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Sample records for castration resistant prostate

  1. Molecular Indicators of Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    two components /kits. Briefly, the ProstateCancerSelect (Product No. T-1-520) kit was used to enrich CTC from 5ml blood using magnetic particles coated...in PatientsWithMetastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Emmanuel S. Antonarakis, MD; Changxue Lu, PhD; Brandon Luber, ScM ; HaoWang, PhD; Yan

  2. New developments in the treatment of castration resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxanne Wadia

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In the past 5 years, the treatment and understanding of metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC have improved dramatically. Our understanding of the mechanisms of castration resistance has allowed for the development of new drugs to target prostate cancer, and our understanding of genetic mutations may give us new tools with which to more accurately diagnose and be able to predict the course of this heterogeneous disease. This article summarizes the recent advances in the understanding of the development of CRPC, as well as the new drugs and targets, which have evolved from this basic research.

  3. Castration-resistant prostate cancer: systemic therapy in 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando C. Maluf

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common non-cutaneous neoplasm in the male population worldwide. It is typically diagnosed in its early stages, and the disease exhibits a relatively indolent course in most patients. Despite the curability of localized disease with prostatectomy and radiation therapy, some patients develop metastatic disease and die. Although androgen deprivation is present in the majority of patients with metastatic prostate cancer, a state of androgen resistance eventually develops. Castration-resistant prostate cancer, defined when there is progression of disease despite low levels of testosterone, requires specialized care, and improved communication between medical and urologic oncologists has been identified as a key component in delivering effective therapy. Despite being considered a chemoresistant tumor in the past, the use of a prostate-specific antigen has paved the way for a new generation of trials for castration-resistant prostate cancer. Docetaxel is a life-prolonging chemotherapy that has been established as the standard first-line agent in two phase III clinical trials. Cabazitaxel, a novel taxane with activity in cancer models resistant to paclitaxel and docetaxel, is the only agent that has been compared to a chemotherapy control in a phase III clinical trial as a second-line therapy; it was found to prolong the overall survival of patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer previously treated with docetaxel when compared to mitoxantrone. Other agents used in this setting include abiraterone and sipuleucel-T, and novel therapies are continually being investigated in an attempt to improve the outcome for patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  4. Targeting Androgen Receptor Aberrations in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Adam; Welti, Jonathan; Blagg, Julian; de Bono, Johann S

    2016-09-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) splice variants (SV) have been implicated in the development of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer and resistance to AR targeting therapies, including abiraterone and enzalutamide. Agents targeting AR-SV are urgently needed to test this hypothesis and further improve the outcome of patients suffering from this lethal disease. Clin Cancer Res; 22(17); 4280-2. ©2016 AACRSee related article by Yang et al., p. 4466.

  5. New Therapeutics to Treat Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ömer Acar; Tarık Esen; Lack, Nathan A.

    2013-01-01

    Hindawi Publishing Corporation The ScientificWorld Journal Volume 2013, Article ID 379641, 8 pages http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/379641 Review Article New Therapeutics to Treat Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer Ömer Acar,1 TarJk Esen,1,2 and Nathan A. Lack1 1 VKF American Hospital, Guzelbahce sokak, Nisantasi, Istanbul 34365, Turkey 2 School of Medicine, Koc¸ University, Rumelifeneri Yolu, Sariyer, Istanbul 34450, Turkey Correspondence should be addressed to Natha...

  6. Palliative care in castrate-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabow, Michael W; Lee, Michael Xiang

    2012-11-01

    Significant symptoms and suffering related to castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) are associated with the disease and its treatment. Increasingly, with advances in treatment efficacy, men can live with symptoms for long periods. Interdisciplinary palliative care teams (including physicians, nurses, social workers, chaplains, pharmacists, psychologists, physical therapists, and nutritionists) focused on symptom management and patients' goals of care can collaborate with prostate cancer surgeons, oncologists, and radiation oncologists to provide the best care for men at all stages of treatment, including end of life. This article reviews the benefits of palliative care in helping patients with CRPC manage symptoms and distress.

  7. Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: Mechanisms, Targets, and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Maria Santos Amaral

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC, who progress after docetaxel therapy, had until very recently, only a few therapeutic options. Recent advances in this field brought about new perspectives in the treatment of this disease. Molecular, basic, and translational research has given us a better understanding on the mechanisms of CRPC. This great investment has turned into a more rational approach to the development of new drugs. Some of the new treatments are already available to our patients outside clinical trials and may include inhibitors of androgen biosynthesis; new chemotherapy agents; bone-targeted therapy; and immunotherapy. This paper aims to review the mechanisms of prostate cancer resistance, possible therapeutic targets, as well as new options to treat CRPC.

  8. New Therapeutics to Treat Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer Acar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effective treatment of castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC has proven to be very challenging. Until recently, docetaxel was the only therapeutic demonstrated to extend overall patient survival. Yet recently, a considerable number of new therapeutics have been approved to treat CRPC patients. These remarkable advances now give new tools for the therapeutic management of late-stage prostate cancer. In this review, we will examine mechanistic and clinical data of several newly approved therapeutics including the chemotherapeutic cabazitaxel, antiandrogen enzalutamide, endocrine disruptor abiraterone acetate, immunotherapy sipuleucel-T, and bone-targeting radiopharmaceutical alpharadin. In addition, we will examine other promising therapeutics that are currently in Phase III trials.

  9. Novel agents in the management of castration resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Chaturvedi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa is a leading cause of cancer mortality in men and despite high cure rates with surgery and/or radiation, 30-40% of patients will eventually develop advanced disease. Androgen deprivation is the first line therapy for standard of care for men with advanced disease. Eventually however all men will progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. Insight into the molecular mechanisms of androgen resistance has led to the development of alternative novel hormonal agents. Newer hormonal agents such as abiraterone, enzalutamide and TOK-001; and the first cancer vaccine, Sipuleucel T have been approved for use in men with CRPC. The recognition of the importance of bone health and morbidity associated with skeletal related events has led to the introduction of the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B-ligand inhibitor denosumab. Other molecularly targeted therapies have shown promise in pre-clinical studies, but this has not consistently translated into clinical efficacy. It is increasingly evident that CRPC is a heterogeneous disease and an individualized approach directed at identifying primary involvement of specific pathways could maximize the benefit from targeted therapies. This review focuses on targeted therapy for PCa with special emphasis on therapies that have been Food and Drug Administration approved for use in men with CRPC.

  10. Radium-223 in metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Winston Vuong; Oliver Sartor; Sumanta K Pal

    2014-01-01

    In 2004, docetaxel was approved for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). For the next several years, there was a lull in drug approvals. However, from 2010 onwards, 5 additional therapies have been approved on the basis of showing a survival beneift in phase III studies. These agents include sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel, abiraterone, enzalutamide and (most recently) radium-223. Amongst radiopharmaceuticals currently used for advanced prostate cancer (e.g. samarium-153 and strontium-89), radium-223 possesses several unique properties. As an alpha-emitting compound, the agent produces a high-energy output over a short range, facilitating selective destruction of tissue within the bone in the region of osteoblastic lesions while sparing surrounding normal tissue. The current review will outline biological rationale for radium-223 and also provide an overview of preclinical and clinical development of the agent. Rational sequencing of radium-223 and combinations, in the increasingly complex landscape of mCRPC will be discussed, along with factors inlfuencing clinical implementation.

  11. Radium-223 in metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winston Vuong

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In 2004, docetaxel was approved for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC. For the next several years, there was a lull in drug approvals. However, from 2010 onwards, 5 additional therapies have been approved on the basis of showing a survival benefit in phase III studies. These agents include sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel, abiraterone, enzalutamide and (most recently radium-223. Amongst radiopharmaceuticals currently used for advanced prostate cancer (e.g. samarium-153 and strontium-89, radium-223 possesses several unique properties. As an alpha-emitting compound, the agent produces a high-energy output over a short range, facilitating selective destruction of tissue within the bone in the region of osteoblastic lesions while sparing surrounding normal tissue. The current review will outline biological rationale for radium-223 and also provide an overview of preclinical and clinical development of the agent. Rational sequencing of radium-223 and combinations, in the increasingly complex landscape of mCRPC will be discussed, along with factors influencing clinical implementation.

  12. Treatment sequencing in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Sartor

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Six different treatments have demonstrated improved survival in phase III trials targeted to patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC. Front-line therapeutic options for mCRPC include docetaxel, sipuleucel-T, abiraterone and radium-223. Post-docetaxel options include cabazitaxel, abiraterone, enzalutamide and radium-223. Despite much progress in recent years, much is yet unknown and debates occur over optimal treatment choices and sequences. None of the new agents have been compared to one another, thus physicians in practice today must make choices based on non-randomized comparisons, toxicity considerations and various assumptions. Abiraterone is now moving into the front line mCRPC space given recent regulatory approvals and enzalutamide will follow soon. Both of the hormonal agents have less toxicity when compared to chemotherapeutic options and both of these hormonal agents are expected to be used in a considerable number of mCRPC patients in the years ahead. Little data are available for the post-abiraterone or post-enzalutamide setting. In this review the currently available sequencing data are summarized and interpreted. It is now clear that cross resistance is a potential issue between various treatments, especially those agents that target the androgen axis. This review highlights the need for additional studies to optimize the current treatments for these patients.

  13. Treatment sequencing in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Oliver Sartor; Silke Gillessen

    2014-01-01

    Six different treatments have demonstrated improved survival in phase III trials targeted to patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Front-line therapeutic options for mCRPC include docetaxel, sipuleucel-T, abiraterone and radium-223. Post-docetaxel options include cabazitaxel, abiraterone, enzalutamide and radium-223. Despite much progress in recent years, much is yet unknown and debates occur over optimal treatment choices and sequences. None of the new agents have been compared to one another, thus physicians in practice today must make choices based on non-randomized comparisons, toxicity considerations and various assumptions. Abiraterone is now moving into the front line mCRPC space given recent regulatory approvals and enzalutamide will follow soon. Both of the hormonal agents have less toxicity when compared to chemotherapeutic options and both of these hormonal agents are expected to be used in a considerable number of mCRPC patients in the years ahead. Little data are available for the post-abiraterone or post-enzalutamide setting. In this review the currently available sequencing data are summarized and interpreted. It is now clear that cross resistance is a potential issue between various treatments, especially those agents that target the androgen axis. This review highlights the need for additional studies to optimize the current treatments for these patients.

  14. Emerging targeted therapies for castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo eAdamo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, few therapeutic options were available for patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. Since 2010, four new molecules with a demonstrated benefit (sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel, abiraterone and denosumab have been approved in this setting, and to-date several other agents are under investigation in clinical trials. The purpose of this review is to present an update of targeted therapies for CRPC. Presented data are obtained from literature and congress reports updated until December 2011. Targeted therapies in advanced phases of clinical development include novel hormone-therapeutic, intracellular molecular pathways inhibiting, anti-angiogenic, bone microenvironment targeting and immunotherapeutic agents. Radium-223 and MDV3100 demonstrated a survival advantage in phase III trials and the road for their introduction in clinical practice is rapidly ongoing. Results are also awaited for phase III studies currently underway or planned with new drugs given as monotherapy (TAK-700, cabozantinib, tasquinimod, PROSTVAC-VF, ipilimumab or in combination with docetaxel (custirsen, aflibercept, dasatinib, zibotentan. Optimal timing, right combination and/or sequencing of emerging therapies as well as use of more sensitive biological markers to individualize therapies for CRPC remain challenging and studies to investigate these aspects are needed.

  15. A changing landscape in castration resistant prostate cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra eFelici

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC is the leading cause of cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-death among men in the Western world. About 10%-20% of men with PC present with metastatic disease at diagnosis, while 20%-30% of patients diagnosed with localized disease will eventually develop metastases. Although most respond to initial androgen deprivation therapy (ADT, progression to castration resistant PC (CRPC is universal. In 2004 the docetaxel/prednisone regimen was approved for the management of patients with metastatic CRPC, becoming the standard first-line therapy. Recent advances have now led to an unprecedented number of new drug approvals within the past years, providing many new treatment options for patients with metastatic CRPC. Four new drugs have received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approval in 2010 and 2011: sipuleucel-T, an immunotherapeutic agent; cabazitaxel, a novel microtubule inhibitor; abiraterone acetate, a new androgen biosynthesis inhibitor; and denosumab, a bone-targeting agent. The data supporting the approval of each of these agents are described in this review, as are current approaches in the treatment of metastatic CRPC and ongoing clinical trials of novel treatments and strategies.

  16. Sipuleucel-T in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: an insight for oncologists

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, Jorge A.

    2011-01-01

    Sipuleucel-T represents a novel immunotherapeutic compound designed to stimulate an immune response against castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Sipuleucel-T is an autologous active cellular immunotherapy product, which includes autologous dendritic cells pulsed ex vivo with PAP2024, a recombinant fusion protein made of prostatic acid phosphatase and granulocyte-macrophag...

  17. Targeted treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer with sipuleucel-T immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulders, P.F.; Santis, M. de; Powles, T.; Fizazi, K.

    2015-01-01

    CONTEXT: Prostate cancer remains highly prevalent and has a poor clinical outcome once metastatic. Sipuleucel-T is an autologous cellular immunotherapy approved for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Sipuleucel-T treatment extends survival but is independent of

  18. Novel Therapeutic Targets to Inhibit Tumor Microenvironment Induced Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    N.L. Androgen receptors in hormone- dependent and castration-resistant prostate cancer. Pharmacol Ther 140, 223-38 (2013). 2. Claessens, F. et al...Derynck, R. Roles of autocrine TGF-beta receptor and Smad signaling in adipocyte differentiation . J Cell Biol 149, 667-82 (2000). Appendices: None. ...will relapse after ADT and become lethal castration- resistant PCa (CRPC). Interestingly, most CRPCs are still AR- dependent 1, 2. Hence, AR remains as

  19. Abiraterone plus prednisone improves survival in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Scott T Tagawa; Himisha Beltran

    2011-01-01

    In essentially just 1 year's time,we have seen science translated into exciting new therapeutic agents for men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC),1 most recently with the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of abiraterone acetate in combination with prednisone.2 While prostate cancer has been known to be highly responsive to surgical or medical castration for well over half a century,3 what was once termed 'hormone refractory' prostate cancer inevitably developed,leading to cancerrelated death.Many consider the introduction of chemotherapy for CRPC initially for symptomatic benefit,then with improvements in survival,a substantial step forward.

  20. Role of Chemotherapy and Mechanisms of Resistance to Chemotherapy in Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohiya, Vipin; Aragon-Ching, Jeanny B.; Sonpavde, Guru

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy using the taxanes, docetaxel and cabazitaxel, remains an important therapeutic option in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). However, despite the survival benefits afforded by these agents, the survival increments are modest and resistance occurs universally. Efforts to overcome resistance to docetaxel by combining with biologic agents have heretofore been unsuccessful. Indeed, resistance to these taxanes is also associated with cross-resistance to the antiandrogen drugs, abiraterone and enzalutamide. Here, we discuss the various mechanisms of resistance to chemotherapy in metastatic CRPC and the potential role of emerging regimens and agents in varying clinical phases of development.

  1. Prostate Cancer Stem-like Cells Contribute to the Development of Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Ojo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT has been the standard care for patients with advanced prostate cancer (PC since the 1940s. Although ADT shows clear benefits for many patients, castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC inevitably occurs. In fact, with the two recent FDA-approved second-generation anti-androgens abiraterone and enzalutamide, resistance develops rapidly in patients with CRPC, despite their initial effectiveness. The lack of effective therapeutic solutions towards CRPC largely reflects our limited understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for CRPC development. While persistent androgen receptor (AR signaling under castration levels of serum testosterone (<50 ng/mL contributes to resistance to ADT, it is also clear that CRPC evolves via complex mechanisms. Nevertheless, the physiological impact of individual mechanisms and whether these mechanisms function in a cohesive manner in promoting CRPC are elusive. In spite of these uncertainties, emerging evidence supports a critical role of prostate cancer stem-like cells (PCSLCs in stimulating CRPC evolution and resistance to abiraterone and enzalutamide. In this review, we will discuss the recent evidence supporting the involvement of PCSLC in CRPC acquisition as well as the pathways and factors contributing to PCSLC expansion in response to ADT.

  2. Sipuleucel-T: in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plosker, Greg L

    2011-01-01

    Sipuleucel-T is an autologous active cellular immunotherapy used in the treatment of men with asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). It is the first therapeutic cancer vaccine to receive US FDA approval. Approximately 3 days prior to each infusion of sipuleucel-T, patients undergo a leukapheresis procedure for collection of autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Preparation of sipuleucel-T involves enrichment for antigen-presenting cells from the leukapheresis product and activation ex vivo with a recombinant fusion protein (PA2024). In the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled IMPACT study in patients with metastatic CRPC, sipuleucel-T was associated with a 22% relative reduction in the risk of death (hazard ratio 0.78; p = 0.03), which was the primary endpoint of the trial. After a median follow-up period of 34.1 months, median survival was 4.1 months longer with sipuleucel-T than placebo (25.8 vs 21.7 months). There was no significant between-group difference for the median time to objective disease progression (a secondary endpoint). Almost all patients treated with sipuleucel-T in clinical trials reported an adverse event, although these were mild or moderate in severity (grade 1 or 2) in most patients. The most common adverse events (e.g. infusion-related events, such as chills and fever) generally occurred within the first day after administration of sipuleucel-T and resolved within 2 days.

  3. Abiraterone acetate for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer progressing after chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sternberg, Cora N; Castellano, Daniel; Daugaard, Gedske

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the final analysis of the phase 3 COU-AA-301 study, abiraterone acetate plus prednisone significantly prolonged overall survival compared with prednisone alone in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer progressing after chemotherapy. Here, we present the final...... analysis of an early-access protocol trial that was initiated after completion of COU-AA-301 to enable worldwide preapproval access to abiraterone acetate in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer progressing after chemotherapy. METHODS: We did a multicentre, open-label, early......-access protocol trial in 23 countries. We enrolled patients who had metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer progressing after taxane chemotherapy. Participants received oral doses of abiraterone acetate (1000 mg daily) and prednisone (5 mg twice a day) in 28-day cycles until disease progression...

  4. Stilbenes inhibit androgen receptor expression in 22Rv1 castrate-resistant prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Androgen receptor (AR) signaling plays an important role in the development and progression of prostate cancer (PCa). Importantly, AR continues to be expressed in advanced stages of castrate-resistant PCa (CRPC), where it can have ligand- independent activity. Identification of naturally occurring s...

  5. Enzalutamide in Men with Chemotherapy-naïve Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beer, Tomasz M; Armstrong, Andrew J; Rathkopf, Dana;

    2017-01-01

    Enzalutamide significantly improved radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS) and overall survival (OS) among men with chemotherapy-naïve metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer at the prespecified interim analysis of PREVAIL, a phase 3, double-blind, randomized study. We evaluated...

  6. Docetaxel rechallenge after an initial good response in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oudard, Stéphane; Kramer, Gero; Caffo, Orazio

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the benefit of docetaxel rechallenge in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) relapsing after an initial good response to first-line docetaxel. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the records of consecutive patients with mCRPC w...

  7. Current and emerging treatment options for castration-resistant prostate cancer: a focus on immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, W.R.; Sharma, P.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Castration-resistant prostate cancer is a disease with limited treatment options. However, the ongoing elucidation of the mechanisms underlying this disease continues to support the development of not only novel agents, but also innovative approaches. Among these therapies, immunotherapy

  8. Castration-resistant prostate cancer: from new pathophysiology to new treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sridhar, S.S.; Freedland, S.J.; Gleave, M.E.; Higano, C.; Mulders, P.; Parker, C.; Sartor, O.; Saad, F.

    2014-01-01

    CONTEXT: Until recently, the only approved agent for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) was docetaxel chemotherapy. But over the last 5 years, significant advances in the field have led to the approval of five new agents, each with different mechanisms of action and demonstratin

  9. Safety of cabazitaxel in senior adults with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heidenreich, Axel; Bracarda, Sergio; Mason, Malcolm;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cabazitaxel/prednisone has been shown to prolong survival versus mitoxantrone/prednisone in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) that has progressed during or after docetaxel. Subsequently, compassionate-use programmes (CUPs) and expanded-access progra...

  10. Targeted treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer with sipuleucel-T immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Mulders, Peter F.; Santis, Maria; Powles, Thomas; Fizazi, Karim

    2015-01-01

    Context Prostate cancer remains highly prevalent and has a poor clinical outcome once metastatic. Sipuleucel-T is an autologous cellular immunotherapy approved for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Sipuleucel-T treatment extends survival but is independent of traditional short-term markers of treatment response observed with chemotherapy and contemporary hormonal treatments. Therefore, it is essential that clinicians understand the mechanism of action o...

  11. Statin derivatives as therapeutic agents for castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, Matthew A; Miller, Dannah R; Martinez, October; Wakefield, C Brent; Hsieh, Kuan-Chan; Simha, M Vijaya; Kao, Chai-Lin; Chen, Hui-Ting; Batra, Surinder K; Lin, Ming-Fong

    2016-12-01

    Despite recent advances in modern medicine, castration-resistant prostate cancer remains an incurable disease. Subpopulations of prostate cancer cells develop castration-resistance by obtaining the complete steroidogenic ability to synthesize androgens from cholesterol. Statin derivatives, such as simvastatin, inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis and may reduce prostate cancer incidence as well as progression to advanced, metastatic phenotype. In this study, we demonstrate novel simvastatin-related molecules SVA, AM1, and AM2 suppress the tumorigenicity of prostate cancer cell lines including androgen receptor-positive LNCaP C-81 and VCaP as well as androgen receptor-negative PC-3 and DU145. This is achieved through inhibition of cell proliferation, colony formation, and migration as well as induction of S-phase cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. While the compounds effectively block androgen receptor signaling, their mechanism of inhibition also includes suppression of the AKT pathway, in part, through disruption of the plasma membrane. SVA also possess an added effect on cell growth inhibition when combined with docetaxel. In summary, of the compounds studied, SVA is the most potent inhibitor of prostate cancer cell tumorigenicity, demonstrating its potential as a promising therapeutic agent for castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  12. Abiraterone acetate: oral androgen biosynthesis inhibitor for treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenberg JE

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Yasser Rehman1, Jonathan E Rosenberg21Division of Hospital Medicine, UMass Memorial Healthcare, Worcester, MA, USA; 2Lank Center for Genitourinary Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in men in the US and Europe. The treatment of advanced-stage prostate cancer has been androgen deprivation. Medical castration leads to decreased production of testosterone and dihydrotestosterone by the testes, but adrenal glands and even prostate cancer tissue continue to produce androgens, which eventually leads to continued prostate cancer growth despite castrate level of androgens. This stage is known as castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC, which continues to be a challenge to treat. Addition of androgen antagonists to hormonal deprivation has been successful in lowering the prostate-specific antigen levels further, but has not actually translated into life-prolonging options. The results of several contemporary studies have continued to demonstrate activation of the androgen receptor as being the key factor in the continued growth of prostate cancer. Blockade of androgen production by nongonadal sources has led to clinical benefit in this setting. One such agent is abiraterone acetate, which significantly reduces androgen production by blocking the enzyme, cytochrome P450 17 alpha-hydroxylase (CYP17. This has provided physicians with another treatment option for patients with CRPC. The landscape for prostate cancer treatment has changed with the approval of cabazitaxel, sipuleucel-T and abiraterone. Here we provide an overview of abiraterone acetate, its mechanism of action, and its potential place for therapy in CRPC.Keywords: CRPC, abiraterone, CYP17, inhibitors, androgens, castration resistant prostate cancer

  13. N-Cadherin in Prostate Cancer: Downstream Pathways and their Translational Application for Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Prostate Center, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. 5Department of Pathology , Geffen School of Medicine, University...Medicine: doi:10.1038/nm.2236 a 0 .000 -0.100 BPH 0 .011 Untreated ( all grades) NHT treated ( all the time points) Recurrent ( documented...antibody (Clone32, BD Transduction Laboratories). (a) BPH : benign prostate hyperplasia; NHT: neoadjuvant hormone therapy; CRPC: castrate resistant

  14. Identification and Targeting of Candidate Pre-Existing Lurker Cells that Give Rise to Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    progenitor cells as the pre-existing “lurker” cells in primary prostate tumors, to evaluate potential therapeutic targets in intermediate luminal... progenitor cells, and to define candidate biomarkers in intermediate luminal progenitor cells that can predict prognosis and response to hormonal therapy...15. SUBJECT TERMS Prostate, epithelial, Androgen-deprivation therapy, Castration-resistant prostate cancer, luminal progenitor , intermediate cell

  15. Integrative Molecular Profiling Reveals Asparagine Synthetase Is a Target in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sircar, Kanishka; Huang, Heng; Hu, Limei; Cogdell, David; Dhillon, Jasreman; Tzelepi, Vassiliki; Efstathiou, Eleni; Koumakpayi, Ismaël H.; Saad, Fred; Luo, Dijun; Bismar, Tarek A.; Aparicio, Ana; Troncoso, Patricia; Navone, Nora; Zhang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    The identification of new and effective therapeutic targets for the lethal, castration-resistant stage of prostate cancer (CRPC) has been challenging because of both the paucity of adequate frozen tissues and a lack of integrated molecular analysis. Therefore, in this study, we performed a genome-wide analysis of DNA copy number alterations from 34 unique surgical CRPC specimens and 5 xenografts, with matched transcriptomic profiling of 25 specimens. An integrated analysis of these data revealed that the asparagine synthetase (ASNS) gene showed a gain in copy number and was overexpressed at the transcript level. The overexpression of ASNS was validated by analyzing other public CRPC data sets. ASNS protein expression, as detected by reverse-phase protein lysate array, was tightly correlated with gene copy number. In addition, ASNS protein expression, as determined by IHC analysis, was associated with progression to a therapy-resistant disease state in TMAs that included 77 castration-resistant and 40 untreated prostate cancer patient samples. Knockdown of ASNS by small-interfering RNAs in asparagine-deprived media led to growth inhibition in both androgen-responsive (ie, LNCaP) and castration-resistant (ie, C4-2B) prostate cancer cell lines and in cells isolated from a CRPC xenograft (ie, MDA PCa 180-30). Together, our results suggest that ASNS is up-regulated in cases of CRPC and that depletion of asparagine using ASNS inhibitors will be a novel strategy for targeting CRPC cells. PMID:22245216

  16. State-Of-The-Art Treatment in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Castro

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PrCa is the most common cancer type in men in developed countries. In the last few years, a dramatic change has occurred in the understanding of castration-resistant PrCa which has led to the development of new drugs that have an impact on patient survival. This review summarises the recent advances in the management of the disease.

  17. MiR-146-SIAH2-AR Signaling in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    clinical response and PCa patients invariably relapse with more aggressive Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer (CRPC). The mechanism of CRPC development...blocks AR-signaling often fails after significant initial clinical response and PCa patients invariably relapse with more aggressive form of PCa...proliferation of both parental LNCaP and MDAPCa2b cells but DHT did not increase proliferation of miR-146a inhibitor expressing cell lines (Fig. 6

  18. Critical questions in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: Integrating emerging clinical evidence and guideline recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) typically confers a poor prognosis, however, novel advances in treatment options, as well as biomarkers for monitoring disease response and progression, have recently helped improve survival rates. Additionally, new guidelines provide some direction on incorporating these new treatments but some confusion still exists among clinicians about best methods for initiating treatment and the optimal sequencing of agents to prolong survival. In ...

  19. Investigating BRCA Mutations: A Breakthrough in Precision Medicine of Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modena, Alessandra; Iacovelli, Roberto; Scarpa, Aldo; Brunelli, Matteo; Ciccarese, Chiara; Fantinel, Emanuela; Bimbatti, Davide; Massari, Francesco; Martignoni, Guido; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2016-10-01

    Despite the development of novel effective therapeutic strategies, metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) remains a disease with a lethal course and a high biological and molecular heterogeneity. To date, germline mutations in the BRCA gene represent one of the main risk factors for developing prostate cancer, with a strong association with aggressive phenotype and poor clinical outcomes. A better understanding of the genomic landscape of prostate cancer has strengthened the idea that "synthetic lethality" of this disease might be useful in cancer-drug discovery, focusing on agents such as platinum compounds and poly (adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase inhibitors (PARPi). In this review, we summarize the main data available on BRCA mutations and discuss the clinical implications of these genomic aberrations in the management of prostate cancer, stressing the need to identify prognostic and predictive biomarkers and to deeply understand the mechanisms of treatment resistance, in order to maximize personalized medicine protocols and therefore clinical benefit.

  20. Clinical use of abiraterone in the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zobniw CM

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Chrystia M Zobniw,1 Alanna Causebrook,2 Mei Ka Fong1 1Department of Pharmacy, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY, USA; 2School of Pharmacy, Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine, Erie, PA, USA Abstract: Prostate cancer remains the most common type of cancer among men in the United States. Treatment for metastatic prostate cancer has improved significantly over the years with more and more agents improving overall survival. This review will address the pathophysiology of prostate cancer followed by the mechanism of action and the pharmacokinetic properties of abiraterone. The review will also discuss the role of abiraterone in the treatment of metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer. Keywords: glucocorticoid receptor, CYP17, pipeline, enzalutamide, sipuleucel-T, drug resistance, radium-223 dichloride

  1. Novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidegger, Isabel; Massoner, Petra; Eder, Iris E; Pircher, Andreas; Pichler, Renate; Aigner, Friedrich; Bektic, Jasmin; Horninger, Wolfgang; Klocker, Helmut

    2013-11-01

    Prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer death in men in developed countries. Once the tumor has achieved a castration-refractory metastatic stage, treatment options are limited with the average survival of patients ranging from two to three years only. Recently, new drugs for treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) have been approved, and others are in an advanced stage of clinical testing. In this review we provide an overview of the new therapeutic agents that arrived in the clinical praxis or are tested in clinical studies and their mode of action including hormone synthesis inhibitors, new androgen receptor blockers, bone targeting and antiangiogenic agents, endothelin receptor antagonists, growth factor inhibitors, novel radiotherapeutics and taxanes, and immunotherapeutic approaches. Results and limitations from clinical studies as well as future needs for improvement of CRPC treatments are critically discussed.

  2. Interdisciplinary critique of sipuleucel-T as immunotherapy in castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huber, Marie L; Haynes, Laura; Parker, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Sipuleucel-T was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration on April 29, 2010, as an immunotherapy for late-stage prostate cancer. To manufacture sipuleucel-T, mononuclear cells harvested from the patient are incubated with a recombinant prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) antigen and reinfused....... The manufacturer proposes that antigen-presenting cells exogenously activated by PAP induce endogenous T-cells to attack PAP-bearing prostate cancer cells. However, the lack of demonstrable tumor responses has prompted calls for scrutiny of the design of the trials in which sipuleucel-T demonstrated a 4-month...... survival benefit. Previously unpublished data from the sipuleucel-T trials show worse overall survival in older vs younger patients in the placebo groups, which have not been shown previously to be prognostic for survival in castration-resistant prostate cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Because two...

  3. Cabazitaxel as second-line or third-line therapy in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Per; Svane, Inge M; Lindberg, Henriette

    2016-01-01

    To compare treatment outcomes in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer treated with cabazitaxel (CA) as second-line or third-line therapy in the everyday clinical setting. Charts from 94 patients treated with CA as second-line (n=28) or third-line therapy (n=66) were...... evaluated. Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events were used to register grade 3-4 nonhematological toxicity during treatment with CA. Baseline metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer-related prognostic factors, duration of therapy, and maximum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) percentage...

  4. Update on options for treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Vishnu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Prakash Vishnu, Winston W TanDivision of Hematology Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, USABackground: Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers in men in US and European countries. Despite having a favorable prognosis, the incidence of incurable metastatic disease and mortality in the US is about 28,000 per year. Although hormone-based androgen deprivation therapies typically result in rapid responses, nearly all patients eventually develop progressive castration-resistant disease state. With readily available prostate-specific antigen (PSA testing, most of these patients are asymptomatic and manifest progression simply as a rising PSA. In patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC, the median survival is about 1–2 years, with improvements in survival seen mostly with docetaxel-based regimens. The purpose of this article is to review the recent developments in the treatment of advanced CRPC.Recent findings: Since the two landmark trials (TAX-327 and Southwest Oncology Group 99–16 in CRPC, several newer cytotoxic drugs (epothilones, satraplatin, targeted agents (abiraterone, MDV3100 and vaccines have been tested in phase II and III setting with promising results.Conclusions: The role of newer agents in the treatment of CRPC still needs to be validated by phase III trials, which are currently ongoing. Whilst the novel biomarkers, ‘circulating tumor cells’, have been shown to provide important prognostic information and are anticipated to be incorporated in future clinical decision-making, their exact utility and relevance calls for a larger prospective validation.Keywords: castration-resistant prostate cancer, novel therapies, mechanisms of resistance, circulating tumor cells

  5. Novel Imidazopyridine Derivatives Possess Anti-Tumor Effect on Human Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A Ingersoll

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa is the second leading cause of cancer-related death afflicting United States males. Most treatments to-date for metastatic PCa include androgen-deprivation therapy and second-generation anti-androgens such as abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide. However, a majority of patients eventually develop resistance to these therapies and relapse into the lethal, castration-resistant form of PCa to which no adequate treatment option remains. Hence, there is an immediate need to develop effective therapeutic agents toward this patient population. Imidazopyridines have recently been shown to possess Akt kinase inhibitory activity; thus in this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of novel imidazopyridine derivatives HIMP, M-MeI, OMP, and EtOP on different human castration-resistant PCa cells. Among these compounds, HIMP and M-MeI were found to possess selective dose- and time-dependent growth inhibition: they reduced castration-resistant PCa cell proliferation and spared benign prostate epithelial cells. Using LNCaP C-81 cells as the model system, these compounds also reduced colony formation as well as cell adhesion and migration, and M-MeI was the most potent in all studies. Further investigation revealed that while HIMP primarily inhibits PCa cell growth via suppression of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, M-MeI can inhibit both PI3K/Akt and androgen receptor pathways and arrest cell growth in the G2 phase. Thus, our results indicate the novel compound M-MeI to be a promising candidate for castration-resistant PCa therapy, and future studies investigating the mechanism of imidazopyridine inhibition may aid to the development of effective anti-PCa agents.

  6. Novel Imidazopyridine Derivatives Possess Anti-Tumor Effect on Human Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniyan, Sakthivel; D’Cunha, Napoleon; Robinson, Tashika; Hoelting, Kyle; Dwyer, Jennifer G.; Bu, Xiu R.; Batra, Surinder K.; Lin, Ming-Fong

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death afflicting United States males. Most treatments to-date for metastatic PCa include androgen-deprivation therapy and second-generation anti-androgens such as abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide. However, a majority of patients eventually develop resistance to these therapies and relapse into the lethal, castration-resistant form of PCa to which no adequate treatment option remains. Hence, there is an immediate need to develop effective therapeutic agents toward this patient population. Imidazopyridines have recently been shown to possess Akt kinase inhibitory activity; thus in this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of novel imidazopyridine derivatives HIMP, M-MeI, OMP, and EtOP on different human castration-resistant PCa cells. Among these compounds, HIMP and M-MeI were found to possess selective dose- and time-dependent growth inhibition: they reduced castration-resistant PCa cell proliferation and spared benign prostate epithelial cells. Using LNCaP C-81 cells as the model system, these compounds also reduced colony formation as well as cell adhesion and migration, and M-MeI was the most potent in all studies. Further investigation revealed that while HIMP primarily inhibits PCa cell growth via suppression of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, M-MeI can inhibit both PI3K/Akt and androgen receptor pathways and arrest cell growth in the G2 phase. Thus, our results indicate the novel compound M-MeI to be a promising candidate for castration-resistant PCa therapy, and future studies investigating the mechanism of imidazopyridine inhibition may aid to the development of effective anti-PCa agents. PMID:26121643

  7. Immunotherapy in castration-resistant prostate cancer: integrating sipuleucel-T into our current treatment paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Jorge A; Dreicer, Robert

    2011-03-01

    The availability of several novel antibodies, coupled with viral, DNA, and dendritic-cell vaccines, has renewed interest in immunotherapeutic approaches to the treatment of advanced prostate cancer. Although promising, none of these approaches have led to major clinical activity, and in the case of cell-based immunotherapy with GVAX, new concerns about safety arose when this therapy was used in the castration-resistant setting. A more attractive yet toxic approach has also utilized a check-point blockade with CTLA-4 antibodies. Although initial clinical efficacy has been observed, toxicity appears to be the major limitation of its use in prostate cancer. Sipuleucel-T (Provenge) is an autologous active cellular immunotherapy product that includes autologous dendritic cells pulsed ex vivo with PAP2024, a recombinant fusion protein made of prostatic acid phosphataase (PAP) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Despite the lack of objective anti-tumor activity seen with sipuleucel-T, a recently reported phase III trial demonstrated a significant improvement in the overall survival of men with asymptomatic, minimally symptomatic metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). This agent is the first FDA-approved novel immunotherapeutic compound for the treatment of a solid malignancy. A better understanding of how clinicians should incorporate this novel agent into the current management of CRPC is needed.

  8. Using a Novel Transgenic Mouse Model to Study c-Myc Oncogenic Pathway in Castration Resistance and Chemoresistance of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Oncogenic Pathway in Castration Resistance and Chemoresistance of Prostate Cancer 3 Annual Progress Report W81XWH-13-1-0162 Using a Novel...Transgenic Mouse Model to Study c-Myc Oncogenic Pathway in Castration Resistance and Chemoresistance of Prostate Cancer Feng Yang, Ph.D. Department of...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0162 TITLE: Using a Novel Transgenic Mouse Model to Study c-Myc Oncogenic Pathway in Castration Resistance and

  9. Osteoblasts promote castration-resistant prostate cancer by altering intratumoral steroidogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagberg Thulin, Malin; Nilsson, Maria E; Thulin, Pontus; Céraline, Jocelyn; Ohlsson, Claes; Damber, Jan-Erik; Welén, Karin

    2016-02-15

    The skeleton is the preferred site for prostate cancer (PC) metastasis leading to incurable castration-resistant disease. The increased expression of genes encoding steroidogenic enzymes found in bone metastatic tissue from patients suggests that up-regulated steroidogenesis might contribute to tumor growth at the metastatic site. Because of the overall sclerotic phenotype, we hypothesize that osteoblasts regulate the intratumoral steroidogenesis of castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) in bone. We here show that osteoblasts alter the steroidogenic transcription program in CRPC cells, closely mimicking the gene expression pattern described in CRPC. Osteoblast-stimulated LNCaP-19 cells displayed an increased expression of genes encoding for steroidogenic enzymes (CYP11A1, HSD3B1, and AKR1C3), estrogen signaling-related genes (CYP19A1, and ESR2), and genes for DHT-inactivating enzymes (UGT2B7, UGT2B15, and UGT2B17). The observed osteoblast-induced effect was exclusive to osteogenic CRPC cells (LNCaP-19) in contrast to osteolytic PC-3 and androgen-dependent LNCaP cells. The altered steroid enzymatic pattern was specific for the intratibial tumors and verified by immunohistochemistry in tissue specimens from LNCaP-19 xenograft tumors. Additionally, the overall steroidogenic effect was reflected by corresponding levels of progesterone and testosterone in serum from castrated mice with intratibial xenografts. A bi-directional interplay was demonstrated since both proliferation and Esr2 expression of osteoblasts were induced by CRPC cells in steroid-depleted conditions. Together, our results demonstrate that osteoblasts are important mediators of the intratumoral steroidogenesis of CRPC and for castration-resistant growth in bone. Targeting osteoblasts may therefore be important in the development of new therapeutic approaches.

  10. Targeting Met and VEGFR Axis in Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: 'Game Over'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modena, Alessandra; Massari, Francesco; Ciccarese, Chiara; Brunelli, Matteo; Santoni, Matteo; Montironi, Rodolfo; Martignoni, Guido; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2016-08-01

    Despite recent advances that have been made in the therapeutic landscape of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), effective management of bone metastases remains a key goal not yet reached. The receptor tyrosine kinase MET and the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) seem to play an important role in prostate cancer progression and pathological bone turnover, representing potential targets for improving clinical outcomes in mCRPC. Studies evaluating agents that target one or both these pathways have demonstrated modest activity but no improvement in overall survival. Nevertheless, this therapeutic strategy seems to still be a promising and engaging area of prostate cancer research and the interest in better understanding the MET/VEGFR axis and the mechanism of action of these inhibitors is growing. This review describes the rationale for targeting MET and VEGFR pathway in mCRPC and provides the clinical data available to date and an update on ongoing trials.

  11. Sipuleucel-T in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: an insight for oncologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Jorge A

    2011-03-01

    Sipuleucel-T represents a novel immunotherapeutic compound designed to stimulate an immune response against castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Sipuleucel-T is an autologous active cellular immunotherapy product, which includes autologous dendritic cells pulsed ex vivo with PAP2024, a recombinant fusion protein made of prostatic acid phosphatase and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Despite the lack of prostate-specific antigen and objective response, a recent phase III randomized trial demonstrated a significant improvement in overall survival in asymptomatic and minimally symptomatic CRPC patients. This review summarizes the clinical development of Sipuleucel-T in CRPC that led to the regulatory approval of this compound in the USA.

  12. Abiraterone in the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostaghel EA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Elahe A Mostaghel Division of Clinical Research, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Androgen deprivation therapy remains the single most effective treatment for the initial therapy of advanced prostate cancer, but is uniformly marked by progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. Residual tumor androgens and androgen axis activation are now recognized to play a prominent role in mediating CRPC progression. Despite suppression of circulating testosterone to castrate levels, castration does not eliminate androgens from the prostate tumor microenvironment and residual androgen levels are well within the range capable of activating the androgen receptor (AR and AR-mediated gene expression. Accordingly, therapeutic strategies that more effectively target production of intratumoral androgens are necessary. The introduction of abiraterone, a potent suppressor of cytochrome P450 17 α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-mediated androgen production, has heralded a new era in the hormonal treatment of men with metastatic CRPC. Herein, the androgen and AR-mediated mechanisms that contribute to CRPC progression and establish cytochrome P450 17 α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase as a critical therapeutic target are briefly reviewed. The mechanism of action and pharmacokinetics of abiraterone are reviewed and its recently described activity against AR and 3-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase is discussed. The Phase I and II data initially demonstrating the efficacy of abiraterone and Phase III data supporting its approval for patients with metastatic CRPC are reviewed. The safety and tolerability of abiraterone, including the incidence and management of side effects and potential drug interactions, are discussed. The current place of abiraterone in CRPC therapy is reviewed and early evidence regarding cross-resistance of abiraterone with taxane therapy, mechanisms of resistance to abiraterone, and observations of an

  13. New drugs in the treatment of elderly patients with metastatic castration-resistance prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genestreti, Giovenzio; Di Battista, Monica; Cavallo, Giovanna; Brandes, Alba A

    2016-08-03

    Treatment of prostate cancer is continually evolving and new therapies have become available. However, the management of elderly patients is challenging due to their age and comorbidities. Androgen deprivation therapy remains the mainstay treatment of hormonal-sensitive disease. Nevertheless, when disease becomes resistant to castration, docetaxel-based chemotherapy represents the standard rescue therapy irrespective of patient age. Recently, chemotherapeutic agents such as cabazitaxel and hormonal therapies such as abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide have been shown to improve survival in patients with progression of disease before or following docetaxel. This review focuses on the safety and efficacy results of these new drugs in elderly patients.

  14. Critical questions in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: Integrating emerging clinical evidence and guideline recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC typically confers a poor prognosis, however, novel advances in treatment options, as well as biomarkers for monitoring disease response and progression, have recently helped improve survival rates. Additionally, new guidelines provide some direction on incorporating these new treatments but some confusion still exists among clinicians about best methods for initiating treatment and the optimal sequencing of agents to prolong survival. In this article, we review the literature and answer some frequently asked questions about treating men with metastatic CRPC, including choosing a first-line treatment, monitoring treatment response, and proceeding to additional lines of therapy.

  15. Optimal Sequencing of New Drugs in Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: Dream or Reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffo, Orazio; Lunardi, Andrea; Trentin, Chiara; Maines, Francesca; Veccia, Antonello; Galligioni, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    The availability of new drugs capable of improving the overall survival of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer has led to the possibility of using them sequentially in the hope of obtaining a cumulative survival benefit. The new agents have already been administered as third-line treatments in patients who have previously received them as second line in everyday clinical practice, but the efficacy of this practice is not yet supported by clinical trial data, and evidence of possible cross-resistance has reinforced the debate concerning the best sequence to use in order to maximise the benefit. Furthermore, the situation is further complicated by the possibility of administering new hormonal agents to chemotherapy-naïve patients, and novel chemotherapeutic agents to hormone-sensitive patients. This article critically reviews the available data concerning the sequential use of new drugs, and discusses the real evidence concerning their optimal positioning in the therapeutic strategy of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  16. [Treatment sequence using newly developed agents for men with castration resistant prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Naohiro

    2014-12-01

    Abiraterone acetate(AA), enzalutamide (EZL) and cabazitaxel (CBZ) are becoming available in Japan. Clinical trials demonstrated the benefit of these agents in men with castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). However, data on sequence therapy using these agents are very limited. Based on the mechanisms of agents and clinical data, AA and EZL may be indicated in early stage and CBZ may be indicated in late stage of CRPC. Prostate cancer is significantly heterogeneous between individuals and useful biomarkers for deciding the best treatment are unavailable yet. Therefore, it is hard to establish a standard sequence of the treatments. Until clinical trials demonstrate the best treatment sequence, individualized therapy is required for each patient based on patient and disease characteristics.

  17. Enzalutamide Antitumour Activity Against Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer Previously Treated with Docetaxel and Abiraterone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasso, Klaus; Thomsen, Frederik B; Schrader, Andres J

    2015-01-01

    , AND PARTICIPANTS: Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients entering one of four European compassionate use programmes of enzalutamide. OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: The primary end point was overall survival (OS). Secondary end points were association between OS and posttreatment...... prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics, patient characteristics, and progression-free survival, respectively. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazard analysis were performed. RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS: We identified 137 patients who prior to enzalutamide had progressed following a median....... Patients who had more than 30% or 50% falls in PSA had improved survival compared with patients who had no such PSA fall (11.4 mo vs 7.1 mo; p=0.001 and 12.6 vs 7.4 mo; p=0.007, respectively). Poor performance status and low haemoglobin was negatively associated with OS. CONCLUSIONS: Median OS...

  18. New strategies for medical management of castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmane, Irène; Céraline, Jocelyn; Duclos, Brigitte; Rob, Lynn; Litique, Valère; Barthélémy, Philippe; Bergerat, Jean-Pierre; Dufour, Patrick; Kurtz, Jean-Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    Although advanced prostate cancer patients respond very well to front-line androgen deprivation, failure to hormonal therapy most often occurs after a median time of 18-24 months. The care of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) has significantly evolved over the past decade, with the onset of first-line therapy with docetaxel. Although numerous therapy schedules have been investigated alongside docetaxel, in either first-line or salvage therapy, results were dismal. However, CRPC chemotherapy is currently evolving, with, on the one hand, new agents targeting androgen metabolism and, on the other hand, significant progress in chemotherapy drugs, particularly for second-line therapy. The aim of the present review is to describe the current treatments for CRPC chemotherapy alongside their challengers that might shortly become new standards. In this article, we discuss the most recent data from clinical trials to provide the reader with a comprehensive, state-of-the-art overview of CRPC chemotherapy and hormonal therapy.

  19. EPI-001, A Compound Active against Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer, Targets Transactivation Unit 5 of the Androgen Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mol, Eva; Fenwick, R Bryn; Phang, Christopher T W; Buzón, Victor; Szulc, Elzbieta; de la Fuente, Alex; Escobedo, Albert; García, Jesús; Bertoncini, Carlos W; Estébanez-Perpiñá, Eva; McEwan, Iain J; Riera, Antoni; Salvatella, Xavier

    2016-09-16

    Castration-resistant prostate cancer is the lethal condition suffered by prostate cancer patients that become refractory to androgen deprivation therapy. EPI-001 is a recently identified compound active against this condition that modulates the activity of the androgen receptor, a nuclear receptor that is essential for disease progression. The mechanism by which this compound exerts its inhibitory activity is however not yet fully understood. Here we show, by using high resolution solution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, that EPI-001 selectively interacts with a partially folded region of the transactivation domain of the androgen receptor, known as transactivation unit 5, that is key for the ability of prostate cells to proliferate in the absence of androgens, a distinctive feature of castration-resistant prostate cancer. Our results can contribute to the development of more potent and less toxic novel androgen receptor antagonists for treating this disease.

  20. Sipuleucel-T: Autologous Cellular Immunotherapy for Men with Asymptomatic or Minimally Symptomatic Metastatic Castrate Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert B. Sims

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sipuleucel T is an autologous cellular immunotherapy designed to stimulate an immune response in men diagnosed with asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic metastatic castrate resistant (hormone refractory prostate cancer. Sipuleucel T improves overall survival and provides an additional treatment option for this patient population.

  1. Sipuleucel-T: autologous cellular immunotherapy for men with asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Robert B

    2011-01-01

    Sipuleucel T is an autologous cellular immunotherapy designed to stimulate an immune response in men diagnosed with asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic metastatic castrate resistant (hormone refractory) prostate cancer. Sipuleucel T improves overall survival and provides an additional treatment option for this patient population.

  2. Sipuleucel-T: Autologous Cellular Immunotherapy for Men with Asymptomatic or Minimally Symptomatic Metastatic Castrate Resistant Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Sims, Robert B.

    2011-01-01

    Sipuleucel T is an autologous cellular immunotherapy designed to stimulate an immune response in men diagnosed with asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic metastatic castrate resistant (hormone refractory) prostate cancer. Sipuleucel T improves overall survival and provides an additional treatment option for this patient population.

  3. Identification and Targeting of Candidate Pre-Existing Lurker Cells that Give Rise to Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    propagation. Lgr5+ intestinal stem cells can initiate and maintain murine intestinal adenomas (6, 7). In mouse models of skin cancer, hair follicle bulge...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0470 TITLE: Identification and Targeting of Candidate Pre... Targeting of Candidate Pre-Existing Lurker Cells that Give Rise to 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer 5b

  4. Cabazitaxel in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: results of a compassionate use program in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wissing, M.D.; Oort, I.M. van; Gerritsen, W.R.; Eertwegh, A.J. van den; Coenen, J.L.; Bergman, A.M.; Gelderblom, H.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cabazitaxel has been reimbursed as a second-line therapy for patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) in the Netherlands since 2011. Before reimbursement was available, cabazitaxel was provided through a Compassionate Use Program (CUP). We report the results of

  5. Mechanism of action and clinical activity of tasquinimod in castrate-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta N

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Neha Gupta, Omar Al Ustwani, Li Shen, Roberto Pili Department of Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY, USA Abstract: Castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC is a disease where survival is poor and treatment is challenging. Over the past 3 years, significant advances in the field have been made with US Food and Drug Administration approval of new drugs for patients with CRPC. However, despite the presence of new approved drugs such as enzalutamide, abiraterone, sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel, and alpharadin, there is still an unmet need for novel agents with different mechanisms of action to target CRPC. Based on earlier studies demonstrating therapeutic potential of a quinoline-3-carboxamide agent roquinimex as an anticancer drug, efforts were directed to identify other useful members in this class. Tasquinimod is a second-generation quinoline-3-carboxamide agent that is currently in final stages of clinical development as a treatment for CRPC. The preclinical studies of tasquinimod have formed the basis for its success as an antiangiogenic and immunomodulatory agent in this disease. Tasquinimod is an orally available agent that has shown efficacy and favorable safety profile as deduced by the results of Phase I and II clinical trials of this drug in prostate cancer. The place of tasquinimod in the treatment of CRPC patients is currently under examination in an ongoing Phase III clinical trial. In this review, we will discuss tasquinimod, starting from its discovery and current knowledge on potential mechanisms of action to its clinical potential in CRPC. Keywords: ABR-215050, quinoline-3-carboxamide, prostate adenocarcinoma, castration resistant

  6. Evolving landscape and novel treatments in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul J Toren; Martin E Gleave

    2013-01-01

    Treatment options for castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) have advanced in recent years and significantly improved the outlook for patients with this aggressive and lethal disease.Further understanding of the biologyof CRPC has led to several new targeted therapies and continues to emphasize the importance of androgen receptor (AR) directed therapy.The treatment landscape is rapidly changing and further biologically rationale,biomarker-based ongoing clinical trials are needed.We review the recent results of major clinical trials in CRPC.New and investigational agents now in clinical evaluation are reviewed including inhibitors of angiogenesis,microtubules,chaperones,AR and intracellular kinases,as well as immunotherapy,radiopharmaceuticals and bone-targeted agents.The recent improvement in prognosis for CRPC brings continued optimism for further improvements.Thoughtful planning of clinical trials and further understanding of the mechanisms of resistance to therapies will allow for continued progress in patient care.

  7. Interdisciplinary critique of sipuleucel-T as immunotherapy in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Marie L; Haynes, Laura; Parker, Chris; Iversen, Peter

    2012-02-22

    Sipuleucel-T was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration on April 29, 2010, as an immunotherapy for late-stage prostate cancer. To manufacture sipuleucel-T, mononuclear cells harvested from the patient are incubated with a recombinant prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) antigen and reinfused. The manufacturer proposes that antigen-presenting cells exogenously activated by PAP induce endogenous T-cells to attack PAP-bearing prostate cancer cells. However, the lack of demonstrable tumor responses has prompted calls for scrutiny of the design of the trials in which sipuleucel-T demonstrated a 4-month survival benefit. Previously unpublished data from the sipuleucel-T trials show worse overall survival in older vs younger patients in the placebo groups, which have not been shown previously to be prognostic for survival in castration-resistant prostate cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Because two-thirds of the cells harvested from placebo patients, but not from the sipuleucel-T arm, were frozen and not reinfused, a detrimental effect of this large repeated cell loss provides a potential alternative explanation for the survival "benefit." Patient safety depends on adequately addressing this alternative explanation for the trial results.

  8. Contemporary agents in the management of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Anil; Wu, Christopher; Shayegan, Bobby; Rybak, Adrian P.

    2016-01-01

    Docetaxel-based chemotherapy has been the standard of care for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) since 2004. Over the past few years, there has been a significant paradigm shift in the treatment landscape of this disease. A deeper understanding of prostate cancer biology, along with the development of novel agents has created hope towards treating chemotherapy-naïve and resistant disease. Following the implementation of docetaxel as the first-line therapy for mCRPC, five novel therapies have demonstrated survival benefit in mCRPC. Cabazitaxel, abiraterone acetate, and enzalutamide are three agents recently approved for the treatment of mCRPC, having shown overall survival benefit in patients previously treated with docetaxel, while both abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide have also shown promise in the pre-docetaxel setting. Sipuleucel-T has shown overall survival benefit in asymptomatic mCRPC, while radium-223 provides survival benefit to patients with mCRPC who are symptomatic from their skeletal metastases in both docetaxel-naïve patients and post-docetaxel patients. Denosumab, an anti-RANKL antibody, has been approved for the prevention of skeletal-related events in patients with prostate cancer bone metastases. This review examines the phase 3 trials supporting the use of theses novel agents in the treatment of mCRPC. While these agents provide incremental increases in patient survival, further study to determine the best choice, combination, and/or sequencing of administration is still necessary. PMID:28096932

  9. A single-center experience with abiraterone as treatment for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thortzen, Anita; Thim, Stine; Røder, Martin Andreas;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Continuous stimulation of the androgen receptor (AR) axis is a prerequisite for growth in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Abiraterone acetate (AA) is a potent inhibitor of extracellular and intracellular androgen synthesis by inhibition of the CYP-17 enzyme system, which...... has been shown to be up-regulated in CRPC. AA was recently introduced in the management of patients with metastatic CRPC (mCRPC) both before and after taxane-based chemotherapy. The purpose of this study is to report the initial clinical experience obtained from mCRPC patients managed on AA......% of the patients. Time to biochemical and radiological progression was 3.5 and 4.9 months, respectively. Overall survival was 13.2 months (95% CI: 9.0-17.4). CONCLUSION: Our initial experience with AA in the routine management of patients with mCRPC demonstrates an efficacy-effectiveness gap compared with clinical...

  10. Challenges to improved therapeutics for metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer: from recent successes and failures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Xuan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC carry poor prognosis despite the use of docetaxel-based regimens which has modest survival benefit shown by randomized clinical trials. Significant progress in the discovery of novel therapeutic agents has been made in the past few years. While sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel, and abiraterone gained regulatory approval in 2010 and 2011, several highly promising candidates/regimens have failed in large scale clinical trials. Challenges remain to optimize the design and interpretation of clinical trial results and develop more effective strategies for mCRPC. In this review, we examined the positive and negative clinical trials in mCRPC in the past and discussed the various aspects of clinical trial design including selection of targets and appropriate outcome measures, biomarker development and implementation, and strategies for combination therapy.

  11. Challenges in the sequencing of therapies for the management of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parente, Phillip; Parnis, Francis; Gurney, Howard

    2014-09-01

    Prior to 2010, docetaxel was the standard option for chemotherapy in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Today, the picture is vastly different: several additional therapies have each demonstrated a survival benefit such that we now have chemotherapy (cabazitaxel), androgen suppressive agents (abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide), a cellular vaccine (sipuleucel-T) and radium-233 (for symptomatic bone metastases). With several other agents in the pipeline for late-stage disease, the future looks promising for mCRPC. As the available data are not able to inform as to the optimum sequencing of therapy, this remains a challenge. This paper draws on insights from published and ongoing clinical studies to provide a practical patient-focused approach to maximize the benefits of the current therapeutic armamentarium. Preliminary sequencing suggestions are made based on clinical trial criteria. But until more data become available, clinical gestalt, experience, cost and individual patient preferences will continue to drive choices.

  12. Castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC): state of the art, perspectives and new challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massari, Francesco; Maines, Francesca; Modena, Alessandra; Brunelli, Matteo; Bria, Emilio; Artibani, Walter; Martignoni, Guido; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2013-07-01

    The rapid approval of several novel agents has given prostate cancer patients and their treating physicians many new and effective therapeutic options. Four new medical therapies were recently approved on the basis of prolonged overall survival in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients: sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel, abiraterone acetate and MDV3100. Additionally, there are several other promising prostate cancer agents in late-stage development, including PROSTVAC-VF, orteronel and radium-223 chloride, each with a novel mechanism of action. The treatment paradigm for these patients is rapidly evolving, with future study needed to define the optimal sequencing and potential combinations of these new agents. In this review, we discuss the recent progress in understanding the biology of this disease and examining the development of a variety of new agents with promising activity and a favorable toxicity profile, that have been investigated in the setting of hormonal, cytotoxic, immune and targeted therapy. In this new therapeutic setting of CRPC, clinicians will have an opportunity to balance benefits and harms of these new agents in an individual context.

  13. Synergistic antitumor activities of docetaxel and octreotide associated with apoptotic-upregulation in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sha Zhu

    Full Text Available Androgen deprivation therapy has become the fist-line treatment of metastatic prostate cancer; however, progression to castrate resistance disease occurs in the majority of patients. Thus, there is an urgent need for improvements in therapy for castration-resistant prostate cancer. The aims of the present study were to determine the efficacy somatostatin analogue octreotide (OCT combined with a low dose of docetaxel (DTX using castration resistant prostate cancer cells and to investigate the involved molecular mechanisms in vitro. The anti-proliferative and synergism potential effects were determined by MTT assay. Induction of apoptosis was analyzed employing annexing V and propidium iodide staining and flow cytometry. VEGFA, CASP9, CASP3 and ABCB1 gene expression was evaluated by RT-PCR and Q-RT-PCR analysis. OCT in combination with DTX treatments on DU145 cell migration was also evaluated. Investigation revealed that combined administration of DTX and OCT had significant, synergistically greater cytotoxicity than DTX or OCT treatment alone. The combination of the two drugs caused a more marked increase in apoptosis and resulted in greater suppression of invasive potential than either individual agent. There was obvious increase in caspase 3 expression in the OCT alone and two-drug combined treatment groups, however, VEGFA expression was markedly suppressed in them. These results support the conclusion that somatostatin analogues combined with docetaxel may enhance the chemotherapy efficacies through multiple mechanisms in castration-resistant PCa cell line. This work provides a preclinical rationale for the therapeutic strategies to improve the treatment in castrate resistance disease.

  14. Intratumoral steroidogenesis in castration-resistant prostate cancer: a target for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armandari, Inna; Hamid, Agus Rizal; Verhaegh, Gerald; Schalken, Jack

    2014-09-01

    Development of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) in a low androgen environment, arising from androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), is a major problem in patients with advanced prostate cancer (PCa). Several mechanisms have been hypothesized to explain the progression of PCa to CRPC during ADT, one of them is so called persistent intratumoral steroidogenesis. The existence of intratumoral steroidogenesis was hinted based on the residual levels of intraprostatic testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) after ADT. Accumulating evidence has shown that the intraprostatic androgen levels after ADT are sufficient to induce cancer progression. Several studies now have demonstrated that PCa cells are able to produce T and DHT from different androgen precursors, such as cholesterol and the adrenal androgen, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA). Furthermore, up-regulation of genes encoding key steroidogenic enzymes in PCa cells seems to be an indicator for active intratumoral steroidogenesis in CRPC cells. Currently, several drugs are being developed targeting those steroidogenic enzymes, some of which are now in clinical trials or are being used as standard care for CRPC patients. In the future, novel agents that target steroidogenesis may add to the arsenal of drugs for CRPC therapy.

  15. Experience with octreotide depot in the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Kolesnikov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC is one of the most complex and unsolved problems in urologic oncology. The somatostatin analogue octreotide depot made in Russia may be used for its treatment. The paper gives the results of a trial of the efficiency and safety of treatment with octreotide depot 30 mg and dexamethasone in 20 patients aged 58 to 89 years with CRPC during continued androgen deprivation therapy. The duration of the trial was 3 months. A response was assessed from the serum levels of prostate-specific antigen (PCA, the time course of changes in general and biochemical blood test values, the degree of pain syndrome, and improvement in quality of life in a patient. A total response in reducing PSA was obtained in 70 % of the patents; overall, the best results were achieved in the group receiving octreotide before chemotherapy with docetaxel. The tolerability of octreotide deport with dexamethasone was good in all cases; no obvious adverse hematological and clinical reactions were noted.

  16. Docetaxel Rechallenge in a Heavily Pretreated Patient With Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Pagliuca, Martina; Perillo, Teresa; Benincasa, Alfonso; Bosso, Davide; De Placido, Sabino; Buonerba, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Chemotherapy agents for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) include docetaxel and cabazitaxel. Although docetaxel is approved in the first-line treatment setting, a few studies have shown that selected patients can benefit from docetaxel rechallenge. We, here, report the case of a heavily pretreated mCRPC patient who reported clinical benefit from receiving docetaxel after previous exposure to docetaxel, cabazitaxel, abiraterone, and enzalutamide. After 4 cycles of treatment, patient's performance status had improved to 1, the hemoglobin level was 12.9 g/dL and his serum prostate specific antigen levels were reduced by >70%, with no treatment-related adverse events. Although docetaxel rechallenge is a therapeutic option for selected patients, the risk of cumulative toxicity described in literature must be carefully considered. As the risk of cabazitaxel-related cumulative toxicity is probably lower, retreatment with cabazitaxel rather than docetaxel may also be an option in the setting of heavily pretreated mCRPC patients. PMID:27057826

  17. Cabazitaxel for Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: Retrospective Data Analysis from an Indian Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanita Noronha

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the efficacy and safety of cabazitaxel in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC patients from the named patient programme (NPP at our centre. Methods: mCRPC patients who progressed on docetaxel were given cabazitaxel intravenously every 3 weeks until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity occurred. Overall survival, progression-free survival, prostate-specific antigen response, quality of life (QOL changes, and safety were reported. Results: Nine men received cabazitaxel (median: 7 cycles; range: 1–27 under the NPP and were followed until death. Median survival was 14.07 months (1.07–23.80 and progression-free survival was 2.67 months (1.07–20.27. QOL was stable for most patients. Common adverse events (grade ≥3 were neutropenia (n = 8, anaemia (n = 4, and leucopenia (n = 4. Conclusion: These data from 9 patients are consistent with the results reported in the TROPIC study with a manageable safety profile.

  18. Piecing the Puzzle Together: Docetaxel Cycles and Current Considerations in the Treatment of Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinman, Hannah E; Price, Douglas K; Figg, William D

    2017-02-25

    Docetaxel is the current first line therapy for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), but there is no standard number of docetaxel cycles given to patients. In their post hoc analysis of the Mainsail study, de Morrée et al. show that the number of docetaxel cycles administered to a patient is a significant factor contributing to overall survival. These findings warrant further investigation into the standardization of the number of docetaxel cycles administered.

  19. Partial response of liver metastases treated with abiraterone in castration-resistant prostate cancer: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Marech,Ilaria; Vacca, Angelo; SIVESTRIS, NICOLA; Gnoni,Antonio; Lorusso, Vito

    2013-01-01

    Docetaxel is the current first-line treatment for castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), following failure to respond to maximal androgen blockade (MAB). Patients who fail to respond to docetaxel may receive cabazitaxel or abiraterone; however, there are no recommendations on which of these two agents should be used first. Here, we present a case of a male patient suffering from CRPC with liver and lymph node metastases, in which abiraterone achieved a partial response, according to REC...

  20. Cabazitaxel: more than a new taxane for metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, Alain C; Figlin, Robert; Mita, Monica M

    2012-12-15

    The taxanes are recognized as a major class of chemotherapeutic agents; however, mechanisms of innate and acquired resistance can limit their usefulness. Cabazitaxel, a novel taxane with microtubule-stabilizing potency similar to docetaxel, exhibits activity against tumor cell lines resistant to paclitaxel and docetaxel. Cabazitaxel showed linear pharmacokinetics and a terminal elimination half-life comparable with that of docetaxel, findings which support dosing as a single infusion in three-week treatment cycles. Dose-ranging studies recommended doses of 20 or 25 mg/m(2) every three weeks. Antitumor activity was shown in patients with advanced cancer and chemotherapy failure (including taxane failure). Other early studies investigated the efficacy of cabazitaxel in pretreated metastatic breast cancer, either as a single agent or in combination with capecitabine. Objective antitumor response rates of up to 24% and sustained tumor stabilizations were also observed. The TROPIC phase III study, conducted in patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer previously treated with docetaxel, established cabazitaxel as the first chemotherapeutic agent to offer a survival advantage in this patient population. Across these studies, the dose-limiting hematologic toxicity was neutropenia (including febrile neutropenia), usually controllable with colony-stimulating factor/granulocyte-colony stimulating factor support.

  1. Enzalutamide: targeting the androgen signalling pathway in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalken, Jack; Fitzpatrick, John M

    2016-02-01

    Significant progress has been made in the understanding of the underlying cancer biology of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) with the androgen receptor (AR) signalling pathway remaining implicated throughout the prostate cancer disease continuum. Reactivation of the AR signalling pathway is considered to be a key driver of CRPC progression and, as such, the AR is a logical target for therapy in CRPC. The objective of this review was to understand the importance of AR signalling in the treatment of patients with metastatic CRPC (mCRPC) and to discuss the clinical benefits associated with inhibition of the AR signalling pathway. A search was conducted to identify articles relating to the role of AR signalling in CRPC and therapies that inhibit the AR signalling pathway. Current understanding of prostate cancer has identified the AR signalling pathway as a logical target for the treatment of CRPC. Available therapies that inhibit the AR signalling pathway include AR blockers, androgen biosynthesis inhibitors, and AR signalling inhibitors. Enzalutamide, the first approved AR signalling inhibitor, has a novel mode of action targeting AR signalling at three key stages. The direct mode of action of enzalutamide has been shown to translate into clinical responses in patients with mCRPC. In conclusion, the targeting of the AR signalling pathway in patients with mCRPC results in numerous clinical benefits. As the number of treatment options increase, more trials evaluating the sequencing and combination of treatments are required. This review highlights the continued importance of targeting a key driver in the progression of CRPC, AR signalling, and the clinical benefits associated with inhibition of the AR signalling pathway in the treatment of patients with CRPC.

  2. Recent Progress in Pharmaceutical Therapies for Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingzhong Hu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Since 2010, six drugs have been approved for the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer, i.e., CYP17 inhibitor Abiraterone, androgen receptor antagonist Enzalutamide, cytotoxic agent Cabazitaxel, vaccine Sipuleucel-T, antibody Denosumab against receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand and radiopharmaceutical Alpharadin. All these drugs demonstrate improvement on overall survival, expect for Denosumab, which increases the bone mineral density of patients under androgen deprivation therapy and prolongs bone-metastasis-free survival. Besides further CYP17 inhibitors (Orteronel, Galeterone, VT-464 and CFG920, androgen receptor antagonists (ARN-509, ODM-201, AZD-3514 and EZN-4176 and vaccine Prostvac, more drug candidates with various mechanisms or new indications of launched drugs are currently under evaluation in different stages of clinical trials, including various kinase inhibitors and platinum complexes. Some novel strategies have also been proposed aimed at further potentiation of antitumor effects or reduction of side effects and complications related to treatments. Under these flourishing circumstances, more investigations should be performed on the optimal combination or the sequence of treatments needed to delay or reverse possible resistance and thus maximize the clinical benefits for the patients.

  3. Targeting autophagy overcomes Enzalutamide resistance in castration-resistant prostate cancer cells and improves therapeutic response in a xenograft model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, H G; Yang, J C; Kung, H-J; Shi, X-B; Tilki, D; Lara, P N; DeVere White, R W; Gao, A C; Evans, C P

    2014-01-01

    Macro-autophagy is associated with drug resistance in various cancers and can function as an adaptive response to maintain cell survival under metabolic stresses, including androgen deprivation. Androgen deprivation or treatment with androgen receptor (AR) signaling inhibitor (ARSI), Enzalutamide (MDV-3100, ENZA) or bicalutamide induced autophagy in androgen-dependent and in castration-resistant CaP (castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC)) cell lines. The autophagic cascade triggered by AR blockage, correlated with the increased light chain 3-II/I ratio and ATG-5 expression. Autophagy was observed in a subpopulation of C4-2B cells that developed insensitivity to ENZA after sustained exposure in culture. Using flow cytometry and clonogenic assays, we showed that inhibiting autophagy with clomipramine (CMI), chloroquine or metformin increased apoptosis and significantly impaired cell viability. This autophagic process was mediated by AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK) activation and the suppression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) through Raptor phosphorylation (Serine 792). Furthermore, small interfering RNA targeting AMPK significantly inhibited autophagy and promoted cell death in CaP cells acutely or chronically exposed to ENZA or androgen deprivation, suggesting that autophagy is an important survival mechanism in CRPC. Lastly, in vivo studies with mice orthotopically implanted with ENZA-resistant cells demonstrated that the combination of ENZA and autophagy modulators, CMI or metformin significantly reduced tumor growth when compared with control groups (P<0.005). In conclusion, autophagy is as an important mechanism of resistance to ARSI in CRPC. Antiandrogen-induced autophagy is mediated through the activation of AMPK pathway and the suppression of mTOR pathway. Blocking autophagy pharmacologically or genetically significantly impairs prostate cancer cell survival in vitro and in vivo, implying the therapeutics potential of autophagy inhibitors

  4. Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC):the rise and fall of systemic chemotherapy. Shadows of recent phase 3 studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Omar Abdel-Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is defined as prostate cancer that recurs while a patient is receiving androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Many treatment options have been suggested for this chal enging disease;starting from 2-year hormonal manipulations, mitoxantrne-and docetaxel-based regimens reaching to the overwhelming new systemic op-tions for CRPC (newer hormonal treatments, cytotoxic chemotherapies, bone-targeted agents and immunotherapeutics);and the question is:do the traditional cytotoxic regimens stil have a role amidst al these new options?

  5. Low-dose prednisolone in first-line docetaxel for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Per; Svane, Inge Marie; Lindberg, Henriette;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Randomized studies have shown improved survival with the combination of docetaxel (D) and prednisone in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). We retrospectively investigated whether coadministration of low-dose glucocorticoids has clinical benefits.......001). P did not influence progression-free survival (P = 0.692, log-rank test) or overall survival when adjusting for baseline levels of hemoglobin, alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase, prostate-specific antigen, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (hazard ratioP = 0.98, 95...

  6. Androgen synthesis inhibitors in the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mark N Stein; Neal Patel; Alexander Bershadskiy; Alisa Sokoloff; Eric A Singer

    2014-01-01

    Suppression of gonadal testosterone synthesis represents the standard ifrst line therapy for treatment of metastatic prostate cancer. However, in the majority of patients who develop castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), it is possible to detect persistent activation of the androgen receptor (AR) through androgens produced in the adrenal gland or within the tumor itself. Abiraterone acetate was developed as an irreversible inhibitor of the dual functional cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP17 with activity as a 17α-hydroxylase and 17,20-lyase. CYP17 is necessary for production of nongonadal androgens from cholesterol. Regulatory approval of abiraterone in 2011, based on a phase III trial showing a signiifcant improvement in overall survival (OS) with abiraterone and prednisone versus prednisone, represented proof of principle that targeting AR is essential for improving outcomes in men with CRPC. Inhibition of 17α-hydroxylase by abiraterone results in accumulation of upstream mineralocorticoids due to loss of cortisol-mediated suppression of pituitary adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), providing a rationale for development of CYP17 inhibitors with increased speciifcity for 17,20-lyase (orteronel, galeterone and VT-464) that can potentially be administered without exogenous corticosteroids. In this article, we review the development of abiraterone and other CYP17 inhibitors;recent studies with abiraterone that inform our understanding of clinical parameters such as drug effects on quality-of-life, potential early predictors of response, and optimal sequencing of abiraterone with respect to other agents;and results of translational studies providing insights into resistance mechanisms to CYP17 inhibitors leading to clinical trials with drug combinations designed to prolong abiraterone beneift or restore abiraterone activity.

  7. An update on TroVax® for the treatment of progressive castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abern M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Michael Abern1, Howard L Kaufman2, Kalyan Latchamsetty11Department of Urology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA; 2Department of General Surgery and Immunology and Microbiology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Prostate cancer is a common human malignancy with few effective therapeutic options for treating advanced castration-resistant disease. The potential therapeutic effectiveness of immunotherapy and vaccines, in particular, has gained popularity based on the identification of prostate-associated antigens, potent expression vectors for vaccination, and data from recent clinical trials. A modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA virus expressing 5T4, a tumor-associated glycoprotein, has shown promise in preclinical studies and clinical trials in patients with colorectal and renal cell carcinoma. This review will discuss the rationale for immunotherapy in prostate cancer and describe preclinical and limited clinical data in prostate cancer for the MVA-5T4 (TroVax® vaccine.Keywords: castration resistance, prostate cancer, TroVax, vaccine

  8. Regulation of the transcriptional coactivator FHL2 licenses activation of the androgen receptor in castrate-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Meagan J; Binge, Lauren C; Sriratana, Absorn; Wang, Hong; Robinson, Paul A; Pook, David; Fedele, Clare G; Brown, Susan; Dyson, Jennifer M; Cottle, Denny L; Cowling, Belinda S; Niranjan, Birunthi; Risbridger, Gail P; Mitchell, Christina A

    2013-08-15

    It is now clear that progression from localized prostate cancer to incurable castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is driven by continued androgen receptor (AR), signaling independently of androgen. Thus, there remains a strong rationale to suppress AR activity as the single most important therapeutic goal in CRPC treatment. Although the expression of ligand-independent AR splice variants confers resistance to AR-targeted therapy and progression to lethal castrate-resistant cancer, the molecular regulators of AR activity in CRPC remain unclear, in particular those pathways that potentiate the function of mutant AR in CRPC. Here, we identify FHL2 as a novel coactivator of ligand-independent AR variants that are important in CRPC. We show that the nuclear localization of FHL2 and coactivation of the AR is driven by calpain cleavage of the cytoskeletal protein filamin, a pathway that shows differential activation in prostate epithelial versus prostate cancer cell lines. We further identify a novel FHL2-AR-filamin transcription complex, revealing how deregulation of this axis promotes the constitutive, ligand-independent activation of AR variants, which are present in CRPC. Critically, the calpain-cleaved filamin fragment and FHL2 are present in the nucleus only in CRPC and not benign prostate tissue or localized prostate cancer. Thus, our work provides mechanistic insight into the enhanced AR activation, most notably of the recently identified AR variants, including AR-V7 that drives CRPC progression. Furthermore, our results identify the first disease-specific mechanism for deregulation of FHL2 nuclear localization during cancer progression. These results offer general import beyond prostate cancer, given that nuclear FHL2 is characteristic of other human cancers where oncogenic transcription factors that drive disease are activated like the AR in prostate cancer.

  9. Aurora A regulates expression of AR-V7 in models of castrate resistant prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dominic; Noble, Martin; Wedge, Steve R.; Robson, Craig N.; Gaughan, Luke

    2017-01-01

    Androgen receptor variants (AR-Vs) provide a mechanism of therapy evasion in castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), yet mechanisms of regulation remain largely unknown. Here we investigate the role of Aurora A kinase on AR-Vs in models of CRPC and show depletion of Aurora A reduces AR-V target gene expression. Importantly, knockdown of Aurora A reconfigures splicing of AR pre-mRNA to discriminately down-regulate synthesis of AR-V transcripts, including AR-V7, without effecting full-length AR mRNA; and as a consequence, AR-V-driven proliferation and survival of CRPC cells is markedly reduced. Critically, these effects are reproduced by Aurora A inhibition. We show that Aurora A levels increase in advanced disease and AURKA is an AR-V target gene demonstrating a positive feedback mechanism of androgenic signalling in CRPC. In all, our data suggests that Aurora A plays a pivotal role in regulation of AR-V7 expression and represents a new therapeutic target in CRPC. PMID:28205582

  10. Economic evaluation of sipuleucel-T immunotherapy in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holko, Przemysław; Kawalec, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    The objective is to examine the cost-utility of sipuleucel-T immunotherapy in asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients. The addition of sipuleucel-T immunotherapy to standard treatment led to a gain of 0.37 quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) at an additional cost of US$104,536. The incremental cost-utility ratio was US$283,000 per QALY saved. Threshold sensitivity analyses indicated that a price reduction of at least 53%, or application in a group of patients resulting in the relative reduction in the mortality rate of at least 39%, ought to augment the economic value of this regimen. Sipuleucel-T immunotherapy treatment at the current price with 96.5% certainty is not cost-effective. The specific group of patients who will benefit more from the treatment should be revealed and treated, or the cost of the vaccine should be lowered significantly to increase its economic value. Accounting for crossover treatment in control patients improves sipuleucel-T's value (US$132,000 per QALY saved) although further investigation is necessary.

  11. Current paradigms and evolving concepts in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Snmanta Krnmar Pal; Oliver Sartor

    2011-01-01

    @@ Until recently,docetaxel-based therapy represented the only therapy shown to prolong survival in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC).The past year and a half has been marked by unprecedented progress in treatments for this disease.Three positive phase III clinical trials have emerged,each evaluating agents (sipuleucel-T,cabazitaxel and abiraterone)with distinct mechanisms of action.Herein,the three pivotal trials are described alongside both past and current large phase III studies conducted in this mCRPC.The overall survival for patients with mCRPC treated in current clinical trials is considerably longer than noted in the past.We note that more recent trials with older agents have also shown improved survival and discuss potential non-therapeutic biases that influence this critical measure of outcome.The necessity for utilizing randomized trials when evaluating new therapeutics is emphasized given the changing prognosis in this mCRPC.

  12. Cabozantinib inhibits growth of androgen-sensitive and castration-resistant prostate cancer and affects bone remodeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly M Nguyen

    Full Text Available Cabozantinib is an inhibitor of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases, including MET and VEGFR2. In a phase II clinical trial in advanced prostate cancer (PCa, cabozantinib treatment improved bone scans in 68% of evaluable patients. Our studies aimed to determine the expression of cabozantinib targets during PCa progression and to evaluate its efficacy in hormone-sensitive and castration-resistant PCa in preclinical models while delineating its effects on tumor and bone. Using immunohistochemistry and tissue microarrays containing normal prostate, primary PCa, and soft tissue and bone metastases, our data show that levels of MET, P-MET, and VEGFR2 are increasing during PCa progression. Our data also show that the expression of cabozantinib targets are particularly pronounced in bone metastases. To evaluate cabozantinib efficacy on PCa growth in the bone environment and in soft tissues we used androgen-sensitive LuCaP 23.1 and castration-resistant C4-2B PCa tumors. In vivo, cabozantinib inhibited the growth of PCa in bone as well as growth of subcutaneous tumors. Furthermore, cabozantinib treatment attenuated the bone response to the tumor and resulted in increased normal bone volume. In summary, the expression pattern of cabozantinib targets in primary and castration-resistant metastatic PCa, and its efficacy in two different models of PCa suggest that this agent has a strong potential for the effective treatment of PCa at different stages of the disease.

  13. Murine Prostate Micro-dissection and Surgical Castration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkenburg, Kenneth C; Amend, Sarah R; Pienta, Kenneth J

    2016-05-11

    Mouse models are used extensively to study prostate cancer and other diseases. The mouse is an excellent model with which to study the prostate and has been used as a surrogate for discoveries in human prostate development and disease. Prostate micro-dissection allows consistent study of lobe-specific prostate anatomy, histology, and cellular characteristics in the absence of contamination of other tissues. Testosterone affects prostate development and disease. Androgen deprivation therapy is a common treatment for prostate cancer patients, but many prostate tumors become castration-resistant. Surgical castration of mouse models allows for the study of castration resistance and other facets of hormonal biology on the prostate. This procedure can be coupled with testosterone reintroduction, or hormonal regeneration of the prostate, a powerful method to study stem cell lineages in the prostate. Together, prostate micro-dissection and surgical castration opens up a multitude of opportunities for robust and consistent research of prostate development and disease. This manuscript describes the protocols for prostate micro-dissection and surgical castration in the laboratory mouse.

  14. HDAC6 regulates androgen receptor hypersensitivity and nuclear localization via modulating Hsp90 acetylation in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Junkui; Wang, Yujuan; Dar, Javid A; Liu, June; Liu, Lingqi; Nelson, Joel B; Wang, Zhou

    2009-12-01

    The development of castration-resistant prostate cancer (PCa) requires that under castration conditions, the androgen receptor (AR) remains active and thus nuclear. Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) plays a key role in androgen-induced and -independent nuclear localization and activation of AR. Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) is implicated, but has not been proven, in regulating AR activity via modulating Hsp90 acetylation. Here, we report that knockdown of HDAC6 in C4-2 cells using short hairpin RNA impaired ligand-independent nuclear localization of endogenous AR and inhibited PSA expression and cell growth in the absence or presence of dihydrotestosterone (DHT). The dose-response curve of DHT-stimulated C4-2 colony formation was shifted by shHDAC6 such that approximately 10-fold higher concentration of DHT is required, indicating a requirement for HDAC6 in AR hypersensitivity. HDAC6 knockdown also inhibited C4-2 xenograft tumor establishment in castrated, but not in testes-intact, nude mice. Studies using HDAC6-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts cells showed that inhibition of AR nuclear localization by HDAC6 knockdown can be largely alleviated by expressing a deacetylation mimic Hsp90 mutant. Taken together, our studies suggest that HDAC6 regulates AR hypersensitivity and nuclear localization, mainly via modulating HSP90 acetylation. Targeting HDAC6 alone or in combination with other therapeutic approaches is a promising new strategy for prevention and/or treatment of castration-resistant PCa.

  15. Biomarkers for Taxane Sensitivity and Hormonal Resistance in Patients with Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    RNA to perform qRT- PCR for splice variants and variant transcriptome. Results: As described in the annual report, the Rarecyte assay originally...modified by Antonarakis et al (1). This assay reliably isolated splice variant transcript as detected by QT- PCR from as low as 5 spiked LNCaP 95 cells...transfectant cells compared to controls (data not shown). 1b. Determine if CTC from abiraterone resistant prostate cancers contain splice variant

  16. Overexpression of the potential kinase serine/ threonine/tyrosine kinase 1 (STYK 1) in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Suyoun; Tamura, Kenji; Furihata, Mutsuo; Uemura, Motohide; Daigo, Yataro; Nasu, Yasutomo; Miki, Tsuneharu; Shuin, Taro; Fujioka, Tomoaki; Nakamura, Yusuke; Nakagawa, Hidewaki

    2009-11-01

    Despite high response rates and clinical benefits, androgen ablation often fails to cure advanced or relapsed prostate cancer because castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) cells inevitably emerge. CRPC cells not only grow under castration, but also behave more aggressively, indicating that a number of malignant signaling pathways are activated in CRPC cells as well as androgen receptor signaling. Based on information from the gene expression profiles of clinical CRPC cells, we here identified one overexpressed gene, serine/threonine/tyrosine kinase 1 (STYK1), encoding a potential kinase, as a molecular target for CRPC. RNA and immunohistochemical analyses validated the overexpression of STYK1 in prostate cancer cells, and its expression was distinct in CRPC cells. Knockdown of STYK1 by siRNA resulted in drastic suppression of prostate cancer cell growth and, concordantly, enforced expression of STYK1 promoted cell proliferation, whereas ectopic expression of a kinase-dead mutant STYK1 did not. An in vitro kinase assay using recombinant STYK1 demonstrated that STYK1 could have some potential as a kinase, although its specific substrates are unknown. These findings suggest that STYK1 could be a possible molecular target for CRPC, and small molecules specifically inhibiting STYK1 kinase could be a possible approach for the development of novel CRPC therapies.

  17. Phase II Study of Pomalidomide in Patients with Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amato, Robert J., E-mail: robert.amato@uth.tmc.edu [Memorial Hermann Cancer Center, University of Texas, 6410 Fannin Street, Suite 830, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Glode, L. Michael [Health Science Center, University of Colorado, Denver, CO 80217 (United States); University of Colorado Cancer Center, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Podolnick, Jeremy [Memorial Hermann Cancer Center, University of Texas, 6410 Fannin Street, Suite 830, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Knight, Robert [Celgene Corporation, Summit, NJ 07901-3915 (United States); Crawford, David [Health Science Center, University of Colorado, Denver, CO 80217 (United States); University of Colorado Cancer Center, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States)

    2011-09-02

    Pomalidomide is a distinct immunomodulatory agent that also displays anti-proliferative and proapoptotic activity. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of pomalidomide for the treatment of chemotherapy-naïve patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Methods: Pomalidomide was administered orally in doses of 1 or 2 mg/day without interruption. Follow ups were conducted every 4 weeks with evaluation of study outcomes at 12 weeks. The principal study outcomes were PSA response, time to progression (TTP) using RECIST, overall survival (OS), and safety. A total of 32 patients were enrolled: 15 in the 1 mg/day cohort (median baseline PSA level of 12.30 ng/mL [0.8–236.0]), and 17 in the 2 mg/day cohort (median baseline PSA level of 12.50 ng/mL [0.6–191.8]). Results: In the 1 mg cohort disease was stabilized for ≥28 days in eight patients, and median TTP was 2.90 months. In the 2 mg cohort, PSA decreased ≥50% in three patients, disease was stabilized for ≥28 days in seven patients, and median TTP was 5.87 months. Toxicity in both cohorts was predominantly grade 1 or 2; 2 grade 3 toxicity (fatigue) occurred in the 1 mg cohort, and 5 grade 3 toxicities (chest pain, diarrhea, epigastric pain, impaction, pain) occurred in the 2 mg cohort. One grade 4 toxicity of cardiac ischemia occurred. Conclusions: Pomalidomide shows promising activity in patients with CRPC and has an acceptable safety profile.

  18. Curcumin induces apoptosis and protective autophagy in castration-resistant prostate cancer cells through iron chelation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chunguang; Ma, Xueyou; Wang, Zhihua; Zeng, Xing; Hu, Zhiquan; Ye, Zhangqun; Shen, Guanxin

    2017-01-01

    Background Curcumin induces apoptosis and autophagy in different cancer cells. Moreover, chemical and biological experiments have evidenced that curcumin is a biologically active iron chelator and induces cytotoxicity through iron chelation. We thus hypothesized that curcumin may induce apoptosis and autophagy in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) cells through its iron-chelating properties. Materials and methods CRPC cells were loaded with curcumin alone or in combination with ferric ammonium citrate (FAC). Cytotoxicity was measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometry, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay and caspase activity. Autophagy status was analyzed by the detection of autophagosomes and light chain 3-II (LC3-II) using transmission electron microscopy and Western blot. Iron-binding activity of curcumin was assessed by spectrophotometry and MTT assay. The expression levels of transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) and iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1) were examined by Western blot. Results Curcumin induced apoptosis and autophagy in CRPC cells. Combining curcumin with autophagy inhibitors (3-methyladenine [3-MA]) synergized the apoptotic effect of curcumin. Moreover, curcumin bound to FAC at a ratio of ~1:1, as assessed by spectrophotometry and MTT assay. Apoptosis and autophagy induced by curcumin were counteracted by equal amounts of FAC. At apoptosis- and autophagy-inducing concentrations, curcumin enhanced the expression levels of TfR1 and IRP1, indicative of iron deprivation induced by curcumin. Conclusion Together, our results indicate that curcumin induces apoptosis and protective autophagy in CRPC cells, which are at least partially dependent on its iron-chelating properties. PMID:28243065

  19. Use of prednisone with abiraterone acetate in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auchus, Richard J; Yu, Margaret K; Nguyen, Suzanne; Mundle, Suneel D

    2014-12-01

    Abiraterone acetate, a prodrug of the CYP17A1 inhibitor abiraterone that blocks androgen biosynthesis, is approved for treatment of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) in combination with prednisone or prednisolone 5 mg twice daily. This review evaluates the basis for the effects of prednisone on mineralocorticoid-related adverse events that arise because of CYP17A1 inhibition with abiraterone. Coadministration with the recommended dose of glucocorticoid compensates for abiraterone-induced reductions in serum cortisol and blocks the compensatory increase in adrenocorticotropic hormone seen with abiraterone. Consequently, 5 mg prednisone twice daily serves as a glucocorticoid replacement therapy when coadministered with abiraterone acetate, analogous to use of glucocorticoid replacement therapy for certain endocrine disorders. We searched PubMed to identify safety concerns regarding glucocorticoid use, placing a focus on longitudinal studies in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases and cancer. In general, glucocorticoid-related adverse events, including bone loss, immunosuppression, hyperglycemia, mood and cognitive alterations, and myopathy, appear dose related and tend to occur at doses and/or treatment durations greater than the low dose of glucocorticoid approved in combination with abiraterone acetate for the treatment of mCRPC. Although glucocorticoids are often used to manage tumor-related symptoms or to prevent treatment-related toxicity, available evidence suggests that prednisone and dexamethasone might also offer modest therapeutic benefit in mCRPC. Given recent improvements in survival achieved for mCRPC with novel agents in combination with prednisone, the risks of these recommended glucocorticoid doses must be balanced with the benefits shown for these regimens.

  20. Sipuleucel-T for the Treatment of Patients With Metastatic Castrate-resistant Prostate Cancer: Considerations for Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieczonka, Christopher M; Telonis, Dimitrios; Mouraviev, Vladimir; Albala, David

    2015-01-01

    Sipuleucel-T treatment is associated with a significant and consistent survival benefit in patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer. Most adverse events are infusion related, manageable, and of short duration. Early screening and diagnosis of metastatic disease is important, as the greatest survival benefit may occur in patients with a lower disease burden. The short duration of sipuleucel-T treatment facilitates the use of subsequent therapies. Sipuleucel-T is now being used in the clinic for patients with a lower disease burden. We present our own experience with the use of sipuleucel-T in the setting of a large urology practice.

  1. Risk Factors for Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer (CRPC) Predict Long-Term Treatment with Docetaxel

    OpenAIRE

    Kawahara, Takashi; Miyoshi, Yasuhide; Sekiguchi, Zenkichi; Sano, Futoshi; Hayashi, Narihiko; Teranishi, Jun-ichi; Misaki, Hiroshi; Noguchi, Kazumi; Kubota, Yoshinobu; Uemura, Hiroji

    2012-01-01

    Purpose For patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostatic cancer (mCRPC), docetaxel plus prednisone leads to superior survival and a higher response rate compared with mitoxantrone plus prednisone. We analyzed the efficacy of long-term treatment with ≥10 cycles of docetaxel, and validated the risk group classification in predicting overall survival (OS) in Japanese patients with mCRPC. Patients and Methods Fifty-two patients with mCRPC were administered 55 mg/m2 docetaxel and 8 mg d...

  2. Gradual reduction of testosterone using a gonadotropin-releasing hormone vaccination delays castration resistance in a prostate cancer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barranco, Jesús A. Junco; Millar, Robert P.; Fuentes, Franklin; Bover, Eddy; Pimentel, Eulogio; Basulto, Roberto; Calzada, Lesvia; Morán, Rolando; Rodríguez, Ayni; Garay, Hilda; Reyes, Osvaldo; Castro, Maria D.; Bringas, Ricardo; Arteaga, Niurka; Toudurí, Henio; Rabassa, Mauricio; Fernández, Yairis; Serradelo, Andrés; Hernández, Eduardo; Guillén, Gerardo E.

    2016-01-01

    In a previous study aimed to design a novel prostate cancer vaccine, the authors of the present study demonstrated the advantage of combining the adjuvants Montanide ISA 51 with very small size proteoliposomes (VSSP) to promote a significant humoral immune response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in healthy animals. The present study compared the efficacy of this vaccine formulation versus the standard treatment currently available in terms of preventing the development of tumors in DD/S mice injected with Shionogi carcinoma (SC) 115 cells. The results demonstrated that 5 non-vaccinated control mice exhibited a fast tumor growth, and succumbed to the disease within 19–31 days. Mice immunized with the GnRH/Montanide ISA 51/VSSP vaccine exhibited a moderate decline in testosterone levels that was associated with a decrease in anti-GnRH antibody titers, which lead to a sustained tumor growth inhibition. In total, 2 mice in the immunized group exhibited complete remission of the tumor for the duration of the present study. In addition, castrated mice, which were used as a control for standard hormonal therapy, exhibited an accelerated decrease in tumor size. However, tumor relapse was observed between days 50 and 54, and between days 65 and 85, following the injection of SC 155 cells. Therefore, these mice were sacrificed at day 90. The present study concludes that the slow and moderate reduction of testosterone levels observed using the GnRH-based vaccine may delay the appearance of castration resistance in a Shionogi prostate cancer model. These findings suggest that this vaccine may be used to delay castration resistance in patients with prostate cancer. PMID:27446378

  3. Prednisone plus cabazitaxel or mitoxantrone for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer progressing after docetaxel treatment: a randomised open-label trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Bono, Johann Sebastian; Oudard, Stephane; Ozguroglu, Mustafa;

    2010-01-01

    Cabazitaxel is a novel tubulin-binding taxane drug with antitumour activity in docetaxel-resistant cancers. We aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of cabazitaxel plus prednisone with those of mitoxantrone plus prednisone in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer...

  4. Phytoestrogens selective for the estrogen receptor beta exert anti-androgenic effects in castration resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelen, Paul; Wuttke, Wolfgang; Seidlová-Wuttke, Dana

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in men of the Western world. A castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) eventually will arise when a local restricted prostate carcinoma was not cured duly by radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy. Although androgen ablation therapies are considered the gold standard for treatments of advanced prostate cancer there is no curative therapy available at present. In previous pre-clinical and clinical trials several phytoestrogens were investigated for their anticancer potential in various models for prostate cancer. Phytoestrogens feature tumour preventive characteristics and most probably are involved in the low incidence rate of hormone related cancers in Asian countries. Phytoestrogens such as isoflavones can have a marked impact on the most essential therapy target of CRPC i.e. the androgen receptor. Furthermore, functional analyses solidified the notion of such drugs as androgen antagonistic. Phytoestrogens commonly feature low toxicity combined with a potential of targeted therapy. Thus, these drugs qualify for conceivable implementation in prostate cancer patients under active surveillance. In addition, relapse prevention with these drugs after radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy might be considered. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Phytoestrogens'.

  5. MicroRNAs and Androgen Receptor 3′ Untranslated Region: A Missing Link in Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikand, Kavleen; Barik, Sailen; Shukla, Girish C.

    2012-01-01

    The ligand-activated transcription factor, androgen receptor (AR) plays a central role in the development and progression of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer initiates as an androgen-dependent disease and further accumulation of multiple sequential genetic and epigenetic alterations transform it into an aggressive, castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The molecular basis of the transition from androgen-dependent prostate cancer to CRPC remains unclear. However, it is apparent that AR plays a pivotal role in this alteration. The recent discovery that microRNAs (miRNAs) can target the function of AR suggests a functional role of these non-coding RNAs in the pathogenesis of prostate cancer. miRNAs usually function by targeting the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of a mRNA by base-pairing interactions and modulate translation either by destabilizing the message or by repression of protein synthesis in actively translating ribosomes. Here, we discuss the potential molecular pathways through which AR targeting miRNAs may promote CRPC. Modulation of AR expression by miRNAs presents a novel therapeutic option for prostate cancer, albeit it will likely be used in combination with the existing therapies. PMID:22468168

  6. A low carbohydrate, high protein diet suppresses intratumoral androgen synthesis and slows castration-resistant prostate tumor growth in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokidis, H Bobby; Yieng Chin, Mei; Ho, Victor W; Adomat, Hans H; Soma, Kiran K; Fazli, Ladan; Nip, Ka Mun; Cox, Michael; Krystal, Gerald; Zoubeidi, Amina; Tomlinson Guns, Emma S

    2015-06-01

    Dietary factors continue to preside as dominant influences in prostate cancer prevalence and progression-free survival following primary treatment. We investigated the influence of a low carbohydrate diet, compared to a typical Western diet, on prostate cancer (PCa) tumor growth in vivo. LNCaP xenograft tumor growth was studied in both intact and castrated mice, representing a more advanced castration resistant PCa (CRPC). No differences in LNCaP tumor progression (total tumor volume) with diet was observed for intact mice (P = 0.471) however, castrated mice on the Low Carb diet saw a statistically significant reduction in tumor growth rate compared with Western diet fed mice (P = 0.017). No correlation with serum PSA was observed. Steroid profiles, alongside serum cholesterol and cholesteryl ester levels, were significantly altered by both diet and castration. Specifically, DHT concentration with the Low Carb diet was 58% that of the CRPC-bearing mice on the Western diet. Enzymes in the steroidogenesis pathway were directly impacted and tumors isolated from intact mice on the Low Carb diet had higher AKR1C3 protein levels and lower HSD17B2 protein levels than intact mice on the Western diet (ARK1C3: P = 0.074; HSD17B2: P = 0.091, with α = 0.1). In contrast, CRPC tumors from mice on Low Carb diets had higher concentrations of both HSD17B2 (P = 0.016) and SRD5A1 (P = 0.058 with α = 0.1) enzymes. There was no correlation between tumor growth in castrated mice for Low Carb diet versus Western diet and (a) serum insulin (b) GH serum levels (c) insulin receptor (IR) or (d) IGF-1R in tumor tissue. Intact mice fed Western diet had higher serum insulin which was associated with significantly higher blood glucose and tumor tissue IR. We conclude that both diet and castration have a significant impact on the endocrinology of mice bearing LNCaP xenograft tumors. The observed effects of diet on cholesterol and steroid regulation impact tumor tissue DHT specifically and are

  7. CH5137291, an androgen receptor nuclear translocation-inhibiting compound, inhibits the growth of castration-resistant prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikura, Nobuyuki; Kawata, Hiromitsu; Nishimoto, Ayako; Nakamura, Ryo; Tsunenari, Toshiaki; Watanabe, Miho; Tachibana, Kazutaka; Shiraishi, Takuya; Yoshino, Hitoshi; Honma, Akie; Emura, Takashi; Ohta, Masateru; Nakagawa, Toshito; Houjo, Takao; Corey, Eva; Vessella, Robert L; Aoki, Yuko; Sato, Haruhiko

    2015-04-01

    Resistance of prostate cancer to castration is currently an unavoidable problem. The major mechanisms underlying such resistance are androgen receptor (AR) overexpression, androgen-independent activation of AR, and AR mutation. To address this problem, we developed an AR pure antagonist, CH5137291, with AR nuclear translocation-inhibiting activity, and compared its activity and characteristics with that of bicalutamide. Cell lines corresponding to the mechanisms of castration resistance were used: LNCaP-BC2 having AR overexpression and LNCaP-CS10 having androgen-independent AR activation. VCaP and LNCaP were used as hormone-sensitive prostate cancer cells. In vitro functional assay clearly showed that CH5137291 inhibited the nuclear translocation of wild-type ARs as well as W741C- and T877A-mutant ARs. In addition, it acted as a pure antagonist on the transcriptional activity of these types of ARs. In contrast, bicalutamide did not inhibit the nuclear translocation of these ARs, and showed a partial/full agonistic effect on the transcriptional activity. CH5137291 inhibited cell growth more strongly than bicalutamide in VCaP and LNCaP cells as well as in LNCaP-BC2 and LNCaP-CS10 cells in vitro. In xenograft models, CH5137291 strongly inhibited the tumor growth of LNCaP, LNCaP-BC2, and LNCaP-CS10, whereas bicalutamide showed a weaker effect in LNCaP and almost no effect in LNCaP-BC2 and LNCaP-CS10 xenografts. Levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in plasma correlated well with the antitumor effect of both agents. CH5137291 inhibited the growth of LNCaP tumors that had become resistant to bicalutamide treatment. A docking model suggested that CH5137291 intensively collided with the M895 residue of helix 12, and therefore strongly inhibited the folding of helix 12, a cause of AR agonist activity, in wild-type and W741C-mutant ARs. In cynomolgus monkeys, the serum concentration of CH5137291 increased dose-dependently and PSA level decreased 80% at 100 mg/kg. CH

  8. Further analysis of PREVAIL: Enzalutamide use in chemotherapy-naïve men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanny B Aragon-Ching

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available PREVAIL was a phase III multinational, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial that enrolled chemotherapy-naïve men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC, which showed remarkable improvement in co-primary endpoints with an overall 81% reduction in the risk of radiographic progression, as well as 29% reduction in the risk of death in favor of the enzalutamide arm over placebo. All secondary endpoints including time to subsequent chemotherapy initiation and prostate specific antigen (PSA progression were in favor of the enzalutamide arm. The results of PREVAIL shows the utility of enzalutamide that would likely soon expand the indication to asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic men with mCRPC not previously treated with chemotherapy.

  9. Pain in castration-resistant prostate cancer with bone metastases: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gater Adam

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bone metastases are a common painful and debilitating consequence of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CPRC. Bone pain may predict patients' prognosis and there is a need to further explore CRPC patients' experiences of bone pain in the overall context of disease pathology. Due to the subjective nature of pain, assessments of pain severity, onset and progression are reliant on patient assessment. Patient reported outcome (PRO measures, therefore, are commonly used as key endpoints for evaluating the efficacy of CRPC treatments. Evidence of the content validity of leading PRO measures of pain severity used in CRPC clinical trials is, however, limited. Methods To document patients' experience of CRPC symptoms including pain, and their impact on health-related quality of life (HRQL, semi-structured in-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 17 patients with CRPC and bone metastases. The content validity of the Present Pain Intensity (PPI scale from the McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ, and the 'Average Pain' and 'Worst Pain' items of the Brief Pain Inventory Short-Form (BPI-SF was also assessed. Results Patients with CRPC and bone metastases present with a constellation of symptoms that can have a profound effect on HRQL. For patients in this study, bone pain was the most prominent and debilitating symptom associated with their condition. Bone pain was chronic and, despite being generally well-managed by analgesic medication, instances of breakthrough cancer pain (BTcP were common. Cognitive debriefing of the selected PRO measures of pain severity highlighted difficulties among patients in understanding the verbal response scale (VRS of the MPQ PPI scale. There were also some inconsistencies in the way in which the BPI-SF 'Average Pain' item was interpreted by patients. In contrast, the BPI-SF 'Worst Pain' item was well understood and interpreted consistently among patients. Conclusions Study findings support the

  10. Mitosis Phase Enrichment with Identification of Mitotic Centromere-Associated Kinesin As a Therapeutic Target in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sircar, Kanishka; Huang, Heng; Hu, Limei; Liu, Yuexin; Dhillon, Jasreman; Cogdell, David; Aprikian, Armen; Efstathiou, Eleni; Navone, Nora; Troncoso, Patricia; Zhang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    The recently described transcriptomic switch to a mitosis program in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) suggests that mitotic proteins may be rationally targeted at this lethal stage of the disease. In this study, we showed upregulation of the mitosis-phase at the protein level in our cohort of 51 clinical CRPC cases and found centrosomal aberrations to also occur preferentially in CRPC compared with untreated, high Gleason–grade hormone-sensitive prostate cancer (P<0.0001). Expression profiling of chemotherapy-resistant CRPC samples (n = 25) was performed, and the results were compared with data from primary chemotherapy-naïve CRPC (n = 10) and hormone-sensitive prostate cancer cases (n = 108). Our results showed enrichment of mitosis-phase genes and pathways, with progression to both castration-resistant and chemotherapy-resistant disease. The mitotic centromere-associated kinesin (MCAK) was identified as a novel mitosis-phase target in prostate cancer that was overexpressed in multiple CRPC gene-expression datasets. We found concordant gene expression of MCAK between our parent and murine CRPC xenograft pairs and increased MCAK protein expression with clinical progression of prostate cancer to a castration-resistant disease stage. Knockdown of MCAK arrested the growth of prostate cancer cells suggesting its utility as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:22363599

  11. Mitosis phase enrichment with identification of mitotic centromere-associated kinesin as a therapeutic target in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanishka Sircar

    Full Text Available The recently described transcriptomic switch to a mitosis program in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC suggests that mitotic proteins may be rationally targeted at this lethal stage of the disease. In this study, we showed upregulation of the mitosis-phase at the protein level in our cohort of 51 clinical CRPC cases and found centrosomal aberrations to also occur preferentially in CRPC compared with untreated, high Gleason-grade hormone-sensitive prostate cancer (P<0.0001. Expression profiling of chemotherapy-resistant CRPC samples (n = 25 was performed, and the results were compared with data from primary chemotherapy-naïve CRPC (n = 10 and hormone-sensitive prostate cancer cases (n = 108. Our results showed enrichment of mitosis-phase genes and pathways, with progression to both castration-resistant and chemotherapy-resistant disease. The mitotic centromere-associated kinesin (MCAK was identified as a novel mitosis-phase target in prostate cancer that was overexpressed in multiple CRPC gene-expression datasets. We found concordant gene expression of MCAK between our parent and murine CRPC xenograft pairs and increased MCAK protein expression with clinical progression of prostate cancer to a castration-resistant disease stage. Knockdown of MCAK arrested the growth of prostate cancer cells suggesting its utility as a potential therapeutic target.

  12. Safety of cabazitaxel in senior adults with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: results of the European compassionate-use programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heidenreich, A.; Bracarda, S.; Mason, M.; Ozen, H.; Sengelov, L.; Oort, I.M. van; Papandreou, C.; Fossa, S.; Hitier, S.; Climent, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cabazitaxel/prednisone has been shown to prolong survival versus mitoxantrone/prednisone in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) that has progressed during or after docetaxel. Subsequently, compassionate-use programmes (CUPs) and expanded-access programme

  13. Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Phase III Trial of Sunitinib Plus Prednisone Versus Prednisone Alone in Progressive, Metastatic, Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michaelson, M Dror; Oudard, Stephane; Ou, Yen-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: We evaluated angiogenesis-targeted sunitinib therapy in a randomized, double-blind trial of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Men with progressive mCRPC after docetaxel-based chemotherapy were randomly assigned 2:1 to receive sunitinib 37.5 mg...

  14. Efficacy and Safety of Abiraterone Acetate in Elderly (75 Years or Older) Chemotherapy Naive Patients with Metastatic Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, M.R.; Rathkopf, D.E.; Mulders, P.F.A.; Carles, J.; Poppel, H. Van; Li, J.; Kheoh, T.; Griffin, T.W.; Molina, A.; Ryan, C.J.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer primarily affects elderly men. In this post hoc analysis we investigated the safety and efficacy of abiraterone acetate in elderly (age 75 years or greater) and younger (less than 75 years) patient subgroups at the prespecified interim analysi

  15. Androgen receptor splice variant 7 (AR-V7) and drug efficacy in castration-resistant prostate cancer: Biomarker for treatment selection exclusion or inclusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibrand, Crystal R; Price, Douglas K; Figg, William D

    2016-05-01

    Currently there are no molecular biomarkers used to help guide treatment selection for those patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer. A recent study published in JAMA Oncology (Antonarakis et al.) presents evidence supporting the potential use of androgen receptor splice variant 7 as a biomarker for optimal treatment selection in this population.

  16. Radium-223 dichloride: illustrating the benefits of a multidisciplinary approach for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renzulli II JF

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Joseph F Renzulli II, Jennifer Collins, Anthony Mega Genitourinary Multidisciplinary Clinic, The Miriam Hospital, Providence, RI, USAAbstract: Improving options for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC provide latitude in designing treatment plans that meet patients' medical needs and personal goals. The field's rapid evolution opens avenues for contributions by multiple medical specialties and requires considering more options to ensure that each patient receives the most appropriate care. A multidisciplinary clinic (MDC focusing on patients with cancers of the genitourinary tract demonstrates an efficient and cost-effective means of integrating the diverse professional knowledge and skills needed to develop an optimal patient treatment plan. As a guide to establishing an MDC for patients with mCRPC, this article describes the operation of the Genitourinary MDC at The Miriam Hospital in Providence, RI – specifically, the successful incorporation of radium-223 dichloride (radium-223 into the treatment algorithm for men with mCRPC and symptomatic bone metastases. Radium-223 is a new treatment that, unlike earlier radionuclide therapies, has shown a survival advantage in a large randomized phase 3 trial (ALSYMPCA. The overall survival benefit was comparable to that of newer immuno- and hormonal therapies in similar populations. Radium-223 treatment also delayed onset of symptomatic skeletal events. Both benefits were independent of prior docetaxel therapy or concurrent bisphosphonate use. In our clinic, radium-223 is used primarily to extend patient survival. Patient selection, patient management, and treatment sequencing are discussed here in the context of a multidisciplinary environment. Keywords: radium-223 dichloride, prostate cancer, castration-resistant prostate cancer, multidisciplinary clinic, best practices

  17. Complete response to ethnylestradiol prolonged for almost two years in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, Hiroshi; Kosaka, Takeo; Oya, Mototsugu

    2014-11-01

    An 80-year-old man with an elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level of 120 ng/mL) presented to the hospital in February 2011. A prostate needle biopsy was performed, and pathological examination revealed prostatic adenocarcinoma. The Gleason score was 4+5=9. Computed tomography revealed metastases of the pelvic lymph nodes. Combined androgen blockade was started. The PSA concentration decreased to 1.68 ng/mL, but started increasing again in August 2012 to 6.08 ng/mL. Although bicalutamide was discontinued due to antiandrogen withdrawal syndrome, the PSA concentration increased even more. The PSA concentration reached 21.62 ng/mL in September 2012, at which time ethnylestradiol was started. The PSA concentration decreased again and has remained below the limit of sensitivity for almost 2 years. To our knowledge, this is first case report describing a complete response to ethnylestradiol that lasted for almost 2 years in a patient with castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  18. Sustained complete response to CTLA-4 blockade in a patient with metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Julie N; Puri, Sachin; Bifulco, Carlo B; Fox, Bernard A; Beer, Tomasz M

    2014-05-01

    We present the case of a man with metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer, who had a complete prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response after 2½ doses of ipilimumab. His treatment course was complicated by diarrhea and autoimmune hepatitis, both of which resolved within 4 months. Sera and biopsy specimens were accessed, and sera from pretreatment and day 113 were analyzed. Augmented antibody responses were detected against 11 potential tumor antigens, with responses ranging from 5- to 20-fold in day 113 sera compared with baseline. Genes that were targets of a strong antibody response (arbitrarily set at 10-fold or greater increase) were analyzed by real-time PCR for expression in the tumor biopsy cDNA. Of the top 5 genes, only 3-hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA hydrolase (HIBCH) could be identified in the amplified tumor biopsy cDNA. Using an antibody to HIBCH, immunohistochemical analysis documented strong expression of the protein. Together, these data suggest that an augmented antibody response to HIBCH, an antigen that was expressed by the patient's prostate cancer, could have contributed to the clinical response. After 16 months of PSA stability, he discontinued his androgen-suppression therapy. With the return of his testosterone, his PSA increased slightly, likely originating from his intact prostate. He has been disease free for the past 6 years without any additional therapy.

  19. In vivo quantitative phosphoproteomic profiling identifies novel regulators of castration-resistant prostate cancer growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Nan; Hjorth-Jensen, Kim; Hekmat, Omid

    2015-01-01

    pathways in castration-resistant tumors, a notion that was confirmed by tumor transcriptome analysis. Further analysis demonstrated that the activation of mTORC1, PAK2 and the increased levels of YAP1 in castration-resistant tumors can be explained by the loss of androgen inhibitory actions. The analysis...

  20. Orteronel plus prednisone in patients with chemotherapy-naive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (ELM-PC 4): a double-blind, multicentre, phase 3, randomised, placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saad, F.; Fizazi, K.; Jinga, V.; Efstathiou, E.; Fong, P.C.; Hart, L.L.; Jones, R.; McDermott, R.; Wirth, M.; Suzuki, K.; MacLean, D.B.; Wang, L.; Akaza, H.; Nelson, J.; Scher, H.I.; Dreicer, R.; Webb, I.J.; Wit, R. de; Oort, I.M. van

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Orteronel is an investigational, partially selective inhibitor of CYP 17,20-lyase in the androgen signalling pathway, a validated therapeutic target for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. We assessed orteronel in chemotherapy-naive patients with metastatic castration-resist

  1. The Rationale for Optimal Combination Therapy With Sipuleucel-T for Patients With Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouraviev, Vladimir; Mariados, Neil; Albala, David; Concepcion, Raoul S; Shore, Neal D; Sims, Robert B; Emberton, Mark; Pieczonka, Christopher M

    2014-01-01

    Immunotherapy encourages the recipient's own immune response to destroy cancer cells, and current evidence suggests that immunotherapies may be most beneficial in early metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Sipuleucel-T is the first therapeutic cancer vaccine to be approved by both the US Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency for the treatment of asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic mCRPC. Combining immunotherapy with other treatments may have potent anticancer effects; cytoreductive therapies can release tumor antigens and promote a proinflammatory environment that could augment immunotherapies. However, some cytoreductive agents or coadministered drugs may be immunosuppressive. Understanding these interactions between different mCRPC treatment modalities may offer further potential to improve patient outcomes.

  2. BAY 1024767 blocks androgen receptor mutants found in castration-resistant prostate cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Tatsuo; Lejeune, Pascale; Köhr, Silke; Neuhaus, Roland; Faus, Hortensia; Gelato, Kathy A; Busemann, Matthias; Cleve, Arwed; Lücking, Ulrich; von Nussbaum, Franz; Brands, Michael; Mumberg, Dominik; Jung, Klaus; Stephan, Carsten; Haendler, Bernard

    2016-02-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) mutations arise in patients developing resistance to hormone deprivation therapies. Here we describe BAY 1024767, a thiohydantoin derivative with strong antagonistic activity against nine AR variants with mutations located in the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD), and against wild-type AR. Antagonism was maintained, though reduced, at increased androgen levels. Anti-tumor efficacy was evidenced in vivo in the KuCaP-1 prostate cancer model which bears the W741C bicalutamide resistance mutation and in the syngeneic prostate cancer rat model Dunning R3327-G. The prevalence of six selected AR mutations was determined in plasma DNA originating from 100 resistant patients and found to be at least 12%. Altogether the results show BAY 1024767 to be a strong antagonist for several AR mutants linked to therapy resistance, which opens the door for next-generation compounds that can benefit patients based on their mutation profile.

  3. Radium-223 chloride: a potential new treatment for castration-resistant prostate cancer patients with metastatic bone disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison MR

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Michael R Harrison, Terence Z Wong, Andrew J Armstrong, Daniel J GeorgeDuke Cancer Institute, Durham, NC, USABackground: Radium-223 chloride (223Ra; Alpharadin is an alpha-emitting radioisotope that targets areas of osteoblastic metastasis and is excreted by the small intestine. When compared with beta-emitters (eg, strontium-89, samarium-153, 223Ra delivers a high quantity of energy per track length with short tissue penetration.Objective: This review describes the mechanism, radiobiology, and preclinical development of 223Ra and discusses the clinical data currently available regarding its safety and efficacy profile.Methods: Data from clinical trials including abstracts were collected and reviewed using the PubMed Database, as well as the American Society of Clinical Oncology abstract database.Conclusion: Current bone-targeted therapies fall into two main categories: antiresorptive agents (eg, zoledronic acid, denosumab, which have been shown to delay skeletal-related events, and radiopharmaceuticals (eg, samarium-153, which may have a role in pain palliation. Historically, neither antiresorptive agents nor radiopharmaceuticals have shown definitive evidence of improved overall survival or other antitumor effects in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC. Radiopharmaceuticals are limited by myelosuppresion, thrombocytopenia, and renal excretion. In a recently reported randomized Phase III trial in men with symptomatic bone-metastatic CRPC who had received or were ineligible for docetaxel chemotherapy, 223Ra treatment resulted in improved overall survival and delayed skeletal-related events. Toxicity consisted of minor gastrointestinal side effects and mild neutropenia and thrombocytopenia that were rarely severe. Pending regulatory approval, 223Ra may represent a unique and distinct option for an important subgroup of patients with mCRPC; future trials should address its use in combination or in sequence with existing and novel

  4. Evolving treatment approaches for the management of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer – role of radium-223

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukherji D

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Deborah Mukherji,1 Imane El Dika,1 Sally Temraz,1 Mohammed Haidar,2 Ali Shamseddine11Department of Hematology/Oncology, 2Department of Nuclear Medicine, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Beirut, LebanonAbstract: Radium-223 is a first-in-class alpha particle-emitting radiopharmaceutical approved for the treatment of bone metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Radium-223 is administered intravenously with no requirement for complex shielding and specifically targets areas of bone metastasis. In a randomized placebo-controlled Phase III study, treatment with radium-223 was shown to improve overall survival, time to skeletal-related events, and health-related quality of life. Apart from radium-223, the cytotoxic chemotherapy agents docetaxel and cabazitaxel, androgen biosynthesis inhibitor abiraterone acetate, novel anti-androgen enzalutamide, and immunotherapy sipuleucel-T have also been shown to improve survival of men with advanced prostate cancer in Phase III trials. This review will outline current treatment approaches for advanced prostate cancer with a focus on the role of radium-223 in changing treatment paradigms.Keywords: Alpharadin, alpha-emitting radionuclide, bone metastasis

  5. Development of sipuleucel-T: autologous cellular immunotherapy for the treatment of metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Robert B

    2012-06-19

    Sipuleucel-T, the first autologous cellular immunotherapy approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration, is designed to stimulate an immune response to prostate cancer. Sipuleucel-T is manufactured by culturing a patient's peripheral blood mononuclear cells, including autologous antigen presenting cells (APCs), with a recombinant protein comprising a tumor-associated antigen (prostatic acid phosphatase [PAP]) and granulocyte colony-macrophage stimulating factor (GM-CSF). A full course of treatment comprises 3 infusions of sipuleucel-T, given at approximately 2-week intervals. The pattern of APC activation is consistent with priming by the first infusion, and boosting by the second and third infusions. Preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated evidence of a robust antigen-specific immune response that includes a progressive and persistent increase in antigen-specific cellular and humoral immune responses. Treatment with sipuleucel-T has demonstrated a survival benefit in Phase 3 studies of subjects with metastatic castrate resistant (hormone refractory) prostate cancer (mCRPC). Adverse events with sipuleucel-T were generally mild to moderate and resolved within 2 days. Serious adverse events, autoimmune events, and cerebrovascular events occurred at a similar rate to control subjects. As the first autologous cellular immunotherapy to demonstrate an improvement in overall survival in asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic mCRPC patients, sipuleucel-T represents a new treatment paradigm in oncology.

  6. Progression of metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer: impact of therapeutic intervention in the post-docetaxel space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartor, A Oliver

    2011-04-23

    Despite the proven success of hormonal therapy for prostate cancer using chemical or surgical castration, most patients eventually will progress to a phase of the disease that is metastatic and shows resistance to further hormonal manipulation. This has been termed metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Despite this designation, however, there is evidence that androgen receptor (AR)-mediated signaling and gene expression can persist in mCRPC, even in the face of castrate levels of androgen. This may be due in part to the upregulation of enzymes involved in androgen synthesis, the overexpression of AR, or the emergence of mutant ARs with promiscuous recognition of various steroidal ligands. The therapeutic options were limited and palliative in nature until trials in 2004 demonstrated that docetaxel chemotherapy could significantly improve survival. These results established first-line docetaxel as the standard of care for mCRPC. After resistance to further docetaxel therapy develops, treatment options were once again limited. Recently reported results from phase 3 trials have shown that additional therapy with the novel taxane cabazitaxel (with prednisone), or treatment with the antiandrogen abiraterone (with prednisone) could improve survival for patients with mCRPC following docetaxel therapy. Compared with mitoxantrone/prednisone, cabazitaxel/prednisone significantly improved overall survival, with a 30% reduction in rate of death, in patients with progression of mCRPC after docetaxel therapy in the TROPIC trial. Similarly, abiraterone acetate (an inhibitor of androgen biosynthesis) plus prednisone significantly decreased the rate of death by 35% compared with placebo plus prednisone in mCRPC patients progressing after prior docetaxel therapy in the COU-AA-301 trial. Results of these trials have thus established two additional treatment options for mCRPC patients in the "post-docetaxel space." In view of the continued AR-mediated signaling on m

  7. Progression of metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer: impact of therapeutic intervention in the post-docetaxel space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sartor A Oliver

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite the proven success of hormonal therapy for prostate cancer using chemical or surgical castration, most patients eventually will progress to a phase of the disease that is metastatic and shows resistance to further hormonal manipulation. This has been termed metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC. Despite this designation, however, there is evidence that androgen receptor (AR-mediated signaling and gene expression can persist in mCRPC, even in the face of castrate levels of androgen. This may be due in part to the upregulation of enzymes involved in androgen synthesis, the overexpression of AR, or the emergence of mutant ARs with promiscuous recognition of various steroidal ligands. The therapeutic options were limited and palliative in nature until trials in 2004 demonstrated that docetaxel chemotherapy could significantly improve survival. These results established first-line docetaxel as the standard of care for mCRPC. After resistance to further docetaxel therapy develops, treatment options were once again limited. Recently reported results from phase 3 trials have shown that additional therapy with the novel taxane cabazitaxel (with prednisone, or treatment with the antiandrogen abiraterone (with prednisone could improve survival for patients with mCRPC following docetaxel therapy. Compared with mitoxantrone/prednisone, cabazitaxel/prednisone significantly improved overall survival, with a 30% reduction in rate of death, in patients with progression of mCRPC after docetaxel therapy in the TROPIC trial. Similarly, abiraterone acetate (an inhibitor of androgen biosynthesis plus prednisone significantly decreased the rate of death by 35% compared with placebo plus prednisone in mCRPC patients progressing after prior docetaxel therapy in the COU-AA-301 trial. Results of these trials have thus established two additional treatment options for mCRPC patients in the "post-docetaxel space." In view of the continued AR

  8. Abiraterone acetate plus prednisone versus prednisone alone in chemotherapy-naive men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: patient-reported outcome results of a randomised phase 3 trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basch, E.; Autio, K.; Ryan, C.J.; Mulders, P.; Shore, N.; Kheoh, T.; Fizazi, K.; Logothetis, C.J.; Rathkopf, D.; Smith, M.R.; Mainwaring, P.N.; Hao, Y.; Griffin, T.; Li, S.; Meyers, M.L.; Molina, A.; Cleeland, C.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Abiraterone acetate plus prednisone significantly improves radiographic progression-free survival in asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic, chemotherapy-naive patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer compared with prednisone alone. We describe analyses of data for patie

  9. Partial response of liver metastases treated with abiraterone in castration-resistant prostate cancer: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marech, Ilaria; Vacca, Angelo; Sivestris, Nicola; Gnoni, Antonio; Lorusso, Vito

    2013-06-01

    Docetaxel is the current first-line treatment for castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), following failure to respond to maximal androgen blockade (MAB). Patients who fail to respond to docetaxel may receive cabazitaxel or abiraterone; however, there are no recommendations on which of these two agents should be used first. Here, we present a case of a male patient suffering from CRPC with liver and lymph node metastases, in which abiraterone achieved a partial response, according to RECIST criteria. In the literature, visceral involvement in patients with advanced prostate cancer is an infrequent occurrence; it affects 18-22% of patients. In the pivotal study concerning docetaxel-resistant patients, abiraterone was compared with a placebo and the forest plot for survival demonstrated that patients with visceral involvement have significantly benefited from abiraterone. In the TROPIC trial comparing cabazitaxel with mitoxantrone, the proportion of patients with visceral disease was ∼25% in both arms and there was no difference in overall survival in this subgroup of patients. In our case, we observed a significant activity of abiraterone in lymph node and liver metastases. If confirmed in large studies, this observation may raise concerns over whether to treat patients suffering from CRPC and visceral metasis with chemotherapy or hormone therapy.

  10. Combining p53 stabilizers with metformin induces synergistic apoptosis through regulation of energy metabolism in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Long; Ahmad, Nihal; Liu, Xiaoqi

    2016-01-01

    Since altered energy metabolism is a hallmark of cancer, many drugs targeting metabolic pathways are in active clinical trials. The tumor suppressor p53 is often inactivated in cancer, either through downregulation of protein or loss-of-function mutations. As such, stabilization of p53 is considered as one promising approach to treat those cancers carrying wild type (WT) p53. Herein, SIRT1 inhibitor Tenovin-1 and polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) inhibitor BI2536 were used to stabilize p53. We found that both Tennovin-1 and BI2536 increased the anti-neoplastic activity of metformin, an inhibitor of oxidative phosphorylation, in a p53 dependent manner. Since p53 has also been shown to regulate metabolic pathways, we further analyzed glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation upon drug treatments. We showed that both Tennovin-1 and BI2536 rescued metformin-induced glycolysis and that both Tennovin-1 and BI2536 potentiated metformin-associated inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation. Of significance, castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) C4-2 cells show a much more robust response to the combination treatment than the parental androgen-dependent prostate cancer LNCaP cells, indicating that targeting energy metabolism with metformin plus p53 stabilizers might be a valid approach to treat CRPC carrying WT p53.

  11. Sipuleucel-T and Androgen Receptor-Directed Therapy for Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renliang Yi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available New treatments, such as sipuleucel-T and androgen receptor- (AR- directed therapies (enzalutamide (Enz and abiraterone acetate (AA, have emerged and been approved for the management of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. There are still debates over their efficacy and clinical benefits. This meta-analysis aimed to investigate the efficacy and safety of sipuleucel-T and AR-directed therapies in patients with CRPC. RevMan 5.1 was used for pooled analysis and analysis of publication bias. Seven studies were included in the meta-analysis, with three studies in sipuleucel-T (totally 737 patients, 488 patients in treatment group, and 249 patients in placebo group and four in AR-directed therapies (totally 5,199 patients, 3,015 patients in treatment group, and 2,184 patients in placebo group. Treatment with sipuleucel-T significantly improved overall survival in patients with CRPC and was not associated with increased risk of adverse event of grade ≥3 (p>0.05. However, treatment with sipuleucel-T did not improve time-to-progression and reduction of prostate-specific antigen (PSA level ≥50% was not significantly different from that with placebo. AR-directed therapies significantly improved overall survival in patients with CRPC and improved time-to-progression and reduction of PSA level ≥50%. AR-directed therapies did not increase risk of adverse event of grade ≥3 (p>0.05.

  12. Sipuleucel-T and Androgen Receptor-Directed Therapy for Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Renliang; Chen, Baoxin; Duan, Peng; Zheng, Chanjiao; Shen, Huanyu; Liu, Qun; Yuan, Chen; Ou, Weilin; Zhou, Zhiheng

    2016-01-01

    New treatments, such as sipuleucel-T and androgen receptor- (AR-) directed therapies (enzalutamide (Enz) and abiraterone acetate (AA)), have emerged and been approved for the management of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). There are still debates over their efficacy and clinical benefits. This meta-analysis aimed to investigate the efficacy and safety of sipuleucel-T and AR-directed therapies in patients with CRPC. RevMan 5.1 was used for pooled analysis and analysis of publication bias. Seven studies were included in the meta-analysis, with three studies in sipuleucel-T (totally 737 patients, 488 patients in treatment group, and 249 patients in placebo group) and four in AR-directed therapies (totally 5,199 patients, 3,015 patients in treatment group, and 2,184 patients in placebo group). Treatment with sipuleucel-T significantly improved overall survival in patients with CRPC and was not associated with increased risk of adverse event of grade ≥3 (p > 0.05). However, treatment with sipuleucel-T did not improve time-to-progression and reduction of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level ≥50% was not significantly different from that with placebo. AR-directed therapies significantly improved overall survival in patients with CRPC and improved time-to-progression and reduction of PSA level ≥50%. AR-directed therapies did not increase risk of adverse event of grade ≥3 (p > 0.05).

  13. Global analysis of transcription in castration-resistant prostate cancer cells uncovers active enhancers and direct androgen receptor targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toropainen, Sari; Niskanen, Einari A; Malinen, Marjo; Sutinen, Päivi; Kaikkonen, Minna U; Palvimo, Jorma J

    2016-09-19

    Androgen receptor (AR) is a male sex steroid-activated transcription factor (TF) that plays a critical role in prostate cancers, including castration-resistant prostate cancers (CRPC) that typically express amplified levels of the AR. CRPC-derived VCaP cells display an excessive number of chromatin AR-binding sites (ARBs) most of which localize to distal inter- or intragenic regions. Here, we analyzed direct transcription programs of the AR in VCaP cells using global nuclear run-on sequencing (GRO-seq) and integrated the GRO-seq data with the ARB and VCaP cell-specific TF-binding data. Androgen immediately activated transcription of hundreds of protein-coding genes, including IGF-1 receptor and EGF receptor. Androgen also simultaneously repressed transcription of a large number of genes, including MYC. As functional enhancers have been postulated to produce enhancer-templated non-coding RNAs (eRNAs), we also analyzed the eRNAs, which revealed that only a fraction of the ARBs reside at functional enhancers. Activation of these enhancers was most pronounced at the sites that also bound PIAS1, ERG and HDAC3, whereas binding of HDAC3 and PIAS1 decreased at androgen-repressed enhancers. In summary, our genome-wide data of androgen-regulated enhancers and primary target genes provide new insights how the AR can directly regulate cellular growth and control signaling pathways in CPRC cells.

  14. Docetaxel Rechallenge in a Heavily Pretreated Patient With Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: A Case Report and Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Pagliuca, Martina; Perillo, Teresa; Benincasa, Alfonso; Bosso, Davide; De Placido, Sabino; Buonerba, Carlo

    2016-04-01

    Chemotherapy agents for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) include docetaxel and cabazitaxel. Although docetaxel is approved in the first-line treatment setting, a few studies have shown that selected patients can benefit from docetaxel rechallenge.We, here, report the case of a heavily pretreated mCRPC patient who reported clinical benefit from receiving docetaxel after previous exposure to docetaxel, cabazitaxel, abiraterone, and enzalutamide.After 4 cycles of treatment, patient's performance status had improved to 1, the hemoglobin level was 12.9 g/dL and his serum prostate specific antigen levels were reduced by >70%, with no treatment-related adverse events.Although docetaxel rechallenge is a therapeutic option for selected patients, the risk of cumulative toxicity described in literature must be carefully considered.As the risk of cabazitaxel-related cumulative toxicity is probably lower, retreatment with cabazitaxel rather than docetaxel may also be an option in the setting of heavily pretreated mCRPC patients.

  15. The predictive value of ERG protein expression for development of castration-resistant prostate cancer in hormone-naïve advanced prostate cancer treated with primary androgen deprivation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Kasper Drimer; Røder, Martin A; Thomsen, Frederik B;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Biomarkers predicting response to primary androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and risk of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is lacking. We aimed to analyse the predictive value of ERG expression for development of CRPC. METHODS: In total, 194 patients with advanced and....../or metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) treated with first-line castration-based ADT were included. ERG protein expression was analysed in diagnostic specimens using immunohistochemistry (anti-ERG, EPR3864). Time to CRPC was compared between ERG subgroups using multiple cause-specific Cox regression stratified...

  16. Predictors of long-term response to abiraterone in patients with metastastic castration-resistant prostate cancer: a retrospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Verzoni, Elena; De Giorgi, Ugo; Derosa, Lisa; Caffo, Orazio; Boccardo, Francesco; Facchini, Gaetano; Porcu, Luca; Vincenzo, Fabio De; Zaniboni, Alberto; Chiuri, Vincenzo Emanuele; Fratino, Lucia; Santini, Daniele; Adamo, Vincenzo; De Vivo, Rocco; Dinota, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to identify clinical predictors of long-term response to abiraterone (defined as >12 months drug exposure) in a retrospective cohort of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients treated in post-docetaxel setting at 24 Italian centers. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to analyze the association between clinical features and the duration of drug exposure. Results were expressed as hazard ratios (HR) with associated 95% confidence intervals (CI). A total of 143...

  17. Increased expression of class III β-tubulin in castration-resistant human prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Terry, S; Ploussard, G.; Allory, Y; Nicolaiew, N; Boissière-Michot, F; Maillé, P; Kheuang, L; Coppolani, E; Ali, A.; Bibeau, F; Culine, S; Buttyan, R; de la Taille, A; Vacherot, F

    2009-01-01

    Background: Class III β-tubulin (βIII-tubulin) is expressed in tissues of neuronal lineage and also in several human malignancies, including non-small-cell lung carcinoma, breast and ovarian cancer. Overexpression of βIII-tubulin in these tumours is associated with an unfavourable outcome and resistance to taxane-based therapies. At present, βIII-tubulin expression remains largely uncharacterised in prostate cancer. Methods: In this report, we evaluated the expression of βIII-tubulin in 138 d...

  18. SU-D-303-01: Spatial Distribution of Bone Metastases In Metastatic Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perk, T; Bradshaw, T; Harmon, S; Perlman, S; Liu, G; Jeraj, R [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Identification of metastatic bone lesions is critical in prostate cancer, where treatments may be more effective in patients with fewer lesions. This study aims characterize the distribution and spread of bone lesions and create a probability map of metastatic spread in bone. Methods: Fifty-five metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer patients received up to 3 whole-body [F-18]NaF PET/CT scans. Lesions were identified by physician on PET/CT and contoured using a threshold of SUV>15. An atlas-based segmentation method was used to create CT regions, which determined skeletal location of lesions. Patients were divided into 3 groups with low (N<40), medium (40100) numbers of lesions. A combination of articulated and deformable registrations was used to register the skeletal segments and lesions of each patient to a single skeleton. All the lesion data was then combined to make a probability map. Results: A total of 4038 metastatic lesions (mean 74, range 2–304) were identified. Skeletal regions with highest occurrence of lesions included ribs, thoracic spine, and pelvis with 21%, 19%, and 15% of the total number lesions and 8%, 18%, and 31 % of the total lesion volume, respectively. Interestingly, patients with fewer lesions were found to have a lower proportion of lesions in the ribs (9% in low vs. 27% in high number of lesions). Additionally, the probability map showed specific areas in the spine and pelvis where over 75% of patients had metastases, and other areas in the skeleton with a less than 2% of metastases. Conclusion: We identified skeletal regions with higher incidence of metastases and specific sub-regions in the skeleton that had high or low probability of occurrence of metastases. Additionally, we found that metastatic lesions in the ribs and skull occur more commonly in advanced disease. These results may have future applications in computer-aided diagnosis. Funding from the Prostate Cancer Foundation.

  19. ASC-J9 Suppresses Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Growth through Degradation of Full-length and Splice Variant Androgen Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichi Yamashita

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Early studies suggested androgen receptor (AR splice variants might contribute to the progression of prostate cancer (PCa into castration resistance. However, the therapeutic strategy to target these AR splice variants still remains unresolved. Through tissue survey of tumors from the same patients before and after castration resistance, we found that the expression of AR3, a major AR splice variant that lacks the AR ligand-binding domain, was substantially increased after castration resistance development. The currently used antiandrogen, Casodex, showed little growth suppression in CWR22Rv1 cells. Importantly, we found that AR degradation enhancer ASC-J9 could degrade both full-length (fAR and AR3 in CWR22Rv1 cells as well as in C4-2 and C81 cells with addition of AR3. The consequences of such degradation of both fAR and AR3 might then result in the inhibition of AR transcriptional activity and cell growth in vitro. More importantly, suppression of AR3 specifically by short-hairpin AR3 or degradation of AR3 by ASC-J9 resulted in suppression of AR transcriptional activity and cell growth in CWR22Rv1-fARKD (fAR knockdown cells in which DHT failed to induce, suggesting the importance of targeting AR3. Finally, we demonstrated the in vivo therapeutic effects of ASC-J9 by showing the inhibition of PCa growth using the xenografted model of CWR22Rv1 cells orthotopically implanted into castrated nude mice with undetectable serum testosterone. These results suggested that targeting both fAR- and AR3-mediated PCa growth by ASC-J9 may represent the novel therapeutic approach to suppress castration-resistant PCa. Successful clinical trials targeting both fAR and AR3 may help us to battle castration-resistant PCa in the future.

  20. HES6 drives a critical AR transcriptional programme to induce castration-resistant prostate cancer through activation of an E2F1-mediated cell cycle network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Montoya, Antonio; Lamb, Alastair D; Russell, Roslin; Carroll, Thomas; Jurmeister, Sarah; Galeano-Dalmau, Nuria; Massie, Charlie E; Boren, Joan; Bon, Helene; Theodorou, Vasiliki; Vias, Maria; Shaw, Greg L; Sharma, Naomi L; Ross-Adams, Helen; Scott, Helen E; Vowler, Sarah L; Howat, William J; Warren, Anne Y; Wooster, Richard F; Mills, Ian G; Neal, David E

    2014-05-01

    Castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is poorly characterized and heterogeneous and while the androgen receptor (AR) is of singular importance, other factors such as c-Myc and the E2F family also play a role in later stage disease. HES6 is a transcription co-factor associated with stem cell characteristics in neural tissue. Here we show that HES6 is up-regulated in aggressive human prostate cancer and drives castration-resistant tumour growth in the absence of ligand binding by enhancing the transcriptional activity of the AR, which is preferentially directed to a regulatory network enriched for transcription factors such as E2F1. In the clinical setting, we have uncovered a HES6-associated signature that predicts poor outcome in prostate cancer, which can be pharmacologically targeted by inhibition of PLK1 with restoration of sensitivity to castration. We have therefore shown for the first time the critical role of HES6 in the development of CRPC and identified its potential in patient-specific therapeutic strategies.

  1. HES6 drives a critical AR transcriptional programme to induce castration-resistant prostate cancer through activation of an E2F1-mediated cell cycle network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Montoya, Antonio; Lamb, Alastair D; Russell, Roslin; Carroll, Thomas; Jurmeister, Sarah; Galeano-Dalmau, Nuria; Massie, Charlie E; Boren, Joan; Bon, Helene; Theodorou, Vasiliki; Vias, Maria; Shaw, Greg L; Sharma, Naomi L; Ross-Adams, Helen; Scott, Helen E; Vowler, Sarah L; Howat, William J; Warren, Anne Y; Wooster, Richard F; Mills, Ian G; Neal, David E

    2014-01-01

    Castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is poorly characterized and heterogeneous and while the androgen receptor (AR) is of singular importance, other factors such as c-Myc and the E2F family also play a role in later stage disease. HES6 is a transcription co-factor associated with stem cell characteristics in neural tissue. Here we show that HES6 is up-regulated in aggressive human prostate cancer and drives castration-resistant tumour growth in the absence of ligand binding by enhancing the transcriptional activity of the AR, which is preferentially directed to a regulatory network enriched for transcription factors such as E2F1. In the clinical setting, we have uncovered a HES6-associated signature that predicts poor outcome in prostate cancer, which can be pharmacologically targeted by inhibition of PLK1 with restoration of sensitivity to castration. We have therefore shown for the first time the critical role of HES6 in the development of CRPC and identified its potential in patient-specific therapeutic strategies. PMID:24737870

  2. Dual-Targeting of AR and Akt Pathways by Berberine in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    maintained by serial passaging in castrated SCID mice. The tumors were cut into 25 mm3 pieces and implanted subcutaneously into castrated SCID mice...transactivate target genes. Cancer Research 2015 Jun 9, Epub ahead of print . Abstracts: Xichun Liu, Elisa Ledet, Yanfeng Qi, Yan Don, Oliver Sartor...expressed at a much lower level than AR-FL (Fig. S5). Moreover, AR-V7 and ARv567es can 230 heterodimerize (Fig. 3D ). Mutating D-box, but not the FxxLF

  3. Repurposing Itraconazole as a Treatment for Advanced Prostate Cancer: A Noncomparative Randomized Phase II Trial in Men With Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Elisabeth I.; Smith, David C.; Rathkopf, Dana; Blackford, Amanda L.; Danila, Daniel C.; King, Serina; Frost, Anja; Ajiboye, A. Seun; Zhao, Ming; Mendonca, Janet; Kachhap, Sushant K.; Rudek, Michelle A.; Carducci, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Background. The antifungal drug itraconazole inhibits angiogenesis and Hedgehog signaling and delays tumor growth in murine prostate cancer xenograft models. We conducted a noncomparative, randomized, phase II study evaluating the antitumor efficacy of two doses of oral itraconazole in men with metastatic prostate cancer. Patients and Methods. We randomly assigned 46 men with chemotherapy-naïve metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) to receive low-dose (200 mg/day) or high-dose (600 mg/day) itraconazole until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The primary endpoint was the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) progression-free survival (PPFS) rate at 24 weeks; a 45% success rate in either arm was prespecified as constituting clinical significance. Secondary endpoints included the progression-free survival (PFS) rate and PSA response rate (Prostate Cancer Working Group criteria). Exploratory outcomes included circulating tumor cell (CTC) enumeration, serum androgen measurements, as well as pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analyses. Results. The high-dose arm enrolled to completion (n = 29), but the low-dose arm closed early (n = 17) because of a prespecified futility rule. The PPFS rates at 24 weeks were 11.8% in the low-dose arm and 48.0% in the high-dose arm. The median PFS times were 11.9 weeks and 35.9 weeks, respectively. PSA response rates were 0% and 14.3%, respectively. In addition, itraconazole had favorable effects on CTC counts, and it suppressed Hedgehog signaling in skin biopsy samples. Itraconazole did not reduce serum testosterone or dehydroepiandrostenedione sulfate levels. Common toxicities included fatigue, nausea, anorexia, rash, and a syndrome of hypokalemia, hypertension, and edema. Conclusion. High-dose itraconazole (600 mg/day) has modest antitumor activity in men with metastatic CRPC that is not mediated by testosterone suppression. PMID:23340005

  4. Activation of P-TEFb by Androgen Receptor-Regulated Enhancer RNAs in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The androgen receptor (AR is required for castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC progression, but the function and disease relevance of AR-bound enhancers remain unclear. Here, we identify a group of AR-regulated enhancer RNAs (e.g., PSA eRNA that are upregulated in CRPC cells, patient-derived xenografts (PDXs, and patient tissues. PSA eRNA binds to CYCLIN T1, activates P-TEFb, and promotes cis and trans target gene transcription by increasing serine-2 phosphorylation of RNA polymerase II (Pol II-Ser2p. We define an HIV-1 TAR RNA-like (TAR-L motif in PSA eRNA that is required for CYCLIN T1 binding. Using TALEN-mediated gene editing we further demonstrate that this motif is essential for increased Pol II-Ser2p occupancy levels and CRPC cell growth. We have uncovered a P-TEFb activation mechanism and reveal altered eRNA expression that is related to abnormal AR function and may potentially be a therapeutic target in CRPC.

  5. Cost-effectiveness of abiraterone treatment in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer who previously received docetaxel therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Rudakova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Therapy for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC is a serious problem that requires significant public health care expenditures.Objective: to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of abiraterone treatment in patients with metastatic CRPC who previously received docetaxel under the conditions of the budgetary public health system of the Russian Federation.Material and methods. Markovian simulation based on the COU-AA-301 randomized placebo-controlled Phase III study was used. Survival analysis was made in 70-year-old patients. The cost of abiraterone therapy corresponded to that of the 2013 auctions.Results. Abiraterone therapy in patients who have previously received docetaxel therapy causes an increase in average life expectancy by an average of 4.6 months and progression-free survival by 2.0 months. Moreover, the cost calculated with reference to one year of additional life will account for about 3.6 million rubles and that to one additional quality-adjusted life year will be about 5.45 million rubles.Conclusion. The cost-effectiveness of abiraterone therapy for metastatic CRPC in patients who have previously received docetaxel therapy is similar to that of other medicaments used in oncological practice under the conditions of the budgetary public health system of the Russian Federation. In this connection, abiraterone may be considered as an economically acceptable medical intervention in this clinical situation.

  6. MLN2238 synergizes BH3 mimetic ABT-263 in castration-resistant prostate cancer cells by induction of NOXA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xinghua; Zhou, Ping; Lin, Xuanting; Lin, Yurong; Wu, Sifeng; Diao, Pengfei; Xie, Haiqing; Xie, Keji; Tang, Ping

    2014-10-01

    Patients undergoing androgen blockade therapy develop castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), which is associated with Bcl-2 upregulation and results in disease progression and death. In recent years, promising therapeutic agents, such as the BH3-only mimetic ABT-263 and proteasome inhibitors, have been developed and widely evaluated against a broad spectrum of cancer types, including prostate cancer, alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents. In this study, the antitumor efficacy of ABT-263 and MLN2238 were evaluated as single agents and in combination in four CRPC cell lines: PC3, C4-2B, C4-2, and DU145. The viability of the treated cells and markers of apoptosis were assayed. Protein-protein interactions were analyzed by co-immunoprecipitation in drug-treated cells. Lentivirus-mediated short hairpin RNA was used to knockdown Bax, Mcl-1, and NOXA expressions. We found that ABT-263 and MLN2238 alone exhibited a mild cytotoxicity, and in combination, they elicited a synergistic cytotoxic effect in CRPC cells. The cell apoptosis induced by the combination drug treatment was evidenced by enhanced caspase-3 and Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage, and annexin-V-positive staining was significantly depleted by Bax knockdown. MLN2238 treatment upregulated NOXA and Mcl-1 expression, leading NOXA/Mcl-1 complexes to disassociate Bak from its complexes with Mcl-1 and enhancing ABT263-triggered Bax activation. NOXA knockdown by short hairpin RNA significantly attenuated the cytotoxicity of ABT-263 and MLN2238 co-administration. In conclusion, MLN2238 and ABT-263 synergistically triggered apoptosis in CRPC cells by upregulating NOXA and activating Bax, indicating a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of CRPC.

  7. Cost-effectiveness analysis of abiraterone and sipuleucel-T in asymptomatic metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Cynthia L; Hay, Joel W

    2014-10-01

    Of patients diagnosed with prostate cancer, 0% to 20% experience disease progression to metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Recently, 4 novel therapies have been introduced for the treatment of mCRPC; of these, abiraterone and sipuleucel-T have been studied in the asymptomatic, pre-docetaxel population. Both have shown clinical benefits compared with placebo. This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of abiraterone acetate and sipuleucel-T compared with prednisone in asymptomatic, pre-docetaxel mCRPC from a US societal perspective. A Markov model was constructed to simulate stable disease, progressed disease, and death. Survival and event rates were derived from published clinical trial data. Costs were derived from the literature and government reimbursement schedules. Outcomes were measured as average cost-effectiveness ratios (ACERs), incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs), and net monetary benefits (NMBs). One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were conducted to test the robustness of the model. The base-case ACER was $114K/quality-adjusted life-years (QALY) for abiraterone, $85K/QALY for sipuleucel-T, and $31K/QALY for prednisone. The base-case ICER was $389K/QALY for abiraterone and $547K/QALY for sipuleucel-T. Prednisone dominates both abiraterone and sipuleucel-T in terms of NMB at willingness-to-pay (WTP) thresholds of $400K or less. One-way sensitivity analyses revealed that the model was most sensitive to overall survival and utility inputs. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses showed abiraterone to be cost-effective 50% or more of the time at a WTP of greater than $400K, whereas sipuleucel-T was cost-effective 50% or more of the time at a WTP of greater than $270K. Neither abiraterone nor sipuleucel-T was found to be cost-effective compared with prednisone in the treatment of asymptomatic, pre-docetaxel mCRPC.

  8. Uncarboxylated Osteocalcin and Gprc6a Axis Produce Intratumoral Androgens in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    state in the progression of prostate cancer . Recently, tumor cells have been shown to activate androgen receptor signaling via multiple pathways ...Gprc6a axis is functional in VCaP prostate cancer cells. This pathway can induce intra turmoral androgen synthesis through overexpression of...androgen biosynthetic enzyme expression. Together this pathway promotes prostate cancer bone metastasis and drive androgen receptor mediated bone tumor

  9. Overcoming Autophagy to Induce Apoptosis in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0529 TITLE: Overcoming Autophagy to Induce Apoptosis in...code) Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 October 2014 Overcoming Autophagy to Induce Apoptosis in Castration...survival mechanism and led cells to undergo apoptosis . Survival mechanisms elicited by CRPC C4-2B cells when treated with Enza may be blocked by

  10. Clinical and Preclinical Treatment Aspects of Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer (CRPC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J. Meulenbeld (Hielke)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIn the Western countries prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer, except for skin cancer, and the second leading cause of male cancer deaths. Prostate cancer tends to develop in men over the age of fifty and although it is one of the most prevalent types of cancer in men,

  11. Epithelial Plasticity in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: Biology of the Lethal Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    others with a glandular well-differentiated epithelial appearance. Even R. L. Bitting :A. J. Armstrong (*) Division of Medical Oncology, Duke Cancer...mouse models of prostate and other cancers [31]. Furthermore, PC cell lines Normal prostate epithelium Genetic and epigenetic changes Epigenetic...model systems, including human ovarian carcinoma Cancer Metastasis Rev cells [145], renal tubular epithelium [146], and mammary epithelial cells [147

  12. Quercetin-loaded nanomicelles to circumvent human castration-resistant prostate cancer in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Liu, Juan; Wei, Tuo; Ma, Xiaowei; Cheng, Qiang; Huo, Shuaidong; Zhang, Chunqiu; Zhang, Yanan; Duan, Xianglin; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2016-02-01

    Prostate cancer is highly prevalent and has become the second leading cause of cancer-related death in men. Its treatment remains a challenge in the clinic, particularly in patients who have advanced to ``castration-resistant prostate cancer'' (CRPC). Thus, more effective therapeutic strategies are required. Quercetin (QCT) is a natural flavonoid compound that has attracted increasing interest due to its anticancer activity. However, the clinical application of quercetin is largely hampered by its poor water solubility and low bioavailability. The objective of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of novel QCT-loaded nanomicelles (M-QCTs) assembled from DSPE-PEG2000 for prostate cancer treatment. Our results indicated that QCT was efficiently encapsulated into micelles up to 1 mg mL-1, which corresponds to a 450-fold increase of its water solubility. In vitro studies showed that the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value (20.2 μM) of M-QCTs was much lower than free QCT (>200 μM). Thus, M-QCTs were considerably more effective than free QCT in proliferation inhibition and apoptosis induction of human androgen-independent PC-3 cells. Furthermore, M-QCTs showed superior antitumor efficacy and the tumor proliferation rate reduced by 52.03% compared to the control group in the PC-3 xenograft mouse model, possibly due to increased accumulation of M-QCTs at the tumor site by the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. Collectively, our studies demonstrated that M-QCTs significantly increase drug accumulation at the tumor site and exhibit superior anticancer activity in prostate cancer. Thus, our nanomicelle-based drug delivery system constitutes a promising and effective therapeutic strategy for clinical treatment.Prostate cancer is highly prevalent and has become the second leading cause of cancer-related death in men. Its treatment remains a challenge in the clinic, particularly in patients who have advanced to ``castration-resistant

  13. New therapies for relapsed castration-resistant prostate cancer based on peptide analogs of hypothalamic hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew V Schally

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is a pleasure to contribute our presentation at the International Prostate Forum of the Annual Meeting of the American Urological Association (AUA to this special issue of the Asian Journal of Andrology.

  14. Disease Progression/Clinical Outcome Model for Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer in Patients Treated with Eribulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hasselt, J. G C; Gupta, A.; Hussein, Z.; Beijnen, J. H.; Schellens, J. H M; Huitema, A. D R

    2015-01-01

    Frameworks that associate cancer dynamic disease progression models with parametric survival models for clinical outcome have recently been proposed to support decision making in early clinical development. Here we developed such a disease progression clinical outcome model for castration-resistant

  15. Food effects on abiraterone pharmacokinetics in healthy subjects and patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Kim N; Spratlin, Jennifer; Kollmannsberger, Christian; North, Scott; Pankras, Catherine; Gonzalez, Martha; Bernard, Apexa; Stieltjes, Hans; Peng, Lixian; Jiao, James; Acharya, Milin; Kheoh, Thian; Griffin, Thomas W; Yu, Margaret K; Chien, Caly; Tran, Nam Phuong

    2015-12-01

    Food effect on abiraterone pharmacokinetics and safety on abiraterone acetate coadministration with low-fat or high-fat meals was examined in healthy subjects and metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients. Healthy subjects (n = 36) were randomized to abiraterone acetate (single dose, 1000 mg) + low-fat meal, + high-fat meal, and fasted state. mCRPC patients received repeated doses (abiraterone acetate 1000 mg + 5 mg prednisone twice daily; days 1-7) in a modified fasting state followed by abiraterone acetate plus prednisone within 0.5 hours post-low-fat (n = 6) or high-fat meal (n = 18; days 8-14). In healthy subjects, geometric mean (GM) abiraterone area under plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) increased ∼5- and ∼10-fold, respectively, with low-fat and high-fat meals versus fasted state (GM [coefficient of variation], 1942 [48] and 4077 [37] ng · h/mL vs 421 [67] ng · h/mL, respectively). In mCRPC patients, abiraterone AUC was ∼2-fold higher with a high-fat meal and similar with a low-fat meal versus modified fasting state (GM [coefficient of variation]: 1992 [34] vs 973 [58] ng · h/mL and 1264 [65] vs 1185 [90] ng · h/mL, respectively). Adverse events (all grade ≤ 3) were similar, with high-fat/low-fat meals or fasted/modified fasting state. Short-term dosing with food did not alter abiraterone acetate safety.

  16. Risk factors for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC predict long-term treatment with docetaxel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Kawahara

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: For patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostatic cancer (mCRPC, docetaxel plus prednisone leads to superior survival and a higher response rate compared with mitoxantrone plus prednisone. We analyzed the efficacy of long-term treatment with ≥10 cycles of docetaxel, and validated the risk group classification in predicting overall survival (OS in Japanese patients with mCRPC. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Fifty-two patients with mCRPC were administered 55 mg/m(2 docetaxel and 8 mg dexamethasone, every 3 or 4 weeks, simultaneously with hormonal therapy and daily oral dexamethasone. They were divided into two groups, short-term (9 or fewer cycles and long-term (10 or more cycles. Four risk factors including the presence of anemia, bone metastases, significant pain and visceral metastases were utilized for the risk group classification. RESULTS: Fourteen patients (27% had an elevation of PSA in spite of docetaxel treatment, while 23 patients (44% had a decline in PSA level, including 9 patients (17% whose PSA level declined by ≥50%. The median duration of OS after the initiation of this therapy was 11.2 months in the short-term group and 28.5 months in the long-term group. The good risk group showed a significant difference in OS compared with the intermediate and poor risk groups (P<0.001. The median number of cycles of treatment was 14, 4 and 3 for each risk group, respectively (p<0.01. CONCLUSIONS: The present study indicated that ≥10 cycles of this docetaxel therapy can significantly prolong survival in Japanese men with CRPC. This risk group classification for men with mCRPC at the initiation of this chemotherapy is useful.

  17. Therapeutic options in docetaxel-refractory metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixian Zhong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Docetaxel is an established first-line therapy to treat metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC. Recently, abiraterone and cabazitaxel were approved for use after docetaxel failure, with improved survival. National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE preliminary recommendations were negative for both abiraterone (now positive in final recommendation and cabazitaxel (negative in final recommendation. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of abiraterone, cabazitaxel, mitoxantrone and prednisone for mCRPC treatment in US. METHODS: A decision-tree model was constructed to compare the two mCRPC treatments versus two placebos over 18 months from a societal perspective. Chance nodes include baseline pain as a severity indicator, grade III/IV side-effects, and survival at 18 months. Probabilities, survival and health utilities were from published studies. Model cost inputs included drug treatment, side-effect management and prevention, radiation for pain, and death associated costs in 2010 US dollars. RESULTS: Abiraterone is a cost-effective choice at $94K/QALY (quality adjusted life years compared to placebo in our base-case analysis. Cabazitaxel and abiraterone are the most effective, yet also most expensive agents. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER at base-case are $101K/QALY (extended dominated for mitoxantrone vs. placebo, $91K/QALY for abiraterone vs. mitoxantrone, $956K/QALY for cabazitaxel vs. abiraterone. Abiraterone becomes less cost-effective as its AWP increases, or if the cost of mitoxantrone side-effect management decreases. Increases in the percentage of patients with baseline pain leads to an increased ICER for both mitoxantrone and abiraterone, but mitoxantrone does relatively better. Cabazitaxel remains not cost-effective. CONCLUSION: Our base case model suggests that abiraterone is a cost-effective option in docetaxel-refractory mCRPC patients. Newer treatments will also

  18. The PREVAIL Study: Primary Outcomes by Site and Extent of Baseline Disease for Enzalutamide-treated Men with Chemotherapy-naïve Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evans, Christopher P; Higano, Celestia S; Keane, Thomas;

    2016-01-01

    in men with chemotherapy-naïve metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, with or without visceral disease, low- or high-volume bone disease, or lymph node only disease. PATIENT SUMMARY: Patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer-including those with or without visceral disease......BACKGROUND: Enzalutamide, an oral androgen receptor inhibitor, significantly improved overall survival (OS) and radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS) versus placebo in the PREVAIL trial of men with chemotherapy-naïve metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. OBJECTIVE: To assess...... the effects of enzalutamide versus placebo in patients from PREVAIL based on site and extent of baseline disease. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: One thousand seven hundred and seventeen asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic patients were randomized to enzalutamide (n=872) or placebo (n=845). Subgroup...

  19. Radium-223 treatment of bone metastases from castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Jann; Højgaard, Liselotte

    2014-01-01

    The alpha emitter Radium-223 ((22)3Ra-Cl2) is a bone-seeking radionuclide studied as a new treatment for patients with bone metastases from hormone refractory prostate cancer. More than 1,000 patients have been included in clinical phase I-III tests showing significant reduction in alkaline...

  20. Toward Maximizing Immunotherapy in Metastatic Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer – Rationale for Combinatorial Approaches Using Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan F Slovin

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is particularly suited for active immunotherapy because of the expression of a distinctive number of antigens which are overexpressed on prostate cancer cells and cell lines. There is evidence in this disease that tumors promote immune tolerance starting early in the disease course. As such, chemotherapy, by suppressing tumors and activating immune system homeostatic mechanisms, may help overcome this tumor-induced immune tolerance. Sipuleucel-T which has recently been approved in the US, is an autologous cellule product immunotherapy that induces immune activity likely through activation of dendritic cells. This was associated with a survival benefit in the absence of significant toxicity. However, a post hoc analysis of phase III trial participants found a substantial survival benefit to receiving docetaxel some months after sipuleucel-T. However, another phase III immunotherapy trial combining a prostate cancer therapeutic vaccine G-VAX plus docetaxel versus standard docetaxel therapy in advanced prostate cancer, observed a lower overall survival with the vaccine regimen. These trials highlight major unresolved questions concerning the optimum choice, dosing, and timing of chemotherapy relative to active immunotherapy and the overall merits of considering this approach. The ideal treatment approach remains unclear; advances in biomarker validation and trial design may likely improve our ability to assess biologic benefit irrespective of the development of true anti-tumor immunity.

  1. Immunotherapy for castration-resistant prostate cancer: Progress and new paradigms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quinn, D.I.; Shore, N.D.; Egawa, S.; Gerritsen, W.R.; Fizazi, K.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The approval of sipuleucel-T in conjunction with data from other immunotherapeutic trials for prostate cancer and other solid tumors demonstrates the potential of harnessing the patients immune system for long-term survival. Thus, a range of therapeutic approaches are under evaluation. T

  2. The prognostic factors of effective ketoconazole treatment for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: who can benefit from ketoconazole therapy?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Wen Lin; Xu-Dong Yao; Ding-Wei Ye; Yao Zhu; Shi-Lin Zhang; Bo Dai; Hai-Liang Zhang; Yi-Jun Shen; Chun-Guang Ma

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the prognostic value of some variables of effective ketoconazole treatment for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC).In total,163 patients with mCRPC were eligible,receiving ketoconazole 200-400 mg three times daily with replacement doses of prednisone.Progression-free survival (PFS) was calculated from the beginning of the ketoconazole therapy to the onset of disease progression.The prognostic value of different variables for PFS was assessed by Cox regression analysis.The median PFS was 2.6 months (0.5-8.6 months) for these patients.The serum testosterone level changed during therapy,which decreased when the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) declined; the serum testosterone level increased as the levels of PSA relapsed.The median PFS values for patients associated with different factors were the following:1.4 and 3.5 months for a nadir PSA of ≥ 0.2 and <0.2 ng ml-1,respectively (hazard rate (HR)=4.767,P<0.001); 3.1 and 1.6 months for a baseline testosterone of ≥-0.1 and <0.1 ng ml-1,respectively (HR=2.865,P=0.012); 2.8 and 1.9 months for a baseline haemoglobin of ≥ 120 and < 120 gl-1,respectively (HR=1.605,P<0.001); and 3.0 and 1.9 months for a PSA doubling time (PSADT) of ≥ 2.0 and <2.0 months,respectively (HR=1.454,P=0.017).A risk model was constructed according to the four factors that divided patients into three subgroups of low risk (0-1 factors),moderate risk (2 factors) and high risk (3-4 factors) with PFS values of 3.6,3.0 and 1∶4 months,respectively (HR=1.619,P<0.001).A nadir PSA of ≥ 0.2 ng ml-1,a baseline testosterone of <0.1 ng ml-1,a baseline haemoglobin of < 120 gl-1 and a PSADT of <2 months were associated with a poor PFS.This risk model could provide evidence to predict the survival benefit of ketoconazole therapy.

  3. Glyphosate Vedotin for Treatment of Bone Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    and AR gene mutations [2], may cause hypersensitivity of AR to low levels of both endocrine and intracrine androgens [3]. AR splicing variants may...Medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum (HyClone, Logan, UT, USA) and 100 IU/mL penicillin /streptomycin, in a 5% CO 2 humidified incubator at 37°C...USA) with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS; Mediatech, Inc.) and 1% penicillin /streptomycin was used as the growth medium. Mouse prostate tissues were

  4. CpG-STAT3siRNA for Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    STAT3 and NF-κB/RELA reduce tumor-initiating potential and viability of TLR9+ cancer cells in xenotransplanted prostate tumor models • STAT3 and NF... cells , such as leukemia and lymphoma, internalize the conjugate within 1–4 h at concentrations from 100 to 500 nM. Higher concentrations of the CpG...innate immune gene family is differentially influenced by DNA stress and p53 status in cancer cells . Cancer Res. 2012; 72:3948–3957. 7. Ilvesaro JM

  5. Automated Bone Scan Index as a quantitative imaging biomarker in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients being treated with enzalutamide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anand, Aseem; Morris, Michael J; Larson, Steven M;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Having performed analytical validation studies, we are now assessing the clinical utility of the upgraded automated Bone Scan Index (BSI) in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). In the present study, we retrospectively evaluated the discriminatory strength of the a......BACKGROUND: Having performed analytical validation studies, we are now assessing the clinical utility of the upgraded automated Bone Scan Index (BSI) in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). In the present study, we retrospectively evaluated the discriminatory strength......-specific antigen (PSA), hemoglobin (HgB), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were obtained at baseline. Change in automated BSI and PSA were obtained from patients who have had bone scan at week 12 of treatment follow-up. Automated BSI was obtained using the analytically validated EXINI Bone(BSI) version 2. Kendall...... alone (C-index 0.73), p = 0.041. CONCLUSIONS: The upgraded and analytically validated automated BSI was found to be a strong predictor of OS in mCRPC patients. Additionally, the change in automated BSI demonstrated an additive clinical value to the change in PSA in mCRPC patients being treated...

  6. The AhR Ligand, TCDD, Regulates Androgen Receptor Activity Differently in Androgen-Sensitive versus Castration-Resistant Human Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghotbaddini, Maryam; Powell, Joann B

    2015-07-06

    The reported biological effects of TCDD include induction of drug metabolizing enzymes, wasting syndrome and tumor promotion. TCDD elicits most of its effects through binding the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). TCDD induced degradation of AhR has been widely reported and requires ubiquitination of the protein. The rapid depletion of AhR following TCDD activation serves as a mechanism to modulate AhR mediated gene induction. In addition to inducing AhR degradation, TCDD has been reported to induce degradation of hormone receptors. The studies reported here, evaluate the effect of TCDD exposure on androgen receptor (AR) expression and activity in androgen-sensitive LNCaP and castration-resistant C4-2 prostate cancer cells. Our results show that TCDD exposure does not induce AhR or AR degradation in C4-2 cells. However, both AhR and AR are degraded in LNCaP cells following TCDD exposure. In addition, TCDD enhances AR phosphorylation and induces expression of AR responsive genes in LNCaP cells. Our data reveals that TCDD effect on AR expression and activity differs in androgen-sensitive and castration-resistant prostate cancer cell models.

  7. The AhR Ligand, TCDD, Regulates Androgen Receptor Activity Differently in Androgen-Sensitive versus Castration-Resistant Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Ghotbaddini

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The reported biological effects of TCDD include induction of drug metabolizing enzymes, wasting syndrome and tumor promotion. TCDD elicits most of its effects through binding the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR. TCDD induced degradation of AhR has been widely reported and requires ubiquitination of the protein. The rapid depletion of AhR following TCDD activation serves as a mechanism to modulate AhR mediated gene induction. In addition to inducing AhR degradation, TCDD has been reported to induce degradation of hormone receptors. The studies reported here, evaluate the effect of TCDD exposure on androgen receptor (AR expression and activity in androgen-sensitive LNCaP and castration-resistant C4-2 prostate cancer cells. Our results show that TCDD exposure does not induce AhR or AR degradation in C4-2 cells. However, both AhR and AR are degraded in LNCaP cells following TCDD exposure. In addition, TCDD enhances AR phosphorylation and induces expression of AR responsive genes in LNCaP cells. Our data reveals that TCDD effect on AR expression and activity differs in androgen-sensitive and castration-resistant prostate cancer cell models.

  8. Radium-223-Dichloride in Castration Resistant Metastatic Prostate Cancer—Preliminary Results of the Response Evaluation Using F-18-Fluoride PET/CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalevi Kairemo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome after Radium-223-dichloride (223RaCl2 treatment of patients with skeletal metastases of castration resistant prostate cancer using whole-body 18F-Fluoride PET/CT. Sodium 18F-fluoride [18F]-NaF PET/CT was performed prior the treatment of 223RaCl2, after the first cycle and after the sixth cycle. The skeletal metastases were analyzed quantitatively using modified PET response evaluation PERCIST criteria. The patients were also analyzed for S-PSA. All ten patients responded in [18F]-NaF scans after 6 cycles, but interim analysis after the 1st cycle did not give additional information about the outcome. The S-PSA decrease correlated with [18F]-NaF response, only 1 patient demonstrated progressive disease, i.e., >25% increase in S-PSA values during 223RaCl2. Our results (although preliminary suggest that 18F-Fluoride PET/CT is useful in the follow-up of castration resistant prostate cancer with skeletal metastases.

  9. {sup 11}C-Choline PET/CT in castration-resistant prostate cancer patients treated with docetaxel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceci, Francesco [University of Bologna, Service of Nuclear Medicine, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Bologna, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, UO Medicina Nucleare PAD. 30, Bologna (Italy); Castellucci, Paolo; Graziani, Tiziano; Renzi, Riccardo; Fanti, Stefano [University of Bologna, Service of Nuclear Medicine, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna (Italy); Schiavina, Riccardo; Borghesi, Marco; Brunocilla, Eugenio [University of Bologna, Department of Urology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna (Italy); Di Tullio, Piergiorgio; Ardizzoni, Andrea [University of Bologna, Department of Oncology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna (Italy)

    2016-01-15

    To investigate the role of {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT for evaluating the response to treatment in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) treated with docetaxel in comparison with PSA response. Inclusion criteria were (a) proven mCRPC, (b) docetaxel as first line of chemotherapy (docetaxel 75 mg/m{sup 2} + prednisone 5 mg), and (c) {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT and PSA values assessed before and after docetaxel administration. A total of 61 patients were retrospectively enrolled (mean age 68.9 years, range 57 - 84 years). {sup 11}C-Choline PET/CT was performed at baseline before docetaxel treatment (PET1) and after the end of treatment (PET2). PSA values were measured before treatment (PSA1) and after treatment (PSA2). PET2 was reported as complete response (CR), partial response (PR) or stable disease (SD). Progressive disease (PD) was considered if a new lesion was seen. PSA trend was calculated from the change in absolute values between PSA1 and PSA2. A decrease of ≥50 % between PSA1 and PSA2 was considered a PSA response. Clinical, radiological and laboratory follow-up ranged from 6 to 53 months (mean 13.5 months). Of the 61 patients, 40 (65.5 %) showed PD on PET2, 13 (21.3 %) showed SD, 2 (3.4 %) showed PR, and 6 (9.8 %) showed CR. An increasing PSA trend was seen in 29 patients (47.5 %) and a decreasing PSA trend in 32 patients (52.5 %). A PSA response of ≥50 % was seen in 25 patients (41 %). Radiological PD was seen in 23 of the 29 patients (79.3 %) with an increasing PSA trend, in 16 of the 32 patients (50 %) with a decreasing PSA trend, and in 11 of the 25 patients (44 %) with a PSA response of ≥50 %. In the multivariate statistical analysis, the presence of more than ten bone lesions detected on PET1 was significantly associated with an increased probability of PD on PET2. No association was observed between PSA level and PD on PET2. Our results suggest that an increasing PSA trend measured after docetaxel treatment could be

  10. Improvement of a predictive model of castration-resistant prostate cancer: functional genetic variants in TGFβ1 signaling pathway modulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana L Teixeira

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in men. The acquisition of castration-resistant (CR phenotype is associated with the activation of signaling pathways mediated by growth factors. The TGFβ1 and its receptors have an important role in tumor progression, being the pro-apoptotic function modulated by the expression of TGFBR2. A single nucleotide polymorphism -875 G > A in TGFBR2 gene has been described, which may influence the expression levels of the receptor. Our purpose was to investigate the potential role of TGFBR2-875G>A in PC risk and in the response to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT. TGFBR2-875G>A polymorphism was studied by allelic discrimination using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR in 891 patients with PC and 874 controls. A follow-up study was undertaken to evaluate response to ADT. The TGFBR2 and SMAD7 mRNA expression were analyzed by a quantitative real-time PCR. We found that TGFBR2-875GG homozygous patients present lower expression levels of TGFBR2 mRNA (AA/AG: 2(-ΔΔCT =1.5, P=0.016. GG genotype was also associated with higher Gleason grade (OR=1.51, P=0.019 and increased risk of an early relapse after ADT (HR=1.47, P=0.024. The concordance (c index analysis showed that the definition of profiles that contains information regarding tumor characteristics associated with genetic information present an increased capacity to predict the risk for CR development (c-index model 1: 0.683 vs model 2: 0.736 vs model 3: 0.746 vs model 4: 0.759. The TGFBR2-875G>A contribution to an early relapse in ADT patients, due to changes in mRNA expression, supports the involvement of TGFβ1 pathway in CRPC. Furthermore, according to our results, we hypothesize the potential benefits of the association of genetic information in predictive models of CR development.

  11. State-of-the-Art Management for the Patient with Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer in 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartor, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Much progress has been made in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), and multiple new U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved survival-prolonging drugs are now available. In 2004, docetaxel/prednisone was the first therapy shown to prolong survival. In 2010 and 2011, sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel/prednisone, and abiraterone/prednisone were FDA approved. Two new agents, radium-223 and MDV-3100, have recently reported large phase III trials prolonging overall survival and will be submitted for regulatory approval in 2012. One can now begin to ask, is there an optimal sequence for therapies in metastatic CRPC? Despite the recent progress, there is much we do not know and virtually no information on this important question. We know that abiraterone/prednisone and cabazitaxel/prednisone are appropriate choices for a patient after receiving docetaxel, but we do not know what, if anything, represents the optimal sequence for abiraterone and cabazitaxel. In fact we do not understand how one therapy may affect the response to a subsequent therapy. We are also aware that the pre- and postdocetaxel spaces represent regulatory rather than biologic divisions. In addition, despite the proven role of docetaxel/prednisone, many patients with CRPC are not considered to be suitable for chemotherapy, and worldwide many never receive any form of chemotherapy. What is the optimal management for these patients? Taken together it is reasonable to assess patient preferences, prior therapies and response/tolerance to prior therapies, burden of disease, comorbidities, current symptoms, drug toxicities, out-of-pocket costs, etc., in clinical decision making. Given the many factors we do not know, it is hard to be dogmatic in approaching the therapeutic options for the patient with CRPC. We will likely soon move beyond the current sequencing paradigm and begin to assess new combinations in a systematic and rational fashion. Perhaps one day, in the not too distant future

  12. Super-Penetrant Androgen Receptor: Overcoming Enzalutamide Sensitivity in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    and (b) the identification of a novel AR acetylation site (K609) in the DNA binding domain of the AR in Enzalutamide resistant metastatic CRPC cells...694.8545 and 0.72 ppm) (Figure 3). This acetylation site mapped to the DNA binding domain of AR. Aim 2. Determine whether Enzalutamide-bound AR...Enzalutamide for 24 hours and fractionated the cells into nuclear and cytosolic fractions. The protein extracts were immunoblotted with AR and Actin

  13. {sup 18}F-fluoromethylcholine (FCH) PET imaging in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer: prospective comparison with standard imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, Michael; Siew, Teck [Royal Perth Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Perth, WA (Australia); WA PET Service, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, WA (Australia); Campbell, Andrew [Royal Perth Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Perth, WA (Australia); Royal Perth Hospital, Department of Medical Engineering and Physics, Perth, WA (Australia); Lenzo, Nat [WA PET Service, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, WA (Australia); Spry, Nigel [Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Perth, WA (Australia); University of Western Australia, Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Perth (Australia); Vivian, Justin [Royal Perth Hospital, School of Surgery, UWA, Perth (Australia); Morandeau, Laurence [Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Department of Medical Technology and Physics, Perth, WA (Australia)

    2011-01-15

    The aim of the study was to assess the utility of {sup 18}F-fluorocholine (FCH), compared to standard imaging of bone scan (BS) and contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT), in patients with castration-resistant prostate carcinoma. FCH has shown promise as a metabolic imaging agent for prostate carcinoma. Twenty-six patients with castration-resistant prostate carcinoma had FCH, BS and CT imaging within a 2-month period. Individual FCH-positive lesions in bone were compared to the BS and soft tissue lesions were compared to CT. The lesions were then classified as concordant or discordant for the presence or absence of prostate cancer metastases. Discordant bone or soft tissue lesions were followed up with BS or CT, respectively, at 6-month intervals for up to 2 years or until a definitive diagnosis of the discordant lesion could be made. In 13 (50%) of the patients, all lesions identified were concordant; this included 5 patients in whom no lesions could be identified with any imaging modality. In 21 patients, 183 lesions were observed with 149 being concordant and 34 (19%) being discordant (13 patients). Based on follow-up, FCH correctly identified the presence or absence of disease in 27 of 34 lesions, and in 14 cases FCH-positive lesions, not identified on initial imaging, were confirmed as disease on follow-up. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive and negative predictive values for lesion detection by FCH are 96% (92-98%), 96% (81-99%), 96% (93-97%), 99% (96-100%) and 81% (64-88%), respectively, with 95% confidence intervals shown in parentheses. In this patient cohort, FCH shows good initial concordance (81%) with BS and CT in the detection of metastatic prostate carcinoma. Follow-up of the cases where FCH was initially discordant with subsequent BS or CT shows that FCH was accurate in determining the presence or absence of prostate metastasis in 79% of lesions. While FCH imaging as compared to BS and CT in this patient

  14. Ipilimumab versus placebo after radiotherapy in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer that had progressed after docetaxel chemotherapy (CA184-043): a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, phase 3 trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwon, Eugene D; Drake, Charles G; Scher, Howard I;

    2014-01-01

    chemotherapy. METHODS: We did a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, phase 3 trial in which men with at least one bone metastasis from castration-resistant prostate cancer that had progressed after docetaxel treatment were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive bone-directed radiotherapy (8 Gy in one...

  15. Intratumoral de novo steroid synthesis activates androgen receptor in castration-resistant prostate cancer and is upregulated by treatment with CYP17A1 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Changmeng; Chen, Sen; Ng, Patrick; Bubley, Glenn J; Nelson, Peter S; Mostaghel, Elahe A; Marck, Brett; Matsumoto, Alvin M; Simon, Nicholas I; Wang, Hongyun; Chen, Shaoyong; Balk, Steven P

    2011-10-15

    Relapse of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) that occurs after androgen deprivation therapy of primary prostate cancer can be mediated by reactivation of the androgen receptor (AR). One important mechanism mediating this AR reactivation is intratumoral conversion of the weak adrenal androgens DHEA and androstenedione into the AR ligands testosterone and dihydrotestosterone. DHEA and androstenedione are synthesized by the adrenals through the sequential actions of the cytochrome P450 enzymes CYP11A1 and CYP17A1, so that CYP17A1 inhibitors such as abiraterone are effective therapies for CRPC. However, the significance of intratumoral CYP17A1 and de novo androgen synthesis from cholesterol in CRPC, and the mechanisms contributing to CYP17A1 inhibitor resistance/relapse, remain to be determined. We report that AR activity in castration-resistant VCaP tumor xenografts can be restored through CYP17A1-dependent de novo androgen synthesis, and that abiraterone treatment of these xenografts imposes selective pressure for increased intratumoral expression of CYP17A1, thereby generating a mechanism for development of resistance to CYP17A1 inhibitors. Supporting the clinical relevance of this mechanism, we found that intratumoral expression of CYP17A1 was markedly increased in tumor biopsies from CRPC patients after CYP17A1 inhibitor therapy. We further show that CRPC cells expressing a progesterone responsive T877A mutant AR are not CYP17A1 dependent, but that AR activity in these cells is still steroid dependent and mediated by upstream CYP11A1-dependent intraturmoral pregnenolone/progesterone synthesis. Together, our results indicate that CRPCs resistant to CYP17A1 inhibition may remain steroid dependent and therefore responsive to therapies that can further suppress de novo intratumoral steroid synthesis.

  16. Addressing the expected survival benefit for clinical trial design in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: Sensitivity analysis of randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massari, Francesco; Modena, Alessandra; Ciccarese, Chiara; Pilotto, Sara; Maines, Francesca; Bracarda, Sergio; Sperduti, Isabella; Giannarelli, Diana; Carlini, Paolo; Santini, Daniele; Tortora, Giampaolo; Porta, Camillo; Bria, Emilio

    2016-02-01

    We performed a sensitivity analysis, cumulating all randomized clinical trials (RCTs) in which patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) received systemic therapy, to evaluate if the comparison of RCTs may drive to biased survival estimations. An overall survival (OS) significant difference according to therapeutic strategy was more likely be determined in RCTs evaluating hormonal drugs versus those studies testing immunotherapy, chemotherapy or other strategies. With regard to control arm, an OS significant effect was found for placebo-controlled trials versus studies comparing experimental treatment with active therapies. Finally, regarding to docetaxel (DOC) timing, the OS benefit was more likely to be proved in Post-DOC setting in comparison with DOC and Pre-DOC. These data suggest that clinical trial design should take into account new benchmarks such as the type of treatment strategy, the choice of the comparator and the phase of the disease in relation to the administration of standard chemotherapy.

  17. Castration Therapy of Prostate Cancer Results in Downregulation of HIF-1{alpha} Levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Ubaidi, Firas L.T. [Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology, Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Urology, Central Hospital, Vaesteras (Sweden); Schultz, Niklas [Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology, Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Egevad, Lars [Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Granfors, Torvald [Department of Urology, Central Hospital, Vaesteras (Sweden); Helleday, Thomas, E-mail: helleday@gmt.su.se [Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology, Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Science for Life Laboratory, Stockholm University, Solna (Sweden)

    2012-03-01

    Background and Purpose: Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation in combination with radiotherapy of prostate cancer is used to improve radioresponsiveness and local tumor control. Currently, the underlying mechanism is not well understood. Because hypoxia causes resistance to radiotherapy, we wanted to test whether castration affects the degree of hypoxia in prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: In 14 patients with locally advanced prostate cancer, six to 12 prostatic needle core biopsy specimens were taken prior to castration therapy. Bilateral orchidectomy was performed in 7 patients, and 7 were treated with a GnRH-agonist (leuprorelin). After castrationm two to four prostatic core biopsy specimens were taken, and the level of hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}) in cancer was determined by immunofluorescence. Results: Among biopsy specimens taken before castration, strong HIF-1{alpha} expression (mean intensity above 30) was shown in 5 patients, weak expression (mean intensity 10-30) in 3 patients, and background levels of HIF-1{alpha} (mean intensity 0-10) in 6 patients. Downregulation of HIF-1{alpha} expression after castration was observed in all 5 patients with strong HIF-1{alpha} precastration expression. HIF-1{alpha} expression was also reduced in 2 of 3 patients with weak HIF-1{alpha} precastration expression. Conclusions: Our data suggest that neoadjuvant castration decreases tumor cell hypoxia in prostate cancer, which may explain increased radiosensitivity after castration.

  18. Prostate radiation in non-metastatic castrate refractory prostate cancer provides an interesting insight into biology of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascoe Abigail C

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The natural history of non-metastatic castrate refractory prostate cancer is unknown and treatment options are limited. We present a retrospective review of 13 patients with locally advanced or high risk prostate cancer, initially treated with hormone monotherapy and then treated with prostate radiation after becoming castration refractory. Findings Median PSA response following prostate radiation was 67.4%. Median time to biochemical progression following radiotherapy was 15 months and to detection of metastatic disease was 18.5 months. Median survival from castration resistance (to date of death or November 2011 was 60 months, with median survival from RT 42 months. Conclusion Prostate radiation appears to be beneficial even in patients with potential micrometastatic disease, which supports the hypothesis that the primary tumour is important in the progression of prostate cancer. These results are an interesting addition to the literature on the biology of prostate cancer especially as this data is unlikely to be available in the future due to combined prostate radiation and androgen deprivation therapy now being the standard of care.

  19. The Stromal Contribution to the Development of Resistance to New-Generation Drugs by Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    J. Hamilton et al., Statin medication use and the risk of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Cancer 116, 3389 (2010). 22. D. J. Mener...Prostate specific antigen reduction following statin therapy: Mechanism of action and review of the literature. IUBMB Life 62, 584 (2010). 23. I...Ortega et al., Simvastatin Reduces Steroidogenesis by Inhibiting Cyp17a1 Gene Expression in Rat Ovarian Theca-Interstitial Cells 1. Biol. Reprod. 86

  20. ASC-J9(®) suppresses castration resistant prostate cancer progression via degrading the enzalutamide-induced androgen receptor mutant AR-F876L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ronghao; Lin, Wanying; Lin, Changyi; Li, Lei; Sun, Yin; Chang, Chawnshang

    2016-08-28

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) with the newly developed powerful anti-androgen enzalutamide (Enz, also known as MDV3100) has promising therapeutic effects to suppress castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and extending patients' lives an extra 4.8 months. However, most Enz therapy eventually fails with the development of Enz resistance. The detailed mechanisms how CRPC develops Enz resistance remain unclear and may involve multiple mechanisms. Among them, the induction of the androgen receptor (AR) mutant AR-F876L in some CRPC patients may represent one driving force that confers Enz resistance. Here, we demonstrate that the AR degradation enhancer, ASC-J9(®), not only degrades wild-type AR, but also has the ability to target AR-F876L. The consequence of suppressing AR-F876L may then abrogate AR-F876L mediated CRPC cell proliferation and metastasis. Thus, developing ASC-J9(®) as a new therapeutic approach may represent a novel therapy to better suppress CRPC that has already developed Enz resistance.

  1. Effects of androgen deprivation therapy and bisphosphonate treatment on bone in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: results from the University of Washington Rapid Autopsy Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Colm; Roudier, Martine P; Dowell, Alex; True, Lawrence D; Ketchanji, Melanie; Welty, Christopher; Corey, Eva; Lange, Paul H; Higano, Celestia S; Vessella, Robert L

    2013-02-01

    Qualitative and quantitative bone features were determined in nondecalcified and decalcified bone from 20 predetermined bone sites in each of 44 patients who died with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), some of which received bisphosphonate treatment (BP) in addition to androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT). Thirty-nine of the 44 patients (89%) had evidence of bone metastases. By histomorphometric analysis, these bone metastases were associated with a range of bone responses from osteoblastic to osteolytic with a wide spectrum of bone responses often seen within an individual patient. Overall, the average bone volume/tissue volume (BV/TV) was 25.7%, confirming the characteristic association of an osteoblastic response to prostate cancer bone metastasis when compared with the normal age-matched weighted mean BV/TV of 14.7%. The observed new bone formation was essentially woven bone, and this was a localized event. In comparing BV/TV at metastatic sites between patients who had received BP treatment and those who had not, there was a significant difference (28.6% versus 19.3%, respectively). At bone sites that were not invaded by tumor, the average BV/TV was 10.1%, indicating significant bone loss owing to ADT that was not improved (11%) in those patients who had received BPs. Surprisingly, there was no significant difference in the number of osteoclasts present at the metastatic sites between patients treated or not treated with BPs, but in bone sites where the patient had been treated with BPs, giant osteoclasts were observed. Overall, 873 paraffin-embedded specimens and 661 methylmethacrylate-embedded specimens were analyzed. Our results indicate that in CRPC patients, ADT induces serious bone loss even in patients treated with BP. Furthermore, in this cohort of patients, BP treatment increased BV and did not decrease the number of osteoclasts in prostate cancer bone metastases compared with bone metastases from patients who did not receive BP.

  2. Health Economics and Radium-223 (Xofigo®) in the Treatment of Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer (mCRPC): A Case History and a Systematic Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Norum, Jan; Traasdahl, Erik R.; Totth, Arpad; Nieder, Carsten; Olsen, Jan Abel

    2015-01-01

    DOI: 10.5539/gjhs.v8n4p1 Creative Commons Attribution License 3.0 OBJECTIVES: Prostate cancer (PC) is the most common cancer in Western countries. Recent advances in the treatment of metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) have caused significant pressure on health care budgets. We aimed to exemplify this dilemma presenting an example, radium-223 (Xofigo®), and review the literature. METHODS: A 74-year-old man diagnosed with mCRPC was referred to our department in O...

  3. Development of a New Class of Drugs to Inhibit All Forms of Androgen Receptor in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AR variants in prostate cancer. I will be responsible for TALEN -based gene editing to develop AR- and AR-V-driven prostate cancer models with...full-length AR and truncated AR variants in prostate cancer. I will be responsible for TALEN -based gene editing to develop AR- and AR-V-driven

  4. The Role of the Neutrophil to Lymphocyte Ratio for Survival Outcomes in Patients with Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Treated with Abiraterone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boegemann, Martin; Schlack, Katrin; Thomes, Stefan; Steinestel, Julie; Rahbar, Kambiz; Semjonow, Axel; Schrader, Andres Jan; Aringer, Martin; Krabbe, Laura-Maria

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the prognostic capability of baseline neutrophil-to-lymphocyte-ratio (NLR) and NLR-change under Abiraterone in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients. The impact of baseline NLR and change after eight weeks of treatment on progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier-estimates and Cox-regression. 79 men with baseline NLR 5 were analyzed. In baseline analysis of PFS NLR >5 was associated with non-significantly shorter median PFS (five versus 10 months) (HR: 1.6 (95%CI:0.9–2.8); p = 0.11). After multivariate adjustment (MVA), ECOG > 0–1, baseline LDH>upper limit of normal (UNL) and presence of visceral metastases were independent prognosticators. For OS, NLR >5 was associated with shorter survival (seven versus 19 months) (HR: 2.3 (95%CI:1.3–4.0); p 0–1 and baseline LDH > UNL remained independent prognosticators. After 8 weeks of Abiraterone NLR-change to 5, NLR-change to <5 after eight weeks of Abiraterone was associated with worse survival and should be interpreted carefully. PMID:28208664

  5. A transient increase in eosinophils is associated with prolonged survival in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer who receive sipuleucel-T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeel, Douglas G; Gardner, Thomas A; Higano, Celestia S; Kantoff, Philip W; Small, Eric J; Wener, Mark H; Sims, Robert B; DeVries, Todd; Sheikh, Nadeem A; Dreicer, Robert

    2014-10-01

    Sipuleucel-T is an autologous cellular immunotherapy used to treat asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Traditional short-term indicators of clinical response commonly used with chemotherapy have not correlated with survival in patients treated with sipuleucel-T. This retrospective study aimed to evaluate laboratory parameters as possible early biomarkers associated with clinical benefit following sipuleucel-T treatment. Patients treated with sipuleucel-T from three randomized, controlled, phase III clinical trials in mCRPC were considered: IMPACT (NCT00065442; n = 512), D9901 (NCT00005947; n = 127), and D9902A (NCT01133704; n = 98). Patients from these trials were included in this study if their samples were analyzed by the central laboratory and if data were available from baseline and ≥ 1 posttreatment time point (n = 377). We found that sipuleucel-T treatment was associated with a transient increase in serum eosinophil count at week 6 that resolved by week 14 in 28% of patients (105 of 377). This eosinophil increase correlated with induced immune response, longer prostate cancer-specific survival [HR, 0.713; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.525-0.970; P = 0.031], and a trend in overall survival (HR, 0.753; 95% CI, 0.563-1.008; P = 0.057). Median serum globulin protein levels also increased transiently, which was associated with antigen-specific antibody responses; however, this finding did not correlate with longer survival. We conclude that transient increases in eosinophils at week 6 may be a useful, objective, short-term indicator of global immune activation and survival benefit with sipuleucel-T in patients with mCRPC. This observation warrants prospective evaluation in future clinical trials.

  6. Efficacy of estramustine phosphate sodium hydrate (EMP) monotherapy in castration-resistant prostate cancer patients: report of 102 cases and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Hayakawa, Nozomi; Ezaki, Taisuke; Suzuki, Kenjiro; Maeda, Takahiro; Ninomiya, Akiharu; Nakamura, So

    2013-12-01

    This retrospective chart review study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of estramustine phosphate sodium hydrate (EMP) monotherapy in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and to determine who would benefit from EMP therapy. EMP was administered at a daily dose of 560 mg to 102 patients as a third-line therapy, who had already received combined androgen blockade (CAB) and subsequent alternative antiandrogen therapy. The responses to EMP after its induction and its toxicity were evaluated. We also analyzed the association between the clinicopathological factors of the patients and their responses to EMP therapy. A reduction in the serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) 4 weeks after induction was observed in 70 patients (68.6%), while 30 cases (29.4%) achieved more than 50% reduction of PSA. Long-term reduction of PSA from baseline for more than 6 months was observed in 31 patients (30.4%). EMP treatment was discontinued in 11 patients (10.8%) because of side effects (nausea in six patients, gynecomastia in three patients, eruption in one patient, and liver dysfunction in one patient). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that long duration of prior hormonal therapy was an independent favorable factor for reduced PSA levels, long responses, and overall survival. The data suggest that oral EMP administration as a third-line monotherapy is well tolerated and effective to some degree in patients with CRPC who have already received CAB and subsequent alternative antiandrogen therapy. Thus, EMP can be regarded as one treatment option, especially for patients whose prior duration of hormonal therapy was long.

  7. Development of a New Class of Drugs to Inhibit All Forms of Androgen Receptor in Castration Resistant Prostate Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    responsible for TALEN -based gene editing to develop AR- and AR-V-driven prostate cancer models with impaired function of PSA enhancer RNA (eRNA...cancer. I will be responsible for TALEN -based gene editing to develop AR- and AR-V-driven prostate cancer models with impaired function of PSA

  8. 雄激素非依赖性晚期转移性前列腺癌生存预后分析%The survival analysis of the advanced metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马春光; 施国海; 秦晓健; 林国文; 杨立峰; 杨柏帅; 肖文军; 叶定伟; 姚旭东; 张世林; 戴波; 张海梁; 朱耀; 沈益君; 朱一平

    2009-01-01

    目的 分析雄激素非依赖性晚期转移性前列腺癌的预后相关因素.方法 1996年12月至2008年3月250例晚期转移性前列腺癌患者在内分泌治疗期间进展为雄激素非依赖性前列腺癌,对其进行随访,末次随访时间为2008年3月31日,中位随访时间为24个月(3~135个月).末次随访时131例生存,105例死亡,14例失访.利用统计学软件进行生存预后分析.结果 中位生存时间为30个月.1年牛存率79%,2年生存率59%,3年生存率41%.单因素分析及多因素分析显示:内分泌治疗过程中PSA最低值、达到PSA最低值时间、进展为雄激素非依赖性前列腺癌时PSA速率、内分泌治疗有效时间为独立预后冈素.结论 内分泌治疗过程中PSA最低值、达到PSA最低值时间、进展为雄激素非依赖性前列腺癌时的PSA速率和内分泌治疗有效时间为雄激素非依赖性晚期转移性前列腺癌生存时间的独立预后因素.%Objective To analyze predictive factors of advanced metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.Methods From December 1996 to March 2008,250 cases of advanced metastatic prostate cancer progressed into the stage of hormonal independent prostate cancer.The last follow-up date was 31 March 2008 and the median follow-up time was 24 months.During the follow-up,131 cases were alive,105cases were dead and 14 cases were lost to follow-up.Clinical and pathological information of the cases was analyzed to find the predictive factors that related to the prognosis.Results The median survival time of advanced metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer was 30 months,and the one-year,two-year,three-year survival rate was 79%,59%,and 41%.The univariate analysis indicated that prostate specific antigen (PSA) at diagnosis,clinical stage,the PSA nadir during hormonal therapy,the time form the start of hormonal therapy to the PSA nadir,the time of response duration during hormonal therapy,PSA velocity (PSAV) and PSA doubling

  9. Sipuleucel-T (Provenge) autologous vaccine approved for treatment of men with asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic castrate-resistant metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Thomas A; Elzey, Bennett D; Hahn, Noah M

    2012-04-01

    Sipuleucel-T (Provenge) (Sip-T) is first -in class as a therapeutic autologous vaccine approved for the treatment of men with asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic castrate-resistant metastatic prostate cancer. This product is the culmination of decades of basic immunological and prostate cancer investigations and 13 y of clinical trial investigations. Sip-T represents a paradigm shift in cancer therapeutics and represents the first approved autologous therapeutic cancer vaccine, which has demonstrated a survival benefit. The potential benefit of this product is the excellent risk to benefit ratio, which will allow for the combination of this approach with other more toxic therapies. The favorable risk to benefit will also afford the opportunity for trials investigating this product earlier in the disease state and in combination with local therapies. The ability to target more localized or lower volume disease will maximize the therapeutic benefit over a longer period of time. The novelty of the platform of this approach could be used to treat any cancer with a tumor-specific cell surface target. The main product of Sip-T is the re-infusion of a patient's antigen presenting cells from leukapheresis after ex-vivo exposure to a chimeric protein of human GM-CSF and PAP. In metastatic CRPC patients three infusions of these activated cells over a month lead to statistically significant 4.1 mo increase in median survival and a 22.5% reduction in risk of death. The main side effect from this re-infusion of activated immune cells is a "flu-like" syndrome that includes chills, fatigue, fevers, back pain, nausea, joints aches and headaches in decreasing order of frequency. Immune monitoring during the clinical trials also demonstrated a specific cellular and antibody immune response, suggesting the proposed mechanism of adoptive immunotherapy to PAP was behind this survival benefit. This product also serves as a proof of principle for targeted immunotherapy for others

  10. Whole blood defensin mRNA expression is a predictive biomarker of docetaxel response in castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohli M

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Manish Kohli,1 Charles YF Young,2 Donald J Tindall,2 Debashis Nandy,1 Kyle M McKenzie,3 Graham H Bevan,4 Krishna Vanaja Donkena5 1Department of Oncology, 2Department of Urology, 3Department of Geriatric Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, 4University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, 5Center for Individualized Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Abstract: This study tested the potential of circulating RNA-based signals as predictive biomarkers for docetaxel response in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. RNA was analyzed in blood from six CRPC patients by whole-transcriptome sequencing (total RNA-sequencing before and after docetaxel treatment using the Illumina’s HiSeq platform. Targeted RNA capture and sequencing was performed in an independent cohort of ten patients with CRPC matching the discovery cohort to confirm differential expression of the genes. Response to docetaxel was defined on the basis of prostate-specific antigen levels and imaging criteria. Two-way analysis of variance was used to compare differential gene expression in patients classified as responders versus nonresponders before and after docetaxel treatment. Thirty-four genes with two-fold differentially expressed transcripts in responders versus nonresponders were selected from total RNA-sequencing for further validation. Targeted RNA capture and sequencing showed that 13/34 genes were differentially expressed in responders. Alpha defensin genes DEFA1, DEFA1B, and DEFA3 exhibited significantly higher expression in responder patients compared with nonresponder patients before administration of chemotherapy (fold change >2.5. In addition, post-docetaxel treatment significantly increased transcript levels of these defensin genes in responders (fold change >2.8. Our results reveal that patients with higher defensin RNA transcripts in blood respond well to docetaxel therapy. We suggest that monitoring DEFA1, DEFA1B, and DEFA3

  11. Comparative efficacy, tolerability, and survival outcomes of various radiopharmaceuticals in castration-resistant prostate cancer with bone metastasis: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tunio M

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mutahir Tunio,1 Mushabbab Al Asiri,1 Abdulrehman Al Hadab,1 Yasser Bayoumi2 1Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, King Fahad Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 2Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt Background: A meta-analysis was conducted to assess the impact of radiopharmaceuticals (RPs in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC on pain control, symptomatic skeletal events (SSEs, toxicity profile, quality of life (QoL, and overall survival (OS.Materials and methods: The PubMed/MEDLINE, CANCERLIT, EMBASE, Cochrane Library database, and other search engines were searched to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs comparing RPs with control (placebo or radiation therapy in metastatic CRPC. Data were extracted and assessed for the risk of bias (Cochrane’s risk of bias tool. Pooled data were expressed as odds ratio (OR, with 95% confidence intervals (CIs; Mantel–Haenszel fixed-effects model.Results: Eight RCTs with a total patient population of 1,877 patients were identified. The use of RP was associated with significant reduction in pain intensity and SSE (OR: 0.63, 95% CI: 0.51–0.78, I2=27%, P<0.0001, improved QoL (OR: 0.71, 95% CI: 0.55–0.91, I2=65%, three trials, 1,178 patients, P=0.006, and a minimal improved OS (OR: 0.84, 95% CI: 0.64–1.04, I2=47%, seven trials, 1,845 patients, P=0.11. A subgroup analysis suggested an improved OS with radium-223 (OR: 0.68, 95% CI: 0.51–0.90, one trial, 921 patients and strontium-89 (OR: 0.21, 95% CI: 0.05–0.91, one trial, 49 patients. Strontium-89 (five trials was associated with increased rates of grade 3 and 4 thrombocytopenia (OR: 4.26, 95% CI: 2.22–8.18, P=0.01, leucopenia (OR: 7.98, 95% CI: 1.82–34.95, P=0.02, pain flare (OR: 6.82, 95% CI: 3.42–13.55, P=0.04, and emesis (OR: 3.61, 95% CI: 1.76–7.40, P=0.02.Conclusion: The use of RPs was associated with significant reduction in SSEs and improved QoL, while the radium-223

  12. Enzalutamide in Men with Chemotherapy-naïve Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer: Extended Analysis of the Phase 3 PREVAIL Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Tomasz M; Armstrong, Andrew J; Rathkopf, Dana; Loriot, Yohann; Sternberg, Cora N; Higano, Celestia S; Iversen, Peter; Evans, Christopher P; Kim, Choung-Soo; Kimura, Go; Miller, Kurt; Saad, Fred; Bjartell, Anders S; Borre, Michael; Mulders, Peter; Tammela, Teuvo L; Parli, Teresa; Sari, Suha; van Os, Steve; Theeuwes, Ad; Tombal, Bertrand

    2017-02-01

    Enzalutamide significantly improved radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS) and overall survival (OS) among men with chemotherapy-naïve metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer at the prespecified interim analysis of PREVAIL, a phase 3, double-blind, randomized study. We evaluated the longer-term efficacy and safety of enzalutamide up to the prespecified number of deaths in the final analysis, which included an additional 20 mo of follow-up for investigator-assessed rPFS, 9 mo of follow-up for OS, and 4 mo of follow-up for safety. Enzalutamide reduced the risk of radiographic progression or death by 68% (hazard ratio [HR] 0.32, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.28-0.37; p<0.0001) and the risk of death by 23% (HR 0.77, 95% CI 0.67-0.88; p=0.0002). Median investigator-assessed rPFS was 20.0 mo (95% CI 18.9-22.1) in the enzalutamide arm and 5.4 mo (95% CI 4.1-5.6) in the placebo arm. Median OS was 35.3 mo (95% CI 32.2-not yet reached) in the enzalutamide arm and 31.3 mo (95% CI 28.8-34.2) in the placebo arm. At the time of the OS analysis, 167 patients in the placebo arm had crossed over to receive enzalutamide. The most common adverse events in the enzalutamide arm were fatigue, back pain, constipation, and arthralgia. This final analysis of PREVAIL provides more complete assessment of the clinical benefit of enzalutamide. PREVAIL is registered on ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT01212991.

  13. Predictors of long-term response to abiraterone in patients with metastastic castration-resistant prostate cancer: a retrospective cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verzoni, Elena; Giorgi, Ugo De; Derosa, Lisa; Caffo, Orazio; Boccardo, Francesco; Facchini, Gaetano; Porcu, Luca; Vincenzo, Fabio De; Zaniboni, Alberto; Chiuri, Vincenzo Emanuele; Fratino, Lucia; Santini, Daniele; Adamo, Vincenzo; Vivo, Rocco De; Dinota, Angelo; Messina, Caterina; Ricotta, Riccardo; Caserta, Claudia; Scavelli, Claudio; Susi, Marina; Tartarone, Alfredo; Surace, Giuseppe; Mosca, Alessandra; Bruno, Michele; Barni, Sandro; Grassi, Paolo; Procopio, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to identify clinical predictors of long-term response to abiraterone (defined as >12 months drug exposure) in a retrospective cohort of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients treated in post-docetaxel setting at 24 Italian centers. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to analyze the association between clinical features and the duration of drug exposure. Results were expressed as hazard ratios (HR) with associated 95% confidence intervals (CI). A total of 143 patients met the inclusion criteria. Their median age was 73 years, median Gleason score 8 and median abiraterone exposure 20 months. At the univariate analysis, a significant correlation with the duration of abiraterone exposure was found for Gleason score (HR 0.82, 95% CI 0.71-0.96; p=0.012), PSA (HR 1.10, 95% CI 1.03-1.18; p=0.08) and lactic dehydrogenase levels (HR 1.22, 95% CI 1.02-1.46; p=0.027), while the association between lower alkaline phosphatase levels and treatment duration was marginally significant (HR 1.07, 95% CI 0.99-1.16; p=0.074). Only PSA and Gleason score were predictive of long-term treatment duration in the multivariate analysis. No other clinical factors resulted to be predictive of sustained response to abiraterone, including metastatic disease at diagnosis and visceral disease, suggesting that all subgroups of patients may derive a substantial clinical benefit from abiraterone treatment. These findings need to be validated in prospective, larger studies. PMID:27223078

  14. First Line Androgen Deprivation Therapy Duration Is Associated with the Efficacy of Abiraterone Acetate Treated Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer after Docetaxel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-Ri; Wang, Shian-Shiang; Yang, Cheng-Kuang; Chen, Chuan-Su; Ho, Hao-Chung; Chiu, Kun-Yuan; Hung, Chi-Feng; Cheng, Chen-Li; Yang, Chi-Rei; Chen, Cheng-Che; Wang, Shu-Chi; Lin, Chia-Yen; Ou, Yen-Chuan

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: We performed a chart review study in our castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients who received Abiraterone acetate (AA) treatment after docetaxel and identified clinical markers which can predict treatment outcome. Materials and Methods: From 2012 to 2016, 64 patients who received docetaxel after CRPC followed by AA treatment were included. Clinical parameters were recorded and analysis was performed to identify associations between pre-treatment variables and treatment outcome. Results: Thirty three patients (51.6%) achieved a decrease in PSA of 50%. The median PSA progression-free survival and overall survival in the total cohort of 64 patients were 6.6 and 24 months, respectively. Adverse events (AEs) in all grades developed in 35.9% (23/64) patients and mostly were grade 1 or 2. The most common AEs were gastric upset, hypokalemia and elevated liver function tests. Of the eight variables analyzed, first line androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) duration showed positive association to progression free survival (HR 0.98, 95% CI [0.96–0.99], p = 0.012) and overall survival (HR 0.97, 95% CI [0.94–0.99], p = 0.019). Pre-AA PSA and PSA progression ratio showed negative association only to progression free survival (HR 1.0, 95% CI [1.000–1.002], p = 0.025, HR 1.01, 95% CI [1.00–1.01], p < 0.001, respectively). Conclusion: First line ADT duration was positively associated with AA treatment efficacy in progression free survival and overall survival. It can be used as a pre-treatment predictor. PMID:28243202

  15. Cytochrome 450 1B1 (CYP1B1 polymorphisms associated with response to docetaxel in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer (CRPC patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Price Douglas K

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The selection of patients according to key genetic characteristics may help to tailor chemotherapy and optimize the treatment in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer (CRPC patients. Functional polymorphisms within the cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1 gene have been associated with alterations in enzymatic expression and activity and may change sensitivity to the widely used docetaxel regimen. Methods CYP1B1 genotyping was performed on blood samples of 60 CRPC patients treated with docetaxel, using TaqMan probes-based assays. Association between CYP1B1-142C>G (leading to the 48ArgGly transition, 4326C>G (432LeuVal, and 4390A>G (453AsnSer polymorphisms and treatment response, progression-free-survival (PFS and overall-survival (OS was estimated using Pearson χ2 test, Kaplan-Meier curves and Log-rank test. Results Patients carrying the CYP1B1-432ValVal genotype experienced a significantly lower response-rate (P = 0.014, shorter progression-free-survival (P = 0.032 and overall-survival (P Conclusions CYP1B1-4326C>G (432LeuVal polymorphism emerged as possible predictive marker of response and clinical outcome to docetaxel in CRPC patients and may represent a potential new tool for treatment optimization. Larger prospective trials are warranted to validate these findings, which might be applied to the future practice of CRPC treatment.

  16. A randomized phase II trial of personalized peptide vaccine plus low dose estramustine phosphate (EMP) versus standard dose EMP in patients with castration resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Masanori; Kakuma, Tatsuyuki; Uemura, Hirotsugu; Nasu, Yasutomo; Kumon, Hiromi; Hirao, Yasuhiko; Moriya, Fukuko; Suekane, Shigetaka; Matsuoka, Kei; Komatsu, Nobukazu; Shichijo, Shigeki; Yamada, Akira; Itoh, Kyogo

    2010-07-01

    Personalized peptide vaccination (PPV) combined with chemotherapy could be a novel approach for many cancer patients. In this randomized study, we evaluated the anti-tumor effect and safety of PPV plus low-dose estramustine phosphate (EMP) as compared to standard-dose EMP for HLA-A2- or -A24-positive patients with castration resistant prostate cancer. Patients were randomized into groups receiving either PPV plus low-dose EMP (280 mg/day) or standard-dose EMP (560 mg/day). After disease progression, patients were switched to the opposite regime. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). We randomly assigned 28 patients to receive PPV plus low-dose EMP and 29 patients to receive standard-dose EMP. Nineteen events in the PPV group and 20 events in the EMP group occurred during the first treatment. Median PFS for the first treatment was 8.5 months in the PPV group and 2.8 months in the EMP group with a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.28 (95% CI, 0.14-0.61; log-rank P = 0.0012), while there was no difference for median PFS for the second treatment. The HR for overall survival was 0.3 (95% CI, 0.1-0.91) in favor of the PPV plus low-dose EMP group (log-rank, P = 0.0328). The PPV plus low-dose EMP was well tolerated without major adverse effects and with increased levels of IgG and cytotoxic-T cell responses to the vaccinated peptides. PPV plus low-dose EMP was associated with an improvement in PSA-based PFS as compared to the standard-dose EMP alone.

  17. Phase I clinical trial of sipuleucel-T combined with escalating doses of ipilimumab in progressive metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scholz M

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Mark Scholz,1 Sabrina Yep,1 Micah Chancey,1 Colleen Kelly,1 Ken Chau,1 Jeffrey Turner,1 Richard Lam,1 Charles G Drake,2,3 1Prostate Oncology Specialists, Inc., Marina del Rey, CA, 2The Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, 3The James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute, John Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD, USA Background: Sipuleucel-T (SIP-T, which functions by stimulating cancer-specific dendritic cells, prolongs survival in men with prostate cancer. Ipilimumab (IPI achieved a borderline survival advantage in a large randomized trial. SIP-T and IPI are potentially synergistic. Patients and Methods: Nine men with progressive metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC were treated prospectively with SIP-T followed immediately by IPI with one of the following doses of IPI: 1 mg/kg at 1 week after SIP-T; 1 mg/kg at 1 and 4 weeks after SIP-T; or 1 mg/kg at 1, 4, and 7 weeks after SIP-T. Three patients were evaluated at each level. Cancer-specific immunoglobulins directed at granulocyte-macrophage-colony-stimulating factor/prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP fusion protein (PA2024 and PAP were measured prior to SIP-T, after SIP-T, 1 week after IPI, every other month for 5 months, then every 3 months for an additional 12 months. Results: Adverse events of SIP-T were consistent with previous reports. IPI only caused a transient grade 1 rash in one patient. Median age, Gleason score, and number of previous hormonal interventions were 77 years, 8, and 3, respectively. Eight men had bone metastases and one had lymph node metastasis. Statistically significant increases in serum immunoglobulin G (IgG and IgG-IgM specific for PA2024 and PAP occurred after SIP-T. An additional statistically significant increase in the aforementioned immunoglobulins – above the levels achieved by SIP-T – occurred after IPI. Median clinical follow-up was 36 months (range: 26–40. Three patients died from progressive disease after 9, 18, and 20 months. Out of the

  18. Androgen suppresses the proliferation of androgen receptor-positive castration-resistant prostate cancer cells via inhibition of Cdk2, CyclinA, and Skp2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Kokontis

    Full Text Available The majority of prostate cancer (PCa patient receiving androgen ablation therapy eventually develop castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. We previously reported that androgen treatment suppresses Skp2 and c-Myc through androgen receptor (AR and induced G1 cell cycle arrest in androgen-independent LNCaP 104-R2 cells, a late stage CRPC cell line model. However, the mechanism of androgenic regulation of Skp2 in CRPC cells was not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the androgenic regulation of Skp2 in two AR-positive CRPC cell line models, the LNCaP 104-R1 and PC-3AR Cells. The former one is an early stage androgen-independent LNCaP cells, while the later one is PC-3 cells re-expressing either wild type AR or mutant LNCaP AR. Proliferation of LNCaP 104-R1 and PC-3AR cells is not dependent on but is suppressed by androgen. We observed in this study that androgen treatment reduced protein expression of Cdk2, Cdk7, Cyclin A, cyclin H, Skp2, c-Myc, and E2F-1; lessened phosphorylation of Thr14, Tyr15, and Thr160 on Cdk2; decreased activity of Cdk2; induced protein level of p27(Kip1; and caused G1 cell cycle arrest in LNCaP 104-R1 cells and PC-3AR cells. Overexpression of Skp2 protein in LNCaP 104-R1 or PC-3AR cells partially blocked accumulation of p27(Kip1 and increased Cdk2 activity under androgen treatment, which partially blocked the androgenic suppressive effects on proliferation and cell cycle. Analyzing on-line gene array data of 214 normal and PCa samples indicated that gene expression of Skp2, Cdk2, and cyclin A positively correlates to each other, while Cdk7 negatively correlates to these genes. These observations suggested that androgen suppresses the proliferation of CRPC cells partially through inhibition of Cyclin A, Cdk2, and Skp2.

  19. Androgen suppresses the proliferation of androgen receptor-positive castration-resistant prostate cancer cells via inhibition of Cdk2, CyclinA, and Skp2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokontis, John M; Lin, Hui-Ping; Jiang, Shih Sheng; Lin, Ching-Yu; Fukuchi, Junichi; Hiipakka, Richard A; Chung, Chi-Jung; Chan, Tzu-Min; Liao, Shutsung; Chang, Chung-Ho; Chuu, Chih-Pin

    2014-01-01

    The majority of prostate cancer (PCa) patient receiving androgen ablation therapy eventually develop castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). We previously reported that androgen treatment suppresses Skp2 and c-Myc through androgen receptor (AR) and induced G1 cell cycle arrest in androgen-independent LNCaP 104-R2 cells, a late stage CRPC cell line model. However, the mechanism of androgenic regulation of Skp2 in CRPC cells was not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the androgenic regulation of Skp2 in two AR-positive CRPC cell line models, the LNCaP 104-R1 and PC-3AR Cells. The former one is an early stage androgen-independent LNCaP cells, while the later one is PC-3 cells re-expressing either wild type AR or mutant LNCaP AR. Proliferation of LNCaP 104-R1 and PC-3AR cells is not dependent on but is suppressed by androgen. We observed in this study that androgen treatment reduced protein expression of Cdk2, Cdk7, Cyclin A, cyclin H, Skp2, c-Myc, and E2F-1; lessened phosphorylation of Thr14, Tyr15, and Thr160 on Cdk2; decreased activity of Cdk2; induced protein level of p27(Kip1); and caused G1 cell cycle arrest in LNCaP 104-R1 cells and PC-3AR cells. Overexpression of Skp2 protein in LNCaP 104-R1 or PC-3AR cells partially blocked accumulation of p27(Kip1) and increased Cdk2 activity under androgen treatment, which partially blocked the androgenic suppressive effects on proliferation and cell cycle. Analyzing on-line gene array data of 214 normal and PCa samples indicated that gene expression of Skp2, Cdk2, and cyclin A positively correlates to each other, while Cdk7 negatively correlates to these genes. These observations suggested that androgen suppresses the proliferation of CRPC cells partially through inhibition of Cyclin A, Cdk2, and Skp2.

  20. {sup 18}F-Fluorocholine PET/CT for early response assessment in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer treated with enzalutamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Giorgi, Ugo; Conteduca, Vincenza; Burgio, Salvatore Luca; Menna, Cecilia; Rossi, Lorena; Amadori, Dino [Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS, Department of Medical Oncology, Meldola (Italy); Caroli, Paola; Paganelli, Giovanni; Matteucci, Federica [Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS, Diagnostic Nuclear Medicine Unit, Meldola (Italy); Scarpi, Emanuela [Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS, Unit of Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Meldola (Italy); Moretti, Andrea; Galassi, Riccardo [Morgagni-Pierantoni Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Forli (Italy)

    2015-07-15

    We investigated the role of {sup 18}F-methylcholine (FCH) PET/CT in the early evaluation of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) treated with enzalutamide. The study group comprised 36 patients with a median age of 72 years (range 48-90 years) who were treated with enzalutamide 160 mg once daily after at least one chemotherapeutic regimen with docetaxel. Patients were evaluated monthly for serological prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response. FCH PET/CT was performed at baseline and repeated after 3-6 weeks. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression models addressed potential predictors of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). At a median follow-up of 24.2 months (range 1.8-27.3 months), 34 patients were evaluable for early FCH PET/CT evaluation of response, and of these 17 showed progressive disease (PD) and 17 had stable disease or a partial response. A decrease in PSA level of more than 50 % was observed in 21 patients. Early FCH PET/CT PD predicted radiological PD 3 months in advance of CT in 12 of 18 patients (66 %) and was discordant with the decrease in PSA level in 13 patients. In 6 of these, biochemical PD was confirmed in 2 months. In multivariate analysis, only decrease in PSA level and FCH PET/CT were significant predictors of PFS (p = 0.0005 and p = 0.029, respectively), whereas decrease in PSA level alone was predictive of OS (p = 0.007). This is one of the first studies to evaluate the role of FCH PET/CT as an early predictor of outcome in mCRPC patients treated with enzalutamide. Our preliminary results suggest that the combination of FCH PET/CT and decrease in PSA level could be a valid tool to predict PFS in mCRPC patients. PSA remains the single most important prognostic factor, while FCH PET/CT does not add more information on OS beyond that obtained from PSA. Further studies in larger populations are needed to confirm these data and to clarify the role of FCH PET/CT in predicting response

  1. Prostate progenitor cells proliferate in response to castration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xudong Shi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Androgen-deprivation is a mainstay of therapy for advanced prostate cancer but tumor regression is usually incomplete and temporary because of androgen-independent cells in the tumor. It has been speculated that these tumor cells resemble the stem/progenitor cells of the normal prostate. The purpose of this study was to examine the response of slow-cycling progenitor cells in the adult mouse prostate to castration. Proliferating cells in the E16 urogenital sinus were pulse labeled by BrdU administration or by doxycycline-controlled labeling of the histone-H2B GFP mouse. A small population of labeled epithelial cells in the adult prostate localized at the junction of the prostatic ducts and urethra. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS showed that GFP label-retaining cells were enriched for cells co-expressing stem cell markers Sca-1, CD133, CD44 and CD117 (4- marker cells; 60-fold enrichment. FACS showed, additionally, that 4-marker cells were androgen receptor positive. Castration induced proliferation and dispersal of E16 labeled cells into more distal ductal segments. When naïve adult mice were administered BrdU daily for 2 weeks after castration, 16% of 4-marker cells exhibited BrdU label in contrast to only 6% of all epithelial cells (P < 0.01. In sham-castrated controls less than 4% of 4-marker cells were BrdU labeled (P < 0.01. The unexpected and admittedly counter-intuitive finding that castration induced progenitor cell proliferation suggests that androgen deprivation therapy in men with advanced prostate cancer could not only exert pleiotrophic effects on tumor sub-populations but may induce inadvertent expansion of tumor stem cells.

  2. 转移性去势抵抗性前列腺癌化疗后预后的影响因素%Factors Influencing Prognosis of Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer after Chemotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庞华

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate prognostic factors of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer ( mCRPC ) trea-ted with docetaxel chemotherapy .Methods Age,Gleason score ,prostate-specific antigen ,blood baseline condition and hormone-sensitive time of 46 patients with mCRPC were recorded .Results Overall survival time of all patients was 3-45 months,the aver-age survival time was (21.34 ±2.13) months,median survival time was 19.36 months;cox regression analysis showed that Glea-son score,hemoglobin,hormone-sensitive time were related with the patient's survival time,RR values were 1.782,2.363 and 2.012,and P<0.05.Conclusion Gleason score,hemoglobin concentration ,and hormone-sensitive time before chemotherapy are prognostic factors of metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer .%目的:探讨采用多西紫杉醇化疗的转移性去势抵抗性前列腺癌( metastatic castration-resistant prostate canc-er,MCRPC)患者预后影响因素。方法以转移性去势抵抗性前列腺癌患者46例作为观察对象,记录患者化疗前年龄、Gleason评分、前列腺特异抗原(prostate-specific antigen,PSA)值、血常规等基线情况及激素敏感时间。结果患者总生存时间为3~45个月,平均生存期为(21.34±2.13)个月,中位生存时间为19.36个月;Cox回归结果提示,Gleason评分、血红蛋白水平、激素敏感时间与患者生存时间相关,RR值分别为1.782、2.363和2.012,且P<0.05。结论多西他赛化疗前Gleason评分、血红蛋白浓度及激素敏感时间,是转移性去势抵抗性前列腺癌患者的预后因素。

  3. {sup 177}Lu-DKFZ-PSMA-617 therapy in metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer: safety, efficacy, and quality of life assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, Madhav Prasad; Ballal, Sanjana; Tripathi, Madhavi; Damle, Nishikant Avinash; Bal, Chandrasekhar [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi (India); Sahoo, Ranjit Kumar [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Medical Oncology, BR Ambedkar Rotary Cancer Hospital, New Delhi (India); Seth, Amlesh [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Urology, New Delhi (India)

    2017-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a novel theranostic agent, {sup 177}Lu-DKFZ-PSMA-617 therapy in metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Thirty-one mCRPC patients with progressive disease despite second-line hormonal therapy and/or docetaxel chemotherapy were recruited for the study. All patients underwent diagnostic{sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CCPET/CT, prior to inclusion for therapy. Included patients then underwent quarterly {sup 177}Lu-DKFZ-PSMA-617 therapy. Hematological, kidney function, liver function tests, and serum PSA levels were recorded before and after therapy at 2 weeks, 4 weeks, and 3 month intervals. Biochemical response was assessed with trend in serum PSA levels. Metabolic response was assessed by PERCIST 1 criteria. Clinical response was assessed by visual analogue score (VASmax) analgesic score (AS), Karanofsky performance status (KPS), and toxicity and response criteria of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) criteria. The mean age of patients was 65.93 ± 9.77 years (range: 38-81 years). The mean activity administered in the 31 patients was 5069 ± 1845 MBq ranging from one to four cycles. There was a decline in the mean serum PSA levels from the baseline (baseline: 275 ng/mL, post 1st cycle therapy: 141.75 ng/mL). Based on biochemical response criteria 2/31, 20/31, 3/31, and 6/31 had complete response (CR), partial response(PR), stable disease (SD), and progressive disease (PD), respectively. Metabolic response revealed 2/6 patients with CR, and the remaining 3/6 patients with PR and 1/6 patients with SD. The mean VASmax score decreased from 7.5 to 3. The mean analgesic score decreased from 2.5 to 1.8 after therapy. The mean KPS score improved from 50.32 to 65.42 after therapies. The mean ECOG performance status improved from 2.54 to 1.78 after therapy. Two patients experienced grade I and grade II hemoglobin toxicity each. None of the patients experienced nephrotoxicity or hepatotoxicity

  4. Phase III, randomized, double-blind, multicenter trial comparing orteronel (TAK-700) plus prednisone with placebo plus prednisone in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer that has progressed during or after docetaxel-based therapy: ELM-PC 5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Fizazi (Karim); R. Jones (Robert); S. Oudard (Stéphane); E. Efstathiou (Eleni); F. Saad (Fred); R. de Wit (Ronald); J.S. de Bono (Johann); F.M. Cruz (Felipe Melo); G. Fountzilas (George); A. Ulys (Albertas); F. Carcano (Flavio); N. Agarwal (Neeraj); D. Agus (David); J. Bellmunt (Joaquim); D.P. Petrylak (Daniel P); S.-Y. Lee (Shih-Yuan); I.J. Webb (Iain J.); B. Tejura (Bindu); N. Borgstein (Niels); R. Dreicer (Robert)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Orteronel (TAK-700) is an investigational, nonsteroidal, reversible, selective 17,20-lyase inhibitor. This study examined orteronel in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer that progressed after docetaxel therapy. Patients and Methods: In our study, 1,099

  5. Does the Androgen Receptor (AR)-Regulated Map Kinase Phosphatase 1 (MKP-1) Enhance Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Survival under Therapeutic Stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    modulators. Identification of a mediator of resistance across therapy classes is a critically unmet need and would be a significant innovation in...prostate cancer (mCRPC) is clinically treated with both taxane chemotherapy and androgen pathway modulators. Identification of a mediator of resistance

  6. Research progress on the molecular signaling pathway of castration-resistant prostate cancer%去势抵抗性前列腺癌分子信号通路的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张秀娜; 赵伟; 高晓芳; 杨勇; 季晖

    2015-01-01

    在美国前列腺癌( PCa)是男性最常见的非皮肤性癌症以及癌症相关死亡的第二号杀手。雄激素与雄激素受体是前列腺癌的关键效应器,因此,雄激素剥夺治疗( ADT)是前列腺癌患者的一线治疗方法,并且效果良好,但是前列腺肿瘤最终复发并进展为去势抵抗性前列腺癌( CRPC)这一致命性形式。研究雄激素受体与去势抵抗性前列腺癌发生发展的关系及其可能的分子机制,可以为其临床诊断、治疗以及进一步的研究提供科学依据。%In United States,prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed non-cutaneous cancer in males and the second leading cause of cancer-related death for men. Androgen and the androgen receptor( AR)are critical effectors of prostate cancer. Consequently,androgen deprivation therapy( ADT)is typically employed as a first-line treatment for pros-tate cancer patients. While initial responses are generally positive,prostate tumors frequently recur and progress to a lethal form known as castration-resistant prostate cancer( CRPC). To study the relationship between androgen receptor and the initiation and development of CRPC,along with the possible molecular mechanisms,helps to diagnosis and treatment of cas-tration-resistant prostate cancer( CRPC),and provide the basis for further research.

  7. Compensatory upregulation of tyrosine kinase Etk/BMX in response to androgen deprivation promotes castration-resistant growth of prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Bojie; Chen, Hege; Guo, Shengjie; Yang, Xi; Linn, Douglas E; Sun, Feng; Li, Wei; Guo, Zhiyong; Xu, Kexin; Kim, Oekyung; Kong, Xiangtian; Melamed, Jonathan; Qiu, Shaopeng; Chen, Hegang; Qiu, Yun

    2010-07-01

    We previously showed that targeted expression of non-receptor tyrosine kinase Etk/BMX in mouse prostate induces prostate intraepithelial neoplasia, implying a possible causal role of Etk in prostate cancer development and progression. Here, we report that Etk is upregulated in both human and mouse prostates in response to androgen ablation. Etk expression seems to be differentially regulated by androgen and interleukin 6 (IL-6), which is possibly mediated by the androgen receptor (AR) in prostate cancer cells. Our immunohistochemical analysis of tissue microarrays containing 112 human prostate tumor samples revealed that Etk expression is elevated in hormone-resistant prostate cancer and positively correlated with tyrosine phosphorylation of AR (Pearson correlation coefficient rho = 0.71, P < 0.0001). AR tyrosine phosphorylation is increased in Etk-overexpressing cells, suggesting that Etk may be another tyrosine kinase, in addition to Src and Ack-1, which can phosphorylate AR. We also showed that Etk can directly interact with AR through its Src homology 2 domain, and such interaction may prevent the association of AR with Mdm2, leading to stabilization of AR under androgen-depleted conditions. Overexpression of Etk in androgen-sensitive LNCaP cells promotes tumor growth while knocking down Etk expression in hormone-insensitive prostate cancer cells by a specific shRNA that inhibits tumor growth under androgen-depleted conditions. Taken together, our data suggest that Etk may be a component of the adaptive compensatory mechanism activated by androgen ablation in prostate and may play a role in hormone resistance, at least in part, through direct modulation of the AR signaling pathway.

  8. Efficacy and safety of second-line agents for treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer progressing after docetaxel. A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianpaolo Perletti

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We performed a systematic review of the literature to assess the efficacy and the safety of second-line agents targeting metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC that has progressed after docetaxel. Pooled-analysis was also performed, to assess the effectiveness of agents targeting the androgen axis via identical mechanisms of action (abiraterone acetate, orteronel. Materials and Methods: We included phase III randomized controlled trials that enrolled patients with mCRPC progressing during or after first-line docetaxel treatment. Trials were identified by electronic database searching. The primary outcome of the review was overall survival. Secondary outcomes were radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS and severe adverse effects (grade 3 or higher. Results: Ten articles met the inclusion criteria for the review. These articles reported the results of five clinical trials, enrolling in total 5047 patients. The experimental interventions tested in these studies were enzalutamide, ipilimumab, abiraterone acetate, orteronel and cabazitaxel. Compared to control cohorts (active drug-treated or placebotreated, the significant overall survival advantages achieved were 4.8 months for enzalutamide (hazard ratio for death vs. placebo: 0.63; 95% CI 0.53 to 0.75, P < 0.0001, 4.6 months for abiraterone (hazard ratio for death vs. placebo: 0.66, 95% CI 0.58 to 0.75, P < 0.0001 and 2.4 months for cabazitaxel (hazard ratio for death vs. mitoxantrone-prednisone: 0.70, 95% CI 0.59 to 0.83, p < 0.0001. Pooled analysis of androgen synthesis inhibitors orteronel and abiraterone resulted in significantly increased overall and progression-free survival for anti-androgen agents, compared to placebo (hazard ratio for death: 0.76, 95% CI 0.67 to 0.87, P < 0.0001; hazard ratio for radiographic progression: 0.7, 95% CI 0.63 to 0.77, P < 0.00001. Androgen synthesis inhibitors induced significant increases in risk ratios for adverse effects

  9. Incidence and relative risk of adverse events of special interest in patients with castration resistant prostate cancer treated with CYP-17 inhibitors: A meta-analysis of published trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roviello, Giandomenico; Sigala, Sandra; Danesi, Romano; Re, Marzia Del; Bonetta, Alberto; Cappelletti, Maria Rosa; Zanotti, Laura; Bottini, Alberto; Generali, Daniele

    2016-05-01

    Abiraterone acetate and orteronel are two CYP-17 inhibitors that have been studied in prostate cancer. They have shown relevant toxicities, including fluid retention/oedema, hypokalaemia, hypertension, liver function test abnormalities and cardiac events. The goal of this study was to determine the risk of special adverse events related to CYP- 17 inhibitor in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRCP). Summary data from four randomized phase III trials comparing CYP-17 inhibitors and prednisone versus placebo and prednisone in metastatic CRCP patients were meta-analysed. Pooled risk ratios (RRs) for the risk of all-grade and grade 3-4 adverse events of special interest were calculated. Data from 4916 patients (2849 in the AA experimental arm; 2067 in the control arm) were analysed. The incidence of grade 3-4 adverse events was never more than 10% of the patients. However, compared with placebo, the CYP-17 inhibitor significantly increased the all-grade events of hypertension (RR=1.53; 95% CI=1.3-1.8; pevents, hypokalaemia (RR=4.23; 95% CI=1.28-13.99; p=0.02) and cardiac disorders (RR=1.55; 95% CI=1.18-2.05; p=0.002). A lot of adverse events such as hypertension, hypokalaemia, cardiac disorders and liver function test abnormalities are increased during CYP-17 inhibitor based therapy. Strict monitoring of these side effects should be considered during CYP- 17 inhibitor therapy in prostate cancer patients.

  10. Emerging Molecularly Targeted Therapies in Castration Refractory Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesal C. Patel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT with medical or surgical castration is the mainstay of therapy in men with metastatic prostate cancer. However, despite initial responses, almost all men eventually develop castration refractory metastatic prostate cancer (CRPC and die of their disease. Over the last decade, it has been recognized that despite the failure of ADT, most prostate cancers maintain some dependence on androgen and/or androgen receptor (AR signaling for proliferation. Furthermore, androgen independent molecular pathways have been identified as drivers of continued progression of CRPC. Subsequently, drugs have been developed targeting these pathways, many of which have received regulatory approval. Agents such as abiraterone, enzalutamide, orteronel (TAK-700, and ARN-509 target androgen signaling. Sipuleucel-T, ipilimumab, and tasquinimod augment immune-mediated tumor killing. Agents targeting classic tumorogenesis pathways including vascular endothelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor, insulin like growth factor-1, tumor suppressor, and those which regulate apoptosis and cell cycles are currently being developed. This paper aims to focus on emerging molecular pathways underlying progression of CRPC, and the drugs targeting these pathways, which have recently been approved or have reached advanced stages of development in either phase II or phase III clinical trials.

  11. Co-targeting hexokinase 2-mediated Warburg effect and ULK1-dependent autophagy suppresses tumor growth of PTEN- and TP53-deficiency-driven castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Currently, no therapeutic options exist for castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC patients who have developed resistance to the second generation anti-androgen receptor (AR axis therapy. Here we report that co-deletion of Pten and p53 in murine prostate epithelium, often observed in human CRPC, leads to AR-independent CRPC and thus confers de novo resistance to second generation androgen deprivation therapy (ADT in multiple independent yet complementary preclinical mouse models. In contrast, mechanism-driven co-targeting hexokinase 2 (HK2-mediated Warburg effect with 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG and ULK1-dependent autophagy with chloroquine (CQ selectively kills cancer cells through intrinsic apoptosis to cause tumor regression in xenograft, leads to a near-complete tumor suppression and remarkably extends survival in Pten−/p53-deficiency-driven CRPC mouse model. Mechanistically, 2-DG causes AMPK phosphorylation, which in turn inhibits mTORC1-S6K1 translation signaling to preferentially block anti-apoptotic protein MCL-l synthesis to prime mitochondria-dependent apoptosis while simultaneously activates ULK1-driven autophagy for cell survival to counteract the apoptotic action of anti-Warburg effect. Accordingly, inhibition of autophagy with CQ sensitizes cancer cells to apoptosis upon 2-DG challenge. Given that 2-DG is recommended for phase II clinical trials for prostate cancer and CQ has been clinically used as an anti-malaria drug for many decades, the preclinical results from our proof-of-principle studies in vivo are imminently translatable to clinical trials to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy by the combination modality for a subset of currently incurable CRPC harboring PTEN and TP53 mutations.

  12. The HGF/c-MET Axis as a Critical Driver of Resistance to Androgen Suppression in Metastatic Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    aspirates from 5 patients. We have obtained 6 blood samples for CTC analyses from 4 patients on abiraterone and 3 blood samples from 2 patients on...bone marrow aspirates has been slower than anticipated. We have addressed this in a number of ways, including pre- screening clinics for eligible...a graphene oxide based microfluidic device (GO Chip) to prostate cancer circulating tumor cell capture and analysis, AACR, 2015. *Patnaik, A

  13. Targeting LSD1 Epigenetic Signature in Castration-Recurrent Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0276 TITLE: Targeting LSD1 Epigenetic Signature in Castration...report 3. DATES COVERED 30 Sep 2013 - 29 Sep 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Targeting LSD1 Epigenetic Signature in Castration-Recurrent Prostate

  14. Small molecule screening reveals a transcription-independent pro-survival function of androgen receptor in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narizhneva, Natalia V; Tararova, Natalia D; Ryabokon, Petro; Shyshynova, Inna; Prokvolit, Anatoly; Komarov, Pavel G; Purmal, Andrei A; Gudkov, Andrei V; Gurova, Katerina V

    2009-12-15

    In prostate cancer (PCa) patients, initial responsiveness to androgen deprivation therapy is frequently followed by relapse due to development of treatment-resistant androgen-independent PCa. This is typically associated with acquisition of mutations in AR that allow activity as a transcription factor in the absence of ligand, indicating that androgen-independent PCa remains dependent on AR function. Our strategy to effectively target AR in androgen-independent PCa involved using a cell-based readout to isolate small molecules that inhibit AR transactivation function through mechanisms other than modulation of ligand binding. A number of the identified inhibitors were toxic to AR-expressing PCa cells regardless of their androgen dependence. Among these, some only suppressed PCa cell growth (ARTIS), while others induced cell death (ARTIK). ARTIK, but not ARTIS, compounds caused disappearance of AR protein from treated cells. siRNA against AR behaved like ARTIK compounds, while a dominant negative AR mutant that prevents AR-mediated transactivation but does not eliminate the protein showed only a growth suppressive effect. These observations reveal a transcription-independent function of AR that is essential for PCa cell viability and, therefore, is an ideal target for anti-PCa treatment. Indeed, several of the identified AR inhibitors demonstrated in vivo efficacy in mouse models of PCa and are candidates for pharmacologic optimization.

  15. The Effect of Prior Androgen Synthesis Inhibition on Outcomes of Subsequent Therapy with Docetaxel in Patients with Metastatic Castrate Resistant Prostate Cancer: Results from a Retrospective Analysis of a Randomized Phase 3 Clinical Trial (CALGB 90401) (Alliance)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Rahul; Halabi, Susan; Kelly, William Kevin; George, Daniel; Mahoney, John F.; Millard, Frederick; Stadler, Walter M.; Morris, Michael J.; Kantoff, Philip; Monk, J. Paul; Carducci, Michael; Small, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Preliminary data suggests a potential decreased benefit of docetaxel in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients previously treated with abiraterone acetate, a novel androgen synthesis inhibitor (ASI). CALGB 90401 (Alliance), a phase 3 trial of mCRPC patients treated with docetaxel-based chemotherapy, offered the opportunity to evaluate effect of prior ketoconazole, an earlier generation ASI, on clinical outcomes following docetaxel. Methods CALGB 90401 randomized 1050 men with chemotherapy-naïve, mCRPC to treatment with docetaxel and prednisone with either bevacizumab or placebo. 1005 men (96%) had data available regarding prior ketoconazole therapy. The effect of prior ketoconazole on overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), PSA decline, and objective response rate (ORR) observed was assessed using proportional hazards and Poisson regression method adjusted for validated prognostic factors and treatment arm. Results Baseline characteristics between patients with (N=277) and without (N=728) prior ketoconazole therapy were similar. There were no statistically significant differences between patients with and without prior ketoconazole therapy with respect to OS (median OS 21.1 vs. 22.3 months, stratified log-rank p-value=0.635); PFS (median PFS 8.1 vs. 8.6 months, stratified log-rank p-value=0.342); ≥50% PSA decline (61% vs. 66%, relative risk=1.09, adjusted p-value=0.129); or ORR (39% vs. 43%, relative risk=1.11, adjusted p-value=0.366). Conclusions As measured by OS, PFS, PSA and ORR, there is no evidence that prior treatment with ketoconazole impacts clinical outcomes in mCRPC patients treated with subsequent docetaxel-based therapy. Prospective studies are needed to assess for potential cross-resistance with novel ASIs and to define the optimal sequence of therapy in mCRPC. PMID:23913744

  16. Impact of Bone-targeted Therapies in Chemotherapy-naïve Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer Patients Treated with Abiraterone Acetate: Post Hoc Analysis of Study COU-AA-302

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Fred; Shore, Neal; Van Poppel, Hendrik; Rathkopf, Dana E.; Smith, Matthew R.; de Bono, Johann S.; Logothetis, Christopher J.; de Souza, Paul; Fizazi, Karim; Mulders, Peter F.A.; Mainwaring, Paul; Hainsworth, John D.; Beer, Tomasz M.; North, Scott; Fradet, Yves; Griffin, Thomas A.; De Porre, Peter; Londhe, Anil; Kheoh, Thian; Small, Eric J.; Scher, Howard I.; Molina, Arturo; Ryan, Charles J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) often involves bone, and bone-targeted therapy (BTT) has become part of the overall treatment strategy. Objective Investigation of outcomes for concomitant BTT in a post hoc analysis of the COU-AA-302 trial, which demonstrated an overall clinical benefit of abiraterone acetate (AA) plus prednisone over placebo plus prednisone in asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic chemotherapy-naïve mCRPC patients. Design, setting, and participants This report describes the third interim analysis (prespecified at 55% overall survival [OS] events) for the COU-AA-302 trial. Intervention Patients were grouped by concomitant BTT use or no BTT use. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis Radiographic progression-free survival and OS were coprimary end points. This report describes the third interim analysis (prespecified at 55% OS events) and involves patients treated with or without concomitant BTT during the COU-AA-302 study. Median follow-up for OS was 27.1 mo. Median time-to-event variables with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs), 95% CIs, and p values for concomitant BTT versus no BTT were obtained via Cox models. Results and limitations While the post hoc nature of the analysis is a limitation, superiority of AA and prednisone versus prednisone alone was demonstrated for clinical outcomes with or without BTT use. Compared with no BTT use, concomitant BTT significantly improved OS (HR 0.75; p = 0.01) and increased the time to ECOG deterioration (HR 0.75; p < 0.001) and time to opiate use for cancer-related pain (HR 0.80; p = 0.036). The safety profile of concomitant BTT with AA was similar to that reported for AA in the overall intent-to-treat population. Osteonecrosis of the jaw (all grade 1/2) with concomitant BTT use was reported in <3% of patients. Conclusions AA with concomitant BTT was safe and well tolerated in men with chemotherapy

  17. Canine prostate carcinoma: epidemiological evidence of an increased risk in castrated dogs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teske, E.; Naan, E.C.; Dijk, E.M. van; Garderen, E. van; Schalken, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    The present retrospective study investigated the frequency of prostate carcinoma (PCA) among prostate abnormalities in dogs and determined whether castration influences the incidence of PCA in dogs. During the years 1993-1998, 15363 male dogs were admitted to the Utrecht University Clinic of Compani

  18. A phase I study of combined docetaxel and repeated high activity {sup 186}Re-HEDP in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) metastatic to bone (the TAXIUM trial)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodewaard-de Jong, Joyce M. van; Bloemendal, Haiko J. [Meander Medical Centre, Department of Internal Medicine, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Klerk, John M.H. de; Haas, Marie J. de [Meander Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Bezooijen, Bart P.J. van [Meander Medical Centre, Department of Urology, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Wilson, Richard H.; O' Sullivan, Joe M. [Queen' s University Belfast, Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Belfast, N. Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    Bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals have palliative benefit in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) metastatic to bone. Recent studies have shown improvement of survival and quality of life when radiopharmaceuticals were given repeatedly or in combination with chemotherapy. We designed a phase I study combining docetaxel and {sup 186}Re-labelled hydroxyethylidene diphosphonate (HEDP) in men with CRPC and bone metastases to evaluate toxicity. A dose escalation schedule was designed consisting of four dose levels with a standard dosage of docetaxel (75 mg/m{sup 2} 3-weekly). {sup 186}Re-HEDP was given in increasing activities (1,250 MBq up to 2,500 MBq) after the third and sixth cycle of docetaxel. Dose limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as any grade 4 toxicity lasting more than 7 days or any grade 3 toxicity that did not recover within 10 days. Three patients were planned for each dose level expanding to six if a DLT occurred. Fourteen patients were recruited with a median age of 64.6 years. One DLT, grade 3 thrombocytopenia lasting >10 days, occurred at dose level 3 leading to expansion of this group to six. One of these patients had an episode of acute renal failure which resolved. Because of production problems of {sup 186}Re-HEDP dose level 4 was not started. Combined therapy with docetaxel and {sup 186}Re-HEDP is generally well tolerated in patients with CRPC metastatic to bone. We will conduct a randomized phase II study using three cycles of docetaxel 75 mg/m{sup 2} 3-weekly followed by {sup 188}Re-HEDP 40 MBq/kg body weight, followed by another three cycles of docetaxel 75 mg/m{sup 2}, followed by {sup 188}Re-HEDP 20 MBq/kg body weight. (orig.)

  19. Castration induces up-regulation of intratumoral androgen biosynthesis and androgen receptor expression in an orthotopic VCaP human prostate cancer xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuuttila, Matias; Yatkin, Emrah; Kallio, Jenny; Savolainen, Saija; Laajala, Teemu D; Aittokallio, Tero; Oksala, Riikka; Häkkinen, Merja; Keski-Rahkonen, Pekka; Auriola, Seppo; Poutanen, Matti; Mäkelä, Sari

    2014-08-01

    Androgens are key factors involved in the development and progression of prostate cancer (PCa), and PCa growth can be suppressed by androgen deprivation therapy. In a considerable proportion of men receiving androgen deprivation therapy, however, PCa progresses to castration-resistant PCa (CRPC), making the development of efficient therapies challenging. We used an orthotopic VCaP human PCa xenograft model to study cellular and molecular changes in tumors after androgen deprivation therapy (castration). Tumor growth was monitored through weekly serum prostate-specific antigen measurements, and mice with recurrent tumors after castration were randomized to treatment groups. Serum prostate-specific antigen concentrations showed significant correlation with tumor volume. Castration-resistant tumors retained concentrations of intratumoral androgen (androstenedione, testosterone, and 5α-dihydrotestosterone) at levels similar to tumors growing in intact hosts. Accordingly, castration induced up-regulation of enzymes involved in androgen synthesis (CYP17A1, AKR1C3, and HSD17B6), as well as expression of full-length androgen receptor (AR) and AR splice variants (AR-V1 and AR-V7). Furthermore, AR target gene expression was maintained in castration-resistant xenografts. The AR antagonists enzalutamide (MDV3100) and ARN-509 suppressed PSA production of castration-resistant tumors, confirming the androgen dependency of these tumors. Taken together, the findings demonstrate that our VCaP xenograft model exhibits the key characteristics of clinical CRPC and thus provides a valuable tool for identifying druggable targets and for testing therapeutic strategies targeting AR signaling in CRPC.

  20. Predictors of Chemotherapy-Induced Toxicity and Treatment Outcomes in Elderly Versus Younger Patients With Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Per; Svane, Inge Marie; Lindberg, Henriette;

    2016-01-01

    records from 421 consecutive patients treated with first-line docetaxel (75 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks) and low-dose prednisolone from 2007 to 2013 at Herlev University Hospital were reviewed. Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0, and the Prostate Cancer Working Group 2 guidelines were...

  1. The activity of SN33638, an inhibitor of AKR1C3, on testosterone and 17β-estradiol production and function in castration-resistant prostate cancer and ER-positive breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yarong Diana eYin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available AKR1C3 is a novel therapeutic target in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC and ER-positive breast cancer because of its ability to produce testosterone and 17β-estradiol intratumorally, thus promoting nuclear receptor signaling and tumor progression. A panel of CRPC, ER-positive breast cancer and high/low AKR1C3-expressing cell lines were treated with SN33638, a selective inhibitor of AKR1C3, in the presence of hormone or prostaglandin precursors, prior to evaluation of cell proliferation and levels of 11β-prostaglandin F2α (11β-PGF2α, testosterone, 17β-estradiol and prostate-specific antigen (PSA. A meta-analysis of AKR1C3 mRNA expression in patient samples was also conducted, which revealed that AKR1C3 mRNA was upregulated in CRPC, but downregulated in ER-positive breast cancer. 11β-PGF2α and testosterone levels in the cell line panel correlated with AKR1C3 protein expression. SN33638 prevented 11β-PGF2α formation in cell lines that expressed AKR1C3, but partially inhibited testosterone formation and subsequently cell proliferation and/or PSA expression only in high (LAPC4 AKR1C3-overexpressing cells or moderate (22RV1 AKR1C3-expressing cell lines. SN33638 had little effect on 17β-estradiol production or estrone-stimulated cell proliferation in ER-positive breast cancer cell lines. Although SN33638 could prevent 11β-PGF2α formation, its ability to prevent testosterone and 17β-estradiol production and their roles in CRPC and ER-positive breast cancer progression was limited due to AKR1C3-independent steroid hormone production, except in LAPC4 AKR1C3 cells where the majority of testosterone was AKR1C3-dependent. These results suggest that inhibition of AKR1C3 is unlikely to produce therapeutic benefit in CRPC and ER-positive breast cancer patients, except possibly in the small subpopulation of CRPC patients with tumors that have upregulated AKR1C3 expression and are dependent on AKR1C3 to produce the testosterone required

  2. Efficacy and safety of enzalutamide in patients 75 years or older with chemotherapy-naive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graff, J N; Baciarello, G; Armstrong, A J;

    2016-01-01

    for an overall higher incidence of falls among elderly patients than younger patients [84/609 (13.8%) versus 62/1106 (5.6%)] and among elderly patients receiving enzalutamide than those receiving placebo [61/317 (19.2%) versus 23/292 (7.9%)]. CONCLUSIONS: Elderly men benefited from treatment with enzalutamide...... in terms of OS and rPFS. Enzalutamide was well tolerated in the elderly subgroup and those aged falls. CLINICAL TRIAL IDENTIFIER: NCT01212991, ClinicalTrials.gov.......BACKGROUND: Prostate cancer disproportionately affects older men. Because age affects treatment decisions, it is important to understand the efficacy and tolerability of therapies for advanced prostate cancer in elderly men. This analysis describes efficacy and safety outcomes in men aged ≥75 years...

  3. Correlation between frequencies of blood monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells, regulatory T cells and negative prognostic markers in patients with castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Idorn, Manja; Køllgaard, Tania; Kongsted, Per

    2014-01-01

    and function of immune suppressive cell subsets in the peripheral blood of 41 patients with prostate cancer (PC) and 36 healthy donors (HD) showed a significant increase in circulating CD14(+) HLA-DR(low/neg) monocytic MDSC (M-MDSC) and Tregs in patients with PC compared to HD. Furthermore, M-MDSC frequencies...... and other cell types may suggest ways to tackle their induction and/or function to improve immunological tumor control....

  4. A comparison of androgen deprivation therapy versus surgical castration for patients with advanced prostatic carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-hsiang LIN; Chien-lun CHEN; Chen-pang HOU; Phei-lang CHANG; Ke-hung TSUI

    2011-01-01

    Airn:To examine the outcomes of patients with advanced prostate carcinoma who underwent medical or surgical castration.Methods:A hundred twenty one consecutive cases of patients with advanced prostate carcinoma who underwent medicaI or surgical castration between 2001 and 2006 were retrospectively reviewed.Associations between clinicaI outcomes and prognostic scoring factors were determined based on the Reijke study.In the surgical and medical castration groups.the impact on the prostate-specific antigen(PSA)normalization rate,the rebound rate and the disease-free survivaI rate were evaluated.The mean foIlow-up was 36.1months.Results:In the initial 12 months.there were no statisticaI differences in the PSA normalization rate and the PSA rebound rate between the two groups.However,the PSA rebound rate after the 12th month(20.90%vs 40.74%.P=-0.0175)and the 18th month PSA normalization rate(59.70%vs 37.04%.P=0.0217)differed significantly between the two groups,and these differences were maintained to the end of the study.When comparing patients grouped according to Reijke prognosis scores.there was no difference between medical and surgical castration for the good prognosis group.However, among the patients given a poor prognosis,surgical castration was superior in terms of the PSA normalization rate,the PSA rebound rate.the tumor progression-free survival rate(P<0.001)and the overalI survivaI rate (P<0.001).Conclusion:Advanced prostate carcinoma patients with poor pretreatment prognosis scores should undergo surgical castration rather than medical castration for better PSA rebound rates and overaII survival.

  5. Matrine inhibits the proliferation, invasion and migration of castration-resistant prostate cancer cells through regulation of the NF-κB signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Lai, Yiming; Wang, Chengbin; Xu, Guibin; He, Zheng; Shang, Xiaohong; Sun, Yi; Zhang, Fan; Liu, Leyuan; Huang, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Matrine is a naturally occurring alkaloid extracted from the Chinese herb Sophora flavescens. It has been demonstrated to exhibit antiproliferative properties, promote apoptosis and inhibit cell invasion in a number of cancer cell lines. It has also been shown to improve the efficacy of chemotherapy when it is combined with other chemotherapy drugs. However, the therapeutic efficacy of matrine for prostate cancer remains poorly understood. In the present study, we showed that matrine inhibited the proliferation, migration and invasion of both DU145 and PC-3 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. It also reduced the cell population at S phase and increased the cell population at sub-G1 phase. The increases in both the apoptotic cell population and cell population at S and sub-G1 phases consistently indicated a pro-apoptotic effect of matrine. Decreases in levels of P65, p-P65, IKKα/β, p-IKKα/β, IKBα and p-IKBα as detected by immunoblot analysis in the matrine-treated DU145 and PC-3 cells suggested an involvement of the NF-κB signaling pathway. Therefore, it is a novel promising addition to the current arsenal of chemotherapy drugs for the treatment of androgen-independent prostate cancer.

  6. Advances in understanding the mechanisms of anti-androgen ther-apeutic action and failure in castration-resistant prostate cancer%抗雄激素药物治疗去势抵抗型前列腺癌的机制研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王前奔; 吴大勇

    2015-01-01

    Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is the lethal form of prostate cancer with developed resistance to androgen deprivation therapy. However, anti-androgen therapy remains an important treatment option because androgen receptor activation is a major driver of the advanced phase of CRPC. Drug resistance is frequently manifested despite the development of various novel anti-an-drogens with significant clinical efficacy. This review introduces several drugs prevalently used to treat CRPC. The mechanisms of ac-tion and pathways to resistance of these drugs are also discussed.%去势抵抗型前列腺癌(castration-resistant prostate cancer,CRPC)是指经内分泌治疗产生耐药并继续发展的致命性前列腺癌,雄激素受体(androgen receptor,AR)激活途径仍是这一阶段前列腺癌发展的驱动机制,因此抗雄激素治疗仍然是重要的治疗手段之一。虽然许多新型抗雄激素治疗药物在临床治疗中显示了显著的疗效,但同时耐药也频繁出现。本文就近年来几种主要抗雄激素治疗药物的作用及相应的耐药机制进行综述。

  7. Maximal androgen blockade versus castration alone in patients with metastatic prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abeer A.Mahmoud; Eman A.El-Sharawy; Mohamed M.El-Bassiouny; Ramy R.Ghali

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Maximum androgen blockade (MAB), consisting of an antiandrogen plus either a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist (LHRHA) or orchiectomy, is a standard care for patients with prostate cancer. Although, clinical trial results have been equivocal, none has shown a significant advantage in favor of MAB over castration alone in metastatic prostate cancer and MAB has been the subject of considerable controversy. The aim of this study was to compare MAB (orchiectomy or LHRHA “Goserelin”) and anti-androgen “Bicalutamide” with castration alone (orchiectomy or LHRHA) in previ-ously untreated metastatic prostate cancer patients.Methods: Hundred eligible patients with adequate performance status and adequate hematologic, hepatic and renal functions were included. MAB arm, fifty patients underwent castration either surgicaly by orchiectomy or medicaly by receiving Goserelin (3.6 mg) depot, which was injected subcutaneously every 28 days plus bicalutamide 50 mg once daily. Castration alone arm, fifty patients underwent castration alone either surgicaly by orchiectomy or medicaly by receiving Goserelin (3.6 mg) depot.Results: During the period from January 2011 to January 2013, with a median folow up of 18 months (range 6 to 24 months), there were eight deaths (16%), in MAB arm and ten deaths (20%) in castration alone arm. At three months, there were 35 patients (70%) with prostate specific antigen (PSA) normalization (≤ 4 mg/dL) in MAB arm versus 17 patients (34%) with PSA normalization in castration alone arm (P = 0.001). The median progression free survival (PFS) times were 22.18 months (95% CI, 19.7 to 24.2 months) for MAB arm versus 22 months in castration alone arm (95% CI, 18 to 25.9 months;P = 0.045). The survival rates for MAB arm were 82% at 18 months and 70.6% at 24 months versus 78.7% at 18 months and 75.1% at 24 months in castration alone arm (P > 0.05). The median overal survival (OS) was not reached in either arm. Both hematological

  8. Plumbagin Inhibits Prostate Carcinogenesis in Intact and Castrated PTEN Knockout Mice via Targeting PKCε, Stat3, and Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafeez, Bilal Bin; Fischer, Joseph W; Singh, Ashok; Zhong, Weixiong; Mustafa, Ala; Meske, Louise; Sheikhani, Mohammad Ozair; Verma, Ajit Kumar

    2015-05-01

    Prostate cancer continues to remain the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in American males. The Pten deletions and/or mutations are frequently observed in both primary prostate cancers and metastatic prostate tissue samples. Pten deletion in prostate epithelium in mice results in prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), followed by progression to invasive adenocarcinoma. The Pten conditional knockout mice [(Pten-loxp/loxp:PB-Cre4(+)) (Pten-KO)] provide a unique preclinical model to evaluate agents for efficacy for both the prevention and treatment of prostate cancer. We present here for the first time that dietary plumbagin, a medicinal plant-derived naphthoquinone (200 or 500 ppm) inhibits tumor development in intact as well as castrated Pten-KO mice. Plumbagin has shown no signs of toxicity at either of these doses. Plumbagin treatment resulted in a decrease expression of PKCε, AKT, Stat3, and COX2 compared with the control mice. Plumbagin treatment also inhibited the expression of vimentin and slug, the markers of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in prostate tumors. In summary, the results indicate that dietary plumbagin inhibits growth of both primary and castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) in Pten-KO mice, possibly via inhibition of PKCε, Stat3, AKT, and EMT markers (vimentin and slug), which are linked to the induction and progression of prostate cancer.

  9. Evaluation of Alpha-Therapy with Radium-223-Dichloride in Castration Resistant Metastatic Prostate Cancer—the Role of Gamma Scintigraphy in Dosimetry and Pharmacokinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalevi Kairemo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Radium-223-dichloride (223RaCl2 is a new bone-seeking calcium analogue alpha-emitter, which has obtained marketing authorization for the treatment skeletal metastases of hormone-refractory prostate cancer. The current treatment regimen is based on six consecutive doses of 223RaCl2 at 4 week intervals and the administered activity dose, 50 kBq/kg per cycle is based on patient weight. We analyzed two patients using quantitative serial gamma imaging to estimate dosimetry in tumors and see possible pharmacokinetic differences in the treatment cycles. The lesions were rather well visualized in gamma scintigraphy in spite of low gamma activity (<1.1% gamma radiation at 0, 7 and 28 days using 30–60 min acquisition times. Both our patients analyzed in serial gamma imagings, had two lesions in the gamma imaging field, the mean counts of the relative intensity varied from 27.8 to 36.5 (patient 1, and from 37.4 to 82.2 (patient 2. The half-lives varied from 1.8 days to 4.5 days during the six cycles (patient 1, and from 1.5 days to 3.6 days (patient 2, respectively. In the lesion half-lives calculated from the imaging the maximum difference between the treatment cycles in the same lesion was 2.0-fold (1.8 vs. 3.6. Of these patients, patient 1 demonstrated a serum PSA response, whereas there was no PSA response in patient 2. From our data, there were maximally up to 4.0-fold differences (62.1 vs. 246.6 between the relative absorbed radiation doses between patients as calculated from the quantitative standardized imaging to be delivered in only two lesions, and in the same lesion the maximum difference in the cycles was up to 2.3-fold (107.4 vs. 246.6. Our recommendation based on statistical simulation analysis, is serial measurement at days 0–8 at least 3 times, this improve the accuracy significantly to study the lesion activities, half-lives or calculated relative absorbed radiation doses as calculated from the imaging. Both our patients had

  10. Combined immunotherapy with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-transduced allogeneic prostate cancer cells and ipilimumab in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: a phase 1 dose-escalation trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eertwegh, A.J. van den; Versluis, J.; Berg, H.P. van den; Santegoets, S.J.; Moorselaar, R.J. van; Sluis, T.M. van der; Gall, H.E.; Harding, T.C.; Jooss, K.; Lowy, I.; Pinedo, H.M.; Scheper, R.J.; Stam, A.G.; Blomberg, B.M. von; Gruijl, T.D. de; Hege, K.; Sacks, N.; Gerritsen, W.R.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-transduced allogeneic prostate cancer cells vaccine (GVAX) has antitumour activity against prostate cancer; preclinical studies have shown potent synergy when combined with ipilimumab, an antibody that blocks cytotoxic T-lymphocyte ant

  11. Complete androgen blockade safely allows for delay of cytotoxic chemotherapy in castration refractory prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael A. Kaliks

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Complete androgen blockade (CAB does not prolong overall survival (OS in patients with castration refractory prostate cancer (CRPC. Although there is variable clinical benefit with second-line hormone manipulation, we do not know which patients might benefit the most. OBJECTIVES: To identify clinical predictors of benefit of complete androgen blockade. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We reviewed the records for 54 patients who received treatment with CAB in the setting of disease progression despite castration. We evaluated progression-free survival (PFS and OS according to PSA at diagnosis, Gleason scores, age, testosterone level, and duration of prior disease control during castration in first line treatment. RESULTS: Among 54 patients who received CAB, the median PFS was 9 months (CI 4.3-13.7 and OS was 36 months (CI 24-48. We did not find an effect of PSA at diagnosis (p = 0.32, Gleason score (p = 0.91, age (p = 0.69 or disease control during castration (p = 0.87 on PFS or OS. Thirty-four patients subsequently received chemotherapy, with a mean OS of 21 months (CI 16.4-25.5, median not reached. CONCLUSION: Age, Gleason score, PSA at diagnosis and length of disease control with castration did not affect PFS or OS. In the absence of predictors of benefit, CAB should still be considered in CRPC.

  12. Reflections on the therapeutic use of {sup 223}RaCl{sub 2} for bone metastases resulting from prostate cancer resistant to castration; Reflexiones sobre el uso terapeutico de {sup 223}RaCl{sub 2} para metastasis osea derivada de cancer de prostata resistente a la castracion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astudillo V, A. J.; Paredes G, L., E-mail: armando.astudillo@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    In January 2014 the Comision Federal para la Proteccion contra Riesgos Sanitarios of the Ministry of Health in Mexico, authorize the use of {sup 223}RaCl{sub 2} as the first radiopharmaceutical emitter α for therapeutic purposes in cases of bone metastases resulting from prostate cancer resistant to castration. The paper analyzes the main variables that affect the metrological traceability using activity meters to evaluate the gamma activity of {sup 223}RaCl{sub 2} in hospitals, because it has a chain of complex decay with alpha, beta and gamma emitters, so was important to verify if a gamma activity measurement for a multiple emitter is reliable to determine the total alpha absorbed dose to bone in a patient. (Author)

  13. The European Medicines Agency Review of Abiraterone for the Treatment of Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer in Adult Men After Docetaxel Chemotherapy and in Chemotherapy-Naïve Disease: Summary of the Scientific Assessment of the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Arantxa Sancho; Hemmings, Robert James; Jiménez, Jorge Camarero; Garcia-Carbonero, Rocio; Gallego, Isabel García; Giménez, Elena Valencia; O'Connor, Daniel; Giuliani, Rosa; Salmonson, Tomas; Pignatti, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    On September 5, 2011, abiraterone was approved in the European Union in combination with prednisone or prednisolone for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) in adult men whose disease has progressed on or after a docetaxel-based chemotherapy regimen. On December 18, 2012, the therapeutic indication was extended to include the use of abiraterone in combination with prednisone or prednisolone for the treatment of metastatic CRPC in adult men who are asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic after failure of androgen deprivation therapy in whom chemotherapy is not yet clinically indicated. Abiraterone is a selective, irreversible inhibitor of cytochrome P450 17α, an enzyme that is key in the production of androgens. Inhibition of androgen biosynthesis deprives prostate cancer cells from important signals for growth, even in cases of resistance to castration. At the time of European Union approval and in a phase III trial in CRPC patients who had failed at least one docetaxel-based chemotherapy regimen, median overall survival for patients treated with abiraterone was 14.8 months versus 10.9 months for those receiving placebo (hazard ratio, 0.65; 95% confidence interval 0.54–0.77; p < .0001). In a subsequent phase III trial in a similar but chemotherapy-naïve patient population, median radiographic progression-free survival was 16.5 months for patients in the abiraterone treatment arm versus 8.3 months for patients in the placebo arm (hazard ratio, 0.53; 95% confidence interval, 0.45–0.62; p < .0001). Abiraterone was most commonly associated with adverse reactions resulting from increased or excessive mineralocorticoid activity. These were generally manageable with basic medical interventions. The most common side effects (affecting more than 10% of patients) were urinary tract infection, hypokalemia, hypertension, and peripheral edema. PMID:23966222

  14. CURRENT POSSIBILITIES OF TREATMENT FOR VISCERAL METASTASES IN PATIENTS WITH METASTATIC CASTRATION-REFRACTORY PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Govorov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Medications increasing the survival of patients with metastatic castration-refractory prostate cancer (CRPC are lacking today. In the past 3 years, in the pharmaceutical market there have been a few novel drugs to treat progressive prostate cancer. Abiraterone acetate is an androgen synthesis inhibitor, which is also used to increase the survival of patients with metastatic CRPC that progresses after chemotherapy. The results of treatment for metastatic CRPC depend on a number of factors. Visceral metastases are poor predictors of the course of the disease. The results of abiraterone acetate treatment were analyzed in CRPC patients with visceral metastases.

  15. Longitudinal tracking of subpopulation dynamics and molecular changes during LNCaP cell castration and identification of inhibitors that could target the PSA-/lo castration-resistant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rycaj, Kiera; Cho, Eun Jeong; Liu, Xin; Chao, Hsueh-Ping; Liu, Bigang; Li, Qiuhui; Devkota, Ashwini K; Zhang, Dingxiao; Chen, Xin; Moore, John; Dalby, Kevin N; Tang, Dean G

    2016-03-22

    We have recently demonstrated that the undifferentiated PSA-/lo prostate cancer (PCa) cell population harbors self-renewing long-term tumor-propagating cells that are refractory to castration, thus representing a therapeutic target. Our goals here are, by using the same lineage-tracing reporter system, to track the dynamic changes of PSA-/lo and PSA+ cells upon castration in vitro, investigate the molecular changes accompanying persistent castration, and develop large numbers of PSA-/lo PCa cells for drug screening. To these ends, we treated LNCaP cells infected with the PSAP-GFP reporter with three regimens of castration, i.e., CDSS, CDSS plus bicalutamide, and MDV3100 continuously for up to ~21 months. We observed that in the first ~7 months, castration led to time-dependent increases in PSA-/lo cells, loss of AR and PSA expression, increased expression of cancer stem cell markers, and many other molecular changes. Meanwhile, castrated LNCaP cells became resistant to high concentrations of MDV3100, chemotherapeutic drugs, and other agents. However, targeted and medium-throughput library screening identified several kinase (e.g., IGF-1R, AKT, PI3K/mTOR, Syk, GSK3) inhibitors as well as the BCL2 inhibitor that could effectively sensitize the LNCaP-CRPC cells to killing. Of interest, LNCaP cells castrated for >7 months showed evidence of cyclic changes in AR and the mTOR/AKT signaling pathways potentially involving epigenetic mechanisms. These observations indicate that castration elicits numerous molecular changes and leads to enrichment of PSA-/lo PCa cells. The ability to generate large numbers of PSA-/lo PCa cells should allow future high-throughput screening to identify novel therapeutics that specifically target this population.

  16. Metformin inhibits castration-induced EMT in prostate cancer by repressing COX2/PGE2/STAT3 axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Dali; Liu, Qiuli; Liu, Gaolei; Xu, Jing; Lan, Weihua; Jiang, Yao; Xiao, Hualiang; Zhang, Dianzheng; Jiang, Jun

    2017-03-28

    Castration is the standard therapeutic treatment for advanced prostate cancer but with limited benefit due to the profound relapse and metastasis. Activation of inflammatory signaling pathway and initiation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) are closely related to drug resistance, tumor relapseas well as metastasis. In this study, we demonstrated that metformin is capable of inhibiting prostate cancer cell migration and invasion by repressing EMT evidenced by downregulating the mesenchymal markers N-cadherin, Vimentin, and Twist and upregulating the epithelium E-cadherin. These effects have also been observed in our animal model as well as prostate cancer patients. In addition, we showed the effects of metformin on the expression of genes involved in EMT through repressing the levels of COX2, PGE2 and phosphorylated STAT3. Furthermore, inactivating COX2 abolishes metformin's regulatory effects and exogenously administered PGE2 is capable of enhancing STAT3 phosphorylation and expression of EMT biomarker. We propose that metformin represses prostate cancer EMT and metastasis through targeting the COX2/PGE2/STAT3 axis. These findings suggest that metformin by itself or in combination with other anticancer drugs could be used as an anti-metastasis therapy.

  17. Predictive effect of androgen receptor splice variant 7 expression on time to castration resistance in patients with metastatic prostate cancer%前列腺癌组织中雄激素受体剪接变异体7表达对转移性前列腺癌患者激素敏感时间的预测作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    瞿元元; 叶定伟; 戴波; 孔蕴毅; 蔡旭; 常坤; 孙自捷; 张海梁; 朱耀

    2014-01-01

    receptor splice variant 7 (AR-V7) expression on time to castration resistance in patients with metastatic prostate cancer.Methods The data of 113 cases of advanced metastatic prostate cancer diagnosed by prostate biopsy in our institute from Jan.2002 to Jun.2010 were collected retrospectively.The median age at diagnosis was 70 years,ranged from 43 to 84 years.The median tPSA was 120.0 μg/L,ranged from 3.0 to 6 006.2 μg/L.There were 5 patients in M1a(4.4%),94 patients in M1b(83.2%) and 14 patients in M1c(12.4%).All patients received hormonal therapy.1mmunohistochemical staining and AR-V7 specific antibody were used to detect the expression of AR-V7 in prostate cancer tissues.Cox regression models were used to analyze the predictive role of patient characteristics including patient's age at diagnosis,tPSA level at diagnosis,Gleason score,clinical stage,PSA nadir during hormonal therapy,the time to PSA nadir and PSA half-life.The effect of AR-V7 expression on time to castration resistance was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier curves,and the differences were assessed using the log-rank test.Results The PSA nadir ranged from 0.0 to 143.0 μg/L and the median value was 0.7 μg/L.The time to PSA nadir ranged from 0.9 to 71.0 months and the median value was 8.1 months.The median PSA half life was 1.0 month,which ranged from 0.1 to 41.0 months.Followed up for a median time of 27 months,100 patients progressed to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and the median time to castration resistance was 24 months.The expression of AR-V7 was positive in 23 out of 113 patients.Multivariate analysis showed that the expression of AR-V7 in prostate cancer (P=0.004,HR =2.223) and PSA nadir during hormonal therapy (P =0.035,HR =1.011) were independent predictive factors of time to castration resistance.The median time to castration resistance for patients with and without AR-V7 expression were (16.04±3.4) months and (30.04-6.0) months,respectively (P=0.001).Conclusions The expression

  18. Pre-therapeutic dosimetry of normal organs and tissues of {sup 177}Lu-PSMA-617 prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) inhibitor in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabasakal, Levent; AbuQbeitah, Mohammad; Ayguen, Aslan; Yeyin, Nami [Istanbul University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul (Turkey); Ocak, Meltem [Istanbul University, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Pharmacy Faculty, Istanbul (Turkey); Demirci, Emre [Sisli Etfal Training and Research Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Istanbul (Turkey); Toklu, Turkay [Yeditepe University Medical Faculty, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2015-12-15

    {sup 177}Lu-617-prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) ligand seems to be a promising tracer for radionuclide therapy of progressive prostate cancer. However, there are no published data regarding the radiation dose given to the normal tissues. The aim of the present study was to estimate the pretreatment radiation doses in patients who will undergo radiometabolic therapy using a tracer amount of {sup 177}Lu-labeled PSMA ligand. The study included seven patients with progressive prostate cancer with a mean age of 63.9 ± 3.9 years. All patients had prior PSMA positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and had intense tracer uptake at the lesions. The injected {sup 177}Lu-PSMA-617 activity ranged from 185 to 210 MBq with a mean of 192.6 ± 11.0 MBq. To evaluate bone marrow absorbed dose 2-cc blood samples were withdrawn in short variable times (3, 15, 30, 60, and 180 min and 24, 48, and 120 h) after injection. Whole-body images were obtained at 4, 24, 48, and 120 h post-injection (p.i.). The geometric mean of anterior and posterior counts was determined through region of interest (ROI) analysis. Attenuation correction was applied using PSMA PET/CT images. The OLINDA/EXM dosimetry program was used for curve fitting, residence time calculation, and absorbed dose calculations. The calculated radiation-absorbed doses for each organ showed substantial variation. The highest radiation estimated doses were calculated for parotid glands and kidneys. Calculated radiation-absorbed doses per megabecquerel were 1.17 ± 0.31 mGy for parotid glands and 0.88 ± 0.40 mGy for kidneys. The radiation dose given to the bone marrow was significantly lower than those of kidney and parotid glands (p < 0.05). The calculated radiation dose to bone marrow was 0.03 ± 0.01 mGy/MBq. Our first results suggested that {sup 177}Lu-PSMA-617 therapy seems to be a safe method. The dose-limiting organ seems to be the parotid glands rather than kidneys and bone marrow. The lesion radiation doses are

  19. Changes in gene expression following androgen receptor blockade is not equivalent to androgen ablation by castration in the rat ventral prostate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anil M Limaye; Irfan Asangani; Thyagarajan Kalyani; Paturu Kondaiah

    2008-06-01

    Involution of the rat ventral prostate and concomitant modulation of gene expression post-castration is a well-documented phenomenon. While the rat castration model has been extensively used to study androgen regulation of gene expression in the ventral prostate, it is not clear whether all the gene expression changes post-castration are due to androgen depletion alone. To obtain insights into this, we performed differential display reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (DD-RT-PCR) which resulted in the identification of castration and/or flutamide-regulated genes in the rat ventral prostate. These include clusterin, methionine adenosyl transferase II, and prostate-specific transcripts such as PBPC1BS, S100RVP and A7. While clusterin, PBPC1BS and methionine adenosyl transferase II are regulated by both castration and flutamide, S100 RVP and A7 are regulated by castration alone. Interestingly, we show that flutamide, unlike castration, does not induce apoptosis in the rat ventral prostate epithelium, which could be an underlying cause for the differential effects of castration and flutamide treatment. We propose that castration leads to enrichment and depletion of stromal and epithelial cell types, respectively, resulting in erroneous conclusions on some of the cell type-specific transcripts as being androgen regulated.

  20. Systemic treatment with Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF)but not Insulin like Growth Factor (IGF-I) decrease the involution of the Prostate in Castrated Rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, Niels; Lars, Vinter-Jensen; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt;

    2000-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) are strong inducers of proliferation to prostate cells cultured in serum-free medium. Accordingly we wanted to study the growth of the prostate gland in castrated rats after treatment with EGF, IGF-I and testosterone. Castrated...... Wistar rats were treated with growth factors (EGF 35 microg/rat per day; IGF-I 350 microg/rat per day) or testosterone (2 mg/rat per day) for 3 days either immediately after or 10 days after castration. Prostate tissue was examined by stereological and immunohistochemical techniques and by enzyme......-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Treatment with EGF inhibited the involution of the prostate (P prostate involution as compared to castrated controls. EGF treatment significantly increased the endogenous rat EGF in the ventral prostate, but cellular...

  1. Systemic treatment with epidermal growth factor but not insulin-like growth factor I decreases the involution of the prostate in castrated rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, N; Vinter-Jensen, L; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt;

    2000-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) are strong inducers of proliferation to prostate cells cultured in serum-free medium. Accordingly we wanted to study the growth of the prostate gland in castrated rats after treatment with EGF, IGF-I and testosterone. Castrated...... Wistar rats were treated with growth factors (EGF 35 microg/rat per day; IGF-I 350 microg/rat per day) or testosterone (2 mg/rat per day) for 3 days either immediately after or 10 days after castration. Prostate tissue was examined by stereological and immunohistochemical techniques and by enzyme......-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Treatment with EGF inhibited the involution of the prostate (P prostate involution as compared to castrated controls. EGF treatment significantly increased the endogenous rat EGF in the ventral prostate, but cellular...

  2. New Prostate Cancer Treatment Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers have identified a potential alternative approach to blocking a key molecular driver of an advanced form of prostate cancer, called androgen-independent or castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  3. Intensity of stromal changes is associated with tumor relapse in clinically advanced prostate cancer after castration therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JianPing Wu; WenBin Huang; Hui Zhou; LuWei Xu; JianHua Zhao; JiaGen Zhu; JiangHao Su; HongBin Sun

    2014-01-01

    Reactive stromal changes in prostate cancer(PCa) are likely involved in the emergence of castration‑resistant PCa(CRPC). This study was designed to investigate stromal changes in patients with clinically advanced PCa and analyze their prognostic signiifcance. Prostate needle biopsies obtained from 148patients before castration therapy were analyzed by Masson trichrome staining and immunohistochemical analysis of vimentin and desmin. Reactive stroma grading was inversely correlated with Gleason score. Stroma grade (Masson stain 82.8%vs 45.6%,P<0.001) and vimentin expression(P=0.005) were signiifcantly higher, and desmin expression (P=0.004) signiifcantly lower, in reactive stroma of tumors with a Gleason score of 6–7 than in adjacent peritumoral tissue. Kaplan‑Meier analysis showed a signiifcant association between reactive stroma grade in tumors and the occurrence of CRPC in patients with a Gleason score of 6–7(P=0.009). Furthermore, patients with higher vimentin or lower desmin expression had a shorter disease‑free period. In multivariate analysis, only vimentin expression was a signiifcant predictor of tumor relapse (hazard ratio 1.78, 95% conifdence interval 1.12–10.26,P=0.012). These ifndings indicate that the intensity of reactive stroma is associated with castration responsiveness, especially in patients with a lower Gleason score where the abundant stroma component is most frequently found. High expression of vimentin in tumor stroma was independently associated with poor outcomes in patients with Gleason scores of 6–7, and may serve as a new prognostic marker in daily practice.

  4. Development in the study of radium-223 chloride for treating castration-resistant prostate carcinoma with bone metastases%镭-223氯化物治疗去势抵抗性前列腺癌骨转移的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    桂继琮; 刘兴党

    2015-01-01

    近年来,全世界前列腺癌的发病率和病死率不断增长,各种治疗方法的研究也进展迅速。镭-223发射的重α粒子(具有<100μm的超短波)靶向作用于骨转移部位和周围新骨生长区域。镭-223氯化物在药物临床试验中以稳定的安全性显著降低了患者的病死率,成为近来被寄予厚望的转移性去势抵抗性前列腺癌(CRPC)治疗领域的“主角”。2013年美国食品药品管理局已批准镭-223氯化物用于治疗有症状的骨转移、未发现内脏转移的CRPC患者。未来其联合治疗方案将会是研究的重点。%Prostate carcinoma rates and mortalities are increasing worldwide. The therapeutic landscape of castration-resistant prostate carcinoma (CRPC) has changed rapidly. Radium-223 chloride, which is a radiopharmaceutical agent, targets bone metastasis by emitting high-energy alpha-particles with extremely short range (<100 μm ) . This chemical is effective in reducing mortality without increasing toxicity. Thus, this agent has the potential to become a new alternative for treating patients with CRPC. The Food and Drug Administration approved radium-223 dichloride for treating patients with CRPC, symptomatic bone metastases, and unknown visceral metastatic disease in 2013. Therefore, combination and sequencing strategies will be future research directions.

  5. TMPRSS2- driven ERG expression in vivo increases self-renewal and maintains expression in a castration resistant subpopulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orla M Casey

    Full Text Available Genomic rearrangements commonly occur in many types of cancers and often initiate or alter the progression of disease. Here we describe an in vivo mouse model that recapitulates the most frequent rearrangement in prostate cancer, the fusion of the promoter region of TMPRSS2 with the coding region of the transcription factor, ERG. A recombinant bacterial artificial chromosome including an extended TMPRSS2 promoter driving genomic ERG was constructed and used for transgenesis in mice. TMPRSS2-ERG expression was evaluated in tissue sections and FACS-fractionated prostate cell populations. In addition to the anticipated expression in luminal cells, TMPRSS2-ERG was similarly expressed in the Sca-1(hi/EpCAM(+ basal/progenitor fraction, where expanded numbers of clonogenic self-renewing progenitors were found, as assayed by in vitro sphere formation. These clonogenic cells increased intrinsic self renewal in subsequent generations. In addition, ERG dependent self-renewal and invasion in vitro was demonstrated in prostate cell lines derived from the model. Clinical studies have suggested that the TMPRSS2-ERG translocation occurs early in prostate cancer development. In the model described here, the presence of the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion alone was not transforming but synergized with heterozygous Pten deletion to promote PIN. Taken together, these data suggest that one function of TMPRSS2-ERG is the expansion of self-renewing cells, which may serve as targets for subsequent mutations. Primary prostate epithelial cells demonstrated increased post transcriptional turnover of ERG compared to the TMPRSS2-ERG positive VCaP cell line, originally isolated from a prostate cancer metastasis. Finally, we determined that TMPRSS2-ERG expression occurred in both castration-sensitive and resistant prostate epithelial subpopulations, suggesting the existence of androgen-independent mechanisms of TMPRSS2 expression in prostate epithelium.

  6. Dominant-negative androgen receptor inhibition of intracrine androgen-dependent growth of castration-recurrent prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Titus

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prostate cancer (CaP is the second leading cause of cancer death in American men. Androgen deprivation therapy is initially effective in CaP treatment, but CaP recurs despite castrate levels of circulating androgen. Continued expression of the androgen receptor (AR and its ligands has been linked to castration-recurrent CaP growth. PRINCIPAL FINDING: In this report, the ligand-dependent dominant-negative ARΔ142-337 (ARΔTR was expressed in castration-recurrent CWR-R1 cell and tumor models to elucidate the role of AR signaling. Expression of ARΔTR decreased CWR-R1 tumor growth in the presence and absence of exogenous testosterone (T and improved survival in the presence of exogenous T. There was evidence for negative selection of ARΔTR transgene in T-treated mice. Mass spectrometry revealed castration-recurrent CaP dihydrotestosterone (DHT levels sufficient to activate AR and ARΔTR. In the absence of exogenous testosterone, CWR-R1-ARΔTR and control cells exhibited altered androgen profiles that implicated epithelial CaP cells as a source of intratumoral AR ligands. CONCLUSION: The study provides in vivo evidence that activation of AR signaling by intratumoral AR ligands is required for castration-recurrent CaP growth and that epithelial CaP cells produce sufficient active androgens for CaP recurrence during androgen deprivation therapy. Targeting intracrine T and DHT synthesis should provide a mechanism to inhibit AR and growth of castration-recurrent CaP.

  7. Plasma AR and abiraterone-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanel, Alessandro; Gasi Tandefelt, Delila; Conteduca, Vincenza; Jayaram, Anuradha; Casiraghi, Nicola; Wetterskog, Daniel; Salvi, Samanta; Amadori, Dino; Zafeiriou, Zafeiris; Rescigno, Pasquale; Bianchini, Diletta; Gurioli, Giorgia; Casadio, Valentina; Carreira, Suzanne; Goodall, Jane; Wingate, Anna; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Tunariu, Nina; Flohr, Penny; De Giorgi, Ugo; de Bono, Johann S; Demichelis, Francesca; Attard, Gerhardt

    2015-11-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) gene aberrations are rare in prostate cancer before primary hormone treatment but emerge with castration resistance. To determine AR gene status using a minimally invasive assay that could have broad clinical utility, we developed a targeted next-generation sequencing approach amenable to plasma DNA, covering all AR coding bases and genomic regions that are highly informative in prostate cancer. We sequenced 274 plasma samples from 97 castration-resistant prostate cancer patients treated with abiraterone at two institutions. We controlled for normal DNA in patients' circulation and detected a sufficiently high tumor DNA fraction to quantify AR copy number state in 217 samples (80 patients). Detection of AR copy number gain and point mutations in plasma were inversely correlated, supported further by the enrichment of nonsynonymous versus synonymous mutations in AR copy number normal as opposed to AR gain samples. Whereas AR copy number was unchanged from before treatment to progression and no mutant AR alleles showed signal for acquired gain, we observed emergence of T878A or L702H AR amino acid changes in 13% of tumors at progression on abiraterone. Patients with AR gain or T878A or L702H before abiraterone (45%) were 4.9 and 7.8 times less likely to have a ≥50 or ≥90% decline in prostate-specific antigen (PSA), respectively, and had a significantly worse overall [hazard ratio (HR), 7.33; 95% confidence interval (CI), 3.51 to 15.34; P = 1.3 × 10(-9)) and progression-free (HR, 3.73; 95% CI, 2.17 to 6.41; P = 5.6 × 10(-7)) survival. Evaluation of plasma AR by next-generation sequencing could identify cancers with primary resistance to abiraterone.

  8. Risk factors analysis for castrate-resistant prostate cancer after prostate cancer treated with androgen deprivation therapy within 1 year%前列腺癌患者内分泌治疗后1年内进展为去势抵抗性前列腺癌的相关因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊太林; 贺大林; 樊桂玲; 李磊; 南勋义; 范晋海

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the risk factors for castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) after prostate cancer treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) within 1 year.Methods One hundred and thirty-one prostate cancer patients treated with ADT in our institute between Jan.2008 and Jan.2011 were selected for this study.Patients were followed up by telephone or in clinic,including serum testosterone,serum PSA,clinical symptoms,imaging studies,digital rectal examination (DRE),survival data,PSA nadir,time to PSA nadir and et al.We mainly studied the CRPC after prostate cancer treated with ADT within 1 year.In the 131 patients,the median age was 70 (ranged from 44-89) years.There were 13 patients (9.9%) less than 60 years,43 patients (32.8%) between 60 and 69 years,62 patients (47.3%) between 70 and 79 years,13 patients (9.9%) more than 80 years.The average body mass index (BMI) was 23.0 (ranged from 14.4-34.4) kg/m2.There were 10 patients less than 18.5 kg/m2,77 patients between 18.5 and 24.0 kg/m2,34 patients between 24.1 and 28.0 kg/m2,and 10 patients more than 28.0 kg/m2.The initial PSA was between 0.3 and 4 707.0 μg/L,there were 19 patients (14.5%) less than 20 μg/L,45 patients (34.4%) between 20 and 99 μg/L,67 patients (51.1%) more than 100 μg/L.One patient (0.7%) was in T1,39 patients (29.8%) in T2,59 patients (45.0%) in T3,32 patients (24.4%) in T4.5 patients (3.8%) were with Gleason score 4,13 patients (9.9%) were with Gleason score 5,24 patients (18.3%) were with Gleason score 6,51 patients (38.9%) were with Gleason score 7,26 patients (19.8%) were with Gleason score 8,9 patients (6.9%) were with Gleason score 9,3 patients (2.3%) were with Gleason score 10.Results There were 32 of 131 patients (24.4%) progressed to CRPC after treated with ADT within 1 year.In the CRPC group,there were 3 patients less than 60 years,15 patients between 60 and 69 years,12 patients between 70 and 79 years,2 patients more than 79 years

  9. Sipuleucel-T for therapy of asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic, castrate-refractory prostate cancer: an update and perspective among other treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta SG; Carballido ES; Fishman M

    2011-01-01

    Shilpa Gupta, Estrella Carballido, Mayer FishmanMoffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL, USAAbstract: Sipuleucel-T is an autologous cell immunotherapy for castrate-refractory prostate cancer, with US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval in asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic prostate cancer. In this review we address the background of prostate cancer incidence and other available therapy onto which sipuleucel-T treatment has been added, with discussion of hormone-ther...

  10. Sipuleucel-T: a therapeutic cancer vaccine for the treatment of castration- or hormone-refractory prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulloch, Marilyn N; Elayan, Mohammed M; Renfroe, Holly R

    2011-11-01

    Sipuleucel-T is a therapeutic cancer vaccine approved for the treatment of castration- or hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Through a novel process, it activates the body's own antigen-presenting cells to induce an immune response to prostatic acid phosphatase, a protein found on prostate cancer cells. A treatment course consists of three total infusions spread 2 weeks apart. Throughout all phases of clinical trials, sipuleucel-T has been shown to be safe and well tolerated. Sipuleucel-T has demonstrated an ability to increase overall survival by approximately 4 months when compared with placebo. However, sipuleucel-T has not shown any improvement in affecting patients' time to disease progression.

  11. Pre-chemotherapy lactate dehydrogenase as a prognostic predictor after docetaxel chemotherapy of castration resistant prostate cancer%化疗前血清乳酸脱氢酶对去势难治性前列腺癌预后预测价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张姣; 王海涛; 杨庆; 杜君; 贾炜莹; 张鹏宇

    2015-01-01

    目的 探讨化疗前血清乳酸脱氢酶(lactate dehydrogenase,LDH)对去势难治性前列腺癌(castration-resistant prostate cancer,CRPC)预后的预测价值.方法 回顾性分析2008-01-01-2012-01-01天津医科大学肿瘤医院收治的58例单独使用多西他赛方案化疗CRPC患者的临床资料,根据化疗前LDH水平将所有患者分为高LDH组(LDH>248 U/L)和低LDH组(LDH≤248 U/L),比较两组患者的临床病理特点,分析LDH对患者预后的影响.结果 58例CRPC患者中,高LDH者28例(48.3%),低LDH者30例(51.7%).两组中位生存期分别为12和27个月,差异有统计学意义,P<0.001.诊断时TNM分期(x2=10.035,P=0.002)、Gleason评分(x2=10.008,P=0.002)、ECOG评分(x2 =5.584,P=0.018)、内脏转移(x2=13.114,P<0.001)、基线PSA(x2 =5.493,P=0.019)、化疗周期数(x2=9.501,P=0.002)、PSA反应(x2=17.215,P<0.001)和基线LDH(x2 =28.394,P<0.001)与CRPC患者预后相关.多因素分析显示,诊断时TNM分期、Gleason评分,化疗前是否内脏转移、化疗周期数、PSA反应和基线LDH是影响患者的独立预后因素,P值均<0.05.结论 化疗前高LDH者预后差,化疗前高LDH是CRPC患者的独立预后因素.

  12. In utero and lactational 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin exposure: effects on the prostate and its response to castration in senescent C57BL/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Wayne A; Lin, Tien-Min; Moore, Robert W; Cooke, Paul S; Peterson, Richard E

    2005-08-01

    In utero and lactational 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) exposure inhibits ventral, dorsolateral, and anterior prostate development in C57BL/6 mice. To determine if prostatic abnormalities persist into senescence, mice born to dams given TCDD (5 mug/kg, po) or vehicle on gestation day 13 were examined at 100 and 510 days of age. Half the mice were castrated ten days prior to necropsy in order to assess androgen dependence, while the remaining mice were sham castrated. Effects of TCDD on the dorsolateral and anterior prostate of senescent sham-castrated mice were relatively subtle, whereas the ventral prostate was rudimentary or absent. Castration of vehicle-exposed mice caused far greater reductions in prostate lobe weights, epithelial cell height, and androgen-dependent gene expression (MP25 and probasin) in young mice than in senescent ones, while cell proliferation was decreased by castration in young mice and increased in senescence. Responses to castration were similar at 100 days of age in vehicle- and TCDD-exposed mice. At 510 days, however, TCDD-exposed mice were substantially more responsive to castration by most indices than vehicle-exposed mice. These results demonstrate that prostatic androgen dependence in mice declines substantially with age in several key ways, and that in utero and lactational TCDD exposure protects against this decline. Surprisingly, TCDD increased the incidence of cribriform structures in dorsolateral prostate ducts, from 2-3% in vehicle-exposed senescent mice to 16% in sham-castrated and to 7% in castrated senescent mice. Collectively, these results demonstrate that effects of in utero and lactational TCDD exposure on the prostate persist into senescence, and suggest that in utero and lactational TCDD exposure retards the aging process in the prostate. However, because cribriform structures are often considered to be associated with prostate carcinogenesis, these results also suggest that TCDD exposure early in

  13. The expression of receptors for estrogen and epithelial growth factor in the male rabbit prostate and prostatic urethra following castration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, A; Balslev, E; Iversen, H G

    1997-01-01

    were included as controls. In the control group, ERs were found in the urothelial lining and lamina propria of the prostatic urethra, and in the prostatic stroma. EGF receptors were demonstrated in the epithelial lining of the prostatic urethra and the glandular epithelium of the prostate. Following...

  14. Overcoming Autophagy to Induce Apoptosis in Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    degradation via Skp-2 mediated ubiquitination Per the report by Shen et al. [11], activation of AMP- activation protein kinase (AMPK) by metformin...activation through neuropeptide (GRP) mediated signaling through the tyrosine kinases Src-Etk-Fak complex [15], the combination of saracatinib and... mediated AR activation of the GRP- Pro line. Enzalutamide is never the ideal treatment drug. Although metformin may cause AR degradation, especially

  15. Characterisation and Manipulation of Docetaxel Resistant Prostate Cancer Cell Lines

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, Amanda J

    2011-10-07

    Abstract Background There is no effective treatment strategy for advanced castration-resistant prostate cancer. Although Docetaxel (Taxotere®) represents the most active chemotherapeutic agent it only gives a modest survival advantage with most patients eventually progressing because of inherent or acquired drug resistance. The aims of this study were to further investigate the mechanisms of resistance to Docetaxel. Three Docetaxel resistant sub-lines were generated and confirmed to be resistant to the apoptotic and anti-proliferative effects of increasing concentrations of Docetaxel. Results The resistant DU-145 R and 22RV1 R had expression of P-glycoprotein and its inhibition with Elacridar partially and totally reversed the resistant phenotype in the two cell lines respectively, which was not seen in the PC-3 resistant sublines. Resistance was also not mediated in the PC-3 cells by cellular senescence or autophagy but multiple changes in pro- and anti-apoptotic genes and proteins were demonstrated. Even though there were lower basal levels of NF-κB activity in the PC-3 D12 cells compared to the Parental PC-3, docetaxel induced higher NF-κB activity and IκB phosphorylation at 3 and 6 hours with only minor changes in the DU-145 cells. Inhibition of NF-κB with the BAY 11-7082 inhibitor reversed the resistance to Docetaxel. Conclusion This study confirms that multiple mechanisms contribute to Docetaxel resistance and the central transcription factor NF-κB plays an immensely important role in determining docetaxel-resistance which may represent an appropriate therapeutic target.

  16. Immunotherapy and Immune Evasion in Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakur, Archana, E-mail: thakur@karmanos.org; Vaishampayan, Ulka [Department of Oncology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Lum, Lawrence G., E-mail: thakur@karmanos.org [Department of Oncology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Department of Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Department of Immunology and Microbiology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)

    2013-05-24

    Metastatic prostate cancer remains to this day a terminal disease. Prostatectomy and radiotherapy are effective for organ-confined diseases, but treatment for locally advanced and metastatic cancer remains challenging. Although advanced prostate cancers treated with androgen deprivation therapy achieves debulking of disease, responses are transient with subsequent development of castration-resistant and metastatic disease. Since prostate cancer is typically a slowly progressing disease, use of immune-based therapies offers an advantage to target advanced tumors and to induce antitumor immunity. This review will discuss the clinical merits of various vaccines and immunotherapies in castrate resistant prostate cancer and challenges to this evolving field of immune-based therapies.

  17. Sipuleucel-T for therapy of asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic, castrate-refractory prostate cancer: an update and perspective among other treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shilpa; Carballido, Estrella; Fishman, Mayer

    2011-01-01

    Sipuleucel-T is an autologous cell immunotherapy for castrate-refractory prostate cancer, with US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval in asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic prostate cancer. In this review we address the background of prostate cancer incidence and other available therapy onto which sipuleucel-T treatment has been added, with discussion of hormone-therapy, chemotherapy, and other investigational immunotherapies. The sipuleucel-T manufacturing process, toxicity and clinical benefit are reviewed, along with an examination of the issue of clinical benefit to survival, independent of apparent changes of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels. Sipuleucel-T therapy is appraised from clinician, patient and immunotherapeutic perspectives, with reference to the clinical data from the pivotal trial, the mechanism of action, and the treatment process.

  18. Sipuleucel-T for therapy of asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic, castrate-refractory prostate cancer: an update and perspective among other treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta SG

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Shilpa Gupta, Estrella Carballido, Mayer FishmanMoffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL, USAAbstract: Sipuleucel-T is an autologous cell immunotherapy for castrate-refractory prostate cancer, with US Food and Drug Administration (FDA approval in asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic prostate cancer. In this review we address the background of prostate cancer incidence and other available therapy onto which sipuleucel-T treatment has been added, with discussion of hormone-therapy, chemotherapy, and other investigational immunotherapies. The sipuleucel-T manufacturing process, toxicity and clinical benefit are reviewed, along with an examination of the issue of clinical benefit to survival, independent of apparent changes of prostate-specific antigen (PSA levels. Sipuleucel-T therapy is appraised from clinician, patient and immunotherapeutic perspectives, with reference to the clinical data from the pivotal trial, the mechanism of action, and the treatment process.Keywords: sipuleucel-T, immunotherapy, vaccine, immunotherapy, dendritic cells

  19. Extracellular Vesicle-Mediated Reversal of Paclitaxel Resistance in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Justin Q.; DeChalus, Austin; Chatterjee, Devin N.; Keller, Evan T.; Mizokami, Atsushi; Camussi, Giovanni; Mendelsohn, Andrew R.; Renzulli, Joseph F.; Quesenberry, Peter J.; Chatterjee, Devasis

    2017-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common solid tumor in males and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in males in the United States. The current first line therapy for metastatic PCa is androgen deprivation therapy and is initially effective against the disease. However, castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) develops in many men within 18–36 months, rendering this treatment ineffective. Chemotherapy, with a class of drugs known as taxanes is the standard-of-care cytotoxic option in metastatic castrate resistant PCa (mCRPC). However, the overall survival advantage for chemotherapy in mCRPC is only 2.2 months and the cancer cells often become resistant to these drugs as well. Once patients fail chemotherapy the progression to death is inevitable. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are involved in cell signaling and play a role in cancer progression. Previous work has demonstrated that EVs are involved in the development of drug resistance in cancer cells. We report the reversal of taxane resistance and tumorigenic phenotype in PCa cells after EVs treatment. This study suggests that EVs represent a potentially novel therapeutic treatment option for CRPC. PMID:27279238

  20. Metabolism of adrenal androgen and its impacts on prostate cancer after castration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ With the extensive utilization of PSA,digital rectum examination and transrectal ultrasound for screening in the aging population,the diagnosis of prostate cancer in China has markedly increased during the past years,particularly in developed regions.

  1. Increased chromogranin A and neuron-specific enolase in rats with chronic nonbacterial prostatitis induced by 17-beta estradiol combined with castration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Song; Hao, Zong-Yao; Zhang, Li; Chen, Xian-Guo; Zhou, Jun; Zang, Yi-Fei; Tai, Sheng; Liang, Chao-Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Although chronic nonbacterial prostatitis (CNBP) is a common diagnosis in middle-aged men, the etiology of this disease remains poorly understood. Neuroendocrine cells play an important role in the neuroendocrine regulation of the prostate, and chromogranin A (CgA) and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) are regarded as classic markers of neuroendocrine cells. This study aimed to determine CgA and NSE levels in a CNBP rat model to evaluate the role of neuroendocrine cells in the pathogenesis of CNBP. For developing a CNBP rat model, we examined the ability of 17-beta estradiol and surgical castration alone or in combination to induce CNBP. Histologic inflammation of the prostate was assessed in CNBP-induced rats by hematoxylin-eosin staining, whereas CgA and NSE protein levels were assessed by immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Our results showed that 17-beta estradiol combined with castration successfully induced CNBP and that CgA and NSE levels were increased in the prostate of CNBP rats as compared to those without CNBP. These findings indicate that the neuroendocrine regulation mediated by neuroendocrine cells may be involved in the pathogenesis of CNBP. PMID:25120776

  2. Risk of cardiovascular thrombotic events after surgical castration versus gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists in Chinese men with prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy YC Teoh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the cardiovascular thrombotic risk after surgical castration (SC versus gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (GnRHa in Chinese men with prostate cancer. All Chinese prostate cancer patients who were treated with SC or GnRHa from year 2000 to 2009 were reviewed and compared. The primary outcome was any new-onset of cardiovascular thrombotic events after SC or GnRHa, which was defined as any event of acute myocardial infarction or ischemic stroke. The risk of new-onset cardiovascular thrombotic event was compared between the SC group and the GnRHa group using Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was performed to adjust for other potential confounding factors. A total of 684 Chinese patients was included in our study, including 387 patients in the SC group and 297 patients in the GnRHa group. The mean age in the SC group (75.3 ± 7.5 years was significantly higher than the GnRHa group (71.8 ± 8.3 years (P < 0.001. There was increased risk of new cardiovascular thrombotic events in the SC group when compared to the GnRHa group upon Kaplan-Meier analysis (P = 0.014. Upon multivariate Cox regression analysis, age (hazard ratio [HR] 1.072, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04-1.11, P< 0.001, hyperlipidemia (HR 2.455, 95% CI 1.53-3.93, P< 0.001, and SC (HR 1.648, 95% CI 1.05-2.59, P= 0.031 were significant risk factors of cardiovascular thrombotic events. In conclusion, SC was associated with increased risk of cardiovascular thrombotic events when compared to GnRHa. This is an important aspect to consider while deciding on the method of androgen deprivation therapy, especially in elderly men with known history of hyperlipidemia.

  3. Bicalutamide monotherapy compared with castration in patients with nonmetastatic locally advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Tyrrell, C J; Kaisary, A V

    2000-01-01

    Nonsteroidal antiandrogen monotherapy may be a treatment option for some patients with advanced prostate cancer. We report a survival and safety update from an analysis of 2 studies in which patients with nonmetastatic (M0) locally advanced disease were treated with either 150 mg. bicalutamide...

  4. Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio as a prognostic factor in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer treated with docetaxel-based chemotherapy%化疗前中性粒细胞与淋巴细胞比值对接受多西他赛化疗的去势难治性前列腺癌患者预后的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张姣; 王海涛; 杨庆; 杜君; 贾炜莹; 张鹏宇

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨化疗前中性粒细胞/淋巴细胞比值(neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio,NLR)对接受多西他赛化疗的去势难治性前列腺癌(castration resistant prostate cancer,CRPC)患者预后的影响.方法:回顾性分析2008年1月-2012年1月天津医科大学肿瘤医院收治的接受多西他赛方案化疗的48例CRPC患者的临床资料,分析NLR与临床资料和预后的关系.结果:本组48例患者中,高NLR(>3)患者24例,低NLR(≤3)患者24例,2组患者的TNM分期和内脏转移率差异有统计学意义(P值均< 0.05).高NLR组与低NLR组的中位生存时间分别为11和25个月(P<0.05).单因素分析结果显示,化疗前NLR、诊断时的TNM分期、Gleason评分、基线前列腺特异性抗原水平、美国东部肿瘤协作组体能状况评分、内脏转移、化疗周期数以及前列腺特异性抗原疗效是影响本组CRPC患者总生存的预后因素(P值均<0.05).COX多因素分析结果显示,化疗前NLR、内脏转移、化疗周期数以及前列腺特异性抗原疗效是影响多西他赛化疗的CRPC患者总生存的独立预后因素(P值均<0.05).结论:NLR是影响接受多西他赛化疗的CRPC患者总生存的独立危险因素,可作为对接受多西他赛化疗的CRPC患者的预后进行评估的有效指标.

  5. Cuprous oxide nanoparticles inhibit prostate cancer by attenuating the stemness of cancer cells via inhibition of the Wnt signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ye; Yang, Qi-Wei; Yang, Qing; Zhou, Tie; Shi, Min-Feng; Sun, Chen-Xia; Gao, Xiu-Xia; Cheng, Yan-Qiong; Cui, Xin-Gang; Sun, Ying-Hao

    2017-01-01

    Disordered copper metabolism plays a critical role in the development of various cancers. As a nanomedicine containing copper, cuprous oxide nanoparticles (CONPs) exert ideal antitumor pharmacological effects in vitro and in vivo. Prostate cancer is a frequently diagnosed male malignancy prone to relapse, and castration resistance is the main reason for endocrine therapy failure. However, whether CONPs have the potential to treat castration-resistant prostate cancer is still unknown. Here, using the castration-resistant PC-3 human prostate cancer cell line as a model, we report that CONPs can selectively induce apoptosis and inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo without affecting normal prostate epithelial cells. CONPs can also attenuate the stemness of cancer cells and inhibit the Wnt signaling pathway, both of which highlight the great potential of CONPs as a new clinical castration-resistant prostate cancer therapy.

  6. Sequential Androgen Receptor Pathway Inhibitor in Prostate Cancer: Piling-Up The Benefits or a Case for Cross-Resistance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand Tombal

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In the last 10 years, there has been accumulating evidence that, even in a low serum testosterone environment, the androgen receptor (AR remains the main driver of prostate cancer progression. This has led to the discovery and clinical development of new anti-androgens and androgen biosynthesis inhibitors. Enzalutamide and abiraterone acetate are the lead compounds of this new generation of agents, but multiple other agents are on their way. Because they both target the ligand-dependent regulation of AR activity, it is plausible that cross-resistance may exist when both drugs are used sequentially, and that the benefit of these agents may fade away when sequencing them. As the exact mechanisms for cross- resistance between AR-targeted agents remain unclear at this point, additional clinical studies are crucial to define the exact combination or sequencing order that could yield highest clinical benefits. Moreover, new molecular targets are needed in order to address these resistances, as well as establishing biomarkers to improve patient selection that could most benefit from AR-targeted therapies, but also help develop novel agents to improve and optimise the management of castration-resistant prostate cancer and metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  7. Vaccine Therapy and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Hormone-Resistant, Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-22

    Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Soft Tissues; Metastatic Prostate Carcinoma; Prostate Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  8. FGF Signaling in Prostate Cancer Progression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nora M. NAVONE

    2009-01-01

    @@ Objective: prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in men in the United States. Localized prostate cancer can be cured by andro-gen ablation, but when the disease escapes the confines of the gland, the prospects for cure decrease drastically and the disease becomes "castrate resistant.

  9. Denosumab Reduces Risk of Bone Side Effects in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    The biological agent denosumab (Xgeva) is more effective than zoledronic acid at decreasing the risk of bone fractures and other skeletal-related events (SRE) in men with castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer, according to results from a randomi

  10. A novel selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) MK-4541 exerts anti-androgenic activity in the prostate cancer xenograft R-3327G and anabolic activity on skeletal muscle mass & function in castrated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisamore, Michael J; Gentile, Michael A; Dillon, Gregory Michael; Baran, Matthew; Gambone, Carlo; Riley, Sean; Schmidt, Azriel; Flores, Osvaldo; Wilkinson, Hilary; Alves, Stephen E

    2016-10-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor super family of transcription factors. Androgens play an essential role in the development, growth, and maintenance of male sex organs, as well as the musculoskeletal and central nervous systems. Yet with advancing age, androgens can drive the onset of prostate cancer, the second leading cause of cancer death in males within the United States. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) by pharmacologic and/or surgical castration induces apoptosis of prostate cells and subsequent shrinkage of the prostate and prostate tumors. However, ADT is associated with significant musculoskeletal and behavioral adverse effects. The unique pharmacological activity of selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) MK-4541 recently has been reported as an AR antagonist with 5α-reductase inhibitor function. The molecule inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in AR positive, androgen dependent prostate cancer cells. Importantly, MK-4541 inhibited androgen-dependent prostate growth in male rats yet maintained lean body mass and bone formation following ovariectomy in female rats. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of SARM MK-4541 in the androgen-dependent Dunning R3327-G prostate carcinoma xenograft mouse model as well as on skeletal muscle mass and function, and AR-regulated behavior in mice. MK-4541 significantly inhibited the growth of R3327-G prostate tumors, exhibited anti-androgen effects on the seminal vesicles, reduced plasma testosterone concentrations in intact males, and inhibited Ki67 expression. MK-4541 treated xenografts appeared similar to xenografts in castrated mice. Importantly, we demonstrate that MK-4541 exhibited anabolic activity in androgen deficient conditions, increasing lean body mass and muscle function in adult castrated mice. Moreover, MK-4541 treatment restored general activity levels in castrated mice. Thus, MK-4541 exhibits an optimum profile as an adjuvant therapy to ADT

  11. [Prostate cancer stem cells: advances in current research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gang; Wu, Deng-long

    2015-02-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common malignancies threatening men's health, and the mechanisms underlying its initiation and progression are poorly understood. Last decade has witnessed encouraging progress in the studies of prostate cancer stem cells (PCSCs), which are considered to play important roles in tumor initiation, recurrence and metastasis, castration resistance, and drug resistance. Therefore, a deeper insight into PCSCs is of great significance for the successful management of prostate cancer. This article presents an overview on the location, origin, and markers of PCSCs as well as their potential correlation with tumor metastasis and castration resistance.

  12. PI3K-AKT-mTOR signaling in prostate cancer progression and androgen deprivation therapy resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Merritt P Edlind; Andrew C Hsieh

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second most common malignancy among men in the world. Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is the lethal form of the disease, which develops upon resistance to ifrst line androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Emerging evidence demonstrates a key role for the PI3K-AKT-mTOR signaling axis in the development and maintenance of CRPC. This pathway, which is deregulated in the majority of advanced PCas, serves as a critical nexus for the integration of growth signals with downstream cellular processes such as protein synthesis, proliferation, survival, metabolism and differentiation, thus providing mechanisms for cancer cells to overcome the stress associated with androgen deprivation. Furthermore, preclinical studies have elucidated a direct connection between the PI3K-AKT-mTOR and androgen receptor (AR) signaling axes, revealing a dynamic interplay between these pathways during the development of ADT resistance. Thus, there is a clear rationale for the continued clinical development of a number of novel inhibitors of the PI3K pathway, which offer the potential of blocking CRPC growth and survival. In this review, we will explore the relevance of the PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway in PCa progression and castration resistance in order to inform the clinical development of speciifc pathway inhibitors in advanced PCa. In addition, we will highlight current deifciencies in our clinical knowledge, most notably the need for biomarkers that can accurately predict for response to PI3K pathway inhibitors.

  13. Efficacy of c-Met inhibitor for advanced prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christensen James G

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aberrant expression of HGF/SF and its receptor, c-Met, often correlates with advanced prostate cancer. Our previous study showed that expression of c-Met in prostate cancer cells was increased after attenuation of androgen receptor (AR signalling. This suggested that current androgen ablation therapy for prostate cancer activates c-Met expression and may contribute to development of more aggressive, castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. Therefore, we directly assessed the efficacy of c-Met inhibition during androgen ablation on the growth and progression of prostate cancer. Methods We tested two c-Met small molecule inhibitors, PHA-665752 and PF-2341066, for anti-proliferative activity by MTS assay and cell proliferation assay on human prostate cancer cell lines with different levels of androgen sensitivity. We also used renal subcapsular and castrated orthotopic xenograft mouse models to assess the effect of the inhibitors on prostate tumor formation and progression. Results We demonstrated a dose-dependent inhibitory effect of PHA-665752 and PF-2341066 on the proliferation of human prostate cancer cells and the phosphorylation of c-Met. The effect on cell proliferation was stronger in androgen insensitive cells. The c-Met inhibitor, PF-2341066, significantly reduced growth of prostate tumor cells in the renal subcapsular mouse model and the castrated orthotopic mouse model. The effect on cell proliferation was greater following castration. Conclusions The c-Met inhibitors demonstrated anti-proliferative efficacy when combined with androgen ablation therapy for advanced prostate cancer.

  14. Rationale for stereotactic body radiation therapy in treating patients with oligometastatic hormone-naïve prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onita eBhattasali

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in treatment for metastatic prostate cancer, patients eventually progress to castrate-resistant disease and ultimately succumb to their cancer. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT is the standard treatment for metastatic prostate cancer and has been shown to improve median time to progression and median survival time. Research suggests that castrate-resistant clones may be present early in the disease process prior to the initiation of ADT. These clones are not susceptible to ADT and may even flourish when androgen-responsive clones are depleted. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT is a safe and efficacious method of treating clinically localized prostate cancer and metastases. In patients with a limited number of metastatic sites, SBRT may have a role in eliminating castrate-resistant clones and possibly delaying progression to castrate-resistant disease.

  15. Exendin-4 shows no effects on the prostatic index in high-fat-diet-fed rat with benign prostatic hyperplasia by improving insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, J-X; Xiao, Y-C; Hu, Y-R; Hao, M; Kuang, H-Y

    2015-03-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a prevalent disease globally, and accumulating evidence has indicated an association between BPH, insulin resistance (IR) and diabetes. Exendin-4 is widely used in clinics, which could enhance the proliferation of pancreatic β cells. The ability of exendin-4 to promote tumorigenesis has been of concern, and whether exendin-4 would enhance the propagation of BPH is not fully understood. We aimed to determine whether glucagon-like peptide-1 receptors (GLP-1Rs) were expressed in rat prostate and to determine the effect of exendin-4 on prostate of BPH. Male Wistar rats were used and assigned to six groups: normal diet (ND), high-fat diet (HFD), HFD + exendin-4, HFD + BPH, HFD + BPH + exendin-4 and HFD + BPH + rosiglitazone group. After castration, steroids were injected subcutaneously for 4 weeks to induce BPH. Rats were kept on high-fat diet to induce IR. Treatment groups were treated with exendin-4 and rosiglitazone. Prostatic index and HOMA-IR index were used to evaluate the prostatic hyperplasia status and the degree of IR respectively. The expression of GLP-1R was indicated not only by immunohistochemistry, but also by Western blot analysis. The expression of GLP-1R was significantly higher, and HOMA-IR index and body weight significantly decreased after administration of exendin-4. However, no significant differences in the prostatic index were observed between exendin-4 treatment groups and non-exendin-4 treatment groups. Prostatic index was not influenced by exendin-4 maybe by improving IR and weight loss.

  16. Association between prostatic resistive index and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baykam, Mehmet Murat; Aktas, Binhan Kagan; Bulut, Suleyman; Ozden, Cuneyt; Deren, Tagmac; Tagci, Suleyman; Gokkaya, Cevdet Serkan; Memis, Ali

    2015-04-01

    We evaluated the relationship between prostatic resistive index (RI) and cardiovascular system (CVS) risk factors in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia. The study included 120 patients who were attending our outpatient clinic with lower urinary tract symptoms related to benign prostatic hyperplasia. The clinical, laboratory, anthropometric data, and CVS risk factors (hypertension, diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, history of CVS events, and smoking) of the patients were evaluated regarding the association between prostate RI level by regression analyses. The prostatic RI levels of the patients were measured using power Doppler imaging. In univariate regression analysis, there were statistically significant relationships between prostatic RI levels and the patients' age, International Prostate Symptom Score, hip circumference, fasting blood glucose, prostate specific antigen, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total prostate volume, uroflowmetric maximal flow rate, and all investigated CVS risk factors (p prostatic RI levels were found to be associated with fasting blood glucose and total prostate volume, and also with CVS risk factors including only metabolic syndrome and cigarette smoking in the multivariate regression analysis. Our results showed that prostatic RI level is significantly related to metabolic syndrome and smoking among the investigated CVS risk factors.

  17. Hormonal therapy and chemotherapy in patients with hormone-sensitive prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Gafanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common men`s cancer in men in developed world and the second cause of death in this population. This review focuses on management of advanced castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC has been rapidly changing and is still evolving. In the last years, there has been an increasing knowledge of prostate cancer biology. New therapeutic agents and approaches have been evaluated demonstrating benefits in survival and quality of life in patients with metastatic prostate cancer.

  18. Investigating Genomic Mechanisms of Treatment Resistance in Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    management and strategies for survivorship in a Spanish - language community outreach and support program. As Chief Fellow I organized and planned... acquisition 6 protocol, and tumor is microdissected from surrounding tissue using laser capture microdissection. DNA and RNA are then isolated for analysis... acquisition of Aragon by Janssen the plan for this clinical trial was modified to become a Phase I, open-label, single-arm multicenter study of the

  19. Biomarkers for Taxane Sensitivity and Hormonal Resistance in Patients with Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    metastasis 3. OVERALL PROJECT SUMMARY: Progress; Aim 1 Determine whether AR variants and the associated mitotic transcriptome can be isolated from blood spiked... mitotic transcriptome. 4 Aim 2. Determine whether AR variants and the associated mitotic transcriptome can be isolated from DTC acquired from men

  20. Discovery of ODM-201, a new-generation androgen receptor inhibitor targeting resistance mechanisms to androgen signaling-directed prostate cancer therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moilanen, Anu-Maarit; Riikonen, Reetta; Oksala, Riikka; Ravanti, Laura; Aho, Eija; Wohlfahrt, Gerd; Nykänen, Pirjo S; Törmäkangas, Olli P; Palvimo, Jorma J; Kallio, Pekka J

    2015-07-03

    Activation of androgen receptor (AR) is crucial for prostate cancer growth. Remarkably, also castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is dependent on functional AR, and several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the addiction. Known causes of CRPC include gene amplification and overexpression as well as point mutations of AR. We report here the pharmacological profile of ODM-201, a novel AR inhibitor that showed significant antitumor activity and a favorable safety profile in phase 1/2 studies in men with CRPC. ODM-201 is a full and high-affinity AR antagonist that, similar to second-generation antiandrogens enzalutamide and ARN-509, inhibits testosterone-induced nuclear translocation of AR. Importantly, ODM-201 also blocks the activity of the tested mutant ARs arising in response to antiandrogen therapies, including the F876L mutation that confers resistance to enzalutamide and ARN-509. In addition, ODM-201 reduces the growth of AR-overexpressing VCaP prostate cancer cells both in vitro and in a castration-resistant VCaP xenograft model. In contrast to other antiandrogens, ODM-201 shows negligible brain penetrance and does not increase serum testosterone levels in mice. In conclusion, ODM-201 is a potent AR inhibitor that overcomes resistance to AR-targeted therapies by antagonizing both overexpressed and mutated ARs. ODM-201 is currently in a phase 3 trial in CRPC.

  1. LHRH agonists in prostate cancer : frequency of treatment, serum testosterone measurement and castrate level: consensus opinion from a roundtable discussion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Igle Jan; Eaton, Alan; Bladou, Franck

    2007-01-01

    Background: Options for lowering testosterone in patients with prostate cancer include bilateral orchiectomy, oestrogens and luteinising hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonists. LHRH agonists have become widely used in the treatment of prostate cancer. Roundtable assembly: In May 2006, a team of e

  2. Sipuleucel-T for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohlich, Mark W

    2012-06-01

    Sipuleucel-T is an autologous cellular immunotherapy designed to stimulate an immune response to prostate cancer that prolongs the overall survival of men with asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The clinical development program and key efficacy, safety, and immune response findings from the phase III studies are presented. The integration of sipuleucel-T into the treatment paradigm of advanced prostate cancer and future directions for research are discussed.

  3. Reasons for the weak correlation between prostate volume and urethral resistance parameters in patients with prostatism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.L.H.R. Bosch (Ruud); R. Kranse (Ries); R. van Mastrigt (Ron); F.H. Schröder (Fritz); W.K. Mebust (W.)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractIn an attempt to increase our understanding of the clinical syndrome of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) an analysis was made of the association between prostate volume as measured by transrectal ultrasound and several reported urodynamically determined urethral resistance parameters.

  4. Loss of PKCδ Induces Prostate Cancer Resistance to Paclitaxel through Activation of Wnt/β-Catenin Pathway and Mcl-1 Accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, M Luz; Castilla, Carolina; Gasca, Jessica; Medina, Rafael; Pérez-Valderrama, Begoña; Romero, Francisco; Japón, Miguel A; Sáez, Carmen

    2016-07-01

    Prostate cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death among men in developed countries. Although castration therapy is initially effective, prostate cancers progress to hormone-refractory disease and in this case taxane-based chemotherapy is widely used. Castration-resistant prostate cancer cells often develop resistance to chemotherapy agents and the search for new therapeutic strategies is necessary. In this article, we demonstrate that PKCδ silencing favors mitotic arrest after paclitaxel treatment in PC3 and LNCaP cells; however, this is associated with resistance to paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. In prostate cancer cells, PKCδ seems to exert a proapoptotic role, acting as a negative regulator of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway. PKCδ silencing induces activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway and the expression of its target genes, including Aurora kinase A, which is involved in activation of Akt and both factors play a key role in GSK3β inactivation and consequently in the stabilization of β-catenin and antiapoptotic protein Mcl-1. We also show that combined treatments with paclitaxel and Wnt/β-catenin or Akt inhibitors improve the apoptotic response to paclitaxel, even in the absence of PKCδ. Finally, we observe that high Gleason score prostate tumors lose PKCδ expression and this correlates with higher activation of β-catenin, inactivation of GSK3β, and higher levels of Aurora kinase A and Mcl-1 proteins. These findings suggest that targeting Wnt/β-catenin or Akt pathways may increase the efficacy of taxane chemotherapy in advanced human prostate cancers that have lost PKCδ expression. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(7); 1713-25. ©2016 AACR.

  5. The preclinical development of novel treatment options for advanced prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a major societal problem with 11.000 new cases every year in the Netherlands. The advanced stage of the disease, castration-resistant prostate cancer, is especially deadly and is often accompanied with (bone) metastases. In this PhD-thesis, we have explored several strategies to i

  6. Novel flutamide regulated genes in the rat ventral prostate: differential modulation of their expression by castration and flutamide treatments%大鼠腹侧前列腺中受氟他胺调控的新基因:去势和氟他胺处理对其表达的调控

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. M. Limaye; I. Asangani; N. Bora; P. Kondaiah

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To identify flutamide regulated genes in the rat ventral prostate. Methods: Total RNA from ventral prostates of control and flutamide treated rats were isolated. Differentially expressed transcripts were identified using differential display reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The effect of castration on the expression of flutamideregulated transcripts was studied. Results: We have identified β2-microglobulin, cytoplasmic FMR1 interacting protein 2 and pumilio 1 as flutamide induced and spermine binding protein and ribophorin Ⅱ as flutamide repressed targets in the rat ventral prostate. Although flutamide treatment caused an induction of pumilio 1 mRNA, castration had no effect. Conclusion: Castration and flutamide treatments exert differential effects on gene expression. Flutamide might also have direct AR independent effects, which might have implications in the emergence of androgen independent prostate cancer and the failure of flutamide therapy.

  7. The HIF1A functional genetic polymorphism at locus +1772 associates with progression to metastatic prostate cancer and refractoriness to hormonal castration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, Avelino; Ribeiro, Ricardo; Príncipe, Paulo; Lobato, Carlos; Pina, Francisco; Maurício, Joaquina; Monteiro, Cátia; Sousa, Hugo; Calais da Silva, F; Lopes, Carlos; Medeiros, Rui

    2014-01-01

    The hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF1a) is a key regulator of tumour cell response to hypoxia, orchestrating mechanisms known to be involved in cancer aggressiveness and metastatic behaviour. In this study we sought to evaluate the association of a functional genetic polymorphism in HIF1A with overall and metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) risk and with response to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). The HIF1A +1772 C>T (rs11549465) polymorphism was genotyped, using DNA isolated from peripheral blood, in 1490 male subjects (754 with prostate cancer and 736 controls cancer-free) through Real-Time PCR. A nested group of cancer patients who were eligible for androgen deprivation therapy was followed up. Univariate and multivariate models were used to analyse the response to hormonal treatment and the risk for developing distant metastasis. Age-adjusted odds ratios were calculated to evaluate prostate cancer risk. Our results showed that patients under ADT carrying the HIF1A +1772 T-allele have increased risk for developing distant metastasis (OR, 2.0; 95%CI, 1.1-3.9) and an independent 6-fold increased risk for resistance to ADT after multivariate analysis (OR, 6.0; 95%CI, 2.2-16.8). This polymorphism was not associated with increased risk for being diagnosed with prostate cancer (OR, 0.9; 95%CI, 0.7-1.2). The HIF1A +1772 genetic polymorphism predicts a more aggressive prostate cancer behaviour, supporting the involvement of HIF1a in prostate cancer biological progression and ADT resistance. Molecular profiles using hypoxia markers may help predict clinically relevant prostate cancer and response to ADT.

  8. A prospective randomized trial: a comparison of the analgesic effect and toxicity of 153Sm radioisotope treatment in monotherapy and combined therapy including local external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) among metastatic castrate resistance prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients with painful bone metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baczyk, M; Milecki, P; Pisarek, M; Gut, P; Antczak, A; Hrab, M

    2013-01-01

    Bone metastases in prostate cancer constitute the most frequent cause of systemic failure in treatment, which results in numerous complications and finally leads to patient's death. Pain is one of the first and most important clinical symptoms of bone metastases and can be found among more than 80% of patients. Therefore, the most analgetic effective and simultaneously the least toxic treatment is an important point of therapeutic management in this group of patients. The aim of this prospective clinical trial was a comparison of analgetic effectiveness and toxicity of monotherapy with 153Sm isotope to combined therapy (153Sm + EBRT) among patients diagnosed with multiple painful bone metastases due to CRPC (mCRPC). 177 patients with mCRPC were included into the prospective randomised clinical trial in which 89 patients were assigned to the 153Sm isotope monotherapy, while 88 patients were assigned to the combined therapy including 153Sm isotope therapy and EBRT. All patients were diagnosed (bone scan and X-ray or/and CT or/and MRI) with painful bone metastases (bone pain intensity >= 6 according to VAS classification). The following additional inclusion criteria were established: histologically confirmed adenocarcinoma of prostate, multifocal bone metastases, no prior chemotherapy or palliative radiotherapy to bone. All patients signed informed consent.The combination of the isotope therapy with EBRT was more effective analgetic treatment than isotope therapy alone. The highest pain decline was noticed in the first weeks after treatment termination. In the whole group, a total or partial analgesic effect was observed among 154 (87%) patients while among 23 (13%) patients there was a lack of analgesic effect or even pain intensification. The results of this clinical trial demonstrated that for patients with multiple mCRPC it is recommended to combine the 153Sm isotope therapy with local EBRT because of a greater analgetic effect. It is important to note that

  9. Evaluation of the resistive index of prostatic blood flow in benign prostatic hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama Abdelwahab

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this work is to study the resistive index (RI of prostatic blood flow by transrectal power Doppler sonography in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH to determine its correlation with other parameters of BPH. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eighty-two male patients aged 52-86 years with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS due to BPH were included in the study. Patients with prostate cancer, neurogenic bladder, or with other pathology (e.g. prostatitis, bladder stone were excluded from the study. All patients were evaluated by full history including Internatinoal Prostate Symptoms Score (IPSS, general and local examination (DRE, neurologic examination, uroflowmetry, laboratory investigations including urine analysis, routine laboratory tests and serum prostate specific antigen (PSA. Transrectal ultrasonography was used to calculate the total prostatic volume. Transrectal Power Doppler Ultrasound (PUD was used to identify the capsular and urethral arteries of the prostate and to measures the RI value. RESULTS: The mean prostate volume was 75.1 ± 44.7 g. The mean RI of the right and left capsular arteries were 0.76 ± 0.06 and 0.76 ± 0.07, respectively. The mean RI of the urethral arteries was 0.76 ± 0.08. There was a high significative correlation between the increase of the RI of the right and left capsular and urethral arteries and the degree of obstruction (P value < 0.001, severity of symptoms (P value < 0.001 and also the prostatic volume (P value < 0.001. CONCLUSION: Resistive index of the prostatic blood flow can be applied as an easy and non-invasive tool to evaluate the lower urinary tract obstruction due to BPH.

  10. Immunotherapy with Sipuleucel-T (APC8015 in patients with metastatic castration-refractory prostate cancer (mCRPC: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Engel Ayer Botrel

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of all randomized controlled trials comparing the efficacy of Sipuleucel-T versus placebo for asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic metastatic castration-refractory prostate cancer (mCRPC. Materials ans Methods Several databases were searched, including MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, and CENTRAL. The endpoints were overall survival (OS, time to progression (TTP and side effects. We performed a meta-analysis (MA of the published data. The results are expressed as Hazard Ratio (HR or Risk Ratio (RR, with their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI 95%. Results The final analysis included 3 trials comprising 737 patients. The TTP was similar in patients who received Sipuleucel-T or placebo (fixed effect: HR = 0.89; CI 95% = 0.75 to 1.05; p = 0.16, with no heterogeneity detected on this analysis (Chi2 = 2.14, df = 2 (P = 0.34; I2 = 6%. The results showed a higher overall survival in patients treated with Sipuleucel-T (fixed effect: HR = 0.74; CI 95% = 0.61 to 0.89; p = 0.001; NNT = 3. We found no heterogeneity on this analysis either (Chi2 = 1.46, df = 2 (P = 0.48; I2 = 0%. The incidence of adverse events (grade > 3 was the same in both groups. Conclusion Sipuleucel-T prolongs overall survival in patients with asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic mCRPC.

  11. MicroRNA Library-Based Functional Screening Identified Androgen-Sensitive miR-216a as a Player in Bicalutamide Resistance in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Miyazaki

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is a major hormone-dependent tumor affecting men, and is often treated by hormone therapy at the primary stages. Despite its initial efficiency, the disease eventually acquires resistance, resulting in the recurrence of castration-resistant prostate cancer. Recent studies suggest that dysregulation of microRNA (miRNA function is one of the mechanisms underlying hormone therapy resistance. Identification of critical miRNAs involved in endocrine resistance will therefore be important for developing therapeutic targets for prostate cancer. In the present study, we performed an miRNA library screening to identify anti-androgen bicalutamide resistance-related miRNAs in prostate cancer LNCaP cells. Cells were infected with a lentiviral miRNA library and subsequently maintained in media containing either bicalutamide or vehicle for a month. Microarray analysis determined the amounts of individual miRNA precursors and identified 2 retained miRNAs after one-month bicalutamide treatment. Of these, we further characterized miR-216a, because its function in prostate cancer remains unknown. miR-216a could be induced by dihydrotestosterone in LNCaP cells and ectopic expression of miR-216a inhibited bicalutamide-mediated growth suppression of LNCaP cells. Furthermore, a microarray dataset revealed that the expression levels of miR-216a were significantly higher in clinical prostate cancer than in benign samples. These results suggest that functional screening using an miRNA expression library could be useful for identifying novel miRNAs that contribute to bicalutamide resistance in prostate cancer.

  12. Successful sperm extraction and live birth after radiation, androgen deprivation and surgical castration for treatment of metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, G J A; Hayden, R P; Tanrikut, C

    2017-02-01

    Fertility preservation has become an important aspect of cancer treatment given the gonadotoxic effects of oncologic therapies. It is now considered standard of care to offer sperm banking to men undergoing treatment for primaries that affect young individuals. Less is known regarding fertility preservation of patients afflicted with prostate cancer. This cohort has progressively expanded and grown younger in the post-PSA era. Prostatectomy, radiation, chemotherapy and androgen blockade all pose unique challenges to the infertility specialist. Optimum management becomes even more uncertain for those men with metastatic prostate cancer. Most of these individuals will have received multiple forms of therapy, each carrying a distinct insult to the patient's reproductive potential. We describe a case of successful ex vivo sperm extraction and live birth in a patient previously treated with radiation and chronic androgen deprivation for metastatic prostate cancer. The presented case demonstrates that conception after radiation therapy and chronic androgen deprivation is feasible. We propose that fertility counselling and sperm cryopreservation should be considered for all prostate cancer patients. Additionally, for those individuals undergoing external beam radiotherapy, testicular shielding should be routinely offered in the event further family building is desired.

  13. Transcriptional network of androgen receptor in prostate cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Ken-ichi; Inoue, Satoshi

    2013-08-01

    The androgen receptor belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily and functions as a ligand-dependent transcription factor. It binds to the androgen responsive element and recruits coregulatory factors to modulate gene transcription. In addition, the androgen receptor interacts with other transcription factors, such as forkhead box A1, and other oncogenic signaling pathway molecules that bind deoxyribonucleic acid and regulate transcription. Androgen receptor signaling plays an important role in the development of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer cells proliferate in an androgen-dependent manner, and androgen receptor blockade is effective in prostate cancer therapy. However, patients often progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer with elevated androgen receptor expression and hypersensitivity to androgen. Recently, comprehensive analysis tools, such as complementary DNA microarray, chromatin immunoprecipitation-on-chip and chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequence, have described the androgen-mediated diverse transcriptional program and gene networks in prostate cancer. Furthermore, functional and clinical studies have shown that some of the androgen receptor-regulated genes could be prognostic markers and potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of prostate cancer, particularly castration-resistant prostate cancer. Thus, identifying androgen receptor downstream signaling events and investigating the regulation of androgen receptor activity is critical for understanding the mechanism of carcinogenesis and progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  14. Early and delayed castrations confer a similar survival advantage in TRAMP mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zai-Xian Zhang; Qing-Quan Xu; Xiao-Bo Huang; Ji-Chuan Zhu; Xiao-Feng Wang

    2009-01-01

    The most appropriate time to introduce androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer remains controversial. Our aim was to evaluate the effects of early versus delayed surgical castration on prostate cancer progression and survival in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. TRAMP mice were randomly divided into three groups: the early castration group (on which castration was performed at the age of 4 weeks), the delayed castration group (on which castration was performed when abdominal turnouts could be palpated), and the sham-castrated group. Mice were monitored daily throughout their lives until cancer-related death or the develop-ment of an obviously moribund appearance, at which time the individual mouse was killed. Androgen receptor expression in prostate turnouts was also evaluated. The results shows that the average lifespan in early castration, delayed castration and sham-castrated groups were 54.1 weeks, 59.9 weeks and 39.1 weeks, respectively. Both early castration and delayed castration conferred a statistically significant survival advantage when compared with the sham-castrated group (P<0.001). However, the difference in lifespan between the early castration group and the delayed castration group was not statistically significant (P=0.85). The increase in lifespan in the TRAMP mice that received either early or delayed castration correlated with lower G/B value (genitourinary tract weight/body weight) at death than the sham-castrated mice. In conclusion, early and delayed castrations in TRAMP mice pro-longed survival to a similar extent. This finding may provide a guide for clinical practice in prostate cancer therapy.

  15. Targeted Approach to Overcoming Treatment Resistance in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    nitrogen) aliquot of PC3 cells (ATCC: human prostate adenocarcinoma). 2. Disperse into 75 cm2 flask containing RPMI 1640 media supplemented with 10% fetal ...compound #88 shows high cell killing efficacy in prostate cancer cell lines, including taxol resistant cells that stems from the induction of apoptosis...approach engages computational modeling to identify compounds that target a specific, mismatch repair protein-­‐dependent cell death pathway. A

  16. Management of patients with advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillessen, S; Omlin, A; Attard, G

    2015-01-01

    -resistant prostate cancer and the recent studies of chemo-hormonal therapy in men with castration-naïve prostate cancer have led to considerable uncertainty as to the best treatment choices, sequence of treatment options and appropriate patient selection. Management recommendations based on expert opinion......The first St Gallen Advanced Prostate Cancer Consensus Conference (APCCC) Expert Panel identified and reviewed the available evidence for the ten most important areas of controversy in advanced prostate cancer (APC) management. The successful registration of several drugs for castration...... decisions on treatment as always will involve consideration of disease extent and location, prior treatments, host factors, patient preferences as well as logistical and economic constraints. Inclusion of men with APC in clinical trials should be encouraged....

  17. Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells incorporate into the prostate during regrowth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica R Placencio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prostate cancer recurrence involves increased growth of cancer epithelial cells, as androgen dependent prostate cancer progresses to castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC following initial therapy. Understanding CRPC prostate regrowth will provide opportunities for new cancer therapies to treat advanced disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Elevated chemokine expression in the prostate stroma of a castrate resistant mouse model, Tgfbr2(fspKO, prompted us to look at the involvement of bone marrow derived cells (BMDCs in prostate regrowth. We identified bone marrow cells recruited to the prostate in GFP-chimeric mice. A dramatic increase in BMDC recruitment for prostate regrowth occurred three days after exogenous testosterone implantation. Recruitment led to incorporation of BMDCs within the prostate epithelia. Immunofluorescence staining suggested BMDCs in the prostate coexpressed androgen receptor; p63, a basal epithelial marker; and cytokeratin 8, a luminal epithelial marker. A subset of the BMDC population, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, were specifically found to be incorporated in the prostate at its greatest time of remodeling. Rosa26 expressing MSCs injected into GFP mice supported MSC fusion with resident prostate epithelial cells through co-localization of β-galactosidase and GFP during regrowth. In a human C4-2B xenograft model of CRPC, MSCs were specifically recruited. Injection of GFP-labeled MSCs supported C4-2B tumor progression by potentiating canonical Wnt signaling. The use of MSCs as a targeted delivery vector for the exogenously expressed Wnt antagonist, secreted frizzled related protein-2 (SFRP2, reduced tumor growth, increased apoptosis and potentiated tumor necrosis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Mesenchymal stem cells fuse with prostate epithelia during the process of prostate regrowth. MSCs recruited to the regrowing prostate can be used as a vehicle for transporting genetic information with potential

  18. Prostate cancer stem-like cells proliferate slowly and resist etoposide-induced cytotoxicity via enhancing DNA damage response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Judy [Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Juravinski Innovation Tower, Room T3310, St. Joseph' s Hospital, 50 Charlton Ave East, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8S 4L8 (Canada); Father Sean O' Sullivan Research Institute, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8N 4A6 (Canada); The Hamilton Centre for Kidney Research (HCKR), St. Joseph' s Hamilton Healthcare, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8N 4A6 (Canada); Tang, Damu, E-mail: damut@mcmaster.ca [Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Juravinski Innovation Tower, Room T3310, St. Joseph' s Hospital, 50 Charlton Ave East, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8S 4L8 (Canada); Father Sean O' Sullivan Research Institute, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8N 4A6 (Canada); The Hamilton Centre for Kidney Research (HCKR), St. Joseph' s Hamilton Healthcare, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8N 4A6 (Canada)

    2014-10-15

    Despite the development of chemoresistance as a major concern in prostate cancer therapy, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. In this report, we demonstrate that DU145-derived prostate cancer stem cells (PCSCs) progress slowly with more cells accumulating in the G1 phase in comparison to DU145 non-PCSCs. Consistent with the important role of the AKT pathway in promoting G1 progression, DU145 PCSCs were less sensitive to growth factor-induced activation of AKT in comparison to non-PCSCs. In response to etoposide (one of the most commonly used chemotherapeutic drugs), DU145 PCSCs survived significantly better than non-PCSCs. In addition to etoposide, PCSCs demonstrated increased resistance to docetaxel, a taxane drug that is commonly used to treat castration-resistant prostate cancer. Etoposide produced elevated levels of γH2AX and triggered a robust G2/M arrest along with a coordinated reduction of the G1 population in PCSCs compared to non-PCSCs, suggesting that elevated γH2AX plays a role in the resistance of PCSCs to etoposide-induced cytotoxicity. We have generated xenograft tumors from DU145 PCSCs and non-PCSCs. Consistent with the knowledge that PCSCs produce xenograft tumors with more advanced features, we were able to demonstrate that PCSC-derived xenograft tumors displayed higher levels of γH2AX and p-CHK1 compared to non-PCSC-produced xenograft tumors. Collectively, our research suggests that the elevation of DNA damage response contributes to PCSC-associated resistance to genotoxic reagents. - Highlights: • Increased survival in DU145 PCSCs following etoposide-induced cytotoxicity. • PCSCs exhibit increased sensitivity to etoposide-induced DDR. • Resistance to cytotoxicity may be due to slower proliferation in PCSCs. • Reduced kinetics to growth factor induced activation of AKT in PCSCs.

  19. The evolving role of immunotherapy in prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, W.R.

    2012-01-01

    The prognosis for men with metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is limited, and patients have very few treatment options, particularly if the treatment failed with docetaxel (Taxotere). As a result, there is a requirement for novel approaches to therapy. Using immunotherapy to ind

  20. Abiraterone in metastatic prostate cancer without previous chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ryan, C.J.; Smith, M.R.; Bono, J. De; Molina, A.; Logothetis, C.J.; Souza, P. de; Fizazi, K.; Mainwaring, P.; Piulats, J.M.; Ng, S.; Carles, J.; Mulders, P.F.A.; Basch, E.; Small, E.J.; Saad, F.; Schrijvers, D.; Poppel, H. van; Mukherjee, S.D.; Suttmann, H.; Gerritsen, W.R.; Flaig, T.W.; George, D.J.; Yu, E.Y.; Efstathiou, E.; Pantuck, A.; Winquist, E.; Higano, C.S.; Taplin, M.E.; Park, Y.; Kheoh, T.; Griffin, T.; Scher, H.I.; Rathkopf, D.E.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Abiraterone acetate, an androgen biosynthesis inhibitor, improves overall survival in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer after chemotherapy. We evaluated this agent in patients who had not received previous chemotherapy. METHODS: In this double-blind study, we

  1. Developing Novel Therapeutics Targeting Undifferentiated and Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    to identify PCSC-specific homing peptides; and 2) To perform unbiased drug library screening to identify novel PCSC-targeting chemicals. In the past...Specific Aim 2, we have finished a targeted library screening to identify several compounds that could sensitize the AR-PSA- LNCaP cells. We have also...peptide and finishing up screening and validating the kinase inhibitor library screening .

  2. Understanding and Targeting Tumor Microenvironment in Prostate Cancer to Inhibit Tumor Progression and Castration Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    as being possible MDSCs. The definition of MDSC requires these cells being immunosuppressive in a standard T cell proliferation assay. Therefore...circulation as the cancer progresses. The MDSCs display potent immunosuppressive activity to limit T cell proliferation. Importantly, depletion of...dependent increase of infiltrating and circulating granulocytic MDSCs in the mouse model. These MDSCs display potent immunosuppressive activity

  3. Cost-effectiveness analysis of treatments for metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew E. Pollard

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Based on the available survival data and current costs of treatment, all treatment strategies greatly exceed a commonly assumed societal willingness-to-pay threshold of US$100,000 per LYS. Improvements in this regard can only come with a reduction in pricing, better tailoring of treatment or significant enhancements in survival with clinical use of treatment combinations or sequences.

  4. Novel Therapeutic Targets to Inhibit Tumor Microenvironment-Induced Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    signaling in HPS19I cells, we transfected HPS19I cells with a (CAGA)12MLP (Smad binding sequence) reporter construct [41] and a pRL -null vector...transfected with (CAGA)12MLP and pRL -null vectors, and treated with 50 pM of TGF-β1 and different dosages of SD-208 compound for 24 hours. Cell lysates were...CAGA)12MLP [41] and 0.1 μg of pRL -null (Promega, Madison, WI, USA) in 12 well plate using FuGENE 6 transfection reagent (Roche Applied Sciences

  5. Role of IKKalpha and STAT3 in the Emergence of Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    androgen-deprived tumor stroma we orally administered a DNA vaccine encoding FAP that is specifically delivered to secondary lymphoid tissues by a...molecular pathology 87, 189-194. Gabbiani, G. (2003). The myofibroblast in wound healing and fibrocontractive diseases. The Journal of pathology 200, 500...affecting wound healing. Journal of dental research 89, 219-229. Higgins, D. F., Biju, M. P., Akai, Y., Wutz, A., Johnson, R. S., and Haase, V. H

  6. Understanding the Role of MDSCs in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer and Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    intern students , one medical intern student . These experiences have provided me the great opportunity to practice my mentoring and management skills. In...network of the tumor microenvironment (TMEN). MDSCs play a pivotal role in suppression of both innate and adaptive immunity and its presence is documented...and comprise two main subsets-- monocytic (Ly6Chi) and granulocytic (Ly6Ghi). It is well established that MDSCs suppress both innate and adaptive

  7. Epithelial Plasticity in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: Biology of the Lethal Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    the WGA protocol with sonication of DNA to remove unwanted DNA fragments that contribute to the increased noisiness in the assay, and then application...hormonal therapies (range) 2.5 (0–5) Prior chemotherapy 68% Prior bisphosphonates 73% Sites of metastatic disease Visceral (lung þ liver) 54% Lymph node...extend to stem cell markers and to treatment-induced 461 effects . For example, we observed an increased predomi- 462 nance of N-cadherin expression

  8. Dual-Targeting of AR and Akt Pathways by Berberine in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    underlying the downregulation of full-length and splice variants of AR by the phytochemical berberine (BBR). We concluded that BBR inhibits the...46-54. [34] Narizhneva NV, Tararova ND, Ryabokon P, Shy- shynova I, Prokvolit A, Komarov PG, Purmal AA, Gudkov AV, Gurova KV. Small molecule screen

  9. Copenhagen uPAR prostate cancer (CuPCa) database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert, Solvej; Berg, Kasper D; Høyer-Hansen, Gunilla;

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) plays a central role during cancer invasion by facilitating pericellular proteolysis. We initiated the prospective 'Copenhagen uPAR Prostate Cancer' study to investigate the significance of uPAR levels in prostate cancer (PCa) patients. METHODS......PAR(I) levels were significantly higher in hormone-naive and castrate-resistant patients compared with patients with localized disease (both: p

  10. New drugs in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangjun Yoo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The standard primary treatment for advanced prostate cancer has been hormonal therapy since the 1940s. However, prostate cancer inevitably progresses to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC after a median duration of 18 months of androgen deprivation therapy. In patients with CRPC, docetaxel has been regarded as the standard treatment. However, survival advantages of docetaxel over other treatments are slim, and the need for new agents persists. In recent years, novel agents, including abiraterone, enzalutamide, cabazitaxel, radium-223, and sipuleucel-T, have been approved for the treatment of CRPC, and more such agents based on diverse mechanisms are under investigation or evaluation. In this article, the authors reviewed the current literature on recent advances in medical treatment of prostate cancer, especially CRPC. In addition, the authors elaborated on novel drugs for prostate cancer currently undergoing investigation and their mechanisms.

  11. Redefining Hormone Sensitive Disease in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyu Hou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men in the United States. For decades, the cornerstone of medical treatment for advanced prostate cancer has been hormonal therapy, intended to lower testosterone levels, known as Androgen Deprivation Therapy (ADT. The development of hormone-resistant prostate cancer (now termed castration-resistant prostate cancer:CRPC remains the key roadblock in successful long-term management of prostate cancer. New advancements in medical therapy for prostate cancer have added to the hormonal therapy armamentarium. These new therapeutic agents not only provide a survival benefit but also show potential for reversing hormonal resistance in metastatic CRPC, and thus redefining hormonally sensitive disease.

  12. Caveolin-1 and prostate cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Michael R; Yang, Wei; Di Vizio, Dolores

    2012-01-01

    Caveolin-1 was identified in the 1990s as a marker of aggressive prostate cancer. The caveolin-1 protein localizes to vesicular structures called caveolae and has been shown to bind and regulate many signaling proteins involved in oncogenesis. Caveolin-1 also has lipid binding properties and mediates aspects of cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism and can elicit biological responses in a paracrine manner when secreted. Caveolin-1 is also present in the serum of prostate cancer patients and circulating levels correlate with extent of disease. Current evidence indicates that increased expression of caveolin-1 in prostate adenocarcinoma cells and commensurate downregulation of the protein in prostate stroma, mediate progression to the castration-resistant phase of prostate cancer through diverse pathways. This chapter summarizes the current state of our understanding of the cellular and physiologic mechanisms in which caveolin-1 participates in the evolution of prostate cancer cell phenotypes.

  13. N-Cadherin in Prostate Cancer: Downstream Pathways and Their Translational Application for Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    inhibition of downstream signaling pathways especially NF-κB and the PI3K/AKT pathways may serve as complementary therapies to N-cadherin targeting...N-cadherin–positive cells from LAPC9-CR tumors are also more tum- origenic than N-cadherin–negative cells (E.K. and R.E.R., unpublished data). A

  14. Integrin β4 and vinculin contained in exosomes are potential markers for progression of prostate cancer associated with taxane-resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Kyojiro; Fujita, Yasunori; Kato, Taku; Mizutani, Kosuke; Kameyama, Koji; Tsumoto, Hiroki; Miura, Yuri; Deguchi, Takashi; Ito, Masafumi

    2015-07-01

    Treatment with taxanes for castration-resistant prostate cancer often leads to the development of resistance. It has been recently demonstrated that exosomes present in the body fluids contain proteins and RNAs in the cells from which they are derived and could serve as a diagnostic marker for various diseases. In the present study, we aimed to identify proteins contained in exosomes that could be markers for progression and taxane-resistance of prostate cancer. Exosomes were isolated by differential centrifugation from the culture medium of taxane-resistant human prostate cancer PC-3 cells (PC-3R) and their parental PC-3 cells. Isolated exosomes were subjected to iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis. Exosomes were also isolated from the culture medium by using anti-CD9 antibody-conjugated magnetic beads. Protein expression was knocked down by siRNA transfection followed by analysis of the silencing effects. Proteomic analysis showed that integrin β4 (ITGB4) and vinculin (VCL) were upregulated in exosomes derived from PC-3R cells compared to PC-3 cells. The elevation of ITGB4 and VCL was confirmed in exosomes captured by anti-CD9 antibody from the culture medium of PC-3R cells. Silencing of ITGB4 and VCL expression did not affect proliferation and taxane-resistance of PC-3R cells, but ITGB4 knockdown attenuated both cell migration and invasion and VCL knockdown reduced invasion. Our results suggest that ITGB4 and VCL in exosomes could be useful markers for progression of prostate cancer associated with taxane-resistance, providing the basis for development of an exosome-based diagnostic system.

  15. A randomised comparison of 'Casodex' (bicalutamide) 150 mg monotherapy versus castration in the treatment of metastatic and locally advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyrrell, C J; Kaisary, A V; Iversen, P;

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of 'Casodex' monotherapy (150 mg daily) for metastatic and locally advanced prostate cancer.......To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of 'Casodex' monotherapy (150 mg daily) for metastatic and locally advanced prostate cancer....

  16. Avaliação histológica da próstata de cães adultos sexualmente intactos Prostatic histological evaluation in adult not castrated dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.E. Fonseca Alves

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se histologicamente a próstata de 30 cães adultos e idosos sexualmente intactos que apresentavam ou não sintomatologia clínica de doença prostática, e verificou-se a incidência de possíveis alterações da glândula. Dentre as alterações encontradas, a hiperplasia prostática benigna constituiu o diagnóstico mais comum, 85,6% (n=24, seguida por prostatite crônica, 64,3% (n=18, displasia do epitélio glandular, 42,8% (n=12, atrofia do epitélio glandular, 39,3% (n=11, infiltrado inflamatório focal, 25% (n=7, dilatação glandular focal, 21,4% (n=6, prostatite aguda, 7,1% (n=2, metaplasia escamosa, 3,6%, (n=1, metástase de neoplasia sistêmica, 3,6% (n=1 e abscesso prostático, 3,6% (n=1. Como em muitos casos os cães são assintomáticos, ressalta-se a importância da realização rotineira de exames clínicos específicos, como o toque retal e a ultrassonografia, para o diagnóstico precoce e o tratamento das afecções prostáticas.The prostates of 30 not castrated old dogs with or without clinical symptoms of prostatic disease were histologically evaluated. It was observed the incidence of possible changes in the gland. Among the changes, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH was the most common diagnosis, accounting for 85.6% (n=24, followed by chronic prostatitis, 64.3% (n=18, dysplasia of the glandular epithelium, 42.8% (n=12, atrophy of the glandular epithelium, 39.3% (n=11, focal inflammatory infiltrate, 25% (n=7, focal glandular dilation, 21.4% (n=6, acute prostatitis, 7.1% (n=2, squamous metaplasia, 3.6% (n=1, metastasis of systemic neoplasia, 3.6% (n=1, and prostatic abscess, 3.6% (n=1. Because the lack of symptoms in most of dogs with prostatic changes, the specific clinic exams in routine, as rectal palpation and ultrasonography, are very important to early diagnosis and treatment of dogs with prostatic disease.

  17. Regulation of Prostate Development and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia by Autocrine Cholinergic Signaling via Maintaining the Epithelial Progenitor Cells in Proliferating Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naitao Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of prostate epithelial progenitor cells is important in prostate development and prostate diseases. Our previous study demonstrated a function of autocrine cholinergic signaling (ACS in promoting prostate cancer growth and castration resistance. However, whether or not such ACS also plays a role in prostate development is unknown. Here, we report that ACS promoted the proliferation and inhibited the differentiation of prostate epithelial progenitor cells in organotypic cultures. These results were confirmed by ex vivo lineage tracing assays and in vivo renal capsule recombination assays. Moreover, we found that M3 cholinergic receptor (CHRM3 was upregulated in a large subset of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH tissues compared with normal tissues. Activation of CHRM3 also promoted the proliferation of BPH cells. Together, our findings identify a role of ACS in maintaining prostate epithelial progenitor cells in the proliferating state, and blockade of ACS may have clinical implications for the management of BPH.

  18. REST mediates androgen receptor actions on gene repression and predicts early recurrence of prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Charlotte; Ceder, Jens; Iglesias Gato, Diego

    2014-01-01

    in cell cycle progression, including Aurora Kinase A, that has previously been implicated in the growth of NE-like castration-resistant tumors. The analysis of prostate cancer tissue microarrays revealed that tumors with reduced expression of REST have higher probability of early recurrence, independently...

  19. Therapeutic Role of Bmi-1 Inhibitors in Eliminating Prostate Tumor Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    inhibitors in prostate cancer. 15. SUBJECT TERMS NOTHING LISTED 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...docetaxel and cabazitaxel are mainline treatments that are FDA -approved for use in castration resistant prostate cancer. Task #5. We selected C-209 as...H.E. Feasibility study of the zebrafish assay as an alternative method to screen for developmental toxicity and embryotoxicity using a training set

  20. Molecular imaging of prostate cancer with PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadvar, Hossein

    2013-10-01

    Molecular imaging is paving the way for precision and personalized medicine. In view of the significant biologic and clinical heterogeneity of prostate cancer, molecular imaging is expected to play an important role in the evaluation of this prevalent disease. The natural history of prostate cancer spans from an indolent localized process to biochemical relapse after radical treatment with curative intent to a lethal castrate-resistant metastatic disease. The ongoing unraveling of the complex tumor biology of prostate cancer uniquely positions molecular imaging with PET to contribute significantly to every clinical phase of prostate cancer evaluation. The purpose of this article was to provide a concise review of the current state of affairs and potential future developments in the diagnostic utility of PET in prostate cancer.

  1. An Overview of Current Screening and Management Approaches for Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Omar N; Mushtaq, Gohar; Kamal, Mohammad Amjad

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the fourth leading cause of mortality in Australian men. The prevalence and incidence is increasing in both developed and developing nations, thus there is a need for better screening and management of this disorder. While there is no direct known cause of prostate cancer, management is largely focused on early detection and treatment strategies. Of particular concern is advanced prostate cancer which can manifest as castrate resistant prostate cancer characterized by therapy resistance. This short review outlines the global epidemiology of prostate cancer, clinical manifestations, risk factors, current screening strategies including first line clinical screening as well as the use of circulating biomarkers, and treatment of prostate cancer through mainstream therapeutics as well as the cutting edge peptide and nano-technology based therapeutics that are being implemented or in the process of development to overcome therapeutic obstacles in the treatment of prostate cancer.

  2. Targeting bone physiology for the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autio, Karen A; Morris, Michael J

    2013-03-01

    Metastatic prostate cancer has a unique predilection for bone that can lead to significant clinical sequelae, such as fracture and cord compression. This tropism for bone yields not only clinical challenges, but also opportunities to understand the tumor biology in bone and to develop relevant therapeutic strategies. The process by which tumor cells migrate to bone, remain dormant, and then colonize and expand is based on complex interactions between prostate cancer tumor cells and the host microenvironment. This review will provide an overview of these interactions as well as therapies targeting osseous metastases in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  3. Resistance of prostate cancer cell lines to COX-2 inhibitor treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Matthew; Loos, James; Weksler, Nicole; Gantner, Marin; Corless, Christopher L; Barry, John M; Beer, Tomasz M; Garzotto, Mark

    2005-07-08

    Targeting of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) for cancer chemoprevention is well supported for several tumor types, most notably colon cancer. In contrast, the data for its role in prostate cancer carcinogenesis are correlative only. Thus, we compared the COX-2 expression, activity, and effects of inhibition in prostate cancer cells on COX-2-dependent colon cancer cells. COX-2 levels in benign and malignant human prostate tissue were determined by immunohistochemistry. Compared to colon cancer cells, prostate cancer cells expressed lower levels of COX-2, produced less PGE2, and were resistant to selective COX-2 inhibition. Examination of benign prostatic epithelium from prostatectomy samples demonstrated rare foci of COX-2. Whereas, human prostate cancer sections were uniformly negative for COX-2. In conclusion, these studies indicate the lack of a putative role for COX-2 in prostate cancer development. Direct evidence for the involvement of COX-2 in prostate cancer carcinogenesis is desperately needed.

  4. Neuroendocrine differentiation in prostate cancer – a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Popescu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This review aims to provide practicing clinicians with the most recent knowledge of the biological nature of prostate cancer especially the information regarding neuroendocrine differentiation. Methods: Review of the literature using PubMed search and scientific journal publications. Results: Much progress has been made towards an understanding of the development and progression of prostate cancer. The prostate is a male accessory sex gland which produces a fraction of seminal fluid. The normal human prostate is composed of a stromal compartment (which contains: nerves, fibroblast, smooth muscle cells, macrophages surrounding glandular acins – epithelial cells. Neuroendocrine cells are one of the epithelial populations in the normal prostate and are believed to provide trophic signals trough the secretion of neuropeptides that diffuse and influence surrounding epithelial cells. Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed malignancy in men. In prostate cancer, neuroendocrine cells can stimulate growth of surrounding prostate adenocarcinoma cells (proliferation of neighboring cancer cells in a paracrine manner by secretion of neuroendocrine products. Neuroendocrine prostate cancer is an aggressive variant of prostate cancer that commonly arises in later stages of castration resistant prostate cancer. The detection of neuroendocrine prostate cancer has clinical implications. These patients are often treated with platinum chemotherapy rather than with androgen receptor targeted therapies. Conclusion: This review shows the need to improve our knowledge regarding diagnostic and treatment methods of the Prostate Cancer, especially cancer cells with neuroendocrine phenotype.

  5. Immune Response to Sipuleucel-T in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David I. Quinn

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Historically, chemotherapy has remained the most commonly utilized therapy in patients with metastatic cancers. In prostate cancer, chemotherapy has been reserved for patients whose metastatic disease becomes resistant to first line castration or androgen deprivation. While chemotherapy palliates, decreases serum prostate specific antigen and improves survival, it is associated with significant side effects and is only suitable for approximately 60% of patients with castrate-resistant prostate cancer. On that basis, exploration of other therapeutic options such as active secondary hormone therapy, bone targeted treatments and immunotherapy are important. Until recently, immunotherapy has had no role in the treatment of solid malignancies aside from renal cancer and melanoma. The FDA-approved autologous cellular immunotherapy sipuleucel-T has demonstrated efficacy in improving overall survival in patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer in randomized clinical trials. The proposed mechanism of action is reliant on activating the patients’ own antigen presenting cells (APCs to prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP fused with granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF and subsequent triggered T-cell response to PAP on the surface of prostate cancer cells in the patients body. Despite significant prolongation of survival in Phase III trials, the challenge to health care providers remains the dissociation between objective changes in serum PSA or on imaging studies after sipleucel-T and survival benefit. On that basis there is an unmet need for markers of outcome and a quest to identify immunologic or clinical surrogates to fill this role. This review focuses on the impact of sipuleucel-T on the immune system, the T and B cells, and their responses to relevant antigens and prostate cancer. Other therapeutic modalities such as chemotherapy, corticosteroids and GM-CSF and host factors can also affect immune response. The

  6. Immune response to sipuleucel-T in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thara, Eddie; Dorff, Tanya B; Averia-Suboc, Monica; Luther, Michael; Reed, Mary E; Pinski, Jacek K; Quinn, David I

    2012-04-18

    Historically, chemotherapy has remained the most commonly utilized therapy in patients with metastatic cancers. In prostate cancer, chemotherapy has been reserved for patients whose metastatic disease becomes resistant to first line castration or androgen deprivation. While chemotherapy palliates, decreases serum prostate specific antigen and improves survival, it is associated with significant side effects and is only suitable for approximately 60% of patients with castrate-resistant prostate cancer. On that basis, exploration of other therapeutic options such as active secondary hormone therapy, bone targeted treatments and immunotherapy are important. Until recently, immunotherapy has had no role in the treatment of solid malignancies aside from renal cancer and melanoma. The FDA-approved autologous cellular immunotherapy sipuleucel-T has demonstrated efficacy in improving overall survival in patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer in randomized clinical trials. The proposed mechanism of action is reliant on activating the patients' own antigen presenting cells (APCs) to prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) fused with granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and subsequent triggered T-cell response to PAP on the surface of prostate cancer cells in the patients body. Despite significant prolongation of survival in Phase III trials, the challenge to health care providers remains the dissociation between objective changes in serum PSA or on imaging studies after sipleucel-T and survival benefit. On that basis there is an unmet need for markers of outcome and a quest to identify immunologic or clinical surrogates to fill this role. This review focuses on the impact of sipuleucel-T on the immune system, the T and B cells, and their responses to relevant antigens and prostate cancer. Other therapeutic modalities such as chemotherapy, corticosteroids and GM-CSF and host factors can also affect immune response. The optimal timing for

  7. Stem cell and neurogenic gene-expression profiles link prostate basal cells to aggressive prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dingxiao; Park, Daechan; Zhong, Yi; Lu, Yue; Rycaj, Kiera; Gong, Shuai; Chen, Xin; Liu, Xin; Chao, Hsueh-Ping; Whitney, Pamela; Calhoun-Davis, Tammy; Takata, Yoko; Shen, Jianjun; Iyer, Vishwanath R; Tang, Dean G

    2016-02-29

    The prostate gland mainly contains basal and luminal cells constructed as a pseudostratified epithelium. Annotation of prostate epithelial transcriptomes provides a foundation for discoveries that can impact disease understanding and treatment. Here we describe a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of human benign prostatic basal and luminal epithelial populations using deep RNA sequencing. Through molecular and biological characterizations, we show that the differential gene-expression profiles account for their distinct functional properties. Strikingly, basal cells preferentially express gene categories associated with stem cells, neurogenesis and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) biogenesis. Consistent with this profile, basal cells functionally exhibit intrinsic stem-like and neurogenic properties with enhanced rRNA transcription activity. Of clinical relevance, the basal cell gene-expression profile is enriched in advanced, anaplastic, castration-resistant and metastatic prostate cancers. Therefore, we link the cell-type-specific gene signatures to aggressive subtypes of prostate cancer and identify gene signatures associated with adverse clinical features.

  8. Comparability of prostate trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suciu, S; Sylvester, R; Iversen, P

    1993-01-01

    The present overview of advanced prostate cancer required the identification of randomized clinical trials studying the question of maximal androgen blockade versus the classic castration therapy. The heterogeneity of the trials concerned the type of castration (surgical or chemical) and the type...

  9. Estrogen Receptor beta 2 Induces Hypoxia Signature of Gene Expression by Stabilizing HIF-1 alpha in Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Prasenjit Dey; Velazquez-Villegas, Laura A.; Michelle Faria; Anthony Turner; Philp Jonsson; Paul Webb; Cecilia Williams; Jan-Åke Gustafsson; Ström, Anders M.

    2015-01-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) beta variant ER beta 2 is expressed in aggressive castration-resistant prostate cancer and has been shown to correlate with decreased overall survival. Genome-wide expression analysis after ER beta 2 expression in prostate cancer cells revealed that hypoxia was an overrepresented theme. Here we show that ER beta 2 interacts with and stabilizes HIF-1 alpha protein in normoxia, thereby inducing a hypoxic gene expression signature. HIF-1 alpha is known to stimulate met...

  10. Prostatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Domingue, Gerald J.; Hellstrom, Wayne J.G.

    1998-01-01

    The laboratory diagnosis of acute bacterial prostatitis is straightforward and easily accomplished in clinical laboratories. Chronic bacterial prostatitis, and especially chronic idiopathic prostatitis (most often referred to as abacterial prostatitis), presents a real challenge to the clinician and clinical microbiologist. Clinically, the diagnosis of chronic idiopathic prostatitis is differentiated from that of acute prostatitis by a lack of prostatic inflammation and no “significant” (cont...

  11. Clinical Observation of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Combined with Radiotherapy、Testicular Castration for Prostate Cancer%高强度聚焦超声联合放疗、睾丸去势治疗前列腺癌的疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐勇军; 余建军; 冯慧萍

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨高强度聚焦超声( HIFU)联合放疗、睾丸去势治疗前列腺癌的疗效。方法对38例已行放疗、睾丸去势治疗的前列腺癌进行HIFU治疗。结果15例(39%)前列腺特异性抗原(PSA)水平降至正常,20例(52%) PSA下降,2例(10%)仅症状缓解,有效率达92%。前列腺体积也明显缩小。结论 HIFU联合放疗、睾丸去势治疗前列腺癌,能有效控制肿瘤进展,为前列腺癌提供了1种新的有效治疗手段。%Objective To study the efficacy of high intensity focused ultrasound ( HIFU) combined with radiotherapy , testicular castration for prostate cancer .Methods 38 patients with prostate cancer who underwent radiotherapy and testicular castration were treated with HIFU.Results 15 cases (39%),prostate specific antigen (PSA) have fallen to normal,20 cases (52%) of the PSA declined,2 cases (10%) of symptoms relieved,effective rate was 92%.Prostate volume also narrowed con-siderably.Conclusion HIFU combined with radiotherapy and testicular castration can effectively control the progression of the tumor,it is a new effective treatment for prostate cancer .

  12. Moving Beyond the Androgen Receptor (AR): Targeting AR-Interacting Proteins to Treat Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Christopher; Mitsiades, Nicholas

    2016-04-01

    Medical or surgical castration serves as the backbone of systemic therapy for advanced and metastatic prostate cancer, taking advantage of the importance of androgen signaling in this disease. Unfortunately, resistance to castration emerges almost universally. Despite the development and approval of new and more potent androgen synthesis inhibitors and androgen receptor (AR) antagonists, prostate cancers continue to develop resistance to these therapeutics, while often maintaining their dependence on the AR signaling axis. This highlights the need for innovative therapeutic approaches that aim to continue disrupting AR downstream signaling but are orthogonal to directly targeting the AR itself. In this review, we discuss the preclinical research that has been done, as well as clinical trials for prostate cancer, on inhibiting several important families of AR-interacting proteins, including chaperones (such as heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) and FKBP52), pioneer factors (including forkhead box protein A1 (FOXA1) and GATA-2), and AR transcriptional coregulators such as the p160 steroid receptor coactivators (SRCs) SRC-1, SRC-2, SRC-3, as well as lysine deacetylases (KDACs) and lysine acetyltransferases (KATs). Researching the effect of-and developing new therapeutic agents that target-the AR signaling axis is critical to advancing our understanding of prostate cancer biology, to continue to improve treatments for prostate cancer and for overcoming castration resistance.

  13. Investigating the Effects of Regular Resistance Training and Prostatic Massage on Proinflammatory Markers and Serum Prostate-Specific Antigen Levels in Males with Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fathollahi Shoorabeh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Prostate cancer (PC is one of the most common cancers worldwide. Some studies support that chronic inflammation of prostate tissue plays a role in the development of PC. A variety of growth factors and cytokines may lead to proinflammatory processes within the prostate. Objectives The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of eight weeks of regular resistance training and prostatic massage on proinflammatory markers CRP, IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-10 and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA levels in males with PC. Patients and Methods Forty-five patients with PC were selected for this study. They were randomized into either the resistance training intervention group (n = 15, the massage intervention group (n = 15, or the control group (n = 15. Resistance-training patients participated in resistance training for eight weeks, and massage was performed for six weeks on the massage group. Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA was used to analyze the data (P ≤ 0.05. Results In the resistance training group, IL-10 levels significantly increased after four (P = 0.055 and eight weeks (P = 0.000. Four and eight weeks of resistance training showed a significant reduction in PSA, CRP, IL-6, and TNF-α levels (P < 0.05. Patients of massage intervention showed an increase in IL-10 after four (P = 0.045 and six weeks (P = 0.005. In addition, four and six weeks of massage intervention showed a significant reduction in PSA, CRP, IL-6, and TNF-α levels (P < 0.05. Conclusions Regular resistance training and prostatic massage can improve proinflammatory markers and PSA levels in men with PC.

  14. Sipuleucel-T: immunotherapy for advanced prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Olson BM; McNeel DG

    2011-01-01

    Brian M Olson, Douglas G McNeelUniversity of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USAAbstract: Prostate cancer continues to be one of the most serious afflictions of men of advanced age, remaining the most commonly diagnosed and second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in American men. The treatment options for patients with incurable metastatic, castrate-resistant disease have long focused on various chemotherapeutic approaches, which provide a ...

  15. Reasons for the weak correlation between prostate volume and urethral resistance parameters in patients with prostatism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Kranse (Ries); R. van Mastrigt (Ron); F.H. Schröder (Fritz); J.L.H.R. Bosch (Ruud)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractIn an attempt to increase our understanding of the clinical syndrome of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) an analysis was made of the association between prostate volume as measured by transrectal ultrasound and several reported urodynamically determined urethral resis

  16. ERK and AKT signaling drive MED1 overexpression in prostate cancer in association with elevated proliferation and tumorigenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Feng; Irshad, Shazia; Yu, Wei; Belakavadi, Madesh; Chekmareva, Marina; Ittmann, Michael M; Abate-Shen, Cory; Fondell, Joseph D

    2013-07-01

    MED1 is a key coactivator of the androgen receptor (AR) and other signal-activated transcription factors. Whereas MED1 is overexpressed in prostate cancer cell lines and is thought to coactivate distinct target genes involved in cell-cycle progression and castration-resistant growth, the underlying mechanisms by which MED1 becomes overexpressed and its oncogenic role in clinical prostate cancer have remained unclear. Here, we report that MED1 is overexpressed in the epithelium of clinically localized human prostate cancer patients, which correlated with elevated cellular proliferation. In a Nkx3.1:Pten mutant mouse model of prostate cancer that recapitulates the human disease, MED1 protein levels were markedly elevated in the epithelium of both invasive and castration-resistant adenocarcinoma prostate tissues. Mechanistic evidence showed that hyperactivated ERK and/or AKT signaling pathways promoted MED1 overexpression in prostate cancer cells. Notably, ectopic MED1 overexpression in prostate cancer xenografts significantly promoted tumor growth in nude mice. Furthermore, MED1 expression in prostate cancer cells promoted the expression of a number of novel genes involved in inflammation, cell proliferation, and survival. Together, these findings suggest that elevated MED1 is a critical molecular event associated with prostate oncogenesis.

  17. The Role of ERK1/2 in the Progression of Anti-Androgen Resistance of mtDNA Deficient Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Biol Chem. 2007;282(37):27436-46. 50. Huggins C, Stevens RE, Jr. , Hodges CV. Studies on prostatic cancer: II. The effects of castration on...prepared. An equal amount of PCR product from each reaction were combined, and the pooled products were nick -translated and labeled with the Alexa-488 dye

  18. A Randomized Phase 2 Trial of 177Lu Radiolabeled Anti-PSMA Biochemically Monoclonal Antibody J591 in Patients with High-Risk Castrate, Biochemically Relapsed Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    review on hold pending additional funding - University of Medicine and Dentistry , New Jersey – scientific review - Nevada Cancer Institute – scientific...BIOCHEMICALLY RELAPSED PROSTATE CANCER AFTER LOCAL THERAPY Scott T. Tagawa, Joseph Osborne, Paul J. Christos, Shankar Vallabhajosula, Kristen Petrillo

  19. ERG Cooperates with Androgen Receptor in Regulating Trefoil Factor 3 in Prostate Cancer Disease Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S. Rickman

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available To elucidate the role of ETS gene fusions in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC, we characterized the transcriptome of 54 CRPC tumor samples from men with locally advanced or metastatic disease. Trefoil factor 3 (TFF3 emerged as the most highly differentially regulated gene with respect to ERG rearrangement status and resistance to hormone ablation therapy. Conventional chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-polymerase chain reaction and ChIP followed by DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq revealed direct binding of ERG to ETS binding sites in the TFF3 promoter in ERG-rearranged prostate cancer cell lines. These results were confirmed in ERG-rearranged hormone-naive prostate cancer (HNPC and CRPC tissue samples. Functional studies demonstrated that ERG has an inhibitory effect on TFF3 expression in hormone-naive cancer but not in the castration-resistant state. In addition, we provide evidence suggesting an effect of androgen receptor signaling on ERG-regulated TFF3 expression. Furthermore, TFF3 overexpression enhances ERG-mediated cell invasion in CRPC prostate cancer cells. Taken together, our findings reveal a novel mechanism for enhanced tumor cell aggressiveness resulting from ERG rearrangement in the castration-resistant setting through TFF3 gene expression.

  20. ERG cooperates with androgen receptor in regulating trefoil factor 3 in prostate cancer disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickman, David S; Chen, Ying-Bei; Banerjee, Samprit; Pan, Yihang; Yu, Jindan; Vuong, Terry; Perner, Sven; Lafargue, Christopher J; Mertz, Kirsten D; Setlur, Sunita R; Sircar, Kanishka; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Bismar, Tarek A; Rubin, Mark A; Demichelis, Francesca

    2010-12-01

    To elucidate the role of ETS gene fusions in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), we characterized the transcriptome of 54 CRPC tumor samples from men with locally advanced or metastatic disease. Trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) emerged as the most highly differentially regulated gene with respect to ERG rearrangement status and resistance to hormone ablation therapy. Conventional chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-polymerase chain reaction and ChIP followed by DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) revealed direct binding of ERG to ETS binding sites in the TFF3 promoter in ERG-rearranged prostate cancer cell lines. These results were confirmed in ERG-rearranged hormone-naive prostate cancer (HNPC) and CRPC tissue samples. Functional studies demonstrated that ERG has an inhibitory effect on TFF3 expression in hormone-naive cancer but not in the castration-resistant state. In addition, we provide evidence suggesting an effect of androgen receptor signaling on ERG-regulated TFF3 expression. Furthermore, TFF3 overexpression enhances ERG-mediated cell invasion in CRPC prostate cancer cells. Taken together, our findings reveal a novel mechanism for enhanced tumor cell aggressiveness resulting from ERG rearrangement in the castration-resistant setting through TFF3 gene expression.

  1. 经尿道前列腺切除联合去势治疗伴膀胱出口梗阻的晚期前列腺癌的临床进展%Transurethral Resection of the Prostate Combined Castration in the Treatment of Bladder Outlet Obstruction in Patients with Advanced Prostate Cancer Clinical Progress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵富

    2012-01-01

      目的对临床上所采用的经尿道前列腺切除联合去势的方法针对膀胱出口梗阻的晚期前列腺癌的治疗效果进行分析与探讨,并且对此方法治疗晚期前列腺癌的可行性做出分析。方法对本院的晚期前列腺癌的患者临床资料进行回顾性总结与分析,和手术后的随访。这些患者均接受过本院实施的经尿道前列腺切除联合去势手术,并且这些患者的晚期前列腺癌均伴随有膀胱出口梗阻。结果进行手术的所有患者均取得了较好的治疗效果,在术后的随访过程中并没有发现患者的意外死亡。患者在接受手术之后排尿良好、并且没有出现尿失禁。结论伴膀胱出口梗阻的晚期前列腺癌的患者在经过经尿道前列腺切除联合去势治疗均取得了较好的康复效果。因此,这是一种具有良好效果,可以进行临床推广应用的手术方法。%  Objective Of clinical the transurethral resection of the prostate joint castrated method in the bladder outlet obstruction of advanced prostate cancer treatment effect of analysis and discussion, and the method is the treatment of advanced prostate cancer to the feasibility analysis. Methods Our hospital since 2004 through February to March 2006 were between the advanced prostate cancer patients with the clinical data were retrospectively summary and analysis, and postoperative fol ow-up.These patients are trained in this hospital implementation of the urethra prostate gland excision with castration surgery, and these patients with advanced prostate cancer are accompanied by a bladder outlet obstruction,and these patients with advanced prostate cancer are accompanied by a bladder outlet obstruction. Results Surgery al of the patients have achieved good results,in the process of the fol ow-up and found no patients accidental death.Patients undergoing surgery urination and did not appear after good urinary incontinence. Conclution

  2. Enhancement of Radiation Therapy in Prostate Cancer by DNA-PKcs Inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    radiotherapy 39 . Restoring DAB2IP may also improve castration resistance in addition to radiation resistance as DAB2IP expression inversely ...expression inversely correlates with androgen receptor activation status particularly in recurrent or metastatic prostate cancer patients 17 . The DAB2IP...attached to microtubule fibers oriented from opposite poles of the spindle. SAC is maintained by the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC) through its

  3. Enzalutamide in metastatic prostate cancer before chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beer, Tomasz M; Armstrong, Andrew J; Rathkopf, Dana E

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Enzalutamide is an oral androgen-receptor inhibitor that prolongs survival in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer in whom the disease has progressed after chemotherapy. New treatment options are needed for patients with metastatic prostate cancer who have not rece......BACKGROUND: Enzalutamide is an oral androgen-receptor inhibitor that prolongs survival in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer in whom the disease has progressed after chemotherapy. New treatment options are needed for patients with metastatic prostate cancer who have...... not received chemotherapy, in whom the disease has progressed despite androgen-deprivation therapy. METHODS: In this double-blind, phase 3 study, we randomly assigned 1717 patients to receive either enzalutamide (at a dose of 160 mg) or placebo once daily. The coprimary end points were radiographic progression...... at the data-cutoff date (29% reduction in the risk of death; hazard ratio, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.60 to 0.84; Pchemotherapy (hazard ratio, 0.35), the time until the first...

  4. 手术去势间断联合多西他赛治疗晚期前列腺癌的疗效观察%Clinic Study of Surgical Castration Intermittent Combined with Docetaxel for Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李宏志; 刘民; 朱庆环; 郭丽晔; 李英杰; 孙志广

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨手术去势间断联合多西他赛治疗晚期前列腺癌的临床疗效。方法收集75例转移性前列腺癌患者的病历资料。按照临床治疗方法不同将患者分为实验组和对照组,实验组28例,对照组47例。实验组患者采取睾丸切除去势+多西他赛治疗,对照组患者采取睾丸切除去势治疗。观察患者的临床疗效、PSA水平、疼痛评分及不良反应发生情况,观察患者生活质量评分变化情况。结果实验组患者治疗后PSA水平、疼痛评分低于治疗前和对照组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);治疗后,对照组患者PSA水平、疼痛评分低于治疗前,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。实验组患者红细胞、白细胞减少,恶心呕吐,骨髓抑制,手足综合征,脱发发生率显著低于对照组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。实验组患者生活质量评分高于治疗前和对照组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);治疗后,对照组患者生活质量评分高于治疗前,差异有统计学意义( P<0.05)。实验组患者中位生存时间、无进展生存时间、2年生存率均高于对照组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论手术去势间断联合多西他赛治疗晚期前列腺癌效果较好,能改善患者PSA水平、疼痛情况,减少不良反应发生情况,提高患者的生活质量,临床应用价值较高。%Objective To explore the clinical efficacy of surgical castration intermittent combined with docetaxel treat -ment for advanced prostate cancer .Methods 75 cases of patients with metastatic prostate cancer were divided into the experi-ment group and the control group .The control group were treated by testicular resection castration +docetaxel,the control group were treated by testicular resection castration .The clinical effects ,the levels of PSA ,the scores of pain ,complication ,the scores of quality of life were

  5. Study of insulin resistance and antioxidant vitamin status in prostate cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Prasanth Vardhan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of prostate cancer is 5 per 100000 in southern and eastern Asia. Both genetic and environmental factors have been implicated in its etiology. The mitogenic and growth stimulatory effects of Insulin growth factor may be involved in prostate carcinogenesis. To evaluate serum insulin and insulin resistance was passed by HOMA- IR. Prostatic specific antigen passed by immune-enzymatic assay. Vitamins were estimated by high performance liquid chromatography. In our study 30 prostate cancer patients aged 60-80years were taken as cases. 30 normal age matched disease free person were taken as controls in both groups, Insulin resistance and antioxidant vitamin status was studied. In the present study, the value of HOMA-IR was (P <0.05 is significantly higher compare to controls. Serum vitamin E and vitamin C values for cases was reduced (P <0.05 significantly lower than controls. The development of prostate cancer is a multistep process. Hyperinsulinemia associated with insulin resistance may play a role in pathogenesis of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer cells generate high levels a ROS. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(2.000: 643-646

  6. Ureteral metastasis from prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, Hiroshi; Kosaka, Takeo; Yoshimine, Shunsuke; Oya, Mototsugu

    2014-08-28

    A 59-year-old man had an elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration (439 ng/mL) in December 2008. We diagnosed prostatic adenocarcinoma by prostate needle biopsy. CT and MRI showed a prostatic tumour with bone and lymph node metastases. Combined androgen blockade therapy reduced the PSA level temporarily. After the PSA level gradually started to increase again and reached 27.27 ng/mL in October 2010, the patient was diagnosed with castration-resistant prostate cancer and treated with docetaxel chemotherapy. Radiological examination detected left hydronephrosis and a tumour in the left lower ureter in March 2011. Retrograde pyelography and urine cytology of class 3 from the left ureter indicated that the ureteral mass was a urothelial carcinoma. A left nephroureterectomy was performed. After the operation, the pathological examination showed a metastatic prostate carcinoma, accompanied by a decrease in the serum PSA level from 59.56 to 45.33 ng/mL.

  7. Personalization of prostate cancer prevention and therapy: are clinically qualified biomarkers in the horizon?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yap Timothy A

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Prostate cancer remains the most common malignancy among men and the second leading cause of male cancer-related mortality. Death from this disease is invariably due to resistance to androgen deprivation therapy. Our improved understanding of the biology of prostate cancer has heralded a new era in molecular anticancer drug development, with multiple novel anticancer drugs for castration resistant prostate cancer now entering the clinic. These include the taxane cabazitaxel, the vaccine sipuleucel-T, the CYP17 inhibitor abiraterone, the novel androgen receptor antagonist MDV-3100 and the radionuclide alpharadin. The management and therapeutic landscape of prostate cancer has now been transformed with this growing armamentarium of effective antitumor agents. This review discusses strategies for the prevention and personalization of prostate cancer therapy, with a focus on the development of predictive and intermediate endpoint biomarkers, as well as novel clinical trial designs that will be crucial for the optimal development of such anticancer therapeutics.

  8. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome after Treatment of Metastatic Prostate Cancer with Taxotere: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Raufi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men. Docetaxel is a common chemotherapeutic agent that has proven its efficacy in the treatment of patients with both castration sensitive and resistant metastatic prostate cancer. We report a case of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS in a patient with metastatic prostate cancer treated with docetaxel (Taxotere. ARDS is very rare but life threatening complication of docetaxel which requires aggressive supportive care and close monitoring. Better awareness and prompt diagnosis of this treatment related ARDS will improve the effectiveness and outcome of its management.

  9. Sipuleucel-T in the treatment of prostate cancer: an evidence-based review of its place in therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Graff JN; Chamberlain ED

    2014-01-01

    Julie N Graff,1,2 Erin D Chamberlain31Portland VA Medical Center, 2Knight Cancer Institute, 3Department of Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USAAbstract: Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer is the lethal form of cancer of the prostate. Five new agents that prolong survival in this group have emerged in the past 5 years, and sipuleucel-T is among them. Sipuleucel-T is the only immunotherapy shown to improve survival in prostate cancer. It is currently in...

  10. Exploring AR-NFkappaB/p52-Targeted Inhibitors as Novel Therapy Against Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Bicalutamide Drug Concentration (uM) 0.01 0.1 1 10 100 % C on tro l F luo re sc en ce P ola riz at ion (m P) 0 20 40 60 80 100 ARP52 Drug...Concentration (uM) 0.1 1 10 100 % C on tro l F luo re sc en ce P ola riz at ion (m P) 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 drug arp52-01001 drug arp52-02001 drug arp52

  11. A Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Study of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Antagonist Mifepristone Combined with Enzalutamide in Castrate Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    drugs for use in combination for daily dosing. The second objective is to use pharmacodynamic biomarkers to support the hypothesis that GR... biomarkers to support the hypothesis that GR antagonism in combination with AR antagonism will delay CRPC progression. This portion of the study will...Pain 1, 7.1 1, 7.1 Confusion 1, 7.1 1, 7.1 Depression 1, 7.1 Fatigue 6, 42.9 5, 35.7 1, 7.1 Gynecomastia 1, 7.1 Hot Flashes 2, 14.3 2, 14.3

  12. A Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Study of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Antagonist Mifepristone Combined with Enzalutamide in Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    study. From a PD standpoint, serum cortisol levels were measured before and after mifepristone at 300mg. Cortisol routinely doubled as expected...leaders in the field. The PI was able to share trial progress and garner support in the group for the trial, which was an excellent learning opportunity

  13. Enzalutamide treatment in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer progressing after chemotherapy and abiraterone acetate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Frederik Birkebaek; Røder, Martin Andreas; Rathenborg, Per

    2013-01-01

    -chemotherapy setting. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty-four mCRPC patients with progression after abiraterone treatment following primary docetaxel therapy received enzalutamide 160 mg/day. The percentage PSA response was recorded following first line docetaxel, abiraterone and enzalutamide treatment. Fischer's exact test...

  14. Discovery of the Selective CYP17A1 Lyase Inhibitor BMS-351 for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Audris; Jayaraman, Lata; Fura, Aberra; Vite, Gregory D; Trainor, George L; Gottardis, Marco M; Spires, Thomas E; Spires, Vanessa M; Rizzo, Cheryl A; Obermeier, Mary T; Elzinga, Paul A; Todderud, Gordon; Fan, Yi; Newitt, John A; Beyer, Sophie M; Zhu, Yongxin; Warrack, Bethanne M; Goodenough, Angela K; Tebben, Andrew J; Doweyko, Arthur M; Gold, David L; Balog, Aaron

    2016-01-14

    Efforts to identify a potent, reversible, nonsteroidal CYP17A1 lyase inhibitor with good selectivity over CYP17A1 hydroxylase and CYPs 11B1 and 21A2 for the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) culminated in the discovery of BMS-351 (compound 18), a pyridyl biaryl benzimidazole with an excellent in vivo profile. Biological evaluation of BMS-351 at a dose of 1.5 mg in castrated cynomolgus monkeys revealed a remarkable reduction in testosterone levels with minimal glucocorticoid and mineralcorticoid perturbation. Based on a favorable profile, BMS-351 was selected as a candidate for further preclinical evaluation.

  15. PROSTVAC® targeted immunotherapy candidate for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Neal D

    2014-01-01

    Targeted immunotherapies represent a valid strategy for the treatment of metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer. A randomized, double-blind, Phase II clinical trial of PROSTVAC® demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in overall survival and a large, global, Phase III trial with overall survival as the primary end point is ongoing. PROSTVAC immunotherapy contains the transgenes for prostate-specific antigen and three costimulatory molecules (designated TRICOM). Research suggests that PROSTVAC not only targets prostate-specific antigen, but also other tumor antigens via antigen cascade. PROSTVAC is well tolerated and has been safely combined with other cancer therapies, including hormonal therapy, radiotherapy, another immunotherapy and chemotherapy. Even greater benefits of PROSTVAC may be recognized in earlier-stage disease and low-disease burden settings where immunotherapy can trigger a long-lasting immune response.

  16. Chemotherapy and its evolving role in the management of advanced prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael T Schweizer; Emmanuel S Antonarakis

    2014-01-01

    prostate cancer has been recognized as being responsive to androgen deprivation since the 1940s when Charles Huggins ifrst described the role of surgical castration in managing these patients. However, androgen deprivation only results in transient disease control for the vast majority of men, with those progressing in spite of castrate testosterone levels labeled as having castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Until 2004, the therapeutic arena for these patients had remained stagnant, with no agent having shown a survival gain in the CRPC setting. Two landmark publications changed the prostate cancer treatment landscape by providing‘level-1 evidence’ that docetaxel-based chemotherapy led to prolongation in overall survival (OS). This was followed by the approval of cabazitaxel in 2010 on the basis of Phase III data demonstrating its efifcacy in patients pretreated with docetaxel. More recently, a number of next-generation androgen-directed agents (e.g. abiraterone and enzalutamide) have also been shown to lead to a survival beneift in men with CRPC. With so many new treatment options available, a number of questions remain. These include:how to best sequence chemotherapy with these newer hormonal agents, the clinical implication of cross-resistance between taxanes and androgen-directed agents and which subsets of patients may beneift most from early use of chemotherapy. This review will provide an overview of the evolving role of chemotherapy in the management of advanced prostate cancer in the current era.

  17. Dendritic Cell-Based Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanka Jähnisch

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs, which display an extraordinary capacity to induce, sustain, and regulate T-cell responses providing the opportunity of DC-based cancer vaccination strategies. Thus, clinical trials enrolling prostate cancer patients were conducted, which were based on the administration of DCs loaded with tumor-associated antigens. These clinical trials revealed that DC-based immunotherapeutic strategies represent safe and feasible concepts for the induction of immunological and clinical responses in prostate cancer patients. In this context, the administration of the vaccine sipuleucel-T consisting of autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells including APCs, which were pre-exposed in vitro to the fusion protein PA2024, resulted in a prolonged overall survival among patients with metastatic castration-resistent prostate cancer. In April 2010, sipuleucel-T was approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for prostate cancer therapy.

  18. SOCS2 mediates the cross talk between androgen and growth hormone signaling in prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iglesias Gato, Diego; Chuan, Yin Choy; Wikström, Pernilla

    2014-01-01

    Anabolic signals such as androgens and the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 (GH/IGF-1) axis play an essential role in the normal development of the prostate but also in its malignant transformation. In this study, we investigated the role of suppressor of cytokine signaling 2 (SOCS2) a...... was present in castration-resistant cases. GH-signaling inhibitors might be a complementary therapeutic option for advanced PCa....

  19. Perspectives on sipuleucel-T: Its role in the prostate cancer treatment paradigm

    OpenAIRE

    Gulley, James L.; Mulders, Peter; Albers, Peter; Banchereau, Jacques; Bolla, Michel; Pantel, Klaus; Powles, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sipuleucel-T is an autologous cellular immunotherapy approved in the US for patients with asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). This significant advance for mCRPC treatment provides healthcare professionals with another effective therapy to extend survival. As an immunotherapy, sipuleucel-T possesses specific characteristics differentiating it from traditional therapies. At a roundtable meeting of experts, sipuleucel-T data wer...

  20. STAT5A/B Gene Locus Undergoes Amplification during Human Prostate Cancer Progression

    OpenAIRE

    Haddad, Bassem R.; Gu, Lei; Mirtti, Tuomas; Dagvadorj, Ayush; Vogiatzi, Paraskevi; Hoang, David T.; Bajaj, Renu; Leiby, Benjamin; Ellsworth, Elyse; Blackmon, Shauna; Ruiz, Christian; Curtis, Mark; Fortina, Paolo; Ertel, Adam; Liu, Chengbao

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying progression of prostate cancer (PCa) to castrate-resistant (CR) and metastatic disease are poorly understood. Our previous mechanistic work shows that inhibition of transcription factor Stat5 by multiple alternative methods induces extensive rapid apoptotic death of Stat5-positive PCa cells in vitro and inhibits PCa xenograft tumor growth in nude mice. Furthermore, STAT5A/B induces invasive behavior of PCa cells in vitro and in vivo, suggesting involvement ...

  1. Human heterochromatin protein 1 isoforms regulate androgen receptor signaling in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itsumi, Momoe; Shiota, Masaki; Yokomizo, Akira; Kashiwagi, Eiji; Takeuchi, Ario; Tatsugami, Katsunori; Inokuchi, Junichi; Song, Yoohyun; Uchiumi, Takeshi; Naito, Seiji

    2013-06-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) signaling is critical for the tumorigenesis and development of prostate cancer, as well as the progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer. We previously showed that the heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) β isoform plays a critical role in transactivation of AR signaling as an AR coactivator that promotes prostate cancer cell proliferation. However, the roles of other HP1 isoforms, HP1α and HP1γ, in AR expression and prostate cancer remain unclear. Here, we found that knockdown of HP1γ, but not HP1α, reduced AR expression and cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest at G1 phase in LNCaP cells. Conversely, overexpression of full-length HP1α and its C-terminal deletion mutant increased AR expression and cell growth, whereas overexpression of HP1γ had no effect. Similarly, HP1α overexpression promoted 22Rv1 cell growth, whereas HP1γ knockdown reduced the proliferation of CxR cells, a castration-resistant LNCaP derivative. Taken together, HP1 isoforms distinctly augment AR signaling and cell growth in prostate cancer. Therefore, silencing of HP1β and HP1γ may be a promising therapeutic strategy for treatment of prostate cancer.

  2. Comparability of prostate trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suciu, S; Sylvester, R; Iversen, P;

    1993-01-01

    The present overview of advanced prostate cancer required the identification of randomized clinical trials studying the question of maximal androgen blockade versus the classic castration therapy. The heterogeneity of the trials concerned the type of castration (surgical or chemical) and the type...... of antiandrogen (flutamide, Anandron, or cyproterone acetate) added to castration. This paper reviews the different types of heterogeneity that might exist among trials that are involved in the overview: study design, randomization procedure, treatment evaluation, statistical evaluation, and data maturity...... with a larger number of patients and a longer follow-up will contribute more to the overview's results....

  3. Hydrogen Sulfide Signaling Axis as a Target for Prostate Cancer Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingzhe Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S was originally considered toxic at elevated levels; however just in the past decade H2S has been proposed to be an important gasotransmitter with various physiological and pathophysiological roles in the body. H2S can be generated endogenously from L-cysteine by multiple enzymes, including cystathionine gamma-lyase, cystathionine beta-synthase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase in combination with cysteine aminotransferase. Prostate cancer is a major health concern and no effective treatment for prostate cancers is available. H2S has been shown to inhibit cell survival of androgen-independent, androgen-dependent, and antiandrogen-resistant prostate cancer cells through different mechanisms. Various H2S-releasing compounds, including sulfide salts, diallyl disulfide, diallyl trisulfide, sulforaphane, and other polysulfides, also have been shown to inhibit prostate cancer growth and metastasis. The expression of H2S-producing enzyme was reduced in both human prostate cancer tissues and prostate cancer cells. Androgen receptor (AR signaling is indispensable for the development of castration resistant prostate cancer, and H2S was shown to inhibit AR transactivation and contributes to antiandrogen-resistant status. In this review, we summarized the current knowledge of H2S signaling in prostate cancer and described the molecular alterations, which may bring this gasotransmitter into the clinic in the near future for developing novel pharmacological and therapeutic interventions for prostate cancer.

  4. Hydrogen Sulfide Signaling Axis as a Target for Prostate Cancer Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingzhe; Wu, Lingyun; Montaut, Sabine; Yang, Guangdong

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) was originally considered toxic at elevated levels; however just in the past decade H2S has been proposed to be an important gasotransmitter with various physiological and pathophysiological roles in the body. H2S can be generated endogenously from L-cysteine by multiple enzymes, including cystathionine gamma-lyase, cystathionine beta-synthase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase in combination with cysteine aminotransferase. Prostate cancer is a major health concern and no effective treatment for prostate cancers is available. H2S has been shown to inhibit cell survival of androgen-independent, androgen-dependent, and antiandrogen-resistant prostate cancer cells through different mechanisms. Various H2S-releasing compounds, including sulfide salts, diallyl disulfide, diallyl trisulfide, sulforaphane, and other polysulfides, also have been shown to inhibit prostate cancer growth and metastasis. The expression of H2S-producing enzyme was reduced in both human prostate cancer tissues and prostate cancer cells. Androgen receptor (AR) signaling is indispensable for the development of castration resistant prostate cancer, and H2S was shown to inhibit AR transactivation and contributes to antiandrogen-resistant status. In this review, we summarized the current knowledge of H2S signaling in prostate cancer and described the molecular alterations, which may bring this gasotransmitter into the clinic in the near future for developing novel pharmacological and therapeutic interventions for prostate cancer. PMID:27019751

  5. A Randomized Phase 2 Trial of 177Lu Radiolabeled Anti-PSMA Monoclonal Antibody J591 in Patients with High-Risk Castrate, Biochemically Relapsed Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Christos, Marina Mikhail, John Chapin, David M. Nanus, Scott T. Tagawa Division of Hematology & Medical Oncology Weill Cornell Medical College Disclosures...Genetics, $26,196,300 Therapy and Mechanisms of Resistance, $87,912,713 Tumor Biology and Immunology, $51,016,047 In This Issue page 1

  6. Prospective evaluation of [{sup 11}C]Choline PET/CT in therapy response assessment of standardized docetaxel first-line chemotherapy in patients with advanced castration refractory prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarzenboeck, Sarah M.; Krause, Bernd J. [Technical University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Rostock University Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rostock (Germany); Eiber, Matthias; Schwaiger, Markus [Technical University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Kundt, Guenther [Rostock University Medical Centre, Department of Biostatistics and Informatics, Rostock (Germany); Retz, Margitta; Treiber, Uwe; Nawroth, Roman; Gschwend, Juergen E.; Thalgott, Mark [Technical University of Munich, Department of Urology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Sakretz, Monique; Kurth, Jens [Rostock University Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rostock (Germany); Rummeny, Ernst J. [Technical University of Munich, Institute of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the value of [{sup 11}C] Choline PET/CT in monitoring early and late response to a standardized first-line docetaxel chemotherapy in castration refractory prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients. Thirty-two patients were referred for [{sup 11}C] Choline PET/CT before the start of docetaxel chemotherapy, after one and ten chemotherapy cycles (or - in case of discontinuation - after the last administered cycle) for therapy response assessment. [{sup 11}C] Choline uptake (SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub mean}), CT derived Houndsfield units (HU{sub max}, HU{sub mean}), and volume of bone, lung, and nodal metastases and local recurrence were measured semi-automatically at these timepoints. Change in SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub mean}, HU{sub max}, HU{sub mean,} and volume was assessed between PET 2 and 1 (early response assessment, ERA) and PET 3 and 1 (late response assessment, LRA) on a patient and lesion basis. Results of PET/CT were compared to clinically used RECIST 1.1 and clinical criteria based therapy response assessment including PSA for defining progressive disease (PD) and non-progressive disease (nPD), respectively. Relationships between changes of SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub mean} (early and late) and changes of PSA{sub early} and PSA{sub late} were evaluated. Prognostic value of initial SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub mean} was assessed. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS. In the patient-based ERA and LRA there were no statistically significant differences in change of choline uptake, HU, and volume between PD and nPD applying RECIST or clinical response criteria. In the lesion-based ERA, decrease in choline uptake of bone metastases was even higher in PD (applying RECIST criteria), whereas in LRA the decrease was higher in nPD (applying clinical criteria). There were only significant correlations between change in choline uptake and PSA in ERA in PD, in LRA no significant correlations were discovered. Initial SUV{sub max

  7. Potential synergistic implications for stromal-targeted radiopharmaceuticals in bone-metastatic prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Oliver Sartor

    2011-01-01

    Genetic heterogeneity and chemotherapy-resistant 'stem cells' represent two of the most pressing issues in devising new strategies for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer. Though curative strategies have long been present for men with localized disease, metastatic prostate cancer is currently incurable. Though substantial improvements in outcomes are now possible through the utilization of newly approved therapies, novel combinations are clearly needed. Herein we describe potentially synergistic interactions between bone stromal-targeted radiopharmaceuticals and other therapies for treatment of bone-metastatic prostate cancer. Radiation has long been known to synergize with cytotoxic chemotherapies and recent data also suggest the possibility of synergy when combining radiation and immune-based strategies. Combination therapies will be required to substantially improve survival for men with castrate-resistant metastatic prostate cancer and we hypothesize that bone-targeted radiopharmaceuticals will play an important role in this process.

  8. AR-V7 and prostate cancer: The watershed for treatment selection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarese, Chiara; Santoni, Matteo; Brunelli, Matteo; Buti, Sebastiano; Modena, Alessandra; Nabissi, Massimo; Artibani, Walter; Martignoni, Guido; Montironi, Rodolfo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Massari, Francesco

    2016-02-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays a key role in progression to metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Despite the recent progress in targeting persistent AR activity with the next-generation hormonal therapies (abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide), resistance to these agents limits therapeutic efficacy for many patients. Several explanations for response and/or resistance to abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide are emerging, but growing interest is focusing on importance of AR splice variants (AR-Vs) and in particular of AR-V7. Increasing evidences highlight the concept that variant expression could be used as a potential predictive biomarker and a therapeutic target in advanced prostate cancer. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms of treatment resistance or sensitivity can help to achieve a more effective management of mCRPC, increasing clinical outcomes and representing a promising and engaging area of prostate cancer research.

  9. Castration-induced expression of caspase-1 in epithelia of accessory sex organs in male rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masao Izawa; Mitunori Kimura; Tomiko Yamada; Makoto Saji

    2001-01-01

    Aim: As an attempt to clarify the molecular basis of castration-induced apoptosis, this study was undertaken to demonstrate the expression of caspase-1 in male accessory sex organs of rats. Methods and results: cDNA of rat caspase-1 was cloned by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction from the ventral prostates. The open reading frame predicts 402 amino acids, which shows more than 91% and 63 % identity to those of mouse and human, respec tively. Northern analyses demonstrated the presence of castration-induced up-regulation of the 1.6 kb transcript in the ventral prostate and the seminal vesicles. Finally, the authors demonstrated the caspase-1 transcripts in the epithelia of these tissues by in situ hybridization analyses. Conclusion: Castration induces the expression of caspase-1 tran scripts in the epithelia of ventral prostate and seminal vesicle. These observations suggest a possible role of caspase-1 in apoptosis in male accessory sex organs.

  10. Management Options in Advanced Prostate Cancer: What is the Role for Sipuleucel-T?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitting, Rhonda L; Armstrong, Andrew J; George, Daniel J

    2011-01-01

    Most prostate cancer-related deaths occur in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Until recently, only therapy with docetaxel and prednisone has been shown to prolong survival in men with metastatic CRPC. With the United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) approvals of sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel, and abiraterone acetate, all based on improvement in overall survival, the landscape for management of men with metastatic CRPC has dramatically changed. In this review we will discuss the pivotal clinical trial data leading to these approvals, with particular focus on the unique indication for sipuleucel-T and the implications for optimal management and sequencing of treatment in this patient population.

  11. The latest advances of experimental research on targeted gene therapy for prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongliang Pan; Lianchao Jin; Xianghua Zhang

    2013-01-01

    The absence of ef ective therapies for castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) establishes the need to de-velop novel therapeutic modality, such as targeted gene therapy, which is ideal for the treatment of CRPC. But its application has been limited due to lack of favorable gene vector and the reduction of“bystander ef ect”. Consequently, scientists al over the world focus their main experimental research on the fol owing four aspects:targeted gene, vector, transfer means and comprehensive therapy. In this paper, we reviewed the latest advances of experimental research on targeted gene therapy for prostate cancer .

  12. Adipose Stem Cell-Based Therapeutic Targeting of Residual Androgens in African Americans with Bone-Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    in vitro and in vivo; (b) determine if α- HSD-expressing osteotropic ASCCont will nullify the ADMSCAA- mediated CaP cell growth and metastasis in vitro...capable of mediating continued androgen-receptor (AR) signaling and gene expression [27]. Moreover, residual intra-prostatic androgens are implicated in...nearly every mechanism whereby AR- mediated signaling leads to the development of castration-resistant disease [28]. The increased expression of

  13. Effect of local anaesthesia and/or analgesia on pain responses induced by piglet castration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyman Görel

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgical castration in male piglets is painful and methods that reduce this pain are requested. This study evaluated the effect of local anaesthesia and analgesia on vocal, physiological and behavioural responses during and after castration. A second purpose was to evaluate if herdsmen can effectively administer anaesthesia. Methods Four male piglets in each of 141 litters in five herds were randomly assigned to one of four treatments: castration without local anaesthesia or analgesia (C, controls, analgesia (M, meloxicam, local anaesthesia (L, lidocaine, or both local anaesthesia and analgesia (LM. Lidocaine (L, LM was injected at least three minutes before castration and meloxicam (M, LM was injected after castration. During castration, vocalisation was measured and resistance movements judged. Behaviour observations were carried out on the castration day and the following day. The day after castration, castration wounds were ranked, ear and skin temperature was measured, and blood samples were collected for analysis of acute phase protein Serum Amyloid A concentration (SAA. Piglets were weighed on the castration day and at three weeks of age. Sickness treatments and mortality were recorded until three weeks of age. Results Piglets castrated with lidocaine produced calls with lower intensity (p p p = 0.06, n.s. and the following day (p = 0.02. Controls had less swollen wounds compared to piglets assigned to treatments M, L and LM (p p = 0.005; p = 0.05 for C + L compared to M + LM. Ear temperature was higher (p Conclusions The study concludes that lidocaine reduced pain during castration and that meloxicam reduced pain after castration. The study also concludes that the herdsmen were able to administer local anaesthesia effectively.

  14. Imaging-guided preclinical trials of vascular targeting in prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmuk, James

    Purpose: Prostate cancer is the most common non-cutaneous malignancy in American men and is characterized by dependence on androgens (Testosterone/Dihydrotestosterone) for growth and survival. Although reduction of serum testosterone levels by surgical or chemical castration transiently inhibits neoplastic growth, tumor adaptation to castrate levels of androgens results in the generation of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Progression to CRPC following androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been associated with changes in vascular morphology and increased angiogenesis. Based on this knowledge, we hypothesized that targeting tumor vasculature in combination with ADT would result in enhanced therapeutic efficacy against prostate cancer. Methods: To test this hypothesis, we examined the therapeutic activity of a tumor-vascular disrupting agent (tumor-VDA), EPC2407 (Crolibulin(TM)), alone and in combination with ADT in a murine model of prostate cancer (Myc-CaP). A non-invasive multimodality imaging approach based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), bioluminescence imaging (BLI), and ultrasound (US) was utilized to characterize tumor response to therapy and to guide preclinical trial design. Imaging results were correlated with histopathologic (H&E) and immunohistochemical (CD31) assessment as well as tumor growth inhibition and survival analyses. Results: Our imaging techniques were able to capture an acute reduction (within 24 hours) in tumor perfusion following castration and VDA monotherapy. BLI revealed onset of recurrent disease 5-7 days post castration prior to visible tumor regrowth suggestive of vascular recovery. Administration of VDA beginning 1 week post castration for 3 weeks resulted in sustained vascular suppression, inhibition of tumor regrowth, and conferred a more pronounced survival benefit compared to either monotherapy. Conclusion: The high mortality rate associated with CRPC underscores the need for investigating novel treatment

  15. Copper signaling axis as a target for prostate cancer therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safi, Rachid; Nelson, Erik R; Chitneni, Satish K; Franz, Katherine J; George, Daniel J; Zalutsky, Michael R; McDonnell, Donald P

    2014-10-15

    Previously published reports indicate that serum copper levels are elevated in patients with prostate cancer and that increased copper uptake can be used as a means to image prostate tumors. It is unclear, however, to what extent copper is required for prostate cancer cell function as we observed only modest effects of chelation strategies on the growth of these cells in vitro. With the goal of exploiting prostate cancer cell proclivity for copper uptake, we developed a "conditional lethal" screen to identify compounds whose cytotoxic actions were manifested in a copper-dependent manner. Emerging from this screen was a series of dithiocarbamates, which, when complexed with copper, induced reactive oxygen species-dependent apoptosis of malignant, but not normal, prostate cells. One of the dithiocarbamates identified, disulfiram (DSF), is an FDA-approved drug that has previously yielded disappointing results in clinical trials in patients with recurrent prostate cancer. Similarly, in our studies, DSF alone had a minimal effect on the growth of prostate cancer tumors when propagated as xenografts. However, when DSF was coadministered with copper, a very dramatic inhibition of tumor growth in models of hormone-sensitive and of castrate-resistant disease was observed. Furthermore, we determined that prostate cancer cells express high levels of CTR1, the primary copper transporter, and additional chaperones that are required to maintain intracellular copper homeostasis. The expression levels of most of these proteins are increased further upon treatment of androgen receptor (AR)-positive prostate cancer cell lines with androgens. Not surprisingly, robust CTR1-dependent uptake of copper into prostate cancer cells was observed, an activity that was accentuated by activation of AR. Given these data linking AR to intracellular copper uptake, we believe that dithiocarbamate/copper complexes are likely to be effective for the treatment of patients with prostate cancer whose

  16. Current Insights into Long Non-Coding RNAs (LncRNAs) in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolle, Maria A.; Bauernhofer, Thomas; Pummer, Karl; Calin, George A.; Pichler, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The importance of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in the pathogenesis of various malignancies has been uncovered over the last few years. Their dysregulation often contributes to or is a result of tumour progression. In prostate cancer, the most common malignancy in men, lncRNAs can promote castration resistance, cell proliferation, invasion, and metastatic spread. Expression patterns of lncRNAs often change during tumour progression; their expression levels may constantly rise (e.g., HOX transcript antisense RNA, HOTAIR), or steadily decrease (e.g., downregulated RNA in cancer, DRAIC). In prostate cancer, lncRNAs likewise have diagnostic (e.g., prostate cancer antigen 3, PCA3), prognostic (e.g., second chromosome locus associated with prostate-1, SChLAP1), and predictive (e.g., metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript-1, MALAT-1) functions. Considering their dynamic role in prostate cancer, lncRNAs may also serve as therapeutic targets, helping to prevent development of castration resistance, maintain stable disease, and prohibit metastatic spread. PMID:28241429

  17. Sipuleucel-T in the treatment of prostate cancer: an evidence-based review of its place in therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graff JN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Julie N Graff,1,2 Erin D Chamberlain31Portland VA Medical Center, 2Knight Cancer Institute, 3Department of Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USAAbstract: Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer is the lethal form of cancer of the prostate. Five new agents that prolong survival in this group have emerged in the past 5 years, and sipuleucel-T is among them. Sipuleucel-T is the only immunotherapy shown to improve survival in prostate cancer. It is currently indicated in asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic patients, as it has never shown a direct cancer effect. This paper describes the process of creating the sipuleucel-T product from the manufacturing and patient aspects. It discusses the four placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trials (RCTs of sipuleucel-T, focusing on survival and adverse events. There are three RCTs in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, all of which showed improved overall survival without meaningful decreases in symptoms, tumor volumes, or prostate-specific antigen levels. One RCT in castration-sensitive, biochemically relapsed prostate cancer attempted to find a decrease in biochemical failure, but that endpoint was not reached. Adverse events in all four of these studies centered around cytokine release. This paper also reviews a Phase II study of sipuleucel-T given neoadjuvantly that speaks to its mechanism of action. Additionally, there is a registry study of sipuleucel-T that has been used to evaluate immunological parameters of the product in men ≥80 years of age and men who had previously been treated with palliative radiation. Attempts to find early markers of response to sipuleucel-T are described. Further ongoing studies that explore the efficacy of sipuleucel-T in combination with immune checkpoint inhibitors and second-generation hormonal therapies that are summarized. Finally, the only published economic analysis of sipuleucel-T is discussed.Keywords: prostate

  18. Angiogenesis inhibitors in the treatment of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heath Elisabeth I

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Prostate cancer remains a significant public health problem, with limited therapeutic options in the setting of castrate-resistant metastatic disease. Angiogenesis inhibition is a relatively novel antineoplastic approach, which targets the reliance of tumor growth on the formation of new blood vessels. This strategy has been used successfully in other solid tumor types, with the FDA approval of anti-angiogenic agents in breast, lung, colon, brain, and kidney cancer. The application of anti-angiogenic therapy to prostate cancer is reviewed in this article, with attention to efficacy and toxicity results from several classes of anti-angiogenic agents. Ultimately, the fate of anti-angiogenic agents in prostate cancer rests on the eagerly anticipated results of several key phase III studies.

  19. A partial differential equation model of metastasized prostatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Avner; Jain, Harsh Vardhan

    2013-06-01

    Biochemically failing metastatic prostate cancer is typically treated with androgen ablation. However, due to the emergence of castration-resistant cells that can survive in low androgen concentrations, such therapy eventually fails. Here, we develop a partial differential equation model of the growth and response to treatment of prostate cancer that has metastasized to the bone. Existence and uniqueness results are derived for the resulting free boundary problem. In particular, existence and uniqueness of solutions for all time are proven for the radially symmetric case. Finally, numerical simulations of a tumor growing in 2-dimensions with radial symmetry are carried in order to evaluate the therapeutic potential of different treatment strategies. These simulations are able to reproduce a variety of clinically observed responses to treatment, and suggest treatment strategies that may result in tumor remission, underscoring our model's potential to make a significant contribution in the field of prostate cancer therapeutics.

  20. An overview of sipuleucel-T: autologous cellular immunotherapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesley, Johnna D; Whitmore, James; Trager, James; Sheikh, Nadeem

    2012-04-01

    Sipuleucel-T, the first autologous active cellular immunotherapy approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration, is designed to stimulate an immune response to prostate cancer. Sipuleucel-T is manufactured by culturing a patient's peripheral blood mononuclear cells (including antigen presenting cells) with a recombinant protein comprising a tumor-associated antigen (prostatic acid phosphatase) and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor. Treatment consists of 3 infusions at approximately 2-week intervals, resulting in a prime-boost pattern of immune activation, a robust antigen-specific cellular and humoral immune response, and, consequently, a survival benefit in subjects with asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer. Adverse events are generally mild to moderate and resolve within 2 d. Serious adverse events occur at a low rate. As the first autologous cellular immunotherapy to demonstrate a survival benefit, sipuleucel-T is a novel oncologic therapeutic that warrants the reassessment of the current prostate cancer treatment paradigm.

  1. Sipuleucel-T for the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer: promise and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paller, Channing J; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S

    2012-04-01

    In the past 18 mo, three new life-prolonging therapies have been approved by the US. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), including sipuleucel-T, the first therapeutic vaccine approved for this disease. With very low toxicity and a demonstrable overall survival benefit, sipuleucel-T offers a promising new therapy and validates further investigation into other immunotherapy approaches for prostate cancer patients. However, questions about its mechanism of action, concerns about its cost, and its optimal sequencing in the prostate cancer treatment landscape may be limiting the adoption of sipuleucel-T. This review summarizes the state-of-the-science with respect to immunotherapy approaches for men with prostate cancer, provides information about the clinical development as well as the strengths and concerns associated with sipuleucel-T, and offers initial insights about where this promising treatment may best fit in the therapeutic landscape.

  2. The 22nd annual prostate cancer foundation scientific retreat report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahira, Andrea K; Simons, Jonathan W; Soule, Howard R

    2016-09-01

    The 22nd Annual Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF) Scientific Retreat was convened in Washington, D.C. from October 8 to 10, 2015. This event is the foremost scientific conference in the world focusing on basic, translational, and clinical prostate cancer research with the highest potential for accelerating the understanding of prostate cancer biology and improving the lives and outcomes of prostate cancer patients. Topics highlighted during the 2015 Retreat included: (i) new strategies and treatments for localized high-risk, hormone-naïve, oligometastatic, castrate-resistant, and treatment-refractory prostate cancer settings; (ii) the biology and genomics of tumor heterogeneity and tumor evolution; (iii) new understandings on the mechanisms and targeting of oncogenic drivers of prostate cancer; (iv) bioengineering of novel therapies and drug delivery methods; (v) innovative approaches to tumor immunotherapy; (vi) emerging molecular imaging technologies with improved sensitivity and specificity; and (vii) advancements in prognostic and predictive biomarkers and precision medicine strategies. Prostate 76:1037-1052, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Modulators of prostate cancer cell proliferation and viability identified by short-hairpin RNA library screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Brown Dahlman

    Full Text Available There is significant need to identify novel prostate cancer drug targets because current hormone therapies eventually fail, leading to a drug-resistant and fatal disease termed castration-resistant prostate cancer. To functionally identify genes that, when silenced, decrease prostate cancer cell proliferation or induce cell death in combination with antiandrogens, we employed an RNA interference-based short hairpin RNA barcode screen in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells. We identified and validated four candidate genes (AKT1, PSMC1, STRADA, and TTK that impaired growth when silenced in androgen receptor positive prostate cancer cells and enhanced the antiproliferative effects of antiandrogens. Inhibition of AKT with a pharmacologic inhibitor also induced apoptosis when combined with antiandrogens, consistent with recent evidence for PI3K and AR pathway crosstalk in prostate cancer cells. Recovery of hairpins targeting a known prostate cancer pathway validates the utility of shRNA library screening in prostate cancer as a broad strategy to identify new candidate drug targets.

  4. Modulators of prostate cancer cell proliferation and viability identified by short-hairpin RNA library screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlman, Kimberly Brown; Parker, Joel S; Shamu, Tambudzai; Hieronymus, Haley; Chapinski, Caren; Carver, Brett; Chang, Kenneth; Hannon, Gregory J; Sawyers, Charles L

    2012-01-01

    There is significant need to identify novel prostate cancer drug targets because current hormone therapies eventually fail, leading to a drug-resistant and fatal disease termed castration-resistant prostate cancer. To functionally identify genes that, when silenced, decrease prostate cancer cell proliferation or induce cell death in combination with antiandrogens, we employed an RNA interference-based short hairpin RNA barcode screen in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells. We identified and validated four candidate genes (AKT1, PSMC1, STRADA, and TTK) that impaired growth when silenced in androgen receptor positive prostate cancer cells and enhanced the antiproliferative effects of antiandrogens. Inhibition of AKT with a pharmacologic inhibitor also induced apoptosis when combined with antiandrogens, consistent with recent evidence for PI3K and AR pathway crosstalk in prostate cancer cells. Recovery of hairpins targeting a known prostate cancer pathway validates the utility of shRNA library screening in prostate cancer as a broad strategy to identify new candidate drug targets.

  5. ERBB2 increases metastatic potentials specifically in androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Tome-Garcia

    Full Text Available Despite all the blood-based biomarkers used to monitor prostate cancer patients, prostate cancer remains as the second common cause of cancer mortality in men in the United States. This is largely due to a lack of understanding of the molecular pathways that are responsible for the aggressive forms of prostate cancers, the castrate-resistant prostate cancer and the metastatic prostate cancer. Cell signaling pathways activated by the ERBB2 oncogene or the RAS oncogene are frequently found to be altered in metastatic prostate cancers. To evaluate and define the role of the ERBB2/RAS pathway in prostate cancer metastasis, we have evaluated the impact of ERBB2- or RAS-overexpression on the metastatic potentials for four prostate cancer cell lines derived from tumors with different androgen sensitivities. To do so, we transfected the human DU145, LnCaP, and PC3 prostate cancer cells and the murine Myc-CaP prostate cancer cells with the activated form of ERBB2 or H-RAS and assessed their metastatic potentials by three complementary assays, a wound healing assay, a transwell motility assay, and a transwell invasion assay. We showed that while overexpression of ERBB2 increased the metastatic potential of the androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cells (i.e. PC3 and DU145, it did not affect metastatic potentials of the androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells (i.e. LnCaP and Myc-CaP. In contrast, overexpression of H-RAS only increased the cell motility of Myc-CaP cells, which overexpress the human c-MYC oncogene. Our data suggest that ERBB2 collaborates with androgen signaling to promote prostate cancer metastasis, and that although RAS is one of the critical downstream effectors of ERBB2, it does not phenocopy ERBB2 for its impact on the metastatic potentials of prostate cancer cell lines.

  6. Endocrine and immune responses to resistance training in prostate cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvão, D A; Nosaka, K; Taaffe, D R; Peake, J; Spry, N; Suzuki, K; Yamaya, K; McGuigan, M R; Kristjanson, L J; Newton, R U

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the effect of 20 weeks resistance training on a range of serum hormones and inflammatory markers at rest, and following acute bouts of exercise in prostate cancer patients undergoing androgen deprivation. Ten patients exercised twice weekly at high intensity for several upper and lower-body muscle groups. Neither testosterone nor prostate-specific antigen changed at rest or following an acute bout of exercise. However, serum growth hormone (GH), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and differential blood leukocyte counts increased (P exercise. Resistance exercise does not appear to compromise testosterone suppression, and acute elevations in serum GH and DHEA may partly underlie improvements observed in physical function.

  7. Defective DNA repair mechanisms in prostate cancer: impact of olaparib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Felice F

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Francesca De Felice,1 Vincenzo Tombolini,1 Francesco Marampon,2 Angela Musella,3 Claudia Marchetti3 1Department of Radiotherapy, Policlinico Umberto I, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Rome, 2Department of Biotechnological and Applied Clinical Sciences, Laboratory of Radiobiology, University of L’Aquila, L’Aquila, 3Department of Gynecological and Obstetrical Sciences and Urological Sciences, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Rome, Italy Abstract: The field of prostate oncology has continued to change dramatically. It has truly become a field that is intensely linked to molecular genetic alterations, especially DNA-repair defects. Germline breast cancer 1 gene (BRCA1 and breast cancer 2 gene (BRCA2 mutations are implicated in the highest risk of prostate cancer (PC predisposition and aggressiveness. Poly adenosine diphosphate ribose polymerase (PARP proteins play a key role in DNA repair mechanisms and represent a valid target for new therapies. Olaparib is an oral PARP inhibitor that blocks DNA repair pathway and coupled with BRCA mutated-disease results in tumor cell death. In phase II clinical trials, including patients with advanced castration-resistant PC, olaparib seems to be efficacious and well tolerated. Waiting for randomized phase III trials, olaparib should be considered as a promising treatment option for PC. Keywords: prostate cancer, metastatic disease, castration resistant, BRCA, DNA-repair, PARP, olaparib

  8. Androgen and prostatic stroma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan-JieNIU; Teng-XiangMA; IuZHANG; YongXU; Rui-FaHAN; GuangSUN

    2003-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the effect of androgen on the proliferation,differentiation and regression of canine prostatic stromal cells in vivo and human stromal cells in vitro.Methods:Twenty-two dogs,including 15 normal prostate doge and 7 prostatic hyperplasia dogs,had their serum concentration of testosterone and estrodiol determined by radioimmunoassay before and after castration.The expression of androgen receptor(AR)and estrogen receptor(ER)in the prostate were analysed by immunohistochemistry and semi-quantitative RT-PCR before and after castration.Light microscopy,transmission electron microscopy and TUNEL assay were carried out successively before and after castration to evaluate the prostatic histomorphology.In vitro serum-free cell cultures from human prostatic stroma were established and exposed to dihydrotestosterone(DHT).The proliferation of the cell culture was detected by MTT assay.The expression of TGFβ bFGF,AR,and smooth muscle cell(SMC) specific proteins (myosin and/or smoothelin)were detected using immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR.The differentiation from fibroblasts to smooth muscle cells was deduced by measuring the expression of SMC specific proteins.Results:Before castration,the serum concentrations of testosterone and estrodiol were not statistically different between normal and hyperplasia groups.Following castration,the serum concentration of testerone decreased rapidly in 2 days,and the concentration of estrodiol had no significant change compared with the pre-castration data.In the prostate,AR was presented in both the epithelial and stromal cells and the AR mRNA level was higher in hyperplasia than in normal prostate tissues(P<0.05).While ER predominantly existed in the prostate stromal cells and the ER mRNA had no difference between the hyperplasia and the normal group.Within the early phase of castration(castration by the end of d

  9. Abiraterone and other novel androgen-directed strategies for the treatment of prostate cancer: a new era of hormonal therapies is born

    OpenAIRE

    Schweizer, Michael T.; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.

    2012-01-01

    The number of life-prolonging therapies proven effective in the treatment of metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) has been limited until recently. In the past 2 years several such therapies have come to market. In 2010, the autologous immunotherapy sipuleucel-T and the next-generation taxane cabazitaxel were approved in this setting. However, abundant evidence has shown that CRPC growth continues to be driven through androgen-dependent signaling. Both of these drugs fail to ta...

  10. Identification of Bone-Derived Factors Conferring De Novo Therapeutic Resistance in Metastatic Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu-Chen; Lin, Song-Chang; Yu, Guoyu; Cheng, Chien-Jui; Liu, Bin; Liu, Hsuan-Chen; Hawke, David H; Parikh, Nila U; Varkaris, Andreas; Corn, Paul; Logothetis, Christopher; Satcher, Robert L; Yu-Lee, Li-Yuan; Gallick, Gary E; Lin, Sue-Hwa

    2015-11-15

    Resistance to currently available targeted therapies significantly hampers the survival of patients with prostate cancer with bone metastasis. Here we demonstrate an important resistance mechanism initiated from tumor-induced bone. Studies using an osteogenic patient-derived xenograft, MDA-PCa-118b, revealed that tumor cells resistant to cabozantinib, a Met and VEGFR-2 inhibitor, reside in a "resistance niche" adjacent to prostate cancer-induced bone. We performed secretome analysis of the conditioned medium from tumor-induced bone to identify proteins (termed "osteocrines") found within this resistance niche. In accordance with previous reports demonstrating that activation of integrin signaling pathways confers therapeutic resistance, 27 of the 90 osteocrines identified were integrin ligands. We found that following cabozantinib treatment, only tumor cells positioned adjacent to the newly formed woven bone remained viable and expressed high levels of pFAK-Y397 and pTalin-S425, mediators of integrin signaling. Accordingly, treatment of C4-2B4 cells with integrin ligands resulted in increased pFAK-Y397 expression and cell survival, whereas targeting integrins with FAK inhibitors PF-562271 or defactinib inhibited FAK phosphorylation and reduced the survival of PC3-mm2 cells. Moreover, treatment of MDA-PCa-118b tumors with PF-562271 led to decreased tumor growth, irrespective of initial tumor size. Finally, we show that upon treatment cessation, the combination of PF-562271 and cabozantinib delayed tumor recurrence in contrast to cabozantinib treatment alone. Our studies suggest that identifying paracrine de novo resistance mechanisms may significantly contribute to the generation of a broader set of potent therapeutic tools that act combinatorially to inhibit metastatic prostate cancer.

  11. ETS Gene Fusions as Predictive Biomarkers of Resistance to Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0582 TITLE: ETS Gene Fusions as Predictive Biomarkers of Resistance to Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL...ETS gene fusion status associated with clinical outcomes following radiation therapy , by analyzing both the collected biomarker and clinical data...denotes absence of an ERG fusion). ETS gene fusions status did not predict outcomes following radiation therapy , as demonstrated by Kaplan Meier

  12. Aphrodisiac properties of Tribulus Terrestris extract (Protodioscin) in normal and castrated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthaman, K; Adaikan, P G; Prasad, R N V

    2002-08-09

    Tribulus terrestris (TT) has long been used in the traditional Chinese and Indian systems of medicine for the treatment of various ailments and is popularly claimed to improve sexual functions in man. Sexual behaviour and intracavernous pressure (ICP) were studied in both normal and castrated rats to further understand the role of TT containing protodioscin (PTN) as an aphrodisiac. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into five groups of 8 each that included distilled water treated (normal and castrated), testosterone treated (normal and castrated, 10 mg/kg body weight, subcutaneously, bi-weekly) and TT treated (castrated, 5 mg/kg body weight, orally once daily). Decreases in body weight, prostate weight and ICP were observed among the castrated groups of rats compared to the intact group. There was an overall reduction in the sexual behaviour parameters in the castrated groups of rats as reflected by decrease in mount and intromission frequencies (MF and IF) and increase in mount, intromission, ejaculation latencies (ML, IL, EL) as well as post-ejaculatory interval (PEI). Compared to the castrated control, treatment of castrated rats (with either testosterone or TT extract) showed increase in prostate weight and ICP that were statistically significant. There was also a mild to moderate improvement of the sexual behaviour parameters as evidenced by increase in MF and IF; decrease in ML, IL and PEI. These results were statistically significant. It is concluded that TT extract appears to possess aphrodisiac activity probably due to androgen increasing property of TT (observed in our earlier study on primates).

  13. Sipuleucel-T in the treatment of prostate cancer: an evidence-based review of its place in therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Julie N; Chamberlain, Erin D

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer is the lethal form of cancer of the prostate. Five new agents that prolong survival in this group have emerged in the past 5 years, and sipuleucel-T is among them. Sipuleucel-T is the only immunotherapy shown to improve survival in prostate cancer. It is currently indicated in asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic patients, as it has never shown a direct cancer effect. This paper describes the process of creating the sipuleucel-T product from the manufacturing and patient aspects. It discusses the four placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trials (RCTs) of sipuleucel-T, focusing on survival and adverse events. There are three RCTs in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, all of which showed improved overall survival without meaningful decreases in symptoms, tumor volumes, or prostate-specific antigen levels. One RCT in castration-sensitive, biochemically relapsed prostate cancer attempted to find a decrease in biochemical failure, but that endpoint was not reached. Adverse events in all four of these studies centered around cytokine release. This paper also reviews a Phase II study of sipuleucel-T given neoadjuvantly that speaks to its mechanism of action. Additionally, there is a registry study of sipuleucel-T that has been used to evaluate immunological parameters of the product in men ≥80 years of age and men who had previously been treated with palliative radiation. Attempts to find early markers of response to sipuleucel-T are described. Further ongoing studies that explore the efficacy of sipuleucel-T in combination with immune checkpoint inhibitors and second-generation hormonal therapies that are summarized. Finally, the only published economic analysis of sipuleucel-T is discussed.

  14. The non-steroidal antiandrogen, bicalutamide ('Casodex'), may preserve bone mineral density as compared with castration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyrrell, C J; Blake, G M; Iversen, P

    2003-01-01

    The impact of bicalutamide (Casodex) monotherapy on bone mineral density (BMD) was investigated in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer. BMD was assessed after treatment with bicalutamide 150 mg daily ( n=21) or by medical castration (goserelin acetate 3.6 mg every 28 days) ( n=8) for a...

  15. New Insights into the Androgen-Targeted Therapies and Epigenetic Therapies in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit M. Godbole

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in the United States, and it is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in American men. The androgen receptor (AR, a receptor of nuclear family and a transcription factor, is the most important target in this disease. While most efforts in the clinic are currently directed at lowering levels of androgens that activate AR, resistance to androgen deprivation eventually develops. Most prostate cancer deaths are attributable to this castration-resistant form of prostate cancer (CRPC. Recent work has shed light on the importance of epigenetic events including facilitation of AR signaling by histone-modifying enzymes, posttranslational modifications of AR such as sumoylation. Herein, we provide an overview of the structure of human AR and its key structural domains that can be used as targets to develop novel antiandrogens. We also summarize recent findings about the antiandrogens and the epigenetic factors that modulate the action of AR.

  16. Navigating the evolving therapeutic landscape in advanced prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, E David; Petrylak, Daniel; Sartor, Oliver

    2017-03-07

    Prostate cancer is the most common cause of cancer in men, with 137.9 new cases per 100,000 men per year. The overall 5-year survival rate for prostate cancer is very high. Up to 20% of men who undergo state-of-the art treatment for prostate cancer will develop castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) within 5 years, with median survival for those with metastatic CRPC ranging from approximately 15 to 36 months in recent studies. With the advent of several new drugs in the past 5 years to treat CRPC, the challenge facing clinicians is how to best sequence or combine therapies or both to optimize outcomes. A better understanding of the disease process and the role of the androgen receptor as a target for both therapy and resistance have led to the consideration of biomarkers as an approach to aid in selecting the appropriate agent for a given patient as patients respond to or tolerate different drugs differently. Research to identify new prognostic biomarkers, which are associated with outcome measures, as well as predictive biomarkers, which predict response or resistance to therapy is ongoing. The treatment of advanced prostate cancer and the research related to biomarkers are discussed.

  17. The Adipocyte-Derived Hormone Leptin Has Proliferative Actions on Androgen-Resistant Prostate Cancer Cells Linking Obesity to Advanced Stages of Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Raschid Hoda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Because obesity may be a risk factor for prostate cancer, we investigated proliferative effects of adipocytes-derived hormone leptin on human prostate cancer cells and assessed the role of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathway in mediating these actions. Material and Methods. Three human prostate cancer cell lines were treated with increasing doses of recombinant leptin. Cell growth was measured under serum-free conditions using a spectrophotometric assay. Further, Western blotting was applied to detect the phosphorylation of an ERK1/2, and a specific inhibitor of MAPK (PD98059; 40 μM was used. Results. In both androgen-resistant cell lines DU145 and PC-3, cell growth was dose-dependently increased by leptin after 24 hrs and 48 hrs of incubation, whereas leptin’s proliferative effects on androgen-sensitive cell line LNCaP was less pronounced. Further, leptin caused dose-dependent ERK1/2 phosphorylation in both androgen-resistant cell lines, and pretreatment of these cells with PD98059 inhibited these responses. Conclusions. Leptin may be a potential link between obesity and risk of progression of prostate cancer. Thus, studies on leptin and obesity association to prostate cancer should differentiate patients according to androgen sensitivity.

  18. Aberrant activation of the androgen receptor by NF-kappaB2/p52 in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadiminty, Nagalakshmi; Lou, Wei; Sun, Meng; Chen, Jun; Yue, Jiao; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Evans, Christopher P; Zhou, Qinghua; Gao, Allen C

    2010-04-15

    Prostate cancer initiation and progression are uniquely dependent on the androgen receptor (AR). Even when the cancer progresses to a castration-resistant stage, AR signaling remains active via a variety of mechanisms. In the present study, we showed that NF-kappaB/p52 can activate the AR, resulting in increased transactivation of AR-responsive genes, such as PSA and NKX3.1, in a ligand-independent manner. NF-kappaB2/p52 enhances nuclear translocation and activation of AR by interacting with its NH(2)-terminal domain and enhances the recruitment of coactivators such as p300 to the promoters of AR-dependent genes. These results were confirmed in three different prostate cancer cell lines: LAPC-4 (wild-type AR), LNCaP (mutant AR), and C4-2 (castration resistant). Transfection of p52 into LAPC-4 and LNCaP cells (which express low levels of p52) showed increased activation of the endogenous AR. Downregulation of endogenous p52 in C4-2 cells resulted in abrogation of AR constitutive activation. Comparison of the relative effects of p52 and p65 (RelA) showed that p52, but not p65, could activate the AR. Collectively, these findings, together with previous reports that the levels of NF-kappaB2/p52 are elevated in prostate cancer cells and that active NF-kappaB2/p52 promotes prostate cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo, suggest that NF-kappaB2/p52 may play a critical role in the progression of castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  19. Genomic and epigenomic alterations in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria eAschelter

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC is the second most frequently diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer deaths in man. The treatment of localized PC includes surgery or radiation therapy. In case of relapse after a definitive treatment or in patients with locally advanced or metastatic disease, the standard treatment includes the androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT. By reducing the levels of Testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT under the castration threshold, the ADT acts on the androgen receptor (AR, even if indirectly. The effects of the ADT are usually temporary and nearly all patients, initially sensitive to the androgen ablation therapy, have a disease progression after a 18-24 months medium term. This is probably due to the selection of the cancer cell clones and to their acquisition of critical somatic genome and epigenomic changes. This review aims to provide an overview about the genetic and epigenetic alterations having a crucial role in the carcinogenesis and in the disease progression toward the castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. We focused on the role of the androgen receptor, on its signaling cascade and on the clinical implications that the knowledge of these aspects would have on hormonal therapy, on its failure and its toxicity.

  20. Regulatory T cells control strain specific resistance to Experimental Autoimmune Prostatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breser, Maria L; Lino, Andreia C; Motrich, Ruben D; Godoy, Gloria J; Demengeot, Jocelyne; Rivero, Virginia E

    2016-09-14

    Susceptibility to autoimmune diseases results from the encounter of a complex and long evolved genetic context with a no less complex and changing environment. Major actors in maintaining health are regulatory T cells (Treg) that primarily dampen a large subset of autoreactive lymphocytes escaping thymic negative selection. Here, we directly asked whether Treg participate in defining susceptibility and resistance to Experimental Autoimmune Prostatitis (EAP). We analyzed three common laboratory strains of mice presenting with different susceptibility to autoimmune prostatitis upon immunization with prostate proteins. The NOD, the C57BL/6 and the BALB/c mice that can be classified along a disease score ranging from severe, mild and to undetectable, respectively. Upon mild and transient depletion of Treg at the induction phase of EAP, each model showed an increment along this score, most remarkably with the BALB/c mice switching from a resistant to a susceptible phenotype. We further show that disease associates with the upregulation of CXCR3 expression on effector T cells, a process requiring IFNγ. Together with recent advances on environmental factors affecting Treg, these findings provide a likely cellular and molecular explanation to the recent rise in autoimmune diseases incidence.

  1. Loss of exogenous androgen dependence by prostate tumor cells is associated with elevated glucuronidation potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Brenna M.; Howell, Michelle E.; Wei, Qin; Ma, Linlin; Romsdahl, Trevor; Loughman, Eileen G.; Markham, Jonathan E.; Seravalli, Javier; Barycki, Joseph J.; Simpson, Melanie A.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate epithelial cells control the potency and availability of androgen hormones in part by inactivation and elimination. UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (UGDH) catalyzes the NAD+-dependent oxidation of UDP-glucose to UDP-glucuronate, an essential precursor for androgen inactivation by the prostate glucuronidation enzymes UGT2B15 and UGT2B17. UGDH expression is androgen stimulated, which increases the production of UDP-glucuronate, and fuels UGT-catalyzed glucuronidation. In this study, we compared the glucuronidation potential and its impact on androgen-mediated gene expression in an isogenic LNCaP model for androgen dependent versus castration resistant prostate cancer. Despite significantly lower androgen-glucuronide output, LNCaP 81 castration resistant tumor cells expressed higher levels of UGDH, UGT2B15, and UGT2B17. However, the magnitude of androgen-activated UGDH and PSA expression, as well as the AR-dependent repression of UGT2B15 and UGT2B17, was blunted several-fold in these cells. Consistent with these results, the ligand-activated binding of AR to the PSA promoter and subsequent transcriptional activation were also significantly reduced in castration resistant cells. Analysis of the UDP-sugar pools and flux through pathways downstream of UDP-glucuronate production revealed that these glucuronidation precursor metabolites were channeled through proteoglycan and glycosaminoglycan biosynthetic pathways, leading to increased surface expression of Notch 1. Knockdown of UGDH diminished Notch1 and increased glucuronide output. Overall, these results support a model in which the aberrant partitioning of UDP-glucuronate and other UDP-sugars into alternative pathways during androgen deprivation contributes to the loss of prostate tumor cell androgen sensitivity by promoting altered cell surface proteoglycan expression. PMID:27307252

  2. Castration alters protein balance after high-frequency muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Jennifer L; Fukuda, David H; Rossetti, Michael L; Hoffman, Jay R; Gordon, Bradley S

    2017-02-01

    Resistance exercise increases muscle mass by shifting protein balance in favor of protein accretion. Androgens independently alter protein balance, but it is unknown whether androgens alter this measure after resistance exercise. To answer this, male mice were subjected to sham or castration surgery 7-8 wk before undergoing a bout of unilateral, high-frequency, electrically induced muscle contractions in the fasted or refed state. Puromycin was injected 30 min before euthanasia to measure protein synthesis. The tibialis anterior was analyzed 4 h postcontraction. In fasted mice, neither basal nor stimulated rates of protein synthesis were affected by castration despite lower phosphorylation of mechanistic target of rapamycin in complex 1 (mTORC1) substrates [p70S6K1 (Thr389) and 4E-BP1 (Ser65)]. Markers of autophagy (LC3 II/I ratio and p62 protein content) were elevated by castration, and these measures remained elevated above sham values after contractions. Furthermore, in fasted mice, the protein content of Regulated in Development and DNA Damage 1 (REDD1) was correlated with LC3 II/I in noncontracted muscle, whereas phosphorylation of uncoordinated like kinase 1 (ULK1) (Ser757) was correlated with LC3 II/I in the contracted muscle. When mice were refed before contractions, protein synthesis and mTORC1 signaling were not affected by castration in either the noncontracted or contracted muscle. Conversely, markers of autophagy remained elevated in the muscles of refed, castrated mice even after contractions. These data suggest the castration-mediated elevation in baseline autophagy reduces the absolute positive shift in protein balance after muscle contractions in the refed or fasted states.

  3. Development of cabozantinib for the treatment of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaishampayan UN

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Ulka N VaishampayanDepartment of Oncology, Wayne State University/Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, MI, USAAbstract: Cabozantinib (XL184 is a multitargeted receptor tyrosine kinase with predominantly MET and vascular endothelial growth factor inhibition properties. It is currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of progressive metastatic medullary thyroid cancer. The agent has a convenient once-daily oral dosing schedule and has demonstrated encouraging activity in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. A Phase I/II trial demonstrated responses in soft tissue, visceral disease, and bone metastases in CRPC. An objective response rate of 5%, a stable disease rate of 75%, and a median progression-free survival of 6 months was observed. As compared with the 140 mg daily dose used in thyroid cancer, a lower dose of 60 mg daily is currently being utilized in prostate cancer studies due to the fact that toxicity could be reduced without compromising efficacy. Randomized trials are ongoing in comparison with prednisone or with mitoxantrone and prednisone in pretreated metastatic CRPC. Cabozantinib has demonstrated a unique mechanism of action and preliminary efficacy in the crowded therapeutic field of prostate cancer. Since multiple therapies have recently demonstrated overall survival benefit in metastatic CRPC, cabozantinib will likely face some challenges in clinical application. At present, in this rapidly evolving field, it is unclear what proportion of patients with prostate cancer will be eligible to receive this therapy. The cost of cabozantinib is likely to be another deterrent, especially if it remains more expensive than other oral therapies, such as abiraterone and enzalutamide. Defining the role of MET overexpression and RET mutations as biomarkers in prostate cancer may help to guide patient selection, and enrich and enhance the future applications of this targeted novel agent.Keywords: XL

  4. Aberrant corticosteroid metabolism in tumor cells enables GR takeover in enzalutamide resistant prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianneng; Alyamani, Mohammad; Zhang, Ao; Chang, Kai-Hsiung; Berk, Michael; Li, Zhenfei; Zhu, Ziqi; Petro, Marianne; Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Garcia, Jorge A; Courtney, Kevin; Klein, Eric A; Sharifi, Nima

    2017-01-01

    Prostate cancer is driven by androgen stimulation of the androgen receptor (AR). The next-generation AR antagonist, enzalutamide, prolongs survival, but resistance and lethal disease eventually prevail. Emerging data suggest that the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is upregulated in this context, stimulating expression of AR-target genes that permit continued growth despite AR blockade. However, countering this mechanism by administration of GR antagonists is problematic because GR is essential for life. We show that enzalutamide treatment in human models of prostate cancer and patient tissues is accompanied by a ubiquitin E3-ligase, AMFR, mediating loss of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-2 (11β-HSD2), which otherwise inactivates cortisol, sustaining tumor cortisol concentrations to stimulate GR and enzalutamide resistance. Remarkably, reinstatement of 11β-HSD2 expression, or AMFR loss, reverses enzalutamide resistance in mouse xenograft tumors. Together, these findings reveal a surprising metabolic mechanism of enzalutamide resistance that may be targeted with a strategy that circumvents a requirement for systemic GR ablation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20183.001 PMID:28191869

  5. Aberrant corticosteroid metabolism in tumor cells enables GR takeover in enzalutamide resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianneng; Alyamani, Mohammad; Zhang, Ao; Chang, Kai-Hsiung; Berk, Michael; Li, Zhenfei; Zhu, Ziqi; Petro, Marianne; Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Garcia, Jorge A; Courtney, Kevin; Klein, Eric A; Sharifi, Nima

    2017-02-13

    Prostate cancer is driven by androgen stimulation of the androgen receptor (AR). The next-generation AR antagonist, enzalutamide, prolongs survival, but resistance and lethal disease eventually prevail. Emerging data suggest that the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is upregulated in this context, stimulating expression of AR-target genes that permit continued growth despite AR blockade. However, countering this mechanism by administration of GR antagonists is problematic because GR is essential for life. We show that enzalutamide treatment in human models of prostate cancer and patient tissues is accompanied by a ubiquitin E3-ligase, AMFR, mediating loss of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-2 (11β-HSD2), which otherwise inactivates cortisol, sustaining tumor cortisol concentrations to stimulate GR and enzalutamide resistance. Remarkably, reinstatement of 11β-HSD2 expression, or AMFR loss, reverses enzalutamide resistance in mouse xenograft tumors. Together, these findings reveal a surprising metabolic mechanism of enzalutamide resistance that may be targeted with a strategy that circumvents a requirement for systemic GR ablation.

  6. Is there a role for antiandrogen monotherapy in patients with metastatic prostate cancer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaisary, A V; Iversen, P; Tyrrell, C J;

    2001-01-01

    with a prostate specific antigen (PSA) level 400 ng/ml) may decide that quality of life and symptomatic benefits outweigh the slight survival disadvantage seen in clinical trials and opt for bicalutamide monotherapy as an alternative to castration.Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases (2001) 4, 196-203.......Castration is the most widely used form of androgen ablation employed in the treatment of metastatic (M1) prostate cancer. Non-steroidal antiandrogen monotherapy is a potential alternative treatment option for men for whom castration is unacceptable or not indicated. Of the three non...

  7. Sipuleucel-T: immunotherapy for advanced prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olson BM

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Brian M Olson, Douglas G McNeelUniversity of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USAAbstract: Prostate cancer continues to be one of the most serious afflictions of men of advanced age, remaining the most commonly diagnosed and second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in American men. The treatment options for patients with incurable metastatic, castrate-resistant disease have long focused on various chemotherapeutic approaches, which provide a slight survival benefit while being associated with potentially significant side effects. However, the recent approval of sipuleucel-T has given patients with advanced disease an additional treatment option that has demonstrated benefit without the side effects associated with chemotherapy. Sipuleucel-T is an antigen-presenting cell-based active immunotherapy that utilizes a patient's own immune cells, presumably to activate an antigen-specific immune response against tumor cells. This review focuses on the development and implementation of sipuleucel-T as a therapy for prostate cancer. Specifically, we present some of the issues associated with the management of advanced prostate cancer, the research and development that led to the approval of sipuleucel-T, how the approval of sipuleucel-T could change the clinical management of prostate cancer, and current and future areas of investigation that are being pursued with regard to sipuleucel-T and other treatments for advanced prostate cancer.Keywords: sipuleucel-T, prostatic acid phosphatase, granulocyte-macrophage colonystimulating factor

  8. Potential use of custirsen to treat prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higano CS

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Celestia S Higano Department of Medicine, University of Washington, and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Over the last few years, five agents have demonstrated a survival benefit over a comparator treatment or placebo in the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer and have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration: sipuleucel-T (a dendritic cell immunotherapy; cabazitaxel; abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide (both hormonal agents; and radium 223 (an alpha emitter. The development of these agents pivoted on whether patients had been treated with docetaxel, which remains the first-line chemotherapy of choice. To date, no combination of docetaxel and another active agent has demonstrated superiority to docetaxel alone despite numerous Phase III trials. Clusterin is a cytoprotective chaperone protein that is upregulated in response to various anticancer therapies. When overexpressed, clusterin interferes with apoptotic signaling, thereby promoting cell survival and conferring broad-spectrum resistance in cancer cell lines. Custirsen (OGX-011 is a second-generation 2´-methoxyethyl modified phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotide that inhibits expression of clusterin. This review presents the preclinical and clinical data that provided the rationale for the combination of custirsen with chemotherapy in ongoing Phase III trials. Keywords: castration-resistant prostate cancer, clusterin, custirsen, OGX-011, antisense, OGX-427, apoptosis

  9. Androgen receptor: structure, role in prostate cancer and drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, M H Eileen; Li, Jun; Xu, H Eric; Melcher, Karsten; Yong, Eu-leong

    2015-01-01

    Androgens and androgen receptors (AR) play a pivotal role in expression of the male phenotype. Several diseases, such as androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) and prostate cancer, are associated with alterations in AR functions. Indeed, androgen blockade by drugs that prevent the production of androgens and/or block the action of the AR inhibits prostate cancer growth. However, resistance to these drugs often occurs after 2-3 years as the patients develop castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In CRPC, a functional AR remains a key regulator. Early studies focused on the functional domains of the AR and its crucial role in the pathology. The elucidation of the structures of the AR DNA binding domain (DBD) and ligand binding domain (LBD) provides a new framework for understanding the functions of this receptor and leads to the development of rational drug design for the treatment of prostate cancer. An overview of androgen receptor structure and activity, its actions in prostate cancer, and how structural information and high-throughput screening have been or can be used for drug discovery are provided herein.

  10. Prolactin-induced prostate tumorigenesis links sustained Stat5 signaling with the amplification of basal/stem cells and emergence of putative luminal progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackmann-Sala, Lucila; Chiche, Aurélie; Mosquera-Garrote, Nerea; Boutillon, Florence; Cordier, Corinne; Pourmir, Ivan; Pascual-Mathey, Luz; Kessal, Karima; Pigat, Natascha; Camparo, Philippe; Goffin, Vincent

    2014-11-01

    Current androgen ablation therapies for prostate cancer are initially successful, but the frequent development of castration resistance urges the generation of alternative therapies and represents an important health concern. Prolactin/signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) signaling is emerging as a putative target for alternative treatment for prostate cancer. However, mechanistic data for its role in development or progression of prostate tumors are scarce. In vivo mouse studies found that local prolactin induced the amplification of prostate epithelial basal/stem cells. Because these cells are proposed cells of origin for prostate cancer and disease recurrence, we looked further into this amplification. Our results indicated that sustained Stat5 activation was associated with the occurrence of abnormal basal/stem cell clusters in prostate epithelium of prostate-specific prolactin-transgenic mice. Analysis of epithelial areas containing these clusters found high proliferation, Stat5 activation, and expression of stem cell antigen 1. Furthermore, enhanced prolactin signaling also led to amplification of a luminal cell population that was positive for stem cell antigen 1. These cells may originate from amplified basal/stem cells and might represent important progenitors for tumor development in prostate epithelium. These data provide a deeper understanding of the initial stages of prostate tumorigenesis induced by prolactin to help determine whether this hormone or its downstream messengers could be useful targets for prostate cancer treatment in the future.

  11. Clonotypic Diversification of Intratumoral T Cells Following Sipuleucel-T Treatment in Prostate Cancer Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Nadeem; Cham, Jason; Zhang, Li; DeVries, Todd; Letarte, Simon; Pufnock, Jeff; Hamm, David; Trager, James; Fong, Lawrence

    2016-07-01

    Sipuleucel-T is an autologous cellular therapy for asymptomatic, or minimally symptomatic, metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer, designed to stimulate an immune response against prostate cancer. In a recent clinical trial (NCT00715104), we found that neoadjuvant sipuleucel-T increased the number of activated T cells within the tumor microenvironment. The current analysis examined whether sipuleucel-T altered adaptive T-cell responses by expanding pre-existing T cells or by recruiting new T cells to prostate tissue. Next-generation sequencing of the T-cell receptor (TCR) genes from blood or prostate tissue was used to quantitate and track T-cell clonotypes in these treated subjects with prostate cancer. At baseline, there was a significantly greater diversity of circulating TCR sequences in subjects with prostate cancer compared with healthy donors. Among healthy donors, circulating TCR sequence diversity remained unchanged over the same time interval. In contrast, sipuleucel-T treatment reduced circulating TCR sequence diversity versus baseline as measured by the Shannon index. Interestingly, sipuleucel-T treatment resulted in greater TCR sequence diversity in resected prostate tissue in sipuleucel-T-treated subjects versus tissue of nonsipuleucel-T-treated subjects with prostate cancer. Furthermore, sipuleucel-T increased TCR sequence commonality between blood and resected prostate tissue in treated versus untreated subjects with prostate cancer. The broadening of the TCR repertoire within the prostate tissue supports the hypothesis that sipuleucel-T treatment facilitates the recruitment of T cells into the prostate. Our results highlight the importance of assessing T-cell response to immunotherapy both in the periphery and in tumor tissue. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3711-8. ©2016 AACR.

  12. MicroRNA-185 and 342 inhibit tumorigenicity and induce apoptosis through blockade of the SREBP metabolic pathway in prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyan Li

    Full Text Available MicroRNA (miRNA or miR inhibition of oncogenic related pathways has been shown to be a promising therapeutic approach for cancer. Aberrant lipid and cholesterol metabolism is involved in prostate cancer development and progression to end-stage disease. We recently demonstrated that a key transcription factor for lipogenesis, sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1, induced fatty acid and lipid accumulation and androgen receptor (AR transcriptional activity, and also promoted prostate cancer cell growth and castration resistance. SREBP-1 was overexpressed in human prostate cancer and castration-resistant patient specimens. These experimental and clinical results indicate that SREBP-1 is a potential oncogenic transcription factor in prostate cancer. In this study, we identified two miRNAs, miR-185 and 342, that control lipogenesis and cholesterogenesis in prostate cancer cells by inhibiting SREBP-1 and 2 expression and down-regulating their targeted genes, including fatty acid synthase (FASN and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGCR. Both miR-185 and 342 inhibited tumorigenicity, cell growth, migration and invasion in prostate cancer cell culture and xenograft models coincident with their blockade of lipogenesis and cholesterogenesis. Intrinsic miR-185 and 342 expression was significantly decreased in prostate cancer cells compared to non-cancerous epithelial cells. Restoration of miR-185 and 342 led to caspase-dependent apoptotic death in prostate cancer cells. The newly identified miRNAs, miR-185 and 342, represent a novel targeting mechanism for prostate cancer therapy.

  13. Surgical castration, coercion and ethics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, Jesper; Petersen, Thomas Søbirk

    2014-01-01

    that the matter is more complicated than his approach to it suggests. The first thing that adds to the complexity of the discussion concerns the alternative for sex offenders who do not accept the offer of castration. As mentioned, it is likely that these offenders will be kept in prison. McMillan even underlines......John McMillan's detailed ethical analysis concerning the use of surgical castration of sex offenders in the Czech Republic and Germany is mainly devoted to considerations of coercion.1 This is not surprising. When castration is offered as an option to offenders and, at the same time, constitutes...... the only means by which these offenders are likely to be released from prison, it is reasonable—and close to the heart of modern medical ethics—to consider whether the offer involves some kind of coercion. However, despite McMillan's seemingly careful consideration of this question, it appears to us...

  14. The genetics of neuroendocrine prostate cancers: a review of current and emerging candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ather MH

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available M Hammad Ather,1 Tahmeena Siddiqui21Dept of Surgery, Aga Khan University, 2Karachi Medical and Dental College, Karachi, PakistanAbstract: Prostate cancer (PC displays a strong familial link and genetic factors; genes regulating inflammation may have a pivotal role in the disease. Epigenetic changes control chromosomal integrity, gene functions, and, ultimately, carcinogenesis. The most widely studied epigenetic event in PC is aberrant DNA methylation (hypo- and hypermethylation; besides this, chromatin remodeling and micro RNA (miRNA are other studied alterations in PC. These all lead to genomic instability and inappropriate gene expression. Causative dysfunction of histone modifying enzymes results in generic and locus-specific changes in chromatin remodeling. miRNA deregulation also contributes to prostate carcinogenesis, including interference with androgen-receptor signaling and apoptosis. These epigenetic alterations have the potential to act as biomarkers for PC for screening and diagnosis as well as prognosis and follow-up. The variable biological potential for a newly diagnosed PC is one of the biggest challenges. The other major clinical problem is in the management of castration-resistant PC. Neuroendocrine (NE differentiation is one of the putative explanations for the development of castration-resistant disease. Most advanced and poorly differentiated cancer does not produce prostate-specific antigen (PSA in response to disease progression. Circulating and tissue biomarkers like chromogranin A (CgA thus become important tools. There is the potential to use various genetic and epigenetic alterations and NE differentiation as therapeutic targets in the management of PC. However, we are still some distance from developing clinically effective tools. Valuable insights into the nature of NE differentiation in PC have been gained in the last decades, but additional understanding of its pathogenetic mechanisms is needed. This will help in

  15. Discovery of Prostate Cancer Tumor Suppressors and Mediators of MDV3100 Resistance Through in Vivo RNA Interference Screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0084 TITLE: Discovery of Prostate Cancer Tumor Suppressors and Mediators of MDV3100 Resistance through in Vivo...Suppressors and Mediators of MDV3100 Resistance through in Vivo RNA Interference Screen 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0084 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT We set out to identify factors that mediate resistance to enzalutamide

  16. Enzalutamide as a second generation antiandrogen for treatment of advanced prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semenas J

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Julius Semenas,1 Nishtman Dizeyi,2 Jenny Liao Persson1 1Division of Experimental Cancer Research, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University, Clinical Research Centre, Malmö, Sweden; 2Division of Urological Research, Department of Clinical Science, Lund University, Clinical Research Centre, Malmö, Sweden Abstract: Prostate cancer (PCa is the most common malignancy, and the third leading cancer-related cause of death among men of the Western world. Upon PCa progression into metastatic disease, androgen deprivation therapy is applied as the first-line treatment, and has been shown to be effective in most patients, leading to a decrease in serum prostate-specific antigen and relief of disease-related symptoms. However, advanced PCa almost inevitably progresses to a castration-resistant state, and is currently regarded as incurable. The large body of evidence indicates that PCa cells remain dependent on androgen receptor (AR signaling even in an androgen-deprived environment. As such, development of drugs that target AR and AR signaling pathways have become one of the major milestones in treatment of castration-resistant PCa (CRPC. Nevertheless, currently available therapies that target AR signaling are still regarded as palliative and more potent therapies are in great need. Over the past few years, a wide range of novel therapies has entered clinical trial for treatment of CRPC, including androgen synthesis inhibitors (abiraterone acetate, chemotherapeutic agents (docetaxel and cabazitaxel, and immunotherapies (sipuleucel-T. In this context, enzalutamide (previously referred to as MDV3100 is a novel second generation antiandrogen that has been demonstrated to significantly improve survival in men with metastatic CRPC in several clinical trials. In this paper we summarize recently completed and ongoing clinical trials of enzalutamide, and briefly discuss the efficacy of the novel antiandrogen therapy and its limitations for treatment of

  17. Abiraterone acetate for prostate cancer: a new era of hormonal therapies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emmanuel S Antonarakis

    2011-01-01

    @@ Therapies targeting the androgen receptor (AR) axis have constituted the Holy Grail in the management of advanced prostate cancer for seven decades.1 These hormonal therapies have traditionally taken two main forms: those that suppress gonadal androgen synthesis (e.g.,the gonadotropin releasing hormone agonists/antagonists,such as leuprolide),and those that inhibit the AR directly (e.g.,the anti-androgens,such asbicalutamide).However,although the vast majority of patients with prostate cancer initially respond favorably to androgen-ablative therapies (manifested by tumor regressions and symptomatic improvements),all patients will eventually develop further disease progression after a median of 18-24 months.This transformed disease state,known as castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC),is invariably fatal.

  18. β-catenin is required for prostate development and cooperates with Pten loss to drive invasive carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey C Francis

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is a major cause of male death in the Western world, but few frequent genetic alterations that drive prostate cancer initiation and progression have been identified. β-Catenin is essential for many developmental processes and has been implicated in tumorigenesis in many tissues, including prostate cancer. However, expression studies on human prostate cancer samples are unclear on the role this protein plays in this disease. We have used in vivo genetic studies in the embryo and adult to extend our understanding of the role of β-Catenin in the normal and neoplastic prostate. Our gene deletion analysis revealed that prostate epithelial β-Catenin is required for embryonic prostate growth and branching but is dispensable in the normal adult organ. During development, β-Catenin controls the number of progenitors in the epithelial buds and regulates a discrete network of genes, including c-Myc and Nkx3.1. Deletion of β-Catenin in a Pten deleted model of castration-resistant prostate cancer demonstrated it is dispensable for disease progression in this setting. Complementary overexpression experiments, through in vivo protein stabilization, showed that β-Catenin promotes the formation of squamous epithelia during prostate development, even in the absence of androgens. β-Catenin overexpression in combination with Pten loss was able to drive progression to invasive carcinoma together with squamous metaplasia. These studies demonstrate that β-Catenin is essential for prostate development and that an inherent property of high levels of this protein in prostate epithelia is to drive squamous fate differentiation. In addition, they show that β-Catenin overexpression can promote invasive prostate cancer in a clinically relevant model of this disease. These data provide novel information on cancer progression pathways that give rise to lethal prostate disease in humans.

  19. [Additional effect of propiverine for naftopidil-resistant nocturia in the patient with benign prostate hypertrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamimura, Noritaka; Hatakeyama, Shingo; Kudo, Shigemasa; Yoneyama, Takahiro; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Koie, Takuya; Yoshikawa, Kazuaki; Kawaguchi, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Shinya; Ohyama, Chikara

    2011-02-01

    The efficacy and safety of additional administration of propiverine were prospectively studied for naftopidil-resistant nocturia in patients with benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). Patients of 50 years and over with BPH who experienced nocturia twice a night or more and an overall International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) of 8 or more were first administered naftopidil (50 or 75 mg/day) for 4 weeks. Thirty subjects who did not show improvement in nocturia and requested further treatment were enrolled in the present study. Propiverine was then administered concomitantly 10 mg/day for 8 weeks. Significant improvement was observed with additional propiverine in the frequency of nocturia on voiding diary, total IPSS, voiding symptom, storage symptom and nocturnal voiding scores. No significant change was observed in the peak urinary flow rate (Qmax), mean urinary flow rate (Qave), voided urine volume, or residual urine volume. Adverse events were dysuria (2 cases), increased residual urine (6 cases), weak urine flow (1 case), thirsty (2 cases), angular cheilitis (1 case). Administration of propiverine was suspended in 7 subjects, 1 following dysuria and 6 following increased residual urine volume. The suspension of propiverine following increased residual urine volume was significantly more prevalent in subjects with pretreatment Qmax values of less than 10 ml/second or in subjects whose prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels were 2 ng/ml or more. In conclusion, the results indicate that additional administration of propiverine may be useful for the patients with BPH who have naftopidil-resistant nocturia. However, caution must be exercised regarding Qmax and PSA levels.

  20. Alterations of global histone H4K20 methylation during prostate carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behbahani Turang E

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Global histone modifications have been implicated in the progression of various tumour entities. Our study was designed to assess global methylation levels of histone 4 lysine 20 (H4K20me1-3 at different stages of prostate cancer (PCA carcinogenesis. Methods Global H4K20 methylation levels were evaluated using a tissue microarray in patients with clinically localized PCA (n = 113, non-malignant prostate disease (n = 27, metastatic hormone-naive PCA (mPCA, n = 30 and castration-resistant PCA (CRPC, n = 34. Immunohistochemistry was performed to assess global levels of H4K20 methylation levels. Results Similar proportions of the normal, PCA, and mPCA prostate tissues showed strong H4K20me3 staining. CRPC tissue analysis showed the weakest immunostaining levels of H4K20me1 and H4K20me2, compared to other prostate tissues. H4K20me2 methylation levels indicated significant differences in examined tissues except for normal prostate versus PCA tissue. H4K20me1 differentiates CRPC from other prostate tissues. H4K20me1 was significantly correlated with lymph node metastases, and H4K20me2 showed a significant correlation with the Gleason score. However, H4K20 methylation levels failed to predict PSA recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Conclusions H4K20 methylation levels constitute valuable markers for the dynamic process of prostate cancer carcinogenesis.

  1. MAGE-C2/CT10 protein expression is an independent predictor of recurrence in prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotta von Boehmer

    Full Text Available The cancer-testis (CT family of antigens is expressed in a variety of malignant neoplasms. In most cases, no CT antigen is found in normal tissues, except in testis, making them ideal targets for cancer immunotherapy. A comprehensive analysis of CT antigen expression has not yet been reported in prostate cancer. MAGE-C2/CT-10 is a novel CT antigen. The objective of this study was to analyze extent and prognostic significance of MAGE-C2/CT10 protein expression in prostate cancer. 348 prostate carcinomas from consecutive radical prostatectomies, 29 castration-refractory prostate cancer, 46 metastases, and 45 benign hyperplasias were immunohistochemically analyzed for MAGE-C2/CT10 expression using tissue microarrays. Nuclear MAGE-C2/CT10 expression was identified in only 3.3% primary prostate carcinomas. MAGE-C2/CT10 protein expression was significantly more frequent in metastatic (16.3% positivity and castration-resistant prostate cancer (17% positivity; p<0.001. Nuclear MAGE-C2/CT10 expression was identified as predictor of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy (p = 0.015, which was independent of preoperative PSA, Gleason score, tumor stage, and surgical margin status in multivariate analysis (p<0.05. MAGE-C2/CT10 expression in prostate cancer correlates with the degree of malignancy and indicates a higher risk for biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Further, the results suggest MAGE-C2/CT10 as a potential target for adjuvant and palliative immunotherapy in patients with prostate cancer.

  2. Cholesterol accumulation in prostate cancer: a classic observation from a modern perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krycer, James Robert; Brown, Andrew John

    2013-04-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common cancer in men in developed countries. Epidemiological studies have associated high blood-cholesterol levels with an increased risk of PCa, whilst cholesterol-lowering drugs (statins) reduce the risk of advanced PCa. Furthermore, normal prostate epithelial cells have an abnormally high cholesterol content, with cholesterol levels increasing further during progression to PCa. In this review, we explore why and how this occurs. Concurrent to this observation, intense efforts have been expended in cardiovascular research to better understand the regulators of cholesterol homeostasis. Here, we apply this knowledge to elucidate the molecular mechanisms driving the accumulation of cholesterol in PCa. For instance, recent evidence from our group and others shows that major signalling players in prostate growth and differentiation, such as androgens and Akt, modulate the key transcriptional regulators of cholesterol homeostasis to enhance cholesterol levels. This includes adjusting central carbon metabolism to sustain greater lipid synthesis. Perturbations in cholesterol homeostasis appear to be maintained even when PCa approaches the advanced, 'castration-resistant' state. Overall, this provides a link between cholesterol accumulation and PCa cell growth. Given there is currently no cure for castration-resistant PCa, could cholesterol metabolism be a novel target for PCa therapy? Overall, this review presents a picture that cholesterol metabolism is important for PCa development: growth-promoting factors stimulate cholesterol accumulation, which in turn presents a possible target for chemotherapy. Consequently, we recommend future investigations, both to better elucidate the mechanisms driving this accumulation and applying it in novel chemotherapeutic strategies.

  3. Optimization of Invasion-Specific Effects of Betulin Derivatives on Prostate Cancer Cells through Lead Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ville Härmä

    Full Text Available The anti-invasive and anti-proliferative effects of betulins and abietane derivatives was systematically tested using an organotypic model system of advanced, castration-resistant prostate cancers. A preliminary screen of the initial set of 93 compounds was performed in two-dimensional (2D growth conditions using non-transformed prostate epithelial cells (EP156T, an androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cell line (LNCaP, and the castration-resistant, highly invasive cell line PC-3. The 25 most promising compounds were all betulin derivatives. These were selected for a focused secondary screen in three-dimensional (3D growth conditions, with the goal to identify the most effective and specific anti-invasive compounds. Additional sensitivity and cytotoxicity tests were then performed using an extended cell line panel. The effects of these compounds on cell cycle progression, mitosis, proliferation and unspecific cytotoxicity, versus their ability to specifically interfere with cell motility and tumor cell invasion was addressed. To identify potential mechanisms of action and likely compound targets, multiplex profiling of compound effects on a panel of 43 human protein kinases was performed. These target de-convolution studies, combined with the phenotypic analyses of multicellular organoids in 3D models, revealed specific inhibition of AKT signaling linked to effects on the organization of the actin cytoskeleton as the most likely driver of altered cell morphology and motility.

  4. New serum biomarkers for prostate cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadha, Kailash C.; Miller, Austin; Nair, Bindukumar B.; Schwartz, Stanley A.; Trump, Donald L.; Underwood, Willie

    2014-01-01

    Background Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is currently used as a biomarker for diagnosis and management of prostate cancer (CaP). However, PSA typically lacks the sensitivity and specificity desired of a diagnostic marker. Objective The goal of this study was to identify an additional biomarker or a panel of biomarkers that is more sensitive and specific than PSA in differentiating benign versus malignant prostate disease and/or localized CaP versus metastatic CaP. Methods Concurrent measurements of circulating interleukin-8 (IL-8), Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and soluble tumor necrosis factor-α receptors 1 (sTNFR1) were obtained from four groups of men: (1) Controls (2) with elevated prostate-specific antigen with a negative prostate biopsy (elPSA_negBx) (3) with clinically localized CaP and (4) with castration resistant prostate cancer. Results TNF-α Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC = 0.93) and sTNFR1 (AUC = 0.97) were strong predictors of elPSA_negBx (vs. CaP). The best predictor of elPSA_negBx vs CaP was sTNFR1 and IL-8 combined (AUC = 0.997). The strongest single predictors of localized versus metastatic CaP were TNF-α (AUC = 0.992) and PSA (AUC = 0.963) levels. Conclusions The specificity and sensitivity of a PSA-based CaP diagnosis can be significantly enhanced by concurrent serum measurements of IL-8, TNF-α and sTNFR1. In view of the concerns about the ability of PSA to distinguish clinically relevant CaP from indolent disease, assessment of these biomarkers in the larger cohort is warranted. PMID:25593898

  5. New serum biomarkers for prostate cancer diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kailash C Chadha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA is currently used as a biomarker for diagnosis and management of prostate cancer (CaP. However, PSA typically lacks the sensitivity and specificity desired of a diagnostic marker. Objective: The goal of this study was to identify an additional biomarker or a panel of biomarkers that is more sensitive and specific than PSA in differentiating benign versus malignant prostate disease and/or localized CaP versus metastatic CaP. Methods: Concurrent measurements of circulating interleukin-8 (IL-8, Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and soluble tumor necrosis factor-α receptors 1 (sTNFR1 were obtained from four groups of men: (1 Controls (2 with elevated prostate-specific antigen with a negative prostate biopsy (elPSA_negBx (3 with clinically localized CaP and (4 with castration resistant prostate cancer. Results: TNF-α Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC = 0.93 and sTNFR1 (AUC = 0.97 were strong predictors of elPSA_negBx (vs. CaP. The best predictor of elPSA_negBx vs CaP was sTNFR1 and IL-8 combined (AUC = 0.997. The strongest single predictors of localized versus metastatic CaP were TNF-α (AUC = 0.992 and PSA (AUC = 0.963 levels. Conclusions: The specificity and sensitivity of a PSA-based CaP diagnosis can be significantly enhanced by concurrent serum measurements of IL-8, TNF-α and sTNFR1. In view of the concerns about the ability of PSA to distinguish clinically relevant CaP from indolent disease, assessment of these biomarkers in the larger cohort is warranted.

  6. Enhanced Inhibition of Prostate Tumor Growth by Dual Targeting the Androgen Receptor and the Regulatory Subunit Type Iα of Protein Kinase A in Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, Iris E.; Egger, Martina; Neuwirt, Hannes; Seifarth, Christof; Maddalo, Danilo; Desiniotis, Andreas; Schäfer, Georg; Puhr, Martin; Bektic, Jasmin; Cato, Andrew C. B.; Klocker, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Progression to castration resistance is a major problem in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer and is likely to be driven by activation of several molecular pathways, including androgen receptor (AR) and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA). In this study, we examined the therapeutic efficacy of a combined inhibition of the AR and the regulatory subunit type Iα (RIα) of protein kinase A with second generation antisense oligonucleotides (ODNs) in androgen-sensitive LNCaP and castration-resistant LNCaPabl tumors in vivo. We found that targeting the AR alone inhibited LNCaP, as well as LNCaPabl tumors. Combined inhibition resulted in an improved response over single targeting and even a complete tumor remission in LNCaPabl. Western blot analysis revealed that both ODNs were effective in reducing their target proteins when administered alone or in combination. In addition, treatment with the ODNs was associated with an induction of apoptosis. Our data suggest that dual targeting of the AR and PKARIα is more effective in inhibiting LNCaP and LNCaPabl tumor growth than single treatment and may give a treatment benefit, especially in castration-resistant prostate cancers. PMID:23736698

  7. Plant-derived flavone Apigenin: The small-molecule with promising activity against therapeutically resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganai, Shabir Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer related deaths in men in the United States. Mounting evidences suggest that in the pathophysiology of prostate cancer epigenetic modifications play a considerable role. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) have strong crosstalk with prostate cancer progression as they regulate various genes meant for tumour suppression. HDACs are emerging as striking molecular targets for anticancer drugs and therapy as their aberrant expression has been implicated in several cancers. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), the small molecules interfering HDACs are the propitious chemotherapeutic agents as they tune the altered acetylation homeostasis for attenuating disease signalling. More than 20 HDACi have entered into the clinical trials and 4 have crossed the journey by gaining FDA approval for treating distinct haematological malignancies including multiple myeloma. Despite the therapeutic benefits, the synthetic HDACi cause detrimental side effects like atrial fibrillation, raising concerns regarding their applicability. Taking these facts into consideration the current article focused on plant-derived HDAC inhibitor Apigenin and its marvelous role in prostate cancer therapy. Moreover, the article sheds light on Apigenin induced apoptosis in various prostate cancer models. The defined inhibitor provokes apoptotic signaling in these models by multiple mechanisms like restraining HDACs, declining the levels of antiapoptotic proteins. Importantly, Apigenin hampers NF-κB signalling and down-modulates its regulated gene products for bringing therapeutic effect. Furthermore, Apigenin shows synergistic effect in combinatorial therapy and induces apoptosis even in prostate cancer models resistant to conventional therapeutic regimens.

  8. Treatment and prevention of bone complications from prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Richard J; Saylor, Philip J; Smith, Matthew R

    2011-01-01

    Bone metastases and skeletal complications are major causes of morbidity in prostate cancer patients. Despite the osteoblastic appearance of bone metastases on imaging studies, patients have elevated serum and urinary markers of bone resorption, indicative of high osteoclast activity. Increased osteoclast activity is independently associated with higher risk of subsequent skeletal complications, disease progression, and death. Osteoclast-targeted therapies are therefore a rational approach to reduction of risk for disease-related skeletal complications, bone metastases, and treatment-related fractures. This review focuses on recent advances in osteoclast-targeted therapy in prostate cancer. Bisphosphonates have been extensively studied in men with prostate cancer. Zoledronic acid significantly decreased the risk of skeletal complications in men with castration-resistant prostate cancer and bone metastases, and it is FDA-approved for this indication. Denosumab is a human monoclonal antibody that binds and inactivates RANKL, a critical mediator of osteoclast differentiation, activation, and survival. Recent global phase 3 clinic trials demonstrated an emerging role for denosumab in the treatment of prostate cancer bone metastases and prevention of fractures associated with androgen deprivation therapy.

  9. Long noncoding RNAs in prostate cancer: overview and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Bhavna; Feng, Felix Y

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cause of cancer mortality among men in the United States. While many prostate cancers are indolent, an important subset of patients experiences disease recurrence after conventional therapy and progresses to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), which is currently incurable. Thus, there is a critical need to identify biomarkers that will distinguish indolent from aggressive disease, as well as novel therapeutic targets for the prevention or treatment of CRPC. In recent years, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as an important class of biological molecules. LncRNAs are polyadenylated RNA species that share many similarities with protein-coding genes despite the fact that they are noncoding (not translated into proteins). They are usually transcribed by RNA polymerase II and exhibit the same epigenetic signatures as protein-coding genes. LncRNAs have also been implicated in the development and progression of variety of cancers, including prostate cancer. While a large number of lncRNAs exhibit tissue- and cancer-specific expression, their utility as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers is just starting to be explored. In this review, we highlight recent findings on the functional role and molecular mechanisms of lncRNAs in the progression of prostate cancer and evaluate their use as potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  10. Sipuleucel-T: immunotherapy for advanced prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Brian M; McNeel, Douglas G

    2011-05-03

    Prostate cancer continues to be one of the most serious afflictions of men of advanced age, remaining the most commonly diagnosed and second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in American men. The treatment options for patients with incurable metastatic, castrate-resistant disease have long focused on various chemotherapeutic approaches, which provide a slight survival benefit while being associated with potentially significant side effects. However, the recent approval of sipuleucel-T has given patients with advanced disease an additional treatment option that has demonstrated benefit without the side effects associated with chemotherapy. Sipuleucel-T is an antigen-presenting cell-based active immunotherapy that utilizes a patient's own immune cells, presumably to activate an antigen-specific immune response against tumor cells. This review focuses on the development and implementation of sipuleucel-T as a therapy for prostate cancer. Specifically, we present some of the issues associated with the management of advanced prostate cancer, the research and development that led to the approval of sipuleucel-T, how the approval of sipuleucel-T could change the clinical management of prostate cancer, and current and future areas of investigation that are being pursued with regard to sipuleucel-T and other treatments for advanced prostate cancer.

  11. Extracellular pH Modulates Neuroendocrine Prostate Cancer Cell Metabolism and Susceptibility to the Mitochondrial Inhibitor Niclosamide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph E Ippolito

    Full Text Available Neuroendocrine prostate cancer is a lethal variant of prostate cancer that is associated with castrate-resistant growth, metastasis, and mortality. The tumor environment of neuroendocrine prostate cancer is heterogeneous and characterized by hypoxia, necrosis, and numerous mitoses. Although acidic extracellular pH has been implicated in aggressive cancer features including metastasis and therapeutic resistance, its role in neuroendocrine prostate cancer physiology and metabolism has not yet been explored. We used the well-characterized PNEC cell line as a model to establish the effects of extracellular pH (pH 6.5, 7.4, and 8.5 on neuroendocrine prostate cancer cell metabolism. We discovered that alkalinization of extracellular pH converted cellular metabolism to a nutrient consumption-dependent state that was susceptible to glucose deprivation, glutamine deprivation, and 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG mediated inhibition of glycolysis. Conversely, acidic pH shifted cellular metabolism toward an oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS-dependent state that was susceptible to OXPHOS inhibition. Based upon this mechanistic knowledge of pH-dependent metabolism, we identified that the FDA-approved anti-helminthic niclosamide depolarized mitochondrial potential and depleted ATP levels in PNEC cells whose effects were enhanced in acidic pH. To further establish relevance of these findings, we tested the effects of extracellular pH on susceptibility to nutrient deprivation and OXPHOS inhibition in a cohort of castrate-resistant prostate cancer cell lines C4-2B, PC-3, and PC-3M. We discovered similar pH-dependent toxicity profiles among all cell lines with these treatments. These findings underscore a potential importance to acidic extracellular pH in the modulation of cell metabolism in tumors and development of an emerging paradigm that exploits the synergy of environment and therapeutic efficacy in cancer.

  12. Catalytic inhibitors of DNA topoisomerase II suppress the androgen receptor signaling and prostate cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haolong; Xie, Ning; Gleave, Martin E; Dong, Xuesen

    2015-08-21

    Although the new generation of androgen receptor (AR) antagonists like enzalutamide (ENZ) prolong survival of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), AR-driven tumors eventually recur indicating that additional therapies are required to fully block AR function. Since DNA topoisomerase II (Topo II) was demonstrated to be essential for AR to initiate gene transcription, this study tested whether catalytic inhibitors of Topo II can block AR signaling and suppress ENZ-resistant CRPC growth. Using multiple prostate cancer cell lines, we showed that catalytic Topo II inhibitors, ICRF187 and ICRF193 inhibited transcription activities of the wild-type AR, mutant ARs (F876L and W741C) and the AR-V7 splice variant. ICRF187 and ICRF193 decreased AR recruitment to target promoters and reduced AR nuclear localization. Both ICRF187 and ICRF193 also inhibited cell proliferation and delayed cell cycling at the G2/M phase. ICRF187 inhibited tumor growth of castration-resistant LNCaP and 22RV1 xenografts as well as ENZ-resistant MR49F xenografts. We conclude that catalytic Topo II inhibitors can block AR signaling and inhibit tumor growth of CRPC xenografts, identifying a potential co-targeting approach using these inhibitors in combination with AR pathway inhibitors in CRPC.

  13. Multi-drug resistant E.coli urosepsis in physicians following transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsies--three cases including one death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, William H; Bell, David G; Lawen, Joseph G; Rendon, Ricardo A

    2010-04-01

    Three male physicians underwent transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsies for elevated prostate-specific antigen levels or irregular digital rectal exam findings. All three of these patients developed urosepsis secondary to multi-drug resistant organisms despite antibiotic prophylaxis. There are increasing reports of infectious complications following prostate biopsy caused by multi-drug resistant organisms. These cases highlight the potentially lethal risks to healthcare workers who are more likely to harbor multi-drug resistant organisms than the general population. Further research into preoperative assessment and appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis in all potentially high risk patients is warranted.

  14. Gray level entropy matrix is a superior predictor than multiplex ELISA in the detection of reactive stroma and metastatic potential of high-grade prostatic adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiaopeng; Sun, Yanan; Wang, Baozhi

    2014-12-01

    Recent reports have indicated that not only the primary glandular tissue but also the surrounding stromal tissue plays an active role in the progression of carcinoma. Such is true for cancer tissues arising in the prostate. However, the precise role of stromal tissue in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate adenocarcinoma is not well described. We undertook this current investigation to examine the changes in orientation of the extracellular matrix and correlate with prostatic cancer progression. We used a novel form of image analysis called gray level entropy matrix (GLEM) texture analysis to evaluate morphometric changes in stromal tissues. We used normal prostatic tissue obtained from cadaveric specimen and compared with BPH, prostatic intraepithelium neoplastic, hormone responsive prostatic adenocarcinoma and castration-resistant prostatic adenocarcinoma tissues. GLEM showed higher entropy in disease-resistant prostatic tissues, compared with benign forms of all spectra of pathologically diagnosed prostatic tissues (P entropy is reflective of the disorganized morphological organization of the stroma, possibly reflecting the reactive matrix. In contrast, ELISA revealed that although individually correlated with the progressive stages of benign and carcinomatous prostatic tissues and trend correlation between groups, intergroup comparisons failed to arrive at statistical significance of comparisons between markers of neovasculogenesis, vascular endothelial growth factor, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (beta1-integrin, E-cadherin, MMP3) and osteogenic metastasis (RANKL and osteoprotegerin). The results of our study demonstrate the potential of GLEM entropy of gray level pixel in providing quasiquantitative estimate of a reactive stroma in advance stages of prostatic adenocarcinoma and thus can be routinely used in clinical decision making.

  15. Immunotherapy in prostate cancer: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Masanori; Koga, Noriko; Moriya, Fukuko; Itoh, Kyogo

    2016-01-01

    Although treatment options for castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) have increased over the last decade, there remains a need for strategies that can provide durable disease control and long-term benefit. Recently, immunotherapy has emerged as a viable and attractive strategy for the treatment of CRPC. To date, there are multiple strategies to target the immune system, and several approaches including therapeutic cancer vaccines and immune checkpoint inhibitors have been most successful in clinical trials. With regard to this, we report the results of the most recent clinical trials investigating immunotherapy in CRPC and discuss the future development of immunotherapy for CRPC, as well as the potential importance of biomarkers in the future progress of this field.

  16. New drug development in metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Andrew J; George, Daniel J

    2008-01-01

    In 2007, drug development in castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer (CRPC) remains challenging, due to the number of potentially viable molecular targets and clinical trials available, the lack of established surrogates for overall survival, and competing causes of mortality. This review will highlight the highest impact phase II and phase III trials of novel agents in the current CRPC landscape, and focus on both molecular targets and clinical trial designs that are more likely to demonstrate clinical benefit. The need for tissue correlative studies for target evaluation and drug mechanism is stressed to continue to advance the field and to define biomarkers that may identify patient populations that may derive a greater benefit from these molecular agents.

  17. Trading in your spindles for blebs: the amoeboid tumor cell phenotype in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Morley

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa remains a principal cause of mortality in developed countries. Because no clinical interventions overcome resistance to androgen ablation therapy, management of castration resistance and metastatic disease remains largely untreatable. Metastasis is a multistep process in which tumor cells lose cell-cell contacts, egress from the primary tumor, intravasate, survive shear stress within the vasculature and extravasate into tissues to colonize ectopic sites. Tumor cells reestablish migratory behaviors employed during nonneoplastic processes such as embryonic development, leukocyte trafficking and wound healing. While mesenchymal motility is an established paradigm of dissemination, an alternate, 'amoeboid' phenotype is increasingly appreciated as relevant to human cancer. Here we discuss characteristics and pathways underlying the phenotype, and highlight our findings that the cytoskeletal regulator DIAPH3 governs the mesenchymal-amoeboid transition. We also describe our identification of a new class of tumor-derived microvesicles, large oncosomes, produced by amoeboid cells and with potential clinical utility in prostate and other cancers.

  18. Oncolytic adenovirus-mediated therapy for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Katrina; Halldén, Gunnel

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death and morbidity in men in the Western world. Tumor progression is dependent on functioning androgen receptor signaling, and initial administration of antiandrogens and hormone therapy (androgen-deprivation therapy) prevent growth and spread. Tumors frequently develop escape mechanisms to androgen-deprivation therapy and progress to castration-resistant late-stage metastatic disease that, in turn, inevitably leads to resistance to all current therapeutics, including chemotherapy. In spite of the recent development of more effective inhibitors of androgen–androgen receptor signaling such as enzalutamide and abiraterone, patient survival benefits are still limited. Oncolytic adenoviruses have proven efficacy in prostate cancer cells and cause regression of tumors in preclinical models of numerous drug-resistant cancers. Data from clinical trials demonstrate that adenoviral mutants have limited toxicity to normal tissues and are safe when administered to patients with various solid cancers, including prostate cancer. While efficacy in response to adenovirus administration alone is marginal, findings from early-phase trials targeting local-ized and metastatic prostate cancer suggest improved efficacy in combination with cytotoxic drugs and radiation therapy. Here, we review recent progress in the development of multimodal oncolytic adenoviruses as biological therapeutics to improve on tumor elimination in prostate cancer patients. These optimized mutants target cancer cells by several mechanisms including viral lysis and by expression of cytotoxic transgenes and immune-stimulatory factors that activate the host immune system to destroy both infected and noninfected prostate cancer cells. Additional modifications of the viral capsid proteins may support future systemic delivery of oncolytic adenoviruses. PMID:27579296

  19. Estrogen Receptor β2 Induces Hypoxia Signature of Gene Expression by Stabilizing HIF-1α in Prostate Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasenjit Dey

    Full Text Available The estrogen receptor (ER β variant ERβ2 is expressed in aggressive castration-resistant prostate cancer and has been shown to correlate with decreased overall survival. Genome-wide expression analysis after ERβ2 expression in prostate cancer cells revealed that hypoxia was an overrepresented theme. Here we show that ERβ2 interacts with and stabilizes HIF-1α protein in normoxia, thereby inducing a hypoxic gene expression signature. HIF-1α is known to stimulate metastasis by increasing expression of Twist1 and increasing vascularization by directly activating VEGF expression. We found that ERβ2 interacts with HIF-1α and piggybacks to the HIF-1α response element present on the proximal Twist1 and VEGF promoters. These findings suggest that at least part of the oncogenic effects of ERβ2 is mediated by HIF-1α and that targeting of this ERβ2 - HIF-1α interaction may be a strategy to treat prostate cancer.

  20. Estrogen Receptor β2 Induces Hypoxia Signature of Gene Expression by Stabilizing HIF-1α in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Prasenjit; Velazquez-Villegas, Laura A.; Faria, Michelle; Turner, Anthony; Jonsson, Philp; Webb, Paul; Williams, Cecilia; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Ström, Anders M.

    2015-01-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) β variant ERβ2 is expressed in aggressive castration-resistant prostate cancer and has been shown to correlate with decreased overall survival. Genome-wide expression analysis after ERβ2 expression in prostate cancer cells revealed that hypoxia was an overrepresented theme. Here we show that ERβ2 interacts with and stabilizes HIF-1α protein in normoxia, thereby inducing a hypoxic gene expression signature. HIF-1α is known to stimulate metastasis by increasing expression of Twist1 and increasing vascularization by directly activating VEGF expression. We found that ERβ2 interacts with HIF-1α and piggybacks to the HIF-1α response element present on the proximal Twist1 and VEGF promoters. These findings suggest that at least part of the oncogenic effects of ERβ2 is mediated by HIF-1α and that targeting of this ERβ2 – HIF-1α interaction may be a strategy to treat prostate cancer. PMID:26010887

  1. Multidrug resistance protein 1 localization in lipid raft domains and prostasomes in prostate cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomà A

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Alba Gomà,1,* Roser Mir,1–3,* Fina Martínez-Soler,1,4 Avelina Tortosa,4 August Vidal,5,6 Enric Condom,5,6 Ricardo Pérez–Tomás,6 Pepita Giménez-Bonafé1 1Departament de Ciències Fisiològiques II, Faculty of Medicine, Campus of Health Sciences of Bellvitge, Universitat de Barcelona, IDIBELL, Barcelona, Spain; 2División de Investigación Básica, Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, México DF, Mexico; 3Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM, México DF, Mexico; 4Department of Basic Nursing, School of Nursing of the Health Campus of Bellvitge, Universitat de Barcelona, 5Department of Pathology, Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, 6Department of Pathology and Experimental Therapeutics, Universitat de Barcelona, IDIBELL, Barcelona, Spain*These authors contributed equally to this work Background: One of the problems in prostate cancer (CaP treatment is the appearance of the multidrug resistance phenotype, in which ATP-binding cassette transporters such as multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1 play a role. Different localizations of the transporter have been reported, some of them related to the chemoresistant phenotype.Aim: This study aimed to compare the localization of MRP1 in three prostate cell lines (normal, androgen-sensitive, and androgen-independent in order to understand its possible role in CaP chemoresistance.Methods: MRP1 and caveolae protein markers were detected using confocal microscopy, performing colocalization techniques. Lipid raft isolation made it possible to detect these proteins by Western blot analysis. Caveolae and prostasomes were identified by electron microscopy.Results: We show that MRP1 is found in lipid raft fractions of tumor cells and that the number of caveolae increases with malignancy acquisition. MRP1 is found not only in the plasma membrane associated with lipid rafts but also in cytoplasmic accumulations colocalizing with the prostasome markers Caveolin-1 and CD59

  2. Overcoming Drug Resistant Prostate Cancer with APE1/Ref 1 Blockade

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    immunofluorescent images of non- inflamed or non-inflamed human prostates representing non-diseased controls, BPH specimens, or prostate cancer... BPH , and cancer) that exhibited 30 leukocytes per 20x section. Three 20x fields per prostate section were averaged for each data point, and all...metastases We have acquired the first 12 specimens of human prostate cancer metastases from our human pathology core, as described in the proposal

  3. Overcoming Drug Resistant Prostate Cancer with APE1/Ref-1 Blockade

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    immunofluorescent images of non- inflamed or non-inflamed human prostates representing non-diseased controls, BPH specimens, or prostate cancer... BPH , and cancer) that exhibited 30 leukocytes per 20x section. Three 20x fields per prostate section were averaged for each data point, and all...metastases We have acquired the first 12 specimens of human prostate cancer metastases from our human pathology core, as described in the proposal

  4. Inhibition of the Androgen Receptor Amino-Terminal Domain by a Small Molecule as Treatment for Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    such as BADGE. 2H2O are inactive (21). The chlorohydrin group of EPI compounds may be required for activity to block AR transcription- al activity...063 were nega- tive controls, by analogy with the inactive analog BADGE. 2H2O (21). SDS-PAGE disrupts noncovalent interactions and is used to determine...TCEP), 100 μM biotin-azide reagent, and 1 mM CuSO4 . Samples were dialyzed overnight in 50 mM HEPES (pH 8.0), 150 mM NaCl, 0.1% SDS, and 1% Triton

  5. The AhR Ligand, TCDD, Regulates Androgen Receptor Activity Differently in Androgen-Sensitive versus Castration-Resistant Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The reported biological effects of TCDD include induction of drug metabolizing enzymes, wasting syndrome and tumor promotion. TCDD elicits most of its effects through binding the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). TCDD induced degradation of AhR has been widely reported and requires ubiquitination of the protein. The rapid depletion of AhR following TCDD activation serves as a mechanism to modulate AhR mediated gene induction. In addition to inducing AhR degradation, TCDD has been reported to i...

  6. Targeting Histone Demethylase GASC1/JMJD2C/KDM4C as a Novel Therapeutic Strategy in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Vandenbos F, Otto J, et al. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of a metastatic lung sarcomatoid carcinoma: 9p23 neocentromere and 9p23-p24...amplification including JAK2 and JMJD2C. Cancer Genet Cytogenet . 2006;167:122-30. 6. Northcott PA, Nakahara Y, Wu X, Feuk L, Ellison DW, Croul S, et al...Primary Organ Site: Not Applicable *Special Consideration: Not Applicable *Choose Chemical Structure Disclosure: NOT APPLICABLE . No compounds

  7. Insulin-like growth factor II mRNA binding protein 3 (IMP3 is overexpressed in prostate cancer and correlates with higher Gleason scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortezavi Ashkan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The oncofetal protein insulin-like growth factor II mRNA binding protein 3 (IMP3 is an important factor for cell-migration and adhesion in malignancies. Recent studies have shown a remarkable overexpression of IMP3 in different human malignant neoplasms and also revealed it as an important prognostic marker in some tumor entities. To our knowledge, IMP3 expression has not been investigated in prostate carcinomas so far. Methods Immunohistochemical stainings for IMP3 were performed on tissue microarray (TMA organized samples from 507 patients: 31 normal prostate tissues, 425 primary carcinomas and 51 prostate cancer metastases or castration-resistant prostate cancers (CRPC. IMP3 immunoreactivity was semiquantitatively scored and correlated with clinical-pathologic parameters including survival. Results IMP3 is significantly stronger expressed in prostate carcinomas compared to normal prostate tissues (p Conclusions Although IMP3 is overexpressed in a significant proportion of prostate cancer cases, which might be of importance for novel therapeutic approaches, it does not appear to possess any immediate diagnostic or prognostic value, limiting its potential as a tissue biomarker for prostate cancer. These results might be corroborated by the fact, that two independent tumor cohorts were separately reviewed.

  8. Role of targeted therapy in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fizazi, Karim; Sternberg, Cora N; Fitzpatrick, John M; Watson, R William; Tabesh, Majid

    2010-03-01

    Over the past decade, the treatment of advanced prostate cancer has developed significantly, and perhaps the most dramatic shift came in 2004 with the demonstration that docetaxel-based chemotherapy significantly improved overall survival in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer. This led to a significant expansion of the role of chemotherapy in the management of prostate cancer. In addition, there is now considerable progress being made in the development of more effective antiandrogens, cytochrome P17 inhibitors, novel chemotherapy regimens, targeted therapies, and immunotherapies that can complement existing therapies and may soon become integrated into the treatment paradigm. Progress in our understanding of molecular signalling pathways that play an important role in prostate cancer has stimulated the investigation of targeted therapies, including antiangiogenic agents, bone-targeted agents, and specific inhibitors of key signalling molecules and chaperone proteins. For the most part, targeted agents are being combined with chemotherapy, similar to the approach taken in other solid tumours. Various therapeutic vaccine strategies also appear to have potential in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer. However, the development of new approaches to the treatment of prostate cancer presents many challenges that will demand collaboration and consensus building with respect to biomarkers for patient selection, clinical endpoints, and trial designs.

  9. Droplet Digital PCR Based Androgen Receptor Variant 7 (AR-V7 Detection from Prostate Cancer Patient Blood Biopsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yafeng Ma

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Androgen receptor splice variant V7 (AR-V7 was recently identified as a valuable predictive biomarker in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer. Here, we report a new, sensitive and accurate screen for AR-V7 mRNA expression directly from circulating tumor cells (CTCs: We combined EpCAM-based immunomagnetic CTC isolation using the IsoFlux microfluidic platform with droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR to analyze total AR and AR-V7 expression from prostate cancer patients CTCs. We demonstrate that AR-V7 is reliably detectable in enriched CTC samples with as little as five CTCs, even considering tumor heterogeneity, and confirm detection of AR-V7 in CTC samples from advanced prostate cancer (PCa patients with AR-V7 detection limited to castrate resistant disease status in our sample set. Sensitive molecular analyses of circulating tumor cells (CTCs or circulating tumor nucleic acids present exciting strategies to detect biomarkers, such as AR-V7 from non-invasive blood samples, so-called blood biopsies.

  10. A novel nuclear role for the Vav3 nucleotide exchange factor in androgen receptor coactivation in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, S; Lyons, L S; Fahrenholtz, C D; Wu, F; Farooq, A; Balkan, W; Burnstein, K L

    2012-02-01

    Increased androgen receptor (AR) transcriptional activity mediated by coactivator proteins may drive castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) growth. Vav3, a Rho GTPase guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), is overexpressed in human prostate cancers, particularly in models of CRPC progression. Vav3 coactivates AR in a Vav3 pleckstrin homology (PH) domain-dependent but GEF-independent manner. Ectopic expression of Vav3 in androgen-dependent human prostate cancer cells conferred robust castration-resistant xenograft tumor growth. Vav3 but not a Vav3 PH mutant greatly stimulated interaction between the AR amino and carboxyl termini (N-C interaction), which is required for maximal receptor transcriptional activity. Vav3 was distributed between the cytoplasm and nucleus with nuclear localization-dependent on the Vav3 PH domain. Membrane targeting of Vav3 abolished Vav3 potentiation of AR activity, whereas nuclear targeting of a Vav3 PH mutant rescued AR coactivation, suggesting that nuclear localization is an important function of the Vav3 PH domain. A nuclear role for Vav3 was further demonstrated by sequential chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, which revealed that Vav3 and AR were recruited to the same transcriptional complexes of an AR target gene enhancer. These data demonstrate the importance of Vav3 in CRPC and define a novel nuclear function of Vav3 in regulating AR activity.

  11. Effects of Alendronate Sodium on Bone Mineral Density and Bone Marker in Prostate Cancer Elderly Pa-tients after Medical Castration Therapy%阿仑膦酸钠对前列腺癌老年患者药物去势治疗后骨密度和骨标志物的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段晓宇; 朱虹; 黄娟

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:To explore the effects of alendronate sodium on bone mineral density (BMD) and bone marker in prostate cancer elderly patients after medical castration therapy. METHODS:In perspective study,84 elderly patients undergoing medical castration therapy were selected and divided into treatment group(45 cases)and control group(39 cases)according to ran-dom number table. Control group received medical castration therapy+Calcium carbonate D3 tablets,1 tablet,po,qn;treatment group was additionally given Alendronate sodium tablets 70 mg,po,once a week,1 week after routine treatment,on the basis of control group. Treatment course of 2 groups lasted for 12 months. The levels of 25-OH-D,testosterone,BMD and bone marker were observed in 2 groups,and the occurrence of ADR was recorded. RESULTS:3 cases of treatment group and 1 case of control group dropped out of the study. Before treatment,there was no statistical significance in above indexes between 2 groups (P>0.05). After treatment,25-OH-D levels of 2 groups were increased slightly,but there was no statistical significance(P>0.05);tes-tosterone level of 2 groups were decreased significantly compared to before treatment,with statistical significance (P0.05). CONCLUSIONS:Alendronate sodium can prevent bone loss and reduce the rate of bone turnover in elderly patients with prostate cancer receiving medical castration therapy.%目的:探讨阿仑膦酸钠对前列腺癌老年患者药物去势治疗后骨密度(BMD)和骨标志物的影响。方法:本研究为前瞻性研究。选取84例拟行药物去势治疗的前列腺癌老年患者,按照随机数字表法分为治疗组(45例)和对照组(39例)。对照组患者给予药物去势治疗+碳酸钙D3片1片,po,qn;治疗组患者在此基础方案开始后1周给予阿仑膦酸钠片70 mg,po,每周1次。两组患者治疗时间均为12个月。观察两组患者25-羟基维生素D(25-OH-D)、睾酮、BMD、骨标志物水平,并

  12. Brachyury as a potential modulator of androgen receptor activity and a key player in therapy resistance in prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Filipe; Pértega-Gomes, Nelma; Vizcaíno, José R.; Andrade, Raquel P.; Cárcano, Flavio M.; Reis, Rui Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most commonly diagnosed neoplasm and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men. Acquisition of resistance to conventional therapy is a major problem for PCa patient management. Several mechanisms have been described to promote therapy resistance in PCa, such as androgen receptor (AR) activation, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), acquisition of stem cell properties and neuroendocrine transdifferentiation (NEtD). Recently, we identified Brachyury as a new biomarker of PCa aggressiveness and poor prognosis. In the present study we aimed to assess the role of Brachyury in PCa therapy resistance. We showed that Brachyury overexpression in prostate cancer cells lines increased resistance to docetaxel and cabazitaxel drugs, whereas Brachyury abrogation induced decrease in therapy resistance. Through ChiP-qPCR assays we further demonstrated that Brachyury is a direct regulator of AR expression as well as of the biomarker AMACR and the mesenchymal markers Snail and Fibronectin. Furthermore, in vitro Brachyury was also able to increase EMT and stem properties. By in silico analysis, clinically human Brachyury-positive PCa samples were associated with biomarkers of PCa aggressiveness and therapy resistance, including PTEN loss, and expression of NEtD markers, ERG and Bcl-2. Taken together, our results indicate that Brachyury contributes to tumor chemotherapy resistance, constituting an attractive target for advanced PCa patients. PMID:27049720

  13. Ornithine Decarboxylase Activity Is Required for Prostatic Budding in the Developing Mouse Prostate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Gamat

    Full Text Available The prostate is a male accessory sex gland that produces secretions in seminal fluid to facilitate fertilization. Prostate secretory function is dependent on androgens, although the mechanism by which androgens exert their effects is still unclear. Polyamines are small cationic molecules that play pivotal roles in DNA transcription, translation and gene regulation. The rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis is ornithine decarboxylase, which is encoded by the gene Odc1. Ornithine decarboxylase mRNA decreases in the prostate upon castration and increases upon administration of androgens. Furthermore, testosterone administered to castrated male mice restores prostate secretory activity, whereas administering testosterone and the ornithine decarboxylase inhibitor D,L-α-difluromethylornithine (DFMO to castrated males does not restore prostate secretory activity, suggesting that polyamines are required for androgens to exert their effects. To date, no one has examined polyamines in prostate development, which is also androgen dependent. In this study, we showed that ornithine decarboxylase protein was expressed in the epithelium of the ventral, dorsolateral and anterior lobes of the adult mouse prostate. Ornithine decarboxylase protein was also expressed in the urogenital sinus (UGS epithelium of the male and female embryo prior to prostate development, and expression continued in prostatic epithelial buds as they emerged from the UGS. Inhibiting ornithine decarboxylase using DFMO in UGS organ culture blocked the induction of prostatic buds by androgens, and significantly decreased expression of key prostate transcription factor, Nkx3.1, by androgens. DFMO also significantly decreased the expression of developmental regulatory gene Notch1. Other genes implicated in prostatic development including Sox9, Wif1 and Srd5a2 were unaffected by DFMO. Together these results indicate that Odc1 and polyamines are required for androgens to exert their

  14. PBP-2 Negative Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus schleiferi Bacteremia from a Prostate Abscess: An Unusual Occurrence

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    Chandni Merchant

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus schleiferi subsp. schleiferi is a coagulase-negative Staphylococcus which has been described as a pathogen responsible for various nosocomial infections including bacteremia, brain abscess, and infection of intravenous pacemakers. Recently, such bacteria have been described to be found typically on skin and mucosal surfaces. It is also believed to be a part of the preaxillary human flora and more frequently found in men. It is very similar in its pathogenicity with Staphylococcus aureus group and expresses a fibronectin binding protein. Literature on this pathogen reveals that it commonly causes otitis among dogs because of its location in the auditory meatus of canines. Also, it has strong association with pyoderma in dogs. The prime concern with this organism is the antibiotic resistance and relapse even after appropriate treatment. Very rarely, if any, cases have been reported about prostatic abscess (PA with this microbe. Our patient had a history of recurrent UTIs and subsequent PA resulting in S. schleiferi bacteremia in contrast to gram negative bacteremia commonly associated with UTI. This organism was found to be resistant to methicillin, in spite of being negative for PBP2, which is a rare phenomenon and needs further studies.

  15. Immune response in hormonally-induced prostatic hyperplasia in the dog.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahapokai, W.; Ingh, T.S. van den; Mil, F. van; Garderen, E. van; Schalken, J.A.; Mol, J.A.; Sluijs, F.J. van

    2001-01-01

    We induced prostatic enlargement in castrated dogs using either androgen alone or androgen combined with estrogen. In addition to previously reported hyperplastic changes, marked infiltration with immune effector cells was observed. This mononuclear cell infiltrate was phenotypically characterized u

  16. Management of bone metastases in refractory prostate cancer – role of denosumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paller CJ

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Channing J Paller,1 Michael A Carducci,1 George K Philips21Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, MD, USA; 2Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Washington DC, USAAbstract: This article reviews the problem of bone disease in prostate cancer and the evolving role of the novel agent denosumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody that inhibits the receptor activator of nuclear factor-ΚB ligand, in suppressing bone resorption and offering bone protection in this disease. Prostate cancer frequently metastasizes to bone, and additionally its treatment with androgen deprivation leads to accelerated bone loss resulting in clinically relevant skeletal complications associated with disabling symptoms. Among the bone-targeting therapeutic strategies investigated for the prevention of bone complications, the potent bisphosphonate zoledronic acid has been the most widely used agent for bone protection in the past decade. Denosumab is the first among a new class of osteoclast-targeting agents to show superior efficacy in several clinical scenarios in both prostate and breast cancer, as well as in osteoporosis, but the focus of this review will be on its role in prostate cancer. The safety and efficacy of denosumab versus zoledronic acid was established in a randomized trial, demonstrating a delay in skeletal-related events in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients. This study led to the approval of denosumab in the US. The chief risks of denosumab were hypocalcemia and osteonecrosis of the jaw. Denosumab was also approved for fracture risk reduction in patients on androgen-deprivation therapy for nonmetastatic prostate cancer. Although denosumab extended bone metastasis-free survival in a Phase III trial in men with castration-resistant nonmetastatic prostate cancer to a statistically significant degree, a Food and Drug Administration committee found that the effect was not sufficiently clinically

  17. Genomic predictors for treatment of late stage prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H Shevrin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the development of new treatments for late stage prostate cancer, significant challenges persist to match individuals with effective targeted therapies. Genomic classification using high-throughput sequencing technologies has the potential to achieve this goal and make precision medicine a reality in the management of men with castrate-resistant prostate cancer. This chapter reviews some of the most recent studies that have resulted in significant progress in determining the landscape of somatic genomic alterations in this cohort and, more importantly, have provided clinically actionable information that could guide treatment decisions. This chapter reviews the current understanding of common alterations such as alterations of the androgen receptor and PTEN pathway, as well as ETS gene fusions and the growing importance of PARP inhibition. It also reviews recent studies that characterize the evolution to neuroendocrine tumors, which is becoming an increasingly important clinical problem. Finally, this chapter reviews recent innovative studies that characterize the compelling evolutionary history of lethal prostate cancer evidenced by polyclonal seeding and interclonal cooperation between metastasis and the importance of tumor clone dynamics measured serially in response to treatment. The genomic landscape of late stage prostate cancer is becoming better defined, and the prospect for assigning clinically actionable data to inform rationale treatment for individuals with this disease is becoming a reality.

  18. Clinical Implications of Hedgehog Pathway Signaling in Prostate Cancer

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    Daniel L. Suzman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Activity in the Hedgehog pathway, which regulates GLI-mediated transcription, is important in organogenesis and stem cell regulation in self-renewing organs, but is pathologically elevated in many human malignancies. Mutations leading to constitutive activation of the pathway have been implicated in medulloblastoma and basal cell carcinoma, and inhibition of the pathway has demonstrated clinical responses leading to the approval of the Smoothened inhibitor, vismodegib, for the treatment of advanced basal cell carcinoma. Aberrant Hedgehog pathway signaling has also been noted in prostate cancer with evidence suggesting that it may render prostate epithelial cells tumorigenic, drive the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and contribute towards the development of castration-resistance through autocrine and paracrine signaling within the tumor microenvironment and cross-talk with the androgen pathway. In addition, there are emerging clinical data suggesting that inhibition of the Hedgehog pathway may be effective in the treatment of recurrent and metastatic prostate cancer. Here we will review these data and highlight areas of active clinical research as they relate to Hedgehog pathway inhibition in prostate cancer.

  19. Vaccine therapy with sipuleucel-T (Provenge) for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thara, Eddie; Dorff, Tanya B; Pinski, Jacek K; Quinn, David I

    2011-08-01

    As the most common malignancy among North American males, prostate cancer causes more than 30,000 deaths each year. After local and hormonal treatments, a great number of patients ultimately progressed to castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), in which chemotherapy provides a small survival advantage, but with significant toxicities. In the past decade, prostate cancer has become a target for several immunotherapeutic approaches. Sipuleucel-T (Provenge®, or APC8015) is a novel cancer vaccine developed from autologous dendritic cells (DC) loaded with engineered fusion protein of prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Phase I and Phase II trials show that the vaccine is safe and effective in creating immune responses toward the fusion-protein target antigen, PAP-GM-CSF also call PA2024. Recent Phase III studies also demonstrated sipuleucel-T's efficacy in prolonging median survival in patients with CRPC, despite little or no effect on clinical disease progression or surrogates such as serum PSA kinetics. Subsequently, the United States Food and Drug Administration approved sipuleucel-T for the treatment of asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic CRPC in April 2010. Filings are projected with international regulatory agencies in 2011. While the development of sipuleucel-T provides an option for patients with early CRPC, it also introduces physicians and researchers to new unanswered questions regarding its optimal clinical use and questions about mechanism of action and combination and sequencing with other agents.

  20. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) assembles a macromolecular complex regulating growth and survival of prostate cancer cells "in vitro" and correlating with progression "in vivo".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perico, Maria Elisa; Grasso, Silvia; Brunelli, Matteo; Martignoni, Guido; Munari, Enrico; Moiso, Enrico; Fracasso, Giulio; Cestari, Tiziana; Naim, Hassan Y; Bronte, Vincenzo; Colombatti, Marco; Ramarli, Dunia

    2016-11-08

    The expression of Prostate Specific-Membrane Antigen (PSMA) increases in high-grade prostate carcinoma envisaging a role in growth and progression. We show here that clustering PSMA at LNCaP or PC3-PSMA cell membrane activates AKT and MAPK pathways thus promoting proliferation and survival. PSMA activity was dependent on the assembly of a macromolecular complex including filamin A, beta1 integrin, p130CAS, c-Src and EGFR. Within this complex beta1 integrin became activated thereby inducing a c-Src-dependent EGFR phosphorylation at Y1086 and Y1173 EGF-independent residues. Silencing or blocking experiments with drugs demonstrated that all the complex components were required for full PSMA-dependent promotion of cell growth and/or survival in 3D culture, but that p130CAS and EGFR exerted a major role. All PSMA complex components were found assembled in multiple samples of two high-grade prostate carcinomas and associated with EGFR phosphorylation at Y1086. The expression of p130CAS and pEGFRY1086 was thus analysed by tissue micro array in 16 castration-resistant prostate carcinomas selected from 309 carcinomas and stratified from GS 3+4 to GS 5+5. Patients with Gleason Score ≤5 resulted negative whereas those with GS≥5 expressed p130CAS and pEGFRY1086 in 75% and 60% of the cases, respectively.Collectively, our results demonstrate for the first time that PSMA recruits a functionally active complex which is present in high-grade patients. In addition, two components of this complex, p130CAS and the novel pEGFRY1086, correlate with progression in castration-resistant patients and could be therefore useful in therapeutic or surveillance strategies of these patients.

  1. Prostate cancer cell-stromal cell crosstalk via FGFR1 mediates antitumor activity of dovitinib in bone metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xinhai; Corn, Paul G; Yang, Jun; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Starbuck, Michael W; Efstathiou, Eleni; Li Ning Tapia, Elsa M; Tapia, Elsa M Li-Ning; Zurita, Amado J; Aparicio, Ana; Ravoori, Murali K; Vazquez, Elba S; Robinson, Dan R; Wu, Yi-Mi; Cao, Xuhong; Iyer, Matthew K; McKeehan, Wallace; Kundra, Vikas; Wang, Fen; Troncoso, Patricia; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Logothetis, Christopher J; Navone, Nora M

    2014-09-01

    Bone is the most common site of prostate cancer (PCa) progression to a therapy-resistant, lethal phenotype. We found that blockade of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) with the receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor dovitinib has clinical activity in a subset of men with castration-resistant PCa and bone metastases. Our integrated analyses suggest that FGF signaling mediates a positive feedback loop between PCa cells and bone cells and that blockade of FGFR1 in osteoblasts partially mediates the antitumor activity of dovitinib by improving bone quality and by blocking PCa cell-bone cell interaction. These findings account for clinical observations such as reductions in lesion size and intensity on bone scans, lymph node size, and tumor-specific symptoms without proportional declines in serum prostate-specific antigen concentration. Our findings suggest that targeting FGFR has therapeutic activity in advanced PCa and provide direction for the development of therapies with FGFR inhibitors.

  2. What is the role of sipuleucel-T in the treatment of patients with advanced prostate cancer? An update on the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Rachel; George, Daniel J; Zhang, Tian

    2016-08-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men and the second most deadly. About one-third of patients with prostate cancer will develop metastatic disease. We discuss the six United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved treatments for metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) with a strong focus on sipuleucel-T. Sipuleucel-T is the first immunotherapy shown to improve survival in asymptomatic or minimally-symptomatic mCRPC. Herein, we discuss the proposed mechanism of sipuleucel-T and its synthesis. We describe in detail the three randomized controlled trials (RTCs) that led to its approval. We also compiled the newest research regarding use of sipuleucel-T with other agents and in different patient populations. Finally, we discuss the current ongoing trials.

  3. Chemotherapy-induced monoamine oxidase expression in prostate carcinoma functions as a cytoprotective resistance enzyme and associates with clinical outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan R Gordon

    Full Text Available To identify molecular alterations in prostate cancers associating with relapse following neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radical prostatectomy patients with high-risk localized prostate cancer were enrolled into a phase I-II clinical trial of neoadjuvant chemotherapy with docetaxel and mitoxantrone followed by prostatectomy. Pre-treatment prostate tissue was acquired by needle biopsy and post-treatment tissue was acquired by prostatectomy. Prostate cancer gene expression measurements were determined in 31 patients who completed 4 cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We identified 141 genes with significant transcript level alterations following chemotherapy that associated with subsequent biochemical relapse. This group included the transcript encoding monoamine oxidase A (MAOA. In vitro, cytotoxic chemotherapy induced the expression of MAOA and elevated MAOA levels enhanced cell survival following docetaxel exposure. MAOA activity increased the levels of reactive oxygen species and increased the expression and nuclear translocation of HIF1α. The suppression of MAOA activity using the irreversible inhibitor clorgyline augmented the apoptotic responses induced by docetaxel. In summary, we determined that the expression of MAOA is induced by exposure to cytotoxic chemotherapy, increases HIF1α, and contributes to docetaxel resistance. As MAOA inhibitors have been approved for human use, regimens combining MAOA inhibitors with docetaxel may improve clinical outcomes.

  4. Paracrine sonic hedgehog signaling contributes significantly to acquired steroidogenesis in the prostate tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubik, Amy A; Nouri, Mannan; Truong, Sarah; Ghaffari, Mazyar; Adomat, Hans H; Corey, Eva; Cox, Michael E; Li, Na; Guns, Emma S; Yenki, Parvin; Pham, Steven; Buttyan, Ralph

    2017-01-15

    Despite the substantial benefit of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for metastatic prostate cancer, patients often progress to castration-resistant disease (CRPC) that is more difficult to treat. CRPC is associated with renewed androgen receptor activity in tumor cells and restoration of tumor androgen levels through acquired intratumoral steroidogenesis (AIS). Although prostate cancer (PCa) cells have been shown to have steroidogenic capability in vitro, we previously found that benign prostate stromal cells (PrSCs) can also synthesize testosterone (T) from an adrenal precursor, DHEA, when stimulated with a hedgehog (Hh) pathway agonist, SAG. Here, we show exposure of PrSCs to a different Smoothened (Smo) agonist, Ag1.5, or to conditioned medium from sonic hedgehog overexpressing LNCaP cells induces steroidogenic enzyme expression in PrSCs and significantly increases production of T and its precursor steroids in a Smo-dependent manner from 22-OH-cholesterol substrate. Hh agonist-/ligand-treated PrSCs produced androgens at a rate similar to or greater than that of PCa cell lines. Likewise, primary bone marrow stromal cells became more steroidogenic and produced T under the influence of Smo agonist. Treatment of mice bearing LNCaP xenografts with a Smo antagonist, TAK-441, delayed the onset of CRPC after castration and substantially reduced androgen levels in residual tumors. These outcomes support the idea that stromal cells in ADT-treated primary or metastatic prostate tumors can contribute to AIS as a consequence of a paracrine Hh signaling microenvironment. As such, Smo antagonists may be useful for targeting prostate tumor stromal cell-derived AIS and delaying the onset of CRPC after ADT.

  5. Prostate; Prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouviere, O.; Valette, O.; Grivolat, S.; Colin-Pangaud, C.; Bouvier, R.; Chapelon, J.Y.; Gelet, A.; Lyonnet, D.; Rouviere, O.; Mege-Lechevallier, F.; Chapelon, J.Y.; Gelet, A.; Bouvier, R.; Boutitie, F.; Lyonnet, D. [69 - Lyon (France)

    2005-10-15

    Two methods to detect recurrence of prostate cancer are presented. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging after radiotherapy and color doppler after high intensity focused ultrasounds (but with patients that have not received a hormones therapy). These two methods presents an useful contribution. (N.C.)

  6. Prostate Cancer: Countdown to Choice between Stitch in Time and Eleventh Hour Begins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammad Ahmad Farooqi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Androgen ablation therapy presumed to be an effective treatment for advanced prostate cancer (PCa is relentlessly challenged. Remissions are impermanent and patients almost inescapably progress to become castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. CRPC is almost invincible and is the major stumbling block in the treatment. It is a dramatic shift of androgen receptor (AR from normal activities to the oncogenesis. AR signaling is remarkably increased under an androgen-depleted environment. It utilizes a miscellany of mechanisms and pathways to compensate for the decreasing levels of androgens. These range from mutations in the receptor more like a business tactic to attract more clients, to the illegitimate crosstalks which promote the signaling. The review will encompass various mechanistic insights of the AR manipulations. Moreover efficacy of therapeutic interventions recently designed keeping in view the molecular hierarchy will be evaluated.

  7. Sequencing therapy in advanced prostate cancer: focus on sipuleucel-T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, David I; Vaishampayan, Ulka; Higano, Celestia S; Lin, Daniel W; Shore, Neal D; Beer, Tomasz M

    2014-01-01

    Immunotherapies such as sipuleucel-T present new and unique challenges for the optimal timing and sequencing of therapies for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Key considerations for the sequencing of sipuleucel-T are its unique proposed mechanism of action, the time required to generate a clinically relevant immune response, and the observed efficacy in Phase III trials in 'early' or asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic mCRPC. There are three broad timing and sequencing options for sipuleucel-T in patients with rising prostate-specific antigen and radiologic evidence of disease: immediately after androgen-deprivation therapy failure, after failure of secondary hormonal maneuvers, or after chemotherapy. There are several other agents in Phase III development in mCRPC and any future approvals will impact on the current treatment algorithm, and raise further questions regarding how to optimize sequencing and timing of therapies for better clinical outcomes.

  8. The complexities of identifying a cell of origin for human prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gail P Risbridger; Renea A Taylor

    2011-01-01

    @@ Prostate cancer(PCa)is the second most common malignancy in men1 and ifloca-lized or confined to the gland at diagnosis,the choice of treatment includes surgery,radiation or watchful waiting.If and when the disease spreads,androgen blockade is effective but inevitably relapse occurs,resulting in incurable castrate-resistant PCa.Understanding the etiology of PCa will underpin the development of better treatment options In particular,the identity of the cell type(s)that are the origin of PCa(or cancer-initiating cells)will enable them to become therapeutic targets that could lead to newer and more sophisticated treatment options.These cells of origin are defined as epithelial cells in the normal prostate,susceptible to malignant transformation and therefore capable of initiating tumourigenesis.However,their identity is unknown.

  9. Advanced prostate cancer – patient survival and potential impact of enzalutamide and other emerging therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel NK

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Nihar K Patel, Antoine Finianos, Kristen D Whitaker, Jeanny B Aragon-Ching Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology and Oncology, George Washington University Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA Abstract: The advent of exponential growth of novel agents tested and approved for the treatment of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC has brought about a need for understanding of the mechanism of action, side-effects, and clinical efficacy of these drugs as they relate to these patients. This review will provide a synopsis of the treatment landscape in mCRPC as varying agents such as abiraterone acetate, cabazitaxel, sipuleucel-T, radium, and selected emerging agents are presented. A distinct focus on the utilization of enzalutamide, its mechanism of action, key pivotal trials that brought about its US Food and Drug Administration approval, as well as patient-focused perspectives and clinical implications are discussed herein. Keywords: metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, enzalutamide, systemic therapies

  10. Early Growth Inhibition Is Followed by Increased Metastatic Disease with Vitamin D (Calcitriol) Treatment in the TRAMP Model of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasik, Ellen; Gillard, Bryan; Moser, Michael T.; Johnson, Candace S.; Trump, Donald L.; Foster, Barbara A.

    2014-01-01

    The active metabolite of vitamin D3, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (calcitriol) has antiproliferative effects in non-aggressive prostate cancer, however, its effects in more aggressive model systems are still unclear. In these studies, effects of calcitriol and a less-calcemic vitamin D analog, QW-1624F2-2 (QW), were tested in vivo, using the aggressive autochthonous transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. To study prevention of androgen-stimulated prostate cancer, vehicle, calcitriol (20 µg/kg), or QW (50 µg/kg) were administered to 4 week-old TRAMP mice intraperitoneal (i.p.) 3×/week on a MWF schedule for 14 weeks. Calcitriol and QW slowed progression of prostate cancer as indicated by reduced urogenital tract (p = 0.0022, calcitriol; p = 0.0009, QW) and prostate weights (p = 0.0178, calcitriol; p = 0.0086, QW). However, only calcitriol increased expression of the pro-differentiation marker, cadherin 1 (p = 0.0086), and reduced tumor proliferation (p = 0.0467). By contrast, neither vitamin D analog had any effect on castration resistant prostate cancer in mice treated pre- or post-castration. Interestingly, although vitamin D showed inhibitory activity against primary tumors in hormone-intact mice, distant organ metastases seemed to be enhanced following treatment (p = 0.0823). Therefore, TRAMP mice were treated long-term with calcitriol to further examine effects on metastasis. Calcitriol significantly increased the number of distant organ metastases when mice were treated from 4 weeks-of-age until development of palpable tumors (20–25 weeks-of-age)(p = 0.0003). Overall, data suggest that early intervention with vitamin D in TRAMP slowed androgen-stimulated tumor progression, but prolonged treatment resulted in development of a resistant and more aggressive disease associated with increased distant organ metastasis. PMID:24586868

  11. Early growth inhibition is followed by increased metastatic disease with vitamin D (calcitriol treatment in the TRAMP model of prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adebusola Alagbala Ajibade

    Full Text Available The active metabolite of vitamin D3, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (calcitriol has antiproliferative effects in non-aggressive prostate cancer, however, its effects in more aggressive model systems are still unclear. In these studies, effects of calcitriol and a less-calcemic vitamin D analog, QW-1624F2-2 (QW, were tested in vivo, using the aggressive autochthonous transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP model. To study prevention of androgen-stimulated prostate cancer, vehicle, calcitriol (20 µg/kg, or QW (50 µg/kg were administered to 4 week-old TRAMP mice intraperitoneal (i.p. 3×/week on a MWF schedule for 14 weeks. Calcitriol and QW slowed progression of prostate cancer as indicated by reduced urogenital tract (p = 0.0022, calcitriol; p = 0.0009, QW and prostate weights (p = 0.0178, calcitriol; p = 0.0086, QW. However, only calcitriol increased expression of the pro-differentiation marker, cadherin 1 (p = 0.0086, and reduced tumor proliferation (p = 0.0467. By contrast, neither vitamin D analog had any effect on castration resistant prostate cancer in mice treated pre- or post-castration. Interestingly, although vitamin D showed inhibitory activity against primary tumors in hormone-intact mice, distant organ metastases seemed to be enhanced following treatment (p = 0.0823. Therefore, TRAMP mice were treated long-term with calcitriol to further examine effects on metastasis. Calcitriol significantly increased the number of distant organ metastases when mice were treated from 4 weeks-of-age until development of palpable tumors (20-25 weeks-of-age(p = 0.0003. Overall, data suggest that early intervention with vitamin D in TRAMP slowed androgen-stimulated tumor progression, but prolonged treatment resulted in development of a resistant and more aggressive disease associated with increased distant organ metastasis.

  12. Isoform 1 of TPD52 (PC-1) promotes neuroendocrine transdifferentiation in prostate cancer cells

    KAUST Repository

    Moritz, Tom

    2016-02-05

    The tumour protein D52 isoform 1 (PC-1), a member of the tumour protein D52 (TPD52) protein family, is androgen-regulated and prostate-specific expressed. Previous studies confirmed that PC-1 contributes to malignant progression in prostate cancer with an important role in castration-resistant stage. In the present work, we identified its impact in mechanisms leading to neuroendocrine (NE) transdifferentiation. We established for long-term PC-1 overexpression an inducible expression system derived from the prostate carcinoma cell line LNCaP. We observed that PC-1 overexpression itself initiates characteristics of neuroendocrine cells, but the effect was much more pronounced in the presence of the cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6). Moreover, to our knowledge, this is the first report that treatment with IL-6 leads to a significant upregulation of PC-1 in LNCaP cells. Other TPD52 isoforms were not affected. Proceeding from this result, we conclude that PC-1 overexpression enhances the IL-6-mediated differentiation of LNCaP cells into a NE-like phenotype, noticeable by morphological changes and increased expression of typical NE markers, like chromogranin A, synaptophysin or beta-3 tubulin. Immunofluorescent staining of IL-6-treated PC-1-overexpressing LNCaP cells indicates a considerable PC-1 accumulation at the end of the long-branched neuron-like cell processes, which are typically formed by NE cells. Additionally, the experimentally initiated NE transdifferentiation correlates with the androgen receptor status, which was upregulated additively. In summary, our data provide evidence for an involvement of PC-1 in NE transdifferentiation, frequently associated with castration resistance, which is a major therapeutic challenge in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer.

  13. Antiandrogens act as selective androgen receptor modulators at the proteome level in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, Greg N; Gamble, Simon C; Hough, Michael A; Begum, Shajna; Dart, D Alwyn; Odontiadis, Michael; Powell, Sue M; Fioretti, Flavia M; Bryan, Rosie A; Waxman, Jonathan; Wait, Robin; Bevan, Charlotte L

    2015-05-01

    Current therapies for prostate cancer include antiandrogens, inhibitory ligands of the androgen receptor, which repress androgen-stimulated growth. These include the selective androgen receptor modulators cyproterone acetate and hydroxyflutamide and the complete antagonist bicalutamide. Their activity is partly dictated by the presence of androgen receptor mutations, which are commonly detected in patients who relapse while receiving antiandrogens, i.e. in castrate-resistant prostate cancer. To characterize the early proteomic response to these antiandrogens we used the LNCaP prostate cancer cell line, which harbors the androgen receptor mutation most commonly detected in castrate-resistant tumors (T877A), analyzing alterations in the proteome, and comparing these to the effect of these therapeutics upon androgen receptor activity and cell proliferation. The majority are regulated post-transcriptionally, possibly via nongenomic androgen receptor signaling. Differences detected between the exposure groups demonstrate subtle changes in the biological response to each specific ligand, suggesting a spectrum of agonistic and antagonistic effects dependent on the ligand used. Analysis of the crystal structures of the AR in the presence of cyproterone acetate, hydroxyflutamide, and DHT identified important differences in the orientation of key residues located in the AF-2 and BF-3 protein interaction surfaces. This further implies that although there is commonality in the growth responses between androgens and those antiandrogens that stimulate growth in the presence of a mutation, there may also be influential differences in the growth pathways stimulated by the different ligands. This therefore has implications for prostate cancer treatment because tumors may respond differently dependent upon which mutation is present and which ligand is activating growth, also for the design of selective androgen receptor modulators, which aim to elicit differential proteomic

  14. The molecular and cellular origin of human prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, John R; Maitland, Norman J

    2016-06-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed male malignancy. Despite compelling epidemiology, there are no definitive aetiological clues linking development to frequency. Pre-malignancies such as proliferative inflammatory atrophy (PIA) and prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) yield insights into the initiating events of prostate cancer, as they supply a background "field" for further transformation. An inflammatory aetiology, linked to recurrent prostatitis, and heterologous signalling from reactive stroma and infiltrating immune cells may result in cytokine addiction of cancer cells, including a tumour-initiating population also known as cancer stem cells (CSCs). In prostate tumours, the background mutational rate is rarely exceeded, but genetic change via profound sporadic chromosomal rearrangements results in copy number variations and aberrant gene expression. In cancer, dysfunctional differentiation is imposed upon the normal epithelial lineage, with disruption/disappearance of the basement membrane, loss of the contiguous basal cell layer and expansion of the luminal population. An initiating role for androgen receptor (AR) is attractive, due to the luminal phenotype of the tumours, but alternatively a pool of CSCs, which express little or no AR, has also been demonstrated. Indolent and aggressive tumours may also arise from different stem or progenitor cells. Castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) remains the inevitable final stage of disease following treatment. Time-limited effectiveness of second-generation anti-androgens, and the appearance of an AR-neuroendocrine phenotype imply that metastatic disease is reliant upon the plasticity of the CSC population, and indeed CSC gene expression profiles are most closely related to those identified in CRPCs.

  15. Non-invasive actionable biomarkers for metastatic prostate cancer

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    Jun Luo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the current clinical setting, many disease management options are available for men diagnosed with prostate cancer. For metastatic prostate cancer, first-line therapies almost always involve agents designed to inhibit androgen receptor (AR signaling. Castration-resistant prostate cancers (CRPCs that arise following first-line androgen deprivation therapies (ADT may continue to respond to additional lines of AR-targeting therapies (abiraterone and enzalutamide, chemotherapies (docetaxel and cabazitaxel, bone-targeting Radium-223 therapy, and immunotherapy sipuleucel-T. The rapidly expanding therapies for CRPC is expected to transform this lethal disease into one that can be managed for prolonged period of time. In the past 3 years, a number of promising biomarkers that may help to guide treatment decisions have been proposed and evaluated, including androgen receptor splice variant-7 (AR-V7, a truncated AR lacking the ligand-binding domain (LBD and mediate constitutively-active AR signaling. Putative treatment selection markers such as AR-V7 may further improve survival benefit of existing therapies and help to accelerate development of new agents for metastatic prostate cancer. In the metastatic setting, it is important to consider compatibility between the putative biomarker with non-invasive sampling. In this review, biomarkers relevant to the setting of metastatic prostate cancer are discussed with respect to a number of key attributes critical for clinical development of non-invasive, actionable markers. It is envisioned that biomarkers for metastatic prostate cancer will continue to be discovered, developed, and refined to meet the unmet needs in both standard-of-care and clinical trial settings.

  16. Testosterone regulates tight junction proteins and influences prostatic autoimmune responses.

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    Meng, Jing; Mostaghel, Elahe A; Vakar-Lopez, Funda; Montgomery, Bruce; True, Larry; Nelson, Peter S

    2011-06-01

    Testosterone and inflammation have been linked to the development of common age-associated diseases affecting the prostate gland including prostate cancer, prostatitis, and benign prostatic hypertrophy. We hypothesized that testosterone regulates components of prostate tight junctions which serve as a barrier to inflammation, thus providing a connection between age- and treatment-associated testosterone declines and prostatic pathology. We examined the expression and distribution of tight junction proteins in prostate biospecimens from mouse models and a clinical study of chemical castration, using transcript profiling, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy. We determined that low serum testosterone is associated with reduced transcript and protein levels of Claudin 4 and Claudin 8, resulting in defective tight junction ultrastructure in benign prostate glands. Expression of Claudin 4 and Claudin 8 was negatively correlated with the mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate caused by testosterone deprivation. Testosterone suppression also induced an autoimmune humoral response directed toward prostatic proteins. Testosterone supplementation in castrate mice resulted in re-expression of tight junction components in prostate epithelium and significantly reduced prostate inflammatory cell numbers. These data demonstrate that tight junction architecture in the prostate is related to changes in serum testosterone levels, and identify an androgen-regulated mechanism that potentially contributes to the development of prostate inflammation and consequent pathology.

  17. Prostate Cancer Immunotherapy with Sipuleucel-T: Current Standards and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiao X; Fong, Lawrence; Small, Eric J

    2015-01-01

    The management of advanced prostate cancer, specifically metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), remains a therapeutic challenge. Sipuleucel-T (Provenge; APC8015) was approved by the FDA in 2010 for the treatment of asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic mCRPC patients, and it remains the only FDA-approved immunotherapy for prostate cancer of any indication to date. Given the continued need to improve therapeutics in patients with advanced prostate cancer, as well as recent enthusiasm for cancer immunotherapy, there is a wide range of ongoing trials evaluating combinations of sipuleucel-T with other therapeutics. Additional trials are aiming to expand the application of sipuleucel-T to prostate cancer patients beyond the mCRPC setting. Ongoing challenges include understanding the full mechanism of action of sipuleucel-T, optimizing the sequence of sipuleucel-T in relation to other therapies for mCRPC in clinical practice, and the identification of surrogate markers to predict survival benefit in clinical trials.

  18. Effect of androgen deprivation on the expression of aquaporins in rat prostate and seminal vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, J C; Xia, J Y; Jiang, J; Jiang, R; He, Y Z; Lin, H

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the level of secretions of prostate and seminal vesicles and its association with the expression of AQP0, 1, 4, 5, 6 and 8 in castrated rats. Eight-week-old male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats (n = 18) were randomly divided into control group, castrated rats group and castrated followed testosterone replacement group. Four weeks after surgery, the secretions and expression of AQP0, 1, 4, 5, 6 and 8 of prostate and seminal vesicles were determined. Serum testosterone was significantly lower in castrated groups than in control and testosterone replacement groups (P seminal vesicle secretions and the expressions of AQP0, 1, 4, 5, 6 and 8 in prostate and seminal vesicles were significantly lower in castrated group than in control and castrated followed testosterone replacement groups (P seminal vesicle secretions in castrated rats may be related to the decrease in AQP0, 1, 4, 5, 6 and 8 in prostatic tissue and seminal vesicles.

  19. Mitosis orientation in prostate epithelial cells changed by endocrine effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang-yun LIU; Dong-mei Li; Xiao-fang ZHANG; Jian-hui WU; Zu-yue SUN

    2008-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of androgen and estrogen on mitosis orientation in the prostate epithelial cells of male rats. Methods: Castrated rats were treated with a single injection of testosterone propionate (TP) or benzogynestry (E2). There were 8 rats in the control group and TP-treated or E2-treated group. Prostate, liver, a specimen of skin, and a segment of the jejunum and colon were removed after the corresponding treatment. The results were observed through immunohistochemistry and iron hematoxylin-eosin staining.Results: All mitoses found in the prostate epithelial cells of castrated rats with TP were oriented parallel to the basement membrane; however, mitoses found in the prostate epithelial cells of castrated rats in E2 and the control group were oriented perpendicular to the basement membrane. TP treatment resulted in marked changes in mitosis orientation in the prostate epithelial cells. Bromodeoxyuridine-labeled positive cells could be seen throughout the stroma and prostate epithelial cells with an injection of TP; however, the positive cells could only be seen in the stroma of prostate with an injection of E2, and the positive cells could hardly be seen in the control group. Conclusion: We found a novel effect of TP in the prostate as a marked change of mitosis orientation in prostate epithelial cells.

  20. Estrogen-dependent induction of cyclooxygenase-2 in the canine prostate in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doré, M; Chevalier, S; Sirois, J

    2005-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 is involved in several physiologic and pathologic processes. COX-2 is overexpressed in human and canine prostate cancer, but little is known about COX-2 inducers in the prostate. Our objective was to investigate the effect of sex steroid hormones on COX-2 expression in the canine prostate in vivo. COX-2 expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in intact and castrated dogs treated with exogenous androgen or estrogen. Results showed that no COX-2 staining was observed in prostates of untreated or androgen-treated castrated or intact dogs. However, treatment of intact and castrated dogs with estrogen resulted in squamous metaplasia with intense COX-2 expression observed in both squamous epithelial cells and in cells of acini without metaplasia. This is the first report to demonstrate the induction of COX-2 by estrogen in the prostate in vivo.

  1. Acute Cold / Restraint Stress in Castrated Rats

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    Farideh Zafari Zangeneh

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study aimed to determine whether castration altered osmotically stimulated vasopressin (VP release and urinary volume and what is the role of endocrine-stress axis in this process.Materials and methods: Totally 108 mice were studied in two main groups of castrated (n=78 and control (n=30. Each group was extracted by acute cold stress (4◦C for 2h/day, restraint stress (by syringes 60cc 2h/day and cold/restraint stress. The castrated group was treated in sub groups of testosterone, control (sesame oil as vehicle of testosterone. Propranolol as blocker of sympathetic nervous system was given to both groups of castrated mice and main control.Results: Our results showed that, there is interactions between testosterone and sympathetic nervous system on vasopressin, because urine volume was decreased only in testoctomized mice with cold/restraint and cold stress (P<0.001; propranolol as the antagonist of sympathetic nervous system could block and increase urine volume in castrated mice. This increased volume of urine was due to acute cold stress, not restraint stress (p<0.001. The role of testosterone, noradrenalin (NA and Vasopressin (VP in the acute cold stress is confirmed, because testosterone could return the effect of decreased urine volume in control group (P<0.001. Conclusion: Considering the effect of cold/restraint stress on urinary volume in castrated mice shows that there is interaction between sex hormone (testosterone, vasopressin and adrenergic systems.

  2. BIRC6 protein, an inhibitor of apoptosis: role in survival of human prostate cancer cells.

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    Christopher G Low

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: BIRC6 is a member of the Inhibitors of Apoptosis Protein (IAP family which is thought to protect a variety of cancer cells from apoptosis. The main objective of the present study was to investigate whether BIRC6 plays a role in prostate cancer and could be useful as a novel therapeutic target. METHODS: BIRC6 expression in cell lines was assessed using Western blot analysis and in clinical samples using immunohistochemistry of tissue microarrays. The biological significance of BIRC6 was determined by siRNA-induced reduction of BIRC6 expression in LNCaP cells followed by functional assays. RESULTS: Elevated BIRC6 protein expression was found in prostate cancer cell lines and clinical specimens as distinct from their benign counterparts. Increased BIRC6 expression was associated with Gleason 6-8 cancers and castration resistance. Reduction of BIRC6 expression in LNCaP cells led to a marked reduction in cell proliferation which was associated with an increase in apoptosis and a decrease in autophagosome formation. Doxorubicin-induced apoptosis was found to be coupled to a reduction in BIRC6 protein expression. CONCLUSION: The data suggest a role for BIRC6 in prostate cancer progression and treatment resistance, and indicate for the first time that the BIRC6 gene and its product are potentially valuable targets for treatment of prostate cancers.

  3. Correction of androgen deficiency in chronic infectious prostatitis as pathogenetic method of overcoming inefficiencies standard antibiotics against the growing antibiotic resistance

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    I. A. Tyuzikov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The chronic prostatitis occupies the big relative density in structure of an out-patient urological pathology in our country, however, results of its standard pharmacotherapy remain unsatisfactory that is accompanied by high risk clinical recurrence and progressing of anatomic and functional disorders in prostata. Modern methods of diagnostics of the chronic infectious prostatitis, which share in the general structure of inflammatory prostata diseases does not exceed 10 %, are based on the recommended volume of the standard tests directed only on revealing of the infectious agent in a prostatic secret, and do not consider degree of disorders of the prostatic homeostasis which key moment is prostata androgen-dependence. It leads to mainly symptomatic approach in treatment of a chronic infectious prostatitis in the modern urological practice, based exclusively on antibacterial therapy that promotes the further growth of prostate pathogens antibiotics resistance, inefficiencies of unreasonable repeated courses of antibacterial therapy and are supported by a myth about incurability of a chronic prostatitis. At the same time, intraprostatic androgen balance defines all basic functions of gland, and its safety essentially depends on testosterone blood level, therefore endogenic testosterone level it is possible to consider as universal predictor of prostata metabolic homeostasis disorders, leading to decrease in bactericidal function of gland and infections. This author’s concept allows to consider correction of an adverse hormonal and metabolic background on which the clinical picture of a chronic prostatitis (first of all, deficiency of sexual hormones as pathogenetic therapy of all infectious chronic prostatitises against which realisation of effects of antibacterial therapy is essentially facilitated is developed or last is not so necessary, to what own clinical supervision resulted in article testify. Such interdisciplinary approach will lead

  4. Correction of androgen deficiency in chronic infectious prostatitis as pathogenetic method of overcoming inefficiencies standard antibiotics against the growing antibiotic resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Tyuzikov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The chronic prostatitis occupies the big relative density in structure of an out-patient urological pathology in our country, however, results of its standard pharmacotherapy remain unsatisfactory that is accompanied by high risk clinical recurrence and progressing of anatomic and functional disorders in prostata. Modern methods of diagnostics of the chronic infectious prostatitis, which share in the general structure of inflammatory prostata diseases does not exceed 10 %, are based on the recommended volume of the standard tests directed only on revealing of the infectious agent in a prostatic secret, and do not consider degree of disorders of the prostatic homeostasis which key moment is prostata androgen-dependence. It leads to mainly symptomatic approach in treatment of a chronic infectious prostatitis in the modern urological practice, based exclusively on antibacterial therapy that promotes the further growth of prostate pathogens antibiotics resistance, inefficiencies of unreasonable repeated courses of antibacterial therapy and are supported by a myth about incurability of a chronic prostatitis. At the same time, intraprostatic androgen balance defines all basic functions of gland, and its safety essentially depends on testosterone blood level, therefore endogenic testosterone level it is possible to consider as universal predictor of prostata metabolic homeostasis disorders, leading to decrease in bactericidal function of gland and infections. This author’s concept allows to consider correction of an adverse hormonal and metabolic background on which the clinical picture of a chronic prostatitis (first of all, deficiency of sexual hormones as pathogenetic therapy of all infectious chronic prostatitises against which realisation of effects of antibacterial therapy is essentially facilitated is developed or last is not so necessary, to what own clinical supervision resulted in article testify. Such interdisciplinary approach will lead

  5. TRIM24 Is an Oncogenic Transcriptional Activator in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groner, Anna C; Cato, Laura; de Tribolet-Hardy, Jonas; Bernasocchi, Tiziano; Janouskova, Hana; Melchers, Diana; Houtman, René; Cato, Andrew C B; Tschopp, Patrick; Gu, Lei; Corsinotti, Andrea; Zhong, Qing; Fankhauser, Christian; Fritz, Christine; Poyet, Cédric; Wagner, Ulrich; Guo, Tiannan; Aebersold, Ruedi; Garraway, Levi A; Wild, Peter J; Theurillat, Jean-Philippe; Brown, Myles

    2016-06-13

    Androgen receptor (AR) signaling is a key driver of prostate cancer (PC). While androgen-deprivation therapy is transiently effective in advanced disease, tumors often progress to a lethal castration-resistant state (CRPC). We show that recurrent PC-driver mutations in speckle-type POZ protein (SPOP) stabilize the TRIM24 protein, which promotes proliferation under low androgen conditions. TRIM24 augments AR signaling, and AR and TRIM24 co-activated genes are significantly upregulated in CRPC. Expression of TRIM24 protein increases from primary PC to CRPC, and both TRIM24 protein levels and the AR/TRIM24 gene signature predict disease recurrence. Analyses in CRPC cells reveal that the TRIM24 bromodomain and the AR-interacting motif are essential to support proliferation. These data provide a rationale for therapeutic TRIM24 targeting in SPOP mutant and CRPC patients.

  6. Parasitic castration: the evolution and ecology of body snatchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafferty, Kevin D.; Kuris, Armand M.

    2009-01-01

    Castration is a response to the tradeoff between consumption and longevity faced by parasites. Common parasitic castrators include larval trematodes in snails, and isopod and barnacle parasites of crustaceans. The infected host (with its many unique properties) is the extended phenotype of the parasitic castrator. Because an individual parasitic castrator can usurp all the reproductive energy from a host, and that energy is limited, intra- and interspecific competition among castrators is generally intense. These parasites can be abundant and can substantially depress host density. Host populations subject to high rates of parasitic castration appear to respond by maturing more rapidly.

  7. Posttranslational modification of the androgen receptor in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Steen, Travis; Tindall, Donald J; Huang, Haojie

    2013-07-16

    The androgen receptor (AR) is important in the development of the prostate by regulating transcription, cellular proliferation, and apoptosis. AR undergoes posttranslational modifications that alter its transcription activity, translocation to the nucleus and stability. The posttranslational modifications that regulate these events are of utmost importance to understand the functional role of AR and its activity. The majority of these modifications occur in the activation function-1 (AF1) region of the AR, which contains the transcriptional activation unit 1 (TAU1) and 5 (TAU5). Identification of the modifications that occur to these regions may increase our understanding of AR activation in prostate cancer and the role of AR in the progression from androgen-dependent to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Most of the posttranslational modifications identified to date have been determined using the full-length AR in androgen dependent cells. Further investigations into the role of posttranslational modifications in androgen-independent activation of full-length AR and constitutively active splicing variants are warranted, findings from which may provide new therapeutic options for CRPC.

  8. From Bench to Bedside: Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer

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    Brian Wan-Chi Tse

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mainstay therapeutic strategy for metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC continues to be androgen deprivation therapy usually in combination with chemotherapy or androgen receptor targeting therapy in either sequence, or recently approved novel agents such as Radium 223. However, immunotherapy has also emerged as an option for the treatment of this disease following the approval of sipuleucel-T by the FDA in 2010. Immunotherapy is a rational approach for prostate cancer based on a body of evidence suggesting these cancers are inherently immunogenic and, most importantly, that immunological interventions can induce protective antitumour responses. Various forms of immunotherapy are currently being explored clinically, with the most common being cancer vaccines (dendritic-cell, viral, and whole tumour cell-based and immune checkpoint inhibition. This review will discuss recent clinical developments of immune-based therapies for prostate cancer that have reached the phase III clinical trial stage. A perspective of how immunotherapy could be best employed within current treatment regimes to achieve most clinical benefits is also provided.

  9. Identification of novel androgen receptor target genes in prostate cancer

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    Gerald William L

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The androgen receptor (AR plays critical roles in both androgen-dependent and castrate-resistant prostate cancer (PCa. However, little is known about AR target genes that mediate the receptor's roles in disease progression. Results Using Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP Display, we discovered 19 novel loci occupied by the AR in castrate resistant C4-2B PCa cells. Only four of the 19 AR-occupied regions were within 10-kb 5'-flanking regulatory sequences. Three were located up to 4-kb 3' of the nearest gene, eight were intragenic and four were in gene deserts. Whereas the AR occupied the same loci in C4-2B (castrate resistant and LNCaP (androgen-dependent PCa cells, differences between the two cell lines were observed in the response of nearby genes to androgens. Among the genes strongly stimulated by DHT in C4-2B cells – D-dopachrome tautomerase (DDT, Protein kinase C delta (PRKCD, Glutathione S- transferase theta 2 (GSTT2, Transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 3 (TRPV3, and Pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase 1 (PYCR1 – most were less strongly or hardly stimulated in LNCaP cells. Another AR target gene, ornithine aminotransferase (OAT, was AR-stimulated in a ligand-independent manner, since it was repressed by AR siRNA knockdown, but not stimulated by DHT. We also present evidence for in vivo AR-mediated regulation of several genes identified by ChIP Display. For example, PRKCD and PYCR1, which may contribute to PCa cell growth and survival, are expressed in PCa biopsies from primary tumors before and after ablation and in metastatic lesions in a manner consistent with AR-mediated stimulation. Conclusion AR genomic occupancy is similar between LNCaP and C4-2B cells and is not biased towards 5' gene flanking sequences. The AR transcriptionally regulates less than half the genes nearby AR-occupied regions, usually but not always, in a ligand-dependent manner. Most are stimulated and a few are

  10. A novel rabbit anti-hepatocyte growth factor monoclonal neutralizing antibody inhibits tumor growth in prostate cancer cells and mouse xenografts

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    Yu, Yanlan; Chen, Yicheng; Ding, Guoqing; Wang, Mingchao; Wu, Haiyang; Xu, Liwei; Rui, Xuefang; Zhang, Zhigen, E-mail: srrshurology@163.com

    2015-08-14

    The hepatocyte growth factor and its receptor c-Met are correlated with castration-resistance in prostate cancer. Although HGF has been considered as an attractive target for therapeutic antibodies, the lack of cross-reactivity of monoclonal antibodies with human/mouse HGFs is a major obstacle in preclinical developments. We generated a panel of anti-HGF RabMAbs either blocking HGF/c-Met interaction or inhibiting c-Met phosphorylation. We selected one RabMAb with mouse cross-reactivity and demonstrated that it blocked HGF-stimulated downstream activation in PC-3 and DU145 cells. Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibited not only the growth of PC-3 cells but also HGF-dependent proliferation in HUVECs. We further demonstrated the efficacy and potency of the anti-HGF RabMAb in tumor xenograft mice models. Through these in vitro and in vivo experiments, we explored a novel therapeutic antibody for advanced prostate cancer. - Highlights: • HGF is an attractive target for castration-refractory prostate cancer. • We generated and characterized a panel of anti-HGF rabbit monoclonal antibodies. • More than half of these anti-HGF RabMAbs was cross-reactive with mouse HGF. • Anti-HGF RabMAb blocks HGF-stimulated phosphorylation and cell growth in vitro. • Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis in xenograft mice.

  11. Prognostic significance of genetic polymorphisms in disease progression and survival in prostate cancer after androgen deprivation therapy

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    Tsung-Yi Huang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It is believed that androgens and their receptors regulate normal prostate growth and mediate prostate cancer development. Androgen deprivation therapy is the most commonly used treatment for advanced prostate cancer. Although the therapy is initially effective, progression of the disease to castration-resistant prostate cancer is almost inevitable, leading to treatment failure. Despite the existence of current clinical parameters, new biomarkers are urgently needed to improve the prognosis. Some molecules and DNA-based genetic biomarkers are under investigation as potential prognostic factors. The advancement in molecular cytogenetic research, such as genome-wide association for single-nucleotide polymorphisms, has made possible the detection of genetic mutations. In this study, a literature search from August 1985 to April 2013 was performed through the PubMed database using the keywords “genetic polymorphisms”, “prostate cancer” and “androgen deprivation therapy”. The results revealed that several genome-wide association studies (such as rs16901979, rs7931342, HSD17B4, rs6162 in the CYP17A1, rs4243229 and rs7201637 in the HSD17B2, rs1062577 in the ESR1, SLCO1B3, SLCO2B1, rs2939244 in the ARRDC3, rs9508016 in the FLT1, rs6504145 in the SKAP1, rs7830611 in the FBXO32, rs9508016 in the FLT1, rs12529 in the AKR1C3, rs16934641 in the BNC2, rs3763763 in the TACC2, rs2051778 in the ALPK1, and rs3763763 in the TACC2, AR, ESR1, and ESR2 and single-nucleotide polymorphisms in important pathways (such as androgen signal, biosynthesis, metabolism, androgen receptor binding site, response element, androgen receptor CAG repeat polymorphism length, and estrogen receptor-binding sites involved in prostate cancer occurrence and mechanism could serve as candidate biomarkers for the early detection of castration-resistant prostate cancer after androgen deprivation therapy. Additional investigations are required to decipher precisely the gene

  12. Cloning of a novel insulin-regulated ghrelin transcript in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seim, Inge; Lubik, Amy A; Lehman, Melanie L; Tomlinson, Nadine; Whiteside, Eliza J