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Sample records for cast steel

  1. Fracture Mechanisms in Steel Castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stradomski Z.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The investigations were inspired with the problem of cracking of steel castings during the production process. A single mechanism of decohesion - the intergranular one - occurs in the case of hot cracking, while a variety of structural factors is decisive for hot cracking initiation, depending on chemical composition of the cast steel. The low-carbon and low-alloyed steel castings crack due to the presence of the type II sulphides, the cause of cracking of the high-carbon tool cast steels is the net of secondary cementite and/or ledeburite precipitated along the boundaries of solidified grains. Also the brittle phosphor and carbide eutectics precipitated in the final stage solidification are responsible for cracking of castings made of Hadfield steel. The examination of mechanical properties at 1050°C revealed low or very low strength of high-carbon cast steels.

  2. Steel Casting Requirements for Ordnance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel , *Castings, *Nondestructive testing , * Charpy impact tests , Tensile properties, Loads(Forces), Toughness, Hardness, Etching, Heat treatment, Microstructure, Shells(Structural forms), Economic analysis

  3. Preventing cracks when casting steel slag ladles

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanov, M.; Shvetsov, V.

    2014-01-01

    The paper is dedicated to the improvement of large steel casting technology where slag ladle casting is taken as an example. The temperature measurement of the crystallization process of casting is held. The causes of the formation of cracks are reviewed. To prevent the formation of cracks the recommendations are developed to improve the casting technology.

  4. Clean Cast Steel Technology, Phase IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles E. Bates

    2003-02-24

    The objective of the Clean Cast Steel Technology Program was to improve casting product quality by removing or minimizing oxide defects and to allow the production of higher integrity castings for high speed machining lines. Previous research has concentrated on macro-inclusions that break, chip, or crack machine tool cutters and drills and cause immediate shutdown of the machining lines. The overall goal of the project is to reduce the amount of surface macro-inclusions and improve the machinability of steel castings. Macro-inclusions and improve the machinability of steel castings. Macro-inclusions have been identified by industrial sponsors as a major barrier to improving the quality and marketability of steel castings.

  5. Clean cast steel technology. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, C.E.; Griffin, J.A.

    1998-06-01

    This report documents the results obtained from the Clean Cast Steel Technology Program financially supported by the DOE Metal Casting Competitiveness Research Program and industry. The primary objective of this program is to develop technology for delivering steel free of oxide macroinclusions to mold cavities. The overall objective is to improve the quality of cast steel by developing and demonstrating the technology for substantially reducing surface and sub-surface oxide inclusions. Two approaches are discussed here. A total of 23 castings were produced by submerge pouring along with sixty conventionally poured castings. The submerged poured castings contained, on average, 96% fewer observable surface inclusions (11.9 vs 0.4) compared to the conventionally poured cast parts. The variation in the population of surface inclusions also decreased by 88% from 5.5 to 0.7. The machinability of the casting was also improved by submerged pouring. The submerge poured castings required fewer cutting tool changes and less operator intervention during machining. Subsequent to these trials, the foundry has decided to purchase more shrouds for continued experimentation on other problem castings where submerge pouring is possible. An examination of melting and pouring practices in four foundries has been carried out. Three of the four foundries showed significant improvement in casting quality by manipulating the melting practice. These melting practice variables can be grouped into two separate categories. The first category is the pouring and filling practice. The second category concerns the concentration of oxidizable elements contained in the steel. Silicon, manganese, and aluminum concentrations were important factors in all four foundries. Clean heats can consistently be produced through improved melting practice and reducing exposure of the steel to atmospheric oxygen during pouring and filling.

  6. Cracks in high-manganese cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chojecki

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The reasons which account for the formation of in service cracks in castings made from Hadfield steel were discussed. To explain the source of existence of the nuclei of brittle fractures, the properties of cast steel were examined within the range of solidification temperatures, remembering that feeding of this material is specially difficult, causing microporosity in hot spots. This creates conditions promoting the formation of microcracks which tend to propagate during service conditions involving high dynamic stresses, and explains why the cracks are mainly characterized by a brittle nature. The reason for crack formation in service are micro-porosities formed during casting solidification.

  7. The quality of the joint between alloy steel and unalloyed cast steel in bimetallic layered castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Wróbel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In paper is presented technology of bimetallic layered castings based on founding method of layer coating directly in cast process so-called method of mould cavity preparation. Prepared castings consist two fundamental parts i.e. bearing part and working part (layer. The bearing part of bimetallic layered casting is typical foundry material i.e. ferritic-pearlitic unalloyed cast steel, whereas working part (layer is plate of austenitic alloy steel sort X2CrNi 18-9. The ratio of thickness between bearing and working part is 8:1. The aim of paper was assessed the quality of the joint between bearing and working part in dependence of pouring temperature and carbon concentration in cast steel. The quality of the joint in bimetallic layered castings was evaluated on the basis of ultrasonic non-destructive testing, structure and microhardness researches.

  8. 46 CFR 59.20-1 - Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings. 59.20-1 Section 59... BOILERS, PRESSURE VESSELS AND APPURTENANCES Welding Repairs to Castings § 59.20-1 Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings. Defects in carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings may be repaired by welding. The repairs...

  9. Aging degradation of cast stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.

    1985-10-01

    A program is being conducted to investigate the significance of in-service embrittlement of cast-duplex stainless steels under light-water reactor operating conditions. Data from room-temperature Charpy-impact tests for several heats of cast stainless steel aged up to 10,000 h at 350, 400, and 450 0 C are presented and compared with results from other studies. Microstructures of cast-duplex stainless steels subjected to long-term aging either in the laboratory or in reactor service have been characterized. The results indicate that at least two processes contribute to the low-temperature embrittleent of duplex stainless steels, viz., weakening of the ferrite/austenite phase boundary by carbide precipitation and embrittlement of ferrite matrix by the formation of additional phases such as G-phase, Type X, or the α' phase. Carbide precipitation has a significant effect on the onset of embrittlement of CF-8 and -8M grades of stainless steels aged at 400 or 450 0 C. The existing correlations do not accurately represent the embrittlement behavior over the temperature range 300 to 450 0 C. 18 refs., 13 figs

  10. TiC reinforced cast Cr steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dogan, O.N.; Hawk, J.A.; Schrems, K.K.

    2006-06-01

    A new class of materials, namely TiC-reinforced cast chromium (Cr) steels, was developed for applications requiring high abrasion resistance and good fracture toughness. The research approach was to modify the carbide structure of commercial AISI 440C steel for better fracture resistance while maintaining the already high abrasion resistance. The new alloys contained 12Cr, 2.5–4.5Ti, and 1–1.5C (wt.%) and were melted in a vacuum induction furnace. Their microstructure was composed primarily of a martensitic matrix with a dispersion of TiC precipitates. Modification of TiC morphology was accomplished through changing the cooling rate during solidification. Wear rates of the TiC-reinforced Cr steels were comparable to that of AISI 440C steel, but the impact resistance was much improved.

  11. TiC-reinforced cast Cr steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, Ö. N.; Hawk, J. A.; Schrems, K. K.

    2006-06-01

    A new class of materials, namely TiC-reinforced cast chromium (Cr) steels, was developed for applications requiring high abrasion resistance and good fracture toughness. The research approach was to modify the carbide structure of commercial AISI 440C steel for better fracture resistance while maintaining the already high abrasion resistance. The new alloys contained 12Cr, 2.5-4.5Ti, and 1-1.5C (wt.%) and were melted in a vacuum induction furnace. Their microstructure was composed primarily of a martensitic matrix with a dispersion of TiC precipitates. Modification of TiC morphology was accomplished through changing the cooling rate during solidification. Wear rates of the TiC-reinforced Cr steels were comparable to that of AISI 440C steel, but the impact resistance was much improved.

  12. Evaluation of Continuous-Cast Steel for Projectile Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-01

    radius and a diagonal measure- ment of 115.2 mm (4.536 in.). The continuous- cast steel supplied by Republic Steel had a ladle analysis of 0.15% silicon...TECHNICAL I LIBRARY IAD AD-E400 808 TECHNICAL REPORT ARLCD-TR-81016 EVALUATION OF CONTINUOUS- CAST STEEL FOR PROJECTILE BODIES CHARLES E...ARLCD-TR-81016 2. GOVT ACCESSION NO. 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER 4. TITLE (mnd Subillle) EVALUATION OF CONTINUOUS- CAST STEEL FOR PROJECTILE

  13. Clean Cast Steel Technology - Machinability and Technology Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. E. Bates; J. A. Griffin

    2000-05-01

    There were two main tasks in the Clean Cast Steel Technology - Machinability and Technology Transfer Project. These were (1) determine the processing facts that control the machinability of cast steel and (2) determine the ability of ladle stirring to homogenize ladle temperature, reduce the tap and pouring temperatures, and reduce casting scrap.

  14. Aging degradation of cast stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.

    1986-10-01

    A program is being conducted to investigate the significance of in-service embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels under light-water reactor operating conditions. Microstructures of cast materials subjected to long-term aging either in reactor service or in the laboratory have been characterized by TEM, SANS, and APFIM techniques. Two precipitate phases, i.e., the Cr-rich α' and Ni- and Si-rich G phase, have been identified in the ferrite matrix of the aged steels. The results indicate that the low-temperature embrittlement is primarily caused by α' precipitates which form by spinodal decomposition. The relative contribution of G phase to loss of toughness is now known. Microstructural data also indicate that weakening of ferrite/austenite phase boundary by carbide precipitates has a significant effect on the onset and extent of embrittlement of the high-carbon CF-8 and CF-8M grades of stainless steels, particularly after aging at 400 or 450 0 C. Data from Charpy-impact, tensile, and J-R curve tests for several heats of cast stainless steel aged up to 10,000 h at 350, 400, and 450 0 C are presented and correlated with the microstructural results. Thermal aging of the steels results in an increase in tensile strength and a decrease in impact energy, J/sub IC/, and tearing modulus. The fracture toughness results show good agreement with the Charpy-impact data. The effects of compositional and metallurgical variables on loss of toughness are discussed

  15. Effect of cast steel production metallurgy on the emergence of casting defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Čamek

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper documents metallurgical possibilities of high alloy cast steel production in open induction medium frequency furnaces and an electric arc furnace in a gravity die casting foundry. The observation was focused on the emergence of gas defects in steel castings. The content of gases achieved during the metallurgical processes was evaluated for every unit of the production equipment and the casting ladle before casting into disposable sand moulds. The sand mould area was considered to be constant. The aim was to evaluate the current metallurgical possibilities of affecting the content of gases in high alloy cast steel in the current technical conditions of the foundry.

  16. Abrasive Wear of Alloyed Cast Steels Applied for Heavy Machinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Studnicki A.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the paper the results and analysis of abrasive wear studies were shown for two grades of cast steels: low-alloyed cast steel applied for heavy machinery parts such as housing, covers etc. and chromium cast steels applied for kinetic nodes of pin-sleeve type. Studies were performed using the modified in Department of Foundry pin-on-disc method.

  17. Influence of Mass on Mechanical Properties of Cast Steel,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel , *Castings, *Mechanical properties, Mass, Sizes(Dimensions), Microstructure, Tensile properties, Charpy impact tests , Impact strength, Fracture(Mechanics), Crack propagation, Chemical analysis, Microscopy

  18. Tundish Technology for Casting Clean Steel: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, Yogeshwar

    2016-08-01

    With increasing demand of high-quality clean steel, cleanliness is of paramount importance in steel production and casting. Tundish plays an important role in controlling the continuously cast steel quality as it links a batch vessel, ladle, to a continuous casting mold. Tundish is also the last vessel in which metal flows before solidifying in mold. For controlling the quality of steel, flow and temperature control of the melt are critical, and these are presented in this paper. Use of proper flux, design of flow control devices, and gas injection in tundish become important factors in casting clean steel. Recycling of hot tundish, centrifugal flow tundish, H-shaped tundish, etc. are some of the developments which were implemented to cast clean steel and these are discussed.

  19. Phase Transformations in Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yoon-Jun [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) constitute both ferrite and austenite as a matrix. Such a microstructure confers a high corrosion resistance with favorable mechanical properties. However, intermetallic phases such as σ and χ can also form during casting or high-temperature processing and can degrade the properties of the DSS. This research was initiated to develop time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagrams of two types of cast duplex stainless steels, CD3MN (Fe-22Cr-5Ni-Mo-N) and CD3MWCuN (Fe-25Cr-7Ni-Mo-W-Cu-N), in order to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formation. The alloys were heat treated isothermally or under controlled cooling conditions and then characterized using conventional metallographic methods that included tint etching, and also using electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). The kinetics of intermetallic-phase (σ + χ) formation were analyzed using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (MA) equation in the case of isothermal transformations and a modified form of this equation in the case of continuous cooling transformations. The rate of intermetallic-phase formation was found to be much faster in CD3MWCuN than CD3MN due mainly to differences in the major alloying contents such as Cr, Ni and Mo. To examine in more detail the effects of these elements of the phase stabilities; a series of eight steel castings was designed with the Cr, Ni and Mo contents systematically varied with respect to the nominal composition of CD3MN. The effects of varying the contents of alloying additions on the formation of intermetallic phases were also studied computationally using the commercial thermodynamic software package, Thermo-Calc. In general, σ was stabilized with increasing Cr addition and χ by increasing Mo addition. However, a delicate balance among Ni and other minor elements such as N and Si also exists. Phase equilibria in DSS can be affected by

  20. Phase transformations in cast duplex stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoon-Jun

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) constitute both ferrite and austenite as a matrix. Such a microstructure confers a high corrosion resistance with favorable mechanical properties. However, intermetallic phases such as sigma (sigma) and chi (chi) can also form during casting or high-temperature processing and can degrade the properties of the DSS. This research was initiated to develop time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagrams of two types of cast duplex stainless steels, CD3MN (Fe-22Cr-5Ni-Mo-N) and CD3MWCuN (Fe-25Cr-7Ni-Mo-W-Cu-N), in order to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formation. The alloys were heat treated isothermally or under controlled cooling conditions and then characterized using conventional metallographic methods that included tint etching, and also using electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). The kinetics of intermetallic-phase (sigma + chi) formation were analyzed using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) equation in the case of isothermal transformations and a modified form of this equation in the case of continuous cooling transformations. The rate of intermetallic-phase formation was found to be much faster in CD3MWCuN than CD3MN due mainly to differences in the major alloying contents such as Cr, Ni and Mo. To examine in more detail the effects of these elements of the phase stabilities, a series of eight steel castings was designed with the Cr, Ni and Mo contents systematically varied with respect to the nominal composition of CD3MN. The effects of varying the contents of alloying additions on the formation of intermetallic phases were also studied computationally using the commercial thermodynamic software package, Thermo-Calc. In general, a was stabilized with increasing Cr addition and chi by increasing Mo addition. However, a delicate balance among Ni and other minor elements such as N and Si also exists. Phase equilibria in

  1. THERMODYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF THE CAST IRON AND STEEL MODIFYING PROCESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Marukovich

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanisms of modification of cast iron and steel\\^ were analyzed and thermodinamic performance criterion of modifiers was defined. It is shown that in cast irons, Mg, Ca and P3M mostly act like refining modifiers. In steel they act as refining and surfactant species. Effectiveness of modifiers for steel is determined by their high degassing and surface activity, low distribution coefficient, weak interaction with Ъ-Ре, low activity in liquid metal.

  2. Investigations of Protective Coatings for Castings of High-manganese Cast Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Holtzer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available When cast steel castings are made in moulding sands on matrices of high-silica sand, which has a low fire resistance the problem of theso-called chemical penetration is distinctly visible. Whereas this effect appears to a small degree only when moulding sand matrices are of chromite, zircon or olivine sands. Therefore in case of making castings of high-manganese cast steel (e.g. Hadfield steel sands not containing free silica should be applied (e.g. olivine sand or in case of a high-silica matrix protective coatings for moulds and cores should be used. Two protective coatings, magnesite alcoholic (marked as coating 1 and coating 2 originated from different producers and intended for moulds for castings of the Hadfield steel, were selected for investigations. Examinations of the basic properties were performed for these coatings: viscosity, thermal analysis, sedimentation properties, wear resistance. In order to estimate the effectiveness of protective coatings the experimental castings were prepared. When applying coating 1, the surface quality of the casting was worse and traces of interaction between the casting material (cast steel and the coating were seen. When protective coating 2 was used none interactions were seen and the surface quality was better.

  3. Investigations of Protective Coatings for Castings of High-Manganese Cast Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holtzer M.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available When cast steel castings are made in moulding sands on matrices of high-silica sand, which has a low fire resistance the problem of the so-called chemical penetration is distinctly visible. Whereas this effect appears to a small degree only when moulding sand matrices are of chromite, zircon or olivine sands. Therefore in case of making castings of high-manganese cast steel (e.g. Hadfield steel sands not containing free silica should be applied (e.g. olivine sand or in case of a high-silica matrix protective coatings for moulds and cores should be used. Two protective coatings, magnesite alcoholic (marked as coating 1 and coating 2 originated from different producers and intended for moulds for castings of the Hadfield steel, were selected for investigations. Examinations of the basic properties were performed for these coatings: viscosity, thermal analysis, sedimentation properties, wear resistance. In order to estimate the effectiveness of protective coatings the experimental castings were prepared. When applying coating 1, the surface quality of the casting was worse and traces of interaction between the casting material (cast steel and the coating were seen. When protective coating 2 was used none interactions were seen and the surface quality was better.

  4. Simulation of continuous cast steel product solidification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardelean, E.

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Primary cooling – inside the tundish – has a great impact over the thickness of the solidified steel crust. If on exiting the tundish the crust is too thin, it can punch and break, as a result of the ferrostatic pressure exerted from the inside by the liquid steel as well as because of the weight of the molten steel. The parameters that influence the amount of dissipated heat depend on the cooling water flow of the tundish, on the pressure and temperature of the cooling water but also on the overheating of the continuously cast steel. The secondary cooling takes place at the exit of the semi-finished product from the tundish, when the solidification is supposed to take place all along the cross section of the strand. In order to achieve it, in addition to a correctly managed primary cooling, it is necessary to obtain the proper correlation of the factors that influence the secondary cooling as well: the water flow rate long the three zones of the installation and its pressure in the secondary circuit. All these have in view a proper solidification length; an intense cooling can generate cracks due to the thermal stress, while a too slow cooling can generate a partial solidification of the strand up to the cropping machine area. The paper presents a mathematical simulation of the continuously cast steel solidification.

    El enfriamiento primario del cristalizador tiene una gran importancia sobre el espesor de la costra de acero solidificado. Si al salir del cristalizador, esta costra es demasiado sutil, bajo la acción de la presión ferro estática ejercitada por el acero líquido del interior y gracias el peso propio del hilo, ésta, puede perforar resultando su rompimiento. Los parámetros que influenyen sobre la cantidad de calor cedida dependen del agua de enfriamiento del catalizador, de la presión y de la temperatura de agua de enfriamiento, pero también del sobrecalentamiento del acero fundido continuamente. A la salida del

  5. Application of electromagnetic mixing on steel continuous casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    Evaluation of results relative to mathematical analysis of hydrodynamic events in the continuously-casted ingot core by application of conduction electromagnetic mixing is presented. The electromagnetic mixing regime is realized in industrial tests in the course of continuous casting the St3sp and St10sp steels with the rate of 0.4 m/min. The problems related to technology of steel casting and industrial application of conduction electromagnetic mixing are considered in the work(4). The results obtained are in fair agreement with the results of mathematical modelling. 5 refs., 3 figs

  6. Analysis of the quality renovated continuous steel casting roller

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. This paper presents the possibility of restoration of worn contact sur- faces of rollers for continuous casting of steel. Permanent effort of steel producers to extend the lifespan of these components requires the implementation of new filler materials or modifying technological renovation processes to reduce the ...

  7. Development of a thin steel strip casting process. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, R.S.

    1994-04-01

    This is a comprehensive effort to develop direct strip casting to the point where a pilot scale program for casting carbon steel strip could be initiated. All important aspects of the technology were being investigated, however the program was terminated early due to a change in the business strategy of the primary contractor, Armco Inc. (focus to be directed at specialty steels, not low carbon steel). At termination, the project was on target on all milestones and under budget. Major part was casting of strip at the experiment casting facility. A new caster, capable of producing direct cast strip of up to 12 in. wide in heats of 1000 and 3000 lb, was used. A total of 81 1000-1200 lb heats were cast as well as one test heat of 3000 lb. Most produced strip of from 0.016 to 0.085 in. thick. Process reliability was excellent for short casting times; quality was generally poor from modern hot strip mill standards, but the practices necessary for good surface quality were identified.

  8. INCREASING OF MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF CAST GRAPHITIZED STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Akimov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Due to the presence of many essential properties (low prime cost, high manufacturability and damping ability, heat conductivity, fluidity and others,the graphitized cast irons are widely applied for parts operating under the conditions of static and cyclic loads, wear at dry friction and aggressive media at elevated temperatures. At the same time because of significant content of the graphite phase in the structure, the cast irons possess relatively low mechanical properties. Thereby the attention is drawn to graphitized steels, the peculiarity of which consists in the presence of graphite inclusions in the structure, which appoints specific cast iron's properties to these materials. But unlike cast irons, the graphite content in them is in 2…3 times lower and it affects positively on mechanical and service properties indices. This work deals with the optimization of the composition of cast graphitized steel, which has high mechanical properties indices. Methodology. The experimental design technique was used in this work. Alloys prototypes were smelted and their mechanical properties were investigated on the basis of these techniques. Findings were exposed to regression processing, and the dependences of the alloys components influence on its properties were obtained. By means of graphical optimization the optimal composition of steel with high mechanical properties indices has been determined. Findings.Ithasbeenestablishedthat carbon and silicon have the most significant influence on the strength and cyclic endurance of graphitized steels. The chemical composition of the cast graphitized steel with high static and cyclic strength indices was suggested in this work. Originality. With the use of mathematical experimental design techniques the dependences describing the influence of carbon, silicon and copper on the static and cyclic strength indices were obtained. They allow optimizing compositions of graphitized steels. Practical

  9. Fuzzy control strategy for secondary cooling of continuous steel casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirian, G. O.; Gheorghiu, C. A.; Hepuţ, T.; Rob, R.

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to create an original fuzzy solution on the existing structure of the control system of continuous casting that eliminates fissures in the poured material from the secondary cooling of steel. For this purpose a system was conceived with three fuzzy database decision rules, which by analyzing a series of measurements taken from the process produces adjustments in the rate of flow of the cooling water and the speed of casting and determine the degree of risk of the wire. In the specialized literature on the national plan and the world, there is no intelligent correction in the rate of flow of the cooling water and the speed of casting in the secondary cooling of steel. The database of rules was made using information collected directly from the installation process of continuous casting of the Arcelor Mittal Hunedoara.

  10. Diffusion of C and Cr During Creation of Surface Layer on Cast Steel Casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szajnar J.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In paper a method of improvement in utility properties of unalloyed cast steel casting in result of diffusion of C and Cr in process of creation of surface layer is presented. The aim of paper was determination of diffusion range of basic elements of alloyed surface layer. Moreover a quantitative analysis of carbides phase strengthens alloyed surface layer of casting was carried out. The results of studies shown that important factors of surface layer creation are maximal temperature Tmax on granular insert – cast steel boundary dependent of pouring temperature, granularity Zw of Fe-Cr-C alloy insert and thickness of casting wall gśo. On the basis of obtained results was affirmed that with increase of thickness of casting wall increases range of diffusion in solid state in Fe-Cr-C grains and in liquid state. Moreover the range of Tmax = 13001500oC favours creation of the proper alloyed surface layers on cast steel.

  11. Use of Numerical Simulations During Continuous Steel Casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David DITTEL

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes numerical modeling of round billets solidification process during continuous steel casting. Emphasis is placed not only on the mathematical nature of transmission events that affect the casting billet (heat conduction, convection and radiation, but also the methods of solving thermal problems (analytical, numerical. The numerical methods are discussed in detail the finite element method and the method of networks that form the core of the most common commercially used simulation software for modeling the temperature fields at various technological processes. In the research was compiled its own sophisticated software - Tefis - solving the problems of temperature fields by using of an explicit (numerical method of networks. The actual solution is implemented using Fourier-Kirchhoff equation in differential form of enthalpy, which includes the velocity of solidified billet. By software Tefis are carried out a series of computer simulations and sensitivity analysis method to examine the effects of different levels of steel in a mould, different casting velocities, different temperatures above the liquidus temperature of steel and different intensity in the secondary cooling zone on the overall temperature field of continuously casted billets. Thus the calculated temperature fields, of declared steel marks, are subsequently confronted with the results of experimental measurements on real operating casting machine.

  12. Solidification control in continuous casting of steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    /lubrication at solid–liquid interface, high temperature properties of the solidifying shell etc. is necessary to control the continuous casting process. The present paper elaborates upon the knowledge developed in the areas of initial shell ...

  13. Process to Continuously Melt, Refine and Cast High Quality Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this project is to conduct research and development targeted at designing a revolutionary steelmaking process. This process will deliver high quality steel from scrap to the casting mold in one continuous process and will be safer, more productive, and less capital intensive to build and operate than conventional steelmaking. The new process will produce higher quality steel faster than traditional batch processes while consuming less energy and other resources.

  14. Review of the continuous casting of steel by strip casting technology. Twin roll method system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibarrondo, I.

    2008-01-01

    In order to compete in the future steel market and to maintain market share, the steel makers will need to use new efficient technologies capable of supplying steel strip products of high quality at low cost. In this way, the strip casting technology by twin rol method is one of the most important research are in the iron and steel industry today. This review makes a general description of the strip casting technology as well as its different steps, such us; metal delivery and casting, solidification process, hot rolling reduction step, etc. Through mathematical and physical models, the influence on microstructure texture surface quality and mechanical properties of the materials obtained by this method are described as a function of processing parameters, specially the roughness of the rolls. the manufacturing of carbon, stainless and electrical steels involves smaller capital and operating cost, lower gas emissions, and an opportunity to create new grades due to a faster solidification rate that leads to a different solidification structures. In sight of all this it is likely that Strip Casting technology will make a profound impact on the manufacturing landscape of the 21 s t century. (Author) 177 refs

  15. Steel castings of valves for nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasaki, Yutaka

    1975-01-01

    The manufacturing of the steel castings of valves for nuclear power plants is reported. The report is divided in six parts. The first part describes the reliability of the steel castings of valves for nuclear power plants. Particular attention must be paid to larger diameter and lower pressure rating for the valves in nuclear power plants than those in thermal power plants. The second part describes the characteristics of steel casting quality, defects and their cause. The defects that may be produced in steel castings are as follows: (a) cavities caused by the insufficient supply of molten steel, (b) sand bites caused by the mold destruction due to thermal shock, and (c) pinholes caused by the gas absorption of molten steel. The third part describes the clarification of quality level and the measures quality project. Gaseous defects and the indications detected by magnetic powder test are attributed to electric furnace steel making. In particular, the method to minimize gas content is important. The fourth part describes the quality control of manufacturing processes. In practice, thirteen semi-automatic testers using gamma radiation are employed. A full automatic inspection plant having capacity of 20,000 radiographs per month is under design. The fifth part describes a quality warrant system. A check sheet system concerning quality and safety is employed in all work shops. The reliability of all testers and measuring instruments as well as the skill of workmen are examined periodically. The seventh part deals with future problems. The manufacturing plan must be controlled so that non-destructive inspection becomes the main means for quality control. (Iwakiri, K.)

  16. Analysis of the quality renovated continuous steel casting roller

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S¯adhan¯a Vol. 38, Part 3, June 2013, pp. 477–490. c Indian Academy of Sciences. Analysis of the quality renovated continuous steel casting roller. J VI ˇNÁŠ. ∗ ... Department of Technology and Materials, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, .... Mentioned line is able to produce slabs with section of 190–250 mm × 960–.

  17. Radiography of steel castings by radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agrawal, D.K.

    1977-01-01

    The salient features of isotope radiography techniques in the inspections of alloy castings are described. Some of the typical radiographic tests conducted in the Bharat Heavy Electricals Ltd., Bhopal and the problems encountered are described in detail. Specific examples are cited to enlighten the benefits of isotope radiography in heavy industries. (author)

  18. Quality improvement of steel cast-welded constructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Аркадій Васильович Лоза

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Among the various types of metallurgical equipment there are structures which are welded compounds of a cast base and additional elements produced by casting or any other means. Such structures are called cast-welded constructions. Besides new working properties such constructions appear to be more efficient and provide better durability as compared to the similar structures produced by other industrial means. Meanwhile the advantages of the technology are not used in full. One reason is low quality of the compound products caused by lack of proper preparation of the elements to be welded and poor quality of the welds themselves. In the article the methods of quality production and the maintenance of steel cast-welded constructions have been considered. A ladle of a blast-furnace slag car is used as the subject of investigation and further testing of the mentioned above technologies. The ladle is a cast product. Under operating conditions, the ladle undergoes mechanical and thermal load, which results in deformation of its sides that deflect inside. To prevent the deflection stiffening ribs are welded onto the outer surface of the ladle. However, there may be casting defects in the base metal that could reduce the durability of the welds. It has been proved that welds on the unprepared cast base of the steel product cannot guarantee the combination’s durability and reliability. To prevent the influence of the casting defects it has been recommended to cover the base metal with one more metal layer before welding the elements on. Two-layer surfacing provides best result as the first layer serves for the weld penetration of the casting defects since this layer has a significant share of base metal therefore it is less malleable; the second layer is necessary for making the layer viscous enough. The viscous layer ensures the absence of sharp transition from the deposited metal to the base metal and increases the crack resistance of the weld. In

  19. Carbon in condensed hydrocarbon phases, steels and cast irons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GAFAROVA Victoria Alexandrovna

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a review of studies carried out mainly by the researchers of the Ufa State Petroleum Technological University, which are aimed at detection of new properties of carbon in such condensed media as petroleum and coal pitches, steels and cast irons. Carbon plays an important role in the industry of construction materials being a component of road and roof bitumen and setting the main mechanical properties of steels. It was determined that crystal-like structures appear in classical glass-like substances – pitches which contain several thousands of individual hydrocarbons of various compositions. That significantly extends the concept of crystallinity. In structures of pitches, the control parameter of the staged structuring process is paramagnetism of condensed aromatic hydrocarbons. Fullerenes were detected in steels and cast irons and identified by various methods of spectrometry and microscopy. Fullerene С60, which contains 60 carbon atoms, has diameter of 0,7 nm and is referred to the nanoscale objects, which have a significant influence on the formation of steel and cast iron properties. It was shown that fullerenes appear at all stages of manufacture of cast irons; they are formed during introduction of carbon from the outside, during crystallization of metal in welded joints. Creation of modified fullerene layers in steels makes it possible to improve anticorrosion and tribological properties of structural materials. At the same time, outside diffusion of carbon from the carbon deposits on the metal surface also leads to formation of additional amount of fullerenes. This creates conditions for occurrence of local microdistortions of the structure, which lead to occurrence of cracks. Distribution of fullerenes in iron matrix is difficult to study as the method is labor-intensive, it requires dissolution of the matrix in the hydrofluoric acid and stage fullerene separation with further identification by spectral methods.

  20. Cast alumina forming austenitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Brady, Michael P

    2013-04-30

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy consisting essentially of, in terms of weight percent ranges 0.15-0.5C; 8-37Ni; 10-25Cr; 2.5-5Al; greater than 0.6, up to 2.5 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Nb and Ta; up to 3Mo; up to 3Co; up to 1W; up to 3Cu; up to 15Mn; up to 2Si; up to 0.15B; up to 0.05P; up to 1 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; steel alloys is also disclosed.

  1. Description Of Alloy Layer Formation On A Cast Steel Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szajnar J.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A description of alloy layer formation on a steel substrate is presented. Two types of formation are considered: diffusion of carbon and chromium into the solid from the pad in the direction of the cast steel within the FeCrC (grains and diffusion in a layer of liquid chromium cast iron formed in a preceding step. The influence of silicon in the pad on the pad’s transformation into the liquid is also examined. Solidus and liquidus temperatures of high carbon ferrochromium are determined. The larger the content of Si is used in the experiment, the lower the solidus temperature of the FeCrC alloy is observed. This results from the higher intensity of the elements’ diffusion and faster formation of the liquid.

  2. Aging degradation of cast stainless steel: status and program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Ayrault, G.

    1983-10-01

    A program has been initiated to investigate the significance of in-service embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels under light-water reactor operating conditions. The existing data are reviewed to determine the critical parameters that control the aging behavior and to define the objectives and scope of the investigation. The test matrices for microstructural studies and mechanical property measurements are presented. The initial experimental effort is focussed on characterizing the microstructure of long-term, low-temperature aged material. Specimens from three heats of cast CF-8 and CF-8M stainless steel aged for up to 70,000 h at 300, 350, and 400 0 C were obtained from George Fisher Ltd., of Switzerland. Initial analyses reveal the formation of three different types of precipitates which are not α'. An FCC phase, similar to the M 23 C 6 precipitates, was present in all the long-term aged material. 15 references, 10 figures, 2 tables

  3. Radiographic evaluation for inspection of steel casting and welding parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilge, A.N.; Tugrul, B.

    1986-01-01

    Evaluation of the radiographs is an important stage of the radiography technique. In this study,the basis of the evaluation are defined and related international references are given with examples. Radiographic inspections for steel casting and welding parts are expanded applications. In Turkey,industrial quality controls are realized mostly on this type of the materials. The important points and different types of the discontinuities are explained with some radiographs. (author)

  4. AIS/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Strip Casting: Anticipating New Routes To Steel Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prof. Alan W. Camb; Prof. Anthony Rollett

    2001-08-31

    To determine the potential for strip casting in the steel industry and to develop the fundamental knowledge necessary to allow the role of strip casting in the modern steel industry to be understood. Based upon a study of carbon steel strip castings that were either produced for the program at British Steel or were received from a pre-commercial production machine, the following conclusions were made. Strip casting of carbon steels is technically feasible for sheet material from slightly less than 1 mm thick to 3 mm thick, and, assuming that it is economically viable, it will be first applied in carbon steel markets that do not require stringent surface quality or extensive forming. The potential of strip casting as a casting process to be developed for steel castings is very high as the cast strip has some very novel characteristics. Direct cast carbon strip has better surface quality, shape and profile than any other casting process currently available. The more rapidly solidified structure of direct cast strip tends to be strong with low ductility; however, with adequate thermal treatment, it is possible to develop a variety of properties from the same grade. The process is more amenable at this time to production tonnages per year of the order of 500,000 tons and as such will first find niche type applications. This technology is an additional technology for steel production and will be in addition to, rather than a replacement for, current casting machines.

  5. Direct strip casting of steel - historical perspective and future direction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manohar, P.A.; Hunter, A.; Ferry, M.

    2000-01-01

    The commercialisation of direct strip casting (DSC) of steel represents the realisation of a dream cherished by engineers for over one hundred and fifty years. The story of the global competition for DSC of steel, that has ingredients of romanticism of chasing of a dream, adventure and intrigue, is being played out across continents over dozens of decades with an interplay of setbacks and successes. At this stage, DSC is set to make a profound impact on the steelmaking landscape. This paper reviews the important milestones in this compelling story, presents the current status and then gazes into the crystal ball in an attempt to predict which turn the story may take in the near future. The constraints and critical challenges for the successful commercialisation of DSC are highlighted. Recent results are discussed relating the production process to quality control and properties of unalloyed, low carbon strip-cast steels. future metallurgical challenges include a better understanding of solidification mechanism during high-speed casting and secondary processing variables affecting the final microstructure of austenitic grains

  6. Development of precision casting in high speed steel; Seimitsu chuzo haisu no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagi, H.; Fujii, T. [Daido Steel Co. Ltd., Nagoya (Japan)

    1997-07-25

    As to the high speed steel manufactured by precision casting process, effect of decarbonization technology and low temperature casting, and difference between the characteristics of a steel and a high speed steel were examined. The high speed steel was cast by vacuum casing process using a mold manufactured by the lost wax process. Effect of superheating in casting on the product structure and the bending strength was examined. Decarbonization can be prevented by the vacuum casting process. By low temperature casting, the high speed steel structure becomes fine, and the bending strength or toughness is improved; 80% of the T-direction bending strength of the steel can be secured in the high speed steel. The high speed steel exceeds the steel by a little bit in abrasion resistance. When the high speed steel was applied to a spiral cutter, the high speed steel product exceeded 1.2 times the machined steel in the tool life. In the high speed steel, the cutting process is drastically reduced, and reduction of the material cost is also possible compared with the machined steel. The high speed steel is considered to show good results because of excellent abrasion resistance since the tool life depended more on abrasion than on toughness because of the machining conditions. 4 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Casting technology for ODS steels - the internal oxidation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miran, S.; Franke, P.; Möslang, A.; Seifert, H. J.

    2017-07-01

    The formation of stainless ODS steel by internal oxidation of as-cast steel has been investigated. An alloy (Fe-16Cr-0.2Al-0.05Y, wt.%) was embedded in a (VO/V2O3) powder mixture serving as an oxygen activity buffer and heat treated at 1450 °C for 20 h. After this procedure no oxide scale was present on the surface of the sample but a zone of internal oxidation with a depth of about 2000 μm was formed in its interior. The precipitates within this zone consisted of two types of oxides. Discrete aluminium oxide particles with a size of a few micrometres were formed in outer regions of the specimen. Finer aluminium-yttrium oxides with a size of some hundred nanometres were mainly precipitated in inner regions of the sample. The results can be considered as a promising step towards an alternative production route for ODS steels.

  8. APPLICATION OF EXOTHERMIC PLUGS AT PRODUCTION OF STEEL CASTING IS THE WAY TO ECONOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Gatsuro

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that application of exothermic plugs allows to decrease steel intensity of casting mold, labor intensiveness for trim, expenses for melting of 1 ton of good casting, material expenses for burden materials.

  9. Effect of tempering temperature on the properties of low-alloy cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Bartocha

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of cast steel are primarily a function of chemical composition and solidification conditions i.e. primary structure, however, them can be change in a limited extent, by heat treatment. In the article the influence parameters of quenching on mechanical properties of low-alloy structural cast steel, modeled in terms of chemical composition, on the cast steel L20HGSNM, are presented. An attempt to quantify this relationship was made.

  10. Exploitation of rare earth metals in cast steel production for power engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kasińska

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of experiments carried out on industrial melts. There has been tested the REM influence on carbon properties (0.20%C as well as austenitic cast steel Cr-Ni 18/8+Ti type.It was found that REM cause an essential improvement of cast steels impact strength and in case of austenitic cast steel – also the corrosion resistance improvement in boiling 65%HNO3 (Huey test.

  11. Hot Ductility Behavior of a Peritectic Steel during Continuous Casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Merih Arıkan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hot ductility properties of a peritectic steel for welded gas cylinders during continuous casting were studied by performing hot tensile tests at certain temperatures ranging from 1200 to 700 °C for some cooling rates by using Gleeble-3500 thermo-mechanical test and simulation machine in this study. The effects of cooling rate and strain rate on hot ductility were investigated and continuous casting process map (time-temperature-ductility were plotted for this material. Reduction of area (RA decreases and cracking susceptibility increases during cooling from solidification between certain temperatures depending on the cooling rate. Although the temperatures which fracture behavior change upon cooling during continuous casting may vary for different materials, it was found that the type of fracture was ductile at 1100 and 1050 °C; semi-ductile at 1000 °C, and brittle at 800 °C for the steel P245NB. There is a ductility trough between 1000 and 725 °C. The ductility trough gets slightly narrower as the cooling rate decreases.

  12. Development of low-temperature high-strength integral steel castings for offshore construction by casting process engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Sub Lim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In casting steels for offshore construction, manufacturing integral casted structures to prevent fatigue cracks in the stress raisers is superior to using welded structures. Here, mold design and casting analysis were conducted for integral casting steel. The laminar flow of molten metal was analyzed and distributions of hot spots and porosities were studied. A prototype was subsequently produced, and air vents were designed to improve the surface defects caused by the release of gas. A radiographic test revealed no internal defects inside the casted steel. Evaluating the chemical and mechanical properties of specimens sampled from the product revealed that target values were quantitatively satisfied. To assess weldability in consideration of repair welding, the product was machined with grooves and welded, after which the mechanical properties of hardness as well as tensile, impact, and bending strengths were evaluated. No substantive differences were found in the mechanical properties before and after welding.

  13. A multiscale slice model for continuous casting of steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Šarler, B; Vertnik, R; Lorbiecka, A Z; Vušanović, I; Sencic, B

    2012-01-01

    A simple Lagrange-an traveling slice model has been applied for the prediction of the relations between process parameters, macrosegregation and solidification grain structure formation (equiaxed to columnar and columnar to equiaxed transition) during the continuous casting process of steel billets. The main advantage of the slice model is its very fast calculation time in comparison with the complete 3D heat and fluid flow model which might need calculation time, measured in days. The slice models thus allows for fast optimisation and even for on-line simulation. The heat and species transfer models are based on the mixture continuum assumptions with Lever solidification rule and enhanced thermal and solutal diffusivities for heuristic accounting of fluid flow effects. The grain structure evolution model is based on the Gaussian nucleation rule, and KGT growth model, coupled to the macroscopic heat and species transfer models. The heat and species transfer models are solved by the meshless technique by using local collocation with radial basis functions. The grain structure evolution model is solved by the point automata technique, a novel meshless variant of the cellular automata method. A comparison of the results with the experimental data for steel grade 51CrV4 is shown in terms of macrosegregation and grain structure across the billet. Simulations and comparisons have been carried out for nominal casting conditions, reduced casting temperature, and reduced casting speed. The model predicts surprisingly well the qualitative features of the macrosegregation and grain structure patterns. Possible refinements of the model with respect to other physical mechanisms are discussed.

  14. Aging degradation of cast stainless steel: status and program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O.K.; Ayrault, G.

    1983-10-01

    A program has been initiated to investigate the significance of in-service embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels under light-water reactor operating conditions. The existing data are reviewed to determine the critical parameters that control the aging behavior and to define the objectives and scope of the investigation. The test matrices for microstructural studies and mechanical property measurements are presented. The initial experimental effort is focussed on characterizing the microstructure of long-term, low-temperature aged material. Specimens from three heats of cast CF-8 and CF-8M stainless steel aged for up to 70,000 h at 300, 350, and 400/sup 0/C were obtained from George Fisher Ltd., of Switzerland. Initial analyses reveal the formation of three different types of precipitates which are not ..cap alpha..'. An FCC phase, similar to the M/sub 23/C/sub 6/ precipitates, was present in all the long-term aged material. 15 references, 10 figures, 2 tables.

  15. Porosity Defect Remodeling and Tensile Analysis of Cast Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linfeng Sun

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Tensile properties on ASTM A216 WCB cast steel with centerline porosity defect were studied with radiographic mapping and finite element remodeling technique. Non-linear elastic and plastic behaviors dependent on porosity were mathematically described by relevant equation sets. According to the ASTM E8 tensile test standard, matrix and defect specimens were machined into two categories by two types of height. After applying radiographic inspection, defect morphologies were mapped to the mid-sections of the finite element models and the porosity fraction fields had been generated with interpolation method. ABAQUS input parameters were confirmed by trial simulations to the matrix specimen and comparison with experimental outcomes. Fine agreements of the result curves between simulations and experiments could be observed, and predicted positions of the tensile fracture were found to be in accordance with the tests. Chord modulus was used to obtain the equivalent elastic stiffness because of the non-linear features. The results showed that elongation was the most influenced term to the defect cast steel, compared with elastic stiffness and yield stress. Additional visual explanations on the tensile fracture caused by void propagation were also given by the result contours at different mechanical stages, including distributions of Mises stress and plastic strain.

  16. A dynamic control water distribution model of steel in continuous casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Jianxun; Hwang, Weng-Sing; Tsai, De-Chang; Tsai, Ming Hsiu; Wang, Chien-Hsun

    2012-01-01

    After investigation in many continuous casting shop of steel, a dynamic water distribution model is proposed for flexible control on secondary cooling in continuous casting. In this model, the water cooling intensity is determined by the model casting speed instead of the real casting speed. When the casting speed is steady, the model casting speed is equal to the real casting speed. When the real casting speed is changing, the model casting speed according to calculating algorithm to adjust and approaches to the real one, but there is a time delay between them, so it can avoid the slab surface temperature fluctuated due to casting speed changes. The secondary cooling can be dynamically controlled by monitoring the model casting speed. The compare of the simulation results and the measured results reveals that the temperature field and thickness of slab shell in simulations agree very well with the real production situations.

  17. Primary Crystallization Studies and Abrasion Analysis of Cr-Ni-Mo Cast Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Studnicki A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article shows results of studies of primary crystallization and wear resistance of Cr-Ni-Mo cast steel intended for work in corrosive and abrasive conditions. The studies of primary crystallization were conducted with use of TDA method and modified tester allowing measurement casting cooling time influence on the cooling and crystallization curves of studied alloys. After heat treatment of examined cast steel wear tests of the samples were conducted on pin-on-disc type device.

  18. The influence of calcium on technological properties and micropurity of steel castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hampl

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the technological parameters, micro-purity and mechanical properties of castings of steel alloyed with calcium. The effect of calcium on the steel was analyzed on samples taken in the process of casting heavy castings and ingots of the weight of ranging from 40 000 to 60 000 kg. Samples for the determination of the liquidus temperature and the solidus temperature of cast steels were analysed using differential thermal analysis (DTA. The production of low alloyed steel grades was performed on the EAF - ASEA-SKF facilities and the production of highalloyed steels on the EAF - ASEA-SKF - SS-VOD facilities. The purity calcium was added into the steel by the injection of a stuffed profile.

  19. Metallographic and autoradiographic investigation of the structure of centrifugally cast steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, K.N.; Krishna Rao, P.

    1981-01-01

    Metallographic and autoradiographic investigations were carried out on the structure of steel tubes cast in a horizontal axis centrifugal casting machine. In chill castings the chill and columnar zones showed significantly lower sulphur contents than the equiaxed zone. Mould rotational speed was found to have an important influence on sulphur segregation. Sulphur-depleted bands, which were often observed in the castings were found to arise due to minor variations in the mould rotational speed. (auth.)

  20. Microstructure and Abrasive Wear Resistance of 18Cr-4Ni-2.5Mo Cast Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Kalandyk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available An influence of a decreased Cr content on the microstructure of the highly alloyed Cr-Ni cast steel, duplex type, melted under laboratoryconditions, was characterized in the paper. The microstructure investigations were performed in the initial state and after the heat treatment (solution annealing at 1060C as well as the phase transformation kinetics at continuous cooling was measured. The wear resistance of the investigated cast steel was tested and compared with the 24%Cr-5%Ni-2.5%Mo cast steel.The Cr content decrease, in ferritic-austenitic cast steels (duplex, from 24-26%Cr to 18% leads to the changes of the castingsmicrostructure and eliminating of a brittle  phase. In dependence of the casting cooling rate, apart from ferrite and austenite, also fine martensite precipitates occur in the casting structure. It was shown that the investigated cast steel is characterised by a slightly lower wear resistance than the typical cast steel duplex grades.

  1. Characteristics of centrifugally cast GX25CrNiSi18-9 steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Zapała

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of microstructural examinations of the industrial heat-resistant centrifugally cast GX25CrNiSi18-9 steel characterised by increased content of Cu. The study included changes in the microstructure of base cast steel respective of the steel held at a temperature of 900 and 950°C for 48 hours. Based on the results obtained, an increase in microhardness of the examined cast steel matrix with increasing temperature was stated, which was probably caused by fine precipitates enriched in Cr, Mo, and C forming inside the matrix grains.The layer of scale formed on the tested cast steel oxidised in the atmosphere of air at 900 and 950°C was characterised by an increased tendency to degradation with increasing temperature of the conducted tests.

  2. Computer-Aided Design of Steel Casting Taking into Account the Feeding Ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polyakov S.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A new Computer-Aided Design approach is introduced for design of steel castings taking into account the feeding ability in sand moulds. This approach uses the geometrical modeling by a CAD-program, in which the modul “Castdesigner” is implemented, which includes the feeding models of steel castings. Furthermore, the feeding ability is guaranteed immediately during the design by an interactive geometry change of the casting cross section, so that a directional feeding of the solidifying casting from the installed risers is assured.

  3. Kinetics of steel heavy ingot formation in dies of semicontinuous-casting machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukerman, V.Ya.; Marchenko, I.K.

    1986-01-01

    Formation kinetics of round section ingot of up to 0.67 m in diameter was analyzed in dies of semicontinuous-casting machines on casting of the most usable assortment steels: medium-carbon low-alloyed and chromium-nickel stainless steels. It is established that solidification coefficient decreases in direct proportion to ingot diameter. Value of different-thickness ingot skin at die outlet is in direct proportion to a casted steel overheating temperature, ingot diameter and inversely proportional to the number and diameter of holes in a ladder nozzle and square root of ingot drawing rate

  4. Microstructure and Abrasive Wear Resistance of 18Cr-4Ni-2.5Mo Cast Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalandyk B.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available An influence of a decreased Cr content on the microstructure of the highly alloyed Cr-Ni cast steel, duplex type, melted under laboratory conditions, was characterized in the paper. The microstructure investigations were performed in the initial state and after the heat treatment (solution annealing at 1060°C as well as the phase transformation kinetics at continuous cooling was measured. The wear resistance of the investigated cast steel was tested and compared with the 24%Cr-5%Ni-2.5%Mo cast steel.

  5. Wearing Quality of Austenitic, Duplex Cast Steel, Gray and Spheroidal Graphite Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The current work presents the research results of abrasion wear and adhesive wear at rubbing and liquid friction of new austenitic, austenitic-ferritic (“duplex” cast steel and gray cast iron EN-GJL-250, spheroidal graphite iron EN-GJS-600-3, pearlitic with ledeburitic carbides and spheroidal graphite iron with ledeburitic carbides with a microstructure of the metal matrix: pearlitic, upper bainite, mixture of upper and lower bainite, martensitic with austenite, pearlitic-martensitic-bainitic-ausferritic obtained in the raw state. The wearing quality test was carried out on a specially designed and made bench. Resistance to abrasion wear was tested using sand paper P40. Resistance to adhesive wear was tested in interaction with steel C55 normalized, hardened and sulfonitrided. The liquid friction was obtained using CASTROL oil. It was stated that austenitic cast steel and “duplex” are characterized by a similar value of abrasion wear and adhesive wear at rubbing friction. The smallest decrease in mass was shown by the cast steel in interaction with the sulfonitrided steel C55. Austenitic cast steel and “duplex��� in different combinations of friction pairs have a higher wear quality than gray cast iron EN-GJL- 250 and spheroidal graphite iron EN-GJS-600-3. Austenitic cast steel and “duplex” are characterized by a lower wearing quality than the spheroidal graphite iron with bainitic-martensitic microstructure. In the adhesive wear test using CASTROL oil the tested cast steels and cast irons showed a small mass decrease within the range of 1÷2 mg.

  6. Hardness and Wear Resistance of TiC-Fe-Cr Locally Reinforcement Produced in Cast Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olejnik E.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to increase wear resistance cast steel casting the TiC-Fe-Cr type composite zones were fabricated. These zones were obtained by means of in situ synthesis of substrates of the reaction TiC with a moderator of a chemical composition of white cast iron with nickel of the Ni-Hard type 4. The synthesis was carried out directly in the mould cavity. The moderator was applied to control the reactive infiltration occurring during the TiC synthesis. The microstructure of composite zones was investigated by electron scanning microscopy, using the backscattered electron mode. The structure of composite zones was verified by the X-ray diffraction method. The hardness of composite zones, cast steel base alloy and the reference samples such as white chromium cast iron with 14 % Cr and 20 % Cr, manganese cast steel 18 % Mn was measured by Vickers test. The wear resistance of the composite zone and the reference samples examined by ball-on-disc wear test. Dimensionally stable composite zones were obtained containing submicron sizes TiC particles uniformly distributed in the matrix. The macro and microstructure of the composite zone ensured three times hardness increase in comparison to the cast steel base alloy and one and a half times increase in comparison to the white chromium cast iron 20 % Cr. Finally ball-on-disc wear rate of the composite zone was five times lower than chromium white cast iron containing 20 % Cr.

  7. Thermomechanical processing and mechanical properties of hypereutectoid steels and cast irons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesuer, D.R.; Syn, C.K.; Sherby, O.D. (eds.)

    1998-01-01

    Recent advances in metallurgy of hypereutectoid steels and cast irons show that unique properties, such ultrahigh hardness and strength, and superplasticity, are achievable. This book focuses on the mechanical properties of hypereutectoid steels and cast irons as influenced by thermomechanical processing and microstructure. Some topics covered are: (1) Hot workability of hypereutectoid tool steels; (2) Thermomechanical processing of austempered ductile iron: An overview; (3) Mechanical behavior of ultrahigh strength, ultrahigh carbon steel wire and rod; and (4) Tensile elongation behavior of fine-grained Fe-C alloys at elevated temperatures.

  8. INVESTIGATION OF PHYSICOCHEMICAL AND MECHANICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF STEEL AND CAST IRON CHIPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Dyakonov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical and phase composition of steel and cast iron chips is studied, quantitative content of phases, including ferric oxides and other chemical elements chips, is determined.

  9. Flaw evaluation of thermally aged cast stainless steel in light-water reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.; Kuo, P.T.; Wichman, K.; Chopra, O.

    1997-01-01

    Cast stainless steel may be used in the fabrication of the primary loop piping, fittings, valve bodies, and pump casings in light-water reactors. However, this material is subject to embrittlement due to thermal aging at the reactor temperature, that is 290 o C (550 o F). The Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) recently completed a research program and the results indicate that the lower-bound fracture toughness of thermally aged cast stainless steel is similar to that of submerged arc welds (SAWs). Thus, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has accepted the use of SAW flaw evaluation procedures in IWB-3640 of Section XI of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code to evaluate flaws in thermally aged cast stainless steel for a license renewal evaluation. Alternatively, utilities may estimate component-specific fracture toughness of thermally aged cast stainless steel using procedures developed at ANL for a case-by-case flaw evaluation. (Author)

  10. Final Report, Volume 1, Metallurgical Evaluation of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels and their Weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Songqing; Lundin, Carl, W.; Batten, Greg, W.

    2005-09-30

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) are being specified for chloride containing environments due to their enhanced pitting and stress corrosion cracking resistance. They exhibit improved corrosion performance over the austenitic stainless steels. Duplex stainless steels also offer improved strength properties and are available in various wrought and cast forms. Selected grades of duplex stainless steel castings and their welds, in comparison with their wrought counterparts, were evaluated, regarding corrosion performance and mechanical properties and weldability. Multiple heats of cast duplex stainless steel were evaluated in the as-cast, solution annealed (SA) static cast and SA centrifugal cast conditions, while their wrought counterparts were characterized in the SA condition and in the form of as-rolled plate. Welding, including extensive assessment of autogenous welds and a preliminary study of composite welds (shielded metal arc weld (SMAW)), was performed. The evaluations included critical pitting temperature (CPT) testing, intergranular corrosion (IGC) testing, ASTM A923 (Methods A, B and C), Charpy impact testing, weldability testing (ASTM A494), ferrite measurement and microstructural evaluations. In the study, the corrosion performances of DSS castings were characterized and assessed, including the wrought counterparts for comparison. The evaluation filled the pore of lack of data for cast duplex stainless steels compared to wrought materials. A database of the pitting corrosion and IGC behavior of cast and wrought materials was generated for a greater depth of understanding for the behavior of cast duplex stainless steel. In addition, improved evaluation methods for DSS castings were developed according to ASTM A923, A262, G48 and A494. The study revealed that when properly heat treated according to the specification, (1) DSS castings have equal or better pitting and intergranular corrosion resistance than their wrought counterparts; (2) Welding reduces the

  11. Final Report, Volume 1, Metallurgical Evaluation of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels and their Weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Songqing; Lundin, Carl, W.; Batten, Greg, W.

    2005-09-30

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) are being specified for chloride containing environments due to their enhanced pitting and stress corrosion cracking resistance. They exhibit improved corrosion performance over the austenitic stainless steels. Duplex stainless steels also offer improved strength properties and are available in various wrought and cast forms. Selected grades of duplex stainless steel castings and their welds, in comparison with their wrought counterparts, were evaluated, regarding corrosion performance and mechanical properties and weldability. Multiple heats of cast duplex stainless steel were evaluated in the as-cast, solution annealed (SA) static cast and SA centrifugal cast conditions, while their wrought counterparts were characterized in the SA condition and in the form of as-rolled plate. Welding, including extensive assessment of autogenous welds and a preliminary study of composite welds (shielded metal arc weld (SMAW)), was performed. The evaluations included critical pitting temperature (CPT) testing, intergranular corrosion (IGC) testing, ASTM A923 (Methods A, B and C), Charpy impact testing, weldability testing (ASTM A494), ferrite measurement and microstructural evaluations. In the study, the corrosion performances of DSS castings were characterized and assessed, including the wrought counterparts for comparison. The evaluation filled the pore of lack of data for cast duplex stainless steels compared to wrought materials. A database of the pitting corrosion and IGC behavior of cast and wrought materials was generated for a greater depth of understanding for the behavior of cast duplex stainless steel. In addition, improved evaluation methods for DSS castings were developed according to ASTM A923, A262, G48 and A494. The study revealed that when properly heat treated according to the specification, (1) DSS castings have equal or better pitting and intergranular corrosion resistance than their wrought counterparts; (2) Welding reduces the

  12. Optimization of Micro-Alloying Elements for Mechanical Properties in Normalized Cast Steel Using Taguchi Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chokkalingam B.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Taguchi method is used to find out the effect of micro alloying elements like vanadium, niobium and titanium on the hardness and tensile strength of the normalized cast steel. Based on this method, plan of experiments were made by using orthogonal arrays to acquire the data on hardness and tensile strength. The signal to noise ratio and analysis of variance (ANOVA are used to investigate the effect of these micro alloying elements on these two mechanical properties of the micro alloyed normalized cast steel. The results indicated that in the micro alloyed normalized cast steel both these properties increases when compared to non-micro-alloyed normalized cast steel. The effect of niobium addition was found to be significantly higher to obtain higher hardness and tensile strength when compared to other micro alloying elements. The maximum hardness of 200HV and the maximum tensile strength of 780 N/mm2 were obtained in 0.05%Nb addition micro alloyed normalized cast steel. Micro-alloyed with niobium normalized cast steel have the finest and uniform microstructure and fine pearlite colonies distributed uniformly in the ferrite. The optimum condition to obtain higher hardness and tensile strength were determined. The results were verified with experiments.

  13. To what extent may we accept manufacturing-related microscopic defects in cast steel?

    OpenAIRE

    Veile, Ines; Tempel, Peter; Weikert-Müller, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of process-related discontinuities and minor flaws in the interior of cast steel cannot be fully avoided during the manufacturing process. Obviously, these microscopic defects affect the material properties of the casting near locations where they occur. However, their very occurrence does not necessarily deteriorate the stability of the entire casting element. Unfortunately, current testing approaches do not integrate a reliable and customized case-by-case quality assessment. ...

  14. Clean cast steel technology. Determination of transformation diagrams for duplex stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chumbley, S. L. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2005-09-01

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) constitute both ferrite and austenite as a matrix. Such a microstructure confers a high corrosion resistance with favorable mechanical properties. However, intermetallic phases such as sigma ( can also form during casting or high-temperature processing and can degrade the properties of the DSS. This research was initiated to develop time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and continuous-cooling- transformation (CCT) diagrams of two types of cast duplex stainless steels, CD3MN (Fe 22Cr-5Ni-Mo-N) and CD3MWCuN (Fe-25Cr-7Ni-Mo-W-Cu-N), in order to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formation. The alloys were heat treated isothermally or under controlled cooling conditions and then characterized using conventional metallographic methods that included tint etching, and also using electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). The kinetics of intermetallic-phase ( formation were analyzed using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) equation in the case of isothermal transformations and a modified form of this equation in the case of continuous cooling transformations, The rate of intermetallic-phase formation was found to be much faster in CD3MWCuN than CD3MN due mainly to differences in the major alloying contents such as Cr, Ni and Mo. To examine in more detail the effects of these elements of the phase stabilities, a series of eight steel castings was designed with the Cr, Ni and Mo contents systematically varied with respect to the nominal composition of CD3MN. The effects of varying the contents of alloying additions on the formation of intermetallic phases were also studied computationally using the commercial thermodynamic software package, Thermo-Calc. In general, was stabilized with increasing Cr addition and by increasing Mo addition. However, a delicate balance among Ni and other minor elements such as N and Si also exists. Phase equilibria in DSS can be affected by local

  15. Evaluation of aging of cast stainless steel components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.M.

    1991-02-01

    Cast stainless steel is used extensively in nuclear reactors for primary-pressure-boundary components such as primary coolant pipes, elbows, valves, pumps, and safe ends. These components are, however, susceptible to thermal aging embrittlement in light water reactors because of the segregation of Cr atoms from Fe and Ni by spinodal decomposition in ferrite and the precipitation of Cr-rich carbides on ferrite/austenite boundaries. A recent advance in understanding the aging kinetics is presented. Aging kinetics are strongly influenced by the synergistic effects of other metallurgical reactions that occur in parallel with spinodal decomposition, i.e., clustering of Ni, Mo, and Si solute atoms and the nucleation and growth of G-phase precipitates in the ferrite phase. A number of methods are outlined for estimating aging embrittlement under end-of-life of life-extension conditions, depending on several factors such as degree of permissible conservatism, availability of component archive material, and methods of estimating and verifying the activation energy of aging. 33 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Mold flux characterization for thin slab casting of steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz-Ramirez, A.; Vargas-Ramirez, M.; Hernandez-Perez, M. A.; Palacios-Beas, E.; Chavez-Alcala, J. E.

    2012-11-01

    The mineralogical constitution and the melting-solidification behavior of two commercial fluxes for thin slab casting of steel were determined. The characterization of the commercial fluxes as received show the presence of wollastonite (CaO . SiO{sub 2}), a sodium carbonate (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}), calcite (CaCO{sub 3}), fluorite (CaF{sub 2}) and carbon as the main components by X ray powder diffraction (XRD) and microscopic techniques. When fluxes were heated to 1573 K and further solidification, there was almost a whole transformation from the original compounds to cuspidine (3CaO. 2SiO{sub 2}.CaF{sub 2}) and nepheline (Na{sub 2}O . Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. 2SiO{sub 2}) phases. The thermal gravimetrical analysis showed an important weight reduction in both fluxes due to the thermal decompositions of calcite and sodium carbonate. The characterization reveals that fluxes are produced by an agglomeration process. (Author) 15 refs.

  17. Optimization of Heat Treatment in Aspect of Production’s Costs Reducing and Improving of Casting Quality from Duplex Cast Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Dyja

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper determines possibilities of cost optimisation in the production of GX2CrNiMoCu25-6-3-3 type duplex cast steel castings through selection of appropriate solution heat treatment temperature, which value depends on the content of alloying elements. Metallographic analysis was carried out for as-cast and heat treated cast steel. Hardness and impact strength of the cast steel were determined, which were correlated with the volume fraction of phases determined by means of ImagePro computer image analyser. It has been shown that increased carbon content creates a need to use higher treatment temperatures, thereby increasing the production cost. With increasing carbon content the cast steel hardness after solution heat treatment increases, however, crack resistance decreases

  18. Solidification microstructure of M2 high speed steel by different casting technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Xuefeng

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The present work investigated the solidification microstructure of AISI M2 high speed steel manufactured by different casting technologies, namely iron mould casting and continuous casting. The results revealed that the as-cast structure of the steel was composed of the iron matrix and the M2C eutectic carbide networks, which were greatly refined in the ingot made by continuous casting process, compared with that by the iron mould casting process. M2C eutectic carbides presented variation in their morphologies and growth characteristics in the ingots by both casting methods. In the ingot by iron mould casting, they have a plate-like morphology and grow anisotropically. However, in the ingot made by continuous casting, the carbides evolved into the fiber-like shape that exhibited little characteristics of anisotropic growth. It was noticed that the fiber-like M2C was much easier to decompose and spheroidize after heated, as a result, the carbides refined remarkably, compared with the case of plate-like carbides in the iron mould casting ingot.

  19. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction (E-SMARRT): Precision Casting of Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Von L. Richards

    2011-09-30

    This project addresses improvements in metal casting processes by reducing scrap and reducing the cost of production, due to scrap reduction from investment casting and yield improvement offered by lost foam casting as compared to no-bake or green sand molding. The objectives for the investment casting portion of the subtask are to improve knowledge of fracture toughness of mold shells and the sources of strength limiting flaws and to understand the effects of wax reclamation procedures on wax properties. Applying 'clean steel' approaches to pouring technology and cleanliness in investment casting of steel are anticipated to improve incoming materials inspection procedures as they affect the microstructure and toughness of the shell. This project focused on two areas of study in the production of steel castings to reduce scrap and save energy: (1) Reducing the amount of shell cracking in investment cast steel production; (2) Investigate the potential of lost foam steel casting The basic findings regarding investment casting shell cracking were: (1) In the case of post pouring cracking, this could be related to phase changes in silica upon cooling and could be delayed by pouring arrangement strategies that maintained the shell surface at temperature for longer time. Employing this delay resulted in less adherent oxidation of castings since the casting was cooler at the time o fair exposure. (2) A model for heat transfer through water saturated shell materials under steam pressure was developed. (3) Initial modeling result of autoclave de-waxing indicated the higher pressure and temperature in the autoclave would impose a steeper temperature gradient on the wax pattern, causing some melt flow prior to bulk expansion and decreasing the stress on the green shell. Basic findings regarding lost foam casting of steel at atmospheric pressure: (1) EPS foam generally decomposes by the collapse mode in steel casting. (2) There is an accumulation of carbon pick-up at

  20. Thermal and mechanical properties of electro-slag cast steel for hot working tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Young Hoon; Kang, Boo Hyun; Tyne, Chester J. van

    2005-01-01

    The thermal and mechanical properties of an electro-slag cast steel of a similar chemical composition with an AISI-6F2 steel are investigated and compared with a forged AISI-6F2 steel. AISI-6F2 is a hot-working tool steel. Electro-Slag Casting (ESC) is a method of producing ingots in a water-cooled metal mold by the heat generated in an electrically conductive slag when current passes through a consumable electrode. The ESC method provides the possibility of producing material for the high quality hot-working tools and ingots directly into a desirable shape. In the present study, the thermal and mechanical properties of yield strength, tensile strength, hardness, impact toughness, wear resistance, thermal fatigue resistance, and thermal shock resistance for electro-slag cast and forged steel are experimentally measured for both annealed and quenched and tempered heat treatment conditions. It has been found that the electro-slag cast steel has comparable thermal and mechanical properties to the forged steel

  1. High Cr white cast iron/carbon steel bimetal liner by lost foam casting with liquid-liquid composite process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Xiaofeng

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Liners in wet ball mill for mineral processing industry must bear abrasive wear and corrosive wear, and consequently, the service life of the liner made from traditional materials, such as Hadfield steel and alloyed steels, is typically less than ten months. Bimetal liner, made from high Cr white cast iron and carbon steel, has been successfully developed by using liquid-liquid composite lost foam casting process. The microstructure and interface of the composite were analyzed using optical microscope, SEM, EDX and XRD. Micrographs indicate that the boundary of bimetal combination regions is staggered like dogtooth, two liquid metals are not mixed, and the interface presents excellent metallurgical bonding state. After heat treatment, the composite liner specimens have shown excellent properties, including hardness > 61 HRC, fracture toughness αk >16.5 J·cm-2 and bending strength >1,600 MPa. Wear comparison was made between the bimetal composite liner and alloyed steel liner in an industrial hematite ball mill of WISCO, and the results of eight-month test in wet grinding environment have proved that the service life of the bimetal composite liner is three times as long as that of the alloyed steel liner.

  2. Laseroptical speed measurement during continuous casting of steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwenzfeier, W.; Kawa, F.

    1986-03-01

    The speed of a continuously cast strand can give important information about the casting process. In order to be able to properly observe the casting process over long periods, it is necessary to use reliable and sufficiently precise speed measuring systems. This report presents first experiences with contactless laser-optical measurement of the real strand speed during the casting of billets, blooms and slabs. For this purpose a newly conceived, especially durable measuring instrument, operating on the basis of the differential Doppler arrangement, was used successfully.

  3. Microstructure and mechanical properties of a new type of austempered boron alloyed high silicon cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xiang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, a new type of austempered boron alloyed high silicon cast steel has been developed, and its microstructures and mechanical properties at different temperatures were investigated. The experimental results indicate that the boron alloyed high silicon cast steel comprises a dendritic matrix and interdendritic eutectic borides in as-cast condition. The dendritic matrix is made up of pearlite, ferrite, and the interdendritic eutectic boride is with a chemical formula of M2B (M represents Fe, Cr, Mn or Mo which is much like that of carbide in high chromium white cast iron. Pure ausferrite structure that consists of bainitic ferrite and retained austenite can be obtained in the matrix by austempering treatment to the cast steel. No carbides precipitate in the ausferrite structure and the morphology of borides remains almost unchanged after austempering treatments. Secondary boride particles precipitate during the course of austenitizing. The hardness and tensile strength of the austempered cast steel decrease with the increase of the austempering temperature, from 250 篊 to 400 篊. The impact toughness is 4-11 J昪m-2 at room temperature and the impact fracture fractogragh indicates that the fracture is caused by the brittle fracture of the borides.

  4. Wear Resistance of TiC Reinforced Cast Steel Matrix Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobula S.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Wear resistance of TiC-cast steel metal matrix composite has been investigated. Composites were obtained with SHSB method known as SHS synthesis during casting. It has been shown the differences in wear between composite and base cast steel. The Miller slurry machine test were used to determine wear loss of the specimens. The slurry was composed of SiC and water. The worn surface of specimens after test, were studied by SEM. Experimental observation has shown that surface of composite zone is not homogenous and consist the matrix lakes. Microscopic observations revealed the long grooves with SiC particles indented in the base alloy area, and spalling pits in the composite area. Due to the presence of TiC carbides on composite layer, specimens with TiC reinforced cast steel exhibited higher abrasion resistance. The wear of TiC reinforced cast steel mechanism was initially by wearing of soft matrix and in second stage by polishing and spalling of TiC. Summary weight loss after 16hr test was 0,14÷0,23 g for composite specimens and 0,90 g for base steel.

  5. Corrosion resistance of various bio-films deposited on austenitic cast steel casted by lost-wax process and in gypsum mould

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gawroński

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is the next of a series concerning the improvement of austenitic cast steel utility predicted for use in implantology for complicated long term implants casted by lost-wax process and in gypsum mould. Austenitic cast steel possess chemical composition of AISI 316L medical steel used for implants. In further part of present work investigated cast steel indicated as AISI 316L medical steel. Below a results of electrochemical corrosion resistance of carbon layer and bi-layer of carbon/HAp deposited on AISI 316L researches are presented. Coatings were manufactured by RF PACVD and PLD methods respectively. Obtained results, unequivocally indicates on the improvement of this type of corrosion resistance by substrate material with as deposited carbon layer. While bi-layer of carbon/HAp are characterized by very low corrosion resistance.

  6. Statistical research using the multiple regression analysis in areas of the cast hipereutectoid steel rolls manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, I.; Alexa, V.; Serban, S.; Rackov, M.; Čavić, M.

    2018-01-01

    The cast hipereutectoid steel (usually named Adamite) is a roll manufacturing destined material, having mechanical, chemical properties and Carbon [C] content of which stands between steelandiron, along–withitsalloyelements such as Nickel [Ni], Chrome [Cr], Molybdenum [Mo] and/or other alloy elements. Adamite Rolls are basically alloy steel rolls (a kind of high carbon steel) having hardness ranging from 40 to 55 degrees Shore C, with Carbon [C] percentage ranging from 1.35% until to 2% (usually between 1.2˜2.3%), the extra Carbon [C] and the special alloying element giving an extra wear resistance and strength. First of all the Adamite roll’s prominent feature is the small variation in hardness of the working surface, and has a good abrasion resistance and bite performance. This paper reviews key aspects of roll material properties and presents an analysis of the influences of chemical composition upon the mechanical properties (hardness) of the cast hipereutectoid steel rolls (Adamite). Using the multiple regression analysis (the double and triple regression equations), some mathematical correlations between the cast hipereutectoid steel rolls’ chemical composition and the obtained hardness are presented. In this work several results and evidence obtained by actual experiments are presented. Thus, several variation boundaries for the chemical composition of cast hipereutectoid steel rolls, in view the obtaining the proper values of the hardness, are revealed. For the multiple regression equations, correlation coefficients and graphical representations the software Matlab was used.

  7. Comparative Studies on the Wear of ADI Alloy Cast Irons as Well as Selected Steels and Surface-Hardened Alloy Cast Steels in the Presence of Abrasive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wieczorek A. N.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of wear tests obtained for 4 groups of materials: surface-hardened alloy steels and alloy cast steels for structural applications, hard-wearing surface-hardened alloy cast steels, and austempered alloy cast irons. The wear tests have been performed on a specially designed test rig that allows reproducing the real operating conditions of chain wheels, including the rolling and sliding form of contact between elements. The chain wheels subjected to tests were operated with the use of loose quartz abrasive. This study presents results of measurements of material parameters, micro-structure of a surface subject to wear, as well as the linear wear determined for the materials considered. Based on the results, the following was found: the best wear properties were obtained for surface-hardened alloy steels and wear surface; strengthening of the ADI surface took place - most probably as a result of transformation of austenite into martensite; the uniformity of the structure of the materials affects the surface wear process. The study also indicated a significant degree of graphite deformation in ADI characterized by the upper ausferritic structure and its oblique orientation in relation to the surface, which resulted in a facilitated degradation of the surface caused by the quartz abrasive.

  8. Effect of melting technology on the properties of G17CrMo5-5 steel for cast turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Mańkowski

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Two technologies of the G17CrMo 5-5 cast steel melting were compared, i.e. the so far used oxygen-recovery melting technology (electricarc furnace + ladle furnace – EAF + LF and a new recovery melting technology (electric induction furnace + ladle furnace - EIF + LF.The effect of the melting technology on the properties of cast steel for turbine parts was determined. The cast steel was evaluated in term of its metallurgical purity and mechanical properties. During melting of G17CrMo 5-5 steel in induction furnace, lower total content of oxygen in casting was reached, but nitrogen content was higher than it was in the cast steel from arc furnace. Metal refining in LF improved the steel desulphurising degree and contributed to modification of the non-metallic inclusions.

  9. TECHNOLOGICAL COMPLEX OF EQUIPMENT FOR REFINING AND CASTING OF STEEL AND ALLOYS IN THE FOUNDRY AND STEEL INDUSTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Zolotukhin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vulcan TM is a small innovative company, specializing in the manufacture of steel and alloys casting systems and refractory accessories.Available for foundry and metallurgical industries, special technological equipment, designed and manufactured by LLC NPP “Vulkan-TM.”

  10. Mold flux characterization for thin slab casting of steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cruz-Ramírez, A.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The mineralogical constitution and the melting-solidification behavior of two commercial fluxes for thin slab casting of steel were determined. The characterization of the commercial fluxes as received show the presence of wollastonite (CaO. SiO2, a sodium carbonate (Na2CO3, calcite (CaCO3, fluorite (CaF2 and carbon as the main components by X ray powder diffraction (XRD and microscopic techniques. When fluxes were heated to 1573 K and further solidification, there was almost a whole transformation from the original compounds to cuspidine (3CaO - 2SiO2 - CaF2 and nepheline (Na2O - Al2O3 - 2SiO2 phases. The thermal gravimetrical analysis showed an important weight reduction in both fluxes due to the thermal decompositions of calcite and sodium carbonate. The characterization reveals that fluxes are produced by an agglomeration process.

    Se determinó la composición mineralógica y el comportamiento de fusión-solidificación de dos fundentes comerciales para la colada de planchón delgado de acero. La caracterización de los fundentes comerciales por difracción de rayos X (XRD y técnicas de microscopía muestra la presencia de wollastonita (CaO - SiO2, un carbonato de sodio (Na2CO3, calcita (CaCO3, fluorita (CaF2 y carbono como los principales componentes. Cuando los fundentes se calentaron a 1.573 K y después de la solidificación, hubo una transformación casi total de los compuestos originales a las fases cuspidina (3CaO - 2SiO2 - CaF2 y nefelina (Na2O - Al2O3 - 2SiO2. El análisis termogravimétrico muestra una importante reducción de peso en los fundentes debido a la descomposición térmica de la calcita y el carbonato de sodio. La caracterización indica que los fundentes son producidos por

  11. Study on Type C Coal Fly ash as an Additive to Molding Sand for Steel Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaniappan, Jayanthi

    2017-04-01

    Study of physio-chemical properties studies such as granulometric analysis, moisture, X ray fluorescence etc. were performed with Type C coal—combustion fly ash to investigate their potential as a distinct option for molding sand in foundry, thereby reducing the dependency on latter. Technological properties study such as compressive strength, tensile strength, permeability and compaction of various compositions of fly ash molding sand (10, 20 and 30 % fly ash substitute to chemically bonded sand) were performed and compared with silica molding sand. Steel casting production using this fly ash molding sand was done and the casting surface finish and typical casting parameters were assessed. It was noted that a good quality steel casting could be produced using type C fly ash molding sand, which effectively replaced 20 % of traditional molding sand and binders thereby providing greater financial profits to the foundry and an effective way of fly ash utilization (waste management).

  12. The comparative studies of ADI versus Hadfield cast steel wear resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mieczysław Kaczorowski

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The results of comparative studies of wear resistance of ADI versus high manganese Hadfield cast steel are presented. For evaluation ofwear resistance three type of ADI were chosen. Two of them were of moderate strength ADI with 800 and 1000MPa tensile strength whilethe third was 1400MPa tensile strength ADI. The specimens were cut from ADI test YII type casting poured and heat treated in Institute ofFoundry in Krakow. The pin on disc method was used for wear resistance experiment. The specimens had a shape of 40mm long rod withdiameter 6mm. The load and speed were 100N and 0,54m/s respectively. It was concluded that the wear resistance of ADI is comparablewith high manganese cast steel and in case of low tensile grade ADI and is even better for high strength ADI than Hadfield steel.

  13. Numerical Modelling of Micro-Stresses in Carbonised Austenitic Cast Steel under Rapid Cooling Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuleja J.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a method of the numerical modelling of micro-stresses in carbonised austenitic cast steel being developed during rapid cooling due to differences in the values of thermal expansion coefficients for this material phases – carbides and austenitic matrix. Micro-stresses are indicated as the main cause of crack initiation in the tooling elements of carburising furnaces being mainly made of austenitic cast steel. A calculation model of carbonised and thermally fatigued austenitic cast steel was developed based on the microstructure images obtained using light microscopy techniques and the phase composition evaluated with the X-ray diffraction method. The values of the stress tensor components and the reduced stress in the complex models of test material structure were determined numerically by the finite element method. The effort analysis was performed and the areas where development of cracks is to be expected were identified, which was experimentally confirmed.

  14. The influence of cooling parameters on the speed of continuous steel casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirian, G. O.; Gheorghiu, C. A.; Hepuţ, T.; Chioncel, C. P.

    2018-01-01

    This paper analyzes the cooling parameters of the continuous casting speed. In the researches carried out we aimed to establish some correlation equations between the parameters characterizing the continuous casting process, the temperature of the steel at the entrance to the crystallizer, the superheating of the steel and the flow of the cooling water in the crystallizer and different zones of the secondary cooling. Parallel to these parameters were also the values for the casting speed. The research was made for the casting of round ϕ270mm semi-finished steel products. The steel was developed in an electric EBT furnace with a capacity of 100t, treated in L.F. (Ladle - Furnace) and VD (Vacuum-Degassing) and poured in a 5-wire continuous casting plant. The obtained data was processed in MATLAB using three types of correlation equations. The obtained results are presented both in the analytical and graphical form, each correlation being analyzed from the technological point of view, indicating the optimal values for the independent parameters monitored. In the analysis we present a comparison between the results obtained after the three types of equations for each correlation.

  15. Simulation of Distortion and Residual Stress Development During Heat Treatment of Steel Castings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckermann, Christoph; Carlson, Kent

    2011-07-22

    Heat treatment and associated processing, such as quenching, are critical during high strength steel casting production. These processes must be managed closely to prevent thermal and residual stresses that may result in distortion, cracking (particularly after machining), re-work, and weld repair. The risk of casting distortion limits aggressive quenching that can be beneficial to the process and yield an improved outcome. As a result of these distortions, adjustments must be made to the casting or pattern design, or tie bars must be added. Straightening castings after heat treatments can be both time-consuming and expensive. Residual stresses may reduce a casting's overall service performance, possibly resulting in catastrophic failure. Stress relieving may help, but expends additional energy in the process. Casting software is very limited in predicting distortions during heat treatment, so corrective measures most often involve a tedious trial-and-error procedure. An extensive review of existing heat treatment residual stress and distortion modeling revealed that it is vital to predict the phase transformations and microstructure of the steel along with the thermal stress development during heat treatment. After reviewing the state-of-the-art in heat treatment residual stress and distortion modeling, an existing commercial code was selected because of its advanced capabilities in predicting phase transformations, the evolving microstructure and related properties along with thermal stress development during heat treatment. However, this software was developed for small parts created from forgings or machined stock, and not for steel castings. Therefore, its predictive capabilities for heat treatment of steel castings were investigated. Available experimental steel casting heat treatment data was determined to be of insufficient detail and breadth, and so new heat treatment experiments were designed and performed, casting and heat treating modified versions

  16. Fabrication and properties of strip casting 4.5 wt% Si steel thin sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zu, Guoqing; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhao, Jingwei; Wang, Yuqian; Yan, Yi; Li, Chengang; Cao, Guangming; Jiang, Zhengyi

    2017-01-01

    Three 4.5 wt% Si steel thin sheets with different thicknesses were efficiently fabricated by twin-roll strip casting, warm rolling and cold rolling followed by final annealing. A comprehensive investigation from the workability of the as-cast strip to the magnetic property of the produces was performed to illustrate the superiority of the new materials. The results show that the as-cast strip, which has a much lower Vickers hardness than that of the 6.5 wt% Si steel, is suitable for rolling processing. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies confirm that no ordering phase exists in the as-cast strip. The cold-rolled thin sheets exhibit good surface quality without edge cracks. Furthermore, all the three 4.5 wt% Si steel thin sheets possess relative strong <100>//ND texture and present high magnetic inductions and low iron losses after finial annealing. - Highlights: • 4.5 wt% Si as-cast sheet with excellent workability was produced by strip casting. • Three 4.5 wt% Si thin sheets were effectively fabricated by warm and cold rolling. • The microstructure and macro-texture of the thin sheets were elucidated. • High magnetic inductions and low iron losses were achieved simultaneously.

  17. Fabrication and properties of strip casting 4.5 wt% Si steel thin sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zu, Guoqing, E-mail: gz854@uowmail.edu.au [State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Zhang, Xiaoming [State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Zhao, Jingwei [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Wang, Yuqian [State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Yan, Yi [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Li, Chengang; Cao, Guangming [State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Jiang, Zhengyi [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2017-02-15

    Three 4.5 wt% Si steel thin sheets with different thicknesses were efficiently fabricated by twin-roll strip casting, warm rolling and cold rolling followed by final annealing. A comprehensive investigation from the workability of the as-cast strip to the magnetic property of the produces was performed to illustrate the superiority of the new materials. The results show that the as-cast strip, which has a much lower Vickers hardness than that of the 6.5 wt% Si steel, is suitable for rolling processing. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies confirm that no ordering phase exists in the as-cast strip. The cold-rolled thin sheets exhibit good surface quality without edge cracks. Furthermore, all the three 4.5 wt% Si steel thin sheets possess relative strong <100>//ND texture and present high magnetic inductions and low iron losses after finial annealing. - Highlights: • 4.5 wt% Si as-cast sheet with excellent workability was produced by strip casting. • Three 4.5 wt% Si thin sheets were effectively fabricated by warm and cold rolling. • The microstructure and macro-texture of the thin sheets were elucidated. • High magnetic inductions and low iron losses were achieved simultaneously.

  18. Rayleigh Number Criterion for Formation of A-Segregates in Steel Castings and Ingots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rad, M. Torabi; Kotas, Petr; Beckermann, C.

    2013-01-01

    A Rayleigh number-based criterion is developed for predicting the formation of A-segregates in steel castings and ingots. The criterion is calibrated using available experimental data for ingots involving 27 different steel compositions. The critical Rayleigh number above which A-segregates can b......, the primary reason for this over-prediction is persumed to be the presence of a central zone of equiaxed grains in the casting sections. A-segregates do not form when the grain structure is equiaxed. © The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society and ASM International 2013...

  19. RESEARCH OF INFLUENCE OF LIQUID ALUMINUM ON RESISTANCE OF THE STEEL AND CAST-IRON TOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Zhizhchenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of the interaction of steel and cast iron with aluminum was performed by immersion, and isothermal holding. By optical and electron microscopy, the microstructure of the reaction zone was investigated. The partial enthalpy of dissolution of iron, steel and cast iron in liquid aluminum has been investigated by high-temperature calorimetry at 1773 K. X-ray analysis and microhardness measurements was used to study the phase composition of the reaction zone. The thermodynamic descriptions of the system Al–Fe and Al–C–Fe are performed within the CALPHAD-method.

  20. Wide – Ranging Influence of Mischmetal on Properties of GP240GH Cast Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Kasińska J.; Gajewski M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents influence of rare earth metals (REM) on the properties of GP240GH cast carbon steel. The research has been performed on successive industrial melts. Each time ca 2000 kg of liquid metal was modified. The rare earth metals were put into the ladle during tapping of heat melt from the furnace. Because of this the amount of sulphur in the cast steel was decreased and the non-metallic inclusion morphology was significantly changed. It was found that non metallic inclusions the ...

  1. The mechanism of the surface alloy layer creation for cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Walasek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a detailed description of the process of creation of a surface alloy layer (using high-carbon ferrochromium on the cast steel casting. The mechanism of the surface alloy layer is based on the known theories [5,6]. The proposed course of formation of the layers has been extended to decarburization stage of steel. The research included proving the presence of carbon-lean zone. The experiment included the analysis of the distribution of elements and microhardness measurement.

  2. Structure of low-alloy constructional cast steel - a quantitative analysis of impurities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Bartocha

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of cast steel are primarily a function of chemical composition and solidification conditions i.e. primary structure, however, a significant role also plays its quality understood as purity metallurgical i.e. as small as possible content of harmful components of the structure. In work the results of porosity and non-metallic inclusions in steel cast structure quantity analysis are presented.A function which coefficient can be treated as parameters of unwontedstructurecomponent was statistically fittedto histograms of impurities distribution. The influence of O, N, P and S content on approximation function coefficients was analyzed.

  3. Hardness and Wear Resistance of TiC-Fe-Cr Locally Reinforcement Produced in Cast Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Olejnik E.; Szymański Ł.; Kurtyka P.; Tokarski T.; Grabowska B.; Czapla P.

    2016-01-01

    In order to increase wear resistance cast steel casting the TiC-Fe-Cr type composite zones were fabricated. These zones were obtained by means of in situ synthesis of substrates of the reaction TiC with a moderator of a chemical composition of white cast iron with nickel of the Ni-Hard type 4. The synthesis was carried out directly in the mould cavity. The moderator was applied to control the reactive infiltration occurring during the TiC synthesis. The microstructure of composite zones was i...

  4. Materials design of high nitrogen manganese austenitic stainless TWIP steels for strip casting

    OpenAIRE

    Mosecker, Linda

    2016-01-01

    High nitrogen manganese austenitic stainless TWIP steels achieve attractive mechanical properties and excellent strain hardening behavior. However, high nitrogen steel melting methods are generally associated with high pressures to enhance the nitrogen solubility in the melt. Thin strip casting offers an attractive option that not only shortens the process route but also allows the alloying with nitrogen at atmospheric pressure. In the present work, the materials design of austenitic Fe-Cr-Mn...

  5. CHANGE OF CONNECTION BETWEEN MAGNETIC PARAMETERS OF CAST IRON IN COMPARISON WITH STEEL UNDER INFLUENCE OF INTERNAL DEMAGNETIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Sandomirsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Connection of maximum magnetic permeability µm of cast irons with coercive force Нс and residual magnetism Мr is established in all size of changing of the magnetic characteristics of cast iron. Differences of this connection for steels and cast irons are revealed. Formula for calculation µm of steels by Нс and Мr is corrected for calculation µm of cast irons. As a result of correction the calculation error of cast irons µm is diminished. The results can be used in magnetic structural analysis instead of labor-consuming measurement µm.

  6. Summary of the PISC round robin results on wrought and cast austenitic steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaitre, P.; Koble, T.D.; Crutzen, S.

    1995-01-01

    Within the framework of Action 4 of the third phase of the Programme for the Inspection of Steel Components (PISC III) three capability studies on stainless steel welds have been conducted. The first capability study used a series of 6 wrought-to-wrought stainless steel assemblies that contained a number of flaws such as intergranular stress corrosion cracks, mechanical and thermal fatigue cracks and PISC type A flaws. The second capability study used two wrought-to-cast austenitic steel assemblies that contained lack of fusion flaws and PISC type A flaws. The third capability study used three cast-to-cast austenitic steel assemblies that contained lack of fusion flaws, mechanical fatigue cracks and PISC type A flaws. In total more than 25 teams from 10 different countries participated. A lot of information was obtained on the performance of the inspection techniques used with respect to detection, false calls, depth and length sizing. Different flaw categories were considered to identify those difficult to detect. Furthermore an analysis at the level of techniques was performed which identified some of the more effective techniques and procedures. In this paper the main conclusions from these capabilities studies on austenitic steel welds will be discussed. (author). 12 refs, 14 figs, 1 tab

  7. The thermal fatigue resistance of vermicular cast iron coupling with H13 steel units by cast-in process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chengtao; Zhou, Hong; Lin, Peng Yu; Sun, Na; Guo, Qingchun; Zhang, Peng; Yu, Jiaxiang; Liu, Yan; Wang, Mingxing; Ren, Luquan

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on improving the thermal fatigue resistance on the surface of vermicular cast iron coupling with inserted H13 steel blocks that had different cross sections, by cast-in processing. The microstructure of bionic units was examined by scanning electron microscope. Micro-hardness and thermal fatigue resistance of bionic samples with varied cross sections and spacings were investigated, respectively. Results show that a marked metallurgical bonding zone was produced at interface between the inserted H13 steel block and the parent material - a unique feature of the bionic structure in the vermicular cast iron samples. The micro-hardness of the bionic samples has been significantly improved. Thermal resistance of the samples with the circular cross section was the highest and the bionics sample with spacing of 2 mm spacing had a much longer thermal fatigue life, thus resulting in the improvement for the thermal fatigue life of the bionic samples, due to the efficient preclusion for the generation and propagation of crack at the interface of H13 block and the matrix.

  8. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (Energy-SMARRT): Clean Steel Casting Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuyucak, Selcuk [CanmetMATERIALS; Li, Delin [CanmetMATERIALS

    2013-12-31

    Inclusions in steel castings can cause rework, scrap, poor machining, and reduced casting performance, which can obviously result in excess energy consumption. Significant progress in understanding inclusion source, formation and control has been made. Inclusions can be defined as non-metallic materials such as refractory, sand, slag, or coatings, embedded in a metallic matrix. This research project has focused on the mold filling aspects to examine the effects of pouring methods and gating designs on the steel casting cleanliness through water modeling, computer modeling, and melting/casting experiments. Early in the research project, comprehensive studies of bottom-pouring water modeling and low-alloy steel casting experiments were completed. The extent of air entrainment in bottom-poured large castings was demonstrated by water modeling. Current gating systems are designed to prevent air aspiration. However, air entrainment is equally harmful and no prevention measures are in current practice. In this study, new basin designs included a basin dam, submerged nozzle, and nozzle extension. The entrained air and inclusions from the gating system were significantly reduced using the new basin method. Near the end of the project, there has been close collaboration with Wescast Industries Inc., a company manufacturing automotive exhaust components. Both computer modeling using Magma software and melting/casting experiments on thin wall turbo-housing stainless steel castings were completed in this short period of time. Six gating designs were created, including the current gating on the pattern, non-pressurized, partially pressurized, naturally pressurized, naturally pressurized without filter, and radial choke gating without filter, for Magma modeling. The melt filling velocity and temperature were determined from the modeling. Based on the simulation results, three gating designs were chosen for further melting and casting experiments on the same casting pattern using

  9. Tool Steels in Die-Casting Utilization and Increased Mold Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepanta Naimi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In die-casting molds, heat-checking is the typical failure mechanism. Optimizing the parameters that decrease this failure venture should be considered when designing and heat treating steels. The quality of die steels and their treatment continue to improve. This research investigated properties of the traditional materials 1.2343 and 1.2344 and the new steels (Dievar and TOOLOX 44 when applied to the die-casting mold specimens, after different experimental cycles. Also microstructures of the mentioned materials were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM test. Chrome-molybdenum-silicon-vanadium steels have good hardening ability in oil and in air. Therefore, the hot-work steels have considerable toughness and plastic attributes through both regular and higher temperatures. So, it is a good traditional die-casting material. However, another special die steel, such as Dievar, is a particularly developed steel grade; its exclusivity profile is exceptional due to its chemical composition and the use of the latest production techniques. Dievar has good heat-checking and gross-cracking resistance as a result of both high toughness and good hot strength. An additional material, a new prehardened tool steel known as TOOLOX 44, exhibits control of the failure described above by optimizing the parameters of impact toughness that could reduce the heat-checking failures. A variety of heat treatment parameters exist for various reasons because the heat treatment operation is performed by a variety of companies. This issue of the diversity in heat treatments is resolved by TOOLOX 44; this steel is quenched and tempered in delivered state.

  10. Algorithm for prevention of molten steel sticking onto mold in continous casting process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blažević, D.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In continuous casting steel production a significant loss reduction – in terms of scrap material, time and money – can be achieved by developing an appropriate algorithm for the prevention of molten steel sticking onto mould. The logic of such algorithm should be simple and manageable to ensure its practical implementation on a computer system via the usage of thermo sensors. This suggests that both the algorithm and the automated data collection can be implemented by means of applicative software. Despite its simplicity, the algorithm should accurately trace physical phenomena in molten steel.

  11. To the problem of nonmetallic inclusions assimilation by slags in the course of steel casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimov, Yu.V.; Krupman, L.I.; Medzhibozhskij, M.Ya.; Povkh, Yu.I.; Belanenko, A.A.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of slag viscosity as well as a method of steel pouring with slag-forming mixtures used upon the slag assimilation of oxide inclusions has been studied with a radioactive tracer method. The inclusions are absorbed by slag primarily in the course of filling casting moulds when a relatively intensive metal circulation occurs. The ensuing decrease of slag viscosity results in better purification of steel from inclusions. In the period of natural convection the inclusions are not removed irrespective of the slag properties. The bottom pouring results in the lowest degree of steel purification from inclusions due to the limited surface of a slag-metal contact

  12. Changes Found on Run-In and Scuffed Surfaces of Steel Chrome Plate, and Cast Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, J. N.; Godfrey, Douglas

    1947-01-01

    A study was made of run-in and scuffed steel, chrome-plate, and cast-iron surfaces. X-ray and electron diffraction techniques, micro-hardness determinations, and microscopy were used. Surface changes varied and were found to include three classes: chemical reaction, hardening, and crystallite-size alteration. The principal chemical reactions were oxidation and carburization.

  13. Thermo-mechanical properties and cracking during solidification of thin slab cast steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santillana, M.B.

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays a vast majority of the steel produced worldwide is via the continuous casting process route because this is the most low-cost, efficient and high quality method to mass produce metal products in a variety of sizes and shapes. Most of the continuous casters are the initial manufacturing step

  14. Constraint Effects at Brittle Fracture Initiation in a Cast Ferritic Steel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dlouhý, Ivo; Chlup, Zdeněk; Kozák, Vladislav

    č. 71 (2004), s. 873-883 ISSN 0013-7944 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA2041003 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : Cast ferritic steel * transition behaviour * fracture toughness Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 1.299, year: 2004 www.sciencedirect.com

  15. Elimination of Hot Tears in Steel Castings by Means of Solidification Pattern Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotas, Petr; Tutum, Cem Celal; Thorborg, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    A methodology of how to exploit the Niyama criterion for the elimination of various defects such as centerline porosity, macrosegregation, and hot tearing in steel castings is presented. The tendency of forming centerline porosity is governed by the temperature distribution close to the end of th...

  16. Developments of steel fabrication processes for castings and ingots for forgings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, S.

    1980-01-01

    This chapter deals with a series of technological developments in the manufacture of steels which have occurred during the last years, in particular reporting the results obtained in Reinosa with some of these methods in the fabrication of castings as well as forgings and rolled products. (author)

  17. Heat treatment of long term serviced Cr – Mo cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Golanski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of research on the influence of heat treatment on the structure and properties of L20HM cast steel after long term operation at elevated temperature. Investigated cast steel was taken out from an outer frame of a steam turbine serviced for 167 424 hours at the temp. of 535 oC and pressure 12.75 MPa. In post-operating condition the investigated cast steel was characterized by mechanical properties below the required minimum and by high brittleness. Performed research on the influence of austenitizing parameters has revealed that the range of austenitizing temperatures for the examined cast steel: Ac3 + 30 ÷ 60 oC ensures obtaining of a fine austenite grain, homogeneous in size. It has been proved that tempering of bainititc – ferritic structure above 680 ÷ 690 oC causes an increase of impact energy along with a decrease of mechanical properties below the required minimum. Moreover, it has been noticed that applying of under-annealing instead of tempering, after full-annealing, guarantees the required impact energy of KV > 27J, with the mechanical properties similar to those after service.

  18. Standard digital reference images for investment steel castings for aerospace applications

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 The digital reference images provided in the adjunct to this standard illustrate various types and degrees of discontinuities occurring in thin-wall steel investment castings. Use of this standard for the specification or grading of castings requires procurement of the adjunct digital reference images which illustrate the discontinuity types and severity levels. They are intended to provide the following: 1.1.1 A guide enabling recognition of thin-wall steel casting discontinuities and their differentiation both as to type and degree through digital radiographic examination. 1.1.2 Example digital radiographic illustrations of discontinuities and a nomenclature for reference in acceptance standards, specifications and drawings. 1.2 Two illustration categories are covered as follows: 1.2.1 Graded—Six common discontinuity types each illustrated in eight degrees of progressively increasing severity. 1.2.2 Ungraded—Twelve single illustrations of additional discontinuity types and of patterns and imper...

  19. Estimation of fracture toughness of cast stainless steels during thermal aging in LWR systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O.K. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

    1991-06-01

    A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting the change in fracture toughness of cast stainless steel components due to thermal aging during service in light water rectors (LWRs) at 280--330{degrees}C (535--625{degrees}F). The fracture toughness J-R curve and Charpy-impact energy of aged cast stainless steels are estimated from known mineral in formation. Fracture toughness of a specific cast stainless steel is estimated from the extent and kinetics of thermal embrittlement. The extent of thermal embrittlement is characterized by the room-temperature normalized'' Charpy-impact energy. A correlation for the extent of embrittlement at saturation,'' i.e., the minimum impact energy that would be achieved for the material after long-term aging, is given in terms of a material parameter, {Phi}, which is determined from the chemical composition. The fracture toughness J-R curve for the material is then obtained from correlations between room-temperature Charpy-impact energy and fracture toughness parameters. Fracture toughness as a function of time and temperature of reactor service is estimated from the kinetics of thermal embrittlement, which is determined from chemical composition. A common lower-bound'' J-R curve for cast stainless steels with unknown chemical composition is also defined for a given material specification, ferrite content, and temperature. Examples for estimating impact strength and fracture toughness of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are describes. 24 refs., 39 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Reasonable Temperature Schedules for Cold or Hot Charging of Continuously Cast Steel Slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Chen, Xin; Liu, Ke; Wang, Jing; Wen, Jin; Zhang, Jiaquan

    2013-12-01

    Some continuously cast steel slabs are sensitive to transverse fracture problems during transportation or handling away from their storage state, while some steel slabs are sensitive to surface transverse cracks during the following rolling process in a certain hot charging temperature range. It is revealed that the investigated steel slabs with high fracture tendency under room cooling condition always contain pearlite transformation delayed elements, which lead to the internal brittle bainitic structure formation, while some microalloyed steels exhibit high surface crack susceptibility to hot charging temperatures due to carbonitride precipitation. According to the calculated internal cooling rates and CCT diagrams, the slabs with high fracture tendency during cold charging should be slowly cooled after cutting to length from hot strand or charged to the reheating furnace directly above their bainite formation temperatures. Based on a thermodynamic calculation for carbonitride precipitation in austenite, the sensitive hot charging temperature range of related steels was revealed for the determination of reasonable temperature schedules.

  1. Heavy steel casting components for power plants 'mega-components' made of high Cr-steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanus, Reinhold [voestalpine Giesserei Linz GmbH, Linz (Austria)

    2010-07-01

    Steel castings of creep resistant steels play a key role in fossil fuel fired power plants for highly loaded components in the high and intermediate pressure section of the turbines. Inner and outer casings, valve casings, inlet connections and elbows are examples of such critical components. The most important characteristic in a power plant is the efficiency, which mainly drives the CO2-emission. As a consequence of steadily improving power plant efficiencies and ever stricter emission standards, steam parameters become more critical and the creep resistance of the cast materials must also be constantly improved. The foundries voestalpine Giesserei Linz and voestalpine Giesserei Traisen participated in the development of the new 9-10% Cr-steels for application up to 625 C/650 C and in the THERMIE project where Ni-base alloys for 700 C-power plants were developed. Beside the material development in the European research projects the commercial production had to be established for industrial processes and the newly developed materials have to be transferred from research into the commercial production of heavy cast components. After selecting the most promising alloy from the laboratory melts, welding tests were performed - mostly with matching electrodes also produced within COST/THERMIE. Base material and welds were investigated in respect of microstructure, creep resistance, mechanical properties and weldability. Heat treatment investigations were also necessary for optimization of the mechanical properties. Based on the results of these studies, pilot components and plates for testing welding processes were cast in order to verify the castability and weldability of larger parts and to make any necessary adjustments to chemical composition, heat treatment or welding parameters. Parallel to the ongoing creep tests within COST/THERMIE-program, the newly developed steel grades were introduced into the commercial production of large components. This involved finding

  2. Autonomous Optimization of a Solidification Pattern and Its Effect on Porosity and Segregation in Steel Castings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotas, Petr; Tutum, Cem Celal; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2011-01-01

    The present paper considers optimization of a solidification pattern of a gravity sand-cast steel part. That is, the choice of proper riser and chill designs has been investigated using genetic algorithms while simultaneously considering their impact on centerline porosity and macrosegregation...... distribution. This was accomplished by coupling a casting simulation software package with an optimization module. The casting process of the original casting design was simulated using a transient 3D thermal model incorporated in a commercial simulation software package to determine potential flaws...... and inadequacies. After this initial assessment, a new geometrical model was suggested with the redesigned gating system and rearranged chills to obtain better filling and solidification patterns. Based on the improved model, relevant optimization targets and constraints were defined. One multi...

  3. Physical and mechanical properties of cast 17-4 PH stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rack, H.J.

    1981-02-01

    The physical and mechanical properties of an overaged 17-4 PH stainless steel casting have been examined. The tensile and compressive properties of cast 17-4 PH are only influenced to a slight degree by changing test temperature and strain rate. However, both the Charpy impact energy and dynamic fracture toughness exhibit a tough-to-brittle transition with decreasing temperature - this transition being related to a change in fracture mode from ductile, dimple to cleavage-like. Finally, although the overaged 17-4 PH casting had a relatively low room temperature Charpy impact energy when compared to wrought 17-4 PH, its fracture toughness was at least comparable to that of wrought 17-4 PH. This observation suggests that prior correlations between Charpy impact energies and fracture toughness, as derived from wrought materials, must be approached with caution when applied to cast alloys

  4. Estimation of shell thickness in a continuously cast steel billet using radiotracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, A.S.; Pandey, J.C.; Kaur, G.

    1994-01-01

    In the continuous casting of steel, one of the factors which limits the rate of faster withdrawal of the casting from the mould is the thickness of the solid shell below the mould. If the shell can not contain the liquid pool, breakouts occur and process of casting disrupts. Estimates of shell thickness have been made on the basis of heat- transfer considerations. The shell thickness could also be delineated, to some extent, by adding radiotracers during casting and subsequently determining the dispersion of radioactivity by autoradiography. The paper presents the results of the estimation of shell thickness based on the heat-transfer model and validation of the model by plant trials using radiotracers. (author). 11 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  5. Evaluation of the degradation characteristics of CF-8A cast stainless steel using EDS and nano-indentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Seung; Koo, Jae Mean; Seok, Chang Sung

    2004-01-01

    Cast austenitic stainless steel piping pump, valve casings, and elbows are susceptible to reductions in toughness and ductility because of long term exposure at the operating temperatures in LWR(Light Water Reactor). In this paper, we have measured the material properties of long term aged CF-8A cast stainless steel, accelerated aging at 400 .deg. C. These studies have been carried out using indentation tests(automated ball indentation and nano-indentation) and EDS(Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy). The fracture toughness of Cf-8A cast stainless steel was also determined by using standard fracture toughness and automated ball indentation

  6. Effect of Flow Rate Controller on Liquid Steel Flow in Continuous Casting Mold using Numerical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gursoy, Kadir Ali; Yavuz, Mehmet Metin

    2014-11-01

    In continuous casting operation of steel, the flow through tundish to the mold can be controlled by different flow rate control systems including stopper rod and slide-gate. Ladle changes in continuous casting machines result in liquid steel level changes in tundishes. During this transient event of production, the flow rate controller opening is increased to reduce the pressure drop across the opening which helps to keep the mass flow rate at the desired level for the reduced liquid steel level in tundish. In the present study, computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models are developed to investigate the effect of flow rate controller on mold flow structure, and particularly to understand the effect of flow controller opening on meniscus flow. First, a detailed validation of the CFD models is conducted using available experimental data and the performances of different turbulence models are compared. Then, the constant throughput casting operations for different flow rate controller openings are simulated to quantify the opening effect on meniscus region. The results indicate that the meniscus velocities are significantly affected by the flow rate controller and its opening level. The steady state operations, specified as constant throughput casting, do not provide the same mold flow if the controller opening is altered. Thus, for quality and castability purposes, adjusting the flow controller opening to obtain the fixed mold flow structure is proposed. Supported by Middle East Technical University (METU) BAP (Scientific Research Projects) Coordination.

  7. Adaptive neural network controller for the molten steel level control of strip casting processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Hung Yi; Huang, Shiuh Jer

    2010-01-01

    The twin-roll strip casting process is a steel-strip production method which combines continuous casting and hot rolling processes. The production line from molten liquid steel to the final steel-strip is shortened and the production cost is reduced significantly as compared to conventional continuous casting. The quality of strip casting process depends on many process parameters, such as molten steel level in the pool, solidification position, and roll gap. Their relationships are complex and the strip casting process has the properties of nonlinear uncertainty and time-varying characteristics. It is difficult to establish an accurate process model for designing a model-based controller to monitor the strip quality. In this paper, a model-free adaptive neural network controller is developed to overcome this problem. The proposed control strategy is based on a neural network structure combined with a sliding-mode control scheme. An adaptive rule is employed to on-line adjust the weights of radial basis functions by using the reaching condition of a specified sliding surface. This surface has the on-line learning ability to respond to the system's nonlinear and time-varying behaviors. Since this model-free controller has a simple control structure and small number of control parameters, it is easy to implement. Simulation results, based on a semi experimental system dynamic model and parameters, are executed to show the control performance of the proposed intelligent controller. In addition, the control performance is compared with that of a traditional Pid controller

  8. The thermal fatigue behaviour of creep-resistant Ni-Cr cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Piekarski

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The study gives a summary of the results of industrial and laboratory investigations regarding an assessment of the thermal fatigue behaviour of creep-resistant austenitic cast steel. The first part of the study was devoted to the problem of textural stresses forming in castings during service, indicating them as a cause of crack formation and propagation. Stresses are forming in carbides and in matrix surrounding these carbides due to considerable differences in the values of the coefficients of thermal expansion of these phases. The second part of the study shows the results of investigations carried out to assess the effect of carbon, chromium and nickel on crack resistance of austenitic cast steel. As a criterion of assessment the amount and propagation rate of cracks forming in the specimens as a result of rapid heating followed by cooling in running water was adopted. Tests were carried out on specimens made from 11 alloys. The chemical composition of these alloys was comprised in a range of the following values: (wt-%: 18-40 %Ni, 17-30 %Cr, 1.2-1.6%Si and 0.05-0.6 %C. The specimens were subjected to 75 cycles of heating to a temperature of 900oC followed by cooling in running water. After every 15 cycles the number of the cracks was counted and their length was measured. The results of the measurements were mathematically processed. It has been proved that the main factor responsible for an increase in the number of cracks is carbon content in the alloy. In general assessment of the results of investigations, the predominant role of carbon and of chromium in the next place in shaping the crack behaviour of creep-resistant austenitic cast steel should be stressed. Attention was also drawn to the effect of high-temperature corrosion as a factor definitely deteriorating the cast steel resistance to thermal fatigue.

  9. The Influence of Vanadium Microalloying on the Production of Thin Slab Casting and Direct Rolled Steel Strip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu; Milbourn, David

    Vanadium microalloying is highly effective in high strength strip steels produced by thin slab casting and direct rolled process. Because of the high solubility of V(C,N) in austenite, vanadium is likely to remain in solution during casting, equalisation and rolling. Vanadium microalloyed steels have better hot ductility and are less prone to transverse cracking than niobium containing steels. Despite a coarse as-cast austenite grain size before rolling, significant grain refinement can be achieved in vanadium microalloyed steels by repeated recrystallization during rolling, resulting in a fine uniform ferrite microstructure in final strip. Almost all vanadium present in microalloyed steels is available to precipitate in ferrite as very fine particles, contributing to precipitation strengthening. Vanadium microalloyed steels show less sensitivity to rolling process variables and exhibit excellent combination of strength and toughness.

  10. Transient Thermo-fluid Model of Meniscus Behavior and Slag Consumption in Steel Continuous Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonayat, A. S. M.; Thomas, Brian G.

    2014-10-01

    The behavior of the slag layer between the oscillating mold wall, the slag rim, the slag/liquid steel interface, and the solidifying steel shell, is of immense importance for the surface quality of continuous-cast steel. A computational model of the meniscus region has been developed, that includes transient heat transfer, multi-phase fluid flow, solidification of the slag, and movement of the mold during an oscillation cycle. First, the model is applied to a lab experiment done with a "mold simulator" to verify the transient temperature-field predictions. Next, the model is verified by matching with available literature and plant measurements of slag consumption. A reasonable agreement has been observed for both temperature and flow-field. The predictions show that transient temperature behavior depends on the location of the thermocouple during the oscillation relative to the meniscus. During an oscillation cycle, heat transfer variations in a laboratory frame of reference are more severe than experienced by the moving mold thermocouples, and the local heat transfer rate is increased greatly when steel overflows the meniscus. Finally, the model is applied to conduct a parametric study on the effect of casting speed, stroke, frequency, and modification ratio on slag consumption. Slag consumption per unit area increases with increase of stroke and modification ratio, and decreases with increase of casting speed while the relation with frequency is not straightforward. The match between model predictions and literature trends suggests that this methodology can be used for further investigations.

  11. Finite Element Modelling of Mechanical Phenomena Connected to the Technological Process of Continuous Casting of Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Heger

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A finite element method algorithm is presented that enables numerical simulation of real phenomena that take place during an industrial process of continuous casting of steel. The algorithm takes into account all known kinds of nonlinearities: material nonlinearity connected to the nonlinear temperature dependence of material properties, large deformations from the process of material forming and contacts between the slab and rollers of the strand. Received results describe the sensitivity of the product to crack initiation, not only during the process of continuous casting itself but also in the finished and cooled slab.

  12. Effect of annealing temperature and time on microstructure and mechanical properties of high Cr ferritic casting steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suo, Z. Y.; Fu, L. M.; Zhang, R. N.; Wang, Y. J.; Shan, A. D.

    2017-09-01

    A new-type of high Cr ferrite cast steel was designed and investigated. Effects of annealing temperature and time on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the high Cr ferrite cast steel were studied. The results show that the microstructures of the as-cast and annealing steels are composed of ferrite and (Cr•Fe)23C6 carbide. The morphology of carbides is from long rod and the continuous network to crystal precipitation for the steels with increasing of annealing temperature and time. The impact toughness is slightly increased from 6 J/cm2 to 8 J/cm2 when the annealing temperature increases from 1180 ℃ to 1200 ℃. But the hardness is about HB 200 and no obvious differences between the as-cast and annealing steels. The most suitable annealing temperature and time are 1200 ℃ and 5 h, respectively. The wear resistance of the high Cr ferrite cast steel is increased and improved with annealing temperature and holding time at 260 ℃. The wear mechanism is changed from abrasion wear to abrasive and adhesive wear. The good wear-resistant of the high Cr ferrite cast steel is mainly attributed to the fine uniformly dispersed carbides.

  13. Modeling of Dendritic Evolution of Continuously Cast Steel Billet with Cellular Automaton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiling; Ji, Cheng; Luo, Sen; Zhu, Miaoyong

    2018-02-01

    In order to predict the dendritic evolution during the continuous steel casting process, a simple mechanism to connect the heat transfer at the macroscopic scale and the dendritic growth at the microscopic scale was proposed in the present work. As the core of the across-scale simulation, a two-dimensional cell automaton (CA) model with a decentered square algorithm was developed and parallelized. Apart from nucleation undercooling and probability, a temperature gradient was introduced to deal with the columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET) by considering its variation during continuous casting. Based on the thermal history, the dendritic evolution in a 4 mm × 40 mm region near the centerline of a SWRH82B steel billet was predicted. The influences of the secondary cooling intensity, superheat, and casting speed on the dendritic structure of the billet were investigated in detail. The results show that the predicted equiaxed dendritic solidification of Fe-5.3Si alloy and columnar dendritic solidification of Fe-0.45C alloy are consistent with in situ experimental results [Yasuda et al. Int J Cast Metals Res 22:15-21 (2009); Yasuda et al. ISIJ Int 51:402-408 (2011)]. Moreover, the predicted dendritic arm spacing and CET location agree well with the actual results in the billet. The primary dendrite arm spacing of columnar dendrites decreases with increasing secondary cooling intensity, or decreasing superheat and casting speed. Meanwhile, the CET is promoted as the secondary cooling intensity and superheat decrease. However, the CET is not influenced by the casting speed, owing to the adjusting of the flow rate of secondary spray water. Compared with the superheat and casting speed, the secondary cooling intensity can influence the cooling rate and temperature gradient in deeper locations, and accordingly exerts a more significant influence on the equiaxed dendritic structure.

  14. Computer Simulation of the Formation of Non-Metallic Precipitates During a Continuous Casting of Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalisz D.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The authors own computer software, based on the Ueshima mathematical model with taking into account the back diffusion, determined from the Wołczyński equation, was developed for simulation calculations. The applied calculation procedure allowed to determine the chemical composition of the non-metallic phase in steel deoxidised by means of Mn, Si and Al, at the given cooling rate. The calculation results were confirmed by the analysis of samples taken from the determined areas of the cast ingot. This indicates that the developed computer software can be applied for designing the steel casting process of the strictly determined chemical composition and for obtaining the required non-metallic precipitates.

  15. The anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel and cast iron in artificial groundwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smart, N.R.; Blackwood, D.J.; Werme, L.

    2001-07-01

    In Sweden, high level radioactive waste will be disposed of in a canister with a copper outer and a cast iron or carbon steel inner. If the iron insert comes into contact with anoxic geological water, anaerobic corrosion leading to the generation of hydrogen will occur. This paper presents a study of the anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel and cast iron in artificial Swedish granitic groundwaters. Electrochemical methods and gas collection techniques were used to assess the mechanisms and rates of corrosion and the associated hydrogen gas production over a range of conditions. The corrosion rate is high initially but is anodically limited by the slow formation of a duplex magnetite film. The effects of key environmental parameters such as temperature and ionic strength on the anaerobic corrosion rate are discussed

  16. Mechanical properties and corrosion behaviour of 18Cr-11Ni-2,5Mo cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Starowicz

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The study discusses the effect of variable carbon concentration (0,02; 0,07 and 0,14% on the mechanical properties and corrosion resistance in 3,0% NaCl solution of 18Cr-11Ni-2,5Mo austenitic cast steel. It has been proved that at the concentration of 0,07%C, products made of the examined cast steel reveal on their surface some symptoms of local corrosion. Carbon concentration raised to 0,14%C results in advanced intercrystalline corrosion and the onset of local corrosion. Carbon concentration increased from 0,02 to 0,14% also results in the tensile strength UTS raised from 487MPa to 579MPa (a nearly 20% increase with elongation El reduced from 55,3% to 49,6%, and reduction of area RA from 69,3% to 53,4%.

  17. Wide – Ranging Influence of Mischmetal on Properties of GP240GH Cast Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kasińska

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents influence of rare earth metals (REM on the properties of GP240GH cast carbon steel. The research has beenperformed on successive industrial melts. Each time ca 2000 kg of liquid metal was modified. The rare earth metals were put into the ladle during tapping of heat melt from the furnace. Because of this the amount of sulphur in the cast steel was decreased and the non-metallic inclusion morphology was significantly changed. It was found that non metallic inclusions the cracking mechanism of Charpy specimens and the impact strength were all changed. The following properties were tested: mechanical properties (y, UTS, plastic properties (necking, elongation and impact strength (SCI. In the three-point bend test the KJC stress intensity factor was evaluated.

  18. Wide – Ranging Influence of Mischmetal on Properties of GP240GH Cast Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasińska J.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents influence of rare earth metals (REM on the properties of GP240GH cast carbon steel. The research has been performed on successive industrial melts. Each time ca 2000 kg of liquid metal was modified. The rare earth metals were put into the ladle during tapping of heat melt from the furnace. Because of this the amount of sulphur in the cast steel was decreased and the non-metallic inclusion morphology was significantly changed. It was found that non metallic inclusions the cracking mechanism of Charpy specimens and the impact strength were all changed. The following properties were tested: mechanical properties (σy, σUTS, plastic properties (necking, elongation and impact strength (SCI. In the three-point bend test the KJC stress intensity factor was evaluated.

  19. Teeming stream protection using an argon shroud during casting of steel ingots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao-jie; Bao, Yan-ping; Wang, Min; Zhang, Le-chen

    2017-01-01

    Two kinds of argon shroud protection devices with two different basic structures were designed and investigated. Industrial experiments and numerical simulations were used to examine the protection effect, and the mechanism of air entrapment during the casting of steel ingots was analyzed. The influence of the structure of the argon shroud protection device on the protection effect was investigated. An argon shroud protection device mounted to the nozzle holder on the bottom of the ladle does not provide a good protection effect because air can easily flow into the teeming system and cause reoxidation of molten steel during teeming. By contrast, an argon shroud protection device seated on the top of the central trumpet provides an excellent protection effect, where air has little chance of flowing into the teeming system during casting. The feasibilities of the argon shroud protection devices are discussed.

  20. Plasma sprayed coatings on mild steel split moulds for uranium casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreekumar, K.P.; Padmanaban, P.V.A.; Venkatramani, N.; Singh, S.P.; Saha, D.P.; Date, V.G.

    2002-01-01

    High velocity high temperature plasma jets are used to deposit metals and ceramics on metallic substrates for oxidation and corrosion protection applications. Plasma sprayed ceramic coatings on metallic substrates are also used to prevent its reaction with molten metals. Metal-alumina duplex coatings on mild steel split moulds have been developed and successfully used for casting of uranium. Techno-economics of the coated moulds against the conventional graphite moulds are a major advantage. Mild steel moulds of 600 mm long and 75 mm in diameter have been plasma spray coated with alumina over a bond coat of molybdenum. In-plant tests showed an increase in number of castings per mould compared to the commonly used graphite moulds. (author)

  1. Ultrasonic detection and sizing of cracks in cast stainless steel samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allidi, F.; Edelmann, X.; Phister, O.; Hoegberg, K.; Pers-Anderson, E.B.

    1986-01-01

    The test consisted of 15 samples of cast stainless steel, each with a weld. Some of the specimens were provided with artificially made thermal fatique cracks. The inspection was performed with the P-scan method. The investigations showed an improvement of recognizability relative to earlier investigations. One probe, the dual type, longitudinal wave 45 degrees, low frequence 0.5-1 MHz gives the best results. (G.B.)

  2. 77 K Fatigue Crack Growth Rate of Modified CF8M Stainless Steel Castings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, R. P.; Toplosky, V. J.; Han, K.; Heitzenroeder, P. J.; Nelson, B. E.

    2006-01-01

    The National Compact Stellerator Experiment (NCSX) is the first of a new class of stellarators. The modular superconducting coils in the NCSX have complex geometry that are manufactured on cast stainless steel (modified CF8M) winding forms. Although CF8M castings have been used before at cryogenic temperature there is limited data available for their mechanical properties at low temperatures. The fatigue life behavior of the cast material is vital thus a test program to generate data on representative material has been conducted. Fatigue test specimens have been obtained from key locations within prototype winding forms to determine the 77 K fatigue crack growth rate. The testing has successfully developed a representative database that ensures confident design. The measured crack growth rates are analyzed in terms of the Paris law parameters and the crack growth properties are related to the materials microstructure

  3. Estimation of fracture toughness of cast stainless steels during thermal aging in LWR systems-revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O.K

    1994-08-01

    This report presents a revision of the procedure and correlations presented earlier in NUREG/CR-4513, ANL-90/42 (June 1991) for predicting the change in mechanical properties of cast stainless steel components due to thermal aging during service in light water reactors at 280-330{degrees}C (535-625{degrees}F). The correlations presented in this report are based on an expanded data base and have been optimized with mechanical-property data on cast stainless steels aged up to {approx}58,000 h at 290-350{degrees}C (554-633{degrees}F). The fracture toughness J-R curve, tensile stress, and Charpy-impact energy of aged cast stainless steels are estimated from known material information. Mechanical properties of a specific cast stainless steel are estimated from the extent and kinetics of thermal embrittlement. Embrittlement of cast stainless steels is characterized in terms of room-temperature Charpy-impact energy. Charpy-impact energy as a function of time and temperature of reactor service is estimated from the kinetics of thermal embrittlement, which are also determined from the chemical composition. The initial impact energy of the unaged steel is required for these estimations. Initial tensile flow stress is needed for estimating the flow stress of the aged material. The fracture toughness J-R curve for the material is then obtained by correlating room-temperature Charpy-impact energy with fracture toughness parameters. The values of J{sub IC} are determined from the estimated J-R curve and flow stress. A common {open_quotes}predicted lower-bound{close_quotes} J-R curve for cast stainless steels of unknown chemical composition is also defined for a given grade of steel, range of ferrite content, and temperature. Examples of estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are presented.

  4. Secondary recrystallization behavior in a twin-roll cast grain-oriented electrical steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hong-Yu; Liu, Hai-Tao, E-mail: liuht@ral.neu.edu.cn; Wang, Yin-Ping; Wang, Guo-Dong

    2017-04-15

    The microstructure and texture evolution along the processing was investigated with a particular focus on the secondary recrystallization behavior in a 0.23 mm-thick twin-roll cast grain-oriented electrical steel. A striking feature is that Goss orientation originated during twin-roll casting as a result of shear deformation and it was further enhanced during hot rolling and normalizing. After primary recrystallization annealing, a homogeneous microstructure associated with a sharp γ-fiber texture was produced. During secondary recrystallization annealing, the γ-fiber texture was first strengthened and weakened with increasing temperature prior to the onset of secondary recrystallization. Goss grains always exhibited more 20–45° misoriented boundaries than the matrix. The matrix was quite stable during secondary recrystallization with the aid of dense inhibitors. Finally, a complete secondary recrystallization microstructure consisting of large Goss grains was produced. The grain boundary characteristics distribution indicated that the high energy model was responsible for the abnormal growth of Goss grains under the present conditions. - Highlights: • A 0.23 mm twin-roll cast grain-oriented silicon steel sheet was produced. • Goss orientation originated during twin-roll casting. • Secondary recrystallization behavior was briefly investigated. • γ-fiber texture was enhanced prior to the onset of secondary recrystallization. • A complete secondary recrystallization microstructure was produced.

  5. MAGMAsoft simulation applied in verification of technology to produce new range of alloy steel castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gwiżdż

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of MAGMAsoft application in simulation of the pouring and solidfication of castings made fromGS20Mn5 steel, basing on some principles adopted in the starting technology. The results of simulation were disclosed in the form of 3Ddrawings, showing the technology of pouring, selected stages of solidification, and porosity in castings made by the examined technology. Using simulation results, some modifications were introduced to the pouring technology, the simulation was repeated, and the results obtained for the technology before and after the modification were compared. Based on the guidelines provided in new technology, the pattern tooling was made. The process of mould preparation was described, along with the process of steel melting and pouring. Castings made by the new technology were X-rayed and subjected to heat treatment according to the newly developed cycle. Together with the main casting, test wedges were poured. Mechanical tests and structure examinations were performed. The results of the tests and investigations were evaluated.

  6. Effects of Rare Earth Metal Addition on Wear Resistance of Chromium-Molybdenum Cast Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasinska J.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses changes in the microstructure and abrasive wear resistance of G17CrMo5-5 cast steel modified with rare earth metals (REM. The changes were assessed using scanning microscopy. The wear response was determined in the Miller test to ASTM G75. Abrasion tests were supplemented with the surface profile measurements of non-modified and modified cast steel using a Talysurf CCI optical profilometer. It was demonstrated that the modification substantially affected the microstructure of the alloy, leading to grain size reduction and changed morphology of non-metallic inclusions. The observed changes in the microstructure resulted in a three times higher impact strength (from 33 to 99 kJ/cm2 and more than two times higher resistance to cracking (from 116 to 250 MPa. The following surface parameters were computed: Sa: Arithmetic mean deviation of the surface, Sq: Root-mean-square deviation of the surface, Sp: Maximum height of the peak Sv: Maximum depth of the valley, Sz: Ten Point Average, Ssk: Asymmetry of the surface, Sku: Kurtosis of the surface. The findings also indicated that the addition of rare earth metals had a positive effect on the abrasion behaviour of G17CrMo5-5 cast steel.

  7. Application of digital radiography in evaluation of crack propagation rate in cast steel specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sikora

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available A technology that utilizes penetrating X-rays is one of the oldest non-destructive testing methods. Digital radiography combines modern digital image processing algorithms with traditional X-ray testing method. The following paper describes the present use of digital radiograms in flaw detection, and the use of identification and classification algorithms in detection of cracks that occur under the effect of thermal fatigue process in creep-resistant steel castings operating as structural elements in heat treatment furnaces. The number and length of cracks formed in specimens of Ø37×5 mm dimensions as a result of shock heating and cooling was evaluated. The test alloy was austenitic cast steel of 30Ni-18Cr type, containing 1.75% Nb and 0.93% Ti (wt.%. It has been indicated that the applied methods of non-destructive testing using digital radiography are fully successful in evaluation of the fatigue crack propagation rate in steel castings.

  8. Effect of Heat Treatment on the Impact Toughness of `High-Chromium Cast Iron - Low Alloy Steel' Bimetal Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Z.

    2017-03-01

    A bimetallic `low-alloy steel - high-chromium cast iron' composite obtained by successive sand casting is studied and shown to have good cohesion on the interface and no casting defects. The hardness and the impact toughness of the bimetal increase simultaneously. The microstructure is more homogeneous after diffusion annealing at 1040°C, rapid cooling, and 3-h tempering at 270°C.

  9. Argon bubble behavior in slide-gate tundish nozzles during continuous casting of steel slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Hua

    2000-10-01

    Argon injection into a tundish nozzle is an efficient and widely employed method to reduce nozzle clogging in the continuous casting process. It also affects casting operation and product quality by changing the flow pattern in the nozzle and mold. The current work combines mathematical modeling and experiments to investigate the argon bubble behavior in slide-gate nozzles and to analyze phenomena related to product defects and operational problems during the continuous casting of steel slabs. Water model experiments are performed to study bubble formation behavior, including bubble size, frequency, mode and effects of variables such as liquid velocity, gas injection flow rate, gas injection hole size and gas density. An analytical model is developed to predict the average bubble size. Argon gas bubbles are predicted to be 1--5mm. This is larger than air bubbles in water, especially at low speed. A three-dimensional finite difference model is developed to study the turbulent flow of liquid steel and argon bubble in the slide-gate nozzles. Experiments are performed on a 0.4-scale "water caster" to verify the model by comparing the model prediction with the measurements using PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) technology. A weighted average scheme for the overall outflow is developed to quantify jet characteristics such as jet angle, jet speed, back flow zone fraction, turbulence and biased mass flow. Swirl is generated at nozzle ports. The validated model is employed to perform extensive parametric studies to investigate the effects of casting operation conditions such as gas injection, slide-gate orientation, casting speed, gate opening and bubble size and nozzle port design including port angle and port shape. The interrelated effects of nozzle clogging, argon injection, tundish bath depth, slide gate opening and nozzle bore diameter on the flow rate and pressure in tundish nozzles are quantified using an inverse model, based on interpolation of the numerical

  10. Melting of Grey Cast Iron Based on Steel Scrap Using Silicon Carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojczew A.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the issue of synthetic cast iron production in the electric induction furnace exclusively on the steel scrap base. Silicon carbide and synthetic graphite were used as carburizers. The carburizers were introduced with solid charge or added on the liquid metal surface. The chemical analysis of the produced cast iron, the carburization efficiency and microstructure features were presented in the paper. It was stated that ferrosilicon can be replaced by silicon carbide during the synthetic cast iron melting process. However, due to its chemical composition (30% C and 70% Si which causes significant silicon content in iron increase, the carbon deficit can be partly compensated by the carburizer introduction. Moreover it was shown that the best carbon and silicon assimilation rate is obtained where the silicon carbide is being introduced together with solid charge. When it is thrown onto liquid alloy surface the efficiency of the process is almost two times less and the melting process lasts dozen minutes long. The microstructure of the cast iron produced with the silicon carbide shows more bulky graphite flakes than inside the microstructure of cast iron produced on the pig iron base.

  11. Cast, heat-resistant austenitic stainless steels having reduced alloying element content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J [Oak Ridge, TN; Pankiw, Roman I [Greensburg, PA

    2010-07-06

    A cast, austenitic steel composed essentially of, expressed in weight percent of the total composition, about 0.4 to about 0.7 C, about 20 to about 30 Cr, about 20 to about 30 Ni, about 0.5 to about 1 Mn, about 0.6 to about 2 Si, about 0.05 to about 1 Nb, about 0.05 to about 1 W, about 0.05 to about 1.0 Mo, balance Fe, the steel being essentially free of Ti and Co, the steel characterized by at least one microstructural component selected from the group consisting of MC, M.sub.23C.sub.6, and M(C, N).

  12. Tribological behaviour of plasma nitrided cast iron D6510 and cast steel S0050A under the inclined-impact sliding condition with extremely high contact pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, C.; Zhang, J.; Nie, X.

    2017-05-01

    Plasma nitriding as a surface modification was applied on two substrate materials: cast iron D6510 and cast steel S0050A. After measurement of the friction coefficients of the treated samples using a pin-on-disc tribotester, an inclined impact-sliding wear tester was utilized to investigate their tribological behaviour under tilting contact with extremely high contact pressure. While numerous surface fatigue cracks, severe chipping, and peeling of the compound layer were observed for the treated cast steel sample, the treated cast iron sample had far fewer surface fatigue cracks without chipping or peeling of the compound at the same test condition. The governing mechanisms of the treated cast iron sample’s superior resistance to surface fatigue failure were revealed by studying the cross-sectional hardness and nitrogen concentration profile. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis indicated that the treated cast iron sample had a smaller nitrogen concentration gradient, which led to a smaller hardness gradient as measured. The results suggest that a smaller hardness gradient between the compound layer and the diffusion zone and a thicker hardened case was able to improve the wear resistance and surface fatigue cracking resistance against high contact loads. Moreover, the smaller friction coefficient of the treated cast iron sample could also be beneficial for improving the wear resistance.

  13. Behavior of the elements in the mechanically alloyed and cast ferritic steels and a type 316 stainless steel in a flowing sodium environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, T.; Mutoh, I.

    1988-01-01

    Sodium corrosion behavior of a mechanically alloyed ferritic steel, dispersion-strengthened with addition of Y 2 0 3 and Ti, two kinds of melted/cast ferritic steels and a Type 316 stainless steel was examined by using a non-isothermal sodium loop system, constructed of another Type 316 stainless steel, with a direct resistance electrical heater. The sodium conditions were 675 0 C, 4.0 m/s in velocity and 1-2 ppm oxygen concentration and a cumulative exposure time of the specimens was about 3000 h. The absorption of Ni and selective dissolution of Cr played an important role in the corrosion of the mechanically alloyed ferritic steel as in the case of the cast ferritic steels. However, the region of Ni absorption and Cr diminution was deeper than that of the cast ferritic steels. Peculiar finding for the mechanically alloyed ferritic steel was the corroded surface with irregularly shaped protuberance, that might be related with formation of sodium titanate, and the absorption of carbon and nitrogen to form carbide and nitride of titanium. It seems that these facts resulted in the irregular weight loss of the specimens, which depended on the downstream position and the cumulative exposure time. However, the tensile properties of the mechanically alloyed ferritic steel did not noticeably change by the sodium exposure

  14. Initial assessment of the mechanisms and significance of low-temperature embrittlement of cast stainless steels in LWR systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Sather, A.

    1990-08-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on long-term embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels in LWR systems. Metallurgical characterization and mechanical property data from Charpy-impact, tensile, and J-R curve tests are presented for several experimental and commercial heats, as well as for reactor-aged CF-3, CF-8, and CF-8M cast stainless steels. The effects of material variables on the embrittlement of cast stainless steels are evaluated. Chemical composition and ferrite morphology strongly affect the extent and kinetics of embrittlement. In general, the low-carbon CF-3 stainless steels are the most resistant and the molybdenum-containing high-carbon CF-8M stainless steels are most susceptible to embrittlement. The microstructural and mechanical-property data are analyzed to establish the mechanisms of embrittlement. The procedure and correlations for predicting the impact strength and fracture toughness of cast components during reactor service are described. The lower bound values of impact strength and fracture toughness for low-temperature-aged cast stainless steel are defined. 39 refs., 56 figs., 8 tabs

  15. The Prediction of Long-Term Thermal Aging in Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Yang, Ying; Lach, Timothy G.

    2017-02-15

    Cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) materials are extensively used for many massive primary coolant system components of light water reactors (LWRs) including coolant piping, valve bodies, pump casings, and piping elbows. Many of these components are operated in complex and persistently damaging environments of elevated temperature, high pressure, corrosive environment, and sometimes radiation for long periods of time. Since a large number of CASS components are installed in every nuclear power plant and replacing such massive components is prohibitively expensive, any significant degradation in mechanical properties that affects structural integrity, cracking resistance in particular, of CASS components will raise a serious concern on the performance of entire power plant. The CASS materials for nuclear components are highly corrosion-resistant Fe-Cr-Ni alloys with 300 series stainless steel compositions and mostly austenite (γ)–ferrite (δ) duplex structures, which result from the casting processes consisting of alloy melting and pouring or injecting liquid metal into a static or spinning mold. Although the commonly used static and centrifugal casting processes enable the fabrication of massive components with proper resistance to environmental attacks, the alloying and microstructural conditions are not highly controllable in actual fabrication, especially in the casting processes of massive components. In the corrosion-resistant Fe-Cr-Ni alloy system, the minor phase (i.e., the δ-ferrite phase) is inevitably formed during the casting process, and is in a non-equilibrium state subject to detrimental changes during exposure to elevated temperature and/or radiation. In general, relatively few critical degradation modes are expected within the current design lifetime of 40 years, given that the CASS components have been processed properly. It has been well known, however, that both the thermal aging and the neutron irradiation can cause degradation of static

  16. Effect of bainite transformation and retained austenite on mechanical properties of austempered spheroidal graphite cast steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Toshio; Abe, Toshihiko; Tada, Shuji [Tohoku National Industrial Research Inst., Sendai (Japan). Materials Engineering Div.

    1996-06-01

    Austempered ductile iron (ADI) has excellent mechanical properties, but its Young`s modulus is low. Austempered spheroidal graphite cast steel (AGS) has been developed in order to obtain a new material with superior mechanical properties to ADI. Its carbon content (approximately 1.0 pct) is almost one-third that of a standard ADI; thus, the volume of graphite is also less. Young`s modulus of AGS is 195 to 200 GPa and is comparable to that of steel. Austempered spheroidal graphite cast steel has an approximately 200 MPa higher tensile strength than ADI and twice the Charpy absorbed energy of ADI. The impact properties and the elongation are enhanced with increasing volume fraction of carbon-enriched retained austenite. At the austempering temperature of 650 K, the volume fraction of austenite is approximately 40 pct for 120 minutes in the 2.4 pct Si alloy, although it decreases rapidly in the 1.4 pct Si alloy. The X-ray diffraction analysis shows that appropriate quantity of silicon retards the decomposition of the carbon-enriched retained austenite. For austempering at 570 K, the amount of the carbon-enriched austenite decreases and the ferrite is supersaturated with carbon, resulting in high tensile strength but low toughness.

  17. Detection of Non-metallic Inclusions in Steel Continuous Casting Billets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Ying; Wang, Yufeng; Li, Shusen; Zhang, Lifeng; Zuo, Xiangjun; Lekakh, Simon N.; Peaslee, Kent

    2014-08-01

    This work applied automated particle analysis to study non-metallic inclusions in steel. Compared with traditional methods, the approach has the advantage of capturing the morphology, measuring the size, recording the original positions, and identifying the composition of inclusions on a selected area in a short time. The morphology and composition of typical inclusions were analyzed using partial acid extraction and discussed through thermodynamic calculation. Steel samples were collected from the entire cross section of billets cast during times of steady state and ladle change. The spatial distribution of inclusions agreed well with the measurement of the total oxygen. The spatial distribution of inclusions was plotted to represent the entrapment positions of inclusions on the casting strand and their concentration on the cross section of the billet. Also, regarding the different size and type of inclusions, the spatial distribution of classified inclusions was explored such as the distribution of sulfide, oxide, and high sodium and potassium content inclusions. The sufficient information could be used to identify the source of inclusions and guide the steel refining process.

  18. Deducing material quality in cast and hot-forged steels by new bending test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valberg, Henry; Langøy, Morten; Nedreberg, Mette; Helvig, Torgeir

    2017-10-01

    A special bend test has been developed and applied for the purpose of characterization and comparison of the material ductility in crankpin steel discs manufactured by casting, or casting subsequently followed by hot open-die forging (ODF) or closed-die forging (CDF). The bending test specimen consists of a small rectangular plate of material with a round hole cut out in the middle. The "eye-shape" specimens were cut out from various positions either near to the surface of, or from the interior of the discs. The test method revealed differences in ductility for the investigated materials, and for different depth positions inside the discs. The roughening of the specimen surface on the top-side of the specimen bend also varied dependent on the processing method for the material. Current results show that this test method is useful for evaluation of material quality in differently processed material. Experimental bend test results are presented for differently processed variants of the same material, i.e., crankpin discs either made by solely casting or casting subsequently followed by hot working either by ODF or CDF.

  19. Kinetics modeling of delta-ferrite formation and retainment during casting of supermartensitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nießen, Frank; Tiedje, Niels Skat; Hald, John

    2017-01-01

    , equilibrium calculations and the Scheil model in Thermo-Calc, and validated by using microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy for chemical analysis on a cast ingot. The kinetics model showed that micro-segregation from solidification homogenizes within 2–3 s (70 °C) of cooling, and that retained δ......The kinetics model for multi-component diffusion DICTRA was applied to analyze the formation and retainment of δ-ferrite during solidification and cooling of GX4-CrNiMo-16-5-1 cast supermartensitic stainless steel. The obtained results were compared with results from the Schaeffler diagram......-ferrite originates from the incomplete transformation to austenite. The kinetics model predicted the measured amount of δ-ferrite and the partitioning of Cr and Ni reasonably well. Further, it showed that slower cooling for the investigated alloy leads to less retained δ-ferrite, which is in excellent agreement...

  20. Study of Distortion on the Example of the Rings from Ductile Iron and Cast Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasik K.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper attempts to analyze distortions of cast iron and cast steel rings, after heat treatment cycles. The factors influencing distortion are: chemical composition of material, sample geometry, manufacturing process, hardenability, temperature and heat treatment method. Standard distortion tests are performed on C-ring samples. We selected a ring-model, which approximate the actual part, so that findings apply to gear rings. Because distortion depends on so many variables, this study followed strictly defined procedures. The research was started by specifying the appropriate geometry of the samples. Then, the heat treatment was conducted and samples were measured again. The obtained results allow to determine the value of the resulting distortion and their admissibility. The research will be used to evaluate the possibility of using the material to produce parts of equipment operated under extreme load conditions.

  1. Influence of heat treatment on microstructure and properties of bainitic cast steel used for frogs in railway crossovers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Tasak

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with influence of heat treatment on microstructure and properties of sample cast assigned as a material used for frogs in railway crossover. Materials used in railway industry for frogs (manganese cast steel and forged pearlitic steel do not fulfil strict conditions of exploitation of railway. One of the solutions is using cast steel with bainitic or bainite-martensite microstructure, what allows to gain high resistance properties (Rm = 1400 MPa, Rp0,2 = 900 MPa, hardness to 400 HBW. The cooling rates of rail type UIC60 shows that it is possible to reach the bainitic microstructure in cast of frog. The microstructure of lower banite should have an advantageous influence on cracking resistance. In order to set the parameters of heat treatment, the critical temperatures were determined by dilatometric methods determined. This heat treatment consisted of normalizing that prepared it to the farther process of resistance welding. Moreover, the CCT diagram of proposed bainitic cast steel was prepared. The exams were done that can be used to evaluate the influence of heat treatment on microstructure and properties of the sample cast.

  2. Assessment of Crack Detection in Heavy-Walled Cast Stainless Steel Piping Welds Using Advanced Low-Frequency Ultrasonic Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Michael T.; Crawford, Susan L.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2007-03-01

    Studies conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington, have focused on assessing the effectiveness and reliability of novel approaches to nondestructive examination (NDE) for inspecting coarse-grained, cast stainless steel reactor components. The primary objective of this work is to provide information to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission on the effectiveness and reliability of advanced NDE methods as related to the inservice inspection of safety-related components in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). This report provides progress, recent developments, and results from an assessment of low frequency ultrasonic testing (UT) for detection of inside surface-breaking cracks in cast stainless steel reactor piping weldments as applied from the outside surface of the components. Vintage centrifugally cast stainless steel piping segments were examined to assess the capability of low-frequency UT to adequately penetrate challenging microstructures and determine acoustic propagation limitations or conditions that may interfere with reliable flaw detection. In addition, welded specimens containing mechanical and thermal fatigue cracks were examined. The specimens were fabricated using vintage centrifugally cast and statically cast stainless steel materials, which are typical of configurations installed in PWR primary coolant circuits. Ultrasonic studies on the vintage centrifugally cast stainless steel piping segments were conducted with a 400-kHz synthetic aperture focusing technique and phased array technology applied at 500 kHz, 750 kHz, and 1.0 MHz. Flaw detection and characterization on the welded specimens was performed with the phased array method operating at the frequencies stated above. This report documents the methodologies used and provides results from laboratory studies to assess baseline material noise, crack detection, and length-sizing capability for low-frequency UT in cast stainless steel piping.

  3. Induction Steel: Inclusion Content and Mechanical Properties of Reinforcing Bars Produced from Pencil Ingots and Continuously Cast Billets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, A.; Kurny, A. S. W.

    2012-04-01

    In Bangladesh, most of the reinforcing bars are produced by rolling steel produced by melting scrap in induction furnaces. In many plants the molten steel is directly cast in vertical moulds into what are usually called `pencil ingots'. In some plants the molten steel is tapped into large ladles, taken to continuous casting machines and cast into continuous billets. In some cases the molten steel is refined in ladles (purged with nitrogen or argon) before casting into continuous billets. This investigation aims at a comparison of the inclusion content and resultant mechanical properties of reinforcing bars produced through these different routes. The samples for this study were collected from the process streams of a steel plant. The inclusion content was determined by direct measurement of inclusions on metallographic specimens and the mechanical properties were determined by using a universal tensile testing machine. Reinforcing bars produced by rolling ladle refined continuously cast billets have the lowest content of inclusion and the best mechanical (yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, percentage elongation, etc.) properties. The highest inclusion content and the worst properties were obtained in the pencil ingots.

  4. Thermal Stress Cracking of Slide-Gate Plates in Steel Continuous Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyoung-Jun; Thomas, Brian G.; Kim, Seon-Hyo

    2016-04-01

    The slide-gate plates in a cassette assembly control the steel flow through the tundish nozzle, and may experience through-thickness cracks, caused by thermal expansion and/or mechanical constraint, leading to air aspiration and safety concerns. Different mechanisms for common and rare crack formation are investigated with the aid of a three-dimensional finite-element model of thermal mechanical behavior of the slide-gate plate assembly during bolt pretensioning, preheating, tundish filling, casting, and cooling stages. The model was validated with previous plant temperature measurements of a ladle plate during preheating and casting, and then applied to a typical tundish-nozzle slide-gate assembly. The formation mechanisms of different types of cracks in the slide-gate plates are investigated using the model and evaluated with actual slide-gate plates at POSCO. Common through-thickness radial cracks, found in every plate, are caused during casting by high tensile stress on the outside surfaces of the plates, due to internal thermal expansion. In the upper plate, these cracks may also arise during preheating or tundish filling. Excessive bolt tightening, combined with thermal expansion during casting may cause rare radial cracks in the upper and lower plates. Rare radial and transverse cracks in middle plate appear to be caused during tundish filling by impingement of molten steel on the middle of the middle plate that generates tensile stress in the surrounding refractory. The mechanical properties of the refractory, the bolt tightening conditions, and the cassette/plate design are all important to service life.

  5. Requirements on cast steel for the primary coolant circuit of water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most important requirements placed on the structural components of water cooled nuclear reactors include corrosion resistance and mechanical materials properties. Intercrystalline corrosion resistance was tested using the Strauss Test in compliance with the DIN 50914 Standard. Following sensitization between 600 to 700 degC with a dwell time between 15 minutes and 100 hours, a specimen homogeneously annealed with the casting and rapidly water cooled showed no intercrystalline corrosion. Specimens cooled from 1050 degC at a rate of 100 degC per hour showed no unambiguous tendency for intercrystalline corrosion after sensitization; in some cases, however, an initial attack of intercrystalline corrosion was found. It was found that austenitic Cr-Ni cast steel containing 2.5% Mo and about 15% ferrite showed the sensitive intercrystalline corrosion range at higher temperatures and longer dwell times than rolled Cr-Ni steels. In plating the ferritic cast steel with a corrosion resistant plating material, annealing temperature after welding must not exceed 600 to 620 degC otherwise the resistance of the plated layer against intercrystalline corrosion would not be safeguarded, and following annealing for stress removal at a temperature of 600 to 620 degC all requirements must be satisfied by the weld metal and weld transition placed on the initial material. Martensite materials are used for the manufacture of components which are not used under pressure, such as alloys with 13% Cr and 1% to 6% Ni and alloys with 17% Cr and 4% Ni. Carbon content is maintained below 0.10% to guarantee good weldability and the highest corrosion resistance. Cast steels with 13% Cr and 4% Ni after a dwell of 2500 hours in fully desalinated water without oxygen and with 3600 ppm of boron at a test temperature of 95 to 300 degC showed a surface reduction of 0.005 mm annually. In identical conditions except for the water containing oxygen the reduction in surface was 0.05 mm per year. (J.B.)

  6. A study of segregation mechanism in centrifugal cast high speed steel rolls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Hanguang; Xiao Qiang; Xing Jiandong

    2008-01-01

    Segregation influences the microstructure and performance of high speed steel (HSS) roll. The main reason why segregation occurs in centrifugal cast HSS roll is that atom clusters are formed in HSS melt and such atom clusters have different densities. The high-density atom clusters move to the outer periphery and the low-density atom clusters move to the inner periphery of the roll under centrifugal force. Changing the movement law of atom clusters in the centrifugal force field and increasing the solidification rate of HSS melt can lighten the segregation in HSS roll and improve its performance

  7. Adaptive fuzzy control design for the molten steel level in a strip casting process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. J. Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the adaptive fuzzy control problem of the molten steel level for a class of twin roll strip casting systems. Based on fuzzy logic systems (FLSs and the mean value theorem, a novel adaptive tracking controller with parameter updated laws is effectively designed. It is proved that all the closed-loop signals are uniformly bounded and the system tracking errors can asymptotically converge to zero by using the Lyapunov stability analysis. Simulation results of semi-experimental system dynamic model and parameters are provided to demonstrate the validity of the proposed adaptive fuzzy design approach.

  8. Industrialization of Ni-?SiC electrodeposition on copper moulds for steel continuous casting

    OpenAIRE

    Lekka, M.; Bonora, P.L.; Lanzutti, A.; Benoni, S.; Caoduro, P.; Fedrizzi, L.

    2013-01-01

    Copper moulds usually used for steel continuous casting suffer from severe wear at relatively high temperaturesand low friction loads. The more severe solid friction occurs at about 10-40cm distance from the meniscus, dependingon the process parameters, where the temperature is about 300-350°C. The copper moulds have been traditionallycoated with hard chromium and actually also with thick nickel deposits even if they present lower wear resistance.The aim of this work was the development of a ...

  9. Effect of deformation on microstructure and mechanical properties of dual phase steel produced via strip casting simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, Z.P.; Kostryzhev, A.G.; Stanford, N.E.; Pereloma, E.V.

    2016-01-01

    The strip casting is a recently appeared technology with a potential to significantly reduce energy consumption in steel production, compared to hot rolling and cold rolling. However, the quantitative dependences of the steel microstructure and mechanical properties on strip casting parameters are unknown and require investigation. In the present work we studied the effects of strain and interrupted cooling temperature on microstructure and mechanical properties in conventional dual phase steel (0.08C–0.81Si–1.47Mn–0.03Al wt%). The strip casting process was simulated using a Gleeble 3500 thermo-mechanical simulator. The steel microstructures were studied using optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Mechanical properties were measured using microhardness and tensile testing. Microstructures consisting of 40–80% polygonal ferrite with remaining martensite, bainite and very small amount of Widmanstätten ferrite were produced. Deformation to 0.17–0.46 strain at 1050 °C refined the prior austenite grain size via static recrystallisation, which led to the acceleration of ferrite formation and the ferrite grain refinement. The yield stress and ultimate tensile strength increased with a decrease in ferrite fraction, while the total elongation decreased. The improvement of mechanical properties via deformation was ascribed to dislocation strengthening and grain boundary strengthening. - Highlights: • A processing route of strip casting was developed to produce dual phase steel. • The mechanical properties were comparable to cold rolled and hot rolled DP steels.

  10. Effect of deformation on microstructure and mechanical properties of dual phase steel produced via strip casting simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Z.P., E-mail: zuileniwota@126.com [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Kostryzhev, A.G. [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Stanford, N.E. [Institute of Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria 3216 (Australia); Pereloma, E.V. [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Electron Microscopy Centre, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2519 (Australia)

    2016-01-10

    The strip casting is a recently appeared technology with a potential to significantly reduce energy consumption in steel production, compared to hot rolling and cold rolling. However, the quantitative dependences of the steel microstructure and mechanical properties on strip casting parameters are unknown and require investigation. In the present work we studied the effects of strain and interrupted cooling temperature on microstructure and mechanical properties in conventional dual phase steel (0.08C–0.81Si–1.47Mn–0.03Al wt%). The strip casting process was simulated using a Gleeble 3500 thermo-mechanical simulator. The steel microstructures were studied using optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Mechanical properties were measured using microhardness and tensile testing. Microstructures consisting of 40–80% polygonal ferrite with remaining martensite, bainite and very small amount of Widmanstätten ferrite were produced. Deformation to 0.17–0.46 strain at 1050 °C refined the prior austenite grain size via static recrystallisation, which led to the acceleration of ferrite formation and the ferrite grain refinement. The yield stress and ultimate tensile strength increased with a decrease in ferrite fraction, while the total elongation decreased. The improvement of mechanical properties via deformation was ascribed to dislocation strengthening and grain boundary strengthening. - Highlights: • A processing route of strip casting was developed to produce dual phase steel. • The mechanical properties were comparable to cold rolled and hot rolled DP steels.

  11. Modelling of phenomena in solid state for the steel casting cooled by liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kulawik

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a mathematical model of cooling process for steel castings is presented. Effect of convective motion of the coolant onmaterial structure after cooling process is investigated. Mathematical and numerical model based on Generalized Difference Method for axysimmertric elements is used. To solve the Navier-Stokes equation the characteristic based split scheme (CBS has been applied. The solution of the heat transport equation with the convective term has been obtained by a stabilized meshless method. To determine of the phase transformation the macroscopic model built on the basis of Time Temperature Transformation diagrams for continuous cooling of medium-carbon steel has been used. The temporary temperature fields, the phase transformation, thermal and structural strains for the cooled element and the fields of temperature and velocity for the coolant have been determined.

  12. Structure mechanical analysis of prestressed cast-steel pressure vessels with the finite-element-method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edalat, B.

    1981-08-01

    The analytical pressure analysis is performed for a vessel with solid bottom and top. The basis of the Finite-Element-Method (FEM) and the criteria for the choice of a suitable element type for use in the computer model was investigated. To investigate the exactness of the FE-program a comparison between the analytical solution and the pressure claculated by FEM at a cylindrical vessel was made. For pressure analyses at the test vessel built of steel sections four different computer models (after FEM) were developed. The pressure analysis of a prestressed cast-steel pressure vessel for the transport and for the storage of burnt HTR fuel elements is performed with the aid of computed models after FEM. The method of developing simple computer models for the prestressed pressure vessel with large dimension is explained with an example. (orig.) [de

  13. Properties of cast Ti-stabilised stainless steel after long-term ageing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrnsten, U.; Karjalainen-Roikonen, P.; Nenonen, P.; Ahlstrand, R.; Hietanen, O.; Timofeev, B.T.; Bloomin, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    Mechanical properties and microstructure are studied and compared for two kinds of specimens of cast Ti-stabilized stainless steel 08Kh18N10T used for manufacturing of valves and pumps in nuclear power plants. One set of specimens represents the main gate valve material after 106000 h (∼ 12 years) operation at 270 deg C. The comparison is made with reference specimens in as-fabricated state. The results of impact tests, hardness measurements and microscopic examination show that 12 year operation gives rise to the shift of ductile-brittle transition temperature to higher values (from - 68 deg C - 103 deg C). The microstructure of both materials is similar. The microhardness of δ-ferrite in the steel after long-term operation is slightly higher [ru

  14. Prevention of halfway cracks in continuous cast A36 steel slabs containing boron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-chao Ma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation of halfway cracks in continuous cast A36 steel slabs containing 17 ppm boron was studied by investigating the zero ductility temperature (ZDT, zero strength temperature (ZST, solidification characteristics, and strain distribution in the steels. Results show that the formation of halfway cracks in A36-B slab is attributed to the increase in both the internal crack susceptibility (ZDT and ZST of the steel and the external tensile strain at the solidification front. The ZST of both steels with (A36-B and without (A36 boron addition is nearly the same, but the ZDT of A36-B steel is found 50 篊 lower due to a considerable increase of boron content at the final stage of solidification. The decrease of ZDT enlarges the solidification cracking susceptibility zone and results in the A36-B steel being more prone to cracking. In addition, during the unbending segments, a large tensile strain, resulting from the unbending process and the misalignment deviation of supporting rolls, occurs in the upper part of the solidified shell, which is another reason causing halfway cracks in A36-B slab. By decreasing the P and S content to be less than 50 ppm and 150 ppm, respectively, controlling B content in the range of 10 to 15 ppm, increasing the secondary cooling specific water ratio from 0.76 to 0.85 L穔g-1, and restricting roll alignment deviation to less than plus or minus 0.3 mm, halfway cracks in the boron containing slab are almost eliminated.

  15. Optimization of Sigma Phase Precipitates with Respect to the Functional Properties of Duplex Cast Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Stradomski

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of examination concerning optimization of the σ phase precipitates with respect to the functional properties of ferritic-austenitic cast steel. The examined material comprised two grades of corrosion-resistant cast steel, namely GX2CrNiMoN25-6-3 and GX2CrNiMoCuN25-6-3-3, used for example in elements of systems of wet flue gas desulphurisation in power industry. The operating conditions in media heated up to 70°C and containing Cl- and SO4 ions and solid particles produce high erosive and corrosive wear. The work proposes an application of the σ phase as a component of precipitation strengthening mechanism in order to increase the functional properties of the material. Morphology and quantities of σ phase precipitates were determined, as well as its influence on the erosion and corrosion wear resistance. It was shown that annealing at 800°C or 900°C significantly improves tribological properties as compared with the supersaturated state, and the best erosion and corrosion wear resistance achieved due to the ferrite decomposition δ → γ’ + σ was exhibited in the case of annealing at the temperature of 800°C for 3 hours.

  16. Significance of dislocations in the mechanism of Hadfield cast steel strengthening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stradomski, Z.; Morgiel, J.; Olszewski, J.

    1999-01-01

    The paper presents the results of microstructural examination of the adfield cast steel (L120G13 according to Polish Standards) strengthened by explosion method, which is an attractive alternative of the surface treatment of metal materials regarding its technological, economical and organizational aspects. The presented results have been obtained by means of qualitative and quantitative analysis of thin foils taken at different distances from the material surface being strengthened by single, double or triple detonation of 3 mm thick charges of explosive. The high pressure, order of 18 GPa, causes significant changes in dislocation structure of the austenite matrix. The strengthening of Hadfield cast steel during explosion is based on the increase of the dislocation density by several times as related to the supersaturated state and on the creation of dislocation bands consisting of short, densely tangled dislocations. Plastic deformation mechanisms i. e., slip lines and micro-twins, are definitively of minor importance. It has been also proved by means of the nuclear resonance method that the explosion do not cause changes in distribution of carbon atoms in the nearest neighbourhood of Fe atoms and that austenite is not transformed into the α-martensite or the hexagonal ε-phase. (author)

  17. Influence of Thermal Aging on Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, T.; Totsuka, N.; Nakajima, N.; Arioka, K.; Negishi, K.

    2002-01-01

    In order to evaluate the SCC (stress corrosion cracking) susceptibility of cast duplex stainless steels which are used for the main coolant piping material of pressurized water reactors (PWRs), the slow strain rate test (SSRT) and the constant load test (CLT) were performed in simulated PWR primary water at 360 C. The main coolant piping materials contain ferrite phase with ranging from 8 to 23 % and its mechanical properties are affected by long time thermal aging. The 23% ferrite material was prepared for test as the maximum ferrite content of main coolant pipes in Japanese PWRs. The brittle fracture in the non-aged materials after SSRT is mainly caused by quasi-cleavage fracture in austenitic phase. On the other hand, a mixture of quasi-cleavage fracture in austenite and ferrite phases was observed on long time aged material. Also on CLT, (2 times σ y ), after 3,000 hours exposure, microcracks were observed on the surface of non-aged and aged for 10,000 hours at 400 C materials. The crack initiation site of CLT is similar to that of SSRT. The SCC susceptibility of the materials increases with aging time. It is suggested that the ferrite hardening with aging affect SCC susceptibility of cast duplex stainless steels. (authors)

  18. Fracture toughness in the transition region of a carbon steel and a ferritic nodular cast iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Keishi; Yasunaka, Takashi

    1995-01-01

    In order to characterize the fracture toughness in the ductile-brittle transition region for thick-walled cylinders of ASME SA350 Gr.LF5 carbon steel and JIS FCD300LT ferritic nodular cast iron, elastic-plastic fracture toughness tests were carried out. The specimens were fatigue precracked compact tension (CT) specimens of 25mm in thickness. The tensile testing machines used were Instron type, electrohydraulic type and drop-weight type ones. In the static fracture toughness test on a FCD300LT cast iron, CT specimens were often fractured at somewhat higher loads after the initiation of pop-in cracks. Although the scatter of pop-in fracture toughness was small, the values of critical J-integral at the unstable brittle fracture scattered largely. In the transition region of SA350 steel, the initiation of pop-in crack was not observed, and fracture toughness scattered largely. At the propagation of the unstable crack near the transition temperature, the Weibull distribution provides good fits for the critical CTOD and the critical J-integral. This distribution can be mainly interpreted by the scatter of the distance between the precrack tip and the origin of unstable brittle fracture. (author)

  19. Effect of residual Al content on microstructure and mechanical properties of Grade B+Steel for castings for locomotives

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Kaifeng; Guo Erjun; Cao Guojian

    2013-01-01

    The bogie made of Grade B+ steel is one of the most important parts of heavy haul trains. Some accidents were found to be the result of fracture failure of the bogies. It is very important to find the reason why the fracture failure occurred. Because Al was added for the final deoxidation during the smelting process of the Grade B+Steel, residual Al existed to some extent in the castings. High residual Al content in the bogie casting was presumed to be the reason for the fracture. In this wor...

  20. Improvement in the DTVG detection method as applied to cast austeno-ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francois, D.

    1996-05-01

    Initially, the so-called DTVG method was developed to improve detection and (lengthwise) dimensioning of cracks in austenitic steel assembly welds. The results obtained during the study and the structural similarity between austenitic and austeno-ferritic steels led us to carry out research into adapting the method on a sample the material of which is representative of the cast steels used in PWR primary circuit bends. The method was first adapted for use on thick-wall cast austeno-ferritic steel structures and was validated for zero ultrasonic beam incidence and for a flat sample with machine-finished reflectors. A second study was carried out notably to allow for non-zero ultrasonic beam incidence and to look at the method's validity when applied to a non-flat geometry. There were three principal goals to the research; adapting the process to take into account the special case of oblique ultrasonic beam incidence (B image handling), examining the effect of non-flat geometry on the detection method, and evaluating the performance of the method on actual defects (shrinkage cavities). We began by focusing on solving the problem of oblique incidence. Having decided on automatic refracted angle determination, the problem could only be solves by locking the algorithm on a representative image of the suspect material comprising an indicator. We then used a simple geometric model to quantify the deformation of the indicators on a B-scan image due to a non-flat translator/part interface. Finally, tests were carried out on measurements acquired from flat samples containing artificial and real defects so that the overall performance of the method after development could be assessed. This work has allowed the DTVG detection method to be adapted for use with B-scan images acquired with a non-zero ultrasonic beam incidence angle. Moreover, we have been able to show that for similar geometries to those of the cast bends and for deep defects the deformation of the indicators due

  1. Effect of Ultrasonic Treatment on the Solidification Microstructure of Die-Cast 35CrMo Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gen Liang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The effects of ultrasonic treatment (UST on the solidification microstructure of a 35CrMo steel cast ingot were investigated. To avoid the erosion of a high-temperature melt, a T-shaped ultrasonic waveguide unit was used to introduce ultrasonic vibrations into a 35CrMo steel die casting melt. The experimental results show that the microstructure of the ingot was refined by ultrasonic treatment. While the microstructure of untreated 35CrMo steel is coarse dendritic grains, after the introduction of ultrasonic treatment, the solidification microstructure transforms from coarse dendritic to equiaxed grains, and the dendrites are also refined. Samples from different positions of the ingots were subjected to different ultrasonic effects, and the effects on grain refinement also varied due to the severe attenuation of the ultrasound in the melt. The mechanisms of grain refinement using ultrasonic treatment for 35CrMo steel melt are presented.

  2. Development of Stronger and More Reliable Cast Austenitic Stainless Steels (H-Series) Based on Scientific and Design Methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pankiw, Roman I; Muralidharan, G. (Murali); Sikka, Vinod K.

    2006-06-30

    The goal of this project was to increase the high-temperature strength of the H-Series of cast austenitic stainless steels by 50% and the upper use temperature by 86 to 140 degrees fahrenheit (30 to 60 degrees celsius). Meeting this goal is expected to result in energy savings of 35 trillion Btu/year by 2020 and energy cost savings of approximately $230 million/year. The higher-strength H-Series cast stainless steels (HK and HP type) have applications for the production of ethylene in the chemical industry, for radiant burner tubes and transfer rolls for secondary processing of steel in the steel industry, and for many applications in the heat treating industry, including radiant burner tubes. The project was led by Duraloy Technologies, Inc., with research participation by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and industrial participation by a diverse group of companies.

  3. Engineering study for a melting, casting, rolling and fabrication facility for recycled contaminated stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-01-01

    This Preliminary Report is prepared to study the facilities required for recycling contaminated stainless steel scrap into plate which will be fabricated into boxes suitable for the storage of contaminated wastes and rubble. The study is based upon the underlying premise that the most cost effective way to produce stainless steel is to use the same processes employed by companies now in production of high quality stainless steel. Therefore, the method selected for this study for the production of stainless steel plate from scrap is conventional process using an Electric Arc Furnace for meltdown to hot metal, a Continuous Caster for production of cast slabs, and a Reversing Hot Mill for rolling the slabs into plate. The fabrication of boxes from the plate utilizes standard Shears, Punch Presses and welding equipment with Robotic Manipulators. This Study presumes that all process fumes, building dusts and vapors will be cycled through a baghouse and a nuclear grade HEPA filter facility prior to discharge. Also, all process waste water will be evaporated into the hot flue gas stream from the furnace utilizing a quench tank; so there will be no liquid discharges from the facility and all vapors will be processed through a HEPA filter. Even though HEPA filters are used today in controlling radioactive contamination from nuclear facilities there is a sparsity of data concerning radioactivity levels and composition of waste that may be collected from contaminated scrap steel processing. This report suggests some solutions to these problems but it is recommended that additional study must be given to these environmental problems.

  4. Engineering study for a melting, casting, rolling and fabrication facility for recycled contaminated stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This Preliminary Report is prepared to study the facilities required for recycling contaminated stainless steel scrap into plate which will be fabricated into boxes suitable for the storage of contaminated wastes and rubble. The study is based upon the underlying premise that the most cost effective way to produce stainless steel is to use the same processes employed by companies now in production of high quality stainless steel. Therefore, the method selected for this study for the production of stainless steel plate from scrap is conventional process using an Electric Arc Furnace for meltdown to hot metal, a Continuous Caster for production of cast slabs, and a Reversing Hot Mill for rolling the slabs into plate. The fabrication of boxes from the plate utilizes standard Shears, Punch Presses and welding equipment with Robotic Manipulators. This Study presumes that all process fumes, building dusts and vapors will be cycled through a baghouse and a nuclear grade HEPA filter facility prior to discharge. Also, all process waste water will be evaporated into the hot flue gas stream from the furnace utilizing a quench tank; so there will be no liquid discharges from the facility and all vapors will be processed through a HEPA filter. Even though HEPA filters are used today in controlling radioactive contamination from nuclear facilities there is a sparsity of data concerning radioactivity levels and composition of waste that may be collected from contaminated scrap steel processing. This report suggests some solutions to these problems but it is recommended that additional study must be given to these environmental problems

  5. [Mineral migration from stainless steel, cast iron and soapstone (steatite) Brazilian pans to food preparations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintaes, Késia Diego; Farfan, Jaime Amaya; Tomazini, Fernanda Mariana; Morgano, Marcelo Antônio

    2006-09-01

    Culinary utensils may release some inorganic elements during food preparation. Mineral migration can be beneficial for as long as it occurs in amounts adequate to the needs of the consumer or no toxicological implications are involved. In this study, the migrations of Fe, Mg, Mn, Cr, Ni and Ca, along seven cooking cycles were evaluated for two food preparations (polished rice and commercial tomato sauce, the latter as an acid food), performed in unused stainless steel, cast iron and soapstone pans, taking refractory glass as a blank. Minerals were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES). The utensils studied exhibited different rates, patterns and variability of migration depending on the type of food. Regression analysis of the data revealed that, as a function of the number of cycles, the iron pans released increasing amounts of iron when tomato sauce was cooked (y = 70.76x + 276.75; R2 = 0.77). The soapstone pans released calcium (35 and 26 mg/kg), magnesium (25 and 15 mg/kg) into the tomato sauce and rice preparations, respectively. Additionally, the commercial tomato sauce drew manganese (3.9 and 0.6 mg/kg) and some undesirable nickel (1.0 mg/kg) from the soapstone material, whereas the stainless steel pans released nickel at a lower rate than steatite and in a diminishing fashion with the number o cooking cycles, while still transferring some iron and chromium to the food. We conclude that while cast iron and glass could be best for the consumer's nutritional health, stainless steel and steatite can be used with relatively low risk, provided acid foods are not routinely prepared in those materials.

  6. Simulation of transient fluid flow in mold region during steel continuous casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, R; Thomas, B G; Sengupta, J

    2012-01-01

    A system of models has been developed to study transient flow during continuous casting and applied to simulate an event of multiple stopper-rod movements. It includes four sub-models to incorporate different aspects in this transient event. A three-dimensional (3-D) porous-flow model of the nozzle wall calculates the rate argon gas flow into the liquid steel, and the initial mean bubble size is estimated. Transient CFD models simulate multiphase flow of steel and gas bubbles in the Submerged Entry Nozzle (SEN) and mold and have been validated with experimental data from both nail dipping and Sub-meniscus Velocity Control (SVC) measurements. To obtain the transient inlet boundary conditions for the simulation, two semi-empirical models, a stopper-rod-position based model and a metal-level-based model, predict the liquid steel flow rate through the SEN based on recorded plant data. Finally the model system was applied to study the effects of stopper rod movements on SEN/mold flow patterns. Meniscus level fluctuations were calculated using a simple pressure method and compared well with plant measurements. Insights were gained from the simulation results to explain the cause of meniscus level fluctuations and the formation of sliver defects during stopper rod movements.

  7. The thermal fatigue resistance of H-13 Die Steel for aluminum die casting dies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    The effects of welding, five selected surface coatings, and stress relieving on the thermal fatigue resistance of H-13 Die Steel for aluminum die casting dies were studied using eleven thermal fatigue specimens. Stress relieving was conducted after each 5,000 cycle interval at 1050 F for three hours. Four thermal fatigue specimens were welded with H-13 or maraging steel welding rods at ambient and elevated temperatures and subsequently, subjected to different post-weld heat treatments. Crack patterns were examined at 5,000, 10,000, and 15,000 cycles. The thermal fatigue resistance is expressed by two crack parameters which are the average maximum crack and the average cracked area. The results indicate that a significant improvement in thermal fatigue resistance over the control was obtained from the stress-relieving treatment. Small improvements were obtained from the H-13 welded specimens and from a salt bath nitrogen and carbon-surface treatment. The other surface treatments and welded specimens either did not affect or had a detrimental influence on the thermal fatigue properties of the H-13 die steel.

  8. Anti-carburizing Coating for Resin Sand Casting of Low Carbon Steel Based on Composite Silicate Powder Containing Zirconium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan Chunyi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studied the structure and properties of anticarburizing coating based on composite silicate powder containing zirconium by X-ray diffraction analyzer, thermal expansion tester, digital microscope and other equipment. It is introduced that the application example of the coating in the resin-sand casting of ZG1Cr18Ni9Ti stainless steel impeller. The anti-carburizing effect of the coating on the surface layer of the cast is studied by using direct reading spectrometer and spectrum analyzer. The change of the micro-structure of the coating after casting and cooling is observed by scanning electron microscope. The analysis of anti-carburizing mechanism of the coating is presented. The results indicate that the coating possesses excellent suspension property, brush ability, permeability, levelling property and crackresistance. The coating exhibits high strength and low gas evolution. Most of the coating could be automatically stripped off flakily when the casting was shaken out. The casting possesses excellent surface finish and antimetal penetration effect. The carburizing layer thickness of the stainless steel impeller casting with respect to allowable upper limit of carbon content is about 1mm and maximum carburizing rate is 23.6%. The anticarburizing effect of casting surface is greatly improved than that of zircon powder coating whose maximum carburizing rate is 67.9% and the carburizing layer thickness with respect to allowable upper limit of carbon content is greater than 2mm. The composite silicate powder containing zirconium coating substantially reduces the zircon powder which is expensive and radioactive and mainly dependent on imports. The coating can be used instead of pure zircon powder coating to effectively prevent metal-penetration and carburizing of resin-sand-casting surface of low carbon steel, significantly improve the foundry production environment and reduce the production costs.

  9. Final Report, Volume 2, The Development of Qualification Standards for Cast Duplex Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Steven, W.; Lundin, Carl, D.

    2005-09-30

    The scope of testing cast Duplex Stainless Steel (DSS) required testing to several ASTM specifications, while formulating and conducting industry round robin tests to verify and study the reproducibility of the results. ASTM E562 (Standard Test Method for Determining Volume Fraction by Systematic manual Point Count) and ASTM A923 (Standard Test Methods for Detecting Detrimental Intermetallic Phase in Wrought Duplex Austenitic/Ferritic Stainless Steels) were the specifications utilized in conducting this work. An ASTM E562 industry round robin, ASTM A923 applicability study, ASTM A923 industry round robin, and an ASTM A923 study of the effectiveness of existing foundry solution annealing procedures for producing cast DSS without intermetallic phases were implemented. In the ASTM E562 study, 5 samples were extracted from various cast austenitic and DSS in order to have varying amounts of ferrite. Each sample was metallographically prepared by UT and sent to each of 8 participants for volume fraction of ferrite measurements. Volume fraction of ferrite was measured using manual point count per ASTM E562. FN was measured from the Feritescope{reg_sign} and converted to volume fraction of ferrite. Results indicate that ASTM E562 is applicable to DSS and the results have excellent lab-to-lab reproducibility. Also, volume fraction of ferrite conversions from the FN measured by the Feritescope{reg_sign} were similar to volume fraction of ferrite measured per ASTM E562. In the ASTM A923 applicability to cast DSS study, 8 different heat treatments were performed on 3 lots of ASTM A890-4A (CD3MN) castings and 1 lot of 2205 wrought DSS. The heat treatments were selected to produce a wide range of cooling rates and hold times in order to study the suitability of ASTM A923 to the response of varying amounts on intermetallic phases [117]. The test parameters were identical to those used to develop ASTM A923 for wrought DSS. Charpy V-notch impact samples were extracted from the

  10. Final Report, Volume 2, The Development of Qualification Standards for Cast Duplex Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Steven, W.; Lundin, Carl, W.

    2005-09-30

    The scope of testing cast Duplex Stainless Steel (DSS) required testing to several ASTM specifications, while formulating and conducting industry round robin tests to verify and study the reproducibility of the results. ASTM E562 (Standard Test Method for Determining Volume Fraction by Systematic manual Point Count) and ASTM A923 (Standard Test Methods for Detecting Detrimental Intermetallic Phase in Wrought Duplex Austenitic/Ferritic Stainless Steels) were the specifications utilized in conducting this work. An ASTM E562 industry round robin, ASTM A923 applicability study, ASTM A923 industry round robin, and an ASTM A923 study of the effectiveness of existing foundry solution annealing procedures for producing cast DSS without intermetallic phases were implemented. In the ASTM E562 study, 5 samples were extracted from various cast austenitic and DSS in order to have varying amounts of ferrite. Each sample was metallographically prepared by UT and sent to each of 8 participants for volume fraction of ferrite measurements. Volume fraction of ferrite was measured using manual point count per ASTM E562. FN was measured from the Feritescope® and converted to volume fraction of ferrite. Results indicate that ASTM E562 is applicable to DSS and the results have excellent lab-to-lab reproducibility. Also, volume fraction of ferrite conversions from the FN measured by the Feritescope® were similar to volume fraction of ferrite measured per ASTM E562. In the ASTM A923 applicability to cast DSS study, 8 different heat treatments were performed on 3 lots of ASTM A890-4A (CD3MN) castings and 1 lot of 2205 wrought DSS. The heat treatments were selected to produce a wide range of cooling rates and hold times in order to study the suitability of ASTM A923 to the response of varying amounts on intermetallic phases [117]. The test parameters were identical to those used to develop ASTM A923 for wrought DSS. Charpy V-notch impact samples were extracted from the castings and wrought

  11. Precipitation of carbides in Cr – Mo – V cast steel after service and regenerative heat treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Golański

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of research on precipitation processes in chromium – molybdenum – vanadium cast steel. Theexamined material was the following cast steel grade: L21HMF and G17CrMoV5 – 10 (L17HMF after long-term operation at elevatedtemperatures and after regenerative heat treatment. Identification of precipitates was performed by means of the transmission electronmicroscope using carbon extraction replicas and thin foils. On the basis of identifications it has been proved that in the structure ofinvestigated cast steel grades, degraded by long-term operation, there are a few sorts of carbides with diverse stability, such as: M3C; M2C, M23C6, MC, M7C3. Moreover, the occurrence of compound complexes of precipitates – the so called “H-carbides” – has been revealed. Heat treatment of the examined cast steels contributed to changes in morphology and precipitation type. Whilst in the bainitic structure, obtained through heat treatment, only the occurrence of carbide types, such as: M3C; M23C6 and MC has been noticed.

  12. Properties of ABNT 41xx and 86xx cast steel modified with niobium; evaluation methodology and experimental preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzczynski, E.F.; Chatterjee, S.; Mueller, Arno

    1982-01-01

    The experimental methodology to evaluate the mechanical properties of ABNT 41xx and 86xx steels modified with NB in the as cast and heat treated conditions and the first preliminary results obtained in a laboratory scale, are presented. (Author) [pt

  13. Effect of inclusions on mechanical properties of Nb stabilized austenitic stainless steels (316Nb) with centrifugal and sand casting techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türker, Mehmet; Çapan, Levon Josef

    2018-01-01

    In this study, 316Nb stabilized austenitic stainless steel pieces were produced via sand and centrifugal casting method in order to be investigated. Heat treatments were done in two stages, and cooling was made in various quenching mediums. As-cast parts and the parts with only the highest and the lowest tensile strength were investigated. Metallographical analyses were made and the content of non-metallic inclusions was examined. Various types of carbides in microstructures were determined by means of SEM-EDX analysis. The sand casting samples had more non-metallic inclusions than the centrifugal casting ones. After the tensile tests, it was seen that these inclusions had significant effect on the mechanical properties. The tensile strength, the yield strength, the elongation and the hardness values of the centrifugal casting samples were higher than the sand casting ones. Investigating the SEM-EDX analyses, it was determined that the sand cast samples had chromium carbides in small quantities, in addition to niobium carbides. Centrifugal cast parts had niobium carbides.

  14. Thermal Aging Performance of Domestic Cast Austenitic Stainless Steels in Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chengliang, Li; Xiaoyun, Deng; Zhiying, Yin; Yuangang, Duan

    The domestic cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS) used for PWR main coolant lines face thermal aging phenomenon during long-term service at reactor operating temperatures in the range of 280-320°C. The accelerated thermal aging experiment of CASS at an elevated temperature of 400°C was carried out. The decrease regularity of absorbed energy of CASS at room temperature was obtained by Charpy impact test, and the variation trend of impacted specimen's fracture surfaces of CASS at different aging time was observed by scanning electron microscope. The experimental results show that: after 15,000 hours of accelerated thermal aging, the domestic CASS gradually reaches a thermal aging saturation, and its absorbed energy suffers a dramatic loss, dropping to almost 41-45% of the initial value, but still meets the assessment indicators for unaged state required by design specifications.

  15. Ultrasonic interactions with CCSS [Centrifugally Cast Stainless Steel] and guidelines for CCSS inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, J.L.; Ngok, T.D.K.; Tverdokhlebov, A.; Balasubramaniam, K.; Huang, Yimei

    1990-01-01

    The project described in this paper is a follow-up of last year's work, Software Simulation of Ultrasonic Interactions with Centrifugally Cast Stainless Steel (CCSS) and Guidelines for CCSS Inspection. Piping components made of CCSS exhibit enhanced corrosion resistance and are therefore widely used in the nuclear industry. However, the polycrystalline microstructure of CCSS forms a pattern with a unidirectional orientation of preference that makes the material distinctively anisotropic. It is now well recognized and acknowledged that anisotropic materials pose essential difficulties for traditional ultrasonic NDE techniques in terms of detection, location, sizing, and classification of defects. This report presents the computational results of the two computer programs developed as a principal fulfillment of the project

  16. The strength evaluation and σ-phase aging behavior of cast stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Jae Do; Park, Joong Cheul; Lee, Woo Ho; Jang, Sun Sik

    1999-01-01

    σ-phase of cast stainless steel(CF8M) was artificially precipitated by means of thermal aging at 700 deg C with various holding time (0.33, 5, 15, 50 and 150 hrs) to evaluate the behavior of thermal aging status of strength change. The structure observation, hardness test, tensile test, impact test and fatigue crack growth rates test for as-received and degraded material were also performed to evaluate static strength, toughness and fatigue crack growth behavior corresponding to the aging condition of CF8M. The results showed that the area fraction of σ-phase and hardness value increased with thermal aging time. But, for the impact values, upper shelf energy decreased and fatigue crack growth rates increased with σ-phase aging progressed than that of virgin material

  17. Interlocking multi-material components made of structured steel sheets and high-pressure die cast aluminium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senge, S.; Brachmann, J.; Hirt, G.; Bührig-Polaczek, A.

    2017-10-01

    Lightweight design is a major driving force of innovation, especially in the automotive industry. Using hybrid components made of two or more different materials is one approach to reduce the vehicles weight and decrease fuel consumption. As a possible way to increase the stiffness of multi-material components, this paper presents a process chain to produce such components made of steel sheets and high-pressure die cast aluminium. Prior to the casting sequence the steel sheets are structured in a modified rolling process which enables continuous interlocking with the aluminium. Two structures manufactured by this rolling process are tested. The first one is a channel like structure and the second one is a channel like structure with undercuts. These undercuts enable the formation of small anchors when the molten aluminium fills them. The correlation between thickness reduction during rolling and the shape of the resulting structure was evaluated for both structures. It can be stated that channels with a depth of up to 0.5 mm and a width of 1 mm could be created. Undercuts with different size depending on the thickness reduction could be realised. Subsequent aluminium high-pressure die casting experiments were performed to determine if the surface structure can be filled gap-free with molten aluminium during the casting sequence and if a gap-free connection can be achieved after contraction of the aluminium. The casting experiments showed that both structures could be filled during the high-pressure die casting. The channel like structure results in a gap between steel and aluminium after contraction of the cast metal whereas the structure with undercuts leads to a good interlocking resulting in a gap-free connection.

  18. Numerical simulation of flow and heat transfer of continous cast steel slab under traveling magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gong Haijun

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A unified numerical model for simulating solidification transport phenomena (STP of steel slab in electromagnetic continuous casting (EMCC process was developed. In order to solve the multi-physics fields coupled problem conveniently, the complicated bidirectional coupled process between EM and STP was simplified as a unidirectional one, and a FEM/FVM-combined numerical simulation technique was adopted. The traveling magnetic fields (TMFs applied to the EMCC process were calculated using the ANSYS11.0 software, and then the EM-data output by ANSYS were converted to FVM-format using a data-format conversion program developed previously. Thereafter, the governing equations were solved using a pressure-based Direct-SIMPLE algorithm. The simulation results of the STP in CC-process show that, due to the influences of Lorentz force and Joule heat, the two strong circulating flows and the temperature field can be obviously damped and changed once TMF with one pair of poles (1-POPs or 2-POPs is applied, which would accordingly improve the quality of casting. It was found in the present research that the integrated actions of 2-POPs TMF are superior to 1-POPs. All the computations indicate that the present numerical model of EM-STP as well as the FEM/FVM-combined technique is successful.

  19. Microstructure of Al-Si Slurry Coatings on Austenitic High-Temperature Creep Resisting Cast Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka E. Kochmańska

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of microstructural examinations on slurry aluminide coatings using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray microanalysis, and X-ray diffraction. Aluminide coatings were produced in air atmosphere on austenitic high-temperature creep resisting cast steel. The function of aluminide coatings is the protection of the equipment components against the high-temperature corrosion in a carburising atmosphere under thermal shock conditions. The obtained coatings had a multilayered structure composed of intermetallic compounds. The composition of newly developed slurry was powders of aluminium and silicon; NaCl, KCl, and NaF halide salts; and a water solution of a soluble glass as an inorganic binder. The application of the inorganic binder in the slurry allowed to produce the coatings in one single step without additional annealing at an intermediate temperature as it is when applied organic binder. The coatings were formed on both: the ground surface and on the raw cast surface. The main technological parameters were temperature (732–1068°C and time of annealing (3.3–11.7 h and the Al/Si ratio (4–14 in the slurry. The rotatable design was used to evaluate the effect of the production parameters on the coatings thickness. The correlation between the technological parameters and the coating structure was determined.

  20. Mechanical Properties and Corrosion-Abrasion Wear Behavior of Low-Alloy MnSiCrB Cast Steels Containing Cu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Kaishuang; Bai, Bingzhe

    2011-01-01

    Two medium carbon low-alloy MnSiCrB cast steels containing different Cu contents (0.01 wt pct and 0.62 wt pct) were designed, and the effect of Cu on the mechanical properties and corrosion-abrasion wear behavior of the cast steels was studied. The results showed that the low-alloy MnSiCrB cast steels obtained excellent hardenability by a cheap alloying scheme. The microstructure of the MnSiCrB cast steels after water quenching from 1123 K (850 °C) consists of lath martensite and retained austenite. After tempering at 503 K (230 °C), carbides precipitated, and the hardness of the cast steels reached 51 to 52 HRC. The addition of Cu was detrimental to the ductility and impact toughness but was beneficial to the wear resistance in a corrosion-abrasion wear test. The MnSiCrB cast steel with Cu by the simple alloying scheme and heat treatment has the advantages of being high performance, low cost, and environmentally friendly. It is a potential, advanced wear-resistant cast steel for corrosion-abrasion wear conditions.

  1. Microstructure, texture and precipitate of grain-oriented 4.5 wt% Si steel by strip casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Xiang; Xu, Yun-bo; Fang, Feng; Zhang, Yuan-xiang; Wang, Yang; Jiao, Hai-tao; Cao, Guang-ming; Li, Cheng-gang; Yuan, Guo; Wang, Guo-dong

    2016-01-01

    A 0.23 mm grain-oriented 4.5 wt% Si steel sheet was prepared by strip casting, hot rolling, one-stage warm rolling, primary annealing and secondary annealing. A detailed study of microstructure, texture and precipitate was carried out by methods of OM, EBSD, XRD and TEM. It was found that the as-cast strip exhibited equaxied microstructure with random orientation, enabling the fine and homogeneous primary microstructure to be obtained after one-stage warm rolling. After hot rolling, weak Goss texture was observed, which could not act as Goss seed. In contrast, the Goss seed was found to originate within the shear bands in {111}〈112〉 grains during warm rolling. Another finding was that the precipitates was suppressed during strip casting due to the rapid solidification and subsequent cooling rate, and mainly precipitated during hot rolling. After secondary annealing, abnormal Goss grains evolved sufficiently, and showed prominent properties. The B 8 was 1.73 T, which was similar to 1.85 T for grain-oriented 3.0 wt% Si steel, and the core losses were low than the grain-oriented 3.0 wt% Si steel and non-oriented high silicon steel. - Highlights: • Grain-oriented 4.5wt% Si steel was successfully prepared by strip casting. • Goss seeds was originated during the warm rolling instead of hot rolling. • Finely distributed precipitates was obtained by strip casing and hot rolling. • Prominent magnetic properties were shown in comparison with 3.0wt% Si steel.

  2. Microstructure, texture and precipitate of grain-oriented 4.5 wt% Si steel by strip casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xiang, E-mail: lx_neu@126.com; Xu, Yun-bo; Fang, Feng; Zhang, Yuan-xiang; Wang, Yang; Jiao, Hai-tao; Cao, Guang-ming; Li, Cheng-gang; Yuan, Guo; Wang, Guo-dong

    2016-04-15

    A 0.23 mm grain-oriented 4.5 wt% Si steel sheet was prepared by strip casting, hot rolling, one-stage warm rolling, primary annealing and secondary annealing. A detailed study of microstructure, texture and precipitate was carried out by methods of OM, EBSD, XRD and TEM. It was found that the as-cast strip exhibited equaxied microstructure with random orientation, enabling the fine and homogeneous primary microstructure to be obtained after one-stage warm rolling. After hot rolling, weak Goss texture was observed, which could not act as Goss seed. In contrast, the Goss seed was found to originate within the shear bands in {111}〈112〉 grains during warm rolling. Another finding was that the precipitates was suppressed during strip casting due to the rapid solidification and subsequent cooling rate, and mainly precipitated during hot rolling. After secondary annealing, abnormal Goss grains evolved sufficiently, and showed prominent properties. The B{sub 8} was 1.73 T, which was similar to 1.85 T for grain-oriented 3.0 wt% Si steel, and the core losses were low than the grain-oriented 3.0 wt% Si steel and non-oriented high silicon steel. - Highlights: • Grain-oriented 4.5wt% Si steel was successfully prepared by strip casting. • Goss seeds was originated during the warm rolling instead of hot rolling. • Finely distributed precipitates was obtained by strip casing and hot rolling. • Prominent magnetic properties were shown in comparison with 3.0wt% Si steel.

  3. Finite volume modeling of the solidification of an axial steel cast impeller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Copur

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the foundry industry, obtaining the solidification contours in cast geometries are extremely important to know the last location(s to solidify in order to define the correct feeding path and the number of risers. This paper presents three-dimensional simulation of transient conduction heat transfer within an axial impeller, made of AISI 1016 steel, poured and solidified in chemically bonded mold and core medium, by using FVM technique and ANSYS CFX. Specific heat, density and thermal conductivity of AISI 1016 steel, mold and Core materials are considered as functions of temperatures. In this transient thermal analysis, the convection heat transfer phenomenon is also considered at the outer surfaces of the mold. In order to shorten the run-time, the nonlinear transient analysis has been made for 600/3600 segment of the impeller, core and mold. The solidification contours of the impeller as well as isothermal lines in core and mold have been obtained in 3-D. The cooling curves of diff erent points are also shown in the result section.

  4. Fine scale microstructure in cast and aged duplex stainless steels investigated by small angle neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epperson, J.E.; Lin, J.S.; Spooner, S.

    1986-02-01

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) allows clustering phenomena to be studied in systems for which the constituent atoms do not differ greatly in atomic number. This investigation used SANS to characterize the fine scale microstructure in two cast and aged duplex stainless steels; aging times extended up to eight years. The steels differed in ferrite content by about a factor of two. The scattering at lowest q was dominated by magnetic scattering effects associated with the ferrite phase. In the range 0.025 less than or equal to q less than or equal to 0.2A -1 , additional scattering due to a precipitating phase rich in Ni and Si was observed. This scattering was rather intense and revealed a volume fraction of precipitate, in the ferrite, estimated to be 12 to 18% after long time aging. After about 70,000 hours at 400 0 C, there were about 10 18 precipitate particles per cm 3 some 50A in mean diameter, and they were distributed in a nonrandom manner, i.e., spatially, short-range-ordered. This investigation suggests that after aging some 70,000 hours at 400 0 C, the precipitate in the ferrite phase is undergoing Ostwald ripening. The present data are insufficient to indicate at what time this ripening process began

  5. Optimization of steel casting feeding system based on BP neural network and genetic algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-dan Gong

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The trial-and-error method is widely used for the current optimization of the steel casting feeding system, which is highly random, subjective and thus inefficient. In the present work, both the theoretical and the experimental research on the modeling and optimization methods of the process are studied. An approximate alternative model is established based on the Back Propagation (BP neural network and experimental design. The process parameters of the feeding system are taken as the input, the volumes of shrinkage cavities and porosities calculated by simulation are simultaneously taken as the output. Thus, a mathematical model is established by the BP neural network to combine the input variables with the output response. Then, this model is optimized by the nonlinear optimization function of the genetic algorithm. Finally, a feeding system optimization of a steel traveling wheel is conducted. No shrinkage cavities and porosities are induced through the optimization. Compared to the initial design scheme, the process yield is increased by 4.1% and the volume of the riser is decreased by 5.48×106 mm3.

  6. Microstructural characteristics and corrosion behavior of a super duplex stainless steel casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Marcelo; Casteletti, Luiz Carlos

    2009-01-01

    The machining of super duplex stainless steel castings is usually complicated by the difficulty involved in maintaining the dimensional tolerances required for given applications. Internal stresses originating from the solidification process and from subsequent heat treatments reach levels that exceed the material's yield strength, promoting plastic strain. Stress relief heat treatments at 520 deg. C for 2 h are an interesting option to solve this problem, but because these materials present a thermodynamically metastable condition, a few precautions should be taken. The main objective of this work was to demonstrate that, after solution annealing at 1130 deg. C and water quenching, stress relief at 520 deg. C for 2 h did not alter the duplex microstructure or impair the pitting corrosion resistance of ASTM A890/A890M Grade 6A steel. This finding was confirmed by microstructural characterization techniques, including light optical and scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Corrosion potential measurements in synthetic sea water containing 20,000 ppm of chloride ions were also conducted at three temperatures: 5 deg. C, 25 deg. C and 60 deg. C

  7. Application of Time-Series Analysis for Predicting Defects in Continuous Steel Casting Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodziewicz A.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper was testing suitability of the time-series analysis for quality control of the continuous steel casting process in production conditions. The analysis was carried out on industrial data collected in one of Polish steel plants. The production data concerned defective fractions of billets obtained in the process. The procedure of the industrial data preparation is presented. The computations for the time-series analysis were carried out in two ways, both using the authors’ own software. The first one, applied to the real numbers type of the data has a wide range of capabilities, including not only prediction of the future values but also detection of important periodicity in data. In the second approach the data were assumed in a binary (categorical form, i.e. the every heat(melt was labeled as ‘Good’ or ‘Defective’. The naïve Bayesian classifier was used for predicting the successive values. The most interesting results of the analysis include good prediction accuracies obtained by both methodologies, the crucial influence of the last preceding point on the predicted result for the real data time-series analysis as well as obtaining an information about the type of misclassification for binary data. The possibility of prediction of the future values can be used by engineering or operational staff with an expert knowledge to decrease fraction of defective products by taking appropriate action when the forthcoming period is identified as critical.

  8. Influence of thermal treatments on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a HC cast refractory steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatica, D; Garin, J; Mannheim, R

    2008-01-01

    The effect of thermal treatments at 750 ( o C) on the microstructure and hardness of a HC cast refractory steel was studied. Samples were extracted from blocks obtained from the melting of this steel, which were heated to 750 ( o C) for 1, 2, 3, 6, 12, 24, 48 and 96 hours and cooled in water. The microstructural analysis was performed using X-ray diffraction, optic and scanning electron microscopy. The phases in each of the samples were quantified using X-ray diffraction, by the direct comparison method, using the DIFRACC-AT, PROFILE FITTING, LATTICE and LAZY-PULVERIX programs. Ferrite was also measured with a magnetic inductor. The phases that were present were ferrite, austenite and Cr 23 C 6 chrome carbides, with a small percentage of molybdenum carbides, slag and non metallic inclusions. As a result of the thermal treatment, the ferrite increased, the austenite decreased and the chrome carbides increased, although their presence varied during the first hours of treatment, displaying a sustained increase only after the 24 hours of heating. Brittle phases, like the sigma phase, did not occur, corroborated by other authors who have noted that for this phase to form there must be preexisting Cr 7 C 3 chrome carbide, as well as Cr 23 C 6 . Temperature impact tests were held in order to determine the temperature of ductile-brittle transition. Unnotched test pieces were submitted to impact trials in a temperature range of 20 to 200 ( o C). This steel does not have a clear transition temperature, but ranges from 50 ( o C) to 80 ( o C )

  9. Influence of thermal aging on primary water stress corrosion cracking of cast duplex stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Takuyo; Negishi, Kazuo; Totsuka, Nobuo; Nakajima, Nobuo

    2001-01-01

    In order to evaluate the SCC susceptibility of cast duplex stainless steels which are often used for the main coolant piping of pressurized water reactors (PWRs), the slow strain rate test (SSRT) and the constant load test (CLT) of the materials were performed in simulated primary water at 360degC. The stainless steel contains ferritic phase with ranging from 8 to 23% and its mechanical properties are affected by long time thermal aging. Therefore, we paid attention to the influence of its ferrite content and thermal aging on the SCC susceptibility of this stainless steel and prepared three kinds of specimen with different ferrite contents (23%, 15% and 8%). The reduction in area observed by the SSRT in simulated primary water at 360degC was smaller than that obtained by the tensile test in air at the same temperature. Microcracks were observed on the unaged specimen surfaces and aged ones at 400degC for 10,000 hours after 3,000 hours of the CLT with the load condition of two times of yield strength. The SCC susceptibility was evaluated by reduction ratio defined by the ratio of the reduction in area by the SSRT to that by the tensile test. The reduction ratio was not clear for low ferrite specimens, but apparently decreased with increasing aging time for the specimen with 23% ferrite. This change by aging time can be explained as follows: (1) the brittle fracture in the unaged specimens is mainly caused by quasi-cleavage fracture in austenitic phase. (2) After aging, it becomes a mixture of quasi-cleavage fracture in both austenitic and ferritic phases and phase boundary fracture of both phases. (author)

  10. Solidification and casting

    CERN Document Server

    Cantor, Brian

    2002-01-01

    INDUSTRIAL PERSPECTIVEDirect chillcasting of aluminium alloysContinuous casting of aluminium alloysContinuous casting of steelsCastings in the automotive industryCast aluminium-silicon piston alloysMODELLING AND SIMULATIONModelling direct chill castingMold filling simulation of die castingThe ten casting rulesGrain selection in single crystal superalloy castingsDefects in aluminium shape castingPattern formation during solidificationPeritectic solidificationSTRUCTURE AND DEFECTSHetergeneous nucleation in aluminium alloysCo

  11. Effect of Ultrasonic Melt Treatment on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of 35CrMo Steel Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chen; Li, Fan; Liang, Gen; Mao, Daheng

    2018-01-01

    Effects of different power ultrasonic on microstructure and mechanical properties of 35CrMo steel casting were investigated using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and hardness testing. A self-developed experiment apparatus was used for the propagation of ultrasonic vibration into the 35CrMo steel melt to carry out ultrasonic treatment. The experimental results showed that compared to the traditional casting, ultrasonic treatment can obviously change the solidification microstructure of 35CrMo steel, which is changed from coarse dendrites to fined dendrites or equiaxed grains. With the increase of ultrasonic power, equiaxed crystal is remarkably refined and its area is broadened. The micro porosity percentage of ingot casting decreases significantly and the porosity defects can be suppressed under ultrasonic treatment. The mechanical properties of 35CrMo steel ingot after heat treatment were enhanced by ultrasonic treatment: the maximum tensile strength is improved by 8.4% and the maximum elongation increased by 1.5 times.

  12. Optimal design of feeding system in steel casting by constrained optimization algorithms based on InteCAST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-chun Dong

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The traditional foundry industry has developed rapidly in recently years due to advancements in computer technology. Modifying and designing the feeding system has become more convenient with the help of the casting software, InteCAST. A common method of designing a feeding system is to first design the initial systems, run simulations with casting software, analyze the feedback, and then redesign. In this work, genetic, fruit fly, and interior point optimizer (IPOPT algorithms were introduced to guide the optimal riser design for the feeding system. The results calculated by the three optimal algorithms indicate that the riser volume has a weak relationship with the modulus constraint; while it has a close relationship with the volume constraint. Based on the convergence rate, the fruit fly algorithm was obviously faster than the genetic algorithm. The optimized riser was also applied during casting, and was simulated using InteCAST. The numerical simulation results reveal that with the same riser volume, the riser optimized by the genetic and fruit fly algorithms has a similar improvement on casting shrinkage. The IPOPT algorithm has the advantage of causing the smallest shrinkage porosities, compared to those of the genetic and fruit fly algorithms, which were almost the same.

  13. Effect of residual Al content on microstructure and mechanical properties of Grade B+Steel for castings for locomotives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Kaifeng

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The bogie made of Grade B+ steel is one of the most important parts of heavy haul trains. Some accidents were found to be the result of fracture failure of the bogies. It is very important to find the reason why the fracture failure occurred. Because Al was added for the final deoxidation during the smelting process of the Grade B+Steel, residual Al existed to some extent in the castings. High residual Al content in the bogie casting was presumed to be the reason for the fracture. In this work, the influence of residual Al content in the range of 0.015wt.% to 0.3wt.% on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the Grade B+ Steel was studied. The experimental results showed that when the residual Al content is between 0.02wt.% and 0.20wt.%, the mechanical properties of the steel meet the requirements of technical specification for heavy haul train parts, and the fracture is typical plastic fractures. If the residual Al content is less than 0.02wt.%, the microstructures are coarse, and the mechanical properties can not meet the demand of bogie steel castings. When the residual Al content is more than 0.2wt.%, the elongation, reduction of area, and low-temperature impact energy markedly deteriorate. The fracture mode then changes from plastic fracture to cleavage brittle fracture. Therefore, the amount of Al addition for the final deoxidation during the smelting process must be strictly controlled. The optimum addition amount needs to be controlled within the range of 0.02wt.% to 0.20wt.% for the Grade B+Steel.

  14. Effect of Rice Husk Ash Insulation Powder on the Reoxidation Behavior of Molten Steel in Continuous Casting Tundish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Sung; Chung, Yongsug; Holappa, Lauri; Park, Joo Hyun

    2017-06-01

    Rice husk ash (RHA) has been widely used as an insulation powder in steel casting tundish. Its effect on the reoxidation of molten steel in tundish as well as on the corrosion of magnesia refractory was investigated. The reoxidation of the steel, indicated by an oxygen pickup, was progressed by increasing the ratio of RHA to the sum of RHA and carryover ladle slag ( R ratio) greater than about 0.2. The increase of the silica activity in the slag layer promoted the self-dissociation of SiO2 from the slag layer into the molten steel, resulting in the silicon and oxygen pickup as the R ratio increased. The total number of reoxidation inclusions dramatically increased and the relative fraction of Al2O3-rich inclusions increased by increasing the R ratio. Hence, the reoxidation of molten steel in tundish might become more serious due to the formation of alumina-rich inclusions as the casting sequence increases. MgO in the refractory directly dissolved into the molten slag layer without forming any intermediate compound layer ( e.g., spinel), which is a completely different situation from the general slag-refractory interfacial reaction. A flow was possibly induced by the bursting of gas bubbles at the ash-slag (-refractory) interface, since the silica in the RHA powder continuously dissolved into the molten slag pool. Thus, the RHA insulation powder has a negative effect on the corrosion of MgO refractory.

  15. Causes of Cracking in Quenching of the Parts Made of Steels and Cast Iron and Recommendations for Their Removal: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, A. A.; Rudnev, V. I.

    2017-12-01

    The domestic and foreign experience on revealing the causes of quenching cracking and its prevention is generalized. We consider the works performed on the machine parts made of carbon and alloyed pearlitic steel and quenchable cast irons.

  16. Mechanical and Microstructural Effects of Thermal Aging on Cast Duplex Stainless Steels by Experiment and Finite Element Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarm, Samuel C.; Mburu, Sarah N.; Kolli, Ratna P.; Perea, Daniel E.; Liu, Jia; Ankem, Sreeramamurthy

    2017-02-05

    Cast duplex stainless steel piping in light water nuclear reactors expe- rience thermal aging embrittlement during operational service. Interest in extending the operational life to 80 years requires an increased understanding of the microstructural evolution and corresponding changes in mechanical behavior. We analyze the evolution of the microstructure during thermal aging of cast CF-3 and CF-8 stainless steels using electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. The evolution of the mechanical properties is measured concurrently by mechanical methods such as tensile tests, Charpy V-notch tests, and instrumented nanoinden- tation. A microstructure-based finite element method model is developed and uti- lized in conjunction with the characterization results in order to correlate the local stress-strain effects in the microstructure with the bulk measurements. This work is supported by the DOE Nuclear Energy University Programs (NEUP), contract number DE-NE0000724.

  17. Effect of heat treatment on microstructure, mechanical properties and erosion resistance of cast 23-8-N nitronic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Avnish; Sharma, Ashok; Goel, S.K.

    2015-01-01

    Effects of heat treatment on microstructure, mechanical properties and erosion behavior of cast 23-8-N nitronic steel were studied. A series of heat treatments were carried out in the temperature range of 1180–1240 °C to observe the effect on microstructure. Optimum heat treatment cycle was obtained at 1220 °C for holding time of 150 min, which leads to dissolution of carbides, formation of equiaxed grains and twins. Heat treatment has shown improvement in tensile strength, toughness, impact strength and work hardening capacity, however at the cost of marginal reduction in hardness and yield strength. This resulted in improvement of erosion resistance of cast 23-8-N nitronic steel. The microstructures, fractured surfaces and phases were studied by optical microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis respectively

  18. Influence of heat treatment on microstructure and properties of GX12CrMoVNbN9-1 cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Golański

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of research on the influence of multistage heat treatment on microstructure and properties of high-chromiummartensitic GX12CrMoVNbN9 – 1 (GP91 steel. The material under investigation were samples taken out from a test coupon. Heattreatment of GP91 cast steel was performed at the parameters of temperature and time typical of treatment for multi-ton steel casts. The research has proved that in the as-received condition (as-cast state GP91 cast steel was characterized by a coarse grain, martensitic microstructure which provided the required standard mechanical properties. The heat treatment of GP91 cast steel contributed to obtainment of a fine grain microstructure of high tempered martensite with numerous precipitations of carbides of diverse size. The GP91 cast steel structure received through heat treatment made it possible to obtain high plastic properties, particularly impact strength, maintaining strength properties on the level of the required minimum.

  19. Numerical and Physical Modeling of Steel Flow in a Two-Strand Tundish for Different Casting Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Alexander; Warzecha, Marek; Pfeifer, Herbert

    2010-06-01

    This article presents computational and water model studies of the three-dimensional turbulent fluid flow in a two-strand tundish for steady-state and transient casting conditions. First, it presents the flow field measurements obtained at a 1:3-scale water model of the tundish with the particle-image velocimetry (PIV) method during steady-state casting. The PIV measurements were performed using the Reynolds-similarity criterion. Thereafter, numerical simulation is carried out with the computational fluid dynamic software, FLUENT, using the realizable k-ɛ turbulence model. The numerical model is validated using the measurement results obtained with the water model. The results of the numerical calculations are in good agreement with the PIV measurements. On this basis, the validated numerical model is adapted to simulate the 1:1-scale steel flow with boundary conditions that are derived from the real casting process. The nonisothermal, unsteady numerical calculations concerning the cooling process of steel melt inside the tundish are done for a 1:1-scale industrial facility—a 69-t two-strand tundish with a 380-t ladle. The influence of transient boundary conditions at the outlet of the tundish (one blocked strand) on the flow structure and mixing process of fluid during the casting process are investigated. The evaluation of the flow structure is performed using a zonal method, which relates the fluid flow with the mixing processes.

  20. The ageing kinetics of CF3 cast stainless steel in the temperature range 3000C to 400OC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhurst, K.N.; Pumphrey, P.H.

    1988-11-01

    The primary coolant pump casings for Sizewell 'B' are made from castings of ASME SA351 CF3 steel which, although predominantly austenitic, is required to contain a small proportion of ferrite. Previous studies have shown that such steels are susceptible to hardening of the ferrite, and associated losses in toughness, as a result of thermal ageing for long times at the service temperature (∼ 300 0 C). For this reason, toughness tests are to be carried out on representative castings made by the Sizewell 'B' pump casing manufacturer. The purpose of these tests is to demonstrate adequate end-of-life fracture resistance, using material which has been given an accelerated ageing treatment. The identification and validation of a suitable ageing treatment is the subject of this Report. Ageing kinetics have been measured for ageing temperatures in the range 300 to 400 0 C, from the results of Charpy impact tests on material from the castings procured for the main fracture programme. Castings with ferrite levels of 15, 25 and 35% have been studied. The losses in impact toughness have been related to the kinetics of ferrite strengthening using microhardness measurements, and to microstructural changes using Field Ion Atom Probe analysis. (author)

  1. Technical Letter Report on the Cracking of Irradiated Cast Stainless Steels with Low Ferrite Content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Alexandreanu, B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Natesan, K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Crack growth rate and fracture toughness J-R curve tests were performed on CF-3 and CF-8 cast austenite stainless steels (CASS) with 13-14% of ferrite. The tests were conducted at ~320°C in either high-purity water with low dissolved oxygen or in simulated PWR water. The cyclic crack growth rates of CF-8 were higher than that of CF-3, and the differences between the aged and unaged specimens were small. No elevated SCC susceptibility was observed among these samples, and the SCC CGRs of these materials were comparable to those of CASS alloys with >23% ferrite. The fracture toughness values of unirradiated CF-3 were similar between unaged and aged specimens, and neutron irradiation decreased the fracture toughness significantly. The fracture toughness of CF-8 was reduced after thermal aging, and declined further after irradiation. It appears that while lowering ferrite content may help reduce the tendency of thermal aging embrittlement, it is not very effective to mitigate irradiation-induced embrittlement. Under a combined condition of thermal aging and irradiation, neutron irradiation plays a dominant role in causing embrittlement in CASS alloys.

  2. Method for Determining the Time Constants Characterizing the Intensity of Steel Mixing in Continuous Casting Tundish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieprzyca J.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A common method used in identification of hydrodynamics phenomena occurring in Continuous Casting (CC device's tundish is to determine the RTD curves of time. These curves allows to determine the way of the liquid steel flowing and mixing in the tundish. These can be identified either as the result of numerical simulation or by the experiments - as the result of researching the physical models. Special problem is to objectify it while conducting physical research. It is necessary to precisely determine the time constants which characterize researched phenomena basing on the data acquired in the measured change of the concentration of the tracer in model liquid's volume. The mathematical description of determined curves is based on the approximate differential equations formulated in the theory of fluid mechanics. Solving these equations to calculate the time constants requires a special software and it is very time-consuming. To improve the process a method was created to calculate the time constants with use of automation elements. It allows to solve problems using algebraic method, which improves interpretation of the research results of physical modeling.

  3. Real-Time, Model-Based Spray-Cooling Control System for Steel Continuous Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrus, Bryan; Zheng, Kai; Zhou, X.; Thomas, Brian G.; Bentsman, Joseph

    2011-02-01

    This article presents a new system to control secondary cooling water sprays in continuous casting of thin steel slabs (CONONLINE). It uses real-time numerical simulation of heat transfer and solidification within the strand as a software sensor in place of unreliable temperature measurements. The one-dimensional finite-difference model, CON1D, is adapted to create the real-time predictor of the slab temperature and solidification state. During operation, the model is updated with data collected by the caster automation systems. A decentralized controller configuration based on a bank of proportional-integral controllers with antiwindup is developed to maintain the shell surface-temperature profile at a desired set point. A new method of set-point generation is proposed to account for measured mold heat flux variations. A user-friendly monitor visualizes the results and accepts set-point changes from the caster operator. Example simulations demonstrate how a significantly better shell surface-temperature control is achieved.

  4. Mechanism-Based Modeling for Low Cycle Fatigue of Cast Austenitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xijia; Quan, Guangchun; Sloss, Clayton

    2017-09-01

    A mechanism-based approach—the integrated creep-fatigue theory (ICFT)—is used to model low cycle fatigue behavior of 1.4848 cast austenitic steel over the temperature range from room temperature (RT) to 1173 K (900 °C) and the strain rate range from of 2 × 10-4 to 2 × 10-2 s-1. The ICFT formulates the material's constitutive equation based on the physical strain decomposition into mechanism strains, and the associated damage accumulation consisting of crack nucleation and propagation in coalescence with internally distributed damage. At room temperature, the material behavior is controlled by plasticity, resulting in a rate-independent and cyclically stable behavior. The material exhibits significant cyclic hardening at intermediate temperatures, 673 K to 873 K (400 °C to 600 °C), with negative strain rate sensitivity, due to dynamic strain aging. At high temperatures >1073 K (800 °C), time-dependent deformation is manifested with positive rate sensitivity as commonly seen in metallic materials at high temperature. The ICFT quantitatively delineates the contribution of each mechanism in damage accumulation, and predicts the fatigue life as a result of synergistic interaction of the above identified mechanisms. The model descriptions agree well with the experimental and fractographic observations.

  5. Characteristics comparison of weld metal zones welded to cast and forged steels for piston crown material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Kyung-Man; Kim, Yun-Hae; Lee, Myeong-Hoon; Baek, Tae-Sil

    2015-03-01

    An optimum repair welding for the piston crown which is one of the engine parts exposed to the combustion chamber is considered to be very important to prolong the engine lifetime from an economical point of view. In this study, two types of filler metals such as 1.25Cr-0.5Mo, 0.5Mo were welded with SMAW method and the other two types of filler metals such as Inconel 625 and 718 were welded with GTAW method, respectively, and the used base metals were the cast and forged steels of the piston crown material. The weld metal zones welded with Inconel 625 and 718 filler metals exhibited higher corrosion resistance compared to 1.25Cr-0.5Mo and 0.5Mo filler metals. In particular, the weld metal zone welded with Inconel 718 and 0.5Mo, filler metals indicated the best and worst corrosion resistance, respectively. Consequently, it is suggested that the corrosion resistance of the weld metal zone surely depends on the chemical components of each filler metal and welding method irrespective of the types of piston crown material.

  6. Contributions of Rare Earth Element (La,Ce) Addition to the Impact Toughness of Low Carbon Cast Niobium Microalloyed Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torkamani, Hadi; Raygan, Shahram; Garcia Mateo, Carlos; Rassizadehghani, Jafar; Palizdar, Yahya; San-Martin, David

    2018-03-01

    In this research Rare Earth elements (RE), La and Ce (200 ppm), were added to a low carbon cast microalloyed steel to disclose their influence on the microstructure and impact toughness. It is suggested that RE are able to change the interaction between the inclusions and matrix during the solidification process (comprising peritectic transformation), which could affect the microstructural features and consequently the impact property; compared to the base steel a clear evolution was observed in nature and morphology of the inclusions present in the RE-added steel i.e. (1) they changed from MnS-based to (RE,Al)(S,O) and RE(S)-based; (2) they obtained an aspect ratio closer to 1 with a lower area fraction as well as a smaller average size. Besides, the microstructural examination of the matrix phases showed that a bimodal type of ferrite grain size distribution exists in both base and RE-added steels, while the mean ferrite grain size was reduced from 12 to 7 μm and the bimodality was redressed in the RE-added steel. It was found that pearlite nodule size decreases from 9 to 6 μm in the RE-added steel; however, microalloying with RE caused only a slight decrease in pearlite volume fraction. After detailed fractography analyses, it was found that, compared to the based steel, the significant enhancement of the impact toughness in RE-added steel (from 63 to 100 J) can be mainly attributed to the differences observed in the nature of the inclusions, the ferrite grain size distribution, and the pearlite nodule size. The presence of carbides (cementite) at ferrite grain boundaries and probable change in distribution of Nb-nanoprecipitation (promoted by RE addition) can be considered as other reasons affecting the impact toughness of steels under investigation.

  7. Micrograph evidence of meniscus solidification and sub-surface microstructure evolution in continuous-cast ultralow-carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengupta, J.; Shin, H.-J.; Thomas, B.G.; Kim, S.-H.

    2006-01-01

    Hooks and other sub-surface features in continuous-cast ultralow-carbon steel samples were examined using optical microscopy, electron backscattering diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and electron probe microanalysis techniques. Special etching reagents revealed dendrites growing from both sides of the line of hook origin. This line was found to represent the frozen meniscus and persisted into the final microstructure, as revealed by grain orientation measurements. A broken hook tip was observed in one micrograph, which explains the characteristic truncated shape of most hooks. Mold powder was found entrapped along the frozen meniscus. These results provide evidence of both solidification and subsequent overflow of the liquid steel meniscus. Thus, the instantaneous meniscus shape governs the shape and microstructure of the final hook, and the extent of the liquid steel overflow determines the shape of oscillation marks. This mechanism has important implications for the entrapment of inclusions and other surface defects

  8. Interaction of Liquid Steel with Mould Flux in Continuous Casting Bloom Mould - Numerical Simulations and Industrial Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cwudziński A.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The device under examination is a mould of a capacity of 0.5 Mg and with inner cross-section of 280×400 mm. The virtual model of the facility under investigation was made using Gambit, DesignModeler and Meshing programs. Computer simulation of the liquid steel flow and mould flux behaviour in turbulent motion conditions was done using the Ansys-Fluent® computer program. On the basis of earlier researches the volume of fluid (VOF model was applied. Based on computer simulations carried out, steel flow and flux behaviour fields and curves of flux mould entrainment concentration were obtained. The results obtained from numerical simulation were compared with the data obtained during bloom casting under industrial conditions. Based on the obtained information on the interaction of steel with mould flux, the region was determined, in which conditions likely to favour the entrainment of slag portions into the forming bloom exist.

  9. Impact Strength of Austenitic and Ferritic-Austenitic Cr-Ni Stainless Cast Steel in -40 and +20°C Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalandyk B.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Studies described in this paper relate to common grades of cast corrosion resistant Cr-Ni steel with different matrix. The test materials were subjected to heat treatment, which consisted in the solution annealing at 1060°C followed by cooling in water. The conducted investigations, besides the microstructural characteristics of selected cast steel grades, included the evaluation of hardness, toughness (at a temperature of -40 and +20oC and type of fracture obtained after breaking the specimens on a Charpy impact testing machine. Based on the results of the measured volume fraction of ferrite, it has been found that the content of this phase in cast austenitic steel is 1.9%, while in the two-phase ferritic-austenitic grades it ranges from 50 to 58%. It has been demonstrated that within the scope of conducted studies, the cast steel of an austenitic structure is characterised by higher impact strength than the two-phase ferritic-austenitic (F-A grade. The changing appearance of the fractures of the specimens reflected the impact strength values obtained in the tested materials. Fractures of the cast austenitic Cr-Ni steel obtained in these studies were of a ductile character, while fractures of the cast ferritic-austenitic grade were mostly of a mixed character with the predominance of brittle phase and well visible cleavage planes.

  10. PERSPECTIVES OF USING OF HIGH-SPEED STEELS FOR PRODUCTION OF CAST METAL-CUTTING INSTRUMENT. THE WAYS OF THE STRUCTURE AND CHARACTERISTICS IMPROVEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Chaus

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article there are examined the peculiarities of the structure and characteristics of cast and deformed high-speed steels R6M5 and R6M5K5. It is established, that there is practically no difference in hardness and heat stability, at the same time cast steels because of the structure specificity are inferior to the deformed ones in impact elasticity, considerably exceeding them in endurance. On the basis of industrial tests it is shown that at correct nomenclature choice for embedding there are being created the backgrounds for secure work of cast instrument, resistance of which can be even higher as compared to the traditional instrument due to higher endurance of cast-steel

  11. (60)Co in cast steel matrix: A European interlaboratory comparison for the characterisation of new activity standards for calibration of gamma-ray spectrometers in metallurgy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzika, Faidra; Burda, Oleksiy; Hult, Mikael; Arnold, Dirk; Marroyo, Belén Caro; Dryák, Pavel; Fazio, Aldo; Ferreux, Laurent; García-Toraño, Eduardo; Javornik, Andrej; Klemola, Seppo; Luca, Aurelian; Moser, Hannah; Nečemer, Marijan; Peyrés, Virginia; Reis, Mario; Silva, Lidia; Šolc, Jaroslav; Svec, Anton; Tyminski, Zbigniew; Vodenik, Branko; Wätjen, Uwe

    2016-08-01

    Two series of activity standards of (60)Co in cast steel matrix, developed for the calibration of gamma-ray spectrometry systems in the metallurgical sector, were characterised using a European interlaboratory comparison among twelve National Metrology Institutes and one international organisation. The first standard, consisting of 14 disc shaped samples, was cast from steel contaminated during production ("originally"), and the second, consisting of 15 similar discs, from artificially-contaminated ("spiked") steel. The reference activity concentrations of (60)Co in the cast steel standards were (1.077±0.019) Bqg(-1) on 1 January 2013 12h00 UT and (1.483±0.022) Bqg(-1) on 1 June 2013 12h00 UT, respectively. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Constrained/unconstrained solidification within the massive cast steel/iron ingots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. S. Wołczyński

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Some properties of the ingot and especially of the steel forging ingots depend on the ratio of a columnar structure area to an equiaxed structure area created during solidification. The C-E transition is fundamental phenomenon that can be applied to characterize massive cast steel ingots produced by the casting house. The mentioned ratio is created spontaneously due to the rate of heat transfer towards the ceramic mould and then to the environment. The ceramic mould operates as an isolator. So that the thickness of the mould together with a growing solid fraction control the heat transfer and finally the ratio of the columnar structure area to the equiaxed structure area. At first the increase of heat accumulation within the ceramic mould is observed. Next the stationary state for heat transfer is created and finally a gentle abatement of the mould temperature associated with the heat output to the environment is expected. The steep thermal gradients correspond to the increase of heat accumulation in the ceramic mould. The steep thermal gradients are required to promote the columnar structure formation. The full heat accumulation in the mould corresponds well with the C-E transformation while the appearance of the moderate thermal gradients is referred to the gentle temperature abatement within the ceramic mould. The equiaxed structure is expected within this period of heat transfer behavior. The steep thermal gradients involve the activity of viscosity gradient in the liquid. As the result a sedimentary cones are formed at the bottom of the ingot. The C-E transformation is associated with competition between columnar and equaixed structure formation. At the end of competition a fully equiaxed structure is formed. The viscosity gradient is replaced by the thermophoresis which is the driving force for the deposition of some equiaxed grain layers onto the surface of C+E zone. The convection together with the gravity allow the layers to be uniform

  13. Influence of formwork surface on the orientation of steel fibres within self-compacting concrete and on the mechanical properties of cast structural elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svec, Oldrich; Zirgulis, Giedrius; Bolander, John E.

    2014-01-01

    The influences of formwork surface on the final orientation of steel fibres immersed in self-compacting concrete and on the resulting mechanical response of the cast structural elements are investigated. Experimental observations of fibre orientation within cast slabs, obtained via computed...... tomography, indicate that fibres tend to orient according to the flow patterns during casting, but such tendencies are suppressed near rough formwork surfaces. Fibre orientation, in turn, affects the mechanical properties of the concrete as demonstrated by the load testing of beams extracted from the cast...... and the mechanical response of the structural elements. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  14. Accelerated aging embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steel: Activation energy for extrapolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.M.; Chopra, O.K.

    1989-05-01

    Cast duplex stainless steels, used extensively in LWR systems for primary pressure boundary components such as primary coolant pipes, valves, and pumps, are susceptible to thermal aging embrittlement at reactor operating or higher temperatures. Since a realistic aging embrittlement for end-of-life or life-extension conditions (i.e., 32--50 yr of aging at 280--320 degree C) cannot be produced, it is customary to simulate the metallurgical structure by accelerated aging at ∼400 degree C. Over the past several years, extensive data on accelerated aging have been reported from a number of laboratories. The most important information from these studies is the activation energy, namely, the temperature dependence of the aging kinetics between 280 and 400 degree C, which is used to extrapolate the aging characteristics to reactor operating conditions. The activation energies (in the range of 18--50 kcal/mole) are, in general, sensitive to material grade, chemical composition, and fabrication process, and a few empirical correlations, obtained as a function of bulk chemical composition, have been reported. In this paper, a mechanistic understanding of the activation energy is described on the basis of the results of microstructural characterization of various heats of CF-3, -8, and -8M grades that were used in aging studies at different laboratories. The primary mechanism of aging embrittlement at temperatures between 280 and 400 degree C is the spinodal decomposition of the ferrite phase, and M 23 C 6 carbide precipitation on the ferrite/austenite boundaries is the secondary mechanism for high-carbon CF-8 grade. 20 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs

  15. The influence of environment on corrosion of cast iron and carbon steel representing samples of outdoor metal technical heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzelec, M.; Marczak, J.; Skrzeczanowski, W.; Zatorska, A.; Sarzynski, A.; Czyz, K.; Zasada, D.

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents the results of annual measurements of the corrosion progress at test samples of cast iron and carbon steel placed in different natural environments. Comparative tests were performed in two outdoor stations, one at the Railway Museum in central Warsaw and one at the location of a Railway Museum in the small town of Sochaczew, 50 km west of Warsaw. The influence of surface roughness on the development of corrosion was determined by two kinds of treatment of all sample surfaces - metal brush or grinding. Stratigraphy and composition of corrosion products in quarterly periods were analyzed with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and Raman laser spectroscopy. Comparative tests were performed using a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) system equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and micro-chemical analytical methods. The corrosion layers on carbon steel have proven to be thicker on average than on cast iron, and thicker on the brushed parts of both materials. Furthermore, a thicker corrosion layer was found on the cast iron test samples exposed in Sochaczew than in Warsaw. Different iron oxides, namely lepidocrocite, goethite, hematite and magnetite were identified in the surface Raman spectra of corrosion layers, the last compound only in the sample from Sochaczew. SEM EDS measurements of surface elemental concentrations showed a higher concentration of sulfur in all samples from Sochaczew. Registered LIBS spectra have been additionally analyzed with statistical approach, using Factorial Analysis (FA). Results generally confirmed conclusions drawn from SEM/Raman/LIBS results.

  16. Overload effects on a ferritic-baintic steel and a cast aluminium alloy: two very different behaviours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saintier, N. [Arts et Metiers Paris Tech, I2M, UMR CNRS, Universite Bordeaux 1, Talene Cedex (France); El Dsoki, C.; Kaufmann, H.; Sonsino, C.M. [Fraunhofer-Institute for Structural Durability and System Reliability LBF, Darmstadt (Germany); Dumas, C. [RENAULT, Technocentre, Guyancourt Cedex (France); Voellmecke, F.J. [BORBET GmbH, Hallenberg-Hesborn (Germany); Palin-Luc, T.; Bidonard, H.

    2011-10-15

    Load controlled fatigue tests were performed up to 10{sup 7} cycles on flat notched specimens (K{sub t} = 2.5) under constant amplitude and variable amplitude loadings with and without periodical overloads. Two materials are studied: a ferritic-bainitic steel (HE400M steel) and a cast aluminium alloy (AlSi7Mg0.3). These materials have a very different cyclic behaviour: the steel exhibits cyclic strain softening whereas the Al alloy shows cyclic strain hardening. The fatigue tests show that, for the steel, periodical overload applications reduce significantly the fatigue life for fully reversed load ratio (R{sub {sigma}} = -1), while they have no influence under pulsating loading (R{sub {sigma}} = 0). For the Al alloy overloads have an effect (fatigue life decreasing) only for variable amplitude loadings. The detrimental effect of overloads on the steel is due to ratcheting at the notch root which evolution is overload's dependent. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Stainless steel fibre reinforced aluminium matrix composites processed by squeeze casting: relationship between processing conditions and interfacial microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colin, C.; Marchal, Y.; Boland, F.; Delannay, F.

    1993-01-01

    This work investigates the influence of some processing parameters on the extent of interfacial reaction in squeeze cast aluminium matrix composites reinforced with 12 μm diameter, continuous stainless steel fibres. The average thickness of the reaction layer at fibre/matrix interfaces was measured by image analysis. When casting was made in a die at room temperature, the thickness of the reaction layer was affected on a distance of several mm from the lateral surface or from the bottom of the preform. The results indicate that the major part of the reaction occurs before solidification of the liquid metal. The control of the extent of interfacial reaction can be achieved through optimization of both infiltration parameters and features of the preform such as the volume fraction of the fibres. (orig.)

  18. An Integrated Study on the Evolution of Inclusions in EH36 Shipbuilding Steel with Mg Addition: From Casting to Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xiaodong; Zhao, Dapeng; Sun, Jincheng; Wang, Cong; Matsuura, Hiroyuki

    2018-04-01

    Inclusion evolution behaviors, in terms of composition, size, and number density, and associated influence on the microstructures of the as-cast slabs, rolled plates, and simulated welded samples of plain EH36 and EH36-Mg shipbuilding steels have been systematically investigated. The results indicate that the inclusions in the as-cast plain EH36 are almost Al-Ca-S-O-(Mn) complex oxides with sizes ranging from 1.0 to 2.0 μm. After Mg addition, a large amount of individually fine MnS precipitates and Mg-containing Ti-Al-Mg-O-(Mn-S) complex inclusions are generated, which significantly refine the microstructure and are conducive to the nucleation of acicular ferrite in the rolled and welded sample. Moreover, after rolling and welding thermal simulation, the number of individual MnS decreases gradually due to its precipitation on the surface of Ti-Al-Mg-O oxides.

  19. MLEP-Fail calibration for 1/8 inch thick cast plate of 17-4 steel.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corona, Edmundo [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of the work presented in this memo was to calibrate the Sierra material model Multilinear Elastic-Plastic Hardening Model with Failure (MLEP-Fail) for 1/8 inch thick cast plate of 17-4 steel. The calibration approach is essentially the same as that recently used in a previous memo using data from smooth and notched tensile specimens. The notched specimens were manufactured with three notch radii R = 1=8, 1/32 and 1/64 inches. The dimensions of the smooth and notched specimens are given in the prints in Appendix A. Two cast plates, Plate 3 and Plate 4, with nominally identical properties were considered.

  20. Influence of cooling rate on the structure and mechanical properties of G17CrMoV5 – 10 cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Golański

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of research on the influence of cooling rate on the structure and properties of G17CrMoV5 – 10 (L17HMF cast steel. The material for research was a section taken out from an outer cylinder of a steam turbine body after about 250 000 hours of operation at the temperature of 535°C and pressure 9 MPa. The investigated cast steel was subjected to heat treatment which consisted in cooling at the rates corresponding to the processes, such as: bainitic hardening, normalizing and full annealing. Tempering after the process of cooling from austenitizing temperature was carried out at the temperatures of: 700, 720 and 740°C. Performed research has proved that structures obtained after bainitic hardening and normalizing are characterized by a large strength margin which allows to apply high temperatures of tempering. It has been shown that the cast steel of bainitic structure, with similar mechanical properties as the cast steel of bainitic – ferritic structure, is characterized by almost twice as high impact energy. Full annealing and tempering of the examined cast steel ensures only the required impact strength, with mechanical properties comparable to those after service.

  1. Identification of the steel viscosity and dynamic yield stress for the numerical modelling of casting simulations in the semi-solid state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solek K.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Conditions of some casting processes cause flow of both liquid and semi-liquid metal alloys inside the die cavity. Generally, the continuous casting, squeeze casting or thixoforming could be classified as such processes. Design or optimisation of casting technology using numerical simulations requires knowledge of the rheological properties. The main objective of the experimental work, presented in this publication, is an analysis of the viscosity of 1.2080 (X210Cr12 high carbon steel in liquid and semisolid state. The secondary purpose of the experimental work was a development of the viscosity models used in continuous casting and thixoforming simulations. The significant achievement of this particular study was identification of thixotropy phenomenon which occurs not only during thixoforming, but also during magnetohydrodynamic stirring in continuous casting processes.

  2. Influence of Rare Earth Metals on Microstructure and Inclusions Morphology G17CrMo5-5 Cast Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasińska J.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents influence of rare earth metals (REM on the microstructure and morphology of non-metallic inclusions of G17CrMo5-5 cast carbon steel The research has been performed on successive industrial melts. Each time about 2000 kg of liquid metal was modified. The REM was in the form of mishmetal of the composition 49, 8% Ce, 21, 8% La, 17, 1% Nd, 5, 5% Pr and 5, 35% the rest of REM. Therareearth metals were put into the ladle during tapping of heat melt from the furnace.

  3. Detection of surface breaking cracks in centrifugally cast stainless steel with ultrasonic - Inspection from the cracked side

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoegberg, K.; Zetterwall, T.

    1986-01-01

    The ability of detecting surface breaking or near-surface cracks with ultrasonic techniques from the inside of centrifugally cast stainless steel pipes have been investigated by the Swedish Plant Inspectorate (SA) and AaF-Tekniska Roentgencentralen AB (AaF-TRC) on behalf of the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) and the Swedish State Power Board (SV). Fifteen specimens from the international Stainless Steel Round Robin Test (SSRRT) were used in this study. All specimens were examined from the cracked side with different ultrasonic probes. The data reported here indicate that a probe with dual elements, low frequency, longitudinal waves and short focus distance can detect almost all of the intended defects with a rather good signal-to-noise ratio. (author)

  4. Mechanical properties and eddy current testing of thermally aged Z3CN20.09M cast duplex stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tonghua; Wang, Wei; Qiang, Wenjiang; Shu, Guogang

    2018-04-01

    To study the thermal aging embrittlement of Z3CN20.09M duplex stainless steel produced in China, accelerated thermal aging experiments were carried out at 380 °C up to 9000 h. Microhardness measurements, Charpy impact and eddy current tests were performed on aged samples to characterize their thermal aging embrittlement. The results showed that the signal amplitude of eddy current decreased with the increase in aging time. Two quantitative correlations of the eddy current signal amplitude with both the Charpy impact energy, and the Vickers microhardness of the ferrite phase are obtained. The study showed that eddy current testing could be used to non-destructively evaluate the thermal aging embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels.

  5. Influence of carbon content on wear resistance and wear mechanism of Mn13Cr2 and Mn18Cr2 cast steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding-shan Lu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available By means of impact abrasion tests, micro-hardness tests, and worn surface morphology observation via SEM, a comparison research based upon different impact abrasive wear conditions was conducted in this research to study the influence of different carbon contents (1.25wt.%, 1.35wt.%, and 1.45 wt.% on the wear resistance and wear mechanism of water-quenched Mn13Cr2 and Mn18Cr2 cast steels. The research results show that the wear resistance of the Mn18Cr2 cast steel is superior to that of the Mn13Cr2 cast steel under the condition of the same carbon content and different impact abrasive wear conditions because the Mn18Cr2 cast steel possesses higher worn work hardening capacity as well as a more desirable combination of high hardness and impact toughness than that of the Mn13Cr2 cast steel. When a 4.5 J impact abrasive load is applied, the wear mechanism of both steels is that plastic deformation fatigue spalling and micro-cutting coexist, and the former dominates. When the carbon content is increased, the worn work hardening effect becomes increasingly dramatic, while the wear resistance of both steels decreases, which implies that an increase in impact toughness is beneficial to improving the wear resistance under severe impact abrasive wear conditions. Under the condition of a 1.0 J impact abrasive load, the wear mechanism of both steels is that plastic deformation fatigue spalling and micro-cutting coexist, and the latter plays a leading role. The worn work hardening effect and wear resistance intensify when the carbon content is increased, which implies that a higher hardness can be conducive to better wear resistance under low impact abrasive condition.

  6. Cast Steels for Creep-resistant Parts Used in Heat Treatment Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Drotlew

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Creep-resistant parts of heat treatment furnaces are in most cases made from high-alloyed chromium-nickel and nickel-chromium ironalloys, both cast and wrought. This paper presents the types of casting alloys used for this particular purpose, since the majority of furnace components are made by the casting process. Standards were cited which give symbols of alloy grades used in technical specifications by the domestic industry. It has been indicated that castings made currently are based on a wider spectrum of the creep-resistant alloy grades than the number of alloys covered by the standards. Alloy grades recommended by the technical literature for individual parts of the furnace equipment were given. The recommendations reflect both the type of the technological process used and the technical tasks performed by individual parts of the furnace equipment. Comments were also made on the role of individual alloying elements in shaping the performance properties of castings.

  7. Cast Steels for Creep-Resistant Parts Used in Heat Treatment Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drotlew A.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Creep-resistant parts of heat treatment furnaces are in most cases made from high-alloyed chromium-nickel and nickel-chromium iron alloys, both cast and wrought. This paper presents the types of casting alloys used for this particular purpose, since the majority of furnace components are made by the casting process. Standards were cited which give symbols of alloy grades used in technical specifications by the domestic industry. It has been indicated that castings made currently are based on a wider spectrum of the creep-resistant alloy grades than the number of alloys covered by the standards. Alloy grades recommended by the technical literature for individual parts of the furnace equipment were given. The recommendations reflect both the type of the technological process used and the technical tasks performed by individual parts of the furnace equipment. Comments were also made on the role of individual alloying elements in shaping the performance properties of castings.

  8. Numerical simulation of casting process to assist in defects reduction in complex steel tidal power component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, E J; Zhao, S C; Wang, L P; Wu, T; Xin, B P; Tan, J J; Jia, H L

    2016-01-01

    In order to reduce defects and improve casting quality, ProCAST software is performed to study the solidification process of discharge bowl. Simulated results of original casting process show that the hot tearing is serious at the intersection of blades and outer or inner rings. The shrinkage porosity appears at the bottom of discharge bowl and the transition area of wall thickness. Based on the formation mechanisms of the defects, the structure of chills attached on the outer surface of discharge bowl casting is optimized. The thickness of chills ranges from 25mm to 35mm. The positions of chills corresponded to the outer surface of the T-shaped parts. Compared to the original casting design (without chills), the hot tearing and shrinkage porosity of the discharge bowl are greatly improved with addition of chills. (paper)

  9. Phase-field modelling of microstructure formation during the solidification of continuously cast low carbon and HSLA steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttger, B.; Apel, M.; Santillana, B.; Eskin, D. G.

    2012-07-01

    Cracking in continuous casting of steels has been one of the main problems for decades. Many of the cracks that occur during solidification are hot tears. To better understand the factors leading to this defect, microstructure formation is simulated for a low carbon (LCAK) and two high strength low alloyed (HSLA) steel grades during the initial stage of the process where the first solidified shell is formed inside the mould and where breakouts typically occur. 2D simulation is performed using the multiphase-field software MICRESS [1], which is coupled to the thermodynamic database TCFE6 [2] and the mobility database MOB2 [2], taking into account all elements which may have a relevant effect on the mechanical properties and structure formation during or subsequent to solidification. The use of a moving-frame boundary condition allows travelling through the entire solidification history starting from the slab surface, and tracking the morphology changes during growth of the shell. A heterogeneous nucleation model is included to permit the description of morphological transitions between the initial solidification and the subsequent columnar growth region. Furthermore, a macroscopic one-dimensional temperature solver is integrated to account for the transient and nonlinear temperature field during the initial stage of continuous casting. The external heat flux boundary conditions for this process were derived from thermal process data of the industrial slab caster. The simulation results for the three steel grades have been validated by thickness measurements of breakout shells and microstructure observation of the corresponding grades. Furthermore, the primary dendrite spacing has been measured across the whole thickness of the shell and compared with the simulated microstructures. Significant microstructure differences between the steel grades are discussed and correlated with their hot-cracking behavior.

  10. Phase-field modelling of microstructure formation during the solidification of continuously cast low carbon and HSLA steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Böttger, B; Apel, M; Santillana, B; Eskin, D G

    2012-01-01

    Cracking in continuous casting of steels has been one of the main problems for decades. Many of the cracks that occur during solidification are hot tears. To better understand the factors leading to this defect, microstructure formation is simulated for a low carbon (LCAK) and two high strength low alloyed (HSLA) steel grades during the initial stage of the process where the first solidified shell is formed inside the mould and where breakouts typically occur. 2D simulation is performed using the multiphase-field software MICRESS, which is coupled to the thermodynamic database TCFE6 and the mobility database MOB2, taking into account all elements which may have a relevant effect on the mechanical properties and structure formation during or subsequent to solidification. The use of a moving-frame boundary condition allows travelling through the entire solidification history starting from the slab surface, and tracking the morphology changes during growth of the shell. A heterogeneous nucleation model is included to permit the description of morphological transitions between the initial solidification and the subsequent columnar growth region. Furthermore, a macroscopic one-dimensional temperature solver is integrated to account for the transient and nonlinear temperature field during the initial stage of continuous casting. The external heat flux boundary conditions for this process were derived from thermal process data of the industrial slab caster. The simulation results for the three steel grades have been validated by thickness measurements of breakout shells and microstructure observation of the corresponding grades. Furthermore, the primary dendrite spacing has been measured across the whole thickness of the shell and compared with the simulated microstructures. Significant microstructure differences between the steel grades are discussed and correlated with their hot-cracking behavior.

  11. Modeling interfacial slag layer phenomena in the shell/mold gap in continuous casting of steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Ya

    A new lubrication and friction model of slag in the interfacial gap was combined into an existing 1-D heat transfer model, CON1D. Analytical transient models of liquid slag flow and solid slag stress have been coupled with a finite-difference model of heat transfer in the mold, gap and steel shell to predict transient shear stress, friction, slip and fracture of the slag layers. Experimental work was conducted to measure the properties of slag powder, including the friction coefficient at elevated temperatures and viscosity near solidification temperature. Tests with wide cooling rates range were conducted to construct CCT curves and to predict critical cooling rates of two slags with different crystallization tendencies. Slag composition and microstructure were analyzed by XRD and SEM. The CON1D model predicts shell thickness, temperature distributions in the mold and shell, slag layers thickness, heat flux profiles down the mold, cooling water temperature rise, ideal taper of the mold walls, and other related phenomena. Plants measurements from operating casters were collected to calibrate the model. The model was then applied to study the effect of casting speed and powder viscosity properties on slag layer behavior. The study finds that liquid slag lubrication would produce negligible stresses. Lower mold slag consumption rate leads to higher solid friction and results in solid slag layer fracture and movement if it falls below a critical value. Mold friction and fracture are governed by lubrication consumption rate. The high measured friction force in operating casters could be due to three sources: an intermittent moving solid slag layer, excessive mold taper or mold misalignment. The model was also applied to interpret the crystallization behavior of slag. A mechanism for the formation of this crystalline layer was proposed that combined the effects of a shift in the viscosity curve, a decrease in the liquid slag conductivity due to partial crystallization

  12. Rare earth metals influence on mechanical properties and crack resistance of GP240GH and G17CrMo5-5 cast steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gajewski

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of research on modification influence of REM on mechanical properties and crack resistance of GP240GH cast carbon steel and G17CrMo5-5 high-temperature cast steel. The tests have been performed on successive industrial melts. The rare earth metals were put into the ladle during tapping of heat melt from the furnace. Each time ca 2000 kg of liquid metals were modified. Because of this the amount of sulphur in the cast steel was decreased and the non-metallic inclusion morphology was significantly changed. There were tested mechanical properties (Re,Rm, plastic properties (A5,Z and impact strength (KV, and on the basis of the three-point bend test the KJC stress intensity factor was evaluated. It was noticed that the REM modification brings essential increase of impact strength as well as fracture toughness determined by KJC factor.

  13. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction (E-SMARRT): Optimization of Heat Treatments on Stainless Steel Castings for Improved Corrosion Resistance and Mechanical Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John N. DuPont; Jeffrey D. Farren; Andrew W. Stockdale; Brett M. Leister

    2012-06-30

    It is commonly believed that high alloy steel castings have inferior corrosion resistance to their wrought counterparts as a result of the increased amount of microsegregation remaining in the as-cast structure. Homogenization and dissolution heat treatments are often utilized to reduce or eliminate the residual microsegregation and dissolve the secondary phases. Detailed electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and light optical microscopy (LOM) were utilized to correlate the amount of homogenization and dissolution present after various thermal treatments with calculated values and with the resultant corrosion resistance of the alloys.The influence of heat treatment time and temperature on the homogenization and dissolution kinetics were investigated using stainless steel alloys CN3MN and CK3MCuN. The influence of heat treatment time and temperature on the impact toughness and corrosion reistance of cast stainless steel alloys CF-3, CF-3M, CF-8, and CF-8M was also investigated.

  14. Properties of a large carbon steel casting used in French PWR nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benhamou, C.; Roux, F.; Nectoux, G.; Delorme, A.

    1980-09-01

    To introduce a large casting in a PWR nuclear plant migh appear detrimental to its safety when comparing with forgings or rollings. In this paper we would like to show the constant efforts of the founder in providing a product with reproducible and high quality. Furthermore a program test covering a complete investigation of a real channel head is presented; the three following aspects have been studied: characterisation of cast flaws by non destructive and destructive examination, homogeneity of casting and fatigue and use properties

  15. Kinetics of the σ Phase Precipitation in Respect of Erosion-corrosion Wear of Duplex Cast Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brodziak-Hyska A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The examined material comprised two grades of corrosion-resistant cast steel, namely GX2CrNiMoN25-6-3 and GX2CrNiMoCuN25-6-3- 3, used for example in elements of systems of wet flue gas desulphurisation in power industry. The operating conditions in media heated up to 70°C and containing Cl' and SO4 ions and solid particles produce high erosive and corrosive wear.The work proposes an application of the σ phase as a component of precipitation strengthening mechanism in order to increase the functional properties of the material. The paper presents the results of examination of the kinetics of σ phase precipitation at a temperature of 800°C and at times ranging from 30 to 180 minutes. Changes in the morphology of precipitates of the σ phase were determined using the value of shape factor R. Resistance to erosion-corrosion wear of duplex cast steel was correlated with the kinetics of sigma phase precipitating.

  16. Influence of Ti(C,N precipitates on austenite growth of micro-alloyed steel during continuous casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Austenite grain size is an important influence factor for ductility of steel at high temperatures during continuous casting. Thermodynamic and kinetics calculations were performed to analyze the characteristics of Ti(C,N precipitates formed during the continuous casting of micro-alloyed steel. Based on Andersen-Grong equation, a coupling model of second phase precipitation and austenite grain growth has been established, and the influence of second precipitates on austenite grain growth under different cooling rates is discussed. Calculations show that the final sizes of austenite grains are 2.155, 1.244, 0.965, 0.847 and 0.686 mm, respectively, under the cooling rate of 1, 3, 5, 7, and 10 ℃·s-1, when ignoring the pinning effect of precipitation on austenite growth. Whereas, if taking the pinning effect into consideration, the grain growth remains stable from 1,350 ℃, the calculated final sizes of austenite grains are 1.46, 1.02, 0.80, 0.67 and 0.57 mm, respectively. The sizes of final Ti(C,N precipitates are 137, 79, 61, 51 and 43 nm, respectively, with the increase of cooling rate from 1 to 10 ℃·s-1. Model validation shows that the austenite size under different cooling rates coincided with the calculation results. Finally, the corresponding measures to strengthen cooling intensity at elevated temperature are proposed to improve the ductility and transverse crack of slab.

  17. Fracture Toughness of Z3CN20.09M Cast Stainless Steel with Long-Term Thermal Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Weiwei; Yu, Dunji; Gao, Hongbo; Xue, Fei; Chen, Xu

    2017-09-01

    Accelerated thermal aging tests were performed at 400 °C for nearly 18,000 h on Z3CN20.09M cast stainless steel which was used for primary coolant pipes of nuclear power plants. A series of Charpy impact tests were conducted on Z3CN20.09M after different long-term thermal aging time. The test results indicated that the Charpy impact energy of Z3CN20.09M cast stainless steel decreased rapidly at an early stage and then almost saturated after thermal aging of 10,000 h. Furthermore, J-resistance curves were measured for CT specimens of longitudinal and circumferential pipe orientations. It showed that there was no obvious difference in the fracture characteristics of Z3CN20.09M in different sampling directions. In addition, the observed stretch zone width (SZW) revealed that the value of initiation fracture toughness J SZW was significantly lower than that of fracture toughness J IC, indicating a low actual crack initiation energy due to long-term thermal aging.

  18. Effects of Zr, Ti, and Al Additions on Nonmetallic Inclusions and Impact Toughness of Cast Low-Alloy Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizyukov, Pavel V.; Giese, Scott R.

    2017-04-01

    A microalloying of the low-carbon and low-alloy cast steel was conducted with Zr, Ti, and Al that were added to the steel in four combinations. After heat treatment, the samples were tested for impact toughness at room temperature using the Charpy method. The highest values of impact toughness were obtained in the group treated with Zr, while Zr-Ti and Zr-Ti-Al groups showed moderate toughness values; the lowest values were observed in the Zr-Al group. Difference among the treatment groups was observed in the fracture mechanisms, morphology, and area distribution of the inclusions. High toughness values achieved in the trials treated with zirconium corresponded with smooth ductile fracture. The metal treated with a combination of zirconium and titanium had a relatively small area occupied by inclusions, but its toughness was also moderate. Lowest impact toughness values corresponded with the larger area occupied by the inclusions in the trials treated with aluminum. Also, a connection between the solubility product [Al][N] and impact toughness was established. The study also provides a qualitative description and quantitative analysis of the nonmetallic inclusions formation as a result of microalloying treatment. The precipitation sequence of the inclusions was described based on the thermochemical calculations for the nonmetallic compounds discovered in the experimental steel. A description of the size distribution, morphology, and composition was conducted for the oxides, nitrides, sulfides, and multiphase particles.

  19. Innovative casting process of lighter steel components for the transport industry (Brite/Euram III ''ICARO'' project)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuganti, A.; Corazzola, M. [Fiat SpA, Orbassano (Italy). Centro Ricerche

    2000-07-01

    The paper presents the main objectives and the technical approach of the ''ICARO'' European Brite project; the up-to-date results and the reached and expected deliverables are reviewed. The overall object of this project is to develop an innovative casting technology for manufacture near net shape steel components, compatible with the mass production requirements of transport industry. The proposed approach for reaching this target is to advance the lost foam technology for its application to steel. The overall objective of this project is to develop an advanced lost foam casting technology to manufacture near net shape steel components for the transport industry. Aiming at this target in the first 12-months of the project the work program was focused on the following main topics: definition of strategies to advance the L.F. process for steel casting, assessment of requirements and specifications for the automotive and aeronautical application that were selected as demonstrators to validate the technological innovation, component selection, first mechanical and microstructural characterisations. The purpose for the next two years is also to develop a numerical model for simulation. The developed software will be exploited for the industrial application design. In conclusion the success of the project will permit to develop casting procedure for lost foam process of steel parts, simulation software for LF-casting of steel and 2 different industrial application (one automotive and one aeronautical). These will be representative for comparing the developed innovative solution (material/process) with the traditional one in terms of components performance improvement, production costs saving, environmental impact benefit. (orig.)

  20. Effect of high-manganese cast steel strain hardening on the abrasion wear resistance in a mixture of SiC and water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalandyk B.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The study attempts to determine the impact of the high-manganese cast steel strain hardening on its abrasion wear resistance in a mixture of SiC and water prepared in accordance with ASTM G75. For tests, the high-manganese cast steel containing 10.7, 17.9 and 20.02% Mn was selected. The results of microstructure examinations and abrasion wear resistance tests carried out on the material in non-hardened condition and after strain hardening with a force of 539.55kN were disclosed. Additionally, the surface of samples after a 16-hour cycle of abrasion tests was examined. Moreover, based on the obtained results, the effect of different contents of Mn in cast steel was studied, mainly in terms of its impact on the abrasion wear resistance. The results obtained on the tested materials were compared with the results obtained on the low-alloyed abrasion wear-resistant cast steel L35GSM.

  1. Effects of shot peening on fatigue behavior in high speed steel and cast iron with spheroidal vanadium carbides dispersed within martensitic-matrix microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uematsu, Y.; Kakiuchi, T.; Tokaji, K.; Nishigaki, K.; Ogasawara, M.

    2013-01-01

    Four-point bending fatigue tests had been performed using high speed steel and cast iron with vanadium carbides (VCs) dispersed within the martensitic-matrix microstructure. Shot peening or shot blast was applied to both the materials and the effect of surface treatments on fatigue behavior was investigated. The fatigue strengths of the high speed steel were improved by both shot peening and shot blast processes due to the high hardness near the specimen surface and residual compressive stress. Although the hardness of cast iron was enhanced by both treatments, the fatigue strengths were not improved by the shot blast because of the existence of large casting defects. Shot peening with higher shot energy could induce the transition of crack initiation mechanism of cast iron, where crack initiated from the cluster of VCs. However the shot peening had small effect on the fatigue strengths of the cast iron because large casting defects were not removed by the shot peening due to the high hardness of the martensitic matrix.

  2. Assessment of thermal aging embrittlement in a cast stainless steel valve and its effect on the structural integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cicero, S.; Setien, J.; Gorrochategui, I.

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyzes the thermal aging embrittlement occurred in a cast stainless steel valve, which is part of the reactor water clean-up (RWCU) system of a Spanish boiling water reactor (BWR) nuclear power plant. The aim is to estimate the current and future state of the material and the corresponding structural integrity of the valve. Given that there is no data available for the experimental characterization of the material, the evolution of the mechanical properties (fracture toughness, yield stress, flow stress and Ramberg-Osgood parameters) has been estimated using the ANL procedure. With the obtained estimations, the critical crack size has been calculated using the European procedure FITNET FFS and the ASME Code. This analysis considers not only the evolution of the mechanical properties up to now but also its future evolution in case there is a life extension of the plant until year 2029

  3. Ultrasonic phased array sound field mapping through large-bore coarse grained cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) piping materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinson, A. D.; Crawford, S. L.; Prowant, M. S.; Diaz, A. A.; Hathaway, J. E.; Anderson, M. T.

    2012-04-01

    A sound field beam mapping exercise was conducted to further understand the effects of coarse-grained microstructures found in cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) materials on phased array ultrasonic wave propagation. Laboratory measurements were made on three CASS specimens with different microstructures; the specimens were polished and etched to reveal measurable grain sizes, shapes, and orientations. Three longitudinal, phased array probes were fixed on a specimen's outside diameter with the sound field directed toward one end (face) of the pipe segment over a fixed range of angles. A point receiver was raster scanned over the surface of the specimen face generating a sound field image. A slice of CASS material was then removed from the specimen end and the beam mapping exercise repeated. The sound fields acquired were analyzed for spot size, coherency, and beam redirection. Qualitative analyses were conducted between the resulting sound fields and the microstructural characteristics of each specimen.

  4. Large Eddy Simulations of Electromagnetic Braking Effects on Argon Bubble Transport and Capture in a Steel Continuous Casting Mold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Kai; Vanka, Surya P.; Thomas, Brian G.

    2018-02-01

    In continuous casting of steel, argon gas is often injected to prevent clogging of the nozzle, but the bubbles affect the flow pattern, and may become entrapped to form defects in the final product. Further, an electromagnetic field is frequently applied to induce a braking effect on the flow field and modify the inclusion transport. In this study, a previously validated GPU-based in-house code CUFLOW is used to investigate the effect of electromagnetic braking on turbulent flow, bubble transport, and capture. Well-resolved large eddy simulations are combined with two-way coupled Lagrangian computations of the bubbles. The drag coefficient on the bubbles is modified to account for the effects of the magnetic field. The distribution of the argon bubbles, capture, and escape rates, are presented and compared with and without the magnetic field. The bubble capture patterns are also compared with results of a previous RANS model as well as with plant measurements.

  5. Effects of Thermocapillary Forces during Welding of 316L-Type Wrought, Cast and Powder Metallurgy Austenitic Stainless Steels

    CERN Document Server

    Sgobba, Stefano

    2003-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is now under construction at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). This 27 km long accelerator requires 1248 superconducting dipole magnets operating at 1.9 K. The cold mass of the dipole magnets is closed by a shrinking cylinder with two longitudinal welds and two end covers at both extremities of the cylinder. The end covers, for which fabrication by welding, casting or Powder Metallurgy (PM) was considered, are dished-heads equipped with a number of protruding nozzles for the passage of the different cryogenic lines. Structural materials and welds must retain high strength and toughness at cryogenic temperature. AISI 316L-type austenitic stainless steel grades have been selected because of their mechanical properties, ductility, weldability and stability of the austenitic phase against low-temperature spontaneous martensitic transformation. 316LN is chosen for the fabrication of the end covers, while the interconnection components to be welded on the protrud...

  6. Influence of Vanadium and Boron Additions on the Microstructure, Fracture Toughness, and Abrasion Resistance of Martensite-Carbide Composite Cast Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed Elghazaly

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High chromium cast steel alloys are being used extensively in many industrial services where dry or wet abrasion resistance is required. Such steel castings are demanded for cement, stoneware pipes, and earth moving industries. In this research, five steel heats were prepared in 100 kg and one-ton medium frequency induction furnaces and then sand cast in both Y-block and final impact arm spare parts, respectively. Vanadium (0.5–2.5% and boron (120–150 ppm were added to the 18Cr-1.9C-0.5Mo steel heats to examine their effects on the steel microstructure, mechanical properties especially impact, fracture toughness and abrasion resistance. Changes in the phase transformation after heat treatment were examined using inverted, SEM-EDX microscopy; however, the abrasion resistance was measured in dry basis using the real tonnage of crushed and milled stoneware clay to less than 0.1 mm size distribution.

  7. Development of Stronger and More Reliable Cast Austenitic Stainless Steels (H-Series) Based on Scientific Design Methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muralidharan, G.; Sikka, V.K.; Pankiw, R.I.

    2006-04-15

    The goal of this program was to increase the high-temperature strength of the H-Series of cast austenitic stainless steels by 50% and upper use temperature by 86 to 140 F (30 to 60 C). Meeting this goal is expected to result in energy savings of 38 trillion Btu/year by 2020 and energy cost savings of $185 million/year. The higher strength H-Series of cast stainless steels (HK and HP type) have applications for the production of ethylene in the chemical industry, for radiant burner tubes and transfer rolls for secondary processing of steel in the steel industry, and for many applications in the heat-treating industry. The project was led by Duraloy Technologies, Inc. with research participation by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and industrial participation by a diverse group of companies. Energy Industries of Ohio (EIO) was also a partner in this project. Each team partner had well-defined roles. Duraloy Technologies led the team by identifying the base alloys that were to be improved from this research. Duraloy Technologies also provided an extensive creep data base on current alloys, provided creep-tested specimens of certain commercial alloys, and carried out centrifugal casting and component fabrication of newly designed alloys. Nucor Steel was the first partner company that installed the radiant burner tube assembly in their heat-treating furnace. Other steel companies participated in project review meetings and are currently working with Duraloy Technologies to obtain components of the new alloys. EIO is promoting the enhanced performance of the newly designed alloys to Ohio-based companies. The Timken Company is one of the Ohio companies being promoted by EIO. The project management and coordination plan is shown in Fig. 1.1. A related project at University of Texas-Arlington (UT-A) is described in Development of Semi-Stochastic Algorithm for Optimizing Alloy Composition of High-Temperature Austenitic Stainless Steels (H-Series) for Desired

  8. Deformation and Recrystallization Behavior of the Cast Structure in Large Size, High Strength Steel Ingots: Experimentation and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadha, K.; Shahriari, D.; Tremblay, R.; Bhattacharjee, P. P.; Jahazi, M.

    2017-09-01

    Constitutive modeling of the ingot breakdown process of large size ingots of high strength steel was carried out through comprehensive thermomechanical processing using Gleeble 3800® thermomechanical simulator, finite element modeling (FEM), optical and electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD). For this purpose, hot compression tests in the range of 1473 K to 1323 K (1200 °C to 1050 °C) and strain rates of 0.25 to 2 s-1 were carried out. The stress-strain curves describing the deformation behavior of the dendritic microstructure of the cast ingot were analyzed in terms of the Arrhenius and Hansel-Spittel models which were implemented in Forge NxT 1.0® FEM software. The results indicated that the Arrhenius model was more reliable in predicting microstructure evolution of the as-cast structure during ingot breakdown, particularly the occurrence of dynamic recrystallization (DRX) process which was a vital parameter in estimating the optimum loads for forming of large size components. The accuracy and reliability of both models were compared in terms of correlation coefficient (R) and the average absolute relative error (ARRE).

  9. Evolution of microstructure, texture and inhibitor along the processing route for grain-oriented electrical steels using strip casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hai-Tao, E-mail: liuht@ral.neu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, P.O. Box 105, Shenyang 110819 (China); Institute of Research of Iron and Steel, Shasteel, Zhangjiagang 215625, Jiangsu (China); Yao, Sheng-Jie [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, 264209 (China); Sun, Yu; Gao, Fei; Song, Hong-Yu; Liu, Guo-Huai [State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, P.O. Box 105, Shenyang 110819 (China); Li, Lei; Geng, Dian-Qiao [Key Laboratory of Electromagnetic Processing of Materials, Ministry of Education, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Liu, Zhen-Yu; Wang, Guo-Dong [State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, P.O. Box 105, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2015-08-15

    In the present work, a regular grade GO sheet was produced successively by strip casting, hot rolling, normalizing annealing, two-stage cold rolling with intermediate annealing, primary recrystallization annealing, secondary recrystallization annealing and purification. The aim of this paper was to characterize the evolution of microstructure, texture and inhibitor along the new processing route by comprehensive utilization of optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. It was found that a fine microstructure with the ferrite grain size range of 7–12 μm could be obtained in the primary recrystallization annealed sheet though a very coarse microstructure was produced in the initial as-cast strip. The main finding was that the “texture memory” effect on Goss texture started on the through-thickness intermediate annealed strip after first cold rolling, which was not similar to the “texture memory” effect on Goss texture starting on the surface layers of the hot rolled strip in the conventional production route. As a result, the origin of Goss nuclei capable of secondary recrystallization lied in the grains already presented in Goss orientation in the intermediate annealed strip after first cold rolling. Another finding was that fine and dispersive inhibitors (mainly AlN) were easy to be produced in the primary recrystallization microstructure due to the initial rapid solidification during strip casting and the subsequent rapid cooling, and the very high temperature reheating usually used before hot rolling in the conventional production route could be avoided. - Highlights: • A regular grade grain-oriented electrical steel was produced. • Evolution of microstructure, texture and inhibitor was characterized. • Origin of Goss nuclei lied in the intermediate annealed strip. • A fine primary recrystallization microstructure could be produced. • Effective inhibitors were easy to be obtained in the new processing route.

  10. Casting technology for ODS steels - dispersion of nanoparticles in liquid metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, M.; Grants, I.; Kaldre, I.; Bojarevics, A.; Gerbeth, G.

    2017-07-01

    Dispersion of particles to produce metal matrix nanocomposites (MMNC) can be achieved by means of ultrasonic vibration of the melt using ultrasound transducers. However, a direct transfer of this method to produce steel composites is not feasible because of the much higher working temperature. Therefore, an inductive technology for contactless treatment by acoustic cavitation was developed. This report describes the samples produced to assess the feasibility of the proposed method for nano-particle separation in steel. Stainless steel samples with inclusions of TiB2, TiO2, Y2O3, CeO2, Al2O3 and TiN have been created and analyzed. Additional experiments have been performed using light metals with an increased value of the steady magnetic field using a superconducting magnet with a field strength of up to 5 T.

  11. Numerical Simulation of the Fluid Flow, Heat Transfer, and Solidification During the Twin-Roll Continuous Casting of Steel and Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mianguang; Zhu, Miaoyong

    2016-02-01

    The commercialization of aluminum twin-roll casting was realized in the early 1950s, while it is still a dream for engineers to produce steel strip by this process. In the present paper, a two-dimensional mathematical model is employed to study the fluid flow, heat transfer, and solidification during the twin-roll casting for both steel and aluminum. The turbulent flow in the pool is examined using the Lam and Bremhorst low-Reynolds-number turbulence model. In order to facilitate the comparison and analysis, a new transformed coordinate system ( r, φ) is established. Characteristics of the momentum boundary layer and the solidification front are described. Reasons of the formation of the wedge-shaped zone near the surface of rotating roll are given. In the transformed coordinate system ( r, φ), the effect of the centrifugal force induced by the rotating roll is presented using the velocity component in the r direction and the pressure gradient in the r direction. At last, the evaluation of the solidified shell in the pool is analyzed. The results show that the twin-roll casting is a roll-rotating-driven process. The variation of the thickness of the momentum boundary layer can be divided into three stages and its thickness is very uniform at the last stage. Near the roll surface, there exists a wedge-shaped zone induced by the near-roll-surface shear flow that washes the mushy zone front, which increases the depth of the liquid pool and decreases the length of the rolling region. The rotating roll gives rise to the stirring effect to the pool region and the metal is moving away from the roll surface in the positive radial velocity region, and the effect of the centrifugal force becomes weak in the lower part of the pool. At the solidification front, the non-dimensional effective heat transfer coefficient distribution in steel twin-roll casting is larger than that in aluminum twin-roll casting. Considering that the turbulence level is determined by the flow

  12. Improvement of Structure and Properties of Cast Ferrite-Pearlite Steels for Freight Railway Cars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rabinovich

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available As it i s known For increasing of propcnics (YTS 2 380 MPa of cast stcds i t is c f k ~ i v tco incrcasc conlcnt o f alhsti~uiionaal lloyingclcrncnts, (Si, Mn, Cr, Ni. 1 lowevcr it lcads to rising in pricc olstccl ton. lncrcasing of Si and Mn conrcnl only is limitcd hy decreasing o lductility and weld nhility. As a rule silicon contcnt at ~hcsca ccls is not highcr than 0.4-0.67'0 and Si:Mn ratio is not highcr khan 1:2. Nowfor grain rcfincmcnt ~wc sin oculation of stcct by nitrogcn and clcincnrs with high chcmical affinity to nltmgcn. Mostly vanadium i s usd.howcvcr niobium sornctime is uscd. Dissldvantagcs of this arc high cost of alloying clcmcnrs and low thcrrnodynamic stability OFvanadium and niobium nitridcs. Parlicles of V(C,N and Nh(C.N dissolvc during hcating fnr licnt trcatmcnt or during wclding. It [cads lodccrcasing of grain refinement elfcc!.Adaptat ion or this microalloying stratcgy Tor casts producing For rrcight mil way cars let cstirnatc possibility of application thcsc casts in ancw gcnerazion freight railway cars.

  13. Effects of chills on the solidification pattern of an axial steel cast impeller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Copur

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents three-dimensional simulation of transient conduction heat transfer within an axial impeller (AISI 1016, two different sizes of chills (AISI 1016, core (green sand and mold (green sand by using Ansys CFX. Specific heat, density and thermal conductivity of AISI 1016 steel, mold and Core materials are considered as functions of temperatures

  14. Effect of Al2O3 on the Crystallization of Mold Flux for Casting High Al Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lejun; Wang, Wanlin; Zhou, Kechao

    2015-06-01

    In order to lower the weight of automotive bodies for better fuel-efficiency and occupant safety, the demand for high Al-containing advanced high strength steel, such as transformation-induced plasticity and twinning-induced plasticity steel, is increasing. However, high aluminum content in steels would tend to significantly affect the properties of mold flux during the continuous casting process. In this paper, a kinetic study of the effect of Al2O3 content on the crystallization behavior of mold flux was conducted by using the single hot thermocouple technique and the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami model combined with the Arrhenius Equation. The results suggested that Al2O3 behaves as an amphoteric oxide in the crystallization process of mold flux. The precipitated phases of mold flux change from cuspidine (Ca4Si2O7F2) into nepheline (NaAlSiO4) and CaF2, and then into gehlenite (Ca2Al2SiO7) with the increase of Al2O3 content. The kinetics study of the isothermal crystallization process indicated that the effective crystallization rate ( k) and Avrami exponent ( n) also first increased and then decreased with the increase of Al2O3 content. The values for the crystallization activation energy of mold flux with different Al2O3 contents were E R0.8A7 = 150.76 ± 17.89 kJ/mol, E R0.8A20 = 136.43 ± 6.48 kJ/mol, E R0.8A30 = 108.63 ± 12.25 kJ/mol and E R0.8A40 = 116.15 ± 8.17 kJ/mol.

  15. Corrosion of low-carbon cast steel in concentrated synthetic groundwater at 80 to 150 C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, T.M.; Soo, P.

    1995-01-01

    Corrosion properties of American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) A216-Grade WCA low-carbon steel were evaluated in concentrated synthetic groundwater at 80 to 150 C. The evaluation provides information on the use of the steel as a container material in the proposed Yucca Mountain high-level waste repository. Uniform corrosion rates measured over 4 months ranged from 10 to 40 microm/year, in initially aerated static solutions under gamma irradiation at 1.3 x 10 6 rad/h. Irradiation effects on uniform corrosion rates were not discernible after 4 months. Pitting corrosion was also found, but the pitting factor was small. Microstructural effects on corrosion were not significant. During corrosion under irradiation, there was an indication of a large amount of hydrogen absorption in the steel. Constant extension rate tests showed evidence for environmental assisted cracking under free corrosion conditions, and strong evidence of hydrogen embrittlement and moisture-induced ductility loss. The use of the test results in support of the Yucca Mountain project is discussed

  16. Sigma phase morphologies in cast and aged super duplex stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Marcelo; Casteletti, Luiz Carlos

    2009-01-01

    Solution annealed and water quenched duplex and super duplex stainless steels are thermodynamically metastable systems at room temperature. These systems do not migrate spontaneously to a thermodynamically stable condition because an energy barrier separates the metastable and stable states. However, any heat input they receive, for example through isothermal treatment or through prolonged exposure to a voltaic arc in the welding process, cause them to reach a condition of stable equilibrium which, for super duplex stainless steels, means precipitation of intermetallic and carbide phases. These phases include the sigma phase, which is easily identified from its morphology, and its influence on the material's impact strength. The purpose of this work was to ascertain how 2-hour isothermal heat treatments at 920 deg. C and 980 deg. C affect the microstructure of ASTM A890/A890M GR 6A super duplex stainless steel. The sigma phase morphologies were found to be influenced by these two aging temperatures, with the material showing a predominantly lacy microstructure when heat treated at 920 deg. C and block-shaped when heat treated at 980 deg. C.

  17. Effect of cooling rate and forced convection on as-cast structure of 2205 duplex stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To forecast the as-cast structure and ferrite-austenite phase ratio of 2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS, the effects of cooling rate and forced convection were observed in a high-vacuum resistance furnace in which the forced convection was created by the rotation of the crucible. The as-cast structure of all 2205 DSS samples is full equiaxed grains, and the microstructure consists of a great amount of desirable intra-granular austenite inside the continuous ferrite grain matrix, besides Widmanstatten austenite and grain boundary austenite. The ferrite grain size decreases gradually with the increase in the cooling rates (20 to 60 ìC·min-1 or the forced convection, while the ferrite grains of the samples solidified with a strong convection are barely changed when the cooling rate is below 50 ìC·min-1. Moreover, a small grain size is beneficial for the austenite formation but the influence is not very obvious under the cooling rates in the range of 5 to 50 ìC·min-1. Compared with grain size, the cooling rate has a greater influence on the final ferrite content. A model based on the experimental results is established to predict the ferrite content, which could be approximated by ヤ(%=20.5·exp(c/80.0+0.34d+34.1, where c is the cooling rate in ìC·min-1 and d is the grain size in mm. By using this model, the dependence of the final ferrite content on cooling rate and grain size is well described.

  18. Ultrasonic Characterization of Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Microstructure: Discrimination between Equiaxed- and Columnar-Grain Material – An Interim Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Good, Morris S.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.; Watson, Bruce E.; Peters, Timothy J.; Dixit, Mukul; Bond, Leonard J.

    2009-10-27

    Ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and inspection of cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) components used in the nuclear power industry is neither as effective nor reliable as is needed due to detrimental effects upon the interrogating ultrasonic beam and interference from ultrasonic backscatter. The root cause is the coarse-grain microstructure inherent to this class of materials. Some ultrasonic techniques perform better for particular microstructural classifications and this has led to the hypothesis that an ultrasonic inspection can be optimized for a particular microstructural class, if a technique exists to reliably classify the microstructure for feedback to the inspection. This document summarizes scoping experiments of in-situ ultrasonic methods for classification and/or characterization of the material microstructures in CASS components from the outside surface of a pipe. The focus of this study was to evaluate ultrasonic methods and provide an interim report that documents results and technical progress. An initial set of experiments were performed to test the hypothesis that in-service characterization of cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) is feasible, and that, if reliably performed, such data would provide real-time feedback to optimize in-service inspections in the field. With this objective in mind, measurements for the experiment were restricted to techniques that should be robust if carried forward to eventual field implementation. Two parameters were investigated for their ability to discriminate between different microstructures in CASS components. The first parameter was a time-of-flight ratio of a normal incidence shear wave to that of a normal incidence longitudinal wave (TOFRSL). The ratio removed dependency on component thickness which may not be accurately reported in the field. The second parameter was longitudinal wave attenuation. The selected CASS specimens provided five equiaxed-grain material samples and five columnar

  19. The effect of clustering on the mobility of dislocations during aging in Nb-microalloyed strip cast steels: In situ heating TEM observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrestha, Sachin L.; Xie, Kelvin Y.; Ringer, Simon P.; Carpenter, Kristin R.; Smith, David R.; Killmore, Chris R.; Cairney, Julie M.

    2013-01-01

    Cluster-strengthened Nb-microalloyed strip cast steels are of interest as clustering during aging leads to an enhancement in strength without compromising ductility, resulting in desirable mechanical properties. However, the precise strengthening mechanism is not well understood. Using in situ heating transmission electron microscopy, clustering was found to impede the movement of dislocations during aging. The attractive combination of ductility and strength was attributed to the effects of recovery and the restricted movement of dislocations through clustering

  20. Research on Soft Reduction Amount Distribution to Eliminate Typical Inter-dendritic Crack in Continuous Casting Slab of X70 Pipeline Steel by Numerical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ke; Wang, Chang; Liu, Guo-liang; Ding, Ning; Sun, Qi-song; Tian, Zhi-hong

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the formation of one kind of typical inter-dendritic crack around triple point region in continuous casting(CC) slab during the operation of soft reduction, fully coupled 3D thermo-mechanical finite element models was developed, also plant trials were carried out in a domestic continuous casting machine. Three possible types of soft reduction amount distribution (SRAD) in the soft reduction region were analyzed. The relationship between the typical inter-dendritic cracks and soft reduction conditions is presented and demonstrated in production practice. Considering the critical strain of internal crack formation, a critical tolerance for the soft reduction amount distribution and related casing parameters have been proposed for better contribution of soft reduction to the internal quality of slabs. The typical inter-dendritic crack around the triple point region had been eliminated effectively through the application of proposed suggestions for continuous casting of X70 pipeline steel in industrial practice.

  1. Application of stress relaxation testing in evaluation of creep strength of a tungsten-alloyed 10% Cr cast steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghavender Rao, G.; Gupta, O.P.; Pradhan, B.

    2011-01-01

    Uniaxial isothermal stress relaxation tests (SRT) were performed on a tungsten-alloyed 10% Cr cast steel (G-X12Cr Mo W V Nb N 10 1 1) at temperatures of 580, 600 and 620 o C and initial strain levels of 0.2, 0.5 and 0.8%. Inelastic strain rates for different stresses were estimated from the stress versus time data generated from the tests. Conventional creep tests were also conducted on the same material at 580, 600 and 620 o C and at different stress levels. The strain rate data estimated from SRT were compared with minimum creep rates derived from the creep tests; the strain rates estimated from SRT with 0.8% initial strain level are in better agreement than those estimated from SRT with 0.2 and 0.5% initial strain levels. In order to ascertain the technique, stress relaxation behaviour was estimated from creep test data and compared with the stress relaxation curves obtained from SRT at corresponding temperatures. The stress relaxation curves obtained from SRT with 0.8% initial strain level are in good agreement with the stress relaxation curves estimated from the creep tests. It is concluded that the stress relaxation test with initial strain level of 0.8% could be considered as an appropriate short-term test technique for estimation of creep strength of newly developed materials.

  2. Mechanical property degradation and microstructural evolution of cast austenitic stainless steels under short-term thermal aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lach, Timothy G.; Byun, Thak Sang; Leonard, Keith J.

    2017-12-01

    Mechanical testing and microstructural characterization were performed on short-term thermally aged cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS) to understand the severity and mechanisms of thermal-aging degradation experienced during extended operation of light water reactor (LWR) coolant systems. Four CASS materials-CF3, CF3M, CF8, and CF8M-were thermally aged for 1500 h at 290 °C, 330 °C, 360 °C, and 400 °C. All four alloys experienced insignificant change in strength and ductility properties but a significant reduction in absorbed impact energy. The primary microstructural and compositional changes during thermal aging were spinodal decomposition of the δ-ferrite into α/α‧, precipitation of G-phase in the δ-ferrite, segregation of solute to the austenite/ferrite interphase boundary, and growth of M23C6 carbides on the austenite/ferrite interphase boundary. These changes were shown to be highly dependent on chemical composition, particularly the concentration of C and Mo, and aging temperature. The low C, high Mo CF3M alloys experienced the most spinodal decomposition and G-phase precipitation coinciding the largest reduction in impact properties.

  3. Mechanical property degradation and microstructural evolution of cast austenitic stainless steels under short-term thermal aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lach, Timothy G.; Byun, Thak Sang; Leonard, Keith J.

    2017-12-01

    Mechanical testing and microstructural characterization were performed on short-term thermally aged cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS) to understand the severity and mechanisms of thermal-aging degradation experienced during extended operation of light water reactor (LWR) coolant systems. Four CASS materials – CF3, CF3M, CF8, and CF8M – were thermally aged for 1500 hours at 290 °C, 330 °C, 360 °C, and 400 °C. All four alloys experienced insignificant change in strength and ductility properties but a significant reduction in absorbed impact energy. The primary microstructural and compositional changes during thermal aging were spinodal decomposition of the δ-ferrite into α/ α`, precipitation of G-phase in the δ-ferrite, segregation of solute to the austenite/ ferrite interphase boundary, and growth of M23C6 carbides on the austenite/ferrite interphase boundary. These changes were shown to be highly dependent on chemical composition, particularly the concentration of C and Mo, and aging temperature. A comprehensive model is being developed to correlate the microstructural evolution with mechanical behavior and simulation for predictive evaluations of LWR coolant system components.

  4. Study on the Surface Microstructure of a Modified STD61 Steel Mold Used for the Die Casting Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Ha-Young; Lee, Seung-Joon; Kang, Minwoo; Lee, Suk-Jin; Lee, Young-Kook [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Won Jon [Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jae Suk; Kim, Byung-Hoon [Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    The surface microstructure and crack formation of an aluminum die-casting mold were investigated. The mold was made of a modified STD61 steel, and was used for more than 165,000 cycles. The mold surface consisted of four layers; an oxidized layer, a decarburized layer, a network carbide layer and a tempered martensite matrix. The depth down to the hardest network carbide layer was ⁓200 μm. Inside the matrix, M{sub 3}C transition carbides were dissolved so that solute C joined pre-existing M{sub 2}3C{sub 6} and MC carbides to make them coarse. About 60% of thermal fatigue cracks had a depth less than 200 μm due to the hard network carbide layer, which obstructed the propagation of cracks. Cracks of over 200 μm were filled with oxide wedges of Al and Si which was which flown from the molten alloy as well as the Fe oxide.

  5. Effect of post heat treatment on the microstructure and microhardness of diffusion coupled gray cast iron and low carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayob, F.; Hussain, P.; Awang, M.; Zoolfakar, M. R.; Abdullah, A.; Baharudin, B. A.; Rahim, A. A. Abdul

    2018-03-01

    Experimental studies carried out on the joining of grey lamellar graphite cast iron to low carbon steel by diffusion welding techniques had successfully produced a few diffusion couples, despite facing some earlier failures. Although faced with some success, analysis on the diffusion couples showed voids and incomplete bond/joint at the interface of the joints while the tensile strength value was found to be low. In furtherance, the diffusion couples were then subjected to a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) that allowed for further diffusion process to take place to remove the voids and complete the bond/weld. The results revealed microvoids and interface lines at the interfaces of the specimens treated at temperatures of 800°C, and becoming less visible at 900°C. At an elevated temperature of 1000°C, on longer treatment times, apparently these microvoids and interface lines had disappeared, and the bond/weld at the interfaces of the diffusional welded couples seemed to be more complete. Thus, heat treatment time and temperature were found to have a strong influence on the structure, thickness and hardness of the diffusion layer produced.

  6. Evaluation of the strain rate effects on environmental fatigue life of CF8M cast stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Ill Seok; Ha, Gak Hyun; Jeon, Hyun Ik

    2009-01-01

    The environmental fatigue life of CF8M cast stainless steel is influenced by mechanical, environmental and metallurgical parameters, such as strain rate, strain amplitude, temperature, dissolved oxygen concentration, water flow rate and so on. In an actual plant, the mechanical and environmental parameters are changing during the plant operation. Therefore, the effect of such mechanical and environmental parameter changes on fatigue life evaluation have to be studied. Low cycle fatigue life of structural materials diminishes remarkably as functions of various parameters in high temperature and high pressure environments. Such reduction can be estimated by the fatigue life reduction factor(F en ). In this study, fatigue tests were performed under changing conditions of strain amplitude, strain rate. Fatigue life was measured in terms of the number of cycles with the variation of strain amplitudes at 0.004 %/s strain rate, and the fatigue life correction factor was evaluated according to the equation modified by U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission(U.S.NRC) and Japanese Environmental Fatigue Tests committee (JEFT).

  7. Continuous Cooling Transformation in Cast Duplex Stainless Steels CD3MN and CD3MWCuN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoon-Jun; Chumbley, L. Scott; Gleeson, Brian

    2008-04-01

    The kinetics of brittle phase transformation in cast duplex stainless steels CD3MN and CD3MWCuN was investigated under continuous cooling conditions. Cooling rates slower than 5 °C/min. were obtained using a conventional tube furnace with a programable controller. In order to obtain controlled high cooling rates, a furnace equipped to grow crystals by means of the Bridgman method was used. Samples were soaked at 1100 °C for 30 min and cooled at different rates by changing the furnace position at various velocities. The velocity of the furnace movement was correlated to a continuous-cooling-temperature profile for the samples. Continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagrams were constructed based on experimental observations through metallographic sample preparations and optical microscopy. These are compared to calculated diagrams derived from previously determined isothermal transformation diagrams. The theoretical calculations employed a modified Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) equation (or Avrami equation) under assumption of the additivity rule. Rockwell hardness tests were made to present the correlation between hardness change and the amount of brittle phases (determined by tint-etching to most likely be a combination of sigma + chi) after cooling.

  8. Study of Ferrite During Refinement of Prior Austenite Grains in Microalloyed Steel Continuous Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiang; Wen, Guanghua; Tang, Ping

    2017-12-01

    The formation of coarse prior austenite grain is a key factor to promote transverse crack, and the susceptibility to the transverse crack can be reduced by refining the austenite grain size. In the present study, the high-temperature confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) was used to simulate two types of double phase-transformation technologies. The distribution and morphology of ferrites under different cooling conditions were analyzed, and the effects of ferrite distribution and morphology on the double phase-transformation technologies were explored to obtain the suitable double phase-change technology for the continuous casting process. The results indicate that, under the thermal cycle TH0 [the specimens were cooled down to 913 K (640 °C) at a cooling rate of 5.0 K/s (5.0 °C/s)], the width of prior austenite grain boundaries was thick, and the dislocation density at grain boundaries was high. It had strong inhibition effect on crack propagation; under the thermal cycle TH1 [the specimens were cooled down to 1073 K (800 °C) at a cooling rate of 5.0 K/s (5.0 °C/s) and then to 913 K (640 °C) at a cooling rate of 1.0 K/s (1.0 °C/s)], the width of prior austenite grain boundary was thin, and the dislocation density at grain boundaries was low. It was beneficial to crack propagation. After the first phase change, the developed film-like ferrite along the austenite grain boundaries improved the nucleation conditions of new austenitic grains and removed the inhibition effect of the prior austenite grain boundaries on the austenite grain size.

  9. The temperature dependence and environmental enhancement mechanism of fatigue crack growth rates of A 351-CF8A cast stainless steel in LWR environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullen, W.H.; Haenninen, H.; Toerroenen, K.; Kemppainen, M.

    1984-01-01

    The fatigue crack growth rates for A 351-CF8A cast stainless steel were determined over a range of temperatures from 93 degC to 338 degC (200 degF to 640 degF). The waveform was 17 mHz sinusoidal and the load ratio was 0.2. The environment was borated and lithiated water with a dissolved oxygen content of approximately 1 ppb. The results show an easily measurable (factors of 2 to 8) increase in crack growth rates due to the environment. However, these rates are well within the known band of results for low-alloy pressure vessel and low-carbon piping steels in LWR environments. An extensive fractographic investigation shows fatigue fracture surfaces consisting of brittle morphology. This fracture morphology is similar to that of stress corrosion cracking of stainless steels, suggesting that there is a distinctive environmental assistance mechanism resulting in the increased crack growth rates. (author)

  10. Final Report, Volume 4, The Develpoment of Qualification Standards forCast Super Duplex Stainless Steel (2507 Wrought Equivalent)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hariharan, Vasudevan; Lundin, Carl, D.

    2005-09-30

    The objective of the program is to determine the suitability of ASTM A923 Standard Test methods for Detecting Detrimental Intermetallic Phase in Wrought Duplex Austenitic-Ferritic Stainless Steels for 25 Cr Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steels (ASTM A890-5A). Different tests were carried out on the materials procured from various steel foundries as stated in the ASTM A923. The foundries were designated as Foundry A, B, C and D. All the materials were foundry solution annealed. Materials from Foundry D were solution heat treated at The University of Tennessee also and then they were subjected to heat treatment schedule which was derived from the testing of wrought DSS to establish the A923 specification. This was possible because the material from the same heat was sufficient for conducting the full scope of heat treatment. This was done prior to carrying out various other tests. Charpy samples were machined. The Ferrite content was measured in all the Charpy samples using Feritscope{reg_sign} and ASTM E562 Manual Point Count Method. After the ferrite content was measured the samples were sent to AMC-Vulcan, Inc. in Alabama to conduct the Charpy impact test based on ASTM A923 Test Method B. This was followed by etch testing and corrosion analysis based on ASTM A923 Test Methods A and C respectively at University of Tennessee. Hardness testing using Rockwell B and C was also carried out on these samples. A correlation was derived between all the three test methods and the best method for evaluating the presence of intermetallic in the material was determined. The ferrite content was correlated with the toughness values. Microstructural analysis was carried out on the etch test samples using Scanning Electron Microscopy in order to determine if intermetallic phases were present. The fracture surfaces from Charpy test specimens were also observed under SEM in order to determine the presence of any cracks and whether it was a brittle or a ductile fracture. A correlation

  11. Final Report, Volume 4, The Development of Qualification Standards for Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steel (2507 Wrought Equivalent)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hariharan, Vasudevan; Lundin, Carl, W.

    2005-09-30

    The objective of the program is to determine the suitability of ASTM A923 Standard Test methods for Detecting Detrimental Intermetallic Phase in Wrought Duplex Austenitic-Ferritic Stainless Steels for 25 Cr Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steels (ASTM A890-5A). Different tests were carried out on the materials procured from various steel foundries as stated in the ASTM A923. The foundries were designated as Foundry A, B, C and D. All the materials were foundry solution annealed. Materials from Foundry D were solution heat treated at The University of Tennessee also and then they were subjected to heat treatment schedule which was derived from the testing of wrought DSS to establish the A923 specification. This was possible because the material from the same heat was sufficient for conducting the full scope of heat treatment. This was done prior to carrying out various other tests. Charpy samples were machined. The Ferrite content was measured in all the Charpy samples using Feritscope® and ASTM E562 Manual Point Count Method. After the ferrite content was measured the samples were sent to AMC-Vulcan, Inc. in Alabama to conduct the Charpy impact test based on ASTM A923 Test Method B. This was followed by etch testing and corrosion analysis based on ASTM A923 Test Methods A and C respectively at University of Tennessee. Hardness testing using Rockwell B and C was also carried out on these samples. A correlation was derived between all the three test methods and the best method for evaluating the presence of intermetallic in the material was determined. The ferrite content was correlated with the toughness values. Microstructural analysis was carried out on the etch test samples using Scanning Electron Microscopy in order to determine if intermetallic phases were present. The fracture surfaces from Charpy test specimens were also observed under SEM in order to determine the presence of any cracks and whether it was a brittle or a ductile fracture. A correlation was

  12. Investigations for the mechanical and nuclear realisation of a pressure-vessel built-up of cast-steel-segments for a high-temperature reactor with a power of 3000 MWsub(th)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebe, H.W.

    1978-06-01

    Presently for gas-cooled reactors prestressed concrete vessels made of prestressed concrete are inserted. An alternative to the prestressed concrete vessel is the prestressed cast-steel vessel, whose mechanical and nuclear realisation is investigated in this report. On the basis of defined interpretation criteria the dimensioning calculations for the necessary cast-steel and prestressed steel-segments are performed as well as voltage gradients and deformation status for different load situations are determined and practically represented, whereby a reactor with ring core is comparative confronted to a reactor with cylindrical core. In the nuclear part it is tested how far the prestressed cast-steel-vessel suffices as a biological shielding or how far problems are to be expected concerning neutron activation and integrated neutron radiation. Weak points are shown and solution proposals are made. (orig.) [de

  13. Long-term creep and creep-rupture behavior of Types 304 and 316 stainless steel, Type 316 casting material (CF8M), and 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkman, C R; Booker, M K; Sikka, V K; McCoy, H E

    1986-06-01

    Final results of long-term creep and creep-rupture tests are compiled and summarized for a number of structural materials evaluated in support of the Liquid Metal Reactor program. These materials include type 304 stainless steel (tested to 13.4 years), type 316 stainless steel (tested to 8.2 years), CF8M or type 316 stainless casting (tested to 2.5 years), and 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel (tested to 6.5 years). Creep curves of all materials evaluated, representative metallography, and hardness data taken subsequent to testing are also included. Comparisons are made between predictions made several years ago with preliminary creep and creep-rupture data and final results obtained under this program.

  14. Microstructural evolution in warm-rolled and cold-rolled strip cast 6.5 wt% Si steel thin sheets and its influence on magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xianglong, E-mail: 215454278@qq.com; Liu, Zhenyu, E-mail: zyliu@mail.neu.edu.cn; Li, Haoze; Wang, Guodong

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • The experimental materials used in the study are based on strip casting. • Magnetic properties between warm rolled and cold rolled sheets are investigated. • Cold rolled 6.5% Si sheet has better magnetic properties than warm rolled sheet. • The γ and λ-fiber recrystallization textures can be optimized after cold rolling. • Cold rolling should be more suitable for fabricating 6.5% Si steel thin sheets. - Abstract: 6.5 wt% Si steel thin sheets were usually fabricated by warm rolling. In our previous work, 6.5 wt% Si steel thin sheets with good magnetic properties had been successfully fabricated by cold rolling based on strip casting. In the present work, the main purposes were to find out the influences of warm rolling and cold rolling on microstructures and magnetic properties of the thin sheets with the thickness of 0.2 mm, and to confirm which rolling method was more suitable for fabricating 6.5 wt% Si steel thin sheets. The results showed that the cold rolled sheet could obtain good surface quality and flatness, while the warm rolled sheet could not. The intensity of γ-fiber rolling texture (<1 1 1>//ND) of cold rolled specimen was weaker than that of the warm rolled specimen, especially for the {1 1 1}<1 1 2> component at surface layer and {1 1 1}<1 1 0> component at center layer. After the same annealing treatment, the cold rolled specimen, which had higher stored energy and weaker intensity of γ-fiber rolling texture, could obtain smaller recrystallization grain size, weaker intensity of γ-fiber recrystallization texture and stronger intensity of λ-fiber recrystallization texture. Therefore, due to the good surface quality, smaller recrystallization grain size and optimum recrystallization texture, the cold rolled specimen possessed improved magnetic properties, and cold rolling should be more suitable for fabricating 6.5 wt% Si steel thin sheets.

  15. The influence of microstructure on the mechanical properties of metallurgical rolls made of G200CrMoNi4-3-3 cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Brodziak

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the study is the high-carbon tool cast steel G200CrMoNi4-3-3 used for metallurgical rolls, especially in section rolling mills. The test material was derived from a roll damaged in production; therefore, the authors had the material in a raw state at their disposal, on which they were able to carry out additional heat treatment operations. The pearlitic matrix of casting steel G200CrMoNi4-3-3 allows machining to be done to modify the pass or to remove any defects, and the primary and secondary precipitates of carbides enhance the tribological properties. The authors have been for years involved in the optimization of the structure of this material by slight correction to its chemical composition and/or the modification of heat treatment. The presented principles of heat treatment modifications will lead to considerable economic and ecologic profits. It has also been demonstrated that raising slightly the contents of carbide-forming elements, which markedly increases the quantity of transformed ledeburite, results in an enhancement of tribological properties. The analysis of a dozen or so rolls exploited down to the dead roll diameter has shown that roll of cast steel with increased contents of carbon and carbide-forming elements exhibit better service properties, as characterized by the amount of feedstock rolled. Such a method of enhancing the service properties required the assessment of fracture toughness, which was verified using the linear-elastic methods of fracture mechanics.

  16. Crack repair welding by CMT brazing using low melting point filler wire for long-term used steam turbine cases of Cr-Mo-V cast steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadoi, Kota, E-mail: kadoi@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan); Murakami, Aoi; Shinozaki, Kenji; Yamamoto, Motomichi [Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan); Matsumura, Hideo [Chugoku Electric Power Co., 3-9-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-0046 (Japan)

    2016-06-01

    Surface melting by gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding and overlaying by cold metal transfer (CMT) brazing using low melting point filler wire were investigated to develop a repair process for cracks in worn cast steel of steam turbine cases. Cr-Mo-V cast steel, operated for 188,500 h at 566 °C, was used as the base material. Silver and gold brazing filler wires were used as overlaying materials to decrease the heat input into the base metal and the peak temperature during the welding thermal cycle. Microstructural analysis revealed that the worn cast steel test samples contained ferrite phases with intragranular precipitates of Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3}, Mo{sub 2}C, and CrSi{sub 2} and grain boundary precipitates of Cr{sub 23}C{sub 6} and Mo{sub 2}C. CMT brazing using low melting point filler wire was found to decrease the heat input and peak temperature during the thermal cycle of the process compared with those during GTA surface melting. Thus, the process helped to inhibit the formation of hardened phases such as intermetallics and martensite in the heat affected zone (HAZ). Additionally, in the case of CMT brazing using BAg-8, the change in the hardness of the HAZ was negligible even though other processes such as GTA surface melting cause significant changes. The creep-fatigue properties of weldments produced by CMT brazing with BAg-8 were the highest, and nearly the same as those of the base metal owing to the prevention of hardened phase formation. The number of fracture cycles using GTA surface melting and CMT brazing with BAu-4 was also quite small. Therefore, CMT brazing using low melting point filler wire such as BAg-8 is a promising candidate method for repairing steam turbine cases. However, it is necessary to take alloy segregation during turbine operation into account to design a suitable filler wire for practical use.

  17. Influence of cold rolling direction on texture, inhibitor and magnetic properties in strip-cast grain-oriented 3% silicon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, F., E-mail: fangfengdbdx@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Rolling Technology and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Lu, X.; Zhang, Y.X.; Wang, Y.; Jiao, H.T.; Cao, G.M.; Yuan, G.; Xu, Y.B. [State Key Laboratory of Rolling Technology and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Misra, R.D.K. [Laboratory for Excellence in Advanced Steel Research, Department of Metallurgical, Materials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, EL Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Wang, G.D. [State Key Laboratory of Rolling Technology and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2017-02-15

    An unconventional cold rolling scheme (inclined rolling at 0°, 30°, 45°, 90° during second-stage cold rolling process) was adopted to process grain-oriented silicon steel based on strip casting process. The influences of inclination angles on microstructure, texture, inhibitor and magnetic properties were studied by a combination of EBSD, XRD and TEM. It was found that the α-fiber texture was weakened and γ-fiber was strengthened in cold rolled sheet with increase in inclination angle. The primary recrystallization sheet exhibited more homogeneous microstructure with relatively strong γ-fiber, medium α-fiber texture, weak λ-fiber texture and Goss component at high inclination angles. Fine and homogeneous inhibitors were obtained after primary annealing with increase in inclination angle from 0° to 90° because of more uniform deformation after inclined rolling. The grain-oriented silicon steel experienced completely secondary recrystallization at various inclination angles after final annealing process, with superior magnetic properties at 0° and 90°. Furthermore, Goss nuclei capable of final secondary recrystallization in strip casting process newly formed both in-grain shear bands and grain boundaries region during second-stage cold rolling and subsequent annealing process, which is different from the well-accepted results that Goss texture originated from the subsurface layer of the hot rolled sheet or during intermediate annealing process. In addition, the Goss texture that nucleated in-grain shear bands was weaker but more accurate as compared to that in grain boundaries region. - Highlights: • Inclined cold rolling was adopted to process strip-cast grain-oriented silicon steel. • Influence of inclination angles on texture, inhibitor and magnetic properties was studied. • The initial texture was changed with respect to the inclination angle. • Homogeneous inhibitors were obtained after primary annealing at various inclination angles.

  18. Influence of 'third' elements and structure on the results of spectral analysis of high alloyed steels and cast iron with glow discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buravlev, Yu.M.; Zamarajev, V.P.; Chernyavskaya, N.V.

    1989-01-01

    The experimental technique consists in estimation of mutual arrangement of the calibration curves obtained using standard reference materials of low-alloyed and high-alloyed (high-chrome, stainless, high-speed) steels as well as of the curves for carbon steels and cast iron differing in their structure. ARL-31000 and Polyvac E-1000 quantometers with U=1300 V, I=0.12 A and argon pressure ∼1 kPa are used. The influence of third elements is shown in shift and slope changes of the curves for abovementioned high-alloyed steels in comparison to ones for low-alloyed steels accepted as basic. The influence magnitude runs up to 10-30 relative percents and more in the case of analysis of carbon, phosphorus, sulfur, silicon and other elements and depends on the type of the element and on the alloy composition. It is shown that the contribution of structure factor caused by different alloy thermal treatment makes up 10 to 20 relative percents. The experiments showed that the increase of influence of these factors caused by their imposing as well as the weakening of this influence caused by their counteraction is possible. When analyzed alloys differ in their composition and manufacturing technology it is necessary to take into consideration the influence of these effects. (author)

  19. Lay-out and construction of a pressure vessel built-up of cast steel segments for a pebble-bed high temperature reactor with a thermal power of 3000 MW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voigt, J.

    1978-03-01

    The prestressed cast vessel is an alternative to the prestressed concrete vessel for big high temperature reactors. In this report different cast steel vessel concepts for an HTR for generation of current with 3000 MW(th) are compared concerning their realization and economy. The most favourable variant serves as a base for the lay-out of the single vessel components as cast steel segments, bracing, cooling and outer sealing. Hereby the actual available possibilities of production and transport are considered. For the concept worked out possibilities of inspection and repair are suggested. A comparison of costs with adequate proposititons of the industry for a prestressed concrete and a cast iron pressure vessel investigates the economical competition. (orig.) [de

  20. Microstructure and texture evolution of ultra-thin grain-oriented silicon steel sheet fabricated using strip casting and three-stage cold rolling method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hong-Yu; Liu, Hai-Tao, E-mail: liuht@ral.neu.edu.cn; Wang, Yin-Ping; Wang, Guo-Dong

    2017-03-15

    A 0.1 mm-thick grain-oriented silicon steel sheet was successfully produced using strip casting and three-stage cold rolling method. The microstructure, texture and inhibitor evolution during the processing was briefly analyzed. It was found that Goss texture was absent in the hot rolled sheet because of the lack of shear deformation. After normalizing, a large number of dispersed MnS precipitates with the size range of 15–90 nm were produced. During first cold rolling, dense shear bands were generated in the deformed ferrite grains, resulting in the intense Goss texture after first intermediate annealing. The microstructure was further refined and homogenized during the subsequent cold rolling and annealing processes. After primary recrystallization annealing, a homogeneous microstructure consisting of fine and equiaxed grains was produced while the associated texture was characterized by a strong γ-fiber texture. Finally, a complete secondary recrystallization microstructure consisting of entirely large Goss grains was produced. The magnetic induction B{sub 8} and iron loss P{sub 10/400} was 1.79 T and 6.9 W/kg, respectively. - Highlights: • Ultra-thin grain-oriented silicon steel was produced by strip casting process. • Microstructure, texture and inhibitor evolution was briefly investigated. • Goss texture was absent in primary recrystallization annealed sheet. • MnS precipitates with a size range of 15–90 nm formed after normalizing. • A complete secondary recrystallization microstructure was produced.

  1. Strength of the Bond of Structural Steel S235JR to Bronze SAE660 Produced by Casting in Pre-Mold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaheri M.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Different methods are used for production of bronze bearings. In terms of technical specifications, the success of each of these methods depends on the bond’s strength and in terms of economic, the production method is important. In this study, the aim is to study the strength and microstructure of steel-bronze thrust bearing bond that has been produced through the casting using pre-mold. In this study, in order to bond, the raw metals are chemically washed with sulfuric acid solution for five minutes at first. Then, the molten bronze SAE660 is cast in a structural steel S235JR pre-mold. The bond’s strength has been measured using the shear test three times; the measurement of bond’s length has been done using field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM. The results indicate that the strength of the bond is at least 94.8 MPa and bond’s length is 0.45 micrometers. Therefore, this method was successful for trust bearing application.

  2. MODERNIZATION OF AUTOMATION SYSTEM OF THE STEEL CONTINUOUS CASTING MACHINE NO 3 OF JSC «BMZ»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Eroshenko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is shown, that the introduction of a new technological automation system for continuous casting machines allowed a full control of product quality and provided cutting blooms in line with production targets.

  3. Development of Cast Alumina-forming Austenitic Stainless Steel Alloys for use in High Temperature Process Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan [ORNL; Yamamoto, Yukinori [ORNL; Brady, Michael P [ORNL; Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Pankiw, Roman [Duraloy Technologies Inc; Voke, Don [Duraloy Technologies Inc

    2015-01-01

    There is significant interest in the development of alumina-forming, creep resistant alloys for use in various industrial process environments. It is expected that these alloys can be fabricated into components for use in these environments through centrifugal casting and welding. Based on the successful earlier studies on the development of wrought versions of Alumina-Forming Austenitic (AFA) alloys, new alloy compositions have been developed for cast products. These alloys achieve good high-temperature oxidation resistance due to the formation of protective Al2O3 scales while multiple second-phase precipitation strengthening contributes to excellent creep resistance. This work will summarize the results on the development and properties of a centrifugally cast AFA alloy. This paper highlights the strength, oxidation resistance in air and water vapor containing environments, and creep properties in the as-cast condition over the temperature range of 750°C to 900°C in a centrifugally cast heat. Preliminary results for a laboratory cast AFA composition with good oxidation resistance at 1100°C are also presented.

  4. Influence of thermal aging on primary water stress corrosion cracking of cast duplex stainless steel (second report). Consideration on fractography after slow strain rate technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Takuyo; Chiba, Goro; Totsuka, Nobuo; Arioka, Koji

    2003-01-01

    In order to evaluate the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of cast duplex stainless steel which is used for the main coolant pipe of pressurized water reactors (PWRs), the slow strain rate technique (SSRT) and the constant load test (CLT) of the materials were performed in simulated primary water at 360degC. The cast duplex stainless steel contains ferrite phase with ranging from 8 to 23% and its mechanical properties are affected by long time thermal aging. Therefore, we paid attention to the influence of its ferrite content and thermal aging on the SCC susceptibility of this unaged and aged stainless steel and prepared three kinds of specimen with different ferrite contents (23%, 15% and 8%). The brittle fracture of the unaged specimens after SSRT mainly consists of quasi-cleavage fracture in austenitic phase. After aging, it changes to a mixture of quasi-cleavage fracture in both austenitic and ferritic phases. Microcracks were observed on the unaged specimen surfaces and aged ones for 10,000 hours at 400degC after about 10,000 hours of the CLT under the load condition of 1.2∼2.0 times of yield strength. The crack initiation sites of CLT specimens are similar to SSRT fracture surfaces. The SCC susceptibility of this 23% ferrite material increases with aging time at 400degC. The SCC susceptibility of 15% and 23% ferrite materials are higher than that of 8% ferrite material with aging condition for 30,000h at 400degC. (author)

  5. Effects of cooling method after intercritical heat treatment on microstructural characteristics and mechanical properties of as-cast high-strength low-alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, Pan; Yu, Hao; Fan, Yongfei; Fu, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The effect of cooling method after intercritical heat treatment on microstructure evolution was investigated. • Fracture mechanism of tensile and impact after different intercritical heat treatment has been analyzed. • The crack initiation and propagation after different intercritical heat treatment was compared in details. - Abstract: The effect of cooling method after intercritical heat treatment on the microstructures and mechanical properties of as-cast steel produced by electroslag casting was investigated. The microstructure characteristics were analyzed by optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD). The mechanical performance was evaluated by tensile testing at ambient temperature and Charp V-notch impact tests at various temperatures (−40 °C, −20 °C, 20 °C). The tensile and impact fracture micromechanisms were discussed in details. The results of microstructure investigation indicated that water cooling after intercritical heat treatment led to a mixed microstructure of ferrite and tempered martensite, while a composite microstructure of ferrite and tempered bainite was obtained after air cooling. The carbides of Cr, Mo and Nb in matrix after water quenching were finer than the ones after air cooling. Compared with water cooling, a good balance of strength and toughness was obtained after air cooling. The crack propagation path in the steel after water cooling can propagate along the long axis direction of ferrite bands, directly across the intersecting banded ferrite and martensite as well as along the interfaces between ferrite and martensite. However, the crack propagation path in the steel after air cooling depends on the shape, size and distribution of M/A islands

  6. Wear resistance of cast iron

    OpenAIRE

    S. Pietrowski; G. Gumienny

    2008-01-01

    In this paper investigations of abrasive and adhesive wear resistance of different cast iron grades have been presented. Examinations showed, that the most advantageous pair of materials is the cast iron – the hardened steel with low-tempered martensite. It was found, that martensitic nodular cast iron with carbides is the most resistant material.

  7. Relationship Between Solidification Microstructure and Hot Cracking Susceptibility for Continuous Casting of Low-Carbon and High-Strength Low-Alloyed Steels: A Phase-Field Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttger, B.; Apel, M.; Santillana, B.; Eskin, D. G.

    2013-08-01

    Hot cracking is one of the major defects in continuous casting of steels, frequently limiting the productivity. To understand the factors leading to this defect, microstructure formation is simulated for a low-carbon and two high-strength low-alloyed steels. 2D simulation of the initial stage of solidification is performed in a moving slice of the slab using proprietary multiphase-field software and taking into account all elements which are expected to have a relevant effect on the mechanical properties and structure formation during solidification. To account for the correct thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the multicomponent alloy grades, the simulation software is online coupled to commercial thermodynamic and mobility databases. A moving-frame boundary condition allows traveling through the entire solidification history starting from the slab surface, and tracking the morphology changes during growth of the shell. From the simulation results, significant microstructure differences between the steel grades are quantitatively evaluated and correlated with their hot cracking behavior according to the Rappaz-Drezet-Gremaud (RDG) hot cracking criterion. The possible role of the microalloying elements in hot cracking, in particular of traces of Ti, is analyzed. With the assumption that TiN precipitates trigger coalescence of the primary dendrites, quantitative evaluation of the critical strain rates leads to a full agreement with the observed hot cracking behavior.

  8. Effect of holding time and surface cover in ladles on liquid steel flow in continuous casting tundishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Sanjib; Sahai, Yogeshwar

    1992-03-01

    Mathematical modeling of fluid flow and heat transfer of melt in a typical two-strand slab caster tundish has been done for a complete casting sequence. The complete casting sequence consists of 1 minute of tundish emptying period during the ladle transfer operation followed by 1 minute of tundish filling period by the new ladle and pouring at the normal operating level of the tundish for 46 minutes. The effect of varying ladle stream temperature conditions on the melt flow and heat transfer in the continuous casting tundish has been studied. When the ladle stream temperature decreases appreciably over the casting period, corresponding to heat loss of the melt in the ladle from the top free surface, the incoming melt temperature becomes lower than that of the melt in the bulk of the tundish after about 30 minutes from the start of teeming. This results in melt flow along the bottom of the tundish instead of the normal free surface directed flow. The ladle melt stream temperature shows little variability when the ladle has an insulated top. Corresponding to this situation, the temperature of the incoming melt remains higher than that of the melt in the bulk of the tundish and the normal free surface directed flow is maintained throughout the casting period. The product cast under such condition is expected to have a uniformly low inclusion content. The heat loss condition from the top of the ladle has been shown to be the dominant factor in determining fluid flow and heat-transfer characteristics of the melt in the tundish rather than the holding time of the melt in the ladle.

  9. INVESTIGATION OF NANOMODIFICATION INFLUENCE ON STRUCTURE AND CHARACTERISTICS OF CAST FAST-CUTTING STEEL R6M5L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Kukuj

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of wide range of elements-modifiers on the structure, character of destruction and physico-mechanical characteristics of high-speed steels and instrument made of them is studied.

  10. Multi-layers castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szajnar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In paper is presented the possibility of making of multi-layers cast steel castings in result of connection of casting and welding coating technologies. First layer was composite surface layer on the basis of Fe-Cr-C alloy, which was put directly in founding process of cast carbon steel 200–450 with use of preparation of mould cavity method. Second layer were padding welds, which were put with use of TIG – Tungsten Inert Gas surfacing by welding technology with filler on Ni matrix, Ni and Co matrix with wolfram carbides WC and on the basis on Fe-Cr-C alloy, which has the same chemical composition with alloy, which was used for making of composite surface layer. Usability for industrial applications of surface layers of castings were estimated by criterion of hardness and abrasive wear resistance of type metal-mineral.

  11. Effects of long-term thermal aging on the stress corrosion cracking behavior of cast austenitic stainless steels in simulated PWR primary water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shilei; Wang, Yanli; Wang, Hui; Xin, Changsheng; Wang, Xitao

    2016-02-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of cast austenitic stainless steels of unaged and thermally aged at 400 °C for as long as 20,000 h were studied by using a slow strain rate testing (SSRT) system. Spinodal decomposition in ferrite during thermal aging leads to hardening in ferrite and embrittlement of the SSRT specimen. Plastic deformation and thermal aging degree have a great influence on the oxidation rate of the studied material in simulated PWR primary water environments. In the SCC regions of the aged SSRT specimen, the surface cracks, formed by the brittle fracture of ferrite phases, are the possible locations for SCC. In the non-SCC regions, brittle fracture of ferrite phases also occurs because of the effect of thermal aging embrittlement.

  12. Effect of double quenching and tempering heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a novel 5Cr steel processed by electro-slag casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jian, E-mail: healygo@163.com; Yu, Hao, E-mail: yuhao@ustb.edu.cn; Zhou, Tao, E-mail: zhoutao130984@163.com; Song, Chenghao, E-mail: songchenghao28@126.com; Zhang, Kai, E-mail: zhangkai8901@126.com

    2014-12-01

    The effect of double quenching and tempering (DQT) treatment as well as conventional high temperature quenching and tempering (CQT) treatment on the microstructures and mechanical properties of low carbon 5Cr martensitic as cast steel produced by electroslag casting was investigated. The microstructure changes were characterized by optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The characteristics of carbides precipitated during tempering were analyzed on both carbon extraction replica and thin foil samples by TEM. The mechanical performance was evaluated by Vickers hardness test, tensile test, and Charpy V-notch impact test at ambient temperature. The results of microstructure study indicated that DQT treatment led to a finer microstructure than that of CQT. The carbides of the tempered samples were identified as M{sub 7}C{sub 3}. The carbides along the prior austenite grain boundaries nucleated directly while those within the laths should be transformed from cementite which formed at the early tempering stage. Compared with CQT condition, yield strength slightly increased after DQT treatment, and impact toughness improved a lot. The strengthening mechanisms were analyzed and it was found that grain refining and precipitation strengthening were mainly responsible for the increase of strength. The superior toughness of DQT condition was attributed to the finer microstructure resulting in more frequent deflections of the cleavage crack and the smaller size of carbides along the prior austenite boundaries. EBSD analysis showed that both martensitic block and packet of low carbon 5Cr tempered martensitic steel could hinder crack propagation, while the latter was more effective.

  13. Laser surface texturing of cast iron steel: dramatic edge burr reduction and high speed process optimisation for industrial production using DPSS picosecond lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruneel, David; Kearsley, Andrew; Karnakis, Dimitris

    2015-07-01

    In this work we present picosecond DPSS laser surface texturing optimisation of automotive grade cast iron steel. This application attracts great interest, particularly in the automotive industry, to reduce friction between moving piston parts in car engines, in order to decrease fuel consumption. This is accomplished by partially covering with swallow microgrooves the inner surface of a piston liner and is currently a production process adopting much longer pulse (microsecond) DPSS lasers. Lubricated interface conditions of moving parts require from the laser process to produce a very strictly controlled surface topography around the laser formed grooves, whose edge burr height must be lower than 100 nm. To achieve such a strict tolerance, laser machining of cast iron steel was investigated using an infrared DPSS picosecond laser (10ps duration) with an output power of 16W and a repetition rate of 200 kHz. The ultrashort laser is believed to provide a much better thermal management of the etching process. All studies presented here were performed on flat samples in ambient air but the process is transferrable to cylindrical geometry engine liners. We will show that reducing significantly the edge burr below an acceptable limit for lubricated engine production is possible using such lasers and remarkably the process window lies at very high irradiated fluences much higher that the single pulse ablation threshold. This detailed experimental work highlights the close relationship between the optimised laser irradiation conditions as well as the process strategy with the final size of the undesirable edge burrs. The optimised process conditions are compatible with an industrial production process and show the potential for removing extra post)processing steps (honing, etc) of cylinder liners on the manufacturing line saving time and cost.

  14. Designing High Performance Steel Castings Today: Proceedings of the Steel Founders Society of America, Technical and Operating Conference December 7-10, 2016Chicago, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-10

    property values. Two (2) standard round tensile specimens shall be manufactured and tested per ASTM E8/E8M and two (2) charpy V-notch specimens...Mo alloy steels ): Yield strength (0.1% offset) – 140/160 ksi Reduction in Area – 30% min. Charpy V-Notch resistance @ - 40 +/- 20F – 20 ft-lb...

  15. Molecular characterization of natural biofilms from household taps with different materials: PVC, stainless steel, and cast iron in drinking water distribution system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wenfang; Yu, Zhisheng; Chen, Xi; Liu, Ruyin; Zhang, Hongxun

    2013-09-01

    Microorganism in drinking water distribution system may colonize in biofilms. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene diversities were analyzed in both water and biofilms grown on taps with three different materials (polyvinyl chloride (PVC), stainless steel, and cast iron) from a local drinking water distribution system. In total, five clone libraries (440 sequences) were obtained. The taxonomic composition of the microbial communities was found to be dominated by members of Proteobacteria (65.9-98.9 %), broadly distributed among the classes Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria. Other bacterial groups included Firmicutes, Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, and Deinococcus-Thermus. Moreover, a small proportion of unclassified bacteria (3.5-10.6 %) were also found. This investigation revealed that the bacterial communities in biofilms appeared much more diversified than expected and more care should be taken to the taps with high bacterial diversity. Also, regular monitor of outflow water would be useful as potentially pathogenic bacteria were detected. In addition, microbial richness and diversity in taps ranked in the order as: PVC cast iron. All the results interpreted that PVC would be a potentially suitable material for use as tap component in drinking water distribution system.

  16. Influence of regenerative heat treatment on structure and properties of G20CrMo2 - 5 (L20HM cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Golański

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Thc papcr prcscnts rcsuSts or rcscarch on thc influence of rcgcncratic hcat treatment on thc structurc and propcrtics [hardncss. impactcncrgy or L2O11M cnst stccl. Invcstipatcd material was taken from outer fmmc of a turbinc which was scrviccd for t 67 424 hours a! thctcmpcrauirc or 535 "C and prcssurc or 12.75 MPa. In psi-operating condition ~hicnv cstigntcd cast steel was cl~aracteri~cbdy low impactcncrpy of II I ant1 hart3ncss of 139HV30. Analysis uF the irlflue~~uuel ;lustcniriz;~ti on pariimctcrs (tcrnpcr;lturc and lime has rcvealcd rhntat thc tcinpcr;~turcr angc o f 895 + 955 "C (i-e. h3 - +I IO + 70 "C.fo r both 3 and 5 hours of holtl timc. rhc ohtaincd grain sizc amounls to 20+ 2511m. I has hccn pmved that tempcred bainitic-rcrri~ica nd remit ic-hainiric-pearlit ic stn~cturco f thc invcstigatcd cast stccl msurcs highimpact cncrgy, i.c. KV > 1001. as well a5 hardncss. i.e. 11Y30. just at thc tcrnpcmturc of OXl "C. 'I'crnpcmliirc or 7110 "C causcs i'~tnhcrincrclrsc of impact cncrgy along with a slight dccrcasc of hardncss. Morcovcr. it has hccn concludd that nppl ying oS under-annealinginstcad or tcmpcring. nflcr standardizalion. guarantees scquircd impact cncrgy of KY r 271.

  17. Production of Steel Casts in Two-Layer Moulds with Alkaline Binders Part 1. Backing sand with the alkaline inorganic binder RUDAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Holtzer

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Steel casts in Z.N. POMET were produced in moulds made of the moulding sand Floster. This sand did not have good knocking outproperties, required a significant binder addition (4.5-5.0 parts by weight, and the casting surface quality gave rise to clients objections.Therefore a decision of implementing two-layer moulds, in which the facing sand would consist of the moulding sand with an alkalineorganic binder while the backing sand would be made of the moulding sand with an inorganic binder also of an alkaline character - wasundertaken. The fraction of this last binder in the moulding sand mass would be smaller than that of the binder used up to now (waterglass. The application of two moulding sands of the same chemical character (highly alkaline should facilitate the reclamation processand improve the obtained reclaimed material quality, due to which it would be possible to increase the reclaim fraction in the mouldingsand (up to now it was 50%. The results of the laboratory investigations of sands with the RUDAL binder are presented in the paper.

  18. Characterisation of Q and T steel pole shoes manufactured by sand casting; Charakterisierung mit Sandguss hergestellter Polschuhe aus verguetetem Stahl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asensio-Lozano, J.; Alvarez-Antolin, J.F. [Oviedo Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering; Panta-Mesones, J.T. [National Univ. of Trujillo, La Libertad (Peru). Faculty of Mines, Metallurgy and Materials; Vander-Voort, G.F. [Buehler Ltd., Lake Bluff, IL (United States)

    2008-04-15

    This paper presents a study of the microstructural and mechanical characterization of the GS 35 CrMoV 10 4 alloy employed in the manufacture of sand-cast pole shoes for 4-pole synchronous electric power generators working at a frequency of 60 Hz. In addition, the most appropriate treatment for ensuring compliance with the technical specifications defined in DIN Standard No. 1.7755 has been designed. (orig.)

  19. Effects of hot-rolling reduction on microstructure, texture and magnetic properties of high silicon steel produced by strip casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, D. Y.; Xu, H. J.; Jiao, H. T.; Zhao, C. W.; Xiong, W.; Yang, J. P.; Qiu, W. Z.; Xu, Y. B.

    2017-01-01

    Non-oriented Fe-7.1wt.% Si as-cast strips were produced by twin-roll strip casting process. Then the as-cast strips were hot rolled with different reductions, followed by warm rolling and final annealing. The microstructure, texture evolution and magnetic properties were investigated in detail. The texture of hot rolled sheets with 40% reduction showed strongest {001} texture, whereas the dominated texture was turned into {110} and {110}as the reduction was increased to 56% and 68%. After warm rolling and annealing, the average grain size was decreased firstly and then increased with an increase in hot rolling reduction. In the case of 40% hot rolling reduction, the recrystallization texture was dominated by strong γ (//ND) texture. With an increase in hot rolling reduction, the γ texture was gradually weakened while α (//RD) texture was enhanced. In addition, relatively stronger {100} texture was presented in the sheet of 68% hot rolling reduction. The highest B50 value attained was 1.66 T and the lowest P10/400 was 24.26 W/kg at a reduction of 56%.

  20. Effects of hot rolled microstructure after twin-roll casting on microstructure, texture and magnetic properties of low silicon non-oriented electrical steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hai-Tao, E-mail: liuht@ral.neu.edu.cn; Wang, Yin-Ping; An, Ling-Zi; Wang, Zhao-Jie; Hou, Dao-Yuan; Chen, Jun-Mou; Wang, Guo-Dong

    2016-12-15

    In this work, a 0.71 wt%Si+0.44 wt%Al as-cast strip was produced by novel twin-roll casting. Some as-cast samples were respectively reheated and hot rolled at different temperatures in order to obtain different microstructure prior to cold rolling and annealing. The effects of the hot rolled microstructure on microstructure, texture evolution and magnetic properties were investigated in detail. A coarse deformed microstructure with λ-fiber texture was formed after hot rolling at 850–1050 °C, finally leading to an inhomogeneous recrystallization microstructure with strong λ-fiber, Goss and extremely weak γ-fiber texture. By contrast, a fine transformed microstructure was formed after hot rolling at 1150–1250 °C, finally leading to a fine and homogeneous recrystallization microstructure with stronger α-fiber, γ-fiber and much weaker λ-fiber texture. It should be noted that both the magnetic induction and core loss non-monotonically decreased or increased according to the hot rolling temperature. The unfavorable α-fiber and γ-fiber textures in the annealed sheets were much weaker than those of the conventional products regardless of the hot rolling temperature, thus contributing to a much higher magnetic induction. However, the average grain size in the annealed sheets was much lower than those of the conventional products regardless of the hot rolling temperature, thus leading to a higher core loss except the case of 1050 °C. Hence, it is underscored that better integrated magnetic properties than those of the conventional products can be obtained by optimizing the hot rolled microstructure to produce final desirable recrystallization microstructure and texture. - Highlights: • Non-oriented silicon steel was fabricated using twin-roll casting route. • Microstructure and texture evolution were clarified. • Effects of the hot rolled microstructure were investigated in detail. • Formation mechanism of the recrystallization texture was explored.

  1. The Use of Barium and Calcium Alloys in the Ladle Furnace Treatment of Selected Grades of Continuously Cast Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derda W.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the paper are the results of laboratory and industrial investigations into the use of Si - Ca - Ba alloys for modifying non-metallic inclusions. Based on laboratory tests, the morphology and chemical composition of non-metallic inclusions in carbon steel were examined before and after refining with the use of the above-mentioned alloy as a refining addition. In particular tests, variable additions of the alloy were used at a constant refining time and temperature.

  2. DE-NE0000724 - Research Performance Final Report - Investigation of Thermal Aging Effects on the Evolution of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ankem, Sreeramamurthy [University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Perea, Daniel E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kolli, R. Prakash [University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Mburu, Sarah [University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Schwarm, Samuel C. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2017-12-11

    This report details the research activities carried out under DOE-NEUP award number DE-NE0000724 concerning the evolution of structural and mechanical properties during thermal aging of CF–3 and CF–8 cast duplex stainless steels (CDSS). The overall objective of this project was to use state-of-the-art characterization techniques to elucidate trends and phenomena in the mechanical and structural evolution of cast duplex stainless steels (CDSS) during thermal aging. These steels are commonly used as structural materials in commercial light water nuclear power plants, undergoing aging for decades in operation as cooling water pipes, pump casings, valve bodies, etc. During extended exposure to these conditions, CDSS are known to undergo a change in mechanical properties resulting in a loss of ductility, i.e. embrittlement. While it is generally accepted that structural changes within the ferrite phase, such as decomposition into iron (Fe)-rich and chromium (Cr)-rich domains, lead to the bulk embrittlement of the steels, many questions remain as to the mechanisms of embrittlement at multiple length scales. This work is intended to shed insight into the atomic level composition changes, associated kinetic mechanisms, and effects of changing phase structure on micro- and nano-scale deformation that lead to loss of impact toughness and tensile ductility in these steels. In general, this project provides a route to answer some of these major questions using techniques such as 3-dimensional (3-D) atom probe tomography (APT) and real-microstructure finite element method (FEM) modeling, which were not readily available when these steels were originally selected for service in light water reactors. Mechanical properties evaluated by Charpy V-notch impact testing (CVN), tensile testing, and microhardness and nanohardness measurements were obtained for each condition and compared with the initial baseline properties to view trends in deformation behavior during aging

  3. Usage of Thermodynamic Activity for Optimization of Power Expenses in Respect of Casting Process in Arc Steel-Melting Furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Chichko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The equilibrium between carbon and oxygen has been investigated during oxidizing refining in an arc steel-melting furnace. It is shown that there is a possibility to apply an equilibrium thermodynamic. It has been established that during oxidizing refining FeO concentration in slag practically does not depend on C concentration in metal. It is demonstrated that in a number of cases metal carbon oxidation is characterized by the presence of a transit period that may be attributed to incomplete slag-formation process.

  4. Study of waterline corrosion on the carbon steel liner cast in concrete at the condensation pool. I. Literature review II. Study of the risk for waterline corrosion on the steel liner cast in concrete at the cylinder wall at Barsebaeck 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sederholm, Bror; Kalinowski, Mariusz; Eistrat, Kaija

    2009-02-01

    The reactor containment in Swedish BWR-type nuclear power plants consists of an inner cylinder-shaped container of stainless steel, with an outer liner of carbon steel about 300 mm from the stainless steel container, both cast in concrete. If water leaks from the inner stainless steel container into the concrete, the risk of corrosion on the carbon steel liner may be increased by the presence of a waterline, and voids in the concrete at the metal surface. The first part of the report is a survey of published information regarding waterline corrosion and the effect of wholly or partly liquid-filled voids at a steel surface cast in concrete. The second part is a report on the investigations of the corrosion status of the steel liner on the inside of the reactor containment at the Barsebaeckverket 1 plant and of the laboratory investigations of the concrete samples that were taken from the reactor containment wall. The waterline corrosion effect is caused by local differences in environmental factors at the water/air border, primarily the supply of oxygen (air), which allows corrosion cells similar to galvanic cells to be set up. On a vertical, partly immersed steel structure the corrosion rate largely varies with the supply of oxygen, with the highest corrosion rate at or immediately above the waterline, where the supply of both oxygen (air) and electrolyte is good. The relative corrosion rates around the waterline may be modified by the action of various concentration cells. Waterline effects due to aeration cells or other concentration cells have been shown to increase the risk for corrosion damage locally, even when the overall corrosion rate does not increase, since corrosion is concentrated to a smaller area and may have a more localised character. Waterline conditions can also develop at a cast-in metal surface inside partly water-filled voids in the concrete. Voids as such at a concrete/metal interface, leaving metal without adhering concrete, have also been

  5. The mechanism of thermal explosion (TE) synthesis of TiC–TiB2 particulate locally reinforced steel matrix composites from an Al–Ti–B4C system via a TE-casting route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Binglin; Shen Ping; Cao Xueqiang; Jiang Qichuan

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We successfully fabricated TiC–TiB 2 locally reinforced steel matrix composites. ► We investigated the product microstructure and formation mechanism of TiC and TiB 2 . ► The formation mechanism during casting is dependent on B 4 C particle size. ► Fe melt promotes the full dissociation of remnant B 4 C particles during casting. ► The relationship between the mechanisms in the ERF and during casting was proposed. - Abstract: TiC–TiB 2 particulate locally reinforced steel matrix composites were fabricated by a novel TE-casting route from an Al–Ti–B 4 C system with various B 4 C particle sizes. The formation mechanism of TiC and TiB 2 in the locally reinforced regions was investigated. The results showed that TiC and TiB 2 are formed and precipitated from Al–Ti–B–C melt resulting from the dissociation of B 4 C into Al–Ti melt when the concentrations of B and C atoms in the Al–Ti–B–C melt become saturated. However, in the case of coarse B 4 C powders (≥40 μm) used, the primary reaction in the Al–Ti–B–C melt is quite limited due to the poor dissociation of B 4 C. The poured steel melt infiltrates into the primary reaction product and thus leads to the formation of Al–Fe–Ti–B–C melt, thanks to the favorable reaction of molten Fe with remnant B 4 C, and then TiC and TiB 2 are further formed and precipitated from the saturated Al–Fe–Ti–B–C melt. The relationship between the mechanisms of thermal explosion (TE) synthesis of TiC and TiB 2 in the electric resistance furnace and during casting was proposed.

  6. Morphology and Performance of 5Cr5MoV Casting Die Steel in the Process of Surfacing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yulai; Kong, Xiangrui; Yang, Pengcong; Fu, Hongde; Wang, Xuezhu

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the microstructures and mechanical properties of the deposited metal on surface of die steel, two layer of weld-seam were prepared on the surface of 5Cr5MoV die steel by arc surfacing. The surface microstructures and microhardness were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometer and Vickers microhardness tester, respectively. The effect of load on the abrasion resistance and wear mechanism of the base metal and surfacing metal was studied by pin–on-disk tribometer. The results showed that martensite and retained austenite exist in weld-seam, both of them grow up in the form of dendrites and equiaxed grains and microhardness reach 774.2HV. The microstructures of the quenching zone mainly consist of martensite and retained austenite, while tempered martensite is the dominant phase in partial quenching zone. The abrasion resistance of the surfacing metal is superior to the base metal based on the results of wear test. The wear rates of surfacing metal and base metal raise with the increase of load. The wear rates of base metal raise extremely when the load reach 210N. Both of two kinds of materials have the similar wear mechanism, namely, abrasive wear at low load, oxidative wear and adhesive wear at high load.

  7. Thin section casting program. Volume 2: Horizontal TSC (Thin-Section Casting) approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    In horizontal thin-section casting (HTSC), 1-inch-thick steel sections are produced at speeds up to 600 ipm or about 60 tons per hour per foot of width (tphf). Liquid steel is fed from the ladle, and flows through a specially designed tundish, then flows through a refractory feeding tube and nozzle, with approximately the same external dimensions as the cast section, into a near-horizontal rectangular mold whose all four sides are traveling in the same direction and speed as the steel casting. This report is the second of a six volume set on thin section casting. This volume covers the research on horizontal thin section casting (TSC).

  8. Thermal fatigue behavior of H-13 die steel for aluminum die casting with various ion sputtered coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieh, C. Y.; Wallace, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    Sputtered coatings of Mo, W, Pt, Ag, Au, Co, Cr, Ni, Ag + Cu, Mo + Pt, Si3N4, A1N, Cr3C2, Ta5Si3, and ZrO2 were applied to a 2-inch-square, 7-inch-long thermal fatigue test specimen which was then internally water cooled and alternately immersed in molten aluminum and cooled in air. After 15,000 cycles the thermal fatigue cracks at the specimen corners were measured. Results indicate that a significant improvement in thermal fatigue resistance was obtained with platinum, molybdenum, and tungsten coatings. Metallographic examination indicates that the improvement in thermal fatigue resistance resulted from protection of the surface of the die steel from oxidation. The high yield strength and ductility of molybdenum and tungsten contributed to the better thermal fatigue resistance.

  9. Microstructure of CrMnNi Cast Steel After Explosive-Driven Flyer-Plate Impact at Room Temperature and Below

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckner, R.; Reichel, B.; Savinykh, A. S.; Krüger, L.; Razorenov, S. V.; Garkushin, G. V.

    2016-01-01

    A low-carbon metastable austenitic CrMnNi cast steel was investigated under shock conditions in a flyer-plate impact test. The samples were impacted by aluminum flyer-plates with impact velocities of 620 ± 30 m/s. Depending on deformation temperature and strain rate, the material exhibited different deformation mechanisms (dislocation glide, martensitic transformation, and mechanical twinning), which determined the microstructural evolution and mechanical behavior. Flyer-plate impact tests were carried out at 213 K and 293 K (-60 °C and +20 °C). A soft recovered sample revealed microstructural changes directly after impact. The subsequent microstructural investigations via light-optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy revealed that transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP effect) was the primary deformation mechanism. Moreover, it was possible to quantify the martensite volume fraction by different methods and to identify the hcp ɛ-martensite phase as an intermediate transformation stage. A decrease in temperature also increased the driving force for the martensitic transformation.

  10. Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding of 10-mm-Thick Cast Martensitic Stainless Steel CA6NM: As-Welded Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirakhorli, Fatemeh; Cao, Xinjin; Pham, Xuan-Tan; Wanjara, Priti; Fihey, Jean-Luc

    2016-07-01

    Cast CA6NM martensitic stainless steel plates, 10 mm in thickness, were welded using hybrid laser-arc welding. The effect of different welding speeds on the as-welded joint integrity was characterized in terms of the weld bead geometry, defects, microstructure, hardness, ultimate tensile strength, and impact energy. Significant defects such as porosity, root humping, underfill, and excessive penetration were observed at a low welding speed (0.5 m/min). However, the underfill depth and excessive penetration in the joints manufactured at welding speeds above 0.75 m/min met the specifications of ISO 12932. Characterization of the as-welded microstructure revealed untempered martensite and residual delta ferrite dispersed at prior-austenite grain boundaries in the fusion zone. In addition, four different heat-affected zones in the weldments were differentiated through hardness mapping and inference from the Fe-Cr-Ni ternary phase diagram. The tensile fracture occurred in the base metal for all the samples and fractographic analysis showed that the crack path is within the martensite matrix, along primary delta ferrite-martensite interfaces and within the primary delta ferrite. Additionally, Charpy impact testing demonstrated slightly higher fracture energy values and deeper dimples on the fracture surface of the welds manufactured at higher welding speeds due to grain refinement and/or lower porosity.

  11. Effect of ferrite on the precipitation of σ phase in cast austenitic stainless steel used for primary coolant pipes of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yongqiang; Li, Na, E-mail: wangyongqiang1124@163.com [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology, Beijing (China)

    2017-11-15

    The effect of ferrite phase on the precipitation of σ phase in a Z3CN20.09M cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) used for primary coolant pipes of pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plants was investigated by using isothermal heat-treatment, optical microscopy (OM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) techniques. The influence of different morphologies and volume fractions of ferrite in the σ phase formation mechanism was discussed. The amount of σ phase precipitated in all specimens with different microstructures increased with increasing of aging time, however, the precipitation rate is significant different. The formation of σ phase in specimens with the coarsest ferrite and the dispersively smallest ferrite is slowest. The lowest level Cr content in ferrite and fewest α/γ interfaces in specimen are the main reasons for the slowest σ precipitation due to they are unfavorable for the kinetics and thermodynamics of phase transformation respectively. By contraries, the fastest formation of σ phase takes place in specimens with narrow and long ferrite due to the most α/γ interfaces and higher Cr content in ferrite which are beneficial for preferential nucleation and formation thermodynamics of σ phase. (author)

  12. Reactor pressure vessel and reactor coolant circuit cast duplex stainless steel components contribution of the expertise for life management studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezdikian, Georges

    2006-09-01

    The life management of French Nuclear Power Plants is a major stake from an economic and a technical point of view considering the aging management assessment of the key components of the plant. The actual life evaluation is the result of prediction of life assessment from important program of expertise for the 3-loop PWR and 4-loop PWR plants in operation. To optimize the strategic policy in order to achieve the best possible performance and to prepare the technical and economical choice and decision, the paper presents the association of life management strategy and the program of expertise considering: - the identification of degradation for different components and prediction criteria proposed; - the large database from cast reactor coolant and component removed from nuclear power plants and expertise studies to confirm the prediction; - the life evaluation of RPV with radiation surveillance program based on the expertise of irradiation capsules, it is particularly shown how the expertise is in the center of the strategic choice. The French utility has organized the life management of nuclear plant as a function of several programs of expertise of knowledge on the long term experience feedback and the maintenance program for life. This paper shows updated on RPV and reactor coolant equipment activities engaged by utility on: - periodic maintenance and volume of expertise; - Alternative maintenance actions; - Large volume of expertise and how are managed these results to predict the aging management. (author)

  13. Ultra-thin grain-oriented silicon steel sheet fabricated by a novel way: Twin-roll strip casting and two-stage cold rolling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yin-Ping; Liu, Hai-Tao; Song, Hong-Yu; Liu, Jia-Xin; Shen, Hui-Ying; Jin, Yang; Wang, Guo-Dong

    2018-04-01

    0.05-0.15 mm-thick ultra-thin grain-oriented silicon steel sheets were successfully produced by a novel processing route including strip casting, hot rolling, normalizing, two-stage cold rolling with intermediate annealing, primary recrystallization annealing and secondary recrystallization annealing. The evolutions of microstructure, texture and inhibitor along the processing were briefly investigated. The results showed that the initial Goss orientation originated due to the heterogenous nucleation of δ-ferrite grains during solidification. Because of the lack of shear deformation, only a few Goss grains were observed in the hot rolled sheet. After the first cold rolling and intermediate annealing, Goss texture was enhanced and distributed in the whole thickness. A small number of Goss grains having a high fraction of high energy boundaries exhibited in the primary recrystallization annealed sheet. A large number of fine and dispersed MnS and AlN and a few co-precipitates MnS and AlN with the size range of 10-70 nm were also observed. Interestingly, a well-developed secondary recrystallization microstructure characterized by 10-60 mm grains and a sharp Goss texture were finally produced in the 0.05-0.15 mm-thick ultra-thin sheets. A magnetic induction B8 of 1.72-1.84 T was obtained. Another new finding was that a few {2 3 0}〈0 0 1〉 and {2 1 0}〈1 2 7〉 grains also can grow up abnormally because of the high fraction of high energy boundaries and the size and number advantage, respectively. These non-Goss grains finally deteriorated the magnetic properties of the ultra-thin sheets. In addition, low surface energies of {hk0} planes may also contribute to the abnormal growth of Goss, {2 3 0}〈0 0 1〉 and {2 1 0}〈1 2 7〉 grains.

  14. Effects of phosphate addition on biofilm bacterial communities and water quality in annular reactors equipped with stainless steel and ductile cast iron pipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyun-Jung; Choi, Young-June; Ro, Hee-Myong; Ka, Jong-Ok

    2012-02-01

    The impact of orthophosphate addition on biofilm formation and water quality was studied in corrosion-resistant stainless steel (STS) pipe and corrosion-susceptible ductile cast iron (DCI) pipe using cultivation and culture-independent approaches. Sample coupons of DCI pipe and STS pipe were installed in annular reactors, which were operated for 9 months under hydraulic conditions similar to a domestic plumbing system. Addition of 5 mg/L of phosphate to the plumbing systems, under low residual chlorine conditions, promoted a more significant growth of biofilm and led to a greater rate reduction of disinfection by-products in DCI pipe than in STS pipe. While the level of THMs (trihalomethanes) increased under conditions of low biofilm concentration, the levels of HAAs (halo acetic acids) and CH (chloral hydrate) decreased in all cases in proportion to the amount of biofilm. It was also observed that chloroform, the main species of THM, was not readily decomposed biologically and decomposition was not proportional to the biofilm concentration; however, it was easily biodegraded after the addition of phosphate. Analysis of the 16S rDNA sequences of 102 biofilm isolates revealed that Proteobacteria (50%) was the most frequently detected phylum, followed by Firmicutes (10%) and Actinobacteria (2%), with 37% of the bacteria unclassified. Bradyrhizobium was the dominant genus on corroded DCI pipe, while Sphingomonas was predominant on non-corroded STS pipe. Methylobacterium and Afipia were detected only in the reactor without added phosphate. PCR-DGGE analysis showed that the diversity of species in biofilm tended to increase when phosphate was added regardless of the pipe material, indicating that phosphate addition upset the biological stability in the plumbing systems.

  15. Improved Life of Die Casting Dies of H13 Steel by Attaining Improved Mechanical Properties and Distortion Control During Heat Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. F. Wallace; D. Schwam

    1998-10-01

    The ultimate goal of this project is to increase die casting die life by using fast enough quenching rates to obtain good toughness and fatigue resistance in premium grade H-13 steel dies. The main tasks of the project were to compile a database on physical and mechanical properties of H-13; conduct gas quenching experiments to determine cooling rates of dies in difference vacuum furnaces; measure the as-quenched distortion of dies and the residual stresses; generate finite element analysis models to predict cooling rates, distortion, and residual stress of gas quenched dies; and establish rules and create PC-based expert system for prediction of cooling rates, distortion, and residual stress in vacuum/gas quenched H-13 dies. Cooling curves during gas quenching of H-13 blocks and die shapes have been measured under a variety of gas pressure. Dimensional changes caused by the gas quenching processes have been determined by accurate mapping of all surfaces with coordinate measuring machines before and after the quench. Residual stresses were determined by the ASTM E837 hole-drilling strain gage method. To facilitate the computer modeling work, a comprehensive database of H-13 mechanical and physical properties has been compiled. Finite element analysis of the heat treated shapes has been conducted using the TRAST/ABAQUS codes. There is a good fit between the predicted and measured distortion contours. However, the magnitude of the predicted distortion and residual stresses does not match well the measured values. Further fine tuning of the model is required before it can be used to predict distortion and residual stress in a quantitative manner. This last step is a prerequisite to generating rules for a reliable expert system.

  16. Application of an energy efficient casting ladle heating system used in the manufacture of stainless steel; Einsatz einer energieeffizienten Pfannenaufheizstation bei der Herstellung von Edelstahl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poeschl, Markus [Edelstahlwerke Schmees GmbH, Langenfeld (Germany); Lodde, Marcus [Effizienz-Agentur NRW, Duisburg (Germany). prisma Consult GmbH

    2011-06-15

    In the melting area, the company has been using four conventional burners to heat the ladles. The existing flame burners heat the upside down ladles from below and consume massive amount of energy. Heat radiation and all of the waste gas are released into the facility. The material around the ladles is therefore heavily affected. The company has now installed a new energy efficient casting ladle heating system with a new kind of porous burner which heats the transport ladles without exposing them to an open flame. The combustion heat is channeled to specially adapted steel pipes via infrared radiation and convection flow. By doing this, the heat is directly transferred to the ladles and can be controlled in a more balanced manner. The company now saves around 61,400 m{sup 3}/a of natural gas, approx. 60 % of the energy required for the ladle heating and, as a result, 113.8 tonnes of CO{sub 2}-equivalent. The life span of the ladles can be increased by a factor of 2 due to the reduced exposure of the fire resistant materials. The resulting waste gas is collected and the waste heat will be reused in the facility in the future (facility heating 2011). Due to reduction in cleaning and carrying time of the ladles, Fr. Schmees expects an increase in productivity of the complete process. The heat radiation from the ladles has been reduced by 75 % which has led to a reduction of breakdowns. In addition, the noise level has sunk from 78.7 dB to 67.4 db. (orig.)

  17. Tensile behavior of CF8-CPF8-304H and CF8M-CPF8M-316H stainless steel static and centrifugal castings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEnerney, J.W.; Sikka, V.K.; Booker, M.K.

    1981-10-01

    We have analyzed the tensile behavior of 11 heats of grades CF8-CPF8-304H and 13 heats of grades CF8M-CPF8M-316H static and centrifugal castings from room temperature to 650 0 C. Except for anomalous conditions, the centrifugal castings exhibited uniform composition. All CPF8-304H centrifugal castings contained only radial columnar grains, but some CPF8M-316H castings had columnar, banded, or equiaxed structures. Ultimate tensile strength and total elongation were the properties in which castings showed the most inferiority to wrought material. With increasing ferrite content, 0.2% yield strength and ultimate tensile strength increased while uniform elongation, total elongation, and reduction of area decreased. Although centrifugal castings did not exhibit significant end-to-end variation in tensile behavior, the 0.2% yield strength displayed anisotropy, with axial and circumferential values being greater than radial

  18. Practical Application of the Concept of Separating the Zone of Overheating and Reducing the Stress Level in Cathode Block of an Aluminium Electrolytic Cell During Formation of Connection with the Steel Pin by Cast Iron Pouring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piekło J.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the concept of division of a carbon block into single cathode sections to reduce stresses that occur during thermal shock accompanying the operation of pouring cast iron into a shaped groove in which the current-carrying steel pin is mounted. The temperature field and the state of stress were determined by FEM. Experimental measurements were used to determine the core displacement during pouring operation. The calculations were verified by thermovision and photoelastic method. Based on the temperature field and stress field analysis, a method for the block division into sections has been proposed, resulting in a significant reduction of the stress level.

  19. CHOICE OF MATERIAL AND MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY OF CASTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. I. Kupriyanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As a result of the carried out work abundant type of steel was chosen for casting production of asterisk of the excavator «Kamatsu». This type of steel is widely used as the wearproof steel working in the conditions of abrasive and shock – abrasive wear. Mathematical modeling of process of filling and hardening of casting was done and it confirmed a choice of the technology to produce casting without faulty parts.

  20. Model castings with composite surface layer - application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szajnar

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a method of usable properties of surface layers improvement of cast carbon steel 200–450, by put directly in foundingprocess a composite surface layer on the basis of Fe-Cr-C alloy. Technology of composite surface layer guarantee mainly increase inhardness and aberasive wear resistance of cast steel castings on machine elements. This technology can be competition for generallyapplied welding technology (surfacing by welding and thermal spraying. In range of studies was made cast steel test castings withcomposite surface layer, which usability for industrial applications was estimated by criterion of hardness and aberasive wear resistance of type metal-mineral and quality of joint cast steel – (Fe-Cr-C. Based on conducted studies a thesis, that composite surface layer arise from liquid state, was formulated. Moreover, possible is control of composite layer thickness and its hardness by suitable selection of parameters i.e. thickness of insert, pouring temperature and solidification modulus of casting. Possibility of technology application of composite surface layer in manufacture of cast steel slide bush for combined cutter loader is presented.

  1. Evaluation of a Belt-Cast Austenitic Steel Alloy from Salzgitter Mannesmann Forschung: Effect of Hardness on the Ballistic Resistance against Two 0.30-cal. Projectile Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    manufacturing technology and requisite alloy compositions for the production of high-strength and high-ductility security steels. Security steels...company was still experiencing fabrication issues that prevent the material from being fabricated in thicker sections. Therefore, currently, only 5-mm... production , an extended period of negotiations was required to obtain representative samples of this experimental steel from Salzgitter. As a result, 5

  2. Reinforcement of Aluminum Castings with Dissimilar Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Q

    2004-01-07

    The project ''Reinforcement of Aluminum Casting with Dissimilar Metal'' was a Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Cummins Inc. This project, technologies have been developed to reinforce aluminum castings with steel insert. Defect-free bond between the steel insert and the aluminum casting has been consistently obtained. The push-out experiment indicated that the bond strength is higher than that of the Al-Fin method. Two patents have been granted to the project team that is comprised of Cummins Inc. and ORNL. This report contains four sections: the coating of the steel pins, the cast-in method, microstructure characterization, and the bond strength. The section of the coating of the steel pins contains coating material selection, electro-plating technique for plating Cu and Ni on steel, and diffusion bonding of the coatings to the steel. The section of cast-in method deals with factors that affecting the quality of the metallurgical bond between the coated steel and the aluminum castings. The results of microstructure characteristics of the bonding are presented in the microstructure characterization section. A push-out experiment and the results obtained using this method is described in the section of bond strength/mechanical property.

  3. Thermodynamical calculations and design for a vessel-cooling of a HTR constructed of prestressed cast-steel segments with a thermal power of 3,000 MW(th)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheler, J.

    1977-07-01

    The fulfilling of the safety requirements for a vessel-cooling-system of a HTR cast-steel vessel leads to the application of an even-even-plate-type of cooling-system, which is block-independent and therewith, in principle, exchangeable. From the consideration of thermal accidents, the results obtained show that due to the fall-out of a cooling-disk, no damages are to be expected to the vessel, because of increased temperatures. For larger break-downs, the time interval is sufficient for countermeasures to be taken. The dimensions of the cooling system of the control rods are such that for a fall-out of the top-cooling, too, a safe reactor operation, and therefore also the starting-up of the reactor, remains possible at any time. (orig.) [de

  4. A Casting Yield Optimization Case Study: Forging Ram

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotas, Petr; Tutum, Cem Celal; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2010-01-01

    This work summarizes the findings of multi-objective optimization of a gravity sand-cast steel part for which an increase of the casting yield via riser optimization was considered. This was accomplished by coupling a casting simulation software package with an optimization module. The benefits o...

  5. Caste System

    OpenAIRE

    Hoff, Karla

    2016-01-01

    In standard economics, individuals are rational actors and economic forces undermine institutions that impose large inefficiencies. The persistence of the caste system is evidence of the need for psychologically more realistic models of decision-making in economics. The caste system divides South Asian society into hereditary groups whose lowest ranks are represented as innately polluted. ...

  6. Empleo de la cáscara de arroz en la fundición de piezas de acero al carbono//Using of rice husk in the carbon steel casting parts process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Cruz-Pérez

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Los materiales auxiliares desempeñan un papel importante en el aumento de la eficiencia tecnológica del proceso de fundición de piezas de acero al carbono. En este artículo se exponen los primeros resultados del empleo de la cáscara de arroz como material termoaislante en la obtención de piezas fundidas de acero al carbono. En los experimentos se evaluó la influencia  de seis combinaciones de las variables espesor de pared del casquillo y capa de cobertura. En la confección de los casquillos se utilizó cáscara de arroz triturada, la que posteriormente fue aglutinada con silicato de sodio, apisonada y endurecida con CO2, mientras que la cobertura se utilizó sin procesamiento previo. El mayor nivel de entrega de acero se obtuvo al emplear un espesor de casquillo de 65 mm y una altura de cobertura de 85 mm. El valor del ASAF generado por las variantes experimentales resultó igual o inferior a 0,48. Palabras claves: casquillo termoaislante, polvo de cobertura, cáscara de arroz, acero fundido.______________________________________________________________________________ Abstract Feeding auxiliary materials perform a very important role in improves technological efficiency of carbon steel casting parts process. In this article are exposing the first results in the rice husk using as an insulating material in such process. The variables sleeve thickness and covering thickness’ influence were evaluated in six combinations by means of experiments. In sleeves preparation was used crushed rice husk, which was agglutinated with sodium silicate, compacted and hardened with CO2, meanwhile as covering it was uses without previous preparation. The mayor liquid steel delivering level was get employing 65 mm sleeve thickness and 85 mm covering thickness. The ASAF value generated for experimental variants was equal or inferior to 0.48. Key words: insulating sleeve, riser sleeve, hot topping, rice husk, steel cast.

  7. Hair casts

    OpenAIRE

    Sweta S Parmar; Kirti S Parmar; Bela J Shah

    2014-01-01

    Hair casts or pseudonits are circumferential concretions, which cover the hair shaft in such a way that, it could be easily removed. They are thin, cylindrical, and elongated in length. We present an unusual case of an 8-year-old girl presenting with hair casts. Occurrence of these is unusual, and they may have varied associations. This patient was suffering from developmental delay. It is commonly misdiagnosed as and very important to differentiate from pediculosis capitis.

  8. Ultrahigh carbon steels, Damascus steels, and superplasticity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherby, O.D. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Wadsworth, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The processing properties of ultrahigh carbon steels (UHCSs) have been studied at Stanford University over the past twenty years. These studies have shown that such steels (1 to 2.1% C) can be made superplastic at elevated temperature and can have remarkable mechanical properties at room temperature. It was the investigation of these UHCSs that eventually brought us to study the myths, magic, and metallurgy of ancient Damascus steels, which in fact, were also ultrahigh carbon steels. These steels were made in India as castings, known as wootz, possibly as far back as the time of Alexander the Great. The best swords are believed to have been forged in Persia from Indian wootz. This paper centers on recent work on superplastic UHCSs and on their relation to Damascus steels. 32 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Advanced lost foam casting quarterly report, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    Objective is to advance the state of the art in lost foam casting technology, in order to improve the competitiveness of the US metals casting industries. The following tasks are reported on pyrolysis defects and sand distortion, bronze casting technology, steel casting technology, sand filling and compaction, coating technology, precision pattern production, and computational modeling.

  10. Clean ferrous casting technology research. Final technical report, September 29, 1993--December 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piwonka, T.S. [ed.

    1996-01-01

    This report details results of a 30-month program to develop methods of making clean ferrous castings, i.e., castings free of inclusions and surface defects. The program was divided into 3 tasks: techniques for producing clean steel castings, electromagnetic removal of inclusions from ferrous melts, and study of causes of metal penetration in sand molds in cast iron.

  11. One-Way Coupling of an Advanced CFD Multi-Physics Model to FEA for Predicting Stress-Strain in the Solidifying Shell during Continuous Casting of Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Johan; Ramírez López, Pavel E.; Jalali, Pooria N.; Cervantes, Michel

    2015-06-01

    One of the main targets for Continuous Casting (CC) modelling is the actual prediction of defects during transient events. However, the majority of CC models are based on a statistical approach towards flow and powder performance, which is unable to capture the subtleties of small variations in casting conditions during real industrial operation or the combined effects of such changes leading eventually to defects. An advanced Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model; which accounts for transient changes on lubrication during casting due to turbulent flow dynamics and mould oscillation has been presented on MCWASP XIV (Austria) to address these issues. The model has been successfully applied to the industrial environment to tackle typical problems such as lack of lubrication or unstable flows. However, a direct application to cracking had proven elusive. The present paper describes how results from this advanced CFD-CC model have been successfully coupled to structural Finite Element Analysis (FEA) for prediction of stress-strains as a function of irregular lubrication conditions in the mould. The main challenge for coupling was the extraction of the solidified shell from CFD calculations (carried out with a hybrid structured mesh) and creating a geometry by using iso-surfaces, re-meshing and mapping loads (e.g. temperature, pressure and external body forces), which served as input to mechanical stress-strain calculations. Preliminary results for CC of slabs show that the temperature distribution within the shell causes shrinkage and thermal deformation; which are in turn, the main source of stress. Results also show reasonable stress levels of 10-20 MPa in regions, where the shell is thin and exposed to large temperature gradients. Finally, predictions are in good agreement with prior works where stresses indicate compression at the slab surface, while tension is observed at the interior; generating a characteristic stress-strain state during solidification in CC.

  12. Interaction model of steel ladle of continuous caster in steel works

    OpenAIRE

    Huang Bang Fu; Ma Zhi Wei; Tian Nai Yuan; Shi Zhe; Zhou Xiao Lei; Cai Jun

    2016-01-01

    For further research on the precondition and interoperability model of interaction ladles among continuous caster, this article takes steel ladle of Y steel works as the object of research. On the basis of turnover number calculation model of single cast steel ladle, the relationship between cast number and the turnover number and turnover times and last turnover number are further analyzed. The simulation of steel ladle turnover rules was taken on the 2 continuous casters with Gantt chart. A...

  13. A Physical Model to Study the Effects of Nozzle Design on Dispersed Two-Phase Flows in a Slab Mold Casting Ultra-Low-Carbon Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Campoy, María M.; Morales, R. D.; Nájera-Bastida, A.; Calderón-Ramos, Ismael; Cedillo-Hernández, Valentín; Delgado-Pureco, J. C.

    2018-02-01

    The effects of nozzle design on dispersed, two-phase flows of the steel-argon system in a slab mold are studied using a water-air model with particle image velocimetry and ultrasound probe velocimetry techniques. Three nozzle designs were tested with the same bore size and different port geometries, including square (S), special bottom design with square ports (U), and circular (C). The meniscus velocities of the liquid increase two- or threefold in two-phase flows regarding one-phase flows using low flow rates of the gas phase. This effect is due to the dragging effects on bubbles by the liquid jets forming two-way coupled flows. Liquid velocities (primary phase) along the narrow face of the mold also are higher for two-phase flows. Flows using nozzle U are less dependent on the effects of the secondary phase (air). The smallest bubble sizes are obtained using nozzle U, which confirms that bubble breakup is dependent on the strain rates of the fluid and dissipation of kinetic energy in the nozzle bottom and port edges. Through dimensionless analysis, it was found that the bubble sizes are inversely proportional to the dissipation rate of the turbulent kinetic energy, ɛ 0.4. A simple expression involving ɛ, surface tension, and density of metal is derived to scale up bubble sizes in water to bubble sizes in steel with different degrees of deoxidation. The validity of water-air models to study steel-argon flows is discussed. Prior works related with experiments to model argon bubbling in steel slab molds under nonwetting conditions are critically reviewed.

  14. A Physical Model to Study the Effects of Nozzle Design on Dispersed Two-Phase Flows in a Slab Mold Casting Ultra-Low-Carbon Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Campoy, María M.; Morales, R. D.; Nájera-Bastida, A.; Calderón-Ramos, Ismael; Cedillo-Hernández, Valentín; Delgado-Pureco, J. C.

    2018-04-01

    The effects of nozzle design on dispersed, two-phase flows of the steel-argon system in a slab mold are studied using a water-air model with particle image velocimetry and ultrasound probe velocimetry techniques. Three nozzle designs were tested with the same bore size and different port geometries, including square (S), special bottom design with square ports (U), and circular (C). The meniscus velocities of the liquid increase two- or threefold in two-phase flows regarding one-phase flows using low flow rates of the gas phase. This effect is due to the dragging effects on bubbles by the liquid jets forming two-way coupled flows. Liquid velocities (primary phase) along the narrow face of the mold also are higher for two-phase flows. Flows using nozzle U are less dependent on the effects of the secondary phase (air). The smallest bubble sizes are obtained using nozzle U, which confirms that bubble breakup is dependent on the strain rates of the fluid and dissipation of kinetic energy in the nozzle bottom and port edges. Through dimensionless analysis, it was found that the bubble sizes are inversely proportional to the dissipation rate of the turbulent kinetic energy, ɛ 0.4. A simple expression involving ɛ, surface tension, and density of metal is derived to scale up bubble sizes in water to bubble sizes in steel with different degrees of deoxidation. The validity of water-air models to study steel-argon flows is discussed. Prior works related with experiments to model argon bubbling in steel slab molds under nonwetting conditions are critically reviewed.

  15. Effect of out-of-furnace treatment on the chemical composition, mechanical properties, and microstructure of cast steel for the car-building industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogova, V. P.; Polyavin, G. V.; Mosunova, I. V.

    2006-01-01

    The mechanical properties, chemical composition, microstructure, and nonmetallic inclusions in steel 20GL subjected to out-of-furnace treatment in an AKP installation (furnace-ladle unit) and melted by the standard process are studied. The effect of the out-of-furnace treatment on the content of sulfur, on the contamination of the metal with nonmetallic inclusions, and on the impact toughness of specimens with U-and V-notches at a test temperature of + 20 and - 60°C is determined.

  16. Improved life of die casting dies of H13 steel by attaining improved mechanical properties and distortion control during heat treatment. Year 1 report, October 1994--September 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, J.F.; Schwam, D. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Optimum heat treatment of dies (quenching) is critical in ensuring satisfactory service performance: rapid cooling rates increase the thermal fatigue/heat checking resistance of the steel, although very fast cooling rates can also lead to distortion and lower fracture toughness, increasing the danger of catastrophic fracture. Goal of this project is to increase die life by using fast enough quenching rates (> 30 F/min ave cooling rate from 1750 to 550 F, 1/2 in. below working surfaces) to obtain good toughness and fatigue resistance in Premium grade H-13 steel dies. An iterative approach of computer modeling validated by experiment was taken. Cooling curves during gas quenching of H-13 blocks and die shapes were measured under 2, 5, and 7.5 bar N2 and 4 bar Ar. Resulting dimensional changes and residual stresses were determined. To facilitate the computer modeling work, a database of H-13 mechanical and physical properties was compiled. Finite element analysis of the heat treated shapes was conducted. Good fit of modeled vs measured quenched rates was demonstrated for simple die shapes. The models predict well the phase transformation products from the quench. There is good fit between predicted and measured distortion contours; however magnitude of predicted distortion and residual stresses does not match well the measured values. Further fine tuning of the model is required.

  17. Spatial Bimetallic Castings Manufactured from Iron Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cholewa

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a conception for manufacturing method of skeleton castings with composite features was shown. Main application of such castings are the working organs of machines subjected to intensive abrasive and erosive wear. Skeleton geometry was based on three-dimensional cubic net consisting of circular connectors and nodes joining 6 connectors according to Cartesian co-ordinate system. Dimension of an elementary cell was equal to 10 mm and diameter of single connector was equal to 5 mm. For bimetallic castings preparation two Fe based alloys were used: L25SHMN cast steel for skeleton substrate and ZlCr15NiMo cast iron for working part of the casting. In presented work obtained structure was analyzed with indication of characteristic regions. Authors described phenomena occurring at the alloys interface and phases in transition zone. A thesis was formulated concerning localization of transition zone at the cast iron matrix – cast steel reinforcement interface. Direction of further studies were indicated.

  18. Structural amorphous steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Z.P.; Liu, C.T.; Porter, W.D.; Thompson, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    Recent advancement in bulk metallic glasses, whose properties are usually superior to their crystalline counterparts, has stimulated great interest in fabricating bulk amorphous steels. While a great deal of effort has been devoted to this field, the fabrication of structural amorphous steels with large cross sections has remained an alchemist's dream because of the limited glass-forming ability (GFA) of these materials. Here we report the discovery of structural amorphous steels that can be cast into glasses with large cross-section sizes using conventional drop-casting methods. These new steels showed interesting physical, magnetic, and mechanical properties, along with high thermal stability. The underlying mechanisms for the superior GFA of these materials are discussed

  19. Sonic testing in assessment of casting quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Białobrzeski

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study has been designing and putting in operation of a stand for sonic testing equipped with modern and readily available numerical devices and with the author’s own computer program, which enables recording and analysis of acoustic fields and of the frequency of free vibrations in selected castings made from Fe and Al alloys, and specifically also from magnesium alloys, and mastering the technique of making such tests along with their practical application in assessment of the quality of castings made from magnesium alloys and investment castings made from carbon steel.

  20. Status quo and development trend of lost foam casting technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Zitian

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Lost foam casting (LFC technology has been widely applied to cast iron and cast steel. However, the development of LFC for Al and Mg alloys was relatively slower than that for cast iron and cast steel. The application of LFC to Al and Mg alloys needs more effort, especially in China. In this paper, the development history of LFC is reviewed, and the application situations of LFC to Al and Mg alloys are mainly discussed. Meanwhile, the key problems of LFC for Al and Mg alloys are also pointed out. Finally, the prospects for LFC technology are discussed, and some special new LFC technologies are introduced for casting Al and Mg alloys. In future, the development trends of green LFC technology mainly focus on the special new LFC methods, metal material, coating, heat treatment, new foam materials as well as purification technology of tail gas, etc.

  1. Advanced constitutive equations for 10 Cr forged and cast steel for steam turbines under creep fatigue and thermo-mechanical fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringel, M.; Roos, E.; Maile, K.; Klenk, A.

    2004-01-01

    In order to determine the material behaviour of 10Cr steels under loading conditions similar to service, multi-axial creep and creep-fatigue tests on hollow-cylinder specimens, were carried out at temperature 600 C. It could be shown, that deformation and failure behaviour under stationary creep could be described in good agreement with the experiment results. For the creep fatigue tests, a loading cycle, which represents service loads was applied. Failure of specimens under this multi-axial creep fatigue loading occurred earlier than predicted by linear damage accumulation. In order to describe the deformation and damage under creep and fatigue loading conditions, an elastic-visco-plastic constitutive equation was developed. A secondary creep rate was introduced for a better description of diffusion-controlled creep at low stresses. Modified kinematic hardening was included to describe cyclic softening behaviour of the materials. Two damage parameters for creep and fatigue were introduced and accumulation of both was determined based on comparison of experimental and numerical results. Model parameters were fitted, using a broad database of uni-axial tests. The model is capable to describe the uni-axial behaviour exactly. Simulation of multi-axial creep fatigue tests showed good agreement between experiment and calculation, too. Special consideration of damage interaction allowed a prediction of failure with less than 10% deviation. First temperature dependent modelling results were obtained by using a simple classical visco-plastic model with temperature dependent parameters. This simple approach will be developed in the near future. Especially the damage behaviour and the strength hypothesis will be included in the same way as in the isothermal case. Comparing the model results to multi-axial thermo-mechanical fatigue test data will make the validation of the model. (orig.)

  2. Manufacturing Methods for Process Effects on Aluminum Casting Allowables

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    at room temperature using a steel ladle coated with refractory Insulkotz R-20. (4) Clean Up After the casting was shaken out of the mold, the gates...ALUMINUM CASTING ALLOWABLES K.J. OSWALT Y. LII NORTHROP CORPORATION AIRCRAFT DIVISION ONE NORTHROP AVENUE HAWTHORNE, CALIFORNIA 90250 MARCH 1985 FINAL...GR. Aluminum Castings , A357, A201, Mechanical Properties 1~~ j’Airframe Structures, Specifications, Manufacturing Methods 1.A TRACT (Continue on rev

  3. Modificación superficial de aceros y hierros fundidos mediante láser de Nd: YAG. // Steels and cast irons superficial modification by means of laser Nd: YAG.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sagaró Z.

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Se presentan los resultados de los autores en el tratamiento térmico superficial con técnica láser (TTSL. Con el empleo deun láser de Nd: YAG se procedió al endurecimiento superficial de los aceros AISI 1045, W1, W112 y hierros fundidos detipo laminar y nodular. Los autores prestan atención a las rutas de endurecimiento superficial atendiendo a los parámetrosoperacionales del láser: potencia incidente en la zona de interacción (P y la velocidad de barrido del haz de láser (V. Deigual forma se establecen valoraciones acerca de las estructuras metalográficas obtenidas. En todos los casos se reportanvalores de microdureza Vickers que oscilan entre los 500-900 HV (incrementos de 3-4 veces respecto al substratooriginal. Los resultados obtenidos permiten establecer en todos los casos experimentados que el incremento de lavelocidad de barrido provocó una disminución de la profundidad de la capa endurecida. Las experiencias del TTSL en losaceros ensayados muestran una tendencia a la disminución de la profundidad del endurecimiento con el incremento delcontenido de carbono.Palabras claves: Endurecimiento superficial, parámetros de operación de láser., microdureza, profundidadde capa endurecida, de fallo, vibraciones.____________________________________________________________________________AbstractThis paper expose the experiences of researchers on the laser surface heat treatment. The hardening of AISI 1045, W1,W112 steels and cast irons flake and nodular was carried out by using a Nd: YAG laser. Operation parameters of laser, likebeam power (P and traverse speed of the laser spot (V are closely with hardening depth . Authors present some analysesabout metallographic studies. In all cases are reported Vickers microhardness about 500-900 HV (three or four times higherthan original substrates. Relations between microhardness and depth of hardening are presented for the processedmaterials. Experimental results showed that the increased

  4. Casting materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Anil R [Xenia, OH; Dzugan, Robert [Cincinnati, OH; Harrington, Richard M [Cincinnati, OH; Neece, Faurice D [Lyndurst, OH; Singh, Nipendra P [Pepper Pike, OH

    2011-06-14

    A foam material comprises a liquid polymer and a liquid isocyanate which is mixed to make a solution that is poured, injected or otherwise deposited into a corresponding mold. A reaction from the mixture of the liquid polymer and liquid isocyanate inside the mold forms a thermally collapsible foam structure having a shape that corresponds to the inside surface configuration of the mold and a skin that is continuous and unbroken. Once the reaction is complete, the foam pattern is removed from the mold and may be used as a pattern in any number of conventional casting processes.

  5. Effect of carbon content on friction and wear of cast irons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    Friction and wear experiments were conducted with cast irons and wrought steels containing various amounts of carbon in the alloy structure in contact with 52100 steel. Gray cast irons were found to exhibit lower friction and wear characteristics than white cast irons. Further, gray cast iron wear was more sensitive to carbon content than was white. Wear with gray cast iron was linearly related to load, and friction was found to be sensitive to relative humidity and carbon content. The form, in which the carbon is present in the alloy, is more important, as the carbon content and no strong relationship seems to exist between hardness of these ferrous alloys and wear.

  6. Cast irons

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Cast iron offers the design engineer a low-cost, high-strength material that can be easily melted and poured into a wide variety of useful, and sometimes complex, shapes. This latest handbook from ASM covers the entire spectrum of one of the most widely used and versatile of all engineered materials. The reader will find the basic, but vital, information on metallurgy, solidification characteristics, and properties. Extensive reviews are presented on the low-alloy gray, ductile, compacted graphite, and malleable irons. New and expanded material has been added covering high-alloy white irons used for abrasion resistance and high-alloy graphitic irons for heat and corrosion resistance. Also discussed are melting furnaces and foundry practices such as melting, inoculation, alloying, pouring, gating and rising, and molding. Heat treating practices including stress relieving, annealing, normalizing, hardening and tempering, autempering (of ductile irons), and surface-hardening treatments are covered, too. ASM Spec...

  7. Analysis of the structure of castings made from chromium white cast iron resistant to abrasive wear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kopyciński

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available It has been proved that an addition of boron carbide and disintegrated steel scrap introduced as an inoculant to the chromium white cast iron changes the structure of castings. The said operation increases the number of crystallization nuclei for dendrites of the primary austenite. In this case, the iron particles act as substrates for the nucleation of primary austenite due to a similar crystallographic lattice. The more numerous are the dendrites of primary austenite and the structure more refined and the mechanical properties higher. Castings after B4C inoculation revealed a different structure of fine grained fracture. Primary precipitates of chromium carbide also appeared, reducing the mechanical properties of as-cast parts. Properly established heat treatment regime makes chromium iron castings regain their, originally high, mechanical properties.

  8. Development of nuclear grade stainless steels at KCSSL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balachandran, G.; Dhere, M.; Mahadik, A.; Hinge, N.M.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2011-01-01

    Kalyani Carpenter Special Steels Ltd is an alloy steel plant, where a variety of alloy steel grades are produced for automotive, defence, nuclear and aerospace applications. The plant has developed expertise in processing of several alloy steel grades of superior quality that meets stringent specifications. Primary steel is processed through a combination of electric arc furnace, ladle furnace and vacuum degassing where stringent control over dephosphorisation, desulphurization, deoxidation is effected to get a refined high quality steel. The molten steel is cast through continuous casting of slabs or ingot casting. In grades specific to nuclear application, the primary cast products are further subjected to electroslag remelting to achieve further freedom from inclusions and to achieve a favourable solidification grain structure, which ultimately improve the hot workability of the alloy steel. Appropriate choice of slag and operating parameters are needed for realising the required ingot quality. The present study would examine the processing and quality aspects of some important grades of steels used in nuclear industry namely ferritic 9Cr-1Mo steel, martensitic stainless steels 403, 410, precipitation hardenable 17-4 PH stainless steel and austenitic 321, 316LN stainless steel, which were made and supplied for applications to Indian nuclear industry. The expertise developed in processing the steels in terms of melting, heat treatment and their relationship to structural features and mechanical properties would be highlighted. (author)

  9. Investment casting or powder metallurgy – the ecological aspect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tomasik

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an analysis of manufacturing methods of material-saving products in relation to investment castings and sinteredpowder technology. Surface microgeometry, shape accuracy, performance parameters, manufacturing costs and energy consumption weretaken into account to make the optimal choice. The analysis was conducted by comparing test results for sintered powder products basedon Distaloy AB alloy that consists of 0.55% C, 1.5% Cu, 1.75% Ni and 0.5% Mo and investment castings made of high alloy cast steel andnodular cast iron. The analysis made it possible to choose the best technology, considering also the ecological aspect.

  10. The ancient Chinese casting techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Tan Derui; Lian Haiping

    2011-01-01

    In the course of Chinese civilization, which lasted more than 5,000 years, casting production has made a huge contribution. In this paper, some representative metal castings were presented. According to their forming techniques, they can be grouped into stone mould casting, clay mould casting, ablation casting, lost wax casting, stack casting, permanent mould casting, sand casting, etc. According to their materials, they can be categorized into tin bronze, bimetallic bronze, malleable cast ir...

  11. Special thermite cast irons

    OpenAIRE

    Yu. Zhiguts; I. Kurytnik

    2008-01-01

    The given paper deals with the problems of the synthesis of cast iron by metallothermy synthesis. On the basis of investigated method of calculations structures of charges have been arranged and cast iron has been synthesized further. Peculiarities metallothermic smelting were found, mechanical properties and structure of received cast iron were investigated and different technologies for cast iron receiving were worked out.

  12. Solidification control in continuous casting of steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    control of metal level in the mould. Oscillation parameters also influence hook depth. Non-sinusoidal oscillation is shown to be an effective tool for improving slab subsurface cleanliness. The combination of lower inward bend (low tN) and higher outward bend (high tP) accompanying high triangular distortion provides ...

  13. Novel technologies for the lost foam casting process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wenming; Fan, Zitian

    2018-03-01

    Lost foam casting (LFC) is a green precision casting process categorized as a near net forming technology. Yet, despite its popularity, it still suffers from some technological problems, such as poor filling ability of the castings, coarse and non-dense microstructure, low mechanical properties for the Al and Mg LFC processes, and defective carburization for the low carbon steel LFC process. These drawbacks restrict the development and widespread application of the LFC process. To solve these problems, the present study developed several novel LFC technologies, namely, LFC technologies under vacuum and low pressure, vibration solidification, and pressure solidification conditions; expendable shell casting technology; and preparation technology of bimetallic castings based on the LFC process. The results showed that the LFC under vacuum and low pressure evidently improved the filling ability and solved the oxidization problem of the alloys, which is suitable for producing complex and thinwall castings. The vibration and pressure solidifications increased the compactness of the castings and refined the microstructure, significantly improving the mechanical properties of the castings. The expendable shell casting technology could solve the pore, carburization, and inclusion defects of the traditional LFC method, obtaining castings with acceptable surface quality. Moreover, the Al/Mg and Al/Al bimetallic castings with acceptable metallurgical bonding were successfully fabricated using the LFC process. These proposed novel LFC technologies can solve the current technological issues and promote the technological progress of the LFC process.

  14. Determinación de la tenacidad a la fractura de muestras de Acero 45 fundido, empleando las correlaciones entre el KIC y la energía de impacto medida en el ensayo de Charpy. // Determination of the fracture tenacity of cast Steel grade 45 samples, using th

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Ramos Morales

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available En el presente trabajo se determinan los valores de tenacidad a la fractura (KIC de muestras de Acero 45 fundido,empleando las correlaciones entre la tenacidad a la fractura y la energía de impacto (CVN obtenida del ensayo de Charpy.Se hace una discusión sobre las correlaciones que más se ajustan en la región de transición y en upper shelf. Se comparanlos valores obtenidos de estas correlaciones a valores de tenacidad a la fractura establecidos en la literatura.Palabras claves: Fractura, energía de impacto, acero fundido.______________________________________________________________________________Abstract.In this paper, the values of fracture toughness (KIC are determined on specimens of cast steel grade 45, using thecorrelations among the fracture toughness (KIC and the impact energy (CVN obtained from a Charpy test. A discussion ismade on the correlations that are better adjusted in the transition region and in upper shelf region. The obtained values arecompared from these correlations to values of fracture toughness (KIC settled down in the literature.Key words. Fracture, impact energy, cast steel.

  15. Fatigue behaviour of synthetic nodular cast irons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vaško

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper shows the influence of charge composition on microstructure, fatigue properties and failure micromechanisms of nodular cast irons. The additive of metallurgical silicon carbide (SiC in analysed specimens increases the content of ferrite in the matrix, decreases the size of graphite and increases the average count of graphitic nodules per unit of area. Consequently, the mechanical and fatigue properties of nodular cast iron are improved. The best fatigue properties (fatigue strength were reached in the melt which was created by 60 % of steel scrap and 40 % of pig iron in the basic charge with SiC additive.

  16. Metallic Reinforcement of Direct Squeeze Die Casting Aluminum Alloys for Improved Strength and Fracture Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Schwam: J.F. Wallace: Y. Zhu: J.W. Ki

    2004-10-01

    The utilization of aluminum die casting as enclosures where internal equipment is rotating inside of the casting and could fracture requires a strong housing to restrain the fractured parts. A typical example would be a supercharger. In case of a failure, unless adequately contained, fractured parts could injure people operating the equipment. A number of potential reinforcement materials were investigated. The initial work was conducted in sand molds to create experimental conditions that promote prolonged contact of the reinforcing material with molten aluminum. Bonding of Aluminum bronze, Cast iron, and Ni-resist inserts with various electroplated coatings and surface treatments were analyzed. Also toughening of A354 aluminum cast alloy by steel and stainless steel wire mesh with various conditions was analyzed. A practical approach to reinforcement of die cast aluminum components is to use a reinforcing steel preform. Such performs can be fabricated from steel wire mesh or perforated metal sheet by stamping or deep drawing. A hemispherical, dome shaped casting was selected in this investigation. A deep drawing die was used to fabricate the reinforcing performs. The tendency of aluminum cast enclosures to fracture could be significantly reduced by installing a wire mesh of austenitic stainless steel or a punched austenitic stainless steel sheet within the casting. The use of reinforcements made of austenitic stainless steel wire mesh or punched austenitic stainless steel sheet provided marked improvement in reducing the fragmentation of the casting. The best strengthening was obtained with austenitic stainless steel wire and with a punched stainless steel sheet without annealing this material. Somewhat lower results were obtained with the annealed punched stainless steel sheet. When the annealed 1020 steel wire mesh was used, the results were only slightly improved because of the lower mechanical properties of this unalloyed steel. The lowest results were

  17. Clean ferrous casting technology research. Final technical report, September 29, 1993--December 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, C.E.; Griffin, J.; Giese, S.R.; Lane, A.M. [and others

    1996-01-31

    This is the final report covering work performed on research into methods of attaining clean ferrous castings. In this program methods were developed to minimize the formation of inclusions in steel castings by using a variety of techniques which decreased the tendency for inclusions to form during melting, casting and solidification. In a second project, a reaction chamber was built to remove inclusions from molten steel using electromagnetic force. Finally, a thorough investigation of the causes of sand penetration defects in iron castings was completed, and a program developed which predicts the probability of penetration formation and indicates methods for avoiding it.

  18. Software Analytical Instrument for Assessment of the Process of Casting Slabs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franek, Zdenek; Kavicka, Frantisek; Stetina, Josef; Masarik, Milos

    2010-01-01

    The paper describes the original proposal of ways of solution and function of the program equipment for assessment of the process of casting slabs. The program system LITIOS was developed and implemented in EVRAZ Vitkovice Steel Ostrava on the equipment of continuous casting of steel (further only ECC). This program system works on the data warehouse of technological parameters of casting and quality parameters of slabs. It enables an ECC technologist to analyze the course of casting melt and with using statistics methods to set the influence of single technological parameters on the duality of final slabs. The system also enables long term monitoring and optimization of the production.

  19. Materials on dies for pressure die casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Ragan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the contribution the stress of die materials of thermal fatigue is defi ned and material life is derived theoretically and compared with the measured values. The important properties of the die materials as thermal conductivity, coeffi cient of thermal expansivity, modulus of elasticity and mechanical properties are described. Binding to it single die materials as carbon steels and chrome-tungsten steels are analyzed. As the perspective die material for pressure die casting of ferrous metals appears molybdenum with regard to advantageous properties.

  20. Plastic casting resin poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epoxy poisoning; Resin poisoning ... Epoxy and resin can be poisonous if they are swallowed or their fumes are breathed in. ... Plastic casting resins are found in various plastic casting resin products.

  1. Casting and Splinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-21

    article /80165-technigue Self Evaluation Is injured extremity in desired position? »- Empty can position »- Wrist extension 20° );;>- MCP Oexion...periodically throughout the day If cast feels tight despite elevation seek medical assistance Do not scratch under cast; do not get cast wet Get

  2. Cast construction elements for heat treatment furnaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Piekarski

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The study presents sketches and photos of the cast creep-resistant components used in various types of heat treatment furnaces. The shape of the elements results from the type of the operation carried out in the furnace, while dimensions are adjusted to the size of the furnace working chamber. The castings are mainly made from the high-alloyed, austenitic chromium-nickel or nickel-chromium steel, selecting the grade in accordance with the furnace operating conditions described by the rated temperature, the type and parameters of the applied operating atmosphere, and the charge weight. Typical examples in this family of construction elements are: crucibles, roller tracks, radiant tubes and guides. The majority of castings are produced in sand moulds.

  3. Last cast for the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The first major contract signed for the LHC is drawing to a close. Belgian firm Cockerill Sambre (a member of the Arcelor Group) has just completed production of 50,000 tonnes of steel sheets for the accelerator's superconducting magnet yokes, in what has proved to be an exemplary partnership with CERN. Philippe Lebrun, Head of the AT Department, Lyn Evans, LHC Project Leader, and Lucio Rossi, Head of the AT-MAS Group, in front of the last batch of steel for the LHC at Cockerill Sambre. It was a bright red-letter day at the end of May, when Belgian firm Cockerill Sambre of the Arcelor Group marked the completion of one of the largest contracts for the LHC machine by casting the last batch of steel sheets for the LHC superconducting magnet yokes in the presence of LHC Project Leader Lyn Evans, AT Department Head Philippe Lebrun, Magnets and Superconductors (AT-MAS) Group Leader Lucio Rossi and Head of the AT-MAS Group's components centre Francesco Bertinelli. The yokes constitute approximately 80% of the acc...

  4. History of ultrahigh carbon steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wadsworth, J.; Sherby, O.D.

    1997-06-20

    The history and development of ultrahigh carbon steels (i.e., steels containing between 1 and 2.l percent C and now known as UHCS) are described. The early use of steel compositions containing carbon contents above the eutectoid level is found in ancient weapons from around the world. For example, both Damascus and Japanese sword steels are hypereutectoid steels. Their manufacture and processing is of interest in understanding the role of carbon content in the development of modern steels. Although sporadic examples of UHCS compositions are found in steels examined in the early part of this century, it was not until the mid-1970s that the modern study began. This study had its origin in the development of superplastic behavior in steels and the recognition that increasing the carbon content was of importance in developing that property. The compositions that were optimal for superplasticity involved the development of steels that contained higher carbon contents than conventional modern steels. It was discovered, however, that the room temperature properties of these compositions were of interest in their own right. Following this discovery, a period of intense work began on understanding their manufacture, processing, and properties for both superplastic forming and room temperature applications. The development of superplastic cast irons and iron carbides, as well as those of laminated composites containing UHCS, was an important part of this history.

  5. Cavitation erosion resistance of 13/4 and 21-4-N steels

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nitrogen strengthened austenitic stainless steel (termed as 21-4-N steel) in as cast and hot rolled conditions has been investigated as an alternative to 13/4 steel (termed as CA6NM) to overcome the problems of cavitation erosion in hydro turbine underwater parts. The cavitation erosion of 21-4-N and 13/4 steels was ...

  6. Abrasion Resistance of as-Cast High-Chromium Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pokusová Marcela

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available High chromium cast irons are widely used as abrasion resistant materials. Their properties and wear resistance depend on carbides and on the nature of the matrix supporting these carbides. The paper presents test results of irons which contain (in wt.% 18-22 Cr and 2-5 C, and is alloyed by 1.7 Mo + 5 Ni + 2 Mn to improve the toughness. Tests showed as-cast irons with mostly austenitic matrix achieved hardness 36-53 HRC but their relative abrasion-resistance was higher than the tool steel STN 19436 heat treated on hardness 60 HRC.

  7. Modeling of high temperature- and diffusion-controlled die soldering in aluminum high pressure die casting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domkin, Konstantin; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Thorborg, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    Soldering of cast alloys to the dies has been a continuing source of die surface damage in the aluminum die-casting industry. To reduce the repair and maintenance costs, an approach to modeling the damage and predicting the die lifetime is required. The aim of the present study is the estimation...... the die-casting industry. As an example, the model is applied to several cases of high pressure die casting (HPDC) where A380 alloy parts are cast in the H13 steel die. The predicted locations of the higher strength of soldering appear in the "hot spot" areas of the die surface in agreement...

  8. Utilization of a numerical model of the temperature field of a conti-casting and prediction anti-break systems at the continuous caster of the steelworks division plant to improve the production quality at U. S Steel Košice, Ltd.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Pavol

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the optimization elements at the continuous caster (CC from the view of the quality management and the costsavingprogram at U. S. Steel Košice, Ltd. The presented issue represents a partial problem within one step of the production cycle, which isconnected with the quality of slabs and with managing their subsequent processing. The solutions to reduce the occurrence of slab defectsare presented. The authors describe the utilization of anti-break systems of the continuous caster and an original numerical model of thenon-stationary temperature field of a conti-casting for CC#2, which solves current thermo-kinetic problems generally, as well asindividually. This model helps to optimize the primary and secondary cooling at CC#2 and to improve the surface quality of slabs.

  9. Enhanced Inclusion Removal from Steel in the Tundish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. C. Bradt; M.A.R. Sharif

    2009-09-25

    The objective of this project was to develop an effective chemical filtering system for significantly reducing the content of inclusion particles in the steel melts exiting the tundish for continuous casting. This project combined a multi-process approach that aimed to make significant progress towards an "inclusion free" steel by incorporating several interdependent concepts to reduce the content of inclusions in the molten steel exiting the tundish for the caster. The goal is to produce "cleaner" steel.

  10. Enhanced Incluison Removal from Steel in the Tundish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.C. Bradt; M.A.R. Sharif

    2009-09-25

    The objective of this project was to develop an effective chemical filtering system for significantly reducing the content of inclusion particles in the steel melts exiting the tundish for continuous casting. This project combined a multi-process approach that aimed to make significant progress towards an "inclusion free" steel by incorporating several interdependent concepts to reduce the content of inclusions in the molten steel exiting the tundish for the caster. The goal is to produce "cleaner" steel.

  11. Crack propagation during fatigue in cast duplex stainless steels: influence of the microstructure, of the aging and of the test temperature; Propagation de fissure par fatigue dans les aciers austeno-ferritiques moules: influence de la microstructure, du vieillissement et de la temperature d'essai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calonne, V

    2001-07-15

    Duplex stainless steels are used as cast components in nuclear power plants. At the service temperature of about 320 C, the ferrite phase is thermally aged and embrittled. This induces a significant decrease in fracture properties of these materials. The aim of this work consists in studying Fatigue Crack Growth Rates (FCGR) and Fatigue Crack Growth Mechanisms (FCGM) as a function of thermal ageing and test temperature (20 C/320 C). Two cast duplex stainless steels (30% ferrite) are tested. In order to better understand the influence of the crystallographic orientation of the phases on the FCGM, the solidification structure of the material is studied by Electron Back-Scatter Diffraction (EBSD) and by Unidirectional Solidification Quenching. Fatigue crack growth tests are also performed in equiaxed and basaltic structures. Microstructure, fatigue crack growth mechanical properties and mechanisms are thus studied in relation to each other. In the studied range of delta K, the crack propagates without any preferential path by successive ruptures of phase laths. The macroscopic crack propagation plane, as determined by EBSD, depends on the crystallographic orientation of the ferrite grain. So, according to the solidification structure, secondary cracks can appear, which in turn influences the FCGR. Fatigue crack closure, which has to be determined to estimate the intrinsic FCGR, decreases with increasing ageing. This can be explained by a decrease in the kinematic cyclic hardening. The Paris exponent as determined from intrinsic FCGR increases with ageing. Intrinsic FCGR can then be separated in two ranges: one with lower FCGR in aged materials than in un-aged and one with the reversed tendency. (author)

  12. Testing of heating and cooling process of ADI cast iron with use of ATND method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Białobrzeski

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available ADI (Austempered Ductile Iron cast iron, owing to its unique combination of high tensile strength and abrasion resistance with very goodplasticity, founds implementation in many branches of industry as a substitute of alloy cast steel and carburized or heat treated steels. Inspite of its solid position among producers and recipients of castings, there are still undertaken studies aimed at perfection of its propertiesand recognition of mechanisms enabling obtaining such properties.The paper presents implementation of thermal-voltage-derivative (ATND method to registration of heating and cooling course of ADIcast iron with EN-GJS-1200-2 grade. ADI cast iron with EN-GJS-1200-2 grade underwent the study. Heat treatment of the cast iron wasperformed in Foundry Institute with use of LT ADI-350/1000 processing line. Results obtained from the testing illustrate in graphic formregistered heating and cooling curves of investigated cast irons obtained with use of the ATND method.

  13. Friction welding of ductile cast iron using interlayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winiczenko, Radoslaw; Kaczorowski, Mieczyslaw

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → The results of the study of the friction welding of ductile cast iron using interlayers are presented. → The results of the analysis shows that the joint has the tensile strength compared to that of basic material. → In case of ductile cast iron, it is possible to reach the tensile strength equals even 700 MPa. → The process of friction welding was accompanied with diffusion of Cr, Ni and C atoms across the interface. -- Abstract: In this paper, ductile cast iron-austenitic stainless steel, ductile cast iron-pure Armco iron and ductile cast iron-low carbon steel interlayers were welded, using the friction welding method. The tensile strength of the joints was determined, using a conventional tensile test machine. Moreover, the hardness across the interface of materials was measured on metallographic specimens. The fracture surface and microstructure of the joints was examined using either light stereoscope microscopy as well as electron microscopy. In this case, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were applied. The results of the analysis shows that the joint has the tensile strength compared to that of basic material. In case of ductile cast iron, it is possible to reach the tensile strength equals even 700 MPa. It was concluded that the process of friction welding was accompanied with diffusion of Cr, Ni and C atoms across the ductile cast iron-stainless steel interface. This leads to increase in carbon concentration in stainless steel where chromium carbides were formed, the size and distribution of which was dependent on the distance from the interface.

  14. Expandable pattern casting research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-01

    The Expandable Pattern Casting (EPC) Process is a developing foundry technology that allows designers the opportunity to consolidate parts, reduce machining, and minimize assembly operations. An air gauging system was developed for measuring foam patterns; exact shrinkage depended on type and density of the foam. Compaction studies showed that maximum sand densities in cavities and under overhangs are achieved with vibrational amplitudes 0.001-0.004 in., and that sand moved most freely within a few inches of the top free surface. Key to complete mold filling while minimizing casting defects lies in removing the foam decomposition products. The most precise iron castings were made by EPC in four commercial EPC foundries, with attention paid to molding and compaction. EP cast 60-45-12 ductile iron had yield strengths, ultimate strengths, and elastic modulus similar to conventionally cast ductile iron cast from the same ladle.

  15. USE OF HIGH-STRENGTH BAINITIC CAST IRON FOR PRODUCING GEAR WHEELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Pokrovskiy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The advantages and drawbacks of high-strength cast irons with bainitic structure are reviewed basing on the authors’ own experience in the production of critical partsfrom this material and on the analysis of world trends. A possibility of the replacement of alloy steels by bainitic cast iron in manufacturing critical machine parts is discussed.

  16. Manufacture of tube billets for fuel cans by vacuum centrifugal casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelenskij, V.F.; Neklyudov, I.M.; Chernyj, B.P.

    1989-01-01

    Vacuum device for induction melting with centrifugal casting in the ingot mold with rotation vertical or horisontal axis is presented. Removing and grinding of nonmetallic inclusions are realized by selection of casting conditions and of chemically active reducer, sound metal with high ductility is obtained. Data on micro- and macrostructure of casted tube billets made of 08Kh18N10T and 06Kh16H15M3B stainless steels, designed for manufacture of fuel cans are presented

  17. Caste and power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roy, Dayabati

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the institution of caste and its operation in a micro-level village setting of West Bengal, an Indian state, where state politics at grass roots level is vibrant with functioning local self-government and entrenched political parties. This ethnographic study reveals that caste......–ideological field, the concept of caste-hierarchy seems to continue as an influencing factor, even in the operation of leftist politics....

  18. Evolution of halictine castes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knerer, Gerd

    1980-03-01

    Social halictine bees have female castes that range from species with no size differences to those with a discrete bimodality. Female caste differences are inversely correlated with the number of males produced in the first brood. It is proposed that the sexual dimorphism of solitary forms is being usurped by the female caste system of species in the process of turning social. Thus, caste differences and summer male suppression are greatest in the social species originating from solitary precursors with distinct sexual dimorphism, and are least in species evolving from solitary ancestors with a continuous sexual polymorphism.

  19. Caste in Itself, Caste and Class, or Caste in Class

    OpenAIRE

    Ramkrishna Mukherjee

    2015-01-01

    After the British conquered Bengal and eventually the whole of India,they set out to administer the colony. In this context they encountered two phenomena with which they were not familiar: (1) the relation of people to land for production (and not for revenue receiving, household living, etc.), and (2) the caste system of India, viz. the jati strati?cation of society.

  20. Auburn Steel Company radioactive contamination incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, F.J.; Cabasino, L.; Kelly, R.; Awai, A.; Kasyk, G.

    1986-04-01

    On February 21, 1983, workers at the Auburn Steel Company, Auburn, New York discovered that about 120 tons of steel poured that day had become contaminated with 60 Co. In addition to the steel, the air cleaning system and portions of the mill used in casting the steel were contaminated. Approximately 25 curies of 60 Co were involved. Decontamination and disposal of the contamination cost in excess of $2,200,000. This report details the discovery of the contamination, decontamination of the plant and disposal of the contamination

  1. Cast iron deterioration with time in various aqueous salt solutions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The concentration of salts taken is expected to be present in potable water. The relative behaviour of these salts ... decreased so as to provide protection towards corrosion have also been calculated. It was found that KCl and. NaCl are ... Cast iron is widely used for water carrying purposes besides mild steel and other ...

  2. Final Environmental Impact Statement Permit Application by United States Steel Corp. Proposed Lake Front Steel Mill, Conneaut, Ohio. Volume 1,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-04-01

    tonnes (360 tons) per heat. The refined molten steel is then transferred under roof in open ladles to the continuous casting shop which abuts the steel...percent MgCO3 (magnesium carbonate ) and dolomitic limestone which contains a combination of carbonates of calcium and magnesium. Only high-calcium...furnace with the coke. To obtain this effect, such basic constituents as dolomite or lime are added to the burden. 1.121 The furnace will be cast

  3. Casting Footprints for Eternity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Apollo 11 Astronaut Buzz Aldrin has his footprints casted during the dedication ceremony of the rocket fountain at Building 4200 at Marshall Space Flight Center. The casts of Aldrin's footprints will be placed in the newly constructed Von Braun courtyard representing the accomplishments of the Apollo 11 lunar landing.

  4. Higher Education's Caste System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannone, Ron

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the history of the present caste system in higher education. He shows how the public's perception of this caste system is based on image and not usually on the quality of teaching and curriculum in colleges and universities. Finally, he discusses a model for accessibility to higher education and how higher…

  5. Cool Cast Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sleeve to protect it in the bath or shower. A splint does the same thing as a cast: It keeps the broken or injured bone from moving so it can heal. It also usually has a soft layer of cotton inside. A splint can be made from the same materials as a cast or may be a pre- ...

  6. Fatigue experiments on connections made of very high strength steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijpers, R.; Kolstein, H.; Bijlaard, F.

    2013-01-01

    An effective application of Very High Strength Steels (VHSS) can be expected in truss-like structures, typically made of hollow sections. Improved design of VHSS truss structures could incorporate the application of cast joints, since an appropriate design of cast joints limits the stress

  7. Heuristic algorithms for scheduling heat-treatment furnaces of steel ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    job-families and non-identical job sizes. We were led to this problem through a real- world application involving the scheduling of heat-treatment operations of steel casting. The scheduling of furnaces for heat-treatment of castings is of considerable interest as a large proportion of the total production time is the processing ...

  8. A comparative study on microgap of premade abutments and abutments cast in base metal alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalithamma, Jaini Jaini; Mallan, Sreekanth Anantha; Murukan, Pazhani Appan; Zarina, Rita

    2014-06-01

    The study compared the marginal accuracy of premade and cast abutments. Premade titanium, stainless steel, and gold abutments formed the control groups. Plastic abutments were cast in nickel-chromium, cobalt-chromium and grade IV titanium. The abutment/implant interface was analyzed. Analysis of variance and Duncan's multiple range test revealed no significant difference in mean marginal microgap between premade gold and titanium abutments and between premade stainless steel and cast titanium abutments. Statistically significant differences (P < .001) were found among all other groups.

  9. Effect of Waste Steel Shavings on Bond Strength between Concrete and Steel Reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osifala, K. B.; Salau, M. A.; Obiyomi, T. H.

    2017-10-01

    The investigation was carried out to know the effect of waste steel shavings on the bond resistance between concrete and steel reinforcement using 16mm and 20mm diameter high-yield reinforcing bars. Eighty (80) RILEM specimens, made up of forty (40) cubes each of 160mm x 160mm x 160mm and 200mm x 200mm x 200mm were cast and tested with varying percentages of waste steel shavings, (0%, 1%, 1.5%, and 2%, by weight of concrete) using pull out arrangement. The normal concrete (with no steel shavings) which are ten (10) in number were used as reference. Also, twelve (12) 150mm concrete cubes were cast to monitor the compressive strength of concrete. The results showed that bond strength increased with the addition of 2%, (by weight of concrete), of waste steel shavings.

  10. Shape Accuracy of Iron Precision Castings in Terms of Ceramic Moulds Physical Properties Anisotropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biernacki R.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available While analyzing shape accuracy of ferroalloy precision castings in terms of ceramic moulds physical anisotropy, low-alloy steel castings ("cover" and cast iron ("plate" were included. The basic parameters in addition to the product linear shape accuracy are flatness deviations, especially due to the expanded flat surface which is cast plate. For mentioned castings surface micro-geometry analysis was also carried, favoring surface load capacity tp50 for Rmax = 50%. Surface load capacity tp50 obtained for the cast cover was compared with machined product, and casting plate surface was compared with wear part of the conveyor belt. The results were referred to anisotropy of ceramic moulds physical properties, which was evaluated by studying ceramic moulds samples in computer tomography equipment Metrotom 800

  11. Caste in Itself, Caste and Class, or Caste in Class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramkrishna Mukherjee

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available After the British conquered Bengal and eventually the whole of India,they set out to administer the colony. In this context they encountered two phenomena with which they were not familiar: (1 the relation of people to land for production (and not for revenue receiving, household living, etc., and (2 the caste system of India, viz. the jati strati?cation of society.

  12. Thermal aging of primary coolant pipe steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.K.; Bentley, J.; Brenner, S.S.; Spitznagel, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    The long term mechanical integrity of the pipes used to carry the primary cooling water in a pressurized water nuclear reactor is of the utmost importance for safe operation. A combined atom probe field-ion microscopy (APFIM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study was performed to characterize the microstructure of this cast stainless steel and to determine the changes that occur during long-term low-temperature thermal aging. The material used in this investigation was a commercial CF 8 type stainless. The steel was examined in the as-cast, unaged condition and also after aging for 7500 h at 673K. 3 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Salt Spray Corrosion of Mechanical Junctions of Magnesium Castings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassini, Sabrina; Matteis, Paolo; Scavino, Giorgio; Rossetto, Marco; Firrao, Donato

    The corrosion of cast, 3 mm thick, AE44 magnesium-alloy plates fastened to aluminum-alloy threaded counterparts, either constituting the screw or the nut, were tested in neutral salt spray for 48 hours, with or without interposed AA5051 spacers (washers). Steel nuts or screws were used, always insulating from corrosion the steel sides. Couplings between magnesium alloy plates and coated steel counterparts (screw heads) with interposed AA5051 washers were also tested, while insulating the nut side. Every 4 or 8 hours the test was halted and the samples were rinsed and photographed for manual image analysis. Then the plates were unmounted, slightly polished (highlighting the deep corrosion pits), and scanned for automatic image analysis. Different image analysis methods were compared. The least corrosion occurs, in couplings with aluminum alloy counterparts, when AA5051 washers are interposed; whereas the most effective coupling with steel counterparts is the one with nylon coated steel heads.

  14. Twin-belt continuous caster with containment and cooling of the exiting cast product for enabling high-speed casting of molten-center product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykes, Charles D.; Daniel, Sabah S.; Wood, J. F. Barry

    1990-02-20

    In continuously casting molten metal into cast product by a twin-belt machine, it is desirable to achieve dramatic increases in speed (linear feet per minute) at which cast product exits the machine, particularly in installations where steel cast product is intended to feed a downstream regular rolling mill (as distinct from a planetary mill) operating in tandem with the twin-belt caster. Such high-speed casting produces product with a relatively thin shell and molten interior, and the shell tends to bulge outwardly due to metallostatic head pressure of the molten center. A number of cooperative features enable high-speed, twin-belt casting: (1) Each casting belt is slidably supported adjacent to the caster exit pulley for bulge control and enhanced cooling of cast product. (2) Lateral skew steering of each belt provides an effective increase in moving mold length plus a continuity of heat transfer not obtained with prior art belt steering apparatus. (3) The exiting slab is contained and supported downstream from the casting machine to prevent bulging of the shell of the cast product, and (4) spray cooling is incorporated in the exit containment apparatus for secondary cooling of cast product.

  15. Energy Saving Through the Control of Initial Solidification During Continuous Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lejun; Wang, Wanlin

    2014-09-01

    With the development of advanced continuous-casting technology, saving energy and reducing greenhouse gas emissions are crucial for its future development. Controlling the initial solidification of molten steel in the mold to improve the quality of casting products would tend to minimize extra postcast treatment like scarfing, etc., which leads to a large amount of energy savings in the continuous-casting process through the minimization of the extra labor and energy consumption. In this article, factors such as mold flux, mold oscillation, cooling potential conditions, and fluid flow in the vicinity of meniscus that correlate with the molten steel initial solidification are discussed with the aim to provide strategy and guidelines for the optimization of molten steel solidification and energy savings in continuous casting.

  16. The ancient Chinese casting techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Derui

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In the course of Chinese civilization, which lasted more than 5,000 years, casting production has made a huge contribution. In this paper, some representative metal castings were presented. According to their forming techniques, they can be grouped into stone mould casting, clay mould casting, ablation casting, lost wax casting, stack casting, permanent mould casting, sand casting, etc. According to their materials, they can be categorized into tin bronze, bimetallic bronze, malleable cast iron, ductile cast iron, brass, cupronickel alloy (Packtong, etc. According to their surface decorative techniques they can be devided into gem inlay, gilding, gold and silver inlay, copper inlay, engraved decoration, surface tin-enrichment, mother-of-pearl inlay, burnished works with gold or silver inlay, surface coloring and cloisonné enamel, etc.

  17. Clean Metal Casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    2002-02-05

    The objective of this project is to develop a technology for clean metal processing that is capable of consistently providing a metal cleanliness level that is fit for a given application. The program has five tasks: Development of melt cleanliness assessment technology, development of melt contamination avoidance technology, development of high temperature phase separation technology, establishment of a correlation between the level of melt cleanliness and as cast mechanical properties, and transfer of technology to the industrial sector. Within the context of the first task, WPI has developed a standardized Reduced Pressure Test that has been endorsed by AFS as a recommended practice. In addition, within the context of task1, WPI has developed a melt cleanliness sensor based on the principles of electromagnetic separation. An industrial partner is commercializing the sensor. Within the context of the second task, WPI has developed environmentally friendly fluxes that do not contain fluorine. Within the context of the third task, WPI modeled the process of rotary degassing and verified the model predictions with experimental data. This model may be used to optimize the performance of industrial rotary degassers. Within the context of the fourth task, WPI has correlated the level of melt cleanliness at various foundries, including a sand casting foundry, a permanent mold casting foundry, and a die casting foundry, to the casting process and the resultant mechanical properties. This is useful in tailoring the melt cleansing operations at foundries to the particular casting process and the desired properties of cast components.

  18. Boron steel. I Part. Preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaraiz Franco, E.; Esteban Hernandez, J. A.

    1960-01-01

    With the advent of the first nuclear reactors arise the need for control rods and shielding duties for some types of radiations. One of the materials used for this purpose has been the high boron steel. This paper describes the melting and casting procedures employed for the production, at laboratory scale, of steels with Boron content ranging from 1 to 4 per cent, as well as the metallographic and X-Ray techniques used for the identification of the present phases. The electrolytic technique employed for the isolation of the Fe 2 B phase and its subsequent X-Ray identification has proved to be satisfactory. (Author) 11 refs

  19. A Casting Yield Optimization Case Study: Forging Ram

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotas, Petr; Tutum, Cem Celal; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2010-01-01

    This work summarizes the findings of multi-objective optimization of a gravity sand-cast steel part for which an increase of the casting yield via riser optimization was considered. This was accomplished by coupling a casting simulation software package with an optimization module. The benefits...... of this approach, recently adopted in foundry industry world wide and based on fully automated computer optimization, were demonstrated. First, analyses of filling and solidification of the original casting design were conducted in the standard simulation environment to determine potential flaws and inadequacies....... Based on the initial assessment, the gating system was redesigned and the chills rearranged to improve the solidification pattern. After these two cases were evaluated, the adequate optimization targets and constraints were defined. One multi-objective optimization case with conflicting objectives...

  20. Integrated Modeling of Process, Structures and Performance in Cast Parts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotas, Petr

    and to defects occurrence. In other words, it is desired to eliminate all of the potential casting defects and at the same time to maximize the casting yield. The numerical optimization algorithm then takes these objectives and searches for a set of the investigated process, design or material parameters e......This thesis deals with numerical simulations of gravity sand casting processes for the production of large steel parts. The entire manufacturing process is numerically modeled and evaluated, taking into consideration mould filling, solidification, solid state cooling and the subsequent stress build.......g. chill design, riser design, gating system design, etc., which would satisfy these objectives the most. The first step in the numerical casting process simulation is to analyze mould filling where the emphasis is put on the gating system design. There are still a lot of foundry specialists who ignore...

  1. New trends in cold-chamber die casting machine design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Dańko

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Larger and larger proportions of aluminium castings, especially those produced by the die casting process, can be observed during recent years in the automotive industry, house-hold articles and others. In case of the automotive industry, apart from the traditional elements produced by the die pressure method such as engine blocks or crank shaft bedplates, aluminium is displacing steel from structural parts of cars (‘body in white’. The current state and development directions of the structural solutions of cold-chamber die castings are analysed in this paper. These solutions drive the prospective development of these machines and die casting technology. The focus is mainly on essential functional systems such as: hydraulic drives of closing and locking units, as well as pressing in die machines of known companies present on the European market.

  2. Symptomatic stent cast.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keohane, John

    2012-02-03

    Biliary stent occlusion is a major complication of endoscopic stent insertion and results in repeat procedures. Various theories as to the etiology have been proposed, the most frequently studied is the attachment of gram negative bacteria within the stent. Several studies have shown prolongation of stent patency with antibiotic prophylaxis. We report the case of stent occlusion from a cast of a previously inserted straight biliary stent; a "stent cast" in an 86-year-old woman with obstructive jaundice. This was retrieved with the lithotrypter and she made an uneventful recovery. This is the first reported case of a biliary stent cast.

  3. Solidification Based Grain Refinement in Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-27

    Charpy impact values of 221J. In 2009 these alloys passed ballistic testing for MIL-PRF-32269 perforated armor. The FeMnAI alloys are 12-18...Stainless Steel Structure-Property Testing Task 7 Conduct Industrial Trial A test casting was selected based on its size and frequency of...Inclusion Particles," 1SIJ International, vol. 46, no. 6. pp 840-846 (2006). Task 9 Stainless Steel Structure-Property Testing The goal of Task 9 was

  4. Effect of chemical composition and superheat on macrostructure of high Cr white iron castings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dogan, Omer N.

    2005-08-01

    White cast irons are frequently used in applications requiring high wear resistance. High Cr white cast irons have a composite microstructure composed of hard (Fe,Cr)7C3 carbides in a steel matrix. Previous research has indicated that the equiaxed region of these high Cr white iron castings is much more wear resistant under high stress abrasive conditions than the columnar region, when the carbides are oriented perpendicular to the wear surface. In the present study, the effect of both the chemical composition, particularly carbon content, and the pouring superheat of the melt on the macrostructure of high Cr white iron castings is investigated.

  5. Impact Characteristics of Diffusion Bonds of Ferritic Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron

    OpenAIRE

    Shizuo, MUKAE; Kazumasa, NISHIO; Mitsuaki, KATOH; Norikazu, NAKAMURA; Kyushu Institute of Technology; Kyushu Institute of Technology; Kyushu Institute of Technology; Fukuoka Industrial Technology Center

    1990-01-01

    Impact characteristics of diffusion bonded joints of ferritic spheroidal graphite cast irons and cast iron to mild steel have been investigated using an instrumented Charpy impact test machine. The tests were performed at 0℃ after ferritizing the joints. Main results obtained are as follows : (1) Absorbed energy of the cast iron joints banded without an insert metal was about 5 J, which was much lower than that of the base metal. (2) Absorbed energy of the cast iron joints bonded with Ni foil...

  6. Damage on 316LN stainless steel transformed by powder metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couturier, R.; Burlet, H.

    1998-01-01

    This study deals with the 316 LN stainless steel elaboration by powder metallurgy. This method allows the realization of structures in austenitic steel less affected by the thermal aging than the cast austenitic-ferritic components. The components are performed by the method of HIP (Hot Isostatic Pressing). Mechanical tests are provided to control mechanical properties

  7. Critical analysis of the influence of the possibilities of establishing the moulding technology on obtaining the castings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josan, A.; Pinca Bretotean, C.; Raţiu, S.

    2018-01-01

    The Romanian foundries give high priority to quality castings. Thus, the castings moulding technology decisively influences their quality. Therefore, it is necessary to study the possibilities of realization the moulds for castings. This paper presents a critical analysis of the influence of all factors of the moulding technology on the quality of steel castings. The purpose of the study is to analyze the way to establishing the separation plane, how to determine the processing allowances and technological allowances, the dimensioning of the riser, the choice of the optimal casting method of the liquid alloy. Establishing optimal moulding technology determines the optimal use of resources with direct implications for manufacturing costs.

  8. HFIR Fuel Casting Support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imhoff, Seth D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gibbs, Paul Jacob [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Solis, Eunice Martinez [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-28

    Process exploration for fuel production for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) using cast LEU-10wt.%Mo as an initial processing step has just begun. This project represents the first trials concerned with casting design and quality. The studies carried out over the course of this year and information contained in this report address the initial mold development to be used as a starting point for future operations. In broad terms, the final billet design is that of a solid rolling blank with an irregular octagonal cross section. The work covered here is a comprehensive view of the initial attempts to produce a sound casting. This report covers the efforts to simulate, predict, cast, inspect, and revise the initial mold design.

  9. Steel making

    CERN Document Server

    Chakrabarti, A K

    2014-01-01

    "Steel Making" is designed to give students a strong grounding in the theory and state-of-the-art practice of production of steels. This book is primarily focused to meet the needs of undergraduate metallurgical students and candidates for associate membership examinations of professional bodies (AMIIM, AMIE). Besides, for all engineering professionals working in steel plants who need to understand the basic principles of steel making, the text provides a sound introduction to the subject.Beginning with a brief introduction to the historical perspective and current status of steel making together with the reasons for obsolescence of Bessemer converter and open hearth processes, the book moves on to: elaborate the physiochemical principles involved in steel making; explain the operational principles and practices of the modern processes of primary steel making (LD converter, Q-BOP process, and electric furnace process); provide a summary of the developments in secondary refining of steels; discuss principles a...

  10. Corrosion produced failures in valves made of micro-melted stainless steel. Valve disk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abuin, G.; Alanis, I.; Berardo, L.

    1991-01-01

    Cast stainless steels show different metallographic structure than equivalent laminated steels where the former presents good resistance in media containing chlorides. In the present work, an analysis is made of the causes for the fracture of an AISI 316 micro-melted stainless steel disk for a valve in a cleaning agents feeding circuit in a food processing plant. (Author) [es

  11. ASSESSMENT OF RANGES OF POSSIBLE CHANGE OF TEMPORARY RESISTANCE OF CAST IRON WITH LAMELLAR AND FLAKED GRAPHITE ON THEIR HARDNESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Sandomirskii

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of ranges of possible change of temporary resistance of sB of castings from ductile and gray cast iron is carried out. The analytical description of ranges of change of sВ depending on casting BH hardness is developed. It is shown that the range of change of sВ of pig-iron castings, wider in comparison with steel, with the measured hardness of BH is caused variations of forms and the amount of graphite inclusions at the considered classes of cast iron and influence of thickness of a wall of casting from gray cast iron on dependence of sВ (HB. The result is intended for determination of the guaranteed casting size sВ without her destruction, when there is no information on sВ of check test pieces.

  12. Interaction model of steel ladle of continuous caster in steel works

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Bang Fu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For further research on the precondition and interoperability model of interaction ladles among continuous caster, this article takes steel ladle of Y steel works as the object of research. On the basis of turnover number calculation model of single cast steel ladle, the relationship between cast number and the turnover number and turnover times and last turnover number are further analyzed. The simulation of steel ladle turnover rules was taken on the 2 continuous casters with Gantt chart. After that, the relationships between turnover number and last turnover number and non-turnover number are researched deeply. Combining with the Gantt chart, the expressions of start casting time and empty ladle ending time and heavy ladle starting time were put forward. The precondition of steel ladle interaction is obtained, which means the exchange ladle should not undertaking transport task in first stop continuous caster, and the empty ladle end time of exchange ladle of first stop continuous caster should early than the heavy ladle start time of last stop continuous caster. After applying the model to practice, 3 steel ladles of No.2 continuous caster can be reduced. This research results is supplying theoretical basis for steel ladle controlling and production organization optimization, and enriches the theory and method of metallurgical process integration.

  13. Predicting Pattern Tooling and Casting Dimensions for Investment Casting, Phase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL

    2008-04-01

    Efforts during Phase III focused mainly on the shell-alloy systems. A high melting point alloy, 17-4PH stainless steel, was considered. The experimental part of the program was conducted at ORNL and commercial foundries, where wax patterns were injected, molds were invested, and alloys were poured. Shell molds made of fused-silica and alumino-silicates were considered. A literature review was conducted on thermophysical and thermomechanical properties alumino-silicates. Material property data, which were not available from material suppliers, was obtained. For all the properties of 17-4PH stainless steel, the experimental data available in the literature did not cover the entire temperature range necessary for process simulation. Thus, some material properties were evaluated using ProCAST, based on CompuTherm database. A comparison between the predicted material property data and measured property data was made. It was found that most material properties were accurately predicted only over several temperature ranges. No experimental data for plastic modulus were found. Thus, several assumptions were made and ProCAST recommendations were followed in order to obtain a complete set of mechanical property data at high temperatures. Thermal expansion measurements for the 17-4PH alloy were conducted during heating and cooling. As a function of temperature, the thermal expansion for both the alloy and shell mold materials showed different evolution on heating and cooling. Numerical simulations were performed using ProCAST for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts in fused silica molds using the thermal expansion obtained on heating and another one with thermal expansion obtained on cooling. Since the fused silica shells had the lowest thermal expansion properties in the industry, the dewaxing phase, including the coupling between wax-shell systems, was neglected. The shell mold was considered to be a pure elastic material. The alloy dimensions were

  14. Characterization of thermal aging of duplex stainless steel by SQUID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isobe, Y.; Kamimura, A.; Aoki, K.; Nakayasu, F.

    1995-01-01

    Thermal aging is a growing concern for long-term-aged duplex stainless steel piping in nuclear power plants. Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) was used for the detection of thermal aging of SUS329 rolled duplex stainless steel and SCS16 cast duplex stainless steel. It was found that the SQUID output signal pattern in the presence of AC magnetic field applied to the specimen was sensitive to the changes in electromagnetic properties due to thermal aging

  15. Fatigue behaviour of cast iron with globular graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huebner, P.; Pusch, G.; Krodel, L. [Institut fuer Werkstofftechnik, TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Gustav-Zeuner-Strasse 5, 09599 Freiberg (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Cast iron with bainitic matrix and globular graphite, so called austempered ductile iron (ADI), allows the substitution of heat-treatable steels. The use of ADI in safety-relevant components requires knowledge of the fracture and fatigue behaviour. Cyclic stress strain behaviour and fatigue life at total strain control and random loading have been investigated at ADI (EN-GJS-1000-5) and pearlitic cast iron (EN-GJS-600-3). In addition fracture mechanic tests at cyclic loading at various stress ratios were carried out. (Abstract Copyright [2004], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  16. Austenitic stainless steels for cryogenic service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalder, E.N.C.; Juhas, M.C.

    1985-01-01

    Presently available information on austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni stainless steel plate, welds, and castings for service below 77 K are reviewed with the intent (1) of developing systematic relationships between mechanical properties, composition, microstructure, and processing, and (2) of assessing the adequacy of these data bases in the design, fabrication, and operation of engineering systems at 4 K

  17. Urban heritage, building maintenance : Iron & steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, L.G.W.

    1999-01-01

    In the 1ge century what had been the traditional building techniques up to th at time were considerably changed owing to the use of cast iron and later wrought iron and steel. In fact, the industrial revolution, initially based in England, would not have been possible without these materiais. Not

  18. Melt Cast High Explosives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisław Cudziło

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available [b]Abstract[/b]. This paper reviews the current state and future developments of melt-cast high explosives. First the compositions, properties and methods of preparation of trinitrotoluene based (TNT conventional mixtures with aluminum, hexogen (RDX or octogen (HMX are described. In the newer, less sensitive explosive formulations, TNT is replaced with dinitroanisole (DNANDNANDNAN and nitrotriazolone (NTONTONTO, nitroguanidine (NG or ammonium perchlorate (AP are the replacement for RDRDX and HMX. Plasticized wax or polymer-based binder systems for melt castable explosives are also included. Hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene (HPTB is the binder of choice, but polyethylene glycol, and polycaprolactone with energetic plasticizers are also used. The most advanced melt-cast explosives are compositions containing energetic thermoplastic elastomers and novel highly energetic compounds (including nitrogen rich molecules in whose particles are nanosized and practically defect-less.[b]Keywords[/b]: melt-cast explosives, detonation parameters

  19. Comparison of marginal accuracy of castings fabricated by conventional casting technique and accelerated casting technique: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, S Srikanth; Revathi, Kakkirala; Reddy, S Kranthikumar

    2013-01-01

    Conventional casting technique is time consuming when compared to accelerated casting technique. In this study, marginal accuracy of castings fabricated using accelerated and conventional casting technique was compared. 20 wax patterns were fabricated and the marginal discrepancy between the die and patterns were measured using Optical stereomicroscope. Ten wax patterns were used for Conventional casting and the rest for Accelerated casting. A Nickel-Chromium alloy was used for the casting. The castings were measured for marginal discrepancies and compared. Castings fabricated using Conventional casting technique showed less vertical marginal discrepancy than the castings fabricated by Accelerated casting technique. The values were statistically highly significant. Conventional casting technique produced better marginal accuracy when compared to Accelerated casting. The vertical marginal discrepancy produced by the Accelerated casting technique was well within the maximum clinical tolerance limits. Accelerated casting technique can be used to save lab time to fabricate clinical crowns with acceptable vertical marginal discrepancy.

  20. Industrial online surface defects detection in continuous casting hot slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Ignacio; Marina, Jorge; Enguita, Jose Maria; Fraga, Cesar; Garcia, Ricardo

    2009-06-01

    Early surface defects inspection in hot steel products is a difficult task, but can help to reduce significantly production costs. This is the case of steel slabs when they are produced in the continuous casting line. Conoscopic holography phase-based long stand-off profilometers have shown to be a great tool for this kind of inspection, and a breakthrough system based on them is being used for more than 2 years in production conditions with high reliability and economical impact. This paper presents the results of this system and the challenges it has overcome: hot material up to 900°C, dust, scale over the inspected surface.

  1. Machine Casting of Ferrous Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-10-01

    Figure 55 Die casting machine. Shot sleeve at S, melt furnace at M, ladle preheat at L. Figure 56 Aluminum die casting top surface. Risers removed... ladle and transferred to the shot sleeve. Upon pouring the metal, the ram is actuated and the casting made. To test the mechanical operation of...mnui i .MI iiiiiuH ’ -84- Figure 55. Die casting machine. Shot sleeve at S, melt furnace at M, ladle preheat at L. ■ ■ wmmm*mm

  2. Segregation in cast products

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    are also available (Moore 1984; Ohnaka 1988; Flemings 1990; Roy et al 1992; Ghosh. 1997). In addition, some recent research papers will also be referred to as required. Original references of earlier studies are omitted for the sake of brevity. The basic principles of formation of microsegregation in castings and ingots were.

  3. ToxCast Dashboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ToxCast Dashboard helps users examine high-throughput assay data to inform chemical safety decisions. To date, it has data on over 9,000 chemicals and information from more than 1,000 high-throughput assay endpoint components.

  4. In vitro evaluation of four methods of attaching transfixation pins into a fiberglass cast for use in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, S R; Watkins, J P; Hogan, H A

    1996-07-01

    To compare the axial stability provided by 4 methods of attaching transfixation pins into a fiberglass cast. Axial stability of 4 methods of transfixation pin attachment to a fiberglass cast cylinder was determined in vitro. Methods of attachment included simple incorporation of the pins into the cast, placement of a washer and nut on the pin and incorporation into the cast, extension of pins beyond the cast and attachment to a steel halo, and washers within the cast and attachment to a steel halo. A model was designed to simulate a transfixation cast applied to the equine metacarpus. 8 identical constructs were present in each of the 4 groups. 6 fiberglass cylinders were also tested to identify the contribution of the cast cylinder to the overall stability of the transfixation cast. Load-sufficient curves were recorded, and a stiffness modulus was calculated for each treatment group and for a simple fiberglass cylinder without transfixation pins. There was no significant difference among the 4 methods of attachment. The fiberglass cast material appears to be the major determinant of axial stability.

  5. Advanced Lost Foam Casting technology: 1997 summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    Previous research made significant advances in understanding the Lost Foam Casting (LFC) Process and clearly identified areas where additional research was needed to improve the process and make it more functional in an industrial environment. The current project focused on eight tasks listed as follows: Task 1--pyrolysis defects and sand distortion; Task 2--bronze casting technology; Task 3--steel casting technology; Task 4--sand filling and compaction; Task 5--coating technology; Task 6--precision pattern production; Task 7--computational modeling; and Task 8--project management and technology transfer. This report summarizes the work done under the current contract in all eight tasks in the period of October 1, 1995 through December 31, 1997.

  6. Main directions in casting of turbine and nuclear equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pobezhimov, P.I.

    1979-01-01

    The main technological processes of production of big castings of austenitic and pearlitic steels for power engineering, including nuclear power engineering, are shown. It is noted that application of cast parts in the NPP equipment permits to reduce liquid metal consumption, amount of machining and to exclude welding. A great attention is paid to improvement of the reinforced casting method, for example, for the NPP gate valve casings, by way of turning the mold filled with liquid metal by 90 deg. New processes of production of molds and mold rods, and new compositions of molding sand mixtures are considered. Perspective utilization of self-set molding mixtures containing organic and nonorganic binders is noted

  7. The EC CAST project (carbon-14 source term)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon-14 is a key radionuclide in the assessment of the safety of underground geological disposal facilities for radioactive wastes. It is possible for carbon-14 to be released from waste packages in a variety of chemical forms, both organic and inorganic, and as dissolved or gaseous species The EC CAST (CArbon-14 Source Term) project aims to develop understanding of the generation and release of carbon-14 from radioactive waste materials under conditions relevant to packaging and disposal. It focuses on the release of carbon-14 from irradiated metals (steels and zirconium alloys), from irradiated graphite and from spent ion-exchange resins. The CAST consortium brings together 33 partners. CAST commenced in October 2013 and this paper describes progress to March 2015. The main activities during this period were reviews of the current status of knowledge, the identification and acquisition of suitable samples and the design of experiments and analytical procedures. (authors)

  8. Initial solidification phenomena: Factors affecting heat transfer in strip casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolli, Paolo

    In the last few years a few companies have announced the final stage of the commercial development of strip casting of steels. In strip casting heat extraction and productivity are limited by the thermal resistance at the interface between processed material and moving mold (rolls for twin-roll strip casters). Among many factors influencing interfacial heat transfer, films of various composition, either formed during casting or deposited before casting on the surface of the rolls, melt superheat and gas atmosphere composition can have a significantly positive or negative effect on the achieved heat transfer rate. From an industrial point view, methods to improve interfacial heat transfer rates must be found, in order to increase productivity. The objective of this research project is to assess if it is feasible to improve heat transfer rates during solidification of steel in direct contact with a copper mold: (1) by the application of thin coatings on the mold surface; (2) by adding a reactive gas species containing sulfur in the gas shrouding where casting is performed. To address the former, solidification experiments were performed with the mold surface either kept uncoated or coated with coatings of different compositions. To address the latter, the experiments were performed in gas shrouding atmospheres with or without sulphydric acid. It was observed that the resulting heat extraction rates were improved by the application of certain coatings and by the addition of H2S to the gas atmosphere. These findings prove that the application of coatings and the use of small amounts of reactive gaseous species containing sulfur may be methods to increase productivity in strip casting. The effect of superheat and the effect of naturally deposited oxides (Mn-oxide) were also evaluated experimentally. A numerical study of the effect of the critical undercooling on the productivity of a twin-roll strip caster showed that the maximum allowable casting speed can be increased

  9. COMPOSITION OF DIE STEEL 5HVMFS WITH INCREASED WEAR RESISTANCE AND THE SCHEME OF ITS SMELTING WITH USE OF UNDIVIDED SCRAP OF STEELS R6M5 AND 45

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Fedulov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The technological scheme of the new tool steel 5HVMFS smelting by means of electroslag casting method with the use of different combinations of steel scrap of R6M5 and CH5 steels and dressing the chemical composition directly in the bowl and also filling into metal bowl is developed.

  10. A GUI for online presentation of steel and steelmaking ladle temperature data and simulation.

    OpenAIRE

    Faheem, Muhammad

    2009-01-01

    Continuous casting is a casting process that produces steel slabs in a continuous manner with steel being poured at the top of the caster and a steel strand emerging from the mould below. Molten steel is transferred from the AOD converter to the caster using a ladle. The ladle is designed to be strong and insulated. Complete insulation is never achieved. Some of the heat is lost to the refractories by convection and conduction. Heat losses by radiation also occur. It is important to know the ...

  11. An ultrasonic inspection procedure for the Sizewell B cast austenitic pump bowls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booler, R.V.; Pearce, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    As part of the safety case for the Sizewell B PWR the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) has carried out a validated ultrasonic inspection of the reactor coolant pump bowls. These are cast from austenitic steel. The techniques used to generate realistic defects in casting and repair weld samples of representative macrostructure are discussed. The use of these test blocks to optimise techniques and develop an inspection procedure is also described. Finally, the programme for operator validation is presented. (author)

  12. Simulation of ingot casting processes at Deutsche Edelstahlwerke GmbH®

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, L; Ernst, C; Klung, J-S

    2012-01-01

    To enhance the quality of tool steels it is necessary to analyse all stages of the production process. During the ingot- or continuous casting processes and the following solidification, material and geometry depending reactions cause defects such as macro segregations or porosities. In former times the trial and error approach, together with the experience and creativity of the steelworks engineers was used to improve the as-cast quality, with a high amount of test procedures and a high demand of research time and costs. Further development in software and algorithms has allowed modern simulation techniques to find their way into industrial steel production and casting-simulations are widely used to achieve an accurate prediction of the ingot quality. To improve the as-cast quality, several ingot casting processes of tool steels were studied at the R and D department of Deutsche Edelstahlwerke GmbH by using the numerical casting simulation software MAGMASOFT ® . In this paper some results extracted from the simulation software are shown and compared to experimental investigations.

  13. Complex, Precision Cast Columbium Alloy Gas Turbine Engine Nozzles Coated to Resist Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-04-01

    s..ed, UNCLASIFIED SECUIv CLASIFICATION OF THiS PAGCbam Do& bwa s Block No. 20 ABSTRACT R tals of Albany, Oregon was the casting subcontractor and...Specimen 25 18 Hollow Vane Segment 25 19 Solid Vane Segment 25 20 Steel Core Pull for Investment of Hollow Wax Patterns 26 21 Cast Solid Nozzles of C129Y...schematical I: in Figure 6. The environmental chamber is a clear quartz tube with stainless steel endcaps. The seals between the pullrods and endcaps and the

  14. Modeling on Fluid Flow and Inclusion Motion in Centrifugal Continuous Casting Strands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Lifeng; Sridhar, Seetharaman

    2016-08-01

    During the centrifugal continuous casting process, unreasonable casting parameters can cause violent level fluctuation, serious gas entrainment, and formation of frozen shell pieces at the meniscus. Thus, in the current study, a three-dimensional multiphase turbulent model was established to study the transport phenomena during centrifugal continuous casting process. The effects of nozzle position, casting and rotational speed on the flow pattern, centrifugal force acting on the molten steel, level fluctuation, gas entrainment, shear stress on mold wall, and motion of inclusions during centrifugal continuous casting process were investigated. Volume of Fluid model was used to simulate the molten steel-air two-phase. The level fluctuation and the gas entrainment during casting were calculated by user-developed subroutines. The trajectory of inclusions in the rotating system was calculated using the Lagrangian approach. The results show that during centrifugal continuous casting, a large amount of gas was entrained into the molten steel, and broken into bubbles of various sizes. The greater the distance to the mold wall, the smaller the centrifugal force. Rotation speed had the most important influence on the centrifugal force distribution at the side region. Angular moving angle of the nozzle with 8° and keeping the rotation speed with 60 revolutions per minute can somehow stabilize the level fluctuation. The increase of angular angle of nozzle from 8 to 18 deg and rotation speed from 40 to 80 revolutions per minute favored to decrease the total volume of entrained bubbles, while the increase of distance of nozzle moving left and casting speed had reverse effects. The trajectories of inclusions in the mold were irregular, and then rotated along the strand length. After penetrating a certain distance, the inclusions gradually moved to the center of billet and gathered there. More work, such as the heat transfer, the solidification, and the inclusions entrapment

  15. Cast iron - a predictable material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorg C. Sturm

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available High strength compacted graphite iron (CGI or alloyed cast iron components are substituting previously used non-ferrous castings in automotive power train applications. The mechanical engineering industry has recognized the value in substituting forged or welded structures with stiff and light-weight cast iron castings. New products such as wind turbines have opened new markets for an entire suite of highly reliable ductile iron cast components. During the last 20 years, casting process simulation has developed from predicting hot spots and solidification to an integral assessment tool for foundries for the entire manufacturing route of castings. The support of the feeding related layout of the casting is still one of the most important duties for casting process simulation. Depending on the alloy poured, different feeding behaviors and self-feeding capabilities need to be considered to provide a defect free casting. Therefore, it is not enough to base the prediction of shrinkage defects solely on hot spots derived from temperature fields. To be able to quantitatively predict these defects, solidification simulation had to be combined with density and mass transport calculations, in order to evaluate the impact of the solidification morphology on the feeding behavior as well as to consider alloy dependent feeding ranges. For cast iron foundries, the use of casting process simulation has become an important instrument to predict the robustness and reliability of their processes, especially since the influence of alloying elements, melting practice and metallurgy need to be considered to quantify the special shrinkage and solidification behavior of cast iron. This allows the prediction of local structures, phases and ultimately the local mechanical properties of cast irons, to asses casting quality in the foundry but also to make use of this quantitative information during design of the casting. Casting quality issues related to thermally driven

  16. Water mist effect on cooling process of casting die and microstructure of AlSi9 alloy

    OpenAIRE

    R. Władysiak

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents the results of crystallization and cooling process of silumin AlSi9 and temperature distribution in the wall of research casting dies made of cast iron and steel in the temperature range 650100C during casting of silumin using water mist cooling consisting with air compressed (0,30,4 MPa) and water (0,350,45 MPa). It’s shown the nature and rate of change of casting die temperature and the formation of the temperature gradient at the wall thickness in the axis of the nozzle ...

  17. Melting and casting of FeAl-based cast alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikka, V.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Wilkening, D. [Columbia Falls Aluminum Co., Columbia Falls, MT (United States); Liebetrau, J.; Mackey, B. [AFFCO, L.L.C., Anaconda, MT (United States)

    1998-11-01

    The FeAl-based intermetallic alloys are of great interest because of their low density, low raw material cost, and excellent resistance to high-temperature oxidation, sulfidation, carburization, and molten salts. The applications based on these unique properties of FeAl require methods to melt and cast these alloys into complex-shaped castings and centrifugal cast tubes. This paper addresses the melting-related issues and the effect of chemistry on the microstructure and hardness of castings. It is concluded that the use of the Exo-Melt{trademark} process for melting and the proper selection of the aluminum melt stock can result in porosity-free castings. The FeAl alloys can be melted and cast from the virgin and revert stock. A large variation in carbon content of the alloys is possible before the precipitation of graphite flakes occurs. Titanium is a very potent addition to refine the grain size of castings. A range of complex sand castings and two different sizes of centrifugal cast tubes of the alloy have already been cast.

  18. A new multi-zone model for porosity distribution in Al–Si alloy castings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiedje, Niels Skat; Taylor, John A.; Easton, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    and distribution of porosity in Al–Si alloys cast as plates in moulds made with silica, ilmenite or zirconia sand cores or steel chills facing the major plate faces. The alloys cast were Al–7wt.% Si and Al–12.5wt.% Si in unmodified and modified forms, the latter with either Na or Sr addition. It is found that......, regardless of cooling condition, Si content and modification treatment, the microstructure can be divided into three zones of varying size (across the casting thickness) that are determined by the local cooling conditions and the nucleation and growth mode of the Al–Si eutectic. The zones are: (1) an outer...

  19. Geometrical modulus of a casting and its influence on solidification process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Havlicek

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Object: The work analyses the importance of the known criterion for evaluating the controlled solidification of castings, so called geometrical modulus defined by N. Chvorinov as the first one. Geometrical modulus influences the solidification process. The modulus has such specificity that during the process of casting formation it is not a constant but its initial value decreases with the solidification progress because the remaining melt volume can decrease faster than its cooling surface.Methodology: The modulus is determined by a simple calculation from the ratio of the casting volume after pouring the metal in the mould to the cooled mould surface. The solidified metal volume and the cooled surface too are changed during solidification. That calculation is much more complicated. Results were checked up experimentally by measuring the temperatures in the cross-section of heavy steel castings during cooling them.Results: The given experimental results have completed the original theoretical calculations by Chvorinov and recent researches done with use of numerical calculations. The contribution explains how the geometrical modulus together with the thermal process in the casting causes the higher solidification rate in the axial part of the casting cross-section and shortening of solidification time. Practical implications: Change of the geometrical modulus negatively affects the casting internal quality. Melt feeding by capillary filtration in the dendritic network in the casting central part decreases and in such a way the shrinkage porosity volume increases. State of stress character in the casting is changed too and it increases.

  20. The abrasion of austempered cast iron in laboratory and work conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Březina

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Austempered ductile iron (ADI is nowadays used for machine parts, which used to be made of steel. It is suitable for abrasive conditions and cast irons exhibit sufficient strength and toughness. The paper deals with the possibility of manufacturing machine parts working in soil of austempered ductile iron. The authors find out the influence of heat treatment mode of ADI on wear resistance and compare it with formed steel.

  1. Development of High-Performance Cast Crankshafts. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Mark E [General Motors, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2017-03-31

    The objective of this project was to develop technologies that would enable the production of cast crankshafts that can replace high performance forged steel crankshafts. To achieve this, the Ultimate Tensile Strength (UTS) of the new material needs to be 850 MPa with a desired minimum Yield Strength (YS; 0.2% offset) of 615 MPa and at least 10% elongation. Perhaps more challenging, the cast material needs to be able to achieve sufficient local fatigue properties to satisfy the durability requirements in today’s high performance gasoline and diesel engine applications. The project team focused on the development of cast steel alloys for application in crankshafts to take advantage of the higher stiffness over other potential material choices. The material and process developed should be able to produce high-performance crankshafts at no more than 110% of the cost of current production cast units, perhaps the most difficult objective to achieve. To minimize costs, the primary alloy design strategy was to design compositions that can achieve the required properties with minimal alloying and post-casting heat treatments. An Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) based approach was utilized, rather than relying only on traditional trial-and-error methods, which has been proven to accelerate alloy development time. Prototype melt chemistries designed using ICME were cast as test specimens and characterized iteratively to develop an alloy design within a stage-gate process. Standard characterization and material testing was done to validate the alloy performance against design targets and provide feedback to material design and manufacturing process models. Finally, the project called for Caterpillar and General Motors (GM) to develop optimized crankshaft designs using the final material and manufacturing processing path developed. A multi-disciplinary effort was to integrate finite element analyses by engine designers and geometry-specific casting

  2. Effect of Casting Parameters on the Microstructural and Mechanical Behavior of Magnesium AZ31-B Alloy Strips Cast on a Single Belt Casting Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Changizi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Strips of magnesium alloy AZ31-B were cast on a simulator of a horizontal single belt caster incorporating a moving mold system. Mixtures of CO2 and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6 gases were used as protective atmosphere during melting and casting. The castability of the AZ31-B strips was investigated for a smooth, low carbon steel substrate, and six copper substrates with various textures and roughnesses. Graphite powder was used to coat the substrates. The correlation between strip thickness and heat flux was investigated. It was found that the heat flux from the forming strip to the copper substrate was higher than that to the steel substrate, while coated substrates registered lower heat fluxes than uncoated substrates. The highest heat flux from the strip was recorded for casting on macrotextured copper substrates with 0.15 mm grooves. As the thickness of the strip decreased, the net heat flux decreased. As the heat flux increased, the grain sizes of the strips were reduced, and the SDAS decreased. The mechanical properties were improved when the heat flux increased. The black layers which formed on the strips’ surfaces were analyzed and identified as nanoscale MgO particles. Nano-Scale particles act as light traps and appeared black.

  3. Cast Aluminum Structures Technology (CAST) Phase VI. Technology Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-04-01

    o Metal preparation o Ladle fill o Pouring 0 Mold shakeout o Casting cleanup o Inspection o Weld correction o Heat treatment and straightening o...presents a summary of foundry data for the 10 Hitchcock cast - ings. Included are the ladle chemistry and the pouring date, temperature, and time for each...properties, and full range stress- strain curves to failure for each specimen d. Chemistry of molten metal in ladle for each casting 3.4.3.2 The foundry

  4. Ultrasonic testing of austenitic stainless steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Shunichi; Hida, Yoshio; Yamamoto, Michio; Ando, Tomozumi; Shirai, Tasuku.

    1982-05-01

    Ultrasonic testing of austenitic stainless steel welds has been considered difficult because of the high noise level and remarkable attenuation of ultrasonic waves. To improve flaw detectability in this kind of steel, various inspection techniques have been studied. A series of tests indicated: (1) The longitudinal angle beam transducers newly developed during this study can detect 4.8 mm dia. side drilled holes in dissimilar metal welds (refraction angle: 55 0 from SUS side, 45 0 from CS side) and in cast stainless steel welds (refraction angle: 45 0 , inspection frequency: 1 MHz). (2) Cracks more than 5% t in depth in the heat affected zones of fine-grain stainless steel pipe welds can be detected by the 45 0 shear wave angle beam method (inspection frequency: 2 MHz). (3) The pattern recognition method using frequency analysis technology was presumed useful for discriminating crack signals from spurious echoes. (author)

  5. Tool steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højerslev, C.

    2001-01-01

    On designing a tool steel, its composition and heat treatment parameters are chosen to provide a hardened and tempered martensitic matrix in which carbides are evenly distributed. In this condition the matrix has an optimum combination of hardness andtoughness, the primary carbides provide...... resistance against abrasive wear and secondary carbides (if any) increase the resistance against plastic deformation. Tool steels are alloyed with carbide forming elements (Typically: vanadium, tungsten, molybdenumand chromium) furthermore some steel types contains cobalt. Addition of alloying elements...... serves primarily two purpose (i) to improve the hardenabillity and (ii) to provide harder and thermally more stable carbides than cementite. Assuming proper heattreatment, the properties of a tool steel depends on the which alloying elements are added and their respective concentrations....

  6. SIMULATIONS OF DISTRIBUTIONS OF SHRINKAGE DEFECTS IN THE CASTING WITH THE PROFITS BASED ON THE NAVIER-STOKES AND FOURIER-KIRCHHOFF EQUATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Chichko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulations of the process of obtaining a cast steel of bearing cases were performed for two options of technical processing. Three-dimensional motion dynamics ofsteel was calculated in the gate-casting system, three-dimensional temperature fields and densities in the process of casting were calculated as well. The possibilities of computer simulation were shown in order to find the best technical processing in the foundry production.

  7. Improved Casting Furnace Conceptual Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fielding, Randall Sidney [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Tolman, David Donald [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-02-01

    In an attempt to ensure more consistent casting results and remove some schedule variance associated with casting, an improved casting furnace concept has been developed. The improved furnace uses the existing arc melter hardware and glovebox utilities. The furnace concept was designed around physical and operational requirements such as; a charge sized of less than 30 grams, high heating rates and minimal additional footprint. The conceptual model is shown in the report as well as a summary of how the requirements were met.

  8. LOST FOAM CASTING OF MAGNESIUM ALLOYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Qingyou [ORNL; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton [ORNL; Sklad, Philip S [ORNL; Currie, Kenneth [Tennessee Technological University; Abdelrahman, Mohamed [Tennessee Technological University; Vondra, Fred [Tennessee Technological University; Walford, Graham [Walford Technologies; Nolan, Dennis J [Foseco-Morval

    2007-01-01

    The lost foam casting process has been successfully used for making aluminum and cast iron thin walled castings of complex geometries. Little work has been carried out on cast magnesium alloys using the lost foam process. The article describes the research activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Tennessee Technological University on lost foam casting of magnesium alloys. The work was focused on castings of simple geometries such as plate castings and window castings. The plate castings were designed to investigate the mold filling characteristics of magnesium and aluminum alloys using an infrared camera. The pate castings were then characterized for porosity distribution. The window castings were made to test the castability of the alloys under lost foam conditions. Significant differences between lost foam aluminum casting and lost foam magnesium casting have been observed.

  9. Modification of steel 35 HL surge current during crystallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhbanova O.M.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The method of electro steel melt modification 35 HL variable polarity current pulses with a duration of more 10-3s frequency within the 5–33 Hz, 5–24 porosity meanders, strength 30–40 A at a voltage of 180–240 V during crystallization, which allows to obtain high-quality castings 35 HL steel grade. Show that electro melt processing improves the structure and reduces the physical heterogeneity of castings and increases the rate of dissolution of metallic impurities and other components in the melt, providing fine-grained structure and increases the homogeneity of metal carbides reduces the amount of manganese reduces gases and nonmetallic inclusions. Modifying steel 35 HL pulse current during crystallization of the melt increases the physical and mechanical properties of tempered steel, increasing yield strength by 30 %, the tensile strength at 7 % elongation of 1,5 % relative narrowing by 2 %, toughness at 20 %.

  10. Urban heritage, building maintenance: Iron & steel

    OpenAIRE

    Verhoef, L.G.W.

    1999-01-01

    In the 1ge century what had been the traditional building techniques up to th at time were considerably changed owing to the use of cast iron and later wrought iron and steel. In fact, the industrial revolution, initially based in England, would not have been possible without these materiais. Not only the development of the product, in which the ditlerence bet ween iron and steellay purely !he fact that steel could be tempered, while iron could be hammered into shape, but also the manufacturi...

  11. New steels now in use for automotive rolling element bearings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsushima, Noriyuki; Maeda, Kikuo; Nakashima, Hirokazu [NTN Corp., Kuwana (Japan). Bearing Engineering R and D Center; Kashimura, Hiroshi [NTN Corp., Iwata (Japan). Automotive Products Engineering Dept.

    1998-12-31

    With the development of clean steels, the influence of retained austenite on the rolling contact fatigue (RCF) life has changed. Under clean oil lubrication, the favorable influence of retained austenite disappeared, Utilizing th is phenomenon, a long life material for high temperature was developed with the use of the element Si which improves the heat resistance of steel. With the continuous casting becoming common steel making process, alloying elements should better be minimized because they cause segregation. From this point of view, a medium carbon through hardening steel which has competing RCF life with SUJ2 was developed. Under debris contaminated lubrication, retained austenite has ever favorable effect on RCF life. For these reasons, surface modification is important. Long life bearings under debris contaminated lubrication were developed by carbonitriding a through hardening steel or a carburizing steel, respectively.

  12. [Measurement of chemical agents in metallurgy field: electric steel plant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottica, D; Grignani, E; Ghitti, R; Festa, D; Apostoli, P

    2012-01-01

    The steel industry maintains its important position in the context of the Italian production involving thousands of workers. The iron and steel processes are divided into primary steel industry, production of intermediate minerals, and secondary steel, scrap from the production of semi-finished industrial and consumer sector (metal inserted into components and metal used for dissipative uses, primarily coatings) and industrial waste. The paper presents the results of environmental monitoring carried out in some electric steel plant for the measurement of airborne chemicals that characterize the occupational exposure of workers employed in particular area like electric oven, to treatment outside the furnace, continuous casting area. For the sampling of the pollutants were used both personal and in fixed positions samplers. The pollutants measured are those typical of steel processes inhalable dust, metals, respirable dust, crystalline silica, but also Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH), polychlorinated dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs).

  13. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron - White Cast Iron (Ⅱ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jiyang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Cast iron, as a traditional metal material, has advantages of low total cost, good castability and machinability, good wear resistance and low notch sensitivity, and is still facing tough challenge in quality, property and variety of types etc. Experts and engineers studying and producing iron castings all around world extremely concern this serious challenge. Over more than 30 years, a great of research work has been carried out on how to further improve its property, expand its application and combine cast iron technology with some hi-techs (for example, computer technology. Nevertheless, cast iron is a multi-element and multi-phase alloy and has complex and variety of structures and still has great development potential in structure and property. For further studying and developing cast iron, theoretical research work is important promise, and the study on solidification process and control mechanism of graphite morphology is fundamental for improving property of cast iron and developing new type of cast iron. Metallography of cast iron normally includes two sections: liquid phase transformation and solid phase transformation. The book, Colour Metallography of Cast Iron, uses colour metallography technique to study solidification structures of cast irons: graphite, carbides, austenite and eutectics; and focuses on solidification processes. With progress of modern solidification theory, the control of material solidification process becomes important measure for improving traditional materials and developing new materials. Solidification structure not only influences mechanical and physical properties of cast iron, but also affects its internal quality. The book uses a large amount of colour photos to describe the formation of solidification structures and their relations. Crystallization phenomena, which cannot be displayed with traditional metallography, are presented and more phase transformation information is obtained from these colour

  14. FEM Simulation Of Stress-Strain Fields in the Blooms with Casting Defect During Soaking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav KVÍČALA

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Round continuously cast blooms heating strategy is crucial in prevention of internal cracks initiation and propagation. Especially vanadium microalloyed Cr-Mo based steels are very sensitive to internal crack occurrence. This paper deals with two heating strategies that were realized in soaking pit. Using FEM simulation it was proved that proper heating strategy is essential to reduce internal crack propagation.

  15. 49 CFR 192.112 - Additional design requirements for steel pipe using alternative maximum allowable operating...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE..., fully killed, continuously cast steel with calcium treatment. (2) The carbon equivalents of the steel... anomalies during construction, strength testing and anticipated operational stresses. (4) The pipe must be...

  16. Solidification Based Grain Refinement in Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-24

    and a coarser microstructure forms (See Figure 17). ROLE OF COBALT ALUMINATE CoAI204 produced very different results in the 1010 and 1030 TA...determine what role CoAl204 played in both steels. Other researchers have observed refinement with cobalt aluminate.2"󈧙 Their work has been using...C0AI2O4 as an interior paint for superalloy investment castings. The alloys examined solidified primarily as austenite. These findings are in agreement

  17. Pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooyen, D.; Bandy, R.

    A pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel comprises 17 to 28 wt. % chromium, 15 to 26 wt. % nickel, 5 to 8 wt. % molybdenum, and 0.3 to 0.5 wt. % nitrogen, the balance being iron, unavoidable impurities, minor additions made in the normal course of melting and casting alloys of this type, and may optionally include up to 10 wt. % of manganese, up to 5 wt. % of silicon, and up to 0.08 wt. % of carbon.

  18. Crack stability analysis of low alloy steel primary coolant pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, T.; Kameyama, M. [Kansai Electric Power Company, Osaka (Japan); Urabe, Y. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Takasago (Japan)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    At present, cast duplex stainless steel has been used for the primary coolant piping of PWRs in Japan and joints of dissimilar material have been applied for welding to reactor vessels and steam generators. For the primary coolant piping of the next APWR plants, application of low alloy steel that results in designing main loops with the same material is being studied. It means that there is no need to weld low alloy steel with stainless steel and that makes it possible to reduce the welding length. Attenuation of Ultra Sonic Wave Intensity is lower for low alloy steel than for stainless steel and they have advantageous inspection characteristics. In addition to that, the thermal expansion rate is smaller for low alloy steel than for stainless steel. In consideration of the above features of low alloy steel, the overall reliability of primary coolant piping is expected to be improved. Therefore, for the evaluation of crack stability of low alloy steel piping to be applied for primary loops, elastic-plastic future mechanics analysis was performed by means of a three-dimensioned FEM. The evaluation results for the low alloy steel pipings show that cracks will not grow into unstable fractures under maximum design load conditions, even when such a circumferential crack is assumed to be 6 times the size of the wall thickness.

  19. Education and Caste in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Chandra Pal Singh

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyses the policy of reservation for lower castes in India. This policy is similar to that of affirmative action in the United States. The paper provides a brief overview of the caste system and discusses the types of groups that are eligible for reservation, based on data from government reports. The stance of this paper is that…

  20. Analysis of the effects of an electromagnetic brake (EMBR on flow behaviors in the large slab continuous casting mold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Xu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, molten steel flow in the submerged entry nozzle (SEN and mold cavity of large slab continuous caster in both environments (with EMBR and without EMBR were investigated with the method of numerical simulation. In addition, the impacts of electromagnetic brake (EMBR on mol ten steel flow and meniscus fluctuation were discussed while the bath meniscus fluctuation was monitored in a steel plant. Computation results were compared with experimental findings of the factory and it is verified that EMBR can be an efficient technology to control liquid steel flow behaviors in the large slab continuous casting mold.

  1. Analysis of four dental alloys following torch/centrifugal and induction/ vacuum-pressure casting procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Geoffrey A; Luo, Qing; Hefti, Arthur

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies have shown casting methodology to influence the as-cast properties of dental casting alloys. It is important to consider clinically important mechanical properties so that the influence of casting can be clarified. The purpose of this study was to evaluate how torch/centrifugal and inductively cast and vacuum-pressure casting machines may affect the castability, microhardness, chemical composition, and microstructure of 2 high noble, 1 noble, and 1 base metal dental casting alloys. Two commonly used methods for casting were selected for comparison: torch/centrifugal casting and inductively heated/ vacuum-pressure casting. One hundred and twenty castability patterns were fabricated and divided into 8 groups. Four groups were torch/centrifugally cast in Olympia (O), Jelenko O (JO), Genesis II (G), and Liberty (L) alloys. Similarly, 4 groups were cast in O, JO, G, and L by an inductively induction/vacuum-pressure casting machine. Each specimen was evaluated for casting completeness to determine a castability value, while porosity was determined by standard x-ray techniques. Each group was metallographically prepared for further evaluation that included chemical composition, Vickers microhardness, and grain analysis of microstructure. Two-way ANOVA was used to determine significant differences among the main effects. Statistically significant effects were examined further with the Tukey HSD procedure for multiple comparisons. Data obtained from the castability experiments were non-normal and the variances were unequal. They were analyzed statistically with the Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test. Significant results were further investigated statistically with the Steel-Dwass method for multiple comparisons (α=.05). The alloy type had a significant effect on surface microhardness (P<.001). In contrast, the technique used for casting did not affect the microhardness of the test specimen (P=.465). Similarly, the interaction between the alloy and casting

  2. The evaluation of dynamic cracking resistance of chosen casting alloys in the aspect of the impact bending test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.Sadowski

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The increase of quality and durability of produced casting alloys can be evaluated on the base of material tests performed on a high level. One of such modern test methods are tests of the dynamic damage process of materials and the evaluation on the base of obtained courses F(f, F(t of parameters of dynamic cracking resistance KId, JId, performed with the usage of instrumented Charpy pendulums. In the paper there was presented the evaluation of dynamic cracking resistance parameters of casting alloys such as: AK12 aluminum alloy, L20G cast steel and spheroid cast iron. The methodology of the evaluation of that parameters was described and their change as well, for the AK12 alloy with the cold work different level, L20G cast steel cooled from different temperatures in the range +20oC -60oC, and for the spheroid cast iron in different stages of treatment i.e. raw state, after normalization, spheroid annealing and graphitizing annealing.Obtained parameters of dynamic cracking resistance KId, JId of tested casting alloys enabled to define the critical value of the ad defect that can be tolerated by tested castings in different work conditions with impact loadings.

  3. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jiyang

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Cast iron, as a traditional metal material, has advantages of low total cost, good castability and machinability, good wear resistance and low notch sensitivity, and is still facing tough challenge in quality, property and variety of types etc. Experts and engineers studying and producing iron castings all around world extremely concern this serious challenge. Over more than 30 years, a great of research work has been carried out on how to further improve its property, expand its application and combine cast iron technology with some hi-techs (for example, computer technology. Nevertheless, cast iron is a multi-element and multi-phase alloy and has complex and variety of structures and still has great development potential in structure and property. For further studying and developing cast iron, theoretical research work is important promise, and the study on solidification process and control mechanism of graphite morphology is fundamental for improving property of cast iron and developing new type of cast iron.Metallography of cast iron normally includes two sections: liquid phase transformation and solid phase transformation. The book, Colour Metallography of Cast Iron , uses colour metallography technique to study solidification structures of cast irons: graphite, carbides, austenite and eutectics; and focuses on solidification processes. With progress of modern solidification theory, the control of material solidification process becomes important measure for improving traditionalmaterials and developing new materials. Solidification structure not only influences mechanical and physical properties of cast iron, but also affects its internal quality. The book uses a large amount of colour photos to describe the formation of solidification structures and their relations. Crystallization phenomena, which cannot be displayed with traditional metallography, are presented and more phase transformation information is obtained from these colour

  4. Caste, social stigma and identity processes

    OpenAIRE

    Jaspal, Rusi

    2011-01-01

    Caste persists as an important socio-psychological phenomenon in many spheres of Indian social life and particularly within village contexts. It is argued that socio-psychological insights into caste identity and caste- based stigma may complement ongoing sociological and anthropological research into caste. Drawing upon identity process theory, this article explores the possible functions performed by caste-based stigma both for the higher caste groups (HCGs) and the ‘Scheduled Caste’ (SC) g...

  5. Aircraft Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-19

    70 mm (0.4 x 0.4 x 2.8 in.) in L orientation with a Charpy notch at the mid-length for SCC test under four-point bending (ASTM F 1624- 95) TESTS ...MAXIMUM STRESS INTENSITY, Kmax, IN HIGH STRENGTH STEELS For the fatigue test in 3.5% NaCl solution, the FCG per cycle, da/dN, is converted to the...NAWCADPAX/TR-2009/12 AIRCRAFT STEELS by E. U. Lee R. Taylor C. Lei H. C. Sanders 19 February 2009

  6. Internal adaptation of cast titanium crowns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sicknan Soares da Rocha

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available As the adaptation of titanium crowns obtained by Rematitan Plus investment, specific for titanium, is not recognized to be suitable, this study evaluated the effect of the concentration of the specific liquid and the temperature of the mold of investments on the internal misfit of crowns cast on commercially pure titanium. Individual dies of epoxy resin were obtained, representing teeth prepared for full-crown restoration with a 6-degree axial surface convergence angle and shoulder (1.0 mm. For the waxing of each crown, a ring-shaped stainless steel matrix (8.0mm internal diameter; 7.5 mm height was adapted above the individual dies of epoxy resin. The Rematian Plus investment was mixed according to the manufacturer's instructions using two different concentrations of the specific liquid: 100%, 75%. Casting was performed in a Discovery Plasma Ar-arc vacuum-pressure casting machine with molds at temperatures of 430ºC, 515ºC and 600ºC. The crowns were cleaned individually in a solution (1% HF + 13% HNO3 for 10 min using a ultrasonic cleaner, with no internal adaptations, and luted with zinc phosphate cement under a 5 kg static load. The crown and die assemblies were embedded in resin and sectioned longitudinally. The area occupied by cement was observed using stereoscopic lens (10X and measured by the Leica Qwin image analysis system (mm². The data for each experimental condition (n=8 were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric test (á=0.05. The results showed that liquid dilution and the increase in mold temperature did not significantly influence the levels of internal fit of the cast titanium crowns. The lowest means (±SD of internal misfit were obtained for the 430ºC/100%: (7.25 mm² ±1.59 and 600ºC/100% (8.8 mm² ±2.25 groups, which presented statistically similar levels of internal misfit.

  7. Tempering Behavior of TiC-Reinforced SKD11 Steel Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Ji-In; Kim, Seong Hoon; Heo, Yoon-Uk; Kim, Dae Ha; Hwang, Keum-Cheol; Suh, Dong-Woo

    2018-03-01

    TiC-reinforced SKD11 steel matrix composite, fabricated by a pressure infiltration casting, undergoes monotonic decrease in hardness as tempering temperature increases. Element mappings by TEM-EDS and thermodynamic calculation indicate that remarkable redistribution of V between the reinforcement and the steel matrix occurs by partial dissolution and re-precipitation of MC carbides upon casting process. The absence of secondary hardening is led by the enrichment of V in the reinforcement that reduces the V content in the steel matrix; this reduction in V content makes the precipitation of fine VC sluggish during the tempering.

  8. Investigation of Solidification of High Strength Steel Castings

    Science.gov (United States)

    1961-12-01

    2U9-259. 23. A. Kohn: "Etude de I’homogeneisation des segregations dendritiques de phosphore et ’ rsenic dans les aciers ...dans les aciers ". Revue de Metallurgie, February i960, pp. 117-134. 35. R. Castro and A. Gueussier: "La fragilite des aciers speciaux...du forgeage sur la segregation dendritique du phosphore dans les lingots d’acier", Revue de Metallurgie, v. 51, 3, 1955, PP

  9. Analysis of the quality renovated continuous steel casting roller

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Worn surface of roller was machined and surfaced using one interlayer and two cover layers. The quality of deposited layers was verified using non-destructive and destructive tests. The influence of filler material on the tribological properties of contact surfaces of deposited layers was analysed by abrasive wear test.

  10. Cast Alloys for Advanced Ultra Supercritical Steam Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. R. Holcomb, P. Wang, P. D. Jablonski, and J. A. Hawk,

    2010-05-01

    The proposed steam inlet temperature in the Advanced Ultra Supercritical (A-USC) steam turbine is high enough (760 °C) that traditional turbine casing and valve body materials such as ferritic/martensitic steels will not suffice due to temperature limitations of this class of materials. Cast versions of several traditionally wrought Ni-based superalloys were evaluated for use as casing or valve components for the next generation of industrial steam turbines. The full size castings are substantial: 2-5,000 kg each half and on the order of 100 cm thick. Experimental castings were quite a bit smaller, but section size was retained and cooling rate controlled to produce equivalent microstructures. A multi-step homogenization heat treatment was developed to better deploy the alloy constituents. The most successful of these cast alloys in terms of creep strength (Haynes 263, Haynes 282, and Nimonic 105) were subsequently evaluated by characterizing their microstructure as well as their steam oxidation resistance (at 760 and 800 °C).

  11. Microstructure and properties of SA 106B carbon steel after treatment of the melt with nano-sized TiC particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jin-Ju; Hong, Sung-Mo; Park, Eun-Kwang; Kim, Kyeong-Yeol; Lee, Min-Ku; Rhee, Chang-Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Carbon steel dispersed with nano-sized TiC ceramic particles was fabricated using the liquid metal casting process by means of their ex-situ introduction. For this purpose, the nano-sized TiC powders with an initial average size of 40 nm were first mechanically activated with two metal powders (Fe, Ni) and then introduced externally into the molten carbon steel during the casting process. According to the chemical composition analysis, 90% of the initial TiC nanoparticles were discovered within the cast carbon steel. Compared to cast carbon steel without TiC nanoparticles, the grain size refinement and mechanical property enhancement were achieved. Atom probe tomographic analysis revealed that the TiC nanoparticles were approximately 30 nm in size in the carbon steel matrix with a number density of 1.49×10 21 m −3

  12. Hegelian Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Poul F.

    2015-01-01

    . Developing a Hegelian inspired historical-sociological approach this paper however argues that national and transnational societies emerged simultaneously and in a co-evolutionary and mutually supportive fashion. In most European settings national societies did not become the central horizon of individuals...... of the European steel industry....

  13. Hegelian Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Poul F.

    2015-01-01

    Even in our globalized world the notion of national economies remain incredibly strong, just as a considerable part of the literature on transnational governance and globalization continue to rely on a zero-sum perspective concerning the relationship between the national and the transnational. De...... of the European steel industry....

  14. Impact of Oscillation Parameters on Surface Quality of Cast Billets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibulka J.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on impact of different oscillation parameters on surface quality of peritectic steel grades cast into billets 150x150 mm. Hydraulic oscillation used for this purpose was temporarily installed on one strand of the billet caster. Hydraulic oscillation enables, in comparison to ordinary used electromechanical oscillation, flexible set-up of basic parameters of the oscillation cycle (negative strip time and its ratio. Proper oscillation mode is capable to assure regular oscillation marks development, good lubrication in the mould and adequate compression of the solidifying shell. Impact of an oscillation mode providing negative strip time 0.085 s and its ratio -50 % on surface quality of cast billets is compared with standard oscillation mode applied on strands equipped with electromechanical oscillation characterized with variable negative strip time between 0.084 and 0.096 s and fixed negative strip ratio to -14 %.

  15. Corrosion Response of Low Carbon Steel in Tropical Road Mud ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Corrosion damages in Steel and Cast- Iron frequently occur in automobile and other vehicle undercarriage parts as a result of regular road mud and other dirt deposits on those components on those vehicles operating on the poorly maintained roads in the developing countries. These ultimately result in Deposit and Pilling ...

  16. corrosion response of low carbon steel in tropical road mud

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    A.N.Enetanya. Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of. Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria. ABSTRACT. Corrosion damages in Steel and Cast- Iron frequently occur in automobile and other vehicle undercarriage parts as a result of regular road mud and other dirt deposits on those components on those vehicles ...

  17. Influence of Temperature and Rolling Speed on Twin Roll Cast Strip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, G.; Bohlen, J.; Stutz, L.; Letzig, D.; Kainer, K. U.

    Reducing vehicle weight and emissions by lightweight design is a major goal of the automotive industry. Magnesium as the lightest structural metal offers a significant weight saving potential compared to steel and aluminum. Cast magnesium components are widely used, e.g. as engine blocks or gear box housings. The application of magnesium sheets is currently hampered by the low formability of magnesium which means that a large number of rolling passes is required to roll a DC cast slab to final gauge sheet. This large number of rolling steps is the main reason for the high cost of magnesium sheets. An alternative, cost-efficient production route for magnesium sheets with improved properties is feedstock production by twin roll casting (TRC). In this paper we report the results of twin roll casting experiments on the magnesium alloy AZ31 (Mg-3Al-lZn-Mn) and discuss the influence of the process on the micro structure and texture of the strips.

  18. Quantitative NDT structuroscopy of cast iron castings for vehicles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Skrbek, B.; Tomáš, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 6, 3-4 (2011), s. 293-305 ISSN 1741-8410 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : magnetic method * structuroscopy * cast iron * clutch disks Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  19. Fan Fuel Casting Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imhoff, Seth D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-28

    LANL was approached to provide material and design guidance for a fan-shaped fuel element. A total of at least three castings were planned. The first casting is a simple billet mold to be made from high carbon DU-10Mo charge material. The second and third castings are for optimization of the actual fuel plate mold. The experimental scope for optimization is only broad enough for a second iteration of the mold design. It is important to note that partway through FY17, this project was cancelled by the sponsor. This report is being written in order to capture the knowledge gained should this project resume at a later date.

  20. Alloy dissolution in argon stirred steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Darryl Scott

    Alloying is required for the production of all steel products from small castings to large beams. Addition of large quantities of bulk alloys can result in alloy segregation and inconsistent alloy recovery. The objective of this research was to better understand alloy dissolution in liquid steel especially as it relates to Missouri S&Ts' patented continuous steelmaking process. A 45-kilogram capacity ladle with a single porous plug was used to evaluate the effect of four experimental factors on alloy dissolution: alloy species, alloy size or form, argon flow rate, and furnace tap temperature. Four alloys were tested experimentally including Class I low carbon ferromanganese, nickel and tin (as a surrogate for low melting alloys) and Class II ferroniobium. The alloys ranged in size and form from granular to 30 mm diameter lumps. Experimental results were evaluated using a theoretically based numerical model for the steel shell period, alloy mixing (Class I) and alloy dissolution (Class II). A CFD model of the experimental ladle was used to understand steel motion in the ladle and to provide steel velocity magnitudes for the numerical steel shell model. Experiments and modeling confirmed that smaller sized alloys have shorter steel shell periods and homogenize faster than larger particles. Increasing the argon flow rate shortened mixing times and reduced the delay between alloy addition and the first appearance of alloy in the melt. In addition, for every five degree increase in steel bath temperature the steel shell period was shortened by approximately four percent. Class II ferroniobium alloy dissolution was an order of magnitude slower than Class I alloy mixing.