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Sample records for castrate-resistant prostate cancer

  1. The hallmarks of castration-resistant prostate cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsogiannou, Maria; Ziouziou, Hajer; Karaki, Sara; Andrieu, Claudia; Henry de Villeneuve, Marie; Rocchi, Palma

    2015-07-01

    Prostate cancer has become a real public health issue in industrialized countries, mainly due to patients' relapse by castration-refractory disease after androgen ablation. Castration-resistant prostate cancer is an incurable and highly aggressive terminal stage of prostate cancer, seriously jeopardizing the patient's quality of life and lifespan. The management of castration-resistant prostate cancer is complex and has opened new fields of research during the last decade leading to an improved understanding of the biology of the disease and the development of new therapies. Most advanced tumors resistant to therapy still maintain the androgen receptor-pathway, which plays a central role for survival and growth of most castration-resistant prostate cancers. Many mechanisms induce the emergence of the castration resistant phenotype through this pathway. However some non-related AR pathways like neuroendocrine cells or overexpression of anti-apoptotic proteins like Hsp27 are described to be involved in CRPC progression. More recently, loss of expression of tumor suppressor gene, post-transcriptional modification using miRNA, epigenetic alterations, alternatif splicing and gene fusion became also hallmarks of castration-resistant prostate cancer. This review presents an up-to-date overview of the androgen receptor-related mechanisms as well as the latest evidence of the non-AR-related mechanisms underlying castration-resistant prostate cancer progression. PMID:25981454

  2. Enzalutamide for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Wijdan H; Kabbara, Wissam K; Al Basiouni Al Masri, Hiba S

    2015-01-01

    Objective To review and evaluate current literature on the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drug enzalutamide (XTANDI®) in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Data sources Literature search was done through PubMed using the terms enzalutamide, MDV3100, abiraterone, and castration-resistant prostate cancer. Data from FDA product labels were also used. Study selection and data extraction Recent and relevant studies were included in the review. Collected clinical trials were screened and evaluated. Data synthesis Enzalutamide is an androgen receptor (AR) inhibitor with high selectivity and affinity to the AR. It was approved by the FDA to treat metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer in patients previously treated with docetaxel, after a Phase III trial (AFFIRM) that showed a 4.8-month survival benefit in this population. Recently, the FDA expanded the approval of enzalutamide as first-line therapy for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) who did not receive chemotherapy. Moreover, enzalutamide is shown to be associated with an acceptable safety profile. Conclusion Enzalutamide has been shown to be both safe and effective in improving overall survival in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer postchemotherapy with docetaxel and as a first line treatment before initiation of chemotherapy. However, additional studies and head-to-head trials are needed. PMID:25945058

  3. Castration-resistant prostate cancer: systemic therapy in 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando C. Maluf

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common non-cutaneous neoplasm in the male population worldwide. It is typically diagnosed in its early stages, and the disease exhibits a relatively indolent course in most patients. Despite the curability of localized disease with prostatectomy and radiation therapy, some patients develop metastatic disease and die. Although androgen deprivation is present in the majority of patients with metastatic prostate cancer, a state of androgen resistance eventually develops. Castration-resistant prostate cancer, defined when there is progression of disease despite low levels of testosterone, requires specialized care, and improved communication between medical and urologic oncologists has been identified as a key component in delivering effective therapy. Despite being considered a chemoresistant tumor in the past, the use of a prostate-specific antigen has paved the way for a new generation of trials for castration-resistant prostate cancer. Docetaxel is a life-prolonging chemotherapy that has been established as the standard first-line agent in two phase III clinical trials. Cabazitaxel, a novel taxane with activity in cancer models resistant to paclitaxel and docetaxel, is the only agent that has been compared to a chemotherapy control in a phase III clinical trial as a second-line therapy; it was found to prolong the overall survival of patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer previously treated with docetaxel when compared to mitoxantrone. Other agents used in this setting include abiraterone and sipuleucel-T, and novel therapies are continually being investigated in an attempt to improve the outcome for patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  4. New Therapeutics to Treat Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ömer Acar; Tarık Esen; Lack, Nathan A.

    2013-01-01

    Hindawi Publishing Corporation The ScientificWorld Journal Volume 2013, Article ID 379641, 8 pages http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/379641 Review Article New Therapeutics to Treat Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer Ömer Acar,1 TarJk Esen,1,2 and Nathan A. Lack1 1 VKF American Hospital, Guzelbahce sokak, Nisantasi, Istanbul 34365, Turkey 2 School of Medicine, Koc¸ University, Rumelifeneri Yolu, Sariyer, Istanbul 34450, Turkey Correspondence should be addressed to Natha...

  5. [Current status of castration-resistant prostate cancer translational research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeno, Atsushi; Habuchi, Tomonori

    2016-01-01

    Recently, new drugs including abiraterone and enzalutamide have been able to be used for castration resistant prostate cancer(CRPC) patients. However, a subset of these patients who receive the new drugs does not response to the therapies. Furthermore, most patients who initially response to the drugs, progress to secondary resistance eventually. Therefore, it is important to investigate a novel therapeutic target and a novel treatment-selection marker for CRPC. In this review, we focused on AR-V7, TMPRSS2-ERG fusion gene and EP4 antagonist as representative translational researches. PMID:26793877

  6. The mutational landscape of lethal castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Catherine S; Wu, Yi-Mi; Robinson, Dan R; Cao, Xuhong; Dhanasekaran, Saravana M; Khan, Amjad P; Quist, Michael J; Jing, Xiaojun; Lonigro, Robert J; Brenner, J Chad; Asangani, Irfan A; Ateeq, Bushra; Chun, Sang Y; Siddiqui, Javed; Sam, Lee; Anstett, Matt; Mehra, Rohit; Prensner, John R; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Ryslik, Gregory A; Vandin, Fabio; Raphael, Benjamin J; Kunju, Lakshmi P; Rhodes, Daniel R; Pienta, Kenneth J; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Tomlins, Scott A

    2012-07-12

    Characterization of the prostate cancer transcriptome and genome has identified chromosomal rearrangements and copy number gains and losses, including ETS gene family fusions, PTEN loss and androgen receptor (AR) amplification, which drive prostate cancer development and progression to lethal, metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). However, less is known about the role of mutations. Here we sequenced the exomes of 50 lethal, heavily pre-treated metastatic CRPCs obtained at rapid autopsy (including three different foci from the same patient) and 11 treatment-naive, high-grade localized prostate cancers. We identified low overall mutation rates even in heavily treated CRPCs (2.00 per megabase) and confirmed the monoclonal origin of lethal CRPC. Integrating exome copy number analysis identified disruptions of CHD1 that define a subtype of ETS gene family fusion-negative prostate cancer. Similarly, we demonstrate that ETS2, which is deleted in approximately one-third of CRPCs (commonly through TMPRSS2:ERG fusions), is also deregulated through mutation. Furthermore, we identified recurrent mutations in multiple chromatin- and histone-modifying genes, including MLL2 (mutated in 8.6% of prostate cancers), and demonstrate interaction of the MLL complex with the AR, which is required for AR-mediated signalling. We also identified novel recurrent mutations in the AR collaborating factor FOXA1, which is mutated in 5 of 147 (3.4%) prostate cancers (both untreated localized prostate cancer and CRPC), and showed that mutated FOXA1 represses androgen signalling and increases tumour growth. Proteins that physically interact with the AR, such as the ERG gene fusion product, FOXA1, MLL2, UTX (also known as KDM6A) and ASXL1 were found to be mutated in CRPC. In summary, we describe the mutational landscape of a heavily treated metastatic cancer, identify novel mechanisms of AR signalling deregulated in prostate cancer, and prioritize candidates for future study. PMID

  7. Castration resistant prostate cancer - something new in the year 2014?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the most frequent solid neoplasm in Europe and therefore is regarded as one of the major medical problem of the male population. PC is extremely complicated and interindividual different tumor. The method of treatment depends on several factors, but mainly on the stage of prostate cancer. The term Hormone resistant (refractory) prostate cancer (HRPC) was used in older terminology. HRPC is cancer that progresses despite castrate levels of testosterone achieved androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), which is resistant to any hormonal therapy. Currently is increasingly used (instead of name HRPC) name CRPC – so called PC resistant for castration (CRPC – castration resistant prostate cancer), which is still able to respond to certain hormonal manipulation, although it meets the the criteria for HRPC. This state probably arises from either clonal selection of androgen – independent cell lines or increased ligand – independent activation of androgen receptors. Men with CRPC are quite a heterogeneous group; they include men with increasing prostate specific antigen (PSA) only and no demonstrable metastases, and men who have many bone and/ or visceral metastases, pain and poor functional status. Survival can range from only a few months to 4 years or more. Historically, therapy had little effect beyond modest palliation. More recently, significantly more options have become available and there are now several treatments that not only improve quality of life and pain palliation, but also increase overall survival. Some of the trials with important results for the treatment of CRPC are summarized in this paper. Objectives of article: provide information to the general medical community (and especially urologists and oncologists) about the possible pathogenesis of CRPC, complicated issues of treatment and evaluation of its effectiveness in patients with CRPC. The article presented basic data on the current and future possibilities of such therapy

  8. Novel agents in the management of castration resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Chaturvedi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa is a leading cause of cancer mortality in men and despite high cure rates with surgery and/or radiation, 30-40% of patients will eventually develop advanced disease. Androgen deprivation is the first line therapy for standard of care for men with advanced disease. Eventually however all men will progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. Insight into the molecular mechanisms of androgen resistance has led to the development of alternative novel hormonal agents. Newer hormonal agents such as abiraterone, enzalutamide and TOK-001; and the first cancer vaccine, Sipuleucel T have been approved for use in men with CRPC. The recognition of the importance of bone health and morbidity associated with skeletal related events has led to the introduction of the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B-ligand inhibitor denosumab. Other molecularly targeted therapies have shown promise in pre-clinical studies, but this has not consistently translated into clinical efficacy. It is increasingly evident that CRPC is a heterogeneous disease and an individualized approach directed at identifying primary involvement of specific pathways could maximize the benefit from targeted therapies. This review focuses on targeted therapy for PCa with special emphasis on therapies that have been Food and Drug Administration approved for use in men with CRPC.

  9. Radium-223 in metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Winston Vuong; Oliver Sartor; Sumanta K Pal

    2014-01-01

    In 2004, docetaxel was approved for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). For the next several years, there was a lull in drug approvals. However, from 2010 onwards, 5 additional therapies have been approved on the basis of showing a survival beneift in phase III studies. These agents include sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel, abiraterone, enzalutamide and (most recently) radium-223. Amongst radiopharmaceuticals currently used for advanced prostate cancer (e.g. samarium-153 and strontium-89), radium-223 possesses several unique properties. As an alpha-emitting compound, the agent produces a high-energy output over a short range, facilitating selective destruction of tissue within the bone in the region of osteoblastic lesions while sparing surrounding normal tissue. The current review will outline biological rationale for radium-223 and also provide an overview of preclinical and clinical development of the agent. Rational sequencing of radium-223 and combinations, in the increasingly complex landscape of mCRPC will be discussed, along with factors inlfuencing clinical implementation.

  10. Tpl2 induces castration resistant prostate cancer progression and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye Won; Cho, Hyun Jung; Lee, Se Jeong; Song, Hye Jin; Cho, Hee Jin; Park, Min Chul; Seol, Ho Jun; Lee, Jung-Il; Kim, Sunghoon; Lee, Hyun Moo; Choi, Han Yong; Nam, Do-Hyun; Joo, Kyeung Min

    2015-05-01

    Progression to metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is the major lethal pathway of prostate cancer (PC). Herein, we demonstrated that tumor progression locus 2 (Tpl2) kinase is the fundamental molecule provoking progression and metastasis of CRPC. Tpl2 upregulates CXCR4 and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) to activate CXCL12/CXCR4 and FAK/Akt signalling pathway. Consequently, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and stemness of androgen depletion independent (ADI) PC cells are induced, which is dependent on the kinase activity of Tpl2. In vitro, proliferation, clonogenicity, migration, invasion and chemoresistance of ADI PC cells were enhanced by Tpl2. In vivo, Tpl2 overexpression and downregulation showed significant stimulatory and inhibitory effects on tumorigenic and metastatic potential of ADI PC cells, respectively. Moreover, the prognostic effects of Tpl2 and expressional correlation between Tpl2 and EMT-related molecules/CXCR4 were validated in clinical PC databases. Since Tpl2 exerts metastatic progression promoting activities in CRPC, Tpl2 could serve as a novel therapeutic target for metastatic CRPC. PMID:25274482

  11. The unfolding treatment landscape for men with castration-resistant prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jenny J.; Keizman, Daniel; Denmeade, Samuel R.; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.

    2011-01-01

    Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is a fatal disease in virtually all patients. Docetaxel chemotherapy became the standard front-line agent based on the results of the TAX327 trial in 2004, with a survival advantage of 3 months achieved over mitoxantrone. Over the past few years, an improved understanding of the molecular biology of castration-resistance has resulted in expansion of the treatment armamentarium for advanced prostate cancer with the emergence of novel androgen recepto...

  12. [Treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffo, Orazio

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) represents one of the oncological fields where the most impressive improvements has been observed in the last decades. At the beginning of this century, the expected survival of mCRPC patients was not more than 12 months. After the introduction of docetaxel in the clinical practice in 2004, and the recent availability of new drugs cabazitaxel, abiraterone acetate, enzalutamide, and radium-223 the landscape is dramatically changed with an expected median survival of about three years. The possibility of administering docetaxel, abiraterone acetate, and enzalutamide as first line treatment, and cabazitaxel, abiretone acetate, and enzalutamide as second line, as well as the availability of radium-223 for the treatment of mCRPC patients regardless of chemotherapy administration, changed the natural history of the disease. At the same time, it is probable that also the biology of the disease is changing with the appearance of mechanisms of resistance which are common to all the drugs. This plays a central role in sequencing the available drugs not only in the first and second line setting but also beyond the second line. The future challenges for the oncologists will be to develop new drugs able to overcome the resistances, mainly when they are native, to find the optimal sequence to optimize the use of available drugs, to place at the best place other active drugs, such as vaccines and radiopharmaceuticals, to exploit the new drugs also in a hormone-sensitive phase. PMID:25621779

  13. Emerging targeted therapies for castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo eAdamo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, few therapeutic options were available for patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. Since 2010, four new molecules with a demonstrated benefit (sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel, abiraterone and denosumab have been approved in this setting, and to-date several other agents are under investigation in clinical trials. The purpose of this review is to present an update of targeted therapies for CRPC. Presented data are obtained from literature and congress reports updated until December 2011. Targeted therapies in advanced phases of clinical development include novel hormone-therapeutic, intracellular molecular pathways inhibiting, anti-angiogenic, bone microenvironment targeting and immunotherapeutic agents. Radium-223 and MDV3100 demonstrated a survival advantage in phase III trials and the road for their introduction in clinical practice is rapidly ongoing. Results are also awaited for phase III studies currently underway or planned with new drugs given as monotherapy (TAK-700, cabozantinib, tasquinimod, PROSTVAC-VF, ipilimumab or in combination with docetaxel (custirsen, aflibercept, dasatinib, zibotentan. Optimal timing, right combination and/or sequencing of emerging therapies as well as use of more sensitive biological markers to individualize therapies for CRPC remain challenging and studies to investigate these aspects are needed.

  14. Developing imaging strategies for castration resistant prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances in the understanding of castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) have lead to a growing number of experimental therapies, many of which are directed against the androgen-receptor (AR) signaling axis. These advances generate the need for reliable molecular imaging biomarkers to non-invasively determine efficacy, and to better guide treatment selection of these promising AR-targeted drugs. Methods. We draw on our own experience, supplemented by review of the current literature, to discuss the systematic development of imaging biomarkers for use in the context of CRPC, with a focus on bone scintigraphy, F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) and PET imaging of the AR signaling axis. Results. The roadmap to biomarker development mandates rigorous standardization and analytic validation of an assay before it can be qualified successfully for use in an appropriate clinical context. The Prostate Cancer Working Group 2 (PCWG2) criteria for 'radiographic' progression by bone scintigraphy serve as a paradigm of this process. Implemented by the Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials Consortium (PCCTC), these consensus criteria may ultimately enable the co-development of more potent and versatile molecular imaging biomarkers. Purported to be superior to single-photon bone scanning, the added value of Na18F-PET for imaging of bone metastases is still uncertain. FDG-PET already plays an integral role in the management of many diseases, but requires further evaluation before being qualified in the context of CRPC. PET tracers that probe the AR signaling axis, such as 18F-FDHT and 89Zr-591, are now under development as pharmacodynamic markers, and as markers of efficacy, in tandem with FDG-PET. Semi-automated analysis programs for facilitating PET interpretation may serve as a valuable tool to help navigate the biomarker roadmap. Conclusions. Molecular imaging strategies, particularly those that probe the AR signaling axis, have the potential to

  15. Sox2 is an androgen receptor-repressed gene that promotes castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Kregel

    Full Text Available Despite advances in detection and therapy, castration-resistant prostate cancer continues to be a major clinical problem. The aberrant activity of stem cell pathways, and their regulation by the Androgen Receptor (AR, has the potential to provide insight into novel mechanisms and pathways to prevent and treat advanced, castrate-resistant prostate cancers. To this end, we investigated the role of the embryonic stem cell regulator Sox2 [SRY (sex determining region Y-box 2] in normal and malignant prostate epithelial cells. In the normal prostate, Sox2 is expressed in a portion of basal epithelial cells. Prostate tumors were either Sox2-positive or Sox2-negative, with the percentage of Sox2-positive tumors increasing with Gleason Score and metastases. In the castration-resistant prostate cancer cell line CWR-R1, endogenous expression of Sox2 was repressed by AR signaling, and AR chromatin-IP shows that AR binds the enhancer element within the Sox2 promoter. Likewise, in normal prostate epithelial cells and human embryonic stem cells, increased AR signaling also decreases Sox2 expression. Resistance to the anti-androgen MDV3100 results in a marked increase in Sox2 expression within three prostate cancer cell lines, and in the castration-sensitive LAPC-4 prostate cancer cell line ectopic expression of Sox2 was sufficient to promote castration-resistant tumor formation. Loss of Sox2 expression in the castration-resistant CWR-R1 prostate cancer cell line inhibited cell growth. Up-regulation of Sox2 was not associated with increased CD133 expression but was associated with increased FGF5 (Fibroblast Growth Factor 5 expression. These data propose a model of elevated Sox2 expression due to loss of AR-mediated repression during castration, and consequent castration-resistance via mechanisms not involving induction of canonical embryonic stem cell pathways.

  16. Andrographolide Targets Androgen Receptor Pathway in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Chengfei; Nadiminty, Nagalakshmi; Tummala, Ramakumar; Chun, Jae Yeon; Lou, Wei; Zhu, Yezi; Sun, Meng; Evans, Christopher P.; Zhou, Qinghua; Gao, Allen C.

    2011-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) signaling not only plays a pivotal role in the development of androgen-dependent prostate cancer but is also important in the growth and survival of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The first line of treatment of androgen-dependent prostate cancer is the use of androgen deprivation therapy. However, most patients will eventually relapse due to development of CRPC. Thus, development of a strategy to target AR for treatment of CRPC is urgently needed. The auth...

  17. State-Of-The-Art Treatment in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Castro; Nuria Romero; David Olmos

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PrCa) is the most common cancer type in men in developed countries. In the last few years, a dramatic change has occurred in the understanding of castration-resistant PrCa which has led to the development of new drugs that have an impact on patient survival. This review summarises the recent advances in the management of the disease.

  18. Angiogenin mediates androgen-stimulated growth of prostate cancer cells and correlates with castration resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Shuping; Hu, Miaofen G.; Sun, Yeqing; YOSHIOKA, NORIE; IBARAGI, SOICHIRO; Sheng, Jinghao; Sun, Guangjie; Kishimoto, Koji; Hu, Guo-fu

    2013-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is a critical effector of prostate cancer (PCa) development and progression. Androgen-dependent PCa rely on the function of AR for growth and progression. Many castration-resistant PCa continue to depend on AR signaling for survival and growth. Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is essential for both androgen-dependent and castration-resistant growth of PCa cells. During androgen-dependent growth of prostate cells, androgen-AR signaling leads to the accumulation of rRNA. However, the...

  19. Stilbenes inhibit androgen receptor expression in 22Rv1 castrate-resistant prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Androgen receptor (AR) signaling plays an important role in the development and progression of prostate cancer (PCa). Importantly, AR continues to be expressed in advanced stages of castrate-resistant PCa (CRPC), where it can have ligand- independent activity. Identification of naturally occurring s...

  20. Serum biomarkers of bone metabolism in castration resistant prostate cancer patients with skeletal metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background. Prior studies suggest that elevated markers of bone turnover are prognostic for poor survival in castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The predictive role of these markers relative to bone-targeted therapy is unknown. We prospectively evaluated the prognostic and predictive value ...

  1. Mechanisms of acquired resistance to androgen receptor targeting drugs in castration resistant prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Chism, David D.; De Silva, Dinuka; Whang, Young E.

    2014-01-01

    After initial response to androgen receptor targeting drugs abiraterone or enzalutamide, most patients develop progressive disease and therefore, castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) remains a terminal disease. Multiple mechanisms underlying acquired resistance have been postulated. Intratumoral androgen synthesis may resume after abiraterone treatment. A point mutation in the ligand binding domain of androgen receptor may confer resistance to enzalutamide. Emergence of androgen recept...

  2. Predictors of Time to Metastasis in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Moreira, DM; Howard, LE; Sourbeer, KN; Amarasekara, HS; Chow, LC; Cockrell, DC; Hanyok, BT; Aronson, WJ; Kane, CJ; Terris, MK; Amling, CL; Cooperberg, MR; Liede, A; Freedland, SJ

    2016-01-01

    To investigate predictors of time to metastasis among men treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for non-metastatic prostate cancer who developed castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) within the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital (SEARCH) cohort.Retrospective analysis of 458 non-metastatic CRPC men. Metastases were detected in routine bone scans or other imaging tests. Predictors of time to metastasis were analyzed using proportional hazards model with CRPC as time ze...

  3. In vivo quantitative phosphoproteomic profiling identifies novel regulators of castration-resistant prostate cancer growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Nan; Hjorth-Jensen, Kim; Hekmat, Omid;

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer remains a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide owing to our inability to treat effectively castration-resistant tumors. To understand the signaling mechanisms sustaining castration-resistant growth, we implemented a mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomic app...

  4. ODM-201: a new-generation androgen receptor inhibitor in castration-resistant prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Fizazi, Karim; Albiges, Laurence; Loriot, Yohann; Massard, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy is the standard of care for patients with advanced hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. Despite an initial response, most patients progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The realization that CRPC remains driven by androgen receptor (AR) signaling has formed the basis for a new generation of agents targeting the AR axis. Two of these agents, abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide, have been shown to prolong overall survival in patients with CRPC. Seve...

  5. Intratumoral steroidogenesis in castration-resistant prostate cancer: a target for therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Armandari, Inna; Hamid, Agus Rizal; Verhaegh, Gerald; Schalken, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Development of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) in a low androgen environment, arising from androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), is a major problem in patients with advanced prostate cancer (PCa). Several mechanisms have been hypothesized to explain the progression of PCa to CRPC during ADT, one of them is so called persistent intratumoral steroidogenesis. The existence of intratumoral steroidogenesis was hinted based on the residual levels of intraprostatic testosterone (T) and dih...

  6. Vimentin and Ki67 expression in circulating tumour cells derived from castrate-resistant prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lindsay, C. R.; Le Moulec, S.; Billiot, F.; Loriot, Y; Ngo-Camus, M.; Vielh, P; Fizazi, K; Massard, C; Farace, F.

    2016-01-01

    Background High circulating tumor cell (CTC) counts are associated with poor prognosis in advanced prostate cancer, and recently CTC number was suggested to be a surrogate for survival in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Ki67 and vimentin are well-characterised markers of tumour cell proliferation and the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), respectively. Here we asked if the expression of vimentin and Ki67 in CTCs offered prognostic or predictive information in mCRP...

  7. Experimental Evidence of Persistent Androgen-Receptor-Dependency in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Osamu Ogawa; Tomomi Kamba; Takahiro Inoue; Takashi Kobayashi

    2013-01-01

    In the majority of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), prostate-specific antigen (PSA), product of a gene that is almost exclusively regulated by the androgen receptor (AR), still acts as a serum marker reflecting disease burden, indicating that AR signaling is activated even under castrate level of serum androgen. Accumulated evidence shows that transcriptional ability of AR is activated both in ligand-dependent and -independent manners in CRPC cells. Some androgen-independent subli...

  8. CYP17A1 Inhibitors in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Gomez, Lissette; Jason R Kovac; Dolores J Lamb

    2015-01-01

    The majority of prostate cancer (PCa) cases are diagnosed as a localized disease. Definitive treatment, active surveillance or watchful waiting are employed as therapeutic paradigms. The current standard of care for the treatment of metastatic PCa is either medical or surgical castration. Once PCa progresses in spite of castrate androgen levels it is termed ‘castration-resistant prostate cancer’ (CRPC). Patients may even exhibit rising PSA levels with possible bone, lymph node or solid organ ...

  9. Abiraterone plus prednisone improves survival in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Scott T Tagawa; Himisha Beltran

    2011-01-01

    In essentially just 1 year's time,we have seen science translated into exciting new therapeutic agents for men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC),1 most recently with the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of abiraterone acetate in combination with prednisone.2 While prostate cancer has been known to be highly responsive to surgical or medical castration for well over half a century,3 what was once termed 'hormone refractory' prostate cancer inevitably developed,leading to cancerrelated death.Many consider the introduction of chemotherapy for CRPC initially for symptomatic benefit,then with improvements in survival,a substantial step forward.

  10. Abiraterone acetate for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer progressing after chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sternberg, Cora N; Castellano, Daniel; Daugaard, Gedske;

    2014-01-01

    investigator. Median time to PSA progression was 8·5 months (95% CI 8·3-9·7) and median time to clinical progression was 12·7 months (11·8-13·8). INTERPRETATION: No new safety signals or unexpected adverse events were found in this early-access protocol trial to assess abiraterone acetate for patients with......BACKGROUND: In the final analysis of the phase 3 COU-AA-301 study, abiraterone acetate plus prednisone significantly prolonged overall survival compared with prednisone alone in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer progressing after chemotherapy. Here, we present the final...... analysis of an early-access protocol trial that was initiated after completion of COU-AA-301 to enable worldwide preapproval access to abiraterone acetate in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer progressing after chemotherapy. METHODS: We did a multicentre, open-label, early...

  11. Circulating microRNAs are associated with docetaxel chemotherapy outcome in castration-resistant prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, H-M.; Castillo, L.; Mahon, K L; Chiam, K; Lee, B Y; Nguyen, Q.; Boyer, M. J.; Stockler, M R; Pavlakis, N; Marx, G.; Mallesara, G; Gurney, H; Clark, S J; Swarbrick, A; Daly, R. J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Docetaxel is the first-line chemotherapy for castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). However, response rates are ∼50% and determined quite late in the treatment schedule, thus non-responders are subjected to unnecessary toxicity. The potential of circulating microRNAs as early biomarkers of docetaxel response in CRPC patients was investigated in this study. Methods: Global microRNA profiling was performed on docetaxel-resistant and sensitive cell lines to identify candidate c...

  12. Safety of cabazitaxel in senior adults with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heidenreich, Axel; Bracarda, Sergio; Mason, Malcolm;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cabazitaxel/prednisone has been shown to prolong survival versus mitoxantrone/prednisone in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) that has progressed during or after docetaxel. Subsequently, compassionate-use programmes (CUPs) and expanded......-CSF, especially at cycle 1 and in men aged > or =75 years, is important and improves tolerability in senior adults treated with cabazitaxel....

  13. Androgen receptor targeted therapies in castration-resistant prostate cancer: Bench to clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Yusuke; Sadar, Marianne D

    2016-08-01

    The androgen receptor is a transcription factor and validated therapeutic target for prostate cancer. Androgen deprivation therapy remains the gold standard treatment, but it is not curative, and eventually the disease will return as lethal castration-resistant prostate cancer. There have been improvements in the therapeutic landscape with new agents approved, such as abiraterone acetate, enzalutamide, sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel and Ra-223, in the past 5 years. New insight into the mechanisms of resistance to treatments in advanced disease is being and has been elucidated. All current androgen receptor-targeting therapies inhibit the growth of prostate cancer by blocking the ligand-binding domain, where androgen binds to activate the receptor. Persuasive evidence supports the concept that constitutively active androgen receptor splice variants lacking the ligand-binding domain are one of the resistant mechanisms underlying advanced disease. Transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor requires a functional AF-1 region in its N-terminal domain. Preclinical evidence proved that this domain is a druggable target to forecast a potential paradigm shift in the management of advanced prostate cancer. This review presents an overview of androgen receptor-related mechanisms of resistance as well as novel therapeutic agents to overcome resistance that is linked to the expression of androgen receptor splice variants in castration-resistant prostate cancer. PMID:27302572

  14. Abiraterone acetate: oral androgen biosynthesis inhibitor for treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenberg JE

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Yasser Rehman1, Jonathan E Rosenberg21Division of Hospital Medicine, UMass Memorial Healthcare, Worcester, MA, USA; 2Lank Center for Genitourinary Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in men in the US and Europe. The treatment of advanced-stage prostate cancer has been androgen deprivation. Medical castration leads to decreased production of testosterone and dihydrotestosterone by the testes, but adrenal glands and even prostate cancer tissue continue to produce androgens, which eventually leads to continued prostate cancer growth despite castrate level of androgens. This stage is known as castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC, which continues to be a challenge to treat. Addition of androgen antagonists to hormonal deprivation has been successful in lowering the prostate-specific antigen levels further, but has not actually translated into life-prolonging options. The results of several contemporary studies have continued to demonstrate activation of the androgen receptor as being the key factor in the continued growth of prostate cancer. Blockade of androgen production by nongonadal sources has led to clinical benefit in this setting. One such agent is abiraterone acetate, which significantly reduces androgen production by blocking the enzyme, cytochrome P450 17 alpha-hydroxylase (CYP17. This has provided physicians with another treatment option for patients with CRPC. The landscape for prostate cancer treatment has changed with the approval of cabazitaxel, sipuleucel-T and abiraterone. Here we provide an overview of abiraterone acetate, its mechanism of action, and its potential place for therapy in CRPC.Keywords: CRPC, abiraterone, CYP17, inhibitors, androgens, castration resistant prostate cancer

  15. Update on options for treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Vishnu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Prakash Vishnu, Winston W TanDivision of Hematology Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, USABackground: Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers in men in US and European countries. Despite having a favorable prognosis, the incidence of incurable metastatic disease and mortality in the US is about 28,000 per year. Although hormone-based androgen deprivation therapies typically result in rapid responses, nearly all patients eventually develop progressive castration-resistant disease state. With readily available prostate-specific antigen (PSA testing, most of these patients are asymptomatic and manifest progression simply as a rising PSA. In patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC, the median survival is about 1–2 years, with improvements in survival seen mostly with docetaxel-based regimens. The purpose of this article is to review the recent developments in the treatment of advanced CRPC.Recent findings: Since the two landmark trials (TAX-327 and Southwest Oncology Group 99–16 in CRPC, several newer cytotoxic drugs (epothilones, satraplatin, targeted agents (abiraterone, MDV3100 and vaccines have been tested in phase II and III setting with promising results.Conclusions: The role of newer agents in the treatment of CRPC still needs to be validated by phase III trials, which are currently ongoing. Whilst the novel biomarkers, ‘circulating tumor cells’, have been shown to provide important prognostic information and are anticipated to be incorporated in future clinical decision-making, their exact utility and relevance calls for a larger prospective validation.Keywords: castration-resistant prostate cancer, novel therapies, mechanisms of resistance, circulating tumor cells

  16. Interdisciplinary critique of sipuleucel-T as immunotherapy in castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huber, Marie L; Haynes, Laura; Parker, Chris;

    2012-01-01

    Sipuleucel-T was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration on April 29, 2010, as an immunotherapy for late-stage prostate cancer. To manufacture sipuleucel-T, mononuclear cells harvested from the patient are incubated with a recombinant prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) antigen and reinfused...... 4-month survival benefit. Previously unpublished data from the sipuleucel-T trials show worse overall survival in older vs younger patients in the placebo groups, which have not been shown previously to be prognostic for survival in castration-resistant prostate cancer patients receiving...... chemotherapy. Because two-thirds of the cells harvested from placebo patients, but not from the sipuleucel-T arm, were frozen and not reinfused, a detrimental effect of this large repeated cell loss provides a potential alternative explanation for the survival "benefit." Patient safety depends on adequately...

  17. Optimal Sequencing of New Drugs in Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: Dream or Reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffo, Orazio; Lunardi, Andrea; Trentin, Chiara; Maines, Francesca; Veccia, Antonello; Galligioni, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    The availability of new drugs capable of improving the overall survival of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer has led to the possibility of using them sequentially in the hope of obtaining a cumulative survival benefit. The new agents have already been administered as third-line treatments in patients who have previously received them as second line in everyday clinical practice, but the efficacy of this practice is not yet supported by clinical trial data, and evidence of possible cross-resistance has reinforced the debate concerning the best sequence to use in order to maximise the benefit. Furthermore, the situation is further complicated by the possibility of administering new hormonal agents to chemotherapy-naïve patients, and novel chemotherapeutic agents to hormone-sensitive patients. This article critically reviews the available data concerning the sequential use of new drugs, and discusses the real evidence concerning their optimal positioning in the therapeutic strategy of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. PMID:26721408

  18. Targeting Alternative Sites on the Androgen Receptor to Treat Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul S. Rennie

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent, metastatic prostate cancer continues to be a leading cause of cancer-death in men. The androgen receptor (AR is a modular, ligand-inducible transcription factor that regulates the expression of genes that can drive the progression of this disease, and as a consequence, this receptor is a key therapeutic target for controlling prostate cancer. The current drugs designed to directly inhibit the AR are called anti-androgens, and all act by competing with androgens for binding to the androgen/ligand binding site. Unfortunately, with the inevitable progression of the cancer to castration resistance, many of these drugs become ineffective. However, there are numerous other regulatory sites on this protein that have not been exploited therapeutically. The regulation of AR activity involves a cascade of complex interactions with numerous chaperones, co-factors and co-regulatory proteins, leading ultimately to direct binding of AR dimers to specific DNA androgen response elements within the promoter and enhancers of androgen-regulated genes. As part of the family of nuclear receptors, the AR is organized into modular structural and functional domains with specialized roles in facilitating their inter-molecular interactions. These regions of the AR present attractive, yet largely unexploited, drug target sites for reducing or eliminating androgen signaling in prostate cancers. The design of small molecule inhibitors targeting these specific AR domains is only now being realized and is the culmination of decades of work, including crystallographic and biochemistry approaches to map the shape and accessibility of the AR surfaces and cavities. Here, we review the structure of the AR protein and describe recent advancements in inhibiting its activity with small molecules specifically designed to target areas distinct from the receptor’s androgen binding site. It is anticipated that these new classes of anti-AR drugs will provide an additional

  19. Histone deacetylase inhibitors in castration-resistant prostate cancer: molecular mechanism of action and recent clinical trials

    OpenAIRE

    Kaushik, Dharam; Vashistha, Vishal; Isharwal, Sudhir; Sediqe, Soud A.; Lin, Ming-Fong

    2015-01-01

    Historically, androgen-deprivation therapy has been the cornerstone for treatment of metastatic prostate cancer. Unfortunately, nearly majority patients with prostate cancer transition to the refractory state of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Newer therapeutic agents are needed for treating these CRPC patients that are unresponsive to androgen deprivation and/or chemotherapy. The histone deacetylase (HDAC) family of enzymes limits the expression of genomic regions by improving b...

  20. ODM-201: a new-generation androgen receptor inhibitor in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fizazi, Karim; Albiges, Laurence; Loriot, Yohann; Massard, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy is the standard of care for patients with advanced hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. Despite an initial response, most patients progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The realization that CRPC remains driven by androgen receptor (AR) signaling has formed the basis for a new generation of agents targeting the AR axis. Two of these agents, abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide, have been shown to prolong overall survival in patients with CRPC. Several other AR inhibitors are currently in development for the treatment of CRPC. The present article reviews ODM-201, a new-generation AR inhibitor with a unique molecular structure, in the treatment of CRPC. The design of an ongoing Phase III trial (ARAMIS) of ODM-201 in men with non-metastatic CRPC is also discussed, at a disease stage for which there is currently no approved treatment. PMID:26313416

  1. Estradiol suppresses tissue androgens and prostate cancer growth in castration resistant prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrogens suppress tumor growth in prostate cancer which progresses despite anorchid serum androgen levels, termed castration resistant prostate cancers (CRPC), although the mechanisms are unclear. We hypothesize that estrogen inhibits CRPC in anorchid animals by suppressing tumoral androgens, an effect independent of the estrogen receptor. The human CRPC xenograft LuCaP 35V was implanted into orchiectomized male SCID mice and established tumors were treated with placebo, 17β-estradiol or 17β-estradiol and estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780. Effects of 17β-estradiol on tumor growth were evaluated and tissue testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) evaluated by mass spectrometry. Treatment of LuCaP 35V with 17β-estradiol slowed tumor growth compared to controls (tumor volume at day 21: 785 ± 81 mm3 vs. 1195 ± 84 mm3, p = 0.002). Survival was also significantly improved in animals treated with 17β-estradiol (p = 0.03). The addition of the estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780 did not significantly change survival or growth. 17β-estradiol in the presence and absence of ICI 182,780 suppressed tumor testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) as assayed by mass spectrometry. Tissue androgens in placebo treated LuCaP 35V xenografts were; T = 0.71 ± 0.28 pg/mg and DHT = 1.73 ± 0.36 pg/mg. In 17β-estradiol treated LuCaP35V xenografts the tissue androgens were, T = 0.20 ± 0.10 pg/mg and DHT = 0.15 ± 0.15 pg/mg, (p < 0.001 vs. controls). Levels of T and DHT in control liver tissue were < 0.2 pg/mg. CRPC in anorchid animals maintains tumoral androgen levels despite castration. 17β-estradiol significantly suppressed tumor T and DHT and inhibits growth of CRPC in an estrogen receptor independent manner. The ability to manipulate tumoral androgens will be critical in the development and testing of agents targeting CRPC through tissue steroidogenesis

  2. Isolation and genomic analysis of circulating tumor cells from castration resistant metastatic prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The number of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in metastatic prostate cancer patients provides prognostic and predictive information. However, it is the molecular characterization of CTCs that offers insight into the biology of these tumor cells in the context of personalized treatment. We developed a novel approach to isolate CTCs away from hematopoietic cells with high purity, enabling genomic analysis of these cells. The isolation protocol involves immunomagnetic enrichment followed by fluorescence activated cell sorting (IE/FACS). To evaluate the feasibility of isolation of CTCs by IE/FACS and downstream genomic profiling, we conducted a pilot study in patients with metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Twenty (20) sequential CRPC patients were assayed using CellSearch™. Twelve (12) patients positive for CTCs were subjected to immunomagnetic enrichment and fluorescence activated cell sorting (IE/FACS) to isolate CTCs. Genomic DNA of CTCs was subjected to whole genome amplification (WGA) followed by gene copy number analysis via array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). CTCs from nine (9) patients successfully profiled were observed to have multiple copy number aberrations including those previously reported in primary prostate tumors such as gains in 8q and losses in 8p. High-level copy number gains at the androgen receptor (AR) locus were observed in 7 (78%) cases. Comparison of genomic profiles between CTCs and archival primary tumors from the same patients revealed common lineage. However, high-level copy number gains in the AR locus were observed in CTCs, but not in the matched archival primary tumors. We developed a new approach to isolate prostate CTCs without significant leukocyte admixture, and to subject them to genome-wide copy number analysis. Our assay may be utilized to explore genomic events involved in cancer progression, e.g. development of castration resistance and to monitor therapeutic efficacy of targeted therapies in

  3. Androgen receptor variant-7: an important predictive biomarker in castrate resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Sartor

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The recent manuscript in New England Journal of Medicine by Antonarakis et al. [1] has important clinical implications. This study evaluates mRNA expression of a particular androgen receptor splice variant-7 (AR-V7, in circulating tumor cells (CTCs from metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC patients receiving enzalutamide or abiraterone. The findings were striking, none of the 18 patients with detectable AR-V7 in CTCs had prostate-specific antigen (PSA responses. Further, the median time to PSA progression after enzalutamide or abiraterone treatment was only 1.3-1.4 months in AR-V7-positive patients as compared to 5.3-6.1 months in AR-V7 negative patients. AR-V7 in CTCs was also associated with shorter survival.

  4. Tasquinimod in the treatment of castrate-resistant prostate cancer – current status and future prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Amit R.; Armstrong, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment options have significantly expanded in recent years for men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), with the routine use of immunotherapy (sipuleucel-T) and novel hormonal agents such as enzalutamide and abiraterone acetate prior to taxane-based chemotherapy or radium-223 radiotherapy. A number of immune checkpoints limit the immune response of the host to metastatic tumor progression in prostate cancer, one of which is an immunosuppressive and pro-angiogenic cell called the myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC). Tasquinimod is a small molecular oral inhibitor of S100A9, a key cell surface regulator of MDSC function, and has shown anti-angiogenic, antitumor and immune-modulatory properties in preclinical models of prostate cancer and other solid tumors. A large randomized phase II trial of tasquinimod in men with chemotherapy-naïve mCRPC demonstrated a significant prolongation in radiographic and symptomatic progression-free survival compared with placebo, which was also associated with improvements in overall survival. Tasquinimod was studied in a global phase III randomized trial in men with bone mCRPC and, while it significantly improved radiographic progression-free survival, this did not result in an overall survival benefit. However, tasquinimod is under evaluation as well as a combination therapy with other systemic agents in prostate cancer and as a single agent in other solid tumors. This review encompasses the preclinical and clinical development of tasquinimod as a therapy for men with prostate cancer. PMID:26834836

  5. Tasquinimod in the treatment of castrate-resistant prostate cancer - current status and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Amit R; Armstrong, Andrew J

    2016-02-01

    Treatment options have significantly expanded in recent years for men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), with the routine use of immunotherapy (sipuleucel-T) and novel hormonal agents such as enzalutamide and abiraterone acetate prior to taxane-based chemotherapy or radium-223 radiotherapy. A number of immune checkpoints limit the immune response of the host to metastatic tumor progression in prostate cancer, one of which is an immunosuppressive and pro-angiogenic cell called the myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC). Tasquinimod is a small molecular oral inhibitor of S100A9, a key cell surface regulator of MDSC function, and has shown anti-angiogenic, antitumor and immune-modulatory properties in preclinical models of prostate cancer and other solid tumors. A large randomized phase II trial of tasquinimod in men with chemotherapy-naïve mCRPC demonstrated a significant prolongation in radiographic and symptomatic progression-free survival compared with placebo, which was also associated with improvements in overall survival. Tasquinimod was studied in a global phase III randomized trial in men with bone mCRPC and, while it significantly improved radiographic progression-free survival, this did not result in an overall survival benefit. However, tasquinimod is under evaluation as well as a combination therapy with other systemic agents in prostate cancer and as a single agent in other solid tumors. This review encompasses the preclinical and clinical development of tasquinimod as a therapy for men with prostate cancer. PMID:26834836

  6. Sipuleucel-T: Autologous Cellular Immunotherapy for Men with Asymptomatic or Minimally Symptomatic Metastatic Castrate Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert B. Sims

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sipuleucel T is an autologous cellular immunotherapy designed to stimulate an immune response in men diagnosed with asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic metastatic castrate resistant (hormone refractory prostate cancer. Sipuleucel T improves overall survival and provides an additional treatment option for this patient population.

  7. Cholesterol biosynthesis inhibitor RO 48-8071 suppresses growth of hormone-dependent and castration-resistant prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Y

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Yayun Liang,1 Benford Mafuvadze,1 Johannes D Aebi,2 Salman M Hyder1 1Dalton Cardiovascular Research Center and Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO, USA; 2Medicinal Chemistry, Roche Pharma Research and Early Development (pRED, Roche Innovation Center Basel, F Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd., Basel, Switzerland Abstract: Standard treatment for primary prostate cancer includes systemic exposure to chemotherapeutic drugs that target androgen receptor or antihormone therapy (chemical castration; however, drug-resistant cancer cells generally emerge during treatment, limiting the continued use of systemic chemotherapy. Patients are then treated with more toxic standard therapies. Therefore, there is an urgent need for novel and more effective treatments for prostate cancer. The cholesterol biosynthetic pathway is an attractive therapeutic target for treating endocrine-dependent cancers because cholesterol is an essential structural and functional component of cell membranes as well as the metabolic precursor of endogenous steroid hormones. In this study, we have examined the effects of RO 48-8071 (4'-[6-(allylmethylaminohexyloxy]-4-bromo-2'-fluorobenzophenone fumarate; Roche Pharmaceuticals internal reference: RO0488071 (RO, which is an inhibitor of 2, 3-oxidosqualene cyclase (a key enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway, on prostate cancer cells. Exposure of both hormone-dependent and castration-resistant human prostate cancer cells to RO reduced prostate cancer cell viability and induced apoptosis in vitro. RO treatment reduced androgen receptor protein expression in hormone-dependent prostate cancer cells and increased estrogen receptor β (ERβ protein expression in both hormone-dependent and castration-resistant prostate cancer cell lines. Combining RO with an ERβ agonist increased its ability to reduce castration-resistant prostate cancer cell viability. In addition, RO effectively suppressed the

  8. Targeting DNA repair with combination veliparib (ABT-888) and temozolomide in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Hussain, Maha; Carducci, Michael A.; Slovin, Susan; Cetnar, Jeremy; Qian, Jiang; McKeegan, Evelyn M.; Refici-Buhr, Marion; Chyla, Brenda; Shepherd, Stacie P.; Giranda, Vincent L.; Alumkal, Joshi J.

    2014-01-01

    Androgen receptor-mediated transcription is directly coupled with the induction of DNA damage, and castration-resistant tumor cells exhibit increased activity of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1, a DNA repair enzyme. This study assessed the efficacy and safety of low dose oral PARP inhibitor veliparib (ABT-888) and temozolomide (TMZ) in docetaxel-pretreated patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) in a single-arm, open-label, pilot study. Patients with mCRPC ...

  9. Persistent androgen receptor-mediated transcription in castration-resistant prostate cancer under androgen-deprived conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Decker, Keith F.; Zheng, Dali; He, Yuhong; Bowman, Tamara; Edwards, John R.; Jia, Li

    2012-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-inducible transcription factor that mediates androgen action in target tissues. Upon ligand binding, the AR binds to thousands of genomic loci and activates a cell-type specific gene program. Prostate cancer growth and progression depend on androgen-induced AR signaling. Treatment of advanced prostate cancer through medical or surgical castration leads to initial response and durable remission, but resistance inevitably develops. In castration-resistant ...

  10. Beyond ten cycles of cabazitaxel for castrate-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Noronha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are limited data regarding cabazitaxel use beyond 10 cycles. Patients and Methods: Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data of patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer who received over 10 cycles of cabazitaxel after docetaxel failure. Results: Four patients received between 14 and 27 cycles. Reasons for stopping cabazitaxel were toxicity (2, progression (1 and logistics (1. Two of the three patients with measurable disease attained a partial remission (PR. Three patients continued to have a PSA response after 10 cycles; PSA nadir occurred between 17 and 23 cycles. Other than peripheral neuropathy (PN, all the cabazitaxel-related toxicities occurred after the initial cycles and did not increase cumulatively. Clinically significant neuropathy occurred after 15-17 cycles. The cabazitaxel-induced PN was partially reversible, with improvement from grade 3 to grade 2 after a 3-5-month long drug holiday. Conclusion: Cautiously continuing cabazitaxel until progression or intolerable toxicity may maximize efficacy.

  11. A combination of sorafenib and nilotinib reduces the growth of castrate-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archibald M

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Monica Archibald,1 Tara Pritchard,1 Hayley Nehoff,1 Rhonda J Rosengren,1 Khaled Greish,1,2 Sebastien Taurin1 1Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand; 2Aljawhara Centre for Molecular Medicine, Arabian Gulf University, Manama, Kingdom of Bahrain Abstract: Castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC remains incurable due to the lack of effective therapies. Several tyrosine kinases have been implicated in the development and growth of CRPC, as such targeting these kinases may offer an alternative therapeutic strategy. We established the combination of two tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs, sorafenib and nilotinib, as the most cytotoxic. In addtion, to improve their bioavailability and reduce their metabolism, we encapsulated sorafenib and nilotinib into styrene-co-maleic acid micelles. The micelles’ charge, size, and release rate were characterized. We assessed the effect of the combination on the cytotoxicity, cell cycle, apoptosis, protein expression, tumor spheroid integrity, migration, and invasion. The micelles exhibited a mean diameter of 100 nm, a neutral charge, and appeared highly stable. The micellar TKIs promoted greater cytotoxicity, decreased cell proliferation, and increased apoptosis relative to the free TKIs. In addition, the combination reduced the expression and activity of several tyrosine kinases and reduced tumor spheroid integrity and metastatic potential of CRPC cell lines more efficiently than the single treatments. The combination increased the therapeutic potential and demonstrated the relevance of a targeted combination therapy for the treatment of CRPC. In addition, the efficacy of the encapsulated drugs provides the basis for an in vivo preclinical testing. Keywords: sorafenib, nilotinib, castrate-resistant prostate cancer, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, nanomedicine

  12. The hippo pathway effector YAP regulates motility, invasion, and castration-resistant growth of prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Yang, Shuping; Chen, Xingcheng; Stauffer, Seth; Yu, Fang; Lele, Subodh M; Fu, Kai; Datta, Kaustubh; Palermo, Nicholas; Chen, Yuanhong; Dong, Jixin

    2015-04-01

    Yes-associated protein (YAP) is an effector of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway. The functional significance of YAP in prostate cancer has remained elusive. In this study, we first show that enhanced expression of YAP is able to transform immortalized prostate epithelial cells and promote migration and invasion in both immortalized and cancerous prostate cells. We found that YAP mRNA was upregulated in androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cells (LNCaP-C81 and LNCaP-C4-2 cells) compared to the level in androgen-sensitive LNCaP cells. Importantly, ectopic expression of YAP activated androgen receptor signaling and was sufficient to promote LNCaP cells from an androgen-sensitive state to an androgen-insensitive state in vitro, and YAP conferred castration resistance in vivo. Accordingly, YAP knockdown greatly reduced the rates of migration and invasion of LNCaP-C4-2 cells and under androgen deprivation conditions largely blocked cell division in LNCaP-C4-2 cells. Mechanistically, we found that extracellular signal-regulated kinase-ribosomal s6 kinase signaling was downstream of YAP for cell survival, migration, and invasion in androgen-insensitive cells. Finally, immunohistochemistry showed significant upregulation and hyperactivation of YAP in castration-resistant prostate tumors compared to their levels in hormone-responsive prostate tumors. Together, our results identify YAP to be a novel regulator in prostate cancer cell motility, invasion, and castration-resistant growth and as a potential therapeutic target for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). PMID:25645929

  13. A Phase 2 Study of Abiraterone Acetate in Japanese Men with Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer Who Had Received Docetaxel-based Chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    SATOH, TAKEFUMI; Uemura, Hiroji; Tanabe, Kazunari; Nishiyama, Tsutomu; Terai, Akito; Yokomizo, Akira; Nakatani, Tatsuya; Imanaka, Keiichiro; Ozono, Seiichiro; Akaza, Hideyuki

    2014-01-01

    Objective In this Phase 2 multicenter study the efficacy and safety of oral abiraterone acetate (1000 mg/once daily) plus prednisolone (5 mg/twice daily) was evaluated in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients from Japan who had previously received docetaxel-based chemotherapy. Methods Men (aged ≥20 years) with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (prostate-specific antigen levels: ≥5 ng/ml), who had received 1 or 2 cytotoxic chemotherapies (with ≥1 regimen being ...

  14. Enzalutamide treatment in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer progressing after chemotherapy and abiraterone acetate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Frederik Birkebaek; Røder, Martin Andreas; Rathenborg, Per;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to record prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response and overall survival (OS) for a group of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients treated with enzalutamide following progression after abiraterone treatment in the post-chemotherapy...... marked fall in PSA following enzalutamide therapy in post-chemotherapy mCRPC patients compared with reported results in randomized trials. Larger prospective studies of sequencing are warranted....

  15. Cabazitaxel: A novel taxane for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer-current implications and future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afroz Abidi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in the management of prostate cancer have shown considerable development with time and many novel therapeutic agents have been approved over the past years. For patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC, initially docetaxel was the standard chemotherapy but once they became refractory to docetaxel, no treatment improved survival. This scenario changed in June 2010 when the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA approved Cabazitaxel as a new therapeutic option for patients with mCRPC resistant to docetaxel. Cabazitaxel, being a novel tubulin-binding taxane with poor affinity for P-glycoprotein, decreases the chances of resistance. It has shown antitumor activity in preclinical, phase I, II and III clinical studies in docetaxel-resistant tumors. This article summarises the background, pharmacodynamic, kinetics and clinical development of cabazitaxel for the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer. Future development and rational use of this drug in other tumors is under therapeutic investigation.

  16. Cabazitaxel as second-line or third-line therapy in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Per; Svane, Inge M; Lindberg, Henriette;

    2016-01-01

    To compare treatment outcomes in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer treated with cabazitaxel (CA) as second-line or third-line therapy in the everyday clinical setting. Charts from 94 patients treated with CA as second-line (n=28) or third-line therapy (n=66) were...... evaluated. Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events were used to register grade 3-4 nonhematological toxicity during treatment with CA. Baseline metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer-related prognostic factors, duration of therapy, and maximum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) percentage...... change were registered during treatment with CA and previous/subsequent novel androgen receptor targeting therapies. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. A median of 6 versus 5 treatment cycles was administered in patients treated with...

  17. Synergistic antitumor activities of docetaxel and octreotide associated with apoptotic-upregulation in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sha Zhu

    Full Text Available Androgen deprivation therapy has become the fist-line treatment of metastatic prostate cancer; however, progression to castrate resistance disease occurs in the majority of patients. Thus, there is an urgent need for improvements in therapy for castration-resistant prostate cancer. The aims of the present study were to determine the efficacy somatostatin analogue octreotide (OCT combined with a low dose of docetaxel (DTX using castration resistant prostate cancer cells and to investigate the involved molecular mechanisms in vitro. The anti-proliferative and synergism potential effects were determined by MTT assay. Induction of apoptosis was analyzed employing annexing V and propidium iodide staining and flow cytometry. VEGFA, CASP9, CASP3 and ABCB1 gene expression was evaluated by RT-PCR and Q-RT-PCR analysis. OCT in combination with DTX treatments on DU145 cell migration was also evaluated. Investigation revealed that combined administration of DTX and OCT had significant, synergistically greater cytotoxicity than DTX or OCT treatment alone. The combination of the two drugs caused a more marked increase in apoptosis and resulted in greater suppression of invasive potential than either individual agent. There was obvious increase in caspase 3 expression in the OCT alone and two-drug combined treatment groups, however, VEGFA expression was markedly suppressed in them. These results support the conclusion that somatostatin analogues combined with docetaxel may enhance the chemotherapy efficacies through multiple mechanisms in castration-resistant PCa cell line. This work provides a preclinical rationale for the therapeutic strategies to improve the treatment in castrate resistance disease.

  18. Abiraterone in the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostaghel EA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Elahe A Mostaghel Division of Clinical Research, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Androgen deprivation therapy remains the single most effective treatment for the initial therapy of advanced prostate cancer, but is uniformly marked by progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. Residual tumor androgens and androgen axis activation are now recognized to play a prominent role in mediating CRPC progression. Despite suppression of circulating testosterone to castrate levels, castration does not eliminate androgens from the prostate tumor microenvironment and residual androgen levels are well within the range capable of activating the androgen receptor (AR and AR-mediated gene expression. Accordingly, therapeutic strategies that more effectively target production of intratumoral androgens are necessary. The introduction of abiraterone, a potent suppressor of cytochrome P450 17 α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-mediated androgen production, has heralded a new era in the hormonal treatment of men with metastatic CRPC. Herein, the androgen and AR-mediated mechanisms that contribute to CRPC progression and establish cytochrome P450 17 α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase as a critical therapeutic target are briefly reviewed. The mechanism of action and pharmacokinetics of abiraterone are reviewed and its recently described activity against AR and 3-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase is discussed. The Phase I and II data initially demonstrating the efficacy of abiraterone and Phase III data supporting its approval for patients with metastatic CRPC are reviewed. The safety and tolerability of abiraterone, including the incidence and management of side effects and potential drug interactions, are discussed. The current place of abiraterone in CRPC therapy is reviewed and early evidence regarding cross-resistance of abiraterone with taxane therapy, mechanisms of resistance to abiraterone, and observations of an

  19. Cytotoxic chemotherapy in the contemporary management of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonpavde, Guru; Wang, Christopher G; Galsky, Matthew D; Oh, William K; Armstrong, Andrew J

    2015-07-01

    For several years, docetaxel was the only treatment shown to improve survival of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). There are now several novel agents available, although chemotherapy with docetaxel and cabazitaxel continues to play an important role. However, the increasing number of available agents will inevitably affect the timing of chemotherapy and therefore it may be important to offer this approach before declining performance status renders patients ineligible for chemotherapy. Patient selection is also important to optimise treatment benefit. The role of predictive biomarkers has assumed greater importance due to the development of multiple agents and resistance to available agents. In addition, the optimal sequence of treatments remains undefined and requires further study in order to maximize long-term outcomes. We provide an overview of the clinical data supporting the role of chemotherapy in the treatment of mCRPC and the emerging role in metastatic castration-sensitive prostate cancer. We review the key issues in the management of patients including selection of patients for chemotherapy, when to start chemotherapy, and how best to sequence treatments to maximise outcomes. In addition, we briefly summarise the promising new chemotherapeutic agents in development in the context of emerging therapies. PMID:25046451

  20. Experience with octreotide depot in the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Kolesnikov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC is one of the most complex and unsolved problems in urologic oncology. The somatostatin analogue octreotide depot made in Russia may be used for its treatment. The paper gives the results of a trial of the efficiency and safety of treatment with octreotide depot 30 mg and dexamethasone in 20 patients aged 58 to 89 years with CRPC during continued androgen deprivation therapy. The duration of the trial was 3 months. A response was assessed from the serum levels of prostate-specific antigen (PCA, the time course of changes in general and biochemical blood test values, the degree of pain syndrome, and improvement in quality of life in a patient. A total response in reducing PSA was obtained in 70 % of the patents; overall, the best results were achieved in the group receiving octreotide before chemotherapy with docetaxel. The tolerability of octreotide deport with dexamethasone was good in all cases; no obvious adverse hematological and clinical reactions were noted.

  1. LncRNA HOTAIR Enhances the Androgen-Receptor-Mediated Transcriptional Program and Drives Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Zhang; Jonathan C. Zhao; Jung Kim; Ka-wing Fong; Yeqing Angela Yang; Debabrata Chakravarti; Yin-Yuan Mo; Jindan Yu

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Understanding the mechanisms of androgen receptor (AR) activation in the milieu of low androgen is critical to effective treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Here, we report HOTAIR as an androgen-repressed lncRNA, and, as such, it is markedly upregulated following androgen deprivation therapies and in CRPC. We further demonstrate a distinct mode of lncRNA-mediated gene regulation, wherein HOTAIR binds to the AR protein to block its interaction with the E3 ubiquiti...

  2. A phase 1 multiple-dose study of orteronel in Japanese patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Ozono, Seiichiro; Yamaguchi, Akito; Koike, Hidekazu; Matsui, Hiroshi; Nagata, Masao; Takubo, Takatoshi; Miyashita, Kana; Matsushima, Takafumi; Akaza, Hideyuki

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Orteronel (TAK-700) is a non-steroidal, selective, reversible inhibitor of 17,20-lyase. We evaluated the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and antitumor effect of orteronel with or without prednisolone in Japanese patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Methods We conducted a phase 1 study in men with progressive and chemotherapy-naïve CRPC. Patients received orteronel orally at doses of 200–400 mg twice daily (BID) with or without oral predn...

  3. Sipuleucel-T immunotherapy for castration-resistant prostate cancer. A systematic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kawalec, Paweł; Paszulewicz, Anna; Holko, Przemysław; Pilc, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Sipuleucel-T is a novel active cellular immunotherapy for the treatment of asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). It is assumed to be associated with less adverse events than conventional docetaxel-based chemotherapy. Material and methods A systematic review of literature published between January, 1 1966 and February, 6 2012 was performed to assess the efficacy and safety of sipuleucel-T in patients with mCRPC. Databases were...

  4. Cabozantinib Inhibits Growth of Androgen-Sensitive and Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer and Affects Bone Remodeling

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Holly M.; Nazanin Ruppender; Xiaotun Zhang; Lisha G. Brown; Gross, Ted S.; Colm Morrissey; Roman Gulati; Vessella, Robert L.; Frauke Schimmoller; Aftab, Dana T.; Eva Corey

    2013-01-01

    Cabozantinib is an inhibitor of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases, including MET and VEGFR2. In a phase II clinical trial in advanced prostate cancer (PCa), cabozantinib treatment improved bone scans in 68% of evaluable patients. Our studies aimed to determine the expression of cabozantinib targets during PCa progression and to evaluate its efficacy in hormone-sensitive and castration-resistant PCa in preclinical models while delineating its effects on tumor and bone. Using immunohistochemis...

  5. Toward a Common Therapeutic Framework in Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer: A Model for Urologic Oncology and Medical Oncology Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    de Vere White, Ralph; Lara, Primo N.

    2014-01-01

    The rapid evolution of palliative therapeutic choices in the last few years for patients with advanced castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) has resulted in a dilemma currently troubling a few other epithelial malignancies: which systemic agent to choose and at what time? In addition, which specialty specifically directs the delivery of such care – Urology or Medical Oncology – has not been clearly established. Recognizing the lack of consensus, we propose a framework for Urology and Me...

  6. Variant allele of HSD3B1 increases progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nastiuk, Kent L.; Li, Jinliang; Gu, Jun; Wu, Ming; Zhang, Qimin; Lin, Hanqing; Wu, Denglong

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (3βHSD1), which is a rate-limiting enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of adrenal-derived steroid dehydroepiandrosterone to DHT, may be a promising target for treating castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). METHODS From 2004 to 2011, a total of 103 consecutive patients presenting with advanced prostate cancer were included in this study. All patients were treated with surgical castration as androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Germline DNA was extracted from archived tissue from each patient and sequenced. PSA half-time (representing rate to PSA nadir after ADT), the incidence of, and time to CRPC occurrence, and cause-specific mortality rates were determined during the 3-10 year follow-up. The perioperative data and postoperative outcomes are compared. The patients were retrospectively analyzed for survival time. RESULTS Of the 103 patient samples analyzed, 18 harbored a heterozygous variant (1245C) HSD3B1 gene, while 85 patients were homozygous wild-type (1245A) for HSD3B1. The two groups were homogenous for age, PSA, Gleason and metastases rate preoperatively. The incidence of CRPC observed in the variant group was significantly higher than that of wild-type group (100% vs 64.7%, respectively; p = 0.003). Despite this higher incidence of CRPC, there were no significant differences in time to develop CRPC, or in cause-specific mortality. Further, neither PSA half-time, nor time to biochemical recurrence (rising PSA is only one of the defining characteristics of CRPC) were different between the variant and wild-type groups. CONCLUSION Prostate cancer patients who harbored the heterozygous variant HSD3B1 (1245C) are more likely to develop to CRPC, but do not have shorter time to biochemical recurrence, shorter survival time or higher mortality risk. PMID:25731771

  7. The Role of Palliative Surgery in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidenreich, Axel; Porres, Daniel; Pfister, David

    2015-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) analogues or antagonists represents the treatment of choice in men with metastatic prostate cancer (PCA). Depending on the serum concentration of the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir, the survival might vary between 11 and 78 months. In castration-resistant PCA (CRPC), all new medical treatment options can induce complete and partial remissions in metastatic foci, but they have no profound effect on the prostate itself, as has been shown recently. About one-third of all patients without local treatment of the primary will develop significant complications of the lower and upper urinary tract due to local progression of the PCA. In men with CRPC and lower urinary tract symptoms, palliative transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) can be performed with a 60-70% success rate. Infiltration of the pelvic floor, the bladder neck and trigone, and the external urethral sphincter can make palliative radical surgery necessary. Bladder neck closure with continent vesicostomy, radical cystoprostatectomy with an incontinent urinary diversion, and anterior and posterior exenteration are individual therapeutic options in men with a good performance status and a considerable life expectancy. Symptomatic involvement of the upper urinary tract can be managed by the placement of endoluminal stents or a percutaneous nephrostomy in men with poor performance. In men with a good response to ADT and a good performance status, reconstructive ureteral surgery might be considered and the options of ureteral reimplantation, ureter ileal replacement, and a subcutaneous pyelovesical bypass have to be discussed. The indication to perform one of the above-mentioned surgical approaches needs to be discussed in a multidisciplinary tumor board. PMID:26632812

  8. [Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer : Clinical data, new treatment options and therapy monitoring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, K; Albers, P; Eichenauer, R; Geiges, G; Grimm, M-O; König, F; Mickisch, G; Pfister, D; Schwentner, C; Suttmann, H; Zastrow, S

    2016-09-01

    Therapies currently available in Germany for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) include docetaxel, cabazitaxel, abiraterone acetate, enzalutamide and radium-223, all of which offer a potential survival benefit that adds up in their sequential application to a significant overall survival benefit. However, the optimal sequencing of these agents is still unclear. In the absence of evidence, treatment selection is based on the particular situation and on comorbid conditions of each individual patient. Furthermore, predictive markers to facilitate the selection of patients for a specific therapy or sequence of therapies remain an unmet need. However, with the recently discovered androgen receptor splice variant V7, which mediates (cross)resistance to or between abiraterone and enzalutamide, the first such marker has been identified. It is critical to monitor the response to treatments at prespecified intervals in order to optimize treatment sequencing so that the patient does not miss a valuable therapeutic window to receive alternative treatment that may prolong his life along with good symptom control and preservation of quality of life. PMID:27411995

  9. Bone-Targeted Therapies in Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: Evolving Paradigms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joelle El-Amm

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Majority of patients with metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC develop bone metastases which results in significant morbidity and mortality as a result of skeletal-related events (SREs. Several bone-targeted agents are either in clinical use or in development for prevention of SREs. Bisphosphonates were the first class of drugs investigated for prevention of SREs and zoledronic acid is the only bisphosphonate that is FDA-approved for this indication. Another bone-targeted agent is denosumab which is a fully humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to the RANK-L thereby inhibiting RANK-L mediated bone resorption. While several radiopharmaceuticals were approved for pain palliation in mCRPC including strontium and samarium, alpharadin is the first radiopharmaceutical to show significant overall survival benefit. Contemporary therapeutic options including enzalutamide and abiraterone have effects on pain palliation and SREs as well. Other novel bone-targeted agents are currently in development, including the receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors cabozantinib and dasatinib. Emerging therapeutics in mCRPC has resulted in great strides in preventing one of the most significant sources of complications of bone metastases.

  10. Current paradigms and evolving concepts in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Snmanta Krnmar Pal; Oliver Sartor

    2011-01-01

    @@ Until recently,docetaxel-based therapy represented the only therapy shown to prolong survival in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC).The past year and a half has been marked by unprecedented progress in treatments for this disease.Three positive phase III clinical trials have emerged,each evaluating agents (sipuleucel-T,cabazitaxel and abiraterone)with distinct mechanisms of action.Herein,the three pivotal trials are described alongside both past and current large phase III studies conducted in this mCRPC.The overall survival for patients with mCRPC treated in current clinical trials is considerably longer than noted in the past.We note that more recent trials with older agents have also shown improved survival and discuss potential non-therapeutic biases that influence this critical measure of outcome.The necessity for utilizing randomized trials when evaluating new therapeutics is emphasized given the changing prognosis in this mCRPC.

  11. Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC):the rise and fall of systemic chemotherapy. Shadows of recent phase 3 studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Omar Abdel-Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is defined as prostate cancer that recurs while a patient is receiving androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Many treatment options have been suggested for this chal enging disease;starting from 2-year hormonal manipulations, mitoxantrne-and docetaxel-based regimens reaching to the overwhelming new systemic op-tions for CRPC (newer hormonal treatments, cytotoxic chemotherapies, bone-targeted agents and immunotherapeutics);and the question is:do the traditional cytotoxic regimens stil have a role amidst al these new options?

  12. Downregulation of c-SRC kinase CSK promotes castration resistant prostate cancer and pinpoints a novel disease subclass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chih-Cheng; Fazli, Ladan; Loguercio, Salvatore; Zharkikh, Irina; Aza-Blanc, Pedro; Gleave, Martin E; Wolf, Dieter A

    2015-09-01

    SRC kinase is activated in castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), phosphorylates the androgen receptor (AR), and causes its ligand-independent activation as a transcription factor. However, activating SRC mutations are exceedingly rare in human tumors, and mechanisms of ectopic SRC activation therefore remain largely unknown. Performing a functional genomics screen, we found that downregulation of SRC inhibitory kinase CSK is sufficient to overcome growth arrest induced by depriving human prostate cancer cells of androgen. CSK knockdown led to ectopic SRC activation, increased AR signaling, and resistance to anti-androgens. Consistent with the in vitro observations, stable knockdown of CSK conferred castration resistance in mouse xenograft models, while sensitivity to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor dasatinib was retained. Finally, CSK was found downregulated in a distinct subset of CRPCs marked by AR amplification and ETS2 deletion but lacking PTEN and RB1 mutations. These results identify CSK downregulation as a principal driver of SRC activation and castration resistance and validate SRC as a drug target in a molecularly defined subclass of CRPCs. PMID:26091350

  13. An update on TroVax® for the treatment of progressive castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abern M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Michael Abern1, Howard L Kaufman2, Kalyan Latchamsetty11Department of Urology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA; 2Department of General Surgery and Immunology and Microbiology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Prostate cancer is a common human malignancy with few effective therapeutic options for treating advanced castration-resistant disease. The potential therapeutic effectiveness of immunotherapy and vaccines, in particular, has gained popularity based on the identification of prostate-associated antigens, potent expression vectors for vaccination, and data from recent clinical trials. A modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA virus expressing 5T4, a tumor-associated glycoprotein, has shown promise in preclinical studies and clinical trials in patients with colorectal and renal cell carcinoma. This review will discuss the rationale for immunotherapy in prostate cancer and describe preclinical and limited clinical data in prostate cancer for the MVA-5T4 (TroVax® vaccine.Keywords: castration resistance, prostate cancer, TroVax, vaccine

  14. Cabozantinib inhibits growth of androgen-sensitive and castration-resistant prostate cancer and affects bone remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Holly M; Ruppender, Nazanin; Zhang, Xiaotun; Brown, Lisha G; Gross, Ted S; Morrissey, Colm; Gulati, Roman; Vessella, Robert L; Schimmoller, Frauke; Aftab, Dana T; Corey, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Cabozantinib is an inhibitor of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases, including MET and VEGFR2. In a phase II clinical trial in advanced prostate cancer (PCa), cabozantinib treatment improved bone scans in 68% of evaluable patients. Our studies aimed to determine the expression of cabozantinib targets during PCa progression and to evaluate its efficacy in hormone-sensitive and castration-resistant PCa in preclinical models while delineating its effects on tumor and bone. Using immunohistochemistry and tissue microarrays containing normal prostate, primary PCa, and soft tissue and bone metastases, our data show that levels of MET, P-MET, and VEGFR2 are increasing during PCa progression. Our data also show that the expression of cabozantinib targets are particularly pronounced in bone metastases. To evaluate cabozantinib efficacy on PCa growth in the bone environment and in soft tissues we used androgen-sensitive LuCaP 23.1 and castration-resistant C4-2B PCa tumors. In vivo, cabozantinib inhibited the growth of PCa in bone as well as growth of subcutaneous tumors. Furthermore, cabozantinib treatment attenuated the bone response to the tumor and resulted in increased normal bone volume. In summary, the expression pattern of cabozantinib targets in primary and castration-resistant metastatic PCa, and its efficacy in two different models of PCa suggest that this agent has a strong potential for the effective treatment of PCa at different stages of the disease. PMID:24205338

  15. Cabozantinib inhibits growth of androgen-sensitive and castration-resistant prostate cancer and affects bone remodeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly M Nguyen

    Full Text Available Cabozantinib is an inhibitor of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases, including MET and VEGFR2. In a phase II clinical trial in advanced prostate cancer (PCa, cabozantinib treatment improved bone scans in 68% of evaluable patients. Our studies aimed to determine the expression of cabozantinib targets during PCa progression and to evaluate its efficacy in hormone-sensitive and castration-resistant PCa in preclinical models while delineating its effects on tumor and bone. Using immunohistochemistry and tissue microarrays containing normal prostate, primary PCa, and soft tissue and bone metastases, our data show that levels of MET, P-MET, and VEGFR2 are increasing during PCa progression. Our data also show that the expression of cabozantinib targets are particularly pronounced in bone metastases. To evaluate cabozantinib efficacy on PCa growth in the bone environment and in soft tissues we used androgen-sensitive LuCaP 23.1 and castration-resistant C4-2B PCa tumors. In vivo, cabozantinib inhibited the growth of PCa in bone as well as growth of subcutaneous tumors. Furthermore, cabozantinib treatment attenuated the bone response to the tumor and resulted in increased normal bone volume. In summary, the expression pattern of cabozantinib targets in primary and castration-resistant metastatic PCa, and its efficacy in two different models of PCa suggest that this agent has a strong potential for the effective treatment of PCa at different stages of the disease.

  16. A phase II trial of personalized peptide vaccination in castration-resistant prostate cancer patients: prolongation of prostate-specific antigen doubling time

    OpenAIRE

    Noguchi, Masanori; MORIYA, FUKUKO; SUEKANE, SHIGETAKA; Ohnishi, Rei; Matsueda, Satoko; Sasada, Tetsuro; Yamada, Akira; Itoh, Kyogo

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancer vaccine is one of the attractive treatment modalities for patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). However, because of delayed immune responses, its clinical benefits, besides for overall survival (OS), are not well captured by the World Health Organization (WHO) and Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) criteria. Several surrogate markers for evaluation of cancer vaccine, including prostate-specific antigen doubling time (PSADT), are curren...

  17. Docetaxel-related toxicity in metastatic hormone-sensitive and metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Michael T; Gulati, Roman; Mostaghel, Elahe A; Nelson, Peter S; Montgomery, R Bruce; Yu, Evan Y; Cheng, Heather H

    2016-07-01

    Docetaxel plus androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) offers a survival benefit in metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer (mHSPC). However, one trial evaluating docetaxel in mHSPC (GETUG-AFU15) showed unexpected toxicity; raising concerns that docetaxel may carry increased toxicity when used to treat mHSPC compared to metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). We conducted a retrospective analysis evaluating differences in toxicity based on the clinical state (i.e., mHSPC vs. mCRPC) that docetaxel was used. Patients initiating docetaxel between 1/1/2014 and 7/15/2015 were included, with the former date chosen to coincide with the press release for the first mHSPC study that showed a survival benefit with early docetaxel; ensuring contemporary docetaxel-treated cohorts. Thirty-nine mCRPC and 22 mHSPC patients were included. Compared to mCRPC, mHSPC patients were younger (median years: 66.3 vs. 71.8, P = 0.007); had better performance status (ECOG 0-1: 100 vs. 62 %, P < 0.0001); and used opiates less frequently (29 vs. 66 %, P = 0.04). Neutropenic fevers occurred in 9 and 5 % (P = 0.95) of men with mHSPC and mCRPC, respectively. Other toxicities also occurred at similar rates between cohorts. The incidence of any toxic event was 73 and 67 % (P = 0.84) for men with mHSPC and mCRPC, respectively. Within the mHSPC cohort, neutropenic fevers occurred at a similar rate regardless of the time interval between initiating ADT and the start of docetaxel. We did not observe a significant difference in toxicity between mHSPC and mCRPC patients receiving docetaxel. However, the small sample size and retrospective nature of this study limit our ability to draw definitive conclusions. PMID:27300548

  18. A Phase 2 Trial of Abiraterone Acetate in Japanese Men with Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer and without Prior Chemotherapy (JPN-201 Study)

    OpenAIRE

    Matsubara, Nobuaki; Uemura, Hirotsugu; SATOH, TAKEFUMI; Suzuki, Hiroyoshi; Nishiyama, Tsutomu; Uemura, Hiroji; Hashine, Katsuyoshi; Imanaka, Keiichiro; Ozono, Seiichiro; Akaza, Hideyuki

    2014-01-01

    Objective Abiraterone acetate has been approved in >70 countries for chemotherapy-naïve metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients. Efficacy and safety of abiraterone acetate (1000 mg/once daily) with prednisolone (5 mg/twice daily) in chemotherapy-naïve Japanese patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer was evaluated. Methods Men, ≥20 years, with prostate-specific antigen levels of ≥5 ng/ml and evidence of progression were enrolled in this Phase 2, multicent...

  19. Androgen Deprivation Therapy and Secondary Hormone Therapy in the Management of Hormone-sensitive and Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Fred; Fizazi, Karim

    2015-11-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is the standard of care for patients with metastatic prostate cancer (mPC). However, nearly all patients with mPC progress to castration-resistant PC (CRPC). Arrays of treatments, including secondary hormonal therapies, are available for the treatment of mPC and CRPC, which show efficacy when administered with ADT. Continuation of ADT is recommended for CRPC treatment as therapies are added. New secondary hormonal therapies include abiraterone, targeting the CYP17 enzyme family, and enzalutamide, an androgen receptor inhibitor with heightened binding specificity. The optimal decision-making process for CRPC treatment option remains unclear, pending further research and experience. PMID:26282624

  20. Saikosaponin-d: A potential chemotherapeutics in castration resistant prostate cancer by suppressing cancer metastases and cancer stem cell phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Di; Zhang, Hui-Jian; Jiang, Yao-Dong; Wu, Peng; Qi, Huan; Cai, Chao; Zheng, Shao-Bin; Dang, Qiang

    2016-06-10

    Androgen deprivation therapy is the gold standard regimen for advanced Prostate cancer (PCa) patients, nevertheless, patients eventually develop into castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Currently only a few chemotherapeutics are available for CRPC. Therefore, it is critical for identifying a new drug. In this study, we will explore a new agent, Saikosaponin-d (SSd), for CRPC therapy based on its mechanism of action. DU145 and CWR22Rv1 cells representing CRPC were employed in this study. A series of cell, biochemical, and molecular biologic assays such as Immunofluorescence, Zymography, Sphere formation, Colony formation, and MTT were used. Finally, we find SSd can significantly inhibit the growth of PCa cells in both dose- and time-dependent and suppress the colony formation during a long-term drug administration, it also can inhibit their migration and invasion abilities, which was accompanied by reverse the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and suppress MMP2/9 expression as well as activities. Furthermore, SSd can suppress cancer stem cell (CSC) phenotypes such as self-renewal ability. Mechanistically, SSd blocks Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway by decreasing GSK3β phosphorylation to affect EMT and CSC. These findings demonstrate the mechanism of anti-cancer activity of SSd in targeting EMT and CSC, suggesting SSd can be a potent agent for CRPC therapy. PMID:27155154

  1. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells in castration resistant prostate cancer: a randomized, controlled, biomarker study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Fuereder

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endothelial progenitor cells (CEPs and circulating endothelial cells (CECs are potential biomarkers of response to anti-angiogenic treatment regimens. In the current study, we investigated the effect of docetaxel and sunitinib on CEP/CEC kinetics and clinical response in castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Chemonaive patients with CRPC were enrolled in this study to receive either sunitinib (37.5 mg/d, in combination with docetaxel (75 mg/m2 or docetaxel alone. CEP and CEC kinetics were analyzed for every cycle. The primary objective was to compare CEP/CEC pharmacodynamics between both treatment arms. We also investigated if CEC/CEP spikes, induced by MTD docetaxel, are suppressed by sunitinib in patients treated with docetaxel/sunitinib relative to docetaxel monotherapy. RESULTS: A total of 27 patients were enrolled. We observed a significant increase of CEP/CEC (total/viable counts over time within each cycle (coefficients 0.29233, 0.22092 and 0.26089, respectively; p<0.001. However, no differences between the treatment groups, in terms of CEP and CEC kinetics, were detected. In the docetaxel monotherapy arm 4 (30% patients responded to therapy with a 50% PSA decline, while 9 (64% patients showed a PSA decline in the combination group (n.s.. The median PFS in the docetaxel monotherapy group was 3.1 months (2.6-3.6 months, 95% CI and 6.2 months (4.9-7.4 months, 95% CI; p = 0.062 in the combination arm. Sunitinib/docetaxel was reasonably well tolerated and toxicity manageable. CONCLUSION: In summary, no significant differences in CEC and CEP kinetics between the treatment arms were observed, although a highly significant increase of CEPs/CECs within each cycle over time was detected. These results mirror the challenge we have to face when employing anti-angiogenic strategies in CRPC. Additional preclinical research is needed to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms. However

  2. Multiplexed quantum dot labeling of activated c-Met signaling in castration-resistant human prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peizhen Hu

    Full Text Available The potential application of multiplexed quantum dot labeling (MQDL for cancer detection and prognosis and monitoring therapeutic responses has attracted the interests of bioengineers, pathologists and cancer biologists. Many published studies claim that MQDL is effective for cancer biomarker detection and useful in cancer diagnosis and prognosis, these studies have not been standardized against quantitative biochemical and molecular determinations. In the present study, we used a molecularly characterized human prostate cancer cell model exhibiting activated c-Met signaling with epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT and lethal metastatic progression to bone and soft tissues as the gold standard, and compared the c-Met cell signaling network in this model, in clinical human prostate cancer tissue specimens and in a castration-resistant human prostate cancer xenograft model. We observed c-Met signaling network activation, manifested by increased phosphorylated c-Met in all three. The downstream survival signaling network was mediated by NF-κB and Mcl-1 and EMT was driven by receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL, at the single cell level in clinical prostate cancer specimens and the xenograft model. Results were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR and western blots in a human prostate cancer cell model. MQDL is a powerful tool for assessing biomarker expression and it offers molecular insights into cancer progression at both the cell and tissue level with high degree of sensitivity.

  3. Multiplexed quantum dot labeling of activated c-Met signaling in castration-resistant human prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Peizhen; Chu, Gina C-Y; Zhu, Guodong; Yang, Hua; Luthringer, Daniel; Prins, Gail; Habib, Fouad; Wang, Yuzhuo; Wang, Ruoxiang; Chung, Leland W K; Zhau, Haiyen E

    2011-01-01

    The potential application of multiplexed quantum dot labeling (MQDL) for cancer detection and prognosis and monitoring therapeutic responses has attracted the interests of bioengineers, pathologists and cancer biologists. Many published studies claim that MQDL is effective for cancer biomarker detection and useful in cancer diagnosis and prognosis, these studies have not been standardized against quantitative biochemical and molecular determinations. In the present study, we used a molecularly characterized human prostate cancer cell model exhibiting activated c-Met signaling with epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and lethal metastatic progression to bone and soft tissues as the gold standard, and compared the c-Met cell signaling network in this model, in clinical human prostate cancer tissue specimens and in a castration-resistant human prostate cancer xenograft model. We observed c-Met signaling network activation, manifested by increased phosphorylated c-Met in all three. The downstream survival signaling network was mediated by NF-κB and Mcl-1 and EMT was driven by receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL), at the single cell level in clinical prostate cancer specimens and the xenograft model. Results were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR and western blots in a human prostate cancer cell model. MQDL is a powerful tool for assessing biomarker expression and it offers molecular insights into cancer progression at both the cell and tissue level with high degree of sensitivity. PMID:22205960

  4. Prednisone plus cabazitaxel or mitoxantrone for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer progressing after docetaxel treatment: a randomised open-label trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Bono, Johann Sebastian; Oudard, Stephane; Ozguroglu, Mustafa;

    2010-01-01

    Cabazitaxel is a novel tubulin-binding taxane drug with antitumour activity in docetaxel-resistant cancers. We aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of cabazitaxel plus prednisone with those of mitoxantrone plus prednisone in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer with progre...

  5. Gradual reduction of testosterone using a gonadotropin-releasing hormone vaccination delays castration resistance in a prostate cancer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barranco, Jesús A. Junco; Millar, Robert P.; Fuentes, Franklin; Bover, Eddy; Pimentel, Eulogio; Basulto, Roberto; Calzada, Lesvia; Morán, Rolando; Rodríguez, Ayni; Garay, Hilda; Reyes, Osvaldo; Castro, Maria D.; Bringas, Ricardo; Arteaga, Niurka; Toudurí, Henio; Rabassa, Mauricio; Fernández, Yairis; Serradelo, Andrés; Hernández, Eduardo; Guillén, Gerardo E.

    2016-01-01

    In a previous study aimed to design a novel prostate cancer vaccine, the authors of the present study demonstrated the advantage of combining the adjuvants Montanide ISA 51 with very small size proteoliposomes (VSSP) to promote a significant humoral immune response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in healthy animals. The present study compared the efficacy of this vaccine formulation versus the standard treatment currently available in terms of preventing the development of tumors in DD/S mice injected with Shionogi carcinoma (SC) 115 cells. The results demonstrated that 5 non-vaccinated control mice exhibited a fast tumor growth, and succumbed to the disease within 19–31 days. Mice immunized with the GnRH/Montanide ISA 51/VSSP vaccine exhibited a moderate decline in testosterone levels that was associated with a decrease in anti-GnRH antibody titers, which lead to a sustained tumor growth inhibition. In total, 2 mice in the immunized group exhibited complete remission of the tumor for the duration of the present study. In addition, castrated mice, which were used as a control for standard hormonal therapy, exhibited an accelerated decrease in tumor size. However, tumor relapse was observed between days 50 and 54, and between days 65 and 85, following the injection of SC 155 cells. Therefore, these mice were sacrificed at day 90. The present study concludes that the slow and moderate reduction of testosterone levels observed using the GnRH-based vaccine may delay the appearance of castration resistance in a Shionogi prostate cancer model. These findings suggest that this vaccine may be used to delay castration resistance in patients with prostate cancer.

  6. Cabazitaxel as second-line or third-line therapy in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongsted, Per; Svane, Inge M; Lindberg, Henriette; Bisbjerg, Rasmus; Daugaard, Gedske; Sengeløv, Lisa

    2016-08-01

    To compare treatment outcomes in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer treated with cabazitaxel (CA) as second-line or third-line therapy in the everyday clinical setting. Charts from 94 patients treated with CA as second-line (n=28) or third-line therapy (n=66) were evaluated. Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events were used to register grade 3-4 nonhematological toxicity during treatment with CA. Baseline metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer-related prognostic factors, duration of therapy, and maximum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) percentage change were registered during treatment with CA and previous/subsequent novel androgen receptor targeting therapies. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. A median of 6 versus 5 treatment cycles was administered in patients treated with second-line and third-line CA (P=0.483). Events with grade 3-4 nonhematological toxicity were equally distributed in the two groups (32 vs. 35%, P=0.80). PSA responses were observed in 46 and 17% of patients treated with second-line and third-line CA (P=0.002). PFS (5.5 vs. 3.3 months, P=0.087, log rank) and OS (18.3 vs. 11.4 months, P=0.003, log rank) was longer in patients treated with second-line CA. OS measured from second-line abiraterone acetate/enzalutamide was similar (18.0 months) to second-line CA (P=0.883, log rank). Treatment-related toxicity was independent of CA being administered as second-line or third-line therapy. Although PFS and the frequency of PSA responders favored patients treated with second-line CA, one treatment sequence could not be considered superior to the other in this study. PMID:27148775

  7. Impact of enzalutamide on quality of life in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer after chemotherapy: additional analyses from the AFFIRM randomized clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Cella, D; Ivanescu, C; Holmstrom, S.; Bui, C. N.; Spalding, J.; Fizazi, K.

    2014-01-01

    Background To present longitudinal changes in Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate (FACT-P) scores during 25-week treatment with enzalutamide or placebo in men with progressive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) after chemotherapy in the AFFIRM trial. Patients and methods Patients were randomly assigned to enzalutamide 160 mg/day or placebo. FACT-P was completed before randomization, at weeks 13, 17, 21, and 25, and every 12 weeks thereafter while on study tre...

  8. Abiraterone Acetate and Castration Resistant Ductal Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Linden-Castro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ductal adenocarcinoma of the prostate is a rare histological variant that only represents <1% of prostate tumors. This histological variant has several important clinical implications with respect to their evolution, clinical prognosis, and treatment. We report the case of a 64-year-old patient with ductal adenocarcinoma of the prostate, which progresses to castration-resistant prostate cancer, that was treated with abiraterone acetate with good clinical response, to our knowledge, the first case of ductal adenocarcinoma of the prostate in treatment with abiraterone acetate.

  9. Pain, PSA flare, and bone scan response in a patient with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer treated with radium-223, a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radium-223 has been shown to improve overall survival in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer with symptomatic bone metastases. The bone scan response to radium-223 has only been described in one single center trial of 14 patients, none of whom achieved the outstanding bone scan response presented in the current case. In this case report, we describe a 75 year-old white man with extensively pre-treated metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer and symptomatic bone metastases who experienced a flare in pain and prostate-specific antigen, followed by dramatic clinical (pain), biochemical (prostate-specific antigen), and imaging (bone scan) response. The flare phenomena and bone scan response we observed have not previously been described with radium-223. This case suggests that the degree and duration of bone scan response may be predictive of overall survival benefit

  10. Evolving Role of Bone Biomarkers in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer1

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Janet E.; Sim, Sheryl

    2010-01-01

    The preferential metastasis of prostate cancer cells to bone disrupts the process of bone remodeling and results in lesions that cause significant pain and patient morbidity. Although prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is an established biomarker in prostate cancer, it provides only limited information relating to bone metastases and the treatment of metastatic bone disease with bisphosphonates or novel noncytotoxic targeted or biological agents that may provide clinical benefits without affecti...

  11. Evolving Role of Bone Biomarkers in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Janet E.; Sheryl Sim

    2010-01-01

    The preferential metastasis of prostate cancer cells to bone disrupts the process of bone remodeling and results in lesions that cause significant pain and patient morbidity. Although prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is an established biomarker in prostate cancer, it provides only limited information relating to bone metastases and the treatment of metastatic bone disease with bisphosphonates or novel noncytotoxic targeted or biological agents that may provide clinical benefits without affecti...

  12. Phase I Study of the Prolactin Receptor Antagonist LFA102 in Metastatic Breast and Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machiels, Jean-Pascal; Suárez, Cristina; Lewis, Nancy; Higgins, Michaela; Wisinski, Kari; Awada, Ahmad; Maur, Michela; Stein, Mark; Hwang, Andy; Mosher, Rebecca; Wasserman, Ernesto; Wu, Gang; Zhang, Hefei; Zieba, Renata; Elmeliegy, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Lessons Learned Despite evidence for a role for prolactin signaling in breast and prostate tumorigenesis, a prolactin receptor-binding monoclonal antibody has not produced clinical efficacy. Increased serum prolactin levels may be a biomarker for prolactin receptor inhibition. Results from the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics (PD) studies suggest that inappropriately long dosing intervals and insufficient exposure to LFA102 may have resulted in lack of antitumor efficacy. Based on preclinical data, combination therapy of LFA102 with those novel agents targeting hormonal pathways in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer and metastatic breast cancer is promising. Given the PD evidence of prolactin receptor blockade by LFA102, this drug has the potential to be used in conditions such as hyperprolactinemia that are associated with high prolactin levels. Background. Prolactin receptor (PRLR) signaling is implicated in breast and prostate cancer. LFA102, a humanized monoclonal antibody (mAb) that binds to and inhibits the PRLR, has exhibited promising preclinical antitumor activity. Methods. Patients with PRLR-positive metastatic breast cancer (MBC) or metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) received doses of LFA102 at 3–60 mg/kg intravenously once every 4 weeks. Objectives were to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and/or recommended dose for expansion (RDE) to investigate the safety/tolerability of LFA102 and to assess pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), and antitumor activity. Results. A total of 73 patients were enrolled at 5 dose levels. The MTD was not reached because of lack of dose-limiting toxicities. The RDE was established at 60 mg/kg based on PK and PD analysis and safety data. The most common all-cause adverse events (AEs) were fatigue (44%) and nausea (33%) regardless of relationship. Grade 3/4 AEs reported to be related to LFA102 occurred in 4% of patients. LFA102 exposure increased approximately dose

  13. Prostaglandin receptor EP3 mediates growth inhibitory effect of aspirin through androgen receptor and contributes to castration resistance in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwagi, Eiji; Shiota, Masaki; Yokomizo, Akira; Itsumi, Momoe; Inokuchi, Junichi; Uchiumi, Takeshi; Naito, Seiji

    2013-06-01

    Although numerous epidemiological studies show aspirin to reduce risk of prostate cancer, the mechanism of this effect is unclear. Here, we first confirmed that aspirin downregulated androgen receptor (AR) and prostate-specific antigen in prostate cancer cells. We also found that aspirin upregulated prostaglandin receptor subtype EP3 but not EP2 or EP4. The EP3 antagonist L798106 and EP3 knockdown increased AR expression and cell proliferation, whereas the EP3 agonist sulprostone decreased them, indicating that EP3 affects AR expression. Additionally, EP3 (PTGER3) transcript levels were significantly decreased in human prostate cancer tissues compared with those in normal human prostate tissues, suggesting that EP3 is important to prostate carcinogenesis. Decreased EP3 expression was also seen in castration-resistant subtype CxR cells compared with parental LNCaP cells. Finally, we found that aspirin and EP3 modulators affected prostate cancer cell growth. Taken together, aspirin suppressed LNCaP cell proliferation via EP3 signaling activation; EP3 downregulation contributed to prostate carcinogenesis and to progression from androgen-dependent prostate cancer to castration-resistant prostate cancer by regulating AR expression. In conclusion, cyclooxygenases and EP3 may represent attractive therapeutic molecular targets in androgen-dependent prostate cancer. PMID:23493387

  14. Targeting Alternative Sites on the Androgen Receptor to Treat Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Rennie, Paul S.; Artem Cherkasov; Nada Lallous; Kush Dalal

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent, metastatic prostate cancer continues to be a leading cause of cancer-death in men. The androgen receptor (AR) is a modular, ligand-inducible transcription factor that regulates the expression of genes that can drive the progression of this disease, and as a consequence, this receptor is a key therapeutic target for controlling prostate cancer. The current drugs designed to directly inhibit the AR are called anti-androgens, and all act by competing with androgens for binding to the ...

  15. The PREVAIL trial of enzalutamide in men with chemotherapy-naïve, metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: Post hoc analysis of Korean patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Choung-Soo; Theeuwes, Ad; Kwon, Dong Deuk; Choi, Young Deuk; Chung, Byung Ha; Lee, Hyun Moo; Lee, Kang Hyun; Lee, Sang Eun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This post hoc analysis evaluated treatment effects, safety, and pharmacokinetics of enzalutamide in Korean patients in the phase 3, double-blind, placebo-controlled PREVAIL trial. Materials and Methods Asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic chemotherapy-naive men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer that progressed on androgen deprivation therapy received 160 mg/d oral enzalutamide or placebo (1:1) until death or discontinuation due to radiographic progression or skeletal-...

  16. Early outcome prediction on 18F-fluorocholine PET/CT in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients treated with abiraterone

    OpenAIRE

    De Giorgi, Ugo; Caroli, Paola; Burgio, Salvatore L.; Menna, Cecilia; Conteduca, Vincenza; Bianchi, Emanuela; Fabbri, Francesca; Carretta, Elisa; Amadori, Dino; Paganelli, Giovanni; Matteucci, Federica

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the role of 18F-fluorocholine positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FCH-PET/CT) in the early evaluation of abiraterone and outcome prediction in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Patient and methods: Forty-three patients with metastatic CRPC progressing after docetaxel received abiraterone 1,000 mg daily with prednisone 5 mg twice daily. Patients were evaluated monthly for serological PSA response and safety. FCH-PET/C...

  17. Abiraterone acetate in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: long term outcome of the Temporary Authorization for Use programme in France

    OpenAIRE

    Houédé, Nadine; Beuzeboc, Philippe; Gourgou, Sophie; Tosi, Diego; Moise, Laura; Gravis, Gwenaëlle; Delva, Remy; Fléchon, Aude; Latorzeff, Igor; Ferrero, Jean-Marc; Oudard, Stéphane; Tartas, Sophie; Laguerre, Brigitte; Topart, Delphine; Roubaud, Guilhem

    2015-01-01

    AbstractBackgroundCOU-AA-301 trial has proved that abiraterone acetate (AA), a selective inhibitor of androgen biosynthesis, improved overall survival (OS) of patients with metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) after a first line of docetaxel. Based on this result, a Temporary Authorization for Use (TAU) was performed between December 2010 and July 2011 to provide patients with mCRPC the opportunity to receive AA before its commercialization. The aim of this study was to eva...

  18. Differences in treatment patterns among patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer treated by oncologists versus urologists in a US managed care population

    OpenAIRE

    Alemayehu,

    2011-01-01

    Nicole M Engel-Nitz1, Berhanu Alemayehu2, David Parry3, Faith Nathan21Innovus, Eden Prairie, MN, USA; 2AstraZeneca, Wilmington, DE, USA; 3AstraZeneca UK, London, UKObjective: Differences in treatment patterns, health care resource utilization, and costs between patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) treated by oncologists and those treated by urologists were examined.Methods: Patients aged ≥40 with CRPC were identified using claims from a large US managed health care...

  19. A multi-centre randomised phase III trial of Dexamethasone vs Dexamethasone and diethylstilbestrol in castration-resistant prostate cancer: immediate vs deferred Diethylstilbestrol

    OpenAIRE

    Shamash, J; Powles, T; Sarker, S J; Protheroe, A; Mithal, N; Mills, R.; Beard, R; Wilson, P; Tranter, N.; O'Brien, N; McFaul, S; Oliver, T

    2011-01-01

    Background: The role of further hormone therapy in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) remains unclear. We performed a multi-centre randomised phase III study comparing the use of Dexamethasone, Aspirin, and immediate addition of Diethylstilbestrol (DAiS) vs Dexamethasone, Aspirin, and deferred (until disease progression) addition of Diethylstilbestrol (DAdS). Methods: From 2001 to 2008, 270 men with chemotherapy-naive CRPC were randomly assigned, in a 1 : 1 ratio, to receive either D...

  20. The tumor suppressor TERE1 (UBIAD1) prenyltransferase regulates the elevated cholesterol phenotype in castration resistant prostate cancer by controlling a program of ligand dependent SXR target genes

    OpenAIRE

    Fredericks, William J.; Sepulveda, Jorge; Lal, Priti; Tomaszewski, John E.; Lin, Ming-Fong; McGarvey, Terry; Rauscher, Frank J.; Malkowicz, S. Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer (CRPC) is characterized by persistent androgen receptor-driven tumor growth in the apparent absence of systemic androgens. Current evidence suggests that CRPC cells can produce their own androgens from endogenous sterol precursors that act in an intracrine manner to stimulate tumor growth. The mechanisms by which CRPC cells become steroidogenic during tumor progression are not well defined. Herein we describe a novel link between the elevated cholesterol phe...

  1. Radium-223 treatment of bone metastases from castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Jann; Højgaard, Liselotte

    2014-01-01

    The alpha emitter Radium-223 ((22)3Ra-Cl2) is a bone-seeking radionuclide studied as a new treatment for patients with bone metastases from hormone refractory prostate cancer. More than 1,000 patients have been included in clinical phase I-III tests showing significant reduction in alkaline...

  2. SU-D-303-01: Spatial Distribution of Bone Metastases In Metastatic Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perk, T; Bradshaw, T; Harmon, S; Perlman, S; Liu, G; Jeraj, R [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Identification of metastatic bone lesions is critical in prostate cancer, where treatments may be more effective in patients with fewer lesions. This study aims characterize the distribution and spread of bone lesions and create a probability map of metastatic spread in bone. Methods: Fifty-five metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer patients received up to 3 whole-body [F-18]NaF PET/CT scans. Lesions were identified by physician on PET/CT and contoured using a threshold of SUV>15. An atlas-based segmentation method was used to create CT regions, which determined skeletal location of lesions. Patients were divided into 3 groups with low (N<40), medium (40100) numbers of lesions. A combination of articulated and deformable registrations was used to register the skeletal segments and lesions of each patient to a single skeleton. All the lesion data was then combined to make a probability map. Results: A total of 4038 metastatic lesions (mean 74, range 2–304) were identified. Skeletal regions with highest occurrence of lesions included ribs, thoracic spine, and pelvis with 21%, 19%, and 15% of the total number lesions and 8%, 18%, and 31 % of the total lesion volume, respectively. Interestingly, patients with fewer lesions were found to have a lower proportion of lesions in the ribs (9% in low vs. 27% in high number of lesions). Additionally, the probability map showed specific areas in the spine and pelvis where over 75% of patients had metastases, and other areas in the skeleton with a less than 2% of metastases. Conclusion: We identified skeletal regions with higher incidence of metastases and specific sub-regions in the skeleton that had high or low probability of occurrence of metastases. Additionally, we found that metastatic lesions in the ribs and skull occur more commonly in advanced disease. These results may have future applications in computer-aided diagnosis. Funding from the Prostate Cancer Foundation.

  3. SU-D-303-01: Spatial Distribution of Bone Metastases In Metastatic Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Identification of metastatic bone lesions is critical in prostate cancer, where treatments may be more effective in patients with fewer lesions. This study aims characterize the distribution and spread of bone lesions and create a probability map of metastatic spread in bone. Methods: Fifty-five metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer patients received up to 3 whole-body [F-18]NaF PET/CT scans. Lesions were identified by physician on PET/CT and contoured using a threshold of SUV>15. An atlas-based segmentation method was used to create CT regions, which determined skeletal location of lesions. Patients were divided into 3 groups with low (N<40), medium (40100) numbers of lesions. A combination of articulated and deformable registrations was used to register the skeletal segments and lesions of each patient to a single skeleton. All the lesion data was then combined to make a probability map. Results: A total of 4038 metastatic lesions (mean 74, range 2–304) were identified. Skeletal regions with highest occurrence of lesions included ribs, thoracic spine, and pelvis with 21%, 19%, and 15% of the total number lesions and 8%, 18%, and 31 % of the total lesion volume, respectively. Interestingly, patients with fewer lesions were found to have a lower proportion of lesions in the ribs (9% in low vs. 27% in high number of lesions). Additionally, the probability map showed specific areas in the spine and pelvis where over 75% of patients had metastases, and other areas in the skeleton with a less than 2% of metastases. Conclusion: We identified skeletal regions with higher incidence of metastases and specific sub-regions in the skeleton that had high or low probability of occurrence of metastases. Additionally, we found that metastatic lesions in the ribs and skull occur more commonly in advanced disease. These results may have future applications in computer-aided diagnosis. Funding from the Prostate Cancer Foundation

  4. Evolving Role of Bone Biomarkers in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet E. Brown

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The preferential metastasis of prostate cancer cells to bone disrupts the process of bone remodeling and results in lesions that cause significant pain and patient morbidity. Although prostate-specific antigen (PSA is an established biomarker in prostate cancer, it provides only limited information relating to bone metastases and the treatment of metastatic bone disease with bisphosphonates or novel noncytotoxic targeted or biological agents that may provide clinical benefits without affecting PSA levels. As bone metastases develop, factors derived from bone metabolism are released into blood and urine, including N- and C-terminal peptide fragments of type 1 collagen and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, which represent potentially useful biomarkers for monitoring metastatic bone disease. A number of clinical trials have investigated these bone biomarkers with respect to their diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive values. Results suggest that higher levels of bone biomarkers are associated with an increased risk of skeletal-related events and/or death. As a result of these findings, bone biomarkers are now being increasingly used as study end points, particularly in studies investigating novel agents with putative bone effects. Data from prospective clinical trials are needed to validate the use of bone biomarkers and to confirm that marker levels provide additional information beyond traditional methods of response evaluation for patients with metastatic prostate cancer.

  5. BAY 1024767 blocks androgen receptor mutants found in castration-resistant prostate cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Tatsuo; Lejeune, Pascale; Köhr, Silke; Neuhaus, Roland; Faus, Hortensia; Gelato, Kathy A; Busemann, Matthias; Cleve, Arwed; Lücking, Ulrich; von Nussbaum, Franz; Brands, Michael; Mumberg, Dominik; Jung, Klaus; Stephan, Carsten; Haendler, Bernard

    2016-02-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) mutations arise in patients developing resistance to hormone deprivation therapies. Here we describe BAY 1024767, a thiohydantoin derivative with strong antagonistic activity against nine AR variants with mutations located in the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD), and against wild-type AR. Antagonism was maintained, though reduced, at increased androgen levels. Anti-tumor efficacy was evidenced in vivo in the KuCaP-1 prostate cancer model which bears the W741C bicalutamide resistance mutation and in the syngeneic prostate cancer rat model Dunning R3327-G. The prevalence of six selected AR mutations was determined in plasma DNA originating from 100 resistant patients and found to be at least 12%. Altogether the results show BAY 1024767 to be a strong antagonist for several AR mutants linked to therapy resistance, which opens the door for next-generation compounds that can benefit patients based on their mutation profile. PMID:26760770

  6. BAY 1024767 blocks androgen receptor mutants found in castration-resistant prostate cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Sugawara, Tatsuo; Lejeune, Pascale; Köhr, Silke; Neuhaus, Roland; Faus, Hortensia; Gelato, Kathy A.; Busemann, Matthias; Cleve, Arwed; Lücking, Ulrich; von Nussbaum, Franz; Brands, Michael; Mumberg, Dominik; Jung, Klaus; Stephan, Carsten; Haendler, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) mutations arise in patients developing resistance to hormone deprivation therapies. Here we describe BAY 1024767, a thiohydantoin derivative with strong antagonistic activity against nine AR variants with mutations located in the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD), and against wild-type AR. Antagonism was maintained, though reduced, at increased androgen levels. Anti-tumor efficacy was evidenced in vivo in the KuCaP-1 prostate cancer model which bears the W741C bicalutamide...

  7. Cost-effectiveness of abiraterone treatment in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer who previously received docetaxel therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Rudakova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Therapy for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC is a serious problem that requires significant public health care expenditures.Objective: to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of abiraterone treatment in patients with metastatic CRPC who previously received docetaxel under the conditions of the budgetary public health system of the Russian Federation.Material and methods. Markovian simulation based on the COU-AA-301 randomized placebo-controlled Phase III study was used. Survival analysis was made in 70-year-old patients. The cost of abiraterone therapy corresponded to that of the 2013 auctions.Results. Abiraterone therapy in patients who have previously received docetaxel therapy causes an increase in average life expectancy by an average of 4.6 months and progression-free survival by 2.0 months. Moreover, the cost calculated with reference to one year of additional life will account for about 3.6 million rubles and that to one additional quality-adjusted life year will be about 5.45 million rubles.Conclusion. The cost-effectiveness of abiraterone therapy for metastatic CRPC in patients who have previously received docetaxel therapy is similar to that of other medicaments used in oncological practice under the conditions of the budgetary public health system of the Russian Federation. In this connection, abiraterone may be considered as an economically acceptable medical intervention in this clinical situation.

  8. Increased expression of class III β-tubulin in castration-resistant human prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Terry, S; Ploussard, G; Allory, Y; Nicolaiew, N; Boissière-Michot, F; Maillé, P; Kheuang, L; Coppolani, E; Ali, A.; Bibeau, F; Culine, S; Buttyan, R.; de la Taille, A; Vacherot, F

    2009-01-01

    Background: Class III β-tubulin (βIII-tubulin) is expressed in tissues of neuronal lineage and also in several human malignancies, including non-small-cell lung carcinoma, breast and ovarian cancer. Overexpression of βIII-tubulin in these tumours is associated with an unfavourable outcome and resistance to taxane-based therapies. At present, βIII-tubulin expression remains largely uncharacterised in prostate cancer. Methods: In this report, we evaluated the expression of βIII-tubulin in 138 d...

  9. ASC-J9 Suppresses Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Growth through Degradation of Full-length and Splice Variant Androgen Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichi Yamashita

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Early studies suggested androgen receptor (AR splice variants might contribute to the progression of prostate cancer (PCa into castration resistance. However, the therapeutic strategy to target these AR splice variants still remains unresolved. Through tissue survey of tumors from the same patients before and after castration resistance, we found that the expression of AR3, a major AR splice variant that lacks the AR ligand-binding domain, was substantially increased after castration resistance development. The currently used antiandrogen, Casodex, showed little growth suppression in CWR22Rv1 cells. Importantly, we found that AR degradation enhancer ASC-J9 could degrade both full-length (fAR and AR3 in CWR22Rv1 cells as well as in C4-2 and C81 cells with addition of AR3. The consequences of such degradation of both fAR and AR3 might then result in the inhibition of AR transcriptional activity and cell growth in vitro. More importantly, suppression of AR3 specifically by short-hairpin AR3 or degradation of AR3 by ASC-J9 resulted in suppression of AR transcriptional activity and cell growth in CWR22Rv1-fARKD (fAR knockdown cells in which DHT failed to induce, suggesting the importance of targeting AR3. Finally, we demonstrated the in vivo therapeutic effects of ASC-J9 by showing the inhibition of PCa growth using the xenografted model of CWR22Rv1 cells orthotopically implanted into castrated nude mice with undetectable serum testosterone. These results suggested that targeting both fAR- and AR3-mediated PCa growth by ASC-J9 may represent the novel therapeutic approach to suppress castration-resistant PCa. Successful clinical trials targeting both fAR and AR3 may help us to battle castration-resistant PCa in the future.

  10. The use of circulating tumor cells in guiding treatment decisions for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onstenk, Wendy; de Klaver, Willemijn; de Wit, Ronald; Lolkema, Martijn; Foekens, John; Sleijfer, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    The therapeutic landscape of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) has drastically changed over the past decade with the advent of several new anti-tumor agents. Oncologists increasingly face dilemmas concerning the best treatment sequence for individual patients since most of the novel compounds have been investigated and subsequently positioned either pre- or post-docetaxel. A currently unmet need exists for biomarkers able to guide treatment decisions and to capture treatment resistance at an early stage thereby allowing for an early change to an alternative strategy. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have in this context intensively been investigated over the last years. The CTC count, as determined by the CellSearch System (Janssen Diagnostics LLC, Raritan, NJ), is a strong, independent prognostic factor for overall survival in patients with mCRPC at various time points during treatment and, as an early response marker, outperforms traditional response evaluations using serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels, scintigraphy as well as radiography. The focus of research is now shifting toward the predictive value of CTCs and the use of the characterization of CTCs to guide the selection of treatments with the highest chance of success for individual patients. Recently, the presence of the androgen receptor splice variant 7 (AR-V7) has been shown to be a promising predictive factor. In this review, we have explored the clinical value of the enumeration and characterization of CTCs for the treatment of mCRPC and have put the results obtained from recent studies investigating the prognostic and predictive value of CTCs into clinical perspective. PMID:27107266

  11. The Evolving Biology of Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: Review of Recommendations From the Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials Working Group 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geethakumari, Praveen Ramakrishnan; Cookson, Michael S; Kelly, William Kevin

    2016-02-01

    In 2008, the Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials Working Group 2 (PCWG2) developed consensus guidelines for clinical trial design and conduct that redefined trial endpoints, with a dual-objective paradigm: to (1) controlling, relieving, or eliminating disease manifestations at the start of treatment; and (2) preventing or delaying further disease manifestations. Clinical and translational research in prostate cancer has expanded our current-day understanding of the mechanisms of its pathogenesis, as well as the different clinicopathologic and molecular subtypes of the disease, and has improved the therapeutic armamentarium for the management of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). These new advances led to the development of the updated PCWG3 guidelines in 2015. In this review, we analyze our evolving understanding of the biology of CRPC, acquired resistance mechanisms, and emerging therapeutic targets in light of the updated PCWG3 guidelines. We present a joint perspective from the medical oncology and urologic disciplines on the ongoing efforts to advance clinical trial performance in order to discover new therapies for this fatal disease. PMID:26888794

  12. Quercetin-loaded nanomicelles to circumvent human castration-resistant prostate cancer in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Liu, Juan; Wei, Tuo; Ma, Xiaowei; Cheng, Qiang; Huo, Shuaidong; Zhang, Chunqiu; Zhang, Yanan; Duan, Xianglin; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2016-02-01

    Prostate cancer is highly prevalent and has become the second leading cause of cancer-related death in men. Its treatment remains a challenge in the clinic, particularly in patients who have advanced to ``castration-resistant prostate cancer'' (CRPC). Thus, more effective therapeutic strategies are required. Quercetin (QCT) is a natural flavonoid compound that has attracted increasing interest due to its anticancer activity. However, the clinical application of quercetin is largely hampered by its poor water solubility and low bioavailability. The objective of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of novel QCT-loaded nanomicelles (M-QCTs) assembled from DSPE-PEG2000 for prostate cancer treatment. Our results indicated that QCT was efficiently encapsulated into micelles up to 1 mg mL-1, which corresponds to a 450-fold increase of its water solubility. In vitro studies showed that the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value (20.2 μM) of M-QCTs was much lower than free QCT (>200 μM). Thus, M-QCTs were considerably more effective than free QCT in proliferation inhibition and apoptosis induction of human androgen-independent PC-3 cells. Furthermore, M-QCTs showed superior antitumor efficacy and the tumor proliferation rate reduced by 52.03% compared to the control group in the PC-3 xenograft mouse model, possibly due to increased accumulation of M-QCTs at the tumor site by the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. Collectively, our studies demonstrated that M-QCTs significantly increase drug accumulation at the tumor site and exhibit superior anticancer activity in prostate cancer. Thus, our nanomicelle-based drug delivery system constitutes a promising and effective therapeutic strategy for clinical treatment.Prostate cancer is highly prevalent and has become the second leading cause of cancer-related death in men. Its treatment remains a challenge in the clinic, particularly in patients who have advanced to ``castration-resistant

  13. Quercetin-loaded nanomicelles to circumvent human castration-resistant prostate cancer in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Liu, Juan; Wei, Tuo; Ma, Xiaowei; Cheng, Qiang; Huo, Shuaidong; Zhang, Chunqiu; Zhang, Yanan; Duan, Xianglin; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2016-02-01

    Prostate cancer is highly prevalent and has become the second leading cause of cancer-related death in men. Its treatment remains a challenge in the clinic, particularly in patients who have advanced to ``castration-resistant prostate cancer'' (CRPC). Thus, more effective therapeutic strategies are required. Quercetin (QCT) is a natural flavonoid compound that has attracted increasing interest due to its anticancer activity. However, the clinical application of quercetin is largely hampered by its poor water solubility and low bioavailability. The objective of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of novel QCT-loaded nanomicelles (M-QCTs) assembled from DSPE-PEG2000 for prostate cancer treatment. Our results indicated that QCT was efficiently encapsulated into micelles up to 1 mg mL-1, which corresponds to a 450-fold increase of its water solubility. In vitro studies showed that the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value (20.2 μM) of M-QCTs was much lower than free QCT (>200 μM). Thus, M-QCTs were considerably more effective than free QCT in proliferation inhibition and apoptosis induction of human androgen-independent PC-3 cells. Furthermore, M-QCTs showed superior antitumor efficacy and the tumor proliferation rate reduced by 52.03% compared to the control group in the PC-3 xenograft mouse model, possibly due to increased accumulation of M-QCTs at the tumor site by the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. Collectively, our studies demonstrated that M-QCTs significantly increase drug accumulation at the tumor site and exhibit superior anticancer activity in prostate cancer. Thus, our nanomicelle-based drug delivery system constitutes a promising and effective therapeutic strategy for clinical treatment.Prostate cancer is highly prevalent and has become the second leading cause of cancer-related death in men. Its treatment remains a challenge in the clinic, particularly in patients who have advanced to ``castration-resistant

  14. Radium-223 chloride: a potential new treatment for castration-resistant prostate cancer patients with metastatic bone disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radium-223 chloride (223Ra; Alpharadin) is an alpha-emitting radioisotope that targets areas of osteoblastic metastasis and is excreted by the small intestine. When compared with beta-emitters (eg, strontium-89, samarium-153), 223Ra delivers a high quantity of energy per track length with short tissue penetration. This review describes the mechanism, radiobiology, and preclinical development of 223Ra and discusses the clinical data currently available regarding its safety and efficacy profile. Data from clinical trials including abstracts were collected and reviewed using the PubMed Database, as well as the American Society of Clinical Oncology abstract database. Current bone-targeted therapies fall into two main categories: antiresorptive agents (eg, zoledronic acid, denosumab), which have been shown to delay skeletal-related events, and radiopharmaceuticals (eg, samarium-153), which may have a role in pain palliation. Historically, neither antiresorptive agents nor radiopharmaceuticals have shown definitive evidence of improved overall survival or other antitumor effects in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Radiopharmaceuticals are limited by myelosuppresion, thrombocytopenia, and renal excretion. In a recently reported randomized Phase III trial in men with symptomatic bone-metastatic CRPC who had received or were ineligible for docetaxel chemotherapy, 223Ra treatment resulted in improved overall survival and delayed skeletal-related events. Toxicity consisted of minor gastrointestinal side effects and mild neutropenia and thrombocytopenia that were rarely severe. Pending regulatory approval, 223Ra may represent a unique and distinct option for an important subgroup of patients with mCRPC; future trials should address its use in combination or in sequence with existing and novel agents

  15. Therapeutic options in docetaxel-refractory metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixian Zhong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Docetaxel is an established first-line therapy to treat metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC. Recently, abiraterone and cabazitaxel were approved for use after docetaxel failure, with improved survival. National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE preliminary recommendations were negative for both abiraterone (now positive in final recommendation and cabazitaxel (negative in final recommendation. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of abiraterone, cabazitaxel, mitoxantrone and prednisone for mCRPC treatment in US. METHODS: A decision-tree model was constructed to compare the two mCRPC treatments versus two placebos over 18 months from a societal perspective. Chance nodes include baseline pain as a severity indicator, grade III/IV side-effects, and survival at 18 months. Probabilities, survival and health utilities were from published studies. Model cost inputs included drug treatment, side-effect management and prevention, radiation for pain, and death associated costs in 2010 US dollars. RESULTS: Abiraterone is a cost-effective choice at $94K/QALY (quality adjusted life years compared to placebo in our base-case analysis. Cabazitaxel and abiraterone are the most effective, yet also most expensive agents. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER at base-case are $101K/QALY (extended dominated for mitoxantrone vs. placebo, $91K/QALY for abiraterone vs. mitoxantrone, $956K/QALY for cabazitaxel vs. abiraterone. Abiraterone becomes less cost-effective as its AWP increases, or if the cost of mitoxantrone side-effect management decreases. Increases in the percentage of patients with baseline pain leads to an increased ICER for both mitoxantrone and abiraterone, but mitoxantrone does relatively better. Cabazitaxel remains not cost-effective. CONCLUSION: Our base case model suggests that abiraterone is a cost-effective option in docetaxel-refractory mCRPC patients. Newer treatments will also

  16. Food effects on abiraterone pharmacokinetics in healthy subjects and patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Kim N; Spratlin, Jennifer; Kollmannsberger, Christian; North, Scott; Pankras, Catherine; Gonzalez, Martha; Bernard, Apexa; Stieltjes, Hans; Peng, Lixian; Jiao, James; Acharya, Milin; Kheoh, Thian; Griffin, Thomas W; Yu, Margaret K; Chien, Caly; Tran, Nam Phuong

    2015-12-01

    Food effect on abiraterone pharmacokinetics and safety on abiraterone acetate coadministration with low-fat or high-fat meals was examined in healthy subjects and metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients. Healthy subjects (n = 36) were randomized to abiraterone acetate (single dose, 1000 mg) + low-fat meal, + high-fat meal, and fasted state. mCRPC patients received repeated doses (abiraterone acetate 1000 mg + 5 mg prednisone twice daily; days 1-7) in a modified fasting state followed by abiraterone acetate plus prednisone within 0.5 hours post-low-fat (n = 6) or high-fat meal (n = 18; days 8-14). In healthy subjects, geometric mean (GM) abiraterone area under plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) increased ∼5- and ∼10-fold, respectively, with low-fat and high-fat meals versus fasted state (GM [coefficient of variation], 1942 [48] and 4077 [37] ng · h/mL vs 421 [67] ng · h/mL, respectively). In mCRPC patients, abiraterone AUC was ∼2-fold higher with a high-fat meal and similar with a low-fat meal versus modified fasting state (GM [coefficient of variation]: 1992 [34] vs 973 [58] ng · h/mL and 1264 [65] vs 1185 [90] ng · h/mL, respectively). Adverse events (all grade ≤ 3) were similar, with high-fat/low-fat meals or fasted/modified fasting state. Short-term dosing with food did not alter abiraterone acetate safety. PMID:26096139

  17. Expression of androgen receptor splice variants in prostate cancer bone metastases is associated with castration-resistance and short survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Hörnberg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Constitutively active androgen receptor variants (AR-V lacking the ligand binding domain (LBD may promote the development of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. The expression of AR-Vs in the clinically most important metastatic site, the bone, has, however, not been well documented. Our aim was therefore to compare levels of AR-Vs in hormone-naive (HN and CRPC bone metastases in comparison to primary PC and non-malignant prostate tissue, as well as in relation to AR protein expression, whole-genome transcription profiles and patient survival. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Hormone-naïve (n = 10 and CRPC bone metastases samples (n = 30 were obtained from 40 patients at metastasis surgery. Non-malignant and malignant prostate samples were acquired from 13 prostatectomized men. Levels of full length AR (ARfl and AR-Vs termed AR-V1, AR-V7, and AR-V567es mRNA were measured with RT-PCR and whole-genome transcription profiles with an Illumina Beadchip array. Protein levels were examined by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Transcripts for ARfl, AR-V1, and AR-V7 were detected in most primary tumors and metastases, and levels were significantly increased in CRPC bone metastases. The AR-V567es transcript was detected in 23% of the CRPC bone metastases only. A sub-group of CRPC bone metastases expressed LBD-truncated AR proteins at levels comparable to the ARfl. Detectable AR-V567es and/or AR-V7 mRNA in the upper quartile, seen in 1/3 of all CRPC bone metastases, was associated with a high nuclear AR immunostaining score, disturbed cell cycle regulation and short survival. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Expression of AR-Vs is increased in CRPC compared to HN bone metastases and associated with a particularly poor prognosis. Further studies are needed to test if patients expressing such AR-Vs in their bone metastases benefit more from drugs acting on or down-stream of these AR-Vs than from therapies inhibiting androgen synthesis.

  18. New therapies for relapsed castration-resistant prostate cancer based on peptide analogs of hypothalamic hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew V Schally

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is a pleasure to contribute our presentation at the International Prostate Forum of the Annual Meeting of the American Urological Association (AUA to this special issue of the Asian Journal of Andrology.

  19. Progression of metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer: impact of therapeutic intervention in the post-docetaxel space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sartor A Oliver

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite the proven success of hormonal therapy for prostate cancer using chemical or surgical castration, most patients eventually will progress to a phase of the disease that is metastatic and shows resistance to further hormonal manipulation. This has been termed metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC. Despite this designation, however, there is evidence that androgen receptor (AR-mediated signaling and gene expression can persist in mCRPC, even in the face of castrate levels of androgen. This may be due in part to the upregulation of enzymes involved in androgen synthesis, the overexpression of AR, or the emergence of mutant ARs with promiscuous recognition of various steroidal ligands. The therapeutic options were limited and palliative in nature until trials in 2004 demonstrated that docetaxel chemotherapy could significantly improve survival. These results established first-line docetaxel as the standard of care for mCRPC. After resistance to further docetaxel therapy develops, treatment options were once again limited. Recently reported results from phase 3 trials have shown that additional therapy with the novel taxane cabazitaxel (with prednisone, or treatment with the antiandrogen abiraterone (with prednisone could improve survival for patients with mCRPC following docetaxel therapy. Compared with mitoxantrone/prednisone, cabazitaxel/prednisone significantly improved overall survival, with a 30% reduction in rate of death, in patients with progression of mCRPC after docetaxel therapy in the TROPIC trial. Similarly, abiraterone acetate (an inhibitor of androgen biosynthesis plus prednisone significantly decreased the rate of death by 35% compared with placebo plus prednisone in mCRPC patients progressing after prior docetaxel therapy in the COU-AA-301 trial. Results of these trials have thus established two additional treatment options for mCRPC patients in the "post-docetaxel space." In view of the continued AR

  20. A Phase 2 Trial of Abiraterone Acetate in Japanese Men with Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer and without Prior Chemotherapy (JPN-201 Study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Nobuaki; Uemura, Hirotsugu; Satoh, Takefumi; Suzuki, Hiroyoshi; Nishiyama, Tsutomu; Uemura, Hiroji; Hashine, Katsuyoshi; Imanaka, Keiichiro; Ozono, Seiichiro; Akaza, Hideyuki

    2014-01-01

    Objective Abiraterone acetate has been approved in >70 countries for chemotherapy-naïve metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients. Efficacy and safety of abiraterone acetate (1000 mg/once daily) with prednisolone (5 mg/twice daily) in chemotherapy-naïve Japanese patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer was evaluated. Methods Men, ≥20 years, with prostate-specific antigen levels of ≥5 ng/ml and evidence of progression were enrolled in this Phase 2, multicenter, open-label study. Primary efficacy endpoint was proportion of patients achieving a prostate-specific antigen decline of ≥50% from baseline (prostate-specific antigen response) after 12 week of treatment. Secondary efficacy endpoints and safety were assessed. Results A confirmed prostate-specific antigen response was observed in 29/48 (60.4%) patients by week 12; lower limit of two-sided 90% confidence interval was >35% (threshold response rate), demonstrating efficacy of abiraterone acetate. Secondary efficacy endpoints: prostate-specific antigen response rate during treatment period: 62.5%; objective radiographic response, partial response: 4/18 (22.2%) patients; complete response: none; stable disease: 11/18 (61.1%) patients; median percent change in prostate-specific antigen level from baseline at Week 12: −66.62%. Median prostate-specific antigen response duration and progression-free survival were not reached, and median radiographic progression-free survival was 253 days. Of 31/48 (64.6%) patients experienced adverse events of special interest; most common was hepatic function abnormality (37.5%, Grade 3: 10.4%). One Grade 3 hypertension was the only mineralocorticoid adverse event >Grade 1/2. Conclusions Efficacy of abiraterone acetate plus prednisolone was demonstrated by decline in prostate-specific antigen levels with evidence of antitumor activity by radiography in Japanese patients with chemotherapy-naïve metastatic castration-resistant prostate

  1. The effectiveness of the TAX 327 nomogram in predicting overall survival in Chinese patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bian, Xiao-Jie; Zhu, Yao; Shen, Yi-Jun; Wang, Jin-You; Ma, Chun-Guang; Zhang, Hai-Liang; Dai, Bo; Zhang, Shi-Lin; Yao, Xu-Dong; Ye, Ding-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Based on the results of TAX 327, a nomogram was developed to predict the overall survival of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) after first-line chemotherapy. The nomogram, however, has not been validated in an independent dataset, especially in a series out of clinical trials. Thus, the objective of the current study was to validate the TAX 327 nomogram in a community setting in China. A total of 146 patients with mCRPC who received first-line chemotherapy (docetaxel or ...

  2. A Phase 2 Study of Abiraterone Acetate in Japanese Men with Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer Who Had Received Docetaxel-based Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Takefumi; Uemura, Hiroji; Tanabe, Kazunari; Nishiyama, Tsutomu; Terai, Akito; Yokomizo, Akira; Nakatani, Tatsuya; Imanaka, Keiichiro; Ozono, Seiichiro; Akaza, Hideyuki

    2014-01-01

    Objective In this Phase 2 multicenter study the efficacy and safety of oral abiraterone acetate (1000 mg/once daily) plus prednisolone (5 mg/twice daily) was evaluated in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients from Japan who had previously received docetaxel-based chemotherapy. Methods Men (aged ≥20 years) with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (prostate-specific antigen levels: ≥5 ng/ml), who had received 1 or 2 cytotoxic chemotherapies (with ≥1 regimen being docetaxel) for prostate cancer, were enrolled in this open-label, single-arm study. Primary efficacy endpoint was proportion of patients achieving a ≥50% prostate-specific antigen decline from baseline (prostate-specific antigen response rate) after 12-week treatment. Safety and pharmacokinetics were also assessed. Results Confirmed prostate-specific antigen response rate by Week 12 was 28.3% (90% confidence interval: 17.6%; 41.1%) or 13 out of 46 (full analysis set) treated patients. However, total prostate-specific antigen response rate including confirmed and unconfirmed responses was 34.8% (90% confidence interval: 23.2%; 47.9%). Secondary efficacy endpoints and outcomes were: improvement in Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status score by ≥1 unit: 7/16 patients (43.8%); objective radiographic response: complete response, partial response and stable disease in 0, 1/22 (4.5%) and 9/22 (40.9%) patients, respectively; pain palliation response: 9/16 (56.3%) patients. The most common adverse events (>20% patients) were upper respiratory tract infection (13/47, 27.7% patients) and hepatic function abnormal (10/47, 21.3% patients, Grade 3: 8.5%). All mineralocorticoid-related toxicities were Grade 1/2. Conclusions Abiraterone acetate plus prednisolone showed favorable efficacy in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer Japanese patients who had received chemotherapy. Abiraterone acetate plus prednisolone had an acceptable safety profile. Clinical

  3. The PREVAIL Study: Primary Outcomes by Site and Extent of Baseline Disease for Enzalutamide-treated Men with Chemotherapy-naïve Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evans, Christopher P; Higano, Celestia S; Keane, Thomas;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Enzalutamide, an oral androgen receptor inhibitor, significantly improved overall survival (OS) and radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS) versus placebo in the PREVAIL trial of men with chemotherapy-naïve metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. OBJECTIVE: To assess the...... while continuing androgen deprivation therapy. OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Coprimary endpoints (rPFS, OS) were prospectively evaluated in nonvisceral and visceral subgroups. All other efficacy analyses were post hoc. RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS: Enzalutamide improved rPFS versus placebo...... significant benefits in men with chemotherapy-naïve metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, with or without visceral disease, low- or high-volume bone disease, or lymph node only disease. PATIENT SUMMARY: Patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer-including those with or without...

  4. Circulating tumor cells in patients with metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer: exploratory findings at a tertiary referral hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fosså SD

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sophie D Fosså,1 Siri L Hess,1 Elisabeth Paus,2 Elin Borgen3 1National Resource Center for Late Effects after Cancer Treatment, 2Department of Medical Biochemistry, 3Department of Pathology, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Radiumhospital, Oslo, Norway Objectives: In patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC, the finding of less than five circulating tumor cells (CTCs/7.5 mL blood before start of cytotoxic treatment or shortly thereafter indicates prolonged survival. In this descriptive pilot study, we investigated whether this association depends on the sequence of the therapeutic attempts. Patients and methods: CTCs were determined in 41 mCRPC patients before and 2–3 months after starting first-line treatment with docetaxel (group 1 or second-line treatment with either radium-223 (group 2 or placebo/best supportive care (group 3. A "favorable" CTC count was defined as <5 CTC/7.5 mL blood. The results were related to overall survival. Results: Pretreatment, six of ten men in group 1, three of 19 in group 2, and three of 12 patients in group 3 had a favorable CTC count, leading to a significant difference between first- and second-line therapy (P=0.04. Decrease of pretreatment elevated CTCs to a favorable CTC count was significantly more often observed in patients on first-line therapy (three of four patients than on second-line treatment (two of 26 men (P=0.03. A favorable CTC count before or shortly after treatment start was observed in nine of ten patients on first-line and in eight of 31 men on second-line therapy (P=0.01. A favorable CTC count pretreatment or 2–3 months after therapy start was associated with beneficial overall survival in the three groups combined and in each group analyzed separately. Conclusion: In mCRPC, a favorable CTC count before or 2–3 months after start of therapy is associated with length of overall survival, though such favorable CTC counts are observed

  5. Impact of pre-treatment prostate tissue androgen content on the prediction of castration-resistant prostate cancer development in patients treated with primary androgen deprivation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Y; Suzuki, K; Arai, S; Miyoshi, Y; Umemoto, S; Masumori, N; Kamiya, N; Ichikawa, T; Kitagawa, Y; Mizokami, A; Sugimura, Y; Nonomura, N; Sakai, H; Honma, S; Kubota, Y

    2013-05-01

    Great advances in tissue androgen analysis using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) have made it possible to evaluate the tissue androgen content from a single needle prostate biopsy specimen. In this study, we investigated if pre-treatment androgen content in prostate biopsy specimens could predict their response to primary androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and future castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). One-hundred and sixty-five prostate cancer patients who received primary ADT were enrolled. They had received multiple core prostate needle biopsy at diagnosis, and an additional one needle biopsy specimen was obtained for tissue androgen determination using LC-MS/MS. The patients' prostate specific antigen (PSA) values were periodically followed during the treatment and patients were determined to have CRPC when their PSA value increased continuously to 25% above the nadir and a 2.0 ng/mL increase. A significant correlation was found between PSA value decline velocity (PSA half-time) after ADT and pre-ADT tissue androgen content. Twenty-three patients were determined to have CRPC. These CRPC patients had a significantly high concentration of tissue T (p development. By using the two statistically significant variables, the relative risk of CRPC development could be calculated. The results of this study suggest that the evaluation of prostate androgen content in a single needle biopsy specimen may be useful to predict future CRPC development after primary ADT. Further studies are required for the clinical application of T/DHT ratio evaluation. PMID:23444052

  6. {sup 11}C-Choline PET/CT in castration-resistant prostate cancer patients treated with docetaxel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceci, Francesco [University of Bologna, Service of Nuclear Medicine, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Bologna, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, UO Medicina Nucleare PAD. 30, Bologna (Italy); Castellucci, Paolo; Graziani, Tiziano; Renzi, Riccardo; Fanti, Stefano [University of Bologna, Service of Nuclear Medicine, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna (Italy); Schiavina, Riccardo; Borghesi, Marco; Brunocilla, Eugenio [University of Bologna, Department of Urology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna (Italy); Di Tullio, Piergiorgio; Ardizzoni, Andrea [University of Bologna, Department of Oncology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna (Italy)

    2016-01-15

    To investigate the role of {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT for evaluating the response to treatment in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) treated with docetaxel in comparison with PSA response. Inclusion criteria were (a) proven mCRPC, (b) docetaxel as first line of chemotherapy (docetaxel 75 mg/m{sup 2} + prednisone 5 mg), and (c) {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT and PSA values assessed before and after docetaxel administration. A total of 61 patients were retrospectively enrolled (mean age 68.9 years, range 57 - 84 years). {sup 11}C-Choline PET/CT was performed at baseline before docetaxel treatment (PET1) and after the end of treatment (PET2). PSA values were measured before treatment (PSA1) and after treatment (PSA2). PET2 was reported as complete response (CR), partial response (PR) or stable disease (SD). Progressive disease (PD) was considered if a new lesion was seen. PSA trend was calculated from the change in absolute values between PSA1 and PSA2. A decrease of ≥50 % between PSA1 and PSA2 was considered a PSA response. Clinical, radiological and laboratory follow-up ranged from 6 to 53 months (mean 13.5 months). Of the 61 patients, 40 (65.5 %) showed PD on PET2, 13 (21.3 %) showed SD, 2 (3.4 %) showed PR, and 6 (9.8 %) showed CR. An increasing PSA trend was seen in 29 patients (47.5 %) and a decreasing PSA trend in 32 patients (52.5 %). A PSA response of ≥50 % was seen in 25 patients (41 %). Radiological PD was seen in 23 of the 29 patients (79.3 %) with an increasing PSA trend, in 16 of the 32 patients (50 %) with a decreasing PSA trend, and in 11 of the 25 patients (44 %) with a PSA response of ≥50 %. In the multivariate statistical analysis, the presence of more than ten bone lesions detected on PET1 was significantly associated with an increased probability of PD on PET2. No association was observed between PSA level and PD on PET2. Our results suggest that an increasing PSA trend measured after docetaxel treatment could be

  7. The AhR Ligand, TCDD, Regulates Androgen Receptor Activity Differently in Androgen-Sensitive versus Castration-Resistant Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Ghotbaddini

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The reported biological effects of TCDD include induction of drug metabolizing enzymes, wasting syndrome and tumor promotion. TCDD elicits most of its effects through binding the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR. TCDD induced degradation of AhR has been widely reported and requires ubiquitination of the protein. The rapid depletion of AhR following TCDD activation serves as a mechanism to modulate AhR mediated gene induction. In addition to inducing AhR degradation, TCDD has been reported to induce degradation of hormone receptors. The studies reported here, evaluate the effect of TCDD exposure on androgen receptor (AR expression and activity in androgen-sensitive LNCaP and castration-resistant C4-2 prostate cancer cells. Our results show that TCDD exposure does not induce AhR or AR degradation in C4-2 cells. However, both AhR and AR are degraded in LNCaP cells following TCDD exposure. In addition, TCDD enhances AR phosphorylation and induces expression of AR responsive genes in LNCaP cells. Our data reveals that TCDD effect on AR expression and activity differs in androgen-sensitive and castration-resistant prostate cancer cell models.

  8. Complete Biochemical (Prostate-specific Antigen) Response to Sipuleucel-T With Enzalutamide in Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer: A Case Report With Implications for Future Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Julie N.; Drake, Charles G.; Beer, Tomasz M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the case of a patient with castration-resistant, metastatic prostate cancer who achieved a complete and durable biochemical response after treatment with sipuleucel-T while continuing with enzalutamide and to explore the immunologic basis for such a response. MATERIALS AND METHODS We obtained serial prostate-specific antigen (PSA) measurements and bone scans to assess the patient’s response to enzalutamide followed by the addition of sipuleucel-T. Using preclinical and clinical data, we describe his response through known immunobiologic mechanisms. RESULTS This patient’s PSA level became undetectable during treatment with enzalutamide and began to increase again after 14 months. He opted for treatment with sipuleucel-T, while continuing with the enzalutamide. This resulted in another complete PSA response 6 months after exposure to sipuleucel-T. CONCLUSION Sipuleucel-T typically does not produce significant PSA reductions, and, to the best of our knowledge, only 1 previous report of a durable complete PSA response in a patient with metastatic disease has been published. The timing of this response supports an immune mechanism. The biologic rationale for the combination, coupled with the clinical result observed in our patient, provides a basis for studies of the combination of sipuleucel-T and enzalutamide. PMID:23374810

  9. Automated Bone Scan Index as a quantitative imaging biomarker in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients being treated with enzalutamide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anand, Aseem; Morris, Michael J; Larson, Steven M;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Having performed analytical validation studies, we are now assessing the clinical utility of the upgraded automated Bone Scan Index (BSI) in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). In the present study, we retrospectively evaluated the discriminatory strength of the...... automated BSI in predicting overall survival (OS) in mCRPC patients being treated with enzalutamide. METHODS: Retrospectively, we included patients who received enzalutamide as a clinically approved therapy for mCRPC and had undergone bone scan prior to starting therapy. Automated BSI, prostate......-specific antigen (PSA), hemoglobin (HgB), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were obtained at baseline. Change in automated BSI and PSA were obtained from patients who have had bone scan at week 12 of treatment follow-up. Automated BSI was obtained using the analytically validated EXINI Bone(BSI) version 2. Kendall...

  10. The Hippo Pathway Effector YAP Regulates Motility, Invasion, and Castration-Resistant Growth of Prostate Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lin ZHANG; Yang, Shuping; Chen, Xingcheng; Stauffer, Seth; Yu, Fang; Lele, Subodh M.; Fu, Kai; Datta, Kaustubh; Palermo, Nicholas; Chen, Yuanhong; Dong, Jixin

    2015-01-01

    Yes-associated protein (YAP) is an effector of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway. The functional significance of YAP in prostate cancer has remained elusive. In this study, we first show that enhanced expression of YAP is able to transform immortalized prostate epithelial cells and promote migration and invasion in both immortalized and cancerous prostate cells. We found that YAP mRNA was upregulated in androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cells (LNCaP-C81 and LNCaP-C4-2 cells) compared to t...

  11. Development and Implementation of a High-Throughput High-Content Screening Assay to Identify Inhibitors of Androgen Receptor Nuclear Localization in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Paul A; Nguyen, Minh M; Dar, Javid A; Ai, Junkui; Wang, Yujuan; Masoodi, Khalid Z; Shun, Tongying; Shinde, Sunita; Camarco, Daniel P; Hua, Yun; Huryn, Donna M; Wilson, Gabriela Mustata; Lazo, John S; Nelson, Joel B; Wipf, Peter; Wang, Zhou

    2016-05-01

    Patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) can be treated with abiraterone, a potent inhibitor of androgen synthesis, or enzalutamide, a second-generation androgen receptor (AR) antagonist, both targeting AR signaling. However, most patients relapse after several months of therapy and a majority of patients with relapsed CRPC tumors express the AR target gene prostate-specific antigen (PSA), suggesting that AR signaling is reactivated and can be targeted again to inhibit the relapsed tumors. Novel small molecules capable of inhibiting AR function may lead to urgently needed therapies for patients resistant to abiraterone, enzalutamide, and/or other previously approved antiandrogen therapies. Here, we describe a high-throughput high-content screening (HCS) campaign to identify small-molecule inhibitors of AR nuclear localization in the C4-2 CRPC cell line stably transfected with GFP-AR-GFP (2GFP-AR). The implementation of this HCS assay to screen a National Institutes of Health library of 219,055 compounds led to the discovery of 3 small molecules capable of inhibiting AR nuclear localization and function in C4-2 cells, demonstrating the feasibility of using this cell-based phenotypic assay to identify small molecules targeting the subcellular localization of AR. Furthermore, the three hit compounds provide opportunities to develop novel AR drugs with potential for therapeutic intervention in CRPC patients who have relapsed after treatment with antiandrogens, such as abiraterone and/or enzalutamide. PMID:27187604

  12. A Joint Model for the Kinetics of CTC Count and PSA Concentration During Treatment in Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbaux, M; Tod, M; De Bono, J; Lorente, D; Mateo, J; Freyer, G; You, B; Hénin, E

    2015-05-01

    Assessment of treatment efficacy in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) is limited by frequent nonmeasurable bone metastases. The count of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is a promising surrogate marker that may replace the widely used prostate-specific antigen (PSA). The purpose of this study was to quantify the dynamic relationships between the longitudinal kinetics of these markers during treatment in patients with mCRPC. Data from 223 patients with mCRPC treated by chemotherapy and/or hormonotherapy were analyzed for up to 6 months of treatment. A semimechanistic model was built, combining the following several pharmacometric advanced features: (1) Kinetic-Pharmacodynamic (K-PD) compartments for treatments (chemotherapy and hormonotherapy); (2) a latent variable linking both marker kinetics; (3) modeling of CTC kinetics with a cell lifespan model; and (4) a negative binomial distribution for the CTC random sampling. Linked with survival, this model would potentially be useful for predicting treatment efficacy during drug development or for therapeutic adjustment in treated patients. PMID:26225253

  13. Systemic Therapy in Men With Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology and Cancer Care Ontario Clinical Practice Guideline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basch, Ethan; Loblaw, D. Andrew; Oliver, Thomas K.; Carducci, Michael; Chen, Ronald C.; Frame, James N.; Garrels, Kristina; Hotte, Sebastien; Kattan, Michael W.; Raghavan, Derek; Saad, Fred; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Walker-Dilks, Cindy; Williams, James; Winquist, Eric; Bennett, Charles L.; Wootton, Ted; Rumble, R. Bryan; Dusetzina, Stacie B.; Virgo, Katherine S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To provide treatment recommendations for men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Methods The American Society of Clinical Oncology and Cancer Care Ontario convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based recommendations informed by a systematic review of the literature. Results When added to androgen deprivation, therapies demonstrating improved survival, improved quality of life (QOL), and favorable benefit-harm balance include abiraterone acetate/prednisone, enzalutamide, and radium-223 (223Ra; for men with predominantly bone metastases). Improved survival and QOL with moderate toxicity risk are associated with docetaxel/prednisone. For asymptomatic/minimally symptomatic men, improved survival with unclear QOL impact and low toxicity are associated with sipuleucel-T. For men who previously received docetaxel, improved survival, unclear QOL impact, and moderate to high toxicity risk are associated with cabazitaxel/prednisone. Modest QOL benefit (without survival benefit) and high toxicity risk are associated with mitoxantrone/prednisone after docetaxel. No benefit and excess toxicity are observed with bevacizumab, estramustine, and sunitinib. Recommendations Continue androgen deprivation (pharmaceutical or surgical) indefinitely. Abiraterone acetate/prednisone, enzalutamide, or 223Ra should be offered; docetaxel/prednisone should also be offered, accompanied by discussion of toxicity risk. Sipuleucel-T may be offered to asymptomatic/minimally symptomatic men. For men who have experienced progression with docetaxel, cabazitaxel may be offered, accompanied by discussion of toxicity risk. Mitoxantrone may be offered, accompanied by discussion of limited clinical benefit and toxicity risk. Ketoconazole or antiandrogens (eg, bicalutamide, flutamide, nilutamide) may be offered, accompanied by discussion of limited known clinical benefit. Bevacizumab, estramustine, and sunitinib should not be offered. There is insufficient evidence to

  14. The predictive value of ERG protein expression for development of castration-resistant prostate cancer in hormone-naïve advanced prostate cancer treated with primary androgen deprivation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Kasper Drimer; Røder, Martin A; Thomsen, Frederik B;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Biomarkers predicting response to primary androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and risk of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is lacking. We aimed to analyse the predictive value of ERG expression for development of CRPC. METHODS: In total, 194 patients with advanced and....../or metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) treated with first-line castration-based ADT were included. ERG protein expression was analysed in diagnostic specimens using immunohistochemistry (anti-ERG, EPR3864). Time to CRPC was compared between ERG subgroups using multiple cause-specific Cox regression stratified on...... ERG-status. Risk reclassification and time-dependent area under the ROC curves were used to assess the discriminative ability of ERG-status. Time to PSA-nadir, proportion achieving PSA-nadir ≤0.2 ng/ml, and risk of PCa-specific death were secondary endpoints. RESULTS: Median follow-up was 6.8 years...

  15. Phase I Dose-Escalation Study of the Novel Anti-androgen BMS-641988 in Patients with Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathkopf, Dana; Liu, Glenn; Carducci, Michael A; Eisenberger, Mario A; Anand, Aseem; Morris, Michael J; Slovin, Susan F; Sasaki, Yasutsuna; Takahashi, Shunji; Ozono, Seiichiro; Fung, Nga Kit Eliza; Cheng, Shinta; Gan, Jinping; Gottardis, Marco; Obermeier, Mary T.; Reddy, Jyotsna; Zhang, Steven; Vakkalagadda, Blisse J.; Wilding, George; Scher, Howard I.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose BMS-641988 is an androgen receptor antagonist with increased potency relative to bicalutamide in both in vitro and in vivo prostate cancer models. A first-in-man phase I study was conducted to define the safety and tolerability of oral BMS-641988 in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Experimental Design Doses were escalated from 5 to 150 mg based on discrete pharmacokinetic parameters in cohorts of 3 to 6 subjects. After establishing safety with 20 mg of BMS-641988 in the United States, a companion study was opened in Japan to assess differences in drug metabolism between populations. Results Sixty-one men with CRPC were treated with daily BMS-641988. The pharmacokinetics of BMS-641988 and its active metabolites were proportional to dose. One patient experienced an epileptic seizure at a dose of 60 mg administered twice. Despite achieving target drug exposures, anti-tumor activity was limited to 1 partial response. Seventeen of 23 evaluable patients (74%) exhibited stable disease on imaging (median 15 weeks; range 8–32), and 10 of 61 patients (16%) achieved a ≥30%. decline in levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Partial agonism was seen within the context of this study upon removal of the drug as evidenced by a decrease in PSA. Conclusions Although the clinical outcomes of predominantly stable disease and partial agonism were similar to what was observed in the preclinical evaluation of the compound, the limited anti-tumor activity of BMS-641988 at therapeutic dose levels coupled with an episode of seizure activity led to study closure. PMID:21131556

  16. Diving Into Cabazitaxel's Mode of Action: More Than a Taxane for the Treatment of Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellado, Begoña; Jimenez, Natalia; Marin-Aguilera, Mercedes; Reig, Oscar

    2016-08-01

    Prostate cancer is a molecularly heterogeneous disease, and mechanisms of action of taxanes and potential mechanisms of resistance are not clearly defined. Taxanes are microtubule-stabilizing agents resulting in the slowing or blocking of mitosis at the metaphase-anaphase transition and induction of apoptotic cell death. Taxanes also can inhibit androgen receptor pathway. To date, several factors have been associated with taxane resistance, including alterations in tubulin, the effect of drug efflux pumps, and the dysfunctional regulation of signaling pathways that may be involved in resistance to therapy. Preclinical and clinical data support the distinct activity of cabazitaxel in prostate cancer that may overcome resistance to prior taxanes or hormonal therapies. It is challenging to define the most adequate therapeutic sequence for each patient. Moreover, the identification of molecular markers of resistance may help to select patients for specific therapies. PMID:26827258

  17. ASC-J9(®) suppresses castration resistant prostate cancer progression via degrading the enzalutamide-induced androgen receptor mutant AR-F876L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ronghao; Lin, Wanying; Lin, Changyi; Li, Lei; Sun, Yin; Chang, Chawnshang

    2016-08-28

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) with the newly developed powerful anti-androgen enzalutamide (Enz, also known as MDV3100) has promising therapeutic effects to suppress castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and extending patients' lives an extra 4.8 months. However, most Enz therapy eventually fails with the development of Enz resistance. The detailed mechanisms how CRPC develops Enz resistance remain unclear and may involve multiple mechanisms. Among them, the induction of the androgen receptor (AR) mutant AR-F876L in some CRPC patients may represent one driving force that confers Enz resistance. Here, we demonstrate that the AR degradation enhancer, ASC-J9(®), not only degrades wild-type AR, but also has the ability to target AR-F876L. The consequence of suppressing AR-F876L may then abrogate AR-F876L mediated CRPC cell proliferation and metastasis. Thus, developing ASC-J9(®) as a new therapeutic approach may represent a novel therapy to better suppress CRPC that has already developed Enz resistance. PMID:27233475

  18. [18F]-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography of LAPC4-CR Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Xenograft Model in Soft Tissue Compartments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisha C. McCall

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Preclinical xenograft models have contributed to advancing our understanding of the molecular basis of prostate cancer and to the development of targeted therapy. However, traditional preclinical in vivo techniques using caliper measurements and survival analysis evaluate the macroscopic tumor behavior, whereas tissue sampling disrupts the microenvironment and cannot be used for longitudinal studies in the same animal. Herein, we present an in vivo study of [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG positron emission tomography (PET/computed tomography (CT designed to evaluate the metabolism within the microenvironment of LAPC4-CR, a unique murine model of castration-resistant prostate cancer. Mice bearing LAPC4-CR subcutaneous tumors were administered [18F]-FDG via intravenous injection. After a 60-minute distribution phase, the mice were imaged on a PET/CT scanner with submillimeter resolution; and the fused PET/CT images were analyzed to evaluate tumor size, location, and metabolism across the cohort of mice. The xenograft tumors showed [18F]-FDG uptake that was independent of tumor size and was significantly greater than uptake in skeletal muscle and liver in mice (Wilcoxon signed-rank P values of .0002 and .0002, respectively. [18F]-FDG metabolism of the LAPC4-CR tumors was 2.1 ± 0.8 ID/cm3*wt, with tumor to muscle ratio of 7.4 ± 4.7 and tumor to liver background ratio of 6.7 ± 2.3. Noninvasive molecular imaging techniques such as PET/CT can be used to probe the microenvironment of tumors in vivo. This study showed that [18F]-FDG-PET/CT could be used to image and assess glucose metabolism of LAPC4-CR xenografts in vivo. Further work can investigate the use of PET/CT to quantify the metabolic response of LAPC4-CR to novel agents and combination therapies using soft tissue and possibly bone compartment xenograft models.

  19. Treatment evolution for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer with recent introduction of novel agents: retrospective analysis of real-world data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaig, Thomas W; Potluri, Ravi C; Ng, Yvette; Todd, Mary B; Mehra, Maneesha

    2016-02-01

    Despite increasing drug treatment options for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients, real-world treatment data are lacking. We conducted retrospective analyses of commercial claims and electronic medical record (EMR) databases to understand how treatment patterns for mCRPC have changed in a US-based real-world population. Truven Health Analytics MarketScan(®) (2000-2013) and EMR (2004-2013) databases were used to identify patients with an index prostate cancer diagnosis (ICD-9 codes 185X or 233.4X) and prescription claims for an mCRPC drug (mitoxantrone, estramustine, docetaxel, sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel, abiraterone acetate, enzalutamide, or radium-223). Regimen analyses for first line of therapy (LOT1), second line of therapy, and beyond were performed among cohorts based on year of first mCRPC drug usage. mCRPC drug usage and treatment duration were compared across cohorts and age groups within each cohort. The commercial claims cohort yielded 3437 evaluable patients. Most men (91%) commencing mCRPC treatment had docetaxel as LOT1 in 2010; this number had declined to 15% in 2013. In 2013, 67% and 9% of patients used abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide, respectively, as LOT1. Among both commercial claims and EMR cohorts, treatment pattern changes were most pronounced in men aged >80 years, and median treatment duration for some mCRPC drugs was shorter than expected based on available clinical trial information. These results demonstrate a shift in mCRPC treatments during the past 5 years, with greater use of newer noncytotoxic treatments than docetaxel. These real-world data aid in understanding the changing role of chemotherapy in the management of mCRPC. PMID:26710718

  20. Comparative efficacy, tolerability, and survival outcomes of various radiopharmaceuticals in castration-resistant prostate cancer with bone metastasis: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tunio M

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mutahir Tunio,1 Mushabbab Al Asiri,1 Abdulrehman Al Hadab,1 Yasser Bayoumi2 1Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, King Fahad Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 2Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt Background: A meta-analysis was conducted to assess the impact of radiopharmaceuticals (RPs in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC on pain control, symptomatic skeletal events (SSEs, toxicity profile, quality of life (QoL, and overall survival (OS.Materials and methods: The PubMed/MEDLINE, CANCERLIT, EMBASE, Cochrane Library database, and other search engines were searched to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs comparing RPs with control (placebo or radiation therapy in metastatic CRPC. Data were extracted and assessed for the risk of bias (Cochrane’s risk of bias tool. Pooled data were expressed as odds ratio (OR, with 95% confidence intervals (CIs; Mantel–Haenszel fixed-effects model.Results: Eight RCTs with a total patient population of 1,877 patients were identified. The use of RP was associated with significant reduction in pain intensity and SSE (OR: 0.63, 95% CI: 0.51–0.78, I2=27%, P<0.0001, improved QoL (OR: 0.71, 95% CI: 0.55–0.91, I2=65%, three trials, 1,178 patients, P=0.006, and a minimal improved OS (OR: 0.84, 95% CI: 0.64–1.04, I2=47%, seven trials, 1,845 patients, P=0.11. A subgroup analysis suggested an improved OS with radium-223 (OR: 0.68, 95% CI: 0.51–0.90, one trial, 921 patients and strontium-89 (OR: 0.21, 95% CI: 0.05–0.91, one trial, 49 patients. Strontium-89 (five trials was associated with increased rates of grade 3 and 4 thrombocytopenia (OR: 4.26, 95% CI: 2.22–8.18, P=0.01, leucopenia (OR: 7.98, 95% CI: 1.82–34.95, P=0.02, pain flare (OR: 6.82, 95% CI: 3.42–13.55, P=0.04, and emesis (OR: 3.61, 95% CI: 1.76–7.40, P=0.02.Conclusion: The use of RPs was associated with significant reduction in SSEs and improved QoL, while the radium-223

  1. Differences in treatment patterns among patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer treated by oncologists versus urologists in a US managed care population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Differences in treatment patterns, health care resource utilization, and costs between patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) treated by oncologists and those treated by urologists were examined. Patients aged ≥40 with CRPC were identified using claims from a large US managed health care plan between July 2001 and December 2007. A 6-month baseline period was used to assess patient characteristics. Patients with visits to an urologist, without visits to an oncologist, were assigned to the urology cohort, and patients with visits to an oncologist, with or without visits to an urologist, were assigned to the oncology cohort. Treatment patterns, health care resource utilization, and costs during a variable follow-up period were compared between cohorts using descriptive statistics and Lin’s regression. The urology cohort had fewer comorbid illnesses (P < 0.001) and patients were less likely to have other cancers during baseline (P < 0.001) or to die during follow-up (P = 0.004) compared with the oncology cohort. The oncology cohort patients were significantly more likely to have a claim for hormones (74.5% vs 61.1%; P < 0.001), chemotherapy (46.9% vs 10.2%, P < 0.001), and radiation (22.3% vs 3.7%, P < 0.0001) over follow-up. Mean unadjusted health care costs were higher in the oncology vs the urology cohort (US$31,896 vs US$15,318, respectively; P < 0.001). At 6 years follow-up, cumulative adjusted CRPC-specific costs were significantly higher among patients treated by oncologists with chemotherapy than among patients treated by urologists. CRPC patients treated by oncologists had greater use of hormones, chemotherapy, and radiation; higher percentages of patients with inpatient stays, emergency room, and ambulatory visits; and higher health care costs, than patients treated by urologists

  2. RADIATION SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE USE OF 223RaCl2 DE IN MEN WITH CASTRATION-RESISTANT PROSTATE CANCER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauer, Lawrence T.; Williamson, Matthew J.; Humm, John; O’Donoghue, Joseph; Ghani, Rashid; Awadallah, Robert; Carrasquillo, Jorge; Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; Aksnes, Anne-Kirsti; Biggin, Colin; Reinton, Vigdis; Morris, Michael; St Germain, Jean

    2016-01-01

    The majority of patients with late stage castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) develop bone metastases that often result in significant bone pain. Therapeutic palliation strategies can delay or prevent skeletal complications and may prolong survival. An alpha-particle based therapy, radium-223 dichloride (223RaCl2), has been developed that delivers highly localized effects in target areas and likely reduces toxicity to adjacent healthy tissue, particularly bone marrow. Radiation safety aspects were evaluated for a single comprehensive cancer center clinical phase 1, open-label, single ascending-dose study for three cohorts at 50, 100, or 200 kBq kg−1 body weight. Ten patients received administrations, and six patients completed the study with 1 y follow-up. Dose rates from patients administered 223Ra dichloride were typically less than 2 μSv h−1 MBq−1 on contact and averaged 0.02 μSv h−1 MBq−1 at 1 m immediately following administration. Removal was primarily by fecal excretion, and whole body effective half-lives were highly dependent upon fecal compartment transfer, ranging from 2.5–11.4 d. Radium-223 is safe and straightforward to administer using conventional nuclear medicine equipment. For this clinical study, few radiation protection limitations were recommended post-therapy based on facility evaluations. Specific precautions are dependent on local regulatory authority guidance. Subsequent studies have demonstrated significantly improved overall survival and very low toxicity, suggesting that 223Ra may provide a new standard of care for patients with CRPC and bone metastases. PMID:24562070

  3. Demethylation of the miR-146a promoter by 5-Aza-2’-deoxycytidine correlates with delayed progression of castration-resistant prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G sites in the combined treatment tumors of both stages. Up-regulating miR-146a expression via the hypomethylation of the miR-146a promoter by 5-Aza-CdR was correlated with delayed progression of castration-resistant prostate cancers. Moreover, site-specific DNA methylation may play an important role in miR-146a expression in androgen-dependent prostate cancer progression to androgen-independent prostate cancer and therefore provides a potentially useful biomarker for assessing drug efficacy in prostate cancer

  4. Can palliative radiotherapy influence prostate-specific antigen response in patients with castrate-resistant prostate cancer treated with systemic therapy (chemotherapy or abiraterone)?—a report of three cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palliative radiotherapy (pRT) is primarily employed for palliation of bone pain in patients with castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). However, evidence that pRT influences prostate-specific antigen response in patients with CRPC on systemic therapy is lacking. We describe three cases of CRPC progressing after treatment with docetaxel (n=2) and abiraterone (n=1), who responded unusually after pRT for bone pain with the development of a significant biochemical response and restoration of response to systemic therapy. The possibility of pRT influencing metastatic disease in CRPC has not been previously reported, and raises the possibility of radiation-induced modulation of anti-tumor immune response mechanisms that may play a role in the restoration of response to systemic treatment

  5. Whole blood defensin mRNA expression is a predictive biomarker of docetaxel response in castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohli M

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Manish Kohli,1 Charles YF Young,2 Donald J Tindall,2 Debashis Nandy,1 Kyle M McKenzie,3 Graham H Bevan,4 Krishna Vanaja Donkena5 1Department of Oncology, 2Department of Urology, 3Department of Geriatric Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, 4University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, 5Center for Individualized Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Abstract: This study tested the potential of circulating RNA-based signals as predictive biomarkers for docetaxel response in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. RNA was analyzed in blood from six CRPC patients by whole-transcriptome sequencing (total RNA-sequencing before and after docetaxel treatment using the Illumina’s HiSeq platform. Targeted RNA capture and sequencing was performed in an independent cohort of ten patients with CRPC matching the discovery cohort to confirm differential expression of the genes. Response to docetaxel was defined on the basis of prostate-specific antigen levels and imaging criteria. Two-way analysis of variance was used to compare differential gene expression in patients classified as responders versus nonresponders before and after docetaxel treatment. Thirty-four genes with two-fold differentially expressed transcripts in responders versus nonresponders were selected from total RNA-sequencing for further validation. Targeted RNA capture and sequencing showed that 13/34 genes were differentially expressed in responders. Alpha defensin genes DEFA1, DEFA1B, and DEFA3 exhibited significantly higher expression in responder patients compared with nonresponder patients before administration of chemotherapy (fold change >2.5. In addition, post-docetaxel treatment significantly increased transcript levels of these defensin genes in responders (fold change >2.8. Our results reveal that patients with higher defensin RNA transcripts in blood respond well to docetaxel therapy. We suggest that monitoring DEFA1, DEFA1B, and DEFA3

  6. Restoration of the cellular secretory milieu overrides androgen dependence of in vivo generated castration resistant prostate cancer cells overexpressing the androgen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patki, Mugdha; Huang, Yanfang; Ratnam, Manohar

    2016-07-22

    It is believed that growth of castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) cells is enabled by sensitization to minimal residual post-castrate androgen due to overexpression of the androgen receptor (AR). Evidence is derived from androgen-induced colony formation in the absence of cell-secreted factors or from studies involving forced AR overexpression in hormone-dependent cells. On the other hand, standard cell line models established from CRPC patient tumors (e.g., LNCaP and VCaP) are hormone-dependent and require selection pressure in castrated mice to re-emerge as CRPC cells and the resulting tumors then tend to be insensitive to the androgen antagonist enzalutamide. Therefore, we examined established CRPC model cells produced by castration of mice bearing hormone-dependent cell line xenografts including CRPC cells overexpressing full-length AR (C4-2) or co-expressing wtAR and splice-variant AR-V7 that is incapable of ligand binding (22Rv1). In standard colony formation assays, C4-2 cells were shown to be androgen-dependent and sensitive to enzalutamide whereas 22Rv1 cells were incapable of colony formation under identical conditions. However, both C4-2 and 22Rv1 cells formed colonies in conditioned media derived from the same cells or from HEK293 fibroblasts that were proven to lack androgenic activity. This effect was (i) not enhanced by androgen, (ii) insensitive to enzalutamide, (iii) dependent on AR (in C4-2) and on AR-V7 and wtAR (in 22Rv1) and (iv) sensitive to inhibitors of several signaling pathways, similar to androgen-stimulation. Therefore, during progression to CRPC in vivo, coordinate cellular changes accompanying overexpression of AR may enable cooperation between hormone-independent activity of AR and actions of cellular secretory factors to completely override androgen-dependence and sensitivity to drugs targeting hormonal factors. PMID:27179779

  7. A randomized phase II clinical trial of personalized peptide vaccination with metronomic low-dose cyclophosphamide in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Masanori; Moriya, Fukuko; Koga, Noriko; Matsueda, Satoko; Sasada, Tetsuro; Yamada, Akira; Kakuma, Tatsuyuki; Itoh, Kyogo

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the effect of metronomic cyclophosphamide (CPA) in combination with personalized peptide vaccination (PPV) on regulatory T cells (Treg) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), and whether it could improve the antitumor effect of PPV. Seventy patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive PPV plus oral low-dose CPA (50 mg/day), or PPV alone. PPV treatment used a maximum of four peptides chosen from 31 pooled peptides according to human leukocyte antigen types and antigen-specific humoral immune responses before PPV, for 8 subcutaneous weekly injections. Peptide-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and immunoglobulin G responses were measured before and after PPV. The incidence of grade 3 or 4 hematologic adverse events was higher in the PPV plus CPA arm than in the PPV alone arm. Decrease in Treg and increase in MDSC were more pronounced in PPV plus CPA treatment than in PPV alone (p = 0.036 and p = 0.048, respectively). There was no correlation between the changes in Treg or MDSC and CTL response. There was no difference in positive immune responses between the two arms, although overall survival in patients with positive immune responses was longer than in those with negative immune responses (p = 0.001). Significant differences in neither progression-free survival nor overall survival were observed between the two arms. Low-dose CPA showed no change in the antitumor effect of PPV, possibly due to the simultaneous decrease in Treg and increase in MDSC, in patients under PPV. PMID:26728480

  8. Progressive computed tomography (CT) appearances preceding malignant spinal cord compression (MSCC) in men with castration-resistant prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To test the hypothesis that computed tomography (CT)-based signs might precede symptomatic malignant spinal cord compression (MSCC) in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Materials and methods: A database was used to identify suitable mCRPC patients. Staging CT images were retrospectively reviewed for signs preceding MSCC. Signs of malignant paravertebral fat infiltration and epidural soft-tissue disease were defined and assessed on serial CT in 34 patients with MSCC and 58 control patients. The presence and evolution of the features were summarized using descriptive statistics. Results: In MSCC patients, CT performed a median of 28 days prior to the diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated significant epidural soft tissue in 28 (80%) patients. The median time to MSCC from a combination of overt malignant paravertebral and epidural disease was 2.7 (0–14.6) months. Conversely, these signs were uncommon in the control cohort. Conclusions: Significant malignant paravertebral and/or epidural disease at CT precede MSCC in up to 80% of mCRPC patients and should prompt closer patient follow-up and consideration of early MRI evaluation. These CT-based features require further prospective validation. - Highlights: • MSCC is a common and devastating complication in CRPC patients. • Screening for MSCC is not performed, but men have regular staging CT scans. • We assessed CTs prior to MSCC for abnormal epidural and paravertebral signs. • Abnormal signs were visible in up to 80% of MSCC patients on prior CT scans. • Presence of these signs on CT should prompt consideration of MRI spine

  9. Cytochrome 450 1B1 (CYP1B1 polymorphisms associated with response to docetaxel in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer (CRPC patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Price Douglas K

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The selection of patients according to key genetic characteristics may help to tailor chemotherapy and optimize the treatment in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer (CRPC patients. Functional polymorphisms within the cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1 gene have been associated with alterations in enzymatic expression and activity and may change sensitivity to the widely used docetaxel regimen. Methods CYP1B1 genotyping was performed on blood samples of 60 CRPC patients treated with docetaxel, using TaqMan probes-based assays. Association between CYP1B1-142C>G (leading to the 48ArgGly transition, 4326C>G (432LeuVal, and 4390A>G (453AsnSer polymorphisms and treatment response, progression-free-survival (PFS and overall-survival (OS was estimated using Pearson χ2 test, Kaplan-Meier curves and Log-rank test. Results Patients carrying the CYP1B1-432ValVal genotype experienced a significantly lower response-rate (P = 0.014, shorter progression-free-survival (P = 0.032 and overall-survival (P Conclusions CYP1B1-4326C>G (432LeuVal polymorphism emerged as possible predictive marker of response and clinical outcome to docetaxel in CRPC patients and may represent a potential new tool for treatment optimization. Larger prospective trials are warranted to validate these findings, which might be applied to the future practice of CRPC treatment.

  10. A pharmacogenetic study of docetaxel and thalidomide in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer using the DMET genotyping platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeken, J F; Cormier, T; Price, D K; Sissung, T M; Steinberg, S M; Tran, K; Liewehr, D J; Dahut, W L; Miao, X; Figg, W D

    2010-06-01

    The anticancer agent docetaxel shows significant inter-individual variation in its pharmacokinetic and toxicity profile. Thalidomide is an active anticancer agent and also shows wide pharmacological variation. Past pharmacogenetic research has not explained this variation. Patients with prostate cancer enrolled in a randomized phase II trial using docetaxel and thalidomide versus docetaxel alone were genotyped using the Affymetrix DMET 1.0 platform, which tests for 1256 genetic variations in 170 drug disposition genes. Genetic polymorphisms were analyzed for associations with clinical response and toxicity. In all, 10 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in three genes were potentially associated with response to therapy: peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-delta (PPAR-delta), sulfotransferase family, cytosolic, 1C, member 2 (SULT1C2) and carbohydrate (chondroitin 6) sulfotransferase 3 (CHST3). In addition, 11 SNPs in eight genes were associated with toxicities to treatment: spastic paraplegia 7 (pure and complicated autosomal recessive) (SPG7), CHST3, cytochrome P450, family 2, subfamily D, polypeptide 6 (CYP2D6), N-acetyltransferase 2 (arylamine N-acetyltransferase) (NAT2), ATP-binding cassette, sub-family C (CFTR/MRP), member 6 (ABCC6), ATPase, Cu++ transporting, alpha polypeptide (ATP7A), cytochrome P450, family 4, subfamily B, polypeptide 1 (CYP4B1) and solute carrier family 10 (sodium/bile acid cotransporter family), member 2 (SLC10A2). Genotyping results between drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters (DMET) and direct sequencing showed >96% of concordance. These findings highlight the role that non-CYP450 metabolizing enzymes and transporters may have in the pharmacology of docetaxel and thalidomide. PMID:20038957

  11. Screening key microRNAs for castration-resistant prostate cancer based on miRNA/mRNA functional synergistic network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jin; Wang, Sugui; Zhang, Wenyu; Qiu, Junyi; Shan, Yuxi; Yang, Dongrong; Shen, Bairong

    2015-12-22

    High-throughput methods have been used to explore the mechanisms by which androgen-sensitive prostate cancer (ASPC) develops into castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). However, it is difficult to interpret cryptic results by routine experimental methods. In this study, we performed systematic and integrative analysis to detect key miRNAs that contribute to CRPC development. From three DNA microarray datasets, we retrieved 11 outlier microRNAs (miRNAs) that had expression discrepancies between ASPC and CRPC using a specific algorithm. Two of the miRNAs (miR-125b and miR-124) have previously been shown to be related to CRPC. Seven out of the other nine miRNAs were confirmed by quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) analysis. MiR-210, miR-218, miR-346, miR-197, and miR-149 were found to be over-expressed, while miR-122, miR-145, and let-7b were under-expressed in CRPC cell lines. GO and KEGG pathway analyses revealed that miR-218, miR-197, miR-145, miR-122, and let-7b, along with their target genes, were found to be involved in the PI3K and AKT3 signaling network, which is known to contribute to CRPC development. We then chose five miRNAs to verify the accuracy of the analysis. The target genes of each miRNA were altered significantly upon transfection of specific miRNA mimics in the C4-2 CRPC cell line, which was consistent with our pathway analysis results. Finally, we hypothesized that miR-218, miR-145, miR-197, miR-149, miR-122, and let-7b may contribute to the development of CRPC through the influence of Ras, Rho proteins, and the SCF complex. Further investigation is needed to verify the functions of the identified novel pathways in CRPC development. PMID:26540468

  12. Differences in treatment patterns among patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer treated by oncologists versus urologists in a US managed care population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engel-Nitz NM

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Nicole M Engel-Nitz1, Berhanu Alemayehu2, David Parry3, Faith Nathan21Innovus, Eden Prairie, MN, USA; 2AstraZeneca, Wilmington, DE, USA; 3AstraZeneca UK, London, UKObjective: Differences in treatment patterns, health care resource utilization, and costs between patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC treated by oncologists and those treated by urologists were examined.Methods: Patients aged ≥40 with CRPC were identified using claims from a large US managed health care plan between July 2001 and December 2007. A 6-month baseline period was used to assess patient characteristics. Patients with visits to an urologist, without visits to an oncologist, were assigned to the urology cohort, and patients with visits to an oncologist, with or without visits to an urologist, were assigned to the oncology cohort. Treatment patterns, health care resource utilization, and costs during a variable follow-up period were compared between cohorts using descriptive statistics and Lin's regression.Results: The urology cohort had fewer comorbid illnesses (P < 0.001 and patients were less likely to have other cancers during baseline (P < 0.001 or to die during follow-up (P = 0.004 compared with the oncology cohort. The oncology cohort patients were significantly more likely to have a claim for hormones (74.5% vs 61.1%; P < 0.001, chemotherapy (46.9% vs 10.2%, P < 0.001, and radiation (22.3% vs 3.7%, P < 0.0001 over follow-up. Mean unadjusted health care costs were higher in the oncology vs the urology cohort (US$31,896 vs US$15,318, respectively; P < 0.001. At 6 years follow-up, cumulative adjusted CRPC-specific costs were significantly higher among patients treated by oncologists with chemotherapy than among patients treated by urologists.Conclusion: CRPC patients treated by oncologists had greater use of hormones, chemotherapy, and radiation; higher percentages of patients with inpatient stays, emergency room, and ambulatory visits; and higher

  13. Volume of Bone Metastasis Assessed with Whole-Body Diffusion-weighted Imaging Is Associated with Overall Survival in Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Lopez, Raquel; Lorente, David; Blackledge, Matthew D; Collins, David J; Mateo, Joaquin; Bianchini, Diletta; Omlin, Aurelius; Zivi, Andrea; Leach, Martin O; de Bono, Johann S; Koh, Dow-Mu; Tunariu, Nina

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To determine the correlation between the volume of bone metastasis as assessed with diffusion-weighted (DW) imaging and established prognostic factors in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) and the association with overall survival (OS). Materials and Methods This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board; informed consent was obtained from all patients. The authors analyzed whole-body DW images obtained between June 2010 and February 2013 in 53 patients with mCRPC at the time of starting a new line of anticancer therapy. Bone metastases were identified and delineated on whole-body DW images in 43 eligible patients. Total tumor diffusion volume (tDV) was correlated with the bone scan index (BSI) and other prognostic factors by using the Pearson correlation coefficient (r). Survival analysis was performed with Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression. Results The median tDV was 503.1 mL (range, 5.6-2242 mL), and the median OS was 12.9 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 8.7, 16.1 months). There was a significant correlation between tDV and established prognostic factors, including hemoglobin level (r = -0.521, P < .001), prostate-specific antigen level (r = 0.556, P < .001), lactate dehydrogenase level (r = 0.534, P < .001), alkaline phosphatase level (r = 0.572, P < .001), circulating tumor cell count (r = 0.613, P = .004), and BSI (r = 0.565, P = .001). A higher tDV also showed a significant association with poorer OS (hazard ratio, 1.74; 95% CI: 1.02, 2.96; P = .035). Conclusion Metastatic bone disease from mCRPC can be evaluated and quantified with whole-body DW imaging. Whole-body DW imaging-generated tDV showed correlation with established prognostic biomarkers and is associated with OS in mCRPC. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:26807894

  14. {sup 18}F-Fluorocholine PET/CT for early response assessment in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer treated with enzalutamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Giorgi, Ugo; Conteduca, Vincenza; Burgio, Salvatore Luca; Menna, Cecilia; Rossi, Lorena; Amadori, Dino [Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS, Department of Medical Oncology, Meldola (Italy); Caroli, Paola; Paganelli, Giovanni; Matteucci, Federica [Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS, Diagnostic Nuclear Medicine Unit, Meldola (Italy); Scarpi, Emanuela [Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS, Unit of Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Meldola (Italy); Moretti, Andrea; Galassi, Riccardo [Morgagni-Pierantoni Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Forli (Italy)

    2015-07-15

    We investigated the role of {sup 18}F-methylcholine (FCH) PET/CT in the early evaluation of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) treated with enzalutamide. The study group comprised 36 patients with a median age of 72 years (range 48-90 years) who were treated with enzalutamide 160 mg once daily after at least one chemotherapeutic regimen with docetaxel. Patients were evaluated monthly for serological prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response. FCH PET/CT was performed at baseline and repeated after 3-6 weeks. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression models addressed potential predictors of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). At a median follow-up of 24.2 months (range 1.8-27.3 months), 34 patients were evaluable for early FCH PET/CT evaluation of response, and of these 17 showed progressive disease (PD) and 17 had stable disease or a partial response. A decrease in PSA level of more than 50 % was observed in 21 patients. Early FCH PET/CT PD predicted radiological PD 3 months in advance of CT in 12 of 18 patients (66 %) and was discordant with the decrease in PSA level in 13 patients. In 6 of these, biochemical PD was confirmed in 2 months. In multivariate analysis, only decrease in PSA level and FCH PET/CT were significant predictors of PFS (p = 0.0005 and p = 0.029, respectively), whereas decrease in PSA level alone was predictive of OS (p = 0.007). This is one of the first studies to evaluate the role of FCH PET/CT as an early predictor of outcome in mCRPC patients treated with enzalutamide. Our preliminary results suggest that the combination of FCH PET/CT and decrease in PSA level could be a valid tool to predict PFS in mCRPC patients. PSA remains the single most important prognostic factor, while FCH PET/CT does not add more information on OS beyond that obtained from PSA. Further studies in larger populations are needed to confirm these data and to clarify the role of FCH PET/CT in predicting response

  15. 18F-Fluorocholine PET/CT for early response assessment in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer treated with enzalutamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the role of 18F-methylcholine (FCH) PET/CT in the early evaluation of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) treated with enzalutamide. The study group comprised 36 patients with a median age of 72 years (range 48-90 years) who were treated with enzalutamide 160 mg once daily after at least one chemotherapeutic regimen with docetaxel. Patients were evaluated monthly for serological prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response. FCH PET/CT was performed at baseline and repeated after 3-6 weeks. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression models addressed potential predictors of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). At a median follow-up of 24.2 months (range 1.8-27.3 months), 34 patients were evaluable for early FCH PET/CT evaluation of response, and of these 17 showed progressive disease (PD) and 17 had stable disease or a partial response. A decrease in PSA level of more than 50 % was observed in 21 patients. Early FCH PET/CT PD predicted radiological PD 3 months in advance of CT in 12 of 18 patients (66 %) and was discordant with the decrease in PSA level in 13 patients. In 6 of these, biochemical PD was confirmed in 2 months. In multivariate analysis, only decrease in PSA level and FCH PET/CT were significant predictors of PFS (p = 0.0005 and p = 0.029, respectively), whereas decrease in PSA level alone was predictive of OS (p = 0.007). This is one of the first studies to evaluate the role of FCH PET/CT as an early predictor of outcome in mCRPC patients treated with enzalutamide. Our preliminary results suggest that the combination of FCH PET/CT and decrease in PSA level could be a valid tool to predict PFS in mCRPC patients. PSA remains the single most important prognostic factor, while FCH PET/CT does not add more information on OS beyond that obtained from PSA. Further studies in larger populations are needed to confirm these data and to clarify the role of FCH PET/CT in predicting response to

  16. The PREVAIL trial of enzalutamide in men with chemotherapy-naïve, metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: Post hoc analysis of Korean patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theeuwes, Ad; Kwon, Dong Deuk; Choi, Young Deuk; Chung, Byung Ha; Lee, Hyun Moo; Lee, Kang Hyun; Lee, Sang Eun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This post hoc analysis evaluated treatment effects, safety, and pharmacokinetics of enzalutamide in Korean patients in the phase 3, double-blind, placebo-controlled PREVAIL trial. Materials and Methods Asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic chemotherapy-naive men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer that progressed on androgen deprivation therapy received 160 mg/d oral enzalutamide or placebo (1:1) until death or discontinuation due to radiographic progression or skeletal-related event and initiation of subsequent therapy. Coprimary end points were centrally assessed radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS) and overall survival (OS). Secondary end points included investigator-assessed rPFS, time to initiation of chemotherapy, time to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) progression, PSA response (≥50% decline), and time to skeletal-related event. Results Of 1,717 total patients, 78 patients were enrolled in Korea (enzalutamide, n=40; placebo, n=38). Hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) for enzalutamide versus placebo were 0.23 (0.02–2.24) for centrally assessed rPFS, 0.77 (0.28–2.15) for OS, 0.21 (0.08–0.51) for time to chemotherapy, and 0.31 (0.17–0.56) for time to PSA progression. A PSA response was observed in 70.0% of enzalutamide-treated and 10.5% of placebo-treated Korean patients. Adverse events of grade ≥3 occurred in 33% of enzalutamide-treated and 11% of placebo-treated Korean patients, with median treatment durations of 13.0 and 5.1 months, respectively. At 13 weeks, the plasma concentration of enzalutamide plus N-desmethyl enzalutamide was similar in Korean and non-Korean patients (geometric mean ratio, 1.04; 90% confidence interval, 0.97–1.10). Conclusions In Korean patients, treatment effects and safety of enzalutamide were consistent with those observed in the overall PREVAIL study population (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01212991). PMID:27195316

  17. Multiplexed Quantum Dot Labeling of Activated c-Met Signaling in Castration-Resistant Human Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Peizhen Hu; Gina C-Y Chu; Guodong Zhu; Hua Yang; Daniel Luthringer; Gail Prins; Fouad Habib; Yuzhuo Wang; Ruoxiang Wang; Chung, Leland W. K.; Zhau, Haiyen E.

    2011-01-01

    The potential application of multiplexed quantum dot labeling (MQDL) for cancer detection and prognosis and monitoring therapeutic responses has attracted the interests of bioengineers, pathologists and cancer biologists. Many published studies claim that MQDL is effective for cancer biomarker detection and useful in cancer diagnosis and prognosis, these studies have not been standardized against quantitative biochemical and molecular determinations. In the present study, we used a molecularl...

  18. Development of a preliminary nomogram to predict progression of bone scan for castration-resistant prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lin GW; Ye DW; Jia HX; Dai B; Zhang HL; Zhu Y; Shi GH; Ma CG

    2015-01-01

    Guo-Wen Lin,1,2 Ding-Wei Ye,1,2 Hui-Xun Jia,2,3 Bo Dai,1,2 Hai-Liang Zhang,1,2 Yao Zhu,1,2 Guo-Hai Shi,1,2 Chun-Guang Ma1,2 1Department of Urology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, 2Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, 3Department of Clinical Statistics Center, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The optimal time to perform bone scan to detect new metastasis during the castration-re...

  19. 转移性去势抵抗性前列腺癌化疗后预后的影响因素%Factors Influencing Prognosis of Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer after Chemotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庞华

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate prognostic factors of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer ( mCRPC ) trea-ted with docetaxel chemotherapy .Methods Age,Gleason score ,prostate-specific antigen ,blood baseline condition and hormone-sensitive time of 46 patients with mCRPC were recorded .Results Overall survival time of all patients was 3-45 months,the aver-age survival time was (21.34 ±2.13) months,median survival time was 19.36 months;cox regression analysis showed that Glea-son score,hemoglobin,hormone-sensitive time were related with the patient's survival time,RR values were 1.782,2.363 and 2.012,and P<0.05.Conclusion Gleason score,hemoglobin concentration ,and hormone-sensitive time before chemotherapy are prognostic factors of metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer .%目的:探讨采用多西紫杉醇化疗的转移性去势抵抗性前列腺癌( metastatic castration-resistant prostate canc-er,MCRPC)患者预后影响因素。方法以转移性去势抵抗性前列腺癌患者46例作为观察对象,记录患者化疗前年龄、Gleason评分、前列腺特异抗原(prostate-specific antigen,PSA)值、血常规等基线情况及激素敏感时间。结果患者总生存时间为3~45个月,平均生存期为(21.34±2.13)个月,中位生存时间为19.36个月;Cox回归结果提示,Gleason评分、血红蛋白水平、激素敏感时间与患者生存时间相关,RR值分别为1.782、2.363和2.012,且P<0.05。结论多西他赛化疗前Gleason评分、血红蛋白浓度及激素敏感时间,是转移性去势抵抗性前列腺癌患者的预后因素。

  20. Efficacy and safety of second-line agents for treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer progressing after docetaxel. A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianpaolo Perletti

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We performed a systematic review of the literature to assess the efficacy and the safety of second-line agents targeting metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC that has progressed after docetaxel. Pooled-analysis was also performed, to assess the effectiveness of agents targeting the androgen axis via identical mechanisms of action (abiraterone acetate, orteronel. Materials and Methods: We included phase III randomized controlled trials that enrolled patients with mCRPC progressing during or after first-line docetaxel treatment. Trials were identified by electronic database searching. The primary outcome of the review was overall survival. Secondary outcomes were radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS and severe adverse effects (grade 3 or higher. Results: Ten articles met the inclusion criteria for the review. These articles reported the results of five clinical trials, enrolling in total 5047 patients. The experimental interventions tested in these studies were enzalutamide, ipilimumab, abiraterone acetate, orteronel and cabazitaxel. Compared to control cohorts (active drug-treated or placebotreated, the significant overall survival advantages achieved were 4.8 months for enzalutamide (hazard ratio for death vs. placebo: 0.63; 95% CI 0.53 to 0.75, P < 0.0001, 4.6 months for abiraterone (hazard ratio for death vs. placebo: 0.66, 95% CI 0.58 to 0.75, P < 0.0001 and 2.4 months for cabazitaxel (hazard ratio for death vs. mitoxantrone-prednisone: 0.70, 95% CI 0.59 to 0.83, p < 0.0001. Pooled analysis of androgen synthesis inhibitors orteronel and abiraterone resulted in significantly increased overall and progression-free survival for anti-androgen agents, compared to placebo (hazard ratio for death: 0.76, 95% CI 0.67 to 0.87, P < 0.0001; hazard ratio for radiographic progression: 0.7, 95% CI 0.63 to 0.77, P < 0.00001. Androgen synthesis inhibitors induced significant increases in risk ratios for adverse effects

  1. 68Ga-PSMA-11 PET Represents the Tumoricidal Effect of 223Ra in a Patient With Castrate-Resistant Metastatic Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadzadehfar, Hojjat; Schlenkhoff, Carl Diedrich; Rogenhofer, Sebastian; Yordanova, Anna; Essler, Markus

    2016-09-01

    A 64-year-old man with prostate cancer and an increasing prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level under therapy with abiraterone acetate underwent a therapy with Ra. Before the first therapy and 4 weeks after the last cycle, the patient underwent Ga-PSMA PET, which showed a clear response of bone metastases. PMID:27405025

  2. AB007. Neurotensin derived from cancer stroma contributes to castration resistance via promoting neuroendocrine transdifferentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shimiao; Shang, Zhiqun; Tian, Hao; Flores-Morales, Amilcar; Niu, Yuanjie

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of neuroendocrine transdifferentiation (NED) during the development of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) remains undefined. Although androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) can impair tumor cell growth, ADT can also triggers a parallel reaction, leading to increased neurotensin (NTS) production in cancer associated stromal cells which drives NED. Here, we systematically explore the NTS network in tumor microenvironment that drives NED following ADT. The CK8+/CK14+ intermediate cells, as opposed to other epithelial cells, can be transdifferentiated to neuroendocrine (NE) status by excessive NTS through simultaneous activation of neurotensin receptor 1 (NTSR1)-PRKACB and 3 (NTSR3)-AHNAK axes. The importance of PRKACB and AHNAK in NED development was then confirmed in human prostate tumor tissues. More importantly, we demonstrated SR48692 (an inhibitor of NTSR1) could inhibit NED and prevent castration resistance in prostate tumor from xenografts and TRAMP models. We propose that targeting this pathway could provide benefit for patients with tumors expressing high levels of NTS following ADT.

  3. Efficacy and safety of enzalutamide in patients 75 years or older with chemotherapy-naive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graff, J N; Baciarello, G; Armstrong, A J;

    2016-01-01

    .6-28.0); hazard ratio (HR) = 0.61 (95% CI 0.47-0.79); P = 0.0001], as was rPFS [not yet reached (95% CI 12.3-not yet reached) versus 3.7 months (95% CI 3.6-5.3); HR = 0.17 (95% CI 0.12-0.24); P ...BACKGROUND: Prostate cancer disproportionately affects older men. Because age affects treatment decisions, it is important to understand the efficacy and tolerability of therapies for advanced prostate cancer in elderly men. This analysis describes efficacy and safety outcomes in men aged ≥75 years...

  4. Treatment of Bone Metastases with Radium-223 in Patients with Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer (CRPC): Alternative or Complementary to Innovative Molecular Therapies?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The skeletal metastatic disease is a real clinical problem. Approximately 70% of patients with prostate or breast cancer and 35% of those with advanced lung, thyroid, and kidney cancers will develop skeletal metastases, which cause considerable morbidity. Several options are available for treatment, to be used either alone or in various combinations: hormones in case of hormone-sensitive tumours, chemotherapy, biphosphonates, external beam radiation therapy, surgery (in pathologic or impending fracture), bone-seeking radiopharmceuticals, and also molecular therapies. Focusing our attention to patients with prostate cancer, 50% of patients with bone metastases develop skeletal related events (SREs) such as: severe pain, pathologic fractures, spinal compression syndrome, malignant hypercalcemia, bone marrow suppression. All these SREs require adequate therapy since generally determine several functional impairments and worsen the prognosis. It is well known that skeletal complications reduce the quality of life affecting different aspects, physical, functional end emotional. SREs are associated also with lower survival

  5. Health Economics and Radium-223 (Xofigo®) in the Treatment of Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer (mCRPC): A Case History and a Systematic Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norum, Jan; Traasdahl, Erik R.; Totth, Arpad; Nieder, Carsten; Olsen, Jan Abel

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Prostate cancer (PC) is the most common cancer in Western countries. Recent advances in the treatment of metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) have caused significant pressure on health care budgets. We aimed to exemplify this dilemma presenting an example, radium-223 (Xofigo®), and review the literature. Methods: A 74-year-old man diagnosed with mCRPC was referred to our department in October 2014 for radium-223 therapy. We faced the following dilemma: is radium-223 standard therapy? Is it cost-effective? Medline was searched employing the following search criteria: “radium-223”, “alpharadin”, “Xofigo” and “prostate”. Exclusion and inclusion criteria were applied. Guidelines and cost-effectiveness analyses were focused. We also searched the websites of ASCO, ESMO and ISPOR. The web was searched, using Yahoo and Google search engines, for Health Technology Assessments (HTAs). Results: 181 publications were identified in the Medline database. Only four studies included the word “cost”, three “economics” and none “budget” in heading or abstract. None of the publications were thorough of cost analysis (cost-effectiveness, cost-utility, cost-minimizing or cost-of-illness analysis). Six HTAs and eight national guidelines were identified. The cost per quality adjusted life years was indicated €80.000-94,000. HTAs concluded reimbursement being not recommendable or no ultimate statement could be made. One pointed towards a limited use with caution. Conclusion: Guidelines were based on data from randomized clinical trials (RCTs). Health economics was not considered when guidelines were made. Most HTAs concluded this therapy not cost-effective or there was insufficient data for final conclusions. Licensing and reimbursement processes should be run simultaneously. PMID:26573043

  6. Matrine inhibits the proliferation, invasion and migration of castration-resistant prostate cancer cells through regulation of the NF-κB signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Lai, Yiming; Wang, Chengbin; Xu, Guibin; He, Zheng; Shang, Xiaohong; Sun, Yi; Zhang, Fan; Liu, Leyuan; Huang, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Matrine is a naturally occurring alkaloid extracted from the Chinese herb Sophora flavescens. It has been demonstrated to exhibit antiproliferative properties, promote apoptosis and inhibit cell invasion in a number of cancer cell lines. It has also been shown to improve the efficacy of chemotherapy when it is combined with other chemotherapy drugs. However, the therapeutic efficacy of matrine for prostate cancer remains poorly understood. In the present study, we showed that matrine inhibited the proliferation, migration and invasion of both DU145 and PC-3 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. It also reduced the cell population at S phase and increased the cell population at sub-G1 phase. The increases in both the apoptotic cell population and cell population at S and sub-G1 phases consistently indicated a pro-apoptotic effect of matrine. Decreases in levels of P65, p-P65, IKKα/β, p-IKKα/β, IKBα and p-IKBα as detected by immunoblot analysis in the matrine-treated DU145 and PC-3 cells suggested an involvement of the NF-κB signaling pathway. Therefore, it is a novel promising addition to the current arsenal of chemotherapy drugs for the treatment of androgen-independent prostate cancer. PMID:26497618

  7. Correlation between frequencies of blood monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells, regulatory T cells and negative prognostic markers in patients with castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Idorn, Manja; Køllgaard, Tania; Kongsted, Per;

    2014-01-01

    function of immune suppressive cell subsets in the peripheral blood of 41 patients with prostate cancer (PC) and 36 healthy donors (HD) showed a significant increase in circulating CD14(+) HLA-DR(low/neg) monocytic MDSC (M-MDSC) and Tregs in patients with PC compared to HD. Furthermore, M-MDSC frequencies......Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are believed to play a role in immune suppression and subsequent failure of T cells to mount an efficient anti-tumor response, by employing both direct T-cell inhibition as well as induction of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Investigating the frequency and...... correlated positively with Treg levels. In vitro proliferation assay with autologous T cells confirmed M-MDSC-mediated T-cell suppression, and intracellular staining of immune suppressive enzyme iNOS revealed a higher expression in M-MDSC from patients with PC. Increased frequencies of M-MDSC correlated with...

  8. New Prostate Cancer Treatment Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers have identified a potential alternative approach to blocking a key molecular driver of an advanced form of prostate cancer, called androgen-independent or castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  9. Combination of carmustine and selenite effectively inhibits tumor growth by targeting androgen receptor, androgen receptor-variants, and Akt in preclinical models: New hope for patients with castration resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamilselvan, Vijayalakshmi; Menon, Mani; Thamilselvan, Sivagnanam

    2016-10-01

    Despite established androgen receptor (AR) antagonists, AR/AR-variants signaling remain a major obstacle for the successful treatment of castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In addition, CRPC cells adapt to survive via AR-independent pathways to escape next generation therapies. Therefore, there is an urgent need for drugs that can target these signaling pathways in CRPC. In this study, we sought to determine whether carmustine and selenite in combination could induce apoptosis and inhibit growth of CRPC in-vitro and in-vivo. CRPC (22Rv1, VCaP, and PC-3) cell lines in culture and xenograft mouse were used. Combination of carmustine and selenite treatment significantly increased reactive oxygen species, apoptosis and growth inhibition in CRPC cells with down regulation of anti-apoptotic (Bcl-2 and Mcl-1) and proliferative proteins (c-Myc and cyclin-D1). This effect was associated with complete reduction of AR/AR-variants, AR-V7, PSA and significant induction of p27Kip1. Combination treatment substantially abolished phospho-Akt, phospho-GSK-3β, and anchorage-independent growth in AR-positive and AR-negative cells. Consistent with in-vitro results, combination treatment effectively induced apoptosis and completely inhibited xenograft tumor growth and markedly reduced AR/AR-variants, AR-V7, PSA, and Bcl-2 in xenograft tumors without causing genotoxicity in host mice. Individual agent treatment showed only partial effect. The combination treatment showed a significant synergistic effect. The present study is the first to demonstrate that the combination of carmustine and selenite treatment completely suppressed CRPC tumor growth by reducing AR/AR-variants and Akt signaling. Our findings suggest that the combination of carmustine and selenite could constitute a promising next-generation therapy for successful treatment of patients with CRPC. PMID:27198552

  10. A phase I study of combined docetaxel and repeated high activity {sup 186}Re-HEDP in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) metastatic to bone (the TAXIUM trial)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodewaard-de Jong, Joyce M. van; Bloemendal, Haiko J. [Meander Medical Centre, Department of Internal Medicine, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Klerk, John M.H. de; Haas, Marie J. de [Meander Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Bezooijen, Bart P.J. van [Meander Medical Centre, Department of Urology, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Wilson, Richard H.; O' Sullivan, Joe M. [Queen' s University Belfast, Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Belfast, N. Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    Bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals have palliative benefit in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) metastatic to bone. Recent studies have shown improvement of survival and quality of life when radiopharmaceuticals were given repeatedly or in combination with chemotherapy. We designed a phase I study combining docetaxel and {sup 186}Re-labelled hydroxyethylidene diphosphonate (HEDP) in men with CRPC and bone metastases to evaluate toxicity. A dose escalation schedule was designed consisting of four dose levels with a standard dosage of docetaxel (75 mg/m{sup 2} 3-weekly). {sup 186}Re-HEDP was given in increasing activities (1,250 MBq up to 2,500 MBq) after the third and sixth cycle of docetaxel. Dose limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as any grade 4 toxicity lasting more than 7 days or any grade 3 toxicity that did not recover within 10 days. Three patients were planned for each dose level expanding to six if a DLT occurred. Fourteen patients were recruited with a median age of 64.6 years. One DLT, grade 3 thrombocytopenia lasting >10 days, occurred at dose level 3 leading to expansion of this group to six. One of these patients had an episode of acute renal failure which resolved. Because of production problems of {sup 186}Re-HEDP dose level 4 was not started. Combined therapy with docetaxel and {sup 186}Re-HEDP is generally well tolerated in patients with CRPC metastatic to bone. We will conduct a randomized phase II study using three cycles of docetaxel 75 mg/m{sup 2} 3-weekly followed by {sup 188}Re-HEDP 40 MBq/kg body weight, followed by another three cycles of docetaxel 75 mg/m{sup 2}, followed by {sup 188}Re-HEDP 20 MBq/kg body weight. (orig.)

  11. A randomized phase II trial of mitoxantrone, estramustine and vinorelbine or bcl-2 modulation with 13-cis retinoic acid, interferon and paclitaxel in patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer: ECOG 3899

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carducci Michael

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To test the hypothesis that modulation of Bcl-2 with 13-cis retinoic acid (CRA/interferon-alpha2b (IFN with paclitaxel (TAX, or mitoxantrone, estramustine and vinorelbine (MEV will have clinical activity in men with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. Methods 70 patients were treated with either MEV (Arm A in a 3-week cycle or CRA/IFN/TAX with an 8-week cycle (Arm B. Patients were assessed for response, toxicity, quality of life (QOL, and the effect of treatment on Bcl-2 levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. Results The PSA response rates were 50% and 23%, measurable disease response rates (CR+PR 14% and 15%, and median overall survival 19.4 months and 13.9 months on Arm A and Arm B respectively. Transient grade 4 neutropenia occurred in 18 and 2 patients, and grade 3 to 4 thrombosis in 7 patients and 1 patient in Arm A and Arm B respectively. Patients on Arm B reported a clinically significant decline in QOL between baseline and week 9/10 (.71 s.d., and a significantly lower level of QOL than Arm A (p = 0.01. As hypothesized, Bcl-2 levels decreased with CRA/IFN therapy only in Arm B (p = 0.03. Conclusions Treatment with MEV was well tolerated and demonstrated clinical activity in patients with CRPC. Given the adverse effect of CRA/IFN/TAX on QOL, the study of other novel agents that target Bcl-2 family proteins is warranted. The feasibility of measuring Bcl-2 protein in a cooperative group setting is hypothesis generating and supports further study as a marker for Bcl-2 targeted therapy. Trial Registration Clinical Trials Registration number: CDR0000067865

  12. 阿比特龙联合泼尼松治疗去势抗拒前列腺癌的临床观察%Clinical Observation of Abriaterone Acetate and Prednison on Patients with Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许玉霞; 张华锋; 李长岭

    2015-01-01

    目的 探讨新型雄激素合成抑制剂醋酸阿比特龙(Abriaterone acetate)治疗去势抗拒前列腺癌(castration-resistant prostate cancer,CRPC)的疗效及安全性.方法 经病理证实并符合入选标准的58例去势抗拒前列腺癌患者,中位年龄68岁(61~81岁),接受醋酸阿比特龙治疗,化疗至少2周期后.按实体瘤疗效评价标准(RECIST)美国NCI制定的毒性评价指标(CTC-AE3.0)评价疗效和毒性反应;采用Kaplan-meier法对患者总生存时间(OS)进行分析.结果 5例未完成总评估过程.可评价疗效的53例患者中,总有效率(ORR) 18.87%(10例),疾病控制率(DCR) 62.26%(33例);中位OS为(15.0±1.2)月;28例前列腺特异性抗原(prostate-specific antigen,PSA)下降>50%,治疗前后PSA中位数分别为78 ng/ml(18~1 776 ng/ml)和37 ng/ml(9~320 ng/ml),两者比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);化疗不良反应多为Ⅰ~Ⅱ级.结论 阿比特龙联合泼尼松治疗去势抗拒前列腺癌疗效较好,不良反应轻.

  13. Abiraterone acetate: A novel drug for castration-resistant prostate carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Nandha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Androgen-deprivation therapy is the mainstay of treatment for the management of advanced prostate carcinoma till transition to castration-resistant prostate carcinoma (CRPC. Recently, adrenal and intratumoral synthesis of androgens has been found to be the major cause for CRPC. Abiraterone acetate is an orally active, potent and selective inhibitor of 17 a hydroxylase and c 17, 20 lyase, which acts by decreasing the de novo production of androgens with no rise in steroids downstream. Multiple randomized trials have shown significant improvement of >50% decline in prostate-specific antigen (PSA and time to PSA progression (TTPP with abiraterone acetate 1000 mg per day in chemotherapy/ketoconazole treated and naive CRPC patients producing reversible and manageable adverse effects due to mineralocorticoid excess. This article reviews the available evidence on efficacy and safety of this drug in CRPC. Searches of Pubmed, Cochrane database, Medscape, Google and clinicaltrial.org were made for terms like CRPC and abiraterone.

  14. Overcoming docetaxel resistance in prostate cancer: a perspective review

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Clara

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer has been historically challenging, with few therapeutic successes. Docetaxel was the first cytotoxic therapy associated with a survival benefit in castrate-resistant prostate cancer. Toxicity is typical of other cytotoxic agents, with myelosuppression being the dose-limiting toxicity and neurotoxicity also a notable side effect for some patients. Unfortunately, a significant proportion of men with castrate-resistant prostate cance...

  15. Radium-223-Dichloride in Castration Resistant Metastatic Prostate Cancer—Preliminary Results of the Response Evaluation Using F-18-Fluoride PET/CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalevi Kairemo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome after Radium-223-dichloride (223RaCl2 treatment of patients with skeletal metastases of castration resistant prostate cancer using whole-body 18F-Fluoride PET/CT. Sodium 18F-fluoride [18F]-NaF PET/CT was performed prior the treatment of 223RaCl2, after the first cycle and after the sixth cycle. The skeletal metastases were analyzed quantitatively using modified PET response evaluation PERCIST criteria. The patients were also analyzed for S-PSA. All ten patients responded in [18F]-NaF scans after 6 cycles, but interim analysis after the 1st cycle did not give additional information about the outcome. The S-PSA decrease correlated with [18F]-NaF response, only 1 patient demonstrated progressive disease, i.e., >25% increase in S-PSA values during 223RaCl2. Our results (although preliminary suggest that 18F-Fluoride PET/CT is useful in the follow-up of castration resistant prostate cancer with skeletal metastases.

  16. Pre-therapeutic dosimetry of normal organs and tissues of {sup 177}Lu-PSMA-617 prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) inhibitor in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabasakal, Levent; AbuQbeitah, Mohammad; Ayguen, Aslan; Yeyin, Nami [Istanbul University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul (Turkey); Ocak, Meltem [Istanbul University, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Pharmacy Faculty, Istanbul (Turkey); Demirci, Emre [Sisli Etfal Training and Research Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Istanbul (Turkey); Toklu, Turkay [Yeditepe University Medical Faculty, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2015-12-15

    {sup 177}Lu-617-prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) ligand seems to be a promising tracer for radionuclide therapy of progressive prostate cancer. However, there are no published data regarding the radiation dose given to the normal tissues. The aim of the present study was to estimate the pretreatment radiation doses in patients who will undergo radiometabolic therapy using a tracer amount of {sup 177}Lu-labeled PSMA ligand. The study included seven patients with progressive prostate cancer with a mean age of 63.9 ± 3.9 years. All patients had prior PSMA positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and had intense tracer uptake at the lesions. The injected {sup 177}Lu-PSMA-617 activity ranged from 185 to 210 MBq with a mean of 192.6 ± 11.0 MBq. To evaluate bone marrow absorbed dose 2-cc blood samples were withdrawn in short variable times (3, 15, 30, 60, and 180 min and 24, 48, and 120 h) after injection. Whole-body images were obtained at 4, 24, 48, and 120 h post-injection (p.i.). The geometric mean of anterior and posterior counts was determined through region of interest (ROI) analysis. Attenuation correction was applied using PSMA PET/CT images. The OLINDA/EXM dosimetry program was used for curve fitting, residence time calculation, and absorbed dose calculations. The calculated radiation-absorbed doses for each organ showed substantial variation. The highest radiation estimated doses were calculated for parotid glands and kidneys. Calculated radiation-absorbed doses per megabecquerel were 1.17 ± 0.31 mGy for parotid glands and 0.88 ± 0.40 mGy for kidneys. The radiation dose given to the bone marrow was significantly lower than those of kidney and parotid glands (p < 0.05). The calculated radiation dose to bone marrow was 0.03 ± 0.01 mGy/MBq. Our first results suggested that {sup 177}Lu-PSMA-617 therapy seems to be a safe method. The dose-limiting organ seems to be the parotid glands rather than kidneys and bone marrow. The lesion radiation doses are

  17. Pre-therapeutic dosimetry of normal organs and tissues of 177Lu-PSMA-617 prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) inhibitor in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    177Lu-617-prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) ligand seems to be a promising tracer for radionuclide therapy of progressive prostate cancer. However, there are no published data regarding the radiation dose given to the normal tissues. The aim of the present study was to estimate the pretreatment radiation doses in patients who will undergo radiometabolic therapy using a tracer amount of 177Lu-labeled PSMA ligand. The study included seven patients with progressive prostate cancer with a mean age of 63.9 ± 3.9 years. All patients had prior PSMA positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and had intense tracer uptake at the lesions. The injected 177Lu-PSMA-617 activity ranged from 185 to 210 MBq with a mean of 192.6 ± 11.0 MBq. To evaluate bone marrow absorbed dose 2-cc blood samples were withdrawn in short variable times (3, 15, 30, 60, and 180 min and 24, 48, and 120 h) after injection. Whole-body images were obtained at 4, 24, 48, and 120 h post-injection (p.i.). The geometric mean of anterior and posterior counts was determined through region of interest (ROI) analysis. Attenuation correction was applied using PSMA PET/CT images. The OLINDA/EXM dosimetry program was used for curve fitting, residence time calculation, and absorbed dose calculations. The calculated radiation-absorbed doses for each organ showed substantial variation. The highest radiation estimated doses were calculated for parotid glands and kidneys. Calculated radiation-absorbed doses per megabecquerel were 1.17 ± 0.31 mGy for parotid glands and 0.88 ± 0.40 mGy for kidneys. The radiation dose given to the bone marrow was significantly lower than those of kidney and parotid glands (p < 0.05). The calculated radiation dose to bone marrow was 0.03 ± 0.01 mGy/MBq. Our first results suggested that 177Lu-PSMA-617 therapy seems to be a safe method. The dose-limiting organ seems to be the parotid glands rather than kidneys and bone marrow. The lesion radiation doses are within acceptable

  18. Abiraterone Improves Survival in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    A multinational phase III trial found that the drug abiraterone acetate prolonged the median survival of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer by 4 months compared with patients who received a placebo.

  19. Immunotherapy and Immune Evasion in Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakur, Archana, E-mail: thakur@karmanos.org; Vaishampayan, Ulka [Department of Oncology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Lum, Lawrence G., E-mail: thakur@karmanos.org [Department of Oncology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Department of Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Department of Immunology and Microbiology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)

    2013-05-24

    Metastatic prostate cancer remains to this day a terminal disease. Prostatectomy and radiotherapy are effective for organ-confined diseases, but treatment for locally advanced and metastatic cancer remains challenging. Although advanced prostate cancers treated with androgen deprivation therapy achieves debulking of disease, responses are transient with subsequent development of castration-resistant and metastatic disease. Since prostate cancer is typically a slowly progressing disease, use of immune-based therapies offers an advantage to target advanced tumors and to induce antitumor immunity. This review will discuss the clinical merits of various vaccines and immunotherapies in castrate resistant prostate cancer and challenges to this evolving field of immune-based therapies.

  20. Immunotherapy and Immune Evasion in Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metastatic prostate cancer remains to this day a terminal disease. Prostatectomy and radiotherapy are effective for organ-confined diseases, but treatment for locally advanced and metastatic cancer remains challenging. Although advanced prostate cancers treated with androgen deprivation therapy achieves debulking of disease, responses are transient with subsequent development of castration-resistant and metastatic disease. Since prostate cancer is typically a slowly progressing disease, use of immune-based therapies offers an advantage to target advanced tumors and to induce antitumor immunity. This review will discuss the clinical merits of various vaccines and immunotherapies in castrate resistant prostate cancer and challenges to this evolving field of immune-based therapies

  1. [Novel treatment for prostate cancer targeting prostaglandins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Naoki; Inoue, Takahiro; Kamba, Tomomi; Ogawa, Osamu

    2014-12-01

    PGE2 is highly expressed in the prostate, associating with prostate cancer progression. Targeting downstream signaling pathways of PGE2 may represent an attractive new strategy for the treatment of prostate cancer. We have established a novel prostate cancer xenograft model, KUCaP-2. The expression of EP4, one of PGE2 receptors, was significantly up-regulated during the development of castration resistance. A specific EP4 antagonist, ONO-AE3-208, decelerated castration-resistant growth of KUCaP-2 tumors in vivo. Moreover, ONO-AE3-208 could in vitro inhibit the cell invasion and in vivo suppress the bone metastasis of prostate cancer cells. These results indicated that EP4 is a novel target for the treatment of metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer. PMID:25518348

  2. FGF Signaling in Prostate Cancer Progression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nora M. NAVONE

    2009-01-01

    @@ Objective: prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in men in the United States. Localized prostate cancer can be cured by andro-gen ablation, but when the disease escapes the confines of the gland, the prospects for cure decrease drastically and the disease becomes "castrate resistant.

  3. The Role of FSH in Prostate Cancer: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Salvatore Catarinicchia; E David Crawford

    2016-01-01

    Castrate Resistant Prostate Cancer (CRPC) is a difficult entity to treat in the spectrum of prostate cancer disease. Recently, Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) has been shown to play an important part in the natural history of prostate cancer disease progression (Crawford et al., 2014). Here, we discuss a now deceased 94 year-old patient who illustrates the importance of this.

  4. Redefining Hormone Sensitive Disease in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaoyu Hou; Flaig, Thomas W.

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men in the United States. For decades, the cornerstone of medical treatment for advanced prostate cancer has been hormonal therapy, intended to lower testosterone levels, known as Androgen Deprivation Therapy (ADT). The development of hormone-resistant prostate cancer (now termed castration-resistant prostate cancer:CRPC) remains the key roadblock in successful long-term management of prostate cancer. New advancements in medical therapy for pros...

  5. Immunotherapy and Immune Evasion in Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Archana Thakur; Ulka Vaishampayan; Lum, Lawrence G.

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic prostate cancer remains to this day a terminal disease. Prostatectomy and radiotherapy are effective for organ-confined diseases, but treatment for locally advanced and metastatic cancer remains challenging. Although advanced prostate cancers treated with androgen deprivation therapy achieves debulking of disease, responses are transient with subsequent development of castration-resistant and metastatic disease. Since prostate cancer is typically a slowly progressing disease, use o...

  6. Chemotherapy in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Michael

    2015-10-01

    For approximately a decade, chemotherapy has been shown to prolong life in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Since that time, however, only two agents have proven to prolong life (docetaxel and cabazitaxel). However, in the last year, the addition of chemotherapy to primary hormonal therapy became a standard of care for high-volume castration-sensitive metastatic disease. Here I will review current prostate cancer chemotherapies, mechanisms of resistance to those therapies, and ongoing clinical studies of chemotherapy combinations and novel chemotherapeutics. PMID:26216506

  7. Liposomal nanomedicines in the treatment of prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, Jan; Metselaar, Josbert M; Storm, G; van der Pluijm, Gabri

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer type and the second leading cause of death from cancer in males. In most cases, no curative treatment options are available for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer as these tumors are highly resistant to chemotherapy. Targeted drug delivery, usin

  8. Denosumab Reduces Risk of Bone Side Effects in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    The biological agent denosumab (Xgeva) is more effective than zoledronic acid at decreasing the risk of bone fractures and other skeletal-related events (SRE) in men with castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer, according to results from a randomi

  9. [Prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morote, Joan; Maldonado, Xavier; Morales-Bárrera, Rafael

    2016-02-01

    The Vall d'Hebron multidisciplinary prostate cancer (PC) team reviews recent advances in the management of this neoplasm. Screening studies with long follow-up show a reduction in mortality, whereas active surveillance is emerging as a therapeutic approach of non-aggressive cancers. New markers increase the specificity of PSA and also allow targeting suspected aggressive cancers. Multiparametric magnetic resonance (mMRI) has emerged as the most effective method in the selection of patients for biopsy and also for local tumor staging. The paradigm of random prostatic biopsy is changing through the fusion techniques that allow guiding ultrasonography-driven biopsy of suspicious areas detected in mMRI. Radical prostatectomy (RP) and radiotherapy (RT) are curative treatments of localized PC and both have experienced significant technological improvements. RP is highly effective and the incorporation of robotic surgery is reducing morbidity. Modern RT allows the possibility of high tumor dose with minimal adjacent dose reducing its toxicity. Androgen deprivation therapy with LHRH analogues remains the treatment of choice for advanced PC, but should be limited to this indication. The loss of bone mass and adverse metabolic effects increases the frequency of fractures and cardiovascular morbimortality. After castration resistance in metastatic disease, new hormone-based drugs have demonstrated efficacy even after chemotherapy resistance. PMID:25727526

  10. Androgen Control in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelekanou, Vasiliki; Castanas, Elias

    2016-10-01

    Research on prostate cancer has extensively advanced in the past decade, through an improved understanding for its genetic basis and risk-stratification. Molecular classification of prostate cancer into distinct subtypes and the recognition of new histologic entities promise the development of tailored-made management strategies of patients. Nowadays, various alternatives are available for clinical management of localized disease ranging from observation alone through radical prostatectomy. In patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer, the approval of new drugs for the management of metastatic disease has offered promising results improving the survival of these patients. In this context, androgen receptors (AR) remain at the epicenter of prostate cancer research holding a prominent role in the biology and therapeutic regimens of prostate cancer. As many of castration-resistant tumors retain hormone-responsiveness, AR is a clinical relevant, druggable target. However, AR paradoxically remains neglected as a prostate cancer biomarker. The great advancements in prostate cancer preclinical and clinical research, imply further improvement in clinical and translational data, for patient selection and treatment optimization. For a precision medicine-guided clinical management of prostate cancer, AR evaluation has to be implemented in companion and complementary diagnostics, as discussed here. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2224-2234, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27104784

  11. Current Stem Cell Biomarkers and Their Functional Mechanisms in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kaile; Zhou, Shukui; Wang, Leilei; Wang, Jianlong; Zou, Qingsong; Zhao, Weixin; Fu, Qiang; Fang, Xiaolan

    2016-01-01

    Currently there is little effective treatment available for castration resistant prostate cancer, which is responsible for the majority of prostate cancer related deaths. Emerging evidence suggested that cancer stem cells might play an important role in resistance to traditional cancer therapies, and the studies of cancer stem cells (including specific isolation and targeting on those cells) might benefit the discovery of novel treatment of prostate cancer, especially castration resistant disease. In this review, we summarized major biomarkers for prostate cancer stem cells, as well as their functional mechanisms and potential application in clinical diagnosis and treatment of patients. PMID:27447616

  12. [Treatment strategies for advanced prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küronya, Zsófia; Bíró, Krisztina; Géczi, Lajos; Németh, Hajnalka

    2015-09-01

    There has been dramatic improvement in the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer recently. The treatment of localized disease became more successful with the application of new, sophisticated techniques available for urologic surgeons and radiotherapists. Nevertheless a significant proportion of patients relapses after the initial local treatment or is diagnosed with metastatic disease at the beginning. In the past five years, six new drugs became registered for the treatment of metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer, such as sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel, abiraterone, enzalutamide, the α-emitting radionuclide alpharadin and the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B (RANK) ligand inhibitor denosumab. The availability of these new treatment options raises numerous questions. In this review we present the standard of care of metastatic prostate cancer by disease stage (hormone naive/ hormone sensitive metastatic prostate cancer, non-metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, oligometastatic/multimetastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer) and the emerging treatment modalities presently assessed in clinical trials. We would also like to give advice on debatable aspects of the management of metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:26339912

  13. Prostate cancer stem cells: The case for model systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul G Hynes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced prostate cancers are treated with androgen deprivation therapy, which usually leads to a rapid and significant reduction in tumor burden but subsequent development of castration-resistant and metastatic disease almost always occurs. The source of tumor heterogeneity and the accompanying mechanisms leading to treatment resistance are major areas of prostate cancer research. Although our understanding of tumor heterogeneity is evolving, the functional isolation of tumor propagating populations, also known as cancer stem cells (CSCs, is fundamental to the identification and molecular characterization of castration-resistant prostate cancer cells. Of clinical importance, knowledge of prostate CSCs has implications for design of next generation-targeted therapies aimed at both eradicating primary tumor mass and preventing castration-resistant disease. The inability to routinely transplant fractionated primary human prostate tumors has prevented progress in analyzing the source of heterogeneous and treatment-resistant populations in prostate cancer. Here, we briefly overview the mechanisms of castration resistance, including the hypothesis for the existence of androgen-independent prostate CSCs. Finally, we discuss the interpretation of preclinical models and their utility for characterizing prostate CSCs in androgen-replete and androgen-deprived conditions.

  14. Management of patients with advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillessen, S; Omlin, A; Attard, G;

    2015-01-01

    The first St Gallen Advanced Prostate Cancer Consensus Conference (APCCC) Expert Panel identified and reviewed the available evidence for the ten most important areas of controversy in advanced prostate cancer (APC) management. The successful registration of several drugs for castration......-resistant prostate cancer and the recent studies of chemo-hormonal therapy in men with castration-naïve prostate cancer have led to considerable uncertainty as to the best treatment choices, sequence of treatment options and appropriate patient selection. Management recommendations based on expert opinion, and not...

  15. Prostate cancer stem cells: the role of androgen and estrogen receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Di Zazzo, Erika; Galasso, Giovanni; Giovannelli, Pia; Di Donato, Marzia; Di Santi, Annalisa; Cernera, Gustavo; Rossi, Valentina; Abbondanza, Ciro; Moncharmont, Bruno; Sinisi, Antonio Agostino; Castoria, Gabriella; Migliaccio, Antimo

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in men, and androgen deprivation therapy still represents the primary treatment for prostate cancer patients. This approach, however, frequently fails and patients develop castration-resistant prostate cancer, which is almost untreatable. Cancer cells are characterized by a hierarchical organization, and stem/progenitor cells are endowed with tumor-initiating activity. Accumulating evidence indicates that prostate cancer stem cells...

  16. Hormonal therapy and chemotherapy in patients with hormone-sensitive prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Gafanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common men`s cancer in men in developed world and the second cause of death in this population. This review focuses on management of advanced castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC has been rapidly changing and is still evolving. In the last years, there has been an increasing knowledge of prostate cancer biology. New therapeutic agents and approaches have been evaluated demonstrating benefits in survival and quality of life in patients with metastatic prostate cancer.

  17. Hormonal therapy and chemotherapy in patients with hormone-sensitive prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    R. A. Gafanov

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common men`s cancer in men in developed world and the second cause of death in this population. This review focuses on management of advanced castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) has been rapidly changing and is still evolving. In the last years, there has been an increasing knowledge of prostate cancer biology. New therapeutic agents and approaches have been evaluated demonstrating benefits in survival and quality of life in patients with metastatic prostat...

  18. Phosphoproteome Integration Reveals Patient-Specific Networks in Prostate Cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Drake, JM; Paull, EO; Graham, NA; Lee, JK; Smith, BA; Titz, B; Stoyanova, T; Faltermeier, CM; Uzunangelov, V; Carlin,, R.; Fleming, DT; Wong, CK; Newton, Y; Sudha, S; Vashisht, AA

    2016-01-01

    We used clinical tissue from lethal metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients obtained at rapid autopsy to evaluate diverse genomic, transcriptomic, and phosphoproteomic datasets for pathway analysis. Using Tied Diffusion through Interacting Events (TieDIE), we integrated differentially expressed master transcriptional regulators, functionally mutated genes, and differentially activated kinases in CRPC tissues to synthesize a robust signaling network consisting of drugga...

  19. 'Charting a new course for prostate cancer' - currying favor for docetaxel in hormone-sensitive metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voskoboynik, Mark; Staffurth, John; Malik, Zafar; Sweeney, Christopher; Chowdhury, Simon

    2014-11-01

    Docetaxel has an established role in the treatment of metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer. A number of recent treatments have been shown to improve the survival outcomes for this group of patients and many with improved toxicity profiles, bringing the role of docetaxel into question. We discuss the results and implications of the CHAARTED study that demonstrated a significant improvement in overall survival with docetaxel in metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. PMID:25353342

  20. Personalization of prostate cancer prevention and therapy: are clinically qualified biomarkers in the horizon?

    OpenAIRE

    Yap Timothy A; Swanton Charles; de Bono Johann S

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Prostate cancer remains the most common malignancy among men and the second leading cause of male cancer-related mortality. Death from this disease is invariably due to resistance to androgen deprivation therapy. Our improved understanding of the biology of prostate cancer has heralded a new era in molecular anticancer drug development, with multiple novel anticancer drugs for castration resistant prostate cancer now entering the clinic. These include the taxane cabazitaxel, the vacc...

  1. Irrefutable evidence for the use of docetaxel in newly diagnosed metastatic prostate cancer: Results from the STAMPEDE and CHAARTED trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J. van Soest (Robert Jan); R. de Wit (Ronald)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractAndrogen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been used in the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer since the first description of its hormonal dependence in 1941. In 2004, docetaxel chemotherapy became the mainstay of treatment in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), fol

  2. Human Prostate Cancer Hallmarks Map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Dipamoy; Aftabuddin, Md; Gupta, Dinesh Kumar; Raha, Sanghamitra; Sen, Prosenjit

    2016-01-01

    Human prostate cancer is a complex heterogeneous disease that mainly affects elder male population of the western world with a high rate of mortality. Acquisitions of diverse sets of hallmark capabilities along with an aberrant functioning of androgen receptor signaling are the central driving forces behind prostatic tumorigenesis and its transition into metastatic castration resistant disease. These hallmark capabilities arise due to an intense orchestration of several crucial factors, including deregulation of vital cell physiological processes, inactivation of tumor suppressive activity and disruption of prostate gland specific cellular homeostasis. The molecular complexity and redundancy of oncoproteins signaling in prostate cancer demands for concurrent inhibition of multiple hallmark associated pathways. By an extensive manual curation of the published biomedical literature, we have developed Human Prostate Cancer Hallmarks Map (HPCHM), an onco-functional atlas of human prostate cancer associated signaling and events. It explores molecular architecture of prostate cancer signaling at various levels, namely key protein components, molecular connectivity map, oncogenic signaling pathway map, pathway based functional connectivity map etc. Here, we briefly represent the systems level understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated with prostate tumorigenesis by considering each and individual molecular and cell biological events of this disease process. PMID:27476486

  3. The first experience in using abiraterone acetate in patients with castration-refractory prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    L. M. Rapoport; E. A. Bezrukov; A. V. Kondrashina

    2015-01-01

    Even in the mid-twentieth century, Huggins and Hodges proved the susceptibility of prostate cancer cells to hormonal manipulations, by using surgical castration as an example. An average of 18–36 months after initiation of first-line hormonal therapy, patients develop the castration resistance in prostate cancer, one of the causes of which was hyperproduction of the tumor receptors of prostate cancer cells and their hypersusceptibility to the castration levels of testosterone. Long-term treat...

  4. Stages of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All ... Cancer Treatment Prostate Cancer Prevention Genetics of Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer Screening Research Prostate Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient ...

  5. Mechanism and Function of Angiogenin in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanli, Nil; Guo-Fu, HU

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenin (ANG), the fifth member of the vertebrate-specific ribonuclease (RNase) A superfamily, is a secreted angiogenic ribonuclease strongly up-regulated in human prostate cancers. ANG is translocated to the nucleus in both prostate cancer epithelial cells and endothelial cells to exert its role in prostate cancer progression by mediating tumor angiogenesis, cancer cell survival and proliferation through rRNA biogenesis. ANG-stimulated rRNA is required not only for prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) formation, but also for androgen-independent growth of prostate cancer cells. Targeting ANG by various antagonists that inhibit its nuclear translocation, function and/or activity has proven to inhibit prostate cancer growth in animal models. Furthermore, the role of ANG in androgen independence has been firmly established, suggesting a strong rationale for therapeutically targeting ANG in the treatment of castration resistant prostate cancer. PMID:27175049

  6. Prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, G.P.; Kuss, R., Khoury, S.; Chatelain, C.; Denis, L.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 70 selections. Some of the titles are: Place of the Computed Tomography in the Staging of Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Staging of the Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Prostate; Long-Term Results in Radiotherapy of Prostatic Cancer; Interstitial Irradiation Using I-125 Seeds; and Treatment of Cancer of the Prostate by Use of Physiotherapy: Long-Term Results.

  7. Prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contains over 70 selections. Some of the titles are: Place of the Computed Tomography in the Staging of Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Staging of the Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Prostate; Long-Term Results in Radiotherapy of Prostatic Cancer; Interstitial Irradiation Using I-125 Seeds; and Treatment of Cancer of the Prostate by Use of Physiotherapy: Long-Term Results

  8. Enzalutamide in metastatic prostate cancer before chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beer, Tomasz M; Armstrong, Andrew J; Rathkopf, Dana E;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Enzalutamide is an oral androgen-receptor inhibitor that prolongs survival in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer in whom the disease has progressed after chemotherapy. New treatment options are needed for patients with metastatic prostate cancer who have not...... most common clinically relevant adverse events associated with enzalutamide treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Enzalutamide significantly decreased the risk of radiographic progression and death and delayed the initiation of chemotherapy in men with metastatic prostate cancer. (Funded by Medivation and Astellas...... skeletal-related event (hazard ratio, 0.72), a complete or partial soft-tissue response (59% vs. 5%), the time until prostate-specific antigen (PSA) progression (hazard ratio, 0.17), and a rate of decline of at least 50% in PSA (78% vs. 3%) (P<0.001 for all comparisons). Fatigue and hypertension were the...

  9. Redefining Hormone Sensitive Disease in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyu Hou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men in the United States. For decades, the cornerstone of medical treatment for advanced prostate cancer has been hormonal therapy, intended to lower testosterone levels, known as Androgen Deprivation Therapy (ADT. The development of hormone-resistant prostate cancer (now termed castration-resistant prostate cancer:CRPC remains the key roadblock in successful long-term management of prostate cancer. New advancements in medical therapy for prostate cancer have added to the hormonal therapy armamentarium. These new therapeutic agents not only provide a survival benefit but also show potential for reversing hormonal resistance in metastatic CRPC, and thus redefining hormonally sensitive disease.

  10. Development of PROSTVAC immunotherapy in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Parminder; Pal, Sumanta K; Alex, Anitha; Agarwal, Neeraj

    2015-01-01

    PROSTVAC immunotherapy is a heterologous prime-boost regimen of two different recombinant pox-virus vectors; vaccinia as the primary immunotherapy, followed by boosters employing fowlpox, to provoke immune responses against prostate-specific antigen. Both vectors contain transgenes for prostate-specific antigen and a triad of T-cell costimulatory molecules (TRICOM). In a placebo-controlled Phase II trial of men with minimally symptomatic, chemotherapy-naive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, PROSTVAC was well tolerated and associated with a 44% reduction in death. With a novel mechanism of action, and excellent tolerability, PROSTVAC has the potential to dramatically alter the treatment landscape of prostate cancer, not only as a monotherapy, but also in combination with other novel agents, such as immune check point inhibitors and novel androgen receptor blockers. A Phase III trial recently completed accrual. PMID:26235179

  11. Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare ... younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family ...

  12. Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare ... men younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family ...

  13. Tubulin-Targeting Chemotherapy Impairs Androgen Receptor Activity in Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Meng-Lei; Horbinski, Craig; Garzotto, Mark; Qian, David Z.; Beer, Tomasz M.; Kyprianou, Natasha

    2010-01-01

    Recent insights into the regulation of the androgen receptor (AR) activity led to novel therapeutic targeting of AR function in prostate cancer patients. Docetaxel is an approved chemotherapy for treatment of castration-resistant-prostate cancer (CRPC), but the mechanism underlying the action of this tubulin-targeting drug is not fully understood. This study investigates the contribution of microtubules and the cytoskeleton to androgen-mediated signaling, and the consequences of their inhibit...

  14. Androgen deprivation promotes intratumoral synthesis of dihydrotestosterone from androgen metabolites in prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Fumio Ishizaki; Tsutomu Nishiyama; Takashi Kawasaki; Yoshimichi Miyashiro; Noboru Hara; Itsuhiro Takizawa; Makoto Naito; Kota Takahashi

    2013-01-01

    Intratumoral synthesis of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) from precursors cannot completely explain the castration resistance of prostate cancer. We showed that DHT was intratumorally synthesized from the inactive androgen metabolites 5α-androstane-3α/β,17β-diol (3α/β-diol) in prostate cancer cells via different pathways in a concentration-dependent manner. Additionally, long-term culture in androgen-deprived media increased transcriptomic expression of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 6 (HSD1...

  15. Hedgehog/Gli supports androgen signaling in androgen deprived and androgen independent prostate cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shtutman Michael; Tanner Matthew J; Carkner Richard D; Baghel Prateek S; Levina Elina; Feuerstein Michael A; Chen Mengqian; Vacherot Francis; Terry Stéphane; de la Taille Alexandre; Buttyan Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) develops as a consequence of hormone therapies used to deplete androgens in advanced prostate cancer patients. CRPC cells are able to grow in a low androgen environment and this is associated with anomalous activity of their endogenous androgen receptor (AR) despite the low systemic androgen levels in the patients. Therefore, the reactivated tumor cell androgen signaling pathway is thought to provide a target for control of CRPC....

  16. Development of a Second-Generation Antiandrogen for Treatment of Advanced Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Chris; Ouk, Samedy; Clegg, Nicola J.; Chen, Yu; Watson, Philip A.; Arora, Vivek; Wongvipat, John; Smith-Jones, Peter M.; Yoo, Dongwon; Kwon, Andrew; Wasielewska, Teresa; Welsbie, Derek; Chen, Charlie; Higano, Celestia S.; Beer, Tomasz M

    2009-01-01

    Metastatic prostate cancer is treated with drugs that antagonize androgen action but most patients progress to a more aggressive form of the disease called castration-resistant prostate cancer, driven by elevated expression of the androgen receptor. Here we characterize the diarylthiohydantoins RD162 and MDV3100, two compounds optimized from a screen for non-steroidal antiandrogens that retain activity in the setting of increased androgen receptor expression. Both compounds bind to the androg...

  17. Upfront Chemotherapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Elaine T; Flaig, Thomas W

    2015-12-01

    Traditionally, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been the standard initial treatment for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer (mHSPC), with chemotherapy utilized in the castration-resistant setting. Data reported from three recent clinical trials shed new light on the role of upfront docetaxel in advanced or mHSPC. Two of these studies-CHAARTED and STAMPEDE-showed significant improvement in overall survival, while the third study, GETUG-AFU 15, showed no statistical difference. The CHAARTED study showed a 13.6-month survival improvement and the STAMPEDE study showed a 10-month survival improvement with ADT plus docetaxel, compared with ADT alone, in the hormone-sensitive setting. These numbers are remarkable when compared with the 2.9-month survival benefit from docetaxel in the metastatic castration-resistant setting, which has been the standard setting for the use of docetaxel in advanced prostate cancer. In this review, we describe the historical data for chemotherapy in the perioperative and metastatic prostate cancer settings, and the recent trials that are changing the paradigm in support of docetaxel in the upfront setting. PMID:26676900

  18. [Metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravis, Gwenaelle; Salem, Naji; Walz, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    The prostate cancer in its hormone-sensitive metastatic presentation is infrequent, it is either an initial presentation of the disease or an evolution after local treatment, without castration of the biological relapse. The surgical or biological castration remains the cornerstone of the treatment. The deadline of castration initiation and its modalities of administration, intermittent or continuous rest debated but consensual on the initiation is the appearance of the symptomatic disease. The chemotherapy by docetaxel in association with the castration increases significantly the survival of the patients having a high tumoral volume. The efficacy on the whole metastatic population requires additional analyses. Clinical prognostic factors as the bone localizations (axial or appendicular), the visceral involvement (liver, lung) are determining for the survival of these patients. Biological prognostic factors are in evaluation. Except the clodronate acid, which showed a survival improvement in the hormone-sensitive metastatic prostate cancer (HSMPC), the other treatments targeting the bone (zoledronic acid, rank-ligand inhibitor) demonstrated a benefit only in castrate resistant metastatic prostate cancer (MCRPC). The management of local disease lets suggest a benefit to at least symptomatic disease, but it requires to be estimated prospectively in clinical trials. The new hormonal treatments targeting the androgen receptor in CPMRC are in evaluation in CPMHS. The objective is to increase the survival and the quality of life of the CPMHS and to delay the evolution towards the castration resistant metastatic disease. PMID:25609491

  19. Learning about Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Information on Prostate Cancer What is prostate cancer? Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in American ... of page Additional Resources of Information on Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer [nlm.nih.gov] From Medline Plus Medical ...

  20. Neuroendocrine differentiation in prostate cancer – a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Popescu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This review aims to provide practicing clinicians with the most recent knowledge of the biological nature of prostate cancer especially the information regarding neuroendocrine differentiation. Methods: Review of the literature using PubMed search and scientific journal publications. Results: Much progress has been made towards an understanding of the development and progression of prostate cancer. The prostate is a male accessory sex gland which produces a fraction of seminal fluid. The normal human prostate is composed of a stromal compartment (which contains: nerves, fibroblast, smooth muscle cells, macrophages surrounding glandular acins – epithelial cells. Neuroendocrine cells are one of the epithelial populations in the normal prostate and are believed to provide trophic signals trough the secretion of neuropeptides that diffuse and influence surrounding epithelial cells. Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed malignancy in men. In prostate cancer, neuroendocrine cells can stimulate growth of surrounding prostate adenocarcinoma cells (proliferation of neighboring cancer cells in a paracrine manner by secretion of neuroendocrine products. Neuroendocrine prostate cancer is an aggressive variant of prostate cancer that commonly arises in later stages of castration resistant prostate cancer. The detection of neuroendocrine prostate cancer has clinical implications. These patients are often treated with platinum chemotherapy rather than with androgen receptor targeted therapies. Conclusion: This review shows the need to improve our knowledge regarding diagnostic and treatment methods of the Prostate Cancer, especially cancer cells with neuroendocrine phenotype.

  1. Progress against Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Prostate Cancer Progress Against Prostate Cancer Past Issues / Winter 2010 Table of Contents ... Read More "Prostate Cancer" Articles Progress Against Prostate Cancer / Prostate Cancer Research Trial Helps John Spencer Treat His ...

  2. Atg7 cooperates with Pten loss to drive prostate cancer tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santanam, Urmila; Banach-Petrosky, Whitney; Abate-Shen, Cory; Shen, Michael M; White, Eileen; DiPaola, Robert S

    2016-02-15

    Understanding new therapeutic paradigms for both castrate-sensitive and more aggressive castrate-resistant prostate cancer is essential to improve clinical outcomes. As a critically important cellular process, autophagy promotes stress tolerance by recycling intracellular components to sustain metabolism important for tumor survival. To assess the importance of autophagy in prostate cancer, we generated a new autochthonous genetically engineered mouse model (GEMM) with inducible prostate-specific deficiency in the Pten tumor suppressor and autophagy-related-7 (Atg7) genes. Atg7 deficiency produced an autophagy-deficient phenotype and delayed Pten-deficient prostate tumor progression in both castrate-naïve and castrate-resistant cancers. Atg7-deficient tumors display evidence of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, suggesting that autophagy may promote prostate tumorigenesis through management of protein homeostasis. Taken together, these data support the importance of autophagy for both castrate-naïve and castrate-resistant growth in a newly developed GEMM, suggesting a new paradigm and model to study approaches to inhibit autophagy in combination with known and new therapies for advanced prostate cancer. PMID:26883359

  3. Cryotherapy for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cryosurgery-prostate cancer; Cryoablation-prostate cancer ... Prostate Cancer. American Cancer Society. www.cancer.org/cancer/prostatecancer/detailedguide/prostate-cancer-treating-cryosurgery. Accessed August 31, 2015. Horwich ...

  4. Enzalutamide Antitumour Activity Against Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer Previously Treated with Docetaxel and Abiraterone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasso, Klaus; Thomsen, Frederik B; Schrader, Andres J;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The degree of antitumour activity of enzalutamide following disease progression on docetaxel and abiraterone remains controversial. OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of enzalutamide in patients progressing following taxane-based chemotherapy and abiraterone. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTIC...

  5. Docetaxel rechallenge after an initial good response in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oudard, Stéphane; Kramer, Gero; Caffo, Orazio;

    2015-01-01

    were associated with reduced OS. Docetaxel rechallenge increased the incidence of grade ≥3 sensory neuropathy, nail disorders and asthenia/fatigue. CONCLUSIONS: Docetaxel rechallenge is a management option for responders to docetaxel with a PFI of >6 months, but did not prolong survival. Potential...

  6. Prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is about diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of prostate cancer. The techniques used are: transrectal ultrasound, laparascopy, bone scan, chest x-ray, radiography, chemoterapy and radiotherapy

  7. What is Prostate Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Get Involved Find Local ACS Learn About Cancer » Prostate Cancer » Detailed Guide » What is prostate cancer? Share ... how cancers start and spread, see What Is Cancer? Prostate cancer begins when cells in the prostate gland ...

  8. Irrefutable evidence for the use of docetaxel in newly diagnosed metastatic prostate cancer: results from the STAMPEDE and CHAARTED trials

    OpenAIRE

    Soest, Robert Jan; de Wit, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    textabstractAndrogen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been used in the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer since the first description of its hormonal dependence in 1941. In 2004, docetaxel chemotherapy became the mainstay of treatment in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), following robust, albeit modest, survival benefit in two randomized phase 3 trials. The recently published CHAARTED trial was the first to show that combining ADT with docetaxel in men with hormone-na...

  9. Combined AKT and MEK Pathway Blockade in Pre-Clinical Models of Enzalutamide-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Toren, Paul; Kim, Soojin; Johnson, Fraser; Zoubeidi, Amina

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent improvements in patient outcomes using newer androgen receptor (AR) pathway inhibitors, treatment resistance in castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) continues to remain a clinical problem. Co-targeting alternate resistance pathways are of significant interest to treat CRPC and delay the onset of resistance. Both the AKT and MEK signaling pathways become activated as prostate cancer develops resistance to AR-targeted therapies. This pre-clinical study explores co-targeting ...

  10. Prostate Cancer (Radiation Therapy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Prostate Cancer Treatment Prostate cancer overview? What are my treatment options? What ... any new developments in treating my disease? Prostate cancer overview Prostate cancer is the most common form of cancer ...

  11. Mathematical modeling of prostate cancer progression in response to androgen ablation therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Harsh Vardhan; Clinton, Steven K.; Bhinder, Arvinder; Friedman, Avner

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer progression depends in part on the complex interactions between testosterone, its active metabolite DHT, and androgen receptors. In a metastatic setting, the first line of treatment is the elimination of testosterone. However, such interventions are not curative because cancer cells evolve via multiple mechanisms to a castrate-resistant state, allowing progression to a lethal outcome. It is hypothesized that administration of antiandrogen therapy in an intermittent, as opposed...

  12. Prostate radiation in non-metastatic castrate refractory prostate cancer provides an interesting insight into biology of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascoe Abigail C

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The natural history of non-metastatic castrate refractory prostate cancer is unknown and treatment options are limited. We present a retrospective review of 13 patients with locally advanced or high risk prostate cancer, initially treated with hormone monotherapy and then treated with prostate radiation after becoming castration refractory. Findings Median PSA response following prostate radiation was 67.4%. Median time to biochemical progression following radiotherapy was 15 months and to detection of metastatic disease was 18.5 months. Median survival from castration resistance (to date of death or November 2011 was 60 months, with median survival from RT 42 months. Conclusion Prostate radiation appears to be beneficial even in patients with potential micrometastatic disease, which supports the hypothesis that the primary tumour is important in the progression of prostate cancer. These results are an interesting addition to the literature on the biology of prostate cancer especially as this data is unlikely to be available in the future due to combined prostate radiation and androgen deprivation therapy now being the standard of care.

  13. Prostate radiation in non-metastatic castrate refractory prostate cancer provides an interesting insight into biology of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The natural history of non-metastatic castrate refractory prostate cancer is unknown and treatment options are limited. We present a retrospective review of 13 patients with locally advanced or high risk prostate cancer, initially treated with hormone monotherapy and then treated with prostate radiation after becoming castration refractory. Median PSA response following prostate radiation was 67.4%. Median time to biochemical progression following radiotherapy was 15 months and to detection of metastatic disease was 18.5 months. Median survival from castration resistance (to date of death or November 2011) was 60 months, with median survival from RT 42 months. Prostate radiation appears to be beneficial even in patients with potential micrometastatic disease, which supports the hypothesis that the primary tumour is important in the progression of prostate cancer. These results are an interesting addition to the literature on the biology of prostate cancer especially as this data is unlikely to be available in the future due to combined prostate radiation and androgen deprivation therapy now being the standard of care

  14. Immune Response to Sipuleucel-T in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David I. Quinn

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Historically, chemotherapy has remained the most commonly utilized therapy in patients with metastatic cancers. In prostate cancer, chemotherapy has been reserved for patients whose metastatic disease becomes resistant to first line castration or androgen deprivation. While chemotherapy palliates, decreases serum prostate specific antigen and improves survival, it is associated with significant side effects and is only suitable for approximately 60% of patients with castrate-resistant prostate cancer. On that basis, exploration of other therapeutic options such as active secondary hormone therapy, bone targeted treatments and immunotherapy are important. Until recently, immunotherapy has had no role in the treatment of solid malignancies aside from renal cancer and melanoma. The FDA-approved autologous cellular immunotherapy sipuleucel-T has demonstrated efficacy in improving overall survival in patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer in randomized clinical trials. The proposed mechanism of action is reliant on activating the patients’ own antigen presenting cells (APCs to prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP fused with granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF and subsequent triggered T-cell response to PAP on the surface of prostate cancer cells in the patients body. Despite significant prolongation of survival in Phase III trials, the challenge to health care providers remains the dissociation between objective changes in serum PSA or on imaging studies after sipleucel-T and survival benefit. On that basis there is an unmet need for markers of outcome and a quest to identify immunologic or clinical surrogates to fill this role. This review focuses on the impact of sipuleucel-T on the immune system, the T and B cells, and their responses to relevant antigens and prostate cancer. Other therapeutic modalities such as chemotherapy, corticosteroids and GM-CSF and host factors can also affect immune response. The

  15. Steroid hormone synthetic pathways in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostaghel, Elahe A

    2013-09-01

    While androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) remains the primary treatment for metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) since the seminal recognition of the disease as androgen-dependent by Huggins and Hodges in 1941, therapy is uniformly marked by progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) over a period of about 18 months, with an ensuing median survival of 1 to 2 years. Importantly, castration does not eliminate androgens from the prostate tumor microenvironment. Castration resistant tumors are characterized by elevated tumor androgens that are well within the range capable of activating the AR and AR-mediated gene expression, and by steroid enzyme alterations which may potentiate de novo androgen synthesis or utilization of circulating adrenal androgens. The dependence of CRPC on intratumoral androgen metabolism has been modeled in vitro and in vivo, and residual intratumoral androgens are implicated in nearly every mechanism by which AR-mediated signaling promotes castration-resistant disease. These observations suggest that tissue based alterations in steroid metabolism contribute to the development of CRPC and underscore these metabolic pathways as critical targets of therapy. Herein, we review the accumulated body of evidence which strongly supports intracrine (tumoral) androgen synthesis as an important mechanism underlying PCa progression. We first discuss the presence and significance of residual prostate tumor androgens in the progression of CRPC. We review the classical and non-classical pathways of androgen metabolism, and how dysregulated expression of these enzymes is likely to potentiate tumor androgen production in the progression to CRPC. Next we review the in vitro and in vivo data in human tumors, xenografts, and cell line models which demonstrate the capacity of prostate tumors to utilize cholesterol and adrenal androgens in the production of testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and briefly review the potential role of exogenous

  16. Efficacy of c-Met inhibitor for advanced prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aberrant expression of HGF/SF and its receptor, c-Met, often correlates with advanced prostate cancer. Our previous study showed that expression of c-Met in prostate cancer cells was increased after attenuation of androgen receptor (AR) signalling. This suggested that current androgen ablation therapy for prostate cancer activates c-Met expression and may contribute to development of more aggressive, castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Therefore, we directly assessed the efficacy of c-Met inhibition during androgen ablation on the growth and progression of prostate cancer. We tested two c-Met small molecule inhibitors, PHA-665752 and PF-2341066, for anti-proliferative activity by MTS assay and cell proliferation assay on human prostate cancer cell lines with different levels of androgen sensitivity. We also used renal subcapsular and castrated orthotopic xenograft mouse models to assess the effect of the inhibitors on prostate tumor formation and progression. We demonstrated a dose-dependent inhibitory effect of PHA-665752 and PF-2341066 on the proliferation of human prostate cancer cells and the phosphorylation of c-Met. The effect on cell proliferation was stronger in androgen insensitive cells. The c-Met inhibitor, PF-2341066, significantly reduced growth of prostate tumor cells in the renal subcapsular mouse model and the castrated orthotopic mouse model. The effect on cell proliferation was greater following castration. The c-Met inhibitors demonstrated anti-proliferative efficacy when combined with androgen ablation therapy for advanced prostate cancer

  17. Prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chabanova, Elizaveta; Balslev, Ingegerd; Logager, Vibeke;

    2011-01-01

    To investigate diagnostic accuracy of detection of prostate cancer by magnetic resonance: to evaluate the performance of T2WI, DCEMRI and CSI and to correlate the results with biopsy and radical prostatectomy histopathological data....

  18. Prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chabanova, Elizaveta; Balslev, Ingegerd; Logager, Vibeke;

    2011-01-01

    To investigate diagnostic accuracy of detection of prostate cancer by magnetic resonance: to evaluate the performance of T2WI, DCEMRI and CSI and to correlate the results with biopsy and radical prostatectomy histopathological data.......To investigate diagnostic accuracy of detection of prostate cancer by magnetic resonance: to evaluate the performance of T2WI, DCEMRI and CSI and to correlate the results with biopsy and radical prostatectomy histopathological data....

  19. Uncovering the Roles of miRNAs and Their Relationship with Androgen Receptor in Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    ChunJiao, Song; Huan, Chen; ChaoYang, Xu; GuoMei, Ru

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second most commonly occurring malignant tumor in Europe and America. Normal and neoplastic growth of prostate gland are dependent on androgen receptor (AR) expression and function. PCa is driven by androgen and its receptor, and they continue to be the key drivers of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). CRPC is the terminal stage of PCa and seriously jeopardizes the patient's quality of life and lifespan. miRNAs are small noncoding RNAs, 18–25 nt in lengt...

  20. CYP17 inhibitors for prostate cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasaitis, Tadas S; Bruno, Robert D; Njar, Vincent C O

    2011-05-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is now the second most prevalent cause of death in men in the USA and Europe. At present, the major treatment options include surgical or medical castration. These strategies cause ablation of the production of testosterone (T), dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and related androgens by the testes. However, because these procedures do not affect adrenal, prostate and other tissues' androgen production, they are often combined with androgen receptor antagonists to block their action. Indeed, recent studies have unequivocally established that in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) many androgen-regulated genes become re-expressed and tissue androgen levels increase despite low serum levels. Clearly, inhibition of the key enzyme which catalyzes the biosynthesis of androgens from pregnane precursors, 17α-hydroxy/17,20-lyase (hereafter referred to as CYP17) could prevent androgen production from all sources. Thus, total ablation of androgen production by potent CYP17 inhibitors may provide effective treatment of prostate cancer patients. This review highlights the role of androgen biosynthesis in the progression of prostate cancer and the impact of CYP17 inhibitors, such as ketoconazole, abiraterone acetate, VN/124-1 (TOK-001) and TAK-700 in the clinic and in clinical development. Article from the special issue on Targeted Inhibitors. PMID:21092758

  1. PD-L1 is highly expressed in Enzalutamide resistant prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bishop, Jennifer L.; Sio, Alexander; Angeles, Arkhjamil; Roberts, Morgan E; Azad, Arun A.; Chi, Kim N.; Zoubeidi, Amina

    2014-01-01

    Efficacy of Enzalutamide (ENZ) in castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients is short-lived. Immunotherapy like T cell checkpoint blockade may improve patient survival. However, when and where checkpoint molecules are expressed in CRPC and whether immune evasion is a mechanism of ENZ resistance remains unclear. Thus, we investigated whether clinically relevant immunotherapy targets, specifically PD-L1/2, PD-1 and CTLA-4, are upregulated in ENZ resistant (ENZR) patients and in a pre-...

  2. Alpha Particle Therapy in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is a leading cause of cancer mortality among men in western countries. Although nearly 85% of patients present with localised disease, up to 40% will eventually develop metastatic disease during the course of illness. Of men dying from prostate cancer, more than 90% have bone metastases many with no other significant metastatic sites. Symptoms related to bone metastases and skeletal related events (SREs) account for the major cause of morbidity in these patients. Bone-seeking radionuclides have been used in the treatment of prostate cancer bone metastases for many years. The first bone seeking radionuclide drug approved by the FDA was Strontium-89. Other agents have also been used including Samarium-153 EDTMP, Rhenium-186 (-188)-HEDP. These radionuclides are all emit shortrange therapeutic beta radiation with bone marrow as the dose limiting toxicity. There is strong clinical trial evidence of benefit for these radionuclides in reducing pain in advanced prostate cancer; however, none of the drugs has been shown to improve survival, albeit none of the clinical trials were powered to detect differences in survival

  3. Functional analysis of androgen receptor mutations that confer anti-androgen resistance identified in circulating cell-free DNA from prostate cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Lallous, Nada; Volik, Stanislav V.; Awrey, Shannon; LeBlanc, Eric; Tse, Ronnie; Murillo, Josef; Singh, Kriti; Azad, Arun A.; Wyatt, Alexander W.; LeBihan, Stephane; Chi, Kim N.; Gleave, Martin E.; Paul S. Rennie; Collins, Colin C; Cherkasov, Artem

    2016-01-01

    Background The androgen receptor (AR) is a pivotal drug target for the treatment of prostate cancer, including its lethal castration-resistant (CRPC) form. All current non-steroidal AR antagonists, such as hydroxyflutamide, bicalutamide, and enzalutamide, target the androgen binding site of the receptor, competing with endogenous androgenic steroids. Several AR mutations in this binding site have been associated with poor prognosis and resistance to conventional prostate cancer drugs. In orde...

  4. Prostate cancer - treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000403.htm Prostate cancer - treatment To use the sharing features on this ... a combination of drugs is recommended. References National Cancer Institute. Prostate cancer treatment (PDQ): Stages of prostate cancer. Updated ...

  5. Cancer of the Prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will die of this disease. Who Gets This Cancer? Prostate cancer occurs only in men, and it is ... Percent of New Cases by Age Group: Prostate Cancer Prostate cancer is most frequently diagnosed among men aged ...

  6. Development of cabozantinib for the treatment of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaishampayan UN

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Ulka N VaishampayanDepartment of Oncology, Wayne State University/Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, MI, USAAbstract: Cabozantinib (XL184 is a multitargeted receptor tyrosine kinase with predominantly MET and vascular endothelial growth factor inhibition properties. It is currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of progressive metastatic medullary thyroid cancer. The agent has a convenient once-daily oral dosing schedule and has demonstrated encouraging activity in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. A Phase I/II trial demonstrated responses in soft tissue, visceral disease, and bone metastases in CRPC. An objective response rate of 5%, a stable disease rate of 75%, and a median progression-free survival of 6 months was observed. As compared with the 140 mg daily dose used in thyroid cancer, a lower dose of 60 mg daily is currently being utilized in prostate cancer studies due to the fact that toxicity could be reduced without compromising efficacy. Randomized trials are ongoing in comparison with prednisone or with mitoxantrone and prednisone in pretreated metastatic CRPC. Cabozantinib has demonstrated a unique mechanism of action and preliminary efficacy in the crowded therapeutic field of prostate cancer. Since multiple therapies have recently demonstrated overall survival benefit in metastatic CRPC, cabozantinib will likely face some challenges in clinical application. At present, in this rapidly evolving field, it is unclear what proportion of patients with prostate cancer will be eligible to receive this therapy. The cost of cabozantinib is likely to be another deterrent, especially if it remains more expensive than other oral therapies, such as abiraterone and enzalutamide. Defining the role of MET overexpression and RET mutations as biomarkers in prostate cancer may help to guide patient selection, and enrich and enhance the future applications of this targeted novel agent.Keywords: XL

  7. [Advancement in the treatment against prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Nobuo; Abe, Takashige; Maruyama, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    With the advancement of basic science and medical technology, the treatment against prostate cancer (PC) has dramatically changed. Although the introduction of robotic radical prostatectomy and particle therapies in patients with early stage PC is of much note, the issues on the over-treatment and treatment cost should be heeded. From these points, active surveillance has been an important strategy in these patients. In patients with metastatic hormone-sensitive PC, especially high volume metastases, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) with docetaxel has been reported to prolong overall survival compared with ADT alone. Lastly, several novel therapeutic agents have been investigated and shown to be favorable outcomes in patients with castration resistant PC. This review focuses on the recent advancement in the treatment against PCs. PMID:26793875

  8. Potential use of custirsen to treat prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higano CS

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Celestia S Higano Department of Medicine, University of Washington, and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Over the last few years, five agents have demonstrated a survival benefit over a comparator treatment or placebo in the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer and have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration: sipuleucel-T (a dendritic cell immunotherapy; cabazitaxel; abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide (both hormonal agents; and radium 223 (an alpha emitter. The development of these agents pivoted on whether patients had been treated with docetaxel, which remains the first-line chemotherapy of choice. To date, no combination of docetaxel and another active agent has demonstrated superiority to docetaxel alone despite numerous Phase III trials. Clusterin is a cytoprotective chaperone protein that is upregulated in response to various anticancer therapies. When overexpressed, clusterin interferes with apoptotic signaling, thereby promoting cell survival and conferring broad-spectrum resistance in cancer cell lines. Custirsen (OGX-011 is a second-generation 2´-methoxyethyl modified phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotide that inhibits expression of clusterin. This review presents the preclinical and clinical data that provided the rationale for the combination of custirsen with chemotherapy in ongoing Phase III trials. Keywords: castration-resistant prostate cancer, clusterin, custirsen, OGX-011, antisense, OGX-427, apoptosis

  9. Androgen deprivation therapy sensitizes prostate cancer cells to T-cell killing through androgen receptor dependent modulation of the apoptotic pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Ardiani, Andressa; Gameiro, Sofia R.; Kwilas, Anna R.; Donahue, Renee N.; Hodge, James W.

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent advances in diagnosis and management, prostrate cancer remains the second most common cause of death from cancer in American men, after lung cancer. Failure of chemotherapies and hormone-deprivation therapies is the major cause of death in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Currently, the androgen inhibitors enzalutamide and abiraterone are approved for treatment of metastatic CRPC. Here we show for the first time that both enzalutamide and abiraterone r...

  10. Androgen deprivation of prostate cancer: Leading to a therapeutic dead end.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzenwadel, Arndt; Wolf, Philipp

    2015-10-10

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is considered as the standard therapy for men with de novo or recurrent metastatic prostate cancer. ADT commonly leads to initial biochemical and clinical responses. However, several months after the beginning of treatment, tumors become castration-resistant and virtually all patients show disease progression. At this stage, tumors are no longer curable and cancer treatment options are only palliative. In this review, we describe molecular alterations in tumor cells during ADT, which lead to deregulation of different signaling pathways and castration-resistance, and how they might interfere with the clinical outcome of different second-line therapeutics. A recent breakthrough finding that early chemotherapy is associated with a significant survival benefit in metastatic hormone-sensitive disease highlights the fact that there is time for a fundamental paradigm shift in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer. Therapeutic intervention seems to be indicated before a castration-resistant stage is reached to improve therapeutic outcome and to reduce undesirable side effects. PMID:26185001

  11. The latest advances of experimental research on targeted gene therapy for prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongliang Pan; Lianchao Jin; Xianghua Zhang

    2013-01-01

    The absence of ef ective therapies for castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) establishes the need to de-velop novel therapeutic modality, such as targeted gene therapy, which is ideal for the treatment of CRPC. But its application has been limited due to lack of favorable gene vector and the reduction of“bystander ef ect”. Consequently, scientists al over the world focus their main experimental research on the fol owing four aspects:targeted gene, vector, transfer means and comprehensive therapy. In this paper, we reviewed the latest advances of experimental research on targeted gene therapy for prostate cancer .

  12. PBX3 is a putative biomarker of aggressive prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramberg, Håkon; Grytli, Helene Hartvedt; Nygård, Ståle; Wang, Wanzhong; Ögren, Olov; Zhao, Sen; Løvf, Marthe; Katz, Betina; Skotheim, Rolf I; Bjartell, Anders; Eri, Lars Magne; Berge, Viktor; Svindland, Aud; Taskén, Kristin Austlid

    2016-10-15

    There is a great need to identify new and better prognostic and predictive biomarkers to stratify prostate cancer patients for optimal treatment. The aims of this study were to characterize the expression profile of pre-B cell leukemia homeobox (PBX) transcription factors in prostate cancer with an emphasis on investigating whether PBX3 harbours any prognostic value. The expression profile of PBX3 and PBX1 in prostate tissue was determined by immunohistochemical and immunoblot analysis. Furthermore, the expression of PBX3 transcript variants was analyzed by RT-PCR, NanoString Technologies®, and by analyzing RNA sequence data. The potential of PBX3 to predict prognosis, either at mRNA or protein level, was studied in four independent cohorts. PBX3 was mainly expressed in the nucleus of normal prostate basal cells, while it showed cytosolic expression in prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and cancer cells. We detected four PBX3 transcript variants in prostate tissue. Competing risk regression analysis revealed that high PBX3 expression was associated with slower progression to castration resistant prostate cancer (sub-hazard ratio (SHR) 0.18, 95% CI: 0.081-0.42, p values aggressive prostate cancer. PMID:27273830

  13. What Is Prostate Cancer?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... no such thing as one type of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer is really a spectrum of diseases where on ... very benevolent in its behavior. Men will develop prostate cancer and live the rest of their lives -- 20, ...

  14. What Is Prostate Cancer?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in their lifetime. Age is the most important risk factor in prostate cancer -- the longer a man ... M.D.: There's no such thing as one type of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer is really a ...

  15. 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents ... early screening. Photo: AP Photo/Danny Moloshok Prostate Cancer The prostate gland is a walnut-sized structure that makes ...

  16. Current status of primary pharmacotherapy and future perspectives toward upfront therapy for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, Masaki; Eto, Masatoshi

    2016-05-01

    Since 1941, androgen deprivation therapy has been the primary treatment for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. Androgen deprivation therapy consists of several regimens that vary according to therapeutic modality, as well as treatment schedule. Androgen deprivation therapy initially shows excellent antitumor effects, such as relief of cancer-related symptoms, tumor marker decline and tumor shrinking. However, most metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer cases eventually develop castration resistance and become lethal. Taxanes, such as docetaxel and cabazitaxel, as well as novel androgen receptor-targeting agents, such as abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide, have emerged for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. The concept and principle of primary therapy for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer has remained unchanged for decades. Recently, upfront docetaxel chemotherapy has been shown to prolong overall survival in men with metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer, and would lead to a paradigm shift in primary pharmacotherapy for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. This raises the possibility of upfront use of taxanes, as well as novel androgen receptor-targeting agents combined with androgen deprivation therapy. The present review summarizes the current status of primary pharmacotherapy for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer, and discusses future perspectives in this field. PMID:27062039

  17. Prostate Cancer Cell–Stromal Cell Cross-Talk via FGFR1 Mediates Antitumor Activity of Dovitinib in Bone Metastases

    OpenAIRE

    Wan, Xinhai; Corn, Paul G.; Yang, Jun; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Starbuck, Michael W.; Efstathiou, Eleni; Li-Ning Tapia, Elsa M.; Zurita, Amado J.; Aparicio, Ana; Ravoori, Murali K.; Vazquez, Elba S; Robinson, Dan R.; Wu, Yi-Mi; Cao, Xuhong; Iyer, Matthew K

    2014-01-01

    Bone is the most common site of prostate cancer (PCa) progression to a therapy-resistant, lethal phenotype. We found that blockade of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) with the receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor dovitinib has clinical activity in a subset of men with castration-resistant PCa and bone metastases. Our integrated analyses suggest that FGF signaling mediates a positive feedback loop between PCa cells and bone cells and that blockade of FGFR1 in osteoblasts partially medi...

  18. Androgen mediated translational and postranslational regulation of IGFBP-2 in androgen-sensitive LNCaP human prostate cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    David J. DeGraff; Aguiar, Adam A.; Chen, Qian; Adams, Lisa K.; Williams, B. Jill; Sikes, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis is associated intimately with prostate cancer (PCa) development, growth, survival and metastasis. In particular, increased levels of IGFBP-2 expression are associated with advanced PCa, bone metastasis, and the development of castrate resistant PCa. Previously, we reported that androgen treatment decreased intracellular and extracellular IGFBP-2 in the androgen sensitive (AS) PCa cell line, LNCaP. Nonetheless, the mechanism by which androgen treatment...

  19. Pleuropulmonary and Lymph Node Progression after Docetaxel – Benefits from Treatment with Cabazitaxel in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Huerta, Angel Segura; Santos, Encarnación Reche; Campos, Gema Bruixola; Coloma, Carmen Salvador; Gómez, Oscar Niño

    2013-01-01

    Introduction To date, there are no guidelines for a rational and more favourable sequence of treatment after docetaxel. Two drugs (cabazitaxel and abiraterone) have recently been approved as second-line treatment after docetaxel failure in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), but there are no studies comparing abiraterone versus cabazitaxel. The most suitable drug is chosen based on the physician's opinion and the patient's characteristics. In patients with a good performa...

  20. Localized Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a decision aid for men with clinically localized prostate cancer (available at http://effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/prostate_da) ... A Decision Aid for Men With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer Page 1 of 24 Introduction Men with clinically ...

  1. Genomic and epigenomic alterations in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria eAschelter

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC is the second most frequently diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer deaths in man. The treatment of localized PC includes surgery or radiation therapy. In case of relapse after a definitive treatment or in patients with locally advanced or metastatic disease, the standard treatment includes the androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT. By reducing the levels of Testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT under the castration threshold, the ADT acts on the androgen receptor (AR, even if indirectly. The effects of the ADT are usually temporary and nearly all patients, initially sensitive to the androgen ablation therapy, have a disease progression after a 18-24 months medium term. This is probably due to the selection of the cancer cell clones and to their acquisition of critical somatic genome and epigenomic changes. This review aims to provide an overview about the genetic and epigenetic alterations having a crucial role in the carcinogenesis and in the disease progression toward the castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. We focused on the role of the androgen receptor, on its signaling cascade and on the clinical implications that the knowledge of these aspects would have on hormonal therapy, on its failure and its toxicity.

  2. Long noncoding RNAs in prostate cancer: overview and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Bhavna; Feng, Felix Y

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cause of cancer mortality among men in the United States. While many prostate cancers are indolent, an important subset of patients experiences disease recurrence after conventional therapy and progresses to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), which is currently incurable. Thus, there is a critical need to identify biomarkers that will distinguish indolent from aggressive disease, as well as novel therapeutic targets for the prevention or treatment of CRPC. In recent years, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as an important class of biological molecules. LncRNAs are polyadenylated RNA species that share many similarities with protein-coding genes despite the fact that they are noncoding (not translated into proteins). They are usually transcribed by RNA polymerase II and exhibit the same epigenetic signatures as protein-coding genes. LncRNAs have also been implicated in the development and progression of variety of cancers, including prostate cancer. While a large number of lncRNAs exhibit tissue- and cancer-specific expression, their utility as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers is just starting to be explored. In this review, we highlight recent findings on the functional role and molecular mechanisms of lncRNAs in the progression of prostate cancer and evaluate their use as potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:27072044

  3. Plasma AR and abiraterone-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanel, Alessandro; Gasi Tandefelt, Delila; Conteduca, Vincenza; Jayaram, Anuradha; Casiraghi, Nicola; Wetterskog, Daniel; Salvi, Samanta; Amadori, Dino; Zafeiriou, Zafeiris; Rescigno, Pasquale; Bianchini, Diletta; Gurioli, Giorgia; Casadio, Valentina; Carreira, Suzanne; Goodall, Jane; Wingate, Anna; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Tunariu, Nina; Flohr, Penny; De Giorgi, Ugo; de Bono, Johann S; Demichelis, Francesca; Attard, Gerhardt

    2015-11-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) gene aberrations are rare in prostate cancer before primary hormone treatment but emerge with castration resistance. To determine AR gene status using a minimally invasive assay that could have broad clinical utility, we developed a targeted next-generation sequencing approach amenable to plasma DNA, covering all AR coding bases and genomic regions that are highly informative in prostate cancer. We sequenced 274 plasma samples from 97 castration-resistant prostate cancer patients treated with abiraterone at two institutions. We controlled for normal DNA in patients' circulation and detected a sufficiently high tumor DNA fraction to quantify AR copy number state in 217 samples (80 patients). Detection of AR copy number gain and point mutations in plasma were inversely correlated, supported further by the enrichment of nonsynonymous versus synonymous mutations in AR copy number normal as opposed to AR gain samples. Whereas AR copy number was unchanged from before treatment to progression and no mutant AR alleles showed signal for acquired gain, we observed emergence of T878A or L702H AR amino acid changes in 13% of tumors at progression on abiraterone. Patients with AR gain or T878A or L702H before abiraterone (45%) were 4.9 and 7.8 times less likely to have a ≥50 or ≥90% decline in prostate-specific antigen (PSA), respectively, and had a significantly worse overall [hazard ratio (HR), 7.33; 95% confidence interval (CI), 3.51 to 15.34; P = 1.3 × 10(-9)) and progression-free (HR, 3.73; 95% CI, 2.17 to 6.41; P = 5.6 × 10(-7)) survival. Evaluation of plasma AR by next-generation sequencing could identify cancers with primary resistance to abiraterone. PMID:26537258

  4. Potential synergistic implications for stromal-targeted radiopharmaceuticals in bone-metastatic prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Oliver Sartor

    2011-01-01

    Genetic heterogeneity and chemotherapy-resistant 'stem cells' represent two of the most pressing issues in devising new strategies for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer. Though curative strategies have long been present for men with localized disease, metastatic prostate cancer is currently incurable. Though substantial improvements in outcomes are now possible through the utilization of newly approved therapies, novel combinations are clearly needed. Herein we describe potentially synergistic interactions between bone stromal-targeted radiopharmaceuticals and other therapies for treatment of bone-metastatic prostate cancer. Radiation has long been known to synergize with cytotoxic chemotherapies and recent data also suggest the possibility of synergy when combining radiation and immune-based strategies. Combination therapies will be required to substantially improve survival for men with castrate-resistant metastatic prostate cancer and we hypothesize that bone-targeted radiopharmaceuticals will play an important role in this process.

  5. New serum biomarkers for prostate cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadha, Kailash C.; Miller, Austin; Nair, Bindukumar B.; Schwartz, Stanley A.; Trump, Donald L.; Underwood, Willie

    2014-01-01

    Background Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is currently used as a biomarker for diagnosis and management of prostate cancer (CaP). However, PSA typically lacks the sensitivity and specificity desired of a diagnostic marker. Objective The goal of this study was to identify an additional biomarker or a panel of biomarkers that is more sensitive and specific than PSA in differentiating benign versus malignant prostate disease and/or localized CaP versus metastatic CaP. Methods Concurrent measurements of circulating interleukin-8 (IL-8), Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and soluble tumor necrosis factor-α receptors 1 (sTNFR1) were obtained from four groups of men: (1) Controls (2) with elevated prostate-specific antigen with a negative prostate biopsy (elPSA_negBx) (3) with clinically localized CaP and (4) with castration resistant prostate cancer. Results TNF-α Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC = 0.93) and sTNFR1 (AUC = 0.97) were strong predictors of elPSA_negBx (vs. CaP). The best predictor of elPSA_negBx vs CaP was sTNFR1 and IL-8 combined (AUC = 0.997). The strongest single predictors of localized versus metastatic CaP were TNF-α (AUC = 0.992) and PSA (AUC = 0.963) levels. Conclusions The specificity and sensitivity of a PSA-based CaP diagnosis can be significantly enhanced by concurrent serum measurements of IL-8, TNF-α and sTNFR1. In view of the concerns about the ability of PSA to distinguish clinically relevant CaP from indolent disease, assessment of these biomarkers in the larger cohort is warranted. PMID:25593898

  6. New serum biomarkers for prostate cancer diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kailash C Chadha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA is currently used as a biomarker for diagnosis and management of prostate cancer (CaP. However, PSA typically lacks the sensitivity and specificity desired of a diagnostic marker. Objective: The goal of this study was to identify an additional biomarker or a panel of biomarkers that is more sensitive and specific than PSA in differentiating benign versus malignant prostate disease and/or localized CaP versus metastatic CaP. Methods: Concurrent measurements of circulating interleukin-8 (IL-8, Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and soluble tumor necrosis factor-α receptors 1 (sTNFR1 were obtained from four groups of men: (1 Controls (2 with elevated prostate-specific antigen with a negative prostate biopsy (elPSA_negBx (3 with clinically localized CaP and (4 with castration resistant prostate cancer. Results: TNF-α Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC = 0.93 and sTNFR1 (AUC = 0.97 were strong predictors of elPSA_negBx (vs. CaP. The best predictor of elPSA_negBx vs CaP was sTNFR1 and IL-8 combined (AUC = 0.997. The strongest single predictors of localized versus metastatic CaP were TNF-α (AUC = 0.992 and PSA (AUC = 0.963 levels. Conclusions: The specificity and sensitivity of a PSA-based CaP diagnosis can be significantly enhanced by concurrent serum measurements of IL-8, TNF-α and sTNFR1. In view of the concerns about the ability of PSA to distinguish clinically relevant CaP from indolent disease, assessment of these biomarkers in the larger cohort is warranted.

  7. Can Prostate Cancer Be Found Early?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Get Involved Find Local ACS Learn About Cancer » Prostate Cancer » Detailed Guide » Can prostate cancer be found ... and symptoms of prostate cancer Tests for prostate cancer Prostate cancer stages Survival rates for prostate cancer Previous ...

  8. MiR-221 promotes the development of androgen independence in prostate cancer cells via downregulation of HECTD2 and RAB1A

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, T; Wang, X; He, HH; Sweeney, CJ; Liu, SX; Brown, M.; Balk, S.; Lee, G-SM; Kantoff, PW

    2013-01-01

    Hormone-sensitive prostate cancer typically progresses to castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) after the androgen deprivation therapy. We investigated the impact of microRNAs (miRs) in the transition of prostate cancer to CRPC. MiR-221/-222 was highly expressed in bone metastatic CRPC tumor specimens. We previously demonstrated that transient overexpression of miR-221/-222 in LNCaP promoted the development of the CRPC phenotype. In current study, we show that stably overexpressing miR-...

  9. Management of bone metastases in refractory prostate cancer--role of denosumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paller, Channing J; Carducci, Michael A; Philips, George K

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the problem of bone disease in prostate cancer and the evolving role of the novel agent denosumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody that inhibits the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand, in suppressing bone resorption and offering bone protection in this disease. Prostate cancer frequently metastasizes to bone, and additionally its treatment with androgen deprivation leads to accelerated bone loss resulting in clinically relevant skeletal complications associated with disabling symptoms. Among the bone-targeting therapeutic strategies investigated for the prevention of bone complications, the potent bisphosphonate zoledronic acid has been the most widely used agent for bone protection in the past decade. Denosumab is the first among a new class of osteoclast-targeting agents to show superior efficacy in several clinical scenarios in both prostate and breast cancer, as well as in osteoporosis, but the focus of this review will be on its role in prostate cancer. The safety and efficacy of denosumab versus zoledronic acid was established in a randomized trial, demonstrating a delay in skeletal-related events in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients. This study led to the approval of denosumab in the US. The chief risks of denosumab were hypocalcemia and osteonecrosis of the jaw. Denosumab was also approved for fracture risk reduction in patients on androgen-deprivation therapy for nonmetastatic prostate cancer. Although denosumab extended bone metastasis-free survival in a Phase III trial in men with castration-resistant nonmetastatic prostate cancer to a statistically significant degree, a Food and Drug Administration committee found that the effect was not sufficiently clinically meaningful for regulatory approval, and the Food and Drug Administration issued a letter concurring with the committee's recommendation. The role of denosumab in prostate cancer will continue to evolve either as monotherapy or in

  10. Prostate cancer screenings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000846.htm Prostate cancer screenings To use the sharing features on this ... Intern Med . 2011;155(11):762-71. National Cancer Institute. Prostate Cancer Screening -- for health professionals. Revised April 2, ...

  11. 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PSA tests. Read More "6 Common Cancers" Articles Lung Cancer / Breast Cancer / Prostate Cancer / Colorectal Cancer / Skin Cancer / Gynecologic Cancers Spring 2007 Issue: Volume 2 Number 2 Page 10 MedlinePlus | Subscribe | Magazine Information | Contact Us | Viewers & ...

  12. [Staging Based Strategies and Practice for Prostate Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi-qiang; Wang, Shu-sheng; Bai, Zun-guang; Wang, Zhao-hui; Lv, Li-guo; Gu, Chi-ming; Xiang, Song-tao; Dai, Rui-xin; Zhu, Shou-lun

    2016-06-01

    Authors raised that staging based strategies and practice of integrative medicine (IM) by combining syndrome typing and disease identification, and choosing suitable measures in accordance with different persons and seasonal conditions after more than ten years' clinical practice and researches. Radical operation as prior (as evil eliminating) and strengthening vital qi in perioerative period are best strategy for promoting rapid rehabilitation of early stage prostate cancer patients. Strengthening body resistance to eliminate evil was used in treating advanced prostate cancer patients. For example, a comprehensive treatment program for hormone-dependent patients was combined with endocrinotherapy and Chinese herbs for synergisic efficacy-enhancing actions. In this way, these patients' quality of life (QOL) were improved and time to castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) was delayed, even some patients were clinically cured. There are lack of effective medicines and methods for CRPC patients. Greatly tonifying original qi is mainly used for improving their clinical symptoms and prolonging survivals. Practice has proved staging based strategies and practice of IM has favorable advantages in treating prostate cancer, especially showing prospect in prolonging survival and postponing progression of advanced prostate cancer patients. Besides, it also could provide beneficial considerations and inspiration for combination of syndrome typing and disease identification. PMID:27491237

  13. Hydrogen Sulfide Signaling Axis as a Target for Prostate Cancer Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingzhe Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S was originally considered toxic at elevated levels; however just in the past decade H2S has been proposed to be an important gasotransmitter with various physiological and pathophysiological roles in the body. H2S can be generated endogenously from L-cysteine by multiple enzymes, including cystathionine gamma-lyase, cystathionine beta-synthase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase in combination with cysteine aminotransferase. Prostate cancer is a major health concern and no effective treatment for prostate cancers is available. H2S has been shown to inhibit cell survival of androgen-independent, androgen-dependent, and antiandrogen-resistant prostate cancer cells through different mechanisms. Various H2S-releasing compounds, including sulfide salts, diallyl disulfide, diallyl trisulfide, sulforaphane, and other polysulfides, also have been shown to inhibit prostate cancer growth and metastasis. The expression of H2S-producing enzyme was reduced in both human prostate cancer tissues and prostate cancer cells. Androgen receptor (AR signaling is indispensable for the development of castration resistant prostate cancer, and H2S was shown to inhibit AR transactivation and contributes to antiandrogen-resistant status. In this review, we summarized the current knowledge of H2S signaling in prostate cancer and described the molecular alterations, which may bring this gasotransmitter into the clinic in the near future for developing novel pharmacological and therapeutic interventions for prostate cancer.

  14. Galeterone for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer: the evidence to date

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastos DA

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Diogo A Bastos,1 Emmanuel S Antonarakis2 1Department of Oncology, Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Sao Paulo, Brazil; 2Department of Oncology and Urology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Major advances have been achieved recently in the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, resulting in significant improvements in quality of life and survival with the use of several new agents, including the next-generation androgen receptor (AR-targeted drugs abiraterone and enzalutamide. However, virtually all patients will eventually progress on these therapies and most will ultimately die of treatment-refractory metastatic disease. Recently, several mechanisms of resistance to AR-directed therapies have been uncovered, including the AR splice variant 7 (AR-V7, which is a ligand-independent constitutionally-active form of the AR that has been associated with poor outcomes to abiraterone and enzalutamide. Galeterone, a potent anti-androgen with three modes of action (CYP17 lyase inhibition, AR antagonism, and AR degradation, is a novel agent under clinical development that could potentially target both full-length AR and aberrant AR, including AR-V7. In this manuscript, we will first discuss the biological mechanisms of action of galeterone and then review the safety and efficacy data from Phase I and II clinical studies of galeterone in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. A Phase III study of galeterone (compared against enzalutamide in AR-V7-positive patients is currently underway, and represents the first pivotal trial using a biomarker-selection design in this disease. Keywords: galeterone, AR splice variants, AR-V7, castration-resistant prostate cancer

  15. To Die or to Survive, a Fatal Question for the Destiny of Prostate Cancer Cells after Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed non-skin cancer in adult males in North America and is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality. For locally advanced or metastatic disease, androgen deprivation, through medical or surgical castration, is the primary treatment to induce prostate cancer cell death and extend patient survival. However, the vast majority of cancers progress to a castration-resistant/androgen-independent state where the cell death processes are no longer active. This review describes the main cell death processes, apoptosis, autophagy, necrosis and necroptosis, which may be activated in prostate cancers after androgen deprivation therapy as well as the molecular mechanisms through which the cancers progress to become castration resistant. In particular, the central role of persistent androgen receptor (AR)-mediated signaling and AR crosstalk with other critical cell signaling pathways, including (i) the PI3K/Akt pathway, (ii) receptor tyrosine kinases, (iii) the p38 MAPK pathway, and (iv) the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, as well as reactivation of AR by de novo synthesized androgen are discussed in this context. Understanding the molecular changes that subvert normal cell death mechanisms and thereby compromise the survival of prostate cancer patients continues to be a major challenge

  16. To Die or to Survive, a Fatal Question for the Destiny of Prostate Cancer Cells after Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Kai-Xin; Firus, Jessica; Prieur, Brenda [The Vancouver Prostate Centre, 2660 Oak St., Vancouver, BC V6H 3Z6 (Canada); Department of Urologic Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6H 3Z6 (Canada); Jia, William [Department of Surgery and Brain Research Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6H 3Z6 (Canada); Rennie, Paul S., E-mail: prennie@interchange.ubc.ca [The Vancouver Prostate Centre, 2660 Oak St., Vancouver, BC V6H 3Z6 (Canada); Department of Urologic Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6H 3Z6 (Canada)

    2011-03-24

    Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed non-skin cancer in adult males in North America and is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality. For locally advanced or metastatic disease, androgen deprivation, through medical or surgical castration, is the primary treatment to induce prostate cancer cell death and extend patient survival. However, the vast majority of cancers progress to a castration-resistant/androgen-independent state where the cell death processes are no longer active. This review describes the main cell death processes, apoptosis, autophagy, necrosis and necroptosis, which may be activated in prostate cancers after androgen deprivation therapy as well as the molecular mechanisms through which the cancers progress to become castration resistant. In particular, the central role of persistent androgen receptor (AR)-mediated signaling and AR crosstalk with other critical cell signaling pathways, including (i) the PI3K/Akt pathway, (ii) receptor tyrosine kinases, (iii) the p38 MAPK pathway, and (iv) the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, as well as reactivation of AR by de novo synthesized androgen are discussed in this context. Understanding the molecular changes that subvert normal cell death mechanisms and thereby compromise the survival of prostate cancer patients continues to be a major challenge.

  17. Low-dose prednisolone in first-line docetaxel for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Per; Svane, Inge Marie; Lindberg, Henriette;

    2015-01-01

    incidence of peripheral edema (32% vs. 15%, P<0.001) and grade 3 nonhematological toxicity (56% vs. 43%, P = 0.022). Patients treated with D alone were also more frequently hospitalized (53% vs. 41%, P = 0.035), mainly owing to a higher incidence of febrile neutropenia in this group (25% vs. 10%, P<0......% CI: 0.76-1.26, P = 0.89, Cox proportional hazard regression model). CONCLUSIONS: Coadministration of low-dose P reduced the incidence of peripheral edema, grade 3 nonhematological toxicity, and the risk of being admitted owing to febrile neutropenia during treatment with D. Adjusted survival analysis...

  18. Battling resistance mechanisms in antihormonal prostate cancer treatment: Novel agents and combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Maeseneer, Daan Joost; Van Praet, Charles; Lumen, Nicolaas; Rottey, Sylvie

    2015-07-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is a hormone-sensitive disease. Androgen deprivation therapy lowers serum testosterone levels (castration) or blocks the androgen receptor (AR) ligand-binding domain. Especially in metastatic disease, hormonal therapy has been able to delay disease progression, reduce symptoms, and improve overall survival. Despite subsequent disease progression and development of castration resistance, PCa remains AR driven. Secondary hormonal treatments such as abiraterone acetate or enzalutamide have demonstrated increased overall survival. However, new resistance mechanisms to these agents have been identified, and systemic chemotherapy is still needed especially in fast-progressing castration-resistant PCa. Several promising androgen synthesis inhibitors (orteronel and galeterone), AR inhibitors (ARN-509, EPI-001, AZD3514, and ODM-201), and heat shock protein modulators (AT11387, 17-DMAG, STA-9090, and OGX-427) are currently under investigation. The wide variety in upcoming systemic agents underlines the molecular heterogeneity of castration-resistant PCa. This article reviews antihormonal therapy in PCa and resistance mechanisms and focuses on novel and upcoming agents currently in clinical testing. PMID:25708954

  19. Cysteine- rich secretory protein 3 (CRISP3), ERG and PTEN define a molecular subtype of prostate cancer with implication to patients’ prognosis

    OpenAIRE

    Al Bashir, Samir; Alshalalfa, Mohammed; Hegazy, Samar A.; Dolph, Michael; Donnelly, Bryan; Bismar, Tarek A.

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine- rich secretory protein 3 (CRISP3) prognostic significance in prostate cancer (PCA) has generated mixed result. Herein, we investigated and independently validated CRISP3 expression in relation to ERG and PTEN genomic aberrations and clinical outcome. CRISP3 protein expression was examined by immunohistochemistry using a cohort of patients with localized PCA (n = 215) and castration resistant PCA (CRPC) (n = 46). The Memorial Sloan Kettering (MSKCC) and Swedish cohorts were used for ...

  20. Prostate cancer staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000397.htm Prostate cancer staging To use the sharing features on this ... trials you may be able to join How Prostate Cancer Staging is Done Initial staging is based on ...

  1. What Is Prostate Cancer?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... In the United States, one in ten men will develop prostate cancer in their lifetime. Age is ... disease that's very benevolent in its behavior. Men will develop prostate cancer and live the rest of ...

  2. What Is Prostate Cancer?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... United States, one in ten men will develop prostate cancer in their lifetime. Age is the most important risk factor in prostate cancer -- the longer a man lives the more likely ...

  3. Screening for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Internal Medicine Summaries for Patients Screening for Prostate Cancer: A Guidance Statement From the Clinical Guidelines Committee ... Physicians The full report is titled “Screening for Prostate Cancer: A Guidance Statement From the Clinical Guidelines Committee ...

  4. Prostate Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treat. There is no standard screening test for prostate cancer. Researchers are studying different tests to find those ... PSA level may be high if you have prostate cancer. It can also be high if you have ...

  5. Prostate Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prostate cancer increases as men get older. Family history of prostate cancer A man whose father, brother, ... some foods, such as green vegetables, beans and orange juice. Folic acid is a man-made form ...

  6. What Is Prostate Cancer?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... important risk factor in prostate cancer -- the longer a man lives the more likely he is to ... men confront the reality of prostate cancer on a visit to their urologist. John Bertini, M.D.: ...

  7. Prostate cancer in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasso, K; Friis, S; Kjaer, S K;

    1998-01-01

    To review the trends in prostate cancer (PC) incidence and mortality rates in Denmark during a 50-year period.......To review the trends in prostate cancer (PC) incidence and mortality rates in Denmark during a 50-year period....

  8. Prostate Cancer Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Faces of Prostate Cancer [4] Survivors Everyday Heroes PCF Researchers Share your story About PCF [1] ... in advanced prostate cancer patients regardless of family history, and are associated with poorer responses to hormonal ...

  9. Neoadjuvant Treatment of High-Risk, Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer Prior to Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietzak, Eugene J; Eastham, James A

    2016-05-01

    Multimodal strategies combining local and systemic therapy offer the greatest chance of cure for many with men with high-risk prostate cancer who may harbor occult metastatic disease. However, no systemic therapy combined with radical prostatectomy has proven beneficial. This was in part due to a lack of effective systemic agents; however, there have been several advancements in the metastatic and castrate-resistant prostate cancer that might prove beneficial if given earlier in the natural history of the disease. For example, novel hormonal agents have recently been approved for castration-resistant prostate cancer with some early phase II neoadjuvant showing promise. Additionally, combination therapy with docetaxel-based chemohormonal has demonstrated a profound survival benefit in metastatic hormone-naïve patients and might have a role in eliminating pre-existing ADT-resistant tumor cells in the neoadjuvant setting. The Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB)/Alliance 90203 trial has finished accrual and should answer the question as to whether neoadjuvant docetaxel-based chemohormonal therapy provides an advantage over prostatectomy alone. There are also several promising targeted agents and immunotherapies under investigation in phase I/II trials with the potential to provide benefit in the neoadjuvant setting. PMID:26968417

  10. Prostate cancer stem cells: the role of androgen and estrogen receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Zazzo, Erika; Galasso, Giovanni; Giovannelli, Pia; Di Donato, Marzia; Di Santi, Annalisa; Cernera, Gustavo; Rossi, Valentina; Abbondanza, Ciro; Moncharmont, Bruno; Sinisi, Antonio Agostino; Castoria, Gabriella; Migliaccio, Antimo

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in men, and androgen deprivation therapy still represents the primary treatment for prostate cancer patients. This approach, however, frequently fails and patients develop castration-resistant prostate cancer, which is almost untreatable.Cancer cells are characterized by a hierarchical organization, and stem/progenitor cells are endowed with tumor-initiating activity. Accumulating evidence indicates that prostate cancer stem cells lack the androgen receptor and are, indeed, resistant to androgen deprivation therapy. In contrast, these cells express classical (α and/or β) and novel (GPR30) estrogen receptors, which may represent new putative targets in prostate cancer treatment.In the present review, we discuss the still-debated mechanisms, both genomic and non-genomic, by which androgen and estradiol receptors (classical and novel) mediate the hormonal control of prostate cell stemness, transformation, and the continued growth of prostate cancer. Recent preclinical and clinical findings obtained using new androgen receptor antagonists, anti-estrogens, or compounds such as enhancers of androgen receptor degradation and peptides inhibiting non-genomic androgen functions are also presented. These new drugs will likely lead to significant advances in prostate cancer therapy. PMID:26506594

  11. Positive Influence of 177Lu PSMA-617 Therapy on Bone Marrow Depression Caused by Metastatic Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenkhoff, Carl Diedrich; Gaertner, Florian; Essler, Markus; Schmidt, Matthias; Ahmadzadehfar, Hojjat

    2016-06-01

    A 75-year-old man with castrate-resistant prostate cancer and increasing prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level developed severe bone marrow depression during Ra radionuclide therapy. Because of this, he was treated with Lu-PSMA in compassionate use for this not-yet-approved therapy. At the beginning of Lu-PSMA therapy, repeated blood transfusions (BT) were necessary. Six months after the last BT, after 3 cycles of Lu-PSMA, his blood count stabilized. He required no further BTs and his PSA level remained lowered. PMID:26909716

  12. Abiraterone acetate for prostate cancer: a new era of hormonal therapies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emmanuel S Antonarakis

    2011-01-01

    @@ Therapies targeting the androgen receptor (AR) axis have constituted the Holy Grail in the management of advanced prostate cancer for seven decades.1 These hormonal therapies have traditionally taken two main forms: those that suppress gonadal androgen synthesis (e.g.,the gonadotropin releasing hormone agonists/antagonists,such as leuprolide),and those that inhibit the AR directly (e.g.,the anti-androgens,such asbicalutamide).However,although the vast majority of patients with prostate cancer initially respond favorably to androgen-ablative therapies (manifested by tumor regressions and symptomatic improvements),all patients will eventually develop further disease progression after a median of 18-24 months.This transformed disease state,known as castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC),is invariably fatal.

  13. Was DHT production by 5α-reductase friend or for in prostate cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeo eKosaka

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The first advance in the history of studies on prostate cancer and androgens was the development of treatment with castration and administration of estrogen by Charles B Huggins, who won the Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine. Since then, and for 70 years, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT has been the standard therapy for advanced prostate cancer and the center of studies on prostate cancer (PCa. However, recent advances have shed light on the relationship between androgens and the development or the progression of PCa. The use of 5AR inhibitors to prevent progression of PCa continues to be widely discussed. Discussion has been fueled by the findings of two large randomized, placebo-controlled trials: the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT with finasteride and the Reduction by Dutasteride of Prostate Cancer Events (REDUCE trial. Does the development of prostate cancer or progression to castration resistant prostate cancer depend on DHT? Here we summarize and discuss recent topics of local androgen production of DHT in prostate cancer.

  14. Oncolytic adenovirus-mediated therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Katrina; Halldén, Gunnel

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death and morbidity in men in the Western world. Tumor progression is dependent on functioning androgen receptor signaling, and initial administration of antiandrogens and hormone therapy (androgen-deprivation therapy) prevent growth and spread. Tumors frequently develop escape mechanisms to androgen-deprivation therapy and progress to castration-resistant late-stage metastatic disease that, in turn, inevitably leads to resistance to all current therapeutics, including chemotherapy. In spite of the recent development of more effective inhibitors of androgen-androgen receptor signaling such as enzalutamide and abiraterone, patient survival benefits are still limited. Oncolytic adenoviruses have proven efficacy in prostate cancer cells and cause regression of tumors in preclinical models of numerous drug-resistant cancers. Data from clinical trials demonstrate that adenoviral mutants have limited toxicity to normal tissues and are safe when administered to patients with various solid cancers, including prostate cancer. While efficacy in response to adenovirus administration alone is marginal, findings from early-phase trials targeting local-ized and metastatic prostate cancer suggest improved efficacy in combination with cytotoxic drugs and radiation therapy. Here, we review recent progress in the development of multimodal oncolytic adenoviruses as biological therapeutics to improve on tumor elimination in prostate cancer patients. These optimized mutants target cancer cells by several mechanisms including viral lysis and by expression of cytotoxic transgenes and immune-stimulatory factors that activate the host immune system to destroy both infected and noninfected prostate cancer cells. Additional modifications of the viral capsid proteins may support future systemic delivery of oncolytic adenoviruses. PMID:27579296

  15. Optimization of Invasion-Specific Effects of Betulin Derivatives on Prostate Cancer Cells through Lead Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Johannes; Ahonen, Ilmari; Schukov, Hannu-Pekka; Alakurtti, Sami; Purev, Enkhee; Rischer, Heiko; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari; Moreira, Vânia M.; Nees, Matthias; Oksman-Caldentey, Kirsi-Marja

    2015-01-01

    The anti-invasive and anti-proliferative effects of betulins and abietane derivatives was systematically tested using an organotypic model system of advanced, castration-resistant prostate cancers. A preliminary screen of the initial set of 93 compounds was performed in two-dimensional (2D) growth conditions using non-transformed prostate epithelial cells (EP156T), an androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cell line (LNCaP), and the castration-resistant, highly invasive cell line PC-3. The 25 most promising compounds were all betulin derivatives. These were selected for a focused secondary screen in three-dimensional (3D) growth conditions, with the goal to identify the most effective and specific anti-invasive compounds. Additional sensitivity and cytotoxicity tests were then performed using an extended cell line panel. The effects of these compounds on cell cycle progression, mitosis, proliferation and unspecific cytotoxicity, versus their ability to specifically interfere with cell motility and tumor cell invasion was addressed. To identify potential mechanisms of action and likely compound targets, multiplex profiling of compound effects on a panel of 43 human protein kinases was performed. These target de-convolution studies, combined with the phenotypic analyses of multicellular organoids in 3D models, revealed specific inhibition of AKT signaling linked to effects on the organization of the actin cytoskeleton as the most likely driver of altered cell morphology and motility. PMID:25965345

  16. Optimization of Invasion-Specific Effects of Betulin Derivatives on Prostate Cancer Cells through Lead Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ville Härmä

    Full Text Available The anti-invasive and anti-proliferative effects of betulins and abietane derivatives was systematically tested using an organotypic model system of advanced, castration-resistant prostate cancers. A preliminary screen of the initial set of 93 compounds was performed in two-dimensional (2D growth conditions using non-transformed prostate epithelial cells (EP156T, an androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cell line (LNCaP, and the castration-resistant, highly invasive cell line PC-3. The 25 most promising compounds were all betulin derivatives. These were selected for a focused secondary screen in three-dimensional (3D growth conditions, with the goal to identify the most effective and specific anti-invasive compounds. Additional sensitivity and cytotoxicity tests were then performed using an extended cell line panel. The effects of these compounds on cell cycle progression, mitosis, proliferation and unspecific cytotoxicity, versus their ability to specifically interfere with cell motility and tumor cell invasion was addressed. To identify potential mechanisms of action and likely compound targets, multiplex profiling of compound effects on a panel of 43 human protein kinases was performed. These target de-convolution studies, combined with the phenotypic analyses of multicellular organoids in 3D models, revealed specific inhibition of AKT signaling linked to effects on the organization of the actin cytoskeleton as the most likely driver of altered cell morphology and motility.

  17. MicroRNA in prostate cancer: Practical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Pallavi A; Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina

    2015-12-01

    In the last decade, microRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as biomarkers for cancer diagnosis, prognosis, therapy and prediction of treatment response and have earned a promising role in prostate cancer (PCa) management. A plethora of studies has been conducted on miRNA expression in PCa compared to non-neoplastic prostatic tissue, in PCa of different histologic grades and pathologic stages, in castration resistance prostate cancer (CRPC), in metastatic disease and in response to therapy, with evidence pointing towards distinctive miRNAs differentially expressed in each of these phases. In addition to tissue, miRNA can be detected in blood, serum, and urine. The aim of this review is to survey studies conducted on human prostate tissue and biofluids and to consolidate trustworthy data on the role of miRNA in the occurrence and progression of PCa, with a delineation of differentially expressed miRNAs and an analysis of their association with PCa prognosis, progression to CRPC and metastatic disease, as well as their correlation with response to chemotherapy and hormonal therapy. Changes in circulating miRNAs may represent potentially useful non-invasive biomarkers for PCa diagnosis, staging and prediction of outcome. PMID:26186079

  18. Clinical Implications of Hedgehog Pathway Signaling in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L. Suzman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Activity in the Hedgehog pathway, which regulates GLI-mediated transcription, is important in organogenesis and stem cell regulation in self-renewing organs, but is pathologically elevated in many human malignancies. Mutations leading to constitutive activation of the pathway have been implicated in medulloblastoma and basal cell carcinoma, and inhibition of the pathway has demonstrated clinical responses leading to the approval of the Smoothened inhibitor, vismodegib, for the treatment of advanced basal cell carcinoma. Aberrant Hedgehog pathway signaling has also been noted in prostate cancer with evidence suggesting that it may render prostate epithelial cells tumorigenic, drive the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and contribute towards the development of castration-resistance through autocrine and paracrine signaling within the tumor microenvironment and cross-talk with the androgen pathway. In addition, there are emerging clinical data suggesting that inhibition of the Hedgehog pathway may be effective in the treatment of recurrent and metastatic prostate cancer. Here we will review these data and highlight areas of active clinical research as they relate to Hedgehog pathway inhibition in prostate cancer.

  19. Prostate cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Tu, Shi-Ming; Lin, Sue-Hwa

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells have long been implicated in prostate glandular formation. The prostate undergoes regression after androgen deprivation and regeneration after testosterone replacement. Regenerative studies suggest that these cells are found in the proximal ducts and basal layer of the prostate. Many characteristics of prostate cancer indicate that it originates from stem cells. For example, the putative AR− status of prostate stem cells renders them inherently insensitive to androgen blockade ther...

  20. Cryotherapy for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cryotherapy uses very cold temperatures to freeze and kill prostate cancer cells. The goal of cryosurgery is ... Possible short-term side effects of cryotherapy for prostate ... of the penis or scrotum Problems controlling your bladder (more ...

  1. Detecting Prostate Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... like to do is just do a rectal examination and feel that prostate. Narrator: The other necessary ... they do have an abnormality in their rectal examination does not mean that they have prostate cancer. ...

  2. Prostate Cancer: Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer: Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment Past Issues / Winter ... Read More "Prostate Cancer" Articles Progress Against Prostate Cancer / Prostate Cancer Research Trial Helps John Spencer Treat His ...

  3. Hormone therapy for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000908.htm Hormone therapy for prostate cancer To use the sharing ... helps slow the growth of prostate cancer. Male Hormones and Prostate Cancer Androgens are male sex hormones. ...

  4. Vaccine Treatment for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Preventing and treating prostate cancer spread to bones Vaccine treatment for prostate cancer Sipuleucel-T (Provenge) is ... less advanced prostate cancer. Possible side effects of vaccine treatment Side effects from the vaccine tend to ...

  5. The molecular and cellular origin of human prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, John R; Maitland, Norman J

    2016-06-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed male malignancy. Despite compelling epidemiology, there are no definitive aetiological clues linking development to frequency. Pre-malignancies such as proliferative inflammatory atrophy (PIA) and prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) yield insights into the initiating events of prostate cancer, as they supply a background "field" for further transformation. An inflammatory aetiology, linked to recurrent prostatitis, and heterologous signalling from reactive stroma and infiltrating immune cells may result in cytokine addiction of cancer cells, including a tumour-initiating population also known as cancer stem cells (CSCs). In prostate tumours, the background mutational rate is rarely exceeded, but genetic change via profound sporadic chromosomal rearrangements results in copy number variations and aberrant gene expression. In cancer, dysfunctional differentiation is imposed upon the normal epithelial lineage, with disruption/disappearance of the basement membrane, loss of the contiguous basal cell layer and expansion of the luminal population. An initiating role for androgen receptor (AR) is attractive, due to the luminal phenotype of the tumours, but alternatively a pool of CSCs, which express little or no AR, has also been demonstrated. Indolent and aggressive tumours may also arise from different stem or progenitor cells. Castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) remains the inevitable final stage of disease following treatment. Time-limited effectiveness of second-generation anti-androgens, and the appearance of an AR-neuroendocrine phenotype imply that metastatic disease is reliant upon the plasticity of the CSC population, and indeed CSC gene expression profiles are most closely related to those identified in CRPCs. PMID:26921821

  6. Genetics and genomics of prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael Dean; Hong Lou

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most common malignancies in the world with over 890 000 cases and over 258 000 deaths worldwide each year.Nearly all mortalities from PCa are due to metastatic disease,typically through tumors that evolve to be hormone-refractory or castrate-resistant.Despite intensive epidemiological study,there are few known environmental risk factors,and age and family history are the major determinants.However,there is extreme heterogeneity in PCa incidence worldwide,suggesting that major determining factors have not been described.Genome-wide association studies have been performed and a considerable number of significant,but low-risk loci have been identified.In addition,several groups have analyzed PCa by determination of genomic copy number,fusion gene generation and targeted resequencing of candidate genes,as well as exome and whole genome sequencing.These initial studies have examined both primary and metastatic tumors as well as murine xenografts and identified somatic alterations in TP53 and other potential driver genes,and the disturbance of androgen response and cell cycle pathways.It is hoped that continued characterization of risk factors as well as gene mutation and misregulation in tumors will aid in understanding,diagnosing and better treating PCa.

  7. Prostate Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Cancer screening is looking for cancer before you have any ... be easier to treat. There is no standard screening test for prostate cancer. Researchers are studying different ...

  8. Prostate cancer staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... effects of treatment The chance that treatment can cure your cancer or help you in other ways With stage ... III prostate cancer, the main goal is to cure the cancer by treating it and keeping it from coming ...

  9. Trading in your spindles for blebs: the amoeboid tumor cell phenotype in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Morley

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa remains a principal cause of mortality in developed countries. Because no clinical interventions overcome resistance to androgen ablation therapy, management of castration resistance and metastatic disease remains largely untreatable. Metastasis is a multistep process in which tumor cells lose cell-cell contacts, egress from the primary tumor, intravasate, survive shear stress within the vasculature and extravasate into tissues to colonize ectopic sites. Tumor cells reestablish migratory behaviors employed during nonneoplastic processes such as embryonic development, leukocyte trafficking and wound healing. While mesenchymal motility is an established paradigm of dissemination, an alternate, 'amoeboid' phenotype is increasingly appreciated as relevant to human cancer. Here we discuss characteristics and pathways underlying the phenotype, and highlight our findings that the cytoskeletal regulator DIAPH3 governs the mesenchymal-amoeboid transition. We also describe our identification of a new class of tumor-derived microvesicles, large oncosomes, produced by amoeboid cells and with potential clinical utility in prostate and other cancers.

  10. Long-term Efficacy and Safety of Enzalutamide Monotherapy in Hormone-naïve Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tombal, Bertrand; Borre, Michael; Rathenborg, Per;

    2015-01-01

    prespecified primary endpoint (ie, prostate-specific antigen [PSA] response at week 25), regardless of metastases at baseline, and favorable tolerability. OBJECTIVE: To determine the long-term efficacy and safety of enzalutamide monotherapy at 1 and 2 yr. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Open-label, single...... reductions in PSA, signals indicating a favorable tumor response, and favorable safety/tolerability profile, with relatively small negative effects on total-body BMD. PATIENT SUMMARY: In this long-term follow-up of the efficacy and safety of enzalutamide monotherapy in patients with hormone-naïve prostate......BACKGROUND: Enzalutamide is an androgen receptor inhibitor with a demonstrated overall survival benefit in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. A phase 2 study of enzalutamide monotherapy in patients with hormone-naïve prostate cancer (HNPC) showed a high response rate for the...

  11. Why Chemotherapy Should be Given Early for Men with Metastatic Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Aya, Leonel F; Hussain, Maha

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer (mHSPC) is an incurable disease, and despite a high response rate to androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT), outcomes have not significantly changed for many decades. Earlier attempts at multitargeted strategies with the addition of cytotoxic chemotherapy to ADT did not affect survival. As more effective therapies are emerging, including cytotoxic therapy for patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), there is increasing interest for testing these drugs earlier in the disease course. The premise is that agents with clinical benefit in advanced mCRPC may have a better effect if used preemptively before the development of significant resistance and to attack earlier de novo androgen resistant/independent clones. The recent results of the phase III clinical trial E3805 investigating ADT with or without docetaxel in mHSPC provide compelling support for this strategy. Docetaxel combined with ADT significantly improved overall survival from 44 to 57.6 months (p=0.0003), particularly in patients with high-volume disease (from 32.2 to 49.2 months; p=0.0006). Longer follow-up is needed to assess the effect on patients with low disease burden. Further studies are needed to further maximize the antitumor effect in patients with mHSPC and to investigate the effects of advancing therapy to this disease setting on the efficacy of respective agents in the castration-resistant setting. PMID:25993184

  12. Advanced prostate cancer – patient survival and potential impact of enzalutamide and other emerging therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel NK

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Nihar K Patel, Antoine Finianos, Kristen D Whitaker, Jeanny B Aragon-Ching Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology and Oncology, George Washington University Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA Abstract: The advent of exponential growth of novel agents tested and approved for the treatment of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC has brought about a need for understanding of the mechanism of action, side-effects, and clinical efficacy of these drugs as they relate to these patients. This review will provide a synopsis of the treatment landscape in mCRPC as varying agents such as abiraterone acetate, cabazitaxel, sipuleucel-T, radium, and selected emerging agents are presented. A distinct focus on the utilization of enzalutamide, its mechanism of action, key pivotal trials that brought about its US Food and Drug Administration approval, as well as patient-focused perspectives and clinical implications are discussed herein. Keywords: metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, enzalutamide, systemic therapies

  13. Management of bone metastases in refractory prostate cancer – role of denosumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paller CJ

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Channing J Paller,1 Michael A Carducci,1 George K Philips21Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, MD, USA; 2Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Washington DC, USAAbstract: This article reviews the problem of bone disease in prostate cancer and the evolving role of the novel agent denosumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody that inhibits the receptor activator of nuclear factor-ΚB ligand, in suppressing bone resorption and offering bone protection in this disease. Prostate cancer frequently metastasizes to bone, and additionally its treatment with androgen deprivation leads to accelerated bone loss resulting in clinically relevant skeletal complications associated with disabling symptoms. Among the bone-targeting therapeutic strategies investigated for the prevention of bone complications, the potent bisphosphonate zoledronic acid has been the most widely used agent for bone protection in the past decade. Denosumab is the first among a new class of osteoclast-targeting agents to show superior efficacy in several clinical scenarios in both prostate and breast cancer, as well as in osteoporosis, but the focus of this review will be on its role in prostate cancer. The safety and efficacy of denosumab versus zoledronic acid was established in a randomized trial, demonstrating a delay in skeletal-related events in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients. This study led to the approval of denosumab in the US. The chief risks of denosumab were hypocalcemia and osteonecrosis of the jaw. Denosumab was also approved for fracture risk reduction in patients on androgen-deprivation therapy for nonmetastatic prostate cancer. Although denosumab extended bone metastasis-free survival in a Phase III trial in men with castration-resistant nonmetastatic prostate cancer to a statistically significant degree, a Food and Drug Administration committee found that the effect was not sufficiently clinically

  14. The SWI/SNF ATPase Brm is a gatekeeper of proliferative control in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hui; Powers, Nathan; Saini, Nitin; Comstock, Clay E S; Sharma, Ankur; Weaver, Katherine; Revelo, Monica P; Gerald, William; Williams, Erin; Jessen, Walter J; Aronow, Bruce J; Rosson, Gary; Weissman, Bernard; Muchardt, Christian; Yaniv, Moshe; Knudsen, Karen E

    2008-12-15

    Factors that drive prostate cancer progression remain poorly defined, thus hindering the development of new therapeutic strategies. Disseminated tumors are treated through regimens that ablate androgen signaling, as prostate cancer cells require androgen for growth and survival. However, recurrent, incurable tumors that have bypassed the androgen requirement ultimately arise. This study reveals that the Brm ATPase, a component of selected SWI/SNF complexes, has significant antiproliferative functions in the prostate that protect against these transitions. First, we show that targeted ablation of Brm is causative for the development of prostatic hyperplasia in mice. Second, in vivo challenge revealed that Brm-/- epithelia acquire the capacity for lobe-specific, castration-resistant cellular proliferation. Third, investigation of human specimens revealed that Brm mRNA and protein levels are attenuated in prostate cancer. Fourth, Brm down-regulation was associated with an increased proliferative index, consistent with the mouse model. Lastly, gene expression profiling showed that Brm loss alters factors upstream of E2F1; this was confirmed in murine models, wherein Brm loss induced E2F1 deregulation in a tissue-specific manner. Combined, these data identify Brm as a major effector of serum androgen-induced proliferation in the prostate that is disrupted in human disease, and indicate that loss of Brm confers a proliferative advantage in prostate cancer. PMID:19074882

  15. What Is Prostate Cancer?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the more likely he is to develop the disease. Physician: Come on back, first room. Narrator: Most ... cancer. Prostate cancer is really a spectrum of diseases where on one end of the spectrum there ...

  16. Detecting Prostate Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... abnormal and raises the index of suspicion that cancer may be present. Narrator: While the use of ... examination does not mean that they have prostate cancer. It means that we're concerned about it ...

  17. Prostate Cancer Research Trial Helps John Spencer Treat His Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer Research Trial Helps John Spencer Treat His ... Read More "Prostate Cancer" Articles Progress Against Prostate Cancer / Prostate Cancer Research Trial Helps John Spencer Treat His ...

  18. Prostate Cancer: Countdown to Choice between Stitch in Time and Eleventh Hour Begins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammad Ahmad Farooqi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Androgen ablation therapy presumed to be an effective treatment for advanced prostate cancer (PCa is relentlessly challenged. Remissions are impermanent and patients almost inescapably progress to become castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. CRPC is almost invincible and is the major stumbling block in the treatment. It is a dramatic shift of androgen receptor (AR from normal activities to the oncogenesis. AR signaling is remarkably increased under an androgen-depleted environment. It utilizes a miscellany of mechanisms and pathways to compensate for the decreasing levels of androgens. These range from mutations in the receptor more like a business tactic to attract more clients, to the illegitimate crosstalks which promote the signaling. The review will encompass various mechanistic insights of the AR manipulations. Moreover efficacy of therapeutic interventions recently designed keeping in view the molecular hierarchy will be evaluated.

  19. The complexities of identifying a cell of origin for human prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gail P Risbridger; Renea A Taylor

    2011-01-01

    @@ Prostate cancer(PCa)is the second most common malignancy in men1 and ifloca-lized or confined to the gland at diagnosis,the choice of treatment includes surgery,radiation or watchful waiting.If and when the disease spreads,androgen blockade is effective but inevitably relapse occurs,resulting in incurable castrate-resistant PCa.Understanding the etiology of PCa will underpin the development of better treatment options In particular,the identity of the cell type(s)that are the origin of PCa(or cancer-initiating cells)will enable them to become therapeutic targets that could lead to newer and more sophisticated treatment options.These cells of origin are defined as epithelial cells in the normal prostate,susceptible to malignant transformation and therefore capable of initiating tumourigenesis.However,their identity is unknown.

  20. Enzalutamide monotherapy: Phase II study results in patients with hormone-naive prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tombal, Bertrand; Borre, Michael; Rathenborg, Per Zier;

    2013-01-01

    studies that exclusively enrolled patients with CRPC receiving androgen deprivation therapy (ie, testosterone (T) levels #50 ng/dL), this phase II study assessed the efficacy and safety of ENZA monotherapy in patients who had never received hormone therapy; presenting with non-castrate T levels ($230 ng....../dL). Methods: This was a 25-wk, open-label, single-arm study of patients with hormone-naïve, histologically confirmed prostate cancer (all stages) requiring hormonal treatment, an ECOG PS score of 0,and a life expectancy .1 y. All patients received ENZA 160 mg/d without concomitment castration. Primary endpoint......Background: Enzalutamide (ENZA) is an oral androgen receptor inhibitor that has been approved in the US and shown to increase overall survival by 4.8 months over a placebo (HR,0.63) in patients with metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) previously treated with docetaxel (Scher et...

  1. Droplet Digital PCR Based Androgen Receptor Variant 7 (AR-V7) Detection from Prostate Cancer Patient Blood Biopsies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yafeng; Luk, Alison; Young, Francis P.; Lynch, David; Chua, Wei; Balakrishnar, Bavanthi; de Souza, Paul; Becker, Therese M.

    2016-01-01

    Androgen receptor splice variant V7 (AR-V7) was recently identified as a valuable predictive biomarker in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer. Here, we report a new, sensitive and accurate screen for AR-V7 mRNA expression directly from circulating tumor cells (CTCs): We combined EpCAM-based immunomagnetic CTC isolation using the IsoFlux microfluidic platform with droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) to analyze total AR and AR-V7 expression from prostate cancer patients CTCs. We demonstrate that AR-V7 is reliably detectable in enriched CTC samples with as little as five CTCs, even considering tumor heterogeneity, and confirm detection of AR-V7 in CTC samples from advanced prostate cancer (PCa) patients with AR-V7 detection limited to castrate resistant disease status in our sample set. Sensitive molecular analyses of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) or circulating tumor nucleic acids present exciting strategies to detect biomarkers, such as AR-V7 from non-invasive blood samples, so-called blood biopsies. PMID:27527157

  2. Droplet Digital PCR Based Androgen Receptor Variant 7 (AR-V7 Detection from Prostate Cancer Patient Blood Biopsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yafeng Ma

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Androgen receptor splice variant V7 (AR-V7 was recently identified as a valuable predictive biomarker in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer. Here, we report a new, sensitive and accurate screen for AR-V7 mRNA expression directly from circulating tumor cells (CTCs: We combined EpCAM-based immunomagnetic CTC isolation using the IsoFlux microfluidic platform with droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR to analyze total AR and AR-V7 expression from prostate cancer patients CTCs. We demonstrate that AR-V7 is reliably detectable in enriched CTC samples with as little as five CTCs, even considering tumor heterogeneity, and confirm detection of AR-V7 in CTC samples from advanced prostate cancer (PCa patients with AR-V7 detection limited to castrate resistant disease status in our sample set. Sensitive molecular analyses of circulating tumor cells (CTCs or circulating tumor nucleic acids present exciting strategies to detect biomarkers, such as AR-V7 from non-invasive blood samples, so-called blood biopsies.

  3. Sequential Androgen Receptor Pathway Inhibitor in Prostate Cancer: Piling-Up The Benefits or a Case for Cross-Resistance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand Tombal

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In the last 10 years, there has been accumulating evidence that, even in a low serum testosterone environment, the androgen receptor (AR remains the main driver of prostate cancer progression. This has led to the discovery and clinical development of new anti-androgens and androgen biosynthesis inhibitors. Enzalutamide and abiraterone acetate are the lead compounds of this new generation of agents, but multiple other agents are on their way. Because they both target the ligand-dependent regulation of AR activity, it is plausible that cross-resistance may exist when both drugs are used sequentially, and that the benefit of these agents may fade away when sequencing them. As the exact mechanisms for cross- resistance between AR-targeted agents remain unclear at this point, additional clinical studies are crucial to define the exact combination or sequencing order that could yield highest clinical benefits. Moreover, new molecular targets are needed in order to address these resistances, as well as establishing biomarkers to improve patient selection that could most benefit from AR-targeted therapies, but also help develop novel agents to improve and optimise the management of castration-resistant prostate cancer and metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  4. Sequential maximum androgen blockade (MAB) in minimally symptomatic prostate cancer progressing after initial MAB:two case reports

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohan Hingorani; Sanjay Dixit; Fahim Bashir; Mohammad Butt; Simon Hawkyard; Richard Khafagy; Andrew Robertson

    2014-01-01

    Te management of castrate-resistant prostate cancer progressing atfer maximum androgen blockade (MAB) has evolved in the last decade with the development of several novel therapeutic options. However, the initial therapeutic strategy in these patients usually involves withdrawal of anti-androgen that can be associated with biochemical response in approximately 20%of patients. Notably, we have observed evidence of sustained biochemical response in two patients following second-and third-line MAB using rechallenge schedule of previously administered anti-androgen atfer latent interval. hTe possibility of response following sequential MAB using the same anti-androgen agent has not yet been reported.

  5. Molecular interplay between cdk4 and p21 dictates G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in prostate cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gulappa, Thippeswamy; Reddy, Ramadevi Subramani; Suman, Suman; Nyakeriga, Alice M; Damodaran, Chendil

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effect of 3, 9-dihydroxy-2-prenylcoumestan (pso), a furanocoumarin, on PC-3 and C4-2B castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) cell lines. Pso caused significant G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and inhibition of cell growth. Molecular analysis of cyclin (D1, D2, D3, and E), cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) (cdks 2, 4, and 6), and cdk inhibitor (p21 and p27) expression suggested transcriptional regulation of the cdk inhibitors and more significant downregulation of cdk4 than of...

  6. Estrogen Receptor β2 Induces Hypoxia Signature of Gene Expression by Stabilizing HIF-1α in Prostate Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasenjit Dey

    Full Text Available The estrogen receptor (ER β variant ERβ2 is expressed in aggressive castration-resistant prostate cancer and has been shown to correlate with decreased overall survival. Genome-wide expression analysis after ERβ2 expression in prostate cancer cells revealed that hypoxia was an overrepresented theme. Here we show that ERβ2 interacts with and stabilizes HIF-1α protein in normoxia, thereby inducing a hypoxic gene expression signature. HIF-1α is known to stimulate metastasis by increasing expression of Twist1 and increasing vascularization by directly activating VEGF expression. We found that ERβ2 interacts with HIF-1α and piggybacks to the HIF-1α response element present on the proximal Twist1 and VEGF promoters. These findings suggest that at least part of the oncogenic effects of ERβ2 is mediated by HIF-1α and that targeting of this ERβ2 - HIF-1α interaction may be a strategy to treat prostate cancer.

  7. Systemic therapy for the treatment of hormone-sensitive metastatic prostate cancer: from intermittent androgen deprivation therapy to chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Bobby C; Shevach, Jeffrey; Oh, William K

    2015-03-01

    Treatment of advanced prostate cancer has changed considerably in recent years, but the vast majority of advances have been made in patients with metastatic castration-resistant disease. There have been relatively fewer advances in the earlier, hormonally responsive stage of metastatic disease. Since the empiric establishment of androgen deprivation therapy as first-line therapy for metastatic prostate cancer decades ago, there have been multiple studies looking at variations of suppressing testosterone, but the overall paradigm has not been strongly challenged until more recently. In particular, the dramatic results reported by the CHAARTED trial not only bring chemotherapy to an arena historically dominated solely by hormonal therapy but also stimulate renewed efforts into improving upon our management of metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. PMID:25677235

  8. Androgen receptor-negative human prostate cancer cells induce osteogenesis in mice through FGF9-mediated mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi Gang; Mathew, Paul; Yang, Jun; Starbuck, Michael W; Zurita, Amado J; Liu, Jie; Sikes, Charles; Multani, Asha S; Efstathiou, Eleni; Lopez, Adriana; Wang, Jing; Fanning, Tina V; Prieto, Victor G; Kundra, Vikas; Vazquez, Elba S; Troncoso, Patricia; Raymond, Austin K; Logothetis, Christopher J; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Maity, Sankar; Navone, Nora M

    2008-08-01

    In prostate cancer, androgen blockade strategies are commonly used to treat osteoblastic bone metastases. However, responses to these therapies are typically brief, and the mechanism underlying androgen-independent progression is not clear. Here, we established what we believe to be the first human androgen receptor-negative prostate cancer xenografts whose cells induced an osteoblastic reaction in bone and in the subcutis of immunodeficient mice. Accordingly, these cells grew in castrated as well as intact male mice. We identified FGF9 as being overexpressed in the xenografts relative to other bone-derived prostate cancer cells and discovered that FGF9 induced osteoblast proliferation and new bone formation in a bone organ assay. Mice treated with FGF9-neutralizing antibody developed smaller bone tumors and reduced bone formation. Finally, we found positive FGF9 immunostaining in prostate cancer cells in 24 of 56 primary tumors derived from human organ-confined prostate cancer and in 25 of 25 bone metastasis cases studied. Collectively, these results suggest that FGF9 contributes to prostate cancer-induced new bone formation and may participate in the osteoblastic progression of prostate cancer in bone. Androgen receptor-null cells may contribute to the castration-resistant osteoblastic progression of prostate cancer cells in bone and provide a preclinical model for studying therapies that target these cells. PMID:18618013

  9. Prostate Cancer Screening (Beyond the Basics)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... best in your individual situation. WHAT IS PROSTATE CANCER? — Prostate cancer is a cancer of the prostate, a ... most of them do not die from their cancer. Prostate cancer often grows so slowly that many men ...

  10. Functional screen identifies kinases driving prostate cancer visceral and bone metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faltermeier, Claire M; Drake, Justin M; Clark, Peter M; Smith, Bryan A; Zong, Yang; Volpe, Carmen; Mathis, Colleen; Morrissey, Colm; Castor, Brandon; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N

    2016-01-12

    Mutationally activated kinases play an important role in the progression and metastasis of many cancers. Despite numerous oncogenic alterations implicated in metastatic prostate cancer, mutations of kinases are rare. Several lines of evidence suggest that nonmutated kinases and their pathways are involved in prostate cancer progression, but few kinases have been mechanistically linked to metastasis. Using a mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics dataset in concert with gene expression analysis, we selected over 100 kinases potentially implicated in human metastatic prostate cancer for functional evaluation. A primary in vivo screen based on overexpression of candidate kinases in murine prostate cells identified 20 wild-type kinases that promote metastasis. We queried these 20 kinases in a secondary in vivo screen using human prostate cells. Strikingly, all three RAF family members, MERTK, and NTRK2 drove the formation of bone and visceral metastasis confirmed by positron-emission tomography combined with computed tomography imaging and histology. Immunohistochemistry of tissue microarrays indicated that these kinases are highly expressed in human metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer tissues. Our functional studies reveal the strong capability of select wild-type protein kinases to drive critical steps of the metastatic cascade, and implicate these kinases in possible therapeutic intervention. PMID:26621741

  11. Androgen receptor–negative human prostate cancer cells induce osteogenesis in mice through FGF9-mediated mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi Gang; Mathew, Paul; Yang, Jun; Starbuck, Michael W.; Zurita, Amado J.; Liu, Jie; Sikes, Charles; Multani, Asha S.; Efstathiou, Eleni; Lopez, Adriana; Wang, Jing; Fanning, Tina V.; Prieto, Victor G.; Kundra, Vikas; Vazquez, Elba S.; Troncoso, Patricia; Raymond, Austin K.; Logothetis, Christopher J.; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Maity, Sankar; Navone, Nora M.

    2008-01-01

    In prostate cancer, androgen blockade strategies are commonly used to treat osteoblastic bone metastases. However, responses to these therapies are typically brief, and the mechanism underlying androgen-independent progression is not clear. Here, we established what we believe to be the first human androgen receptor–negative prostate cancer xenografts whose cells induced an osteoblastic reaction in bone and in the subcutis of immunodeficient mice. Accordingly, these cells grew in castrated as well as intact male mice. We identified FGF9 as being overexpressed in the xenografts relative to other bone-derived prostate cancer cells and discovered that FGF9 induced osteoblast proliferation and new bone formation in a bone organ assay. Mice treated with FGF9-neutralizing antibody developed smaller bone tumors and reduced bone formation. Finally, we found positive FGF9 immunostaining in prostate cancer cells in 24 of 56 primary tumors derived from human organ-confined prostate cancer and in 25 of 25 bone metastasis cases studied. Collectively, these results suggest that FGF9 contributes to prostate cancer–induced new bone formation and may participate in the osteoblastic progression of prostate cancer in bone. Androgen receptor–null cells may contribute to the castration-resistant osteoblastic progression of prostate cancer cells in bone and provide a preclinical model for studying therapies that target these cells. PMID:18618013

  12. Co-Targeting Prostate Cancer Epithelium and Bone Stroma by Human Osteonectin-Promoter–Mediated Suicide Gene Therapy Effectively Inhibits Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Shian-Ying; Chang, Junn-Liang; Chen, Kuan-Chou; Yeh, Shauh-Der; Liu, Yun-Ru; Su, Yen-Hao; Hsueh, Chia-Yen; Chung, Leland W. K.; Hsieh, Chia-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Stromal-epithelial interaction has been shown to promote local tumor growth and distant metastasis. We sought to create a promising gene therapy approach that co-targets cancer and its supporting stromal cells for combating castration-resistant prostate tumors. Herein, we demonstrated that human osteonectin is overexpressed in the prostate cancer epithelium and tumor stroma in comparison with their normal counterpart. We designed a novel human osteonectin promoter (hON-522E) containing positive transcriptional regulatory elements identified in both the promoter and exon 1 region of the human osteonectin gene. In vitro reporter assays revealed that the hON-522E promoter is highly active in androgen receptor negative and metastatic prostate cancer and bone stromal cells compared to androgen receptor-positive prostate cancer cells. Moreover, in vivo prostate-tumor–promoting activity of the hON-522E promoter was confirmed by intravenous administration of an adenoviral vector containing the hON-522E promoter-driven luciferase gene (Ad-522E-Luc) into mice bearing orthotopic human prostate tumor xenografts. In addition, an adenoviral vector with the hON-522E-promoter–driven herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene (Ad-522E-TK) was highly effective against the growth of androgen-independent human prostate cancer PC3M and bone stromal cell line in vitro and in pre-established PC3M tumors in vivo upon addition of the prodrug ganciclovir. Because of the heterogeneity of human prostate tumors, hON-522E promoter-mediated gene therapy has the potential for the treatment of hormone refractory and bone metastatic prostate cancers. PMID:27054343

  13. Epidaurus: aggregation and integration analysis of prostate cancer epigenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liguo; Huang, Haojie; Dougherty, Gregory; Zhao, Yu; Hossain, Asif; Kocher, Jean-Pierre A

    2015-01-01

    Integrative analyses of epigenetic data promise a deeper understanding of the epigenome. Epidaurus is a bioinformatics tool used to effectively reveal inter-dataset relevance and differences through data aggregation, integration and visualization. In this study, we demonstrated the utility of Epidaurus in validating hypotheses and generating novel biological insights. In particular, we described the use of Epidaurus to (i) integrate epigenetic data from prostate cancer cell lines to validate the activation function of EZH2 in castration-resistant prostate cancer and to (ii) study the mechanism of androgen receptor (AR) binding deregulation induced by the knockdown of FOXA1. We found that EZH2's noncanonical activation function was reaffirmed by its association with active histone markers and the lack of association with repressive markers. More importantly, we revealed that the binding of AR was selectively reprogramed to promoter regions, leading to the up-regulation of hundreds of cancer-associated genes including EGFR. The prebuilt epigenetic dataset from commonly used cell lines (LNCaP, VCaP, LNCaP-Abl, MCF7, GM12878, K562, HeLa-S3, A549, HePG2) makes Epidaurus a useful online resource for epigenetic research. As standalone software, Epidaurus is specifically designed to process user customized datasets with both efficiency and convenience. PMID:25378314

  14. Prostate cancer; Cancer de la prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieillot, S.; Fenoglietto, P.; Ailleres, N.; Hay, M.H.; Dubois, J.B.; Azria, D. [Departement de cancerologie radiotherapie, Universite Montpellier I, CRLC Val d' Aurelle, 34 - Montpellier (France)

    2010-07-01

    Radiation therapy is now widely accepted as an efficacious treatment of localized prostate cancer. The technical developments of recent years have enabled the evolution of a three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, offering a better adaptation of the dose distribution, and leading therefore to preserve organs at risk. In addition, the required dose delivered to the target volume permit physician to increase the total dose if necessary. This requires a thorough knowledge of the radio-anatomy of the prostate, the natural history of the disease but also the ballistics and dosimetry. The objectives of this work were to detail epidemiology and radio-anatomy of the prostate cancer. In addition, conformal radiation modalities are illustrated by a case report. (authors)

  15. GnRH agonists and the rapidly increasing use of combined androgen blockade in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrie, Fernand

    2014-08-01

    The discovery of medical castration with GnRH agonists in 1979 rapidly replaced surgical castration and high doses of estrogens for the treatment of prostate cancer. Soon afterwards, it was discovered that androgens were made locally in the prostate from the inactive precursor DHEA of adrenal origin, a mechanism called intracrinology. Taking into account these novel facts, combined androgen blockade (CAB) using a pure antiandrogen combined with castration in order to block the two sources of androgens was first published in 1982. CAB was the first treatment shown in randomized and placebo-controlled trials to prolong life in prostate cancer, even at the metastatic stage. Most importantly, the results recently obtained with the novel pure antiandrogen enzalutamide as well as with abiraterone, an inhibitor of 17α-hydroxylase in castration-resistant prostate cancer, has revitalized the CAB concept. The effects of CAB observed on survival of heavily pretreated patients further demonstrates the importance of the androgens made locally in the prostate and are a strong motivation to apply CAB to efficiently block all sources of androgens earlier at start of treatment and, even better, before metastasis occurs. The future of research in this field thus seems to be centered on the development of more potent blockers of androgens formation and action in order to obtain better results at the metastatic stage and, for the localized stage, reduce the duration of treatment required to achieve complete apoptosis and control of prostate cancer proliferation before it reaches the metastatic or noncurable stage. PMID:24825748

  16. What Tests Can Detect Prostate Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Prostate Cancer Prevention and Early Detection + - Text Size Download Printable Version [ ... coverage for prostate cancer screening Additional resources for prostate cancer prevention and early detection References: Prostate cancer prevention and ...

  17. Detecting Prostate Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... rectal examination does not mean that they have prostate cancer. It means that we're concerned about it and they should go on to have other tests, such as a trans-rectal ultrasound ... made of the prostate gland. Usually these are accompanied by a biopsy -- ...

  18. Detecting Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rectal examination does not mean that they have prostate cancer. It means that we're concerned about it and they should go on to have other tests, such as a trans-rectal ultrasound ... made of the prostate gland. Usually these are accompanied by a biopsy -- ...

  19. Drugs Approved for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Prostate Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Prostate Cancer Abiraterone Acetate Bicalutamide Cabazitaxel Casodex (Bicalutamide) Degarelix Docetaxel ...

  20. Selective cell death mediated by small conditional RNAs:a novel therapeutic approach to cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Che-Kai Tsao; William K Oh

    2011-01-01

    @@ Targeted molecular therapy has been an elusive goal in the treatment of neo-plastic diseases.While chemotherapy has improved the outcome of many cancers, a non-selective cytotoxic approach invariably causes damage to normal cells, resulting in side effects and limiting treatment efficacy.This is evident in the evolution of treatment for castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC).

  1. Detecting Prostate Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have by having their blood sampled and what we look for is a particular glyco-protein that's ... that they have prostate cancer. It means that we're concerned about it and they should go ...

  2. Epigenetics in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costantine Albany

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC is the most commonly diagnosed nonskin malignancy and the second most common cause of cancer death among men in the United States. Epigenetics is the study of heritable changes in gene expression caused by mechanisms other than changes in the underlying DNA sequences. Two common epigenetic mechanisms, DNA methylation and histone modification, have demonstrated critical roles in prostate cancer growth and metastasis. DNA hypermethylation of cytosine-guanine (CpG rich sequence islands within gene promoter regions is widespread during neoplastic transformation of prostate cells, suggesting that treatment-induced restoration of a “normal” epigenome could be clinically beneficial. Histone modification leads to altered tumor gene function by changing chromosome structure and the level of gene transcription. The reversibility of epigenetic aberrations and restoration of tumor suppression gene function have made them attractive targets for prostate cancer treatment with modulators that demethylate DNA and inhibit histone deacetylases.

  3. Screening for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... absolute reduction in mortal- ity. Preliminary results from PIVOT (Prostate Cancer In- tervention Versus Observation Trial), in ... early PSA screening era, prelim- inary findings from PIVOT show that, after 12 years, in- tention to ...

  4. Integrated multimodal imaging of dynamic bone-tumor alterations associated with metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisset, Jean-Christophe; Hoff, Benjamin A; Chenevert, Thomas L; Jacobson, Jon A; Boes, Jennifer L; Galbán, Stefanie; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; Johnson, Timothy D; Pienta, Kenneth J; Galbán, Craig J; Meyer, Charles R; Schakel, Timothy; Nicolay, Klaas; Alva, Ajjai S; Hussain, Maha; Ross, Brian D

    2015-01-01

    Bone metastasis occurs for men with advanced prostate cancer which promotes osseous growth and destruction driven by alterations in osteoblast and osteoclast homeostasis. Patients can experience pain, spontaneous fractures and morbidity eroding overall quality of life. The complex and dynamic cellular interactions within the bone microenvironment limit current treatment options thus prostate to bone metastases remains incurable. This study uses voxel-based analysis of diffusion-weighted MRI and CT scans to simultaneously evaluate temporal changes in normal bone homeostasis along with prostate bone metatastsis to deliver an improved understanding of the spatiotemporal local microenvironment. Dynamic tumor-stromal interactions were assessed during treatment in mouse models along with a pilot prospective clinical trial with metastatic hormone sensitive and castration resistant prostate cancer patients with bone metastases. Longitudinal changes in tumor and bone imaging metrics during delivery of therapy were quantified. Studies revealed that voxel-based parametric response maps (PRM) of DW-MRI and CT scans could be used to quantify and spatially visualize dynamic changes during prostate tumor growth and in response to treatment thereby distinguishing patients with stable disease from those with progressive disease (pprostate tumor-stromal responses to therapies thus demonstrating the potential of multi-modal PRM image-based biomarkers as a novel means for assessing dynamic alterations associated with metastatic prostate cancer. These results establish an integrated and clinically translatable approach which can be readily implemented for improving the clinical management of patients with metastatic bone disease. PMID:25859981

  5. PI3K-AKT-mTOR signaling in prostate cancer progression and androgen deprivation therapy resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Merritt P Edlind; Andrew C Hsieh

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second most common malignancy among men in the world. Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is the lethal form of the disease, which develops upon resistance to ifrst line androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Emerging evidence demonstrates a key role for the PI3K-AKT-mTOR signaling axis in the development and maintenance of CRPC. This pathway, which is deregulated in the majority of advanced PCas, serves as a critical nexus for the integration of growth signals with downstream cellular processes such as protein synthesis, proliferation, survival, metabolism and differentiation, thus providing mechanisms for cancer cells to overcome the stress associated with androgen deprivation. Furthermore, preclinical studies have elucidated a direct connection between the PI3K-AKT-mTOR and androgen receptor (AR) signaling axes, revealing a dynamic interplay between these pathways during the development of ADT resistance. Thus, there is a clear rationale for the continued clinical development of a number of novel inhibitors of the PI3K pathway, which offer the potential of blocking CRPC growth and survival. In this review, we will explore the relevance of the PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway in PCa progression and castration resistance in order to inform the clinical development of speciifc pathway inhibitors in advanced PCa. In addition, we will highlight current deifciencies in our clinical knowledge, most notably the need for biomarkers that can accurately predict for response to PI3K pathway inhibitors.

  6. Asian trends in primar y androgen depletion therapy on prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hideyuki Akaza

    2013-01-01

    hTere are notable differences in the incidence and mortality rates for prostate cancer between Asia and Western countries. It is also recognized that there are differences in thinking with regard to treatment options. Recently it is also the case that opinions have been reported concerning the differences between Asian and Western patients with regard to their reaction to androgen depletion therapy (ADT). Given that ADT is a method of treatment that focuses on the elimination of testosterone, an inevitable symptom of its administration is testosterone losing syndrome. It is for this reason that in Western countries ADT has only been recommended in cases of advanced or metastatic cancer. On the other hand, in Asia, ADT is used in relatively many cases, including non-metastatic localized cancer and invasive localized cancer. To date, however, there has been little substantive discussion concerning this difference in utilization of ADT. ADT-related drugs for prostate cancer and the development of new drugs for castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) have been actively tested in recent years. It could be the case that analyzing the differences in concepts about ADT between Asia and the West could contribute to the effective use of ADT-related drugs and also help to build new treatment strategies for prostate cancer.

  7. Integrative analysis identifies targetable CREB1/FoxA1 transcriptional co-regulation as a predictor of prostate cancer recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunkel, Benjamin; Wu, Dayong; Chen, Zhong; Wang, Chiou-Miin; Liu, Xiangtao; Ye, Zhenqing; Horning, Aaron M; Liu, Joseph; Mahalingam, Devalingam; Lopez-Nicora, Horacio; Lin, Chun-Lin; Goodfellow, Paul J; Clinton, Steven K; Jin, Victor X; Chen, Chun-Liang; Huang, Tim H-M; Wang, Qianben

    2016-05-19

    Identifying prostate cancer-driving transcription factors (TFs) in addition to the androgen receptor promises to improve our ability to effectively diagnose and treat this disease. We employed an integrative genomics analysis of master TFs CREB1 and FoxA1 in androgen-dependent prostate cancer (ADPC) and castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) cell lines, primary prostate cancer tissues and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) to investigate their role in defining prostate cancer gene expression profiles. Combining genome-wide binding site and gene expression profiles we define CREB1 as a critical driver of pro-survival, cell cycle and metabolic transcription programs. We show that CREB1 and FoxA1 co-localize and mutually influence each other's binding to define disease-driving transcription profiles associated with advanced prostate cancer. Gene expression analysis in human prostate cancer samples found that CREB1/FoxA1 target gene panels predict prostate cancer recurrence. Finally, we showed that this signaling pathway is sensitive to compounds that inhibit the transcription co-regulatory factor MED1. These findings not only reveal a novel, global transcriptional co-regulatory function of CREB1 and FoxA1, but also suggest CREB1/FoxA1 signaling is a targetable driver of prostate cancer progression and serves as a biomarker of poor clinical outcomes. PMID:26743006

  8. Epigenomic Alterations in Localized and Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Chun Lin

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Although prostate cancer (PCa is the second leading cause of cancer death among men worldwide, not all men diagnosed with PCa will die from the disease. A critical challenge, therefore, is to distinguish indolent PCa from more advanced forms to guide appropriate treatment decisions. We used Enhanced Reduced Representation Bisulfite Sequencing, a genome-wide high-coverage single-base resolution DNA methylation method to profile seven localized PCa samples, seven matched benign prostate tissues, and six aggressive castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC samples. We integrated these data with RNA-seq and whole-genome DNA-seq data to comprehensively characterize the PCa methylome, detect changes associated with disease progression, and identify novel candidate prognostic biomarkers. Our analyses revealed the correlation of cytosine guanine dinucleotide island (CGI-specific hypermethylation with disease severity and association of certain breakpoints (deletion, tandem duplications, and interchromosomal translocations with DNA methylation. Furthermore, integrative analysis of methylation and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs uncovered widespread allele-specific methylation (ASM for the first time in PCa. We found that most DNA methylation changes occurred in the context of ASM, suggesting that variations in tumor epigenetic landscape of individuals are partly mediated by genetic differences, which may affect PCa disease progression. We further selected a panel of 13 CGIs demonstrating increased DNA methylation with disease progression and validated this panel in an independent cohort of 20 benign prostate tissues, 16 PCa, and 8 aggressive CRPCs. These results warrant clinical evaluation in larger cohorts to help distinguish indolent PCa from advanced disease.

  9. The Multifaceted Roles of STAT3 Signaling in the Progression of Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, Jennifer L.; Thaper, Daksh; Zoubeidi, Amina, E-mail: azoubeidi@prostatecentre.com [The Vancouver Prostate Centre, Department of Urologic Sciences, University of British Columbia, 2660 Oak Street, Vancouver British Columbia, V6H 3Z6 (Canada)

    2014-04-09

    The signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)3 governs essential functions of epithelial and hematopoietic cells that are often dysregulated in cancer. While the role for STAT3 in promoting the progression of many solid and hematopoietic malignancies is well established, this review will focus on the importance of STAT3 in prostate cancer progression to the incurable metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Indeed, STAT3 integrates different signaling pathways involved in the reactivation of androgen receptor pathway, stem like cells and the epithelial to mesenchymal transition that drive progression to mCRPC. As equally important, STAT3 regulates interactions between tumor cells and the microenvironment as well as immune cell activation. This makes it a major factor in facilitating prostate cancer escape from detection of the immune response, promoting an immunosuppressive environment that allows growth and metastasis. Based on the multifaceted nature of STAT3 signaling in the progression to mCRPC, the promise of STAT3 as a therapeutic target to prevent prostate cancer progression and the variety of STAT3 inhibitors used in cancer therapies is discussed.

  10. Understanding Prostate Cancer: Newly Diagnosed

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Wellness PCF Spotlight Glossary African American Men Understanding Prostate Cancer Newly Diagnosed Newly Diagnosed Staging the Disease Issues ... you care about has recently been diagnosed with prostate cancer, this section will help guide you through the ...

  11. Clinical Perspective of Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Nilesh; Gaitonde, Krishnanath

    2016-06-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common noncutaneous cancer affecting men today. It largely affects men in the fifth and sixth decade of life. Screening for prostate cancer, though controversial, is still the only way to detect early prostate cancer. Multiple newer options such as blood tests and genetic markers are being used in the clinical domain today to improve cancer detection and avoid unnecessary biopsies. To date, biopsy of the prostate remains the only modality to stratify the grade of cancer. Significant improvements in the imaging technology have improved localizing and detecting the disease. Treatment of prostate cancer is stratified on the basis of the grade and volume of the disease. There are multiple treatment options involved in the management of prostate cancer. Treatment of localized prostate cancer still continues to have very high cure rates and long-term cancer-specific survival rates. PMID:27187167

  12. Genetic epidemiology of prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wiklund, Fredrik

    2004-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a major health burden throughout the world, yet the etiology of prostate cancer is poorly understood. Evidence has accumulated supporting the existence of a hereditary form of this disease. Improved understanding of the genetic mechanisms underlying the development and progression of prostate cancer would be a major advance for improved prevention, detection and treatment strategies. This thesis evaluates different aspects of the genetic epidemiology of prostate cancer. In ...

  13. Prostate cancer: emerging pharmacotherapeutic modalities

    OpenAIRE

    Pratap Shankar; Anoop Kumar Verma; Rakesh Kumar Dixit; Amod Kumar Sachan

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in the world due to factors like old age, family history, ethnicity, diet and some elements exposure, with lot of controversies regarding prevention of prostate cancer. Though the exact pathogenesis is not clear, epidemiological evidence supports a relationship between prostate cancer and hormone levels. In this review article we are focusing on the advances in different pharmacotherapeutic modalities i.e. Chemoprevention, Prostate-Specific Antigen, H...

  14. Focal therapy in prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bos, van den, G.A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Interesting developments took place in the treatment of prostate cancer including focal therapy for less aggressive organ-confined prostate cancer. Fortunately, curative treatment is often still an option for patients suffering from the lower staged tumors. In carefully selected patients, the prostate cancer may be focally treated followed by careful post-treatment evaluation, and if necessary by focal re-treatment. During the past decades, the age of men at prostate cancer detection has decr...

  15. The evolving role of cytotoxic chemotherapy in the management of patients with metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Elan; Garcias, María del Carmen; Karir, Beerinder; Tagawa, Scott T

    2015-02-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the most common cancer in men in the United States. Although outcomes are excellent for early-stage disease, survival for men with metastatic PC is limited. While older studies did not supported the use of chemotherapy in PC, the efficacy of taxane chemotherapy plus prednisone is now well established in men with metastatic castration resistant PC (CRPC). The results of CHAARTED trial have further expanded the use of chemotherapy to patients with metastatic hormone-sensitive disease. The clinical efficacy of taxanes over other chemotherapeutics may be a result of its ability to inhibit microtubule-dependent trafficking of proteins such as the androgen-receptor (AR). Ongoing research uses chemotherapy earlier in the disease course as well as explores the utility of combining cytotoxic chemotherapy with biologic agents. PMID:25762124

  16. American Cancer Society Recommendations for Prostate Cancer Early Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Prostate Cancer Prevention and Early Detection + - Text Size Download Printable Version [ ... coverage for prostate cancer screening Additional resources for prostate cancer prevention and early detection References: Prostate cancer prevention and ...

  17. Novel Insights into Molecular Indicators of Response and Resistance to Modern Androgen-Axis Therapies in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.

    2016-01-01

    While androgen ablation remains a mainstay for advanced prostate cancer therapy, nearly all patients will inevitably develop disease escape with time. Upon the development of castration-resistant prostate cancer, other androgen-axis-targeted treatments may be added in an effort to starve the disease of its androgen signaling. Nevertheless, additional androgen-pathway resistance usually develops to these novel hormonal therapies. In this review, we will discuss the resistance mechanisms to modern androgen-axis modulators and how these alterations can influence a patient's response to novel hormonal therapy. We conceptualize these resistance pathways as three broad categories: (1) reactivation of androgen/AR-signaling, (2) AR bypass pathways, and (3) androgen/AR-independent mechanisms. We highlight examples of each, as well as potential therapeutic approaches to overcome these resistance mechanisms. PMID:26902623

  18. Osteoporosis and prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Mads Hvid; Nielsen, Morten Frost Munk; Abrahamsen, Bo;

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective. The aim of this study was to analyse the prevalence of osteoporosis and risk factors of osteoporotic fractures before androgen deprivation in Danish men. Treatment and prognosis of prostate cancer necessitate management of long-term consequences of androgen deprivation therapy...... (ADT), including accelerated bone loss resulting in osteoporosis. Osteoporotic fractures are associated with excess morbidity and mortality. Material and methods. Patients with prostate cancer awaiting initiation of ADT were consecutively included. Half of the patients had localized disease and were......-specific antigen level was 30.5 g/l (1-5714 g/l). The average Gleason score was 7.8 (range 5-10, SD 1.1). Fifty patients had localized prostate cancer and the other 55 patients had disseminated disease. The prevalence of osteoporosis was 10% and the prevalence of osteopenia was 58% before ADT. There was no...

  19. A peptide against soluble guanylyl cyclase α1: a new approach to treating prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Gao

    Full Text Available Among the many identified androgen-regulated genes, sGCα1 (soluble guanylyl cyclase α1 appears to play a pivotal role in mediating the pro-cancer effects of androgens and androgen receptor. The classical role for sGCα1 is to heterodimerize with the sGCβ1 subunit, forming sGC, the enzyme that mediates nitric oxide signaling by catalyzing the synthesis of cyclic guanosine monophosphate. Our published data show that sGCα1 can drive prostate cancer cell proliferation independent of hormone and provide cancer cells a pro-survival function, via a novel mechanism for p53 inhibition, both of which are independent of sGCβ1, NO, and cGMP. All of these properties make sGCα1 an important novel target for prostate cancer therapy. Thus, peptides were designed targeting sGCα1 with the aim of disrupting this protein's pro-cancer activities. One peptide (A-8R was determined to be strongly cytotoxic to prostate cancer cells, rapidly inducing apoptosis. Cytotoxicity was observed in both hormone-dependent and, significantly, hormone-refractory prostate cancer cells, opening the possibility that this peptide can be used to treat the usually lethal castration-resistant prostate cancer. In mouse xenograft studies, Peptide A-8R was able to stop tumor growth of not only hormone-dependent cells, but most importantly from hormone-independent cells. In addition, the mechanism of Peptide A cytotoxicity is generation of reactive oxygen species, which recently have been recognized as a major mode of action of important cancer drugs. Thus, this paper provides strong evidence that targeting an important AR-regulated gene is a new paradigm for effective prostate cancer therapy.

  20. The first experience in using abiraterone acetate in patients with castration-refractory prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Rapoport

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Even in the mid-twentieth century, Huggins and Hodges proved the susceptibility of prostate cancer cells to hormonal manipulations, by using surgical castration as an example. An average of 18–36 months after initiation of first-line hormonal therapy, patients develop the castration resistance in prostate cancer, one of the causes of which was hyperproduction of the tumor receptors of prostate cancer cells and their hypersusceptibility to the castration levels of testosterone. Long-term treatment in patients with castration-refractory prostate cancer was extremely symptomatic and quality of life and overall survival were low. In the 2000s, investigations aimed at designing drugs to treat this category of patients were underway, which have culminated in the advent of three drugs (two of which belong to chemotherapy that are now used in the Russian Federation. The second-line hormonal agent abiraterone acetate (Zytiga is one of these drugs, which was officially registered in 2011. Its mechanism of action is due to inhibition of the enzyme CYP17, leading to the blocked synthesis of testosterone at all levels, including at the intracrine level, and achieving testosterone levels below the postcastration ones. The paper reviews the literature regarding abiraterone acetate and the first experience in using second-line hormonal therapy in three patients.

  1. Looking beyond Androgen Receptor Signaling in the Treatment of Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Sunkel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This review will provide a description of recent efforts in our laboratory contributing to a general goal of identifying critical determinants of prostate cancer growth in both androgen-dependent and -independent contexts. Important outcomes to date have indicated that the sustained activation of AR transcriptional activity in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC cells results in a gene expression profile separate from the androgen-responsive profile of androgen-dependent prostate cancer (ADPC cells. Contributing to this reprogramming is enhanced FoxA1 recruitment of AR to G2/M phase target gene loci and the enhanced chromatin looping of CRPC-specific gene regulatory elements facilitated by PI3K/Akt-phosphorylated MED1. We have also observed a role for FoxA1 beyond AR signaling in driving G1/S phase cell cycle progression that relies on interactions with novel collaborators MYBL2 and CREB1. Finally, we describe an in-depth mechanism of GATA2-mediated androgen-responsive gene expression in both ADPC and CRPC cells. Altogether these efforts provide evidence to support the development of novel prostate cancer therapeutics that address downstream targets of AR activity as well as AR-independent drivers of disease-relevant transcription programs.

  2. Chemotherapy and its evolving role in the management of advanced prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael T Schweizer; Emmanuel S Antonarakis

    2014-01-01

    prostate cancer has been recognized as being responsive to androgen deprivation since the 1940s when Charles Huggins ifrst described the role of surgical castration in managing these patients. However, androgen deprivation only results in transient disease control for the vast majority of men, with those progressing in spite of castrate testosterone levels labeled as having castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Until 2004, the therapeutic arena for these patients had remained stagnant, with no agent having shown a survival gain in the CRPC setting. Two landmark publications changed the prostate cancer treatment landscape by providing‘level-1 evidence’ that docetaxel-based chemotherapy led to prolongation in overall survival (OS). This was followed by the approval of cabazitaxel in 2010 on the basis of Phase III data demonstrating its efifcacy in patients pretreated with docetaxel. More recently, a number of next-generation androgen-directed agents (e.g. abiraterone and enzalutamide) have also been shown to lead to a survival beneift in men with CRPC. With so many new treatment options available, a number of questions remain. These include:how to best sequence chemotherapy with these newer hormonal agents, the clinical implication of cross-resistance between taxanes and androgen-directed agents and which subsets of patients may beneift most from early use of chemotherapy. This review will provide an overview of the evolving role of chemotherapy in the management of advanced prostate cancer in the current era.

  3. BPH and prostate cancer risk

    OpenAIRE

    Miah, Saiful; Catto, James

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: With the exclusion of non-melanomatous skin malignancy, prostate cancer (PCa) is the second most prevalent cancer in men globally. It has been reported that the majority of men will develop benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) by the time they reach their 60s. Together, these prostatic diseases have a significant morbidity and mortality affecting over a billion men throughout the world. The risk of developing prostate cancer of men suffering BPH is one that has resulted in a healt...

  4. Prostate Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... HPV-Associated Lung Ovarian Skin Uterine Cancer Home Prostate Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity Language: English Español ( ... Tweet Share Compartir The rate of men getting prostate cancer or dying from prostate cancer varies by race ...

  5. Prostate Cancer: Take Time to Decide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PDF for professional printing [PDF-983KB] Cancer Home Prostate Cancer: Take Time to Decide Infographic Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Prostate Cancer: Take Time to Decide Most prostate cancers grow ...

  6. Integrated Proteomic and Glycoproteomic Analyses of Prostate Cancer Cells Reveal Glycoprotein Alteration in Protein Abundance and Glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Punit; Wang, Xiangchun; Yang, Weiming; Toghi Eshghi, Shadi; Sun, Shisheng; Hoti, Naseruddin; Chen, Lijun; Yang, Shuang; Pasay, Jered; Rubin, Abby; Zhang, Hui

    2015-10-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men in the U.S. and worldwide, and androgen-deprivation therapy remains the principal treatment for patients. Although a majority of patients initially respond to androgen-deprivation therapy, most will eventually develop castration resistance. An increased understanding of the mechanisms that underline the pathogenesis of castration resistance is therefore needed to develop novel therapeutics. LNCaP and PC3 prostate cancer cell lines are models for androgen-dependence and androgen-independence, respectively. Herein, we report the comparative analysis of these two prostate cancer cell lines using integrated global proteomics and glycoproteomics. Global proteome profiling of the cell lines using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling and two- dimensional (2D) liquid chromatography-tandem MS (LC-MS/MS) led to the quantification of 8063 proteins. To analyze the glycoproteins, glycosite-containing peptides were isolated from the same iTRAQ-labeled peptides from the cell lines using solid phase extraction followed by LC-MS/MS analysis. Among the 1810 unique N-linked glycosite-containing peptides from 653 identified N-glycoproteins, 176 glycoproteins were observed to be different between the two cell lines. A majority of the altered glycoproteins were also observed with changes in their global protein expression levels. However, alterations in 21 differentially expressed glycoproteins showed no change at the protein abundance level, indicating that the glycosylation site occupancy was different between the two cell lines. To determine the glycosylation heterogeneity at specific glycosylation sites, we further identified and quantified 1145 N-linked glycopeptides with attached glycans in the same iTRAQ-labeled samples. These intact glycopeptides contained 67 glycan compositions and showed increased fucosylation in PC3 cells in several of the examined glycosylation sites. The increase in

  7. CACUL1 functions as a negative regulator of androgen receptor in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hanbyeul; Lee, Sang Hyup; Um, Soo-Jong; Kim, Eun-Joo

    2016-07-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays a critical role in the initiation and progression of prostate cancer (PCa), and thus its regulation is an important tool in PCa therapy. Here, we report that CDK2-associated cullin 1 (CACUL1) directly associates with AR and suppresses AR transcriptional activity. In addition, CACUL1 represses histone demethylase LSD1-mediated AR transactivation by competing with LSD1 for AR binding. Depletion of CACUL1 enhances the LSD1 occupancy of the AR-target promoter, accompanied by decreased accumulation of H3K9me2, a repressive transcriptional marker. CACUL1 and LSD1 oppositely regulate CDX-induced cell death in AR-positive LNCaP and metastatic castrate-resistant LNCaP-LN3 cells. These data suggest that CACUL1 impairs LSD1-mediated activation of AR, thereby implicating it as a potential antitumor target in PCa. PMID:27085459

  8. Detecting Prostate Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an abnormality in their rectal examination does not mean that they have prostate cancer. It means that we're concerned about it and they ... tissue with a needle. Physician: Now there's a little pressure -- you can probably feel that. Then you' ...

  9. Vitamin E and Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamin E, its metabolites or its analogs, might help prevent prostate cancer initiation or progression. Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer deaths among men in the United States, exceeded only by lung cancer. About 218,890 new cases of prost...

  10. Prevention strategies in prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Trottier, Greg; Lawrentschuk, N.; Fleshner, N.E.

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer (pca) prevention has been an exciting and controversial topic since the results of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (pcpt) were published. With the recently published results of the reduce (Reduction by Dutasteride of Prostate Cancer Events) trial, interest in this topic is at a peak. Primary pca prevention will be unlikely to affect mortality significantly, but the reduction in overtreatment and the effect on quality of life from the avoidance of a cancer diagnosis are im...

  11. The Androgen Receptor Regulates PPARγ Expression and Activity in Human Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olokpa, Emuejevoke; Bolden, Adrienne; Stewart, LaMonica V

    2016-12-01

    The peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that regulates growth and differentiation within normal prostate and prostate cancers. However the factors that control PPARγ within the prostate cancers have not been characterized. The goal of this study was to examine whether the androgen receptor (AR) regulates PPARγ expression and function within human prostate cancer cells. qRT-PCR and Western blot analyses revealed nanomolar concentrations of the AR agonist dihydrotestosterone (DHT) decrease PPARγ mRNA and protein within the castration-resistant, AR-positive C4-2 and VCaP human prostate cancer cell lines. The AR antagonists bicalutamide and enzalutamide blocked the ability of DHT to reduce PPARγ levels. In addition, siRNA mediated knockdown of AR increased PPARγ protein levels and ligand-induced PPARγ transcriptional activity within the C4-2 cell line. Furthermore, proteasome inhibitors that interfere with AR function increased the level of basal PPARγ and prevented the DHT-mediated suppression of PPARγ. These data suggest that AR normally functions to suppress PPARγ expression within AR-positive prostate cancer cells. To determine whether increases in AR protein would influence PPARγ expression and activity, we used lipofectamine-based transfections to overexpress AR within the AR-null PC-3 cells. The addition of AR to PC-3 cells did not significantly alter PPARγ protein levels. However, the ability of the PPARγ ligand rosiglitazone to induce activation of a PPARγ-driven luciferase reporter and induce expression of FABP4 was suppressed in AR-positive PC-3 cells. Together, these data indicate AR serves as a key modulator of PPARγ expression and function within prostate tumors. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2664-2672, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26945682

  12. Prostate cancer cell-stromal cell crosstalk via FGFR1 mediates antitumor activity of dovitinib in bone metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xinhai; Corn, Paul G; Yang, Jun; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Starbuck, Michael W; Efstathiou, Eleni; Li Ning Tapia, Elsa M; Tapia, Elsa M Li-Ning; Zurita, Amado J; Aparicio, Ana; Ravoori, Murali K; Vazquez, Elba S; Robinson, Dan R; Wu, Yi-Mi; Cao, Xuhong; Iyer, Matthew K; McKeehan, Wallace; Kundra, Vikas; Wang, Fen; Troncoso, Patricia; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Logothetis, Christopher J; Navone, Nora M

    2014-09-01

    Bone is the most common site of prostate cancer (PCa) progression to a therapy-resistant, lethal phenotype. We found that blockade of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) with the receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor dovitinib has clinical activity in a subset of men with castration-resistant PCa and bone metastases. Our integrated analyses suggest that FGF signaling mediates a positive feedback loop between PCa cells and bone cells and that blockade of FGFR1 in osteoblasts partially mediates the antitumor activity of dovitinib by improving bone quality and by blocking PCa cell-bone cell interaction. These findings account for clinical observations such as reductions in lesion size and intensity on bone scans, lymph node size, and tumor-specific symptoms without proportional declines in serum prostate-specific antigen concentration. Our findings suggest that targeting FGFR has therapeutic activity in advanced PCa and provide direction for the development of therapies with FGFR inhibitors. PMID:25186177

  13. Prostate Cancer Cell–Stromal Cell Cross-Talk via FGFR1 Mediates Antitumor Activity of Dovitinib in Bone Metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xinhai; Corn, Paul G.; Yang, Jun; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Starbuck, Michael W.; Efstathiou, Eleni; Li-Ning Tapia, Elsa M.; Zurita, Amado J.; Aparicio, Ana; Ravoori, Murali K.; Vazquez, Elba S.; Robinson, Dan R.; Wu, Yi-Mi; Cao, Xuhong; Iyer, Matthew K.; McKeehan, Wallace; Kundra, Vikas; Wang, Fen; Troncoso, Patricia; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Logothetis, Christopher J.; Navone, Nora M.

    2015-01-01

    Bone is the most common site of prostate cancer (PCa) progression to a therapy-resistant, lethal phenotype. We found that blockade of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) with the receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor dovitinib has clinical activity in a subset of men with castration-resistant PCa and bone metastases. Our integrated analyses suggest that FGF signaling mediates a positive feedback loop between PCa cells and bone cells and that blockade of FGFR1 in osteoblasts partially mediates the antitumor activity of dovitinib by improving bone quality and by blocking PCa cell–bone cell interaction. These findings account for clinical observations such as reductions in lesion size and intensity on bone scans, lymph node size, and tumor-specific symptoms without proportional declines in prostate-specific antigen concentration. Our findings suggest that targeting FGFR has therapeutic activity in advanced PCa and provide direction for the development of therapies with FGFR inhibitors. PMID:25186177

  14. SOXs in human prostate cancer: implication as progression and prognosis factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SOX genes play an important role in a number of developmental processes. Potential roles of SOXs have been demonstrated in various neoplastic tissues as tumor suppressors or promoters depending on tumor status and types. The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of SOXs in the progression and prognosis of human prostate cancer (PCa). The gene expression changes of SOXs in human PCa tissues compared with non-cancerous prostate tissues was detected using gene expression microarray, and confirmed by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (QRT-PCR) analysis and immunohositochemistry. The roles of these genes in castration resistance were investigated in LNCaP xenograft model of PCa. The microarray analysis identified three genes (SOX7, SOX9 and SOX10) of SOX family that were significantly dis-regulated in common among four PCa specimens. Consistent with the results of the microarray, differential mRNA and protein levels of three selected genes were found in PCa tissues by QRT-PCR analysis and immunohistochemistry. Additionally, we found that the immunohistochemical staining scores of SOX7 in PCa tissues with higher serum PSA level (P = 0.02) and metastasis (P = 0.03) were significantly lower than those with lower serum PSA level and without metastasis; the increased SOX9 protein expression was frequently found in PCa tissues with higher Gleason score (P = 0.02) and higher clinical stage (P < 0.0001); the down-regulation of SOX10 tend to be found in PCa tissues with higher serum PSA levels (P = 0.03) and advanced pathological stage (P = 0.01). Moreover, both univariate and multivariate analyses showed that the down-regulation of SOX7 and the up-regulation of SOX9 were independent predictors of shorter biochemical recurrence-free survival. Furthermore, we discovered that SOX7 was significantly down-regulated and SOX9 was significantly up-regulated during the progression to castration resistance. Our data offer the convince

  15. Survival in prostate cancer prevention trial detailed

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the NCI-sponsored Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial, initial findings from a decade ago showed that the drug finasteride significantly reduced the risk of prostate cancer, but among those who did develop prostate cancer, paradoxically, the drug was asso

  16. The importance of non-nuclear AR signaling in prostate cancer progression and therapeutic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarif, Jelani C; Miranti, Cindy K

    2016-05-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) remains the major oncogenic driver of prostate cancer, as evidenced by the efficacy of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in naïve patients, and the continued effectiveness of second generation ADTs in castration resistant disease. However, current ADTs are limited to interfering with AR ligand binding, either through suppression of androgen production or the use of competitive antagonists. Recent studies demonstrate 1) the expression of constitutively active AR splice variants that no longer depend on androgen, and 2) the ability of AR to signal in the cytoplasm independently of its transcriptional activity (non-genomic); thus highlighting the need to consider other ways to target AR. Herein, we review canonical AR signaling, but focus on AR non-genomic signaling, some of its downstream targets and how these effectors contribute to prostate cancer cell behavior. The goals of this review are to 1) re-highlight the continued importance of AR in prostate cancer as the primary driver, 2) discuss the limitations in continuing to use ligand binding as the sole targeting mechanism, 3) discuss the implications of AR non-genomic signaling in cancer progression and therapeutic resistance, and 4) address the need to consider non-genomic AR signaling mechanisms and pathways as a viable targeting strategy in combination with current therapies. PMID:26829214

  17. Radium-223 Improves Survival in Patients with Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and data sets for researchers Research by Cancer Type Find research about a specific cancer type Progress Annual Report ... Laws Careers Visitor Information Search Search Home Cancer Types Prostate Cancer Research Prostate Cancer Patient Prostate Cancer Treatment Prostate Cancer ...

  18. Prognostic significance of genetic polymorphisms in disease progression and survival in prostate cancer after androgen deprivation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-Yi Huang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It is believed that androgens and their receptors regulate normal prostate growth and mediate prostate cancer development. Androgen deprivation therapy is the most commonly used treatment for advanced prostate cancer. Although the therapy is initially effective, progression of the disease to castration-resistant prostate cancer is almost inevitable, leading to treatment failure. Despite the existence of current clinical parameters, new biomarkers are urgently needed to improve the prognosis. Some molecules and DNA-based genetic biomarkers are under investigation as potential prognostic factors. The advancement in molecular cytogenetic research, such as genome-wide association for single-nucleotide polymorphisms, has made possible the detection of genetic mutations. In this study, a literature search from August 1985 to April 2013 was performed through the PubMed database using the keywords “genetic polymorphisms”, “prostate cancer” and “androgen deprivation therapy”. The results revealed that several genome-wide association studies (such as rs16901979, rs7931342, HSD17B4, rs6162 in the CYP17A1, rs4243229 and rs7201637 in the HSD17B2, rs1062577 in the ESR1, SLCO1B3, SLCO2B1, rs2939244 in the ARRDC3, rs9508016 in the FLT1, rs6504145 in the SKAP1, rs7830611 in the FBXO32, rs9508016 in the FLT1, rs12529 in the AKR1C3, rs16934641 in the BNC2, rs3763763 in the TACC2, rs2051778 in the ALPK1, and rs3763763 in the TACC2, AR, ESR1, and ESR2 and single-nucleotide polymorphisms in important pathways (such as androgen signal, biosynthesis, metabolism, androgen receptor binding site, response element, androgen receptor CAG repeat polymorphism length, and estrogen receptor-binding sites involved in prostate cancer occurrence and mechanism could serve as candidate biomarkers for the early detection of castration-resistant prostate cancer after androgen deprivation therapy. Additional investigations are required to decipher precisely the gene

  19. Insulin-like growth factor II mRNA binding protein 3 (IMP3) is overexpressed in prostate cancer and correlates with higher Gleason scores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oncofetal protein insulin-like growth factor II mRNA binding protein 3 (IMP3) is an important factor for cell-migration and adhesion in malignancies. Recent studies have shown a remarkable overexpression of IMP3 in different human malignant neoplasms and also revealed it as an important prognostic marker in some tumor entities. To our knowledge, IMP3 expression has not been investigated in prostate carcinomas so far. Immunohistochemical stainings for IMP3 were performed on tissue microarray (TMA) organized samples from 507 patients: 31 normal prostate tissues, 425 primary carcinomas and 51 prostate cancer metastases or castration-resistant prostate cancers (CRPC). IMP3 immunoreactivity was semiquantitatively scored and correlated with clinical-pathologic parameters including survival. IMP3 is significantly stronger expressed in prostate carcinomas compared to normal prostate tissues (p < 0.0001), but did not show significant correlation with the pT-stage, the proliferation index (MIB1), preoperative serum PSA level and the margin status. Only a weak and slightly significant correlation was found with the Gleason score and IMP3 expression failed to show prognostic significance in clinico-pathological correlation-analyses. Although IMP3 is overexpressed in a significant proportion of prostate cancer cases, which might be of importance for novel therapeutic approaches, it does not appear to possess any immediate diagnostic or prognostic value, limiting its potential as a tissue biomarker for prostate cancer. These results might be corroborated by the fact, that two independent tumor cohorts were separately reviewed

  20. Prostate cancer is not breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajit Venniyoor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancers of the prostate and breast are hormone dependent cancers. There is a tendency to equate them and apply same algorithms for treatment. It is pointed out that metastatic prostate cancer with bone-only disease is a potentially fatal condition with a much poorer prognosis than metastatic breast cancer and needs a more aggressive approach.

  1. Prostate cancer is not breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ajit Venniyoor

    2016-01-01

    Cancers of the prostate and breast are hormone dependent cancers. There is a tendency to equate them and apply same algorithms for treatment. It is pointed out that metastatic prostate cancer with bone-only disease is a potentially fatal condition with a much poorer prognosis than metastatic breast cancer and needs a more aggressive approach.

  2. Biomarkers in Prostate Cancer Epidemiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mudit Verma

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the etiology of a disease such as prostate cancer may help in identifying populations at high risk, timely intervention of the disease, and proper treatment. Biomarkers, along with exposure history and clinical data, are useful tools to achieve these goals. Individual risk and population incidence of prostate cancer result from the intervention of genetic susceptibility and exposure. Biochemical, epigenetic, genetic, and imaging biomarkers are used to identify people at high risk for developing prostate cancer. In cancer epidemiology, epigenetic biomarkers offer advantages over other types of biomarkers because they are expressed against a person’s genetic background and environmental exposure, and because abnormal events occur early in cancer development, which includes several epigenetic alterations in cancer cells. This article describes different biomarkers that have potential use in studying the epidemiology of prostate cancer. We also discuss the characteristics of an ideal biomarker for prostate cancer, and technologies utilized for biomarker assays. Among epigenetic biomarkers, most reports indicate GSTP1 hypermethylation as the diagnostic marker for prostate cancer; however, NKX2-5, CLSTN1, SPOCK2, SLC16A12, DPYS, and NSE1 also have been reported to be regulated by methylation mechanisms in prostate cancer. Current challenges in utilization of biomarkers in prostate cancer diagnosis and epidemiologic studies and potential solutions also are discussed.

  3. MRI diagnosis for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, in Japan, both the Westernization of life styles and the advent of an aged-society have led to an increase in the incidence of prostate cancer. In making a localizing diagnosis of prostate cancer, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which has excellent contrast resolution, and transrectal ultrasonography, are used clinically, and their usefulness is being established. MRI is employed in the diagnosis of prostate cancer to detect tumors, and to determine the stage of such tumors. For the visualization of prostate cancer by MRI, T2-weighted axial images are used exclusively. After becoming familiar with normal prostate images, it is important to evaluate the localization of a tumor, and the invasion of the capsule and seminal vesicles. Future applications of new techniques for MRI will undoubtedly be found. In this paper, the present state of MRI diagnosis of prostate cancer at Kawasaki Medical School Hospital will be reviewed. (author)

  4. MRI diagnosis for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamada, Tsutomu; Nagai, Kiyohisa; Imai, Shigeki; Kajihara, Yasumasa; Jo, Yoshimasa; Tanaka, Hiroyoshi; Fukunaga, Masao (Kawasaki Medical School, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan)); Matsuki, Takakazu

    1998-01-01

    Recently, in Japan, both the Westernization of life styles and the advent of an aged-society have led to an increase in the incidence of prostate cancer. In making a localizing diagnosis of prostate cancer, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which has excellent contrast resolution, and transrectal ultrasonography, are used clinically, and their usefulness is being established. MRI is employed in the diagnosis of prostate cancer to detect tumors, and to determine the stage of such tumors. For the visualization of prostate cancer by MRI, T2-weighted axial images are used exclusively. After becoming familiar with normal prostate images, it is important to evaluate the localization of a tumor, and the invasion of the capsule and seminal vesicles. Future applications of new techniques for MRI will undoubtedly be found. In this paper, the present state of MRI diagnosis of prostate cancer at Kawasaki Medical School Hospital will be reviewed. (author)

  5. MRI diagnosis for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamada, Tsutomu; Nagai, Kiyohisa; Imai, Shigeki; Kajihara, Yasumasa; Jo, Yoshimasa; Tanaka, Hiroyoshi; Fukunaga, Masao [Kawasaki Medical School, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan); Matsuki, Takakazu

    1998-12-31

    Recently, in Japan, both the Westernization of life styles and the advent of an aged-society have led to an increase in the incidence of prostate cancer. In making a localizing diagnosis of prostate cancer, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which has excellent contrast resolution, and transrectal ultrasonography, are used clinically, and their usefulness is being established. MRI is employed in the diagnosis of prostate cancer to detect tumors, and to determine the stage of such tumors. For the visualization of prostate cancer by MRI, T2-weighted axial images are used exclusively. After becoming familiar with normal prostate images, it is important to evaluate the localization of a tumor, and the invasion of the capsule and seminal vesicles. Future applications of new techniques for MRI will undoubtedly be found. In this paper, the present state of MRI diagnosis of prostate cancer at Kawasaki Medical School Hospital will be reviewed. (author)

  6. Integrated multimodal imaging of dynamic bone-tumor alterations associated with metastatic prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Christophe Brisset

    Full Text Available Bone metastasis occurs for men with advanced prostate cancer which promotes osseous growth and destruction driven by alterations in osteoblast and osteoclast homeostasis. Patients can experience pain, spontaneous fractures and morbidity eroding overall quality of life. The complex and dynamic cellular interactions within the bone microenvironment limit current treatment options thus prostate to bone metastases remains incurable. This study uses voxel-based analysis of diffusion-weighted MRI and CT scans to simultaneously evaluate temporal changes in normal bone homeostasis along with prostate bone metatastsis to deliver an improved understanding of the spatiotemporal local microenvironment. Dynamic tumor-stromal interactions were assessed during treatment in mouse models along with a pilot prospective clinical trial with metastatic hormone sensitive and castration resistant prostate cancer patients with bone metastases. Longitudinal changes in tumor and bone imaging metrics during delivery of therapy were quantified. Studies revealed that voxel-based parametric response maps (PRM of DW-MRI and CT scans could be used to quantify and spatially visualize dynamic changes during prostate tumor growth and in response to treatment thereby distinguishing patients with stable disease from those with progressive disease (p<0.05. These studies suggest that PRM imaging biomarkers are useful for detection of the impact of prostate tumor-stromal responses to therapies thus demonstrating the potential of multi-modal PRM image-based biomarkers as a novel means for assessing dynamic alterations associated with metastatic prostate cancer. These results establish an integrated and clinically translatable approach which can be readily implemented for improving the clinical management of patients with metastatic bone disease.

  7. Is DHT Production by 5α-Reductase Friend or Foe in Prostate Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaka, Takeo; Miyajima, Akira; Oya, Mototsugu

    2014-01-01

    The first advance in the history of studies on prostate cancer (PCa) and androgens was the development of treatment with castration and administration of estrogen by Charles B. Huggins, who won the Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine. Since then, and for 70 years, androgen deprivation therapy has been the standard therapy for advanced PCa and the center of studies on PCa. However, recent advances have shed light on the relationship between androgens and the development or the progression of PCa. The use of 5AR inhibitors to prevent progression of PCa continues to be widely discussed. Discussion has been fueled by the findings of two large randomized, placebo-controlled trials: the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial with finasteride and the Reduction by Dutasteride of Prostate Cancer Events trial. Does the development of PCa or progression to castration-resistant PCa depend on dihydrotestosterone (DHT)? Here, we summarize and discuss recent topics of local androgen production of DHT in PCa. PMID:25279351

  8. Redirecting abiraterone metabolism to fine-tune prostate cancer anti-androgen therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenfei; Alyamani, Mohammad; Li, Jianneng; Rogacki, Kevin; Abazeed, Mohamed; Upadhyay, Sunil K; Balk, Steven P; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Auchus, Richard J; Sharifi, Nima

    2016-05-26

    Abiraterone blocks androgen synthesis and prolongs survival in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer, which is otherwise driven by intratumoral androgen synthesis. Abiraterone is metabolized in patients to Δ(4)-abiraterone (D4A), which has even greater anti-tumour activity and is structurally similar to endogenous steroidal 5α-reductase substrates, such as testosterone. Here, we show that D4A is converted to at least three 5α-reduced and three 5β-reduced metabolites in human serum. The initial 5α-reduced metabolite, 3-keto-5α-abiraterone, is present at higher concentrations than D4A in patients with prostate cancer taking abiraterone, and is an androgen receptor agonist, which promotes prostate cancer progression. In a clinical trial of abiraterone alone, followed by abiraterone plus dutasteride (a 5α-reductase inhibitor), 3-keto-5α-abiraterone and downstream metabolites were depleted by the addition of dutasteride, while D4A concentrations rose, showing that dutasteride effectively blocks production of a tumour-promoting metabolite and permits D4A accumulation. Furthermore, dutasteride did not deplete the three 5β-reduced metabolites, which were also clinically detectable, demonstrating the specific biochemical effects of pharmacological 5α-reductase inhibition on abiraterone metabolism. Our findings suggest a previously unappreciated and biochemically specific method of clinically fine-tuning abiraterone metabolism to optimize therapy. PMID:27225130

  9. Prostate Cancer: All Aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmet Tefekli; Murat Tunc; Volkan Tugcu; Tarık Esen

    2013-01-01

    Hindawi Publishing Corporation The ScientificWorld Journal Volume 2013, Article ID 265234, 2 pages http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/265234 Editorial Prostate Cancer: All Aspects Ahmet Tefekli,1 Murat Tunc,2 Volkan Tugcu,3 and TarJk Esen4 1 Bahcesehir School of Medicine, 34353 Istanbul, Turkey 2 Istanbul School of Medicine, Istanbul University, 34340 Istanbul, Turkey 3Department of Urology, Bakırkoy Training and Research Hospital, 34360 Istanbul, Turkey 4 Koc Univer...

  10. Prostate cancer brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transperineal brachytherapy with 125I/Pd103 seed implantation guided by transurethral ultrasound must be presented as therapeutical option of low urinary morbidity in patients with localized prostate cancer. The combined clinical staging - including Gleason and initial PSA - must be encouraged, for definition of a group of low risk and indication of exclusive brachytherapy. Random prospective studies are necessary in order to define the best role of brachytherapy, surgery and external beam radiation therapy

  11. The Early Prostate Cancer program: bicalutamide in nonmetastatic prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Peter; Roder, Martin Andreas; Røder, Martin Andreas

    2008-01-01

    The Early Prostate Cancer program is investigating the addition of bicalutamide 150 mg to standard care for localized or locally advanced, nonmetastatic prostate cancer. The third program analysis, at 7.4 years' median follow-up, has shown that bicalutamide 150 mg does not benefit patients with...

  12. Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Phase III Trial of Sunitinib Plus Prednisone Versus Prednisone Alone in Progressive, Metastatic, Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michaelson, M Dror; Oudard, Stephane; Ou, Yen-Chuan;

    2014-01-01

    /d continuously or placebo. Patients also received oral prednisone 5 mg twice daily. The primary end point was overall survival (OS); secondary end points included progression-free survival (PFS). Two interim analyses were planned. RESULTS: Overall, 873 patients were randomly assigned to receive sunitinib (n...

  13. RM8 – Comparison of Timed Automata with Discrete Event Simulation for Modeling Personalized Treatment Decisions: the Case of Metastatic Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Degeling, K.; Koffijberg, H.; Schivo, S.; Langerak, R.; IJzerman, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study is to compare the usefulness of two promising alternative modeling techniques, Timed Automata (TA) originating from informatics, and Discrete Event Simulation (DES) known in operations research, for modeling todays complex and personalized treatment decisions over ti

  14. Weekly low-dose docetaxel is an effective treatment with fewer adverse events for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer in Taiwanese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Li Kao

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: For Taiwanese mCRPC patients, weekly DTX 30 mg/m2 is an efficient regimen for disease control with relatively low Grade 3 or 4 hematological adverse effects. The proper treatment duration of DTX therapy for mCRPC in Taiwanese patients is still uncertain, so further research is needed.

  15. [Prostate cancer and Cancer Treatment-Induced Bone Loss(CTIBL)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, Hisashi

    2016-07-01

    Osteopenia and osteoporosis often become the long term complications in cancer treatment and is defined as cancer treatment-induced bone loss(CTIBL). Hormonal therapy is the main factor for CTIBL in both men and women. Androgen deprivation therapy(ADT)is a mainstay in the systemic therapy for prostate cancer(PC)and often persists for a long term. ADT induces bone loss and increases the risk of osteoporosis and bone fractures, which reduces QOL of the patients, results in the need of nursing care state and a serious adverse event to be connected for shortening of the overall survival. It is important that we prevent a fracture above all in the bone management of patients with PC. According to the results of overseas large-scale clinical trials, denosumab is a drug having the highest evidence level. And it is necessary to set a clear treatment objective depending on the clinical condition of the PC patients, and to use it. In the non-bone metastatic, castration-sensitive PC patients, we do it with a dose for the purpose of the prevention of osteoporosis and bone fractures, and it is demanded what a dose for the purpose of prevention and in bone metastatic, castration resistant PC patients, the reduction of symptomatic skeletal events. However, There is no benefit in prolongation of overall survival by addition of denosumab or zoledronic acid. Care for oral hygiene should be considered to avoid osteonecrosis of the jaw, oral infection and hypocalcemia. PMID:27346316

  16. HUMAN PROSTATE CANCER RISK FACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prostate cancer has the highest prevalence of any non-skin cancer in the human body, with similar likelihood of neoplastic foci found within the prostates of men around the world regardless of diet, occupation, lifestyle, or other factors. Essentially all men with circulating an...

  17. Multidrug Resistance in Prostate Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P. van Brussel

    2005-01-01

    textabstractAdvanced hormone refractory prostate cancer constitutes a therapeutic challenge, because all available treatment strategies have failed to substantially increase cancer specific survival. Among these strategies, a multitude of chemotherapeutic approaches did not offer a superior life

  18. The link between benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ørsted, David D; Bojesen, Stig E

    2013-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer are among the most common diseases of the prostate gland and represent significant burdens for patients and health-care systems in many countries. The two diseases share traits such as hormone-dependent growth and response to antiandrogen therapy. Furthermore, risk factors such as prostate inflammation and metabolic disruption have key roles in the development of both diseases. Despite these commonalities, BPH and prostate cancer exhibit important differences in terms of histology and localization. Although large-scale epidemiological studies have shown that men with BPH have an increased risk of prostate cancer and prostate-cancer-related mortality, it remains unclear whether this association reflects a causal link, shared risk factors or pathophysiological mechanisms, or detection bias upon statistical analysis. Establishing BPH as a causal factor for prostate cancer development could improve the accuracy of prognostication and expedite intervention, potentially reducing the number of men who die from prostate cancer. PMID:23165396

  19. Irrefutable evidence for the use of docetaxel in newly diagnosed metastatic prostate cancer: results from the STAMPEDE and CHAARTED trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Soest, Robert J; de Wit, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been used in the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer since the first description of its hormonal dependence in 1941. In 2004, docetaxel chemotherapy became the mainstay of treatment in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), following robust, albeit modest, survival benefit in two randomized phase 3 trials. The recently published CHAARTED trial was the first to show that combining ADT with docetaxel in men with hormone-naïve (hormone-sensitive) metastatic prostate cancer (mHSPC) yielded a remarkable overall survival benefit of 13.6 months as compared with ADT alone. In the current issue of The Lancet, James et al. report results of the STAMPEDE trial in men with high-risk locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer initiating long-term hormone therapy. The combination of six cycles of docetaxel with ADT in men commencing long-term ADT demonstrated a similar OS benefit compared with standard of care (SOC) by a median of 10 months. Based on the consistency of the data and the firmness of the benefit provided, docetaxel in addition to ADT should be considered SOC for men with newly diagnosed mHSPC. PMID:26695172

  20. Berberine inhibits androgen synthesis by interaction with aldo-keto reductase 1C3 in 22Rv1 prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yuantong; Zhao, Lijing; Wang, Ye; Zhang, Haitao; Xu, Duo; Zhao, Xuejian; Li, Yi; Li, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 has recently been regarded as a potential therapeutic target in castrate-resistant prostate cancer. Herein, we investigated whether berberine delayed the progression of castrate-resistant prostate cancer by reducing androgen synthesis through the inhibition of Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3. Cell viability and cellular testosterone content were measured in prostate cancer cells. Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 mRNA and protein level were detected by RT-PCR and Western bolt analyses, respectively. Computer analysis with AutoDock Tools explored the molecular interaction of berberine with Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3. We found that berberine inhibited 22Rv1 cells proliferation and decreased cellular testosterone formation in a dose-dependent manner. Berberine inhibited Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 enzyme activity, rather than influenced mRNA and protein expressions. Molecular docking study demonstrated that berberine could enter the active center of Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 and form p-p interaction with the amino-acid residue Phe306 and Phe311. In conclusion, the structural interaction of berberine with Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 is attributed to the suppression of Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 enzyme activity and the inhibition of 22Rv1 prostate cancer cell growth by decreasing the intracellular androgen synthesis. Our result provides the experimental basis for the design, research, and development of AKR1C3 inhibitors using berberine as the lead compound. PMID:26698234

  1. Prostate cancer stem cell biology

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Chunyan; Yao, Zhi; Jiang, Yuan; Keller, Evan T.

    2012-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) model provides insights into pathophysiology of cancers and their therapeutic response. The CSC model has been both controversial, yet provides a foundation to explore cancer biology. In this review, we provide an overview of CSC concepts, biology and potential therapeutic avenues. We then focus on prostate CSC including (1) their purported origin as either basal-derived or luminal-derived cells; (2) markers used for prostate CSC identification; (3) alterations of s...

  2. Chemotherapeutic prevention studies of prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Djavan, Bob; Zlotta, Alexandre; Schulman, Claude;

    2004-01-01

    Despite advances in the detection and management of prostate cancer, this disease remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in men. Increasing attention has focused on the role of chemoprevention for prostate cancer, ie the administration of agents that inhibit 1 or more steps in the natural...... history of prostate carcinogenesis. We review prostate cancer chemoprevention studies in Europe....

  3. Prevention and early detection of prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuzick, J.; Thorat, M.A.; Andriole, G.; Brawley, O.W.; Brown, P.H.; Culig, Z.; Eeles, R.A.; Ford, L.G.; Hamdy, F.C.; Holmberg, L.; Ilic, D.; Key, T.J.; Vecchia, C. La; Lilja, H.; Marberger, M.; Meyskens, F.L.; Minasian, L.M.; Parker, C.; Parnes, H.L.; Perner, S.; Rittenhouse, H.; Schalken, J.A.; Schmid, H.P.; Schmitz-Drager, B.J.; Schroder, F.H.; Stenzl, A.; Tombal, B.; Wilt, T.J.; Wolk, A.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common malignancy in men and the worldwide burden of this disease is rising. Lifestyle modifications such as smoking cessation, exercise, and weight control offer opportunities to reduce the risk of developing prostate cancer. Early detection of prostate cancer by prostate-speci

  4. Chemotherapeutic prevention studies of prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Djavan, Bob; Zlotta, Alexandre; Schulman, Claude; Teillac, Pierre; Iversen, Peter; Boccon Gibod, Laurent; Bartsch, Georg; Marberger, Michael

    Despite advances in the detection and management of prostate cancer, this disease remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in men. Increasing attention has focused on the role of chemoprevention for prostate cancer, ie the administration of agents that inhibit 1 or more steps in the natural...... history of prostate carcinogenesis. We review prostate cancer chemoprevention studies in Europe....

  5. 177Lu-EDTMP for palliation of pain from bone metastases in patients with prostate and breast cancer: a phase II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of 177Lu-EDTMP for pain palliation in patients with bone metastases from castration-resistant prostate and breast cancer. The secondary objective was to compare low-dose and high-dose 177Lu-EDTMP in bone pain palliation. Included in the study were 44 patients with documented breast carcinoma (12 patients; age 47 ± 13 years) or castration-resistant prostate carcinoma (32 patients; age 66 ± 9 years) and skeletal metastases. Patients were randomized into two equal groups treated with 177Lu-EDTMP intravenously at a dose of 1,295 MBq (group A) or 2,590 MBq (group B). Pain palliation was evaluated using a visual analogue score (VAS), analgesic score (AS) and Karnofsky performance score (KPS) up to 16 weeks. Toxicity was assessed in terms of haematological and renal parameters. The overall response rate (in all 44 patients) was 86 %. Complete, partial and minimal responses were seen in 6 patients (13 %), 21 patients (48 %) and 11 patients (25 %), respectively. A favourable response was seen in 27 patients (84 %) with prostate cancer and in 11 patients (92 %) with breast cancer. There was a progressive decrease in the VAS from baseline up to 4 weeks (p 177Lu-EDTMP was found to be a safe and effective radiopharmaceutical for bone pain palliation in patients with metastatic prostate and breast carcinoma. There were no differences in efficacy or toxicity between patients receiving low-dose and high-dose 177Lu-EDTMP. (orig.)

  6. Concurrent AURKA and MYCN Gene Amplifications Are Harbingers of Lethal TreatmentRelated Neuroendocrine Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Miguel Mosquera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroendocrine prostate cancer (NEPC, also referred to as anaplastic prostate cancer, is a lethal tumor that most commonly arises in late stages of prostate adenocarcinoma (PCA with predilection to metastasize to visceral organs. In the current study, we explore for evidence that Aurora kinase A (AURKA and N-myc (MYCN gene abnormalities are harbingers of treatment-related NEPC (t-NEPC. We studied primary prostate tissue from 15 hormone naïve PCAs, 51 castration-resistant prostate cancers, and 15 metastatic tumors from 72 patients at different stages of disease progression to t-NEPC, some with multiple specimens. Histologic evaluation, immunohistochemistry, and fluorescence in situ hybridization were performed and correlated with clinical variables. AURKA amplification was identified in overall 65% of PCAs (hormone naïve and treated from patients that developed t-NEPC and in 86% of metastases. Concurrent amplification of MYCN was present in 70% of primary PCAs, 69% of treated PCAs, and 83% of metastases. In contrast, in an unselected PCA cohort, AURKA and MYCN amplifications were identified in only 5% of 169 cases. When metastatic t-NEPC was compared to primary PCA from the same patients, there was 100% concordance of ERG rearrangement, 100% concordance of AURKA amplification, and 60% concordance of MYCN amplification. In tumors with mixed features, there was also 100% concordance of ERG rearrangement and 94% concordance of AURKA and MYCN co-amplification between areas of NEPC and adenocarcinoma. AURKA and MYCN amplifications may be prognostic and predictive biomarkers, as they are harbingers of tumors at risk of progressing to t-NEPC after hormonal therapy.

  7. An EP4 antagonist ONO-AE3-208 suppresses cell invasion, migration, and metastasis of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Song; Zhang, Zhengyu; Ogawa, Osamu; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Sakamoto, Hiromasa; Shibasaki, Noboru; Goto, Takayuki; Wang, Liming; Terada, Naoki

    2014-09-01

    EP4 is one of the prostaglandin E2 receptors, which is the most common prostanoid and is associated with inflammatory disease and cancer. We previously reported that over-expression of EP4 was one of the mechanisms responsible for progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer, and an EP4 antagonist ONO-AE3-208 in vivo suppressed the castration-resistant progression regulating the activation of androgen receptor. The aim of this study was to analyze the association of EP4 with prostate cancer metastasis and the efficacy of ONO-AE3-208 for suppressing the metastasis. The expression levels of EP4 mRNA were evaluated in prostate cancer cell lines, LNCaP, and PC3. EP4 over-expressing LNCaP was established, and their cell invasiveness was compared with the control LNCaP (LNCaP/mock). The in vitro cell proliferation, invasion, and migration of these cells were examined under different concentrations of ONO-AE3-208. An in vivo bone metastatic mouse model was constructed by inoculating luciferase expressing PC3 cells into left ventricle of nude mice. Their bone metastasis was observed by bioluminescent imaging with or without ONO-AE3-208 administration. The EP4 mRNA expression levels were higher in PC3 than in LNCaP, and EP4 over-expression of LNCaP cells enhanced their cell invasiveness. The in vitro cell invasion and migration were suppressed by ONO-AE3-208 in a dose-dependent manner without affecting cell proliferation. The in vivo bone metastasis of PC3 was also suppressed by ONO-AE3-208 treatment. EP4 expression levels were correlated with prostate cancer cell invasiveness and EP4 specific antagonist ONO-AE3-208 suppressed cell invasion, migration, and bone metastasis, indicating that it is a potential novel therapeutic modality for the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:24744183

  8. Neuroendocrine differentiation in prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiaoti Huang

    2008-01-01

    @@ The treatment of choice for advanced/metastatic prostate cancer(PC) is hormonal therapy. Although patients respond initially to this therapy, the tumor will recur and enter the androgen-independent state, which is the major obstacle in therapy.

  9. Contemporary Management of Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Katherine; Konety, Badrinath; Ordonez, Maria A

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer represents a spectrum ranging from low-grade, localized tumors to devastating metastatic disease. We discuss the general options for treatment and recent developments in the field. PMID:26949522

  10. Effectiveness and adverse effects of hormonal therapy for prostate cancer: Japanese experience and perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mikio Namiki; Satoru Ueno; Yasuhide Kitagawa; Takashi Fukagai; Hideyuki Akaza

    2012-01-01

    Recently,novel anti-androgens and inhibitors of androgen biosynthesis have been developed through the elucidation of mechanisms of castration resistance of prostate cancer.We believe that these new developments will improve hormonal therapy.On the other hand,there has been an increase in criticism of hormonal therapy,because hormonal therapy is supposed to induce adverse effects such as cardiovascular disease.In this review,we have introduced the Japanese experience of hormonal therapy,because we believe that there may be ethnic differences between Caucasians and Asian people in the efficacy and adverse effects of hormonal therapy.First,we showed that primary hormonal therapy can achieve long-term control of localized prostate cancer in some cases and that quality of life of patients receiving hormonal therapy is rather better than previously thought.Neoadjuvant and adjuvant hormonal therapy in cases undergoing radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy are very useful for high-risk or locally advanced prostate cancer.Further clinical trials are required to confirm the efficacy of neoadjuvant or adjuvant hormonal therapy.We showed that the death from cardiovascular diseases in Japanese patients receiving hormonal therapy was not higher than that in the general population.However,efforts should be made to decrease the adverse effects of hormonal therapy,because life-style change may increase the susceptibility to adverse effects by hormonal therapy even in Japan.Managements of endocrine and metabolic dysfunction,such as diabetes mellitus,are essential.New hormonal compounds such as selective androgen receptor modulators capable of specifically targeting prostate cancer are expected to be developed.

  11. Steroid hormone receptors and prostate cancer: role of structural dynamics in therapeutic targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Raj

    2016-01-01

    Steroid hormone receptors (SHRs) act in cell type- and gene-specific manner through interactions with coregulatory proteins to regulate numerous physiological and pathological processes at the level of gene regulation. Binding of steroid receptor modulator (SRM) ligand leads to allosteric changes in SHR to exert positive or negative effects on the expression of target genes. Due, in part, to the fact that current SRMs generally target ligand binding domain (LBD)/AF2 and neglect intrinsically disordered (ID) N-terminal domain (NTD)/AF1, clinically relevant SRMs lack selectivity and are also prone to the development of resistance over time. Therefore, to maximize the efficacy of SHR-based therapeutics, the possibility of developing unique modulators that act to control AF1 activity must be considered. Recent studies targeting androgen receptor's (AR's) ID AF1 domain for the castration-resistant prostate cancer has provided the possibility of therapeutically targeting ID NTD/AF1 surfaces by allosteric modulations to achieve desired effects. In this review article, we discuss how inter- and intra- molecular allosteric regulations controlled by AR's structural flexibility and dynamics particularly the ID NTD/AF1 is an emerging area of investigation, which could be exploited for drug development and therapeutic targeting of prostate cancer. PMID:27364545

  12. Advantages and Disadvantages of Bone Protective Agents in Metastatic Prostate Cancer: Lessons Learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Nine out of ten metastatic prostate cancer (PCa patients will develop osseous metastases. Of these, every second will suffer from skeletal-related events (SRE. SRE are associated with an increased risk for death, which is markedly increased in the presence of pathological fracture. Moreover, health insurance costs nearly double in the presence of SRE. Zoledronic acid and denosumab are both approved drugs for the prevention or delay of SRE in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC patients with osseous metastases. However, long-term treatment with one of these two drugs is associated with the development of medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (MRONJ. Routine inspections of the oral cavity before and during treatment are mandatory in these patients. Regarding imaging techniques, bone scintigraphy seems to be a promising tool to detect early stage MRONJ. Zoledronic acid does not reduce the incidence of SRE in hormone-sensitive PCa. First data shows 3-monthly application of zoledronic acid to be equi-effective to monthly application.

  13. An imaging agent to detect androgen receptor and its active splice variants in prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Yusuke; Tien, Amy H.; Pan, Jinhe; Leung, Jacky K.; Banuelos, Carmen A.; Jian, Kunzhong; Wang, Jun; Mawji, Nasrin R.; Fernandez, Javier Garcia; Lin, Kuo-Shyan; Andersen, Raymond J.; Sadar, Marianne D.

    2016-01-01

    Constitutively active splice variants of androgen receptor (AR-Vs) lacking ligand-binding domain (LBD) are a mechanism of resistance to androgen receptor LBD–targeted (AR LBD–targeted) therapies for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). There is a strong unmet clinical need to identify prostate cancer patients with AR-V–positive lesions to determine whether they will benefit from further AR LBD–targeting therapies or should receive taxanes or investigational drugs like EPI-506 or galeterone. Both EPI-506 (NCT02606123) and galeterone (NCT02438007) are in clinical trials and are proposed to have efficacy against lesions that are positive for AR-Vs. AR activation function-1 (AF-1) is common to the N-terminal domains of full-length AR and AR-Vs. Here, we provide proof of concept for developing imaging compounds that directly bind AR AF-1 to detect both AR-Vs and full-length AR. 123I-EPI-002 had specific binding to AR AF-1, which enabled direct visualization of CRPC xenografts that express full-length AR and AR-Vs. Our findings highlight the potential of 123I-EPI-002 as an imaging agent for the detection of full-length AR and AR-Vs in CRPC.

  14. Bone targeted therapies for the prevention of skeletal morbidity in men with prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Philip J Saylor

    2014-01-01

    Men with prostate cancer suffer substantially from bone-related complications. Androgen deprivation therapy itself is a cause of loss of bone mineral density and is associated with an increased incidence of osteoporotic fractures. In advanced disease, bone is by far the most common site of metastasis. Complications of bone metastases prominently include pain and the potential for skeletal events such as spinal cord compression and pathologic fractures. Elevated osteoclast activity is an important aspect of the pathophysiology of both treatment-related osteoporosis and skeletal complications due to metastases. The osteoclast is therefore a therapeutic target. Denosumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody to receptor activator of nuclear factor-k-B ligand that was designed to potently inhibit osteoclast activity and is the central focus of this review. Bisphosphonates, radiopharmaceuticals and systemically-active hormonal agents such as abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide have each been shown to improve skeletal morbidity in speciifc clinical situations. Denosumab is the only agent that has been shown to prevent osteoporotic fractures in men receiving androgen deprivation therapy and at elevated risk for fracture. It has also demonstrated superiority to the potent bisphosphonate zoledronic acid for the prevention of skeletal-related events in men with castration-resistant prostate cancer metastatic to bone. Efifcacy and toxicity data will be discussed.

  15. Strontium-89 for prostate cancer with bone metastases. The potential of cancer control and improvement of overall survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strontium-89 (Sr-89) has been considered to have a tumoricidal effect with minimal adverse events. However, few reports have investigated these effects in detail. In this study, we examined the tumoricidal and pain-relief effects of Sr-89 on prostate cancer with bone metastasis as well as survival. A retrospective study was performed involving 31 prostate cancer patients with bone metastasis treated with Sr-89. Using prostate specific antigen (PSA) as an evaluation criterion of cancer control, patients were divided into PSA responder and non-responder groups, and the survival rates of these groups were compared. In addition, using the total amount of painkillers administered as an evaluation criterion of pain relief, patients were divided into pain responder and non-responder groups, and the survival rates of these groups were also compared. As secondary investigation items, age, PSA (ng/ml), pain site, extent of the disease, the presence or absence of castration-resistant prostatic cancer (CRPC), the presence or absence of a past medical history of treatment with docetaxel in CRPC cases, Gleason Score, hemoglobin (g/dl), platelet (Plt) (/μl), serum carboxyterminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ng/ml), and bone-alkaline phosphatase (BAP) (U/l) were investigated. Longer survival was expected for the PSA responder group than for the PSA non-responder group, and whether the spine was the pain site and the presence or absence of CRPC were useful as predictors of this. Plt was suggested to be a useful indicator. Furthermore, the survival time was significantly longer in the pain responder group than in the pain non-responder group, and whether the pain site was present in the spine was considered to be a predictor; however, no significant difference was noted in any of the items assumed to be biomarkers. Sr-89 has the potential to control PSA and prolong survival. A large-scale prospective study of the therapeutic effect of Sr-89 is expected. (author)

  16. Resistance to docetaxel in prostate cancer is associated with androgen receptor activation and loss of KDM5D expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komura, Kazumasa; Jeong, Seong Ho; Hinohara, Kunihiko; Qu, Fangfang; Wang, Xiaodong; Hiraki, Masayuki; Azuma, Haruhito; Lee, Gwo-Shu Mary; Kantoff, Philip W; Sweeney, Christopher J

    2016-05-31

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays an essential role in prostate cancer, and suppression of its signaling with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been the mainstay of treatment for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer for more than 70 y. Chemotherapy has been reserved for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). The Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group-led trial E3805: ChemoHormonal Therapy Versus Androgen Ablation Randomized Trial for Extensive Disease in Prostate Cancer (CHAARTED) showed that the addition of docetaxel to ADT prolonged overall survival compared with ADT alone in patients with metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. This finding suggests that there is an interaction between AR signaling activity and docetaxel sensitivity. Here we demonstrate that the prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP and LAPC4 display markedly different sensitivity to docetaxel with AR activation, and RNA-seq analysis of these cell lines identified KDM5D (lysine-specific demethylase 5D) encoded on the Y chromosome as a potential mediator of this sensitivity. Knocking down KDM5D expression in LNCaP leads to docetaxel resistance in the presence of dihydrotestosterone. KDM5D physically interacts with AR in the nucleus, and regulates its transcriptional activity by demethylating H3K4me3 active transcriptional marks. Attenuating KDM5D expression dysregulates AR signaling, resulting in docetaxel insensitivity. KDM5D deletion was also observed in the LNCaP-derived CRPC cell line 104R2, which displayed docetaxel insensitivity with AR activation, unlike parental LNCaP. Dataset analysis from the Oncomine database revealed significantly decreased KDM5D expression in CRPC and poorer prognosis with low KDM5D expression. Taking these data together, this work indicates that KDM5D modulates the AR axis and that this is associated with altered docetaxel sensitivity. PMID:27185910

  17. Regulation of Prostate Development and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia by Autocrine Cholinergic Signaling via Maintaining the Epithelial Progenitor Cells in Proliferating Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naitao Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of prostate epithelial progenitor cells is important in prostate development and prostate diseases. Our previous study demonstrated a function of autocrine cholinergic signaling (ACS in promoting prostate cancer growth and castration resistance. However, whether or not such ACS also plays a role in prostate development is unknown. Here, we report that ACS promoted the proliferation and inhibited the differentiation of prostate epithelial progenitor cells in organotypic cultures. These results were confirmed by ex vivo lineage tracing assays and in vivo renal capsule recombination assays. Moreover, we found that M3 cholinergic receptor (CHRM3 was upregulated in a large subset of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH tissues compared with normal tissues. Activation of CHRM3 also promoted the proliferation of BPH cells. Together, our findings identify a role of ACS in maintaining prostate epithelial progenitor cells in the proliferating state, and blockade of ACS may have clinical implications for the management of BPH.

  18. Detecting Prostate Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... such as a trans-rectal ultrasound and a biopsy. Physician: Now, just relax -- the best thing to ... prostate gland. Usually these are accompanied by a biopsy -- a sampling of the prostate tissue with a ...

  19. Dietary Antioxidants and Prostate Cancer: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Vance, Terrence M.; Su, Joseph; Fontham, Elizabeth T. H.; Koo, Sung I; Chun, Ock K.

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common non-cutaneous cancer in men in the United States. Several studies have examined the relationship between prostate cancer and antioxidants; however, the results of these studies are inconsistent. This article provides a systematic review of studies on prostate cancer and antioxidant intake from diet and supplements. Tea and coffee appear to offer protection against advanced prostate cancer. Different forms of vitamin E appear to exert different effects on pro...

  20. The emerging role of histone lysine demethylases in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crea Francesco

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Early prostate cancer (PCa is generally treatable and associated with good prognosis. After a variable time, PCa evolves into a highly metastatic and treatment-refractory disease: castration-resistant PCa (CRPC. Currently, few prognostic factors are available to predict the emergence of CRPC, and no curative option is available. Epigenetic gene regulation has been shown to trigger PCa metastasis and androgen-independence. Most epigenetic studies have focused on DNA and histone methyltransferases. While DNA methylation leads to gene silencing, histone methylation can trigger gene activation or inactivation, depending on the target amino acid residues and the extent of methylation (me1, me2, or me3. Interestingly, some histone modifiers are essential for PCa tumor-initiating cell (TIC self-renewal. TICs are considered the seeds responsible for metastatic spreading and androgen-independence. Histone Lysine Demethylases (KDMs are a novel class of epigenetic enzymes which can remove both repressive and activating histone marks. KDMs are currently grouped into 7 major classes, each one targeting a specific methylation site. Since their discovery, KDM expression has been found to be deregulated in several neoplasms. In PCa, KDMs may act as either tumor suppressors or oncogenes, depending on their gene regulatory function. For example, KDM1A and KDM4C are essential for PCa androgen-dependent proliferation, while PHF8 is involved in PCa migration and invasion. Interestingly, the possibility of pharmacologically targeting KDMs has been demonstrated. In the present paper, we summarize the emerging role of KDMs in regulating the metastatic potential and androgen-dependence of PCa. In addition, we speculate on the possible interaction between KDMs and other epigenetic effectors relevant for PCa TICs. Finally, we explore the role of KDMs as novel prognostic factors and therapeutic targets. We believe that studies on histone demethylation may add a

  1. Characterisation and Manipulation of Docetaxel Resistant Prostate Cancer Cell Lines

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, Amanda J

    2011-10-07

    Abstract Background There is no effective treatment strategy for advanced castration-resistant prostate cancer. Although Docetaxel (Taxotere®) represents the most active chemotherapeutic agent it only gives a modest survival advantage with most patients eventually progressing because of inherent or acquired drug resistance. The aims of this study were to further investigate the mechanisms of resistance to Docetaxel. Three Docetaxel resistant sub-lines were generated and confirmed to be resistant to the apoptotic and anti-proliferative effects of increasing concentrations of Docetaxel. Results The resistant DU-145 R and 22RV1 R had expression of P-glycoprotein and its inhibition with Elacridar partially and totally reversed the resistant phenotype in the two cell lines respectively, which was not seen in the PC-3 resistant sublines. Resistance was also not mediated in the PC-3 cells by cellular senescence or autophagy but multiple changes in pro- and anti-apoptotic genes and proteins were demonstrated. Even though there were lower basal levels of NF-κB activity in the PC-3 D12 cells compared to the Parental PC-3, docetaxel induced higher NF-κB activity and IκB phosphorylation at 3 and 6 hours with only minor changes in the DU-145 cells. Inhibition of NF-κB with the BAY 11-7082 inhibitor reversed the resistance to Docetaxel. Conclusion This study confirms that multiple mechanisms contribute to Docetaxel resistance and the central transcription factor NF-κB plays an immensely important role in determining docetaxel-resistance which may represent an appropriate therapeutic target.

  2. Perceived causes of prostate cancer among prostate cancer survivors in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, D.E.G.; Cremers, R.G.H.M.; Aben, K.K.H.; Oort, van I.M.; Kampman, E.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to evaluate self-reported causes of prostate cancer among prostate cancer survivors in the Netherlands to obtain insight into the common beliefs and perceptions of risk factors for prostate cancer. Materials and methods A total of 956 prostate cancer survivors,

  3. Role of chemotherapy in combination with hormonal therapy in first-line treatment of metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceresoli, G L; De Vincenzo, F; Sauta, M G; Bonomi, M; Zucali, P A

    2015-12-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is a heterogeneous disease, whose growth is driven by androgens and androgen receptors. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is the standard treatment of hormone-naïve metastatic disease. The majority of patients are treated with medical castration with GnRH agonists or antagonists, which usually determines a profound PSA decline and a radiological and clinical benefit. However, essentially all patients experience progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), and overall prognosis remains disappointing. Early targeting of cells that survive hormonal therapy may potentially prevent the development of CRPC. Several trials have explored the use of combination therapy with ADT and chemotherapy, targeting both the androgen dependent and independent cells simultaneously. Docetaxel was administered in combination with ADT to men with hormone-naïve metastatic prostate cancer, in the attempt to improve the duration and quality of patient survival. Three large randomized trials (the GETUG-15, CHAARTED and more recently the STAMPEDE study) have assessed these endpoints, with partially conflicting results. Overall, the results from these trials seem to support the use of early docetaxel combined with ADT in selected hormone-naïve metastatic PC patients. Full publication of the results of all studies, with longer follow-up, and the results of other ongoing trials in this setting will hopefully further define the role and the indications of this therapeutic strategy. PMID:26222275

  4. Road to Recovery from Prostate Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... about robotic prostatectomies for the treatment of prostate cancer. During the program, we would like to go ... potency post- surgery. So in 2008, while prostate cancer remains a very controversial subject, it is obviously ...

  5. African American Men and Prostate Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Americans have one of the highest incidences of prostate cancer in the world, and in this country the ... is -- an epidemic. Winston Dyer: My introduction to prostate cancer started with the death of my 46-year- ...

  6. African American Men and Prostate Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have one of the highest incidences of prostate cancer in the world, and in this country the ... an epidemic. Winston Dyer: My introduction to prostate cancer started with the death of my 46-year- ...

  7. African American Men and Prostate Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Americans have one of the highest incidences of prostate cancer in the world, and in this country ... is -- an epidemic. Winston Dyer: My introduction to prostate cancer started with the death of my 46- ...

  8. Road to Recovery from Prostate Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... more about robotic prostatectomies for the treatment of prostate cancer. During the program, we would like to go ... and potency post- surgery. So in 2008, while prostate cancer remains a very controversial subject, it is obviously ...

  9. Rationale for a multimodality strategy to enhance the efficacy of dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Jashodeep eDatta; Erik eBerk; Jessica A Cintolo; Shuwen eXu; Roses, Robert E; Czerniecki, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC), master antigen-presenting cells that orchestrate interactions between the adaptive and innate immune arms, are increasingly utilized in cancer immunotherapy. Despite remarkable progress in our understanding of DC immunobiology, as well as several encouraging clinical applications — such as DC-based sipuleucel-T for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer — clinically effective DC-based immunotherapy as monotherapy for a majority of tumors remains a distant goal. ...

  10. Rationale for a Multimodality Strategy to Enhance the Efficacy of Dendritic Cell-Based Cancer Immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Datta, Jashodeep; Berk, Erik; Jessica A Cintolo; Xu, Shuwen; Roses, Robert E; Czerniecki, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC), master antigen-presenting cells that orchestrate interactions between the adaptive and innate immune arms, are increasingly utilized in cancer immunotherapy. Despite remarkable progress in our understanding of DC immunobiology, as well as several encouraging clinical applications – such as DC-based sipuleucel-T for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer – clinically effective DC-based immunotherapy as monotherapy for a majority of tumors remains a distant goal. ...

  11. Active surveillance for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Otero, Javier; García-Gómez, Borja; Duarte-Ojeda, José M; Rodríguez-Antolín, Alfredo; Vilaseca, Antoni; Carlsson, Sigrid V; Touijer, Karim A

    2016-03-01

    It is worth distinguishing between the two strategies of expectant management for prostate cancer. Watchful waiting entails administering non-curative androgen deprivation therapy to patients on development of symptomatic progression, whereas active surveillance entails delivering curative treatment on signs of disease progression. The objectives of the two management strategies and the patients enrolled in either are different: (i) to review the role of active surveillance as a management strategy for patients with low-risk prostate cancer; and (ii) review the benefits and pitfalls of active surveillance. We carried out a systematic review of active surveillance for prostate cancer in the literature using the National Center for Biotechnology Information's electronic database, PubMed. We carried out a search in English using the terms: active surveillance, prostate cancer, watchful waiting and conservative management. Selected studies were required to have a comprehensive description of the demographic and disease characteristics of the patients at the time of diagnosis, inclusion criteria for surveillance, and a protocol for the patients' follow up. Review articles were included, but not multiple papers from the same datasets. Active surveillance appears to reduce overtreatment in patients with low-risk prostate cancer without compromising cancer-specific survival at 10 years. Therefore, active surveillance is an option for select patients who want to avoid the side-effects inherent to the different types of immediate treatment. However, inclusion criteria for active surveillance and the most appropriate method of monitoring patients on active surveillance have not yet been standardized. PMID:26621054

  12. Prevention strategies for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz-Dräger, B J; Lümmen, G; Bismarck, E; Fischer, C

    2012-12-01

    Through the last decade consideration of the role of vitamins and minerals in primary prevention of genitourinary tumors has dramatically changed. Despite all efforts efficacy of a specific compound has not been proven, so far. In consequence, recommendations for a use of vitamins or other supplements with the intention of prostate cancer prevention should be avoided today. In contrast, there is some evidence that life style modification might be helpful: recent investigations suggest that smoking may be involved in prostate cancer carcinogenesis. In addition, there is evidence that moderate food consumption, reduction of dairy products and an Asian or Mediterranean diet might not only prevent prostate cancer but also harbors additional beneficial effects on general health. This move from single compounds to more complex diets can be considered as a change of paradigm in prostate cancer prevention and could be the starting point of future epidemiological research. Disappointing findings with regards to nutritional cancer prevention contrast with a solid evidence concerning the efficacy of chemoprevention using 5a-reductase inhibitors: Long-term use of Finasteride and Dutasteride significantly reduces prostate cancer detection. Further candidate drugs are under investigation. However, translation of these findings into urological practice remains a matter of controversial discussion. PMID:23288209

  13. Solitary pulmonary metastasis from prostate sarcomatoid cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Oyamada Yoshitaka; Maeshima Arafumi; Goto Taichiro; Kato Ryoichi

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Pulmonary metastasis from prostate cancer is considered to be a late event, and patients can be treated with chemotherapy or hormonal manipulation. However, there has been only a few reports on surgical resection for pulmonary metastasis from prostate cancer. Case Presentation We present a surgical case of solitary pulmonary metastasis from prostate cancer. A 73-year-old man underwent pelvic evisceration for prostate cancer. Histopathological examination revealed a poorly ...

  14. The link between benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørsted, David Dynnes; Bojesen, Stig E

    2013-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer are among the most common diseases of the prostate gland and represent significant burdens for patients and health-care systems in many countries. The two diseases share traits such as hormone-dependent growth and response to antiandrogen...... therapy. Furthermore, risk factors such as prostate inflammation and metabolic disruption have key roles in the development of both diseases. Despite these commonalities, BPH and prostate cancer exhibit important differences in terms of histology and localization. Although large-scale epidemiological...... studies have shown that men with BPH have an increased risk of prostate cancer and prostate-cancer-related mortality, it remains unclear whether this association reflects a causal link, shared risk factors or pathophysiological mechanisms, or detection bias upon statistical analysis. Establishing BPH as a...

  15. Serum Oxidized Protein and Prostate Cancer Risk within the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Hoque, Ashraful; Ambrosone, Christine B; Till, Cathee; Goodman, Phyllis J.; Tangen, Cathy; Kristal, Alan; Lucia, Scott; Wang, Qiao; Kappil, Maya; Thompson, Ian; Hsing, Ann W.; Parnes, Howard; Lippman, Scott M.; Santella, Regina M.

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the role of oxidative stress in prostate cancer risk, we analyzed serum levels of protein carbonyl groups in 1808 prostate cancer cases and 1805 controls, nested in the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial, a randomized, placebo-control trial that found finasteride decreased prostate cancer risk. There were no significant differences in protein carbonyl levels in baseline samples between those later diagnosed with prostate cancer and those without at the end of study biopsy. Adjusted ...

  16. Finasteride Concentrations and Prostate Cancer Risk: Results from the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Chau, Cindy H.; Price, Douglas K.; Cathee Till; Goodman, Phyllis J.; Xiaohong Chen; Leach, Robin J; Johnson-Pais, Teresa L.; Hsing, Ann W.; Ashraful Hoque; Tangen, Catherine M.; Lisa Chu; Parnes, Howard L.; Schenk, Jeannette M.; Reichardt, Juergen K. V.; Thompson, Ian M

    2015-01-01

    Objective In the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT), finasteride reduced the risk of prostate cancer by 25%, even though high-grade prostate cancer was more common in the finasteride group. However, it remains to be determined whether finasteride concentrations may affect prostate cancer risk. In this study, we examined the association between serum finasteride concentrations and the risk of prostate cancer in the treatment arm of the PCPT and determined factors involved in modifying dru...

  17. Association of Symptomatic Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia and Prostate Cancer: Results from the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Schenk, Jeannette M.; Kristal, Alan R.; Arnold, Kathryn B.; Tangen, Catherine M.; Neuhouser, Marian L; Lin, Daniel W; White, Emily; Thompson, Ian M

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the association between symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer risk in 5,068 placebo-arm participants enrolled in the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (1993–2003). These data include 1,225 men whose cancer was detected during the 7-year trial—556 detected for cause (following abnormal prostate-specific antigen or digital rectal examination) and 669 detected not for cause (without indication), as well as 3,843 men who had biopsy-proven absence of...

  18. Prostate Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing prostate cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  19. Potassium channels in prostate and colonic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ousingsawat, Jiraporn

    2007-01-01

    Large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels in human prostate cancer The KCNMA1 gene encoding the alpha-subunit of BK channels is amplified and BK channel expression is enhanced in late-stage, metastatic and hormone-refractory human prostate cancer tissues, whereas benign prostate tissues show only a weak expression of BK channels. PC-3 hormone-insensitive prostate cancer cells, but not hormone-sensitive prostate cancer cells (LNCaP) and benign prostate hyperplasia cells (BPH-1), show an ...

  20. Prostate cancer may trigger paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jakob Kristian; Zakharia, Elias Raja; Boysen, Anders Kindberg Fossø;

    2013-01-01

    -Hu antibody test the patient was diagnosed with paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis related to prostate cancer. The patient died within 6 months. We review the literature on prostate cancer-related paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis. High-risk prostate cancer can trigger paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis, a...

  1. Prevention and early detection of prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Cuzick (Jack); M.A. Thorat (Mangesh A); G. Andriole (Gerald); O.W. Brawley (Otis W); P.H. Brown (Powel H); Z. Culig (Zoran); R. Eeles (Rosalind); L.G. Ford (Leslie G); F. Hamdy (Freddie); L. Holmberg (Lars); D. Ilic (Dragan); T.J. Key (Timothy J); C.L. Vecchia (Carlo La); H. Lilja (Hans); M. Marberger (Michael); F.L. Meyskens (Frank L); L.M. Minasian (Lori M); C. Parker (C.); H.L. Parnes (Howard L); S. Perner (Sven); H. Rittenhouse (Harry); J.A. Schalken (J.); H.-P. Schmid (Hans-Peter); B.J. Schmitz-Dräger (Bernd J); F.H. Schröder (Fritz); A. Stenzl (Arnulf); B. Tombal (Bertrand); T.J. Wilt (Timothy J.); K. Wolk (Kerstin)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractProstate cancer is a common malignancy in men and the worldwide burden of this disease is rising. Lifestyle modifications such as smoking cessation, exercise, and weight control offer opportunities to reduce the risk of developing prostate cancer. Early detection of prostate cancer by pr

  2. Prostate cancer in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinos, Hatzimouratidis

    2005-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths among men. Despite earlier diagnosis due to prostate specific antigen (PSA) screening, it is still a disease of the elderly. Diagnosis is based on digital rectal examination (DRE) and PSA assessment. Refinements in PSA testing (age-specific reference ranges, free PSA, PSA density and velocity) increased specificity and limited unnecessary prostate biopsies. Diagnosis in earlier stages (T1 and T2) commonly leads to cure with current treatment modalities. These include radical prostatectomy, external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy. Other treatment options under development include cryotherapy and high-intensity focused ultrasound. Metastatic prostate cancer is incurable and treatment is based on hormonal therapy. Cytotoxic chemotherapy has only limited role in hormone-independent prostate cancer. Radioisotopes and biphosphonates may alleviate bone pain and prevent osteoporosis and pathological fractures. Follow-up is based on PSA. Prognostic factors for recurrence include stage, Gleason score, pre- and posttreatment PSA. Quality of life issues play an important role in selecting treatment, especially in the elderly due to comorbidities that may negatively affect the overall quality of life. A holistic approach is recommended addressing all quality of life issues without focus only in cancer control. PMID:16362603

  3. [Prostate cancer and chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravis, Gwenaelle; Salem, Naji; Bladou, Franck; Viens, Patrice

    2007-07-01

    Androgen deprivation in patients with metastatic prostate cancer produces palliation of symptoms, PSA decrease and tumoral regression in most patients. After a brief period of disease regression lasting 18 to 24 months nearly all pts will progress to androgen independence disease (HRPC) with progressive clinical deterioration and ultimately death. Chemotherapy with mitoxantrone has been shown to palliate symptoms but did not extend survival. Two large randomized trials showed a survival benefit for pts with HRPC treated with docetaxel with a reduction risk of death by 21-24%, and significant improvement in palliation of symptoms and quality of life. New agents targeting angiogenesis, apoptosis, signal transduction pathway, used alone or in combination with docetaxel currently are under trial in an attempt to provide much needed improvements in outcome. Questions remains in suspend when and who need to be treated, earlier, in high risk as in adjuvant setting? Current data have demonstrated that neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy is relatively safe and feasible. Further investigation through prospective randomize trials is critical to define the precise role of this modality in high risk populations. PMID:17845990

  4. Maspin mediates the gemcitabine sensitivity of hormone-independent prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chien-Yu; Chang, Yu-Jia; Luo, Sheng-Dean; Uyanga, Batzorig; Lin, Feng-Yen; Tai, Cheng-Jeng; Huang, Ming-Te

    2016-03-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy has constituted the main treatment for prostate cancer; however, tumors ultimately progress to hormone-independent prostate cancer (HIPC), and suitable therapeutic strategies for HIPC are not available. Maspin, which is also known as mammary serine protease inhibitor, has been suggested to be a valuable focus for targeted cancer therapy. Specifically, maspin has been shown to be upregulated after androgen ablation therapy. Gemcitabine is used as a first-line therapy for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, but its disease control rate is low. Furthermore, the role of maspin in the therapeutic efficacy of gemcitabine for HIPC remains unclear. The expression levels of maspin in PC-3 and DU145 cells were determined by real-time PCR and Western blotting. Furthermore, the expression of maspin was silenced using shRNA technology to generate maspin-KD cells. The cytotoxicity of gemcitabine to prostate cancer cells was assessed using 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-3,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays, whereas flow cytometry analyses and annexin V-propidium iodide (PI) apoptosis assays were used to assess the ability of gemcitabine to induce apoptosis in maspin-KD and control cells. Additionally, the expression patterns of anti-apoptosis proteins (myeloid cell leukemia 1 (Mcl-1) and B cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)) and pro-apoptosis proteins (Bcl-2-associated death promoter (Bad) and Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax)) were determined by Western blotting. In this study, PC-3 cells were more resistant to gemcitabine administration than DU145 cells, which correlated with the higher expression levels of maspin observed in PC-3 cells. Furthermore, maspin knockdown enhanced gemcitabine-induced cell death, as evidenced by the increased number of apoptotic cells. Gemcitabine treatment upregulated the levels of anti-apoptosis proteins (Mcl-2 and Bcl-2) in both scrambled control and maspin-KD cells; however, the fold changes in Mcl-1 and Bcl-2

  5. Cell Line Modeling to Study Biomarker Panel in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    NickKholgh, Bita; Fang, Xiaolan; Winters, Shira M.; Raina, Anvi; Pandya, Komal S.; Gyabaah, Kenneth; Fino, Nora; Balaji, K.C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND African–American men with prostate cancer (PCa) present with higher-grade and -stage tumors compared to Caucasians. While the disparity may result from multiple factors, a biological basis is often strongly suspected. Currently, few well-characterized experimental model systems are available to study the biological basis of racial disparity in PCa. We report a validated in vitro cell line model system that could be used for the purpose. METHODS We assembled a PCa cell line model that included currently available African–American PCa cell lines and LNCaP (androgen-dependent) and C4-2 (castration-resistant) Caucasian PCa cells. The utility of the cell lines in studying the biological basis of variance in a malignant phenotype was explored using a multiplex biomarker panel consisting of proteins that have been proven to play a role in the progression of PCa. The panel expression was evaluated by Western blot and RT-PCR in cell lines and validated in human PCa tissues by RT-PCR. As proof-of-principle to demonstrate the utility of our model in functional studies, we performed MTS viability assays and molecular studies. RESULTS The dysregulation of the multiplex biomarker panel in primary African–American cell line (E006AA) was similar to metastatic Caucasian cell lines, which would suggest that the cell line model could be used to study an inherent aggressive phenotype in African–American men with PCa. We had previously demonstrated that Protein kinase D1 (PKD1) is a novel kinase that is down regulated in advanced prostate cancer. We established the functional relevance by over expressing PKD1, which resulted in decreased proliferation and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) in PCa cells. Moreover, we established the feasibility of studying the expression of the multiplex biomarker panel in archived human PCa tissue from African–Americans and Caucasians as a prelude to future translational studies. CONCLUSION We have characterized a novel in

  6. Gene therapy for prostate cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tangney, Mark

    2012-01-31

    Cancer remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Despite advances in understanding, detection, and treatment, it accounts for almost one-fourth of all deaths per year in Western countries. Prostate cancer is currently the most commonly diagnosed noncutaneous cancer in men in Europe and the United States, accounting for 15% of all cancers in men. As life expectancy of individuals increases, it is expected that there will also be an increase in the incidence and mortality of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer may be inoperable at initial presentation, unresponsive to chemotherapy and radiotherapy, or recur following appropriate treatment. At the time of presentation, patients may already have metastases in their tissues. Preventing tumor recurrence requires systemic therapy; however, current modalities are limited by toxicity or lack of efficacy. For patients with such metastatic cancers, the development of alternative therapies is essential. Gene therapy is a realistic prospect for the treatment of prostate and other cancers, and involves the delivery of genetic information to the patient to facilitate the production of therapeutic proteins. Therapeutics can act directly (eg, by inducing tumor cells to produce cytotoxic agents) or indirectly by upregulating the immune system to efficiently target tumor cells or by destroying the tumor\\'s vasculature. However, technological difficulties must be addressed before an efficient and safe gene medicine is achieved (primarily by developing a means of delivering genes to the target cells or tissue safely and efficiently). A wealth of research has been carried out over the past 20 years, involving various strategies for the treatment of prostate cancer at preclinical and clinical trial levels. The therapeutic efficacy observed with many of these approaches in patients indicates that these treatment modalities will serve as an important component of urological malignancy treatment in the clinic, either in isolation or

  7. Gene therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangney, Mark; Ahmad, Sarfraz; Collins, Sara A; O'Sullivan, Gerald C

    2010-05-01

    Cancer remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Despite advances in understanding, detection, and treatment, it accounts for almost one-fourth of all deaths per year in Western countries. Prostate cancer is currently the most commonly diagnosed noncutaneous cancer in men in Europe and the United States, accounting for 15% of all cancers in men. As life expectancy of individuals increases, it is expected that there will also be an increase in the incidence and mortality of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer may be inoperable at initial presentation, unresponsive to chemotherapy and radiotherapy, or recur following appropriate treatment. At the time of presentation, patients may already have metastases in their tissues. Preventing tumor recurrence requires systemic therapy; however, current modalities are limited by toxicity or lack of efficacy. For patients with such metastatic cancers, the development of alternative therapies is essential. Gene therapy is a realistic prospect for the treatment of prostate and other cancers, and involves the delivery of genetic information to the patient to facilitate the production of therapeutic proteins. Therapeutics can act directly (eg, by inducing tumor cells to produce cytotoxic agents) or indirectly by upregulating the immune system to efficiently target tumor cells or by destroying the tumor's vasculature. However, technological difficulties must be addressed before an efficient and safe gene medicine is achieved (primarily by developing a means of delivering genes to the target cells or tissue safely and efficiently). A wealth of research has been carried out over the past 20 years, involving various strategies for the treatment of prostate cancer at preclinical and clinical trial levels. The therapeutic efficacy observed with many of these approaches in patients indicates that these treatment modalities will serve as an important component of urological malignancy treatment in the clinic, either in isolation or

  8. Androgen deprivation therapy sensitizes prostate cancer cells to T-cell killing through androgen receptor dependent modulation of the apoptotic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardiani, Andressa; Gameiro, Sofia R; Kwilas, Anna R; Donahue, Renee N; Hodge, James W

    2014-10-15

    Despite recent advances in diagnosis and management, prostrate cancer remains the second most common cause of death from cancer in American men, after lung cancer. Failure of chemotherapies and hormone-deprivation therapies is the major cause of death in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Currently, the androgen inhibitors enzalutamide and abiraterone are approved for treatment of metastatic CRPC. Here we show for the first time that both enzalutamide and abiraterone render prostate tumor cells more sensitive to T cell-mediated lysis through immunogenic modulation, and that these immunomodulatory activities are androgen receptor (AR)-dependent. In studies reported here, the NAIP gene was significantly down-regulated in human prostate tumor cells treated in vitro and in vivo with enzalutamide. Functional analysis revealed that NAIP played a critical role in inducing CTL sensitivity. Amplification of AR is a major mechanism of resistance to androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT). Here, we show that enzalutamide enhances sensitivity to immune-mediated killing of prostate tumor cells that overexpress AR. The immunomodulatory properties of enzalutamide and abiraterone provide a rationale for their use in combination with immunotherapeutic agents in CRPC, especially for patients with minimal response to enzalutamide or abiraterone alone, or for patients who have developed resistance to ADT. PMID:25344864

  9. Icaritin suppresses development of neuroendocrine differentiation of prostate cancer through inhibition of IL-6/STAT3 and Aurora kinase A pathways in TRAMP mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Feng; Zhang, Zhi Wei; Tan, Ee Min; Lim, Z L Ryan; Li, Yu; Wang, Xiao Chong; Chua, Seok Eng; Li, Jun; Cheung, Edwin; Yong, Eu-Leong

    2016-07-01

    Neuroendocrine prostate cancer (NEPC) has a poor prognosis, with a median survival of less than 1 year after diagnosis. Following androgen deprivation therapy, prostate adenocarcinoma cells have been observed to develop an androgen receptor-negative, terminally differentiated and indolent neuroendocrine-like phenotype. However, several molecular events, including interleukin 6 (IL-6) stimulation, in the prostate microenvironment result in the appearance of aggressive, highly proliferative castrate-resistant NEPC. In this study, we examined the mechanistic effects of a natural prenylflavonoid, icaritin (ICT), on neuroendocrine differentiation in IL-6-induced LNCaP cells and NEPC development in the male transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. TRAMP mice received daily intraperitoneal injection of ICT or vehicle. ICT induced apoptosis in prostate tumor, suppressed NEPC development and, accordingly, improved overall survival in TRAMP mice. Expression of neuroendocrine markers (synaptophysin) and androgen receptor in TRAMP mice and neuroendocrine-like LNCaP cells were inhibited by ICT. Suppression of neuroendocrine and NEPC development by ICT was associated with dose-dependent inhibitory effects on abnormally elevated IL-6/STAT3 and Aurora kinase A in vitro and in vivo Since ICT demonstrated favorable pharmacokinetic and safety profiles with marked enrichment in prostate tissues, our study provides evidence for the development of prenylflavonoid as a multimodal therapeutic agent against NEPC. PMID:27207661

  10. Diagnosis and treatment for prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zuoxing Niu; Guohua Ren; Shuping Song

    2008-01-01

    The morbility of prostate cancer has risen in China in recent years, it is important to diagnose and treat prostate cancer standardly and systemically.This review analyzed the status and advances of PSA examination, digital rectal examination, prostate biopsy in prostate cancer, and it gave a detailed description of radical prostatectomy, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, etc.The advances of targeted therapy and tumor vaccine is also discussed.

  11. AB012. Brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yong; Yang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the security and effect of brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. Methods Forty five patients with Tl–T2 prostate cancer were treated with real-time transperineal ultrasound-guide 125I seeds prostate implantation. Results The median operation time was 90 min, the median number of I seeds used was 56. The follow up time was 12–48 months, the cases of PSA Brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer is safe and effective.

  12. Effect of small molecules modulating androgen receptor (SARMs in human prostate cancer models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Tesei

    Full Text Available The management of hormone-refractory prostate cancer represents a major challenge in the therapy of this tumor, and identification of novel androgen receptor antagonists is needed to render treatment more effective. We analyzed the activity of two novel androgen receptor antagonists, (S-11 and (R-9, in in vitro and in vivo experimental models of hormone-sensitive or castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. In vitro experiments were performed on LNCaP, LNCaP-AR, LNCaP-Rbic and VCaP human prostate cancer cells. Cytotoxic activity was assessed by SRB and BrdU uptake, AR transactivation by luciferase reporter assay and PSA levels by Real Time RT-PCR and ELISA assays. Cell cycle progression-related markers were evaluated by western blot. In vivo experiments were performed on SCID mice xenografted with cells with different sensitivity to hormonal treatment. In hormone-sensitive LNCaP and LNCaP-AR cells, the latter expressing high androgen receptor levels, (R-9 and (S-11 exhibited a higher cytotoxic effect compared to that of the reference compound ((R-bicalutamide, also in the presence of the synthetic androgen R1881. Furthermore, the cytotoxic effect produced by (R-9 was higher than that of (S-11 in the two hormone-resistant LNCaP-AR and VCaP cells. A significant reduction in PSA levels was observed after exposure to both molecules. Moreover, (S-11 and (R-9 inhibited DNA synthesis by blocking the androgen-induced increase in cyclin D1 protein levels. In vivo studies on the toxicological profile of (R-9 did not reveal the presence of adverse events. Furthermore, (R-9 inhibited tumor growth in various in vivo models, especially LNCaP-Rbic xenografts, representative of recurrent disease. Our in vitro results highlight the antitumor activity of the two novel molecules (R-9 and (S-11, making them a potentially attractive option for the treatment of CRPC.

  13. Cancer stem cells in prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Moltzahn, Felix; Thalmann, George N

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (P-Ca) remains a leading cause of cancer-related death in men. Lately, increasing evidence for a hierarchically organized cancer stem cell (CSC) model emerged for different tumors entities, including P-Ca. CSCs are defined by several characteristics including self-renewal, pluripotency and tumorigenicity and are thought to be responsible for tumor recurrence, metastasis and cancer related death. In this review we discuss the recent research in the field of CSCs, its limitation...

  14. Prostate cancer immunotherapy: beyond immunity to curability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Jonathan W

    2014-11-01

    Metastatic prostate cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer in the United States. It is the first prevalent cancer in which overall survival in advanced disease is modestly, but objectively, improved with outpatient delivered dendritic cell-based immunotherapy. More prostate cancer patients have enrolled through Facebook and trusted-site Internet searches in clinical trials for prostate cancer vaccine-based immunotherapy than in immunotherapy trials for lung, breast, colon, pancreas, ovarian, and bladder cancer combined in the past 7 years. Exceptional responses to anti-CTLA-4 treatment have been documented in clinics, and prostate cancer neoantigen characterization and T-cell clonotyping are in their research ascendancy. The prostate is an accessory organ; it is not required for fertility, erectile function, or urinary continence. The true evolutionary advantage of having a prostate for male mammalian physiology is a topic of speculation in seminar rooms and on bar stools, but it remains unknown. Hundreds of prostate lineage-unique proteins (PLUP) exist among the >37,000 normal human prostate lineage-unique open reading frames that can be targeted for immunologic ablation of PLUP(+) prostate cancer cells by prostate-specific autoimmunity. This bioengineered graft-versus-prostate disease is a powerful strategy that can eliminate deaths from prostate cancer. Immunologic tolerance to prostate cancer can be overcome at every clinical stage of presentation. This Cancer Immunology at the Crossroads article aims to present advances in the past two decades of basic, translational, and clinical research in prostate cancer, including bioengineering B-cell and T-cell responses, and ongoing prostate cancer immunotherapy trials. PMID:25367978

  15. Inflammatory Genetic Markers of Prostate Cancer Risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in Western society males, with incidence rates predicted to rise with global aging. Etiology of prostate cancer is however poorly understood, while current diagnostic tools can be invasive (digital rectal exam or biopsy) and/or lack specificity for the disease (prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing). Substantial histological, epidemiological and molecular genetic evidence indicates that inflammation is important in prostate cancer pathogenesis. In this review, we summarize the current status of inflammatory genetic markers influencing susceptibility to prostate cancer. The focus will be on inflammatory cytokines regulating T-helper cell and chemokine homeostasis, together with the Toll-like receptors as key players in the host innate immune system. Although association studies indicating a genetic basis for prostate cancer are presently limited mainly due to lack of replication, larger and more ethnically and clinically defined study populations may help elucidate the true contribution of inflammatory gene variants to prostate cancer risk

  16. Vitamin D, Sunlight and Prostate Cancer Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Krishna Vanaja Donkena; Young, Charles Y. F.

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second common cancer in men worldwide. The prevention of prostate cancer remains a challenge to researchers and clinicians. Here, we review the relationship of vitamin D and sunlight to prostate cancer risk. Ultraviolet radiation of the sunlight is the main stimulator for vitamin D production in humans. Vitamin D's antiprostate cancer activities may be involved in the actions through the pathways mediated by vitamin D metabolites, vitamin D metabolizing enzymes, vitamin...

  17. Progress in Gene Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    KamranAliAhmed; BrianJamesDavis; TorrenceMWilson; GregoryAWiseman; MarkJFederspiel; JohnCMorris

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy has held promise to correct various disease processes. Prostate cancer represents the second leading cause of cancer death in American men. A number of clinical trials involving gene therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer have been reported. The ability to efficiently transduce tumors with effective levels of therapeutic genes has been identified as a fundamental barrier to effective cancer gene therapy. The approach utilizing gene therapy in prostate cancer patients at our...

  18. Detecting Prostate Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have other tests, such as a trans-rectal ultrasound and a biopsy. Physician: Now, just relax -- the ... exam or PSA test indicates an abnormality, an ultrasound image is made of the prostate gland. Usually ...

  19. Detecting Prostate Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... stands for Prostate Specific Antigen. It is a test that men have by having their blood sampled ... be present. Narrator: While the use of the test remains controversial, a normal PSA level is considered ...

  20. Detecting Prostate Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... PSA stands for Prostate Specific Antigen. It is a test that men have by having their blood sampled and what we look for is a particular glyco-protein that's found in the blood. ...

  1. Detecting Prostate Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... M.D.: PSA stands for Prostate Specific Antigen. It is a test that men have by having ... detection is the digital rectal exam. Barry Trevithick: It doesn't make sense to be afraid of ...

  2. What Is Prostate Cancer?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... visit to their urologist. John Bertini, M.D.: It's a wide variety of reasons why they might ... have a prostate. Most men don't pronounce it correctly and wouldn't know where it's located ...

  3. Targeting Bone Metabolism in Patients with Advanced Prostate Cancer: Current Options and Controversies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilman Todenhöfer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining bone health remains a clinical challenge in patients with prostate cancer (PC who are at risk of developing metastatic bone disease and increased bone loss due to hormone ablation therapy. In patients with cancer-treatment induced bone loss (CTIBL, antiresorptive agents have been shown to improve bone mineral density (BMD and to reduce the risk of fractures. For patients with bone metastases, both zoledronic acid and denosumab delay skeletal related events (SREs in the castration resistant stage of disease. Novel agents targeting the Wnt inhibitors dickkopf-1 and sclerostin are currently under investigation for the treatment of osteoporosis and malignant bone disease. New antineoplastic drugs such as abiraterone, enzalutamide, and Radium-223 are capable of further delaying SREs in patients with advanced PC. The benefit of antiresorptive treatment for patients with castration sensitive PC appears to be limited. Recent trials on the use of zoledronic acid for the prevention of bone metastases failed to be successful, whereas denosumab delayed the occurrence of bone metastases by a median of 4.1 months. Currently, the use of antiresorptive drugs to prevent bone metastases still remains a field of controversies and further trials are needed to identify patient subgroups that may profit from early therapy.

  4. Targeting bone metabolism in patients with advanced prostate cancer: current options and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todenhöfer, Tilman; Stenzl, Arnulf; Hofbauer, Lorenz C; Rachner, Tilman D

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining bone health remains a clinical challenge in patients with prostate cancer (PC) who are at risk of developing metastatic bone disease and increased bone loss due to hormone ablation therapy. In patients with cancer-treatment induced bone loss (CTIBL), antiresorptive agents have been shown to improve bone mineral density (BMD) and to reduce the risk of fractures. For patients with bone metastases, both zoledronic acid and denosumab delay skeletal related events (SREs) in the castration resistant stage of disease. Novel agents targeting the Wnt inhibitors dickkopf-1 and sclerostin are currently under investigation for the treatment of osteoporosis and malignant bone disease. New antineoplastic drugs such as abiraterone, enzalutamide, and Radium-223 are capable of further delaying SREs in patients with advanced PC. The benefit of antiresorptive treatment for patients with castration sensitive PC appears to be limited. Recent trials on the use of zoledronic acid for the prevention of bone metastases failed to be successful, whereas denosumab delayed the occurrence of bone metastases by a median of 4.1 months. Currently, the use of antiresorptive drugs to prevent bone metastases still remains a field of controversies and further trials are needed to identify patient subgroups that may profit from early therapy. PMID:25802521

  5. Improving Screening Strategies for Prostate Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Wolters (Tineke)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractTh is thesis describes research on screening for prostate cancer. To improve understanding of the thesis, some background information will be provided in this introduction. First, a short description of the prostate and of prostate cancer will be given in Chapter 1, followed by more deta

  6. Screening spectroscopy of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yermolenko, S. B.; Voloshynskyy, D. I.; Fedoruk, O. S.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the study was to establish objective parameters of the field of laser and incoherent radiation of different spectral ranges (UV, visible, IR) as a non-invasive optical method of interaction with different samples of biological tissues and fluids of patients to determine the state of prostate cancer and choosing the best personal treatment. The objects of study were selected venous blood plasma of patient with prostate cancer, histological sections of rat prostate gland in the postoperative period. As diagnostic methods have been used ultraviolet spectrometry samples of blood plasma in the liquid state, infrared spectroscopy middle range (2,5-25 microns) dry residue of plasma by spectral diagnostic technique of thin histological sections of biological tissues.

  7. Consequence of the introduction of routine FCH PET/CT imaging for patients with prostate cancer: a dual centre survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorocholine(18F) (FCH) was introduced at the beginning of April 2010 in France, Slovenia and three other EU member states for the localisation of bone metastases of prostate cancer with PET. The aim of the study was to compare the evolution of diagnostic imaging in patients with prostate cancer using a new radiopharmaceutical FCH, observed in France and in Slovenia, and to quantify the consequence of the results of new imaging modality on the detection rate of abnormal metastases and recurrences of prostate cancer. In two centres (France/Slovenia), a survey of the number of nuclear medicine examinations in patients with prostate cancer was performed, covering 5 quarters of the year since the introduction of FCH. For each examination, the clinical and biological circumstances were recorded, as well as the detection of bone or soft tissue foci. Six hundred and eighty-eight nuclear medicine examinations were performed impatients with prostate cancer. Nuclear medicine examinations were performed for therapy monitoring and follow-up in 23% of cases. The number of FCH PET/CT grew rapidly between the 1st and 5th period of the observation (+220%), while the number of bone scintigraphies (BS) and fluoride(18F) PET/CTs decreased (−42% and −23% respectively). Fluorodeoxyglucose(18F) (FDG) PET/CT remained limited to few cases of castrate-resistant or metastatic prostate cancer in Paris. The proportion of negative results was significantly lower with FCH PET/CT (14%) than with BS (49%) or fluoride(18F) PET/CT (54%). For bone metastases, the detection rate was similar, but FCH PET/CT was performed on average at lower prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels and was less frequently doubtful (4% vs. 28% for BS). FCH PET/CT also showed foci in prostatic bed (53% of cases) or in soft tissue (35% of cases). A rapid development of FCH PET/CT was observed in both centres and led to a higher detection rate of prostate cancer lesions

  8. Road to Recovery from Prostate Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Urology and the Director of the Deane Prostate Health and Research Center at the Mount Sinai ... more about robotic prostatectomies for the treatment of prostate cancer. During the program, we would like to ...

  9. Road to Recovery from Prostate Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the Director of the Deane Prostate Health and Research Center at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine ... about robotic prostatectomies for the treatment of prostate cancer. During the program, we would like to go ...

  10. Effects of Prostate Cancer Screening and Treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M. Wever (Elisabeth)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractProstate cancer is the second most frequently diagnosed cancer of men worldwide. The number of new cases worldwide was estimated at 899,000 and accounted for 13.6% of all cancers in men in 2008. With an estimated 258,000 deaths in 2008, prostate cancer is the sixth leading cause of death

  11. Prostate stem cells and cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Nikitin, Alexander Y.; Matoso, A; Roy-Burman, P

    2007-01-01

    Properties shared by neoplastic and stem cells indicate a possibility that somatic stem cells or transit-amplifying cells that have reacquired stem cell properties, particularly the ability for self-renewal, represent favorable targets for malignant transformation. In this review we discuss significance of the stem cell model for understanding prostate cancer pathogenesis and describe relevant studies in animals. It is proposed that dissemination of rare cancer stem ce...

  12. Prostate and Urologic Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conducts and supports research on the prevention and early detection of prostate and bladder cancer. | Conducts and supports research on the prevention and early detection of prostate, bladder, and skin cancers.

  13. Prostate Cancer and Bone: The Elective Affinities

    OpenAIRE

    Nadia Rucci; Adriano Angelucci

    2014-01-01

    The onset of metastases dramatically changes the prognosis of prostate cancer patients, determining increased morbidity and a drastic fall in survival expectancy. Bone is a common site of metastases in few types of cancer, and it represents the most frequent metastatic site in prostate cancer. Of note, the prevalence of tumor relapse to the bone appears to be increasing over the years, likely due to a longer overall survival of prostate cancer patients. Bone tropism represents an intriguing c...

  14. Multidisciplinary Functional MR Imaging for Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jeong Kon; Jang, Yun-Jin; Cho, Gyunggoo

    2009-01-01

    Various functional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques are used for evaluating prostate cancer including diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging, and MR spectroscopy. These techniques provide unique information that is helpful to differentiate prostate cancer from non-cancerous tissue and have been proven to improve the diagnostic performance of MRI not only for cancer detection, but also for staging, post-treatment monitoring, and guiding prostate biopsies. Ho...

  15. Prostate cancer and metastasis initiating stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kathleen Kelly; Juan Juan Yin

    2008-01-01

    Androgen refractory prostate cancer metastasis is a major clinical challenge.Mechanism-based approaches to treating prostate cancer metastasis require an understanding of the developmental origin of the metastasis-initiating cell.Properties of prostate cancer metastases such as plasticity with respect to differentiated phenotype and androgen independence are consistent with the transformation of a prostate epithelial progenitor or stem cell leading to metastasis.This review focuses upon current evidence and concepts addressing the identification and properties of normal prostate stem or progenitor cells and their transformed counterparts.

  16. Detecting Prostate Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Roger Babaian, M.D.: PSA stands for Prostate Specific Antigen. It is a test that men have by having their blood sampled and ... testing may be required. Physician: OK, what I'd like to do is just do a rectal ...

  17. Role of androgen receptor in prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HiroyoshiSuzuki; HaruoIto

    1999-01-01

    The growth of prostate cancer is sensitive to androgen, and hormonal therapy has been used for treatment of ad-vanced cancer. About 80 % of prostate cancers initially respond to hormonal therapy, howcrver, more than half of the re-sponders gradtmlly become resistant to this therapy. Changes in tumors from an androgen-responsive to an androgen-unre-sponsive state have been widely discussed. Since androgen action is mediated by androgen receptor (AR), abnonnalitiesof AR is believed to play an important role of the loss of androgen responsiveness in prostate cancer. "Ilais article focusedon the role of AR in the progression of prostate cancer.

  18. Clinical survey of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment trends and outcomes for prostate cancer in our hospital were reported. A total of 482 patients with prostate cancer treated in our hospital between January, 1990 and December, 2004. The age distribution was from 51 to 99 years-old, with the mean age of 72.9 years-old at onset. The number of prostate cancer patients, especially asymptomatic patients with prostatic specific antigen (PSA) elevation, have increased recently. As for the clinical stage, 92 cases (19.1%), 238 cases (49.4%), 48 cases (10.0%) and 104 cases (21.6%) were stage A, B, C and D, respectively. 425 cases (88.2%) received some form of endocrine therapy. Retropubic prostatectomy or external beam radiation therapy was performed in 77 and 57 cases, respectively all cases. The cause-specific 5-year survival rate of the 482 cases was 79.7%, comprising 100% for stage A1, 96.8% for stage A2, 89.4% for stage B, 79.9% for stage C and 42.9% for stage D. The cause-specific 5-year survival was significantly better in the latter patients (1997-2004) than the former patients (1990-1996) in stage C (p=0.0226), D (p=0.0448). In stage C patients, the retropubic prostatectomy (with endocrine therapy) group, increased in the latter period and showed longer cause-specific 5-year survival than the endocrine therapy group (p=0.0027). In stage D2 patients, chemo-endocrine therapy with etoposide (VP-16), adriamycin (ADM) and cisplatin (CDDP) refractory and cause-specific 5-year survival was longer than endocrine therapy alone (p=0.0467, P=0.0381). Our results suggest that retropubic prostatectomy with endocrine therapy and chemo-endocrine therapy are useful for stage C and D prostate cancer patients, respectively. (author)

  19. Effects of Sorafenib on C-Terminally Truncated Androgen Receptor Variants in Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Schrader

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence suggests that the development of castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPCa is commonly associated with an aberrant, ligand-independent activation of the androgen receptor (AR. A putative mechanism allowing prostate cancer (PCa cells to grow under low levels of androgens, is the expression of constitutively active, C-terminally truncated AR lacking the AR-ligand binding domain (LBD. Due to the absence of a LBD, these receptors, termed ARΔLBD, are unable to respond to any form of anti-hormonal therapies. In this study we demonstrate that the multikinase inhibitor sorafenib inhibits AR as well as ARΔLBD-signalling in CRPCa cells. This inhibition was paralleled by proteasomal degradation of the AR- and ARΔLBD-molecules. In line with these observations, maximal antiproliferative effects of sorafenib were achieved in AR and ARΔLBD-positive PCa cells. The present findings warrant further investigations on sorafenib as an option for the treatment of advanced AR-positive PCa.

  20. Design and synthesis of novel bicalutamide and enzalutamide derivatives as antiproliferative agents for the treatment of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassetto, Marcella; Ferla, Salvatore; Pertusati, Fabrizio; Kandil, Sahar; Westwell, Andrew D; Brancale, Andrea; McGuigan, Christopher

    2016-08-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is one of the major causes of male death worldwide and the development of new and more potent anti-PC compounds is a constant requirement. Among the current treatments, (R)-bicalutamide and enzalutamide are non-steroidal androgen receptor antagonist drugs approved also in the case of castration-resistant forms. Both these drugs present a moderate antiproliferative activity and their use is limited due to the development of resistant mutants of their biological target. Insertion of fluorinated and perfluorinated groups in biologically active compounds is a current trend in medicinal chemistry, applied to improve their efficacy and stability profiles. As a means to obtain such effects, different modifications with perfluoro groups were rationally designed on the bicalutamide and enzalutamide structures, leading to the synthesis of a series of new antiproliferative compounds. Several new analogues displayed improved in vitro activity towards four different prostate cancer cell lines, while maintaining full AR antagonism and therefore representing promising leads for further development. Furthermore, a series of molecular modelling studies were performed on the AR antagonist conformation, providing useful insights on potential protein-ligand interactions. PMID:27131065

  1. TRICHOMONOSIS AND SUBSEQUENT RISK OF PROSTATE CANCER IN THE PROSTATE CANCER PREVENTION TRIAL

    OpenAIRE

    Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Alderete, John F.; Till, Cathee; Goodman, Phyllis J.; Hsing, Ann W.; Zenilman, Jonathan M; De Marzo, Angelo M.; Platz, Elizabeth A.

    2009-01-01

    We previously observed a positive association between a history of trichomonosis, a sexually transmitted infection caused by the protozoan, Trichomonas vaginalis, and prostate cancer risk in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. To determine the reproducibility of this finding, we conducted a second, prospective investigation of trichomonosis and prostate cancer in the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial. Participants were men ≥55 years of age with no evidence of prostate cancer at enrollmen...

  2. Serum Phospholipid Fatty Acids and Prostate Cancer Risk: Results From the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Brasky, Theodore M.; Till, Cathee; White, Emily; Neuhouser, Marian L; Song, Xiaoling; Goodman, Phyllis; Thompson, Ian M; King, Irena B.; Albanes, Demetrius; Kristal, Alan R.

    2011-01-01

    Inflammation may be involved in prostate cancer development and progression. This study examined the associations between inflammation-related phospholipid fatty acids and the 7-year-period prevalence of prostate cancer in a nested case-control analysis of participants, aged 55–84 years, in the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial during 1994–2003. Cases (n = 1,658) were frequency matched to controls (n = 1,803) on age, treatment, and prostate cancer family history. Phospholipid fatty acids were ...

  3. Palliative pelvic radiotherapy for symptomatic incurable prostate cancer – A prospective multicenter study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Radiotherapy is used to palliate pelvic symptoms of castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). However, magnitude and time course of effects and toxicities are poorly documented. Study aims were to evaluate changes in patient-reported target symptoms (TS), health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and toxicity following palliative pelvic radiotherapy (PPRT) of CRPC. Material and methods: 47 patients with CRPC and a symptomatic pelvic mass prescribed PPRT with 30–39 Gy were prospectively included. Primary endpoint was patient-reported improvement or complete resolution of the TS twelve weeks after PPRT. HRQOL changes were explored. Toxicity was physician-evaluated. Results: Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) (45%), hematuria (26%) and pain (19%) were the most common TS. In the 40 evaluable patients, overall TS response twelve weeks after PPRT was 70%. TS responses were 8/18 for LUTS, 11/12 for hematuria, and 7/9 for pain. Global HRQOL improved transiently. The most common toxicity was grade 1 or 2 diarrhea (50%). There was no grade 4 toxicity. Conclusions: In the majority of patients with CRPC and a symptomatic pelvic tumor, PPRT with 30–39 Gy contributes to relief of hematuria, pain and other pelvic symptoms, with acceptable toxicity. Future studies should investigate whether PPRT regimens can be simplified

  4. Role of transurethral resection of the prostate in the management of prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Szollosi Attila; Martha Orsolya; Denes Lorand; Vida Arpad Oliver; Maier Adrian; Pavai Zoltan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Prostate cancer is the second most diagnosed cancer in men, after lung cancer. The gold standard procedure in prostate cancer (PCa) diagnosis is the ultrasound guided prostate biopsy. Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) used in solving the bladder outlet obstruction, can have a role in detection of PCa. The aim of this retrospective study is to examine the role of transurethral resection of the prostate in the diagnosis and therapy of prostate cancer.

  5. Role of transurethral resection of the prostate in the management of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szollosi Attila

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Prostate cancer is the second most diagnosed cancer in men, after lung cancer. The gold standard procedure in prostate cancer (PCa diagnosis is the ultrasound guided prostate biopsy. Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP used in solving the bladder outlet obstruction, can have a role in detection of PCa. The aim of this retrospective study is to examine the role of transurethral resection of the prostate in the diagnosis and therapy of prostate cancer.

  6. Inhibition of AKT promotes FOXO3a-dependent apoptosis in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, T P; Suman, S; Alatassi, H; Ankem, M K; Damodaran, C

    2016-01-01

    Growth factor-induced activation of protein kinase-B (PKB), also known as AKT, induces pro-survival signaling and inhibits activation of pro-apoptotic signaling molecules including the Forkhead box O-3a (FOXO3a) transcription factor and caspase in transformed prostate cells in vitro. Earlier we reported that Withaferin-A (WA), a small herbal molecule, induces pro-apoptotic response-4 (Par-4) mediated apoptosis in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) cells. In the present study, we demonstrate that inhibition of AKT facilitates nuclear shuttling of FOXO3a where it regulates Par-4 transcription in CRPC cells. FOXO3a is upstream of Par-4 signaling, which is required for induction of apoptosis in CRPC cells. Promoter bashing studies and Ch-IP analysis confirm a direct interaction of FOXO3a and Par-4; a sequential deletion of FOXO3a-binding sites in the Par-4 promoter fails to induce Par-4 activation. To confirm these observations, we either overexpressed AKT or silenced FOXO3a activation in CRPC cells. Both methods inhibit Par-4 function and apoptosis is significantly compromised. In xenograft tumors derived from AKT-overexpressed CRPC cells, FOXO3a and Par-4 expression is downregulated, leading to aggressive tumor growth. Oral administration of WA to mice with xenograft tumors restores FOXO3a-mediated Par-4 functions and results in inhibited tumor growth. Finally, an inverse correlation of nuclear localization of AKT expression corresponds to cytoplasmic Par-4 localization in human prostate tissue array. Our studies suggest that Par-4 is one of the key transcriptional targets of FOXO3a, and Par-4 activation is required for induction of apoptosis in CRPC cells. Activation of FOXO3a appears to be an attractive target for the treatment of CRPC and molecules such as WA can be explored further for the treatment of CRPC. PMID:26913603

  7. An improved CTC isolation scheme for pairing with downstream genomics: Demonstrating clinical utility in metastatic prostate, lung and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premasekharan, Gayatri; Gilbert, Elizabeth; Okimoto, Ross A; Hamirani, Ashiya; Lindquist, Karla J; Ngo, Vy T; Roy, Ritu; Hough, Jeffrey; Edwards, Matthew; Paz, Rosa; Foye, Adam; Sood, Riddhi; Copren, Kirsten A; Gubens, Matthew; Small, Eric J; Bivona, Trever G; Collisson, Eric A; Friedlander, Terence W; Paris, Pamela L

    2016-09-28

    Improvements in technologies to yield purer circulating tumor cells (CTCs) will enable a broader range of clinical applications. We have previously demonstrated the use of a commercially available cell-adhesion matrix (CAM) assay to capture invasive CTCs (iCTCs). To improve the purity of the isolated iCTCs, here we used fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) in combination with the CAM assay (CAM + FACS). Our results showed an increase of median purity from the CAM assay to CAM + FACS for the spiked-in cell lines and patient samples analyzed from three different metastatic cancer types: castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), non-small cell lung cancer (mNSCLC) and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cancer (mPDAC). Copy number profiles for spiked-in mCRPC cell line and mCRPC patient iCTCs were similar to expected mCRPC profiles and a matched biopsy. A somatic epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation specific to mNSCLC was observed in the iCTCs recovered from EGFR(+) mNSCLC cell lines and patient samples. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) of spiked-in pancreatic cancer cell line and mPDAC patient iCTCs showed mPDAC common mutations. CAM + FACS iCTC enrichment enables multiple downstream genomic characterizations across different tumor types. PMID:27343980

  8. Prostate Cancer Screening : The effect on prostate cancer mortality and incidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. van Leeuwen (Pim)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractAt first glance, deciding whether to get the PSA screening test for prostate cancer seems to be pretty straightforward and attractive. It’s a simple blood test that can pick up the prostate cancer long before your symptoms appear. After all, your prostate cancer is earlier treated result

  9. CRITICAL REVIEW OF PROSTATE CANCER PREDICTIVE TOOLS

    OpenAIRE

    Shahrokh F. Shariat; Michael W Kattan; Vickers, Andrew J; Karakiewicz, Pierre I; Scardino, Peter T.

    2009-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a very complex disease, and the decision-making process requires the clinician to balance clinical benefits, life expectancy, comorbidities, and potential treatment related side effects. Accurate prediction of clinical outcomes may help in the difficult process of making decisions related to prostate cancer. In this review, we discuss attributes of predictive tools and systematically review those available for prostate cancer. Types of tools include probability formulas, lo...

  10. Obesity, body composition, and prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Fowke Jay H; Motley Saundra S; Concepcion Raoul S; Penson David F; Barocas Daniel A

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Established risk factors for prostate cancer have not translated to effective prevention or adjuvant care strategies. Several epidemiologic studies suggest greater body adiposity may be a modifiable risk factor for high-grade (Gleason 7, Gleason 8-10) prostate cancer and prostate cancer mortality. However, BMI only approximates body adiposity, and may be confounded by centralized fat deposition or lean body mass in older men. Our objective was to use bioelectric impedance ...

  11. Aging Men and Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson B

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in men worldwide and its incidence increases with age, mainly affecting elderly men aged 60 and above. Factors known to be associated with the development and progression of PCa are age, family history, and race/ethnicity, with age being the most important factor. The reasons for the increased incidence and mortality due to prostate cancer in elderly men are not entirely clear. Continued exposure to environmental and dietary factors may lead to accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes over the life-span, leading to altered expression and/or activity of tumor promoter and tumor suppressor genes. Changing levels of endogenous hormones (like androgens and metabolism in elderly men may also play a role in the development of prostate cancers which may be further influenced by testosterone replacement therapy. For many decades now preventative strategies and treatments such as radiation therapy or hormone therapy, and others have been administered to manage PCa; however current studies and evidence suggest that PCa is undertreated in elderly men, despite evidence of efficacy of these treatments, which leads to higher prevalence of mortality in this age group. Studies involving basic research, preventative and management strategies are still underway to understand the mechanisms of PCa development in elderly men and treatment of this disease in ageing male population.

  12. Antisense approaches in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Kim N; Gleave, Martin E

    2004-06-01

    Patients with hormone refractory prostate cancer have limited treatment options and new therapies are urgently needed. Advances in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms implicated in prostate cancer progression have identified many potential therapeutic gene targets that are involved in apoptosis, growth factors, cell signalling and the androgen receptor (AR). Antisense oligonucleotides are short sequences of synthetic modified DNA that are designed to be complimentary to a selected gene's mRNA and thereby specifically inhibit expression of that gene. The antisense approach continues to hold promise as a therapeutic modality to target genes involved in cancer progression, especially those in which the gene products are not amenable to small molecule inhibition or antibodies. The current status and future direction of a number of antisense oligonucleotides targeting several genes, including BCL-2, BCL-XL, clusterin, the inhibitors of apoptosis (IAP) family, MDM2, protein kinase C-alpha, c-raf, insulin-like growth factor binding proteins and the AR, that have potential clinical use in prostate cancer are reviewed. PMID:15174974

  13. Vitamin D, Sunlight and Prostate Cancer Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Vanaja Donkena

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the second common cancer in men worldwide. The prevention of prostate cancer remains a challenge to researchers and clinicians. Here, we review the relationship of vitamin D and sunlight to prostate cancer risk. Ultraviolet radiation of the sunlight is the main stimulator for vitamin D production in humans. Vitamin D's antiprostate cancer activities may be involved in the actions through the pathways mediated by vitamin D metabolites, vitamin D metabolizing enzymes, vitamin D receptor (VDR, and VDR-regulated genes. Although laboratory studies including the use of animal models have shown that vitamin D has antiprostate cancer properties, whether it can effectively prevent the development and/or progression of prostate cancer in humans remains to be inconclusive and an intensively studied subject. This review will provide up-to-date information regarding the recent outcomes of laboratory and epidemiology studies on the effects of vitamin D on prostate cancer prevention.

  14. Predictive value of prostate-specific antigen for prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shepherd, Leah; Borges, Alvaro Humberto; Ravn, Lene;

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Although prostate cancer (PCa) incidence is lower in HIV+ men than in HIV- men, the usefulness of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening in this population is not well defined and may have higher false negative rates than in HIV- men. We aimed to describe the kinetics and...

  15. Estrogen receptors in the human male prostatic urethra and prostate in prostatic cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, A; Bruun, J; Balslev, E;

    1999-01-01

    Estrogen receptors (ERs) in the prostate and prostatic urethra were examined in 33 men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and in 11 with prostate cancer (PC). The Abbot monoclonal ER-ICA assay was used for immunohistochemical investigation. In the BPH group, ERs were revealed in the prostatic...... stroma in eight cases and in the glandular epithelium in one. In four cases ERs were seen in the prostatic stroma and in the glandular epithelium. In the prostatic urethra, ERs were found in 19 cases located in the urothelium, lamina propria and/or periurethral glands. In the PC group, ERs were...... demonstrated in the prostatic stroma and/or prostatic urethra in 6 out of 11 cases. In both BPH and PC patients, immunoreactivity was weak and confined to few cells, indicating low ER content in the prostate as well as in the prostatic urethra. Dextran-coated charcoal (DCC) analysis was used for detection and...

  16. [Medical treatment of prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobel, B; Cipolla, B; Labrador, J

    1994-03-01

    Hormone dependence of prostate cancer is well known. In 80% of cases with metastases, hormone suppression leads to the reduction of tumour volume and related disorders. However the treatment is generally palliative because malignant process recurs after about around 16 months. Mean survival is less than 3 years in these forms. Lack of response come always together with a poor prognosis, and there is 90% mortality at 2 years. Advanced prostatic cancer should not be treated with hormones if the patient has few symptoms and his quality of life is satisfactory. Symptomatic forms require hormone manipulation. Orchidectomy or LH-RH are recommended. Total androgen ablation (combined treatment) leads rapidly to more relief of symptoms, but its drawbacks and especially high cost indicate that its use should be weighed individually. Estramustine is not a first-lune treatment. Presently, there is no criteria to predict response to treatment. PMID:8066398

  17. The genomic landscape of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvan eBaca

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is a common malignancy in men, with a markedly variable clinical course. Somatic alterations in DNA drive the growth of prostate cancers and may underlie the behavior of aggressive versus indolent tumors. The accelerating application of genomic technologies over the last two decades has identified mutations that drive prostate cancer formation, progression, and therapeutic resistance. Here, we discuss exemplary somatic mutations in prostate cancer, and highlight mutated cellular pathways with biological and possible therapeutic importance. Examples include mutated genes involved in androgen signaling, cell cycle regulation, signal transduction and development. Some genetic alterations may also predict the clinical course of disease or response to therapy, although the molecular heterogeneity of prostate tumors poses challenges to genomic biomarker identification. The widespread application of massively parallel sequencing technology to the analysis of prostate cancer genomes should continue to advance both discovery-oriented and diagnostic avenues.

  18. Cancer of the prostate - role of PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1979 when prostate specific antigen (PSA), found in the cytoplasm of benign and malignant prostatic cells, was first purified, it has attained world wide popularity in prostate cancer detection. It is also a sensitive test for skeletal meta states from carcinoma of the prostate. Prostate cancer has become the number one cancer in men and constitutes 11% of all cancers. Approximately 50% of men over 50 years have symptoms referable to the lower urinary tract. 50% or more of patients at Ibadan present an advanced stage of the disease and are therefore not curable. Thus, lacking the skill to manage advanced manifestations, early detection and screening programs are the best means to reduce mortality due to prostate cancer

  19. A novel rabbit anti-hepatocyte growth factor monoclonal neutralizing antibody inhibits tumor growth in prostate cancer cells and mouse xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hepatocyte growth factor and its receptor c-Met are correlated with castration-resistance in prostate cancer. Although HGF has been considered as an attractive target for therapeutic antibodies, the lack of cross-reactivity of monoclonal antibodies with human/mouse HGFs is a major obstacle in preclinical developments. We generated a panel of anti-HGF RabMAbs either blocking HGF/c-Met interaction or inhibiting c-Met phosphorylation. We selected one RabMAb with mouse cross-reactivity and demonstrated that it blocked HGF-stimulated downstream activation in PC-3 and DU145 cells. Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibited not only the growth of PC-3 cells but also HGF-dependent proliferation in HUVECs. We further demonstrated the efficacy and potency of the anti-HGF RabMAb in tumor xenograft mice models. Through these in vitro and in vivo experiments, we explored a novel therapeutic antibody for advanced prostate cancer. - Highlights: • HGF is an attractive target for castration-refractory prostate cancer. • We generated and characterized a panel of anti-HGF rabbit monoclonal antibodies. • More than half of these anti-HGF RabMAbs was cross-reactive with mouse HGF. • Anti-HGF RabMAb blocks HGF-stimulated phosphorylation and cell growth in vitro. • Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis in xenograft mice

  20. A novel rabbit anti-hepatocyte growth factor monoclonal neutralizing antibody inhibits tumor growth in prostate cancer cells and mouse xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Yanlan; Chen, Yicheng; Ding, Guoqing; Wang, Mingchao; Wu, Haiyang; Xu, Liwei; Rui, Xuefang; Zhang, Zhigen, E-mail: srrshurology@163.com

    2015-08-14

    The hepatocyte growth factor and its receptor c-Met are correlated with castration-resistance in prostate cancer. Although HGF has been considered as an attractive target for therapeutic antibodies, the lack of cross-reactivity of monoclonal antibodies with human/mouse HGFs is a major obstacle in preclinical developments. We generated a panel of anti-HGF RabMAbs either blocking HGF/c-Met interaction or inhibiting c-Met phosphorylation. We selected one RabMAb with mouse cross-reactivity and demonstrated that it blocked HGF-stimulated downstream activation in PC-3 and DU145 cells. Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibited not only the growth of PC-3 cells but also HGF-dependent proliferation in HUVECs. We further demonstrated the efficacy and potency of the anti-HGF RabMAb in tumor xenograft mice models. Through these in vitro and in vivo experiments, we explored a novel therapeutic antibody for advanced prostate cancer. - Highlights: • HGF is an attractive target for castration-refractory prostate cancer. • We generated and characterized a panel of anti-HGF rabbit monoclonal antibodies. • More than half of these anti-HGF RabMAbs was cross-reactive with mouse HGF. • Anti-HGF RabMAb blocks HGF-stimulated phosphorylation and cell growth in vitro. • Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis in xenograft mice.