WorldWideScience

Sample records for cat middle ear

  1. Ear Infection (Middle Ear)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... back of the nose believed to play a role in immune system activity. This function may make them particularly vulnerable to infection, inflammation and swelling. Because adenoids are near the ... likely to play a role in ear infections in children because children have ...

  2. Middle Ear Infections (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... happen when viruses or bacteria get into the middle ear, the space behind the eardrum. When a child has an ear infection (also called otitis media ), ... down can cause painful pressure changes in the middle ear. Older kids can complain about ear pain, but a younger child might just tug at the ear or be ...

  3. Middle Ear Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to develop a serious illness. What if a child with a middle ear infection is in great pain and discomfort? The mainstay of pain management for AOM is medications such as acetominophen ... before the child's bedtime. Fortunately, by 24 hours about 60 percent ...

  4. Middle ear implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K S Gangadhara Somayaji

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss is becoming more common in the society living in cities with lot of background noise around, and frequent use of gadgets like mobile phones, MP3s, and IPods are adding to the problem. The loss may involve the conductive or perceptive pathway. Majority of the patients with conductive hearing loss will revert back to normal hearing levels with medical and/or surgical treatment. However, in sensorineural hearing loss, many factors are involved in the management. Though traditionally hearing aids in various forms are the most commonly used modality in managing these patients, there are some drawbacks associated with them. Implantable middle ear amplifiers represent the most recent breakthrough in the management of hearing loss. Middle ear implants are surgically implanted electronic devices that aim to correct hearing loss by stimulating the ossicular chain or middle ear. Of late, they are also being used in the management of congenital conductive hearing loss and certain cases of chronic otitis media with residual hearing loss. The article aims to provide general information about the technology, indications and contraindications, selection of candidates, available systems, and advantages of middle ear implants. (MEI

  5. Middle ear effusion

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJSR

    Abstract. Carcinoma of the breast can metastasise to many organs. Metastasis to the temporal bone is rare and even when it does, it would usually spread to other parts of the body. This is a report of isolated metastasis to the temporal bone with middle ear effusion. Key words: Carcinoma, breast, metastasis, temporal bone, ...

  6. [Endoscopy of the middle ear].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayache, Stéphane

    2010-12-20

    The otoscopy is a major point in a daily practice. The otoscope is usually used. In an ENT practice, the microscope is the main instrument but presents limits. The use of rigid endoscopes allows to refine considerably this otoscopy. In ear surgery, the endoscopy of the middle ear for ear chronic diseases has evolved, from an additional tool to the microscope towards an exclusive surgical procedure with its own indications, advantages and limits.

  7. Middle Ear Infections and Ear Tube Surgery (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ears.) Infection Bacteria or viruses can enter the middle ear through the eustachian tube and cause an infection — this often happens when a child has had a cold or other respiratory infection. ...

  8. [Implantable middle ear hearing aids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    à Wengen, D F

    2004-01-01

    Conventional acoustic hearing aids are limited in their performance. Due to physical laws their amplification of sound is limited to within 5 kHz. However, the frequencies between 5 and 10 kHz are essential for understanding consonants. Words can only be understood correctly if their consonants can be understood. Furthermore noise amplification remains a problem with hearing aids. Other problems consist of recurrent infections of the external auditory canal, intolerance for occlusion of the ear canal, feedback noise, and resonances in speech or singing. Implantable middle ear hearing aids like the Soundbridge of Symphonix-Siemens and the MET of Otologics offer improved amplification and a more natural sound. Since the first implantation of a Soundbridge in Switzerland in 1996 almost one thousand patients have been implanted worldwide. The currents systems are semi-implantable. The external audio processor containing the microphone, computer chip, battery and radio system is worn in the hair bearing area behind the ear. Implantation is only considered after unsuccessful fitting of conventional hearing aids. In Switzerland the cost for these implantable hearing aids is covered by social insurances. Initially the cost for an implant is higher than for hearing aids. However, hearing aids need replacement every 5 or 6 years whereas implants will last 20 to 30 years. Due to the superior sound quality and the improved understanding of speech in noise, the number of patients with implantable hearing aids will certainly increase in the next years. Other middle ear implants are in clinical testing.

  9. [Rhabdomyosarcoma of the middle ear].

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Fehri, F; Salih-Alj, A; Kzadri, M; Zemmama, M; Alaoui, B H; Jazouli, N

    1982-01-01

    A seven year old boy was admitted with what appeared to be polyp of the external auditory canal, otitis media and Bell's palsy. It was subsequently diagnosed as rhabdomyosarcoma of the middle ear. This rare tumor must not be out of mind of practitioners, and especially pediatricians and E.N.T. specialists, when they have to examine a child with what looks like chronic otitis media, and aural polyp, or idiopathic facial paralysis. The diagnosis is histological and must be quickly made for early and aggressive multimodal antitumor therapy, which seems to be improving the hitherto gloomy prognosis for these highly lethal sarcoma.

  10. Carcinoid tumour of the middle ear

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Baig, Salman

    2012-09-01

    A case of middle ear mass in a young female from Ireland is described, who presented with left ear hearing loss and intermittent bloody discharge from the same ear. Examination under microscope revealed occlusive polyp in the left ear and a biopsy had been taken under general anaesthesia. Histopathology report described an adenoma \\/ carcinoid tumour of the middle ear confirmed by positive immunohistochemical staining. CT temporal bones revealed the extension of the disease. The patient underwent left tympanotomy and excision of the tumour. In general, these tumours are regarded as benign but may be mistaken for adenocarcinomas because of their histological heterogenecity.

  11. 21 CFR 874.3430 - Middle ear mold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Middle ear mold. 874.3430 Section 874.3430 Food... DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3430 Middle ear mold. (a) Identification. A middle ear mold is a preformed device that is intended to be implanted to reconstruct the middle ear...

  12. Imaging of the postoperative middle ear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Marc T. [Department of Medical Imaging, Fondation Ophtalmologique Adolphe de Rothschild, 25 rue Manin, 75940, Paris (France); Ayache, Denis [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Fondation Ophtalmologique Adolphe de Rothschild, Paris (France)

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this article is twofold: (a) to present the principles and the indications of surgical treatment of middle ear pathologies; and (b) to review the imaging findings after middle ear surgery, including the normal postoperative aspects and imaging findings in patients presenting with unsatisfactory surgical results or with suspicion of postoperative complications. This review is intentionally restricted to the most common diseases involving the middle ear: chronic otitis media and otosclerosis. In these specific fields of interest, CT and MR imaging play a very important role in the postoperative follow-up and in the work-up of surgical failures and complications. (orig.)

  13. Osteoma of the middle ear: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Ji Hwa [College of Medicine, Inje University, Dongrae Paik Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-15

    Osteomas of the middle ear are exceedingly rare benign neoplasms. To date, only 21 cases have been reported in the literature. They arise from the promontory, the pyramidal process and the ossicles, and they are usually asymptomatic or cause some conductive hearing loss. We report here the CT and pathologic findings in a 38-year-old woman with a benign osteoma of the middle ear along with chronic otitis media.

  14. Your Ears

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Outer Ear: Catch the Wave The Middle Ear: Good Vibrations The Inner Ear: Nerve Signals Start Here Day or Night, Ears Keep You Upright Three Cheers for the Ears! en español Tus oídos Did you hear something? Maybe the sound you heard was as quiet as your cat licking her paws. Or maybe it was loud, ...

  15. Animal Models of Middle Ear Cholesteatoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomomi Yamamoto-Fukuda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Middle ear acquired cholesteatoma is a pathological condition associated with otitis media, which may be associated with temporal bone resorption, otorrhea and hearing loss, and occasionally various other complications. Cholesteatoma is characterized by the enhanced proliferation of epithelial cells with aberrant morphologic characteristics. Unfortunately, our understanding of the mechanism underlying its pathogenesis is limited. To investigate its pathogenesis, different animal models have been used. This paper provides a brief overview of the current status of research in the field of pathogenesis of middle ear acquired cholesteatoma, four types of animal models previously reported on, up-to-date cholesteatoma research using these animal models, our current studies of the local hybrid ear model, and the future prospect of new animal models of middle ear cholesteatoma.

  16. 3D finite element model of the chinchilla ear for characterizing middle ear functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuelin; Gan, Rong Z

    2016-10-01

    Chinchilla is a commonly used animal model for research of sound transmission through the ear. Experimental measurements of the middle ear transfer function in chinchillas have shown that the middle ear cavity greatly affects the tympanic membrane (TM) and stapes footplate (FP) displacements. However, there is no finite element (FE) model of the chinchilla ear available in the literature to characterize the middle ear functions with the anatomical features of the chinchilla ear. This paper reports a recently completed 3D FE model of the chinchilla ear based on X-ray micro-computed tomography images of a chinchilla bulla. The model consisted of the ear canal, TM, middle ear ossicles and suspensory ligaments, and the middle ear cavity. Two boundary conditions of the middle ear cavity wall were simulated in the model as the rigid structure and the partially flexible surface, and the acoustic-mechanical coupled analysis was conducted with these two conditions to characterize the middle ear function. The model results were compared with experimental measurements reported in the literature including the TM and FP displacements and the middle ear input admittance in chinchilla ear. An application of this model was presented to identify the acoustic role of the middle ear septa-a unique feature of chinchilla middle ear cavity. This study provides the first 3D FE model of the chinchilla ear for characterizing the middle ear functions through the acoustic-mechanical coupled FE analysis.

  17. 3D finite element model of the chinchilla ear for characterizing middle ear functions

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xuelin; Gan, Rong Z.

    2016-01-01

    Chinchilla is a commonly used animal model for research of sound transmission through the ear. Experimental measurements of the middle ear transfer function in chinchillas have shown that the middle ear cavity greatly affects the tympanic membrane (TM) and stapes footplate (FP) displacements. However, there is no finite element (FE) model of the chinchilla ear available in the literature to characterize the middle ear functions with the anatomical features of the chinchilla ear. This paper re...

  18. [Functional model of the middle ear ossicles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoda, Takahiro; Shimoe, Saiji; Makihira, Seicho; Tamamoto, Mitsuhiro; Matsumoto, Atsue; Hara, Kumiko; Noso, Maki; Niitani, Yoshie; Sugiyama, Masaru; Takemoto, Toshinobu; Murayama, Takeshi; Amano, Hideaki; Nikawa, Hiroki

    2009-06-01

    In students' dissection practice, it is very difficult to teach students the structures and functions of the middle ear ossicles. The middle ear ossicles are too small to explain their structures and functions. Models are useful in explaining these points, but there have been no models that accurately explain the movements of the middle ear ossicles and the functions of the muscles in the middle ear. This time, we have made a model of middle ear ossicles. Our ear ossicles are made of paper-mache with metal in it. The incudomalleolar and incudostapedial articulations are made of rubber. The tensor tympani and the stapedius muscles are made of wire and the two wires can be fixed by cord stoppers. Our model explains clearly the following mechanisms of the middle ear ossicles. 1. The mechanism of sound conduction system. When the sound vibrates the tympanic membrane, malleus and incus rotate together. The long process of the incus pushes the head of the stapes. The sound is amplified by leverage. 2. Attenuation of sound by contractions of tensor tympani and stapedius muscles. When a loud sound is transmitted through the ossicular system, the tensor tympani muscle pulls the malleus inward while the stapedius muscle pulls the stapes outward. These two forces oppose each other and increase rigidity of the ossicular system, thus reducing the ossicular conduction. 3. The mechanism of how paralysis of stapedius muscle, caused by an injury to the facial nerve, results in hyperacusis. 4. This model also suggests a possible reason why the pars lucida of the tympanic membrane exists.

  19. Prenatal evaluation of the middle ear and diagnosis of middle ear hypoplasia using MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katorza, Eldad; Nahama-Allouche, Catherine; Ducou le Pointe, Hubert; Garel, Catherine [Hopital d' Enfants Armand-Trousseau, Service de Radiologie, Paris (France); Castaigne, Vanina [Hopital Saint-Antoine, Service de Gynecologie-Obstetrique, Paris (France); Gonzales, Marie; Marlin, Sandrine [Hopital d' Enfants Armand-Trousseau, Service de Genetique et Embryologie medicales, Paris (France); Galliani, Eva [Hopital d' Enfants Armand-Trousseau, Service de Chirurgie maxillo-faciale, Paris (France); Jouannic, Jean-Marie; Rosenblatt, Jonathan [Hopital d' Enfants Armand-Trousseau, Service de Gynecologie-Obstetrique, Centre pluridisciplinaire de diagnostic prenatal, Paris (France)

    2011-05-15

    Analysis of the middle ear with fetal MRI has not been previously reported. To show the contribution of fetal MRI to middle ear imaging. The tympanic cavity was evaluated in 108 fetal cerebral MRI examinations (facial and/or cerebral malformation excluded) and in two cases, one of Treacher Collins syndrome (case 1) and the other of oculo-auriculo-vertebral (OUV) spectrum (case 2) with middle ear hypoplasia identified by MRI at 27 and 36 weeks' gestation, respectively. In all 108 fetuses (mean gestational age 32.5 weeks), the tympanic cavity and T2 hypointensity related to the ossicles were well visualised on both sides. Case 1 had micro/retrognathia and bilateral external ear deformity and case 2 had retrognathism with a left low-set and deformed ear. MRI made it possible to recognize the marked hypoplasia of the tympanic cavity, which was bilateral in case 1 and unilateral in case 2. Both syndromes are characterized by craniofacial abnormalities including middle ear hypoplasia, which cannot be diagnosed with US. The middle ear cavity can be visualized with fetal MRI. We emphasize the use of this imaging modality in the diagnosis of middle ear hypoplasia. (orig.)

  20. Change of guinea pig inner ear pressure by square wave middle ear cavity pressure variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feijen, RA; Segenhout, JM; Albers, FWJ; Wit, HP

    The inner ear fluid pressure of guinea pigs was measured during square wave middle ear cavity pressure variation. Time constants were derived for the slopes of the inner ear pressure recovery curves after middle ear pressure change. A "single exponential" function did not fit well and therefore more

  1. Evaluation of the incidence of bacteremia following middle ear operations

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Naeimi; Kiarash Ghazvini K; Mohammad Taghi Shakeri MT; Merangiz Kaboli; Mahmood Bagheri

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Bacteremia following middle ear surgeries occurs in a significant number of patients. The aim of this study is to investigate the incidence of bacteremia following middle ear surgeries. Materials and Methods: Sixty two patients who where candidates for middle ear operation were enrolled in this study. Blood samples were obtained from each patient immediately before and after operation for bacteriologic analysis. Demographic and middle ear disease characteristics were also record...

  2. Microbiomes of the normal middle ear and ears with chronic otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Shujiro B; Mutai, Hideki; Suzuki, Tomoko; Horii, Arata; Oishi, Naoki; Wasano, Koichiro; Katsura, Motoyasu; Tanaka, Fujinobu; Takiguchi, Tetsuya; Fujii, Masato; Kaga, Kimitaka

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to profile and compare the middle ear microbiomes of human subjects with and without chronic otitis media. Prospective multicenter cohort study. All consecutive patients undergoing tympanoplasty surgery for chronic otitis media or ear surgery for conditions other than otitis media were recruited. Sterile swab samples were collected from the middle ear mucosa during surgery. The variable region 4 of the 16S rRNA gene in each sample were amplified using region-specific primers adapted for the Illumina MiSeq sequencer (Illumina, CA, USA)). The sequences were subjected to local blast and classified using Metagenome@KIN (World Fusion, Tokyo, Japan). In total, 155 participants were recruited from seven medical centers. Of these, 88 and 67 had chronic otitis media and normal middle ears, respectively. The most abundant bacterial phyla on the mucosal surfaces of the normal middle ears were Proteobacteria, followed by Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes. The children and adults with normal middle ears differed significantly in terms of middle ear microbiomes. Subjects with chronic otitis media without active inflammation (dry ear) had similar middle ear microbiomes as the normal middle ears group. Subjects with chronic otitis media with active inflammation (wet ear) had a lower prevalence of Proteobacteria and a higher prevalence of Firmicutes than the normal middle ears. The human middle ear is inhabited by more diverse microbial communities than was previously thought. Alteration of the middle ear microbiome may contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic otitis media with active inflammation. 2b. Laryngoscope, 127:E371-E377, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  3. Mouse middle ear ion homeostasis channels and intercellular junctions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M Morris

    Full Text Available The middle ear contains homeostatic mechanisms that control the movement of ions and fluids similar to those present in the inner ear, and are altered during inflammation.The normal middle ear cavity is fluid-free and air-filled to allow for effective sound transmission. Within the inner ear, the regulation of fluid and ion movement is essential for normal auditory and vestibular function. The same ion and fluid channels active in the inner ear may have similar roles with fluid regulation in the middle ear.Middle and inner ears from BALB/c mice were processed for immunohistochemistry of 10 specific ion homeostasis factors to determine if similar transport and barrier mechanisms are present in the tympanic cavity. Examination also was made of BALB/c mice middle ears after transtympanic injection with heat-killed Haemophilus influenza to determine if these channels are impacted by inflammation.The most prominent ion channels in the middle ear included aquaporins 1, 4 and 5, claudin 3, ENaC and Na(+,K(+-ATPase. Moderate staining was found for GJB2, KCNJ10 and KCNQ1. The inflamed middle ear epithelium showed increased staining due to expected cellular hypertrophy. Localization of ion channels was preserved within the inflamed middle ear epithelium.The middle ear epithelium is a dynamic environment with intrinsic mechanisms for the control of ion and water transport to keep the middle ear clear of fluids. Compromise of these processes during middle ear disease may underlie the accumulation of effusions and suggests they may be a therapeutic target for effusion control.

  4. Neuroendocrine Adenoma of the Middle Ear: A Rare Histopathological Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zubair Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroendocrine tumours occur throughout the body but are rare in the head and neck region and particularly rare in the middle ear. Clinical findings are often nonspecific and therefore pose a diagnostic challenge. Furthermore, the nomenclature of neuroendocrine tumours of the middle ear is historically controversial. Herein a case is presented of a middle ear adenoma in a 33-year-old patient who presented with otalgia, hearing loss, and facial nerve palsy. A brief discussion is included regarding the histopathological features of middle ear adenomas and seeks to clarify the correct nomenclature for these tumours.

  5. Inflammatory diseases of the middle ear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boasquevisque, Gustavo Santos; Andrade, Carlos Ramon de; Boasquevisque, Edson Mendes

    2008-01-01

    Objective: to determine the aspects and frequency of middle ear alterations at computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in patients with clinical suspicion for middle ear inflammatory disease. Material and method: imaging examination results of 95 patients (95 computed tomography and 1 magnetic resonance imaging) were compared with the results of otology, imaging and surgical findings. Results: fifty-two patients had normal imaging results. Forty-three patients had radiologic alterations compared to the physical, otology and histopathologic exams: acute otomastoiditis in 2 patients (4.6%), unilateral chronic otomastoiditis in 9 (21.0%), bilateral chronic otomastoiditis in 2 (4.6%), unilateral cholesteatoma in 26 (60.5%), and bilateral cholesteatoma in 4 (9.3%). Conclusion: computed tomography was able to demonstrate the characteristics of the lesions and found complications in majority of the cases. Magnetic resonance imaging was used only in one patient to rule out scar and cholesteatoma. The knowledge of the clinical and otologic data enables the radiologist to elaborate a more appropriate interpretation of the imaging findings. (author)

  6. Drop weld thermal injuries to the middle ear.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keogh, I J

    2009-01-01

    Drop weld injuries to the tympanic membrane and middle ear caused by hot sparks or molten slag are a rare but significant injury. Steel workers and welders who are regularly exposed to flying sparks and molten metal slag are predisposed. This type of transtympanic thermal injury occurs when the slag literally drops into the external auditory canal and burns through the tympanic membrane. A spectrum of severity of injury occurs which includes chronic tympanic membrane perforation, chronic otorrhoea, facial nerve injury and deafness. Chronic tympanic membrane perforation is the most common sequelae and is perhaps one of the most challenging of all perforations to repair The combination of direct thermal injury and foreign body reaction results in continuing or recurrent suppuration. The foreign body reaction is due to the embedding of metal slag in the promontorial mucosa. We present a case of drop weld injury to the left tympanic membrane, resulting in chronic middle ear inflammation, otorrhoea and tympanic perforation. CAT scan clearly demonstrated a metallic promontorial foreign body with localised bone erosion. We emphasise the importance of removing these foreign bodies and recommend a cartilage reinforced underlay tympanoplasty technique to repair these perforations. Transtympanic thermal trauma is a preventable occupational injury, which is best, avoided by earplugs and increased awareness.

  7. Middle-ear velocity transfer function, cochlear input immittance, and middle-ear efficiency in chinchilla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravicz, Michael E.; Rosowski, John J.

    2013-01-01

    The transfer function HV between stapes velocity VS and sound pressure near the tympanic membrane PTM is a descriptor of sound transmission through the middle ear (ME). The ME power transmission efficiency (MEE), the ratio of sound power entering the cochlea to power entering the middle ear, was computed from HV measured in seven chinchilla ears and previously reported measurements of ME input admittance YTM and ME pressure gain GMEP [Ravicz and Rosowski, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 132, 2437–2454 (2012); J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 133, 2208–2223 (2013)] in the same ears. The ME was open, and a pressure sensor was inserted into the cochlear vestibule for most measurements. The cochlear input admittance YC computed from HV and GMEP is controlled by a combination of mass and resistance and is consistent with a minimum-phase system up to 27 kHz. The real part Re{YC}, which relates cochlear sound power to inner-ear sound pressure, decreased gradually with frequency up to 25 kHz and more rapidly above that. MEE was about 0.5 between 0.1 and 8 kHz, higher than previous estimates in this species, and decreased sharply at higher frequencies. PMID:24116422

  8. Middle ear function in sinonasal polyposis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshaee, Mehdi; Ardakani, Hossein Payedar; Ghazizadeh, Amir Hossain; Movahed, Rahman; Jarahi, Lida; Rajati, Mohsen

    2016-10-01

    Nasal airway patency has long been considered a major factor in ear health. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of sinonasal polyposis on middle ear and eustachian tube (ET) functionality. Forty-four individuals with polyposis, 23 with non-polyposis nasal obstruction, and 23 healthy controls were enrolled. Demographic, clinical and imaging data of all participants were collected and ET function tests and audiologic tests were performed. Hearing loss (p = 0.02), flat tympanogram (p = 0.02), disturbed Toynbee and Valsalva tests (p = 0.01), and the prevalence of allergy (p = 0.04) and purulent nasal discharge (p polyposis group than the other groups. Regression analysis revealed that infection and allergy have more important roles in ET function than the nasal obstruction. Polyposis could impede ET function; however, it is probably not because of its obstructive nature, but because of the associated increased risk of infection.

  9. Impact of Jacobson's (tympanic) nerve sectioning on middle ear functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceylan, Alper; Göksu, Nebil; Kemaloğlu, Yusuf Kemal; Uğur, Birol; Akyürek, Nalan; Bayazit, Yildirim A

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of sectioning of the Jacobson's (tympanic) nerve on middle ear functions. Twenty-five adult New Zealand rabbits were included in this study. The Jacobson's nerve was cut in the left ear of the rabbits (study group), whereas only a small mucosal incision was performed while keeping the Jacobson's nerve intact in their right ear (control group). After the operation, the ears were assessed both otomicroscopically and histopathologically on Days 30, 60, and 90. On otomicroscopy, retraction pockets were observed in 48 and 4% of the ears in the study and control groups, respectively (p ear effusion was observed in 56 and 12%, respectively (p ear mucosa was present in all ears in the study group, whereas it was present only in 20% of the control ears (p ear chemosensory organs and are involved in the regulation of middle ear aeration. Disruption of these neural elements such as Jacobson's nerve negatively impacts on middle ear functions and may result in atelectasis.

  10. Surgical Observations on Atelectasis of the Middle Ear in Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Borgstein (Johannes)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractAtelectasis of the middle ear, synonymous with that of the lung, is a variable collapse of the middle ear space, associated with retraction pockets formed by extreme atrophy of the tympanic membrane. It is a common condition in the paediatric patient population presenting to the Sophia

  11. Sub-clinical middle ear malfunctions in elderly patients; prevalence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract: Background: Little is known about functioning of the middle ear with advancing age. Objectives: To estimate the prevalence and describe tympanometric patterns of sub-clinical middle ear malfunctions,( S-MEM) in elderly patients. It also assessed clinical factors that could predict S-MEM. Methods: Cross-sectional ...

  12. Middle Ear Infection (Chronic Otitis Media) and Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hearing loss. How does otitis media affect a child’s hearing? All children with middle ear infection or fluid have some degree of ... words and speaks louder than normal. Essentially, a child experiencing hearing loss from middle ear infections will hear muffled sounds and misunderstand ...

  13. Advances tomographic in evaluation of middle ear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anjos, Mayara Alves Pinheiro dos; Ledo, Mirelle D'arc Frota; Ribeiro, Marcio Duarte

    2011-01-01

    Computed tomography has a key role in the study of hearing, since through it can be evaluated structures not seen by otoscope. In many clinical situations the diagnosis through this test proves limited, being fundamental examination of the associated image reconstructions: multiplanar reconstruction, maximum intensity projection, and volume-rendering technique. The ossicular chain is a complex formed by the ossicles malleus, incus and stapes, situated in the middle ear; it is difficult to view them in orthogonals planes. This review article intends to demonstrate the importance of post-processing the image of the ossicular chain for a better representation of the anatomy and possible diseases. Reformatting of images helps, significantly, to a better visualization of these structures as related congenital malformations, vascular abnormalities, inflammatory conditions, neoplasia and traumas. (author)

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging in inflammatory lesions of the middle ear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tono, Tetsuya; Saku, Kazuaki; Miyanaga, Satoshi; Kano, Kiyo; Morimitsu, Tamotsu; Suzuki, Yukiko.

    1988-05-01

    Eighteen patients with chronic otitis media, middle ear cholesteatoma, and postoperative inflammatory diseases of the middle ear underwent high resolution computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before surgical exploration of the middle ear. Results showed that CT provides higher detail resolution in middle ear structures, but provides limited density resolution in displaying inflammatory soft tissue lesions. By contrast, MRI differentiates among soft tissue lesions such as fluid-filled spaces, granulation tissues, and cholesteatomatous debris. Cholesterin granulomas show a particularly characteristic signal pattern with a very high intensity area in both T1 and T2 weighted images. It is concluded that MRI is useful in differentiating soft tissue density masses when used in conjunction with CT in middle ear inflammatory diseases.

  15. Aberrant internal carotid artery in the middle ear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Keun Tak; Kang, Hyun Koo [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul Veterans Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The knowledge about the aberrant internal carotid artery (ICA) in the middle ear is essential for clinicians, because a misdiagnosis of the aberrant ICA could have serious consequences such as excessive aural bleeding during a middle ear surgery. A 38-year-old woman presented with tinnitus and hearing difficulties of the left ear that had started 5 years ago. During otoscopy, an anteroinferior bluish mass was seen in the tympanic space. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a left-side aberrant ICA with bony dehiscence of the carotid canal in the middle ear and a reduced diameter of the tympanic ICA. Herein we report a case of an aberrant ICA in the middle ear. We also review the literature regarding this important vascular anomaly of the temporal bone which may lead to disastrous surgical complications.

  16. Aberrant internal carotid artery in the middle ear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roh, Keun Tak; Kang, Hyun Koo

    2014-01-01

    The knowledge about the aberrant internal carotid artery (ICA) in the middle ear is essential for clinicians, because a misdiagnosis of the aberrant ICA could have serious consequences such as excessive aural bleeding during a middle ear surgery. A 38-year-old woman presented with tinnitus and hearing difficulties of the left ear that had started 5 years ago. During otoscopy, an anteroinferior bluish mass was seen in the tympanic space. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a left-side aberrant ICA with bony dehiscence of the carotid canal in the middle ear and a reduced diameter of the tympanic ICA. Herein we report a case of an aberrant ICA in the middle ear. We also review the literature regarding this important vascular anomaly of the temporal bone which may lead to disastrous surgical complications.

  17. Predictions of middle-ear and passive cochlear mechanics using a finite element model of the pediatric ear

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xuelin; Keefe, Douglas H.; Gan, Rong Z.

    2016-01-01

    A finite element (FE) model was developed based on histological sections of a temporal bone of a 4-year-old child to simulate middle-ear and cochlear function in ears with normal hearing and otitis media. This pediatric model of the normal ear, consisting of an ear canal, middle ear, and spiral cochlea, was first validated with published energy absorbance (EA) measurements in young children with normal ears. The model was used to simulate EA in an ear with middle-ear effusion, whose results w...

  18. An in vitro model of murine middle ear epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apoorva Mulay

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Otitis media (OM, or middle ear inflammation, is the most common paediatric disease and leads to significant morbidity. Although understanding of underlying disease mechanisms is hampered by complex pathophysiology it is clear that epithelial abnormalities underpin the disease. There is currently a lack of a well-characterised in vitro model of the middle ear (ME epithelium that replicates the complex cellular composition of the middle ear. Here, we report the development of a novel in vitro model of mouse middle ear epithelial cells (mMECs at an air–liquid interface (ALI that recapitulates the characteristics of the native murine ME epithelium. We demonstrate that mMECs undergo differentiation into the varied cell populations seen within the native middle ear. Proteomic analysis confirmed that the cultures secrete a multitude of innate defence proteins from their apical surface. We showed that the mMECs supported the growth of the otopathogen, nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi, suggesting that the model can be successfully utilised to study host–pathogen interactions in the middle ear. Overall, our mMEC culture system can help to better understand the cell biology of the middle ear and improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of OM. The model also has the potential to serve as a platform for validation of treatments designed to reverse aspects of epithelial remodelling that underpin OM development.

  19. Imaging of postoperative middle ear cholesteatoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khemani, S.; Singh, A.; Lingam, R.K.; Kalan, A.

    2011-01-01

    Cholesteatoma is often treated surgically using canal wall-preserving techniques. Clinical and otoscopic diagnosis of residual or recurrent disease after this form of surgery is unreliable and thus radiological imaging is often used prior to mandatory 'second-look' surgery. Imaging needs to be able to differentiate residual or recurrent disease from granulation tissue, inflammatory tissue or fluid within the middle ear cavity and mastoid cavity. High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT), conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and delayed contrast MRI have all been used in detecting postoperative cholesteatoma. Although delayed contrast MRI performs better than HRCT and conventional MRI, the sensitivities and specificities of these different imaging methods are relatively poor. Diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI and, in particular, non-echo planar DWI) has been shown to have a high sensitivity and specificity for detecting recurrent cholesteatoma. In this review we provide examples of postoperative imaging appearances following cholesteatoma surgery and we review the relevant literature with an emphasis on studies evaluating the diagnostic accuracy of DWI.

  20. Chronic inflammatory middle ear disease: Postoperative CT and MRI findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nivan Hany Khater

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: CT and MRI are both safe non-invasive diagnostic methods. Both procedures can provide radiologists a confident diagnosis of postoperative middle ear complications, assisting otologists with a provisional diagnosis for a better management.

  1. Ear asymmetries in middle-ear, cochlear, and brainstem responses in human infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Douglas H; Gorga, Michael P; Jesteadt, Walt; Smith, Lynette M

    2008-03-01

    In 2004, Sininger and Cone-Wesson examined asymmetries in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of otoacoustic emissions (OAE) in infants, reporting that distortion-product (DP)OAE SNR was larger in the left ear, whereas transient-evoked (TE)OAE SNR was larger in the right. They proposed that cochlear and brainstem asymmetries facilitate development of brain-hemispheric specialization for sound processing. Similarly, in 2006 Sininger and Cone-Wesson described ear asymmetries mainly favoring the right ear in infant auditory brainstem responses (ABRs). The present study analyzed 2640 infant responses to further explore these effects. Ear differences in OAE SNR, signal, and noise were evaluated separately and across frequencies (1.5, 2, 3, and 4 kHz), and ABR asymmetries were compared with cochlear asymmetries. Analyses of ear-canal reflectance and admittance showed that asymmetries in middle-ear functioning did not explain cochlear and brainstem asymmetries. Current results are consistent with earlier studies showing right-ear dominance for TEOAE and ABR. Noise levels were higher in the right ear for OAEs and ABRs, causing ear asymmetries in SNR to differ from those in signal level. No left-ear dominance for DPOAE signal was observed. These results do not support a theory that ear asymmetries in cochlear processing mimic hemispheric brain specialization for auditory processing.

  2. Evaluation of the incidence of bacteremia following middle ear operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Naeimi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bacteremia following middle ear surgeries occurs in a significant number of patients. The aim of this study is to investigate the incidence of bacteremia following middle ear surgeries. Materials and Methods: Sixty two patients who where candidates for middle ear operation were enrolled in this study. Blood samples were obtained from each patient immediately before and after operation for bacteriologic analysis. Demographic and middle ear disease characteristics were also recorded for each patient. Results: In 2 culture samples obtained before the operation and in 15 culture samples obtained after the operation, blood cultures were positive. One postoperative sample was excluded from the study due to probability of contamination. Of 14 postoperative cultures, staphylococcus epidermidis and streptococcus pyogenes were positive in 8 and 4 cases, respectively. There were no significant correlations between positive culture and age, otorrhea (duration and odor, surgical approach, type of surgery and pathological condition of patients. Conclusion: Risk of bacteremia following middle ear operations should be considered especially in patients who are high risk for postoperative endocarditis. Considering the serious complications of bacteremia, prophylactic measures are necessary in middle ear operations in this group of patients.    

  3. Wideband acoustic transfer functions predict middle-ear effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, John C; Gorga, Michael; Cohn, Edward; Fitzpatrick, Denis; Sanford, Chris A; Keefe, Douglas H

    2012-04-01

    Compare the accuracy of wideband acoustic transfer functions (WATFs) measured in the ear canal at ambient pressure to methods currently recommended by clinical guidelines for predicting middle-ear effusion (MEE). Cross-sectional validating diagnostic study among young children with and without MEE to investigate the ability of WATFs to predict MEE. WATF measures were obtained in an MEE group of 44 children (53 ears; median age, 1.3 years) scheduled for middle-ear ventilation tube placement and a normal age-matched control group of 44 children (59 ears; median age, 1.2 years) with normal pneumatic otoscopic findings and no history of ear disease or middle-ear surgery. An otolaryngologist judged whether MEE was present or absent and rated tympanic-membrane (TM) mobility via pneumatic otoscopy. A likelihood-ratio classifier reduced WATF data (absorbance, admittance magnitude and phase) from 0.25 to 8 kHz to a single predictor of MEE status. Absorbance was compared to pneumatic otoscopy classifications of TM mobility. Absorbance was reduced in ears with MEE compared to ears from the control group. Absorbance and admittance magnitude were the best single WATF predictors of MEE, but a predictor combining absorbance, admittance magnitude, and phase was the most accurate. Absorbance varied systematically with TM mobility based on data from pneumatic otoscopy. Results showed that absorbance is sensitive to middle-ear stiffness and MEE, and WATF predictions of MEE in young children are as accurate as those reported for methods recommended by the clinical guidelines. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  4. CT analysis of 333 cases of congenital malformations of the external and middle ear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Xin; Li Qiang; Wang Zhenchang; Xian Junfang; Lan Baosen

    1997-01-01

    To analyze the different CT findings of congenital malformations of the external and middle ear, 333 cases including 404 ears with external and middle ear malformations diagnosed by high resolution CT (HRCT) were analysed according to the location and type of the malformation. In 404 ears, there were 364 ears with atresia of external auditory meatus, 40 ears with stenosis of external auditory meatus, 377 ears with malformation of the ossicles, 382 ears with stenosis of tympanum and 333 ears with anterior position of the mastoid segment of the facial canal. HRCT can show the location and type of external and middle ear malformation and provide valuable information for surgery

  5. Congenital malformations of the external and middle ear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koesling, S.; Omenzetter, M.; Bartel-Friedrich, S.

    2009-01-01

    With the focus on imaging, this paper gives a summarized view of the present knowledge on fields, which are necessary to know for a profound understanding of congenital malformations of the external and middle ear. Typical and less typical combinations of malformed parts of the ear can be derived from the embryogenesis. Clinical signs and audiometric findings lead to diagnosis in congenital aural atresia. Isolated middle ear malformations can be clinically mixed up especially with otosclerosis and tympanosclerosis. Imaging is needed for exact morphological information. In malformations of the external and middle ear, CT is the imaging modality of choice. Requirements on CT-technique as well as radiological findings including classification and pre-surgical rating are described. Morphological CT-correlates of congenital malformations and their differential diagnoses are enlisted and illustrated. The impact of CT-results on therapy is explained and actual therapeutic concepts are briefly presented

  6. Congenital malformations of the external and middle ear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koesling, S. [University of Halle, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Germany)], E-mail: sabrina.koesling@medizin.uni-halle.de; Omenzetter, M. [University of Halle, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Germany); Bartel-Friedrich, S. [University of Halle, Department of Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Section of Phoniatrics and Pedaudiology (Germany)

    2009-02-15

    With the focus on imaging, this paper gives a summarized view of the present knowledge on fields, which are necessary to know for a profound understanding of congenital malformations of the external and middle ear. Typical and less typical combinations of malformed parts of the ear can be derived from the embryogenesis. Clinical signs and audiometric findings lead to diagnosis in congenital aural atresia. Isolated middle ear malformations can be clinically mixed up especially with otosclerosis and tympanosclerosis. Imaging is needed for exact morphological information. In malformations of the external and middle ear, CT is the imaging modality of choice. Requirements on CT-technique as well as radiological findings including classification and pre-surgical rating are described. Morphological CT-correlates of congenital malformations and their differential diagnoses are enlisted and illustrated. The impact of CT-results on therapy is explained and actual therapeutic concepts are briefly presented.

  7. Computed tomography of middle ear cholesteatomas without tympanic membrane perforation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ettorre, G.C.

    1991-01-01

    The growth of a middle ear cholesteatoma behind a normal tympanic membrane is a rate though possible event. In such cases, CT may provide useful information for diagnosis. The results are presented of a CT study carried out on 14 patients affected with unilateral conductive hearing loss and with normal tympanic membrane. CT allowed the diagnosis of meddle ear cholesteatoma to be made in all cases. All patients were treated with surgery: 8 of them underwent tympanoplasty and 6 explorative tympanotomy. While the diagnosis of cholesteatoma was confirmed in 13 patients, in 1 case tympanosclerosis was diagnosed. CT diagnosis of middle ear cholesteatoma is based on the demonstration of a low-density soft-tissue mass, in association with bone erosion or ossicular dislocation. The author emphasizes the difficulty of a CT diagnosis of cholesteatoma in the patients with middle ear soft-tissue masses in the absence of bone alterations

  8. Predictions of middle-ear and passive cochlear mechanics using a finite element model of the pediatric ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuelin; Keefe, Douglas H; Gan, Rong Z

    2016-04-01

    A finite element (FE) model was developed based on histological sections of a temporal bone of a 4-year-old child to simulate middle-ear and cochlear function in ears with normal hearing and otitis media. This pediatric model of the normal ear, consisting of an ear canal, middle ear, and spiral cochlea, was first validated with published energy absorbance (EA) measurements in young children with normal ears. The model was used to simulate EA in an ear with middle-ear effusion, whose results were compared to clinical EA measurements. The spiral cochlea component of the model was constructed under the assumption that the mechanics were passive. The FE model predicted middle-ear transfer functions between the ear canal and cochlea. Effects of ear structure and mechanical properties of soft tissues were compared in model predictions for the pediatric and adult ears. EA responses are predicted to differ between adult and pediatric ears due to differences in the stiffness and damping of soft tissues within the ear, and any residual geometrical differences between the adult ear and pediatric ear at age 4 years. The results have significance for predicting effects of otitis media in children.

  9. Poor Oral Hygiene and Middle Ear Infections: Any Relationship?

    OpenAIRE

    Esra, Eryaman; Banu, Oter Ilhan; Erdinc, Aydin

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relationship between poor oral hygiene and middle ear infections. 59 children between 3–12 age intervals were included in this study. The ears were examined by microscope. The findings were marked according to Kempthorne clinical scale and tympanograms were performed. For data analysis of dental caries, dft and DMFT indexes were used in accordance with WHO (World Health Organization) criteria for oral health surveys. The oral hygiene status was det...

  10. Soft tissue attenuation in middle ear on HRCT: Pictorial review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anbarasu, Arangasamy; Chandrasekaran, Kiruthika; Balakrishnan, Sivasubramanian

    2012-01-01

    Middle ear disease is a common clinical entity; imaging, especially High resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT), plays a crucial role in diagnosis and assessing the disease extent, helping to decide appropriate management. Temporal bone imaging is challenging and involves thorough understanding of the anatomy, especially in relation to HRCT imaging. Most of the middle ear pathologies appear as “soft tissue” on imaging. Careful analysis of the soft tissue on the HRCT is crucial in achieving the right diagnosis; clinical information is essential and the imaging findings need correlation with clinical presentation and otoscopic findings. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to enlist the pathologies that present as soft tissue in middle ear and to provide a structured and practical imaging approach that will serve as a guide for confident reporting in daily practice

  11. Endoscopic Ear Surgery: Critical Review of Anatomy and Physiology of Normal and Reconstructive Middle Ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udagatti, Vithal D; Dinesh Kumar, Rajendran

    2016-06-01

    Middle ear anatomy is complex hence it is difficult to study the microscopic vibration of tympanic membrane and ossicles. The basic research has been done in few centres. Our experience is based on clinical data. The lack of quantitative understanding of structural and functional relationship in the mechanical response of the normal and reconstructed middle ear is major factor in poor hearing results after surgery (Merchant et al. in J Laryngol Otol 112:715-731, 1998). The vibration pattern of tympanic membrane changes with different frequencies. It depends upon shape, position and tension of tympanic membrane. Sometimes reconstructed tympanic membrane loses its shape and tension and thus its vibratory response (Pusalkar and Steinbach in Transplants and implants in otology II, 1992). Then what should be the shape, position, tension of the tympanic membrane and the ossicles. In order to have a serviceable hearing, dry and safe ear, there is a necessity of answering all these queries by us.

  12. FEM model of middle ear prosthesis with pseudo-elastic effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzysztof, Kozik; Wojciech, Klein; Rafal, Rusinek

    2018-01-01

    In this paper a concept of the middle ear prosthesis made of the shape memory alloy is presented. Natural vibrations of the shape memory prosthesis are investigated with the help of the finite element method in order to verify possibility of its implementation to the human middle ear. Next, the simplified prosthesis is introduced to the ear model and the system response is investigated. Results show that, Vibration modes and frequencies of the reconstructed middle ear are similar to the intact ear.

  13. Imaging evaluation of middle ear cholesteatoma: iconographic essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avila, Ana Flavia Assis de; Aburjeli, Bruna de Oliveira Melim; Moreira, Wanderval; Motta, Emilia Guerra Pinto Coelho; Ribeiro, Marcelo Almeida; Diniz, Renata Lopes Furletti Caldeira, E-mail: fauassis@hotmail.com [Hospital Mater Dei, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-06-15

    Middle ear cholesteatoma is a relevant and relatively common disease that may have severe consequences. In the present pictorial essay, the authors have selected illustrative examples of multislice computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging depicting the main presentations of cholesteatomas, and describing their characteristics, locations, and major complications. (author)

  14. Imaging evaluation of middle ear cholesteatoma: iconographic essay

    OpenAIRE

    Ávila,Ana Flávia Assis de; Aburjeli,Bruna de Oliveira Melim; Moreira,Wanderval; Motta,Emília Guerra Pinto Coelho; Ribeiro,Marcelo Almeida; Diniz,Renata Lopes Furletti Caldeira

    2013-01-01

    Middle ear cholesteatoma is a relevant and relatively common disease that may have severe consequences. In the present pictorial essay, the authors have selected illustrative examples of multislice computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging depicting the main presentations of cholesteatomas, and describing their characteristics, locations, and major complications.

  15. Imaging evaluation of middle ear cholesteatoma: iconographic essay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Flavia Assis de Avila

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Middle ear cholesteatoma is a relevant and relatively common disease that may have severe consequences. In the present pictorial essay, the authors have selected illustrative examples of multislice computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging depicting the main presentations of cholesteatomas, and describing their characteristics, locations, and major complications.

  16. Water Penetration into Middle Ear Through Ventilation Tubes in Children While Swimming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao-Che Wang

    2009-02-01

    Conclusion: Water penetration into the middle ear through ventilation tubes and middle ear infection are not likely when surface swimming. Children with ventilation tubes can enjoy swimming without protection in clean chlorinated swimming pools.

  17. Forward and reverse middle ear frequency responses with various terminal loads

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Thejane, T

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available An analog network model of the human middle ear is used to study the effect of terminal loads on the middle ear frequency response. A new transformer ratio value is computed and used to improve the model of the middle ear through the use of an ideal...

  18. Poor oral hygiene and middle ear infections: any relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esra, Eryaman; Banu, Oter Ilhan; Erdinc, Aydin

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relationship between poor oral hygiene and middle ear infections. 59 children between 3-12 age intervals were included in this study. The ears were examined by microscope. The findings were marked according to Kempthorne clinical scale and tympanograms were performed. For data analysis of dental caries, dft and DMFT indexes were used in accordance with WHO (World Health Organization) criteria for oral health surveys. The oral hygiene status was determined by using Simplified Oral Hygiene Index of Greene and Vermillion. The scores of 0-1 were classified as low, and of 2-3 as high oral hygiene index (OHI-S). The low OHI-S was taken as the control group (30 patients). The high OHI-S was taken as the study group (29 patients). The effusion scores, the compliance values and the middle ear pressure values in the two groups were compared. The difference between the effusion score values of the control and study groups was found to be statistically meaningful (p = 0.338, and the χ(2) = 2.167). The compliance values of the control and study groups did not differ meaningfully statistically (p = 0.671). However, there was a statistically meaningful low middle ear pressure (p = 0.044, χ(2) = 4.069) in the control group. Since this finding is expected in the study group, instead of the control group, we did not make an issue of this result. We conclude from these clinical results that there is no statistically meaningful relation between the oral hygiene index and the middle ear.

  19. Using the shortwave infrared to image middle ear pathologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Tulio A.; Bruns, Oliver T.; Bawendi, Moungi G.

    2016-01-01

    Visualizing structures deep inside opaque biological tissues is one of the central challenges in biomedical imaging. Optical imaging with visible light provides high resolution and sensitivity; however, scattering and absorption of light by tissue limits the imaging depth to superficial features. Imaging with shortwave infrared light (SWIR, 1–2 μm) shares many advantages of visible imaging, but light scattering in tissue is reduced, providing sufficient optical penetration depth to noninvasively interrogate subsurface tissue features. However, the clinical potential of this approach has been largely unexplored because suitable detectors, until recently, have been either unavailable or cost prohibitive. Here, taking advantage of newly available detector technology, we demonstrate the potential of SWIR light to improve diagnostics through the development of a medical otoscope for determining middle ear pathologies. We show that SWIR otoscopy has the potential to provide valuable diagnostic information complementary to that provided by visible pneumotoscopy. We show that in healthy adult human ears, deeper tissue penetration of SWIR light allows better visualization of middle ear structures through the tympanic membrane, including the ossicular chain, promontory, round window niche, and chorda tympani. In addition, we investigate the potential for detection of middle ear fluid, which has significant implications for diagnosing otitis media, the overdiagnosis of which is a primary factor in increased antibiotic resistance. Middle ear fluid shows strong light absorption between 1,400 and 1,550 nm, enabling straightforward fluid detection in a model using the SWIR otoscope. Moreover, our device is easily translatable to the clinic, as the ergonomics, visual output, and operation are similar to a conventional otoscope. PMID:27551085

  20. Thyroid Hormone Receptors Control Developmental Maturation of the Middle Ear and the Size of the Ossicular Bones

    OpenAIRE

    Cordas, Emily A.; Ng, Lily; Hernandez, Arturo; Kaneshige, Masahiro; Cheng, Sheue-Yann; Forrest, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid hormone is critical for auditory development and has well-known actions in the inner ear. However, less is known of thyroid hormone functions in the middle ear, which contains the ossicles (malleus, incus, stapes) that relay mechanical sound vibrations from the outer ear to the inner ear. During the later stages of middle ear development, prior to the onset of hearing, middle ear cavitation occurs, involving clearance of mesenchyme from the middle ear cavity while the immature cartila...

  1. Mites in cat ears: a source of cross antigenicity with house dust mites. Preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, A D; Gaillard, G E

    1981-06-01

    Dermatophagoides had been established as an antigen in house dust by many investigators. An untapped source of cross antigenicity is presented in this paper, namely, Otodectes cyanotis, the mite found in the ears of millions of cats. House dust samples for mite species in other parts of the world may not be similar to samples in the United States since in most other countries the cat exists outdoors, whereas in this country it is a household pet.

  2. Finite element analysis of the middle ear transfer functions and related pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fei; Koike, Takuji; Wang, Jie; Sienz, Hans; Meredith, Rhys

    2009-10-01

    With developments in software and micro-measurement technology, a three-dimensional middle ear finite element (FE) model can now be more easily constructed to study sound transfer function. Many FE models of the middle ear have been constructed to date, and each has its own particular advantages and disadvantages. In this article, we review the latest developments and technologies in the field of the FE models of the middle ear, and the use of FE in the study of middle ear pathology. Proposals are made for future developments in the field of finite element analysis of middle ear transfer function.

  3. The middle ear immune defense changes with age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Michelle Christine; Friis, Morten; Martin-Bertelsen, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    performed. Complementary DNA microarray technology was used to identify immune-related genes differentially expressed between the normal middle ear mucosa of young (10 days old) and adult rats (80 days old). Data were analyzed using tools of bioinformatics. A total of 260 age-related genes were identified......-chain T-cell receptor-associated protein kinase and linker of activated T-cells, were upregulated in the adult. This study concludes that the normal middle ear immune system changes with age. Genes related to the innate immune system are upregulated in young rats, whereas genes related to the adaptive......Otitis media is a common disease in childhood. In adults, the disease is relatively rare, but more frequently associated with complications. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are age-related differences in pathogen exposure, anatomy of the Eustachian tube and immune system. The objective...

  4. Intra-operative hearing monitoring methods in middle ear surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Ren

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss is a condition affecting millions of people worldwide. Conductive hearing loss (CHL is mainly caused by middle ear diseases. The low frequency area is the pivotal part of speech frequencies and most frequently impaired in patients with CHL. Among various treatments of CHL, middle ear surgery is efficient to improve hearing. However, variable success rates and possible needs for prolonged revision surgery still frustrate both surgeons and patients. Nowadays, increasing numbers of researchers explore various methods to monitor the efficacy of ossicular reconstruction intraoperatively, including electrocochleography (ECochG, auditory brainstem response (ABR, auditory steady state response (ASSR, distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE, subjective whisper test, and optical coherence tomography (OCT. Here, we illustrate several methods used clinically by reviewing the literature.

  5. Imaging evaluation of middle ear cholesteatoma: iconographic essay

    OpenAIRE

    Ávila, Ana Flávia Assis de; Aburjeli, Bruna de Oliveira Melim; Moreira, Wanderval; Motta, Emília Guerra Pinto Coelho; Ribeiro, Marcelo Almeida; Diniz, Renata Lopes Furletti Caldeira

    2013-01-01

    Middle ear cholesteatoma is a relevant and relatively common disease that may have severe consequences. In the present pictorial essay, the authors have selected illustrative examples of multislice computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging depicting the main presentations of cholesteatomas, and describing their characteristics, locations, and major complications. O colesteatoma da orelha média é uma doença importante e relativamente comum, podendo ter sérias consequências. Neste e...

  6. Surgical anatomy and pathology of the middle ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luers, Jan Christoffer; Hüttenbrink, Karl-Bernd

    2016-02-01

    Middle ear surgery is strongly influenced by anatomical and functional characteristics of the middle ear. The complex anatomy means a challenge for the otosurgeon who moves between preservation or improvement of highly important functions (hearing, balance, facial motion) and eradication of diseases. Of these, perforations of the tympanic membrane, chronic otitis media, tympanosclerosis and cholesteatoma are encountered most often in clinical practice. Modern techniques for reconstruction of the ossicular chain aim for best possible hearing improvement using delicate alloplastic titanium prostheses, but a number of prosthesis-unrelated factors work against this intent. Surgery is always individualized to the case and there is no one-fits-all strategy. Above all, both middle ear diseases and surgery can be associated with a number of complications; the most important ones being hearing deterioration or deafness, dizziness, facial palsy and life-threatening intracranial complications. To minimize risks, a solid knowledge of and respect for neurootologic structures is essential for an otosurgeon who must train him- or herself intensively on temporal bones before performing surgery on a patient. © 2015 Anatomical Society.

  7. Age effects in the human middle ear: Wideband acoustical measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeney, M. Patrick; Sanford, Chris A.

    2004-12-01

    Studies that have examined age effects in the human middle ear using either admittance measures at 220 or 660 Hz or multifrequency tympanometry from 200 to 2000 Hz have had conflicting results. Several studies have suggested an increase in admittance with age, while several others have suggested a decrease in admittance with age. A third group of studies found no significant age effect. This study examined 226 Hz tympanometry and wideband energy reflectance and impedance at ambient pressure in a group of 40 young adults and a group of 30 adults with age >=60 years. The groups did not differ in admittance measures of the middle ear at 226 Hz. However, significant age effects were found in wideband energy reflectance and impedance. In particular, in older adults there was a comparative decrease in reflectance from 800 to 2000 Hz but an increase near 4000 Hz. The results suggest a decrease in middle-ear stiffness with age. The findings of this study hold relevance for understanding the aging process in the auditory system, for the establishment of normative data for wideband energy reflectance, for the possibility of a conductive component to presbycusis, and for the interpretation of otoacoustic emission measurements. .

  8. Passage of albumin from the middle ear to the inner ear in otitis media in the chinchilla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, B.; Goycoolea, M.V.; Schleivert, P.M.; Shea, D.; Schachern, P.; Paparella, M.M.; Carpenter, A.M.

    1981-08-01

    A study of the permeability of the middle ear-inner ear interface for macromolecules was carried out in chinchillas with open and obstructed eustachian tubes utilizing tritiated human serum albumin and immunoelectrophoresis. Tritiated albumin was placed in the round window niche area or normal animals and animals in which the eustachian tubes had been obstructed for 24 hours or 14 days. The tritiated albumin was allowed to remain in the middle ear cavity for 24 hours, Samples of middle ear effusion, perilymph, blood and cerebrospinal fluid were collected and measured for radioactivity. Radioactivity was demonstrated in the perilymph. Samples of middle ear effusions and perilymph were also studied by immunoelectrophoresis with goat antihuman albumin. Albumin placed in the round window niche of an experimental animal could be recovered unchanged in the perilymph. The results suggest a pathophysiologic explanation for the association of otitis media and sensorineural hearing loss or endolymphatic hydrops.

  9. Systematic Review of Endoscopic Middle Ear Surgery Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozin, Elliott D.; Gulati, Shawn; Lehmann, Ashton; Remenschneider, Aaron K.; Kaplan, Alyson; Landegger, Lukas D.; Cohen, Michael S.; Lee, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Middle ear surgery increasingly employs endoscopes as an adjunct to or replacement for the operative microscope. Superior visualization and transcanal access to disease normally managed with a transmastoid approach are touted as advantages with the endoscope. No study, however, has systemically reviewed the literature to evaluate outcomes of endoscopic ear surgery (EES). We provide a systematic review of endoscope applications in middle ear surgery with an emphasis on outcomes. Data Sources PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Methods A literature review was performed using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis recommendations. Articles were categorized based on study design, indication, and use of an endoscope either as an adjunct to or as a replacement for a microscope. Quantitative and descriptive analyses were performed. Results Ninety-one articles published between 1967 and 2014 met inclusion and exclusion criteria. The main indication for the use of an endoscope was cholesteatoma or myringoplasty. Of the identified articles, 40 provided a discrete discussion of outcomes. In cholesteatoma surgery, the endoscope has been mainly employed as an adjunct to the microscope, and although outcomes assessments vary across studies, the endoscope identified residual cholesteatoma in up to 50% of cases. Conclusion Endoscopes have been predominately used as an observational adjunct to the microscope to improve visualization of the tympanic cavity. Recent reports utilize the endoscope exclusively during surgical dissection; however, data comparing patient outcomes following the use of an operative endoscope versus a microscope are lacking. Areas in need of additional research are highlighted. PMID:25418475

  10. Anatomic Considerations on the Middle Ear in Dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Berghes

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of this study is to explain some aspects of middle ear anatomy in dog. The study was conducted on five dog skulls (different ages from common, large size dogs. The skulls were processed by maceration and submitted to a treatment of mechanical cleaning with perhydrol. The temporal bone was collected first; the external wall was opened carefully to study the tympanic cavity. The ossicles were collected separately and subsequently described. From research carried promontory appears as an elongated projection that separates the oval window and round window. Vestibular window is oval or slightly ovoid shape of a hole, located dorso-medially to the promontory, which communicates with the middle ear vestibule. Cochlearia window appears as a round or circular hole located caudo-lateral to the promontory . it is blocked by a membrane called the tympanum secondary, cavity separating the ramp of the snail. In the ventro-oral cavity openings ductus faringo tympanicum. The osicules sound represented by hammer, anvil and stirrup are articulated with each other and form a chain as a link between the eardrum and vestibular window. Bones are driven by two muscles: the tensor muscle and muscle stirrup eardrum is very thin. osicules ear are relatively large and resemble those of humans. Lenticular bone is the lenticular process of the long arm of anvile.

  11. Congenital cholesteatoma of the middle ear - uncommon clinical presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bukurov Bojana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Congenital cholesteatoma of the middle ear is un uncommon and yet not well-defined disease. Only few cases of cholesteatoma in the fossa ovalis with unusual clinical presentation have been reported in medical literature. Case report. We reported a 16-year-old girl with congenital cholesteatoma in the fossa ovalis with minimal clinical presentation. A small mass was found occluding the fossa ovalis and mimicking otosclerotic process within tympanic cavity. The operation started as stapedotomy, and when the process was confirmed it converted to mastoidectomy via the retroauricular approach. Conclusion. The diagnosis of congenital cholesteatoma in children should always be considered, even if the clinical symptoms imitate other ear disorders, in our case otosclerosis. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 179055: Cochlear implantation impact on education of deaf and hearing-impaired

  12. Modeling Analysis of Biomechanical Changes of Middle Ear and Cochlea in Otitis Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Rong Z.; Zhang, Xiangming; Guan, Xiying

    2011-11-01

    A comprehensive finite element (FE) model of the human ear including the ear canal, middle ear, and spiral cochlea was developed using histological sections of human temporal bone. The cochlea was modeled with three chambers separated by the basilar membrane and Reissner's membrane and filled with perilymphatic fluid. The viscoelastic material behavior was applied to middle ear soft tissues based on dynamic measurements of tissues in our lab. The model was validated using the experimental data obtained in human temporal bones and then used to simulate various stages of otitis media (OM) including the changes of morphology, mechanical properties, pressure, and fluid level in the middle ear. Function alterations of the middle ear and cochlea in OM were derived from the model and compared with the measurements from temporal bones. This study indicates that OM can be simulated in the FE model to predict the hearing loss induced by biomechanical changes of the middle ear and cochlea.

  13. Alternative sampling site for blood glucose testing in cats: giving the ears a rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeugswetter, Florian K; Rebuzzi, Laura; Karlovits, Sonja

    2010-09-01

    BACKGROUND AND STUDY RATIONALE: Home monitoring is an important part of the long-term management of diabetic cats. Despite the extensive use of glucometers in this species, up until now only the pinna of the ear has been validated as a testing site. This cross-sectional study investigated the feasibility and validity of sampling from the metacarpal/metatarsal pads in hospitalised cats with various diseases. The large pads were compared with the ear as a sampling site in 75 cats. Lancing the pads was tolerated very well. If the initial drop of blood was too small, an adequate volume of blood was almost always achieved by squeezing the pads. No significant differences were observed in first-attempt success rate or glucose values between the two sites. Due to the inability to obtain an adequate volume of blood or struggling, no measurement was possible in four cats. While further work is necessary to assess the utility of this technique, especially in the home environment, the results indicate that the metacarpal pads, in particular, may offer a viable alternative testing site for the measurement of blood glucose concentrations, especially if ear sampling fails. Copyright 2010 ISFM and AAFP. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Bone Signaling in Middle Ear Development: A Genome‐Wide Differential Expression Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Michelle Christine; Bertelsen, Tomas Martin; Friis, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Common middle ear diseases may affect bone behavior in the middle ear air cell system. To understand this pathologic pneumatization, the normal development of bone in the middle ear should be investigated. The objective of this study was to analyze gene expression of bone‐related signaling factor...... of the bulla wall. Anat Rec, 297:2349–2355, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  15. Jun N-terminal protein kinase enhance middle ear mucosal proliferation during bacterial otitis media

    OpenAIRE

    Furukawa, Masayuki; Ebmayer, Jörg; Pak , Kwang; Austin, Darrell A.; Melhus , Åsa; Webster, Nicholas J. G.; Ryan, Allen F.

    2007-01-01

    Mucosal hyperplasia is a characteristic component of otitis media. The present study investigated the participation of signaling via the Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) mitogen-activated protein kinase in middle ear mucosal hyperplasia in animal models of bacterial otitis media. Otitis media was induced by the inoculation of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae into the middle ear cavity. Western blotting revealed that phosphorylation of JNK isoforms in the middle ear mucosa preceded but pa...

  16. Effect of Formaldehyde on Human Middle Ear Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Hye Kim

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Formaldehyde (FA is a familiar indoor air pollutant found in everything from cosmetics to clothing, but its impact on the middle ear is unknown. This study investigated whether FA causes cytotoxicity, inflammation, or induction of apoptosis in human middle ear epithelial cells (HMEECs. Cell viability was investigated using the trypan blue assay and a cell counting kit (CCK-8 in HMEECs treated with FA for 4 or 24 h. The expression of genes encoding the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α and mucin (MUC5AC was analyzed using RT-PCR. Activation of the apoptosis pathway was determined by measuring mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, cytochrome oxidase, caspase-9/Mch6/Apaf 3, and Caspase-Glo® 3/7 activities. The CCK-8 assay and trypan blue assay results showed a reduction in cell viability in FA-treated HMEECs. FA also increased the cellular expression of TNF-α and MUC5AC and reduced the activities of MMP and cytochrome oxidase. Caspase-9 activity increased in cells stimulated for 4 h, as well as caspase-3/7 activity in cells stimulated for 24 h. The decreased cell viability, the induction of inflammation and mucin gene expression, and the activation of the apoptosis pathway together indicate a link between environmental FA exposure and the development of otitis media.

  17. Middle-Ear Microsurgery Simulation to Improve New Robotic Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Kazmitcheff

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Otological microsurgery is delicate and requires high dexterity in bad ergonomic conditions. To assist surgeons in these indications, a teleoperated system, called RobOtol, is developed. This robot enhances gesture accuracy and handiness and allows exploration of new procedures for middle ear surgery. To plan new procedures that exploit the capacities given by the robot, a surgical simulator is developed. The simulation reproduces with high fidelity the behavior of the anatomical structures and can also be used as a training tool for an easier control of the robot for surgeons. In the paper, we introduce the middle ear surgical simulation and then we perform virtually two challenging procedures with the robot. We show how interactive simulation can assist in analyzing the benefits of robotics in the case of complex manipulations or ergonomics studies and allow the development of innovative surgical procedures. New robot-based microsurgical procedures are investigated. The improvement offered by RobOtol is also evaluated and discussed.

  18. A short-wave infrared otoscope for middle ear disease diagnostics (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Jessica A.; Valdez, Tulio; Bruns, Oliver; Bawendi, Moungi

    2016-02-01

    Otitis media, a range of inflammatory conditions of the middle ear, is the second most common illness diagnosed in children. However, the diagnosis can be challenging, particularly in pediatric patients. Otitis media is commonly over-diagnosed and over-treated and has been identified as one of the primary factors in increased antibiotic resistance. We describe the development of a short-wave infrared (SWIR) otoscope for objective middle ear effusion diagnosis. The SWIR otoscope can unambiguously detect the presence of middle ear fluid based on its strong light absorption in the SWIR. This absorption causes a stark, visual contrast between the presence and absence of fluid behind the tympanic membrane. Additionally, when there is no middle ear fluid, the deeper tissue penetration of SWIR light allows the SWIR otoscope to better visualize middle ear anatomy through the tympanic membrane than is possible with visible light. We demonstrate that in healthy, adult human ears, SWIR otoscopy can image a range of middle ear anatomy, including landmarks of the entire ossicular chain, the promontory, the round window niche, and the chorda tympani. We suggest that SWIR otoscopy can provide valuable diagnostic information complementary to that provided by visible pneumotoscopy in the diagnosis of middle ear effusions, otitis media, and other maladies of the middle ear.

  19. A comparative study on efficiency of middle ear pressure equalization techniques in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidir, Yusuf; Ulus, Sergül; Karahatay, Serdar; Satar, Bulent

    2011-08-01

    To compare success rates of middle ear inflation device (Ear Popper (©)), Valsalva maneuver and Toynbee maneuver in middle ear pressure equalization in healthy adults. Adult volunteers with otoscopically healthy ears were enrolled to the study. In a prospective setting, 60 ears of 35 volunteers were divided into two groups according to eustachian tube (ET) functions tested using the nine step inflation deflation test. Group A: good eustachian tube function at nine step inflation deflation test (30 ears), Group B: possible dysfunction of the ET at nine step inflation deflation test (30 ears). All the volunteers performed Valsalva maneuver, Toynbee maneuver and Ear Popper(©) application, respectively. The efficiencies of all the three techniques were statistically compared first overall, then paired-wise between the two groups. There was no statistical difference in success rates of middle ear pressure equalization techniques in 60 ears, regardless of ET function results (Valsalva and Toynbee maneuvers 51.7% effective, Ear Popper(©) 43.3% effective). There was also no statistical difference among the middle ear pressure shifts obtained by these three techniques. In almost half of the subjects in whom at least one technique was unsuccessful, the other two was effective. When the groups were separately compared; there was no significant difference between Valsalva and Toynbee maneuvers, whereas Ear Popper(©) was found more effective in Group A (56.7% vs. 30%, p=0.037). No statistical difference in equalization of the middle ear pressure was found among Valsalva maneuvers, Toynbee maneuvers and Ear Popper(©) in healthy adults under physiological conditions. Using alternative techniques may improve the success individually when a technique fails. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Benefits of active middle ear implants in mixed hearing loss: Stapes versus round window.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeon Mi; Jung, Jinsei; Moon, In Seok; Kim, Sung Huhn; Choi, Jae Young

    2017-06-01

    We compared the audiologic benefits of active middle ear implants with those of passive middle ear implants with hearing aids in mixed hearing loss, and also compared the outcomes of stapes vibroplasty with those of round window vibroplasty. Retrospective chart review. Thirty-four patients with mixed hearing loss due to chronic otitis media were treated with a middle ear implant. Of these, 15 were treated with a passive middle ear implant (conventional ossiculoplasty with a partial ossicular replacement prosthesis), nine with an active middle ear implant coupling to the stapes, and 10 with an active middle ear implant coupling to the round window. Patients underwent pure-tone/free-field audiograms and speech discrimination tests before surgery and 6 months after surgery, and the results of these tests were compared. The active middle ear implant resulted in better outcomes than the passive middle ear implant with hearing aids at mid to high frequencies (P window vibroplasty showed comparable hearing gain except at 8,000 Hz (48.9 dB vs. 31.0 dB, P window or round window stimulation shares similar good results. 4 Laryngoscope, 127:1435-1441, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  1. Static analysis of C-shape SMA middle ear prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latalski, Jarosław; Rusinek, Rafał

    2017-08-01

    Shape memory alloys are a family of metals with the ability to change specimen shape depending on their temperature. This unique property is useful in many areas of mechanical and biomechanical engineering. A new half-ring middle ear prosthesis design made of a shape memory alloy, that is undergoing initial clinical tests, is investigated in this research paper. The analytical model of the studied structure made of nonlinear constitutive material is solved to identify the temperature-dependent stiffness characteristics of the proposed design on the basis of the Crotti-Engesser theorem. The final integral expression for the element deflection is highly complex, thus the solution has to be computed numerically. The final results show the proposed shape memory C-shape element to behave linearly in the analysed range of loadings and temperatures. This is an important observation that significantly simplifies the analysis of the prototype structure and opens wide perspectives for further possible applications of shape memory alloys.

  2. Erbium laser in middle ear surgery: laboratory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Udayan K.; Poe, Dennis S.; Rebeiz, Elie E.; Perrault, Donald F., Jr.; Pankratov, Michail M.; Shapshay, Stanley M.

    1994-09-01

    Cadaveric human temporal bones, cadaveric rabbits, and live rats were used to demonstrate the use and safety of the erbium:yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er:YSGG) laser for otologic applications: for dissection and precise drilling of bone. The shallow penetration of this wavelength and hence minimal collateral thermal effects spare underlying middle and inner ear structures and make it appealing for stapedotomy. Temperature measurements from the round window area during Er:YSGG stapedotomy recorded an elevation of less than 2 degree(s)C, which is well within acceptable limits. Ablation of bone was good and efficient. An acoustic shock produced at the impact site is the major disadvantage and requires further in vivo investigation of the transient and sustained deleterious effects away from the application site. This work supports further investigation into potential applications of the Er:YSGG laser in otology.

  3. Use of the nine-step inflation/deflation test and resting middle-ear pressure range as predictors of middle-ear barotrauma in aircrew members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, A; Abousetta, A

    2014-07-01

    To explore the role of the nine-step inflation/deflation tympanometric test and resting middle-ear pressure range as predictors of barotrauma in aircrew members. A prospective, non-randomised study was conducted on 100 aircrew members. Resting middle-ear pressure was measured and the nine-step inflation/deflation test performed on all subjects before flights. Subjects were allocated to two groups according to resting middle-ear pressure range (group A, within the range of +26 to +100 and -26 to -100 mmH2O; group B, -25 to +25 mmH2O). All aircrew members were assessed after flights regarding the presence and the grade of barotrauma. In both groups, the sensitivity and specificity values of the entire post-inflation/deflation test were close to those of the post-deflation part of the test. The post-deflation test had a higher negative predictive value than the post-inflation test. Ears with resting middle-ear pressure lower than -55 mmH2O experienced barotrauma, regardless of good or poor post-inflation or post-deflation test results. In an aircrew member, a resting middle-ear pressure within the range of -55 and +50 mmH2O, together with good post-deflation test results, are considered reliable predictors for fitness to fly.

  4. Real ear unaided gain and its relation with the equivalent volume of the external and middle ear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastos, Bárbara Guimarães

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Old age is associated with changes in the characteristics of the middle ear transmission system and in external ear resonance, and these carry implications for the hearing aid (HA verification process for which targets and measures of the real ear insertion gain (REIG are used. Aim: To compare the real ear unaided gain (REUG and the equivalent volumes of the external ear (VeqEE and the middle ear (VeqME between elderly and adult patients. Methods: This is a retrospective study in which the medical records of 28 elderly patients (aged between 61 and 102 years, average hearing thresholds between 38.75 and 85 dB HL and 23 adult patients (aged 20-59, mean hearing thresholds between 31.25 and 116.25 dB HL with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss and no history of middle ear abnormalities were analyzed. Immittance measurements (VeqEE, VeqME, and pressure of the peak of maximum compliance and the REUG (frequency and amplitude of the primary peak were recovered for a total of 40 ears. These data were compared between elderly and adults as well as between men and women, using Student's t test. Correlations (Pearson between immittance and REUG data were also verified. Results: No statistically significant differences (p < 0.01 were found for immittance and REUG data between elderly and adults, or between men and women. A negative and weak but significant correlation was observed between the REUG primary peak and VeqEE. Conclusion: Hearing aid verification can be performed with target and measures of the REIG in the elderly population.

  5. Middle ear cavity morphology is consistent with an aquatic origin for testudines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie L Willis

    Full Text Available The position of testudines in vertebrate phylogeny is being re-evaluated. At present, testudine morphological and molecular data conflict when reconstructing phylogenetic relationships. Complicating matters, the ecological niche of stem testudines is ambiguous. To understand how turtles have evolved to hear in different environments, we examined middle ear morphology and scaling in most extant families, as well as some extinct species, using 3-dimensional reconstructions from micro magnetic resonance (MR and submillimeter computed tomography (CT scans. All families of testudines exhibited a similar shape of the bony structure of the middle ear cavity, with the tympanic disk located on the rostrolateral edge of the cavity. Sea Turtles have additional soft tissue that fills the middle ear cavity to varying degrees. When the middle ear cavity is modeled as an air-filled sphere of the same volume resonating in an underwater sound field, the calculated resonances for the volumes of the middle ear cavities largely fell within testudine hearing ranges. Although there were some differences in morphology, there were no statistically significant differences in the scaling of the volume of the bony middle ear cavity with head size among groups when categorized by phylogeny and ecology. Because the cavity is predicted to resonate underwater within the testudine hearing range, the data support the hypothesis of an aquatic origin for testudines, and function of the middle ear cavity in underwater sound detection.

  6. Investigation of gastric pepsinogen in middle ear fluid of children with glue ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toros, Sema Zer; Toros, Ahmet Burak; Ozel, Leyla; Çatal, Banu Er; Kiniş, Vefa; Zorlu, Aylin; Habeşoğlu, Tülay Erden; Naiboğlu, Bariş; Egeli, Erol

    2010-11-01

    The presence of pepsinogen in middle ear effusion (MEE) supports the relationship between gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and otitis media with effusion (OME). Measurement of pepsin/pepsinogen can be considered as a simple and reliable method for assesment of reflux in children. However, further research is needed to establish a definite association between GER and OME before beginning antireflux treatment in the management of MEE. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between GER and chronic OME, and to confirm the presence of gastric enzyme in the MEE of children with OME. This was a prospective study. MEE and blood samples were obtained from 42 children undergoing tympanostomy tube placement. Total pepsinogen concentrations of effusions and serum samples were measured with a commercial ELISA using a human pepsinogen I specific antibody. Albumin levels of effusions and serum samples were also measured with ELISA for comparison with pepsinogen levels. Measurable pepsinogen was present in all MEEs from patients, with levels higher than the serum values. The difference between the levels of pepsinogen measured in MEE and serum was statistically significant (p < 0.01), but albumin levels were higher in serum than in MEE and the difference was statistically significant (p < 0.01).

  7. Middle ear barotrauma causing transient facial nerve paralysis after scuba diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Matthew Lee; Boyev, K Paul

    2016-12-01

    Middle ear barotrauma is a well known entity with typical injury occurring when diving or ascending in a commercial jetliner. Patients often present with symptoms of acute onset otalgia, hearing loss and sometimes haemotympanum (with or without tympanic membrane perforation). On rare occasions, facial nerve paralysis can occur when the tympanic segment of the facial nerve is dehiscent within the middle ear. We present a case of spontaneously resolving facial nerve palsy associated with middle ear barotrauma following a brief, shallow dive. Prompt and astute diagnosis leads to proper management with simple myringotomy and can prevent unnecessary testing and other misguided treatments.

  8. Microtomography of the human middle and inner ear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Uwe; Beckmann, Felix; Zahnert, Thomas; Bonse, Ulrich

    2002-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation and x-ray microtomography based on absorption contrast (performed at HASYLAB at DESY/Hamburg and BAM/Berlin) have been used for imaging of temporal bones and various internal components in situ at spatial resolution down to 7 micrometers with potential enhancement into the submicron range. Due to the volume imaging approach, several hidden structures (e.g., intra-ossicular channels) were revealed. Using several 3D-image processing techniques all data have been segmented into objects (e.g., bony ossicles, ligaments, fluids, air spaces) and subsequently transformed into vectorized data models. Because they are based on the original voxel resolution their content of vector primitives (e.g., polygons) is huge compared to recent models. Therefore they became polygon-reduced to fit into current computation limitations. So far individual data models of the entire hearing apparatus from tympanic membrane to cochlea out of intact specimen, including separate models of ossicles, ligaments and other components have been obtained, provided, in interchangeable data formats (e.g. vector-based: IGES, STL, VRML) and introduced into FEA for modeling of acousto-mechanic transfer characteristics of the middle ear. Their pseudo and real 3D- visualizations (rendering, autosteroscopic display, enlarged solid models) allow easy understanding of the anatomy and pathology of the human hearing organ and may support patient and student education in the field of otology and audiology.

  9. Oxymetazoline solutions inhibit middle ear pathogens and are not ototoxic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacson, Glenn; Buttaro, Bettina A; Mazeffa, Valorie; Li, Geming; Frenz, Dorothy A

    2005-08-01

    This study was performed to explore the antimicrobial activity of two commercially available oxymetazoline hydrochloride preparations against the common pathogens of otitis media and to demonstrate the lack of ototoxicity of these agents and of United States Pharmacopeia (USP) oxymetazoline in a standard animal model. Disc diffusion assays and minimum inhibitory concentration studies against American Type Culture Collection reference strains of common middle ear pathogens were used to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of oxymetazoline solutions and fluoroquinolone drops, and outer hair cell counts were performed on scanning electron micrographs of guinea pig basal cochlear segments after chronic exposure to oxymetazoline solutions and positive and negative controls. Oxymetazoline nasal spray and eyedrops had activity against all species tested except Haemophilus influenzae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The USP oxymetazoline had limited antimicrobial activity. Oxymetazoline nasal spray, oxymetazoline eyedrops, and USP oxymetazoline had ototoxicity profiles indistinguishable from that of the saline solution control. Commercially available oxymetazoline solutions are active against several of the common pathogens of otitis media. This antimicrobial activity is not due to oxymetazoline, and is more likely due to preservatives present in the solutions. The solutions tested are not ototoxic to guinea pig outer hair cells. Oxymetazoline solutions are potential substitutes for broad-spectrum antibiotic drops after tympanostomy tube placement.

  10. Middle ear packing materials: comparison between absorbable hemostatic gelatine sponge and sugarcane biopolymer sponge in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Lopes Bunzen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Several biomaterials can be used in ear surgery to pack the middle ear or support the graft. The absorbable gelatin sponge is the most widely used, but it may produce fibrosis and impair ventilation of the middle ear. OBJECTIVE: This experimental study aimed to investigate the inflammatory effects of the sugarcane biopolymer sponge (BP in the rat middle ear compared with absorbable gelatin sponge (AGS. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Prospective experimental study design. Thirty adult female Wistar rats were allocated to receive the BP sponge into the right ear and AGS into the left ear. Animals were randomly killed at 4 and 12 weeks post-procedure. Qualitative histological assessments were performed to evaluate the inflammatory reaction in the tympanic bullae. RESULTS: The BP sponge caused inflammation more intense and persistent than AGS. The BP was not absorbed during the experiment. Fibrosis was observed only in the ears with AGS. There were thickening of the mucosa and neoangiogenesis in the group of AGS. CONCLUSION: Despite inflammation, the BP sponge produced less fibrosis and neoangiogenesis compared to AGS. The sponge BP appeared to be a non-absorbable biomaterial in the middle ear.

  11. Effects of Consecutive Wideband Tympanometry Trials on Energy Absorbance Measures of the Middle Ear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdiek, Laina M.; Sun, Xiao-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Wideband acoustic immittance (WAI) is a new technique for assessing middle ear transfer function. It includes energy absorbance (EA) measures and can be acquired with the ear canal pressure varied, known as "wideband tympanometry" (WBTymp). The authors of this study aimed to investigate effects of consecutive WBTymp testing on…

  12. The malleable middle ear: an underappreciated player in the evolution of hearing in vertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Manley, Geoffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    The middle ear of tetrapods (limbed vertebrates) originated from nonauditory structures, and has been modified by adaptations arising from the lifestyle of the tetrapods. These accessory structures for the inner ear increased the sensitivity to airborne sound, the frequency range of hearing, and ...

  13. Theory of forward and reverse middle-ear transmission applied to otoacoustic emissions in infant and adult ears

    OpenAIRE

    Keefe, Douglas H.; Abdala, Carolina

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand why otoacoustic emission (OAE) levels are higher in normal-hearing human infants relative to adults. In a previous study, distortion product (DP) OAE input/output (I/O) functions were shown to differ at f2=6 kHz in adults compared to infants through 6 months of age. These DPOAE I/O functions were used to noninvasively assess immaturities in forward/reverse transmission through the ear canal and middle ear [Abdala, C., and Keefe, D. H., (2006). J. Aco...

  14. Association of microRNA 146 with middle ear hyperplasia in pediatric otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Tina L; Yan, Justin; Khampang, Pawjai; MacKinnon, Alexander; Hong, Wenzhou; Johnston, Nikki; Kerschner, Joseph E

    2016-09-01

    Toll-like receptor signaling activated by bacterial otitis media pathogens in the middle ear has been shown to play a key role in OM susceptibility, pathogenesis and recovery. Recent studies implicate microRNA 146 (miR-146) in regulation of inflammation via negative feedback of toll-like receptor signaling (TLR) in a wide variety of tissues, however its involvement in otitis media is unknown. Human middle ear epithelial cells were stimulated with proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin 1 beta or tumor necrosis factor alpha, for two to twenty-four hours. Middle ear biopsies were collected from children with otitis media with effusion (n = 20), recurrent otitis media (n = 9), and control subjects undergoing cochlear implantation (n = 10). miR-146a, miR-146b expression was assayed by quantitative PCR (qPCR). Expression of miR-146 targets involved in TLR signaling, IRAK1 and TRAF6, was assayed by qPCR in middle ear biopsies. Middle ear biopsies were cryosectioned and epithelial thickness measured by a certified pathologist. Proinflammatory cytokines induced expression of miR-146 in middle ear epithelial cells in vitro. Middle ear miR-146a and miR-146b expression was elevated in otitis media patients relative to control subjects and correlated with middle ear epithelial thickness. A trend towards inverse correlation was observed between miR-146 and TRAF6 expression in the clinical population. This report is the first to assess miRNA expression in a clinical population with OM. Findings herein suggest miR-146 may play a role in OM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of immittance testing for the identification of middle ear pathology in South African mineworkers.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Habig, A

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available or otological intervention has traditionally relied on pure -tone testing and otoscopic examinations. If the purpose of screening is also to identify persons with middle-ear pathology, acoustic immittance screening (tympanometry and acoustic reflex testing...) should be considered, along with otoscopic examinations and medical histories for otological abnormalities, in accordance with recommendations by ASLHA (1993). The present study evaluated immittance measures for the identification of middle ear...

  16. Multi-color reflectance imaging of middle ear pathology in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Tulio A; Spegazzini, Nicolas; Pandey, Rishikesh; Longo, Kaitlyn; Grindle, Christopher; Peterson, Donald; Barman, Ishan

    2015-05-01

    Otoscopic examination using white-light illumination has remained virtually unchanged for well over a century. However, the limited contrast of white-light otoscopy constrains the ability to make accurate assessment of middle ear pathology and is subject to significant observer variability. Here, we employ a modified otoscope with multi-color imaging capabilities for superior characterization of the middle ear constituents in vivo and for enhanced diagnosis of acute otitis media and cholesteatoma. In this pilot study, five patients undergoing surgery for tympanostomy tube placement and congenital cholesteatoma excision were imaged using the custom-designed multi-color video-rate reflectance imaging system. We show that the multi-color imaging approach offers an increase in image contrast, thereby enabling clear visualization of the middle ear constituents, especially of the tympanic membrane vascularity. Differential absorption at the multiple wavelengths provides a measure of biochemical and morphological information, and the rapid acquisition and analysis of these images aids in objective evaluation of the middle ear pathology. Our pilot study shows the potential of using label-free narrow-band reflectance imaging to differentiate middle ear pathological conditions from normal middle ear. This technique can aid in obtaining objective and reproducible diagnoses as well as provide assistance in guiding excisional procedures.

  17. Detection of otoacoustic emissions in chinchilla when the middle ear contains amniotic fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinpelu, Olubunmi V; Funnell, W Robert J; Daniel, Sam J

    2015-04-01

    Otoacoustic emissions have frequently been used for newborn hearing screening. However, they have low specificities and high referral rates. The presence of amniotic fluid in the middle ear is one reason for these problems. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of human amniotic fluid on otoacoustic emissions and on middle-ear function. Forty-six chinchillas were randomly divided into eight groups based on the type (amniotic fluid or normal saline) and volume (0.5, 1, 1.5, 2 ml) of liquid introduced into the middle ear. Distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) and wideband reflectance (WBR) measurements were taken under inhalational anaesthesia before and after introduction of middle-ear liquid. The differences in these measurements were subjected to statistical analyses. Prospective controlled animal study. Significant reductions of DPOAE levels and increases in WBR occurred across all frequencies when there was liquid in the middle ear, and the changes became greater for increased volumes of liquid. Changes in the noise level had important effects on the otoacoustic-emission signal-to-noise ratio at the three lowest frequencies. Both human amniotic fluid and saline in the chinchilla middle ear resulted in changes in otoacoustic-emission detection patterns and WBR that may be relevant to newborn hearing screening. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  18. Malformations of the middle and inner ear on CT imaging in 22q11 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loos, Elke; Verhaert, Nicolas; Willaert, Annelore; Devriendt, Koenraad; Swillen, Ann; Hermans, Robert; Op de Beeck, Katya; Hens, Greet

    2016-11-01

    The 22q11 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), the most frequent microdeletion syndrome in humans, presents with a large variety of abnormalities. A common abnormality is hearing impairment. The exact pathophysiological explanation of the observed hearing loss remains largely unknown. The aim of this study was to analyze the middle and inner ear malformations as seen on computer tomographic imaging in patients with 22q11DS. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 11 22q11DS patients who had undergone a CT of the temporal bone in the past. Of the 22 examined ears, two showed an abnormal malleus and incus, 10 presented with a dense stapes superstructure, and three ears had an abnormal orientation of the stapes. With regard to the inner ear, 12 ears showed an incomplete partition type II with a normal vestibular aqueduct. In four ears the vestibule and lateral semicircular canal were composed of a single cavity, in 14 ears the vestibule was too wide, and three ears had a broadened lateral semicircular canal. These findings suggest that malformations of the stapes, cochlea, vestibule, and lateral semicircular canal are frequent in 22q11DS. To our knowledge, the current study involves the largest case series describing middle and inner ear malformations in 22q11DS. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Ear asymmetries in middle-ear, cochlear, and brainstem responses in human infants

    OpenAIRE

    Keefe, Douglas H.; Gorga, Michael P.; Jesteadt, Walt; Smith, Lynette M.

    2008-01-01

    In 2004, Sininger and Cone-Wesson examined asymmetries in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of otoacoustic emissions (OAE) in infants, reporting that distortion-product (DP)OAE SNR was larger in the left ear, whereas transient-evoked (TE)OAE SNR was larger in the right. They proposed that cochlear and brainstem asymmetries facilitate development of brain-hemispheric specialization for sound processing. Similarly, in 2006 Sininger and Cone-Wesson described ear asymmetries mainly favoring the rig...

  20. Correlation between middle-ear pressure-regulation functions and outcome of type-I tympanoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Haruo; Sato, Hiroaki; Nakamura, Hajime; Naito, Yasushi; Umeki, Hiroshi

    2007-06-01

    To examine the correlation between the middle-ear pressure-regulation functions including active eustachian tube (ET) functions and transmucosal gas exchange function, and outcome of tympanoplasty. Seventy five patients (78 ears) with non-cholesteatomatous chronic otitis media with eardrum perforation but without ossicular damage or middle-ear anomaly participated in this study. Before surgery, patency of the ET was examined by applying positive pressure to the middle ear through the eardrum perforation, and then the ET pressure-regulation functions were examined using the inflation-deflation test. Also their transmucosal gas exchange function was evaluated by examining the presence or absence of aeration in the mastoid on the CT before surgery or through the microscope during the surgery. All of them underwent type-I tympanoplasty, and their postoperative conditions including the hearing were followed for more than 6 months. The outcome of the surgery was judged as poor outcome when they had any of the following conditions; more than 20 dB of mean air-bone gap, spontaneous perforation within 6 months, or persistent wet condition including recurrent otorrhea. First, the outcome of all the four ears of which ETs were considered mechanically obstructed was poor. Next, among the remaining 74 ears, none of the three individual parameters, including positive and negative middle-ear pressure-equalizing functions and mastoid aeration, showed significantly positive correlation with the outcome of the surgery, but significantly higher incidence of poor outcome was seen only when all the three parameters were poor. These results indicated that impairment of all the middle-ear pressure-regulation functions was likely to cause poor outcome of tympanoplasty, and also allowed us reconfirm that ears with mechanically obstructed ETs were contraindicated for tympanoplasty. Therefore, assessment of mastoid condition is important as well as the ET function before tympanoplasty.

  1. Comparison of glucose concentrations in blood samples obtained with a marginal ear vein nick technique versus from a peripheral vein in healthy cats and cats with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Melanie D; Taylor, Susan M; Adams, Vicki J; Waldner, Cheryl L; Feldman, Edward C

    2002-08-01

    To compare blood glucose (BG) concentrations measured with a portable blood glucose meter in blood samples obtained with a marginal ear vein (MEV) nick technique, from a peripheral venous catheter, and by direct venipuncture in healthy cats and cats with diabetes mellitus. Prospective study. 1 0 healthy cats and 11 cats with diabetes mellitus. Procedure-On day 1, blood samples were collected every hour for 10 hours by the MEV nick technique and from a peripheral venous catheter. On day 2, blood samples were collected every hour for 10 hours by the MEV nick technique and by direct venipuncture of the medial saphenous vein. For all cats, mean BG concentration for samples collected by the MEV nick technique was not significantly different from mean concentration for samples obtained from the peripheral venous catheter. For healthy cats, mean BG concentration for samples collected by the MEV nick technique was not significantly different from mean concentration for samples obtained by direct venipuncture. For cats with diabetes mellitus, mean BG concentration for samples collected by the MEV nick technique was significantly different from mean concentration for samples obtained by direct venipuncture; however, for the range of concentrations examined, this difference was not clinically important. Results suggest that for the range of concentrations examined, the MEV nick technique is a reasonable alternative to venous blood collection for serial measurement of BG concentrations in cats.

  2. Thyroid hormone receptors control developmental maturation of the middle ear and the size of the ossicular bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordas, Emily A; Ng, Lily; Hernandez, Arturo; Kaneshige, Masahiro; Cheng, Sheue-Yann; Forrest, Douglas

    2012-03-01

    Thyroid hormone is critical for auditory development and has well-known actions in the inner ear. However, less is known of thyroid hormone functions in the middle ear, which contains the ossicles (malleus, incus, stapes) that relay mechanical sound vibrations from the outer ear to the inner ear. During the later stages of middle ear development, prior to the onset of hearing, middle ear cavitation occurs, involving clearance of mesenchyme from the middle ear cavity while the immature cartilaginous ossicles attain appropriate size and ossify. Using in situ hybridization, we detected expression of Thra and Thrb genes encoding thyroid hormone receptors α1 and β (TRα1 and TRβ, respectively) in the immature ossicles, surrounding mesenchyme and tympanic membrane in the mouse. Thra(+/PV) mice that express a dominant-negative TRα1 protein exhibited deafness with elevated auditory thresholds and a range of middle ear abnormalities including chronic persistence of mesenchyme in the middle ear into adulthood, markedly enlarged ossicles, and delayed ossification of the ossicles. Congenitally hypothyroid Tshr(-/-) mice and TR-deficient Thra1(-/-);Thrb(-/-) mice displayed similar abnormalities. These findings demonstrate that middle ear maturation is TR dependent and suggest that the middle ear is a sensitive target for thyroid hormone in development.

  3. A formal description of middle ear pressure-regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, William J

    2017-10-01

    Middle ear (ME) pressure-regulation (MEPR) is a homeostatic mechanism that maintains the ME-environment pressure-gradient (MEEPG) within a range optimized for "normal" hearing. Describe MEPR using equations applicable to passive, inter-compartmental gas-exchange and determine if the predictions of that description include the increasing ME pressure observed under certain conditions and interpreted by some as evidencing gas-production by the ME mucosa. MEPR was modeled as the combined effect of passive gas-exchanges between the ME and: perilymph via the round window membrane, the ambient environment via the tympanic membrane, and the local blood via the ME mucosa and of gas flow between the ME and nasopharynx during Eustachian tube openings. The first 3 of these exchanges are described at the species level using the Fick's diffusion equation and the last as a bulk gas transfer governed by Poiseuille's equation. The model structure is a time-iteration of the equation: P ME g(t=(i+1)Δt)  = ∑ s (P ME s(t=iΔt) +(1/(β ME s V ME )∑ P (Қ P s (P C s(t=(iΔt) -P ME s(t=(iΔt) )). There, P ME g(t=iΔt) and P ME s(t=iΔt) are the ME total and species-pressures at the indexed times, P C s(t=iΔt) is the species-pressure for each exchange-compartment, β ME s V ME is the product of the ME species-capacitance and volume, Қ P s is the pathway species-conductance, and ∑ S and ∑ P are operators for summing the expression over all species or exchange pathways. When calibrated to known values, the model predicts the empirically measured ME species-pressures and the observed time-trajectories for total ME pressure and the MEEPG under a wide variety of physiologic, pathologic and non-physiologic conditions. Passive inter-compartmental gas exchange is sole and sufficient to describe MEPR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Erosion of the incus by the chorda tympani nerve in a normally ventilated middle ear and its implications during stapedotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Lemieux-Martel

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A case is reported showing partial erosion of the incus long process by the chorda tympani nerve in a normally ventilated middle ear: type A tympanogram, no tympanic membrane retraction, normal middle ear mucosa. A patient with no history of middle ear disease was diagnosed with left otosclerosis. After failed attempt with conservative treatment, she underwent elective stapedotomy. Intraoperatively, a deep groove in the incus long process was found upon mobilization of the chorda tympani without any sign of middle ear inflammation or other ossicular erosion. The tympanic membrane was also normal. Review of the current literature shows cases of incus erosion by the chorda tympani nerve associated with eustachian tube dysfunction resulting in middle ear disease and tympanic membrane retraction. Our findings are unique because unlike previously reported cases, our patient had no history or signs of chronic middle ear disease. Implications of this abnormality on stapedotomy completion are discussed.

  5. Outer- and middle-ear contributions to presbycusis in the Brown Norway rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratton, Michael Anne; Bateman, Kristin; Cannuscio, Joseph F; Saunders, James C

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the contribution of the outer and middle ears to the hearing loss associated with presbycusis in Brown Norway rats. Animals were formed into two groups; young adults (2-3 months old) and aged animals (approximately 34 months old). Auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds were obtained with the outer ear intact or surgically removed. Tympanic membrane (TM) velocity transfer functions were measured from the umbo with the outer ear removed. The length of the auditory meatus, TM surface area, and TM thickness were quantified. The ABR thresholds were 17-26 dB less sensitive in the aged animals between 8.0 and 40.0 kHz when the outer ear was intact. A significant and reliable reduction in the aged rat velocity transfer function of 5-8 dB occurred between 10.0 and 32.0 kHz, while the low frequency velocity response was only a few decibels greater in the younger animals. The ABR threshold differences between young adult and aged ears were compensated by removing the outer/middle ear effects of aging to reveal a purely sensorineural component of presbycusis. The outer and middle ear effects were calculated directly when the ABR and TM velocity data were obtained with the outer ear removed. The outer ear intact condition was modeled in order to compare the ABR data obtained with the outer ear intact with the TM velocity data obtained with the outer removed. With either procedure, removal of the age-related contributions of the outer and middle ear to the ABR threshold resulted in similar age-related ABR threshold shifts between the two age groups. The pure sensorineural threshold shift component of the ABR response was restricted to frequencies between 5.0 and 20.0 kHz and reached a maximum of approximately 15 dB. These results support the conclusion that there is an outer- and middle-ear contribution to the threshold loss defining presbycusis. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Noninvasive in vivo optical detection of biofilm in the human middle ear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Woonggyu; Kim, Jeehyun; Chaney, Eric J.; Novak, Michael; Stewart, Charles N.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2012-01-01

    Otitis media (OM), a middle-ear infection, is the most common childhood illness treated by pediatricians. If inadequately treated, OM can result in long-term chronic problems persisting into adulthood. Children with chronic OM or recurrent OM often have conductive hearing loss and communication difficulties and require surgical treatment. Tympanostomy tube insertion, the placement of a small drainage tube in the tympanic membrane (TM), is the most common surgical procedure performed in children under general anesthesia. Recent clinical studies have shown evidence of a direct correspondence between chronic OM and the presence of a bacterial biofilm within the middle ear. Biofilms are typically very thin and cannot be recognized using a regular otoscope. Here we report the use of optical coherent ranging techniques to noninvasively assess the middle ear to detect and quantify biofilm microstructure. This study involves adults with chronic OM, which is generally accepted as a biofilm-related disease. Based on more than 18,537 optical ranging scans and 742 images from 13 clinically infected patients and 7 normal controls using clinical findings as the gold standard, all middle ears with chronic OM showed evidence of biofilms, and all normal ears did not. Information on the presence of a biofilm, along with its structure and response to antibiotic treatment, will not only provide a better fundamental understanding of biofilm formation, growth, and eradication in the middle ear, but also may provide much-needed quantifiable data to enable early detection and quantitative longitudinal treatment monitoring of middle-ear biofilms responsible for chronic OM. PMID:22645342

  7. Penicillin treatment accelerates middle ear inflammation in experimental pneumococcal otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawana, M; Kawana, C; Giebink, G S

    1992-01-01

    Most Streptococcus pneumoniae strains are killed by very low concentrations of penicillin and other beta-lactam antibiotics, yet middle ear inflammation and effusion persist for days to weeks after treatment in most cases of pneumococcal otitis media. To study the effect of beta-lactam antibiotic treatment on pneumococci and the middle ear inflammatory response during pneumococcal otitis media, we measured concentrations of pneumococci, inflammatory cells, and lysozyme in middle ear fluid (MEF) by using the chinchilla model. Procaine penicillin G given intramuscularly 12 and 36 h after inoculation of pneumococci into the middle ear caused a significant acceleration in the MEF inflammatory cell concentration compared with that in untreated controls, with a significant peak in the inflammatory cell concentration 24 h after pneumococcal inoculation. The lysozyme concentration in MEF also increased more rapidly in treated than in control animals. Viable pneumococci were not detected in MEF after the second dose of penicillin, but the total pneumococcal cell concentration remained unchanged for at least 45 days. Therefore, penicillin treatment accelerated middle ear inflammation while killing pneumococci, but treatment did not accelerate clearance of the nonviable pneumococcal cells from MEF. Further studies will need to define the contribution of these responses to acute and chronic tissue injury. PMID:1563782

  8. Middle Ear Fluid Cytokine and Inflammatory Cell Kinetics in the Chinchilla Otitis Media Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Katsuro; Liebeler, Carol L.; Quartey, Moses K.; Le, Chap T.; Giebink, G. Scott

    1999-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most frequent microbe causing middle ear infection. The pathophysiology of pneumococcal otitis media has been characterized by measurement of local inflammatory mediators such as inflammatory cells, lysozyme, oxidative metabolic products, and inflammatory cytokines. The role of cytokines in bacterial infection has been elucidated with animal models, and interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) are recognized as being important local mediators in acute inflammation. We characterized middle ear inflammatory responses in the chinchilla otitis media model after injecting a very small number of viable pneumococci into the middle ear, similar to the natural course of infection. Middle ear fluid (MEF) concentrations of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α were measured by using anti-human cytokine enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay reagents. IL-1β showed the earliest peak, at 6 h after inoculation, whereas IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α concentrations were increasing 72 h after pneumococcal inoculation. IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α but not IL-1β concentrations correlated significantly with total inflammatory cell numbers in MEF, and all four cytokines correlated significantly with MEF neutrophil concentration. Several intercytokine correlations were significant. Cytokines, therefore, participate in the early middle ear inflammatory response to S. pneumoniae. PMID:10085040

  9. Activation of NLRP3 inflammasome in human middle ear cholesteatoma and chronic otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariya, Shin; Okano, Mitsuhiro; Zhao, Pengfei; Kataoka, Yuko; Yoshinobu, Junko; Maeda, Yukihide; Ishihara, Hisashi; Higaki, Takaya; Nishizaki, Kazunori

    2016-01-01

    The nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome plays an important role in the pathogenesis of middle ear diseases. Modulation of inflammasome-mediated inflammation may be a novel therapeutic strategy for cholesteatoma and chronic otitis media. NLRP3 inflammasome is a critical molecule mediating interleukin (IL)-1β responses. However, the expression of NLRP3 in the pathogenesis of cholesteatoma and chronic otitis media has not been fully examined. This study sought to assess the expression of NLRP3, ASC (apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain and a pyrin domain), and caspase-1 in middle ear tissues in patients with cholesteatoma or chronic otitis media. Middle ear tissue samples were obtained from patients with cholesteatoma or chronic otitis media. Control middle ear samples were collected during cochlear implant surgery of patients without middle ear inflammation. The expression of NLRP3, ASC, and caspase-1 were examined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay and immunohistochemical study. The levels of mRNA of NLRP3, ASC, and caspase-1 were significantly elevated in cholesteatoma and chronic otitis media as compared with that of normal controls. The proteins of NLRP3, ASC, and caspase-1 were observed in infiltrating inflammatory cells in cholesteatoma and chronic otitis media.

  10. Multiwavelength fluorescence otoscope for video-rate chemical imaging of middle ear pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Tulio A; Pandey, Rishikesh; Spegazzini, Nicolas; Longo, Kaitlyn; Roehm, Corrie; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Barman, Ishan

    2014-10-21

    A common motif in otolaryngology is the lack of certainty regarding diagnosis for middle ear conditions, resulting in many patients being overtreated under the worst-case assumption. Although pneumatic otoscopy and adjunctive tests offer additional information, white light otoscopy has been the main tool for diagnosis of external auditory canal and middle ear pathologies for over a century. In middle ear pathologies, the inability to avail high-resolution structural and/or molecular imaging is particularly glaring, leading to a complicated and erratic decision analysis. Here, we propose a novel multiwavelength fluorescence-based video-rate imaging strategy that combines readily available optical elements and software components to create a novel otoscopic device. This modified otoscope enables low-cost, detailed and objective diagnosis of common middle ear pathological conditions. Using the detection of congenital cholesteatoma as a specific example, we demonstrate the feasibility of fluorescence imaging to differentiate this proliferative lesion from uninvolved middle ear tissue based on the characteristic autofluorescence signals. Availability of real-time, wide-field chemical information should enable more complete removal of cholesteatoma, allowing for better hearing preservation and substantially reducing the well-documented risks, costs and psychological effects of repeated surgical procedures.

  11. High-resolution computed tomography of cholesteatoma of the middle ear. CT, otological, and surgical correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, Kiyoshi; Fukusumi, Akio; Okudera, Toshio; Kato, Toshihiko; Soda, Toyoji

    1988-08-01

    The high-resolution computed tomography (CT) appearances of 72 consecutive cases (92 ears) of chronic otomastoiditis were reviewed. The cholesteatomas were verified surgically and/or otologically in 35 of these 92 ears. Discussion was made with special emphasis on the differential diagnosis of cholesteatoma of the middle ear from the non-cholesteatoma otitis media. The CT findings suggestive of cholesteatoma were as follows: the definitive findings was of a soft-tissue opacity filling Purssak's space, with a medial displacement of the malleus and the incus; the possible findings were 1) a bony erosion of the wall of the middle ear cavity, 2) a partial or complete disappearance of the malleus and/or the incus, and 3) an opacification of Purssak's space and the superomedial aspect of the external auditory meatus.

  12. An ossified Meckel's cartilage in two Cretaceous mammals and origin of the mammalian middle ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Hu, Y; Meng, J; Li, C

    2001-10-12

    An ossified Meckel's cartilage has been recovered from two early Cretaceous mammals from China. This element is similar to Meckel's cartilage in prenatal and some postnatal extant mammals and indicates the relationship of Meckel's cartilage with the middle ear in early mammals. The evidence shows that brain expansion may not be the initial factor that caused the separation of postdentary bones from the dentary as middle ear ossicles during mammalian evolution. The failure of the dentary to seize reduced postdentary elements during ontogeny of early mammals is postulated as an alternative mechanism for the separation. Modifications of both feeding and hearing apparatuses in early mammals may have led to the development of the definitive mammalian middle ear.

  13. First Branchial Cleft Fistula Associated with External Auditory Canal Stenosis and Middle Ear Cholesteatoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    shahin abdollahi fakhim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: First branchial cleft anomalies manifest with duplication of the external auditory canal.   Case Report: This report features a rare case of microtia and congenital middle ear and canal cholesteatoma with first branchial fistula. External auditory canal stenosis was complicated by middle ear and external canal cholesteatoma, but branchial fistula, opening in the zygomatic root and a sinus in the helical root, may explain this feature. A canal wall down mastoidectomy with canaloplasty and wide meatoplasty was performed. The branchial cleft was excised through parotidectomy and facial nerve dissection.   Conclusion:  It should be considered that canal stenosis in such cases can induce cholesteatoma formation in the auditory canal and middle ear.

  14. Vibration of middle ear with shape memory prosthesis - Experimental and numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafal, Rusinek; Szymanski, Marcin; Lajmert, Pawel

    2018-01-01

    The paper presents experimental investigations of ossicular chain vibrations using a Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) for the intact middle ear and a reconstructed one by means of the new designed shape memory prosthesis. Vibrations of the round window are measured with the Laser Doppler vibrometer and studied classically by the transfer function analysis. Moreover, the recurrence plot technique and the Hilbert vibration decomposition method are used to extend the classical analysis. The new methods show additional vibrations components and provide more information about middle ear behaviour.

  15. Design, Kinematic Optimization, and Evaluation of a Teleoperated System for Middle Ear Microsurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Miroir

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Middle ear surgery involves the smallest and the most fragile bones of the human body. Since microsurgical gestures and a submillimetric precision are required in these procedures, the outcome can be potentially improved by robotic assistance. Today, there is no commercially available device in this field. Here, we describe a method to design a teleoperated assistance robotic system dedicated to the middle ear surgery. Determination of design specifications, the kinematic structure, and its optimization are detailed. The robot-surgeon interface and the command modes are provided. Finally, the system is evaluated by realistic tasks in experimental dedicated settings and in human temporal bone specimens.

  16. Capillary blood sampling from the ear of dogs and cats and use of portable meters to measure glucose concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wess, G; Reusch, C

    2000-02-01

    Two new methods for collection of capillary blood from the ear of dogs and cats for the measurement of blood glucose concentration using portable blood glucose meters (PBGMs) are described. The first method uses a lancing device after pre-warming the ear, while the second employs a vacuum lancing device. Both methods generated blood drops of adequate size, although the latter method was faster and easier to perform. Accuracy of the two PBGMs was evaluated clinically and statistically. Although assessment of statistical accuracy revealed differences between the PBGMs and the reference method, all of the PBGM readings were within clinically acceptable ranges. Measurement of capillary blood glucose concentration is easy to perform, inexpensive and fast. It may be used by owners to determine blood glucose concentrations at home, and could serve as a new tool for monitoring diabetic dogs and cats.

  17. Forward and reverse transfer functions of the middle ear based on pressure and velocity DPOAEs with implications for differential hearing diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalhoff, Ernst; Turcanu, Diana; Gummer, Anthony W

    2011-10-01

    Recently it was shown that distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) can be measured as vibration of the human tympanic membrane in vivo, and proposed to use these vibration DPOAEs to support a differential diagnosis of middle-ear and cochlear pathologies. Here, we investigate how the reverse transfer function (r-TF), defined as the ratio of DPOAE-velocity of the umbo to DPOAE-pressure in the ear canal, can be used to diagnose the state of the middle ear. Anaesthetized guinea pigs served as the experimental animal. Sound was delivered free-field and the vibration of the umbo measured with a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV). Sound pressure was measured 2-3 mm from the tympanic membrane with a probe-tube microphone. The forward transfer function (f-TF) of umbo velocity relative to ear-canal pressure was obtained by stimulating with multi-tone pressure. The r-TF was assembled from DPOAE components generated in response to acoustic stimulation with two stimulus tones of frequencies f(1) and f(2); f(2)/f(1) was constant at 1.2. The r-TF was plotted as function of DPOAE frequencies; they ranged from 1.7 kHz to 23 kHz. The r-TF showed a characteristic shape with an anti-resonance around 8 kHz as its most salient feature. The data were interpreted with the aid of a middle-ear transmission-line model taken from the literature for the cat and adapted to the guinea pig. Parameters were estimated with a three-step fitting algorithm. Importantly, the r-TF is governed by only half of the 15 independent, free parameters of the model. The parameters estimated from the r-TF were used to estimate the other half of the parameters from the f-TF. The use of r-TF data - in addition to f-TF data - allowed robust estimates of the middle-ear parameters to be obtained. The results highlight the potential of using vibration DPOAEs for ascertaining the functionality of the middle ear and, therefore, for supporting a differential diagnosis of middle-ear and cochlear pathologies

  18. A 3D-printed functioning anatomical human middle ear model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuru, Ismail; Maier, Hannes; Müller, Mathias; Lenarz, Thomas; Lueth, Tim C

    2016-10-01

    The middle ear is a sophisticated and complex structure with a variety of functions, yet a delicate organ prone to injuries due to various reasons. Both, understanding and reconstructing its functions has always been an important topic for researchers from medical and technical background. Currently, human temporal bones are generally used as model for tests, experiments and validation of the numerical results. However, fresh human preparations are not always easily accessible and their mechanical properties vary with time and between individuals. Therefore we have built an anatomically based and functional middle ear model to serve as a reproducible test environment. Our middle ear model was manufactured with the aid of 3D-printing technology. We have segmented the essential functional elements from micro computed tomography data (μCT) of a single temporal bone. The ossicles were 3D-printed by selective laser melting (SLM) and the soft tissues were casted with silicone rubber into 3D-printed molds. The ear canal, the tympanic cavity and the inner ear were artificially designed, but their design ensured the anatomically correct position of the tympanic membrane, ossicular ligaments and the oval window. For the determination of their auditory properties we have conducted two kinds of tests: measurement of the stapes footplate response to sound and tympanometry of the model. Our experiments regarding the sound transmission showed that the model has a similar behavior to a human middle ear. The transfer function has a resonance frequency at around 1 kHz, the stapes' response is almost constant for frequencies below the resonance and a roll-off is observed above the resonance. The tympanometry results show that the compliance of the middle ear model is similar to the compliance of a healthy human middle ear. We also present that we were able to manipulate the transmission behavior, so that healthy or pathological scenarios can be created. For this purpose we have

  19. Medicinal plant treatments for fleas and ear problems of cats and dogs in British Columbia, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lans, Cheryl; Turner, Nancy; Khan, Tonya

    2008-09-01

    Research conducted in 2003/2004 documented and validated (in a non-experimental way) ethnoveterinary medicines used by small-scale, organic livestock farmers in British Columbia (BC), Canada. Interviews were conducted with 60 participants who were organic farmers or holistic medicinal/veterinary practitioners. A workshop was held with selected participants to discuss the plant-based treatments. This paper reports on the medicinal plants used for fleas in cats and dogs. Fleas and flies are treated with Artemisia vulgaris L. (Asteraceae), Citrus x limon (L.), Juniperus communis L. var. depressa Pursh. (Cupressaceae), Lavandula officinalis L. (Labiatae), Melissa officinalis L. (Lamiaceae), and Thuja plicata Donn ex D. Don (Cupressaceae). All of the plants used have insecticidal activity. Ear problems are treated with Achillea millefolium L., Calendula officinalis L., and Helichrysum angustifolium (Roth.) G. Don. (Asteraceae), Allium sativum L. (Alliaceae), Berberis aquifolium Pursh./Mahonia aquifolium (Berberidaceae), Glycyrrhiza glabra L. (Fabaceae), Lobelia inflata L. (Campanulaceae), Matricaria recutita L., Melaleuca alternifolia L. (Myrtaceae), Origanum vulgare L. (Labiatae), Ricinus communis L. (Euphorbiaceae), Syzygium aromaticum (L.) Merr. & L. M. Perry (Myrtaceae), Thymus vulgaris L. (Lamiaceae), and Verbascum thapsus L. (Scrophulariaceae).

  20. Middle ear impedance studies in elderly patients implications on age-related hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olusola Ayodele Sogebi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Controversies arise with respect to functioning of the middle ear over time.OBJECTIVE: To assess changes in middle ear impedance that may be related to aging, and/or if there was an association of these changes with those of the inner ear in the elderly patients.METHODS: Cross-sectional, comparative study of elderly patients managed in ear, nose and throat clinics. A structured questionnaire was administered to obtain clinical information. Pure tone audiometry, tympanometry, and acoustic reflexes were performed. Comparative analyses were performed to detect intergroup differences between clinico-audiometric findings and middle ear measures, viz. tympanograms and acoustic reflexes.RESULTS: One hundred and three elderly patients participated in the study; 52.4% were male, averagely 70.0 ± 6.3 years old, age-related hearing loss in 59.2%, abnormal tympanograms in 39.3%, absent acoustic reflex in 37.9%. There was no association between age and gender in patients with abnormal tympanograms and absent acoustic reflex. Significantly more patients with different forms and grades of age-related hearing loss had abnormal tympanometry and absent acoustic reflex.CONCLUSION: Some abnormalities were observed in the impedance audiometric measures of elderly patients, which were significantly associated with parameters connected to age-related hearing loss.

  1. Middle ear impedance studies in elderly patients implications on age-related hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogebi, Olusola Ayodele

    2015-01-01

    Controversies arise with respect to functioning of the middle ear over time. To assess changes in middle ear impedance that may be related to aging, and/or if there was an association of these changes with those of the inner ear in the elderly patients. Cross-sectional, comparative study of elderly patients managed in ear, nose and throat clinics. A structured questionnaire was administered to obtain clinical information. Pure tone audiometry, tympanometry, and acoustic reflexes were performed. Comparative analyses were performed to detect intergroup differences between clinico-audiometric findings and middle ear measures, viz. tympanograms and acoustic reflexes. One hundred and three elderly patients participated in the study; 52.4% were male, averagely 70.0±6.3 years old, age-related hearing loss in 59.2%, abnormal tympanograms in 39.3%, absent acoustic reflex in 37.9%. There was no association between age and gender in patients with abnormal tympanograms and absent acoustic reflex. Significantly more patients with different forms and grades of age-related hearing loss had abnormal tympanometry and absent acoustic reflex. Some abnormalities were observed in the impedance audiometric measures of elderly patients, which were significantly associated with parameters connected to age-related hearing loss. Copyright © 2014 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of pathologic conditions of the middle ear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maroldi, R.; Farina, D.; Palvarini, L.; Marconi, A.; Gadola, E.; Menni, K.; Battaglia, G.

    2001-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is an excellent technique for demonstrating even small abnormalities of the thin and complex bony structures of the middle ear. For this reason, it is the modality of choice in the study of conductive hearing loss (CHL). However, not every patient complaining of CHL requires a CT study. In fact, established indications encompass complex conditions, such as the complications of acute and chronic otomastoiditis, the postoperative ear in chronic otomastoiditis or in the localization of prosthetic devices, and the assessment of congenital or vascular anomalies. Particularly, the precise extent of bone erosion associated with cholesteatoma is correctly demonstrated by high resolution CT. Conversely, although fistulization through the tegmen tympani or the posterior wall of temporal bone is usually detectable by CT, the actual involvement of meninges and veins are better assessed by magnetic resonance (MR). MR is also indicated when complicated inflammatory lesions are suspected to extend into the inner ear or towards the sigmoid sinus or jugular vein. Neoplasms arising from or extending into the middle ear require the use of both techniques as their combined data provide essential information. Most important data for surgical planning concern the destruction of thin bony structures and the relationships of the lesion with the dura and surrounding vessels. DSA and interventional vascular techniques maintain an essential role in the presurgical work-up and embolization of paragangliomas extended into the middle ear

  3. In vivo imaging of middle-ear and inner-ear microstructures of a mouse guided by SD-OCT combined with a surgical microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Nam Hyun; Jang, Jeong Hun; Jung, Woonggyu; Kim, Jeehyun

    2014-01-01

    We developed an augmented-reality system that combines optical coherence tomography (OCT) with a surgical microscope. By sharing the common optical path in the microscope and OCT, we could simultaneously acquire OCT and microscope views. The system was tested to identify the middle-ear and inner-ear microstructures of a mouse. Considering the probability of clinical application including otorhinolaryngology, diseases such as middle-ear effusion were visualized using in vivo mouse and OCT images simultaneously acquired through the eyepiece of the surgical microscope during surgical manipulation using the proposed system. This system is expected to realize a new practical area of OCT application. PMID:24787787

  4. Optical coherence tomography system requirements for clinical diagnostic middle ear imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDougall, Dan; Rainsbury, James; Brown, Jeremy; Bance, Manohar; Adamson, Robert

    2015-05-01

    Noninvasive middle ear imaging using optical coherence tomography (OCT) presents some unique challenges for real-time, clinical use in humans. We present results from a two-dimensional/three-dimensional OCT system built to assess the imaging requirements of clinical middle ear imaging, and the technical challenges associated with them. These include the need to work at a low numerical aperture, the deleterious effects of transtympanic imaging on image quality at the ossicles, sensitivity requirements for clinical fidelity of images at real-time rates, and the high dynamic-range requirements of the ear. We validated the system by imaging cadaveric specimens with simulated disorders to show the clinical applicability of the images. We also provide additional insight into the likely role of OCT in clinical otology.

  5. Middle ear injury in animals exposed to complex blast waves inside an armored vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Y Y; Mundie, T G; Hoyt, R; Dodd, K T

    1989-05-01

    With greater reliance on armored vehicles of improved survivability, questions have arisen about the likelihood of the wounding of vehicle occupants from blast waves alone. In this study, we placed anesthetized animals (sheep or pigs) inside lightly armored vehicles and exposed them to the blast waves generated by one of three sizes of shaped-charge munitions. Sixty-seven animals were exposed and 15 served as controls. No difference was noted between exposed and control groups for blast injury to the respiratory or gastrointestinal tracts. In contrast, middle ear damage was observed exclusively in animals exposed to blast and was correlated strongly with the peak pressure. The ear is the organ most sensitive to blast damage, and if protectors are not used, military physicians can expect to see a high incidence of middle ear injury in modern combat. The operational consequences of such an injury are not known.

  6. Age and Gender Effects on Wideband Absorbance in Adults with Normal Outer and Middle Ear Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazlan, Rafidah; Kei, Joseph; Ya, Cheng Li; Yusof, Wan Nur Hanim Mohd; Saim, Lokman; Zhao, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the effects of age and gender on wideband energy absorbance in adults with normal middle ear function. Method: Forty young adults (14 men, 26 women, aged 20-38 years), 31 middle-aged adults (16 men, 15 women, aged 42-64 years), and 30 older adults (20 men, 10 women, aged 65-82 years) were assessed. Energy absorbance…

  7. Anomalous vessel in the middle ear: the role of CT and MR angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldas, J.G.M.P.; Iffenecker, C.; Lasjaunias, P.; Doyon, D.; Attal, P.

    1998-01-01

    An 8-year-old child was examined because of conductive hearing loss with a retrotympanic mass on otoscopy. CT and MR angiography showed a large inferior tympanic artery traversing the hypotympanum and joining a thin, irregular internal carotid artery with a normal middle meningeal artery. These investigations, coupled with knowledge of the embryological development allowed a diagnosis of a complex vascular anomaly in the middle ear and avoided potential surgical complications. (orig.)

  8. Clinical investigation of flat panel CT following middle ear reconstruction: a study of 107 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaoui, K. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Ruprecht Karls University, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Heidelberg (Germany); Kromeier, J. [St. Josefs Hospital, RkK, Department of Radiology, Freiburg (Germany); Neudert, M.; Beleites, T.; Zahnert, T. [University Hospital Dresden, Technical University, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Dresden (Germany); Laszig, R.; Offergeld, C. [University Hospital Freiburg, Albert Ludwigs University, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Freiburg (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    After middle ear reconstruction using partial or total ossicular replacement prostheses (PORP/TORP), an air-bone gap (ABG) may persist because of prosthesis displacement or malposition. So far, CT of the temporal bone has played the main role in the diagnosis of reasons for postoperative insufficient ABG improvement. Recent experimental and clinical studies have evaluated flat panel CT (fpCT) as an alternative imaging technique that provides images with high isovolumetric resolution, fewer metal-induced artefacts and lower irradiation doses. One hundred and seven consecutive patients with chronic otitis media with or without cholesteatoma underwent reconstruction by PORP (n = 52) or TORP (n = 55). All subjects underwent preoperative and postoperative audiometric testing and postoperative fpCT. Statistical evaluation of all 107 patients as well as the sole sub-assembly groups (PORP or TORP) showed a highly significant correlation between hearing improvement and fpCT-determined prosthesis position. FpCT enables detailed postoperative information on patients with middle ear reconstruction. FpCT is a new imaging technique that provides immediate feedback on surgical results after reconstructive middle ear surgery. Specific parameters evaluated by fpCT may serve as a predictive tool for estimated postoperative hearing improvement. Therefore this imaging technique is suitable for postoperative quality control in reconstructive middle ear surgery. (orig.)

  9. Pattern of bacterial isolates in the middle ear discharge of patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the commonest middle ear pathogenic organism identified and the sensitivity pattern highly favoured ciprofloxacin Conclusion: CSOM is still a childhood problem among the under tens' more prevalent among males and the commonest agent is Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Ciprofloxacin is still ...

  10. Modelling of shape memory alloy oscillator and its application to middle ear structural reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusinek, Rafal; Rekas, Joanna

    2018-01-01

    The paper presents numerical research of a reconstructed middle ear system using the element made of shape memory alloy. The material is modelled based on a hysteretic nonlinear theory where strain rate is taken into account. Bifurcation analysis of the system reveals different kinds of solutions starting from regular and ending with chaotic vibrations depending on external excitation.

  11. Clinical investigation of flat panel CT following middle ear reconstruction: a study of 107 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaoui, K.; Kromeier, J.; Neudert, M.; Beleites, T.; Zahnert, T.; Laszig, R.; Offergeld, C.

    2014-01-01

    After middle ear reconstruction using partial or total ossicular replacement prostheses (PORP/TORP), an air-bone gap (ABG) may persist because of prosthesis displacement or malposition. So far, CT of the temporal bone has played the main role in the diagnosis of reasons for postoperative insufficient ABG improvement. Recent experimental and clinical studies have evaluated flat panel CT (fpCT) as an alternative imaging technique that provides images with high isovolumetric resolution, fewer metal-induced artefacts and lower irradiation doses. One hundred and seven consecutive patients with chronic otitis media with or without cholesteatoma underwent reconstruction by PORP (n = 52) or TORP (n = 55). All subjects underwent preoperative and postoperative audiometric testing and postoperative fpCT. Statistical evaluation of all 107 patients as well as the sole sub-assembly groups (PORP or TORP) showed a highly significant correlation between hearing improvement and fpCT-determined prosthesis position. FpCT enables detailed postoperative information on patients with middle ear reconstruction. FpCT is a new imaging technique that provides immediate feedback on surgical results after reconstructive middle ear surgery. Specific parameters evaluated by fpCT may serve as a predictive tool for estimated postoperative hearing improvement. Therefore this imaging technique is suitable for postoperative quality control in reconstructive middle ear surgery. (orig.)

  12. Defects in middle ear cavitation cause conductive hearing loss in the Tcof1 mutant mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Carol A; Amin, Susan; Linden, Jennifer; Dixon, Jill; Dixon, Michael J; Tucker, Abigail S

    2010-04-15

    Conductive hearing loss (CHL) is one of the most common forms of human deafness. Despite this observation, a surprising gap in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying CHL remains, particularly with respect to the molecular mechanisms underlying middle ear development and disease. Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder of facial development that results from mutations in the gene TCOF1. CHL is a common feature of TCS but the causes of the hearing defect have not been studied. In this study, we have utilized Tcof1 mutant mice to dissect the developmental mechanisms underlying CHL. Our results demonstrate that effective cavitation of the middle ear is intimately linked to growth of the auditory bulla, the neural crest cell-derived structure that encapsulates all middle ear components, and that defects in these processes have a profoundly detrimental effect on hearing. This research provides important insights into a poorly characterized cause of human deafness, and provides the first mouse model for the study of middle ear cavity defects, while also being of direct relevance to a human genetic disorder.

  13. Squamous cell carcinoma of the middle ear arising from CSOM: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S R Davanageri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma occurring in a background of chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM is a rare complication. It runs an aggressive course. Hence early identification is significant to prevent disease progression and to improve the survival rate. Subjecting granulation tissue from middle ear for histopathologic examination is of importance to rule out associated malignant change.

  14. Safety of labetalol-induced controlled hypotension during middle ear microsurgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hert, S.; Boeckx, E.; Vercauteren, M.; Claes, J.; van den Heyning, P.; Adriaensen, H.

    1989-01-01

    In order to study the influence of labetalol on the peroperative oxygenation during deliberate hypotension, 50 patients undergoing middle ear microsurgery were randomly divided in two groups of 25 patients; one group receiving labetalol to induce hypotension, the other group receiving placebo in a

  15. Evaluation of bacteriology of middle ear in early quiescent stage of chronic otitis media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Bhandari

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The objectives of this study were to determine whether any organism does exist in middle ear cavity during the early quiescent stage of chronic otitis media and to isolate their types. Materials and methods Forty-seven patients of age 13 years and above with diagnosis of chronic otitis media mucosal type in early quiescent stage were included. Swab was collected from middle ear cavity for culture and sensitivity in operation theatre prior to middle ear surgery and brought to microbiology laboratory within half an hour to inoculate in Blood agar, Chocolate agar and Mac Conkey agar. The isolates were identified with the use of standard bacteriological technique. Results Aerobic bacteria were isolated from 15 cases (31.9%. Staphylococcus aureus isolated in 12(80%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa in 2(13.3% and E. coli in 1(6.7%. Conclusion Aerobic bacteria were isolated from middle ear cavity in quiescent stage of chronic otitis media in 15(32% cases. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common organism. Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2012, Vol-8, No-4, 22-26 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v8i4.8696

  16. SuperSILAC Quantitative Proteome Profiling of Murine Middle Ear Epithelial Cell Remodeling with NTHi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Val, Stéphanie; Burgett, Katelyn; Brown, Kristy J; Preciado, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Chronic Otitis Media with effusion (COME) develops after sustained inflammation and is characterized by secretory middle ear epithelial metaplasia and effusion, most frequently mucoid. Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), the most common acute Otitis Media (OM) pathogen, is postulated to promote middle ear epithelial remodeling in the progression of OM from acute to chronic. The goals of this study were to examine histopathological and quantitative proteomic epithelial effects of NTHi challenge in a murine middle ear epithelial cell line. NTHi lysates were generated and used to stimulate murine epithelial cells (mMEEC) cultured at air-liquid interface over 48 hours- 1 week. Conditional quantitative Stable Isotope Labeling with Amino Acids in Cell Culture (SILAC) of cell lysates was performed to interrogate the global protein production in the cells, using the SuperSILAC technique. Histology of the epithelium over time was done to measure bacterial dependent remodeling. Mass spectrometry analysis identified 2,565 proteins across samples, of which 74 exhibited differential enrichment or depletion in cell lysates (+/-2.0 fold-change; p valuefunctions regulated by NTHi lysates exposure were related to cell proliferation, death, migration, adhesion and inflammation. Finally, chronic exposure induced significant epithelial thickening of cells grown at air liquid interface. NTHi lysates drive pathways responsible of cell remodeling in murine middle ear epithelium which likely contributes to observed epithelial hyperplasia in vitro. Further elucidation of these mediators will be critical in understanding the progression of OM from acute to chronic at the molecular level.

  17. Acoustical transmission-line model of the middle-ear cavities and mastoid air cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Douglas H

    2015-04-01

    An acoustical transmission line model of the middle-ear cavities and mastoid air cell system (MACS) was constructed for the adult human middle ear with normal function. The air-filled cavities comprised the tympanic cavity, aditus, antrum, and MACS. A binary symmetrical airway branching model of the MACS was constructed using an optimization procedure to match the average total volume and surface area of human temporal bones. The acoustical input impedance of the MACS was calculated using a recursive procedure, and used to predict the input impedance of the middle-ear cavities at the location of the tympanic membrane. The model also calculated the ratio of the acoustical pressure in the antrum to the pressure in the middle-ear cavities at the location of the tympanic membrane. The predicted responses were sensitive to the magnitude of the viscothermal losses within the MACS. These predicted input impedance and pressure ratio functions explained the presence of multiple resonances reported in published data, which were not explained by existing MACS models.

  18. The Effects of Age at Cleft Palate Repair on Middle Ear Function and Hearing Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Qun; Zhu, Hongping; Luo, Yi; Zhou, Zhibo; Ma, Lian; Ma, Xiaoran; Fu, Yuan

    2018-05-01

    To investigate the age effects of cleft palate repair on middle ear function and hearing level in patients who underwent cleft palate repair at different ages by audiologic examination. Medical histories were gathered in detail, and audiologic tests (ie, tympanometry and pure tone hearing threshold) were conducted in 126 patients after palatoplasty. The patients were divided into the following 4 groups according to their ages when they underwent cleft palate repair: group I (0-3 years, 73 patients), group II (4-7 years, 29 patients), group III (8-11 years, 16 patients), and group IV (12 years and older, 8 patients). The data regarding tympanograms, hearing levels, and the average hearing thresholds of each group were analyzed using chi-square tests. The prevalence of middle ear dysfunction and hearing loss in the patients who underwent palatoplasty before 3 years old (27.4% and 2.0% respectively) was significantly lower than that in patients who underwent palatopalsty at 12 years or older (75.0% and 43.7%, respectively). Linear-by-linear association revealed that the prevalences of middle ear dysfunction and hearing loss among the 4 groups were significantly different ( P cleft palate repair. From an audiologist's perspective, palatoplasty at an early age is very beneficial in helping children with cleft palates acquire better middle ear function and hearing level.

  19. Panel 2: Anatomy (Eustachian Tube, Middle Ear, and Mastoid-Anatomy, Physiology, Pathophysiology, and Pathogenesis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alper, Cuneyt M; Luntz, Michal; Takahashi, Haruo; Ghadiali, Samir N; Swarts, J Douglas; Teixeira, Miriam S; Csákányi, Zsuzsanna; Yehudai, Noam; Kania, Romain; Poe, Dennis S

    2017-04-01

    Objective In this report, we review the recent literature (ie, past 4 years) to identify advances in our understanding of the middle ear-mastoid-eustachian tube system. We use this review to determine whether the short-term goals elaborated in the last report were achieved, and we propose updated goals to guide future otitis media research. Data Sources PubMed, Web of Science, Medline. Review Methods The panel topic was subdivided, and each contributor performed a literature search within the given time frame. The keywords searched included middle ear, eustachian tube, and mastoid for their intersection with anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, and pathology. Preliminary reports from each panel member were consolidated and discussed when the panel met on June 11, 2015. At that meeting, the progress was evaluated and new short-term goals proposed. Conclusions Progress was made on 13 of the 20 short-term goals proposed in 2011. Significant advances were made in the characterization of middle ear gas exchange pathways, modeling eustachian tube function, and preliminary testing of treatments for eustachian tube dysfunction. Implications for Practice In the future, imaging technologies should be developed to noninvasively assess middle ear/eustachian tube structure and physiology with respect to their role in otitis media pathogenesis. The new data derived from these structure/function experiments should be integrated into computational models that can then be used to develop specific hypotheses concerning otitis media pathogenesis and persistence. Finally, rigorous studies on medical or surgical treatments for eustachian tube dysfunction should be undertaken.

  20. Fetal development of the elastic-fiber-mediated enthesis in the human middle ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takanashi, Yoshitaka; Shibata, Shunichi; Katori, Yukio; Murakami, Gen; Abe, Shinichi; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Jose Francisco; Kawase, Tetsuaki

    2013-10-01

    In the human middle ear, the annular ligament of the incudostapedial joint and the insertions of the tensor tympani and stapedius muscles contain abundant elastic fibers; i.e., the elastic-fiber-mediated entheses. Hyaluronan also coexists with the elastic fibers. In the present study using immunohistochemistry, we demonstrated the distribution of elastin not only in the incudostapedial joint but also in the other two joints of the middle ear in adults and fetuses. In adults, the expression of elastin did not extend out of the annular ligament composed of mature elastic fibers but clearly overlapped with it. Electron microscopic observations of the annular ligament demonstrated a few microfibrils along the elastic fibers. Thus, in contrast to the vocal cord, the middle ear entheses seemed not to contain elaunin and oxytalan fibers. In mid-term fetuses (at approximately 15-16 weeks of gestation) before opening of the external acoustic meatus, the incudostapedial joint showed abundant elastic fibers, but the incudomalleolar and stapediovestibular joints did not. At this stage, hyaluronan was not colocalized, but distributed diffusely in loose mesenchymal tissues surrounding the ear ossicles. Therefore, fetal development of elastin and elastic fibers in the middle ear entheses is unlikely to require acoustic oscillation. In late-stage fetuses (25-30 weeks), whose ear ossicles were almost the same size as those in adults, we observed bundling and branching of elastic fibers. However, hyaluronan expression was not as strong as in adults. Colocalization between elastic fibers and hyaluronan appeared to be a result of postnatal maturation of the entheses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Experimental measurement of tympanic membrane response for finite element model validation of a human middle ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Tae-Soo; Baek, Moo-Jin; Lee, Dooho

    2013-01-01

    The middle ear consists of a tympanic membrane, ligaments, tendons, and three ossicles. An important function of the tympanic membrane is to deliver exterior sound stimulus to the ossicles and inner ear. In this study, the responses of the tympanic membrane in a human ear were measured and compared with those of a finite element model of the middle ear. A laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) was used to measure the dynamic responses of the tympanic membrane, which had the measurement point on the cone of light of the tympanic membrane. The measured subjects were five Korean male adults and a cadaver. The tympanic membranes were stimulated using pure-tone sine waves at 18 center frequencies of one-third octave band over a frequency range of 200 Hz ~10 kHz with 60 and 80 dB sound pressure levels. The measured responses were converted into the umbo displacement transfer function (UDTF) with a linearity assumption. The measured UDTFs were compared with the calculated UDTFs using a finite element model for the Korean human middle ear. The finite element model of the middle ear consists of three ossicles, a tympanic membrane, ligaments, and tendons. In the finite element model, the umbo displacements were calculated under a unit sound pressure on the tympanic membrane. The UDTF of the finite element model exhibited good agreement with that of the experimental one in low frequency range, whereas in higher frequency band, the two response functions deviated from each other, which demonstrates that the finite element model should be updated with more accurate material properties and/or a frequency dependent material model.

  2. A new model for non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae middle ear infection in the Junbo mutant mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek Hood

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute otitis media, inflammation of the middle ear, is the most common bacterial infection in children and, as a consequence, is the most common reason for antimicrobial prescription to this age group. There is currently no effective vaccine for the principal pathogen involved, non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi. The most frequently used and widely accepted experimental animal model of middle ear infection is in chinchillas, but mice and gerbils have also been used. We have established a robust model of middle ear infection by NTHi in the Junbo mouse, a mutant mouse line that spontaneously develops chronic middle ear inflammation in specific pathogen-free conditions. The heterozygote Junbo mouse (Jbo/+ bears a mutation in a gene (Evi1, also known as Mecom that plays a role in host innate immune regulation; pre-existing middle ear inflammation promotes NTHi middle ear infection. A single intranasal inoculation with NTHi produces high rates (up to 90% of middle ear infection and bacterial titres (104-105 colony-forming units/µl in bulla fluids. Bacteria are cleared from the majority of middle ears between day 21 and 35 post-inoculation but remain in approximately 20% of middle ears at least up to day 56 post-infection. The expression of Toll-like receptor-dependent response cytokine genes is elevated in the middle ear of the Jbo/+ mouse following NTHi infection. The translational potential of the Junbo model for studying antimicrobial intervention regimens was shown using a 3 day course of azithromycin to clear NTHi infection, and its potential use in vaccine development studies was shown by demonstrating protection in mice immunized with killed homologous, but not heterologous, NTHi bacteria.

  3. CT and MR imaging after middle ear surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koesling, Sabrina E-mail: sabrina.koesling@medizin.uni-halle.de; Bootz, F

    2001-11-01

    This article describes the current value of imaging in patients after stapes surgery and surgery after chronic otitis media including cholesteatoma. Possibilities and limits of computed tomography (CT) and MRI are described and most important investigation parameters are mentioned. After otosclerosis surgery, CT is the method of first choice in detection of reasons for vertigo and/or recurrent hearing loss in the later postoperative phase. CT may show the position and condition of prosthesis, scarring around the prosthesis and otospongiotic foci. Sometimes, it gives indirect hints for perilymphatic fistulas and incus necrosis. MRI is able to document inner ear complications. CT has a high negative predictive value in cases with a free cavity after mastoidectomy. Localized opacities or total occlusion are difficult to distinguish by CT alone. MRI provides important additional information in the differentiation of cholesterol granuloma, cholesteatoma, effusion, granulation and scar tissue.

  4. The Impact of a Cochlear Implant Electrode Array on the Middle Ear Transfer Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazen, David; Anagiotos, Andreas; Nünning, Maike; Gostian, Antoniu-Oreste; Ortmann, Magdalene; Beutner, Dirk

    As a treatment for partial deafness with residual hearing in the lower frequency range, the combined acoustic and electric stimulation of the cochlea has become widespread. Acoustic stimulation is provided by a hearing aid's airborne sound and the electric stimulation by a cochlear implant electrode array, which may be inserted through the round window or a cochleostomy. To take advantage of that concept, it is essential to preserve residual hearing after surgery. Therefore, the intracochlear electrode array should not compromise the middle ear vibration transmission. This study investigates the influence of different electrode types and insertion paths on the middle ear transfer function and the inner ear fluid dynamics. Sound-induced oval and round window net volume velocities were calculated from vibration measurements with laser vibrometers on six nonfixated human temporal bones. After baseline measurements in the "natural" condition, a cochleostomy was drilled and closed with connective tissue. Then, four different electrode arrays were inserted through the cochleostomy. Afterwards, they were inserted through the round window while the cochleostomy was patched again with connective tissue. After having drilled a cochleostomy and electrode insertion, no systematic trends in the changes of oval and round window volume velocities were observed. Nearly all changes of middle ear transfer functions, as well as oval and round window volume velocity ratios, were statistically insignificant. Intracochlear electrode arrays do not significantly increase cochlear input impedance immediately after insertion. Any changes that may occur seem to be independent of electrode array type and insertion path.

  5. Chorda tympani nerve, may it have a role in stabilizing middle ear pressure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, V; Cappadona, M; Gaffuri, M; Torretta, S; Pignataro, L

    2013-06-01

    The chorda tympani (ChT) is a mixed nerve, branch of the facial nerve, crossing the middle ear and containing the preganglionic parasympathetic axons that innervate the sublingual and submandibular glands. The maintenance of a correct middle ear pressure (MEP) is essential for normal ear functions; its regulation has a sophisticated neural control mainly provided by middle ear receptors (tympanic plexus, TP) and Eustachian tube (ET). The information provided by chemoreceptors and baroreceptors of the TP is transmitted to the nuclei of the solitary tract (NST) and then a neural circuit promotes the activation of ET muscles. We hypothesize that the information provided by the TP may modulate submandibular and sublingual glands activity through a neural pathway involving the NST, the superior salivatory nucleus (SSN) and finally the ChT. According to our hypothesis, sudden perturbations of the MEP may stimulate saliva production with consequent swallowing, opening of the Eustachian tube and endotympanic pressure rebalancing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Pneumatic low-coherence interferometry otoscope to quantify tympanic membrane mobility and middle ear pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Jungeun; Monroy, Guillermo L; Huang, Pin-Chieh; Dsouza, Roshan; Hill, Malcolm C; Novak, Michael A; Porter, Ryan G; Chaney, Eric; Barkalifa, Ronit; Boppart, Stephen A

    2018-02-01

    Pneumatic otoscopy to assess the mobility of the tympanic membrane (TM) is a highly recommended diagnostic method of otitis media (OM), a widespread middle ear infection characterized by the fluid accumulation in the middle ear. Nonetheless, limited depth perception and subjective interpretation of small TM displacements have challenged the appropriate and efficient examination of TM dynamics experienced during OM. In this paper, a pneumatic otoscope integrated with low coherence interferometry (LCI) was adapted with a controlled pressure-generating system to record the pneumatic response of the TM and to estimate middle ear pressure (MEP). Forty-two ears diagnosed as normal (n = 25), with OM (n = 10), or associated with an upper respiratory infection (URI) (n = 7) were imaged with a pneumatic LCI otoscope with an axial, transverse, and temporal resolution of 6 µm, 20 µm, and 1 msec, respectively. The TM displacement under pneumatic pressure transients (a duration of 0.5 sec with an intensity of ± 150 daPa) was measured to compute two metrics (compliance and amplitude ratio). These metrics were correlated with peak acoustic admittance and MEP from tympanometry and statistically compared via Welch's t- test. As a result, the compliance represents pneumatic TM mobility, and the amplitude ratio estimates MEP. The presence of a middle ear effusion (MEE) significantly decreased compliance (p<0.001). The amplitude ratio of the OM group was statistically less than that of the normal group (p<0.01), indicating positive MEP. Unlike tympanometry, pneumatic LCI otoscopy quantifies TM mobility as well as MEP regardless of MEE presence. With combined benefits of pneumatic otoscopy and tympanometry, pneumatic LCI otoscopy may provide new quantitative metrics for understanding TM dynamics and diagnosing OM.

  7. Endoscopic middle ear exploration in pediatric patients with conductive hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, John M; Hoff, Stephen R

    2017-05-01

    To describe our indications, findings, and outcomes for transcanal endoscopic middle ear exploration in pediatric patients with conductive hearing loss of unknown etiology, without effusions. Prospective case series for all pediatric patients undergoing totally endoscopic transcanal middle ear exploration between April 2012 and October 2015 at a pediatric tertiary care referral hospital. Demographic data, operative findings, and hearing results were reviewed. 21 cases were performed in 20 ears (1 revision). Average age at surgery was 7.98 years and average follow up was 2.1 years. Middle ear pathology identified on CT imaging was confirmed in 55% of cases while identified in 45% of cases where pre-operative imaging was non-diagnostic. 6/20 patients (30%) had an ossicular deformity. 8/20(40%) had bony ossicular fixation. 5/20(25%) had ossicular discontinuity. 2/20(10%) had facial nerve dehiscence impinging on the stapes. 15% had adhesive myringosclerosis or severe granulation causing hearing loss. Prosthetic ossiculoplasty was done in 7/21 (33.3%) of the cases, with 1 TORP, 3 PORPs, and 3 IS joint replacements. Imaging was predictive of intra-operative findings in 13/20 cases (55%). Trainees assisted in 16/21(76%) of cases. The average improvement of PTA was 11.65 dB (range -10 to 36.25), and the average ABG improved 10.19 (range -11.25 to 28.75). There were no perioperative complications or adverse events. The endoscopic transcanal approach for middle ear exploration offers excellent visualization and is one of the best applications for the endoscopes in pediatric otology cases. This is particularly helpful for "unexplained" conductive hearing loss where ossicular deformity/fixation/discontinuity is suspected. The etiology of the conductive hearing loss was definitively found in 100% of cases, and can be repaired in the same sitting when applicable. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Replication of type 5 adenovirus promotes middle ear infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae in the chinchilla model of otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrah, Kyle A; Turner, Roberta L; Pang, Bing; Perez, Antonia C; Reimche, Jennifer L; King, Lauren B; Wren, John; Gandhi, Uma; Swords, W Edward; Ornelles, David A

    2015-03-01

    Adenoviral infection is a major risk factor for otitis media. We hypothesized that adenovirus promotes bacterial ascension into the middle ear through the disruption of normal function in the Eustachian tubes due to inflammation-induced changes. An intranasal infection model of the chinchilla was used to test the ability of type 5 adenovirus to promote middle ear infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae. The hyperinflammatory adenovirus mutant dl327 and the nonreplicating adenovirus mutant H5wt300ΔpTP were used to test the role of inflammation and viral replication, respectively, in promotion of pneumococcal middle ear infection. Precedent infection with adenovirus resulted in a significantly greater incidence of middle ear disease by S. pneumoniae as compared to nonadenovirus infected animals. Infection with the adenovirus mutant dl327 induced a comparable degree of bacterial ascension into the middle ear as did infection with the wild-type virus. By contrast, infection with the nonreplicating adenovirus mutant H5wt300ΔpTP resulted in less extensive middle ear infection compared to the wild-type adenovirus. We conclude that viral replication is necessary for adenoviral-induced pneumococcal middle ear disease. © FEMS 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Replication of type 5 adenovirus promotes middle ear infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae in the chinchilla model of otitis media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrah, Kyle A.; Turner, Roberta L.; Pang, Bing; Perez, Antonia C.; Reimche, Jennifer L.; King, Lauren B.; Wren, John; Gandhi, Uma; Swords, W. Edward; Ornelles, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviral infection is a major risk factor for otitis media. We hypothesized that adenovirus promotes bacterial ascension into the middle ear through the disruption of normal function in the Eustachian tubes due to inflammation-induced changes. An intranasal infection model of the chinchilla was used to test the ability of type 5 adenovirus to promote middle ear infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae. The hyperinflammatory adenovirus mutant dl327 and the nonreplicating adenovirus mutant H5wt300ΔpTP were used to test the role of inflammation and viral replication, respectively, in promotion of pneumococcal middle ear infection. Precedent infection with adenovirus resulted in a significantly greater incidence of middle ear disease by S. pneumoniae as compared to nonadenovirus infected animals. Infection with the adenovirus mutant dl327 induced a comparable degree of bacterial ascension into the middle ear as did infection with the wild-type virus. By contrast, infection with the nonreplicating adenovirus mutant H5wt300ΔpTP resulted in less extensive middle ear infection compared to the wild-type adenovirus. We conclude that viral replication is necessary for adenoviral-induced pneumococcal middle ear disease. PMID:25251686

  10. Bone conduction responses of middle ear structures in Thiel embalmed heads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Andreas; Stieger, Christof; Caversaccio, Marco; Kompis, Martin; Guignard, Jérémie

    2015-12-01

    Thiel-embalmed human whole-head specimens offer a promising alternative model for bone conduction (BC) studies of middle ear structures. In this work we present the Thiel model's linearity and stability over time as well as its possible use in the study of a fixed ossicle chain. Using laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV), the motion of the retroauricular skull, the promontory, the stapes footplate and the round window (RW) were measured. A bone-anchored hearing aid stimulated the ears with step sinus tones logarithmically spread between 0.1 and 10 kHz. Linearity of the model was verified using input levels in steps of 10 dBV. The stability of the Thiel model over time was examined with measurements repeated after hours and weeks. The influence of a cement-fixed stapes was assessed. The middle ear elements measured responded linearly in amplitude for the applied input levels (100, 32.6, and 10 mV). The variability of measurements for both short- (2 h) and long-term (4-16 weeks) repetitions in the same ear was lower than the interindividual difference. The fixation of the stapes induced a lowered RW displacement for frequencies near 750 Hz (-4 dB) and an increased displacement for frequencies above 1 kHz (max. +3.7 dB at 4 kHz). LDV assessment of BC-induced middle ear motion in Thiel heads can be performed with stable results. The vibratory RW response is affected by the fixation of the stapes, indicating a measurable effect of ossicle chain inertia on BC response in Thiel embalmed heads.

  11. Optical and tomographic imaging of a middle ear malformation in the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Seth S.; Simmons, Andrea Megela; Ketten, Darlene R.

    2005-08-01

    Using a combination of in vivo computerized tomography and histological staining, a middle ear anomaly in two wild-caught American bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana) is characterized. In these animals, the tympanic membrane, extrastapes, and pars media (shaft) of the stapes are absent on one side of the head, with the other side exhibiting normal morphology. The pars interna (footplate) of the stapes and the operculum are present in their normal positions at the entrance of the otic capsule on both the affected and unaffected sides. The pattern of deformity suggests a partial failure of development of tympanic pathway tissues, but with a preservation of the opercularis pathway. While a definitive proximate cause of the condition could not be determined, the anomalies show similarities to developmental defects in mammalian middle ear formation.

  12. Middle-ear disease in remote Aboriginal Australia: a field assessment of surgical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, D; MacKendrick, A; Weeks, S; Plant, A J

    2000-01-01

    Chronic middle-ear disease is highly prevalent among Australian Aboriginal people, and many undergo surgical treatment. However, the outcomes of surgery in this group have not been fully evaluated. This is a descriptive study of operations for middle-ear disease (excluding grommets) on Aboriginal patients in Kimberley hospitals between 1 October 1986 and 31 December 1995. Logistic regression was used to model predictors of surgical outcome. Success was defined by an intact tympanic membrane and air-bone gap of 10 years, however, this does not take into account the necessity of hearing for language acquisition and learning. Dedicated resources must be allocated for post-operative follow-up of Aboriginal patients so that much-needed, rigorous evaluations of ENT surgery can be conducted.

  13. Study Of The Effect Of Nasal- Septal Deviation On The Middle Ear Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motesaddi Zarandi M

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Eustachian tube connects middle ear space to the nasopharyngeal space. Upper airway obstruction, with any cause, can derange Eustachian tube function. Nasal septal deviation is one of the prevalent causes of upper airway obstruction which can affects the ventilation function of Eustachian tube."nMaterials and Methods: This study was conducted on the patients who underwent septoplasty due to severe septal deviation leading to unilateral nasal obstruction in Amiraalam hospital from summer of 1378 till the spring of 1379."nResults: There was 140 patients whose data were as: female patients 34 (24.3% male patients 106 (75.7%, mean age (22.7. Median age (20 years and mode of age (18 years of age. they were from 12 to 40 years of age."nConclusion: Comparison between preoperative and postoperative middle ear pressures shows no any significant statistical difference (p=0.798.

  14. Middle ear cavity morphology is consistent with an aquatic origin for testudines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willis, Katie L; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Ketten, Darlene R

    2013-01-01

    The position of testudines in vertebrate phylogeny is being re-evaluated. At present, testudine morphological and molecular data conflict when reconstructing phylogenetic relationships. Complicating matters, the ecological niche of stem testudines is ambiguous. To understand how turtles have...... evolved to hear in different environments, we examined middle ear morphology and scaling in most extant families, as well as some extinct species, using 3-dimensional reconstructions from micro magnetic resonance (MR) and submillimeter computed tomography (CT) scans. All families of testudines exhibited...

  15. The Vibrant Soundbridge® middle ear implant: A historical overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labassi, S; Beliaeff, M; Péan, V; Van de Heyning, P

    2017-11-01

    To present a historical overview of the Vibrant Soundbridge ® (VSB) middle ear implant (MEI), since its beginning in the 1990s to date and to describe its course and contemplate what it might become in the future. MEIs started to take form in researchers' mind in the 1930s with the first experiment of Wilska. In the 1970s, several devices, such as the Goode and Perkins', the Maniglia's, or the Hough and Dormer's were created but remained prototypes. It is only in the 1990s the devices that emerged remained on the market. In 1994, Symphonix, Inc. was created and aimed to manufacture and commercialize its semi-implantable MEI, the VSB. The principle of the VSB lies on a direct drive of the sound to a vibratory structure of the middle ear through an electromagnetic transducer, the floating mass transducer (FMT). The particularity of the system VSB is the simplicity of the transducer which is made of both the magnet and the coil; thus, the FMT, fixed on a vibrating middle ear structure, mimics the natural movement of the ossicular chain by moving in the same direction. The goal of the VSB was to give an alternative to patients with mild-to-severe sensorineural hearing loss who could not wear hearing aids (HAs) or who were unsatisfied conventional HA users. Subsequent to Tjellström's experiment in 1997, implantations started to include etiologies such as otosclerosis, radical mastoidectomy, failed ossiculoplasty/tympanoplasty, and atresia. Nowadays, the VSB, with more than 20 years of experience, is the oldest and most used middle ear implant worldwide. It is well acknowledged that the straightforward design and reliability of the transducer have certainly contributed to the success of the device.

  16. Ear Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the ear drum or eustachian tube, Down Syndrome, cleft palate, and barotrauma (injury to the middle ear caused by a reduction of air pressure, ... specialist) may be warranted if you or your child has experienced repeated ... fluid in the middle ear, barotrauma, or have an anatomic abnormality that ...

  17. Laser Doppler velocimetry for measurement of nonlinearity in the vibrations of the middle ear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, John; Dirckx, Joris

    2014-05-01

    At audible Frequencies and at sound pressure below 96 dB SPL the mammalian middle ear is known to behave as an almost entirely linear system. However, as we go to higher sound pressure levels, smaller nonlinear distortions begin to appear, and increase with increasing pressure level. Some modern hearing aids seek to remedy hearing impairment by amplifying sounds to sound pressure levels as high as 130 or 140 dB SPL. Thus at these levels the small nonlinear distortions can become significant, and understanding their behaviour could help us to improve the design of these hearing aids. In order to measure the tiny vibration amplitudes of the middle ear, and to detect the even smaller nonlinear distortions, a very sensitive measurement and analysis method is needed. The tiny vibration amplitudes of the middle ear can easily be measured with laser vibrometry. Thanks to the highly linear response of LDV, the technique is also able to measure small nonlinearities. To detect the nonlinear distortions we developed a sophisticated measurement and analysis method based on the use of multisine excitation signals. These signals are specially designed to measure nonlinear systems. We will describe our set up and our stimulation and analysis method in detail, we will then go on to present some results of measurements at different points along the ossicular chain.

  18. HB-EGF expression as a potential biomarker of acquired middle ear cholesteatoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shumin; Wang, Xiaoli; Ren, Hongmiao; Liu, Xiaoyu; Ren, Jihao; Liu, Wei

    2017-08-01

    The heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) plays an essential role in the development and invasiveness of cholesteatoma. This study may help to realize the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of cholesteatoma and make HB-EGF a promising target for drug intervention of cholesteatoma. To detect HB-EGF expression in human surgical specimens of acquired middle ear cholesteatoma and analyze its functional role as a regulator of epithelial keratinocytes hyperproliferation. A total of 34 patients who underwent surgical treatment for middle ear cholesteatoma were recruited in the study. The mRNA and protein expression of HB-EGF in middle ear cholesteatoma tissues and normal postauricular skin tissues was investigated by real-time quantitative reverse-transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), immunohistochemical staining, and western blot. The correlation between bone resorption degree and HB-EGF expression was also analyzed. On average, compared with normal postauricular skin, expression of HB-EGF mRNA in the cholesteatoma epithelium was significantly elevated 2.41-fold by RT-qPCR, and HB-EGF protein significantly upregulated 2.32-fold by western blot. Positive HB-EGF immunostaining observed in the basal and suprabasal layers of cholesteatoma epithelium was significantly stronger than in normal postauricular skin. Meanwhile, an obviously positive correlation between HB-EGF protein expression and bone resorption degree was discovered.

  19. Into the dark: patterns of middle ear adaptations in subterranean eulipotyphlan mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyabu, Daisuke; Hosojima, Misato; Endo, Hideki

    2017-09-01

    Evolution of the middle ear ossicles was a key innovation for mammals, enhancing the transmission of airborne sound. Radiation into various habitats from a terrestrial environment resulted in diversification of the auditory mechanisms among mammals. However, due to the paucity of phylogenetically controlled investigations, how middle ear traits have diversified with functional specialization remains unclear. In order to identify the respective patterns for various lifestyles and to gain insights into fossil forms, we employed a high-resolution tomography technique and compared the middle ear morphology of eulipotyphlan species (moles, shrews and hedgehogs), a group that has radiated into various environments, such as terrestrial, aquatic and subterranean habitats. Three-dimensional geometric morphometric analysis was conducted within a phylogenetically controlled framework. Quantitative shapes were found to strongly reflect the degree of subterranean lifestyle and weakly involve phylogeny. Our analyses demonstrate that subterranean adaptation should include a relatively shorter anterior process of the malleus, an enlarged incus, an enlarged stapes footplate and a reduction of the orbicular apophysis. These traits arguably allow improving low-frequency sound transmission at low frequencies and inhibiting the low-frequency noise which disturbs the subterranean animals in hearing airborne sounds.

  20. Prophylactic antiemetic effects of midazolam, dexamethasone, and its combination after middle ear surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhdoom, Naeem K; Farid, Magdy F

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate and compare the efficacy of the combination of midazolam and dexamethasone, with midazolam and dexamethasone alone, for the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) in female patients undergoing middle ear surgery. A prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in 80 female patients (mean age 32.6 years), undergoing middle ear surgery with general anesthesia at Ohud Hospital, Madina, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from May 2007 to May 2008. Patients were classified into 4 groups. They received intravenous normal saline (S group), midazolam 0.075 mg/kg (M group), or dexamethasone 10 mg (D group), or a combination of midazolam and dexamethasone (MD group), before the induction of anesthesia. Postoperatively for 24 hours observation and assessment of nausea, vomiting, rescue anti-emetics, and side effects of the study drugs such as headache and drowsiness were carried out. There was a significant difference between the 4 groups. The MD group was the least to develop PONV compared to other groups (p<0.01). Regarding nausea, there was a non-significant difference between the 4 groups, although the MD group developed the least symptoms among the 4 groups, there were no significant differences in pain intensity and side effects such as, headache, dizziness, and drowsiness between the 4 groups. The combination of midazolam 0.075 mg/kg and dexamethasone 10 mg intravenously is better than either drug alone in reducing the incidence of PONV in female patients after middle ear surgery. (author)

  1. Comparison of Carina active middle-ear implant with conventional hearing aids for mixed hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savaş, V A; Gündüz, B; Karamert, R; Cevizci, R; Düzlü, M; Tutar, H; Bayazit, Y A

    2016-04-01

    To compare the auditory outcomes of Carina middle-ear implants with those of conventional hearing aids in patients with moderate-to-severe mixed hearing loss. The study comprised nine patients (six males, three females) who underwent middle-ear implantation with Carina fully implantable active middle-ear implants to treat bilateral moderate-to-severe mixed hearing loss. The patients initially used conventional hearing aids and subsequently received the Carina implants. The hearing thresholds with implants and hearing aids were compared. There were no significant differences between: the pre-operative and post-operative air and bone conduction thresholds (p > 0.05), the thresholds with hearing aids and Carina implants (p > 0.05), or the pre-operative (mean, 72.8 ± 19 per cent) and post-operative (mean, 69.9 ± 24 per cent) speech discrimination scores (p > 0.05). One of the patients suffered total sensorineural hearing loss three months following implantation despite an initial 38 dB functional gain. All except one patient showed clinical improvements after implantation according to quality of life questionnaire (Glasgow Benefit Inventory) scores. Acceptance of Carina implants is better than with conventional hearing aids in patients with mixed hearing loss, although both yield similar hearing amplification. Cosmetic reasons appear to be critical for patient acceptance.

  2. Histamine Applied Topically to the Nasal Mucosa Increases the Transmucosal Nitrous Oxide Exchange for the Middle Ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Miriam S; Alper, Cuneyt M; Martin, Brian S; Cetin, Selma; El-Wagaa, Jenna A; Doyle, William J

    2017-04-01

    Determine if the middle ear transmucosal nitrous oxide (N 2 O) exchange rate is affected by nasal inflammation caused by topical application of histamine. In a randomized, double-blind, crossover study, 20 adults were challenged intranasally with histamine (5 mg) and placebo on separate occasions. At each session, the subjects were fitted with a non-rebreathing mask and breathed room air for 20 minutes, 50% N 2 O:50% O 2 for 20 minutes, and 100% O 2 for 10 minutes. Throughout, heart rate, blood pressure, and blood O 2 saturation were monitored, and bilateral middle ear pressure was recorded by tympanometry every minute. The primary outcome measure was the slope of the middle ear pressure-time function for the 50% N 2 O:50% O 2 breathing period, which is a measure of the transmucosal N 2 O exchange-constant. The effects of challenge substance, session, and period on the measured vital signs and of treatment, session, ear disease history, and test ear on the pressure-time slopes were evaluated using repeated measures ANOVAs. The post-challenge total symptom score and the slope of the middle ear pressure-time function were greater after histamine when compared to placebo challenge. Of the signs, only heart rate was affected, responding to challenge substance and study period. The transmucosal N 2 O exchange rate for the middle ear is increased during inflammation caused by nasal histamine exposure.

  3. Mass distribution and rotational inertia of "microtype" and "freely mobile" middle ear ossicles in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavender, Danielle; Taraskin, Sergei N; Mason, Matthew J

    2011-12-01

    The middle ears of seven species of rodents, including four hamster species, were examined under light microscopy and through micro-CT imaging. Hamsters were found to possess a spectrum of ossicular morphologies ranging from something approaching "freely mobile" (Mesocricetus) to something nearer the "microtype" (Cricetulus), although no hamster has an orbicular apophysis of the malleus. Rats, mice and Calomyscus were found to have typically microtype ossicles. To explore the functional effects of these morphological differences, CT scan data were used to calculate the magnitudes of the moments of inertia and positions of the centres of mass and principal rotational axes for the malleus-incus complexes. Microtype species were found to have much greater ossicular inertias, relative to size, about the "anatomical axis" extending between anterior process of the malleus and short process of the incus; ossicular centres of mass were displaced further from this axis. Calculated inertial values were then put into an existing model of middle ear function (Hemilä et al., 1995), in order to see whether the more accurate data would improve predictions of upper hearing limits. For the rat and mouse they did, but this was not so for the hamster Mesocricetus. This might indicate that the inner rather than the middle ear limits hearing in this species, or might simply reflect other shortcomings of the model. Functional differences appear to exist even among rodent ears of the same general type, but the adaptive significance of these differences remains enigmatic. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The role of the tensor veli palatini muscle in the development of cleft palate-associated middle ear problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidsieck, David S P; Smarius, Bram J A; Oomen, Karin P Q; Breugem, Corstiaan C

    2016-09-01

    Otitis media with effusion is common in infants with an unrepaired cleft palate. Although its prevalence is reduced after cleft surgery, many children continue to suffer from middle ear problems during childhood. While the tensor veli palatini muscle is thought to be involved in middle ear ventilation, evidence about its exact anatomy, function, and role in cleft palate surgery is limited. This study aimed to perform a thorough review of the literature on (1) the role of the tensor veli palatini muscle in the Eustachian tube opening and middle ear ventilation, (2) anatomical anomalies in cleft palate infants related to middle ear disease, and (3) their implications for surgical techniques used in cleft palate repair. A literature search on the MEDLINE database was performed using a combination of the keywords "tensor veli palatini muscle," "Eustachian tube," "otitis media with effusion," and "cleft palate." Several studies confirm the important role of the tensor veli palatini muscle in the Eustachian tube opening mechanism. Maintaining the integrity of the tensor veli palatini muscle during cleft palate surgery seems to improve long-term otological outcome. However, anatomical variations in cleft palate children may alter the effect of the tensor veli palatini muscle on the Eustachian tube's dilatation mechanism. More research is warranted to clarify the role of the tensor veli palatini muscle in cleft palate-associated Eustachian tube dysfunction and development of middle ear problems. Optimized surgical management of cleft palate could potentially reduce associated middle ear problems.

  5. Design and experimental analysis of a new malleovestibulopexy prosthesis using a finite element model of the human middle ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo Valdezate, Luis A; Hidalgo Otamendi, Antonio; Hernández, Alberto; Lobo, Fernando; Gil-Carcedo Sañudo, Elisa; Gil-Carcedo García, Luis M

    2015-01-01

    Many designs of prostheses are available for middle ear surgery. In this study we propose a design for a new prosthesis, which optimises mechanical performance in the human middle ear and improves some deficiencies in the prostheses currently available. Our objective was to design and assess the theoretical acoustic-mechanical behaviour of this new total ossicular replacement prosthesis. The design of this new prosthesis was based on an animal model (an iguana). For the modelling and mechanical analysis of the new prosthesis, we used a dynamic 3D computer model of the human middle ear, based on the finite elements method (FEM). The new malleovestibulopexy prosthesis design demonstrates an acoustical-mechanical performance similar to that of the healthy human middle ear. This new design also has additional advantages, such as ease of implantation and stability in the middle ear. This study shows that computer simulation can be used to design and optimise the vibroacoustic characteristics of middle ear implants and demonstrates the effectiveness of a new malleovestibulopexy prosthesis in reconstructing the ossicular chain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Patología Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  6. Detection of Epstein-Barr and Human Papilloma Viruses in the Middle Ear Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surono, Agus; Hariwiyanto, Bambang; Samodra, Edhie

    2018-03-01

    The uncommon ear tumor of middle ear squamous cell carcinoma (MESCC) is thought to be associated with the history of long-term chronic otitis media in the most cases. The main etiologic factor of MESCC is still unclear and may be multifactorial. Infections of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Human Papillomavirus (HPV) are considered as one of the etiologic factor of MESCC. Previous studies have shown that the EBV and HPV have been detected in MESCC. Although the EBV and HPV have been implicated in human malignancies, their roles in pathogenesis of MESCC have not been elucidated. There has never been report on the presence of EBV and HPV in Indonesian MESCC. This study aimed to determine the presence of EBV and HPV in MESCC. Seven paraffin-embedded tissues of speciment from biopsy were analyzed for the presence of EBV and HPV by immunohistochemistry, stained using polyclonal antibody anti EBNA1 and anti HPV. The samples consisted of 4 (57 %) males and 3 (43 %) females with age range of 26-87 years old. Immunohistochemistry result demonstrated that EBV was detected in three of seven (43 %) and HPV in two of seven (29 %) samples. Coexistence of the presence of EBV and HPV were found in one of seven (14 %) sample. The presence of EBV and HPV in MESCC suggests that viral infection may play an important etiologic role in the carcinogenesis of middle ear.

  7. Connectivity analysis of suggestive brain areas involved in middle ear pressure regulation in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    SA, Sami; Gaihede, Michael

    2010-01-01

    of these distinct mechanisms were found. CONCLUSION:: The human mastoid as well as the Eustachian tube was capable of active counter-regulation of the MEP in short-term experimental pressure changes in healthy ears. Thus, these 2 systems seemed to function in a complementary way, where the mastoid was related......HYPOTHESIS:: Middle ear pressure (MEP) is actively regulated by both the Eustachian tube and the mastoid air cell system. BACKGROUND:: MEP is a highly significant factor involved in many clinical conditions related to otitis media. Basic knowledge on its overall regulation remains insufficient......, but the Eustachian tube and mastoid gas exchange are important factors. The main focus has been aimed at the tube; however, evidence points to the mastoid as equally important. More detailed methods are demanded to study their complementary functions. METHODS:: A catheter was inserted into the mastoid of 12 human...

  8. Three-dimensional CT of the ossicles of the middle ear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edamatsu, Hideo; Yamashita, Koichi [Kanazawa Medical Univ., Uchinada, Ishikawa (Japan)

    1995-02-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the usefulness and limitations of three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of the ossicular chain in the middle ear by high speed helical CT. One dissected human temporal bone, five normal ears, and twelve diseased ears (trauma, ossicular anomaly, cholesteatoma, chronic otitis media) were scanned in 1.0 mm slices and reconstructed at a thickness of 0.2-0.5 mm. All 3-D CT specimens can be observed in any plane and from any direction. Ossicular 3-D CT temporal bone images were reconstructed as if the malleus, incus and stapes were being observed under a microscope. No defect in the ossicles or their joints was seen in the images. The entire structure of the stapes could not be represented by conventional two-dimensional CT, but the 3-D CT in our study showed the head, crus and foot plate of the stapes in detail. Ossicular 3-D CT images of normal ears yielded the same findings as those recorded in the temporal bone. Preoperative diagnostic findings of ossicles in diseased ears were very useful. 3-D CT was diagnostic and its accuracy was confirmed by surgical observations, especially in ossicular anomalies. 3-D CT was also an important method of postoperative evaluation of ossicular reconstruction, i.e. TORP and PORP. It could represent the anatomical relation between prosthesis and the oval window. Postoperative hearing improvement can be compared with 3-D CT findings. High-speed helical CT can scan an object more quickly and clearly than conventional CT, and its biological damage in humans is less than that of other methods. 3-D CT allows obviously clearer reconstruction by helical CT than the other methods. (author).

  9. In vitro interaction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa with human middle ear epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Mittal

    Full Text Available Otitis media (OM is an inflammation of the middle ear which can be acute or chronic. Acute OM is caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis whereas Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading cause of chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM. CSOM is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the middle ear characterized by infection and discharge. The survivors often suffer from hearing loss and neurological sequelae. However, no information is available regarding the interaction of P. aeruginosa with human middle ear epithelial cells (HMEECs.In the present investigation, we demonstrate that P. aeruginosa is able to enter and survive inside HMEECs via an uptake mechanism that is dependent on microtubule and actin microfilaments. The actin microfilament disrupting agent as well as microtubule inhibitors exhibited significant decrease in invasion of HMEECs by P. aeruginosa. Confocal microscopy demonstrated F-actin condensation associated with bacterial entry. This recruitment of F-actin was transient and returned to normal distribution after bacterial internalization. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated the presence of bacteria on the surface of HMEECs, and transmission electron microscopy confirmed the internalization of P. aeruginosa located in the plasma membrane-bound vacuoles. We observed a significant decrease in cell invasion of OprF mutant compared to the wild-type strain. P. aeruginosa induced cytotoxicity, as demonstrated by the determination of lactate dehydrogenase levels in culture supernatants of infected HMEECs and by a fluorescent dye-based assay. Interestingly, OprF mutant showed little cell damage compared to wild-type P. aeruginosa.This study deciphered the key events in the interaction of P. aeruginosa with HMEECs in vitro and highlighted the role of bacterial outer membrane protein, OprF, in this process. Understanding the molecular mechanisms in the pathogenesis of CSOM will help in identifying

  10. The clinical efficacy of 1 mm-slice CT of the middle ear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Kazuhiro; Noiri, Teruhisa [Kawanishi Municipal Hospital, Hyogo (Japan); Doi, Katsumi; Koizuka, Izumi; Tanaka, Hisashi; Mishiro, Yasuo; Okumura, Shin-ichi; Kubo, Takeshi

    2000-02-01

    The efficacy of the preoperative 1 mm-slice CT for evaluating the condition of the ossicular chain and the facial canal was assessed. CT findings were compared with the operative findings of middle ears in 120 cases of chronic otitis media or cholesteatoma that underwent tympanoplasty. The reliability of 1 mm-slice CT in detecting any defect of the ossicular chain was much superior to those of 2 mm-slice CT previously reported, and the difference between them is essential for preoperative information. On the other hand, thinner slice than 1 mm may be unnecessary, especially in routine use. (author)

  11. Effects of middle ear quasi-static stiffness on sound transmission quantified by a novel 3-axis optical force sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrev, Ivo; Sim, Jae Hoon; Aqtashi, Baktash; Huber, Alexander M; Linder, Thomas; Röösli, Christof

    2018-01-01

    Intra-operative quantification of the ossicle mobility could provide valuable feedback for the current status of the patient's conductive hearing. However, current methods for evaluation of middle ear mobility are mostly limited to the surgeon's subjective impression through manual palpation of the ossicles. This study investigates how middle ear transfer function is affected by stapes quasi-static stiffness of the ossicular chain. The stiffness of the middle ear is induced by a) using a novel fiber-optic 3-axis force sensor to quantify the quasi-static stiffness of the middle ear, and b) by artificial reduction of stapes mobility due to drying of the middle ear. Middle ear transfer function, defined as the ratio of the stapes footplate velocity versus the ear canal sound pressure, was measured with a single point LDV in two conditions. First, a controlled palpation force was applied at the stapes head in two in-plane (superior-inferior or posterior-anterior) directions, and at the incus lenticular process near the incudostapedial joint in the piston (lateral-medial) direction with a novel 3-axis PalpEar force sensor (Sensoptic, Losone, Switzerland), while the corresponding quasi-static displacement of the contact point was measured via a 3-axis micrometer stage. The palpation force was applied sequentially, step-wise in the range of 0.1-20 gF (1-200 mN). Second, measurements were repeated with various stages of stapes fixation, simulated by pre-load on the stapes head or drying of the temporal bone, and with severe ossicle immobilization, simulated by gluing of the stapes footplate. Simulated stapes fixation (forced drying of 5-15 min) severely decreases (20-30 dB) the low frequency (4 kHz) response. Stapes immobilization (gluing of the footplate) severely reduces (20-40 dB) the low and mid frequency response (force (Force-displacement measurements around the incudostapedial joint showed quasi-static stiffness in the range of 200-500 N/m for normal middle

  12. Limits on normal cochlear 'third' windows provided by previous investigations of additional sound paths into and out of the cat inner ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosowski, John J; Bowers, Peter; Nakajima, Hideko H

    2018-03-01

    While most models of cochlear function assume the presence of only two windows into the mammalian cochlea (the oval and round windows), a position that is generally supported by several lines of data, there is evidence for additional sound paths into and out of the inner ear in normal mammals. In this report we review the existing evidence for and against the 'two-window' hypothesis. We then determine how existing data and inner-ear anatomy restrict transmission of sound through these additional sound pathways in cat by utilizing a well-tested model of the cat inner ear, together with anatomical descriptions of the cat cochlear and vestibular aqueducts (potential additional windows to the cochlea). We conclude: (1) The existing data place limits on the size of the cochlear and vestibular aqueducts in cat and are consistent with small volume-velocities through these ducts during ossicular stimulation of the cochlea, (2) the predicted volume velocities produced by aqueducts with diameters half the size of the bony diameters match the functional data within ±10 dB, and (3) these additional volume velocity paths contribute to the inner ear's response to non-acoustic stimulation and conductive pathology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Airplane Ear

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your flight. If you're prone to severe airplane ear and must fly often, your doctor may surgically place tubes in your eardrums to aid fluid drainage, ventilate your middle ear, and equalize the ... prevent airplane ear These additional tips can help young children ...

  14. Conductive hearing loss and middle ear pathology in young infants referred through a newborn universal hearing screening program in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aithal, Sreedevi; Aithal, Venkatesh; Kei, Joseph; Driscoll, Carlie

    2012-10-01

    Although newborn hearing screening programs have been introduced in most states in Australia, the prevalence of conductive hearing loss and middle ear pathology in the infants referred through these programs is not known. This study was designed to (1) evaluate the prevalence of conductive hearing loss and middle ear pathology in infants referred by a newborn hearing screening program in north Queensland, (2) compare prevalence rates of conductive hearing loss and middle ear pathology in indigenous and nonindigenous infants, and (3) review the outcomes of those infants diagnosed with conductive hearing loss and middle ear pathology. Retrospective chart review of infants referred to the Audiology Department of The Townsville Hospital was conducted. Chart review of 234 infants referred for one or both ears from a newborn hearing screening program in north Queensland was conducted. A total of 211 infants attended the diagnostic appointment. Review appointments to monitor hearing status were completed for 46 infants with middle ear pathology or conductive hearing loss. Diagnosis of hearing impairment was made using an age-appropriate battery of audiological tests. Results were analyzed for both initial and review appointments. Mean age at initial diagnostic assessment was 47.5 days (SD = 31.3). Of the 69 infants with middle ear pathology during initial diagnostic assessment, 18 had middle ear pathology with normal hearing, 47 had conductive hearing loss, and 4 had mixed hearing loss. Prevalence of conductive hearing loss in the newborns was 2.97 per 1,000 while prevalence of middle ear pathology (with or without conductive hearing loss) was 4.36 per 1,000. Indigenous Australians or Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (ATSI) infants had a significantly higher prevalence of conductive hearing loss and middle ear pathology than non-ATSI infants (35.19 and 44.45% vs 17.83 and 28.66%, respectively). ATSI infants also showed poor resolution of conductive hearing loss

  15. Inflammatory diseases of the middle ear; Doencas inflamatorias da orelha media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boasquevisque, Gustavo Santos [Hospital Sao Vicente de Paula, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], e-mail: gsboas@gmail.com; Andrade, Carlos Ramon de [Santa Casa de Misericordia, Barra Mansa, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Saude Auditiva; Boasquevisque, Eliana Teles Santos [Instituto Nacional do Cancer (INCA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Imagem; Cavalcante Neto, Augusto Jose [Clinica Vale Imagem, Barra Mansa, RJ (Brazil); Boasquevisque, Edson Mendes [Instituto Nacional do Cancer, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-12-15

    Objective: to determine the aspects and frequency of middle ear alterations at computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in patients with clinical suspicion for middle ear inflammatory disease. Material and method: imaging examination results of 95 patients (95 computed tomography and 1 magnetic resonance imaging) were compared with the results of otology, imaging and surgical findings. Results: fifty-two patients had normal imaging results. Forty-three patients had radiologic alterations compared to the physical, otology and histopathologic exams: acute otomastoiditis in 2 patients (4.6%), unilateral chronic otomastoiditis in 9 (21.0%), bilateral chronic otomastoiditis in 2 (4.6%), unilateral cholesteatoma in 26 (60.5%), and bilateral cholesteatoma in 4 (9.3%). Conclusion: computed tomography was able to demonstrate the characteristics of the lesions and found complications in majority of the cases. Magnetic resonance imaging was used only in one patient to rule out scar and cholesteatoma. The knowledge of the clinical and otologic data enables the radiologist to elaborate a more appropriate interpretation of the imaging findings. (author)

  16. Non-invasive optical interferometry for the assessment of biofilm growth in the middle ear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cac T.; Tu, Haohua; Chaney, Eric J.; Stewart, Charles N.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) is the most common illness in children in the United States. Three-fourths of children under the age of three have OM at least once. Children with chronic OM, including OM with effusion and recurrent OM, will often have conductive hearing loss and communication difficulties, and need surgical treatment. Recent clinical studies provide evidence that almost all chronic OM cases are accompanied by a bacterial biofilm behind the tympanic membrane (eardrum) and within the middle ear. Biofilms are typically very thin, and cannot be recognized using a regular otoscope. Here we demonstrate how optical low coherence interferometry (LCI) noninvasively depth-ranges into the middle ear to detect and quantify biofilm microstructure. A portable diagnostic system integrating LCI with a standard video otoscope was constructed and used to detect and quantify the presence of biofilms in a newly-developed pre-clinical animal model for this condition. Using a novel classification algorithm for acquired LCI data, the system identified the presence of a biofilm with 86% sensitivity and 90% specificity, compared to histological findings. This new information on the presence of a biofilm, its structure, and its response to antibiotic treatment, will not only provide better understanding of fundamental principles that govern biofilm formation, growth, and eradication, but may also provide much needed clinical data to direct and monitor protocols for the successful management of otitis media. PMID:21258533

  17. Antiadhesive effect of polyurethane foam packing in the guinea pig middle ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Cheol Hee; Jang, Chul Ho

    2015-02-01

    No significant subepithelial healing differences were found between Gelfoam and polyurethane foam (PUF). However, levels of hyperplasia of the mucosal lining and inflammation were lower with PUF packing. PUF packing is not feasible as a middle ear packing material for abraded mucosa. Further studies are required before clinical application. To date, there have been few reports on the antiadhesive effect of PUF as a middle ear packing. The purpose of this study was to investigate the antiadhesive effect of PUF soaked with saline in an animal model of mucosal trauma. Bioresorbable PUF soaked with saline was placed over abraded mucosa in the experimental group (n = 7), and compressed Gelfoam soaked with saline was placed in the control group (n = 7). After measurement of auditory brainstem responses (ABRs), the animals were sacrificed 3 weeks after packing placement for histological observation. The ABR results at postoperative week 3 showed no statistically significant difference between the preoperative and post-packing values. An adhesion pattern with subepithelial thickening was observed in the control group. Adhesion was not observed in the experimental group; however, subepithelial fibrous thickening was noted.

  18. Comparison of advanced optical imaging techniques with current otolaryngology diagnostics for improved middle ear assessment (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Ryan M.; Shelton, Ryan L.; Monroy, Guillermo L.; Spillman, Darold R.; Novak, Michael A.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-02-01

    Otolaryngologists utilize a variety of diagnostic techniques to assess middle ear health. Tympanometry, audiometry, and otoacoustic emissions examine the mobility of the tympanic membrane (eardrum) and ossicles using ear canal pressure and auditory tone delivery and detection. Laser Doppler vibrometry provides non-contact vibrational measurement, and acoustic reflectometry is used to assess middle ear effusion using sonar. These technologies and techniques have advanced the field beyond the use of the standard otoscope, a simple tissue magnifier, yet the need for direct visualization of middle ear disease for superior detection, assessment, and management remains. In this study, we evaluated the use of portable optical coherence tomography (OCT) and pneumatic low-coherence interferometry (LCI) systems with handheld probe delivery to standard tympanometry, audiometry, otoacoustic emissions, laser Doppler vibrometry, and acoustic reflectometry. Comparison of these advanced optical imaging techniques and current diagnostics was conducted with a case study subject with a history of unilateral eardrum trauma. OCT and pneumatic LCI provide novel dynamic spatiotemporal structural data of the middle ear, such as the thickness of the eardrum and quantitative detection of underlying disease pathology, which could allow for more accurate diagnosis and more appropriate management than currently possible.

  19. Middle and inner ear malformations in two siblings exposed to valproic acid during pregnancy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Houtte, Evelyne; Casselman, Jan; Janssens, Sandra; De Kegel, Alexandra; Maes, Leen; Dhooge, Ingeborg

    2014-11-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a known teratogenic drug. Exposure to VPA during the pregnancy can lead to a distinct facial appearance, a cluster of major and minor anomalies and developmental delay. In this case report, two siblings with fetal valproate syndrome and a mild conductive hearing loss were investigated. Radiologic evaluation showed middle and inner ear malformations in both children. Audiologic, vestibular and motor examination was performed. This is the first case report to describe middle and inner ear malformations in children exposed to VPA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Middle ear implant in conductive and mixed congenital hearing loss in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Stéphane; Denoyelle, Françoise; Farinetti, Anne; Garabedian, Erea-Noel; Triglia, Jean-Michel

    2012-12-01

    Active middle ear implant can be used in children and adolescents with congenital hearing loss. The authors report their experience with the semi implantable Medel Vibrant Soundbridge(®) (VSB) in the audiologic rehabilitation of such patients. In this retrospective study, audiological and surgical data of 10 children (10.5±4 years) implanted with 12 VSB in 2 tertiary cares ENT Departments were analysed. Two children with bilateral external auditory canal (EAC) atresia and mixed hearing loss (mean air conduction (AC) thresholds=65dB HL) were bilaterally implanted. Eight children presented with microtia associated with EAC atresia bilaterally (n=3) and unilaterally (n=5). All of them had a conductive hearing loss in the implanted ear (mean (AC) thresholds were 58.75dB HL preoperatively). The Floating Mass Transducer was crimped on the long process of the incus (n=8) or on the suprastructure of the stapes (n=4). There were no intra- or postoperative surgical complications. All the children wore their implants after 5 weeks. Postoperative mean bone conduction (BC) thresholds were unchanged. The mean aided thresholds with VSB (four frequencies warble tones at 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 kHz) were 28dB HL (± 10). Word discrimination threshold in quiet conditions in free field with the VSB unilaterally activated was 50% at 38dB SPL (± 9). The results indicate that satisfaction of the children and their parents is very encouraging but surgeons should be cautious with this new approach in relation to the pinna reconstruction and to possible risks to inner ear and facial nerve. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Cholesteatoma of the middle ear in children. Apropos of 160 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachidi-Alaoui, F; Benchekroun, L; Jazouli, N; Lazrak, A; Kzadri, M

    1996-01-01

    Cholesteatoma of the middle ear in children is a current topic and authors are not yet unanimous as far as surgical treatment is concerned. We report our experience on 160 cases of cholesteatoma observed in 150 children aged from 4 to 15 years old. The first complications represent the reason for consulting in 36% and bilateral affection in 15% of the cases. We have practised the "open technique" in 62%, the "closed technique" in 38% of the cases. The "second look" operation for a residual cholesteatoma, or a recurrence constitute 26% of cases after the closed technique. Our choice of the open technique is explained by the social and economic standard of the patients, the state of the mastoid, the frequency of the complications mainly intracranial ones, and the types of lesions encountered during the operation. According to this serie, we can review the data of the literature, and analyse the different points of view.

  2. Diagnosis of ossicular chain in the middle ear by high-resolution CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuse, Takeo (Hanamaki-Kosei Hospital, Iwate (Japan)); Aoyagi, Masaru; Koike, Yoshio; Sugai, Yukio

    1992-02-01

    This study was conducted to assess the usefulness and limitation of high-resolution CT for evaluating the condition of ossicular chain in the middle ear. Preoperative CT findings of the ossicular chain were compared with the operative findings of ossicles in 26 patients with chronic otitis media or congenital ossicular anomaly who underwent tympanoplasty. Total defect of head of the malleus, body of the incus and long process of the incus were completely detected by high-resolution CT. But the reliability in detecting the defect of handle of the malleus and superstructure of the stapes were 33.3% and 60%, respectively. Defect of the I-S joint (1 case) and partial defect of stapes crus (2 cases) could not be diagnosed correctly in the preoperative estimation. Although these findings demonstrate the limitations of high-resolution CT in the diagnosis of ossicular chain, it will be diminished by the advanced space resolution of CT in the future. (author).

  3. Advances tomographic in evaluation of middle ear; Avancos tomograficos na avaliacao da orelha media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anjos, Mayara Alves Pinheiro dos; Ledo, Mirelle D& #x27; arc Frota; Ribeiro, Marcio Duarte, E-mail: may_anjos@yahoo.com.br [Fundacao Bahiana para o Desenvolvimento das Ciencias, Escola Bahiana de Medicina e Saude Publica, Salvador, BA (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Computed tomography has a key role in the study of hearing, since through it can be evaluated structures not seen by otoscope. In many clinical situations the diagnosis through this test proves limited, being fundamental examination of the associated image reconstructions: multiplanar reconstruction, maximum intensity projection, and volume-rendering technique. The ossicular chain is a complex formed by the ossicles malleus, incus and stapes, situated in the middle ear; it is difficult to view them in orthogonals planes. This review article intends to demonstrate the importance of post-processing the image of the ossicular chain for a better representation of the anatomy and possible diseases. Reformatting of images helps, significantly, to a better visualization of these structures as related congenital malformations, vascular abnormalities, inflammatory conditions, neoplasia and traumas. (author)

  4. Gene Expression Differences in Infected and Noninfected Middle Ear Complementary DNA Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerschner, Joseph E.; Horsey, Edward; Ahmed, Azad; Erbe, Christy; Khampang, Pawjai; Cioffi, Joseph; Hu, Fen Ze; Post, James Christopher; Ehrlich, Garth D.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To investigate genetic differences in middle ear mucosa (MEM) with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) infection. Genetic upregulation and downregulation occurs in MEM during otitis media (OM) pathogenesis. A comprehensive assessment of these genetic differences using the techniques of complementary DNA (cDNA) library creation has not been performed. Design The cDNA libraries were constructed from NTHi-infected and noninfected chinchilla MEM. Random clones were picked, sequenced bidirectionally, and submitted to the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Expressed Sequence Tags database, where they were assigned accession numbers. These numbers were used with the basic local alignment search tool (BLAST) to align clones against the nonredundant nucleotide database at NCBI. Results Analysis with the Web-based statistical program FatiGO identified several biological processes with significant differences in numbers of represented genes. Processes involved in immune, stress, and wound responses were more prevalent in the NTHi-infected library. S100 calcium-binding protein A9 (S100A9); secretory leukoprotease inhibitor (SLPI); β2-microglobulin (B2M); ferritin, heavy-chain polypeptide 1 (FTH1); and S100 calcium-binding protein A8 (S100A8) were expressed at significantly higher levels in the NTHi-infected library. Calcium-binding proteins S100A9 and S100A8 serve as markers for inflammation and have antibacterial effects. Secretory leukoprotease inhibitor is an antibacterial protein that inhibits stimuli-induced MUC1, MUC2, and MUC5AC production. Conclusions A number of genes demonstrate changes during the pathogenesis of OM, including SLPI, which has an impact on mucin gene expression; this expression is known to be an important regulator in OM. The techniques described herein provide a framework for future investigations to more thoroughly understand molecular changes in the middle ear, which will likely be important in developing new

  5. Gene expression differences in infected and noninfected middle ear complementary DNA libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerschner, Joseph E; Horsey, Edward; Ahmed, Azad; Erbe, Christy; Khampang, Pawjai; Cioffi, Joseph; Hu, Fen Ze; Post, James Christopher; Ehrlich, Garth D

    2009-01-01

    To investigate genetic differences in middle ear mucosa (MEM) with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) infection. Genetic upregulation and downregulation occurs in MEM during otitis media (OM) pathogenesis. A comprehensive assessment of these genetic differences using the techniques of complementary DNA (cDNA) library creation has not been performed. The cDNA libraries were constructed from NTHi-infected and noninfected chinchilla MEM. Random clones were picked, sequenced bidirectionally, and submitted to the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Expressed Sequence Tags database, where they were assigned accession numbers. These numbers were used with the basic local alignment search tool (BLAST) to align clones against the nonredundant nucleotide database at NCBI. Analysis with the Web-based statistical program FatiGO identified several biological processes with significant differences in numbers of represented genes. Processes involved in immune, stress, and wound responses were more prevalent in the NTHi-infected library. S100 calcium-binding protein A9 (S100A9); secretory leukoprotease inhibitor (SLPI); beta(2)-microglobulin (B2M); ferritin, heavy-chain polypeptide 1 (FTH1); and S100 calcium-binding protein A8 (S100A8) were expressed at significantly higher levels in the NTHi-infected library. Calcium-binding proteins S100A9 and S100A8 serve as markers for inflammation and have antibacterial effects. Secretory leukoprotease inhibitor is an antibacterial protein that inhibits stimuli-induced MUC1, MUC2, and MUC5AC production. A number of genes demonstrate changes during the pathogenesis of OM, including SLPI, which has an impact on mucin gene expression; this expression is known to be an important regulator in OM. The techniques described herein provide a framework for future investigations to more thoroughly understand molecular changes in the middle ear, which will likely be important in developing new therapeutic and intervention

  6. Predominant Bacteria Detected from the Middle Ear Fluid of Children Experiencing Otitis Media: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Chinh C; Massa, Helen M; Thornton, Ruth B; Cripps, Allan W

    2016-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) is amongst the most common childhood diseases and is associated with multiple microbial pathogens within the middle ear. Global and temporal monitoring of predominant bacterial pathogens is important to inform new treatment strategies, vaccine development and to monitor the impact of vaccine implementation to improve progress toward global OM prevention. A systematic review of published reports of microbiology of acute otitis media (AOM) and otitis media with effusion (OME) from January, 1970 to August 2014, was performed using PubMed databases. This review confirmed that Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae, remain the predominant bacterial pathogens, with S. pneumoniae the predominant bacterium in the majority reports from AOM patients. In contrast, H. influenzae was the predominant bacterium for patients experiencing chronic OME, recurrent AOM and AOM with treatment failure. This result was consistent, even where improved detection sensitivity from the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) rather than bacterial culture was conducted. On average, PCR analyses increased the frequency of detection of S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae 3.2 fold compared to culture, whilst Moraxella catarrhalis was 4.5 times more frequently identified by PCR. Molecular methods can also improve monitoring of regional changes in the serotypes and identification frequency of S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae over time or after vaccine implementation, such as after introduction of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. Globally, S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae remain the predominant otopathogens associated with OM as identified through bacterial culture; however, molecular methods continue to improve the frequency and accuracy of detection of individual serotypes. Ongoing monitoring with appropriate detection methods for OM pathogens can support development of improved vaccines to provide protection from the complex combination of otopathogens within

  7. The prevalence of middle ear diseases among 7- to 13-year-old primary school students in Yozgat province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkiriş, Mahmut; Kapusuz, Zeliha; Saydam, Levent

    2012-01-01

    External and/or middle ear pathologies are commonly encountered by otolaryngologists, family practitioners and pediatricians. If left undiagnosed, these conditions may result in significant irreversible damage such as varying degree of hearing loss that can affect the social or professional performance of the individuals in later stages of life. In this study, we aimed to investigate the prevalence of several external and/or middle ear diseases among 7-13-year-old primary school students in Yozgat province. The province of Yozgat serves as a transition point between the Central Anatolian and Black Sea regions of Turkey. Nine hundred and seventy-eight primary school students were included in the study between March 1, 2012 and March 15, 2012. All subjects underwent a routine ear examination in school with a diagnostic otoscope. The students with pathologic ear findings were further evaluated to identify the underlying process. The age range of 978 students (527 males, 451 females) was 7 to 13 (mean: 10.5) years. Tympanic membrane (TM) pathology was detected in 33 (3.37%) of the cases overall. Of the cases, 3 (0.30%) had TM perforation, 11 (1.12%) had myringosclerosis (MS), 13 (1.32%) had serous otitis media, 1 (0.10%) had atresia of the left ear, and 4 (0.40%) had retraction pocket. One patient (0.10%) had undergone a left cochlear implantation procedure. The results of our study seem to be comparable with the other studies reported in the literature. Routine periodic ear examinations during the primary school ages are mandatory to obtain the exact prevalence of these pathologies in the entire population. We believe that early childhood screening of middle ear disease will have a positive effect on treatment.

  8. Antibodies mediate formation of neutrophil extracellular traps in the middle ear and facilitate secondary pneumococcal otitis media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Short, K.R.; Kockritz-Blickwede, M. von; Langereis, J.D.; Chew, K.Y.; Job, E.R.; Armitage, C.W.; Hatcher, B.; Fujihashi, K.; Reading, P.C.; Hermans, P.W.M.; Wijburg, O.L.; Diavatopoulos, D.A.

    2014-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) (a middle ear infection) is a common childhood illness that can leave some children with permanent hearing loss. OM can arise following infection with a variety of different pathogens, including a coinfection with influenza A virus (IAV) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (the

  9. Antibodies mediate formation of neutrophil extracellular traps in the middle ear and facilitate secondary pneumococcal otitis media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.R. Short (Kirsty); M. von Köckritz-Blickwede (Maren); J.D. Langereis (Jeroen); K.Y. Chew (Keng Yih); E.R. Job (Emma); S. Armitage (Shane); P. Hatcher (Pascale); K. Fujihashi (Kohtaro); C.L. Reading (Chris ); P.W.M. Hermans (Peter); O.L. Wijburg (Odilia); D.A. Diavatopoulos (Dimitri)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractOtitis media (OM) (a middle ear infection) is a common childhood illness that can leave some children with permanent hearing loss.OMcan arise following infection with a variety of different pathogens, including a coinfection with influenza A virus (IAV) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (the

  10. Amphiphilic γ-PGA nanoparticles administered on rat middle ear mucosa produce adjuvant-like immunostimulation in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Johan S; Broos, Sissela; Akagi, Takami

    2014-01-01

    as a concomitant antigen delivery system and adjuvant measure in the context of vaccinations. OBJECTIVES: To examine effects of topical mucosal administration of γ-PGA-Phe NPs as a potentially combined antigen delivery system and adjuvant. METHODS: γ-PGA-Phe NPs were administered on rat middle ear mucosa in a sham...

  11. Estimated cost-effectiveness of active middle-ear implantation in hearing-impaired patients with severe external otitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snik, A.F.M.; Duijnhoven, N.T.L.; Mylanus, E.A.M.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the cost-effectiveness of middle-ear implantations in hearing-impaired patients with severe external otitis in the Netherlands. DESIGN: Cost-effectiveness analysis, using single-subject repeated measures of quality of life and total cost determinations. SETTING: Hospital

  12. Visualisation of passive middle ear implants by cone beam and multi-detector computed tomography: a comparative in vitro study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, T.D.; Koesling, S. [University of Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Radiology, Halle Saale (Germany); Mlynski, R. [Head and Neck Surgery ' ' Otto Koerner' ' , Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Rostock (Germany); Plontke, S.K. [University of Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Halle Saale (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Modern passive middle ear titanium prostheses are filigree structures, resulting in poorer depiction on CT compared to prostheses used in the past. We compared the visibility of newer prostheses on cone beam CT (CBCT) to multi-detector CT (MDCT) with standard and lower dose in vitro, and analysed image noise and metal artefacts. Six different titanium middle ear prostheses (three partial and one total ossicular replacement prostheses, two stapes prostheses) were implanted twice in formalin-fixed head specimens - first correctly and then with displacement. Imaging was performed using standard CBCT and MDCT as well as MDCT with lower dose (36 single imaging investigations). Images were analysed with knowledge of the used types of middle ear prostheses, but blinded with respect to the positioning in the specific case. On all images the type of prostheses and their positions could be clearly recognized. Their identifiability including their details was rated as statistically significantly higher for all CBCT investigations than for MDCT. MDCT with lower dose showed the worst results. No statistical differences were found in image noise and metal artefacts. If available, CBCT should be preferred over MDCT in diagnostic evaluation of passive middle ear prostheses. (orig.)

  13. Alteration of distortion product otoacoustic emission input/output functions in subjects with a previous history of middle ear dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De P Campos, Ualace; Sanches, Seisse G; Hatzopoulos, Stavros; Carvallo, Renata M M; Kochanek, Krzysztof; Skarżyński, Henryk

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of sub-clinical alterations on the amplitudes and slopes of the DPOAE input-output responses from subjects with previous history of middle ear dysfunction. The study included 15 subjects with and 15 subjects without a history of otitis media in the last 10 years. All participants were assessed with acoustic immittance, pure-tone audiometry, and DPOAEs. For the later, I/O functions and I/O slopes were estimated at 1501, 2002, 3174, 4004 and 6384 Hz. No statistically significant differences were found between the 2 groups in terms of behavioral thresholds. The group with a previous history of middle ear dysfunction presented significantly lower mean DPOAE amplitudes at 2002, 3174 and 4004 Hz. In terms of DPOAE slopes, no statistically significant differences were observed at the tested frequencies, except at 3174 Hz. Middle ear pathologies can produce subclinical alterations that are undetectable with traditional pure-tone audiometry. The data from the present study show that reduced amplitude DPOAEs are associated with a previous history of middle ear complications. The corresponding DPOAE slopes were affected at only 1 tested frequency, suggesting that the cochlear non-linearity is preserved. Considering these results, it remains to be elucidated to what degree the DPOAE amplitude attenuation interferes with higher-order auditory tasks.

  14. Treatment of middle ear ventilation disorders: sheep as animal model for stenting the human Eustachian tube--a cadaver study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicitas Miller

    Full Text Available Eustachian tube disorders can lead to chronic otitis media with consecutive conductive hearing loss. To improve treatment and to develop new types of implants such as stents, an adequate experimental animal model is required. As the middle ear of sheep is known to be comparable to the human middle ear, the dimensions of the Eustachian tube in two strains of sheep were investigated. The Eustachian tube and middle ear of half heads of heathland and blackface sheep were filled with silicone rubber, blended with barium sulfate to induce X-ray visibility. Images were taken by digital volume tomography. The tubes were segmented, and a three-dimensional model of every Eustachian tube was generated. The lengths, diameters and shapes were determined. Additionally, the feasibility of endoscopic stent implantation and fixation was tested in cadaver experiments. The length of the tube between ostium pharyngeum and the isthmus and the diameters were comparable to published values for the human tube. The tube was easily accessible through the nose, and then stents could be implanted and fixed at the isthmus. The sheep appears to be a promising model for testing new stent treatments for middle ear ventilation disorders.

  15. Ear infection - chronic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middle ear infection - chronic; Otitis media - chronic; Chronic otitis media; Chronic ear infection ... blocked, fluid can build up. When this happens, infection can occur. A chronic ear infection develops when ...

  16. Suitability of the partially implantable active middle-ear amplifier Vibrant Soundbridge® to hyperbaric exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingmann, Christoph; Klingmann, Angela; Skevas, Theodoros

    2011-12-01

    Active middle ear amplifiers represent a modern possibility to treat sensorineural, conductive and combined hearing loss. They can be in use in divers and patients who need hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Therefore, active middle-ear amplifiers have to be tested to determine whether or not they are prone to implosion or function loss in hyperbaric conditions. We asked three of the companies registered by the German health authorities as manufacturers of active middle ear amplifiers to test their devices in hyperbaric conditions. Med-El agreed to support the study; Envoy stated that their devices were unable to withstand a pressure of 608 kPa; Otologics had no capacity to take part in this study. Twelve Vibrant Soundbridge® (Med-El) middle-ear amplifiers were tested in a water bath in a hyperbaric chamber. Four devices were pressurised to a maximum of 284 kPa, four devices to 405 kPa and four devices to 608 kPa, each for a maximum dive time of 78 minutes. The functions of the 12 devices were tested by the manufacturer pre- and post-hyperbaric exposure. Visual inspections as well as laboratory function tests were normal in all 12 devices after hyperbaric exposure. Hyperbaric exposure to more than one bar pressure difference can result in structure damage, implosion or loss of function of the mechanical device. The Vibrant Soundbridge® middle-ear amplifier tolerated a single hyperbaric exposure to pressures of up to 608 kPa for 78 minutes with no loss of performance.

  17. Middle ear structures in the Permian Glanosuchus sp. (Therocephalia, Therapsida, based on thin sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Maier

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Transverse sections of the skull of the Permian therocephalian Glanosuchus sp. were studied with regard to the structures of the middle ear region. It is generally accepted that most of the skeletal elements of the mammalian middle ear are derived from the postdentary bones of the lower jaw. During synapsid evolution there is a gradual transition from a primitive amniote condition to derived mammalian condition; the latter is characterized by the decoupling of the remaining middle ear elements (angular, prearticular, articular from the dentary, which forms a secondary jaw articulation with the squamosal. Morganucodon from the Triassic-Jurassic boundary represents an evolutionary stage, where both jaw articulations are present in a coaxial position and where the primary joint is a Pready a fully effective sound transmitter. Therocephalians are considered to be a good representation of the transitory state of this evolutionary process; this may be especially true for primitive taxa such as the lycosuchid Glanosuchus, whose anatomy may represent the "groundplan" (ancestral morphotype of Lower to Middle Permian eutheriodonts. We studied a complete sectional series of a young specimen of Glanosuchus sp. prepared using the grind-and peel-technique. This showed that the reflected lamina of Glanosuchus is in major parts an extremely thin bony plate, which is best interpreted as a sound-receiving element overlying an air-filled recessus of the pharynx. In this specimen, the vestibular foramen and the stapes are preserved in situ; it is likely, however, that both structures were framed by cartilage which fixed the anular ligament. Both the stapes and the quadrate process of the pterygoid are in direct contact with the quadrate. Comparison of the area of the reflected lamina and the vestibular foramen shows that impedance matching was still very ineffective in Therocephalia when compared to extant mammals. In dieser Arbeit wurden Transversalschnitte des

  18. ["Vibrant Soundbridge" middle ear implant for auditory rehabilitation in sensory hearing loss. I. Clinical aspects, indications and initial results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dazert, S; Shehata-Dieler, W E; Dieler, R; Helms, J

    2000-08-01

    The adequate therapy for patients suffering from a sensory hearing loss consists of fitting electronic hearing devices. Conventional hearing aids, however, present with significant inherent drawbacks such as insufficient amplification in the high frequency range, problems with the ear mold (feed back, occlusion, external otitis), or distortion of sound with an "unnatural" hearing impression. The partially implantable middle ear device Vibrant Soundbridge provides a sound wave conversion into mechanical vibrations at the middle ear ossicles using the Floating Mass Transducer (FMT). The audiological advantages are due to a direct moving force to the perilymph via incus and stapes. The Vibrant Soundbridge system is indicated in patients with a medium to severe symmetrical sensory hearing loss and a normal middle ear. Candidates need previous experience with conventional hearing aids without satisfactory results. The eight operated patients report a "natural" quality of sound and speech, a better hearing perception at high frequencies and the absence of feed back phenomena. Audiological evaluation and questionnair results support the patients subjective hearing impression. The Vibrant Soundbridge improves hearing quality in patients with sensory hearing loss. The hearing implant is indicated in particular in patients that are unable to wear conventional hearing aids.

  19. The middle ear muscle reflex in the diagnosis of cochlear neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, Michelle D; Hancock, Kenneth E; Liberman, M Charles

    2016-02-01

    Cochlear neuropathy, i.e. the loss of auditory nerve fibers (ANFs) without loss of hair cells, may cause hearing deficits without affecting threshold sensitivity, particularly if the subset of ANFs with high thresholds and low spontaneous rates (SRs) is preferentially lost, as appears to be the case in both aging and noise-damaged cochleas. Because low-SR fibers may also be important drivers of the medial olivocochlear reflex (MOCR) and middle-ear muscle reflex (MEMR), these reflexes might be sensitive metrics of cochlear neuropathy. To test this hypothesis, we measured reflex strength and reflex threshold in mice with noise-induced neuropathy, as documented by confocal analysis of immunostained cochlear whole-mounts. To assay the MOCR, we measured contra-noise modulation of ipsilateral distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) before and after the administration of curare to block the MEMR or curare + strychnine to also block the MOCR. The modulation of DPOAEs was 1) dominated by the MEMR in anesthetized mice, with a smaller contribution from the MOCR, and 2) significantly attenuated in neuropathic mice, but only when the MEMR was intact. We then measured MEMR growth functions by monitoring contra-noise induced changes in the wideband reflectance of chirps presented to the ipsilateral ear. We found 1) that the changes in wideband reflectance were mediated by the MEMR alone, and 2) that MEMR threshold was elevated and its maximum amplitude was attenuated in neuropathic mice. These data suggest that the MEMR may be valuable in the early detection of cochlear neuropathy. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. High-resolution numerical model of the middle and inner ear for a detailed analysis of radio frequency absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, Gernot; Ueberbacher, Richard; Samaras, Theodoros; Jappel, Alexandra; Baumgartner, Wolf-Dieter; Tschabitscher, Manfred; Mazal, Peter R

    2007-01-01

    In order to enable a detailed analysis of radio frequency (RF) absorption in the human middle and inner ear organs, a numerical model of these organs was developed at a spatial resolution of 0.1 mm, based on a real human tissue sample. The dielectric properties of the liquids (perilymph and endolymph) inside the bony labyrinth were measured on samples of ten freshly deceased humans. After inserting this model into a commercially available numerical head model, FDTD-based computations for exposure scenarios with generic models of handheld devices operated close to the head in the frequency range 400-3700 MHz were carried out. For typical output power values of real handheld mobile communication devices the obtained results showed only very small amounts of absorbed RF power in the middle and inner ear organs. Highest absorption in the middle and inner ear was found for the 400 MHz irradiation. In this case, the RF power absorbed inside the labyrinth and the vestibulocochlear nerve was as low as 166 μW and 12 μW, respectively, when considering a device of 500 mW output power operated close to the ear. For typical mobile phone frequencies (900 MHz and 1850 MHz) and output power values (250 mW and 125 mW) the corresponding values of absorbed RF power were found to be more than one order of magnitude lower than the values given above. These results indicate that temperature-related biologically relevant effects on the middle and inner ear, induced by the RF emissions of typical handheld mobile communication devices, are unlikely

  1. Strategies for decreasing multidrug antibiotic resistance: role of ototopical agents for treatment of middle ear infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Jerome O

    2002-10-01

    Change in the susceptibility of bacterial pathogens to antimicrobial agents is constant. The efficacy of a new drug may change as it is used in clinical settings, and resistant bacterial clones result from the encounter of drug and organism. Soon after the introduction of the sulfonamides in the mid-1930s, the first effective agents of the antimicrobial era, resistance of pneumococci and group A streptococci was evident. In each of the following decades, a different problem in multidrug resistance occurred among common bacterial pathogens: beta-lactamase-producing staphylococci in the 1950s; highly resistant gram-negative enteric bacteria in the 1960s; beta-lactamase-producing Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis in the 1970s; and multidrug-resistant pneumococci in the 1980s. Antimicrobial resistance among respiratory pathogens is now a common clinical problem throughout the world, and its management is a part of routine office practice. Currently in the United States, about 25% of pneumococci are resistant to penicillin, and 25% of H influenzae and 90% of M catarrhalis produce beta-lactamase and would be inactivated by organisms producing the enzyme. The emergence of penicillin and multidrug-resistant pneumococci and beta-lactamase-producing strains of H influenzae and M catarrhalis have special importance for the management of infections of the middle ear. The widespread use of oral and parenteral antimicrobial drugs for appropriate and inappropriate uses has driven the emergence and spread of resistant organisms. This article discusses current susceptibility patterns of organisms involved in middle ear infections, risk factors associated with development of resistant strains, strategies for limiting the incidence and spread of resistant organisms and, as part of the strategy, use of ototopical rather than systemic antimicrobial drugs for chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM) and acute otitis media (AOM) in children with tympanostomy tubes. Although

  2. In vivo areal modulus of elasticity estimation of the human tympanic membrane system: modelling of middle ear mechanical function in normal young and aged ears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaihede, Michael Lyhne; Donghua, Liao; Gregersen, H.

    2007-01-01

    The quasi-static elastic properties of the tympanic membrane system can be described by the areal modulus of elasticity determined by a middle ear model. The response of the tympanic membrane to quasi-static pressure changes is determined by its elastic properties. Several clinical problems are r...... finite element analyses. In vivo estimates of Young's modulus in this study were a factor 2-3 smaller than previously found in vitro. No significant age-related differences were found in the elastic properties as expressed by the areal modulus.......The quasi-static elastic properties of the tympanic membrane system can be described by the areal modulus of elasticity determined by a middle ear model. The response of the tympanic membrane to quasi-static pressure changes is determined by its elastic properties. Several clinical problems...... are related to these, but studies are few and mostly not comparable. The elastic properties of membranes can be described by the areal modulus, and these may also be susceptible to age-related changes reflected by changes in the areal modulus. The areal modulus is determined by the relationship between...

  3. Dental root agenesis secondary to irradiation therapy in a case of rhabdomyosarcoma of the middle ear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dury, D.C.; Roberts, M.W.; Miser, J.S.; Folio, J.

    1984-01-01

    There have been only a few published reports on the dental-facial effects of radiation therapy and the subsequent oral management of these patients. A case involving a 13-year-old black male patient with a history of rhabdomyosarcoma is presented. The patient received 4,050 rads of radiation to the right middle ear when he was 2 years of age. His residual medical and dental difficulties are apparently complications from the initial therapy. Examination of the oral cavity revealed bimaxillary micrognathia and marked loss of vertical dimension. A Class II facial profile with Class I molar relationship was observed. The mandible was thin and hypoplastic, with a small knife-edge alveolar ridge. The remaining eighteen erupted permanent teeth were very mobile, and root development had ceased after only initial formation. All of the teeth except the first permanent molars were extracted, and immediate partial dentures were inserted at the time of surgery. A discussion of therapeutic considerations follows the case report

  4. Dental root agenesis secondary to irradiation therapy in a case of rhabdomyosarcoma of the middle ear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dury, D.C.; Roberts, M.W.; Miser, J.S.; Folio, J.

    1984-06-01

    There have been only a few published reports on the dental-facial effects of radiation therapy and the subsequent oral management of these patients. A case involving a 13-year-old black male patient with a history of rhabdomyosarcoma is presented. The patient received 4,050 rads of radiation to the right middle ear when he was 2 years of age. His residual medical and dental difficulties are apparently complications from the initial therapy. Examination of the oral cavity revealed bimaxillary micrognathia and marked loss of vertical dimension. A Class II facial profile with Class I molar relationship was observed. The mandible was thin and hypoplastic, with a small knife-edge alveolar ridge. The remaining eighteen erupted permanent teeth were very mobile, and root development had ceased after only initial formation. All of the teeth except the first permanent molars were extracted, and immediate partial dentures were inserted at the time of surgery. A discussion of therapeutic considerations follows the case report.

  5. Effect of acrolein, a hazardous air pollutant in smoke, on human middle ear epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jae-Jun; Lee, Jong Dae; Lee, Byung Don; Chae, Sung Won; Park, Moo Kyun

    2013-10-01

    Acrolein is a hazardous air pollutant. Tobacco smoke and indoor air pollution are the main causes of human exposure. Acrolein has been shown to cause cytotoxicity in the airways and induce inflammation and mucin production in pulmonary cells. We investigated whether acrolein caused cytotoxicity, induced inflammation or increased expression of mucin in immortalized human middle ear epithelial cell lines (HMEECs). Cytotoxicity following acrolein treatment was investigated using the MTT assay, flow cytometry, and Hoechst 33342 staining of HMEECs. We measured expression of inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-2 and the mucin gene MUC5AC using semi-quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting. Exposure to >50 μg/mL acrolein caused a decrease in cell viability. Acrolein induced apoptosis and necrosis at 50 μg/mL. Acrolein at 5-50 μg/mL increased expression of TNF-α and COX-2, as shown by RT-PCR and Western blotting. Acrolein exposure at 5-50 μg/mL for 2-24h increased MUC5AC expression, as determined by RT-PCR. Acrolein decreased cell viability, induced an inflammatory response, and increased mucin gene expression in HMEECs. These findings support the hypothesis that acrolein, a hazardous air pollutant in tobacco smoke and ambient air, is a risk factor for otitis media. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Three-dimensional reconstruction and modeling of middle ear biomechanics by high-resolution computed tomography and finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chia-Fone; Chen, Peir-Rong; Lee, Wen-Jeng; Chen, Jyh-Horng; Liu, Tien-Chen

    2006-05-01

    To present a systematic and practical approach that uses high-resolution computed tomography to derive models of the middle ear for finite element analysis. This prospective study included 31 subjects with normal hearing and no previous otologic disorders. Temporal bone images obtained from 15 right ears and 16 left ears were used for evaluation and reconstruction. High-resolution computed tomography of temporal bone was performed using simultaneous acquisition of 16 sections with a collimated slice thickness of 0.625 mm. All images were transferred to an Amira visualization system for three-dimensional reconstruction. The created three-dimensional model was translated into two commercial modeling packages, Patran and ANSYS, for finite element analysis. The characteristic dimensions of the model were measured and compared with previously published histologic section data. This result confirms that the geometric model created by the proposed method is accurate except that the tympanic membrane is thicker than when measured by the histologic section method. No obvious difference in the geometrical dimension between right and left ossicles was found (P > .05). The three-dimensional model created by finite element method and predicted umbo and stapes displacements are close to the bounds of the experimental curves of Nishihara's, Huber's, Gan's, and Sun's data across the frequency range of 100 to 8000 Hz. The model includes a description of the geometry of the middle ear components and dynamic equations of vibration. The proposed method is quick, practical, low-cost, and, most importantly, noninvasive as compared with histologic section methods.

  7. Original Solution for Middle Ear Implant and Anesthetic/Surgical Management in a Child with Severe Craniofacial Dysmorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Bianchin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the novel solution adopted in positioning middle ear implant in a child with bilateral congenital aural atresia and craniofacial dysmorphism that have posed a significant challenge for the safe and correct management of deafness. A five-year-old child, affected by a rare congenital disease (Van Maldergem Syndrome, suffered from conductive hearing loss. Conventional skin-drive bone-conduction device, attached with a steel spring headband, has been applied but auditory restoration was not optimal. The decision made was to position Vibrant Soundbridge, a middle ear implant, with an original surgical application due to hypoplasia of the tympanic cavity. Intubation procedure was complicated due to child craniofacial deformities. Postoperative hearing rehabilitation involved a multidisciplinary team, showing improved social skills and language development.

  8. Ribotyping of strains of Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis cultured from the nasopharynx and middle ear of children with otitis media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brygge, K; Sørensen, C H; Colding, H

    1998-01-01

    . The distribution of these types was found to be almost identical to the distribution among 16 M. catarrhalis strains cultured from middle ear exudates of 16 children with acute otitis media. Ribotype HAPA was found in two-thirds of all the cultures investigated, and 44% of the children harboured more than one...... ribotype in the nasopharynx at the same time. The vast majority of the nasopharyngeal M. catarrhalis cultures were beta-lactamase positive. One child had both a HAPA ribotype, beta-lactamase-negative strain in the nasopharyngeal secretions, and HAPA ribotype, beta-lactamase-positive strains at the entrance...... of the eustachian tube, the nasopharyngeal tonsils, the folds of the nasopharyngeal tonsils and the oropharynx. All except one of the M. catarrhalis strains cultured from middle ear exudates were beta-lactamase positive....

  9. First report of a Staphylococcus caprae isolated from middle ear fluid of an infant with recurrent acute otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Elżbieta; Żychowski, Piotr; Juda, Marek; Korona-Głowniak, Izabela; Niedzielska, Grażyna; Malm, Anna; Kozioł-Montewka, Maria

    2017-09-21

    Staphylococcus caprae was originally isolated from goat milk. This uncommon coagulase-negative staphylococcus, usually associated with animals, has only infrequently been detected in human clinical specimens. Its association with acute otitis media has not been demonstrated so far. The study reports the first isolation of S. caprae from the middle ear fluid of a 12-month-old infant with recurrent, bilateral acute otitis media. Biochemical traits and susceptibility pattern of the isolated strain are also presented.

  10. Prognostic value of bone involvement in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the external and middle ear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiga, Hideaki; Ito, Makoto; Uramoto, Naoki; Hatano, Miyako; Miwa, Takaki; Furukawa, Mitsuru

    2007-01-01

    The incidence of the external and middle ear squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is extremely rare in the head and neck cancer with less than 1%. Therefore, the correlation between the staging classification and the prognosis has not been clear. Prognostic factors for patients with the external and middle ear SCC were assessed in the initial clinical symptoms and radiographic imaging. 13 patients with the external and middle ear SCC (5 male and 8 female) that had been treated at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Kanazawa University hospital from 2000 to 2006 were selected for this study. The radiation therapy followed surgery in ten patients. One patient received the radical cure irradiation before surgery. Two patients received a surgical excision alone. The temporal bone involvement and the parotid gland involvement in the radiographic image (computed tomography imaging and/or magnetic resonance imaging) were assessed. Clinical symptoms (otalgia, hearing disturbance, tinnitus, vertigo and facial nerve palsy) before treatment were reviewed based on the medical record. The correlation of those clinical factors and T staging in the Pittsburgh classification with overall survival was statistically assessed. The temporal bone involvement significantly correlated with worse prognosis. However, parotid gland involvement did not influence the prognosis. Moreover, statistically significant difference in T staging of the Pittsburgh classification (T1·T2 vs. T3·T4) was not found. The temporal bone involvement in the radiographic image was a prognostic factor for patients with the external and middle ear SCC. Pittsburgh classification needs to be modified because the bony part of the external auditory canal involvement is considered as T2 stage and the soft tissue involvement is defined as T4 stage. (author)

  11. Partial Characterization of Normal and Haemophilus influenzae–Infected Mucosal Complementary DNA Libraries in Chinchilla Middle Ear Mucosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerschner, Joseph E.; Erdos, Geza; Hu, Fen Ze; Burrows, Amy; Cioffi, Joseph; Khampang, Pawjai; Dahlgren, Margaret; Hayes, Jay; Keefe, Randy; Janto, Benjamin; Post, J. Christopher; Ehrlich, Garth D.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives We sought to construct and partially characterize complementary DNA (cDNA) libraries prepared from the middle ear mucosa (MEM) of chinchillas to better understand pathogenic aspects of infection and inflammation, particularly with respect to leukotriene biogenesis and response. Methods Chinchilla MEM was harvested from controls and after middle ear inoculation with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae. RNA was extracted to generate cDNA libraries. Randomly selected clones were subjected to sequence analysis to characterize the libraries and to provide DNA sequence for phylogenetic analyses. Reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction of the RNA pools was used to generate cDNA sequences corresponding to genes associated with leukotriene biosynthesis and metabolism. Results Sequence analysis of 921 randomly selected clones from the uninfected MEM cDNA library produced approximately 250,000 nucleotides of almost entirely novel sequence data. Searches of the GenBank database with the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool provided for identification of 515 unique genes expressed in the MEM and not previously described in chinchillas. In almost all cases, the chinchilla cDNA sequences displayed much greater homology to human or other primate genes than with rodent species. Genes associated with leukotriene metabolism were present in both normal and infected MEM. Conclusions Based on both phylogenetic comparisons and gene expression similarities with humans, chinchilla MEM appears to be an excellent model for the study of middle ear inflammation and infection. The higher degree of sequence similarity between chinchillas and humans compared to chinchillas and rodents was unexpected. The cDNA libraries from normal and infected chinchilla MEM will serve as useful molecular tools in the study of otitis media and should yield important information with respect to middle ear pathogenesis. PMID:20433028

  12. First report of a Staphylococcus caprae isolated from middle ear fluid of an infant with recurrent acute otitis media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Mazur

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus caprae was originally isolated from goat milk. This uncommon coagulase-negative staphylococcus, usually associated with animals, has only infrequently been detected in human clinical specimens. Its association with acute otitis media has not been demonstrated so far. The study reports the first isolation of S. caprae from the middle ear fluid of a 12-month-old infant with recurrent, bilateral acute otitis media. Biochemical traits and susceptibility pattern of the isolated strain are also presented

  13. Partial characterization of normal and Haemophilus influenzae-infected mucosal complementary DNA libraries in chinchilla middle ear mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerschner, Joseph E; Erdos, Geza; Hu, Fen Ze; Burrows, Amy; Cioffi, Joseph; Khampang, Pawjai; Dahlgren, Margaret; Hayes, Jay; Keefe, Randy; Janto, Benjamin; Post, J Christopher; Ehrlich, Garth D

    2010-04-01

    We sought to construct and partially characterize complementary DNA (cDNA) libraries prepared from the middle ear mucosa (MEM) of chinchillas to better understand pathogenic aspects of infection and inflammation, particularly with respect to leukotriene biogenesis and response. Chinchilla MEM was harvested from controls and after middle ear inoculation with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae. RNA was extracted to generate cDNA libraries. Randomly selected clones were subjected to sequence analysis to characterize the libraries and to provide DNA sequence for phylogenetic analyses. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction of the RNA pools was used to generate cDNA sequences corresponding to genes associated with leukotriene biosynthesis and metabolism. Sequence analysis of 921 randomly selected clones from the uninfected MEM cDNA library produced approximately 250,000 nucleotides of almost entirely novel sequence data. Searches of the GenBank database with the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool provided for identification of 515 unique genes expressed in the MEM and not previously described in chinchillas. In almost all cases, the chinchilla cDNA sequences displayed much greater homology to human or other primate genes than with rodent species. Genes associated with leukotriene metabolism were present in both normal and infected MEM. Based on both phylogenetic comparisons and gene expression similarities with humans, chinchilla MEM appears to be an excellent model for the study of middle ear inflammation and infection. The higher degree of sequence similarity between chinchillas and humans compared to chinchillas and rodents was unexpected. The cDNA libraries from normal and infected chinchilla MEM will serve as useful molecular tools in the study of otitis media and should yield important information with respect to middle ear pathogenesis.

  14. Separating the contributions of olivocochlear and middle ear muscle reflexes in modulation of distortion product otoacoustic emission levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolter, Nikolaus E; Harrison, Robert V; James, Adrian L

    2014-01-01

    Mediated by the medial olivocochlear system (MOCS), distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) levels are reduced by presentation of contralateral acoustic stimuli. Such acoustic signals can also evoke a middle ear muscle reflex (MEMR) that also attenuates recorded DPOAE levels. Our aim is to clearly differentiate these two inhibitory mechanisms and to analyze each separately, perhaps allowing the development of novel tests of hearing function. DPOAE were recorded in real time from chinchillas with normal auditory brainstem response thresholds and middle ear function. Amplitude reduction and its onset latency caused by contralateral presentation of intermittent narrow-band noise (NBN) were measured. Stapedius and tensor tympani muscle tendons were divided without disturbing the ossicular chain, and DPOAE testing was repeated. Peak reduction of (2f1 - f2) DPOAE levels occurred when the center frequency of contralateral NBN approximated the primary tone f2, indicating an f2-frequency-specific response. For a 4.5-kHz centered NBN, DPOAE (f2 = 4.4 kHz) inhibition was 0.1 dB (p Low-frequency NBN (center frequency: 0.5 kHz) reduced otoacoustic emission levels (0.1 dB, p low-frequency response was abolished by division of the middle ear muscle tendons, clearly indicating MEMR involvement. Following middle ear muscle tendon division, DPOAE inhibition by contralateral stimuli approximating the primary tone f2 persists, whereas responses evoked by lower contralateral frequencies are abolished. This distinguishes the different roles of the MOCS (f2 frequency specific) and MEMR (low frequency only) in contralateral modulation of DPOAE. This analysis helps clarify the pathways involved in an objective test that might have clinical benefit in the testing of neonates.

  15. Dexmedetomidine infusion during middle ear surgery under general anaesthesia to provide oligaemic surgical field: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumkum Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Middle ear surgery requires bloodless surgical field for better operating conditions, deep level of anaesthesia and rapid emergence. Recent studies suggest that α2 agonists could provide desired surgical field, sedation and analgesia. The present study was aimed to evaluate the clinical effects of dexmedetomidine infusion as anaesthetic adjuvant during middle ear surgery using operating microscope. Methods: Sixty four adult patients aged 18-58 years, American Society of Anaesthesiologists Grades I and II, of both gender were randomised into two comparable equal groups of 32 patients each for middle ear surgery under general anaesthesia with standard anaesthetic technique. After induction of general anaesthesia, patients of Group I were given dexmedetomidine infusion of 0.5 μg/kg/h and patients of Group II were given placebo infusion of normal saline. Isoflurane concentration was titrated to achieve a systolic blood pressure 30% below the baseline value. All patients were assessed intra-operatively for bleeding at surgical field, haemodynamic changes, awakening time and post-operative recovery. Results: Statistically significant reduction was observed in the required percentage of isoflurane (0.8 ± 0.6% to maintain the systolic blood pressure 30% below the baseline values in patients receiving dexmedetomidine infusion when compared to those receiving placebo infusion (1.6 ± 0.7%. Patients receiving dexmedetomidine infusion had statistically significant lesser bleeding at surgical field (P < 0.05. The mean awakening time and recovery from anaesthesia did not show any significant difference between the groups. Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine infusion can be safely used to provide oligaemic surgical field for better visualization using operating microscope for middle ear surgery.

  16. Ribotyping of strains of Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis cultured from the nasopharynx and middle ear of children with otitis media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brygge, K; Sørensen, C H; Colding, H

    1998-01-01

    ribotype in the nasopharynx at the same time. The vast majority of the nasopharyngeal M. catarrhalis cultures were beta-lactamase positive. One child had both a HAPA ribotype, beta-lactamase-negative strain in the nasopharyngeal secretions, and HAPA ribotype, beta-lactamase-positive strains at the entrance...... of the eustachian tube, the nasopharyngeal tonsils, the folds of the nasopharyngeal tonsils and the oropharynx. All except one of the M. catarrhalis strains cultured from middle ear exudates were beta-lactamase positive....

  17. Original Solution for Middle Ear Implant and Anesthetic/Surgical Management in a Child with Severe Craniofacial Dysmorphism

    OpenAIRE

    Bianchin, Giovanni; Tribi, Lorenzo; Reverzani, Aronne; Formigoni, Patrizia; Polizzi, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    We describe the novel solution adopted in positioning middle ear implant in a child with bilateral congenital aural atresia and craniofacial dysmorphism that have posed a significant challenge for the safe and correct management of deafness. A five-year-old child, affected by a rare congenital disease (Van Maldergem Syndrome), suffered from conductive hearing loss. Conventional skin-drive bone-conduction device, attached with a steel spring headband, has been applied but auditory restoration ...

  18. Betahistine as an add-on: The magic bullet for postoperative nausea, vomiting and dizziness after middle ear surgery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandip Mukhopadhyay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Patients undergoing middle ear surgery experience variable degrees of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV despite prophylaxis and treatment with ondansetron or other 5HT 3 receptor antagonists. Furthermore vertigo or dizziness are not well controlled perioperatively. Role of betahistine was tested as an add-on to ondansetron in control of PONV and vertigo in middle ear surgery cases. Materials and Methods: We conducted a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled study, enrolling one hundred patients undergoing middle ear surgery under local anesthesia into two groups consisting of fifty (n = 50 patients each. Group A patients were given betahistine 16 mg plus ondansetron 8 mg and placebo plus ondansetron 8 mg were given to group B or placebo group, orally 3 hours before starting operation. The incidence of nausea, vomiting, and dizziness was noted during the intraoperative and postoperative 24 hours period. Chi-square test, unpaired ′t′ test, and Fisher′s exact tests were performed for statistical analysis using SPSS version 16 and Open Epi version 2.3.1 softwares. Results: Complete response was obtained in 90% patients in the betahistine group as compared to 66% in the placebo group. Vomiting in the intraoperative and postoperative period was noted in 4% and 8% cases, respectively, in the betahistine group as compared to 18% and 26%, respectively, in the placebo group. Overall, vertigo was 10% versus 32% in betahistine group and placebo group, respectively. Conclusion: Betahistine as an add-on to ondansetron can significantly attenuate PONV and perioperative vertigo, following middle ear surgeries.

  19. Auditing in middle ear surgery, feasibility of the common otology database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Rompaey, V; Yung, M; Van de Heyning, P

    2010-01-01

    Clinical auditing is a systematic process for improving quality of care. The primary goal is to compare current practice with established standards. A common dataset enables the comparison of results, and takes into account the effect of case mix, surgical techniques and follow-up periods on outcome. The Common Otology Database (COD) is a joint effort of an international group of otologists to standardise reporting on middle ear surgery, including myringoplasty, ossiculoplasty, stapes surgery and cholesteatoma removal. It aims to identify audit data using the internet (http://www.ear-audit.net), provide a storage system for otological data, to create a prospective database allowing statistical analysis with sufficient power and to produce standards for comparative auditing. The COD provides two levels of data entry, anonymising surgeon and patient data. Level 1 is designed for general otorhinolaryngologists and trainees, and only records main outcomes. Level 2 is designed for benchmark otologists and includes detailed information about pathologies, risk factors, aim of surgery, surgical findings, procedures, follow-up periods and complications. Level-2 surgeons are required to submit pre-operative data on all patients scheduled for surgery in order to eliminate bias as a result of selective reporting. The COD began in January 2004 and is continuously including patients. In May 2009, 2,291 cases were entered in the level-2 benchmark database, including 1,218 myringoplasties (53.2%), 576 ossiculoplasties (25.1%), 695 stapes surgeries (30.3%) and 532 cholesteatoma surgeries (23.2%). Currently, 151 surgeons use the database system (levels 1 and 2 combined). Eighteen otologists were invited to contribute to the level 2 database. Eight contributors complied with the validation criteria. Others did not cooperate, citing a lack of resources to support data input, or their health system discouraging follow-up. Some were also reluctant to have their outcome data subjected to

  20. Congestion of mastoid mucosa and influence on middle ear pressure - Effect of retroauricular injection of adrenaline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fooken Jensen, Pernille Vita; Gaihede, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Micro-CT scanning of temporal bones has revealed numerous retroauricular microchannels, which connect the outer bone surface directly to the underlying mastoid air cells. Their structure and dimensions have suggested a separate vascular supply to the mastoid mucosa, which may play a role in middle ear (ME) pressure regulation. This role may be accomplished by changes in the mucosa congestion resulting in volumetric changes, which ultimately affect the pressure of the enclosed ME gas pocket (Boyle's law). Further, such mucosa congestion may be susceptible to α-adrenergic stimulation similar to the mucosa of the nose. The purpose of our study was to investigate these hypotheses by recording the ME pressure in response to adrenergic stimulation administered by retroauricular injections at the surface of the microchannels. In a group of 20 healthy adults we measured the ME pressure by tympanometry initially in the sitting position, and then in the supine position over a 5 min period with 30 s intervals. In each subject, the study included 1) a control reference experiment with no intervention, 2) a control experiment with subcutaneously retroauricular injection of 1 ml isotonic NaCl solution, and 3) a test experiment with subcutaneously retroauricular injection of 1 ml NaCl-adrenaline solution. In both control experiments the ME pressure displayed an immediate increase in response to changing body position; this pressure increase remained stable for the entire period up to five minutes. In the test experiments the ME pressure also showed an initial pressure increase, but it was followed by a distinct significant pressure decrease with a maximum after 90 s. The test group was injected with both a 5 and 10% adrenaline solution, but the responses appeared similar for the two concentrations. Subcutaneous retroauricular injection of adrenaline caused a significant pressure decrease in ME pressure compared with control ears. This may be explained by the microchannels

  1. Enhanced oval window and blocked round window passages for middle-inner ear transportation of gadolinium in guinea pigs with a perforated round window membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jing; Pyykkö, Ilmari

    2015-02-01

    To elucidate the communication between the middle and inner ear, and the fluid dynamics of the inner ear with the perilymphatic fistula (PLF) of the round window membrane (RWM). The PLF of the RWM was created in nine guinea pigs. Gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid bismethylamide (Gd-DTPA-BMA) was delivered into the middle ear and followed in the inner ear using a 4.7 Tesla MRI. Pressure was delivered to the external ear canal of PLF ear in an attempt to enhance the inner ear uptake of Gd-DTPA-BMA. The immediate loading of Gd-DTPA-BMA in the scala tympani of the basal turn was ablated by the outflow of perilymph through the leaking RWM while the oval window passage for Gd-DTPA-BMA was enhanced. There was more Gd-DTPA-BMA distribution in the scala tympani than in the scala vestibuli in the second turn of the PLF cochlea (within 20 min). Signal in the vestibulum and scala vestibuli of the basal turn and rest part of PLF cochlea was greater than that of the control cochlea with intact RWM within 30 min. Pressure applied to the external ear canal tended to enhance the loading of Gd-DTPA-BMA in the perilymphatic scalae of the PLF cochlea. The enhanced oval window passage of Gd-DTPA-BMA was proven by the distorted distribution in the inner ear with PLF. The radial communication of cochlear perilymph was supported by the Gd-DTPA-BMA gradient among the perilymphatic scalae. Applying positive pressure to the external ear canal caused backflow of perilymph into the cochlea which has a potential of transmitting microbes from the middle ear into the inner ear.

  2. Ontogeny of the Middle-Ear Air-Sinus System in Alligator mississippiensis (Archosauria: Crocodylia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufeau, David L; Witmer, Lawrence M

    2015-01-01

    volume, but instead support the hypothesis that these changes may be a function of the acoustic properties of the middle ear.

  3. Ontogeny of the Middle-Ear Air-Sinus System in Alligator mississippiensis (Archosauria: Crocodylia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L Dufeau

    function of braincase volume, but instead support the hypothesis that these changes may be a function of the acoustic properties of the middle ear.

  4. Middle Ear Mechanics of Cartilage Tympanoplasty Evaluated by Laser Holography and Vibrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarnisalo, Antti A.; Cheng, Jeffrey T.; Ravicz, Michael E.; Hulli, Nesim; Harrington, Ellery J.; Hernandez-Montes, Maria S.; Furlong, Cosme; Merchant, Saumil N.; Rosowski, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Goals To assess the effects of thickness and position of cartilage used to reconstruct the tympanic membrane (TM) using a novel technique, time-averaged laser holography. Background Cartilage is commonly used in TM reconstruction to prevent formation of retraction pockets. The thickness, position, and shape of the cartilage graft may adversely affect TM motion and hearing. We sought to systematically investigate these parameters in an experimental setting. Methods Computer-assisted optoelectronic laser holography was used in 4 human cadaveric temporal bones to study sound-induced TM motion for 500 Hz to 8 kHz. Stapes velocity was measured with a laser Doppler vibrometer. Baseline (control) measurements were made with the TM intact. Measurements were repeated after a 0.5- or 1.0-mm-thick oval piece of conchal cartilage was placed on the medial TM surface in the posterior-superior quadrant. The cartilage was rotated so that it was either in contact with the bony tympanic rim and manubrium or not. Results At frequencies less than 4 kHz, the cartilage graft had only minor effects on the overall TM fringe patterns. The different conditions had no effects on stapes velocity. Greater than 4 kHz, TM motion was reduced over the grafted TM, both with 0.5- and 1.0-mm-thick grafts. No significant differences in stapes velocity were seen with the 2 different thicknesses of cartilage compared with control. Conclusion Computer-assisted optoelectronic laser holography is a promising technique to investigate middle ear mechanics after tympanoplasty. Such positioning may prevent postoperative TM retraction. These findings and conclusions apply to cartilage placed in the posterior-superior TM quadrant. PMID:19779389

  5. The value of single-shot turbo spin-echo diffusion-weighted MR imaging in the detection of middle ear cholesteatoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Foer, Bert; Bernaerts, Anja; Maes, Joachim; Deckers, Filip; Pouillon, Marc; Vercruysse, Jean-Philippe; Somers, Thomas; Offeciers, Erwin; Michiels, Johan; Casselman, Jan W.

    2007-01-01

    Single-shot (SS) turbo spin-echo (TSE) diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non echo-planar imaging (EPI) technique recently reported for the evaluation of middle ear cholesteatoma. We prospectively evaluated a SS TSE DW sequence in detecting congenital or acquired middle ear cholesteatoma and evaluated the size of middle ear cholesteatoma detectable with this sequence. The aim of this study was not to differentiate between inflammatory tissue and cholesteatoma using SS TSE DW imaging. A group of 21 patients strongly suspected clinically and/or otoscopically of having a middle ear cholesteatoma without any history of prior surgery were evaluated with late post-gadolinium MRI including this SS TSE DW sequence. A total of 21 middle ear cholesteatomas (5 congenital and 16 acquired) were found at surgery with a size varying between 2 and 19 mm. Hyperintense signal on SS TSE DW imaging compatible with cholesteatoma was found in 19 patients. One patient showed no hyperintensity due to autoevacuation of the cholesteatoma sac into the external auditory canal. Another patient showed no hyperintensity because of motion artifacts. This study shows the high sensitivity of this SS TSE DW sequence in detecting small middle ear cholesteatomas, with a size limit as small as 2 mm. (orig.)

  6. In vivo areal modulus of elasticity estimation of the human tympanic membrane system: modelling of middle ear mechanical function in normal young and aged ears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaihede, Michael; Liao Donghua; Gregersen, Hans

    2007-01-01

    The quasi-static elastic properties of the tympanic membrane system can be described by the areal modulus of elasticity determined by a middle ear model. The response of the tympanic membrane to quasi-static pressure changes is determined by its elastic properties. Several clinical problems are related to these, but studies are few and mostly not comparable. The elastic properties of membranes can be described by the areal modulus, and these may also be susceptible to age-related changes reflected by changes in the areal modulus. The areal modulus is determined by the relationship between membrane tension and change of the surface area relative to the undeformed surface area. A middle ear model determined the tension-strain relationship in vivo based on data from experimental pressure-volume deformations of the human tympanic membrane system. The areal modulus was determined in both a younger (n = 10) and an older (n = 10) group of normal subjects. The areal modulus for lateral and medial displacement of the tympanic membrane system was smaller in the older group (mean = 0.686 and 0.828 kN m -1 , respectively) compared to the younger group (mean = 1.066 and 1.206 kN m -1 , respectively), though not significantly (2p = 0.10 and 0.11, respectively). Based on the model the areal modulus was established describing the summated elastic properties of the tympanic membrane system. Future model improvements include exact determination of the tympanic membrane area accounting for its shape via 3D finite element analyses. In vivo estimates of Young's modulus in this study were a factor 2-3 smaller than previously found in vitro. No significant age-related differences were found in the elastic properties as expressed by the areal modulus

  7. Dissection of the Auditory Bulla in Postnatal Mice: Isolation of the Middle Ear Bones and Histological Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Ayako; Kuroda, Yukiko; Kanzaki, Sho; Matsuo, Koichi

    2017-01-04

    In most mammals, auditory ossicles in the middle ear, including the malleus, incus and stapes, are the smallest bones. In mice, a bony structure called the auditory bulla houses the ossicles, whereas the auditory capsule encloses the inner ear, namely the cochlea and semicircular canals. Murine ossicles are essential for hearing and thus of great interest to researchers in the field of otolaryngology, but their metabolism, development, and evolution are highly relevant to other fields. Altered bone metabolism can affect hearing function in adult mice, and various gene-deficient mice show changes in morphogenesis of auditory ossicles in utero. Although murine auditory ossicles are tiny, their manipulation is feasible if one understands their anatomical orientation and 3D structure. Here, we describe how to dissect the auditory bulla and capsule of postnatal mice and then isolate individual ossicles by removing part of the bulla. We also discuss how to embed the bulla and capsule in different orientations to generate paraffin or frozen sections suitable for preparation of longitudinal, horizontal, or frontal sections of the malleus. Finally, we enumerate anatomical differences between mouse and human auditory ossicles. These methods would be useful in analyzing pathological, developmental and evolutionary aspects of auditory ossicles and the middle ear in mice.

  8. An overview of changes in pressure values of the middle ear using impedance audiometry among diver candidates in a hyperbaric chamber before and after a pressure test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anoraga, J. S.; Bramantyo, B.; Bardosono, S.; Simanungkalit, S. H.; Basiruddin, J.

    2017-08-01

    Impedance audiometry is not yet routinely used in pressure tests, especially in Indonesia. Direct exposure to pressure in a hyperbaric chamber is sometimes without any assessment of the middle ear or the Eustachian tube function (ETF) of ventilation. Impedance audiometry examinations are important to assess ETF ventilation. This study determined the middle ear pressure value changes associated with the ETF (ventilation) of prospective divers. This study included 29 prospective divers aged 20-40 years without conductive hearing loss. All subjects underwent a modified diving impedance audiometry examination both before and after the pressure test in a double-lock hyperbaric chamber. Using the Toynbee maneuver, the values obtained for changes of pressure in the middle ear were significant before and after the pressure test in the right and left ears: p < 0.001 and p = 0.018, respectively. The impedance audiometry examination is necessary for the selection of candidate divers undergoing pressure tests within a hyperbaric chamber.

  9. Assessment of Middle Ear Function during the Acoustic Reflex Using Laser-Doppler Vibrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-07

    probe stimulus. Using a surgical microscope (Zeiss POMI-1), the laser beam was focused on the light reflex near the umbo of the TM in the right ear...a surgical microscope and focused on the TM near the umbo. A continuous probe tone of varying frequencies was delivered to the ear measured by the...the Doppler Effect, sensing the frequency shift of back scattered light from a moving surface. Briefly, LDV works by comparing the frequency of the

  10. Wideband acoustic immittance for assessing middle ear functioning for preterm neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandel Gouws

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The primary aim of newborn hearing screening is to detect permanent hearing loss. Because otoacoustic emissions (OAEs and automated auditory brainstem response (AABR are sensitive to hearing loss, they are often used as screening tools. On the other hand, false-positive results are most often because of transient outer- and middle ear conditions. Wideband acoustic immittance (WAI, which includes physical measures known as reflectance and absorbance, has shown potential for accurate assessment of middle ear function in young infants. Objective: The main objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of WAI as a diagnostic tool for assessing middle ear functioning in preterm neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU designed for premature and ill neonates. A further objective was to indicate the difference between the reflectance values of tones and click stimuli. Method: Fifty-six at-risk neonates (30 male and 26 female, with a mean age at testing of 35.6 weeks (range: 32–37 weeks and a standard deviation of 1.6 from three private hospitals, who passed both the distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE and AABR tests, were evaluated prior to discharge from the NICU. Neonates who presented with abnormal DPOAE and AABR results were excluded from the study. WAI was measured by using chirp and tone stimuli. In addition to reflectance, the reflectance area index (RAI values were calculated. Results: Both tone and chirp stimuli indicated high-power reflectance values below a frequency of 1.5 kHz. Median reflectance reached a minimum of 0.67 at 1 kHz – 2 kHz but increased to 0.7 below 1 kHz and 0.72 above 2 kHz for the tone stimuli. For chirp stimuli, the median reflectance reached a minimum of 0.51 at 1 kHz – 2 kHz but increased to 0.68 below 1 kHz and decreased to 0.5 above 2 kHz. A comparison between the present study and previous studies on WAI indicated a substantial variability across all frequency ranges

  11. Transmucosal gas-loss rates in middle ears initially filled with O2 or CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kania, Romain E; Vérillaud, Benjamin; Ars, Bernard; Tran Ba Huy, Patrice; Herman, Philippe; Ar, Amos

    2016-10-01

    This study investigates the role of different gases in clearance of gas in the middle ear cavity (ME) by its mucosal blood flow. A rat model was used to measure gas volume changes in the ME cavity at constant pressure without ventilation. We disturbed the normal gas composition of the ME by filling it with O 2 or CO 2 , measured the consequent changes in gas volume over time and compared these results with previously obtained ones for air and N 2 . The first 5 min of the primary transient phase (phase I) for O 2 or CO 2 was characterized by a volume loss decrease of -0.49 ± 0.34 μL and -46.28 ± 8.49 μL, respectively, with volume loss increase for air and N 2 differing greatly, at +0.17 ± 0.17 and +2.31 ± 0.81, respectively. The CO 2 value of -46.28 μL showed that a volume of gas equivalent to that of the ME cleft volume was eliminated within the first 5 min. In the second phase (phase II), all gases showed a linear decrease in volume, which presumably represents a steady-state gas loss rate. However, the gas loss rate of -0.307 ± 0.170 μL min -1 for O 2 -filled MEs was significantly higher than the mean of -0.124 μL min -1 for all other gases. We used a previously established mathematical model to calculate the effective ME mucosal blood flow rate under steady-state (phase II) conditions. The blood flow results for O 2 -filled MEs differed greatly from those of the other gases (89.0 ± 49.28 vs. 26.5 μL min -1 , on average), which suggest that the model used to calculate blood flow should be modified if used with O 2 -filled MEs. Further work should involve a comparison of our method with different methods to verify ME blood flow rate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. [Evaluation of antibiotic resistance in material isolated from the middle ear in children with acute otitis media not responding to standard antibiotic treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielnik-Jurkiewicz, Beata; Bielicka, Anna

    2007-01-01

    An increasing antibiotic resistance of pathogens is the main cause of failures during treatment of acute otitis media (AOM). Aim. A qualitative and quantitative bacteriological analysis of material isolated from the middle ear in children with AOM treated with antibiotic without improvement. This is a prospective study performed in Department of Otolaryngology in Warsaw between 2005 and 2007. An examined group consisted of 72 children aged from 6 months to 17 years, admitted to Department of Otolaryngology because of failure of antibiotic therapy of AOM, severe course of this disease and complications of AOM or persistent AOM. In all children were performed the myryngotomy and/or ventilatory tube insertion and/or mastoidectomy and the material from the middle ear was collected to bacteriological examinations. The positive cultures were obtained in 63.9% patients. Streptococcus pneumoniae (40.4%), Staphylococcus aureus (14%), Haemophilus influenzae (10.5%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (10.5%) were the most frequently found bacteria in the culture of middle ear. beta-lactamase producing bacteria were isolated in 12 children (21.1% of isolated bacteria). Staphylococcus aureus (7 children, 12.3% of positive cultures) was the bacteria most frequent producing beta-lactamase. The most of organisms were susceptibility to amoxicillin/clavulanate--56.1% of bacteria from the middle ear. The most of organisms presented resistance to penicillin--63.9% of bacteria from the middle ear. Microbiological identifications and antibiotic resistance determination of pathogens isolated from the middle ear in children with AOM not responding to empirical antibiotic treatment gives possibility of the choice of an effective antibiotic and its proper dosage. The pathogenic bacterial flora isolated from the middle ear in children with AOM shows evidence to accomplishing changes in the most frequent pathogens causing acute otitis media in children.

  13. Changes in microvascular permeability of the middle ear mucosa following the occulsion of the eustachian tube of rabbits. The functional investigation using radioisotope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Yasutaka

    1988-12-01

    Serial changes in submucosal microvascular permeability of the middle ear and the response to histamine after occlusion of the eustachian tube were functionally investigated using radioisotope in rabbits with experimentally induced otitis media with effusion. Tritium water was administered through intravenous injection and transference of tritium water into the middle ear cavity was measured by radioactivity of the middle ear perfusate. Morphological changes were concurrently examined for comparison. Vascular permeability, as measured one, 7, and 14 days after occlusion of the eustachian tube, increased with time. A histological study showed an edematous hypertrophy of the submucosal tissue of the middle ear, suggesting a noticeable increase in microvascular permeability. The response of the middle ear mucosa to histamine, which was added to the fluid for perfusion, gradually decreased after occlusion of the eustachian tube, although the effect of histamine tended to persist for a long time, irrespective of the amount of administration. The results indicated that the mucosal membrane of the middle ear has a noticeable permeability at least up to 14 days after occlusion, and that histamine may be responsible for the increase of submucosal microvascular permeability not only in the normal middle ear cavity but also in otitis media with effusion which results in the persistance of the disease. The presence of factors permeable to the blood, other than histamine, caused microvascular peameability to increase, probably resulting in chronic or irreversible inflammation. This may be explained by markedly proliferative or parenchymatous connective tissues observed 7 and l0 weeks after occlusion. It should be noted that surgical treatment be performed as early as possible in the case of otitis media with effusion. (Namekawa, K) 80 refs.

  14. The midterm results of concurrent superselective arterial chemoradiotherapy for carcinoma of the external auditory canal and middle ear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Masayuki; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Doi, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    This study retrospectively reports the midterm results of concurrent superselective arterial chemoradiotherapy for carcinoma of the external auditory canal and middle ear. Fifteen patients (7 males and 8 females) who were treated for carcinoma of the external auditory canal and middle ear between March 2003 and July 2009 were enrolled in this study. The median follow-up period was 14 months (4-44 months). All patients were staged according to the Pittsburgh staging system by Moody as follows: T1 (n=1), T2 (n=1), T3 (n=1), T4 (n=12). Thirteen patients had squamous cell carcinoma, one had adenocarcinoma, and one had undifferentiated carcinoma. All catheterizations were performed via a transfemoral approach by the Seldinger method. After identifying the feeding arteries of the primary tumor, cisplatin (50 mg/body) was injected. Simultaneously a cisplatin antagonist, sodium thiosulfate, was administered intravenously. Four or five courses of arterial infusion were given weekly. The catheter was removed after each session. External beam irradiation was performed five times a week at 2 Gy per fraction. Total dose ranged from 40 to 60 Gy (median: 60 Gy). The toxicity was evaluated by Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTC-AE) ver. 3.0. The 2-year overall survival (OS) rate was 73.4%, and progression free survival (PFS) rate was 53.3% for all patients. Concerning acute toxicity, one patient had Grade 3 dermatitis, and one had Grade 3 leucopenia. No catheter-related complications and no treatment-related deaths were observed. No severe late complications were observed, but one patient had a mild inflammation on the subcutaneous tissue. These results are comparable with those of other reports, suggesting that this method for carcinoma of the external auditory canal and middle ear is acceptable, but the OS rate and PFS rate need improvement. Further investigations are required with larger series to evaluate the long-term survival rate with this treatment. (author)

  15. Relationship of the Middle Ear Effusion Microbiome to Secretory Mucin Production in Pediatric Patients With Chronic Otitis Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Anna; Val, Stéphanie; Pérez-Losada, Marcos; Panchapakesan, Karuna; Devaney, Joe; Duah, Vanessa; DeMason, Christine; Poley, Marian; Rose, Mary; Preciado, Diego

    2017-07-01

    Acute otitis media, an infection of the middle ear, can become chronic after multiple episodes. Microbial influence on chronic otitis media remains unclear. It has been reported that mucin glycoproteins are required for middle ear immune defense against pathogens. We aim to characterize the middle ear effusion (MEE) microbiome using high-throughput sequencing and assess potential associations in microbiome diversity with the presence of the secretory mucins MUC5B and MUC5AC. We hypothesize that MEEs containing MUC5B will exhibit a microbiome largely devoid of typical acute otitis media bacteria. Fifty-five MEEs from children undergoing myringotomy at Children's National Health System were recovered. Mucin was semiquantitatively determined through Western blot analysis. DNA was subjected to 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing using the Illumina MiSeq platform. Raw data were processed in mothur (SILVA reference database). Alpha- and beta-diversity metrics were determined. Abundance differences between sample groups were estimated. MUC5B was present in 94.5% and MUC5AC in 65.5% of MEEs. Sequencing revealed 39 genera with a relative abundance ≥0.1%. Haemophilus (22.54%), Moraxella (11.11%) and Turicella (7.84%) were the most abundant. Turicella and Pseudomonas proportions were greater in patients older than 24 months of age. In patients with hearing loss, Haemophilus was more abundant, while Turicella and Actinobacteria were less abundant. Haemophilus was also more abundant in samples containing both secretory mucins. The microbiome of MEEs from children with chronic otitis media differs according to specific clinical features, such as mucin content, age and presence of hearing loss. These associations provide novel pathophysiologic insights across the spectrum of otitis media progression.

  16. Efficacy of nasopharyngeal culture in identification of pathogens in middle ear fluid in chronic otitis media with effusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eser O

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Chronic otitis media with effusion (OME is the leading cause of hearing loss during childhood. In bacterial etiology of OME, the most frequent pathogens responsible are Haemophilus influenzae followed by Streptococcus pneumoniae and Moraxella catarrhalis . This study aimed at evaluating the accuracy of nasopharyngeal (NP specimens in the identification of pathogens in the middle ear fluid (MEF in patients with OME. Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional, case-control study, 95 MEFs and 53 NP secretion specimens were obtained from 53 children. As a control group, 102 NP specimens were taken from children having an operation other than an otological disease. Conventional culture methods and multiplex-PCR method have been used to determine the etiology of OME; NP carriage between cases and control groups were compared using conventional culture methods. Pearson Chi-Square and Fisher′s Exact tests were used in statistical analysis. Results : Bacteria were isolated by culture in 37.9% of MEF specimens, 14.7% of which belonged to the group H. influenzae , S. pneumoniae and M. catarrhalis. PCR was positive in 30.5% specimens targeting the same pathogens. There was a two-fold increase in carriage rate of S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae in patients than controls for each pathogen. Conclusion: PCR is a more reliable method to detect middle ear pathogens in MEF in comparison with the conventional culture methods. The NP colonization wasn′t found to be an indicator of the pathogen in MEF although middle ear pathogens colonize more in nasopharynx of diseased children.

  17. "Swimmer's Ear" (Otitis Externa) Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... drops. Is there a difference between a childhood middle ear infection and swimmer's ear? Yes. Swimmer’s ear ... WASH-related Emergencies & Outbreaks Water, Sanitation, & Environmentally-related Hygiene Get Email Updates To receive email updates about ...

  18. Middle ear microbiome differences in indigenous Filipinos with chronic otitis media due to a duplication in the A2ML1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Hutchinson, Diane S; Ajami, Nadim J; Reyes-Quintos, Ma Rina T; Tantoco, Ma Leah C; Labra, Patrick John; Lagrana, Sheryl Mae; Pedro, Melquiadesa; Llanes, Erasmo Gonzalo D V; Gloria-Cruz, Teresa Luisa; Chan, Abner L; Cutiongco-de la Paz, Eva Maria; Belmont, John W; Chonmaitree, Tasnee; Abes, Generoso T; Petrosino, Joseph F; Leal, Suzanne M; Chiong, Charlotte M

    2016-11-01

    Previously rare A2ML1 variants were identified to confer otitis media susceptibility in an indigenous Filipino community and in otitis-prone US children. The goal of this study is to describe differences in the middle ear microbiome between carriers and non-carriers of an A2ML1 duplication variant that increases risk for chronic otitis media among indigenous Filipinos with poor health care access. Ear swabs were obtained from 16 indigenous Filipino individuals with chronic otitis media, of whom 11 carry the A2ML1 duplication variant. Ear swabs were submitted for 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Genotype-based differences in microbial richness, structure, and composition were identified, but were not statistically significant. Taxonomic analysis revealed that the relative abundance of the phyla Fusobacteria and Bacteroidetes, and genus Fusobacterium were nominally increased in carriers compared to non-carriers, but were non-significant after correction for multiple testing. We also detected rare bacteria including Oligella that was reported only once in the middle ear. These findings suggest that A2ML1-related otitis media susceptibility may be mediated by changes in the middle ear microbiome. Knowledge of middle ear microbial profiles according to genetic background can be potentially useful for therapeutic and prophylactic interventions for otitis media and can guide public health interventions towards decreasing otitis media prevalence within the indigenous Filipino community.

  19. Middle Ear Exploration Results in Suspected Otosclerosis Cases Referred to Amir-Almomenin and Golsar Hospitals, Rasht, 2001-2011: Are Ossicular and Footplate Area Anomalies Rare?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadman Nemati

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Otosclerosis is a disease of bony labyrinth. Structural changes in the labyrinth often cause ossicular fixation, and thus conductive hearing loss. The purpose of this study was to evaluate middle ear exploration findings and frequency of ossicular and footplate area anomalies in patients with suspected otosclerosis referred to Amiralmomenin and Golsar Hospitals in Rasht, Iran.   Materials and Methods: In 47 patients undergone middle ear exploration in Amiralmomenin and Golsar hospitals from April 2001 to March 2011, the intraoperative findings, and other data were extracted from the medical records of the patients. The data was analyzed using SPSS 17 software.   Results: Frequency of fixation of stapes, malleus, and incus by age and sex in patients undergoing middle ear exploration showed that stapes had been fixed in 39 patients, malleus in 6 patients, and incus in 21 patients. Analysis of data showed that there was no significant association between sex and age with fixation of any of ossicles (P>0/05. Middle ear anomalies were seen in 16 cases (34.0%. Overhanging of facial nerve in 4 cases, thick stapedial crura in 5 cases, and perilymph gusher in 2 cases were the most frequent anomalies.   Conclusion:  This study show that the results of middle ear explorations in our patients in the north of Iran is somehow different from the typical otosclerotic cases, although the frequency of ossicular anomalies is better to be evaluated and compared in different areas of Iran, and other countries. 

  20. the effect of cd4 count level on the middle ear dynamics of hiv

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-01-01

    Jan 1, 2014 ... Tympanometry: The auditory canal and tympanic membrane were examined before tympanometry. ... of the external auditory canal. The probe tip sizable for each EAM was selected for each ear to .... Memory CD4+ T-Cell Generation in the Circulation of Young Children May Contribute to the Otitis-Prone.

  1. Proteomic Characterization of Middle Ear Fluid Confirms Neutrophil Extracellular Traps as a Predominant Innate Immune Response in Chronic Otitis Media.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Val

    Full Text Available Chronic Otitis Media (COM is characterized by middle ear effusion (MEE and conductive hearing loss. MEE reflect mucus hypersecretion, but global proteomic profiling of the mucosal components are limited.This study aimed at characterizing the proteome of MEEs from children with COM with the goal of elucidating important innate immune responses.MEEs were collected from children (n = 49 with COM undergoing myringotomy. Mass spectrometry was employed for proteomic profiling in nine samples. Independent samples were further analyzed by cytokine multiplex assay, immunoblotting, neutrophil elastase activity, next generation DNA sequencing, and/or immunofluorescence analysis.109 unique and common proteins were identified by MS. A majority were innate immune molecules, along with typically intracellular proteins such as histones and actin. 19.5% percent of all mapped peptide counts were from proteins known to be released by neutrophils. Immunofluorescence and immunoblotting demonstrated the presence of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs in every MEE, along with MUC5B colocalization. DNA found in effusions revealed unfragmented DNA of human origin.Proteomic analysis of MEEs revealed a predominantly neutrophilic innate mucosal response in which MUC5B is associated with NET DNA. NETs are a primary macromolecular constituent of human COM middle ear effusions.

  2. Upregulation of Phosphorylated HSP27, PRDX2, GRP75, GRP78 and GRP94 in Acquired Middle Ear Cholesteatoma Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Kuen Yao; Yeh, Tai Sheng; Huang, Han Hsiang; Hung, Kuo Feng; Chai, Chee Yin; Chen, Wan Tzu; Tsai, Shih Meng; Chang, Ning Chia; Chien, Chen Yu; Wang, Hsun Mo; Wu, Yu Jen

    2013-01-01

    Cholesteatoma is a destructive and expanding growth of keratinizing squamous epithelium in the middle ear or petrous apex. The molecular and cellular processes of the pathogenesis of acquired middle ear cholesteatoma have not been fully understood. In this study, comparative proteomic analysis was conducted to investigate the roles of specific proteins in the pathways regarding keratinocyte proliferation in cholesteatoma. The differential proteins were detected by comparing the two-dimension electrophoresis (2-DE) maps of the epithelial tissues of 12 attic cholesteatomas with those of retroauricular skins. There were 14 upregulated proteins in the epithelial tissues of cholesteatoma in comparison with retroauricular skin. The modulation of five crucial proteins, HSP27, PRDX2, GRP75, GRP78 and GRP94, was further determined by RT-PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Phosphorylation of HSP27 at Ser-82 was identified by mass spectroscopy. The results of this study suggested that phosphorylated HSP27 is the end expression of two potential signal-transduction pathways, and together with PRDX2, they are very likely involved in the proliferation of keratinocytes in cholesteatoma. Upregulations of GRP75, GRP78 and GRP94 in keratinocytes may be able to counter endoplasmic reticulum stress, to inhibit cell apoptosis, to prevent protein unfolding and to promote cholesteatoma growth. PMID:23852020

  3. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG in the middle ear after randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled oral administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapiovaara, Laura; Lehtoranta, Liisa; Swanljung, Elisa; Mäkivuokko, Harri; Laakso, Sanna; Roivainen, Merja; Korpela, Riitta; Pitkäranta, Anne

    2014-10-01

    Probiotics may have potency in reducing upper respiratory infections, in particular in children. We studied findings from middle ear effusion (MEE) samples after randomized, placebo-controlled 3-week oral administration of probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (L. 40 children referred to tympanostomy were randomized to receive either L. GG or placebo (1:1) for 3 weeks before surgery. MEE samples were collected from 13 children (in total, 25 samples, 19 from the L. GG group and 6 from the placebo group) and analyzed for L. GG and pathogenic bacterial and viral findings. L. GG was present in 5 of the 25 MEE samples (4 from the L. GG group). Haemophilus infuenzae was the most prominent pathogen in 12 samples (10 from the L. GG group). Rhinovirus was present in 12 samples (10 from the L. GG group) and enterovirus in 1 sample (L. GG group). L. GG was present in the middle ear of children suffering from otitis media with effusion, but did not reduce the presence of pathogenic bacteria or viruses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Patient selection for incus body coupling of a totally implantable middle ear implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenner, Hans Peter; Baumann, Joachim W; Reischl, Gabriele; Plinkert, Peter; Zimmermann, Rainer; Mauz, Paul S; Limberger, Annette; Maassen, Marcus M

    2003-08-01

    To evaluate audiologic selection criteria for incus body coupling (IBC) of a totally implantable middle ear implant (TI-MEI) for the treatment of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). The protocol is specified in the Investigational Device Exemption of a Food and Drug Administration-approved multicenter clinical trial. The prospective study compared pre- and postoperative hearing levels using each patient as their own control. In addition, an implant on/off comparison was made. All patients had a follow-up interval of at least 6 months. Audiologic assessment tests included speech discrimination in quiet as the primary efficacy variable and pure-tone audiometry (aided thresholds), gain, speech recognition in noise and subject satisfaction using standardized questionnaires and visual analog scales (VASs) as secondary efficacy variables. The study group of patients (n = 13) was divided into 3 subgroups based on their pure-tone and speech discrimination scores: Group A consisted of 6 patients, Group B 9 patients and Group C of all 13 patients. All patients suffered from long-standing bilateral moderate to severe SNHL. Five patients were dissatisfied hearing aid (HA) users and eight subjects could not wear HAs. All patients were implanted with a TI-MEI which was coupled to the incus body. The amplification level of the device was set postoperatively using inductive digital fitting based on "most comfortable loudness" specifications. The implant produced median improvements from 30% (optimally fit bilateral HAs; n = 5) and 50% (HA non-users; n = 8) to 70% word recognition at 60 dB SPL. Average word recognition scores at 60, 80 and 90 dB SPL in Groups A and B showed increases from 42% (interquartile range +27%, -12%) to 93.5% (+3%, -5%) and 92.5% (+3%, -7%), respectively. In the presence of background noise, the sentence recognition threshold ranged from -2 to 1 dB signal-to-noise ratio. Maximum amplification was 50 dB at 3 kHz and 55 dB at 4 kHz. In Groups A and B, VASs

  5. Vibrant SoundBridge application to middle ear windows versus conventional hearing aids: a comparative study based on international outcome inventory for hearing aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atas, Ahmet; Tutar, Hakan; Gunduz, Bulent; Bayazıt, Yıldırım A

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to compare the outcomes of satisfaction of the patients who used hearing aids preceding the vibrant sound bridge (VSB) application on middle ear windows (14 oval window and 5 round window). Nineteen adult patients with conductive or mixed hearing loss were included in the study. All patients used behind the ear hearing aids on the site which was selected for VSB application. The patients used hearing aids for at least 3 months before the VSB operation. The floating mass transducer (FMT) was placed on one of the middle ear windows (oval or round) in VSB operation. The patients were evaluated with International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids (IOI-HA) preoperatively after at least 3 months trial of conventional hearing aid and postoperatively after 3 months use of VSB. No perioperative problem was encountered. The total score of IOI-HA was significantly higher with VSB compared with conventional hearing aids (p 0.05). The IOI-HA scores were significantly higher with the middle ear implant than the conventional hearing aid regarding benefit and residual participation restrictions (p < 0.05). Although the scores for quality of life assessment was similar between VSB and hearing aid use, there was a superiority of VSB in terms of benefit and residual participation restrictions as well as overall IOI-HA scores as the FMT was placed on one of the middle ear windows.

  6. [Duration of middle ear ventilation after laser myringotomy with the CO2 laser otoscope Otoscan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlmaier, B; Jivanjee, A; Gutzler, R; Huscher, D; Jovanovic, S

    2001-06-01

    The most important principle in treating secretory otitis media (SOM) is ventilation of the tympanic cavity. CO2 laser myringotomy achieves this via a self-healing perforation whose diameter essentially determines the duration of transtympanic ventilation. In this study, laser myringotomy was performed with the CO2 laser otoscope Otoscan in a homogeneous patient collective comprising 81 children (159 ears) suffering from SOM. The tympanic intervention was combined with an adenoidectomy or a CO2 laser tonsillotomy and therefore performed under general insufflation anesthesia. In all ears, approximately 2 mm circular perforations were created in the lower anterior quadrants with a power of 12-15 W and a pulse duration of 180 ms. None of the children showed postoperative impairment of inner ear function. Otomicroscopic and videoendoscopic monitoring documented the healing process. The mean closure time was found to be 16.35 days (8-34 days). As a rule, an onion-skin-like membrane of keratinized material was seen in the former myringotomy perforations at the time of closure. At the follow-up 6 months later the laser myringotomy sites appeared normal and irritation-free. Two of the tympanic membranes (1.6%) examined showed atrophic scar formation, one (0.8%) a perforation with a diameter of 0.5 mm. In 19 ears (14.7%) there was a recurrence of SOM within the observation period. Laser myringotomy competes with ventilation tube insertion in the treatment of SOM. It may be an useful alternative in the surgical management of secretory otitis media.

  7. Preoperative evaluation of the congenital aural atresia on computed tomography; an analysis of the severity of the deformity of the middle ear and mastoid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasar, Mustafa [Gulhane Medical School, Department of Radiology, Etlik-Ankara (Turkey)]. E-mail: tasarmus@yahoo.com; Yetiser, Sertac [Gulhane Medical School, Department of ORL and HNS (Turkey); Yildirim, Duzgun [Gulhane Medical School, Department of Radiology, Etlik-Ankara (Turkey); Bozlar, Ugur [Gulhane Medical School, Department of Radiology, Etlik-Ankara (Turkey); Tasar, M. Aysin [Ankara Hospital, Department of Pediatrics (Turkey); Saglam, Mutlu [Gulhane Medical School, Department of Radiology, Etlik-Ankara (Turkey); Ugurel, M. Sahin [Gulhane Medical School, Department of Radiology, Etlik-Ankara (Turkey); Battal, Bilal [Gulhane Medical School, Department of Radiology, Etlik-Ankara (Turkey); Ucoz, Taner [Gulhane Medical School, Department of Radiology, Etlik-Ankara (Turkey)

    2007-04-15

    Objective: To compare the development of temporal bone in normal and atretic ears and to assess some radiological landmarks that could be important in the hearing restoration interventions in such patients. Material and methods: Thirty-five patients with 40 atretic external ears were evaluated with temporal bone CT and compared to a control group of 40 normal ears retrospectively. Using comparable slice levels in all patients, the course and the caliper of the facial canal, the surface area of the incus and malleus, the level of mastoid aeration, the location and anteroposterior diameters of the jugular bulb and sigmoid sinus, the direction and the caliber of the tympanic bony part of the Eustachian tube, area of the middle ear cavity, distance from facial nerve to incudomalleolar joint, to the vestibule and to the jugular bulb were included in the assessment. Non-parametric and parametric statistical tests were used for comparison. Results: In atretic ears middle ear sectional area was found to be smaller at the equivalent plane as compared to control subjects (mean area index: 19.3 mm{sup 2} versus 47.4 mm{sup 2}). Mastoid aeration was low in general and the ossicles in the atretic ears were hypoplastic (mean ossicular sectional area: 8.3 mm{sup 2} versus 11 mm{sup 2}). The distance from the jugular bulb to the facial nerve was significantly lower (mean: 6.2 mm versus 6.8 mm) (p < 0.05) in the atretic ears. Facial canal caliber, distance from the facial canal to the incudomalleolar joint and distance from the facial canal to the vestibule in the atretic ears (means: 1.49, 2.93 and 1.82, respectively) did not show statistically significant difference from the control subjects (means: 1.44, 2.91 and 1.83, respectively) (p > 0.05 for all). Conclusion: External ear atresia is significantly associated with middle ear and mastoid abnormalities. The ossicles were underdeveloped which always have to be considered during reconstructive surgery. Radiologically, in the

  8. Domestic cat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diffendorfer, James E.

    2017-01-01

    The familiar domestic cat is not native to southern California and is considered an invasive spe-cies by biologists and conservation organizations. When owners abandon their cats, wild or feral populations may arise, as they have in San Diego County. Cats’ pelage color, tail length, and hair thickness vary widely, given human fascination with breeding diverse phenotypes, but all have a typical felid body with upright ears, forward-looking eyes adapted for nocturnal foraging, protractible claws, and a sinuous, flexible body. Cats allowed outdoors and feral cats kill and eat a wide variety of vertebrates such as small mammals, birds, and reptiles

  9. Anatomic Malformations of the Middle and Inner Ear in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: Case Series and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheij, E; Elden, L; Crowley, T B; Pameijer, F A; Zackai, E H; McDonald-McGinn, D M; Thomeer, H G X M

    2018-03-15

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is characterized by a heterogenic phenotype, including hearing loss. The underlying cause of hearing loss, especially sensorineural hearing loss, is not yet clear. Therefore, our objective was to describe anatomic malformations in the middle and inner ear in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. A retrospective case series was conducted in 2 tertiary referral centers. All patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome who had undergone CT or MR imaging of the temporal bones were included. Radiologic images were evaluated on predetermined parameters, including abnormalities of the ossicular chain, cochlea, semicircular canals, and vestibule. There were 26 patients (52 ears) with a CT or MR imaging scan available. A dense stapes superstructure was found in 18 ears (36%), an incomplete partition type II was suspected in 12 cochleas (23%), the lateral semicircular canal was malformed with a small bony island in 17 ears (33%), and the lateral semicircular canal and vestibule were fused to a single cavity in 15 ears (29%). Middle and inner ear abnormalities were frequently encountered in our cohort, including malformations of the lateral semicircular canal. © 2018 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  10. Oxymetazoline Applied Topically to the Nasal Mucosa Decreases Trans-Mucosal Nitrous Oxide Exchange for the Middle Ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Miriam S; Alper, Cuneyt M; Martin, Brian S; Helal, Narmin; Doyle, Brendan M Cullen; Doyle, William J

    2016-05-01

    Determine if the middle ear (ME) trans-mucosal nitrous oxide (N2O) gas exchange rate can be pharmacologically modulated by the nasal application of a vasoconstrictor. In a randomized, double-blind, crossover study, 20 adults received a nasal spray challenge containing either oxymetazoline or saline (placebo). At each session, subjects were fitted with a non-rebreathing mask and breathed room air for 20 minutes, 50% N2O:50% O2 for 20 minutes, and 100% O2 for 10 minutes. Throughout, heart rate, blood pressure (BP), and blood O2 saturation were monitored, and bilateral ME pressure was recorded by tympanometry every minute. The primary outcome measure was the slope of the ME pressure-time function for the experimental period, a direct measure of the transMEM N2O exchange constant. The effects of treatment, session, and period on the measured vital signs and of treatment, session, disease history, and ear on the ME pressure-time slopes were evaluated for statistical significance using repeated measures ANOVAs. The analysis documented a significant effect of period on O2 saturation (N2O > room air, P = .03) and of treatment on blood pressure (oxymetazoline > placebo, P oxymetazoline, P = .05). The exchange rate across the ME mucosa of inert gases can be decreased by topical treatment of the nasal mucosa with oxymetazoline. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. The effect of flying and low humidity on the admittance of the tympanic membrane and middle ear system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Robert Peter

    2013-10-01

    Many passengers experience discomfort during flight because of the effect of low humidity on the skin, eyes, throat, and nose. In this physiological study, we have investigated whether flight and low humidity also affect the tympanic membrane. From previous studies, a decrease in admittance of the tympanic membrane through drying might be expected to affect the buffering capacity of the middle ear and to disrupt automatic pressure regulation. This investigation involved an observational study onboard an aircraft combined with experiments in an environmental chamber, where the humidity could be controlled but could not be made to be as low as during flight. For the flight study, there was a linear relationship between the peak compensated static admittance of the tympanic membrane and relative humidity with a constant of proportionality of 0.00315 mmho/% relative humidity. The low humidity at cruise altitude (minimum 22.7 %) was associated with a mean decrease in admittance of about 20 % compared with measures in the airport. From the chamber study, we further found that a mean decrease in relative humidity of 23.4 % led to a significant decrease in mean admittance by 0.11 mmho [F(1,8) = 18.95, P = 0.002], a decrease of 9.4 %. The order of magnitude for the effect of humidity was similar for the flight and environmental chamber studies. We conclude that admittance changes during flight were likely to have been caused by the low humidity in the aircraft cabin and that these changes may affect the automatic pressure regulation of the middle ear during descent.

  12. Coupling of an active middle-ear implant to the long process of the incus using an elastic clip attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schraven, Sebastian P; Mlynski, Robert; Dalhoff, Ernst; Heyd, Andreas; Wildenstein, Daniela; Rak, Kristen; Radeloff, Andreas; Hagen, Rudolf; Gummer, Anthony W

    2016-10-01

    The active middle-ear implant Vibrant Soundbridge © (VSB) is used to treat mild-to-severe sensorineural hearing losses. The standard surgical approach for incus vibroplasty is a mastoidectomy and a posterior tympanotomy, crimping the Floating Mass Transducer (FMT) to the long process of the incus (LPI) (standard crimped application). However, tight crimping increases the risk of necrosis of the LPI, resulting in reduction of energy transfer and loss of amplification. The aim of this study was to develop a new coupling device for the LPI, that does not require crimping, and to test its vibrational transfer properties in temporal-bone preparations. An extended antrotomy and a posterior tympanotomy were performed in ten fresh human temporal bones. As a control for normal middle-ear function, the tympanic membrane was stimulated acoustically and the vibration of the stapes footplate was measured by laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV). FMT-induced vibration responses of the stapes were then measured for the standard crimped application at the LPI and for the newly designed elastic long process coupler (LP coupler). For the LP coupler, velocity-amplitude responses in temporal-bone preparations showed increased mean amplitudes at around 1 kHz (∼10 dB) and a reduction between 1.8 and 6 kHz (13 dB on average for 2 ≤ f ≤ 5 kHz). In conclusion, attachment of the FMT to the LPI with the LP coupler leads to generally good mechanical and functional coupling in temporal-bone preparations with a notable disadvantage between 1.8 and 6 kHz. Due to its elastic clip attachment it is expected that the LP coupler will reduce the risk of necrosis of the incus long process, which has to been shown in further studies. Clinical results of the LP coupler are pending. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Treatment of Age-Related Hearing Loss in Dogs with the Vibrant Soundbridge Middle Ear Implant : Short-Term Results in 3 Dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Haar, G.; Mulder, J. J.; Venker-van Haagen, A. J.; van Sluijs, F. J.; Snik, A. F.; Smoorenburg, G. F.

    2010-01-01

    Background Age-related hearing loss (ARHL), or presbycusis, is the most common form of acquired hearing loss in dogs. Middle ear implants have been used successfully in people with ARHL who cannot benefit from conventional hearing aids. Hypothesis Audibility improves in dogs with ARHL after

  14. Long-term results of middle fossa plugging of superior semicircular canal dehiscences : clinically and instrumentally demonstrated efficiency in a retrospective series of 16 ears

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomeer, Hans; Bonnard, Damien; Castetbon, Vincent; Franco-Vidal, Valérie; Darrouzet, Patricia; Darrouzet, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to report the surgical outcome after middle fossa approach (MFA) plugging in patients suffering from a superior semi-circular canal dehiscence (SCD) syndrome. This is a retrospective case review. Tertiary referral center. Sixteen ears in 13 patients with a SCD syndrome

  15. Treatment of age-related hearing loss in dogs with the vibrant soundbridge middle ear implant: short-term results in 3 dogs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haar, G. Ter; Mulder, J.J.S.; Venker-van Haagen, A.J.; Sluijs, F.J. van; Snik, A.F.M.; Smoorenburg, G.F.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Age-related hearing loss (ARHL), or presbycusis, is the most common form of acquired hearing loss in dogs. Middle ear implants have been used successfully in people with ARHL who cannot benefit from conventional hearing aids. HYPOTHESIS: Audibility improves in dogs with ARHL after

  16. Roles of autolysin and pneumolysin in middle ear inflammation caused by a type 3 Streptococcus pneumoniae strain in the chinchilla otitis media model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, K; Quartey, M K; Liebeler, C L; Le, C T; Giebink, G S

    1996-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae cell wall and pneumolysin are important contributors to pneumococcal pathogenicity in some animal models. To further explore these factors in middle ear inflammation caused by pneumococci, penicillin-induced inflammatory acceleration was studied by using three closely related pneumococcal strains: a wild-type 3 strain (WT3), its pneumolysin-negative derivative (P-1), and into autolysin-negative derivative (A-1). Both middle ears of chinchillas were inoculated with one of the three pneumococcal strains. During the first 12 h, all three strains grew in vivo at the same rate, and all three strains induced similar inflammatory cell responses in middle ear fluid (MEF). Procaine penicillin G was given as 12 h to one-half of the animals in each group, and all treated chinchillas had sterile MEF at 24 h. Penicillin significantly accelerated MEF inflammatory cell influx into WT3-and P-1-infected ears at 18 and 24 h in comparison with the rate for penicillin-treated A-1-infected ears. Inflammatory cell influx was slightly, but not significantly, greater after treatment of WT3 infection than after treatment of P-1 infection. Interleukin (IL)-1beta and IL-6, but not IL-8, concentrations in MEF at 24 h reflected the penicillin effect on MEF inflammatory cells; however, differences between treatment groups were not significant. Results suggest that pneumococcal otitis media pathogenesis is triggered principally by the inflammatory effects of intact and lytic cell wall products in the middle ear, with at most a modes additional pneumolysin effect. Investigation strategies that limit the release of these products or neutralize them warrant further investigation. PMID:8606070

  17. Oval window transport of Gd-dOTA from rat middle ear to vestibulum and scala vestibuli visualized by in vivo magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jing; Poe, Dennis; Ramadan, Usama Abo; Pyykkö, Ilmari

    2012-02-01

    We tested our hypothesis that the oval window (OW) potentially functions as a route to carry substances from the middle ear to the vestibulum and then the scala vestibuli through the annular ligament across the stapediovestibular joint. Gd-DOTA was either injected into the lateral attic compartment of rats with a high-performance polyimide tube in a selective OW delivery group, or administered to the middle ear cavity of two groups of rats in which the OW was either sealed or not sealed. The dynamic uptake of Gd-DOTA in the inner ear was visualized with a 4.7-T magnetic resonance imaging machine. In the selective OW delivery group, Gd-DOTA appeared in the vestibulum and in the basal turn of the scala vestibuli but not in the scala tympani on T1-weighted images acquired at 10 minutes after Gd-DOTA administration (the earliest available time point of magnetic resonance imaging). In the sealed-OW group, immediate uptake of Gd-DOTA was absent in the vestibulum and scala vestibuli. Measurement of the signal ratio of the vestibulum to that of the scala tympani showed that selective OW delivery induced the greatest signal ratio and that sealing of the OW induced the lowest signal ratio. The OW is a genuine and efficient pathway to transport Gd-DOTA from the middle ear to the vestibulum.

  18. Comparison of the tympanogram and otoscopic findings in effusions of middle ear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rıfat Karlı

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate therole of tympanogram test in routine use comparing thetympanogram findings and otoscopic examination findingsin patients with suspicious otitis media with effusion.Materials and methods: 64 outpatients with suspiciousotitis media with effusion presented at our Otorhinolaryngologyclinic and first otoscopic examination and thentympanometric examination was performed for their 128ears. Predictions of the physicians who performed otoscopicexamination for outcomes from tympanogram andactual tympanogram outcomes were compared.Results: Predictions of the physician for otoscopic examinationwere different from tympanogram outcomesin 22.6 percent (n=29 of 128 otoscopic examinationsin total. However, the physician predicted Type A tympanogramsuggesting no effusion in only four of theseotoscopic examinations yet Type B or Type C outcomessuggesting existence of effusion were obtained from tympanogram.Conclusion: Application of tympanogram test routinelyas part of otologic examination to each patient is a causeof material loss. Our first choice should be otoscopic examination.Key words: Otitis media with effusion, tympanogram,otoscope

  19. Functional results of Vibrant Soundbridge middle ear implants in conductive and mixed hearing losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardeschi, Daniele; Hoffman, Caroline; Benchaa, Tarek; Labassi, Samia; Beliaeff, Michel; Sterkers, Olivier; Grayeli, Alexis Bozorg

    2011-01-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate the results of Vibrant Soundbridge (VSB) in conductive or mixed hearing loss. Twenty-five adult patients (29 ears) with a mixed or conductive hearing loss and various etiologies were included in this retrospective study. The preoperative ipsilateral pure tone average was 71 ± 3.0 dB, and the average bone conduction threshold was 42 ± 2.8 dB (n = 29). The transducer was placed on the long apophysis of the incus (n = 16), in the round window (n = 10) or on the stapes (n = 3). No complications were noted. The bone conduction threshold remained unchanged. VSB was activated in all cases. The postoperative pure tone average without VSB was 63 ± 3.9 dB (n = 24) and with VSB in free-field condition 24 ± 2.1 dB (n = 22). VSB is safe and efficacious for auditory rehabilitation in conductive and mixed hearing losses. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. The Effect of Ethnicity on Wideband Absorbance of Neonates with Healthy Middle Ear Functions in Malaysia: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wali, Hamzah A; Mazlan, Rafidah

    2018-01-01

    Although ethnicity effect on wideband absorbance (WBA) findings was evident for adults, its effect on neonates has not been established yet. This study aimed to investigate the influence of ethnicity on WBA measured at 0 daPa from neonates with healthy middle ear functions. Participants were 99 normal, healthy, full-term newborn babies with chronological age between 11 and 128 hours of age (mean=46.73, standard deviation=26.36). A cross-sectional study design was used to measure WBA at 16 one-third octave frequency points from 99 neonates comprising of three ethnic groups: Malays (n=58), Chinese (n=13) and Indians (n=28). A total of 165 ears (83.3%) that passed a battery of tests involving distortion product otoacoustic emissions, 1 kHz tympanometry and acoustic stapedial reflex were further tested using WBA. Moreover, body size measurements were recorded from each participant. The Malays and Indians neonates showed almost identical WBA response across the frequency range while the Chinese babies showed lower absorbance values between 1.25 kHz and 5 kHz. However, the differences observed in WBA between the three ethnic groups were not statistically significant ( p =0.23). Additionally, there were no statistically significant difference in birth weight, height and head circumference among the three ethnic groups. This study showed that Malays, Chinese and Indians neonates were not significantly different in their WBA responses. In conclusion, to apply for the ethnic-specific norms is not warranted when testing neonates from population constitute of these three ethnicities.

  1. Otogenic meningoencephalomyelitis due to (VGII infection in a cat from Western Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng K Siak

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Case summary A 7-year-old spayed domestic longhair cat from Perth, Western Australia, presented with left-sided head tilt, dysphonia, head shaking, inappetence and weight loss. A polypoid lesion had previously been removed from the external ear canal. Otitis media with extension into the external ear canal was suspected and investigated using video-otoscopy and computed tomography examination. Invasive disease with extension from the middle ear to the base of the skull, and intracranial extension into the caudal fossa and cranial cervical vertebral canal was detected. Cytology of external ear canal exudate showed capsulated budding yeasts and Cryptococcus gattii VGII was cultured. Treatment with amphotericin B infusions and oral fluconazole was prescribed, with nutritional support via oesophagostomy tube. The cat clinically recovered 12 months after treatment commenced. Relevance and novel information This case report describes the successful medical treatment of otogenic meningoencephalomyelitis due to C gattii (VGII infection in a cat.

  2. Experiential instruction in graduate-level preparation of speech-language pathology students in outer and middle ear screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpanos, Yula C; Senzer, Deborah

    2015-05-01

    This study presents a piloted training model of experiential instruction in outer and middle ear (OE-ME) screening for graduate speech-language pathology students with peer teaching by doctor of audiology (AuD) students. Six individual experiential training sessions in screening otoscopy and tympanometry were conducted for 36 graduate-level speech-language pathology students led by a supervised AuD student. Postexperiential training, survey outcomes from 24 speech-language pathology students revealed a significant improvement (p = .01) in perceptions of attaining adequate knowledge and comfort in performing screening otoscopy (handheld and video otoscopy) and tympanometry. In a group of matched controls who did not receive experiential training in OE-ME screening (n = 24), ratings on the same learning outcomes survey in otoscopy and tympanometry were significantly poorer (p = .01) compared with students who did receive experiential training. A training model of experiential instruction for speech-language pathology students by AuD students improved learning outcomes, illustrating its promise in affecting clinical practices. The instructional model also meets the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (CAA; American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 2008) and American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (2014) Certificate of Clinical Competence (ASHA CCC) standards for speech-language pathology in OE-ME screening and CAA (2008) and ASHA (2012) CCC standards in the supervisory process for audiology.

  3. A comparison of high resolution CT scan of temporal bone and operative findings in middle ear cholesteatoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kweon, Tae Beom; Seong, Hun; Cheon, Mal Soon; Kim, Hack Jin; Jang, Keung Jae; Chun, Byung Hee

    1993-01-01

    To evaluate the value of HRCT imaging in middle ear cholesteatoma, we prospectively analysed the CT images in 28 surgically proven cases with cholesteatomas regarding main site of lesion, ossicular change, facial nerve exposure and fistula formation. The most common main site of lesion was the epitympanum (92.8%). The results of sensitivity, positive predictability, and accuracy by CT imagings were as follows: for ossicular involvement, 94.1%, 88.8%, and 86.2% in malleus, 96.0%, 88.8%, and 85.7% in incus, 81.2%, 81.2%, and 78.5% in stapes; for facial nerve exposure, 66.6%, 57.1%, and 81.2%: for fistula formation, 100%, 75.0%, and 96.4%, respectively. In conclusion, the temoral bone HRCT imaging is an accurate preoperative method in detecting main lesion site, ossicular involvement, fistula formation. Because of the low sensitivity and positive predictability in detecting facial nerve exposure, it is necessary to correlate the HRCT images with the clinical status

  4. On the design of a MEMS piezoelectric accelerometer coupled to the middle ear as an implantable sensor for hearing devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesing, A L; Alves, F D P; Paul, S; Cordioli, J A

    2018-03-02

    The presence of external elements is a major limitation of current hearing aids and cochlear implants, as they lead to discomfort and inconvenience. Totally implantable hearing devices have been proposed as a solution to mitigate these constraints, which has led to challenges in designing implantable sensors. This work presents a feasibility analysis of a MEMS piezoelectric accelerometer coupled to the ossicular chain as an alternative sensor. The main requirements of the sensor include small size, low internal noise, low power consumption, and large bandwidth. Different designs of MEMS piezoelectric accelerometers were modeled using Finite Element (FE) method, as well as optimized for high net charge sensitivity. The best design, a 2 × 2 mm 2 annular configuration with a 500 nm thick Aluminum Nitride (AlN) layer was selected for fabrication. The prototype was characterized, and its charge sensitivity and spectral acceleration noise were found to be with good agreement to the FE model predictions. Weak coupling between a middle ear FE model and the prototype was considered, resulting in equivalent input noise (EIN) lower than 60 dB sound pressure level between 600 Hz and 10 kHz. These results are an encouraging proof of concept for the development of MEMS piezoelectric accelerometers as implantable sensors for hearing devices.

  5. Influence of Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine on Acute Otitis Media with Severe Middle Ear Inflammation: A Retrospective Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugino, Hirotoshi; Tsumura, Shigeru; Kunimoto, Masaru; Noda, Masuhiro; Chikuie, Daisuke; Noda, Chieko; Yamashita, Mariko; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Ishii, Hidemasa; Tashiro, Toru; Iwata, Kazuhiro; Kono, Takashi; Tsumura, Kaoru; Sumiya, Takahiro; Takeno, Sachio; Hirakawa, Katsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The Japanese guidelines for acute otitis media in children recommend classifying acute otitis media by age, manifestations and local findings, and also recommend myringotomy for moderate-grade cases with severe local findings, severe-grade cases, and treatment-resistant cases. The heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine was released in Japan in February 2010. In Hiroshima City, public funding allowing free inoculation with this vaccine was initiated from January 2011, and the number of vaccinated individuals has since increased dramatically. This study investigated changes in the number of myringotomies performed to treat acute otitis media during the 5-year period from January 2008 to December 2012 at two hospitals and five clinics in the Asa Area of Hiroshima City, Japan. A total of 3,165 myringotomies for acute otitis media were performed. The rate of procedures per child-year performed in otitis media in 1-year-old infants decreased significantly in the 2 years after the introduction of public funding for heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine compared to all years before introduction (potitis media in reducing the financial burden of myringotomy. In addition, this vaccine may help prevent acute otitis media with severe middle ear inflammation in 1-year-old infants.

  6. Otopathogens Detected in Middle Ear Fluid Obtained during Tympanostomy Tube Insertion: Contrasting Purulent and Non-Purulent Effusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, Robert C.; Kirse, Daniel J.; Evans, Adele K.; Whigham, Amy S.; Peters, Timothy R.; Poehling, Katherine A.; Swords, William E.; Reid, Sean D.

    2015-01-01

    Otitis media is a prominent disease among children. Previous literature indicates that otitis media is a polymicrobial disease, with Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Alloiococcus otitidis and Moraxella catarrhalis being the most commonly associated bacterial pathogens. Recent literature suggests that introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines has had an effect on the etiology of otitis media. Using a multiplex PCR procedure, we sought to investigate the presence of the aforementioned bacterial pathogens in middle ear fluid collected from children undergoing routine tympanostomy tube placement at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center during the period between January 2011 and March 2014. In purulent effusions, one or more bacterial organisms were detected in ~90% of samples. Most often the presence of H. influenzae alone was detected in purulent effusions (32%; 10 of 31). In non-purulent effusions, the most prevalent organism detected was A. otitidis (26%; 63 of 245). Half of the non-purulent effusions had none of these otopathogens detected. In purulent and non-purulent effusions, the overall presence of S. pneumoniae was lower (19%; 6 of 31, and 4%; 9 of 245, respectively) than that of the other pathogens being identified. The ratio of the percentage of each otopathogen identified in purulent vs. non-purulent effusions was >1 for the classic otopathogens but not for A. otitidis. PMID:26039250

  7. Electrophysiological and Histopathological Evaluation of Effects of Sodium-2 Mercaptoethanesulfonate Used for Middle Ear Surgery on Facial Nerve Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eğilmez, Oğuz Kadir; Kökten, Numan; Baran, Mustafa; Kalcıoğlu, M Tayyar; Doğan Ekici, Işın; Tekin, Muhammet

    2017-12-14

    Sodium-2-mercaptoethanesulfonate (MESNA) is widely used in medicine because of its antioxidant and mucolytic effects. In recent years, it has been used in otologic surgery. Because it cleaves disulfide bonds, it is used to easily dissect the epithelial matrix in cholesteatoma and atelectasis. In this study, we hypothesized that MESNA does not have any toxic effect on the facial nerve, and the effects of MESNA on the facial nerve were examined histologically and electrophysiologically. Twenty Wistar albino rats were used. Groups A and B were designated as the control and sham groups, respectively. The animals in groups C and D were administered 20% and 50% of MESNA solution, respectively, after the facial nerve was exposed in the parotid region. Electromyography (EMG) measurements were performed preoperatively and postoperatively at 4 weeks. The animals were subsequently euthanized; facial nerve samples were taken for histopathological examination. When EMG parameters were compared within and between each group, preoperative and postoperative results were not statistically significantly different. Histopathological examination showed that MESNA did not cause any inflammation, granulation tissue, or foreign body reaction. To the best of our knowledge, the effects of MESNA on facial nerve functions have not been investigated. In this study, the effects of MESNA after direct application to the facial nerve were examined electrophysiologically and histologically, and it was determined that MESNA did not cause any toxic effects. It was concluded that MESNA can, therefore, be safely used during middle ear surgery.

  8. Middle and inner ear malformations in mutation-proven branchio-oculo-facial (BOF) syndrome: case series and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Melissa T; Blaser, Susan; Papsin, Blake; Meschino, Wendy; Reardon, Willie; Klatt, Regan; Babul-Hirji, Riyana; Milunsky, Jeff; Chitayat, David

    2012-08-01

    Hearing impairment is common in individuals with branchio-oculo-facial (BOF) syndrome. The majority of described individuals have conductive hearing impairment due to malformed ossicles and/or external canal stenosis or atresia, although a sensorineural component to the hearing impairment in BOF syndrome is increasingly being reported. Sophisticated computed tomography (CT) of the temporal bone has revealed middle and inner ear malformations in three previous reports. We present middle and inner ear abnormalities in three additional individuals with mutation-proven BOF syndrome. We suggest that temporal bone CT imaging be included in the medical workup of a child with BOF syndrome, in order to guide management. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Synergistic effect of interleukin 1 alpha on nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae-induced up-regulation of human beta-defensin 2 in middle ear epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Raekil

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We recently showed that beta-defensins have antimicrobial activity against nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi and that interleukin 1 alpha (IL-1 alpha up-regulates the transcription of beta-defensin 2 (DEFB4 according to new nomenclature of the Human Genome Organization in human middle ear epithelial cells via a Src-dependent Raf-MEK1/2-ERK signaling pathway. Based on these observations, we investigated if human middle ear epithelial cells could release IL-1 alpha upon exposure to a lysate of NTHi and if this cytokine could have a synergistic effect on beta-defensin 2 up-regulation by the bacterial components. Methods The studies described herein were carried out using epithelial cell lines as well as a murine model of acute otitis media (OM. Human cytokine macroarray analysis was performed to detect the released cytokines in response to NTHi exposure. Real time quantitative PCR was done to compare the induction of IL-1 alpha or beta-defensin 2 mRNAs and to identify the signaling pathways involved. Direct activation of the beta-defensin 2 promoter was monitored using a beta-defensin 2 promoter-Luciferase construct. An IL-1 alpha blocking antibody was used to demonstrate the direct involvement of this cytokine on DEFB4 induction. Results Middle ear epithelial cells released IL-1 alpha when stimulated by NTHi components and this cytokine acted in an autocrine/paracrine synergistic manner with NTHi to up-regulate beta-defensin 2. This synergistic effect of IL-1 alpha on NTHi-induced beta-defensin 2 up-regulation appeared to be mediated by the p38 MAP kinase pathway. Conclusion We demonstrate that IL-1 alpha is secreted by middle ear epithelial cells upon exposure to NTHi components and that it can synergistically act with certain of these molecules to up-regulate beta-defensin 2 via the p38 MAP kinase pathway.

  10. A Comparison of Three Drug Combinations for Sedation during Middle Ear Surgeries under Local Anesthesia: A Multicentric Randomized Double Blind Study

    OpenAIRE

    Vikas Kumar; Jyotsna S. Paranjpe; Shishir D. Gosavi; Ruta H. Kulkarni; Rahul S. Gosavi; Tanuja M. Kulkarni

    2015-01-01

    Background: During Middle Ear Surgeries (MES) done under Local Anesthesia (LA), patients may feel discomfort due to noise of suction, manipulation of instruments, positioning of head-neck and sometimes due to pain. A bloodless microscopic field is also essential to facilitate surgical exposure in MES. Various combinations of analgesics and sedatives have been tried to alleviate apprehension of the patients and improve microscopic field which may result into reductio...

  11. General health, otitis media, nasopharyngeal carriage and middle ear microbiology in Northern Territory Aboriginal children vaccinated during consecutive periods of 10-valent or 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Amanda J; Wigger, Christine; Beissbarth, Jemima; Woltring, Donna; Andrews, Ross; Chatfield, Mark D; Smith-Vaughan, Heidi; Morris, Peter S

    2016-07-01

    This study aims to monitor the prevalence of suppurative otitis media in remote Indigenous communities after introduction of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) in October 2011. We previously reported a decline in suppurative OM following replacement of PCV7 by 10-valent pneumococcal Haemophilus influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine (PHiD-CV10) in October 2009. We continued regular surveillance in remote Indigenous communities between February 2010 and August 2013. This analysis reports the general health, otitis media (OM), nasopharyngeal (NP) carriage and middle ear microbiology in children less than 36 months of age who received a primary course of at least two doses of PHiD-CV10 or PCV13, and not more than one dose of another pneumococcal vaccine. Mean ages of 511 PHiD-CV10- and 140 PCV13-vaccinated children were 19 and 13 months, respectively. Most children received 3-dose non-mixed PCV schedules. At the time of assessment, general health was poor and prevalence of risk factors was high in both groups: overall, around 14% of children had scabies, 20% had impetigo, 59% had runny nose and 39% had cough. Average household size was 8 persons, and 60% of the mothers smoked. Bilaterally normal middle ears were detected in 10% and 7%, respectively. OM with effusion (OME), almost all bilateral, was diagnosed in 52% and 50%, any suppurative OM (acute OM or any tympanic membrane perforation [TMP]) in 37% and 41%, and TMP in 14% and 12%, respectively. Children in the PCV13 group had significantly less NP carriage of combined Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn) and non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) (62% versus 51%) but significantly more polymicrobial (Spn and NTHi) middle ear cultures (12% versus 43%), and significantly less Staphylococcus aureus-positive middle ears (40% versus 7%). Although NP carriage of pneumococcal serotype 19A was low in the PCV13 group, serotypes 19F and 23F persist. The general health, particularly ear health, of little children

  12. Microbiota indígena do meato acústico externo de gatos hígidos Normal microflora of the ear canal in healthy cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Coutinho do Amaral

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Cinqüenta felinos hígidos, adultos - vinte e seis machos e vinte e quatro fêmeas - sem definição racial, com distintas idades, reunidos em dois grupos (GRUPO 1- animais domiciliados e GRUPO 2 - animais que rendados de vinte e cinco animais cada. Após anamnese e prévia sedação, os gatos foram submetidos a exame físico e à otoscopia, comprovando-se a ausência de lesões meatais e timpânicas, com cureta de Buck e wragatoas estéreis, foi colhido material meatal, que foi então submetido a exames bacteriológico e micológico. No Grupo 1, foi evidenciado presença de Otodectes cynotis (4% das amostras, em 72% dos casos de bolores e leveduras (Cladosporium sp 66,6%, Malassezia sp 40%, Penicillium sp 33%, Aspergillus sp 33,3%, Rhodotorula sp 20,0%, Mycelia sp 13,3% e Alternaria sp, Aureobasidium sp, Ryzopus sp, Trichosporon sp, todos com 6,6% e, finalmente, em 64% da amostragem, bactérias dos gêneros Staphylococcus spp (81,2%, Pseudomonas sp (12,5%, Klebsiella sp (12,5%, Acinetobacter sp, Bacilos difteróides, Enterobacter sp, Lactobacillus spp (todos com 6,2%. No Grupo 2, o Otodectes sp foi identificado em 36% das amostras, em 96% daquelas isolaram-se fungos dos gêneros: Malassezia sp - 54,1%, Aspergillus e Penicillium sp, ambos com 33,3%, Microsporum sp - 29,1%, Cladosporium sp - 16,6%, Trichoderma sp - 12,5%, Alternaria e Phoma sp, ambos com 8,3% e Epicoccum sp, Neurospora sp. Mycelia sp, Rhodotorula sp, todos com 4,1% e, por fim, em 20 das 25 amostras (80% isolaram-se pelo menos uma cepa bacteriana (Staphylococcus spp 75%, Klebsiella sp 20,8%, Bacilos difteróides 12,5%, Pseudomonas sp, 8,3% e Acinetobacter sp, Enterobacter sp e Escherichia sp, todos com 4,1% cada um em cultivo monoespecífico ou em associação.The study aimed to find out the frequency of microrganisms in the external ear canal in healthy cats. Fifty adult male (26 and female (24 short hair cats were utilized for the purpose, and they were divided according to

  13. Pressure buffering by the tympanic membrane. In vivo measurements of middle ear pressure fluctuations during elevator motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padurariu, Simona; de Greef, Daniël; Jacobsen, Henrik; Nlandu Kamavuako, Ernest; Dirckx, Joris J; Gaihede, Michael

    2016-10-01

    The tympanic membrane (TM) represents a pressure buffer, which contributes to the overall pressure regulation of the middle ear (ME). This buffer capacity is based on its viscoelastic properties combined with those of the attached ossicular chain, muscles and ligaments. The current work presents a set of in vivo recordings of the ME pressure variations normally occurring in common life: elevator motion. This is defined as a situation of smooth ambient pressure increase or decrease on a limited range and at a low rate of pressure change. Based on these recordings, the purpose was a quantitative analysis of the TM buffer capacity including the TM compliance. The pressure changes in seven normal adult ME's with intact TM's were continuously recorded directly inside the ME cavity during four different elevator trips using a high precision instrument. The TM buffer capacity was determined by the ratio between the changes in ME and the ambient pressure. Further, the ME volumes were calculated by Boyle's Law from pressure recordings during inflation-deflation tests; subsequently the TM compliance could also be calculated. Finally, the correlation between the ME volume and buffer function was determined. Twenty-one elevator trips could be used for the analysis. The overall mean TM pressure buffering capacity was 23.3% (SEM = 3.4), whereas the mean overall compliance was 28.9 × 10 -3  μL/Pa (SEM = 4.8). A strong negative linear correlation was found between the TM buffer capacity and the ME volumes (R 2  = 0.92). These results were in fair agreement with the literature obtained in clinical as well as temporal bone experiments, and they provide an in vivo reference for the normal ME function as well as for ME modeling. The TM buffer capacity was found more efficient in smaller mastoids. Possible clinical implications are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Ear Infections - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ear Infection in Children - 简体中文 (Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect)) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese, Traditional (Cantonese dialect) (繁體中文) Expand Section Middle ...

  15. Comparison of the Effect of Ondansetrone - Dexamethasone, Dexamethasone – Metoclopeamide and Ondansetron - Normal Saline in Decreasing Post Operative Nausa and Vomitting (PONV after Middle Ear Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haddadi Soudabeh

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The incidence of post-operative nausea and vomitting (PONV is increased after middle ear surgery and it may complicate and interact with reconstruction after surgery, so prevention and treatment of these complications are necessary.The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of anti-emetic combinations in decreasing the PONV after middle ear surgery.Materials and methods: This double blind clinical trial was carried out during 2007-2008 on 111 patients of 15-45 years old with ASA I-II who were candidates for elective middle ear surgery under general anesthesia. The patients were divided into three groups. Patients in the ON group received Ondansetrone 0.1mg/kg + Nacl 0.9% 2cc, OD group received Ondansetrone 0.1mg/kg + Dexamethasone 0.15mg/kg and MD group received Dexamethasone 0.15mg/kg+ Metoclopramide 0.15mg/kg intravenously just before the end of surgery. The patients were evaluated for nausea, vomiting, need of anti-emetic drugs and drug dosage in recovery, 1-6, 6-12 and 12-24 hours after operation and then all data were statistically analyzed by SPSS software, Chi-square, ANOVA and t- Test. P<0.05 was significant.Results: There were no significant differences among three groups in age and sex. The incidence of PONV among 3 groups was not significantly different during 24 hours after operation. (P=0.271 but the incidence of PONV in the first six hours was different among 3 groups (P=0.007 (ON: 8.1%, OD: 0%, MD: 21.6%. Also Metoclopramide consumption was significant between three groups. Conclusion: This study showed that the need to anti-emetic drugs in first 6 hours was the least in OD group, but the difference in the incidence of PONV was not significant otherwise.

  16. Ondansetron versus droperidol or placebo when given prophylactically for the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting in patients undergoing middle ear procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellish, W S; Thalji, Z; Fluter, E; Leonetti, J P

    1997-09-01

    To compare the prophylactic administration of ondansetron with droperidol or placebo to determine its effectiveness in reducing postoperative nausea and vomiting after middle ear procedures. Prospective, randomized, double-blind study. Inpatient otolaryngology service at a university medical center. 120 ASA physical status I and II patients presenting for elective middle ear surgical procedures. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either placebo (Group 1), ondansetron 4 mg intravenously (IV) (Group 2), or droperidol 25 mcg/kg i.v. (Group 3) 10 minutes before induction of general anesthesia using thiopental 5 mg/kg i.v. with fentanyl 2 mcg/kg i.v. and maintenance anesthesia with isoflurane 1% to 2% end-tidal in a 50% air/oxygen mixture. Total surgical, anesthesia, extubation, and postanesthesia care unit (PACU) occupancy times were recorded along with anesthesia recovery scores. The incidence and severity of nausea, vomiting, and pain along with rescue antiemetic administration, also were recorded. Similar assessments were made over the next 24 hours. Intergroup demographic data were similar except that the male to female ratio was higher in the ondansetron group. Stewart scores, reflecting emergence from anesthesia, were higher with ondansetron compared with droperidol. The incidence of nausea was similar between the groups but the severity was less after ondansetron therapy. More patients vomited after placebo than when given either droperidol or ondansetron. No intergroup differences were noted in the use of rescue antiemetics. Twenty-four hours later, more patients who received the placebo drug had nausea or vomited compared with either ondansetron or droperidol. Ondansetron 4 mg i.v. is as effective as droperidol and better than placebo in preventing nausea and vomiting in patients undergoing middle ear surgery. No cost advantage as determined by lower use of rescue antiemetics or shorter PACU times was noted after the prophylactic administration of

  17. A COMPARISON OF TWO DIFFERENT DOSES OF DEXMEDETOMIDINE INFUSION DURING MAINTENANCE OF GENERAL ANAESTHESIA IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING SPINE SURGERIES, FUNCTIONAL ENDOSCOPIC SINUS SURGERY AND MIDDLE EAR SURGERIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijay

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND This study is undertaken to compare the hemodynamic effects and reduction in the doses of volatile anaesthetics and muscle relaxants using two different doses of dexmedetomidine infusion during maintenance of anaesthesia in spine, functional endoscopic sinus surgery and middle ear surgeries. METHODS Sixty patients are randomly divided into 2 groups of 30 each. After shifting to the operation theatre baseline vitals were recorded. Anesthesia induced with thiopentone sodium and intubation done with the help of succinylcholine and maintained with oxygen, nitrous oxide and isoflurane. After 1 min of intubation, maintenance infusion of dexmedetomidine (0.4 mcg/kg/hr and 0.7 mcg/kg/hr for patients allotted in 2 separate groups was started and stopped 15 min before end of surgery. Hemodynamic parameters and any reduction in the doses of volatile anaesthetics and muscle relaxants was noted. RESULTS Dexmedetomidine infusion (0.4 mcg/kg/hr and 0.7 mcg/kg/hr in both groups reduced the requirements of muscle relaxants and volatile anaesthetics. Hemodynamic stability was better in the group receiving 0.4 mcg/kg/hr. Patients receiving 0.7 mcg/kg/hr had higher incidence of hypotension, bradycardia and delayed emergence from anaesthesia. CONCLUSION Dexmedetomidine infusion at 0.4 mcg/kg/hr during maintenance of anaesthesia in spine surgery, FESS and middle ear surgery would be good option to reduce the requirements of volatile anaesthetics, muscle relaxants and for better hemodynamic stability. OBJECTIVE OF STUDY: Primary Objective To compare and evaluate the hemodynamic effects and reduction in requirements of volatile anaesthetics and muscle relaxants with two different doses of dexmedetomidine infusion during maintenance of general anaesthesia in patients undergoing spine, FESS and middle ear surgeries.

  18. That Fat Cat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Phyllis Gilchrist

    2012-01-01

    This activity began with a picture book, Nurit Karlin's "Fat Cat On a Mat" (HarperCollins; 1998). The author and her students started their project with a 5-inch circular template for the head of their cats. They reviewed shapes as they drew the head and then added the ears and nose, which were triangles. Details to the face were added when…

  19. Differential Gene Expression in the Otic Capsule and the Middle Ear-An Annotation of Bone-Related Signaling Genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Michelle C.; Martin-Bertelsen, Tomas; Friis, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Hypothesis: A number of bone-related genes may be responsible for the unique suppression of perilabyrinthine bone remodeling. Background: Bone remodeling is highly inhibited around the inner ear space most likely because of osteoprotegerin (OPG), which is a well-known potent inhibitor of osteocla...

  20. Detection of ossicular chain abnormalities using CT imaging. Comparison of axial and virtual middle ear endoscopic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakata, Motomichi; Kamagata, Masaki; Harada, Kuniaki; Shirase, Ryuji; Oomoto, Hidechika [Sapporo Medical Univ. (Japan). Hospital; Himi, Tetsuo

    2000-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of axial and three-dimensional imaging (virtual endoscopy) with helical CT for the detection of ossicular chain abnormalities. In 15 patients who had traumatic ossicular dislocation, disruption, and congenital ossicular defect and anomaly, axial helical CT scanning of the temporal bone was performed with GE HSA. Axial and three-dimensional imaging was carried out in normal ears (15 ears) and abnormal ears (10 ears), for the detection of ossicular chain abnormalities. Diagnostic accuracy was evaluated by receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) curve analysis using a continuous reporting scale. Furthermore, ROC testing was done to determine the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the detection of ossicular chain abnormalities. Diagnostic accuracy in the detection of ossicular chain abnormalities with three-dimensional imaging (A{sub z}=0.967, SD=0.022) was not significantly better than that of axial imaging (A{sub z}=0.930, SD=0.046); however, the interobserver standard deviation was better for three-dimensional imaging. Three-dimensional imaging resulted in an increase in true positive cases and a decrease in false negatives. Three-dimensional imaging also showed higher sensitivity and accuracy. In the evaluation of ossicular chain abnormalities, three-dimensional imaging (virtual endoscopy) is useful and provides additional information. Three-dimensional imaging may have an important role in diagnostic procedures and/or preoperative evaluation in otology. (author)

  1. Penicillin resistance is not extrapolable to amoxicillin resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from middle ear fluid in children with acute otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblüt, Andrés; Santolaya, María Elena; Gonzalez, Patricia; Borel, Cecilia; Cofré, José

    2006-03-01

    We evaluated the in vitro antibacterial activity of amoxicillin against penicillin-susceptible and -nonsusceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae strains isolated from children with acute otitis media (AOM). Children more than 3 months of age with AOM who were seen in the Dr Sótero del Rio and Luis Calvo Mackenna Hospitals in Santiago, Chile, between July 1998 and December 2002 were subjected to tympanic puncture for middle ear fluid culture. The penicillin and amoxicillin susceptibilities of the S pneumoniae isolates were determined by epsilometer test (E test). A bacterial pathogen was isolated in 432 of 543 children (80%) as follows: S pneumoniae, 40%; Haemophilus influenzae, 29%; Moraxella catarrhalis, 7%; and Streptococcus pyogenes, 4%. Penicillin-susceptible S pneumoniae strains were less common than amoxicillin-susceptible strains (60% versus 95%; odds ratio [OR], 0.08; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.04 to 0.18). Both intermediate- and high-resistance strains were more common for penicillin (22% versus 4.5%; OR, 5.6; 95% CI, 2.5 to 12.7) than for amoxicillin (18% versus 0.5%; OR, 41.3; 95% CI, 6.0 to 821). Penicillin resistance is not extrapolable to amoxicillin among S pneumoniae strains isolated from middle ear fluid of children with AOM. Our results support the recommendation to evaluate the minimal inhibitory concentrations of penicillin-nonsusceptible S pneumoniae for amoxicillin and to continue use of this antimicrobial as a first-line antimicrobial choice for children with AOM.

  2. Neutrophil extracellular traps and bacterial biofilms in middle ear effusion of children with recurrent acute otitis media--a potential treatment target.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth B Thornton

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacteria persist within biofilms on the middle ear mucosa of children with recurrent and chronic otitis media however the mechanisms by which these develop remain to be elucidated. Biopsies can be difficult to obtain from children and their small size limits analysis. METHODS: In this study we aimed to investigate biofilm presence in middle ear effusion (MEE from children with recurrent acute otitis media (rAOM and to determine if these may represent infectious reservoirs similarly to those on the mucosa. We examined this through culture, viability staining and fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH to determine bacterial species present. Most MEEs had live bacteria present using viability staining (32/36 and all effusions had bacteria present using the universal FISH probe (26/26. Of these, 70% contained 2 or more otopathogenic species. Extensive DNA stranding was also present. This DNA was largely host derived, representing neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs within which live bacteria in biofilm formations were present. When treated with the recombinant human deoxyribonuclease 1, Dornase alfa, these strands were observed to fragment. CONCLUSIONS: Bacterial biofilms, composed of multiple live otopathogenic species can be demonstrated in the MEEs of children with rAOM and that these contain extensive DNA stranding from NETs. The NETs contribute to the viscosity of the effusion, potentially contributing to its failure to clear as well as biofilm development. Our data indicates that Dornase alfa can fragment these strands and may play a role in future chronic OM treatment.

  3. Understanding the developmental course of the acoustic properties of the human outer and middle ear over the first 6 months of life by using a longitudinal analysis of power reflectance at ambient pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahnaz, Navid; Cai, Anika; Qi, Li

    2014-05-01

    As shown by tympanometric and wideband acoustic immittance (WAI) measures, developmental changes that occur in the middle ear and the external auditory canal can affect the mechano-acoustic properties of the middle ear system during the first 2 years of life. However, these observed differences and the specific course of maturation have not been fully investigated. The overall goal of the current study was to define the time course and rate at which functional maturation of the middle ear occurs in human infants through wideband acoustic immittance (WAI). It was also within the scope of this study to establish normative data to characterize acoustic properties of the normal middle ear in infants from birth to 6 mo of age. Newborns were tested longitudinally at 1-mo intervals up to 6 mo of age for a total of six visits. All babies passed transient evoked otoacoustic emission screening on each visit. Tympanograms and WAI were recorded, and the distributions of WAI patterns were analyzed as a function of age. WAI was measured across a wide range of frequencies from birth to 6 mos of age in a cohort of 31 infants. Test-retest differences for WAI were also evaluated. Thirty-one newborns were recruited. A repeated-measure analysis of variance was conducted to investigate whether the variations observed in power reflectance at ambient pressure across the six visits were statistically different. All significant findings were subject to Greenhouse-Geisser correction for repeated-measures sphericity and inflated type-I error. RESULTS showed that power reflectance increased (closer to 1) at low frequencies (2000 Hz) as a function of age. There was very little change in power reflectance from 600 to 1600 Hz across the first 6 mo of life. Most group changes that were observed were also consistently shown in longitudinal changes observed within individual subjects. The overall maturation of the middle ear can result in a lower reflectance at higher frequencies and a higher

  4. Isolation of Malassezia furfur from a Cat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, M. J.; Abarca, M. L.; Cabañes, F. J.

    1999-01-01

    During a survey of the occurrence of Malassezia species in the external ear canals of cats without otitis externa, Malassezia furfur was isolated. This is the first report of the isolation of M. furfur from cats. PMID:10203525

  5. Isolation of Malassezia furfur from a Cat

    OpenAIRE

    Crespo, M. J.; Abarca, M. L.; Cabañes, F. J.

    1999-01-01

    During a survey of the occurrence of Malassezia species in the external ear canals of cats without otitis externa, Malassezia furfur was isolated. This is the first report of the isolation of M. furfur from cats.

  6. Swimmer's Ear

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert Answers (Q&A) Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Swimmer's Ear KidsHealth / ... español Otitis del nadador What Is Swimmer's Ear? Swimmer's ear is an infection of the ear canal . If you stick your ...

  7. A Study of Relationship between the Acoustic Sensitivity of Vestibular System and the Ability to Trigger Sound-Evoked Muscle Reflex of the Middle Ear in Adults with Normal Hearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.F. Emami

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: The vestibular system is sound sensitive and the sensitivity is related to the saccule. The vestibular afferents are projected to the middle ear muscles (such as the stapedius. The goal of this research was studying the relationship between the vestibular hearing and the sound-evoked muscle reflex of the middle ear to 500 HZ. Materials & Methods: This study was a cross sectional-comparison done in audiology department of Sheikholreis C‍‍linic (Hamadan, Iran. The study groups consisted of thirty healthy people and thirty patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Inclusion criteria of the present study were to have normal hearing on pure tone audiometry, acoustic reflex, and speech discrimination scores. Based on ipsilateral acoustic reflex test at 500HZ, they were divided to normal and abnormal groups. Then they were evaluated by cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMPs and finally classified in three groups (N Normal ear , (CVUA Contra lateral vertiginous ear with unaffected saccular sensitivity to sound,(IVA Ipsilateral vertiginous ear with affected saccular sensitivity to sound. Results: Thirty affected ears (IVA with decreased vestibular excitability as detected by ab-normal cVEMPs, revealed abnormal findings of acoustic reflex at 500HZ. Whereas, both un-affected (CVUA and normal ears (N had normal results. Multiple comparisons of mean values of cVEMPs (p13,n23 and acoustic reflex at500HZ among the three groups were sig-nificant. The correlation between acoustic reflex at 500HZ and p13 latencies was significant. The n23 latencies showed significant correlation with acoustic reflex at 500HZ. Conclusion: The vestibular sensitivity to sound retains the ability to trigger sound-evoked re-flex of the middle ear at 500 HZ. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2014; 21 (2:99-104

  8. Ventilation time of the middle ear in otitis media with effusion (OME) after CO2 laser myringotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlmaier, Benedikt; Jivanjee, Antonio; Gutzler, Rico; Huscher, Dörte; Jovanovic, Sergije

    2002-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the transtympanic ventilation time, the healing course of the tympanic membrane, the early and late complications, and the recurrence rate of otitis media with effusion (OME) within 6 months after CO2 laser myringotomy with the CO2 laser otoscope Otoscan. Prospective clinical study. In this study, laser myringotomy was performed with the CO2 laser otoscope Otoscan in a patient population comprising 81 children (159 ears) with a history of otitis media with effusion (OME) associated with adenoidal and sometimes tonsillar hyperplasia. The procedure on the tympanic membrane was accordingly combined with an adenoidectomy, a CO2 laser tonsillotomy, or a tonsillectomy and therefore performed under insufflation anesthesia. In all ears, approximately 2 mm circular perforations were created in the lower anterior quadrants with a power of 12 to 15 W, a pulse duration of 180 msec, and a scanned area of 2.2 mm in diameter. None of the children showed postoperative impairment of cochleovestibular function such as sensorineural hearing loss or nystagmus. Otomicroscopic and videoendoscopic monitoring documented the closure time and healing pattern of tympanic membrane perforations. The mean closure time was found to be 16.35 days (minimum, 8 days; maximum, 34 days). As a rule, an onion-skin-like membrane of keratinized material was seen in the former myringotomy perforations at the time of closure. At the follow-up 6 months later, the condition of the tympanic membrane of 129 ears (81.1%) could be checked by otomicroscopy and videoendoscopy and the hearing ability by audiometry and tympanometry. The CO2 laser myringotomy sites appeared normal and irritation-free. Two of the tympanic membranes examined (1.6%) showed atrophic scar formation, and 1 (0.8%) had a perforation with a diameter of 0.3 mm. The perforation was seen closed in a control otoscopy 15 months postoperatively. OME recurred in 26.3% of the ears seen intraoperatively with

  9. Interconnections between the Ears in Nonmammalian Vertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Albert S.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.

    2010-01-01

    Many of the nonmammalian vertebrates (anurans, lizards, crocodiles, and some bird species) have large, continuous air spaces connecting the middle ears and acoustically coupling the eardrums. Acoustical coupling leads to strongly enhanced directionality of the ear at frequencies where diffraction...

  10. Divergent expression of α-ENaC in middle ear mucosa in the course of otitis media with effusion induced by barotrauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ji; Zong, Yu; Li, Xiangcui; Zhang, Yi; Li, Jiping

    2015-07-01

    Gene transcription and protein expression of α-ENaC showed a divergent expression in association with the development of OME induced by barotrauma. ENaC was identified to mediate the fluid absorption through epithelia of the middle ear. This study was designed to investigate the involvement of ENaC in otitis media with effusion (OME) induced by barotrauma. A rat model of otitis media with effusion was established using a pressure cabin. The dynamic expression of α-ENaC was detected by Real time-PCR and western blot in the course of otitis media. Compared with the control, the volume of α-ENaC mRNA and protein increased significantly by 3.18-fold and 2.8-fold on the 3(rd) day, respectively, while decreased by 0.54-fold and 0.32-fold on the 7(th) day, respectively.

  11. Pierced Ears

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... how they do things is to watch another customer get his or her ears pierced. Without these precautions, you run the risk of getting infected ears. Metal Matters Your first earrings should have gold posts (the ...

  12. Chronic suppurative otitis media, middle ear pathology and corresponding hearing loss in a cohort of Greenlandic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avnstorp, Magnus Balslev; Homøe, Preben; Bjerregaard, Peter; Jensen, Ramon Gordon

    2016-04-01

    Otitis media (OM) has been observed at elevated prevalence rates in Greenlandic children. OM associated hearing loss (HL) may compromise the children's linguistic skills, social development and educational achievements. We investigated the prevalence of chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM), otitis media with effusion (OME) and tympanic membrane sequelae of OM, and compared the corresponding hearing thresholds. In 2010 we examined a cohort of 223 Greenlandic children aged 4-10 years by video otoscopy, tympanometry and tested hearing thresholds for the low-frequencies: 500, 1000 and 2000Hz and the high-frequencies: 4000 and 6000Hz. HL was categorized according to the worst hearing ear and was compared within the groups: CSOM, OME, tympanic membrane sequelae of OM and normal. Of 207 children, 5.8% had CSOM, 13.9% had OME and 55.6% had tympanic membrane sequelae of OM. The median pure tone average in low-frequencies/high-frequencies were: CSOM: 34.2/31.3dB, OME: 23.3/22.5dB, Sequelae of OM: 13.3/15dB and normal ears: 11.7/12.5dB. We found a significant difference (pchildren a HL>15dB in any frequency was found, while 6.5% suffered from a bilateral low-frequency HL>25dB. The severity of OM significantly corresponded to increased HL. The burden of CSOM and HL remains high in young Greenlandic children. Aggressive treatment with antibiotics, improved hearing rehabilitation, sound field amplification in classrooms and otosurgical capacity should be further promoted in Greenland. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Ear Problems in Swimmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao-Che Wang

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute diffuse otitis externa (swimmer's ear, otomycosis, exostoses, traumatic eardrum perforation, middle ear infection, and barotraumas of the inner ear are common problems in swimmers and people engaged in aqua activities. The most common ear problem in swimmers is acute diffuse otitis externa, with Pseudomonas aeruginosa being the most common pathogen. The symptoms are itching, otalgia, otorrhea, and conductive hearing loss. The treatment includes frequent cleansing of the ear canal, pain control, oral or topical medications, acidification of the ear canal, and control of predisposing factors. Swimming in polluted waters and ear-canal cleaning with cotton-tip applicators should be avoided. Exostoses are usually seen in people who swim in cold water and present with symptoms of accumulated debris, otorrhea and conductive hearing loss. The treatment for exostoses is transmeatal surgical removal of the tumors. Traumatic eardrum perforations may occur during water skiing or scuba diving and present with symptoms of hearing loss, otalgia, otorrhea, tinnitus and vertigo. Tympanoplasty might be needed if the perforations do not heal spontaneously. Patients with chronic otitis media with active drainage should avoid swimming, while patients who have undergone mastoidectomy and who have no cavity problems may swim. For children with ventilation tubes, surface swimming is safe in a clean, chlorinated swimming pool. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss and some degree of vertigo may occur after diving because of rupture of the round or oval window membrane.

  14. What Is an Ear Infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your ear with a special flashlight called an otoscope (say: OH-te-skope). With the otoscope, the doctor can see your eardrum , the thin ... and middle ear. The doctor may use the otoscope to blow a little puff of air in ...

  15. Long-term results of middle fossa plugging of superior semicircular canal dehiscences: clinically and instrumentally demonstrated efficiency in a retrospective series of 16 ears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomeer, Hans; Bonnard, Damien; Castetbon, Vincent; Franco-Vidal, Valérie; Darrouzet, Patricia; Darrouzet, Vincent

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study is to report the surgical outcome after middle fossa approach (MFA) plugging in patients suffering from a superior semi-circular canal dehiscence (SCD) syndrome. This is a retrospective case review. Tertiary referral center. Sixteen ears in 13 patients with a SCD syndrome suffering from severe and disabling vestibular symptoms with a bony dehiscence on CT scan >3 mm and decreased threshold of cervical vestibular evoked potentials (cVEMPs). We assessed preoperatively: clinical symptoms, hearing, cVEMPs threshold, size of dehiscence and videonystagmography (VNG) with caloric and 100 Hz vibratory tests. Postoperatively, we noted occurrences of neurosurgical complication, evolution of audiological and vestibular symptoms, and evaluation of cVEMP data. Tullio's phenomenon was observed in 13 cases (81.3 %) and subjectively reported hearing loss in seven (43.7 %). All patients were so disabled that they had to stop working. No neurosurgical complications were observed in the postoperative course. In three cases (16.6 %), an ipsilateral and transitory immediate postoperative vestibular deficit associated with a sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) was noted, which totally resolved with steroids and bed rest. All patients were relieved of audiological and vestibular symptoms and could return to normal activity with a mean follow-up of 31.1 months (range 3-95). No patient had residual SNHL. cVEMPs were performed in 14 ears postoperatively and were normalized in 12 (85.7 %). Two of the three patients operated on both sides kept some degree of unsteadiness and oscillopsia. MFA plugging of the superior semi-circular canal is an efficient and non-hearing deteriorating procedure.

  16. Innovative 3D Model of the Human Middle Ear in High Resolution with a Histological Microgrinding Method: A Feasibility Study and Comparison with μCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Bradel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Conclusion. The development of a histological 3D model of the tympanic cavity visualizes the exact microanatomy of the sound conduction organ and is therefore essential for finite elements simulations and surgical training. Objectives. So far, no accurate histological 3D model of the sound conduction system existed in literature. For 3D reconstruction of the very fine structures inside and outside the auditory ossicles, a method based on histological slices allows a more differential analysis of both hard and soft tissues and could thus be superior to μCT. Method. A complete temporal bone was embedded in epoxy resin and microground in distances of about 34 μm. After photodocumentation of every plane, a 3D reconstruction was performed by using the Computer Aided Design (CAD program Rhinoceros 5®. For comparison, a μCT of the same specimen resulted in a 3D model of the calcified structures in the middle ear. Results. The histological 3D model gives an excellent overview to all anatomical soft and bony tissues of the human auditory ossicles. Specifically the fine blood vessel system and the exact dimension of cartilage areas inside the ossicles can be illustrated much more precisely than with μCT data. The present technique also allows the evaluation of the fine connecting ligaments inside the tympanic cavity.

  17. Facial nerve palsy secondary to Epstein-Barr virus infection of the middle ear in pediatric population may be more common than we think.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelnik, Katarina; Matos, Aleš

    2017-11-01

    Facial nerve palsy is a rare complication of acute otitis media (AOM). The general understanding is that this complication has a bacterial cause although bacteria can be isolated from the middle ear only in approximately two-thirds of cases of AOM. Detection of viral agents from specimens obtained during myringotomy in patients with AOM suggests a possible role of viruses in the etiology of this disease. We studied 5 otherwise healthy 17- to 27-month-old children who were referred to the Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Cervicofacial Surgery from December 2012 to January 2016 because of AOM and ipsilateral facial nerve palsy. In all cases, serological tests were indicative of a primary Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and no other causative pathogens were identified during hospitalization. In one patient, the technique of in situ hybridization (ISH) detected EBV-specific ribonucleic acid (RNA) sequences within tissue sections obtained during mastoidectomy. The aim of this article is to alert clinicians that AOM induced facial nerve palsy secondary to an acute EBV infection in the pediatric population is very likely more common than originally thought. To our knowledge until the present case series, only 2 cases of AOM induced facial nerve palsy secondary to an acute EBV infection have been reported and no cases of EBV infection proven by the ISH technique showing the presence of EBV-specific RNA sequences in patient's tissue biopsies have been reported until now.

  18. Pneumococcal Neuraminidase A (NanA) Promotes Biofilm Formation and Synergizes with Influenza A Virus in Nasal Colonization and Middle Ear Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wren, John T; Blevins, Lance K; Pang, Bing; Basu Roy, Ankita; Oliver, Melissa B; Reimche, Jennifer L; Wozniak, Jessie E; Alexander-Miller, Martha A; Swords, W Edward

    2017-04-01

    Even in the vaccine era, Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) remains a leading cause of otitis media, a significant public health burden, in large part because of the high prevalence of nasal colonization with the pneumococcus in children. The primary pneumococcal neuraminidase, NanA, which is a sialidase that catalyzes the cleavage of terminal sialic acids from host glycoconjugates, is involved in both of these processes. Coinfection with influenza A virus, which also expresses a neuraminidase, exacerbates nasal colonization and disease by S. pneumoniae , in part via the synergistic contributions of the viral neuraminidase. The specific role of its pneumococcal counterpart, NanA, in this interaction, however, is less well understood. We demonstrate in a mouse model that NanA-deficient pneumococci are impaired in their ability to cause both nasal colonization and middle ear infection. Coinfection with neuraminidase-expressing influenza virus and S. pneumoniae potentiates both colonization and infection but not to wild-type levels, suggesting an intrinsic role of NanA. Using in vitro models, we show that while NanA contributes to both epithelial adherence and biofilm viability, its effect on the latter is actually independent of its sialidase activity. These data indicate that NanA contributes both enzymatically and nonenzymatically to pneumococcal pathogenesis and, as such, suggest that it is not a redundant bystander during coinfection with influenza A virus. Rather, its expression is required for the full synergism between these two pathogens. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  19. Human and animal ear, comparative anatomy and physiology, literature overview

    OpenAIRE

    Mesarčíková, Zuzana

    2007-01-01

    As used herein, the ear of humans are different things . For some it may najvysunutejšia be only that portion of the auditory system - pinna , for others it is a conversion part of the auditory apparatus - middle ear , and for another group of people is custom ear receptor component of the spirit of the inner - ear . To say nothing of other meanings words ear to ear containers and bags ; chick ear (she praslenitá - sage salvia verticillata , which so fiercely Zháňal witch Saxana ); Judas' ear...

  20. Ear Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Infants and Children Chest Pain, Acute Chest Pain, Chronic Cold and Flu Cough Diarrhea Ear Problems Elimination Problems Elimination Problems in Infants and Children Eye Problems Facial Swelling Feeding Problems in Infants ...

  1. Ear examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to the side, or the child's head may rest against an adult's chest. Older children and adults may sit with the head tilted toward the shoulder opposite the ear being examined. The provider will ...

  2. Discontinuity of the incudo-stapedial joint within a fully aerated middle ear and mastoid on computed tomography: A clinico-radiological study of its aetiology and clinical consequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, S.E.J.; Pai, I.; Jiang, D.; Spiers, A.J.D.; Fitzgerald-O'Connor, A.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the aetiology and clinical consequences of incudo-stapedial (IS) discontinuity when it is demonstrated on computed tomography (CT) within a fully aerated middle ear and mastoid. Methods and materials: Patients with CT evidence of IS discontinuity within a fully aerated middle ear and mastoid were prospectively identified. Clinical history, otoscopic findings, audiometry, and CT data were evaluated. Predefined criteria were used to determine the likely aetiology of IS discontinuity, whether it was diagnosed prior to the CT study, and the clinical consequences in terms of degree of conductive hearing loss and requirement for surgical correction. The range of CT appearances was evaluated. Results: The IS discontinuity in 34/36 ears was felt to be due to incus erosion secondary to chronic otitis, on the basis of clinical history and otoscopic findings. The IS discontinuity was rarely evident prior to CT with long-process deficiency being identified in only 5/36 cases. The mean air bone gap was only 22.5 dB. The ossicular defect was surgically addressed in only four cases. The incus deficiency was confined to the lower-third on CT in 19/36 cases. Conclusion: When IS discontinuity is demonstrated within a fully aerated middle ear and mastoid, the most likely aetiology is of acquired incus erosion due to chronic otitis media. The IS discontinuity on CT is usually not evident otoscopically. It usually results in only mild conductive hearing loss and the ossicular discontinuity was rarely surgically addressed in the present series.

  3. The Galker test of speech reception in noise; associations with background variables, middle ear status, hearing, and language in Danish preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauritsen, Maj-Britt Glenn; Söderström, Margareta; Kreiner, Svend; Dørup, Jens; Lous, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    We tested "the Galker test", a speech reception in noise test developed for primary care for Danish preschool children, to explore if the children's ability to hear and understand speech was associated with gender, age, middle ear status, and the level of background noise. The Galker test is a 35-item audio-visual, computerized word discrimination test in background noise. Included were 370 normally developed children attending day care center. The children were examined with the Galker test, tympanometry, audiometry, and the Reynell test of verbal comprehension. Parents and daycare teachers completed questionnaires on the children's ability to hear and understand speech. As most of the variables were not assessed using interval scales, non-parametric statistics (Goodman-Kruskal's gamma) were used for analyzing associations with the Galker test score. For comparisons, analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used. Interrelations were adjusted for using a non-parametric graphic model. In unadjusted analyses, the Galker test was associated with gender, age group, language development (Reynell revised scale), audiometry, and tympanometry. The Galker score was also associated with the parents' and day care teachers' reports on the children's vocabulary, sentence construction, and pronunciation. Type B tympanograms were associated with a mean hearing 5-6dB below that of than type A, C1, or C2. In the graphic analysis, Galker scores were closely and significantly related to Reynell test scores (Gamma (G)=0.35), the children's age group (G=0.33), and the day care teachers' assessment of the children's vocabulary (G=0.26). The Galker test of speech reception in noise appears promising as an easy and quick tool for evaluating preschool children's understanding of spoken words in noise, and it correlated well with the day care teachers' reports and less with the parents' reports. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Non-echoplanar diffusion weighted imaging in the detection of post-operative middle ear cholesteatoma: navigating beyond the pitfalls to find the pearl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi K. Lingam

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Non-echoplanar diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI has established itself as the modality of choice in detecting and localising post-operative middle ear cleft cholesteatoma. Despite its good diagnostic performance, there are recognised pitfalls in its radiological interpretation which both the radiologist and otologist should be aware of. Our article highlights the various pitfalls and provides guidance for improving radiological interpretation and navigating beyond many of the pitfalls. It is recommended radiological practice to interpret the diffusion weighted images together with the ADC map and supplement with the corresponding T1 weighted and T2 weighted images, all of which can contribute to and enhance lesion localisation and characterisation. ADC values are also helpful in improving specificity and confidence levels. Given the limitation in sensitivity in detecting small cholesteatoma less than 3 mm, serial monitoring with DWI over time is recommended to allow any small residual cholesteatoma pearls to grow and become large enough to be detected on DWI. Optimising image acquisition and discussing at a joint clinico-radiological meeting both foster good radiological interpretation to navigate beyond the pitfalls and ultimately good patient care. Teaching Points • Non-echoplanar DWI is the imaging of choice in detecting post-operative cholesteatoma. • There are recognised pitfalls which may hinder accurate radiological interpretation. • Interpret with the ADC map /values and T1W and T2W images. • Serial DWI monitoring is of value in detection and characterisation. • Optimising image acquisition and discussing at clinico-radiological meetings enhance radiological interpretation.

  5. Pro-inflammatory interleukins in middle ear effusions from atopic and non-atopic children with chronic otitis media with effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielnik-Jurkiewicz, Beata; Stankiewicz-Szymczak, Wanda

    2016-06-01

    Chronic otitis media with effusion (OME) is associated with irreversible changes in the middle ear, sometimes leading to hearing loss and abnormal language development in children. While the pathogenesis of OME is not fully understood, inflammatory and allergic factors are thought to be involved. The study aimed to investigate the role of cytokines in the local development of chronic OME, and assess differences in the cytokine profiles between atopic and non-atopic children. 84 atopic and non-atopic children with chronic OME (mean age of 6 years 7 months) were studied. Age-matched children with hypertrophy of the adenoids and Eustachian tube dysfunction served as the control group. The number of past acute otitis media (AOM) episodes, their age, and the type of effusion were recorded for all children. Pro-inflammatory cytokine concentrations (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8) were determined and the presence of pathogenic bacteria in the patients' effusions was examined. High concentrations of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 were found in the effusions in all children with chronic OME, with the highest levels observed in the non-atopic group. The atopic group showed persistently high IL-1β levels, while in the non-atopic children, IL-1β and TNF-α levels positively correlated with the patient's age and the number of past AOM episodes. Pathogenic bacteria were more frequently isolated from effusions in non-atopic children. In both atopic and non-atopic children, pro-inflammatory cytokines are found at high concentrations. This argues in favor of instituting anti-inflammatory management for treating OME, regardless of atopy.

  6. Monitored anaesthesia care – Comparison of nalbuphine/dexmedetomidine versus nalbuphine/propofol for middle ear surgeries: A double-blind randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasa Rao Nallam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Middle ear surgeries (MESs are usually performed under sedation with local anaesthesia and can be well tolerated by the patient with minimal discomfort. In the present study, we compare the effect of nalbuphine/dexmedetomidine combination with nalbuphine/propofol on sedation and analgesia in monitored anaesthesia care. Methods: One hundred adult patients undergoing MESs under monitored anaesthesia care (MAC were randomly allocated into two groups. All patients in both groups received injection nalbuphine 50 μg/kg intravenously (IV. Group D received a bolus dose of injection dexmedetomidine 1 μg/kg IV over 10 min followed by an infusion started at 0.4 μg/kg/h IV. Group P received a bolus dose of injection propofol 0.75 mg/kg followed by an infusion started at 0.025 mg/kg/min IV. Sedation was titrated to Ramsay Sedation Score (RSS of 3. Patient's mean arterial pressure, heart rate, saturation peripheral pulse and need for intraoperative rescue sedation/analgesia were recorded and compared. The data analysis was carried out with Z test and Chi-square test. Results: Mean RSS was significantly more in Group D (4.24 ± 1.54 as compared to Group P (2.58 ± 0.95. Overall VAS score was also significantly less in Group D (3.5 ± 1.7 than in Group P (5.4 ± 1.8. In total, 16 patients (32% in Group D had hypotension whereas 7 patients (14% only in Group P had hypotension. Conclusion: Nalbuphine/dexmedetomidine combination is superior to nalbuphine/propofol in producing sedation and decreasing VAS in patients undergoing MESs under MAC. Better surgeon and patient satisfaction were observed with nalbuphine/dexmedetomidine. Haemodynamics need to be closely monitored.

  7. Application of high resolution computer tomography in external ear canal cholesteatoma diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubin Chen

    2018-03-01

    Conclusion: HRCT can provide detail information about the extent of external ear canal cholesteatoma. Such information can be used to identify special situations with serious complications and to differentiate external ear canal cholesteatoma from middle ear cholesteatoma.

  8. Primary angiocentric/angioinvasive T-cell lymphoma of the tympanic bulla in a feline leukaemia virus-positive cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara F Santagostino

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Case summary A 5-year-old neutered female feline leukaemia virus (FeLV-positive domestic shorthair cat with a 5 month history of otitis media was referred for head tilt, stertor and dyspnoea. Computed tomography scan revealed soft tissue opacities inside the right tympanic bulla, with bone remodelling, and concurrent nasopharyngeal and intracranial invasion. Endoscopically guided bioptic samples were collected from the nasopharynx and middle ear. Histology revealed dense sheets of round, large, neoplastic cells, often surrounding or invading vascular walls. Neoplastic cells expressed CD3, FeLV p27 and gp70 antigens. A middle ear angiocentric/angioinvasive T-cell lymphoma was diagnosed. After improvement of clinical conditions following radiation therapy, the cat died unexpectedly. At necropsy, hepatic and splenic spread was detected. Relevance and novel information Primary middle ear tumours are rare and their diagnosis is often delayed as clinical signs mimic more common otological conditions. Multiple bioptic specimens are pivotal for a definitive diagnosis. The young age of the cat, serology and immunohistochemistry revealed a possible transforming role of FeLV.

  9. Ear Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can cause your child’s eardrum to rupture or pop, leaving a hole in the ear. The initial pop hurts, but actually relieves the pressure and pain. ... turns up the volume of the TV or music, is not responding to softer sounds or is ...

  10. Cosmetic ear surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otoplasty; Ear pinning; Ear surgery - cosmetic; Ear reshaping; Pinnaplasty ... Cosmetic ear surgery may be done in the surgeon's office, an outpatient clinic, or a hospital. It can be performed under ...

  11. A Comparison of Three Drug Combinations for Sedation during Middle Ear Surgeries under Local Anesthesia: A Multicentric Randomized Double Blind Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: During Middle Ear Surgeries (MES done under Local Anesthesia (LA, patients may feel discomfort due to noise of suction, manipulation of instruments, positioning of head-neck and sometimes due to pain. A bloodless microscopic field is also essential to facilitate surgical exposure in MES. Various combinations of analgesics and sedatives have been tried to alleviate apprehension of the patients and improve microscopic field which may result into reduction in surgical time. In the present study, we have compared Dexmedetomedine (Dex with Midazolam-Fentanyl (MF and PentazocinePromethazine (PP combinations for their sedoanalgesia, anxiolysis and other pharmacological effects when administered during MES, not lasting for more than 60 min. Material and Methods: Ninety American Society of American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA group I /II patients admitted in either of the three hospitals during May 2014 to January 2015 for MES under LA were randomly divided into three groups by an independent observer. Group D received intravenous bolus of Injection Dexmedetomidine 1 µg/ kg over 10 min. Group MF received Injection Midazolam 0.06 mg/ kg + Inj. Fentanyl 1 µg/ kg and Group PP received Injection Pentazocine 0.3 mg/kg + Injection Promethazine 0.5mg/kg given intravenously followed by LA before taking incision for the surgery. Need of a rescue sedoanalgesic dose of (Midazolam 0.01 mg/kg + Fentanyl 0.5 µg/kg during the surgery was noted. All the patients received 500 ml of normal saline infusion till the end of the surgery. All surgeries were finished within 60 min. Vital parameters and Ramsay Sedation Score (RSS of the patients were noted from the time of administration of sedative till the end of the surgery. Patient and surgeon satisfaction scores were recorded immediately after the surgery. Drug combinations of three groups were compared for their effectiveness, adverse effects and satisfaction scores in given doses. Children, mentally

  12. Pathogenesis of otitis externa and otitis media in dogs and cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović Nikola

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Diseases of the outer and middle ear (Otitis externa and Otitis media are a frequent clinical problem which is mostly approached in the wrong way. We believe that the approach to a diseased ear in dogs or cats by practicing veterinarians in our country is most often incorrect. Namely, the conventional approach to inflammation of the outer ear is narrowed down to cleaning the ear, usually with cotton wool and hydrogen peroxide, and then by applying ear drops for veterinary or human use over the next few days. A somewhat more conscientious approach implies treatment using antibiotics, topical and/or systemic, but based on an antibiogram. If the presence of a foreign body is suspected, the veterinarian will use an otoscope, and this is where the entire diagnostic approach in our conditions usually ends. Such procedures most often fail to resolve the problem, so that the disease recurs after a certain time or becomes chronic recurrent Otitis externa, which is one of the biggest problems in dog dermatology. Experience shows that veterinarians here are generally not familiar with the pathogenesis of outer and middle ear infection, and that this is the reason why they approach diagnostics and therapy in the wrong way. The most important thing is to have in mind that bacteria and fungi linked with a pathological process in the ear canal are merely opportunistic microorganisms, and never primary pathogens, themselves responsible for Otitis externa. Antibiotic or antimycotic treatment does not cure the basic disease which led to the inflammation, but only its consequences. A large number of factors involved in the inflammation of the outer or middle ear are traditionally divided into primary, predisposing, secondary, and underlying. The basis for the successful treatment of Otitis externa and Otitis media is the recognition, elimination or control of the primary factors (atopy, nutritive allergy, keratinization disorders, parasitic infestations. The

  13. Cochlear aqueduct flow resistance is not constant during evoked inner ear pressure change in the guinea pig

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, HP; Feijen, RA; Albers, FWJ

    Inner ear fluid pressure was measured during 6.25 mHz square wave middle ear pressure manipulation, with a perforated tympanic membrane. After a negative-going middle ear pressure change the calculated flow resistance of the inner ear pressure release routes (mainly the cochlear aqueduct) was

  14. Ear infection - acute

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Family history of ear infections Not being breastfed Pacifier use Recent ear infection Recent illness of any ... lead to fewer ear infections. DO NOT use pacifiers. Breastfeed -- this makes a child much less prone ...

  15. CT of the ear in Pendred syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfeld, Moshe; Glaser, Benjamin; Nassir, Elias; Gomori, John Moshe; Hazani, Elitsur; Bishara, Nassir

    2005-05-01

    To prospectively determine the structural anomalies of the inner ear by using thin-section computed tomography (CT) in an extended family with Pendred syndrome. Ethics committee approved the study, and informed consent was obtained from every patient or from parents of patients under legal age. Twelve patients (three females and nine males aged 7-47 years) with Pendred syndrome (all from the same ethnic isolate and with the same mutation in the PDS gene) were evaluated for inner-ear malformation at thin-section CT. Both ears were evaluated. Presence or absence of interscalar septum between upper and middle turns of the cochlea was evaluated, and vestibule and vestibular aqueduct were examined for enlargement. Modiolus was determined to be present or absent (modiolar deficiency). CT scans were evaluated in consensus by two radiologists (M.G., J.M.G.). All patients had inner ear malformation on both sides. Modiolus was absent and vestibule was enlarged on both sides in all 12 patients. Interscalar septum was absent in 18 (75%) of 24 ears. In eight patients, interscalar septum was absent in both ears, whereas in two patients, it was absent on only one side. Aqueduct was enlarged in 20 (80%) of 24 ears. In nine patients, both ears had enlarged aqueducts, while in two patients, only one side was abnormal. Inner ear malformation is an invariable finding in Pendred syndrome. Modiolus deficiency and vestibular enlargement were the most consistent anomalies in this population with Pendred syndrome. (c) RSNA, 2005.

  16. Monitoring inner ear pressure changes in normal guinea pigs induced by the Meniett (R) 20

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feijen, RA; Segenhout, JM; Wit, HP; Albers, FWJ

    2000-01-01

    The inner ear fluid pressure of guinea pigs was measured during a series of complex escalating middle ear pressure changes induced by the Meniett(R)20 (Pascal Medical, Sweden), a possible therapeutic pressure generator to be used by patients with Meniere's disease. Middle ear pressure changes were

  17. Ear Disorders in Scuba Divers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MH Azizi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available History of underwater diving dates back to antiquity. Breath-hold technique in diving was known to the ancient nations. However, deep diving progressed only in the early decades of the 19th century as the result of advancements in efficient underwater technologies which subsequently led to invention of sophisticated sets of scuba diving in the 20th century. Currently, diving is performed for various purposes including commercial, recreational, military, underwater construction, oil industry, underwater archeology and scientific assessment of marine life. By increasing popularity of underwater diving, dive-related medical conditions gradually became more evident and created a new challenge for the health care professionals, so that eventually, a specialty the so-called “diving medicine” was established. Most of the diving-associated disorders appear in the head and neck. The most common of all occupational disorders associated with diving are otologic diseases. External otitis has been reported as the most common otolaryngologic problem in underwater divers. Exostosis of the external ear canal may be formed in divers as the result of prolonged diving in cold waters. Other disorders of the ear and paranasal sinuses in underwater divers are caused by barometric pressure change (i.e., barotraumas, and to a lesser extent by decompression sickness. Barotrauma of the middle ear is the most prevalent barotrauma in divers. The inner ear barotraumas, though important, is less common. The present paper is a brief overview of diving-related ear disorders particularly in scuba divers.

  18. Prenatal and postnatal development of the mammalian ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powles-Glover, Nicola; Maconochie, Mark

    2018-02-15

    The ear can be subdivided into three distinct parts, each with significantly distinct structural and functional differences, the outer, middle, and inner ear, the latter housing the specialized sensory hair cells that act as transducers. There are numerous manuscripts documenting the anatomical development of the inner, middle, and outer ear in humans, rodents, chick, and zebrafish, dating back to the early 20th Century, and these developmental processes of these components are further compared in a number of review articles (Anthwal & Thompson, ; Basch, Brown, Jen, & Groves, ; Sai & Ladher, ). This article presents a review of both pre- and postnatal development of the inner ear, discusses recent molecular genetic advances toward our understanding of hair cells responsible for the sensory functions of the inner ear. Finally, a survey of comparative ear biology is used to pull together our understanding of the species differences, similarities, and key time points of definitive organ development of the ear. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Play it by Ear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, Nikolaj Peter Iversen; Kvist, Søren Helstrup; Thaysen, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    The first antenna for ear-to-ear communication with a standard Bluetooth chip has the potential to improve hearing aid technology.......The first antenna for ear-to-ear communication with a standard Bluetooth chip has the potential to improve hearing aid technology....

  20. Inner ear tissue remodeling and ion homeostasis gene alteration in murine chronic otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacArthur, Carol J; Hausman, Fran; Kempton, J Beth; Sautter, Nathan; Trune, Dennis R

    2013-02-01

    Studies were designed to ascertain the impact of chronic middle ear infection on the numerous ion and water channels, transporters, and tissue remodeling genes in the inner and middle ear. Permanent sensorineural hearing loss is a significant problem resulting from chronic middle ear disease, although the inner ear processes involved are poorly defined. Maintaining a balanced ionic composition of endolymph in the inner ear is crucial for hearing; thus, it was hypothesized that this may be at risk with inflammation. Inner and middle ear RNA collected separately from 6-month-old C3H/HeJ mice with prolonged middle ear disease were subjected to qRT-PCR for 8 common inflammatory cytokine genes, 24 genes for channels controlling ion (sodium, potassium, and chloride) and water (aquaporin) transport, tight junction claudins, and gap junction connexins, and 32 tissue remodeling genes. Uninfected Balb/c mice were used as controls. Significant increase in inner ear inflammatory and ion homeostasis (claudin, aquaporin, and gap junction) gene expression, and both upregulation and downregulation of tissue remodeling gene expression occurred. Alteration in middle ear ion homeostasis and tissue remodeling gene expression was noted in the setting of uniform upregulation of cytokine genes. Chronic inflammatory middle ear disease can impact inner ear ion and water transport functions and induce tissue remodeling. Recognizing these inner ear mechanisms at risk may identify potential therapeutic targets to maintain hearing during prolonged otitis media.

  1. Analysis of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae isolated from middle ear fluid before and after the introduction of government subsidies for pneumococcal and H. influenzae type b vaccines in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Tadashi; Takeuchi, Noriko; Fukasawa, Chie; Hirose, Shoko; Okui, Hideyuki; Sato, Hiroko; Sato, Mari; Arimoto, Yukiko; Nakano, Atsuko; Ishiwada, Naruhiko

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to identify trends in frequency, serotype, and antimicrobial susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae isolated from middle ear fluid specimens of children aged≤15 years (mean, 2 years), before and after the introduction of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) and the H. influenzae type b vaccine, at a pediatric facility in Japan. Sixty-six S. pneumoniae and 88 H. influenzae strains were isolated from 820 middle ear fluid samples. Serotyping and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were performed. The study time-frame was divided into period 1 (2007-2010) and period 2 (2011-2014), according to the availability of vaccine public funding. The S. pneumoniae detection rate decreased from 9.6% in period 1-6.1% in period 2 (p = 0.042). PCV7 serotypes decreased from 56.8% to 9.1% (p = 0.0002). No significant change was observed for the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) serotypes: 72.7% in period 1 and 59.1% in period 2. Penicillin-resistant strains (penicillin G-MIC ≥2 μg/mL) decreased from 25% to 4.5% (p = 0.038). Detection rates for H. influenzae did not change significantly: 10.3% in period 1 and 11.3% in period 2. Serotypes were mostly non-typeable: 97.9% in period 1 and 90.2% in period 2, and only one serotype b strain was isolated in each period. The frequency of ampicillin-resistant strains (MIC ≥4 μg/mL) did not change. These results show a preventative effect of PCV7 on otitis media due to S. pneumoniae. PCV7 was replaced with PCV13 in 2013 in Japan; therefore, a further decrease in pneumococcal otitis media is anticipated in the future. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Precise individualized armature for ear reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evenhouse, Raymond J.; Chen, Xiaoming

    1991-04-01

    The cosmetic result of an ear restored surgically or via prosthetics is dependent on the surgeon''s ability to carve a precise cartilage armature at the time of surgery or the prosthetist''s ability to sculpt in wax an exact duplicate of the patient''s " missing" ear. Introducing CAD/CAM technology into the process benefits the esthetic outcome of these procedures. By utilizing serial section information derived from CAT MRI or moulage techniques a mirrorimage of the patient''s " donor" ear is generated. The resulting earform data is then used for the design of a cartilage armature produced by multi-axis milling or to produce by stereolithography a model which serves as the basis for a prosthesis.

  3. Ear Infection and Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Infection and Vaccines Ear Infection and Vaccines Patient Health Information News ... or may need reinsertion over time. What about vaccines? A vaccine is a preparation administered to stimulate ...

  4. External Otitis (Swimmer's Ear)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abbreviations Weights & Measures ENGLISH View Professional English Deutsch Japanese Espaniol Find information on medical topics, symptoms, drugs, ... A doctor's examination of the ear canal Sometimes culture of a sample from the ear canal The ...

  5. An abbreviated history of the ear: from Renaissance to present.

    OpenAIRE

    Hachmeister, Jorge E.

    2003-01-01

    In this article we discuss important discoveries in relation to the anatomy and physiology of the ear from Renaissance to present. Before the Renaissance, there was a paucity of knowledge of the anatomy of the ear, because of the relative inaccessibility of the temporal bone and the general perception that human dissections should not be conducted. It was not until the sixteenth century that the middle ear was described with detail. Further progress would be made between the sixteenth and eig...

  6. Swimmer's Ear (External Otitis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert Answers (Q&A) Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español ... español Otitis del nadador (otitis externa) What Is Swimmer's Ear? Swimmer's ear is an infection of the ear canal, the tubular opening that ...

  7. 3D visualisation of the middle ear and adjacent structures using reconstructed multi-slice CT datasets, correlating 3D images and virtual endoscopy to the 2D cross-sectional images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodt, T.; Ratiu, P.; Kacher, D.F.; Anderson, M.; Jolesz, F.A.; Kikinis, R.; Becker, H.; Bartling, S.

    2002-01-01

    The 3D imaging of the middle ear facilitates better understanding of the patient's anatomy. Cross-sectional slices, however, often allow a more accurate evaluation of anatomical structures, as some detail may be lost through post-processing. In order to demonstrate the advantages of combining both approaches, we performed computed tomography (CT) imaging in two normal and 15 different pathological cases, and the 3D models were correlated to the cross-sectional CT slices. Reconstructed CT datasets were acquired by multi-slice CT. Post-processing was performed using the in-house software ''3D Slicer'', applying thresholding and manual segmentation. 3D models of the individual anatomical structures were generated and displayed in different colours. The display of relevant anatomical and pathological structures was evaluated in the greyscale 2D slices, 3D images, and the 2D slices showing the segmented 2D anatomy in different colours for each structure. Correlating 2D slices to the 3D models and virtual endoscopy helps to combine the advantages of each method. As generating 3D models can be extremely time-consuming, this approach can be a clinically applicable way of gaining a 3D understanding of the patient's anatomy by using models as a reference. Furthermore, it can help radiologists and otolaryngologists evaluating the 2D slices by adding the correct 3D information that would otherwise have to be mentally integrated. The method can be applied to radiological diagnosis, surgical planning, and especially, to teaching. (orig.)

  8. [HRCT imaging characterized of congenital abnormalities of the inner ear in 45 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinling; Meng, Meijuan; Huan, Yi; Zhang, Jinsong

    2003-10-01

    To explore the high resolution CT (HRCT) image characterized of congenital abnormalities of the inner ear(CAIE), and its value in the diagnosis and treatment of CAIE. The clinic data and axial HRCT scans of CAIE in 45 cases were analyzed. In 45 CAIE patients, most of them were frequently associated with slowly progressive sensorineural hearing loss in childhood, 15 ears were fluctuating hearing loss. Seventeen ears were unilateral semicircular canal paralysis. HRCT showed that Michel type 3 cases(4 ears), Mondini type 25 cases(39 ears). Large vestibular aqueduct malformation not associated with anomalies of inner ears 13 cases(23 ears), anomalies of internal auditory canal 4 cases (5 ears). Thirteen ears were associated with outer and middle ear malformation. HRCT image has the important value in the diagnosis and treatment of CAIE, especially for the excerpt of indication of cochlear implantation.

  9. Cat's Claw

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... R S T U V W X Y Z Cat's Claw Share: On This Page Background How Much ... Foster This fact sheet provides basic information about cat’s claw—common names, usefulness and safety, and resources ...

  10. Temporal bone CT analysis of congenital ear anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Jung Won; Moon, Min Joo; Sung, Kyu Bo

    1988-01-01

    Authors analysed the CT findings of the congenital ear anomalies of twenty-nine patients for 2 years and 3 months. The results were as follows: 1. Most of the patients were under the age of 20 (82.7%) and prevalent in male (72.4%). 2. Clinically, congenital ear anomalies were detected in 20 patients (68.9%), conductive hearing loss in 4, sensorineural hearing loss in 1, and the remained 4 patients were detected incidentally without clinical symptom. 3. In the cases of unilateral involvement of 20 patients, right ear was more common (12/20). Eight of 9 bilateral involvement showed similar degree. 4. The middle ear malformations were found in 22 patients (75.9%) and bilateral in 4 patients. 26 cases of middle ear malformations had been classified by Frey into 4 groups; Group I in 5, Group II in 9, Graoup III in 9 and Group IV in 3. 5. Incidentally found ear anomaly was lateral semicircular canal formed a single cavity with the vestibule in all patients (5 pts.). 6. Inner ear malformations accompanying sensorineural hearing loss were found in 3 patients with bilateral involvement and middle ear malformations were accompanied in 2 patients. The degree of involvement of labyrinth was variable.

  11. Secreção na orelha média em lactentes - ocorrência, recorrência e aspectos relacionados Secretion of middle ear in infants - occurrence, recurrence and related factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra de O. Saes

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O presente estudo objetivou avaliar a ocorrência e recorrência de secreção na orelha média e os possíveis fatores associados, em 190 recém-nascidos e lactentes observados nos 2 primeiros anos de vida, participantes de um programa de prevenção, detecção e intervenção interdisciplinar desenvolvido na Clínica de Educação para Saúde da Universidade do Sagrado Coração. MÉTODOS: Os recém-nascidos e lactentes foram submetidos mensalmente a anamnese, otoscopia, avaliação audiológica comportamental por meio de instrumentos sonoros e tons puros (audiometria pediátrica e timpanometria. RESULTADOS: Os resultados revelaram que 68,4% dos lactentes apresentaram um ou mais episódios de secreção na orelha média nos 2 primeiros anos, com maior recorrência para o sexo masculino. A idade de maior ocorrência foi entre 4 e 12 meses. Quanto mais cedo ocorreu o primeiro episódio, maior foi a probabilidade de recorrência. Os meses do ano de maior incidência foram de maio a agosto. Das variáveis estudadas, constatou-se que o período de aleitamento materno exclusivo atuou como um fator protetor. Quanto aos fatores de risco, verificou-se que a presença tabagismo passivo, refluxo gastroesofágico, alergia respiratória esteve relacionada à recorrência de efusão. CONCLUSÃO: Os achados revelaram a importância do acompanhamento auditivo periódico para lactentes nos 2 primeiros anos de vida, considerando ser o período crítico para o processo de maturação do sistema auditivo, no qual privações sensoriais auditivas podem ser responsáveis por seqüelas para o desenvolvimento de fala e linguagem.OBJECTIVE: The present study aimed at evaluating the occurrence and recurrence of middle ear secretion and possible associated factors in the first two years of life of 190 newborns and infants, participants in the interdisciplinary prevention, detection, and intervention program at the Clínica de Educação para Saúde of

  12. Confirmation of the southwest continuation of the Cat Square terrane, southern Appalachian Inner Piedmont, with implications for middle Paleozoic collisional orogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, Matthew T.; Hatcher, Robert D.; Merschat, Arthur J.

    2017-01-01

    Detailed geologic mapping, U-Pb zircon geochronology and whole-rock geochemical analyses were conducted to test the hypothesis that the southwestern extent of the Cat Square terrane continues from the northern Inner Piedmont (western Carolinas) into central Georgia. Geologic mapping revealed the Jackson Lake fault, a ∼15 m-thick, steeply dipping sillimanite-grade fault zone that truncates lithologically distinct granitoids and metasedimentary units, and roughly corresponds with a prominent aeromagnetic lineament hypothesized to represent the southern continuation of the terrane-bounding Brindle Creek fault. Results of U-Pb SHRIMP geochronology indicate Late Ordovician to Silurian granitoids (444–439 Ma) occur exclusively northwest of the fault, whereas Devonian (404–371 Ma) granitoids only occur southeast of the fault. The relatively undeformed Indian Springs granodiorite (three individual bodies dated 317–298 Ma) crosscuts the fault and occurs on both sides, which indicates the Jackson Lake fault is a pre-Alleghanian structure. However, detrital zircon signatures from samples southeast of the Jackson Lake fault reveal dominant Grenville provenance, in contrast to Cat Square terrane detrital zircon samples from the northern Inner Piedmont, which include peri-Gondwanan (600–500 Ma) and a prominent Ordovician-Silurian (∼430 Ma) signature. We interpret the rocks southeast of the Jackson Lake fault to represent the southwestern extension of the Cat Square terrane primarily based on the partitioning of granitoid ages and lithologic distinctions similar to the northern Inner Piedmont.Data suggest Cat Square terrane metasedimentary rocks were initially deposited in a remnant ocean basin setting and developed into an accretionary prism in front of the approaching Carolina superterrane, ultimately overridden by it in Late Devonian to Early Mississippian time. Burial to >20 km resulted in migmatization of lower plate rocks, forming an infrastructure beneath the

  13. 'Outrunning' the running ear

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chantel

    acute purulent otitis media should be considered when evaluating a patient with a running ear.These are listed in Table I. To outrun the running ear all these facts should be kept in mind when evaluating a patient. HISTORY. Some important questions to ask, are: • Family history. • cystic fibrosis. • allergies — nasal, chest and.

  14. External Otitis (Swimmer's Ear)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an otoscope for redness, swelling, and pus. Debris removal, antibiotic ear drops, keeping water out of the ear, and pain relievers are ... cleaning it (using cotton-tipped swabs) or getting water or irritants, such as hair spray or hair dye, in the canal often leads to external otitis. ...

  15. Prosthetic ossicular on middle ear: what look?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabral, Christiane Pena; Ramos, Frederico Rocha Henriques; Pires, Diego Demolinari; Antunes, Augusto Braga Fernandes; Motta, Emilia Guerra Pinto Coelho; Ribeiro, Marcelo Almeida; Moreira, Wanderval; Diniz, Renata Lopes Furletti Caldeira

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this essay was to demonstrate the normal and pathological CT findings of the post-operative imaging of patients underwent ossicular prosthesis implants. The stapedectomy replaced by prosthesis is considered the 'gold standard' treatment of patients with oval window closure, related to otosclerosis or other inflammatory conditions. Several types of prosthesis are available and the choice depends on the extension of the disease or the surgeon's preferences. Based on extensive literature review, the normal postoperative findings, as well as some surgery inherent complications were described, including among others: perforation of the tympanic membrane, necrosis associated with subluxation/extrusion of the prosthesis, granuloma/cholesteatoma or periprosthetic fibrosis, perilymphatic fistula, facial nerve damage, among other. The knowledge of post-operative and related complications CT findings is extremely useful for head and neck radiologist, but it is essential for an assertive diagnoses a close clinical correlation. (author)

  16. Alterations in the Contra lateral Ear in Chronic Otitis Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Damghani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chronic otitis media (COM, a persistent and durable inflammation and infection of the middle ear, is a common disorder. Alterations in the contralateral ear in sufferers have been observed in recent years. Because only a few studies have been reported in this area, we performed this study in order to assess alterations in the contralateral ear of patients with COM.   Materials and Methods: Cross-sectional and descriptive methods were used in 100 patients with COM who were selected for surgical treatment and admitted to hospital. An information form was completed for all patients including demographic data, medical history of otoscopy and paraclinical examinations such as pure tone audiometry (PTA, tympanometry, Schuller radiography, and high resolution computed tomography (HRCT. All data were processed using SPSS (version 18 software and descriptive statistical tests.   Results: According to otoscopy, PTA, tympanometry and graphical analysis, 60% of patients experienced disorders of the contralateral ear. Otoscopy analysis showed 54% of patients had a disorder of the contralateral ear, with the most common disorder being perforation of the ear drum. PTA showed a 48% incidence of contralateral ear problems (85% conductive hearing impairment; 12.5% sensorineural hearing impairment; 1.2% mixed. A total of 73.2% of patients with conductive hearing loss had a problem across all frequencies, while half of the patients with sensorineural hearing impairment had problems at frequencies greater than 1000 Hz. According to tympanometry, 38% of patients had problem in the contralateral ear. HRCT and Schuller graphical analyses indicated 31.5% and 36% occurrence of contralateral ear disorders, respectively.   Conclusion:  More than 50% of patients with COM in one ear have a chance of also presenting with the disease in the other ear. Outcomes of this study and previous studies have shown that COM should not be perceived as a disease limited

  17. Katsvanga, CAT

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Katsvanga, CAT. Vol 1, No 2 (2006) - Articles Eucalyptus species performance under short rotation conditions on the Vumba highlands in Zimbabwe Abstract PDF. ISSN: 1819-3692. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners ...

  18. A Catalogue of Anatomical Fugitive Sheets: Cat. 49-62

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    Images Cat. 50 Cat. 51 Cat. 53 Cat. 54 Cat. 55 (a) Cat. 55 (b) Cat. 56 Cat. 57: 1 Cat. 57: 2 Cat. 57: 3 Cat. 57: 4 Cat. 59: 1 Cat. 59: 2 Cat. 59: 3 Cat. 59: 4 Cat. 60 Cat. 61 Cat. 62: 1 (a) Cat. 62: 1 (b) Cat. 62: 2 (a) Cat. 62: 2 (b)

  19. A Catalogue of Anatomical Fugitive Sheets: Cat. 26-48

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    Images Cat. 26: 1 (a) Cat. 26: 1 (b) Cat. 26: 2 (a) Cat. 26: 2(b) Cat. 27: 1 (a) Cat. 27: 1 (b) Cat. 27: 2 (a) Cat. 27: 2 (b) Cat. 28 Cat. 29: 2 (a) Cat. 29: 2 (b) Cat. 30: 1 Cat. 30: 2 Cat. 30: 3 Cat. 33 Cat. 34: 1 Cat. 34: 2 Cat. 35: 1 Cat. 35: 2 Cat. 35: 3 Cat. 36 Cat. 37 Cat. 38: 1 Cat. 38: 2 Cat. 40 Cat. 42 Cat. 43 Cat. 44 Cat. 45: 1 Cat. 45: 2 Cat. 46 Cat. 47: 1 Cat. 47: 2 Cat. 47: 3 Cat. 48: 1 Cat. 48: 2 Cat. 48: 3

  20. Dynamics of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes causing acute otitis media isolated from children with spontaneous middle-ear drainage over a 12-year period (1999-2010 in a region of northern Spain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Alonso

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the serotype and clonal distribution of pneumococci causing acute otitis media (AOM and their relationship with recurrences and mixed infections with other microorganisms under the influence of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7. To do this, all pneumococcal isolates collected from the spontaneous middle-ear drainage of children <5 years old diagnosed of AOM by their pediatrician or their general practitioner from 1999 to 2010 were phenotypically characterized and the most frequent serotypes were genotyped. In the 12-year study, 818 episodes of pneumococcal AOM were detected, mostly (70.5% in children younger than 2 years old. In 262 episodes (32%, the pneumococci were isolated with another bacterium, mainly (n=214 Haemophilus influenzae. Mixed infections were similar in children under or over 2 years old. The most frequent serotypes were 19A (n=227, 27.8%, 3 (n=92, 11.2% and 19F (n=74, 9%. Serotypes included in the PCV7 sharply decreased from 62.4% in the pre-vaccination (1999-2001 to 2.2% in the late post-vaccination period (2008-2010. Serotype diversity steadily increased after the introduction of the PCV7 but decreased from 2008-2010 due to the predominant role of serotype 19A isolates, mostly ST276 and ST320. The prevalence of serotype 3 doubled from 6.1% (20/326 in 1999-2004 to 14.6% (72/492 in 2005-2010. Relapses mainly occurred in male infants infected with isolates with diminished antimicrobial susceptibility. Reinfections caused by isolates with the same serotype but different genotype were frequent, highlighting the need for genetic studies to differentiate among similar strains. In conclusion, the main change in pneumococcal AOM observed after the introduction of the PCV7 was the sharp decrease in vaccine serotypes. Also notable was the high burden of serotype 19A in total pneumococcal AOM before and especially after the introduction of the PCV7, as well as in relapses and

  1. CT of temporal bone - IV. inner ear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Jae Yoon; Sung, Kyu Bo; Youn, Eun Kyoung; Park, Youn Kyeung; Lee, Young Uk [Koryo general Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-07-15

    Temporal bone CT was done in 697 patients from April 1985 to October 1989. The abnormal findings were seen in 453 patients, which were chronic otitis media in 355 patients, fracture in 49 patients and congenital anomaly in 44 patients, etc. The abnormal findings of inner ear were observed on 46 patients. The results were summarized as follows : 1. The incidence of inner ear involvement by chronic otitis media was 7.3% (26/355 : labyrinthine fistula in 17 patients, labyrinthitis ossificans in 9 patients). Labyrinthine fistula was most commonly located on lateral semicircular canal (15/17, 88.2%). 2. Fusion of vestibule with lateral semicircular canal and formation of common cavity was demonstrated incidentally in 5 patients (0.7% of total number of temporal bone CT), and bilateral in 3 patients. 3. The incidence of inner ear anomaly in congenital ear anomaly was 11.4% (5/44). All cases were bilateral and three patients showed associated middle ear anomaly. 4. The incidence of involvement of bony labyrinth in temporal bone fracture was 10.2% (5/49). Labyrinthine fracture was seen all patients of transverse(3) and mixed fracture(1). In longitudinal fracture, labyrinthine fracture was seen in 2.2% (1/45). 5. Others were traumatic labyrinthitis ossificans(1), intracanalicular acoustic neuroma(3) and facial nerve neuroma(1)

  2. Ear tube insertion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mastoiditis) or the brain, or that damages nearby nerves Injury to the ear after sudden changes in ... does not heal after the tube falls out. Most of the time, these problems DO NOT last long. They also ...

  3. Auditory lateralization of conspecific and heterospecific vocalizations in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siniscalchi, Marcello; Laddago, Serena; Quaranta, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Auditory lateralization in response to both conspecific and heterospecific vocalizations (dog vocalizations) was observed in 16 tabby cats (Felis catus). Six different vocalizations were used: cat "purring," "meowing" and "growling" and dog typical vocalizations of "disturbance," "isolation" and "play." The head-orienting paradigm showed that cats turned their head with the right ear leading (left hemisphere activation) in response to their typical-species vocalization ("meow" and "purring"); on the other hand, a clear bias in the use of the left ear (right hemisphere activation) was observed in response to vocalizations eliciting intense emotion (dogs' vocalizations of "disturbance" and "isolation"). Overall these findings suggest that auditory sensory domain seems to be lateralized also in cat species, stressing the role of the left hemisphere for intraspecific communication and of the right hemisphere in processing threatening and alarming stimuli.

  4. Comparative Auditory Neuroscience: Understanding the Evolution and Function of Ears

    OpenAIRE

    Manley, Geoffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    Comparative auditory studies make it possible both to understand the origins of modern ears and the factors underlying the similarities and differences in their performance. After all lineages of land vertebrates had independently evolved tympanic middle ears in the early Mesozoic era, the subsequent tens of millions of years led to the hearing organ of lizards, birds, and mammals becoming larger and their upper frequency limits higher. In extant species, lizard papillae remained relatively s...

  5. Reflectance Measures from Infant Ears With Normal Hearing and Transient Conductive Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Susan E; Herrmann, Barbara S; Horton, Nicholas J; Amadei, Elizabeth A; Kujawa, Sharon G

    2016-01-01

    The objective is to develop methods to utilize newborn reflectance measures for the identification of middle-ear transient conditions (e.g., middle-ear fluid) during the newborn period and ultimately during the first few months of life. Transient middle-ear conditions are a suspected source of failure to pass a newborn hearing screening. The ability to identify a conductive loss during the screening procedure could enable the referred ear to be either (1) cleared of a middle-ear condition and recommended for more extensive hearing assessment as soon as possible, or (2) suspected of a transient middle-ear condition, and if desired, be rescreened before more extensive hearing assessment. Reflectance measurements are reported from full-term, healthy, newborn babies in which one ear referred and one ear passed an initial auditory brainstem response newborn hearing screening and a subsequent distortion product otoacoustic emission screening on the same day. These same subjects returned for a detailed follow-up evaluation at age 1 month (range 14 to 35 days). In total, measurements were made on 30 subjects who had a unilateral refer near birth (during their first 2 days of life) and bilateral normal hearing at follow-up (about 1 month old). Three specific comparisons were made: (1) Association of ear's state with power reflectance near birth (referred versus passed ear), (2) Changes in power reflectance of normal ears between newborn and 1 month old (maturation effects), and (3) Association of ear's newborn state (referred versus passed) with ear's power reflectance at 1 month. In addition to these measurements, a set of preliminary data selection criteria were developed to ensure that analyzed data were not corrupted by acoustic leaks and other measurement problems. Within 2 days of birth, the power reflectance measured in newborn ears with transient middle-ear conditions (referred newborn hearing screening and passed hearing assessment at age 1 month) was significantly

  6. Schroedinger's cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubkin, E.

    1979-01-01

    The issue is to seek quantum interference effects in an arbitrary field, in particular in psychology. For this a digest of quantum mechanics over finite-n-dimensional Hilbert space is invented. In order to match crude data not only von Neumann's mixed states are used but also a parallel notion of unsharp tests. The mathematically styled text (and earlier work on multibin tests, designated MB) deals largely with these new tests. Quantum psychology itself is only given a foundation. It readily engenders objections; its plausibility is developed gradually, in interlocking essays. There is also the empirically definite proposal that (state, test, outcome)-indexed counts be gathered to record data, then fed to a 'matrix format' (MF) search for quantum models. A previously proposed experiment in visual perception which has since failed to find significant quantum correlations, is discussed. The suspicion that quantum mechanics is all around goes beyond MF, and 'Schroedinger's cat' symbolizes this broader perspective. (author)

  7. The visible ear simulator: a public PC application for GPU-accelerated haptic 3D simulation of ear surgery based on the visible ear data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Sølvsten; Mosegaard, Jesper; Trier, Peter

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Existing virtual simulators for middle ear surgery are based on 3-dimensional (3D) models from computed tomographic or magnetic resonance imaging data in which image quality is limited by the lack of detail (maximum, approximately 50 voxels/mm3), natural color, and texture of the sour...

  8. Ear, Hearing and Speech

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Torben

    2000-01-01

    An introduction is given to the the anatomy and the function of the ear, basic psychoacoustic matters (hearing threshold, loudness, masking), the speech signal and speech intelligibility. The lecture note is written for the course: Fundamentals of Acoustics and Noise Control (51001)...

  9. From Ear to Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Doreen

    2011-01-01

    In this paper Doreen Kimura gives a personal history of the "right-ear effect" in dichotic listening. The focus is on the early ground-breaking papers, describing how she did the first dichotic listening studies relating the effects to brain asymmetry. The paper also gives a description of the visual half-field technique for lateralized stimulus…

  10. Lumped parametric model of the human ear for sound transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Bin; Gan, Rong Z

    2004-09-01

    A lumped parametric model of the human auditoria peripherals consisting of six masses suspended with six springs and ten dashpots was proposed. This model will provide the quantitative basis for the construction of a physical model of the human middle ear. The lumped model parameters were first identified using published anatomical data, and then determined through a parameter optimization process. The transfer function of the middle ear obtained from human temporal bone experiments with laser Doppler interferometers was used for creating the target function during the optimization process. It was found that, among 14 spring and dashpot parameters, there were five parameters which had pronounced effects on the dynamic behaviors of the model. The detailed discussion on the sensitivity of those parameters was provided with appropriate applications for sound transmission in the ear. We expect that the methods for characterizing the lumped model of the human ear and the model parameters will be useful for theoretical modeling of the ear function and construction of the ear physical model.

  11. Cat and Dog Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Wellness Staying Healthy Pets and Animals Cat and Dog Bites Cat and Dog Bites Share Print Cat and dog bites are common injuries. A family pet or ... bites. Path to safety If a cat or dog bites you, you should: Wash the wound gently ...

  12. aetiological agents of ear discharge: a two year re- view in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-01

    Jun 1, 2014 ... practice. It affects people of all age groups but primari- ly it is a condition of children.1-3 inflammatory condi- tions of the external and middle ear account for most ear discharges. These include acute and chronic otitis externa, acute otitis media, chronic suppurative otitis media with or without cholesteatoma, ...

  13. An uncommon experience during removal of a foreign body from ear of a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjoy Kumar Ghosh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A difficult to extract geoid bead was successfully removed from the middle ear cavity by threading it with monofilament polypropylene without drill-out of the bony annulus or widening the isthmus of the external auditory canal.

  14. Ear Infection Treatment Shouldn't Be Shortened

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treatments might also reduce other side effects. A new NIH-funded study provides some answers—at least for children under age 2. The study enrolled 520 children, ages 6 to 23 months, who had middle-ear infections diagnosed using stringent criteria. Kids were ...

  15. Diagnosis and surgical management of obstructive ureteral calculi in cats: 11 cases (1993-1996)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyles, A.E.; Stone, E.A.; Gookin, J.; Spaulding, K.; Clary, E.M.; Wylie, K.; Spodnick, G.

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate diagnostic methods, surgical treatment, perioperative management, and renal function of cats with obstructive calcium oxalate ureteroliths. Retrospective case series. 11 cats that underwent surgery for removal of calcium oxalate ureteroliths. Medical records were reviewed, and the following information was recorded: signalment; results of physical examination, clinicopathologic analyses, and abdominal imaging; surgical procedure; postoperative management; and results of ureterolith quantitative analysis. Ureteroliths in the proximal portion of the ureter were removed from 5 cats (pyelotomy, 1 cat; unilateral ureterotomy, 2 cats; bilateral ureterotomies, 2 cats). Calculi in the middle and distal part of the ureter were removed by partial ureterectomy and ureteroneocystostomy (6 cats). Ten cats recovered from surgery and were discharged from the hospital. One cat died from unknown causes 4 months after surgery, and 1 cat had a nephrectomy elsewhere 5 weeks after ureterolith removal. Eight cats were evaluated 12 to 20 months after surgery. Of these, 2 cats that were markedly azotemic before surgery improved after surgery, and 2 cats developed nephroliths after surgery. Also, of 5 cats that had nephroliths that were not removed at the time of surgery, 4 still had visible nephroliths. One cat had recurrent ureteral obstruction from a ureterolith and persistent urinary tract infection. Ureteroliths or ultrasonographic evidence of ureteral obstruction were not detected in other cats. A combination of microsurgical techniques and intensive postoperative care is necessary to minimize morbidity of cats after removal of a ureterolith. Renal function may improve or stabilize after removal of the ureteral obstruction

  16. High-resolution three-dimensional diffusion-weighted imaging of middle ear cholesteatoma at 3.0 T MRI: Usefulness of 3D turbo field-echo with diffusion-sensitized driven-equilibrium preparation (TFE–DSDE) compared to single-shot echo-planar imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Koji; Yoshiura, Takashi; Hiwatashi, Akio; Obara, Makoto; Togao, Osamu; Matsumoto, Nozomu; Kikuchi, Kazufumi; Honda, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To prospectively evaluate the usefulness of a newly developed high-resolution three-dimensional diffusion-weighted imaging method, turbo field-echo with diffusion-sensitized driven-equilibrium (TFE–DSDE) in diagnosing middle-ear cholesteatoma by comparing it to conventional single-shot echo-planar diffusion-weighted imaging (SS-EP DWI). Materials and methods: Institutional review board approval and informed consent from all participants were obtained. We studied 30 patients with preoperatively suspected acquired cholesteatoma. Each patient underwent an MR examination including both SS-EP DWI and DSDE-TFE using a 3.0 T MR scanner. Images of the 30 patients (60 temporal bones including 30 with and 30 without cholesteatoma) were reviewed by two independent neuroradiologists. The confidence level for the presence of cholesteatoma was graded on a scale of 0–2 (0 = definite absence, 1 = equivocal, 2 = definite presence). Interobserver agreement as well as sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for detection were assessed for the two reviewers. Results: Excellent interobserver agreement was shown for TFE–DSDE (κ = 0.821) whereas fair agreement was obtained for SS-EP DWI (κ = 0.416). TFE–DSDE was associated with significantly higher sensitivity (83.3%) and accuracy (90.0%) compared to SS-EP DWI (sensitivity = 35.0%, accuracy = 66.7%; p < 0.05). No significant difference was found in specificity (96.7% for TFE–DSDE, 98.3% for SS-EP DWI) Conclusion: With increased spatial resolution and reduced susceptibility artifacts, TFE–DSDE improves the accuracy in diagnosing acquired middle ear cholesteatomas compared to SS-EP DWI

  17. Ear recognition: a complete system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaza, Ayman; Harrison, Mary Ann F.

    2013-05-01

    Ear Recognition has recently received significant attention in the literature. Even though current ear recognition systems have reached a certain level of maturity, their success is still limited. This paper presents an efficient complete ear-based biometric system that can process five frames/sec; Hence it can be used for surveillance applications. The ear detection is achieved using Haar features arranged in a cascaded Adaboost classifier. The feature extraction is based on dividing the ear image into several blocks from which Local Binary Pattern feature distributions are extracted. These feature distributions are then fused at the feature level to represent the original ear texture in the classification stage. The contribution of this paper is three fold: (i) Applying a new technique for ear feature extraction, and studying various optimization parameters for that technique; (ii) Presenting a practical ear recognition system and a detailed analysis about error propagation in that system; (iii) Studying the occlusion effect of several ear parts. Detailed experiments show that the proposed ear recognition system achieved better performance (94:34%) compared to other shape-based systems as Scale-invariant feature transform (67:92%). The proposed approach can also handle efficiently hair occlusion. Experimental results show that the proposed system can achieve about (78%) rank-1 identification, even in presence of 60% occlusion.

  18. Comparison of Ear-Canal Reflectance and Umbo Velocity in Patients with Conductive Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Gabrielle R.; Nakajima, Hideko H.; Pisano, Dominic V.; Röösli, Christof; Hamade, Mohamad A.; Mafoud, Lorice; Halpin, Christopher F.; Merchant, Saumil N.; Rosowski, John J.

    2011-11-01

    Patients who present at hearing clinics with a conductive hearing loss (CHL) in the presence of an intact, healthy tympanic membrane create a unique challenge for otologists. While patient counseling, treatment options, and outcome vary with differing middle-ear pathologies, a non-invasive diagnostic that can differentiate between these pathologies does not currently exist. We evaluated the clinical utility and diagnostic accuracy of two non-invasive measures of middle-ear mechanics: ear-canal reflectance (ECR) and umbo velocity (VU).

  19. Micro-endoscopic ear anatomy of guinea pig applied to experimental surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Bruno Borges de Carvalho; Andrade, José Santos Cruz de; Garcia, Leandro Borborema; Pifaia, Gustavo Ribeiro; Cruz, Oswaldo Laércio Mendonça; Onishi, Ektor Tsuneo; Penido, Norma de Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    To describe topographic and endoscopic anatomy of guinea pig ear for development of surgical approaches in experimental studies. Experimental study. Eight adult guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus) were used in this study. Four animals were described through endoscopic view and four animals were used to describe topographic anatomy. The main structures of middle ear were well identified through endoscopy view: oval and round window, ossicles and vascular structures. Temporal bone position, landmarks and its relations to skull are perceived with topographic description. Topographic anatomic description allowed exposition of temporal bone relations for external surgical approaches. Alternatively, grooves and middle ear structures were identified and may be used to transcanal accesses.

  20. 21 CFR 524.1484d - Neomycin sulfate, hydrocortisone acetate, tetracaine hydrochloride ear ointment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... OPHTHALMIC AND TOPICAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.1484d Neomycin sulfate, hydrocortisone acetate... a lesser degree, chronic otitis externa in dogs and cats. In treatment of ear canker and other... organisms or to prolonged use of antibiotic-containing preparations resulting in overgrowth of...

  1. Inner ear dysplasia is common in children with Down syndrome (trisomy 21).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaser, Susan; Propst, Evan J; Martin, Daniel; Feigenbaum, Annette; James, Adrian L; Shannon, Patrick; Papsin, Blake C

    2006-12-01

    Middle and external ear anomalies are well recognized in Down syndrome (DS, trisomy 21). Inner ear anomalies are much less frequently described. This study reviews inner ear morphology on imaging to determine the prevalence of cochlear and vestibular anomalies in children with DS. The authors conducted a retrospective review of imaging features of (DS) inner ear structures. Fifty-nine sequential patients with DS with imaging of the inner ear were identified by a radiology report text search program. Quantitative biometric assessment of the inner ear was performed on patients with high-resolution computed tomography or magnetic resonance images of the petrous bone. Petrous imaging was performed for evaluation of inflammatory disease or hearing loss. Spinal imaging, which included petrous views, was performed in most cases to exclude C1 to 2 dislocation, a potential complication of DS. Measurements were compared with normative data. Inner ear dysplasia is much more common in DS than previously reported. Inner ear structures are universally hypoplastic. Vestibular malformations are particularly common and a small bony island of the lateral semicircular canal (vestibule into a single cavity, vestibular aqueduct and endolymphatic sac fossa enlargement, cochlear nerve canal hypoplasia, and stenosis or duplication of the internal auditory canal. Stenosis of the external meatus, poor mastoid pneumatization, middle ear and mastoid opacification, and cholesteatoma were common, as expected.

  2. Cat-Scratch Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mammals Pet Rodents Wildlife Animal Tales & Features Giant Sharks Help Wounded Warriors Heal Loving Your Special Cat ... bite while they play and learn how to attack prey. How cats and people become infected Kitten ...

  3. Cat Scratch Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cat scratch disease (CSD) is an illness caused by the bacterium Bartonella henselae. Almost half of all cats carry the infection ... symptoms of CSD, call your doctor. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  4. External ear canal cholesteatoma after ventilation tube insertion and mastoidectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đerić Dragoslava

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Etiopathogenetically, there are two types of chollesteatomas: congenital, and acquired. Numerous theories in the literature try to explain the nature of the disease, however, the question about cholesteatomas remain still unanswered. The aim of the study was to present a case of external ear canal cholesteatoma (EEC developed following microsurgery (ventilation tube insertion and mastoidectomy, as well as to point ant possible mechanisms if its development. Case report. A 16-yearold boy presented a 4-month sense of fullness in the ear and otalgia on the left side. A year before, mastoidectomy and posterior atticotomy were performed with ventilation tube placement due to acute purulent mastoiditis. Diagnosis was based on otoscopy examination, audiology and computed tomography (CT findings. CT showed an obliterative soft-tissue mass completely filled the external ear canal with associated erosion of subjacent the bone. There were squamous epithelial links between the canal cholesteatoma and lateral tympanic membrane surface. They originated from the margins of tympanic membrane incision made for a ventilation tube (VT insertion. The position of VT was good as well as the aeration of the middle ear cavity. The tympanic membrane was intact and of normal appearance without middle ear extension or mastoid involvement of cholesteatoma. Cholesteatoma and ventilation tube were both removed. The patient recovered without complications and shortly audiology revealed hearing improving. Follow-up 2 years later, however, showed no signs of the disease. Conclusion. There could be more than one potential delicate mechanism of developing EEC in the ear with VT insertion and mastoidectomy. It is necessary to perform routine otologic surveillance in all patients with tubes. Affected ear CT scan is very helpful in showing the extent of cholesteatoma and bony defects, which could not be assessed by otoscopic examination alone.

  5. Biocompatibility of Liposome Nanocarriers in the Rat Inner Ear After Intratympanic Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jing; Feng, Hao; Sood, Rohit; Kinnunen, Paavo K. J.; Pyykko, Ilmari

    2017-05-01

    Liposome nanocarriers (LPNs) are potentially the future of inner ear therapy due to their high drug loading capacity and efficient uptake in the inner ear after a minimally invasive intratympanic administration. However, information on the biocompatibility of LPNs in the inner ear is lacking. The aim of the present study is to document the biocompatibility of LPNs in the inner ear after intratympanic delivery. LPNs with or without gadolinium-tetra-azacyclo-dodecane-tetra-acetic acid (Gd-DOTA) were delivered to the rats through transtympanic injection. The distribution of the Gd-DOTA-containing LPNs in the middle and inner ear was tracked in vivo using MRI. The function of the middle and inner ear barriers was evaluated using gadolinium-enhanced MRI. The auditory function was measured using auditory brainstem response (ABR). The potential inflammatory response was investigated by analyzing glycosaminoglycan and hyaluronic acid secretion and CD44 and TLR2 expression in the inner ear. The potential apoptosis was analyzed using terminal transferase (TdT) to label the free 3'OH breaks in the DNA strands of apoptotic cells with TMR-dUTP (TUNEL staining). As a result, LPNs entered the inner ear efficiently after transtympanic injection. The transtympanic injection of LPNs with or without Gd-DOTA neither disrupted the function of the middle and inner ear barriers nor caused hearing impairment in rats. The critical inflammatory biological markers in the inner ear, including glycosaminoglycan and hyaluronic acid secretion and CD44 and TLR2 expression, were not influenced by the administration of LPNs. There was no significant cell death associated with the administration of LPNs. The transtympanic injection of LPNs is safe for the inner ear, and LPNs may be applied as a drug delivery matrix in the clinical therapy of sensorineural hearing loss.

  6. Association of smoking or tobacco use with ear diseases among men: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaur Kiran

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health related behaviour specially smoking and tobacco in any form are major determinants of health and lead to health inequities. Tobacco leads to various health problems including ear, nose and throat diseases. Objective To determine the influence of smoking or tobacco use on ear diseases we performed a retrospective study among men. Method Of 11454 subjects of different age-groups there were 4143 men aged 20-60 years who were evaluated for demographic variables, smoking/tobacco use and middle and internal ear diseases. Descriptive statistics and age adjusted logistic regression analyses were performed. Results Among the 4143 men, 1739 (42.0% were smokers or used tobacco. In smokers/tobacco users compared to non-users the age adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI for chronic suppurative otitis media were 1.13 (CI 0.96-1.34, acute otitis media 1.16 (CI 0.82-1.64, suppurative otitis media 1.21 (CI 0.79-1.84, otosclerosis 0.97 (CI 0.52-1.33 (p > 0.05 and for overall middle ear diseases was 1.15 (CI 0.99-1.33, p = 0.05. For internal ear diseases the age adjusted odds ratios were for sensorineural hearing loss 1.12 (CI 0.92-1.58, 0.12 (CI 0.42-0.93 for vertigo and tinnitus and overall internal ear diseases were 0.97 (CI 0.77-1.22, p = 0.81. Among men 40-60 years there was a significantly greater risk for both middle ear (OR 1.73, CI 1.29-2.30 and internal ear diseases (OR 1.94, CI 1.24-3.04 (p Conclusion Smoking/tobacco use is significantly associated with greater prevalence of middle and internal ear diseases among middle-aged men in India.

  7. Effect of sub-loops in SMA ear system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitura, Andrzej; Rusinek, Rafał

    2018-01-01

    The main aim of this paper is modelling the hysteresis effect in shape memory alloys. The stress versus strain relation is approximated by idealized curves. The adopted characteristics is modelled using the piecewise linear model. Transmission between individual line segments is dependent on the proposed conditions if(…). Performed numerical research allows to evaluate the possibilities of hysteresis sub-loops modelling. Finally, this model is used in a specific system - the biomechanical model of the middle ear to find the reconstructed ear response.

  8. Ultrastructural myocardial changes in seven cats with spontaneous hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Liselotte Bruun; Prats Gavalda, Clara; Hyttel, Poul

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common heart disease in cats and shares clinical and pathological characteristics with human HCM. Little is known about the pathogenic mechanisms underlying development of spontaneous feline HCM. ANIMALS: The study population consisted...... of seven cats diagnosed with HCM and eight age-matched cats with no evidence of cardiac disease. METHODS: Fresh myocardial biopsies taken from the middle of the left ventricular posterior free wall were obtained and examined with transmission electron microscopy. RESULTS: Electron microscopic examination...... showed ultrastructural aberrations of the myocardial cytoarchitecture and of the interstitium in the seven cats with HCM. In the most severely affected cats the myofibrils were disorganized and subsarcolemmal mitochondria were depleted. In control cats, contraction band artifacts were commonly seen...

  9. A Catalogue of Anatomical Fugitive Sheets: Cat. 1-10

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    Images Cat. 1 Cat. 2 (a) Cat. 2 (b) Cat. 2 (c) Cat. 2 (d) Cat. 2 (e) Cat. 2 (f) Cat. 3: 1 (a) Cat. 3: 1 (b) Cat. 3: 2 (a) Cat. 3: 2 (b) Cat. 4: 1 Cat. 4: 2 Cat. 6: 1 (a) Cat. 6: 1 (b) Cat. 6: 2 (a) Cat. 6: 2 (b) Cat. 7: 1 (a) Cat. 7: 1 (b) Cat. 7: 2 (a) Cat. 7: 2 (b) Cat. 8: 1 Cat. 9: 1 Cat. 9: 2 Cat. 10: 1 Cat. 10: 2

  10. Visualization of normal and abnormal inner ear with volume rendering technique using multislice spiral CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Hui; Han Ping; Liang Bo; Lei Ziqiao; Liu Fang; Tian Zhiliang

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the ability of the volume rendering technique to display the normal and abnormal inner ear structures. Methods: Forty normal earand 61 abnormal inner ears (40 congenital inner ear malformations, 7 labyrinthitis ossificans, and 14 inner ear erosion caused by cholesteatomas) were examined with a MSCT scanner. Axial imaging were performed using the following parameters: 120 kV, 100 mAs, 0.75 mm slice thickness, a pitch factor of 1. The axial images of interested ears were reconstructed with 0.1 mm reconstruction increment and a FOV of 50 mm. The 3D reconstructions were done with volume rendering technique on the workstation. Results: In the subjects without ear disorders a high quality 3D visualization of the inner ear could be achieved. In the patients with inner ear' disorders all inner ear malformations could be clearly displayed on 3D images as follows: (1) Michel deformity (one ear): There was complete absence of all cochlear and vestibular structures. (2) common cavity deformity (3 ears): The cochlea and vestibule were represented by a cystic cavity and couldn't be differentiated from each other. (3)incomplete partition type I (3 ears): The cochlea lacked the entire modiolus and cribriform area, resulting in a cystic appearance. (4) incomplete partition type II (Mondini deformity) (5 ears): The cochlea consisted of 1.5 turns, in which the middle and apical turns coalesced to form a cystic apex. (5) vestibular and semicircular canal malformations (14 ears): Cochlea was normal, vestibule dilated, semicircular canals were absent, hypoplastic or enlarged. (6) dilated vestibular aqueduct (14 ears): The vestibular aqueduct was bell-mouthed. In 7 patients with labyrinthifis ossificans, 3D images failed to clearly show the completeinner ears in 4 ears because of too high ossifications in the membranous labyrinth. In the other 3 ears volume rendering could display the thin cochlea basal turn and the intermittent semicircular canals. In the patients

  11. A Catalogue of Anatomical Fugitive Sheets: Cat. 11-25

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    Images Cat. 11 (a) Cat. 11 (b) Cat. 11 (c) Cat. 11 (d) Cat. 12: 1 (a) Cat. 12: 1 (b) Cat. 12: 2 (a) Cat. 12: 2 (b) Cat. 13 Cat. 14 (a) Cat. 14 (b) Cat. 14 (c) Cat. 15 (a) Cat. 15 (b) Cat. 17: 1 Cat. 17: 2 Cat. 18: 1 Cat. 18: 2 Cat. 19: 1 (a) Cat. 19: 1 (b) Cat. 19: 2 (a) Cat. 19: 2 (b) Cat. 20: 1 Cat. 20: 2 (a) Cat. 20: 2 (b) Cat. 21 (a) Cat. 21 (b) Cat. 21 (c) Cat. 21 (d) Cat. 21 (e) Cat. 22 Cat. 24: 1 and 2 Cat. 25: 1 Cat. 25: 2 Cat. 25: 3 Cat. 25: 4

  12. Development and validation of a novel ear simulator to teach pneumatic otoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Elizabeth; Kesser, Bradley W; Peirce-Cottler, Shayn; Keeley, Meg

    2012-02-01

    Otoscopy is an important skill in diagnosing conditions of the middle ear. This study evaluated the ability of a novel ear simulator to teach medical students diagnostic and pneumatic otoscopy. We hypothesized that exposure to this simulator improves the ability of medical students to apply an appropriate pneumatic pressure during insufflation and accurately identify the presence of a middle ear effusion in a simulated setting. An ear simulator was created to teach otoscopic skills to medical students. Third-year medical students attended a workshop on pediatric otoscopy, including a demonstration, videos, and verbal instruction on otoscope use. A cohort of these students then practiced pneumatic otoscopy with the simulator. All students, as well as a group of experts who had not been exposed to the trainer, then diagnosed the presence or absence of middle ear fluid in six simulator ears and pneumatic pressures generated were recorded. Interaction with the simulator enabled students to insufflate with pressures in the proper range (0.4-20 in H2O) more often, apply an average pressure (12.7 in H2O) in the appropriate range, and diagnose middle ear fluid more accurately (79.2%) than students who were not exposed to the trainer (57.3%). The students exposed to the simulator also performed closer to the level of the experts who diagnosed presence of effusion 100% accurately with an average insufflation pressure of 3.8 in H2O. Medical students trained with the ear simulator applied appropriate pneumatic pressure more consistently and diagnosed the presence of effusion more accurately and more like experts than students not exposed to the simulator. This ear trainer is a valuable tool for teaching pneumatic otoscopy.

  13. [Cochlear implantation through the middle fossa approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szyfter, W; Colletti, V; Pruszewicz, A; Kopeć, T; Szymiec, E; Kawczyński, M; Karlik, M

    2001-01-01

    The inner part of cochlear implant is inserted into inner ear during surgery through mastoid and middle ear. It is a classical method, used in the majority cochlear centers in the world. This is not a suitable method in case of chronic otitis media and middle ear malformation. In these cases Colletti proposed the middle fossa approach and cochlear implant insertion omitting middle ear structures. In patient with bilateral chronic otitis media underwent a few ears operations without obtaining dry postoperative cavity. Cochlear implantation through the middle fossa approach was performed in this patient. The bone fenster was cut, temporal lobe was bent and petrosus pyramid upper surface was exposed. When the superficial petrosal greater nerve, facial nerve and arcuate eminence were localised, the cochlear was open in the basal turn and electrode were inserted. The patient achieves good results in the postoperative speech rehabilitation. It confirmed Colletti tesis that deeper electrode insertion in the cochlear implantation through the middle fossa approach enable use of low and middle frequencies, which are very important in speech understanding.

  14. Comparison of parasitic mite retrieval methods in a population of community cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milley, Catherine; Dryden, Michael; Rosenkrantz, Wayne; Griffin, Joya; Reeder, Christopher

    2017-06-01

    Objectives This study compared methods of mite retrieval from community cats in the Ohio River Valley region of the USA and determined incidence of parasitic mites in this region. Methods In total, 493 community cats were humanely trapped and anesthetized for a trap-neuter-return program. Cats received a dermatologic examination, ear swabs, superficial skin scraping, flea combing, acetate tape preparation and feces collection. All samples were examined microscopically. Large volumes of hair and scale from flea combing were dissolved in 10% potassium hydroxide and centrifuged with Sheather's solution. Fecal samples were mixed with Sheather's solution, filtered and centrifuged. Results Ear swabs were significantly ( P mites and Otodectes cynotis, and skin scraping was significantly better than ear swabs for finding Cheyletiella species. Only cats with O cynotis had clinical lesions. Mites remained identifiable for 6 months at room temperature. Mite incidence rates were as follows: Notoedres cati (1/493 cats), 0.002 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0-0.006); Lynxacarus radovskyi (2/493 cats), 0.004 (95% CI 0-0.01); Demodex gatoi (5/493 cats), 0.01 (95% CI 0.001-0.019); chigger mites (10/493 cats), 0.02 (95% CI 0.008-0.033); Cheyletiella species (12/493 cats), 0.024 (95% CI 0.011-0.038); and O cynotis (124/493 cats), 0.252 (95% CI 0.213-0.29). Conclusions and relevance Ear swabs are recommended when O cynotis or chigger mites are suspected. Skin scraping is more likely to yield positive results than ear swabs, but was not significantly better than acetate tape preparations, flea combing or fecal flotation for finding Cheyletiella species. Mites can remain identifiable for prolonged periods at room temperature. With the exception of O cynotis, the incidence of feline parasitic mites in the Ohio River Valley region of the USA is low; however, D gatoi and L radovskyi were present in the area and should be considered in cats with dermatologic disease attributable to them. In

  15. A tortoiseshell male cat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A. S.; Berg, Lise Charlotte; Almstrup, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    Tortoiseshell coat color is normally restricted to female cats due to X-linkage of the gene that encodes the orange coat color. Tortoiseshell male cats do, however, occur at a low frequency among tortoiseshell cats because of chromosome aberrations similar to the Klinefelter syndrome in man...... tissue from a tortoiseshell male cat referred to us. Chromosome analysis using RBA-banding consistently revealed a 39,XXY karyotype. Histological examinations of testis biopsies from this cat showed degeneration of the tubules, hyperplasia of the interstitial tissue, and complete loss of germ cells....... Immunostaining using anti-vimentin and anti-VASA (DDX4) showed that only Sertoli cells and no germ cells were observed in the testicular tubules. As no sign of spermatogenesis was detected, we conclude that this is a classic case of a sterile, male tortoiseshell cat with a 39,XXY chromosome complement. © 2013 S...

  16. Human ear recognition by computer

    CERN Document Server

    Bhanu, Bir; Chen, Hui

    2010-01-01

    Biometrics deals with recognition of individuals based on their physiological or behavioral characteristics. The human ear is a new feature in biometrics that has several merits over the more common face, fingerprint and iris biometrics. Unlike the fingerprint and iris, it can be easily captured from a distance without a fully cooperative subject, although sometimes it may be hidden with hair, scarf and jewellery. Also, unlike a face, the ear is a relatively stable structure that does not change much with the age and facial expressions. ""Human Ear Recognition by Computer"" is the first book o

  17. Megaesophagus in a Cat

    OpenAIRE

    Forbes, Douglas C.; Leishman, Dyan E.

    1985-01-01

    Megaesophagus in an eight month old Siamese cat is described. Initially, a cause for the vomiting was not discovered and the cat was treated for pyloric spasm. Several months later the same cat, in poor physical condition, was presented with a palpable bulge along its ventral neck. At this time a very dilated and flaccid esophagus was found. An exploratory thoracotomy was done but a cause for the megaesophagus was not discovered.

  18. Anatomical variants of surgical interest in inner ear pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro, M.; Lazaro, A.; Beaus, B.; Fernandez, F.

    1996-01-01

    The study of the temporal bone by means of high-resolution computed tomography has had a great impact on the medical and surgical management of patients with middle ear pathology. In addition to making it possible to evaluate the disorder and determine its extension, ct aids in demonstrating the existence of morphological variants that can make the surgical approach enormously difficult. The operative knowledge of these variants allows the ear specialist to choose the most suitable surgical approach in each case (endaural, retro auricular mastoid or modifications of these strategies) and foresee the technical difficulties associated with the changes. We have considered the presence of lateral sinus procidentia, dehiscence or elevation of the jugular bulb, descent of the dura mater the middle cranial fossa and changes in the paths of the carotid artery and the facial nerve to be of surgical interest. (Author) 8 refs

  19. Global Ear. Werke 2001 - 2006

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Dresdenis muusikafestivalil "Global Ear" 23.3.03 esitusel Eesti heliloojate muusika: Helena Tulve "lumineux/opaque", Jaan Rääts "Meditation", Mirjam Tally "Aura", Mati Kuulberg "Sonate Nr.4", Mari Vihmand "Seitsmele"

  20. The aquatic tympanic ear: convergent adaptations for underwater hearing in three tetrapods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Wahlberg, Magnus; Larsen, Ole Næsbye

    pressure, low particle motion medium, and the consequence is that an efficient underwater ear is sensitive to sound pressure. It is often stated that underwater hearing can work efficiently without a middle ear apparatus by bone conduction, since sound is transmitted from water to inner ear tissue...... with little loss. However, the sensitivity of such an ear is limited by the very low particle motion in water. We report on underwater hearing in tetrapods ranging from totally aquatic (the clawed frog Xenopus laevis) and mostly aquatic (the red-eared slider Trachemys scripta) to mostly terrestrial (the...... is modified (cartilaginous or partly cartilaginous). In all three species, the lowest threshold to underwater sound is at this peak frequency and is around 80 dB re 1 µPa. The sensitivity to sound pressure is slightly lower in water than in air, making underwater hearing much more efficient in terms of sound...

  1. Management of obesity in cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoelmkjaer KM

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Kirsten M Hoelmkjaer, Charlotte R Bjornvad Department of Veterinary Clinical and Animal Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark Abstract: Obesity is a common nutritional disorder in cats, especially when they are neutered and middle-aged. Obesity predisposes cats to several metabolic and clinical disorders, including insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus, lameness, and skin disease. Prevention and treatment of obesity is therefore of great importance in veterinary practice. Correct assessment of body composition is important for recognizing early states of obesity and for monitoring success of weight-loss programs. Various methods for assessing body composition have been proposed, of which a 9-point body-condition score has been validated in cats, and is possibly the most simple to use in the clinic; however, for extremely obese individuals, it is less useful. When calculating the appropriate daily caloric intake for a weight-loss plan, the aim is to maintain a safe weight-loss rate, increasing the chance of preserving lean body mass and decreasing the risk of developing hepatic lipidosis, while also producing a sufficient weight-loss rate to keep owners motivated. A weight-loss rate of 0.5%–2% per week is recommended, which for a cat that needs to lose 3 kg body weight results in an anticipated time for reaching the target weight of 24–60 weeks. There are several purpose-made weight-loss diets available. The optimal composition of a weight-loss diet for cats is unknown, but most of the available products have lower caloric density, an increased nutrient:energy ratio, and higher protein and fiber content. Regular follow-up visits allow the caloric intake to be adjusted based on progress, and possibly increase the chance of success. This review discusses the risk factors for and consequences of obesity, and gives directions for formulating a weight-loss plan, including daily caloric

  2. Petrified ears in a patient with Keutel syndrome: temporal bone CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parmar, Hemant; Blaser, Susan; Yoo, Shi-Joon; Unger, Sheila; Papsin, Blake

    2006-01-01

    We present unusual imaging findings of petrified ears in a 9-year-old girl with Keutel syndrome. The patient presented for a temporal bone study for hearing loss. CT scan showed middle and inner ear abnormalities along with extensive and unsuspected calcification of the external ears and ossicular ligaments. On further investigation, the patient was found to have diffuse cartilage calcification in the larynx and tracheobronchial tree, brachytelephalangism and peripheral pulmonary stenosis suggestive of Keutel syndrome. Confirmation was obtained by mutation analysis. (orig.)

  3. CAT questions and answers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    This document, prepared in February 1993, addresses the most common questions asked by APS Collaborative Access Teams (CATs). The answers represent the best judgment on the part of the APS at this time. In some cases, details are provided in separate documents to be supplied by the APS. Some of the answers are brief because details are not yet available. The questions are separated into five categories representing different aspects of CAT interactions with the APS: (1) Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), (2) CAT Beamline Review and Construction, (3) CAT Beamline Safety, (4) CAT Beamline Operations, and (5) Miscellaneous. The APS plans to generate similar documents as needed to both address new questions and clarify answers to present questions

  4. Inner Ear Barotrauma After Underwater Pool Competency Training Without the Use of Compressed Air Case and Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntire, Sean; Boujie, Lee

    2016-01-01

    Inner ear barotrauma can occur when the gas-filled chambers of the ear have difficulty equalizing pressure with the outside environment after changes in ambient pressure. This can transpire even with small pressure changes. Hypobaric or hyperbaric environments can place significant stress on the structures of the middle and inner ear. If methods to equalize pressure between the middle ear and other connected gas-filled spaces (i.e., Valsalva maneuver) are unsuccessful, middle ear overpressurization can occur. This force can be transmitted to the fluid-filled inner ear, making it susceptible to injury. Damage specifically to the structures of the vestibulocochlear system can lead to symptoms of vertigo, hearing loss, and tinnitus. This article discusses the case of a 23-year-old male Marine who presented with symptoms of nausea and gait instability after performing underwater pool competency exercises to a maximum depth of 13 feet, without breathing compressed air. Diagnosis and management of inner ear barotrauma are reviewed, as is differentiation from inner ear decompression sickness. 2016.

  5. Human ear detection in the thermal infrared spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaza, Ayman; Bourlai, Thirimachos

    2012-06-01

    In this paper the problem of human ear detection in the thermal infrared (IR) spectrum is studied in order to illustrate the advantages and limitations of the most important steps of ear-based biometrics that can operate in day and night time environments. The main contributions of this work are two-fold: First, a dual-band database is assembled that consists of visible and thermal profile face images. The thermal data was collected using a high definition middle-wave infrared (3-5 microns) camera that is capable of acquiring thermal imprints of human skin. Second, a fully automated, thermal imaging based ear detection method is developed for real-time segmentation of human ears in either day or night time environments. The proposed method is based on Haar features forming a cascaded AdaBoost classifier (our modified version of the original Viola-Jones approach1 that was designed to be applied mainly in visible band images). The main advantage of the proposed method, applied on our profile face image data set collected in the thermal-band, is that it is designed to reduce the learning time required by the original Viola-Jones method from several weeks to several hours. Unlike other approaches reported in the literature, which have been tested but not designed to operate in the thermal band, our method yields a high detection accuracy that reaches ~ 91.5%. Further analysis on our data set yielded that: (a) photometric normalization techniques do not directly improve ear detection performance. However, when using a certain photometric normalization technique (CLAHE) on falsely detected images, the detection rate improved by ~ 4%; (b) the high detection accuracy of our method did not degrade when we lowered down the original spatial resolution of thermal ear images. For example, even after using one third of the original spatial resolution (i.e. ~ 20% of the original computational time) of the thermal profile face images, the high ear detection accuracy of our method

  6. [Survey of quality of life scale for patients with congenital ear malformation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yuan-yuan; Zhao, Shou-qin; Xue, Yu-bin

    2012-01-31

    To explore the congenital ear malformation (CEM)-specific quality of life (QOL) and examine the effects of total ear reconstruction surgery for QOL of CEM patients. A self-composed QOL scale was used for 129 patients with congenital external and middle ear malformation. All patients were requested to fill in the QOL scale before and 1 month after ear reconstruction surgery. The level of QOL varied according to the degree of ear malformation. The total QOL score of patients with unilateral and bilateral CEM was 28.5 ± 18.4 and 51.6 ± 23.6, respectively. The total QOL score of patients pre- and post-operation was 21.0 ± 14.0 and 14.2 ± 9.7 respectively. Physiological functions, psychological status and social interactions of the patients were of statistical significance after ear reconstruction surgery compared to that of at pre-operation. Congenital ear malformation-specific QOL scale can show sensitively the changes of QOL of CEM patients. And ear reconstruction surgery is beneficial for the patients.

  7. 3D printed bionic ears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing.

  8. Cat-scratch neuroretinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, J

    1999-08-01

    Cat-scratch disease is a subacute regional lymphadenitis, usually preceded by a history of a cat scratch or exposure to kittens. The disease is caused by Bartonella henselae, and possibly Bartonella quintana, pleomorphic gram-negative rods formerly known as Rochalimaea henselae and Rochalimaea quintana. Ocular involvement is rare and typically manifests as either Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome or neuroretinitis. Patients with neuroretinitis resulting from cat-scratch disease may be asymptomatic or experience mild-to-severe vision loss. The clinical features, angiographic appearance, differential diagnosis, and management of cat-scratch neuroretinitis are discussed. A 30-year-old white woman reported to the eye clinic with painless, decreased vision in the right eye. A diagnosis of cat scratch neuroretinitis was made on the basis of the history of cat scratch, clinical appearance, and angiographic findings. Treatment with oral ciprofloxacin restored vision to normal in 4 weeks. Painless vision loss associated with optic nerve swelling and macular star exudate should alert suspicion of systemic disease. Additional findings--including positive history of a cat scratch, lymphadenopathy, and flu-like symptoms--may indicate Bartonella henselae or Bartonella quintana infection. While treatment remains controversial, appropriate serology testing may aid in the diagnosis and management of the underlying infection.

  9. [Paracoccidioidomycosis of the external ear].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambourg, E; Demar, M; Simon, S; Blanchet, D; Dufour, J; Sainte-Marie, D; Fior, A; Carme, B; Aznar, C; Couppié, P

    2014-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis is a systemic fungal infection common in Latin America. Cutaneous involvement is frequent and usually affects multiple sites, being most frequently associated with lesions of the oropharyngeal mucosa. The cutaneous form on its own is rare. We report a case of paracoccidioidomycosis isolated from the ear of a 43-year-old immunocompetent man. The lesion consisted of a partially ulcerated plaque on the auricle of the left ear. Direct examination, histopathological examination and PCR revealed the presence in the skin lesion of yeasts identified as Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. The sites of paracoccidioidomycosis on the ear can be confused with other tropical diseases frequently found in the Amazon region such as leishmaniasis, leprosy and lobomycosis. The absence of any other cutaneous sites in this case raised the question of whether the lesion was of primary or secondary origin. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Development of the inner ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield, Tanya T

    2015-06-01

    The vertebrate inner ear is a sensory organ of exquisite design and sensitivity. It responds to sound, gravity and movement, serving both auditory (hearing) and vestibular (balance) functions. Almost all cell types of the inner ear, including sensory hair cells, sensory neurons, secretory cells and supporting cells, derive from the otic placode, one of the several ectodermal thickenings that arise around the edge of the anterior neural plate in the early embryo. The developmental patterning mechanisms that underlie formation of the inner ear from the otic placode are varied and complex, involving the reiterative use of familiar signalling pathways, together with roles for transcription factors, transmembrane proteins, and extracellular matrix components. In this review, I have selected highlights that illustrate just a few of the many recent discoveries relating to the development of this fascinating organ system. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Panoramic zonography in ear radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallikainen, D.; Sjoeblom, C.J.; Toetterman, S.; Melartin, E.; Paukku, P.; Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital

    1983-01-01

    Thirty ears in 15 patients were examined by plain film radiography and by panoramic zonography with two tracks: A cylindrical concave image layer with 26 mm. radius and a paired sagittal image layer, at 51 mm. distance from midline. The films were interpreted according to the visibility of 23 different anatomic details. On panoramic films the visualization was better in 14 details, equal in 6 and worse in 3 compared to the plain films. The result suggests that panoramic techniques can replace conventional radiography of the ear. (orig.)

  12. Did one ear infection in France change the history of Britain? The illness and death of Francis II (1544-60).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srouji, Ibrahim Albert

    2009-11-01

    The middle ear has long been considered a continuum of the upper respiratory tract and modern physicians recognize the impact of upper respiratory tract pathology on the middle ear and are familiar with the possible neurosurgical complications of any resultant chronic or acute middle ear infection. In the 16th century, lack of this knowledge may have led to a sequence of events and one of the most important turning points for the British monarchy. This paper on the illness and death of King Francis II of France uncovers interesting aspects of ENT practice from the French Renaissance period and the intrigue surrounding this royal patient's well-documented but little discussed illness.

  13. IndexCat

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — IndexCat provides access to the digitized version of the printed Index-Catalogue of the Library of the Surgeon General's Office; eTK for medieval Latin texts; and...

  14. StreamCat

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The StreamCat Dataset provides summaries of natural and anthropogenic landscape features for ~2.65 million streams, and their associated catchments, within the...

  15. Cat-Scratch Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pain. Antibiotics may be needed if your symptoms don’t go away in a month or two. In rare cases, the infection can travel to your bones, liver, or other organs. This requires more intensive treatment. Should cats be ...

  16. In-the-Ear Hearing-Instrument Antenna for ISM-Band Body-Centric Ear-to-Ear Communications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yatman, William H.; Larsen, Lauge K; Kvist, Søren Helstrup

    2012-01-01

    A compact 2.45 GHz slot-loop antenna is implemented for the use in the outer shell of an in-the-ear (ITE) hearing instrument (HI). The antenna is optimized for high ear-to-ear path gain (jS21j). The antenna simulation results are presented for two identical antennas, one placed in the center of e...

  17. Physiological functioning of the ear and masking

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    The physiological functions of the ear and the role masking plays in speech communication are examined. Topics under investigation include sound analysis of the ear, the aural reflex, and various types of noise masking.

  18. COMMON INFECTIONS OF THE EAR

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    steroid/anti-fungal/antibiotic. (e.g. Kenacomb) ear pack if severe. Bacterial. Severe pain. Oedema with occlusion. Swimming. Ichthammol glycerin, combination ... oral medication.2. Benefits of antibiotic treatment for otitis media. A Cochrane review of antibiotics for acute otitis media in children showed no reduction in pain at ...

  19. Proteomics and the Inner Ear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isolde Thalmann

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The inner ear, one of the most complex organs, contains within its bony shell three sensory systems, the evolutionary oldest gravity receptor system, the three semicircular canals for the detection of angular acceleration, and the auditory system - unrivaled in sensitivity and frequency discrimination. All three systems are susceptible to a host of afflictions affecting the quality of life for all of us. In the first part of this review we present an introduction to the milestones of inner ear research to pave the way for understanding the complexities of a proteomics approach to the ear. Minute sensory structures, surrounded by large fluid spaces and a hard bony shell, pose extreme challenges to the ear researcher. In spite of these obstacles, a powerful preparatory technique was developed, whereby precisely defined microscopic tissue elements can be isolated and analyzed, while maintaining the biochemical state representative of the in vivo conditions. The second part consists of a discussion of proteomics as a tool in the elucidation of basic and pathologic mechanisms, diagnosis of disease, as well as treatment. Examples are the organ of Corti proteins OCP1 and OCP2, oncomodulin, a highly specific calcium-binding protein, and several disease entities, Meniere's disease, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, and perilymphatic fistula.

  20. Mechanics of the frog ear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijk, Pim; Mason, Matthew J.; Schoffelen, Richard L. M.; Narins, Peter M.; Meenderink, Sebastiaan W. F.

    The frog inner ear contains three regions that are sensitive to airborne sound and which are functionally distinct. (1) The responses of nerve fibres innervating the low-frequency, rostral part of the amphibian papilla (AP) are complex. Electrical tuning of hair cells presumably contributes to the

  1. Immunologic Disorders of the Inner Ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, William C.; Hughes, Gordon B.

    1997-01-01

    Immune inner ear disease represents a series of immune system mediated problems that can present with hearing loss, dizziness, or both. The etiology, presentation, testing, and treatment of primary immune inner ear disease is discussed. A review of secondary immune inner ear disease is presented for comparison. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  2. 21 CFR 878.3590 - Ear prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ear prosthesis. 878.3590 Section 878.3590 Food and... GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3590 Ear prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ear prosthesis is a silicone rubber solid device intended to be implanted to reconstruct the external...

  3. Can Loud Music Hurt My Ears?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Can Loud Music Hurt My Ears? KidsHealth / For Kids / Can Loud Music Hurt My Ears? Print en español La música ... up? Oh! You want to know if loud music can hurt your ears . Are you asking because ...

  4. Ear biometrics in 2D and 3D localization and recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Prakash, Surya

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the state-of-the-art techniques and recent research progress on Ear Biometrics. Among the various physiological traits, the reasons for the ear to gain much attention in recent years are many folds. It has been found to be a reliable biometrics for human verification and identification. Ears are remarkably consistent and unlike face, it does not change shape with different expressions or age, and remain fixed in the middle of the side of the head against a predictable background. The book contains figures, tables and plots to illustrate the techniques in an easy and lucid manner. The book also provides an extensive literature on the subject, where readers have the benefit of receiving all the relevant material at one place in a very comprehensive manner. This book caters students, academics, researchers, practitioners who are interested in the field of Ear Biometrics and its applications in face recognition and security.

  5. Pancreatitis in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, P Jane; Williams, David A

    2012-08-01

    Pancreatitis was considered a rare disease in the cat until a couple of decades ago when several retrospective studies of severe acute pancreatitis were published. It was apparent that few of the diagnostic tests of value in the dog were helpful in cats. With increasing clinical suspicion, availability of abdominal ultrasonography, and introduction of pancreas-specific blood tests of increasing utility, it is now accepted that acute pancreatitis is probably almost as common in cats as it is in dogs, although the etiology(s) remain more obscure. Pancreatitis in cats often co-exists with inflammatory bowel disease, less commonly with cholangitis, and sometimes with both. Additionally, pancreatitis may trigger hepatic lipidosis, while other diseases, such as diabetes mellitus, may be complicated by pancreatitis. Therapy is similar to that used in dogs, with added emphasis on early nutritional support to prevent hepatic lipidosis. Less is known about chronic pancreatitis than the acute form, but chronic pancreatitis is more common in cats than it is in dogs and may respond positively to treatment with corticosteroids. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Conductive Hearing Loss Caused by Third-Window Lesions of the Inner Ear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Saumil N.; Rosowski, John J.

    2008-01-01

    Background Various authors have described conductive hearing loss (CHL), defined as an air-bone gap on audiometry, in patients without obvious middle ear pathologic findings. Recent investigations have suggested that many of these cases are due to disorders of the inner ear, resulting in pathologic third windows. Objective To provide an overview of lesions of the inner ear resulting in a CHL due to a third-window mechanism. The mechanism of the CHL is explained along with a classification scheme for these disorders. We also discuss methods for diagnosis of these disorders. Data Sources The data were compiled from a review of the literature and recent published research on middle and inner ear mechanics from our laboratory. Conclusion A number of disparate disorders affecting the labyrinth can produce CHL by acting as a pathologic third window in the inner ear. The common denominator is that these conditions result in a mobile window on the scala vestibuli side of the cochlear partition. The CHL results by the dual mechanism of worsening of air conduction thresholds and improvement of bone conduction thresholds. Such lesions may be anatomically discrete or diffuse. Anatomically discrete lesions may be classified by location: semicircular canals (superior, lateral, or posterior canal dehiscence), bony vestibule (large vestibular aqueduct syndrome, other inner ear malformations), or the cochlea (carotid-cochlear dehiscence, X-linked deafness with stapes gusher, etc.). An example of an anatomically diffuse lesion is Paget disease, which may behave as a distributed or diffuse third window. Third-window lesions should be considered in the differential diagnosis of CHL in patients with an intact tympanic membrane and an aerated, otherwise healthy, middle ear. Clues to suspect such a lesion include a low-frequency air-bone gap with supranormal thresholds for bone conduction, and presence of acoustic reflexes, vestibular evoked myogenic responses, or otoacoustic emission

  7. Management of hearing loss and the normal ear in cases of unilateral Microtia with aural atresia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, Kathleen R; Qureshi, Hannan; Gouveia, Christopher; Ittner, Colleen; Hoff, Stephen R

    2016-06-01

    To identify the rate of hearing loss related to middle ear disease and the frequency of tympanostomy tube (TT) insertion in the contralateral ear of patients with unilateral microtia/aural atresia. Retrospective case series of patients less than 3 years of age with unilateral microtia/aural atresia treated at an urban, tertiary care children's hospital from 2008 to 2013. Clinical and audiologic data were reviewed. Statistical analysis was performed to determine the relative risk of TT insertion in the normal ear. A total of 72 patients were included for analysis. The average age of patients at their initial otolaryngology visit was 3.3 months (range 0.08-1.67 years); 38 (52.8%) patients were males. Aural atresia involved the right ear in 43 (59.7%) cases. Five (6.9%) patients were syndromic. Abnormal audiometric testing of the normal ear was noted in 12 (16.7%), and 14 (19.4%) underwent TT during the first 3 years of life. Twelve children (85.7%) who had a TT placed were nonsyndromic. When compared to published norms for TT placement in the general population (6.8% of children atresia had TT placement in the normal ear (z = 4.26, P atresia have increased rates of hearing loss and middle ear effusion leading to TT in their normal ear at a higher rate versus the general population. This information can help guide more vigilant care and audiologic follow-up in affected children. 4. Laryngoscope, 126:1470-1474, 2016. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  8. The Effects of Middle Ear Pressure on Hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-04-30

    of moderately intense sounds on auditory sensitivity in rhesus monkeys: Be- havioral and neural observations. J. :.’o ore-’uiol. 46: 563- . 586, 1981...Plenum Publishers, New York. 4. DeVincetits, I., Bozzi, L. and Pizzichetta, V. 1964. Sulla terapia medica di alcuwe gravi ipoacusie. Valsalua 40:65-79

  9. Effects of Acoustic Impulses on the Middle Ear

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    via the modified Hughson-Westlake procedure. In addition to thresholds, the ART software retains the detailed history of stimulus presentations and...evaluation of threshold reliability. 7 Figure 7. Example of ART presentation history review. Each plot represents ascending presentations as a function of...applied to the trigger on the toy gun (and measured using a force-sensing resistor ), EMG activity on the FDS muscle, and the output of a microphone

  10. Effects of Acoustic Impulses on the Middle Ear

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    policy or decision unless so designated by other documentation. REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for...the gap, they are asked to track a target on the video monitor using a toy gun mounted on a stand. The fourth conditioned task (Simulated Trigger...ST) uses the same toy gun as the UA task; however, in this task, only the MEMC probe clicks will be presented. The fifth conditioned task (Dry Fire

  11. Tympanosclerosis of the middle ear: radiologic-surgical correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Won Jin; Park, Dong Woo; Lee, Seung Ro; Seong, Jin Yong; Song, Soon Young; Hahm, Chang Kok; Kim, Yong Soo; Park, Choong Ki; Tae, Kyung [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine

    1998-02-01

    Tympanosclerosis is a common problem causing conductive hearing loss accompanied by chronic otitis media. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the CT findings of tympanosclerosis, and correlate them with the surgical findings. The CT scans of 17 patients with surgically-proven tympanosclerosis and those of a control group of 34 patients with nontympanosclerotic chronic otitis media were reviewed. According to their location, they were assigned to one of three groups; tympanic membrane, epitympanum, or ossicles. Tympanosclerosis usually appears on CT as ossicular thickening, narrowing of the epitympanum, calcification of the tympanic membrane and/or tympanic cavity. CT is very helpful in evaluating ossicular involvement and determining the appropriate surgical treatment of tympanosclerosis. (author). 13 refs., 4 figs.

  12. CHRONIC OTITIS MEDIA WITH MIDDLE EAR CHOLESTEATOMA – CASEREPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Četina

    2008-02-01

    The case is interesting because in one patient three different complications are present(labyrinth fistula, destruction of facial nerve bony canal and skull base with dura exposure.There are also some data about surgery approaches, hearing results and discussionabout complications

  13. Effects of Acoustic Impulses on the Middle Ear

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    ORGANIZATION: The Geneva Foundation Tacoma, WA 98402 REPORT DATE: October 2017 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual PREPARED FOR: U.S. Army Medical Research...REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) October 2017 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 09/22/2016 - 9/21/2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE “Effects of...5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) The Geneva Foundation 917 Pacific Ave

  14. Tympanosclerosis of the middle ear: radiologic-surgical correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Won Jin; Park, Dong Woo; Lee, Seung Ro; Seong, Jin Yong; Song, Soon Young; Hahm, Chang Kok; Kim, Yong Soo; Park, Choong Ki; Tae, Kyung

    1998-01-01

    Tympanosclerosis is a common problem causing conductive hearing loss accompanied by chronic otitis media. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the CT findings of tympanosclerosis, and correlate them with the surgical findings. The CT scans of 17 patients with surgically-proven tympanosclerosis and those of a control group of 34 patients with nontympanosclerotic chronic otitis media were reviewed. According to their location, they were assigned to one of three groups; tympanic membrane, epitympanum, or ossicles. Tympanosclerosis usually appears on CT as ossicular thickening, narrowing of the epitympanum, calcification of the tympanic membrane and/or tympanic cavity. CT is very helpful in evaluating ossicular involvement and determining the appropriate surgical treatment of tympanosclerosis. (author). 13 refs., 4 figs

  15. Arthritis of the middle ear in ankylosing spondylitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Magarò, M; Ceresia, G; Frustaci, A

    1984-01-01

    A case of ankylosing spondylitis with aortic valve disease and hearing loss is described. A series of radiographic and audiometric investigations showed the hearing loss to be of a conductive type. It seemed most likely that the hearing loss was related to an inflammatory involvement of the ossicular joints due to the primary disease. No other case of conductive hearing loss has previously been reported due to otoarthritis in ankylosing spondylitis. This is important both theoretically and pr...

  16. Evolution of a sensory novelty: tympanic ears and the associated neural processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Carr, Catherine E

    2008-01-01

    sensitivity and directionality at low frequencies. Therefore, tetrapod auditory processing may originally have been organized into low- and high-frequency streams, where only the high-frequency processing was mediated by tympanic input. The closure of the middle ear cavity in mammals and some birds...

  17. E-Z-CAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyman, U.; Dinnetz, G.; Andersson, I.

    1984-01-01

    A new barium sulphate suspension, E-Z-CAT, for use as an oral contrast medium at computed tomography of the abdomen has been compared with the commonly used water-soluble iodinated contrast medium Gastrografin as regards patient tolerance and diagnostic information. The investigation was conducted as an unpaired randomized single-blind study in 100 consecutive patients. E-Z-CAT seems to be preferred because of its better taste, its lesser tendency to cause diarrhoea, and for usage in patients who are known to be hypersensitive to iodinated contrast media. The diagnostic information was the same for both contrast media. (Auth.)

  18. [Declawing in cats?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, I

    1983-02-15

    Those forms of behaviour in which cats use their claws are reviewed. Forms of undesirable use of the claws and possible solutions to this problem are discussed. An inquiry among veterinary practitioners showed that nearly fifty per cent of these practitioners refused to declaw cats on principle. Approximately seventy-five per cent of the veterinarians taking part in the inquiry advocated that the Royal Netherlands Veterinary Association should state its position with regard to declawing. It is concluded by the present author that declawing is unacceptable for ethical and ethological reasons.

  19. Clinical analysis of ear carcinoma treated in the Department of Otolaryngology, Niigata University Hospital. Focus on correlation between treatment method and prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Katsuro; Tomita, Masahiko; Takahashi, Sugata; Watanabe, Jun; Matsuyama, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    Thirty-six patients of ear carcinoma treated in our department were clinically analyzed. Those ear carcinoma patients accounted for 3.5% of all head and neck carcinoma patients. The most common primary site was the external auditory canal (67%), followed by the middle ear (19%) and the auricle (14%). The mean age of the patients was 66 years old, and the male to female ratio was 3:2. The most common chief complaint of the external auditory canal and middle ear carcinoma was otorrhea followed by ear itching and ear ache. Of patients with external auditory canal carcinoma and middle ear carcinoma, 26% had a history of ear surgery, and 35% had a habit of ear-picking. Histopathologically, 94% of the patients were squamous cell carcinoma, and 6% were malignant melanoma. Sixty-two % of squamous cell carcinoma patients underwent surgery, and the remaining 38% had radiotherapy without surgery. Postoperative radiotherapy was added for 67% of the surgery group. Five-year survival rates of the patients with squamous cell carcinoma were 74% for external auditory canal carcinoma, 67% for auricular carcinoma, and 34% for middle ear carcinoma, respectively. The five-year survival rate of the surgery group was 82%, and that of the non-surgery group was 29%. There was a statistical significance between the two groups. No statistical significance was seen between with and without postoperative radiotherapy. In the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma in the ear, radical en bloc surgery followed by postoperative radiotherapy was considered to be an appropriate treatment strategy. (author)

  20. The War of Jenkins' Ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graboyes, Evan M; Hullar, Timothy E

    2013-02-01

    In 1731, Spanish sailors boarded the British brig Rebecca off the coast of Cuba and sliced off the left ear of its captain, Robert Jenkins. This traumatic auriculectomy was used as a pretext by the British to declare war on Spain in 1739, a conflict that is now known as the War of Jenkins' Ear. Here, we examine the techniques available for auricular repair at the time of Jenkins' injury and relate them to the historical events surrounding the incident. Review of relevant original published manuscripts and monographs. Surgeons in the mid-18th century did not have experience with repair of traumatic total auriculectomies. Some contemporary surgeons favored auricular prostheses over surgical treatment. METHODS for the reconstruction of partial defects were available, and most authors advocated a local post-auricular flap instead of a free tissue transfer. Techniques for repair of defects of the auricle lagged behind those for repair of the nose. Limitations in care of traumatic auricular defects may have intensified the significance of Jenkins' injury and helped lead to the War of Jenkins' Ear, but conflict between Britain and Spain was probably unavoidable because of their conflicting commercial interests in the Caribbean. (C) 2013 Otology & Neurotology, Inc.

  1. The War of Jenkins’ Ear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graboyes, Evan M.; Hullar, Timothy E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective In 1731, Spanish sailors boarded the British brig Rebecca off the coast of Cuba and sliced off the left ear of its captain, Robert Jenkins. This traumatic auriculectomy was used as a pretext by the British to declare war on Spain in 1739, a conflict that is now known as the War of Jenkins’ Ear. Here, we examine the techniques available for auricular repair at the time of Jenkins’ injury and relate them to the historical events surrounding the incident. Methods Review of relevant original published manuscripts and monographs. Results Surgeons in the mid-18th century did not have experience with repair of traumatic total auriculectomies. Some contemporary surgeons favored auricular prostheses over surgical treatment. Methods for the reconstruction of partial defects were available, and most authors advocated a local post-auricular flap instead of a free tissue transfer. Techniques for repair of defects of the auricle lagged behind those for repair of the nose. Conclusion Limitations in care of traumatic auricular defects may have intensified the significance of Jenkins’ injury and helped lead to the War of Jenkins’ Ear, but conflict between Britain and Spain was probably unavoidable due to their conflicting commercial interests in the Caribbean. PMID:23444484

  2. Tracheal collapse in two cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, J.C.; O'Brien, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Two cats examined bronchoscopically to discover the cause of tracheal collapse were found to have tracheal obstruction cranial to the collapse. Cats with this unusual sign should be examined bronchoscopically to ascertain whether there is an obstruction, as the cause in these 2 cats was distinct from the diffuse airway abnormality that causes tracheal collapse in dogs

  3. Concurrent idiopathic vestibular syndrome and facial nerve paralysis in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, A R; Long, S N; le Chevoir, M A

    2015-07-01

    A 4-year-old male neutered Domestic Medium-hair cat was referred for right head tilt and ataxia of 2 weeks duration. On examination it was determined that the cat had right facial nerve paralysis and peripheral vestibular signs. Haematology and serum biochemical testing were performed in addition to magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and ears, and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. An underlying condition was not identified. A diagnosis of idiopathic vestibular syndrome and concurrent idiopathic right facial nerve paralysis was consequently made. The cat was re-evaluated over the following weeks and was determined to have complete resolution of clinical signs within 7 weeks. Vestibular dysfunction and concurrent facial nerve paralysis have previously been reported in the cat, but not of an idiopathic nature. © 2015 Australian Veterinary Association.

  4. Early and late surgical site infections in ear surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastier, P L; Leroyer, C; Lashéras, A; Rogues, A-M; Darrouzet, V; Franco-Vidal, V

    2016-04-01

    A retroauricular approach is routinely used for treating chronic otitis media. The incidence of surgical site infections after ear surgery is around 10% in contaminated or dirty procedures. This observational prospective study describes surgical site infections after chronic otitis media surgery with the retroauricular approach and investigated their potential predictive factors. This observational prospective study included patients suffering from chronic otitis media and eligible for therapeutic surgery with a retroauricular approach. During follow-up, surgical site infections were defined as "early" if occurring within 30 days after surgery or as "late" if occurring thereafter. The data of 102 patients were analysed. Concerning early surgical site infections, four cases were diagnosed (3.9%) and a significant association was found with preoperative antibiotic therapy, wet ear at pre-operative examination, class III (contaminated) in the surgical wound classification, NNIS (National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance) index > 1, and oral post-operative antibiotic use. Seven late surgical site infections were diagnosed (7.1%) between 90 and 160 days after surgery and were significantly correlated to otorrhoea during the 6 months before surgery, surgery duration ≤60 minutes, canal wall down technique and use of fibrin glue. Surgical site infections after chronic otitis media surgery seem to be associated with factors related to the inflammatory state of the middle ear at the time of surgery in early infections and with chronic inflammation in late infections. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale, Rome, Italy.

  5. Immune-Mediated Inner Ear Disease: Diagnostic and therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penêda, José Ferreira; Lima, Nuno Barros; Monteiro, Francisco; Silva, Joana Vilela; Gama, Rita; Condé, Artur

    2018-03-07

    Immune Mediated Inner Ear Disease (IMIED) is a rare form of sensorineural bilateral hearing loss, usually progressing in weeks to months and responsive to immunosuppressive treatment. Despite recent advances, there is no consensus on diagnosis and optimal treatment. A review of articles on IMIED from the last 10 years was conducted using PubMed ® database. IMIED is a rare disease, mostly affecting middle aged women. It may be a primary ear disease or secondary to autoimmune systemic disease. A dual immune response (both cellular and humoral) seems to be involved. Cochlin may be the inner ear protein targeted in this disease. Distinction from other (core common) forms of neurosensory hearing loss is a challenge. Physical examination is mandatory for exclusion of other causes of hearing loss; audiometry identifies characteristic hearing curves. Laboratory and imaging studies are controversial since no diagnostic marker is available. Despite recent research, IMIED diagnosis remains exclusive. Steroids are the mainstay treatment; other therapies need further investigation. For refractory cases, cochlear implantation is an option and with good relative outcome. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Prostatic carcinoma in two cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caney, S.M.A.; Holt, P.E.; Day, M.J.; Rudorf, H.; Gruffydd-Jones, T.J.

    1998-01-01

    Clinical, radiological and pathological features of two cats with prostatic carcinoma are reported. In both cats the presenting history included signs of lower urinary tract disease with haematuria and dysuria. Prostatomegaly was visible radiographically in one cat; an irregular intraprostatic urethra was seen on retrograde contrast urethrography in both cats. In one of the cats, neoplasia was suspected on the basis of a transurethral catheter biopsy. Following a poor response to palliative treatment in both cases, euthanasia was performed with histological confirmation of the diagnosis

  7. Sensibility of the ear after otoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coltro, Pedro Soler; Alves, Hélio R N; Gallafrio, Samuel T; Busnardo, Fábio F; Ferreira, Marcus C

    2012-02-01

    Changes in skin sensibility occur in various postoperative plastic surgeries, especially when they involve major skin and subcutaneous dissection. There were no studies so far that objectively compared changes of ear sensibility. This prospective study was conducted to compare ear sensibility before and after otoplasty. Patients with prominent ears (n = 15) underwent bilateral otoplasty. Ear tactile sensibility was tested preoperatively and 6 and 12 months after surgery by Pressure Specified Sensory Device, an apparatus that quantifies cutaneous pressure sensation (g/mm(2)). Comparison between preoperative and 6-months postoperative results indicated an increment on mean skin pressure thresholds; however, mean thresholds between pre- and 12 months postoperative period were similar. Vibratory and hot/cold sensibility did not present any difference during this period. This is the first comparative assessment of ear tactile sensibility using quantitative methods. After otoplasty, initially there was reduction in an ear tactile sensibility, followed by a return to levels similar to preoperative sensibility.

  8. Cutpoints for screening blood glucose concentrations in healthy senior cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve-Johnson, Mia K; Rand, Jacquie S; Vankan, Dianne; Anderson, Stephen T; Marshall, Rhett; Morton, John M

    2017-12-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were to determine the reference interval for screening blood glucose in senior cats, to apply this to a population of obese senior cats, to compare screening and fasting blood glucose, to assess whether screening blood glucose is predicted by breed, body weight, body condition score (BCS), behaviour score, fasting blood glucose and/or recent carbohydrate intake and to assess its robustness to changes in methodology. Methods The study included a total of 120 clinically healthy client-owned cats aged 8 years and older of varying breeds and BCSs. Blood glucose was measured at the beginning of the consultation from an ear/paw sample using a portable glucose meter calibrated for cats, and again after physical examination from a jugular sample. Fasting blood glucose was measured after overnight hospitalisation and fasting for 18-24 h. Results The reference interval upper limit for screening blood glucose was 189 mg/dl (10.5 mmol/l). Mean screening blood glucose was greater than mean fasting glucose. Breed, body weight, BCS, behaviour score, fasting blood glucose concentration and amount of carbohydrate consumed 2-24 h before sampling collectively explained only a small proportion of the variability in screening blood glucose. Conclusions and relevance Screening blood glucose measurement represents a simple test, and cats with values from 117-189 mg/dl (6.5-10.5 mmol/l) should be retested several hours later. Cats with initial screening blood glucose >189 mg/dl (10.5 mmol/l), or a second screening blood glucose >116 mg/dl (6.4 mmol/l) several hours after the first, should have fasting glucose and glucose tolerance measured after overnight hospitalisation.

  9. Imunoexpressão da citoqueratina 16 e do antígeno nuclear Ki-67 no colesteatoma adquirido da orelha média Expression patterns of cytokeratin 16 and the nuclear antigen Ki-67 in acquired middle ear cholesteatoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celina S. B. Pereira

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Introdução: Ocolesteatoma da orelha média é caracterizado pela presença de epitélio escamoso estratificado queratinizado nesta cavidade, causando destruição óssea e podendo levar a complicações. Algumas substâncias como a citoqueratina 16 e o Ki-67, marcadores de proliferação celular, vêm sendo utilizadas para estudar essa doença. A CK 16 é um filamento protéico, situado no citoplasma das células epiteliais, característico de epitélios hiperproliferativos. O Ki-67 é um antígeno nuclear que aparece nas células em estágio de proliferação. Objetivo: O objetivo deste trabalho foi estudar a imunoexpressão da CK 16 e do Ki-67 no colesteatoma adquirido. Forma de estudo: Clínico prospectivo. Material e Método: Foram colhidas amostras de colesteatoma de 31 pacientes submetidos à cirurgia otológica, sendo 20 adultos e 11 crianças, no período de 1998 e 2000. Essas amostras foram submetidas à análise histológica e imuno-histoquímica para estudo da expressão da CK 16 e do Ki-67 na matriz do colesteatoma. Resultado: A análise dos resultados mostrou a presença da CK 16 nas camadas suprabasais da matriz do colesteatoma e, do Ki-67, na camada basal, estendendo-se para as camadas suprabasais e, inclusive, para a camada apical da matriz. A reação aos anticorpos anti-CK 16 e Ki-67 foi heterogênea. A correlação entre a CK 16 e o Ki-67 suprabasal com variáveis morfológicas, como acantose do epitélio e hiperplasia da camada basal formando cones epiteliais em direção à perimatriz, foi positiva e significativa. Também houve relação positiva e significativa entre a CK 16 e o Ki-67 suprabasal e apical. Conclusão: Esses resultados permitem concluir que o colesteatoma tem características hiperproliferativas, expressando a CK 16 e o Ki-67 na sua matriz.Introduction: Cholesteatomas of the middle ear are characterized by the presence of stratified squamous epithelium in this cavity presenting with highly invasive

  10. Aetiology and pathogenesis of cranial cruciate ligament rupture in cats by histological examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessely, Marlis; Reese, Sven; Schnabl-Feichter, Eva

    2017-06-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to examine histologically intact and ruptured cranial cruciate ligaments in cats, in order to evaluate whether degeneration is a prerequisite for rupture. Methods We performed a histological examination of 50 intact and 19 ruptured cranial cruciate ligaments in cadaver or client-owned cats, respectively, using light microscopy. Cats with stifle pathology were further divided into five age groups in order to investigate the relationship of changes in the ligament with lifespan. Cats with ruptured cranial cruciate ligaments were divided into two groups according to medical history (with presumed history of trauma or without any known history of trauma) in order to investigate the relationship of ligament rupture with a traumatic event. Data from 200 healthy cats were selected randomly and reviewed to make a statistical comparison of cats with and without cranial cruciate ligament rupture (reference group). Results On histological examination, the intact cranial cruciate ligaments showed basic parallel arrangement of the collagen fibres, with no relation to age. While cats of a more advanced age showed fibrocartilage in the middle of the cranial cruciate ligament - a likely physiological reaction to compression forces over the lifespan - degenerative changes within the fibrocartilage were absent in all cases, regardless of age or rupture status. Cats suffering from cranial cruciate ligament rupture without history of trauma were significantly older than cats in the reference group. Conclusions and relevance This study showed that differentiation of fibrocartilage in the middle of the cranial cruciate ligament is likely a physiological reaction to compressive forces and not a degenerative change associated with greater risk of rupture in advanced age. This finding in cats is distinct from the known decrease in differentiation of fibrocartilage in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture. Furthermore, the histological examination

  11. Molecular Mechanisms of Inner Ear Development

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Doris K.; Kelley, Matthew W.

    2012-01-01

    The inner ear is a structurally complex vertebrate organ built to encode sound, motion, and orientation in space. Given its complexity, it is not surprising that inner ear dysfunction is a relatively common consequence of human genetic mutation. Studies in model organisms suggest that many genes currently known to be associated with human hearing impairment are active during embryogenesis. Hence, the study of inner ear development provides a rich context for understanding the functions of gen...

  12. Endoscopic and minimally-invasive ear surgery: A path to better outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Pollak

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The development of endoscopic ear surgery techniques promises to change the way we approach ear surgery. In this review paper, we explore the current evidence, seek to determine the advantages of endoscopic ear surgery, and see if these advantages are both measureable and meaningful. The wide field of view of the endoscope allows the surgeon to better visualize the various recesses of the middle ear cleft. Endoscopes make it possible to address the target pathology transcanal, while minimizing dissection or normal tissue done purely for exposure, leading to the evolution of minimally-invasive ear surgery and reducing morbidity. When used in chronic ear surgery, endoscopy appears to have the potential to significantly reduce cholesteatoma recidivism rates. Using endoscopes as an adjunct can increase the surgeon's confidence in total cholesteatoma removal. By doing so, endoscopes reduce the need to reopen the mastoid during second-look surgery, help preserve the canal wall, or even change post-cholesteatoma follow-up protocols by channeling more patients away from a planned second-look.

  13. Preoperative diagnosis and surgical strategy in congenital auditory ossicular malformation of 26 ears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanazawa, Yuji; Naito, Yasushi; Shinohara, Shogo; Fujiwara, Keizo; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Kurihara, Risa; Kishimoto, Ippei

    2012-01-01

    We retrospectively analyzed 26 ears of 21 subjects having auditory ossicular malformation and who had undergone auditory reconstruction between April 2004 and December 2010 at our clinic. We checked preoperative condition, pathological classification, surgical procedure, and hearing improvement. We could predict pathological conditions precisely from preoperative computed tomography (CT), including incudostapedial disconnection (9/12, 75%) and malleus and/or incus fixation (7/12, 58%), which tended to be present in external ear malformation, and stapes footplate fixation (0/12, 0%). We could not, however, predict complex malformation (0/8, 0%). Overall success was 90% (18/20) in the 20 ears observed for at least 1 year. In the 2 ears without improved hearing, the first had congenital cholesteatoma and no stapes superstructure, was treated with type IV tympanoplasty. The second had malleus, incus, and stapes fixation and discontinuity between the incus and stapes, and was treated with type III tympanoplasty and stapes mobilization. Preoperative diagnosis is difficult in mixed congenital auditory ossicular malformation, especially stapes footplate fixation, possibly requiring unexpected procedures, with a poor hearing outcome. Preoperative status must thus be evaluated precisely using hearing, tympanometry, acoustic reflex test, and CT. Temporal bone CT and external ear findings are useful in diagnosing middle-ear malformation. Subjects' informed consent should also be obtained due to the possible need for changing procedure based on findings during surgery. (author)

  14. CT and MR imaging of congenital abnormalities of the inner ear and internal auditory canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casselman, Jan W.; Offeciers, Erwin F.; Foer, Bert de; Govaerts, Paul; Kuhweide, Rudy; Somers, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    The embryology of the inner ear must be known as many of the inner ear malformations present as a result of the arrest during the various stages of embryology. These malformations are described in this 'embryologic' perspective and specific names for certain malformations are no longer used. Both CT and MR can be used to look at inner ear malformations but often both techniques are complementary. However, CT is preferred when associated middle- or external ear malformations must be excluded. Magnetic resonance is preferred when subtle changes in the membranous labyrinth or abnormalities of the nerves in the internal auditory canal must be visualised. The CT and MR technique must however be adapted as more and more subtle congenital malformations can only be seen when the right technique is used. The heavily T2-weighted gradient-echo or fast spin-echo MR techniques are mandatory if malformations of the inner ear must be excluded. The purpose of this paper is to describe the techniques used to study these patients and to give an overview of the most frequent and important congenital malformations which can be found in the inner ear and internal auditory canal/cerebellopontine angle

  15. Molecular mechanisms of inner ear development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Doris K; Kelley, Matthew W

    2012-08-01

    The inner ear is a structurally complex vertebrate organ built to encode sound, motion, and orientation in space. Given its complexity, it is not surprising that inner ear dysfunction is a relatively common consequence of human genetic mutation. Studies in model organisms suggest that many genes currently known to be associated with human hearing impairment are active during embryogenesis. Hence, the study of inner ear development provides a rich context for understanding the functions of genes implicated in hearing loss. This chapter focuses on molecular mechanisms of inner ear development derived from studies of model organisms.

  16. Cat-eye syndrome with unusual marker chromosome probably not chromosome 22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, W; Verma, R S; Jhaveri, R C

    1984-05-01

    An unusual supernumerary chromosome with a single satellite on the long arm was found in a child with manifestations of the cat-eye syndrome including apparently low-set and malformed ears, preauricular tags, micrognathia, and imperforate anus. Although G-banding suggested that this extra material was chromosome 22, this was not confirmed by several other banding techniques. After examination of the parents' chromosomes, the nature and origin of this extra chromosome remains obscure. We conclude that patients previously diagnosed as having "partial trisomy 22" with incomplete cat-eye syndrome may have a different chromosome constitution when studied by various banding techniques.

  17. Effects of strain and age on ear wound healing and regeneration in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A. Costa

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Round holes in the ears of MRL mice tend to close with characteristics of regeneration believed to be absent in other mouse strains (e.g., C57BL/6. We evaluated the kinetics and the histopathology of ear wound closure in young (8 weeks old C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice. We also used middle-aged (40 weeks old C57BL/6 mice to evaluate the influence of aging on this process. A circular through-and-through hole was made in the ear, photographs were taken at different times after injury and wound area was measured with digital analysis software. The percentages of closed area measured on day 100 were: 23.57 ± 8.66% for young BALB/c mice, 56.47 ± 7.39% for young C57BL/6 mice, and 75.31 ± 23.65% for middle-aged C57BL/6 mice. Mice were sacrificed on days 1, 3, 5, 25, 44, and 100 for histological evaluation with hematoxylin and eosin, Gomori’s trichrome, periodic acid-Schiff, or picrosirius red staining. In young mice of both strains, healing included re-epithelialization, chondrogenesis, myogenesis, and collagen deposition. Young C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice differed in the organization of collagen fibers visualized using picrosirius-polarization. Sebaceous glands and hair follicles regenerated and chondrogenesis was greater in young C57BL/6 mice. In middle-aged C57BL/6 mice all aspects of regeneration were depressed. The characteristics of regeneration were present during ear wound healing in both young BALB/c and young C57BL/6 mice although they differed in intensity and pattern. Greater ear wound closure in middle-aged C57BL/6 mice was not correlated with regeneration.

  18. Playing by Ear: Foundation or Frill?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woody, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    Many people divide musicians into two types: those who can read music and those who play by ear. Formal music education tends to place great emphasis on producing musically literate performers but devotes much less attention to teaching students to make music without notation. Some would suggest that playing by ear is a specialized skill that is…

  19. Congenital malformation of inner ear, single cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres Pazmino, Julio Cesar; Marrugo Pardo, Gilberto Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Congenital malformations of the inner ear are rare conditions, but their detection requires high diagnostic accuracy. In this report we describe the case of a patient with single or common cavity, discuss the corresponding radiological images, describe the treatment of this patient with a cochlear implant, and review the classification and differential diagnosis of the other anomalies of the inner ear.

  20. Objective Audiometry using Ear-EEG

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Christian Bech; Kidmose, Preben

    Recently, a novel electroencephalographic (EEG) method called ear-EEG [1], that enable recording of auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) from a personalized earpiece was introduced. Initial investigations show that well established AEPs, such as ASSR and P1-N1-P2 complex can be observed from ear-EEG...

  1. The frog inner ear : picture perfect?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mason, Matthew J.; Segenhout, Johannes M.; Cobo-Cuan, Ariadna; Quiones, Patricia M.; van Dijk, Pim

    Many recent accounts of the frog peripheral auditory system have reproduced Wever's (1973) schematic cross-section of the ear of a leopard frog. We sought to investigate to what extent this diagram is an accurate and representative depiction of the anuran inner ear, using three-dimensional

  2. Local cloning of CAT states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahaman, Ramij

    2011-01-01

    In this Letter we analyze the (im)possibility of the exact cloning of orthogonal three-qubit CAT states under local operation and classical communication (LOCC) with the help of a restricted entangled state. We also classify the three-qubit CAT states that can (not) be cloned under LOCC restrictions and extend the results to the n-qubit case. -- Highlights: → We analyze the (im)possibility of exact cloning of orthogonal CAT states under LOCC. → We also classify the set of CAT states that can(not) be cloned by LOCC. → No set of orthogonal CAT states can be cloned by LOCC with help of similar CAT state. → Any two orthogonal n-qubit GHZ-states can be cloned by LOCC with help of a GHZ state.

  3. A Model for the representation of Speech Signals in Normal and Impaired Ears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Ulrich

    2004-01-01

    hearing was modelled as a combination of outer- and inner hair cell loss. The percentage of dead inner hair cells was calculated based on a new computational method relating auditory nerve fibre thresholds to behavioural thresholds. Finally, a model of the entire auditory nerve fibre population......A model of human auditory periphery, ranging from the outer ear to the auditory nerve, was developed. The model consists of the following components: outer ear transfer function, middle ear transfer function, basilar membrane velocity, inner hair cell receptor potential, inner hair cell probability...... of neurotransmitter release and auditory nerve fibre refractoriness. The model builds on previously published models, however, parameters for basilar membrane velocity and inner hair cell probability of neurotransmitter release were successfully fitted to model data from psychophysical and physiological data...

  4. X-linked deafness, stapes gushers and a distinctive defect of the inner ear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelps, P.D.; Reardon, W.; Pembrey, M.; Bellman, S.; Luxom, L.

    1991-01-01

    We have made genetic linkage studies in 7 pedigrees in whom deafness was inherited in an X-linked manner. All patients had a full range of audiometric and vestibular function tests. Thin section high resolution CT in two planes was used to assess the state of the middle and inner ears. We found a distinctive inner ear deformity in some of the deaf males. Moreover, some of the obligate feamle carriers seem to have a milder form of the same anomaly associated with slight hearing loss. Genetic studies on some of the deaf males with apparently normal inner ear anatomy suggest a different locus on the X chromosome and hence a different pathogenesis for the deafness. (orig./GDG)

  5. Cystinuria in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBartola, S P; Chew, D J; Horton, M L

    1991-01-01

    A 10-month-old male Siamese cat with dysuria was determined to have cystine crystalluria. Many small calculi composed entirely of cystine were found in the urinary bladder. Measurement of serum and urine amino acids and calculation of fractional reabsorption of amino acids indicated reabsorption defects for cystine, ornithine, lysine, and arginine. Urinary acidification, fractional reabsorption of glucose, and fractional reabsorption of electrolytes were normal. Diagnoses of cystinuria and cystine urolithiasis were made on the basis of low fractional reabsorption of cystine and dibasic amino acids and the detection of cystine calculi in the urinary bladder.

  6. Air-bone gap component of inner-ear origin in audiograms of cochlear implant candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attias, Joseph; Ulanovski, David; Shemesh, Rafael; Kornreich, Liora; Nageris, Benny; Preis, Michal; Peled, Miriam; Efrati, Michal; Raveh, Eyal

    2012-06-01

    Experimental studies have shown that creating a window in the bony cover of the cochlea and vestibular parts of the inner ear, with preservation of membranous and middle-ear functions, induces an air-bone gap (ABG). This study sought to determine if a similar mechanism explains the ABG frequently observed in audiograms of cochlear implant candidates. The study group included 47 candidates for a cochlear implant (94 ears) attending a university-affiliated tertiary medical center who had an ABG component in the audiogram in the absence of external or middle-ear abnormalities. Air- and bone-conduction thresholds on pure-tone audiometry were analyzed for 250 to 8,000 Hz and 250 to 4,000 Hz, respectively. In the 25 patients operated on during the study period, differences in the ABG and in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak were compared between those with and without anomalies on computed tomography. Imaging revealed an abnormal inner-ear structure in 46% of cases, mostly a large vestibular aqueduct, alone or combined with other cochlear or vestibular malformations. ABG was evident over high and low frequencies and was significantly larger at low frequencies and in ears with structural anomalies. A high rate of CSF leak was observed in patients with an ABG and structural anomalies imaging as well as in those with an ABG and normal imaging findings. In cochlear implant candidates, the presence of a third window could cause an ABG because of stapes motion-induced shunting of acoustic energy outside the cochlear duct in response to air-conducted stimuli while bone conduction is preserved.

  7. Toxoplasmosis: An Important Message for Cat Owners

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... role do cats play in the spread of toxoplasmosis? Cats get Toxoplasma infection by eating infected rodents, ... an infected cat may have defecated. What is toxoplasmosis? Toxoplasmosis is an infection caused by a microscopic ...

  8. Acceleration induced water removal from ear canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hosung; Averett, Katelee; Jung, Sunghwan

    2017-11-01

    Children and adults commonly experience having water trapped in the ear canals after swimming. To remove the water, individuals will shake their head sideways. Since a child's ear canal has a smaller diameter, it requires more acceleration of the head to remove the trapped water. In this study, we theoretically and experimentally investigated the acceleration required to break the surface meniscus of the water in artificial ear canals and hydrophobic-coated glass tubes. In experiments, ear canal models were 3D-printed from a CT-scanned human head. Also, glass tubes were coated with silane to match the hydrophobicity in ear canals. Then, using a linear stage, we measured the acceleration values required to forcefully eject the water from the artificial ear canals and glass tubes. A theoretical model was developed to predict the critical acceleration at a given tube diameter and water volume by using a modified Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Furthermore, this research can shed light on the potential of long-term brain injury and damage by shaking the head to push the water out of the ear canal. This research was supported by National Science Foundation Grant CBET-1604424.

  9. Systemic Cat Scratch Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Min Liao

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic cat scratch disease (CSD is often associated with prolonged fever and microabscesses in the liver and/or spleen. We report a case of systemic CSD with hepatic, splenic and renal involvement in an aboriginal child in Taiwan. A previously healthy 9-year-old girl had an intermittent fever for about 17 days, and complained of abdominal pain, headache and weight loss. Abdominal computed tomography showed multiple tiny hypodense nodular lesions in the spleen and both kidneys. Laparotomy revealed multiple soft, whitishtan lesions on the surface of the liver and spleen. Histopathologic examination of a biopsy specimen of the spleen showed necrotizing granulomatous inflammation with central necrosis surrounded by epithelioid cells and occasional Langhans' giant cells, strongly suggestive of Bartonella henselae infection. History revealed close contact with a cat. B. henselae DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction in the tissue specimen, and the single antibody titer against B. henselae was greater than 1:2048. These results confirmed the diagnosis of visceral CSD caused by B. henselae. The patient's symptoms resolved after treatment with rifampin and tetracycline. This case illustrates the need for inclusion of systemic CSD in patients with fever of unknown origin and abdominal pain.

  10. Ear Structures of the Naked Mole-Rat, Heterocephalus glaber, and Its Relatives (Rodentia: Bathyergidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Mason

    Full Text Available Although increasingly popular as a laboratory species, very little is known about the peripheral auditory system of the naked mole-rat, Heterocephalus glaber. In this study, middle and inner ears of naked mole-rats of a range of ages were examined using micro-computed tomography and dissection. The ears of five other bathyergid species (Bathyergus suillus, Cryptomys hottentotus, Fukomys micklemi, Georychus capensis and Heliophobius argenteocinereus were examined for comparative purposes. The middle ears of bathyergids show features commonly found in other members of the Ctenohystrica rodent clade, including a fused malleus and incus, a synovial stapedio-vestibular articulation and the loss of the stapedius muscle. Heterocephalus deviates morphologically from the other bathyergids examined in that it has a more complex mastoid cavity structure, poorly-ossified processes of the malleus and incus, a 'columelliform' stapes and fewer cochlear turns. Bathyergids have semicircular canals with unusually wide diameters relative to their radii of curvature. How the lateral semicircular canal reaches the vestibule differs between species. Heterocephalus has much more limited high-frequency hearing than would be predicted from its small ear structures. The spongy bone forming its ossicular processes, the weak incudo-stapedial articulation, the columelliform stapes and (compared to other bathyergids reduced cochlear coiling are all potentially degenerate features which might reflect a lack of selective pressure on its peripheral auditory system. Substantial intraspecific differences were found in certain middle and inner ear structures, which might also result from relaxed selective pressures. However, such interpretations must be treated with caution in the absence of experimental evidence.

  11. Ear Structures of the Naked Mole-Rat, Heterocephalus glaber, and Its Relatives (Rodentia: Bathyergidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Matthew J; Cornwall, Hannah L; Smith, Ewan St J

    2016-01-01

    Although increasingly popular as a laboratory species, very little is known about the peripheral auditory system of the naked mole-rat, Heterocephalus glaber. In this study, middle and inner ears of naked mole-rats of a range of ages were examined using micro-computed tomography and dissection. The ears of five other bathyergid species (Bathyergus suillus, Cryptomys hottentotus, Fukomys micklemi, Georychus capensis and Heliophobius argenteocinereus) were examined for comparative purposes. The middle ears of bathyergids show features commonly found in other members of the Ctenohystrica rodent clade, including a fused malleus and incus, a synovial stapedio-vestibular articulation and the loss of the stapedius muscle. Heterocephalus deviates morphologically from the other bathyergids examined in that it has a more complex mastoid cavity structure, poorly-ossified processes of the malleus and incus, a 'columelliform' stapes and fewer cochlear turns. Bathyergids have semicircular canals with unusually wide diameters relative to their radii of curvature. How the lateral semicircular canal reaches the vestibule differs between species. Heterocephalus has much more limited high-frequency hearing than would be predicted from its small ear structures. The spongy bone forming its ossicular processes, the weak incudo-stapedial articulation, the columelliform stapes and (compared to other bathyergids) reduced cochlear coiling are all potentially degenerate features which might reflect a lack of selective pressure on its peripheral auditory system. Substantial intraspecific differences were found in certain middle and inner ear structures, which might also result from relaxed selective pressures. However, such interpretations must be treated with caution in the absence of experimental evidence.

  12. Lumbosacral agenesis in a cat

    OpenAIRE

    Gabrielle C Hybki; Lisa A Murphy; Joseph P Marchi; Jeffrey E Patlogar; Jennifer O Brisson; Reid K Nakamura

    2016-01-01

    Case summary Lumbosacral agenesis is a rare congenital condition reported in children. We report a 17-week-old female domestic shorthair cat with lumbosacral agenesis on whole-body radiographs. The cat was euthanized shortly thereafter presentation. A necropsy was not permitted. Relevance and novel information This is the first reported feline case of lumbosacral agenesis.

  13. Rebound hyperglycaemia in diabetic cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roomp, Kirsten; Rand, Jacquie

    2016-08-01

    Rebound hyperglycaemia (also termed Somogyi effect) is defined as hyperglycaemia caused by the release of counter-regulatory hormones in response to insulin-induced hypoglycaemia, and is widely believed to be common in diabetic cats. However, studies in human diabetic patients over the past quarter century have rejected the common occurrence of this phenomenon. Therefore, we evaluated the occurrence and prevalence of rebound hyperglycaemia in diabetic cats. In a retrospective study, 10,767 blood glucose curves of 55 cats treated with glargine using an intensive blood glucose regulation protocol with a median of five blood glucose measurements per day were evaluated for evidence of rebound hyperglycaemic events, defined in two different ways (with and without an insulin resistance component). While biochemical hypoglycaemia occurred frequently, blood glucose curves consistent with rebound hyperglycaemia with insulin resistance was confined to four single events in four different cats. In 14/55 cats (25%), a median of 1.5% (range 0.32-7.7%) of blood glucose curves were consistent with rebound hyperglycaemia without an insulin resistance component; this represented 0.42% of blood glucose curves in both affected and unaffected cats. We conclude that despite the frequent occurrence of biochemical hypoglycaemia, rebound hyperglycaemia is rare in cats treated with glargine on a protocol aimed at tight glycaemic control. For glargine-treated cats, insulin dose should not be reduced when there is hyperglycaemia in the absence of biochemical or clinical evidence of hypoglycaemia. © ISFM and AAFP 2015.

  14. Lumbosacral agenesis in a cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielle C Hybki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Case summary Lumbosacral agenesis is a rare congenital condition reported in children. We report a 17-week-old female domestic shorthair cat with lumbosacral agenesis on whole-body radiographs. The cat was euthanized shortly thereafter presentation. A necropsy was not permitted. Relevance and novel information This is the first reported feline case of lumbosacral agenesis.

  15. Local cloning of CAT states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahaman, Ramij

    2011-06-01

    In this Letter we analyze the (im)possibility of the exact cloning of orthogonal three-qubit CAT states under local operation and classical communication (LOCC) with the help of a restricted entangled state. We also classify the three-qubit CAT states that can (not) be cloned under LOCC restrictions and extend the results to the n-qubit case.

  16. College Students and Their Cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Lawrence; Alexander, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-two Siamese and 32 mixed breed cats' personalities were rated by their respective college student owners and compared. Further, the owners' self rated personality traits were correlated with the pets'; significant Siamese and Mixed differences and correlations were obtained. These are the first data to examine breed of cat on a personality…

  17. CONTRACT ADMINISTRATIVE TRACKING SYSTEM (CATS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Contract Administrative Tracking System (CATS) was developed in response to an ORD NHEERL, Mid-Continent Ecology Division (MED)-recognized need for an automated tracking and retrieval system for Cost Reimbursable Level of Effort (CR/LOE) Contracts. CATS is an Oracle-based app...

  18. Coupled ears in lizards and crocodilians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carr, Catherine E; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Bierman, Hilary

    2016-01-01

    Lizard ears are coupled across the pharynx, and are very directional. In consequence all auditory responses should be directional, without a requirement for computation of sound source location. Crocodilian ears are connected through sinuses, and thus less tightly coupled. Coupling may improve...... the processing of low-frequency directional signals, while higher frequency signals appear to be progressively uncoupled. In both lizards and crocodilians, the increased directionality of the coupled ears leads to an effectively larger head and larger physiological range of ITDs. This increased physiological...

  19. Inner-ear sound pressures near the base of the cochlea in chinchilla: Further investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravicz, Michael E.; Rosowski, John J.

    2013-01-01

    The middle-ear pressure gain GMEP, the ratio of sound pressure in the cochlear vestibule PV to sound pressure at the tympanic membrane PTM, is a descriptor of middle-ear sound transfer and the cochlear input for a given stimulus in the ear canal. GMEP and the cochlear partition differential pressure near the cochlear base ΔPCP, which determines the stimulus for cochlear partition motion and has been linked to hearing ability, were computed from simultaneous measurements of PV, PTM, and the sound pressure in scala tympani near the round window PST in chinchilla. GMEP magnitude was approximately 30 dB between 0.1 and 10 kHz and decreased sharply above 20 kHz, which is not consistent with an ideal transformer or a lossless transmission line. The GMEP phase was consistent with a roughly 50-μs delay between PV and PTM. GMEP was little affected by the inner-ear modifications necessary to measure PST. GMEP is a good predictor of ΔPCP at low and moderate frequencies where PV ⪢ PST but overestimates ΔPCP above a few kilohertz where PV ≈ PST. The ratio of PST to PV provides insight into the distribution of sound pressure within the cochlear scalae. PMID:23556590

  20. Optimising magnetic resonance image quality of the ear in healthy dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Davina; Lüpke, Matthias; Wefstaedt, Patrick; Klopmann, Thilo; Nolte, Ingo; Seifert, Hermann

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an examination protocol for magnetic resonance imaging, in order to display diagnostically important information of the canine middle and inner ear. To ensure that this protocol could also be used as a basis for determining pathological changes, the anatomical structures of the ear were presented in detail. To minimise stress through anaesthesia in live animals, preliminary examinations were carried out on four dog cadavers. During these initial examinations, three-dimensional (3D) sequences proved to be superior to two-dimensional ones. Therefore, only 3D sequences were applied for the main examinations performed on six clinically healthy Beagles. The anonymised MR images were rated by three experienced reviewers using a five-point scale. The most valuable sequence was a T2-weighted CISS sequence (TR = 16.7 ms, TE = 8.08 ms). This sequence proved to be most suitable for illustrating the inner ear structures and enabled good tissue contrasts. The sequence ranked second best was also a T2-weighted DESS sequence (TR = 19 ms, TE = 6 ms), allowing the imaging of the tympanic cavity and enabling 3D reconstruction due to its isotropic voxels. Due to low contrast and strong noise, the other sequences (TSE, FISP, MP RAGE) were not suitable for anatomical illustration of the middle and inner ear.

  1. An experimental study of inner ear injury in an animal model of eosinophilic otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Atsushi; Nishizawa, Hisanori; Kurose, Akira; Nakagawa, Takashi; Takahata, Junko; Sasaki, Akira

    2014-03-01

    As the periods of intratympanic injection of ovalbumin (OVA) to the middle ear became longer, marked eosinophil infiltration in the perilymphatic space was observed. Moreover severe morphological damage of the organ of Corti was observed in the 28-day antigen-stimulation side. These results indicate that eosinophilic inflammation occurred in the inner ear and caused profound hearing loss. The purpose of the present study was to elucidate the inner ear damage in a new animal model of eosinophilic otitis media (EOM) which we recently constructed. We constructed the animal model of EOM by intraperitoneal and intratympanic injection of OVA. Infiltrating cells and the inner ear damage were examined by histological study. In the inner ear, a few eosinophils were seen in the scala tympani of the organ of Corti and the dilation of capillaries of the stria vascularis was observed in the 7-day stimulation side. In the 14-day antigen stimulation side, some eosinophils and macrophages were seen in not only the scala tympani but also the scala vestibule. In the 28-day antigen-stimulation side, severe morphological damage of the organ of Corti and many eosinophils, red blood cells, and plasma cells infiltrating the perilymph were observed.

  2. Accumulation of intimal platelets in cerebral arteries following experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage in cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haining, J.L.; Clower, B.R.; Honma, Y.; Smith, R.R.

    1988-01-01

    From 2 hours to 23 days following experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage, the accumulation of indium-111-labeled platelets on the intimal surface of the middle cerebral artery was studied in 23 cats. Subarachnoid hemorrhage was produced by transorbital rupture of the right middle cerebral artery. Of the 23 cats, 17 exhibited right middle cerebral artery/left middle cerebral artery radioactivity ratios of greater than 1.25. When these results were compared with those of 12 control cats, 0.001 less than p less than 0.005 (chi2 test). Thus, the results from the control and experimental groups are significantly different and indicate early (after 2 hours) preferential accumulation of intimal platelets in the ruptured right middle cerebral artery compared with the unruptured left middle cerebral artery and new platelet deposition continuing for up to 23 days. However, the experimental group did not reveal a clear pattern for platelet accumulation following subarachnoid hemorrhage. There was no simple correlation between the magnitude of the radioactivity ratios and the time after hemorrhage when the cats were killed although the ratios for 2 hours to 7 days seemed greater than those for 8 to 23 days. Assuming the pivotal role of platelets in the angiopathy of subarachnoid hemorrhage, the administration of antiplatelet agents as soon as possible following its occurrence may be of value

  3. Peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia in cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neiger, R.

    1996-01-01

    Peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia in a cat is often an incidental finding on a routine thoracic or abdominal radiograph. Clinical signs are nonspecific-usually respiratory (dyspnea) or gastrointestinal(vomiting or diarrhea). Some of the cats with this anomaly are asymptomatic. The physical examination may be normal: muffled heart sounds are the most common abnormality noted during a physical examination. Cats of many breeds are affected, although 26% of reported cases were inPersians. Age of the cat at diagnosis ranged from 6 days to 14 years. Thirty of the 52 reported cases were in females. Diagnostic studies used to confirm the diagnosis included echocardiography, upper gastrointestinal study, ultrasonography, angiography, positive-contrast peritoneography, and laparotomy. Surgical correction was reportedly successful in 22 of 25 cats

  4. Expression of Cat Podoplanin in Feline Squamous Cell Carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itai, Shunsuke; Yamada, Shinji; Kaneko, Mika K; Harada, Hiroyuki; Kagawa, Yumiko; Konnai, Satoru; Kato, Yukinari

    2017-12-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma is an aggressive tumor in cats; however, molecular-targeted therapies against this tumor, including antibody therapy, have not been developed. Sensitive and specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against highly expressed membrane proteins are needed to develop antibody therapies. Podoplanin, a type I transmembrane glycoprotein, is expressed in many human malignant tumors, including brain tumor, esophageal cancer, lung cancer, mesothelioma, and oral cancer. Podoplanin binds to C-type lectin-like receptor-2 (CLEC-2) and activates platelet aggregation, which is involved in cancer metastasis. Until now, we have established several mAbs against podoplanin in humans, mice, rats, rabbits, dogs, cattle, and cats. We have reported podoplanin expression in canine melanoma and squamous cell carcinomas using an anti-dog podoplanin mAb PMab-38. In this study, we investigated podoplanin expression in 40 feline squamous cell carcinomas (14 cases of mouth floor, 13 of skin, 9 of ear, and 4 of tongue) by immunohistochemical analysis using an anti-cat podoplanin mAb PMab-52, which we recently developed by cell-based immunization and screening (CBIS) method. Of the total 40 cases, 38 (95%) showed positive staining for PMab-52. In particular, 12 cases (30%) showed a strong membrane-staining pattern of squamous cell carcinoma cells. PMab-52 can be useful for antibody therapy against feline podoplanin-expressing squamous cell carcinomas.

  5. Blepharitis due to in a cat from northern Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Pimenta

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Case summary We report a clinical case of blepharitis due to Cryptococcus neoformans yeasts in a 2-year-old stray cat from northern Portugal (Vila Real without concurrent naso-ocular signs. Ophthalmological examination revealed mucopurulent discharge from an open wound in the right upper and lower lids. Slit-lamp biomicroscopy showed a normal anterior segment, and intraocular pressure was within the normal reference interval. No fundoscopic alterations were detected in either eye by direct and indirect ophthalmoscopic examination. Cytological examination of an appositional smear showed numerous polymorphic neutrophils and macrophages, together with spherical yeast cells compatible with Cryptococcus species. Molecular analysis by means of PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism identified C neoformans genotype VNI. The cat was treated with itraconazole, and amoxicillin and clavulanic acid, combined with a commercial ear ointment and an imidacloprid/moxidectin spot-on application for bilateral parasitic otitis caused by Otodectes cynotis . One month after treatment, the clinical signs were completely resolved. Localised cutaneous lesions, as in the present case, probably result from contamination of cat-scratch injuries with viable encapsulated yeasts. Relevance and novel information This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first clinical report of feline blepharitis due to C neoformans without concurrent naso-ocular signs. The current findings, together with those from recent reports of the infection in domestic animals, should alert the veterinary community both in Portugal and in Europe to this underdiagnosed disease.

  6. Efficacy of fluralaner against Otodectes cynotis infestations in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taenzler, Janina; de Vos, Christa; Roepke, Rainer K A; Frénais, Régis; Heckeroth, Anja R

    2017-01-16

    The efficacy of fluralaner for the treatment of Otodectes cynotis infestations in dogs and cats was evaluated after oral (dogs) or topical administration (dogs and cats). Twenty-four dogs and sixteen cats were experimentally infested with O. cynotis and randomly allocated to equal sized groups (n = 8/group). Dog groups were treated once, either orally with fluralaner at a minimum dose of 25 mg/kg body weight, topically with fluralaner at a dose of 25 mg/kg body weight or topically with saline solution (control). Cat groups were treated once, either topically with fluralaner at a dose of 40 mg/kg body weight or topically with saline solution. Ears of all animals were examined otoscopically for live visible mites and the amount of debris and cerumen before, and 14 and 28 days after treatment. Twenty-eight days after treatment, animals were sedated and both ears were flushed to obtain the total number of live mites per animal. The efficacy was calculated, based on the results of the ear flushing, by comparing mean live mite counts in the fluralaner treated groups versus the saline solution treated group. A single topical treatment of cats with fluralaner reduced the mean mite counts by 100% (P dogs with fluralaner reduced the mean mite counts by 99.8% (P Cats treated topically with fluralaner had no mites visible during otoscopic examination at either 14 or 28 days after treatment. All dogs treated orally or topically with fluralaner had no mites visible during otoscopic examination at 28 days after treatment. At 14 days after treatment, only 1-2 mites were visible in three dogs (oral treatment: 2 dogs, topical treatment: 1 dog). All fluralaner-treated animals showed improvement in the amount of cerumen exudation compared with observations performed before treatment. No treatment related adverse events were observed in any dogs or cats enrolled in these studies. In this study, fluralaner administered topically to cats and orally or topically to dogs was

  7. Nutrition for aging cats and dogs and the importance of body condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laflamme, Dorothy P

    2005-05-01

    Before recommending a diet for a senior pet, a thorough nutritional evaluation should be completed. Although many middle-aged and older pets are overweight, a large percentage of geriatric cats and dogs have a low BCS. Approximately one third of cats older than 12 years of age may have a decreased ability to digest fat, whereas one in five may have a compromised ability to digest protein. Thus, appropriate diets for these two age groups may differ considerably. Mature (middle-aged) cats would likely benefit from a lower calorie food, whereas geriatric cats (>12 years of age) may need a highly digestible nutrient-dense diet. More than 40% of dogs between the ages of 5 and 10 years are overweight or obese. Such dogs may benefit from diets with lower fat and calories. Senior dogs also have an increased need for dietary protein, however. Therefore, healthy older dogs may benefit from diets with an increased protein-to-calorie ratio, providing a minimum of 25% of calories from protein. Common obesity-related conditions in dogs or cats include DM and OA. Diabetes differs between dogs and cats. Type I diabetes, common in dogs, seems to respond to fiber-enriched diets, whereas type II diabetes, common in cats, seems to benefit from high-protein and low-carbohydrate diets. OA, an inflammatory condition that occurs in approximately 20% of dogs, may benefit from weight management and nutrients that reduce the inflammatory responses, such as long-chain n-3 fatty acids.

  8. Structural Metadata Research in the Ears Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Yang; Shriberg, Elizabeth; Stolcke, Andreas; Peskin, Barbara; Ang, Jeremy; Hillard, Dustin; Ostendorf, Mari; Tomalin, Marcus; Woodland, Phil; Harper, Mary

    2005-01-01

    Both human and automatic processing of speech require recognition of more than just words. In this paper we provide a brief overview of research on structural metadata extraction in the DARPA EARS rich transcription program...

  9. Diode Laser Ear Piercing: A Novel Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suseela, Bibilash Babu; Babu, Preethitha; Chittoria, Ravi Kumar; Mohapatra, Devi Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Earlobe piercing is a common office room procedure done by a plastic surgeon. Various methods of ear piercing have been described. In this article, we describe a novel method of laser ear piercing using the diode laser. An 18-year-old female patient underwent an ear piercing using a diode laser with a power of 2.0 W in continuous mode after topical local anaesthetic and pre-cooling. The diode laser was fast, safe, easy to use and highly effective way of ear piercing. The advantages we noticed while using the diode laser over conventional methods were more precision, minimal trauma with less chances of hypertrophy and keloids, no bleeding with coagulation effect of laser, less time taken compared to conventional method and less chance of infection due to thermal heat effect of laser.

  10. Environment for Auditory Research Facility (EAR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — EAR is an auditory perception and communication research center enabling state-of-the-art simulation of various indoor and outdoor acoustic environments. The heart...

  11. Ear Infection Treatment: Do Alternative Therapies Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in books and magazines. They include chiropractic adjustments, homeopathy, herbal eardrops and others. Perhaps you're seeking ... infection treatments have been studied with mixed results. Homeopathy. A controversial treatment for ear infection, homeopathy involves ...

  12. Mozart ear: diagnosis, treatment, and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Ken; Yotsuyanagi, Takatoshi; Saito, Tamotsu; Isogai, Noritaka; Mori, Hiromasa; Itani, Yoshihito

    2011-11-01

    Mozart ear is a congenital auricular deformity, which is mainly characterized by a bulging appearance of the anterosuperior portion of the auricle, a convexly protruded cavum conchae, and a slit-like narrowing of the orifice of the external auditory meatus. It is said to be uncommon, and because no one has yet fully described neither the disease nor the treatment, the concept of Mozart ear has not been unified. This report describes a case of a 13-year-old girl presented with an unusual congenital deformity which showed the features of Mozart ear. It is an extremely rare deformity that only about 4 clinical cases have been reported in medical literature thereby a treatment method has not been fully discussed. For surgical correction of our cases, we excised deformed conchal cartilage, turned it over, regrafted, and maintained a cosmetically positive result. We also reviewed and described the origin, current concept, and treatment method of Mozart ear.

  13. Three dimensional and high resolution magnetic resonance imaging of the inner ear. Normal ears and anomaly scanned with 3D-CISS sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edamatsu, Hideo [Dokkyo Univ., Saitama (Japan). Koshigaya Hospital; Uechi, Yoko; Honjyo, Shiro; Yamashita, Koichi; Tonami, Hisao

    1997-12-01

    The MRI system used in this study was a new scanning sequence, 3D-CISS (Three dimensional-constructive interference in steady state) with 1.5 Tesla. Ten normal ears and one ear with Mondini type anomaly were scanned and reconstructed. In imagings of normal inner ears, the cochlea has three spiral layers; basal, middle and apical turns. Each turn was separated into three parts; the scala vestibuli, osseous spiral lamina and scala tympani. Three semicircular ducts, utricle and saccule were also reconstructed in one frame. In the inner ear of Mondini anomaly, 3D MRI showed cochlear aplasia, hypoplasia of semicircular ducts and widely dilated vestibule. The imaging was identical with findings of ``common cavity``. The anomaly was easily recognized in 3D MRI more than in 2D imagings. The detailed and cubic imagings of the Mondini anomaly in 3D MRI could not be observed with conventional 2D MRI. 3D MRI is not invasive method and can scan a target very quickly. (author)

  14. Influence of Ear Surface Area on Heat Tolerance of Composite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Low correlation (r = 0.12) was observed between body weight and ear width. There were no correlations between ear width, respiratory rates and pulse rate. However, a residual correlation (r = -0.03) was obtained between ear width and body temperature. Large ear surface area in composite rabbits enhances better ...

  15. Toxoplasmosis : Beware of Cats !!!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubina Kumari Baithalu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Anthropozoonotic parasite Toxoplasma gondii causes widespread human and animal diseases, mostly involving central nervous system. Human acquires toxoplasmosis from cats, from consuming raw or undercooked meat and from vertical transmission to the fetus through placenta from mother during pregnancy. Socio-epidemiological as well as unique environmental factors also plays a significant role in transmission of this infection. Preventive measures should be taken into account the importance of culture, tradition, and beliefs of people in various communities more than solving poverty and giving health education. Therefore the focus of this article is to create public awareness regarding sense of responsibility of looking after pets to prevent such an important zoonotic disease. [Vet. World 2010; 3(5.000: 247-249

  16. Commissioning of n_TOF EAR2

    CERN Multimedia

    The construction of the second beam line and experiment area (EAR2) of the n_TOF facility is currently ongoing and scheduled to be completed by July 2014. An extensive series of measurements is planned in order to determine the beam characteristics like the neutron flux, the spatial beam profile and the resolution function, as well as the response of several detectors considered for use in future measurements at EAR2. A rigorous study of backgrounds will be undertaken in various conditions.

  17. Comparative Auditory Neuroscience: Understanding the Evolution and Function of Ears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manley, Geoffrey A

    2017-02-01

    Comparative auditory studies make it possible both to understand the origins of modern ears and the factors underlying the similarities and differences in their performance. After all lineages of land vertebrates had independently evolved tympanic middle ears in the early Mesozoic era, the subsequent tens of millions of years led to the hearing organ of lizards, birds, and mammals becoming larger and their upper frequency limits higher. In extant species, lizard papillae remained relatively small (70 mm (made possible by coiling), as do their upper frequency limits (from 12 to >200 kHz). The auditory organs of the three amniote groups differ characteristically in their cellular structure, but their hearing sensitivity and frequency selectivity within their respective hearing ranges hardly differ. In the immediate primate ancestors of humans, the cochlea became larger and lowered its upper frequency limit. Modern humans show an unusual trend in frequency selectivity as a function of frequency. It is conceivable that the frequency selectivity patterns in humans were influenced in their evolution by the development of speech.

  18. CAT-D-T tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.; Blue, T.; Miley, G.H.

    1981-01-01

    The domains of plasma fuel cycles bounded by the D-T and Cat-D, and by the D-T and SCD modes of operation are examined. These domains, referred to as, respectively, the Cat-D-T and SCD-T modes of operation, are characterized by the number (γ) of tritons per fusion neutron available from external (to the plasma) sources. Two external tritium sources are considered - the blankets of the Cat-D-T (SCD-T) reactors and fission reactors supported by the Cat-D-T (SCD-T) driven hybrid reactors. It is found that by using 6 Li for the active material of the control elements of the fission reactors, it is possible to achieve γ values close to unity. Cat-D-T tokamaks could be designed to have smaller size, higher power density, lower magnetic field and even lower plasma temperature than Cat-D tokamaks; the difference becomes significant for γ greater than or equal to .75. The SCD-T mode of operation appears to be even more attractive. Promising applications identified for these Cat-D-T and SCD-T modes of operation include hybrid reactors, fusion synfuel factories and fusion reactors which have difficulty in providing all their tritium needs

  19. Measurement of acoustic impedance and reflectance in the human ear canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, S E; Allen, J B

    1994-01-01

    The pressure reflectance R (omega) is the transfer function which may be defined for a linear one-port network by the ratio of the reflected complex pressure divided by the incident complex pressure. The reflectance is a function that is closely related to the impedance of the 1-port. The energy reflectance R (omega) is defined as magnitude of [R]2. It represents the ratio of reflected to incident energy. In the human ear canal the energy reflectance is important because it is a measure of the inefficiency of the middle ear and cochlea, and because of the insight provided by its simple frequency domain interpretation. One may characterize the ear canal impedance by use of the pressure reflectance and its magnitude, sidestepping the difficult problems of (a) the unknown canal length from the measurement point to the eardrum, (b) the complicated geometry of the drum, and (c) the cross-sectional area changes in the canal as a function of distance. Reported here are acoustic impedance measurements, looking into the ear canal, measured on ten young adults with normal hearing (ages 18-24). The measurement point in the canal was approximately 0.85 cm from the entrance of the canal. From these measurements, the pressure reflectance in the canal is computed and impedance and reflectance measurements from 0.1 to 15.0 kHz are compared among ears. The average reflectance and the standard deviation of the reflectance for the ten subjects have been determined. The impedance and reflectance of two common ear simulators, the Brüel & Kjaer 4157 and the Industrial Research Products DB-100 (Zwislocki) coupler are also measured and compared to the average human measurements. All measurements are made using controls that assure a uniform accuracy in the acoustic calibration across subjects. This is done by the use of two standard acoustic resistors whose impedances are known. From the experimental results, it is concluded that there is significant subject variability in the magnitude

  20. A Jurassic gliding euharamiyidan mammal with an ear of five auditory bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Gang; Mao, Fangyuan; Bi, Shundong; Wang, Yuanqing; Meng, Jin

    2017-11-01

    Gliding is a distinctive locomotion type that has been identified in only three mammal species from the Mesozoic era. Here we describe another Jurassic glider that belongs to the euharamiyidan mammals and shows hair details on its gliding membrane that are highly similar to those of extant gliding mammals. This species possesses a five-boned auditory apparatus consisting of the stapes, incus, malleus, ectotympanic and surangular, representing, to our knowledge, the earliest known definitive mammalian middle ear. The surangular has not been previously identified in any mammalian middle ear, and the morphology of each auditory bone differs from those of known mammals and their kin. We conclude that gliding locomotion was probably common in euharamiyidans, which lends support to idea that there was a major adaptive radiation of mammals in the mid-Jurassic period. The acquisition of the auditory bones in euharamiyidans was related to the formation of the dentary-squamosal jaw joint, which allows a posterior chewing movement, and must have evolved independently from the middle ear structures of monotremes and therian mammals.

  1. Diagnosis of prediabetes in cats: glucose concentration cut points for impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve-Johnson, M K; Rand, J S; Vankan, D; Anderson, S T; Marshall, R; Morton, J M

    2016-10-01

    Diabetes is typically diagnosed in cats once clinical signs are evident. Diagnostic criteria for prediabetes in cats have not been defined. The objective of the study was to establish methodology and cut points for fasting and 2-h blood glucose concentrations in healthy client-owned senior cats (≥8 yr) using ear/paw samples and a portable glucose meter calibrated for feline blood. Of the 78 cats, 27 were ideal (body condition score [BCS] 4 or 5 of 9), 31 overweight (BCS 6 or 7), and 20 obese (BCS 8 or 9); 19 were Burmese and 59 non-Burmese. After an 18-24-h fast and an ear/paw blood glucose measurement using a portable glucose meter, glucose (0.5 g/kg bodyweight) was administered intravenous and blood glucose measured at 2 min and 2 h. Cut points for fasting and 2-h glucose concentrations were defined as the upper limits of 95% reference intervals using cats with BCS 4 or 5. The upper cut point for fasting glucose was 6.5 mmol/L. Of the overweight and obese cats, 1 (BCS 7) was above this cut point indicating evidence of impaired fasting glucose. The cut point for 2-h glucose was 9.8 mmol/L. A total of 7 cats (4 with BCS 8 or 9 including 1 Burmese; 3 with BCS 6 or 7, non-Burmese) were above this cut point and thus had evidence of impaired glucose tolerance. In conclusion, the methodology and cutpoints for diagnosis of prediabetes are defined for use in healthy cats 8 yr and older with a range of BCSs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Sonography of cat scratch disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melville, David M; Jacobson, Jon A; Downie, Brian; Biermann, J Sybil; Kim, Sung Moon; Yablon, Corrie M

    2015-03-01

    To characterize the sonographic features of cat scratch disease and to identify features that allow differentiation from other causes of medial epitrochlear masses. After Institutional Review Board approval was obtained, patients who underwent sonography for a medial epitrochlear mass or lymph node were identified via the radiology information system. Patients were divided into 2 groups: cat scratch disease and non-cat scratch disease, based on pathologic results and clinical information. Sonograms were retrospectively reviewed and characterized with respect to dimension, shape (round, oval, or lobular), symmetry, location (subcutaneous or intramuscular), multiplicity, echogenicity (anechoic, hypoechoic, isoechoic, hyperechoic, or mixed), hyperechoic hilum (present or absent), adjacent anechoic or hypoechoic area, hyperemia (present or absent), pattern of hyperemia if present (central, peripheral, or mixed), increased posterior through-transmission (present or absent), and shadowing (present or absent). Sonographic findings were compared between the patients with and without cat scratch disease. The final patient group consisted of 5 cases of cat scratch disease and 16 cases of other causes of medial epitrochlear masses. The 2 sonographic findings that were significantly different between the cat scratch disease and non-cat scratch disease cases included mass asymmetry (P = .0062) and the presence of a hyperechoic hilum (P = .0075). The other sonographic findings showed no significant differences between the groups. The sonographic finding of an epitrochlear mass due to cat scratch disease most commonly is that of a hypoechoic lobular or oval mass with central hyperemia and a possible adjacent fluid collection; however, the presence of asymmetry and a hyperechoic hilum differentiate cat scratch disease from other etiologies. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  3. Successful medical management of a domestic longhair cat with subdural intracranial empyema and multifocal pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardy, Thomas J A; Lam, Richard; Peters, Laureen M; McLaren, Philippa J; Matas Riera, Màrian; De Decker, Steven

    2017-03-01

    To describe a case of successful medical management of subdural intracranial empyema and multifocal pneumonia in a domestic longhaired cat. A 7-year-and-8-month-old male neutered domestic longhair cat presented with tachypnea, respiratory compromise, vestibular ataxia, obtundation, left-sided head tilt, and multiple cranial nerve deficits. Neuroanatomical localization was multifocal with central vestibular involvement. Magnetic resonance imaging of the head indicated diffuse subdural empyema, mainly affecting the middle cranial fossa and the right cerebrum. Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid revealed degenerate neutrophils with a mixed population of intracellular bacilli. Computed tomography (CT) of the thorax was suggestive for multifocal pneumonia. Aggressive medical management with IV fluids, oxygen supplementation, mannitol boluses, dexamethasone, and broad-spectrum antimicrobials was initiated. The cat demonstrated gradual improvement within 24 hours following initiation of treatment. General physical and neurological examinations, 9 weeks after initiating treatment, did not reveal any abnormalities. A CT examination performed at this time revealed resolution of the cat's pulmonary lesions. The cat was still free of clinical signs, 9 months after treatment was started. Subdural empyema is infrequently reported in cats and has high mortality rates even following surgical treatment. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of successful medical management of a cat with subdural empyema and suggests that aggressive medical management should be attempted in cats that are not considered surgical candidates. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2017.

  4. Clinical, radiographic, and bronchial cytologic features of cats with bronchial disease: 65 cases (1980-1986)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moise, N.S.; Wiedenkeller, D.; Yeager, A.E.; Blue, J.T.; Scarlett, J.

    1989-01-01

    Medical records, radiographs, and bronchial cytologic abnormalities of 65 cats with bronchial disease were reviewed. Bronchial disease was defined as abnormality of the lower airways to the exclusion of disease originating or mainly involving the alveoli, interstitium, vasculature, or pleura. Cats with bronchial disease were more likely to be female and older. Siamese cats were over represented and had more chronic disease. In order of frequency, the following clinical signs were reported: coughing, dyspnea, occasional sneezing, wheezing, and vomiting. Radiography revealed prominent bronchial markings, with some cats having collapse of the middle lobe of the right lung (n = 7), overinflation of the lungs (n = 9), or aerophagia (n = 13). Of 65 bronchial washes, 58 were considered exudative, with the predominant cell type being eosinophil in 24%, neutrophil in 33%, macrophage in 22%, and mixed population of cells in 21%. Cultures for bacteria were considered positive in 24% of the cats. Circulating eosinophilia was not helpful in predicting the predominant cell type in bronchial cytologic exudates. Hyperproteinemia without dehydration was present in a third of the cats, indicating an immunologic response. Half the cats had resolution of clinical signs, whereas half the cats required continuing medication with bronchodilators, antimicrobial agents, or corticosteroids

  5. Ear-to-Ear On-Body Channel Fading in the ISM-band for Tangentially-Polarized Antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, Søren Helstrup; Thaysen, Jesper; Jakobsen, Kaj Bjarne

    2011-01-01

    The ear-to-ear on-body channel fading has been studied in the ISM-band. The ear-to-ear path gain was measured on six persons in an indoor environment for a duration of 200 s. The channel fading has been characterized in terms of empirical cumulative distribution functions (CDF), average fade...

  6. [Identification of human papilloma viruses (HPV) in inflammatory states and ear neoplasms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydzewski, Bogdan; Goździcka-Józefiak, Anna; Sokalski, Jerzy; Matusiak, Monika; Durzyński, Lukasz

    2007-01-01

    Human Papilloma Virus has a strong relation to oropharyngeal mucosa and is considered to be responsible for a wide range of upper respiratory tract pathologies, like laryngeal papilloma. There's a hypothesis, that it plays a significant role in middle ear chronic inflammations and neoplasm's. MATERIAL AND METHODIC. The examination was carried on a group of 53 patients, 39 of which was suffering from granulation tissue chronic otitis media, 7-cholesteatomatous otitis media, 6--middle ear malignant neoplasm, and 1 middle and/or external ear benign neoplasm. The control group consisted of 5 patients operated on: otosclerosis--4 cases and post-traumatic tympanic membrane perforation--1 case. The material was postoperative tissue, like polyps, inflammatory granulation tissue, cholesteatoma masses and malignant neoplasm's tissue. In the whole group of 53 examined cases, HPV DNA was confirmed in 22 cases (41.5%), in that group oncogenic types 16 or 18 in 12 cases (22.6%), and in 14 cases (26.4%) types 6 or 11. In a group of chronic granulomatous otitis media DNA characteristic for Papilloma was identified in 12 cases (25.6%), in it in 9 cases DNA HPV type 6 or 11 was confirmed, and in 7 cases type 16 or 18. Among cholesteatomatous chronic otitis media HPV DNA types 6 or 11 was identified in 70%. In every case of middle ear malignant neoplasm a presence of high-risk DNA Papilloma types 16 or 18 was confirmed. In any case of control group HPV DNA was detected. The results has been compared with other authors examinations and it is claimed that they confirm the observation, that Human Papilloma Viruses may be a factor, that might play an important role in pathology of chronic otitis media and ear neoplasm's. It is concluded, that differences in percentages of HPV presence in chronic inflammations (70%) and ear neoplasm's may be explained by viral co-infection during bacterial c. o. m. Viral infection probably evolves carcinogenesis, which leads to a neoplastic growth.

  7. Inner ear and facial nerve complications of acute otitis media with focus on bacteriology and virology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydén, Dag; Akerlind, Britt; Peebo, Markus

    2006-05-01

    Among 20 patients with inner ear complications and/or peripheral facial palsy secondary to acute otitis media (AOM) a proven or probable bacteriological cause was found in 13 (65%). In seven patients (35%), a proven or probable viral cause was found. Only two of the patients (10%), with a proven bacterial AOM and a clinical picture of a purulent labyrinthitis in both, together with a facial palsy in one, had a substantial degree of dysfunction. Although the number of patients in this study is relatively low our findings show that inner ear complications and facial palsy due to AOM can be of both bacterial and viral origin. Severe sequelae were found only where a bacterial origin was proven. Inner ear complications and/or peripheral facial palsy secondary to AOM are rare. The general understanding is that they are due to bacterial infections. However, in some of these patients there are no clinical or laboratory signs of bacterial infections and they have negative bacterial cultures. During recent years different viruses have been isolated from the middle ear or serologically proven in AOM patients and are thought to play a pathogenetic role. We suggest that in some cases of AOM complications from the inner ear and the facial nerve can be caused by viruses. The purpose of our study was to analyze infectious agents present in patients with inner ear complications and/or facial palsy arising from AOM. The medical records of 20 patients who had inner ear complications and/or facial palsy following AOM ( unilateral in 18, bilateral in 2) between January 1989 and March 2003 were evaluated. Bacterial cultures were carried out for all patients. Sera from 12 of the patients were stored and tested for a battery of specific viral antibodies. In three patients, investigated between November 2002 and March 2003, viral cultures were also performed on samples from the middle ear and nasopharynx. Nineteen patients had inner ear symptoms. Eight of them had a unilateral

  8. Retrospective study of ear findings of dogs submitted to cranial tomography in FMVZ - UNESP, Botucatu; Estudo retrospectivo dos achados otologicos de caes submetidos a tomografia craniana na FMVZ - UNESP, Botucatu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babicsak, Viviam Rocco; Oliveira, Hugo Salvador de; Belotta, Alexandra Frey; Santos, Debora Rodrigues dos; Zardo, Karen Maciel; Mamprim, Maria Jaqueline; Machado, Vania Maria de Vasconcelos; Vulcano, Luiz Carlos, E-mail: viviam.babicsak@gmail.com [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (FMVZ/UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia. Dept. de Reproducao Animal e Radiologia Veterinaria

    2012-07-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is an important imaging modality in the diagnosis of ear alterations, especially those affecting the middle ear. In this retrospective study, in which the cranial CT scans of 151 dogs were evaluated, the most common finding was the mineralization of the external auditory cartilage, followed by secretions in external and middle ear and tissue in these two regions. The average age of affected animals ranged from 6-9 years. Mixed breed dogs were the most affected animals, followed by cockers, boxers, poodles, labrador retrievers, german shepherds and pit bulls. (author)

  9. The Effects of Silicone and Acrylic Ear Mold Materials on Outer Ear Canal Resonance Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnıaçık Erdoğan, Asuman; Arslan, Şeyda Nur

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of earmolds made of silicone and acrylic on outer ear canal resonance characteristics in terms of resonance frequency and amplitude measured in a hearing aid fitting. Outer ear canal resonance frequencies and amplitudes in open ears and those measured with silicone and acrylic ear molds were obtained from 30 participants between the ages of 20 and 25 years (average age, 22.0 years; 18 females and 12 males) with a real ear gain measurement. To observe the changes depending on probe tube placement, test-retest variation was investigated in 10 participants before the study. There was no statistically significant difference between open ear canal resonance frequencies and those measured with silicone and acrylic earmolds (p>0.05). the silicone earmold resonance amplitude values were statistically significantly lower than the open ear canal resonance amplitudes when compared to those of the acrylic earmolds (p<0.05). Depending on the changes occurring in outer ear resonance features as a result of earmold materials used in hearing aid fittings, the application of earmolds should be done by experienced specialists.

  10. NRPC ServCat priorities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — This document lists the Natural Resource Program Center’s priority ServCat documents. It is recommended that these documents- which include annual narrative reports,...

  11. Fructosamine concentrations in hyperglycemic cats.

    OpenAIRE

    Lutz, T A; Rand, J S; Ryan, E

    1995-01-01

    The aims of this study were 1) to establish a reference range for fructosamine in cats using a commercial fructosamine kit; 2) to demonstrate that the fructosamine concentration is not increased by transient hyperglycemia of 90 min duration, simulating hyperglycemia of acute stress; and 3) to determine what percentage of blood samples submitted to a commercial laboratory from 95 sick cats had evidence of persistent hyperglycemia based on an elevated fructosamine concentration. Reference inter...

  12. Properties of squeezed Schroedinger cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obada, A.S.F.; Omar, Z.M.

    1995-09-01

    In this article we investigate some statistical properties of the even and odd squeezed (squeezed Schroedinger cat) states. The quasi-probability distribution functions especially W(α) and Q(α) are calculated and discussed for these states. The phase distribution function is discussed. A generation scheme is proposed for either the squeezed generalized Schroedinger cat, or the squeezed number state. (author). 35 refs, 5 figs

  13. Echocardiographic Findings in 11 Cats with Acromegaly

    OpenAIRE

    Myers, J.A.; Lunn, K.F.; Bright, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Information regarding cardiac changes in domestic cats with acromegaly is limited. Hypothesis/Objectives The objective of this study was to describe the echocardiographic findings in cats with acromegaly. Animals Eighteen cats diagnosed with acromegaly at Colorado State University between 2008 and 2012. Of these 18 cats, 11 had echocardiography performed. Methods A retrospective review of medical records was made to identify cats with acromegaly that also had echocardiography perfo...

  14. Multistate matrix population model to assess the contributions and impacts on population abundance of domestic cats in urban areas including owned cats, unowned cats, and cats in shelters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flockhart, D T Tyler; Coe, Jason B

    2018-01-01

    Concerns over cat homelessness, over-taxed animal shelters, public health risks, and environmental impacts has raised attention on urban-cat populations. To truly understand cat population dynamics, the collective population of owned cats, unowned cats, and cats in the shelter system must be considered simultaneously because each subpopulation contributes differently to the overall population of cats in a community (e.g., differences in neuter rates, differences in impacts on wildlife) and cats move among categories through human interventions (e.g., adoption, abandonment). To assess this complex socio-ecological system, we developed a multistate matrix model of cats in urban areas that include owned cats, unowned cats (free-roaming and feral), and cats that move through the shelter system. Our model requires three inputs-location, number of human dwellings, and urban area-to provide testable predictions of cat abundance for any city in North America. Model-predicted population size of unowned cats in seven Canadian cities were not significantly different than published estimates (p = 0.23). Model-predicted proportions of sterile feral cats did not match observed sterile cat proportions for six USA cities (p = 0.001). Using a case study from Guelph, Ontario, Canada, we compared model-predicted to empirical estimates of cat abundance in each subpopulation and used perturbation analysis to calculate relative sensitivity of vital rates to cat abundance to demonstrate how management or mismanagement in one portion of the population could have repercussions across all portions of the network. Our study provides a general framework to consider cat population abundance in urban areas and, with refinement that includes city-specific parameter estimates and modeling, could provide a better understanding of population dynamics of cats in our communities.

  15. Fructosamine concentrations in hyperglycemic cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, T A; Rand, J S; Ryan, E

    1995-03-01

    The aims of this study were 1) to establish a reference range for fructosamine in cats using a commercial fructosamine kit; 2) to demonstrate that the fructosamine concentration is not increased by transient hyperglycemia of 90 min duration, simulating hyperglycemia of acute stress; and 3) to determine what percentage of blood samples submitted to a commercial laboratory from 95 sick cats had evidence of persistent hyperglycemia based on an elevated fructosamine concentration. Reference intervals for the serum fructosamine concentration were established in healthy, normoglycemic cats using a second generation kit designed for the measurement of the fructosamine concentration in humans. Transient hyperglycemia of 90 min duration was induced by IV glucose injection in healthy cats. Multisourced blood samples that were submitted to a commercial veterinary laboratory either as fluoride oxalated plasma or serum were used to determine the percentage of hyperglycemic cats having persistent hyperglycemia. The reference interval for the serum fructosamine concentration was 249 to 406 mumol/L. Transient hyperglycemia of 90 min duration did not increase the fructosamine concentration and there was no correlation between fructosamine and blood glucose. In contrast, the fructosamine concentration was correlated with the glucose concentration in sick hyper- and normoglycemic cats. It is concluded that the fructosamine concentration is a useful marker for the detection of persistent hyperglycemia and its differentiation from transient stress hyperglycemia. Fructosamine determinations should be considered when blood glucose is 12 to 20 mmol/L and only a single blood sample is available for analysis.

  16. Cat eye syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Deepak; Murki, Srinivas; Pratap, Tejo; Vasikarla, Madhavi

    2014-05-19

    A full-term female baby, a product of non-consanguineous marriage, was born at 37 weeks of gestation with a birth weight of 2.08 kg. Antenatal scan at 31 weeks revealed complex congenital heart disease with a hypoplastic right ventricle, pulmonary atresia and an intact septum. Immediately after birth, the infant was shifted to the nursery and was started on intravenous fluids and infusion prostaglandin E1 (Alprostidil). On examination, she had microcephaly, periorbital puffiness, a long philtrum, a broad nasal bridge and retrognathia, up slanting palpebral fissures, widely spaced nipples, a sacral dimple and right upper limb postaxial polydactyly. Postnatal echocardiography confirmed a large ostium secundum atrial septal defect with left to right shunt, right ventricle hypoplasia, pulmonary atresia with an intact septum and a large vertical patent ductus arteriosus. Ophthalmological examination showed a bilateral chorioretinal coloboma sparing disc and fovea. Karyotyping showed an extra small marker chromosome suggestive of the Cat eye syndrome. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  17. Dog and cat bites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Robert; Ellis, Carrie

    2014-08-15

    Animal bites account for 1% of all emergency department visits in the United States and more than $50 million in health care costs per year. Most animal bites are from a dog, usually one known to the victim. Most dog bite victims are children. Bite wounds should be cleaned, copiously irrigated with normal saline using a 20-mL or larger syringe or a 20-gauge catheter attached to the syringe. The wound should be explored for tendon or bone involvement and possible foreign bodies. Wounds may be closed if cosmetically favorable, such as wounds on the face or gaping wounds. Antibiotic prophylaxis should be considered, especially if there is a high risk of infection, such as with cat bites, with puncture wounds, with wounds to the hand, and in persons who are immunosuppressed. Amoxicillin/clavulanate is the first-line prophylactic antibiotic. The need for rabies prophylaxis should be addressed with any animal bite because even domestic animals are often unvaccinated. Postexposure rabies prophylaxis consists of immune globulin at presentation and vaccination on days 0, 3, 7, and 14. Counseling patients and families about animal safety may help decrease animal bites. In most states, physicians are required by law to report animal bites.

  18. Knowledge and care seeking practices for ear infections among parents of under five children in Kigali, Rwanda: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaitesi Batamuliza Mukara

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infections affecting the middle ear are a common childhood occurrence. Some cases may present with ear discharge through a tympanic membrane perforation which may heal spontaneously. However, up to 5% or more cases of those affected have persistent ear discharge. A number of barriers contribute towards delayed presentation at health facilities for treatment of ear infections. We conducted a study to evaluate parents’ and caregivers’ knowledge and care seeking practices for ear infections in children under five in Gasabo district in Kigali, Rwanda. Methods Parents/guardians (n = 810 were interviewed using a structured questionnaire to elicit their knowledge of ear infections in children under five and their attitude to seeking care for their children. Results The mean age of the respondents was 31.27 years (SD = 7.88, range 17–83. Considering an average of knowledge parameters which included causes, symptoms, prevention, treatment and consequences of ear infections, we found that 76.6% (622 of respondents were knowledgeable about ear infections. We defined a positive practice as seeking medical treatment (community health workers or health facility and this was found in 89.1% (722 respondents. Correlating knowledge with choice of seeking treatment, respondents were 33% less likely to practice medical pluralism (OR = 0.33, CI 0.11–0.97, P = 0.043 if they were familiar with infections. Moreover, urban dweller were 1.7 times more likely to know ear infections compared to rural dwellers (OR = 1.70, CI 1.22–2.38, P = 0.002. Conclusion The majority of respondents had good knowledge and positive attitudes and practices about ear infection. However, medical pluralism was common. There is need to improve the community’s awareness and access to primary health care facilities for the care of ear infections especially in rural areas of Rwanda.

  19. Ear Acupuncture in European Traditional Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Gori

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Auricular acupuncture is a diagnostic and treatment system based on normalizing the body's dysfunction through stimulation of definite points on the ear. Rudimentary forms of acupuncture which probably arose during the Stone Age have survived in many parts of the world right down to present day. It was used in the ancient Egypt, Rome, Greece and all the Mediterranean area. It is a microacupuncture technique similar to reflexology, and was first described in France in 1950 by Paul Nogier who is considered the Father of modern ear acupuncture. It was speculated that the technique works because groups of pluripotent cells contain information from the whole organism and create regional organization centers representing different parts of the body. Nevertheless stimulation of a reflex point in the ear seems relieve symptoms of distant pathologies. Modern research is confirming the efficacy of ear acupuncture for analgesia and anxiety related disease, while tobacco dependence and other substance abuse still need confirmation. Actually main methodological problems with auricular acupuncture are that exist too many maps with little agreement regarding point location in the ear, and that the correspondence or reflex systems does not correlated with modern knowledge of anatomy and physiology.

  20. Body lift, drag and power are relatively higher in large-eared than in small-eared bat species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Håkansson, Jonas; Jakobsen, Lasse; Hedenström, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Bats navigate the dark using echolocation. Echolocation is enhanced by external ears, but external ears increase the projected frontal area and reduce the streamlining of the animal. External ears are thus expected to compromise flight efficiency, but research suggests that very large ears may...... mitigate the cost by producing aerodynamic lift. Here we compare quantitative aerodynamic measures of flight efficiency of two bat species, one large-eared (Plecotus auritus) and one small-eared (Glossophaga soricina), flying freely in a wind tunnel. We find that the body drag of both species is higher...... than previously assumed and that the large-eared species has a higher body drag coefficient, but also produces relatively more ear/body lift than the small-eared species, in line with prior studies on model bats. The measured aerodynamic power of P. auritus was higher than predicted from...