association of both on intraocular pressure (IOP) and pupil diameter (PD) in young healthy cats. Cats were randomly allocated into three groups (n=10/each) and intramuscular acepromazine (AG), tramadol (TG) or acepromazine combined with tramadol (ATG) were injected. PD (electronic caliper) and IOP (applanation tonometry) were assessed before (baseline) and following 15, 30, 6...

  1. The effect of the phenomenon of mobbing at the quality of life of health professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Koinis, Aristotelis; Saridi, Maria; Tziaferi Styliani

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Inroduction: In the last 15 years, a significant increase of incidents of mobbing in occupational health professionals (Hospitals), mainly in nursing, medical, and administrative staff. The phenomenon of mobbing and its effects on mental and physical health of health professionals, and consequently on the quality of life, in workplace is a significant limitation in the psycho-spiritual balance of employees as well as for the proper functioning of the organization Over time, moral...

  2. Repressing the Foreign Fighters Phenomenon in Western Europe: Towards an Effective Response Based on Human Rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Paulussen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This Research Paper explores how the foreign fighters phenomenon and terrorism more generally is repressed in Western Europe. It looks at a few specific repressive measures announced or adopted by France and the Netherlands, as well as criticism expressed against these proposals and measures. In addition to these two detailed analyses, references will also be made to other developments in Western Europe which appear to be indicative of a more general trend in which human rights increasingly seem to be put on the back seat when countering the phenomenon of foreign fighters and terrorism more generally. In the final section, a number of concluding thoughts and recommendations will be offered which explain why only a response based on human rights will be effective in countering this global problem in the long run.

  3. Influence of sound source location on the behavior and physiology of the precedence effect in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dent, Micheal L; Tollin, Daniel J; Yin, Tom C T

    2009-08-01

    Psychophysical experiments on the precedence effect (PE) in cats have shown that they localize pairs of auditory stimuli presented from different locations in space based on the spatial position of the stimuli and the interstimulus delay (ISD) between the stimuli in a manner similar to humans. Cats exhibit localization dominance for pairs of transient stimuli with |ISDs| from approximately 0.4 to 10 ms, summing localization for |ISDs| 10 ms, which is the approximate echo threshold. The neural correlates to the PE have been described in both anesthetized and unanesthetized animals at many levels from auditory nerve to cortex. Single-unit recordings from the inferior colliculus (IC) and auditory cortex of cats demonstrate that neurons respond to both lead and lag sounds at ISDs above behavioral echo thresholds, but the response to the lag is reduced at shorter ISDs, consistent with localization dominance. Here the influence of the relative locations of the leading and lagging sources on the PE was measured behaviorally in a psychophysical task and physiologically in the IC of awake behaving cats. At all configurations of lead-lag stimulus locations, the cats behaviorally exhibited summing localization, localization dominance, and breakdown of fusion. Recordings from the IC of awake behaving cats show neural responses paralleling behavioral measurements. Both behavioral and physiological results suggest systematically shorter echo thresholds when stimuli are further apart in space.

  4. Effects of tramadol and acepromazine on intraocular pressure and pupil diameter in young healthy cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deise Cristine Schroder

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: This study aimed to investigate the effects of the systemic administration of acepromazine, tramadol and the association of both on intraocular pressure (IOP and pupil diameter (PD in young healthy cats. Cats were randomly allocated into three groups (n=10/each and intramuscular acepromazine (AG, tramadol (TG or acepromazine combined with tramadol (ATG were injected. PD (electronic caliper and IOP (applanation tonometry were assessed before (baseline and following 15, 30, 60, and 120 minutes of treatments. It was verified that in AG, PD decreased significantly from time point 30 to 120 (P=0.002, but such reduction did not differ significantly from baseline (P=0.89. In TG, PD increased significantly from the first 15 minutes, until the last time point of evaluation (P0.05. It can be concluded that tramadol alone or in association with acepromazine produced significant mydriasis for up to 120 minutes, without changing IOP values in normal cats. Results of this study suggested that tramadol alone or in association with acepromazine caused significant mydriasis and did not change IOP values in normal cats. Therefore, it may be considered a satisfactory pre-anesthetic combination for ophthalmic surgery in cats. However, further studies are warranted on the use of such protocols in cats with ophthalmic diseases undergoing ocular or intraocular surgery.

  5. The effects of L-carnitin in Budd-Chiari syndrome in a domestic cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliye Sağkan Öztürk

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a thrombosis in the vena cava caudalis of a 15 year-old cat with ascites. Trauma and eventually feline enteric corona virus infection in the cat were not detected. In the intrahepatic region, a blockage of vena cava caudalis was brought to light by ultrasonographic imaging. An aspirate of abdominal fl uid revealed modified transudate. Liver enzyme levels were increased in the serum sample of the cat. The levels of total oxidant status (TOS and total antioxidant status (TAS were elevated in the peritoneal fluid. Liver protection diet with L-carnitine, diuretic therapy and antimicrobial drugs were administrated for treatment of the cat. During the continuous treatment, the amount of abdominal fluid decreased, but never completely absorbed. L-carnitine was administered to the cat during the time of treatment, and subsequently the levels of liver enzymes decreased. However, the cat died because of recurrent ascites and persistent thrombosis. In conclusion, ultrasonographic examination was very reliable, non-invasive and highly useful diagnostic method for BCS and L-carnitine has crucial effects on the quality of life, energy metabolism and liver enzyme levels. However, the blockage of the vena cava caudalis could not completely respond to medical treatment and thrombosis should be eliminated by surgical intervention.

  6. Effects of an iodine-restricted food on client-owned cats with hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kooij, Marieke; Bečvářová, Iveta; Meyer, Hein P; Teske, Erik; Kooistra, Hans S

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this prospective, multicentre, non-controlled, open-label study was to evaluate the effects of an iodine-restricted food on circulating total thyroxine (TT4) concentrations and clinical parameters in client-owned cats with hyperthyroidism. Two hundred and twenty-five cats were enrolled in the study and adapted to the iodine-restricted food. Data from physical examinations, questionnaires completed by veterinarians and owners, and circulating concentrations of TT4, urea and creatinine were recorded at weeks 0, 4 and 8. The study group included 136 female and 89 male cats (median age 15 years, range 4-21 years). Group 1 (n = 113) had been on previous anti-thyroid medication, while group 2 (n = 112) consisted of newly diagnosed cats. No differences were found between the two groups at any time point. Circulating TT4 concentrations had decreased (P weight loss, hair coat quality, and quality of life) had improved (P hyperthyroidism an iodine-restricted food is a valuable management option to normalise circulating TT4 concentrations, and improve clinical signs of hyperthyroidism within 4 weeks. This applies to newly diagnosed cats, as well as to previously diagnosed cats receiving anti-thyroid drugs. © ISFM and AAFP 2013.

  7. Managing feral cats on a university's campuses: how many are there and is sterilization having an effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Amanda L; Downs, Colleen T

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide domestic and feral cat (Felis catus) numbers have increased. Concerns regarding high populations of feral cats in urban areas include wildlife predation, public nuisance, and disease. This study aimed to estimate the size of the feral cat population on 5 campuses of the University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, to determine whether sterilization has an effect and to make management recommendations. The study used both the total count and mark-recapture methods to estimate the feral cat population on each campus. The study chose a noninvasive method of taking photographs to "mark" individuals and record those who were sterilized. The study estimated a total of 186 cats on all campuses and density at 161 cats km(-2). There was a negative relationship between sterilization and numbers. Sites with higher sterilization showed a lower proportion of younger cats. At the average sterilization of 55%, the population, according to predictions, would remain stable at fecundity, survival, and immigration rates reported by cat caretakers. However, caretakers underestimated cat abundance by 7 ± 37 SD%. Caretakers' feral cat sterilization and feeding programs appear to provide a service to the university community. Key management recommendations were to increase sterilization to 90% to reduce the population over the long term and to raise funds to support the costs incurred by voluntary cat caretakers.

  8. Designing a Qualitative Model of Doping Phenomenon Effect on Sport Marketing in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasem Manouchehri

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available There a number of factors effecting consumers' purchase behavior. It is believed that celebrities can effect selling positively by transferring their popular image to the endorsed product. But, it is heard lots about excommunicate behaviors in the sport world today. Disclosure of the recent doping affairs relating to Lance Armstrong's seven wins in Tour De France is just one among many spectacular and also negative cases. The main aim of the present paper was to explore the effect of doping phenomenon on sport marketing. Depth interviews data were analyzed in three phases: open coding, axial coding, and selective coding. 297 open codes were achieved by 18 interviews. Grouping axial codes in each case and comparing, all gained codes can be divided in five groups: brand image (athlete and endorsed product brands images, moral reasoning (moral coupling, moral decoupling, and moral rationalization, consumer behavioral consequences (word of mouth, purchasing intention, and brand loyalty, attitude change (attitudes change toward athlete and brand, and moral emotions (moral evaluation, contempt, anger, disgust, and sympathy. The proposed qualitative model for the effect of doping phenomenon on sport marketing in Iran illustrated that moral emotions and product brand image affected by the doped athlete brand image and it resulted in attitudes change toward endorser athlete and endorsed brand and negative consumer behavioral consequences, however, moral reasoning strategies emerged by cognitive dissonance might protect consumers behavior from negative effects.

  9. Effect of gentle stroking and vocalization on behaviour, mucosal immunity and upper respiratory disease in anxious shelter cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourkow, Nadine; Hamon, Sara C; Phillips, Clive J C

    2014-11-01

    Emotional, behavioural, and health benefits of gentle stroking and vocalizations, otherwise known as gentling, have been documented for several species, but little is known about the effect of gentling on cats in stressful situations. In this study, 139 cats rated as anxious upon admission to an animal shelter were allocated to either a Gentled or Control group. Cats were gentled four times daily for 10 min over a period of 10 days, with the aid of a tool for cats that were too aggressive to handle. The cats' mood, or persistent emotional state, was rated daily for 10 d as Anxious, Frustrated or Content. Gentled cats were less likely to have negatively valenced moods (Anxious or Frustrated) than Control cats (Incidence Rate Ratio [IRR]=0.61 CI 0.42-0.88, P=0.007). Total secretory immunoglobulin A (S-IgA) was quantified from faeces by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Gentled cats had increased S-IgA (6.9 ± 0.7 logeμg/g) compared to Control cats (5.9 ± 0.5 logeμg/g) (Pincrease in shedding over time in Control cats (23%, 35%, 52% on days 1, 4 and 10, respectively), but not in gentled cats (32%, 26%, 30% on days 1, 4 and 10, respectively) (P=0.001). Onset of upper respiratory disease was determined by veterinary staff based on clinical signs, in particular ocular and/or nasal discharge. Control cats were 2.4 (CI: 1.35-4.15) times more likely to develop upper respiratory disease over time than gentled cats (Pincrease production of S-IgA, and reduce the incidence of upper respiratory disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. An "oblique effect" in the visual evoked potential of the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonds, A B

    1982-01-01

    An oblique effect was observed in the amplitude of the VEP recorded from area 17 of the cat. The ratio of the responses to oblique gratings compared with responses to horizontal and vertical gratings averaged 0.77. Orientation dependence was strongest at low spatial frequencies, unlike the effect found in primates.

  11. Resistive switching phenomenon and hole wind effect in YBCO thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truchly, Martin; Plecenik, Tomas [Department of Experimental Physics, Comenius University, Bratislava (Slovakia); Zhitlukhina, Elena [Donetsk Institute for Physics and Engineering, Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2016-07-01

    We present an overview of our experimental and theoretical activities aimed to clarify the mechanism of resistive memory effects in YBCO thin layers. The phenomenon was studied by scanning spreading resistance microscopy (SSRM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) techniques. The most striking feature uncovered (in contrast to previous experiments on planar bilayers with YBCO films) was the opposite voltage-bias polarity of the switching effect in all SSRM and a number of STM measurements. Observed hysteresis in current-voltage characteristics is interpreted as a movement of oxygen vacancies in the vicinity of the tip-YBCO contact. Since the charge distribution in YBCO samples is expected to be strongly inhomogeneous, the balance between the direct electrostatic force on activated oxygen ions and that caused by momentum exchange with the current carriers (holes) hitting them determines direction in which the oxygen vacancies are moving. We propose a minimalist model with the only fitting parameter that accounts for the resistance hysteresis phenomenon in the YBCO films studied.

  12. Raynaud's phenomenon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S L; Christensen, N J; Olsen, N

    1980-01-01

    . The forearm venous concentration of noradrenaline was lower and adrenaline concentration higher in the sympathectomized patients than in the other groups (p less than 0,05). Noradrenaline showed a significant increase during body cooling in normals and primary Raynaud's (p less than 0......The reaction to body and finger cooling was recorded in seven patients with relapse of primary Raynaud's phenomenon after sufficiently performed bilateral upper thoracic sympathectomy and for comparison in eight young women with primary Raynaud's phenomenon as well as in seven normal women......,05). There was no significant correlation between the vasoconstrictor response to cooling of a finger and the noradrenaline concentration probably due to the fact that skin vasoconstriction impeded release of noradrenaline from the skin. The relapse of Raynaud's phenomenon after surgically sufficient sympathectomy could...

  13. Strength of evidence for the effects of feral cats on insular wildlife: The Club Med Syndrome Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Various types of evidence have been promulgated as proof for the effects of feral cats on wildlife, typically including numerous studies on predation inferred from diet, mortality attributed to pathogens, and photographic or videographic documentation. The strength of these types of evidence is often short of conclusive. For example, studies of predation inferred from diet provide weak evidence for two reasons: 1) they cannot differentiate depredation from scavenging by feral cats, and 2) they cannot address population-level effects on wildlife because it is rarely understood if mortality acts in compensatory or additive manner. Likewise, pathogens may cause mortality of individuals, but population-level effects of pathogens are rarely known. Photographic or videographic documentation provides direct ‘smoking gun’ evidence that may be useful for positive identification of depredation by cats, or identification of prey designated as threatened or endangered species. However, the most direct and compelling evidence comes from examples where feral cats have been entirely removed from islands. In many cases, several species of seabirds as well as other wildlife have recovered after the complete removal of cats. Where possible, the experimental removal of cats would provide the most conclusive proof of effects on wildlife populations. In other cases where cat removal is not feasible, modeling based on predation rates and life history parameters of species may be the only means of assessing population-level effects on wildlife. Understanding population-level effects of feral cats on wildlife will ultimately be necessary to resolve long-standing wildlife management issues.

  14. FUSIMOTOR EFFECTS OF MIDBRAIN STIMULATION ON JAW MUSCLE-SPINDLES OF THE ANESTHETIZED CAT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TAYLOR, A; JUCH, PJW

    The effects of electrical stimulation within the midbrain on fusimotor output to the jaw elevator muscles were studied in anaesthetized cats. Muscle spindle afferents recorded in the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus were categorised as primary or secondary by their responses to succinylcholine

  15. Effects of photoperiod on food intake, activity and metabolic rate in adult neutered male cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappen, K L; Garner, L M; Kerr, K R; Swanson, K S

    2014-10-01

    With the continued rise in feline obesity, novel weight management strategies are needed. To date, strategies aimed at altering physical activity, an important factor in weight maintenance, have been lacking. Photoperiod is known to cause physiological changes in seasonal mammals, including changes in body weight (BW) and reproductive status. Thus, our objective was to determine the effect of increased photoperiod (longer days) on voluntary physical activity levels, resting metabolic rate (RMR), food intake required to maintain BW, and fasting serum leptin and ghrelin concentrations in adult cats. Eleven healthy, adult, neutered, male domestic shorthair cats were used in a randomized crossover design study. During two 12-week periods, cats were exposed to either a short-day (SD) photoperiod of 8 h light: 16 h dark or a long-day (LD) photoperiod of 16 h light: 8 h dark. Cats were fed a commercial diet to maintain baseline BW. In addition to daily food intake and twice-weekly BW, RMR (via indirect calorimetry), body composition [via dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA)] and physical activity (via Actical activity monitors) were measured at week 0 and 12 of each period. Fasting serum leptin and ghrelin concentrations were measured at week 0, 6 and 12 of each period. Average hourly physical activity was greater (p = 0.008) in LD vs. SD cats (3770 vs. 3129 activity counts/h), which was primarily due to increased (p dark period activity (1188 vs. 710 activity counts/h). This corresponded to higher (p energy intake (mean over 12-week period: 196 vs. 187 kcal/day), and increased (p = 0.048) RMR in LD cats (9.02 vs. 8.37 kcal/h). Body composition, serum leptin and serum ghrelin were not altered by photoperiod. More research is needed to determine potential mechanisms by which these physiological changes occurred and how they may apply to weight management strategies.

  16. Floor Effect of PROMIS Depression CAT Associated With Hasty Completion in Orthopaedic Surgery Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guattery, Jason M; Dardas, Agnes Z; Kelly, Michael; Chamberlain, Aaron; McAndrew, Christopher; Calfee, Ryan P

    2018-04-01

    Function and Depression CATs and was compared between assessments within each group as well as between the two groups. Bivariate statistics compared the demographic data between the two groups. Physical Function CAT scores in musculoskeletal patients were normally distributed like the distribution calibration population; however, the score distribution of the Depression CAT in musculoskeletal patients was nonnormal with a spike in the floor score. After excluding the floor spike, the distribution of the Depression CAT scores was not different from the population control group. Patients who scored the floor score on the Depression CAT took slightly less time per question for Physical Function CAT when compared with other musculoskeletal patients (floor patients: 11 ± 9 seconds; normally distributed patients: 12 ± 10 seconds; mean difference: 1 second [0.8-1.1]; p CAT (Floor Group: 4 ± 3 seconds; Standard Group: 7 ± 7 seconds; mean difference: 3 [2.9-3.2]; p CAT were younger than other patients (Floor Group: 50 ± 18 SD; Standard Group: 55 ± 16 SD; mean difference: 4.5 [4.2-4.7]; p CAT as part of routine practice, the Physical Function item bank had a normal performance, but there is a group of patients who hastily complete Depression questions producing a strong floor effect and calling into question the validity of those floor scores that indicate minimal depression. Level II, diagnostic study.

  17. Solitonic excitations in collisions of superfluid nuclei a qualitatively new phenomenon distinct from the Josephson effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekizawa, Kazuyuki; Wlazłowski, Gabriel; Magierski, Piotr

    2017-11-01

    Recently, we have reported a novel role of pairing in low-energy heavy ion reactions at energies above the Coulomb barrier, which may have a detectable impact on reaction outcomes, such as the kinetic energy of fragments and the fusion cross section [arXiv:1611.10261, arXiv:1702.00069]. The phenomenon mimics the one studied experimentally with ultracold atomic gases, where two clouds of fermionic superfluids with different phases of the pairing fields are forced to merge, inducing various excitation modes of the pairing field. Although it originates from the phase difference of the pairing fields, the physics behind it is markedly different from the so-called Josephson effect. In this short contribution, we will briefly outline the results discussed in our recent papers and explain relations with the field of ultracold atomic gases.

  18. Effect of the Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Analogue Exenatide Extended Release in Cats with Newly Diagnosed Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riederer, A; Zini, E; Salesov, E; Fracassi, F; Padrutt, I; Macha, K; Stöckle, T M; Lutz, T A; Reusch, C E

    2016-01-01

    Exenatide extended release (ER) is a glucagon-like peptide-1 analogue that increases insulin secretion, inhibits glucagon secretion and induces satiation in humans with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The use of exenatide ER is safe and stimulates insulin secretion in healthy cats. The objective of this study is to assess the safety of exenatide ER and its effect on body weight, remission and metabolic control in newly diagnosed diabetic cats receiving insulin and a low-carbohydrate diet. Thirty client-owned cats. Prospective placebo-controlled clinical trial. Cats were treated with exenatide ER or 0.9% saline, administered SC, once weekly. Both groups received insulin glargine and a low-carbohydrate diet. Exenatide ER was administered for 16 weeks, or in cats that achieved remission it was given for 4 weeks after discontinuing insulin treatment. Nonparametric tests were used for statistical analysis. Cats in the exenatide ER and placebo groups had transient adverse signs including decreased appetite (60% vs. 20%, respectively, P = .06) and vomiting (53% vs. 40%, respectively, P = .715). Body weight increased significantly in the placebo group (P = .002), but not in cats receiving exenatide ER. Cats on exenatide ER achieved remission or good metabolic control in 40% or 89%, respectively, whereas in control cats percentages were 20% or 58% (P = .427 and P = .178, respectively). Exenatide ER is safe in diabetic cats and does not result in weight gain. Our pilot study suggests that, should there be an additional clinically relevant beneficial effect of exenatide ER in insulin-treated cats on rate of remission and good metabolic control, it would likely approximate 20% and 30%, respectively. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  19. Effect of benazepril, robenacoxib and their combination on glomerular filtration rate in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jonathan N; Panteri, Alessandro; Graille, Melanie; Seewald, Wolfgang; Friton, Gabriele; Desevaux, Cyril

    2016-06-23

    Combined use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may induce acute kidney injury in humans, especially when combined with diuretics. The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the effects of benazepril, robenacoxib and their combination in healthy cats. In each of two studies (study 1 followed by study 2), 32 healthy cats were randomised to one of four groups (n = 4 male and 4 female cats per group) in a parallel-group design. The groups received orally once daily for 7 days either placebo (control group), benazepril, robenacoxib or benazepril plus robenacoxib. In study 2, all groups received in addition 0.5 mg/kg furosemide twice daily by subcutaneous injection for 7 days. Benazepril, robenacoxib and their combination were well tolerated as evidenced from lack of clinical signs and no negative effects on body weight, feed consumption and clinical chemistry, haematology and urinalysis variables. The primary endpoint of the study was the glomerular filtration rate (GFR), which was estimated from the plasma clearance of iohexol. In the absence of furosemide, GFR was significantly higher in cats receiving the combination of benazepril plus robenacoxib compared to the other three groups, and was also significantly higher in females receiving only benazepril compared to the control. Administration of furosemide induced diuresis, reduced GFR and activated the renin-aldosterone-angiotensin system, evidenced from increased plasma renin activity and plasma aldosterone concentrations. Compared to the control group in cats treated with furosemide, GFR was increased by benazepril (females only) but decreased by robenacoxib (males only). Benazepril, robenacoxib and their combination significantly inhibited the increase in plasma aldosterone induced by furosemide. The combination of benazepril and robenacoxib was well tolerated and either increased or had a neutral effect on GFR in healthy cats without or with

  20. Effect of lingual gauze swab placement on pulse oximeter readings in anaesthetised dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, A; Martinez-Taboada, F; Nitzan, M

    2017-01-14

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of lingual gauze swab placement on pulse oximeter readings in anaesthetised dogs and cats. Following anaesthetic induction, the following pulse oximeter probe configurations were performed: no gauze swab (control), placement of a gauze swab between the tongue and the probe, placement of different thicknesses of gauze swab, placement of red cotton fabric, placement of a sheet of white paper and placement of the probe and gauze swab on different locations on the tongue. Oxygen saturation (SpO 2 ) and peripheral perfusion index (PI) were recorded. Placement of a gauze swab between the pulse oximeter probe and the tongue in anaesthetised dogs and cats resulted in significantly higher SpO 2 values compared with the control group. In dogs, PI values were significantly higher than the control in all groups except the quarter thickness swab group. In cats, PI was significantly higher in the double thickness swab and white paper groups compared with the control. Cats had significantly higher SpO 2 and lower PI values than dogs. The authors propose that increased contact pressure is responsible for significantly higher SpO 2 and PI readings with the use of a lingual gauze swab resulting from changes in transmural pressure and arterial compliance. British Veterinary Association.

  1. The Effect of Moderate Dietary Protein and Phosphate Restriction on Calcium-Phosphate Homeostasis in Healthy Older Cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geddes, R F; Biourge, V; Chang, Y; Syme, H M; Elliott, J

    2016-09-01

    Dietary phosphate and protein restriction decreases plasma PTH and FGF-23 concentrations and improves survival time in azotemic cats, but has not been examined in cats that are not azotemic. Feeding a moderately protein- and phosphate-restricted diet decreases PTH and FGF-23 in healthy older cats and thereby slows progression to azotemic CKD. A total of 54 healthy, client-owned cats (≥ 9 years). Prospective double-blinded randomized placebo-controlled trial. Cats were assigned to test diet (protein 76 g/Mcal and phosphate 1.6 g/Mcal) or control diet (protein 86 g/Mcal and phosphate 2.6 g/Mcal) and monitored for 18 months. Changes in variables over time and effect of diet were assessed by linear mixed models. A total of 26 cats ate test diet and 28 cats ate control diet. There was a significant effect of diet on urinary fractional excretion of phosphate (P = 0.045), plasma PTH (P = 0.005), and ionized calcium concentrations (P = 0.018), but not plasma phosphate, FGF-23, or creatinine concentrations. Plasma PTH concentrations did not significantly change in cats fed the test diet (P = 0.62) but increased over time in cats fed the control diet (P = 0.001). There was no significant treatment effect of the test diet on development of azotemic CKD (3 of 26 (12%) test versus 3 of 28 (11%) control, odds ratio 1.09 (95% CI 0.13-8.94), P = 0.92). Feeding a moderately protein- and phosphate-restricted diet has effects on calcium-phosphate homeostasis in healthy older cats and is well tolerated. This might have an impact on renal function and could be useful in early chronic kidney disease. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  2. Shadow corrosion phenomenon. An out-of-pile study on electrochemical effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Nadine

    2017-04-28

    The focus of the present thesis was the study of the enhanced corrosion phenomenon named ''Shadow Corrosion''. Within the context of researching based on the corrosion mechanism as well as the influencing parameters and driving forces, which cause or even intensify the corrosion, a variety of electrochemical characterization and surface analysis techniques were used. The first part of this thesis gives a short introduction with the definition of the term Shadow Corrosion and of the specific type called ''Enhanced Spacer Shadow Corrosion'' (ESSC). This is followed by a description of the involved materials being Zircaloy and Inconel 718. Chapter 2 introduces the background knowledge including fundamentals about environ-mental conditions under which Shadow Corrosion occurs as well as the oxidation behavior of Zircaloy and Inconel 718. Furthermore, the state of the art about the Shadow Corrosion mechanism is presented and a description of the influencing effects on the enhanced corrosion phenomenon, like galvanic corrosion, water radiolysis, and photo-effect, is given. Further information and parameters on the part of AREVA GmbH concerning water impurities and a used coating layer on Inconel 718 are listed, which are of interest for the issue concerning the phenomenon Shadow Corrosion. The last part of this chapter contains the experimental conditions and parameters for the laboratory experiments with focus on water chemistry, specimen geometry, and UV-light exposure for photoexcitation and water radiolysis. Three different working hypotheses of this thesis are described in chapter 3. One hypothesis regarding the Shadow Corrosion Phenomenon is based on a galvanic corrosion mechanism between Zircaloy and Inconel 718. In addition, it is supposed that the galvanic corrosion could be influenced by the deposition of silver on Zircaloy and Inconel 718 in the form of an increased galvanic current. A further assumption is that the

  3. Shadow corrosion phenomenon. An out-of-pile study on electrochemical effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Nadine

    2017-01-01

    The focus of the present thesis was the study of the enhanced corrosion phenomenon named ''Shadow Corrosion''. Within the context of researching based on the corrosion mechanism as well as the influencing parameters and driving forces, which cause or even intensify the corrosion, a variety of electrochemical characterization and surface analysis techniques were used. The first part of this thesis gives a short introduction with the definition of the term Shadow Corrosion and of the specific type called ''Enhanced Spacer Shadow Corrosion'' (ESSC). This is followed by a description of the involved materials being Zircaloy and Inconel 718. Chapter 2 introduces the background knowledge including fundamentals about environ-mental conditions under which Shadow Corrosion occurs as well as the oxidation behavior of Zircaloy and Inconel 718. Furthermore, the state of the art about the Shadow Corrosion mechanism is presented and a description of the influencing effects on the enhanced corrosion phenomenon, like galvanic corrosion, water radiolysis, and photo-effect, is given. Further information and parameters on the part of AREVA GmbH concerning water impurities and a used coating layer on Inconel 718 are listed, which are of interest for the issue concerning the phenomenon Shadow Corrosion. The last part of this chapter contains the experimental conditions and parameters for the laboratory experiments with focus on water chemistry, specimen geometry, and UV-light exposure for photoexcitation and water radiolysis. Three different working hypotheses of this thesis are described in chapter 3. One hypothesis regarding the Shadow Corrosion Phenomenon is based on a galvanic corrosion mechanism between Zircaloy and Inconel 718. In addition, it is supposed that the galvanic corrosion could be influenced by the deposition of silver on Zircaloy and Inconel 718 in the form of an increased galvanic current. A further assumption is that the galvanic current could be decreased by a Cr

  4. Histological Study of the Effects of Ibuprofen on Acute Apical Inflammation Following Root Canal Therapy in Cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghoddusi J

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative pain following Root Canal Therapy (RCT is the common problem for patients,"ndentist and dental staff. Regardless of cause it appears that postoperative pain and discomfort is related to"nperiapical inflammation. The purpose of this study was to investigate histologically the effect of"nIbuprofen on acute apical inflammation following RCT. on cat. Fifty-six cuspids teeth of 14 cats were"ndivided into three groups, 6 cats for experimental group, 6 cats for positive control group and 2 cats for"nnegative control group. In first group, to anesthesize the animals each cat received 10 mg/kg Ibuprofen"n36 hours before RCT and repeated every 24 hours. In second group RCT was performed in 24 cat teeth"nwithout any prescription. In negative control groups 2 cats, no RCT were done."nFollowing vital perfusion, in interval of 6, 12, 24 hours, samples were post fixed in 10% formalin and"nfive micron sections were prepared, and stained with H&E and studied under the Mann Whitney"nparameter test. Infilteration of inflamatory cells in 6 hours interval in experimental group was"nsignificantly less than two control groups. In 12 hours samples, however, inflammation in experimental"ngroup reduced, but it was not significant. In 24 hours samples there was no significant difference"nbetween experimental groups and controls. The result of this in-vivo study shows prescription of"nIbuprofen before root canal therapy can reduce inflammatory reaction.

  5. El Nino phenomenon and its effect in the climate in Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ideam

    1998-01-01

    The author in his paper gives a series of generalities on El Nino phenomenon, its duration, intensity and aspects related with the El Nino standard with the temperature and the precipitations among other topics

  6. Sedative and antinociceptive effects of dexmedetomidine and buprenorphine after oral transmucosal or intramuscular administration in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porters, Nathalie; Bosmans, Tim; Debille, Mariëlla; de Rooster, Hilde; Duchateau, Luc; Polis, Ingeborgh

    2014-01-01

    To compare sedation and antinociception after oral transmucosal (OTM) and intramuscular (IM) administration of a dexmedetomidine-buprenorphine combination in healthy adult cats. Randomized, 'blinded' crossover study, with 1 month washout between treatments. Six healthy neutered female cats, weighing 5.3-7.5 kg. A combination of dexmedetomidine (40 μg kg(-1) ) and buprenorphine (20 μg kg(-1) ) was administered by either the OTM (buccal cavity) or IM (quadriceps muscle) route. Sedation was measured using a numerical rating scale, at baseline and at various time points until 6 hours after treatment. At the same time points, analgesia was scored using a dynamic and interactive visual analogue scale, based on the response to an ear pinch, and by the cat's response to a mechanical stimulus exerted by a pressure rate onset device. Physiological and adverse effects were recorded, and oral pH measured. Signed rank tests were performed, with significance set at p < 0.05. Data are presented as median and range. There were no differences in sedation or antinociception scores between OTM and IM dosing at any of the time points. Nociceptive thresholds increased after both treatments but without significant difference between groups. Buccal pH remained between 8 and 8.5. Salivation was noted after OTM administration (n = 2) and vomiting after both OTM (n = 4), and IM (n = 3) dosing. In healthy adult cats, OTM administration of dexmedetomidine and buprenorphine resulted in comparable levels of sedation and antinociception to IM dosing. The OTM administration may offer an alternative route to administer this sedative-analgesic combination in cats. © 2013 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  7. The effect of blood cell count on coronary flow in patients with coronary slow flow phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soylu, Korhan; Gulel, Okan; Yucel, Huriye; Yuksel, Serkan; Aksan, Gokhan; Soylu, Ayşegül İdil; Demircan, Sabri; Yılmaz, Ozcan; Sahin, Mahmut

    2014-09-01

    The coronary slow flow phenomenon (CSFP) is a coronary artery disease with a benign course, but its pathological mechanisms are not yet fully understood.The purpose of this controlled study was to investigate the cellular content of blood in patients diagnosed with CSFP and the relationship of this with coronary flow rates. Selective coronary angiographies of 3368 patients were analyzed to assess Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) frame count (TFC) values. Seventy eight of them had CSFP, and their demographic and laboratory findings were compared with 61 patients with normal coronary flow. Patients' demographic characteristics were similar in both groups. Mean corrected TFC (cTFC) values were significantly elevated in CSFP patients (p<0.001). Furthermore, hematocrit and hemoglobin values, and eosinophil and basophil counts of the CSFP patients were significantly elevated compared to the values obtained in the control group (p=0.005, p=0.047, p=0.001 and p=0.002, respectively). The increase observed in hematocrit and eosinophil levels showed significant correlations with increased TFC values (r=0.288 and r=0.217, respectively). Significant changes have been observed in the cellular composition of blood in patients diagnosed with CSFP as compared to the patients with normal coronary blood flow. The increases in hematocrit levels and in the eosinophil and basophil counts may have direct or indirect effects on the rate of coronary blood flow.

  8. Estimation of effectiveness of three methods of feral cat population control by use of a simulation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Robert J; Levine, Stephen H; Reed, J Michael

    2013-08-15

    To predict effectiveness of 3 interventional methods of population control for feral cat colonies. Population model. Estimates of vital data for feral cats. Data were gathered from the literature regarding the demography and mating behavior of feral cats. An individual-based stochastic simulation model was developed to evaluate the effectiveness of trap-neuter-release (TNR), lethal control, and trap-vasectomy-hysterectomy-release (TVHR) in decreasing the size of feral cat populations. TVHR outperformed both TNR and lethal control at all annual capture probabilities between 10% and 90%. Unless > 57% of cats were captured and neutered annually by TNR or removed by lethal control, there was minimal effect on population size. In contrast, with an annual capture rate of ≥ 35%, TVHR caused population size to decrease. An annual capture rate of 57% eliminated the modeled population in 4,000 days by use of TVHR, whereas > 82% was required for both TNR and lethal control. When the effect of fraction of adult cats neutered on kitten and young juvenile survival rate was included in the analysis, TNR performed progressively worse and could be counterproductive, such that population size increased, compared with no intervention at all. TVHR should be preferred over TNR for management of feral cats if decrease in population size is the goal. This model allowed for many factors related to the trapping program and cats to be varied and should be useful for determining the financial and person-effort commitments required to have a desired effect on a given feral cat population.

  9. Effects of a single preappointment dose of gabapentin on signs of stress in cats during transportation and veterinary examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Haaften, Karen A; Forsythe, Lauren R Eichstadt; Stelow, Elizabeth A; Bain, Melissa J

    2017-11-15

    OBJECTIVE To determine the effects of oral gabapentin administration prior to veterinary examination on signs of stress in cats. DESIGN Randomized, blinded, crossover clinical trial. ANIMALS 20 healthy pet cats with a history of fractious behavior or signs of stress during veterinary examination. PROCEDURES Cats were scheduled for 2 veterinary visits 1 week apart and randomly assigned to receive a capsule containing 100 mg of gabapentin (13.0 to 29.4 mg/kg [5.9 to 13.4 mg/lb]) or placebo (lactose powder) prior to the first visit and the opposite treatment prior to the second visit. Owners were instructed to administer the assigned capsule orally 90 minutes prior to placing the cat into a carrier and transporting it to the veterinary hospital. Standardized physical examinations and blood pressure readings were performed. Owners assigned a cat stress score during transportation and examination, and the veterinarian assigned a compliance score at the visit. Scores were compared between treatments, controlling for various factors. RESULTS Owner-assessed cat stress scores during transportation and veterinary examination and veterinarian-assessed compliance scores were significantly lower when cats received gabapentin than when they received the placebo. Sedation was a common effect of gabapentin administration, and ataxia, hypersalivation, and vomiting were also reported. All effects resolved within 8 hours after gabapentin administration. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Owners' perception of stress in their cats is a primary reason for failing to seek veterinary care. Results of this study suggested that gabapentin is a safe and effective treatment for cats to help reduce stress and aggression and increase compliance for transportation and veterinary examination.

  10. A review of over three decades of research on cat-human and human-cat interactions and relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Dennis C

    2017-08-01

    This review article covers research conducted over the last three decades on cat-human and human-cat interactions and relationships, especially from an ethological point of view. It includes findings on cat-cat and cat-human communication, cat personalities and cat-owner personalities, the effects of cats on humans, and problems caused by cats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of sedation on echocardiographic variables of left atrial and left ventricular function in healthy cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jessica L; Schober, Karsten E; Fuentes, Virginia Luis; Bonagura, John D

    2012-10-01

    Although sedation is frequently used to facilitate patient compliance in feline echocardiography, the effects of sedative drugs on echocardiographic variables have been poorly documented. This study investigated the effects of two sedation protocols on echocardiographic indices in healthy cats, with special emphasis on the assessment of left atrial size and function, as well as left ventricular diastolic performance. Seven cats underwent echocardiography (transthoracic two-dimensional, spectral Doppler, color flow Doppler and tissue Doppler imaging) before and after sedation with both acepromazine (0.1 mg/kg IM) and butorphanol (0.25 mg/kg IM), or acepromazine (0.1 mg/kg IM), butorphanol (0.25 mg/kg IM) and ketamine (1.5 mg/kg IV). Heart rate increased significantly following acepromazine/butorphanol/ketamine (mean±SD of increase, 40±26 beats/min) and non-invasive systolic blood pressure decreased significantly following acepromazine/butorphanol (mean±SD of decrease, 12±19 mmHg). The majority of echocardiographic variables were not significantly different after sedation compared with baseline values. Both sedation protocols resulted in mildly decreased left ventricular end-diastolic dimension and mildly increased left ventricular end-diastolic wall thickness. This study therefore failed to demonstrate clinically meaningful effects of these sedation protocols on echocardiographic measurements, suggesting that sedation with acepromazine, butorphanol and/or ketamine can be used to facilitate echocardiography in healthy cats.

  12. Lysine supplementation is not effective for the prevention or treatment of feline herpesvirus 1 infection in cats: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bol, Sebastiaan; Bunnik, Evelien M

    2015-11-16

    Feline herpesvirus 1 is a highly contagious virus that affects many cats. Virus infection presents with flu-like signs and irritation of ocular and nasal regions. While cats can recover from active infections without medical treatment, examination by a veterinarian is recommended. Lysine supplementation appears to be a popular intervention (recommended by > 90 % of veterinarians in cat hospitals). We investigated the scientific merit of lysine supplementation by systematically reviewing all relevant literature. NCBI's PubMed database was used to search for published work on lysine and feline herpesvirus 1, as well as lysine and human herpesvirus 1. Seven studies on lysine and feline herpesvirus 1 (two in vitro studies and 5 studies with cats), and 10 publications on lysine and human herpesvirus 1 (three in vitro studies and 7 clinical trials) were included for qualitative analysis. There is evidence at multiple levels that lysine supplementation is not effective for the prevention or treatment of feline herpesvirus 1 infection in cats. Lysine does not have any antiviral properties, but is believed to act by lowering arginine levels. However, lysine does not antagonize arginine in cats, and evidence that low intracellular arginine concentrations would inhibit viral replication is lacking. Furthermore, lowering arginine levels is highly undesirable since cats cannot synthesize this amino acid themselves. Arginine deficiency will result in hyperammonemia, which may be fatal. In vitro studies with feline herpesvirus 1 showed that lysine has no effect on the replication kinetics of the virus. Finally, and most importantly, several clinical studies with cats have shown that lysine is not effective for the prevention or the treatment of feline herpesvirus 1 infection, and some even reported increased infection frequency and disease severity in cats receiving lysine supplementation. We recommend an immediate stop of lysine supplementation because of the complete lack of

  13. Pharmacokinetics and effects of alfaxalone after intravenous and intramuscular administration to cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo-Mocholí, D; Escudero, E; Belda, E; Laredo, F G; Hernandis, V; Marín, P

    2018-07-01

    To determine the pharmacokinetics, and anaesthetic and sedative effects of alfaxalone after I/V and I/M administration to cats. Six European shorthair cats, three males and three females, with a mean weight of 4.21 (SD 0.53) kg and aged 3.8 (SD 0.9) years were enrolled in this crossover, two-treatment, two-period study. Alfaxalone at a dose of 5 mg/kg was administered either I/V or I/M. Blood samples were collected between 2-480 minutes after drug administration and analysed for concentrations of alfaxalone by HPLC. The plasma concentration-time curves were analysed by non-compartmental analysis. Sedation scores were evaluated between 5-120 minutes after drug administration using a numerical rating scale (from 0-18). Intervals from drug administration to sit, sternal and lateral recumbency during the induction phase, and to head-lift, sternal recumbency and standing position during recovery were recorded. The mean half-life and mean residence time of alfaxalone were longer after I/M (1.28 (SD 0.21) and 2.09 (SD 0.36) hours, respectively) than after I/V (0.49 (SD 0.07) and 0.66 (SD 0.16) hours, respectively) administration (pV (0 minutes for all animals) treated cats (p15) were recorded from 5-15 minutes after I/V administration and deep sedation (scores 11-15) at 20 and 30 minutes. Deep sedation was observed from 10-45 minutes after I/M administration. One cat from each group showed hyperkinesia during recovery, and the remainder had an uneventful recovery. Alfaxalone administered I/V in cats provides rapid and smooth induction of anaesthesia. After I/M administration, a longer exposure to the drug and an extended half life were obtained compared to I/V administration. Therefore I/M administration of alfaxalone could be a reliable, suitable and easy route in cats, taking into account that alfaxalone has a slower onset of sedation than when given I/V and achieves deep sedation rather than general anaesthesia.

  14. Systemic absorption and adverse ocular and systemic effects after topical ophthalmic administration of 0.1% diclofenac to healthy cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Kimberly K; Pinard, Chantale L; Johnson, Ron J; Allen, Dana G; KuKanich, Butch K; Nykamp, Stephanie G

    2015-03-01

    To quantify plasma concentrations and determine adverse ocular, renal, or hepatic effects associated with repeated topical ophthalmic application of 0.1% diclofenac to healthy cats. 8 healthy sexually intact male cats. A randomized, placebo-controlled crossover study was conducted. A topical formulation of 0.1% diclofenac was administered 4 times/d for 7 days to 4 cats, and artificial tear (control) solution was administered to the other 4 cats. After a 12-day washout period, cats received the other treatment. Ophthalmic examinations were performed daily. Plasma samples were obtained on days 1 and 7 for pharmacokinetic analysis. A CBC, serum biochemical analysis, urinalysis, determination of urine protein-to-creatinine ratio, and determination of glomerular filtration rate were performed before the start of the study and after each 7-day treatment period. Mild conjunctival hyperemia was the only adverse ocular effect detected. Maximal drug concentration and area under the curve were significantly higher on day 7 than on day 1. Diclofenac-treated cats had a significantly lower glomerular filtration rate than did control-treated cats after the second but not after the first treatment period, presumably associated with iatrogenic hypovolemia. Topical ophthalmic administration of 0.1% diclofenac was well tolerated in healthy cats, with only mild signs of ocular irritation. Detectable systemic concentrations of diclofenac were achieved with accumulation over 7 days. Systemic absorption of diclofenac may be associated with reduced glomerular filtration rate, particularly in volume-contracted animals. Topical ophthalmic 0.1% diclofenac should be used with caution in volume-contracted or systemically ill cats.

  15. Mesopredator Management: Effects of Red Fox Control on the Abundance, Diet and Use of Space by Feral Cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molsher, Robyn; Newsome, Alan E; Newsome, Thomas M; Dickman, Christopher R

    2017-01-01

    Apex predators are subject to lethal control in many parts of the world to minimize their impacts on human industries and livelihoods. Diverse communities of smaller predators-mesopredators-often remain after apex predator removal. Despite concern that these mesopredators may be 'released' in the absence of the apex predator and exert negative effects on each other and on co-occurring prey, these interactions have been little studied. Here, we investigate the potential effects of competition and intraguild predation between red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and feral cats (Felis catus) in south-eastern Australia where the apex predator, the dingo (Canis dingo), has been extirpated by humans. We predicted that the larger fox would dominate the cat in encounters, and used a fox-removal experiment to assess whether foxes affect cat abundance, diet, home-range and habitat use. Our results provide little indication that intraguild predation occurred or that cats responded numerically to the fox removal, but suggest that the fox affects some aspects of cat resource use. In particular, where foxes were removed cats increased their consumption of invertebrates and carrion, decreased their home range size and foraged more in open habitats. Fox control takes place over large areas of Australia to protect threatened native species and agricultural interests. Our results suggest that fox control programmes could lead to changes in the way that cats interact with co-occurring prey, and that some prey may become more vulnerable to cat predation in open habitats after foxes have been removed. Moreover, with intensive and more sustained fox control it is possible that cats could respond numerically and alter their behaviour in different ways to those documented herein. Such outcomes need to be considered when estimating the indirect impacts of fox control. We conclude that novel approaches are urgently required to control invasive mesopredators at the same time, especially in areas where

  16. Mesopredator Management: Effects of Red Fox Control on the Abundance, Diet and Use of Space by Feral Cats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robyn Molsher

    Full Text Available Apex predators are subject to lethal control in many parts of the world to minimize their impacts on human industries and livelihoods. Diverse communities of smaller predators-mesopredators-often remain after apex predator removal. Despite concern that these mesopredators may be 'released' in the absence of the apex predator and exert negative effects on each other and on co-occurring prey, these interactions have been little studied. Here, we investigate the potential effects of competition and intraguild predation between red foxes (Vulpes vulpes and feral cats (Felis catus in south-eastern Australia where the apex predator, the dingo (Canis dingo, has been extirpated by humans. We predicted that the larger fox would dominate the cat in encounters, and used a fox-removal experiment to assess whether foxes affect cat abundance, diet, home-range and habitat use. Our results provide little indication that intraguild predation occurred or that cats responded numerically to the fox removal, but suggest that the fox affects some aspects of cat resource use. In particular, where foxes were removed cats increased their consumption of invertebrates and carrion, decreased their home range size and foraged more in open habitats. Fox control takes place over large areas of Australia to protect threatened native species and agricultural interests. Our results suggest that fox control programmes could lead to changes in the way that cats interact with co-occurring prey, and that some prey may become more vulnerable to cat predation in open habitats after foxes have been removed. Moreover, with intensive and more sustained fox control it is possible that cats could respond numerically and alter their behaviour in different ways to those documented herein. Such outcomes need to be considered when estimating the indirect impacts of fox control. We conclude that novel approaches are urgently required to control invasive mesopredators at the same time

  17. Survival time and effect of selected predictor variables on survival in owned pet cats seropositive for feline immunodeficiency and leukemia virus attending a referral clinic in northern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spada, Eva; Perego, Roberta; Sgamma, Elena Assunta; Proverbio, Daniela

    2018-02-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukemia virus (FeLV) are among the most important feline infectious diseases worldwide. This retrospective study investigated survival times and effects of selected predictor factors on survival time in a population of owned pet cats in Northern Italy testing positive for the presence of FIV antibodies and FeLV antigen. One hundred and three retrovirus-seropositive cats, 53 FIV-seropositive cats, 40 FeLV-seropositive cats, and 10 FIV+FeLV-seropositive cats were included in the study. A population of 103 retrovirus-seronegative age and sex-matched cats was selected. Survival time was calculated and compared between retrovirus-seronegative, FIV, FeLV and FIV+FeLV-seropositive cats using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Cox proportional-hazards regression analysis was used to study the effect of selected predictor factors (male gender, peripheral blood cytopenia as reduced red blood cells - RBC- count, leukopenia, neutropenia and lymphopenia, hypercreatininemia and reduced albumin to globulin ratio) on survival time in retrovirus-seropositive populations. Median survival times for seronegative cats, FIV, FeLV and FIV+FeLV-seropositive cats were 3960, 2040, 714 and 77days, respectively. Compared to retrovirus-seronegative cats median survival time was significantly lower (P<0.000) in FeLV and FIV+FeLV-seropositive cats. Median survival time in FeLV and FIV+FeLV-seropositive cats was also significant lower (P<0.000) when compared to FIV-seropositive cats. Hazard ratio of death in FeLV and FIV+FeLV-seropositive cats being respectively 3.4 and 7.4 times higher, in comparison to seronegative cats and 2.3 and 4.8 times higher in FeLV and FIV+FeLV-seropositive cats as compared to FIV-seropositive cats. A Cox proportional-hazards regression analysis showed that FIV and FeLV-seropositive cats with reduced RBC counts at time of diagnosis of seropositivity had significantly shorter survival times when compared to FIV and Fe

  18. Contextual effects in the primary visual cortex of anesthetized cats

    OpenAIRE

    Biederlack, Julia

    2007-01-01

    Responses of visual cortical neurons in early processing stages can be modulated by stimuli presented outside the classical receptive field. The function of these context effects is still not completly understood, but its relevance for global image processing such as figure-ground segregation has been suggested. In the present study we investigate aspects of centre-surround interactions and the role of neural synchronisation in this context. Neuronal synchronization has been proposed to under...

  19. Effect of dietary protein and GABA on food intake, growth and tissue amino acids in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tews, J K; Rogers, Q R; Morris, J G; Harper, A E

    1984-02-01

    GABA at 5%, but not 3%, of a low protein diet depressed food intake and growth of kittens. Adaptation to high protein prevented these effects. When cats adapted to low or high protein were fed a meal containing GABA, plasma GABA concentration after 2 hr was 8-fold higher in the low than in the high protein group; clearance was almost complete within 6 hr. Concentrations of proline, branched-chain, other large neutral and basic (especially ornithine) amino acids increased more when cats were fed a high rather than a low protein meal; glycine decreased. At 6 hr, concentrations had consistently returned to initial levels only in the low protein group. Feeding the high protein diet ad lib increased tissue concentrations of threonine, proline and the branched-chain amino acids. Hepatic or renal GABA-aminotransferase activity was not altered in kittens fed the high protein diet. Kidney activity was 10-fold that of liver, which may contribute to the better tolerance of GABA by cats than by rats.

  20. Effect of cat and daycare exposures on the risk of asthma in children with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffin, Jonathan M; Spergel, Jonathan M; Boguniewicz, Mark; Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Paller, Amy S; Fowler, Joseph F; Dinulos, James G; Tilles, Stephen A; Schneider, Lynda C; Phipatanakul, Wanda

    2012-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) in young children is often followed by the development of asthma (atopic march). The role of environmental exposures is unclear in this high-risk population. We aimed to determine the predictive relationship between indoor allergen exposures, particularly pets, rodents, and cockroaches, to the development of asthma in a prospective pediatric cohort. Children with AD and a family history of allergy were followed prospectively with questionnaire ascertainment of environmental exposure to cats, dogs, cockroaches, rats, and mice. Asthma was diagnosed by study physicians based on caregiver reports of symptoms continually assessed over the course of the study period. Fifty-five of the 299 children developed asthma by the end of the study. Cat exposure had a strong and independent effect to reduce the risk of developing asthma across all analyses (odds ratio [OR], 0.16; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.05-0.53). Dog, mouse, rat, and cockroach exposures did not significantly influence the development of asthma. Daycare exposure had the largest risk reduction for the development of asthma (OR, 0.08; 95% CI, 0.03-0.19). Maternal asthma (OR, 2.93; 95% CI, 1.29-6.67), baseline body mass index (OR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.08-1.42), and specific immunoglobulin E to house-dust mix at 3 years were each independent risk factors for the development of asthma. In children with AD, cat and daycare exposure may reduce the risk of developing early childhood asthma.

  1. Exploring the Response Shift Phenomenon in Childhood Patients With Cancer and Its Effect on Health-Related Quality of Life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinksma, Aeltsje; Tissing, Wim J. E.; Sulkers, Esther; Kamps, Willem A.; Roodbol, Petrie F.; Sanderman, Robbert

    Purpose/Objectives: To explore the response shift phenomenon in pediatric patients with cancer and to determine its effects on ratings of health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Design: Retrospective pre- and post-test design. Setting: Pediatric oncology department in the northern part of the

  2. Hypothermia in Uremic Dogs and Cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabatchnick, E; Langston, C; Olson, B; Lamb, K E

    2016-09-01

    The prevalence of uremic hypothermia (UH) and the effects of improving uremia on body temperature have not been determined in veterinary patients. To determine the prevalence of UH and correlations between uremia and body temperature in patients undergoing intermittent hemodialysis (IHD). Uremic dogs (n = 122) and cats (n = 79) treated by IHD at the Bobst Hospital of the Animal Medical Center from 1997 to 2013. Retrospective review of medical records. The prevalence of hypothermia was 38% in azotemic cats and 20.5% in azotemic dogs. Statistically significant temperature differences were observed between uremic and nonuremic dogs (nonuremic: mean, 100.8°F; range, 91.2-109.5°F; uremic: mean, 99.9°F; range, 95.6-103.8°F; P cats (nonuremic: mean, 100.6°F; range, 94.0-103.8°F; uremic: mean, 99.3°F; range, 92.3-103.4°F; P dog dialysis patients, significant models included (1) timing (pre-dialysis versus post-dialysis) with weight class (small [P dogs), (2) timing with serum creatinine concentration (P = .021), and (3) timing with BUN concentration (P cat dialysis patients, there was a significant interaction between timing and weight as a categorical variable (cats and dogs. Uremic patients are hypothermic compared to ill nonuremic patients and body temperatures increase when uremia is corrected with IHD in dogs and in cats >5 kg. In cats, UH seems to be a more prevalent phenomenon driven by uremia. Uremic hypothermia does occur in dogs, but body weight is a more important predictor of body temperature. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  3. Effects of various factors on Doppler ultrasonographic measurements of radial and coccygeal arterial blood pressure in privately owned, conscious cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittemore, Jacqueline C; Nystrom, Michael R; Mawby, Dianne I

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the effects of age, body condition score (BCS), and muscle condition score (MCS) on radial and coccygeal systolic arterial blood pressure (SAP) in cats. DESIGN Prospective randomized trial. ANIMALS 66 privately owned cats enrolled between May and December 2010. PROCEDURES BCS and MCS of cats were assessed by 2 investigators; SAP was measured via Doppler ultrasonic flow detector, with cats positioned in right lateral or sternal recumbency for measurements at the radial or coccygeal artery, respectively, with order of site randomized. Associations among variables were assessed through correlation coefficients, partial correlation coefficients, and ANCOVA. RESULTS Interrater reliability for BCS and MCS assessment was high (correlation coefficients, 0.95 and 0.83, respectively). No significant effect was identified for order of SAP measurement sites. Coccygeal and radial SAP were positively correlated (ρ = 0.45). The median difference in coccygeal versus radial SAP was 19 mm Hg, but differences were not consistently positive or negative. Radial SAP was positively correlated with age (ρ = 0.48) and negatively correlated with MCS (ρ = -0.30). On the basis of the correlation analysis, the association between radial SAP and MCS reflected the confounding influence of age. Coccygeal SAP was not significantly correlated with age, BCS, or MCS. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Use of the coccygeal artery is recommended to reduce the confounding effects of age and sarcopenia on Doppler ultrasonographic SAP measurements in cats. Additionally, monitoring for changes in MCS is recommended for cats undergoing serial SAP measurement.

  4. An ecological approach to learning with technology: responding to tensions within the "wow-effect" phenomenon in teaching practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herro, Danielle

    2016-12-01

    This review explores Anne Kamstrupp's "The Wow-effect in Science Teacher Education" by examining her theorized "wow-effect" as a teaching enactment that may serve to engage students, but often fails to provide deep understanding of science content. My response extends her perspective of socio-materiality as means to understand the "wow-effect" by suggesting social constructivism provides a more accurate lens to disentangle the phenomenon. I react to her position that tension fields within the phenomenon include the relationship between new and old technologies, boredom and engagement, and active and sedentary learning. In this conversation, I point to a new way of conceptualizing using digital media in the classroom as ecology of learning that may serve to decrease problems associated with the "wow-effect".

  5. Study of the effect on shelter cat intakes and euthanasia from a shelter neuter return project of 10,080 cats from March 2010 to June 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicirelli, Jon

    2014-01-01

    Cat impoundments were increasing at the municipal San Jose animal shelter in 2009, despite long-term successful low cost sterilization programs and attempts to lower the euthanasia rate of treatable-rehabilitatable impounds beginning in 2008. San Jose Animal Care and Services implemented a new strategy designed to control overall feral cat reproduction by altering and returning feral cats entering the shelter system, rather than euthanizing the cats. The purpose of this case study was to determine how the program affected the shelter cat intakes over time. In just over four years, 10,080 individual healthy adult feral cats, out of 11,423 impounded at the shelter during this time frame, were altered and returned to their site of capture. Included in the 11,423 cats were 862 cats impounded from one to four additional times for a total of 958 (9.5%) recaptures of the previously altered 10,080 cats. The remaining 385 healthy feral cats were euthanized at the shelter from March 2010 to June 2014. Four years into the program, researchers observed cat and kitten impounds decreased 29.1%; euthanasia decreased from over 70% of intakes in 2009, to 23% in 2014. Euthanasia in the shelter for Upper Respiratory Disease decreased 99%; dead cat pick up off the streets declined 20%. Dog impounds did not similarly decline over the four years. No other laws or program changes were implemented since the beginning of the program. PMID:25374785

  6. Study of the effect on shelter cat intakes and euthanasia from a shelter neuter return project of 10,080 cats from March 2010 to June 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen L. Johnson

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cat impoundments were increasing at the municipal San Jose animal shelter in 2009, despite long-term successful low cost sterilization programs and attempts to lower the euthanasia rate of treatable-rehabilitatable impounds beginning in 2008. San Jose Animal Care and Services implemented a new strategy designed to control overall feral cat reproduction by altering and returning feral cats entering the shelter system, rather than euthanizing the cats. The purpose of this case study was to determine how the program affected the shelter cat intakes over time. In just over four years, 10,080 individual healthy adult feral cats, out of 11,423 impounded at the shelter during this time frame, were altered and returned to their site of capture. Included in the 11,423 cats were 862 cats impounded from one to four additional times for a total of 958 (9.5% recaptures of the previously altered 10,080 cats. The remaining 385 healthy feral cats were euthanized at the shelter from March 2010 to June 2014. Four years into the program, researchers observed cat and kitten impounds decreased 29.1%; euthanasia decreased from over 70% of intakes in 2009, to 23% in 2014. Euthanasia in the shelter for Upper Respiratory Disease decreased 99%; dead cat pick up off the streets declined 20%. Dog impounds did not similarly decline over the four years. No other laws or program changes were implemented since the beginning of the program.

  7. Effect of Rickettsia felis Strain Variation on Infection, Transmission, and Fitness in the Cat Flea (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Sean P; Brown, Lisa D; Hagstrom, Melena R; Foil, Lane D; Macaluso, Kevin R

    2017-07-01

    Rickettsia felis is a human pathogen transmitted by the cat flea, Ctenocephalides felis (Bouché) (str. LSU), as well as an obligate symbiont of the parthenogenic booklouse Liposcelis bostrychophila (Badonnel) (str. LSU-Lb). The influence of genetic variability in these two strains of R. felis on host specialization and fitness and possible resulting differences on infection and transmission kinetics in C. felis is unknown. Utilizing an artificial host system, cat fleas were exposed to a R. felis str. LSU-Lb-infected bloodmeal and monitored for infection at 7-d intervals for 28 d. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to determine rickettsial load and infection density in newly exposed cat fleas, and transmission frequency between cat fleas. The effect of persistent R. felis infection on cat flea F1 progeny was also assessed. At 7 d postexposure 76.7% of the cat fleas successfully acquired R. felis str. LSU-Lb. In R. felis str. LSU-Lb-exposed cat fleas, the mean infection load (6.15 × 106), infection density (0.76), and infection prevalence (91/114) were significantly greater than R. felis str. LSU infection load (3.09 × 106), infection density (0.68), and infection prevalence (76/113). A persistent R. felis str. LSU-Lb infection was detected for 28 d in adult cat fleas but neither female:male ratio distortion nor vertical transmission was observed in F1 progeny. While infection kinetics differed, with higher intensity associated with R. felis str. LSU-Lb, no distinct phenotype was observed in the F1 progeny. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.

  8. Effects of isradipine and other calcium antagonists on arteriovenous-shunt flow in anesthetized rabbits and cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hof, R.P.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of vasodilators on arteriovenous (AV)-shunt flow was investigated in anesthetized cats and rabbits, using the tracer microsphere method. In cats, the calcium antagonist isradipine reduced AV-shunt flow; verapamil showed a similar tendency and nicardipine was without effect. Dihydralazine strongly increased, but nitroglycerin and dipyridamole decreased AV-shunt flow. In rabbits, the effects of isradipine and verapamil were similar to those seen in cats. Sodium nitroprusside had no effect, whereas prazosin, minoxidil, and the potassium-channel activator cromakalim increased AV-shunt flow. The contrasting effects of drugs sharing the same mechanism of action suggest that target-tissue selectivity is more important than the mechanism of action. An increase of AV-shunt flow is unlikely to be beneficial but could be associated with a number of undesirable side effects. It might negatively affect migraine sufferers and, if AV-shunt dilatation shows no tolerance development, it represents an unnecessary hemodynamic burden for the heart

  9. Effects of cerebellar nuclear inactivation on the learning of a complex forelimb movement in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J J; Shimansky, Y; Bracha, V; Bloedel, J R

    1998-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of inactivating concurrently the cerebellar interposed and dentate nuclei on the capacity of cats to acquire and retain a complex, goal-directed forelimb movement. To assess the effects on acquisition, cats were required to learn to move a vertical manipulandum bar through a two-segment template with a shape approximating an inverted "L" after the injection of muscimol (saline for the control group) in the interposed and dentate cerebellar nuclei. During training periods, they were exposed progressively to more difficult templates, which were created by decreasing the angle between the two segments of the template. After determining the most difficult template the injected animals could learn within the specified time and performance constraints, the retraining phase of the experiment was initiated in which the cats were required to execute the same sequence of templates in the absence of any injection. This stage of the experiment assessed retention and determined the extent of any relearning required to execute the task at criterion levels. Next, the animals were overtrained without any injection on the most difficult template they could perform. Finally, to determine the effects of nuclear inactivation on retention after extensive retraining, their capacity to perform the same template was determined after muscimol injection in the interposed and dentate nuclei. The findings show that during the inactivation of the dentate and interposed nuclei the animals could learn to execute the more difficult templates. However, when required to execute the most difficult template learned under muscimol on the day after injections were discontinued, the cats had to "relearn" (reacquire) the movement. Finally, when the cerebellar nuclei were inactivated after the animals learned the task in the absence of any injections during the retraining phase, retention was not blocked. The data indicate that the intermediate and

  10. Spinning process variables and polymer solution effects in the die-swell phenomenon during hollow fiber membranes formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira C.C.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available During hollow fiber spinning many variables are involved whose effects are still not completely clear. However, its understanding is of great interest because the control of these variables may originate membranes with the desired morphologies and physical properties. In this work, the phase inversion process induced by the immersion precipitation technique was applied to prepare hollow fibers membranes. It was verified that some of the variables involved, can promote a visco-elastic polymer solution expansion, called die-swell phenomenon, which is undesired since it may lead to low reproducibility of the permeation properties. The effects of the distance between spinneret and precipitation bath, the bore liquid composition, and the polymer solution composition were analyzed and discussed in order to avoid this phenomenon. According to the results, it was verified that the parameters investigated might promote a delay precipitation, which restrained the visco-elastic expansion.

  11. Assessment of the effects of dalteparin on coagulation variables and determination of a treatment schedule for use in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönig, Jette C; Mischke, Reinhard H

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine a treatment protocol for SC administration of dalteparin to cats on the basis of currently available detailed pharmacokinetic data and to assess the effect of SC administration of dalteparin to cats on coagulation variables such as activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), thrombin time, and results for thromboelastometry, compared with effects on anti-activated coagulation factor X (anti-Xa) activity. ANIMALS 6 healthy domestic shorthair cats. PROCEDURES Cats received 14 injections of dalteparin (75 anti-Xa U/kg, SC) at 6-hour intervals. Blood samples were collected before and 2 hours after the first and second injections on days 1, 2, and 4. Anti-Xa activity was measured by use of a chromogenic substrate assay, aPTT and thrombin time were measured by use of an automated coagulometer, and viscoelastic measurements were obtained with thromboelastrometry. RESULTS 2 hours after the second injection, the target peak anti-Xa activity range of 0.5 to 1.0 U/mL was achieved in all cats, whereas median trough values remained below this range. Peak anti-Xa activity had only minimal effects on coagulation variables; the maximum median ratio for aPTT (in relationship to the value before the first dalteparin injection) was 1.23. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results of this study indicated that this treatment protocol resulted in reproducible anti-Xa activity in cats that was mostly within the targeted peak range of anti-Xa activity recommended for humans. Treatment in accordance with this protocol may not require routine coagulation monitoring of cats, but this must be confirmed in feline patients.

  12. Non-equilibrium effects on the two-phase flow critical phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sami, S.M.

    1988-01-01

    In the present study, the choking criterion for nonhomogeneous nonequilibrium two phase flow is obtained by solving the two-fluid model conservation equations. The method of characteristics is employed to predict the critical flow conditions. Critical flow is established after the magnitude of the characteristic slopes (velocities). Critical flow conditions are reached when the smallest characteristic slope becomes equal to zero. Several expression are developed to determine the nonequilibrium mass and heat exchanges in terms of the system dependent parameters derivatives. In addition, comprehensive transition flow regime maps are employed in the calculation of interfacial heat and momentum transfer rates. Numerical results reveal that the proposed model reliably predicts the critical two-phase flow phenomenon under different inlet conditions and compares well with other existing models

  13. Evaluation of systemic absorption and renal effects of topical ophthalmic flurbiprofen and diclofenac in healthy cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanuza, Rick; Rankin, Amy J; KuKanich, Butch; Meekins, Jessica M

    2016-07-01

    To investigate systemic absorption and renal effects of topically applied ophthalmic flurbiprofen and diclofenac in healthy cats. Twelve domestic shorthair cats. Cats were randomly assigned to two treatment groups (n = 6) and administered one drop (approximately 40 μL) of either flurbiprofen 0.03% or diclofenac 0.1% in both eyes four times daily (6 am, 12 pm, 6 pm, and 12 am) for 14 days. Blood samples were collected on days 0, 4, 8, 14, 16, and 17 and analyzed by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry for flurbiprofen and diclofenac plasma concentrations. A complete blood count (CBC), serum chemistry, and urinalysis were analyzed at the beginning of the study (Day 0) and at the end of topical drug administration (Day 15). Both drugs demonstrated systemic absorption. Flurbiprofen was detected (mean ± SD) at day 4 (237 ± 65 ng/mL), day 8 (396 ± 91 ng/mL), day 14 (423 ± 56 ng/mL), day 16 (350 ± 66 ng/mL), and day 17 (270 ± 62 ng/mL), and diclofenac was detected (mean ± SD) at day 4 (130 ± 44 ng/mL), day 8 (131 ± 25 ng/mL), day 14 (150 ± 36 ng/mL), and sporadically on day 16 [corrected]. Flurbiprofen plasma concentration decreased slowly over 48 h after the last dose. No clinically significant abnormalities were noted in the serum blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, or urine specific gravity at the end of topical drug administration compared to the beginning of the study. Flurbiprofen and diclofenac were systemically absorbed after topical administration four times daily to both eyes of healthy cats. Flurbiprofen reached higher plasma concentrations compared to diclofenac. © 2015 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  14. Domestic cat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diffendorfer, James E.

    2017-01-01

    The familiar domestic cat is not native to southern California and is considered an invasive spe-cies by biologists and conservation organizations. When owners abandon their cats, wild or feral populations may arise, as they have in San Diego County. Cats’ pelage color, tail length, and hair thickness vary widely, given human fascination with breeding diverse phenotypes, but all have a typical felid body with upright ears, forward-looking eyes adapted for nocturnal foraging, protractible claws, and a sinuous, flexible body. Cats allowed outdoors and feral cats kill and eat a wide variety of vertebrates such as small mammals, birds, and reptiles

  15. Simpson's Paradox, Lord's Paradox, and Suppression Effects are the same phenomenon – the reversal paradox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnell David

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article discusses three statistical paradoxes that pervade epidemiological research: Simpson's paradox, Lord's paradox, and suppression. These paradoxes have important implications for the interpretation of evidence from observational studies. This article uses hypothetical scenarios to illustrate how the three paradoxes are different manifestations of one phenomenon – the reversal paradox – depending on whether the outcome and explanatory variables are categorical, continuous or a combination of both; this renders the issues and remedies for any one to be similar for all three. Although the three statistical paradoxes occur in different types of variables, they share the same characteristic: the association between two variables can be reversed, diminished, or enhanced when another variable is statistically controlled for. Understanding the concepts and theory behind these paradoxes provides insights into some controversial or contradictory research findings. These paradoxes show that prior knowledge and underlying causal theory play an important role in the statistical modelling of epidemiological data, where incorrect use of statistical models might produce consistent, replicable, yet erroneous results.

  16. 'Parity effect' based generation of Schrodinger cat like states in high-Q microcavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napoli, A.; Messina, A.

    1999-01-01

    It has been very recently shown that the dynamics of a two-level atom coupled to a bimodal degenerate cavity field by two-photon processes, is characterized by an interesting nonclassical dynamical behavior christened ''parity effect''. This effect consists in the fact that if the cavity field is prepared leaving one mode in its vacuum state and exciting the other one in a generic linear combination of even number states only, or odd number states only, then there exists an appropriate intensity-dependent interval of time after which the bimodal cavity exhibits macroscopically different parity-dependent quantum features. We show that this nonclassical effect is at the origin of the possibility of generating Schrodinger cat like states of the bimodal field appropriately selecting its initial conditions

  17. Effects of subanesthetic doses of ketamine in cats with induced experimental endotoxemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Hertzing Farias

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Farias F.H., Gehrcke M.I., Padilha V.S., Volpato J., Tochetto R., Comassetto F. & Oleskovicz N. [Effects of subanesthetic doses of ketamine in cats with induced experimental endotoxemia.] Efeitos da cetamina em doses subanestésicas em gatos submetidos à endotoxemia experimental. Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veterinária, 37(4:297-302, 2015. Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciência Animal, Centro de Ciências Agroveterinárias, Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina, Avenida Luís de Camões, 2090, Bairro Conta Dinheiro, Lages, SC 88520-000, Brasil. E-mail: noleskovicz@yahoo.com.br The clinical endotoxemia is difficult to diagnosis and treatment because of the involvement of multiple organs. This study aimed to evaluate the clinical effects of subanesthetic doses of ketamine, before or after the induction of endotoxemia in cats. Were used nine healthy cats, with 4.3±0.59 kg, autocontroles, placed into three groups: lipopolysaccharide (LPS, n=9 received a bolus of NaCl 0,9 % followed by a continuous infusion (CI of LPS for two hours and; bolus of NaCl 0,9 % followed by CI of LPS for two hours; ketamine/LPS (C/ LPS, n=9 received a bolus of ketamine followed by ketamine CI and LPS for two hours and, after, bolus of saline followed by CI of LPS for another two hours; LPS/ketamine (LPS/C, n=9 received bolus of saline followed by a CI LPS for two hours and then after bolus of ketamine followed by the same CI associated with LPS for two hours. The heart rate was higher for 5 to 120 minutes after initiation of the CI LPS in C/LPS and less than 150 to 240 minutes and from 600 to 720 minutes in LPS compared to the other groups. Five minutes after CI LPS initiation in C/LPS, 60 minutes in LPS/C and 90 minutes to 720 minutes in LPS, FC was higher than at baseline. The PAS was lower in all groups from 360 to 720 minutes compared to baseline. All treatments showed increased TR from 60 to 600 minutes compared to baseline. The levels of glucose

  18. Effect of deslorelin on testicular function, serum dihydrotestosterone and oestradiol concentrations during and after suppression of sexual activity in tom cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gültiken, Nilgün; Aslan, Selim; Ay, Serhan Serhat; Gülbahar, Mustafa Yavuz; Thuróczy, Julianna; Koldaş, Ece; Kaya, Duygu; Fındık, Murat; Schäfer-Somi, Sabine

    2017-02-01

    Objectives The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of a 4.7 mg deslorelin implant in tom cats. Methods Nine mature male cats were included in the deslorelin group and five cats in the control group. Before the study started, all cats were confirmed to have distinct sexually dimorphic behaviour. Blood samples were taken on the implantation day, at day 7 and at day 15, then monthly, in order to measure serum dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and 17beta(β)-oestradiol concentrations. The deslorelin group (n = 9) was divided into two subgroups: five cats (cats 1-5) were neutered in the postimplantation period during suppression of sexually dimorphic behaviour, and four cats (cats 6-9) were neutered after re-expression of sexually dimorphic behaviour. The control group cats (n = 5) were castrated without administration of the implant. Results Sexually dimorphic behaviours ceased within a mean ± SD of 13-58 days (23.30 ± 14.17) after implantation. DHT concentration decreased within 30 days. The mean duration of suppression was 26.5 ± 7.42 months and reactivation coincided with increased DHT values reaching preimplantation concentrations within 1 month. 17β-oestradiol concentrations significantly correlated with DHT concentrations ( P tom cats without any side effects and with full reversibility; however, duration of suppression is highly individual.

  19. Schroedinger's cat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lubkin, E [Wisconsin Univ., Madison (USA). Dept. of Physics

    1979-08-01

    The issue is to seek quantum interference effects in an arbitrary field, in particular in psychology. For this a digest of quantum mechanics over finite-n-dimensional Hilbert space is invented. In order to match crude data not only von Neumann's mixed states are used but also a parallel notion of unsharp tests. The mathematically styled text (and earlier work on multibin tests, designated MB) deals largely with these new tests. Quantum psychology itself is only given a foundation. It readily engenders objections; its plausibility is developed gradually, in interlocking essays. There is also the empirically definite proposal that (state, test, outcome)-indexed counts be gathered to record data, then fed to a matrix format (MF) search for quantum models. A previously proposed experiment in visual perception which has since failed to find significant quantum correlations, is discussed. The suspicion that quantum mechanics is all around goes beyond MF, and Schroedinger's cat symbolizes this broader perspective.

  20. Schroedinger's cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubkin, E.

    1979-01-01

    The issue is to seek quantum interference effects in an arbitrary field, in particular in psychology. For this a digest of quantum mechanics over finite-n-dimensional Hilbert space is invented. In order to match crude data not only von Neumann's mixed states are used but also a parallel notion of unsharp tests. The mathematically styled text (and earlier work on multibin tests, designated MB) deals largely with these new tests. Quantum psychology itself is only given a foundation. It readily engenders objections; its plausibility is developed gradually, in interlocking essays. There is also the empirically definite proposal that (state, test, outcome)-indexed counts be gathered to record data, then fed to a 'matrix format' (MF) search for quantum models. A previously proposed experiment in visual perception which has since failed to find significant quantum correlations, is discussed. The suspicion that quantum mechanics is all around goes beyond MF, and 'Schroedinger's cat' symbolizes this broader perspective. (author)

  1. The effects of L-carnitin in Budd-Chiari syndrome in a domestic cat

    OpenAIRE

    Aliye Sağkan Öztürk; Nuri Altuğ; Serkan İrfan Köse; Oktay Hasan Öztürk

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a thrombosis in the vena cava caudalis of a 15 year-old cat with ascites. Trauma and eventually feline enteric corona virus infection in the cat were not detected. In the intrahepatic region, a blockage of vena cava caudalis was brought to light by ultrasonographic imaging. An aspirate of abdominal fl uid revealed modified transudate. Liver enzyme levels were increased in the serum sample of the cat. The levels of total oxidant status (TOS) and total antioxidant status (T...

  2. Effect of altered thyroid state on the in situ mechanical properties of adult cat soleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, R. R.; Zhong, H.; Hodgson, J. A.; Grossman, E. J.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2003-01-01

    To determine the responsiveness of cat hindlimb muscles to thyroid manipulation, adult female cats were made hypothyroid (thyroidectomy plus tapazole treatment), hyperthyroid (synthroid pellets), or maintained euthyroid. After 4 months, the hypothyroid soleus had slower time-to-peak (TPT, 80%) and half-relaxation (HRT) times, whereas the hyperthyroid soleus had faster TPT (20%) and HRT than euthyroid cats. The tension at low stimulation frequencies (5-15 Hz) was higher in hypothyroid and lower in hyperthyroid cats compared to euthyroid cats. Muscle weight, maximum twitch and tetanic (Po) tensions, and maximum rates of shortening (Vmax) were similar across groups. The soleus of hypothyroid cats was more fatigable than normal. The myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition, based on gel electrophoresis, was unaffected by thyroid hormone manipulation. Based on the reaction of monoclonal antibodies for specific MHCs, some fast fibers in the hypothyroid cats coexpressed developmental MHC. These data indicate that 4 months of an altered thyroid state result in changes in the isometric twitch speed properties of the cat soleus, but not the tension-related or isotonic properties. Further, a chronic decrease in thyroid hormone had a greater impact than a chronic increase in thyroid hormone on the mechanical properties of the adult cat soleus. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Greenhouse effect. DOE's programs and activities relevant to the global warming phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, Robert E. Jr.; Iager, Richard E.; Che, Deborah

    1990-03-01

    energy efficiency, and switching from fossil fuel to non-fossil fuel based technologies, and/or reducing the emissions from fossil-fuel use. Section 1 contains background information on the global warming issue and our objectives, scope, and methodology. Section 2 provides details on DOE policies and research efforts, while section 3 provides examples of energy policy and program changes to mitigate the global warming phenomenon that have been suggested by various federal and non-federal authorities

  4. Effects of drug treatment on inflammation and hyperreactivity of airways and on immune variables in cats with experimentally induced asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinero, Carol R; Decile, Kendra C; Byerly, Jenni R; Berghaus, Roy D; Walby, William E; Berghaus, Londa J; Hyde, Dallas M; Schelegle, Edward S; Gershwin, Laurel J

    2005-07-01

    To compare the effects of an orally administered corticosteroid (prednisone), an inhaled corticosteroid (flunisolide), a leukotriene-receptor antagonist (zafirlukast), an antiserotonergic drug (cyproheptadine), and a control substance on the asthmatic phenotype in cats with experimentally induced asthma. 6 cats with asthma experimentally induced by the use of Bermuda grass allergen (BGA). A randomized, crossover design was used to assess changes in the percentage of eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF); airway hyperresponsiveness; blood lymphocyte phenotype determined by use of flow cytometry; and serum and BALF content of BGA-specific IgE, IgG, and IgA determined by use of ELISAs. Mean +/- SE eosinophil percentages in BALF when cats were administered prednisone (5.0 +/- 2.3%) and flunisolide (2.5 +/- 1.7%) were significantly lower than for the control treatment (33.7 +/- 11.1%). We did not detect significant differences in airway hyperresponsiveness or lymphocyte surface markers among treatments. Content of BGA-specific IgE in serum was significantly lower when cats were treated with prednisone (25.5 +/- 5.4%), compared with values for the control treatment (63.6 +/- 12.9%); no other significant differences were observed in content of BGA-specific immunoglobulins among treatments. Orally administered and inhaled corticosteroids decreased eosinophilic inflammation in airways of cats with experimentally induced asthma. Only oral administration of prednisone decreased the content of BGA-specific IgE in serum; no other significant local or systemic immunologic effects were detected among treatments. Inhaled corticosteroids can be considered as an alternate method for decreasing airway inflammation in cats with asthma.

  5. Effect of kibble size, shape and additives on plaque in cats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clarke, D.E.; Servet, E.; Hendriks, W.H.; Thomas, D.G.; Weidgraaf, K.; Biourge, V.C.

    2010-01-01

    Forty mixed-breed cats completed a parallel-group, clinical study to compare supragingival plaque accumulation using a triangular or rectangular shaped dry-expanded diet, with or without an anti-calculus agent (sodium tripolyphosphate) or an anti-plaque agent (plaquereducing nutrient). The cats were

  6. Blind Cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arka Chattopadhyay

    2015-08-01

    There’s no way to know whether he was blind from birth or blindness was something he had picked up from his fights with other cats. He wasn’t an urban cat. He lived in a little village, soaked in the smell of fish with a river running right beside it. Cats like these have stories of a different kind. The two-storied hotel where he lived had a wooden floor. It stood right on the riverbank and had more than a tilt towards the river, as if deliberately leaning on the water.

  7. A Rational Look at the Emotional Stroop Phenomenon: A Generic Slowdown, Not a Stroop Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algom, Daniel; Chajut, Eran; Lev, Shlomo

    2004-01-01

    The role of Stroop processes in the emotional Stroop effect was subjected to a conceptual scrutiny augmented by a series of experiments entailing reading or lexical decision as well as color naming. The analysis showed that the Stroop effect is not defined in the emotional Stroop task. The experiments showed that reading, lexical decision, and…

  8. Comparison of the cardiovascular effects of meptazinol and naloxone following haemorrhagic shock in rats and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chance, E.; Paciorek, P. M.; Todd, M. H.; Waterfall, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    The cardiovascular effects of the opioid mixed agonist-antagonist, meptazinol, and the opioid antagonist, naloxone, have been evaluated in conscious rats, anaesthetized rats and anaesthetized cats following the induction of haemorrhagic shock. The mean arterial pressure of conscious rats decreased by 17-29 mmHg following a haemorrhage of 20% of blood volume. Meptazinol (17 mg kg-1, i.m.) administered after haemorrhage evoked a rapid and sustained increase in mean arterial pressure to pre-haemorrhage levels. Naloxone (10 mg kg-1, i.v.) also increased mean arterial pressure to a level significantly higher than post-haemorrhage values. Neither haemorrhage nor subsequent drug treatments evoked significant changes in the heart rates of conscious rats. In anaesthetized rats, 20% haemorrhage evoked decreases in mean arterial pressure, heart rate and cardiac output. Blood flow to the heart, skin, skeletal muscle, kidneys, spleen and liver (arterial) was decreased. Meptazinol and naloxone increased blood pressure and total peripheral resistance, but did not significantly alter heart rate or cardiac output. Hepatic arterial flow decreased further in both drug and vehicle treated groups. In addition meptazinol slightly reduced skeletal muscle flow. In anaesthetized cats 40% haemorrhage decreased mean arterial pressure by 46 +/- 3 mmHg. An intravenous infusion of either meptazinol or naloxone (cumulative 2 mg kg-1, i.v.) partially restored blood pressure. In experimental animal models of haemorrhagic shock, meptazinol has a similar cardiovascular profile to naloxone. The established analgesic activity of meptazinol may confer an advantage in some shock states. PMID:4052729

  9. Comparative study of Valeriana Officinalis root extract¸diazepam and ketamin on CNS depressive effects in cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Kaffashi Elahi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Valeriana officinalis is a medicinal plant used in alternative medicine for its sedative and anxiolytic properties. It acts trough GABA receptors increases GABA in synaptic space and stimulates GABA receptors. Ketamine and diazepam also acts trough GABA mechanism but with a different pathway. The purpose of our study was to investigate the sedative effects on cats of valerian extract that extremely beloved by cats in combination with ketamine, and evaluate the possibility of its usage in cats and change the routine methods of anti-anxiety and restraining method. 24 healthy short haired mature male cats randomly selected, fed with standard ration and water ad libitum , were divided into three groups G1, G2, G3, received ketamine(11mg/kg, ketamine-diazepam(1mg/kg, and ketamine-valerian (1250 µg/kg PO respectively. Rate of CNS depression were evaluated by; onset time of effects, peak score, and duration of peak score, total time of effects and highest recorded score. Scores obtained by ataxia, time at which falling recumbent and pinch test over anus, tail and Achilles tendon. This experiment was conducted as blind. Statistical analysis made by variance analysis (ANOVA and Tukey test, at a significance level of 5% (p

  10. A rational look at the emotional stroop phenomenon: a generic slowdown, not a stroop effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algom, Daniel; Chajut, Eran; Lev, Shlomo

    2004-09-01

    The role of Stroop processes in the emotional Stroop effect was subjected to a conceptual scrutiny augmented by a series of experiments entailing reading or lexical decision as well as color naming. The analysis showed that the Stroop effect is not defined in the emotional Stroop task. The experiments showed that reading, lexical decision, and color naming all are slower with emotional words and that this delay is immune to task-irrelevant variation and to changes in the relative salience of the words and the colors. The delay was absent when emotional and neutral words appeared in a single block. A threat-driven generic slowdown is implicated, not a selective attention mechanism associated with the classic Stroop effect. ((c) 2004 APA, all rights reserved)

  11. Boiling transition phenomenon in BWR fuel assemblies effect of fuel spacer shape on critical power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yasushi; Morooka, Shin-ichi; Mitsutake, Toru; Yokobori, Seiichi; Kimura, Jiro.

    1996-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the thermal-hydraulic phenomena near fuel spacer is necessary for the accurate prediction of the critical power of BWR fuel assemblies, and is thus essential for effective developments of a new BWR fuel assembly. The main purpose of this study is to develop an accurate method for predicting the effect of spacer shapes on critical power. Tests have been conducted under actual BWR operating conditions, using an annulus flow channel consisting of a heated rod and circular-tube channel, and BWR simulated 4x4 rod bundles with heater rods unheated just upsteam of spacer. The effect of spacer shapes on critical power was predicted analytically based on the droplet deposition rate estimation. The droplet deposition rate for different spacer shapes was calculated using a single-phase flow model. The prediction results were compared with the test results for the annulus flow channel using ring-type spacers. Analytical results of critical power agreed with measured critical power from point of the effects of changes in the rod-spacer clearance and the spacer thickness on critical power. (author)

  12. Salt Effect on the Cloud Point Phenomenon of Amphiphilic Drug-Hydroxypropylmethyl Cellulose System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd. Sajid Ali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of two amphiphilic drugs (tricyclic antidepressant, nortriptyline hydrochloride (NORT, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, sodium salt of ibuprofen (IBF on the cloud point of biopolymer hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose (HPMC was studied. Effect of NaCl was also seen on the CP of HPMC-drug system. CP of HPMC increases uniformly on increasing the (drug. Both drugs, though one being anionic (IBF and other cationic (NORT, affect the CP in almost the same manner but with different extent implying the role of hydrophobicity in the interaction between drug and polymer. Salt affects the CP of the drug in a dramatic way as low concentration of salt was only able to increase the value of the CP, though not affecting the pattern. However, in presence of high concentration of salts, minimum was observed on CP versus (drug plots. Various thermodynamic parameters were evaluated and discussed on the basis of the observed results.

  13. The reversion phenomenon in irradiated fern prothalli: Effects of acute or chronic anoxia and let

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendry, J.H.; Cowie, F.G.; Wangenheim, K.H. von

    1985-01-01

    In several systems a paradoxical reduction of radiation damage with increasing dose, termed reversion, has been observed. In the fern Osmunda regalis the percentage of cells which does not die but stays alive, although reproductively sterile, increases with dose. The assumed mechanism of this effect is a continuation of cytoplasmic growth during radiation-induced mitotic delay which induces terminal differentiation (early differentiation) thus preventing mitosis and the expression of chromosomal injury. Suppression of cytoplasmic growth after irradiation should abrogate reversion. This was tested using anoxia. Reversion was suppressed by storage of the sporelings in nitrogen for 8 h or more after X-rays, but was not suppressed by storage in 0.27 μM oxygen nor by a 60-min exposure to air after irradiation and before storage in nitrogen. Anoxia before irradiation in air had no effect.

  14. A new phenomenon in the prenatal effects of harmful agents: total system teratogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filyushkin, I.V.; Ignatov, A.N.

    1997-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies of the mechanism of induction of minor teratogenic effects were performed. Theoretical analysis of the mechanism of minor teratogenesis have utilized reliable facts, well established concepts of biomedical science, and also categories and language of the theory of complex systems. To check theoretical statement in the experiments 889 baby rats were obtained. Of them, 487 were prenatally irradiated with 2 Gy of gamma rays and 402 were nonirradiated controls. Indices of the CNS development indices of the immunity status development and indices of the endocrine development were studied along the course of postnatal development of prenatally irradiated rats comparatively to controls, with loading test also being used, such as sensitization with allogeneic protein, immobilization stress and acute irradiation. A mechanism through which prenatal exposure to radiation and any other agent affecting physical embryonic development leads to congenital CNS deficiencies is found theoretically and confirmed in animal experiment. In the frame of this mechanism, the ultimate effect of prenatal exposure to a deleterious agent is the distortion of the structure of the neuroimmunoendocrine regulation of a postnatal organism in the direction of the excessive development of is endocrine component and the (ontogenetically) successive coadaptive under development of nervous and immune components. 27 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Experimental and numerical investigations on spray structure under the effect of cavitation phenomenon in a microchannel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghorbani, Morteza; Sadaghiani, Abdolali Khalili; Yidiz, Mehmet; Kosar, Ali

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the effect of upstream pressure on cavitation flows inside a microchannel with an inner diameter of 152 μm and resulting spray structure were experimentally and numerically investigated. The effects of bubble number density on two-phase flow hydrodynamics were studied using the numerical approach, where transient model was utilized to obtain the changes in vapor quality inside the microchannel and velocity field near the inlet and outlet of the nozzle. Spray visualization was carried out at a distance of 4.5 mm from the tip of the microchannel using the high speed visualization system. The experimental results showed that the spray cone angle increased with upstream pressure, and beyond the upstream pressure of 50 bar, the liquid jet flow changed to the cloudy spray flow. The bubble collapse was recorded at upstream pressures of 100 and 120 bar, where the cavitation bubbles extended to the outlet of the microchannel, and their collapse took place around the spray

  16. New phenomenon of potassium permanganate treatment effect in polymer irradiated with heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Mi; Liu Yibao; Wei Qianglin; Fu Yuanyong; Ju Wei; Chen Dongfeng; Wu Zhendong; Liang Haiying

    2014-01-01

    Background: Nuclear track membranes offer distinct advantages over conventional membranes due to their precisely determined structure. Their pore size, shape and density can be controlled intentionally so that a membrane with the required characteristics can be produced. The track etching technology plays an important role in the production of nuclear track membranes. Purpose: The effect of potassium permanganate solution pretreatment on the etching rate for polyethylene terephthalate film (PET) is studied in this work. Methods: The conductivity method is used in this research. Under different conditions, the PET films were pretreated for 1 h, 2 h, 3 h, 4 h, 5 h and 6 h by potassium permanganate solution. 5%, 15%, 25%, 35% of 2-mol·L -1 sulfuric acid solutions were added in 0.1 mol·L -1 potassium permanganate solution. Results: Track etching rate reached a peak at 2 h, Afterwards, with the pretreatment time increasing, the track etching rate declined, and the longer of the pretreatment time, the smaller of the bulk etching rate. Half cone angle either. Adding to sulfuric solution, the experimental results show that the effect on track etching rate is small, with the amount of sulfuric acid increasing, bulk etching rate becomes larger, the same change with half cone angle. In addition, the DC voltage used in the conductivity method also has impact on the track etching rate. Conclusion: The experiment has provided a method to improve the etching rate. (authors)

  17. Chiral magnetic effect in the presence of electroweak interactions as a quasiclassical phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvornikov, Maxim; Semikoz, Victor B.

    2018-03-01

    We elaborate the quasiclassical approach to obtain the modified chiral magnetic effect (CME) in the case when the massless charged fermions interact with electromagnetic fields and the background matter by the electroweak forces. The derivation of the anomalous current along the external magnetic field involves the study of the energy density evolution of chiral particles in parallel electric and magnetic fields. We consider both the particle acceleration by the external electric field and the contribution of the Adler anomaly. The condition of the validity of this method for the derivation of the CME is formulated. We obtain the expression for the electric current along the external magnetic field, which appears to coincide with our previous results based on the purely quantum approach. Our results are compared with the findings of other authors.

  18. Effects of stimulation parameters and electrode location on thresholds for epidural stimulation of cat motor cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongsarnpigoon, Amorn; Grill, Warren M.

    2011-12-01

    Epidural electrical stimulation (ECS) of the motor cortex is a developing therapy for neurological disorders. Both placement and programming of ECS systems may affect the therapeutic outcome, but the treatment parameters that will maximize therapeutic outcomes and minimize side effects are not known. We delivered ECS to the motor cortex of anesthetized cats and investigated the effects of electrode placement and stimulation parameters on thresholds for evoking motor responses in the contralateral forelimb. Thresholds were inversely related to stimulation frequency and the number of pulses per stimulus train. Thresholds were lower over the forelimb representation in motor cortex (primary site) than surrounding sites (secondary sites), and thresholds at sites 4 mm away. Electrode location and montage influenced the effects of polarity on thresholds: monopolar anodic and cathodic thresholds were not significantly different over the primary site, cathodic thresholds were significantly lower than anodic thresholds over secondary sites and bipolar thresholds were significantly lower with the anode over the primary site than with the cathode over the primary site. A majority of bipolar thresholds were either between or equal to the respective monopolar thresholds, but several bipolar thresholds were greater than or less than the monopolar thresholds of both the anode and cathode. During bipolar stimulation, thresholds were influenced by both electric field superposition and indirect, synaptically mediated interactions. These results demonstrate the influence of stimulation parameters and electrode location during cortical stimulation, and these effects should be considered during the programming of systems for therapeutic cortical stimulation.

  19. Primary Phenomenon in the Network Formation of Endothelial Cells: Effect of Charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Shunto

    2015-12-07

    Blood vessels are essential organs that are involved in the supply of nutrients and oxygen and play an important role in regulating the body's internal environment, including pH, body temperature, and water homeostasis. Many studies have examined the formation of networks of endothelial cells. The results of these studies have revealed that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) affects the interactions of these cells and modulates the network structure. Though almost all previous simulation studies have assumed that the chemoattractant VEGF is present before network formation, vascular endothelial cells secrete VEGF only after the cells bind to the substrate. This suggests VEGF is not essential for vasculogenesis especially at the early stage. Using a simple experiment, we find chain-like structures which last quite longer than it is expected, unless the energetically stable cluster should be compact. Using a purely physical model and simulation, we find that the hydrodynamic interaction retard the compaction of clusters and that the chains are stabilized through the effects of charge. The charge at the surface of the cells affect the interparticle potential, and the resulting repulsive forces prevent the chains from folding. The ions surrounding the cells may also be involved in this process.

  20. Effect of age and surgical approach on perioperative wound complication following ovariohysterectomy in shelter-housed cats in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeleine L Roberts

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of age and/or surgical approach on perioperative wound complication following ovariohysterectomy (OHE. Methods A retrospective search of perioperative monitoring records from a shelter desexing program was conducted to identify cats that underwent OHE between 1 June 2010 and 31 December 2012 inclusive. A wound complication was defined as gross observation of inflammation or wound dehiscence at the surgical site in the 5 day postoperative period. Cases were grouped according to age (≤12 weeks or >12 weeks and surgical approach (flank or midline. Stratified analyses were conducted to evaluate the association between surgical approach and wound complications, after adjusting for age. Mantel–Haenszel adjusted risk ratio, Cochran–Mantel–Haenszel test statistic and their 95% confidence intervals were presented. Results A total of 312 cases met the study criteria. The overall wound complication risk was low (6.09% and was not related to age. A midline approach was associated with a 4.59-times increased risk of wound complication, compared with a flank approach in cats up to 12 weeks of age ( P = 0.015 but not in older cats. Conclusions and relevance These findings support the practice of prepubertal desexing for cats.

  1. Effects of obesity, energy restriction and neutering on the faecal microbiota of cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Manuela M; Kessler, Alexandre M; Kieffer, Dorothy A; Knotts, Trina A; Kim, Kyoungmi; Wei, Alfreda; Ramsey, Jon J; Fascetti, Andrea J

    2017-10-01

    Surveys report that 25-57 % of cats are overweight or obese. The most evinced cause is neutering. Weight loss often fails; thus, new strategies are needed. Obesity has been associated with altered gut bacterial populations and increases in microbial dietary energy extraction, body weight and adiposity. This study aimed to determine whether alterations in intestinal bacteria were associated with obesity, energy restriction and neutering by characterising faecal microbiota using 16S rRNA gene sequencing in eight lean intact, eight lean neutered and eight obese neutered cats before and after 6 weeks of energy restriction. Lean neutered cats had a bacterial profile similar to obese rodents and humans, with a greater abundance (Pcats was due to a bloom in Peptostreptococcaceae. Obese cats had an 18 % reduction in fat mass after energy restriction (Pcats. Additional work is needed to understand how neutering, obesity and weight loss are related to changes in feline microbiota and how these microbial shifts affect host physiology.

  2. Central respiratory and circulatory effects of Gymnodinium breve toxin in anaesthetized cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borison, Herbert L.; Ellis, Sydney; McCarthy, Lawrence E.

    1980-01-01

    1 In cats anaesthetized with pentobarbitone, observations were made on respiration, spontaneous and evoked diaphragmatic electromyograms, blood pressure, heart rate, indirectly-induced contractions of the anterior tibialis muscle and nictitating membrane, and electrical excitability of the inspiratory centre in the medulla oblongata. 2 Gymnodinium breve toxin (GBTX) was administered intravenously, intra-arterially to the brain, and intracerebroventricularly. Physiological effects were recorded while alveolar PCO2 was controlled at a constant level except when changes in gas tension were made in order to measure CO2-ventilatory responsiveness. 3 Adequate doses of GBTX given intravenously by bolus injection elicited a non-tachyphylactic reflex response triad of apnoea, hypotension and bradycardia mediated by the vagus nerves independently of arterial baroreceptor and chemoreceptor innervation. 4 After vagotomy, additional amounts of GBTX (i.v.) resulted in apneustic breathing, hypertension and tachycardia. The cardiovascular effects were abolished by ganglionic blockade with hexamethonium. 5 Smaller doses of GBTX were required intra-arterially and intracerebroventricularly than by the intravenous route of injection to produce respiratory irregularity and cardiovascular hyperactivity. 6 Evoked motor responses, electrical excitability of the medulla oblongata and CO2-ventilatory responsiveness were largely spared even though GBTX caused marked disturbances in respiratory rhythmicity and cardiovascular functions. 7 It is concluded that GBTX acts reflexly on vagally innervated receptors to evoke a Bezold-Jarisch effect but that the toxin further acts centrally to cause irregular breathholding and hypertension with tachycardia, leading ultimately to respiratory and circulatory failure. PMID:7191740

  3. Cat Ownership Perception and Caretaking Explored in an Internet Survey of People Associated with Cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zito, Sarah; Vankan, Dianne

    2015-01-01

    People who feed cats that they do not perceive they own (sometimes called semi-owners) are thought to make a considerable contribution to unwanted cat numbers because the cats they support are generally not sterilized. Understanding people’s perception of cat ownership and the psychology underlying cat semi-ownership could inform approaches to mitigate the negative effects of cat semi-ownership. The primary aims of this study were to investigate cat ownership perception and to examine its association with human-cat interactions and caretaking behaviours. A secondary aim was to evaluate a definition of cat semi-ownership (including an association time of ≥1 month and frequent feeding), revised from a previous definition proposed in the literature to distinguish cat semi-ownership from casual interactions with unowned cats. Cat owners and semi-owners displayed similar types of interactions and caretaking behaviours. Nevertheless, caretaking behaviours were more commonly displayed towards owned cats than semi-owned cats, and semi-owned cats were more likely to have produced kittens (pcats in semi-ownership relationships compared to casual interaction relationships. Determinants of cat ownership perception were identified (pcat friendliness and health, and feelings about unowned cats, including the acceptability of feeding unowned cats. Encouraging semi-owners to have the cats they care for sterilized may assist in reducing the number of unwanted kittens and could be a valuable alternative to trying to prevent semi-ownership entirely. Highly accessible semi-owner “gatekeepers” could help to deliver education messages and facilitate the provision of cat sterilization services to semi-owners. This research enabled semi-ownership to be distinguished from casual interaction relationships and can assist welfare and government agencies to identify cat semi-owners in order to develop strategies to address this source of unwanted cats. PMID:26218243

  4. Evaluation of the adverse effects of subcutaneous carprofen over six days in healthy cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steagall, P V M; Moutinho, F Q; Mantovani, F B; Passarelli, D; Thomassian, A

    2009-02-01

    This study evaluated the adverse effects of carprofen in seven healthy cats. Values for CBC, biochemical profiles and platelet aggregation were measured before and at seven days after SID treatment with subcutaneous carprofen: 4 mg/kg (day 1), 2mg/kg (day 2 and 3) and 1mg/kg (day 4 and 6) (CG) or 0.35 ml of saline (SG) for six days in a randomized, blinded, cross-over study with a four-week washout period. No treatment was given on day 5. Endoscopy of the GI tract was performed pre-treatment and on day 7 post-treatment. There were no significant changes in hematological profiles, biochemical profiles and endoscopy grading scores within nor between groups, except for lower albumin values at baseline than on day 7 (CG), and globulin and ALP values were higher at baseline than on day 7 in CG and SG. SC administration of carprofen over six days did not cause any adverse effects on gastrointestinal, hematological, or serum biochemical variables.

  5. Temporo-mandibular joint condylectomy and its effect over occlusion in cats: cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Warrak, A O; Ferrer, G A; Lanthier, T; Loureiro Silva, B; El-Warrak, L O

    2011-03-01

    To determine the effect of unilateral condylectomy on dental occlusion in cats. Twelve feline cadaver heads were randomly submitted to either a right or left unilateral condylectomy of the temporo-mandibular joint. The distance between the mandibular and maxillary canine tooth was measured before (B0) and after the unilateral condylectomy (P0). A right or left latero--lateral standardised force (4 N) was applied to the mandibular mentus area before and after the surgical procedure. These measurements were analysed with a linear model for repeated measures. The comparative analysis between pre- and postsurgical values indicated no significant variation in teeth displacement following condylectomy between B0 and P0 measurements. Statistically significant differences were detected after either left or right condylectomy with respect to all measurements after application of the standardised forces. Occlusion changes are significant when comparing bites before and after surgery. Unilateral condylectomy causes a significant increase in latero-lateral amplitude of jaw movement which might clinically affect feline dental occlusion. Clinical studies are required to determine the effect of unilateral condylectomies on mastication and dental occlusion in feline patients. © 2011 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  6. Early effects of neutering on energy expenditure in adult male cats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfreda Wei

    Full Text Available The initial cause of post-neutering weight gain in male cats is not entirely known. There is evidence that energy intake (EI increases rapidly post-neutering, but it is not clear if neutering also decreases energy expenditure (EE prior to weight gain. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine if a decrease in EE contributes to the initial shift toward positive energy balance in neutered male cats. To determine the influence of neutering on EE independent of changes in EI and body weight (BW, male cats were fed at their pre-neutering maintenance EI and EE was measured at 4 days pre-neutering, 3-4 days post-neutering, and 9 days post- neutering. Ad libitum food access was then provided for 6 months. Body composition was measured and blood samples collected for serum chemistry at pre-neutering and 7 days, 13 days and 6 months post-neutering. Total energy expenditure (TEE adjusted for lean body mass (LBM did not change in cats from pre-neutering to 9 days post-neutering. However, TEE adjusted for BW and resting energy expenditure adjusted for either LBM or BW showed a small, but significant (P<0.05 increase from pre-neutering to 9 days post-neutering. When allowed free choice food access, cats showed significant increases of food intake (FI and BW. Circulating concentrations of ghrelin increased, while adiponectin levels decreased following neutering. The results of this study indicate that initial post-neutering weight gain in male cats results from increased FI and not decreased EE. Long-term control of FI should be initiated after neutering to prevent hyperphagia and weight gain in male cats.

  7. The effect of strychnine, bicuculline, and picrotoxin on X and Y cells in the cat retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, A W

    1979-07-01

    The effect of intravenous strychnine and the GABA antagonists picrotoxin and bicuculline upon the discharge pattern of center-surround-organized cat retinal ganglion cells of X and Y type were studied. Stimuli (mostly scotopic, and some photopic) were selected such that responses from both on and off-center cells were either due to the center, due to the surround, or clearly mixed. Pre-drug control responses were obtained, and their behavior following administration of the antagonists was observed for periods up to several hours. X-cell responses were affected in a consistent manner by strychnine while being unaffected by GABA antagonists. All observed changes following strychnine were consistent with a shift in center-surround balance of X cells in favor of the center. For Y-cell responses to flashing annuli following strychnine, there was either no shift or a relatively small shift in center-surround balance. Compared to X-cell responses to flashing lights, those of Y cells were very little affected by strychnine and in most cases were unaffected. It thus appears that glycine plays a similar role in receptive field organization of X cells as does GABA in Y cells (Kirby and Enroth-Cugell, 1976. J. Gen. Physiol. 68:465-484).

  8. Effects of CO2-HCO3- on catecholamine efflux from cat carotid body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iturriaga, R; Alcayaga, J

    1998-01-01

    Using a chronoamperometric technique with carbon-fiber microelectrodes and neural recordings, we simultaneously measured the effects of the following procedures on catecholamine efflux (delta CA) and frequency of chemosensory discharges (fx) from superfused cat carotid body: 1) the addition of CO2-HCO3- to Tyrode solution previously buffered with N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethane-sulfonic acid, maintaining pH at 7.40; 2) hypercapnia (10% CO2, pH 7.10); 3) hypoxia (PO2 h approximately 40 Torr) with and without CO2-HCO3-; and 4) the impact of several boluses of dopamine (DA; 10-100 micrograms) on hypoxic and hypercapnic challenges. With CO2-HCO3-, hypoxia increased fx which preceded delta CA increases, whereas hypercapnia raised fx but did not consistently increase delta CA. Repeated stimuli induced similar fx increases, but attenuated delta CA. After DA, hypoxia produced larger delta CA, which preceded chemosensory responses. Without CO2-HCO3-, hypoxia produced a similar pattern of delta CA and fx responses. Switching to Tyrode solution with CO2-HCO3- at pH 7.40 raised fx but did not increase delta CA. With CO2-HCO3- and after DA, hypoxic-induced delta CAs were larger than in its absence. Results suggest that DA release is not essential for chemosensory excitation.

  9. Effects of early cat or dog ownership on sensitisation and asthma in a high-risk cohort without disease-related modification of exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almqvist, Catarina; Garden, Frances; Kemp, Andrew S; Li, Qiang; Crisafulli, Daniel; Tovey, Euan R; Xuan, Wei; Marks, Guy B

    2010-03-01

    Variation in the observed association between pet ownership and allergic disease may be attributable to selection bias and confounding. The aim of this study was to suggest a method to assess disease-related modification of exposure and second to examine how cat acquisition or dog ownership in early life affects atopy and asthma at 5 years. Information on sociodemographic factors and cat and dog ownership was collected longitudinally in an initially cat-free Australian birth cohort based on children with a family history of asthma. At age 5 years, 516 children were assessed for wheezing, and 488 for sensitisation. Data showed that by age 5 years, 82 children had acquired a cat. Early manifestations of allergic disease did not foreshadow a reduced rate of subsequent acquisition of a cat. Independent risk factors for acquiring a cat were exposure to tobacco smoke at home odds ratio (OR) 1.92 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.13, 3.26], maternal education ownership OR 2.23 [1.23, 4.05]. Cat or dog exposure in the first 5 years was associated with a decreased risk of any allergen sensitisation, OR 0.50 [0.28, 0.88] but no association with wheeze OR 0.96 [0.57, 1.61]. This risk was not affected by age at which the cat was acquired or whether the pet was kept in- or outdoors. In conclusion, cat or dog ownership reduced the risk of subsequent atopy in this high-risk birth cohort. This cannot be explained by disease-related modification of exposure. Public health recommendations on the effect of cat and dog ownership should be based on birth cohort studies where possible selection bias has been taken into account.

  10. Metabolic Profiling Reveals Effects of Age, Sexual Development and Neutering in Plasma of Young Male Cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaway, David; Gilham, Matthew S; Colyer, Alison; Jönsson, Thomas J; Swanson, Kelly S; Morris, Penelope J

    2016-01-01

    Neutering is a significant risk factor for obesity in cats. The mechanisms that promote neuter-associated weight gain are not well understood but following neutering, acute changes in energy expenditure and energy consumption have been observed. Metabolic profiling (GC-MS and UHPLC-MS-MS) was used in a longitudinal study to identify changes associated with age, sexual development and neutering in male cats fed a nutritionally-complete dry diet to maintain an ideal body condition score. At eight time points, between 19 and 52 weeks of age, fasted blood samples were taken from kittens neutered at either 19 weeks of age (Early Neuter (EN), n = 8) or at 31 weeks of age (Conventional Neuter (CN), n = 7). Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to compare plasma metabolites (n = 370) from EN and CN cats. Age was the primary driver of variance in the plasma metabolome, including a developmental change independent of neuter group between 19 and 21 weeks in lysolipids and fatty acid amides. Changes associated with sexual development and its subsequent loss were also observed, with differences at some time points observed between EN and CN cats for 45 metabolites (FDR pcats was the most significantly altered pathway, increasing during sexual development and decreasing acutely following neutering. Felinine is a testosterone-regulated, felid-specific glutathione derivative secreted in urine. Alterations in tryptophan, histidine and tocopherol metabolism observed in peripubertal cats may be to support physiological functions of glutathione following diversion of S-amino acids for urinary felinine secretion.

  11. Katsvanga, CAT

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Katsvanga, CAT. Vol 1, No 2 (2006) - Articles Eucalyptus species performance under short rotation conditions on the Vumba highlands in Zimbabwe Abstract PDF. ISSN: 1819-3692. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners ...

  12. Effects of castration on penile extracellular matrix morphology in domestic cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Nathalia Cs; Pereira-Sampaio, Marco A; Pereira, Vivian Alves; Abidu-Figueiredo, Marcelo; Chagas, Maurício Alves

    2017-12-01

    Objectives This study was undertaken to verify the possible modifications caused by hormonal deprivation in the extracellular matrix in the penises of neutered cats. Methods Twenty-seven penises from domestic shorthair cats were collected: 14 samples from intact cats and 13 from neutered cats. Sections were stained with Weigert's resorcin-fuchsin, hematoxylin and eosin, and picrosirius red. Histomorphometric analysis was performed using light microscopy and image analysis software. The following parameters were analyzed: density of the elastic fibers and collagen fibers in the corpus spongiosum; density of the elastic fibers in the tunica albuginea of the corpus cavernosum and the tunica albuginea of the corpus spongiosum; luminal area of the urethra; area of the corpus spongiosum; area of the corpus cavernosum; and thickness of the urethral epithelium. The data were analyzed using the Shapiro-Wilk test to verify the normal distribution, and groups were compared using Student's t-test; P cats and neutered cats in the density of elastic fibers in the tunica albuginea of the corpus cavernosum (8.13% ± 1.38% vs 3.11% ± 0.66%), tunica albuginea of the corpus spongiosum (4.37% ± 1.08% vs 3.30% ± 1.01%) and corpus spongiosum (6.28% ± 3.03% vs 4.10% ± 2.19%), and density of collagen fibers in the corpus spongiosum (34.11% ± 10.86% vs 44.21% ± 12.72%). Conclusions and relevance The results show a significant decrease in the density of the elastic fibers and a significant increase of the density of the collagen fibers in the corpus spongiosum in neutered animals. This suggests that the compliance of the periurethral region is reduced, and these changes could be a predisposing factor for urethral obstructive disease.

  13. Randomized, placebo controlled study of the effect of propentofylline on survival time and quality of life of cats with feline infectious peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Y; Ritz, S; Weber, K; Sauter-Louis, C; Hartmann, K

    2011-01-01

    Currently there is no drug proven to effectively treat cats with feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). Propentofylline (PPF) can decrease vasculitis, and therefore prolong survival time in cats with FIP, and increase their quality of life. Twenty-three privately owned cats with FIP. Placebo-controlled double-blind trial. FIP was confirmed by histology or immunostaining of feline coronavirus (FCoV) antigen in effusion or tissue macrophages or both. The cats were randomly selected for treatment with either PPF or placebo. All cats received additional treatment with glucocorticoids, antibiotics, and low molecular weight heparin according to methods. There was no statistically significant difference in the survival time of cats treated with PPF (8 days, 95% CI 5.4-10.6) versus placebo (7.5 days, 95% CI 4.4-9.6). The median survival time of all cats was 8 days (4-36 days). There was neither a difference in quality of life (day 7, P = .892), in the amount of effusion (day 7, P = .710), the tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) concentration (day 7, P = .355), nor in any other variable investigated in this study, including a complete blood count, and a small animal biochemistry profile. This study did not detect an effect of PPF on the survival time, the quality of life, or any clinical or laboratory parameter in cats with FIP. Therefore, PPF does not appear to be an effective treatment option in cats with a late stage of the disease FIP. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  14. The Role of Thiamine and Effects of Deficiency in Dogs and Cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Kritikos

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent pet food recalls for insufficient dietary thiamine have highlighted the importance of adequate thiamine intake in dogs and cats, as thiamine is an essential dietary nutrient with a critical role in energy metabolism. Prolonged thiamine deficiency leads to clinical signs that can span several organ systems, and deficiency can be fatal if not reversed. In this review, the current knowledge of thiamine metabolism will be summarized. Dietary recommendations for dogs and cats will be discussed, and the risk factors and clinical signs associated with thiamine deficiency will be examined.

  15. The Role of Thiamine and Effects of Deficiency in Dogs and Cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritikos, Georgia; Verbrugghe, Adronie

    2017-01-01

    Recent pet food recalls for insufficient dietary thiamine have highlighted the importance of adequate thiamine intake in dogs and cats, as thiamine is an essential dietary nutrient with a critical role in energy metabolism. Prolonged thiamine deficiency leads to clinical signs that can span several organ systems, and deficiency can be fatal if not reversed. In this review, the current knowledge of thiamine metabolism will be summarized. Dietary recommendations for dogs and cats will be discussed, and the risk factors and clinical signs associated with thiamine deficiency will be examined.

  16. Clinical efficacy and cardiorespiratory effects of intramuscular administration of alfaxalone alone or in combination with dexmedetomidine in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo-Mocholí, Diego; Belda, Eliseo; Bosmans, Tim; Laredo, Francisco G

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the sedative, anaesthetic and cardiorespiratory effects of intramuscular (IM) administration of alfaxalone alone or in combination with dexmedetomidine in cats. Blinded, randomized crossover study with a washout period of 15 days. Seven adult cats, weighing 3.5 ± 0.7 kg. Cats were assigned randomly to each of three treatments: A5 (alfaxalone 5 mg kg(-1) ), D20 A5 (dexmedetomidine 20 μg kg(-1) and alfaxalone 5 mg kg(-1) ) and D40 A5 (dexmedetomidine 40 μg kg(-1) and alfaxalone 5 mg kg(-1) ). Drugs were administered IM into the epaxial muscles. Sedation or anaesthesia scores were evaluated by a modified numerical rating scale. Times to extubation, head-lift, sternal recumbency and standing were recorded. Heart and respiratory rates, systolic arterial pressure, arterial oxygen saturation of haemoglobin, end-tidal carbon dioxide tension and rectal temperature were measured at 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120 and 150 minutes after drug administration. Adverse events were recorded. Data were analysed by one-way anova with Tukey's post-hoc test for parametric values and, for non-normally distributed parameters, a Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U-test for two independent samples (p Cats in A5 were deeply sedated, whereas cats administered dexmedetomidine were anaesthetized. The onset of action and the duration of anaesthesia were related to the dose of dexmedetomidine. Cardiorespiratory parameters remained stable in the A5 group. Lower heart rates, higher systolic blood pressures and occasional low pulse oximetry readings were observed in the dexmedetomidine groups. A limited number of adverse events (hyperkinesia, emesis) occurred during recovery. Alfaxalone administered IM induced sedation in cats. The addition of dexmedetomidine to alfaxalone induced general anaesthesia with a mild decrease in the heart rate and arterial oxygen saturation of haemoglobin. © 2015 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of

  17. Effects of bilateral vestibular nucleus lesions on cardiovascular regulation in conscious cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, R L; Cotter, L A; Arendt, H E; Olsheski, C J; Yates, B J

    2005-02-01

    The vestibular system participates in cardiovascular regulation during postural changes. In prior studies (Holmes MJ, Cotter LA, Arendt HE, Cas SP, and Yates BJ. Brain Res 938: 62-72, 2002, and Jian BJ, Cotter LA, Emanuel BA, Cass SP, and Yates BJ. J Appl Physiol 86: 1552-1560, 1999), transection of the vestibular nerves resulted in instability in blood pressure during nose-up body tilts, particularly when no visual information reflecting body position in space was available. However, recovery of orthostatic tolerance occurred within 1 wk, presumably because the vestibular nuclei integrate a variety of sensory inputs reflecting body location. The present study tested the hypothesis that lesions of the vestibular nuclei result in persistent cardiovascular deficits during orthostatic challenges. Blood pressure and heart rate were monitored in five conscious cats during nose-up tilts of varying amplitude, both before and after chemical lesions of the vestibular nuclei. Before lesions, blood pressure remained relatively stable during tilts. In all animals, the blood pressure responses to nose-up tilts were altered by damage to the medial and inferior vestibular nuclei; these effects were noted both when animals were tested in the presence and absence of visual feedback. In four of the five animals, the lesions also resulted in augmented heart rate increases from baseline values during 60 degrees nose-up tilts. These effects persisted for longer than 1 wk, but they gradually resolved over time, except in the animal with the worst deficits. These observations suggest that recovery of compensatory cardiovascular responses after loss of vestibular inputs is accomplished at least in part through plastic changes in the vestibular nuclei and the enhancement of the ability of vestibular nucleus neurons to discriminate body position in space by employing nonlabyrinthine signals.

  18. THE ANALYSIS OF CAUSES AND EFFECTS OF A PHENOMENON BY MEANS OF THE “FISHBONE” DIAGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ECOBICI MIHAELA LOREDANA

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The risk has been and will remain one of the main problems any company is put to trial during its activity, regardless of its type. Whether we are talking about a financial activity, a production activity, a management activity, etc ... the risk is a matter which should not be neglected. The motivation behind a detailed analysis of risks lies in the complexity and their multiple effects, in the need for security, in the desire for a safe development of the activity of the company, a development of safe and cost-effective projects, the implementation of performance and safe technologies etc. Depending on the field of activity, the risk is dealt with in different ways. Whether we are talking about a transaction, a project, an organization, an asset, a monetary flow, the risk is composed of two elements: the probability of occurring of an event that could affect one of the units of analysis mentioned above and the effect that this has on the unit of analysis. Therefore, the manifestation of risk leads the analysis to a difficult situation to which the management of the organization is supposed to find viable solutions for surpassing. In the specialized literature there many methods and techniques in managing the emergence and the manifestation of risks, and one of these is the fishbone technique. Researches in the field have led to the gathering and analysis of items of information regarding this analytical tool. The results of the theoretical and practical research have resulted in a multitude of studies and research papers on such analysis tools that help improve understanding and identify the underlying causes of certajn problems. The purpose of this article is to achieve a representation of the relationships between the possible effects and possible causes that can influence a process, a phenomenon, an action.

  19. Cytogenetic Effects of Low Dose Radiation in Mammalian Cells Analysis of the Phenomenon Hypersensitivity and Induced Radioresistence

    CERN Document Server

    Shmakova, N L; Nasonova, E A; Krasavin, E A; Rsjanina, A V

    2001-01-01

    The induction of cytogenetic damage after irradiation of chinese hamster cells and human melanoma cells within dose range 1-200 cGy was studied. The anaphase and metaphase analysis of chromosome damage and micronuclei test were applied. The hypersensitivity (HRS) at doses below 20 cGy and the increased radioresistence at higher doses (IR) were shown with all cytogenetic criteria for both cell lines. The phenomenon of HRS/IR was reproduced in synchronic as well as in asynchronic population of chinese hamster cells. This fact shows that HRS was caused by high radiosensitivity of all cells and can not be explained by any differential sensitivity of cells in different phases of the cell cycle. So it was supposed that the increasing radioresistence is determined by the inclusion of the inducible repair processes in all cells. This conclusion agress with the fact that there was no evidence of HRS on dose-effect curves and that some part of pre-existent damage was repaired after preliminary irradiation with low dose...

  20. Effect of portal hypertension and duct ligature on pancreatic fluid pressures in cats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbehøj, N; Borly, L; Heyeraas, K J

    1990-01-01

    measured before and after acutely induced portal hypertension; in the other group of cats the pressures were measured after an overnight ligature of the pancreatic main duct. At rest the needle pressure was equal to duct pressure but significantly lower than interstitial fluid pressure and portal pressure...

  1. Effects of dietary selenium and moisture on the physical activity and thyroid axis of cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. E. Hooper; R. Backus; S. Amelon

    2018-01-01

    Consumption of canned cat food is considered a risk factor for the development of feline hyperthyroidism. Because selenium and water are substantially higher in canned diets compared to dry diets, objectives of this study were to determine whether increased dietary selenium or water alters the function of the hypothalamic–pituitary– thyroid axis and leads to an...

  2. Effect of peritoneal lavage solution temperature on body temperature in anaesthetised cats and small dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, D C; Leece, E A; Trimble, T A; Demetriou, J L

    2017-05-20

    A prospective, randomised, non-blinded, clinical study to assess the effect of peritoneal lavage using warmed fluid on body temperature in anesthetised cats and dogs of less than 10 kg body mass undergoing coeliotomy. A standardised anaesthetic protocol was used. Oesophageal and rectal temperatures were measured at various time points. At the end of surgery, group 1 patients (n=10) were lavaged with 200 ml/kg sterile isotonic saline at 34±1°C and group 2 (n=10) at 40±1°C. Groups were similar with respect to age, mass, body condition and surgical incision length. Duration of anaesthesia, surgical procedures and peritoneal lavage was similar between groups. Linear regression showed no significant change in oesophageal temperature during the lavage period for group 1 (P=0.64), but a significant increase for group 2 patients (Ptemperature changes of -0.5°C (from (36.3°C to 35.9°C) and +0.9°C (from 35.4°C to 36.3°C), respectively. Similar results were found for rectal temperature, with mean changes of -0.5°C and +0.8°C (P=0.922 and 0.045), respectively. The use of isotonic crystalloid solution for peritoneal lavage at a temperature of 40±1°C significantly warms small animal patients, when applied in a clinical setting, compared with lavage solution at 34±1°C. British Veterinary Association.

  3. Cardiovascular, respiratory and sedative effects of intramuscular alfaxalone, butorphanol and dexmedetomidine compared with ketamine, butorphanol and dexmedetomidine in healthy cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, Jeannette; Riccó, Carolina H

    2017-11-01

    Objectives The aim of the study was to evaluate the cardiorespiratory effects, quality of sedation and recovery of intramuscular alfaxalone-dexmedetomidine-butorphanol (ADB) and ketamine-dexmedetomidine-butorphanol (KDB), in cats. Methods Nine adult, healthy cats (6.63 ± 1.42 kg) were enrolled in a blinded, randomized, crossover experimental design. Cats were sedated twice intramuscularly, once with ADB (alfaxalone 1 mg/kg, dexmedetomidine 0.005 mg/kg, butorphanol 0.2 mg/kg), and once with KDB (ketamine 5 mg/kg, dexmedetomidine 0.005 mg/kg, butorphanol 0.2 mg/kg), in random order. Data collected included heart rate (HR), arterial blood pressure and blood gas analysis, respiratory rate, and sedation score. Analysis of variance with Bonferroni post-hoc correction was used for parametric data, and a Wilcoxon signed rank test was used for non-parametric data. Significance was set at P <0.05. Results Total sedation time was shorter for ADB (90.71 ± 15.12 mins vs 147.00 ± 47.75 mins). Peak sedation was observed within 15 mins in both groups. Quality of recovery was excellent in both groups. HR decreased over time in both groups. Diastolic and mean arterial pressure decreased over time for ADB, becoming significant after 30 mins. All cardiovascular variables were within the clinically acceptable range in both groups. Arterial partial pressure of oxygen was significantly decreased from baseline for KDB at all time points (73 ± 2.5 mmHg [9.7 ± 0.3 kPa] vs ADB 83 ± 2.6 mmHg [11 ± 0.3 kPa]). Hypoventilation was not observed. Conclusions and relevance Both protocols produced acceptable cardiovascular stability. Sedation and recovery quality were good, albeit sedation was shorter with ADB. Although oxygenation was better maintained in the ADB group, all sedated cats should receive oxygen supplementation.

  4. Plasma lipids, lipoprotein composition and profile during induction and treatment of hepatic lipidosis in cats and the metabolic effect of one daily meal in healthy cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, G; Paragon, B M; Sérougne, C; Férézou, J; Milliat, F; Lutton, C

    2004-04-01

    Anorexia in obese cats may result in feline hepatic lipidosis (FHL). This study was designed to determine plasma lipids and lipoprotein profiles in queens at different stages during experimental induction of FHL (lean, obese, FHL), and after 10 weeks of treatment. Results were compared with those obtained from lean queens of same age fed the same diet but at a maintenance level, once a day. Hepatic lipidosis led to an increase in plasma triacylglycerol (TG), very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and low density lipoprotein (LDL), and an enrichment of LDL with TG and of high density lipoprotein (HDL) with cholesterol, suggesting that VLDL secretion is enhanced, VLDL and LDL catabolism is lowered, and lipoprotein exchanges are impaired in FHL. This study also showed that cholesterolaemia is increased in cats fed at a dietary rhythm of one meal per day compared to ad libitum feeding.

  5. Effects of linear and nonlinear time-delayed feedback on the noise-enhanced stability phenomenon in a periodically driven bistable system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Zheng-Lin; Mei, Dong-Cheng

    2011-01-01

    We investigate numerically the effects of time delay on the phenomenon of noise-enhanced stability (NES) in a periodically modulated bistable system. Three types of time-delayed feedback, including linear delayed feedback, nonlinear delayed feedback and global delayed feedback, are considered. We find a non-monotonic behaviour of the mean first-passage time (MFPT) as a function of the delay time τ, with a maximum in the case of linear delayed feedback and with a minimum in the case of nonlinear delayed feedback. There are two peculiar values of τ around which the NES phenomenon is enhanced or weakened. For the case of global delayed feedback, the increase of τ always weakens the NES phenomenon. Moreover, we also show that the amplitude A and the frequency Ω of the periodic forcing play an opposite role in the NES phenomenon, i.e. the increase of A weakens the NES effect while the increase of Ω enhances it. These observations demonstrate that the time-delayed feedback can be used as a feasible control scheme for the NES phenomenon

  6. Fel d 1-derived synthetic peptide immuno-regulatory epitopes show a long-term treatment effect in cat allergic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couroux, P; Patel, D; Armstrong, K; Larché, M; Hafner, R P

    2015-05-01

    Cat-PAD, the first in a new class of synthetic peptide immuno-regulatory epitopes (SPIREs), was shown to significantly improve rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms in subjects with cat allergy up to 1 year after the start of a short course of treatment. To evaluate the long-term effects of Cat-PAD on rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms following standardized allergen challenge 2 years after treatment. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group study, subjects were exposed to cat allergen in an environmental exposure chamber (EEC) before and after treatment with two regimens of Cat-PAD (either eight doses of 3 nmol or four doses of 6 nmol) given intradermally over a 3-month period. In this follow-up study, changes from baseline in rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms were reassessed 2 years after the start of treatment. The primary endpoint showed a mean reduction in total rhinoconjunctivitis symptom scores of 3.85 units in the 4 × 6 nmol Cat-PAD group compared to placebo 2 years after the start of treatment (P = 0.13), and this difference was statistically significant in the secondary endpoint at the end of day 4 when the cumulative allergen challenge was greatest (P = 0.02). Consistent reductions in nasal symptoms of between 2 and 3 units were observed for 4 × 6 nmol Cat-PAD compared to placebo between the 2 and 3 h time points on days 1-4 of EEC challenge at 2 years (P Cat-PAD. This study is the first to provide evidence of a long-term therapeutic effect with this new class of SPIREs. © 2015 The Authors. Clinical & Experimental Allergy Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. The impostor phenomenon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringby, Betina; Østergaard, Gert Værge; Bønnelykke, Helle

    Persons suffering from the impostor phenomenon often fail to thrive and might be in danger of dropping out of studies. The impostor-phenomenon relates to people who are both skillful and capable, but sees themselves as frauds and as someone who is not worthy of good grades, appraisal for their work...

  8. A Prospective, Placebo-Controlled Pilot Evaluation of the Effect of Omeprazole on Serum Calcium, Magnesium, Cobalamin, Gastrin Concentrations, and Bone in Cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, E; Clements, C; Reed, A; Giori, L; Steiner, J M; Lidbury, J A; Suchodolski, J S; Brand, M; Moyers, T; Emery, L; Tolbert, M K

    2016-05-01

    Chronic proton pump inhibitor administration has been associated with electrolyte and cobalamin deficiency, disrupted bone homeostasis, hypergastrinemia, and rebound acid hypersecretion in humans. It is unknown if this occurs in cats. Prolonged oral omeprazole results in altered bone mineral density or content, serum calcium, magnesium, cobalamin, and gastrin concentrations in healthy cats. Six healthy adult DSH cats. In a within subjects, before and after design, cats received placebo followed by omeprazole (0.83-1.6 mg/kg PO q12h) for 60 days each. Analysis of serum calcium, magnesium, cobalamin, and gastrin concentrations was performed on days 0, 30, and 60. Bone density and content were evaluated on days 0 and 60 of each intervention. Continuous data were analyzed using a two-way ANOVA (α = 0.006). On day 60 of omeprazole administration, continuous intragastric pH monitoring was performed in 2 cats to evaluate the effects of abrupt withdrawal of omeprazole. No significant changes were detected between treatments for any variables, except serum gastrin, which was significantly higher during omeprazole treatment in comparison to placebo (P = 0.002). Evidence of gastric hyperacidity was seen in both cats in which intragastric pH monitoring was performed following cessation of omeprazole. Although further studies with larger populations of cats will be needed to draw any definitive conclusions, these preliminary results suggest that prolonged PPI treatment results in hypergastrinemia and abrupt PPI withdrawal might result in RAH in cats. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  9. The cardiopulmonary effects and quality of anesthesia after induction with alfaxalone in 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin in dogs and cats: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, K W; Robson, S; Devi, J L; Woodward, A; Whittem, T

    2016-12-01

    To systematically review the quality of evidence comparing the cardiopulmonary effects and quality of anesthesia after induction with alfaxalone vs. other anesthetic agents in dogs and cats. Studies published from 2001 until 20th May 2013 were identified with the terms 'alfaxan' OR 'alfaxalone' OR 'alphaxalone' in electronic databases: Discovery, PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Wiley Interscience. The study design and risk of bias of all included studies were assessed. Twenty-two studies from 408 (22 of 408, 5.39%) satisfied the inclusion criteria. Fourteen studies (14 of 22, 64%) focused on dogs and nine (9 of 22, 40%) on cats. One study had both dogs and cats as subjects. (Hunt et al., 2013) Twelve studies were rated an LOE1, and six of these as ROB1. One, seven, and two studies were rated as LOE2, LOE3, and LOE5, respectively. In dogs, strong evidence shows that induction quality with either alfaxalone-HPCD or propofol is smooth. Moderate evidence supports this finding in cats. In dogs, moderate evidence shows that there is no significant change in heart rate after induction with either alfaxalone-HPCD or propofol. In cats, moderate evidence shows no significant difference in postinduction respiratory rate and heart rate between alfaxalone-HPCD and propofol induction. Strong evidence shows dogs and cats have smooth recoveries after induction using either alfaxalone-HPCD or propofol, before reaching sternal recumbency. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Effects of attenuation and scatter corrections in cat brain PET images using microPET R4 scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Su; Lee, Jae Sung; Lee, Jong Jin

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of attenuation correction (AC) and scatter correction (SC) on the quantification of PET count rates. To assess the effects of AC and SC, 18 F-FDG PET images of phantom and cat brain were acquired using microPET R4 scanner. Thirty-minute transmission images using 68 Ge source and emission images after injection of FDG were acquired. PET images were reconstructed using. 2D OSEM. AC and SC were applied. Regional count rates were measured using ROls drawn on cerebral cortex including frontal, parietal, and latral temporal lobes and deep gray matter including head of caudate nucleus, putamen and thalamus for pre- and post-AC and SC images. The count rates were then normalized with the injected dose per body weight. To assess the effects of AC, count ratio of 'deep gray matter/cerebral cortex' was calculated. To assess the effects of SC, ROls were also drawn on the gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM), and contrast between them ((GM-WM)/GM) was measured. After the AC, count ratio of 'deep gray matter/cerebral cortex' was increased by 17±7%. After the SC, contrast was also increased by 12±3%. Relative count of deep gray matter and contrast between gray and white matters were increased after AC and SC, suggesting that the AC would be critical for the quantitative analysis of cat brain PET data

  11. Domestic Cat (Felis silvestris catus) Urine Odour as a Potential ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of cat urine odour extract on rodent pest species to reduce crop losses. Cat urine from the captured cats was drawn using cat catcher. Urinary catheter was inserted into the urethra up to the urinary bladder and a syringe attached to the urinary catheter was used to draw ...

  12. Strong spatial segregation between wildcats and domestic cats may explain low hybridization rates on the Iberian Peninsula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Sánchez, J M; Jaramillo, J; Barea-Azcón, J M

    2015-12-01

    The European wildcat (Felis silvestris silvestris) is an endangered felid impacted by genetic introgression with the domestic cat (Felis silvestris catus). The problem of hybridization has had different effects in different areas. In non-Mediterranean regions pure forms of wildcats became almost extinct, while in Mediterranean regions genetic introgression is a rare phenomenon. The study of the potential factors that prevent the gene flow in areas of lower hybridization may be key to wildcat conservation. We studied the population size and spatial segregation of wildcats and domestic cats in a typical Mediterranean area of ancient sympatry, where no evidence of hybridization had been detected by genetic studies. Camera trapping of wild-living cats and walking surveys of stray cats in villages were used for capture-recapture estimations of abundance and spatial segregation. Results showed (i) a low density of wildcats and no apparent presence of putative hybrids; (ii) a very low abundance of feral cats in spite of the widespread and large population sources of domestic cats inhabiting villages; (iii) strong spatial segregation between wildcats and domestic/feral cats; and (iv) no relationship between the size of the potential population sources and the abundance of feral cats. Hence, domestic cats were limited in their ability to become integrated into the local habitat of wildcats. Ecological barriers (habitat preferences, food limitations, intra-specific and intra-guild competition, predation) may explain the severe divergences of hybridization impact observed at a biogeographic level. This has a direct effect on key conservation strategies for wildcats (i.e., control of domestic cats). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. The effect of micro-particles of linoleic acid emulsion on the blood-brain barrier in cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hak Jin; Lee, Chang Hun; Lee, Tae Hong; Pyun, Yong Seon

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the permeability change of the blood-brain barrier and the reversibility of the embolized lesions induced with a fat-emulsion technique by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and we also wished to evaluate the resultant histologic findings in cat brains. MR imaging was scheduled serially at 1 hour, day 1, day 4 and day 7 after infusion of linoleic acid-emulsion (0.05 ml linoleic acid + 20 ml saline) to the internal carotid artery in 12 cats. Abnormal signal intensity or contrast enhancement was evaluated on diffusion-weighted images (DWIs), the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps, and gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted images (Gd-T1WIs) at the stated times. MR imaging was stopped if the lesion shows isointensity and no contrast enhancement was observed at the acquisition time, and then brain tissue was harvested and examined. Light microscopic (LM) and electron microscopic (EM) examinations were performed. The embolized lesions appeared as isointensities (n = 7) or mild hyperintensities (n = 5) on DWIs, as isointensities (n = 12) on the ADC maps, and as contrast enhancements (n = 12) on Gd-T1WIs at 1 hour. The lesions showed isointensity on DWIs and the ADC maps, and as no contrast enhancement for all cats at day 1. The LM findings revealed small (< 1 cm) focal necrosis and demyelination in three cats. EM examinations showed minimal findings of small (< 3 μm) fat globules within the endothelial wall (n = 10) and mild swelling of the neuropils (< 5 μm). Widening of the interstitium or morphologic disruption of the endothelial wall was not seen. Cerebral fat embolism induced by linoleic acid emulsion revealed vasogenic edema and reversible changes as depicted on the MR images. These results might help us to understand the mechanisms of fat on the blood-brain barrier, and this technique could be used as a basic model for research of the effects of drugs on the disrupted blood-brain barrier, and also as a research

  14. Safety and effectiveness of a single and repeat intramuscular injection of a GnRH vaccine (GonaCon™) in adult female domestic cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vansandt, L M; Kutzler, M A; Fischer, A E; Morris, K N; Swanson, W F

    2017-04-01

    Sterilization is a key strategy to reduce the number of domestic cats entering and killed in shelters each year. However, surgical sterilization is expensive and labour-intensive and cannot fully address the 70 million free-roaming cats estimated to exist in the United States. GonaCon™ is a gonadotropin-releasing hormone vaccine originally developed for use as a wildlife immunocontraceptive. An earlier formulation was tested in domestic cats and found to be safe and effective for long-term contraception. However, the current Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-registered formulation consists of a different antigen-carrier protein and increased antigen concentration and has never been tested in cats. A pilot study was undertaken to evaluate the short-term safety of a single GonaCon immunization, assess the consequences of vaccinated cats receiving an accidental second GonaCon injection and determine the humoral immune response to immunization. During Phase 1, cats in Group A (n = 3) received a single intramuscular injection of GonaCon and Group B (n = 3) received a single intramuscular injection of saline. During Phase 2, Group A received a second GonaCon injection and Group B received their initial GonaCon injection. All cats developed GnRH antibodies within 30 days of vaccine administration. The endpoint titre (1:1,024,000) was similar among all cats, and levels remained high throughout the duration of the study. Four cats developed a sterile, painless, self-limiting mass at the site of injection. The mean number of days to mass development was 110.3 (range, 18-249 days). In conclusion, this preliminary study suggests that the EPA-registered GonaCon formulation is safe for continued testing in domestic cats, an accidental revaccination should not increase the risk of a vaccine reaction and the EPA-registered formulation effectively elicits a strong humoral immune response. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  15. Effect of morphine, methadone, hydromorphone or oxymorphone on the thermal threshold, following intravenous or buccal administration to cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pypendop, Bruno H; Shilo-Benjamini, Yael; Ilkiw, Jan E

    2016-11-01

    To determine the effects of morphine, methadone, hydromorphone or oxymorphone on the thermal threshold in cats, following buccal and intravenous (IV) administration. Randomized crossover study. Six healthy adult female ovariohysterectomized cats weighing 4.5 ± 0.4 kg. Morphine sulfate (0.2 mg kg -1 IV or 0.5 mg kg -1 buccal), methadone hydrochloride (0.3 mg kg -1 IV or 0.75 mg kg -1 buccal), hydromorphone hydrochloride (0.1 mg kg -1 IV or 0.25 mg kg -1 buccal) or oxymorphone hydrochloride (0.1 mg kg -1 IV or 0.25 mg kg -1 buccal) were administered. All cats were administered all treatments. Skin temperature and thermal threshold were measured in duplicate prior to drug administration, and at various times up to 8 hours after drug administration. The difference between thermal threshold and skin temperature (ΔT) was analyzed. Administration of methadone and hydromorphone IV resulted in significant increases in ΔT at 40 minutes after drug administration. Buccal administration of methadone resulted in significant increases in thermal threshold, although no significant difference from baseline measurement was detected at any time point. IV administration of morphine and oxymorphone, and buccal administration of morphine, hydromorphone and oxymorphone did not cause significant thermal antinociception. At the doses used in this study, IV administration of methadone and hydromorphone, and buccal administration of methadone resulted in transient thermal antinociception. The results of this study do not allow us to predict the usefulness of these drugs for providing analgesia in clinical patients. © 2016 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  16. Therapeutic effects of an alpha-casozepine and L-tryptophan supplemented diet on fear and anxiety in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsberg, Gary; Milgram, Bill; Mougeot, Isabelle; Kelly, Stephanie; de Rivera, Christina

    2017-06-01

    Objectives This study assessed the anxiolytic effectiveness of a test diet (Royal Canin Feline Calm diet) supplemented with L-tryptophan and alpha-casozepine. Methods Subjects were 24 cats that were classified as mildly or markedly fearful based on the presence of a person in their home room. Three different protocols were used to assess anxiety: (1) evaluation of the response to a human in the cat's home room (home room test); (2) analysis of the response to placement in an empty test room (open-field test); and (3) analysis of the response to an unfamiliar human (human interaction test). All three protocols were first run at baseline, and the results were used to assign the animals to control and test diet groups that showed equivalent fear and anxiety. Both groups were retested on the three protocols after 2 weeks (test 1) and again after 4 weeks (test 2). Results The diet groups differed for two behavioral measures in the open-field test: inactivity duration and inactivity frequency. The control group showed statistically significant increases in inactivity duration between baseline and test 1 and baseline and test 2, while the group fed the test diet showed a marginally not significant decrease in inactivity duration between baseline and test 1 and a not significant decrease for test 2. There was also a significant increase in inactivity frequency between baseline and test 1 in the test diet group and marginally not significant decrease in the control group. There were no differences between groups in the approach of the cats toward people for the home room test and the human interaction test. Conclusions and relevance These results suggest that the test diet reduced the anxiety response to placement in an unfamiliar location, but that fear in the presence of an unfamiliar person was not counteracted by the diet.

  17. Effect of methysergide on pudendal inhibition of micturition reflex in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuta, Yosuke; Schwen, Zeyad; Mally, Abhijith D; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2013-09-01

    The role of 5-HT2 and opioid receptors in pudendal inhibition of bladder activity induced by intravesical infusion of saline or 0.25% acetic acid (AA) was investigated in anesthetized cats using methysergide (a 5-HT2 receptor antagonist) and naloxone (an opioid receptor antagonist). AA irritated the bladder and significantly (Preflex bladder activity and interact with opioid mechanisms in micturition reflex pathway. Understanding neurotransmitter mechanisms underlying pudendal neuromodulation is important for the development of new treatments for bladder disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [3H]-ouabain binding to peripheral organs of cats: effect of ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, S.P.; Sharma, V.K.

    1978-01-01

    The specific [ 3 H]-ouabain binding to microsomal fractions derived from cat heart, liver, spleen, and kidney increased significantly following chronic administration of ethanol. Since ouabain binds exclusively to cell membrane (Na + + K + )-adenosine triphosphatase ((Na + + K + )-ATPase), these results provide evidence for an increase in number of (Na + + K + )-ATPase macromolecules during chronic alcoholism. The importance of the increase in number of (Na + + K + )-ATPase molecules in the adaptive increase in ethanol metabolism and cardiac myopathy in chronic alcoholism is discussed. (author)

  19. Effect of the probiotic Enterococcus faecium SF68 on presence of diarrhea in cats and dogs housed in an animal shelter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bybee, S N; Scorza, A V; Lappin, M R

    2011-01-01

    Beneficial effects of probiotics have never been analyzed in an animal shelter. Dogs and cats housed in an animal shelter and administered a probiotic are less likely to have diarrhea of ≥2 days duration than untreated controls. Two hundred and seventeen cats and 182 dogs. Double blinded and placebo controlled. Shelter dogs and cats were housed in 2 separate rooms for each species. For 4 weeks, animals in 1 room for each species was fed Enterococcus faecium SF68 while animals in the other room were fed a placebo. After a 1-week washout period, the treatments by room were switched and the study continued an additional 4 weeks. A standardized fecal score system was applied to feces from each animal every day by a blinded individual. Feces of animals with and without diarrhea were evaluated for enteric parasites. Data were analyzed by a generalized linear mixed model using a binomial distribution with treatment being a fixed effect and the room being a random effect. The percentage of cats with diarrhea ≥2 days was significantly lower (P = .0297) in the probiotic group (7.4%) when compared with the placebo group (20.7%). Statistical differences between groups of dogs were not detected but diarrhea was uncommon in both groups of dogs during the study. Cats fed SF68 had fewer episodes of diarrhea of ≥2 days when compared with controls suggests the probiotic may have beneficial effects on the gastrointestinal tract. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  20. Interfacial phenomenon theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Deuk

    2000-02-01

    This book is composed of 8 chapters. It tells what interfacial phenomenon is by showing interfacial energy, characteristic of interface and system of interface from chapter 1. It also introduces interfacial energy and structure theory, molecular structure and orientation theory, and interfacial electricity phenomenon theory in the following 3 chapters. It still goes on by introducing super molecule cluster, disequilibrium dispersion, and surface and film through 3 chapters. And the last chapter is about colloid and application of interface.

  1. The effect of prior lumbar surgeries on the flexion relaxation phenomenon and its responsiveness to rehabilitative treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neblett, Randy; Mayer, Tom G; Brede, Emily; Gatchel, Robert J

    2014-06-01

    Abnormal pretreatment flexion-relaxation in chronic disabling occupational lumbar spinal disorder patients has been shown to improve with functional restoration rehabilitation. Little is known about the effects of prior lumbar surgeries on flexion-relaxation and its responsiveness to treatment. To quantify the effect of prior lumbar surgeries on the flexion-relaxation phenomenon and its responsiveness to rehabilitative treatment. A prospective cohort study of chronic disabling occupational lumbar spinal disorder patients, including those with and without prior lumbar spinal surgeries. A sample of 126 chronic disabling occupational lumbar spinal disorder patients with prior work-related injuries entered an interdisciplinary functional restoration program and agreed to enroll in this study. Fifty-seven patients had undergone surgical decompression or discectomy (n=32) or lumbar fusion (n=25), and the rest had no history of prior injury-related spine surgery (n=69). At post-treatment, 116 patients were reevaluated, including those with prior decompressions or discectomies (n=30), lumbar fusions (n=21), and no surgery (n=65). A comparison group of 30 pain-free control subjects was tested with an identical assessment protocol, and compared with post-rehabilitation outcomes. Mean surface electromyography (SEMG) at maximum voluntary flexion; subject achievement of flexion-relaxation (SEMG≤3.5 μV); gross lumbar, true lumbar, and pelvic flexion ROM; and a pain visual analog scale self-report during forward bending task. Identical measures were obtained at pretreatment and post-treatment. Patients entered an interdisciplinary functional restoration program, including a quantitatively directed, medically supervised exercise process and a multimodal psychosocial disability management component. The functional restoration program was accompanied by a SEMG-assisted stretching training program, designed to teach relaxation of the lumbar musculature during end-range flexion

  2. NO REFLOW PHENOMENON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Hashemifard

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Definition No reflow is a phenomenon in which myocardial ischemia and reduced antegrade flow occur despite the absence of proximal stenosis, spasm, dissection, or embolic cut off of major distal branches.1 In another word no reflow phenomenon means failure of restoration of myocardial flow despite removal of epicardial coronary obstruction.2 The incidence is 2% with plain balloon angioplasty (PTCA, 7% in patients undergoing rotational atherectomy, 12% for primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI, and much higher at 42% for PCI of degenerated Saphenous Vein Graft (SVG.3 No reflow is a strong predictor of mortality after PCI. The mortality of patients who developed no reflow has been estimated to be 8% Predictors of no reflow include a higher plaque burden, thrombus, lipid pools by intra vascular ultra sonography (IVUS, higher lesion elastic membrane cross sectional area, preinfarction angina and thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI flow grade 0 on the initial coronary angiogram. Mechanism The cause is mainly embolization of atheromatous material (gruel. Particles are composed of cholesterol clefts, lipid rich macrophages, fragments of fibrous cap, necrotic lesion core and fibrin. This is aggravated by microembolization of platelet-rich thrombi that release vasoactive agents (e.g., serotonin and thromboxane A2, leading to intense arteriolar vasopasm in the distal vasculature. In the animal laboratory, experimental no reflow has been shown to be due to the plugging of capillaries by red blood cells and neutrophils, myocyte contracture and local intracellular and interstitial edema.4,5      A loss of capillary autoregulation and severe microvascular dysfunction are the ultimate physiologic consequences of these microscopic anatomic alterations. Debris of varying sizes of particulate has variable effects on microcirculatory plugging. The effect of particle size on microvascular dysfunction has been mostly investigated during

  3. Effects of cholesterol and cAMP on progesterone production in cultured luteal cells isolated from pseudopregnant cat ovaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikan, Sevket; Yigit, Ayse Arzu

    2009-10-01

    The present study was designed to incubate luteal cells isolated from pseudopregnant cats and to investigate the effects of cholesterol and cAMP on luteal progesterone production. Corpora lutea were collected from the cats on days 10 and 15 of pseudopregnancy. Luteal cells were isolated from the ovaries by collagenase digestion. Steroidogenic luteal cells were stained for 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3beta-HSD) activity. Cells (2 x 10(4)) staining positive for 3beta-HSD were cultured for up to 7 days. The cells were treated with 22(R)-hydroxycholesterol (22R-HC) and dibutyryl cyclic AMP (dbcAMP) on days 1, 3 and 7. Treatment of cells with 22R-HC resulted in a dose-dependent increase (pprogesterone production. When 22R-HC was used at a concentration of 10 microg/ml, it resulted in 2.7- and 5.1-fold increases in progesterone production on days 3 and 5, respectively. When the dose was doubled (20 microg/ml), treated cells produced four times more progesterone on days 3 and 7, and three times more on day 5. By day 7, progesterone production increased up to 9.1 times more than the control. Incubation of cells with both concentrations of dbcAMP (0.1 mM and 1 mM) resulted in significant stimulations of progesterone on days 5 and 7 (pProgesterone production was increased up to 2- and 2.9-fold of the control when cells were treated with lower concentration of dbcAMP (0.1 mM) on days 5 and 7, respectively. Incubation of cells with 1 mM concentrations of dbcAMP induced a 3.2-fold increase on day 5 and a 5-fold increase on day 7. In conclusion, a successful incubation was performed for long-life culturing of luteal cells collected from pseudopregnant cats. The method works well and allows for optimal growth and development of cells in the culture. The present study also demonstrated that incubating cat luteal cells with 22R-HC and dbcAMP induces a significant increase in luteal progesterone synthesis.

  4. Effects of feral cats on the evolution of anti-predator behaviours in island reptiles: insights from an ancient introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Binbin; Belasen, Anat; Pafilis, Panayiotis; Bednekoff, Peter; Foufopoulos, Johannes

    2014-08-07

    Exotic predators have driven the extinction of many island species. We examined impacts of feral cats on the abundance and anti-predator behaviours of Aegean wall lizards in the Cyclades (Greece), where cats were introduced thousands of years ago. We compared populations with high and low cat density on Naxos Island and populations on surrounding islets with no cats. Cats reduced wall lizard populations by half. Lizards facing greater risk from cats stayed closer to refuges, were more likely to shed their tails in a standardized assay, and fled at greater distances when approached by either a person in the field or a mounted cat decoy in the laboratory. All populations showed phenotypic plasticity in flight initiation distance, suggesting that this feature is ancient and could have helped wall lizards survive the initial introduction of cats to the region. Lizards from islets sought shelter less frequently and often initially approached the cat decoy. These differences reflect changes since islet isolation and could render islet lizards strongly susceptible to cat predation. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of Long-Term Exposure to an Electronic Containment System on the Behaviour and Welfare of Domestic Cats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naïma Kasbaoui

    Full Text Available Free-roaming cats are exposed to a variety of risks, including involvement in road traffic accidents. One way of mitigating these risks is to contain cats, for example using an electronic boundary fence system that delivers an electric 'correction' via a collar if a cat ignores a warning cue and attempts to cross the boundary. However, concerns have been expressed over the welfare impact of such systems. Our aim was to determine if long-term exposure to an electronic containment system was associated with reduced cat welfare. We compared 46 owned domestic cats: 23 cats that had been contained by an electronic containment system for more than 12 months (AF group; and 23 cats with no containment system that were able to roam more widely (C group. We assessed the cats' behavioural responses and welfare via four behavioural tests (unfamiliar person test; novel object test; sudden noise test; cognitive bias test and an owner questionnaire. In the unfamiliar person test, C group lip-licked more than the AF group, whilst the AF group looked at, explored and interacted more with the unfamiliar person than C group. In the novel object test, the AF group looked at and explored the object more than C group. No significant differences were found between AF and C groups for the sudden noise or cognitive bias tests. Regarding the questionnaire, C group owners thought their cats showed more irritable behaviour and AF owners thought that their cats toileted inappropriately more often than C owners. Overall, AF cats were less neophobic than C cats and there was no evidence of significant differences between the populations in general affective state. These findings indicate that an electronic boundary fence with clear pre-warning cues does not impair the long term quality of life of cats.

  6. Investigation of effect of air flow rate on Zircaloy-4 oxidation kinetics and breakaway phenomenon in air at 850 .deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeng, Yunhwan; Lee, Jaeyoung; Park, Sanggil

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyzed an effect of flow rate on oxidation kinetics of Zircaloy-4 in air at 850 .deg. C. In case of the oxidation of Zircaloy-4 in air at 850 .deg. C, acceleration of oxidation kinetics from parabolic to linear (breakaway phenomenon) occurs. Oxidation and breakaway kinetics of the Zircaloy-4 in air was experimentally studied by changing a flow rate of argon/air mixture. Tests were conducted at 850 .deg. C under constant ratio of argon and air. The effects of flow rate on the oxidation and breakaway kinetics was observed. This paper is based on a revised and considerably extended presentation given at the 21 st International Quench Workshop. The effects of flow conditions on the oxidation kinetics of Zircaloy-4 samples were explained with residence time and percent flow efficiency. In addition, several issues were observed from this study, interdiffusion at breakaway and deformation of oxide structure by breakaway phenomenon

  7. Cat and Dog Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Wellness Staying Healthy Pets and Animals Cat and Dog Bites Cat and Dog Bites Share Print Cat and dog bites are common injuries. A family pet or ... bites. Path to safety If a cat or dog bites you, you should: Wash the wound gently ...

  8. Evaluation of the Cerebral State Index in Cats under Isoflurane Anaesthesia: Dose-Effect Relationship and Prediction of Clinical Signs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana R. Sousa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of the cerebral state index (CSI in reflecting different levels of isoflurane anaesthesia was evaluated in ten cats subjected to four end-tidal isoflurane concentrations (EtIso, each maintained for 15 minutes (0.8%, 1.2%, 1.6%, or 2.0% EtIso. The CSI, hemodynamic data, ocular reflexes, and eye position were recorded for each EtIso concentration. Pharmacodynamic analysis of CSI with EtIso was performed, as well as prediction probability analysis with a clinical scale based on the eye reflexes. The CSI values showed great variability. Between all parameters, burst suppression ratio showed the better fitting with the sigmoidal concentration-effect model (R2=0.93 followed by CSI (R2=0.82 and electromyographic activity (R2=0.79. EtIso was the variable with better prediction of the clinical scale of anaesthesia (prediction probability value of 0.94. Although the CSI values decrease with increasing isoflurane concentrations, the huge variability in CSI values may be a strong limitation for its use in cats and it seems to be no better than EtIso as a predictor of clinical signs.

  9. Environmental enrichment as a therapeutic avenue for anxiety in aged Wistar rats: Effect on cat odor exposition and GABAergic interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampedro-Piquero, P; Castilla-Ortega, E; Zancada-Menendez, C; Santín, L J; Begega, A

    2016-08-25

    The use of more ethological animal models to study the neurobiology of anxiety has increased in recent years. We assessed the effect of an environmental enrichment (EE) protocol (24h/day over a period of two months) on anxiety-related behaviors when aged Wistar rats (21months old) were confronted with cat odor stimuli. Owing to the relationship between GABAergic interneurons and the anxiety-related neuronal network, we examined changes in the expression of Parvalbumin (PV) and 67kDa form of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD-67) immunoreactive cells in different brain regions involved in stress response. Behavioral results revealed that enriched rats traveled further and made more grooming behaviors during the habituation session. In the cat odor session, they traveled longer distances and they showed more active interaction with the odor stimuli and less time in freezing behavior. Zone analysis revealed that the enriched group spent more time in the intermediate zone according to the proximity of the predator odor. Regarding the neurobiological data, the EE increased the expression of PV-positive cells in some medial prefrontal regions (cingulate (Cg) and prelimbic (PL) cortices), whereas the GAD-67 expression in the basolateral amygdala was reduced in the enriched group. Our results suggest that EE is able to reduce anxiety-like behaviors in aged animals even when ethologically relevant stimuli are used. Moreover, GABAergic interneurons could be involved in mediating this resilient behavior. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Acetaminophen Toxicosis in a Cat

    OpenAIRE

    Özkan, Burçak

    2017-01-01

    Acetaminophen causes serious problems as toxication in cats in spite of being an effective and reliable analgesic and antipyretic in humans. A six months-old female cat suffering from cough was presented to examination to International Pet Hospital/Tirana/Albania when no result was obtained after one  acetaminophen tablet had been administered in order to heal the disease. Depression, grey and cyanotic mucous membranes and tongue, tachypnea, tachycardia, hypothermia were primary clinical sign...

  11. Radioactive iodine therapy in cats with hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turrel, J.M.; Feldman, E.C.; Hays, M.; Hornof, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    Eleven cats with hyperthyroidism were treated with radioactive iodine ( 131 I). Previous unsuccessful treatments for hyperthyroidism included hemithyroidectomy (2 cats) and an antithyroid drug (7 cats). Two cats had no prior treatment. Thyroid scans, using technetium 99m, showed enlargement and increased radionuclide accumulation in 1 thyroid lobe in 5 cats and in both lobes in 6 cats. Serum thyroxine concentrations were high and ranged from 4.7 to 18 micrograms/dl. Radioactive iodine tracer studies were used to determine peak radioactive iodine uptake (RAIU) and effective and biological half-lives. Activity of 131 I administered was calculated from peak RAIU, effective half-life, and estimated thyroid gland weight. Activity of 131 I administered ranged from 1.0 to 5.9 mCi. The treatment goal was to deliver 20,000 rad to hyperactive thyroid tissue. However, retrospective calculations based on peak RAIU and effective half-life obtained during the treatment period showed that radiation doses actually ranged from 7,100 to 64,900 rad. Complete ablation of the hyperfunctioning thyroid tissue and a return to euthyroidism were seen in 7 cats. Partial responses were seen in 2 cats, and 2 cats became hypothyroid. It was concluded that 131 I ablation of thyroid tumors was a reasonable alternative in the treatment of hyperthyroidism in cats. The optimal method of dosimetry remains to be determined

  12. Effects of Long-Term Exposure to an Electronic Containment System on the Behaviour and Welfare of Domestic Cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasbaoui, Naïma; Cooper, Jonathan; Mills, Daniel S.; Burman, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Free-roaming cats are exposed to a variety of risks, including involvement in road traffic accidents. One way of mitigating these risks is to contain cats, for example using an electronic boundary fence system that delivers an electric ‘correction’ via a collar if a cat ignores a warning cue and attempts to cross the boundary. However, concerns have been expressed over the welfare impact of such systems. Our aim was to determine if long-term exposure to an electronic containment system was associated with reduced cat welfare. We compared 46 owned domestic cats: 23 cats that had been contained by an electronic containment system for more than 12 months (AF group); and 23 cats with no containment system that were able to roam more widely (C group). We assessed the cats’ behavioural responses and welfare via four behavioural tests (unfamiliar person test; novel object test; sudden noise test; cognitive bias test) and an owner questionnaire. In the unfamiliar person test, C group lip-licked more than the AF group, whilst the AF group looked at, explored and interacted more with the unfamiliar person than C group. In the novel object test, the AF group looked at and explored the object more than C group. No significant differences were found between AF and C groups for the sudden noise or cognitive bias tests. Regarding the questionnaire, C group owners thought their cats showed more irritable behaviour and AF owners thought that their cats toileted inappropriately more often than C owners. Overall, AF cats were less neophobic than C cats and there was no evidence of significant differences between the populations in general affective state. These findings indicate that an electronic boundary fence with clear pre-warning cues does not impair the long term quality of life of cats. PMID:27602572

  13. The fecal microbiome in cats with diarrhea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan S Suchodolski

    Full Text Available Recent studies have revealed that microbes play an important role in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal (GI diseases in various animal species, but only limited data is available about the microbiome in cats with GI disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the fecal microbiome in cats with diarrhea. Fecal samples were obtained from healthy cats (n = 21 and cats with acute (n = 19 or chronic diarrhea (n = 29 and analyzed by sequencing of 16S rRNA genes, and PICRUSt was used to predict the functional gene content of the microbiome. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA effect size (LEfSe revealed significant differences in bacterial groups between healthy cats and cats with diarrhea. The order Burkholderiales, the families Enterobacteriaceae, and the genera Streptococcus and Collinsella were significantly increased in diarrheic cats. In contrast the order Campylobacterales, the family Bacteroidaceae, and the genera Megamonas, Helicobacter, and Roseburia were significantly increased in healthy cats. Phylum Bacteroidetes was significantly decreased in cats with chronic diarrhea (>21 days duration, while the class Erysipelotrichi and the genus Lactobacillus were significantly decreased in cats with acute diarrhea. The observed changes in bacterial groups were accompanied by significant differences in functional gene contents: metabolism of fatty acids, biosynthesis of glycosphingolipids, metabolism of biotin, metabolism of tryptophan, and ascorbate and aldarate metabolism, were all significantly (p<0.001 altered in cats with diarrhea. In conclusion, significant differences in the fecal microbiomes between healthy cats and cats with diarrhea were identified. This dysbiosis was accompanied by changes in bacterial functional gene categories. Future studies are warranted to evaluate if these microbial changes correlate with changes in fecal concentrations of microbial metabolites in cats with diarrhea for the identification of potential diagnostic or

  14. Effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on the cochlear nucleus in cats deafened as neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandathil, Cherian K; Stakhovskaya, Olga; Leake, Patricia A

    2016-12-01

    Many previous studies have shown significant neurotrophic effects of intracochlear delivery of BDNF in preventing degeneration of cochlear spiral ganglion (SG) neurons after deafness in rodents and our laboratory has shown similar results in developing cats deafened prior to hearing onset. This study examined the morphology of the cochlear nucleus (CN) in a group of neonatally deafened cats from a previous study in which infusion of BDNF elicited a significant improvement in survival of the SG neurons. Five cats were deafened by systemic injections of neomycin sulfate (60 mg/kg, SQ, SID) starting one day after birth, and continuing for 16-18 days until auditory brainstem response (ABR) testing demonstrated profound bilateral hearing loss. The animals were implanted unilaterally at about 1 month of age using custom-designed electrodes with a drug-delivery cannula connected to an osmotic pump. BDNF (94 μg/ml; 0.25 μl/hr) was delivered for 10 weeks. The animals were euthanized and studied at 14-23 weeks of age. Consistent with the neurotrophic effects of BDNF on SG survival, the total CN volume in these animals was significantly larger on the BDNF-treated side than on the contralateral side. However, total CN volume, both ipsi- and contralateral to the implants in these deafened juvenile animals, was markedly smaller than the CN in normal adult animals, reflecting the severe effects of deafness on the central auditory system during development. Data from the individual major CN subdivisions (DCN, Dorsal Cochlear Nucleus; PVCN, Posteroventral Cochlear Nucleus; AVCN, Anteroventral Cochlear Nucleus) also were analyzed. A significant difference was observed between the BDNF-treated and control sides only in the AVCN. Measurements of the cross-sectional areas of spherical cells showed that cells were significantly larger in the AVCN ipsilateral to the implant than on the contralateral side. Further, the numerical density of spherical cells was significantly lower in

  15. Study on the noncoincidence effect phenomenon using matrix isolated Raman spectra and the proposed structural organization model of acetone in condense phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenwen; Wu, Fengqi; Zhao, Yanying; Zhou, Ran; Wang, Huigang; Zheng, Xuming; Ni, Bukuo

    2017-03-01

    The isotropic and anisotropic Raman spectra of acetone and deuterated acetone isolated in an argon matrix have been recorded for the understanding of noncoincidence effect (NCE) phenomenon. According to the matrix isolated Raman spectra and DFT calculations, we proposed aggregated model for the explanations of the acetone C=O vibration NCE phenomenon and its concentration effect. The experimental data were in consistence with the DFT calculations performed at the B3LYP-D3/6-311 G (d,p) levels based on the proposed model. The experimental identification of the monomer, dimer and trimer are reported here, and the dynamic of the transformation from monomer to aggregated structure can be easily controlled by tuning annealing temperature.

  16. Electrical switching phenomenon and memory effect in the semiconductor chalcogenide glass Ge0.10 As0.20 Te0.70

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haro, M.; Marquez, E.; Villares, P.; Jimenez-Garay, R.

    1987-01-01

    Electrical switching phenomenon, as well as the memory effect in the semiconductor chalcogenide glass Ge 0.10 As 0.20 Te 0.70 has been studied. A device with a plano-punctual interelectrode configuration has been designed and built, so that the electrical stimuli may be applied correctly. This device permits adequate positioning of the upper electrode, as well as contact pressure regulation. The I-V characteristics in the OFF-state have been obtained, showing a marked non-linear character. Equally, a relation has been found between the threshold voltage and electrical resistance parameters, indicating that the electrical power giving rise to the phenomenon is constant. Finally, memory effects showing a sudden reduction in electrical resistance, as well as interelectrode filaments, have been observed. (author)

  17. Effect of Acarbose, Sitagliptin and combination therapy on blood glucose, insulin, and incretin hormone concentrations in experimentally induced postprandial hyperglycemia of healthy cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Akihiro; Ueda, Kaori; Lee, Peter; Oda, Hitomi; Ishioka, Katsumi; Arai, Toshiro; Sako, Toshinori

    2016-06-01

    Acarbose (AC) and Sitagliptin (STGP) are oral hypoglycemic agents currently used either alone or in conjunction with human diabetic (Type 2) patients. AC has been used with diabetic cats, but not STGP thus far. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the potential use of AC or STGP alone and in combination for diabetic cats, by observing their effect on short-term post-prandial serum glucose, insulin, and incretin hormone (active glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and total glucose dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP)) concentrations in five healthy cats, following ingestion of a meal with maltose. All treatments tended (pglucose area under the curve (AUC), with an accompanying significant reduction (pAUC as compared to no treatment. Meanwhile, a significant increase (pAUC was observed with STGP (100% higher) and combined treatment (130% greater), as compared to either AC or no treatment. Lastly, a significant reduction (pAUC was observed with STGP (21% reduction) and combined treatment (7% reduction) as compared to control. Overall, AC, STGP, or combined treatment can significantly induce positive post-prandial changes to insulin and incretin hormone levels of healthy cats. Increasing active GLP-1 and reducing postprandial hyperglycemia appear to be the principal mechanisms of combined treatment. Considering the different, but complementary mechanisms of action by which AC and STGP induce lower glucose and insulin levels, combination therapy with both these agents offers great potential for treating diabetic cats in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Multigroup analysis of nuclear elastic scattering effects in Cat-D and DD3He fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Yasuyuki; Hanada, Takahiro; Hori, Hidetoshi; Kudo, Kazuhiko; Ohta, Masao

    1987-01-01

    Effects of nuclear elastic scattering (NES) on the slowing down of charged fusion products in a typical deuterium plasma and the burn dynamics of ignited Cat-D and DD 3 He plasmas are investigated. A time-dependent multigroup method is used to take into account the effect of finite (non-zero) slowing-down time as well as the discrete nature of NES. It is shown that adequate treatment of the slowing-down process, especially consideration of NES and slowing-down time delay, is essential for an accurate prediction of the dynamic behavior and thermal instability of the plasmas. NES accelerates the temporal plasma behavior and enhances the thermal instability, leading to 20∼30 keV increase in the critical temperature. (author)

  19. Phenomenon detection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Yasuo.

    1994-01-01

    Detection signals for a specific phenomenon outputted from any of detectors are distributed by way of half mirrors and inputted to a logic discrimination circuit by way of a photoelectric convertor. The photoelectric convertor detects the quantity of light corresponding to the optical signals from more than two detectors which detected the phenomenon, and outputs detection signals to the logic discrimination circuit. If the phenomenon is detected, since both inputs turn ON in the logic discrimination circuit in accordance with the predetermined logical sum, the occurrence of a specific phenomenon is detected. Thus, an optical system substantially comprises half mirrors, reflection mirrors and photoelectric convertor in combination provides a logic circuit. Since the circuit which transmits signals of the detectors is constituted with an optical system using the half mirrors, the number of parts constituting the logic circuit can greatly be saved. In addition, since the optical system comprises mirrors or half mirrors which have been used so far, they can be used, once assembled, quasipermanently, and the reliability can be enhanced greatly. (N.H.)

  20. Mask Phenomenon in Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郎丽璇

    2013-01-01

    People sometimes wear masks. Abusive expression may be used to convey love while polite words can be exchanged among enemies. This essay describes and discusses this special phenomenon in communication and analyzes the elements that con-tribute to the success of a mask communication.

  1. Effects of weight loss with a moderate-protein, high-fiber diet on body composition, voluntary physical activity, and fecal microbiota of obese cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallotto, Marissa R; de Godoy, Maria R C; Holscher, Hannah D; Buff, Preston R; Swanson, Kelly S

    2018-02-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine effects of restriction feeding of a moderate-protein, high-fiber diet on loss of body weight (BW), voluntary physical activity, body composition, and fecal microbiota of overweight cats. ANIMALS 8 neutered male adult cats. PROCEDURES After BW maintenance for 4 weeks (week 0 = last week of baseline period), cats were fed to lose approximately 1.5% of BW/wk for 18 weeks. Food intake (daily), BW (twice per week), body condition score (weekly), body composition (every 4 weeks), serum biochemical analysis (weeks 0, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, and 16), physical activity (every 6 weeks), and fecal microbiota (weeks 0, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, and 16) were assessed. RESULTS BW, body condition score, serum triglyceride concentration, and body fat mass and percentage decreased significantly over time. Lean mass decreased significantly at weeks 12 and 16. Energy required to maintain BW was 14% less than National Research Council estimates for overweight cats and 16% more than resting energy requirement estimates. Energy required for weight loss was 11% more, 6% less, and 16% less than American Animal Hospital Association recommendations for weight loss (80% of resting energy requirement) at weeks 1 through 4, 5 through 8, and 9 through 18, respectively. Relative abundance of Actinobacteria increased and Bacteroidetes decreased with weight loss. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Restricted feeding of a moderate-protein, high-fiber diet appeared to be a safe and effective means for weight loss in cats. Energy requirements for neutered cats may be overestimated and should be reconsidered.

  2. Opinions from the front lines of cat colony management conflict.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Nils Peterson

    Full Text Available Outdoor cats represent a global threat to terrestrial vertebrate conservation, but management has been rife with conflict due to differences in views of the problem and appropriate responses to it. To evaluate these differences we conducted a survey of opinions about outdoor cats and their management with two contrasting stakeholder groups, cat colony caretakers (CCCs and bird conservation professionals (BCPs across the United States. Group opinions were polarized, for both normative statements (CCCs supported treating feral cats as protected wildlife and using trap neuter and release [TNR] and BCPs supported treating feral cats as pests and using euthanasia and empirical statements. Opinions also were related to gender, age, and education, with females and older respondents being less likely than their counterparts to support treating feral cats as pests, and females being less likely than males to support euthanasia. Most CCCs held false beliefs about the impacts of feral cats on wildlife and the impacts of TNR (e.g., 9% believed feral cats harmed bird populations, 70% believed TNR eliminates cat colonies, and 18% disagreed with the statement that feral cats filled the role of native predators. Only 6% of CCCs believed feral cats carried diseases. To the extent the beliefs held by CCCs are rooted in lack of knowledge and mistrust, rather than denial of directly observable phenomenon, the conservation community can manage these conflicts more productively by bringing CCCs into the process of defining data collection methods, defining study/management locations, and identifying common goals related to caring for animals.

  3. Opinions from the Front Lines of Cat Colony Management Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, M. Nils; Hartis, Brett; Rodriguez, Shari; Green, Matthew; Lepczyk, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    Outdoor cats represent a global threat to terrestrial vertebrate conservation, but management has been rife with conflict due to differences in views of the problem and appropriate responses to it. To evaluate these differences we conducted a survey of opinions about outdoor cats and their management with two contrasting stakeholder groups, cat colony caretakers (CCCs) and bird conservation professionals (BCPs) across the United States. Group opinions were polarized, for both normative statements (CCCs supported treating feral cats as protected wildlife and using trap neuter and release [TNR] and BCPs supported treating feral cats as pests and using euthanasia) and empirical statements. Opinions also were related to gender, age, and education, with females and older respondents being less likely than their counterparts to support treating feral cats as pests, and females being less likely than males to support euthanasia. Most CCCs held false beliefs about the impacts of feral cats on wildlife and the impacts of TNR (e.g., 9% believed feral cats harmed bird populations, 70% believed TNR eliminates cat colonies, and 18% disagreed with the statement that feral cats filled the role of native predators). Only 6% of CCCs believed feral cats carried diseases. To the extent the beliefs held by CCCs are rooted in lack of knowledge and mistrust, rather than denial of directly observable phenomenon, the conservation community can manage these conflicts more productively by bringing CCCs into the process of defining data collection methods, defining study/management locations, and identifying common goals related to caring for animals. PMID:22970269

  4. Opinions from the front lines of cat colony management conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, M Nils; Hartis, Brett; Rodriguez, Shari; Green, Matthew; Lepczyk, Christopher A

    2012-01-01

    Outdoor cats represent a global threat to terrestrial vertebrate conservation, but management has been rife with conflict due to differences in views of the problem and appropriate responses to it. To evaluate these differences we conducted a survey of opinions about outdoor cats and their management with two contrasting stakeholder groups, cat colony caretakers (CCCs) and bird conservation professionals (BCPs) across the United States. Group opinions were polarized, for both normative statements (CCCs supported treating feral cats as protected wildlife and using trap neuter and release [TNR] and BCPs supported treating feral cats as pests and using euthanasia) and empirical statements. Opinions also were related to gender, age, and education, with females and older respondents being less likely than their counterparts to support treating feral cats as pests, and females being less likely than males to support euthanasia. Most CCCs held false beliefs about the impacts of feral cats on wildlife and the impacts of TNR (e.g., 9% believed feral cats harmed bird populations, 70% believed TNR eliminates cat colonies, and 18% disagreed with the statement that feral cats filled the role of native predators). Only 6% of CCCs believed feral cats carried diseases. To the extent the beliefs held by CCCs are rooted in lack of knowledge and mistrust, rather than denial of directly observable phenomenon, the conservation community can manage these conflicts more productively by bringing CCCs into the process of defining data collection methods, defining study/management locations, and identifying common goals related to caring for animals.

  5. Effects of metric hierarchy and rhyme predictability on word duration in The Cat in the Hat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Mara

    2018-05-01

    Word durations convey many types of linguistic information, including intrinsic lexical features like length and frequency and contextual features like syntactic and semantic structure. The current study was designed to investigate whether hierarchical metric structure and rhyme predictability account for durational variation over and above other features in productions of a rhyming, metrically-regular children's book: The Cat in the Hat (Dr. Seuss, 1957). One-syllable word durations and inter-onset intervals were modeled as functions of segment number, lexical frequency, word class, syntactic structure, repetition, and font emphasis. Consistent with prior work, factors predicting longer word durations and inter-onset intervals included more phonemes, lower frequency, first mention, alignment with a syntactic boundary, and capitalization. A model parameter corresponding to metric grid height improved model fit of word durations and inter-onset intervals. Specifically, speakers realized five levels of metric hierarchy with inter-onset intervals such that interval duration increased linearly with increased height in the metric hierarchy. Conversely, speakers realized only three levels of metric hierarchy with word duration, demonstrating that they shortened the highly predictable rhyme resolutions. These results further understanding of the factors that affect spoken word duration, and demonstrate the myriad cues that children receive about linguistic structure from nursery rhymes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The tsunami phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röbke, B. R.; Vött, A.

    2017-12-01

    With human activity increasingly concentrating on coasts, tsunamis (from Japanese tsu = harbour, nami = wave) are a major natural hazard to today's society. Stimulated by disastrous tsunami impacts in recent years, for instance in south-east Asia (2004) or in Japan (2011), tsunami science has significantly flourished, which has brought great advances in hazard assessment and mitigation plans. Based on tsunami research of the last decades, this paper provides a thorough treatise on the tsunami phenomenon from a geoscientific point of view. Starting with the wave features, tsunamis are introduced as long shallow water waves or wave trains crossing entire oceans without major energy loss. At the coast, tsunamis typically show wave shoaling, funnelling and resonance effects as well as a significant run-up and backflow. Tsunami waves are caused by a sudden displacement of the water column due to a number of various trigger mechanisms. Such are earthquakes as the main trigger, submarine and subaerial mass wastings, volcanic activity, atmospheric disturbances (meteotsunamis) and cosmic impacts, as is demonstrated by giving corresponding examples from the past. Tsunamis are known to have a significant sedimentary and geomorphological off- and onshore response. So-called tsunamites form allochthonous high-energy deposits that are left at the coast during tsunami landfall. Tsunami deposits show typical sedimentary features, as basal erosional unconformities, fining-upward and -landward, a high content of marine fossils, rip-up clasts from underlying units and mud caps, all reflecting the hydrodynamic processes during inundation. The on- and offshore behaviour of tsunamis and related sedimentary processes can be simulated using hydro- and morphodynamic numerical models. The paper provides an overview of the basic tsunami modelling techniques, including discretisation, guidelines for appropriate temporal and spatial resolution as well as the nesting method. Furthermore, the

  7. Radio-iodine treatment of hyperthyroid cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, B.R.; Cayzer, J.; Dillon, E.A.; Smidt, K.P.

    1991-01-01

    Thirty-two elderly domestic shorthaired cats (mean age 12.9 years) were treated with radioiodine (131I). The dose of 131I administered ranged from 39 mBq to 134 mBq. Twenty-eight cats became euthyroid after treatment, one became hypothyroid and three remained hyperthyroxaemic. Two of the hyperthyroxaemic cats were successfully re-treated with 131I. Five cats died from concurrent diseases within one year of treatment. The administration of a dose of 131I selected by assessing the severity of the clinical signs, the size of the thyroid gland(s) and the serum level of thyroxine was an effective treatment for hyperthyroidism

  8. Effect of water content in a canned food on voluntary food intake and body weight in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Alfreda; Fascetti, Andrea J; Villaverde, Cecilia; Wong, Raymond K; Ramsey, Jon J

    2011-07-01

    To determine whether water content in a canned food diet induces decreases in voluntary energy intake (EI) or body weight (BW) in cats fed ad libitum. 16 sexually intact male domestic shorthair cats. Maintenance EI was determined for 2 months in 10 weight-stable cats consuming a control diet (typical colony diet). Cats were allocated into 2 groups of equal BW and fed a canned diet (with-water [WW] diet) or a freeze-dried version of the canned diet (low-water [LW] diet) twice daily. Diets were identical in nutrient profile on a dry-matter basis. Each dietary treatment period of the crossover experiment lasted 3 weeks, with a 3-week washout period between diets. Body composition measurements were determined by use of deuterium oxide at the end of each dietary treatment. Daily food intake was measured for determination of dry-matter intake and EI. Six other cats were used in preference tests for the 3 diets. EI was significantly decreased for the WW diet (mean ± SD, 1,053.0 ± 274.9 kJ/d), compared with EI for the LW diet (1,413.8 ± 345.8 kJ/d). Cats had a significant decrease in BW during consumption of the WW diet. Body composition was unaltered by diet. In short-term preference tests, cats ate significantly more of the WW than the LW diet. Bulk water in the WW diet stimulated decreases in EI and BW in cats. The impact of water content on energy density and food consumption may help promote weight loss in cats.

  9. Born to roam? Surveying cat owners in Tasmania, Australia, to identify the drivers and barriers to cat containment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Lynette J; Hine, Donald W; Bengsen, Andrew J

    2015-12-01

    Free-roaming domestic cats, Felis catus, are a major public nuisance in neighbourhoods across the world, and have been linked to biodiversity loss and a host of community health problems. Owners who let their cats roam, also place their cats at risk of serious injury. One management strategy that is gaining considerable support involves encouraging cat owners to contain their pets within their property. Contemporary behaviour change models highlight the importance of identifying drivers and barriers that encourage and discourage target behaviours such as cat containment. Results from a random dial phone survey of 356 cat owners in northern Tasmania identified four distinct cat containment profiles: owners who contained their cat all the time, owners who only contained their cat at night, owners who sporadically contained their cat with no set routine, and owners who made no attempt to contain their pet. Our results indicated that cat-owners' decisions to contain or not contain their cats were guided by a range of factors including owners' beliefs about their ability to implement an effective containment strategy and their views about the physical and psychological needs of their cats. The results are discussed in terms of improving the behavioural effectiveness of cat containment interventions by selecting appropriate behavioural change tools for the identified drivers and barriers, and developing targeted engagement strategies and messaging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Discospondylitis in a cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, E.; Roberts, R.E.

    1993-01-01

    The incidence and causative agents of discospondylitis in cats are unknown. This report describes a cat with radiologic changes consistent with discospondylitis and concurrent urinary tract infection. As in dogs, discospondylitis should be the primary rule out for vertebral end plate lysis in cats

  11. WORKPLACE HARASSMENT. MOBBING PHENOMENON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Ezer

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Moral harassment at the workplace has become in the last period a very often met phenomenon that severely affects the work relations and represents a significant health and safety danger. This problem has become in the last period an important issue for the European Union which has initiated a series of studie for analyzing the consequences of this pehenomenon on the normal process of the work relations, that has lead, in its turn to an awareness of this new dimenion of harassment between the employees at the internal level.

  12. Birds be safe: Can a novel cat collar reduce avian mortality by domestic cats (Felis catus?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.K. Willson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The domestic cat (Felis catus has been described as the largest anthropogenic threat to songbird populations in North America. We examined the effectiveness of a novel cat collar in reducing avian and small mammal mortality by cats. The 2-inch wide Birdsbesafe® collar cover (CC is worn over a nylon quick-release collar, and the bright colors and patterns of the CC are hypothesized to warn birds of approaching cats. We conducted two seasonal trials, each lasting 12 weeks, in autumn 2013 (n=54 cats and spring 2014 (n=19 cats. Cats were randomly assigned to two groups, and CCs with interior collars were removed or put on every two weeks, to control for weather fluctuations and seasonal change. Cats wearing Birdsbesafe® CCs killed 19 times fewer birds than uncollared cats in the spring trial, and 3.4 times fewer birds in the fall. Birdsbesafe® CCs were extremely effective at reducing predation on birds. Small mammal data were less clear, but did decrease predation by half in the fall. The Birdsbesafe® CC is a highly effective device for decreasing bird predation, especially in the spring season. We suggest that the CCs be used as a conservation tool for owned as well as feral cats.

  13. An Ecological Approach to Learning with Technology: Responding to Tensions within the "Wow-Effect" Phenomenon in Teaching Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herro, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    This review explores Anne Kamstrupp's "The Wow-effect in Science Teacher Education" by examining her theorized "wow-effect" as a teaching enactment that may serve to engage students, but often fails to provide deep understanding of science content. My response extends her perspective of socio-materiality as means to understand…

  14. Is the COPD assessment test (CAT) effective in demonstrating the systemic inflammation and other components in COPD?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarioglu, N; Hismiogullari, A A; Bilen, C; Erel, F

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is currently a complex, multicomponent disorder. The COPD Assessment Test (CAT) has been increasingly used to assess COPD patients. This study aims to investigate the relationship between CAT and inflammation markers and other COPD components. We enrolled 110 stable COPD patients and 65 control subjects in this study. All patients completed the CAT questionnaire and the modified Medical Research Council (mMRC) dispnea scale. The quality of life of these patients was measured with St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ). Levels of TNFα, IL-6, CRP were determined in blood samples. In COPD patients, serum levels of TNFα (109.5 ± 58 pg/ml), IL-6 (10.3 ± 18 pg/ml), and C-reactive protein (CRP) (1.6 ± 1.7 mg/L) were found to be significantly higher compared to controls (TNF-α: 14.6 ± 18 pg/ml, IL-6: 2.14 ± 1.9 pg/ml, CRP: 0.4 ± 0.3mg/L, pCAT score correlated with GOLD spirometric stages, mMRC dyspnea score, number of exacerbations in the previous year and FEV1 (pCAT score (r=0.43, pCAT was observed. Systemic inflammation persists in the stable period of COPD. CRP, one of the inflammation markers, was correlated with the CAT. Further studies are required to confirm the relationship between CAT and biomarkers. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Portuguesa de Pneumologia. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Quantum Computer Games: Schrodinger Cat and Hounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

    2012-01-01

    The quantum computer game "Schrodinger cat and hounds" is the quantum extension of the well-known classical game fox and hounds. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. "Schrodinger cat and hounds" demonstrates the effects of superposition, destructive and constructive interference, measurements and…

  16. Ageing, immunosenescence and inflammageing in the dog and cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, M J

    2010-01-01

    Improvements in veterinary healthcare over recent decades mean that we now have a significant population of geriatric small companion animals. The design of optimum nutritional and vaccination programmes for these aged animals must be underpinned by knowledge of the physiological changes that occur in later life. It is clear that older dogs and cats are affected by the process of immunosenescence and that similar changes occur in these species to those documented in elderly people. The most consistent findings of recent investigations indicate impairment of cell-mediated immune function with age. Senior dogs and cats are generally shown to have reduced blood CD4(+) T cells (with imbalance in Th1 versus Th2 functional activity), elevation in the CD8(+) subset and reduction in the CD4:CD8 ratio. The ability of blood lymphocytes to respond to stimulation by mitogens decreases, as does the cutaneous delayed type hypersensitivity response. By contrast, there is relative preservation of the ability to mount humoral immune responses. Serum and salivary immunoglobulin (Ig)A production increases and IgG concentration remains unaltered with age. Elderly animals generally have persisting vaccinal antibody titres at protective level and respond to booster vaccination with elevation in titre. Older dogs and cats are able to make primary humoral responses to novel antigens, but the magnitude of these may be reduced relative to titres achieved in younger animals. Fewer investigations have studied the phenomenon of 'inflammageing' (the effect of cumulative antigenic exposure and onset of late life inflammatory disease) in these species. Senior cats have increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by blood monocytes, but this effect has not been demonstrated with cells derived from older dogs. Numerous studies have investigated whether canine and feline immunosenescence might be slowed or reversed by dietary supplementation with antioxidants, but no significant research has

  17. Harmful Algal Blooms in Asia: an insidious and escalating water pollution phenomenon with effects on ecological and human health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia M Glibert

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs, those proliferations of algae that causeenvironmental, economic, or human health problems, are increasing in frequency,duration, and geographic extent due to nutrient pollution. The scale of the HABproblem in Asia has escalated in recent decades in parallel with the increase in useof agricultural fertilizer, the development of aquaculture, and a growing population.Three examples, all from China but illustrative of the diversity of events and theirecological, economic, and human health effects throughout Asia, are highlightedhere. These examples include inland (Lake Tai or Taihu as well as offshore (EastChina Sea and Yellow Sea waters. The future outlook for controlling these bloomsis bleak. The effects of advancing industrialized agriculture and a continually growingpopulation will continue to result in more nutrient pollution and more HABs—-and more effects - in the foreseeable future.

  18. The Effect of Chinese rhubarb, Rheum officinale, with and without benazepril on the progression of naturally occurring chronic kidney disease in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanzlicek, A S; Roof, C J; Sanderson, M W; Grauer, G F

    2014-01-01

    Renal fibrosis is common in progressive kidney disease. Transforming growth factors β (TGF-β) are important mediators of all types of fibrosis, including renal fibrosis. Chinese rhubarb has been shown to have antifibrotic properties in part because of inhibition of TGF-β and has slowed the progression of kidney disease in rodent models. That administration of a Chinese rhubarb supplement will slow the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in cats and the concurrent administration of Chinese rhubarb and benazepril will be more effective than either alone. Twenty-nine client-owned cats with naturally occurring IRIS Stage 2 or early Stage 3 CKD and without comorbidity such as cancer, urinary tract obstruction, urinary tract infection, poorly controlled hyperthyroidism, or systemic hypertension were enrolled in the study. A randomized, positive-controlled, prospective study was performed. Cats received Chinese rhubarb, benazepril, or both in addition to standard treatment for CKD. Repeated measures ANOVA was used to assess changes in serum creatinine concentration, body weight, hematocrit, urine protein: urine creatinine ratio (UPC), and systemic arterial blood pressure over time between and within treatment groups over an average of 22 months. No significant differences were detected in serum creatinine concentration, body weight, hematocrit, UPC, and systemic arterial pressure over time between or within treatment groups. This study failed to detect a significant difference in the progression of CKD in cats treated with Chinese rhubarb, benazepril, or both. Further study in specific subsets of cats with CKD is warranted. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  19. The statistical stability phenomenon

    CERN Document Server

    Gorban, Igor I

    2017-01-01

    This monograph investigates violations of statistical stability of physical events, variables, and processes and develops a new physical-mathematical theory taking into consideration such violations – the theory of hyper-random phenomena. There are five parts. The first describes the phenomenon of statistical stability and its features, and develops methods for detecting violations of statistical stability, in particular when data is limited. The second part presents several examples of real processes of different physical nature and demonstrates the violation of statistical stability over broad observation intervals. The third part outlines the mathematical foundations of the theory of hyper-random phenomena, while the fourth develops the foundations of the mathematical analysis of divergent and many-valued functions. The fifth part contains theoretical and experimental studies of statistical laws where there is violation of statistical stability. The monograph should be of particular interest to engineers...

  20. Negative Effects of Reward on Intrinsic Motivation--A Limited Phenomenon: Comment on Deci, Koestner, and Ryan (2001).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Judy

    2001-01-01

    Prior meta analyses by J. Cameron and other researchers suggested that the negative effects of extrinsic reward on intrinsic motivation were limited and avoidable. E. Deci and others (2001) suggested that the analyses were flawed. This commentary makes the case that there is no inherent negative property of reward. (SLD)

  1. The Effect of the Microstructure on Trap-Assisted Recombination and Light Soaking Phenomenon in Hybrid Perovskite Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shao, Shuyan; Abdu-Aguye, Mustapha; Sherkar, Tejas S.; Fang, Hong-Hua; Adjokatse, Sampson; ten Brink, Gert; Kooi, Bart J.; Koster, L. Jan Anton; Loi, Maria Antonietta

    2016-01-01

    Despite the rich experience gained in controlling the microstructure of perovskite films over the past several years, little is known about how the microstructure affects the device properties of perovskite solar cells (HPSCs). In this work, the effects of the perovskite film microstructure on the

  2. Effect of heartworm disease and heartworm-associated respiratory disease (HARD) on the right ventricle of cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Randolph L; Ray Dillon, A; Cattley, Russell C; Blagburn, Byron L; Michael Tillson, D; Johnson, Calvin M; Brawner, William R; Welles, Elizabeth G; Barney, Sharon

    2017-11-09

    Dirofilaria immitis infection occurs in dogs and cats, both of which species are clinically affected by mature adult infections. Cats are uniquely affected by immature-adult infections with an inflammatory pulmonary disease called Heartworm-Associated Respiratory Disease (HARD). D. immitis infection causes pulmonary parenchymal and vascular pathology in the dog and cat. Dogs develop pulmonary hypertension and cor pulmonale, whereas the development of pulmonary hypertension is rare in the cat. D. immitis infection in the dog causes alteration of the right ventricular (RV) extracellular matrix, including a decrease in myocardial collagen. In this study, the RV myocardial changes of cats infected with adult and immature-adult D. immitis were assessed. The cardiopulmonary systems of six groups of SPF cats (n = 9-10 per group) were examined 8 or 18 months after infection with L3 D. immitis. Two groups were untreated and allowed to develop adult HW; two groups were treated with ivermectin starting 3 months post infection, thus allowing HARD but no mature adult heartworms; and two groups were treated with selamectin beginning 1 month post infection, preventing development of L5 or adult heartworms. A group of specific pathogen free (SPF) normal cats was utilized as a negative control (n = 12). Lung pathologic lesions were objectively assessed, and both RV and left ventricular (LV) weights were obtained to calculate an RV/LV ratio. Intramural RV myocardial collagen content was quantitatively assessed. RV/LV weight ratios were not different between groups. Negative control cats had significantly greater RV collagen content than all other affected groups (P = 0.032). Analysis of the RV/LV ratios and collagen content revealed no significant relationship (r = 0.03, P = 0.723, respectively). Collagen content had a modest, but significant, negative correlation, however, with both pulmonary vascular pathology (r = -0.25, P = 0.032) as well as the total pulmonary

  3. [Effect of stimulation of GABA-ergic structures of the substantia nigra and caudate nucleus on food-getting behavior in the cat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shugalev, N P

    1983-01-01

    A study was made of the functional significance of GABA-ergic structures of the substantia nigra (SN) and the caudate nucleus (CN) and their role in food-procuring behaviour of cats. Analysis was made of behavioral and EEG-effects of local GABA and the GABA antagonist, picrotoxin, microinjections into the studied brain structures. Stimulation of the GABA-ergic structures of the SN produced a sedative effect and depression of the cat food-procuring behaviour. Effects of stimulation of the CN GABA-ergic structures were to a great degree reverse. The conclusion has been made that GABA-ergic structures of the SN and the CN play different roles in controlling the CN inhibitory influence upon food-procuring behaviour.

  4. Sensitivity analysis on the interfacial drag in SPACE code to simulate UPTF separate effect test about loop seal clearance phenomenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sukho; Lim, Sanggyu; You, Gukjong; Park, Youngsheop [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company, Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The nuclear thermal hydraulic system code known as SPACE (Safety and Performance Analysis CodE) was developed and its V and V (Verification and Validation) have been conducted using well-known SETs (Separate Effect Tests) and IETs (Integral Effect Tests). At the same time, the SBLOCA (Small Break Loss of Coolant Accident) methodology in accordance with Appendix K of 10CFR50 for the APR1400 (Advanced Power Reactor 1400) was developed and applied to regulatory body for licensing in 2013. Especially, the SBLOCA methodology developed using SPACE v2.14 code adopts inherent test matrix independent of V and V test to show its conservatism for important phenomena. In this paper, the predictability of SPACE code for UPTF (Upper Plenum Test Facility) test simulating loop seal clearance of SBLOCA important phenomena and the related sensitivity analysis are introduced.

  5. Flat-roof phenomenon of dynamic equilibrium phase in the negative bias temperature instability effect on a power MOSFET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yue; Zhuo Qing-Qing; Liu Hong-Xia; Ma Xiao-Hua; Hao Yue

    2014-01-01

    The effect of the static negative bias temperature (NBT) stress on a p-channel power metal—oxide—semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) is investigated by experiment and simulation. The time evolution of the negative bias temperature instability (NBTI) degradation has the trend predicted by the reaction—diffusion (R—D) model but with an exaggerated time scale. The phenomena of the flat-roof section are observed under various stress conditions, which can be considered as the dynamic equilibrium phase in the R—D process. Based on the simulated results, the variation of the flat-roof section with the stress condition can be explained. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  6. Modeling the effect of the stress demagnetization phenomenon on the magnetic properties in a no Fe-Si 3% sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakhlef Malika

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is the modeling of the stress demagnetization effect on the magnetic properties in a non-oriented Fe-Si 3% sheet under different external stresses. The magneto-mechanical model used for magnetic hysteresis is based on a model originally formulated by Sablik-Jiles-Atherthon (S.J.A.. This latter has been modified by including both the stress demagnetization factor and the eddy current effects. The influence of the stress demagnetization term SDT on the magnetostrictive behavior of the material is also modeled. The proposed model has been validated by extensive simulations at different stresses, namely compressive and tensile stresses. Simulation results obtained by this model are very close to those published in the literature. Using the proposed model, very satisfactory performance has been achieved.

  7. The beneficial effects of exercise in rodents are preserved after detraining: a phenomenon unrelated to GLUT4 expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Angelis Kátia

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although exercise training has well-known cardiorespiratory and metabolic benefits, low compliance with exercise training programs is a fact, and the harmful effects of physical detraining regarding these adaptations usually go unnoticed. We investigated the effects of exercise detraining on blood pressure, insulin sensitivity, and GLUT4 expression in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR and normotensive Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY. Methods Studied animals were randomized into sedentary, trained (treadmill running/5 days a week, 60 min/day for 10 weeks, 1 week of detraining, and 2 weeks of detraining. Blood pressure (tail-cuff system, insulin sensitivity (kITT, and GLUT4 (Western blot in heart, gastrocnemius and white fat tissue were measured. Results Exercise training reduced blood pressure (19%, improved insulin sensitivity (24%, and increased GLUT4 in the heart (+34%; gastrocnemius (+36% and fat (+22% in SHR. In WKY no change in either blood pressure or insulin sensitivity were observed, but there was an increase in GLUT4 in the heart (+25%, gastrocnemius (+45% and fat (+36% induced by training. Both periods of detraining did not induce any change in neither blood pressure nor insulin sensitivity in SHR and WKY. One-week detraining reduced GLUT4 in SHR (heart: -28%; fat: -23% and WKY (heart: -19%; fat: -22%; GLUT4 in the gastrocnemius was reduced after a 2-week detraining (SHR: -35%; WKY: -25%. There was a positive correlation between GLUT4 (gastrocnemius and the maximal velocity in the exercise test (r = 0.60, p = 0.004. Conclusions The study findings show that in detraining, despite reversion of the enhanced GLUT4 expression, cardiorespiratory and metabolic beneficial effects of exercise are preserved.

  8. New nonlinear optical effect: self-reflection phenomenon due to exciton-biexciton-light interaction in semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadzhi, P. I.; Lyakhomskaya, K. D.; Nadkin, L. Y.; Markov, D. A.

    2002-05-01

    The characteristic peculiarities of the self-reflection of a strong electromagnetic wave in a system of coherent excitons and biexcitons due to the exciton-photon interaction and optical exciton-biexciton conversion in semiconductors were investigated as one of the manifestations of nonlinear optical Stark-effect. It was found that a monotonously decreasing standing wave with an exponential decreasing spatial tail is formed in the semiconductor. Under the action of the field of a strong pulse, an optically homogeneous medium is converted, into the medium with distributed feedback. The appearance of the spatially separated narrow pears of the reflective index, extinction and reflection coefficients is predicted.

  9. Surrenderers’ Relationships with Cats Admitted to Four Australian Animal Shelters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Zito

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The surrender of cats to animal shelters results in financial, social and moral burdens for the community. Correlations of caretaking and interactions with surrendered cats were calculated, to understand more about humans’ relationships with surrendered cats and the contribution of semi-owned cats to shelter intakes. A questionnaire was used to collect detailed information about 100 surrenderers’ relationships with cats they surrendered to four animal shelters in Australia, with each surrenderer classifying themselves as being either the owner or a non-owner of the surrendered cat (ownership perception. Method of acquisition of the cat, association time, closeness of the relationship with the cat and degree of responsibility for the cat’s care were all associated with ownership perception. Many non-owners (59% fed and interacted with the cat they surrendered but rarely displayed other caretaking behaviours. However, most surrenderers of owned and unowned cats were attached to and felt responsible for the cat. Based on these results and other evidence, a causal model of ownership perception was proposed to provide a better understanding of factors influencing ownership perception. This model consisted of a set of variables proposed as directly or indirectly influencing ownership perception, with connecting arrows to indicate proposed causal relationships. Understanding ownership perception and the contribution of semi-owned cats to shelter intake is important as these can inform the development of more targeted and effective intervention strategies to reduce numbers of unwanted cats.

  10. The Joint Action Effect on Memory as a Social Phenomenon: The Role of Cued Attention and Psychological Distance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ullrich Wagner

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to individual tasks, a specific social setting is created when two partners work together on a task. How does such a social setting affect memory for task-related information? We addressed this issue in a distributed joint-action paradigm, where two team partners respond to different types of information within the same task. Previous work has shown that joint action in such a task enhances memory for items that are relevant to the partner’s task but not to the own task. By removing critical, non-social confounds, we wanted to pinpoint the social nature of this selective memory advantage. Specifically, we created joint task conditions in which participants were aware of the shared nature of the concurrent task but could not perceive sensory cues to the other’s responses. For a differentiated analysis of the social parameters, we also varied the distance between partners. We found that the joint action effect emerged even without sensory cues from the partner, and it declined with increasing distance between partners. These results support the notion that the joint-action effect on memory is in its core driven by the experience of social co-presence, and does not simply emerge as a by-product of partner-generated sensory cues.

  11. Resonance phenomenon in classical cepheids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuti, Mine; Aikawa, Toshiki

    1981-01-01

    To investigate resonance phenomenon in classical cepheids, the non-linear radial oscillation of stars is studied based on the assumption that the non-adiabatic perturbation is expressed in terms of van der Pol's type damping. Two- and three-wave resonance in this system is applied to classical cepheids to describe their bump and double-mode behavior. The phase of bump and the depression of amplitude are explained for bump cepheids. The double-periodicity is shown by the enhancement of the third overtone in three-wave resonance. Non-linear effect on resonant period is also discussed briefly. (author)

  12. Effect of soybean diet: Growth and conversion efficiencies of fingerling of stinging cat fish, Heteropneustes fossilis (Bloch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzzammil Iqbal Siddiqui

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Replacement of 15% protein from soybean meal in Diet II was feasible for the stinging cat fish, Heteropneustes fossilis and no significant differences in growth parameters were found in fish fed soybean meal-based diets compared to those fed control diet (Diet I. Live weight gain percent (165% obtained in fish fed soybean meal based diet was not significantly different to that achieved (171% in fish fed Diet I. Specific growth rate percent, SGR (2.79%, feed conversion ratio FCR (1.40 and protein efficiency ratio PER (1.79 recorded in fish fed Diet II were also more less comparable to those fed control diet. Mortality was not recorded in the period of the feeding trial. Body composition of the fish fed soybean meal based diet (Diet II was also comparable to that fed control diet. Significantly higher fat content was noted in fish fed Diet II. However, the protein contents were not changed in fish fed Diet I and II. Similarly, no significant differences (P > 0.05 in protein productive value were noted between the two groups. However, ash content differed significantly (P < 0.05 in fish fed Diet I and II. Although soybean meal-based diet depressed growth and feed conversion efficiencies of the fish to some extent, inclusion of soybean meal was found to be cost-effective alternative to fish meal.

  13. Multicomponent DFT study of geometrical H/D isotope effect on hydrogen-bonded organic conductor, κ-H3(Cat EDT-ST)2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kaichi; Kanematsu, Yusuke; Nagashima, Umpei; Ueda, Akira; Mori, Hatsumi; Tachikawa, Masanori

    2017-04-01

    We theoretically investigated a significant contraction of the hydrogen-bonding O⋯O distance upon H/D substitution in our recently developed purely organic crystals, κ-H3(Cat-EDT-ST)2 (H-ST) and its isotopologue κ-D3(Cat-EDT-ST)2 (D-ST), having π-electron systems coupled with hydrogen-bonding fluctuation. The origin of this geometrical H/D isotope effect was elucidated by using the multicomponent DFT method, which takes the H/D nuclear quantum effect into account. The optimized O⋯O distance in H-ST was found to be longer than that in D-ST due to the anharmonicity of the potential energy curve along the Osbnd H bond direction, which was in reasonable agreement with the experimental trend.

  14. Effects of urinary bladder distention on location of the urinary bladder and urethra of healthy dogs and cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, G.R.; Osborne, C.A.; Jessen, C.R.; Feeney, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    Evaluation of the anatomic location of the distended and empty urinary bladders and urethras of healthy adult male and female dogs and cats by retrograde urethrocystography revealed substantial variations. In 15 dogs in lateral recumbency with empty bladder lumens, the caudal portion of the urinary bladder was within the pelvic canal in 5 of 7 male and 5 of 8 female dogs. In female dogs examined in ventrodorsal recumbency, only 4 of 8 had the empty urinary bladders in part within the pelvic canal. After luminal distention, 3 of 7 male and 3 of 8 female dogs, while in lateral recumbency, had the urinary bladders in part intrapelvically. However, when female dogs were placed in ventrodorsal recumbency, only 1 of 7 urinary bladders was in part within the pelvis. The urinary bladders of 14 cats were consistently within the abdominal cavity, irrespective of whether the bladder lumen was distended or empty. Urethral flexures occurred in dogs with intrapelvic bladders that were distended or empty. Urethral flexures were not found in cats. The urethras of dogs and cats in lateral recumbency were generally closer to the floor of the pelvis after urinary bladder distention than when the bladder was empty. The urethra of the dogs and cats in ventrodorsal recumbency was to the left or right of or on the midsagittal plane, whether the urinary bladder was empty or distended. A greater degree of lateral displacement was encountered in ventrodorsal recumbency after urinary bladder distention

  15. The crossed phrenic phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghali, Michael George Zaki

    2017-06-01

    The cervical spine is the most common site of traumatic vertebral column injuries. Respiratory insufficiency constitutes a significant proportion of the morbidity burden and is the most common cause of mortality in these patients. In seeking to enhance our capacity to treat specifically the respiratory dysfunction following spinal cord injury, investigators have studied the "crossed phrenic phenomenon", wherein contraction of a hemidiaphragm paralyzed by a complete hemisection of the ipsilateral cervical spinal cord above the phrenic nucleus can be induced by respiratory stressors and recovers spontaneously over time. Strengthening of latent contralateral projections to the phrenic nucleus and sprouting of new descending axons have been proposed as mechanisms contributing to the observed recovery. We have recently demonstrated recovery of spontaneous crossed phrenic activity occurring over minutes to hours in C 1 -hemisected unanesthetized decerebrate rats. The specific neurochemical and molecular pathways underlying crossed phrenic activity following injury require further clarification. A thorough understanding of these is necessary in order to develop targeted therapies for respiratory neurorehabilitation following spinal trauma. Animal studies provide preliminary evidence for the utility of neuropharmacological manipulation of serotonergic and adenosinergic pathways, nerve grafts, olfactory ensheathing cells, intraspinal microstimulation and a possible role for dorsal rhizotomy in recovering phrenic activity following spinal cord injury.

  16. Color anomaly and flavor-singlet axial charge of the proton in the chiral bag: the Cheshire Cat revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rho, M.; Vento, V.

    1997-01-01

    Quantum effects inside the chiral bag induce a color anomaly which requires a compensating surface term to prevent breakdown of color gauge invariance. We show that the presence of this surface term first discovered several years ago allows one to derive in a gauge-invariant way a chiral-bag version of the Shore-Veneziano two-component formula for the flavor-singlet axial charge of the proton. This has relevance to what is referred to as the ''proton spin problem'' on the one hand and to the Cheshire-Cat phenomenon in hadron structure on the other. We show that when calculated to the leading order in the color gauge coupling and for a specific color electric monopole configuration in the bag, one can obtain a striking Cheshire-Cat phenomenon with a negligibly small singlet axial charge. (orig.)

  17. Effects of storage time and temperature on pH, specific gravity, and crystal formation in urine samples from dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albasan, Hasan; Lulich, Jody P; Osborne, Carl A; Lekcharoensuk, Chalermpol; Ulrich, Lisa K; Carpenter, Kathleen A

    2003-01-15

    To determine effects of storage temperature and time on pH and specific gravity of and number and size of crystals in urine samples from dogs and cats. Randomized complete block design. 31 dogs and 8 cats. Aliquots of each urine sample were analyzed within 60 minutes of collection or after storage at room or refrigeration temperatures (20 vs 6 degrees C [68 vs 43 degrees F]) for 6 or 24 hours. Crystals formed in samples from 11 of 39 (28%) animals. Calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals formed in vitro in samples from 1 cat and 8 dogs. Magnesium ammonium phosphate (MAP) crystals formed in vitro in samples from 2 dogs. Compared with aliquots stored at room temperature, refrigeration increased the number and size of crystals that formed in vitro; however, the increase in number and size of MAP crystals in stored urine samples was not significant. Increased storage time and decreased storage temperature were associated with a significant increase in number of CaOx crystals formed. Greater numbers of crystals formed in urine aliquots stored for 24 hours than in aliquots stored for 6 hours. Storage time and temperature did not have a significant effect on pH or specific gravity. Urine samples should be analyzed within 60 minutes of collection to minimize temperature- and time-dependent effects on in vitro crystal formation. Presence of crystals observed in stored samples should be validated by reevaluation of fresh urine.

  18. A review of CCFL phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Issa, S.; Macian, R.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → CCFL mechanisms, correlations, parameters and related variables were reviewed extensively. → Consideration of geometrical effects is crucial for meaningful comparison and review. → Differentiation between 'onset of CCFL' and 'deflooding/partial delivery' data is required. → Following 2+3, new correlations for onset of CCFL according to liquid velocity ranges were suggested. → Large number of correlations was compared against large data bank that considers points 2+3. - Abstract: Counter current flow limitation CCFL is an important phenomenon for numerous engineering applications and safety of light water reactors. In particular, the possible occurrence of CCFL in the hot-leg of a PWR during SBLOCA or LOCA accidents is of special interest for nuclear safety research. A review of the related literature has made in order to present the most important studies about the phenomenon and to reach common general understanding of the different factors that govern CCFL. Eventually this will allow explaining contradictions among different explanations provided by different authors. Most important factors were geometrical characteristics, liquid superficial velocity, and physical properties. The review shows that despite numerous experimental works, many scaling and geometrical effects are still not fully understood. For Instance there exist no consistent explanation of the channel diameter and inclined riser length effect upon results. The same can be stated-though to a minimum extent - for the inclination angle while channel length (or channel to diameter ratio) effect was clear and consistent. Since most experimental work was done in down-scaled hot-leg simulators, it becomes interesting to build a coherent knowledge about these effects and to explain arising contradictions in order to safely extrapolate results to full-scale hot-leg. The review has shown that many differences were simply due to geometrical effects, this leads to the need to

  19. Higgs CAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passarino, Giampiero [Universita di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica Teorica, Turin (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Torino, Turin (Italy)

    2014-05-15

    Higgs Computed Axial Tomography, an excerpt. The Higgs boson lineshape (..and the devil hath power to assume a pleasing shape, Hamlet, Act II, scene 2) is analyzed for the gg → ZZ process, with special emphasis on the off-shell tail which shows up for large values of the Higgs virtuality. The effect of including background and interference is also discussed. The main focus of this work is on residual theoretical uncertainties, discussing how much-improved constraint on the Higgs intrinsic width can be revealed by an improved approach to analysis. (orig.)

  20. Higgs CAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passarino, Giampiero

    2014-01-01

    Higgs Computed Axial Tomography, an excerpt. The Higgs boson lineshape (..and the devil hath power to assume a pleasing shape, Hamlet, Act II, scene 2) is analyzed for the gg → ZZ process, with special emphasis on the off-shell tail which shows up for large values of the Higgs virtuality. The effect of including background and interference is also discussed. The main focus of this work is on residual theoretical uncertainties, discussing how much-improved constraint on the Higgs intrinsic width can be revealed by an improved approach to analysis. (orig.)

  1. A tortoiseshell male cat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A. S.; Berg, Lise Charlotte; Almstrup, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    Tortoiseshell coat color is normally restricted to female cats due to X-linkage of the gene that encodes the orange coat color. Tortoiseshell male cats do, however, occur at a low frequency among tortoiseshell cats because of chromosome aberrations similar to the Klinefelter syndrome in man...... tissue from a tortoiseshell male cat referred to us. Chromosome analysis using RBA-banding consistently revealed a 39,XXY karyotype. Histological examinations of testis biopsies from this cat showed degeneration of the tubules, hyperplasia of the interstitial tissue, and complete loss of germ cells....... Immunostaining using anti-vimentin and anti-VASA (DDX4) showed that only Sertoli cells and no germ cells were observed in the testicular tubules. As no sign of spermatogenesis was detected, we conclude that this is a classic case of a sterile, male tortoiseshell cat with a 39,XXY chromosome complement. © 2013 S...

  2. Effect of aqueous fruit extract of Solanum macrocarpum Linn. on cat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of the extract on the gastrointestinal propulsion of charcoal meal for laxative effect and on blood pressure of albino rats at known concentrations were monitored. Also ... The study shows that the aqueous fruit extract of Solanum macrocarpum could be useful as a laxative and hypotensive agent. Keywords: ...

  3. Megaesophagus in two cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenig, M; Mahaffey, M B; Parnell, P G; Styles, M E

    1990-03-01

    Megaesophagus was diagnosed in 2 cats. Both had a history of regurgitation, and one was dyspneic. Radiography of the thorax and abdomen revealed generalized megaesophagus and gastric distention with gas. There was no esophageal motility during fluoroscopic observation. The prognosis for cats with megaesophagus is guarded. Although they may be satisfactory pets, cats with this condition should not be used for breeding because the condition is believed to be inherited through recessive genes.

  4. Raynaud’s phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Ingegnoli

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Raynaud’s phenomenon (RP is a vasospastic disorder characterized by episodic color changes of blanching, cyanosis, and hyperemia in response to cold and/or emotional stress. Although most typically noted in the fingers, the circulation of the toes, ears, nose and tongue is also frequently affected. Population studies have shown that RP in adults is more common in women than men, with prevalence estimates ranging from 4% to 30%. Geographic variations in the prevalence reflect differences in climate. RP may be a primary or a secondary process. LeRoy and Medsger suggested criteria for primary RP: symmetric attacks, the absence of tissue necrosis, ulceration or gangrene, the absence of a secondary cause, negative antinuclear antibodies, normal nailfold capillaroscopy and a normal erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Secondary RP is characterized by an age of onset of more than 30 years, painful and asymmetric attacks, ischemic skin lesions, positive autoautoantibodies, capillaroscopic abnormalities and/or clinical features suggestive of connective tissue diseases (CTDs. Among the CTDs, systemic sclerosis has the highest frequency of RP. Finding a cause for RP requires a knowledge of the patient’s occupational, smoking, drug history, physical examination, nailfold capillaroscopy, routine laboratory tests and autoantibodies. Furthermore, RP should be distinguished from acrocyanosis, a condition characterized by continuous cyanosis of the hands or feet that is aggravated by cold temperature. The most important instruction to the patient is abstinence from any smoking, offending drugs should be discontinued, and abrupt changes in temperature. If these measures are inadequate, calcium-channel blockers are the most widely used (nifedipine 30 mg up to 90 mg daily. Alternatively, sympatholytic agent (prazosin, angiotensin II -receptor type I antagonist (losartan, selective sertonin-reuptake inhibitor (fluoxetine may be useful. In the severe cases the role of

  5. The phenomenon of the switching of estrogen effects and joker function of glucose: similarities and relation to age-associated pathology and approaches to correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berstein, Lev M; Tsyrlina, Evgenia V; Vasilyev, Dmitry A; Poroshina, Tatjana E; Kovalenko, Rina G

    2005-12-01

    Estrogens and glucose are characterized by a myriad of functions that can be reduced to a small number of principal actions. In aging there is a simultaneous increase in the prevalence of diseases connected with estrogen deficiency as well as with estrogenic excess and associated with the phenomenon of the switching of estrogen effects (PSEE). Estrogens possess hormonal and genotoxic properties. An increase in genotoxic effect (isolated or combined with a decrease in hormonal effect) can influence the course of age-associated diseases that, contrary to the situation with adaptive hypersensitivity to estrogens, may become less favorable or more aggressive. Inductors of PSEE include smoking, irradiation, and aging. Yet with "glycemic load" and the endocrine effect of glucose (the stimulation of insulin secretion), reactive oxygen species are formed in multiple sites, including adipose tissue. The ratio between hormonal and genotoxic effects reflects a "joker" function of glucose and can be conditioned by endogenous (perhaps including genetic) and exogenous factors. The shift in this glucose-associated ratio may selectively encourage some chronic non-communicable diseases. Several groups of treatments can be distinguished including alleviators of PSEE and insulin resistance syndrome (biguanides, glitazones, statins, modifiers of adipocytokines secretion, etc.) as well as other compounds aimed to optimally orchestrate the balance between endocrine and DNA-damaging effects of estrogens and glucose.

  6. Comparative Study of the Effects of ENSO Phenomenon (El Niño, La Niña on Temperature and Precipitation of Mashhad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    vajiheh mohammadi sabet

    2017-03-01

    occurring high ENSO, these three indexes (ENSO index, standardized rainfall and anomalies temperature were compared. The co-variation of these indexes was compared. Also, the correlation and cross correlation for each period of occurring ENSO, with rain and temperature of Mashhad was calculated. Results and Discussion: Mashhad monthly temperature and precipitation were compared with the extreme values of ENSO index in periods of the occurrence this phenomenon (1950-2016. In addition, the correlation and cross-correlation between ENSO-Rainfall index and ENSO-temperature index for this period were calculated.Forecasted temperature for 2016 by ARMA (1,1 was 13.2 Degrees Celsius, which has 0.2 degree increase in comparison to last year. Results showed thatthere is no an obvious relation between ENSO-Temperature and ENSO-Rainfall in interval (-1, +1. But there are good relation between ENSO-Temperature and ENSO-Rainfall beyond of (-1,+1. The results of Elnino showed that the monthly precipitation and temperature increase with a lag of 2 to 5 months and 0 to 4 months, respectively. The results of Lanina showed that the monthly precipitation and temperature decrease with a lag of 3 to 5 months and 1 to 4 months, respectively. Also when ENSO index is located in the interval (-1, +1, there is no certain harmony with temperature and precipitation of Mashhad. Conclusions: The aim of this study was evaluating the effect of the ENSO phenomenon on monthly temperature and precipitation of Mashhad.Mashhad monthly temperature and precipitation, respectively, for 132 and 124 years were available.Precipitation was static and has no trend, but temperature was not static and has two changed (jumped point in 1976 and 2000. MARS regression was used for patterning the process. Removing the trend was done by MARS model and the data was obtained without trend. Monthly ENSO index since 1950 from reliable websites worldwide (NOAA was obtained. Mashhad monthly temperature data was animalized and

  7. Effect of blood contamination on results of dipstick evaluation and urine protein-to-urine creatinine ratio for urine samples from dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vientós-Plotts, Aida I; Behrend, Ellen N; Welles, Elizabeth G; Chew, Dennis J; Gaillard, Philippe R; Busler, Jessica N; Lee, Hollie P

    2018-05-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate effects of blood contamination on dipstick results, specific gravity (SG), and urine protein-to-urine creatinine ratio (UPCR) for urine samples from dogs and cats. SAMPLE Urine samples collected from 279 dogs and 120 cats. PROCEDURES Urine pools were made for each species (dogs [n = 60] and cats [30]). Blood was added to an aliquot of a pool, and serial dilutions were prepared with the remaining urine. Color and dipstick variables were recorded, and SG and UPCR were measured. For cats, 1 set of pools was used; for dogs, 2 sets were used. Comparisons were made between undiluted urine and spiked urine samples for individual colors. Repeated-measures ANOVA on ranks was used to compare dipstick scores and UPCR results; χ 2 tests were used to compare proteinuria categorizations (nonproteinuric, borderline, or proteinuric). RESULTS Any blood in the urine resulted in significantly increased dipstick scores for blood. In both species, scores for bilirubin and ketones, pH, and SG were affected by visible blood contamination. No significant difference for the dipstick protein reagent results was evident until a sample was visibly hematuric. The UPCR was significantly increased in dark yellow samples of both species. Proteinuria categorizations differed significantly between undiluted urine and urine of all colors, except light yellow. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Any degree of blood contamination affected results of dipstick analysis. Effects depended on urine color and the variable measured. Microscopic blood contamination may affect the UPCR; thus, blood contamination may be a differential diagnosis for proteinuria in yellow urine samples.

  8. Assessment of Clicker Training for Shelter Cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, Lori

    2017-01-01

    Simple Summary Living conditions in animal shelters can be stressful for cats. Clicker training might be able to alleviate this stress, by giving cats an opportunity to learn new behaviors and interact with humans. In this study, we assessed the initial ability of 100 shelter cats to perform four cued behaviors: touching a target, sitting, spinning, and giving a high-five. Each cat completed 15, five-min training sessions over a two-week span. At the end of the program, we assessed the cats’ ability to perform the same behaviors. On average, the cats performed better on all four behaviors after clicker training, suggesting that the cats could learn to perform specific behaviors on cue. Individual cats with a higher level of interest in food showed greater gains in learning for two of the behaviors (high-five and touching a target). Cats with a bolder temperament at post-assessment demonstrated greater gains in learning than those classified as shy. We suggest that clicker training can be used to enhance cats’ well-being while they are housed in shelters, and that the learned behaviors might make them more desirable to adopters. Abstract Clicker training has the potential to mitigate stress among shelter cats by providing environmental enrichment and human interaction. This study assessed the ability of cats housed in a shelter-like setting to learn new behaviors via clicker training in a limited amount of time. One hundred shelter cats were enrolled in the study. Their baseline ability to perform four specific behaviors touching a target, sitting, spinning, and giving a high-five was assessed, before exposing them to 15, five-min clicker training sessions, followed by a post-training assessment. Significant gains in performance scores were found for all four cued behaviors after training (p = 0.001). A cat’s age and sex did not have any effect on successful learning, but increased food motivation was correlated with greater gains in learning for two of the

  9. Auxin-induced modifications of cell wall polysaccharides in cat coleoptile segments. Effect of galactose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, R.; Masuda, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Galactose inhibits auxin-induced cell elongation in oat coleoptile segments. Cell elongation induced by exogenously applied auxin is controlled by factors such as auxin uptake, cell wall loosening, osmotic concentration of sap and hydraulic conductivity. However, galactose does not have any effect on these factors. The results discussed in this paper led to the conclusion that galactose does not affect cell wall loosening which controls rapid growth, but inhibits cell wall synthesis which is required to maintain long-term growth

  10. Effect of chronic metoprolol and coronary occlusion (CO) on cardiac beta receptor density in cats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lathers, C.M.; Spivey, W.H.; Levin, R.M.

    1986-03-05

    The effect of metoprolol (M) on beta receptor density (BRD) was examined. M (5 mg/kg, p.o., b.i.d.) was given for 2 and 8 wks prior to CO of the left anterior descending artery (LAD) at its origin. BRD, determined by binding of /sup 3/H-dihydroalprenol, was examined in the myocardium (LA = left atrium, RA = right atrium, LV1 = proximal LAD distribution, LV = 2 distal LAD distribution, LV3 = posterior left ventricle, RV = right ventricle, and S = septum. A 2 factor ANOVA followed by simple effect and Newman-Keuls post hoc tests revealed that M produced no effect in BRD in LA, RA, LV2, or S. M increased BRD in LV1, LV3, and RV after 2 wk when compared to no M. In addition, BRD in LV3 and RV were also greater at 2 wk than after 8 wk M. The data indicate that there are regional differences in the beta adrenergic receptor densities among the areas of the heart and within the left ventricle. Chronic dosing with M produced increased BRD in only some of the areas of the heart. These differences may be related to functional differences in the various areas of the heart after CO.

  11. Region-specificity of GABAA receptor mediated effects on orientation and direction selectivity in cat visual cortical area 18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirmann, Kay-Uwe; Pernberg, Joachim; Eysel, Ulf T

    2009-01-01

    The role of GABAergic inhibition in orientation and direction selectivity has been investigated with the GABA(A)-Blocker bicuculline in the cat visual cortex, and results indicated a region specific difference of functional contributions of GABAergic inhibition in areas 17 and 18. In area 17 inhibition appeared mainly involved in sculpturing orientation and direction tuning, while in area 18 inhibition seemed more closely associated with temporal receptive field properties. However, different types of stimuli were used to test areas 17 and 18 and further studies performed in area 17 suggested an important influence of the stimulus type (single light bars vs. moving gratings) on the evoked responses (transient vs. sustained) and inhibitory mechanisms (GABA(A) vs. GABA(B)) which in turn might be more decisive for the specific results than the cortical region. To insert the missing link in this chain of arguments it was necessary to study GABAergic inhibition in area 18 with moving light bars, which has not been done so far. Therefore, in the present study we investigated area 18 cells responding to oriented moving light bars with extracellular recordings and reversible microiontophoretic blockade of GABAergig inhibition with bicuculline methiodide. The majority of neurons was characterized by a pronounced orientation specificity and variable degrees of direction selectivity. GABA(A)ergic inhibition significantly influenced preferred orientation and preferred direction in area 18. During the action of bicuculline orientation tuning width increased and orientation and direction selectivity indices decreased. Our results obtained in area 18 with moving bar stimuli, although in the proportion of affected cells similar to those described in area 17, quantitatively matched the findings for direction and orientation specificity obtained with moving gratings in area 18. Accordingly, stimulus type is not decisive in area 18 and the GABA(A) dependent, inhibitory intracortical

  12. Subjective Evaluation of Media Content as a Moderator of Media Effects on European Identity: Mere Exposure and the Hostile Media Phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waqas Ejaz

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper posits that the concept of European identity is an important indicator of the legitimacy of the European Union (EU. It further assumes that the exposure to EU related media content can influence the feeling of European identity. In order to verify this assumption, we combined the mere-exposure-theory and the hostile media phenomenon. We assume that these theoretical concepts could help to understand the influence of media on people’s levels of attachment to the EU. Regression analyses are performed on secondary data that were collected in a Eurobarometer survey in 2013. Our findings revealed that media exposure affected the respondents’ identification with Europe, as well as the modifications of this effect based on their assessments of EU media coverage. The results of the current study not only validate assumptions about the mere-exposure effects on identity but also confirm the theoretical assumption that perceived hostility reduces such effects, whereas exposure to information that is perceived as neutral promotes the effects of media exposure on the feeling of European identity.

  13. Surrenderers’ Relationships with Cats Admitted to Four Australian Animal Shelters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zito, Sarah; Paterson, Mandy; Rand, Jacquie; Phillips, Clive J. C.

    2018-01-01

    Simple Summary The surrender of cats to animal shelters results in financial, social and moral burdens for the community. Human caretaking of cats was explored in a sample of people surrendering cats to shelters in Australia. At the shelters surrenderers classified themselves as owners or non-owners and a questionnaire identified that this was related to their method of acquisition of the cat, their association time with the cat, the closeness of their relationship with the cat and their degree of responsibility for the cat’s care. A model of ownership perception was developed to provide a better understanding of factors influencing ownership perception. Understanding ownership perceptions in cats surrendered to shelters is important as these can inform the development of more targeted and effective intervention strategies to reduce numbers of unwanted cats. Abstract The surrender of cats to animal shelters results in financial, social and moral burdens for the community. Correlations of caretaking and interactions with surrendered cats were calculated, to understand more about humans’ relationships with surrendered cats and the contribution of semi-owned cats to shelter intakes. A questionnaire was used to collect detailed information about 100 surrenderers’ relationships with cats they surrendered to four animal shelters in Australia, with each surrenderer classifying themselves as being either the owner or a non-owner of the surrendered cat (ownership perception). Method of acquisition of the cat, association time, closeness of the relationship with the cat and degree of responsibility for the cat’s care were all associated with ownership perception. Many non-owners (59%) fed and interacted with the cat they surrendered but rarely displayed other caretaking behaviours. However, most surrenderers of owned and unowned cats were attached to and felt responsible for the cat. Based on these results and other evidence, a causal model of ownership perception

  14. Effect of prewarming EDTA blood samples to 37°C on platelet count measured by Sysmex XT-2000iV in dogs, cats, and horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Tim L; Archer, Joy

    2016-09-01

    Pseudothrombocytopenia secondary to platelet clumping is a common cause of preanalytic error for platelet counts in dogs, cats, and horses. In human beings, it is suggested that prewarming blood samples to 37°C prior to hematology analysis will reduce platelet clumping. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effect of prewarming EDTA blood samples to 37°C on measured platelet counts and other hematologic variables. The EDTA blood samples from dogs, cats and horses submitted to the clinical pathology laboratory at the University of Cambridge were included. Complete blood cell counts performed using a Sysmex XT-2000iV hematology analyzer were done on samples at room temperature (approximately 22°C) and following warming of the samples to 37°C in a water bath. The Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to compare hematologic variables, including platelet count, before and after sample warming to 37°C. Data are presented as median (25(th) , 75(th) percentile) increase. Blood samples from 39 dogs, 19 cats, and 10 horses were included. Sample warming to 37°C resulted in a statistically significant increase in platelet counts in dogs (11 [-2, 30] ×10(9) /L), cats (36 [14, 84] ×10(9) /L), and horses (42 [31, 79] ×10(9) /L). Sample warming did not significantly affect other hematologic variables. Prewarming EDTA blood samples to 37°C prior to hematologic analysis increased platelet counts overall in canine, feline, and equine blood, but did not abrogate platelet clumping and pseudothrombocytopenia fully in some cases. Furthermore, true pseudothrombocytopenia was not confirmed in these animals. © 2016 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  15. Obesity in show cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbee, R J

    2014-12-01

    Obesity is an important disease with a high prevalence in cats. Because obesity is related to several other diseases, it is important to identify the population at risk. Several risk factors for obesity have been described in the literature. A higher incidence of obesity in certain cat breeds has been suggested. The aim of this study was to determine whether obesity occurs more often in certain breeds. The second aim was to relate the increased prevalence of obesity in certain breeds to the official standards of that breed. To this end, 268 cats of 22 different breeds investigated by determining their body condition score (BCS) on a nine-point scale by inspection and palpation, at two different cat shows. Overall, 45.5% of the show cats had a BCS > 5, and 4.5% of the show cats had a BCS > 7. There were significant differences between breeds, which could be related to the breed standards. Most overweight and obese cats were in the neutered group. It warrants firm discussions with breeders and cat show judges to come to different interpretations of the standards in order to prevent overweight conditions in certain breeds from being the standard of beauty. Neutering predisposes for obesity and requires early nutritional intervention to prevent obese conditions. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. Cat-Scratch Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CDC.gov . Healthy Pets, Healthy People About Pets & People Pets & Other Animals Birds Cats Dogs Farm Animals Backyard ... to have CSD and spread it to people, persons with a weakened immune system should ... Play rough with your pets because they may scratch and bite. Allow cats ...

  17. That Fat Cat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Phyllis Gilchrist

    2012-01-01

    This activity began with a picture book, Nurit Karlin's "Fat Cat On a Mat" (HarperCollins; 1998). The author and her students started their project with a 5-inch circular template for the head of their cats. They reviewed shapes as they drew the head and then added the ears and nose, which were triangles. Details to the face were added when…

  18. HOOLIGANISM – CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL PHENOMENON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIA LULESCU

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The proposed scientific theme is going to approach and study the hooliganism phenomenon as a contemporary social matter, in terms of conceptual and etiological. The present work has four main purposes: (1- that of explaining the meaning of hooliganism social phenomenon; (2- that of discovering the origins of hooliganism; (3- that of knowing which are the causes that encourages the occurence of the hooliganism; (4- that of knowing how to control and minimize this phenomenon.

  19. CAT questions and answers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    This document, prepared in February 1993, addresses the most common questions asked by APS Collaborative Access Teams (CATs). The answers represent the best judgment on the part of the APS at this time. In some cases, details are provided in separate documents to be supplied by the APS. Some of the answers are brief because details are not yet available. The questions are separated into five categories representing different aspects of CAT interactions with the APS: (1) Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), (2) CAT Beamline Review and Construction, (3) CAT Beamline Safety, (4) CAT Beamline Operations, and (5) Miscellaneous. The APS plans to generate similar documents as needed to both address new questions and clarify answers to present questions

  20. MnSOD and CAT polymorphisms modulate the effect of the Mediterranean diet on breast cancer risk among Greek-Cypriot women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakkoura, Maria G; Demetriou, Christiana A; Loizidou, Maria A; Loucaides, Giorgos; Neophytou, Ioanna; Malas, Simon; Kyriacou, Kyriacos; Hadjisavvas, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Oxidative stress arises due to a cellular imbalance in oxidants and antioxidants and/or due to an altered activity of antioxidant enzymes, caused by SNPs. Oxidative stress increases susceptibility to breast cancer (BC) risk, and we previously showed that the Mediterranean diet (MD), which is rich in antioxidants, reduces BC risk in Greek-Cypriot women. Here, we investigated the effect of MnSOD (p.Val16Ala, rs4880) and CAT (-262C>T, rs1001179) SNPs on the association between the MD and BC risk in the case-control study of BC MASTOS in Cyprus. Dietary intake data were obtained using a 32-item food frequency questionnaire, from which a dietary pattern was previously derived, using principal component analysis. This pattern included high loadings of vegetables, fruit, legumes and fish, a combination that closely resembles the MD and was used as our dietary variable. High vegetable intake lowered BC risk in women with at least one MnSOD Val allele (ORHigh vs. Low for Val/Val = 0.56, 95 % CI 0.35-0.88, for Val/Ala = 0.57, 95 % CI 0.39-0.82), or one CAT -262C allele (ORHigh vs. Low for -262CC = 0.66, 95 % CI 0.47-0.92, for -262CT = 0.53, 95 % CI 0.35-0.81). High fish intake conferred a decreased BC risk of CAT -262CC women (ORQ4 vs. Q1 0.66, 95 % CI 0.47-0.92) compared with the CAT -262TT women and low fish intake (ORQ2 vs. Q1 2.79, 95 % CI 1.08-7.17). Additionally, high fish intake reduced BC risk in MnSOD Val/Val women (ORQ4 vs. Q1 0.63, 95 % CI 0.40-0.98). p interaction values were, however, not statistically significant. Our results demonstrate that the antioxidative effects of the MD against BC risk may be enhanced by the wild-type alleles of the MnSOD or CAT SNPs among Greek-Cypriot women.

  1. Double-blind, placebo-controlled study of intravenous prostacyclin on hemodynamics in severe Raynaud's phenomenon: the acute vasodilatory effect is not sustained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingma, K; Wollersheim, H; Thien, T

    1995-09-01

    In 12 patients with severe Raynaud's phenomenon (RP: ischemic ulcers or intractable pain despite use of narcotic analgetics), we studied the acute and long-term hemodynamic effects of epoprostenol on systemic and finger skin circulation. Epoprostenol was infused intravenously (i.v., initial infusion rate of 2 ng/kg/min, with a subsequent increase of 2 ng/kg/min every 30 min to the individually tolerated maximal dose of 8 ng/kg/min) in a triple, 5-h, double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over study. During epoprostenol infusion, systolic blood pressure (SBP) remained stable, while diastolic BP (DBP) decreased (-8 mm Hg, p Forearm blood flow (FBF) increased and forearm vascular resistance (FVR) decreased during epoprostenol as compared with placebo infusion (p cooling test of the hand as compared with placebo. The increase in transcutaneous oxygen tension reached significant difference only during recovery (p cooling tests performed 1 and 6 weeks after the completed epoprostenol or placebo triple-infusion cycle. Repeated long-lasting epoprostenol infusion immediately improves the microcirculation, but these effects are not sustained after 1 week.

  2. Environmental enrichment choices of shelter cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, J J; Stryhn, H; Spears, J; Cockram, M S

    2017-08-01

    Choices made by cats between different types of environmental enrichment may help shelters to prioritize how to most effectively enrich cat housing, especially when limited by space or funds. This study investigates the environmental enrichment use of cats in a choice test. Twenty-six shelter cats were kept singularly in choice chambers for 10days. Each chamber had a central area and four centrally-linked compartments containing different types of environmental enrichment: 1) an empty control, 2) a prey-simulating toy, 3) a perching opportunity, and 4) a hiding opportunity. Cat movement between compartments was quantitatively recorded using a data-logger. Enriched compartments were visited significantly more frequently during the light period than during the dark period. Cats spent a significantly greater percentage of time in the hiding compartment (median=55%, IQR=46) than in the toy compartment (median=2%, IQR=9), or in the empty control compartment (median=4%, IQR=4). These results provide additional evidence to support the value of a hiding box to cats housed in a novel environment, in that they choose hiding relative to other types of environmental enrichment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The Harry Potter Phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comber, Barbara; Nixon, Helen

    2001-01-01

    Notes that while many adults seem to be rejoicing in the fact that the Harry Potter books have brought the pleasures of book reading to a new generation of young readers, Harry Potter is also entering the realm of popular media culture. Discusses and analyses the effect Harry Potter books have on children and on society. (SG)

  4. Validation of the Impostor Phenomenon among Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrmann, Sonja; Bechtoldt, Myriam N; Leonhardt, Mona

    2016-01-01

    Following up on earlier investigations, the present research aims at validating the construct impostor phenomenon by taking other personality correlates into account and to examine whether the impostor phenomenon is a construct in its own right. In addition, gender effects as well as associations with dispositional working styles and strain are examined. In an online study we surveyed a sample of N = 242 individuals occupying leadership positions in different sectors. Confirmatory factor analyses provide empirical evidence for the discriminant validity of the impostor phenomenon. In accord with earlier studies we show that the impostor phenomenon is accompanied by higher levels of anxiety, dysphoric moods, emotional instability, a generally negative self-evaluation, and perfectionism. The study does not reveal any gender differences concerning the impostor phenomenon. With respect to working styles, persons with an impostor self-concept tend to show perfectionist as well as procrastinating behaviors. Moreover, they report being more stressed and strained by their work. In sum, the findings show that the impostor phenomenon constitutes a dysfunctional personality style. Practical implications are discussed.

  5. Effect of second to first normal stress difference ratio at the die exit on neck-in phenomenon in polymeric flat film production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barborik, Tomas; Zatloukal, Martin

    2017-05-01

    In this study, viscoelastic modeling of the extrusion film casting process, based on the lD membrane model and modified Leonov constitutive equation, was conducted and the effect of the viscoelastic stress state at the die exit (captured here via second to first normal stress difference ratio) on the unwanted neck-in phenomenon has been analyzed for wide range of Deborah numbers and materials having different level of uniaxial and planar extensional strain hardening. Relevant experimental data for LDPE and theoretical predictions based on multimode eXtended Pom-Pom model acquired from the open literature were used for the validation purposes. It was found that firstly, the predicting capabilities of both constitutive equations for given material and processing conditions are comparable even if the single mode modified Leonov model was used and secondly, the agreement between theoretical and experimental data on neck-in is fairly good. Results of the theoretical study revealed that the viscoelastic stress state at the die exit (i.e. -N2/N1 ratio) increases the level of neck-in if uniaxial extensional strain hardening, planar to uniaxial extensional viscosity ratio and Deborah number increases. It has also been revealed that there exists threshold value for Deborah number and extensional strain hardening below which the neck-in becomes independent on the die exit stress state.

  6. Computerised Axial Tomography (CAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-01

    Ministry of’ Defence, Defence Research Information Centre, UK. Computerised Axial Tomography ( CAT ) Report Secufty C"uMiauion tide Onadtiicadon (U. R, Cor S...DRIC T 8485 COMPUTERISED AXIAL TOMOGRAPHY ( CAT ) F.P. GENTILE, F. SABETTA, V. TRO1* ISS R 78/4.Rome, 1.5 Mlarch 1978 (from Italian) B Distribution(f...dello Radiazioni ISSN 0390--6477 F.P. GENTILE, F. SABETTA. V. TROI Computerised Axial Tomography ( CAT ) March 15, 1978). This paper is a review of

  7. Evaluation of fenbendazole for treatment of Giardia infection in cats concurrently infected with Cryptosporidium parvum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Carey L; Radecki, Steven V; Lappin, Michael R

    2003-08-01

    To determine whether fenbendazole effectively eliminates Giardia organisms from chronically infected cats that have a concurrent Cryptosporidium parvum infection. 16 clinically normal cats. Eight cats with chronic concurrent Giardia and C parvum infections received fenbendazole (50 mg/kg, PO, q 24 h) for 5 days (treatment-group cats). Feces from each cat were collected and processed 3 days weekly for 23 days after treatment. By use of an immunofluorescent assay for detection of Giardia lamblia cysts and C parvum oocysts, organism numbers were counted and scored. Fecal results from treatment-group cats were compared with those of 8 untreated cats with Giardia infection but no C parvum infection (control-group cats). Four of 8 treatment-group cats had consistently negative results for Giardia infection after treatment. These 4 cats had consistently positive results for C parvum oocysts prior to treatment and consistently negative results after treatment. One treatment-group cat had positive results for cysts on all fecal samples, and 3 treatment-group cats had 1 to 3 negative results and then resumed shedding large numbers of cysts; each of these cats had consistently positive results for C parvum oocysts. When compared with control-group cats, treatment-group cats shed less Giardia cysts during week 1 after treatment but not during week 2. Administration of fenbendazole decreases Giardia cyst shedding to less than detectable numbers in some cats. In our study, persistent C parvum infection may have been associated with failure of fenbendazole to eliminate Giardia infection.

  8. Short-Term Estrogen Replacement Effects on Insulin Sensitivity and Glucose Tolerance in At-Risk Cats for Feline Diabetes Mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Wara

    Full Text Available Male domestic cats that are neutered and overweight are at an increased risk for developing a type-2-like diabetes mellitus. Beneficial effects of 17β-estradiol (E2 on glucose homeostasis may be lost with neutering and thereby account for increased diabetes risk. To evaluate this, adult male neutered overweight cats (n=6 were given daily E2 (1.0 μg/kg or vehicle (Vh; ethanol, 1.0 μL/kg in a single crossover trial of 14-day periods with a 7-day washout. The E2 and Vh were voluntarily ingested on food. The E2 dosage was determined in a pre-trial to significantly and transiently reduce food intake with no measurable change in plasma E2 concentration. During treatments, physical activity was assessed with collar-mounted accelerometers on days 9-11, and tests of intravenous insulin tolerance and intravenous glucose tolerance were conducted on days 13 and 14, respectively. Over the 14 days, E2 compared to Vh treatment reduced (p=0.03 food intake (- 22% but not enough to significantly reduce body weight; activity counts were not significantly changed. With E2 compared to Vh treatment, the late-phase plasma insulin response of the glucose tolerance test was less (p=0.03 by 31%, while glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity indexes were not significantly changed. The results indicate that oral E2 at a dosage that moderately affects food intake may reduce insulin requirement for achieving glucose homeostasis in neutered male cats. Further investigation is needed to identify the mechanism underlying the E2 effect.

  9. StreamCat

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The StreamCat Dataset provides summaries of natural and anthropogenic landscape features for ~2.65 million streams, and their associated catchments, within the...

  10. IndexCat

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — IndexCat provides access to the digitized version of the printed Index-Catalogue of the Library of the Surgeon General's Office; eTK for medieval Latin texts; and...

  11. Cheshire cat phenomena and quarks in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rho, M.

    1986-11-01

    The notion of the ''Cheshire Cat'' principle in hadron structure is developed rigorously in (1+1) dimensions and approximately in (3+1) dimensions for up- and down-quark flavor systems. This phenomenon is invoked to address the issue as to whether or not direct quark-gluon signatures can be ''seen'' in low-energy nuclear phenomena. How addition of the third flavor -strangeness- can modify the Cheshire Cat property is discussed. It is proposed that one of the primary objectives of nuclear physics be to probe -and disturb- the ''vacuum'' of the strong interactions (QCD) and that for this purpose the chiral symmetry SU(3)xSU(3) can play a crucial role in normal and extreme conditions. As an illustration, kaon condensation at a density ρ>∼ 3ρ 0 is discussed in terms of a toy model and is related to ''cleansing'' of the quark condensates from the vacuum

  12. THE ROMANIAN MIGRATIONAL EVOLUTION PHENOMENON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Raluca

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available In our contemporary democratic society the migration phenomenon meets unknown valences in any previous societies. Free will and right to self-determination, much exploited by the XX century society., raised the possibility of interpretation of migration

  13. Age and body weight effects on glucose and insulin tolerance in colony cats maintained since weaning on high dietary carbohydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backus, R C; Cave, N J; Ganjam, V K; Turner, J B M; Biourge, V C

    2010-12-01

    High dietary carbohydrate is suggested to promote development of diabetes mellitus in cats. Glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, and insulin secretion were assessed in young [0.8-2.3 (median = 1.1) years, n = 13] and mature [4.0-7.0 (median 5.8) years, n = 12] sexually intact females of a large (n ≅ 700) feline colony in which only dry-type diets (35% metabolizable energy as carbohydrate) were fed from weaning. Insulin sensitivity was assessed from the 'late-phase' (60-120 min) plasma insulin response of intravenous glucose tolerance tests (IVGTTs) and from fractional change in glycaemia from baseline 15 min after an insulin bolus (0.1 U/kg, i.v.). Insulin secretion was assessed from the 'early-phase' (0-15 min) plasma insulin response of IVGTTs. Compared to the young cats, the mature cats had greater body weights [2.3-3.8 (median = 2.9) vs. 3.0-6.3 (median = 4.0) kg, p < 0.01], greater late-phase insulin responses (p < 0.05), lower insulin-induced glycaemic changes (p = 0.06), lower early-phase insulin responses (p < 0.05), and non-significantly different rates of glucose disposal. The late-phase insulin response was correlated with body weight and age (p < 0.05). When group assignments were balanced for body weight, the age-group differences and correlations became non-significant. The findings indicate that body weight gain is more likely than dry-type diets to induce the pre-diabetic conditions of insulin resistance and secretion dysfunction. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2010 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  14. The contribution of cat owners' attitudes and behaviours to the free-roaming cat overpopulation in Tel Aviv, Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkler, Hilit; Terkel, Joseph

    2012-04-01

    The attitudes and behaviours of cat owners in regard to treatment of cats may have a cumulative effect on the food availability, reproduction, density and welfare of the free-roaming cat population and thus also on the extent of cat overpopulation. Understanding this is thus a vital step in the a priori planning of cat management programs on any scale, as well as in developing public education programs on this issue. Although recent years have seen an accumulation of knowledge in regard to cat owners' attitudes and behaviours, the findings vary among countries and locations and in Israel this has never been investigated systematically. Using a questionnaire provided to cat owners in veterinary clinics, this study aimed at identifying those attitudes and behaviours that may be contributing to cat overpopulation in Tel Aviv, Israel, and at exploring the socio-economic factors that influence this problem. The findings show that the influential factors can be predicted from the cat owners' socio-economic status, mainly education and income, as well as gender and age. A consistency in those cat owner behaviours that contribute to cat overpopulation was also uncovered, revealing a sub-population of individuals who persist in the undesirable behaviours. Finally, a strong relationship between attitude and consequent behaviour was demonstrated, indicating the importance of education and targeted publicity as a means to influence attitudes and thereby change behaviours in this respect. We propose several measures by which to reduce the current extent of cat owners' contribution to the cat overpopulation: discouraging unwanted owner behaviours such as abandonment of their cats and allowing them to breed; promoting awareness of the neutering option among cat caretakers; and increasing pre-adoption neutering rates in shelters. Regional and national laws promoting responsible pet ownership need to be enacted. By improving the current level of knowledge and awareness among cat

  15. Leidenfrost phenomenon on conical surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo-Caballero, S.; Escobar-Ortega, Y.; Pacheco-Vázquez, F.

    2016-09-01

    The Leidenfrost state is typically studied by placing droplets on flat or slightly curved surfaces. Here this phenomenon is investigated by depositing water in hot conical bowls. We found that this phase exists even for large amounts of liquid in very narrow cones without considerable effect of the confinement on the Leidenfrost transition temperature TL. At a fixed temperature, T >TL , the total evaporation time τ has a nonmonotonic dependence on the angle of confinement θ : for large volumes (˜20 ml) on flat surfaces (θ ˜0∘ ), vapor chimneys appear and accelerate the evaporation rate, their frequency diminishes as θ augments and becomes zero at a certain angle θc, at which τ reaches its maximum value; then, τ decreases again at larger angles because the vapor layer holding up the water becomes thinner due to the increase of hydrostatic pressure and because the geometry facilitates the vapor expulsion along the conical wall. For small volumes (˜1 ml), surface tension mainly determines the drop curvature and the lifetime is practically independent of θ . Different chimney regimes and oscillation patterns were observed and summarized in a phase diagram. Finally, we developed a simple model to decipher the shape adopted by the liquid volume and its evolution as a function of time, and the predictions are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  16. The Feline Mystique: Dispelling the Myth of the Independent Cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltow, Willow

    1984-01-01

    Describes learning activities about cats for primary and intermediate grades. Primary grade activity subjects include cat behavior, needs, breeds, storybook cats, and celestial cats. Intermediate grade activity subjects include cat history, care, language, literary cats, and cats in art. (BC)

  17. Hysteresis phenomenon in nuclear reactor dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirayesh, Behnam; Pazirandeh, Ali [Islamic Azad Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Science and Research Branch; Akbari, Monireh [Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Mathematics

    2017-05-15

    This paper applies a nonlinear analysis method to show that hysteresis phenomenon, due to the Saddle-node bifurcation, may occur in the nuclear reactor. This phenomenon may have significant effects on nuclear reactor dynamics and can even be the beginning of a nuclear reactor accident. A system of four dimensional nonlinear ordinary differential equations was considered to study the hysteresis phenomenon in a typical nuclear reactor. It should be noted that the reactivity was considered as a nonlinear function of state variables. The condition for emerging hysteresis was investigated using Routh-Hurwitz criterion and Sotomayor's theorem for saddle node bifurcation. A numerical analysis is also provided to illustrate the analytical results.

  18. Rabies prevention and management of cats in the context of trap-neuter-vaccinate-release programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roebling, A D; Johnson, D; Blanton, J D; Levin, M; Slate, D; Fenwick, G; Rupprecht, C E

    2014-06-01

    Domestic cats are an important part of many Americans' lives, but effective control of the 60-100 million feral cats living throughout the country remains problematic. Although trap-neuter-vaccinate-return (TNVR) programmes are growing in popularity as alternatives to euthanizing feral cats, their ability to adequately address disease threats and population growth within managed cat colonies is dubious. Rabies transmission via feral cats is a particular concern as demonstrated by the significant proportion of rabies post-exposure prophylaxis associated with exposures involving cats. Moreover, TNVR has not been shown to reliably reduce feral cat colony populations because of low implementation rates, inconsistent maintenance and immigration of unsterilized cats into colonies. For these reasons, TNVR programmes are not effective methods for reducing public health concerns or for controlling feral cat populations. Instead, responsible pet ownership, universal rabies vaccination of pets and removal of strays remain integral components to control rabies and other diseases. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  19. Rabies Prevention and Management of Cats in the Context of Trap, Neuter, Vaccinate, Release Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roebling, Allison D.; Johnson, Dana; Blanton, Jesse D.; Levin, Michael; Slate, Dennis; Fenwick, George; Rupprecht, Charles E.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Domestic cats are an important part of many Americans’ lives, but effective control of the 60–100 million feral cats living throughout the country remains problematic. Although Trap-Neuter-Vaccinate-Return (TNVR) programs are growing in popularity as alternatives to euthanizing feral cats, their ability to adequately address disease threats and population growth within managed cat colonies is dubious. Rabies transmission via feral cats is a particular concern as demonstrated by the significant proportion of rabies postexposure prophylaxis associated with exposures involving cats. Moreover, TNVR has not been shown to reliably reduce feral cat colony populations because of low implementation rates, inconsistent maintenance, and immigration of unsterilized cats into colonies. For these reasons, TNVR programs are not effective methods for reducing public health concerns or for controlling feral cat populations. Instead, responsible pet ownership, universal rabies vaccination of pets, and removal of strays remain integral components to control rabies and other diseases. PMID:23859607

  20. Bell inequalities with Schroedinger cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, M.D.

    2001-01-01

    In the Schrodinger cat gedanken experiment a ''cat'' is in a quantum superposition of two macroscopically distinct states. There is the apparent interpretation that the ''cat'' is not in one state or the other, ''alive'' or ''dead''. Here this interpretation is proved objectively. I propose the following definition of macroscopic reality: first, that the ''cat'' is either dead or alive, the measurement revealing which; second, that measurements on other ''cats'' some distance away cannot induce the macroscopic change, ''dead'' to ''alive'' and vice versa, to the ''cat''. The predictions of quantum mechanics are shown to be incompatible with this premise. (orig.)

  1. Koebner Phenomenon and Mycosis Fungoides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eve Lebas

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Mycosis fungoides (MF is the most frequent type of primary cutaneous T-cell/NK-cell lymphoma. The Koebner phenomenon is defined as the appearance of cutaneous lesions on previously noninvolved skin following trauma and is observed in a series of cutaneous diseases including psoriasis, lichen planus, viral warts, molluscum contagiosum, etc. In this case report, 3 patients with longstanding MF are presented, the 1st with the appearance of a circumscribed early-stage type MF lesion rapidly following a surgical excision of an infundibular cyst, the 2nd with the appearance of a unique unilateral palmar tumoral MF lesion at the pressure site of a crutch, and the 3rd presented localized MF early stage lesions at the friction site of a belt. This report suggests that some MF patients may experience Koebner phenomenon-induced MF lesions and that MF should be added to the long list of skin diseases potentially exhibiting the Koebner phenomenon.

  2. Crystallized Schroedinger cat states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castanos, O.; Lopez-Pena, R.; Man'ko, V.I.

    1995-01-01

    Crystallized Schroedinger cat states (male and female) are introduced on the base of extension of group construction for the even and odd coherent states of the electromagnetic field oscillator. The Wigner and Q functions are calculated and some are plotted for C 2 , C 3 , C 4 , C 5 , C 3v Schroedinger cat states. Quadrature means and dispersions for these states are calculated and squeezing and correlation phenomena are studied. Photon distribution functions for these states are given explicitly and are plotted for several examples. A strong oscillatory behavior of the photon distribution function for some field amplitudes is found in the new type of states

  3. E-Z-CAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyman, U.; Dinnetz, G.; Andersson, I.

    1984-01-01

    A new barium sulphate suspension, E-Z-CAT, for use as an oral contrast medium at computed tomography of the abdomen has been compared with the commonly used water-soluble iodinated contrast medium Gastrografin as regards patient tolerance and diagnostic information. The investigation was conducted as an unpaired randomized single-blind study in 100 consecutive patients. E-Z-CAT seems to be preferred because of its better taste, its lesser tendency to cause diarrhoea, and for usage in patients who are known to be hypersensitive to iodinated contrast media. The diagnostic information was the same for both contrast media. (Auth.)

  4. Juvenile hyperthyroidism in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Jana M; Ehrhart, E J; Sisson, D D; Jones, M A

    2003-01-01

    An 8-month-old, male domestic shorthaired cat presented for chronic weight loss, intermittent dyspnea, chronic diarrhea, hyperactivity, and weakness. The cat had a palpable thyroid nodule and increased serum total thyroxine and 3,5,3' triiodothyronine levels. The cat was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism, and a unilateral thyroidectomy was performed followed by radioactive iodine at a later date. The clinical signs resolved following radioactive iodine, and the cat subsequently developed clinical hypothyroidism.

  5. Tracheal collapse in two cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, J.C.; O'Brien, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Two cats examined bronchoscopically to discover the cause of tracheal collapse were found to have tracheal obstruction cranial to the collapse. Cats with this unusual sign should be examined bronchoscopically to ascertain whether there is an obstruction, as the cause in these 2 cats was distinct from the diffuse airway abnormality that causes tracheal collapse in dogs

  6. Evaluating Sucralfate as a Phosphate Binder in Normal Cats and Cats with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quimby, Jessica; Lappin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Control of hyperphosphatemia is an important part of the management of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of sucralfate as a phosphate binder in normal cats and normophosphatemic CKD cats. A 500 mg sucralfate slurry was administered orally q 8 hr for 2 wk, and serum phosphorus, urine fractional excretion of phosphorus, and fecal phosphorus concentrations were measured. In normal cats treated with sucralfate, significant changes in serum phosphorus concentration or urinary excretion of phosphorus were not detected, and vomiting occurred after 14.7% of administrations. Of the five normophosphatemic cats with CKD treated with sucralfate, three experienced clinical decompensation, including vomiting, anorexia, constipation, and increased azotemia. Administration of sucralfate did not result in significant changes in fecal phosphorus concentration in these cats. The effects of sucralfate administration on serum phosphorus concentration and urinary excretion of phosphorus in CKD cats was difficult to determine because of dehydration and worsening azotemia associated with decompensation. Due to side effects and the apparent lack of efficacy of the medication, the study was discontinued. This study was unable to confirm efficacy of this sucralfate formulation as a phosphate binder, and side effects were problematic during the study.

  7. Laser Sintering Technology and Balling Phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyar, Perihan

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this review was to evaluate the balling phenomenon which occurs typically in Selective Laser Sintering (SLS). The balling phenomenon is a typical SLS defect, and observed in laser sintered powder, significantly reduces the quality of SLS, and hinders the further development of SLS Technology. Electronic database searches were performed using Google Scholar. The keywords "laser sintering, selective laser sintering, direct metal laser melting, and balling phenomenon" were searched in title/abstract of publications, limited to December 31, 2016. The inclusion criteria were SLS, balling phenomenon, some alloys (such as Cr-Co, iron, stainless steel, and Cu-based alloys) mechanical properties, microstructure and bond strength between metal-ceramic crown, laboratory studies, full text, and in English language. A total of 100 articles were found the initial search and yielded a total of 50 studies, 30 of which did not fulfill the inclusion criteria and were therefore excluded. In addition, 20 studies were found by screening the reference list of all included publications. Finally, 40 studies were selected for this review. The method in question is regulated by powder material characteristics and the conditions of laser processing. The procedure of formation, affecting factors, and the mechanism of the balling effect are very complex.

  8. Resistive index for kidney evaluation in normal and diseased cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipisca, Vlad; Murino, Carla; Cortese, Laura; Mennonna, Giuseppina; Auletta, Luigi; Vulpe, Vasile; Meomartino, Leonardo

    2016-06-01

    The objectives were to determine the resistive index (RI) in normal cats and in cats with various renal diseases, and to evaluate the effect of age on RI. The subjects were cats that had ultrasonography (US) of the urinary tract and RI measurement at our centre between January 2003 and April 2014. Based on clinical evaluation, biochemical and haematological tests, urinalysis and US, the cats were classified as healthy or diseased. RI measurements were made from the interlobar or arcuate arteries. Data were analysed for differences between the right and the left kidney, the two sexes, different age groups in healthy cats, and between healthy and diseased cats. A total of 116 cats (68 males, 48 females) were included: 24 healthy and 92 diseased. In the healthy cats, RI (mean ± SD) differed significantly (P = 0.02) between the right kidney (0.54 ± 0.07) and the left kidney (0.59 ± 0.08). For the left kidney, RI was significantly higher in cats with chronic kidney disease (0.73 ± 0.12) and acute kidney injury (0.72 ± 0.08) (P = 0.0008). For the right kidney, RI was significantly higher in cats with chronic kidney disease (0.72 ± 0.11), acute kidney injury (0.74 ± 0.08), polycystic kidney disease (0.77 ± 0.11) and renal tumour (0.74 ± 0.001) (P cats, useful in the differential diagnosis of diffuse renal diseases. While it does not change with the age of the cat, ultrasonographers should be aware that RI may differ between the two kidneys. © ISFM and AAFP 2015.

  9. Coxofemoral luxations in cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pérez-Aparicio, F.J.; Fjeld, T.O.

    1993-01-01

    In a retrospective study, 79 untreated luxations of the coxofemoral joint in cats were recorded over a 12-year period. Twenty-nine of these cases were available for follow-up, of which 13 were re-examined clinically and radiologically. It was found that the maximum incidence of the injury occurred from one to three years of age. Follow-up radiographs showed that the cats had developed nearthroses of various degrees located dorsally on the ilium. The degree of nearthrosis formation was not consistently correlated with the length of the observation time. Radiological signs of decreased bone density of the proximal femur may be caused by reduced weightbearing related to changes in biomechanical function and altered blood supply in the luxated limb. Almost two-thirds of the re-examined animals presented some kind of locomotor dysfunction on clinical examination. Limb function improved with time. The best clinical results appeared to be in cats that were immature at the time of injury and developed nearthrosis similar to a normal coxofemoral joint. All the cats available to this study showed acceptable functional results and had a normal level of activity according to the owners

  10. Experimental induction of hepatic lipidosis in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biourge, V C; Groff, J M; Munn, R J; Kirk, C A; Nyland, T G; Madeiros, V A; Morris, J G; Rogers, Q R

    1994-09-01

    The effect of long-term voluntary fasting on hematologic variables, biochemical profiles, and liver histologic findings was assessed in 15 obese cats (> 40% overweight). Clinical signs and laboratory results consistent with hepatic lipidosis were observed in 12 of 15 cats after 5 to 7 weeks of fasting, and were associated with 30 to 35% reduction of initial body weight. Histologic examination of successive liver biopsy specimens revealed that obesity was not associated with liver parenchymal lipid accumulation, but that fasting resulted in lipidosis in all 15 cats. The long-term fast was associated with an early (after 2 to 4 weeks of fasting) and significant (P hepatic-associated enzyme activities and in total and direct serum bilirubin concentrations. Significant (P hepatic lipidosis, cats appeared to tolerate the fast without other adverse effect. This study confirmed that long-term fasting may induce clinical hepatic lipidosis in obese cats. Fasting appears to induce a syndrome of hepatic lipidosis that is indistinguishable from feline idiopathic hepatic lipidosis and may be an appropriate model to study the pathophysiologic features and treatment of hepatic lipidosis.

  11. Tetrathyridiosis in a domestic shorthair cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothee Dahlem

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Case summary This report describes the clinical and parasitological findings in a domestic shorthair cat with isolated thoracic tetrathyridiosis. The cat was a stray from Malta that had lived in Germany for several years since as an indoor-only cat. Therefore, the process of infection remains very unusual. In this case it must be considered that the cat had been infected years previously while in Malta, and had lived at least 4 years without any clinical signs. It was possible to diagnose this uncommon disease and initiate an effective treatment with fenbendazole, praziquantel and supportive care. Clinical signs, as well as radiographic findings, were regressive with this treatment. Relevance and novel information Tetrathyridiosis is a rare finding in cats, especially in Germany, but it seems to be a potential differential diagnosis of pleural effusion. Mesocestoides corti , which was the causative parasite in this case, has not previously been isolated in Germany. Because tetrathyridiosis is only diagnosed post mortem in most cases, little is known about effective therapeutic options. Furthermore, clinical signs of this disease can be absent for several years and can potentially be triggered by neoplastic conditions or immunosuppression. Tetrathyridiosis seems to be a treatable disease that can be controlled by adequate antiparasitic therapy.

  12. Cat scratches, not bites, are associated with unipolar depression--cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegr, Jaroslav; Hodný, Zdeněk

    2016-01-05

    A recent study performed on 1.3 million patients showed a strong association between being bitten by a cat and probability of being diagnosed with depression. Authors suggested that infection with cat parasite Toxoplasma could be the reason for this association. A cross sectional internet study on a non-clinical population of 5,535 subjects was undertaken. The subjects that reported having been bitten by a dog and a cat or scratched by a cat have higher Beck depression score. They were more likely to have visited psychiatrists, psychotherapists and neurologists in past two years, to have been previously diagnosed with depression (but not with bipolar disorder). Multivariate analysis of models with cat biting, cat scratching, toxoplasmosis, the number of cats at home, and the age of subjects as independent variables showed that only cat scratching had positive effect on depression (p = 0.004). Cat biting and toxoplasmosis had no effect on the depression, and the number of cats at home had a negative effect on depression (p = 0.021). Absence of association between toxoplasmosis and depression and five times stronger association of depression with cat scratching than with cat biting suggests that the pathogen responsible for mood disorders in animals-injured subjects is probably not the protozoon Toxoplasma gondii but another organism; possibly the agent of cat-scratched disease - the bacteria Bartonella henselae.

  13. Monitoring the effect of cat removal on reproductive success in Red-billed Tropicbird colonies on Saba, 2013 - 2014: first season of results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terpstra, M.; Woude, van der E.; Wulf, K.; Rijn, van J.; Debrot, A.O.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most deleterious invasive introduced predators worldwide is the domestic cat which has been found responsible for many island extinctions worldwide. Cats can live off both natural prey and garbage and can be a particularly serious threat to ground-nesting bird populations. Saba is an

  14. Suppression of fertility in adult cats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goericke-Pesch, Sandra Kathrin; Wehrend, A.; Georgiev, P.

    2014-01-01

    /needed? (iii) sex of the animal? New effective and available methods for hormonal contraception include melatonin implants for short-term post ponement of oestrus in adult queens and slow-release GnRH-agonist implants containing deslorelin (Suprelorin®) for short- and long-term contraception in male and female......Contents: Cats are animals with highly efficient reproduction, clearly pointing to a need for suppression of fertility. Although surgical contraception is highly effective, it is not always the method of choice. This is predominantly because it is cost-intensive, time-consuming and irreversible......, with the latter being of major importance for cat breeders. This article reviews the use of progestins, scleroting agents, immunocontraception, melatonin, GnRH antagonists and finally, GnRH agonists, in adult male and female cats in detail, according to the present state of the art. By now, various scientific...

  15. Risk as a social phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamison, Wesley V

    2003-01-01

    What do nuclear power, smoking, and eating beef have in common? The answer is multifaceted. They all share aspects of mass production and consumption, and therefore consumer confidence comes into play in evaluating each of the products' merits. They all produce some level of anxiety--be it in response to adverse media coverage, or the successes of adversarial interest groups in publicizing those products' weaknesses--among consumers who wonder what if any level of the product should be consumed. Finally, nuclear power, smoking, and eating beef all share risk; that is, the perceived and real detriments of producing and consuming those products. Whether or not the associated risks--from increased cancer to increased heart disease--are real is beside the point. When talking about risk, scientific education must deal with the perception of risk as much as its reality. Risk is a socially defined phenomenon, and as such, the successful scientists/communicator must understand the social evaluations of it. While many scientists take a rational view of risk evaluation and consumers often make rational decisions about technological and scientific risk based upon the costs and benefits of that technology, this approach is problematic for three reasons. First, the nature of modern risks has changed in that risk is complex, incomprehensible and uncontrollable to the average person. Second, the rational approach assumes that all costs and benefits of a technology, both real and potential, both current and future, can be known and therefore rationally evaluated. This is not the case. Third, evidence from Europe indicates that trust in information sources about risk has fallen, and thus classic scientific education campaigns that rely upon increasing public knowledge and acceptance of technological and scientific risk are problematic. Because of these factors we argue that effective scientific response must begin to understand the social components of risk if campaigns to shape

  16. Prostatic carcinoma in two cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caney, S.M.A.; Holt, P.E.; Day, M.J.; Rudorf, H.; Gruffydd-Jones, T.J.

    1998-01-01

    Clinical, radiological and pathological features of two cats with prostatic carcinoma are reported. In both cats the presenting history included signs of lower urinary tract disease with haematuria and dysuria. Prostatomegaly was visible radiographically in one cat; an irregular intraprostatic urethra was seen on retrograde contrast urethrography in both cats. In one of the cats, neoplasia was suspected on the basis of a transurethral catheter biopsy. Following a poor response to palliative treatment in both cases, euthanasia was performed with histological confirmation of the diagnosis

  17. A Placebo-Controlled Study on the Effects of the Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Mimetic, Exenatide, on Insulin Secretion, Body Composition and Adipokines in Obese, Client-Owned Cats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoelmkjaer, Kirsten M.; Albrechtsen, Nicolai Jacob Wewer; Holst, Jens Juul

    2016-01-01

    by exenatide (P>0.05). Twelve weeks of exenatide was well-tolerated, with only two cases of mild, self-limiting gastrointestinal signs and a single case of mild hypoglycemia. The long-term insulinotropic effect of exenatide appeared less pronounced in obese cats compared to previous short-term studies in lean...

  18. Feline hepatic biotransformation of diazepam: Differences between cats and dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beusekom, Cyrina D; van den Heuvel, Jeroen J M W; Russel, Frans G M; Schrickx, Johannes A

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to humans and dogs, diazepam has been reported to induce severe hepatic side effects in cats, particularly after repeated dosing. With the aim to elucidate the mechanisms underlying this apparent sensitivity of cats to drug-induced liver injury, in a series of in vitro experiments, the

  19. Evaluation of the embolic effect of polyvinyl alcohol foam particles according to particle size on the cerebral artery of a cat, focusing on T2 weighted MR images and pathologic study after 24 hours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Man Soo; Woo, Don Hee; Chung, Haingsub R.; Kang Gil Hyun; Lee, Sang Youl; Ryu, Dae Sik; Lee, Yong Chul

    2000-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the embolic effect of PVA particles of various sizes on the cerebral artery of a cat and to determine the appropriate particle size for embolization. A total of 21 cats were divided into three groups according to the PVA particle size injected: group I (n=3D7), embolized with 45-150μm PVA; group II (n=3D7), with 150-250μm PVA; and group III (n=3D7), with 350-500μm PVA. PVA particles were slowly injected into the left common carotid artery of each cat, and T2-weighted coronal MR images were obtained 24 hours after injection. During histologic examination of brain sections we analyzed the size, number of occluded vessels, and the ischemic changes caused by the particles. On T2 weighted images, areas of high signal intensity (infarction) were observed in four of the seven cats (57%) in group I and in two of the seven (29%) II. High signal intensity was not found in group III. The mean percentage of areas of high signal intensity was 11.86 ± 1.37% in group I and 5.18 ± 1.77% in group II (P less than 0.05). During histologic examination, occlusion of the distal branches of the anterior cerebral (ACA) and/or the middle cerebral arteries (MCA) by PVA particles was observed in all seven cats (100%) in group I, and in four of the seven cats (57%) in group II, No group III cat showed occlusion of the distal branches of the ACA and/or MCA. The mean caliber of occluded vessels was 175μm in Group I and 258μm in Group II. The mean number of occluded vessels seen on all slide sections was 14 in Group I and 5 in Group II. Small PVA particles has a greater cerebral embolic effect than did those which were medium or large. For the induction of embolic infarction in cat brain, PVA particles 45-150μm in size are appropriate. (author)

  20. Rescuing--a universal phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, John

    2014-12-01

    Rescuing, where the person is delivered from the immediacy of their conundrum by another, complicates management. The object of this paper is to understand the difficulty in relinquishing the rescuing role. Rescuing is a universal phenomenon in parenting, teaching and therapy that has developed over time through a variety of interwoven social, economic, psychological and clinical variables. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2014.

  1. The effects of acute alcohol exposure on the response properties of neurons in visual cortex area 17 of cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Bo; Xia Jing; Li Guangxing; Zhou Yifeng

    2010-01-01

    Physiological and behavioral studies have demonstrated that a number of visual functions such as visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, and motion perception can be impaired by acute alcohol exposure. The orientation- and direction-selective responses of cells in primary visual cortex are thought to participate in the perception of form and motion. To investigate how orientation selectivity and direction selectivity of neurons are influenced by acute alcohol exposure in vivo, we used the extracellular single-unit recording technique to examine the response properties of neurons in primary visual cortex (A17) of adult cats. We found that alcohol reduces spontaneous activity, visual evoked unit responses, the signal-to-noise ratio, and orientation selectivity of A17 cells. In addition, small but detectable changes in both the preferred orientation/direction and the bandwidth of the orientation tuning curve of strongly orientation-biased A17 cells were observed after acute alcohol administration. Our findings may provide physiological evidence for some alcohol-related deficits in visual function observed in behavioral studies.

  2. Optical quality of the living cat eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonds, A B

    1974-12-01

    1. The optical quality of the living cat eye was measured under conditions similar to those of cat retinal ganglion cell experiments by recording the aerial image of a nearly monochromatic thin line of light.2. Experiments were performed to assess the nature of the fundal reflexion of the cat eye, which was found to behave essentially as a diffuser.3. The optical Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) was calculated from the measured aerial linespread using Fourier mathematics; the MTF of a ;typical' cat eye was averaged from data collected from ten eyes.4. The state of focus of the optical system, the pupil size and the angle of the light incident on the eye were all varied to determine their effect on image quality.5. By using an image rotator, the aerial linespread was measured for several orientations of the line; these measurements yielded an approximation of the two-dimensional pointspread completely characterizing the optical system.6. Evidence is reviewed to show that the optical resolution of the cat, albeit some 3-5 times worse than that of human, appears to be better than the neural resolution of its retina and its visual system as a whole.

  3. Leptin and ghrelin concentration in hyperthyroid cats before and after radioactive iodine therapy compared to euthyroid control cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsilio, Sina; Glanemann, Barbara; Martin, Lucile; Szladovits, Balazs; Neiger, Reto

    2017-04-19

    Leptin and ghrelin, two peptide hormones with antagonistic effects on satiety and energy balance, could be involved in the pathogenesis of weight loss and polyphagia in cats with hyperthyroidism. Leptin generally decreases appetite and increases energy expenditure, while ghrelin exerts the opposite effects. Leptin and ghrelin were measured in 42 client owned hyperthyroid cats with a body condition score (BCS) ≤ 5/9 before (T0) and 4 weeks after radioactive iodine treatment (RAIT) (T1). Dependent on the serum total thyroxine concentration concentration at T1, cats were sub-classified as still hyperthyroid (ht-ht) (n = 4), euthyroid (ht-eu) (n = 10) or hypothyroid (ht-hypo) (n = 28). Results were compared to those of 22 healthy, euthyroid control cats with a comparable BCS (≤ 5/9) and age (≥ 8 years) to hyperthyroid cats. At T0, there were no significant differences between hyperthyroid and control cats for leptin (p = 0.06) or ghrelin concentrations (p = 0.27). At T1, leptin significantly decreased in ht-hypo cats compared to T0 (p = 0.0008) despite a significantly increased body weight in this group (p = 0.0001). Serum ghrelin concentrations did not differ between hyperthyroid cats with a history of polyphagia compared to non-polyphagic cats (p = 0.42). After RAIT, ghrelin concentration significantly increased in all hyperthyroid cats (p weight in different states of thyroid dysfunction; increasing ghrelin concentrations after RAIT suggest a ghrelin-independent mechanism for polyphagia in hyperthyroid cats.

  4. The seasonal and ovarian status effects on in vitro production of domestic cat embryos between Equator and Tropic of Capricorn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lílian R. Martins

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available From the Tropic of Capricorn to Equator, the seasonality of domestic cat is known to be absent, i.e., these animals are considered non-seasonal breeders at these regions. We hypothesized that this particularity might have some influence on in vitro embryo production. The aim of this experiment was to determine the percentage of cleavage and morulae and blastocyst formation produced from oocytes recovered from queen ovaries of three distinct status - follicular, luteal or inactive - during two different reproductive seasons experienced by cats in southeast of Brazil (22°53'09" S and 48°26'42" W - non breeding season (NBS, comprehending January to March; and breeding season (BS, August to October. Thirty queens were neutered. Ovaries were classified according to their status and were sliced in PBS for cumulus oocyte complex (COC releasing. Grade I COC were washed three times in H-MEM supplemented with BSA, glutamine, sodium pyruvate, cysteine, streptomycin and penicillin. Oocytes were incubated in groups of 20-30 in 400µL of DMEM supplemented with FSH, LH, estradiol, IGF-I and basic fibroblast growth factor under mineral oil for 30 or 36 hours at 38°C in humidified environment of 5% de O2, 5% CO2 and 90% N2. COC were fertilized in Ham's F-10 medium supplemented with BSA, cysteine, pyruvate and streptomycin/penicillin (culture medium with fresh semen selected through swim up technique. Eighteen hours later, the presumptive zygotes were denuded, the percentage of cleavage was determined and every 10 zygotes were transferred to 100mL drops of culture medium for culture during three days. After 72 hours of culture the percentage of morulae formation was evaluated and these structures were transferred to drops of the same culture medium. At the eighth day of culture blastocyst formation was analyzed. During NBS, from a total of 272 (inactive, 162 (luteal and 134 (follicular fertilized oocytes, the percentage of cleaved zygotes, morulae and

  5. Congenital and inherited neurologic diseases in dogs and cats: Legislation and its effect on purchase in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria Passantino

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Many of the congenital neurologic diseases can result in incapacity or death of the animal. Some of them, such as idiopathic epilepsy and hydrocephalus, exhibit breed or familial predisposition and a genetic basis was proved or suggested. Some diseases can be presumptively diagnosed after a detailed signalment (breed predisposition, history (e.g. family history because many of these defects have familial tendencies, and through physical exam; other diagnostic methods (radiography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance, electrophysiologic tests, etc. can provide supportive evidence for the congenital defect and help to confirm the diagnosis. Some cases can lead to civil law-suits when the lesions are congenital, but not easily recognizable, or when the lesions are hereditary but tend to became manifest only after some time (more than 12 months after the date of purchase, e.g., after the vice-free guarantee period has expired. Moreover, quite frequently an early diagnosis is not made because there are delays in consulting the veterinarian or the general practitioner veterinarian does not perceive subtle signs. This study was designed to focus on the medico-legal aspects concerning the buying and selling in Italy of dogs and cats affected by congenital and hereditary neurologic diseases that could constitute vice in these animals. While adequate provisions to regulate in detail the various aspects of pet sale have still to be drawn up by legislators, it may be helpful to involve breeders, by obliging them by contract to extend guarantees in the case of hereditary lesions, including neurologic diseases.

  6. The veining phenomenon in unalloyed plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, J.S.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation has been made of the veining phenomenon in unalloyed plutonium. The surface markings, or veins, which are sometimes seen on α-phase plutonium samples, arise as a result of the β→α transformation. As far as is known, this veining is unrivalled in its scale and form as compared with the solid state surface transformation effects shown by any other metal. The phenomenon has been explained by the application of the Le Chatelier principle to the phase change. In this instance, the large (10%) volume contraction associated with the β→α reaction and the anisotropy of the nonoclinic α-phase structure, account for the fact that the veins are so prominent in plutonium. On the basis of the proposed model, the veins can only form at temperatures where the transformation mechanism is non-martensitic. (Auth.)

  7. Effect of tetrastarch (hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4) on plasma creatinine concentration in cats: a retrospective analysis (2010-2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yozova, Ivayla D; Howard, Judith; Adamik, Katja N

    2017-10-01

    Objectives The objective was to determine survival and changes in creatinine concentrations after administration of 6% tetrastarch (hydroxyethyl starch [HES] 130/0.4) vs crystalloids in critically ill cats. Methods The medical records were reviewed for cats admitted to the intensive care unit with at least two plasma creatinine measurements and initial concentrations not exceeding the upper reference interval. Cats were excluded if they had received HES prior to admission or if they had received fluid therapy for creatinine concentrations were evaluated as the percentage change from initial values to the maximum subsequent measurements. Cats receiving only crystalloids were assigned to the crystalloid group; cats receiving only HES or HES and crystalloids were assigned to the HES group. Results Ninety-three cats were included in the study (62 in the crystalloid group, 31 in the HES group). The total median cumulative HES dose was 94 ml/kg (range 26-422 ml/kg) and 24 ml/kg/day (range 16-42 ml/kg/day). No difference was detected between the groups for age, sex, body weight or mortality. The HES group had a significantly longer length of hospitalisation ( P = 0.012), lower albumin concentrations ( P creatinine concentrations between the groups. Moreover, there was no significant difference in maximum change in creatinine concentrations in the subgroups of cats with systemic inflammatory response syndrome or sepsis. Conclusions and relevance In this population of cats, the administration of HES did not result in a significantly greater increase in creatinine from values measured on admission or higher mortality compared with administration of crystalloids. Further prospective studies are needed to assess both safety and efficacy of HES in cats before recommendations can be made.

  8. Hybrid Cat Bonds

    OpenAIRE

    Barrieu, Pauline; Louberge, Henri

    2009-01-01

    Natural catastrophes attract regularly the attention of media and have become a source of public concern. From a financial viewpoint, natural catastrophes represent idiosyncratic risks, diversifiable at the world level. But for reasons analyzed in this paper reinsurance markets are unable to cope with this risk completely. Insurance-linked securities, such as cat bonds, have been issued to complete the international risk transfer process, but their development is disappointing so far. This pa...

  9. Nuisances and welfare of free-roaming cats in urban settings and their association with cat reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunther, I; Raz, T; Berke, O; Klement, E

    2015-05-01

    Free roaming cats (FRC) are highly abundant in cities around the world. Increasing populations of these cats might result in impairment of cat welfare and cause nuisances and public health risks. In order to study the seasonal dynamics of FRC populations and its association with events of cat welfare impairment and nuisances, we analyzed a database of FRC-associated citizens' telephone complaint events, which were registered in five cities in Israel (total human population of 1.42 million residents) during the years 2007-2011. These complaint events were classified to the following six categories: cat's carcasses, kittens, parturition, aggressive behavior toward people, invasion to human facilities, and cat injuries and distress. Overall, 87,764 complaint events associated with these categories were registered in the five cities during the study period (123.2 complaint events per 10,000 citizens per year). Length of daylight was moderately correlated with the rate of complaints on kittens in the same month (r=0.64) and parturition in the previous month (r=0.54) (Pcat aggressiveness toward people, cat invasion to human facilities and cat injuries and distress. In most of the cities the rate of citizen complaints regarding carcasses, aggression, invasion and injuries were still significantly correlated with rate of complaints regarding kittens after omission of these joint complaints and remained significant after controlling for seasonality. These findings imply an association of cat welfare impairment and nuisances with FRC reproduction intensity. The current study revealed the high rate of nuisances and potential public health hazards related to FRC, as well as the impairment of cat welfare, which might be merely 'the tip of the iceberg' of the real welfare situation of these cats. Further studies should examine the effectiveness of FRC population control strategies for the reduction of the rate of nuisances and public health risks related to FRC, as well as for

  10. Extraterritorial hunting expeditions to intense fire scars by feral cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Hugh W.; Legge, Sarah; Jones, Menna E.; Johnson, Christopher N.

    2016-03-01

    Feral cats are normally territorial in Australia’s tropical savannahs, and hunt intensively with home-ranges only two to three kilometres across. Here we report that they also undertake expeditions of up to 12.5 km from their home ranges to hunt for short periods over recently burned areas. Cats are especially likely to travel to areas burned at high intensity, probably in response to vulnerability of prey soon after such fires. The movements of journeying cats are highly directed to specific destinations. We argue that the effect of this behaviour is to increase the aggregate impact of cats on vulnerable prey. This has profound implications for conservation, considering the ubiquity of feral cats and global trends of intensified fire regimes.

  11. Evaluation of thromboelastography in two factor XII-deficient cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blois, Shauna L; Holowaychuk, Marie K; Wood, R Darren

    2015-01-01

    The current report describes thromboelastography (TEG) findings in two cats with factor XII (FXII) deficiency. The first cat was diagnosed with bilateral perinephric pseudocysts; hemostatic testing was performed prior to performing renal aspirates. The second cat was healthy; hemostatic testing was performed prior to inclusion into a research project. Both cats had markedly prolonged partial thromboplastin times and hypocoagulable TEG tracings when samples were activated with kaolin. However, when tissue factor (TF) was used to activate the sample, both cats had normal-to-hypercoagulable TEG tracings. The cats each had a subnormal FXII level. TEG is becoming widely used to investigate hemostasis in veterinary patients, and TEG results in cats with FXII deficiency have not been previously reported. FXII deficiency is the most common hereditary hemostatic defect in cats. While FXII deficiency does not lead to in vivo hemorrhagic tendencies, it can lead to marked prolongation in activated partial thromboplastin and activated clotting times, and cannot be differentiated from true hemorrhagic diatheses without measuring individual factor activity. With the increased use of TEG to evaluate hemostasis in veterinary patients, it is important to recognize the effects of FXII deficiency on this testing modality. The finding of a hypocoagulable kaolin-activated TEG tracing and a concurrent normal TF-activated TEG tracing in samples should prompt clinicians to consider ruling out FXII deficiency.

  12. Evaluation of thromboelastography in two factor XII-deficient cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shauna L Blois

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Case summary The current report describes thromboelastography (TEG findings in two cats with factor XII (FXII deficiency. The first cat was diagnosed with bilateral perinephric pseudocysts; hemostatic testing was performed prior to performing renal aspirates. The second cat was healthy; hemostatic testing was performed prior to inclusion into a research project. Both cats had markedly prolonged partial thromboplastin times and hypocoagulable TEG tracings when samples were activated with kaolin. However, when tissue factor (TF was used to activate the sample, both cats had normal-to-hypercoagulable TEG tracings. The cats each had a subnormal FXII level. Relevance and novel information TEG is becoming widely used to investigate hemostasis in veterinary patients, and TEG results in cats with FXII deficiency have not been previously reported. FXII deficiency is the most common hereditary hemostatic defect in cats. While FXII deficiency does not lead to in vivo hemorrhagic tendencies, it can lead to marked prolongation in activated partial thromboplastin and activated clotting times, and cannot be differentiated from true hemorrhagic diatheses without measuring individual factor activity. With the increased use of TEG to evaluate hemostasis in veterinary patients, it is important to recognize the effects of FXII deficiency on this testing modality. The finding of a hypocoagulable kaolin-activated TEG tracing and a concurrent normal TF-activated TEG tracing in samples should prompt clinicians to consider ruling out FXII deficiency.

  13. Local cloning of CAT states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahaman, Ramij

    2011-01-01

    In this Letter we analyze the (im)possibility of the exact cloning of orthogonal three-qubit CAT states under local operation and classical communication (LOCC) with the help of a restricted entangled state. We also classify the three-qubit CAT states that can (not) be cloned under LOCC restrictions and extend the results to the n-qubit case. -- Highlights: → We analyze the (im)possibility of exact cloning of orthogonal CAT states under LOCC. → We also classify the set of CAT states that can(not) be cloned by LOCC. → No set of orthogonal CAT states can be cloned by LOCC with help of similar CAT state. → Any two orthogonal n-qubit GHZ-states can be cloned by LOCC with help of a GHZ state.

  14. Purring in cats during auscultation: how common is it, and can we stop it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, C J L; Ferasin, L; Ferasin, H; Holmes, M A

    2014-01-01

    When cats purr during examination it is difficult to perform auscultation. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of purring in cats during examination, and identify interventions that could be used to stop purring. Cats seen at a first opinion clinic were enrolled in the study and their purring status recorded. Thirty of the purring cats were exposed to up to three different interventions in an attempt to stop purring in a randomised controlled trial including blowing at the ear, use of an ethanol-based aerosol near the cat and proximity to a running tap. The 30 cats in the trial were subjected to a total of 54 attempts to stop purring, proximity to a running tap caused 17 of 21 (81%) cats to stop purring, blowing at the cat's ears worked in 2 of 15 (13%) cats, spraying an aerosol close to the cat was effective in 9 of 18 (50%) cases. In 2 cats (7%), none of the interventions interrupted purring. This study provides evidence that placing a purring cat near a running tap and in proximity to the discharge of an ethanol-based aerosol are effective measures to stop purring in order to allow auscultation. © 2013 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  15. Contraceptive vaccines for the humane control of community cat populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Julie K.

    2011-01-01

    Problem Free-roaming unowned stray and feral cats exist throughout the world, creating concerns regarding their welfare as well as their impact on the environment on public health. Millions of healthy cats are culled each year in an attempt to control their numbers. Surgical sterilization followed by return to the environment is an effective nonlethal population control method but is limited in scope due to expense and logistical impediments. Immunocontraception has the potential to be a more practical and cost-effective method of control. Method of study This is a review of current research in immunocontraception in domestic cats. Functional characteristics of an ideal immunocontraceptive for community cats would include a wide margin of safety for target animals and the environment, rapid onset and long duration of activity following a single treatment in males and females of all ages, and sex hormone inhibition. In addition, product characteristics should include stability and ease of use under field conditions, efficient manufacturing process, and low cost to the user. Two reproductive antigens, zona pellucida and GnRH, have been identified as possible targets for fertility control in cats. Results Zona pellucida, which is used successfully in multiple wildlife species, has achieved little success in cats. In contrast, immunization against GnRH has resulted in long-term contraception in both male and female cats following a single dose. GnRH is an ideal contraceptive target because it regulates pituitary and gonadal hormone responses in both males and females, thus suppressing nuisance behaviors associated with sex hormones in addition to preventing pregnancy. Conclusion The responsiveness of cats to fertility control via GnRH suppression should encourage researchers and cat control stakeholders to continue efforts to optimize vaccines that induce multi-year contraception following a single dose in a high proportion of treated cats. PMID:21501281

  16. Dystocia in the cat evaluated using an insurance database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst, Bodil Ström; Axnér, Eva; Öhlund, Malin; Möller, Lotta; Egenvall, Agneta

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to describe the incidence of feline dystocia with respect to breed. Methods The data used were reimbursed claims for veterinary care insurance and/or life insurance claims in cats registered in a Swedish insurance database from 1999-2006. Results The incidence rates for dystocia were about 22 cats per 10,000 cat-years at risk, 67 per 10,000 for purebred cats and seven per 10,000 for domestic shorthair cats. The median age was 2.5 years. A significant effect of breed was seen. An incidence rate ratio (IRR) that was significantly higher compared with other purebred cats was seen in the British Shorthair (IRR 2.5), the Oriental group (IRR 2.2), Birman (IRR 1.7), Ragdoll (IRR 1.5) and the Abyssinian group (IRR 1.5). A significantly lower IRR was seen in the Norwegian Forest Cat (IRR 0.38), the Maine Coon (IRR 0.48), the Persian/Exotic group (IRR 0.49) and the Cornish Rex (IRR 0.50). No common factor among the high-risk breeds explained their high risk for dystocia. There was no effect of location; that is, the incidence rate did not differ depending on whether the cat lived in an urban or rural area. Caesarean section was performed in 56% of the cats with dystocia, and the case fatality was 2%. Conclusions and relevance The incidence rate for dystocia was of a similar magnitude in purebred cats as in dogs. The IRR varied significantly among breeds, and the main cause for dystocia should be identified separately for each breed. A selection for easy parturitions in breeding programmes is suggested.

  17. The Phenomenon of Dental Fear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod

    Odontophobia is a rather unique phobia with special psychosomatic components that impact on the dental health of odontophobic persons. It also has psychosocial components largely as a result of destruction of the teeth and subsequent embarrassment that can affect a person and cause a vicious cycle...... of dental fear (see fig. 1). The phenomenon is facilitated by misunderstandings and myths generated by both patients and dentists (see table 1 for examples). The most common reasons given in the literature for such strong fears of dental treatment are: 1) bad experiences in childhood for 85% of cases, 2......) feeling of powerlessness and lack of control over personal emotional reactions and over the social situation in the dental chair, 3) social learning processes in which the image of the dentist is cast in a negative light by the mass media or by the person's relatives or friends and 4) that the person has...

  18. New Phenomenon of Commercial Corruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Nowakowski

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This article is about increase corruption in private sector as commercial corruption. This establishes a wide understanding of that phenomenon in social science and law. Corruption and bribery are types of fraud and are linked with the private sector too. Although certain types of corruption will decline as the private sector grows and consolidates, other new types involving private sector firms may increase. The commercial corruption can be described as relation inside of an organization and as relation between firms. Corruption in private sector in Poland is connected with social distrust and specific organizational culture, too. Commercial corruption is a familiar feature of their societies and has been the focus of law enforcement and institutional reform. Many others problems do not change the fact that such corruption is a new important problem and causes lost of competitiveness and creates a substitute for fair market and competition in Polish economy and abroad.

  19. Vascular diagnostics for Raynaud's phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinsdale G

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Graham Dinsdale, Ariane L Herrick Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, Institute of Inflammation and Repair, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester, UK Abstract: Raynaud's phenomenon (RP is common, and in most patients is primary (idiopathic when due to reversible vasospasm and does not progress to irreversible tissue injury. However, in those patients for whom RP is secondary to an underlying disease (eg, systemic sclerosis or atherosclerosis, progression to digital ulceration or critical ischemia can occur. Therefore, the key question for the clinician is “Why does this patient have RP?” Vascular diagnostics play a key role in answering this. In this review, we firstly discuss the different vascular investigations relevant to clinical practice: nail fold capillaroscopy (including the different methodologies for examining the nail fold capillaries, and the role of capillaroscopy in helping to differentiate between primary and systemic sclerosis-related RP, thermography (available in specialist centers, and evaluation of large vessel disease (for example, due to atherosclerosis. We then discuss research tools, mainly laser Doppler methods, including laser Doppler imaging and laser speckle contrast imaging. These are commercially available as complete imaging systems and are (relatively easy to use. The main current goal in vascular imaging research is to validate these novel state-of-the-art techniques as outcome measures of digital vascular disease, and then apply them in early and later phase studies of new treatment approaches, thus facilitating drug development programs. Keywords: Raynaud's phenomenon, systemic sclerosis, nail fold capillaroscopy, thermography, laser Doppler, angiography

  20. Effects of the α-adrenoceptor antagonists phentolamine, phenoxybenzamine, and Idazoxan on sympathetic blood flow control in the periodontal ligament of the cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwall, B.; Gazelius, B.

    1988-01-01

    Blood flow changes in the periodontal ligament (PDL) were measured indirectly by monitoring the local clearance of 125 I - during electric sympathetic nerve stimulation or close intra-arterial infusions of either noradrenaline (NA) or adrenaline (ADR) before and after administration of phentolamine (PA), phenoxybenzamine (PBZ) or Idazoxan (RX). At the doses used in the present study, PA was the only antagonist that significantly reduced the blood flow decrease seen on activation of sympathetic fibers, although PBZ also reduced this response. Idazoxan, however, did not induce the consistent effect on blood flow decreases seen on sympathetic activation. All three α-adrenoceptor antagonists almost abolished the effects of exogenously administered NA and ADR. The results suggest the presence of functional post-junctional adrenoceptors of both the α 1 and α 2 subtypes in the sympathetic regulation of the blood flow in the PDL of the cat. A component of the response elicited by electrical sympathetic stimulation appeared to be resistant to α-adrenoceptor blockade. Administration of guanethidine (which inhibits further release of NA and neuropeptide Y) after PA abolished this residual sympathetic response

  1. Desires and management preferences of stakeholders regarding feral cats in the Hawaiian islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohr, Cheryl A; Lepczyk, Christopher A

    2014-04-01

    Feral cats are abundant in many parts of the world and a source of conservation conflict. Our goal was to clarify the beliefs and desires held by stakeholders regarding feral cat abundance and management. We measured people's desired abundance of feral cats in the Hawaiian Islands and identified an order of preference for 7 feral cat management techniques. In 2011 we disseminated a survey to 5407 Hawaii residents. Approximately 46% of preidentified stakeholders and 20% of random residents responded to the survey (1510 surveys returned). Results from the potential for conflict index revealed a high level of consensus (86.9% of respondents) that feral cat abundance should be decreased. The 3 most common explanatory variables for respondents' stated desires were enjoyment from seeing feral cats (84%), intrinsic value of feral cats (12%), and threat to native fauna (73%). The frequency with which respondents saw cats and change in the perceived abundance of cats also affected respondent's desired abundance of cats; 41.3% of respondents stated that they saw feral cats daily and 44.7% stated that the cat population had increased in recent years. Other potential environmental impacts of feral cats had little affect on desired abundance. The majority of respondents (78%) supported removing feral cats from the natural environment permanently. Consensus convergence models with data from 1388 respondents who completed the relevant questions showed live capture and lethal injection was the most preferred technique and trap-neuter-release was the least preferred technique for managing feral cats. However, the acceptability of each technique varied among stakeholders. Our results suggest that the majority of Hawaii's residents would like to see effective management that reduces the abundance of feral or free-roaming cats. © 2013 Society for Conservation Biology.

  2. Diprosopia in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camón, J; Ruberte, J; Ordóñez, G

    1990-05-01

    A diprosopic cat is described. In the head, two snouts, three eyes and two pinnae were present. The mandible was single and immobile because labial skin of both upper lips and single lower lip was partly fused. Superimposition of upper and lower dental arches was impossible and the mouths remained permanently open. Two incomplete oral cavities were present and the two tongues were joined at their base. The brain was duplicated in part. In the cranium only occipital and temporal bones were normal, the basisphenoid was bifurcated and the remaining bones were duplicated. Embryological mechanisms are discussed.

  3. Discrete-Event Simulation Unmasks the Quantum Cheshire Cat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michielsen, Kristel; Lippert, Thomas; Raedt, Hans De

    2017-05-01

    It is shown that discrete-event simulation accurately reproduces the experimental data of a single-neutron interferometry experiment [T. Denkmayr {\\sl et al.}, Nat. Commun. 5, 4492 (2014)] and provides a logically consistent, paradox-free, cause-and-effect explanation of the quantum Cheshire cat effect without invoking the notion that the neutron and its magnetic moment separate. Describing the experimental neutron data using weak-measurement theory is shown to be useless for unravelling the quantum Cheshire cat effect.

  4. Serum thyroxine concentrations after radioactive iodine therapy in cats with hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meric, S.M.; Hawkins, E.C.; Washabau, R.J.; Turrel, J.M.; Feldman, E.C.

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-one cats with hyperthyroidism were given one dose of radioactive iodine (131I) IV. Serum thyroxine (T4) concentrations were measured before treatment in all cats, at 12-hour intervals after treatment in 10 cats, and at 48-hour intervals after treatment in 21 cats. Serum T4 concentrations also were measured one month after 131 I therapy in 29 cats. Activity of 131I administered was 1.5 to 6.13 mCi, resulting in a dose of 20,000 rads to the thyroid. Serum T4 concentrations before 131 I administration were 5.3 to 51.0 micrograms/dl, with a median T4 concentration of 11.0 micrograms/dl. Serum T4 decreased most rapidly during the first 3 to 6 days after treatment. Sixteen cats (55%) had normal serum thyroxine concentrations by day 4 after 131I administration, and 23 cats (74%) were euthyroxinemic by day 8 after treatment. One month after administration of 131I, the 29 cats evaluated were clinically improved, and 24 (83%) of the 29 cats evaluated had normal serum T4 concentrations, 3 cats (10%) remained hyperthyroxinemic, and 2 cats (7%) were hypothyroxinemic. Therefore, administration of 131I was a safe and effective method to quickly decrease serum T4 concentrations in hyperthyroid cats

  5. European bat Lyssavirus transmission among cats, Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacheux, Laurent; Larrous, Florence; Mailles, Alexandra; Boisseleau, Didier; Delmas, Olivier; Biron, Charlotte; Bouchier, Christiane; Capek, Isabelle; Muller, Michel; Ilari, Frédéric; Lefranc, Tanguy; Raffi, François; Goudal, Maryvonne; Bourhy, Hervé

    2009-02-01

    We identified 2 cases of European bat lyssavirus subtype 1 transmission to domestic carnivores (cats) in France. Bat-to-cat transmission is suspected. Low amounts of virus antigen in cat brain made diagnosis difficult.

  6. Toxoplasmosis: An Important Message for Cat Owners

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... role do cats play in the spread of toxoplasmosis? Cats get Toxoplasma infection by eating infected rodents, ... an infected cat may have defecated. What is toxoplasmosis? Toxoplasmosis is an infection caused by a microscopic ...

  7. Can people with Raynaud's phenomenon travel to high altitude?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luks, Andrew M; Grissom, Colin K; Jean, Dominique; Swenson, Erik R

    2009-01-01

    To determine whether high altitude travel adversely affects mountain enthusiasts with Raynaud's phenomenon. Volunteers with Raynaud's phenomenon were recruited using announcements disseminated by organizations dedicated to climbing or wilderness travel and Internet discussion boards dedicated to mountain activities to complete an online, anonymous survey. Survey questions addressed demographic variables, aspects of their Raynaud's phenomenon, and features of their mountain activities. Respondents compared experiences with Raynaud's phenomenon between high (>2440 m; 8000 feet) and low elevations and rated agreement with statements concerning their disease and the effects of high altitude. One hundred forty-two people, 98% of whom had primary Raynaud's phenomenon, completed the questionnaire. Respondents spent 5 to 7 days per month at elevations above 2440 m and engaged in 5.4 +/- 2.0 different activities. Eighty-nine percent of respondents engaged in winter sports and only 22% reported changing their mountain activities because of Raynaud's phenomenon. Respondents reported a variety of tactics to prevent and treat Raynaud's attacks, but only 12% used prophylactic medications. Fifteen percent of respondents reported an episode of frostbite following a Raynaud's phenomenon attack at high altitude. There was considerable heterogeneity in participants' perceptions of the frequency, duration, and severity of attacks at high altitude compared to their home elevation. Motivated individuals with primary Raynaud's phenomenon, employing various prevention and treatment strategies, can engage in different activities, including winter sports, at altitudes above 2440 m. Frostbite may be common in this population at high altitude, and care must be taken to prevent its occurrence.

  8. Systemic Cat Scratch Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Min Liao

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic cat scratch disease (CSD is often associated with prolonged fever and microabscesses in the liver and/or spleen. We report a case of systemic CSD with hepatic, splenic and renal involvement in an aboriginal child in Taiwan. A previously healthy 9-year-old girl had an intermittent fever for about 17 days, and complained of abdominal pain, headache and weight loss. Abdominal computed tomography showed multiple tiny hypodense nodular lesions in the spleen and both kidneys. Laparotomy revealed multiple soft, whitishtan lesions on the surface of the liver and spleen. Histopathologic examination of a biopsy specimen of the spleen showed necrotizing granulomatous inflammation with central necrosis surrounded by epithelioid cells and occasional Langhans' giant cells, strongly suggestive of Bartonella henselae infection. History revealed close contact with a cat. B. henselae DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction in the tissue specimen, and the single antibody titer against B. henselae was greater than 1:2048. These results confirmed the diagnosis of visceral CSD caused by B. henselae. The patient's symptoms resolved after treatment with rifampin and tetracycline. This case illustrates the need for inclusion of systemic CSD in patients with fever of unknown origin and abdominal pain.

  9. Accelerator programme at CAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramamurthi, S.S.

    1991-01-01

    The Accelerator Programme at the Centre for Advanced Technology (CAT), Indore, has very broad based concept under which all types of accelerators are to be taken up for design and fabrication. This centre will be housing a wide variety of accelerators to serve as a common facility for the universities, national laboratories in addition to laboratories under the Department of Atomic Energy. In the first phase of the programme, a series of electron accelerators are designed and fabricated. They are synchrotron radiation sources of 450 MeV (INDUS-I) and of 2 GeV (INDUS-II), microtron upto energy of 20 MeV, linear accelerator upto 20 MeV, and DC Accelerator for industrial irradiation upto 750 KeV and 20 KW. A proton accelerator of 300 MeV with 20 MeV linac injector is also designed. CAT is also developing a strong base for support technologies like ultra high vacuum, radio frequency and microwaves, DC pulsed and superconducting magnets, power supplies and controls etc. These technologies are very useful for other industrial applications also. To develop user groups to utilise INDUS-II synchrotron radiation source, a batch production of rotating Anode X-ray generators with power supplies has been initiated. So also, the sputter ion pumps, electron guns, turbo molecular pumps are brought into batch production. (author)

  10. The Overshoot Phenomenon in Geodynamics Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kommu, R. K.; Heien, E. M.; Kellogg, L. H.; Bangerth, W.; Heister, T.; Studley, E. H.

    2013-12-01

    The overshoot phenomenon is a common occurrence in numerical software when a continuous function on a finite dimensional discretized space is used to approximate a discontinuous jump, in temperature and material concentration, for example. The resulting solution overshoots, and undershoots, the discontinuous jump. Numerical simulations play an extremely important role in mantle convection research. This is both due to the strong temperature and stress dependence of viscosity and also due to the inaccessibility of deep earth. Under these circumstances, it is essential that mantle convection simulations be extremely accurate and reliable. CitcomS and ASPECT are two finite element based mantle convection simulations developed and maintained by the Computational Infrastructure for Geodynamics. CitcomS is a finite element based mantle convection code that is designed to run on multiple high-performance computing platforms. ASPECT, an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) code built on the Deal.II library, is also a finite element based mantle convection code that scales well on various HPC platforms. CitcomS and ASPECT both exhibit the overshoot phenomenon. One attempt at controlling the overshoot uses the Entropy Viscosity method, which introduces an artificial diffusion term in the energy equation of mantle convection. This artificial diffusion term is small where the temperature field is smooth. We present results from CitcomS and ASPECT that quantify the effect of the Entropy Viscosity method in reducing the overshoot phenomenon. In the discontinuous Galerkin (DG) finite element method, the test functions used in the method are continuous within each element but are discontinuous across inter-element boundaries. The solution space in the DG method is discontinuous. FEniCS is a collection of free software tools that automate the solution of differential equations using finite element methods. In this work we also present results from a finite element mantle convection

  11. Antihypertensive treatment with telmisartan in a cat with amlodipine-induced gingival hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lien Desmet

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Case summary Systemic arterial hypertension is commonly reported in middle-aged-to-older cats. Amlodipine is recommended as the initial antihypertensive drug in cats. In this case report, gingival hyperplasia secondary to the use of amlodipine in a cat is described. Benazepril as a monotherapy was unsuccessful in reducing blood pressure in this cat. After replacement of benazepril by telmisartan, gingival hyperplasia disappeared and blood pressure was well controlled. Relevance and novel information This case report describes the first reported case of reversible gingival hyperplasia as a result of the treatment with amlodipine. It also contains the first published data on the effect of telmisartan in a hypertensive cat.

  12. Lumbosacral agenesis in a cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielle C Hybki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Case summary Lumbosacral agenesis is a rare congenital condition reported in children. We report a 17-week-old female domestic shorthair cat with lumbosacral agenesis on whole-body radiographs. The cat was euthanized shortly thereafter presentation. A necropsy was not permitted. Relevance and novel information This is the first reported feline case of lumbosacral agenesis.

  13. College Students and Their Cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Lawrence; Alexander, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-two Siamese and 32 mixed breed cats' personalities were rated by their respective college student owners and compared. Further, the owners' self rated personality traits were correlated with the pets'; significant Siamese and Mixed differences and correlations were obtained. These are the first data to examine breed of cat on a personality…

  14. CONTRACT ADMINISTRATIVE TRACKING SYSTEM (CATS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Contract Administrative Tracking System (CATS) was developed in response to an ORD NHEERL, Mid-Continent Ecology Division (MED)-recognized need for an automated tracking and retrieval system for Cost Reimbursable Level of Effort (CR/LOE) Contracts. CATS is an Oracle-based app...

  15. Development of a laboratory model to assess fear and anxiety in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rivera, Christina; Ley, Jacqui; Milgram, Bill; Landsberg, Gary

    2017-06-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were: (1) to develop a laboratory-based model to assess fear and anxiety in cats using the feline open-field test (OFT) and the feline human interaction test (HIT); and (2) to validate the model using diazepam, a known anxiolytic. Methods Laboratory-housed cats (n = 41) were first classified as fearful, mildly fearful or non-fearful by a technician familiar with the cats and also by veterinary behaviorists (GL, JL), by assessing the cats' behavior in their home rooms. In experiment 1, each cat's behavior was assessed in an OFT and an HIT. In experiment 2, after administration of the anxiolytic diazepam, a subset of the cats was re-tested. Results In experiment 1, the OFT revealed significant group effects on two measures: duration of inactivity, and vocalization. Fearful animals had significantly longer periods of inactivity than non-fearful animals. Non-fearful and mildly fearful cats vocalized more frequently than fearful cats. In the HIT, fearful cats travelled less than non-fearful and mildly fearful cats. Fearful and mildly fearful animals had significantly longer durations of inactivity, and non-fearful and mildly fearful cats had a significantly higher frequency of vocalization compared with fearful cats. In experiment 2, in the OFT, treatment with diazepam caused an increase in distance travelled, shorter durations of inactivity, and more frequent inactivity and vocalization. In the HIT, diazepam increased distance travelled and decreased duration of inactivity. Fearful cats spent significantly less time near the human compared with non-fearful cats, and this persisted under diazepam. Conclusions and relevance The feline OFT and feline HIT can be used jointly to assess the effects of medications or other therapies on fear and anxiety in the domestic cat.

  16. Sporotrichosis in cats: ABCD guidelines on prevention and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloret, Albert; Hartmann, Katrin; Pennisi, Maria Grazia; Ferrer, Lluis; Addie, Diane; Belák, Sándor; Boucraut-Baralon, Corine; Egberink, Herman; Frymus, Tadeusz; Gruffydd-Jones, Tim; Hosie, Margaret J; Lutz, Hans; Marsilio, Fulvio; Möstl, Karin; Radford, Alan D; Thiry, Etienne; Truyen, Uwe; Horzinek, Marian C

    2013-07-01

    Sporotrichosis is an important subcutaneous fungal infection of humans and animals in some endemic tropical and subtropical areas. Among domestic species, cats are the most frequently infected. The primary mode of transmission is traumatic inoculation of fungal conidia from plants and soil. Contact with infected cats is the major mode of transmission to humans, especially in endemic areas like Brazil, where a large epidemic has occurred in the past decade. Most cases in cats are cutaneous, presenting as multiple ulcerated nodules and draining tracts in the skin. Lymphadenopathy, respiratory signs and systemic dissemination may also occur. Diagnosis is based on fungal detection by cytology and/or histology, and confirmation by culture. Treatment consists of at least 2 months' systemic antifungal therapy, with itraconazole as the first-choice agent. The prognosis is favourable provided there is good owner compliance and adverse drug effects do not occur. Contact with infected cats carries a high zoonotic risk. Cat owners travelling to endemic areas should be warned and advised to keep their cats indoors to prevent infection. Professionals must wear gloves when handling cats with skin nodules and ulcers and dealing with diagnostic samples.

  17. More than just T₄: diagnostic testing for hyperthyroidism in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Mark E

    2013-09-01

    In older cats presenting with clinical features of hyperthyroidism, confirmation of a diagnosis of thyroid disease is usually straightforward. However, the potential for false-negative and false-positive results exists with all thyroid function tests (especially in the context of routine screening of asymptomatic cats) and leads to clinical dilemmas. For example, a high serum T₄ value may be found in a cat that lacks clinical signs of hyperthyroidism, or hyperthyroidism may be suspected in a cat with normal total T₄ concentrations. To avoid unnecessary treatment and potentially adverse effects in a euthyroid cat, thyroid function tests must always be interpreted in the light of the cat's history, clinical signs, physical examination findings and other laboratory findings. In this article the author reviews the use of commonly recommended thyroid function tests, focusing on clinical scenarios that present diagnostic difficulties. In doing so, he draws on the veterinary and comparative literature, his own clinical experience, and data, unpublished to date, obtained from a series of 100 hyperthyroid cats consecutively diagnosed at his clinic.

  18. Assessing the impact of different persuasive messages on the intentions and behaviour of cat owners: A randomised control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Lynette J; Hine, Donald W; Bengsen, Andrew J; Driver, Aaron B

    2017-10-01

    Owners of free-ranging domestic cats (Felis catus) are under increasing pressure to keep their pet contained within their house or yard, in an effort to reduce adverse impacts on cat welfare, ecosystem biodiversity and neighbourhoods. We conducted a randomised online experiment to assess the effectiveness of two persuasive messages to encourage cat owners to contain their pets. A total of 512 Australian cat owners, who currently do not contain their cats, were randomly assigned to view one of three short video messages: one framed to highlight the negative impact of cats' on wildlife and biodiversity ('wildlife protection' frame), one framed to highlight the health and safety benefits of keeping cats contained ('cat benefit' frame), and a control message focused on general information about cats ('neutral' frame). We assessed the impact of these video messages on two post-treatment outcome variables: (1) the intention of owners to contain their cat; and (2) the adoption of containment practices, based on a 4-week follow-up survey. Mediation analysis revealed both the 'wildlife protection' and 'cat benefit' messages increased owners' motivation to contain their cat and their beliefs that they could effectively contain their cat to achieve the desired outcomes (response efficacy). In turn, higher levels of motivation and response efficacy predicted increased cat containment intentions and increased adoption of cat containment. In addition, the response efficacy effects of the 'cat benefit' message were strengthened by the cat owner's bond to their pet, suggesting audience segmentation may improve the effectiveness of interventions. Implications for future intervention development are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Toxoplasmosis : Beware of Cats !!!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubina Kumari Baithalu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Anthropozoonotic parasite Toxoplasma gondii causes widespread human and animal diseases, mostly involving central nervous system. Human acquires toxoplasmosis from cats, from consuming raw or undercooked meat and from vertical transmission to the fetus through placenta from mother during pregnancy. Socio-epidemiological as well as unique environmental factors also plays a significant role in transmission of this infection. Preventive measures should be taken into account the importance of culture, tradition, and beliefs of people in various communities more than solving poverty and giving health education. Therefore the focus of this article is to create public awareness regarding sense of responsibility of looking after pets to prevent such an important zoonotic disease. [Vet. World 2010; 3(5.000: 247-249

  20. CAT-D-T tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.; Blue, T.; Miley, G.H.

    1981-01-01

    The domains of plasma fuel cycles bounded by the D-T and Cat-D, and by the D-T and SCD modes of operation are examined. These domains, referred to as, respectively, the Cat-D-T and SCD-T modes of operation, are characterized by the number (γ) of tritons per fusion neutron available from external (to the plasma) sources. Two external tritium sources are considered - the blankets of the Cat-D-T (SCD-T) reactors and fission reactors supported by the Cat-D-T (SCD-T) driven hybrid reactors. It is found that by using 6 Li for the active material of the control elements of the fission reactors, it is possible to achieve γ values close to unity. Cat-D-T tokamaks could be designed to have smaller size, higher power density, lower magnetic field and even lower plasma temperature than Cat-D tokamaks; the difference becomes significant for γ greater than or equal to .75. The SCD-T mode of operation appears to be even more attractive. Promising applications identified for these Cat-D-T and SCD-T modes of operation include hybrid reactors, fusion synfuel factories and fusion reactors which have difficulty in providing all their tritium needs

  1. Assessment of melamine and cyanuric acid toxicity in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puschner, Birgit; Poppenga, Robert H; Lowenstine, Linda J; Filigenzi, Michael S; Pesavento, Patricia A

    2007-11-01

    The major pet food recall associated with acute renal failure in dogs and cats focused initially on melamine as the suspect toxicant. In the course of the investigation, cyanuric acid was identified in addition to melamine in the offending food. The purpose of this study was to characterize the toxicity potential of melamine, cyanuric acid, and a combination of melamine and cyanuric acid in cats. In this pilot study, melamine was added to the diet of 2 cats at 0.5% and 1%, respectively. Cyanuric acid was added to the diet of 1 cat at increasing doses of 0.2%, 0.5%, and 1% over the course of 10 days. Melamine and cyanuric acid were administered together at 0%, 0.2%, 0.5%, and 1% to 1 cat per dose group. No effect on renal function was observed in cats fed with melamine or cyanuric acid alone. Cats dosed with a combination were euthanized at 48 hours after dosing because of acute renal failure. Urine and touch impressions of kidneys from all cats dosed with the combination revealed the presence of fan-shaped, birefringent crystals. Histopathologic findings were limited to the kidneys and included crystals primarily within tubules of the distal nephron, severe renal interstitial edema, and hemorrhage at the corticomedullary junction. The kidneys contained estimated melamine concentrations of 496 to 734 mg/kg wet weight and estimated cyanuric acid concentrations of 487 to 690 mg/kg wet weight. The results demonstrate that the combination of melamine and cyanuric acid is responsible for acute renal failure in cats.

  2. The phenomenon of retarded potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noskov, N.K.

    2003-01-01

    The logic simulation of process of time delay of potential on a moved body - recipient resulted in the deduction about cyclic irregularity of time delay, that means, that the moved body makes longitudinal vibrations. A conclusion is drawn that length of longitudinal vibrations depending from three variable: the law of interaction, spacing interval between bodies of interaction and phase velocity looks like: λ=Hv ph /R·F(R) (1), where λ- length of oscillations; H- factor of proportionality; v ph - phase velocity of a body; R - distance between test and central bodies R(t); F(R) - law of interaction. So far as λ=v ph /v, and R·F(R)=∫ ∞ R F(R)dR=E move , then formula (1) will be transformed into: E move =Hv pv /λ=Hv. Thus, the energy of radiating having the similar law is only reflex of motion of a matter. The energy of oscillating motion can be expressed through linear maximal velocity. It is established, that different expressions of the same energy, result in the law of a view of a proportion for lengths of de Broglie's waves: It shows that de Broglie's waves - the actual oscillating motions of bodies, as demonstrate interference and diffraction pictures at a dissipation of the accelerated particles on crystalline gratings. This deduction has far-reaching consequences for finding - out of the cause bases of the laws of a nature. So, the quantum mechanics becomes partition of mechanics of solids and is comprises all interactions. The nuclear energy is not 'defect of mass', but is 'defect' of energy of oscillating motion: ΔE=H v1 -H v2 . Definition of real cause of nuclear energy is very important for construction of model of nuclei and for development of physics as the whole. The interconnection of the phenomenon of longitudinal vibrations of moved bodies, as result of irregularity of time delay of potential, with many other natural phenomena is looked through. By such, as: motion of planets and electrons on elliptical orbits, oscillating of dipping drips

  3. The happy victimizer phenomenon: Not found here

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jevtić Ana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Children’s attribution of emotions to a moral transgressor is an important research topic in the psychology of moral and emotional development. This is especially because of the so-called Happy Victimizer Phenomenon (HVP where younger children attribute positive emotions to a moral transgressor described in a story. In the two studies that we have conducted (children aged 5, 7 and 9, 20 of each age; 10 of each age in the second study we have tested the possible influence of the fear of sanctions and the type of transgression (stealing and inflicting body injuries on the attribution of emotions. Children were presented with stories that described transgressions and they were asked to answer how the transgressor felt. The fear of sanctions did not make a significant difference in attribution but the type of transgression did - more negative emotions were attributed for inflicting body injuries than for stealing. Positive emotions were explained with situational-instrumental explanations in 84% of cases while negative emotions were explained with moral explanations in 63,5%. Girls attributed more positive emotions (61% than boys (39%. However, our main finding was that, for the aforementioned age groups, we did not find the HVP effect although it has regularly been registered in foreign studies. This finding denies the generalizability of the phenomenon and points to the significance of disciplining styles and, even more so, culture for children’s attribution of emotions to moral transgressors.

  4. Sonography of cat scratch disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melville, David M; Jacobson, Jon A; Downie, Brian; Biermann, J Sybil; Kim, Sung Moon; Yablon, Corrie M

    2015-03-01

    To characterize the sonographic features of cat scratch disease and to identify features that allow differentiation from other causes of medial epitrochlear masses. After Institutional Review Board approval was obtained, patients who underwent sonography for a medial epitrochlear mass or lymph node were identified via the radiology information system. Patients were divided into 2 groups: cat scratch disease and non-cat scratch disease, based on pathologic results and clinical information. Sonograms were retrospectively reviewed and characterized with respect to dimension, shape (round, oval, or lobular), symmetry, location (subcutaneous or intramuscular), multiplicity, echogenicity (anechoic, hypoechoic, isoechoic, hyperechoic, or mixed), hyperechoic hilum (present or absent), adjacent anechoic or hypoechoic area, hyperemia (present or absent), pattern of hyperemia if present (central, peripheral, or mixed), increased posterior through-transmission (present or absent), and shadowing (present or absent). Sonographic findings were compared between the patients with and without cat scratch disease. The final patient group consisted of 5 cases of cat scratch disease and 16 cases of other causes of medial epitrochlear masses. The 2 sonographic findings that were significantly different between the cat scratch disease and non-cat scratch disease cases included mass asymmetry (P = .0062) and the presence of a hyperechoic hilum (P = .0075). The other sonographic findings showed no significant differences between the groups. The sonographic finding of an epitrochlear mass due to cat scratch disease most commonly is that of a hypoechoic lobular or oval mass with central hyperemia and a possible adjacent fluid collection; however, the presence of asymmetry and a hyperechoic hilum differentiate cat scratch disease from other etiologies. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  5. Hypophosphatemia and hemolytic anemia associated with diabetes mellitus and hepatic lipidosis in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, L G; Hardy, R M; Weiss, D J; Bartges, J W

    1993-01-01

    Hypophosphatemia associated with hemolytic anemia was diagnosed in five cats with diabetes mellitus and in one cat with idiopathic hepatic lipidosis. The hematocrit began decreasing within 24 to 48 hours after documented hypophosphatemia in each case. The anemia resolved in all five surviving cats. Because of the temporal relationship and lack of other detectable causes, hemolytic anemia was presumed to be caused by hypophosphatemia. There were increased Heinz bodies in three of six hypophosphatemic cats during episodes of hemolysis. Intravenous potassium phosphate administration corrected the hypophosphatemia in four of five cats. The effective dosages of intravenous phosphate ranged from 0.011 to 0.017 mmol of phosphate/kg/h for 6 to 12 hours. Hypocalcemia (5.4 to 8.7 mg/dL) occurred in four of five cats treated with intravenous phosphate; however, only one cat developed clinical signs attributable to hypocalcemia. Based on this retrospective study, we recommend monitoring serum phosphorus concentration every 6 to 12 hours in cats likely to become hypophosphatemic. Treatment of hypophosphatemia in cats is warranted because of the apparent increased susceptibility of cats to hypophosphatemia-induced hemolysis. Cats with severe hypophosphatemia (< or = 1.5 mg/dL) should be given oral or parenteral phosphate if contraindications do not exist.

  6. Sex specific differences in hepatic and plasma lipid profiles in healthy cats pre and post spaying and neutering: relationship with feline hepatic lipidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Valtolina, Chiara; Vaandrager, Arie B.; Favier, Robert P.; Tuohetahuntila, Maidina; Kummeling, Anne; Jeusette, Isabelle; Rothuizen, Jan; Robben, Joris H.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A link between lipid metabolism and disease has been recognized in cats. Since hepatic lipidosis is a frequent disorder in cats, the aim of the current study was to evaluate liver and plasma lipid dimorphism in healthy cats and the effects of gonadectomy on lipid profiling. From six female and six male cats plasma and liver lipid profiles before and after spaying/neutering were assessed and compared to five cats (three neutered male and two spayed female) diagnosed with hepatic li...

  7. The effect of position on the precision of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and correlation with body condition score in dogs and cats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnvad, Charlotte R.; Nielsen, Mie E.; Hansen, Susanna E.M.

    2017-01-01

    during DEXA scanning influences results. Dogs and cats that were brought to the University Hospital for Companion Animals for euthanasia during the period 15 September–6 November 2015 were consecutively recruited if owners signed a written consent. Following euthanasia and before rigor mortis...

  8. The effects of EGF and IGF-1 on FSH-mediated in vitro maturation of domestic cat oocytes derived from follicular and luteal stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yıldırım, Koray; Vural, M Rıfat; Küplülü, Sükrü; Ozcan, Ziya; Polat, I Mert

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and insulin like growth factor-I (IGF-1) on the in vitro maturation of cat oocytes recovered from follicular and luteal stage ovaries. Oocytes from follicular (n=580) and luteal (n=209) stages were harvested and divided into four groups, which were cultured in FSH-mediated maturation medium supplemented with: (1) EGF alone (25ng/mL); (2) IGF-1 alone (100ng/mL); (3) EGF+IGF-1 (25ng/mL EGF+100ng/mL IGF-I); or (4) no growth factor (control). The proportion of follicular stage oocytes reaching the metaphase II stage was significantly higher than that of oocytes obtained at the luteal stage in both control and study groups (pIGF-1, and 78.1% in EGF+IGF-1 groups, whereas the respective values for gametes collected from luteal stage ovaries were 12.5%, 17.5%, 12.5%, and 16.9%. Additionally, the differences between the study and control groups were significant in the case of follicular stage oocytes. Finally, supplementing the maturation medium with EGF and/or IGF-1 significantly enhanced the meiotic maturation of oocytes recovered from follicular stage ovaries. The present study also demonstrated that the combination of EGF and IGF-I provides an additional or synergic effect on meiotic maturation of oocytes recovered from the follicular stage. Copyright © 2014 Society for Biology of Reproduction & the Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research of Polish Academy of Sciences in Olsztyn. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  9. Biochemical effects of glyphosate based herbicide, Excel Mera 71 on enzyme activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), lipid peroxidation (LPO), catalase (CAT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and protein content on teleostean fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Palas; Pal, Sandipan; Mukherjee, Aloke Kumar; Ghosh, Apurba Ratan

    2014-09-01

    Effects of glyphosate based herbicide, Excel Mera 71 at a dose of 17.20mg/l on enzyme activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), lipid peroxidation (LPO), catalase (CAT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and protein content were measured in different tissues of two Indian air-breathing teleosts, Anabas testudineus (Bloch) and Heteropneustes fossilis (Bloch) during an exposure period of 30 days under laboratory condition. AChE activity was significantly increased in all the investigated tissues of both fish species and maximum elevation was observed in brain of H. fossilis, while spinal cord of A. testudineus showed minimum increment. Fishes showed significant increase LPO levels in all the tissues; highest was observed in gill of A. testudineus but lowest LPO level was observed in muscle of H. fossilis. CAT was also enhanced in both the fishes, while GST activity in liver diminished substantially and minimum was observed in liver of A. testudineus. Total protein content showed decreased value in all the tissues, maximum reduction was observed in liver and minimum in brain of A. testudineus and H. fossilis respectively. The results indicated that Excel Mera 71 caused serious alterations in the enzyme activities resulting into severe deterioration of fish health; so, AChE, LPO, CAT and GST can be used as suitable indicators of herbicidal toxicity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of the interaction conditions of the probe of an atomic-force microscope with the n-GaAs surface on the triboelectrization phenomenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baklanov, A. V., E-mail: baklanov@mail.ioffe.ru [St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University, Institute of Physics, Nanotechnology, and Telecommunications (Russian Federation); Gutkin, A. A.; Kalyuzhnyy, N. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Institute (Russian Federation); Brunkov, P. N. [St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University, Institute of Physics, Nanotechnology, and Telecommunications (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-15

    Triboelectrization as a result of the scanning of an atomic-force-microscope probe over an n-GaAs surface in the contact mode is investigated. The dependences of the local potential variation on the scanning rate and the pressing force of the probe are obtained. The results are explained by point-defect formation in the surface layers of samples under the effect of deformation of these layers during probe scanning. The charge localized at these defects in the case of equilibrium changes the potential of surface, which is subject to triboelectrization. It is shown that, for qualitative explanation of the observed dependences, it is necessary to take into account both the generation and annihilation of defects in the region experiencing deformation.

  11. Nutritional Management of Overweight and Obesity in Dogs and Cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorana Teodora MATEI

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Some of the most common nutritional disorders are overweight and obesity, a proportion of approximately 59% of dogs and cats being affected. A permanent challenge for vets is weight management, including the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity. Corporeal score and body-weight loss in dogs and cats have been monitored by feeding various diets. The study was conducted on a total of 10 animals (6 dogs and 4 cats, monitoring the effect of three types of food for dogs and two types for cats suffering from overweight and obesity.  Cooked food, dry food diet and premium dry food were investigated. We determined the quality and gross chemical composition of food and we measured corporeal score, weekly weight loss percentage and the number of calories consumed daily. We also appreciated the quality of life and activity level of the animals at the beginning and at the end of the trial. Nutritional management of investigated diets for overweight and obesity in dogs and cats revealed that through the smallest caloric restriction, dry food diet presented the highest efficiency, dogs and cats loosing weight steadily without losing muscle mass. Although the satiety effect occurs when the animals reach their ideal weight, the Rebound effect was not present.

  12. Collective Order within Family; An Axial Phenomenon regarding the Effect of Islamic Teachings on the ‎Economic Action of Family: A Study Based on the Grounded Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ‎ V. Arshadi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The present article aims to identify the intermediate factors regarding the effect of Islamic teachings on family economic action through an interpretative and multifactorial approach. The method is qualitative and is based on grounded theory method”. Due to the interdisciplinary nature of the matter, a semi-structured interview with 16 experts on Islamic economy, Muslim consumer behavior, educational sciences, psychology and sociology and the issue of values and actions has served as the main research tool. The samples were selected through purposive sampling and snowball method, and interviews were conducted to the point of theoretical saturation. Findings of data analysis in this three steps show that factors such as the synergy of the high quality of transfer of teachings from formal and informal education institutes, high quality of the perception of teachings by family members, high quality of family income resources, and faith and belief in the accountability in the Hereafter can create collective order within family based on the subjective value of Islamic economic teaching. The collective order is influenced by "underlying" and "structural" factors and leads to discretion behavior. This paper is also innovative in terms of its profound look into the formation of economic behavior within the family.

  13. NRPC ServCat priorities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — This document lists the Natural Resource Program Center’s priority ServCat documents. It is recommended that these documents- which include annual narrative reports,...

  14. H2 dilution effect in the Cat-CVD processes of the SiH4/NH3 system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansari, S.G.; Umemoto, Hironobu; Morimoto, Takashi; Yoneyama, Koji; Izumi, Akira; Masuda, Atsushi; Matsumura, Hideki

    2006-01-01

    Gas-phase diagnostics in the catalytic chemical vapor deposition processes of the SiH 4 /NH 3 /H 2 system were carried out to examine the effect of H 2 dilution. The decomposition efficiency of NH 3 showed a sharp decrease with the introduction of a small amount of SiH 4 , but this decrease was recovered by the addition of H 2 when the NH 3 pressure was low. On the other hand, at higher NH 3 pressures, the decomposition efficiency showed a minor dependence on the H 2 partial pressure. The addition of SiH 4 to the NH 3 system decreases the H-atom density by one order of magnitude, but this decrease is also recovered by H 2 addition. H atoms produced from H 2 must re-activate the catalyzer surfaces poisoned by SiH 4 when the NH 3 pressure is low

  15. Detached phenomenon: Its effect on the crystal quality of Ga{sub (1−x)}In{sub x}Sb bulk crystal grown by the VDS technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadkari, Dattatray, E-mail: db.gadkari@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Mithibai College, Mumbai 400056 (India)

    2013-05-15

    Vertical directional solidification (VDS) technique is used on the combined growth principals of the conventional methods since 1994, which leads to the detached growth. For evaluation of the detached growth, five bulk ingots of indium doped gallium–antimonide GaSb:In (In = 0.5, 0.25, 0.15) have been grown – without the seed, without contact to the ampoule wall, without coating and without external pressure. The gap is attributed to compensate the differential thermal dilatation that is grown with the reduced diameter than the diameter of the ampoule. VDS experiments have been proved that the sum of the contact angle and growth angle is large enough to allow detachment without any additional pressure difference under the melt to offset hydrostatic pressure. A meniscus forms at the bottom of the melt, the capillarity effect establishes due to which spontaneous gap could be created by the melt free surface, thus no thermal shear stress and thermo-mechanical stresses at the interface. Detached grown bulk GaSb:In crystals showed superior crystal quality with the highest physical properties and mobility than the crystals grown ever. The axial and radial composition profile of the grown GaSb:In ingots showed variation ≤10%. From the conical region, dislocation density decreases in the growth direction and reaches less than 10{sup 3} cm{sup −2}. - Highlights: ► Detachment: without seed, without ampoule contact, without coating, without external pressure. ► Detached ingot growth samples showed the highest physical properties and the carrier mobility. ► Initial to final transition: in detached growth, dislocations decreases and less than 10{sup 3} cm{sup −2}. ► Detached samples: Raman spectrum shows only TO phonon (110) direction of single orientation. ► Detached ingot: FTIR shows highest transmissions % but decreases on increase doping in samples.

  16. Multistate matrix population model to assess the contributions and impacts on population abundance of domestic cats in urban areas including owned cats, unowned cats, and cats in shelters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Jason B.

    2018-01-01

    Concerns over cat homelessness, over-taxed animal shelters, public health risks, and environmental impacts has raised attention on urban-cat populations. To truly understand cat population dynamics, the collective population of owned cats, unowned cats, and cats in the shelter system must be considered simultaneously because each subpopulation contributes differently to the overall population of cats in a community (e.g., differences in neuter rates, differences in impacts on wildlife) and cats move among categories through human interventions (e.g., adoption, abandonment). To assess this complex socio-ecological system, we developed a multistate matrix model of cats in urban areas that include owned cats, unowned cats (free-roaming and feral), and cats that move through the shelter system. Our model requires three inputs—location, number of human dwellings, and urban area—to provide testable predictions of cat abundance for any city in North America. Model-predicted population size of unowned cats in seven Canadian cities were not significantly different than published estimates (p = 0.23). Model-predicted proportions of sterile feral cats did not match observed sterile cat proportions for six USA cities (p = 0.001). Using a case study from Guelph, Ontario, Canada, we compared model-predicted to empirical estimates of cat abundance in each subpopulation and used perturbation analysis to calculate relative sensitivity of vital rates to cat abundance to demonstrate how management or mismanagement in one portion of the population could have repercussions across all portions of the network. Our study provides a general framework to consider cat population abundance in urban areas and, with refinement that includes city-specific parameter estimates and modeling, could provide a better understanding of population dynamics of cats in our communities. PMID:29489854

  17. Multistate matrix population model to assess the contributions and impacts on population abundance of domestic cats in urban areas including owned cats, unowned cats, and cats in shelters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flockhart, D T Tyler; Coe, Jason B

    2018-01-01

    Concerns over cat homelessness, over-taxed animal shelters, public health risks, and environmental impacts has raised attention on urban-cat populations. To truly understand cat population dynamics, the collective population of owned cats, unowned cats, and cats in the shelter system must be considered simultaneously because each subpopulation contributes differently to the overall population of cats in a community (e.g., differences in neuter rates, differences in impacts on wildlife) and cats move among categories through human interventions (e.g., adoption, abandonment). To assess this complex socio-ecological system, we developed a multistate matrix model of cats in urban areas that include owned cats, unowned cats (free-roaming and feral), and cats that move through the shelter system. Our model requires three inputs-location, number of human dwellings, and urban area-to provide testable predictions of cat abundance for any city in North America. Model-predicted population size of unowned cats in seven Canadian cities were not significantly different than published estimates (p = 0.23). Model-predicted proportions of sterile feral cats did not match observed sterile cat proportions for six USA cities (p = 0.001). Using a case study from Guelph, Ontario, Canada, we compared model-predicted to empirical estimates of cat abundance in each subpopulation and used perturbation analysis to calculate relative sensitivity of vital rates to cat abundance to demonstrate how management or mismanagement in one portion of the population could have repercussions across all portions of the network. Our study provides a general framework to consider cat population abundance in urban areas and, with refinement that includes city-specific parameter estimates and modeling, could provide a better understanding of population dynamics of cats in our communities.

  18. Quantum self-controlling free-falling cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chryssomalakos, C; Serrano-Ensástiga, E; Hernández-Coronado, H

    2015-01-01

    In the separation of rotations from internal motions in the n-body problem, there appear some gauge fields which physically represent Coriolis effects. These fields are also present in the “falling cat” problem: at the kinematical level they map changes in the cat's shape to changes in its orientation whereas at the dynamical level they show up as gauge potentials in the Hamiltonian. Classically, the vanishing angular momentum condition allows for the orientation degrees of freedom to decouple from the internal ones and the cat's re-orientation can be accounted for at the kinematical level, partially. In the quantum case the cat's reorientation description requires to be done on dynamical grounds. In this paper we explore the quantum version of the falling cat modelled as a three body problem. (paper)

  19. Properties of squeezed Schroedinger cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obada, A.S.F.; Omar, Z.M.

    1995-09-01

    In this article we investigate some statistical properties of the even and odd squeezed (squeezed Schroedinger cat) states. The quasi-probability distribution functions especially W(α) and Q(α) are calculated and discussed for these states. The phase distribution function is discussed. A generation scheme is proposed for either the squeezed generalized Schroedinger cat, or the squeezed number state. (author). 35 refs, 5 figs

  20. [Rhytidectomy and Raynaud's phenomenon: about two cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, J; Labbé, D

    2004-12-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon is a currently vascular syndrome (8 to 10% of women and 3 to 5% of men). It was defined as episodic ischaemia of the fingers, toes, nose, ears and nipples, which presents clinically as pallor, cyanosis, and often rubor of the skins, in response to cold, emotional stimuli and vasoconstriction agents. The phenomenon is caused by a vasoconstriction of arterials skin. In severe forms of the phenomenon, we can see ulcerations and necrosis. We report here two cases of rhytidectomy flap necrosis in Raynaud's Phenomenon. After review of literature, we explain the elements of physiopathology whose can explain these complications and we try to establish recommendations to these complications.

  1. Spatial adaptation of the cortical visual evoked potential of the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonds, A B

    1984-06-01

    Adaptation that is spatially specific for the adapting pattern has been seen psychophysically in humans. This is indirect evidence for independent analyzers (putatively single units) that are specific for orientation and spatial frequency in the human visual system, but it is unclear how global adaptation characteristics may be related to single unit performance. Spatially specific adaptation was sought in the cat visual evoked potential (VEP), with a view towards relating this phenomenon with what we know of cat single units. Adaptation to sine-wave gratings results in a temporary loss of cat VEP amplitude, with induction and recovery similar to that seen in human psychophysical experiments. The amplitude loss was specific for both the spatial frequency and orientation of the adapting pattern. The bandwidth of adaptation was not unlike the average selectivity of a population of cat single units.

  2. Food puzzles for cats: Feeding for physical and emotional wellbeing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Leticia Ms; Delgado, Mikel M; Johnson, Ingrid; Buffington, Ca Tony

    2016-09-01

    Many pet cats are kept indoors for a variety of reasons (eg, safety, health, avoidance of wildlife predation) in conditions that are perhaps the least natural to them. Indoor housing has been associated with health issues, such as chronic lower urinary tract signs, and development of problem behaviors, which can cause weakening of the human-animal bond and lead to euthanasia of the cat. Environmental enrichment may mitigate the effects of these problems and one approach is to take advantage of cats' natural instinct to work for their food. In this article we aim to equip veterinary professionals with the tools to assist clients in the use of food puzzles for their cats as a way to support feline physical health and emotional wellbeing. We outline different types of food puzzles, and explain how to introduce them to cats and how to troubleshoot challenges with their use. The effect of food puzzles on cats is a relatively new area of study, so as well as reviewing the existing empirical evidence, we provide case studies from our veterinary and behavioral practices showing health and behavioral benefits resulting from their use. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Suspected zonisamide-related anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinet, Audrey; Sammut, Veronique

    2017-12-15

    CASE DESCRIPTION A 2-year-old neutered male domestic shorthair cat was evaluated for sudden onset of cluster seizures. CLINICAL FINDINGS At an emergency clinic, the cat had hyperimmunoglobulinemia and thrombocytopenia. On referral, treatment with levetiracetam, zonisamide, and phenobarbital initially provided good control of cluster seizure activity (attributable to epilepsy of unknow origin). Two weeks later, assessments revealed that serum phenobarbital concentration was within the ideal range but serum zonisamide concentration exceeded the recommended therapeutic range. The dosage of zonisamide was therefore decreased. Four days after dosage reduction, the cat developed generalized lymphadenopathy. Cytologic analysis of lymph node aspirate samples revealed a heterogeneous population of well-differentiated lymphocytes, interpreted as marked reactivity. Although neoplasia could not be ruled out, hypersensitivity to phenobarbital was suspected, and this treatment was discontinued. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME Despite cessation of phenobarbital administration, generalized peripheral lymphadenopathy progressed and hyperglobulinemia and cytopenias developed. These abnormalities resolved after discontinuation of zonisamide administration. The cat remained seizure free with no recurrence of the aforementioned concerns after reinstitution of phenobarbital treatment. CLINICAL RELEVANCE To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of zonisamide-related lymphadenopathy, hyperglobulinemia, and cytopenias in a cat. Anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome is well documented in human medicine, but little information has been published in the veterinary medical literature. Although the effects of anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome in this cat were serious, these effects were reversible with treatment discontinuation.

  4. Evaluation of the clinical efficacy of benazepril in the treatment of chronic renal insufficiency in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Hisashi; Koyama, Hidekazu; Watanabe, Toshifumi; Kitagawa, Hitoshi; Nakano, Masakazu; Kajiwara, Keita; King, Jonathan N

    2006-01-01

    Chronic renal insufficiency (CRI) is a common disease in cats. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) have beneficial effects in humans with CRI by reducing the loss of protein in the urine and increasing life expectancy. The ACEI benazepril has beneficial effects on survival, clinical variables, or both as compared with placebo in cats with CRI. 61 cats with naturally occurring CRI. The cats were enrolled into a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Cats received placebo or 0.5-1 mg/kg benazepril once daily for up to 6 months. Urine protein/urine creatinine ratios were significantly (P benazepril as compared with placebo at days 120 and 180. Three cats with placebo and 1 cat with benazepril were removed prematurely from the study because of deterioration of CRI or death. Cats were classified into 4 stages of CRI according to the International Renal Interest Society (IRIS) classification scheme. Incidence rates of cats with IRIS classification stage 2 or stage 3 that remained in stage 2 or 3 without progressing to stage 4 were higher with benazepril (93 +/- 5%) as compared with placebo (73 +/- 13%). These results suggest a potential for benazepril to delay the progression of disease, extend survival time, or both in cats with CRI.

  5. The ontogenesis of lateralized behavior in the domestic cat, Felis silvestris catus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Deborah L; Millsopp, Sarah

    2012-02-01

    For the first time, the development of paw preferences in the domestic cat, Felis silvestris catus, is explored. Twelve cats were tested at ages 12 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year on a challenge requiring them to use one of their paws to retrieve food. To control for repeated testing of the same cats at different ages, the subjects' paw preferences were compared with those of cats tested just once, at 6 months (n = 11) or 1 year (n = 14) of age. Analysis revealed a significant effect of age on the distribution of cats' paw preferences. Cats were significantly more likely to be ambilateral than paw preferent at 12 weeks and at 6 months but more likely to display a lateral bias in paw use at 1 year. There was a significant positive correlation between cats' paw preferences at 6 months and at 1 year. Lateralized behavior was strongly sex related. Females had a greater preference for using their right paw; males were significantly more inclined to adopt their left. Analysis revealed no significant difference in the direction or strength of paw preferences of cats tested longitudinally or cross-sectionally at 6 months or 1 year of age. Findings indicate that cats develop paw preferences by 1 year and hint at a relative stability in preferred paw use over time. The strong sex effect observed strengthens the case for the influence of a biological mechanism in the emergence of motor asymmetry in cats.

  6. An intriguing oscillating combustion phenomenon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corbel, J.M.L.; Lingen, J.N.J.; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Gijzeman, O.L.J.; Meijerink, A.

    2012-01-01

    Strobes are pyrotechnic compositions that emit bright flashes of white or colored light at regular time intervals. The strobe effect has applications in various fields, most notably in the fireworks industry and in the military area (signaling – missile decoys – crowd control). However, the chemical

  7. Binaural interaction in low-frequency neurons in inferior colliculus of the cat. II. Effects of changing rate and direction of interaural phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, T C; Kuwada, S

    1983-10-01

    We used the binaural beat stimulus to study the interaural phase sensitivity of inferior colliculus (IC) neurons in the cat. The binaural beat, produced by delivering tones of slightly different frequencies to the two ears, generates continuous and graded changes in interaural phase. Over 90% of the cells that exhibit a sensitivity to changes in the interaural delay also show a sensitivity to interaural phase disparities with the binaural beat. Cells respond with a burst of impulses with each complete cycle of the beat frequency. The period histogram obtained by binning the poststimulus time histogram on the beat frequency gives a measure of the interaural phase sensitivity of the cell. In general, there is good correspondence in the shapes of the period histograms generated from binaural beats and the interaural phase curves derived from interaural delays and in the mean interaural phase angle calculated from them. The magnitude of the beat frequency determines the rate of change of interaural phase and the sign determines the direction of phase change. While most cells respond in a phase-locked manner up to beat frequencies of 10 Hz, there are some cells tht will phase lock up to 80 Hz. Beat frequency and mean interaural phase angle are linearly related for most cells. Most cells respond equally in the two directions of phase change and with different rates of change, at least up to 10 Hz. However, some IC cells exhibit marked sensitivity to the speed of phase change, either responding more vigorously at low beat frequencies or at high beat frequencies. In addition, other cells demonstrate a clear directional sensitivity. The cells that show sensitivity to the direction and speed of phase changes would be expected to demonstrate a sensitivity to moving sound sources in the free field. Changes in the mean interaural phase of the binaural beat period histograms are used to determine the effects of changes in average and interaural intensity on the phase sensitivity

  8. Kierkegaard and the Sheer Phenomenon of Love

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søltoft, Pia

    2013-01-01

    In this article we will argue that Kierkegaard has a positive view of love as a sheer natural and universal phenomenon. This sheer phenomenon of love is rooted in God’s love and is implanted in human nature by its Creator. Therefore this natural urge to love, that manifests itself both as a lack...

  9. Terrorism as a Social and Legal Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebrennikova, Anna; Mashkova, Yekaterina

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the concept of terrorism as a social and legal phenomenon, its international legal and criminal-legal characteristics. Highlighted are the main aspects of cooperation of the states and the international community to counter terrorist activities. Terrorism as a social phenomenon is determined by paragraph 1 of article 3 of the…

  10. Prussian phenomenon and its historical distortion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Y. Plenkov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the phenomenon of Prussia. Once, Prussia had been the largest continental Protestant state in Europe. The main issue of this phenomenon is that upon the tragic events of the World War II Prussian history and heritage had been considerably distorted, in order to compensate somehow for the dreadful casualties suffered by the victorious powers. The common European misconception implied that Prussia had been the bulwark of militarism, and therefore had to bear all the responsibility for the atrocities of war. Unfortunately, the majority of modern German historians share such misinterpretation of Prussian heritage in order to please false political correctness, perhaps, as an act of contrition for National Socialism and its crimes. However, the Prussian tradition and history go far beyond this militarism, and this article explains what ways. The authors believe that there should not be any prejudices and biases, that any subject should be examined sine ira et studio. Moreover, given that it is possible to characterize the Great French Revolution as a juristic one, and the Great October revolution – as a social one, the Prussian revolution “from above”, led by the first representatives of the Hohenzollern family, may be well considered as a pedagogical revolution. This revolution did bring definitely positive changes; they are surveyed in the article. The French Revolution has not eliminated the covetousness of the bourgeoisie after 1789; despotism of the authorities and people’s passiveness similarly have remained unaltered in Russia after 1917. On the contrary, Federal Republic of Germany of nowadays, distinctive for its law, order and effective responsible government is unthinkable without Prussian heritage.

  11. Support for Lateralization of the Whorf Effect beyond the Realm of Color Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Aubrey L.; Regier, Terry; Kay, Paul; Ivry, Richard B.

    2008-01-01

    Recent work has shown that Whorf effects of language on color discrimination are stronger in the right visual field than in the left. Here we show that this phenomenon is not limited to color: The perception of animal figures (cats and dogs) was more strongly affected by linguistic categories for stimuli presented to the right visual field than…

  12. Insulin sensitivity, fat distribution, and adipocytokine response to different diets in lean and obese cats before and after weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenig, M; Thomaseth, K; Waldron, M; Ferguson, D C

    2007-01-01

    Obesity is a major health problem in cats and a risk factor for diabetes. It has been postulated that cats are always gluconeogenic and that the rise in obesity might be related to high dietary carbohydrates. We examined the effect of a high-carbohydrate/low-protein (HC) and a high-protein/low-carbohydrate (HP) diet on glucose and fat metabolism during euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp, adipocytokines, and fat distribution in 12 lean and 16 obese cats before and after weight loss. Feeding diet HP led to greater heat production in lean but not in obese cats. Regardless of diet, obese cats had markedly decreased glucose effectiveness and insulin resistance, but greater suppression of nonesterified fatty acids during the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp was seen in obese cats on diet HC compared with lean cats on either diet or obese cats on diet HP. In contrast to humans, obese cats had abdominal fat equally distributed subcutaneously and intra-abdominally. Weight loss normalized insulin sensitivity; however, increased nonesterified fatty acid suppression was maintained and fat loss was less in cats on diet HC. Adiponectin was negatively and leptin positively correlated with fat mass. Lean cats and cats during weight loss, but not obese cats, adapted to the varying dietary carbohydrate/protein content with changes in substrate oxidation. We conclude that diet HP is beneficial through maintenance of normal insulin sensitivity of fat metabolism in obese cats, facilitating the loss of fat during weight loss, and increasing heat production in lean cats. These data also show that insulin sensitivity of glucose and fat metabolism can be differentially regulated in cats.

  13. MOBBING PHENOMENON - FACTORS OF DISCRIMINATION AND STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROMANESCU MARCEL LAURENTIU

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on exemplifying the features of discrimination phenomenon in the workplace, a phenomenon that has appeared in the Romanian social studies only in the last 4 years. Mobbing phenomenon has been analyzed by several countries in Europe such as England, France, Germany; after these analyzes it has been found that this phenomenon refers only to actions of intense psychological pressure. Actions are geared to a single employee, in order to cause it to leave its job. Without these measures, dismissal of the employee would lead to numerous legal problems on the employer. In conclusion, employee who is the subject of mobbing phenomenon must endure a long period of time a series of injustices focused on himself, but also extremely high humiliation, which determines him to mentally give up and take the decision to resign.

  14. Cat and dog exposure and respiratory morbidities in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Christopher B; Raraigh, Karen S; Green, Deanna M; Blackman, Scott M; Cutting, Garry R; Collaco, Joseph M

    2014-10-01

    To understand the triggers that may impact respiratory health in cystic fibrosis (CF), including the effects of pets, because environmental factors contribute to one-half of the variation in lung function in patients with CF. A total of 703 subjects with CF were recruited through the US CF Twin-Sibling Study. Questionnaires were used to determine the presence/absence of cats and dogs in households with a child with CF. Questionnaires, chart review, and US CF Foundation Patient Registry data were used to track respiratory and infection outcomes. Within the sample, 47% of subjects reported owning a dog, and 28% reported owning a cat. After adjustment for demographic factors, dog ownership was not associated with any adverse clinical outcomes, and cat ownership was associated an increased risk in developing nasal polyps (aOR 1.66; P = .024) compared with noncat owners. Subjects who owned both cats and dogs were twice as likely to report wheezing compared with other subjects (aOR: 2.01; P = .009). There were no differences in prevalence and age of acquisition for the common CF respiratory pathogens Pseudomonas aeruginosa and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus between cat/dog owners and noncat/dog owners. Cat ownership was associated with a greater frequency of developing nasal polyps and combined cat-dog ownership was associated with a greater rate of wheezing. Prospective studies are needed to confirm these associations and the potential psychosocial benefits of cat and/or dog ownership. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Feline hepatic biotransformation of diazepam: Differences between cats and dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beusekom, Cyrina D; van den Heuvel, Jeroen J M W; Koenderink, Jan B; Russel, Frans G M; Schrickx, Johannes A

    2015-12-01

    In contrast to humans and dogs, diazepam has been reported to induce severe hepatic side effects in cats, particularly after repeated dosing. With the aim to elucidate the mechanisms underlying this apparent sensitivity of cats to drug-induced liver injury, in a series of in vitro experiments, the feline-specific biotransformation of diazepam was studied with liver microsomes obtained from cats and dogs and the possible inhibition of the bile salt export pump (Bsep) was measured in isolated membrane vesicles overexpressing feline and canine Bsep. In line with previous in vivo studies, the phase I metabolites nordiazepam, temazepam and oxazepam were measurable in microsomal incubations, although enzyme velocity of demethylases and hydroxylases differed significantly between cats and dogs. In cats, the main metabolite was temazepam, which also could be glucuronidated. In contrast to dogs, no other glucuronidated metabolites could be observed. In addition, in the membrane vesicles an inhibition of the transport of the Bsep substrate taurocholic acid could be observed in the presence of diazepam and its metabolites. It was concluded that both mechanisms, the slow biotransformation of diazepam as well the inhibition of the bile acid efflux that results in an accumulation of bile acids in the hepatocytes, seem to contribute to the liver injury observed in cats following repetitive treatment with diazepam. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Predictors of proximity to others in colony housed shelter cats (Felis silvestris catus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malini Suchak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Colony housing of cats allows shelters to maximize the number of cats housed in limited space. Most research on colony-housed cats examines stress in relation to group size or enclosure size. While this is important for evaluating welfare, it is equally important to understand how cats are interacting socially in these colonies. We observed 259 adult cats housed in groups of two to eight individuals. Scan samples were used to assess how frequently individual cats were in close proximity to other cats. These data were used to measure individual differences in sociability and patterns of proximity to certain partners. We used information about the past history of the cat, which was collected upon admission to the shelter to identify predictors of time spent in proximity. There was a high degree of inter-individual variability in sociability. Strays tended to spend less time in proximity to other cats, and this effect was most pronounced in females.However, none of the information collected upon admission predicted patterns of proximity to certain partners, or which cats spent time in association witheach other. Future studies should explore the implications of differences in sociability by associating observations of social behavior and stress behaviors

  17. Longitudinal change of COPD assessment test (CAT) in a telehealthcare cohort is associated with exacerbation risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassouli, Frank; Baty, Florent; Stolz, Daiana; Albrich, Werner Christian; Tamm, Michael; Widmer, Sandra; Brutsche, Martin Hugo

    2017-01-01

    There are only scarce data regarding the evolution of the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) assessment test (CAT) over time. Our aim was to investigate the evolution of the CAT in a telehealthcare (THC) cohort and to evaluate its potential to predict exacerbations. The CAT was measured weekly over up to 1 year in 40 COPD patients undergoing a THC intervention. The evolution of the CAT was analyzed using linear regression. The association between this evolution and the occurrence of exacerbations was evaluated using the Andersen-Gill formulation of the Cox proportional hazards model for the analysis of recurrent time-to-event data with time-varying predictors. The median CAT at inclusion was 17 (interquartile range 13-22) points. During the study, 25% of patients had a significant negative slope (median -7 points per year [ppy]), 38% were stable (median +0 ppy) and 38% had a significant positive slope (median +6 ppy). The median slope of the CAT in the overall cohort was +1 (interquartile range -3 to +6) ppy. A significant positive association was found between the change in CAT scores and the risk of exacerbations (hazard ratio =1.08, 95% CI: 1.03-1.13; p evolution of the CAT over time and the risk of exacerbations. In about one-fifth of patients, there was a significant learning effect in filling out the CAT, before reliable results could be obtained. The evolution of the CAT could help to assess the risk for future exacerbations.

  18. Behavior and Welfare of Domestic Cats Housed in Cages Larger than U.S. Norm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, Judith L; Croney, Candace C; Buffington, C Tony

    2017-01-01

    The effect of providing additional floor space on cat behavior and welfare is not well documented. This study involved replication of an investigation of cats' responses to enhanced cage and room environments using cages of 0.56 m 2 with the same methodology but an increased space allowance of 1.1 m 2 . Singly housed adult cats (n = 59) were randomly assigned to a treatment group that was a combination of a managed or unmanaged room and an enriched or unenriched cage environment. Cats were observed for 2 days for maintenance, affiliative, and avoidant behaviors using scan sampling and 5-min, continuous focal sampling. At the end of Day 2, cats' reactions to the approach of an unfamiliar person were assessed. Cats housed in enriched/managed environments exhibited more maintenance and affiliative behaviors and fewer avoidant behaviors than cats in unmanaged/unenriched environments, suggesting that macro and micro environments may be equally relevant to the cat. Increased space did not enhance the cats' welfare outcomes, suggesting that the provision of additional cage space may not be as important to the cat as a managed housing environment.

  19. Association of CAT-262C/T with the concentration of catalase in seminal plasma and the risk for male infertility in Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousnane, Nour El Houda; May, Sadiq; Yahia, Mouloud; Abu Alhaija, Abed Alkarem

    2017-10-01

    Catalase (CAT) plays a central role in the protection of different cell types against the deleterious effects of hydrogen peroxide. In human, CAT is implicated in many physiological and pathological conditions including idiopathic male infertility. In this study we examined the association between CAT levels in seminal plasma with different sperm parameters and with CAT-262 C/T polymorphism and their risk for idiopathic male infertility in Algeria. Semen and blood samples were obtained from 111 infertile males and 104 fertile controls from the region of Eastern Algeria following informed consent. Standard semen parameters, DNA integrity, and CAT concentration in seminal plasma were evaluated. CAT-262C/T genotypes were screened using allele specific PCR. Seminal CAT activity was significantly different (pCAT activity and semen parameters (volume, motility, concentration, and morphology) were detected, but not with sperm DNA integrity. There was no direct association between CAT-262C/T polymorphism and general male infertility. However, the results presented in this study showed that CAT activity is remarkably associated with the CAT-262T allele (p=0.001) and the different CAT-262C/T genotypes. This study highlighted the major differences in the seminal plasma CAT content between infertile and fertile males and the differences of CAT concentration between different CAT-262C/T genotypes carriers.

  20. CatB is Critical for Total Catalase Activity and Reduces Bactericidal Effects of Phenazine-1-Carboxylic Acid on Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae and X. oryzae pv. oryzicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiayan; Wu, Jian; Xu, Shu; Duan, Yabing; Zhou, Mingguo

    2017-02-01

    Rice bacterial leaf blight, caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, and rice bacterial leaf streak, caused by X. oryzae pv. oryzicola, are major diseases of rice. Phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA) is a natural product that is isolated from Pseudomonas spp. and is used to control many important rice diseases in China. We previously reported that PCA disturbs the redox balance, which results in the accumulation of reactive oxygen species in X. oryzae pv. oryzae. In this study, we found that PCA significantly upregulated the transcript levels of catB and katE, which encode catalases, and that PCA sensitivity was reduced when X. oryzae pvs. oryzae and oryzicola were cultured with exogenous catalase. Furthermore, catB deletion mutants of X. oryzae pvs. oryzae and oryzicola showed dramatically decreased total catalase activity, increased sensitivity to PCA, and reduced virulence in rice. In contrast, deletion mutants of srpA and katG, which also encode catalases, exhibited little change in PCA sensitivity. The results indicate that catB in both X. oryzae pvs. oryzae and oryzicola encodes a catalase that helps protect the bacteria against PCA-induced stress.

  1. Prevalence of feline immunodeficiency virus infection in domesticated and feral cats in eastern Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Jacqueline M; Bell, Erin T; Hales, Louise; Toribio, Jenny-Ann L M L; White, Joanna D; Wigney, Denise I; Baral, Randolph M; Malik, Richard

    2007-08-01

    Serum samples from 340 pet cats presented to three inner city clinics in Sydney Australia, 68 feral cats from two separate colonies in Sydney, and 329 cattery-confined pedigree and domestic cats in eastern Australia, were collected over a 2-year period and tested for antibodies directed against feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) using immunomigration (Agen FIV Rapid Immunomigration test) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods (Snap Combo feline leukaemia virus antigen/FIV antibody test kit, IDEXX Laboratories). Western blot analysis was performed on samples in which there was discrepancy between the results. Information regarding breed, age, gender, housing arrangement and health status were recorded for all pet and cattery-confined cats, while the estimated age and current physical condition were recorded for feral cats. The FIV prevalence in the two feral cat populations was 21% and 25%. The majority of FIV-positive cats were male (60-80%). The FIV prevalence in cattery-confined cats was nil. The prevalence of FIV in the pet cat sample population was 8% (27/340) with almost equal prevalence in 'healthy' (13/170) and 'systemically unwell' (14/170) cats. The age of FIV-positive pet cats ranged from 3 to 19 years; all FIV-positive cats were domestic shorthairs with outside access. The median age of FIV-positive pet cats (11 years) was significantly greater than the median age of FIV-negative pet cats (7.5 years: Pcats (21/172; 12%) was three times that in female pet cats (6/168; 4%; Pcat population given outside access and continued FIV infection present in the feral population, this study highlights the need to develop rapid, accurate and cost-effective diagnostic methods that are not subject to false positives created by concurrent vaccination against FIV. This is especially important in re-homing stray cats within animal shelters and monitoring the efficacy of the new vaccine, which has not been challenged against Australian strains. The absence of FIV

  2. Efficacy of praziquantel against Clonorchis sinensis infection in dogs and cats.

    OpenAIRE

    斎藤, 哲郎; 森重, 和久; 川崎, 伸二; 頓宮, 廉正

    1993-01-01

    The efficacy of praziquantel was tested using 11 dogs and 3 cats infected with Clonorchis sinensis. Each experimental animal was infected with 50 metacercariae of Clonorchis sinensis respectively. The efficacy of the drug was evaluated by considerable reductions of EPG. The worms were eliminated from 91% of dogs and 100% of cats with hypodermic injection of total 75mg/kg praziquantel. This drug was effective against Clonorchis sinensis infection in dogs and cats as in the case of other tremat...

  3. Priming intelligent behavior: an elusive phenomenon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R Shanks

    Full Text Available Can behavior be unconsciously primed via the activation of attitudes, stereotypes, or other concepts? A number of studies have suggested that such priming effects can occur, and a prominent illustration is the claim that individuals' accuracy in answering general knowledge questions can be influenced by activating intelligence-related concepts such as professor or soccer hooligan. In 9 experiments with 475 participants we employed the procedures used in these studies, as well as a number of variants of those procedures, in an attempt to obtain this intelligence priming effect. None of the experiments obtained the effect, although financial incentives did boost performance. A Bayesian analysis reveals considerable evidential support for the null hypothesis. The results conform to the pattern typically obtained in word priming experiments in which priming is very narrow in its generalization and unconscious (subliminal influences, if they occur at all, are extremely short-lived. We encourage others to explore the circumstances in which this phenomenon might be obtained.

  4. Priming Intelligent Behavior: An Elusive Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, David R.; Newell, Ben R.; Lee, Eun Hee; Balakrishnan, Divya; Ekelund, Lisa; Cenac, Zarus; Kavvadia, Fragkiski; Moore, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Can behavior be unconsciously primed via the activation of attitudes, stereotypes, or other concepts? A number of studies have suggested that such priming effects can occur, and a prominent illustration is the claim that individuals' accuracy in answering general knowledge questions can be influenced by activating intelligence-related concepts such as professor or soccer hooligan. In 9 experiments with 475 participants we employed the procedures used in these studies, as well as a number of variants of those procedures, in an attempt to obtain this intelligence priming effect. None of the experiments obtained the effect, although financial incentives did boost performance. A Bayesian analysis reveals considerable evidential support for the null hypothesis. The results conform to the pattern typically obtained in word priming experiments in which priming is very narrow in its generalization and unconscious (subliminal) influences, if they occur at all, are extremely short-lived. We encourage others to explore the circumstances in which this phenomenon might be obtained. PMID:23637732

  5. THE BUREAUCRATIC PHENOMENON: CLASSICAL CONCEPTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Дама Ибрагима

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this article - to analyze Hegel and Karl Marx’s classic bureaucracy theories and also Max Weber’s concept of rational bureaucracy and its development in the works of Herbert Simon, Robert Merton, Peter Blau and Michel Crozier. It shows that the above listed researchers only undertook a change of terminology within the same theoretical tradition. The article describes different approaches to the bureaucratic system of administrative schools of the late 1950s and early 1980s. Major conclusions in the article include the following: administering the state apparatus consists in the organization of government on the basis of regulated rights, mandatory procedures that are invoked to ensure balance in the interest of man and society; bad effectiveness of government, infringement of the rights and freedoms of the individual is the result of dysfunction in the state apparatus; the struggle against it can be carried out with the help of administrative, economical and legal methods.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-6-45

  6. Creating cat states in one-dimensional quantum walks using delocalized initial states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Wei-Wei; Gao, Fei; Goyal, Sandeep K; Sanders, Barry C; Simon, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Cat states are coherent quantum superpositions of macroscopically distinct states and are useful for understanding the boundary between the classical and the quantum world. Due to their macroscopic nature, cat states are difficult to prepare in physical systems. We propose a method to create cat states in one-dimensional quantum walks using delocalized initial states of the walker. Since the quantum walks can be performed on any quantum system, our proposal enables a platform-independent realization of the cat states. We further show that the linear dispersion relation of the effective quantum walk Hamiltonian, which governs the dynamics of the delocalized states, is responsible for the formation of the cat states. We analyze the robustness of these states against environmental interactions and present methods to control and manipulate the cat states in the photonic implementation of quantum walks. (paper)

  7. Analgesic efficacy of tramadol in cats with naturally occurring osteoarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz P Monteiro

    Full Text Available This study aimed to (1 compare outcome assessments in normal and osteoarthritic cats and (2 evaluate the analgesic efficacy of tramadol in feline osteoarthritis (OA, in a prospective, randomised, blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover design.Twenty cats were included after clinical examination, blood work and full body radiographs were performed. In Phase 1, outcome assessments aimed to differentiate normal (n = 5; i.e. exempt of any radiographic and clinical sign of OA from OA (n = 15 cats. In Phase 2, OA cats were treated twice daily with a placebo (PG: cornstarch 15 mg or tramadol (TG: 3 mg/kg orally for 19 days, with a 3-month washout period between treatments. Evaluations were performed in normal and OA cats at baseline and consisted of: 1 peak vertical force (PVF after staircase exercise; 2 telemetered night-time motor activity (NMA; and 3 response to mechanical temporal summation (RMTS. After treatment, PVF, NMA and RMTS evaluations were repeated in OA cats. Data were analysed with mixed model methods with an alpha-threshold of 5%.Phase 1: 1 PVF (% of body weight; mean ± SD was higher in normal (59 ± 10.5 than in OA cats (50.6 ± 5.7 (p = 0.005; 2 NMA (no unit was not different between groups; 3 RMTS (number of stimuli; median (range was higher in normal [29.5 (23.5-30] than in OA cats [14 (8.5-28] (p < 0.0001. Phase 2: PVF, NMA and RMTS presented a treatment effect (p = 0.024, p = 0.008 and p = 0.018, respectively. No clinically important adverse-effects were observed.Outcome assessments such as kinetics (PVF and evaluation of central sensitisation (RMTS are discriminant of OA status. Mobility measured by NMA was not discriminant of OA status, however it increased in OA cats with tramadol treatment. Nociceptive hypersensitivity quantified by RMTS was evident in OA cats and was responsive to tramadol treatment.

  8. Effects of simvastatin on CAT-1-mediated arginine transport and NO level under high glucose conditions in conditionally immortalized rat inner blood-retinal barrier cell lines (TR-iBRB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tun, Temdara; Kang, Young-Sook

    2017-05-01

    Hyperglycemia causes the breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier by impairing endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) function. Statins have many pleiotropic effects such as improving endothelial barrier permeability and increasing eNOS mRNA stability. The objective of this study was to determine effect of simvastatin on l-arginine transport and NO production under high-glucose conditions in conditionally immortalized rat retinal capillary endothelial cell line (TR-iBRB). Changes in l-arginine transport uptake and, expression levels of cationic amino acid transporter 1 (CAT-1) and eNOS mRNA were investigated after pre-treatment with simvastatin and NOS inhibitors (l-NMMA and l-NAME) under high-glucose conditions using TR-iBRB, an in vitro model of iBRB. The NO level released from TR-iBRB cells was examined using Griess reagents. Under high glucose conditions, [ 3 H]l-arginine uptake was decreased in TR-iBRB cells. Simvastatin pretreatment elevated [ 3 H]l-arginine uptake, the expression levels of CAT-1 and eNOS mRNA, and NO production under high-glucose conditions. Moreover, the co-treatment with simvastatin and NOS inhibitors reduced [ 3 H]l-arginine uptake compared to pretreatment with simvastatin alone. Our results suggest that, in the presence of high-glucose levels, increased l-arginine uptake due to simvastatin treatment was associated with increased CAT-1 and eNOS mRNA levels, leading to higher NO production in TR-iBRB cells. Thus, simvastatin might be a good modulator for diabetic retinopathy therapy by increasing of the l-arginine uptake and improving endothelial function in retinal capillary endothelial cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Review of thymic pathology in 30 cats and 36 dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, M J

    1997-09-01

    Data are presented from 30 cats and 36 dogs in which thymic disease was recognised clinically or on postmortem examination. The diagnoses included thymic lymphoma (19 cats, 12 dogs), thymoma (five cats, 18 dogs), thymic branchial cyst formation or cystic change (one cat, four dogs), thymic hyperplasia (two cats), congenital hypoplasia (one cat, one dog), thymic haemorrhage (one cat, one dog) and thymic amyloidosis (one cat). Thymic lymphoma occurred in younger dogs and cats, and was recorded equally among domestic shorthaired and purebred (especially Siamese) cats. Eight cats with thymic lymphoma were tested for feline leukaemia virus and four were positive. Thymoma occurred more frequently in older cats and dogs, and in Labradors and German shepherd dogs. Thymic tumours were associated with paraneoplastic hypercalcaemia (six dogs), megaoesophagus (two dogs) or interface dermatitis with basement membrane immune complex deposition (one cat). Non-neoplastic thymic diseases were associated with myasthenia gravis (one cat), pemphigus foliaceus (one cat) and superficial necrolytic dermatitis (one cat).

  10. Atomistic understanding of hydrogen loading phenomenon into ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IASBS), ... ically through various electrochemical methods and high-level quantum ... ton) by applying a constant anodic voltage. .... phenomenon being occurred at metal | solution inter- .... cationic form and extra energy is released by occupying.

  11. Hippocampal theta activity in the acute cerveau isolé cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottesmann, C; Zernicki, B; Gandolfo, G

    1981-01-01

    In three cerveau isole cats, cortical and hippocampal EEG activity were recorded. In the cortical records, spindles alternated with low-voltage activity, whereas theta activity dominated in the hippocampus. The amount and frequency of theta were similar to those described previously for the pretrigeminal cat. In confirmation of previous results on rats, although cortical EEG activity differs in cerveau isole cat and pretrigeminal cat, both preparations show domination of theta activity in the hippocampus. It is concluded that the mesencephalic transection eliminates inhibitory effects from the lower brainstem on generators of the theta rhythm.

  12. Lead exposure potentiates predatory attack behavior in the cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wenjie; Han Shenggao; Gregg, T.R.; Kemp, F.W.Francis W.; Davidow, A.L.; Louria, D.B.; Siegel, Allan; Bogden, J.D.

    2003-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated that environmental lead exposure is associated with aggressive behavior in children; however, numerous confounding variables limit the ability of these studies to establish a causal relationship. The study of aggressive behavior using a validated animal model was used to test the hypothesis that there is a causal relationship between lead exposure and aggression in the absence of confounding variables. We studied the effects of lead exposure on a feline model of aggression: predatory (quiet biting) attack of an anesthetized rat. Five cats were stimulated with a precisely controlled electrical current via electrodes inserted into the lateral hypothalamus. The response measure was the predatory attack threshold current (i.e., the current required to elicit an attack response on 50% of the trials). Blocks of trials were administered in which predatory attack threshold currents were measured three times a week for a total of 6-10 weeks, including before, during, and after lead exposure. Lead was incorporated into cat food 'treats' at doses of 50-150 mg/kg/day. Two of the five cats received a second period of lead exposure. Blood lead concentrations were measured twice a week and were <1, 21-77, and <20 μg/dL prior to, during, and after lead exposure, respectively. The predatory attack threshold decreased significantly during initial lead exposure in three of five cats and increased after the cessation of lead exposure in four of the five cats (P<0.01). The predatory attack thresholds and blood lead concentrations for each cat were inversely correlated (r=-0.35 to -0.74). A random-effects mixed model demonstrated a significant (P=0.0019) negative association between threshold current and blood lead concentration. The data of this study demonstrate that lead exposure enhances predatory aggression in the cat and provide experimental support for a causal relationship between lead exposure and aggressive behavior in humans

  13. Is cognitive adaptation training (CAT) compensatory, restorative, or both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrick, Megan M; Mintz, Jim; Roberts, David L; Maples, Natalie J; Sarkar, Sonali; Li, Xueying; Velligan, Dawn I

    2015-08-01

    Cognitive adaptation training (CAT) is a psychosocial treatment incorporating environmental supports including signs, checklists to bypass the cognitive deficits of schizophrenia. Our objective was to examine the association between CAT, functional outcomes, and cognitive test performance (cognition). The two research questions were as follows: 1) Does cognition mediate the effect of CAT intervention on functional outcome? 2) Does CAT impact cognitive test performance? A total of 120 participants with schizophrenia were randomized to one of three treatments: 1) CAT (weekly for 9months; monthly thereafter), 2) generic environmental supports (given to participants on clinic visits to promote adaptive behavior), or 3) treatment as usual (TAU). Assessments of cognition and functional outcome were conducted at baseline, 9 and 24months. Mediation analyses and mixed effects regression were conducted. Mediation analyses revealed that during the initial 9months, the direct path from treatment group to functional outcome on the primary measure was positive and highly significant. CAT significantly improved functional outcome compared to the other treatments. However, paths involving cognition were negligible. There was no evidence that cognition mediated improvement in functional outcomes. At 24months, cognition improved more in CAT compared to other treatment groups. The test for cognition mediating improvement in functional outcomes was not significant at this time point. However, improvement in functional outcome led to better performance on cognitive testing. We concluded that improvement in cognition is not a necessary condition for improvement in functional outcome and that greater engagement in functional behavior has a positive impact on cognition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Cerebral cysticercosis in a cat : clinical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Schwan

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The metacestode of Taenia solium, Cysticercus cellulosae, was recovered from the brain of a cat showing central nervous clinical signs ante mortem. This is the first record of cerebral cysticercosis in a cat in South Africa.

  15. Koebner phenomenon of the ear canal skin.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Young, O

    2012-02-01

    The Koebner phenomenon originally described the appearance of psoriatic lesions in the uninvolved skin of patients with psoriasis as a consequence of trauma. We describe a case of concurrent lichen planus and sarcoidosis in the auditory canal, which represents an unusual manifestation of the Koebner phenomenon. This is the first case of concurrent lichen planus and sarcoidosis in the head and neck region and highlights the need for biopsy to allow accurate histopathological diagnosis and treatment.

  16. Koebner phenomenon of the ear canal skin.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Young, O

    2009-02-01

    The Koebner phenomenon originally described the appearance of psoriatic lesions in the uninvolved skin of patients with psoriasis as a consequence of trauma. We describe a case of concurrent lichen planus and sarcoidosis in the auditory canal, which represents an unusual manifestation of the Koebner phenomenon. This is the first case of concurrent lichen planus and sarcoidosis in the head and neck region and highlights the need for biopsy to allow accurate histopathological diagnosis and treatment.

  17. Job Insecurity as a Social Psychological Phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuykova T.S.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper addresses a relatively new phenomenon of job insecurity. It provides an analysis of the various interpretations of the phenomenon given by Russian and foreign researchers, focuses on its social economical determinants and consequences for individuals and organizations. The paper concludes with an outline of some possible ways of overcoming the negative consequences of job insecurity — as for individuals, as for organizations, as for the society as a whole.

  18. Open source innovation phenomenon, participant behaviour, impact

    CERN Document Server

    Herstatt, Cornelius

    2015-01-01

    Open Source Innovation (OSI) has gained considerable momentum within the last years. Academic and management practice interest grows as more and more end-users consider and even participate in Open Source product development like Linux, Android, or Wikipedia. Open Source Innovation: Phenomenon, Participant Behaviour, Impact brings together rigorous academic research and business importance in scrutinizing OCI from three perspectives: The Phenomenon, Participants' Behavior, and Business Implications. The first section introduces OCI artefacts, including who is participating and why, and provide

  19. Genome - wide variation and demographic history of small cats with a focus on Felis species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anubhab Khan

    2017-10-01

    the demographic history is all the small cats seem to have recovered from the effects of Toba Volcano eruption which had triggered a glacial maximum leading a decline in big cat population. Thus it seems the partitioning of genetic variation has happened less than ten thousand years ago owing to anthropogenic activities?

  20. Critical assessment of claims regarding management of feral cats by trap-neuter-return.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longcore, Travis; Rich, Catherine; Sullivan, Lauren M

    2009-08-01

    Many jurisdictions have adopted programs to manage feral cats by trap-neuter-return (TNR), in which cats are trapped and sterilized, then returned to the environment to be fed and cared for by volunteer caretakers. Most conservation biologists probably do not realize the extent and growth of this practice and that the goal of some leading TNR advocates is that cats ultimately be recognized and treated as "protected wildlife." We compared the arguments put forth in support of TNR by many feral cat advocates with the scientific literature. Advocates promoting TNR often claim that feral cats harm wildlife only on islands and not on continents; fill a natural or realized niche; do not contribute to the decline of native species; and are insignificant vectors or reservoirs of disease. Advocates also frequently make claims about the effectiveness of TNR, including claims that colonies of feral cats are eventually eliminated by TNR and that managed colonies resist invasion by other cats. The scientific literature contradicts each of these claims. TNR of feral cats is primarily viewed and regulated as an animal welfare issue, but it should be seen as an environmental issue, and decisions to implement it should receive formal environmental assessment. Conservation scientists have a role to play by conducting additional research on the effects of feral cats on wildlife and by communicating sound scientific information about this problem to policy makers.

  1. Follow-up on long-term antiretroviral therapy for cats infected with feline immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Sheila de Oliveira; Abreu, Celina Monteiro; Delvecchio, Rodrigo; Ribeiro, Anísia Praxedes; Vasconcelos, Zilton; Brindeiro, Rodrigo de Moraes; Tanuri, Amilcar

    2016-04-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a lentivirus that induces AIDS-like disease in cats. Some of the antiretroviral drugs available to treat patients with HIV type 1 are used to treat FIV-infected cats; however, antiretroviral therapy (ART) is not used in cats as a long-term treatment. In this study, the effects of long-term ART were evaluated in domestic cats treated initially with the nucleoside transcriptase reverse inhibitor (NTRI) zidovudine (AZT) over a period ranging from 5-6 years, followed by a regimen of the NTRI lamivudine (3TC) plus AZT over 3 years. Viral load, sequencing of pol (reverse transcriptase [RT]) region and CD4:CD8 lymphocyte ratio were evaluated during and after treatment. Untreated cats were evaluated as a control group. CD4:CD8 ratios were lower, and uncharacterized resistance mutations were found in the RT region in the group of treated cats. A slight increase in viral load was observed in some cats after discontinuing treatment. The data strongly suggest that treated cats were resistant to therapy, and uncharacterized resistance mutations in the RT gene of FIV were selected for by AZT. Few studies have been conducted to evaluate the effect of long-term antiretroviral therapy in cats. To date, resistance mutations have not been described in vivo. © ISFM and AAFP 2015.

  2. Dietary influences on periodontal health in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Ellen I

    2006-11-01

    A pet cannot be healthy without oral health. Periodontal is a significant disease that has local and systemic ramifications. It has been stated earlier that effective plaque control prevents gingivitis. In human beings, 90% of periodontitis occurs as the result of progression gingivitis, and this type of periodontitis can be completely prevented by plaque control. It is reasonable that dogs and cats react similarly and that effective plaque control could prevent a large percentage of periodontitis cases. Proper nutrition and effective oral hygiene are necessary components of oral health and should be jointly promoted in the management of oral disease in dogs and cats.

  3. PP composites with Hybrid Nanofillers: NTC phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarlin, Juha; Immonen, Kirsi

    2010-01-01

    Electric conductive plastic composites have a wide potential for commercial applications, some examples are EMI shielding housings and components in automotive industry and in consumer electronics, equipments in health care sector and fuel cell components. A phenomenon in conductive composites, especially in composites with carbon based fillers, is change of thermal induced change in conductivity as a result of morphological transitions. Usually the observed changes are practically irreversible. The phenomenon may cause increasing resistivity, usually called as 'positive temperature coefficient' (PTC) or decreasing resistivity, called 'negative temperature coefficient' (NTC), where the new morphology created by heat treatment is more favorable for electric conductivity compared to the original state. The existence of NTC is a sing of the lost potential in material design and processing. Therefore detailed information about the phenomenon gives us tools to develop high performance conductive materials. It this paper we discuss about NTC phenomenon observed in PP composites with CNT or in-situ synthesized CNT-PANi hybrid nanofiller with an amphiphilic dispersing agent. The goal of the paper is not to present a comprehensive model of this phenomenon; we present some experimental results which may be related to polymer-filler interactions. These details are a part of this complicated phenomenon.

  4. Calculation of the total plasma concentration of nonvolatile weak acids and the effective dissociation constant of nonvolatile buffers in plasma for use in the strong ion approach to acid-base balance in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Sheila M; Constable, Peter D

    2003-08-01

    To determine values for the total concentration of nonvolatile weak acids (Atot) and effective dissociation constant of nonvolatile weak acids (Ka) in plasma of cats. Convenience plasma samples of 5 male and 5 female healthy adult cats. Cats were sedated, and 20 mL of blood was obtained from the jugular vein. Plasma was tonometered at 37 degrees C to systematically vary PCO2 from 8 to 156 mm Hg, thereby altering plasma pH from 6.90 to 7.97. Plasma pH, PCO2, and concentrations of quantitatively important strong cations (Na+, K+, and Ca2+), strong anions (Cl-, lactate), and buffer ions (total protein, albumin, and phosphate) were determined. Strong ion difference was estimated from the measured strong ion concentrations and nonlinear regression used to calculate Atot and Ka from the measured pH and PCO2 and estimated strong ion difference. Mean (+/- SD) values were as follows: Atot = 24.3 +/- 4.6 mmol/L (equivalent to 0.35 mmol/g of protein or 0.76 mmol/g of albumin); Ka = 0.67 +/- 0.40 x 10(-7); and the negative logarithm (base 10) of Ka (pKa) = 7.17. At 37 degrees C, pH of 7.35, and a partial pressure of CO2 (PCO2) of 30 mm Hg, the calculated venous strong ion difference was 30 mEq/L. These results indicate that at a plasma pH of 7.35, a 1 mEq/L decrease in strong ion difference will decrease pH by 0.020, a 1 mm Hg decrease in PCO2 will increase plasma pH by 0.011, and a 1 g/dL decrease in albumin concentration will increase plasma pH by 0.093.

  5. The Sexting Phenomenon in Spanish Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Puertas, Vanesa; Gutiérrez-Puertas, Lorena; Aguilera-Manrique, Gabriel; Baños-Martín, María Del Mar; Granados-Gámez, Genoveva; Márquez-Hernández, Verónica V

    2017-08-01

    One of the adverse effects arising among young people who engage in various social practices is the phenomenon of sexting. Sexting involves the production and delivery of sexual content voluntarily and freely and, in many cases, without the consent of the recipient. The aim of this study was to describe the presence of sexting in undergraduate students at the College of Nursing of the University of Almeria in Spain. It is a descriptive cross-sectional quantitative study. A total of 105 undergraduate nursing students completed the sexuality and technology questionnaire. The questionnaire consists of seven dimensions with 59 items. Depending on size, statistically significant differences between the use of social networks and the dimension "sexting actions completed" and the dimension "position on statements about sexting" were found. No statistically significant differences between gender and the practice of sexting were found. The three main reasons for sexting match in both genders, these being "to draw attention," "as a sexy gift," and "to feel sexy." Nursing students associated behaviors to show sexting, being a standard practice, common in both genders. Future research should consider the possible influence of this behavior on future professionals and on the field of nursing.

  6. Getting a CAT Scan (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A) Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Getting a CAT Scan (Video) KidsHealth / For Kids / Getting a CAT Scan (Video) Print en español Obtención de una tomografía computada (video) CAT stands ...

  7. Diagnostic Exercise: Neurologic Disorder in a Cat

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-21

    IWORK UNIT ELEMENT NO. NO. NO. ACCESSION NO. 11. TITLE (Include Security Classification) Diagnostic Exercise - Neurologic Disorder in a Cat 12...and identify by block number) This report documents the fifth reported occurrance of cerebral phaeophyphomycosis in cats . Because mycotic...Exercise: Neurologic Disorder in a Cat Ronald C. Bell United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), Fort Detrick

  8. Dipylidium (Dog and Cat Flea Tapeworm) FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the most common kind of tapeworm dogs and cats get? The most common tapeworm of dogs and cats in the United States is called Dipylidium caninum . ... infected with a tapeworm larvae. A dog or cat may swallow a flea while self-grooming. Once ...

  9. Groups acting on CAT(0) cube complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Niblo, Graham A.; Reeves, Lawrence

    1997-01-01

    We show that groups satisfying Kazhdan's property (T) have no unbounded actions on finite dimensional CAT(0) cube complexes, and deduce that there is a locally CAT(-1) Riemannian manifold which is not homotopy equivalent to any finite dimensional, locally CAT(0) cube complex.

  10. Statistical Agent Based Modelization of the Phenomenon of Drug Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Clemente, Riccardo; Pietronero, Luciano

    2012-07-01

    We introduce a statistical agent based model to describe the phenomenon of drug abuse and its dynamical evolution at the individual and global level. The agents are heterogeneous with respect to their intrinsic inclination to drugs, to their budget attitude and social environment. The various levels of drug use were inspired by the professional description of the phenomenon and this permits a direct comparison with all available data. We show that certain elements have a great importance to start the use of drugs, for example the rare events in the personal experiences which permit to overcame the barrier of drug use occasionally. The analysis of how the system reacts to perturbations is very important to understand its key elements and it provides strategies for effective policy making. The present model represents the first step of a realistic description of this phenomenon and can be easily generalized in various directions.

  11. Methods of fertility control in cats: Owner, breeder and veterinarian behavior and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Jane K; Mosteller, Jill R; Loberg, Jenny M; Andersson, Maria; Benka, Valerie A W

    2015-09-01

    Fertility control is important for population management of owned and unowned cats, provides health benefits at the individual level and can reduce unwanted sexually dimorphic behaviors such as roaming, aggression, spraying and calling. This article reviews the available evidence regarding European and American veterinarian, owner and pedigree cat breeder attitudes toward both surgical sterilization and non-surgical fertility control. It additionally presents new data on veterinarians' and pedigree cat breeders' use of, and attitudes toward, alternative modalities of fertility control. Within the United States and Europe, the proportion of cats reported to be sterilized varies widely. Published estimates range from 27-93% for owned cats and 2-5% for cats trapped as part of a trap-neuter-return (TNR) program. In some regions and populations of cats, non-surgical fertility control is also used. Social context, cultural norms, individual preferences, economic considerations, legislation and professional organizations may all influence fertility control decisions for cats. Particularly in Europe, a limited number of non-surgical temporary contraceptives are available for cats; these include products with regulatory approval for cats as well as some used 'off label'. Non-surgical methods remove the risk of complications related to surgery and offer potential to treat more animals in less time and at lower cost; they may also appeal to pedigree cat breeders seeking temporary contraception. However, concerns over efficacy, delivery methods, target species safety, duration and side effects exist with current non-surgical options. Research is under way to develop new methods to control fertility in cats without surgery. US and European veterinarians place high value on three perceived benefits of surgical sterilization: permanence, behavioral benefits and health benefits. Non-surgical options will likely need to share these benefits to be widely accepted by the veterinary

  12. Concentrations of cysteinyl leukotrienes in urine and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of cats with experimentally induced asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Carol R; Decile, Kendra C; Berghaus, Londa J; Berghaus, Roy D; Walby, William F; Schelegle, Edward S; Hyde, Dallas M; Gershwin, Laurel J

    2003-11-01

    To evaluate changes in cysteinyl leukotriene (LT) concentrations in urine and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in cats with experimentally induced asthma. 19 cats with experimentally induced asthma and 5 control cats. Cats were sensitized to Bermuda grass or house dust mite allergen, and phenotypic features of asthma were confirmed with intradermal skin testing, evaluation of BALF eosinophil percentages, and pulmonary function testing. A competitive ELISA kit for LTC4, LTD4, and LTE4 was used for quantitative analysis of LTs. Urinary creatinine concentrations and BALF total protein (TP) concentrations were measured, and urinary LT-to-creatinine ratios and BALF LT-to-TP ratios were calculated. Mean urinary LT-to-creatinine ratios did not differ significantly between control cats and allergen-sensitized cats before or after sensitization and challenge exposure with saline (0.9% NaCl) solution or allergen, respectively. In BALF the mean LT-to-TP ratio of control cats did not differ significantly before or after sensitization and challenge exposure with saline. Asthmatic cats had BALF LT-to-TP ratios that were significantly lower than control cats at all time points, whereas ratios for asthmatic cats did not differ significantly among the various time points. Although LTs were readily detectable in urine, no significant increases in urinary LT concentrations were detected after challenge in allergen-sensitized cats. Spot testing of urinary LT concentrations appears to have no clinical benefit for use in monitoring the inflammatory asthmatic state in cats. The possibility that cysteinyl LTs bind effectively to their target receptors in BALF and, thus, decrease free LT concentrations deserves further study.

  13. Cat-scratch disease osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heye, S.; Matthijs, P.; Campenhoudt, M. van; Wallon, J.

    2003-01-01

    We report on a patient who presented with osteomyelitis of a rib and adjacent abscess as a rare and atypical manifestation of cat-scratch disease. Radiographic findings showed an osteolytic lesion with adjacent mass. Biopsy, serology and polymerase chain reaction technique are essential for the final diagnosis. Prognosis is excellent with full recovery. (orig.)

  14. A strange cat in Dublin

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Raifeartaigh, Cormac

    2012-11-01

    Not many life stories in physics involve Nazis, illicit sex, a strange cat and the genetic code. Thus, a new biography of the great Austrian physicist Erwin Schrödinger is always of interest, and with Erwin Schrödinger and the Quantum Revolution, veteran science writer John Gribbin does not disappoint.

  15. Religiosidad catódica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Ignacio Sierra G.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Estos apuntes se refieren a que en estos últimos tiempos ha habido un resurgimiento del fenómeno religioso de diversas maneras, incluso sorprendentes. Al aproximarse el tercer milenio, la posmodernidad religiosa disputa parte de la pantalla electrónica con el melodrama religioso: hoy estamos viviendo una religiosidad mediática, una religiosidad catódica.

  16. EUROmediCAT signal detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Given, Joanne E; Loane, Maria; Luteijn, Johannes Michiel

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate congenital anomaly (CA)-medication exposure associations produced by the new EUROmediCAT signal detection system and determine which require further investigation. METHODS: Data from 15 EUROCAT registries (1995-2011) with medication exposures at the chemical substance (5th level...

  17. A multivariate model of stakeholder preference for lethal cat management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, Dara M; Jacobson, Susan K

    2014-01-01

    Identifying stakeholder beliefs and attitudes is critical for resolving management conflicts. Debate over outdoor cat management is often described as a conflict between two groups, environmental advocates and animal welfare advocates, but little is known about the variables predicting differences among these critical stakeholder groups. We administered a mail survey to randomly selected stakeholders representing both of these groups (n=1,596) in Florida, where contention over the management of outdoor cats has been widespread. We used a structural equation model to evaluate stakeholder intention to support non-lethal management. The cognitive hierarchy model predicted that values influenced beliefs, which predicted general and specific attitudes, which in turn, influenced behavioral intentions. We posited that specific attitudes would mediate the effect of general attitudes, beliefs, and values on management support. Model fit statistics suggested that the final model fit the data well (CFI=0.94, RMSEA=0.062). The final model explained 74% of the variance in management support, and positive attitudes toward lethal management (humaneness) had the largest direct effect on management support. Specific attitudes toward lethal management and general attitudes toward outdoor cats mediated the relationship between positive (pstakeholder intention to support non-lethal cat management. Our findings suggest that stakeholders can simultaneously perceive both positive and negative beliefs about outdoor cats, which influence attitudes toward and support for non-lethal management.

  18. The Use of Refuges by Communally Housed Cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Sicuto de Oliveira

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The increase of domestic animals kept in shelters highlights the need to ensure animal welfare. Environmental enrichment can improve animal welfare in many ways, such as encouraging captive animals to use all the space available to them. The effects of physical environmental enrichment on the spatial distribution and behavioral repertoire of 35 neutered domestic cats housed communally were analyzed. The provision of boxes in the environment increases the use of available space by the cats. We suggest this improves the cats’ welfare while in communally-housed rescue shelters. The frequencies of active and especially inactive behaviors also increased in the enriched condition. In a test with vertical environmental enrichment, the animals showed an increased length of stay in refuges located at a height of 0.5 m compared to those on the ground (0.0 m. However, the entry frequency was higher in refuges at 0.0 m. Both horizontal and vertical environmental enrichment increased the use of available space, demonstrating that box refuges as enrichment are effective in providing a refuge when at a height, or a place to explore at ground level. We suggest it enhances the welfare of cats in communally housed shelters. This information adds to the body of evidence relating to cat enrichment and can be useful in designing cat housing in veterinary clinics, research laboratories, shelters and domestic homes.

  19. Environmental Aspects of Domestic Cat Care and Management: Implications for Cat Welfare

    OpenAIRE

    Stella, Judith L.; Croney, Candace C.

    2016-01-01

    Domestic cats (Felis silvestris catus) are the most commonly kept companion animals in the US with large populations of owned (86 million), free-roaming (70 million), research (13,000), and shelter (2-3 million) cats. Vast numbers of cats are maintained in homes and other facilities each year and are reliant on humans for all of their care. Understanding cat behavior and providing the highest quality environments possible, including positive human-cat interactions, based on research could hel...

  20. Breast Cancer a Multifaceted Phenomenon in Older Women in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper takes a look at Breast Cancer a Multifaceted Phenomenon in Older Women. The risk factors, screening, therapy and diagnosis, some forms of modern treatment were mentioned and described, their effects on victims enumerated and possible remedies spelt out for the management, reduction or eradication of the ...

  1. A Modular Approach for Teaching Partial Discharge Phenomenon through Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, B.; Dey, D.; Chakravorti, S.

    2011-01-01

    Partial discharge (PD) monitoring is an effective predictive maintenance tool for electrical power equipment. As a result, an understanding of the theory related to PD and the associated measurement techniques is now necessary knowledge for power engineers in their professional life. This paper presents a modular course on PD phenomenon in which…

  2. Preparing Schrodinger cat states by parametric pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leghtas, Zaki; Touzard, Steven; Pop, Ioan; Vlastakis, Brian; Zalys-Geller, Evan; Albert, Victor V.; Jiang, Liang; Frunzio, Luigi; Schoelkopf, Robert J.; Mirrahimi, Mazyar; Devoret, Michel H.

    2014-03-01

    Maintaining a quantum superposition state of light in a cavity has important applications for quantum error correction. We present an experimental protocol based on parametric pumping and Josephson circuits, which could prepare a Schrodinger cat state in a cavity. This is achieved by engineering a dissipative environment, which exchanges only pairs or quadruples of photons with our cavity mode. The dissipative nature of this preparation would lead to the observation of a dynamical Zeno effect, where the competition between a coherent drive and the dissipation reveals non trivial dynamics. Work supported by: IARPA, ARO, and NSF.

  3. PET study of the [11C]raclopride binding in the striatum of the awake cat: effects of anaesthetics and role of cerebral blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassoun, Wadad; Ginovart, Nathalie; Zimmer, Luc; Gualda, Veronique; Bonnefoi, Frederic; Le Cavorsin, Marion; Leviel, Vincent

    2003-01-01

    Cats were trained to stay in a containment box, without developing any signs of behavioural stress, while their head was maintained in a position that allowed positron emission tomography (PET) experiments to be performed. The binding potential for [ 11 C]raclopride (BP raclo ), a radioligand with good specificity for dopamine (DA) receptors of the D 2 type, was measured in the striatum and in three experimental situations: awake, anaesthetised with ketamine (50 mg kg -1 h -1 ; i.m.) and anaesthetised with halothane (1.5%). Non-specific binding was evaluated in the cerebellum. In the striatum of both sides, the BP raclo was unmodified by ketamine anaesthesia when compared with awake animals. In contrast, a large increase in BP raclo was observed under halothane anaesthesia. The non-specific binding of [ 11 C]raclopride, evaluated in the cerebellum, was also unchanged under ketamine anaesthesia but greatly increased under halothane anaesthesia. To evaluate whether changes in the cerebral blood flow (CBF) resulting from the different experimental situations could be at the root of these discrepancies, injections of [ 15 O]H 2 O were performed; measurements revealed a drastically increased CBF under halothane anaesthesia and a slight enhancement under ketamine anaesthesia, when compared with the waking state. These results are the first to be obtained on this topic in awake cats, and show that the BP raclo is greatly dependent on alterations in the CBF. (orig.)

  4. Dietary dissolution of urinary calculi in cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyde, D.C.

    1987-01-01

    A young adult, castrated male DSH cat was admitted for pollakiuria, hematuria and dysuria. The cat was being fed a commercial dry grocery brand cat food. Radiographs demonstrated multiple radiodense cystic calculi and urinalysis showed hematuria but no crystalluria. A tentative diagnosis of struvite urolithiasis was made. The cat was fed s/d® Feline food exclusively. Clinical signs disappeared within a week and no calculi were visible radiographically within three weeks. s/d® Feline food was continued an additional two weeks. This case study shows that s/d® Feline therapeutic food can be used to successfully manage struvite urolithiasis in cats

  5. Retorting conditions affect palatability and physical characteristics of canned cat food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagen-Plantinga, E.A.; Orlanes, D.F.; Bosch, G.; Hendriks, W.H.; Poel, van der A.F.B.

    2017-01-01

    The effects of different temperature and time conditions during retorting of canned cat food on physicochemical characteristics and palatability were examined. For this purpose, lacquer cans containing an unprocessed loaf-type commercial cat food were heated in a pressurised retorting system at

  6. Positive Impact of Nutritional Interventions on Serum Symmetric Dimethylarginine and Creatinine Concentrations in Client-Owned Geriatric Cats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean A Hall

    Full Text Available A prospective study was conducted in client-owned geriatric cats to evaluate the short- term effects of a test food on serum symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA and creatinine (Cr concentrations. Test food contained functional lipids (fish oil, antioxidants (vitamins C and E, L-carnitine, botanicals (vegetables, highly bioavailable protein, and amino acid supplements. Cats (n = 80 were fed either test food or owner's-choice foods (non-nutritionally controlled cohort. Cats were included based on age (≥ 9 years, indoor only, neutered, and free of chronic disease. At baseline, all cats had serum Cr concentrations within the reference interval. Renal function biomarkers and urinalysis results at baseline and after consuming test food or owner's-choice foods for 3 and 6 months were evaluated. Cats consuming test food showed significant decreases in serum Cr and BUN concentrations across time. Overall, cats consuming owner's-choice foods showed significant increases in serum SDMA concentrations at 3 and 6 months compared with baseline (P ≤ 0.05, whereas in cats consuming test food serum SDMA concentrations did not change. At baseline or during the 6-month feeding trial, 23 (28.8% cats had increased serum SDMA, but normal serum Cr consistent with IRIS Stage 1 chronic kidney disease. This included 6 cats fed test food and 17 cats fed owner's-choice foods. In the 6 cats fed test food, serum SDMA decreased in 3 cats and remained stable in 1 cat, whereas in the 17 cats fed owner's-choice foods, serum SDMA increased in 13 cats and decreased or remained stable in 4 cats. The increase in serum SDMA concentration was significant (P = 0.02 only for cats fed owner's-choice foods. These results suggest that nonazotemic cats with elevated serum SDMA (early renal insufficiency when fed a food designed to promote healthy aging are more likely to demonstrate stable renal function compared with cats fed owner's-choice foods. Cats fed owner's-choice foods were more

  7. Historical Aspects in Tolerance Phenomenon Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janat A. Karmanova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the historical aspect of the tolerance phenomenon research, particularly the study of tolerance in the age of Antiquity, Middle Ages, New Times, Enlightenment. It is remarkable that the problem of tolerance, emerged in Western civilization on religious grounds, laid the foundation for all other freedoms, attained in many countries. Besides, the article attaches special attention to the researchers of the East, such as Abu Nasr al-Farabi, Khoja Ahmed Yasawi, studies the historical aspect of works by Kazakhstan thinkers A. Kunanbayev, C. Valikhanova, K.B. Zharikbayev, S.K. Kaliyev, A.N. Nysanbayev, A.I. Artemev and others. The analysis of historical research of the tolerance phenomenon brings the author to the conclusion that religious freedom was the starting point for the emergence of new areas of tolerance display. The content of this phenomenon changed according to the historical peculiarities of the societies’ development

  8. Acute pancreatitis in cats with hepatic lipidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akol, K G; Washabau, R J; Saunders, H M; Hendrick, M J

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the incidence, clinical features, and prognosis of acute pancreatitis in cats with hepatic lipidosis. Of 13 cats histologically diagnosed with hepatic lipidosis between July 1988, and November 1989, 5(38%) were also histologically diagnosed with acute pancreatitis. In cats with hepatic lipidosis alone, the signalment, history, physical examination, and clinicopathologic findings were generally indistinguishable from those of cats with concurrent acute pancreatitis except that cats with acute pancreatitis were more likely to be cachectic and to have coagulation abnormalities. Hepatomegaly was seen on abdominal radiographs in both groups. Of the 5 cats with concurrent acute pancreatitis, abdominal ultrasonography detected 1 cat with a hypoechoic pancreas and 5 with peritoneal effusion; those abnormalities were not seen in cats without concurrent acute pancreatitis. Cats with concurrent acute pancreatitis had only a 20% recovery rate, compared with a 50% recovery rate in cats with hepatic lipidosis alone. We conclude that cats with hepatic lipidosis should be rigorously evaluated for concurrent acute pancreatitis because of 1) the rate of disease coincidence, 2) the inability of signalment, history, physical examination, and clinicopathologic findings to adequately distinguish between hepatic lipidosis and acute pancreatitis, 3) the worse prognosis associated with concurrent acute pancreatitis, and 4) the opposing nutritional strategies for hepatic lipidosis and acute pancreatitis.

  9. Dog and Cat Interactions in a Remote Aboriginal Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooke Kennedy

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This study examined dog and cat demographics, roaming behaviours, and interspecific interactions in a remote Aboriginal island community using multiple methods. Our results revealed temporal differences between the roaming behaviours of dogs, cats, and wildlife. Dogs showed crepuscular behaviour, being active around dawn (5:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. and dusk (6:00 p.m. and 11:35 p.m.. The majority of cats were active between dawn (6:30 a.m. and dusk (7:30 p.m. and travelled shorter distances than dogs. However, some cats were also observed roaming between dusk and dawn, and were likely to be hunting since flightless wildlife were also recorded on our remote-sensing cameras during this time. These baseline data provide evidence to suggest that new management programs are needed to reduce the number of roaming cats and therefore their potential impacts on native wildlife. Collaborations between Aboriginal owners and other stakeholders is necessary to design innovative and effective animal management and policy on the island.

  10. Devil declines and catastrophic cascades: is mesopredator release of feral cats inhibiting recovery of the eastern quoll?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fancourt, Bronwyn A; Hawkins, Clare E; Cameron, Elissa Z; Jones, Menna E; Nicol, Stewart C

    2015-01-01

    The eastern quoll (Dasyurus viverrinus) is a medium-sized Australian marsupial carnivore that has recently undergone a rapid and severe population decline over the 10 years to 2009, with no sign of recovery. This decline has been linked to a period of unfavourable weather, but subsequent improved weather conditions have not been matched by quoll recovery. A recent study suggested another mechanism: that declines in Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) populations, due to the spread of the fatal Devil Facial Tumour Disease, have released feral cats (Felis catus) from competitive suppression, with eastern quoll declines linked to a subsequent increase in cat sightings. Yet current evidence of intraguild suppression among devils, cats and quolls is scant and equivocal. We therefore assessed the influences of top-down effects on abundance and activity patterns among devils, feral cats and eastern quolls. Between 2011 and 2013, we monitored four carnivore populations using longitudinal trapping and camera surveys, and performed camera surveys at 12 additional sites throughout the eastern quoll's range. We did not find evidence of a negative relationship between devil and cat abundance, nor of higher cat abundance in areas where devil populations had declined the longest. Cats did not appear to avoid devils spatially; however, there was evidence of temporal separation of cat and devil activity, with reduced separation and increasing nocturnal activity observed in areas where devils had declined the longest. Cats and quolls used the same areas, and there was no evidence that cat and quoll abundances were negatively related. Temporal overlap in observed cat and quoll activity was higher in summer than in winter, but this seasonal difference was unrelated to devil declines. We suggest that cats did not cause the recent quoll decline, but that predation of juvenile quolls by cats could be inhibiting low density quoll populations from recovering their former abundance

  11. Free-ranging domestic cats (Felis catus) on public lands: estimating density, activity, and diet in the Florida Keys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cove, Michael V.; Gardner, Beth; Simons, Theodore R.; Kays, Roland; O'Connell, Allan F.

    2017-01-01

    Feral and free-ranging domestic cats (Felis catus) can have strong negative effects on small mammals and birds, particularly in island ecosystems. We deployed camera traps to study free-ranging cats in national wildlife refuges and state parks on Big Pine Key and Key Largo in the Florida Keys, USA, and used spatial capture–recapture models to estimate cat abundance, movement, and activities. We also used stable isotope analyses to examine the diet of cats captured on public lands. Top population models separated cats based on differences in movement and detection with three and two latent groups on Big Pine Key and Key Largo, respectively. We hypothesize that these latent groups represent feral, semi-feral, and indoor/outdoor house cats based on the estimated movement parameters of each group. Estimated cat densities and activity varied between the two islands, with relatively high densities (~4 cats/km2) exhibiting crepuscular diel patterns on Big Pine Key and lower densities (~1 cat/km2) exhibiting nocturnal diel patterns on Key Largo. These differences are most likely related to the higher proportion of house cats on Big Pine relative to Key Largo. Carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios from hair samples of free-ranging cats (n = 43) provided estimates of the proportion of wild and anthropogenic foods in cat diets. At the population level, cats on both islands consumed mostly anthropogenic foods (>80% of the diet), but eight individuals were effective predators of wildlife (>50% of the diet). We provide evidence that cat groups within a population move different distances, exhibit different activity patterns, and that individuals consume wildlife at different rates, which all have implications for managing this invasive predator.

  12. Social Media: A Phenomenon to be Analyzed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    danah boyd

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of “social media” has more to do with its cultural positioning than its technological affordances. Rooted in the broader “Web 2.0” landscape, social media helped engineers, entrepreneurs, and everyday people reimagine the role that technology could play in information dissemination, community development, and communication. While the technologies invoked by the phrase social media have a long history, what unfolded in the 2000s reconfigured socio-technical practices in significant ways. Reflecting on the brief history of social media, this essay argues for the need to better understand this phenomenon.

  13. Microsatellite Polymorphisms Adjacent to the Oxytocin Receptor Gene in Domestic Cats: Association with Personality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minori Arahori

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A growing number of studies have explored the oxytocin system in humans and non-human animals, and some have found important genetic polymorphisms in the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR associated with the bonding system, social behaviors, and personality in several species. Although single nucleotide polymorphisms in OXTR have been well-examined in various species, microsatellites (or short tandem repeats adjacent to OXTR have rarely been studied, despite some suggestions that microsatellite polymorphisms near genes might play a role in genetic transcription and translation. In this study, we surveyed microsatellites in the upstream, intron, and downstream regions of OXTR in domestic cats (Felis catus. We succeeded in amplifying 5 out of 10 regions, and recognized these five regions as polymorphic. We compared allele frequencies in these five regions between mongrel cats in Japan (n = 100 and cats of 10 pure breeds (n = 40. There were significant differences in allele frequencies between the two populations in all microsatellite regions. Additionally, the owners of mongrel cats answered a comprehensive personality questionnaire, and factor analysis extracted four factors (Openness, Friendliness, Roughness, and Neuroticism. We examined the association between the microsatellite genotypes, age, sex, neutering status, and personality scores. Compared to their counterparts, younger cats tended to score higher on Openness, male cats scored higher on Friendliness, and female and neutered cats scored higher on Roughness. When we divided the sample into three groups depending on the length of alleles, we found a marginally significant association between Friendliness and MS3. Additionally, we found a sex-mediated effect of genotypes in MS4 on Friendliness, resulting in different effects on females and males. Our findings that mongrel cats had longer alleles in MS3 and MS4 than purebred cats, and that those cats tended to score higher on Friendliness

  14. Electron string phenomenon: physics and use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donets, Evgeny D.

    2004-01-01

    Electron string phenomenon arises as a result of phase transition of a state of multiply reflected electron beam to this new discovered state of one component electron plasma and can be easily observed in the reflex mode of EBIS operation. The transition goes via a strong instability, which causes considerable electron energy spread, which in its turn suppresses the instability. Electron string state is a stationary state of hot pure electron plasma, which is heated by injected electron beam and cooled because of electron loses. Electron string is quiet in broad regions of experimental parameters, so that it is used for confinement and ionization of positive ions by electron impact to highly charge states similar to electron beams in EBIS. Application of electron strings instead of electron beams for ion production allows to save about 99% of electric power of electron beam and simultaneously to improve reliability of an ion source considerably. The JINR EBIS `Krion-2' in the string mode of operation is used for production of N7+, Ar16+ and Fe24+ ion beams and their acceleration to relativistic energies on the facility of the JINR super conducting one turn injection synchrotron `Nuklotron'. The tubular electron string possibly can exist and it is under study now theoretically and experiments are prepared now. Estimations show that a Tubular Electron String Ion Source (TESIS) could have up to three orders of magnitude higher ion output then a Linear one (LESIS). In frames of nuclear astrophysics electron strings can be used for research of fusion nuclear reactions at low energies in conditions when both beam and target nuclei do not carry orbital electrons. The project NARITA — Nuclear Astrophysics Researches in an Ion Trap Apparatus is proposed. Polarization effects also can be studied.

  15. Electron string phenomenon: physics and use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donets, Evgeny D

    2004-01-01

    Electron string phenomenon arises as a result of phase transition of a state of multiply reflected electron beam to this new discovered state of one component electron plasma and can be easily observed in the reflex mode of EBIS operation. The transition goes via a strong instability, which causes considerable electron energy spread, which in its turn suppresses the instability. Electron string state is a stationary state of hot pure electron plasma, which is heated by injected electron beam and cooled because of electron loses. Electron string is quiet in broad regions of experimental parameters, so that it is used for confinement and ionization of positive ions by electron impact to highly charge states similar to electron beams in EBIS. Application of electron strings instead of electron beams for ion production allows to save about 99% of electric power of electron beam and simultaneously to improve reliability of an ion source considerably. The JINR EBIS 'Krion-2' in the string mode of operation is used for production of N 7+ , Ar 16+ and Fe 24+ ion beams and their acceleration to relativistic energies on the facility of the JINR super conducting one turn injection synchrotron 'Nuklotron'. The tubular electron string possibly can exist and it is under study now theoretically and experiments are prepared now. Estimations show that a Tubular Electron String Ion Source (TESIS) could have up to three orders of magnitude higher ion output then a Linear one (LESIS). In frames of nuclear astrophysics electron strings can be used for research of fusion nuclear reactions at low energies in conditions when both beam and target nuclei do not carry orbital electrons. The project NARITA - Nuclear Astrophysics Researches in an Ion Trap Apparatus is proposed. Polarization effects also can be studied

  16. Mapping of cat albumin using monoclonal antibodies: identification of determinants common to cat and dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutin, Y; Hébert, J; Vrancken, E R; Mourad, W

    1989-01-01

    Cat and dog albumins from commercial extracts were used to produce monoclonal antibodies (MoAb). Anti-cat albumin MoAb recognized both cat and dog albumin equally, as did anti-dog albumin MoAb; this confirms cross-reactivity between cat and dog. The MoAb were separated into two groups according to their epitopic specificity; they recognized two overlapping epitopes of cat albumin. Furthermore, by competitive inhibition of radio-allergosorbent test (RAST), it was shown that one MoAb group inhibited significantly the binding of human IgE antibodies (from a pool of 13 patients allergic to both cats and dogs) to insolubilized cat or dog extracts. These observations suggest that murine anti-cat or anti-dog MoAb and human IgE antibodies recognize identical or closely related determinants on cat and dog albumin. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:2478325

  17. Behaviour Problems of Cats Reared Individually or in Coexistence with other Animals (Cats, Dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kmecová N.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine whether behaviour problems in indoor cats depend on the number of cats in a household or rearing one or more cats in a household together with a dog. The study was carried out on animals which were divided for the purpose of this study into 4 groups: (1 households with one cat; (2 households with two cats; (3 households with three or more cats; (4 households with one or more cats and a dog. Altogether 91 cats were included in the study. The practical part of this investigation was based on a questionnaire. It was observed that the probability of behaviour problems was not related unambiguously to the number of cats in a household or the company of a dog. The percentage of the occurrence of changed behaviour did not differ significantly between the groups.

  18. Serum and urinary cystatin C in cats with feline immunodeficiency virus infection and cats with hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghys, Liesbeth Fe; Paepe, Dominique; Taffin, Elien Rl; Vandermeulen, Eva; Duchateau, Luc; Smets, Pascale My; Delanghe, Joris; Daminet, Sylvie

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate serum cystatin C (sCysC) and urinary cystatin C (uCysC) in cats with hyperthyroidism and cats with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). Thirty cats with FIV, 26 hyperthyroid cats and 28 healthy cats were included. sCysC and uCysC:creatinine (uCysC/uCr) ratio were measured with a human particle-enhanced nephelometric immunoassay, previously validated for feline CysC measurement. Routine renal variables (serum creatinine [sCr], urine specific gravity, urinary protein:creatinine ratio [UPC]) were also measured in the three groups. Cats with hyperthyroidism had significantly higher sCysC and higher uCysC/uCr ratio, lower sCr and a higher UPC than healthy cats. Cats with FIV infection did not show a significantly higher sCysC concentration but had a significantly higher sCr and UPC than healthy cats. uCysC could be detected in only four of them. This study demonstrated that sCysC is increased in cats with hyperthyroidism, in contrast with sCr, but not in cats with FIV. Many hyperthyroid cats, but only four cats with FIV, had an elevated uCysC/uCr ratio. Further studies may reveal if uCysC might be a valuable marker for tubular dysfunction in cats. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Effect of epileptogenic agents on the incorporation of /sup 3/H-glycine into proteins in the cat's cerebral cortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojik, I.; Feher, O.

    1982-06-01

    Filter paper strips soaked in /sup 3/H-glycine solution were applied to acoustic cortex of cats, anaesthetized with Nembutal and pretreated with epileptogenic agents (Metrazol, G-penicillin, and 3-amino-pyridine) and cycloheximide. The untreated contralateral hemisphere served as control. After 1 h incubation, both cortical samples were excised simultaneously and fixed in Bouin solution for autoradiography. Incorporation was blocked by cycloheximide. There was no glycine incorporation on the penicillin-treated side, while pyramidal cells were intensively labelled in layers II-V of the mirror focus. 3-Aminopyridine produced the same result. Metrazol as convulsant proved to be far weaker than the previous two. The intensity of incorporation was significantly more intensive in the mirror focus than in the primary one. Penicillin and 3-aminopyridine, while provoking cortical seizures, seem to inhibit glycine incorporation into a neuron-specific, function-dependent protein contained by the labelled cells in the autoradiogram.

  20. In vitro fertilization and sperm cryopreservation in the black-footed cat (Felis nigripes) and sand cat (Felis margarita).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, J R; Campbell, M; Levens, G; Moore, T; Benson, K; D'Agostino, J; West, G; Okeson, D M; Coke, R; Portacio, S C; Leiske, K; Kreider, C; Polumbo, P J; Swanson, W F

    2010-03-01

    Studies of in vitro fertilization (IVF) and sperm cryopreservation have been conducted in several small cat species, but virtually no data exist for black-footed cats (Felis nigripes) (BFCs) or sand cats (Felis margarita) (SCs). The objectives of this study were 1) to compare in vitro motility and acrosome status of fresh and cryopreserved (frozen in pellets on dry ice or in straws in liquid nitrogen vapor) BFC and SC spermatozoa cultured in feline-optimized culture medium (FOCM) or Ham F-10, 2) to assess ovarian responsiveness in BFCs and SCs following exogenous gonadotropin treatment and laparoscopic oocyte recovery, and 3) to evaluate the fertility of fresh and frozen-thawed spermatozoa from both species using homologous and heterologous (domestic cat oocytes) IVF in the two culture media. Motility and acrosomal integrity of fresh and frozen-thawed spermatozoa from BFCs and SCs were similar (P > 0.05) in both media during 6 h of culture. Although effects were more pronounced in SCs, cryopreservation in straws was superior (P 80% of recovered oocytes were of optimal (grade 1) quality. The BFC and SC spermatozoa fertilized 60.0%-79.4% of homologous and 37.7%-42.7% of heterologous oocytes in both culture media, with increased (P < 0.05) cleavage of homologous (SC) and heterologous (BFC and SC) oocytes in FOCM. These results provide the first information to date on the gamete biology of two imperiled cat species and further our capacity to apply reproductive technologies for their conservation.

  1. Suppression of phase synchronisation in network based on cat's brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lameu, Ewandson L; Borges, Fernando S; Borges, Rafael R; Iarosz, Kelly C; Caldas, Iberê L; Batista, Antonio M; Viana, Ricardo L; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    We have studied the effects of perturbations on the cat's cerebral cortex. According to the literature, this cortex structure can be described by a clustered network. This way, we construct a clustered network with the same number of areas as in the cat matrix, where each area is described as a sub-network with a small-world property. We focus on the suppression of neuronal phase synchronisation considering different kinds of perturbations. Among the various controlling interventions, we choose three methods: delayed feedback control, external time-periodic driving, and activation of selected neurons. We simulate these interventions to provide a procedure to suppress undesired and pathological abnormal rhythms that can be associated with many forms of synchronisation. In our simulations, we have verified that the efficiency of synchronisation suppression by delayed feedback control is higher than external time-periodic driving and activation of selected neurons of the cat's cerebral cortex with the same coupling strengths.

  2. PET study of the [{sup 11}C]raclopride binding in the striatum of the awake cat: effects of anaesthetics and role of cerebral blood flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassoun, Wadad; Ginovart, Nathalie; Zimmer, Luc; Gualda, Veronique; Bonnefoi, Frederic [CERMEP, Lyon (France); Le Cavorsin, Marion; Leviel, Vincent [CNRS UMR5123, Villeurbanne (France)

    2003-01-01

    Cats were trained to stay in a containment box, without developing any signs of behavioural stress, while their head was maintained in a position that allowed positron emission tomography (PET) experiments to be performed. The binding potential for [{sup 11}C]raclopride (BP{sub raclo}), a radioligand with good specificity for dopamine (DA) receptors of the D{sub 2} type, was measured in the striatum and in three experimental situations: awake, anaesthetised with ketamine (50 mg kg{sup -1} h{sup -1}; i.m.) and anaesthetised with halothane (1.5%). Non-specific binding was evaluated in the cerebellum. In the striatum of both sides, the BP{sub raclo} was unmodified by ketamine anaesthesia when compared with awake animals. In contrast, a large increase in BP{sub raclo} was observed under halothane anaesthesia. The non-specific binding of [{sup 11}C]raclopride, evaluated in the cerebellum, was also unchanged under ketamine anaesthesia but greatly increased under halothane anaesthesia. To evaluate whether changes in the cerebral blood flow (CBF) resulting from the different experimental situations could be at the root of these discrepancies, injections of [{sup 15}O]H{sub 2}O were performed; measurements revealed a drastically increased CBF under halothane anaesthesia and a slight enhancement under ketamine anaesthesia, when compared with the waking state. These results are the first to be obtained on this topic in awake cats, and show that the BP{sub raclo} is greatly dependent on alterations in the CBF. (orig.)

  3. The Cheshire Cat principle applied to hybrid bag models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, H.B.; Wirzba, A.

    1987-05-01

    Here is argued for the Cheshire Cat point of view according to which the bag (itself) has only notational, but no physical significance. It is explained in a 1+1 dimensional exact Cheshire Cat model how a fermion can escape from the bag by means of an anomaly. We also suggest that suitably constructed hybrid bag models may be used to fix such parameters of effective Lagrangians that can otherwise be obtained from experiments only. This idea is illustrated in a calculation of the mass of the pseudoscalar η' meson in 1+1 dimension. Thus there is hope to find a construction principle for a phenomenologically sensible model. (orig.)

  4. Molecular data reveal complex hybridization and a cryptic species of neotropical wild cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigo, Tatiane C; Schneider, Alexsandra; de Oliveira, Tadeu G; Lehugeur, Livia M; Silveira, Leandro; Freitas, Thales R O; Eizirik, Eduardo

    2013-12-16

    Hybridization among animal species has recently become more recognized as an important phenomenon, especially in the context of recent radiations. Here we show that complex hybridization has led to contrasting patterns of genomic composition among closely related species of the Neotropical cat genus Leopardus. We show strong evidence of ancient hybridization and introgression between the pampas cat (L. colocolo) and northeastern populations of tigrina (L. tigrinus), leading to remarkable cytonuclear discordance in the latter. In contrast, southern tigrina populations show recent and continuing hybridization with Geoffroy's cat (L. geoffroyi), leading to extreme levels of interspecific admixture at their contact zone. Finally, we demonstrate that two seemingly continuous Brazilian tigrina populations show no evidence of ongoing gene flow between them, leading us to support their formal recognition as distinct species, namely L. tigrinus in the northeast and L. guttulus in the south. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Differences between vocalization evoked by social stimuli in feral cats and house cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeon, Seong C; Kim, Young K; Park, Se J; Lee, Scott S; Lee, Seung Y; Suh, Euy H; Houpt, Katherine A; Chang, Hong H; Lee, Hee C; Yang, Byung G; Lee, Hyo J

    2011-06-01

    To investigate how socialization can affect the types and characteristics of vocalization produced by cats, feral cats (n=25) and house cats (n=13) were used as subjects, allowing a comparison between cats socialized to people and non-socialized cats. To record vocalization and assess the cats' responses to behavioural stimuli, five test situations were used: approach by a familiar caretaker, by a threatening stranger, by a large doll, by a stranger with a dog and by a stranger with a cat. Feral cats showed extremely aggressive and defensive behaviour in most test situations, and produced higher call rates than those of house cats in the test situations, which could be attributed to less socialization to other animals and to more sensitivity to fearful situations. Differences were observed in the acoustic parameters of feral cats in comparison to those of house cats. The feral cat produced significantly higher frequency in fundamental frequency, peak frequency, 1st quartile frequency, 3rd quartile frequency of growls and hisses in agonistic test situations. In contrast to the growls and hisses, in meow, all acoustic parameters like fundamental frequency, first formant, peak frequency, 1st quartile frequency, and 3rd quartile frequency of house cats were of significantly higher frequency than those of feral cats. Also, house cats produced calls of significantly shorter in duration than feral cats in agonistic test situations. These results support the conclusion that a lack of socialization may affect usage of types of vocalizations, and the vocal characteristics, so that the proper socialization of cat may be essential to be a suitable companion house cat. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Free-ranging farm cats: home range size and predation on a livestock unit in Northwest Georgia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna E Kitts-Morgan

    Full Text Available This study's objective was to determine seasonal and diurnal vs. nocturnal home range size, as well as predation for free-ranging farm cats at a livestock unit in Northwest Georgia. Seven adult cats were tracked with attached GPS units for up to two weeks for one spring and two summer seasons from May 2010 through August 2011. Three and five cats were tracked for up to two weeks during the fall and winter seasons, respectively. Feline scat was collected during this entire period. Cats were fed a commercial cat food daily. There was no seasonal effect (P > 0.05 on overall (95% KDE and 90% KDE or core home range size (50% KDE. Male cats tended (P = 0.08 to have larger diurnal and nocturnal core home ranges (1.09 ha compared to female cats (0.64 ha. Reproductively intact cats (n = 2 had larger (P < 0.0001 diurnal and nocturnal home ranges as compared to altered cats. Feline scat processing separated scat into prey parts, and of the 210 feline scats collected during the study, 75.24% contained hair. Of these 158 scat samples, 86 contained non-cat hair and 72 contained only cat hair. Other prey components included fragments of bone in 21.43% of scat and teeth in 12.86% of scat. Teeth were used to identify mammalian prey hunted by these cats, of which the Hispid cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus was the primary rodent. Other targeted mammals were Peromyscus sp., Sylvilagus sp. and Microtus sp. Invertebrates and birds were less important as prey, but all mammalian prey identified in this study consisted of native animals. While the free-ranging farm cats in this study did not adjust their home range seasonally, sex and reproductive status did increase diurnal and nocturnal home range size. Ultimately, larger home ranges of free-ranging cats could negatively impact native wildlife.

  7. Free-ranging farm cats: home range size and predation on a livestock unit in Northwest Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitts-Morgan, Susanna E; Caires, Kyle C; Bohannon, Lisa A; Parsons, Elizabeth I; Hilburn, Katharine A

    2015-01-01

    This study's objective was to determine seasonal and diurnal vs. nocturnal home range size, as well as predation for free-ranging farm cats at a livestock unit in Northwest Georgia. Seven adult cats were tracked with attached GPS units for up to two weeks for one spring and two summer seasons from May 2010 through August 2011. Three and five cats were tracked for up to two weeks during the fall and winter seasons, respectively. Feline scat was collected during this entire period. Cats were fed a commercial cat food daily. There was no seasonal effect (P > 0.05) on overall (95% KDE and 90% KDE) or core home range size (50% KDE). Male cats tended (P = 0.08) to have larger diurnal and nocturnal core home ranges (1.09 ha) compared to female cats (0.64 ha). Reproductively intact cats (n = 2) had larger (P ranges as compared to altered cats. Feline scat processing separated scat into prey parts, and of the 210 feline scats collected during the study, 75.24% contained hair. Of these 158 scat samples, 86 contained non-cat hair and 72 contained only cat hair. Other prey components included fragments of bone in 21.43% of scat and teeth in 12.86% of scat. Teeth were used to identify mammalian prey hunted by these cats, of which the Hispid cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus) was the primary rodent. Other targeted mammals were Peromyscus sp., Sylvilagus sp. and Microtus sp. Invertebrates and birds were less important as prey, but all mammalian prey identified in this study consisted of native animals. While the free-ranging farm cats in this study did not adjust their home range seasonally, sex and reproductive status did increase diurnal and nocturnal home range size. Ultimately, larger home ranges of free-ranging cats could negatively impact native wildlife.

  8. Free-Ranging Farm Cats: Home Range Size and Predation on a Livestock Unit In Northwest Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitts-Morgan, Susanna E.; Caires, Kyle C.; Bohannon, Lisa A.; Parsons, Elizabeth I.; Hilburn, Katharine A.

    2015-01-01

    This study’s objective was to determine seasonal and diurnal vs. nocturnal home range size, as well as predation for free-ranging farm cats at a livestock unit in Northwest Georgia. Seven adult cats were tracked with attached GPS units for up to two weeks for one spring and two summer seasons from May 2010 through August 2011. Three and five cats were tracked for up to two weeks during the fall and winter seasons, respectively. Feline scat was collected during this entire period. Cats were fed a commercial cat food daily. There was no seasonal effect (P > 0.05) on overall (95% KDE and 90% KDE) or core home range size (50% KDE). Male cats tended (P = 0.08) to have larger diurnal and nocturnal core home ranges (1.09 ha) compared to female cats (0.64 ha). Reproductively intact cats (n = 2) had larger (P cats. Feline scat processing separated scat into prey parts, and of the 210 feline scats collected during the study, 75.24% contained hair. Of these 158 scat samples, 86 contained non-cat hair and 72 contained only cat hair. Other prey components included fragments of bone in 21.43% of scat and teeth in 12.86% of scat. Teeth were used to identify mammalian prey hunted by these cats, of which the Hispid cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus) was the primary rodent. Other targeted mammals were Peromyscus sp., Sylvilagus sp. and Microtus sp. Invertebrates and birds were less important as prey, but all mammalian prey identified in this study consisted of native animals. While the free-ranging farm cats in this study did not adjust their home range seasonally, sex and reproductive status did increase diurnal and nocturnal home range size. Ultimately, larger home ranges of free-ranging cats could negatively impact native wildlife. PMID:25894078

  9. Mesoscale Phenomenon Revealed by an Acoustic Sounder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundtang Petersen, Erik; Jensen, Niels Otto

    1976-01-01

    A particular phenomenon observed on an acoustic sounder record is analyzed, and is interpreted as being associated with the passing of a land breeze front. A simple physical explanation of the frontal movements is suggested. The actual existence of the land breeze is demonstrated by examination...

  10. Methods to Minimize Zero-Missing Phenomenon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Silva, Filipe Miguel Faria; Bak, Claus Leth; Gudmundsdottir, Unnur Stella

    2010-01-01

    With the increasing use of high-voltage AC cables at transmission levels, phenomena such as current zero-missing start to appear more often in transmission systems. Zero-missing phenomenon can occur when energizing cable lines with shunt reactors. This may considerably delay the opening of the ci...

  11. Key-Phenomenon and Religious Meaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lomuscio Vincenzo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I develop a phenomenology of religious experience through the notion of keyphenomenon. My analysis moves from a general phenomenology of situation, in which we have to relate different phenomena according to a sense. What does “according to a sense” mean? My suggestion is that we should look for a relationship among these data when we find a key-phenomenon (among a series of phenomena that would enlighten all the others. This key-phenomenon would show a non-phenomenal meaning which would make all the others understandable. Each other datum, therefore, becomes the witness of invisible meaning through a key-witness. The key-phenomenon we choose determines the role (i.e., the truth of each datum within its situation. This phenomenological relationship belongs to both the sense of day-life situations, and that one of possible religious situations. If the religious interpretation of a situation depends on our choice of key-phenomenon, or key-witness, we have to define what kind of keyphenomenon constitutes a religious intuition.

  12. Concept "Medical Museum" as a Sociocultural Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizh, Nina V.; Slyshkin, Gennady G.; Zheltukhina, Marina R.; Privalova, Irina V.; Kravchenko, Olga A.

    2016-01-01

    The article examines the concept "medical museum" as a sociocultural phenomenon. The register of medical museums in Russia makes the material of research. The complex methods of analysis of the concept "medical museum" are used. The philosophical, historical, cultural, structural, communicative and semantic analysis is carried…

  13. Geometrical optics and the diffraction phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timofeev, Aleksandr V

    2005-01-01

    This note outlines the principles of the geometrical optics of inhomogeneous waves whose description necessitates the use of complex values of the wave vector. Generalizing geometrical optics to inhomogeneous waves permits including in its scope the analysis of the diffraction phenomenon. (methodological notes)

  14. Orgasm Induced Seizures: A Rare Phenomenon

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    testing of the brain revealed no structural abnormality. His blood examination findings were ... A variety of stimuli can cause reflex seizures, Some triggers include light, music and cognitive phenomenon. There are case reports ... seizures cause great personal distress and significantly affect marital relationships. Though ...

  15. Lead exposure potentiates predatory attack behavior in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenjie; Han, Shenggao; Gregg, Thomas R; Kemp, Francis W; Davidow, Amy L; Louria, Donald B; Siegel, Allan; Bogden, John D

    2003-07-01

    Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated that environmental lead exposure is associated with aggressive behavior in children; however, numerous confounding variables limit the ability of these studies to establish a causal relationship. The study of aggressive behavior using a validated animal model was used to test the hypothesis that there is a causal relationship between lead exposure and aggression in the absence of confounding variables. We studied the effects of lead exposure on a feline model of aggression: predatory (quiet biting) attack of an anesthetized rat. Five cats were stimulated with a precisely controlled electrical current via electrodes inserted into the lateral hypothalamus. The response measure was the predatory attack threshold current (i.e., the current required to elicit an attack response on 50% of the trials). Blocks of trials were administered in which predatory attack threshold currents were measured three times a week for a total of 6-10 weeks, including before, during, and after lead exposure. Lead was incorporated into cat food "treats" at doses of 50-150 mg/kg/day. Two of the five cats received a second period of lead exposure. Blood lead concentrations were measured twice a week and were cats and increased after the cessation of lead exposure in four of the five cats (Pcat were inversely correlated (r=-0.35 to -0.74). A random-effects mixed model demonstrated a significant (P=0.0019) negative association between threshold current and blood lead concentration. The data of this study demonstrate that lead exposure enhances predatory aggression in the cat and provide experimental support for a causal relationship between lead exposure and aggressive behavior in humans.

  16. Sex specific differences in hepatic and plasma lipid profiles in healthy cats pre and post spaying and neutering : relationship with feline hepatic lipidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valtolina, Chiara|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412503034; Vaandrager, Arie B|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073165506; Favier, Robert P|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304828742; Tuohetahuntila, Maidina; Kummeling, Anne|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304828793; Jeusette, Isabelle; Rothuizen, Jan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071276033; Robben, Joris H|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/266740790

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A link between lipid metabolism and disease has been recognized in cats. Since hepatic lipidosis is a frequent disorder in cats, the aim of the current study was to evaluate liver and plasma lipid dimorphism in healthy cats and the effects of gonadectomy on lipid profiling. From six

  17. Human-related factors regulate the spatial ecology of domestic cats in sensitive areas for conservation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim P Ferreira

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Domestic cats ranging freely in natural areas are a conservation concern due to competition, predation, disease transmission or hybridization with wildcats. In order to improve our ability to design effective control policies, we investigate the factors affecting their numbers and space use in natural areas of continental Europe. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We describe the patterns of cat presence, abundance and space use and analyse the associated environmental and human constraints in a well-preserved Mediterranean natural area with small scattered local farms. We failed in detecting cats in areas away from human settlements (trapping effort above 4000 trap-nights, while we captured 30 individuals near inhabited farms. We identified 130 cats, all of them in farms still in use by people (30% of 128 farms. All cats were free-ranging and very wary of people. The main factor explaining the presence of cats was the presence of people, while the number of cats per farm was mostly affected by the occasional food provisioning with human refuse and the presence of people. The home ranges of eight radio tagged cats were centred at inhabited farms. Males went furthest away from the farms during the mating season (3.8 km on average, maximum 6.3 km, using inhabited farms as stepping-stones in their mating displacements (2.2 km of maximum inter-farm distance moved. In their daily movements, cats notably avoided entering in areas with high fox density. CONCLUSIONS: The presence, abundance and space use of cats were heavily dependent on human settlements. Any strategy aiming at reducing their impact in areas of conservation concern should aim at the presence of settlements and their spatial spread and avoid any access to human refuse. The movements of domestic cats would be limited in areas with large patches of natural vegetation providing good conditions for other carnivore mammals such as red foxes.

  18. Management of feral domestic cats in the urban environment of Rome (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natoli, Eugenia; Maragliano, Laura; Cariola, Giuseppe; Faini, Anna; Bonanni, Roberto; Cafazzo, Simona; Fantini, Claudio

    2006-12-18

    In Italy, which is rabies-free, the national Law No. 281 [Legge Nazionale 14 agosto 1991. No. 281: Legge Quadro in materia di animali di affezione e prevenzione del randagismo. Gazz. Uff. Rep. Ital. no 203 del 30 agosto 1991: p. 3] on the management of pets and on the control of feral cats has introduced the no-kill policy for this species. Thus, "trap-neuter-release" (TNR) programs have been carried out for >10 years. In this paper we present data on registered colonies and censused cats in Rome from 1991 to 2000; the results of the neutering campaign from 1991 to 2000; and a survey, on 103 cat colonies, on the effects of demographic control of urban feral-cat colonies in the city of Rome, carried out by the local Veterinary Public Services (VPS) in collaboration with the associations of cat care-takers. In 10 years almost 8000 were neutered and reintroduced in their original colony. The spay/neuter campaigns brought about a general decrease in cat number but the percentage of cat immigration (due to abandonment and spontaneous arrival) is around 21%. This suggests that all these efforts without an effective education of people to control the reproduction of house cats (as a prevention for abandonment) are a waste of money, time and energy.

  19. Tolerability and efficacy of benazepril in cats with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jonathan N; Gunn-Moore, Danielle A; Tasker, Séverine; Gleadhill, Allison; Strehlau, Günther

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the study was to test the effect of the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) benazepril in cats with chronic kidney disease (CKD). A total of 192 cats with CKD with an initial plasma creatinine concentration > or = 2 mg/dL (> or = 177 micromol/L) and urine specific gravity benazepril x HCl at a dosage of 0.5-1.0 mg/kg (n = 96) for up to 1,119 days. Most cats were fed exclusively a diet containing low amounts of phosphate, protein, and sodium. Benazepril produced a significant reduction in proteinuria, assessed by the urine protein-to-creatinine ratio (UPC, P = .005). This effect of benazepril was present in all subgroups tested, including cats with UPC benazepril as compared with placebo during treatment in cats with initial UPC benazepril and 520 +/- 323 days with placebo (P = .47). Mean +/- SD renal survival times in the 13 cats with initial UPC > or = 1 were 402 +/- 202 days with benazepril and 149 +/- 90 days with placebo (P = .27). Cats with initial UPC > or = 1 treated with benazepril had better appetite (P = .017) as compared with those treated with placebo. Benazepril was well tolerated. In conclusion, benazepril decreased proteinuria in cats with CKD.

  20. Guardians' Perceptions of Cats' Welfare and Behavior Regarding Visiting Veterinary Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariti, Chiara; Bowen, Jonathan E; Campa, Sonia; Grebe, Gabriele; Sighieri, Claudio; Gazzano, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    To assess the welfare of cats at the veterinary clinic and how caregivers and veterinarians affect it, a survey of Italian cat guardians (n = 1,111) was conducted using a 28-item multichoice questionnaire. Most cats showed impaired welfare during all stages of a clinic visit: before entering, in the waiting room, moving to the examination room, on the examination table, and after returning home. A relationship was found between welfare states in each stage. Stress worsened with further experience and had negative effects on traveling and handling in other situations. Restraint, pain, and anxiety led to aggression toward vets and guardians. Guardians showed a positive attitude toward their cats' health and welfare, and the veterinarians' behavior toward the cats was a reason for changing the veterinarian. One in 10 veterinarians examined the cat immediately, without stroking, talking, or offering food. However, the use of food was effective only if cats were not already stressed. Educating guardians and veterinarians to minimize stress during every stage of a clinic visit is the best approach to improving welfare for cats visiting the clinic.

  1. Acetaminophen Toxicosis in a Cat

    OpenAIRE

    Anvik, J. O.

    1984-01-01

    A seven month old domestic shorthaired male cat was presented with a known history of acetaminophen ingestion. Clinical findings included icterus, depression, hypothermia, tachypnea and pronounced edema of the head and neck. Treatment was aimed at providing substrate to assist in conjugation of the drug and reversing methemoglobinemia. Administration of oral acetylcysteine, ascorbic acid and IV fluids was insufficient in this case due to a delay in initiation of treatment. The salient postmor...

  2. Hypophosphatemia associated with enteral alimentation in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justin, R B; Hohenhaus, A E

    1995-01-01

    Hypophosphatemia is uncommon in cats, but it has been reported in association with diabetes mellitus and hepatic lipidosis, where it can cause hemolysis, rhabdomyopathy, depression, seizures, and coma. The purpose of this article is to describe 9 cats that developed low serum phosphorus concentrations (alimentation. Serum biochemical analyses from more than 6,000 cats were reviewed. The medical records of all cats with hypophosphatemia were examined for history of enteral alimentation; diabetic cats were excluded from the study. Nine cats, ranging in age from 3 to 17 years, were identified. All cats had normal serum phosphorus concentrations before tube feeding began. Onset of hypophosphatemia occurred 12 to 72 hours after initiation of enteral alimentation, and the nadir for phosphorus concentrations ranged from 0.4 to 2.4 mg/dL. Hemolysis occurred in 6 of the 9 cats. Hypophosphatemia secondary to enteral alimentation is an uncommon clinical finding in cats. Cats with high alanine aminotransferase activity, hyperbilirubinemia, and weight loss should be closely monitored for hypophosphatemia during the first 72 hours of enteral alimentation.

  3. Odontogenic keratocyst in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaDouceur, E E B; Walker, K S; Mohr, F C; Murphy, B

    2014-01-01

    Odontogenic cysts are derived from odontogenic epithelium, can be locally invasive and destructive and have been reported rarely in cats. A 16-year-old, male domestic shorthair cat had a 3-year history of a slowly progressive, right mandibular swelling. Intraoral dental radiographs revealed a multilocular, radiolucent, cystic mass within the right mandible that extended from the distal aspect of the canine tooth to the mesial aspect of the fourth premolar tooth. Radiographically, the mass was associated with distortion and regional destruction of the right mandibular bone and resorption of regional tooth roots. Histological examination of an incisional biopsy sample revealed multiple ruptured cysts lined by stratified squamous epithelium of odontogenic origin with luminal parakeratinization and a prominent palisading basal cell layer. The cyst contained abundant orthokeratotic and parakeratotic keratin. The clinical, radiographical and histological features were consistent with a diagnosis of odontogenic keratocyst, as seen in man. This is the first report of an odontogenic keratocyst in a cat. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Presenteeism – (Not new phenomenon in the occupational environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Wężyk

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Presenteeism, understood as being at work while ill, is not a new phenomenon. However, not long ago it has become an object of researchers' interest. Formerly, they focused mainly on absenteeism. In general, presenteesim is perceived as negative and very costly for employers. The majority of scientific studies refer to the problem of employees' productivity reduced due to their attending work despite being ill, but the knowledge about presenteeism's causes and effects (other than decreased productivity for both, the employee and the organisation, is still very limited. Especially in Poland there are very few scientific reports on this issue. However, the paper on presenteeism published recently (the 3/2013 issue of this Journal defined this phenomenon as a noneffective presence at work. The authors postulate to avoid pejorative connotation of this term by equating presenteeism with loss of productivity, and to separate this phenomenon from its possible negative and positive consequences. Thus, this paper aims at presenting current state of the art on this phenomenon, including such issues as definitional problems, measures and frequency of presenteeism, as well as its causes and consequences. In this paper presenteeism is presented in a wider perspective of its individual and contextual determinants. Med Pr 2013;64(6:847–861

  5. A Theoretical Model for the Prediction of Siphon Breaking Phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Youngmin; Kim, Young-In; Seo, Jae-Kwang; Kim, Keung Koo; Yoon, Juhyeon

    2014-01-01

    A siphon phenomenon or siphoning often refers to the movement of liquid from a higher elevation to a lower one through a tube in an inverted U shape (whose top is typically located above the liquid surface) under the action of gravity, and has been used in a variety of reallife applications such as a toilet bowl and a Greedy cup. However, liquid drainage due to siphoning sometimes needs to be prevented. For example, a siphon breaker, which is designed to limit the siphon effect by allowing the gas entrainment into a siphon line, is installed in order to maintain the pool water level above the reactor core when a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) occurs in an open-pool type research reactor. In this paper, we develop a theoretical model to predict the siphon breaking phenomenon. In this paper, a theoretical model to predict the siphon breaking phenomenon is developed. It is shown that the present model predicts well the fundamental features of the siphon breaking phenomenon and undershooting height

  6. A Theoretical Model for the Prediction of Siphon Breaking Phenomenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Youngmin; Kim, Young-In; Seo, Jae-Kwang; Kim, Keung Koo; Yoon, Juhyeon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    A siphon phenomenon or siphoning often refers to the movement of liquid from a higher elevation to a lower one through a tube in an inverted U shape (whose top is typically located above the liquid surface) under the action of gravity, and has been used in a variety of reallife applications such as a toilet bowl and a Greedy cup. However, liquid drainage due to siphoning sometimes needs to be prevented. For example, a siphon breaker, which is designed to limit the siphon effect by allowing the gas entrainment into a siphon line, is installed in order to maintain the pool water level above the reactor core when a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) occurs in an open-pool type research reactor. In this paper, we develop a theoretical model to predict the siphon breaking phenomenon. In this paper, a theoretical model to predict the siphon breaking phenomenon is developed. It is shown that the present model predicts well the fundamental features of the siphon breaking phenomenon and undershooting height.

  7. Management of obesity in cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoelmkjaer KM

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Kirsten M Hoelmkjaer, Charlotte R Bjornvad Department of Veterinary Clinical and Animal Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark Abstract: Obesity is a common nutritional disorder in cats, especially when they are neutered and middle-aged. Obesity predisposes cats to several metabolic and clinical disorders, including insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus, lameness, and skin disease. Prevention and treatment of obesity is therefore of great importance in veterinary practice. Correct assessment of body composition is important for recognizing early states of obesity and for monitoring success of weight-loss programs. Various methods for assessing body composition have been proposed, of which a 9-point body-condition score has been validated in cats, and is possibly the most simple to use in the clinic; however, for extremely obese individuals, it is less useful. When calculating the appropriate daily caloric intake for a weight-loss plan, the aim is to maintain a safe weight-loss rate, increasing the chance of preserving lean body mass and decreasing the risk of developing hepatic lipidosis, while also producing a sufficient weight-loss rate to keep owners motivated. A weight-loss rate of 0.5%–2% per week is recommended, which for a cat that needs to lose 3 kg body weight results in an anticipated time for reaching the target weight of 24–60 weeks. There are several purpose-made weight-loss diets available. The optimal composition of a weight-loss diet for cats is unknown, but most of the available products have lower caloric density, an increased nutrient:energy ratio, and higher protein and fiber content. Regular follow-up visits allow the caloric intake to be adjusted based on progress, and possibly increase the chance of success. This review discusses the risk factors for and consequences of obesity, and gives directions for formulating a weight-loss plan, including daily caloric

  8. Limbic control of aggression in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamec, R E; Stark-Adamec, C I

    1983-01-01

    Over a decade of work by Flynn and colleagues has delineated a network of limbic circuits which function to modulate the expression of predatory aggression and defence in the cat, and aspects of this work are reviewed. In particular, Flynn's work revealed a circuit involving the basomedial amygdala which functions to suppress attack, and at the same time facilitates defence. A second circuit, involving the ventral hippocampus, is involved in attack facilitation. Studies relating stable differences in excitability in these two circuits to developmentally determined behavioural dispositions toward aggression or defence are summarized. Finally, the impact of experimentally induced limbic seizures on interictally maintained expression of aggression and defence behaviourally, and on limbic excitability are reviewed. Taken together, the data indicate that the behavioural balance of attack and defence is under the tonic control of opponent limbic circuits, which are themselves biased in a measureable manner. Developmental studies indicate that adult defensiveness is determined early in life, so early as to suggest some pre-programmed neuro-developmental process. Experimentally induced seizures alter behaviour lastingly, producing an increase in defensive disposition. At the same time there is an equally lasting potentiation of interictal transmission of neural activity from the amygdala to the hypothalamus. Moreover, seizures may reduce interictal transmission of activity through the ventral hippocampus by potentiating recurrent inhibition. These effects of seizures are of interest since seizures reproduce naturally occurring differences in limbic excitability seen in naturally defensive cats.

  9. Terbinafine hydrochloride treatment of Microsporum canis experimentally-induced ringworm in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotnik, T; Kozuh Erzen, N; Kuzner, J; Drobnic-Kosorok, M

    2001-11-08

    Cats represent the most important source of Microsporum canis infection to people. Terbinafine hydrochloride is commonly used in the treatment of microsporosis. Its fungicidal action permits short period of treatment. It was our objective to evaluate the effectiveness of this drug in treatment of microsporosis in cats. We treated nine experimentally M. canis infected cats with terbinafine at a dose of 10-20mg/kg SID (low-dose group, LDG), nine cats with 30-40mg/kg SID (high-dose group, HDG), and nine cats were left untreated (control group, CG). The drug's levels in cats' plasma and hair were measured by a reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatographic method (RP-HPLC) and the cats' cure was followed by Wood's lamp illumination, microscopic exam and fungal culture. We showed no difference between the clinical course in CG and LDG, but HDG were significantly differentiated from both other groups. Terbinafine levels in plasma at 120 days of treatment were not statistically different among LDG (4.13 microg/l) and HDG (5.48 microg/l), but levels in hair of LDG (1.24 microg/l) and HDG (3.62 microg/l) were significantly different. Terbinafine can be used for the treatment of microsporosis in cats in the dose of 30-40mg/kg SID.

  10. An Evaluation of Feral Cat Management Options Using a Decision Analysis Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerrie Anne T. Loyd

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The feral domestic cat (Felis catus is a predatory invasive species with documented negative effects on native wildlife. The issue of appropriate and acceptable feral cat management is a matter of contentious debate in cities and states across the United States due to concerns for wildlife conservation, cat welfare, and public health. Common management strategies include: Trap-Neuter-Release, Trap-Neuter-Release with removal of kittens for adoption and Trap-Euthanize. Very little empirical evidence exists relevant to the efficacy of alternative options and a model-based approach is needed to predict population response and extend calculations to impact on wildlife. We have created a structured decision support model representing multiple stakeholder groups to facilitate the coordinated management of feral cats. We used a probabilistic graphical model (a Bayesian Belief Network to evaluate and rank alternative management decisions according to efficacy, societal preferences, and cost. Our model predicts that Trap-Neuter-Release strategies would be optimal management decisions for small local populations of less than fifty cats while Trap-Euthanize would be the optimal management decision for populations greater than 50 cats. Removal is predicted to reduce feral cat populations quickly and prevent cats from taking a large number of wildlife prey.

  11. A review of feral cat control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Sheilah A

    2008-08-01

    Animal overpopulation including feral cats is an important global problem. There are many stakeholders involved in the feral cat debate over 'what to do about the problem', including those who consider them a nuisance, the public at risk from zoonotic disease, people who are concerned about the welfare of feral cats, those concerned with wildlife impacts, and the cats themselves. How best to control this population is controversial and has ranged from culling, relocation, and more recently 'trap neuter return' (TNR) methods. Data support the success of TNR in reducing cat populations, but to have a large impact it will have to be adopted on a far greater scale than it is currently practised. Non-surgical contraception is a realistic future goal. Because the feral cat problem was created by humans, concerted educational efforts on responsible pet ownership and the intrinsic value of animals is an integral part of a solution.

  12. Molecular Detection of Rickettsia felis in Humans, Cats, and Cat Fleas in Bangladesh, 2013-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Rajib; Paul, Shyamal Kumar; Hossain, Muhammad Akram; Ahmed, Salma; Mahmud, Muhammad Chand; Nasreen, Syeda Anjuman; Ferdouse, Faria; Sharmi, Rumana Hasan; Ahamed, Farid; Ghosh, Souvik; Urushibara, Noriko; Aung, Meiji Soe; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    2016-05-01

    High prevalence of Rickettsia felis in patients with fever of unknown origin was revealed in the north-central Bangladesh from 2012 to 2013. Subsequently, in this study, prevalence of R. felis in cats and cat fleas (Ctenocephalides felis), together with febrile patients, was studied by PCR detection of 17 kDa antigen gene and DNA sequencing. R. felis was detected in 28% (28/100) and 21% (14/68) of cat blood and cat flea samples, respectively, whereas 42% (21/50) of patients were positive for R. felis. R. felis-positive cat fleas were detected at significantly higher rate on R. felis-positive cats. The results suggested a potential role of cats and cat fleas for transmission of R. felis to humans in Bangladesh.

  13. Toxicity and response in cats with neoplasia treated with toceranib phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Aaron; Blackwood, Laura

    2017-06-01

    Objectives Toceranib phosphate is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor licensed for the treatment of non-resectable Patnaik grade II/III recurrent cutaneous mast cell tumours in dogs. There is no information in cats regarding the tolerated dose, toxicity or tumour response of this drug. The aim of this study was to analyse retrospectively a cohort of cats with advanced neoplasia treated with toceranib to identify toxicity and response. Methods The medical records of the Small Animal Teaching Hospital were reviewed. Cats were included if they had received toceranib for at least 2 weeks for the treatment of histologically or cytologically confirmed neoplastic disease, and had at least one set of monitoring blood tests (haematology, biochemistry) performed after baseline tests. Toxicity was graded according to the Veterinary Comparative Oncology Group - common terminology criteria for adverse events(VCOG-CTCAE) and response was measured according to Response Evaluation In Solid Tumors (RECIST) criteria. Results Fourteen cats met the inclusion criteria, the majority of which (13/14) had received previous therapy (surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy). The most common tumour types were mast cell tumours or malignant epithelial tumours. Toxicity occurred in 10/14 cats - 10 cats had mild myelosuppression or gastrointestinal effects. Two cats developed severe hepatoxicity. One cat died from congestive heart failure, although whether this was related to toceranib therapy is unknown. Regarding response, one cat achieved complete response; two cats achieved partial response and five cats achieved stable disease: overall biological response rate was 57.1%. All of the cats that achieved either partial or complete response were treated for mast cell disease. Overall median duration of response was 90 days (range 14-570 days). None of the cats with squamous cell carcinoma achieved a response. Conclusions and relevance Toceranib phosphate is generally well tolerated in cats, with toxicity

  14. 42 CFR 71.51 - Dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dogs and cats. 71.51 Section 71.51 Public Health... QUARANTINE Importations § 71.51 Dogs and cats. (a) Definitions. As used in this section the term: Cat means all domestic cats. Confinement means restriction of a dog or cat to a building or other enclosure at a...

  15. Phase transition phenomenon: A compound measure analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Bo Soo; Park, Chanhi; Ryu, Doojin; Song, Wonho

    2015-06-01

    This study investigates the well-documented phenomenon of phase transition in financial markets using combined information from both return and volume changes within short time intervals. We suggest a new measure for the phase transition behaviour of markets, calculated as a return distribution conditional on local variance in volume imbalance, and show that this measure successfully captures phase transition behaviour under various conditions. We analyse the intraday trade and quote dataset from the KOSPI 200 index futures, which includes detailed information on the original order size and the type of each initiating investor. We find that among these two competing factors, the submitted order size yields more explanatory power on the phenomenon of market phase transition than the investor type.

  16. Diffusion phenomenon for linear dissipative wave equations

    KAUST Repository

    Said-Houari, Belkacem

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we prove the diffusion phenomenon for the linear wave equation. To derive the diffusion phenomenon, a new method is used. In fact, for initial data in some weighted spaces, we prove that for {equation presented} decays with the rate {equation presented} [0,1] faster than that of either u or v, where u is the solution of the linear wave equation with initial data {equation presented} [0,1], and v is the solution of the related heat equation with initial data v 0 = u 0 + u 1. This result improves the result in H. Yang and A. Milani [Bull. Sci. Math. 124 (2000), 415-433] in the sense that, under the above restriction on the initial data, the decay rate given in that paper can be improved by t -γ/2. © European Mathematical Society.

  17. CAT-ASVAB Technical Bulletin Number 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    CAT -ASVAB Technical Bulletin #1 Personnel Testing Division Defense Manpower Data Center March 2006 Report...2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE CAT -ASVAB Technical Bulletin #1 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...Hetter, R. D. "Psychometric Procedures for Administering CAT -ASVAB" (pp. 131-140) Chapter 4 Hetter, R. D., & Sympson J. B. "Item Exposure

  18. Channel CAT: A Tactical Link Analysis Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-09-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, California THESIS CHANNEL CAT : A TACTICAL LINK ANALYSIS TOOL by Michael Glenn Coleman September 1997 Thesis...REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED September 1997 Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE CHANNEL CAT : A TACTICAL LINK ANALYSIS TOOL 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6...tool, the Channel Capacity Analysis Tool (Channel CAT ), designed to provide an automated tool for the anlysis of design decisions in developing client

  19. CAT/RF Simulation Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-06-11

    IVSS-2003-MAS-7 CAT /RF Simulation Lessons Learned Christopher Mocnik Vetronics Technology Area, RDECOM TARDEC Tim Lee DCS Corporation...developed a re- configurable Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) simulation for the Crew integration and Automation Test bed ( CAT ) and Robotics Follower (RF...Advanced Technology Demonstration (ATD) experiments. This simulation was developed as a component of the Embedded Simulation System (ESS) of the CAT

  20. Phenomenon of displacement in Arabic language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Displacement is one of the characteristics of language and common phenomena in the Arabic language. Not only is this phenomenon limited to Arabic poetry and prose, but it is also broadened, so we can see examples of this in the Qur'an. Because of this phenomenon extensively in Arabic literature and also because of its essence that leads to the transmission of the elements for the first visibility to the other visibility in the sentence and sometimes had to change the grammatical role of the words, its identify helps us in a better understanding of text and the correct translation of it and protects the reader from mistakes. This paper in the descriptive analytical approach tries studying of the phenomenon of the displacement in the Arabic language and bringing its instances in Arabic poetry and prose as well as verses contained in the Holy Quran, to show that through the types and characteristics in the Arabic language and to response to several questions, including: how important is the displacement and what is its types in rhetoric, and the reasons of the displacement, and etc... Of the most important results of this study may refer to the undeniable role of the displacement as a rhetorical method to better understanding of the texts including: one of the most important reasons of the displacement in the use of language is to improve speech verbally and morally, and violation of the standard language and create a poetic atmosphere, and the recognition of the occurrence of the phenomenon of displacement in the Arabic language that uphold different interpretations remote and estimates when faced with the displacement in the text and help us to understand it and etc...

  1. Multiplayer computer games as youth's leisure phenomenon

    OpenAIRE

    HADERKOVÁ, Barbora

    2016-01-01

    The thesis is dedicated to multiplayer computer games as youth's leisure phenomenon of this time. The theoretical part is focused on computer games history, multiplayer computer games and their types, gaming platforms, community of multiplayer games players and potential negatives and positives, which follows from playing this type of games. The practical part contains a qualitative survey using interviews with multiplayer computer games players aged from 15 to 26 years from city of České Bud...

  2. THE PHENOMENON OF MIGRATION. OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen BOGHEAN

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Migration is not a new phenomenon, neither for Europe, nor for the entire world and it exists since the beginning of mankind. Over time, this kind of international mobility generated many opportunities, but many challenges as well. Being an extremely important and complex phenomenon, both in economic terms and mostly from the social perspective, mass emigration has never been more intense as nowadays. Together with this particular complexity, the intensity of the migration phenomenon reveals each individual’s profound freedom desire, but also the acute need to ensure a better future for himself and especially for his family. Currently, an ever increasing number of individuals migrate in search of a better place, changing regions, countries or even continents. Witnessing the events that transcend the people all around the world, we consider that migration generates economic, social and cultural, but also political profound changes. These major changes require the involvement of the political actors, namely the governments, in creating a favorable and reliable framework so as the society and decision makers to understand that immigrants represent an opportunity for the emerging economies and not a phenomenon that should be criticized. In this paper we aim to follow the theories regarding the migration process, as well as the changes it generates, taking into consideration that of the 507 million current inhabitants of the EU, approximately 20 million are from countries outside the EU. We consider this research to be underlain, taking into consideration that regardless of the form it takes, in Europe immigration is and will remain a difficult to manage reality.

  3. No benefit of therapeutic vaccination in clinically healthy cats persistently infected with feline leukemia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfer-Hungerbuehler, A Katrin; Spiri, Andrea M; Riond, Barbara; Grest, Paula; Boretti, Felicitas S; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2015-03-24

    Therapeutic vaccinations have a potential application in infections where no curative treatment is available. In contrast to HIV, efficacious vaccines for a cat retrovirus, feline leukemia virus (FeLV), are commercially available. However, the infection is still prevalent, and no effective treatment of the infection is known. By vaccinating persistently FeLV-infected cats and presenting FeLV antigens to the immune system of the host, e.g., in the form of recombinant and/or adjuvanted antigens, we intended to shift the balance toward an advantage of the host so that persistent infection could be overcome by the infected cat. Two commercially available FeLV vaccines efficacious in protecting naïve cats from FeLV infection were tested in six experimentally and persistently FeLV-infected cats: first, a canarypox-vectored vaccine, and second, an adjuvanted, recombinant envelope vaccine was repeatedly administered with the aim to stimulate the immune system. No beneficial effects on p27 antigen and plasma viral RNA loads, anti-FeLV antibodies, or life expectancy of the cats were detected. The cats were unable to overcome or decrease viremia. Some cats developed antibodies to FeLV antigens although not protective. Thus, we cannot recommend vaccinating persistently FeLV-infected cats as a means of improving their FeLV status, quality of life or life expectancy. We suggest testing of all cats for FeLV infection prior to FeLV vaccination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Controlled Archaeological Test Site (CATS) Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — CATS facility is at the Construction Engineering Research Laboratory (CERL), Champaign, IL. This 1-acre test site includes a variety of subsurface features carefully...

  5. Association between Characteristics of Cats and Satisfaction of Owners who Adopted Cats from an Animal Hospital in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ONODERA, Nodoka; UCHIDA, Keiko; KAKUMA, Yoshie

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT A follow-up questionnaire survey was conducted with 29 cat owners who adopted cats from an animal hospital in Japan. Physical characteristics were found to be important factors for the owners when choosing a cat. There were significant differences between impression of the cat for the owners at present and images of their ideal cats, and the levels of aggression and activeness of the cats at present were rated higher than their ideal cats. A significant negative correlation was found between the degree of satisfaction with the cat and occurrence of house soiling; thus, some behavioral problems may deteriorate the relationship between the owner and the cat. PMID:24419973

  6. Effect of superficial radial nerve stimulation on the activity of nigro-striatal dopaminergic neurons in the cat: role of cutaneous sensory input

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieoullon, A; Dusticier, N [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 13 - Marseille (France). Inst. de Neurophysiologie et Psychophysiologie

    1982-01-01

    The release of /sup 3/H-dopamine (DA) continuously synthesized from /sup 3/H-thyrosine was measured in the caudate nucleus (CN) and in the substantia nigra (SN) in both sides of the brain during electrical stimulation of the superficial radial nerve in cats lightly anaesthetized with halothane. Use of appropriate electrophysiologically controlled stimulation led to selective activation of low threshold afferent fibers whereas high stimulation activated all cutaneous afferents. Results showed that low threshold fiber activation induced a decreased dopaminergic activity in CN contralateral to nerve stimulation and a concomitant increase in dopaminergic activity on the ipsilateral side. Stimulation of group I and threshold stimulation of group II afferent fibers induced changes in the release of /sup 3/H-DA mainly on the contralateral CN and SN and in the ipsilateral CN. High stimulation was followed by a general increase of the neurotransmitter release in the four structures. This shows that the nigro-striatal dopaminergic neurons are mainly-if not exclusively-controlled by cutaneous sensory inputs. This control, non-specific when high threshold cutaneous fibers are also activated. Such activations could contribute to reestablish sufficient release of DA when the dopaminergic function is impaired as in Parkinson's disease.

  7. Effect of superficial radial nerve stimulation on the activity of nigro-striatal dopaminergic neurons in the cat: role of cutaneous sensory input

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieoullon, A.; Dusticier, N.

    1982-01-01

    The release of 3 H-dopamine (DA) continuously synthesized from 3 H-thyrosine was measured in the caudate nucleus (CN) and in the substantia nigra (SN) in both sides of the brain during electrical stimulation of the superficial radial nerve in cats lightly anaesthetized with halothane. Use of appropriate electrophysiologically controlled stimulation led to selective activation of low threshold afferent fibers whereas high stimulation activated all cutaneous afferents. Results showed that low threshold fiber activation induced a decreased dopaminergic activity in CN contralateral to nerve stimulation and a concomitant increase in dopaminergic activity on the ipsilateral side. Stimulation of group I and threshold stimulation of group II afferent fibers induced changes in the release of 3 H-DA mainly on the contralateral CN and SN and in the ipsilateral CN. High stimulation was followed by a general increase of the neurotransmitter release in the four structures. This shows that the nigro-striatal dopaminergic neurons are mainly-if not exclusively-controlled by cutaneous sensory inputs. This control, non-specific when high threshold cutaneous fibers are also activated. Such activations could contribute to restablish sufficient release of DA when the dopaminergic function is impaired as in Parkinson's disease. (Author)

  8. Phenomenon of political actionism in modern society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Bavykina

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Political actionism is the fenomen in social and art space, that appeared in middle of XX century as the practice of critic and protest with using different artistic methods and techniques. Political actionism as art and political tradition exist in postsoviet space, especially in Russia where actionism appeared in 1990 years and develops for actually days. In other countries this phenomenon not such systematic.  But analyze and compare actions in different countries appears the possibility to understand social and cultural context, their difference and similarity. Actionism is a reaction to external public, social and political situation, but its appearance more like the symptom of some problem than its critic or display – traditional approaches in art.  Appearance of actionism also connected with inability of manifestation of personal and civil liberty, that’s why in actions liberty affairs in such radical and hyperbolized forms. First volume of Russian political actionism began in 1990 years (Oleg Kulik, Alexander Brener, Anatoly Osmolovsky etc. and Second volume in 2010 (art-group Voina, Pussy Riot, Pyotr Pavlensky. This process not only a transformation of artistic and traditional space, but also modification of reaction on social and political situation. Actionism becomes a source of new type of knowledge, that give a possibility to see the habitual reality from another side and find in it new pointes and concepts. Political actionism contracting own interpretation of already well-established phenomenon. Usual concepts of liberty, authority, social control are deconstructed in actions. Those destructions of reality and cultural reorientation destroys traditional imposed patterns of interaction and social structure. But new views, that appeared in daily life from actions, often has mistaken interpretations. Exist a problem about identification of actions, its correct interpretations and understanding of its causes. In article was

  9. Simulation of the AC corona phenomenon with experimental validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villa, Andrea; Barbieri, Luca; Marco, Gondola; Malgesini, Roberto; Leon-Garzon, Andres R

    2017-01-01

    The corona effect, and in particular the Trichel phenomenon, is an important aspect of plasma physics with many technical applications, such as pollution reduction, surface and medical treatments. This phenomenon is also associated with components used in the power industry where it is, in many cases, the source of electro-magnetic disturbance, noise and production of undesired chemically active species. Despite the power industry to date using mainly alternating current (AC) transmission, most of the studies related to the corona effect have been carried out with direct current (DC) sources. Therefore, there is technical interest in validating numerical codes capable of simulating the AC phenomenon. In this work we describe a set of partial differential equations that are comprehensive enough to reproduce the distinctive features of the corona in an AC regime. The model embeds some selectable chemical databases, comprising tens of chemical species and hundreds of reactions, the thermal dynamics of neutral species and photoionization. A large set of parameters—deduced from experiments and numerical estimations—are compared, to assess the effectiveness of the proposed approach. (paper)

  10. Combined acquisition technique (CAT for neuroimaging of multiple sclerosis at low specific absorption rates (SAR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin Biller

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To compare a novel combined acquisition technique (CAT of turbo-spin-echo (TSE and echo-planar-imaging (EPI with conventional TSE. CAT reduces the electromagnetic energy load transmitted for spin excitation. This radiofrequency (RF burden is limited by the specific absorption rate (SAR for patient safety. SAR limits restrict high-field MRI applications, in particular. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was approved by the local Medical Ethics Committee. Written informed consent was obtained from all participants. T2- and PD-weighted brain images of n = 40 Multiple Sclerosis (MS patients were acquired by CAT and TSE at 3 Tesla. Lesions were recorded by two blinded, board-certificated neuroradiologists. Diagnostic equivalence of CAT and TSE to detect MS lesions was evaluated along with their SAR, sound pressure level (SPL and sensations of acoustic noise, heating, vibration and peripheral nerve stimulation. RESULTS: Every MS lesion revealed on TSE was detected by CAT according to both raters (Cohen's kappa of within-rater/across-CAT/TSE lesion detection κCAT = 1.00, at an inter-rater lesion detection agreement of κLES = 0.82. CAT reduced the SAR burden significantly compared to TSE (p<0.001. Mean SAR differences between TSE and CAT were 29.0 (± 5.7 % for the T2-contrast and 32.7 (± 21.9 % for the PD-contrast (expressed as percentages of the effective SAR limit of 3.2 W/kg for head examinations. Average SPL of CAT was no louder than during TSE. Sensations of CAT- vs. TSE-induced heating, noise and scanning vibrations did not differ. CONCLUSION: T2-/PD-CAT is diagnostically equivalent to TSE for MS lesion detection yet substantially reduces the RF exposure. Such SAR reduction facilitates high-field MRI applications at 3 Tesla or above and corresponding protocol standardizations but CAT can also be used to scan faster, at higher resolution or with more slices. According to our data, CAT is no more uncomfortable than TSE scanning.

  11. Periaortic lymphoma in a cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Bree

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Case summary A 14-year-old neutered male Siamese cat was presented with a 3 month history of lethargy, inappetence, dehydration, hindlimb ataxia and intermittent proprioceptive deficits in the hindlimbs. Physical examination revealed low body condition score (1.75/5, pallor and bilateral basilar grade II/VI systolic heart murmur. Neurological examination revealed hindlimb ataxia, severe atrophy of the hindlimb musculature, intermittent hindlimb proprioceptive deficits and normoreflexia. Clinicopathological investigations revealed non-regenerative anaemia (haematocrit 0.17 l/l; reference interval [RI] 0.24–0.45 l/l and increased feline pancreatic lipase concentration (Spec fPL test [IDEXX] 8.3 μg/l; RI 0.1–3.5 μg/l. Feline leukaemia virus antigen and feline immunodeficiency virus antibody tests were negative. Thoracic and abdominal imaging revealed a soft tissue structure in the area of the thoracoabdominal aorta. CT confirmed a periaortic contrast-enhancing mass extending from the level of T9–L2, with associated intervertebral infiltration at the level of T11–T12. Post-mortem examination confirmed the presence of a solid, white, multinodular, well-demarcated mass encircling the aorta extending from T9–L2. Based on histopathology and immunohistochemistry, a diagnosis of B-cell lymphoma was made. Lymphoma was also identified histopathologically within the kidneys and spleen. Evidence of mild Wallerian degeneration was present within the spinal cord, indicating compression at the level of the periaortic mass. Relevance and novel information To our knowledge, this is the first report of periaortic lymphoma in the cat. Although periaortic tumours are exceptionally rare in veterinary medicine, lymphoma should be considered as a differential in cats.

  12. On Schr\\"odinger's cat

    OpenAIRE

    de Silva, Nalin

    2010-01-01

    Schr\\"odinger's cat appears to have been harassed in a chamber during the past eighty years or so by interpreting the role of the observer as a person, who sets an experiment and then observes results, may be after some time. The realist position tells us that the physical processes would take place independent of the observer with well defined properties, whereas the positivist position wants us to believe that nothing can be said of a system when it is not being observed. In this paper we q...

  13. In search of Schroedinger's cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gribbin, John.

    1984-01-01

    The book explains how the paradox of Schroedinger's cat led to an understanding of reality in quantum physics. The contents of the book is divided into three parts. Part one concerns light, atoms and Bohr's atom. Quantum mechanics is discussed in Part Two, including photons and electrons, matrices and waves, and applications of quanta. The last part deals with chance and uncertainty, paradoxes and possibilities, the experimental proof of the paradoxical reality of the quantum world, and the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics. (U.K.)

  14. Powerful Radio Burst Indicates New Astronomical Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    . "It was a bit of luck that the survey included some observations of the sky surrounding the clouds," Narkevic said. It was from those "flanking" observations that the mysterious radio burst appeared in the data. The burst of radio waves was strong by astronomical standards, but lasted less than five milliseconds. The signal was spread out, with higher frequencies arriving at the telescope before the lower frequencies. This effect, called dispersion, is caused by the signal passing through ionized gas in interstellar and intergalactic space. The amount of this dispersion, the astronomers said, indicates that the signal likely originated about three billion light-years from Earth. No previously-detected cosmic radio burst has the same set of characteristics. "This burst represents an entirely new astronomical phenomenon," Bailes said. The astronomers estimate on the basis of their results that hundreds of similar events should occur over the sky each day. "Few radio surveys have the necessary sensitivity to such short-duration bursts, which makes them notoriously difficult to detect with current instruments," added Crawford. The next generation of radio telescopes currently under development should be able to detect many of these bursts across the sky. Although the nature of the mysterious new object is unclear, the astronomers have some ideas of what may cause such a burst. One idea is that it may be part of the energy released when a pair of superdense neutron stars collide and merge. Such an event is thought by some scientists to be the cause of one type of gamma-ray burst, but the only radio emission seen so far from these has been from the long-lived "afterglow" that follows the original burst. Another, more exotic, candidate is a burst of energy from an evaporating black hole. Black holes, concentrations of mass so dense that not even light can escape their powerful gravity, can lose mass and energy through a process proposed by famed British physicist Stephen

  15. CANINE DISTEMPER VIRUS ANTIBODY TITERS IN DOMESTIC CATS AFTER DELIVERY OF A LIVE ATTENUATED VIRUS VACCINE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, Edward; Sadler, Ryan; Rush, Robert; Seimon, Tracie; Tomaszewicz, Ania; Fleetwood, Ellen A; McAloose, Denise; Wilkes, Rebecca P

    2016-06-01

    Three methods for delivering a live attenuated canine distemper virus (CDV) vaccine to domestic cats ( Felis catus ) were investigated, as models for developing vaccination protocols for tigers (Panthera tigris). Twenty domestic cats were randomly divided into four treatment groups: saline injection (negative controls); and oral, intranasal, and subcutaneous vaccinates. Cats were injected with saline or a CDV vaccine (Nobivac DP, Merck) at wk 0 and 4. Blood and nasal swabs were collected at wk 0 (prior to the initial vaccination) and weekly thereafter for 9 wk. Urine samples were collected on wk 1 to 9 after initial vaccination. Forty-nine weeks following the initial vaccination series, three cats from the subcutaneous group and three cats from the intranasal group were revaccinated. Blood was collected immediately prior, and 7 and 21 days subsequent to revaccination. Nasal swabs and urine samples were collected from each cat prior to wk 49 revaccination and daily for 7 days thereafter. Nasal swabs and urine were analyzed by quantitative PCR for vaccine virus presence. Sera were tested for CDV antibodies by virus neutralization. All cats were sero-negative for CDV antibodies at the beginning of the study, and saline-injected cats remained sero-negative throughout the study. A dramatic anamnestic response was seen following wk 4 subcutaneous vaccinations, with titers peaking at wk 6 (geometric mean = 2,435.5). Following wk 49 revaccination, subcutaneous vaccinates again mounted impressive titers (wk 52 geometric mean = 2,048). Revaccination of the intranasal group cats at wk 49 produced a small increase in titers (wk 52 geometric mean = 203). CDV viral RNA was detected in six nasal swabs but no urine samples, demonstrating low viral shedding postvaccination. The strong antibody response to subcutaneous vaccination and the lack of adverse effects suggest this vaccine is safe and potentially protective against CDV infection in domestic cats.

  16. Cats with diabetes mellitus have diastolic dysfunction in the absence of structural heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, N J; Novo Matos, J; Baron Toaldo, M; Bartoszuk, U; Summerfield, N; Riederer, A; Reusch, C; Glaus, T M

    2017-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) can result in cardiovascular dysfunction and heart failure characterized by diastolic dysfunction with or without the presence of systolic dysfunction in people and laboratory animals. The objective of this prospective study was to determine if cats with newly diagnosed DM had myocardial dysfunction and, if present, whether it would progress if appropriate antidiabetic therapy was commenced. Thirty-two diabetic cats were enrolled and received baseline echocardiographic examination; of these, 15 cats were re-examined after 6 months. Ten healthy age- and weight-matched cats served as controls. Diabetic cats at diagnosis showed decreased diastolic, but not systolic function, when compared to healthy controls, with lower mitral inflow E wave (E) and E/E' than controls. After 6 months, E and E/IVRT' decreased further in diabetic cats compared to the baseline evaluation. After excluding cats whose DM was in remission at 6 months, insulin-dependent diabetic cats had lower E, E/A and E' than controls. When classifying diastolic function according to E/A and E'/A', there was shift towards impaired relaxation patterns at 6 months. All insulin-dependent diabetic cats at 6 months had abnormal diastolic function. These results indicate that DM has similar effects on diastolic function in feline and human diabetics. The dysfunction seemed to progress rather than to normalize after 6 months, despite antidiabetic therapy. In cats with pre-existing heart disease, the development of DM could represent an important additional health risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Toxoplasma gondii seroprevalence in pet cats in Norway and risk factors for seropositivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sævik, Bente Kristin; Krontveit, Randi Ingebjørg; Eggen, Kristine P; Malmberg, Nina; Thoresen, Stein I; Prestrud, Kristin W

    2015-12-01

    The aims of the study were to estimate Toxoplasma gondii seroprevalence in pet cats in Norway and to evaluate risk factors for seropositivity. Additionally, serum biochemistry and haematological variables for T gondii seropositive and seronegative cats were compared. A convenience sample of surplus sera submitted to the Central Laboratory, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, was collected. The samples were from healthy cats and cats with a variety of diseases. Analyses for IgG antibodies to T gondii were performed with a commercial direct agglutination test, with 1:40 as the threshold value. For risk factor analysis a logistic regression model of the relationship between predictors and the outcome was applied. One hundred and ninety-six of 478 cats were seropositive for T gondii, and the estimated seroprevalence in the study sample was 41.0% (95% confidence interval 36.6-45.4). Compared with domestic cats, pedigree cats had reduced risk for Toxoplasma seropositivity (odds ratio [OR] 0.42). Males had increased risk (OR 1.63) compared with females. The effect of age was highly significant, and an increase in the cats' age across the interquartile range (IQR; 52-160 months/4-13 years of age) doubled the risk of Toxoplasma seropositivity (OR 2.11). The risk for Toxoplasma seropositivity among cats living in Oslo was significantly reduced (OR 0.51) when compared with the rest of Norway. Pet cats in Norway appear to be commonly exposed to T gondii. Signalment and geographical region influenced the odds of Toxoplasma seropositivity, whereas health status did not. © ISFM and AAFP 2015.

  18. Sex specific differences in hepatic and plasma lipid profiles in healthy cats pre and post spaying and neutering: relationship with feline hepatic lipidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valtolina, Chiara; Vaandrager, Arie B; Favier, Robert P; Tuohetahuntila, Maidina; Kummeling, Anne; Jeusette, Isabelle; Rothuizen, Jan; Robben, Joris H

    2017-08-08

    A link between lipid metabolism and disease has been recognized in cats. Since hepatic lipidosis is a frequent disorder in cats, the aim of the current study was to evaluate liver and plasma lipid dimorphism in healthy cats and the effects of gonadectomy on lipid profiling. From six female and six male cats plasma and liver lipid profiles before and after spaying/neutering were assessed and compared to five cats (three neutered male and two spayed female) diagnosed with hepatic lipidosis. Intact female cats had a significantly lower level of plasma triacylglycerides (TAG) and a higher liver level of the long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid arachidonic acid (AA) compared to their neutered state. Both male and female cats with lipidosis had a higher liver, but not plasma TAG level and an increased level of plasma and liver sphingomyelin compared to the healthy cats. Although lipid dimorphism in healthy cats resembles that of other species, intact female cats show differences in metabolic configuration that could predispose them to develop hepatic lipidosis. The increased sphingomyelin levels in cats with lipidosis could suggest a potential role in the pathogenesis of hepatic lipidosis in cats.

  19. Domestic cat allergen and allergic sensitisation in young children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Chih-Mei; Gehring, Ulrike; Wickman, Magnus; Hoek, Gerard; Giovannangelo, Mariella; Nordling, Emma; Wijga, Alet; de Jongste, Johan; Pershagen, Goeran; Almqvist, Catarina; Kerkhof, Marjan; Bellander, Tom; Wichmann, H. -Erich; Brunekreef, Bert; Heinrich, Joachim

    Studies have presented conflicting associations between cat allergen exposure and sensitisation and atopic disease. We therefore investigated the association between the observed domestic cat allergen level and cat sensitisation in young children in four study populations from three European

  20. Overweight adult cats have significantly lower voluntary physical activity than adult lean cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Godoy, Maria Rc; Shoveller, Anna K

    2017-12-01

    Objectives The objectives of the current pilot study were to evaluate whether body condition score (BCS) and body weight are significantly related to physical activity counts, and to evaluate potential interaction between BCS and voluntary physical activity measured over a 14 day period. Methods Ten (five lean, five overweight), neutered, adult American Shorthair cats were selected for this study (median age 4 ± 0.5 years). Cats with a BCS of ⩽3.0 were considered lean, whereas cats with a BCS >3.0 were considered overweight, using a 5-point scale. Cats were housed in a free-living environment with indoor/outdoor access and were individually fed once daily a commercially available dry extruded diet and allowed 1 h to eat. Voluntary physical activity was measured consecutively for 14 days using the Actical Activity Monitors that were worn parallel to the ribs and attached via a harness. Results Lean cats had a greater mean total daily voluntary physical activity ( P = 0.0059), and a greater voluntary physical activity during light ( P = 0.0023) and dark ( P = 0.0446) periods, with overweight cats having 60% of the physical activity of lean cats. Lean cats were more active before feeding and during animal care procedures. These data suggest that lean cats have a greater anticipatory physical activity prior to feeding and are more eager to have social interaction with humans than overweight cats. A significant interaction was observed between day of physical activity measurement and BCS for total daily voluntary physical activity ( P = 0.0133) and activity during the light period ( P = 0.0016) where lean cats were consistently more active than overweight cats. In general, cats were more active during weekdays vs weekends. Conclusions and relevance The results of this study suggest that overweight cats are less active than lean cats and that voluntary physical activity level appears to be influenced by social interaction with humans.

  1. Cat exposure in early life decreases asthma risk from the 17q21 high-risk variant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokholm, Jakob; Chawes, Bo L.; Vissing, Nadja

    2018-01-01

    Background: Early-life exposure to cats and dogs has shown diverging associations with childhood asthma risk, and gene-environment interaction is one possible explanation. Objectives: We investigated interactions between cat and dog exposure and single nucleotide polymorphism rs7216389 variants...... was the number of episodes with pneumonia and bronchiolitis from 0 to 3 years of age. Exposures included cat and dog ownership from birth and cat and dog allergen levels in bedding at age 1 year. Replication was performed in the unselected COPSAC2010 cohort with follow-up until 5 years of age. Results: Cat and....../or dog exposure from birth was associated with a lower prevalence of asthma among children with the rs7216389 high-risk TT genotype (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.16; 95% CI, 0.04-0.71; P =.015), with no effect in those with the CC/CT genotype (adjusted P =.283), demonstrating interaction between cat and dog...

  2. Serum thyroxine concentrations following fixed-dose radioactive iodine treatment in hyperthyroid cats: 62 cases (1986-1989)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meric, S.M.; Rubin, S.I.

    1990-01-01

    The medical records of 62 hyperthyroid cats treated with a fixed dose of 4 mCi of radioactive iodine (131I) were reviewed. In 60 cats, serum thyroxine concentrations were determined after treatment, allowing evaluation of treatment success. Eighty-four percent of the cats had normal serum thyroxine concentrations after treatment. Five of the 60 cats (8%) remained hyperthyroxinemic after treatment. Five cats (8%) were hypothyroxinemic when evaluated within 60 days of treatment. Three of these cats had normal serum thyroxine concentrations 6 months after treatment, and none had clinical signs of hypothyroidism. The administration of a fixed dose of 4 mCi of 131I was determined to be an effective treatment for feline hyperthyroidism

  3. Peripheral Sympathectomy for Raynaud's Phenomenon: A Salvage Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Her Wang

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available We retrospectively reviewed the effectiveness of peripheral sympathectomy for severe Raynaud's phenomenon. In this study, a total of 14 digits from six patients with chronic digital ischemic change were included. All patients had pain, ulcer, or gangrenous change in the affected digits and were unresponsive to pharmacologic or other nonsurgical therapies. In all cases, angiography showed multifocal arterial lesions, so microvascular reconstruction was unfeasible. Peripheral sympathectomy was performed as a salvage procedure to prevent digit amputation. The results were analyzed according to reduction of pain, healing of ulcers, and prevention of amputation. In 12 of the 14 digits, the ulcers healed and amputation was avoided. In the other two digits, the ulcers improved and progressive gangrene was limited. As a salvage procedure for Raynaud's phenomenon recalcitrant to conservative treatment, peripheral sympathectomy improves perfusion to ischemic digits and enables amputation to be avoided.

  4. Earnings Management: Obvious Phenomenon in Albanian Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teuta Llukani

    2013-07-01

    This paper is focused on reviewing the existing literature with regard to the Earnings Management in response to the growing pressure of investors, policy makers, and companies’ governance reform mechanisms to curb opportunistic behavior of the managers of these companies. It also examines the existence of this phenomenon in Albanian context as well as tests the importance of Modified Jones Model as an efficient tool for detection of abnormal accruals, used as a proxy for earnings management. The results show that firms in the Albanian market are engaged in earnings management initiatives.

  5. Memoirs as Cultural Phenomenon and Historical Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Наталия Георгиевна Георгиева

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the role of memoirs as the native culture phenomenon, process and means of introducing memoirs to the social and scientific and educational practice. The author considers the Russian historians' views development on theoretical and methodological problems of memoirs studies. There are shown the offered variants and achieved results of development of defining «memoirs», studies of their specific peculiarities, principles and schemes of memoirs systematization as well as the criteria of defining their scientific and educational value as historical sources.

  6. Magnetic poles and a still unexplained phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trower, W.P.

    1981-01-01

    A review is given of ideas about magnetic monopoles. Attention is drawn to the still unexplained observations of Schein, Haskin and Glasser (1954), in which electron-positron pairs were produced in large numbers by a cosmic-ray interaction. Their experiment has been simulated in 300 GeV pN interactions at Fermilab, giving a production limit of 10 -7 per proton interaction. The explanation for this phenomenon may lie in magnetic monopoles, or it may be similar to that invoked to explain the so-called Centauro events. (A.W.)

  7. Diffusion phenomenon for linear dissipative wave equations in an exterior domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikehata, Ryo

    Under the general condition of the initial data, we will derive the crucial estimates which imply the diffusion phenomenon for the dissipative linear wave equations in an exterior domain. In order to derive the diffusion phenomenon for dissipative wave equations, the time integral method which was developed by Ikehata and Matsuyama (Sci. Math. Japon. 55 (2002) 33) plays an effective role.

  8. Probing a gravitational cat state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anastopoulos, C; Hu, B L

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the nature of a gravitational two-state system (G2S) in the simplest setup in Newtonian gravity. In a quantum description of matter a single motionless massive particle can in principle be in a superposition state of two spatially separated locations. This superposition state in gravity, or gravitational cat state, would lead to fluctuations in the Newtonian force exerted on a nearby test particle. The central quantity of importance for this inquiry is the energy density correlation. This corresponds to the noise kernel in stochastic gravity theory, evaluated in the weak field nonrelativistic limit. In this limit quantum fluctuations of the stress–energy tensor manifest as the fluctuations of the Newtonian force. We describe the properties of such a G2S system and present two ways of measuring the cat state for the Newtonian force, one by way of a classical probe, the other a quantum harmonic oscillator. Our findings include: (i) mass density fluctuations persist even in single particle systems, and they are of the same order of magnitude as the mean; (ii) a classical probe generically records a non-Markovian fluctuating force; (iii) a quantum probe interacting with the G2S system may undergo Rabi oscillations in a strong coupling regime. This simple prototypical gravitational quantum system could provide a robust testing ground to compare predictions from alternative quantum theories, since the results reported here are based on standard quantum mechanics and classical gravity. (paper)

  9. Cats, Cancer and Comparative Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire M. Cannon

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Naturally occurring tumors in dogs are well-established models for several human cancers. Domestic cats share many of the benefits of dogs as a model (spontaneous cancers developing in an immunocompetent animal sharing the same environment as humans, shorter lifespan allowing more rapid trial completion and data collection, lack of standard of care for many cancers allowing evaluation of therapies in treatment-naïve populations, but have not been utilized to the same degree in the One Medicine approach to cancer. There are both challenges and opportunities in feline compared to canine models. This review will discuss three specific tumor types where cats may offer insights into human cancers. Feline oral squamous cell carcinoma is common, shares both clinical and molecular features with human head and neck cancer and is an attractive model for evaluating new therapies. Feline mammary tumors are usually malignant and aggressive, with the ‘triple-negative’ phenotype being more common than in humans, offering an enriched population in which to examine potential targets and treatments. Finally, although there is not an exact corollary in humans, feline injection site sarcoma may be a model for inflammation-driven tumorigenesis, offering opportunities for studying variations in individual susceptibility as well as preventative and therapeutic strategies.

  10. Postanaesthetic tear production and ocular irritation in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peche, N; Köstlin, R; Reese, S; Pieper, K

    2015-01-01

    General anaesthesia significantly reduces tear production and normal values are not immediately re-established on ending anaesthesia. Therefore, adequate protection of the cornea has to be assured during the perianaesthetic period. There are various methods available, including taping of the eyelids and the application of eye ointments, gels and drops. In human medicine studies, different formulations were found to induce signs of ocular irritation. The aim of the present study was to determine tear production in cats after general anaesthesia, and to identify possible causes of irritation. Tear production was determined in 41 cats after general anaesthesia and eyes were examined for signs of irritation. Two different anaesthetic protocols were used. To protect the cornea, an ointment and gel were applied to the right and left eyes, respectively. Postoperatively, tear production was significantly reduced for 6 hours and 18 hours in the right and left eyes, respectively. Two hours after anaesthesia, blepharospasm of the right eye was observed in 92.7% (n = 38) of the cats. In contrast, the left eye was always held open. This study demonstrated that tear production in cats is significantly decreased both during and after anaesthesia. The degree of reduction was independent of the anaesthetic protocol. Both the eye ointment and gel proved effective in protecting the corneal surface. However, eye gel use is recommended because the eye ointment consistently caused an irritation comparable to the foreign-body sensation reported in humans.

  11. Successful treatment of vaginal malakoplakia in a young cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan P Cattin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Case summary A 3-year-old, female, spayed, domestic shorthair cat presented for dysuria and haematuria, unresponsive to antibiotic treatment. A small, fleshy, erythematous mass protruded from the vaginal vault. Ultrasound identified a vaginal mass effect with mixed echogenicity measuring in excess of 3 cm. Vaginoscopy confirmed an extensive, fleshy, irregular mass that was characterised histologically as pyogranulomatous vaginitis, with periodic acid–Schiff-positive macrophages containing gram-negative bacteria. Fluorescence in situ hybridisation analysis demonstrated invasive intracellular Escherichia coli. Vaginal malakoplakia was diagnosed. Tissue culture and antimicrobial susceptibility of E coli was used to guide treatment. A 6 week course of enrofloxacin 5 mg/kg q24h resulted in complete resolution of the mass and clinical signs. Relevance and novel information Malakoplakia is a rare chronic inflammatory condition that has been previously reported in the bladder of two cats. The pathogenesis of malakoplakia is thought to involve ineffective killing of bacteria (eg. E coli , similar to granulomatous colitis in Boxers and French Bulldogs. The literature on malakoplakia in cats is sparse. This is the first reported feline case with vaginal involvement, intracellular E coli and successful treatment with a fluoroquinolone. Malakoplakia is an important, non-neoplastic differential diagnosis when a mass is identified in the urogenital system of a young cat.

  12. The cat is out of the bag

    KAUST Repository

    Ananthanarayanan, Rajagopal

    2009-01-01

    In the quest for cognitive computing, we have built a massively parallel cortical simulator, C2, that incorporates a number of innovations in computation, memory, and communication. Using C2 on LLNL\\'s Dawn Blue Gene/P supercomputer with 147, 456 CPUs and 144 TB of main memory, we report two cortical simulations - at unprecedented scale - that effectively saturate the entire memory capacity and refresh it at least every simulated second. The first simulation consists of 1.6 billion neurons and 8.87 trillion synapses with experimentally-measured gray matter thalamocortical connectivity. The second simulation has 900 million neurons and 9 trillion synapses with probabilistic connectivity. We demonstrate nearly perfect weak scaling and attractive strong scaling. The simulations, which incorporate phenomenological spiking neurons, individual learning synapses, axonal delays, and dynamic synaptic channels, exceed the scale of the cat cortex, marking the dawn of a new era in the scale of cortical simulations. Copyright 2009 ACM.

  13. Physics Girl: Where Education meets Cat Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowern, Dianna

    YouTube is usually considered an entertainment medium to watch cats, gaming, and music videos. But educational channels have been gaining momentum on the platform, some garnering millions of subscribers and billions of views. The Physics Girl YouTube channel is an educational series with PBS Digital Studios created by Dianna Cowern. Using Physics Girl as an example, this talk will examine what it takes to start a short-form educational video series, including logistics and resources. One benefit of video is that every failure is documented on camera and can, and will, be used in this talk as a learning tool. We will look at the channels demographical reach, discuss best practices for effective physics outreach, and survey how online media and technology can facilitate good and bad learning. The aim of this talk is to show how videos are a unique way to share science and enrich the learning experience, in and out of a classroom.

  14. Longitudinal change of COPD assessment test (CAT in a telehealthcare cohort is associated with exacerbation risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rassouli F

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Frank Rassouli,1 Florent Baty,1 Daiana Stolz,2 Werner Christian Albrich,3 Michael Tamm,2 Sandra Widmer,1 Martin Hugo Brutsche1 1Department of Pulmonary and Sleep Medicine, Cantonal Hospital St Gallen, St Gallen, Switzerland; 2Department of Pulmonary and Sleep Medicine, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland; 3Division of Infectious Diseases and Hospital Epidemiology, Cantonal Hospital St Gallen, St Gallen, Switzerland Background: There are only scarce data regarding the evolution of the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD assessment test (CAT over time. Our aim was to investigate the evolution of the CAT in a telehealthcare (THC cohort and to evaluate its potential to predict exacerbations.Patients and methods: The CAT was measured weekly over up to 1 year in 40 COPD patients undergoing a THC intervention. The evolution of the CAT was analyzed using linear regression. The association between this evolution and the occurrence of exacerbations was evaluated using the Andersen–Gill formulation of the Cox proportional hazards model for the analysis of recurrent time-to-event data with time-varying predictors.Results: The median CAT at inclusion was 17 (interquartile range 13–22 points. During the study, 25% of patients had a significant negative slope (median –7 points per year [ppy], 38% were stable (median +0 ppy and 38% had a significant positive slope (median +6 ppy. The median slope of the CAT in the overall cohort was +1 (interquartile range –3 to +6 ppy. A significant positive association was found between the change in CAT scores and the risk of exacerbations (hazard ratio =1.08, 95% CI: 1.03–1.13; p<0.001. There was an 8% increase of the risk of exacerbation per unit increase in CAT. We detected a significant learning effect in filling out the CAT in 18.4% of patients with a median learning phase of five filled questionnaires.Conclusion: Sixty-three percent of the COPD patients monitored by THC experienced a stable

  15. Bacterial reproductive pathogens of cats and dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Elizabeth M; Taylor, David J

    2012-05-01

    With the notable exception of Brucella canis, exogenous bacterial pathogens are uncommon causes of reproductive disease in cats and dogs. Most bacterial reproductive infections are endogenous, and predisposing factors for infection are important. This article reviews the etiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and public health significance of bacterial reproductive pathogens in cats and dogs.

  16. Disseminated Mycobacterium avium infection in a cat

    OpenAIRE

    Barry, Maureen; Taylor, Judith; Woods, Paul

    2002-01-01

    A domestic shorthair cat was presented for lethargy and ataxia. Clinical findings included an abdominal mass, lumbosacral pain, ataxia. Aspirates from the liver and lymph nodes revealed intracellular, negative-staining rods. Treatment for presumptive mycobacterium infection was unsuccessful and the cat was euthanized. Disseminated Mycobacterium avium was confirmed on culture.

  17. Disseminated Mycobacterium avium infection in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Maureen; Taylor, Judith; Woods, J Paul

    2002-05-01

    A domestic shorthair cat was presented for lethargy and ataxia. Clinical findings included an abdominal mass, lumbosacral pain, ataxia. Aspirates from the liver and lymph nodes revealed intracellular, negative-staining rods. Treatment for presumptive mycobacterium infection was unsuccessful and the cat was euthanized. Disseminated Mycobacterium avium was confirmed on culture.

  18. Criptococose em felino Cryptococcosis in cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.J.F. Sant’Ana

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available A case of cryptococcosis in a cat refferred to the Hospital Veterinário da Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco is described. The cat was euthanized and the microscopic examination of a firm mass observed in the nasal cavity was accomplished. Cryptococcus sp. and a chronic inflammatory process was observed throughout the tissue.

  19. Malassezia spp. overgrowth in allergic cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordeix, Laura; Galeotti, Franca; Scarampella, Fabia; Dedola, Carla; Bardagí, Mar; Romano, Erica; Fondati, Alessandra

    2007-10-01

    A series of 18 allergic cats with multifocal Malassezia spp. overgrowth is reported: atopic dermatitis was diagnosed in 16, an adverse food reaction in another and one was euthanized 2 months after diagnosis of Malassezia overgrowth. All the cats were otherwise healthy and those tested (16 out of 18) for feline leukaemia or feline immunodeficiency virus infections were all negative. At dermatological examination, multifocal alopecia, erythema, crusting and greasy adherent brownish scales were variably distributed on all cats. Cytological examination revealed Malassezia spp. overgrowth with/without bacterial infection in facial skin (n = 11), ventral neck (n = 6), abdomen (n = 6), ear canal (n = 4), chin (n = 2), ear pinnae (n = 2), interdigital (n = 1) and claw folds skin (n = 1). Moreover, in two cats Malassezia pachydermatis was isolated in fungal cultures from lesional skin. Azoles therapy alone was prescribed in seven, azoles and antibacterial therapy in eight and azoles with both antibacterial and anti-inflammatory therapy in three of the cats. After 3-4 weeks of treatment, substantial reduction of pruritus and skin lesions was observed in all 11 cats treated with a combined therapy and in five of seven treated solely with azoles. Malassezia spp. overgrowth may represent a secondary cutaneous problem in allergic cats particularly in those presented for dermatological examination displaying greasy adherent brownish scales. The favourable response to treatment with antifungal treatments alone suggests that, as in dogs, Malassezia spp. may be partly responsible for both pruritus and cutaneous lesions in allergic cats.

  20. Mysterious quantum Cheshire cat: an illusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michielsen, K.; Lippert, Th.; De Raedt, H.

    2015-09-01

    We provide a mystery-free explanation for the experimentally observed facts in the neutron interferometry quantum Cheshire cat experiment of Denkmayr et al. [Nat. Comm. 5, 4492, 2014] in terms of a discrete-event simulation model, demonstrating that the quantum Cheshire cat is an illusion.