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Sample records for castration resistant prostate

  1. The hallmarks of castration-resistant prostate cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsogiannou, Maria; Ziouziou, Hajer; Karaki, Sara; Andrieu, Claudia; Henry de Villeneuve, Marie; Rocchi, Palma

    2015-07-01

    Prostate cancer has become a real public health issue in industrialized countries, mainly due to patients' relapse by castration-refractory disease after androgen ablation. Castration-resistant prostate cancer is an incurable and highly aggressive terminal stage of prostate cancer, seriously jeopardizing the patient's quality of life and lifespan. The management of castration-resistant prostate cancer is complex and has opened new fields of research during the last decade leading to an improved understanding of the biology of the disease and the development of new therapies. Most advanced tumors resistant to therapy still maintain the androgen receptor-pathway, which plays a central role for survival and growth of most castration-resistant prostate cancers. Many mechanisms induce the emergence of the castration resistant phenotype through this pathway. However some non-related AR pathways like neuroendocrine cells or overexpression of anti-apoptotic proteins like Hsp27 are described to be involved in CRPC progression. More recently, loss of expression of tumor suppressor gene, post-transcriptional modification using miRNA, epigenetic alterations, alternatif splicing and gene fusion became also hallmarks of castration-resistant prostate cancer. This review presents an up-to-date overview of the androgen receptor-related mechanisms as well as the latest evidence of the non-AR-related mechanisms underlying castration-resistant prostate cancer progression. PMID:25981454

  2. Enzalutamide for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Wijdan H; Kabbara, Wissam K; Al Basiouni Al Masri, Hiba S

    2015-01-01

    Objective To review and evaluate current literature on the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drug enzalutamide (XTANDI®) in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Data sources Literature search was done through PubMed using the terms enzalutamide, MDV3100, abiraterone, and castration-resistant prostate cancer. Data from FDA product labels were also used. Study selection and data extraction Recent and relevant studies were included in the review. Collected clinical trials were screened and evaluated. Data synthesis Enzalutamide is an androgen receptor (AR) inhibitor with high selectivity and affinity to the AR. It was approved by the FDA to treat metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer in patients previously treated with docetaxel, after a Phase III trial (AFFIRM) that showed a 4.8-month survival benefit in this population. Recently, the FDA expanded the approval of enzalutamide as first-line therapy for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) who did not receive chemotherapy. Moreover, enzalutamide is shown to be associated with an acceptable safety profile. Conclusion Enzalutamide has been shown to be both safe and effective in improving overall survival in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer postchemotherapy with docetaxel and as a first line treatment before initiation of chemotherapy. However, additional studies and head-to-head trials are needed. PMID:25945058

  3. Abiraterone Acetate and Castration Resistant Ductal Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Linden-Castro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ductal adenocarcinoma of the prostate is a rare histological variant that only represents <1% of prostate tumors. This histological variant has several important clinical implications with respect to their evolution, clinical prognosis, and treatment. We report the case of a 64-year-old patient with ductal adenocarcinoma of the prostate, which progresses to castration-resistant prostate cancer, that was treated with abiraterone acetate with good clinical response, to our knowledge, the first case of ductal adenocarcinoma of the prostate in treatment with abiraterone acetate.

  4. Castration-resistant prostate cancer: systemic therapy in 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando C. Maluf

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common non-cutaneous neoplasm in the male population worldwide. It is typically diagnosed in its early stages, and the disease exhibits a relatively indolent course in most patients. Despite the curability of localized disease with prostatectomy and radiation therapy, some patients develop metastatic disease and die. Although androgen deprivation is present in the majority of patients with metastatic prostate cancer, a state of androgen resistance eventually develops. Castration-resistant prostate cancer, defined when there is progression of disease despite low levels of testosterone, requires specialized care, and improved communication between medical and urologic oncologists has been identified as a key component in delivering effective therapy. Despite being considered a chemoresistant tumor in the past, the use of a prostate-specific antigen has paved the way for a new generation of trials for castration-resistant prostate cancer. Docetaxel is a life-prolonging chemotherapy that has been established as the standard first-line agent in two phase III clinical trials. Cabazitaxel, a novel taxane with activity in cancer models resistant to paclitaxel and docetaxel, is the only agent that has been compared to a chemotherapy control in a phase III clinical trial as a second-line therapy; it was found to prolong the overall survival of patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer previously treated with docetaxel when compared to mitoxantrone. Other agents used in this setting include abiraterone and sipuleucel-T, and novel therapies are continually being investigated in an attempt to improve the outcome for patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  5. Targeting Androgen Receptor Aberrations in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

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    Sharp, Adam; Welti, Jonathan; Blagg, Julian; de Bono, Johann S

    2016-09-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) splice variants (SV) have been implicated in the development of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer and resistance to AR targeting therapies, including abiraterone and enzalutamide. Agents targeting AR-SV are urgently needed to test this hypothesis and further improve the outcome of patients suffering from this lethal disease. Clin Cancer Res; 22(17); 4280-2. ©2016 AACRSee related article by Yang et al., p. 4466.

  6. New Therapeutics to Treat Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ömer Acar; Tarık Esen; Lack, Nathan A.

    2013-01-01

    Hindawi Publishing Corporation The ScientificWorld Journal Volume 2013, Article ID 379641, 8 pages http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/379641 Review Article New Therapeutics to Treat Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer Ömer Acar,1 TarJk Esen,1,2 and Nathan A. Lack1 1 VKF American Hospital, Guzelbahce sokak, Nisantasi, Istanbul 34365, Turkey 2 School of Medicine, Koc¸ University, Rumelifeneri Yolu, Sariyer, Istanbul 34450, Turkey Correspondence should be addressed to Natha...

  7. CYP17A1 Inhibitors in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Gomez, Lissette; Jason R Kovac; Dolores J Lamb

    2015-01-01

    The majority of prostate cancer (PCa) cases are diagnosed as a localized disease. Definitive treatment, active surveillance or watchful waiting are employed as therapeutic paradigms. The current standard of care for the treatment of metastatic PCa is either medical or surgical castration. Once PCa progresses in spite of castrate androgen levels it is termed ‘castration-resistant prostate cancer’ (CRPC). Patients may even exhibit rising PSA levels with possible bone, lymph node or solid organ ...

  8. Mechanisms of acquired resistance to androgen receptor targeting drugs in castration resistant prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Chism, David D.; De Silva, Dinuka; Whang, Young E.

    2014-01-01

    After initial response to androgen receptor targeting drugs abiraterone or enzalutamide, most patients develop progressive disease and therefore, castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) remains a terminal disease. Multiple mechanisms underlying acquired resistance have been postulated. Intratumoral androgen synthesis may resume after abiraterone treatment. A point mutation in the ligand binding domain of androgen receptor may confer resistance to enzalutamide. Emergence of androgen recept...

  9. Sox2 is an androgen receptor-repressed gene that promotes castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Kregel

    Full Text Available Despite advances in detection and therapy, castration-resistant prostate cancer continues to be a major clinical problem. The aberrant activity of stem cell pathways, and their regulation by the Androgen Receptor (AR, has the potential to provide insight into novel mechanisms and pathways to prevent and treat advanced, castrate-resistant prostate cancers. To this end, we investigated the role of the embryonic stem cell regulator Sox2 [SRY (sex determining region Y-box 2] in normal and malignant prostate epithelial cells. In the normal prostate, Sox2 is expressed in a portion of basal epithelial cells. Prostate tumors were either Sox2-positive or Sox2-negative, with the percentage of Sox2-positive tumors increasing with Gleason Score and metastases. In the castration-resistant prostate cancer cell line CWR-R1, endogenous expression of Sox2 was repressed by AR signaling, and AR chromatin-IP shows that AR binds the enhancer element within the Sox2 promoter. Likewise, in normal prostate epithelial cells and human embryonic stem cells, increased AR signaling also decreases Sox2 expression. Resistance to the anti-androgen MDV3100 results in a marked increase in Sox2 expression within three prostate cancer cell lines, and in the castration-sensitive LAPC-4 prostate cancer cell line ectopic expression of Sox2 was sufficient to promote castration-resistant tumor formation. Loss of Sox2 expression in the castration-resistant CWR-R1 prostate cancer cell line inhibited cell growth. Up-regulation of Sox2 was not associated with increased CD133 expression but was associated with increased FGF5 (Fibroblast Growth Factor 5 expression. These data propose a model of elevated Sox2 expression due to loss of AR-mediated repression during castration, and consequent castration-resistance via mechanisms not involving induction of canonical embryonic stem cell pathways.

  10. Novel agents in the management of castration resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Chaturvedi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa is a leading cause of cancer mortality in men and despite high cure rates with surgery and/or radiation, 30-40% of patients will eventually develop advanced disease. Androgen deprivation is the first line therapy for standard of care for men with advanced disease. Eventually however all men will progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. Insight into the molecular mechanisms of androgen resistance has led to the development of alternative novel hormonal agents. Newer hormonal agents such as abiraterone, enzalutamide and TOK-001; and the first cancer vaccine, Sipuleucel T have been approved for use in men with CRPC. The recognition of the importance of bone health and morbidity associated with skeletal related events has led to the introduction of the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B-ligand inhibitor denosumab. Other molecularly targeted therapies have shown promise in pre-clinical studies, but this has not consistently translated into clinical efficacy. It is increasingly evident that CRPC is a heterogeneous disease and an individualized approach directed at identifying primary involvement of specific pathways could maximize the benefit from targeted therapies. This review focuses on targeted therapy for PCa with special emphasis on therapies that have been Food and Drug Administration approved for use in men with CRPC.

  11. Radium-223 in metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Winston Vuong; Oliver Sartor; Sumanta K Pal

    2014-01-01

    In 2004, docetaxel was approved for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). For the next several years, there was a lull in drug approvals. However, from 2010 onwards, 5 additional therapies have been approved on the basis of showing a survival beneift in phase III studies. These agents include sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel, abiraterone, enzalutamide and (most recently) radium-223. Amongst radiopharmaceuticals currently used for advanced prostate cancer (e.g. samarium-153 and strontium-89), radium-223 possesses several unique properties. As an alpha-emitting compound, the agent produces a high-energy output over a short range, facilitating selective destruction of tissue within the bone in the region of osteoblastic lesions while sparing surrounding normal tissue. The current review will outline biological rationale for radium-223 and also provide an overview of preclinical and clinical development of the agent. Rational sequencing of radium-223 and combinations, in the increasingly complex landscape of mCRPC will be discussed, along with factors inlfuencing clinical implementation.

  12. Tpl2 induces castration resistant prostate cancer progression and metastasis.

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    Lee, Hye Won; Cho, Hyun Jung; Lee, Se Jeong; Song, Hye Jin; Cho, Hee Jin; Park, Min Chul; Seol, Ho Jun; Lee, Jung-Il; Kim, Sunghoon; Lee, Hyun Moo; Choi, Han Yong; Nam, Do-Hyun; Joo, Kyeung Min

    2015-05-01

    Progression to metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is the major lethal pathway of prostate cancer (PC). Herein, we demonstrated that tumor progression locus 2 (Tpl2) kinase is the fundamental molecule provoking progression and metastasis of CRPC. Tpl2 upregulates CXCR4 and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) to activate CXCL12/CXCR4 and FAK/Akt signalling pathway. Consequently, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and stemness of androgen depletion independent (ADI) PC cells are induced, which is dependent on the kinase activity of Tpl2. In vitro, proliferation, clonogenicity, migration, invasion and chemoresistance of ADI PC cells were enhanced by Tpl2. In vivo, Tpl2 overexpression and downregulation showed significant stimulatory and inhibitory effects on tumorigenic and metastatic potential of ADI PC cells, respectively. Moreover, the prognostic effects of Tpl2 and expressional correlation between Tpl2 and EMT-related molecules/CXCR4 were validated in clinical PC databases. Since Tpl2 exerts metastatic progression promoting activities in CRPC, Tpl2 could serve as a novel therapeutic target for metastatic CRPC. PMID:25274482

  13. [Treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffo, Orazio

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) represents one of the oncological fields where the most impressive improvements has been observed in the last decades. At the beginning of this century, the expected survival of mCRPC patients was not more than 12 months. After the introduction of docetaxel in the clinical practice in 2004, and the recent availability of new drugs cabazitaxel, abiraterone acetate, enzalutamide, and radium-223 the landscape is dramatically changed with an expected median survival of about three years. The possibility of administering docetaxel, abiraterone acetate, and enzalutamide as first line treatment, and cabazitaxel, abiretone acetate, and enzalutamide as second line, as well as the availability of radium-223 for the treatment of mCRPC patients regardless of chemotherapy administration, changed the natural history of the disease. At the same time, it is probable that also the biology of the disease is changing with the appearance of mechanisms of resistance which are common to all the drugs. This plays a central role in sequencing the available drugs not only in the first and second line setting but also beyond the second line. The future challenges for the oncologists will be to develop new drugs able to overcome the resistances, mainly when they are native, to find the optimal sequence to optimize the use of available drugs, to place at the best place other active drugs, such as vaccines and radiopharmaceuticals, to exploit the new drugs also in a hormone-sensitive phase. PMID:25621779

  14. Treatment sequencing in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Oliver Sartor; Silke Gillessen

    2014-01-01

    Six different treatments have demonstrated improved survival in phase III trials targeted to patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Front-line therapeutic options for mCRPC include docetaxel, sipuleucel-T, abiraterone and radium-223. Post-docetaxel options include cabazitaxel, abiraterone, enzalutamide and radium-223. Despite much progress in recent years, much is yet unknown and debates occur over optimal treatment choices and sequences. None of the new agents have been compared to one another, thus physicians in practice today must make choices based on non-randomized comparisons, toxicity considerations and various assumptions. Abiraterone is now moving into the front line mCRPC space given recent regulatory approvals and enzalutamide will follow soon. Both of the hormonal agents have less toxicity when compared to chemotherapeutic options and both of these hormonal agents are expected to be used in a considerable number of mCRPC patients in the years ahead. Little data are available for the post-abiraterone or post-enzalutamide setting. In this review the currently available sequencing data are summarized and interpreted. It is now clear that cross resistance is a potential issue between various treatments, especially those agents that target the androgen axis. This review highlights the need for additional studies to optimize the current treatments for these patients.

  15. Experimental Evidence of Persistent Androgen-Receptor-Dependency in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Osamu Ogawa; Tomomi Kamba; Takahiro Inoue; Takashi Kobayashi

    2013-01-01

    In the majority of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), prostate-specific antigen (PSA), product of a gene that is almost exclusively regulated by the androgen receptor (AR), still acts as a serum marker reflecting disease burden, indicating that AR signaling is activated even under castrate level of serum androgen. Accumulated evidence shows that transcriptional ability of AR is activated both in ligand-dependent and -independent manners in CRPC cells. Some androgen-independent subli...

  16. Emerging targeted therapies for castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo eAdamo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, few therapeutic options were available for patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. Since 2010, four new molecules with a demonstrated benefit (sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel, abiraterone and denosumab have been approved in this setting, and to-date several other agents are under investigation in clinical trials. The purpose of this review is to present an update of targeted therapies for CRPC. Presented data are obtained from literature and congress reports updated until December 2011. Targeted therapies in advanced phases of clinical development include novel hormone-therapeutic, intracellular molecular pathways inhibiting, anti-angiogenic, bone microenvironment targeting and immunotherapeutic agents. Radium-223 and MDV3100 demonstrated a survival advantage in phase III trials and the road for their introduction in clinical practice is rapidly ongoing. Results are also awaited for phase III studies currently underway or planned with new drugs given as monotherapy (TAK-700, cabozantinib, tasquinimod, PROSTVAC-VF, ipilimumab or in combination with docetaxel (custirsen, aflibercept, dasatinib, zibotentan. Optimal timing, right combination and/or sequencing of emerging therapies as well as use of more sensitive biological markers to individualize therapies for CRPC remain challenging and studies to investigate these aspects are needed.

  17. Prostate Cancer Stem-like Cells Contribute to the Development of Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

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    Diane Ojo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT has been the standard care for patients with advanced prostate cancer (PC since the 1940s. Although ADT shows clear benefits for many patients, castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC inevitably occurs. In fact, with the two recent FDA-approved second-generation anti-androgens abiraterone and enzalutamide, resistance develops rapidly in patients with CRPC, despite their initial effectiveness. The lack of effective therapeutic solutions towards CRPC largely reflects our limited understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for CRPC development. While persistent androgen receptor (AR signaling under castration levels of serum testosterone (<50 ng/mL contributes to resistance to ADT, it is also clear that CRPC evolves via complex mechanisms. Nevertheless, the physiological impact of individual mechanisms and whether these mechanisms function in a cohesive manner in promoting CRPC are elusive. In spite of these uncertainties, emerging evidence supports a critical role of prostate cancer stem-like cells (PCSLCs in stimulating CRPC evolution and resistance to abiraterone and enzalutamide. In this review, we will discuss the recent evidence supporting the involvement of PCSLC in CRPC acquisition as well as the pathways and factors contributing to PCSLC expansion in response to ADT.

  18. Abiraterone plus prednisone improves survival in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Scott T Tagawa; Himisha Beltran

    2011-01-01

    In essentially just 1 year's time,we have seen science translated into exciting new therapeutic agents for men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC),1 most recently with the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of abiraterone acetate in combination with prednisone.2 While prostate cancer has been known to be highly responsive to surgical or medical castration for well over half a century,3 what was once termed 'hormone refractory' prostate cancer inevitably developed,leading to cancerrelated death.Many consider the introduction of chemotherapy for CRPC initially for symptomatic benefit,then with improvements in survival,a substantial step forward.

  19. Role of Chemotherapy and Mechanisms of Resistance to Chemotherapy in Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohiya, Vipin; Aragon-Ching, Jeanny B.; Sonpavde, Guru

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy using the taxanes, docetaxel and cabazitaxel, remains an important therapeutic option in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). However, despite the survival benefits afforded by these agents, the survival increments are modest and resistance occurs universally. Efforts to overcome resistance to docetaxel by combining with biologic agents have heretofore been unsuccessful. Indeed, resistance to these taxanes is also associated with cross-resistance to the antiandrogen drugs, abiraterone and enzalutamide. Here, we discuss the various mechanisms of resistance to chemotherapy in metastatic CRPC and the potential role of emerging regimens and agents in varying clinical phases of development.

  20. Andrographolide Targets Androgen Receptor Pathway in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Chengfei; Nadiminty, Nagalakshmi; Tummala, Ramakumar; Chun, Jae Yeon; Lou, Wei; Zhu, Yezi; Sun, Meng; Evans, Christopher P.; Zhou, Qinghua; Gao, Allen C.

    2011-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) signaling not only plays a pivotal role in the development of androgen-dependent prostate cancer but is also important in the growth and survival of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The first line of treatment of androgen-dependent prostate cancer is the use of androgen deprivation therapy. However, most patients will eventually relapse due to development of CRPC. Thus, development of a strategy to target AR for treatment of CRPC is urgently needed. The auth...

  1. Angiogenin mediates androgen-stimulated growth of prostate cancer cells and correlates with castration resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Shuping; Hu, Miaofen G.; Sun, Yeqing; YOSHIOKA, NORIE; IBARAGI, SOICHIRO; Sheng, Jinghao; Sun, Guangjie; Kishimoto, Koji; Hu, Guo-fu

    2013-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is a critical effector of prostate cancer (PCa) development and progression. Androgen-dependent PCa rely on the function of AR for growth and progression. Many castration-resistant PCa continue to depend on AR signaling for survival and growth. Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is essential for both androgen-dependent and castration-resistant growth of PCa cells. During androgen-dependent growth of prostate cells, androgen-AR signaling leads to the accumulation of rRNA. However, the...

  2. Stilbenes inhibit androgen receptor expression in 22Rv1 castrate-resistant prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Androgen receptor (AR) signaling plays an important role in the development and progression of prostate cancer (PCa). Importantly, AR continues to be expressed in advanced stages of castrate-resistant PCa (CRPC), where it can have ligand- independent activity. Identification of naturally occurring s...

  3. A single-center experience with abiraterone as treatment for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thortzen, Anita; Thim, Stine; Røder, Martin Andreas;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Continuous stimulation of the androgen receptor (AR) axis is a prerequisite for growth in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Abiraterone acetate (AA) is a potent inhibitor of extracellular and intracellular androgen synthesis by inhibition of the CYP-17 enzyme system, which...

  4. Serum biomarkers of bone metabolism in castration resistant prostate cancer patients with skeletal metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background. Prior studies suggest that elevated markers of bone turnover are prognostic for poor survival in castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The predictive role of these markers relative to bone-targeted therapy is unknown. We prospectively evaluated the prognostic and predictive value ...

  5. Safety of cabazitaxel in senior adults with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heidenreich, Axel; Bracarda, Sergio; Mason, Malcolm;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cabazitaxel/prednisone has been shown to prolong survival versus mitoxantrone/prednisone in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) that has progressed during or after docetaxel. Subsequently, compassionate-use programmes (CUPs) and expanded-access progra...

  6. Abiraterone acetate for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer progressing after chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sternberg, Cora N; Castellano, Daniel; Daugaard, Gedske;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the final analysis of the phase 3 COU-AA-301 study, abiraterone acetate plus prednisone significantly prolonged overall survival compared with prednisone alone in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer progressing after chemotherapy. Here, we present the fina...

  7. ODM-201: a new-generation androgen receptor inhibitor in castration-resistant prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Fizazi, Karim; Albiges, Laurence; Loriot, Yohann; Massard, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy is the standard of care for patients with advanced hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. Despite an initial response, most patients progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The realization that CRPC remains driven by androgen receptor (AR) signaling has formed the basis for a new generation of agents targeting the AR axis. Two of these agents, abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide, have been shown to prolong overall survival in patients with CRPC. Seve...

  8. Predictors of Time to Metastasis in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Moreira, DM; Howard, LE; Sourbeer, KN; Amarasekara, HS; Chow, LC; Cockrell, DC; Hanyok, BT; Aronson, WJ; Kane, CJ; Terris, MK; Amling, CL; Cooperberg, MR; Liede, A; Freedland, SJ

    2016-01-01

    To investigate predictors of time to metastasis among men treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for non-metastatic prostate cancer who developed castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) within the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital (SEARCH) cohort.Retrospective analysis of 458 non-metastatic CRPC men. Metastases were detected in routine bone scans or other imaging tests. Predictors of time to metastasis were analyzed using proportional hazards model with CRPC as time ze...

  9. Intratumoral steroidogenesis in castration-resistant prostate cancer: a target for therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Armandari, Inna; Hamid, Agus Rizal; Verhaegh, Gerald; Schalken, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Development of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) in a low androgen environment, arising from androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), is a major problem in patients with advanced prostate cancer (PCa). Several mechanisms have been hypothesized to explain the progression of PCa to CRPC during ADT, one of them is so called persistent intratumoral steroidogenesis. The existence of intratumoral steroidogenesis was hinted based on the residual levels of intraprostatic testosterone (T) and dih...

  10. Vimentin and Ki67 expression in circulating tumour cells derived from castrate-resistant prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lindsay, C. R.; Le Moulec, S.; Billiot, F.; Loriot, Y; Ngo-Camus, M.; Vielh, P; Fizazi, K; Massard, C; Farace, F.

    2016-01-01

    Background High circulating tumor cell (CTC) counts are associated with poor prognosis in advanced prostate cancer, and recently CTC number was suggested to be a surrogate for survival in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Ki67 and vimentin are well-characterised markers of tumour cell proliferation and the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), respectively. Here we asked if the expression of vimentin and Ki67 in CTCs offered prognostic or predictive information in mCRP...

  11. Abiraterone acetate: oral androgen biosynthesis inhibitor for treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenberg JE

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Yasser Rehman1, Jonathan E Rosenberg21Division of Hospital Medicine, UMass Memorial Healthcare, Worcester, MA, USA; 2Lank Center for Genitourinary Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in men in the US and Europe. The treatment of advanced-stage prostate cancer has been androgen deprivation. Medical castration leads to decreased production of testosterone and dihydrotestosterone by the testes, but adrenal glands and even prostate cancer tissue continue to produce androgens, which eventually leads to continued prostate cancer growth despite castrate level of androgens. This stage is known as castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC, which continues to be a challenge to treat. Addition of androgen antagonists to hormonal deprivation has been successful in lowering the prostate-specific antigen levels further, but has not actually translated into life-prolonging options. The results of several contemporary studies have continued to demonstrate activation of the androgen receptor as being the key factor in the continued growth of prostate cancer. Blockade of androgen production by nongonadal sources has led to clinical benefit in this setting. One such agent is abiraterone acetate, which significantly reduces androgen production by blocking the enzyme, cytochrome P450 17 alpha-hydroxylase (CYP17. This has provided physicians with another treatment option for patients with CRPC. The landscape for prostate cancer treatment has changed with the approval of cabazitaxel, sipuleucel-T and abiraterone. Here we provide an overview of abiraterone acetate, its mechanism of action, and its potential place for therapy in CRPC.Keywords: CRPC, abiraterone, CYP17, inhibitors, androgens, castration resistant prostate cancer

  12. In vivo quantitative phosphoproteomic profiling identifies novel regulators of castration-resistant prostate cancer growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Nan; Hjorth-Jensen, Kim; Hekmat, Omid;

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer remains a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide owing to our inability to treat effectively castration-resistant tumors. To understand the signaling mechanisms sustaining castration-resistant growth, we implemented a mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomic app...

  13. Androgen receptor targeted therapies in castration-resistant prostate cancer: Bench to clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Yusuke; Sadar, Marianne D

    2016-08-01

    The androgen receptor is a transcription factor and validated therapeutic target for prostate cancer. Androgen deprivation therapy remains the gold standard treatment, but it is not curative, and eventually the disease will return as lethal castration-resistant prostate cancer. There have been improvements in the therapeutic landscape with new agents approved, such as abiraterone acetate, enzalutamide, sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel and Ra-223, in the past 5 years. New insight into the mechanisms of resistance to treatments in advanced disease is being and has been elucidated. All current androgen receptor-targeting therapies inhibit the growth of prostate cancer by blocking the ligand-binding domain, where androgen binds to activate the receptor. Persuasive evidence supports the concept that constitutively active androgen receptor splice variants lacking the ligand-binding domain are one of the resistant mechanisms underlying advanced disease. Transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor requires a functional AF-1 region in its N-terminal domain. Preclinical evidence proved that this domain is a druggable target to forecast a potential paradigm shift in the management of advanced prostate cancer. This review presents an overview of androgen receptor-related mechanisms of resistance as well as novel therapeutic agents to overcome resistance that is linked to the expression of androgen receptor splice variants in castration-resistant prostate cancer. PMID:27302572

  14. Persistent androgen receptor-mediated transcription in castration-resistant prostate cancer under androgen-deprived conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Decker, Keith F.; Zheng, Dali; He, Yuhong; Bowman, Tamara; Edwards, John R.; Jia, Li

    2012-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-inducible transcription factor that mediates androgen action in target tissues. Upon ligand binding, the AR binds to thousands of genomic loci and activates a cell-type specific gene program. Prostate cancer growth and progression depend on androgen-induced AR signaling. Treatment of advanced prostate cancer through medical or surgical castration leads to initial response and durable remission, but resistance inevitably develops. In castration-resistant ...

  15. Integrative Molecular Profiling Reveals Asparagine Synthetase Is a Target in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sircar, Kanishka; Huang, Heng; Hu, Limei; Cogdell, David; Dhillon, Jasreman; Tzelepi, Vassiliki; Efstathiou, Eleni; Koumakpayi, Ismaël H.; Saad, Fred; Luo, Dijun; Bismar, Tarek A.; Aparicio, Ana; Troncoso, Patricia; Navone, Nora; Zhang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    The identification of new and effective therapeutic targets for the lethal, castration-resistant stage of prostate cancer (CRPC) has been challenging because of both the paucity of adequate frozen tissues and a lack of integrated molecular analysis. Therefore, in this study, we performed a genome-wide analysis of DNA copy number alterations from 34 unique surgical CRPC specimens and 5 xenografts, with matched transcriptomic profiling of 25 specimens. An integrated analysis of these data revealed that the asparagine synthetase (ASNS) gene showed a gain in copy number and was overexpressed at the transcript level. The overexpression of ASNS was validated by analyzing other public CRPC data sets. ASNS protein expression, as detected by reverse-phase protein lysate array, was tightly correlated with gene copy number. In addition, ASNS protein expression, as determined by IHC analysis, was associated with progression to a therapy-resistant disease state in TMAs that included 77 castration-resistant and 40 untreated prostate cancer patient samples. Knockdown of ASNS by small-interfering RNAs in asparagine-deprived media led to growth inhibition in both androgen-responsive (ie, LNCaP) and castration-resistant (ie, C4-2B) prostate cancer cell lines and in cells isolated from a CRPC xenograft (ie, MDA PCa 180-30). Together, our results suggest that ASNS is up-regulated in cases of CRPC and that depletion of asparagine using ASNS inhibitors will be a novel strategy for targeting CRPC cells. PMID:22245216

  16. How I do it: Prescribing abiraterone acetate for metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuding; Dason, Shawn; Shayegan, Bobby

    2016-08-01

    Abiraterone acetate (AA) is a selective irreversible inhibitor of CYP 17, a key enzyme in androgen biosynthesis. The efficacy and safety of AA in improving survival and quality of life in metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) has been demonstrated in two landmark clinical trials (COU-AA-301 and COU-AA-302). This article will review the rationale, pharmacology, clinical indications and contraindications, administration, and adverse effects of AA administration in mCRPC. PMID:27544566

  17. Cabazitaxel Plus Prednisone With Octreotide For Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer (CRPC) Previously Treated With Docetaxel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-21

    Diarrhea; Hormone-resistant Prostate Cancer; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Stage I Prostate Cancer; Stage IIA Prostate Cancer; Stage IIB Prostate Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  18. Novel Imidazopyridine Derivatives Possess Anti-Tumor Effect on Human Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniyan, Sakthivel; D’Cunha, Napoleon; Robinson, Tashika; Hoelting, Kyle; Dwyer, Jennifer G.; Bu, Xiu R.; Batra, Surinder K.; Lin, Ming-Fong

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death afflicting United States males. Most treatments to-date for metastatic PCa include androgen-deprivation therapy and second-generation anti-androgens such as abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide. However, a majority of patients eventually develop resistance to these therapies and relapse into the lethal, castration-resistant form of PCa to which no adequate treatment option remains. Hence, there is an immediate need to develop effective therapeutic agents toward this patient population. Imidazopyridines have recently been shown to possess Akt kinase inhibitory activity; thus in this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of novel imidazopyridine derivatives HIMP, M-MeI, OMP, and EtOP on different human castration-resistant PCa cells. Among these compounds, HIMP and M-MeI were found to possess selective dose- and time-dependent growth inhibition: they reduced castration-resistant PCa cell proliferation and spared benign prostate epithelial cells. Using LNCaP C-81 cells as the model system, these compounds also reduced colony formation as well as cell adhesion and migration, and M-MeI was the most potent in all studies. Further investigation revealed that while HIMP primarily inhibits PCa cell growth via suppression of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, M-MeI can inhibit both PI3K/Akt and androgen receptor pathways and arrest cell growth in the G2 phase. Thus, our results indicate the novel compound M-MeI to be a promising candidate for castration-resistant PCa therapy, and future studies investigating the mechanism of imidazopyridine inhibition may aid to the development of effective anti-PCa agents. PMID:26121643

  19. Abiraterone acetate: A novel drug for castration-resistant prostate carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Nandha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Androgen-deprivation therapy is the mainstay of treatment for the management of advanced prostate carcinoma till transition to castration-resistant prostate carcinoma (CRPC. Recently, adrenal and intratumoral synthesis of androgens has been found to be the major cause for CRPC. Abiraterone acetate is an orally active, potent and selective inhibitor of 17 a hydroxylase and c 17, 20 lyase, which acts by decreasing the de novo production of androgens with no rise in steroids downstream. Multiple randomized trials have shown significant improvement of >50% decline in prostate-specific antigen (PSA and time to PSA progression (TTPP with abiraterone acetate 1000 mg per day in chemotherapy/ketoconazole treated and naive CRPC patients producing reversible and manageable adverse effects due to mineralocorticoid excess. This article reviews the available evidence on efficacy and safety of this drug in CRPC. Searches of Pubmed, Cochrane database, Medscape, Google and clinicaltrial.org were made for terms like CRPC and abiraterone.

  20. Targeting Met and VEGFR Axis in Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: 'Game Over'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modena, Alessandra; Massari, Francesco; Ciccarese, Chiara; Brunelli, Matteo; Santoni, Matteo; Montironi, Rodolfo; Martignoni, Guido; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2016-08-01

    Despite recent advances that have been made in the therapeutic landscape of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), effective management of bone metastases remains a key goal not yet reached. The receptor tyrosine kinase MET and the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) seem to play an important role in prostate cancer progression and pathological bone turnover, representing potential targets for improving clinical outcomes in mCRPC. Studies evaluating agents that target one or both these pathways have demonstrated modest activity but no improvement in overall survival. Nevertheless, this therapeutic strategy seems to still be a promising and engaging area of prostate cancer research and the interest in better understanding the MET/VEGFR axis and the mechanism of action of these inhibitors is growing. This review describes the rationale for targeting MET and VEGFR pathway in mCRPC and provides the clinical data available to date and an update on ongoing trials.

  1. Interdisciplinary critique of sipuleucel-T as immunotherapy in castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huber, Marie L; Haynes, Laura; Parker, Chris;

    2012-01-01

    Sipuleucel-T was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration on April 29, 2010, as an immunotherapy for late-stage prostate cancer. To manufacture sipuleucel-T, mononuclear cells harvested from the patient are incubated with a recombinant prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) antigen and reinfused...... 4-month survival benefit. Previously unpublished data from the sipuleucel-T trials show worse overall survival in older vs younger patients in the placebo groups, which have not been shown previously to be prognostic for survival in castration-resistant prostate cancer patients receiving...... chemotherapy. Because two-thirds of the cells harvested from placebo patients, but not from the sipuleucel-T arm, were frozen and not reinfused, a detrimental effect of this large repeated cell loss provides a potential alternative explanation for the survival "benefit." Patient safety depends on adequately...

  2. Abiraterone in the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostaghel EA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Elahe A Mostaghel Division of Clinical Research, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Androgen deprivation therapy remains the single most effective treatment for the initial therapy of advanced prostate cancer, but is uniformly marked by progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. Residual tumor androgens and androgen axis activation are now recognized to play a prominent role in mediating CRPC progression. Despite suppression of circulating testosterone to castrate levels, castration does not eliminate androgens from the prostate tumor microenvironment and residual androgen levels are well within the range capable of activating the androgen receptor (AR and AR-mediated gene expression. Accordingly, therapeutic strategies that more effectively target production of intratumoral androgens are necessary. The introduction of abiraterone, a potent suppressor of cytochrome P450 17 α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-mediated androgen production, has heralded a new era in the hormonal treatment of men with metastatic CRPC. Herein, the androgen and AR-mediated mechanisms that contribute to CRPC progression and establish cytochrome P450 17 α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase as a critical therapeutic target are briefly reviewed. The mechanism of action and pharmacokinetics of abiraterone are reviewed and its recently described activity against AR and 3-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase is discussed. The Phase I and II data initially demonstrating the efficacy of abiraterone and Phase III data supporting its approval for patients with metastatic CRPC are reviewed. The safety and tolerability of abiraterone, including the incidence and management of side effects and potential drug interactions, are discussed. The current place of abiraterone in CRPC therapy is reviewed and early evidence regarding cross-resistance of abiraterone with taxane therapy, mechanisms of resistance to abiraterone, and observations of an

  3. Histone deacetylase inhibitors in castration-resistant prostate cancer: molecular mechanism of action and recent clinical trials

    OpenAIRE

    Kaushik, Dharam; Vashistha, Vishal; Isharwal, Sudhir; Sediqe, Soud A.; Lin, Ming-Fong

    2015-01-01

    Historically, androgen-deprivation therapy has been the cornerstone for treatment of metastatic prostate cancer. Unfortunately, nearly majority patients with prostate cancer transition to the refractory state of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Newer therapeutic agents are needed for treating these CRPC patients that are unresponsive to androgen deprivation and/or chemotherapy. The histone deacetylase (HDAC) family of enzymes limits the expression of genomic regions by improving b...

  4. Optimal Sequencing of New Drugs in Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: Dream or Reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffo, Orazio; Lunardi, Andrea; Trentin, Chiara; Maines, Francesca; Veccia, Antonello; Galligioni, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    The availability of new drugs capable of improving the overall survival of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer has led to the possibility of using them sequentially in the hope of obtaining a cumulative survival benefit. The new agents have already been administered as third-line treatments in patients who have previously received them as second line in everyday clinical practice, but the efficacy of this practice is not yet supported by clinical trial data, and evidence of possible cross-resistance has reinforced the debate concerning the best sequence to use in order to maximise the benefit. Furthermore, the situation is further complicated by the possibility of administering new hormonal agents to chemotherapy-naïve patients, and novel chemotherapeutic agents to hormone-sensitive patients. This article critically reviews the available data concerning the sequential use of new drugs, and discusses the real evidence concerning their optimal positioning in the therapeutic strategy of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. PMID:26721408

  5. ODM-201: a new-generation androgen receptor inhibitor in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fizazi, Karim; Albiges, Laurence; Loriot, Yohann; Massard, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy is the standard of care for patients with advanced hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. Despite an initial response, most patients progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The realization that CRPC remains driven by androgen receptor (AR) signaling has formed the basis for a new generation of agents targeting the AR axis. Two of these agents, abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide, have been shown to prolong overall survival in patients with CRPC. Several other AR inhibitors are currently in development for the treatment of CRPC. The present article reviews ODM-201, a new-generation AR inhibitor with a unique molecular structure, in the treatment of CRPC. The design of an ongoing Phase III trial (ARAMIS) of ODM-201 in men with non-metastatic CRPC is also discussed, at a disease stage for which there is currently no approved treatment. PMID:26313416

  6. Docetaxel rechallenge after an initial good response in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oudard, Stéphane; Kramer, Gero; Caffo, Orazio;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the benefit of docetaxel rechallenge in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) relapsing after an initial good response to first-line docetaxel. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the records of consecutive patients with m......CRPC with a good response to first-line docetaxel [serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) decrease ≥50%; no clinical/radiological progression]. We analysed the impact of management at relapse (docetaxel rechallenge or non-taxane-based therapy) on PSA response, symptomatic response (performance status....../pain/analgesic consumption), and overall survival (OS). We used multivariate stepwise logistic regression to analyse potential predictors of a favourable outcome. RESULTS: We identified 270 good responders to first-line docetaxel. The median progression-free interval (PFI) was 6 months from the last docetaxel dose...

  7. Cytotoxic chemotherapy in the contemporary management of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonpavde, Guru; Wang, Christopher G; Galsky, Matthew D; Oh, William K; Armstrong, Andrew J

    2015-07-01

    For several years, docetaxel was the only treatment shown to improve survival of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). There are now several novel agents available, although chemotherapy with docetaxel and cabazitaxel continues to play an important role. However, the increasing number of available agents will inevitably affect the timing of chemotherapy and therefore it may be important to offer this approach before declining performance status renders patients ineligible for chemotherapy. Patient selection is also important to optimise treatment benefit. The role of predictive biomarkers has assumed greater importance due to the development of multiple agents and resistance to available agents. In addition, the optimal sequence of treatments remains undefined and requires further study in order to maximize long-term outcomes. We provide an overview of the clinical data supporting the role of chemotherapy in the treatment of mCRPC and the emerging role in metastatic castration-sensitive prostate cancer. We review the key issues in the management of patients including selection of patients for chemotherapy, when to start chemotherapy, and how best to sequence treatments to maximise outcomes. In addition, we briefly summarise the promising new chemotherapeutic agents in development in the context of emerging therapies. PMID:25046451

  8. Targeting Alternative Sites on the Androgen Receptor to Treat Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul S. Rennie

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent, metastatic prostate cancer continues to be a leading cause of cancer-death in men. The androgen receptor (AR is a modular, ligand-inducible transcription factor that regulates the expression of genes that can drive the progression of this disease, and as a consequence, this receptor is a key therapeutic target for controlling prostate cancer. The current drugs designed to directly inhibit the AR are called anti-androgens, and all act by competing with androgens for binding to the androgen/ligand binding site. Unfortunately, with the inevitable progression of the cancer to castration resistance, many of these drugs become ineffective. However, there are numerous other regulatory sites on this protein that have not been exploited therapeutically. The regulation of AR activity involves a cascade of complex interactions with numerous chaperones, co-factors and co-regulatory proteins, leading ultimately to direct binding of AR dimers to specific DNA androgen response elements within the promoter and enhancers of androgen-regulated genes. As part of the family of nuclear receptors, the AR is organized into modular structural and functional domains with specialized roles in facilitating their inter-molecular interactions. These regions of the AR present attractive, yet largely unexploited, drug target sites for reducing or eliminating androgen signaling in prostate cancers. The design of small molecule inhibitors targeting these specific AR domains is only now being realized and is the culmination of decades of work, including crystallographic and biochemistry approaches to map the shape and accessibility of the AR surfaces and cavities. Here, we review the structure of the AR protein and describe recent advancements in inhibiting its activity with small molecules specifically designed to target areas distinct from the receptor’s androgen binding site. It is anticipated that these new classes of anti-AR drugs will provide an additional

  9. Tasquinimod in the treatment of castrate-resistant prostate cancer – current status and future prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Amit R.; Armstrong, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment options have significantly expanded in recent years for men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), with the routine use of immunotherapy (sipuleucel-T) and novel hormonal agents such as enzalutamide and abiraterone acetate prior to taxane-based chemotherapy or radium-223 radiotherapy. A number of immune checkpoints limit the immune response of the host to metastatic tumor progression in prostate cancer, one of which is an immunosuppressive and pro-angiogenic cell called the myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC). Tasquinimod is a small molecular oral inhibitor of S100A9, a key cell surface regulator of MDSC function, and has shown anti-angiogenic, antitumor and immune-modulatory properties in preclinical models of prostate cancer and other solid tumors. A large randomized phase II trial of tasquinimod in men with chemotherapy-naïve mCRPC demonstrated a significant prolongation in radiographic and symptomatic progression-free survival compared with placebo, which was also associated with improvements in overall survival. Tasquinimod was studied in a global phase III randomized trial in men with bone mCRPC and, while it significantly improved radiographic progression-free survival, this did not result in an overall survival benefit. However, tasquinimod is under evaluation as well as a combination therapy with other systemic agents in prostate cancer and as a single agent in other solid tumors. This review encompasses the preclinical and clinical development of tasquinimod as a therapy for men with prostate cancer. PMID:26834836

  10. Sipuleucel-T: Autologous Cellular Immunotherapy for Men with Asymptomatic or Minimally Symptomatic Metastatic Castrate Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert B. Sims

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sipuleucel T is an autologous cellular immunotherapy designed to stimulate an immune response in men diagnosed with asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic metastatic castrate resistant (hormone refractory prostate cancer. Sipuleucel T improves overall survival and provides an additional treatment option for this patient population.

  11. A Phase 2 Study of Abiraterone Acetate in Japanese Men with Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer Who Had Received Docetaxel-based Chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    SATOH, TAKEFUMI; Uemura, Hiroji; Tanabe, Kazunari; Nishiyama, Tsutomu; Terai, Akito; Yokomizo, Akira; Nakatani, Tatsuya; Imanaka, Keiichiro; Ozono, Seiichiro; Akaza, Hideyuki

    2014-01-01

    Objective In this Phase 2 multicenter study the efficacy and safety of oral abiraterone acetate (1000 mg/once daily) plus prednisolone (5 mg/twice daily) was evaluated in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients from Japan who had previously received docetaxel-based chemotherapy. Methods Men (aged ≥20 years) with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (prostate-specific antigen levels: ≥5 ng/ml), who had received 1 or 2 cytotoxic chemotherapies (with ≥1 regimen being ...

  12. Evolving landscape and novel treatments in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul J Toren; Martin E Gleave

    2013-01-01

    Treatment options for castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) have advanced in recent years and significantly improved the outlook for patients with this aggressive and lethal disease.Further understanding of the biologyof CRPC has led to several new targeted therapies and continues to emphasize the importance of androgen receptor (AR) directed therapy.The treatment landscape is rapidly changing and further biologically rationale,biomarker-based ongoing clinical trials are needed.We review the recent results of major clinical trials in CRPC.New and investigational agents now in clinical evaluation are reviewed including inhibitors of angiogenesis,microtubules,chaperones,AR and intracellular kinases,as well as immunotherapy,radiopharmaceuticals and bone-targeted agents.The recent improvement in prognosis for CRPC brings continued optimism for further improvements.Thoughtful planning of clinical trials and further understanding of the mechanisms of resistance to therapies will allow for continued progress in patient care.

  13. The hippo pathway effector YAP regulates motility, invasion, and castration-resistant growth of prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Yang, Shuping; Chen, Xingcheng; Stauffer, Seth; Yu, Fang; Lele, Subodh M; Fu, Kai; Datta, Kaustubh; Palermo, Nicholas; Chen, Yuanhong; Dong, Jixin

    2015-04-01

    Yes-associated protein (YAP) is an effector of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway. The functional significance of YAP in prostate cancer has remained elusive. In this study, we first show that enhanced expression of YAP is able to transform immortalized prostate epithelial cells and promote migration and invasion in both immortalized and cancerous prostate cells. We found that YAP mRNA was upregulated in androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cells (LNCaP-C81 and LNCaP-C4-2 cells) compared to the level in androgen-sensitive LNCaP cells. Importantly, ectopic expression of YAP activated androgen receptor signaling and was sufficient to promote LNCaP cells from an androgen-sensitive state to an androgen-insensitive state in vitro, and YAP conferred castration resistance in vivo. Accordingly, YAP knockdown greatly reduced the rates of migration and invasion of LNCaP-C4-2 cells and under androgen deprivation conditions largely blocked cell division in LNCaP-C4-2 cells. Mechanistically, we found that extracellular signal-regulated kinase-ribosomal s6 kinase signaling was downstream of YAP for cell survival, migration, and invasion in androgen-insensitive cells. Finally, immunohistochemistry showed significant upregulation and hyperactivation of YAP in castration-resistant prostate tumors compared to their levels in hormone-responsive prostate tumors. Together, our results identify YAP to be a novel regulator in prostate cancer cell motility, invasion, and castration-resistant growth and as a potential therapeutic target for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). PMID:25645929

  14. Targeting DNA repair with combination veliparib (ABT-888) and temozolomide in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Hussain, Maha; Carducci, Michael A.; Slovin, Susan; Cetnar, Jeremy; Qian, Jiang; McKeegan, Evelyn M.; Refici-Buhr, Marion; Chyla, Brenda; Shepherd, Stacie P.; Giranda, Vincent L.; Alumkal, Joshi J.

    2014-01-01

    Androgen receptor-mediated transcription is directly coupled with the induction of DNA damage, and castration-resistant tumor cells exhibit increased activity of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1, a DNA repair enzyme. This study assessed the efficacy and safety of low dose oral PARP inhibitor veliparib (ABT-888) and temozolomide (TMZ) in docetaxel-pretreated patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) in a single-arm, open-label, pilot study. Patients with mCRPC ...

  15. Challenges to improved therapeutics for metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer: from recent successes and failures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Xuan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC carry poor prognosis despite the use of docetaxel-based regimens which has modest survival benefit shown by randomized clinical trials. Significant progress in the discovery of novel therapeutic agents has been made in the past few years. While sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel, and abiraterone gained regulatory approval in 2010 and 2011, several highly promising candidates/regimens have failed in large scale clinical trials. Challenges remain to optimize the design and interpretation of clinical trial results and develop more effective strategies for mCRPC. In this review, we examined the positive and negative clinical trials in mCRPC in the past and discussed the various aspects of clinical trial design including selection of targets and appropriate outcome measures, biomarker development and implementation, and strategies for combination therapy.

  16. Challenges in the sequencing of therapies for the management of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parente, Phillip; Parnis, Francis; Gurney, Howard

    2014-09-01

    Prior to 2010, docetaxel was the standard option for chemotherapy in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Today, the picture is vastly different: several additional therapies have each demonstrated a survival benefit such that we now have chemotherapy (cabazitaxel), androgen suppressive agents (abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide), a cellular vaccine (sipuleucel-T) and radium-233 (for symptomatic bone metastases). With several other agents in the pipeline for late-stage disease, the future looks promising for mCRPC. As the available data are not able to inform as to the optimum sequencing of therapy, this remains a challenge. This paper draws on insights from published and ongoing clinical studies to provide a practical patient-focused approach to maximize the benefits of the current therapeutic armamentarium. Preliminary sequencing suggestions are made based on clinical trial criteria. But until more data become available, clinical gestalt, experience, cost and individual patient preferences will continue to drive choices. PMID:24750803

  17. A combination of sorafenib and nilotinib reduces the growth of castrate-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archibald M

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Monica Archibald,1 Tara Pritchard,1 Hayley Nehoff,1 Rhonda J Rosengren,1 Khaled Greish,1,2 Sebastien Taurin1 1Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand; 2Aljawhara Centre for Molecular Medicine, Arabian Gulf University, Manama, Kingdom of Bahrain Abstract: Castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC remains incurable due to the lack of effective therapies. Several tyrosine kinases have been implicated in the development and growth of CRPC, as such targeting these kinases may offer an alternative therapeutic strategy. We established the combination of two tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs, sorafenib and nilotinib, as the most cytotoxic. In addtion, to improve their bioavailability and reduce their metabolism, we encapsulated sorafenib and nilotinib into styrene-co-maleic acid micelles. The micelles’ charge, size, and release rate were characterized. We assessed the effect of the combination on the cytotoxicity, cell cycle, apoptosis, protein expression, tumor spheroid integrity, migration, and invasion. The micelles exhibited a mean diameter of 100 nm, a neutral charge, and appeared highly stable. The micellar TKIs promoted greater cytotoxicity, decreased cell proliferation, and increased apoptosis relative to the free TKIs. In addition, the combination reduced the expression and activity of several tyrosine kinases and reduced tumor spheroid integrity and metastatic potential of CRPC cell lines more efficiently than the single treatments. The combination increased the therapeutic potential and demonstrated the relevance of a targeted combination therapy for the treatment of CRPC. In addition, the efficacy of the encapsulated drugs provides the basis for an in vivo preclinical testing. Keywords: sorafenib, nilotinib, castrate-resistant prostate cancer, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, nanomedicine

  18. Castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC): state of the art, perspectives and new challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massari, Francesco; Maines, Francesca; Modena, Alessandra; Brunelli, Matteo; Bria, Emilio; Artibani, Walter; Martignoni, Guido; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2013-07-01

    The rapid approval of several novel agents has given prostate cancer patients and their treating physicians many new and effective therapeutic options. Four new medical therapies were recently approved on the basis of prolonged overall survival in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients: sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel, abiraterone acetate and MDV3100. Additionally, there are several other promising prostate cancer agents in late-stage development, including PROSTVAC-VF, orteronel and radium-223 chloride, each with a novel mechanism of action. The treatment paradigm for these patients is rapidly evolving, with future study needed to define the optimal sequencing and potential combinations of these new agents. In this review, we discuss the recent progress in understanding the biology of this disease and examining the development of a variety of new agents with promising activity and a favorable toxicity profile, that have been investigated in the setting of hormonal, cytotoxic, immune and targeted therapy. In this new therapeutic setting of CRPC, clinicians will have an opportunity to balance benefits and harms of these new agents in an individual context.

  19. Cabazitaxel as second-line or third-line therapy in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Per; Svane, Inge M; Lindberg, Henriette;

    2016-01-01

    To compare treatment outcomes in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer treated with cabazitaxel (CA) as second-line or third-line therapy in the everyday clinical setting. Charts from 94 patients treated with CA as second-line (n=28) or third-line therapy (n=66) were...... evaluated. Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events were used to register grade 3-4 nonhematological toxicity during treatment with CA. Baseline metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer-related prognostic factors, duration of therapy, and maximum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) percentage...... change were registered during treatment with CA and previous/subsequent novel androgen receptor targeting therapies. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. A median of 6 versus 5 treatment cycles was administered in patients treated...

  20. Synergistic antitumor activities of docetaxel and octreotide associated with apoptotic-upregulation in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sha Zhu

    Full Text Available Androgen deprivation therapy has become the fist-line treatment of metastatic prostate cancer; however, progression to castrate resistance disease occurs in the majority of patients. Thus, there is an urgent need for improvements in therapy for castration-resistant prostate cancer. The aims of the present study were to determine the efficacy somatostatin analogue octreotide (OCT combined with a low dose of docetaxel (DTX using castration resistant prostate cancer cells and to investigate the involved molecular mechanisms in vitro. The anti-proliferative and synergism potential effects were determined by MTT assay. Induction of apoptosis was analyzed employing annexing V and propidium iodide staining and flow cytometry. VEGFA, CASP9, CASP3 and ABCB1 gene expression was evaluated by RT-PCR and Q-RT-PCR analysis. OCT in combination with DTX treatments on DU145 cell migration was also evaluated. Investigation revealed that combined administration of DTX and OCT had significant, synergistically greater cytotoxicity than DTX or OCT treatment alone. The combination of the two drugs caused a more marked increase in apoptosis and resulted in greater suppression of invasive potential than either individual agent. There was obvious increase in caspase 3 expression in the OCT alone and two-drug combined treatment groups, however, VEGFA expression was markedly suppressed in them. These results support the conclusion that somatostatin analogues combined with docetaxel may enhance the chemotherapy efficacies through multiple mechanisms in castration-resistant PCa cell line. This work provides a preclinical rationale for the therapeutic strategies to improve the treatment in castrate resistance disease.

  1. Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 (AKR1C3) is a biomarker and therapeutic target for castration-resistant prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamid, A.R.A.H.; Pfeiffer, M.J.; Verhaegh, G.W.C.T.; Schaafsma, H.E.; Brandt, A.; Sweep, F.C.; Sedelaar, J.P.M.; Schalken, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Current endocrine treatment for advanced prostate cancer does not result in a complete ablation of adrenal androgens. Adrenal androgens can be metabolized by prostate cancer cells, which is one of the mechanisms associated with progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Aldo-keto re

  2. Predictors of overall survival in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Markova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to estimate overall survival (OS rates in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC, who have received currently available drugs and to identify the predictors of OS.Subjects and methods. The case histories of 112 patients with mCRPC treated at the N.N. Blokhin Russian Cancer Research Center in 2005 to 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. All the patients had received standard regimens based on docetaxel, cabazitaxel, abiraterone acetate in combination with prednisolone.Results. Whatever the treatment option was, three-year OS rate was 32.0 ± 5.44 %; median survival was 24.3 months. The following poor prognostic factors for OS were pain syndrome; an ECOG performance status score of 2; the levels of prostate-specific antigen ≥ 288 ng/ml, lactate dehydrogenase ≥ 450 U/l, alkaline phosphatase ≥ 250 U/l, calcium < 2.28 mmol/l, and hemoglobin < 11.5 g/dl; as well as < 24 months’ duration of a response to hormonal therapy.Conclusion. The use of standard drug treatment regimen for mCRPC may increase survival in this category of patients to achieve 3-years OV; and the identified factors of OV may aid in choosing treatment policy.

  3. Experience with octreotide depot in the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Kolesnikov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC is one of the most complex and unsolved problems in urologic oncology. The somatostatin analogue octreotide depot made in Russia may be used for its treatment. The paper gives the results of a trial of the efficiency and safety of treatment with octreotide depot 30 mg and dexamethasone in 20 patients aged 58 to 89 years with CRPC during continued androgen deprivation therapy. The duration of the trial was 3 months. A response was assessed from the serum levels of prostate-specific antigen (PCA, the time course of changes in general and biochemical blood test values, the degree of pain syndrome, and improvement in quality of life in a patient. A total response in reducing PSA was obtained in 70 % of the patents; overall, the best results were achieved in the group receiving octreotide before chemotherapy with docetaxel. The tolerability of octreotide deport with dexamethasone was good in all cases; no obvious adverse hematological and clinical reactions were noted.

  4. A phase II trial of personalized peptide vaccination in castration-resistant prostate cancer patients: prolongation of prostate-specific antigen doubling time

    OpenAIRE

    Noguchi, Masanori; MORIYA, FUKUKO; SUEKANE, SHIGETAKA; Ohnishi, Rei; Matsueda, Satoko; Sasada, Tetsuro; Yamada, Akira; Itoh, Kyogo

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancer vaccine is one of the attractive treatment modalities for patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). However, because of delayed immune responses, its clinical benefits, besides for overall survival (OS), are not well captured by the World Health Organization (WHO) and Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) criteria. Several surrogate markers for evaluation of cancer vaccine, including prostate-specific antigen doubling time (PSADT), are curren...

  5. Cabazitaxel: more than a new taxane for metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, Alain C; Figlin, Robert; Mita, Monica M

    2012-12-15

    The taxanes are recognized as a major class of chemotherapeutic agents; however, mechanisms of innate and acquired resistance can limit their usefulness. Cabazitaxel, a novel taxane with microtubule-stabilizing potency similar to docetaxel, exhibits activity against tumor cell lines resistant to paclitaxel and docetaxel. Cabazitaxel showed linear pharmacokinetics and a terminal elimination half-life comparable with that of docetaxel, findings which support dosing as a single infusion in three-week treatment cycles. Dose-ranging studies recommended doses of 20 or 25 mg/m(2) every three weeks. Antitumor activity was shown in patients with advanced cancer and chemotherapy failure (including taxane failure). Other early studies investigated the efficacy of cabazitaxel in pretreated metastatic breast cancer, either as a single agent or in combination with capecitabine. Objective antitumor response rates of up to 24% and sustained tumor stabilizations were also observed. The TROPIC phase III study, conducted in patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer previously treated with docetaxel, established cabazitaxel as the first chemotherapeutic agent to offer a survival advantage in this patient population. Across these studies, the dose-limiting hematologic toxicity was neutropenia (including febrile neutropenia), usually controllable with colony-stimulating factor/granulocyte-colony stimulating factor support.

  6. LncRNA HOTAIR Enhances the Androgen-Receptor-Mediated Transcriptional Program and Drives Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Zhang; Jonathan C. Zhao; Jung Kim; Ka-wing Fong; Yeqing Angela Yang; Debabrata Chakravarti; Yin-Yuan Mo; Jindan Yu

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Understanding the mechanisms of androgen receptor (AR) activation in the milieu of low androgen is critical to effective treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Here, we report HOTAIR as an androgen-repressed lncRNA, and, as such, it is markedly upregulated following androgen deprivation therapies and in CRPC. We further demonstrate a distinct mode of lncRNA-mediated gene regulation, wherein HOTAIR binds to the AR protein to block its interaction with the E3 ubiquiti...

  7. A phase 1 multiple-dose study of orteronel in Japanese patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Ozono, Seiichiro; Yamaguchi, Akito; Koike, Hidekazu; Matsui, Hiroshi; Nagata, Masao; Takubo, Takatoshi; Miyashita, Kana; Matsushima, Takafumi; Akaza, Hideyuki

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Orteronel (TAK-700) is a non-steroidal, selective, reversible inhibitor of 17,20-lyase. We evaluated the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and antitumor effect of orteronel with or without prednisolone in Japanese patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Methods We conducted a phase 1 study in men with progressive and chemotherapy-naïve CRPC. Patients received orteronel orally at doses of 200–400 mg twice daily (BID) with or without oral predn...

  8. Cabozantinib Inhibits Growth of Androgen-Sensitive and Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer and Affects Bone Remodeling

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Holly M.; Nazanin Ruppender; Xiaotun Zhang; Lisha G. Brown; Gross, Ted S.; Colm Morrissey; Roman Gulati; Vessella, Robert L.; Frauke Schimmoller; Aftab, Dana T.; Eva Corey

    2013-01-01

    Cabozantinib is an inhibitor of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases, including MET and VEGFR2. In a phase II clinical trial in advanced prostate cancer (PCa), cabozantinib treatment improved bone scans in 68% of evaluable patients. Our studies aimed to determine the expression of cabozantinib targets during PCa progression and to evaluate its efficacy in hormone-sensitive and castration-resistant PCa in preclinical models while delineating its effects on tumor and bone. Using immunohistochemis...

  9. Sipuleucel-T immunotherapy for castration-resistant prostate cancer. A systematic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kawalec, Paweł; Paszulewicz, Anna; Holko, Przemysław; Pilc, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Sipuleucel-T is a novel active cellular immunotherapy for the treatment of asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). It is assumed to be associated with less adverse events than conventional docetaxel-based chemotherapy. Material and methods A systematic review of literature published between January, 1 1966 and February, 6 2012 was performed to assess the efficacy and safety of sipuleucel-T in patients with mCRPC. Databases were...

  10. [Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer : Clinical data, new treatment options and therapy monitoring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, K; Albers, P; Eichenauer, R; Geiges, G; Grimm, M-O; König, F; Mickisch, G; Pfister, D; Schwentner, C; Suttmann, H; Zastrow, S

    2016-09-01

    Therapies currently available in Germany for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) include docetaxel, cabazitaxel, abiraterone acetate, enzalutamide and radium-223, all of which offer a potential survival benefit that adds up in their sequential application to a significant overall survival benefit. However, the optimal sequencing of these agents is still unclear. In the absence of evidence, treatment selection is based on the particular situation and on comorbid conditions of each individual patient. Furthermore, predictive markers to facilitate the selection of patients for a specific therapy or sequence of therapies remain an unmet need. However, with the recently discovered androgen receptor splice variant V7, which mediates (cross)resistance to or between abiraterone and enzalutamide, the first such marker has been identified. It is critical to monitor the response to treatments at prespecified intervals in order to optimize treatment sequencing so that the patient does not miss a valuable therapeutic window to receive alternative treatment that may prolong his life along with good symptom control and preservation of quality of life. PMID:27411995

  11. Androgen synthesis inhibitors in the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mark N Stein; Neal Patel; Alexander Bershadskiy; Alisa Sokoloff; Eric A Singer

    2014-01-01

    Suppression of gonadal testosterone synthesis represents the standard ifrst line therapy for treatment of metastatic prostate cancer. However, in the majority of patients who develop castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), it is possible to detect persistent activation of the androgen receptor (AR) through androgens produced in the adrenal gland or within the tumor itself. Abiraterone acetate was developed as an irreversible inhibitor of the dual functional cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP17 with activity as a 17α-hydroxylase and 17,20-lyase. CYP17 is necessary for production of nongonadal androgens from cholesterol. Regulatory approval of abiraterone in 2011, based on a phase III trial showing a signiifcant improvement in overall survival (OS) with abiraterone and prednisone versus prednisone, represented proof of principle that targeting AR is essential for improving outcomes in men with CRPC. Inhibition of 17α-hydroxylase by abiraterone results in accumulation of upstream mineralocorticoids due to loss of cortisol-mediated suppression of pituitary adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), providing a rationale for development of CYP17 inhibitors with increased speciifcity for 17,20-lyase (orteronel, galeterone and VT-464) that can potentially be administered without exogenous corticosteroids. In this article, we review the development of abiraterone and other CYP17 inhibitors;recent studies with abiraterone that inform our understanding of clinical parameters such as drug effects on quality-of-life, potential early predictors of response, and optimal sequencing of abiraterone with respect to other agents;and results of translational studies providing insights into resistance mechanisms to CYP17 inhibitors leading to clinical trials with drug combinations designed to prolong abiraterone beneift or restore abiraterone activity.

  12. Targeting autophagy overcomes Enzalutamide resistance in castration-resistant prostate cancer cells and improves therapeutic response in a xenograft model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, H G; Yang, J C; Kung, H-J; Shi, X-B; Tilki, D; Lara, P N; DeVere White, R W; Gao, A C; Evans, C P

    2014-01-01

    Macro-autophagy is associated with drug resistance in various cancers and can function as an adaptive response to maintain cell survival under metabolic stresses, including androgen deprivation. Androgen deprivation or treatment with androgen receptor (AR) signaling inhibitor (ARSI), Enzalutamide (MDV-3100, ENZA) or bicalutamide induced autophagy in androgen-dependent and in castration-resistant CaP (castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC)) cell lines. The autophagic cascade triggered by AR blockage, correlated with the increased light chain 3-II/I ratio and ATG-5 expression. Autophagy was observed in a subpopulation of C4-2B cells that developed insensitivity to ENZA after sustained exposure in culture. Using flow cytometry and clonogenic assays, we showed that inhibiting autophagy with clomipramine (CMI), chloroquine or metformin increased apoptosis and significantly impaired cell viability. This autophagic process was mediated by AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK) activation and the suppression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) through Raptor phosphorylation (Serine 792). Furthermore, small interfering RNA targeting AMPK significantly inhibited autophagy and promoted cell death in CaP cells acutely or chronically exposed to ENZA or androgen deprivation, suggesting that autophagy is an important survival mechanism in CRPC. Lastly, in vivo studies with mice orthotopically implanted with ENZA-resistant cells demonstrated that the combination of ENZA and autophagy modulators, CMI or metformin significantly reduced tumor growth when compared with control groups (P<0.005). In conclusion, autophagy is as an important mechanism of resistance to ARSI in CRPC. Antiandrogen-induced autophagy is mediated through the activation of AMPK pathway and the suppression of mTOR pathway. Blocking autophagy pharmacologically or genetically significantly impairs prostate cancer cell survival in vitro and in vivo, implying the therapeutics potential of autophagy inhibitors

  13. Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC):the rise and fall of systemic chemotherapy. Shadows of recent phase 3 studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Omar Abdel-Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is defined as prostate cancer that recurs while a patient is receiving androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Many treatment options have been suggested for this chal enging disease;starting from 2-year hormonal manipulations, mitoxantrne-and docetaxel-based regimens reaching to the overwhelming new systemic op-tions for CRPC (newer hormonal treatments, cytotoxic chemotherapies, bone-targeted agents and immunotherapeutics);and the question is:do the traditional cytotoxic regimens stil have a role amidst al these new options?

  14. Regulation of the transcriptional coactivator FHL2 licenses activation of the androgen receptor in castrate-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Meagan J; Binge, Lauren C; Sriratana, Absorn; Wang, Hong; Robinson, Paul A; Pook, David; Fedele, Clare G; Brown, Susan; Dyson, Jennifer M; Cottle, Denny L; Cowling, Belinda S; Niranjan, Birunthi; Risbridger, Gail P; Mitchell, Christina A

    2013-08-15

    It is now clear that progression from localized prostate cancer to incurable castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is driven by continued androgen receptor (AR), signaling independently of androgen. Thus, there remains a strong rationale to suppress AR activity as the single most important therapeutic goal in CRPC treatment. Although the expression of ligand-independent AR splice variants confers resistance to AR-targeted therapy and progression to lethal castrate-resistant cancer, the molecular regulators of AR activity in CRPC remain unclear, in particular those pathways that potentiate the function of mutant AR in CRPC. Here, we identify FHL2 as a novel coactivator of ligand-independent AR variants that are important in CRPC. We show that the nuclear localization of FHL2 and coactivation of the AR is driven by calpain cleavage of the cytoskeletal protein filamin, a pathway that shows differential activation in prostate epithelial versus prostate cancer cell lines. We further identify a novel FHL2-AR-filamin transcription complex, revealing how deregulation of this axis promotes the constitutive, ligand-independent activation of AR variants, which are present in CRPC. Critically, the calpain-cleaved filamin fragment and FHL2 are present in the nucleus only in CRPC and not benign prostate tissue or localized prostate cancer. Thus, our work provides mechanistic insight into the enhanced AR activation, most notably of the recently identified AR variants, including AR-V7 that drives CRPC progression. Furthermore, our results identify the first disease-specific mechanism for deregulation of FHL2 nuclear localization during cancer progression. These results offer general import beyond prostate cancer, given that nuclear FHL2 is characteristic of other human cancers where oncogenic transcription factors that drive disease are activated like the AR in prostate cancer.

  15. Current paradigms and evolving concepts in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Snmanta Krnmar Pal; Oliver Sartor

    2011-01-01

    @@ Until recently,docetaxel-based therapy represented the only therapy shown to prolong survival in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC).The past year and a half has been marked by unprecedented progress in treatments for this disease.Three positive phase III clinical trials have emerged,each evaluating agents (sipuleucel-T,cabazitaxel and abiraterone)with distinct mechanisms of action.Herein,the three pivotal trials are described alongside both past and current large phase III studies conducted in this mCRPC.The overall survival for patients with mCRPC treated in current clinical trials is considerably longer than noted in the past.We note that more recent trials with older agents have also shown improved survival and discuss potential non-therapeutic biases that influence this critical measure of outcome.The necessity for utilizing randomized trials when evaluating new therapeutics is emphasized given the changing prognosis in this mCRPC.

  16. Bone-Targeted Therapies in Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: Evolving Paradigms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joelle El-Amm

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Majority of patients with metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC develop bone metastases which results in significant morbidity and mortality as a result of skeletal-related events (SREs. Several bone-targeted agents are either in clinical use or in development for prevention of SREs. Bisphosphonates were the first class of drugs investigated for prevention of SREs and zoledronic acid is the only bisphosphonate that is FDA-approved for this indication. Another bone-targeted agent is denosumab which is a fully humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to the RANK-L thereby inhibiting RANK-L mediated bone resorption. While several radiopharmaceuticals were approved for pain palliation in mCRPC including strontium and samarium, alpharadin is the first radiopharmaceutical to show significant overall survival benefit. Contemporary therapeutic options including enzalutamide and abiraterone have effects on pain palliation and SREs as well. Other novel bone-targeted agents are currently in development, including the receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors cabozantinib and dasatinib. Emerging therapeutics in mCRPC has resulted in great strides in preventing one of the most significant sources of complications of bone metastases.

  17. Economic evaluation of sipuleucel-T immunotherapy in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holko, Przemysław; Kawalec, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    The objective is to examine the cost-utility of sipuleucel-T immunotherapy in asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients. The addition of sipuleucel-T immunotherapy to standard treatment led to a gain of 0.37 quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) at an additional cost of US$104,536. The incremental cost-utility ratio was US$283,000 per QALY saved. Threshold sensitivity analyses indicated that a price reduction of at least 53%, or application in a group of patients resulting in the relative reduction in the mortality rate of at least 39%, ought to augment the economic value of this regimen. Sipuleucel-T immunotherapy treatment at the current price with 96.5% certainty is not cost-effective. The specific group of patients who will benefit more from the treatment should be revealed and treated, or the cost of the vaccine should be lowered significantly to increase its economic value. Accounting for crossover treatment in control patients improves sipuleucel-T's value (US$132,000 per QALY saved) although further investigation is necessary.

  18. Cabozantinib inhibits growth of androgen-sensitive and castration-resistant prostate cancer and affects bone remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Holly M; Ruppender, Nazanin; Zhang, Xiaotun; Brown, Lisha G; Gross, Ted S; Morrissey, Colm; Gulati, Roman; Vessella, Robert L; Schimmoller, Frauke; Aftab, Dana T; Corey, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Cabozantinib is an inhibitor of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases, including MET and VEGFR2. In a phase II clinical trial in advanced prostate cancer (PCa), cabozantinib treatment improved bone scans in 68% of evaluable patients. Our studies aimed to determine the expression of cabozantinib targets during PCa progression and to evaluate its efficacy in hormone-sensitive and castration-resistant PCa in preclinical models while delineating its effects on tumor and bone. Using immunohistochemistry and tissue microarrays containing normal prostate, primary PCa, and soft tissue and bone metastases, our data show that levels of MET, P-MET, and VEGFR2 are increasing during PCa progression. Our data also show that the expression of cabozantinib targets are particularly pronounced in bone metastases. To evaluate cabozantinib efficacy on PCa growth in the bone environment and in soft tissues we used androgen-sensitive LuCaP 23.1 and castration-resistant C4-2B PCa tumors. In vivo, cabozantinib inhibited the growth of PCa in bone as well as growth of subcutaneous tumors. Furthermore, cabozantinib treatment attenuated the bone response to the tumor and resulted in increased normal bone volume. In summary, the expression pattern of cabozantinib targets in primary and castration-resistant metastatic PCa, and its efficacy in two different models of PCa suggest that this agent has a strong potential for the effective treatment of PCa at different stages of the disease. PMID:24205338

  19. Cabozantinib inhibits growth of androgen-sensitive and castration-resistant prostate cancer and affects bone remodeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly M Nguyen

    Full Text Available Cabozantinib is an inhibitor of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases, including MET and VEGFR2. In a phase II clinical trial in advanced prostate cancer (PCa, cabozantinib treatment improved bone scans in 68% of evaluable patients. Our studies aimed to determine the expression of cabozantinib targets during PCa progression and to evaluate its efficacy in hormone-sensitive and castration-resistant PCa in preclinical models while delineating its effects on tumor and bone. Using immunohistochemistry and tissue microarrays containing normal prostate, primary PCa, and soft tissue and bone metastases, our data show that levels of MET, P-MET, and VEGFR2 are increasing during PCa progression. Our data also show that the expression of cabozantinib targets are particularly pronounced in bone metastases. To evaluate cabozantinib efficacy on PCa growth in the bone environment and in soft tissues we used androgen-sensitive LuCaP 23.1 and castration-resistant C4-2B PCa tumors. In vivo, cabozantinib inhibited the growth of PCa in bone as well as growth of subcutaneous tumors. Furthermore, cabozantinib treatment attenuated the bone response to the tumor and resulted in increased normal bone volume. In summary, the expression pattern of cabozantinib targets in primary and castration-resistant metastatic PCa, and its efficacy in two different models of PCa suggest that this agent has a strong potential for the effective treatment of PCa at different stages of the disease.

  20. A Phase 2 Trial of Abiraterone Acetate in Japanese Men with Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer and without Prior Chemotherapy (JPN-201 Study)

    OpenAIRE

    Matsubara, Nobuaki; Uemura, Hirotsugu; SATOH, TAKEFUMI; Suzuki, Hiroyoshi; Nishiyama, Tsutomu; Uemura, Hiroji; Hashine, Katsuyoshi; Imanaka, Keiichiro; Ozono, Seiichiro; Akaza, Hideyuki

    2014-01-01

    Objective Abiraterone acetate has been approved in >70 countries for chemotherapy-naïve metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients. Efficacy and safety of abiraterone acetate (1000 mg/once daily) with prednisolone (5 mg/twice daily) in chemotherapy-naïve Japanese patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer was evaluated. Methods Men, ≥20 years, with prostate-specific antigen levels of ≥5 ng/ml and evidence of progression were enrolled in this Phase 2, multicent...

  1. HDAC6 regulates androgen receptor hypersensitivity and nuclear localization via modulating Hsp90 acetylation in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Junkui; Wang, Yujuan; Dar, Javid A; Liu, June; Liu, Lingqi; Nelson, Joel B; Wang, Zhou

    2009-12-01

    The development of castration-resistant prostate cancer (PCa) requires that under castration conditions, the androgen receptor (AR) remains active and thus nuclear. Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) plays a key role in androgen-induced and -independent nuclear localization and activation of AR. Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) is implicated, but has not been proven, in regulating AR activity via modulating Hsp90 acetylation. Here, we report that knockdown of HDAC6 in C4-2 cells using short hairpin RNA impaired ligand-independent nuclear localization of endogenous AR and inhibited PSA expression and cell growth in the absence or presence of dihydrotestosterone (DHT). The dose-response curve of DHT-stimulated C4-2 colony formation was shifted by shHDAC6 such that approximately 10-fold higher concentration of DHT is required, indicating a requirement for HDAC6 in AR hypersensitivity. HDAC6 knockdown also inhibited C4-2 xenograft tumor establishment in castrated, but not in testes-intact, nude mice. Studies using HDAC6-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts cells showed that inhibition of AR nuclear localization by HDAC6 knockdown can be largely alleviated by expressing a deacetylation mimic Hsp90 mutant. Taken together, our studies suggest that HDAC6 regulates AR hypersensitivity and nuclear localization, mainly via modulating HSP90 acetylation. Targeting HDAC6 alone or in combination with other therapeutic approaches is a promising new strategy for prevention and/or treatment of castration-resistant PCa.

  2. Overexpression of the potential kinase serine/ threonine/tyrosine kinase 1 (STYK 1) in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Suyoun; Tamura, Kenji; Furihata, Mutsuo; Uemura, Motohide; Daigo, Yataro; Nasu, Yasutomo; Miki, Tsuneharu; Shuin, Taro; Fujioka, Tomoaki; Nakamura, Yusuke; Nakagawa, Hidewaki

    2009-11-01

    Despite high response rates and clinical benefits, androgen ablation often fails to cure advanced or relapsed prostate cancer because castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) cells inevitably emerge. CRPC cells not only grow under castration, but also behave more aggressively, indicating that a number of malignant signaling pathways are activated in CRPC cells as well as androgen receptor signaling. Based on information from the gene expression profiles of clinical CRPC cells, we here identified one overexpressed gene, serine/threonine/tyrosine kinase 1 (STYK1), encoding a potential kinase, as a molecular target for CRPC. RNA and immunohistochemical analyses validated the overexpression of STYK1 in prostate cancer cells, and its expression was distinct in CRPC cells. Knockdown of STYK1 by siRNA resulted in drastic suppression of prostate cancer cell growth and, concordantly, enforced expression of STYK1 promoted cell proliferation, whereas ectopic expression of a kinase-dead mutant STYK1 did not. An in vitro kinase assay using recombinant STYK1 demonstrated that STYK1 could have some potential as a kinase, although its specific substrates are unknown. These findings suggest that STYK1 could be a possible molecular target for CRPC, and small molecules specifically inhibiting STYK1 kinase could be a possible approach for the development of novel CRPC therapies.

  3. Docetaxel-related toxicity in metastatic hormone-sensitive and metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Michael T; Gulati, Roman; Mostaghel, Elahe A; Nelson, Peter S; Montgomery, R Bruce; Yu, Evan Y; Cheng, Heather H

    2016-07-01

    Docetaxel plus androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) offers a survival benefit in metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer (mHSPC). However, one trial evaluating docetaxel in mHSPC (GETUG-AFU15) showed unexpected toxicity; raising concerns that docetaxel may carry increased toxicity when used to treat mHSPC compared to metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). We conducted a retrospective analysis evaluating differences in toxicity based on the clinical state (i.e., mHSPC vs. mCRPC) that docetaxel was used. Patients initiating docetaxel between 1/1/2014 and 7/15/2015 were included, with the former date chosen to coincide with the press release for the first mHSPC study that showed a survival benefit with early docetaxel; ensuring contemporary docetaxel-treated cohorts. Thirty-nine mCRPC and 22 mHSPC patients were included. Compared to mCRPC, mHSPC patients were younger (median years: 66.3 vs. 71.8, P = 0.007); had better performance status (ECOG 0-1: 100 vs. 62 %, P < 0.0001); and used opiates less frequently (29 vs. 66 %, P = 0.04). Neutropenic fevers occurred in 9 and 5 % (P = 0.95) of men with mHSPC and mCRPC, respectively. Other toxicities also occurred at similar rates between cohorts. The incidence of any toxic event was 73 and 67 % (P = 0.84) for men with mHSPC and mCRPC, respectively. Within the mHSPC cohort, neutropenic fevers occurred at a similar rate regardless of the time interval between initiating ADT and the start of docetaxel. We did not observe a significant difference in toxicity between mHSPC and mCRPC patients receiving docetaxel. However, the small sample size and retrospective nature of this study limit our ability to draw definitive conclusions. PMID:27300548

  4. Androgen Deprivation Therapy and Secondary Hormone Therapy in the Management of Hormone-sensitive and Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Fred; Fizazi, Karim

    2015-11-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is the standard of care for patients with metastatic prostate cancer (mPC). However, nearly all patients with mPC progress to castration-resistant PC (CRPC). Arrays of treatments, including secondary hormonal therapies, are available for the treatment of mPC and CRPC, which show efficacy when administered with ADT. Continuation of ADT is recommended for CRPC treatment as therapies are added. New secondary hormonal therapies include abiraterone, targeting the CYP17 enzyme family, and enzalutamide, an androgen receptor inhibitor with heightened binding specificity. The optimal decision-making process for CRPC treatment option remains unclear, pending further research and experience. PMID:26282624

  5. Gradual reduction of testosterone using a gonadotropin-releasing hormone vaccination delays castration resistance in a prostate cancer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barranco, Jesús A. Junco; Millar, Robert P.; Fuentes, Franklin; Bover, Eddy; Pimentel, Eulogio; Basulto, Roberto; Calzada, Lesvia; Morán, Rolando; Rodríguez, Ayni; Garay, Hilda; Reyes, Osvaldo; Castro, Maria D.; Bringas, Ricardo; Arteaga, Niurka; Toudurí, Henio; Rabassa, Mauricio; Fernández, Yairis; Serradelo, Andrés; Hernández, Eduardo; Guillén, Gerardo E.

    2016-01-01

    In a previous study aimed to design a novel prostate cancer vaccine, the authors of the present study demonstrated the advantage of combining the adjuvants Montanide ISA 51 with very small size proteoliposomes (VSSP) to promote a significant humoral immune response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in healthy animals. The present study compared the efficacy of this vaccine formulation versus the standard treatment currently available in terms of preventing the development of tumors in DD/S mice injected with Shionogi carcinoma (SC) 115 cells. The results demonstrated that 5 non-vaccinated control mice exhibited a fast tumor growth, and succumbed to the disease within 19–31 days. Mice immunized with the GnRH/Montanide ISA 51/VSSP vaccine exhibited a moderate decline in testosterone levels that was associated with a decrease in anti-GnRH antibody titers, which lead to a sustained tumor growth inhibition. In total, 2 mice in the immunized group exhibited complete remission of the tumor for the duration of the present study. In addition, castrated mice, which were used as a control for standard hormonal therapy, exhibited an accelerated decrease in tumor size. However, tumor relapse was observed between days 50 and 54, and between days 65 and 85, following the injection of SC 155 cells. Therefore, these mice were sacrificed at day 90. The present study concludes that the slow and moderate reduction of testosterone levels observed using the GnRH-based vaccine may delay the appearance of castration resistance in a Shionogi prostate cancer model. These findings suggest that this vaccine may be used to delay castration resistance in patients with prostate cancer.

  6. Gradual reduction of testosterone using a gonadotropin-releasing hormone vaccination delays castration resistance in a prostate cancer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barranco, Jesús A. Junco; Millar, Robert P.; Fuentes, Franklin; Bover, Eddy; Pimentel, Eulogio; Basulto, Roberto; Calzada, Lesvia; Morán, Rolando; Rodríguez, Ayni; Garay, Hilda; Reyes, Osvaldo; Castro, Maria D.; Bringas, Ricardo; Arteaga, Niurka; Toudurí, Henio; Rabassa, Mauricio; Fernández, Yairis; Serradelo, Andrés; Hernández, Eduardo; Guillén, Gerardo E.

    2016-01-01

    In a previous study aimed to design a novel prostate cancer vaccine, the authors of the present study demonstrated the advantage of combining the adjuvants Montanide ISA 51 with very small size proteoliposomes (VSSP) to promote a significant humoral immune response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in healthy animals. The present study compared the efficacy of this vaccine formulation versus the standard treatment currently available in terms of preventing the development of tumors in DD/S mice injected with Shionogi carcinoma (SC) 115 cells. The results demonstrated that 5 non-vaccinated control mice exhibited a fast tumor growth, and succumbed to the disease within 19–31 days. Mice immunized with the GnRH/Montanide ISA 51/VSSP vaccine exhibited a moderate decline in testosterone levels that was associated with a decrease in anti-GnRH antibody titers, which lead to a sustained tumor growth inhibition. In total, 2 mice in the immunized group exhibited complete remission of the tumor for the duration of the present study. In addition, castrated mice, which were used as a control for standard hormonal therapy, exhibited an accelerated decrease in tumor size. However, tumor relapse was observed between days 50 and 54, and between days 65 and 85, following the injection of SC 155 cells. Therefore, these mice were sacrificed at day 90. The present study concludes that the slow and moderate reduction of testosterone levels observed using the GnRH-based vaccine may delay the appearance of castration resistance in a Shionogi prostate cancer model. These findings suggest that this vaccine may be used to delay castration resistance in patients with prostate cancer. PMID:27446378

  7. Phytoestrogens selective for the estrogen receptor beta exert anti-androgenic effects in castration resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelen, Paul; Wuttke, Wolfgang; Seidlová-Wuttke, Dana

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in men of the Western world. A castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) eventually will arise when a local restricted prostate carcinoma was not cured duly by radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy. Although androgen ablation therapies are considered the gold standard for treatments of advanced prostate cancer there is no curative therapy available at present. In previous pre-clinical and clinical trials several phytoestrogens were investigated for their anticancer potential in various models for prostate cancer. Phytoestrogens feature tumour preventive characteristics and most probably are involved in the low incidence rate of hormone related cancers in Asian countries. Phytoestrogens such as isoflavones can have a marked impact on the most essential therapy target of CRPC i.e. the androgen receptor. Furthermore, functional analyses solidified the notion of such drugs as androgen antagonistic. Phytoestrogens commonly feature low toxicity combined with a potential of targeted therapy. Thus, these drugs qualify for conceivable implementation in prostate cancer patients under active surveillance. In addition, relapse prevention with these drugs after radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy might be considered. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Phytoestrogens'.

  8. Prednisone plus cabazitaxel or mitoxantrone for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer progressing after docetaxel treatment: a randomised open-label trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Bono, Johann Sebastian; Oudard, Stephane; Ozguroglu, Mustafa;

    2010-01-01

    Cabazitaxel is a novel tubulin-binding taxane drug with antitumour activity in docetaxel-resistant cancers. We aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of cabazitaxel plus prednisone with those of mitoxantrone plus prednisone in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer with progre...

  9. A low carbohydrate, high protein diet suppresses intratumoral androgen synthesis and slows castration-resistant prostate tumor growth in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokidis, H Bobby; Yieng Chin, Mei; Ho, Victor W; Adomat, Hans H; Soma, Kiran K; Fazli, Ladan; Nip, Ka Mun; Cox, Michael; Krystal, Gerald; Zoubeidi, Amina; Tomlinson Guns, Emma S

    2015-06-01

    Dietary factors continue to preside as dominant influences in prostate cancer prevalence and progression-free survival following primary treatment. We investigated the influence of a low carbohydrate diet, compared to a typical Western diet, on prostate cancer (PCa) tumor growth in vivo. LNCaP xenograft tumor growth was studied in both intact and castrated mice, representing a more advanced castration resistant PCa (CRPC). No differences in LNCaP tumor progression (total tumor volume) with diet was observed for intact mice (P = 0.471) however, castrated mice on the Low Carb diet saw a statistically significant reduction in tumor growth rate compared with Western diet fed mice (P = 0.017). No correlation with serum PSA was observed. Steroid profiles, alongside serum cholesterol and cholesteryl ester levels, were significantly altered by both diet and castration. Specifically, DHT concentration with the Low Carb diet was 58% that of the CRPC-bearing mice on the Western diet. Enzymes in the steroidogenesis pathway were directly impacted and tumors isolated from intact mice on the Low Carb diet had higher AKR1C3 protein levels and lower HSD17B2 protein levels than intact mice on the Western diet (ARK1C3: P = 0.074; HSD17B2: P = 0.091, with α = 0.1). In contrast, CRPC tumors from mice on Low Carb diets had higher concentrations of both HSD17B2 (P = 0.016) and SRD5A1 (P = 0.058 with α = 0.1) enzymes. There was no correlation between tumor growth in castrated mice for Low Carb diet versus Western diet and (a) serum insulin (b) GH serum levels (c) insulin receptor (IR) or (d) IGF-1R in tumor tissue. Intact mice fed Western diet had higher serum insulin which was associated with significantly higher blood glucose and tumor tissue IR. We conclude that both diet and castration have a significant impact on the endocrinology of mice bearing LNCaP xenograft tumors. The observed effects of diet on cholesterol and steroid regulation impact tumor tissue DHT specifically and are

  10. A low carbohydrate, high protein diet suppresses intratumoral androgen synthesis and slows castration-resistant prostate tumor growth in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokidis, H Bobby; Yieng Chin, Mei; Ho, Victor W; Adomat, Hans H; Soma, Kiran K; Fazli, Ladan; Nip, Ka Mun; Cox, Michael; Krystal, Gerald; Zoubeidi, Amina; Tomlinson Guns, Emma S

    2015-06-01

    Dietary factors continue to preside as dominant influences in prostate cancer prevalence and progression-free survival following primary treatment. We investigated the influence of a low carbohydrate diet, compared to a typical Western diet, on prostate cancer (PCa) tumor growth in vivo. LNCaP xenograft tumor growth was studied in both intact and castrated mice, representing a more advanced castration resistant PCa (CRPC). No differences in LNCaP tumor progression (total tumor volume) with diet was observed for intact mice (P = 0.471) however, castrated mice on the Low Carb diet saw a statistically significant reduction in tumor growth rate compared with Western diet fed mice (P = 0.017). No correlation with serum PSA was observed. Steroid profiles, alongside serum cholesterol and cholesteryl ester levels, were significantly altered by both diet and castration. Specifically, DHT concentration with the Low Carb diet was 58% that of the CRPC-bearing mice on the Western diet. Enzymes in the steroidogenesis pathway were directly impacted and tumors isolated from intact mice on the Low Carb diet had higher AKR1C3 protein levels and lower HSD17B2 protein levels than intact mice on the Western diet (ARK1C3: P = 0.074; HSD17B2: P = 0.091, with α = 0.1). In contrast, CRPC tumors from mice on Low Carb diets had higher concentrations of both HSD17B2 (P = 0.016) and SRD5A1 (P = 0.058 with α = 0.1) enzymes. There was no correlation between tumor growth in castrated mice for Low Carb diet versus Western diet and (a) serum insulin (b) GH serum levels (c) insulin receptor (IR) or (d) IGF-1R in tumor tissue. Intact mice fed Western diet had higher serum insulin which was associated with significantly higher blood glucose and tumor tissue IR. We conclude that both diet and castration have a significant impact on the endocrinology of mice bearing LNCaP xenograft tumors. The observed effects of diet on cholesterol and steroid regulation impact tumor tissue DHT specifically and are

  11. Enzalutamide treatment in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer progressing after chemotherapy and abiraterone acetate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Frederik Birkebaek; Røder, Martin Andreas; Rathenborg, Per;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to record prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response and overall survival (OS) for a group of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients treated with enzalutamide following progression after abiraterone treatment in the post-chemotherapy......%). Forty-six percent had a greater than 30% decrease in PSA. The PSA response to enzalutamide did not correlate with the number of prior cancer treatments (p = 0.57), time from diagnosis to mCRPC (p = 0.11) or prior response to docetaxel (p = 0.67). However, patients treated with second line cabazitaxel...... marked fall in PSA following enzalutamide therapy in post-chemotherapy mCRPC patients compared with reported results in randomized trials. Larger prospective studies of sequencing are warranted....

  12. Further analysis of PREVAIL: Enzalutamide use in chemotherapy-naïve men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanny B Aragon-Ching

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available PREVAIL was a phase III multinational, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial that enrolled chemotherapy-naïve men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC, which showed remarkable improvement in co-primary endpoints with an overall 81% reduction in the risk of radiographic progression, as well as 29% reduction in the risk of death in favor of the enzalutamide arm over placebo. All secondary endpoints including time to subsequent chemotherapy initiation and prostate specific antigen (PSA progression were in favor of the enzalutamide arm. The results of PREVAIL shows the utility of enzalutamide that would likely soon expand the indication to asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic men with mCRPC not previously treated with chemotherapy.

  13. CH5137291, an androgen receptor nuclear translocation-inhibiting compound, inhibits the growth of castration-resistant prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikura, Nobuyuki; Kawata, Hiromitsu; Nishimoto, Ayako; Nakamura, Ryo; Tsunenari, Toshiaki; Watanabe, Miho; Tachibana, Kazutaka; Shiraishi, Takuya; Yoshino, Hitoshi; Honma, Akie; Emura, Takashi; Ohta, Masateru; Nakagawa, Toshito; Houjo, Takao; Corey, Eva; Vessella, Robert L; Aoki, Yuko; Sato, Haruhiko

    2015-04-01

    Resistance of prostate cancer to castration is currently an unavoidable problem. The major mechanisms underlying such resistance are androgen receptor (AR) overexpression, androgen-independent activation of AR, and AR mutation. To address this problem, we developed an AR pure antagonist, CH5137291, with AR nuclear translocation-inhibiting activity, and compared its activity and characteristics with that of bicalutamide. Cell lines corresponding to the mechanisms of castration resistance were used: LNCaP-BC2 having AR overexpression and LNCaP-CS10 having androgen-independent AR activation. VCaP and LNCaP were used as hormone-sensitive prostate cancer cells. In vitro functional assay clearly showed that CH5137291 inhibited the nuclear translocation of wild-type ARs as well as W741C- and T877A-mutant ARs. In addition, it acted as a pure antagonist on the transcriptional activity of these types of ARs. In contrast, bicalutamide did not inhibit the nuclear translocation of these ARs, and showed a partial/full agonistic effect on the transcriptional activity. CH5137291 inhibited cell growth more strongly than bicalutamide in VCaP and LNCaP cells as well as in LNCaP-BC2 and LNCaP-CS10 cells in vitro. In xenograft models, CH5137291 strongly inhibited the tumor growth of LNCaP, LNCaP-BC2, and LNCaP-CS10, whereas bicalutamide showed a weaker effect in LNCaP and almost no effect in LNCaP-BC2 and LNCaP-CS10 xenografts. Levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in plasma correlated well with the antitumor effect of both agents. CH5137291 inhibited the growth of LNCaP tumors that had become resistant to bicalutamide treatment. A docking model suggested that CH5137291 intensively collided with the M895 residue of helix 12, and therefore strongly inhibited the folding of helix 12, a cause of AR agonist activity, in wild-type and W741C-mutant ARs. In cynomolgus monkeys, the serum concentration of CH5137291 increased dose-dependently and PSA level decreased 80% at 100 mg/kg. CH

  14. Pain in castration-resistant prostate cancer with bone metastases: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gater Adam

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bone metastases are a common painful and debilitating consequence of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CPRC. Bone pain may predict patients' prognosis and there is a need to further explore CRPC patients' experiences of bone pain in the overall context of disease pathology. Due to the subjective nature of pain, assessments of pain severity, onset and progression are reliant on patient assessment. Patient reported outcome (PRO measures, therefore, are commonly used as key endpoints for evaluating the efficacy of CRPC treatments. Evidence of the content validity of leading PRO measures of pain severity used in CRPC clinical trials is, however, limited. Methods To document patients' experience of CRPC symptoms including pain, and their impact on health-related quality of life (HRQL, semi-structured in-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 17 patients with CRPC and bone metastases. The content validity of the Present Pain Intensity (PPI scale from the McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ, and the 'Average Pain' and 'Worst Pain' items of the Brief Pain Inventory Short-Form (BPI-SF was also assessed. Results Patients with CRPC and bone metastases present with a constellation of symptoms that can have a profound effect on HRQL. For patients in this study, bone pain was the most prominent and debilitating symptom associated with their condition. Bone pain was chronic and, despite being generally well-managed by analgesic medication, instances of breakthrough cancer pain (BTcP were common. Cognitive debriefing of the selected PRO measures of pain severity highlighted difficulties among patients in understanding the verbal response scale (VRS of the MPQ PPI scale. There were also some inconsistencies in the way in which the BPI-SF 'Average Pain' item was interpreted by patients. In contrast, the BPI-SF 'Worst Pain' item was well understood and interpreted consistently among patients. Conclusions Study findings support the

  15. Multiplexed quantum dot labeling of activated c-Met signaling in castration-resistant human prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peizhen Hu

    Full Text Available The potential application of multiplexed quantum dot labeling (MQDL for cancer detection and prognosis and monitoring therapeutic responses has attracted the interests of bioengineers, pathologists and cancer biologists. Many published studies claim that MQDL is effective for cancer biomarker detection and useful in cancer diagnosis and prognosis, these studies have not been standardized against quantitative biochemical and molecular determinations. In the present study, we used a molecularly characterized human prostate cancer cell model exhibiting activated c-Met signaling with epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT and lethal metastatic progression to bone and soft tissues as the gold standard, and compared the c-Met cell signaling network in this model, in clinical human prostate cancer tissue specimens and in a castration-resistant human prostate cancer xenograft model. We observed c-Met signaling network activation, manifested by increased phosphorylated c-Met in all three. The downstream survival signaling network was mediated by NF-κB and Mcl-1 and EMT was driven by receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL, at the single cell level in clinical prostate cancer specimens and the xenograft model. Results were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR and western blots in a human prostate cancer cell model. MQDL is a powerful tool for assessing biomarker expression and it offers molecular insights into cancer progression at both the cell and tissue level with high degree of sensitivity.

  16. Multiplexed quantum dot labeling of activated c-Met signaling in castration-resistant human prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Peizhen; Chu, Gina C-Y; Zhu, Guodong; Yang, Hua; Luthringer, Daniel; Prins, Gail; Habib, Fouad; Wang, Yuzhuo; Wang, Ruoxiang; Chung, Leland W K; Zhau, Haiyen E

    2011-01-01

    The potential application of multiplexed quantum dot labeling (MQDL) for cancer detection and prognosis and monitoring therapeutic responses has attracted the interests of bioengineers, pathologists and cancer biologists. Many published studies claim that MQDL is effective for cancer biomarker detection and useful in cancer diagnosis and prognosis, these studies have not been standardized against quantitative biochemical and molecular determinations. In the present study, we used a molecularly characterized human prostate cancer cell model exhibiting activated c-Met signaling with epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and lethal metastatic progression to bone and soft tissues as the gold standard, and compared the c-Met cell signaling network in this model, in clinical human prostate cancer tissue specimens and in a castration-resistant human prostate cancer xenograft model. We observed c-Met signaling network activation, manifested by increased phosphorylated c-Met in all three. The downstream survival signaling network was mediated by NF-κB and Mcl-1 and EMT was driven by receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL), at the single cell level in clinical prostate cancer specimens and the xenograft model. Results were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR and western blots in a human prostate cancer cell model. MQDL is a powerful tool for assessing biomarker expression and it offers molecular insights into cancer progression at both the cell and tissue level with high degree of sensitivity. PMID:22205960

  17. Mitosis Phase Enrichment with Identification of Mitotic Centromere-Associated Kinesin As a Therapeutic Target in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sircar, Kanishka; Huang, Heng; Hu, Limei; Liu, Yuexin; Dhillon, Jasreman; Cogdell, David; Aprikian, Armen; Efstathiou, Eleni; Navone, Nora; Troncoso, Patricia; Zhang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    The recently described transcriptomic switch to a mitosis program in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) suggests that mitotic proteins may be rationally targeted at this lethal stage of the disease. In this study, we showed upregulation of the mitosis-phase at the protein level in our cohort of 51 clinical CRPC cases and found centrosomal aberrations to also occur preferentially in CRPC compared with untreated, high Gleason–grade hormone-sensitive prostate cancer (P<0.0001). Expression profiling of chemotherapy-resistant CRPC samples (n = 25) was performed, and the results were compared with data from primary chemotherapy-naïve CRPC (n = 10) and hormone-sensitive prostate cancer cases (n = 108). Our results showed enrichment of mitosis-phase genes and pathways, with progression to both castration-resistant and chemotherapy-resistant disease. The mitotic centromere-associated kinesin (MCAK) was identified as a novel mitosis-phase target in prostate cancer that was overexpressed in multiple CRPC gene-expression datasets. We found concordant gene expression of MCAK between our parent and murine CRPC xenograft pairs and increased MCAK protein expression with clinical progression of prostate cancer to a castration-resistant disease stage. Knockdown of MCAK arrested the growth of prostate cancer cells suggesting its utility as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:22363599

  18. Mitosis phase enrichment with identification of mitotic centromere-associated kinesin as a therapeutic target in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanishka Sircar

    Full Text Available The recently described transcriptomic switch to a mitosis program in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC suggests that mitotic proteins may be rationally targeted at this lethal stage of the disease. In this study, we showed upregulation of the mitosis-phase at the protein level in our cohort of 51 clinical CRPC cases and found centrosomal aberrations to also occur preferentially in CRPC compared with untreated, high Gleason-grade hormone-sensitive prostate cancer (P<0.0001. Expression profiling of chemotherapy-resistant CRPC samples (n = 25 was performed, and the results were compared with data from primary chemotherapy-naïve CRPC (n = 10 and hormone-sensitive prostate cancer cases (n = 108. Our results showed enrichment of mitosis-phase genes and pathways, with progression to both castration-resistant and chemotherapy-resistant disease. The mitotic centromere-associated kinesin (MCAK was identified as a novel mitosis-phase target in prostate cancer that was overexpressed in multiple CRPC gene-expression datasets. We found concordant gene expression of MCAK between our parent and murine CRPC xenograft pairs and increased MCAK protein expression with clinical progression of prostate cancer to a castration-resistant disease stage. Knockdown of MCAK arrested the growth of prostate cancer cells suggesting its utility as a potential therapeutic target.

  19. Pain, PSA flare, and bone scan response in a patient with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer treated with radium-223, a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radium-223 has been shown to improve overall survival in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer with symptomatic bone metastases. The bone scan response to radium-223 has only been described in one single center trial of 14 patients, none of whom achieved the outstanding bone scan response presented in the current case. In this case report, we describe a 75 year-old white man with extensively pre-treated metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer and symptomatic bone metastases who experienced a flare in pain and prostate-specific antigen, followed by dramatic clinical (pain), biochemical (prostate-specific antigen), and imaging (bone scan) response. The flare phenomena and bone scan response we observed have not previously been described with radium-223. This case suggests that the degree and duration of bone scan response may be predictive of overall survival benefit

  20. Hypoxic tumor kinase signaling mediated by STAT5A in development of castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrine Røe

    Full Text Available In this study, we hypothesized that androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT in prostate cancer, although initially efficient, induces changes in the tumor kinome, which subsequently promote development of castration-resistant (CR disease. Recognizing the correlation between tumor hypoxia and poor prognosis in prostate cancer, we further hypothesized that such changes might be influenced by hypoxia. Microarrays with 144 kinase peptide substrates were applied to analyze CWR22 prostate carcinoma xenograft samples from ADT-naïve, androgen-deprived (AD, long-term AD (ADL, and CR disease stages. The impact of hypoxia was assessed by matching the xenograft kinase activity profiles with those acquired from hypoxic and normoxic prostate carcinoma cell cultures, whereas the clinical relevance was evaluated by analyzing prostatectomy tumor samples from patients with locally advanced disease, either in ADT-naïve or early CR disease stages. By using this novel peptide substrate microarray method we revealed high kinase activity mediated by signal transducer and activator of transcription 5A (STAT5A in CR prostate cancer. Additionally, we uncovered high STAT5A kinase activity already in regressing ADL xenografts, before renewed CR growth was evidenced. Finally, since increased STAT5A kinase activity also was detected after exposing prostate carcinoma cells to hypoxia, we propose long-term ADT to induce tumor hypoxia and stimulate STAT5A kinase activity, subsequently leading to renewed CR tumor growth. Hence, the study detected STAT5A as a candidate to be further investigated for its potential as marker of advanced prostate cancer and as possible therapeutic target protein.

  1. Effect of abiraterone acetate treatment on the quality of life of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer after failure of docetaxel chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harland, S.; Staffurth, J.; Molina, A.; Hao, Y.; Gagnon, D.D.; Sternberg, C.N.; Cella, D.; Fizazi, K.; Logothetis, C.J.; Kheoh, T.; Haqq, C.M.; Bono, J.S. de; Scher, H.I.; Mulders, P.F.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In a recent randomised, double-blind, phase III clinical trial among 1195 patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) who had failed docetaxel chemotherapy, abiraterone acetate was shown to significantly prolong overall survival compared with prednisone alone. H

  2. Efficacy and Safety of Abiraterone Acetate in Elderly (75 Years or Older) Chemotherapy Naive Patients with Metastatic Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, M.R.; Rathkopf, D.E.; Mulders, P.F.A.; Carles, J.; Poppel, H. Van; Li, J.; Kheoh, T.; Griffin, T.W.; Molina, A.; Ryan, C.J.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer primarily affects elderly men. In this post hoc analysis we investigated the safety and efficacy of abiraterone acetate in elderly (age 75 years or greater) and younger (less than 75 years) patient subgroups at the prespecified interim analysi

  3. Androgen receptor splice variant 7 (AR-V7) and drug efficacy in castration-resistant prostate cancer: Biomarker for treatment selection exclusion or inclusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibrand, Crystal R; Price, Douglas K; Figg, William D

    2016-05-01

    Currently there are no molecular biomarkers used to help guide treatment selection for those patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer. A recent study published in JAMA Oncology (Antonarakis et al.) presents evidence supporting the potential use of androgen receptor splice variant 7 as a biomarker for optimal treatment selection in this population.

  4. Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Phase III Trial of Sunitinib Plus Prednisone Versus Prednisone Alone in Progressive, Metastatic, Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michaelson, M Dror; Oudard, Stephane; Ou, Yen-Chuan;

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: We evaluated angiogenesis-targeted sunitinib therapy in a randomized, double-blind trial of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Men with progressive mCRPC after docetaxel-based chemotherapy were randomly assigned 2:1 to receive sunitinib 37.5 mg...

  5. Radium-223 dichloride: illustrating the benefits of a multidisciplinary approach for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renzulli II JF

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Joseph F Renzulli II, Jennifer Collins, Anthony Mega Genitourinary Multidisciplinary Clinic, The Miriam Hospital, Providence, RI, USAAbstract: Improving options for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC provide latitude in designing treatment plans that meet patients' medical needs and personal goals. The field's rapid evolution opens avenues for contributions by multiple medical specialties and requires considering more options to ensure that each patient receives the most appropriate care. A multidisciplinary clinic (MDC focusing on patients with cancers of the genitourinary tract demonstrates an efficient and cost-effective means of integrating the diverse professional knowledge and skills needed to develop an optimal patient treatment plan. As a guide to establishing an MDC for patients with mCRPC, this article describes the operation of the Genitourinary MDC at The Miriam Hospital in Providence, RI – specifically, the successful incorporation of radium-223 dichloride (radium-223 into the treatment algorithm for men with mCRPC and symptomatic bone metastases. Radium-223 is a new treatment that, unlike earlier radionuclide therapies, has shown a survival advantage in a large randomized phase 3 trial (ALSYMPCA. The overall survival benefit was comparable to that of newer immuno- and hormonal therapies in similar populations. Radium-223 treatment also delayed onset of symptomatic skeletal events. Both benefits were independent of prior docetaxel therapy or concurrent bisphosphonate use. In our clinic, radium-223 is used primarily to extend patient survival. Patient selection, patient management, and treatment sequencing are discussed here in the context of a multidisciplinary environment. Keywords: radium-223 dichloride, prostate cancer, castration-resistant prostate cancer, multidisciplinary clinic, best practices

  6. Zyflamend, a polyherbal mixture, down regulates class I and class II histone deacetylases and increases p21 levels in castrate-resistant prostate cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, E-Chu; Zhao, Yi; Chen, Guoxun; Baek, Seung Joon; McEntee, Michael F.; Minkin, Steven; Biggerstaff, John P.; Whelan, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Background Zyflamend, a mixture containing extracts of ten herbs, has shown promise in a variety of preclinical cancer models, including prostate cancer. The current experiments were designed to investigate the effects of Zyflamend on the expression of class I and II histone deacetylases, a family of enzymes known to be over expressed in a variety of cancers. Methods CWR22Rv1 cells, a castrate-resistant prostate cancer cell line, were treated with Zyflamend and the expression of class I and I...

  7. MOR209/ES414, a Novel Bispecific Antibody Targeting PSMA for the Treatment of Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Hoyos, Gabriela; Sewell, Toddy; Bader, Robert; Bannink, Jeannette; Chenault, Ruth A; Daugherty, Mollie; Dasovich, Maria; Fang, Hang; Gottschalk, Rebecca; Kumer, John; Miller, Robert E; Ravikumar, Padma; Wiens, Jennifer; Algate, Paul A; Bienvenue, David; McMahan, Catherine J; Natarajan, Sateesh K; Gross, Jane A; Blankenship, John W

    2016-09-01

    Treatment of metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) remains a highly unmet medical need and current therapies ultimately result in disease progression. Immunotherapy is a rapidly growing approach for treatment of cancer but has shown limited success to date in the treatment of mCRPC. We have developed a novel humanized bispecific antibody, MOR209/ES414, built on the ADAPTIR (modular protein technology) platform, to redirect T-cell cytotoxicity toward prostate cancer cells by specifically targeting T cells through CD3ε to prostate cancer cells expressing PSMA (prostate-specific membrane antigen). In vitro cross-linking of T cells with PSMA-expressing tumor cells by MOR209/ES414 triggered potent target-dependent tumor lysis and induction of target-dependent T-cell activation and proliferation. This activity occurred at low picomolar concentrations of MOR209/ES414 and was effective at low T-effector to tumor target cell ratios. In addition, cytotoxic activity was equivalent over a wide range of PSMA expression on target cells, suggesting that as few as 3,700 PSMA receptors per cell are sufficient for tumor lysis. In addition to high sensitivity and in vitro activity, MOR209/ES414 induced limited production of cytokines compared with other bispecific antibody formats. Pharmacokinetic analysis of MOR209/ES414 demonstrated a serum elimination half-life in NOD/SCID γ (NSG) mice of 4 days. Administration of MOR209/ES414 in murine xenograft models of human prostate cancer significantly inhibited tumor growth, prolonged survival, and decreased serum prostate-specific antigen levels only in the presence of adoptively transferred human T cells. On the basis of these preclinical findings, MOR209/ES414 warrants further investigation as a potential therapeutic for the treatment of CRPC. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(9); 2155-65. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27406985

  8. BAY 1024767 blocks androgen receptor mutants found in castration-resistant prostate cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Tatsuo; Lejeune, Pascale; Köhr, Silke; Neuhaus, Roland; Faus, Hortensia; Gelato, Kathy A; Busemann, Matthias; Cleve, Arwed; Lücking, Ulrich; von Nussbaum, Franz; Brands, Michael; Mumberg, Dominik; Jung, Klaus; Stephan, Carsten; Haendler, Bernard

    2016-02-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) mutations arise in patients developing resistance to hormone deprivation therapies. Here we describe BAY 1024767, a thiohydantoin derivative with strong antagonistic activity against nine AR variants with mutations located in the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD), and against wild-type AR. Antagonism was maintained, though reduced, at increased androgen levels. Anti-tumor efficacy was evidenced in vivo in the KuCaP-1 prostate cancer model which bears the W741C bicalutamide resistance mutation and in the syngeneic prostate cancer rat model Dunning R3327-G. The prevalence of six selected AR mutations was determined in plasma DNA originating from 100 resistant patients and found to be at least 12%. Altogether the results show BAY 1024767 to be a strong antagonist for several AR mutants linked to therapy resistance, which opens the door for next-generation compounds that can benefit patients based on their mutation profile.

  9. Radium-223 chloride: a potential new treatment for castration-resistant prostate cancer patients with metastatic bone disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison MR

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Michael R Harrison, Terence Z Wong, Andrew J Armstrong, Daniel J GeorgeDuke Cancer Institute, Durham, NC, USABackground: Radium-223 chloride (223Ra; Alpharadin is an alpha-emitting radioisotope that targets areas of osteoblastic metastasis and is excreted by the small intestine. When compared with beta-emitters (eg, strontium-89, samarium-153, 223Ra delivers a high quantity of energy per track length with short tissue penetration.Objective: This review describes the mechanism, radiobiology, and preclinical development of 223Ra and discusses the clinical data currently available regarding its safety and efficacy profile.Methods: Data from clinical trials including abstracts were collected and reviewed using the PubMed Database, as well as the American Society of Clinical Oncology abstract database.Conclusion: Current bone-targeted therapies fall into two main categories: antiresorptive agents (eg, zoledronic acid, denosumab, which have been shown to delay skeletal-related events, and radiopharmaceuticals (eg, samarium-153, which may have a role in pain palliation. Historically, neither antiresorptive agents nor radiopharmaceuticals have shown definitive evidence of improved overall survival or other antitumor effects in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC. Radiopharmaceuticals are limited by myelosuppresion, thrombocytopenia, and renal excretion. In a recently reported randomized Phase III trial in men with symptomatic bone-metastatic CRPC who had received or were ineligible for docetaxel chemotherapy, 223Ra treatment resulted in improved overall survival and delayed skeletal-related events. Toxicity consisted of minor gastrointestinal side effects and mild neutropenia and thrombocytopenia that were rarely severe. Pending regulatory approval, 223Ra may represent a unique and distinct option for an important subgroup of patients with mCRPC; future trials should address its use in combination or in sequence with existing and novel

  10. Early Prediction of Therapy Response to Abiraterone Acetate Using PSA Subforms in Patients with Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlack, Katrin; Krabbe, Laura-Maria; Fobker, Manfred; Schrader, Andres Jan; Semjonow, Axel; Boegemann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prognostic ability of early changes of total prostate specific antigen (tPSA), free PSA (fPSA), [-2]proPSA and the Prostate Health Index (PHI) following initiation of Abiraterone-therapy in men with castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). In 25 patients, PSA-subforms were analyzed before and at 8-12 weeks under therapy as prognosticators of progression-free-survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Comparing patients with a PFS 15 months of OS there was a non-significant trend for a difference in the relative-median-change of fPSA (17.0% vs. -46.3%; p = 0.06). In Kaplan-Meier analyses, declining fPSA and [-2]proPSA were associated with a longer median PFS (13 months, 95% confidence interval (CI): 9.6-16.4 vs. 10 months, 95% CI: 3.5-16.5; p = 0.11), respectively. Correspondingly, decreasing fPSA and [-2]proPSA values indicated an OS of 32 months (95% CI: not reached (NR)) compared to 21 months in men with rising values (95% CI: 7.7-34.3; p = 0.14), respectively. We concluded that the addition of fPSA- and [-2]proPSA-changes to tPSA-information might be further studied as potential markers of early Abiraterone response in mCRPC patients. PMID:27618028

  11. Evolving treatment approaches for the management of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer – role of radium-223

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukherji D

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Deborah Mukherji,1 Imane El Dika,1 Sally Temraz,1 Mohammed Haidar,2 Ali Shamseddine11Department of Hematology/Oncology, 2Department of Nuclear Medicine, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Beirut, LebanonAbstract: Radium-223 is a first-in-class alpha particle-emitting radiopharmaceutical approved for the treatment of bone metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Radium-223 is administered intravenously with no requirement for complex shielding and specifically targets areas of bone metastasis. In a randomized placebo-controlled Phase III study, treatment with radium-223 was shown to improve overall survival, time to skeletal-related events, and health-related quality of life. Apart from radium-223, the cytotoxic chemotherapy agents docetaxel and cabazitaxel, androgen biosynthesis inhibitor abiraterone acetate, novel anti-androgen enzalutamide, and immunotherapy sipuleucel-T have also been shown to improve survival of men with advanced prostate cancer in Phase III trials. This review will outline current treatment approaches for advanced prostate cancer with a focus on the role of radium-223 in changing treatment paradigms.Keywords: Alpharadin, alpha-emitting radionuclide, bone metastasis

  12. Progression of metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer: impact of therapeutic intervention in the post-docetaxel space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sartor A Oliver

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite the proven success of hormonal therapy for prostate cancer using chemical or surgical castration, most patients eventually will progress to a phase of the disease that is metastatic and shows resistance to further hormonal manipulation. This has been termed metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC. Despite this designation, however, there is evidence that androgen receptor (AR-mediated signaling and gene expression can persist in mCRPC, even in the face of castrate levels of androgen. This may be due in part to the upregulation of enzymes involved in androgen synthesis, the overexpression of AR, or the emergence of mutant ARs with promiscuous recognition of various steroidal ligands. The therapeutic options were limited and palliative in nature until trials in 2004 demonstrated that docetaxel chemotherapy could significantly improve survival. These results established first-line docetaxel as the standard of care for mCRPC. After resistance to further docetaxel therapy develops, treatment options were once again limited. Recently reported results from phase 3 trials have shown that additional therapy with the novel taxane cabazitaxel (with prednisone, or treatment with the antiandrogen abiraterone (with prednisone could improve survival for patients with mCRPC following docetaxel therapy. Compared with mitoxantrone/prednisone, cabazitaxel/prednisone significantly improved overall survival, with a 30% reduction in rate of death, in patients with progression of mCRPC after docetaxel therapy in the TROPIC trial. Similarly, abiraterone acetate (an inhibitor of androgen biosynthesis plus prednisone significantly decreased the rate of death by 35% compared with placebo plus prednisone in mCRPC patients progressing after prior docetaxel therapy in the COU-AA-301 trial. Results of these trials have thus established two additional treatment options for mCRPC patients in the "post-docetaxel space." In view of the continued AR

  13. Progression of metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer: impact of therapeutic intervention in the post-docetaxel space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartor, A Oliver

    2011-04-23

    Despite the proven success of hormonal therapy for prostate cancer using chemical or surgical castration, most patients eventually will progress to a phase of the disease that is metastatic and shows resistance to further hormonal manipulation. This has been termed metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Despite this designation, however, there is evidence that androgen receptor (AR)-mediated signaling and gene expression can persist in mCRPC, even in the face of castrate levels of androgen. This may be due in part to the upregulation of enzymes involved in androgen synthesis, the overexpression of AR, or the emergence of mutant ARs with promiscuous recognition of various steroidal ligands. The therapeutic options were limited and palliative in nature until trials in 2004 demonstrated that docetaxel chemotherapy could significantly improve survival. These results established first-line docetaxel as the standard of care for mCRPC. After resistance to further docetaxel therapy develops, treatment options were once again limited. Recently reported results from phase 3 trials have shown that additional therapy with the novel taxane cabazitaxel (with prednisone), or treatment with the antiandrogen abiraterone (with prednisone) could improve survival for patients with mCRPC following docetaxel therapy. Compared with mitoxantrone/prednisone, cabazitaxel/prednisone significantly improved overall survival, with a 30% reduction in rate of death, in patients with progression of mCRPC after docetaxel therapy in the TROPIC trial. Similarly, abiraterone acetate (an inhibitor of androgen biosynthesis) plus prednisone significantly decreased the rate of death by 35% compared with placebo plus prednisone in mCRPC patients progressing after prior docetaxel therapy in the COU-AA-301 trial. Results of these trials have thus established two additional treatment options for mCRPC patients in the "post-docetaxel space." In view of the continued AR-mediated signaling on m

  14. Impact of pre-treatment prostate tissue androgen content on the prediction of castration-resistant prostate cancer development in patients treated with primary androgen deprivation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Y; Suzuki, K; Arai, S; Miyoshi, Y; Umemoto, S; Masumori, N; Kamiya, N; Ichikawa, T; Kitagawa, Y; Mizokami, A; Sugimura, Y; Nonomura, N; Sakai, H; Honma, S; Kubota, Y

    2013-05-01

    Great advances in tissue androgen analysis using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) have made it possible to evaluate the tissue androgen content from a single needle prostate biopsy specimen. In this study, we investigated if pre-treatment androgen content in prostate biopsy specimens could predict their response to primary androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and future castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). One-hundred and sixty-five prostate cancer patients who received primary ADT were enrolled. They had received multiple core prostate needle biopsy at diagnosis, and an additional one needle biopsy specimen was obtained for tissue androgen determination using LC-MS/MS. The patients' prostate specific antigen (PSA) values were periodically followed during the treatment and patients were determined to have CRPC when their PSA value increased continuously to 25% above the nadir and a 2.0 ng/mL increase. A significant correlation was found between PSA value decline velocity (PSA half-time) after ADT and pre-ADT tissue androgen content. Twenty-three patients were determined to have CRPC. These CRPC patients had a significantly high concentration of tissue T (p development. By using the two statistically significant variables, the relative risk of CRPC development could be calculated. The results of this study suggest that the evaluation of prostate androgen content in a single needle biopsy specimen may be useful to predict future CRPC development after primary ADT. Further studies are required for the clinical application of T/DHT ratio evaluation. PMID:23444052

  15. Increased expression of class III β-tubulin in castration-resistant human prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Terry, S; Ploussard, G; Allory, Y; Nicolaiew, N; Boissière-Michot, F; Maillé, P; Kheuang, L; Coppolani, E; Ali, A.; Bibeau, F; Culine, S; Buttyan, R.; de la Taille, A; Vacherot, F

    2009-01-01

    Background: Class III β-tubulin (βIII-tubulin) is expressed in tissues of neuronal lineage and also in several human malignancies, including non-small-cell lung carcinoma, breast and ovarian cancer. Overexpression of βIII-tubulin in these tumours is associated with an unfavourable outcome and resistance to taxane-based therapies. At present, βIII-tubulin expression remains largely uncharacterised in prostate cancer. Methods: In this report, we evaluated the expression of βIII-tubulin in 138 d...

  16. The first experience in using abiraterone acetate in patients with castration-refractory prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    L. M. Rapoport; E. A. Bezrukov; A. V. Kondrashina

    2015-01-01

    Even in the mid-twentieth century, Huggins and Hodges proved the susceptibility of prostate cancer cells to hormonal manipulations, by using surgical castration as an example. An average of 18–36 months after initiation of first-line hormonal therapy, patients develop the castration resistance in prostate cancer, one of the causes of which was hyperproduction of the tumor receptors of prostate cancer cells and their hypersusceptibility to the castration levels of testosterone. Long-term treat...

  17. Differences in treatment patterns among patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer treated by oncologists versus urologists in a US managed care population

    OpenAIRE

    Alemayehu,

    2011-01-01

    Nicole M Engel-Nitz1, Berhanu Alemayehu2, David Parry3, Faith Nathan21Innovus, Eden Prairie, MN, USA; 2AstraZeneca, Wilmington, DE, USA; 3AstraZeneca UK, London, UKObjective: Differences in treatment patterns, health care resource utilization, and costs between patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) treated by oncologists and those treated by urologists were examined.Methods: Patients aged ≥40 with CRPC were identified using claims from a large US managed health care...

  18. A multi-centre randomised phase III trial of Dexamethasone vs Dexamethasone and diethylstilbestrol in castration-resistant prostate cancer: immediate vs deferred Diethylstilbestrol

    OpenAIRE

    Shamash, J; Powles, T; Sarker, S J; Protheroe, A; Mithal, N; Mills, R.; Beard, R; Wilson, P; Tranter, N.; O'Brien, N; McFaul, S; Oliver, T

    2011-01-01

    Background: The role of further hormone therapy in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) remains unclear. We performed a multi-centre randomised phase III study comparing the use of Dexamethasone, Aspirin, and immediate addition of Diethylstilbestrol (DAiS) vs Dexamethasone, Aspirin, and deferred (until disease progression) addition of Diethylstilbestrol (DAdS). Methods: From 2001 to 2008, 270 men with chemotherapy-naive CRPC were randomly assigned, in a 1 : 1 ratio, to receive either D...

  19. The PREVAIL trial of enzalutamide in men with chemotherapy-naïve, metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: Post hoc analysis of Korean patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Choung-Soo; Theeuwes, Ad; Kwon, Dong Deuk; Choi, Young Deuk; Chung, Byung Ha; Lee, Hyun Moo; Lee, Kang Hyun; Lee, Sang Eun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This post hoc analysis evaluated treatment effects, safety, and pharmacokinetics of enzalutamide in Korean patients in the phase 3, double-blind, placebo-controlled PREVAIL trial. Materials and Methods Asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic chemotherapy-naive men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer that progressed on androgen deprivation therapy received 160 mg/d oral enzalutamide or placebo (1:1) until death or discontinuation due to radiographic progression or skeletal-...

  20. Early outcome prediction on 18F-fluorocholine PET/CT in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients treated with abiraterone

    OpenAIRE

    De Giorgi, Ugo; Caroli, Paola; Burgio, Salvatore L.; Menna, Cecilia; Conteduca, Vincenza; Bianchi, Emanuela; Fabbri, Francesca; Carretta, Elisa; Amadori, Dino; Paganelli, Giovanni; Matteucci, Federica

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the role of 18F-fluorocholine positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FCH-PET/CT) in the early evaluation of abiraterone and outcome prediction in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Patient and methods: Forty-three patients with metastatic CRPC progressing after docetaxel received abiraterone 1,000 mg daily with prednisone 5 mg twice daily. Patients were evaluated monthly for serological PSA response and safety. FCH-PET/C...

  1. Abiraterone acetate in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: long term outcome of the Temporary Authorization for Use programme in France

    OpenAIRE

    Houédé, Nadine; Beuzeboc, Philippe; Gourgou, Sophie; Tosi, Diego; Moise, Laura; Gravis, Gwenaëlle; Delva, Remy; Fléchon, Aude; Latorzeff, Igor; Ferrero, Jean-Marc; Oudard, Stéphane; Tartas, Sophie; Laguerre, Brigitte; Topart, Delphine; Roubaud, Guilhem

    2015-01-01

    AbstractBackgroundCOU-AA-301 trial has proved that abiraterone acetate (AA), a selective inhibitor of androgen biosynthesis, improved overall survival (OS) of patients with metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) after a first line of docetaxel. Based on this result, a Temporary Authorization for Use (TAU) was performed between December 2010 and July 2011 to provide patients with mCRPC the opportunity to receive AA before its commercialization. The aim of this study was to eva...

  2. SU-D-303-01: Spatial Distribution of Bone Metastases In Metastatic Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perk, T; Bradshaw, T; Harmon, S; Perlman, S; Liu, G; Jeraj, R [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Identification of metastatic bone lesions is critical in prostate cancer, where treatments may be more effective in patients with fewer lesions. This study aims characterize the distribution and spread of bone lesions and create a probability map of metastatic spread in bone. Methods: Fifty-five metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer patients received up to 3 whole-body [F-18]NaF PET/CT scans. Lesions were identified by physician on PET/CT and contoured using a threshold of SUV>15. An atlas-based segmentation method was used to create CT regions, which determined skeletal location of lesions. Patients were divided into 3 groups with low (N<40), medium (40100) numbers of lesions. A combination of articulated and deformable registrations was used to register the skeletal segments and lesions of each patient to a single skeleton. All the lesion data was then combined to make a probability map. Results: A total of 4038 metastatic lesions (mean 74, range 2–304) were identified. Skeletal regions with highest occurrence of lesions included ribs, thoracic spine, and pelvis with 21%, 19%, and 15% of the total number lesions and 8%, 18%, and 31 % of the total lesion volume, respectively. Interestingly, patients with fewer lesions were found to have a lower proportion of lesions in the ribs (9% in low vs. 27% in high number of lesions). Additionally, the probability map showed specific areas in the spine and pelvis where over 75% of patients had metastases, and other areas in the skeleton with a less than 2% of metastases. Conclusion: We identified skeletal regions with higher incidence of metastases and specific sub-regions in the skeleton that had high or low probability of occurrence of metastases. Additionally, we found that metastatic lesions in the ribs and skull occur more commonly in advanced disease. These results may have future applications in computer-aided diagnosis. Funding from the Prostate Cancer Foundation.

  3. SU-D-303-01: Spatial Distribution of Bone Metastases In Metastatic Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Identification of metastatic bone lesions is critical in prostate cancer, where treatments may be more effective in patients with fewer lesions. This study aims characterize the distribution and spread of bone lesions and create a probability map of metastatic spread in bone. Methods: Fifty-five metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer patients received up to 3 whole-body [F-18]NaF PET/CT scans. Lesions were identified by physician on PET/CT and contoured using a threshold of SUV>15. An atlas-based segmentation method was used to create CT regions, which determined skeletal location of lesions. Patients were divided into 3 groups with low (N<40), medium (40100) numbers of lesions. A combination of articulated and deformable registrations was used to register the skeletal segments and lesions of each patient to a single skeleton. All the lesion data was then combined to make a probability map. Results: A total of 4038 metastatic lesions (mean 74, range 2–304) were identified. Skeletal regions with highest occurrence of lesions included ribs, thoracic spine, and pelvis with 21%, 19%, and 15% of the total number lesions and 8%, 18%, and 31 % of the total lesion volume, respectively. Interestingly, patients with fewer lesions were found to have a lower proportion of lesions in the ribs (9% in low vs. 27% in high number of lesions). Additionally, the probability map showed specific areas in the spine and pelvis where over 75% of patients had metastases, and other areas in the skeleton with a less than 2% of metastases. Conclusion: We identified skeletal regions with higher incidence of metastases and specific sub-regions in the skeleton that had high or low probability of occurrence of metastases. Additionally, we found that metastatic lesions in the ribs and skull occur more commonly in advanced disease. These results may have future applications in computer-aided diagnosis. Funding from the Prostate Cancer Foundation

  4. ASC-J9 Suppresses Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Growth through Degradation of Full-length and Splice Variant Androgen Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichi Yamashita

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Early studies suggested androgen receptor (AR splice variants might contribute to the progression of prostate cancer (PCa into castration resistance. However, the therapeutic strategy to target these AR splice variants still remains unresolved. Through tissue survey of tumors from the same patients before and after castration resistance, we found that the expression of AR3, a major AR splice variant that lacks the AR ligand-binding domain, was substantially increased after castration resistance development. The currently used antiandrogen, Casodex, showed little growth suppression in CWR22Rv1 cells. Importantly, we found that AR degradation enhancer ASC-J9 could degrade both full-length (fAR and AR3 in CWR22Rv1 cells as well as in C4-2 and C81 cells with addition of AR3. The consequences of such degradation of both fAR and AR3 might then result in the inhibition of AR transcriptional activity and cell growth in vitro. More importantly, suppression of AR3 specifically by short-hairpin AR3 or degradation of AR3 by ASC-J9 resulted in suppression of AR transcriptional activity and cell growth in CWR22Rv1-fARKD (fAR knockdown cells in which DHT failed to induce, suggesting the importance of targeting AR3. Finally, we demonstrated the in vivo therapeutic effects of ASC-J9 by showing the inhibition of PCa growth using the xenografted model of CWR22Rv1 cells orthotopically implanted into castrated nude mice with undetectable serum testosterone. These results suggested that targeting both fAR- and AR3-mediated PCa growth by ASC-J9 may represent the novel therapeutic approach to suppress castration-resistant PCa. Successful clinical trials targeting both fAR and AR3 may help us to battle castration-resistant PCa in the future.

  5. The use of circulating tumor cells in guiding treatment decisions for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onstenk, Wendy; de Klaver, Willemijn; de Wit, Ronald; Lolkema, Martijn; Foekens, John; Sleijfer, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    The therapeutic landscape of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) has drastically changed over the past decade with the advent of several new anti-tumor agents. Oncologists increasingly face dilemmas concerning the best treatment sequence for individual patients since most of the novel compounds have been investigated and subsequently positioned either pre- or post-docetaxel. A currently unmet need exists for biomarkers able to guide treatment decisions and to capture treatment resistance at an early stage thereby allowing for an early change to an alternative strategy. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have in this context intensively been investigated over the last years. The CTC count, as determined by the CellSearch System (Janssen Diagnostics LLC, Raritan, NJ), is a strong, independent prognostic factor for overall survival in patients with mCRPC at various time points during treatment and, as an early response marker, outperforms traditional response evaluations using serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels, scintigraphy as well as radiography. The focus of research is now shifting toward the predictive value of CTCs and the use of the characterization of CTCs to guide the selection of treatments with the highest chance of success for individual patients. Recently, the presence of the androgen receptor splice variant 7 (AR-V7) has been shown to be a promising predictive factor. In this review, we have explored the clinical value of the enumeration and characterization of CTCs for the treatment of mCRPC and have put the results obtained from recent studies investigating the prognostic and predictive value of CTCs into clinical perspective. PMID:27107266

  6. A Phase 2 Trial of Abiraterone Acetate in Japanese Men with Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer and without Prior Chemotherapy (JPN-201 Study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Nobuaki; Uemura, Hirotsugu; Satoh, Takefumi; Suzuki, Hiroyoshi; Nishiyama, Tsutomu; Uemura, Hiroji; Hashine, Katsuyoshi; Imanaka, Keiichiro; Ozono, Seiichiro; Akaza, Hideyuki

    2014-01-01

    Objective Abiraterone acetate has been approved in >70 countries for chemotherapy-naïve metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients. Efficacy and safety of abiraterone acetate (1000 mg/once daily) with prednisolone (5 mg/twice daily) in chemotherapy-naïve Japanese patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer was evaluated. Methods Men, ≥20 years, with prostate-specific antigen levels of ≥5 ng/ml and evidence of progression were enrolled in this Phase 2, multicenter, open-label study. Primary efficacy endpoint was proportion of patients achieving a prostate-specific antigen decline of ≥50% from baseline (prostate-specific antigen response) after 12 week of treatment. Secondary efficacy endpoints and safety were assessed. Results A confirmed prostate-specific antigen response was observed in 29/48 (60.4%) patients by week 12; lower limit of two-sided 90% confidence interval was >35% (threshold response rate), demonstrating efficacy of abiraterone acetate. Secondary efficacy endpoints: prostate-specific antigen response rate during treatment period: 62.5%; objective radiographic response, partial response: 4/18 (22.2%) patients; complete response: none; stable disease: 11/18 (61.1%) patients; median percent change in prostate-specific antigen level from baseline at Week 12: −66.62%. Median prostate-specific antigen response duration and progression-free survival were not reached, and median radiographic progression-free survival was 253 days. Of 31/48 (64.6%) patients experienced adverse events of special interest; most common was hepatic function abnormality (37.5%, Grade 3: 10.4%). One Grade 3 hypertension was the only mineralocorticoid adverse event >Grade 1/2. Conclusions Efficacy of abiraterone acetate plus prednisolone was demonstrated by decline in prostate-specific antigen levels with evidence of antitumor activity by radiography in Japanese patients with chemotherapy-naïve metastatic castration-resistant prostate

  7. Cost-effectiveness of abiraterone treatment in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer who previously received docetaxel therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Rudakova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Therapy for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC is a serious problem that requires significant public health care expenditures.Objective: to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of abiraterone treatment in patients with metastatic CRPC who previously received docetaxel under the conditions of the budgetary public health system of the Russian Federation.Material and methods. Markovian simulation based on the COU-AA-301 randomized placebo-controlled Phase III study was used. Survival analysis was made in 70-year-old patients. The cost of abiraterone therapy corresponded to that of the 2013 auctions.Results. Abiraterone therapy in patients who have previously received docetaxel therapy causes an increase in average life expectancy by an average of 4.6 months and progression-free survival by 2.0 months. Moreover, the cost calculated with reference to one year of additional life will account for about 3.6 million rubles and that to one additional quality-adjusted life year will be about 5.45 million rubles.Conclusion. The cost-effectiveness of abiraterone therapy for metastatic CRPC in patients who have previously received docetaxel therapy is similar to that of other medicaments used in oncological practice under the conditions of the budgetary public health system of the Russian Federation. In this connection, abiraterone may be considered as an economically acceptable medical intervention in this clinical situation.

  8. Evolving Role of Bone Biomarkers in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer1

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Janet E.; Sim, Sheryl

    2010-01-01

    The preferential metastasis of prostate cancer cells to bone disrupts the process of bone remodeling and results in lesions that cause significant pain and patient morbidity. Although prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is an established biomarker in prostate cancer, it provides only limited information relating to bone metastases and the treatment of metastatic bone disease with bisphosphonates or novel noncytotoxic targeted or biological agents that may provide clinical benefits without affecti...

  9. Evolving Role of Bone Biomarkers in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Janet E.; Sheryl Sim

    2010-01-01

    The preferential metastasis of prostate cancer cells to bone disrupts the process of bone remodeling and results in lesions that cause significant pain and patient morbidity. Although prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is an established biomarker in prostate cancer, it provides only limited information relating to bone metastases and the treatment of metastatic bone disease with bisphosphonates or novel noncytotoxic targeted or biological agents that may provide clinical benefits without affecti...

  10. Clinical and Preclinical Treatment Aspects of Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer (CRPC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J. Meulenbeld (Hielke)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIn the Western countries prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer, except for skin cancer, and the second leading cause of male cancer deaths. Prostate cancer tends to develop in men over the age of fifty and although it is one of the most prevalent types of cancer in men,

  11. A Phase 2 Study of Abiraterone Acetate in Japanese Men with Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer Who Had Received Docetaxel-based Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Takefumi; Uemura, Hiroji; Tanabe, Kazunari; Nishiyama, Tsutomu; Terai, Akito; Yokomizo, Akira; Nakatani, Tatsuya; Imanaka, Keiichiro; Ozono, Seiichiro; Akaza, Hideyuki

    2014-01-01

    Objective In this Phase 2 multicenter study the efficacy and safety of oral abiraterone acetate (1000 mg/once daily) plus prednisolone (5 mg/twice daily) was evaluated in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients from Japan who had previously received docetaxel-based chemotherapy. Methods Men (aged ≥20 years) with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (prostate-specific antigen levels: ≥5 ng/ml), who had received 1 or 2 cytotoxic chemotherapies (with ≥1 regimen being docetaxel) for prostate cancer, were enrolled in this open-label, single-arm study. Primary efficacy endpoint was proportion of patients achieving a ≥50% prostate-specific antigen decline from baseline (prostate-specific antigen response rate) after 12-week treatment. Safety and pharmacokinetics were also assessed. Results Confirmed prostate-specific antigen response rate by Week 12 was 28.3% (90% confidence interval: 17.6%; 41.1%) or 13 out of 46 (full analysis set) treated patients. However, total prostate-specific antigen response rate including confirmed and unconfirmed responses was 34.8% (90% confidence interval: 23.2%; 47.9%). Secondary efficacy endpoints and outcomes were: improvement in Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status score by ≥1 unit: 7/16 patients (43.8%); objective radiographic response: complete response, partial response and stable disease in 0, 1/22 (4.5%) and 9/22 (40.9%) patients, respectively; pain palliation response: 9/16 (56.3%) patients. The most common adverse events (>20% patients) were upper respiratory tract infection (13/47, 27.7% patients) and hepatic function abnormal (10/47, 21.3% patients, Grade 3: 8.5%). All mineralocorticoid-related toxicities were Grade 1/2. Conclusions Abiraterone acetate plus prednisolone showed favorable efficacy in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer Japanese patients who had received chemotherapy. Abiraterone acetate plus prednisolone had an acceptable safety profile. Clinical

  12. Quercetin-loaded nanomicelles to circumvent human castration-resistant prostate cancer in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Liu, Juan; Wei, Tuo; Ma, Xiaowei; Cheng, Qiang; Huo, Shuaidong; Zhang, Chunqiu; Zhang, Yanan; Duan, Xianglin; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2016-02-01

    Prostate cancer is highly prevalent and has become the second leading cause of cancer-related death in men. Its treatment remains a challenge in the clinic, particularly in patients who have advanced to ``castration-resistant prostate cancer'' (CRPC). Thus, more effective therapeutic strategies are required. Quercetin (QCT) is a natural flavonoid compound that has attracted increasing interest due to its anticancer activity. However, the clinical application of quercetin is largely hampered by its poor water solubility and low bioavailability. The objective of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of novel QCT-loaded nanomicelles (M-QCTs) assembled from DSPE-PEG2000 for prostate cancer treatment. Our results indicated that QCT was efficiently encapsulated into micelles up to 1 mg mL-1, which corresponds to a 450-fold increase of its water solubility. In vitro studies showed that the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value (20.2 μM) of M-QCTs was much lower than free QCT (>200 μM). Thus, M-QCTs were considerably more effective than free QCT in proliferation inhibition and apoptosis induction of human androgen-independent PC-3 cells. Furthermore, M-QCTs showed superior antitumor efficacy and the tumor proliferation rate reduced by 52.03% compared to the control group in the PC-3 xenograft mouse model, possibly due to increased accumulation of M-QCTs at the tumor site by the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. Collectively, our studies demonstrated that M-QCTs significantly increase drug accumulation at the tumor site and exhibit superior anticancer activity in prostate cancer. Thus, our nanomicelle-based drug delivery system constitutes a promising and effective therapeutic strategy for clinical treatment.Prostate cancer is highly prevalent and has become the second leading cause of cancer-related death in men. Its treatment remains a challenge in the clinic, particularly in patients who have advanced to ``castration-resistant

  13. Quercetin-loaded nanomicelles to circumvent human castration-resistant prostate cancer in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Liu, Juan; Wei, Tuo; Ma, Xiaowei; Cheng, Qiang; Huo, Shuaidong; Zhang, Chunqiu; Zhang, Yanan; Duan, Xianglin; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2016-02-01

    Prostate cancer is highly prevalent and has become the second leading cause of cancer-related death in men. Its treatment remains a challenge in the clinic, particularly in patients who have advanced to ``castration-resistant prostate cancer'' (CRPC). Thus, more effective therapeutic strategies are required. Quercetin (QCT) is a natural flavonoid compound that has attracted increasing interest due to its anticancer activity. However, the clinical application of quercetin is largely hampered by its poor water solubility and low bioavailability. The objective of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of novel QCT-loaded nanomicelles (M-QCTs) assembled from DSPE-PEG2000 for prostate cancer treatment. Our results indicated that QCT was efficiently encapsulated into micelles up to 1 mg mL-1, which corresponds to a 450-fold increase of its water solubility. In vitro studies showed that the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value (20.2 μM) of M-QCTs was much lower than free QCT (>200 μM). Thus, M-QCTs were considerably more effective than free QCT in proliferation inhibition and apoptosis induction of human androgen-independent PC-3 cells. Furthermore, M-QCTs showed superior antitumor efficacy and the tumor proliferation rate reduced by 52.03% compared to the control group in the PC-3 xenograft mouse model, possibly due to increased accumulation of M-QCTs at the tumor site by the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. Collectively, our studies demonstrated that M-QCTs significantly increase drug accumulation at the tumor site and exhibit superior anticancer activity in prostate cancer. Thus, our nanomicelle-based drug delivery system constitutes a promising and effective therapeutic strategy for clinical treatment.Prostate cancer is highly prevalent and has become the second leading cause of cancer-related death in men. Its treatment remains a challenge in the clinic, particularly in patients who have advanced to ``castration-resistant

  14. New therapies for relapsed castration-resistant prostate cancer based on peptide analogs of hypothalamic hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew V Schally

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is a pleasure to contribute our presentation at the International Prostate Forum of the Annual Meeting of the American Urological Association (AUA to this special issue of the Asian Journal of Andrology.

  15. Targeting Alternative Sites on the Androgen Receptor to Treat Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Rennie, Paul S.; Artem Cherkasov; Nada Lallous; Kush Dalal

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent, metastatic prostate cancer continues to be a leading cause of cancer-death in men. The androgen receptor (AR) is a modular, ligand-inducible transcription factor that regulates the expression of genes that can drive the progression of this disease, and as a consequence, this receptor is a key therapeutic target for controlling prostate cancer. The current drugs designed to directly inhibit the AR are called anti-androgens, and all act by competing with androgens for binding to the ...

  16. Therapeutic options in docetaxel-refractory metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixian Zhong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Docetaxel is an established first-line therapy to treat metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC. Recently, abiraterone and cabazitaxel were approved for use after docetaxel failure, with improved survival. National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE preliminary recommendations were negative for both abiraterone (now positive in final recommendation and cabazitaxel (negative in final recommendation. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of abiraterone, cabazitaxel, mitoxantrone and prednisone for mCRPC treatment in US. METHODS: A decision-tree model was constructed to compare the two mCRPC treatments versus two placebos over 18 months from a societal perspective. Chance nodes include baseline pain as a severity indicator, grade III/IV side-effects, and survival at 18 months. Probabilities, survival and health utilities were from published studies. Model cost inputs included drug treatment, side-effect management and prevention, radiation for pain, and death associated costs in 2010 US dollars. RESULTS: Abiraterone is a cost-effective choice at $94K/QALY (quality adjusted life years compared to placebo in our base-case analysis. Cabazitaxel and abiraterone are the most effective, yet also most expensive agents. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER at base-case are $101K/QALY (extended dominated for mitoxantrone vs. placebo, $91K/QALY for abiraterone vs. mitoxantrone, $956K/QALY for cabazitaxel vs. abiraterone. Abiraterone becomes less cost-effective as its AWP increases, or if the cost of mitoxantrone side-effect management decreases. Increases in the percentage of patients with baseline pain leads to an increased ICER for both mitoxantrone and abiraterone, but mitoxantrone does relatively better. Cabazitaxel remains not cost-effective. CONCLUSION: Our base case model suggests that abiraterone is a cost-effective option in docetaxel-refractory mCRPC patients. Newer treatments will also

  17. Radium-223 chloride: a potential new treatment for castration-resistant prostate cancer patients with metastatic bone disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radium-223 chloride (223Ra; Alpharadin) is an alpha-emitting radioisotope that targets areas of osteoblastic metastasis and is excreted by the small intestine. When compared with beta-emitters (eg, strontium-89, samarium-153), 223Ra delivers a high quantity of energy per track length with short tissue penetration. This review describes the mechanism, radiobiology, and preclinical development of 223Ra and discusses the clinical data currently available regarding its safety and efficacy profile. Data from clinical trials including abstracts were collected and reviewed using the PubMed Database, as well as the American Society of Clinical Oncology abstract database. Current bone-targeted therapies fall into two main categories: antiresorptive agents (eg, zoledronic acid, denosumab), which have been shown to delay skeletal-related events, and radiopharmaceuticals (eg, samarium-153), which may have a role in pain palliation. Historically, neither antiresorptive agents nor radiopharmaceuticals have shown definitive evidence of improved overall survival or other antitumor effects in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Radiopharmaceuticals are limited by myelosuppresion, thrombocytopenia, and renal excretion. In a recently reported randomized Phase III trial in men with symptomatic bone-metastatic CRPC who had received or were ineligible for docetaxel chemotherapy, 223Ra treatment resulted in improved overall survival and delayed skeletal-related events. Toxicity consisted of minor gastrointestinal side effects and mild neutropenia and thrombocytopenia that were rarely severe. Pending regulatory approval, 223Ra may represent a unique and distinct option for an important subgroup of patients with mCRPC; future trials should address its use in combination or in sequence with existing and novel agents

  18. Determine of the optimal number of cycles of docetaxel in the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yuan-Chi; Chiang, Po-Hui; Luo, Hao-Lun; Chuang, Yao-Chi; Chen, Yen-Ta; Kang, Chih-Hsiung; Hsu, Chun-Chien; Lee, Wei-Ching; Cheng, Yuan-Tso

    2016-09-01

    To determine the optimal number of cycles of docetaxel for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, we retrospectively collected 73 patients receiving varying numbers of docetaxel plus prednisolone and analyzed the clinical outcomes including overall survival, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response, and adverse events. The study included 33 patients receiving ≤ 10 cycles of docetaxel and 40 patients receiving > 10 cycles. Patients receiving > 10 cycles were younger than those who received ≤ 10 cycles. There was no statistical significant difference in overall survival between the two groups (log-rank test, p = 0.75). Adverse effects were more common among patients receiving ≥ 10 cycles of treatment. A PSA flare-up was observed among six patients (8.2%); the median duration of the PSA surge was 3 weeks (range, 3-12 weeks). The overall survival rates in patients with PSA flare-up were comparable with the patients having PSA response. We concluded that at least four cycles of docetaxel should be administered in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients in order not to cease treatment prematurely from potentially beneficial chemotherapy. However, administering > 10 cycles does not result in any further improvement in survival and is associated with more adverse effects. PMID:27638405

  19. The PREVAIL Study: Primary Outcomes by Site and Extent of Baseline Disease for Enzalutamide-treated Men with Chemotherapy-naïve Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evans, Christopher P; Higano, Celestia S; Keane, Thomas;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Enzalutamide, an oral androgen receptor inhibitor, significantly improved overall survival (OS) and radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS) versus placebo in the PREVAIL trial of men with chemotherapy-naïve metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. OBJECTIVE: To assess the...... while continuing androgen deprivation therapy. OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Coprimary endpoints (rPFS, OS) were prospectively evaluated in nonvisceral and visceral subgroups. All other efficacy analyses were post hoc. RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS: Enzalutamide improved rPFS versus placebo...... significant benefits in men with chemotherapy-naïve metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, with or without visceral disease, low- or high-volume bone disease, or lymph node only disease. PATIENT SUMMARY: Patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer-including those with or without...

  20. The effectiveness of the TAX 327 nomogram in predicting overall survival in Chinese patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bian, Xiao-Jie; Zhu, Yao; Shen, Yi-Jun; Wang, Jin-You; Ma, Chun-Guang; Zhang, Hai-Liang; Dai, Bo; Zhang, Shi-Lin; Yao, Xu-Dong; Ye, Ding-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Based on the results of TAX 327, a nomogram was developed to predict the overall survival of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) after first-line chemotherapy. The nomogram, however, has not been validated in an independent dataset, especially in a series out of clinical trials. Thus, the objective of the current study was to validate the TAX 327 nomogram in a community setting in China. A total of 146 patients with mCRPC who received first-line chemotherapy (docetaxel or ...

  1. Enzalutamide Antitumour Activity Against Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer Previously Treated with Docetaxel and Abiraterone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasso, Klaus; Thomsen, Frederik B; Schrader, Andres J;

    2015-01-01

    prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics, patient characteristics, and progression-free survival, respectively. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazard analysis were performed. RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS: We identified 137 patients who prior to enzalutamide had progressed following a median....... Patients who had more than 30% or 50% falls in PSA had improved survival compared with patients who had no such PSA fall (11.4 mo vs 7.1 mo; p=0.001 and 12.6 vs 7.4 mo; p=0.007, respectively). Poor performance status and low haemoglobin was negatively associated with OS. CONCLUSIONS: Median OS...

  2. Radium-223 treatment of bone metastases from castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Jann; Højgaard, Liselotte

    2014-01-01

    The alpha emitter Radium-223 ((22)3Ra-Cl2) is a bone-seeking radionuclide studied as a new treatment for patients with bone metastases from hormone refractory prostate cancer. More than 1,000 patients have been included in clinical phase I-III tests showing significant reduction in alkaline...... phosphatase- and PSA level and prolonged survival. Adverse events are usually mild to moderate and comprise gastrointestinal and myelotoxic symp-toms. Intravenously administered (22)3Ra-Cl2 (half-life 11.4 days) will likely be given every four weeks for six treatments to out-patients....

  3. The predictive value of ERG protein expression for development of castration-resistant prostate cancer in hormone-naïve advanced prostate cancer treated with primary androgen deprivation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Kasper Drimer; Røder, Martin A; Thomsen, Frederik B;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Biomarkers predicting response to primary androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and risk of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is lacking. We aimed to analyse the predictive value of ERG expression for development of CRPC. METHODS: In total, 194 patients with advanced and...... in secondary endpoints were observed. CONCLUSIONS: ERG expression was not associated with risk of CRPC suggesting that ERG is not a candidate biomarker for predicting response to primary ADT in patients diagnosed with advanced and/or metastatic PCa....

  4. The AhR Ligand, TCDD, Regulates Androgen Receptor Activity Differently in Androgen-Sensitive versus Castration-Resistant Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Ghotbaddini

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The reported biological effects of TCDD include induction of drug metabolizing enzymes, wasting syndrome and tumor promotion. TCDD elicits most of its effects through binding the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR. TCDD induced degradation of AhR has been widely reported and requires ubiquitination of the protein. The rapid depletion of AhR following TCDD activation serves as a mechanism to modulate AhR mediated gene induction. In addition to inducing AhR degradation, TCDD has been reported to induce degradation of hormone receptors. The studies reported here, evaluate the effect of TCDD exposure on androgen receptor (AR expression and activity in androgen-sensitive LNCaP and castration-resistant C4-2 prostate cancer cells. Our results show that TCDD exposure does not induce AhR or AR degradation in C4-2 cells. However, both AhR and AR are degraded in LNCaP cells following TCDD exposure. In addition, TCDD enhances AR phosphorylation and induces expression of AR responsive genes in LNCaP cells. Our data reveals that TCDD effect on AR expression and activity differs in androgen-sensitive and castration-resistant prostate cancer cell models.

  5. Radium-223-Dichloride in Castration Resistant Metastatic Prostate Cancer—Preliminary Results of the Response Evaluation Using F-18-Fluoride PET/CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalevi Kairemo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome after Radium-223-dichloride (223RaCl2 treatment of patients with skeletal metastases of castration resistant prostate cancer using whole-body 18F-Fluoride PET/CT. Sodium 18F-fluoride [18F]-NaF PET/CT was performed prior the treatment of 223RaCl2, after the first cycle and after the sixth cycle. The skeletal metastases were analyzed quantitatively using modified PET response evaluation PERCIST criteria. The patients were also analyzed for S-PSA. All ten patients responded in [18F]-NaF scans after 6 cycles, but interim analysis after the 1st cycle did not give additional information about the outcome. The S-PSA decrease correlated with [18F]-NaF response, only 1 patient demonstrated progressive disease, i.e., >25% increase in S-PSA values during 223RaCl2. Our results (although preliminary suggest that 18F-Fluoride PET/CT is useful in the follow-up of castration resistant prostate cancer with skeletal metastases.

  6. {sup 11}C-Choline PET/CT in castration-resistant prostate cancer patients treated with docetaxel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceci, Francesco [University of Bologna, Service of Nuclear Medicine, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Bologna, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, UO Medicina Nucleare PAD. 30, Bologna (Italy); Castellucci, Paolo; Graziani, Tiziano; Renzi, Riccardo; Fanti, Stefano [University of Bologna, Service of Nuclear Medicine, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna (Italy); Schiavina, Riccardo; Borghesi, Marco; Brunocilla, Eugenio [University of Bologna, Department of Urology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna (Italy); Di Tullio, Piergiorgio; Ardizzoni, Andrea [University of Bologna, Department of Oncology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna (Italy)

    2016-01-15

    To investigate the role of {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT for evaluating the response to treatment in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) treated with docetaxel in comparison with PSA response. Inclusion criteria were (a) proven mCRPC, (b) docetaxel as first line of chemotherapy (docetaxel 75 mg/m{sup 2} + prednisone 5 mg), and (c) {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT and PSA values assessed before and after docetaxel administration. A total of 61 patients were retrospectively enrolled (mean age 68.9 years, range 57 - 84 years). {sup 11}C-Choline PET/CT was performed at baseline before docetaxel treatment (PET1) and after the end of treatment (PET2). PSA values were measured before treatment (PSA1) and after treatment (PSA2). PET2 was reported as complete response (CR), partial response (PR) or stable disease (SD). Progressive disease (PD) was considered if a new lesion was seen. PSA trend was calculated from the change in absolute values between PSA1 and PSA2. A decrease of ≥50 % between PSA1 and PSA2 was considered a PSA response. Clinical, radiological and laboratory follow-up ranged from 6 to 53 months (mean 13.5 months). Of the 61 patients, 40 (65.5 %) showed PD on PET2, 13 (21.3 %) showed SD, 2 (3.4 %) showed PR, and 6 (9.8 %) showed CR. An increasing PSA trend was seen in 29 patients (47.5 %) and a decreasing PSA trend in 32 patients (52.5 %). A PSA response of ≥50 % was seen in 25 patients (41 %). Radiological PD was seen in 23 of the 29 patients (79.3 %) with an increasing PSA trend, in 16 of the 32 patients (50 %) with a decreasing PSA trend, and in 11 of the 25 patients (44 %) with a PSA response of ≥50 %. In the multivariate statistical analysis, the presence of more than ten bone lesions detected on PET1 was significantly associated with an increased probability of PD on PET2. No association was observed between PSA level and PD on PET2. Our results suggest that an increasing PSA trend measured after docetaxel treatment could be

  7. Restoration of the cellular secretory milieu overrides androgen dependence of in vivo generated castration resistant prostate cancer cells overexpressing the androgen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patki, Mugdha; Huang, Yanfang; Ratnam, Manohar

    2016-07-22

    It is believed that growth of castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) cells is enabled by sensitization to minimal residual post-castrate androgen due to overexpression of the androgen receptor (AR). Evidence is derived from androgen-induced colony formation in the absence of cell-secreted factors or from studies involving forced AR overexpression in hormone-dependent cells. On the other hand, standard cell line models established from CRPC patient tumors (e.g., LNCaP and VCaP) are hormone-dependent and require selection pressure in castrated mice to re-emerge as CRPC cells and the resulting tumors then tend to be insensitive to the androgen antagonist enzalutamide. Therefore, we examined established CRPC model cells produced by castration of mice bearing hormone-dependent cell line xenografts including CRPC cells overexpressing full-length AR (C4-2) or co-expressing wtAR and splice-variant AR-V7 that is incapable of ligand binding (22Rv1). In standard colony formation assays, C4-2 cells were shown to be androgen-dependent and sensitive to enzalutamide whereas 22Rv1 cells were incapable of colony formation under identical conditions. However, both C4-2 and 22Rv1 cells formed colonies in conditioned media derived from the same cells or from HEK293 fibroblasts that were proven to lack androgenic activity. This effect was (i) not enhanced by androgen, (ii) insensitive to enzalutamide, (iii) dependent on AR (in C4-2) and on AR-V7 and wtAR (in 22Rv1) and (iv) sensitive to inhibitors of several signaling pathways, similar to androgen-stimulation. Therefore, during progression to CRPC in vivo, coordinate cellular changes accompanying overexpression of AR may enable cooperation between hormone-independent activity of AR and actions of cellular secretory factors to completely override androgen-dependence and sensitivity to drugs targeting hormonal factors. PMID:27179779

  8. Abiraterone acetate plus prednisone versus placebo plus prednisone in chemotherapy-naive men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (COU-AA-302): final overall survival analysis of a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 3 study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ryan, C.J.; Smith, M.R.; Fizazi, K.; Saad, F.; Mulders, P.F.A.; Sternberg, C.N.; Miller, K.; Logothetis, C.J.; Shore, N.D.; Small, E.J.; Carles, J.; Flaig, T.W.; Taplin, M.E.; Higano, C.S.; Souza, P. de; Bono, J.S. de; Griffin, T.W.; Porre, P. De; Yu, M.K.; Park, Y.C.; Li, J.; Kheoh, T.; Naini, V.; Molina, A.; Rathkopf, D.E.; Gerritsen, W.R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Abiraterone acetate plus prednisone significantly improved radiographic progression-free survival compared with placebo plus prednisone in men with chemotherapy-naive castration-resistant prostate cancer at the interim analyses of the COU-AA-302 trial. Here, we present the prespecified f

  9. Ipilimumab versus placebo after radiotherapy in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer that had progressed after docetaxel chemotherapy (CA184-043): a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, phase 3 trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwon, Eugene D; Drake, Charles G; Scher, Howard I;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ipilimumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody that binds cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 to enhance antitumour immunity. Our aim was to assess the use of ipilimumab after radiotherapy in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer that progressed after docetaxel c...... that warrant further investigation. FUNDING: Bristol-Myers Squibb....

  10. Intratumoral de novo steroid synthesis activates androgen receptor in castration-resistant prostate cancer and is upregulated by treatment with CYP17A1 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Changmeng; Chen, Sen; Ng, Patrick; Bubley, Glenn J; Nelson, Peter S; Mostaghel, Elahe A; Marck, Brett; Matsumoto, Alvin M; Simon, Nicholas I; Wang, Hongyun; Chen, Shaoyong; Balk, Steven P

    2011-10-15

    Relapse of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) that occurs after androgen deprivation therapy of primary prostate cancer can be mediated by reactivation of the androgen receptor (AR). One important mechanism mediating this AR reactivation is intratumoral conversion of the weak adrenal androgens DHEA and androstenedione into the AR ligands testosterone and dihydrotestosterone. DHEA and androstenedione are synthesized by the adrenals through the sequential actions of the cytochrome P450 enzymes CYP11A1 and CYP17A1, so that CYP17A1 inhibitors such as abiraterone are effective therapies for CRPC. However, the significance of intratumoral CYP17A1 and de novo androgen synthesis from cholesterol in CRPC, and the mechanisms contributing to CYP17A1 inhibitor resistance/relapse, remain to be determined. We report that AR activity in castration-resistant VCaP tumor xenografts can be restored through CYP17A1-dependent de novo androgen synthesis, and that abiraterone treatment of these xenografts imposes selective pressure for increased intratumoral expression of CYP17A1, thereby generating a mechanism for development of resistance to CYP17A1 inhibitors. Supporting the clinical relevance of this mechanism, we found that intratumoral expression of CYP17A1 was markedly increased in tumor biopsies from CRPC patients after CYP17A1 inhibitor therapy. We further show that CRPC cells expressing a progesterone responsive T877A mutant AR are not CYP17A1 dependent, but that AR activity in these cells is still steroid dependent and mediated by upstream CYP11A1-dependent intraturmoral pregnenolone/progesterone synthesis. Together, our results indicate that CRPCs resistant to CYP17A1 inhibition may remain steroid dependent and therefore responsive to therapies that can further suppress de novo intratumoral steroid synthesis.

  11. Diving Into Cabazitaxel's Mode of Action: More Than a Taxane for the Treatment of Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellado, Begoña; Jimenez, Natalia; Marin-Aguilera, Mercedes; Reig, Oscar

    2016-08-01

    Prostate cancer is a molecularly heterogeneous disease, and mechanisms of action of taxanes and potential mechanisms of resistance are not clearly defined. Taxanes are microtubule-stabilizing agents resulting in the slowing or blocking of mitosis at the metaphase-anaphase transition and induction of apoptotic cell death. Taxanes also can inhibit androgen receptor pathway. To date, several factors have been associated with taxane resistance, including alterations in tubulin, the effect of drug efflux pumps, and the dysfunctional regulation of signaling pathways that may be involved in resistance to therapy. Preclinical and clinical data support the distinct activity of cabazitaxel in prostate cancer that may overcome resistance to prior taxanes or hormonal therapies. It is challenging to define the most adequate therapeutic sequence for each patient. Moreover, the identification of molecular markers of resistance may help to select patients for specific therapies. PMID:26827258

  12. Addressing the expected survival benefit for clinical trial design in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: Sensitivity analysis of randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massari, Francesco; Modena, Alessandra; Ciccarese, Chiara; Pilotto, Sara; Maines, Francesca; Bracarda, Sergio; Sperduti, Isabella; Giannarelli, Diana; Carlini, Paolo; Santini, Daniele; Tortora, Giampaolo; Porta, Camillo; Bria, Emilio

    2016-02-01

    We performed a sensitivity analysis, cumulating all randomized clinical trials (RCTs) in which patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) received systemic therapy, to evaluate if the comparison of RCTs may drive to biased survival estimations. An overall survival (OS) significant difference according to therapeutic strategy was more likely be determined in RCTs evaluating hormonal drugs versus those studies testing immunotherapy, chemotherapy or other strategies. With regard to control arm, an OS significant effect was found for placebo-controlled trials versus studies comparing experimental treatment with active therapies. Finally, regarding to docetaxel (DOC) timing, the OS benefit was more likely to be proved in Post-DOC setting in comparison with DOC and Pre-DOC. These data suggest that clinical trial design should take into account new benchmarks such as the type of treatment strategy, the choice of the comparator and the phase of the disease in relation to the administration of standard chemotherapy.

  13. Reflections on the therapeutic use of 223RaCl2 for bone metastases resulting from prostate cancer resistant to castration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In January 2014 the Comision Federal para la Proteccion contra Riesgos Sanitarios of the Ministry of Health in Mexico, authorize the use of 223RaCl2 as the first radiopharmaceutical emitter α for therapeutic purposes in cases of bone metastases resulting from prostate cancer resistant to castration. The paper analyzes the main variables that affect the metrological traceability using activity meters to evaluate the gamma activity of 223RaCl2 in hospitals, because it has a chain of complex decay with alpha, beta and gamma emitters, so was important to verify if a gamma activity measurement for a multiple emitter is reliable to determine the total alpha absorbed dose to bone in a patient. (Author)

  14. Automated Bone Scan Index as a quantitative imaging biomarker in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients being treated with enzalutamide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anand, Aseem; Morris, Michael J; Larson, Steven M;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Having performed analytical validation studies, we are now assessing the clinical utility of the upgraded automated Bone Scan Index (BSI) in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). In the present study, we retrospectively evaluated the discriminatory strength......-specific antigen (PSA), hemoglobin (HgB), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were obtained at baseline. Change in automated BSI and PSA were obtained from patients who have had bone scan at week 12 of treatment follow-up. Automated BSI was obtained using the analytically validated EXINI Bone(BSI) version 2. Kendall...... = 0.017. Treatment follow-up bone scans were available from 62 patients. Both change in BSI and percent change in PSA were predictive of OS. However, the combined predictive model of percent PSA change and change in automated BSI (C-index 0.77) was significantly higher than that of percent PSA change...

  15. Prostate radiation in non-metastatic castrate refractory prostate cancer provides an interesting insight into biology of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascoe Abigail C

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The natural history of non-metastatic castrate refractory prostate cancer is unknown and treatment options are limited. We present a retrospective review of 13 patients with locally advanced or high risk prostate cancer, initially treated with hormone monotherapy and then treated with prostate radiation after becoming castration refractory. Findings Median PSA response following prostate radiation was 67.4%. Median time to biochemical progression following radiotherapy was 15 months and to detection of metastatic disease was 18.5 months. Median survival from castration resistance (to date of death or November 2011 was 60 months, with median survival from RT 42 months. Conclusion Prostate radiation appears to be beneficial even in patients with potential micrometastatic disease, which supports the hypothesis that the primary tumour is important in the progression of prostate cancer. These results are an interesting addition to the literature on the biology of prostate cancer especially as this data is unlikely to be available in the future due to combined prostate radiation and androgen deprivation therapy now being the standard of care.

  16. Development and Implementation of a High-Throughput High-Content Screening Assay to Identify Inhibitors of Androgen Receptor Nuclear Localization in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Paul A; Nguyen, Minh M; Dar, Javid A; Ai, Junkui; Wang, Yujuan; Masoodi, Khalid Z; Shun, Tongying; Shinde, Sunita; Camarco, Daniel P; Hua, Yun; Huryn, Donna M; Wilson, Gabriela Mustata; Lazo, John S; Nelson, Joel B; Wipf, Peter; Wang, Zhou

    2016-05-01

    Patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) can be treated with abiraterone, a potent inhibitor of androgen synthesis, or enzalutamide, a second-generation androgen receptor (AR) antagonist, both targeting AR signaling. However, most patients relapse after several months of therapy and a majority of patients with relapsed CRPC tumors express the AR target gene prostate-specific antigen (PSA), suggesting that AR signaling is reactivated and can be targeted again to inhibit the relapsed tumors. Novel small molecules capable of inhibiting AR function may lead to urgently needed therapies for patients resistant to abiraterone, enzalutamide, and/or other previously approved antiandrogen therapies. Here, we describe a high-throughput high-content screening (HCS) campaign to identify small-molecule inhibitors of AR nuclear localization in the C4-2 CRPC cell line stably transfected with GFP-AR-GFP (2GFP-AR). The implementation of this HCS assay to screen a National Institutes of Health library of 219,055 compounds led to the discovery of 3 small molecules capable of inhibiting AR nuclear localization and function in C4-2 cells, demonstrating the feasibility of using this cell-based phenotypic assay to identify small molecules targeting the subcellular localization of AR. Furthermore, the three hit compounds provide opportunities to develop novel AR drugs with potential for therapeutic intervention in CRPC patients who have relapsed after treatment with antiandrogens, such as abiraterone and/or enzalutamide. PMID:27187604

  17. Castration Therapy of Prostate Cancer Results in Downregulation of HIF-1{alpha} Levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Ubaidi, Firas L.T. [Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology, Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Urology, Central Hospital, Vaesteras (Sweden); Schultz, Niklas [Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology, Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Egevad, Lars [Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Granfors, Torvald [Department of Urology, Central Hospital, Vaesteras (Sweden); Helleday, Thomas, E-mail: helleday@gmt.su.se [Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology, Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Science for Life Laboratory, Stockholm University, Solna (Sweden)

    2012-03-01

    Background and Purpose: Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation in combination with radiotherapy of prostate cancer is used to improve radioresponsiveness and local tumor control. Currently, the underlying mechanism is not well understood. Because hypoxia causes resistance to radiotherapy, we wanted to test whether castration affects the degree of hypoxia in prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: In 14 patients with locally advanced prostate cancer, six to 12 prostatic needle core biopsy specimens were taken prior to castration therapy. Bilateral orchidectomy was performed in 7 patients, and 7 were treated with a GnRH-agonist (leuprorelin). After castrationm two to four prostatic core biopsy specimens were taken, and the level of hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}) in cancer was determined by immunofluorescence. Results: Among biopsy specimens taken before castration, strong HIF-1{alpha} expression (mean intensity above 30) was shown in 5 patients, weak expression (mean intensity 10-30) in 3 patients, and background levels of HIF-1{alpha} (mean intensity 0-10) in 6 patients. Downregulation of HIF-1{alpha} expression after castration was observed in all 5 patients with strong HIF-1{alpha} precastration expression. HIF-1{alpha} expression was also reduced in 2 of 3 patients with weak HIF-1{alpha} precastration expression. Conclusions: Our data suggest that neoadjuvant castration decreases tumor cell hypoxia in prostate cancer, which may explain increased radiosensitivity after castration.

  18. ASC-J9(®) suppresses castration resistant prostate cancer progression via degrading the enzalutamide-induced androgen receptor mutant AR-F876L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ronghao; Lin, Wanying; Lin, Changyi; Li, Lei; Sun, Yin; Chang, Chawnshang

    2016-08-28

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) with the newly developed powerful anti-androgen enzalutamide (Enz, also known as MDV3100) has promising therapeutic effects to suppress castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and extending patients' lives an extra 4.8 months. However, most Enz therapy eventually fails with the development of Enz resistance. The detailed mechanisms how CRPC develops Enz resistance remain unclear and may involve multiple mechanisms. Among them, the induction of the androgen receptor (AR) mutant AR-F876L in some CRPC patients may represent one driving force that confers Enz resistance. Here, we demonstrate that the AR degradation enhancer, ASC-J9(®), not only degrades wild-type AR, but also has the ability to target AR-F876L. The consequence of suppressing AR-F876L may then abrogate AR-F876L mediated CRPC cell proliferation and metastasis. Thus, developing ASC-J9(®) as a new therapeutic approach may represent a novel therapy to better suppress CRPC that has already developed Enz resistance. PMID:27233475

  19. ASC-J9(®) suppresses castration resistant prostate cancer progression via degrading the enzalutamide-induced androgen receptor mutant AR-F876L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ronghao; Lin, Wanying; Lin, Changyi; Li, Lei; Sun, Yin; Chang, Chawnshang

    2016-08-28

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) with the newly developed powerful anti-androgen enzalutamide (Enz, also known as MDV3100) has promising therapeutic effects to suppress castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and extending patients' lives an extra 4.8 months. However, most Enz therapy eventually fails with the development of Enz resistance. The detailed mechanisms how CRPC develops Enz resistance remain unclear and may involve multiple mechanisms. Among them, the induction of the androgen receptor (AR) mutant AR-F876L in some CRPC patients may represent one driving force that confers Enz resistance. Here, we demonstrate that the AR degradation enhancer, ASC-J9(®), not only degrades wild-type AR, but also has the ability to target AR-F876L. The consequence of suppressing AR-F876L may then abrogate AR-F876L mediated CRPC cell proliferation and metastasis. Thus, developing ASC-J9(®) as a new therapeutic approach may represent a novel therapy to better suppress CRPC that has already developed Enz resistance.

  20. A Joint Model for the Kinetics of CTC Count and PSA Concentration During Treatment in Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbaux, M; Tod, M; De Bono, J; Lorente, D; Mateo, J; Freyer, G; You, B; Hénin, E

    2015-05-01

    Assessment of treatment efficacy in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) is limited by frequent nonmeasurable bone metastases. The count of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is a promising surrogate marker that may replace the widely used prostate-specific antigen (PSA). The purpose of this study was to quantify the dynamic relationships between the longitudinal kinetics of these markers during treatment in patients with mCRPC. Data from 223 patients with mCRPC treated by chemotherapy and/or hormonotherapy were analyzed for up to 6 months of treatment. A semimechanistic model was built, combining the following several pharmacometric advanced features: (1) Kinetic-Pharmacodynamic (K-PD) compartments for treatments (chemotherapy and hormonotherapy); (2) a latent variable linking both marker kinetics; (3) modeling of CTC kinetics with a cell lifespan model; and (4) a negative binomial distribution for the CTC random sampling. Linked with survival, this model would potentially be useful for predicting treatment efficacy during drug development or for therapeutic adjustment in treated patients. PMID:26225253

  1. Overcoming docetaxel resistance in prostate cancer: a perspective review

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Clara

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer has been historically challenging, with few therapeutic successes. Docetaxel was the first cytotoxic therapy associated with a survival benefit in castrate-resistant prostate cancer. Toxicity is typical of other cytotoxic agents, with myelosuppression being the dose-limiting toxicity and neurotoxicity also a notable side effect for some patients. Unfortunately, a significant proportion of men with castrate-resistant prostate cance...

  2. Phase I Dose-Escalation Study of the Novel Anti-androgen BMS-641988 in Patients with Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathkopf, Dana; Liu, Glenn; Carducci, Michael A; Eisenberger, Mario A; Anand, Aseem; Morris, Michael J; Slovin, Susan F; Sasaki, Yasutsuna; Takahashi, Shunji; Ozono, Seiichiro; Fung, Nga Kit Eliza; Cheng, Shinta; Gan, Jinping; Gottardis, Marco; Obermeier, Mary T.; Reddy, Jyotsna; Zhang, Steven; Vakkalagadda, Blisse J.; Wilding, George; Scher, Howard I.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose BMS-641988 is an androgen receptor antagonist with increased potency relative to bicalutamide in both in vitro and in vivo prostate cancer models. A first-in-man phase I study was conducted to define the safety and tolerability of oral BMS-641988 in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Experimental Design Doses were escalated from 5 to 150 mg based on discrete pharmacokinetic parameters in cohorts of 3 to 6 subjects. After establishing safety with 20 mg of BMS-641988 in the United States, a companion study was opened in Japan to assess differences in drug metabolism between populations. Results Sixty-one men with CRPC were treated with daily BMS-641988. The pharmacokinetics of BMS-641988 and its active metabolites were proportional to dose. One patient experienced an epileptic seizure at a dose of 60 mg administered twice. Despite achieving target drug exposures, anti-tumor activity was limited to 1 partial response. Seventeen of 23 evaluable patients (74%) exhibited stable disease on imaging (median 15 weeks; range 8–32), and 10 of 61 patients (16%) achieved a ≥30%. decline in levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Partial agonism was seen within the context of this study upon removal of the drug as evidenced by a decrease in PSA. Conclusions Although the clinical outcomes of predominantly stable disease and partial agonism were similar to what was observed in the preclinical evaluation of the compound, the limited anti-tumor activity of BMS-641988 at therapeutic dose levels coupled with an episode of seizure activity led to study closure. PMID:21131556

  3. Effects of androgen deprivation therapy and bisphosphonate treatment on bone in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: results from the University of Washington Rapid Autopsy Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Colm; Roudier, Martine P; Dowell, Alex; True, Lawrence D; Ketchanji, Melanie; Welty, Christopher; Corey, Eva; Lange, Paul H; Higano, Celestia S; Vessella, Robert L

    2013-02-01

    Qualitative and quantitative bone features were determined in nondecalcified and decalcified bone from 20 predetermined bone sites in each of 44 patients who died with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), some of which received bisphosphonate treatment (BP) in addition to androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT). Thirty-nine of the 44 patients (89%) had evidence of bone metastases. By histomorphometric analysis, these bone metastases were associated with a range of bone responses from osteoblastic to osteolytic with a wide spectrum of bone responses often seen within an individual patient. Overall, the average bone volume/tissue volume (BV/TV) was 25.7%, confirming the characteristic association of an osteoblastic response to prostate cancer bone metastasis when compared with the normal age-matched weighted mean BV/TV of 14.7%. The observed new bone formation was essentially woven bone, and this was a localized event. In comparing BV/TV at metastatic sites between patients who had received BP treatment and those who had not, there was a significant difference (28.6% versus 19.3%, respectively). At bone sites that were not invaded by tumor, the average BV/TV was 10.1%, indicating significant bone loss owing to ADT that was not improved (11%) in those patients who had received BPs. Surprisingly, there was no significant difference in the number of osteoclasts present at the metastatic sites between patients treated or not treated with BPs, but in bone sites where the patient had been treated with BPs, giant osteoclasts were observed. Overall, 873 paraffin-embedded specimens and 661 methylmethacrylate-embedded specimens were analyzed. Our results indicate that in CRPC patients, ADT induces serious bone loss even in patients treated with BP. Furthermore, in this cohort of patients, BP treatment increased BV and did not decrease the number of osteoclasts in prostate cancer bone metastases compared with bone metastases from patients who did not receive BP.

  4. Differences in treatment patterns among patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer treated by oncologists versus urologists in a US managed care population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engel-Nitz NM

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Nicole M Engel-Nitz1, Berhanu Alemayehu2, David Parry3, Faith Nathan21Innovus, Eden Prairie, MN, USA; 2AstraZeneca, Wilmington, DE, USA; 3AstraZeneca UK, London, UKObjective: Differences in treatment patterns, health care resource utilization, and costs between patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC treated by oncologists and those treated by urologists were examined.Methods: Patients aged ≥40 with CRPC were identified using claims from a large US managed health care plan between July 2001 and December 2007. A 6-month baseline period was used to assess patient characteristics. Patients with visits to an urologist, without visits to an oncologist, were assigned to the urology cohort, and patients with visits to an oncologist, with or without visits to an urologist, were assigned to the oncology cohort. Treatment patterns, health care resource utilization, and costs during a variable follow-up period were compared between cohorts using descriptive statistics and Lin's regression.Results: The urology cohort had fewer comorbid illnesses (P < 0.001 and patients were less likely to have other cancers during baseline (P < 0.001 or to die during follow-up (P = 0.004 compared with the oncology cohort. The oncology cohort patients were significantly more likely to have a claim for hormones (74.5% vs 61.1%; P < 0.001, chemotherapy (46.9% vs 10.2%, P < 0.001, and radiation (22.3% vs 3.7%, P < 0.0001 over follow-up. Mean unadjusted health care costs were higher in the oncology vs the urology cohort (US$31,896 vs US$15,318, respectively; P < 0.001. At 6 years follow-up, cumulative adjusted CRPC-specific costs were significantly higher among patients treated by oncologists with chemotherapy than among patients treated by urologists.Conclusion: CRPC patients treated by oncologists had greater use of hormones, chemotherapy, and radiation; higher percentages of patients with inpatient stays, emergency room, and ambulatory visits; and higher

  5. Common Genetic Variation in CYP17A1 and Response to Abiraterone Acetate in Patients with Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Moritz; Zhang, Ben Y; Hillman, David W; Kohli, Rhea; Kohli, Tanvi; Lee, Adam; Kohli, Manish

    2016-01-01

    Treatment with abiraterone acetate and prednisone (AA/P) prolongs survival in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients. We evaluated the genetic variation in CYP17A1 as predictive of response to AA/P. A prospective collection of germline DNA prior to AA/P initiation and follow-up of a mCRPC cohort was performed. Five common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CYP17A1 identified using a haplotype-based tagging algorithm were genotyped. Clinical outcomes included biochemical response and time to biochemical progression on AA/P. Logistic regression was used to assess the association between tag SNPs and biochemical response. Proportional hazards regression was used to assess the association between tag SNPs and time to biochemical progression. Odds or hazard ratio per minor allele were estimated and p-values below 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Germline DNA was successfully genotyped for four tag SNPs in 87 patients. The median age was 73 years (54-90); the median prostate-specific antigen was 66 ng/dL (0.1-99.9). A single SNP, rs2486758, was associated with lower odds of experiencing a biochemical response (Odds ratio 0.22, 95% confidence interval 0.07-0.63, p = 0.005) and a shorter time to biochemical progression (Hazard ratio 2.23, 95% confidence interval 1.39-3.56, p < 0.001). This tag SNP located in the promoter region of CYP17A1 will need further validation as a predictive biomarker for AA/P therapy. PMID:27409606

  6. Treatment evolution for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer with recent introduction of novel agents: retrospective analysis of real-world data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaig, Thomas W; Potluri, Ravi C; Ng, Yvette; Todd, Mary B; Mehra, Maneesha

    2016-02-01

    Despite increasing drug treatment options for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients, real-world treatment data are lacking. We conducted retrospective analyses of commercial claims and electronic medical record (EMR) databases to understand how treatment patterns for mCRPC have changed in a US-based real-world population. Truven Health Analytics MarketScan(®) (2000-2013) and EMR (2004-2013) databases were used to identify patients with an index prostate cancer diagnosis (ICD-9 codes 185X or 233.4X) and prescription claims for an mCRPC drug (mitoxantrone, estramustine, docetaxel, sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel, abiraterone acetate, enzalutamide, or radium-223). Regimen analyses for first line of therapy (LOT1), second line of therapy, and beyond were performed among cohorts based on year of first mCRPC drug usage. mCRPC drug usage and treatment duration were compared across cohorts and age groups within each cohort. The commercial claims cohort yielded 3437 evaluable patients. Most men (91%) commencing mCRPC treatment had docetaxel as LOT1 in 2010; this number had declined to 15% in 2013. In 2013, 67% and 9% of patients used abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide, respectively, as LOT1. Among both commercial claims and EMR cohorts, treatment pattern changes were most pronounced in men aged >80 years, and median treatment duration for some mCRPC drugs was shorter than expected based on available clinical trial information. These results demonstrate a shift in mCRPC treatments during the past 5 years, with greater use of newer noncytotoxic treatments than docetaxel. These real-world data aid in understanding the changing role of chemotherapy in the management of mCRPC.

  7. The Hippo Pathway Effector YAP Regulates Motility, Invasion, and Castration-Resistant Growth of Prostate Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lin ZHANG; Yang, Shuping; Chen, Xingcheng; Stauffer, Seth; Yu, Fang; Lele, Subodh M.; Fu, Kai; Datta, Kaustubh; Palermo, Nicholas; Chen, Yuanhong; Dong, Jixin

    2015-01-01

    Yes-associated protein (YAP) is an effector of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway. The functional significance of YAP in prostate cancer has remained elusive. In this study, we first show that enhanced expression of YAP is able to transform immortalized prostate epithelial cells and promote migration and invasion in both immortalized and cancerous prostate cells. We found that YAP mRNA was upregulated in androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cells (LNCaP-C81 and LNCaP-C4-2 cells) compared to t...

  8. Development of a preliminary nomogram to predict progression of bone scan for castration-resistant prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lin GW; Ye DW; Jia HX; Dai B; Zhang HL; Zhu Y; Shi GH; Ma CG

    2015-01-01

    Guo-Wen Lin,1,2 Ding-Wei Ye,1,2 Hui-Xun Jia,2,3 Bo Dai,1,2 Hai-Liang Zhang,1,2 Yao Zhu,1,2 Guo-Hai Shi,1,2 Chun-Guang Ma1,2 1Department of Urology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, 2Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, 3Department of Clinical Statistics Center, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The optimal time to perform bone scan to detect new metastasis during the castration-re...

  9. Whole blood defensin mRNA expression is a predictive biomarker of docetaxel response in castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohli M

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Manish Kohli,1 Charles YF Young,2 Donald J Tindall,2 Debashis Nandy,1 Kyle M McKenzie,3 Graham H Bevan,4 Krishna Vanaja Donkena5 1Department of Oncology, 2Department of Urology, 3Department of Geriatric Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, 4University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, 5Center for Individualized Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Abstract: This study tested the potential of circulating RNA-based signals as predictive biomarkers for docetaxel response in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. RNA was analyzed in blood from six CRPC patients by whole-transcriptome sequencing (total RNA-sequencing before and after docetaxel treatment using the Illumina’s HiSeq platform. Targeted RNA capture and sequencing was performed in an independent cohort of ten patients with CRPC matching the discovery cohort to confirm differential expression of the genes. Response to docetaxel was defined on the basis of prostate-specific antigen levels and imaging criteria. Two-way analysis of variance was used to compare differential gene expression in patients classified as responders versus nonresponders before and after docetaxel treatment. Thirty-four genes with two-fold differentially expressed transcripts in responders versus nonresponders were selected from total RNA-sequencing for further validation. Targeted RNA capture and sequencing showed that 13/34 genes were differentially expressed in responders. Alpha defensin genes DEFA1, DEFA1B, and DEFA3 exhibited significantly higher expression in responder patients compared with nonresponder patients before administration of chemotherapy (fold change >2.5. In addition, post-docetaxel treatment significantly increased transcript levels of these defensin genes in responders (fold change >2.8. Our results reveal that patients with higher defensin RNA transcripts in blood respond well to docetaxel therapy. We suggest that monitoring DEFA1, DEFA1B, and DEFA3

  10. Comparative efficacy, tolerability, and survival outcomes of various radiopharmaceuticals in castration-resistant prostate cancer with bone metastasis: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tunio M

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mutahir Tunio,1 Mushabbab Al Asiri,1 Abdulrehman Al Hadab,1 Yasser Bayoumi2 1Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, King Fahad Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 2Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt Background: A meta-analysis was conducted to assess the impact of radiopharmaceuticals (RPs in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC on pain control, symptomatic skeletal events (SSEs, toxicity profile, quality of life (QoL, and overall survival (OS.Materials and methods: The PubMed/MEDLINE, CANCERLIT, EMBASE, Cochrane Library database, and other search engines were searched to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs comparing RPs with control (placebo or radiation therapy in metastatic CRPC. Data were extracted and assessed for the risk of bias (Cochrane’s risk of bias tool. Pooled data were expressed as odds ratio (OR, with 95% confidence intervals (CIs; Mantel–Haenszel fixed-effects model.Results: Eight RCTs with a total patient population of 1,877 patients were identified. The use of RP was associated with significant reduction in pain intensity and SSE (OR: 0.63, 95% CI: 0.51–0.78, I2=27%, P<0.0001, improved QoL (OR: 0.71, 95% CI: 0.55–0.91, I2=65%, three trials, 1,178 patients, P=0.006, and a minimal improved OS (OR: 0.84, 95% CI: 0.64–1.04, I2=47%, seven trials, 1,845 patients, P=0.11. A subgroup analysis suggested an improved OS with radium-223 (OR: 0.68, 95% CI: 0.51–0.90, one trial, 921 patients and strontium-89 (OR: 0.21, 95% CI: 0.05–0.91, one trial, 49 patients. Strontium-89 (five trials was associated with increased rates of grade 3 and 4 thrombocytopenia (OR: 4.26, 95% CI: 2.22–8.18, P=0.01, leucopenia (OR: 7.98, 95% CI: 1.82–34.95, P=0.02, pain flare (OR: 6.82, 95% CI: 3.42–13.55, P=0.04, and emesis (OR: 3.61, 95% CI: 1.76–7.40, P=0.02.Conclusion: The use of RPs was associated with significant reduction in SSEs and improved QoL, while the radium-223

  11. Progression-free and overall survival in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer treated with abiraterone acetate can be predicted with serial C11-acetate PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnebo, Jacob; Wadelius, Agnes; Sandström, Per; Nilsson, Sten; Jacobsson, Hans; Blomqvist, Lennart; Ullén, Anders

    2016-08-01

    In this retrospective study, we evaluated the benefit of repeated carbon 11 (C11)-acetate positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) to assess response in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) treated with abiraterone acetate (AA).A total of 30 patients with mCRPC were monitored with C11-acetate PET/CT and PSA levels during their treatment with AA. Retrospective evaluation of their response was made after 102 days (median; range 70-155) of treatment. Statistical analyses were employed to detect predictors of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS), and potential correlation between serum levels of PSA, standardized uptake values (SUVpeak), and bone lesion index measured from PET were investigated.At follow-up 10 patients exhibited partial response (PR), 10 progressive disease (PD), and 10 stable disease (SD), as assessed by PET/CT. In survival analysis, both PR and PD were significantly associated with PFS and OS. CT response was also associated with OS, but only 19/30 patients demonstrated a lesion meeting target lesion criteria according to RECIST 1.1. No PET/CT baseline characteristic was significantly associated with PFS or OS. A PSA response (reduction in the level by >50%) could also predict PFS and OS. In the subgroup lacking a PSA response, those with PD had significantly shorter OS than those with PR or SD.PFS and OS in patients with mCRPC treated with AA can be predicted from repeated C11-acetate PET/CT. This may be of particular clinical value in patients who do not exhibit a PSA response to treatment. PMID:27495034

  12. RADIATION SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE USE OF 223RaCl2 DE IN MEN WITH CASTRATION-RESISTANT PROSTATE CANCER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauer, Lawrence T.; Williamson, Matthew J.; Humm, John; O’Donoghue, Joseph; Ghani, Rashid; Awadallah, Robert; Carrasquillo, Jorge; Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; Aksnes, Anne-Kirsti; Biggin, Colin; Reinton, Vigdis; Morris, Michael; St Germain, Jean

    2016-01-01

    The majority of patients with late stage castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) develop bone metastases that often result in significant bone pain. Therapeutic palliation strategies can delay or prevent skeletal complications and may prolong survival. An alpha-particle based therapy, radium-223 dichloride (223RaCl2), has been developed that delivers highly localized effects in target areas and likely reduces toxicity to adjacent healthy tissue, particularly bone marrow. Radiation safety aspects were evaluated for a single comprehensive cancer center clinical phase 1, open-label, single ascending-dose study for three cohorts at 50, 100, or 200 kBq kg−1 body weight. Ten patients received administrations, and six patients completed the study with 1 y follow-up. Dose rates from patients administered 223Ra dichloride were typically less than 2 μSv h−1 MBq−1 on contact and averaged 0.02 μSv h−1 MBq−1 at 1 m immediately following administration. Removal was primarily by fecal excretion, and whole body effective half-lives were highly dependent upon fecal compartment transfer, ranging from 2.5–11.4 d. Radium-223 is safe and straightforward to administer using conventional nuclear medicine equipment. For this clinical study, few radiation protection limitations were recommended post-therapy based on facility evaluations. Specific precautions are dependent on local regulatory authority guidance. Subsequent studies have demonstrated significantly improved overall survival and very low toxicity, suggesting that 223Ra may provide a new standard of care for patients with CRPC and bone metastases. PMID:24562070

  13. Systemic Therapy in Men With Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology and Cancer Care Ontario Clinical Practice Guideline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basch, Ethan; Loblaw, D. Andrew; Oliver, Thomas K.; Carducci, Michael; Chen, Ronald C.; Frame, James N.; Garrels, Kristina; Hotte, Sebastien; Kattan, Michael W.; Raghavan, Derek; Saad, Fred; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Walker-Dilks, Cindy; Williams, James; Winquist, Eric; Bennett, Charles L.; Wootton, Ted; Rumble, R. Bryan; Dusetzina, Stacie B.; Virgo, Katherine S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To provide treatment recommendations for men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Methods The American Society of Clinical Oncology and Cancer Care Ontario convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based recommendations informed by a systematic review of the literature. Results When added to androgen deprivation, therapies demonstrating improved survival, improved quality of life (QOL), and favorable benefit-harm balance include abiraterone acetate/prednisone, enzalutamide, and radium-223 (223Ra; for men with predominantly bone metastases). Improved survival and QOL with moderate toxicity risk are associated with docetaxel/prednisone. For asymptomatic/minimally symptomatic men, improved survival with unclear QOL impact and low toxicity are associated with sipuleucel-T. For men who previously received docetaxel, improved survival, unclear QOL impact, and moderate to high toxicity risk are associated with cabazitaxel/prednisone. Modest QOL benefit (without survival benefit) and high toxicity risk are associated with mitoxantrone/prednisone after docetaxel. No benefit and excess toxicity are observed with bevacizumab, estramustine, and sunitinib. Recommendations Continue androgen deprivation (pharmaceutical or surgical) indefinitely. Abiraterone acetate/prednisone, enzalutamide, or 223Ra should be offered; docetaxel/prednisone should also be offered, accompanied by discussion of toxicity risk. Sipuleucel-T may be offered to asymptomatic/minimally symptomatic men. For men who have experienced progression with docetaxel, cabazitaxel may be offered, accompanied by discussion of toxicity risk. Mitoxantrone may be offered, accompanied by discussion of limited clinical benefit and toxicity risk. Ketoconazole or antiandrogens (eg, bicalutamide, flutamide, nilutamide) may be offered, accompanied by discussion of limited known clinical benefit. Bevacizumab, estramustine, and sunitinib should not be offered. There is insufficient evidence to

  14. Differences in treatment patterns among patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer treated by oncologists versus urologists in a US managed care population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Differences in treatment patterns, health care resource utilization, and costs between patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) treated by oncologists and those treated by urologists were examined. Patients aged ≥40 with CRPC were identified using claims from a large US managed health care plan between July 2001 and December 2007. A 6-month baseline period was used to assess patient characteristics. Patients with visits to an urologist, without visits to an oncologist, were assigned to the urology cohort, and patients with visits to an oncologist, with or without visits to an urologist, were assigned to the oncology cohort. Treatment patterns, health care resource utilization, and costs during a variable follow-up period were compared between cohorts using descriptive statistics and Lin’s regression. The urology cohort had fewer comorbid illnesses (P < 0.001) and patients were less likely to have other cancers during baseline (P < 0.001) or to die during follow-up (P = 0.004) compared with the oncology cohort. The oncology cohort patients were significantly more likely to have a claim for hormones (74.5% vs 61.1%; P < 0.001), chemotherapy (46.9% vs 10.2%, P < 0.001), and radiation (22.3% vs 3.7%, P < 0.0001) over follow-up. Mean unadjusted health care costs were higher in the oncology vs the urology cohort (US$31,896 vs US$15,318, respectively; P < 0.001). At 6 years follow-up, cumulative adjusted CRPC-specific costs were significantly higher among patients treated by oncologists with chemotherapy than among patients treated by urologists. CRPC patients treated by oncologists had greater use of hormones, chemotherapy, and radiation; higher percentages of patients with inpatient stays, emergency room, and ambulatory visits; and higher health care costs, than patients treated by urologists

  15. Enzalutamide for treatment of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer who have previously received docetaxel: U.S. Food and Drug Administration drug approval summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Yangmin M; Pierce, William; Maher, V Ellen; Karuri, Stella; Tang, Sheng-Hui; Chiu, Haw-Jyh; Palmby, Todd; Zirkelbach, Jeanne Fourie; Marathe, Dhananjay; Mehrotra, Nitin; Liu, Qi; Ghosh, Debasis; Cottrell, Christy L; Leighton, John; Sridhara, Rajeshwari; Ibrahim, Amna; Justice, Robert; Pazdur, Richard

    2013-11-15

    This article summarizes the regulatory evaluation that led to the full approval of enzalutamide (XTANDI, Medivation Inc.) by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on August 31, 2012, for the treatment of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer who have previously received docetaxel. This approval was based on the results of a randomized, placebo-controlled trial which randomly allocated 1,199 patients with mCRPC who had received prior docetaxel to receive either enzalutamide, 160 mg orally once daily (n = 800), or placebo (n = 399). All patients were required to continue androgen deprivation therapy. The primary endpoint was overall survival. At the prespecified interim analysis, a statistically significant improvement in overall survival was demonstrated for the enzalutamide arm compared with the placebo arm [HR = 0.63; 95% confidence interval: 0.53-0.75; P < 0.0001]. The median overall survival durations were 18.4 months and 13.6 months in the enzalutamide and placebo arms, respectively. The most common adverse reactions (≥10%) included asthenia or fatigue, back pain, diarrhea, arthralgia, hot flush, peripheral edema, musculoskeletal pain, headache, and upper respiratory infection. Seizures occurred in 0.9% of patients on enzalutamide compared with no patients on the placebo arm. Overall, the FDA's review and analyses of the submitted data confirmed that enzalutamide had a favorable benefit-risk profile in the study patient population, thus supporting its use for the approved indication. The recommended dose is 160 mg of enzalutamide administered orally once daily. Enzalutamide represents the third product that the FDA has approved in the same disease setting within a period of 2 years. Clin Cancer Res; 19(22); 6067-73. ©2013 AACR.

  16. {sup 18}F-Fluorocholine PET/CT for early response assessment in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer treated with enzalutamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Giorgi, Ugo; Conteduca, Vincenza; Burgio, Salvatore Luca; Menna, Cecilia; Rossi, Lorena; Amadori, Dino [Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS, Department of Medical Oncology, Meldola (Italy); Caroli, Paola; Paganelli, Giovanni; Matteucci, Federica [Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS, Diagnostic Nuclear Medicine Unit, Meldola (Italy); Scarpi, Emanuela [Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS, Unit of Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Meldola (Italy); Moretti, Andrea; Galassi, Riccardo [Morgagni-Pierantoni Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Forli (Italy)

    2015-07-15

    We investigated the role of {sup 18}F-methylcholine (FCH) PET/CT in the early evaluation of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) treated with enzalutamide. The study group comprised 36 patients with a median age of 72 years (range 48-90 years) who were treated with enzalutamide 160 mg once daily after at least one chemotherapeutic regimen with docetaxel. Patients were evaluated monthly for serological prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response. FCH PET/CT was performed at baseline and repeated after 3-6 weeks. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression models addressed potential predictors of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). At a median follow-up of 24.2 months (range 1.8-27.3 months), 34 patients were evaluable for early FCH PET/CT evaluation of response, and of these 17 showed progressive disease (PD) and 17 had stable disease or a partial response. A decrease in PSA level of more than 50 % was observed in 21 patients. Early FCH PET/CT PD predicted radiological PD 3 months in advance of CT in 12 of 18 patients (66 %) and was discordant with the decrease in PSA level in 13 patients. In 6 of these, biochemical PD was confirmed in 2 months. In multivariate analysis, only decrease in PSA level and FCH PET/CT were significant predictors of PFS (p = 0.0005 and p = 0.029, respectively), whereas decrease in PSA level alone was predictive of OS (p = 0.007). This is one of the first studies to evaluate the role of FCH PET/CT as an early predictor of outcome in mCRPC patients treated with enzalutamide. Our preliminary results suggest that the combination of FCH PET/CT and decrease in PSA level could be a valid tool to predict PFS in mCRPC patients. PSA remains the single most important prognostic factor, while FCH PET/CT does not add more information on OS beyond that obtained from PSA. Further studies in larger populations are needed to confirm these data and to clarify the role of FCH PET/CT in predicting response

  17. Androgen suppresses the proliferation of androgen receptor-positive castration-resistant prostate cancer cells via inhibition of Cdk2, CyclinA, and Skp2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Kokontis

    Full Text Available The majority of prostate cancer (PCa patient receiving androgen ablation therapy eventually develop castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. We previously reported that androgen treatment suppresses Skp2 and c-Myc through androgen receptor (AR and induced G1 cell cycle arrest in androgen-independent LNCaP 104-R2 cells, a late stage CRPC cell line model. However, the mechanism of androgenic regulation of Skp2 in CRPC cells was not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the androgenic regulation of Skp2 in two AR-positive CRPC cell line models, the LNCaP 104-R1 and PC-3AR Cells. The former one is an early stage androgen-independent LNCaP cells, while the later one is PC-3 cells re-expressing either wild type AR or mutant LNCaP AR. Proliferation of LNCaP 104-R1 and PC-3AR cells is not dependent on but is suppressed by androgen. We observed in this study that androgen treatment reduced protein expression of Cdk2, Cdk7, Cyclin A, cyclin H, Skp2, c-Myc, and E2F-1; lessened phosphorylation of Thr14, Tyr15, and Thr160 on Cdk2; decreased activity of Cdk2; induced protein level of p27(Kip1; and caused G1 cell cycle arrest in LNCaP 104-R1 cells and PC-3AR cells. Overexpression of Skp2 protein in LNCaP 104-R1 or PC-3AR cells partially blocked accumulation of p27(Kip1 and increased Cdk2 activity under androgen treatment, which partially blocked the androgenic suppressive effects on proliferation and cell cycle. Analyzing on-line gene array data of 214 normal and PCa samples indicated that gene expression of Skp2, Cdk2, and cyclin A positively correlates to each other, while Cdk7 negatively correlates to these genes. These observations suggested that androgen suppresses the proliferation of CRPC cells partially through inhibition of Cyclin A, Cdk2, and Skp2.

  18. Androgen suppresses the proliferation of androgen receptor-positive castration-resistant prostate cancer cells via inhibition of Cdk2, CyclinA, and Skp2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokontis, John M; Lin, Hui-Ping; Jiang, Shih Sheng; Lin, Ching-Yu; Fukuchi, Junichi; Hiipakka, Richard A; Chung, Chi-Jung; Chan, Tzu-Min; Liao, Shutsung; Chang, Chung-Ho; Chuu, Chih-Pin

    2014-01-01

    The majority of prostate cancer (PCa) patient receiving androgen ablation therapy eventually develop castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). We previously reported that androgen treatment suppresses Skp2 and c-Myc through androgen receptor (AR) and induced G1 cell cycle arrest in androgen-independent LNCaP 104-R2 cells, a late stage CRPC cell line model. However, the mechanism of androgenic regulation of Skp2 in CRPC cells was not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the androgenic regulation of Skp2 in two AR-positive CRPC cell line models, the LNCaP 104-R1 and PC-3AR Cells. The former one is an early stage androgen-independent LNCaP cells, while the later one is PC-3 cells re-expressing either wild type AR or mutant LNCaP AR. Proliferation of LNCaP 104-R1 and PC-3AR cells is not dependent on but is suppressed by androgen. We observed in this study that androgen treatment reduced protein expression of Cdk2, Cdk7, Cyclin A, cyclin H, Skp2, c-Myc, and E2F-1; lessened phosphorylation of Thr14, Tyr15, and Thr160 on Cdk2; decreased activity of Cdk2; induced protein level of p27(Kip1); and caused G1 cell cycle arrest in LNCaP 104-R1 cells and PC-3AR cells. Overexpression of Skp2 protein in LNCaP 104-R1 or PC-3AR cells partially blocked accumulation of p27(Kip1) and increased Cdk2 activity under androgen treatment, which partially blocked the androgenic suppressive effects on proliferation and cell cycle. Analyzing on-line gene array data of 214 normal and PCa samples indicated that gene expression of Skp2, Cdk2, and cyclin A positively correlates to each other, while Cdk7 negatively correlates to these genes. These observations suggested that androgen suppresses the proliferation of CRPC cells partially through inhibition of Cyclin A, Cdk2, and Skp2.

  19. Volume of Bone Metastasis Assessed with Whole-Body Diffusion-weighted Imaging Is Associated with Overall Survival in Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Lopez, Raquel; Lorente, David; Blackledge, Matthew D; Collins, David J; Mateo, Joaquin; Bianchini, Diletta; Omlin, Aurelius; Zivi, Andrea; Leach, Martin O; de Bono, Johann S; Koh, Dow-Mu; Tunariu, Nina

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To determine the correlation between the volume of bone metastasis as assessed with diffusion-weighted (DW) imaging and established prognostic factors in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) and the association with overall survival (OS). Materials and Methods This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board; informed consent was obtained from all patients. The authors analyzed whole-body DW images obtained between June 2010 and February 2013 in 53 patients with mCRPC at the time of starting a new line of anticancer therapy. Bone metastases were identified and delineated on whole-body DW images in 43 eligible patients. Total tumor diffusion volume (tDV) was correlated with the bone scan index (BSI) and other prognostic factors by using the Pearson correlation coefficient (r). Survival analysis was performed with Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression. Results The median tDV was 503.1 mL (range, 5.6-2242 mL), and the median OS was 12.9 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 8.7, 16.1 months). There was a significant correlation between tDV and established prognostic factors, including hemoglobin level (r = -0.521, P < .001), prostate-specific antigen level (r = 0.556, P < .001), lactate dehydrogenase level (r = 0.534, P < .001), alkaline phosphatase level (r = 0.572, P < .001), circulating tumor cell count (r = 0.613, P = .004), and BSI (r = 0.565, P = .001). A higher tDV also showed a significant association with poorer OS (hazard ratio, 1.74; 95% CI: 1.02, 2.96; P = .035). Conclusion Metastatic bone disease from mCRPC can be evaluated and quantified with whole-body DW imaging. Whole-body DW imaging-generated tDV showed correlation with established prognostic biomarkers and is associated with OS in mCRPC. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:26807894

  20. The first experience in using abiraterone acetate in patients with castration-refractory prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Rapoport

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Even in the mid-twentieth century, Huggins and Hodges proved the susceptibility of prostate cancer cells to hormonal manipulations, by using surgical castration as an example. An average of 18–36 months after initiation of first-line hormonal therapy, patients develop the castration resistance in prostate cancer, one of the causes of which was hyperproduction of the tumor receptors of prostate cancer cells and their hypersusceptibility to the castration levels of testosterone. Long-term treatment in patients with castration-refractory prostate cancer was extremely symptomatic and quality of life and overall survival were low. In the 2000s, investigations aimed at designing drugs to treat this category of patients were underway, which have culminated in the advent of three drugs (two of which belong to chemotherapy that are now used in the Russian Federation. The second-line hormonal agent abiraterone acetate (Zytiga is one of these drugs, which was officially registered in 2011. Its mechanism of action is due to inhibition of the enzyme CYP17, leading to the blocked synthesis of testosterone at all levels, including at the intracrine level, and achieving testosterone levels below the postcastration ones. The paper reviews the literature regarding abiraterone acetate and the first experience in using second-line hormonal therapy in three patients.

  1. 转移性去势抵抗性前列腺癌化疗后预后的影响因素%Factors Influencing Prognosis of Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer after Chemotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庞华

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate prognostic factors of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer ( mCRPC ) trea-ted with docetaxel chemotherapy .Methods Age,Gleason score ,prostate-specific antigen ,blood baseline condition and hormone-sensitive time of 46 patients with mCRPC were recorded .Results Overall survival time of all patients was 3-45 months,the aver-age survival time was (21.34 ±2.13) months,median survival time was 19.36 months;cox regression analysis showed that Glea-son score,hemoglobin,hormone-sensitive time were related with the patient's survival time,RR values were 1.782,2.363 and 2.012,and P<0.05.Conclusion Gleason score,hemoglobin concentration ,and hormone-sensitive time before chemotherapy are prognostic factors of metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer .%目的:探讨采用多西紫杉醇化疗的转移性去势抵抗性前列腺癌( metastatic castration-resistant prostate canc-er,MCRPC)患者预后影响因素。方法以转移性去势抵抗性前列腺癌患者46例作为观察对象,记录患者化疗前年龄、Gleason评分、前列腺特异抗原(prostate-specific antigen,PSA)值、血常规等基线情况及激素敏感时间。结果患者总生存时间为3~45个月,平均生存期为(21.34±2.13)个月,中位生存时间为19.36个月;Cox回归结果提示,Gleason评分、血红蛋白水平、激素敏感时间与患者生存时间相关,RR值分别为1.782、2.363和2.012,且P<0.05。结论多西他赛化疗前Gleason评分、血红蛋白浓度及激素敏感时间,是转移性去势抵抗性前列腺癌患者的预后因素。

  2. Research progress on the molecular signaling pathway of castration-resistant prostate cancer%去势抵抗性前列腺癌分子信号通路的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张秀娜; 赵伟; 高晓芳; 杨勇; 季晖

    2015-01-01

    在美国前列腺癌( PCa)是男性最常见的非皮肤性癌症以及癌症相关死亡的第二号杀手。雄激素与雄激素受体是前列腺癌的关键效应器,因此,雄激素剥夺治疗( ADT)是前列腺癌患者的一线治疗方法,并且效果良好,但是前列腺肿瘤最终复发并进展为去势抵抗性前列腺癌( CRPC)这一致命性形式。研究雄激素受体与去势抵抗性前列腺癌发生发展的关系及其可能的分子机制,可以为其临床诊断、治疗以及进一步的研究提供科学依据。%In United States,prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed non-cutaneous cancer in males and the second leading cause of cancer-related death for men. Androgen and the androgen receptor( AR)are critical effectors of prostate cancer. Consequently,androgen deprivation therapy( ADT)is typically employed as a first-line treatment for pros-tate cancer patients. While initial responses are generally positive,prostate tumors frequently recur and progress to a lethal form known as castration-resistant prostate cancer( CRPC). To study the relationship between androgen receptor and the initiation and development of CRPC,along with the possible molecular mechanisms,helps to diagnosis and treatment of cas-tration-resistant prostate cancer( CRPC),and provide the basis for further research.

  3. Incidence and relative risk of adverse events of special interest in patients with castration resistant prostate cancer treated with CYP-17 inhibitors: A meta-analysis of published trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roviello, Giandomenico; Sigala, Sandra; Danesi, Romano; Re, Marzia Del; Bonetta, Alberto; Cappelletti, Maria Rosa; Zanotti, Laura; Bottini, Alberto; Generali, Daniele

    2016-05-01

    Abiraterone acetate and orteronel are two CYP-17 inhibitors that have been studied in prostate cancer. They have shown relevant toxicities, including fluid retention/oedema, hypokalaemia, hypertension, liver function test abnormalities and cardiac events. The goal of this study was to determine the risk of special adverse events related to CYP- 17 inhibitor in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRCP). Summary data from four randomized phase III trials comparing CYP-17 inhibitors and prednisone versus placebo and prednisone in metastatic CRCP patients were meta-analysed. Pooled risk ratios (RRs) for the risk of all-grade and grade 3-4 adverse events of special interest were calculated. Data from 4916 patients (2849 in the AA experimental arm; 2067 in the control arm) were analysed. The incidence of grade 3-4 adverse events was never more than 10% of the patients. However, compared with placebo, the CYP-17 inhibitor significantly increased the all-grade events of hypertension (RR=1.53; 95% CI=1.3-1.8; pevents, hypokalaemia (RR=4.23; 95% CI=1.28-13.99; p=0.02) and cardiac disorders (RR=1.55; 95% CI=1.18-2.05; p=0.002). A lot of adverse events such as hypertension, hypokalaemia, cardiac disorders and liver function test abnormalities are increased during CYP-17 inhibitor based therapy. Strict monitoring of these side effects should be considered during CYP- 17 inhibitor therapy in prostate cancer patients.

  4. EXPERIENCE WITH OCTREOTIDE IN PATIENTS WITH CASTRATION REFRACTORY PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. I. Ganov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Fifteen patients with castration refractory prostate cancer have been treated with sustained-release octreotide in combination with dexamethasone at the Altai Territory Oncology Dispensary since 2008. Control PSA test revealed that 9 (60 % patients had positive changes; tumor process stabilization was noted in 4 (26.7 % and only 2 (13.3 % were found to have disease progression. Thus, more than 86 % of patients responded to combination treatment with sustained-release octreotide + dexamethasone. Octreotide treatment caused no serious specific adverse toxic reactions.

  5. Co-targeting hexokinase 2-mediated Warburg effect and ULK1-dependent autophagy suppresses tumor growth of PTEN- and TP53-deficiency-driven castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Currently, no therapeutic options exist for castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC patients who have developed resistance to the second generation anti-androgen receptor (AR axis therapy. Here we report that co-deletion of Pten and p53 in murine prostate epithelium, often observed in human CRPC, leads to AR-independent CRPC and thus confers de novo resistance to second generation androgen deprivation therapy (ADT in multiple independent yet complementary preclinical mouse models. In contrast, mechanism-driven co-targeting hexokinase 2 (HK2-mediated Warburg effect with 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG and ULK1-dependent autophagy with chloroquine (CQ selectively kills cancer cells through intrinsic apoptosis to cause tumor regression in xenograft, leads to a near-complete tumor suppression and remarkably extends survival in Pten−/p53-deficiency-driven CRPC mouse model. Mechanistically, 2-DG causes AMPK phosphorylation, which in turn inhibits mTORC1-S6K1 translation signaling to preferentially block anti-apoptotic protein MCL-l synthesis to prime mitochondria-dependent apoptosis while simultaneously activates ULK1-driven autophagy for cell survival to counteract the apoptotic action of anti-Warburg effect. Accordingly, inhibition of autophagy with CQ sensitizes cancer cells to apoptosis upon 2-DG challenge. Given that 2-DG is recommended for phase II clinical trials for prostate cancer and CQ has been clinically used as an anti-malaria drug for many decades, the preclinical results from our proof-of-principle studies in vivo are imminently translatable to clinical trials to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy by the combination modality for a subset of currently incurable CRPC harboring PTEN and TP53 mutations.

  6. Efficacy and safety of enzalutamide in patients 75 years or older with chemotherapy-naive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graff, J N; Baciarello, G; Armstrong, A J;

    2016-01-01

    -resistant prostate cancer. Overall survival (OS) and radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS) were coprimary end points. Subgroup analysis of men aged ≥75 years (elderly) and men aged ... for an overall higher incidence of falls among elderly patients than younger patients [84/609 (13.8%) versus 62/1106 (5.6%)] and among elderly patients receiving enzalutamide than those receiving placebo [61/317 (19.2%) versus 23/292 (7.9%)]. CONCLUSIONS: Elderly men benefited from treatment with enzalutamide...... in terms of OS and rPFS. Enzalutamide was well tolerated in the elderly subgroup and those aged falls. CLINICAL TRIAL IDENTIFIER: NCT01212991, ClinicalTrials.gov....

  7. Health Economics and Radium-223 (Xofigo®) in the Treatment of Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer (mCRPC): A Case History and a Systematic Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norum, Jan; Traasdahl, Erik R.; Totth, Arpad; Nieder, Carsten; Olsen, Jan Abel

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Prostate cancer (PC) is the most common cancer in Western countries. Recent advances in the treatment of metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) have caused significant pressure on health care budgets. We aimed to exemplify this dilemma presenting an example, radium-223 (Xofigo®), and review the literature. Methods: A 74-year-old man diagnosed with mCRPC was referred to our department in October 2014 for radium-223 therapy. We faced the following dilemma: is radium-223 standard therapy? Is it cost-effective? Medline was searched employing the following search criteria: “radium-223”, “alpharadin”, “Xofigo” and “prostate”. Exclusion and inclusion criteria were applied. Guidelines and cost-effectiveness analyses were focused. We also searched the websites of ASCO, ESMO and ISPOR. The web was searched, using Yahoo and Google search engines, for Health Technology Assessments (HTAs). Results: 181 publications were identified in the Medline database. Only four studies included the word “cost”, three “economics” and none “budget” in heading or abstract. None of the publications were thorough of cost analysis (cost-effectiveness, cost-utility, cost-minimizing or cost-of-illness analysis). Six HTAs and eight national guidelines were identified. The cost per quality adjusted life years was indicated €80.000-94,000. HTAs concluded reimbursement being not recommendable or no ultimate statement could be made. One pointed towards a limited use with caution. Conclusion: Guidelines were based on data from randomized clinical trials (RCTs). Health economics was not considered when guidelines were made. Most HTAs concluded this therapy not cost-effective or there was insufficient data for final conclusions. Licensing and reimbursement processes should be run simultaneously. PMID:26573043

  8. Small molecule screening reveals a transcription-independent pro-survival function of androgen receptor in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narizhneva, Natalia V; Tararova, Natalia D; Ryabokon, Petro; Shyshynova, Inna; Prokvolit, Anatoly; Komarov, Pavel G; Purmal, Andrei A; Gudkov, Andrei V; Gurova, Katerina V

    2009-12-15

    In prostate cancer (PCa) patients, initial responsiveness to androgen deprivation therapy is frequently followed by relapse due to development of treatment-resistant androgen-independent PCa. This is typically associated with acquisition of mutations in AR that allow activity as a transcription factor in the absence of ligand, indicating that androgen-independent PCa remains dependent on AR function. Our strategy to effectively target AR in androgen-independent PCa involved using a cell-based readout to isolate small molecules that inhibit AR transactivation function through mechanisms other than modulation of ligand binding. A number of the identified inhibitors were toxic to AR-expressing PCa cells regardless of their androgen dependence. Among these, some only suppressed PCa cell growth (ARTIS), while others induced cell death (ARTIK). ARTIK, but not ARTIS, compounds caused disappearance of AR protein from treated cells. siRNA against AR behaved like ARTIK compounds, while a dominant negative AR mutant that prevents AR-mediated transactivation but does not eliminate the protein showed only a growth suppressive effect. These observations reveal a transcription-independent function of AR that is essential for PCa cell viability and, therefore, is an ideal target for anti-PCa treatment. Indeed, several of the identified AR inhibitors demonstrated in vivo efficacy in mouse models of PCa and are candidates for pharmacologic optimization.

  9. 68Ga-PSMA-11 PET Represents the Tumoricidal Effect of 223Ra in a Patient With Castrate-Resistant Metastatic Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadzadehfar, Hojjat; Schlenkhoff, Carl Diedrich; Rogenhofer, Sebastian; Yordanova, Anna; Essler, Markus

    2016-09-01

    A 64-year-old man with prostate cancer and an increasing prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level under therapy with abiraterone acetate underwent a therapy with Ra. Before the first therapy and 4 weeks after the last cycle, the patient underwent Ga-PSMA PET, which showed a clear response of bone metastases. PMID:27405025

  10. Impact of Bone-targeted Therapies in Chemotherapy-naïve Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer Patients Treated with Abiraterone Acetate: Post Hoc Analysis of Study COU-AA-302

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Fred; Shore, Neal; Van Poppel, Hendrik; Rathkopf, Dana E.; Smith, Matthew R.; de Bono, Johann S.; Logothetis, Christopher J.; de Souza, Paul; Fizazi, Karim; Mulders, Peter F.A.; Mainwaring, Paul; Hainsworth, John D.; Beer, Tomasz M.; North, Scott; Fradet, Yves; Griffin, Thomas A.; De Porre, Peter; Londhe, Anil; Kheoh, Thian; Small, Eric J.; Scher, Howard I.; Molina, Arturo; Ryan, Charles J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) often involves bone, and bone-targeted therapy (BTT) has become part of the overall treatment strategy. Objective Investigation of outcomes for concomitant BTT in a post hoc analysis of the COU-AA-302 trial, which demonstrated an overall clinical benefit of abiraterone acetate (AA) plus prednisone over placebo plus prednisone in asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic chemotherapy-naïve mCRPC patients. Design, setting, and participants This report describes the third interim analysis (prespecified at 55% overall survival [OS] events) for the COU-AA-302 trial. Intervention Patients were grouped by concomitant BTT use or no BTT use. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis Radiographic progression-free survival and OS were coprimary end points. This report describes the third interim analysis (prespecified at 55% OS events) and involves patients treated with or without concomitant BTT during the COU-AA-302 study. Median follow-up for OS was 27.1 mo. Median time-to-event variables with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs), 95% CIs, and p values for concomitant BTT versus no BTT were obtained via Cox models. Results and limitations While the post hoc nature of the analysis is a limitation, superiority of AA and prednisone versus prednisone alone was demonstrated for clinical outcomes with or without BTT use. Compared with no BTT use, concomitant BTT significantly improved OS (HR 0.75; p = 0.01) and increased the time to ECOG deterioration (HR 0.75; p < 0.001) and time to opiate use for cancer-related pain (HR 0.80; p = 0.036). The safety profile of concomitant BTT with AA was similar to that reported for AA in the overall intent-to-treat population. Osteonecrosis of the jaw (all grade 1/2) with concomitant BTT use was reported in <3% of patients. Conclusions AA with concomitant BTT was safe and well tolerated in men with chemotherapy

  11. Canine prostate carcinoma: epidemiological evidence of an increased risk in castrated dogs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teske, E.; Naan, E.C.; Dijk, E.M. van; Garderen, E. van; Schalken, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    The present retrospective study investigated the frequency of prostate carcinoma (PCA) among prostate abnormalities in dogs and determined whether castration influences the incidence of PCA in dogs. During the years 1993-1998, 15363 male dogs were admitted to the Utrecht University Clinic of Compani

  12. Combination of carmustine and selenite effectively inhibits tumor growth by targeting androgen receptor, androgen receptor-variants, and Akt in preclinical models: New hope for patients with castration resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamilselvan, Vijayalakshmi; Menon, Mani; Thamilselvan, Sivagnanam

    2016-10-01

    Despite established androgen receptor (AR) antagonists, AR/AR-variants signaling remain a major obstacle for the successful treatment of castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In addition, CRPC cells adapt to survive via AR-independent pathways to escape next generation therapies. Therefore, there is an urgent need for drugs that can target these signaling pathways in CRPC. In this study, we sought to determine whether carmustine and selenite in combination could induce apoptosis and inhibit growth of CRPC in-vitro and in-vivo. CRPC (22Rv1, VCaP, and PC-3) cell lines in culture and xenograft mouse were used. Combination of carmustine and selenite treatment significantly increased reactive oxygen species, apoptosis and growth inhibition in CRPC cells with down regulation of anti-apoptotic (Bcl-2 and Mcl-1) and proliferative proteins (c-Myc and cyclin-D1). This effect was associated with complete reduction of AR/AR-variants, AR-V7, PSA and significant induction of p27Kip1. Combination treatment substantially abolished phospho-Akt, phospho-GSK-3β, and anchorage-independent growth in AR-positive and AR-negative cells. Consistent with in-vitro results, combination treatment effectively induced apoptosis and completely inhibited xenograft tumor growth and markedly reduced AR/AR-variants, AR-V7, PSA, and Bcl-2 in xenograft tumors without causing genotoxicity in host mice. Individual agent treatment showed only partial effect. The combination treatment showed a significant synergistic effect. The present study is the first to demonstrate that the combination of carmustine and selenite treatment completely suppressed CRPC tumor growth by reducing AR/AR-variants and Akt signaling. Our findings suggest that the combination of carmustine and selenite could constitute a promising next-generation therapy for successful treatment of patients with CRPC. PMID:27198552

  13. A randomized non-comparative phase II trial of cixutumumab (IMC-A12) or ramucirumab (IMC-1121B) plus mitoxantrone and prednisone in men with metastatic docetaxel-pretreated castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Maha; Rathkopf, Dana; Liu, Glenn; Armstrong, Andrew; Kelly, Wm. Kevin; Ferrari, Anna; Hainsworth, John; Joshi, Adarsh; Hozak, Rebecca R.; Yang, Ling; Schwartz, Jonathan D.; Higano, Celestia S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cixutumumab, a human monoclonal antibody (HuMAb), targets the insulin-like growth factor receptor. Ramucirumab is a recombinant HuMAb that binds to vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2. A non-comparative randomized phase II study evaluated cixutumumab or ramucirumab plus mitoxantrone and prednisone (MP) in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Patients and Methods Men with progressive mCRPC during or after docetaxel therapy received mitoxantrone 12 mg/m2 on day 1 and prednisone 5 mg twice daily and were randomized 1:1 to receive either cixutumumab or ramucirumab 6 mg/kg intravenously weekly in a 21-day cycle. Primary endpoint was composite progression-free survival (cPFS). Secondary endpoints included safety, response, radiographic PFS, and overall survival (OS). Sample size was based on a 50% increase in median cPFS from 2.6 (MP) to 3.9 months (either combination). Results 132 men were treated (66 per arm). Median cPFS was 4.1 months (95% CI, 2.2–5.6) for cixutumumab and 6.7 months (95% CI, 4.5–8.3) for ramucirumab. Median time to radiographic progression was 7.5 months for cixutumumab and 10.2 months for ramucirumab, with a median OS of 10.8 and 13.0 months, respectively. Fatigue was the most frequent adverse event (AE). Incidence of most non-hematologic grade 3-4 AEs was <10% on both arms. Grade 3 cardiac dysfunction occurred in 7.6% of patients on ramucirumab. Conclusion Combinations of cixutumumab or ramucirumab plus MP were feasible and associated with moderate toxicities in docetaxel pretreated men with mCRPC. Of the two regimens, the ramucirumab regimen is worthy of further testing based on the observed cPFS relative to the historical control. PMID:26082390

  14. A phase I study of combined docetaxel and repeated high activity {sup 186}Re-HEDP in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) metastatic to bone (the TAXIUM trial)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodewaard-de Jong, Joyce M. van; Bloemendal, Haiko J. [Meander Medical Centre, Department of Internal Medicine, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Klerk, John M.H. de; Haas, Marie J. de [Meander Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Bezooijen, Bart P.J. van [Meander Medical Centre, Department of Urology, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Wilson, Richard H.; O' Sullivan, Joe M. [Queen' s University Belfast, Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Belfast, N. Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    Bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals have palliative benefit in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) metastatic to bone. Recent studies have shown improvement of survival and quality of life when radiopharmaceuticals were given repeatedly or in combination with chemotherapy. We designed a phase I study combining docetaxel and {sup 186}Re-labelled hydroxyethylidene diphosphonate (HEDP) in men with CRPC and bone metastases to evaluate toxicity. A dose escalation schedule was designed consisting of four dose levels with a standard dosage of docetaxel (75 mg/m{sup 2} 3-weekly). {sup 186}Re-HEDP was given in increasing activities (1,250 MBq up to 2,500 MBq) after the third and sixth cycle of docetaxel. Dose limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as any grade 4 toxicity lasting more than 7 days or any grade 3 toxicity that did not recover within 10 days. Three patients were planned for each dose level expanding to six if a DLT occurred. Fourteen patients were recruited with a median age of 64.6 years. One DLT, grade 3 thrombocytopenia lasting >10 days, occurred at dose level 3 leading to expansion of this group to six. One of these patients had an episode of acute renal failure which resolved. Because of production problems of {sup 186}Re-HEDP dose level 4 was not started. Combined therapy with docetaxel and {sup 186}Re-HEDP is generally well tolerated in patients with CRPC metastatic to bone. We will conduct a randomized phase II study using three cycles of docetaxel 75 mg/m{sup 2} 3-weekly followed by {sup 188}Re-HEDP 40 MBq/kg body weight, followed by another three cycles of docetaxel 75 mg/m{sup 2}, followed by {sup 188}Re-HEDP 20 MBq/kg body weight. (orig.)

  15. A randomized phase II trial of mitoxantrone, estramustine and vinorelbine or bcl-2 modulation with 13-cis retinoic acid, interferon and paclitaxel in patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer: ECOG 3899

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carducci Michael

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To test the hypothesis that modulation of Bcl-2 with 13-cis retinoic acid (CRA/interferon-alpha2b (IFN with paclitaxel (TAX, or mitoxantrone, estramustine and vinorelbine (MEV will have clinical activity in men with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. Methods 70 patients were treated with either MEV (Arm A in a 3-week cycle or CRA/IFN/TAX with an 8-week cycle (Arm B. Patients were assessed for response, toxicity, quality of life (QOL, and the effect of treatment on Bcl-2 levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. Results The PSA response rates were 50% and 23%, measurable disease response rates (CR+PR 14% and 15%, and median overall survival 19.4 months and 13.9 months on Arm A and Arm B respectively. Transient grade 4 neutropenia occurred in 18 and 2 patients, and grade 3 to 4 thrombosis in 7 patients and 1 patient in Arm A and Arm B respectively. Patients on Arm B reported a clinically significant decline in QOL between baseline and week 9/10 (.71 s.d., and a significantly lower level of QOL than Arm A (p = 0.01. As hypothesized, Bcl-2 levels decreased with CRA/IFN therapy only in Arm B (p = 0.03. Conclusions Treatment with MEV was well tolerated and demonstrated clinical activity in patients with CRPC. Given the adverse effect of CRA/IFN/TAX on QOL, the study of other novel agents that target Bcl-2 family proteins is warranted. The feasibility of measuring Bcl-2 protein in a cooperative group setting is hypothesis generating and supports further study as a marker for Bcl-2 targeted therapy. Trial Registration Clinical Trials Registration number: CDR0000067865

  16. Treatment of Bone Metastases with Radium-223 in Patients with Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer (CRPC): Alternative or Complementary to Innovative Molecular Therapies?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The skeletal metastatic disease is a real clinical problem. Approximately 70% of patients with prostate or breast cancer and 35% of those with advanced lung, thyroid, and kidney cancers will develop skeletal metastases, which cause considerable morbidity. Several options are available for treatment, to be used either alone or in various combinations: hormones in case of hormone-sensitive tumours, chemotherapy, biphosphonates, external beam radiation therapy, surgery (in pathologic or impending fracture), bone-seeking radiopharmceuticals, and also molecular therapies. Focusing our attention to patients with prostate cancer, 50% of patients with bone metastases develop skeletal related events (SREs) such as: severe pain, pathologic fractures, spinal compression syndrome, malignant hypercalcemia, bone marrow suppression. All these SREs require adequate therapy since generally determine several functional impairments and worsen the prognosis. It is well known that skeletal complications reduce the quality of life affecting different aspects, physical, functional end emotional. SREs are associated also with lower survival

  17. 阿比特龙联合泼尼松治疗去势抗拒前列腺癌的临床观察%Clinical Observation of Abriaterone Acetate and Prednison on Patients with Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许玉霞; 张华锋; 李长岭

    2015-01-01

    目的 探讨新型雄激素合成抑制剂醋酸阿比特龙(Abriaterone acetate)治疗去势抗拒前列腺癌(castration-resistant prostate cancer,CRPC)的疗效及安全性.方法 经病理证实并符合入选标准的58例去势抗拒前列腺癌患者,中位年龄68岁(61~81岁),接受醋酸阿比特龙治疗,化疗至少2周期后.按实体瘤疗效评价标准(RECIST)美国NCI制定的毒性评价指标(CTC-AE3.0)评价疗效和毒性反应;采用Kaplan-meier法对患者总生存时间(OS)进行分析.结果 5例未完成总评估过程.可评价疗效的53例患者中,总有效率(ORR) 18.87%(10例),疾病控制率(DCR) 62.26%(33例);中位OS为(15.0±1.2)月;28例前列腺特异性抗原(prostate-specific antigen,PSA)下降>50%,治疗前后PSA中位数分别为78 ng/ml(18~1 776 ng/ml)和37 ng/ml(9~320 ng/ml),两者比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);化疗不良反应多为Ⅰ~Ⅱ级.结论 阿比特龙联合泼尼松治疗去势抗拒前列腺癌疗效较好,不良反应轻.

  18. Castration induces up-regulation of intratumoral androgen biosynthesis and androgen receptor expression in an orthotopic VCaP human prostate cancer xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuuttila, Matias; Yatkin, Emrah; Kallio, Jenny; Savolainen, Saija; Laajala, Teemu D; Aittokallio, Tero; Oksala, Riikka; Häkkinen, Merja; Keski-Rahkonen, Pekka; Auriola, Seppo; Poutanen, Matti; Mäkelä, Sari

    2014-08-01

    Androgens are key factors involved in the development and progression of prostate cancer (PCa), and PCa growth can be suppressed by androgen deprivation therapy. In a considerable proportion of men receiving androgen deprivation therapy, however, PCa progresses to castration-resistant PCa (CRPC), making the development of efficient therapies challenging. We used an orthotopic VCaP human PCa xenograft model to study cellular and molecular changes in tumors after androgen deprivation therapy (castration). Tumor growth was monitored through weekly serum prostate-specific antigen measurements, and mice with recurrent tumors after castration were randomized to treatment groups. Serum prostate-specific antigen concentrations showed significant correlation with tumor volume. Castration-resistant tumors retained concentrations of intratumoral androgen (androstenedione, testosterone, and 5α-dihydrotestosterone) at levels similar to tumors growing in intact hosts. Accordingly, castration induced up-regulation of enzymes involved in androgen synthesis (CYP17A1, AKR1C3, and HSD17B6), as well as expression of full-length androgen receptor (AR) and AR splice variants (AR-V1 and AR-V7). Furthermore, AR target gene expression was maintained in castration-resistant xenografts. The AR antagonists enzalutamide (MDV3100) and ARN-509 suppressed PSA production of castration-resistant tumors, confirming the androgen dependency of these tumors. Taken together, the findings demonstrate that our VCaP xenograft model exhibits the key characteristics of clinical CRPC and thus provides a valuable tool for identifying druggable targets and for testing therapeutic strategies targeting AR signaling in CRPC.

  19. Matrine inhibits the proliferation, invasion and migration of castration-resistant prostate cancer cells through regulation of the NF-κB signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Lai, Yiming; Wang, Chengbin; Xu, Guibin; He, Zheng; Shang, Xiaohong; Sun, Yi; Zhang, Fan; Liu, Leyuan; Huang, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Matrine is a naturally occurring alkaloid extracted from the Chinese herb Sophora flavescens. It has been demonstrated to exhibit antiproliferative properties, promote apoptosis and inhibit cell invasion in a number of cancer cell lines. It has also been shown to improve the efficacy of chemotherapy when it is combined with other chemotherapy drugs. However, the therapeutic efficacy of matrine for prostate cancer remains poorly understood. In the present study, we showed that matrine inhibited the proliferation, migration and invasion of both DU145 and PC-3 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. It also reduced the cell population at S phase and increased the cell population at sub-G1 phase. The increases in both the apoptotic cell population and cell population at S and sub-G1 phases consistently indicated a pro-apoptotic effect of matrine. Decreases in levels of P65, p-P65, IKKα/β, p-IKKα/β, IKBα and p-IKBα as detected by immunoblot analysis in the matrine-treated DU145 and PC-3 cells suggested an involvement of the NF-κB signaling pathway. Therefore, it is a novel promising addition to the current arsenal of chemotherapy drugs for the treatment of androgen-independent prostate cancer.

  20. Matrine inhibits the proliferation, invasion and migration of castration-resistant prostate cancer cells through regulation of the NF-κB signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Lai, Yiming; Wang, Chengbin; Xu, Guibin; He, Zheng; Shang, Xiaohong; Sun, Yi; Zhang, Fan; Liu, Leyuan; Huang, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Matrine is a naturally occurring alkaloid extracted from the Chinese herb Sophora flavescens. It has been demonstrated to exhibit antiproliferative properties, promote apoptosis and inhibit cell invasion in a number of cancer cell lines. It has also been shown to improve the efficacy of chemotherapy when it is combined with other chemotherapy drugs. However, the therapeutic efficacy of matrine for prostate cancer remains poorly understood. In the present study, we showed that matrine inhibited the proliferation, migration and invasion of both DU145 and PC-3 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. It also reduced the cell population at S phase and increased the cell population at sub-G1 phase. The increases in both the apoptotic cell population and cell population at S and sub-G1 phases consistently indicated a pro-apoptotic effect of matrine. Decreases in levels of P65, p-P65, IKKα/β, p-IKKα/β, IKBα and p-IKBα as detected by immunoblot analysis in the matrine-treated DU145 and PC-3 cells suggested an involvement of the NF-κB signaling pathway. Therefore, it is a novel promising addition to the current arsenal of chemotherapy drugs for the treatment of androgen-independent prostate cancer. PMID:26497618

  1. A comparison of androgen deprivation therapy versus surgical castration for patients with advanced prostatic carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-hsiang LIN; Chien-lun CHEN; Chen-pang HOU; Phei-lang CHANG; Ke-hung TSUI

    2011-01-01

    Airn:To examine the outcomes of patients with advanced prostate carcinoma who underwent medical or surgical castration.Methods:A hundred twenty one consecutive cases of patients with advanced prostate carcinoma who underwent medicaI or surgical castration between 2001 and 2006 were retrospectively reviewed.Associations between clinicaI outcomes and prognostic scoring factors were determined based on the Reijke study.In the surgical and medical castration groups.the impact on the prostate-specific antigen(PSA)normalization rate,the rebound rate and the disease-free survivaI rate were evaluated.The mean foIlow-up was 36.1months.Results:In the initial 12 months.there were no statisticaI differences in the PSA normalization rate and the PSA rebound rate between the two groups.However,the PSA rebound rate after the 12th month(20.90%vs 40.74%.P=-0.0175)and the 18th month PSA normalization rate(59.70%vs 37.04%.P=0.0217)differed significantly between the two groups,and these differences were maintained to the end of the study.When comparing patients grouped according to Reijke prognosis scores.there was no difference between medical and surgical castration for the good prognosis group.However, among the patients given a poor prognosis,surgical castration was superior in terms of the PSA normalization rate,the PSA rebound rate.the tumor progression-free survival rate(P<0.001)and the overalI survivaI rate (P<0.001).Conclusion:Advanced prostate carcinoma patients with poor pretreatment prognosis scores should undergo surgical castration rather than medical castration for better PSA rebound rates and overaII survival.

  2. The expression of receptors for estrogen and epithelial growth factor in the male rabbit prostate and prostatic urethra following castration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, A; Balslev, E; Iversen, H G;

    1997-01-01

    In the lower urinary tract of the male rabbit, estrogen receptors (ERs) are restricted to the urethra and the prostatic stroma. At present, the function of ERs in these tissues is not known. Epithelial growth factor (EGF) stimulates proliferation of epidermal and epithelial tissues, and several...... were included as controls. In the control group, ERs were found in the urothelial lining and lamina propria of the prostatic urethra, and in the prostatic stroma. EGF receptors were demonstrated in the epithelial lining of the prostatic urethra and the glandular epithelium of the prostate. Following...... castration, the expression of ERs, assessed as the increase in the number of positively stained specimens, increased significantly in the lamina propria of the prostatic urethra and the prostatic stroma. EGF receptor expression increased significantly in the epithelial lining of the prostatic urethra. In the...

  3. Correlation between frequencies of blood monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells, regulatory T cells and negative prognostic markers in patients with castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Idorn, Manja; Køllgaard, Tania; Kongsted, Per;

    2014-01-01

    function of immune suppressive cell subsets in the peripheral blood of 41 patients with prostate cancer (PC) and 36 healthy donors (HD) showed a significant increase in circulating CD14(+) HLA-DR(low/neg) monocytic MDSC (M-MDSC) and Tregs in patients with PC compared to HD. Furthermore, M-MDSC frequencies......Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are believed to play a role in immune suppression and subsequent failure of T cells to mount an efficient anti-tumor response, by employing both direct T-cell inhibition as well as induction of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Investigating the frequency and...... correlated positively with Treg levels. In vitro proliferation assay with autologous T cells confirmed M-MDSC-mediated T-cell suppression, and intracellular staining of immune suppressive enzyme iNOS revealed a higher expression in M-MDSC from patients with PC. Increased frequencies of M-MDSC correlated with...

  4. Reviews on Abiraterone Acetate Treatment on Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer%醋酸阿比特龙治疗转移性去势抵抗性前列腺癌综述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈文东; 孙艳; 王沭; 杜芬

    2016-01-01

    Advanced prostate cancer (PCa) eventually progresses to castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) after androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) because the adrenal and prostate cancer cells still generate androgen that stimulates the growth of tumor cells. Abiraterone acetate is a specific inhibitor of CYP17 that blocks testicular, adrenal and tumor androgen biosynthesis. Large phase III randomized clinical trials have proved that abiraterone acetate improved overall survival, delayed disease progress, controlled disease-related symptoms, and improved quality of life in metastatic CRPC (mCRPC) patients without chemotherapy or with failed chemotherapy. The published economic analysis suggested that the combination of abiraterone and low dose prednisone was cost-effective compared with other new therapies in post-chemotherapy mCRPC patients. Additionally, abiraterone acetate was found to have minimal budget impact on health plans likely due to small size of patients and saved health resources utilization associated with administration and safety of abiraterone acetate. The treatments for mCRPC in China are limited and the launch of using abiraterone acetate provided patients and health care providers a new treatment option.%经雄激素剥夺疗法(ADT)治疗后,晚期前列腺癌(PCa)最终进展为去势抵抗性前列腺癌(CRPC)的原因是睾丸外器官(肾上腺)和前列腺癌细胞本身仍有合成雄激素的能力,继续刺激癌细胞的生长。醋酸阿比特龙是CYP17酶的选择性抑制剂,能全面阻断睾丸、肾上腺和前列腺癌细胞中的雄激素生物合成。大型三期随机对照临床试验均已证明,对未经化疗或者化疗失败的转移性CRPC(mCRPC)患者,醋酸阿比特龙联合小剂量泼尼松能够显著提高患者生存时间、延缓疾病进展、缓解疾病症状、提高患者生命质量。已发表的经济学分析表明,在化疗后的人群中,阿比特龙方案相对于其

  5. Maximal androgen blockade versus castration alone in patients with metastatic prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abeer A.Mahmoud; Eman A.El-Sharawy; Mohamed M.El-Bassiouny; Ramy R.Ghali

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Maximum androgen blockade (MAB), consisting of an antiandrogen plus either a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist (LHRHA) or orchiectomy, is a standard care for patients with prostate cancer. Although, clinical trial results have been equivocal, none has shown a significant advantage in favor of MAB over castration alone in metastatic prostate cancer and MAB has been the subject of considerable controversy. The aim of this study was to compare MAB (orchiectomy or LHRHA “Goserelin”) and anti-androgen “Bicalutamide” with castration alone (orchiectomy or LHRHA) in previ-ously untreated metastatic prostate cancer patients.Methods: Hundred eligible patients with adequate performance status and adequate hematologic, hepatic and renal functions were included. MAB arm, fifty patients underwent castration either surgicaly by orchiectomy or medicaly by receiving Goserelin (3.6 mg) depot, which was injected subcutaneously every 28 days plus bicalutamide 50 mg once daily. Castration alone arm, fifty patients underwent castration alone either surgicaly by orchiectomy or medicaly by receiving Goserelin (3.6 mg) depot.Results: During the period from January 2011 to January 2013, with a median folow up of 18 months (range 6 to 24 months), there were eight deaths (16%), in MAB arm and ten deaths (20%) in castration alone arm. At three months, there were 35 patients (70%) with prostate specific antigen (PSA) normalization (≤ 4 mg/dL) in MAB arm versus 17 patients (34%) with PSA normalization in castration alone arm (P = 0.001). The median progression free survival (PFS) times were 22.18 months (95% CI, 19.7 to 24.2 months) for MAB arm versus 22 months in castration alone arm (95% CI, 18 to 25.9 months;P = 0.045). The survival rates for MAB arm were 82% at 18 months and 70.6% at 24 months versus 78.7% at 18 months and 75.1% at 24 months in castration alone arm (P > 0.05). The median overal survival (OS) was not reached in either arm. Both hematological

  6. Evaluation of Alpha-Therapy with Radium-223-Dichloride in Castration Resistant Metastatic Prostate Cancer—the Role of Gamma Scintigraphy in Dosimetry and Pharmacokinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalevi Kairemo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Radium-223-dichloride (223RaCl2 is a new bone-seeking calcium analogue alpha-emitter, which has obtained marketing authorization for the treatment skeletal metastases of hormone-refractory prostate cancer. The current treatment regimen is based on six consecutive doses of 223RaCl2 at 4 week intervals and the administered activity dose, 50 kBq/kg per cycle is based on patient weight. We analyzed two patients using quantitative serial gamma imaging to estimate dosimetry in tumors and see possible pharmacokinetic differences in the treatment cycles. The lesions were rather well visualized in gamma scintigraphy in spite of low gamma activity (<1.1% gamma radiation at 0, 7 and 28 days using 30–60 min acquisition times. Both our patients analyzed in serial gamma imagings, had two lesions in the gamma imaging field, the mean counts of the relative intensity varied from 27.8 to 36.5 (patient 1, and from 37.4 to 82.2 (patient 2. The half-lives varied from 1.8 days to 4.5 days during the six cycles (patient 1, and from 1.5 days to 3.6 days (patient 2, respectively. In the lesion half-lives calculated from the imaging the maximum difference between the treatment cycles in the same lesion was 2.0-fold (1.8 vs. 3.6. Of these patients, patient 1 demonstrated a serum PSA response, whereas there was no PSA response in patient 2. From our data, there were maximally up to 4.0-fold differences (62.1 vs. 246.6 between the relative absorbed radiation doses between patients as calculated from the quantitative standardized imaging to be delivered in only two lesions, and in the same lesion the maximum difference in the cycles was up to 2.3-fold (107.4 vs. 246.6. Our recommendation based on statistical simulation analysis, is serial measurement at days 0–8 at least 3 times, this improve the accuracy significantly to study the lesion activities, half-lives or calculated relative absorbed radiation doses as calculated from the imaging. Both our patients had

  7. Combined immunotherapy with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-transduced allogeneic prostate cancer cells and ipilimumab in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: a phase 1 dose-escalation trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eertwegh, A.J. van den; Versluis, J.; Berg, H.P. van den; Santegoets, S.J.; Moorselaar, R.J. van; Sluis, T.M. van der; Gall, H.E.; Harding, T.C.; Jooss, K.; Lowy, I.; Pinedo, H.M.; Scheper, R.J.; Stam, A.G.; Blomberg, B.M. von; Gruijl, T.D. de; Hege, K.; Sacks, N.; Gerritsen, W.R.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-transduced allogeneic prostate cancer cells vaccine (GVAX) has antitumour activity against prostate cancer; preclinical studies have shown potent synergy when combined with ipilimumab, an antibody that blocks cytotoxic T-lymphocyte ant

  8. Possible mechanism of benign prostatic hyperplasia induced by androgen-estrogen ratios in castrated rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Yun Liu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : To explore the role of androgen-estrogen balance in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH induced by varying doses of estradiol/testosterone propionate (E 2 /TP in castrated rats. Materials and Methods : A total of 222 rats were divided into 37 groups at random, including 35 groups of different E 2 /TP, one control, and one castrated group. All 37 groups except the control group were castrated, for eliminating endogenesis of testosterone in rats. The treated groups were administered testosterone propionate (TP; at the dosages of 0.15, 0.74, 3.7, 18.5, and 92.6 mg/kg, combined with estradiol (E 2 ; at the dosage of 0, 0.4, 2, 10, 50, 250, and 1250 μg/kg diluted in vegetable oil for 30 days, respectively, whereas the control groups received only vegetable oil. All prostate specimens were removed under anesthesia, then fixed and embedded in paraffin, for measuring the organ quotient, volume, area of prostate glandular cavity, and the height of prostate epithelia. Results : When the dosages of TP were 0.15, 3.7, 18.5, and 92.6 mg/kg, the degree of prostatic hyperplasia had no obvious dose-effect relationship with E 2 . When TP was 0.74 mg/kg, with the increase of the dosage of E 2 , the volume and quotient of prostate were increasing. However, when the dosage of E 2 exceeded 50 μg/kg, E 2 /TP was 5/74, the prostatic volume did not increase obviously. Conclusion : The proper levels of E2/TP play an important role in the pathogenesis of BPH. In rats, the balance point of E 2 /TP is 5/74.

  9. The effects of castration followed testosterone supplementation in prostatic complex of Artibeus planirostris (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puga, Cíntia C I; Beguelini, Mateus R; Morielle-Versute, Eliana; Vilamaior, Patricia S L; Taboga, Sebastião R

    2016-06-01

    The prostatic complex (ventral and dorsal regions) of Artibeus planirostris exhibits seasonal variations throughout the year. Circulating testosterone was correlated with prostate weight, showing an increase from autumn to summer, with the highest peak in summer corresponding to the largest breeding season. This indicates that the level of serum testosterone influences variations in both testicular and prostatic weights. Serum testosterone levels seem to be closely related to the different responses of these glands throughout the year. The castration (consequent suppression of testosterone) and subsequent hormone supplementation may elucidate the relationship of these two glandular types with testosterone. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of castration and the testosterone supplementation in the male prostatic complex of A. planirostris. The results indicated that both prostatic regions were affected by the ablation of testosterone, presenting a decrease in cell proliferation and an increase in apoptosis. Similarly, the prostate was responsive to hormonal supplementation, having a recovery of the active morphophysiological pattern with testosterone supplementation. However, data have shown that the ventral region was more sensitive to changes in testosterone than the dorsal, presenting greater cell renewal. PMID:27032910

  10. CURRENT POSSIBILITIES OF TREATMENT FOR VISCERAL METASTASES IN PATIENTS WITH METASTATIC CASTRATION-REFRACTORY PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Govorov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Medications increasing the survival of patients with metastatic castration-refractory prostate cancer (CRPC are lacking today. In the past 3 years, in the pharmaceutical market there have been a few novel drugs to treat progressive prostate cancer. Abiraterone acetate is an androgen synthesis inhibitor, which is also used to increase the survival of patients with metastatic CRPC that progresses after chemotherapy. The results of treatment for metastatic CRPC depend on a number of factors. Visceral metastases are poor predictors of the course of the disease. The results of abiraterone acetate treatment were analyzed in CRPC patients with visceral metastases.

  11. Reflections on the therapeutic use of {sup 223}RaCl{sub 2} for bone metastases resulting from prostate cancer resistant to castration; Reflexiones sobre el uso terapeutico de {sup 223}RaCl{sub 2} para metastasis osea derivada de cancer de prostata resistente a la castracion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astudillo V, A. J.; Paredes G, L., E-mail: armando.astudillo@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    In January 2014 the Comision Federal para la Proteccion contra Riesgos Sanitarios of the Ministry of Health in Mexico, authorize the use of {sup 223}RaCl{sub 2} as the first radiopharmaceutical emitter α for therapeutic purposes in cases of bone metastases resulting from prostate cancer resistant to castration. The paper analyzes the main variables that affect the metrological traceability using activity meters to evaluate the gamma activity of {sup 223}RaCl{sub 2} in hospitals, because it has a chain of complex decay with alpha, beta and gamma emitters, so was important to verify if a gamma activity measurement for a multiple emitter is reliable to determine the total alpha absorbed dose to bone in a patient. (Author)

  12. Pre-therapeutic dosimetry of normal organs and tissues of {sup 177}Lu-PSMA-617 prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) inhibitor in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabasakal, Levent; AbuQbeitah, Mohammad; Ayguen, Aslan; Yeyin, Nami [Istanbul University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul (Turkey); Ocak, Meltem [Istanbul University, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Pharmacy Faculty, Istanbul (Turkey); Demirci, Emre [Sisli Etfal Training and Research Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Istanbul (Turkey); Toklu, Turkay [Yeditepe University Medical Faculty, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2015-12-15

    {sup 177}Lu-617-prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) ligand seems to be a promising tracer for radionuclide therapy of progressive prostate cancer. However, there are no published data regarding the radiation dose given to the normal tissues. The aim of the present study was to estimate the pretreatment radiation doses in patients who will undergo radiometabolic therapy using a tracer amount of {sup 177}Lu-labeled PSMA ligand. The study included seven patients with progressive prostate cancer with a mean age of 63.9 ± 3.9 years. All patients had prior PSMA positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and had intense tracer uptake at the lesions. The injected {sup 177}Lu-PSMA-617 activity ranged from 185 to 210 MBq with a mean of 192.6 ± 11.0 MBq. To evaluate bone marrow absorbed dose 2-cc blood samples were withdrawn in short variable times (3, 15, 30, 60, and 180 min and 24, 48, and 120 h) after injection. Whole-body images were obtained at 4, 24, 48, and 120 h post-injection (p.i.). The geometric mean of anterior and posterior counts was determined through region of interest (ROI) analysis. Attenuation correction was applied using PSMA PET/CT images. The OLINDA/EXM dosimetry program was used for curve fitting, residence time calculation, and absorbed dose calculations. The calculated radiation-absorbed doses for each organ showed substantial variation. The highest radiation estimated doses were calculated for parotid glands and kidneys. Calculated radiation-absorbed doses per megabecquerel were 1.17 ± 0.31 mGy for parotid glands and 0.88 ± 0.40 mGy for kidneys. The radiation dose given to the bone marrow was significantly lower than those of kidney and parotid glands (p < 0.05). The calculated radiation dose to bone marrow was 0.03 ± 0.01 mGy/MBq. Our first results suggested that {sup 177}Lu-PSMA-617 therapy seems to be a safe method. The dose-limiting organ seems to be the parotid glands rather than kidneys and bone marrow. The lesion radiation doses are

  13. Longitudinal tracking of subpopulation dynamics and molecular changes during LNCaP cell castration and identification of inhibitors that could target the PSA-/lo castration-resistant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rycaj, Kiera; Cho, Eun Jeong; Liu, Xin; Chao, Hsueh-Ping; Liu, Bigang; Li, Qiuhui; Devkota, Ashwini K; Zhang, Dingxiao; Chen, Xin; Moore, John; Dalby, Kevin N; Tang, Dean G

    2016-03-22

    We have recently demonstrated that the undifferentiated PSA-/lo prostate cancer (PCa) cell population harbors self-renewing long-term tumor-propagating cells that are refractory to castration, thus representing a therapeutic target. Our goals here are, by using the same lineage-tracing reporter system, to track the dynamic changes of PSA-/lo and PSA+ cells upon castration in vitro, investigate the molecular changes accompanying persistent castration, and develop large numbers of PSA-/lo PCa cells for drug screening. To these ends, we treated LNCaP cells infected with the PSAP-GFP reporter with three regimens of castration, i.e., CDSS, CDSS plus bicalutamide, and MDV3100 continuously for up to ~21 months. We observed that in the first ~7 months, castration led to time-dependent increases in PSA-/lo cells, loss of AR and PSA expression, increased expression of cancer stem cell markers, and many other molecular changes. Meanwhile, castrated LNCaP cells became resistant to high concentrations of MDV3100, chemotherapeutic drugs, and other agents. However, targeted and medium-throughput library screening identified several kinase (e.g., IGF-1R, AKT, PI3K/mTOR, Syk, GSK3) inhibitors as well as the BCL2 inhibitor that could effectively sensitize the LNCaP-CRPC cells to killing. Of interest, LNCaP cells castrated for >7 months showed evidence of cyclic changes in AR and the mTOR/AKT signaling pathways potentially involving epigenetic mechanisms. These observations indicate that castration elicits numerous molecular changes and leads to enrichment of PSA-/lo PCa cells. The ability to generate large numbers of PSA-/lo PCa cells should allow future high-throughput screening to identify novel therapeutics that specifically target this population. PMID:26871947

  14. Systemic treatment with epidermal growth factor but not insulin-like growth factor I decreases the involution of the prostate in castrated rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, N; Vinter-Jensen, L; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt;

    2000-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) are strong inducers of proliferation to prostate cells cultured in serum-free medium. Accordingly we wanted to study the growth of the prostate gland in castrated rats after treatment with EGF, IGF-I and testosterone. Castrate...

  15. Changes in gene expression following androgen receptor blockade is not equivalent to androgen ablation by castration in the rat ventral prostate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anil M Limaye; Irfan Asangani; Thyagarajan Kalyani; Paturu Kondaiah

    2008-06-01

    Involution of the rat ventral prostate and concomitant modulation of gene expression post-castration is a well-documented phenomenon. While the rat castration model has been extensively used to study androgen regulation of gene expression in the ventral prostate, it is not clear whether all the gene expression changes post-castration are due to androgen depletion alone. To obtain insights into this, we performed differential display reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (DD-RT-PCR) which resulted in the identification of castration and/or flutamide-regulated genes in the rat ventral prostate. These include clusterin, methionine adenosyl transferase II, and prostate-specific transcripts such as PBPC1BS, S100RVP and A7. While clusterin, PBPC1BS and methionine adenosyl transferase II are regulated by both castration and flutamide, S100 RVP and A7 are regulated by castration alone. Interestingly, we show that flutamide, unlike castration, does not induce apoptosis in the rat ventral prostate epithelium, which could be an underlying cause for the differential effects of castration and flutamide treatment. We propose that castration leads to enrichment and depletion of stromal and epithelial cell types, respectively, resulting in erroneous conclusions on some of the cell type-specific transcripts as being androgen regulated.

  16. New Prostate Cancer Treatment Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers have identified a potential alternative approach to blocking a key molecular driver of an advanced form of prostate cancer, called androgen-independent or castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  17. Development in the study of radium-223 chloride for treating castration-resistant prostate carcinoma with bone metastases%镭-223氯化物治疗去势抵抗性前列腺癌骨转移的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    桂继琮; 刘兴党

    2015-01-01

    近年来,全世界前列腺癌的发病率和病死率不断增长,各种治疗方法的研究也进展迅速。镭-223发射的重α粒子(具有<100μm的超短波)靶向作用于骨转移部位和周围新骨生长区域。镭-223氯化物在药物临床试验中以稳定的安全性显著降低了患者的病死率,成为近来被寄予厚望的转移性去势抵抗性前列腺癌(CRPC)治疗领域的“主角”。2013年美国食品药品管理局已批准镭-223氯化物用于治疗有症状的骨转移、未发现内脏转移的CRPC患者。未来其联合治疗方案将会是研究的重点。%Prostate carcinoma rates and mortalities are increasing worldwide. The therapeutic landscape of castration-resistant prostate carcinoma (CRPC) has changed rapidly. Radium-223 chloride, which is a radiopharmaceutical agent, targets bone metastasis by emitting high-energy alpha-particles with extremely short range (<100 μm ) . This chemical is effective in reducing mortality without increasing toxicity. Thus, this agent has the potential to become a new alternative for treating patients with CRPC. The Food and Drug Administration approved radium-223 dichloride for treating patients with CRPC, symptomatic bone metastases, and unknown visceral metastatic disease in 2013. Therefore, combination and sequencing strategies will be future research directions.

  18. TMPRSS2- driven ERG expression in vivo increases self-renewal and maintains expression in a castration resistant subpopulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orla M Casey

    Full Text Available Genomic rearrangements commonly occur in many types of cancers and often initiate or alter the progression of disease. Here we describe an in vivo mouse model that recapitulates the most frequent rearrangement in prostate cancer, the fusion of the promoter region of TMPRSS2 with the coding region of the transcription factor, ERG. A recombinant bacterial artificial chromosome including an extended TMPRSS2 promoter driving genomic ERG was constructed and used for transgenesis in mice. TMPRSS2-ERG expression was evaluated in tissue sections and FACS-fractionated prostate cell populations. In addition to the anticipated expression in luminal cells, TMPRSS2-ERG was similarly expressed in the Sca-1(hi/EpCAM(+ basal/progenitor fraction, where expanded numbers of clonogenic self-renewing progenitors were found, as assayed by in vitro sphere formation. These clonogenic cells increased intrinsic self renewal in subsequent generations. In addition, ERG dependent self-renewal and invasion in vitro was demonstrated in prostate cell lines derived from the model. Clinical studies have suggested that the TMPRSS2-ERG translocation occurs early in prostate cancer development. In the model described here, the presence of the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion alone was not transforming but synergized with heterozygous Pten deletion to promote PIN. Taken together, these data suggest that one function of TMPRSS2-ERG is the expansion of self-renewing cells, which may serve as targets for subsequent mutations. Primary prostate epithelial cells demonstrated increased post transcriptional turnover of ERG compared to the TMPRSS2-ERG positive VCaP cell line, originally isolated from a prostate cancer metastasis. Finally, we determined that TMPRSS2-ERG expression occurred in both castration-sensitive and resistant prostate epithelial subpopulations, suggesting the existence of androgen-independent mechanisms of TMPRSS2 expression in prostate epithelium.

  19. Dominant-negative androgen receptor inhibition of intracrine androgen-dependent growth of castration-recurrent prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Titus

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prostate cancer (CaP is the second leading cause of cancer death in American men. Androgen deprivation therapy is initially effective in CaP treatment, but CaP recurs despite castrate levels of circulating androgen. Continued expression of the androgen receptor (AR and its ligands has been linked to castration-recurrent CaP growth. PRINCIPAL FINDING: In this report, the ligand-dependent dominant-negative ARΔ142-337 (ARΔTR was expressed in castration-recurrent CWR-R1 cell and tumor models to elucidate the role of AR signaling. Expression of ARΔTR decreased CWR-R1 tumor growth in the presence and absence of exogenous testosterone (T and improved survival in the presence of exogenous T. There was evidence for negative selection of ARΔTR transgene in T-treated mice. Mass spectrometry revealed castration-recurrent CaP dihydrotestosterone (DHT levels sufficient to activate AR and ARΔTR. In the absence of exogenous testosterone, CWR-R1-ARΔTR and control cells exhibited altered androgen profiles that implicated epithelial CaP cells as a source of intratumoral AR ligands. CONCLUSION: The study provides in vivo evidence that activation of AR signaling by intratumoral AR ligands is required for castration-recurrent CaP growth and that epithelial CaP cells produce sufficient active androgens for CaP recurrence during androgen deprivation therapy. Targeting intracrine T and DHT synthesis should provide a mechanism to inhibit AR and growth of castration-recurrent CaP.

  20. Plasma AR and abiraterone-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanel, Alessandro; Gasi Tandefelt, Delila; Conteduca, Vincenza; Jayaram, Anuradha; Casiraghi, Nicola; Wetterskog, Daniel; Salvi, Samanta; Amadori, Dino; Zafeiriou, Zafeiris; Rescigno, Pasquale; Bianchini, Diletta; Gurioli, Giorgia; Casadio, Valentina; Carreira, Suzanne; Goodall, Jane; Wingate, Anna; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Tunariu, Nina; Flohr, Penny; De Giorgi, Ugo; de Bono, Johann S; Demichelis, Francesca; Attard, Gerhardt

    2015-11-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) gene aberrations are rare in prostate cancer before primary hormone treatment but emerge with castration resistance. To determine AR gene status using a minimally invasive assay that could have broad clinical utility, we developed a targeted next-generation sequencing approach amenable to plasma DNA, covering all AR coding bases and genomic regions that are highly informative in prostate cancer. We sequenced 274 plasma samples from 97 castration-resistant prostate cancer patients treated with abiraterone at two institutions. We controlled for normal DNA in patients' circulation and detected a sufficiently high tumor DNA fraction to quantify AR copy number state in 217 samples (80 patients). Detection of AR copy number gain and point mutations in plasma were inversely correlated, supported further by the enrichment of nonsynonymous versus synonymous mutations in AR copy number normal as opposed to AR gain samples. Whereas AR copy number was unchanged from before treatment to progression and no mutant AR alleles showed signal for acquired gain, we observed emergence of T878A or L702H AR amino acid changes in 13% of tumors at progression on abiraterone. Patients with AR gain or T878A or L702H before abiraterone (45%) were 4.9 and 7.8 times less likely to have a ≥50 or ≥90% decline in prostate-specific antigen (PSA), respectively, and had a significantly worse overall [hazard ratio (HR), 7.33; 95% confidence interval (CI), 3.51 to 15.34; P = 1.3 × 10(-9)) and progression-free (HR, 3.73; 95% CI, 2.17 to 6.41; P = 5.6 × 10(-7)) survival. Evaluation of plasma AR by next-generation sequencing could identify cancers with primary resistance to abiraterone.

  1. Androgen Receptor Expression and Cellular Proliferation During Transition from Androgen-Dependent to Recurrent Growth after Castration in the CWR22 Prostate Cancer Xenograft

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Desok; Gregory, Christopher W.; French, Frank S.; Smith, Gary J.; Mohler, James L.

    2002-01-01

    Androgen receptor expression was analyzed in the CWR22 human prostate cancer xenograft model to better understand its role in prostate cancer recurrence after castration. In androgen-dependent tumors, 98.5% of tumor cell nuclei expressed androgen receptor with a mean optical density of 0.26 ± 0.01. On day 2 after castration androgen deprivation decreased immunostained cells to 2% that stained weakly (mean optical density, 0.16 ± 0.08). Cellular proliferation measured using Ki-67 revealed

  2. Battling resistance mechanisms in antihormonal prostate cancer treatment: Novel agents and combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Maeseneer, Daan Joost; Van Praet, Charles; Lumen, Nicolaas; Rottey, Sylvie

    2015-07-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is a hormone-sensitive disease. Androgen deprivation therapy lowers serum testosterone levels (castration) or blocks the androgen receptor (AR) ligand-binding domain. Especially in metastatic disease, hormonal therapy has been able to delay disease progression, reduce symptoms, and improve overall survival. Despite subsequent disease progression and development of castration resistance, PCa remains AR driven. Secondary hormonal treatments such as abiraterone acetate or enzalutamide have demonstrated increased overall survival. However, new resistance mechanisms to these agents have been identified, and systemic chemotherapy is still needed especially in fast-progressing castration-resistant PCa. Several promising androgen synthesis inhibitors (orteronel and galeterone), AR inhibitors (ARN-509, EPI-001, AZD3514, and ODM-201), and heat shock protein modulators (AT11387, 17-DMAG, STA-9090, and OGX-427) are currently under investigation. The wide variety in upcoming systemic agents underlines the molecular heterogeneity of castration-resistant PCa. This article reviews antihormonal therapy in PCa and resistance mechanisms and focuses on novel and upcoming agents currently in clinical testing. PMID:25708954

  3. Functional analysis of androgen receptor mutations that confer anti-androgen resistance identified in circulating cell-free DNA from prostate cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Lallous, Nada; Volik, Stanislav V.; Awrey, Shannon; LeBlanc, Eric; Tse, Ronnie; Murillo, Josef; Singh, Kriti; Azad, Arun A.; Wyatt, Alexander W.; LeBihan, Stephane; Chi, Kim N.; Gleave, Martin E.; Paul S. Rennie; Collins, Colin C; Cherkasov, Artem

    2016-01-01

    Background The androgen receptor (AR) is a pivotal drug target for the treatment of prostate cancer, including its lethal castration-resistant (CRPC) form. All current non-steroidal AR antagonists, such as hydroxyflutamide, bicalutamide, and enzalutamide, target the androgen binding site of the receptor, competing with endogenous androgenic steroids. Several AR mutations in this binding site have been associated with poor prognosis and resistance to conventional prostate cancer drugs. In orde...

  4. Abiraterone Improves Survival in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    A multinational phase III trial found that the drug abiraterone acetate prolonged the median survival of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer by 4 months compared with patients who received a placebo.

  5. Radium-223 for Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    A summary of results from a phase III trial that compared radium-223 dichloride plus the best standard of care versus a placebo plus the best standard of care in men with metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  6. Characterisation and Manipulation of Docetaxel Resistant Prostate Cancer Cell Lines

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, Amanda J

    2011-10-07

    Abstract Background There is no effective treatment strategy for advanced castration-resistant prostate cancer. Although Docetaxel (Taxotere®) represents the most active chemotherapeutic agent it only gives a modest survival advantage with most patients eventually progressing because of inherent or acquired drug resistance. The aims of this study were to further investigate the mechanisms of resistance to Docetaxel. Three Docetaxel resistant sub-lines were generated and confirmed to be resistant to the apoptotic and anti-proliferative effects of increasing concentrations of Docetaxel. Results The resistant DU-145 R and 22RV1 R had expression of P-glycoprotein and its inhibition with Elacridar partially and totally reversed the resistant phenotype in the two cell lines respectively, which was not seen in the PC-3 resistant sublines. Resistance was also not mediated in the PC-3 cells by cellular senescence or autophagy but multiple changes in pro- and anti-apoptotic genes and proteins were demonstrated. Even though there were lower basal levels of NF-κB activity in the PC-3 D12 cells compared to the Parental PC-3, docetaxel induced higher NF-κB activity and IκB phosphorylation at 3 and 6 hours with only minor changes in the DU-145 cells. Inhibition of NF-κB with the BAY 11-7082 inhibitor reversed the resistance to Docetaxel. Conclusion This study confirms that multiple mechanisms contribute to Docetaxel resistance and the central transcription factor NF-κB plays an immensely important role in determining docetaxel-resistance which may represent an appropriate therapeutic target.

  7. Stromal remodelling is required for progressive involution of the rat ventral prostate after castration: identification of a matrix metalloproteinase-dependent apoptotic wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruni-Cardoso, A; Augusto, T M; Pravatta, H; Damas-Souza, D M; Carvalho, H F

    2010-10-01

    Prostate epithelial-cell apoptosis occurs in response to androgen deprivation. We have hypothesized that continued regression would require stromal changes. Studying apoptosis kinetics up to the 14th day after castration, we identified successive waves of apoptosis, with a prominent peak on day 11. This peak was associated with caspase-3 activity, nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor and clusterin expression. The apoptosis peak on day 11 was preceded by increased MMP-2 and MMP-7 activation, and MMP-9 expression on days 9 and 10. Treatment with the matrix metalloproteinases inhibitors doxycyclin, hydrocortisone, or GM6001 caused significant reduction in the apoptosis rate on day 11. The present data demonstrate that prostatic epithelial-cell deletion at the 11th day after castration was induced by focal degradation of the extracellular matrix associated with stromal remodelling. PMID:19906188

  8. Non-steroidal antiandrogen monotherapy compared with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists or surgical castration monotherapy for advanced prostate cancer: a Cochrane systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunath, Frank; Grobe, Henrik R; Rücker, Gerta; Motschall, Edith; Antes, Gerd; Dahm, Philipp; Wullich, Bernd; Meerpohl, Joerg J

    2015-07-01

    To assess the effects of non-steroidal antiandrogen monotherapy compared with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists or surgical castration monotherapy for treating advanced hormone-sensitive stages of prostate cancer. We searched the Cochrane Prostatic Diseases and Urologic Cancers Group Specialized Register (PROSTATE), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science with Conference Proceedings, three trial registries and abstracts from three major conferences to 23 December 2013, together with reference lists, and contacted selected experts in the field and manufacturers. We included randomized controlled trials comparing non-steroidal antiandrogen monotherapy with medical or surgical castration monotherapy for men in advanced hormone-sensitive stages of prostate cancer. Two review authors independently examined full-text reports, identified relevant studies, assessed the eligibility of studies for inclusion, extracted data and assessed risk of bias as well as quality of evidence according to the GRADE working group guidelines. We used Review Manager 5.2 for data synthesis and the fixed-effect model as primary analysis (when heterogeneity was low with I(2) cancer-specific survival and biochemical progression remained unclear. Non-steroidal antiandrogen monotherapy compared with medical or surgical castration monotherapy for advanced prostate cancer is less effective in terms of overall survival, clinical progression, treatment failure and treatment discontinuation resulting from adverse events. Evidence quality was rated as moderate according to GRADE; therefore, further research is likely to have an important impact on results for patients with advanced but non-metastatic prostate cancer treated with non-steroidal antiandrogen monotherapy. PMID:25523493

  9. [Medical castration in the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer: an update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouin, S-J; Rouprêt, M; Davin, J-L; Soulié, M

    2009-04-01

    Indications for hormonotherapy in prostate cancer are in deep mutation and are constantly evolving. Used initially (1941) in metastatic stages, hormone therapy is used nowadays in locally advanced prostate cancer and aggressive localized disease. Its prescription in association with radiotherapy or surgery has provided a benefit regarding survival free progression. The place of hormone therapy in localized prostate cancer is not well defined and the debate is still ongoing, especially in case of biochemical recurrence after irradiation or radical prostatectomy and even in neoadjuvant cases. Additional and further studies are ongoing and are strongly needed to establish new guidelines. Nevertheless, hormone therapy is not restricted any more to palliative cases and is part of the current therapeutic arsenal of the urologist for high risk localized and/or locally advanced prostate cancers. PMID:19465332

  10. Metabolism of adrenal androgen and its impacts on prostate cancer after castration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ With the extensive utilization of PSA,digital rectum examination and transrectal ultrasound for screening in the aging population,the diagnosis of prostate cancer in China has markedly increased during the past years,particularly in developed regions.

  11. PREVENTION OF COMPLICATIONS IN CASTRATE-REFRACTORY PROSTATE CANCER PATIENTS WITH BONE METASTASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Nushko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:Prostate cancer (PC is one of the most urgent problems in modern oncourology. Every year the world is recording more than 900 thousands new cases of prostate cancer. For this reason, the diagnosis and treatment of this disease has recently been given more attention, both abroad and in the Russian Federation. Despite improvements in diagnostic methods and implementation of programs for active detection of the disease in its early stages, the number of patients suffering from advanced forms of prostate cancer remains high. Currently, the main method of treatment in patients with metastatic prostate cancer remains the hormone therapy (HT. Patients with metastatic prostate cancer most frequently have localization of metastatic lesions in the lymph nodes and bones. Frequent localization of metastatic lesions in the bones is due to tumor cell tropism of prostate cancer to the bone. Metastatic bone disease, as well as long-term HT conducted in patients with metastatic prostate cancer, leads to irreversible disruption of bone remodeling, which may be accompanied by osteoporosis and fragility fractures. Bone metastases in patients with PC are the most common cause of complications and significantly impair the quality of life of patients. Therapy underlying the prevention of bone complications can be specific, aimed directly at the tumor tissue and non-specific, to strengthen bones and decrease its resorption processes. The article provides an overview of the literature covering the effectiveness of modern drugs, aimed at non-specific prevention of bone complications in patients with metastatic prostate cancer, such as bisphosphonates, and inhibitors of the ligand RANKL, as well as an overview of studies to assess the effectiveness of domestic analogue zolendronovoy acid preparation Resorba in the prevention of osteoporosis.

  12. PREVENTION OF COMPLICATIONS IN CASTRATE-REFRACTORY PROSTATE CANCER PATIENTS WITH BONE METASTASES

    OpenAIRE

    K. M. Nushko; A. S. Kalpinskiy; A. D. Kaprin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract:Prostate cancer (PC) is one of the most urgent problems in modern oncourology. Every year the world is recording more than 900 thousands new cases of prostate cancer. For this reason, the diagnosis and treatment of this disease has recently been given more attention, both abroad and in the Russian Federation. Despite improvements in diagnostic methods and implementation of programs for active detection of the disease in its early stages, the number of patients suffering from advanced...

  13. Redefining Hormone Sensitive Disease in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaoyu Hou; Flaig, Thomas W.

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men in the United States. For decades, the cornerstone of medical treatment for advanced prostate cancer has been hormonal therapy, intended to lower testosterone levels, known as Androgen Deprivation Therapy (ADT). The development of hormone-resistant prostate cancer (now termed castration-resistant prostate cancer:CRPC) remains the key roadblock in successful long-term management of prostate cancer. New advancements in medical therapy for pros...

  14. Immunotherapy and Immune Evasion in Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metastatic prostate cancer remains to this day a terminal disease. Prostatectomy and radiotherapy are effective for organ-confined diseases, but treatment for locally advanced and metastatic cancer remains challenging. Although advanced prostate cancers treated with androgen deprivation therapy achieves debulking of disease, responses are transient with subsequent development of castration-resistant and metastatic disease. Since prostate cancer is typically a slowly progressing disease, use of immune-based therapies offers an advantage to target advanced tumors and to induce antitumor immunity. This review will discuss the clinical merits of various vaccines and immunotherapies in castrate resistant prostate cancer and challenges to this evolving field of immune-based therapies

  15. Immunotherapy and Immune Evasion in Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakur, Archana, E-mail: thakur@karmanos.org; Vaishampayan, Ulka [Department of Oncology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Lum, Lawrence G., E-mail: thakur@karmanos.org [Department of Oncology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Department of Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Department of Immunology and Microbiology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)

    2013-05-24

    Metastatic prostate cancer remains to this day a terminal disease. Prostatectomy and radiotherapy are effective for organ-confined diseases, but treatment for locally advanced and metastatic cancer remains challenging. Although advanced prostate cancers treated with androgen deprivation therapy achieves debulking of disease, responses are transient with subsequent development of castration-resistant and metastatic disease. Since prostate cancer is typically a slowly progressing disease, use of immune-based therapies offers an advantage to target advanced tumors and to induce antitumor immunity. This review will discuss the clinical merits of various vaccines and immunotherapies in castrate resistant prostate cancer and challenges to this evolving field of immune-based therapies.

  16. Risk of cardiovascular thrombotic events after surgical castration versus gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists in Chinese men with prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy YC Teoh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the cardiovascular thrombotic risk after surgical castration (SC versus gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (GnRHa in Chinese men with prostate cancer. All Chinese prostate cancer patients who were treated with SC or GnRHa from year 2000 to 2009 were reviewed and compared. The primary outcome was any new-onset of cardiovascular thrombotic events after SC or GnRHa, which was defined as any event of acute myocardial infarction or ischemic stroke. The risk of new-onset cardiovascular thrombotic event was compared between the SC group and the GnRHa group using Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was performed to adjust for other potential confounding factors. A total of 684 Chinese patients was included in our study, including 387 patients in the SC group and 297 patients in the GnRHa group. The mean age in the SC group (75.3 ± 7.5 years was significantly higher than the GnRHa group (71.8 ± 8.3 years (P < 0.001. There was increased risk of new cardiovascular thrombotic events in the SC group when compared to the GnRHa group upon Kaplan-Meier analysis (P = 0.014. Upon multivariate Cox regression analysis, age (hazard ratio [HR] 1.072, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04-1.11, P< 0.001, hyperlipidemia (HR 2.455, 95% CI 1.53-3.93, P< 0.001, and SC (HR 1.648, 95% CI 1.05-2.59, P= 0.031 were significant risk factors of cardiovascular thrombotic events. In conclusion, SC was associated with increased risk of cardiovascular thrombotic events when compared to GnRHa. This is an important aspect to consider while deciding on the method of androgen deprivation therapy, especially in elderly men with known history of hyperlipidemia.

  17. Chemotherapy in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Michael

    2015-10-01

    For approximately a decade, chemotherapy has been shown to prolong life in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Since that time, however, only two agents have proven to prolong life (docetaxel and cabazitaxel). However, in the last year, the addition of chemotherapy to primary hormonal therapy became a standard of care for high-volume castration-sensitive metastatic disease. Here I will review current prostate cancer chemotherapies, mechanisms of resistance to those therapies, and ongoing clinical studies of chemotherapy combinations and novel chemotherapeutics. PMID:26216506

  18. Multidrug Resistance in Prostate Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P. van Brussel

    2005-01-01

    textabstractAdvanced hormone refractory prostate cancer constitutes a therapeutic challenge, because all available treatment strategies have failed to substantially increase cancer specific survival. Among these strategies, a multitude of chemotherapeutic approaches did not offer a superior life

  19. The Role of FSH in Prostate Cancer: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Salvatore Catarinicchia; E David Crawford

    2016-01-01

    Castrate Resistant Prostate Cancer (CRPC) is a difficult entity to treat in the spectrum of prostate cancer disease. Recently, Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) has been shown to play an important part in the natural history of prostate cancer disease progression (Crawford et al., 2014). Here, we discuss a now deceased 94 year-old patient who illustrates the importance of this.

  20. Vaccine Therapy and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Hormone-Resistant, Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-22

    Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Soft Tissues; Metastatic Prostate Carcinoma; Prostate Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  1. Sequential Androgen Receptor Pathway Inhibitor in Prostate Cancer: Piling-Up The Benefits or a Case for Cross-Resistance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand Tombal

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In the last 10 years, there has been accumulating evidence that, even in a low serum testosterone environment, the androgen receptor (AR remains the main driver of prostate cancer progression. This has led to the discovery and clinical development of new anti-androgens and androgen biosynthesis inhibitors. Enzalutamide and abiraterone acetate are the lead compounds of this new generation of agents, but multiple other agents are on their way. Because they both target the ligand-dependent regulation of AR activity, it is plausible that cross-resistance may exist when both drugs are used sequentially, and that the benefit of these agents may fade away when sequencing them. As the exact mechanisms for cross- resistance between AR-targeted agents remain unclear at this point, additional clinical studies are crucial to define the exact combination or sequencing order that could yield highest clinical benefits. Moreover, new molecular targets are needed in order to address these resistances, as well as establishing biomarkers to improve patient selection that could most benefit from AR-targeted therapies, but also help develop novel agents to improve and optimise the management of castration-resistant prostate cancer and metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  2. A Multicenter, Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing the Three-Weekly Docetaxel Regimen plus Prednisone versus Mitoxantone plus Prednisone for Chinese Patients with Metastatic Castration Refractory Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Tie Zhou; Shu-xiong Zeng; Ding-wei Ye; Qiang Wei; Xu Zhang; Yi-ran Huang; Zhang-qun Ye; Yong Yang; , Wei Zhang; Ye Tian; Fang-jian Zhou; Jin Jie; Shi-ping Chen; Yan Sun; Li-ping Xie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To explore the feasibility and efficacy of docetaxel plus prednisone for Chinese population with metastatic castration refractory prostate cancer (mCRPC). Patients and methods A total of 228 patients recruited from 15 centers were randomized to receive 10 cycles of D3P arm (docetaxel: 75 mg/m2, intravenous infusion, every three weeks; Prednisone 10mg orally given daily) or M3P arm (mitoxantrone: 12 mg/m2, intravenous infusion, every three weeks; Prednisone 10mg orally given daily). Pr...

  3. FGF Signaling in Prostate Cancer Progression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nora M. NAVONE

    2009-01-01

    @@ Objective: prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in men in the United States. Localized prostate cancer can be cured by andro-gen ablation, but when the disease escapes the confines of the gland, the prospects for cure decrease drastically and the disease becomes "castrate resistant.

  4. Liposomal nanomedicines in the treatment of prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, Jan; Metselaar, Josbert M; Storm, G; van der Pluijm, Gabri

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer type and the second leading cause of death from cancer in males. In most cases, no curative treatment options are available for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer as these tumors are highly resistant to chemotherapy. Targeted drug delivery, usin

  5. Denosumab Reduces Risk of Bone Side Effects in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    The biological agent denosumab (Xgeva) is more effective than zoledronic acid at decreasing the risk of bone fractures and other skeletal-related events (SRE) in men with castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer, according to results from a randomi

  6. Current Stem Cell Biomarkers and Their Functional Mechanisms in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kaile; Zhou, Shukui; Wang, Leilei; Wang, Jianlong; Zou, Qingsong; Zhao, Weixin; Fu, Qiang; Fang, Xiaolan

    2016-01-01

    Currently there is little effective treatment available for castration resistant prostate cancer, which is responsible for the majority of prostate cancer related deaths. Emerging evidence suggested that cancer stem cells might play an important role in resistance to traditional cancer therapies, and the studies of cancer stem cells (including specific isolation and targeting on those cells) might benefit the discovery of novel treatment of prostate cancer, especially castration resistant disease. In this review, we summarized major biomarkers for prostate cancer stem cells, as well as their functional mechanisms and potential application in clinical diagnosis and treatment of patients. PMID:27447616

  7. [Prostate cancer stem cells: advances in current research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gang; Wu, Deng-long

    2015-02-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common malignancies threatening men's health, and the mechanisms underlying its initiation and progression are poorly understood. Last decade has witnessed encouraging progress in the studies of prostate cancer stem cells (PCSCs), which are considered to play important roles in tumor initiation, recurrence and metastasis, castration resistance, and drug resistance. Therefore, a deeper insight into PCSCs is of great significance for the successful management of prostate cancer. This article presents an overview on the location, origin, and markers of PCSCs as well as their potential correlation with tumor metastasis and castration resistance.

  8. The importance of non-nuclear AR signaling in prostate cancer progression and therapeutic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarif, Jelani C; Miranti, Cindy K

    2016-05-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) remains the major oncogenic driver of prostate cancer, as evidenced by the efficacy of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in naïve patients, and the continued effectiveness of second generation ADTs in castration resistant disease. However, current ADTs are limited to interfering with AR ligand binding, either through suppression of androgen production or the use of competitive antagonists. Recent studies demonstrate 1) the expression of constitutively active AR splice variants that no longer depend on androgen, and 2) the ability of AR to signal in the cytoplasm independently of its transcriptional activity (non-genomic); thus highlighting the need to consider other ways to target AR. Herein, we review canonical AR signaling, but focus on AR non-genomic signaling, some of its downstream targets and how these effectors contribute to prostate cancer cell behavior. The goals of this review are to 1) re-highlight the continued importance of AR in prostate cancer as the primary driver, 2) discuss the limitations in continuing to use ligand binding as the sole targeting mechanism, 3) discuss the implications of AR non-genomic signaling in cancer progression and therapeutic resistance, and 4) address the need to consider non-genomic AR signaling mechanisms and pathways as a viable targeting strategy in combination with current therapies. PMID:26829214

  9. PI3K-AKT-mTOR signaling in prostate cancer progression and androgen deprivation therapy resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Merritt P Edlind; Andrew C Hsieh

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second most common malignancy among men in the world. Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is the lethal form of the disease, which develops upon resistance to ifrst line androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Emerging evidence demonstrates a key role for the PI3K-AKT-mTOR signaling axis in the development and maintenance of CRPC. This pathway, which is deregulated in the majority of advanced PCas, serves as a critical nexus for the integration of growth signals with downstream cellular processes such as protein synthesis, proliferation, survival, metabolism and differentiation, thus providing mechanisms for cancer cells to overcome the stress associated with androgen deprivation. Furthermore, preclinical studies have elucidated a direct connection between the PI3K-AKT-mTOR and androgen receptor (AR) signaling axes, revealing a dynamic interplay between these pathways during the development of ADT resistance. Thus, there is a clear rationale for the continued clinical development of a number of novel inhibitors of the PI3K pathway, which offer the potential of blocking CRPC growth and survival. In this review, we will explore the relevance of the PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway in PCa progression and castration resistance in order to inform the clinical development of speciifc pathway inhibitors in advanced PCa. In addition, we will highlight current deifciencies in our clinical knowledge, most notably the need for biomarkers that can accurately predict for response to PI3K pathway inhibitors.

  10. Immunotherapy and Immune Evasion in Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Archana Thakur; Ulka Vaishampayan; Lum, Lawrence G.

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic prostate cancer remains to this day a terminal disease. Prostatectomy and radiotherapy are effective for organ-confined diseases, but treatment for locally advanced and metastatic cancer remains challenging. Although advanced prostate cancers treated with androgen deprivation therapy achieves debulking of disease, responses are transient with subsequent development of castration-resistant and metastatic disease. Since prostate cancer is typically a slowly progressing disease, use o...

  11. Androgen receptor: structure, role in prostate cancer and drug discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, MH Eileen; Li, Jun; Xu, H. Eric; Melcher, Karsten; Yong, Eu-Leong

    2014-01-01

    Androgens and androgen receptors (AR) play a pivotal role in expression of the male phenotype. Several diseases, such as androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) and prostate cancer, are associated with alterations in AR functions. Indeed, androgen blockade by drugs that prevent the production of androgens and/or block the action of the AR inhibits prostate cancer growth. However, resistance to these drugs often occurs after 2–3 years as the patients develop castration-resistant prostate cancer ...

  12. Efficacy of c-Met inhibitor for advanced prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christensen James G

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aberrant expression of HGF/SF and its receptor, c-Met, often correlates with advanced prostate cancer. Our previous study showed that expression of c-Met in prostate cancer cells was increased after attenuation of androgen receptor (AR signalling. This suggested that current androgen ablation therapy for prostate cancer activates c-Met expression and may contribute to development of more aggressive, castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. Therefore, we directly assessed the efficacy of c-Met inhibition during androgen ablation on the growth and progression of prostate cancer. Methods We tested two c-Met small molecule inhibitors, PHA-665752 and PF-2341066, for anti-proliferative activity by MTS assay and cell proliferation assay on human prostate cancer cell lines with different levels of androgen sensitivity. We also used renal subcapsular and castrated orthotopic xenograft mouse models to assess the effect of the inhibitors on prostate tumor formation and progression. Results We demonstrated a dose-dependent inhibitory effect of PHA-665752 and PF-2341066 on the proliferation of human prostate cancer cells and the phosphorylation of c-Met. The effect on cell proliferation was stronger in androgen insensitive cells. The c-Met inhibitor, PF-2341066, significantly reduced growth of prostate tumor cells in the renal subcapsular mouse model and the castrated orthotopic mouse model. The effect on cell proliferation was greater following castration. Conclusions The c-Met inhibitors demonstrated anti-proliferative efficacy when combined with androgen ablation therapy for advanced prostate cancer.

  13. LHRH agonists in prostate cancer : frequency of treatment, serum testosterone measurement and castrate level: consensus opinion from a roundtable discussion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Igle Jan; Eaton, Alan; Bladou, Franck

    2007-01-01

    Background: Options for lowering testosterone in patients with prostate cancer include bilateral orchiectomy, oestrogens and luteinising hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonists. LHRH agonists have become widely used in the treatment of prostate cancer. Roundtable assembly: In May 2006, a team of e

  14. Atg7 cooperates with Pten loss to drive prostate cancer tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santanam, Urmila; Banach-Petrosky, Whitney; Abate-Shen, Cory; Shen, Michael M; White, Eileen; DiPaola, Robert S

    2016-02-15

    Understanding new therapeutic paradigms for both castrate-sensitive and more aggressive castrate-resistant prostate cancer is essential to improve clinical outcomes. As a critically important cellular process, autophagy promotes stress tolerance by recycling intracellular components to sustain metabolism important for tumor survival. To assess the importance of autophagy in prostate cancer, we generated a new autochthonous genetically engineered mouse model (GEMM) with inducible prostate-specific deficiency in the Pten tumor suppressor and autophagy-related-7 (Atg7) genes. Atg7 deficiency produced an autophagy-deficient phenotype and delayed Pten-deficient prostate tumor progression in both castrate-naïve and castrate-resistant cancers. Atg7-deficient tumors display evidence of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, suggesting that autophagy may promote prostate tumorigenesis through management of protein homeostasis. Taken together, these data support the importance of autophagy for both castrate-naïve and castrate-resistant growth in a newly developed GEMM, suggesting a new paradigm and model to study approaches to inhibit autophagy in combination with known and new therapies for advanced prostate cancer. PMID:26883359

  15. 去势后阻断自噬对大鼠前列腺细胞凋亡的影响%The influence of blocking autophagy to apoptosis in rat prostate after castration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    凌生涛; 姚启盛; 柳建军; 陈从波; 黄力; 王黎

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To discuss the influence of blocking autophagy to apoptosis in rat prostate after cas-tration.Methods Seventy-two healthy male SD rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: the sham operation group, castration group and hydroxychloroquine group.Each group contains 24 rats.After 24 hours, 72hours, 7days, 10days, 14days and 21 days of the operation, we took out four rats randomly from each group and removed the protastes.Then we observed the morphological changes of the prostates through optical microscope and the changes of cytolysosomes and apoptotic bodies in the prostates by electronic speculum.Analyzed the expression of the proteins of P62 and Caspase-3 by immunohistochemistry.Results The prostate tissues shranked remarkably in the castrated rats.Cytolysosomes were observed through electronic speculum.The expressoin of Caspase-3 increased significantly ( P Autophagy protect protaste from apoptosis, and apoptosis would increase after dealing with choroquine, which would provide new therapies for drug-resistant prostate cancer.%目的:探讨去势后阻断自噬对大鼠前列腺细胞凋亡的影响。方法 SD雄性大鼠72只随机分为3组:即假切对照组、去势组、去势+硫酸羟氯喹处理组。各组大鼠分别于术后第1、3、7、10、14、21d随机抽取4只,完整取出前列腺组织。 HE染色观察大鼠前列腺组织形态学变化,电镜下观察前列腺微观结构、自噬和凋亡的变化,免疫组化SP法检测自噬受体蛋白P62和凋亡促进蛋白 Caspase-3在前列腺组织中表达。结果光镜下去势后大鼠前列腺体积逐渐缩小,腺上皮细胞逐渐萎缩,核染色加深,腺泡萎缩甚至闭塞,间质增生,加用羟氯喹处理后这一变化更加明显。电镜下观察去势后自噬小体的数量明显增加。免疫组化检测去势后自噬活性蛋白P62表达减弱,用羟氯喹处理后表达增强;凋亡促进蛋白 Caspase-3表达增强,用羟氯喹处

  16. [Metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravis, Gwenaelle; Salem, Naji; Walz, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    The prostate cancer in its hormone-sensitive metastatic presentation is infrequent, it is either an initial presentation of the disease or an evolution after local treatment, without castration of the biological relapse. The surgical or biological castration remains the cornerstone of the treatment. The deadline of castration initiation and its modalities of administration, intermittent or continuous rest debated but consensual on the initiation is the appearance of the symptomatic disease. The chemotherapy by docetaxel in association with the castration increases significantly the survival of the patients having a high tumoral volume. The efficacy on the whole metastatic population requires additional analyses. Clinical prognostic factors as the bone localizations (axial or appendicular), the visceral involvement (liver, lung) are determining for the survival of these patients. Biological prognostic factors are in evaluation. Except the clodronate acid, which showed a survival improvement in the hormone-sensitive metastatic prostate cancer (HSMPC), the other treatments targeting the bone (zoledronic acid, rank-ligand inhibitor) demonstrated a benefit only in castrate resistant metastatic prostate cancer (MCRPC). The management of local disease lets suggest a benefit to at least symptomatic disease, but it requires to be estimated prospectively in clinical trials. The new hormonal treatments targeting the androgen receptor in CPMRC are in evaluation in CPMHS. The objective is to increase the survival and the quality of life of the CPMHS and to delay the evolution towards the castration resistant metastatic disease. PMID:25609491

  17. Discovery of ODM-201, a new-generation androgen receptor inhibitor targeting resistance mechanisms to androgen signaling-directed prostate cancer therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moilanen, Anu-Maarit; Riikonen, Reetta; Oksala, Riikka; Ravanti, Laura; Aho, Eija; Wohlfahrt, Gerd; Nykänen, Pirjo S; Törmäkangas, Olli P; Palvimo, Jorma J; Kallio, Pekka J

    2015-07-03

    Activation of androgen receptor (AR) is crucial for prostate cancer growth. Remarkably, also castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is dependent on functional AR, and several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the addiction. Known causes of CRPC include gene amplification and overexpression as well as point mutations of AR. We report here the pharmacological profile of ODM-201, a novel AR inhibitor that showed significant antitumor activity and a favorable safety profile in phase 1/2 studies in men with CRPC. ODM-201 is a full and high-affinity AR antagonist that, similar to second-generation antiandrogens enzalutamide and ARN-509, inhibits testosterone-induced nuclear translocation of AR. Importantly, ODM-201 also blocks the activity of the tested mutant ARs arising in response to antiandrogen therapies, including the F876L mutation that confers resistance to enzalutamide and ARN-509. In addition, ODM-201 reduces the growth of AR-overexpressing VCaP prostate cancer cells both in vitro and in a castration-resistant VCaP xenograft model. In contrast to other antiandrogens, ODM-201 shows negligible brain penetrance and does not increase serum testosterone levels in mice. In conclusion, ODM-201 is a potent AR inhibitor that overcomes resistance to AR-targeted therapies by antagonizing both overexpressed and mutated ARs. ODM-201 is currently in a phase 3 trial in CRPC.

  18. Hormonal therapy and chemotherapy in patients with hormone-sensitive prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Gafanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common men`s cancer in men in developed world and the second cause of death in this population. This review focuses on management of advanced castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC has been rapidly changing and is still evolving. In the last years, there has been an increasing knowledge of prostate cancer biology. New therapeutic agents and approaches have been evaluated demonstrating benefits in survival and quality of life in patients with metastatic prostate cancer.

  19. Hormonal therapy and chemotherapy in patients with hormone-sensitive prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    R. A. Gafanov

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common men`s cancer in men in developed world and the second cause of death in this population. This review focuses on management of advanced castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) has been rapidly changing and is still evolving. In the last years, there has been an increasing knowledge of prostate cancer biology. New therapeutic agents and approaches have been evaluated demonstrating benefits in survival and quality of life in patients with metastatic prostat...

  20. The HIF1A functional genetic polymorphism at locus +1772 associates with progression to metastatic prostate cancer and refractoriness to hormonal castration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, Avelino; Ribeiro, Ricardo; Príncipe, Paulo; Lobato, Carlos; Pina, Francisco; Maurício, Joaquina; Monteiro, Cátia; Sousa, Hugo; Calais da Silva, F; Lopes, Carlos; Medeiros, Rui

    2014-01-01

    The hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF1a) is a key regulator of tumour cell response to hypoxia, orchestrating mechanisms known to be involved in cancer aggressiveness and metastatic behaviour. In this study we sought to evaluate the association of a functional genetic polymorphism in HIF1A with overall and metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) risk and with response to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). The HIF1A +1772 C>T (rs11549465) polymorphism was genotyped, using DNA isolated from peripheral blood, in 1490 male subjects (754 with prostate cancer and 736 controls cancer-free) through Real-Time PCR. A nested group of cancer patients who were eligible for androgen deprivation therapy was followed up. Univariate and multivariate models were used to analyse the response to hormonal treatment and the risk for developing distant metastasis. Age-adjusted odds ratios were calculated to evaluate prostate cancer risk. Our results showed that patients under ADT carrying the HIF1A +1772 T-allele have increased risk for developing distant metastasis (OR, 2.0; 95%CI, 1.1-3.9) and an independent 6-fold increased risk for resistance to ADT after multivariate analysis (OR, 6.0; 95%CI, 2.2-16.8). This polymorphism was not associated with increased risk for being diagnosed with prostate cancer (OR, 0.9; 95%CI, 0.7-1.2). The HIF1A +1772 genetic polymorphism predicts a more aggressive prostate cancer behaviour, supporting the involvement of HIF1a in prostate cancer biological progression and ADT resistance. Molecular profiles using hypoxia markers may help predict clinically relevant prostate cancer and response to ADT.

  1. Loss of PKCδ Induces Prostate Cancer Resistance to Paclitaxel through Activation of Wnt/β-Catenin Pathway and Mcl-1 Accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, M Luz; Castilla, Carolina; Gasca, Jessica; Medina, Rafael; Pérez-Valderrama, Begoña; Romero, Francisco; Japón, Miguel A; Sáez, Carmen

    2016-07-01

    Prostate cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death among men in developed countries. Although castration therapy is initially effective, prostate cancers progress to hormone-refractory disease and in this case taxane-based chemotherapy is widely used. Castration-resistant prostate cancer cells often develop resistance to chemotherapy agents and the search for new therapeutic strategies is necessary. In this article, we demonstrate that PKCδ silencing favors mitotic arrest after paclitaxel treatment in PC3 and LNCaP cells; however, this is associated with resistance to paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. In prostate cancer cells, PKCδ seems to exert a proapoptotic role, acting as a negative regulator of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway. PKCδ silencing induces activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway and the expression of its target genes, including Aurora kinase A, which is involved in activation of Akt and both factors play a key role in GSK3β inactivation and consequently in the stabilization of β-catenin and antiapoptotic protein Mcl-1. We also show that combined treatments with paclitaxel and Wnt/β-catenin or Akt inhibitors improve the apoptotic response to paclitaxel, even in the absence of PKCδ. Finally, we observe that high Gleason score prostate tumors lose PKCδ expression and this correlates with higher activation of β-catenin, inactivation of GSK3β, and higher levels of Aurora kinase A and Mcl-1 proteins. These findings suggest that targeting Wnt/β-catenin or Akt pathways may increase the efficacy of taxane chemotherapy in advanced human prostate cancers that have lost PKCδ expression. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(7); 1713-25. ©2016 AACR.

  2. [Treatment strategies for advanced prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küronya, Zsófia; Bíró, Krisztina; Géczi, Lajos; Németh, Hajnalka

    2015-09-01

    There has been dramatic improvement in the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer recently. The treatment of localized disease became more successful with the application of new, sophisticated techniques available for urologic surgeons and radiotherapists. Nevertheless a significant proportion of patients relapses after the initial local treatment or is diagnosed with metastatic disease at the beginning. In the past five years, six new drugs became registered for the treatment of metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer, such as sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel, abiraterone, enzalutamide, the α-emitting radionuclide alpharadin and the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B (RANK) ligand inhibitor denosumab. The availability of these new treatment options raises numerous questions. In this review we present the standard of care of metastatic prostate cancer by disease stage (hormone naive/ hormone sensitive metastatic prostate cancer, non-metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, oligometastatic/multimetastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer) and the emerging treatment modalities presently assessed in clinical trials. We would also like to give advice on debatable aspects of the management of metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:26339912

  3. Novel flutamide regulated genes in the rat ventral prostate: differential modulation of their expression by castration and flutamide treatments%大鼠腹侧前列腺中受氟他胺调控的新基因:去势和氟他胺处理对其表达的调控

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. M. Limaye; I. Asangani; N. Bora; P. Kondaiah

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To identify flutamide regulated genes in the rat ventral prostate. Methods: Total RNA from ventral prostates of control and flutamide treated rats were isolated. Differentially expressed transcripts were identified using differential display reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The effect of castration on the expression of flutamideregulated transcripts was studied. Results: We have identified β2-microglobulin, cytoplasmic FMR1 interacting protein 2 and pumilio 1 as flutamide induced and spermine binding protein and ribophorin Ⅱ as flutamide repressed targets in the rat ventral prostate. Although flutamide treatment caused an induction of pumilio 1 mRNA, castration had no effect. Conclusion: Castration and flutamide treatments exert differential effects on gene expression. Flutamide might also have direct AR independent effects, which might have implications in the emergence of androgen independent prostate cancer and the failure of flutamide therapy.

  4. Personalization of prostate cancer prevention and therapy: are clinically qualified biomarkers in the horizon?

    OpenAIRE

    Yap Timothy A; Swanton Charles; de Bono Johann S

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Prostate cancer remains the most common malignancy among men and the second leading cause of male cancer-related mortality. Death from this disease is invariably due to resistance to androgen deprivation therapy. Our improved understanding of the biology of prostate cancer has heralded a new era in molecular anticancer drug development, with multiple novel anticancer drugs for castration resistant prostate cancer now entering the clinic. These include the taxane cabazitaxel, the vacc...

  5. Resistance to docetaxel in prostate cancer is associated with androgen receptor activation and loss of KDM5D expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komura, Kazumasa; Jeong, Seong Ho; Hinohara, Kunihiko; Qu, Fangfang; Wang, Xiaodong; Hiraki, Masayuki; Azuma, Haruhito; Lee, Gwo-Shu Mary; Kantoff, Philip W; Sweeney, Christopher J

    2016-05-31

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays an essential role in prostate cancer, and suppression of its signaling with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been the mainstay of treatment for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer for more than 70 y. Chemotherapy has been reserved for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). The Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group-led trial E3805: ChemoHormonal Therapy Versus Androgen Ablation Randomized Trial for Extensive Disease in Prostate Cancer (CHAARTED) showed that the addition of docetaxel to ADT prolonged overall survival compared with ADT alone in patients with metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. This finding suggests that there is an interaction between AR signaling activity and docetaxel sensitivity. Here we demonstrate that the prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP and LAPC4 display markedly different sensitivity to docetaxel with AR activation, and RNA-seq analysis of these cell lines identified KDM5D (lysine-specific demethylase 5D) encoded on the Y chromosome as a potential mediator of this sensitivity. Knocking down KDM5D expression in LNCaP leads to docetaxel resistance in the presence of dihydrotestosterone. KDM5D physically interacts with AR in the nucleus, and regulates its transcriptional activity by demethylating H3K4me3 active transcriptional marks. Attenuating KDM5D expression dysregulates AR signaling, resulting in docetaxel insensitivity. KDM5D deletion was also observed in the LNCaP-derived CRPC cell line 104R2, which displayed docetaxel insensitivity with AR activation, unlike parental LNCaP. Dataset analysis from the Oncomine database revealed significantly decreased KDM5D expression in CRPC and poorer prognosis with low KDM5D expression. Taking these data together, this work indicates that KDM5D modulates the AR axis and that this is associated with altered docetaxel sensitivity. PMID:27185910

  6. Androgen Control in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelekanou, Vasiliki; Castanas, Elias

    2016-10-01

    Research on prostate cancer has extensively advanced in the past decade, through an improved understanding for its genetic basis and risk-stratification. Molecular classification of prostate cancer into distinct subtypes and the recognition of new histologic entities promise the development of tailored-made management strategies of patients. Nowadays, various alternatives are available for clinical management of localized disease ranging from observation alone through radical prostatectomy. In patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer, the approval of new drugs for the management of metastatic disease has offered promising results improving the survival of these patients. In this context, androgen receptors (AR) remain at the epicenter of prostate cancer research holding a prominent role in the biology and therapeutic regimens of prostate cancer. As many of castration-resistant tumors retain hormone-responsiveness, AR is a clinical relevant, druggable target. However, AR paradoxically remains neglected as a prostate cancer biomarker. The great advancements in prostate cancer preclinical and clinical research, imply further improvement in clinical and translational data, for patient selection and treatment optimization. For a precision medicine-guided clinical management of prostate cancer, AR evaluation has to be implemented in companion and complementary diagnostics, as discussed here. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2224-2234, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27104784

  7. Glucocorticoid receptor antagonism reverts docetaxel resistance in human prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, Jan; Puhr, Martin; Buijs, Jeroen T.; Van Der Horst, Geertje; Lemhemmer, Daniël; Marijt, Koen A.; Hwang, Ming S.; Masood, Motasim; Grimm, Stefan; Storm, Gert; Metselaar, Josbert M.; Meijer, Onno C.; Culig, Zoran; Van Der Pluijm, Gabri

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to docetaxel is a major clinical problem in advanced prostate cancer (PCA). Although glucocorticoids (GCs) are frequently used in combination with docetaxel, it is unclear to what extent GCs and their receptor, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), contribute to the chemotherapy resistance. I

  8. Transcriptional network of androgen receptor in prostate cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Ken-ichi; Inoue, Satoshi

    2013-08-01

    The androgen receptor belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily and functions as a ligand-dependent transcription factor. It binds to the androgen responsive element and recruits coregulatory factors to modulate gene transcription. In addition, the androgen receptor interacts with other transcription factors, such as forkhead box A1, and other oncogenic signaling pathway molecules that bind deoxyribonucleic acid and regulate transcription. Androgen receptor signaling plays an important role in the development of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer cells proliferate in an androgen-dependent manner, and androgen receptor blockade is effective in prostate cancer therapy. However, patients often progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer with elevated androgen receptor expression and hypersensitivity to androgen. Recently, comprehensive analysis tools, such as complementary DNA microarray, chromatin immunoprecipitation-on-chip and chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequence, have described the androgen-mediated diverse transcriptional program and gene networks in prostate cancer. Furthermore, functional and clinical studies have shown that some of the androgen receptor-regulated genes could be prognostic markers and potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of prostate cancer, particularly castration-resistant prostate cancer. Thus, identifying androgen receptor downstream signaling events and investigating the regulation of androgen receptor activity is critical for understanding the mechanism of carcinogenesis and progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  9. Irrefutable evidence for the use of docetaxel in newly diagnosed metastatic prostate cancer: Results from the STAMPEDE and CHAARTED trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J. van Soest (Robert Jan); R. de Wit (Ronald)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractAndrogen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been used in the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer since the first description of its hormonal dependence in 1941. In 2004, docetaxel chemotherapy became the mainstay of treatment in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), fol

  10. A multicenter, randomized clinical trial comparing the three-weekly docetaxel regimen plus prednisone versus mitoxantone plus prednisone for Chinese patients with metastatic castration refractory prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tie Zhou

    Full Text Available To explore the feasibility and efficacy of docetaxel plus prednisone for Chinese population with metastatic castration refractory prostate cancer (mCRPC.A total of 228 patients recruited from 15 centers were randomized to receive 10 cycles of D3P arm (docetaxel: 75 mg/m2, intravenous infusion, every three weeks; Prednisone 10mg orally given daily or M3P arm (mitoxantrone: 12 mg/m2, intravenous infusion, every three weeks; Prednisone 10mg orally given daily. Primary end point was overall survival, and secondary end points were events progression-free survival (PFS, response rate, response duration. Quality of life (QoL was also assessed in both treatment groups.The median overall survival was 21.88 months in D3P arm and 13.67 months in M3P arm (P = 0.0011, hazard ratio = 0.63, 95% confidence interval, 0.46-0.86. Subgroup analysis was consistent with the results of overall analysis. Events progression-free survival (pain, PSA, tumor and disease were significantly improved in D3P arm compared with M3P arm. PSA response rate was 35.11% for patients treated by D3P arm and 19.39% for M3P arm (P = 0.0155. Pain response rate was higher in D3P arm (61.11%, P = 0.0011 than in M3P (23.08% arm. No statistical differences were found between D3P arm and M3P arm for QoL, tumor response rate and response duration of PSA and pain. The tolerability and overall safety of D3P arm were generally comparable to that of M3P arm.Compared with M3P arm, D3P arm significantly prolonged overall survival for the Chinese patients with mCRPC and improved the response rate for PSA and pain.clinicaltrials.gov NCT00436839.

  11. Early and delayed castrations confer a similar survival advantage in TRAMP mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zai-Xian Zhang; Qing-Quan Xu; Xiao-Bo Huang; Ji-Chuan Zhu; Xiao-Feng Wang

    2009-01-01

    The most appropriate time to introduce androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer remains controversial. Our aim was to evaluate the effects of early versus delayed surgical castration on prostate cancer progression and survival in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. TRAMP mice were randomly divided into three groups: the early castration group (on which castration was performed at the age of 4 weeks), the delayed castration group (on which castration was performed when abdominal turnouts could be palpated), and the sham-castrated group. Mice were monitored daily throughout their lives until cancer-related death or the develop-ment of an obviously moribund appearance, at which time the individual mouse was killed. Androgen receptor expression in prostate turnouts was also evaluated. The results shows that the average lifespan in early castration, delayed castration and sham-castrated groups were 54.1 weeks, 59.9 weeks and 39.1 weeks, respectively. Both early castration and delayed castration conferred a statistically significant survival advantage when compared with the sham-castrated group (P<0.001). However, the difference in lifespan between the early castration group and the delayed castration group was not statistically significant (P=0.85). The increase in lifespan in the TRAMP mice that received either early or delayed castration correlated with lower G/B value (genitourinary tract weight/body weight) at death than the sham-castrated mice. In conclusion, early and delayed castrations in TRAMP mice pro-longed survival to a similar extent. This finding may provide a guide for clinical practice in prostate cancer therapy.

  12. [The development of therapeutics targeting oxidative stress in prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, Masaki; Yokomizo, Akira; Naito, Seiji

    2014-12-01

    Oxidative stress is caused by increased reactive-oxygen species (ROS) due to augmented ROS production and impaired anti-oxidative capacity. Recently, oxidative stress has been revealed to promote castration resistance via androgen receptor(AR)-dependent pathway such as AR overexpression, AR cofactor, and AR post-translational modification as well as AR-independent pathway, leading to the emergence of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Therefore, antioxidants therapy using natural and chemical ROS scavengers and inhibitors of ROS production seems to be a promising therapy for CRPC as well as preventing castration resistance. However, at present, the application to therapeutics is limited. Therefore, further research on oxidative stress in prostate cancer, as well as on the development for clinical application would be needed.

  13. Enzalutamide in Men with Chemotherapy-naïve Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beer, Tomasz M; Armstrong, Andrew J; Rathkopf, Dana;

    2016-01-01

    progression or death by 68% (hazard ratio [HR] 0.32, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.28-0.37; pdeath by 23% (HR 0.77, 95% CI 0.67-0.88; p=0.0002). Median investigator-assessed rPFS was 20.0 mo (95% CI 18.9-22.1) in the enzalutamide arm and 5.4 mo (95% CI 4.1-5.6) in the placebo arm...... the longer-term efficacy and safety of enzalutamide up to the prespecified number of deaths in the final analysis, which included an additional 20 mo of follow-up for investigator-assessed rPFS, 9 mo of follow-up for OS, and 4 mo of follow-up for safety. Enzalutamide reduced the risk of radiographic....... Median OS was 35.3 mo (95% CI 32.2-not yet reached) in the enzalutamide arm and 31.3 mo (95% CI 28.8-34.2) in the placebo arm. At the time of the OS analysis, 167 patients in the placebo arm had crossed over to receive enzalutamide. The most common adverse events in the enzalutamide arm were fatigue...

  14. Prostate cancer stem-like cells proliferate slowly and resist etoposide-induced cytotoxicity via enhancing DNA damage response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite the development of chemoresistance as a major concern in prostate cancer therapy, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. In this report, we demonstrate that DU145-derived prostate cancer stem cells (PCSCs) progress slowly with more cells accumulating in the G1 phase in comparison to DU145 non-PCSCs. Consistent with the important role of the AKT pathway in promoting G1 progression, DU145 PCSCs were less sensitive to growth factor-induced activation of AKT in comparison to non-PCSCs. In response to etoposide (one of the most commonly used chemotherapeutic drugs), DU145 PCSCs survived significantly better than non-PCSCs. In addition to etoposide, PCSCs demonstrated increased resistance to docetaxel, a taxane drug that is commonly used to treat castration-resistant prostate cancer. Etoposide produced elevated levels of γH2AX and triggered a robust G2/M arrest along with a coordinated reduction of the G1 population in PCSCs compared to non-PCSCs, suggesting that elevated γH2AX plays a role in the resistance of PCSCs to etoposide-induced cytotoxicity. We have generated xenograft tumors from DU145 PCSCs and non-PCSCs. Consistent with the knowledge that PCSCs produce xenograft tumors with more advanced features, we were able to demonstrate that PCSC-derived xenograft tumors displayed higher levels of γH2AX and p-CHK1 compared to non-PCSC-produced xenograft tumors. Collectively, our research suggests that the elevation of DNA damage response contributes to PCSC-associated resistance to genotoxic reagents. - Highlights: • Increased survival in DU145 PCSCs following etoposide-induced cytotoxicity. • PCSCs exhibit increased sensitivity to etoposide-induced DDR. • Resistance to cytotoxicity may be due to slower proliferation in PCSCs. • Reduced kinetics to growth factor induced activation of AKT in PCSCs

  15. Prostate cancer stem-like cells proliferate slowly and resist etoposide-induced cytotoxicity via enhancing DNA damage response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Judy [Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Juravinski Innovation Tower, Room T3310, St. Joseph' s Hospital, 50 Charlton Ave East, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8S 4L8 (Canada); Father Sean O' Sullivan Research Institute, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8N 4A6 (Canada); The Hamilton Centre for Kidney Research (HCKR), St. Joseph' s Hamilton Healthcare, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8N 4A6 (Canada); Tang, Damu, E-mail: damut@mcmaster.ca [Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Juravinski Innovation Tower, Room T3310, St. Joseph' s Hospital, 50 Charlton Ave East, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8S 4L8 (Canada); Father Sean O' Sullivan Research Institute, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8N 4A6 (Canada); The Hamilton Centre for Kidney Research (HCKR), St. Joseph' s Hamilton Healthcare, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8N 4A6 (Canada)

    2014-10-15

    Despite the development of chemoresistance as a major concern in prostate cancer therapy, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. In this report, we demonstrate that DU145-derived prostate cancer stem cells (PCSCs) progress slowly with more cells accumulating in the G1 phase in comparison to DU145 non-PCSCs. Consistent with the important role of the AKT pathway in promoting G1 progression, DU145 PCSCs were less sensitive to growth factor-induced activation of AKT in comparison to non-PCSCs. In response to etoposide (one of the most commonly used chemotherapeutic drugs), DU145 PCSCs survived significantly better than non-PCSCs. In addition to etoposide, PCSCs demonstrated increased resistance to docetaxel, a taxane drug that is commonly used to treat castration-resistant prostate cancer. Etoposide produced elevated levels of γH2AX and triggered a robust G2/M arrest along with a coordinated reduction of the G1 population in PCSCs compared to non-PCSCs, suggesting that elevated γH2AX plays a role in the resistance of PCSCs to etoposide-induced cytotoxicity. We have generated xenograft tumors from DU145 PCSCs and non-PCSCs. Consistent with the knowledge that PCSCs produce xenograft tumors with more advanced features, we were able to demonstrate that PCSC-derived xenograft tumors displayed higher levels of γH2AX and p-CHK1 compared to non-PCSC-produced xenograft tumors. Collectively, our research suggests that the elevation of DNA damage response contributes to PCSC-associated resistance to genotoxic reagents. - Highlights: • Increased survival in DU145 PCSCs following etoposide-induced cytotoxicity. • PCSCs exhibit increased sensitivity to etoposide-induced DDR. • Resistance to cytotoxicity may be due to slower proliferation in PCSCs. • Reduced kinetics to growth factor induced activation of AKT in PCSCs.

  16. Phosphoproteome Integration Reveals Patient-Specific Networks in Prostate Cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Drake, JM; Paull, EO; Graham, NA; Lee, JK; Smith, BA; Titz, B; Stoyanova, T; Faltermeier, CM; Uzunangelov, V; Carlin,, R.; Fleming, DT; Wong, CK; Newton, Y; Sudha, S; Vashisht, AA

    2016-01-01

    We used clinical tissue from lethal metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients obtained at rapid autopsy to evaluate diverse genomic, transcriptomic, and phosphoproteomic datasets for pathway analysis. Using Tied Diffusion through Interacting Events (TieDIE), we integrated differentially expressed master transcriptional regulators, functionally mutated genes, and differentially activated kinases in CRPC tissues to synthesize a robust signaling network consisting of drugga...

  17. 'Charting a new course for prostate cancer' - currying favor for docetaxel in hormone-sensitive metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voskoboynik, Mark; Staffurth, John; Malik, Zafar; Sweeney, Christopher; Chowdhury, Simon

    2014-11-01

    Docetaxel has an established role in the treatment of metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer. A number of recent treatments have been shown to improve the survival outcomes for this group of patients and many with improved toxicity profiles, bringing the role of docetaxel into question. We discuss the results and implications of the CHAARTED study that demonstrated a significant improvement in overall survival with docetaxel in metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. PMID:25353342

  18. Redefining Hormone Sensitive Disease in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyu Hou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men in the United States. For decades, the cornerstone of medical treatment for advanced prostate cancer has been hormonal therapy, intended to lower testosterone levels, known as Androgen Deprivation Therapy (ADT. The development of hormone-resistant prostate cancer (now termed castration-resistant prostate cancer:CRPC remains the key roadblock in successful long-term management of prostate cancer. New advancements in medical therapy for prostate cancer have added to the hormonal therapy armamentarium. These new therapeutic agents not only provide a survival benefit but also show potential for reversing hormonal resistance in metastatic CRPC, and thus redefining hormonally sensitive disease.

  19. Antiandrogens and androgen depleting therapies in prostate cancer: novel agents for an established target

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yu; Clegg, Nicola J.; Scher, Howard I.

    2009-01-01

    Activation of the androgen receptor is critical for prostate cancer growth at all points in the illness. Currently therapies targeting the androgen receptor, including androgen depletion approaches and antiandrogens, do not completely inhibit androgen receptor activity. Prostate cancer cells develop resistance to castration by acquiring changes such as AR overexpression that result in reactivation of the receptor. Based on understanding of these resistance mechanisms and androgen synthesis pa...

  20. A randomised comparison of 'Casodex' (bicalutamide) 150 mg monotherapy versus castration in the treatment of metastatic and locally advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyrrell, C J; Kaisary, A V; Iversen, P;

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of 'Casodex' monotherapy (150 mg daily) for metastatic and locally advanced prostate cancer.......To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of 'Casodex' monotherapy (150 mg daily) for metastatic and locally advanced prostate cancer....

  1. Integrin β4 and vinculin contained in exosomes are potential markers for progression of prostate cancer associated with taxane-resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Kyojiro; Fujita, Yasunori; Kato, Taku; Mizutani, Kosuke; Kameyama, Koji; Tsumoto, Hiroki; Miura, Yuri; Deguchi, Takashi; Ito, Masafumi

    2015-07-01

    Treatment with taxanes for castration-resistant prostate cancer often leads to the development of resistance. It has been recently demonstrated that exosomes present in the body fluids contain proteins and RNAs in the cells from which they are derived and could serve as a diagnostic marker for various diseases. In the present study, we aimed to identify proteins contained in exosomes that could be markers for progression and taxane-resistance of prostate cancer. Exosomes were isolated by differential centrifugation from the culture medium of taxane-resistant human prostate cancer PC-3 cells (PC-3R) and their parental PC-3 cells. Isolated exosomes were subjected to iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis. Exosomes were also isolated from the culture medium by using anti-CD9 antibody-conjugated magnetic beads. Protein expression was knocked down by siRNA transfection followed by analysis of the silencing effects. Proteomic analysis showed that integrin β4 (ITGB4) and vinculin (VCL) were upregulated in exosomes derived from PC-3R cells compared to PC-3 cells. The elevation of ITGB4 and VCL was confirmed in exosomes captured by anti-CD9 antibody from the culture medium of PC-3R cells. Silencing of ITGB4 and VCL expression did not affect proliferation and taxane-resistance of PC-3R cells, but ITGB4 knockdown attenuated both cell migration and invasion and VCL knockdown reduced invasion. Our results suggest that ITGB4 and VCL in exosomes could be useful markers for progression of prostate cancer associated with taxane-resistance, providing the basis for development of an exosome-based diagnostic system.

  2. Doxorubicin Conjugated to Immunomodulatory Anticancer Lactoferrin Displays Improved Cytotoxicity Overcoming Prostate Cancer Chemo resistance and Inhibits Tumour Development in TRAMP Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankaranarayanan, Jayanth Suryanarayanan; Kanwar, Jagat R; Al-Juhaishi, Afrah Jalil Abd; Kanwar, Rupinder K

    2016-01-01

    Advanced, metastatic, castration resistant and chemo-resistant prostate cancer has triggered change in the drug development landscape against prostate cancer. Bovine lactoferrin (bLf) is currently attracting attention in clinics for its anti-cancer properties and proven safety profile. bLf internalises into cancer cells via receptor mediated endocytosis, boosts immunity and complements chemotherapy. We employed bLf as an excellent functional carrier protein for delivering doxorubicin (Dox) into DU145 cells, CD44+/EpCAM+ double positive enriched DU145 3D prostaspheres and drug resistant ADR1000-DU145 cells, thus circumventing Dox efflux, to overcome chemo-resistance. Successful bLf-Dox conjugation with iron free or iron saturated bLf forms did not affect the integrity and functionality of bLf and Dox. bLf-Dox internalised into DU145 cells within 6 h, enhanced nuclear Dox retention up to 24 h, and proved significantly effective (p resistance. PMID:27576789

  3. Regulation of Prostate Development and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia by Autocrine Cholinergic Signaling via Maintaining the Epithelial Progenitor Cells in Proliferating Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naitao Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of prostate epithelial progenitor cells is important in prostate development and prostate diseases. Our previous study demonstrated a function of autocrine cholinergic signaling (ACS in promoting prostate cancer growth and castration resistance. However, whether or not such ACS also plays a role in prostate development is unknown. Here, we report that ACS promoted the proliferation and inhibited the differentiation of prostate epithelial progenitor cells in organotypic cultures. These results were confirmed by ex vivo lineage tracing assays and in vivo renal capsule recombination assays. Moreover, we found that M3 cholinergic receptor (CHRM3 was upregulated in a large subset of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH tissues compared with normal tissues. Activation of CHRM3 also promoted the proliferation of BPH cells. Together, our findings identify a role of ACS in maintaining prostate epithelial progenitor cells in the proliferating state, and blockade of ACS may have clinical implications for the management of BPH.

  4. Molecular imaging of prostate cancer with PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadvar, Hossein

    2013-10-01

    Molecular imaging is paving the way for precision and personalized medicine. In view of the significant biologic and clinical heterogeneity of prostate cancer, molecular imaging is expected to play an important role in the evaluation of this prevalent disease. The natural history of prostate cancer spans from an indolent localized process to biochemical relapse after radical treatment with curative intent to a lethal castrate-resistant metastatic disease. The ongoing unraveling of the complex tumor biology of prostate cancer uniquely positions molecular imaging with PET to contribute significantly to every clinical phase of prostate cancer evaluation. The purpose of this article was to provide a concise review of the current state of affairs and potential future developments in the diagnostic utility of PET in prostate cancer.

  5. Glucocorticoid receptor antagonism reverts docetaxel resistance in human prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon, Jan; Puhr, Martin; Buijs, Jeroen T; van der Horst, Geertje; Hemmer, Daniëlle M; Marijt, Koen A; Hwang, Ming S; Masood, Motasim; Grimm, Stefan; Storm, Gert; Metselaar, Josbert M; Meijer, Onno C; Culig, Zoran; van der Pluijm, Gabri

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to docetaxel is a major clinical problem in advanced prostate cancer (PCa). Although glucocorticoids (GCs) are frequently used in combination with docetaxel, it is unclear to what extent GCs and their receptor, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), contribute to the chemotherapy resistance. In this study, we aim to elucidate the role of the GR in docetaxel-resistant PCa in order to improve the current PCa therapies. GR expression was analyzed in a tissue microarray of primary PCa specimens from chemonaive and docetaxel-treated patients, and in cultured PCa cell lines with an acquired docetaxel resistance (PC3-DR, DU145-DR, and 22Rv1-DR). We found a robust overexpression of the GR in primary PCa from docetaxel-treated patients and enhanced GR levels in cultured docetaxel-resistant human PCa cells, indicating a key role of the GR in docetaxel resistance. The capability of the GR antagonists (RU-486 and cyproterone acetate) to revert docetaxel resistance was investigated and revealed significant resensitization of docetaxel-resistant PCa cells for docetaxel treatment in a dose- and time-dependent manner, in which a complete restoration of docetaxel sensitivity was achieved in both androgen receptor (AR)-negative and AR-positive cell lines. Mechanistically, we demonstrated down-regulation of Bcl-xL and Bcl-2 upon GR antagonism, thereby defining potential treatment targets. In conclusion, we describe the involvement of the GR in the acquisition of docetaxel resistance in human PCa. Therapeutic targeting of the GR effectively resensitizes docetaxel-resistant PCa cells. These findings warrant further investigation of the clinical utility of the GR antagonists in the management of patients with advanced and docetaxel-resistant PCa. PMID:26483423

  6. An Overview of Current Screening and Management Approaches for Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Omar N; Mushtaq, Gohar; Kamal, Mohammad Amjad

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the fourth leading cause of mortality in Australian men. The prevalence and incidence is increasing in both developed and developing nations, thus there is a need for better screening and management of this disorder. While there is no direct known cause of prostate cancer, management is largely focused on early detection and treatment strategies. Of particular concern is advanced prostate cancer which can manifest as castrate resistant prostate cancer characterized by therapy resistance. This short review outlines the global epidemiology of prostate cancer, clinical manifestations, risk factors, current screening strategies including first line clinical screening as well as the use of circulating biomarkers, and treatment of prostate cancer through mainstream therapeutics as well as the cutting edge peptide and nano-technology based therapeutics that are being implemented or in the process of development to overcome therapeutic obstacles in the treatment of prostate cancer.

  7. Tubulin-Targeting Chemotherapy Impairs Androgen Receptor Activity in Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Meng-Lei; Horbinski, Craig; Garzotto, Mark; Qian, David Z.; Beer, Tomasz M.; Kyprianou, Natasha

    2010-01-01

    Recent insights into the regulation of the androgen receptor (AR) activity led to novel therapeutic targeting of AR function in prostate cancer patients. Docetaxel is an approved chemotherapy for treatment of castration-resistant-prostate cancer (CRPC), but the mechanism underlying the action of this tubulin-targeting drug is not fully understood. This study investigates the contribution of microtubules and the cytoskeleton to androgen-mediated signaling, and the consequences of their inhibit...

  8. Androgen deprivation promotes intratumoral synthesis of dihydrotestosterone from androgen metabolites in prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Fumio Ishizaki; Tsutomu Nishiyama; Takashi Kawasaki; Yoshimichi Miyashiro; Noboru Hara; Itsuhiro Takizawa; Makoto Naito; Kota Takahashi

    2013-01-01

    Intratumoral synthesis of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) from precursors cannot completely explain the castration resistance of prostate cancer. We showed that DHT was intratumorally synthesized from the inactive androgen metabolites 5α-androstane-3α/β,17β-diol (3α/β-diol) in prostate cancer cells via different pathways in a concentration-dependent manner. Additionally, long-term culture in androgen-deprived media increased transcriptomic expression of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 6 (HSD1...

  9. Hedgehog/Gli supports androgen signaling in androgen deprived and androgen independent prostate cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shtutman Michael; Tanner Matthew J; Carkner Richard D; Baghel Prateek S; Levina Elina; Feuerstein Michael A; Chen Mengqian; Vacherot Francis; Terry Stéphane; de la Taille Alexandre; Buttyan Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) develops as a consequence of hormone therapies used to deplete androgens in advanced prostate cancer patients. CRPC cells are able to grow in a low androgen environment and this is associated with anomalous activity of their endogenous androgen receptor (AR) despite the low systemic androgen levels in the patients. Therefore, the reactivated tumor cell androgen signaling pathway is thought to provide a target for control of CRPC....

  10. Development of a Second-Generation Antiandrogen for Treatment of Advanced Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Chris; Ouk, Samedy; Clegg, Nicola J.; Chen, Yu; Watson, Philip A.; Arora, Vivek; Wongvipat, John; Smith-Jones, Peter M.; Yoo, Dongwon; Kwon, Andrew; Wasielewska, Teresa; Welsbie, Derek; Chen, Charlie; Higano, Celestia S.; Beer, Tomasz M

    2009-01-01

    Metastatic prostate cancer is treated with drugs that antagonize androgen action but most patients progress to a more aggressive form of the disease called castration-resistant prostate cancer, driven by elevated expression of the androgen receptor. Here we characterize the diarylthiohydantoins RD162 and MDV3100, two compounds optimized from a screen for non-steroidal antiandrogens that retain activity in the setting of increased androgen receptor expression. Both compounds bind to the androg...

  11. Targeting bone physiology for the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autio, Karen A; Morris, Michael J

    2013-03-01

    Metastatic prostate cancer has a unique predilection for bone that can lead to significant clinical sequelae, such as fracture and cord compression. This tropism for bone yields not only clinical challenges, but also opportunities to understand the tumor biology in bone and to develop relevant therapeutic strategies. The process by which tumor cells migrate to bone, remain dormant, and then colonize and expand is based on complex interactions between prostate cancer tumor cells and the host microenvironment. This review will provide an overview of these interactions as well as therapies targeting osseous metastases in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  12. 手术去势对晚期前列腺癌患者生活质量的影响%The quality of life in man after treatment of advanced prostate cancer by surgical castration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈伟; 余志贤; 谢辉; 张方毅; 王思齐; 邓哲宪; 吴秀玲; 翁志梁

    2008-01-01

    目的 调查手术去势对晚期前列腺癌患者生活质量的影响.方法 采用EORTCQLQ-C30总量表和QLQ-PR25子量表调查69例接受手术去势的晚期前列腺癌患者患病前、治疗后6个月和治疗后12个月3个时闯点的生活质量情况.结果 手术去势虽然能缓解全身或局部疼痛(P<0.01),并改善排尿症状(P<0.01),且患者感觉总体健康状况有好转(P<0.01),但术后患者躯体(P<0.05)、角色(P<0.01)、情绪(P<0.01)、认知(P<0.05)、社会(P<0.05或<0.01)等功能均有不同程度下降,且失眠增多(P<0.05)、疲倦加剧(P<0.01),治疗相关症状如潮红与乳房胀痛等显著出现(P<0.01),性趣明显下降甚至丧失(P<0.01),特别是彻底丧失了正常的性生活.结论 手术去势对前列腺癌患者的机体与心理均有不同程度的影响,尤其是性功能方面有不可逆性损害.%Objective To investigate the quality of life in man after treatment of advanced prostate cancer by surgical castration. Methods A total of 69 patients with advanced prostate cancer treated by sur-gical castration completed the European organization for research and treatment of cancer quality of life questionnaire (QLQ-C30) and QLQ-prostate specific 25-item (PR25) module third at a 12-month interval.The assessment points were preoporative,6 months postoperative and 12 months postoperative. Results Although there were improvement on pain relief (P < 0.01 ) and symptom of urinary (P < 0.01 ) and global health (P < 0.01 ), the physical functioning (P < 0.05 ), role functioning (P < 0.01 ), emotional functioning (P < 0.01 ), cognitive functioning (P < 0.05 ), social functioning (P < 0.05 or < 0.01 ) were found significantly reduced , and insomnia (P < 0.05) and fatigue (P < 0.01 ) aggravated, treatment related symptoms (P <0.01 )appeared predominantly, especially deprivation of sexual functioning. Conclusion The surgical cas-tration when treating advanced

  13. Comparability of prostate trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suciu, S; Sylvester, R; Iversen, P;

    1993-01-01

    The present overview of advanced prostate cancer required the identification of randomized clinical trials studying the question of maximal androgen blockade versus the classic castration therapy. The heterogeneity of the trials concerned the type of castration (surgical or chemical) and the type...... of antiandrogen (flutamide, Anandron, or cyproterone acetate) added to castration. This paper reviews the different types of heterogeneity that might exist among trials that are involved in the overview: study design, randomization procedure, treatment evaluation, statistical evaluation, and data maturity...

  14. Neuroendocrine differentiation in prostate cancer – a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Popescu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This review aims to provide practicing clinicians with the most recent knowledge of the biological nature of prostate cancer especially the information regarding neuroendocrine differentiation. Methods: Review of the literature using PubMed search and scientific journal publications. Results: Much progress has been made towards an understanding of the development and progression of prostate cancer. The prostate is a male accessory sex gland which produces a fraction of seminal fluid. The normal human prostate is composed of a stromal compartment (which contains: nerves, fibroblast, smooth muscle cells, macrophages surrounding glandular acins – epithelial cells. Neuroendocrine cells are one of the epithelial populations in the normal prostate and are believed to provide trophic signals trough the secretion of neuropeptides that diffuse and influence surrounding epithelial cells. Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed malignancy in men. In prostate cancer, neuroendocrine cells can stimulate growth of surrounding prostate adenocarcinoma cells (proliferation of neighboring cancer cells in a paracrine manner by secretion of neuroendocrine products. Neuroendocrine prostate cancer is an aggressive variant of prostate cancer that commonly arises in later stages of castration resistant prostate cancer. The detection of neuroendocrine prostate cancer has clinical implications. These patients are often treated with platinum chemotherapy rather than with androgen receptor targeted therapies. Conclusion: This review shows the need to improve our knowledge regarding diagnostic and treatment methods of the Prostate Cancer, especially cancer cells with neuroendocrine phenotype.

  15. Human Prostate Cancer Hallmarks Map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Dipamoy; Aftabuddin, Md; Gupta, Dinesh Kumar; Raha, Sanghamitra; Sen, Prosenjit

    2016-01-01

    Human prostate cancer is a complex heterogeneous disease that mainly affects elder male population of the western world with a high rate of mortality. Acquisitions of diverse sets of hallmark capabilities along with an aberrant functioning of androgen receptor signaling are the central driving forces behind prostatic tumorigenesis and its transition into metastatic castration resistant disease. These hallmark capabilities arise due to an intense orchestration of several crucial factors, including deregulation of vital cell physiological processes, inactivation of tumor suppressive activity and disruption of prostate gland specific cellular homeostasis. The molecular complexity and redundancy of oncoproteins signaling in prostate cancer demands for concurrent inhibition of multiple hallmark associated pathways. By an extensive manual curation of the published biomedical literature, we have developed Human Prostate Cancer Hallmarks Map (HPCHM), an onco-functional atlas of human prostate cancer associated signaling and events. It explores molecular architecture of prostate cancer signaling at various levels, namely key protein components, molecular connectivity map, oncogenic signaling pathway map, pathway based functional connectivity map etc. Here, we briefly represent the systems level understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated with prostate tumorigenesis by considering each and individual molecular and cell biological events of this disease process.

  16. Human Prostate Cancer Hallmarks Map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Dipamoy; Aftabuddin, Md; Gupta, Dinesh Kumar; Raha, Sanghamitra; Sen, Prosenjit

    2016-01-01

    Human prostate cancer is a complex heterogeneous disease that mainly affects elder male population of the western world with a high rate of mortality. Acquisitions of diverse sets of hallmark capabilities along with an aberrant functioning of androgen receptor signaling are the central driving forces behind prostatic tumorigenesis and its transition into metastatic castration resistant disease. These hallmark capabilities arise due to an intense orchestration of several crucial factors, including deregulation of vital cell physiological processes, inactivation of tumor suppressive activity and disruption of prostate gland specific cellular homeostasis. The molecular complexity and redundancy of oncoproteins signaling in prostate cancer demands for concurrent inhibition of multiple hallmark associated pathways. By an extensive manual curation of the published biomedical literature, we have developed Human Prostate Cancer Hallmarks Map (HPCHM), an onco-functional atlas of human prostate cancer associated signaling and events. It explores molecular architecture of prostate cancer signaling at various levels, namely key protein components, molecular connectivity map, oncogenic signaling pathway map, pathway based functional connectivity map etc. Here, we briefly represent the systems level understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated with prostate tumorigenesis by considering each and individual molecular and cell biological events of this disease process. PMID:27476486

  17. Prevalence of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria on Rectal Swabs and Factors Affecting Resistance to Antibiotics in Patients Undergoing Prostate Biopsy

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jong Beom; Jung, Seung Il; Hwang, Eu Chang; Kwon, Dong Deuk

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria on rectal swabs in patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsy and the factors affecting resistance to antibiotics were evaluated. Materials and Methods Two hundred twenty-three men who underwent TRUS-guided prostate biopsy from November 2011 to December 2012 were retrospectively evaluated. Rectal swabs were cultured on MacConkey agar to identify antibiotic-resistant bacteria in rectal flora before TRUS-guide...

  18. [Human castration: historical notes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serarcangeli, C; Rispoli, G

    2001-01-01

    Human castration has been performed from early times for different reasons: to punish and revenge, to display one's religious fanaticism, to protect or to control women, for eunuchs' trade, for therapeutical purposes. In early modern times men were castrated to obtain sopranos voices, or for eugenic or racial reasons. Nowadays chemical castration is used as a therapeutic treatment or as a way to punish rape and other criminal behaviours. Castration is surgical or chemical act that may obviously cause serious physical and psychological consequences. PMID:12375586

  19. Management of patients with advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillessen, S; Omlin, A; Attard, G;

    2015-01-01

    -resistant prostate cancer and the recent studies of chemo-hormonal therapy in men with castration-naïve prostate cancer have led to considerable uncertainty as to the best treatment choices, sequence of treatment options and appropriate patient selection. Management recommendations based on expert opinion......, and not based on a critical review of the available evidence, are presented. The various recommendations carried differing degrees of support, as reflected in the wording of the article text and in the detailed voting results recorded in supplementary Material, available at Annals of Oncology online. Detailed...

  20. Immune Response to Sipuleucel-T in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David I. Quinn

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Historically, chemotherapy has remained the most commonly utilized therapy in patients with metastatic cancers. In prostate cancer, chemotherapy has been reserved for patients whose metastatic disease becomes resistant to first line castration or androgen deprivation. While chemotherapy palliates, decreases serum prostate specific antigen and improves survival, it is associated with significant side effects and is only suitable for approximately 60% of patients with castrate-resistant prostate cancer. On that basis, exploration of other therapeutic options such as active secondary hormone therapy, bone targeted treatments and immunotherapy are important. Until recently, immunotherapy has had no role in the treatment of solid malignancies aside from renal cancer and melanoma. The FDA-approved autologous cellular immunotherapy sipuleucel-T has demonstrated efficacy in improving overall survival in patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer in randomized clinical trials. The proposed mechanism of action is reliant on activating the patients’ own antigen presenting cells (APCs to prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP fused with granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF and subsequent triggered T-cell response to PAP on the surface of prostate cancer cells in the patients body. Despite significant prolongation of survival in Phase III trials, the challenge to health care providers remains the dissociation between objective changes in serum PSA or on imaging studies after sipleucel-T and survival benefit. On that basis there is an unmet need for markers of outcome and a quest to identify immunologic or clinical surrogates to fill this role. This review focuses on the impact of sipuleucel-T on the immune system, the T and B cells, and their responses to relevant antigens and prostate cancer. Other therapeutic modalities such as chemotherapy, corticosteroids and GM-CSF and host factors can also affect immune response. The

  1. Clinical Observation of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Combined with Radiotherapy、Testicular Castration for Prostate Cancer%高强度聚焦超声联合放疗、睾丸去势治疗前列腺癌的疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐勇军; 余建军; 冯慧萍

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨高强度聚焦超声( HIFU)联合放疗、睾丸去势治疗前列腺癌的疗效。方法对38例已行放疗、睾丸去势治疗的前列腺癌进行HIFU治疗。结果15例(39%)前列腺特异性抗原(PSA)水平降至正常,20例(52%) PSA下降,2例(10%)仅症状缓解,有效率达92%。前列腺体积也明显缩小。结论 HIFU联合放疗、睾丸去势治疗前列腺癌,能有效控制肿瘤进展,为前列腺癌提供了1种新的有效治疗手段。%Objective To study the efficacy of high intensity focused ultrasound ( HIFU) combined with radiotherapy , testicular castration for prostate cancer .Methods 38 patients with prostate cancer who underwent radiotherapy and testicular castration were treated with HIFU.Results 15 cases (39%),prostate specific antigen (PSA) have fallen to normal,20 cases (52%) of the PSA declined,2 cases (10%) of symptoms relieved,effective rate was 92%.Prostate volume also narrowed con-siderably.Conclusion HIFU combined with radiotherapy and testicular castration can effectively control the progression of the tumor,it is a new effective treatment for prostate cancer .

  2. Irrefutable evidence for the use of docetaxel in newly diagnosed metastatic prostate cancer: results from the STAMPEDE and CHAARTED trials

    OpenAIRE

    Soest, Robert Jan; de Wit, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    textabstractAndrogen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been used in the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer since the first description of its hormonal dependence in 1941. In 2004, docetaxel chemotherapy became the mainstay of treatment in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), following robust, albeit modest, survival benefit in two randomized phase 3 trials. The recently published CHAARTED trial was the first to show that combining ADT with docetaxel in men with hormone-na...

  3. Development of PROSTVAC immunotherapy in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Parminder; Pal, Sumanta K; Alex, Anitha; Agarwal, Neeraj

    2015-01-01

    PROSTVAC immunotherapy is a heterologous prime-boost regimen of two different recombinant pox-virus vectors; vaccinia as the primary immunotherapy, followed by boosters employing fowlpox, to provoke immune responses against prostate-specific antigen. Both vectors contain transgenes for prostate-specific antigen and a triad of T-cell costimulatory molecules (TRICOM). In a placebo-controlled Phase II trial of men with minimally symptomatic, chemotherapy-naive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, PROSTVAC was well tolerated and associated with a 44% reduction in death. With a novel mechanism of action, and excellent tolerability, PROSTVAC has the potential to dramatically alter the treatment landscape of prostate cancer, not only as a monotherapy, but also in combination with other novel agents, such as immune check point inhibitors and novel androgen receptor blockers. A Phase III trial recently completed accrual. PMID:26235179

  4. SOCS2 mediates the cross talk between androgen and growth hormone signaling in prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iglesias Gato, Diego; Chuan, Yin Choy; Wikström, Pernilla;

    2014-01-01

    ) as mediator of the cross talk between androgens and GH signals in the prostate and its potential role as tumor suppressor in prostate cancer (PCa). We observed that SOCS2 protein levels assayed by immunohistochemistry are elevated in hormone therapy-naive localized prostatic adenocarcinoma in comparison...... with benign tissue. In contrast, however, castration-resistant bone metastases exhibit reduced levels of SOCS2 in comparison with localized or hormone naive, untreated metastatic tumors. In PCa cells, SOCS2 expression is induced by androgens through a mechanism that requires signal transducer and activator...... to GH. Our results suggest that the use of GH-signaling inhibitors could be of value as a complementary treatment for castration-resistant PCa.Summary: Androgen induced SOCS2 ubiquitin ligase expression and inhibited GH signaling as well as cell proliferation and invasion in PCa, whereas reduced SOCS2...

  5. ERK and AKT signaling drive MED1 overexpression in prostate cancer in association with elevated proliferation and tumorigenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Feng; Irshad, Shazia; Yu, Wei; Belakavadi, Madesh; Chekmareva, Marina; Ittmann, Michael M; Abate-Shen, Cory; Fondell, Joseph D

    2013-07-01

    MED1 is a key coactivator of the androgen receptor (AR) and other signal-activated transcription factors. Whereas MED1 is overexpressed in prostate cancer cell lines and is thought to coactivate distinct target genes involved in cell-cycle progression and castration-resistant growth, the underlying mechanisms by which MED1 becomes overexpressed and its oncogenic role in clinical prostate cancer have remained unclear. Here, we report that MED1 is overexpressed in the epithelium of clinically localized human prostate cancer patients, which correlated with elevated cellular proliferation. In a Nkx3.1:Pten mutant mouse model of prostate cancer that recapitulates the human disease, MED1 protein levels were markedly elevated in the epithelium of both invasive and castration-resistant adenocarcinoma prostate tissues. Mechanistic evidence showed that hyperactivated ERK and/or AKT signaling pathways promoted MED1 overexpression in prostate cancer cells. Notably, ectopic MED1 overexpression in prostate cancer xenografts significantly promoted tumor growth in nude mice. Furthermore, MED1 expression in prostate cancer cells promoted the expression of a number of novel genes involved in inflammation, cell proliferation, and survival. Together, these findings suggest that elevated MED1 is a critical molecular event associated with prostate oncogenesis.

  6. ERG Cooperates with Androgen Receptor in Regulating Trefoil Factor 3 in Prostate Cancer Disease Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S. Rickman

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available To elucidate the role of ETS gene fusions in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC, we characterized the transcriptome of 54 CRPC tumor samples from men with locally advanced or metastatic disease. Trefoil factor 3 (TFF3 emerged as the most highly differentially regulated gene with respect to ERG rearrangement status and resistance to hormone ablation therapy. Conventional chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-polymerase chain reaction and ChIP followed by DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq revealed direct binding of ERG to ETS binding sites in the TFF3 promoter in ERG-rearranged prostate cancer cell lines. These results were confirmed in ERG-rearranged hormone-naive prostate cancer (HNPC and CRPC tissue samples. Functional studies demonstrated that ERG has an inhibitory effect on TFF3 expression in hormone-naive cancer but not in the castration-resistant state. In addition, we provide evidence suggesting an effect of androgen receptor signaling on ERG-regulated TFF3 expression. Furthermore, TFF3 overexpression enhances ERG-mediated cell invasion in CRPC prostate cancer cells. Taken together, our findings reveal a novel mechanism for enhanced tumor cell aggressiveness resulting from ERG rearrangement in the castration-resistant setting through TFF3 gene expression.

  7. ERG cooperates with androgen receptor in regulating trefoil factor 3 in prostate cancer disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickman, David S; Chen, Ying-Bei; Banerjee, Samprit; Pan, Yihang; Yu, Jindan; Vuong, Terry; Perner, Sven; Lafargue, Christopher J; Mertz, Kirsten D; Setlur, Sunita R; Sircar, Kanishka; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Bismar, Tarek A; Rubin, Mark A; Demichelis, Francesca

    2010-12-01

    To elucidate the role of ETS gene fusions in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), we characterized the transcriptome of 54 CRPC tumor samples from men with locally advanced or metastatic disease. Trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) emerged as the most highly differentially regulated gene with respect to ERG rearrangement status and resistance to hormone ablation therapy. Conventional chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-polymerase chain reaction and ChIP followed by DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) revealed direct binding of ERG to ETS binding sites in the TFF3 promoter in ERG-rearranged prostate cancer cell lines. These results were confirmed in ERG-rearranged hormone-naive prostate cancer (HNPC) and CRPC tissue samples. Functional studies demonstrated that ERG has an inhibitory effect on TFF3 expression in hormone-naive cancer but not in the castration-resistant state. In addition, we provide evidence suggesting an effect of androgen receptor signaling on ERG-regulated TFF3 expression. Furthermore, TFF3 overexpression enhances ERG-mediated cell invasion in CRPC prostate cancer cells. Taken together, our findings reveal a novel mechanism for enhanced tumor cell aggressiveness resulting from ERG rearrangement in the castration-resistant setting through TFF3 gene expression.

  8. Uncovering the Roles of miRNAs and Their Relationship with Androgen Receptor in Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    ChunJiao, Song; Huan, Chen; ChaoYang, Xu; GuoMei, Ru

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second most commonly occurring malignant tumor in Europe and America. Normal and neoplastic growth of prostate gland are dependent on androgen receptor (AR) expression and function. PCa is driven by androgen and its receptor, and they continue to be the key drivers of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). CRPC is the terminal stage of PCa and seriously jeopardizes the patient's quality of life and lifespan. miRNAs are small noncoding RNAs, 18–25 nt in lengt...

  9. Enzalutamide in metastatic prostate cancer before chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beer, Tomasz M; Armstrong, Andrew J; Rathkopf, Dana E;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Enzalutamide is an oral androgen-receptor inhibitor that prolongs survival in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer in whom the disease has progressed after chemotherapy. New treatment options are needed for patients with metastatic prostate cancer who have not rece......BACKGROUND: Enzalutamide is an oral androgen-receptor inhibitor that prolongs survival in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer in whom the disease has progressed after chemotherapy. New treatment options are needed for patients with metastatic prostate cancer who have...... not received chemotherapy, in whom the disease has progressed despite androgen-deprivation therapy. METHODS: In this double-blind, phase 3 study, we randomly assigned 1717 patients to receive either enzalutamide (at a dose of 160 mg) or placebo once daily. The coprimary end points were radiographic progression...... at the data-cutoff date (29% reduction in the risk of death; hazard ratio, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.60 to 0.84; Pchemotherapy (hazard ratio, 0.35), the time until the first...

  10. Multiplexed Quantum Dot Labeling of Activated c-Met Signaling in Castration-Resistant Human Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Peizhen Hu; Gina C-Y Chu; Guodong Zhu; Hua Yang; Daniel Luthringer; Gail Prins; Fouad Habib; Yuzhuo Wang; Ruoxiang Wang; Chung, Leland W. K.; Zhau, Haiyen E.

    2011-01-01

    The potential application of multiplexed quantum dot labeling (MQDL) for cancer detection and prognosis and monitoring therapeutic responses has attracted the interests of bioengineers, pathologists and cancer biologists. Many published studies claim that MQDL is effective for cancer biomarker detection and useful in cancer diagnosis and prognosis, these studies have not been standardized against quantitative biochemical and molecular determinations. In the present study, we used a molecularl...

  11. Low-dose prednisolone in first-line docetaxel for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Per; Svane, Inge Marie; Lindberg, Henriette;

    2015-01-01

    incidence of peripheral edema (32% vs. 15%, Pfebrile neutropenia in this group (25% vs. 10%, P...% CI: 0.76-1.26, P = 0.89, Cox proportional hazard regression model). CONCLUSIONS: Coadministration of low-dose P reduced the incidence of peripheral edema, grade 3 nonhematological toxicity, and the risk of being admitted owing to febrile neutropenia during treatment with D. Adjusted survival analysis...

  12. Personalization of prostate cancer prevention and therapy: are clinically qualified biomarkers in the horizon?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yap Timothy A

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Prostate cancer remains the most common malignancy among men and the second leading cause of male cancer-related mortality. Death from this disease is invariably due to resistance to androgen deprivation therapy. Our improved understanding of the biology of prostate cancer has heralded a new era in molecular anticancer drug development, with multiple novel anticancer drugs for castration resistant prostate cancer now entering the clinic. These include the taxane cabazitaxel, the vaccine sipuleucel-T, the CYP17 inhibitor abiraterone, the novel androgen receptor antagonist MDV-3100 and the radionuclide alpharadin. The management and therapeutic landscape of prostate cancer has now been transformed with this growing armamentarium of effective antitumor agents. This review discusses strategies for the prevention and personalization of prostate cancer therapy, with a focus on the development of predictive and intermediate endpoint biomarkers, as well as novel clinical trial designs that will be crucial for the optimal development of such anticancer therapeutics.

  13. Identification of CD166 as a surface marker for enriching prostate stem/progenitor and cancer initiating cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Jiao

    Full Text Available New therapies for late stage and castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC depend on defining unique properties and pathways of cell sub-populations capable of sustaining the net growth of the cancer. One of the best enrichment schemes for isolating the putative stem/progenitor cell from the murine prostate gland is Lin(-;Sca1(+;CD49f(hi (LSC(hi, which results in a more than 10-fold enrichment for in vitro sphere-forming activity. We have shown previously that the LSC(hi subpopulation is both necessary and sufficient for cancer initiation in the Pten-null prostate cancer model. To further improve this enrichment scheme, we searched for cell surface molecules upregulated upon castration of murine prostate and identified CD166 as a candidate gene. CD166 encodes a cell surface molecule that can further enrich sphere-forming activity of WT LSC(hi and Pten null LSC(hi. Importantly, CD166 could enrich sphere-forming ability of benign primary human prostate cells in vitro and induce the formation of tubule-like structures in vivo. CD166 expression is upregulated in human prostate cancers, especially CRPC samples. Although genetic deletion of murine CD166 in the Pten null prostate cancer model does not interfere with sphere formation or block prostate cancer progression and CRPC development, the presence of CD166 on prostate stem/progenitors and castration resistant sub-populations suggest that it is a cell surface molecule with the potential for targeted delivery of human prostate cancer therapeutics.

  14. Was DHT production by 5α-reductase friend or for in prostate cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeo eKosaka

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The first advance in the history of studies on prostate cancer and androgens was the development of treatment with castration and administration of estrogen by Charles B Huggins, who won the Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine. Since then, and for 70 years, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT has been the standard therapy for advanced prostate cancer and the center of studies on prostate cancer (PCa. However, recent advances have shed light on the relationship between androgens and the development or the progression of PCa. The use of 5AR inhibitors to prevent progression of PCa continues to be widely discussed. Discussion has been fueled by the findings of two large randomized, placebo-controlled trials: the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT with finasteride and the Reduction by Dutasteride of Prostate Cancer Events (REDUCE trial. Does the development of prostate cancer or progression to castration resistant prostate cancer depend on DHT? Here we summarize and discuss recent topics of local androgen production of DHT in prostate cancer.

  15. Steroid hormone synthetic pathways in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostaghel, Elahe A

    2013-09-01

    While androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) remains the primary treatment for metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) since the seminal recognition of the disease as androgen-dependent by Huggins and Hodges in 1941, therapy is uniformly marked by progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) over a period of about 18 months, with an ensuing median survival of 1 to 2 years. Importantly, castration does not eliminate androgens from the prostate tumor microenvironment. Castration resistant tumors are characterized by elevated tumor androgens that are well within the range capable of activating the AR and AR-mediated gene expression, and by steroid enzyme alterations which may potentiate de novo androgen synthesis or utilization of circulating adrenal androgens. The dependence of CRPC on intratumoral androgen metabolism has been modeled in vitro and in vivo, and residual intratumoral androgens are implicated in nearly every mechanism by which AR-mediated signaling promotes castration-resistant disease. These observations suggest that tissue based alterations in steroid metabolism contribute to the development of CRPC and underscore these metabolic pathways as critical targets of therapy. Herein, we review the accumulated body of evidence which strongly supports intracrine (tumoral) androgen synthesis as an important mechanism underlying PCa progression. We first discuss the presence and significance of residual prostate tumor androgens in the progression of CRPC. We review the classical and non-classical pathways of androgen metabolism, and how dysregulated expression of these enzymes is likely to potentiate tumor androgen production in the progression to CRPC. Next we review the in vitro and in vivo data in human tumors, xenografts, and cell line models which demonstrate the capacity of prostate tumors to utilize cholesterol and adrenal androgens in the production of testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and briefly review the potential role of exogenous

  16. Chemotherapy and its evolving role in the management of advanced prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael T Schweizer; Emmanuel S Antonarakis

    2014-01-01

    prostate cancer has been recognized as being responsive to androgen deprivation since the 1940s when Charles Huggins ifrst described the role of surgical castration in managing these patients. However, androgen deprivation only results in transient disease control for the vast majority of men, with those progressing in spite of castrate testosterone levels labeled as having castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Until 2004, the therapeutic arena for these patients had remained stagnant, with no agent having shown a survival gain in the CRPC setting. Two landmark publications changed the prostate cancer treatment landscape by providing‘level-1 evidence’ that docetaxel-based chemotherapy led to prolongation in overall survival (OS). This was followed by the approval of cabazitaxel in 2010 on the basis of Phase III data demonstrating its efifcacy in patients pretreated with docetaxel. More recently, a number of next-generation androgen-directed agents (e.g. abiraterone and enzalutamide) have also been shown to lead to a survival beneift in men with CRPC. With so many new treatment options available, a number of questions remain. These include:how to best sequence chemotherapy with these newer hormonal agents, the clinical implication of cross-resistance between taxanes and androgen-directed agents and which subsets of patients may beneift most from early use of chemotherapy. This review will provide an overview of the evolving role of chemotherapy in the management of advanced prostate cancer in the current era.

  17. Upfront Chemotherapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Elaine T; Flaig, Thomas W

    2015-12-01

    Traditionally, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been the standard initial treatment for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer (mHSPC), with chemotherapy utilized in the castration-resistant setting. Data reported from three recent clinical trials shed new light on the role of upfront docetaxel in advanced or mHSPC. Two of these studies-CHAARTED and STAMPEDE-showed significant improvement in overall survival, while the third study, GETUG-AFU 15, showed no statistical difference. The CHAARTED study showed a 13.6-month survival improvement and the STAMPEDE study showed a 10-month survival improvement with ADT plus docetaxel, compared with ADT alone, in the hormone-sensitive setting. These numbers are remarkable when compared with the 2.9-month survival benefit from docetaxel in the metastatic castration-resistant setting, which has been the standard setting for the use of docetaxel in advanced prostate cancer. In this review, we describe the historical data for chemotherapy in the perioperative and metastatic prostate cancer settings, and the recent trials that are changing the paradigm in support of docetaxel in the upfront setting. PMID:26676900

  18. Comparability of prostate trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suciu, S; Sylvester, R; Iversen, P;

    1993-01-01

    The present overview of advanced prostate cancer required the identification of randomized clinical trials studying the question of maximal androgen blockade versus the classic castration therapy. The heterogeneity of the trials concerned the type of castration (surgical or chemical) and the type...... of antiandrogen (flutamide, Anandron, or cyproterone acetate) added to castration. This paper reviews the different types of heterogeneity that might exist among trials that are involved in the overview: study design, randomization procedure, treatment evaluation, statistical evaluation, and data maturity...... with a larger number of patients and a longer follow-up will contribute more to the overview's results....

  19. Acid ceramidase in prostate cancer radiation therapy resistance and relapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Joseph C.

    Prostate tumor cell escape from ionizing radiation (IR)-induced killing can lead to disease progression and relapse. Sphingolipids such as ceramide and sphingosine 1-phosphate influence signal transduction pathways that regulate stress response in cancer cells. In particular, metabolism of apoptotic ceramide constitutes an important survival adaptation. Assessments of enzyme activity, mRNA, and protein demonstrated preferential upregulation of the ceramide deacylating enzyme acid ceramidase (AC) in irradiated cancer cells. Promoter-reporter and ChIP-qPCR assays revealed AC transcription by activator protein 1 (AP-1) is sensitive to pharmacological inhibition of de novo ceramide biosynthesis, identifying a protective feedback mechanism that mitigates the effects of IR-induced ceramide. Deregulation of c-Jun, in particular, induced marked radiosensitization in vitro and in vivo, which was rescued by ectopic AC over-expression. AC over-expression in prostate cancer clonogens surviving 80 Gray fractionated irradiation was associated with increased radioresistance and proliferation, suggesting a role in radiotherapy failure and relapse. Indeed, immunohistochemical analysis of human prostate cancer tissues revealed higher levels of AC after radiotherapy failure than therapy-naive adenocarcinoma, PIN, or benign tissues. By genetically downregulating AC with small interfering RNA (siRNA), we observed radiosensitization of cells using clonogenic and cytotoxicity assays. Finally, treatment with lysosomotropic small molecule inhibitors of AC, LCL385 or LCL521, induced prostate cancer xenograft radiosensitization and long-term suppression, suggesting AC is a tractable target for adjuvant radiotherapy.

  20. Mathematical modeling of prostate cancer progression in response to androgen ablation therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Harsh Vardhan; Clinton, Steven K.; Bhinder, Arvinder; Friedman, Avner

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer progression depends in part on the complex interactions between testosterone, its active metabolite DHT, and androgen receptors. In a metastatic setting, the first line of treatment is the elimination of testosterone. However, such interventions are not curative because cancer cells evolve via multiple mechanisms to a castrate-resistant state, allowing progression to a lethal outcome. It is hypothesized that administration of antiandrogen therapy in an intermittent, as opposed...

  1. STAT5A/B Gene Locus Undergoes Amplification during Human Prostate Cancer Progression

    OpenAIRE

    Haddad, Bassem R.; Gu, Lei; Mirtti, Tuomas; Dagvadorj, Ayush; Vogiatzi, Paraskevi; Hoang, David T.; Bajaj, Renu; Leiby, Benjamin; Ellsworth, Elyse; Blackmon, Shauna; Ruiz, Christian; Curtis, Mark; Fortina, Paolo; Ertel, Adam; Liu, Chengbao

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying progression of prostate cancer (PCa) to castrate-resistant (CR) and metastatic disease are poorly understood. Our previous mechanistic work shows that inhibition of transcription factor Stat5 by multiple alternative methods induces extensive rapid apoptotic death of Stat5-positive PCa cells in vitro and inhibits PCa xenograft tumor growth in nude mice. Furthermore, STAT5A/B induces invasive behavior of PCa cells in vitro and in vivo, suggesting involvement ...

  2. Current status of primary pharmacotherapy and future perspectives toward upfront therapy for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, Masaki; Eto, Masatoshi

    2016-05-01

    Since 1941, androgen deprivation therapy has been the primary treatment for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. Androgen deprivation therapy consists of several regimens that vary according to therapeutic modality, as well as treatment schedule. Androgen deprivation therapy initially shows excellent antitumor effects, such as relief of cancer-related symptoms, tumor marker decline and tumor shrinking. However, most metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer cases eventually develop castration resistance and become lethal. Taxanes, such as docetaxel and cabazitaxel, as well as novel androgen receptor-targeting agents, such as abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide, have emerged for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. The concept and principle of primary therapy for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer has remained unchanged for decades. Recently, upfront docetaxel chemotherapy has been shown to prolong overall survival in men with metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer, and would lead to a paradigm shift in primary pharmacotherapy for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. This raises the possibility of upfront use of taxanes, as well as novel androgen receptor-targeting agents combined with androgen deprivation therapy. The present review summarizes the current status of primary pharmacotherapy for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer, and discusses future perspectives in this field. PMID:27062039

  3. Human heterochromatin protein 1 isoforms regulate androgen receptor signaling in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itsumi, Momoe; Shiota, Masaki; Yokomizo, Akira; Kashiwagi, Eiji; Takeuchi, Ario; Tatsugami, Katsunori; Inokuchi, Junichi; Song, Yoohyun; Uchiumi, Takeshi; Naito, Seiji

    2013-06-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) signaling is critical for the tumorigenesis and development of prostate cancer, as well as the progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer. We previously showed that the heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) β isoform plays a critical role in transactivation of AR signaling as an AR coactivator that promotes prostate cancer cell proliferation. However, the roles of other HP1 isoforms, HP1α and HP1γ, in AR expression and prostate cancer remain unclear. Here, we found that knockdown of HP1γ, but not HP1α, reduced AR expression and cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest at G1 phase in LNCaP cells. Conversely, overexpression of full-length HP1α and its C-terminal deletion mutant increased AR expression and cell growth, whereas overexpression of HP1γ had no effect. Similarly, HP1α overexpression promoted 22Rv1 cell growth, whereas HP1γ knockdown reduced the proliferation of CxR cells, a castration-resistant LNCaP derivative. Taken together, HP1 isoforms distinctly augment AR signaling and cell growth in prostate cancer. Therefore, silencing of HP1β and HP1γ may be a promising therapeutic strategy for treatment of prostate cancer.

  4. Hydrogen Sulfide Signaling Axis as a Target for Prostate Cancer Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingzhe Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S was originally considered toxic at elevated levels; however just in the past decade H2S has been proposed to be an important gasotransmitter with various physiological and pathophysiological roles in the body. H2S can be generated endogenously from L-cysteine by multiple enzymes, including cystathionine gamma-lyase, cystathionine beta-synthase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase in combination with cysteine aminotransferase. Prostate cancer is a major health concern and no effective treatment for prostate cancers is available. H2S has been shown to inhibit cell survival of androgen-independent, androgen-dependent, and antiandrogen-resistant prostate cancer cells through different mechanisms. Various H2S-releasing compounds, including sulfide salts, diallyl disulfide, diallyl trisulfide, sulforaphane, and other polysulfides, also have been shown to inhibit prostate cancer growth and metastasis. The expression of H2S-producing enzyme was reduced in both human prostate cancer tissues and prostate cancer cells. Androgen receptor (AR signaling is indispensable for the development of castration resistant prostate cancer, and H2S was shown to inhibit AR transactivation and contributes to antiandrogen-resistant status. In this review, we summarized the current knowledge of H2S signaling in prostate cancer and described the molecular alterations, which may bring this gasotransmitter into the clinic in the near future for developing novel pharmacological and therapeutic interventions for prostate cancer.

  5. Hydrogen Sulfide Signaling Axis as a Target for Prostate Cancer Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingzhe; Wu, Lingyun; Montaut, Sabine; Yang, Guangdong

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) was originally considered toxic at elevated levels; however just in the past decade H2S has been proposed to be an important gasotransmitter with various physiological and pathophysiological roles in the body. H2S can be generated endogenously from L-cysteine by multiple enzymes, including cystathionine gamma-lyase, cystathionine beta-synthase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase in combination with cysteine aminotransferase. Prostate cancer is a major health concern and no effective treatment for prostate cancers is available. H2S has been shown to inhibit cell survival of androgen-independent, androgen-dependent, and antiandrogen-resistant prostate cancer cells through different mechanisms. Various H2S-releasing compounds, including sulfide salts, diallyl disulfide, diallyl trisulfide, sulforaphane, and other polysulfides, also have been shown to inhibit prostate cancer growth and metastasis. The expression of H2S-producing enzyme was reduced in both human prostate cancer tissues and prostate cancer cells. Androgen receptor (AR) signaling is indispensable for the development of castration resistant prostate cancer, and H2S was shown to inhibit AR transactivation and contributes to antiandrogen-resistant status. In this review, we summarized the current knowledge of H2S signaling in prostate cancer and described the molecular alterations, which may bring this gasotransmitter into the clinic in the near future for developing novel pharmacological and therapeutic interventions for prostate cancer. PMID:27019751

  6. MiR-221 promotes the development of androgen independence in prostate cancer cells via downregulation of HECTD2 and RAB1A

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, T; Wang, X; He, HH; Sweeney, CJ; Liu, SX; Brown, M.; Balk, S.; Lee, G-SM; Kantoff, PW

    2013-01-01

    Hormone-sensitive prostate cancer typically progresses to castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) after the androgen deprivation therapy. We investigated the impact of microRNAs (miRs) in the transition of prostate cancer to CRPC. MiR-221/-222 was highly expressed in bone metastatic CRPC tumor specimens. We previously demonstrated that transient overexpression of miR-221/-222 in LNCaP promoted the development of the CRPC phenotype. In current study, we show that stably overexpressing miR-...

  7. Potential synergistic implications for stromal-targeted radiopharmaceuticals in bone-metastatic prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Oliver Sartor

    2011-01-01

    Genetic heterogeneity and chemotherapy-resistant 'stem cells' represent two of the most pressing issues in devising new strategies for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer. Though curative strategies have long been present for men with localized disease, metastatic prostate cancer is currently incurable. Though substantial improvements in outcomes are now possible through the utilization of newly approved therapies, novel combinations are clearly needed. Herein we describe potentially synergistic interactions between bone stromal-targeted radiopharmaceuticals and other therapies for treatment of bone-metastatic prostate cancer. Radiation has long been known to synergize with cytotoxic chemotherapies and recent data also suggest the possibility of synergy when combining radiation and immune-based strategies. Combination therapies will be required to substantially improve survival for men with castrate-resistant metastatic prostate cancer and we hypothesize that bone-targeted radiopharmaceuticals will play an important role in this process.

  8. AR-V7 and prostate cancer: The watershed for treatment selection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarese, Chiara; Santoni, Matteo; Brunelli, Matteo; Buti, Sebastiano; Modena, Alessandra; Nabissi, Massimo; Artibani, Walter; Martignoni, Guido; Montironi, Rodolfo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Massari, Francesco

    2016-02-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays a key role in progression to metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Despite the recent progress in targeting persistent AR activity with the next-generation hormonal therapies (abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide), resistance to these agents limits therapeutic efficacy for many patients. Several explanations for response and/or resistance to abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide are emerging, but growing interest is focusing on importance of AR splice variants (AR-Vs) and in particular of AR-V7. Increasing evidences highlight the concept that variant expression could be used as a potential predictive biomarker and a therapeutic target in advanced prostate cancer. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms of treatment resistance or sensitivity can help to achieve a more effective management of mCRPC, increasing clinical outcomes and representing a promising and engaging area of prostate cancer research.

  9. PBX3 is a putative biomarker of aggressive prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramberg, Håkon; Grytli, Helene Hartvedt; Nygård, Ståle; Wang, Wanzhong; Ögren, Olov; Zhao, Sen; Løvf, Marthe; Katz, Betina; Skotheim, Rolf I; Bjartell, Anders; Eri, Lars Magne; Berge, Viktor; Svindland, Aud; Taskén, Kristin Austlid

    2016-10-15

    There is a great need to identify new and better prognostic and predictive biomarkers to stratify prostate cancer patients for optimal treatment. The aims of this study were to characterize the expression profile of pre-B cell leukemia homeobox (PBX) transcription factors in prostate cancer with an emphasis on investigating whether PBX3 harbours any prognostic value. The expression profile of PBX3 and PBX1 in prostate tissue was determined by immunohistochemical and immunoblot analysis. Furthermore, the expression of PBX3 transcript variants was analyzed by RT-PCR, NanoString Technologies®, and by analyzing RNA sequence data. The potential of PBX3 to predict prognosis, either at mRNA or protein level, was studied in four independent cohorts. PBX3 was mainly expressed in the nucleus of normal prostate basal cells, while it showed cytosolic expression in prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and cancer cells. We detected four PBX3 transcript variants in prostate tissue. Competing risk regression analysis revealed that high PBX3 expression was associated with slower progression to castration resistant prostate cancer (sub-hazard ratio (SHR) 0.18, 95% CI: 0.081-0.42, p values aggressive prostate cancer. PMID:27273830

  10. To Die or to Survive, a Fatal Question for the Destiny of Prostate Cancer Cells after Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed non-skin cancer in adult males in North America and is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality. For locally advanced or metastatic disease, androgen deprivation, through medical or surgical castration, is the primary treatment to induce prostate cancer cell death and extend patient survival. However, the vast majority of cancers progress to a castration-resistant/androgen-independent state where the cell death processes are no longer active. This review describes the main cell death processes, apoptosis, autophagy, necrosis and necroptosis, which may be activated in prostate cancers after androgen deprivation therapy as well as the molecular mechanisms through which the cancers progress to become castration resistant. In particular, the central role of persistent androgen receptor (AR)-mediated signaling and AR crosstalk with other critical cell signaling pathways, including (i) the PI3K/Akt pathway, (ii) receptor tyrosine kinases, (iii) the p38 MAPK pathway, and (iv) the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, as well as reactivation of AR by de novo synthesized androgen are discussed in this context. Understanding the molecular changes that subvert normal cell death mechanisms and thereby compromise the survival of prostate cancer patients continues to be a major challenge

  11. Copper signaling axis as a target for prostate cancer therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safi, Rachid; Nelson, Erik R; Chitneni, Satish K; Franz, Katherine J; George, Daniel J; Zalutsky, Michael R; McDonnell, Donald P

    2014-10-15

    Previously published reports indicate that serum copper levels are elevated in patients with prostate cancer and that increased copper uptake can be used as a means to image prostate tumors. It is unclear, however, to what extent copper is required for prostate cancer cell function as we observed only modest effects of chelation strategies on the growth of these cells in vitro. With the goal of exploiting prostate cancer cell proclivity for copper uptake, we developed a "conditional lethal" screen to identify compounds whose cytotoxic actions were manifested in a copper-dependent manner. Emerging from this screen was a series of dithiocarbamates, which, when complexed with copper, induced reactive oxygen species-dependent apoptosis of malignant, but not normal, prostate cells. One of the dithiocarbamates identified, disulfiram (DSF), is an FDA-approved drug that has previously yielded disappointing results in clinical trials in patients with recurrent prostate cancer. Similarly, in our studies, DSF alone had a minimal effect on the growth of prostate cancer tumors when propagated as xenografts. However, when DSF was coadministered with copper, a very dramatic inhibition of tumor growth in models of hormone-sensitive and of castrate-resistant disease was observed. Furthermore, we determined that prostate cancer cells express high levels of CTR1, the primary copper transporter, and additional chaperones that are required to maintain intracellular copper homeostasis. The expression levels of most of these proteins are increased further upon treatment of androgen receptor (AR)-positive prostate cancer cell lines with androgens. Not surprisingly, robust CTR1-dependent uptake of copper into prostate cancer cells was observed, an activity that was accentuated by activation of AR. Given these data linking AR to intracellular copper uptake, we believe that dithiocarbamate/copper complexes are likely to be effective for the treatment of patients with prostate cancer whose

  12. Castration-induced expression of caspase-1 in epithelia of accessory sex organs in male rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masao Izawa; Mitunori Kimura; Tomiko Yamada; Makoto Saji

    2001-01-01

    Aim: As an attempt to clarify the molecular basis of castration-induced apoptosis, this study was undertaken to demonstrate the expression of caspase-1 in male accessory sex organs of rats. Methods and results: cDNA of rat caspase-1 was cloned by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction from the ventral prostates. The open reading frame predicts 402 amino acids, which shows more than 91% and 63 % identity to those of mouse and human, respec tively. Northern analyses demonstrated the presence of castration-induced up-regulation of the 1.6 kb transcript in the ventral prostate and the seminal vesicles. Finally, the authors demonstrated the caspase-1 transcripts in the epithelia of these tissues by in situ hybridization analyses. Conclusion: Castration induces the expression of caspase-1 tran scripts in the epithelia of ventral prostate and seminal vesicle. These observations suggest a possible role of caspase-1 in apoptosis in male accessory sex organs.

  13. The latest advances of experimental research on targeted gene therapy for prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongliang Pan; Lianchao Jin; Xianghua Zhang

    2013-01-01

    The absence of ef ective therapies for castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) establishes the need to de-velop novel therapeutic modality, such as targeted gene therapy, which is ideal for the treatment of CRPC. But its application has been limited due to lack of favorable gene vector and the reduction of“bystander ef ect”. Consequently, scientists al over the world focus their main experimental research on the fol owing four aspects:targeted gene, vector, transfer means and comprehensive therapy. In this paper, we reviewed the latest advances of experimental research on targeted gene therapy for prostate cancer .

  14. Enzalutamide monotherapy: Phase II study results in patients with hormone-naive prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tombal, Bertrand; Borre, Michael; Rathenborg, Per Zier;

    2013-01-01

    Background: Enzalutamide (ENZA) is an oral androgen receptor inhibitor that has been approved in the US and shown to increase overall survival by 4.8 months over a placebo (HR,0.63) in patients with metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) previously treated with docetaxel (Scher et...... al, N Engl J Med 2012;367:1187). Compared with bicalutamide in nonclinical studies, enzalutamide had higher androgen receptor– binding affinity, prevented nuclear translocation, showed no DNA binding, and induced apoptosis (Tran et al, Science 2009;324:787). In contrast to previous phase II and III....../dL). Methods: This was a 25-wk, open-label, single-arm study of patients with hormone-naïve, histologically confirmed prostate cancer (all stages) requiring hormonal treatment, an ECOG PS score of 0,and a life expectancy .1 y. All patients received ENZA 160 mg/d without concomitment castration. Primary endpoint...

  15. Imaging-guided preclinical trials of vascular targeting in prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmuk, James

    Purpose: Prostate cancer is the most common non-cutaneous malignancy in American men and is characterized by dependence on androgens (Testosterone/Dihydrotestosterone) for growth and survival. Although reduction of serum testosterone levels by surgical or chemical castration transiently inhibits neoplastic growth, tumor adaptation to castrate levels of androgens results in the generation of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Progression to CRPC following androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been associated with changes in vascular morphology and increased angiogenesis. Based on this knowledge, we hypothesized that targeting tumor vasculature in combination with ADT would result in enhanced therapeutic efficacy against prostate cancer. Methods: To test this hypothesis, we examined the therapeutic activity of a tumor-vascular disrupting agent (tumor-VDA), EPC2407 (Crolibulin(TM)), alone and in combination with ADT in a murine model of prostate cancer (Myc-CaP). A non-invasive multimodality imaging approach based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), bioluminescence imaging (BLI), and ultrasound (US) was utilized to characterize tumor response to therapy and to guide preclinical trial design. Imaging results were correlated with histopathologic (H&E) and immunohistochemical (CD31) assessment as well as tumor growth inhibition and survival analyses. Results: Our imaging techniques were able to capture an acute reduction (within 24 hours) in tumor perfusion following castration and VDA monotherapy. BLI revealed onset of recurrent disease 5-7 days post castration prior to visible tumor regrowth suggestive of vascular recovery. Administration of VDA beginning 1 week post castration for 3 weeks resulted in sustained vascular suppression, inhibition of tumor regrowth, and conferred a more pronounced survival benefit compared to either monotherapy. Conclusion: The high mortality rate associated with CRPC underscores the need for investigating novel treatment

  16. Androgen mediated translational and postranslational regulation of IGFBP-2 in androgen-sensitive LNCaP human prostate cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    David J. DeGraff; Aguiar, Adam A.; Chen, Qian; Adams, Lisa K.; Williams, B. Jill; Sikes, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis is associated intimately with prostate cancer (PCa) development, growth, survival and metastasis. In particular, increased levels of IGFBP-2 expression are associated with advanced PCa, bone metastasis, and the development of castrate resistant PCa. Previously, we reported that androgen treatment decreased intracellular and extracellular IGFBP-2 in the androgen sensitive (AS) PCa cell line, LNCaP. Nonetheless, the mechanism by which androgen treatment...

  17. Pleuropulmonary and Lymph Node Progression after Docetaxel – Benefits from Treatment with Cabazitaxel in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Huerta, Angel Segura; Santos, Encarnación Reche; Campos, Gema Bruixola; Coloma, Carmen Salvador; Gómez, Oscar Niño

    2013-01-01

    Introduction To date, there are no guidelines for a rational and more favourable sequence of treatment after docetaxel. Two drugs (cabazitaxel and abiraterone) have recently been approved as second-line treatment after docetaxel failure in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), but there are no studies comparing abiraterone versus cabazitaxel. The most suitable drug is chosen based on the physician's opinion and the patient's characteristics. In patients with a good performa...

  18. TRAPEZE: a randomised controlled trial of the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of chemotherapy with zoledronic acid, strontium-89, or both, in men with bony metastatic castration-refractory prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Nicholas; Pirrie, Sarah; Pope, Ann; Barton, Darren; Andronis, Lazaros; Goranitis, Ilias; Collins, Stuart; McLaren, Duncan; O'Sullivan, Joe; Parker, Chris; Porfiri, Emilio; Staffurth, John; Stanley, Andrew; Wylie, James; Beesley, Sharon; Birtle, Alison; Brown, Janet; Chakraborti, Prabir; Russell, Martin; Billingham, Lucinda

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bony metastatic castration-refractory prostate cancer is associated with a poor prognosis and high morbidity. TRAPEZE was a two-by-two factorial randomised controlled trial of zoledronic acid (ZA) and strontium-89 (Sr-89), each combined with docetaxel. All have palliative benefits, are used to control bone symptoms and are used with docetaxel to prolong survival. ZA, approved on the basis of reducing skeletal-related events (SREs), is commonly combined with docetaxel in practice, although evidence of efficacy and cost-effectiveness is lacking. Sr-89, approved for controlling metastatic pain and reducing need for subsequent bone treatments, is generally palliatively used in patients unfit for chemotherapy. Phase II analysis confirmed the safety and feasibility of combining these agents. TRAPEZE aimed to determine the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of each agent. METHODS: Patients were randomised to receive six cycles of docetaxel plus prednisolone: alone, with ZA, with a single Sr-89 dose after cycle 6, or with both. Primary outcomes were clinical progression-free survival (CPFS: time to pain progression, SRE or death) and cost-effectiveness. Secondary outcomes were SRE-free interval (SREFI), total SREs, overall survival (OS) and quality of life (QoL). Log-rank test and Cox regression modelling were used to determine clinical effectiveness. Cost-effectiveness was assessed from the NHS perspective and expressed as cost per additional quality-adjusted life-year (QALY). An additional analysis was carried out for ZA to reflect the availability of generic ZA. RESULTS: PATIENTS: 757 randomised (median age 68.7 years; Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group scale score 0, 40%; 1, 52%; 2, 8%; prior radiotherapy, 45%); median prostate-specific antigen 143.78 ng/ml (interquartile range 50.8-353.9 ng/ml). Stratified log-rank analysis of CPFS was statistically non-significant for either agent (Sr-89, p = 0.11; ZA, p = 0.45). Cox regression

  19. Effect of local anaesthesia and/or analgesia on pain responses induced by piglet castration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyman Görel

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgical castration in male piglets is painful and methods that reduce this pain are requested. This study evaluated the effect of local anaesthesia and analgesia on vocal, physiological and behavioural responses during and after castration. A second purpose was to evaluate if herdsmen can effectively administer anaesthesia. Methods Four male piglets in each of 141 litters in five herds were randomly assigned to one of four treatments: castration without local anaesthesia or analgesia (C, controls, analgesia (M, meloxicam, local anaesthesia (L, lidocaine, or both local anaesthesia and analgesia (LM. Lidocaine (L, LM was injected at least three minutes before castration and meloxicam (M, LM was injected after castration. During castration, vocalisation was measured and resistance movements judged. Behaviour observations were carried out on the castration day and the following day. The day after castration, castration wounds were ranked, ear and skin temperature was measured, and blood samples were collected for analysis of acute phase protein Serum Amyloid A concentration (SAA. Piglets were weighed on the castration day and at three weeks of age. Sickness treatments and mortality were recorded until three weeks of age. Results Piglets castrated with lidocaine produced calls with lower intensity (p p p = 0.06, n.s. and the following day (p = 0.02. Controls had less swollen wounds compared to piglets assigned to treatments M, L and LM (p p = 0.005; p = 0.05 for C + L compared to M + LM. Ear temperature was higher (p Conclusions The study concludes that lidocaine reduced pain during castration and that meloxicam reduced pain after castration. The study also concludes that the herdsmen were able to administer local anaesthesia effectively.

  20. Sipuleucel-T in the treatment of prostate cancer: an evidence-based review of its place in therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graff JN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Julie N Graff,1,2 Erin D Chamberlain31Portland VA Medical Center, 2Knight Cancer Institute, 3Department of Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USAAbstract: Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer is the lethal form of cancer of the prostate. Five new agents that prolong survival in this group have emerged in the past 5 years, and sipuleucel-T is among them. Sipuleucel-T is the only immunotherapy shown to improve survival in prostate cancer. It is currently indicated in asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic patients, as it has never shown a direct cancer effect. This paper describes the process of creating the sipuleucel-T product from the manufacturing and patient aspects. It discusses the four placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trials (RCTs of sipuleucel-T, focusing on survival and adverse events. There are three RCTs in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, all of which showed improved overall survival without meaningful decreases in symptoms, tumor volumes, or prostate-specific antigen levels. One RCT in castration-sensitive, biochemically relapsed prostate cancer attempted to find a decrease in biochemical failure, but that endpoint was not reached. Adverse events in all four of these studies centered around cytokine release. This paper also reviews a Phase II study of sipuleucel-T given neoadjuvantly that speaks to its mechanism of action. Additionally, there is a registry study of sipuleucel-T that has been used to evaluate immunological parameters of the product in men ≥80 years of age and men who had previously been treated with palliative radiation. Attempts to find early markers of response to sipuleucel-T are described. Further ongoing studies that explore the efficacy of sipuleucel-T in combination with immune checkpoint inhibitors and second-generation hormonal therapies that are summarized. Finally, the only published economic analysis of sipuleucel-T is discussed.Keywords: prostate

  1. Angiogenesis inhibitors in the treatment of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heath Elisabeth I

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Prostate cancer remains a significant public health problem, with limited therapeutic options in the setting of castrate-resistant metastatic disease. Angiogenesis inhibition is a relatively novel antineoplastic approach, which targets the reliance of tumor growth on the formation of new blood vessels. This strategy has been used successfully in other solid tumor types, with the FDA approval of anti-angiogenic agents in breast, lung, colon, brain, and kidney cancer. The application of anti-angiogenic therapy to prostate cancer is reviewed in this article, with attention to efficacy and toxicity results from several classes of anti-angiogenic agents. Ultimately, the fate of anti-angiogenic agents in prostate cancer rests on the eagerly anticipated results of several key phase III studies.

  2. Identification of Bone-Derived Factors Conferring De Novo Therapeutic Resistance in Metastatic Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu-Chen; Lin, Song-Chang; Yu, Guoyu; Cheng, Chien-Jui; Liu, Bin; Liu, Hsuan-Chen; Hawke, David H; Parikh, Nila U; Varkaris, Andreas; Corn, Paul; Logothetis, Christopher; Satcher, Robert L; Yu-Lee, Li-Yuan; Gallick, Gary E; Lin, Sue-Hwa

    2015-11-15

    Resistance to currently available targeted therapies significantly hampers the survival of patients with prostate cancer with bone metastasis. Here we demonstrate an important resistance mechanism initiated from tumor-induced bone. Studies using an osteogenic patient-derived xenograft, MDA-PCa-118b, revealed that tumor cells resistant to cabozantinib, a Met and VEGFR-2 inhibitor, reside in a "resistance niche" adjacent to prostate cancer-induced bone. We performed secretome analysis of the conditioned medium from tumor-induced bone to identify proteins (termed "osteocrines") found within this resistance niche. In accordance with previous reports demonstrating that activation of integrin signaling pathways confers therapeutic resistance, 27 of the 90 osteocrines identified were integrin ligands. We found that following cabozantinib treatment, only tumor cells positioned adjacent to the newly formed woven bone remained viable and expressed high levels of pFAK-Y397 and pTalin-S425, mediators of integrin signaling. Accordingly, treatment of C4-2B4 cells with integrin ligands resulted in increased pFAK-Y397 expression and cell survival, whereas targeting integrins with FAK inhibitors PF-562271 or defactinib inhibited FAK phosphorylation and reduced the survival of PC3-mm2 cells. Moreover, treatment of MDA-PCa-118b tumors with PF-562271 led to decreased tumor growth, irrespective of initial tumor size. Finally, we show that upon treatment cessation, the combination of PF-562271 and cabozantinib delayed tumor recurrence in contrast to cabozantinib treatment alone. Our studies suggest that identifying paracrine de novo resistance mechanisms may significantly contribute to the generation of a broader set of potent therapeutic tools that act combinatorially to inhibit metastatic prostate cancer.

  3. Androgen and prostatic stroma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan-JieNIU; Teng-XiangMA; IuZHANG; YongXU; Rui-FaHAN; GuangSUN

    2003-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the effect of androgen on the proliferation,differentiation and regression of canine prostatic stromal cells in vivo and human stromal cells in vitro.Methods:Twenty-two dogs,including 15 normal prostate doge and 7 prostatic hyperplasia dogs,had their serum concentration of testosterone and estrodiol determined by radioimmunoassay before and after castration.The expression of androgen receptor(AR)and estrogen receptor(ER)in the prostate were analysed by immunohistochemistry and semi-quantitative RT-PCR before and after castration.Light microscopy,transmission electron microscopy and TUNEL assay were carried out successively before and after castration to evaluate the prostatic histomorphology.In vitro serum-free cell cultures from human prostatic stroma were established and exposed to dihydrotestosterone(DHT).The proliferation of the cell culture was detected by MTT assay.The expression of TGFβ bFGF,AR,and smooth muscle cell(SMC) specific proteins (myosin and/or smoothelin)were detected using immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR.The differentiation from fibroblasts to smooth muscle cells was deduced by measuring the expression of SMC specific proteins.Results:Before castration,the serum concentrations of testosterone and estrodiol were not statistically different between normal and hyperplasia groups.Following castration,the serum concentration of testerone decreased rapidly in 2 days,and the concentration of estrodiol had no significant change compared with the pre-castration data.In the prostate,AR was presented in both the epithelial and stromal cells and the AR mRNA level was higher in hyperplasia than in normal prostate tissues(P<0.05).While ER predominantly existed in the prostate stromal cells and the ER mRNA had no difference between the hyperplasia and the normal group.Within the early phase of castration(castration by the end of d

  4. Loss of exogenous androgen dependence by prostate tumor cells is associated with elevated glucuronidation potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Brenna M; Howell, Michelle E; Wei, Qin; Ma, Linlin; Romsdahl, Trevor; Loughman, Eileen G; Markham, Jonathan E; Seravalli, Javier; Barycki, Joseph J; Simpson, Melanie A

    2016-08-01

    Prostate epithelial cells control the potency and availability of androgen hormones in part by inactivation and elimination. UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (UGDH) catalyzes the NAD(+)-dependent oxidation of UDP-glucose to UDP-glucuronate, an essential precursor for androgen inactivation by the prostate glucuronidation enzymes UGT2B15 and UGT2B17. UGDH expression is androgen stimulated, which increases the production of UDP-glucuronate and fuels UGT-catalyzed glucuronidation. In this study, we compared the glucuronidation potential and its impact on androgen-mediated gene expression in an isogenic LNCaP model for androgen-dependent versus castration-resistant prostate cancer. Despite significantly lower androgen-glucuronide output, LNCaP 81 castration-resistant tumor cells expressed higher levels of UGDH, UGT2B15, and UGT2B17. However, the magnitude of androgen-activated UGDH and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) expression, as well as the androgen receptor (AR)-dependent repression of UGT2B15 and UGT2B17, was blunted several-fold in these cells. Consistent with these results, the ligand-activated binding of AR to the PSA promoter and subsequent transcriptional activation were also significantly reduced in castration-resistant cells. Analysis of the UDP-sugar pools and flux through pathways downstream of UDP-glucuronate production revealed that these glucuronidation precursor metabolites were channeled through proteoglycan and glycosaminoglycan biosynthetic pathways, leading to increased surface expression of Notch1. Knockdown of UGDH diminished Notch1 and increased glucuronide output. Overall, these results support a model in which the aberrant partitioning of UDP-glucuronate and other UDP-sugars into alternative pathways during androgen deprivation contributes to the loss of prostate tumor cell androgen sensitivity by promoting altered cell surface proteoglycan expression. PMID:27307252

  5. The Adipocyte-Derived Hormone Leptin Has Proliferative Actions on Androgen-Resistant Prostate Cancer Cells Linking Obesity to Advanced Stages of Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Raschid Hoda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Because obesity may be a risk factor for prostate cancer, we investigated proliferative effects of adipocytes-derived hormone leptin on human prostate cancer cells and assessed the role of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathway in mediating these actions. Material and Methods. Three human prostate cancer cell lines were treated with increasing doses of recombinant leptin. Cell growth was measured under serum-free conditions using a spectrophotometric assay. Further, Western blotting was applied to detect the phosphorylation of an ERK1/2, and a specific inhibitor of MAPK (PD98059; 40 μM was used. Results. In both androgen-resistant cell lines DU145 and PC-3, cell growth was dose-dependently increased by leptin after 24 hrs and 48 hrs of incubation, whereas leptin’s proliferative effects on androgen-sensitive cell line LNCaP was less pronounced. Further, leptin caused dose-dependent ERK1/2 phosphorylation in both androgen-resistant cell lines, and pretreatment of these cells with PD98059 inhibited these responses. Conclusions. Leptin may be a potential link between obesity and risk of progression of prostate cancer. Thus, studies on leptin and obesity association to prostate cancer should differentiate patients according to androgen sensitivity.

  6. Management of bone metastases in refractory prostate cancer--role of denosumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paller, Channing J; Carducci, Michael A; Philips, George K

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the problem of bone disease in prostate cancer and the evolving role of the novel agent denosumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody that inhibits the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand, in suppressing bone resorption and offering bone protection in this disease. Prostate cancer frequently metastasizes to bone, and additionally its treatment with androgen deprivation leads to accelerated bone loss resulting in clinically relevant skeletal complications associated with disabling symptoms. Among the bone-targeting therapeutic strategies investigated for the prevention of bone complications, the potent bisphosphonate zoledronic acid has been the most widely used agent for bone protection in the past decade. Denosumab is the first among a new class of osteoclast-targeting agents to show superior efficacy in several clinical scenarios in both prostate and breast cancer, as well as in osteoporosis, but the focus of this review will be on its role in prostate cancer. The safety and efficacy of denosumab versus zoledronic acid was established in a randomized trial, demonstrating a delay in skeletal-related events in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients. This study led to the approval of denosumab in the US. The chief risks of denosumab were hypocalcemia and osteonecrosis of the jaw. Denosumab was also approved for fracture risk reduction in patients on androgen-deprivation therapy for nonmetastatic prostate cancer. Although denosumab extended bone metastasis-free survival in a Phase III trial in men with castration-resistant nonmetastatic prostate cancer to a statistically significant degree, a Food and Drug Administration committee found that the effect was not sufficiently clinically meaningful for regulatory approval, and the Food and Drug Administration issued a letter concurring with the committee's recommendation. The role of denosumab in prostate cancer will continue to evolve either as monotherapy or in

  7. Androgen deprivation of prostate cancer: Leading to a therapeutic dead end.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzenwadel, Arndt; Wolf, Philipp

    2015-10-10

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is considered as the standard therapy for men with de novo or recurrent metastatic prostate cancer. ADT commonly leads to initial biochemical and clinical responses. However, several months after the beginning of treatment, tumors become castration-resistant and virtually all patients show disease progression. At this stage, tumors are no longer curable and cancer treatment options are only palliative. In this review, we describe molecular alterations in tumor cells during ADT, which lead to deregulation of different signaling pathways and castration-resistance, and how they might interfere with the clinical outcome of different second-line therapeutics. A recent breakthrough finding that early chemotherapy is associated with a significant survival benefit in metastatic hormone-sensitive disease highlights the fact that there is time for a fundamental paradigm shift in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer. Therapeutic intervention seems to be indicated before a castration-resistant stage is reached to improve therapeutic outcome and to reduce undesirable side effects. PMID:26185001

  8. Cysteine- rich secretory protein 3 (CRISP3), ERG and PTEN define a molecular subtype of prostate cancer with implication to patients’ prognosis

    OpenAIRE

    Al Bashir, Samir; Alshalalfa, Mohammed; Hegazy, Samar A.; Dolph, Michael; Donnelly, Bryan; Bismar, Tarek A.

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine- rich secretory protein 3 (CRISP3) prognostic significance in prostate cancer (PCA) has generated mixed result. Herein, we investigated and independently validated CRISP3 expression in relation to ERG and PTEN genomic aberrations and clinical outcome. CRISP3 protein expression was examined by immunohistochemistry using a cohort of patients with localized PCA (n = 215) and castration resistant PCA (CRPC) (n = 46). The Memorial Sloan Kettering (MSKCC) and Swedish cohorts were used for ...

  9. Androgen deprivation therapy sensitizes prostate cancer cells to T-cell killing through androgen receptor dependent modulation of the apoptotic pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Ardiani, Andressa; Gameiro, Sofia R.; Kwilas, Anna R.; Donahue, Renee N.; Hodge, James W.

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent advances in diagnosis and management, prostrate cancer remains the second most common cause of death from cancer in American men, after lung cancer. Failure of chemotherapies and hormone-deprivation therapies is the major cause of death in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Currently, the androgen inhibitors enzalutamide and abiraterone are approved for treatment of metastatic CRPC. Here we show for the first time that both enzalutamide and abiraterone r...

  10. New Insights into the Androgen-Targeted Therapies and Epigenetic Therapies in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit M. Godbole

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in the United States, and it is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in American men. The androgen receptor (AR, a receptor of nuclear family and a transcription factor, is the most important target in this disease. While most efforts in the clinic are currently directed at lowering levels of androgens that activate AR, resistance to androgen deprivation eventually develops. Most prostate cancer deaths are attributable to this castration-resistant form of prostate cancer (CRPC. Recent work has shed light on the importance of epigenetic events including facilitation of AR signaling by histone-modifying enzymes, posttranslational modifications of AR such as sumoylation. Herein, we provide an overview of the structure of human AR and its key structural domains that can be used as targets to develop novel antiandrogens. We also summarize recent findings about the antiandrogens and the epigenetic factors that modulate the action of AR.

  11. Detection of Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Organisms from Rectal Swabs by Use of Selective Media Prior to a Transrectal Prostate Biopsy▿

    OpenAIRE

    Liss, Michael A; Peeples, Amy N.; Peterson, Ellena M.

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis caused by fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli is a risk for patients undergoing an ultrasound-guided, transrectal prostate biopsy. A method incorporating selective broth and media was evaluated using rectal swabs obtained from 136 patients prior to a biopsy procedure. Fluoroquinolone-resistant organisms were isolated from 22% of the patients included in this study.

  12. Genomic and epigenomic alterations in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria eAschelter

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC is the second most frequently diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer deaths in man. The treatment of localized PC includes surgery or radiation therapy. In case of relapse after a definitive treatment or in patients with locally advanced or metastatic disease, the standard treatment includes the androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT. By reducing the levels of Testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT under the castration threshold, the ADT acts on the androgen receptor (AR, even if indirectly. The effects of the ADT are usually temporary and nearly all patients, initially sensitive to the androgen ablation therapy, have a disease progression after a 18-24 months medium term. This is probably due to the selection of the cancer cell clones and to their acquisition of critical somatic genome and epigenomic changes. This review aims to provide an overview about the genetic and epigenetic alterations having a crucial role in the carcinogenesis and in the disease progression toward the castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. We focused on the role of the androgen receptor, on its signaling cascade and on the clinical implications that the knowledge of these aspects would have on hormonal therapy, on its failure and its toxicity.

  13. Aberrant activation of the androgen receptor by NF-kappaB2/p52 in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadiminty, Nagalakshmi; Lou, Wei; Sun, Meng; Chen, Jun; Yue, Jiao; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Evans, Christopher P; Zhou, Qinghua; Gao, Allen C

    2010-04-15

    Prostate cancer initiation and progression are uniquely dependent on the androgen receptor (AR). Even when the cancer progresses to a castration-resistant stage, AR signaling remains active via a variety of mechanisms. In the present study, we showed that NF-kappaB/p52 can activate the AR, resulting in increased transactivation of AR-responsive genes, such as PSA and NKX3.1, in a ligand-independent manner. NF-kappaB2/p52 enhances nuclear translocation and activation of AR by interacting with its NH(2)-terminal domain and enhances the recruitment of coactivators such as p300 to the promoters of AR-dependent genes. These results were confirmed in three different prostate cancer cell lines: LAPC-4 (wild-type AR), LNCaP (mutant AR), and C4-2 (castration resistant). Transfection of p52 into LAPC-4 and LNCaP cells (which express low levels of p52) showed increased activation of the endogenous AR. Downregulation of endogenous p52 in C4-2 cells resulted in abrogation of AR constitutive activation. Comparison of the relative effects of p52 and p65 (RelA) showed that p52, but not p65, could activate the AR. Collectively, these findings, together with previous reports that the levels of NF-kappaB2/p52 are elevated in prostate cancer cells and that active NF-kappaB2/p52 promotes prostate cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo, suggest that NF-kappaB2/p52 may play a critical role in the progression of castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  14. Development of cabozantinib for the treatment of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaishampayan UN

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Ulka N VaishampayanDepartment of Oncology, Wayne State University/Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, MI, USAAbstract: Cabozantinib (XL184 is a multitargeted receptor tyrosine kinase with predominantly MET and vascular endothelial growth factor inhibition properties. It is currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of progressive metastatic medullary thyroid cancer. The agent has a convenient once-daily oral dosing schedule and has demonstrated encouraging activity in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. A Phase I/II trial demonstrated responses in soft tissue, visceral disease, and bone metastases in CRPC. An objective response rate of 5%, a stable disease rate of 75%, and a median progression-free survival of 6 months was observed. As compared with the 140 mg daily dose used in thyroid cancer, a lower dose of 60 mg daily is currently being utilized in prostate cancer studies due to the fact that toxicity could be reduced without compromising efficacy. Randomized trials are ongoing in comparison with prednisone or with mitoxantrone and prednisone in pretreated metastatic CRPC. Cabozantinib has demonstrated a unique mechanism of action and preliminary efficacy in the crowded therapeutic field of prostate cancer. Since multiple therapies have recently demonstrated overall survival benefit in metastatic CRPC, cabozantinib will likely face some challenges in clinical application. At present, in this rapidly evolving field, it is unclear what proportion of patients with prostate cancer will be eligible to receive this therapy. The cost of cabozantinib is likely to be another deterrent, especially if it remains more expensive than other oral therapies, such as abiraterone and enzalutamide. Defining the role of MET overexpression and RET mutations as biomarkers in prostate cancer may help to guide patient selection, and enrich and enhance the future applications of this targeted novel agent.Keywords: XL

  15. Loss of exogenous androgen dependence by prostate tumor cells is associated with elevated glucuronidation potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Brenna M.; Howell, Michelle E.; Wei, Qin; Ma, Linlin; Romsdahl, Trevor; Loughman, Eileen G.; Markham, Jonathan E.; Seravalli, Javier; Barycki, Joseph J.; Simpson, Melanie A.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate epithelial cells control the potency and availability of androgen hormones in part by inactivation and elimination. UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (UGDH) catalyzes the NAD+-dependent oxidation of UDP-glucose to UDP-glucuronate, an essential precursor for androgen inactivation by the prostate glucuronidation enzymes UGT2B15 and UGT2B17. UGDH expression is androgen stimulated, which increases the production of UDP-glucuronate, and fuels UGT-catalyzed glucuronidation. In this study, we compared the glucuronidation potential and its impact on androgen-mediated gene expression in an isogenic LNCaP model for androgen dependent versus castration resistant prostate cancer. Despite significantly lower androgen-glucuronide output, LNCaP 81 castration resistant tumor cells expressed higher levels of UGDH, UGT2B15, and UGT2B17. However, the magnitude of androgen-activated UGDH and PSA expression, as well as the AR-dependent repression of UGT2B15 and UGT2B17, was blunted several-fold in these cells. Consistent with these results, the ligand-activated binding of AR to the PSA promoter and subsequent transcriptional activation were also significantly reduced in castration resistant cells. Analysis of the UDP-sugar pools and flux through pathways downstream of UDP-glucuronate production revealed that these glucuronidation precursor metabolites were channeled through proteoglycan and glycosaminoglycan biosynthetic pathways, leading to increased surface expression of Notch 1. Knockdown of UGDH diminished Notch1 and increased glucuronide output. Overall, these results support a model in which the aberrant partitioning of UDP-glucuronate and other UDP-sugars into alternative pathways during androgen deprivation contributes to the loss of prostate tumor cell androgen sensitivity by promoting altered cell surface proteoglycan expression. PMID:27307252

  16. Potential use of custirsen to treat prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higano CS

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Celestia S Higano Department of Medicine, University of Washington, and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Over the last few years, five agents have demonstrated a survival benefit over a comparator treatment or placebo in the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer and have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration: sipuleucel-T (a dendritic cell immunotherapy; cabazitaxel; abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide (both hormonal agents; and radium 223 (an alpha emitter. The development of these agents pivoted on whether patients had been treated with docetaxel, which remains the first-line chemotherapy of choice. To date, no combination of docetaxel and another active agent has demonstrated superiority to docetaxel alone despite numerous Phase III trials. Clusterin is a cytoprotective chaperone protein that is upregulated in response to various anticancer therapies. When overexpressed, clusterin interferes with apoptotic signaling, thereby promoting cell survival and conferring broad-spectrum resistance in cancer cell lines. Custirsen (OGX-011 is a second-generation 2´-methoxyethyl modified phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotide that inhibits expression of clusterin. This review presents the preclinical and clinical data that provided the rationale for the combination of custirsen with chemotherapy in ongoing Phase III trials. Keywords: castration-resistant prostate cancer, clusterin, custirsen, OGX-011, antisense, OGX-427, apoptosis

  17. Is there a role for antiandrogen monotherapy in patients with metastatic prostate cancer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaisary, A V; Iversen, P; Tyrrell, C J;

    2001-01-01

    Castration is the most widely used form of androgen ablation employed in the treatment of metastatic (M1) prostate cancer. Non-steroidal antiandrogen monotherapy is a potential alternative treatment option for men for whom castration is unacceptable or not indicated. Of the three non...... with a prostate specific antigen (PSA) level 400 ng/ml) may decide that quality of life and symptomatic benefits outweigh the slight survival disadvantage seen in clinical trials and opt for bicalutamide monotherapy as an alternative to castration.Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases (2001) 4, 196-203....

  18. [Staging Based Strategies and Practice for Prostate Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi-qiang; Wang, Shu-sheng; Bai, Zun-guang; Wang, Zhao-hui; Lv, Li-guo; Gu, Chi-ming; Xiang, Song-tao; Dai, Rui-xin; Zhu, Shou-lun

    2016-06-01

    Authors raised that staging based strategies and practice of integrative medicine (IM) by combining syndrome typing and disease identification, and choosing suitable measures in accordance with different persons and seasonal conditions after more than ten years' clinical practice and researches. Radical operation as prior (as evil eliminating) and strengthening vital qi in perioerative period are best strategy for promoting rapid rehabilitation of early stage prostate cancer patients. Strengthening body resistance to eliminate evil was used in treating advanced prostate cancer patients. For example, a comprehensive treatment program for hormone-dependent patients was combined with endocrinotherapy and Chinese herbs for synergisic efficacy-enhancing actions. In this way, these patients' quality of life (QOL) were improved and time to castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) was delayed, even some patients were clinically cured. There are lack of effective medicines and methods for CRPC patients. Greatly tonifying original qi is mainly used for improving their clinical symptoms and prolonging survivals. Practice has proved staging based strategies and practice of IM has favorable advantages in treating prostate cancer, especially showing prospect in prolonging survival and postponing progression of advanced prostate cancer patients. Besides, it also could provide beneficial considerations and inspiration for combination of syndrome typing and disease identification. PMID:27491237

  19. Androgen receptor: structure, role in prostate cancer and drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, M H Eileen; Li, Jun; Xu, H Eric; Melcher, Karsten; Yong, Eu-leong

    2015-01-01

    Androgens and androgen receptors (AR) play a pivotal role in expression of the male phenotype. Several diseases, such as androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) and prostate cancer, are associated with alterations in AR functions. Indeed, androgen blockade by drugs that prevent the production of androgens and/or block the action of the AR inhibits prostate cancer growth. However, resistance to these drugs often occurs after 2-3 years as the patients develop castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In CRPC, a functional AR remains a key regulator. Early studies focused on the functional domains of the AR and its crucial role in the pathology. The elucidation of the structures of the AR DNA binding domain (DBD) and ligand binding domain (LBD) provides a new framework for understanding the functions of this receptor and leads to the development of rational drug design for the treatment of prostate cancer. An overview of androgen receptor structure and activity, its actions in prostate cancer, and how structural information and high-throughput screening have been or can be used for drug discovery are provided herein. PMID:24909511

  20. Prolactin-induced prostate tumorigenesis links sustained Stat5 signaling with the amplification of basal/stem cells and emergence of putative luminal progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackmann-Sala, Lucila; Chiche, Aurélie; Mosquera-Garrote, Nerea; Boutillon, Florence; Cordier, Corinne; Pourmir, Ivan; Pascual-Mathey, Luz; Kessal, Karima; Pigat, Natascha; Camparo, Philippe; Goffin, Vincent

    2014-11-01

    Current androgen ablation therapies for prostate cancer are initially successful, but the frequent development of castration resistance urges the generation of alternative therapies and represents an important health concern. Prolactin/signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) signaling is emerging as a putative target for alternative treatment for prostate cancer. However, mechanistic data for its role in development or progression of prostate tumors are scarce. In vivo mouse studies found that local prolactin induced the amplification of prostate epithelial basal/stem cells. Because these cells are proposed cells of origin for prostate cancer and disease recurrence, we looked further into this amplification. Our results indicated that sustained Stat5 activation was associated with the occurrence of abnormal basal/stem cell clusters in prostate epithelium of prostate-specific prolactin-transgenic mice. Analysis of epithelial areas containing these clusters found high proliferation, Stat5 activation, and expression of stem cell antigen 1. Furthermore, enhanced prolactin signaling also led to amplification of a luminal cell population that was positive for stem cell antigen 1. These cells may originate from amplified basal/stem cells and might represent important progenitors for tumor development in prostate epithelium. These data provide a deeper understanding of the initial stages of prostate tumorigenesis induced by prolactin to help determine whether this hormone or its downstream messengers could be useful targets for prostate cancer treatment in the future.

  1. The genetics of neuroendocrine prostate cancers: a review of current and emerging candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ather MH

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available M Hammad Ather,1 Tahmeena Siddiqui21Dept of Surgery, Aga Khan University, 2Karachi Medical and Dental College, Karachi, PakistanAbstract: Prostate cancer (PC displays a strong familial link and genetic factors; genes regulating inflammation may have a pivotal role in the disease. Epigenetic changes control chromosomal integrity, gene functions, and, ultimately, carcinogenesis. The most widely studied epigenetic event in PC is aberrant DNA methylation (hypo- and hypermethylation; besides this, chromatin remodeling and micro RNA (miRNA are other studied alterations in PC. These all lead to genomic instability and inappropriate gene expression. Causative dysfunction of histone modifying enzymes results in generic and locus-specific changes in chromatin remodeling. miRNA deregulation also contributes to prostate carcinogenesis, including interference with androgen-receptor signaling and apoptosis. These epigenetic alterations have the potential to act as biomarkers for PC for screening and diagnosis as well as prognosis and follow-up. The variable biological potential for a newly diagnosed PC is one of the biggest challenges. The other major clinical problem is in the management of castration-resistant PC. Neuroendocrine (NE differentiation is one of the putative explanations for the development of castration-resistant disease. Most advanced and poorly differentiated cancer does not produce prostate-specific antigen (PSA in response to disease progression. Circulating and tissue biomarkers like chromogranin A (CgA thus become important tools. There is the potential to use various genetic and epigenetic alterations and NE differentiation as therapeutic targets in the management of PC. However, we are still some distance from developing clinically effective tools. Valuable insights into the nature of NE differentiation in PC have been gained in the last decades, but additional understanding of its pathogenetic mechanisms is needed. This will help in

  2. Surgical castration, coercion and ethics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, Jesper; Petersen, Thomas Søbirk

    2014-01-01

    John McMillan's detailed ethical analysis concerning the use of surgical castration of sex offenders in the Czech Republic and Germany is mainly devoted to considerations of coercion.1 This is not surprising. When castration is offered as an option to offenders and, at the same time, constitutes...... the only means by which these offenders are likely to be released from prison, it is reasonable—and close to the heart of modern medical ethics—to consider whether the offer involves some kind of coercion. However, despite McMillan's seemingly careful consideration of this question, it appears to us...

  3. β-catenin is required for prostate development and cooperates with Pten loss to drive invasive carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey C Francis

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is a major cause of male death in the Western world, but few frequent genetic alterations that drive prostate cancer initiation and progression have been identified. β-Catenin is essential for many developmental processes and has been implicated in tumorigenesis in many tissues, including prostate cancer. However, expression studies on human prostate cancer samples are unclear on the role this protein plays in this disease. We have used in vivo genetic studies in the embryo and adult to extend our understanding of the role of β-Catenin in the normal and neoplastic prostate. Our gene deletion analysis revealed that prostate epithelial β-Catenin is required for embryonic prostate growth and branching but is dispensable in the normal adult organ. During development, β-Catenin controls the number of progenitors in the epithelial buds and regulates a discrete network of genes, including c-Myc and Nkx3.1. Deletion of β-Catenin in a Pten deleted model of castration-resistant prostate cancer demonstrated it is dispensable for disease progression in this setting. Complementary overexpression experiments, through in vivo protein stabilization, showed that β-Catenin promotes the formation of squamous epithelia during prostate development, even in the absence of androgens. β-Catenin overexpression in combination with Pten loss was able to drive progression to invasive carcinoma together with squamous metaplasia. These studies demonstrate that β-Catenin is essential for prostate development and that an inherent property of high levels of this protein in prostate epithelia is to drive squamous fate differentiation. In addition, they show that β-Catenin overexpression can promote invasive prostate cancer in a clinically relevant model of this disease. These data provide novel information on cancer progression pathways that give rise to lethal prostate disease in humans.

  4. Galeterone for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer: the evidence to date

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastos DA

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Diogo A Bastos,1 Emmanuel S Antonarakis2 1Department of Oncology, Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Sao Paulo, Brazil; 2Department of Oncology and Urology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Major advances have been achieved recently in the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, resulting in significant improvements in quality of life and survival with the use of several new agents, including the next-generation androgen receptor (AR-targeted drugs abiraterone and enzalutamide. However, virtually all patients will eventually progress on these therapies and most will ultimately die of treatment-refractory metastatic disease. Recently, several mechanisms of resistance to AR-directed therapies have been uncovered, including the AR splice variant 7 (AR-V7, which is a ligand-independent constitutionally-active form of the AR that has been associated with poor outcomes to abiraterone and enzalutamide. Galeterone, a potent anti-androgen with three modes of action (CYP17 lyase inhibition, AR antagonism, and AR degradation, is a novel agent under clinical development that could potentially target both full-length AR and aberrant AR, including AR-V7. In this manuscript, we will first discuss the biological mechanisms of action of galeterone and then review the safety and efficacy data from Phase I and II clinical studies of galeterone in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. A Phase III study of galeterone (compared against enzalutamide in AR-V7-positive patients is currently underway, and represents the first pivotal trial using a biomarker-selection design in this disease. Keywords: galeterone, AR splice variants, AR-V7, castration-resistant prostate cancer

  5. CYP17 inhibitors in prostate cancer: latest evidence and clinical potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex, Anitha B; Pal, Sumanta K; Agarwal, Neeraj

    2016-07-01

    Since androgen signaling plays a pivotal role in the proliferation and metastasis of prostate cancer, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) or castration therapy is considered the backbone of treatment for newly diagnosed metastatic prostate cancer. However, almost all men experience disease progression on ADT to a state known as metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), which continues to be driven by intratumoral androgen synthesis or androgen receptor signaling. Hence, the extragonadal ablation of androgen synthesis from pregnane precursors holds much promise. An inhibitor of cytochrome P450 17α-hydroxy/17,20-lyase (CYP17) enzymes, abiraterone acetate, has already been approved for men with mCRPC. Newer CYP17 inhibitors continue to be developed which are either more selective or have concomitant inhibitory actions on AR signaling. These include VT-464, orteronel, and galeterone. Herein, we focus on the molecular mechanism of action, efficacy, latest evidence, and clinical potential of CYP17 inhibitors in prostate cancer. PMID:27482286

  6. Abiraterone acetate for prostate cancer: a new era of hormonal therapies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emmanuel S Antonarakis

    2011-01-01

    @@ Therapies targeting the androgen receptor (AR) axis have constituted the Holy Grail in the management of advanced prostate cancer for seven decades.1 These hormonal therapies have traditionally taken two main forms: those that suppress gonadal androgen synthesis (e.g.,the gonadotropin releasing hormone agonists/antagonists,such as leuprolide),and those that inhibit the AR directly (e.g.,the anti-androgens,such asbicalutamide).However,although the vast majority of patients with prostate cancer initially respond favorably to androgen-ablative therapies (manifested by tumor regressions and symptomatic improvements),all patients will eventually develop further disease progression after a median of 18-24 months.This transformed disease state,known as castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC),is invariably fatal.

  7. Comparison of the effects of surgical and drug castration on the psychology and quality of life in patients with prostate cancer%手术去势与药物去势对前列腺癌患者心理及生活质量影响的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周小波; 叶志弘; 郭丹红; 朱双爱; 蒋燕; 傅素靓; 张璟; 戚海琴; 刘娟

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of surgical castration and drug castration (androgen deprivation therapy) on the psychology and quality of life in patients with prostate cancer. Methods The symptom self rating scale (SCL-90), QLQ-C30 scale and QLQ-PR25 sub scale were used to investigate 102 cases of prostate cancer who accepted surgical cas-tration and 86 cases of prostate cancer who received androgen deprivation therapy before treatment and after treatment for 6 months and 12 months. Results The SCL-90 survey showed that the somatization, compulsion, interpersonal relation-ships, anxiety and psychotic after treatment for 6 months and 12 months of patients treated with two different therapies were significantly improved (t=2.87, 3.91, 3.49, 4.17, 1.99, 3.01, 3.95, 3.74, 4.28, 4.58; 2.09, 2.21, 2.17, 1.99, 3.96, 1.99, 2.13, 2.08, 1.99, 3.73,P<0.05). The two treatments relieved pain and improved urination after treatment for 6 and 12 months (t=3.76,4.51,3.51,4.58; 2.41,4.37,2.53,4.63,P<0.05), especially improving sexual function after treatment for 6 months(t=3.57,3.37,P<0.05). The treatment of medical castration had different degrees of improvement on sexual function, and surgical treatment caused permanent loss of sexual function. Conclusion Two kinds of treatment programs bring different psychological problems so that lower the quality of life. But the effect of medical castration on the quality of life of the patients is reversible.%目的 研究手术去势和药物去势即雄激素阻断治疗对前列腺癌患者心理及生活质量的影响.方法 采用症状自评量表(SCL-90)、癌症患者生命质量测定量表(QLQ-C30)及前列腺癌患者生活质量子量表(QLQ-PR25)对102例接受手术去势治疗和86例接受雄激素阻断治疗的前列腺癌患者,分别在治疗前、治疗后6个月及治疗后12个月的心理及生活质量状况进行评价. 结果 SCL-90显示两种治疗方法组在治疗6月后和治疗12月后躯体化、强迫

  8. New serum biomarkers for prostate cancer diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kailash C Chadha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA is currently used as a biomarker for diagnosis and management of prostate cancer (CaP. However, PSA typically lacks the sensitivity and specificity desired of a diagnostic marker. Objective: The goal of this study was to identify an additional biomarker or a panel of biomarkers that is more sensitive and specific than PSA in differentiating benign versus malignant prostate disease and/or localized CaP versus metastatic CaP. Methods: Concurrent measurements of circulating interleukin-8 (IL-8, Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and soluble tumor necrosis factor-α receptors 1 (sTNFR1 were obtained from four groups of men: (1 Controls (2 with elevated prostate-specific antigen with a negative prostate biopsy (elPSA_negBx (3 with clinically localized CaP and (4 with castration resistant prostate cancer. Results: TNF-α Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC = 0.93 and sTNFR1 (AUC = 0.97 were strong predictors of elPSA_negBx (vs. CaP. The best predictor of elPSA_negBx vs CaP was sTNFR1 and IL-8 combined (AUC = 0.997. The strongest single predictors of localized versus metastatic CaP were TNF-α (AUC = 0.992 and PSA (AUC = 0.963 levels. Conclusions: The specificity and sensitivity of a PSA-based CaP diagnosis can be significantly enhanced by concurrent serum measurements of IL-8, TNF-α and sTNFR1. In view of the concerns about the ability of PSA to distinguish clinically relevant CaP from indolent disease, assessment of these biomarkers in the larger cohort is warranted.

  9. New serum biomarkers for prostate cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadha, Kailash C.; Miller, Austin; Nair, Bindukumar B.; Schwartz, Stanley A.; Trump, Donald L.; Underwood, Willie

    2014-01-01

    Background Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is currently used as a biomarker for diagnosis and management of prostate cancer (CaP). However, PSA typically lacks the sensitivity and specificity desired of a diagnostic marker. Objective The goal of this study was to identify an additional biomarker or a panel of biomarkers that is more sensitive and specific than PSA in differentiating benign versus malignant prostate disease and/or localized CaP versus metastatic CaP. Methods Concurrent measurements of circulating interleukin-8 (IL-8), Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and soluble tumor necrosis factor-α receptors 1 (sTNFR1) were obtained from four groups of men: (1) Controls (2) with elevated prostate-specific antigen with a negative prostate biopsy (elPSA_negBx) (3) with clinically localized CaP and (4) with castration resistant prostate cancer. Results TNF-α Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC = 0.93) and sTNFR1 (AUC = 0.97) were strong predictors of elPSA_negBx (vs. CaP). The best predictor of elPSA_negBx vs CaP was sTNFR1 and IL-8 combined (AUC = 0.997). The strongest single predictors of localized versus metastatic CaP were TNF-α (AUC = 0.992) and PSA (AUC = 0.963) levels. Conclusions The specificity and sensitivity of a PSA-based CaP diagnosis can be significantly enhanced by concurrent serum measurements of IL-8, TNF-α and sTNFR1. In view of the concerns about the ability of PSA to distinguish clinically relevant CaP from indolent disease, assessment of these biomarkers in the larger cohort is warranted. PMID:25593898

  10. The SWI/SNF ATPase Brm is a gatekeeper of proliferative control in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hui; Powers, Nathan; Saini, Nitin; Comstock, Clay E S; Sharma, Ankur; Weaver, Katherine; Revelo, Monica P; Gerald, William; Williams, Erin; Jessen, Walter J; Aronow, Bruce J; Rosson, Gary; Weissman, Bernard; Muchardt, Christian; Yaniv, Moshe; Knudsen, Karen E

    2008-12-15

    Factors that drive prostate cancer progression remain poorly defined, thus hindering the development of new therapeutic strategies. Disseminated tumors are treated through regimens that ablate androgen signaling, as prostate cancer cells require androgen for growth and survival. However, recurrent, incurable tumors that have bypassed the androgen requirement ultimately arise. This study reveals that the Brm ATPase, a component of selected SWI/SNF complexes, has significant antiproliferative functions in the prostate that protect against these transitions. First, we show that targeted ablation of Brm is causative for the development of prostatic hyperplasia in mice. Second, in vivo challenge revealed that Brm-/- epithelia acquire the capacity for lobe-specific, castration-resistant cellular proliferation. Third, investigation of human specimens revealed that Brm mRNA and protein levels are attenuated in prostate cancer. Fourth, Brm down-regulation was associated with an increased proliferative index, consistent with the mouse model. Lastly, gene expression profiling showed that Brm loss alters factors upstream of E2F1; this was confirmed in murine models, wherein Brm loss induced E2F1 deregulation in a tissue-specific manner. Combined, these data identify Brm as a major effector of serum androgen-induced proliferation in the prostate that is disrupted in human disease, and indicate that loss of Brm confers a proliferative advantage in prostate cancer. PMID:19074882

  11. Long noncoding RNAs in prostate cancer: overview and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Bhavna; Feng, Felix Y

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cause of cancer mortality among men in the United States. While many prostate cancers are indolent, an important subset of patients experiences disease recurrence after conventional therapy and progresses to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), which is currently incurable. Thus, there is a critical need to identify biomarkers that will distinguish indolent from aggressive disease, as well as novel therapeutic targets for the prevention or treatment of CRPC. In recent years, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as an important class of biological molecules. LncRNAs are polyadenylated RNA species that share many similarities with protein-coding genes despite the fact that they are noncoding (not translated into proteins). They are usually transcribed by RNA polymerase II and exhibit the same epigenetic signatures as protein-coding genes. LncRNAs have also been implicated in the development and progression of variety of cancers, including prostate cancer. While a large number of lncRNAs exhibit tissue- and cancer-specific expression, their utility as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers is just starting to be explored. In this review, we highlight recent findings on the functional role and molecular mechanisms of lncRNAs in the progression of prostate cancer and evaluate their use as potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  12. Long noncoding RNAs in prostate cancer: overview and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Bhavna; Feng, Felix Y

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cause of cancer mortality among men in the United States. While many prostate cancers are indolent, an important subset of patients experiences disease recurrence after conventional therapy and progresses to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), which is currently incurable. Thus, there is a critical need to identify biomarkers that will distinguish indolent from aggressive disease, as well as novel therapeutic targets for the prevention or treatment of CRPC. In recent years, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as an important class of biological molecules. LncRNAs are polyadenylated RNA species that share many similarities with protein-coding genes despite the fact that they are noncoding (not translated into proteins). They are usually transcribed by RNA polymerase II and exhibit the same epigenetic signatures as protein-coding genes. LncRNAs have also been implicated in the development and progression of variety of cancers, including prostate cancer. While a large number of lncRNAs exhibit tissue- and cancer-specific expression, their utility as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers is just starting to be explored. In this review, we highlight recent findings on the functional role and molecular mechanisms of lncRNAs in the progression of prostate cancer and evaluate their use as potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:27072044

  13. Treatment and prevention of bone complications from prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Richard J; Saylor, Philip J; Smith, Matthew R

    2011-01-01

    Bone metastases and skeletal complications are major causes of morbidity in prostate cancer patients. Despite the osteoblastic appearance of bone metastases on imaging studies, patients have elevated serum and urinary markers of bone resorption, indicative of high osteoclast activity. Increased osteoclast activity is independently associated with higher risk of subsequent skeletal complications, disease progression, and death. Osteoclast-targeted therapies are therefore a rational approach to reduction of risk for disease-related skeletal complications, bone metastases, and treatment-related fractures. This review focuses on recent advances in osteoclast-targeted therapy in prostate cancer. Bisphosphonates have been extensively studied in men with prostate cancer. Zoledronic acid significantly decreased the risk of skeletal complications in men with castration-resistant prostate cancer and bone metastases, and it is FDA-approved for this indication. Denosumab is a human monoclonal antibody that binds and inactivates RANKL, a critical mediator of osteoclast differentiation, activation, and survival. Recent global phase 3 clinic trials demonstrated an emerging role for denosumab in the treatment of prostate cancer bone metastases and prevention of fractures associated with androgen deprivation therapy.

  14. Optimization of Invasion-Specific Effects of Betulin Derivatives on Prostate Cancer Cells through Lead Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ville Härmä

    Full Text Available The anti-invasive and anti-proliferative effects of betulins and abietane derivatives was systematically tested using an organotypic model system of advanced, castration-resistant prostate cancers. A preliminary screen of the initial set of 93 compounds was performed in two-dimensional (2D growth conditions using non-transformed prostate epithelial cells (EP156T, an androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cell line (LNCaP, and the castration-resistant, highly invasive cell line PC-3. The 25 most promising compounds were all betulin derivatives. These were selected for a focused secondary screen in three-dimensional (3D growth conditions, with the goal to identify the most effective and specific anti-invasive compounds. Additional sensitivity and cytotoxicity tests were then performed using an extended cell line panel. The effects of these compounds on cell cycle progression, mitosis, proliferation and unspecific cytotoxicity, versus their ability to specifically interfere with cell motility and tumor cell invasion was addressed. To identify potential mechanisms of action and likely compound targets, multiplex profiling of compound effects on a panel of 43 human protein kinases was performed. These target de-convolution studies, combined with the phenotypic analyses of multicellular organoids in 3D models, revealed specific inhibition of AKT signaling linked to effects on the organization of the actin cytoskeleton as the most likely driver of altered cell morphology and motility.

  15. CSF1 Receptor Targeting In Prostate Cancer Reverses Macrophage-Mediated Resistance To Androgen Blockade Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escamilla, Jemima; Schokrpur, Shiruyeh; Liu, Connie; Priceman, Saul J.; Moughon, Diana; Jiang, Ziyue; Pouliot, Frederic; Magyar, Clara; Sung, James L.; Xu, Jingying; Deng, Gang; West, Brian L.; Bollag, Gideon; Fradet, Yves; Lacombe, Louis; Jung, Michael E.; Huang, Jiaoti; Wu, Lily

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) promote cancer progression and therapeutic resistance by enhancing angiogenesis, matrix-remodeling and immunosuppression. In this study prostate cancer (PCa) under androgen blockade therapy (ABT) was investigated, demonstrating that TAMs contribute to PCa disease recurrence through paracrine signaling processes. ABT induced the tumor cells to express macrophage colony-stimulating factor 1 (M-CSF-1 or CSF-1) and other cytokines that recruit and modulate macrophages, causing a significant increase in TAM infiltration. Inhibitors of CSF-1 signaling through its receptor, CSF-1R, were tested in combination with ABT, demonstrating that blockade of TAM influx in this setting disrupts tumor promotion and sustains a more durable therapeutic response compared to ABT alone. PMID:25736687

  16. Multidrug resistance protein 1 localization in lipid raft domains and prostasomes in prostate cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomà A

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Alba Gomà,1,* Roser Mir,1–3,* Fina Martínez-Soler,1,4 Avelina Tortosa,4 August Vidal,5,6 Enric Condom,5,6 Ricardo Pérez–Tomás,6 Pepita Giménez-Bonafé1 1Departament de Ciències Fisiològiques II, Faculty of Medicine, Campus of Health Sciences of Bellvitge, Universitat de Barcelona, IDIBELL, Barcelona, Spain; 2División de Investigación Básica, Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, México DF, Mexico; 3Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM, México DF, Mexico; 4Department of Basic Nursing, School of Nursing of the Health Campus of Bellvitge, Universitat de Barcelona, 5Department of Pathology, Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, 6Department of Pathology and Experimental Therapeutics, Universitat de Barcelona, IDIBELL, Barcelona, Spain*These authors contributed equally to this work Background: One of the problems in prostate cancer (CaP treatment is the appearance of the multidrug resistance phenotype, in which ATP-binding cassette transporters such as multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1 play a role. Different localizations of the transporter have been reported, some of them related to the chemoresistant phenotype.Aim: This study aimed to compare the localization of MRP1 in three prostate cell lines (normal, androgen-sensitive, and androgen-independent in order to understand its possible role in CaP chemoresistance.Methods: MRP1 and caveolae protein markers were detected using confocal microscopy, performing colocalization techniques. Lipid raft isolation made it possible to detect these proteins by Western blot analysis. Caveolae and prostasomes were identified by electron microscopy.Results: We show that MRP1 is found in lipid raft fractions of tumor cells and that the number of caveolae increases with malignancy acquisition. MRP1 is found not only in the plasma membrane associated with lipid rafts but also in cytoplasmic accumulations colocalizing with the prostasome markers Caveolin-1 and CD59

  17. The genetics of neuroendocrine prostate cancers: a review of current and emerging candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ather, M Hammad; Siddiqui, Tahmeena

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) displays a strong familial link and genetic factors; genes regulating inflammation may have a pivotal role in the disease. Epigenetic changes control chromosomal integrity, gene functions, and, ultimately, carcinogenesis. The most widely studied epigenetic event in PC is aberrant DNA methylation (hypo- and hypermethylation); besides this, chromatin remodeling and micro RNA (miRNA) are other studied alterations in PC. These all lead to genomic instability and inappropriate gene expression. Causative dysfunction of histone modifying enzymes results in generic and locus-specific changes in chromatin remodeling. miRNA deregulation also contributes to prostate carcinogenesis, including interference with androgen-receptor signaling and apoptosis. These epigenetic alterations have the potential to act as biomarkers for PC for screening and diagnosis as well as prognosis and follow-up. The variable biological potential for a newly diagnosed PC is one of the biggest challenges. The other major clinical problem is in the management of castration-resistant PC. Neuroendocrine (NE) differentiation is one of the putative explanations for the development of castration-resistant disease. Most advanced and poorly differentiated cancer does not produce prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in response to disease progression. Circulating and tissue biomarkers like chromogranin A (CgA) thus become important tools. There is the potential to use various genetic and epigenetic alterations and NE differentiation as therapeutic targets in the management of PC. However, we are still some distance from developing clinically effective tools. Valuable insights into the nature of NE differentiation in PC have been gained in the last decades, but additional understanding of its pathogenetic mechanisms is needed. This will help in devising novel therapeutic strategies to develop targeted therapies. CgA has the potential to become an important marker of advanced castration-resistant

  18. [Advancement in the treatment against prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Nobuo; Abe, Takashige; Maruyama, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    With the advancement of basic science and medical technology, the treatment against prostate cancer (PC) has dramatically changed. Although the introduction of robotic radical prostatectomy and particle therapies in patients with early stage PC is of much note, the issues on the over-treatment and treatment cost should be heeded. From these points, active surveillance has been an important strategy in these patients. In patients with metastatic hormone-sensitive PC, especially high volume metastases, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) with docetaxel has been reported to prolong overall survival compared with ADT alone. Lastly, several novel therapeutic agents have been investigated and shown to be favorable outcomes in patients with castration resistant PC. This review focuses on the recent advancement in the treatment against PCs. PMID:26793875

  19. Oncolytic adenovirus-mediated therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Katrina; Halldén, Gunnel

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death and morbidity in men in the Western world. Tumor progression is dependent on functioning androgen receptor signaling, and initial administration of antiandrogens and hormone therapy (androgen-deprivation therapy) prevent growth and spread. Tumors frequently develop escape mechanisms to androgen-deprivation therapy and progress to castration-resistant late-stage metastatic disease that, in turn, inevitably leads to resistance to all current therapeutics, including chemotherapy. In spite of the recent development of more effective inhibitors of androgen-androgen receptor signaling such as enzalutamide and abiraterone, patient survival benefits are still limited. Oncolytic adenoviruses have proven efficacy in prostate cancer cells and cause regression of tumors in preclinical models of numerous drug-resistant cancers. Data from clinical trials demonstrate that adenoviral mutants have limited toxicity to normal tissues and are safe when administered to patients with various solid cancers, including prostate cancer. While efficacy in response to adenovirus administration alone is marginal, findings from early-phase trials targeting local-ized and metastatic prostate cancer suggest improved efficacy in combination with cytotoxic drugs and radiation therapy. Here, we review recent progress in the development of multimodal oncolytic adenoviruses as biological therapeutics to improve on tumor elimination in prostate cancer patients. These optimized mutants target cancer cells by several mechanisms including viral lysis and by expression of cytotoxic transgenes and immune-stimulatory factors that activate the host immune system to destroy both infected and noninfected prostate cancer cells. Additional modifications of the viral capsid proteins may support future systemic delivery of oncolytic adenoviruses. PMID:27579296

  20. Oncolytic adenovirus-mediated therapy for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Katrina; Halldén, Gunnel

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death and morbidity in men in the Western world. Tumor progression is dependent on functioning androgen receptor signaling, and initial administration of antiandrogens and hormone therapy (androgen-deprivation therapy) prevent growth and spread. Tumors frequently develop escape mechanisms to androgen-deprivation therapy and progress to castration-resistant late-stage metastatic disease that, in turn, inevitably leads to resistance to all current therapeutics, including chemotherapy. In spite of the recent development of more effective inhibitors of androgen–androgen receptor signaling such as enzalutamide and abiraterone, patient survival benefits are still limited. Oncolytic adenoviruses have proven efficacy in prostate cancer cells and cause regression of tumors in preclinical models of numerous drug-resistant cancers. Data from clinical trials demonstrate that adenoviral mutants have limited toxicity to normal tissues and are safe when administered to patients with various solid cancers, including prostate cancer. While efficacy in response to adenovirus administration alone is marginal, findings from early-phase trials targeting local-ized and metastatic prostate cancer suggest improved efficacy in combination with cytotoxic drugs and radiation therapy. Here, we review recent progress in the development of multimodal oncolytic adenoviruses as biological therapeutics to improve on tumor elimination in prostate cancer patients. These optimized mutants target cancer cells by several mechanisms including viral lysis and by expression of cytotoxic transgenes and immune-stimulatory factors that activate the host immune system to destroy both infected and noninfected prostate cancer cells. Additional modifications of the viral capsid proteins may support future systemic delivery of oncolytic adenoviruses. PMID:27579296

  1. Why Chemotherapy Should be Given Early for Men with Metastatic Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Aya, Leonel F; Hussain, Maha

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer (mHSPC) is an incurable disease, and despite a high response rate to androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT), outcomes have not significantly changed for many decades. Earlier attempts at multitargeted strategies with the addition of cytotoxic chemotherapy to ADT did not affect survival. As more effective therapies are emerging, including cytotoxic therapy for patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), there is increasing interest for testing these drugs earlier in the disease course. The premise is that agents with clinical benefit in advanced mCRPC may have a better effect if used preemptively before the development of significant resistance and to attack earlier de novo androgen resistant/independent clones. The recent results of the phase III clinical trial E3805 investigating ADT with or without docetaxel in mHSPC provide compelling support for this strategy. Docetaxel combined with ADT significantly improved overall survival from 44 to 57.6 months (p=0.0003), particularly in patients with high-volume disease (from 32.2 to 49.2 months; p=0.0006). Longer follow-up is needed to assess the effect on patients with low disease burden. Further studies are needed to further maximize the antitumor effect in patients with mHSPC and to investigate the effects of advancing therapy to this disease setting on the efficacy of respective agents in the castration-resistant setting. PMID:25993184

  2. Catalytic inhibitors of DNA topoisomerase II suppress the androgen receptor signaling and prostate cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haolong; Xie, Ning; Gleave, Martin E; Dong, Xuesen

    2015-08-21

    Although the new generation of androgen receptor (AR) antagonists like enzalutamide (ENZ) prolong survival of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), AR-driven tumors eventually recur indicating that additional therapies are required to fully block AR function. Since DNA topoisomerase II (Topo II) was demonstrated to be essential for AR to initiate gene transcription, this study tested whether catalytic inhibitors of Topo II can block AR signaling and suppress ENZ-resistant CRPC growth. Using multiple prostate cancer cell lines, we showed that catalytic Topo II inhibitors, ICRF187 and ICRF193 inhibited transcription activities of the wild-type AR, mutant ARs (F876L and W741C) and the AR-V7 splice variant. ICRF187 and ICRF193 decreased AR recruitment to target promoters and reduced AR nuclear localization. Both ICRF187 and ICRF193 also inhibited cell proliferation and delayed cell cycling at the G2/M phase. ICRF187 inhibited tumor growth of castration-resistant LNCaP and 22RV1 xenografts as well as ENZ-resistant MR49F xenografts. We conclude that catalytic Topo II inhibitors can block AR signaling and inhibit tumor growth of CRPC xenografts, identifying a potential co-targeting approach using these inhibitors in combination with AR pathway inhibitors in CRPC.

  3. Improved outcomes in elderly patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer treated with the androgen receptor inhibitor enzalutamide: results from the phase III AFFIRM trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sternberg, C.N.; Bono, J.S. de; Chi, K.N.; Fizazi, K.; Mulders, P.; Cerbone, L.; Hirmand, M.; Forer, D.; Scher, H.I.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The randomized, double-blind phase III AFFIRM trial demonstrated that enzalutamide, an oral androgen receptor inhibitor, significantly prolonged overall survival (OS) [median 18.4 versus 13.6 months (hazard ratio, HR) 0.63 (95% confidence interval, CI, 0.53-0.75); P<0.001] compared wi

  4. Weekly low-dose docetaxel is an effective treatment with fewer adverse events for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer in Taiwanese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Li Kao

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: For Taiwanese mCRPC patients, weekly DTX 30 mg/m2 is an efficient regimen for disease control with relatively low Grade 3 or 4 hematological adverse effects. The proper treatment duration of DTX therapy for mCRPC in Taiwanese patients is still uncertain, so further research is needed.

  5. RM8 – Comparison of Timed Automata with Discrete Event Simulation for Modeling Personalized Treatment Decisions: the Case of Metastatic Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Degeling, K.; Koffijberg, H.; Schivo, S.; Langerak, R.; IJzerman, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study is to compare the usefulness of two promising alternative modeling techniques, Timed Automata (TA) originating from informatics, and Discrete Event Simulation (DES) known in operations research, for modeling todays complex and personalized treatment decisions over ti

  6. Prostate; Prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouviere, O.; Valette, O.; Grivolat, S.; Colin-Pangaud, C.; Bouvier, R.; Chapelon, J.Y.; Gelet, A.; Lyonnet, D.; Rouviere, O.; Mege-Lechevallier, F.; Chapelon, J.Y.; Gelet, A.; Bouvier, R.; Boutitie, F.; Lyonnet, D. [69 - Lyon (France)

    2005-10-15

    Two methods to detect recurrence of prostate cancer are presented. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging after radiotherapy and color doppler after high intensity focused ultrasounds (but with patients that have not received a hormones therapy). These two methods presents an useful contribution. (N.C.)

  7. Systemic therapy for the treatment of hormone-sensitive metastatic prostate cancer: from intermittent androgen deprivation therapy to chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Bobby C; Shevach, Jeffrey; Oh, William K

    2015-03-01

    Treatment of advanced prostate cancer has changed considerably in recent years, but the vast majority of advances have been made in patients with metastatic castration-resistant disease. There have been relatively fewer advances in the earlier, hormonally responsive stage of metastatic disease. Since the empiric establishment of androgen deprivation therapy as first-line therapy for metastatic prostate cancer decades ago, there have been multiple studies looking at variations of suppressing testosterone, but the overall paradigm has not been strongly challenged until more recently. In particular, the dramatic results reported by the CHAARTED trial not only bring chemotherapy to an arena historically dominated solely by hormonal therapy but also stimulate renewed efforts into improving upon our management of metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. PMID:25677235

  8. Long-term Efficacy and Safety of Enzalutamide Monotherapy in Hormone-naïve Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tombal, Bertrand; Borre, Michael; Rathenborg, Per;

    2015-01-01

    patients with metastases at baseline, 13 (50%) had a complete and four (15.4%) had a partial response as best overall tumor response up to 97 wk on treatment. There was overall maintenance of total-body bone mineral density (BMD) and moderate changes in lean and fat body mass at 49 and 97 wk. The most...... cancer, enzalutamide maintained long-term reductions in prostate-specific antigen, with a minimal impact on total-body bone mineral density. TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT01302041.......BACKGROUND: Enzalutamide is an androgen receptor inhibitor with a demonstrated overall survival benefit in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. A phase 2 study of enzalutamide monotherapy in patients with hormone-naïve prostate cancer (HNPC) showed a high response rate...

  9. Brachyury as a potential modulator of androgen receptor activity and a key player in therapy resistance in prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Filipe; Pértega-Gomes, Nelma; Vizcaíno, José R.; Andrade, Raquel P.; Cárcano, Flavio M.; Reis, Rui Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most commonly diagnosed neoplasm and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men. Acquisition of resistance to conventional therapy is a major problem for PCa patient management. Several mechanisms have been described to promote therapy resistance in PCa, such as androgen receptor (AR) activation, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), acquisition of stem cell properties and neuroendocrine transdifferentiation (NEtD). Recently, we identified Brachyury as a new biomarker of PCa aggressiveness and poor prognosis. In the present study we aimed to assess the role of Brachyury in PCa therapy resistance. We showed that Brachyury overexpression in prostate cancer cells lines increased resistance to docetaxel and cabazitaxel drugs, whereas Brachyury abrogation induced decrease in therapy resistance. Through ChiP-qPCR assays we further demonstrated that Brachyury is a direct regulator of AR expression as well as of the biomarker AMACR and the mesenchymal markers Snail and Fibronectin. Furthermore, in vitro Brachyury was also able to increase EMT and stem properties. By in silico analysis, clinically human Brachyury-positive PCa samples were associated with biomarkers of PCa aggressiveness and therapy resistance, including PTEN loss, and expression of NEtD markers, ERG and Bcl-2. Taken together, our results indicate that Brachyury contributes to tumor chemotherapy resistance, constituting an attractive target for advanced PCa patients. PMID:27049720

  10. Sex steroid induced apoptosis as a rational strategy to treat anti-hormone resistant breast and prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, V Craig; Fan, Ping; Abderrahman, Balkees; Maximov, Philipp Y; Hawsawi, Yousef M; Bhattacharya, Poulomi; Pokharel, Niranjana

    2016-05-01

    The combined incidence and the extended disease course of breast and prostate cancer is a major challenge for health care systems. The solution for society requires an economically viable treatment strategy to maintain individuals disease free and productive, so as to avoid the fracture of the family unit. Forty years ago, translational research using the antiestrogen tamoxifen was targeted to estrogen receptor (ER) positive micrometastatic tumor cells and established the long-term antihormone adjuvant treatment strategy used universally today. The antihormone strategy was the accepted structure of cancer biology. Sex steroid deprivation therapy remains the orthodox strategy for the treatment of both breast and prostate cancer. Despite major initial therapeutic success, the strategies of long term anti-hormone therapies with either tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors (AI) or antiandrogens or abiraterone for breast and prostate cancer, respectively, eventually lead to a significant proportion of anti-hormone resistant or stimulated tumor growth. Remarkably, a general principle of anti-hormone resistance has emerged for both breast and prostate cancer based primarily on clinical and supportive laboratory data. Paradoxically, anti-hormone resistant cell populations emerge and grow but are vulnerable to the cytotoxicity of estrogen or androgen-induced apoptosis for both breast and prostate cancer, respectively. These consistent anticancer actions of sex steroids appear to recapitulate the more complex mechanism of bone remodeling in elderly men and women during sex steroid deprivation. Estrogen is the key hormone in both sexes because in men androgen is first converted to estrogen. Estrogen regulates and triggers apoptosis in osteoclasts that develop during estrogen deprivation and destroy bone to cause osteoporosis. Sex steroid deprived breast and prostate cancer has recruited a streamlined natural apoptotic program from the human genome, but this is suppressed in the

  11. Integrated multimodal imaging of dynamic bone-tumor alterations associated with metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisset, Jean-Christophe; Hoff, Benjamin A; Chenevert, Thomas L; Jacobson, Jon A; Boes, Jennifer L; Galbán, Stefanie; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; Johnson, Timothy D; Pienta, Kenneth J; Galbán, Craig J; Meyer, Charles R; Schakel, Timothy; Nicolay, Klaas; Alva, Ajjai S; Hussain, Maha; Ross, Brian D

    2015-01-01

    Bone metastasis occurs for men with advanced prostate cancer which promotes osseous growth and destruction driven by alterations in osteoblast and osteoclast homeostasis. Patients can experience pain, spontaneous fractures and morbidity eroding overall quality of life. The complex and dynamic cellular interactions within the bone microenvironment limit current treatment options thus prostate to bone metastases remains incurable. This study uses voxel-based analysis of diffusion-weighted MRI and CT scans to simultaneously evaluate temporal changes in normal bone homeostasis along with prostate bone metatastsis to deliver an improved understanding of the spatiotemporal local microenvironment. Dynamic tumor-stromal interactions were assessed during treatment in mouse models along with a pilot prospective clinical trial with metastatic hormone sensitive and castration resistant prostate cancer patients with bone metastases. Longitudinal changes in tumor and bone imaging metrics during delivery of therapy were quantified. Studies revealed that voxel-based parametric response maps (PRM) of DW-MRI and CT scans could be used to quantify and spatially visualize dynamic changes during prostate tumor growth and in response to treatment thereby distinguishing patients with stable disease from those with progressive disease (pprostate tumor-stromal responses to therapies thus demonstrating the potential of multi-modal PRM image-based biomarkers as a novel means for assessing dynamic alterations associated with metastatic prostate cancer. These results establish an integrated and clinically translatable approach which can be readily implemented for improving the clinical management of patients with metastatic bone disease. PMID:25859981

  12. Functional screen identifies kinases driving prostate cancer visceral and bone metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faltermeier, Claire M; Drake, Justin M; Clark, Peter M; Smith, Bryan A; Zong, Yang; Volpe, Carmen; Mathis, Colleen; Morrissey, Colm; Castor, Brandon; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N

    2016-01-12

    Mutationally activated kinases play an important role in the progression and metastasis of many cancers. Despite numerous oncogenic alterations implicated in metastatic prostate cancer, mutations of kinases are rare. Several lines of evidence suggest that nonmutated kinases and their pathways are involved in prostate cancer progression, but few kinases have been mechanistically linked to metastasis. Using a mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics dataset in concert with gene expression analysis, we selected over 100 kinases potentially implicated in human metastatic prostate cancer for functional evaluation. A primary in vivo screen based on overexpression of candidate kinases in murine prostate cells identified 20 wild-type kinases that promote metastasis. We queried these 20 kinases in a secondary in vivo screen using human prostate cells. Strikingly, all three RAF family members, MERTK, and NTRK2 drove the formation of bone and visceral metastasis confirmed by positron-emission tomography combined with computed tomography imaging and histology. Immunohistochemistry of tissue microarrays indicated that these kinases are highly expressed in human metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer tissues. Our functional studies reveal the strong capability of select wild-type protein kinases to drive critical steps of the metastatic cascade, and implicate these kinases in possible therapeutic intervention. PMID:26621741

  13. 白膜下睾丸实质剜除术与药物去势治疗Ⅳ期前列腺癌疗效回顾性研究%Retrospective study of therapeutic efficacy of subcapsular orchiectomy and medical castration in prostate cancer patients-Ⅳ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赖彩永; 陈洁; 徐谊朝; 傅全胜; 张燊; 刘玉峰; 邹自灏; 黄伟佳; 蒋光愉; 苏泽轩; 李立; 李红; 梁蔚波; 卓育敏; 郭泽雄; 李宇同

    2012-01-01

    目的 回顾性分析白膜下睾丸实质剜除术与药物去势治疗Ⅳ期前列腺癌的疗效及副作用的差异.方法 2005年01月~2011年10月采用白膜下睾丸实质剜除术(n=70)和诺雷德联合康士得(n=62)治疗Ⅳ期前列腺癌并进行随访,分析其肿瘤缓解时间、总生存时间、手术并发症及对患者心理的影响.结果 随访时间1~59个月,手术组和药物组肿瘤缓解时间分别为18个月和17个月,两组差异无显著性(x2=0.166,P=0.682),总生存时间分别为33个月和31个月,两组差异无显著性(x2=0.080,P=0.778).手术组发生术后并发症的比率为10%,没有出现因睾丸切除导致的心理疾病.结论 白膜下睾丸实质剜除术作为Ⅳ期前列腺癌白膜下睾丸实质剜除方法,具有疗效确切、对心理影响少及成本低的特点,可作为Ⅳ期激素依赖型前列腺癌去势治疗的首选方法.%[Objective] To explore retrospectively the difference of therapeutic efficacy and side effect between subcapsular orchiectomy and medical castration in prostate cancer Patients-IV. [Methods] In the retrospective study, 132 consecutive Patients-IV were evaluated, the operation group (n =70) had primarily been treated by subcapsular bilateral orchiectomy and the medicine group (n =62) had received medical castration from Jan 2005 ~Oct 2011. Response to therapy, time of tumor remission, overall survival time, psychological disorders due to loss of organ and postoperative surgical complications were recorded. [ Results ] The follow up time was 1 -59 months. Median time of tumor remission of the operation group and medicine group were 18 and 17 months. The difference was sta tistically insignificant (x2=0.166, P =0.682). Median times of overall survival were 33 and 31 months respectively. The difference was statistically insignificant (x2=0.080, P =0.778). 10% of the operation group showed minor postoperative complications. No psychological disease occurred following

  14. Is DHT Production by 5α-Reductase Friend or Foe in Prostate Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaka, Takeo; Miyajima, Akira; Oya, Mototsugu

    2014-01-01

    The first advance in the history of studies on prostate cancer (PCa) and androgens was the development of treatment with castration and administration of estrogen by Charles B. Huggins, who won the Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine. Since then, and for 70 years, androgen deprivation therapy has been the standard therapy for advanced PCa and the center of studies on PCa. However, recent advances have shed light on the relationship between androgens and the development or the progression of PCa. The use of 5AR inhibitors to prevent progression of PCa continues to be widely discussed. Discussion has been fueled by the findings of two large randomized, placebo-controlled trials: the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial with finasteride and the Reduction by Dutasteride of Prostate Cancer Events trial. Does the development of PCa or progression to castration-resistant PCa depend on dihydrotestosterone (DHT)? Here, we summarize and discuss recent topics of local androgen production of DHT in PCa. PMID:25279351

  15. A novel nuclear role for the Vav3 nucleotide exchange factor in androgen receptor coactivation in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, S; Lyons, L S; Fahrenholtz, C D; Wu, F; Farooq, A; Balkan, W; Burnstein, K L

    2012-02-01

    Increased androgen receptor (AR) transcriptional activity mediated by coactivator proteins may drive castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) growth. Vav3, a Rho GTPase guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), is overexpressed in human prostate cancers, particularly in models of CRPC progression. Vav3 coactivates AR in a Vav3 pleckstrin homology (PH) domain-dependent but GEF-independent manner. Ectopic expression of Vav3 in androgen-dependent human prostate cancer cells conferred robust castration-resistant xenograft tumor growth. Vav3 but not a Vav3 PH mutant greatly stimulated interaction between the AR amino and carboxyl termini (N-C interaction), which is required for maximal receptor transcriptional activity. Vav3 was distributed between the cytoplasm and nucleus with nuclear localization-dependent on the Vav3 PH domain. Membrane targeting of Vav3 abolished Vav3 potentiation of AR activity, whereas nuclear targeting of a Vav3 PH mutant rescued AR coactivation, suggesting that nuclear localization is an important function of the Vav3 PH domain. A nuclear role for Vav3 was further demonstrated by sequential chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, which revealed that Vav3 and AR were recruited to the same transcriptional complexes of an AR target gene enhancer. These data demonstrate the importance of Vav3 in CRPC and define a novel nuclear function of Vav3 in regulating AR activity.

  16. Droplet Digital PCR Based Androgen Receptor Variant 7 (AR-V7) Detection from Prostate Cancer Patient Blood Biopsies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yafeng; Luk, Alison; Young, Francis P.; Lynch, David; Chua, Wei; Balakrishnar, Bavanthi; de Souza, Paul; Becker, Therese M.

    2016-01-01

    Androgen receptor splice variant V7 (AR-V7) was recently identified as a valuable predictive biomarker in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer. Here, we report a new, sensitive and accurate screen for AR-V7 mRNA expression directly from circulating tumor cells (CTCs): We combined EpCAM-based immunomagnetic CTC isolation using the IsoFlux microfluidic platform with droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) to analyze total AR and AR-V7 expression from prostate cancer patients CTCs. We demonstrate that AR-V7 is reliably detectable in enriched CTC samples with as little as five CTCs, even considering tumor heterogeneity, and confirm detection of AR-V7 in CTC samples from advanced prostate cancer (PCa) patients with AR-V7 detection limited to castrate resistant disease status in our sample set. Sensitive molecular analyses of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) or circulating tumor nucleic acids present exciting strategies to detect biomarkers, such as AR-V7 from non-invasive blood samples, so-called blood biopsies. PMID:27527157

  17. Droplet Digital PCR Based Androgen Receptor Variant 7 (AR-V7 Detection from Prostate Cancer Patient Blood Biopsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yafeng Ma

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Androgen receptor splice variant V7 (AR-V7 was recently identified as a valuable predictive biomarker in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer. Here, we report a new, sensitive and accurate screen for AR-V7 mRNA expression directly from circulating tumor cells (CTCs: We combined EpCAM-based immunomagnetic CTC isolation using the IsoFlux microfluidic platform with droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR to analyze total AR and AR-V7 expression from prostate cancer patients CTCs. We demonstrate that AR-V7 is reliably detectable in enriched CTC samples with as little as five CTCs, even considering tumor heterogeneity, and confirm detection of AR-V7 in CTC samples from advanced prostate cancer (PCa patients with AR-V7 detection limited to castrate resistant disease status in our sample set. Sensitive molecular analyses of circulating tumor cells (CTCs or circulating tumor nucleic acids present exciting strategies to detect biomarkers, such as AR-V7 from non-invasive blood samples, so-called blood biopsies.

  18. 去势联合高强度聚焦超声治疗晚期前列腺癌对患者生存及免疫状态的影响%The influence of castration in combination with high intensity focused ultrasound treatment on survival and immune state of patients with advanced prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武睿毅; 王国民; 徐磊; 徐叶青

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the influence of castration in combination with high intensity focused ultra-sound(HIFU) treatment on survival and immune state of patients as local therapy for advanced prostate cancer. Method:Between March 2000 and December 2010, we performed a prospective,controlled,and nonrandomized stud-y on 64 patients with advanced PCa after hormonal therapy. 30 cases in control group received hormonal therapy a-lone.and 34 cases in H1FU group received HIFU treatment following castration. To make survival analyses by the method of Kaplan-Meier survival curves and calculating survival rates. Some patients(control group 11 cases, HIFU group 12 cases)were detected the immunity index of peripheral blood before and after treatments, including IL-2, IFN-γ. VEGF,TGF-β1 and CD4 + CD25+ Foxp3+ cell. Result:The 3-year and 5-year survival rates of control group were 45. 19% and 25. 83%.and those of HIFU group were 76. 92% and 51. 26%. There was significant difference between two groups in survival curve( P =0. 0404). Compared with control group,IL-2( P =0. 042)and IFN-γ( P = 0. 019)level of peripheral blood in HIFU group significantly rose,and VEGF( P =0. 032) ,TGF-β1( P =0. 042) level and CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ ( % ) ( P =0. 001) significantly decreased. Conclusion: After castration treatment for advanced prostate cancer,combination with HIFU to strengthen local control of primary lesions could enhanced the therapeutic response of patients to hormone therapy, also improved systemic immune state, significantly prolonged the survival time of patients.%目的:探索晚期前列腺癌(prostate cancer,PCa)去势后,联合高强度聚焦超声(HIFU)局部治疗原发灶对患者生存和免疫状态的影响.方法:我院于2000年3月~2010年12月对64例晚期PCa去势手术后的患者进行前瞻性对照非随机研究,对照组30例接受单纯内分泌治疗,HIFU组34例去势后联合HIFU治疗.绘制两组患者的Kaplan-Meier生存曲线和并计算生存

  19. Genes regulated by androgen in the rat ventral prostate

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhou; Tufts, Rachel; Haleem, Riffat; Cai, Xiaoyan

    1997-01-01

    Genes that are regulated by androgen in the prostate were studied in the rat. Four of the less than 10 genes that are down-regulated by androgen in the ventral prostate of a 7-day castrated rat were identified; their mRNAs decayed with identical kinetics. Twenty-five of the estimated 56 genes that are up-regulated by androgen in the castrated prostate have been isolated. The up-regulated genes fall into two kinetic types. Early genes are significantly up-regulated by 6.5 hr whereas the delaye...

  20. Clinical Implications of Hedgehog Pathway Signaling in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L. Suzman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Activity in the Hedgehog pathway, which regulates GLI-mediated transcription, is important in organogenesis and stem cell regulation in self-renewing organs, but is pathologically elevated in many human malignancies. Mutations leading to constitutive activation of the pathway have been implicated in medulloblastoma and basal cell carcinoma, and inhibition of the pathway has demonstrated clinical responses leading to the approval of the Smoothened inhibitor, vismodegib, for the treatment of advanced basal cell carcinoma. Aberrant Hedgehog pathway signaling has also been noted in prostate cancer with evidence suggesting that it may render prostate epithelial cells tumorigenic, drive the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and contribute towards the development of castration-resistance through autocrine and paracrine signaling within the tumor microenvironment and cross-talk with the androgen pathway. In addition, there are emerging clinical data suggesting that inhibition of the Hedgehog pathway may be effective in the treatment of recurrent and metastatic prostate cancer. Here we will review these data and highlight areas of active clinical research as they relate to Hedgehog pathway inhibition in prostate cancer.

  1. Chemotherapy-induced monoamine oxidase expression in prostate carcinoma functions as a cytoprotective resistance enzyme and associates with clinical outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan R Gordon

    Full Text Available To identify molecular alterations in prostate cancers associating with relapse following neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radical prostatectomy patients with high-risk localized prostate cancer were enrolled into a phase I-II clinical trial of neoadjuvant chemotherapy with docetaxel and mitoxantrone followed by prostatectomy. Pre-treatment prostate tissue was acquired by needle biopsy and post-treatment tissue was acquired by prostatectomy. Prostate cancer gene expression measurements were determined in 31 patients who completed 4 cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We identified 141 genes with significant transcript level alterations following chemotherapy that associated with subsequent biochemical relapse. This group included the transcript encoding monoamine oxidase A (MAOA. In vitro, cytotoxic chemotherapy induced the expression of MAOA and elevated MAOA levels enhanced cell survival following docetaxel exposure. MAOA activity increased the levels of reactive oxygen species and increased the expression and nuclear translocation of HIF1α. The suppression of MAOA activity using the irreversible inhibitor clorgyline augmented the apoptotic responses induced by docetaxel. In summary, we determined that the expression of MAOA is induced by exposure to cytotoxic chemotherapy, increases HIF1α, and contributes to docetaxel resistance. As MAOA inhibitors have been approved for human use, regimens combining MAOA inhibitors with docetaxel may improve clinical outcomes.

  2. Management of bone metastases in refractory prostate cancer – role of denosumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paller CJ

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Channing J Paller,1 Michael A Carducci,1 George K Philips21Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, MD, USA; 2Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Washington DC, USAAbstract: This article reviews the problem of bone disease in prostate cancer and the evolving role of the novel agent denosumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody that inhibits the receptor activator of nuclear factor-ΚB ligand, in suppressing bone resorption and offering bone protection in this disease. Prostate cancer frequently metastasizes to bone, and additionally its treatment with androgen deprivation leads to accelerated bone loss resulting in clinically relevant skeletal complications associated with disabling symptoms. Among the bone-targeting therapeutic strategies investigated for the prevention of bone complications, the potent bisphosphonate zoledronic acid has been the most widely used agent for bone protection in the past decade. Denosumab is the first among a new class of osteoclast-targeting agents to show superior efficacy in several clinical scenarios in both prostate and breast cancer, as well as in osteoporosis, but the focus of this review will be on its role in prostate cancer. The safety and efficacy of denosumab versus zoledronic acid was established in a randomized trial, demonstrating a delay in skeletal-related events in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients. This study led to the approval of denosumab in the US. The chief risks of denosumab were hypocalcemia and osteonecrosis of the jaw. Denosumab was also approved for fracture risk reduction in patients on androgen-deprivation therapy for nonmetastatic prostate cancer. Although denosumab extended bone metastasis-free survival in a Phase III trial in men with castration-resistant nonmetastatic prostate cancer to a statistically significant degree, a Food and Drug Administration committee found that the effect was not sufficiently clinically

  3. Sequential maximum androgen blockade (MAB) in minimally symptomatic prostate cancer progressing after initial MAB:two case reports

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohan Hingorani; Sanjay Dixit; Fahim Bashir; Mohammad Butt; Simon Hawkyard; Richard Khafagy; Andrew Robertson

    2014-01-01

    Te management of castrate-resistant prostate cancer progressing atfer maximum androgen blockade (MAB) has evolved in the last decade with the development of several novel therapeutic options. However, the initial therapeutic strategy in these patients usually involves withdrawal of anti-androgen that can be associated with biochemical response in approximately 20%of patients. Notably, we have observed evidence of sustained biochemical response in two patients following second-and third-line MAB using rechallenge schedule of previously administered anti-androgen atfer latent interval. hTe possibility of response following sequential MAB using the same anti-androgen agent has not yet been reported.

  4. Molecular interplay between cdk4 and p21 dictates G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in prostate cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gulappa, Thippeswamy; Reddy, Ramadevi Subramani; Suman, Suman; Nyakeriga, Alice M; Damodaran, Chendil

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effect of 3, 9-dihydroxy-2-prenylcoumestan (pso), a furanocoumarin, on PC-3 and C4-2B castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) cell lines. Pso caused significant G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and inhibition of cell growth. Molecular analysis of cyclin (D1, D2, D3, and E), cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) (cdks 2, 4, and 6), and cdk inhibitor (p21 and p27) expression suggested transcriptional regulation of the cdk inhibitors and more significant downregulation of cdk4 than of...

  5. Nandrolone decanoate and resistance exercise training favor the occurrence of lesions and activate the inflammatory response in the ventral prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, F C; Chuffa, L G A; Scarano, W R; Pinheiro, P F F; Fávaro, W J; Domeniconi, R F

    2016-05-01

    Age is a key factor in the development of prostatic lesions. An increase in reactive oxygen species levels occurs during aging. Furthermore, the indiscriminate use of anabolic androgenic steroids and physical exercise alter the availability of hormones and may promote the appearance of lesions. This study examined whether the use of nandrolone decanoate (ND), associated or not with resistance exercise training, affects the pathways related to the inflammatory response in the ventral prostate of adult and aged rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were distributed into eight experimental groups: sedentary with ND, sedentary without ND, exercise with ND, and exercise without ND. The animals performed resistance exercise training and received ND two times/week (5 mg/kg, i.m.) for 8 weeks. Adult rats were killed immediately following treatment completion, and aged rats remained untreated until reaching 300 days of age. The adult animals that received ND and performed resistance exercise training showed a higher occurrence of lesions with TLR4 activation. Marked IL-6 expression occurred in the group that performed resistance exercise training. The group exposed to ND showed overexpression of TLR2, TLR4, NOX1, Nrf2, TNF-α, and P38MAPK. The animals that received ND and performed training showed increase levels of NFκB, IRF3, IL-6, TNF-α, and NOX1. TLR2 and TLR4 showed no upregulation in the aged animals. The groups exercise + ND showed lesions in the adult stage and after aging, followed by molecular alterations. We concluded that nandrolone decanoate and resistance exercise training can promote the onset of prostatic tumors in the adult stage, and during aging, activating pathways involved in the inflammatory response. PMID:27011054

  6. Prostate cancer cell-stromal cell crosstalk via FGFR1 mediates antitumor activity of dovitinib in bone metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xinhai; Corn, Paul G; Yang, Jun; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Starbuck, Michael W; Efstathiou, Eleni; Li Ning Tapia, Elsa M; Tapia, Elsa M Li-Ning; Zurita, Amado J; Aparicio, Ana; Ravoori, Murali K; Vazquez, Elba S; Robinson, Dan R; Wu, Yi-Mi; Cao, Xuhong; Iyer, Matthew K; McKeehan, Wallace; Kundra, Vikas; Wang, Fen; Troncoso, Patricia; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Logothetis, Christopher J; Navone, Nora M

    2014-09-01

    Bone is the most common site of prostate cancer (PCa) progression to a therapy-resistant, lethal phenotype. We found that blockade of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) with the receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor dovitinib has clinical activity in a subset of men with castration-resistant PCa and bone metastases. Our integrated analyses suggest that FGF signaling mediates a positive feedback loop between PCa cells and bone cells and that blockade of FGFR1 in osteoblasts partially mediates the antitumor activity of dovitinib by improving bone quality and by blocking PCa cell-bone cell interaction. These findings account for clinical observations such as reductions in lesion size and intensity on bone scans, lymph node size, and tumor-specific symptoms without proportional declines in serum prostate-specific antigen concentration. Our findings suggest that targeting FGFR has therapeutic activity in advanced PCa and provide direction for the development of therapies with FGFR inhibitors.

  7. Use of early chemotherapy for hormone-sensitive prostate cancer: time for CHAARTED

    OpenAIRE

    Aragon-Ching, Jeanny B.

    2015-01-01

    CHAARTED was an ECOG-led phase III trial looking at early chemotherapy with the use of docetaxel in addition to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) versus ADT alone in hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. The positive results of the trial showing marked improvement in overall survival in those who received chemotherapy with ADT have revolutionized the treatment of metastatic castration-sensitive prostate cancer. In addition to overall survival, secondary endpoints such as time to castration resi...

  8. Prostate Cancer: Countdown to Choice between Stitch in Time and Eleventh Hour Begins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammad Ahmad Farooqi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Androgen ablation therapy presumed to be an effective treatment for advanced prostate cancer (PCa is relentlessly challenged. Remissions are impermanent and patients almost inescapably progress to become castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. CRPC is almost invincible and is the major stumbling block in the treatment. It is a dramatic shift of androgen receptor (AR from normal activities to the oncogenesis. AR signaling is remarkably increased under an androgen-depleted environment. It utilizes a miscellany of mechanisms and pathways to compensate for the decreasing levels of androgens. These range from mutations in the receptor more like a business tactic to attract more clients, to the illegitimate crosstalks which promote the signaling. The review will encompass various mechanistic insights of the AR manipulations. Moreover efficacy of therapeutic interventions recently designed keeping in view the molecular hierarchy will be evaluated.

  9. The complexities of identifying a cell of origin for human prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gail P Risbridger; Renea A Taylor

    2011-01-01

    @@ Prostate cancer(PCa)is the second most common malignancy in men1 and ifloca-lized or confined to the gland at diagnosis,the choice of treatment includes surgery,radiation or watchful waiting.If and when the disease spreads,androgen blockade is effective but inevitably relapse occurs,resulting in incurable castrate-resistant PCa.Understanding the etiology of PCa will underpin the development of better treatment options In particular,the identity of the cell type(s)that are the origin of PCa(or cancer-initiating cells)will enable them to become therapeutic targets that could lead to newer and more sophisticated treatment options.These cells of origin are defined as epithelial cells in the normal prostate,susceptible to malignant transformation and therefore capable of initiating tumourigenesis.However,their identity is unknown.

  10. Advanced prostate cancer – patient survival and potential impact of enzalutamide and other emerging therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel NK

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Nihar K Patel, Antoine Finianos, Kristen D Whitaker, Jeanny B Aragon-Ching Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology and Oncology, George Washington University Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA Abstract: The advent of exponential growth of novel agents tested and approved for the treatment of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC has brought about a need for understanding of the mechanism of action, side-effects, and clinical efficacy of these drugs as they relate to these patients. This review will provide a synopsis of the treatment landscape in mCRPC as varying agents such as abiraterone acetate, cabazitaxel, sipuleucel-T, radium, and selected emerging agents are presented. A distinct focus on the utilization of enzalutamide, its mechanism of action, key pivotal trials that brought about its US Food and Drug Administration approval, as well as patient-focused perspectives and clinical implications are discussed herein. Keywords: metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, enzalutamide, systemic therapies

  11. The molecular and cellular origin of human prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, John R; Maitland, Norman J

    2016-06-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed male malignancy. Despite compelling epidemiology, there are no definitive aetiological clues linking development to frequency. Pre-malignancies such as proliferative inflammatory atrophy (PIA) and prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) yield insights into the initiating events of prostate cancer, as they supply a background "field" for further transformation. An inflammatory aetiology, linked to recurrent prostatitis, and heterologous signalling from reactive stroma and infiltrating immune cells may result in cytokine addiction of cancer cells, including a tumour-initiating population also known as cancer stem cells (CSCs). In prostate tumours, the background mutational rate is rarely exceeded, but genetic change via profound sporadic chromosomal rearrangements results in copy number variations and aberrant gene expression. In cancer, dysfunctional differentiation is imposed upon the normal epithelial lineage, with disruption/disappearance of the basement membrane, loss of the contiguous basal cell layer and expansion of the luminal population. An initiating role for androgen receptor (AR) is attractive, due to the luminal phenotype of the tumours, but alternatively a pool of CSCs, which express little or no AR, has also been demonstrated. Indolent and aggressive tumours may also arise from different stem or progenitor cells. Castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) remains the inevitable final stage of disease following treatment. Time-limited effectiveness of second-generation anti-androgens, and the appearance of an AR-neuroendocrine phenotype imply that metastatic disease is reliant upon the plasticity of the CSC population, and indeed CSC gene expression profiles are most closely related to those identified in CRPCs.

  12. Early Growth Inhibition Is Followed by Increased Metastatic Disease with Vitamin D (Calcitriol) Treatment in the TRAMP Model of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasik, Ellen; Gillard, Bryan; Moser, Michael T.; Johnson, Candace S.; Trump, Donald L.; Foster, Barbara A.

    2014-01-01

    The active metabolite of vitamin D3, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (calcitriol) has antiproliferative effects in non-aggressive prostate cancer, however, its effects in more aggressive model systems are still unclear. In these studies, effects of calcitriol and a less-calcemic vitamin D analog, QW-1624F2-2 (QW), were tested in vivo, using the aggressive autochthonous transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. To study prevention of androgen-stimulated prostate cancer, vehicle, calcitriol (20 µg/kg), or QW (50 µg/kg) were administered to 4 week-old TRAMP mice intraperitoneal (i.p.) 3×/week on a MWF schedule for 14 weeks. Calcitriol and QW slowed progression of prostate cancer as indicated by reduced urogenital tract (p = 0.0022, calcitriol; p = 0.0009, QW) and prostate weights (p = 0.0178, calcitriol; p = 0.0086, QW). However, only calcitriol increased expression of the pro-differentiation marker, cadherin 1 (p = 0.0086), and reduced tumor proliferation (p = 0.0467). By contrast, neither vitamin D analog had any effect on castration resistant prostate cancer in mice treated pre- or post-castration. Interestingly, although vitamin D showed inhibitory activity against primary tumors in hormone-intact mice, distant organ metastases seemed to be enhanced following treatment (p = 0.0823). Therefore, TRAMP mice were treated long-term with calcitriol to further examine effects on metastasis. Calcitriol significantly increased the number of distant organ metastases when mice were treated from 4 weeks-of-age until development of palpable tumors (20–25 weeks-of-age)(p = 0.0003). Overall, data suggest that early intervention with vitamin D in TRAMP slowed androgen-stimulated tumor progression, but prolonged treatment resulted in development of a resistant and more aggressive disease associated with increased distant organ metastasis. PMID:24586868

  13. Early growth inhibition is followed by increased metastatic disease with vitamin D (calcitriol treatment in the TRAMP model of prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adebusola Alagbala Ajibade

    Full Text Available The active metabolite of vitamin D3, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (calcitriol has antiproliferative effects in non-aggressive prostate cancer, however, its effects in more aggressive model systems are still unclear. In these studies, effects of calcitriol and a less-calcemic vitamin D analog, QW-1624F2-2 (QW, were tested in vivo, using the aggressive autochthonous transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP model. To study prevention of androgen-stimulated prostate cancer, vehicle, calcitriol (20 µg/kg, or QW (50 µg/kg were administered to 4 week-old TRAMP mice intraperitoneal (i.p. 3×/week on a MWF schedule for 14 weeks. Calcitriol and QW slowed progression of prostate cancer as indicated by reduced urogenital tract (p = 0.0022, calcitriol; p = 0.0009, QW and prostate weights (p = 0.0178, calcitriol; p = 0.0086, QW. However, only calcitriol increased expression of the pro-differentiation marker, cadherin 1 (p = 0.0086, and reduced tumor proliferation (p = 0.0467. By contrast, neither vitamin D analog had any effect on castration resistant prostate cancer in mice treated pre- or post-castration. Interestingly, although vitamin D showed inhibitory activity against primary tumors in hormone-intact mice, distant organ metastases seemed to be enhanced following treatment (p = 0.0823. Therefore, TRAMP mice were treated long-term with calcitriol to further examine effects on metastasis. Calcitriol significantly increased the number of distant organ metastases when mice were treated from 4 weeks-of-age until development of palpable tumors (20-25 weeks-of-age(p = 0.0003. Overall, data suggest that early intervention with vitamin D in TRAMP slowed androgen-stimulated tumor progression, but prolonged treatment resulted in development of a resistant and more aggressive disease associated with increased distant organ metastasis.

  14. Isoform 1 of TPD52 (PC-1) promotes neuroendocrine transdifferentiation in prostate cancer cells

    KAUST Repository

    Moritz, Tom

    2016-02-05

    The tumour protein D52 isoform 1 (PC-1), a member of the tumour protein D52 (TPD52) protein family, is androgen-regulated and prostate-specific expressed. Previous studies confirmed that PC-1 contributes to malignant progression in prostate cancer with an important role in castration-resistant stage. In the present work, we identified its impact in mechanisms leading to neuroendocrine (NE) transdifferentiation. We established for long-term PC-1 overexpression an inducible expression system derived from the prostate carcinoma cell line LNCaP. We observed that PC-1 overexpression itself initiates characteristics of neuroendocrine cells, but the effect was much more pronounced in the presence of the cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6). Moreover, to our knowledge, this is the first report that treatment with IL-6 leads to a significant upregulation of PC-1 in LNCaP cells. Other TPD52 isoforms were not affected. Proceeding from this result, we conclude that PC-1 overexpression enhances the IL-6-mediated differentiation of LNCaP cells into a NE-like phenotype, noticeable by morphological changes and increased expression of typical NE markers, like chromogranin A, synaptophysin or beta-3 tubulin. Immunofluorescent staining of IL-6-treated PC-1-overexpressing LNCaP cells indicates a considerable PC-1 accumulation at the end of the long-branched neuron-like cell processes, which are typically formed by NE cells. Additionally, the experimentally initiated NE transdifferentiation correlates with the androgen receptor status, which was upregulated additively. In summary, our data provide evidence for an involvement of PC-1 in NE transdifferentiation, frequently associated with castration resistance, which is a major therapeutic challenge in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer.

  15. Antiandrogens act as selective androgen receptor modulators at the proteome level in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, Greg N; Gamble, Simon C; Hough, Michael A; Begum, Shajna; Dart, D Alwyn; Odontiadis, Michael; Powell, Sue M; Fioretti, Flavia M; Bryan, Rosie A; Waxman, Jonathan; Wait, Robin; Bevan, Charlotte L

    2015-05-01

    Current therapies for prostate cancer include antiandrogens, inhibitory ligands of the androgen receptor, which repress androgen-stimulated growth. These include the selective androgen receptor modulators cyproterone acetate and hydroxyflutamide and the complete antagonist bicalutamide. Their activity is partly dictated by the presence of androgen receptor mutations, which are commonly detected in patients who relapse while receiving antiandrogens, i.e. in castrate-resistant prostate cancer. To characterize the early proteomic response to these antiandrogens we used the LNCaP prostate cancer cell line, which harbors the androgen receptor mutation most commonly detected in castrate-resistant tumors (T877A), analyzing alterations in the proteome, and comparing these to the effect of these therapeutics upon androgen receptor activity and cell proliferation. The majority are regulated post-transcriptionally, possibly via nongenomic androgen receptor signaling. Differences detected between the exposure groups demonstrate subtle changes in the biological response to each specific ligand, suggesting a spectrum of agonistic and antagonistic effects dependent on the ligand used. Analysis of the crystal structures of the AR in the presence of cyproterone acetate, hydroxyflutamide, and DHT identified important differences in the orientation of key residues located in the AF-2 and BF-3 protein interaction surfaces. This further implies that although there is commonality in the growth responses between androgens and those antiandrogens that stimulate growth in the presence of a mutation, there may also be influential differences in the growth pathways stimulated by the different ligands. This therefore has implications for prostate cancer treatment because tumors may respond differently dependent upon which mutation is present and which ligand is activating growth, also for the design of selective androgen receptor modulators, which aim to elicit differential proteomic

  16. Androgens and androgen receptors in prostatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O.G.J.M. van Aubel (Olav)

    1989-01-01

    textabstractOur understanding of the testicular control of growth and functioning of the accessory sex glands began with an observation in the 18th century of John Hunter (1), who discovered in animals the endocrine dependency of the prostate. He demonstrated that castration in experimental animals

  17. Prostate Cancer Immunotherapy with Sipuleucel-T: Current Standards and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiao X; Fong, Lawrence; Small, Eric J

    2015-01-01

    The management of advanced prostate cancer, specifically metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), remains a therapeutic challenge. Sipuleucel-T (Provenge; APC8015) was approved by the FDA in 2010 for the treatment of asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic mCRPC patients, and it remains the only FDA-approved immunotherapy for prostate cancer of any indication to date. Given the continued need to improve therapeutics in patients with advanced prostate cancer, as well as recent enthusiasm for cancer immunotherapy, there is a wide range of ongoing trials evaluating combinations of sipuleucel-T with other therapeutics. Additional trials are aiming to expand the application of sipuleucel-T to prostate cancer patients beyond the mCRPC setting. Ongoing challenges include understanding the full mechanism of action of sipuleucel-T, optimizing the sequence of sipuleucel-T in relation to other therapies for mCRPC in clinical practice, and the identification of surrogate markers to predict survival benefit in clinical trials.

  18. Role of chemotherapy in combination with hormonal therapy in first-line treatment of metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceresoli, G L; De Vincenzo, F; Sauta, M G; Bonomi, M; Zucali, P A

    2015-12-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is a heterogeneous disease, whose growth is driven by androgens and androgen receptors. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is the standard treatment of hormone-naïve metastatic disease. The majority of patients are treated with medical castration with GnRH agonists or antagonists, which usually determines a profound PSA decline and a radiological and clinical benefit. However, essentially all patients experience progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), and overall prognosis remains disappointing. Early targeting of cells that survive hormonal therapy may potentially prevent the development of CRPC. Several trials have explored the use of combination therapy with ADT and chemotherapy, targeting both the androgen dependent and independent cells simultaneously. Docetaxel was administered in combination with ADT to men with hormone-naïve metastatic prostate cancer, in the attempt to improve the duration and quality of patient survival. Three large randomized trials (the GETUG-15, CHAARTED and more recently the STAMPEDE study) have assessed these endpoints, with partially conflicting results. Overall, the results from these trials seem to support the use of early docetaxel combined with ADT in selected hormone-naïve metastatic PC patients. Full publication of the results of all studies, with longer follow-up, and the results of other ongoing trials in this setting will hopefully further define the role and the indications of this therapeutic strategy. PMID:26222275

  19. Correction of androgen deficiency in chronic infectious prostatitis as pathogenetic method of overcoming inefficiencies standard antibiotics against the growing antibiotic resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Tyuzikov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The chronic prostatitis occupies the big relative density in structure of an out-patient urological pathology in our country, however, results of its standard pharmacotherapy remain unsatisfactory that is accompanied by high risk clinical recurrence and progressing of anatomic and functional disorders in prostata. Modern methods of diagnostics of the chronic infectious prostatitis, which share in the general structure of inflammatory prostata diseases does not exceed 10 %, are based on the recommended volume of the standard tests directed only on revealing of the infectious agent in a prostatic secret, and do not consider degree of disorders of the prostatic homeostasis which key moment is prostata androgen-dependence. It leads to mainly symptomatic approach in treatment of a chronic infectious prostatitis in the modern urological practice, based exclusively on antibacterial therapy that promotes the further growth of prostate pathogens antibiotics resistance, inefficiencies of unreasonable repeated courses of antibacterial therapy and are supported by a myth about incurability of a chronic prostatitis. At the same time, intraprostatic androgen balance defines all basic functions of gland, and its safety essentially depends on testosterone blood level, therefore endogenic testosterone level it is possible to consider as universal predictor of prostata metabolic homeostasis disorders, leading to decrease in bactericidal function of gland and infections. This author’s concept allows to consider correction of an adverse hormonal and metabolic background on which the clinical picture of a chronic prostatitis (first of all, deficiency of sexual hormones as pathogenetic therapy of all infectious chronic prostatitises against which realisation of effects of antibacterial therapy is essentially facilitated is developed or last is not so necessary, to what own clinical supervision resulted in article testify. Such interdisciplinary approach will lead

  20. Correction of androgen deficiency in chronic infectious prostatitis as pathogenetic method of overcoming inefficiencies standard antibiotics against the growing antibiotic resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Tyuzikov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The chronic prostatitis occupies the big relative density in structure of an out-patient urological pathology in our country, however, results of its standard pharmacotherapy remain unsatisfactory that is accompanied by high risk clinical recurrence and progressing of anatomic and functional disorders in prostata. Modern methods of diagnostics of the chronic infectious prostatitis, which share in the general structure of inflammatory prostata diseases does not exceed 10 %, are based on the recommended volume of the standard tests directed only on revealing of the infectious agent in a prostatic secret, and do not consider degree of disorders of the prostatic homeostasis which key moment is prostata androgen-dependence. It leads to mainly symptomatic approach in treatment of a chronic infectious prostatitis in the modern urological practice, based exclusively on antibacterial therapy that promotes the further growth of prostate pathogens antibiotics resistance, inefficiencies of unreasonable repeated courses of antibacterial therapy and are supported by a myth about incurability of a chronic prostatitis. At the same time, intraprostatic androgen balance defines all basic functions of gland, and its safety essentially depends on testosterone blood level, therefore endogenic testosterone level it is possible to consider as universal predictor of prostata metabolic homeostasis disorders, leading to decrease in bactericidal function of gland and infections. This author’s concept allows to consider correction of an adverse hormonal and metabolic background on which the clinical picture of a chronic prostatitis (first of all, deficiency of sexual hormones as pathogenetic therapy of all infectious chronic prostatitises against which realisation of effects of antibacterial therapy is essentially facilitated is developed or last is not so necessary, to what own clinical supervision resulted in article testify. Such interdisciplinary approach will lead

  1. Prostate carcinoma and radiation therapy: therapeutic treatment resistance and strategies for targeted therapeutic intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzgerald, TJ; Tao WANG; Goel, Hira Lal; Huang, Jiayi; Stein, Gary; Lian, Jane; Davis, Roger J.; Doxsey, Steven; Balaji, KC; Aronowitz, Jesse; Languino, Lucia R.

    2008-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the prostate remains a significant public health problem and a prevalent cancer in men. Prostate-specific antigen used as a biomarker has established a clear migration of patients towards earlier-stage disease at presentation. However, in spite of process improvements in traditional therapies including surgery, radiation therapy, and hormone management, there remains a significant cohort of patients with intermediate- to high-risk features for poor outcome in spite of optima...

  2. Mitosis orientation in prostate epithelial cells changed by endocrine effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang-yun LIU; Dong-mei Li; Xiao-fang ZHANG; Jian-hui WU; Zu-yue SUN

    2008-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of androgen and estrogen on mitosis orientation in the prostate epithelial cells of male rats. Methods: Castrated rats were treated with a single injection of testosterone propionate (TP) or benzogynestry (E2). There were 8 rats in the control group and TP-treated or E2-treated group. Prostate, liver, a specimen of skin, and a segment of the jejunum and colon were removed after the corresponding treatment. The results were observed through immunohistochemistry and iron hematoxylin-eosin staining.Results: All mitoses found in the prostate epithelial cells of castrated rats with TP were oriented parallel to the basement membrane; however, mitoses found in the prostate epithelial cells of castrated rats in E2 and the control group were oriented perpendicular to the basement membrane. TP treatment resulted in marked changes in mitosis orientation in the prostate epithelial cells. Bromodeoxyuridine-labeled positive cells could be seen throughout the stroma and prostate epithelial cells with an injection of TP; however, the positive cells could only be seen in the stroma of prostate with an injection of E2, and the positive cells could hardly be seen in the control group. Conclusion: We found a novel effect of TP in the prostate as a marked change of mitosis orientation in prostate epithelial cells.

  3. Effect of androgen deprivation on the expression of aquaporins in rat prostate and seminal vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, J C; Xia, J Y; Jiang, J; Jiang, R; He, Y Z; Lin, H

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the level of secretions of prostate and seminal vesicles and its association with the expression of AQP0, 1, 4, 5, 6 and 8 in castrated rats. Eight-week-old male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats (n = 18) were randomly divided into control group, castrated rats group and castrated followed testosterone replacement group. Four weeks after surgery, the secretions and expression of AQP0, 1, 4, 5, 6 and 8 of prostate and seminal vesicles were determined. Serum testosterone was significantly lower in castrated groups than in control and testosterone replacement groups (P seminal vesicle secretions and the expressions of AQP0, 1, 4, 5, 6 and 8 in prostate and seminal vesicles were significantly lower in castrated group than in control and castrated followed testosterone replacement groups (P seminal vesicle secretions in castrated rats may be related to the decrease in AQP0, 1, 4, 5, 6 and 8 in prostatic tissue and seminal vesicles.

  4. Development of the VCaP Androgen Independent Model of Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Loberg, Robert D; St. John, Lauren N; Day, LaShon L.; Neeley, Chris K; Kenneth J. Pienta

    2006-01-01

    Prostate epithelial cell growth is dependent on the presence of androgens and the transition of prostate cancer to an androgen independent phenotype results in a highly aggressive, currently incurable cancer. We have developed a new preclinical model of androgen independent prostate cancer derived from the VCaP prostate cancer epithelial cell line. VCaP cells were subcutaneously implanted and serially passaged in castrated male SCID mice. Androgen independence was confirmed by WST-1 (a tetraz...

  5. BIRC6 protein, an inhibitor of apoptosis: role in survival of human prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher G Low

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: BIRC6 is a member of the Inhibitors of Apoptosis Protein (IAP family which is thought to protect a variety of cancer cells from apoptosis. The main objective of the present study was to investigate whether BIRC6 plays a role in prostate cancer and could be useful as a novel therapeutic target. METHODS: BIRC6 expression in cell lines was assessed using Western blot analysis and in clinical samples using immunohistochemistry of tissue microarrays. The biological significance of BIRC6 was determined by siRNA-induced reduction of BIRC6 expression in LNCaP cells followed by functional assays. RESULTS: Elevated BIRC6 protein expression was found in prostate cancer cell lines and clinical specimens as distinct from their benign counterparts. Increased BIRC6 expression was associated with Gleason 6-8 cancers and castration resistance. Reduction of BIRC6 expression in LNCaP cells led to a marked reduction in cell proliferation which was associated with an increase in apoptosis and a decrease in autophagosome formation. Doxorubicin-induced apoptosis was found to be coupled to a reduction in BIRC6 protein expression. CONCLUSION: The data suggest a role for BIRC6 in prostate cancer progression and treatment resistance, and indicate for the first time that the BIRC6 gene and its product are potentially valuable targets for treatment of prostate cancers.

  6. Acute Cold / Restraint Stress in Castrated Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Zafari Zangeneh

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study aimed to determine whether castration altered osmotically stimulated vasopressin (VP release and urinary volume and what is the role of endocrine-stress axis in this process.Materials and methods: Totally 108 mice were studied in two main groups of castrated (n=78 and control (n=30. Each group was extracted by acute cold stress (4◦C for 2h/day, restraint stress (by syringes 60cc 2h/day and cold/restraint stress. The castrated group was treated in sub groups of testosterone, control (sesame oil as vehicle of testosterone. Propranolol as blocker of sympathetic nervous system was given to both groups of castrated mice and main control.Results: Our results showed that, there is interactions between testosterone and sympathetic nervous system on vasopressin, because urine volume was decreased only in testoctomized mice with cold/restraint and cold stress (P<0.001; propranolol as the antagonist of sympathetic nervous system could block and increase urine volume in castrated mice. This increased volume of urine was due to acute cold stress, not restraint stress (p<0.001. The role of testosterone, noradrenalin (NA and Vasopressin (VP in the acute cold stress is confirmed, because testosterone could return the effect of decreased urine volume in control group (P<0.001. Conclusion: Considering the effect of cold/restraint stress on urinary volume in castrated mice shows that there is interaction between sex hormone (testosterone, vasopressin and adrenergic systems.

  7. TRIM24 Is an Oncogenic Transcriptional Activator in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groner, Anna C; Cato, Laura; de Tribolet-Hardy, Jonas; Bernasocchi, Tiziano; Janouskova, Hana; Melchers, Diana; Houtman, René; Cato, Andrew C B; Tschopp, Patrick; Gu, Lei; Corsinotti, Andrea; Zhong, Qing; Fankhauser, Christian; Fritz, Christine; Poyet, Cédric; Wagner, Ulrich; Guo, Tiannan; Aebersold, Ruedi; Garraway, Levi A; Wild, Peter J; Theurillat, Jean-Philippe; Brown, Myles

    2016-06-13

    Androgen receptor (AR) signaling is a key driver of prostate cancer (PC). While androgen-deprivation therapy is transiently effective in advanced disease, tumors often progress to a lethal castration-resistant state (CRPC). We show that recurrent PC-driver mutations in speckle-type POZ protein (SPOP) stabilize the TRIM24 protein, which promotes proliferation under low androgen conditions. TRIM24 augments AR signaling, and AR and TRIM24 co-activated genes are significantly upregulated in CRPC. Expression of TRIM24 protein increases from primary PC to CRPC, and both TRIM24 protein levels and the AR/TRIM24 gene signature predict disease recurrence. Analyses in CRPC cells reveal that the TRIM24 bromodomain and the AR-interacting motif are essential to support proliferation. These data provide a rationale for therapeutic TRIM24 targeting in SPOP mutant and CRPC patients.

  8. Cardiac glycosides induce resistance to tubulin-dependent anticancer drugs in androgen-independent human prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dong-Ming; Guh, Jih-Hwa; Huang, Yao-Ting; Chueh, Shih-Chieh; Wang, Hui-Po; Teng, Che-Ming

    2002-01-01

    Due to high prevalence and mortality and the lack of effective therapies, prostate cancer is one of the most crucial health problems in men. Drug resistance aggravates the situation, not only in human prostate cancer but also in other cancers. In this study, we report for the first time that cardiac glycosides (e.g. ouabain and digitoxin) induced resistance of human prostate cancer cells (PC-3) in vitro to tubulin-binding anticancer drugs, such as paclitaxel, colchicine, vincristine and vinblastine. Cardiac glycosides exhibited amazing ability to reverse the G2/M arrest of the cell cycle and cell apoptosis induced by tubulin-binding agents. However, neither ionomycin (a Ca(2+) ionophore) nor veratridine (a Na(+) ionophore) mimicked the preventive action of cardiac glycosides, indicating that elevation of the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and Na(+) accumulation were not involved in the cardiac glycoside action. Furthermore, cardiac glycosides showed little influence on the effects induced by actinomycin D, anisomycin and doxorubicin, suggesting selectivity for microtubule-targeted anticancer drugs. Using in situ immunofluorescent detection of mitotic spindles, our data showed that cardiac glycosides diminished paclitaxel-induced accumulation of microtubule spindles; however, in a non-cell assay system, cardiac glycosides had little influence on colchicine- and paclitaxel-induced microtubule dynamics. Using an isotope-labeled assay method, we found that ouabain modestly but significantly inhibited the transport of [(14)C]paclitaxel from the cytosol into the nucleus. It is suggested that cardiac glycosides inhibit the G2/M arrest induced by tubulin-binding anticancer drugs via an indirect blockade on microtubule function. The decline in transport of these drugs into the nucleus may partly explain the action of cardiac glycosides. PMID:12218360

  9. Identification of novel androgen receptor target genes in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald William L

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The androgen receptor (AR plays critical roles in both androgen-dependent and castrate-resistant prostate cancer (PCa. However, little is known about AR target genes that mediate the receptor's roles in disease progression. Results Using Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP Display, we discovered 19 novel loci occupied by the AR in castrate resistant C4-2B PCa cells. Only four of the 19 AR-occupied regions were within 10-kb 5'-flanking regulatory sequences. Three were located up to 4-kb 3' of the nearest gene, eight were intragenic and four were in gene deserts. Whereas the AR occupied the same loci in C4-2B (castrate resistant and LNCaP (androgen-dependent PCa cells, differences between the two cell lines were observed in the response of nearby genes to androgens. Among the genes strongly stimulated by DHT in C4-2B cells – D-dopachrome tautomerase (DDT, Protein kinase C delta (PRKCD, Glutathione S- transferase theta 2 (GSTT2, Transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 3 (TRPV3, and Pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase 1 (PYCR1 – most were less strongly or hardly stimulated in LNCaP cells. Another AR target gene, ornithine aminotransferase (OAT, was AR-stimulated in a ligand-independent manner, since it was repressed by AR siRNA knockdown, but not stimulated by DHT. We also present evidence for in vivo AR-mediated regulation of several genes identified by ChIP Display. For example, PRKCD and PYCR1, which may contribute to PCa cell growth and survival, are expressed in PCa biopsies from primary tumors before and after ablation and in metastatic lesions in a manner consistent with AR-mediated stimulation. Conclusion AR genomic occupancy is similar between LNCaP and C4-2B cells and is not biased towards 5' gene flanking sequences. The AR transcriptionally regulates less than half the genes nearby AR-occupied regions, usually but not always, in a ligand-dependent manner. Most are stimulated and a few are

  10. Icaritin suppresses development of neuroendocrine differentiation of prostate cancer through inhibition of IL-6/STAT3 and Aurora kinase A pathways in TRAMP mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Feng; Zhang, Zhi Wei; Tan, Ee Min; Lim, Z L Ryan; Li, Yu; Wang, Xiao Chong; Chua, Seok Eng; Li, Jun; Cheung, Edwin; Yong, Eu-Leong

    2016-07-01

    Neuroendocrine prostate cancer (NEPC) has a poor prognosis, with a median survival of less than 1 year after diagnosis. Following androgen deprivation therapy, prostate adenocarcinoma cells have been observed to develop an androgen receptor-negative, terminally differentiated and indolent neuroendocrine-like phenotype. However, several molecular events, including interleukin 6 (IL-6) stimulation, in the prostate microenvironment result in the appearance of aggressive, highly proliferative castrate-resistant NEPC. In this study, we examined the mechanistic effects of a natural prenylflavonoid, icaritin (ICT), on neuroendocrine differentiation in IL-6-induced LNCaP cells and NEPC development in the male transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. TRAMP mice received daily intraperitoneal injection of ICT or vehicle. ICT induced apoptosis in prostate tumor, suppressed NEPC development and, accordingly, improved overall survival in TRAMP mice. Expression of neuroendocrine markers (synaptophysin) and androgen receptor in TRAMP mice and neuroendocrine-like LNCaP cells were inhibited by ICT. Suppression of neuroendocrine and NEPC development by ICT was associated with dose-dependent inhibitory effects on abnormally elevated IL-6/STAT3 and Aurora kinase A in vitro and in vivo Since ICT demonstrated favorable pharmacokinetic and safety profiles with marked enrichment in prostate tissues, our study provides evidence for the development of prenylflavonoid as a multimodal therapeutic agent against NEPC. PMID:27207661

  11. Morphological differences between circulating tumor cells from prostate cancer patients and cultured prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunyoung Park

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cell (CTC enumeration promises to be an important predictor of clinical outcome for a range of cancers. Established CTC enumeration methods primarily rely on affinity capture of cell surface antigens, and have been criticized for underestimation of CTC numbers due to antigenic bias. Emerging CTC capture strategies typically distinguish these cells based on their assumed biomechanical characteristics, which are often validated using cultured cancer cells. In this study, we developed a software tool to investigate the morphological properties of CTCs from patients with castrate resistant prostate cancer and cultured prostate cancer cells in order to establish whether the latter is an appropriate model for the former. We isolated both CTCs and cultured cancer cells from whole blood using the CellSearch® system and examined various cytomorphological characteristics. In contrast with cultured cancer cells, CTCs enriched by CellSearch® system were found to have significantly smaller size, larger nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio, and more elongated shape. These CTCs were also found to exhibit significantly more variability than cultured cancer cells in nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio and shape profile.

  12. Prognostic significance of genetic polymorphisms in disease progression and survival in prostate cancer after androgen deprivation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-Yi Huang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It is believed that androgens and their receptors regulate normal prostate growth and mediate prostate cancer development. Androgen deprivation therapy is the most commonly used treatment for advanced prostate cancer. Although the therapy is initially effective, progression of the disease to castration-resistant prostate cancer is almost inevitable, leading to treatment failure. Despite the existence of current clinical parameters, new biomarkers are urgently needed to improve the prognosis. Some molecules and DNA-based genetic biomarkers are under investigation as potential prognostic factors. The advancement in molecular cytogenetic research, such as genome-wide association for single-nucleotide polymorphisms, has made possible the detection of genetic mutations. In this study, a literature search from August 1985 to April 2013 was performed through the PubMed database using the keywords “genetic polymorphisms”, “prostate cancer” and “androgen deprivation therapy”. The results revealed that several genome-wide association studies (such as rs16901979, rs7931342, HSD17B4, rs6162 in the CYP17A1, rs4243229 and rs7201637 in the HSD17B2, rs1062577 in the ESR1, SLCO1B3, SLCO2B1, rs2939244 in the ARRDC3, rs9508016 in the FLT1, rs6504145 in the SKAP1, rs7830611 in the FBXO32, rs9508016 in the FLT1, rs12529 in the AKR1C3, rs16934641 in the BNC2, rs3763763 in the TACC2, rs2051778 in the ALPK1, and rs3763763 in the TACC2, AR, ESR1, and ESR2 and single-nucleotide polymorphisms in important pathways (such as androgen signal, biosynthesis, metabolism, androgen receptor binding site, response element, androgen receptor CAG repeat polymorphism length, and estrogen receptor-binding sites involved in prostate cancer occurrence and mechanism could serve as candidate biomarkers for the early detection of castration-resistant prostate cancer after androgen deprivation therapy. Additional investigations are required to decipher precisely the gene

  13. Cloning of a novel insulin-regulated ghrelin transcript in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seim, Inge; Lubik, Amy A; Lehman, Melanie L; Tomlinson, Nadine; Whiteside, Eliza J; Herington, Adrian C; Nelson, Colleen C; Chopin, Lisa K

    2013-04-01

    Ghrelin is a multifunctional hormone, with roles in stimulating appetite and regulating energy balance, insulin secretion and glucose homoeostasis. The ghrelin gene locus (GHRL) is highly complex and gives rise to a range of novel transcripts derived from alternative first exons and internally spliced exons. The wild-type transcript encodes a 117 amino acid preprohormone that is processed to yield the 28 amino acid peptide ghrelin. Here, we identified insulin-responsive transcription corresponding to cryptic exons in intron 2 of the human ghrelin gene. A transcript, termed in2c-ghrelin (intron 2-cryptic), was cloned from the testis and the LNCaP prostate cancer cell line. This transcript may encode an 83 amino acid preproghrelin isoform that codes for ghrelin, but not obestatin. It is expressed in a limited number of normal tissues and in tumours of the prostate, testis, breast and ovary. Finally, we confirmed that in2c-ghrelin transcript expression, as well as the recently described in1-ghrelin transcript, is significantly upregulated by insulin in cultured prostate cancer cells. Metabolic syndrome and hyperinsulinaemia have been associated with prostate cancer risk and progression. This may be particularly significant after androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer, which induces hyperinsulinaemia, and this could contribute to castrate-resistant prostate cancer growth. We have previously demonstrated that ghrelin stimulates prostate cancer cell line proliferation in vitro. This study is the first description of insulin regulation of a ghrelin transcript in cancer and should provide further impetus for studies into the expression, regulation and function of ghrelin gene products.

  14. The Androgen Receptor Regulates PPARγ Expression and Activity in Human Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olokpa, Emuejevoke; Bolden, Adrienne; Stewart, LaMonica V

    2016-12-01

    The peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that regulates growth and differentiation within normal prostate and prostate cancers. However the factors that control PPARγ within the prostate cancers have not been characterized. The goal of this study was to examine whether the androgen receptor (AR) regulates PPARγ expression and function within human prostate cancer cells. qRT-PCR and Western blot analyses revealed nanomolar concentrations of the AR agonist dihydrotestosterone (DHT) decrease PPARγ mRNA and protein within the castration-resistant, AR-positive C4-2 and VCaP human prostate cancer cell lines. The AR antagonists bicalutamide and enzalutamide blocked the ability of DHT to reduce PPARγ levels. In addition, siRNA mediated knockdown of AR increased PPARγ protein levels and ligand-induced PPARγ transcriptional activity within the C4-2 cell line. Furthermore, proteasome inhibitors that interfere with AR function increased the level of basal PPARγ and prevented the DHT-mediated suppression of PPARγ. These data suggest that AR normally functions to suppress PPARγ expression within AR-positive prostate cancer cells. To determine whether increases in AR protein would influence PPARγ expression and activity, we used lipofectamine-based transfections to overexpress AR within the AR-null PC-3 cells. The addition of AR to PC-3 cells did not significantly alter PPARγ protein levels. However, the ability of the PPARγ ligand rosiglitazone to induce activation of a PPARγ-driven luciferase reporter and induce expression of FABP4 was suppressed in AR-positive PC-3 cells. Together, these data indicate AR serves as a key modulator of PPARγ expression and function within prostate tumors. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2664-2672, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26945682

  15. Integrated multimodal imaging of dynamic bone-tumor alterations associated with metastatic prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Christophe Brisset

    Full Text Available Bone metastasis occurs for men with advanced prostate cancer which promotes osseous growth and destruction driven by alterations in osteoblast and osteoclast homeostasis. Patients can experience pain, spontaneous fractures and morbidity eroding overall quality of life. The complex and dynamic cellular interactions within the bone microenvironment limit current treatment options thus prostate to bone metastases remains incurable. This study uses voxel-based analysis of diffusion-weighted MRI and CT scans to simultaneously evaluate temporal changes in normal bone homeostasis along with prostate bone metatastsis to deliver an improved understanding of the spatiotemporal local microenvironment. Dynamic tumor-stromal interactions were assessed during treatment in mouse models along with a pilot prospective clinical trial with metastatic hormone sensitive and castration resistant prostate cancer patients with bone metastases. Longitudinal changes in tumor and bone imaging metrics during delivery of therapy were quantified. Studies revealed that voxel-based parametric response maps (PRM of DW-MRI and CT scans could be used to quantify and spatially visualize dynamic changes during prostate tumor growth and in response to treatment thereby distinguishing patients with stable disease from those with progressive disease (p<0.05. These studies suggest that PRM imaging biomarkers are useful for detection of the impact of prostate tumor-stromal responses to therapies thus demonstrating the potential of multi-modal PRM image-based biomarkers as a novel means for assessing dynamic alterations associated with metastatic prostate cancer. These results establish an integrated and clinically translatable approach which can be readily implemented for improving the clinical management of patients with metastatic bone disease.

  16. A novel rabbit anti-hepatocyte growth factor monoclonal neutralizing antibody inhibits tumor growth in prostate cancer cells and mouse xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Yanlan; Chen, Yicheng; Ding, Guoqing; Wang, Mingchao; Wu, Haiyang; Xu, Liwei; Rui, Xuefang; Zhang, Zhigen, E-mail: srrshurology@163.com

    2015-08-14

    The hepatocyte growth factor and its receptor c-Met are correlated with castration-resistance in prostate cancer. Although HGF has been considered as an attractive target for therapeutic antibodies, the lack of cross-reactivity of monoclonal antibodies with human/mouse HGFs is a major obstacle in preclinical developments. We generated a panel of anti-HGF RabMAbs either blocking HGF/c-Met interaction or inhibiting c-Met phosphorylation. We selected one RabMAb with mouse cross-reactivity and demonstrated that it blocked HGF-stimulated downstream activation in PC-3 and DU145 cells. Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibited not only the growth of PC-3 cells but also HGF-dependent proliferation in HUVECs. We further demonstrated the efficacy and potency of the anti-HGF RabMAb in tumor xenograft mice models. Through these in vitro and in vivo experiments, we explored a novel therapeutic antibody for advanced prostate cancer. - Highlights: • HGF is an attractive target for castration-refractory prostate cancer. • We generated and characterized a panel of anti-HGF rabbit monoclonal antibodies. • More than half of these anti-HGF RabMAbs was cross-reactive with mouse HGF. • Anti-HGF RabMAb blocks HGF-stimulated phosphorylation and cell growth in vitro. • Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis in xenograft mice.

  17. Asian trends in primar y androgen depletion therapy on prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hideyuki Akaza

    2013-01-01

    hTere are notable differences in the incidence and mortality rates for prostate cancer between Asia and Western countries. It is also recognized that there are differences in thinking with regard to treatment options. Recently it is also the case that opinions have been reported concerning the differences between Asian and Western patients with regard to their reaction to androgen depletion therapy (ADT). Given that ADT is a method of treatment that focuses on the elimination of testosterone, an inevitable symptom of its administration is testosterone losing syndrome. It is for this reason that in Western countries ADT has only been recommended in cases of advanced or metastatic cancer. On the other hand, in Asia, ADT is used in relatively many cases, including non-metastatic localized cancer and invasive localized cancer. To date, however, there has been little substantive discussion concerning this difference in utilization of ADT. ADT-related drugs for prostate cancer and the development of new drugs for castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) have been actively tested in recent years. It could be the case that analyzing the differences in concepts about ADT between Asia and the West could contribute to the effective use of ADT-related drugs and also help to build new treatment strategies for prostate cancer.

  18. Looking beyond Androgen Receptor Signaling in the Treatment of Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Sunkel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This review will provide a description of recent efforts in our laboratory contributing to a general goal of identifying critical determinants of prostate cancer growth in both androgen-dependent and -independent contexts. Important outcomes to date have indicated that the sustained activation of AR transcriptional activity in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC cells results in a gene expression profile separate from the androgen-responsive profile of androgen-dependent prostate cancer (ADPC cells. Contributing to this reprogramming is enhanced FoxA1 recruitment of AR to G2/M phase target gene loci and the enhanced chromatin looping of CRPC-specific gene regulatory elements facilitated by PI3K/Akt-phosphorylated MED1. We have also observed a role for FoxA1 beyond AR signaling in driving G1/S phase cell cycle progression that relies on interactions with novel collaborators MYBL2 and CREB1. Finally, we describe an in-depth mechanism of GATA2-mediated androgen-responsive gene expression in both ADPC and CRPC cells. Altogether these efforts provide evidence to support the development of novel prostate cancer therapeutics that address downstream targets of AR activity as well as AR-independent drivers of disease-relevant transcription programs.

  19. The significance of dynamin 2 expression for prostate cancer progression, prognostication, and therapeutic targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bin; Teng, Liang Hong; Silva, Sabrina Daniela da; Bijian, Krikor; Al Bashir, Samir; Jie, Su; Dolph, Michael; Alaoui-Jamali, Moulay A; Bismar, Tarek A

    2014-02-01

    Dynamin 2 (Dyn2) is essential for intracellular vesicle formation and trafficking, cytokinesis, and receptor endocytosis. In this study, we investigated the implication of Dyn2 as a prognostic marker and therapeutic target for progressive prostate cancer (PCA). We evaluated Dyn2 protein expression by immunohistochemistry in two cohorts: men with localized PCA treated by retropubic radical prostatectomy (n = 226), and men with advanced/castrate-resistant PCA (CRPC) treated by transurethral resection of prostate (TURP) (n = 253). The role of Dyn2 in cell invasiveness was assessed by in vitro and in vivo experiments using androgen-responsive and refractory PCA preclinical models. Dyn2 expression was significantly increased across advanced stages of PCA compared to benign prostate tissue (P size and lymph node metastases in vivo. In isolated PCA cells, Dyn2 was found to regulate focal adhesion turnover, which is critical for cell migration; this mechanism requires full Dyn2 compared to mutants deficient in GTPase activity. In conclusion, Dyn2 overexpression is associated with neoplastic prostate epithelium and is associated with poor prognosis. Inhibition of Dyn2 prevents cell invasiveness in androgen-responsive and -refractory PCA models, supporting the potential benefit of Dyn2 to serve as a therapeutic target for advanced PCA.

  20. The Multifaceted Roles of STAT3 Signaling in the Progression of Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, Jennifer L.; Thaper, Daksh; Zoubeidi, Amina, E-mail: azoubeidi@prostatecentre.com [The Vancouver Prostate Centre, Department of Urologic Sciences, University of British Columbia, 2660 Oak Street, Vancouver British Columbia, V6H 3Z6 (Canada)

    2014-04-09

    The signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)3 governs essential functions of epithelial and hematopoietic cells that are often dysregulated in cancer. While the role for STAT3 in promoting the progression of many solid and hematopoietic malignancies is well established, this review will focus on the importance of STAT3 in prostate cancer progression to the incurable metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Indeed, STAT3 integrates different signaling pathways involved in the reactivation of androgen receptor pathway, stem like cells and the epithelial to mesenchymal transition that drive progression to mCRPC. As equally important, STAT3 regulates interactions between tumor cells and the microenvironment as well as immune cell activation. This makes it a major factor in facilitating prostate cancer escape from detection of the immune response, promoting an immunosuppressive environment that allows growth and metastasis. Based on the multifaceted nature of STAT3 signaling in the progression to mCRPC, the promise of STAT3 as a therapeutic target to prevent prostate cancer progression and the variety of STAT3 inhibitors used in cancer therapies is discussed.

  1. Anti-androgen resistance in prostate cancer cells chronically induced by interleukin-1β

    OpenAIRE

    Staverosky, Julia A.; Zhu, Xin-Hua; Ha, Susan; Logan, Susan K.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic inflammation has been linked to cancer initiation and progression in a variety of tissues, yet the impact of acute and chronic inflammatory signaling on androgen receptor function has not been widely studied. In this report, we examine the impact of the inflammation-linked cytokine, interleukin-1β on androgen receptor function in prostate cancer cells. We demonstrate that acute interleukin-1β treatment inhibits the transcription of the androgen receptor gene itself, resulting in the r...

  2. Identification of prostate-specific G-protein coupled receptor as a tumor antigen recognized by CD8(+ T cells for cancer immunotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoko Matsueda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among elderly men in the US, and immunotherapy has been shown to be a promising strategy to treat patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Efforts to identify novel prostate specific tumor antigens will facilitate the development of effective cancer vaccines against prostate cancer. Prostate-specific G-protein coupled receptor (PSGR is a novel antigen that has been shown to be specifically over-expressed in human prostate cancer tissues. In this study, we describe the identification of PSGR-derived peptide epitopes recognized by CD8(+ T cells in an HLA-A2 dependent manner. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Twenty-one PSGR-derived peptides were predicted by an immuno-informatics approach based on the HLA-A2 binding motif. These peptides were examined for their ability to induce peptide-specific T cell responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs obtained from either HLA-A2(+ healthy donors or HLA-A2(+ prostate cancer patients. The recognition of HLA-A2 positive and PSGR expressing LNCaP cells was also tested. Among the 21 PSGR-derived peptides, three peptides, PSGR3, PSGR4 and PSGR14 frequently induced peptide-specific T cell responses in PBMCs from both healthy donors and prostate cancer patients. Importantly, these peptide-specific T cells recognized and killed LNCaP prostate cancer cells in an HLA class I-restricted manner. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have identified three novel HLA-A2-restricted PSGR-derived peptides recognized by CD8(+ T cells, which, in turn, recognize HLA-A2(+ and PSGR(+ tumor cells. The PSGR-derived peptides identified may be used as diagnostic markers as well as immune targets for development of anticancer vaccines.

  3. Enlarged prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    BPH; Benign prostatic hyperplasia (hypertrophy); Prostate - enlarged ... Lepor H. Evaluation and nonsurgical management of benign prostatic hyperplasia. In: Wein AJ, ed. Campbell-Walsh Urology . 10th ...

  4. Integrated Proteomic and Glycoproteomic Analyses of Prostate Cancer Cells Reveal Glycoprotein Alteration in Protein Abundance and Glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Punit; Wang, Xiangchun; Yang, Weiming; Toghi Eshghi, Shadi; Sun, Shisheng; Hoti, Naseruddin; Chen, Lijun; Yang, Shuang; Pasay, Jered; Rubin, Abby; Zhang, Hui

    2015-10-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men in the U.S. and worldwide, and androgen-deprivation therapy remains the principal treatment for patients. Although a majority of patients initially respond to androgen-deprivation therapy, most will eventually develop castration resistance. An increased understanding of the mechanisms that underline the pathogenesis of castration resistance is therefore needed to develop novel therapeutics. LNCaP and PC3 prostate cancer cell lines are models for androgen-dependence and androgen-independence, respectively. Herein, we report the comparative analysis of these two prostate cancer cell lines using integrated global proteomics and glycoproteomics. Global proteome profiling of the cell lines using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling and two- dimensional (2D) liquid chromatography-tandem MS (LC-MS/MS) led to the quantification of 8063 proteins. To analyze the glycoproteins, glycosite-containing peptides were isolated from the same iTRAQ-labeled peptides from the cell lines using solid phase extraction followed by LC-MS/MS analysis. Among the 1810 unique N-linked glycosite-containing peptides from 653 identified N-glycoproteins, 176 glycoproteins were observed to be different between the two cell lines. A majority of the altered glycoproteins were also observed with changes in their global protein expression levels. However, alterations in 21 differentially expressed glycoproteins showed no change at the protein abundance level, indicating that the glycosylation site occupancy was different between the two cell lines. To determine the glycosylation heterogeneity at specific glycosylation sites, we further identified and quantified 1145 N-linked glycopeptides with attached glycans in the same iTRAQ-labeled samples. These intact glycopeptides contained 67 glycan compositions and showed increased fucosylation in PC3 cells in several of the examined glycosylation sites. The increase in

  5. Elimination of Enhanced Thermal Resistance of Spheroid Culture Model of Prostate Carcinoma Cell Line by Inhibitors of Hsp70 Induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samideh Khoei

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the enhanced thermal resistancemechanism of the DU145 tumor spheroid cultures as compared to the prostate carcinomacell line's monolayer cultures.Materials and Methods: DU145 cells were cultured either as spheroids or monolayers.Cultures were treated with hyperthermia in a precision water bath (at 43°C for 60 minutesand/or quercetin (50 and 500 μM for monolayer and spheroid cultures respectively. Afterhyperthermic treatment, the cell viability colony forming ability, and the expression of heatshock protein 70 (Hsp70 were examined in both culture systems. Hsp70 expression wasstudied using the western blot method.Results: Our results showed that the DU145 monolayer and spheroid cell culture treatmentwith hyperthermia alone resulted in a marked survival inhibition. Furthermore, thespheroids showed a more significant resistance to hyperthermia compared to the monolayercultures (p = 0.01. They also produced more Hsp70 than the monolayer cultures.Treatment of cells with quercetin reduced the Hsp70 level in both culture systems. However,with the reduced Hsp70 levels, thermal resistance of the spheroids showed a greaterdecrease in relation to that of the monolayers.Conclusion: The results suggest that the enhanced hyperthermia resistance mechanismof the spheroid cultures compared to that of the monolayer cultures can be attributed tospheroids' Hsp70 production.

  6. Androgen deprivation therapy sensitizes prostate cancer cells to T-cell killing through androgen receptor dependent modulation of the apoptotic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardiani, Andressa; Gameiro, Sofia R; Kwilas, Anna R; Donahue, Renee N; Hodge, James W

    2014-10-15

    Despite recent advances in diagnosis and management, prostrate cancer remains the second most common cause of death from cancer in American men, after lung cancer. Failure of chemotherapies and hormone-deprivation therapies is the major cause of death in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Currently, the androgen inhibitors enzalutamide and abiraterone are approved for treatment of metastatic CRPC. Here we show for the first time that both enzalutamide and abiraterone render prostate tumor cells more sensitive to T cell-mediated lysis through immunogenic modulation, and that these immunomodulatory activities are androgen receptor (AR)-dependent. In studies reported here, the NAIP gene was significantly down-regulated in human prostate tumor cells treated in vitro and in vivo with enzalutamide. Functional analysis revealed that NAIP played a critical role in inducing CTL sensitivity. Amplification of AR is a major mechanism of resistance to androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT). Here, we show that enzalutamide enhances sensitivity to immune-mediated killing of prostate tumor cells that overexpress AR. The immunomodulatory properties of enzalutamide and abiraterone provide a rationale for their use in combination with immunotherapeutic agents in CRPC, especially for patients with minimal response to enzalutamide or abiraterone alone, or for patients who have developed resistance to ADT. PMID:25344864

  7. Prostate Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Prostate Ultrasound of the prostate uses sound waves ... the limitations of Prostate Ultrasound Imaging? What is Ultrasound Imaging of the Prostate? Ultrasound is safe and ...

  8. A peptide against soluble guanylyl cyclase α1: a new approach to treating prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Gao

    Full Text Available Among the many identified androgen-regulated genes, sGCα1 (soluble guanylyl cyclase α1 appears to play a pivotal role in mediating the pro-cancer effects of androgens and androgen receptor. The classical role for sGCα1 is to heterodimerize with the sGCβ1 subunit, forming sGC, the enzyme that mediates nitric oxide signaling by catalyzing the synthesis of cyclic guanosine monophosphate. Our published data show that sGCα1 can drive prostate cancer cell proliferation independent of hormone and provide cancer cells a pro-survival function, via a novel mechanism for p53 inhibition, both of which are independent of sGCβ1, NO, and cGMP. All of these properties make sGCα1 an important novel target for prostate cancer therapy. Thus, peptides were designed targeting sGCα1 with the aim of disrupting this protein's pro-cancer activities. One peptide (A-8R was determined to be strongly cytotoxic to prostate cancer cells, rapidly inducing apoptosis. Cytotoxicity was observed in both hormone-dependent and, significantly, hormone-refractory prostate cancer cells, opening the possibility that this peptide can be used to treat the usually lethal castration-resistant prostate cancer. In mouse xenograft studies, Peptide A-8R was able to stop tumor growth of not only hormone-dependent cells, but most importantly from hormone-independent cells. In addition, the mechanism of Peptide A cytotoxicity is generation of reactive oxygen species, which recently have been recognized as a major mode of action of important cancer drugs. Thus, this paper provides strong evidence that targeting an important AR-regulated gene is a new paradigm for effective prostate cancer therapy.

  9. Is DHT Production by 5α-Reductase Friend or Foe in Prostate Cancer?

    OpenAIRE

    Takeo eKosaka; Akira eMiyajima; Mototsugu eOya

    2014-01-01

    The first advance in the history of studies on prostate cancer and androgens was the development of treatment with castration and administration of estrogen by Charles B Huggins, who won the Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine. Since then, and for 70 years, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been the standard therapy for advanced prostate cancer and the center of studies on prostate cancer (PCa). However, recent advances have shed light on the relationship between androgens and the dev...

  10. Epigenomic Alterations in Localized and Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Chun Lin

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Although prostate cancer (PCa is the second leading cause of cancer death among men worldwide, not all men diagnosed with PCa will die from the disease. A critical challenge, therefore, is to distinguish indolent PCa from more advanced forms to guide appropriate treatment decisions. We used Enhanced Reduced Representation Bisulfite Sequencing, a genome-wide high-coverage single-base resolution DNA methylation method to profile seven localized PCa samples, seven matched benign prostate tissues, and six aggressive castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC samples. We integrated these data with RNA-seq and whole-genome DNA-seq data to comprehensively characterize the PCa methylome, detect changes associated with disease progression, and identify novel candidate prognostic biomarkers. Our analyses revealed the correlation of cytosine guanine dinucleotide island (CGI-specific hypermethylation with disease severity and association of certain breakpoints (deletion, tandem duplications, and interchromosomal translocations with DNA methylation. Furthermore, integrative analysis of methylation and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs uncovered widespread allele-specific methylation (ASM for the first time in PCa. We found that most DNA methylation changes occurred in the context of ASM, suggesting that variations in tumor epigenetic landscape of individuals are partly mediated by genetic differences, which may affect PCa disease progression. We further selected a panel of 13 CGIs demonstrating increased DNA methylation with disease progression and validated this panel in an independent cohort of 20 benign prostate tissues, 16 PCa, and 8 aggressive CRPCs. These results warrant clinical evaluation in larger cohorts to help distinguish indolent PCa from advanced disease.

  11. Berberine inhibits androgen synthesis by interaction with aldo-keto reductase 1C3 in 22Rv1 prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yuantong; Zhao, Lijing; Wang, Ye; Zhang, Haitao; Xu, Duo; Zhao, Xuejian; Li, Yi; Li, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 has recently been regarded as a potential therapeutic target in castrate-resistant prostate cancer. Herein, we investigated whether berberine delayed the progression of castrate-resistant prostate cancer by reducing androgen synthesis through the inhibition of Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3. Cell viability and cellular testosterone content were measured in prostate cancer cells. Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 mRNA and protein level were detected by RT-PCR and Western bolt analyses, respectively. Computer analysis with AutoDock Tools explored the molecular interaction of berberine with Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3. We found that berberine inhibited 22Rv1 cells proliferation and decreased cellular testosterone formation in a dose-dependent manner. Berberine inhibited Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 enzyme activity, rather than influenced mRNA and protein expressions. Molecular docking study demonstrated that berberine could enter the active center of Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 and form p-p interaction with the amino-acid residue Phe306 and Phe311. In conclusion, the structural interaction of berberine with Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 is attributed to the suppression of Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 enzyme activity and the inhibition of 22Rv1 prostate cancer cell growth by decreasing the intracellular androgen synthesis. Our result provides the experimental basis for the design, research, and development of AKR1C3 inhibitors using berberine as the lead compound. PMID:26698234

  12. 177Lu-EDTMP for palliation of pain from bone metastases in patients with prostate and breast cancer: a phase II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of 177Lu-EDTMP for pain palliation in patients with bone metastases from castration-resistant prostate and breast cancer. The secondary objective was to compare low-dose and high-dose 177Lu-EDTMP in bone pain palliation. Included in the study were 44 patients with documented breast carcinoma (12 patients; age 47 ± 13 years) or castration-resistant prostate carcinoma (32 patients; age 66 ± 9 years) and skeletal metastases. Patients were randomized into two equal groups treated with 177Lu-EDTMP intravenously at a dose of 1,295 MBq (group A) or 2,590 MBq (group B). Pain palliation was evaluated using a visual analogue score (VAS), analgesic score (AS) and Karnofsky performance score (KPS) up to 16 weeks. Toxicity was assessed in terms of haematological and renal parameters. The overall response rate (in all 44 patients) was 86 %. Complete, partial and minimal responses were seen in 6 patients (13 %), 21 patients (48 %) and 11 patients (25 %), respectively. A favourable response was seen in 27 patients (84 %) with prostate cancer and in 11 patients (92 %) with breast cancer. There was a progressive decrease in the VAS from baseline up to 4 weeks (p 177Lu-EDTMP was found to be a safe and effective radiopharmaceutical for bone pain palliation in patients with metastatic prostate and breast carcinoma. There were no differences in efficacy or toxicity between patients receiving low-dose and high-dose 177Lu-EDTMP. (orig.)

  13. The Early Effects of Rapid Androgen Deprivation on Human Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Shaw, Greg L; Whitaker, Hayley; Corcoran, Marie; Dunning, Mark J.; Luxton, Hayley; Kay, Jonathan; Massie, Charlie E; Miller, Jodi L.; Lamb, Alastair D.; Ross-Adams, Helen; Russell, Roslin; Adam W Nelson; Eldridge, Matthew D.; Lynch, Andrew G.; Ramos-Montoya, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is the dominant growth factor in prostate cancer (PCa). Therefore, understanding how ARs regulate the human transcriptome is of paramount importance. The early effects of castration on human PCa have not previously been studied 27 patients medically castrated with degarelix 7 d before radical prostatectomy. We used mass spectrometry, immunohistochemistry, and gene expression array (validated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction) to compare resected tum...

  14. Irrefutable evidence for the use of docetaxel in newly diagnosed metastatic prostate cancer: results from the STAMPEDE and CHAARTED trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Soest, Robert J; de Wit, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been used in the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer since the first description of its hormonal dependence in 1941. In 2004, docetaxel chemotherapy became the mainstay of treatment in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), following robust, albeit modest, survival benefit in two randomized phase 3 trials. The recently published CHAARTED trial was the first to show that combining ADT with docetaxel in men with hormone-naïve (hormone-sensitive) metastatic prostate cancer (mHSPC) yielded a remarkable overall survival benefit of 13.6 months as compared with ADT alone. In the current issue of The Lancet, James et al. report results of the STAMPEDE trial in men with high-risk locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer initiating long-term hormone therapy. The combination of six cycles of docetaxel with ADT in men commencing long-term ADT demonstrated a similar OS benefit compared with standard of care (SOC) by a median of 10 months. Based on the consistency of the data and the firmness of the benefit provided, docetaxel in addition to ADT should be considered SOC for men with newly diagnosed mHSPC. PMID:26695172

  15. The CT flare response of metastatic bone disease in prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messiou, Christina; deSouza, Nandita M. (Cancer Research UK Clinical Magnetic Resonance Research Group, Inst. of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Surrey (United Kingdom)), email: Christina.Messiou@icr.ac.uk; Cook, Gary (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Surrey (United Kingdom)); Reid, Alison H.M.; Attard, Gerhardt; Dearnaley, David; deBono, Johann S. (Inst. of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Surrey (United Kingdom))

    2011-06-15

    Background New or worsening bone lesions in patients responding to treatment, known as the flare phenomenon is well described on 99mTc-MDP bone scintigraphy, but to our knowledge has not previously been described on CT. The appearance of new or worsening bone sclerosis on CT in patients with prostate cancer may therefore be erroneously classified as disease progression. Purpose To assess the incidence of osteoblastic healing flare response at 3-month CT assessment in patients with castrate-resistant prostate cancer and to identify associated features that enable differentiation from progressive metastatic bone disease at 3 months. Material and Methods CT scans of 67 patients with castrate-resistant prostate cancer undergoing treatment were reviewed by a radiologist blinded to clinical outcome. Changes in number, size, and density of metastatic bone lesions were documented and Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours (RECIST) in soft tissue lesions, alkaline phosphatase, prostate specific antigen, and 99mTc-MDP bone scans were used for correlation. Results Of the 39 patients who had 3- and 6-month follow-up, eight patients (21%) demonstrated an increase in number, size, or density of sclerotic lesions on the 3-month CT scan despite improvement in PSA and soft tissue lesions. Three out of eight patients (8%) maintained partial response/remained stable at follow-up and were defined as showing a flare response: in this group bone metastases evident on CT showed a qualitative and quantitative increase in density and no lesions faded at 3 months. In contrast, in all patients who progressed at 3 months by PSA/RECIST criteria (n = 8) bone lesions showed a mixed pattern with some lesions increasing and others decreasing in density. Conclusion The incidence of flare response of metastatic bone disease evident at 3-month post-treatment CT in patients with prostate cancer undergoing systemic treatment is 8%. In patients with falling PSA and stable/responding soft tissue

  16. Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors and Prostate Cancer: A New Frontier?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modena, Alessandra; Ciccarese, Chiara; Iacovelli, Roberto; Brunelli, Matteo; Montironi, Rodolfo; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Massari, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), agents that provide durable disease control and long-term survival are still needed. It is a fact that a tumor-induced immunosuppressive status (mediated by aberrant activation of inhibitory immune checkpoint pathways as a mechanism to evade host immune surveillance) plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of cancer, including prostate cancer (PC), making CRPC patients suitable candidates for immunotherapy. Therefore, growing interest of anticancer research aims at blocking immune checkpoints (mainly targeting CTLA-4 and PD1/PD-L1 pathways) to restore and enhance cellular-mediated antitumor immunity and achieve durable tumor regression. In this review, we describe the current knowledge regarding the role of immune checkpoints in mediating PC progression, focusing on CTLA-4 and PD1 pathways. We also provide current clinical data available, an update on ongoing trials of immune checkpoint inhibitors in PC. Finally, we discuss the necessity to identify prognostic and predictive biomarkers of immune activity, and we analyze new immune checkpoints with a role as promising targets for PC therapy. PMID:27471580

  17. Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors and Prostate Cancer: A New Frontier?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modena, Alessandra; Ciccarese, Chiara; Iacovelli, Roberto; Brunelli, Matteo; Montironi, Rodolfo; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Massari, Francesco

    2016-04-15

    Despite recent advances in the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), agents that provide durable disease control and long-term survival are still needed. It is a fact that a tumor-induced immunosuppressive status (mediated by aberrant activation of inhibitory immune checkpoint pathways as a mechanism to evade host immune surveillance) plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of cancer, including prostate cancer (PC), making CRPC patients suitable candidates for immunotherapy. Therefore, growing interest of anticancer research aims at blocking immune checkpoints (mainly targeting CTLA-4 and PD1/PD-L1 pathways) to restore and enhance cellular-mediated antitumor immunity and achieve durable tumor regression. In this review, we describe the current knowledge regarding the role of immune checkpoints in mediating PC progression, focusing on CTLA-4 and PD1 pathways. We also provide current clinical data available, an update on ongoing trials of immune checkpoint inhibitors in PC. Finally, we discuss the necessity to identify prognostic and predictive biomarkers of immune activity, and we analyze new immune checkpoints with a role as promising targets for PC therapy.

  18. What controls PTEN and what it controls (in prostate cancer)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paramita M Ghosh

    2012-01-01

    The standard of care for metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) is androgen deprivation therapy since almost all PCa growth is initially reliant on the androgen receptor (AR).However,almost all patients develop resistance to this therapy within 18-24months,and current treatment for castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is extremely limited,despite the advent of new drugs that target the AR,such as ahiraterone and MDV3100.1 Multiple studies have associated the loss of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10(PTEN),a dual lipid and protein phosphatase that is frequently lost in prostate cancer,with the development of CRPC.2,3 Yet,multiple studies have shown that at least 20%-40%of primary PCa,which are almost always androgen sensitive,experience a loss of PTEN,4,5 while as many as 30% of CRPC tumors are PTEN-positive.6 The broad questions then facing researchers are:(i) How does PTEN loss cause CRPC?;(ii) What is the mechanism of CRPC development in PTEN+/+ tumors?;and (iii) How can CRPC tumors be inhibited in PTEN-null cells?Three new publications in recent times have come up with mechanisms that answer these questions.7-9 Two of these,both in Cancer Cell eadier this year,from the laboratories of Dr Charles Sawyers and Dr Hong Wu,address a novel negative feedback regulation between AR and PTEN,and all three,including the one from Dr Damu Tang,show that the loss of PTEN function is likely the first step towards the development of CRPC.

  19. The evolving role of cytotoxic chemotherapy in the management of patients with metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Elan; Garcias, María del Carmen; Karir, Beerinder; Tagawa, Scott T

    2015-02-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the most common cancer in men in the United States. Although outcomes are excellent for early-stage disease, survival for men with metastatic PC is limited. While older studies did not supported the use of chemotherapy in PC, the efficacy of taxane chemotherapy plus prednisone is now well established in men with metastatic castration resistant PC (CRPC). The results of CHAARTED trial have further expanded the use of chemotherapy to patients with metastatic hormone-sensitive disease. The clinical efficacy of taxanes over other chemotherapeutics may be a result of its ability to inhibit microtubule-dependent trafficking of proteins such as the androgen-receptor (AR). Ongoing research uses chemotherapy earlier in the disease course as well as explores the utility of combining cytotoxic chemotherapy with biologic agents. PMID:25762124

  20. CACUL1 functions as a negative regulator of androgen receptor in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hanbyeul; Lee, Sang Hyup; Um, Soo-Jong; Kim, Eun-Joo

    2016-07-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays a critical role in the initiation and progression of prostate cancer (PCa), and thus its regulation is an important tool in PCa therapy. Here, we report that CDK2-associated cullin 1 (CACUL1) directly associates with AR and suppresses AR transcriptional activity. In addition, CACUL1 represses histone demethylase LSD1-mediated AR transactivation by competing with LSD1 for AR binding. Depletion of CACUL1 enhances the LSD1 occupancy of the AR-target promoter, accompanied by decreased accumulation of H3K9me2, a repressive transcriptional marker. CACUL1 and LSD1 oppositely regulate CDX-induced cell death in AR-positive LNCaP and metastatic castrate-resistant LNCaP-LN3 cells. These data suggest that CACUL1 impairs LSD1-mediated activation of AR, thereby implicating it as a potential antitumor target in PCa. PMID:27085459

  1. Genetics and genomics of prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael Dean; Hong Lou

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most common malignancies in the world with over 890 000 cases and over 258 000 deaths worldwide each year.Nearly all mortalities from PCa are due to metastatic disease,typically through tumors that evolve to be hormone-refractory or castrate-resistant.Despite intensive epidemiological study,there are few known environmental risk factors,and age and family history are the major determinants.However,there is extreme heterogeneity in PCa incidence worldwide,suggesting that major determining factors have not been described.Genome-wide association studies have been performed and a considerable number of significant,but low-risk loci have been identified.In addition,several groups have analyzed PCa by determination of genomic copy number,fusion gene generation and targeted resequencing of candidate genes,as well as exome and whole genome sequencing.These initial studies have examined both primary and metastatic tumors as well as murine xenografts and identified somatic alterations in TP53 and other potential driver genes,and the disturbance of androgen response and cell cycle pathways.It is hoped that continued characterization of risk factors as well as gene mutation and misregulation in tumors will aid in understanding,diagnosing and better treating PCa.

  2. A potent chemotherapeutic strategy in prostate cancer:S-(methoxytrityl)-L-cysteine,a novel Eg5 inhibitor%治疗前列腺癌的化疗新策略:一种新的Eg5抑制剂S-(methoxytrityl)-L-cysteine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nai-Dong Xing; Osamu Ogawa; Hiroyuki Nishiyama; Sen-Tai Ding; Ryoichi Saito; Koji Nishizawa; Takashi Kobayashi; Takahiro Inoue; Shinya Oishi; Nobutaka Fujii; Jia-Jv Lv

    2011-01-01

    Docetaxel-based combination chemotherapy remains the predominant treatment for castration-resistant prostate cancer.However,taxane-related drug resistance and neurotoxicity have prompted us to develop substitute treatment strategies.Eg5 (kinesin spindle protein),which is crucial for bipolar spindle formation and duplicated chromosome separation during the early phase of mitosis,has emerged as an attractive target for cancer chemotherapy.The aim of this study was to investigate the anticancer efficacy of S-(methoxytrityl)-L-cysteine (S(MeO)TLC),a novel Eg5 inhibitor in prostate cancer.Eg5 expression was examined in human prostate cancer cell lines and tissue microarrays were constructed from clinical specimens.Antiproliferative activity of S(MeO)TLC in prostate cancer cells was assessed by a cell viability assay.The anticancer effect and inhibitory mechanism of S(MeO)TLC in prostate cancer cells was further explored by Hoechst staining,flow cytometry and immunofluorescence.In addition,the antitumor effect of S(MeO)TLC on subcutaneous xenograft models was assessed.Eg5 expression was identified in PC3,DU 145 and LNCaP cells.More than half of prostate cancer clinical specimens displayed Eg5 expression.S(MeO)TLC exhibited more powerful anticancer activity in prostate cancer cells compared with the other four Eg5 inhibitors tested.S(MeO)TLC induced cell death after arresting dividing cells at mitosis with distinct monopolar spindle formation.S(MeO)TLC exhibited its significant inhibitory activity (P<0.05) on subcutaneous xenograft models also through induction of mitotic arrest.We conclude that Eg5 is a good target for prostate cancer chemotherapy,and S(MeO)TLC is a potent promising anticancer agent in prostate cancer.

  3. Nrf1 and Nrf2 transcription factors regulate androgen receptor transactivation in prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle A Schultz

    Full Text Available Despite androgen deprivation therapy (ADT, persistent androgen receptor (AR signaling enables outgrowth of castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. In prostate cancer (PCa cells, ADT may enhance AR activity through induction of oxidative stress. Herein, we investigated the roles of Nrf1 and Nrf2, transcription factors that regulate antioxidant gene expression, on hormone-mediated AR transactivation using a syngeneic in vitro model of androgen dependent (LNCaP and castration resistant (C4-2B PCa cells. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT stimulated transactivation of the androgen response element (ARE was significantly greater in C4-2B cells than in LNCaP cells. DHT-induced AR transactivation was coupled with higher nuclear translocation of p65-Nrf1 in C4-2B cells, as compared to LNCaP cells. Conversely, DHT stimulation suppressed total Nrf2 levels in C4-2B cells but elevated total Nrf2 levels in LNCaP cells. Interestingly, siRNA mediated silencing of Nrf1 attenuated AR transactivation while p65-Nrf1 overexpression enhanced AR transactivation. Subsequent studies showed that Nrf1 physically interacts with AR and enhances AR's DNA-binding activity, suggesting that the p65-Nrf1 isoform is a potential AR coactivator. In contrast, Nrf2 suppressed AR-mediated transactivation by stimulating the nuclear accumulation of the p120-Nrf1 which suppressed AR transactivation. Quantitative RT-PCR studies further validated the inductive effects of p65-Nrf1 isoform on the androgen regulated genes, PSA and TMPRSS2. Therefore, our findings implicate differential roles of Nrf1 and Nrf2 in regulating AR transactivation in PCa cells. Our findings also indicate that the DHT-stimulated increase in p65-Nrf1 and the simultaneous suppression of both Nrf2 and p120-Nrf1 ultimately facilitates AR transactivation in CRPC cells.

  4. Resource efficiency and economic implications of alternatives to surgical castration without anaesthesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roest, de K.; Montanari, C.; Fowler, T.; Baltussen, W.H.M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the economic implications of alternative methods to surgical castration without anaesthesia. Detailed research results on the economic implications of four different alternatives are reported. castration with local anaesthesia, castration with general anaesthesia,

  5. Targeted α-particle therapy of bone metastases in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadvar, Hossein; Quinn, David I

    2013-12-01

    Medical oncology is moving toward personalized and precision treatments. This evolution is spearheaded by ongoing discoveries on the fundamental machinery that controls tumor and hosts microenvironment biological behavior. α-Particles with their high energy and short range had long been recognized as potentially useful in the treatment of cancer. More than a century after the discovery of radium by the Curies, 223Ra dichloride is now available in the expanding armamentarium of therapies for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. This advance occurs in the context of several other novel therapeutics in advanced prostate cancer that include more effective androgen receptor pathway inhibition, better chemotherapy, and immunotherapy. We present a concise review on the therapeutic use of 223Ra dichloride in this clinically important setting including excerpts on the radium history, physical properties, the alpharadin in symptomatic prostate cancer clinical trial, and practical information on its use in the clinic. It is anticipated that, with the current emergence of 223Ra as a viable form of therapy, interest in and use of α-particle therapy in the management of cancer will grow.

  6. Integrated genome and transcriptome sequencing identifies a novel form of hybrid and aggressive prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chunxiao; Wyatt, Alexander W; Lapuk, Anna V; McPherson, Andrew; McConeghy, Brian J; Bell, Robert H; Anderson, Shawn; Haegert, Anne; Brahmbhatt, Sonal; Shukin, Robert; Mo, Fan; Li, Estelle; Fazli, Ladan; Hurtado-Coll, Antonio; Jones, Edward C; Butterfield, Yaron S; Hach, Faraz; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Hajirasouliha, Iman; Boutros, Paul C; Bristow, Robert G; Jones, Steven Jm; Hirst, Martin; Marra, Marco A; Maher, Christopher A; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Sahinalp, S Cenk; Gleave, Martin E; Volik, Stanislav V; Collins, Colin C

    2012-05-01

    Next-generation sequencing is making sequence-based molecular pathology and personalized oncology viable. We selected an individual initially diagnosed with conventional but aggressive prostate adenocarcinoma and sequenced the genome and transcriptome from primary and metastatic tissues collected prior to hormone therapy. The histology-pathology and copy number profiles were remarkably homogeneous, yet it was possible to propose the quadrant of the prostate tumour that likely seeded the metastatic diaspora. Despite a homogeneous cell type, our transcriptome analysis revealed signatures of both luminal and neuroendocrine cell types. Remarkably, the repertoire of expressed but apparently private gene fusions, including C15orf21:MYC, recapitulated this biology. We hypothesize that the amplification and over-expression of the stem cell gene MSI2 may have contributed to the stable hybrid cellular identity. This hybrid luminal-neuroendocrine tumour appears to represent a novel and highly aggressive case of prostate cancer with unique biological features and, conceivably, a propensity for rapid progression to castrate-resistance. Overall, this work highlights the importance of integrated analyses of genome, exome and transcriptome sequences for basic tumour biology, sequence-based molecular pathology and personalized oncology.

  7. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound for the Treatment of Localized and Locally Advanced Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer: 2,5 Year Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovov, V. A.; Dvoynikov, S. Y.; Vozdvizhenskiy, M. O.

    2011-09-01

    Introduction & Objectives: High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) has been shown to be a successful treatment for localised prostate cancer (PC). Here we have explored the effectiveness of the HIFU treatment for hormone-resistant prostate cancer (HRPC). Materials & Methods: 341 patients were treated in our center between September 2007 and December 2009; all of them showed treatment failure following hormone ablation. The median time before hormone-resistance was 20 (3-48) months. In the group with localised PC: number of patients 237, Gleason score ≤7, stage T1-2N0M0, age 69 (60-89) years, mean PSA before treatment 40,0 (5,8-92,9) ng/ml, mean prostate volume—39,3 (28-92) cc; in the group with locally advanced PC: number of patients 104, Gleason score ≤9, stage T2-3N0M0, age 72 (52-83) years, PSA before treatment 30,3 (20,1-60) ng/ml, mean prostate volume—41,2 (25-198) cc. HIFU was delivered under spinal anesthesia using the Ablatherm HIFU device (EDAP, France). Pre HIFU transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) was performed for all patients. Mean follow-up time 18 months (3-30). Results: The median PSA level 12 months after HIFU treatment was 0,04 (0-2,24) ng/ml—localised PC, and for locally advanced disease—0,05 (0-48,4) ng/ml, at 18 months after HIFU treatment this was 0,2 (0,02-2,0) ng/ml for localised PC, and for locally advanced disease 0,18 (0,04-7,45) ng/ml. Patients with localised PC has 4,5% recurrence, those with locally advanced PC 20%. Kaplan-Meir analyses of the total group indicated that the risk of recurrence after 1 year follow-up was 10%, the risk of recurrence was 19% after 2 years of follow-up. Conclusions: Our initial experience shows that ultrasound ablation is safe, minimally invasive and effective as a treatment for localised and locally advanced hormone-resistant prostate cancer.

  8. Androgen receptor non-nuclear regulation of prostate cancer cell invasion mediated by Src and matriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarif, Jelani C; Lamb, Laura E; Schulz, Veronique V; Nollet, Eric A; Miranti, Cindy K

    2015-03-30

    Castration-resistant prostate cancers still depend on nuclear androgen receptor (AR) function despite their lack of dependence on exogenous androgen. Second generation anti-androgen therapies are more efficient at blocking nuclear AR; however resistant tumors still develop. Recent studies indicate Src is highly active in these resistant tumors. By manipulating AR activity in several different prostate cancer cell lines through RNAi, drug treatment, and the use of a nuclear-deficient AR mutant, we demonstrate that androgen acting on cytoplasmic AR rapidly stimulates Src tyrosine kinase via a non-genomic mechanism. Cytoplasmic AR, acting through Src enhances laminin integrin-dependent invasion. Active Matriptase, which cleaves laminin, is elevated within minutes after androgen stimulation, and is subsequently shed into the medium. Matriptase activation and shedding induced by cytoplasmic AR is dependent on Src. Concomitantly, CDCP1/gp140, a Matriptase and Src substrate that controls integrin-based migration, is activated. However, only inhibition of Matriptase, but not CDCP1, suppresses the AR/Src-dependent increase in invasion. Matriptase, present in conditioned medium from AR-stimulated cells, is sufficient to enhance invasion in the absence of androgen. Thus, invasion is stimulated by a rapid but sustained increase in Src activity, mediated non-genomically by cytoplasmic AR, leading to rapid activation and shedding of the laminin protease Matriptase.

  9. Regulation of the pentose phosphate pathway by an androgen receptor-mTOR-mediated mechanism and its role in prostate cancer cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsouko, E; Khan, A S; White, M A; Han, J J; Shi, Y; Merchant, F A; Sharpe, M A; Xin, L; Frigo, D E

    2014-05-26

    Cancer cells display an increased demand for glucose. Therefore, identifying the specific aspects of glucose metabolism that are involved in the pathogenesis of cancer may uncover novel therapeutic nodes. Recently, there has been a renewed interest in the role of the pentose phosphate pathway in cancer. This metabolic pathway is advantageous for rapidly growing cells because it provides nucleotide precursors and helps regenerate the reducing agent NADPH, which can contribute to reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging. Correspondingly, clinical data suggest glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), the rate-limiting enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway, is upregulated in prostate cancer. We hypothesized that androgen receptor (AR) signaling, which plays an essential role in the disease, mediated prostate cancer cell growth in part by increasing flux through the pentose phosphate pathway. Here, we determined that G6PD, NADPH and ribose synthesis were all increased by AR signaling. Further, this process was necessary to modulate ROS levels. Pharmacological or molecular inhibition of G6PD abolished these effects and blocked androgen-mediated cell growth. Mechanistically, regulation of G6PD via AR in both hormone-sensitive and castration-resistant models of prostate cancer was abolished following rapamycin treatment, indicating that AR increased flux through the pentose phosphate pathway by the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-mediated upregulation of G6PD. Accordingly, in two separate mouse models of Pten deletion/elevated mTOR signaling, Pb-Cre;Pten(f/f) and K8-CreER(T2);Pten(f/f), G6PD levels correlated with prostate cancer progression in vivo. Importantly, G6PD levels remained high during progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer. Taken together, our data suggest that AR signaling can promote prostate cancer through the upregulation of G6PD and therefore, the flux of sugars through the pentose phosphate pathway. Hence, these findings support a

  10. Targeting bone metabolism in patients with advanced prostate cancer: current options and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todenhöfer, Tilman; Stenzl, Arnulf; Hofbauer, Lorenz C; Rachner, Tilman D

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining bone health remains a clinical challenge in patients with prostate cancer (PC) who are at risk of developing metastatic bone disease and increased bone loss due to hormone ablation therapy. In patients with cancer-treatment induced bone loss (CTIBL), antiresorptive agents have been shown to improve bone mineral density (BMD) and to reduce the risk of fractures. For patients with bone metastases, both zoledronic acid and denosumab delay skeletal related events (SREs) in the castration resistant stage of disease. Novel agents targeting the Wnt inhibitors dickkopf-1 and sclerostin are currently under investigation for the treatment of osteoporosis and malignant bone disease. New antineoplastic drugs such as abiraterone, enzalutamide, and Radium-223 are capable of further delaying SREs in patients with advanced PC. The benefit of antiresorptive treatment for patients with castration sensitive PC appears to be limited. Recent trials on the use of zoledronic acid for the prevention of bone metastases failed to be successful, whereas denosumab delayed the occurrence of bone metastases by a median of 4.1 months. Currently, the use of antiresorptive drugs to prevent bone metastases still remains a field of controversies and further trials are needed to identify patient subgroups that may profit from early therapy. PMID:25802521

  11. [Prostate cancer and Cancer Treatment-Induced Bone Loss(CTIBL)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, Hisashi

    2016-07-01

    Osteopenia and osteoporosis often become the long term complications in cancer treatment and is defined as cancer treatment-induced bone loss(CTIBL). Hormonal therapy is the main factor for CTIBL in both men and women. Androgen deprivation therapy(ADT)is a mainstay in the systemic therapy for prostate cancer(PC)and often persists for a long term. ADT induces bone loss and increases the risk of osteoporosis and bone fractures, which reduces QOL of the patients, results in the need of nursing care state and a serious adverse event to be connected for shortening of the overall survival. It is important that we prevent a fracture above all in the bone management of patients with PC. According to the results of overseas large-scale clinical trials, denosumab is a drug having the highest evidence level. And it is necessary to set a clear treatment objective depending on the clinical condition of the PC patients, and to use it. In the non-bone metastatic, castration-sensitive PC patients, we do it with a dose for the purpose of the prevention of osteoporosis and bone fractures, and it is demanded what a dose for the purpose of prevention and in bone metastatic, castration resistant PC patients, the reduction of symptomatic skeletal events. However, There is no benefit in prolongation of overall survival by addition of denosumab or zoledronic acid. Care for oral hygiene should be considered to avoid osteonecrosis of the jaw, oral infection and hypocalcemia. PMID:27346316

  12. Targeting Bone Metabolism in Patients with Advanced Prostate Cancer: Current Options and Controversies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilman Todenhöfer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining bone health remains a clinical challenge in patients with prostate cancer (PC who are at risk of developing metastatic bone disease and increased bone loss due to hormone ablation therapy. In patients with cancer-treatment induced bone loss (CTIBL, antiresorptive agents have been shown to improve bone mineral density (BMD and to reduce the risk of fractures. For patients with bone metastases, both zoledronic acid and denosumab delay skeletal related events (SREs in the castration resistant stage of disease. Novel agents targeting the Wnt inhibitors dickkopf-1 and sclerostin are currently under investigation for the treatment of osteoporosis and malignant bone disease. New antineoplastic drugs such as abiraterone, enzalutamide, and Radium-223 are capable of further delaying SREs in patients with advanced PC. The benefit of antiresorptive treatment for patients with castration sensitive PC appears to be limited. Recent trials on the use of zoledronic acid for the prevention of bone metastases failed to be successful, whereas denosumab delayed the occurrence of bone metastases by a median of 4.1 months. Currently, the use of antiresorptive drugs to prevent bone metastases still remains a field of controversies and further trials are needed to identify patient subgroups that may profit from early therapy.

  13. Concurrent AURKA and MYCN Gene Amplifications Are Harbingers of Lethal TreatmentRelated Neuroendocrine Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Miguel Mosquera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroendocrine prostate cancer (NEPC, also referred to as anaplastic prostate cancer, is a lethal tumor that most commonly arises in late stages of prostate adenocarcinoma (PCA with predilection to metastasize to visceral organs. In the current study, we explore for evidence that Aurora kinase A (AURKA and N-myc (MYCN gene abnormalities are harbingers of treatment-related NEPC (t-NEPC. We studied primary prostate tissue from 15 hormone naïve PCAs, 51 castration-resistant prostate cancers, and 15 metastatic tumors from 72 patients at different stages of disease progression to t-NEPC, some with multiple specimens. Histologic evaluation, immunohistochemistry, and fluorescence in situ hybridization were performed and correlated with clinical variables. AURKA amplification was identified in overall 65% of PCAs (hormone naïve and treated from patients that developed t-NEPC and in 86% of metastases. Concurrent amplification of MYCN was present in 70% of primary PCAs, 69% of treated PCAs, and 83% of metastases. In contrast, in an unselected PCA cohort, AURKA and MYCN amplifications were identified in only 5% of 169 cases. When metastatic t-NEPC was compared to primary PCA from the same patients, there was 100% concordance of ERG rearrangement, 100% concordance of AURKA amplification, and 60% concordance of MYCN amplification. In tumors with mixed features, there was also 100% concordance of ERG rearrangement and 94% concordance of AURKA and MYCN co-amplification between areas of NEPC and adenocarcinoma. AURKA and MYCN amplifications may be prognostic and predictive biomarkers, as they are harbingers of tumors at risk of progressing to t-NEPC after hormonal therapy.

  14. SOXs in human prostate cancer: implication as progression and prognosis factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SOX genes play an important role in a number of developmental processes. Potential roles of SOXs have been demonstrated in various neoplastic tissues as tumor suppressors or promoters depending on tumor status and types. The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of SOXs in the progression and prognosis of human prostate cancer (PCa). The gene expression changes of SOXs in human PCa tissues compared with non-cancerous prostate tissues was detected using gene expression microarray, and confirmed by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (QRT-PCR) analysis and immunohositochemistry. The roles of these genes in castration resistance were investigated in LNCaP xenograft model of PCa. The microarray analysis identified three genes (SOX7, SOX9 and SOX10) of SOX family that were significantly dis-regulated in common among four PCa specimens. Consistent with the results of the microarray, differential mRNA and protein levels of three selected genes were found in PCa tissues by QRT-PCR analysis and immunohistochemistry. Additionally, we found that the immunohistochemical staining scores of SOX7 in PCa tissues with higher serum PSA level (P = 0.02) and metastasis (P = 0.03) were significantly lower than those with lower serum PSA level and without metastasis; the increased SOX9 protein expression was frequently found in PCa tissues with higher Gleason score (P = 0.02) and higher clinical stage (P < 0.0001); the down-regulation of SOX10 tend to be found in PCa tissues with higher serum PSA levels (P = 0.03) and advanced pathological stage (P = 0.01). Moreover, both univariate and multivariate analyses showed that the down-regulation of SOX7 and the up-regulation of SOX9 were independent predictors of shorter biochemical recurrence-free survival. Furthermore, we discovered that SOX7 was significantly down-regulated and SOX9 was significantly up-regulated during the progression to castration resistance. Our data offer the convince

  15. Influence of testosterone on the distribution of 65Zn-binding proteins in the prostate and seminal vesicles of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    65Zn (7.4 MBq; 200 μCi) was injected intravenously into normal, castrated and castrated, testosteronesubstituted rats. After 1,24 and 48 hours, the distribution of 65Zn-binding proteins in the 100,000 g supernatant of the prostate and seminal vesicles was investigated by separation on Sephadex G 100. The prostate and seminal vesicles from any one rat showed the same distribution pattern of 65Zn-proteins. In castrated rats, the incorporation of 65Zn was, however, 5-6 times lower than in the normal or castrated, testosterone-substituted rats. One hour after the injection, the highest activity of 65Zn was found in proteins in the molecular weight range above 100,000. After 48 hours the greatest proportion of 65Zn was present in the protein peak corresponding to 28,000 Daltons. (orig.) 891 AJ

  16. Annexin A1 is involved in the acquisition and maintenance of a stem cell-like/aggressive phenotype in prostate cancer cells with acquired resistance to zoledronic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzarro, Valentina; Belvedere, Raffaella; Milone, Maria Rita; Pucci, Biagio; Lombardi, Rita; Bruzzese, Francesca; Popolo, Ada; Parente, Luca; Budillon, Alfredo; Petrella, Antonello

    2015-09-22

    In this study, we have characterized the role of annexin A1 (ANXA1) in the acquisition and maintenance of stem-like/aggressive features in prostate cancer (PCa) cells comparing zoledronic acid (ZA)-resistant DU145R80 with their parental DU145 cells. ANXA1 is over-expressed in DU145R80 cells and its down-regulation abolishes their resistance to ZA. Moreover, ANXA1 induces DU145 and DU145R80 invasiveness acting through formyl peptide receptors (FPRs). Also, ANXA1 knockdown is able to inhibit epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and to reduce focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and metalloproteases (MMP)-2/9 expression in PCa cells. DU145R80 show a cancer stem cell (CSC)-like signature with a high expression of CSC markers including CD44, CD133, NANOG, Snail, Oct4 and ALDH7A1 and CSC-related genes as STAT3. Interestingly, ANXA1 knockdown induces these cells to revert from a putative prostate CSC to a more differentiated phenotype resembling DU145 PCa cell signature. Similar results are obtained concerning some drug resistance-related genes such as ATP Binding Cassette G2 (ABCG2) and Lung Resistant Protein (LRP). Our study provides new insights on the role of ANXA1 protein in PCa onset and progression. PMID:26312765

  17. Delayed physeal closure associated with castration in cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiographs of 152 cats under four years of age were examined for evidence of physeal closure. Radiographic closure was compared between entire male, castrated male, and female (neutered and entire] cats. Physeal closure in castrated males was delayed when compared to that of entire males

  18. [Castration of dogs from the standpoint of behaviour therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhne, F

    2012-04-24

    The castration of dogs is an amputation covered by Section 6 (1) of the Animal Protection Law in Germany. Apart from the general indications given by veterinary medicine, castration of an animal is a potential method of animal behaviour therapy. However, the highly variable, individual effects of castration on behaviour require detailed diagnosis by the veterinarian. Castration appears to exert its strongest influence on sexually dimorphic behaviour patterns in male dogs, e.g. status- related aggression, urine marking, mounting, house-soiling problems, and roaming. An indication to castrate a bitch is maternal aggression. When evaluating the effects of castration, one should always consider individual circumstances, such as learning experience (for example in the case of "experienced copulators"), age, and pack behaviour (if there is more than one dog in the household). Additional benefits of castration include a reduction in the dog's general activity level, decreased preparatory arousal and a decline in the dog's ability to focus its attention fully on the target of attack. As a result, it is much easier for the owner to disrupt and manage or control the dog's agonistic intentions. However, castration is not the ultimate remedy in dog-handling. Any decision in this respect should be based on a precise behaviour- related indication. Otherwise, such surgery may well violate the Animal Protection Law. PMID:22526819

  19. Prostate tumor-derived exosomes down-regulate NKG2D expression on natural killer cells and CD8+ T cells: mechanism of immune evasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Lundholm

    Full Text Available Tumor-derived exosomes, which are nanometer-sized extracellular vesicles of endosomal origin, have emerged as promoters of tumor immune evasion but their role in prostate cancer (PC progression is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the ability of prostate tumor-derived exosomes to downregulate NKG2D expression on natural killer (NK and CD8+ T cells. NKG2D is an activating cytotoxicity receptor whose aberrant loss in cancer plays an important role in immune suppression. Using flow cytometry, we found that exosomes produced by human PC cells express ligands for NKG2D on their surface. The NKG2D ligand-expressing prostate tumor-derived exosomes selectively induced downregulation of NKG2D on NK and CD8+ T cells in a dose-dependent manner, leading to impaired cytotoxic function in vitro. Consistent with these findings, patients with castration-resistant PC (CRPC showed a significant decrease in surface NKG2D expression on circulating NK and CD8+ T cells compared to healthy individuals. Tumor-derived exosomes are likely involved in this NKG2D downregulation, since incubation of healthy lymphocytes with exosomes isolated from serum or plasma of CRPC patients triggered downregulation of NKG2D expression in effector lymphocytes. These data suggest prostate tumor-derived exosomes as down-regulators of the NKG2D-mediated cytotoxic response in PC patients, thus promoting immune suppression and tumor escape.

  20. Role of the HSP90-associated cochaperone p23 in enhancing activity of the androgen receptor and significance for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reebye, Vikash; Querol Cano, Laia; Lavery, Derek N; Brooke, Greg N; Powell, Sue M; Chotai, Deepa; Walker, Marjorie M; Whitaker, Hayley C; Wait, Robin; Hurst, Helen C; Bevan, Charlotte L

    2012-10-01

    Prostate tumor growth initially depends on androgens, which act via the androgen receptor (AR). Despite androgen ablation therapy, tumors eventually progress to a castrate-resistant stage in which the AR remains active. The mechanisms are poorly understood but it may be that changes in levels or activity of AR coregulators affect trafficking and activation of the receptor. A key stage in AR signaling occurs in the cytoplasm, where unliganded receptor is associated with the heat shock protein (HSP)90 foldosome complex. p23, a key component of this complex, is best characterized as a cochaperone for HSP90 but also has HSP90-independent activity and has been reported as having differential effects on the activity of different steroid receptors. Here we report that p23 increases activity of the AR, and this appears to involve steps both in the cytoplasm (increasing ligand-binding capacity, possibly via direct interaction with AR) and the nucleus (enhancing AR occupancy at target promoters). We show, for the first time, that AR and p23 can interact, perhaps directly, when HSP90 is not present in the same complex. The effects of p23 on AR activity are at least partly HSP90 independent because a mutant form of p23, unable to bind HSP90, nevertheless increases AR activity. In human prostate tumors, nuclear p23 was higher in malignant prostate cells compared with benign/normal cells, supporting the utility of p23 as a therapeutic target in prostate cancer.

  1. The incidence and risk factors of resistant E. coli infections after prostate biopsy under fluoroquinolone prophylaxis: a single-centre experience with 2215 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandemir, Özlem; Bozlu, Murat; Efesoy, Ozan; Güntekin, Onur; Tek, Mesut; Akbay, Erdem

    2016-08-01

    We evaluated the incidence and risk factors of resistant Escherichia coli infections after the prostate biopsy under flouroquinolone prophylaxis. From January 2003 to December 2012, we retrospectively evaluated the records of 2215 patients. The risk factors were described for infective complications and resistant E. coli in positive cultures was calculated. Of 2215 patients, 153 had positive urine cultures, such as 129 (84·3%) E. coli, 8 (5·2%) Enterococcus spp., 6 (3·9%) Enterobacter spp., 5 (3·2%) Pseudomonas spp., 3 (1·9%) MRCNS, and 2 (1·3%) Klebsiella spp. Of the positive urine cultures which yielded E. coli, 99 (76·7%) were evaluated for fluoroquinolone resistance. Of those, 83 (83·8%) were fluoroquinolone-resistant and composed of 51 (61·4%) extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-positive. Fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli ratios were 73·4 and 95·9% before 2008 and after 2008, respectively (P = 0·002). The most sensitive antibiotics for fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli strains were imipenem (100%), amikacin (84%) and cefoperazone (83%). The use of quinolones in the last 6 months and a history of hospitalization in the last 30 days were found to be significant risk factors. We found that resistant E. coli strains might be a common microorganism in patients with this kind of complication. The risk factors for development of infection with these resistant strains were history of the use of fluoroquinolones and hospitalization. PMID:25630553

  2. An imaging agent to detect androgen receptor and its active splice variants in prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Yusuke; Tien, Amy H.; Pan, Jinhe; Leung, Jacky K.; Banuelos, Carmen A.; Jian, Kunzhong; Wang, Jun; Mawji, Nasrin R.; Fernandez, Javier Garcia; Lin, Kuo-Shyan; Andersen, Raymond J.; Sadar, Marianne D.

    2016-01-01

    Constitutively active splice variants of androgen receptor (AR-Vs) lacking ligand-binding domain (LBD) are a mechanism of resistance to androgen receptor LBD–targeted (AR LBD–targeted) therapies for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). There is a strong unmet clinical need to identify prostate cancer patients with AR-V–positive lesions to determine whether they will benefit from further AR LBD–targeting therapies or should receive taxanes or investigational drugs like EPI-506 or galeterone. Both EPI-506 (NCT02606123) and galeterone (NCT02438007) are in clinical trials and are proposed to have efficacy against lesions that are positive for AR-Vs. AR activation function-1 (AF-1) is common to the N-terminal domains of full-length AR and AR-Vs. Here, we provide proof of concept for developing imaging compounds that directly bind AR AF-1 to detect both AR-Vs and full-length AR. 123I-EPI-002 had specific binding to AR AF-1, which enabled direct visualization of CRPC xenografts that express full-length AR and AR-Vs. Our findings highlight the potential of 123I-EPI-002 as an imaging agent for the detection of full-length AR and AR-Vs in CRPC.

  3. Steroid hormone receptors and prostate cancer: role of structural dynamics in therapeutic targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Raj

    2016-01-01

    Steroid hormone receptors (SHRs) act in cell type- and gene-specific manner through interactions with coregulatory proteins to regulate numerous physiological and pathological processes at the level of gene regulation. Binding of steroid receptor modulator (SRM) ligand leads to allosteric changes in SHR to exert positive or negative effects on the expression of target genes. Due, in part, to the fact that current SRMs generally target ligand binding domain (LBD)/AF2 and neglect intrinsically disordered (ID) N-terminal domain (NTD)/AF1, clinically relevant SRMs lack selectivity and are also prone to the development of resistance over time. Therefore, to maximize the efficacy of SHR-based therapeutics, the possibility of developing unique modulators that act to control AF1 activity must be considered. Recent studies targeting androgen receptor's (AR's) ID AF1 domain for the castration-resistant prostate cancer has provided the possibility of therapeutically targeting ID NTD/AF1 surfaces by allosteric modulations to achieve desired effects. In this review article, we discuss how inter- and intra- molecular allosteric regulations controlled by AR's structural flexibility and dynamics particularly the ID NTD/AF1 is an emerging area of investigation, which could be exploited for drug development and therapeutic targeting of prostate cancer. PMID:27364545

  4. Prostate cancer characteristics associated with response to pre-receptor targeting of the androgen axis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elahe A Mostaghel

    Full Text Available Factors influencing differential responses of prostate tumors to androgen receptor (AR axis-directed therapeutics are poorly understood, and predictors of treatment efficacy are needed. We hypothesized that the efficacy of inhibiting DHT ligand synthesis would associate with intra-tumoral androgen ratios indicative of relative dependence on DHT-mediated growth.We characterized two androgen-sensitive prostate cancer xenograft models after androgen suppression by castration in combination with the SRD5A inhibitor, dutasteride, as well as a panel of castration resistant metastases obtained via rapid autopsy.In LuCaP35 tumors (intra-tumoral T:DHT ratio 2:1 dutasteride suppressed DHT to 0.02 ng/gm and prolonged survival vs. castration alone (337 vs.152 days, HR 2.8, p = 0.0015. In LuCaP96 tumors (T:DHT 10:1, survival was not improved despite similar DHT reduction (0.02 ng/gm. LuCaP35 demonstrated higher expression of steroid biosynthetic enzymes maintaining DHT levels (5-fold higher SRD5A1, 41 fold higher, 99-fold higher RL-HSD, p<0.0001 for both, reconstitution of intra-tumoral DHT (to ∼30% of untreated tumors, and ∼2 fold increased expression of full length AR. In contrast, LuCaP96 demonstrated higher levels of steroid catabolizing enzymes (6.9-fold higher AKR1C2, 3000-fold higher UGT2B15, p = 0.002 and p<0.0001 respectively, persistent suppression of intra-tumoral DHT, and 6-8 fold induction of full length AR and the ligand independent V7 AR splice variant. Human metastases demonstrated bio-active androgen levels and AR full length and AR splice-variant expression consistent with the range observed in xenografts.Intrinsic differences in basal steroidogenesis, as well as variable expression of full length and splice-variant AR, associate with response and resistance to pre-receptor AR ligand suppression. Expression of steroidogenic enzymes and AR isoforms may serve as potential biomarkers of sensitivity to potent AR-axis inhibition and

  5. Prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, G.P.; Kuss, R., Khoury, S.; Chatelain, C.; Denis, L.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 70 selections. Some of the titles are: Place of the Computed Tomography in the Staging of Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Staging of the Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Prostate; Long-Term Results in Radiotherapy of Prostatic Cancer; Interstitial Irradiation Using I-125 Seeds; and Treatment of Cancer of the Prostate by Use of Physiotherapy: Long-Term Results.

  6. In vivo MRI volumetric measurement of prostate regression and growth in mice

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    Nalcioglu Orhan

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mouse models for treatment of late-stage prostate cancer are valuable tools, but assessing the extent of growth of the prostate and particularly its regression due to therapeutic intervention or castration is difficult due to the location, small size and interdigitated anatomy of the prostate gland in situ. Temporal monitoring of mouse prostate regression requires multiple animals and examination of histological sections. Methods Initially, T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was performed on normal year-old C57/BL6 mice. Individual mice were repeatedly imaged using inhalation anesthesia to establish the reproducibility of the method and to follow hormone manipulation of the prostate volume. Subsequently, MRI fat signal was suppressed using a chemical shift-selective (CHESS pulse to avoid signal contamination and enhance discrimination of the prostate. Results High field (7T MRI provides high resolution (117 × 117 μm in plane, highly reproducible images of the normal mouse prostate. Despite long imaging times, animals can be imaged repeatedly to establish reliability of volume measurements. Prostate volume declines following castration and subsequently returns to normal with androgen administration in the same animal. CHESS imaging allowed discrimination of both the margins of the prostate and the dorsal-lateral lobes of the prostate (DLP from the ventral lobes (VP. Castration results in a 40% reduction in the volume of the DLP and a 75% reduction in the volume of the VP. Conclusion MRI assessment of the volume of the mouse prostate is precise and reproducible. MRI improves volumetric determination of the extent of regression and monitoring of the same mouse over time during the course of treatment is possible. Since assessing groups of animals at each time point is avoided, this improves the accuracy of the measurement of any manipulation effect and reduces the number of animals required.

  7. PROGRESSION TO ANDROGEN-INDEPENDENT LNCAP HUMAN PROSTATE TUMORS: CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR ALTERATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Jin-Rong; Yu, Lunyin; Zerbini, Luiz F.; Libermann, Towia A.; Blackburn, George L.

    2004-01-01

    Lethal phenotypes of human prostate cancer are characterized by progression to androgen-independence and metastasis. For want of a clinically relevant animal model, mechanisms behind this progression remain unclear. Our study used an in vivo model of androgen-sensitive LNCaP human prostate cancer cell xenografts in male SCID mice to study the cellular and molecular biology of tumor progression. Primary tumors were established orthotopically, and the mice were then surgically castrated to with...

  8. DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF BENIGN PROSTATIC HYPERPLASIA IN A PIED TAMARIN (SAGUINUS BICOLOR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbon, Alberto Rodriguez; Ordóñez, Israel Alamilla; Haworth, Peter; Glendewar, Gale; Routh, Andrew; Pocknell, Ann

    2016-06-01

    An intact male pied tamarin (Saguinus bicolor) presented with a hunched posture while moving, dysuria, pollakiuria, and hematuria. After diagnostic imaging assessment and prostate biopsy, benign prostatic hyperplasia was diagnosed. Treatments with delmadinone acetate and osaterone caused clinical signs and hematuria to resolve temporarily for a variable period of time. Because of frequent recurrence, elective surgical castration was performed, leading to resolution of the clinical signs. PMID:27468035

  9. Inhibitory effects by ayurvedic plants on prostate enlargement induced in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Rahul K Dumbre; Manisha B Kamble; Patil, Vijay R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Ayurveda recommends several plants and plant preparation for conditions of urogenital disorders as per its principles. Objectives: Ayurvedic plants Tamala (Cinnamomum tamala); Daruhalad (Berberis aristata); Ativish (Aconitum heterophyllum) were studied for mechanisms of prostatic hyperplasia induced in rats. Materials and Methods: Prostatic enlargement was induced in castrated rats by testosterone injection s.c. for 21 days and simultaneously plants were dosed orally daily. On day...

  10. Effectiveness and adverse effects of hormonal therapy for prostate cancer: Japanese experience and perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mikio Namiki; Satoru Ueno; Yasuhide Kitagawa; Takashi Fukagai; Hideyuki Akaza

    2012-01-01

    Recently,novel anti-androgens and inhibitors of androgen biosynthesis have been developed through the elucidation of mechanisms of castration resistance of prostate cancer.We believe that these new developments will improve hormonal therapy.On the other hand,there has been an increase in criticism of hormonal therapy,because hormonal therapy is supposed to induce adverse effects such as cardiovascular disease.In this review,we have introduced the Japanese experience of hormonal therapy,because we believe that there may be ethnic differences between Caucasians and Asian people in the efficacy and adverse effects of hormonal therapy.First,we showed that primary hormonal therapy can achieve long-term control of localized prostate cancer in some cases and that quality of life of patients receiving hormonal therapy is rather better than previously thought.Neoadjuvant and adjuvant hormonal therapy in cases undergoing radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy are very useful for high-risk or locally advanced prostate cancer.Further clinical trials are required to confirm the efficacy of neoadjuvant or adjuvant hormonal therapy.We showed that the death from cardiovascular diseases in Japanese patients receiving hormonal therapy was not higher than that in the general population.However,efforts should be made to decrease the adverse effects of hormonal therapy,because life-style change may increase the susceptibility to adverse effects by hormonal therapy even in Japan.Managements of endocrine and metabolic dysfunction,such as diabetes mellitus,are essential.New hormonal compounds such as selective androgen receptor modulators capable of specifically targeting prostate cancer are expected to be developed.

  11. KLF6 Loss of Function in Human Prostate Cancer Progression Is Implicated in Resistance to Androgen Deprivation

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xiaomei; Gomez-Pinillos, Alejandro; Loder, Charisse; Carrillo-de Santa Pau, Enrique; Qiao, Ruifang; Unger, Pamela D.; Kurek, Ralf; Oddoux, Carole; Melamed, Jonathan; Gallagher, Robert E.; Mandeli, John; Ferrari, Anna C.

    2012-01-01

    Inactivation of the transcription factor/tumor suppressor Krüppel-like factor 6 (KLF6) has been described in prostate cancer (PC). This study investigated the prevalence and significance of KLF6 exon 2 mutations and splice variants (SVs) in different stages of human PC progression. By using laser-capture microdissection and recombinant clone isolation of DNA sequences to enhance sensitivity, base changes were found in 20 (24.7%) of 81 PC tissues versus 1 (4%) of 25 normal prostate tissues (P ...

  12. Hedgehog/Gli supports androgen signaling in androgen deprived and androgen independent prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shtutman Michael

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC develops as a consequence of hormone therapies used to deplete androgens in advanced prostate cancer patients. CRPC cells are able to grow in a low androgen environment and this is associated with anomalous activity of their endogenous androgen receptor (AR despite the low systemic androgen levels in the patients. Therefore, the reactivated tumor cell androgen signaling pathway is thought to provide a target for control of CRPC. Previously, we reported that Hedgehog (Hh signaling was conditionally activated by androgen deprivation in androgen sensitive prostate cancer cells and here we studied the potential for cross-talk between Hh and androgen signaling activities in androgen deprived and androgen independent (AI prostate cancer cells. Results Treatment of a variety of androgen-deprived or AI prostate cancer cells with the Hh inhibitor, cyclopamine, resulted in dose-dependent modulation of the expression of genes that are regulated by androgen. The effect of cyclopamine on endogenous androgen-regulated gene expression in androgen deprived and AI prostate cancer cells was consistent with the suppressive effects of cyclopamine on the expression of a reporter gene (luciferase from two different androgen-dependent promoters. Similarly, reduction of smoothened (Smo expression with siRNA co-suppressed expression of androgen-inducible KLK2 and KLK3 in androgen deprived cells without affecting the expression of androgen receptor (AR mRNA or protein. Cyclopamine also prevented the outgrowth of AI cells from androgen growth-dependent parental LNCaP cells and suppressed the growth of an overt AI-LNCaP variant whereas supplemental androgen (R1881 restored growth to the AI cells in the presence of cyclopamine. Conversely, overexpression of Gli1 or Gli2 in LNCaP cells enhanced AR-specific gene expression in the absence of androgen. Overexpressed Gli1/Gli2 also enabled parental LNCaP cells to

  13. Castration of a Black Rhinoceros Diceros Bicornis Minor

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    V de Vos

    1980-01-01

    Full Text Available A black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis minor in the Addo Elephant National Park was castrated in order to prevent the possibility of an aotic inducing gene to be introduced into the Addo population. The classic castration technique was used. It was subsequently found that the rhino showed a drastic change in behaviour, and is at this stage predictably timid, which is not the case w