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Sample records for cassini radar experiment

  1. Impact of aerosols present in Titan's atmosphere on the CASSINI radar experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Rodríguez, S; Dobrijevic, M; Ruffié, G; Coll, P; Bernard, J M; Encrenaz, P; 10.1016/S0019-1035(03)00125-8

    2009-01-01

    Simulations of Titan's atmospheric transmission and surface reflectivity have been developed in order to estimate how Titan's atmosphere and surface properties could affect performances of the Cassini radar experiment. In this paper we present a selection of models for Titan's haze, vertical rain distribution, and surface composition implemented in our simulations. We collected dielectric constant values for the Cassini radar wavelength ($\\sim 2.2$ cm) for materials of interest for Titan: liquid methane, liquid mixture of methane-ethane, water ice and light hydrocarbon ices. Due to the lack of permittivity values for Titan's haze particles in the microwave range, we performed dielectric constant ($\\varepsilon_r$) measurements around 2.2 cm on tholins synthesized in laboratory. We obtained a real part of $\\varepsilon_r$ in the range of 2-2.5 and a loss tangent between $10^{-3}$ and $5.10^{-2}$. By combining aerosol distribution models (with hypothetical condensation at low altitudes) to surface models, we find...

  2. The Italian involvement in Cassini radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirchio, F.; Pernice, B.; Borgarelli, L.; Dionisio, C.

    1991-12-01

    The Radio Frequency Electronic Subsystem (RFES) of the Cassini radar is described. The requirements of the Cassini radar are summarized. The design parameters taken into consideration in developing the RFES are described. The RFES interfaces with the High Gain Antenna (HGA) for signal transmission and reception. The operational parameters of the Cassini radar are presented. The front end electronics (FEE), microwave receiver (MR), high power amplifier (HPA), frequency generator (FG), digital chip generator (DCG), Chirp Up Converter and Amplifier (CUCA) and power supply of the RFES are described.

  3. The rotational dynamics of Titan from Cassini RADAR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriggiola, Rachele; Iess, Luciano; Stiles, Bryan. W.; Lunine, Jonathan. I.; Mitri, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Between 2004 and 2009 the RADAR instrument of the Cassini mission provided 31 SAR images of Titan. We tracked the position of 160 surface landmarks as a function of time in order to monitor the rotational dynamics of Titan. We generated and processed RADAR observables using a least squares fit to determine the updated values of the rotational parameters. We provide a new rotational model of Titan, which includes updated values for spin pole location, spin rate, precession and nutation terms. The estimated pole location is compatible with the occupancy of a Cassini state 1. We found a synchronous value of the spin rate (22.57693 deg/day), compatible at a 3-σ level with IAU predictions. The estimated obliquity is equal to 0.31°, incompatible with the assumption of a rigid body with fully-damped pole and a moment of inertia factor of 0.34, as determined by gravity measurements.

  4. Exploring inner structure of Titan's dunes from Cassini Radar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, P.; Heggy, E.; Farr, T. G.

    2013-12-01

    Linear dunes discovered in the equatorial regions of Titan by the Cassini-Huygens mission are morphologically very similar to many terrestrial linear dune fields. These features have been compared with terrestrial longitudinal dune fields like the ones in Namib desert in western Africa. This comparison is based on the overall parallel orientation of Titan's dunes to the predominant wind direction on Titan, their superposition on other geomorphological features and the way they wrap around topographic obstacles. Studying the internal layering of dunes has strong implications in understanding the hypothesis for their origin and evolution. In Titan's case, although the morphology of the dunes has been studied from Cassini Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images, it has not been possible to investigate their internal structure in detail as of yet. Since no radar sounding data is available for studying Titan's subsurface yet, we have developed another technique to examine the inner layering of the dunes. In this study, we utilize multiple complementary radar datasets, including radar imaging data for Titan's and Earth's dunes and Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR)/radar sounding data for terrestrial dunes. Based on dielectric mixing models, we suggest that the Cassini Ku-band microwaves should be able to penetrate up to ~ 3 m through Titan's dunes, indicating that the returned radar backscatter signal would include contributions from both surface and shallow subsurface echoes. This implies that the shallow subsurface properties can be retrieved from the observed radar backscatter (σ0). In our analysis, the variation of the radar backscatter as a function of dune height is used to provide an insight into the layering in Titan's dunes. We compare the variation of radar backscatter with elevation over individual dunes on Titan and analogous terrestrial dunes in three sites (Great Sand Sea, Siwa dunes and Qattaniya dunes) in the Egyptian Sahara. We observe a strong, positive

  5. Constraints on Titan's rotation from Cassini mission radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bills, Bruce; Stiles, Bryan W.; Hayes, Alexander

    2015-05-01

    We present results of a new analysis of the rotational kinematics of Titan, as constrained by Cassini radar data, extending over the entire currently available set of flyby encounters. Our analysis provides a good constraint on the current orientation of the spin pole, but does not have sufficient accuracy and duration to clearly see the expected spin pole precession. In contrast, we do clearly see temporal variations in the spin rate, which are driven by gravitational torques which attempt to keep the prime meridian oriented toward Saturn.Titan is a synchronous rotator. At lowest order, that means that the rotational and orbital motions are synchronized. At the level of accuracy required to fit the Cassini radar data, we can see that synchronous rotation and uniform rotation are not quite the same thing. Our best fitting model has a fixed pole, and a rotation rate which varies with time, so as to keep Titan's prime meridian oriented towards Saturn, as the orbit varies.A gravitational torque on the tri-axial figure of Titan attempts to keep the axis of least inertia oriented toward Saturn. The main effect is to synchronize the orbit and rotation periods, as seen in inertial space. The response of the rotation angle, to periodic changes in orbital mean longitude, is modeled as a damped, forced harmonic oscillator. This acts as a low-pass filter. The rotation angle accurately tracks orbital variations at periods longer than the free libration period, but is unable to follow higher frequency variations.The mean longitude of Titan's orbit varies on a wide range of time scales. The largest variations are at Saturn's orbital period (29.46 years), and are due to solar torques. There are also variations at periods of 640 and 5800 days, due to resonant interaction with Hyperion.For a rigid body, with moments of inertia estimated from observed gravity, the free libration period for Titan would be 850 days. The best fit to the radar data is obtained with a libration period of

  6. Analysis and interpretation of Cassini Titan radar altimeter echoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebker, Howard A.; Gim, Yonggyu; Callahan, Philip; Hensley, Scott; Lorenz, Ralph; Cassini Radar Team

    2009-03-01

    The Cassini spacecraft has acquired 25 radar altimeter elevation profiles along Titan's surface as of April 2008, and we have analyzed 18 of these for which there are currently reconstructed ephemeris data. Altimeter measurements were collected at spatial footprint sizes from 6-60 km along ground tracks of length 400-3600 km. The elevation profiles yield topographic information at this resolution with a statistical height accuracy of 35-50 m and kilometer-scale errors several times greater. The data exhibit significant variations in terrain, from flat regions with little topographic expression to very rugged Titanscapes. The bandwidth of the transmitted waveform admits vertical resolution of the terrain height to 35 m at each observed location on the surface. Variations in antenna pointing and changes in surface statistics cause the range-compressed radar echoes to exhibit strong systematic and time-variable biases of hundreds of meters in delay. It is necessary to correct the received echoes for these changes, and we have derived correction algorithms such that the derived echo profiles are accurate at the 100 m level for off-nadir pointing errors of 0.3° and 0.6°, for leading edge and echo centroid estimators, respectively. The leading edge of the echo yields the elevation of the highest points on the surface, which we take to be the peaks of any terrain variation. The mean value of the echo delay is more representative of the mean elevation, so that the difference of these values gives an estimate of any local mountain heights. Finding locations where these values diverge indicates higher-relief terrain. Elevation features are readily seen in the height profiles. Several of the passes show mountains of several hundred m altitude, spread over 10's or even 100's of km in spatial extent, so that slopes are very small. Large expanses of sub-100 m topography are commonplace on Titan, so it is rather smooth in many locations. Other areas exhibit more relief

  7. The Global Geology of Titan from Cassini RADAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Rosaly; Malaska, Michael J.

    The variety of geological processes on Titan is rivaled in our Solar System only on Earth. Results from the Cassini-Huygens mission obtained so far have revealed a wide range of geologic and climatological processes. We use data obtained by Cassini’s Titan Radar Mapper (13.78 GHz, lambda=2.17 cm) to analyze the distribution of different types of geologic processes occurring on Titan’s surface, both endogenic and exogenic, and to derive temporal relationships between these processes, at least at local scales. The distribution and interplay of geologic processes is important to provide constraints on models of the interior and of surface-atmosphere interactions. We mapped the SAR images in terms of characteristic morphology of geological features and their radar backscatter in order to determine possible emplacement sequences and the overall distribution of geologic processes. All the major planetary geologic processes - volcanism, tectonism, impact cratering and erosion - appear to have played a role in shaping Titan’s complex surface. This paper will review the distribution and relative ages of different geomorphologic units. While some units (craters, dunes, mountains, channels, lakes and seas) are well established in the literature, the presence of cryovolcanic features is still somewhat controversial, and the origin of undifferentiated plains (known as blandlands) is still mysterious. We now have over half of Titan’s surface imaged by SAR and the interpretation of these and other terrains is better constrained. The results from our latest analyses suggest that a sedimentary origin for the undifferentiated plains is the most likely. Cryovolcanism appears to have occurred on Titan, but it is not ubiquitous, and the major cryovolcanic area appears to be old, now partly covered by dunes. Titan’s surface shows a complex interaction between the surface and atmosphere, with erosional processes being driven by wind, liquids and dissolution.

  8. Cassini Radar at Titan : Evolving Studies of an Evolving World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    2013-04-01

    The Cassini RADAR investigation continues to explore Titan : here I summarize some recent and ongoing developments. Geological interpretation of SAR imaging engages a wide community, in particular addressing Titan's dunes, lakes, seas and fluvial systems, impact craters and possible cryovolcanic features. Mapping of these features continues to suggest a dynamic world, with geologically-recent surface change due to tectonic, hydrological and aeolian processes. Mapping of fluvial channels and shoreline features suggests some tectonic controls and spatially-variable land/sea level changes. A despeckle filter applied to the images has proven popular for image interpretation, for example in resolving what may be star- and barchanoid dune morphologies which contrast with the dominant linear type. New observations in 2012 (T83, T84 and T86) place bounds on liquid accumulation in the northern polar regions - not expected to be substantial for another couple of years - and have highlighted a possibly cryomagma-inflated 'hot cross bun' feature and anomalous midlatitude ridges that may be paleodunes from a different climate epoch. The accumulating body of topographic data from altimetry and SARtopo has permitted the assembly of a global topographic map (albeit substantially interpolated) and an estimate of the spherical harmonic shape out to degree ~12. These datasets will be of substantial value in interpreting Titan's structure and geology, and as a boundary condition on global circulation models and fluvial studies. The growing number of overlap regions also permits stereo topography on smaller scales (e.g. of impact structures Ksa and Soi) which helps to understand the processes obliterating craters on Titan.

  9. Titan's Elusive Lakes? Properties and Context of Dark Spots in Cassini TA Radar Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, R. D.; Elachi, C.; Stiles, B.; West, R.; Janssen, M.; Lopes, R.; Stofan, E.; Paganelli, F.; Wood, C.; Kirk, R.

    2005-01-01

    Titan's atmospheric methane abundance suggests the likelihood of a surface reservoir of methane and a surface sink for its photochemical products, which might also be predominantly liquid. Although large expanses of obvious hydrocarbon seas have not been unambiguously observed, a number of rather radar-dark spots up to approximately 30 km across are observed in the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data acquired during the Cassini TA encounter on October 26th 2004. Here we review the properties and setting of these dark spots to explore whether these may be hydrocarbon lakes.

  10. Nordic Snow Radar Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmetyinen, Juha; Kontu, Anna; Pulliainen, Jouni; Vehviläinen, Juho; Rautiainen, Kimmo; Wiesmann, Andreas; Mätzler, Christian; Werner, Charles; Rott, Helmut; Nagler, Thomas; Schneebeli, Martin; Proksch, Martin; Schüttemeyer, Dirk; Kern, Michael; Davidson, Malcolm W. J.

    2016-09-01

    The objective of the Nordic Snow Radar Experiment (NoSREx) campaign was to provide a continuous time series of active and passive microwave observations of snow cover at a representative location of the Arctic boreal forest area, covering a whole winter season. The activity was a part of Phase A studies for the ESA Earth Explorer 7 candidate mission CoReH2O (Cold Regions Hydrology High-resolution Observatory). The NoSREx campaign, conducted at the Finnish Meteorological Institute Arctic Research Centre (FMI-ARC) in Sodankylä, Finland, hosted a frequency scanning scatterometer operating at frequencies from X- to Ku-band. The radar observations were complemented by a microwave dual-polarization radiometer system operating from X- to W-bands. In situ measurements consisted of manual snow pit measurements at the main test site as well as extensive automated measurements on snow, ground and meteorological parameters. This study provides a summary of the obtained data, detailing measurement protocols for each microwave instrument and in situ reference data. A first analysis of the microwave signatures against snow parameters is given, also comparing observed radar backscattering and microwave emission to predictions of an active/passive forward model. All data, including the raw data observations, are available for research purposes through the European Space Agency and the Finnish Meteorological Institute. A consolidated dataset of observations, comprising the key microwave and in situ observations, is provided through the ESA campaign data portal to enable easy access to the data.

  11. An Overview of the Bathymetry and Composition of Titan's Hydrocarbon Seas from the Cassini RADAR Altimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrogiuseppe, M.; Hayes, A.; Lunine, J. I.; Poggiali, V.; Seu, R.; Hofgartner, J. D.; Lorenz, R. D.; Le Gall, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Cassini RADAR's altimetry mode has been successfully used for probing the depth and composition of Titan's hydrocarbons seas. In May 2013, during the spacecraft's 91stflyby of Titan (T91), the instrument demonstrates its capabilities as a radar sounder, presenting a unique opportunity to constrain direct measurements of the depth and composition of Titan's second largest sea, Ligeia Mare. Later, observations of Kraken Mare and Punga Mare were planned and executed in August 2014 (T104) and January 2015 (T108), respectively. While most of the seafloor was not detected at Kraken, suggesting the sea was either too deep or too absorptive in these areas to observe a return from the seafloor, shallow areas near Moray Sinus did return subsurface detections. At Punga Mare, a clear detection of the subsurface was observed with a maximum depth of 120 m along the interrogated track of the sea. We will present an analysis of all three altimetric observations of Titan's mare, as well a re-analysis of altimetry data acquired over southern Ontario Lacus. Depths measurements and liquid composition are obtained using a novel technique which makes use of radar simulations and Monte Carlo based inversions. Finally, we will show that the estimates obtained from the direct measurements described above can be used along with the RADAR's active (i.e. Synthetic Aperture Radar) and passive (Radiometry) modes to generate bathymetry maps of areas not observed by altimetry.

  12. Bathymetry and Composition of Titan's Hydrocarbon Seas from the Cassini RADAR Altimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrogiuseppe, Marco; Hayes, Alex; Poggiali, Valerio; Lunine, Jonathan; Seu, Roberto; Hofgartner, Jason; Le Gall, Alice; Lorenz, Ralph

    2016-04-01

    The Cassini RADAR's altimetry mode has been successfully used for probing the depth and composition of Titan's hydrocarbons seas. In May 2013, during the spacecraft's T91 flyby of Titan, the instrument demonstrated its capabilities as a radar sounder, presenting a unique opportunity to constraint the depth and composition of Titan's second largest sea, Ligeia Mare. Later, observations of Kraken Mare and Punga Mare were planned and executed in August 2014 (T104) and January 2015 (T108), respectively. While most of the seafloor was not detected at Kraken, suggesting the sea was either too deep or too absorptive in these areas to observe a return from the seafloor, shallow areas near Moray Sinus did show subsurface reflections. At Punga Mare, a clear detection of the subsurface was observed with a maximum depth of 120 m along the radar altimetry transect. Herein we present a re-analysis of altimetry data acquired over Ligeia Mare and, earlier in the Cassini mission (in December 2008 during T49), over the southern Ontario Lacus. Depths measurements and liquid composition are obtained using a novel technique which makes use of radar simulations and Monte Carlo-based inversions. Simulation is based on a two-layer model, where the surface is represented by a specular reflection and the seafloor is modeled using a facet-based synthetic surface, including thermal noise, speckle effects, analog to digital conversion (ADC), block adaptive quantization (BAQ), and allows for possible receiver saturation. This new analysis provides an update to the Ku-band attenuation (the Cassini RADAR operates at a wavelength of 2 cm) and results in a new estimate for loss tangent and composition. We found a value of specific attenuation of the liquid equal to 0.14±0.02 dB/m and 0.2±0.1 dB/m, which is equivalent to a loss tangent of 4.4±0.9x10^-5 and 7±3x10^-5 for Ligeia Mare and Ontario Lacus, respectively. Assuming that Titan's liquid bodies are composed by a ternary mixture of methane

  13. Cassini Scientist for a Day: a tactile experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canas, L.; Altobelli, N.

    2012-09-01

    In September 2011, the Cassini spacecraft took images of three targets and a challenge was launched to all students: to choose the one target they thought would provide the best science and to write an essay explaining their reasons (more information on the "Cassini Scientist for a Day" essay contest official webpage in: http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/education/scientistforaday10thedition/, run by NASA/JPL) The three targets presented were: Hyperion, Rhea and Titan, and Saturn. The idea behind "Cassini Scientist for a Day: a tactile experience" was to transform each of these images into schematic tactile images, highlighting relevant features apprehended through a tactile key, accompanied by a small text in Braille with some additional information. This initial approach would allow reach a broader community of students, more specifically those with visual impairment disabilities. Through proper implementation and careful study cases the adapted images associated with an explanatory key provide more resources in tactile astronomy. As the 2012 edition approaches a new set of targeted objet images will be once again transformed and adapted to visually impaired students and will aim to reach more students into participate in this international competition and to engage them in a quest to expand their knowledge in the amazing Cassini discoveries and the wonders of Saturn and its moons. As the winning essays will be published on the Cassini website and contest winners invited to participate in a dedicated teleconference with Cassini scientists from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, this initiative presents a great chance to all visually impaired students and teachers to participate in an exciting experience. These initiatives must be complemented with further information to strengthen the learning experience. However they stand as a good starting point to tackle further astronomical concepts in the classroom, especially this field that sometimes lacks the resources. Although

  14. Mapping and interpretation of Sinlap crater on Titan using Cassini VIMS and RADAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Mouelic S.; Paillou, P.; Janssen, M.A.; Barnes, J.W.; Rodriguez, S.; Sotin, C.; Brown, R.H.; Baines, K.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Crapeau, M.; Encrenaz, P.J.; Jaumann, R.; Geudtner, D.; Paganelli, F.; Soderblom, L.; Tobie, G.; Wall, S.

    2008-01-01

    Only a few impact craters have been unambiguously detected on Titan by the Cassini-Huygens mission. Among these, Sinlap is the only one that has been observed both by the RADAR and VIMS instruments. This paper describes observations at centimeter and infrared wavelengths which provide complementary information about the composition, topography, and surface roughness. Several units appear in VIMS false color composites of band ratios in the Sinlap area, suggesting compositional heterogeneities. A bright pixel possibly related to a central peak does not show significant spectral variations, indicating either that the impact site was vertically homogeneous, or that this area has been recovered by homogeneous deposits. Both VIMS ratio images and dielectric constant measurements suggest the presence of an area enriched in water ice around the main ejecta blanket. Since the Ku-band SAR may see subsurface structures at the meter scale, the difference between infrared and SAR observations can be explained by the presence of a thin layer transparent to the radar. An analogy with terrestrial craters in Libya supports this interpretation. Finally, a tentative model describes the geological history of this area prior, during, and after the impact. It involves mainly the creation of ballistic ejecta and an expanding plume of vapor triggered by the impact, followed by the redeposition of icy spherules recondensed from this vapor plume blown downwind. Subsequent evolution is then driven by erosional processes and aeolian deposition. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Compositional and spatial variations in Titan dune and interdune regions from Cassini VIMS and RADAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnefoy, Léa E.; Hayes, Alexander G.; Hayne, Paul O.; Malaska, Michael J.; Le Gall, Alice; Solomonidou, Anezina; Lucas, Antoine

    2016-05-01

    Dunes cover about 15 % of Titan's visible surface, and represent one of the largest reservoirs of hydrocarbon solids on Titan (Rodriguez, S. et al. [2014]. Icarus 230, 168-179; Lopes, R.M.C. et al. [2016]. Icarus 270, 162-182.). Herein, we use data from the Cassini spacecraft to derive constraints on the compositional and regional variability of Titan's dune and interdune regions by combining spectral information from the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) and spatial information from Synthetic Aperture RADAR (SAR) data. Using the combined datasets, we extract pure infrared spectra of dune and interdune regions by extrapolating linear correlations between VIMS reflectance and dune area fraction calculated in each VIMS footprint from SAR images. We applied the same method using the Cassini RADAR Radiometer dataset to extract the microwave surface emissivity of the dune and interdune regions. Globally the dune spectra show little variation, but we find that the interdune spectra exhibit several different behaviors. Similarly, we extract from passive radiometry a mean dune emissivity of 0.98 ± 0.01, while interdune emissivity varies from 0.86 to 0.98. We find that the interdune regions are often spectrally similar to other Titan terrain units, namely Caladan Planitia, the Adiri Mountains, and Sinlap crater, while the dunes are spectrally distinct from all terrain units. Around Sinlap crater, the interdune regions correspond to the dark blue VIMS unit: the dunes could be forming on top of the ejecta, or the material corresponding to the blue unit could be depositing preferentially in the interdunes areas. There was one region in the Belet sand sea where we were unable to extract the dune and interdune spectra and emissivities in spite of high-quality data, which we interpret to result from a thick sand cover in the interdune regions, implying inactive or saturated dune fields. However, the fact that we were able to extract distinct dune and interdune

  16. Disribution and interplay of geologic processes on Titan from Cassini radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, R.M.C.; Stofan, E.R.; Peckyno, R.; Radebaugh, J.; Mitchell, K.L.; Mitri, G.; Wood, C.A.; Kirk, R.L.; Wall, S.D.; Lunine, J.I.; Hayes, A.; Lorenz, R.; Farr, Tom; Wye, L.; Craig, J.; Ollerenshaw, R.J.; Janssen, M.; LeGall, A.; Paganelli, F.; West, R.; Stiles, B.; Callahan, P.; Anderson, Y.; Valora, P.; Soderblom, L.

    2010-01-01

    The Cassini Titan Radar Mapper is providing an unprecedented view of Titan's surface geology. Here we use Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image swaths (Ta-T30) obtained from October 2004 to December 2007 to infer the geologic processes that have shaped Titan's surface. These SAR swaths cover about 20% of the surface, at a spatial resolution ranging from ~350 m to ~2 km. The SAR data are distributed over a wide latitudinal and longitudinal range, enabling some conclusions to be drawn about the global distribution of processes. They reveal a geologically complex surface that has been modified by all the major geologic processes seen on Earth - volcanism, tectonism, impact cratering, and erosion and deposition by fluvial and aeolian activity. In this paper, we map geomorphological units from SAR data and analyze their areal distribution and relative ages of modification in order to infer the geologic evolution of Titan's surface. We find that dunes and hummocky and mountainous terrains are more widespread than lakes, putative cryovolcanic features, mottled plains, and craters and crateriform structures that may be due to impact. Undifferentiated plains are the largest areal unit; their origin is uncertain. In terms of latitudinal distribution, dunes and hummocky and mountainous terrains are located mostly at low latitudes (less than 30 degrees), with no dunes being present above 60 degrees. Channels formed by fluvial activity are present at all latitudes, but lakes are at high latitudes only. Crateriform structures that may have been formed by impact appear to be uniformly distributed with latitude, but the well-preserved impact craters are all located at low latitudes, possibly indicating that more resurfacing has occurred at higher latitudes. Cryovolcanic features are not ubiquitous, and are mostly located between 30 degrees and 60 degrees north. We examine temporal relationships between units wherever possible, and conclude that aeolian and fluvial

  17. Distribution and interplay of geologic processes on Titan from Cassini radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, R.M.C.; Stofan, E.R.; Peckyno, R.; Radebaugh, J.; Mitchell, K.L.; Mitri, G.; Wood, C.A.; Kirk, R.L.; Wall, S.D.; Lunine, J.I.; Hayes, A.; Lorenz, R.; Farr, Tom; Wye, L.; Craig, J.; Ollerenshaw, R.J.; Janssen, M.; LeGall, A.; Paganelli, F.; West, R.; Stiles, B.; Callahan, P.; Anderson, Y.; Valora, P.; Soderblom, L.

    2010-01-01

    The Cassini Titan Radar Mapper is providing an unprecedented view of Titan's surface geology. Here we use Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image swaths (Ta-T30) obtained from October 2004 to December 2007 to infer the geologic processes that have shaped Titan's surface. These SAR swaths cover about 20% of the surface, at a spatial resolution ranging from ???350 m to ???2 km. The SAR data are distributed over a wide latitudinal and longitudinal range, enabling some conclusions to be drawn about the global distribution of processes. They reveal a geologically complex surface that has been modified by all the major geologic processes seen on Earth - volcanism, tectonism, impact cratering, and erosion and deposition by fluvial and aeolian activity. In this paper, we map geomorphological units from SAR data and analyze their areal distribution and relative ages of modification in order to infer the geologic evolution of Titan's surface. We find that dunes and hummocky and mountainous terrains are more widespread than lakes, putative cryovolcanic features, mottled plains, and craters and crateriform structures that may be due to impact. Undifferentiated plains are the largest areal unit; their origin is uncertain. In terms of latitudinal distribution, dunes and hummocky and mountainous terrains are located mostly at low latitudes (less than 30??), with no dunes being present above 60??. Channels formed by fluvial activity are present at all latitudes, but lakes are at high latitudes only. Crateriform structures that may have been formed by impact appear to be uniformly distributed with latitude, but the well-preserved impact craters are all located at low latitudes, possibly indicating that more resurfacing has occurred at higher latitudes. Cryovolcanic features are not ubiquitous, and are mostly located between 30?? and 60?? north. We examine temporal relationships between units wherever possible, and conclude that aeolian and fluvial/pluvial/lacustrine processes are the

  18. A despeckle filter for the Cassini synthetic aperture radar images of Titan's surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratsolis, Emmanuel; Bampasidis, Georgios; Solomonidou, Anezina; Coustenis, Athena

    2012-02-01

    Cassini synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of Titan, the largest satellite of Saturn, reveal surface features with shapes ranging from quasi-circular to more complex ones, interpreted as liquid hydrocarbon deposits assembled in the form of lakes or seas. One of the major problems hampering the derivation of meaningful texture information from SAR imagery is the speckle noise. It overlays real structures and causes gray value variations even in homogeneous parts of the image. We propose a filtering technique which can be applied to obtain restored SAR images. Our technique is based on probabilistic methods and regards an image as a random element drawn from a prespecified set of possible images. The despeckle filter can be used as an intermediate step for the extraction of regions of interest, corresponding to structured units in a given area or distinct objects of interest, such as lake-like features on Titan. This tool can therefore be used, among other, to study seasonal surficial changes of Titan's polar regions. In this study we also present a segmentation technique that allows us to separate the lakes from the local background.

  19. Cassini VIMS and RADAR investigation of Titan's equatorial regions: a case for changes in surface properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomonidou, Anezina; Coustenis, Athena; Lopes, Rosaly M. C.; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Hirtzig, Mathieu; Malaska, Michael; Stephan, Katrin; Sotin, Christophe; Drossart, Pierre; Jaumann, Ralf; Bratsolis, Emmanuel; Le Mouélic, Stephane; Brown, Robert H.

    2015-04-01

    The Cassini-Huygens instruments revealed that Titan, Saturn's largest moon, has - in many aspects - a complex, dynamic and Earth-like surface [1;2;3]. Understanding the distribution and interplay of geologic processes on Titan is important for constraining models of its interior, surface-atmosphere interactions, and climate evolution. Data from the remote sensing instruments have shown the presence of diverse terrains, suggesting exogenic and endogenic processes, whose composition remains largely unknown. Interpreting surface features further requires precise knowledge of the contribution by the dense intervening atmosphere, especially the troposphere, which can be recovered from near-IR data such as those collected by Cassini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) collects in the so-called "methane windows". In order to simulate the atmospheric contribution and extract surface information, a statistical tool (PCA) and a radiative transfer code are applied on certain regions of interest (i.e. possibly geologically varying and suggested in some cases to be cryovolcanic and/or evaporitic in origin) [4;5;7]. We also analyze RADAR despeckled SAR images in terms of morphology [6]. For comparison, we also look at undifferentiated plains and dune fields regions that are not expected to change with time. We find that Tui Regio and Sotra Patera change with time becoming darker and brighter respectively in terms of surface albedo while the plains and the suggested evaporitic areas in the equatorial regions do not present any significant change [5]. The surface brightening of Sotra supports a possible internal rather than exogenic origin. The unchanged surface behavior of the plains supports a sedimentary origin rather than cryovolcanic. Preliminary results on the chemical composition of the changed regions with time are also presented. We therefore suggest that temporal variations of surface albedo (in chemical composition and/or morphology) exist for some areas

  20. Constrains on the nature of Titan's surface from Cassini/VIMS and RADAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomonidou, Anezina; Coustenis, Athena; Lopes, Rosaly; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Drossart, Pierre; Schmitt, Bernard; Philippe, Sylvain; Malaska, Michael; Janssen, Michael; Maltagliati, Luca; Lawrence, Kenneth; Jaumann, Ralf; Sohl, Frank; Stephan, Katrin; Brown, Robert; Bratsolis, Emannuel; Matsoukas, Christos

    2016-04-01

    Cassini remote-sensing instruments for more than 10 years now and in situ by the Huygens instruments back in 2005. For the surface, the presence of diverse terrains in terms of morphology and composition suggest both exogenic and endogenic processes to be at play. In this study, we investigate the surface and atmospheric contributions from the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) spectro-imaging data by use of a radiative transfer code in the near-IR range and the RADAR/SAR data for the distinction of geomorphological units. We focus here on those units identified in Lopes et al. (2010, 2015) [1; 2] and Malaska et al. (2015) [3]: mountains, plains, labyrinths, dune fields, and the areas previously suggested to have experienced change such as the possible cryovolcanic and evaporite features (Barnes et al. 2013; Solomonidou et al. 2014; 2015) [4; 5; 6]. With the use of a recently updated radiative transfer code, we evaluate the atmospheric contribution and extract the pure surface albedo information for each region of interest. The extracted albedo shapes and values are then tested against spectra of constituents that are considered to be the best Titan candidate materials, including a very recent library of Titan ice spectra [7]. We find that many of the units show compositional variations while units of significant geomorphological differences seem to consist of very similar materials, which help us provide implications on their endogenic or exogenic origin. Preliminary results on the chemical composition of the regions that have shown temporal changes are also presented. References: [1] Lopes, R.M.C., et al.: Icarus, 205, 540-558, 2010; [2] Lopes, R.M.C., et al.: Icarus, in press; [3] Malaska, M., et al. : Icarus, submitted; [4] Barnes, J., et al.: Planetary Science, 2:1, 2013; [5] Solomonidou, A., et al.: JGR, 119, 1729-1747, 2014; [6] Solomonidou, A., et al.: Icarus, in press; [7] Schmitt, B., et al.: GhoSST datacase (ghosst.osug.fr).

  1. Constraining Depths and Wave Heights for Titan's lakes with Cassini RADAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wye, L.; Zebker, H. A.; Hayes, A. G.; Lorenz, R. D.; Notarnicola, C.; Ventura, B.; Casarano, D.; Cassini RADAR Team

    2010-12-01

    Hayes et al. (JGR 2010) observed that the Cassini synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging magnitudes collected in Titan flybys T57 (22-June-2009) and T58 (8-July-2009) over Titan’s Ontario Lacus vary exponentially with distance from the lake shore, as expected if there is a deepening liquid layer that is attenuating the reflection from a roughened bottom. They deduced near-shore slopes at 13 locations around the lake perimeter. Previously, at the 2010 DPS meeting, we applied a similar model to the real-aperture radar data collected on Titan flyby T65 (12-January-2010) to obtain complete depth profiles across the entire width and length of Ontario Lacus, thereby constraining its maximum depths. The real-aperture reduction provides longer integration times, thus reducing the noise in the data. Consequently, we can detect bottom reflections from greater depths farther out into the lake. This improvement in signal-to-noise comes at the expense of resolution. We assume that the variation in backscatter across the lake is due largely to changes in depth, although changes in the lake bottom roughness or changes in the concentration of suspended scatterers would also affect the perceived backscatter. In this paper, we add the T57 and T58 data to our T65 Ontario Lacus analysis to more completely evaluate the subsurface topography across the lake. The shape of the lakebed may have implications for the lake geology. We also extend the bathymetry model to the northern lakes. While we map the depths of Ontario Lacus to be not much greater than several times the two-way absorption length (1.2 m for the assumed dielectric properties), the subsurface reflection in the northern lakes quickly extinguishes as the radar beam moves away from the shore, suggesting the lake floor to be at much greater depths. Only in Jingpo Lacus and Ligeia Mare do we find detectable subsurface structure away from the shore. Assuming dielectric properties similar to those deduced by Hayes et al. for

  2. Electromagnetic models and inversion techniques for Titan’s Ontario Lacus depth estimation from Cassini RADAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Bartolomeo; Notarnicola, Claudia; Casarano, Domenico; Posa, Francesco; Hayes, Alexander G.; Wye, Lauren

    2012-11-01

    Since 2004, Cassini RADAR, operating at 13.8 GHz as a radiometer, scatterometer, altimeter and synthetic aperture radar (SAR), provides a vast amount of data, suggesting new scenarios for Titan’s morphology and evolution. An important result was the detection of lakes constituted by liquid hydrocarbons, thus supporting the hypothesis of a methane and ethane cycle similar to water cycle on Earth. In 2007 Ontario Lacus, a 200 km × 70 km lake, was detected near the South pole. To date Ontario is the only large liquid area sensed by Cassini RADAR in the southern hemisphere of Titan. In this work, we analyze the SAR data using two different electromagnetic modeling approaches to retrieve the optical thickness parameter of the liquid hydrocarbon layer. A physically-based model, IEM combined with a gravity capillary wave spectra and integrated into a Bayesian statistical inversion is compared with a semi-empirical model also based on a double-layer description. We consider the impact of the dielectric constant of the surface constituents, as well as wind speed and wave motion scenarios, on the retrieved optical thickness, and by extension, the lake depth and volume estimation. Wind speed can be constrained below 0.7 m/s, in good agreement with the forecasts of Global Circulation Models on Titan. Lake depths estimates depend on the hypotheses on wind speed and loss tangent of the liquid. The average depth lake estimates obtained with the physically based approach range from 2.7 and 8.3 m, with the 95% of the lake area not exceeding 30 m depth. The semiempirical model results confirm this interval, also considering the hypothesis of a low reflectivity lake bed: this would imply lower depth, with a significant part of the lake area not liquid-filled at the present.

  3. Preliminary results of noise radar experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malanowski, Mateusz; Contartese, Clara; Maslikowski, Lukasz; Baczyk, Marcin; Kulpa, Krzysztof

    2009-06-01

    The paper describes the first results of noise radar experiments carried out at Warsaw University of Technology. The radar system was built with Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) components: log-periodic antennas, an arbitrary waveform generator and a two-channel spectrum analyzer. The radar operated in the continuous-wave mode, and the aim was to detect moving targets in the received signal. The paper shows the system setup as well as the numerical results obtained from the recorded signals.

  4. Cassini Radio Science Experiments on Saturn and Titan Preserved Because of Lewis Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jeffrey D.

    1999-01-01

    The Cassini mission to Saturn is an international venture with participation from NASA, the European Space Agency, and the Italian Space Agency. The Cassini spacecraft was launched from Cape Canaveral in October 1997 and is scheduled to arrive at Saturn in July 2004. After arrival, the spacecraft will orbit Saturn about 60 times over a period of 4 years. During this time, the Cassini Radio Science Subsystem will be used to investigate the atmosphere and rings of Saturn and the atmosphere of its largest moon, Titan--which is larger than Mercury and is the only moon in our solar system with a dense atmosphere. A critical component in Cassini s Radio Science Subsystem is a traveling-wave tube (TWT) that was designed at the NASA Lewis Research Center and built by Hughes Electronic Dynamics Division (ref. 1). This TWT will amplify downlink microwave signals at a frequency of 32 GHz for the Deep Space Network and will be involved in a number of experiments. These include occultation experiments in which the microwave signal will be beamed through rings and atmospheres toward Earth. Researchers will analyze the received signals to determine the sizes and distributions of the particles in the rings and the structure and composition of the atmospheres. The Radio Science Subsystem also will also be used to more accurately determine the mass and size of Saturn and its moons, to investigate the solar corona, and to search for gravity waves from outside the solar system.

  5. Constraining the physical properties of Titan's empty lake basins using nadir and off-nadir Cassini RADAR backscatter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelides, R. J.; Hayes, A. G.; Mastrogiuseppe, M.; Zebker, H. A.; Farr, T. G.; Malaska, M. J.; Poggiali, V.; Mullen, J. P.

    2016-05-01

    We use repeat synthetic aperture radar (SAR) observations and complementary altimetry passes acquired by the Cassini spacecraft to study the scattering properties of Titan's empty lake basins. The best-fit coefficients from fitting SAR data to a quasi-specular plus diffuse backscatter model suggest that the bright basin floors have a higher dielectric constant, but similar facet-scale rms surface facet slopes, to surrounding terrain. Waveform analysis of altimetry returns reveals that nadir backscatter returns from basin floors are greater than nadir backscatter returns from basin surroundings and have narrower pulse widths. This suggests that floor deposits are structurally distinct from their surroundings, consistent with the interpretation that some of these basins may be filled with evaporitic and/or sedimentary deposits. Basin floor deposits also express a larger diffuse component to their backscatter, which is likely due to variations in subsurface structure or an increase in roughness at the wavelength scale (Hayes, A.G. et al. [2008]. Geophys. Res. Lett. 35, 9). We generate a high-resolution altimetry radargram of the T30 altimetry pass over an empty lake basin, with which we place geometric constraints on the basin's slopes, rim heights, and depth. Finally, the importance of these backscatter observations and geometric measurements for basin formation mechanisms is briefly discussed.

  6. Filtering and segmentation of the Cassini synthetic aperture radar images on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratsolis, E.; Bampasidis, G.; Solomonidou, A.; Coustenis, A.; Hirtzig, M.

    2011-10-01

    A filtering technique is applied to obtain the restored synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. One of the major problems hampering the derivation of meaningful texture information from SAR imagery is the speckle noise. It overlays "real" structures and causes gray value variations even in homogeneous parts of the image. Our method, the TSPR (total sum preserving regularization) filter, is based on probabilistic methods and regards an image as a random element drawn from a prespecified set of possible images optimized by a synchronous local iterative method. The despeckle filter can be used as intermediate stage for the extraction of meaningful regions that correspond to structural units in the scene or distinguish objects of interest like lakes, drainage networks, equatorial dunes or impact craters, where different textures appear.

  7. First Results From the Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) Experiment on the Cassini-Huygens Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, Hasso B.; Demick, J.; Haberman, J.; Harpold, D.; Kasprzak, W.; Raaen, E.; Way, S.; Atreya, S.; Carignan, G.; Bauer, S.

    2005-01-01

    The Huygens Probe of the Cassini Huygens Mission entered the atmosphere of the moon Titan on January 14,2005. The GCMS was part of the instrument complement on the Probe to measure in situ the chemical composition of the atmosphere during the probe descent and to support the Aerosol Collector Pyrolyser (ACP) experiment by serving as detector for the pyrolization products. The GCMS employed a quadrupole mass filter with a secondary electron multiplier detection system and a gas sampling system providing continuous direct atmospheric composition measurements and batch sampling through three gas chromatographic (GC) columns. The mass spectrometer employed five electron impact ion sources with available electron energies of either 70 or 25 eV. Three ion sources served as detectors for the GC columns and two were dedicated to direct atmosphere sampling and ACP gas sampling, respectively. The GCMS gas inlet was heated to prevent condensation, and served to evaporate surface constituents after impact.

  8. Cryo-Cooled Sapphire Oscillator for the Cassini Ka-Band Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rabi T.; Dick, G. John

    1997-01-01

    We present features for an ultra-stable sapphire cryogenic oscillator which has been designed to support the Cassini Ka-band Radio Science experiment. The design of this standard is new in several respects. It is cooled by a commercial cryocooler instead of liquid cryogens to increase operating time, and it uses a technology to adjust the temperature turn-over point to extend the upper operating temperature limit and to enable construction of multiple units with uniform operating characteristics. Objectives are 3 x 10(exp -15) stability for measuring times 1 second less than or equal to (tau) less than or equal to 100 seconds, phase noise of -85 dBc/Hz from offset frequencies of 1 Hz to 1000 Hz at 10 GHz carrier frequency, and a one year continuous operating period.

  9. Design of a Cryocooled Sapphire Oscillator for the Cassini Ka-Band Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, G. J.; Wang, R. T.

    1998-04-01

    We present design aspects of a cryogenic sapphire oscillator that is being developed for ultra-high short-term stability and low phase noise in support of the Cassini Ka-band (32-GHz) radio science experiment. With cooling provided by a commercial cryocooler instead of liquid helium, this standard is designed to operate continuously for periods of a year or more. Performance targets are a stability of 3 x 10^(-15) (1 second ≤ τ ≤ 100 seconds) and a phase noise of -73 dBc/Hz at 1 Hz measured at 34 GHz. Test results are reported for several subsystems, including the cryocooler, vibration isolation system, and ruby compensating element.

  10. Built But Not Used, Needed But Not Built: Ground System Guidance Based On Cassini-Huygens Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Barbara S.

    2006-01-01

    These reflections share insight gleaned from Cassini-Huygens experience in supporting uplink operations tasks with software. Of particular interest are developed applications that were not widely adopted and tasks for which the appropriate application was not planned. After several years of operations, tasks are better understood providing a clearer picture of the mapping of requirements to applications. The impact on system design of the changing user profile due to distributed operations and greater participation of scientists in operations is also explored. Suggestions are made for improving the architecture, requirements, and design of future systems for uplink operations.

  11. The Shuttle Imaging Radar B (SIR-B) experiment report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimino, Jo Bea; Holt, Benjamin; Richardson, Annie

    1988-01-01

    The primary objective of the SIR-B experiment was to acquire multiple-incidence-angle radar imagery of a variety of Earth's surfaces to better understand the effects of imaging geometry on radar backscatter. A complementary objective was to map extensive regions of particular interest. Under these broad objectives, many specific scientific experiments were defined by the 43 SIR-B Science Team members, including studies in the area of geology, vegetation, radar penetration, oceanography, image analysis, and calibration technique development. Approximately 20 percent of the planned digital data were collected, meeting 40 percent of the scientific objectives. This report is an overview of the SIR-B experiment and includes the science investigations, hardware design, mission scenario, mission operations, events of the actual missions, astronaut participation, data products (including auxiliary data), calibrations, and a summary of the actual coverage. Also included are several image samples.

  12. Radar imagery from the 1994 Lock Linnhe ship wake experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullenhoff, C.J.; Lehman, S.K.; Jones, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-11-15

    The 1994 Loch Linnhe radar ocean imaging trials were held from September 4 through September 17. Two ships were used: the R.V. Colonel Templer, and the RMAS Collie. Thorn EMI, Inc., fielded a dual band, dual polarization radar on a hillside overlooking the loch. A primary purpose of the experiment was to obtain highly visible images of ship generated internal waves. Presented here is imagery for a few of the good ship runs, as well as a study of the environment of the visibility of ship generated internal waves.

  13. SAR Experiments Using a Conformal Antenna Array Radar Demonstrator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Knott

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Conformal antenna arrays have been studied for several years but only few examples of applications in modern radar or communication systems may be found up to date due to technological difficulties. The objective of the “Electronic Radar with Conformal Array Antenna” (ERAKO demonstrator system which has been developed at the Fraunhofer Institute for High Frequency Physics and Radar Techniques (FHR is to demonstrate the feasibility of an active electronically scanned antenna for conformal integration into small and medium sized airborne platforms. For practical trials the antenna has been adapted for operation with the Phased Array Multifunctional Imaging Radar (PAMIR system developed at the institute. The antenna in combination with the PAMIR front-end needed to undergo a special calibration procedure for beam forming and imaging post-processing. The present paper describes the design and development of the conformal antenna array of the demonstrator system, its connection to the PAMIR system and results of recently conducted synthetic aperture radar (SAR experiments.

  14. Planetary Radars Operating Centre PROC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catallo, C.; Flamini, E.; Seu, R.; Alberti, G.

    2007-12-01

    Planetary exploration by means of radar systems, mainly using Ground Penetrating Radars (GPR) plays an important role in Italy. Numerous scientific international space programs are currently carried out jointly with ESA and NASA by Italian Space Agency, the scientific community and the industry. Three important experiments under Italian leadership ( designed and manufactured by the Italian industry), provided by ASI either as contribution to ESA programs either within a NASA/ASI joint venture framework, are now operating: MARSIS on-board Mars Express, SHARAD on-board Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and CASSINI Radar on-board Cassini spacecraft. In order to support all the scientific communities, institutional customers and experiment teams operation three Italian dedicated operational centers have been realized, namely SHOC, (Sharad Operating Centre), MOC (Marsis Operating Center) and CASSINI PAD ( Processing Altimetry Data). Each center is dedicated to a single instrument management and control, data processing and distribution. Although they had been conceived to operate autonomously and independently one from each other, synergies and overlaps have been envisaged leading to the suggestion of a unified center, the Planetary Radar Processing Center (PROC). PROC is conceived in order to include the three operational centers, namely SHOC, MOC and CASSINI PAD, either from logistics point of view and from HW/SW capabilities point of view. The Planetary Radar Processing Center shall be conceived as the Italian support facility to the scientific community for on-going and future Italian planetary exploration programs. Therefore, scalability, easy use and management shall be the design drivers. The paper describes how PROC is designed and developed, to allow SHOC, MOC and CASSINI PAD to operate as before, and to offer improved functionalities to increase capabilities, mainly in terms of data exchange, comparison, interpretation and exploitation. Furthermore, in the frame of

  15. Multifrequency radar imaging of ash plumes: an experiment at Stromboli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnadieu, Franck; Freret-Lorgeril, Valentin; Delanoë, Julien; Vinson, Jean-Paul; Peyrin, Frédéric; Hervier, Claude; Caudoux, Christophe; Van Baelen, Joël; Latchimy, Thierry

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic ash emissions in the atmosphere are hazardous to aviation while ash fallout affects people and human activities and may cause damage to infrastructures and economic losses. In the framework of the French Government Laboratory of Excellence ClerVolc initiative, an experiment was carried out on Stromboli volcano (Italy), between 28 September and 4 October 2015. The aim was to retrieve various physical properties of the ash plumes, especially the mass loading parameters which are critical for the modelling of ash dispersal. We used a complementary set of cutting edge techniques recording in different bands of the electromagnetic spectrum. The innovative instrument setup consisted in three radars, hyperspectral thermal infrared and dual-band UV cameras, a mini DOAS-Flyspec and a multigas sensor. A drone equipped with differential GPS was flown near the ash plumes with several sensors including SO2, CO2 and particle counter. We mainly focus on radar measurements of over 200 ash plumes and present some preliminary comparisons at three frequencies. The BASTA Doppler radar at 95 GHz, originally designed for atmospheric studies, was deployed at about 2.2 km in slant distance from the eruptive craters. It was configured to observe volumes above one of the active craters with a spatio-temporal resolution of 12.5 m and 1 s. From the same location, a 1.2 GHz volcano Doppler radar (VOLDORAD) was recording the signature of ballistics and small lapilli at 0.15 s in 60 m-deep volumes. In addition, a commercial 24 GHz micro rain Doppler radar (MRR) simultaneously recorded activity from the Rochette station, at 400 to 650 m from the active craters with a sampling rate of 10 s and a resolution of 25 m. The latter was pointing almost perpendicularly to the other radar beams. Reflectivity factors were measured inside the ash plume above the source vent by the BASTA radar (3 mm wavelength) spanning -9 to +21 dBZ. Fallout could sometimes be tracked during several minutes within

  16. Space Debris Radar Experiments at the Medicina VLBI Dish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pupillo, G.; Montebugnoli, S.; Di Martino, M.; Salerno, E.; Bartolini, M.; Pluchino, S.; Schilliro, F.; Anselmo, L.; Portelli, C.; Konovalenko, A.; Nabatov, A.

    2009-03-01

    In 2007 three space debris detection tests were performed in the framework of a monitoring program carried out by the Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica - INAF - in collaboration with the Italian Space Agency - ASI. The observations were made by using the bistatic radar technique. The INAF 32 m radiotelescope located at Medicina (Bologna, Italy) was used as receiver whereas the Ukrainian 70 m parabolic antenna located at Evpatoria was utilized as transmitter. The aim of the experiment was to test the sensitivity of the Medicina-Evpatoria radar system in space debris detection, and to validate and optimize the hardware setup. Measurements were mainly carried out on inactive satellites and catalogued space debris. However the search for new fragments in LEO was also performed during the campaign. This paper reports on results of these observations.

  17. Experiments on a Ground-Based Tomographic Synthetic Aperture Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoonyol Lee

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development and experiment of three-dimensional image formation by using a ground-based tomographic synthetic aperture radar (GB-TomoSAR system. GB-TomoSAR formulates two-dimensional synthetic aperture by the motion of antennae, both in azimuth and vertical directions. After range compression, three-dimensional image focusing is performed by applying Deramp-FFT (Fast Fourier Transform algorithms, both in azimuth and vertical directions. Geometric and radiometric calibrations were applied to make an image cube, which is then projected into range-azimuth and range-vertical cross-sections for visualization. An experiment with a C-band GB-TomoSAR system with a scan length of 2.49 m and 1.86 m in azimuth and vertical-direction, respectively, shows distinctive three-dimensional radar backscattering of stable buildings and roads with resolutions similar to the theoretical values. Unstable objects such as trees and moving cars generate severe noise due to decorrelation during the eight-hour image-acquisition time.

  18. Analytical pyrolysis experiments of Titan aerosol analogues in preparation for the Cassini Huygens mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenfreund, P.; Boon, J. J.; Commandeur, J.; Sagan, C.; Thompson, W. R.; Khare, B.

    1995-01-01

    Comparative pyrolysis mass spectrometric data of Titan aerosol analogs, called 'tholins', are presented. The Titan tholins were produced in the laboratory at Cornell by irradiation of simulated Titan atmospheres with high energy electrons in plasma discharge. Mass-spectrometry measurements were performed at FOM of the solid phase of various tholins by Curie-point pyrolysis Gas-Chromatography/Mass-Spectrometry (GCMS) and by temperature resolved in-source Pyrolysis Mass-Spectrometry to reveal the composition and evolution temperature of the dissociation products. The results presented here are used to further define the ACP (Aerosol Collector Pyrolyser)-GCMS experiment and provide a basis for modelling of aerosol composition on Titan and for the iterpretation of Titan atmosphere data from the Huygens probe in the future.

  19. Accurate Navigation of Deep Space Probes using Multifrequency Links: the Cassini Breakthrough during Solar Conjunction Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortora, P.; Iess, L.; Ekelund, J. E.

    2002-01-01

    (1) transponders, used for both range and range-rate estimation. These devices are characterized by a frequency stability (measured by the Allan deviation) whose typical value never falls below the limit of 10-13, which broadly reflects in a range rate accuracy of about 15.10-4 cm/s. Moreover, for missions in the ecliptic plane, a critical phase is represented by the solar conjunctions which, depending on the spacecraft trajectory, can last up to two weeks. In such conditions the radio data are inherently corrupted by solar plasma noise, which causes a dramatic decay of the obtainable navigation accuracy. As a matter of fact, in the orbit determination process, radio data collected when the line of sight falls within 40 solar radii are usually discarded, leading to long time spans during which navigation cannot rely on actual data. and 2001 solar conjunctions were removed for navigation purposes. While this strategy is widely acceptable and proven during the cruise flight, it is not recommended during critical mission phases, when frequent ground-commanded maneuvers are executed. maneuver, scheduled on July 1st 2004, a few days before a solar conjunction. A significant improvement of the navigation accuracy would be achieved using, for the Orbit Determination process, all radio data collected up to the SOI. science experiments (RSE). The on-board configuration is based on a X/X transponder, which generates a reference signal to the Ka-Band Exciter (KEX) for the X/Ka link; furthermore a coherent frequency translator (KaT) is used for the Ka/Ka link. With this configuration, the sky frequencies in the three bands (X/X, X/Ka, Ka/Ka) can be coherently combined to remove the effects of the solar plasma, the major noise source in the Doppler observable. plasma calibration scheme, has shown an improvement of a factor of 8 over the noise of the bare Ka/Ka observable and a factor of 100 over X/X data. At an impact parameter of about 25 solar radii, the Allan deviation is as

  20. Multistatic Wireless Fidelity Network Based Radar – Results of the Chrcynno Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rzewuski

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the theory and experimental result of passive radar using WIFI transmitters as illuminators of opportunity. As a result of experiments conducted on 17th August 2013 at airfield Chrcynno a Cessna C208 airplane was detected and tracked using multistatic passive radar system based on low power signal from WIFI network nodes, which were acting as non cooperative illuminators of opportunity. In the experiment 3 wireless access points were communicating with each other and illuminating the radar scene (airfield. The direct reference and reflected (surveillance signals have been acquired and processed using specially developed algorithm presented in the paper. After signal processing using Passive Coherent Location methods target has been detected. This paper describes in details the algorithms and the results of the experiment for the multistatic passive radar based on the WIFI signal.

  1. Cassini Mission. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*Plus database)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the Cassini mission to the Saturnian system. Topics include radar instrumentation, altimetry, and model testing, and reference the Voyager and Galileo missions. The interplanetary trajectory design process is discussed.

  2. Experiment in Onboard Synthetic Aperture Radar Data Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Single event upsets (SEUs) are a threat to any computing system running on hardware that has not been physically radiation hardened. In addition to mandating the use of performance-limited, hardened heritage equipment, prior techniques for dealing with the SEU problem often involved hardware-based error detection and correction (EDAC). With limited computing resources, software- based EDAC, or any more elaborate recovery methods, were often not feasible. Synthetic aperture radars (SARs), when operated in the space environment, are interesting due to their relevance to NASAs objectives, but problematic in the sense of producing prodigious amounts of raw data. Prior implementations of the SAR data processing algorithm have been too slow, too computationally intensive, and require too much application memory for onboard execution to be a realistic option when using the type of heritage processing technology described above. This standard C-language implementation of SAR data processing is distributed over many cores of a Tilera Multicore Processor, and employs novel Radiation Hardening by Software (RHBS) techniques designed to protect the component processes (one per core) and their shared application memory from the sort of SEUs expected in the space environment. The source code includes calls to Tilera APIs, and a specialized Tilera compiler is required to produce a Tilera executable. The compiled application reads input data describing the position and orientation of a radar platform, as well as its radar-burst data, over time and writes out processed data in a form that is useful for analysis of the radar observations.

  3. Compressive Sensing Radar: Simulation and Experiments for Target Detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anitori, L.; Rossum, W.L. van; Otten, M.P.G.; Maleki, A.; Baraniuk, R.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the performance of a combined Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR) Compressive Sensing (CS) radar detector is investigated Using the properties of the Complex Approximate Message Passing (CAMP) algorithm, it is demonstratedthat the behavior of the CFAR processor can be separated from that

  4. Experiment for buried pipes by stepped FM-CW radar; Step shiki FM-CW radar ni yoru maisetsukan tansa jikken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, K.; Ito, M. [Kawasaki Geological Engineering, Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Tanabe, K. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-05-27

    The underground radar exploration is adopted to surveys of cavity under the road and buried pipes since the result of high resolution is obtained. However, the explorative depth of the radar is shallow, 2-3m in soil basement, and its applicable field has been limited. The continuous wave radar (FM-CW radar) was devised to get deeper explorative depth, but has been used for the geological structure survey such as the fault survey since it is lower in resolution as compared with the pulse radar. Therefore, to make use of characteristics of the continuous wave radar and enhance resolution in the shallow part, an experiment on buried pipes was conducted for the purpose of assessing and improving the FM-CW radar. In this processing, the wave form treatment used in the reflection method seismic survey was adopted for the radar survey. There are some problems, but it is effective to adopt the same algorithm to that used in the seismic survey to the radar exploration. The explorative depth was discussed from the damping rate of electromagnetic waves and dynamic range of facilities of the experimental site, and 7m was obtained. 5 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Unexploded ordnance detection experiments using ultrawideband synthetic aperture radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLuca, Clyde C.; Marinelli, Vincent R.; Ressler, Marc A.; Ton, Tuan T.

    1998-09-01

    The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) has several technology development programs that are evaluating the use of ultra- wideband synthetic aperture radar (UWB SAR) to detect and locate targets that are subsurface or concealed by foliage. Under these programs, a 1-GHz-bandwidth, low-frequency, fully polarimetric UWB SAR instrumentation system was developed to collect the data needed to support foliage and ground- penetrating radar studies. The radar was integrated onto a 150-ft-high mobile boomlift platform in 1995 and was thus named the BoomSAR. In 1997, under the sponsorship of the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP), ARL began a project focused on enhancing the detection and discrimination of unexploded ordnance (UXO). The program's technical approach is to collect high-quality, precision data to support phenomenological investigations of electromagnetic wave propagation through varying dielectric media, which in turn supports the development of algorithms for automatic target detection. For this project, a UXO test site was set up at the Steel Crater Test Area -- an existing test site that already contained subsurface mines, tactical vehicles, 55-gallon drums, storage containers, wires, pipes, and arms caches located at Yuma Proving Ground (YPG), Arizona. More than 600 additional pieces of inert UXO were added to the Steel Crater Test Area, including bombs (250, 500, 750, 1000, and 2000 lb), mortars (60 and 81 mm), artillery shells (105 and 155 mm), 2.75-in. rockets, submunitions (M42, BLU-63, M68, BLU-97, and M118), and mines (Gator, VS1.6, M12, PMN, and POM- Z). In the selection of UXO to be included at YPG, an emphasis was placed on the types of munitions that may be present at CONUS test and training ranges.

  6. A Frequency Transfer and Cleanup System for Ultra-High Stability at Both Long and Short Times for the Cassini Ka-Band Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, M. D.; Dick, G. J.; Wang, R. T.

    1999-01-01

    New radio science experiments, including a gravitational wave search and several atmospheric occultation studies, are planned for the Cassini Ka-band experiment. These experiments are made possible by reduced solar-induced phase fluctuations at the high-frequency (32 GHZ) of the radio link between the earth and the spacecraft. In order to match the improved link performance, a significant upgrade is under way to improve the frequency stability capabilities of NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN). Significant improvements are being undertaken in many areas, including antenna vibration and (wet) tropospheric calibration, in addition to frequency generation and distribution. We describe here the design and development of a system to provide a reference signal with the highest possible frequency stability for both long-term, short-term, and phase noise, at an antenna (DSS 25) that is remote from the frequency standards room at SPC-10 at the Goldstone site. The new technologies were developed in order to meet the very tight requirements. They are: 1) a Stabilized Fiber-Optic Distribution Assembly (SFODA) that includes active compensation of thermal variations to transfer long-term stability over 16 km of ordinary fiber-optic cable, and 2) a Compensated Sapphire Oscillator (CSO) that provides short-term performance in a cryocooled sapphire oscillator with ultra-high short-term stability and low phase noise.

  7. Cassini science planning process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paczkowski, Brian G.; Ray, Trina L.

    2004-01-01

    The mission design for Cassini-Huygens calls for a four-year orbital survey of the Saturnian system and the descent into the Titan atmosphere and eventual soft-landing of the Huygens probe. The Cassini orbiter tour consists of 76 orbits around Saturn with 44 close Titan flybys and 8 targeted icy satellite flybys. The Cassini orbiter spacecraft carries twelve scientific instruments that will perform a wide range of observations on a multitude of designated targets. The science opportunities, frequency of encounters, the length of the Tour, and the use of distributed operations pose significant challenges for developing the science plan for the orbiter mission. The Cassini Science Planning Process is the process used to develop and integrate the science and engineering plan that incorporates an acceptable level of science required to meet the primary mission objectives far the orbiter. The bulk of the integrated science and engineering plan will be developed prior to Saturn Orbit Insertion (Sol). The Science Planning Process consists of three elements: 1) the creation of the Tour Atlas, which identifies the science opportunities in the tour, 2) the development of the Science Operations Plan (SOP), which is the conflict-free timeline of all science observations and engineering activities, a constraint-checked spacecraft pointing profile, and data volume allocations to the science instruments, and 3) an Aftermarket and SOP Update process, which is used to update the SOP while in tour with the latest information on spacecraft performance, science opportunities, and ephemerides. This paper will discuss the various elements of the Science Planning Process used on the Cassini Mission to integrate, implement, and adapt the science and engineering activity plans for Tour.

  8. Time-Expanded Sampling for Ensemble-Based Filters:Assimilation Experiments with Real Radar Observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Huijuan; Qin XU; YAO Mingming; GAO Shouting

    2011-01-01

    By sampling perturbed state vectors from each ensenble prediction run at properly selected time levels in the vicinity of the analysis time, the recently proposed time-expanded sampling approach can enlarge the ensemble size without increasing the number of prediction runs and, hence, can reduce the computational cost of an ensemble-based filter. In this study, this approach is tested for the first time with real radar data from a tornadic thunderstorm. In particular, four assimilation experiments were performed to test the time-expanded sampling method against the conventional ensemble sampling method used by ensemblebased filters. In these experiments, the ensemble square-root filter (EnSRF) was used with 45 ensemble members generated by the time-expanded sampling and conventional sampling from 15 and 45 prediction runs, respectively, and quality-controlled radar data were compressed into super-observations with properly reduced spatial resolutions to improve the EnSRF performances. The results show that the time-expanded sampling approach not only can reduce the computational cost but also can improve the accuracy of the analysis, especially when the ensemble size is severely limited due to computational constraints for real-radar data assimilation. These potential merits are consistent with those previously demonstrated by assimilation experiments with simulated data.

  9. Radar Observations of Snowpack Changes from the Second Cold Land Processes Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, D.; Yueh, S.; Elder, K.

    2007-12-01

    To support the NASA Snow and Cold Land Processes (SCLP) and the ESA Cold Regions High-Resolution Hydrologic Observatory (CoRe-H2O) missions and advance observation of the global water cycle, NASA is supporting the second Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX-II). The experiment is being conducted in two parts over two winter seasons (Colorado 2006-2007, and Alaska 2007-2008). The focus of CLPX-II is on testing and development of advanced snow measurement using high-frequency radar through repeat observations of changing snow conditions using airborne and spaceborne radars and intensive in situ measurements. During 2006-2007 three field campaigns were conducted in a 90-km x 9-km study area in north-central Colorado. The campaigns were carried out in December, January and February to observe significant changes in snowpack characteristics. In each campaign, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's conically scanning Ku- band polarimetric scatterometer (POLSCAT) was flown on a Twin Otter aircraft to collect radar data over the study area. Multiple complete images of the entire study area were acquired during each campaign, enabling examination of short-term changes in radar response as well as long-term changes between campaigns. In each campaign, intensive in situ observations of snow depth, water equivalent, stratigraphy, and grain size were made in each of 16 target sites. All of the target sites shared similar backgrounds (flat terrain with a ground cover of grasses and sedges) but exhibited a wide range of snowpack characteristics. Preliminary analyses of the POLSCAT data acquired from the CLPX-II in winter 2006-2007 are described. The data showed response of the Ku-band radar echoes to snowpack changes for various types of background vegetation. There was about 0.4 dB increase in backscatter for every 1 cm SWE accumulation for sage brush and pasture fields. The data also showed the impact of freeze/thaw cycles, which appeared to create depth hoar and ice lenses with large

  10. Saturation and hysteresis effects in ionospheric modification experiments observed by the CUTLASS and EISCAT radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Wright

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The results of high latitude ionospheric modification experiments utilising the EISCAT heating facility at Tromsø are presented. As a result of the interaction between the high power pump waves and upper hybrid waves in the ionosphere, field-aligned electron density irregularities are artificially excited. Observations of these structures with the CUTLASS coherent HF radars and the EISCAT incoherent UHF radar exhibit hysteresis effects as the heater output power is varied. These are explained in terms of the two-stage mechanism which leads to the growth of the irregularities. Experiments which involve preconditioning of the ionosphere also indicate that hysteresis could be exploited to maximise the intensity of the field-aligned irregularities, especially where the available heater power is limited.

    In addition, the saturation of the irregularity amplitude is considered. Although, the rate of irregularity growth becomes less rapid at high heater powers it does not seem to fully saturate, indicating that the amplification would continue beyond the capabilities of the Tromsø heater - currently the most powerful of its kind. It is shown that the CUTLASS radars are sensitive to irregularities produced by very low heater powers (effective radiated powers <4 MW. This fact is discussed from the perspective of a new heating facility, SPEAR, located on Spitzbergen and capable of transmitting high frequency radio waves with an effective radiated power ~10% of that of the Tromsø heater (28MW.

  11. Saturation and hysteresis effects in ionospheric modification experiments observed by the CUTLASS and EISCAT radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, D. M.; Davies, J. A.; Yeoman, T. K.; Robinson, T. R.; Shergill, H.

    2006-03-01

    The results of high latitude ionospheric modification experiments utilising the EISCAT heating facility at Tromsø are presented. As a result of the interaction between the high power pump waves and upper hybrid waves in the ionosphere, field-aligned electron density irregularities are artificially excited. Observations of these structures with the CUTLASS coherent HF radars and the EISCAT incoherent UHF radar exhibit hysteresis effects as the heater output power is varied. These are explained in terms of the two-stage mechanism which leads to the growth of the irregularities. Experiments which involve preconditioning of the ionosphere also indicate that hysteresis could be exploited to maximise the intensity of the field-aligned irregularities, especially where the available heater power is limited. In addition, the saturation of the irregularity amplitude is considered. Although, the rate of irregularity growth becomes less rapid at high heater powers it does not seem to fully saturate, indicating that the amplification would continue beyond the capabilities of the Tromsø heater - currently the most powerful of its kind. It is shown that the CUTLASS radars are sensitive to irregularities produced by very low heater powers (effective radiated powers <4 MW). This fact is discussed from the perspective of a new heating facility, SPEAR, located on Spitzbergen and capable of transmitting high frequency radio waves with an effective radiated power ~10% of that of the Tromsø heater (28MW).

  12. Cassini launch contingency effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yale; O'Neil, John M.; McGrath, Brian E.; Heyler, Gene A.; Brenza, Pete T.

    2002-01-01

    On 15 October 1997 at 4:43 AM EDT, the Cassini spacecraft was successfully launched on a Titan IVB/Centaur on a mission to explore the Saturnian system. It carried three Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) and 117 Light Weight Radioisotope Heater Units (LWRHUs). As part of the joint National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) safety effort, a contingency plan was prepared to address the unlikely events of an accidental suborbital reentry or out-of-orbital reentry. The objective of the plan was to develop procedures to predict, within hours, the Earth impact footprints (EIFs) for the nuclear heat sources released during the atmospheric reentry. The footprint predictions would be used in subsequent notification and recovery efforts. As part of a multi-agency team, The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) had the responsibility to predict the EIFs of the heat sources after a reentry, given the heat sources' release conditions from the main spacecraft. (No ablation burn-through of the heat sources' aeroshells was expected, as a result of earlier testing.) JHU/APL's other role was to predict the time of reentry from a potential orbital decay. The tools used were a three degree-of-freedom trajectory code, a database of aerodynamic coefficients for the heat sources, secure links to obtain tracking data, and a high fidelity special perturbation orbit integrator code to predict time of spacecraft reentry from orbital decay. In the weeks and days prior to launch, all the codes and procedures were exercised. Notional EIFs were derived from hypothetical reentry conditions. EIFs predicted by JHU/APL were compared to those by JPL and US SPACECOM, and were found to be in good agreement. The reentry time from orbital decay for a booster rocket for the Russian Progress M-36 freighter, a cargo ship for the Mir space station, was predicted to within 5 minutes more than two hours before reentry. For the

  13. Exploration of the Saturn System by the Cassini Mission: Observations with the Cassini Infrared Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Mian M.

    2014-01-01

    Outline: Introduction to the Cassini mission, and Cassini mission Objectives; Cassini spacecraft, instruments, launch, and orbit insertion; Saturn, Rings, and Satellite, Titan; Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS); and Infrared observations of Saturn and titan.

  14. Island based radar and microwave radiometer measurements of stratus cloud parameters during the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frisch, A.S. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Fairall, C.W.; Snider, J.B. [NOAA Environmental Technology Lab., Boulder, CO (United States); Lenshow, D.H.; Mayer, S.D. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1996-04-01

    During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) in June 1992, simultaneous measurements were made with a vertically pointing cloud sensing radar and a microwave radiometer. The radar measurements are used to estimate stratus cloud drizzle and turbulence parameters. In addition, with the microwave radiometer measurements of reflectivity, we estimated the profiles of cloud liquid water and effective radius. We used radar data for computation of vertical profiles of various drizzle parameters such as droplet concentration, modal radius, and spread. A sample of these results is shown in Figure 1. In addition, in non-drizzle clouds, with the radar and radiometer we can estimate the verticle profiles of stratus cloud parameters such as liquid water concentration and effective radius. This is accomplished by assuming a droplet distribution with droplet number concentration and width constant with height.

  15. Imaging radar observations of Farley Buneman waves during the JOULE II experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Hysell

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Vector electric fields and associated E×B drifts measured by a sounding rocket in the auroral zone during the NASA JOULE II experiment in January 2007, are compared with coherent scatter spectra measured by a 30 MHz radar imager in a common volume. Radar imaging permits precise collocation of the spectra with the background electric field. The Doppler shifts and spectral widths appear to be governed by the cosine and sine of the convection flow angle, respectively, and also proportional to the presumptive ion acoustic speed. The neutral wind also contributes to the Doppler shifts. These findings are consistent with those from the JOULE I experiment and also with recent numerical simulations of Farley Buneman waves and instabilities carried out by Oppenheim et al. (2008. Simple linear analysis of the waves offers some insights into the spectral moments. A formula relating the spectral width to the flow angle, ion acoustic speed, and other ionospheric parameters is derived.

  16. NASA 3D Models: Cassini

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cassini spacecraft from SPACE rendering package, built by Michael Oberle under NASA contract at JPL. Includes orbiter only, Huygens probe detached. Accurate except...

  17. Cassini Tour Atlas Automated Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazier, Kevin R.; Roumeliotis, Chris; Lange, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    During the Cassini spacecraft s cruise phase and nominal mission, the Cassini Science Planning Team developed and maintained an online database of geometric and timing information called the Cassini Tour Atlas. The Tour Atlas consisted of several hundreds of megabytes of EVENTS mission planning software outputs, tables, plots, and images used by mission scientists for observation planning. Each time the nominal mission trajectory was altered or tweaked, a new Tour Atlas had to be regenerated manually. In the early phases of Cassini s Equinox Mission planning, an a priori estimate suggested that mission tour designers would develop approximately 30 candidate tours within a short period of time. So that Cassini scientists could properly analyze the science opportunities in each candidate tour quickly and thoroughly so that the optimal series of orbits for science return could be selected, a separate Tour Atlas was required for each trajectory. The task of manually generating the number of trajectory analyses in the allotted time would have been impossible, so the entire task was automated using code written in five different programming languages. This software automates the generation of the Cassini Tour Atlas database. It performs with one UNIX command what previously took a day or two of human labor.

  18. Microcontroller-based binary integrator for millimeter-wave radar experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskelinen, Pekka; Ruoskanen, Jukka; Peltonen, Jouni

    2010-05-01

    An easily on-site reconfigurable multiple binary integrator for millimeter radar experiments has been constructed of static random access memories, an eight bit microcontroller, and high speed video operational amplifiers. The design uses a raw comparator path and two adjustable m-out-of-n chains in a wired-OR configuration. Standard high speed memories allow the use of pulse widths below 100 ns. For eight pulse repetition intervals it gives a maximum improvement of 6.6 dB for stationary low-level target echoes. The doubled configuration enhances the capability against fluctuating targets. Because of the raw comparator path, also single return pulses of relatively high amplitude are processed.

  19. Waveform Retracking and Emulation Experiment Analysis of Synthetic Aperture Radar Altimeter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHAI Zhenhe

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Based on the synthetic aperture radar(SAR convolution model, the convolution computation formula about the derivative of three parameters of time migration, rise time and amplitude are deduced. The SAR waveform retracking is completed using numerical integration and Fourier transform. Besides, the echo waveform under SAR model is generated using the simulation orbit, troposphere, ionosphere and tide model. The comparison shows that the shape of echo waveform under SAR model is the same as that of CryoSat-2 1 Hz SAR. The experiments show that the accuracy of SAR altimeter retracking is about 5 cm under the 20 Hz data(about 350 m resolution, which are improved compared with that of the traditional model.

  20. Polarisation in the auroral red line during coordinated EISCAT Svalbard Radar/optical experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Barthélémy

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The polarisation of the atomic oxygen red line in the Earth's thermosphere is observed in different configurations with respect to the magnetic field line at high latitude during several coordinated Incoherent Scatter radar/optical experiment campaigns. When pointing northward with a line-of-sight nearly perpendicular to the magnetic field, we show that, as expected, the polarisation is due to precipitated electrons with characteristic energies of a few hundreds of electron Volts. When pointing toward the zenith or southward with a line-of-sight more parallel to the magnetic field, we show that the polarisation practically disappears. This confirms experimentally the predictions deduced from the recent discovery of the red line polarisation. We show that the polarisation direction is parallel to the magnetic field line during geomagnetic activity intensification and that these results are in agreement with theoretical work.

  1. The Cassini-Huygens mission

    CERN Document Server

    The joint NASA-ESA Cassini-Huygens mission promises to return four (and possibly more) years of unparalleled scientific data from the solar system’s most exotic planet, the ringed, gas giant, Saturn. Larger than Galileo with a much greater communication bandwidth, Cassini can accomplish in a single flyby what Galileo returned in a series of passes. Cassini explores the Saturn environment in three dimensions, using gravity assists to climb out of the equatorial plane to look down on the rings from above, to image the aurora and to study polar magnetospheric processes such as field-aligned currents. Since the radiation belt particle fluxes are much more benign than those at Jupiter, Cassini can more safely explore the inner regions of the magnetosphere. The spacecraft approaches the planet closer than Galileo could, and explores the inner moons and the rings much more thoroughly than was possible at Jupiter. This book is the second volume, in a three volume set, that describes the Cassini/Huygens mission. Thi...

  2. Cassini data assessment report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-08-01

    On October 15, 1997, the Cassini spacecraft was launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) and is now on its way to the planet Saturn. The functional support provided to NASA by DOE included the Advance Launch Support Group (ALSG). If there had been a launch anomaly, the ALSG would have provided a level of radiological emergency response support adequate to transition into a Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC). Additional functional radiological emergency response support, as part of the ALSG, included the: (1) Aerial Measurement System (AMS); (2) Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC); (3) Geographic Information System (GIS); (4) Emergency Response Data System (ERDS); (5) Radiation Emergency Assistance Center and Training Site (REAC/TS); (6) Field monitoring and sampling; (7) Radioanalysis via RASCAL; (8) Source recovery; and (9) Neutron dosimetry and communications support. This functional support provided the capability to rapidly measure and assess radiological impacts from a launch anomaly. The Radiological Control Officer (RCO) on KSC established a Radiological Control Center (RADCC) as the focal point for all on-site and off-site radiological data and information flow. Scientists and radiological response personnel located at the RADCC managed the field monitoring team on the KSC/CCAS federal properties. Off-site radiological emergency response activities for all public lands surrounding the KSC/CCAS complex were coordinated through the Off-site ALSG located at the National Guard Armory in Cocoa, Florida. All of the in situ measurement data of good quality gathered during the dry run, the first launch attempt and the launch day are listed in this document. The RASCAL analysis results of the air filters and impactor planchets are listed.

  3. Time-lapse 3D ground-penetrating radar during plot-scale infiltration experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allroggen, Niklas; Jackisch, Conrad; Tronicke, Jens

    2016-04-01

    In electrical resistive soils, surface-based ground-penetrating radar (GPR) is known as the geophysical tool providing the highest spatial resolution. Thus, 2D and 3D GPR surveys are commonly used for imaging subsurface structures or estimating soil moisture content. Due to its sensitivity to soil moisture and its non-invasive character, GPR provides a large potential to monitor soil moisture variation at high temporal and spatial resolution. As shown in previous experiments, the acquisition of time-lapse GPR data under field conditions requires a high data quality in terms of repeatability as well as spatial and temporal resolution. We present hydrogeophysical field experiments at the plot scale (1m x 1m), during which we record time-lapse 3D GPR. For GPR data acquisition, we use a pulseEKKO PRO GPR system equipped with a pair of 500 MHz antennas in combination with a specially designed metal-free measuring platform. Additionally, we collect tracer and soil moisture data, which are used to improve the interpretation of the GPR data with special focus on preferential flow paths and their structured advective flow field. After an accurate time-lapse GPR data processing, we compare 3D reflection events before and after infiltration and quantitatively interpret their relative time-shift in terms of soil moisture variations. Thereby, we are able to account for basically all of the infiltrated water. The first experiments demonstrate the general applicability of our experimental approach but are limited by the number of acquired time steps and measurement during the sprinkling period (the time of the highest temporal dynamics) are not possible at all. Based on this experience we redesign our experimental setup to continuously collect GPR data during irrigation and infiltration. Thereby, we strongly increase the temporal resolution of our measurements, improve the interpretability of the GPR data, and monitor the temporal and spatial dynamics of shallow subsurface

  4. An Overview of Cassini Radio Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliore, A.; Rappaport, N.; Anabtawi, A.; Asmar, S.; Armstrong, J.; Barbinis, E.; Goltz, G.; Johnston, D.; Fleischman, D.; Rochblatt, D.; Anderson, J.; Marouf, E.; Wong, K.; Thomson, F.; Flasar, F. M.; Schinder, P.; French, R.; McGhee, C.; Mohammed, P.; Steffes, P.; Nagy, A.; Iess, L.; Tortora, P.; Ambrosini, R.; Flamini, E.

    2005-08-01

    The Cassini spacecraft, which has been in orbit about Saturn for over a year, is the first Radio Science platform to provide three downlink frequencies. In addition to the X-band telemetry link (3,56 cm w.l.), two other frequencies, S-band (13.04 cm), and Ka-band (0.94 cm) are available. This, plus the high SNR (>50 dBHz at X-band) afforded by the 4 m diameter s/c high gain antenna in combination with the excellent low noise receivers of the DSN, as well as overall system stabilities of 1 x 10-13 when referenced to the on-board ultra-stable oscillator (USO) in one-way operation, and 1 x 10-15 for a two-way link, make Cassini an unprecedented instrument of radio science. In addition to Gravitational Wave Search and Solar Conjunction experiments conducted during the cruise phase, the orbital tour phase of the mission has as its main radio science objectives: a) determination of the masses and gravity fields of Saturn's icy satellites, Titan, and Saturn through two-way tracking during fly-bys. To date, the masses of Phoebe, Iapetus, Dione and Enceladus have been measured, and will be reported here. b) Measurement of the structure and other properties of Saturn's rings through three-band occultation. Several near-diametric occultations at a high ring opening angle have been completed, and the results will be presented here. c) Measurement of the vertical structure of the atmosphere and ionosphere of Saturn. The same series of occultations have provided nearly equatorial occultations, and the results on the atmosphere structure, the ionosphere, and the abundances of microwave-absorbing gases in Saturn's atmosphere will be described here. In the remaining years of the Cassini mission, these results will be expanded to include the atmosphere, ionosphere, surface, and gravity field of Titan, the gravity field and masses of Saturn and the remaining icy satellites, and the completion of the Saturn objectives described above. The Cassini Radio Science Team wishes to express

  5. Stratiform and Convective Precipitation Observed by Multiple Radars during the DYNAMO/AMIE Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Min; Kollias, Pavlos; Feng, Zhe; Zhang, Chidong; Long, Charles N.; Kalesse, Heike; Chandra, Arunchandra; Kumar, Vickal; Protat, Alain

    2014-11-01

    The motivation for this research is to develop a precipitation classification and rain rate estimation method using cloud radar-only measurements for Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) long-term cloud observation analysis, which are crucial and unique for studying cloud lifecycle and precipitation features under different weather and climate regimes. Based on simultaneous and collocated observations of the Ka-band ARM zenith radar (KAZR), two precipitation radars (NCAR S-PolKa and Texas A&M University SMART-R), and surface precipitation during the DYNAMO/AMIE field campaign, a new cloud radar-only based precipitation classification and rain rate estimation method has been developed and evaluated. The resulting precipitation classification is equivalent to those collocated SMART-R and S-PolKa observations. Both cloud and precipitation radars detected about 5% precipitation occurrence during this period. The convective (stratiform) precipitation fraction is about 18% (82%). The 2-day collocated disdrometer observations show an increased number concentration of large raindrops in convective rain compared to dominant concentration of small raindrops in stratiform rain. The composite distributions of KAZR reflectivity and Doppler velocity also show two distinct structures for convective and stratiform rain. These indicate that the method produces physically consistent results for two types of rain. The cloud radar-only rainfall estimation is developed based on the gradient of accumulative radar reflectivity below 1 km, near-surface Ze, and collocated surface rainfall (R) measurement. The parameterization is compared with the Z-R exponential relation. The relative difference between estimated and surface measured rainfall rate shows that the two-parameter relation can improve rainfall estimation.

  6. Improving quantitative precipitation nowcasting with a local ensemble transform Kalman filter radar data assimilation system: observing system simulation experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Chien Tsai

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study develops a Doppler radar data assimilation system, which couples the local ensemble transform Kalman filter with the Weather Research and Forecasting model. The benefits of this system to quantitative precipitation nowcasting (QPN are evaluated with observing system simulation experiments on Typhoon Morakot (2009, which brought record-breaking rainfall and extensive damage to central and southern Taiwan. The results indicate that the assimilation of radial velocity and reflectivity observations improves the three-dimensional winds and rain-mixing ratio most significantly because of the direct relations in the observation operator. The patterns of spiral rainbands become more consistent between different ensemble members after radar data assimilation. The rainfall intensity and distribution during the 6-hour deterministic nowcast are also improved, especially for the first 3 hours. The nowcasts with and without radar data assimilation have similar evolution trends driven by synoptic-scale conditions. Furthermore, we carry out a series of sensitivity experiments to develop proper assimilation strategies, in which a mixed localisation method is proposed for the first time and found to give further QPN improvement in this typhoon case.

  7. Parameters of optical signals registered with the AZT-33IK telescope in active Radar-Progress space experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eselevich, Maksim; Khakhinov, Vitaliy; Klunko, Evgeniy

    2016-09-01

    Images of Progress cargo spacecraft (PCS) and areas around them were captured by the AZT-33IK optical telescope (Sayan Observatory of ISTP SB RAS) during sessions of the active Radar-Progress space experiment. We took images of exhaust and fuel jets when propulsion systems worked and after they were cut off, during fuel system purging. In different sessions of the experiment, PCS had different orientations relative to the telescope, thus allowing us to find some parameters of the observed phenomena. These parameters make it possible to determine instants of engine ignitions, to estimate velocities of the jets, and, if necessary, to control the geometry of the space experiment. The paper reports common features of optical signals from jets measured in these experiments.

  8. Comparisons between high-resolution profiles of squared refractive index gradient M2 measured by the Middle and Upper Atmosphere Radar and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) during the Shigaraki UAV-Radar Experiment 2015 campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, Hubert; Kantha, Lakshmi; Hashiguchi, Hiroyuki; Lawrence, Dale; Yabuki, Masanori; Tsuda, Toshitaka; Mixa, Tyler

    2017-03-01

    New comparisons between the square of the generalized potential refractive index gradient M2, estimated from the very high-frequency (VHF) Middle and Upper Atmosphere (MU) Radar, located at Shigaraki, Japan, and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) measurements are presented. These comparisons were performed at unprecedented temporal and range resolutions (1-4 min and ˜ 20 m, respectively) in the altitude range ˜ 1.27-4.5 km from simultaneous and nearly collocated measurements made during the ShUREX (Shigaraki UAV-Radar Experiment) 2015 campaign. Seven consecutive UAV flights made during daytime on 7 June 2015 were used for this purpose. The MU Radar was operated in range imaging mode for improving the range resolution at vertical incidence (typically a few tens of meters). The proportionality of the radar echo power to M2 is reported for the first time at such high time and range resolutions for stratified conditions for which Fresnel scatter or a reflection mechanism is expected. In more complex features obtained for a range of turbulent layers generated by shear instabilities or associated with convective cloud cells, M2 estimated from UAV data does not reproduce observed radar echo power profiles. Proposed interpretations of this discrepancy are presented.

  9. Application of Radar Reflectivity Factor in Initializing Cloud-Resolving Mesoscale Model. Part Ⅱ: Numerical Simulation Experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hongya; XU Haiming; XUE Jishan; HU Zhijin; SHEN Tongli

    2008-01-01

    Microphysics elements and vertical velocity retrieved were incorporated using the nudging method into the initial data assimilation of GRAPES (Global/Regional Assimilation and Prediction System) model.Simulation experiments indicated that nudging technique was effective in forcing the model forecast gradually consistent to the observations, yielding the thermodynamically and dynamically balanced analysis field. As viewed from the simulation results, water vapor is vital to precipitation, and it is a governing factor for the amount and duration of precipitation. The initial cloud water, rain water, and vertical velocity determine the strength distribution of convection and precipitation at the beginning time of forecast; the horizontal wind field steers the motion of the mesoscale weather system embedded in and impacts the position of precipitation zone to a large extent. The simulation experiments show that the influence of the initial retrieval data on prediction weakens with the increase of forecast time, and within the first hour of forecast, the retrieval data have an important impact on the evolution of the weather system, but its influence becomes trivial after the first three hours. Changing the nudging coefficient and the integral time-spacing of numerical model will bring some influences to the results. Herein only one radar reflectivity was used, the radar observations did not cover the whole model domain, and some empirical parameters were used in the retrieval method, therefore some differences still lie between simulation and observation to a certain extent, and further studies on several aspects are expected.

  10. Improving the Planetary Ephemeris with Astrometric Observations of Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dayton L.; Fomalont, E.; Dhawan, V.; Romney, J.; Lanyi, G.; Border, J.; Folkner, B.; Jacobson, B.

    2009-05-01

    During the past three years we have carried out a series of astrometric VLBA observations of the Cassini spacecraft. At each epoch, we used phase referencing to obtain high precision relative positions between Cassini and an angularly nearby calibration source. The calibration sources were separately tied to nearby defining sources of the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) through additional phase-referenced VLBA experiments. By combining our position measurements of Cassini with a model of Cassini's orbit around Saturn (from Doppler measurements by the Deep Space Network), we are able to determine the ICRF position of Saturn at each epoch to about 0.3 mas. This is about 2 km at the average distance of Saturn. These results will improve the Saturn ephemeris, particularly in ecliptic latitude (the plane of Saturn's orbit). The error in latitude decreases dramatically as the total time span of VLBA data approaches 1/4 of Saturn's orbital period in 2011-2012. Saturn is the first outer planet whose ephemeris can be improved and more closely tied to the ICRF and the inner solar system through long-term observations of an orbiter. The planned Juno mission to Jupiter will allow this technique to be applied there also. The planetary ephemeris is an essential tool for studies of solar system dynamics, interplanetary spacecraft navigation, and test of general relativity. It requires continuous maintenance and improvement. This research has been carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and has relied on observations by the Very Long Baseline Array, a facility of the National Science Foundation operated by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory under a cooperative agreement with Associated Universities, Inc.

  11. High resolution observations of sporadic-E layers within the polar cap ionosphere using a new incoherent scatter radar experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Damtie

    Full Text Available High resolution observations of sporadic-E layers using a new experiment with the EISCAT (European Incoherent SCATter Svalbard radar (ESR are presented. The observations were made by means of a new type of hardware, which was connected in parallel with the standard receiver. The radar beam was aligned with the geomagnetic field. The experiment applies a new modulation principle. Two phase codes, one with 22 bits and the other with 5 bits, were transmitted at separate frequencies. Each bit was further modulated by a 5-bit Barker code. The basic bit length of both transmissions was 6 µs. Instead of storing the lagged products of the ionospheric echoes in the traditional way, samples of both the transmitted pulses and the ionospheric echoes were taken at intervals of 1 µs and stored on hard disk. The lagged products were calculated later in an off-line analysis. In the analysis a sidelobe-free Barker decoding technique was used. The experiment produces range ambiguities, which were removed by mathematical inversion. Sporadic-E layers were observed at 105–115 km altitudes, and they are displayed with a 150-m range resolution and a 10-s time resolution. The layers show sometimes complex shapes, including triple peaked structures. The thickness of these sublayers is of the order of 1–2 km and they may be separated by 5 km in range. While drifting downwards, the sublayers merge together to form a single layer. The plasma inside a layer is found to have a longer correlation length than that of the surrounding plasma. This may be an indication of heavy ions inside the layer. The field-aligned ion velocity is also calculated. It reveals shears in the meridional wind, which suggests that shears probably also exist in the zonal wind. Hence the wind shear mechanism is a possible generation mechanism of the layer. However, observations from the coherent SuperDARN radar indicate the presence of an ionospheric electric field pointing in the sector between

  12. The relationship between the microwave radar cross section and both wind speed and stress: Model function studies using Frontal Air-Sea Interaction Experiment data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, David E.; Davidson, Kenneth L.; Brown, Robert A.; Friehe, Carl A.; Li, Fuk

    1994-01-01

    The Frontal Air-Sea Interaction Experiment (FASINEX) provided a unique data set with coincident airborne scatterometer measurements of the ocean surface radar cross section (RCS)(at Ku band) and near-surface wind and wind stress. These data have been analyzed to study new model functions which relate wind speed and surface friction velocity (square root of the kinematic wind stress) to the radar cross section and to better understand the processes in the boundary layer that have a strong influence on the radar backscatter. Studies of data from FASINEX indicate that the RCS has a different relation to the friction velocity than to the wind speed. The difference between the RCS models using these two variables depends on the polarization and the incidence angle. The radar data have been acquired from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory airborne scatterometer. These data span 10 different flight days. Stress measurements were inferred from shipboard instruments and from aircraft flying at low altitudes, closely following the scatterometer. Wide ranges of radar incidence angles and environmental conditions needed to fully develop algorithms are available from this experiment.

  13. Five years use of Pulse Doppler RADAR-utechnology in debris-flows monitoring - experience at three test sites so far

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koschuch, Richard; Brauner, Michael; Hu, Kaiheng; Hübl, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    Automatic monitoring of alpine mass movement is a major challenge in dealing with natural hazards. The presented research project shows a new approach in measurment and alarming technology for water level changes an debris flow by using a high-frequency Pulse Doppler RADAR. The detection system was implemented on 3 places (2 in Tirol/Austria within the monitoring systems of the IAN/BOKU; 1 in Dongchuan/China within the monitoring systems of the IMHE/Chinese Academy of Science) in order to prove the applicability of the RADAR in monitoring torrential activities (e.g. debris-flows, mudflows, flash floods, etc.). The main objective is to illustrate the principles and the potential of an innovative RADAR system and its versatility as an automatic detection system for fast (> 1 km/h - 300 km/h) alpine mass movements of any kind. The high frequency RADAR device was already successfully tested for snow avalanches in Sedrun/Switzerland (Lussi et al., 2012), in Ischgl/Austria (Kogelnig et al., 2012). The experience and the data of the five year showed the enormous potential of the presented RADAR technology in use as an independent warning and monitoring system in the field of natural hazard. We have been able to measure water level changes, surface velocities and several debris flows and can compare this data with the other installed systems.

  14. Cassini's Grand Finale: The Final Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, Linda; Edgington, Scott

    2016-04-01

    The Cassini-Huygens mission, a joint collaboration between NASA, ESA and the Italian Space Agency, is approaching its last year of operations after nearly 12 years in orbit around Saturn. Cassini will send back its final bits of unique data on September 15th, 2017 as it plunges into Saturn's atmosphere, vaporizing and satisfying planetary protection requirements. Before that time Cassini will continue its legacy of exploration and discovery with 12 close flybys of Titan in 2016 and 2017 that will return new science data as well as sculpt the inclinations and periods of the final orbits. Even though all of our close icy satellite flybys, including those of Enceladus, are now completed, numerous Voyager-class flybys (summer solstice approaches. In November 2016 Cassini will transition to a series of orbits with peripases just outside Saturn's F ring. These 20 orbits will include close flybys of some tiny ring moons and excellent views of the F ring and outer A ring. The 126th and final close flyby of Titan will propel Cassini across Saturn's main rings and into its final orbits. Cassini's Grand Finale, starting in April 2017, is comprised of 22 orbits at an inclination of 63 degrees. Cassini will repeatedly dive between the innermost rings and the upper atmosphere of the planet providing insights into fundamental questions unattainable during the rest of the mission. Cassini will be the first spacecraft to explore this region. These close orbits provide the highest resolution observations of both the rings and Saturn, and direct in situ sampling of the ring particles, composition, plasma, Saturn's exosphere and the innermost radiation belts. Saturn's gravitational field will be measured to unprecedented accuracy, providing information on the interior structure of the planet, winds in the outer layers of Saturn's atmosphere, and the mass distribution in the rings. Probing the magnetic field will give insight into the nature of the magnetic dynamo, telling us: why the

  15. Quantum radar

    CERN Document Server

    Lanzagorta, Marco

    2011-01-01

    This book offers a concise review of quantum radar theory. Our approach is pedagogical, making emphasis on the physics behind the operation of a hypothetical quantum radar. We concentrate our discussion on the two major models proposed to date: interferometric quantum radar and quantum illumination. In addition, this book offers some new results, including an analytical study of quantum interferometry in the X-band radar region with a variety of atmospheric conditions, a derivation of a quantum radar equation, and a discussion of quantum radar jamming.This book assumes the reader is familiar w

  16. Health physics innovations developed during Cassini for future space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickell, Rod; Rutherford, Theresa; Marmaro, George

    1999-01-01

    There has been a long history of space missions involving Space Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) devices starting with the Transit 4A Spacecraft (1961), on through the Apollo, Pioneer, Viking, Voyager, Galileo, Ulysses, Mars Pathfinder, and most recently, Cassini (1997). All of these Major Radiological Source (MRS) missions were processed at the Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral Air Station (KSC/CCAS) Launch Site in full compliance with program and regulatory requirements. The cumulative experience gained supporting these past missions has led to significant innovations which will be useful for bench-marking future MRS ground processing.

  17. Radar Chart

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Radar Chart collection is an archived product of summarized radar data. The geographic coverage is the 48 contiguous states of the United States. These hourly...

  18. Cassini State Transitions with a Fossil Figure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Isamu; Tuttle Keane, James

    2016-10-01

    The Moon has experienced large obliquity variations during Cassini state transitions which greatly impact tidal heating, and the long-term stability of polar volatiles. It has been known for centuries that the lunar rotational and tidal bulges are much larger than expected. The South Pole-Aitken basin can explain a large fraction of the excess deformation. Accounting for the contribution of this basin (and other large basins), the remaining excess deformation arises due to a fossil figure established when the Moon orbited much closer to Earth than it does today. Previous studies assume that the present, excess deformation is entirely preserved throughout Cassini state transitions. This ignores basin contributions to the excess deformation, and requires an interior with infinite rigidity. We consider Cassini state transition models that take into account basin contributions to the excess deformation, and the effect of finite rigidity on the fossil figure.

  19. Determination of radar MTF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    The ultimate goal of the Current Meter Array (CMA) is to be able to compare the current patterns detected with the array with radar images of the water surface. The internal wave current patterns modulate the waves on the water surface giving a detectable modulation of the radar cross-section (RCS). The function relating the RCS modulations to the current patterns is the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). By comparing radar images directly with co-located CMA measurements the MTF can be determined. In this talk radar images and CMA measurements from a recent experiment at Loch Linnhe, Scotland, will be used to make the first direct determination of MTF for an X and S band radar at low grazing angles. The technical problems associated with comparing radar images to CMA data will be explained and the solution method discussed. The results suggest the both current and strain rate contribute equally to the radar modulation for X band. For S band, the strain rate contributes more than the current. The magnitude of the MTF and the RCS modulations are consistent with previous estimates when the wind is blowing perpendicular to the radar look direction.

  20. Cassini Dust Measurements at Enceladus and Implications for the Origin of the E Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahn, Frank; Schmidt, Jürgen; Albers, Nicole; Hörning, Marcel; Makuch, Martin; Seiß, Martin; Kempf, Sascha; Srama, Ralf; Dikarev, Valeri; Helfert, Stefan; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg; Krivov, Alexander V.; Sremčević, Miodrag; Tuzzolino, Anthony J.; Economou, Thanasis; Grün, Eberhard

    2006-03-01

    During Cassini's close flyby of Enceladus on 14 July 2005, the High Rate Detector of the Cosmic Dust Analyzer registered micron-sized dust particles enveloping this satellite. The dust impact rate peaked about 1 minute before the closest approach of the spacecraft to the moon. This asymmetric signature is consistent with a locally enhanced dust production in the south polar region of Enceladus. Other Cassini experiments revealed evidence for geophysical activities near Enceladus' south pole: a high surface temperature and a release of water gas. Production or release of dust particles related to these processes may provide the dominant source of Saturn's E ring.

  1. A scaled down laboratory experiment of cross-borehole pulse radar signatures for detection of a terminated tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jae-Hyoung; Jung, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Se-Yun; Yook, Jong-Gwan

    2016-09-01

    In the cross-borehole pulse radar signatures measured near the front end of a terminated tunnel, the time-of-arrival (TOA) with fully penetrated tunnel is significantly shortened due to the relatively fast pulse propagation in an empty tunnel compared with the TOA obtained without a tunnel. To analyze the TOA variation with the protrusion length of the terminated tunnel from the line-of-sight between two antennas or boreholes, additional borehole pairs are required around the terminated tunnel in spite of their high construction costs. As an alternative, a laboratory scaled down experiment, which has a high ability to simulate different underground configurations, is designed for investigation into the TOA effects of tunnel termination. A round ceramic rod with a careful selection of its dielectric constant is immersed in pure water in a water tank and used to simulate the tunnel in the experiment. Coaxial fed dipole antennas with balanced wire and ferrite cores are used not only to suppress borehole-guided waves but also to generate a symmetric radiation pattern. The accuracy of the laboratory scaled down experiment is verified by the symmetricity of the measured diffraction pattern of the fully penetrated ceramic rod. Then, the TOA variation is measured for the protrusion length of the ceramic rod relative to the line-of-sight between two antennas from  +80 mm to  -80 mm with an equal step of 5 mm. Based on the scaled down experimental measurements of the TOA, it is found that a tunnel 1.2 m away from the measuring cross-borehole section closely approaches the scaled up variation curve under the same conditions of the protrusion length.

  2. Radar Fundamentals, Presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Jenn, David

    2008-01-01

    Topics include: introduction, radar functions, antennas basics, radar range equation, system parameters, electromagnetic waves, scattering mechanisms, radar cross section and stealth, and sample radar systems.

  3. The determination of Dione's gravity field after four Cassini flybys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannoni, Marco; Tortora, Paolo; Iess, Luciano; Jacobson, Robert A.; Armstrong, John W.; Asmar, Sami W.

    2015-04-01

    We present the expected accuracy in the determination of Dione's gravity field obtained through numerical simulations of all radio science flybys currently planned in the entire Cassini mission. During its tour of the Saturn system, Cassini already performed two flybys of Dione dedicated to the determination of its mass and gravity field, in October 2005 and December 2011, respectively. Two additional radio science flybys are planned in June 2015 and August 2015. The analysis of the Doppler data acquired during the closest approach of the second flyby allowed the first estimation of Dione's J2 and C22 but, given the limited amount of data, their estimation has a large correlation and cannot be considered fully reliable. Here we infer the expected final accuracy in the determination of Dione's J2 and C22 by combining the available results from the already performed experiments with numerical simulations of future flybys. The main observables considered in the analysis are two-way and three-way Doppler data obtained from the frequency shift of a highly stable microwave carrier between the spacecraft and the stations of NASA's Deep Space Network. White Gaussian noise was added to the simulated data, with a constant standard deviation for each tracking pass, obtained from an accurate noise budget of the Cassini mission. For the two flybys to be carried out in 2015, we consider a continuous coverage during +/-18 hours around the closest approach, plus one tracking pass 36 hours before and after it. The data analysis is carried out using a global, multi-arc fit, and comparing the independent solutions obtained from each flyby and different multi-arc solutions. The analysis of all four flybys is expected to provide the best, unconstrained, reliable estimation of the full quadrupole gravity field of Dione.

  4. First Results of the VLBI Experiment on Radar Location of the Asteroid 2012 DA14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechaeva, M.; Antipenko, A.; Bezrukov, D.; Bezrukovs, Vl.; Dementjev, A.; Dugin, N.; Jekabsons, N.; Khutornoy, R.; Klapers, M.; Konovalenko, A.; Kulishenko, V.; Nabatov, A.; Nesteruk, V.; Pupillo, G.; Reznichenko, A.; Salerno, E.; Shmeld, I.; Skirmante, K.; Tikhomirov, Yu.; Voytyuk, V.

    An international VLBI experiment on radio location of the asteroid 2012 DA14 was organized on 2013 February 15--16, during its flyby close to Earth. The purpose of observations was to investigate and specify orbital parameters of the asteroid, as well as to evaluate its rotation period and other characteristics. The irradiation of the asteroid was performed by the RT-70 transmitter at Evpatoria (Crimea, Ukraine), while the reflected signals were successfully accepted by the two 32 m radio telescopes at Medicina (Bologna, Italy) and Irbene (Ventspils, Latvia). Processing and interpretation of the data were performed both in the Radiophysical Research Institute and in the Ventspils International Radio Astronomy Center. The first results of this experiment are presented and discussed.

  5. Managing Cassini Safe Mode Attitude at Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burk, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft was launched on October 15, 1997 and arrived at Saturn on June 30, 2004. It has performed detailed observations and remote sensing of Saturn, its rings, and its satellites since that time. In the event safe mode interrupts normal orbital operations, Cassini has flight software fault protection algorithms to detect, isolate, and recover to a thermally safe and commandable attitude and then wait for further instructions from the ground. But the Saturn environment is complex, and safety hazards change depending on where Cassini is in its orbital trajectory around Saturn. Selecting an appropriate safe mode attitude that insures safe operation in the Saturn environment, including keeping the star tracker field of view clear of bright bodies, while maintaining a quiescent, commandable attitude, is a significant challenge. This paper discusses the Cassini safe table management strategy and the key criteria that must be considered, especially during low altitude flybys of Titan, in deciding what spacecraft attitude should be used in the event of safe mode.

  6. Radar equations for modern radar

    CERN Document Server

    Barton, David K

    2012-01-01

    Based on the classic Radar Range-Performance Analysis from 1980, this practical volume extends that work to ensure applicability of radar equations to the design and analysis of modern radars. This unique book helps you identify what information on the radar and its environment is needed to predict detection range. Moreover, it provides equations and data to improve the accuracy of range calculations. You find detailed information on propagation effects, methods of range calculation in environments that include clutter, jamming and thermal noise, as well as loss factors that reduce radar perfo

  7. A despeckle filter for the Cassini SAR images of Titan's surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratsolis, Emmanuel; Solomonidou, Anezina; Bampasidis, Georgios; Le Mouelic, Stephane; Sotin, Christophe; Coustenis, Athena; Moussas, Xenophon; Kyriakopoulos, Konstantinos

    2010-05-01

    Cassini carries a multimode Ku-band (13.78 GHz) radar instrument designed to probe the surface of Titan and that of other targets in the Saturn system in four operating modes: imaging, altimetry, scatterometry, and radiometry. The Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) mode is used at altitudes under ~4000 km, resulting in spatial resolution ranging from ~350 m to >1 km. Images are acquired either left or right of nadir using 2-7 looks. A swath 120-450 km wide is created from 5 antenna beams. SAR coverage is dependent on spacecraft range and orbital geometry. Radar backscatter variations in SAR images can be interpreted in terms of variations of surface slope, near-surface roughness, or near-surface dielectric properties. The images obtained using SAR revealed that Titan has very complex surface (Elachi et al. 2005). A filtering technique is applied to obtain the restored image. One of the major problems hampering the derivation of meaningful texture information from SAR imagery is the speckle noise. It overlays "real" structures and causes gray value variations even in homogeneous parts of the image. Our method is based on probabilistic methods and regards an image as a random element drawn from a prespecified set of possible images. The TSPR (Total Sum Preserving Regularization) filter used here is based on a membrane model Markov random field approximation with a Gaussian conditional probability density function optimized by a synchronous local iterative method. The final form of despeckling gives a sum-preserving regularization for the pixel values of the image. The TSPR method preserves the mean values of local homogeneous regions and decreases the standard deviation up to six times (Bratsolis and Sigelle, 2003). The despeckle filter can be used as intermediate stage for the extraction of meaningful regions that correspond to structural units in the scene or distinguish objects of interest (Bratsolis, 2009). References E. Bratsolis, and M. Sigelle, "Fast SAR Image

  8. Monitoring Ground Subsidence in Hong Kong via Spaceborne Radar: Experiments and Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxiao Qin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The persistent scatterers interferometry (PSI technique is gradually becoming known for its capability of providing up to millimeter accuracy of measurement on ground displacement. Nevertheless, there is still quite a good amount of doubt regarding its correctness or accuracy. In this paper, we carried out an experiment corroborating the capability of the PSI technique with the help of a traditional survey method in the urban area of Hong Kong, China. Seventy three TerraSAR-X (TSX and TanDEM-X (TDX images spanning over four years are used for the data process. There are three aims of this study. The first is to generate a displacement map of urban Hong Kong and to check for spots with possible ground movements. This information will be provided to the local surveyors so that they can check these specific locations. The second is to validate if the accuracy of the PSI technique can indeed reach the millimeter level in this real application scenario. For validating the accuracy of PSI, four corner reflectors (CR were installed at a construction site on reclaimed land in Hong Kong. They were manually moved up or down by a few to tens of millimeters, and the value derived from the PSI analysis was compared to the true value. The experiment, carried out in unideal conditions, nevertheless proved undoubtedly that millimeter accuracy can be achieved by the PSI technique. The last is to evaluate the advantages and limitations of the PSI technique. Overall, the PSI technique can be extremely useful if used in collaboration with other techniques, so that the advantages can be highlighted and the drawbacks avoided.

  9. Analysis of Cassini UVIS Image Cube Vectors of Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemansky, D. E.; Yoshii, J.; Hansen, Candice; Hendrix, Amanda R.; Liu, X.; Yung, Yuk

    2016-10-01

    Cassini UVIS image cubes of Enceladus from a spacecraft range of image cube matrix discussed here is a virtual 20 X 20 RE structure centered on the satellite body with pixel size 0.2 X 0.2 RE. The pixels are composed of FUV spectral vectors accumulated from multiple exposures by the Cassini experiments in the years 2005 - 2015. In spite of the multiple year exposure, the matrix structure is significantly non-uniform in brightness and spectral content. The features that can be presented at this time are: 1) The pixels at the center of the body show a strong solar reflection that over the 1500 – 1900 A region indicates a spectrally structureless albedo. 2) The central pixels show no discrete emissions other than a weak optically thick atomic hydrogen resonance line (HLya) at 1216 A. 3) Above the limb the solar reflection spectrum appears at irregular locations. One of these is recognized as the south polar plume. The plume solar reflection albedo shows a multiply scattered spectrum dominantly composed of hydrocarbon absorbers, primarily C2H4. 4) Above the limb, the HLya line shows spatially irregular structure with emission peaks in the north 50X brighter than the signal from body center. No discrete emissions other than HLya are observed in the < 2RE region above the limb. The neutral torus at the Enceladus orbit shows only the OI 1304 A line emission. Limits on the presence of other species, H2 in particular, will be presented.

  10. Variations of topside ionospheric scale heights over Millstone Hill during the 30-day incoherent scatter radar experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Liu

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available A 30-day incoherent scatter radar (ISR experiment was conducted at Millstone Hill (288.5° E, 42.6° N from 4 October to 4 November 2002. The altitude profiles of electron density Ne, ion and electron temperature (Ti and Te, and line-of-sight velocity during this experiment were processed to deduce the topside plasma scale height Hp, vertical scale height VSH, Chapman scale height Hm, ion velocity, and the relative altitude gradient of plasma temperature (dTp/dh/Tp, as well as the F2 layer electron density (NmF2 and height (hmF2. These data are analyzed to explore the variations of the ionosphere over Millstone Hill under geomagnetically quiet and disturbed conditions. Results show that ionospheric parameters generally follow their median behavior under geomagnetically quiet conditions, while the main feature of the scale heights, as well as other parameters, deviated significantly from their median behaviors under disturbed conditions. The enhanced variability of ionospheric scale heights during the storm-times suggests that the geomagnetic activity has a major impact on the behavior of ionospheric scale heights, as well as the shape of the topside electron density profiles. Over Millstone Hill, the diurnal behaviors of the median VSH and Hm are very similar to each other and are not so tightly correlated with that of the plasma scale height Hp or the plasma temperature. The present study confirms the sensitivity of the ionospheric scale heights over Millstone Hill to thermal structure and dynamics. The values of VSH/Hp tend to decrease as (dTp/dh/Tp becomes larger or the dynamic processes become enhanced.

  11. Use of borehole radar reflection logging to monitor steam-enhanced remediation in fractured limestone-results of numerical modelling and a field experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoire, C.; Joesten, P.K.; Lane, J.W.

    2006-01-01

    Ground penetrating radar is an efficient geophysical method for the detection and location of fractures and fracture zones in electrically resistive rocks. In this study, the use of down-hole (borehole) radar reflection logs to monitor the injection of steam in fractured rocks was tested as part of a field-scale, steam-enhanced remediation pilot study conducted at a fractured limestone quarry contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons at the former Loring Air Force Base, Limestone, Maine, USA. In support of the pilot study, borehole radar reflection logs were collected three times (before, during, and near the end of steam injection) using broadband 100 MHz electric dipole antennas. Numerical modelling was performed to predict the effect of heating on radar-frequency electromagnetic (EM) wave velocity, attenuation, and fracture reflectivity. The modelling results indicate that EM wave velocity and attenuation change substantially if heating increases the electrical conductivity of the limestone matrix. Furthermore, the net effect of heat-induced variations in fracture-fluid dielectric properties on average medium velocity is insignificant because the expected total fracture porosity is low. In contrast, changes in fracture fluid electrical conductivity can have a significant effect on EM wave attenuation and fracture reflectivity. Total replacement of water by steam in a fracture decreases fracture reflectivity of a factor of 10 and induces a change in reflected wave polarity. Based on the numerical modelling results, a reflection amplitude analysis method was developed to delineate fractures where steam has displaced water. Radar reflection logs collected during the three acquisition periods were analysed in the frequency domain to determine if steam had replaced water in the fractures (after normalizing the logs to compensate for differences in antenna performance between logging runs). Analysis of the radar reflection logs from a borehole where the temperature

  12. Cassini states for black-hole binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Correia, Alexandre C M

    2016-01-01

    Cassini states correspond to equilibria of the spin axis of a celestial body when its orbit is perturbed. They were initially described for planetary satellites, but the spin axes of black-hole binaries also present this kind of equilibria. In previous works, Cassini states were reported as spin-orbit resonances, but actually the spin of black-hole binaries is in circulation and there is no resonant motion. Here we provide a general description of the spin dynamics of black-hole binary systems based on a Hamiltonian formalism. In absence of dissipation the problem is integrable and it is easy to identify all possible trajectories for the spin for a given value of the total angular momentum. As the system collapses due to radiation reaction, the Cassini states are shifted to different positions, which modifies the dynamics around them. This is why the final spin distribution may differ from the initial one. Our method provides a simple way of predicting the distribution of the spin of black-hole binaries at th...

  13. FMWC Radar for Breath Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suhr, Lau Frejstrup; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso; Vegas Olmos, Juan José

    We report on the experimental demonstration of an FMCW radar operating in the 25.7 - 26.6 GHz range with a repetition rate of 500 sweeps per second. The radar is able to track the breathing rate of an adult human from a distance of 1 meter. The experiments have utilized a 50 second recording window...... to accurately track the breathing rate. The radar utilizes a saw tooth modulation format and a low latency receiver. A breath tracking radar is useful both in medical scenarios, diagnosing disorders such as sleep apnea, and for home use where the user can monitor its health. Breathing is a central part of every...... radar chip which, through the use of a simple modulation scheme, is able to measure the breathing rate of an adult human from a distance. A high frequency output makes sure that the radar cannot penetrate solid obstacles which is a wanted feature in private homes where people therefore cannot measure...

  14. On the design and construction of drifting-mine test targets for sonar, radar and electro-optical detection experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dol, H.S.

    2014-01-01

    The timely detection of small hazardous objects at the sea surface, such as drifting mines, is challenging for ship-mounted sensor systems, both for underwater sensor systems like sonar and above-water sensor systems like radar and electro-optics (lidar, infrared/visual cameras). This is due to the

  15. Cassini Information Management System in Distributed Operations Collaboration and Cassini Science Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Equils, Douglas J.

    2008-01-01

    Launched on October 15, 1997, the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft began its ambitious journey to the Saturnian system with a complex suite of 12 scientific instruments, and another 6 instruments aboard the European Space Agencies Huygens Probe. Over the next 6 1/2 years, Cassini would continue its relatively simplistic cruise phase operations, flying past Venus, Earth, and Jupiter. However, following Saturn Orbit Insertion (SOI), Cassini would become involved in a complex series of tasks that required detailed resource management, distributed operations collaboration, and a data base for capturing science objectives. Collectively, these needs were met through a web-based software tool designed to help with the Cassini uplink process and ultimately used to generate more robust sequences for spacecraft operations. In 2001, in conjunction with the Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) and later Venustar Software and Engineering Inc., the Cassini Information Management System (CIMS) was released which enabled the Cassini spacecraft and science planning teams to perform complex information management and team collaboration between scientists and engineers in 17 countries. Originally tailored to help manage the science planning uplink process, CIMS has been actively evolving since its inception to meet the changing and growing needs of the Cassini uplink team and effectively reduce mission risk through a series of resource management validation algorithms. These algorithms have been implemented in the web-based software tool to identify potential sequence conflicts early in the science planning process. CIMS mitigates these sequence conflicts through identification of timing incongruities, pointing inconsistencies, flight rule violations, data volume issues, and by assisting in Deep Space Network (DSN) coverage analysis. In preparation for extended mission operations, CIMS has also evolved further to assist in the planning and coordination of the dual playback redundancy of

  16. The architecture of the Cassini division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedman, M.M.; Nicholson, P.D.; Baines, K.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Sotin, C.; Clark, R.N.; Brown, R.H.; French, R.G.; Marouf, E.A.

    2010-01-01

    The Cassini Division in Saturn's rings contains a series of eight named gaps, three of which contain dense ringlets. Observations of stellar occultations by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer onboard the Cassini spacecraft have yielded 40 accurate and precise measurements of the radial position of the edges of all of these gaps and ringlets. These data reveal suggestive patterns in the shapes of many of the gap edges: the outer edges of the five gaps without ringlets are circular to within 1 km, while the inner edges of six of the gaps are eccentric, with apsidal precession rates consistent with those expected for eccentric orbits near each edge. Intriguingly, the pattern speeds of these eccentric inner gap edges, together with that of the eccentric Huygens Ringlet, form a series with a characteristic spacing of 006 day-1. The two gaps with non-eccentric inner edges lie near first-order inner Lindblad resonances (ILRs) with moons. One such edge is close to the 5:4 ILR with Prometheus, and the radial excursions of this edge do appear to have an m = 5 component aligned with that moon. The other resonantly confined edge is the outer edge of the B ring, which lies near the 2:1 Mimas ILR. Detailed investigation of the B-ring-edge data confirm the presence of an m = 2 perturbation on the B-ring edge, but also show that during the course of the Cassini Mission, this pattern has drifted backward relative to Mimas. Comparisons with earlier occultation measurements going back to Voyager suggest the possibility that the m = 2 pattern is actually librating relative to Mimas with a libration frequency L 006 day-1 (or possibly 012 day -1). In addition to the m = 2 pattern, the B-ring edge also has an m = 1 component that rotates around the planet at a rate close to the expected apsidal precession rate (?? ?? ?? B ??? 5.??06 day -1). Thus, the pattern speeds of the eccentric edges in the Cassini Division can be generated from various combinations of the pattern speeds

  17. Cassini, Jean-Dominique [known as Cassini IV] (1748-1845)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Astronomer, born at the Paris Observatory, great-grandson of the first director, grandson of the second, son of the third and himself the fourth, assuming the responsibilities of the directorship during the decline of his father, and the directorship itself in 1784. Persuaded King Louis XVI to restore the observatory, but the French Revolution occurred and Cassini, a monarchist, bitterly opposed ...

  18. Thermal Infrared Spectroscopy of Saturn and Titan from Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Donald E.; Brasunas, J. C.; Carlson, R. C.; Flasar, F. M.; Kunde, V. G.; Mamoutkine, A. A.; Nixon, A.; Pearl, J. C.; Romani, P. N.; Simon-Miller, A. A.; Bjoraker, G. L.

    2009-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft completed its nominal mission at Saturn in 2008 and began its extended mission. Cassini carries the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS); a Fourier transform spectrometer that measures the composition, thermal structure and dynamics of the atmospheres of Saturn and Titan, and also the temperatures of other moons and the rings.

  19. A Traveling Exhibit of Cassini Image Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Joseph A.; Hedman, M. M.; Tiscareno, M. S.; Ebel, D.; Mac Low, M.; Lovett, L. E.; Burns, J. K.; Schaff, N.; Bilson, E. M.

    2007-10-01

    An exhibit of Cassini's images will open at NYC's American Museum of Natural History in March 2008 and then visit the Johnson Art Museum (Cornell) throughout fall 2008, including during next year's DPS. It is under consideration by several other venues in the States and overseas. The exhibit will feature 40-50 images, ranging from letter size to large posters, taken by remote-sensing instruments aboard Cassini and Huygens. Photos will be organized into a half-dozen thematic clusters (e.g., organized by celestial target or by physical process); a panel will introduce each grouping with individual images identified briefly. The Saturn system is a perfect vehicle to educate citizens about planetary science and origins. The images’ beauty should capture the public's attention, allowing us to then engage their curiosity about the relevant science. Among the Saturn system's broad suite of objects are Enceladus and Titan, two satellites of astrobiological interest; moreover, the rings display many processes active in other astrophysical disks. Several auxiliary ideas will be implemented. In Ithaca, we will project images at night against the museum's sand-colored exterior walls. A 10-12 minute musical composition has been commissioned from Roberto Sierra to open the show. We will encourage school children to participate in a human orrery circling the museum and will seek volunteers to participate in several Saturnalia. At Cornell we will involve the university and local communities, by taping their reactions to the images’ exquisite beauty as well as to their scientific content. Cassini will be the E/PO focus of next year's DPS meeting; those materials will be employed throughout the fall at New York schools and be available to travel with the show. We intend to work with NYC partners to offer teacher credits for associated weekend courses. We will produce classroom materials, including a DVD, for teacher use.

  20. Cassini RSS occultation observations of density waves in Saturn's rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGhee, C. A.; French, R. G.; Marouf, E. A.; Rappaport, N. J.; Schinder, P. J.; Anabtawi, A.; Asmar, S.; Barbinis, E.; Fleischman, D.; Goltz, G.; Johnston, D.; Rochblatt, D.

    2005-08-01

    On May 3, 2005, the first of a series of eight nearly diametric occultations by Saturn's rings and atmosphere took place, observed by the Cassini Radio Science (RSS) team. Simultaneous high SNR measurements at the Deep Space Network (DSN) at S, X, and Ka bands (λ = 13, 3.6, and 0.9 cm) have provided a remarkably detailed look at the radial structure and particle scattering behavior of the rings. By virtue of the relatively large ring opening angle (B=-23.6o), the slant path optical depth of the rings was much lower than during the Voyager epoch (B=5.9o), making it possible to detect many density waves and other ring features in the Cassini RSS data that were lost in the noise in the Voyager RSS experiment. Ultimately, diffraction correction of the ring optical depth profiles will yield radial resolution as small as tens of meters for the highest SNR data. At Ka band, the Fresnel scale is only 1--1.5 km, and thus even without diffraction correction, the ring profiles show a stunning array of density waves. The A ring is replete with dozens of Pandora and Prometheus inner Lindblad resonance features, and the Janus 2:1 density wave in the B ring is revealed with exceptional clarity for the first time at radio wavelengths. Weaker waves are abundant as well, and multiple occultation chords sample a variety of wave phases. We estimate the surface mass density of the rings from linear density wave models of the weaker waves. For stronger waves, non-linear models are required, providing more accurate estimates of the wave dispersion relation, the ring surface mass density, and the angular momentum exchange between the rings and satellite. We thank the DSN staff for their superb support of these complex observations.

  1. Weather Radar Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — These data represent Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) and Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) weather radar stations within the US. The NEXRAD radar stations are...

  2. Cassini-Huygens results on Titan's surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Athena Coustenis; Mathieu Hirtzig

    2009-01-01

    Our understanding of Titan, Saturn's largest satellite, has recently been consid-erably enhanced, thanks to the Cassini-Huygens mission. Since the Saturn Orbit Injection in July 2004, the probe has been harvesting new insights of the Kronian system. In par-ticular, this mission orchestrated a climax on January 14, 2005 with the descent of the Huygens probe into Titan's thick atmosphere. The orbiter and the lander have provided us with picturesque views of extraterrestrial landscapes, new in composition but reassuringly Earth-like in shape. Thus, Saturn's largest satellite displays chains of mountains, fields of dark and damp dunes, lakes and possibly geologic activity. As on Earth, landscapes on Titan are eroded and modeled by some alien hydrology: dendritic systems, hydrocarbon lakes, and methane clouds imply periods of heavy rainfalls, even though rain was never observed directly. Titan's surface also proved to be geologically active - today or in the recent past - given the small number of impact craters listed to date, as well as a few possible cryovolcanic features. We attempt hereafter a synthesis of the most significant results of the Cassini-Huygens endeavor, with emphasis on the surface.

  3. The Architecture of the Cassini Division

    CERN Document Server

    Hedman, M M; Baines, K; Buratti, B; Sotin, C; Clark, R N; Brown, R H; French, R; Marouf, E

    2009-01-01

    The Cassini Division in Saturn's rings contains a series of eight named gaps, three of which contain dense ringlets. Observations of stellar occultations by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer onboard the Cassini spacecraft have yielded ~40 accurate and precise measurements of the radial position of the edges of all of these gaps and ringlets. These data reveal suggestive patterns in the shapes of many of the gap edges: the outer edges of the 5 gaps without ringlets are circular to within 1 km, while the inner edges of 6 of the gaps are eccentric, with apsidal precession rates consistent with those expected for eccentric orbits near each edge. Intriguingly, the pattern speeds of these eccentric inner gap edges, together with that of the eccentric Huygens ringlet,form a series with a characteristic spacing of 0.06 degrees/day. The two gaps with non-eccentric inner edges lie near first-order Inner Lindblad Resonances (ILRs) with moons. One such edge is close to the 5:4 ILR with Prometheus. The other re...

  4. Enhancing Cassini Operations & Science Planning Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castello, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    The Cassini team uses a variety of software utilities as they manage and coordinate their mission to Saturn. Most of these tools have been unchanged for many years, and although stability is a virtue for long-lived space missions, there are some less-fragile tools that could greatly benefit from modern improvements. This report shall describe three such upgrades, including their architectural differences and their overall impact. Emphasis is placed on the motivation and rationale behind architectural choices rather than the final product, so as to illuminate the lessons learned and discoveries made.These three enhancements included developing a strategy for migrating Science Planning utilities to a new execution model, rewriting the team's internal portal for ease of use and maintenance, and developing a web-based agenda application for tracking the sequence of files being transmitted to the Cassini spacecraft. Of this set, the first two have been fully completed, while the agenda application is currently in the early prototype stage.

  5. Introduction to special section: Studies of the ocean surface from the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band SAR experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Benjamin

    1998-08-01

    Nearly 20 years have now passed since Seasat briefly sampled the ocean surface with its suite of then extraordinarily advanced active microwave instruments. The tantalizing 3-month snapshots from Seasat's altimeter and scatterometer were analyzed and reanalyzed and used to justify follow-on missions that were finally implemented within the last decade, including the ERS missions, TOPEX/POSEIDON, NSCAT, and Geosat. The third active microwave instrument carried on Seasat, the synthetic aperture radar (SAR), has had more of a mixed success in its contribution to physical oceanography, despite its being flown on four satellites since 1991, the European Space Agency's ERS-I and ERS-2, the Japanese Space Agency's JERS-I, and Canada's RADARSAT. The recent special issue on oceanographic results from ERS-I and ERS-2 (special section on Advances in Oceanography and Sea Ice Research Using ERS Observations, Journal of Geophysical Research, 103(C4), 1998) has numerous papers that incorporate SAR for both ocean and polar sea ice research. The finescale twodimensional view of the ocean surface seen in SAR imagery provides unparalleled detail of the short wave field and its interactions with longer waves and currents. However, the detailed view comes at an expense. Using the imagery for oceanographic applications has required the unraveling of the data's often baffling signatures, arising not only from the complicated wave-wave and wave-current interactions but also from the varying local wind field. Once understood, these signatures provide new and unique oceanographic and atmospheric information at higher spatial resolution than is available in the other microwave instruments. One approach to untangle this challenging interaction of ocean and radar physics is to look at the ocean surface simultaneously with multiple radar frequencies and polarizations. Most commonly, this is done with aircraft and surface-based instrumentation. This suite of multiple channels provides a more

  6. High Angular Resolution Stellar Imaging with Occultations from the Cassini Spacecraft I: Observational Technique

    CERN Document Server

    Stewart, Paul N; Hedman, Matthew M; Nicholson, Philip D; Lloyd, James P

    2013-01-01

    We present novel observations utilising the Cassini spacecraft to conduct an observing campaign for stellar astronomy from a vantage point in the outer solar system. By exploiting occultation events in which Mira passed behind the Saturnian ring plane as viewed by Cassini, parametric imaging data were recovered spanning the near-infrared. From this, spatial information at extremely high angular resolution was recovered enabling a study of the stellar atmospheric extension across a spectral bandpass spanning the 1 - 5 {\\mu}m spectral region in the near-infrared. The resulting measurements of the angular diameter of Mira were found to be consistent with existing observations of its variation in size with wavelength. The present study illustrates the validity of the technique; more detailed exploration of the stellar physics obtained by this novel experiment will be the subject of forthcoming papers.

  7. A data assimilation experiment of RASTA airborne cloud radar data during HyMeX IOP16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saussereau, Gaël; Caumont, Olivier; Delanoë, Julien

    2015-04-01

    The main goal of HyMeX first special observing period (SOP1), which took place from 5 September to 5 November 2012, was to document the heavy precipitation events and flash floods that regularly affect the north-western Mediterranean coastal areas. In the two-month campaign, around twenty rainfall events were documented in France, Italy, and Spain. Among the instrumental platforms that were deployed during SOP1, the Falcon 20 of the Safire unit (http://www.safire.fr/) made numerous flights in storm systems so as to document their thermodynamic, microphysical, and dynamical properties. In particular, the RASTA cloud radar (http://rali.projet.latmos.ipsl.fr/) was aboard this aircraft. This radar measures vertical profiles of reflectivity and Doppler velocity above and below the aircraft. This unique instrument thus allows us to document the microphysical properties and the speed of wind and hydrometeors in the clouds, quasi-continuously in time and at a 60-m vertical resolution. For this field campaign, a special version of the numerical weather prediction (NWP) Arome system was developed to cover the whole north-western Mediterranean basin. This version, called Arome-WMed, ran in real time during the SOP in order to, notably, schedule the airborne operations, especially in storm systems. Like the operational version, Arome-WMed delivers forecasts at a horizontal resolution of 2.5 km with a one-moment microphysical scheme that predicts the evolution of six water species: water vapour, cloud liquid water, rainwater, pristine ice, snow, and graupel. Its three-dimensional variational (3DVar) data assimilation (DA) system ingests every three hours (at 00 UTC, 03 UTC, etc.) numerous observations (radiosoundings, ground automatic weather stations, radar, satellite, GPS, etc.). In order to provide improved initial conditions to Arome-WMed, especially for heavy precipitation events, RASTA data were assimilated in Arome-WMed 3DVar DA system for IOP16 (26 October 2012), to

  8. Exploration of the Saturn System by the Cassini Mission: Observations with the Cassini Infrared Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Mian M.

    2014-01-01

    The Cassini mission is a joint NASA-ESA international mission, launched on October 17, 1997 with 12 instruments on board, for exploration of the Saturn system. A composite Infrared Spectrometers is one of the major instruments. Successful insertion of the spacecraft in Saturn's orbit for an extended orbital tour occurred on July 1, 2004. The French Huygens-Probe on board, with six instruments was programmed for a soft landing on Titan's surface occurred in January 2005. The broad range scientific objectives of the mission are: Exploration of the Saturn system for investigations of the origin, formation, & evolution of the solar system, with an extensive range of measurements and the analysis of the data for scientific interpretations. The focus of research dealing with the Cassini mission at NASA/MSFC in collaboration with the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, JPL, as well as the research teams at Oxford/UK and Meudon Observatory/France, involves the Infrared observations of Saturn and its satellites, for measurements of the thermal structure and global distributions of the atmospheric constituents. A brief description of the Cassini spacecraft, the instruments, the objectives, in particular with the infrared observations of the Saturn system will be given. The analytical techniques for infrared radiative transfer and spectral inversion programs, with some selected results for gas constituent distributions will be presented.

  9. Cassini SAR, radiometry, scatterometry and altimetry observations of Titan's dune fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Gall A.; Janssen, M.A.; Wye, L.C.; Hayes, A.G.; Radebaugh, J.; Savage, C.; Zebker, H.; Lorenz, R.D.; Lunine, J.I.; Kirk, R.L.; Lopes, R.M.C.; Wall, S.; Callahan, P.; Stofan, E.R.; Farr, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Large expanses of linear dunes cover Titan's equatorial regions. As the Cassini mission continues, more dune fields are becoming unveiled and examined by the microwave radar in all its modes of operation (SAR, radiometry, scatterometry, altimetry) and with an increasing variety of observational geometries. In this paper, we report on Cassini's radar instrument observations of the dune fields mapped through May 2009 and present our key findings in terms of Titan's geology and climate. We estimate that dune fields cover ???12.5% of Titan's surface, which corresponds to an area of ???10millionkm2, roughly the area of the United States. If dune sand-sized particles are mainly composed of solid organics as suggested by VIMS observations (Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) and atmospheric modeling and supported by radiometry data, dune fields are the largest known organic reservoir on Titan. Dune regions are, with the exception of the polar lakes and seas, the least reflective and most emissive features on this moon. Interestingly, we also find a latitudinal dependence in the dune field microwave properties: up to a latitude of ???11??, dune fields tend to become less emissive and brighter as one moves northward. Above ???11?? this trend is reversed. The microwave signatures of the dune regions are thought to be primarily controlled by the interdune proportion (relative to that of the dune), roughness and degree of sand cover. In agreement with radiometry and scatterometry observations, SAR images suggest that the fraction of interdunes increases northward up to a latitude of ???14??. In general, scattering from the subsurface (volume scattering and surface scattering from buried interfaces) makes interdunal regions brighter than the dunes. The observed latitudinal trend may therefore also be partially caused by a gradual thinning of the interdunal sand cover or surrounding sand sheets to the north, thus allowing wave penetration in the underlying

  10. How Mimas cleared the Cassini Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyelles, Benoit; Baillie, Kevin; Lainey, Valery; Charnoz, Sebastien

    2016-10-01

    Recent measurements of the dissipation of Saturn (Lainey et al. 2016, Icarus, in press) combined with a theoretical study by Fuller et al. (2016, MNRAS) require to revisit the energy dissipation models in planetary systems and the way it affects their satellite system. In addition, the measurements of the large librations of Mimas (Tajeddine et al. 2014, Science) could point to a global ocean underneath the surface of the satellite. These results allowed us to refine the scenarios of the opening of the Cassini Division that we initially presented at the DPS 2012. Assuming a dissipation that is consistent with these latest results, we propose scenarios of combined evolutions of Mimas and the main rings of Saturn, that explain the current size and location of the Division, the excess of density in the outer B ring, a past episode of intense heating of Mimas required to create a global ocean, and its current eccentricity. For that, we show that a past resonance with Tethys increased the eccentricity of Mimas up to 0.2, possibly triggering the melting of Mimas and an episode of inward migration, which created the Cassini Division: the 2:1 resonance between Mimas and the rings pushed the ring material inner to accumulate in the B ring. Once its eccentricity is damped, Mimas resumes its outward migration, leading to a trapping into the current vertical resonance with Tethys. These results are supported by numerical simulations, in which Mimas is driven by the tides, and the rings are simulated with the 1-D hydrodynamical code Hydrorings (Charnoz et al., 2010, Nature). This study has been partially supported by the International Space Sciences Institute in Bern, Switzerland.

  11. Titan's Isotopic Menagerie: The Cassini CIRS Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Conor A.; Achterberg, R. K.; Bezard, B.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Coustenis, A.; de Kok, R.; Flasar, F. M.; Hewagama, T.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Jennings, D. E.; Jolly, A.; Romani, P. N.; Teanby, N. A.; Vinatier, S.; CIRS Team

    2008-09-01

    Saturn's long-mysterious moon Titan is gradually yielding up its secrets under the intense scrutiny of the Cassini spacecraft, which has just completed a 4-year prime mission including 45 close flybys of the giant satellite. We here focus on the isotopic composition of the stratosphere, which since Voyager 1 in 1980 has been known to comprise a surprisingly rich mixture of hydrocarbons, nitriles and several oxygen species. These molecules are now understood to originate in the upper atmosphere by chemical processes initiated by the dissociation of the most abundant native species - methane and nitrogen - with some oxygen added from externally-supplied water. Measurements of isotopic ratios in these compounds are important and can provide valuable information on the formation and evolution of Titan's atmosphere. E.g. Chemical processes can cause isotopic fractionation via the 'kinetic isotope effect' (KIE). Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS), which is sensitive to thermal infrared radiation from 10-1500 cm-1 (7-1000 micron), is an ideal tool for measuring molecular concentrations and can distinguish between isotopologues due to the shifts in the molecular bands. CIRS has now identified at least eleven isotopologue species in our spectra, with multiple new detections in the past year (13CO2, CO18O, HC13CCCN). CIRS has measured the ratios 12C/13C in a total of seven species, D/H in two species, and 14N/15N and 16O/18O each in one species - the best measurement so far of the important ratio 16O/18O on Titan (346±110). In this presentation we will summarize all our results to date on isotopic ratios, including comparison with Huygens GCMS and other determinations, a discussion of possible isotopic separation in hydrocarbon chains, and formation/evolution implications of these measurements for Titan.

  12. Cassini Radio Occultation by Enceladus Plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliore, A.; Armstrong, J.; Flasar, F.; French, R.; Marouf, E.; Nagy, A.; Rappaport, N.; McGhee, C.; Schinder, P.; Anabtawi, A.; Asmar, S.; Barbinis, E.; Fleischman, D.; Goltz, G.; Aguilar, R.; Rochblatt, D.

    2006-12-01

    A fortuitous Cassini radio occultation by Enceladus plume occurs on September 15, 2006. The occultation track (the spacecraft trajectory in the plane of the sky as viewed from the Earth) has been designed to pass behind the plume (to pass above the south polar region of Enceladus) in a roughly symmetrical geometry centered on a minimum altitude above the surface of about 20 km. The minimum altitude was selected primarily to ensure probing much of the plume with good confidence given the uncertainty in the spacecraft trajectory. Three nearly-pure sinusoidal signals of 0.94, 3.6, and 13 cm-wavelength (Ka-, X-, and S-band, respectively) are simultaneously transmitted from Cassini and are monitored at two 34-m Earth receiving stations of the Deep Space Network (DSN) in Madrid, Spain (DSS-55 and DSS-65). The occultation of the visible plume is extremely fast, lasting less than about two minutes. The actual observation time extends over a much longer time interval, however, to provide a good reference baseline for potential detection of signal perturbations introduced by the tenuous neutral and ionized plume environment. Given the likely very small fraction of optical depth due to neutral particles of sizes larger than about 1 mm, detectable changes in signal intensity is perhaps unlikely. Detection of plume plasma along the radio path as perturbations in the signals frequency/phase is more likely and the magnitude will depend on the electron columnar density probed. The occultation time occurs not far from solar conjunction time (Sun-Earth-probe angle of about 33 degrees), causing phase scintillations due to the solar wind to be the primary limiting noise source. We estimate a delectability limit of about 1 to 3E16 electrons per square meter columnar density assuming about 100 seconds integration time. Potential measurement of the profile of electron columnar density along the occultation track is an exciting prospect at this time.

  13. Radio Telescopes Will Add to Cassini-Huygens Discoveries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-01

    When the European Space Agency's Huygens spacecraft makes its plunge into the atmosphere of Saturn's moon Titan on January 14, radio telescopes of the National Science Foundation's National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) will help international teams of scientists extract the maximum possible amount of irreplaceable information from an experiment unique in human history. Huygens is the 700-pound probe that has accompanied the larger Cassini spacecraft on a mission to thoroughly explore Saturn, its rings and its numerous moons. The Green Bank Telescope The Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF (Click on image for GBT gallery) The Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia and eight of the ten telescopes of the continent-wide Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), located at Pie Town and Los Alamos, NM, Fort Davis, TX, North Liberty, IA, Kitt Peak, AZ, Brewster, WA, Owens Valley, CA, and Mauna Kea, HI, will directly receive the faint signal from Huygens during its descent. Along with other radio telescopes in Australia, Japan, and China, the NRAO facilities will add significantly to the information about Titan and its atmosphere that will be gained from the Huygens mission. A European-led team will use the radio telescopes to make extremely precise measurements of the probe's position during its descent, while a U.S.-led team will concentrate on gathering measurements of the probe's descent speed and the direction of its motion. The radio-telescope measurements will provide data vital to gaining a full understanding of the winds that Huygens encounters in Titan's atmosphere. Currently, scientists know little about Titan's winds. Data from the Voyager I spacecraft's 1980 flyby indicated that east-west winds may reach 225 mph or more. North-south winds and possible vertical winds, while probably much weaker, may still be significant. There are competing theoretical models of Titan's winds, and the overall picture is best summarized as

  14. Limitations of Radar Coordinates

    OpenAIRE

    Bini, Donato; Lusanna, Luca; Mashhoon, Bahram

    2004-01-01

    The construction of a radar coordinate system about the world line of an observer is discussed. Radar coordinates for a hyperbolic observer as well as a uniformly rotating observer are described in detail. The utility of the notion of radar distance and the admissibility of radar coordinates are investigated. Our results provide a critical assessment of the physical significance of radar coordinates.

  15. Temporal variations of Titan's surface with Cassini/VIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomonidou, Anezina; Coustenis, A.; Hirtzig, M.; Rodriguez, S.; Stephan, K.; Lopes, R. M. C.; Drossart, P.; Sotin, C.; Le Mouélic, S.; Lawrence, K.; Bratsolis, E.; Jaumann, R.; Brown, R. H.

    2016-05-01

    We analyze Cassini VIMS data of several areas on Titan's surface looking for variations with time. Three of these locations are near the equator (10-30°S), namely Hotei Regio, Tui Regio and Sotra Patera; in some cases changes in brightness and/or in appearance were reported therein. We also investigate a portion of the undifferentiated plains, areas relatively homogeneous and dark in radar observations, located near 20-25°N. This is a follow-up on a previous paper in which we had inferred surface albedos for some distinct regions of interest (RoIs) identified within the Hotei, Tui and Sotra areas through a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and radiative transfer (RT) modeling (Solomonidou [2014]. J. Geophys. Res. 119, 1729-1747). We apply the same methods here to a larger dataset looking for variations of the surface albedo with time and using the Huygens landing site as the 'ground truth' for calibration purposes. As expected, the undifferentiated plains remain unchanged from January 2010 to June 2012. Our analysis of Hotei Regio data from March 2005 to March 2009 also does not show any significant surface albedo variations within uncertainties. We note however that our RT retrievals are not optimal in this case because of the use of a plane-parallel code and the unfavorable geometry of the associated datasets. Conversely, Tui Regio and Sotra Patera show surface albedo fluctuations with time with pronounced trends for darkening and for brightening respectively. The Tui Regio spectrum exhibits a surface albedo decrease from March 2005 to February 2009, at 0.94, 1.08, 2.03, and 5 μm wavelengths, while the spectrum shape remains the same over that time. On the contrary, the Sotra Patera area became at least two times brighter within a year (April 2005-February 2006), at 1.58 μm, 2.03 μm, and 5 μm. We also retrieved surface albedo spectra for three reference regions surrounding Hotei, Tui and Sotra and for three additional regions we use as 'test cases' that

  16. RADAR PPI Scope Overlay

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — RADAR PPI Scope Overlays are used to position a RADAR image over a station at the correct resolution. The archive maintains several different RADAR resolution types,...

  17. Advances in bistatic radar

    CERN Document Server

    Willis, Nick

    2007-01-01

    Advances in Bistatic Radar updates and extends bistatic and multistatic radar developments since publication of Willis' Bistatic Radar in 1991. New and recently declassified military applications are documented. Civil applications are detailed including commercial and scientific systems. Leading radar engineers provide expertise to each of these applications. Advances in Bistatic Radar consists of two major sections: Bistatic/Multistatic Radar Systems and Bistatic Clutter and Signal Processing. Starting with a history update, the first section documents the early and now declassified military

  18. (abstract) Cassini MLI Balnkets High-Temperature Exposure Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Edward I.; Stultz, James W.

    1995-01-01

    The trajectory required for the Cassini spacecraft to reach Saturn will subject the spacecraft to a 0.61 AU temperature environment at perihelion. Temperatures on some sunlit blanket surfaces at 0.61 AU can reach levels that are beyond the service capability of the conventional Mylar/Dacron net MLI. The majority of the blanket surfaces, however, will experience temperatures with an upper bound of 250(deg) C. The maximum allowable temperature for Mylar/Dacron net is determined to be 220(deg)C. Kapton can withstand temperatures in excess of 400(deg) C; however, the high cost of embossed Kapton relative to Mylar/Dacron net requires a baseline design which includes a standard layup and a high-temperature layup. The high-temperature layup is utilized at a limited number of locations, while at least 90% of the blankets are of the standard layup. The verification of both layups' capability to meet all temperature requirements has been accomplished by a comprehensive test program which addressed their high-temperature survivability, effective emittance, and optical and electrical properties. This paper focuses on the high-temperature exposure tests which helped define the hybrid standard layup, and which demonstrated the adequacy of both layups in withstanding their respective thermal environments.

  19. Radar scattering of linear dunes and mega-yardangs: Application to Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paillou, Philippe; Seignovert, Benoît; Radebaugh, Jani; Wall, Stephen

    2016-05-01

    The Ku-band (13.8 GHz - 2.2 cm) RADAR instrument onboard the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft has revealed the richness of the surface of Titan, as numerous seas, lakes, rivers, cryo-volcanic flows and vast dune fields have been discovered. Linear dunes are a major geomorphological feature present on Titan, covering up to 17% of its surface, mainly in equatorial regions. However, the resolution of the RADAR instrument is not good enough to allow a detailed study of the morphology of these features. In addition, other linear wind-related landforms, such as mega-yardangs (linear wind-abraded ridges formed in cohesive rocks), are likely to present a comparable radar signature that could be confused with the one of dunes. We conducted a comparative study of the radar radiometry of both linear dunes and mega-yardangs, based on representative terrestrial analogues: the linear dunes located in the Great Sand Sea in western Egypt and in the Namib Desert in Namibia, and the mega-yardangs observed in the Lut Desert in eastern Iran and in the Borkou Desert in northern Chad. We analysed the radar scattering of both terrestrial linear dunes and mega-yardangs, using high-resolution radar images acquired by the X-band (9.6 GHz - 3.1 cm) sensor of the TerraSAR-X satellite. Variations seen in the radar response of dunes are the result of a contrast between the dune and interdune scattering, while for mega-yardangs these variations are the result of a contrast between ridges and erosion valleys. We tested a simple surface scattering model, with parameters derived from the local topography and surface roughness estimates, to accurately reproduce the radar signal variations for both landforms. It appears that we can discriminate between two types of dunes - bare interdunes as in Egypt and sand-covered interdunes as in Namibia, and between two types of mega-yardangs - young yardangs as in Iran and older ones as in Chad. We applied our understanding of the radar scattering to the analysis of

  20. Adding "Missed" Science to Cassini's Ops Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Mou; Burton, Marcia E.; Edgington, Scott; Pitesky, Jo E.; Steadman, Kimberly B.; Ray, Trina L.; Evans, Mike

    2014-01-01

    The phenomenal success of the Cassini Mission at Saturn is largely due to flagship instruments, in a target rich environment, for a long period of time, executing almost error free complex mission operations. A smooth transition from cruise operations through the prime science mission and extended science (Equinox) mission culminating in the currently executing Solstice mission has folded in necessary procedural alterations due to improved understanding of the spacecraft, instruments, uplink and planning systems as well as additional science objectives. These have come with the maturation of the mission along with management of workforce reductions. One important set of operational changes has been initiated due to scientific findings highlighting "missed" science opportunities. This is the case for the Titan Meteorology Campaigns and Saturn Storm Watch Campaigns. These observations involve long term monitoring of the atmospheres of Titan and Saturn while the spacecraft and science teams are focused on other high priority targets of opportunity (like Enceladus). Our objective in this paper is to emphasize how a non-invasive strategy to get additional remarkable science was conceived and implemented in a mission with an already well defined operational plan. To illustrate this we will detail Titan Meteorology Campaign and Saturn Storm Watch Campaign integration and implementation strategies as well as the scientific goals and achievements of both.

  1. Saturn's Exploration Beyond Cassini-Huygens

    CERN Document Server

    Guillot, Tristan; Charnoz, Sébastien; Dougherty, Michele K; Read, Peter

    2009-01-01

    For its beautiful rings, active atmosphere and mysterious magnetic field, Saturn is a fascinating planet. It also holds some of the keys to understanding the formation of our Solar System and the evolution of giant planets in general. While the exploration by the Cassini-Huygens mission has led to great advances in our understanding of the planet and its moons, it has left us with puzzling questions: What is the bulk composition of the planet? Does it have a helium core? Is it enriched in noble gases like Jupiter? What powers and controls its gigantic storms? We have learned that we can measure an outer magnetic field that is filtered from its non-axisymmetric components, but what is Saturn's inner magnetic field? What are the rings made of and when were they formed? These questions are crucial in several ways: a detailed comparison of the compositions of Jupiter and Saturn is necessary to understand processes at work during the formation of these two planets and of the Solar System. This calls for the contin...

  2. The Cassini project: Lessons learned through operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Egan D.

    1998-01-01

    The Cassini space probe requires 180 238Pu Light-weight Radioisotopic Heater Units (LWRHU) and 216 238Pu General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) pellets. Additional LWRHU and GPHS pellets required for non-destructive (NDA) and destructive assay purposes were fabricated bringing the original pellet requirement to 224 LWRHU and 252 GPHS. Due to rejection of pellets resulting from chemical impurities in the fuel and/or failure to meet dimensional specifications a total of 320 GPHS pellets were fabricated for the mission. Initial plans called for LANL to process a total of 30 kg of oxide powder for pressing into monolithic ceramic pellets. The original 30 kg commitment was processed within the time frame allotted; an additional 8 kg were required to replace fuel lost due to failure to meet Quality Assurance specifications for impurities and dimensions. During the time frame allotted for pellet production, operations were impacted by equipment failure, unacceptable fuel impurities levels, and periods of extended down time, >30 working days during which little or no processing occurred. Throughout the production process, the reality of operations requirements varied from the theory upon which production schedules were based.

  3. Techniques for Radar Imaging Based on MUSIC Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    At first, the radar target scattering centers model and MUSIC algorithm are analyzed in this paper. How to efficiently set the parameters of the MUSIC algorithms is given by a great deal of simulated radar data in experiments. After that, according to measured data from two kinds of plane targets on fully polarized and high range resolution radar system, the author mainly investigated particular utilization of MUSIC algorithm in radar imaging. And two-dimensional radar images are generated for two targets measured in compact range. In the end, a conclusion is drew about the relation of radar target scattering properties and imaging results.

  4. Radar activities of the DFVLR Institute for Radio Frequency Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keydel, W.

    1983-01-01

    Aerospace research and the respective applications microwave tasks with respect to remote sensing, position finding and communication are discussed. The radar activities are directed at point targets, area targets and volume targets; they center around signature research for earth and ocean remote sensing, target recognition, reconnaissance and camouflage and imaging and area observation radar techniques (SAR and SLAR). The radar activities cover a frequency range from 1 GHz up to 94 GHz. The radar program is oriented to four possible application levels: ground, air, shuttle orbits and satellite orbits. Ground based studies and measurements, airborne scatterometers and imaging radars, a space shuttle radar, the MRSE, and follow on experiments are considered.

  5. Man with a Mission: Jean-Dominique Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkora, Leila

    2004-03-01

    Jean-Dominique Cassini, for whom the Cassini mission to Saturn is named, is best known for his early understanding of that planet's rings. This article is an overview of his influential career in astronomy and other scientific fields.= Born in Italy in1625 and formally educated at an early age, he was a professor of astronomy at the University of Bologna, a leading center of learning in Europe of the time. He was an early observer of Jupiter, Mars, and Venus. He is best known for constructing a giant pinhole camera in a cathedral that he used with a meridian line on the floor to track the Sun's image through the year, thus providing the Catholic Church with a reliable calendar. Cassini also used the pinhole camera observations to calculate the variation in the distance between the Sun and Earth, thus lending support to the Copernican (Sun-centered) view of the solar system. Cassini moved to Paris at the request of King Louis XIV, originally to oversee the surveying needed for a new map system of France, but ultimately he took over as the director of the Paris Observatory. Cassini's descendants ran the observatory there for the following century.

  6. Birotor dipole model for Saturn's inner magnetic field from CASSINI RPWS measurements and MAG data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galopeau, Patrick H. M.

    2016-10-01

    The radio and plasma wave science (RPWS) experiment on board the Cassini spacecraft, orbiting around Saturn since July 2004, revealed the presence of two distinct and variable rotation periods in the Saturnian kilometric radiation (SKR). These two periods were attributed to the northern and southern hemispheres respectively. The existence of a double period makes the study of the planetary magnetic field much more complicated and the building of a field model, based on the direct measurements of the MAG experiment from the magnetometers embarked on board Cassini, turns out to be uncertain. The first reason is the difficulty for defining a longitude system linked to the variable period, because the internal magnetic field measurements from MAG are not continuous. The second reason is the existence itself of two distinct periods which could imply the existence of a double rotation magnetic structure generated by Saturn's dynamo. However, the radio observations from the RPWS experiment allow a continuous and accurate follow-up of the rotation phase of the variable two periods, since the SKR emission is permanently observable and produced very close to the planetary surface. A wavelet transform analysis of the intensity of the SKR signal received at 290 kHz was performed in order to calculate the rotation phase of each Saturnian hemisphere. A dipole model was proposed for Saturn's inner magnetic field: this dipole presents the particularity to rotate around Saturn's axis at two different angular velocities; it is tilted and not centered. Then it is possible to fit the MAG data for each Cassini's revolution around the planet the periapsis of which is less than 5 Saturnian radii. This study suggests that Saturn's inner magnetic field is neither stationary nor fully axisymmetric. Such a result can be used as a boundary condition for modelling and constraining the planetary dynamo.

  7. Radar-to-Radar Interference Suppression for Distributed Radar Sensor Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Wen-Qin Wang; Huaizong Shao

    2014-01-01

    Radar sensor networks, including bi- and multi-static radars, provide several operational advantages, like reduced vulnerability, good system flexibility and an increased radar cross-section. However, radar-to-radar interference suppression is a major problem in distributed radar sensor networks. In this paper, we present a cross-matched filtering-based radar-to-radar interference suppression algorithm. This algorithm first uses an iterative filtering algorithm to suppress the radar-to-radar ...

  8. An MSK Radar Waveform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Srinivasan, Meera

    2012-01-01

    The minimum-shift-keying (MSK) radar waveform is formed by periodically extending a waveform that separately modulates the in-phase and quadrature- phase components of the carrier with offset pulse-shaped pseudo noise (PN) sequences. To generate this waveform, a pair of periodic PN sequences is each passed through a pulse-shaping filter with a half sinusoid impulse response. These shaped PN waveforms are then offset by half a chip time and are separately modulated on the in-phase and quadrature phase components of an RF carrier. This new radar waveform allows an increase in radar resolution without the need for additional spectrum. In addition, it provides self-interference suppression and configurable peak sidelobes. Compared strictly on the basis of the expressions for delay resolution, main-lobe bandwidth, effective Doppler bandwidth, and peak ambiguity sidelobe, it appears that bi-phase coded (BPC) outperforms the new MSK waveform. However, a radar waveform must meet certain constraints imposed by the transmission and reception of the modulation, as well as criteria dictated by the observation. In particular, the phase discontinuity of the BPC waveform presents a significant impediment to the achievement of finer resolutions in radar measurements a limitation that is overcome by using the continuous phase MSK waveform. The phase continuity, and the lower fractional out-of-band power of MSK, increases the allowable bandwidth compared with BPC, resulting in a factor of two increase in the range resolution of the radar. The MSK waveform also has been demonstrated to have an ambiguity sidelobe structure very similar to BPC, where the sidelobe levels can be decreased by increasing the length of the m-sequence used in its generation. This ability to set the peak sidelobe level is advantageous as it allows the system to be configured to a variety of targets, including those with a larger dynamic range. Other conventionally used waveforms that possess an even greater

  9. Cassini radio and plasma wave investigation: Data compression and scientific applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolliscroft, L. J. C.; Farrell, W. M.; Alleyne, H. St. C.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kirchner, D. L.; Kurth, W. S.; Thompson, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    The Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) experiment being built for the Cassini spacecraft will study a wide range of plasma and radio wave phenomena in the magnetosphere of Saturn and will also make valuable measurements during the cruise phase and at other encounters. A feature of data from wave receivers is the capability of producing vastly more data than the spacecraft telemetry link is capable of transmitting back to the Earth. Thus, techniques of on-board data compression and data reduction are important. The RPWS instrument has one processor dedicated to data compression tasks.

  10. Cassini radio and plasma wave investigation - Data compression and scientific applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolliscroft, L. J. C.; Farrell, W. M.; Alleyne, H. St. C.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kirchner, D. L.; Kurth, W. S.; Thompson, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    The Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) experiment being built for the Cassini spacecraft will study a wide range of plasma and radio wave phenomena in the magnetosphere of Saturn and will also make valuable measurements during the cruise phase and at other encounters. A feature of data from wave receivers is the capability of producing vastly more data than the spacecraft telemetry link is capable of transmitting back to the Earth. Thus, techniques of on-board data compression and data reduction are important. The RPWS instrument has one processor dedicated to data compression tasks.

  11. The Calm Methane Northern Seas of Titan from Cassini Radio Science Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marouf, Essam A.; French, Richard G.; Wong, Kwok; Anabtawi, Aseel; Schinder, Paul J.; Cassini Radio Science Team

    2016-10-01

    We report on results from 3 bistatic scattering observations of Titan northern seas conducted by the Cassini spacecraft in 2014 ( flybys T101, T102, and T106). The onboard Radio Science instrument transmits 3 sinusoidal signals of 0.94, 3.6, and 13 cm wavelengths. The spacecraft is continuously maneuvered to point in incidence direction so that mirror-like reflections from Titan's surface are observed at the ground stations of the NASA Deep Space Network. The corresponding ground-track in all 3 cases crossed different regions of Kraken Mare, and in the case of T101 also crossed Ligeia Mare. A nearly pure sinusoidal reflected signal was clearly detectable in the observed echoes spectra over surface regions identified in the Cassini RADAR images as potential liquid regions. Weaker quasi-specular echoes were also evident over some intermediate dry land and near sea shores. Cassini transmits right-circularly-polarized (RCP) signals and both the RCP and LCP echo components are observed. Their spectral shape, bandwidth, and total power are the observables used to infer/constrain physical surface properties. Presented results are limited to the 3.6 cm wavelength signal which has the largest SNR. The remarkably preserved sinusoidal echo spectral shape and the little detectable Doppler broadening strongly suggest surface that is smooth on scales large compared to 3.6 cm. If long wavelength gravity waves are present, they must be very subtle. The measured RCP/LCP echo power ratio provides direct measurement of the surface dielectric constant and is diagnostic of the liquid composition. The power ratio measurements eliminate possible significant ethane contribution and strongly imply predominantly liquid methane and nitrogen composition. Carefully calibrated measurements of the absolute echo power and the inferred dielectric constant constrain the presence of any capillary waves of wavelength << 3.6 cm. The latter affect wave coherence across the Fresnel region, reducing the

  12. Titan's interior from Cassini-Huygens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobie, G.; Baland, R.-M.; Lefevre, A.; Monteux, J.; Cadek, O.; Choblet, G.; Mitri, G.

    2013-09-01

    The Cassini-Huygens mission has brought many informations about Titan that can be used to infer its interior structure: the gravity field coefficients (up to degree 3, [1]), the surface shape (up to degree 6, [2]), the tidal Love number [1], the electric field [3], and the orientation of its rotation axis [4]. The measured obliquity and gravity perturbation due to tides, as well as the electric field, are lines of evidence for the presence of an internal global ocean beneath the ice surface of Titan [5,1,3]. The observed surface shape and gravity can be used to further constrain the structure of the ice shell above the internal ocean. The presence of a significant topography associated with weak gravity anomalies indicates that deflections of internal interface or lateral density variations may exist to compensate the topography. To assess the sources of compensation, we consider interior models including interface deflections and/or density variations, which reproduces simultaneously the surface gravity and long-wavelength topography data [6]. Furthermore, in order to test the long-term mechanical stability of the internal mass anomalies, we compute the relaxation rate of each internal interface in response to surface mass load. We show that the topography can be explained either by defections of the ocean/ice interface or by density variations in an upper crust [6]. For non-perfectly compensated models of the outer ice shell, the present-day structure is stable only for a conductive layer above a relatively cold ocean (for bottom viscosity > 1016 Pa.s, T Love number and the obliquity. To derive the possible density profile, the obliquity is computed from a Cassini state model for a satellite with an internal liquid layer, each layer having an ellipsoidal shape consistent with the measured surface shape and gravity field [7]. We show that, once the observed surface flattening is taken into account, the measured obliquity can be reproduced only for internal models

  13. Evaluation of ground-penetrating radar to detect free-phase hydrocarbons in fractured rocks - Results of numerical modeling and physical experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, J.W.; Buursink, M.L.; Haeni, F.P.; Versteeg, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    The suitability of common-offset ground-penetrating radar (GPR) to detect free-phase hydrocarbons in bedrock fractures was evaluated using numerical modeling and physical experiments. The results of one- and two-dimensional numerical modeling at 100 megahertz indicate that GPR reflection amplitudes are relatively insensitive to fracture apertures ranging from 1 to 4 mm. The numerical modeling and physical experiments indicate that differences in the fluids that fill fractures significantly affect the amplitude and the polarity of electromagnetic waves reflected by subhorizontal fractures. Air-filled and hydrocarbon-filled fractures generate low-amplitude reflections that are in-phase with the transmitted pulse. Water-filled fractures create reflections with greater amplitude and opposite polarity than those reflections created by air-filled or hydrocarbon-filled fractures. The results from the numerical modeling and physical experiments demonstrate it is possible to distinguish water-filled fracture reflections from air- or hydrocarbon-filled fracture reflections, nevertheless subsurface heterogeneity, antenna coupling changes, and other sources of noise will likely make it difficult to observe these changes in GPR field data. This indicates that the routine application of common-offset GPR reflection methods for detection of hydrocarbon-filled fractures will be problematic. Ideal cases will require appropriately processed, high-quality GPR data, ground-truth information, and detailed knowledge of subsurface physical properties. Conversely, the sensitivity of GPR methods to changes in subsurface physical properties as demonstrated by the numerical and experimental results suggests the potential of using GPR methods as a monitoring tool. GPR methods may be suited for monitoring pumping and tracer tests, changes in site hydrologic conditions, and remediation activities.The suitability of common-offset ground-penetrating radar (GPR) to detect free-phase hydrocarbons

  14. Cassini's Cameras Catch Delightful Dynamics Surrounding Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, J. A.; Cassini Imaging Team

    2005-05-01

    Saturn's rings and satellites delight DDA members because of the baroque variety of their extant features and the pivotal role played by resonances. I will review some of the highlights imaged by Cassini during the first nine months of its mission. Numerous density waves, mainly in the outer A ring, were identified with unprecedented accuracy from high-resolution approach images. These include waves initiated by the classically known perturbing satellites, but also by tiny (though nearby) Atlas and Pan, the latter embedded within the A ring. Wavelet analyses have eased identification of waves, allowing estimates of the ring's areal mass density and viscosity, and the perturber's mass. The latter, when combined with satellite images, indicate that low satellite densities (ρ ˜ 0.5 g-cm-3) are the norm. Pan pries open the Encke gap, producing edge waves and imposing numerous (kinematic) gravity wakes. A narrow ringlet within that gap, coincident with Pan's orbit, shows clumps and wiggles that march along relative to Pan, presumably horseshoeing particles. All aspects of the narrow Keeler gap still await explanation. Several previously unknown structures may result from collective effects or non-linear instabilities as particles are driven together. The F ring's structure is beautifully complex but can be mostly understood as resulting from Prometheus's tugs. A few isolated narrow ringlets have been found, occasionally sharing the paths of known satellites. Some parts of the rings show time variability already. We eagerly await the switch of co-orbital Janus/Epimetheus in 2006, and again in 2010, and the plunge of Prometheus into the F ring in 2010. To date, three new satellites have been discovered: two orbit between the classical moons Mimas and Enceladus, while the third is a trailing Lagrangian of Dione. Several other objects, probably temporary clumps of material, were sighted near the F ring.

  15. The Saturn System's Icy Satellites: New Results from Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes-Gautier, Rosaly M.; Buratti, Bonnie; Hendrix, A. R.

    2008-01-01

    Cassini-Huygens is a multidisciplinary, international planetary mission consisting of an orbiting spacecraft and a probe. The Huygens probe successfully landed on Titan's surface on January 14, 2005, while the orbiter has performed observations of Saturn, its rings, satellites, and magnetosphere since it entered orbit around Saturn on July 1, 2004. The Cassini mission has been prolific in its scientific discoveries about the Saturn system. In this special section, we present new mission results with a focus on the 'icy satellites,' which we define as all Saturn's moons with the exception of Titan. The results included in this section have come out of the Cassini SOST--Satellites Orbiter Science Team--a multi-instrument and multidiscipline group that works together to better understand the icy satellites and their interactions with Saturn and its rings. Other papers included in this issue present ground-based observations and interior modeling of these icy moons.

  16. Cassini detection of Enceladus' cold water-group plume ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokar, R. L.; Johnson, R. E.; Thomsen, M. F.; Wilson, R. J.; Young, D. T.; Crary, F. J.; Coates, A. J.; Jones, G. H.; Paty, C. S.

    2009-07-01

    This study reports direct detection by the Cassini plasma spectrometer of freshly-produced water-group ions (O+, OH+, H2O+, H3O+) and heavier water dimer ions (HxO2)+ very close to Enceladus where the plasma begins to emerge from the plume. The data were obtained during two close (52 and 25 km) flybys of Enceladus in 2008 and are similar to ion data in cometary comas. The ions are observed in detectors looking in the Cassini ram direction exhibiting energies consistent with the Cassini speed, indicative of a nearly stagnant plasma flow in the plume. North of Enceladus the plasma slowing commences about 4 to 6 Enceladus radii away, while south of Enceladus signatures of the plasma interaction with the plume are detected 22 Enceladus radii away.

  17. Automation of Cassini Support Imaging Uplink Command Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly-Hollins, Lisa; Breneman, Herbert H.; Brooks, Robert

    2010-01-01

    "Support imaging" is imagery requested by other Cassini science teams to aid in the interpretation of their data. The generation of the spacecraft command sequences for these images is performed by the Cassini Instrument Operations Team. The process initially established for doing this was very labor-intensive, tedious and prone to human error. Team management recognized this process as one that could easily benefit from automation. Team members were tasked to document the existing manual process, develop a plan and strategy to automate the process, implement the plan and strategy, test and validate the new automated process, and deliver the new software tools and documentation to Flight Operations for use during the Cassini extended mission. In addition to the goals of higher efficiency and lower risk in the processing of support imaging requests, an effort was made to maximize adaptability of the process to accommodate uplink procedure changes and the potential addition of new capabilities outside the scope of the initial effort.

  18. Cassini-Huygens Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer and the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, J. Hunter

    2014-05-01

    The Cassini-Huygens Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (Cassini INMS) designed and built by Hasso Niemann has revolutionized our understanding of the Saturn system and demonstrated the importance of mass spectrometry as a tool for understanding formation, evolution, and chemical processes. In this talk that honors the accomplishments of Hasso I will discuss: 1) the major discoveries of INMS at Titan, Enceladus, and the other icy moons of Saturn, 2) the new perspective this has given us on understanding the formation and evolution of the outer solar system, and 3) the implications for future studies in the outer solar system using mass spectrometry.

  19. Going Out in a Blaze of Glory: Cassini's Grand Finale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, Linda; Edgington, Scott G.; Altobelli, Nicolas

    2016-10-01

    The Cassini-Huygens mission, a joint collaboration between NASA, ESA and the Italian Space Agency, is approaching its final year of operations after more than 12 years in Saturn orbit. Cassini will send back its final bits of unique data on 15 September 2017 as it plunges into Saturn's atmosphere, vaporizing and satisfying planetary protection requirements.Since early 2016 Cassini's orbital inclination has been slowly increasing. In November Cassini will transition to a series of 20 orbits with peripases just outside Saturn's F ring that include some of the closest flybys of the tiny ring moons and excellent views of the F ring and outer A ring. Cassini's final close flyby of Titan will propel it across Saturn's main rings and into its final orbits.Cassini's Grand Finale begins in April 2017 and is comprised of 22 orbits at an inclination of 63 degrees. Cassini will repeatedly dive between the innermost ring and Saturn's upper atmosphere providing insights into fundamental questions unattainable during the rest of the mission. It will be the first spacecraft to explore this region.These close orbits provide the highest resolution observations of both the rings and Saturn, and direct in situ sampling of the ring particles' composition, plasma, Saturn's exosphere and the innermost radiation belts. Saturn's gravitational field will be measured to unprecedented accuracy, providing information on Saturn's interior structure and mass distribution in the rings. Probing the magnetic field will give insight into the nature of the magnetic dynamo and the true rotation rate of Saturn's interior. The ion and neutral mass spectrometer will sniff the exosphere and upper atmosphere and examine water-based molecules originating from the rings. The cosmic dust analyzer will sample particle composition from different parts of the main rings.New science highlights and science objectives from Cassini's final orbits will be discussed.This work was carried out in part at the Jet

  20. In Situ Cassini Spacecraft Observations of Turbulence in Saturn's Magnetosheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadid, L.; Sahraoui, F.; Retino, A.; Modolo, R.; Canu, P.; Jackman, C.; Masters, A.; Dougherty, M. K.; Gurnett, D. A.

    2013-09-01

    Throughout this work we investigate, the properties of turbulence in the Magnetosheath of Saturn. To do so, we computed Power Spectral Densities (PSD) based on Cassini interplanetary magnetic field data between 2004 and 2007. As a preliminary result, we show the absence of the Kolmogorov scale ~ f-5/3 in the inertial range whereas only the f-1 scale is present.

  1. Observational Constraints on Planet Nine: Cassini Range Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Holman, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    We significantly constrain the sky position, distance, and mass of a possible additional, distant planet in the solar system by examining its influence on the distance between Earth and the Cassini Spacecraft. Our preferred region is approximately centered on (RA, Dec) = ($40\\arcdeg$, $-15\\arcdeg$), extending approximately 20 degrees in all directions.

  2. Watch Cassini-Huygens setting off for Saturn and Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-10-01

    NASA's Cassini spacecraft, to which the Italian Space Agency ASI has made an important contribution, is crammed with instruments prepared by American and European scientists. It will spend four busy years in orbit around Saturn, and explore its famous rings and eighteen known moons. On its arrival at Saturn in 2004, the Cassini orbiter will release the European Space Agency's probe Huygens towards the largest moon, Titan.Also equipped by multinational scientific teams, Huygens will parachute through Titan's atmosphere to accomplish the most distant landing ever made, on the surface of another world. Television coverage of the launch for viewers in Europe On Monday 13 October the launch window for Cassini-Huygens opens at 4.55 a.m. Florida time (EDT). Starting at 4.00 a.m. Florida time (10.00 a.m. in most of western Europe and 9.00 a.m. in Great Britain and Ireland) ESA will provide a live TV transmission via satellite for European news organizations and other organizations wishing to receive it. Views of the launch will be accompanied by interviews with scientists and engineers of the Cassini-Huygens joint mission. A short news package will be transmitted near the end of transmission, and details will be announced on air. If the launch occurs promptly, ESA's TV operation will last until about 60 minutes after launch (i.e. about noon, European time). Technical details for TV reception Two satellites links are available, both carrying English on audio channel 1 and French on audio channel 2. Broadcasters and others with digital receivers will favour Intelsat K, while those with analogue receivers can use Eutelsat 2. Full information on transponders etc. is contained in an appendix to this press release. Paris press centre At ESA Headquarters in Paris, journalists will be able to view the TV transmission and to obtain news and background information about the Cassini-Huygens mission. The press centre will open at 10.00 a.m. on 13 October. If you wish to attend, please

  3. Adaptive radar resource management

    CERN Document Server

    Moo, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Radar Resource Management (RRM) is vital for optimizing the performance of modern phased array radars, which are the primary sensor for aircraft, ships, and land platforms. Adaptive Radar Resource Management gives an introduction to radar resource management (RRM), presenting a clear overview of different approaches and techniques, making it very suitable for radar practitioners and researchers in industry and universities. Coverage includes: RRM's role in optimizing the performance of modern phased array radars The advantages of adaptivity in implementing RRMThe role that modelling and

  4. Radar and ARPA manual

    CERN Document Server

    Bole, A G

    2013-01-01

    Radar and ARPA Manual focuses on the theoretical and practical aspects of electronic navigation. The manual first discusses basic radar principles, including principles of range and bearing measurements and picture orientation and presentation. The text then looks at the operational principles of radar systems. Function of units; aerial, receiver, and display principles; transmitter principles; and sitting of units on board ships are discussed. The book also describes target detection, Automatic Radar Plotting Aids (ARPA), and operational controls of radar systems, and then discusses radar plo

  5. Validation of GPM Ka-Radar Algorithm Using a Ground-based Ka-Radar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kenji; Kaneko, Yuki; Nakagawa, Katsuhiro; Furukawa, Kinji; Suzuki, Kenji

    2016-04-01

    GPM led by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration of US (NASA) aims to observe global precipitation. The core satellite is equipped with a microwave radiometer (GMI) and a dual-frequency radar (DPR) which is the first spaceborne Ku/Ka-band dual-wavelength radar dedicated for precipitation measurement. In the DPR algorithm, measured radar reflectivity is converted to effective radar reflectivity by estimating the rain attenuation. Here, the scattering/attenuation characteristics of Ka-band radiowaves are crucial, particularly for wet snow. A melting layer observation using a dual Ka-band radar system developed by JAXA was conducted along the slope of Mt. Zao in Yamagata Prefecture, Japan. The dual Ka-band radar system consists of two nearly identical Ka-band FM-CW radars, and the precipitation systems between two radars were observed in opposite directions. From this experiment, equivalent radar reflectivity (Ze) and specific attenuation (k) were obtained. The experiments were conducted for two winter seasons. During the data analyses, it was found that k estimate easily fluctuates because the estimate is based on double difference calculation. With much temporal and spatial averaging, k-Ze relationship was obtained for melting layers. One of the results is that the height of the peak of k seems slightly higher than that of Ze. The results are compared with in-situ precipitation particle measurements.

  6. Fractal characteristics for binary noise radar waveform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing C.

    2016-05-01

    Noise radars have many advantages over conventional radars and receive great attentions recently. The performance of a noise radar is determined by its waveforms. Investigating characteristics of noise radar waveforms has significant value for evaluating noise radar performance. In this paper, we use binomial distribution theory to analyze general characteristics of binary phase coded (BPC) noise waveforms. Focusing on aperiodic autocorrelation function, we demonstrate that the probability distributions of sidelobes for a BPC noise waveform depend on the distances of these sidelobes to the mainlobe. The closer a sidelobe to the mainlobe, the higher the probability for this sidelobe to be a maximum sidelobe. We also develop Monte Carlo framework to explore the characteristics that are difficult to investigate analytically. Through Monte Carlo experiments, we reveal the Fractal relationship between the code length and the maximum sidelobe value for BPC waveforms, and propose using fractal dimension to measure noise waveform performance.

  7. Weather Radar Impact Zones

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data represent an inventory of the national impacts of wind turbine interference with NEXRAD radar stations. This inventory was developed by the NOAA Radar...

  8. Digital LPI Radar Detector

    OpenAIRE

    Ong, Peng Ghee; Teng, Haw Kiad

    2001-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The function of a Low Probability ofIntercept (LPI) radar is to prevent its interception by an Electronic Support (ES) receiver. This objective is generally achieved through the use of a radar waveform that is mismatched to those waveforms for which an ES receiver is tuned. This allows the radar to achieve a processing gain, with respect to the ES receiver, that is equal to the time-bandwidth product ofthe radar waveform. This...

  9. Rhea and Dione Exospheric Dynamics and Magnetospheric Current Systems Revealed by Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teolis, B. D.

    2015-12-01

    Cassini's close Rhea and Dione flybys have provided the most detailed in situ field, plasma, and neutral gas measurements ever acquired at a large icy satellite, and have transformed understanding of the magnetospheric interaction of plasma absorbing bodies. This talk will review four key discoveries resulting from Cassini's observations: (1) Rhea and Dione O2 and CO2 [Teolis et al 2010; Simon et al 2011; Tokar et al 2012] exospheres with drastic seasonal variability [Teolis & Waite, submitted] (2) possible refractory lag material which suppresses surface sputtering two orders of magnitude below expectations from laboratory experiments [Teolis & Waite, submitted], (3) a heretofore unknown thermoelectric type flux tube current system, formed to mantain current balance on Rhea's surface [Teolis et al 2014], and (4) secondary Alfvenic induction currents [Simon et al 2012; Khurana et al 2012] stimulated as the diamagnetic and flux tube currents perturb the ambient plasma flow. The findings will be extrapolated to other possible solar system moon-plasma interaction enviroments including Jupiter's icy satellites.

  10. Network radar countermeasure systems integrating radar and radar countermeasures

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Qiuxi

    2016-01-01

    This is the very first book to present the network radar countermeasure system. It explains in detail the systematic concept of combining radar and radar countermeasures from the perspective of the information acquisition of target location, the optimization of the reconnaissance and detection, the integrated attack of the signals and facilities, and technological and legal developments concerning the networked system. It achieves the integration of the initiative and passivity, detection and jamming. The book explains how the system locates targets, completes target identification, tracks targets and compiles the data.

  11. Radar: Human Safety Net

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritz, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Radar is a technology that can be used to detect distant objects not visible to the human eye. A predecessor of radar, called the telemobiloscope, was first used to detect ships in the fog in 1904 off the German coast. Many scientists have worked on the development and refinement of radar (Hertz with electromagnetic waves; Popov with determining…

  12. Near-infrared spectra of liquid/solid acetylene under Titan relevant conditions and implications for Cassini/VIMS detections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S.; Cornet, T.; Chevrier, V. F.; Combe, J.-Ph.; McCord, T. B.; Roe, L. A.; Le Mouélic, S.; Le Menn, E.; Wasiak, F. C.

    2016-05-01

    Acetylene is thought to be abundant on Titan according to most photochemical models. While detected in the atmosphere, its likely presence at the surface still lacks physical evidence. It is thought that solid acetylene could be a major component of Titan's lakes shorelines and dry lakebed, detected as the 5 μm-bright deposits with the Cassini/VIMS instrument. Acetylene could also be present under its liquid form as dissolved solids in Titan's methane-ethane lakes, as emphasized by thermodynamics studies. This paper is devoted to the near-infrared spectroscopy study of acetylene under solid and liquid phases between 1 and 2.2 μm, synthesized in a Titan simulation chamber that is able to reproduce extreme temperature conditions. From experiments, we observed a ∼10% albedo increase between liquid acetylene at 193-188 K and solid acetylene at 93 K. Using the NIR spectroscopy technique we successfully calculated the reflectivity ratio of solid/liquid acetylene as 1.13. The second difference we observed between liquid and solid acetylene is a shift in the major absorption band detected at 1.54 μm, the shift of ∼0.01 μm occurring toward higher wavelength. In order to assess the detectability of acetylene on Titan using the Cassini/VIMS instrument, we adapted our spectra to the VIMS spectral resolution. The spectral band at 1.55 μm and a negative slope at 2.0 μm falls in the Cassini/VIMS atmospheric windows over several VIMS infrared spectels, thus Cassini/VIMS should be able to detect acetylene.

  13. External calibration technique of millimeter-wave cloud radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Tao; Zhao, Zeng-Liang; Yao, Zhi-Gang; Han, Zhi-Gang; Guo, Lin-Da

    2016-10-01

    The millimeter-wave cloud radar can provide a large number of fine and reliable information for the inversion of cloud macro and micro parameters. A key link of using the millimeter-wave cloud radar to detect the cloud is that the radar must be calibrated. Due to the precision components and severe environment of millimeter-wave cloud radar, subtle changes may take place in the operation process of cloud radar, unless the cloud radar is calibrated regularly. Although the calibration system inside the cloud radar can track and monitor the main working parameters and correct the detection results, it fails to consider the characteristics of the antenna and the mutual influence among different components of cloud radar. Therefore, the external calibration for cloud radar system is very important. Combined with the actual situation of cloud radar under domestic onboard platform, this paper builds a complete external calibration technique process of cloud radar based on the calm sea, providing the theoretical support for the external calibration experiments of the airborne and even satellite-borne millimeter-wave cloud radar developed by our country.

  14. Radar and wind turbines; Radar en windturbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Doorn, H.

    2010-03-15

    In the last years the developments of wind parks were hampered because of their possible effect on the radar for observation of air traffic. Work is currently being done on a new assessment model for wind turbines under the auspices of the steering group National Security for the military radar systems. Air traffic control Netherlands (LVNL) will look at the options for civil radars to join in. [Dutch] In de afgelopen jaren zijn windparkontwikkelingen onder meer belemmerd vanwege mogelijke effecten op radar voor de waarneming van luchtverkeer. Onder auspicien van de stuurgroep Nationale Veiligheid voor de militaire radarsystemen op land wordt gewerkt aan een nieuw beoordelingsmodel voor windturbines. De Luchtverkeersleiding Nederland (LVNL) zal bezien in hoeverre de civiele radars hierbij kunnen aansluiten.

  15. Understanding radar systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kingsley, Simon

    1999-01-01

    What is radar? What systems are currently in use? How do they work? This book provides engineers and scientists with answers to these critical questions, focusing on actual radar systems in use today. It is a perfect resource for those just entering the field, or as a quick refresher for experienced practitioners. The book leads readers through the specialized language and calculations that comprise the complex world of radar engineering as seen in dozens of state-of-the-art radar systems. An easy to read, wide ranging guide to the world of modern radar systems.

  16. Pulse Doppler radar

    CERN Document Server

    Alabaster, Clive

    2012-01-01

    This book is a practitioner's guide to all aspects of pulse Doppler radar. It concentrates on airborne military radar systems since they are the most used, most complex, and most interesting of the pulse Doppler radars; however, ground-based and non-military systems are also included. It covers the fundamental science, signal processing, hardware issues, systems design and case studies of typical systems. It will be a useful resource for engineers of all types (hardware, software and systems), academics, post-graduate students, scientists in radar and radar electronic warfare sectors and milit

  17. Cassini/CAPS Observations of Tail Dynamics at Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, M. F.; Tokar, R. L.; Wilson, R. J.; Jackman, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    Following up a recent study of the density and flow direction of plasmas in Saturn's premidnight tail, we apply the same methodology to examine Cassini's near- and post-midnight tail passes as well. Specifically, we focus on intervals when CAPS was able to view both inward and outward plasma flows, and we examine the spatial distribution and other properties of such flows. We compare our results with those found by McAndrews et al. [Plasma in Saturn's nightside magnetosphere and the implications for global circulation, Plan. Sp. Sci. (2009)], using a different approach to the analysis of Cassini/CAPS data. These observations provide important clues to Saturn's tail structure and dynamics.

  18. Ongoing Analysis of Jupiter's Equatorial Hotspots and Plumes from Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, D. S.; Showmwn, A. P.; Vasavada, A. R.; Simon-Miller, A. A.

    2012-01-01

    We present updated results from our ongoing analysis of Cassini observations of Jupiter's equatorial meteorology. For two months preceding the spacecraft's closest approach of the planet, the ISS instrument onboard Cassini regularly imaged the atmosphere of Jupiter. We created time-lapse movies from this period that show the complex activity and interactions of the equatorial atmosphere. During this period, hot spots exhibited significant variations in size and shape over timescales of days and weeks. Some of these changes appear to be a result of interactions with passing vortex systems in adjacent latitudes. Strong anticyclonic gyres to the southeast of the dark areas converge with flow from the west and appear to circulate into a hot spot at its southwestern corner.

  19. Multidimensional radar picture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waz, Mariusz

    2010-05-01

    In marine navigation systems, the three-dimensional (3D) visualization is often and often used. Echosonders and sonars working in hydroacustic systems can present pictures in three dimensions. Currently, vector maps also offer 3D presentation. This presentation is used in aviation and underwater navigation. In the nearest future three-dimensional presentation may be obligatory presentation in displays of navigation systems. A part of these systems work with radar and communicates with it transmitting data in a digital form. 3D presentation of radar picture require a new technology to develop. In the first step it is necessary to compile digital form of radar signal. The modern navigation radar do not present data in three-dimensional form. Progress in technology of digital signal processing make it possible to create multidimensional radar pictures. For instance, the RSC (Radar Scan Converter) - digital radar picture recording and transforming tool can be used to create new picture online. Using RSC and techniques of modern computer graphics multidimensional radar pictures can be generated. The radar pictures mentioned should be readable for ECDIS. The paper presents a method for generating multidimensional radar picture from original signal coming from radar receiver.

  20. The cosmic dust analyser onboard cassini: ten years of discoveries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srama, R.; Kempf, S.; Moragas-Klostermeyer, G.; Altobelli, N.; Auer, S.; Beckmann, U.; Bugiel, S.; Burton, M.; Economomou, T.; Fechtig, H.; Fiege, K.; Green, S. F.; Grande, M.; Havnes, O.; Hillier, J. K.; Helfert, S.; Horanyi, M.; Hsu, S.; Igenbergs, E.; Jessberger, E. K.; Johnson, T. V.; Khalisi, E.; Krüger, H.; Matt, G.; Mocker, A.; Lamy, P.; Linkert, G.; Lura, F.; Möhlmann, D.; Morfill, G. E.; Otto, K.; Postberg, F.; Roy, M.; Schmidt, J.; Schwehm, G. H.; Spahn, F.; Sterken, V.; Svestka, J.; Tschernjawski, V.; Grün, E.; Röser, H.-P.

    2011-12-01

    The interplanetary space probe Cassini/Huygens reached Saturn in July 2004 after 7 years of cruise phase. The German cosmic dust analyser (CDA) was developed under the leadership of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg under the support of the DLR e.V. This instrument measures the interplanetary, interstellar and planetary dust in our solar system since 1999 and provided unique discoveries. In 1999, CDA detected interstellar dust in the inner solar system followed by the detection of electrical charges of interplanetary dust grains during the cruise phase between Earth and Jupiter. The instrument determined the composition of interplanetary dust and the nanometre-sized dust streams originating from Jupiter's moon Io. During the approach to Saturn in 2004, similar streams of submicron grains with speeds in the order of 100 km/s were detected from Saturn's inner and outer ring system and are released to the interplanetary magnetic field. Since 2004 CDA measured more than one million dust impacts characterising the dust environment of Saturn. The instrument is one of the three experiments which discovered the active ice geysers located at the south pole of Saturn's moon Enceladus in 2005. Later, a detailed compositional analysis of the water ice grains in Saturn's E ring system led to the discovery of large reservoirs of liquid water (oceans) below the icy crust of Enceladus. Finally, the determination of the dust-magnetosphere interaction and the discovery of the extended E ring (at least twice as large as predicted) allowed the definition of a dynamical dust model of Saturn's E ring describing the observed properties. This paper summarizes the discoveries of a 10-year story of success based on reliable measurements with the most advanced dust detector flown in space until today. This paper focuses on cruise results and findings achieved at Saturn with a focus on flux and density measurements. CDA discoveries related to the detailed dust stream

  1. A Change Of Seasons On Titan Observed By Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teanby, Nicholas; Irwin, P.; Nixon, C.; de Kok, R.; Vinatier, S.; Coustenis, A.; Sefton-Nash, E.; Calcutt, S.; Flasar, M.

    2012-10-01

    Cassini's tour of the Saturn system now spans over eight years, equivalent to more than a quarter of a Titan year. This provides us with an excellent opportunity to study atmospheric seasonal behaviour. Here we use infrared spectra measured by Cassini's CIRS instrument to determine variations in temperature and composition throughout the mission - covering northern fall to northern spring - and use these quantities as tracers to probe changes in atmospheric circulation. Our results focus on the middle atmosphere (stratosphere-mesosphere at 100-500km altitude), where the majority of atmospheric super-rotation occurs and where high altitude photochemical production is linked to the lower atmosphere and surface. Our observations show significant changes in the distribution of trace chemical species with season - indicating changes in large-scale circulation patterns around the 2009 equinox. The timing and behaviour of the transition between different seasonal regimes will be discussed, in addition to implications for atmospheric general circulation models. Cassini has allowed us to study these phenomenon for the first time and is providing fresh insight into planetary atmospheric processes.

  2. Abundances of Jupiter's Trace Hydrocarbons from Voyager and Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, C. A.; Achterberg, R. K.; Romani, P. N.; Allen, M.; Zhang, X.; Teanby, N. A.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Flasar, F. M.

    2010-01-01

    The flybys of Jupiter by the Voyager spacecraft in 1979, and over two decades later by Cassini in 2000, have provided us with unique datasets from two different epochs, allowing the investigation of seasonal change in the atmosphere. In this paper we model zonal averages of thermal infrared spectra from the two instruments, Voyager 1 IRIS and Cassini CIRS, to retrieve the vertical and meridional profiles of temperature, and the abundances of the two minor hydrocarbons, acetylene (C2H2) and ethane (C2H6). The spatial variation of these gases is controlled by both chemistry and dynamics, and therefore their observed distribution gives us an insight into both processes, We find that the two gases paint quite different pictures of seasonal change. Whilst the 2-D cross-section of C2H6 abundance is slightly increased and more symmetric in 2000 (northern summer solstice) compared to 1979 (northern fall equinox), the major trend of equator to pole increase remains. For C2H2 on tile other hand, the Voyager epoch exhibits almost no latitudinal variation, whilst the Cassini era shows a marked decrease polewards in both hemispheres. At the present time, these experimental findings are in advance of interpretation, as there are no published models of 2-D Jovian seasonal chemical variation available for comparison.

  3. Cassini at Saturn Proximal Orbits - Attitude Control Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burk, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    The Cassini mission at Saturn will come to an end in the spring and summer of 2017 with a series of 22 orbits that will dip inside the rings of Saturn. These are called proximal orbits and will conclude with spacecraft disposal into the atmosphere of the ringed world on September 15, 2017. These unique orbits that cross the ring plane only a few thousand kilometers above the cloud tops of the planet present new attitude control challenges for the Cassini operations team. Crossing the ring plane so close to the inner edge of the rings means that the Cassini orientation during the crossing will be tailored to protect the sensitive electronics bus of the spacecraft. This orientation will put the sun sensors at some extra risk so this paper discusses how the team prepares for dust hazards. Periapsis is so close to the planet that spacecraft controllability with RCS thrusters needs to be evaluated because of the predicted atmospheric torque near closest approach to Saturn. Radiation during the ring plane crossings will likely trigger single event transients in some attitude control sensors. This paper discusses how the attitude control team deals with radiation hazards. The angular size and unique geometry of the rings and Saturn near periapsis means that star identification will be interrupted and this paper discusses how the safe mode attitude is selected to best deal with these large bright bodies during the proximal orbits.

  4. Neutrino Radar

    CERN Document Server

    Panigrahi, P K

    2002-01-01

    We point out that with improving our present knowledge of experimental neutrino physics it will be possible to locate nuclear powered vehicles like submarines, aircraft carriers and UFOs and detect nuclear testing. Since neutrinos cannot be shielded, it will not be possible to escape these detection. In these detectors it will also be possible to perform neutrino oscillation experiments during any nuclear testing.

  5. Monitoring by holographic radar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catapano, Ilaria; Crocco, Lorenzo; Affinito, Antonio; Gennarelli, Gianluca; Soldovieri, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    Nowadays, radar technology represents a significant opportunity to collect useful information for the monitoring and conservation of critical infrastructures. Radar systems exploit the non-invasive interaction between the matter and the electromagnetic waves at microwave frequencies. Such an interaction allows obtaining images of the region under test from which one can infer the presence of potential anomalies such as deformations, cracks, water infiltrations, etc. This information turns out to be of primary importance in practical scenarios where the probed structure is in a poor state of preservation and renovation works must be planned. In this framework, the aim of this contribution is to describe the potentialities of the holographic radar Rascan 4/4000, a holographic radar developed by Remote Sensing Laboratory of Bauman Moscow State Technical University, as a non-destructive diagnostic tool capable to provide, in real-time, high resolution subsurface images of the sounded structure [1]. This radar provides holograms of hidden anomalies from the amplitude of the interference signal arising between the backscattered signal and a reference signal. The performance of the holographic radar is appraised by means of several experiments. Preliminary tests concerning the imaging below the floor and inside wood structures are carried out in controlled conditions at the Electromagnetic Diagnostic Laboratory of IREA-CNR. After, with reference to bridge monitoring for security aim, the results of a measurement campaign performed on the Musmeci bridge are presented [2]. Acknowledgments This research has been performed in the framework of the "Active and Passive Microwaves for Security and Subsurface imaging (AMISS)" EU 7th Framework Marie Curie Actions IRSES project (PIRSES-GA-2010-269157). REFERENCES [1] S. Ivashov, V. Razevig, I. Vasilyev, A. Zhuravlev, T. Bechtel, L. Capineri, The holographic principle in subsurface radar technology, International Symposium to

  6. Phased-array radar design application of radar fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Jeffrey, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Phased-Array Radar Design is a text-reference designed for electrical engineering graduate students in colleges and universities as well as for corporate in-house training programs for radar design engineers, especially systems engineers and analysts who would like to gain hands-on, practical knowledge and skills in radar design fundamentals, advanced radar concepts, trade-offs for radar design and radar performance analysis.

  7. Passive MIMO Radar Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    from history to future”. Proc. 11th Int. Radar Symp. (IRS), 1–4. 2010. [58] Levanon, N. “ Interferometry against differential Doppler: performance...2141, 2013. [71] Richards, M. A., J. A. Scheer, and W. A. Holm. Principles of Modern Radar , volume 1. SciTech Publishing, Inc., 2010. [72] Scharf, L...PASSIVE MIMO RADAR DETECTION DISSERTATION Daniel E. Hack, Civilian AFIT-ENG-DS-13-S-07 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIR UNIVERSITY AIR FORCE INSTITUTE

  8. Cratering on Titan: A Pre-Cassini Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, R. D.

    1997-01-01

    The NASA-ESA Cassini mission, comprising a formidably instrumented orbiter and parachute-borne probe to be launched this October, promises to reveal a crater population on Titan that has been heretofore hidden by atmospheric haze. This population on the largest remaining unexplored surface in the solar system will be invaluable in comparative planetological studies, since it introduces evidence of the atmospheric effects of cratering on an icy satellite. Here, I highlight some impact features we may hope to find and could devote some modeling effort toward. Titan in a Nutshell: Radius= 2575 km. Density= 1880 kg/cubic m consistent with rock-ice composition. Surface pressure = 1.5 bar. Surface gravity = 1.35 m/square s Atmosphere -94% N2 6% CH, Surface temperature = 94K Tropopause temperature = 70K at 40 km alt. Probable liquid hydrocarbon deposits exist on or near the surface.Titan in a Nutshell: Radius= 2575 km. Density= 1880 kg/cubic m consistent with rock-ice composition. Surface pressure = 1.5 bar. Surface gravity = 1.35 m/square s; Atmosphere about 94% N2 6% CH, Surface temperature = 94K Tropopause temperature = 70K at 40 km alt. Probable liquid hydrocarbon deposits exist on or near the surface. Titan is comparable to Callisto and Ganymede for strength/gravity, Mars/Earth/Venus for atmospheric interaction, and Hyperion, Rhea, and Iapetus for impactor distribution. The leading/trailing asymmetry of crater density from heliocentric impactors is expected to be about 5-6, in the absence of resurfacing. Any Saturnocentric impactor population is likely to alter this. In particular the impact disruption of Hyperion is noted; because of the 3:4 orbital resonance with Titan, fragments from the proto-Hyperion breakup would have rapidly accreted onto Titan. Titan's resurfacing history is of course unknown. The disruption of impactors into fragments that individually create small craters is expected to occur. A crude estimate suggests a maximum separation of about 2 km

  9. Radar Signature Calculation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: The calculation, analysis, and visualization of the spatially extended radar signatures of complex objects such as ships in a sea multipath environment and...

  10. Doppler radar physiological sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Lubecke, Victor M; Droitcour, Amy D; Park, Byung-Kwon; Singh, Aditya

    2016-01-01

    Presents a comprehensive description of the theory and practical implementation of Doppler radar-based physiological monitoring. This book includes an overview of current physiological monitoring techniques and explains the fundamental technology used in remote non-contact monitoring methods. Basic radio wave propagation and radar principles are introduced along with the fundamentals of physiological motion and measurement. Specific design and implementation considerations for physiological monitoring radar systems are then discussed in detail. The authors address current research and commercial development of Doppler radar based physiological monitoring for healthcare and other applications.

  11. Cassini Radio Occultation of Saturn's Rings: a Bayesian Approach to Particle Size Distribution Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, K. K.; Marouf, E. A.

    2004-12-01

    The radio occultation technique was first used to study Saturn's rings through their effects on quasi-monochromatic radio signals transmitted from Voyager 1 during its flyby of Saturn in 1980. Almost a quarter of a century later, Cassini is planned to conduct a more extensive set of radio occultation experiments during its tour of the Saturn system. Cassini enjoys the advantage of a wide range of ring viewing geometry as well as the unique new capability of simultaneously transmitting 0.94, 3.6 and 13 cm-wavelength coherent radio signals (Ka-, X-, and S-band, respectively). Observed extinction of the direct signal and time-sequence spectra (spectrogram) of the near-forward scattered signal can be used to infer the size distribution of particles of resolved ring features (among other objectives). The inference requires solving three distinct inversion problems to recover from the measurements: i) the multiply-scattered collective diffraction lobe of a resolved ring feature, ii) the first-order scattering contribution to the collective lobe, and iii) the corresponding particle size distribution. Although various classical regularization techniques may be used for this purpose, a subjective valuation of solution smoothness usually needs to be introduced. We investigate an alternative approach based on Bayesian function learning schemes which provides a rigorous probabilistic framework to address the tradeoff between data fit residuals and prior knowledge about the character of the solution. In contrast with the regularization approach, the Bayesian approach provides estimates of confidence intervals for the most-likely solution achieved, an important advantage. The approach is particularly adaptable to some Cassini occultations of relatively unfavorable alignment between contours of constant Doppler shift in the ring plane and circular boundaries of ring features, as the approach naturally "fuses" time-sequence of spectra each containing contributions from adjacent

  12. The Cassini Solstice Mission: Streamlining Operations by Sequencing with PIEs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandermey, Nancy; Alonge, Eleanor K.; Magee, Kari; Heventhal, William

    2014-01-01

    The Cassini Solstice Mission (CSM) is the second extended mission phase of the highly successful Cassini/Huygens mission to Saturn. Conducted at a much-reduced funding level, operations for the CSM have been streamlined and simplified significantly. Integration of the science timeline, which involves allocating observation time in a balanced manner to each of the five different science disciplines (with representatives from the twelve different science instruments), has long been a labor-intensive endeavor. Lessons learned from the prime mission (2004-2008) and first extended mission (Equinox mission, 2008-2010) were utilized to design a new process involving PIEs (Pre-Integrated Events) to ensure the highest priority observations for each discipline could be accomplished despite reduced work force and overall simplification of processes. Discipline-level PIE lists were managed by the Science Planning team and graphically mapped to aid timeline deconfliction meetings prior to assigning discrete segments of time to the various disciplines. Periapse segments are generally discipline-focused, with the exception of a handful of PIEs. In addition to all PIEs being documented in a spreadsheet, allocated out-of-discipline PIEs were entered into the Cassini Information Management System (CIMS) well in advance of timeline integration. The disciplines were then free to work the rest of the timeline internally, without the need for frequent interaction, debate, and negotiation with representatives from other disciplines. As a result, the number of integration meetings has been cut back extensively, freeing up workforce. The sequence implementation process was streamlined as well, combining two previous processes (and teams) into one. The new Sequence Implementation Process (SIP) schedules 22 weeks to build each 10-week-long sequence, and only 3 sequence processes overlap. This differs significantly from prime mission during which 5-week-long sequences were built in 24 weeks

  13. E ring dust sources: Implications from Cassini's dust measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahn, Frank; Albers, Nicole; Hörning, Marcel; Kempf, Sascha; Krivov, Alexander V.; Makuch, Martin; Schmidt, Jürgen; Seiß, Martin; Miodrag Sremčević

    2006-08-01

    The Enceladus flybys of the Cassini spacecraft are changing our understanding of the origin and sustainment of Saturn's E ring. Surprisingly, beyond the widely accepted dust production caused by micrometeoroid impacts onto the atmosphereless satellites (the impactor-ejecta process), geophysical activities have been detected at the south pole of Enceladus, providing an additional, efficient dust source. The dust detector data obtained during the flyby E11 are used to identify the amount of dust produced in the impactor-ejecta process and to improve related modeling [Spahn, F., Schmidt, J., Albers, N., Hörning, M., Makuch, M., Seiß, M., Kempf, S., Srama, R., Dikarev, V.V., Helfert, S., Moragas-Klostermeyer, G., Krivov, A.V., Sremčević, M., Tuzzolino, A., Economou, T., Grün, E., 2006. Cassini dust measurements at Enceladus: implications for Saturn's E ring. Science, in press]. With this, we estimate the impact-generated dust contributions of the other E ring satellites and find significant differences in the dust ejection efficiency by two projectile families - the E ring particles (ERPs) and the interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). Together with the Enceladus south-pole source, the ERP impacts play a crucial role in the inner region, whereas the IDP impacts dominate the particle production in the outer E ring, possibly accounting for its large radial extent. Our results can be verified in future Cassini flybys of the E ring satellites. In this way poorly known parameters of the dust particle production in hypervelocity impacts can be constrained by comparison of the data and theory.

  14. Microwave absorptivity in the Saturn atmosphere from Cassini Radio Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliore, A. J.; Marouf, E. A.; Flasar, F. M.

    2011-12-01

    Since 2005, the Cassini spacecraft has collected data from numerous radio occultations by the atmosphere of Saturn. These occultations probed a wide range of latitudes, ranging from equatorial to near-polar. The radio system of Cassini transmits three coherent downlinks to Earth at S-Band (13.04 cm), X-Band (3.56 cm), and Ka-Band (0.94 cm) wavelengths. With the Deep Space Net 70 m receiving stations, The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is approximately 48 dB at X-Band, and 38 dB at S-band. At Ka-band, 34 m DSN stations are used, resulting in an SNR of about 41 dB. These SNRs are quite adequate to follow the signals through the top of the microwave-absorbing regions before the noise-floor is reached. By subtracting the refractive defocusing attenuation in the atmosphere (derived from the phase data) from the total attenuation, one obtains the attenuation due to absorption (dB0, which can then be inverted to obtain vertical profiles of absorptivity (dB km-1 ) at each of the three wavelengths. Preliminary results show the expected large effect of wavelength on the absorptivity profiles, with the shorter wavelength signals being absorbed higher in the atmosphere. These profiles can be used to estimate the vertical density profiles of known microwave absorbers, such as NH3 and PH3, examples of which are presented .This work was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, San Jose State University, and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center with support from the Cassini program.

  15. Titan's Complex Neutral Composition as Measured by Cassini INMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, J. H.; Magee, B. A.; Gell, D. A.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Cravens, T.; Vuitton, V. S.; Yelle, R. V.

    2006-12-01

    The composition of Titan's complex neutral atmosphere above 1000 km as observed by the Cassini Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer on recent flybys of Titan are presented. A rich mixture of hydrocarbons and nitriles are found with mixing ratios that vary from 10-4 to 10-7: acetylene, ethylene, ethane, benzene, toluene, cyanogen, propyne, propene, propane, and various nitriles. The calibration and mass deconvolution processes are presented in order to establish clear boundaries on the systematic errors that can occur in the mass deconvolution process. The role of ion neutral chemistry in forming these compounds will also be discussed.

  16. Lightweight Radioisotope Heater Unit (LWRHU) production for the Cassini mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinehart, G.H.

    1996-06-01

    The Lightweight Radioisotope Heater Unit (LWRHU) is a {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fueled heat source designed to provide a thermal watt of power for space missions. The LWRHU will be used to maintain the temperature of various components on the spacecraft at the required level. The heat source consists of a {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel pellet, a Pt-30Rh capsule, a pyrolytic graphite insulator, and a woven graphite aeroshell assembly. Los Alamos has fabricated 180 heater units, which will be used on the Cassini mission. This report summarizes the specifications, fabrication processes, and production data for the heat sources fabricated at Los Alamos.

  17. Flight Path Control Design for the Cassini Solstice Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Christopher G.; Ionasescu, Rodica

    2011-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft has been in orbit around Saturn for just over 7 years, with a planned 7-year extension, called the Solstice Mission, which started on September 27, 2010. The Solstice Mission includes 205 maneuvers and 70 flybys which consist of the moons Titan, Enceladus, Dione, and Rhea. This mission is designed to use all available propellant with a statistical margin averaging 0.6 m/s per encounter, and the work done to prove and ensure the viability of this margin is highlighted in this paper.

  18. Optical navigation planning process for the Cassini Solstice Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolet, Simon; Gillam, Stephen D.; Jones, Jeremy B.

    2011-01-01

    During the Cassini Equinox Mission, the Optical Navigation strategy has gradually evolved toward maintenance of an acceptable level of uncertainty on the positions of the bodies to be observed. By counteracting the runoff of the uncertainty over time, this strategy helps satisfy the spacecraft pointing requirements throughout the Solstice Mission, while considerably reducing the required imaging frequency. Requirements for planning observations were established, and the planning process itself was largely automated to facilitate re-planning if it becomes necessary. This paper summarizes the process leading to the optical navigation schedule for the seven years of the Solstice Mission.

  19. Aspects of Radar Polarimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Lüneburg, Ernst

    2002-01-01

    This contribution is a tutorial introduction to the phenomenological theory of radar polarimetry for the coherent scatter case emphasizing monostatic backscattering and forward scattering (transmission). Characteristic similarities and differences between radar polarimetry and optical polarimetry and the role of linear and antilinear operators (time-reversal) are pointed out and typical polarimetric invariants are identified.

  20. Radar illusion via metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei Xiang; Cui, Tie Jun

    2011-02-01

    An optical illusion is an image of a real target perceived by the eye that is deceptive or misleading due to a physiological illusion or a specific visual trick. The recently developed metamaterials provide efficient approaches to generate a perfect optical illusion. However, all existing research on metamaterial illusions has been limited to theory and numerical simulations. Here, we propose the concept of a radar illusion, which can make the electromagnetic (EM) image of a target gathered by radar look like a different target, and we realize a radar illusion device experimentally to change the radar image of a metallic target into a dielectric target with predesigned size and material parameters. It is well known that the radar signatures of metallic and dielectric objects are significantly different. However, when a metallic target is enclosed by the proposed illusion device, its EM scattering characteristics will be identical to that of a predesigned dielectric object under the illumination of radar waves. Such an illusion device will confuse the radar, and hence the real EM properties of the metallic target cannot be perceived. We designed and fabricated the radar illusion device using artificial metamaterials in the microwave frequency, and good illusion performances are observed in the experimental results.

  1. Java Radar Analysis Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaczek, Mariusz P.

    2005-01-01

    Java Radar Analysis Tool (JRAT) is a computer program for analyzing two-dimensional (2D) scatter plots derived from radar returns showing pieces of the disintegrating Space Shuttle Columbia. JRAT can also be applied to similar plots representing radar returns showing aviation accidents, and to scatter plots in general. The 2D scatter plots include overhead map views and side altitude views. The superposition of points in these views makes searching difficult. JRAT enables three-dimensional (3D) viewing: by use of a mouse and keyboard, the user can rotate to any desired viewing angle. The 3D view can include overlaid trajectories and search footprints to enhance situational awareness in searching for pieces. JRAT also enables playback: time-tagged radar-return data can be displayed in time order and an animated 3D model can be moved through the scene to show the locations of the Columbia (or other vehicle) at the times of the corresponding radar events. The combination of overlays and playback enables the user to correlate a radar return with a position of the vehicle to determine whether the return is valid. JRAT can optionally filter single radar returns, enabling the user to selectively hide or highlight a desired radar return.

  2. Netherlands naval APAR multifunction radar system and development experience analysis%荷兰海军APAR多功能雷达系统及其开发经验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢红胜; 宿勇

    2012-01-01

    In order to fully exploit multifunctional superiority, APAR adopts efficient control technology. Compromises on the utilization of the time and energy budget. Careful design of the waveform to employ all features the radar may extract from the received video, good understanding of these features from a physical point of view and also thorough understanding of the operational benefit of capabilities must go together. The system design, system engineering and the detailed design and testing of APAR were planned such that success of the radar can be assured.%为充分发挥多功能优势,APAR雷达采用了高效控制手段,对雷达信号收/发时间和能量进行综合管理,综合平衡二者系统资源开支.APAR雷达波形设计还综合考虑了包括作战需求、接收信号特征、技术特征和参数等在内的各种因素.APAR雷达在系统设计、系统工程、详细设计与评估测试等方面均进行了总体规划,并很好地吸收了已有的技术积累,保证了系统最终成功.

  3. Detecting and classifying low probability of intercept radar

    CERN Document Server

    Pace, Phillip E

    2003-01-01

    The drive is on to devise LPI radar systems that evade hostile detection as well as develop non-cooperative intercept devices that outsmart enemy LPI radar. Based on the author's own design experience, this comprehensive, hands-on book gives you the latest design and development techniques to innovate new LPI radar systems and discover new ways to intercept enemy LPI radar. and help you visually identify waveform parameters. Filled with more than 500 equations that provide rigorous mathematical detail, this book can be used by both entry-level and seasoned engineers. Besides thoroughly treatin

  4. Moving target detection for frequency agility radar by sparse reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Yinghui; Li, YaChao; Wu, Yaojun; Ran, Lei; Xing, Mengdao; Liu, Mengqi

    2016-09-01

    Frequency agility radar, with randomly varied carrier frequency from pulse to pulse, exhibits superior performance compared to the conventional fixed carrier frequency pulse-Doppler radar against the electromagnetic interference. A novel moving target detection (MTD) method is proposed for the estimation of the target's velocity of frequency agility radar based on pulses within a coherent processing interval by using sparse reconstruction. Hardware implementation of orthogonal matching pursuit algorithm is executed on Xilinx Virtex-7 Field Programmable Gata Array (FPGA) to perform sparse optimization. Finally, a series of experiments are performed to evaluate the performance of proposed MTD method for frequency agility radar systems.

  5. Micropower impulse radar imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, M.S.

    1995-11-01

    From designs developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in radar and imaging technologies, there exists the potential for a variety of applications in both public and private sectors. Presently tests are being conducted for the detection of buried mines and the analysis of civil structures. These new systems use a patented ultra-wide band (impulse) radar technology known as Micropower Impulse Radar (GPR) imaging systems. LLNL has also developed signal processing software capable of producing 2-D and 3-D images of objects embedded in materials such as soil, wood and concrete. My assignment while at LLNL has focused on the testing of different radar configurations and applications, as well as assisting in the creation of computer algorithms which enable the radar to scan target areas of different geometeries.

  6. Radar Emitter Signal Recognition Based on Complexity Features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张葛祥; 金炜东; 胡来招

    2004-01-01

    Intra-pulse characteristics of different radar emitter signals reflect on signal waveform by way of changing frequency, phase and amplitude. A novel approach was proposed to extract complexity features of radar emitter signals in a wide range of signal-to-noise ratio ( SNR), and radial basis probability neural network (RBPNN) was used to recognize different radar emitter signals. Complexity features, including Lempel-Ziv complexity (LZC) and correlation dimension (CD), can measure the complexity and irregularity of signals, which mirrors the intra-pulse modulation laws of radar emitter signals. In an experiment, LZC and CD features of 10 typical radar emitter signals were extracted and RBPNN was applied to identify the 10 radar emitter signals. Simulation results show that the proposed approach is effective and has good application values because average accurate recognition rate is high when SNR varies in a wide range.

  7. Principles of modern radar radar applications

    CERN Document Server

    Scheer, James A

    2013-01-01

    Principles of Modern Radar: Radar Applications is the third of the three-volume seriesof what was originally designed to be accomplished in one volume. As the final volumeof the set, it finishes the original vision of a complete yet bounded reference for radartechnology. This volume describes fifteen different system applications or class ofapplications in more detail than can be found in Volumes I or II.As different as the applications described, there is a difference in how these topicsare treated by the authors. Whereas in Volumes I and II there is strict adherence tochapter format and leve

  8. To See the Unseen: A History of Planetary Radar Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butrica, Andrew J.

    1996-01-01

    This book relates the history of planetary radar astronomy from its origins in radar to the present day and secondarily to bring to light that history as a case of 'Big Equipment but not Big Science'. Chapter One sketches the emergence of radar astronomy as an ongoing scientific activity at Jodrell Bank, where radar research revealed that meteors were part of the solar system. The chief Big Science driving early radar astronomy experiments was ionospheric research. Chapter Two links the Cold War and the Space Race to the first radar experiments attempted on planetary targets, while recounting the initial achievements of planetary radar, namely, the refinement of the astronomical unit and the rotational rate and direction of Venus. Chapter Three discusses early attempts to organize radar astronomy and the efforts at MIT's Lincoln Laboratory, in conjunction with Harvard radio astronomers, to acquire antenna time unfettered by military priorities. Here, the chief Big Science influencing the development of planetary radar astronomy was radio astronomy. Chapter Four spotlights the evolution of planetary radar astronomy at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a NASA facility, at Cornell University's Arecibo Observatory, and at Jodrell Bank. A congeries of funding from the military, the National Science Foundation, and finally NASA marked that evolution, which culminated in planetary radar astronomy finding a single Big Science patron, NASA. Chapter Five analyzes planetary radar astronomy as a science using the theoretical framework provided by philosopher of science Thomas Kuhn. Chapter Six explores the shift in planetary radar astronomy beginning in the 1970s that resulted from its financial and institutional relationship with NASA Big Science. Chapter Seven addresses the Magellan mission and its relation to the evolution of planetary radar astronomy from a ground-based to a space-based activity. Chapters Eight and Nine discuss the research carried out at ground

  9. Research at the Stanford Center for Radar Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    The research is reported in the applications of radar and radio techniques to the study of the solar system, and to space programs. Experiments reported include: bistatic-radar on Apollo missions, development of an unmanned geophysical observatory in the Antartic, Bragg scattering probes of sea states, characteristics of dense solar wind disturbances, and satellite communications for Alaska.

  10. Weather radars – the new eyes for offshore wind farms?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trombe, Pierre-Julien; Pinson, Pierre; Vincent, Claire Louise

    2014-01-01

    Offshore wind fluctuations are such that dedicated prediction and control systems are needed for optimizing the management of wind farms in real-time. In this paper, we present a pioneer experimentRadar@Sea – in which weather radars are used for monitoring the weather at the Horns Rev offshore...

  11. Io Plasma Torus Ion Composition: Voyager, Galileo, Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagenal, Fran; Nerney, Edward; Steffl, Andrew Joseph

    2016-10-01

    With JAXA's Hisaki spacecraft in orbit around Earth gathering information on the Io plasma torus and NASA's Juno mission measuring plasma conditions in the jovian magnetosphere, the time is ripe for a re-evaluation of earlier observations of the plasma torus to assess evidence for temporal variations. In particular, we are interested in exploring the ion composition of the torus and whether there is evidence of the ultimate source – the volcanic gases from Io – have deviated from SO2. We use the latest CHIANTI 8.0 atomic database to analyze UV spectra of the torus from Voyager, Galileo and Cassini as well as with the physical chemistry model of Delamere, Steffl and Bagenal (2005). We find that contrary to earlier analyses of Voyager data (e.g. Shemansky 1987; 1988) that produced a composition requiring a neutral source of O/S~4, we find an ion composition that is consistent with the Cassini UVIS data (Steffl et al. 2004) and a neutral O/S~2, consistent with SO2.

  12. Planetary turbulence: survey of Cassini data in the Saturn's magnetosheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadid, Lina; Sahraoui, Fouad; Kiyani, Khurom; Modolo, Ronan; Retino, Alessandro; Canu, Patrick; Masters, Adam; Dougherty, Michele K.; Gurnett, Donald A.

    2015-04-01

    Turbulence is one of the most important yet not fully understood topics of modern physics. Understanding turbulence is collisionless plasmas, where kinetic effects mediate interactions between fields and charged particles play, is crucial to apprehend many dynamical processes such as particle heating and acceleration. Among others, one key open issue of plasma turbulence is how the energy associated to magnetic and electric fields is converted, and eventually dissipated, into kinetic and internal energy of the plasma. The planets' magnetosheath present a high level of turbulence that involves both nonlinear stochastic processes and a rich variety of wave phenomena. In comparison with turbulence in the solar wind and in the terrestrial magnetosheath, turbulence around other planets is far less explored. Here, we expand our knowledge in plasma turbulence by exploring the properties of turbulence in the Kronian magnetosheath using the Cassini spacecraft data. These properties include the magnetic field energy spectra, the magnetic compressibility and intermittency at both MHD and kinetic scales. The analysis is based on in-situ data provided by the Fluxgate Magnetometer of the MAG instrument, which measures the magnetic field data with 32ms time resolution and the plasma data from the CAPS/IMS (Cassini Plasma Spectrometer) and the Electron Spectrometer (ELS), during 39 shock-crossings between 2004 and 2005. Similarities and differences with the solar wind were found, in particular about the nature of the turbulence and its scaling laws, as well as the dependence of those properties on the topology of the bow shock.

  13. Exploring Plasma Turbulence in the Kronian Magnetosheath Using Cassini Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadid, L.; Sahraoui, F.; Kiyani, K. H.; Modolo, R.; Retino, A.; Canu, P.; Masters, A.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2014-12-01

    The shocked solar wind plasma upstream of the bowshock forms the magnetosheath. Through this region energy, mass and momentum are transported from the solar wind into the planet's magnetosphere, playing a crucial role in the solar-planet interactions. Hence, the planets' magnetosheath present a high level of turbulence, with a rich variety of wave and stochastic phenomena. While the magnetic turbulence of the terrestrial magnetosheath has been extensively studied, not so much work has been done regarding the planets magnetosheaths. Therefore, and in order to expand our knowledge on plasma turbulence, we investigate here the main properties of the plasma turbulence in the magnetosheath of Saturn using the Cassini spacecraft data and compare it with the well-explored terrestrial solar wind turbulence. These properties include the magnetic field energy spectra, the magnetic compressibility and intermittency, at both MHD and kinetic scales. The analysis is based on in-situ data provided by the Fluxgate Magnetometer of the MAG instrument, which measures the magnetic field data with 32ms time resolution and the plasma data from the CAPS/IMS (Cassini Plasma Spectrometer) and the Electron Spectrometer (ELS), during 39 shock-crossings between 2004 and 2005. Similarities and differences were found between the different media, in particular about the nature of the turbulence and its scaling laws. These finding will be discussed along with theoretical implications on the modeling of space plasma.

  14. The shape of Saturn's Huygens ringlet viewed by Cassini ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitale, J. N.; Hahn, J. M.

    2016-11-01

    A new model for the shape of the prominent eccentric ringlet in the gap exterior to Saturn's B ring is developed based on Cassini imaging observations taken over about 8 years. Unlike previous analyses, the new model treats each edge of the ringlet separately. The Keplerian component of the model is consistent with results derived from Voyager observations, and m = 2 modes forced by the nearby Mimas 2:1 Lindblad resonance are seen. Additionally, a free m = 2 mode is seen on the outer edge of the ringlet. Significant irregular structure that cannot be described using normal-mode analysis is seen on the ringlet edges as well. Particularly on the inner edge, that structure remains coherent over multi-year intervals, moving at the local Keplerian rate. We interpret the irregular structure as the signature of embedded massive bodies. The long coherence time suggests the responsible bodies are concentrated near the edge of the ringlet. Long wake-like structures originate from two locations on the inner edge of the ringlet, revealing the locations of the two most massive embedded bodies in that region. As with the Voyager observations, the Cassini data sets showed no correlation between the width and the radius of the ringlet as would be expected for a self-gravitating configuration, except for a brief interval during late 2006, when the width-radius relation was similar to those seen in most other narrow eccentric ringlets in the Solar System.

  15. Dust occultation at Titan measured by CDA onboard Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srama, Ralf; CDA science Team

    2016-10-01

    The Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) onboard Cassini characterized successfully the dust environment at Saturn since 2004. The instrument measures the primary charge, speed, mass and composition of individual submicron and micron sized dust grains. The detection threshold scales with speed^3.5 such that the detection of fast nanograins (~100 km/s) is possible. Saturn's nanodust environment (streams) is studied many years. However, a special geometric condition of Saturn, Cassini and Titan during a Titan flyby in 2014 (DOY 65) provided a special dust occultation opportunity. Titan and its atmosphere blocked the stream of fast nanoparticles such that CDA registered a clear drop in impact rate around closest approach. An analysis of the data allows to constrain the source region of the nanograins, which is compatible with a source region in the ring plane at distances from Saturn between 4 and 8 Saturn radii. Backward and forward modeling was performed leading to dust grain sizes between 3 and 9 nm and speeds between 80 and 150 km/s. The new modeling results also show that Enceladus acts a direct source for nanodust streams leading to the observation of periodic impact rates in the outer Saturn system. Such periodicities were observed recently by CDA and showed a clear signature of the Enceladus orbital period. A second dust occultation opportunity using Titan is planned august 2016.

  16. Cassini observations of carbon-based anions in Titan's ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Ravindra; Lewis, Gethyn; Waite, J. Hunter; Kataria, Dhiren; Wellbrock, Anne; Jones, Geraint; Coates, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    Cassini observations of Titan's ionosphere revealed an atmosphere rich in positively and negatively charged ions and organic molecules. The detection of large quantities of negatively charged ions was particularly surprising and adds Titan to the growing list of locations where anion chemistry has been observed to play an important role. In this study we present updated analysis on these negatively charged ions through an enhanced understanding of the Cassini CAPS Electron Spectrometer (CAPS-ELS) instrument response. The ionisation of Titan's dominant atmospheric constituent, N2, by the HeII Solar line, results in an observable photoelectron population at 24.1eV which we use to correct for differential spacecraft charging. Correcting for further energy-angle signatures within this dataset, we use an updated fitting procedure to show how the ELS mass spectrum, previously grouped into broad mass ranges, can be resolved into specific peaks at multiples of carbon-based anion species up to over 100amu/q. These peaks are shown to be ubiquitous within Titan's upper atmosphere and reminiscent of carbon-based anions identified in dense molecular clouds beyond our Solar System. It is thus shown how the moon Titan in the Outer Solar System can be used as an analogue to study these even more remote and exotic astrophysical environments.

  17. Abundances of Jupiter's Trace Hydrocarbons From Voyager and Cassini

    CERN Document Server

    Nixon, Conor A; Romani, Paul N; Allen, Mark; Zhang, Xi; Teanby, Nicholas A; Irwin, Patrick G J; Flasar, F Michael; 10.1016/j.pss2010.05.08

    2010-01-01

    The flybys of Jupiter by the Voyager spacecraft in 1979, and over two decades later by Cassini in 2000, have provided us with unique datasets from two different epochs, allowing the investigation of seasonal change in the atmosphere. In this paper we model zonal averages of thermal infrared spectra from the two instruments, Voyager 1 IRIS and Cassini CIRS, to retrieve the vertical and meridional profiles of temperature, and the abundances of the two minor hydrocarbons, acetylene (C2H2) and ethane (C2H6). The spatial variation of these gases is controlled by both chemistry and dynamics, and therefore their observed distribution gives us an insight into both processes. We find that the two gases paint quite different pictures of seasonal change. Whilst the 2-D cross-section of C2H6 abundance is slightly increased and more symmetric in 2000 (northern summer solstice) compared to 1979 (northern fall equinox), the major trend of equator to pole increase remains. For C2H2 on the other hand, the Voyager epoch exhibi...

  18. A composite scanning method and experiment of laser radar%一种激光雷达复合式扫描方法及试验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马辰昊; 付跃刚; 宫平; 欧阳名钊; 张书瀚

    2015-01-01

    In traditional laser radar system, the imaging is influenced by repetition rate of selected solid-state laser as well as scanning bandwidth and scanning precision in the laser scanning system. In order to improve the scanning bandwidth and precision, DFB high-repetition-rate semiconductor laser which was amplified by EDFA was adopted as the laser source firstly. Secondly, a two-stage composite laser scanning method had been proposed with combination of PZT and galvanometer. PZT got on meticulous scanning in small areas, then galvanometer was used to deflect and finish coarse scanning on the PZT scanning field and receiving the field. The scanning accuracy had been raised and the scanning field of laser radar had been expanded simultaneously. At last, azimuth of composite scanning laser radar is ±99 mrad, pitch angle is ±49.5 mrad. Angular resolution can measure up to 0.1 mrad, and the ranging precision can reach 0.159 m.%传统激光雷达系统中,固态激光光源的重复频率和扫描系统的扫描带宽、精度均制约着系统成像.为提高激光雷达的成像精度,首先,在激光光源上采用经EDFA放大后的DFB高重频激光光源.其次,提出了一种PZT与振镜相结合的两级复合式激光扫描方法,利用PZT对小视场范围进行精细扫描,利用振镜对 PZT 的扫描视场和接收视场进行偏转完成粗扫描,在提高激光雷达扫描精度的同时拥有较大的扫描视场.最后,经试验所设计的复合式扫描激光雷达的方位角为±99 mrad,俯仰角为±49.5 mrad,角分辨率达到0.1 mrad,测距精度达到0.159 m.

  19. Enceladus Plume Density Modeling and Reconstruction for Cassini Attitude Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarani, Siamak

    2010-01-01

    In 2005, Cassini detected jets composed mostly of water, spouting from a set of nearly parallel rifts in the crust of Enceladus, an icy moon of Saturn. During an Enceladus flyby, either reaction wheels or attitude control thrusters on the Cassini spacecraft are used to overcome the external torque imparted on Cassini due to Enceladus plume or jets, as well as to slew the spacecraft in order to meet the pointing needs of the on-board science instruments. If the estimated imparted torque is larger than it can be controlled by the reaction wheel control system, thrusters are used to control the spacecraft. Having an engineering model that can predict and simulate the external torque imparted on Cassini spacecraft due to the plume density during all projected low-altitude Enceladus flybys is important. Equally important is being able to reconstruct the plume density after each flyby in order to calibrate the model. This paper describes an engineering model of the Enceladus plume density, as a function of the flyby altitude, developed for the Cassini Attitude and Articulation Control Subsystem, and novel methodologies that use guidance, navigation, and control data to estimate the external torque imparted on the spacecraft due to the Enceladus plume and jets. The plume density is determined accordingly. The methodologies described have already been used to reconstruct the plume density for three low-altitude Enceladus flybys of Cassini in 2008 and will continue to be used on all remaining low-altitude Enceladus flybys in Cassini's extended missions.

  20. Mimo radar waveform design for spectrum sharing with cellular systems a Matlab based approach

    CERN Document Server

    Khawar, Awais; Clancy, T Charles

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses spectrum sharing between cellular systems and radars. The book addresses a novel way to design radar waveforms that can enable spectrum sharing between radars and communication systems, without causing interference to communication systems, and at the same time achieving radar objectives of target detection, estimation, and tracking. The book includes a MATLAB-based approach, which provides reader with a way to learn, experiment, compare, and build on top of existing algorithms.

  1. Radar cross section

    CERN Document Server

    Knott, Gene; Tuley, Michael

    2004-01-01

    This is the second edition of the first and foremost book on this subject for self-study, training, and course work. Radar cross section (RCS) is a comparison of two radar signal strengths. One is the strength of the radar beam sweeping over a target, the other is the strength of the reflected echo sensed by the receiver. This book shows how the RCS ?gauge? can be predicted for theoretical objects and how it can be measured for real targets. Predicting RCS is not easy, even for simple objects like spheres or cylinders, but this book explains the two ?exact? forms of theory so well that even a

  2. Radar and electronic navigation

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnenberg, G J

    2013-01-01

    Radar and Electronic Navigation, Sixth Edition discusses radar in marine navigation, underwater navigational aids, direction finding, the Decca navigator system, and the Omega system. The book also describes the Loran system for position fixing, the navy navigation satellite system, and the global positioning system (GPS). It reviews the principles, operation, presentations, specifications, and uses of radar. It also describes GPS, a real time position-fixing system in three dimensions (longitude, latitude, altitude), plus velocity information with Universal Time Coordinated (UTC). It is accur

  3. Cassini Attitude Control Fault Protection Design: Launch to End of Prime Mission Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meakin, Peter C.

    2008-01-01

    The Cassini Attitude and Articulation Control Subsystem (AACS) Fault Protection (FP) has been successfully supporting operations for over 10 years from launch through the end of the prime mission. Cassini's AACS FP is complex, containing hundreds of error monitors and thousands of tunable parameters. Since launch there have been environmental, hardware, personnel and mission event driven changes which have required AACS FP to adapt and be robust to a variety of scenarios. This paper will discuss the process of monitoring, maintaining and updating the AACS FP during Cassini's lengthy prime mission as well as provide some insight into lessons learned during tour operations.

  4. Maneuver Performance Assessment of the Cassini Spacecraft Through Execution-Error Modeling and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Sean

    2014-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft has executed nearly 300 maneuvers since 1997, providing ample data for execution-error model updates. With maneuvers through 2017, opportunities remain to improve on the models and remove biases identified in maneuver executions. This manuscript focuses on how execution-error models can be used to judge maneuver performance, while providing a means for detecting performance degradation. Additionally, this paper describes Cassini's execution-error model updates in August 2012. An assessment of Cassini's maneuver performance through OTM-368 on January 5, 2014 is also presented.

  5. Cassini-plasma interactions in the Enceladus torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaroshenko, V. V.; Miloch, W. J.; Morfill, G. E.

    2012-04-01

    This study reports the results of the first simulations of spacecraft-plasma interactions within the proposed Enceladus torus, a radially narrow toroidal region surrounding Saturn that contains a high density of water-group neutrals. Charge exchange collisions scatter these neutrals and replace a fraction of the co-rotating ions with a new and slower-moving ion population. The newly-created ions are moving near the local Keplerian speed, slower than the co-rotation speed, and are ''picked-up'' by Saturn's magnetic field. These water-group ions are detected throughout the Enceladus torus including regions far from Enceladus [1,2]. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell self-consistent code is applied to find the potential and plasma distributions around the spherical model of Cassini in a complicated plasma environment of the Enceladus torus. The modeling includes two types of water group ions (co-rotating, and non-thermalized pick-up ions), plasma flows, photoemission due to solar UV radiation, and flyby geometry. As input data the parameters derived from the Cassini plasma spectrometer measurements obtained in 2005 on Oct. 11, and 29, Nov. 27, and Dec. 24 [1] are employed. The numerical simulations show that the pick-up ions significantly modify the spatial structure of the plasma perturbations, arising in the vicinity of the orbiter in comparison to that obtained for only co-rotating ions [3]. The plasma species produce a specific strongly inhomogeneous configuration with a self-consistent charge separation between the different plasma components in the electric field of the orbiter. The highly energetic co-rotating water group ions are mainly responsible for the configuration of the plasma wake. The region extending up to a few electron Debye lengths downstream of the spacecraft reveals negative potentials that are a significant fraction of the thermal electron energy. Arising wake electric fields capture the cold, pick-up ions and lead to a strong enhancement of

  6. Radar Landmass Simulation Computer Programming (Interim Report).

    Science.gov (United States)

    RADAR SCANNING, TERRAIN), (*NAVAL TRAINING, RADAR OPERATORS), (*FLIGHT SIMULATORS, TERRAIN AVOIDANCE), (* COMPUTER PROGRAMMING , INSTRUCTION MANUALS), PLAN POSITION INDICATORS, REAL TIME, DISPLAY SYSTEMS, RADAR IMAGES, SIMULATION

  7. Wind Profiling Radar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Clutter present in radar return signals as used for wind profiling is substantially removed by carrying out a Daubechies wavelet transformation on a time series of...

  8. Imaging Radar Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanZyl, J. J.; Zebker, H. A.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, we review the state of the art in imaging radar polarimetry, examine current developments in sensor technology and implementation for recording polarimetric measurements, and describe techniques and areas of application for the new remote sensing data.

  9. Downhole pulse radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsi-Tien

    1987-09-28

    A borehole logging tool generates a fast rise-time, short duration, high peak-power radar pulse having broad energy distribution between 30 MHz and 300 MHz through a directional transmitting and receiving antennas having barium titanate in the electromagnetically active region to reduce the wavelength to within an order of magnitude of the diameter of the antenna. Radar returns from geological discontinuities are sampled for transmission uphole. 7 figs.

  10. Exploration of Kronian Magnetosheath Turbulence Using Cassini Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadid, L.; Sahraoui, F.; Retino, A.; Kiyani, K.; Modolo, R.; Canu, P.; Masters, A.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2014-04-01

    The power density spectra and the magnetic compressibility in Saturn's magnetosheath are investigated using in-situ measurements of the fields and particles from Cassini spacecraft mission. Two major results are found. 1) The absence of the f-5/3 Kolmogorov-like inertial range: the averaged magnetic power spectral densities indicate that the spectra jump from a 1/f scaling at the large scales (typical for solar wind spectra, Leamon et al. 1999) directly into the ion scales with a slope of - 2.5 ,without forming any 5/3 inertial range. Furthermore 2) computing the magnetic compressibility we show the dominance of the compressible magnetosonic modes at the kinetic scales compared with Kinetic Alfven Waves (KAW) reported in the solar wind (Sahraoui et al 2009 )

  11. Cassini Main Engine Assembly Cover Flight Management and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somawardhana, Ruwan P.; Millard, Jerry M.

    2010-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft has performed its four year Prime Mission at Saturn and is currently in orbit at Saturn performing a two year extended mission. 12Its main engine nozzles are susceptible to impact damage from micrometeoroids and on-orbit dust. The spacecraft has an articulating device known as the Main Engine Assembly (MEA) cover which can close and shield the main engines from these threats. The cover opens to allow for main engine burns that are necessary to maintain the trajectory. Periodically updated analyses of potential on-orbit dust hazard threats have resulted in the need to continue to use the MEA cover beyond its intended use and beyond its design life. This paper provides a detailed Systems-level overview of the flight management of the MEA cover device and its flight performance to date.

  12. Cassini observations of ion cyclotron waves and ions anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crary, F. J.; Dols, V. J.; Cassidy, T. A.; Tokar, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    In Saturn's equatorial, inner magnetosphere, the production of fresh ions in a pick-up distribution generates ion cyclotron waves. These waves are a sensitive indicator of fresh plasma production, but the quantitative relation between wave properties and ionization rates is nontrivial. We present a combined analysis of Cassini MAG and CAPS data, from a variety of equatorial orbits between 2005 and 2012. Using the MAG data, we determine the amplitude and peak frequency of ion cyclotron waves. From the CAPS data we extract the parallel and perpendicular velocity distribution of water group ions. We compare these results with hybrid simulations of the ion cyclotron instability and relate the observed wave amplitudes and ion velocity distributions to the production rate of pickup ions. The resulting relation between wave and plasma properties will allow us to infer ion production rates even at times when no direct ion measurements are available.

  13. The Gravity Field of Enceladus from the three Cassini Flybys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iess, L.; Parisi, M.; Ducci, M.; Jacobson, R. A.; Armstrong, J. W.; Asmar, S. W.; Lunine, J. I.; Stevenson, D. J.; Tortora, P.

    2013-12-01

    The Cassini spacecraft carried out gravity measurements of the small Saturnian moon Enceladus during three close flybys on April 28, 2010, November 30, 2010 and May 2, 2012 (designated E9, E12 and E19), at the low altitudes of 100, 48 and 70 km to maximize the accelerations exerted by the moon on the spacecraft. The goals of these observations were the determination of the gravitational quadrupole and the search for a North-South asymmetry in the gravity field, controlled primarily by the spherical harmonic coefficient C30. The estimation of Enceladus' gravity field is especially complex because of the small surface gravity (0.11 m/s2), the short duration of the gravitational interaction and the small number of available flybys. In addition to the gravitational accelerations, the spacecraft was also subject to small but non-negligible drag when it flew through the plume emitted from the south pole of the satellite. This effect occurred during the two south polar flybys E9 and E19. The inclusion of these non-gravitational accelerations proved to be crucial to attain a stable solution for the gravity field. Our estimation relied entirely on precise range rate measurements enabled by a coherent, two-way, microwave link at X-band (7.2-8.4 GHz). Measurement accuracies of 10 micron/s at 60 s integration times were attained under favorable conditions, thanks also to an advanced tropospheric calibration system. The data were fitted using the MONTE orbit determination code, recently developed by JPL for deep space navigation. In addition to the satellite degree 2 gravity field and C30, the solution included the state vector of the spacecraft (one for each flyby) and corrections to the mass and the initial orbital elements of Enceladus. The effect of the drag in E9 and E19 was modeled either as an unknown, impulsive, vectorial delta-V at closest approach, or by using density profiles from models of the plume and solving for the aerodynamic coefficient of the spacecraft. Both

  14. Meteorology of Jupiter's Equatorial Hot Spots and Plumes from Cassini

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, David S; Vasavada, Ashwin R; Simon-Miller, Amy A

    2013-01-01

    We present an updated analysis of Jupiter's equatorial meteorology from Cassini observations. For two months preceding the spacecraft's closest approach, the Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) onboard regularly imaged the atmosphere. We created time-lapse movies from this period in order to analyze the dynamics of equatorial hot spots and their interactions with adjacent latitudes. Hot spots are quasi-stable, rectangular dark areas on visible-wavelength images, with defined eastern edges that sharply contrast with surrounding clouds, but diffuse western edges serving as nebulous boundaries with adjacent equatorial plumes. Hot spots exhibit significant variations in size and shape over timescales of days and weeks. Some of these changes correspond with passing vortex systems from adjacent latitudes interacting with hot spots. Strong anticyclonic gyres present to the south and southeast of the dark areas appear to circulate into hot spots. Impressive, bright white plumes occupy spaces in between hot spots. Compact...

  15. Observation and theory of the radar aurora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahr, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    Plasma density irregularities occurring near the Aurora Borealis cause scattering of HF, VHF, and UHF radio waves. Analysis of the resulting radar signal provides great detail about the spatial and temporal characteristics of these auroral E region irregularities. Observations are presented of the radar aurora from recent campaigns in northern Sweden. After reviewing the basic theory and observations of auroral electrojet irregularities, a simple nonlinear fluid theory of electrojet ion-acoustic waves is introduced, and reduced to a form of the three-wave interaction equations. This theory provides a simple mechanism for excitation of linearly stable waves at large aspect and flow angles, as well as a prediction of the power spectra that a coherent scatter radar should observe. In addition, this theory may be able to account for type 3 waves without resorting to ion gyro modes, such as the electrostatic ion-cyclotron wave. During the course of the research a simple new radar transmitting mode and signal processing algorithm was generated which very simply solves a frequency aliasing problem that often occurs in CUPRI auroral radar studies. Several new radar data analysis routines were developed, including the principally cross-beam image and scatter plots of the second versus first moments of the power spectrum of the irregularities. Analysis of vertical interferometer data shows that type 3 waves originate at ordinary electrojet altitudes, not in the upper E region, from which it is concluded that the electrostatic ion-cyclotron mode does not generate type 3 waves. The measured height of type 3 waves and other spectral analyses provide support for the pure ion-acoustic theory of type 3 waves. Suggestions are offered for hardware improvements to the CUPRI radar, new experiments to test new and existing theories.

  16. ARAC's operational support of the Cassini Launch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baskett, R L; Pace, J C

    1998-10-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was the U.S. Department of Energy atmospheric modeling resource used for the contingency of potential radiological releases during the launch of the Cassini mission. The ARAC Center at LLNL forecasted detailed weather conditions and delivered consequence assessments for potential accident scenarios to NASA before and during launch operations. A key aspect of ARAC's support was to acquire a variety of meteorological data for use in both forecast and real-time model calculations. ARAC acquired electronically two types of real-time observed meteorological data: 1) the full set of on-site towers and profilers via the Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) Meteorological Interactive Data Display System (MIDDS), and 2) routine regional airport observations (delivered to the ARAC Center from the Air Force Weather Agency). We also used two forecasted data sources: 1) the U.S. Air Force 45th Weather Squadron at CCAS forecasted soundings for launch time, and 2) the Navy Operational Regional Atmospheric Prediction System (NORAPS) prognostic model which ARAC ran over the Cape. The NORAPS runs produced detailed 24-hr forecasts of 3-D wind fields. ARAC used default radiological accident source terms involving the potential destruction of Cassini's Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) during 3 phases: 1) before the launch, 2) during the first S set after ignition, and 3) from 5 to 143 set after ignition. ARAC successfully developed and delivered dose and deposition plots at 24 hours, 3 hours, and 30 minutes before each of the lau

  17. ARAC's radiological support of the Cassini Launch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baskett, R L; Pace, J C

    1998-10-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was the U.S. Department of Energy atmospheric modeling resource used for the contingency of potential radiological releases during the launch of the Cassini mission. Having the ARAC system up and running was one of the launch criteria during the countdown. The ARAC Center at LLNL forecasted detailed weather conditions and delivered consequence assessments for potential accident scenarios to NASA before and during launch operations. A key aspect of ARAC's support was to acquire a variety of meteorological data for use in both forecast and real-time model calculations. ARAC acquired electronically two types of real-time observed meteorological data: 1) the set of on-site tower and profiler data via the Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) Meteorological Interactive Data Display System (MIDDS), and 2) routine regional airport observations delivered to the ARAC Center from the Air Force Weather Agency. We also used two forecasted data sources: 1) the U.S. Air Force 45th Weather Squadron at CCAS forecasted soundings for launch time, and 2) the Navy Operational Regional Atmospheric Prediction System (NORAPS) prognostic model which ARAC ran over the Cape. The NORAPS runs produced detailed 24-hr forecasts of 3-D wind fields. ARAC used default radiological accident source terms involving the potential destruction of Cassini's Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) during 3 phases: 1) before the launch, 2) during the first 5 sec after ignition, and 3) from 5 to 143 sec after ignition. ARAC successfully developed and delivered dose and deposition plots at 24 hours, 3 hours, and 30 minutes before each of the launch windows.

  18. Rhea gravity field and interior modeling from Cassini data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortora, Paolo; Zannoni, Marco; Hemingway, Doug; Nimmo, Francis; Jacobson, Robert A.; Iess, Luciano; Parisi, Marzia

    2016-01-01

    During its tour of the Saturn system, Cassini performed two close flybys of Rhea dedicated to gravity investigations, the first in November 2005 and the second in March 2013. This paper presents an estimation of Rhea's fully unconstrained quadrupole gravity field obtained from a joint multi-arc analysis of the two Cassini flybys. Our best estimates of the main gravity quadrupole unnormalized coefficients are J2 × 106 = 946.0 ± 13.9, C22 × 106 = 242.1 ± 4.0 (uncertainties are 1-σ). Their resulting ratio is J2/C22 = 3.91 ± 0.10, statistically not compatible (at a 5-σ level) with the theoretical value of 10/3, predicted for a hydrostatic satellite in slow, synchronous rotation around a planet. Therefore, it is not possible to infer the moment of inertia factor directly using the Radau-Darwin approximation. The observed excess J2 (gravity oblateness) was investigated using a combined analysis of gravity and topography, under different plausible geophysical assumptions. The observed gravity is consistent with that generated by the observed shape for an undifferentiated (uniform density) body. However, because the surface is more likely to be water ice, a two-layer model may be a better approximation. In this case, and assuming a mantle density of 920 kg/m3, some 1-3 km of excess core oblateness is consistent with the observed gravity. A wide range of moments of inertia is allowed, but models with low moments of inertia (i.e., more differentiation) require greater magnitudes of excess core topography to satisfy the observations.

  19. Saturn's equatorial jet structure from Cassini/ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Melendo, Enrique; Legarreta, Jon; Sánchez-Lavega, Agustín.; Pérez-Hoyos, Santiago; Hueso, Ricardo

    2010-05-01

    Detailed wind observations of the equatorial regions of the gaseous giant planets, Jupiter and Saturn, are crucial for understanding the basic problem of the global circulation and obtaining new detailed information on atmospheric phenomena. In this work we present high resolution data of Saturn's equatorial region wind profile from Cassini/ISS images. To retrieve wind measurements we applied an automatic cross correlator to image pairs taken by Cassini/ISS with the MT1, MT2, MT3 filters centred at the respective three methane absorbing bands of 619nm, 727nm, and 889nm, and with the adjacent continuum CB1, CB2, and CB3 filters. We obtained a complete high resolution coverage of Saturn's wind profile in the equatorial region. The equatorial jet displays an overall symmetric structure similar to that shown the by same region in Jupiter. This result suggests that, in accordance to some of the latest compressible atmosphere computer models, probably global winds in gaseous giants are deeply rooted in the molecular hydrogen layer. Wind profiles in the methane absorbing bands show the effect of strong vertical shear, ~40m/s per scale height, confirming previous results and an important decay in the wind intensity since the Voyager era (~100 m/s in the continuum and ~200 m/s in the methane absorbing band). We also report the discovery of a new feature, a very strong and narrow jet on the equator, about only 5 degrees wide, that despite the vertical shear maintains its intensity (~420 m/s) in both, the continuum and methane absorbing band filters. Acknowledgements: Work supported by the Spanish MICIIN AYA2009-10701 with FEDER and Grupos Gobierno Vasco IT-464-07.

  20. Analyzing Bleriot's propeller gaps in Cassini NAC images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Holger; Chen, Cheng; Seiß, Martin; Albers, Nicole; Spahn, Frank; Nic

    2016-10-01

    Among the great discoveries of the Cassini mission are the propeller-shaped structures created by small moonlets embedded in Saturn's dense rings. These moonlets are not massive enough to counteract the viscous ring diffusion to open and maintain circumferential gaps, distinguishing them from ring-moons like Pan and Daphnis.Although one of the defining features of propeller structures, well-formed partial gaps have been resolved by the Imaging Science Subsystem Narrow Angle Camera onboard the Cassini spacecraft only for the largest known propeller named Bleriot. We analyze images of the sunlit side of Saturn's outer A ring showing the propeller Bleriot with clearly visible gaps. By fitting a Gaussian to radial brightness profiles at different azimuthal locations, we obtain the evolution of gap minimum and gap width downstream of the moonlet.We report two findings:1) Numerical simulations indicate that the radial separation of the partial propeller gaps is expected to be 4 Hill radii (Spahn and Sremcevic, 2000, A&A). We infer Bleriot's Hill radius to be a few hundred meters, consistent with values given by Sremcevic et al. (2014, DPS) and Hoffmann et al. (2015, Icarus).2) In order to estimate the ring viscosity in the region of Saturn's outer A ring, where Bleriot orbits, we fit several model functions (one example being the analytic solution derived by Sremcevic, Spahn and Duschl, 2002, MNRAS) describing the azimuthal evolution of the surface density in the propeller gap region to the data obtained from the image analysis. We find viscosity values consistent with the parameterization of ring viscosity by Daisaka et al. (2001, Icarus), but significantly lower than the upper limit given by Esposito et al. (1983, Icarus)

  1. The Geodesy of the Main Saturnian Satellites from Range Rate Measurements of the Cassini Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducci, M.; Iess, L.; Armstrong, J. W.; Asmar, S. W.; Jacobson, R. A.; Lunine, J. I.; Racioppa, P.; Rappaport, N. J.; Stevenson, D. J.; Tortora, P.

    2012-03-01

    During Cassini's eight-year tour in the saturnian system, the gravity field of the main satellites was inferred from range rate measurements of the spacecraft. Here we present our latest results and an overview of our analysis methods.

  2. Revised Full-Disk Spectra by Cassini-VIMS of the Saturnian Minor Icy Moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filacchione, G.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Clark, R. N.; Buratti, B. J.; Capaccioni, F.; Tosi, F.; Coradini, A.; Cerroni, P.; Adriani, A.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.; Brown, R. H.; Nicholson, P. D.; Baines, K. H.; Nelson, R. M.; McCord, T. B.

    2009-03-01

    This abstract concern with a detailed re-analysis of the disk-integrated spectra of the minor moons of Saturn (Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, Epimetheus, Calypso and Telesto) obtained by Cassini-VIMS.

  3. Detecting weather radar clutter using satellite-based nowcasting products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas B.S.; Gill, Rashpal S.; Overgaard, Søren

    2006-01-01

    This contribution presents the initial results from experiments with detection of weather radar clutter by information fusion with satellite based nowcasting products. Previous studies using information fusion of weather radar data and first generation Meteosat imagery have shown promising results...... for the detecting and removal of clutter. Naturally, the improved spatio-temporal resolution of the Meteosat Second Generation sensors, coupled with its increased number of spectral bands, is expected to yield even better detection accuracies. Weather radar data from three C-band Doppler weather radars...... for three rain intensity classes (heavy precipitation, light to moderate precipitation, and no precipitation) to every pixel in the Meteosat-8 images. Image fusion of the satellite image product and the radar composite images was done by resampling to a common grid of a spatial resolution dictated...

  4. Airport Surveillance Radar : Model 7 -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Airport Surveillance Radar Model 7 (ASR-7) is a short-range (60 nautical miles (nmi)) analog radar system used to detect and report the presence and location of...

  5. Airport Surveillance Radar : Model 8 -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Airport Surveillance Radar Model 8 (ASR-8) is a short-range (60 nautical mile (nmi)), analog radar system used to detect and report the presence and location of...

  6. Use of radars to monitor stream discharge by noncontact methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, J.E.; Cheng, R.T.; Haeni, F.P.; Melcher, N.; Spicer, K.R.; Hayes, E.; Plant, W.; Hayes, K.; Teague, C.; Barrick, D.

    2006-01-01

    Conventional measurements of river flows are costly, time-consuming, and frequently dangerous. This report evaluates the use of a continuous wave microwave radar, a monostatic UHF Doppler radar, a pulsed Doppler microwave radar, and a ground-penetrating radar to measure river flows continuously over long periods and without touching the water with any instruments. The experiments duplicate the flow records from conventional stream gauging stations on the San Joaquin River in California and the Cowlitz River in Washington. The purpose of the experiments was to directly measure the parameters necessary to compute flow: surface velocity (converted to mean velocity) and cross-sectional area, thereby avoiding the uncertainty, complexity, and cost of maintaining rating curves. River channel cross sections were measured by ground-penetrating radar suspended above the river. River surface water velocity was obtained by Bragg scattering of microwave and UHF Doppler radars, and the surface velocity data were converted to mean velocity on the basis of detailed velocity profiles measured by current meters and hydroacoustic instruments. Experiments using these radars to acquire a continuous record of flow were conducted for 4 weeks on the San Joaquin River and for 16 weeks on the Cowlitz River. At the San Joaquin River the radar noncontact measurements produced discharges more than 20% higher than the other independent measurements in the early part of the experiment. After the first 3 days, the noncontact radar discharge measurements were within 5% of the rating values. On the Cowlitz River at Castle Rock, correlation coefficients between the USGS stream gauging station rating curve discharge and discharge computed from three different Doppler radar systems and GPR data over the 16 week experiment were 0.883, 0.969, and 0.992. Noncontact radar results were within a few percent of discharge values obtained by gauging station, current meter, and hydroacoustic methods. Time

  7. Radar for tracer particles

    CERN Document Server

    Ott, Felix; Huang, Kai

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a radar system capable of tracking a $5$mm spherical target continuously in three dimensions. The $10$GHz (X-band) radar system has a transmission power of $1$W and operates in the near field of the horn antennae. By comparing the phase shift of the electromagnetic wave traveling through the free space with an IQ-Mixer, we obtain the relative movement of the target with respect to the antennae. From the azimuth and inclination angles of the receiving antennae obtained in the calibration, we reconstruct the target trajectory in a three-dimensional Cartesian system. Finally, we test the tracking algorithm with target moving in circular as well as in pendulum motions, and discuss the capability of the radar system.

  8. Titan's mid-latitude surface regions with Cassini VIMS and SAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomonidou, Anezina; Coustenis, Athena; Drossart, Pierre; Brown, Robert H.; Sohl, Frank; Stephan, Katrin; Jaumann, Ralf; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Bratsolis, Emmanuel; Schmitt, Bernard; Le Gall, Alice; Lopes, Rosaly; Malaska, Michael; Janssen, Michael; Maltagliati, Luca; Villanueva, Edward; Matsoukas, Christos

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the surface of Saturn's moon Titan by means of two Cassini instruments used in synergy. We apply a radiative transfer code to VIMS hyperspectral data to correct the strong atmospheric contribution and extract information on surface composition (Hirtzig et al. 2014; Solomonidou et al. 2014; 2015). We then put this in the context of terrain morphology by use of denoised Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images (Bratsolis et al. 2012). We examine here the mid-latitude zones extending from 50ºN to 50ºS, which includes key geological features identified in Lopes et al. (2010, 2015) and Malaska et al. (2015): mountains, plains, labyrinths, dune fields, and possible cryovolcanic and/or evaporitic deposits. We find that many of the different units show compositional variations while units of significant geomorphological differences seem to consist of very similar material mixtures. The Huygens landing site and the candidate evaporitic regions are compositionally similar to the variable plains. We also find that temporal variations of surface albedo exist for two of the candidate cryovolcanic regions Tui Regio and Sotra Patera, suggesting the presence of surface activity, while a number of other regions such as Hotei Regio and the undifferentiated plains remain unchanged (Solomonidou et al. 2015). The surface albedo variations, together with the presence of volcanic-like morphological features, suggest that the active regions are possibly related to the deep interior, possibly via cryovolcanic processes (with important implications for the satellite's astrobiological potential) as also indicated by recent interior structure models of Titan and corresponding calculations of the spatial pattern of maximum tidal stresses (Sohl et al. 2014). In previous studies (Lopes et al. 2015; Solomonidou et al. 2015) we showed that a variety of surface processes could be linked to the formation of the various geomorphological units (aeolian, fluvial, sedimentary, lacustrine

  9. Equatorial belt of Titan: Aaru Region as seen by VIMS/Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florian Brossier, Jeremy; Rodriguez, Sébastien; Maltagliati, Luca; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Solomonidou, Anezina; Coustenis, Athena; Hirtzig, Mathieu; Jaumann, Ralf; Brown, Robert H.

    2016-10-01

    Since eleven years of observation, near-infrared imaging data from the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard Cassini1 reveal a variety of surface units that are compositionally and structurally distinct2, 3. The analysis of these units enables constraining the surface composition of Titan, which is of prime importance for modelling Titan's interior, surface, and atmosphere, particularly in the search for an endogenic methane source. For this study, we investigate a selection of units of interest seen in VIMS data by comparatively applying an empirical correction4, 5 and a radiative transfer code6-8 in order to correct for atmospheric contributions and retrieve surface albedo. SAR swaths from the Radar instrument are also used for geomorphological mapping purposes. We focus on the region of Aaru, located in the equatorial belt and centered at 10°N and 340°W, where several geological features have been identified: (1) infrared-brown dunes material; (2) a strongly eroded impact crater named Paxsi9 (3) mountainous and infrared-bright plateaus; and (4) infrared-blue areas devoid of dunes (similar to those seen in other regions probably enriched in water-ice, such as Chusuk Planitia10). By using our radiative transfer model, we estimate the surface albedo of regions of our interest within different infrared units of the Aaru region and compare with spectra of surface candidates, starting with water-ice and tholins. As seen in the similar study over Sinlap crater and its surroundings11, this method of analysis allows understanding of the compositional and structural relations between the different spectral units.References: 1 Brown, R. H. et al. (2005) SSR. 2 Barnes, J. W. et al. (2007) Icarus, 186 (1). 3 Soderblom, L. A. et al. (2007) PSS, 55 (13). 4 Cornet, T. et al. (2012) Icarus, 218 (2). 5 Le Mouélic, S. et al. (2012) PSS, 73 (1). 6 Hirtzig, M. et al. (2013) Icarus, 226 (1). 7 Solomonidou, A. et al. (2014) JGR, 119 (8). 8 Maltagliati, L. et al

  10. Radar Control Optimal Resource Allocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-13

    14. ABSTRACT This proposal will work towards the eventual realization of a long term goal of developing, waveforms and other radar resources... realizable radar system. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Radar Systems, Radar Resource Scheduling, Golay Codes, Doppler Resilient Processing...special case, a function can be fitted to q(·, S) and the optimal value of Γ found in closed-form. Interestingly, the optimal Γ for 3 Distribution A

  11. Mode S Baseline Radar Tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-11-01

    range units and 20 azimuth units) overlaying the position of the beacon reports. In the cases analyzed where beacon reports were not radar reinforced ...82/53 j~ C ~ 7 C _ _ _ _ _ _ 4. Title end Su.btitle 5. Neget at. November 1982 MDDE S BASELINE RADAR TRACKIN4G 6. Poelin Orgeuianti.. Cede ACT-100...Ground Clutter 33 Mode S/ARTS III 100-Scan False Radar Track Summary 74 34 Percent Beacon Radar Reinforcement 77 vii INTRODUCTION PURPOSE. The purpose of

  12. Localizing Ground-Penetrating Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    ing Ground-Penetrating Radar (LGPR) uses very high frequency (VHF) radar reflections of underground features to generate base- line maps and then...Innovative ground- penetrating radar that maps underground geological features provides autonomous vehicles with real-time localization. Localizing...NOV 2014 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Localizing Ground-Penetrating Radar 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER

  13. Saturn's icy satellites investigated by Cassini-VIMS. II. Results at the end of nominal mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Clark, R.N.; Cuzzi, J.N.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Coradini, A.; Cerroni, P.; Nicholson, P.D.; McCord, T.B.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Tosi, F.; Nelson, R.M.; Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.

    2010-01-01

    We report the detailed analysis of the spectrophotometric properties of Saturn's icy satellites as derived by full-disk observations obtained by visual and infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) experiment aboard Cassini. In this paper, we have extended the coverage until the end of the Cassini's nominal mission (June 1st 2008), while a previous paper (Filacchione, G., and 28 colleagues [2007]. Icarus 186, 259-290, hereby referred to as Paper I) reported the preliminary results of this study. During the four years of nominal mission, VIMS has observed the entire population of Saturn's icy satellites allowing us to make a comparative analysis of the VIS-NIR spectral properties of the major satellites (Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Hyperion, Iapetus) and irregular moons (Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, Epimetheus, Telesto, Calypso, Phoebe). The results we discuss here are derived from the entire dataset available at June 2008 which consists of 1417 full-disk observations acquired from a variety of distances and inclinations from the equatorial plane, with different phase angles and hemispheric coverage. The most important spectrophotometric indicators (as defined in Paper I: I/F continua at 0.55 ??m, 1.822 ??m and 3.547 ??m, visible spectral slopes, water and carbon dioxide bands depths and positions) are calculated for each observation in order to investigate the disk-integrated composition of the satellites, the distribution of water ice respect to "contaminants" abundances and typical regolith grain properties. These quantities vary from the almost pure water ice surfaces of Enceladus and Calypso to the organic and carbon dioxide rich Hyperion, Iapetus and Phoebe. Janus visible colors are intermediate between these two classes having a slightly positive spectral slope. These results could help to decipher the origins and evolutionary history of the minor moons of the Saturn's system. We introduce a polar representation of the spectrophotometric

  14. Cassini observations of ionospheric plasma in Saturn's magnetotail lobes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felici, M.; Arridge, C. S.; Coates, A. J.; Badman, S. V.; Dougherty, M. K.; Jackman, C. M.; Kurth, W. S.; Melin, H.; Mitchell, D. G.; Reisenfeld, D. B.; Sergis, N.

    2016-01-01

    Studies of Saturn's magnetosphere with the Cassini mission have established the importance of Enceladus as the dominant mass source for Saturn's magnetosphere. It is well known that the ionosphere is an important mass source at Earth during periods of intense geomagnetic activity, but lesser attention has been dedicated to study the ionospheric mass source at Saturn. In this paper we describe a case study of data from Saturn's magnetotail, when Cassini was located at ≃ 2200 h Saturn local time at 36 RS from Saturn. During several entries into the magnetotail lobe, tailward flowing cold electrons and a cold ion beam were observed directly adjacent to the plasma sheet and extending deeper into the lobe. The electrons and ions appear to be dispersed, dropping to lower energies with time. The composition of both the plasma sheet and lobe ions show very low fluxes (sometimes zero within measurement error) of water group ions. The magnetic field has a swept-forward configuration which is atypical for this region, and the total magnetic field strength is larger than expected at this distance from the planet. Ultraviolet auroral observations show a dawn brightening, and upstream heliospheric models suggest that the magnetosphere is being compressed by a region of high solar wind ram pressure. We interpret this event as the observation of ionospheric outflow in Saturn's magnetotail. We estimate a number flux between (2.95 ± 0.43) × 109 and (1.43 ± 0.21) × 1010 cm-2 s-1, 1 or about 2 orders of magnitude larger than suggested by steady state MHD models, with a mass source between 1.4 ×102 and 1.1 ×103 kg/s. After considering several configurations for the active atmospheric regions, we consider as most probable the main auroral oval, with associated mass source between 49.7 ±13.4 and 239.8 ±64.8 kg/s for an average auroral oval, and 10 ±4 and 49 ±23 kg/s for the specific auroral oval morphology found during this event. It is not clear how much of this mass is

  15. Saturn Ring Radiation Environment for the Cassini Grand Finale Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.; Kollmann, Peter; Johnson, Robert E.; Roussos, Elias; Sittler, Edward C.; Sturner, Steven J.

    2016-10-01

    Grand Finale (proximal) orbits of Cassini from April to September 2017 will provide an unprecedented opportunity for further in-situ exploration of the energetic radiation environment primarily arising from galactic cosmic ray interactions with the main rings. Improved modeling of these interactions contributes to ring mass properties, radiation chemistry, and source modeling for trapped radiation within and beyond the rings. Our new GEANT simulations show that these interactions produce very substantial fluxes of secondary gamma rays, neutrons, electrons, protons, and more short-lived particles. Cosmic ray albedo neutron decay from ring neutron emissions provides the primary source of trapped protons near and above 10 MeV in the radiation belts extending from beyond the F ring to the orbit of Tethys. Fluxes of these high-energy trapped protons increased as expected with declining solar activity from 2004 through 2009, consistent with decreasing modulation of the galactic cosmic ray protons and heavier ions by the solar wind. In 2017 solar activity and modulation will again be declining from earlier maximum levels in 2012 - 2014, while solar illumination of the rings will be near solstice levels. There may then be similarities in the ring radiation and plasma environment to conditions in 2004. In comparison, the 1979 traversal of the main rings by Pioneer 11 occurred during peak solar activity but declining cosmic ray flux. The questions are then what radiation environment we might expect to find during the Grand Finale orbits, how would the Cassini MIMI LEMMS sensor respond to this environment, and how might these new measurements change our understanding of the rings? During SOI flyover of the rings, LEMMS nominal data showed intensities higher than those from Pioneer 11 to an extent that cannot be explained by the updated interaction model. LEMMS more likely responded to penetrating high-energy radiation at energies outside its nominal ranges for electrons and

  16. Pickup ions at Dione and Enceladus: Cassini Plasma Spectrometer simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittler, Ed C.; Johnson, R. E.; Jurac, S.; Richardson, J. D.; McGrath, M.; Crary, F.; Young, D. T.; Nordholt, J. E.

    2004-01-01

    Voyager images of the icy satellites of Saturn, Dione and Enceladus, suggest that they may have been geologically active and are not only composed of ice. Recent observations by the Hubble Space Telescope have shown the presence of ozone at both Dione and Rhea, which also implies the presence of molecular oxygen at these bodies. Observations of Ariel, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto indicate the presence of CO2, so its presence on the Saturnian satellites is also expected. The Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) will provide the capability to determine the global composition of these bodies by measuring the pickup ions produced by the ionization of their sputter-produced atmospheres. We will present a model of these atmospheres and associated pickup ions and demonstrate CAPS ability to distinguish the freshly produced picked up ions from the ambient plasma. Such ions are expected to form a ring distribution that will have a uniquely different energy-angle dependence than the ambient plasma ions. In the case of Dione we expect the potential for a moderate strength interaction for which both Voyager 1 and Pioneer 11 spacecraft measured ion cyclotron waves centered on the Dione L shell and near the equatorial plane. SKR radio emissions also displayed emissions occurring at the orbital period of Dione which could indicate some intrinsic activity due to Dione. So again, something interesting may be going on at Dione. Since Enceladus, or material in orbit near Enceladus, may be the source of the E-ring, some surprises may be encountered during its close encounter with the Cassini spacecraft. In the case of Dione we will show that a wake pass at 500 km altitude is more than an order of magnitude better than an upstream pass at 500 km altitude. Pickup ion detection for minor ion species such as NH3+ is possible for 500 km altitude wake pass but not for ≈500 km altitude upstream pass at closest approach. For navigation reasons a 100 km pass is not allowed. Therefore it is

  17. Titan Extinction Profiles Observed by Cassini Radio Occultations and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marouf, Essam; French, Richard; Flasar, F. Michael; Schinder, Paul J.; Rappaport, Nicole J.

    Three monochromatic and phase-coherent radio signals of wavelength = 0.9, 3.6, and 13 cm (Ka-, X-, and S-bands), were propagated by Cassini through the neutral atmosphere of Titan and the refracted signals were observed on the Earth. Abel inversion of observed changes in the signal frequency is used to recover the refractivity profile of the atmosphere, hence estimate the expected loss in signal strength due to defocusing of the radio signal by differential refraction. The refractive defocusing component (wavelength independent, in principle) is then removed from the actual measured signal strength profiles yielding the "true" signal extinction due to absorption and scattering integrated along the propagation path. Abel inversion of the integrated intensity profiles, tempered to combat noise contribution, yields localized estimates of the extinction coefficient (absorbtivity) as a function of altitude, or the extinction profiles. The initial radio measurements are diffraction-limited. We extend Fresnel transform based diffraction reconstruction procedures developed for radio occultation observations of planetary rings to remove diffraction effects from the initial radio measurements. The procedures are tested using idealized models of simple isothermal atmospheric profile extending above a hard-limb (knife-edge) model. Reconstruction of the simulated "observed" diffraction-limited data shows good agreement with the assumed atmospheric profile and the location of the hard-limb for a range of model parameters. We then apply a similar approach to the actual measured data. Strong wavelength-dependent extinction coefficient profile behavior is observed. Its large-scale structure appears well modeled by predictions based on N2-N2 collision-induced gaseous absorption for Titan's physical conditions. Interesting localized features of yet unexplained origin are also observed. Because the spatial scales of the extinction profile features are relatively large compared with

  18. Ground penetrating radar

    CERN Document Server

    Daniels, David J

    2004-01-01

    Ground-penetrating radar has come to public attention in recent criminal investigations, but has actually been a developing and maturing remote sensing field for some time. In the light of recent expansion of the technique to a wide range of applications, the need for an up-to-date reference has become pressing. This fully revised and expanded edition of the best-selling Surface-Penetrating Radar (IEE, 1996) presents, for the non-specialist user or engineer, all the key elements of this technique, which span several disciplines including electromagnetics, geophysics and signal processing. The

  19. Noise Radar Technology Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    poursuite, estimation Doppler, polarimétrie, interférométrie, sondage du sol ou profilage de la sous- surface , détection, imagerie SAR (radar à synthèse...mesure de distance et d’estimation Doppler. Deux récepteurs de traitement cohérent, soit le récepteur de corrélation et le récep- teur de traitement DSP... traitement spectral double) des échos radar sont décrits et une estimation de leur portée est présentée. Les capacités LPI (faible probabilité

  20. Status Of Imaging Radar Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Zyl, Jakob J.; Zebker, Howard A.

    1991-01-01

    Report pulls together information on imaging radar polarimetry from a variety of sources. Topics include theory, equipment, and experimental data. Reviews state of the art, examines current applicable developments in radar equipment, describes recording and processing of radar polarimetric measurements, and discusses interpretation and application of resulting polarimetric images.

  1. Human walking estimation with radar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorp, Ph. van; Groen, F.C.A.

    2003-01-01

    Radar can be used to observe humans that are obscured by objects such as walls. These humans cannot be visually observed. The radar measurements are used to animate an obscured human in virtual reality. This requires detailed information about the motion. The radar measurements give detailed informa

  2. Coded continuous wave meteor radar

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The concept of coded continuous wave meteor radar is introduced. The radar uses a continuously transmitted pseudo-random waveform, which has several advantages: coding avoids range aliased echoes, which are often seen with commonly used pulsed specular meteor radars (SMRs); continuous transmissions maximize pulse compression gain, allowing operation with significantly lower peak transmit power; the temporal resolution can be changed after ...

  3. Bistatic Forward Scattering Radar Detection and Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Cheng

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Forward Scattering Radar (FSR is a special type of bistatic radar that can implement image detection, imaging, and identification using the forward scattering signals provided by the moving targets that cross the baseline between the transmitter and receiver. Because the forward scattering effect has a vital significance in increasing the targets’ Radar Cross Section (RCS, FSR is quite advantageous for use in counter stealth detection. This paper first introduces the front line technology used in forward scattering RCS, FSR detection, and Shadow Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (SISAR imaging and key problems such as the statistical characteristics of forward scattering clutter, accurate parameter estimation, and multitarget discrimination are then analyzed. Subsequently, the current research progress in FSR detection and SISAR imaging are described in detail, including the theories and experiments. In addition, with reference to the BeiDou navigation satellite, the results of forward scattering experiments in civil aircraft detection are shown. Finally, this paper considers future developments in FSR target detection and imaging and presents a new, promising technique for stealth target detection.

  4. VIS-NIR Spectrophotometric Study of the Saturnian icy Satellites by Cassini-VIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Tosi, F.; Coradini, A.; Cerroni, P.; Adriani, A.; McCord, T. B.; Baines, K. H.; Bellucci, G.; Brown, R. H.; Bibring, J.; Buratti, B. J.; Clark, R. N.; Combes, M.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Formisano, V.; Jaumann, R.; Langevin, Y. G.; Matson, D. L.; Mennella, V.; Nelson, R. M.; Nicholson, P. D.; Sicardy, B.; Sotin, C.

    2007-12-01

    After the first three years of the nominal mission aboard the Cassini probe the VIMS (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) experiment has collected more than one thousand useful full-disk observations of both regular (Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Hyperion, Iapetus, Phoebe) and minor (Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, Epimetheus, Telesto, Calypso) icy moons of Saturn. These data, acquired from a variety of distances and inclinations from the equatorial plane, with different phase angles and hemispheric coverage, are analyzed by using several spectroscopic indicators (I/F continuum level, slopes, bands strengths) in order to identify analogies and differences in the compositional units of satellites and derive the phase curves at different longitudes; many observations acquired close to zero phase angle allow us to measure the opposition surge effect on several satellites. Concerning the composition we have derived the distribution of the water ice abundance and grain size from the almost pure icy surfaces of Enceladus and Calypso to the organic rich Hyperion, Iapetus and Phoebe. We report about the differences observed in the CO2 band position which is shifted at shorter wavelengths on Hyperion respect to Phoebe and Iapetus; this effect is probably related to a different distribution of clathrates on these icy surfaces. This research was completed thanks to the support of the Italian Space Agency (ASI).

  5. Radar scattering of linear dunes and mega-yardangs: Application to Titan

    CERN Document Server

    Paillou, Philippe; Radebaugh, Jani; Wall, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The Ku-band (13.8 GHz - 2.2 cm) RADAR instrument onboard the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft has revealed the richness of the surface of Titan, as numerous seas, lakes, rivers, cryo-volcanic flows and vast dune fields have been discovered. Linear dunes are a major geomorphological feature present on Titan, covering up to 17% of its surface, mainly in equatorial regions. However, the resolution of the RADAR instrument is not good enough to allow a detailed study of the morphology of these features. In addition, other linear wind-related landforms, such as mega-yardangs (linear wind-abraded ridges formed in cohesive rocks), are likely to present a comparable radar signature that could be confused with the one of dunes. We conducted a comparative study of the radar radiometry of both linear dunes and mega-yardangs, based on representative terrestrial analogues: the linear dunes located in the Great Sand Sea in western Egypt and in the Namib Desert in Namibia, and the mega-yardangs observed in the Lut Desert in easter...

  6. Coherent dust cloud observed by three Cassini instruments

    CERN Document Server

    Khalisi, Emil

    2015-01-01

    We revisit the evidence for a "dust cloud" observed by the Cassini spacecraft at Saturn in 2006. The simultaneous data of 3 instruments are compared to interpret the signatures of a coherent swarm of dust that could have remained floating near the equatorial plane. The conspicuous pattern, as seen in the dust counters of the Cosmic Dust Analyser (CDA) and in the magnetic field (MAG), clearly repeats on three consecutive revolutions of the spacecraft. The data of the Radio Plasma and Wave Science (RPWS) appear less decisive but do back our conclusions. The results support the idea of a "magnetic bubble" as reported from both Voyager flybys in the early 1980ies. That particular cloud, which we firstly discovered in the CDA data, is estimated to about 1.36 Saturnian radii in size, and probably broadening. Both the bulk of dust particles and the peak of the magnetic depression seem to drift apart, but this can also be an effect of hitting the cloud at different parts during the traverse.

  7. The Structure of Enceladus' Plume from Cassini Occultation Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, C. J.; Esposito, L. W.; Buffington, B. B.; Colwell, J.; Hendrix, A. R.; Meinke, B. K.; Shemansky, D. E.; Stewart, I.; West, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    Cassini's Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) has observed 2 stellar and one solar occultation by Enceladus' water vapor plume. These observations have established that water is the primary constituent of the plume, allowed us to calculate the flux of water coming from the plume, and detected super-sonic jets of gas imbedded within the plume [1]. On 19 October 2011 two stars (epsilon and zeta Orionis) will simultaneously be occulted by the plume, and the signal of the two will be in separate pixels on the detector. This is a tangential occultation that will provide a horizontal cut through the plume at two altitudes. The two stars are separated by 24 mrad, or ~20 km, with the lower altitude star 18 km above the limb at its closest point. The groundtrack is similar to the 2010 solar occultation, but viewed from the other side of the plume. Results from this new data set with implications for the vertical structure of the plume and jets will be presented.

  8. Silicates on Iapetus from Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Young, Cindy L; Clark, Roger N; Spencer, John R; Jennings, Donald E; Hand, Kevin P; Poston, Michael J; Carlson, Robert W

    2015-01-01

    We present the first spectral features obtained from Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) for any icy moon. The spectral region covered by CIRS focal planes (FP) 3 and 4 is rich in emissivity features, but previous studies at these wavelengths have been limited by low signal to noise ratios (S/Rs) for individual spectra. Our approach is to average CIRS FP3 spectra to increase the S/R and use emissivity spectra to constrain the composition of the dark material on Iapetus. We find an emissivity feature at ~855 cm-1 and a possible doublet at 660 and 690 cm-1 that do not correspond to any known instrument artifacts. We attribute the 855 cm-1 feature to fine-grained silicates, similar to those found in dust on Mars and in meteorites, which are nearly featureless at shorter wavelengths. Silicates on the dark terrains of Saturn's icy moons have been suspected for decades, but there have been no definitive detections until now. Serpentines reported in the literature at ambient temperature and pressure hav...

  9. The Shape of Saturn's Huygens Ringlet Viewed by Cassini ISS

    CERN Document Server

    Spitale, Joseph N

    2015-01-01

    A new model for the shape of the prominent eccentric ringlet in the gap exterior to Saturn's B-ring is developed based on Cassini observations taken over about 8 years. Unlike previous treatments, the new model treats each edge of the ringlet separately. The Keplerian component of the model is consistent with results derived from Voyager observations, and $m=2$ modes forced by the nearby Mimas 2:1 Lindblad resonance are seen. Additionally, a free $m=2$ mode is seen on the outer edge of the ringlet. Significant irregular structure that cannot be described using normal-mode analysis is seen on the ringlet edges as well. Particularly on the inner edge, that structure remains coherent over multi-year intervals, moving at the local Keplerian rate. We interpret the irregular structure as the signature of embedded massive bodies. The long coherence time suggests the responsible bodies are concentrated near the edge of the ringlet. Long wake-like structures originate from two locations on the inner edge of the ringle...

  10. Saturn's aurora observed by the Cassini camera at visible wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Dyudina, Ulyana A; Ewald, Shawn P; Wellington, Danika

    2015-01-01

    The first observations of Saturn's visible-wavelength aurora were made by the Cassini camera. The aurora was observed between 2006 and 2013 in the northern and southern hemispheres. The color of the aurora changes from pink at a few hundred km above the horizon to purple at 1000-1500 km above the horizon. The spectrum observed in 9 filters spanning wavelengths from 250 nm to 1000 nm has a prominent H-alpha line and roughly agrees with laboratory simulated auroras. Auroras in both hemispheres vary dramatically with longitude. Auroras form bright arcs between 70 and 80 degree latitude north and between 65 and 80 degree latitude south, which sometimes spiral around the pole, and sometimes form double arcs. A large 10,000-km-scale longitudinal brightness structure persists for more than 100 hours. This structure rotates approximately together with Saturn. On top of the large steady structure, the auroras brighten suddenly on the timescales of a few minutes. These brightenings repeat with a period of about 1 hour....

  11. Probing Saturn's tropospheric cloud with Cassini/VIMS

    CERN Document Server

    Barstow, Joanna K; Fletcher, Leigh N; Giles, Rohini S; Merlet, Cecile

    2016-01-01

    In its decade of operation the Cassini mission has allowed us to look deep into Saturn's atmosphere and investigate the processes occurring below its enshrouding haze. We use Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) 4.6-5.2 micron data from early in the mission to investigate the location and properties of Saturn's cloud structure between 0.6 and 5 bars. We average nightside spectra from 2006 over latitude circles and model the spectral limb darkening using the NEMESIS radiative transfer and retrieval tool. We present our best-fit deep cloud model for latitudes between -40 and 50 degrees, along with retrieved abundances for NH3, PH3 and AsH3. We find an increase in NH3 abundance at the equator, a cloud base at ~2.3 bar and no evidence for cloud particles with strong absorption features in the 4.6-5.2 micron wavelength range, all of which are consistent with previous work. Non-scattering cloud models assuming a composition of either NH3 or NH4SH, with a scattering haze overlying, fit limb darkening curv...

  12. On Cas A, Cassini, Comets, and King Charles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Roberto; Balestrieri, Riccardo; Ohtsuka, Yasuyo

    2013-03-01

    We re-examine the long-standing problem of the date of the Cassiopeia A supernova (SN), in view of recent claims that it might be the 1630 'noon-star' seen at the birth of King Charles II. We do not support this identification, based on the expected brightness of a Type-IIb SN (too faint to be seen in daylight), the extrapolated motion of the ejecta (inconsistent with a date earlier than 1650), the lack of any scientific follow-up observations, the lack of any mention of it in Asian archives. The origin of the 1630 noon-star event (if real) remains a mystery; there was a bright comet in 1630 June but no evidence to determine whether or not it was visible in daylight. Instead, we present French reports about a fourth-magnitude star discovered by Cassini in Cassiopeia in or shortly before 1671, which was not seen before or since. The brightness is consistent with what we expect for the Cas A SN; the date is consistent with the extrapolated motion of the ejecta. We argue that this source could be the long-sought SN.

  13. On Cas A, Cassini, Comets and King Charles

    CERN Document Server

    Soria, Roberto; Ohtsuka, Yasuyo

    2013-01-01

    We re-examine the long-standing problem of the date of the Cassiopeia A supernova (SN), in view of recent claims that it might be the 1630 "noon-star" seen at the birth of King Charles II. We do not support this identification, based on the expected brightness of a Type-IIb SN (too faint to be seen in daylight), the extrapolated motion of the ejecta (inconsistent with a date earlier than 1650), the lack of any scientific follow-up observations, the lack of any mention of it in Asian archives. The origin of the 1630 noon-star event (if real) remains a mystery; there was a bright comet in 1630 June but no evidence to determine whether or not it was visible in daylight. Instead, we present French reports about a 4th-magnitude star discovered by Cassini in Cassiopeia in or shortly before 1671, which was not seen before or since. The brightness is consistent with what we expect for the Cas A SN; the date is consistent with the extrapolated motion of the ejecta. We argue that this source could be the long-sought SN...

  14. SOLAR OCCULTATION BY TITAN MEASURED BY CASSINI/UVIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capalbo, Fernando J.; Benilan, Yves [Laboratoire Interuniversitaire des Systemes Atmospheriques (LISA), UMR 7583 du CNRS, Universites Paris Est Creteil (UPEC) and Paris Diderot - UPD, 61 avenue du General de Gaulle, 94010 Creteil Cedex (France); Yelle, Roger V.; Koskinen, Tommi T.; Sandel, Bill R. [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, 1629 E. University Blvd., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Holsclaw, Gregory M.; McClintock, William E., E-mail: fernando.capalbo@lisa.u-pec.fr [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, 3665 Discovery Drive, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States)

    2013-04-01

    We present the first published analysis of a solar occultation by Titan's atmosphere measured by the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph on board Cassini. The data were measured during flyby T53 in 2009 April and correspond to latitudes between 21 Degree-Sign and 28 Degree-Sign south. The analysis utilizes the absorption of two solar emission lines (584 A and 630 A) in the ionization continuum of the N{sub 2} absorption cross section and solar emission lines around 1085 A where absorption is due to CH{sub 4}. The measured transmission at these wavelengths provides a direct estimate of the N{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} column densities along the line of sight from the spacecraft to the Sun, which we inverted to obtain the number densities. The high signal-to-noise ratio of the data allowed us to retrieve density profiles in the altitude range 1120-1400 km for nitrogen and 850-1300 km for methane. We find an N{sub 2} scale height of {approx}76 km and a temperature of {approx}153 K. Our results are in general agreement with those from previous work, although there are some differences. Particularly, our profiles agree, considering uncertainties, with the density profiles derived from the Voyager 1 Ultraviolet Spectrograph data, and with in situ measurements by the Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer with revised calibration.

  15. New constraints on Saturn's interior from Cassini astrometric data

    CERN Document Server

    Lainey, Valéry; Tajeddine, Radwan; Cooper, Nicholas J; Murray, Carl; Robert, Vincent; Tobie, Gabriel; Guillot, Tristan; Mathis, Stéphane; Remus, Françoise; Desmars, Josselin; Arlot, Jean-Eudes; De Cuyper, Jean-Pierre; Dehant, Véronique; Pascu, Dan; Thuillot, William; Poncin-Lafitte, Christophe Le; Zahn, Jean-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Using astrometric observations spanning more than a century and including a large set of Cassini data, we determine Saturn's tidal parameters through their current effects on the orbits of the eight main and four coorbital moons. We have used the latter to make the first determination of Saturn's Love number, $k_2=0.390 \\pm 0.024$, a value larger than the commonly used theoretical value of 0.341 (Gavrilov & Zharkov, 1977), but compatible with more recent models (Helled & Guillot, 2013) for which $k_2$ ranges from 0.355 to 0.382. Depending on the assumed spin for Saturn's interior, the new constraint can lead to a reduction of up to 80% in the number of potential models, offering great opportunities to probe the planet's interior. In addition, significant tidal dissipation within Saturn is confirmed (Lainey et al., 2012) corresponding to a high present-day tidal ratio $k_2/Q=(1.59 \\pm 0.74) \\times 10^{-4}$ and implying fast orbital expansions of the moons. This high dissipation, with no obvious variati...

  16. Cassini CAPS Measurements of Thermal Ion Properties: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, R. J.; Bagenal, F.; Delamere, P. A.

    2010-12-01

    Since the Wilson et al. [2008] paper on thermal ion properties in Saturn's inner equatorial magnetosphere there have been several advances in forward model techniques and instrument knowledge. These include: a) Improved CAPS (SNG) calibration values since 2008. While the previous fits to data are still valid, this efficiency adjustment has the effect of reducing the density values calculated from that fit. Compared to the previous calibration values, nOH+ and nH+ are ≈30% and ≈9% lower respectively. b) Robust error analysis on the forward model process to produce standard deviations for the fitted parameters. This also shows the expected dependences between various fitted parameters, such as Vφ and OH+ T⊥, inherent in the model. c) Utilization of real magnetic field data to forward model T⊥ and T\\par. Previously assumed magnetic field was in the -z direction. In addition, these improvements allow us to remove the constraint that Vz = 0, and the use of real magnetic field data allows us to analyze data farther from the equator. References Wilson, R. J., R. L. Tokar, M. G. Henderson, T. W. Hill, M. F. Thomsen, and D. H. Pontius (2008), Cassini plasma spectrometer thermal ion measurements in Saturn's inner magnetosphere,

  17. Cassini in Titan's tail: CAPS observations of plasma escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, A. J.; Wellbrock, A.; Lewis, G. R.; Arridge, C. S.; Crary, F. J.; Young, D. T.; Thomsen, M. F.; Reisenfeld, D. B.; Sittler, E. C., Jr.; Johnson, R. E.; Szego, K.; Bebesi, Z.; Jones, G. H.

    2012-05-01

    We present observations of CAPS electron and ion spectra during Titan distant tail crossings at 5,000-10,000 km altitude by the Cassini spacecraft. In common with closer tail encounters, we identify ionospheric plasma in the tail. Some of the electron spectra indicate a direct magnetic connection to Titan's dayside ionosphere due to the presence of ionospheric photoelectrons. Ion observations reveal heavy (m/q˜ 16 and 28) and light (m/q = 1-2) ion populations streaming into the tail. Using the distant tail encounters T9, T75 and T63, we estimate total plasma loss rates from Titan via this process of (4.2, 0.96 and 2.3) × 1024 ions s-1 respectively for the three encounters, values which are in agreement with some simulations but slightly lower than earlier estimates based on non-differential techniques. Using the mass-separated data, this corresponds to mass loss rates of (8.9, 1.6, 4.0) × 1025 amu s-1 for T9, T75 and T63 respectively, an average loss rate of ˜7 tonnes per Earth day. Remarkably, all of the tail encounters studied here indicate a split tail feature, indicating that this may be a common feature in Titan's interaction with Saturn's magnetosphere.

  18. Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, P. A.; Hensley, S.; Joughin, I. R.; Li, F.; Madsen, S. N.; Rodriguez, E.; Goldstein, R. M.

    1998-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar interferometry is an imaging technique for measuring the topography of a surface, its changes over time, and other changes in the detailed characteristics of the surface. This paper reviews the techniques of interferometry, systems and limitations, and applications in a rapidly growing area of science and engineering.

  19. Compressive CFAR radar detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anitori, L.; Otten, M.P.G.; Rossum, W.L. van; Maleki, A.; Baraniuk, R.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we develop the first Compressive Sensing (CS) adaptive radar detector. We propose three novel architectures and demonstrate how a classical Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR) detector can be combined with ℓ1-norm minimization. Using asymptotic arguments and the Complex Approximate Messag

  20. Compressive CFAR Radar Processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anitori, L.; Rossum, W.L. van; Otten, M.P.G.; Maleki, A.; Baraniuk, R.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the performance of a combined Compressive Sensing (CS) Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR) radar processor under different interference scenarios using both the Cell Averaging (CA) and Order Statistic (OS) CFAR detectors. Using the properties of the Complex Approximate Mess

  1. The Newcastle meteor radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keay, Colin

    1987-01-01

    A brief history and development of the Newcastle Meteor Radar system is given. Also described are its geographical coordinates and its method of operation. The initial objective when the project was commenced was to develop an entirely digital analyzer capable of recognizing meteor echo signals and recording as many of their parameters as possible. This objective was achieved.

  2. Design and prototype of radar sensor with Vivaldi linear array for through-wall radar imaging: an experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Betül; Özdemir, Caner

    2016-10-01

    We present a radar sensor that was designed to detect and image moving objects/targets on the other side of a wall. The radar sensor was composed of a linear array of Vivaldi antenna elements, an radio frequency (RF) switch, a microcontroller unit, and an RF transceiver. For the linear array, a total of eight antenna elements were used as sensors in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) configuration in the cross-range axis to improve the resolution in this dimension. Design steps of Vivaldi antenna elements and the entire linear array were presented. After the design, the prototyping procedure and the details of the radar sensor were given. Through-the-wall radar (TWR) imaging experiments were performed for stationary and moving targets using the assembled sensor. The resultant TWR images after these experiments were presented. During the image formation, a back-projection type image focusing algorithm was implemented and applied to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the raw images. The constructed radar images demonstrated that our radar sensor could successfully detect and image both stationary and moving targets on the other side of the wall.

  3. Space Radar Image of Star City, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This radar image shows the Star City cosmonaut training center, east of Moscow, Russia. Four American astronauts are training here for future long-duration flights aboard the Russian Mir space station. These joint flights are giving NASA and the Russian Space Agency experience necessary for the construction of the international Alpha space station, beginning in late 1997. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR), on its 62nd orbit on October 3, 1994. This Star City image is centered at 55.55 degrees north latitude and 38.0 degrees east longitude. The area shown is approximately 32 kilometers by 49 kilometers (20 miles by 30 miles). North is to the top in this image. The radar illumination is from the top of the image. The image was produced using three channels of SIR-C radar data: red indicates L-band (23 cm wavelength, horizontally transmitted and received); green indicates L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received); blue indicates C-band (6 cm wavelength, horizontally transmitted and vertically received). In general, dark pink areas are agricultural; pink and light blue areas are urban communities; black areas represent lakes and rivers; dark blue areas are cleared forest; and light green areas are forested. The prominent black runways just right of center are Shchelkovo Airfield, about 4 km long. The textured pale blue-green area east and southeast of Shchelkovo Airfield is forest. Just east of the runways is a thin railroad line running southeast; the Star City compound lies just east of the small bend in the rail line. Star City contains the living quarters and training facilities for Russian cosmonauts and their families. Moscow's inner loop road is visible at the lower left edge of the image. The Kremlin is just off the left edge, on the banks of the meandering Moskva River. The Klyazma River snakes to the southeast from the reservoir in the upper left (shown in bright red

  4. Radar Observations of Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostro, S. J.

    2003-05-01

    During the past 25 years, radar investigations have provided otherwise unavailable information about the physical and dynamical properties of more than 200 asteroids. Measurements of the distribution of echo power in time delay and Doppler frequency provide two-dimensional images with spatial resolution as fine as a decameter. Sequences of delay-Doppler images can be used to produce geologically detailed three-dimensional models, to define the rotation state precisely, to constrain the internal density distribution, and to estimate the trajectory of the object's center of mass. Radar wavelengths (4 to 13 cm) and the observer's control of transmitted and received polarizations make the observations sensitive to near-surface bulk density and macroscopic structure. Since delay-Doppler positional measurements are orthogonal to optical angle measurements and typically have much finer fractional precision, they are powerful for refining orbits and prediction ephemerides. Radar astrometry can add decades or centuries to the interval over which an asteroid's close Earth approaches can accurately be predicted and can significantly refine collision probability estimates based on optical astrometry alone. In the highly unlikely case that a small body is on course for an Earth collision in this century, radar reconnaissance would almost immediately distinguish between an impact trajectory and a near miss and would dramatically reduce the difficulty and cost of any effort to prevent the collision. The sizes and rotation periods of radar-detected asteroids span more than four orders of magnitude. These observations have revealed both stony and metallic objects, elongated and nonconvex shapes as well as nearly featureless spheroids, small-scale morphology ranging from smoother than the lunar regolith to rougher than the rockiest terrain on Mars, craters and diverse linear structures, non-principal-axis spin states, contact binaries, and binary systems.

  5. VLBI Radar of the 2012 DA14 Asteroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechaeva, M. B.; Dugin, N. A.; Antipenko, A. A.; Bezrukov, D. A.; Bezrukov, V. V.; Voytyuk, V. V.; Dement'ev, A. F.; Jekabsons, N.; Klapers, M.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Kulishenko, V. F.; Nabatov, A. S.; Nesteruk, V. N.; Putillo, D.; Reznichenko, A. M.; Salerno, E.; Snegirev, S. D.; Tikhomirov, Yu. V.; Khutornoy, R. V.; Skirmante, K.; Shmeld, I.; Chagunin, A. K.

    2015-03-01

    An experiment on VLBI radar of the 2012 DA14 asteroid was carried out on February 15-16, 2011 at the time of its closest approach to the Earth. The research teams of Kharkov (Institute of Radio Astronomy of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine), Evpatoria (National Space Facilities Control and Test Center), Nizhny Novgorod (Radiophysical Research Institute), Bologna (Istituto di Radioastronomia (INAF)), and Ventspils (Ventspils International Radioastronomy Center) took part in the experiment. The asteroid was irradiated by the RT-70 planetary radar (Evpatoria) at a frequency of 5 GHz. The reflected signal was received using two 32-m radio telescopes in Medicina (Italy) and Irbene (Latvia) in radiointerferometric mode. The Doppler frequency shifts in bi-static radar mode and interference frequency in VLBI mode were measured. Accuracy of the VLBI radar method for determining the radial and angular velocities of the asteroid were estimated.

  6. Cassini Attitude Control Operations Flight Rules and How They are Enforced

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burk, Thomas; Bates, David

    2008-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft was launched on October 15, 1997 and arrived at Saturn on June 30, 2004. It has performed detailed observations and remote sensing of Saturn, its rings, and its satellites since that time. Cassini deployed the European-built Huygens probe which descended through the Titan atmosphere and landed on its surface on January 14, 2005. Operating the Cassini spacecraft is a complex scientific, engineering, and management job. In order to safely operate the spacecraft, a large number of flight rules were developed. These flight rules must be enforced throughout the lifetime of the Cassini spacecraft. Flight rules are defined as any operational limitation imposed by the spacecraft system design, hardware, and software, violation of which would result in spacecraft damage, loss of consumables, loss of mission objectives, loss and/or degradation of science, and less than optimal performance. Flight rules require clear description and rationale. Detailed automated methods have been developed to insure the spacecraft is continuously operated within these flight rules. An overview of all the flight rules allocated to the Cassini Attitude Control and Articulation Subsystem and how they are enforced is presented in this paper.

  7. Development of a Single-Borehole Radar for Well Logging

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng-ou Zhou; Qing Zhao; Haining Yang; Tingjun Li

    2012-01-01

    An impulse-based single-borehole radar prototype has been developed for well logging. The borehole radar is comprised of subsurface sonde and surface equipment. An armored 7-conductor well logging cable is used to connect subsurface sonde and surface equipment which is well compatible with the other well logging instruments. The performance experiments of the prototype have been conducted in a test field. The results show that the prototype system is capable of detecting the target which is 8...

  8. PDS and NASA Tournament Laboratory Project to Engage Citizen Scientists and to Provide New Access to Cassini Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odess, Jennifer; Gordon, Mitch; Showalter, Mark; LaMora, Andy; Del Villar, Ambi; Raugh, Anne; Erickson, Kristen; Galica, Carol; Grayzeck, Ed; Morgan, Thomas; Knopf, Bill

    2014-11-01

    Jennifer Odess (1), Mitch Gordon (2), Mark Showalter (2), Andy LaMora (1), Ambi Del Villar (1), Anne Raugh (3), Kristen Erickson (4), Carol Galica (4), Ed Grayzeck (5), T. Morgan (5), and Bill Knopf (4)1. Appirio Top Coder, Inc2. SETI Institute3. University of Maryland4. NASA Headquarters5. Goddard Space Flight CenterThe Planetary Data System (PDS), working with the NASA Tournament Lab (NTL) and TopCoder® , is using challenge-based competition to generate new applications that increase both access to planetary data and discoverability—allowing users to “mine” data, and thus, to make new discoveries from data already “on the ground”. The first challenge-based completion was an optimized database and API for comet data at the PDS Small Bodies Node (SBN) in 2012. Since start-up, the installation at SBN has been tweaked to provide access to the comet data holdings of the SBN, and has introduced new users and new developers to PDS data. A follow-on contest using Cassini images from the PDS Rings Discipline Node, was designed to challenge the competitors to create new, more transparent, agile tools for public access to NASA’s planetary data, where “public” includes citizen scientists and educators. The experience gained with the API at SBN was applied to establishing a second installation at the PDS Planetary Rings Node (Rings), to serve as the basis to develop similar access tools at Rings to make the growing archive of Cassini images available through the API. The Cassini-Rings project had as its goal to develop a crowd-sourcing project with eventual application across the PDS holdings. From the contest results, a preliminary algorithm can detect known satellites hidden in Saturn’s rings which should prove valuable to programmers. The contest approach is also of potential use to educators for exercises studying the solar system. The progress to date and results of this citizen-scientist project will be discussed.

  9. Surface Contour Radar (SCR) contributions to FASINEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, E. J.

    1988-01-01

    The SCR was asked to participate in the Frontal Air-Sea Interaction Experiment (FASINEX) to provide directional wave spectra. The NASA P-3 carrying the SCR, the Radar Ocean Wave Spectrometer, and the Airborne Oceanographic Lidar was one of five aircrafts and two ocean research ships participating in this coordinated study of the air sea interaction in the vicinity of a sea surface temperature front near 28 deg N, 70 deg W. Analysis of data from the February 1986 experiment is still ongoing, but results already submitted for publication strengthen the hypothesis that off-nadir radar backscatter is closely correlated to wind stress. The SCR provided valuable information on the directional wave spectrum and its spatial variation.

  10. Constraining the Enceladus plume using numerical simulation and Cassini data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeoh, Seng Keat; Li, Zheng; Goldstein, David B.; Varghese, Philip L.; Levin, Deborah A.; Trafton, Laurence M.

    2017-01-01

    Since its discovery, the Enceladus plume has been subjected to intense study due to the major effects that it has on the Saturnian system and the window that it provides into the interior of Enceladus. However, several questions remain and we attempt to answer some of them in this work. In particular, we aim to constrain the H2O production rate from the plume, evaluate the relative importance of the jets and the distributed sources along the Tiger Stripes, and make inferences about the source of the plume by accurately modeling the plume and constraining the model using the Cassini INMS and UVIS data. This is an extension of a previous work (Yeoh, S.K., et al. [2015] Icarus, 253, 205-222) in which we only modeled the collisional part of the Enceladus plume and studied its important physical processes. In this work, we propagate the plume farther into space where the flow has become free-molecular and the Cassini INMS and UVIS data were sampled. Then, we fit this part of the plume to the INMS H2O density distributions sampled along the E3, E5 and E7 trajectories and also compare some of the fit results with the UVIS measurements of the plume optical depth collected during the solar occultation observation on 18 May 2010. We consider several vent conditions and source configurations for the plume. By constraining our model using the INMS and UVIS data, we estimate H2O production rates of several hundred kgs-1: 400-500 kg/s during the E3 and E7 flybys and ∼900 kg/s during the E5 flyby. These values agree with other estimates and are consistent with the observed temporal variability of the plume over the orbital period of Enceladus (Hedman, M.M., et al. [2013] Nature, 500, 182-184). In addition, we determine that one of the Tiger Stripes, Cairo, exhibits a local temporal variability consistent with the observed overall temporal variability of the plume. We also find that the distributed sources along the Tiger Stripes are likely dominant while the jets provide a

  11. Cassini Imaging of Auroral Emissions on the Galilean Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, P.; McEwen, A.; Porco, C.

    2001-05-01

    Cassini captured several sequences of images showing Io, Europa and Ganymede while the moons were eclipsed by Jupiter. Io was the best studied of the satellites, with 4 eclipses successfully recorded. Earlier eclipse imaging by Galileo (Geissler et al., Science 295, 870-874) had shown colorful atmospheric emissions from Io and raised questions concerning their temporal variability and the identity of the emitting species. With its high data rate and numerous filter combinations, Cassini was able to fill some of the gaps in our knowledge of Io's visible aurorae. Io's bright equatorial glows were detected at previously unknown wavelengths and were also seen in motion. One eclipse took place on 12/29/2000 while Io was far from the plasma torus center. The pair of equatorial glows near the sub-Jupiter and anti-Jupiter points appeared about equal in brightness and changed little in location or intensity over a two hour period. Io crossed the plasma torus center during the next eclipse on 1/01/2001, as it passed through System III magnetic longitudes from 250 to 303 degrees. The equatorial glows were seen to shift in latitude during this eclipse, tracking the tangent points of the jovian magnetic field lines. This behaviour is similar to that observed for ultraviolet and other atomic emissions, and confirms that these visible glows are powered by Birkeland currents connecting Io and Jupiter. The eclipse on 1/05/2001 provided the best spectral measurements of the aurorae. The equatorial glows were detected at near ultraviolet wavelengths, consistent with their interpretation as molecular SO2 emissions. More than 100 kR were recorded in the ISS UV3 filter (300-380 nm) along with a similar intensity in BL1 (290-500 nm), comparable to Galileo estimates. At least 50 kR were detected in UV2 images (265-330 nm). No detection was made in UV1 (235-280 nm), allowing us to place an upper limit of about 100 kR. A new detection of the equatorial glows was made in the IR1 band (670

  12. Retrievals of Jovian Tropospheric Phosphine from Cassini/CIRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, P. G. J.; Parrish, P.; Fouchet, T.; Calcutt, S. B.; Taylor, F. W.; Simon-Miller, A. A.; Nixon, C. A.

    2004-01-01

    On December 30th 2000, the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft reached the perijove milestone on its continuing journey to the Saturnian system. During an extended six-month encounter, the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) returned spectra of the Jovian atmosphere, rings and satellites from 10-1400 cm(exp -1) (1000-7 microns) at a programmable spectral resolution of 0.5 to 15 cm(exp -1). The improved spectral resolution of CIRS over previous IR instrument-missions to Jupiter, the extended spectral range, and higher signal-to-noise performance provide significant advantages over previous data sets. CIRS global observations of the mid-infrared spectrum of Jupiter at medium resolution (2.5 cm(exp -1)) have been analysed both with a radiance differencing scheme and an optimal estimation retrieval model to retrieve the spatial variation of phosphine and ammonia fractional scale height in the troposphere between 60 deg S and 60 deg N at a spatial resolution of 6 deg. The ammonia fractional scale height appears to be high over the Equatorial Zone (EZ) but low over the North Equatorial Belt (NEB) and South Equatorial Belt (SEB) indicating rapid uplift or strong vertical mixing in the EZ. The abundance of phosphine shows a similar strong latitudinal variation which generally matches that of the ammonia fractional scale height. However while the ammonia fractional scale height distribution is to a first order symmetric in latitude, the phosphine distribution shows a North/South asymmetry at mid latitudes with higher amounts detected at 40 deg N than 40 deg S. In addition the data show that while the ammonia fractional scale height at this spatial resolution appears to be low over the Great Red Spot (GRS), indicating reduced vertical mixing above the approx. 500 mb level, the abundance of phosphine at deeper levels may be enhanced at the northern edge of the GRS indicating upwelling.

  13. Meteorology of Jupiter's Equatorial Hot Spots and Plumes from Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, David Sanghun; Showman, Adam P.; Vasavada, Ashwin R.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.

    2013-01-01

    We present an updated analysis of Jupiter's equatorial meteorology from Cassini observations. For two months preceding the spacecraft's closest approach, the Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) onboard regularly imaged the atmosphere. We created time-lapse movies from this period in order to analyze the dynamics of equatorial hot spots and their interactions with adjacent latitudes. Hot spots are relatively cloud-free regions that emit strongly at 5 lm; improved knowledge of these features is crucial for fully understanding Galileo probe measurements taken during its descent through one. Hot spots are quasistable, rectangular dark areas on visible-wavelength images, with defined eastern edges that sharply contrast with surrounding clouds, but diffuse western edges serving as nebulous boundaries with adjacent equatorial plumes. Hot spots exhibit significant variations in size and shape over timescales of days and weeks. Some of these changes correspond with passing vortex systems from adjacent latitudes interacting with hot spots. Strong anticyclonic gyres present to the south and southeast of the dark areas appear to circulate into hot spots. Impressive, bright white plumes occupy spaces in between hot spots. Compact cirrus-like 'scooter' clouds flow rapidly through the plumes before disappearing within the dark areas. These clouds travel at 150-200 m/s, much faster than the 100 m/s hot spot and plume drift speed. This raises the possibility that the scooter clouds may be more illustrative of the actual jet stream speed at these latitudes. Most previously published zonal wind profiles represent the drift speed of the hot spots at their latitude from pattern matching of the entire longitudinal image strip. If a downward branch of an equatorially-trapped Rossby wave controls the overall appearance of hot spots, however, the westward phase velocity of the wave leads to underestimates of the true jet stream speed.

  14. New constraints on Saturn's interior from Cassini astrometric data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lainey, Valéry; Jacobson, Robert A.; Tajeddine, Radwan; Cooper, Nicholas J.; Murray, Carl; Robert, Vincent; Tobie, Gabriel; Guillot, Tristan; Mathis, Stéphane; Remus, Françoise; Desmars, Josselin; Arlot, Jean-Eudes; De Cuyper, Jean-Pierre; Dehant, Véronique; Pascu, Dan; Thuillot, William; Le Poncin-Lafitte, Christophe; Zahn, Jean-Paul

    2017-01-01

    Using astrometric observations spanning more than a century and including a large set of Cassini data, we determine Saturn's tidal parameters through their current effects on the orbits of the eight main and four coorbital Moons. We have used the latter to make the first determination of Saturn's Love number from observations, k2=0.390 ± 0.024, a value larger than the commonly used theoretical value of 0.341 (Gavrilov & Zharkov, 1977), but compatible with more recent models (Helled & Guillot, 2013) for which the static k2 ranges from 0.355 to 0.382. Depending on the assumed spin for Saturn's interior, the new constraint can lead to a significant reduction in the number of potential models, offering great opportunities to probe the planet's interior. In addition, significant tidal dissipation within Saturn is confirmed (Lainey et al., 2012) corresponding to a high present-day tidal ratio k2/Q=(1.59 ± 0.74) × 10-4 and implying fast orbital expansions of the Moons. This high dissipation, with no obvious variations for tidal frequencies corresponding to those of Enceladus and Dione, may be explained by viscous friction in a solid core, implying a core viscosity typically ranging between 1014 and 1016 Pa.s (Remus et al., 2012). However, a dissipation increase by one order of magnitude at Rhea's frequency could suggest the existence of an additional, frequency-dependent, dissipation process, possibly from turbulent friction acting on tidal waves in the fluid envelope of Saturn (Ogilvie & Lin, 2004; Fuller et al. 2016).

  15. Cassini's Maneuver Automation Software (MAS) Process: How to Successfully Command 200 Navigation Maneuvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Genevie Velarde; Mohr, David; Kirby, Charles E.

    2008-01-01

    To keep Cassini on its complex trajectory, more than 200 orbit trim maneuvers (OTMs) have been planned from July 2004 to July 2010. With only a few days between many of these OTMs, the operations process of planning and executing the necessary commands had to be automated. The resulting Maneuver Automation Software (MAS) process minimizes the workforce required for, and maximizes the efficiency of, the maneuver design and uplink activities. The MAS process is a well-organized and logically constructed interface between Cassini's Navigation (NAV), Spacecraft Operations (SCO), and Ground Software teams. Upon delivery of an orbit determination (OD) from NAV, the MAS process can generate a maneuver design and all related uplink and verification products within 30 minutes. To date, all 112 OTMs executed by the Cassini spacecraft have been successful. MAS was even used to successfully design and execute a maneuver while the spacecraft was in safe mode.

  16. Cassini Attitude and Articulation Control Subsystem Fault Protection Challenges During Saturn Proximal Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, David M.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Cassini Spacecraft, launched on October 15th, 1997 arrived at Saturn on June 30th, 2004, is the largest and most ambitious interplanetary spacecraft in history. As the first spacecraft to achieve orbit at Saturn, Cassini has collected science data throughout its four-year prime mission (2004-08), and has since been approved for a first and second extended mission through 2017. As part of the final extended mission, Cassini will begin an aggressive and exciting campaign of high inclination low altitude flybys within the inner most rings of Saturn, skimming Saturn's outer atmosphere, until the spacecraft is finally disposed of via planned impact with the planet. This final campaign, known as the proximal orbits, presents unique fault protection related challenges, the details of which are discussed in this paper.

  17. Radar cross-sectional study using noise radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freundorfer, A. P.; Siddiqui, J. Y.; Antar, Y. M. M.

    2015-05-01

    A noise radar system is proposed with capabilities to measure and acquire the radar cross-section (RCS) of targets. The proposed system can cover a noise bandwidth of near DC to 50 GHz. The noise radar RCS measurements were conducted for selective targets like spheres and carpenter squares with and without dielectric bodies for a noise band of 400MHz-5000MHz. The bandwidth of operation was limited by the multiplier and the antennae used.

  18. Investigating Titan's Atmospheric Chemistry at Low Temperature in Support of the NASA Cassini Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Salama, Farid

    2013-01-01

    Titan's atmosphere, composed mainly of N2 and CH4, is the siege of a complex chemistry induced by solar UV radiation and electron bombardment from Saturn's magnetosphere. This organic chemistry occurs at temperatures lower than 200 K and leads to the production of heavy molecules and subsequently solid aerosols that form the orange haze surrounding Titan. The Titan Haze Simulation (THS) experiment has been developed on the COSMIC simulation chamber at NASA Ames in order to study the different steps of Titan's atmospheric chemistry at low temperature and to provide laboratory data in support for Cassini data analysis. The chemistry is simulated by plasma in the stream of a supersonic expansion. With this unique design, the gas mixture is adiabatically cooled to Titan-like temperature (approx. 150 K) before inducing the chemistry by plasma discharge. Different gas mixtures containing N2, CH4, and the first products of the N2,-CH4 chemistry (C2H2, C2H4, C6H6...) but also heavier molecules such as PAHs or nitrogen containing PAHs can be injected. Both the gas phase and solid phase products resulting from the plasma-induced chemistry can be monitored and analyzed. Here we present the results of recent gas phase and solid phase studies that highlight the chemical growth evolution when injecting heavier hydrocarbon trace elements in the initial N2-CH4 mixture. Due to the short residence time of the gas in the plasma discharge, only the first steps of the chemistry have time to occur in a N2-CH4 discharge. However by adding acetylene and benzene to the initial N2-CH4 mixture, we can study the intermediate steps of Titan's atmospheric chemistry as well as specific chemical pathways. These results show the uniqueness of the THS experiment to help understand the first and intermediate steps of Titan fs atmospheric chemistry as well as specific chemical pathways leading to Titan fs haze formation.

  19. Discovering habitable environments and life in the Saturn System (Jean Dominique Cassini Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunine, Jonathan I.

    2015-04-01

    One of the most notable scientific adventures of our time is being conducted jointly by Europe and the United States around the solar system's great ringed planet, Saturn. The Cassini-Huygens mission arrived in orbit in 2004, and the Huygens probe descended through Titan's atmosphere in January 2005. Titan's surface has been found to host a rich and still-enigmatic methane cycle, complete with lakes, seas, rivers and rain. Enceladus is jetting its interior volatiles into space, where the Cassini Orbiter detected and measured a number of species within the resulting plume. These include water, organic molecules, nitrogen compounds, and salts. Cassini radio science detected the presence within both Enceladus and Titan of internal water oceans. Variability with orbital phase of the Enceladus plume, also discovered by the Cassini Orbiter, makes a convincing case for the jets themselves being derived from the deep interior and controlled by tidal forces. Both Enceladus and Titan host potentially habitable environments, and they represent unique opportunities for testing whether either or both of these bodies harbor life. Titan's interior will be difficult to access, but its large surface hydrocarbon seas can be explored in situ with Huygens-like vehicles. The Cassini Orbiter determined the liquid in Titan's seas to be methane and ethane, which raises the question of whether simple chemistry can evolve into autocatalysis and self-replication in a non-aqueous liquid environment. In effect, is there an exotic kind of "life" in the Titan seas? Enceladus is perhaps more straightforward: given that the interior water ocean as expressed through the plume appears to satisfy the formal requirements for habitability, is biological activity occurring there? Answering these questions will require a new generation of robotic vehicles beyond Cassini-Huygens -- and new opportunities for international collaborations in planetary exploration.

  20. The Orbits of Saturn's Small Satellites Derived from Combined Historic and Cassini Imaging Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitale, J. N.; Jacobson, R. A.; Porco, C. C.; Owen, W. M., Jr.

    2006-08-01

    We report on the orbits of the small, inner Saturnian satellites, either recovered or newly discovered in recent Cassini imaging observations. The orbits presented here reflect improvements over our previously published values in that the time base of Cassini observations has been extended, and numerical orbital integrations have been performed in those cases in which simple precessing elliptical, inclined orbit solutions were found to be inadequate. Using combined Cassini and Voyager observations, we obtain an eccentricity for Pan 7 times smaller than previously reported because of the predominance of higher quality Cassini data in the fit. The orbit of the small satellite (S/2005 S1 [Daphnis]) discovered by Cassini in the Keeler gap in the outer A ring appears to be circular and coplanar; no external perturbations are apparent. Refined orbits of Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, and Epimetheus are based on Cassini , Voyager, Hubble Space Telescope, and Earth-based data and a numerical integration perturbed by all the massive satellites and each other. Atlas is significantly perturbed by Prometheus, and to a lesser extent by Pandora, through high-wavenumber mean-motion resonances. Orbital integrations involving Atlas yield a mass of GMAtlas=(0.44+/-0.04)×10-3 km3 s -2, 3 times larger than reported previously (GM is the product of the Newtonian constant of gravitation G and the satellite mass M). Orbital integrations show that Methone is perturbed by Mimas, Pallene is perturbed by Enceladus, and Polydeuces librates around Dione's L5 point with a period of about 791 days. We report on the nature and orbits of bodies sighted in the F ring, two of which may have persisted for a year or more.

  1. The Radar Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Same as Report ( SAR ) 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 25 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT unclassified b. ABSTRACT unclassified c...ABSTRACT Same as Report ( SAR ) 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 25 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT unclassified b. ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE...object bistatic radars. The former allows high resolution without the use of pulse compression techniques and the latter promises cheaper systems by

  2. Imaging synthetic aperture radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Bryan L.; Cordaro, J. Thomas

    1997-01-01

    A linear-FM SAR imaging radar method and apparatus to produce a real-time image by first arranging the returned signals into a plurality of subaperture arrays, the columns of each subaperture array having samples of dechirped baseband pulses, and further including a processing of each subaperture array to obtain coarse-resolution in azimuth, then fine-resolution in range, and lastly, to combine the processed subapertures to obtain the final fine-resolution in azimuth. Greater efficiency is achieved because both the transmitted signal and a local oscillator signal mixed with the returned signal can be varied on a pulse-to-pulse basis as a function of radar motion. Moreover, a novel circuit can adjust the sampling location and the A/D sample rate of the combined dechirped baseband signal which greatly reduces processing time and hardware. The processing steps include implementing a window function, stabilizing either a central reference point and/or all other points of a subaperture with respect to doppler frequency and/or range as a function of radar motion, sorting and compressing the signals using a standard fourier transforms. The stabilization of each processing part is accomplished with vector multiplication using waveforms generated as a function of radar motion wherein these waveforms may be synthesized in integrated circuits. Stabilization of range migration as a function of doppler frequency by simple vector multiplication is a particularly useful feature of the invention; as is stabilization of azimuth migration by correcting for spatially varying phase errors prior to the application of an autofocus process.

  3. Netted LPI RADARs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    easier and, since they cover most of the space around the antenna, can expose it easily at various bearings ). Typical sidelobe levels for conventional...modern radar systems results in an electro- magnetic environment where the receiver should expect very few pulses. Staggered PRF and frequency agility...detector, a logarithmic amplitude compressor , and a signal encoder. All subunits are digitally controlled by computer as to frequency, sweep rate, and

  4. Radar Investigations of Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostro, S.

    2004-05-01

    Radar investigations have provided otherwise unavailable information about the physical and dynamical properties of about 230 asteroids. Measurements of the distribution of echo power in time delay (range) and Doppler frequency (line-of-sight velocity) provide two-dimensional images with spatial resolution as fine as a decameter. Sequences of delay-Doppler images can be used to produce geologically detailed three-dimensional models, to define the rotation state precisely, to constrain the internal density distribution, and to estimate the trajectory of the object's center of mass. Radar wavelengths (4 to 13 cm) and the observer's control of transmitted and received polarizations make the observations sensitive to near-surface bulk density and macroscopic structure. Since delay-Doppler measurements are orthogonal to optical angle measurements and typically have much finer fractional precision, they are powerful for refining orbits and prediction ephemerides. Such astrometric measurements can add decades or centuries to the interval over which an asteroid's close Earth approaches can accurately be predicted and can significantly refine collision probability estimates based on optical astrometry alone. In the highly unlikely case that a small body is on course for an Earth collision in this century, radar reconnaissance would almost immediately distinguish between an impact trajectory and a near miss and would dramatically reduce the difficulty and cost of any effort to prevent the collision. The sizes and rotation periods of radar-detected asteroids span more than four orders of magnitude. The observations have revealed both stony and metallic objects, elongated and nonconvex shapes as well as nearly featureless spheroids, small-scale morphology ranging from smoother than the lunar regolith to rougher than the rockiest terrain on Mars, craters and diverse linear structures, non-principal-axis spin states, contact binaries, and binary systems.

  5. Radar gun hazards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-20

    Radar guns - hand-held units used by the law to nail speeders - have been in use since the early '60s. Now they've been accused of causing cancer. Police officers in several states have so far filed eight suits against the manufacturer, claiming that they have contracted rare forms of cancer, such as of the eyelid and the testicle, from frequent proximity to the devices. Spurred by concerns expressed by police groups, researchers at the Rochester Institute of Technology are conducting what they believe to be the first research of its kind in the nation. Last month psychologist John Violanti, an expert in policy psychology and health, sent out a one-page survey to 6,000 active and retired police officers in New York State, asking them about their health and their use of radar guns. Violanti says melanoma, leukemia, and lymph node cancer may be linked to these as well as other electromagnetic devices. The Food and Drug Administration earlier this year issued a warning about radar guns, telling users not to operate them closer than 6 inches from the body. But this may not be a sufficient safeguard since the instruments can give off crisscrossing wave emissions within a police vehicle. The survey will be used to help determine if it would be safer to mount the guns, which are currently either hand-held or mounted on dashboards, outside troopers' cars.

  6. Radar clutter classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehwien, Wolfgang

    1989-11-01

    The problem of classifying radar clutter as found on air traffic control radar systems is studied. An algorithm based on Bayes decision theory and the parametric maximum a posteriori probability classifier is developed to perform this classification automatically. This classifier employs a quadratic discriminant function and is optimum for feature vectors that are distributed according to the multivariate normal density. Separable clutter classes are most likely to arise from the analysis of the Doppler spectrum. Specifically, a feature set based on the complex reflection coefficients of the lattice prediction error filter is proposed. The classifier is tested using data recorded from L-band air traffic control radars. The Doppler spectra of these data are examined; the properties of the feature set computed using these data are studied in terms of both the marginal and multivariate statistics. Several strategies involving different numbers of features, class assignments, and data set pretesting according to Doppler frequency and signal to noise ratio were evaluated before settling on a workable algorithm. Final results are presented in terms of experimental misclassification rates and simulated and classified plane position indicator displays.

  7. Constraints on MOND theory from radio tracking data of the Cassini spacecraft

    CERN Document Server

    Hees, A; Jacobson, R A; Park, R S

    2014-01-01

    The MOdified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) is an attempt to modify the gravitation theory to solve the Dark Matter problem. This phenomenology is very successful at the galactic level. The main effect produced by MOND in the Solar System is called the External Field Effect parametrized by the parameter $Q_2$. We have used 9 years of Cassini range and Doppler measurements to constrain $Q_2$. Our estimate of this parameter based on Cassini data is given by $Q_2=(3 \\pm 3)\\times 10^{-27} \\ \\rm{s^{-2}}$ which shows no deviation from General Relativity and excludes a large part of the relativistic MOND theories.

  8. Cassini Attitude Control Flight Software: from Development to In-Flight Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jay

    2008-01-01

    The Cassini Attitude and Articulation Control Subsystem (AACS) Flight Software (FSW) has achieved its intended design goals by successfully guiding and controlling the Cassini-Huygens planetary mission to Saturn and its moons. This paper describes an overview of AACS FSW details from early design, development, implementation, and test to its fruition of operating and maintaining spacecraft control over an eleven year prime mission. Starting from phases of FSW development, topics expand to FSW development methodology, achievements utilizing in-flight autonomy, and summarize lessons learned during flight operations which can be useful to FSW in current and future spacecraft missions.

  9. Detection of Weather Radar Clutter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøvith, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Weather radars provide valuable information on precipitation in the atmosphere but due to the way radars work, not only precipitation is observed by the weather radar. Weather radar clutter, echoes from non-precipitating targets, occur frequently in the data, resulting in lowered data quality....... Especially in the application of weather radar data in quantitative precipitation estimation and forecasting a high data quality is important. Clutter detection is one of the key components in achieving this goal. This thesis presents three methods for detection of clutter. The methods use supervised...... and precipitating and non-precipitating clouds. Another method uses the difference in the motion field of clutter and precipitation measured between two radar images. Furthermore, the direction of the wind field extracted from a weather model is used. The third method uses information about the refractive index...

  10. Detection of space debris with VLBI radar technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molotov, I.; Konovalenko, A.; Agapov, V.; Sochilina, A.; Lipatov, B.; Molotov, E.; Gorshenkov, Y.

    The possibility of Evpatoria RT-70 planetary radar application for space debris research was tested in two trial experiments for targets at geostationary (GEO) and high-elliptic (HEO) orbits in 2001. The RT-70 has the 200 kW continuous power transmitter at 6-cm wavelength, which was used for radio location of planets. Therefore the bistatic radar system only may be realized for orbital object measurements. The receiving antennas (Bear Lakes RT-64, Svetloe RT-32, Noto RT- 32, Torun RT-32 and Urumqi RT-25) used the standard VLBI equipment for recording of echo-signals, because they have not specialized radar apparatus. Such multi-antennas configuration allows to add the classic radar data with VLBI measurements: radar has the resolution for range and radial velocity, VLBI provides the angle and angular rate. Moreover the VLBI radar may be a tool for 3D- measurements: combination of radar map and VLBI image can result the "radio holography" picture of investigated object. Seven GEO objects were detected in May session and four GEO + two HEO objects - in December session. The uncontrolled axial rotation with 5 - 20 s period was fixed for GEO targets. The first results of processing that carry out at Russia and Canada are presented. It is planned to finally adjust the VLBI radar method and t o start the regular observations under the international program of optical and radar monitoring of the near-Earth space environment that will be partially supported by INTAS-01-0669, RFBR-02-02- 17568 and RFBR-02-02-3108.

  11. Radar techniques using array antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Wirth, Wulf-Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Radar Techniques Using Array Antennas is a thorough introduction to the possibilities of radar technology based on electronic steerable and active array antennas. Topics covered include array signal processing, array calibration, adaptive digital beamforming, adaptive monopulse, superresolution, pulse compression, sequential detection, target detection with long pulse series, space-time adaptive processing (STAP), moving target detection using synthetic aperture radar (SAR), target imaging, energy management and system parameter relations. The discussed methods are confirmed by simulation stud

  12. 探地雷达在地下考古遗存探测中的实验与应用%Experiments and Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar in the Investigation of Subsurface Archaeological Interest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宗鑫; 王心源; 刘传胜; 骆磊

    2016-01-01

    近年来,探地雷达被越来越多地应用于考古探查中。由于反演多解性问题的存在,雷达图像上的异常既可能是考古目标引起的,也可能是由于地下环境介质的不连续性引起的,所以探究不同类型的考古遗存在探地雷达图像上的典型异常响应,有助于准确识别雷达图像上的“真”异常,剔除一些“假”异常。首先,本文基于西北干旱-半干旱区文物埋藏环境,在河北省怀来县遥感综合试验站试验区设计实施了地下目标体探地雷达探测实验,分析了不同材质的小尺度目标体及夯土结构在探地雷达图像上的响应特征;然后,进一步将探地雷达应用于悬泉置遗址地下城墙基址的探测,对城墙在雷达图像上的响应特征进行了分析。实践表明,探地雷达技术在埋藏浅、小尺度、物性差异不大的考古探查中具有很好的效果,得到并解释了点状、线状、面状等不同考古目标体在探地雷达图像上的响应规律。%Ground Penetrating Radar(GPR) has been more and more widely used in archaeological investigations, because it can be a non-destructive, cost-effective way to locate buried structures in archaeological studies. Compared with the conventional geophysical tools used in the shallow explorations, the electromagnetic method, ground-penetrating radar (GPR), is more economical and is capable to produce large amounts of continuous, high resolution subsurface data. GPR canextend the exploration range of remote sensing (RS) to subsurface. However, because of the non-uniqueness of inversion, an anomaly could be raised by the archaeological interest or the inhomogeneity of underground matrixes, therefore studying the typical anomalies of diferent archaeological targets on GPR images is helpful to distinguish the“true”anamolies from the“fake”anamolies. Furthemore, some experiences and references could be provided. The following

  13. Basic gait analysis based on continuous wave radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun

    2012-09-01

    A gait analysis method based on continuous wave (CW) radar is proposed in this paper. Time-frequency analysis is used to analyze the radar micro-Doppler echo from walking humans, and the relationships between the time-frequency spectrogram and human biological gait are discussed. The methods for extracting the gait parameters from the spectrogram are studied in depth and experiments on more than twenty subjects have been performed to acquire the radar gait data. The gait parameters are calculated and compared. The gait difference between men and women are presented based on the experimental data and extracted features. Gait analysis based on CW radar will provide a new method for clinical diagnosis and therapy.

  14. UWB radar target recognition based on time-domain bispectrum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Donghong; Zhang Yongshun; Chen Zhijie; Cheng Junbin

    2006-01-01

    Complex targets are irradiated by UWB radar, not only the mirror scattering echoes but also the multiscattering interacting echoes are included in target echoes. These two echoes can not be distinguished by classical frequency spectrum and power spectrum. Time-domain bispectrum features of UWB radar signals that mingled with noise are analyzed, then processing this kind of signal using the method of time-domain bispectrum is experimented. At last, some UWB radar returns with different signal noise ratio are simulated using the method of time-domain bispectrum. Theoretical analysis and the results of simulation show that the method of extraction partial features of UWB radar targets based on time-domain bispectrum is good, and target classification and recognition can be implemented using those features.

  15. Laser Radar Receiver Performance Improvement by Inter Symbol Interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xuesong; Inoue, Daisuke; Matsubara, Hiroyuki; Kagami, Manabu

    The power of laser radar received echoes varies over a large range due to many factors such as target distance, size, reflection ratio, etc, which leads to the difficulty of decoding codes from the received noise buried signals for spectrum code modulated laser radar. Firstly, a pseudo-random noise (PN) code modulated laser radar model is given, and the problem to be addressed is discussed. Then, a novel method based on Inter Symbol Interference (ISI) is proposed for resolving the problem, providing that only Additive White Gaussian Noise (AWGN) exists. The ISI effect is introduced by using a high pass filter (HPF). The results show that ISI improves laser radar receiver decoding ratio, thus the peak of the correlation function of decoded codes and modulation codes. Finally, the effect of proposed method is verified by a simple experiment.

  16. Methane Band and Continuum Band Imaging of Titan's Atmosphere Using Cassini ISS Narrow Angle Camera Pictures from the CURE/Cassini Imaging Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shitanishi, Jennifer; Gillam, S. D.

    2009-05-01

    The study of Titan's atmosphere, which bears resemblance to early Earth's, may help us understand more of our own. Constructing a Monte Carlo model of Titan's atmosphere is helpful to achieve this goal. Methane (MT) and continuum band (CB) images of Titan taken by the CURE/Cassini Imaging Project, using the Cassini Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) were analyzed. They were scheduled by Cassini Optical Navigation. Images were obtained at phase 53°, 112°, 161°, and 165°. They include 22 total MT1(center wavelength at 619nm), MT2(727nm), MT3(889nm), CB1(635nm), CB2(751nm), and CB3(938nm) images. They were reduced with previously written scripts using the National Optical Astronomy Observatory Image Reduction and Analysis Facility scientific analysis suite. Correction for horizontal and vertical banding and cosmic ray hits were made. The MT images were registered with corresponding CB images to ensure that subsequently measured fluxes ratios came from the same parts of the atmosphere. Preliminary DN limb-to-limb scans and loci of the haze layers will be presented. Accurate estimates of the sub-spacecraft points on each picture will be presented. Flux ratios (FMT/FCB=Q0) along the scans and total absorption coefficients along the lines of sight from the spacecraft through the pixels (and into Titan) will also be presented.

  17. Icy Satellite Science Today and in Cassini's Final Three Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buratti, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Cassini Mission has turned our view of Saturn's icy moons from scientific sketches to fully realized worlds. Among the major discoveries are: Activity on Enceladus and associated plumes that originate in small hot spots on its south pole and that appear to be modulated by tidal forces; a liquid subsurface water ocean on Enceladus that is a habitable environment; several new moons; debris rings associated with moons; a unique equatorial ridge on Iapetus; the identity of new constituents on the moons including carbon dioxide ice on most of them and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)on Iapetus; differentiated or partially differentiated interiors; nano-iron on the surfaces of the moons and in the rings; volatile segregation on Iapetus and Hyperion; and a bewildering array of geologic processes on the small moons. But our new view of these icy worlds has spawned new questions. Among these unanswered questions are: How variable are the plumes? Have any other moons had activity similar to that on Enceladus and did it continue up to the recent past? How much dust do the moons contribute to the region around Saturn? What caused the ridge on Iapetus? What are the interiors of the moons like? How differentiated and compensated are they? Five additional targeted flybys, two of Dione and three of Enceladus, have been designed to answer these questions and will be implemented during the remainder of the Solstice Mission. The Dione flybys both include gravity passes to determine its state of differentiation. One of the flybys is optimized to measure the fields and particle environment around Dione. One of the two remote-sensing flybys of Enceladus will scrutinize the south polar region to further understand the size, temperature, and variability of the emitting areas, while the other will observe the north pole to determine why it is so different from the south. The third Enceladus flyby involves an unprecedented pass less than 50 km above the surface into the midst of

  18. Removing interfering clutter associated with radar pulses that an airborne radar receives from a radar transponder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormesher, Richard C.; Axline, Robert M.

    2008-12-02

    Interfering clutter in radar pulses received by an airborne radar system from a radar transponder can be suppressed by developing a representation of the incoming echo-voltage time-series that permits the clutter associated with predetermined parts of the time-series to be estimated. These estimates can be used to estimate and suppress the clutter associated with other parts of the time-series.

  19. Radar foundations for imaging and advanced concepts

    CERN Document Server

    Sullivan, Roger

    2004-01-01

    Through courses internally taught at IDA, Dr. Roger Sullivan has devised a book that brings readers fully up to speed on the most essential quantitave aspects of general radar in order to introduce study of the most exciting and relevant applications to radar imaging and advanced concepts: Synthetic Aperture Radar (4 chapters), Space-time Adaptive Processing, moving target indication (MTI), bistatic radar, low probability of intercept (LPI) radar, weather radar, and ground-penetrating radar. Whether you're a radar novice or experienced professional, this is an essential refer

  20. 18th International Laser Radar Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Neuber, Roland; Rairoux, Patrick; Wandinger, Ulla

    1997-01-01

    Lidar or laser radar, the depth-resolved remote measurement of atmospheric parameters with optical means, has become an important tool in the field of atmospheric and environmental remote sensing. In this volume the latest progress in the development of lidar methods, experiments, and applications is described. The content is based on selected and thoroughly refereed papers presented at the 18th International Laser Radar Conference, Berlin, 22-26 July 1996. The book is divided into six parts which cover the topics of tropospheric aerosols and clouds, lidar in space, wind, water vapor, troposheric trace gases and plumes, and stratospheric and mesospheric profiling. As a supplement to fundamental lidar textbooks this volume may serve as a guide for scientists, engineers, and graduate students through the blossoming field of modern lidar techniques and their contribution to atmospheric and environmental research.

  1. Parametric estimation of ultra wideband radar targets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Ping; Jing Zhanrong

    2009-01-01

    Based on the analysis of impulse response properties, a scattering model of ultra wideband (UWB) radar targets is developed to estimate the target parameters exactly. With this model, two algorithms of multiple signal classification (MUSIC), and matrix pencil (MP), are introduced to calculate the scattering center parame-ters of targets and their performances are compared. The simulation experiments show that there are no differ-ences in the estimation precision of MUSIC and MP methods when the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is larger than 13 dB. However, the MP method has a better performance than that of MUSIC method when the SNR is smaller than 13 dB. Besides, the time consuming of MP method is leas than that of MUSIC method. Therefore, the MP algorithm is preferred for the parametric estimation of UWB radar targets.

  2. Broadview Radar Altimetry Toolbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondéjar, Albert; Benveniste, Jérôme; Naeije, Marc; Escolà, Roger; Moyano, Gorka; Roca, Mònica; Terra-Homem, Miguel; Friaças, Ana; Martinho, Fernando; Schrama, Ernst; Ambrózio, Américo; Restano, Marco

    2016-07-01

    The universal altimetry toolbox, BRAT (Broadview Radar Altimetry Toolbox) which can read all previous and current altimetry missions' data, incorporates now the capability to read the upcoming Sentinel-3 L1 and L2 products. ESA endeavoured to develop and supply this capability to support the users of the future Sentinel-3 SAR Altimetry Mission. BRAT is a collection of tools and tutorial documents designed to facilitate the processing of radar altimetry data. This project started in 2005 from the joint efforts of ESA (European Space Agency) and CNES (Centre National d'Études Spatiales), and it is freely available at http://earth.esa.int/brat. The tools enable users to interact with the most common altimetry data formats. The BratGUI is the front-end for the powerful command line tools that are part of the BRAT suite. BRAT can also be used in conjunction with MATLAB/IDL (via reading routines) or in C/C++/Fortran via a programming API, allowing the user to obtain desired data, bypassing the data-formatting hassle. BRAT can be used simply to visualise data quickly, or to translate the data into other formats such as NetCDF, ASCII text files, KML (Google Earth) and raster images (JPEG, PNG, etc.). Several kinds of computations can be done within BRAT involving combinations of data fields that the user can save for posterior reuse or using the already embedded formulas that include the standard oceanographic altimetry formulas. The Radar Altimeter Tutorial, that contains a strong introduction to altimetry, shows its applications in different fields such as Oceanography, Cryosphere, Geodesy, Hydrology among others. Included are also "use cases", with step-by-step examples, on how to use the toolbox in the different contexts. The Sentinel-3 SAR Altimetry Toolbox shall benefit from the current BRAT version. While developing the toolbox we will revamp of the Graphical User Interface and provide, among other enhancements, support for reading the upcoming S3 datasets and

  3. Application of the JPDA-UKF to HFSW Radars for Maritime Situational Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    paper preliminary results from the NATO Under- sea Research Centre ( NURC ) Battlespace Preparation 2009 (BP09) HFWS Radar experiment, which took place...information about the NURC HFSW-radar experiment are provided. The MTT is described in Section III. Experimental results are reported in Section IV...EXPERIMENT RESULTS In this section the MTT has been tested on a subset of the NURC BP09 experiment data set. Data from the Palmaria and San Rossore WERA

  4. Galileo SSI and Cassini ISS Observations of Io's Pele Hotspot: Temperatures, Areas, and Variation with Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radebaugh, J.; McEwen, A. S.; Milazzo, M.; Davies, A. G.; Keszthelyi, L. P.; Geissler, P.

    2002-01-01

    Temperatures of Io's Pele hotspot were found using dual-filter observations from Galileo and Cassini. Temperatures average 1375 K, but vary widely over tens of minutes. Dropoff in emission with rotation consistent with lava fountaining at a lava lake. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  5. Peeling the Onion: The Upper Surface of Mimas from Cassini VIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buratti, Bonnie J.; Brown, R. H.; Clark, R. N.; Mosher, J. A.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Filacchione, G.; Baines, K. H.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2010-10-01

    Cloaked in light from Saturn and its rings, the medium-sized Saturnian satellite Mimas is difficult to observe form Earth, and it was the only major satellite not to have a close encounter by the Cassini spacecraft. Observations of the moon during Ring Plane Crossing in 1995 and by the Hubble Space Telescope established that the moon has a visual geometric albedo of greater than unity (Verbiscer et al. 2007, Science 315, 815) and a brighter trailing side (Buratti et al. 1998, Icarus 136, 223), suggesting it is being coated by the E-ring. Observations at opposition obtained by the Cassini Visual Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) instrument between 0.4 and 5.2 microns show the moon has a surge similar to that seen on other icy bodies, increasing in brightness by over 30% in the last five degrees. During the closest nontargeted flyby by Cassini on February 13, 2010, when the Cassini spacecraft approached within 9500 km of Mimas, maps of the moon were obtained by VIMS. Water ice absorption bands in the central peak and crater rim of Herschel are deeper than those in the surrounding regions. Preliminary results indicate the water ice grain size decreases as the distance from the apex of motion increases. No constituents other than water ice have yet been identified. Funded by NASA.

  6. Passive Acoustic Radar for Detecting Supersonic Cruise Missile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Feng; XIAO Hui

    2005-01-01

    A Passive Acoustic Radar is presented as a necessary complement to electromagnetic wave radar, which will be expected to be an effective means for detecting cruise missiles. Acoustic characteristics of supersonic flying projectiles with diverse shapes are expounded via experiment. It is pointed out that simulation experiment could be implemented using bullet or shell instead of cruise missile. Based on theoretical analysis and experiment, the "acoustic fingerprint" character of cruise missile is illustrated to identify it in a strong noise environment. After establishing a locating mathematical model,the technique of acoustic embattling is utilized to resolve a problem of confirming the time of early-warning, considering the fact that velocity of sound is much slower than that of light. Thereby, a whole system of passive acoustic radar for detecting supersonic cruise missile is formed.

  7. Weather Radar Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-08-15

    Preparation). MISCELLANEOUS Donaldson Jr, R.J., 1987: "Significance of the 40th Anniversary Conference." Address at the Battan Memorial and 40th Anni - versary...Bergen and Albers (1987). They have achieved -37 -29 -25 -6 4 7 magnificent results for reducing general -35 -28 -19 -7 -3 4 ambiguity. 283 284 285 3.2... Albers , 1988: Two- and the National Severe Storms Laboratory S-band three-dimensional de-aliasing of Doppler radar in Norman, Oklahoma. For three

  8. Imaging with Synthetic Aperture Radar

    CERN Document Server

    Massonnet, Didier

    2008-01-01

    Describing a field that has been transformed by the recent availability of data from a new generation of space and airborne systems, the authors offer a synthetic geometrical approach to the description of synthetic aperture radar, one that addresses physicists, radar specialists, as well as experts in image processing.  

  9. Terahertz radar cross section measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Heiselberg, Henning; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2010-01-01

    We perform angle- and frequency-resolved radar cross section (RCS) measurements on objects at terahertz frequencies. Our RCS measurements are performed on a scale model aircraft of size 5-10 cm in polar and azimuthal configurations, and correspond closely to RCS measurements with conventional radar...

  10. Performance indicators modern surveillance radar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nooij, P.N.C.; Theil, A.

    2014-01-01

    Blake chart computations are widely employed to rank detection coverage capabilities of competitive search radar systems. Developed for comparable 2D radar systems with a mechanically rotating reflector antenna, it was not necessary to regard update rate and plot quality in Blake's chart. To charact

  11. Measuring human behaviour with radar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorp, Ph. van

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents human motion measurements with the experimental Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave(FMCW) radar at TNO-FEL. The aim of these measurements is to analyse the Doppler velocity spectrum of humans. These analysis give insight in measuring human behaviour with radar for security applica

  12. Synthetic Aperture Radar - Hardware Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Rosner

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Experimental real and synthetic aperture radar are developed from the base-band digital unit to the analogue RF parts, based on solid state units, using pulse compression for radar imaging. Proper QPSK code is found for matched filter.

  13. THE TEST OF APPLYING RADAR TREC WIND IN THREE-DIMENSIONAL VARIATIONAL ASSIMILATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN Qi-lin; XUE Ji-shan; CHEN Zhi-tong; LIU Chun-xia

    2006-01-01

    The application of radar-derived TREC wind to 3DVAR assimilation system of GRAPeS-3DVar developed by Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences is introduced. The resulting fundamental feature is estimated when radar TREC wind is assimilated into GRAPeS-3DVar system. It was found that radar TREC wind has better potential of the application in GRAPeS-3DVar system and can effectively improve the analyzed results. Moreover a numerical experiment is performed in which tropical cyclones make landfall and transform;it also showed that the predicted effect can be improved when the radar TREC wind is added into GRAPeS-3DVar system.

  14. A radar image time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leberl, F.; Fuchs, H.; Ford, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    A set of ten side-looking radar images of a mining area in Arizona that were aquired over a period of 14 yr are studied to demonstrate the photogrammetric differential-rectification technique applied to radar images and to examine changes that occurred in the area over time. Five of the images are rectified by using ground control points and a digital height model taken from a map. Residual coordinate errors in ground control are reduced from several hundred meters in all cases to + or - 19 to 70 m. The contents of the radar images are compared with a Landsat image and with aerial photographs. Effects of radar system parameters on radar images are briefly reviewed.

  15. Radar image registration and rectification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naraghi, M.; Stromberg, W. D.

    1983-01-01

    Two techniques for radar image registration and rectification are presented. In the registration method, a general 2-D polynomial transform is defined to accomplish the geometric mapping from one image into the other. The degree and coefficients of the polynomial are obtained using an a priori found tiepoint data set. In the second part of the paper, a rectification procedure is developed that models the distortion present in the radar image in terms of the radar sensor's platform parameters and the topographic variations of the imaged scene. This model, the ephemeris data and the digital topographic data are then used in rectifying the radar image. The two techniques are then used in registering and rectifying two examples of radar imagery. Each method is discussed as to its benefits, shortcomings and registration accuracy.

  16. Processing of 3D Weather Radar Data with Application for Assimilation in the NWP Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ośródka Katarzyna

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on the processing of 3D weather radar data to minimize the impact of a number of errors from different sources, both meteorological and non-meteorological. The data is also quantitatively characterized in terms of its quality. A set of dedicated algorithms based on analysis of the reflectivity field pattern is described. All the developed algorithms were tested on data from the Polish radar network POLRAD. Quality control plays a key role in avoiding the introduction of incorrect information into applications using radar data. One of the quality control methods is radar data assimilation in numerical weather prediction models to estimate initial conditions of the atmosphere. The study shows an experiment with quality controlled radar data assimilation in the COAMPS model using the ensemble Kalman filter technique. The analysis proved the potential of radar data for such applications; however, further investigations will be indispensable.

  17. The Use of Radar to Improve Rainfall Estimation over the Tennessee and San Joaquin River Valleys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Walter A.; Gatlin, Patrick N.; Felix, Mariana; Carey, Lawrence D.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation provides an overview of the collaborative radar rainfall project between the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the Von Braun Center for Science & Innovation (VCSI), NASA MSFC and UAHuntsville. Two systems were used in this project, Advanced Radar for Meteorological & Operational Research (ARMOR) Rainfall Estimation Processing System (AREPS), a demonstration project of real-time radar rainfall using a research radar and NEXRAD Rainfall Estimation Processing System (NREPS). The objectives, methodology, some results and validation, operational experience and lessons learned are reviewed. The presentation. Another project that is using radar to improve rainfall estimations is in California, specifically the San Joaquin River Valley. This is part of a overall project to develop a integrated tool to assist water management within the San Joaquin River Valley. This involves integrating several components: (1) Radar precipitation estimates, (2) Distributed hydro model, (3) Snowfall measurements and Surface temperature / moisture measurements. NREPS was selected to provide precipitation component.

  18. Subsurface radar location of the putative ocean on Ganymede: Numerical simulation of the surface terrain impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyushin, Ya. A.

    2014-03-01

    Exploration of subsurface oceans on Jupiter's icy moons is a key issue of the icy moons' geology. Radar is in fact the only sounding technique which is able to penetrate their icy mantles, which can be many kilometers thick. Surface clutter, i.e. scattering of the radio waves on the rough surface, is known to be one of the most important problems of subsurface radar probing. Adequate numerical modeling of this scattering is required on all stages of subsurface radar experiment, including design of an instrument, operational strategy planning and data interpretation. In the present paper, a computer simulation technique for numerical simulations of radar sounding of rough surfaces is formulated in general form. Subsurface radar location of the ocean beneath Ganymedian ice with chirp radar signals has been simulated.

  19. Laser radar technology and applications; Proceedings of the Meeting, Quebec, Canada, June 3-5, 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruickshank, James M.; Harney, Robert C.

    1986-01-01

    Various papers on laser radar technology and applications are presented. The topics considered include: eye-safe solid lasers for lidar applications, practical DF laser for ranging applications, ultrafast surface barrier photodetectors, performance analyses for peak-detecting laser radars, multiple scattering for laser beams propagating in a layered atmosphere, laser radar cross section of objects immersed in the earth's atmosphere, measurements of pulse coherence in mode-locked TEA-CO2 lasers, and single longitudinal mode operation of a continuously tunable high pressure TE-CO2. Also discussed are: amplitude-modulated laser system for distance and displacement measurement, minilaser rangefinder, laser docking system radar flight experiment, improved optical resonator for laser radars, design of frequency-stable TEA-CO2 lasers, HgCdTe photodiodes for heterodyne applications, acoustooptic spectrum analyzer for laser radar applications, laser cloud mapper and its applications, scanning lidar bathymeter for water depth measurement, and fluorescence lidar for land and sea remote sensing.

  20. 100 years of radar

    CERN Document Server

    Galati, Gaspare

    2016-01-01

    This book offers fascinating insights into the key technical and scientific developments in the history of radar, from the first patent, taken out by Hülsmeyer in 1904, through to the present day. Landmark events are highlighted and fascinating insights provided into the exceptional people who made possible the progress in the field, including the scientists and technologists who worked independently and under strict secrecy in various countries across the world in the 1930s and the big businessmen who played an important role after World War II. The book encourages multiple levels of reading. The author is a leading radar researcher who is ideally placed to offer a technical/scientific perspective as well as a historical one. He has taken care to structure and write the book in such a way as to appeal to both non-specialists and experts. The book is not sponsored by any company or body, either formally or informally, and is therefore entirely unbiased. The text is enriched by approximately three hundred ima...

  1. Radar imaging of solar system ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harcke, Leif J.

    We map the planet Mercury and Jupiter's moons Ganymede and Callisto using Earth-based radar telescopes and find that all of these have regions exhibiting high, depolarized radar backscatter and polarization inversion (m c > 1). Both characteristics suggest significant volume scattering from water ice or similar cold-trapped volatiles. Synthetic aperture radar mapping of Mercury's north and south polar regions at fine (6 km) resolution at 3.5 cm wavelength corroborates the results of previous 13 cm investigations of enhanced backscatter and polarization inversion (0.9 caused by simple double-bounce geometries, since the bright, reflective regions do not appear on the radar-facing wall but, instead, in shadowed regions not directly aligned with the radar look direction. Thermal models require the existence of such a layer to preserve ice deposits in craters at other than high polar latitudes. The additional attenuation (factor 1.64 +/- 15%) of the 3.5 cm wavelength data from these experiments over previous 13 cm radar observations is consistent with a range of layer thickness from 0 +/- 11 to 35 +/- 15 cm, depending on the assumed scattering law exponent n. Our 3.5 cm wavelength bistatic aperture synthesis observations of the two outermost Galilean satellites of Jupiter, Ganymede and Callisto, resolve the north-south ambiguity of previous images, and confirm the disk-integrated enhanced backscatter and polarization inversion noted in prior investigations. The direct imaging technique more clearly shows that higher backscatter are as are associated with the terrain that has undergone recent resurfacing, such as the sulci and the impact crater basins. The leading hemispheres of both moons have somewhat higher (20% +/- 5%) depolarized echoes than their trailing hemispheres, suggesting additional wavelength-scale structure in the regolith. Two improvements to existing delay-Doppler techniques enhance data reduction. First, correlation using subsets of the standard

  2. Surface Circulation in the Iroise Sea (W. Brittany) from High Resolution HF Radar Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    ratios and also a real data set from the radar experiment in Bodega Bay, northern Cal- ifornia, in the Gulf of Lion, western Mediterranean (Sentchev et...2005. HF radar observations of surface circula- tion off Bodega Bay (northern California, USA). J. Geophys. Res. 110, C10020. doi:10.1029

  3. Scanning Radar Investigations to Characterize Cloud and Precipitation Processes for ASR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkatachalam, Chandrasekar [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Cooperative Inst. for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA)

    2016-12-17

    The project conducted investigations in the following areas related to scanning radar retrievals: a) Development for Cloud drizzle separation studies for the ENA site based on Doppler Spectra b) Advanced radar retrieval for the SGP site c) Characterizing falling snow using multifrequency dual-polarization measurements d) BAECC field experiment. More details about these investigations can be found within each subtopic within the report.

  4. Observation of Tropical Rain Forest Trees by Airborne High-Resolution Interferometric Radar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekman, D.H.; Varekamp, C.

    2001-01-01

    The Indonesian Radar Experiment (INDREX) Campaign was executed in Indonesia to study the potential of high-resolution interferometric airborne radar in support of sustainable tropical forest management. Severe cloud cover limits the use of aerial photography, which is currently applied on a routine

  5. Clear-air radar observations of the atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ince, Turker

    2001-10-01

    This dissertation presents the design and operation of a high-resolution frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FM- CW) radar system to study the structure and dynamics of clear-air turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). This sensitive radar can image the vertical structure of the ABL with both high spatial and temporal resolutions, and provide both qualitative information about the morphology of clear-air structures and quantitative information on the intensity of fluctuations in refractive-index of air. The principles of operation and the hardware and data acquisition characteristics of the radar are described in the dissertation. In October 1999, the radar participated in the Cooperative Atmosphere-Surface Exchange Study (CASES'99) Experiment to characterize the temporal structure and evolution of the boundary-layer features in both convective and stable conditions. The observed structures include clear-air convection, boundary layer evolution, gravity waves, Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, stably stratified layers, and clear-air turbulence. Many of the S-band radar images also show high- reflectivity returns from Rayleigh scatterers such as insects. An adaptive median filtering technique based on local statistics has, therefore, been developed to discriminate between Bragg and Rayleigh scattering in clear-air radar observations. The filter is tested on radar observations of clear air convection with comparison to two commonly used image processing techniques. The dissertation also examines the statistical mean of the radar-measured C2n for clear-air convection, and compares it with the theoretical predictions. The study also shows that the inversion height, local thickness of the inversion layer, and the height of the elevated atmospheric layers can be estimated from the radar reflectivity measurements. In addition, comparisons to the radiosonde-based height estimates are made. To examine the temporal and spatial structure of C2n , the dissertation

  6. Radar signature acquisition using an indigenously designed noise radar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freundorfer, A. P.; Siddiqui, J. Y.; Antar, Y. M. M.; Thayaparan, T.

    2011-06-01

    A new design of a noise radar system is proposed with capabilities to measure and acquire the radar signature of various targets. The proposed system can cover a noise bandwidth of near DC to 30 GHz. The noise radar signature measurements were conducted for selective targets like spheres and carpenter squares with and without dielectric bodies for a noise band of 400MHz-3000MHz. The bandwidth of operation was limited by the multiplier and the antennae used. The measured results of the target signatures were verified with the simulation results.

  7. The use of radar for bathymetry assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aardoom, J.H.; Greidanus, H.S.F.

    1998-01-01

    The bottom topography in shallow seas can be observed by air- and spaceborne imaging radar. Bathymetric information derived from radar data is limited in accuracy, but radar has a good spatial coverage. The accuracy can be increased by assimilating the radar imagery into existing or insitu gathered

  8. Radar signal analysis and processing using Matlab

    CERN Document Server

    Mahafza, Bassem R

    2008-01-01

    Offering radar-related software for the analysis and design of radar waveform and signal processing, this book provides comprehensive coverage of radar signals and signal processing techniques and algorithms. It contains numerous graphical plots, common radar-related functions, table format outputs, and end-of-chapter problems. The complete set of MATLAB[registered] functions and routines are available for download online.

  9. Radar, Insect Population Ecology, and Pest Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, C. R. (Editor); Wolf, W. (Editor); Klassen, W. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    Discussions included: (1) the potential role of radar in insect ecology studies and pest management; (2) the potential role of radar in correlating atmospheric phenomena with insect movement; (3) the present and future radar systems; (4) program objectives required to adapt radar to insect ecology studies and pest management; and (5) the specific action items to achieve the objectives.

  10. Signal processing in noise waveform radar

    CERN Document Server

    Kulpa, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    This book is devoted to the emerging technology of noise waveform radar and its signal processing aspects. It is a new kind of radar, which use noise-like waveform to illuminate the target. The book includes an introduction to basic radar theory, starting from classical pulse radar, signal compression, and wave radar. The book then discusses the properties, difficulties and potential of noise radar systems, primarily for low-power and short-range civil applications. The contribution of modern signal processing techniques to making noise radar practical are emphasized, and application examples

  11. Air and spaceborne radar systems an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Lacomme, Philippe; Hardange, Jean-Philippe; Normant, Eric

    2001-01-01

    A practical tool on radar systems that will be of major help to technicians, student engineers and engineers working in industry and in radar research and development. The many users of radar as well as systems engineers and designers will also find it highly useful. Also of interest to pilots and flight engineers and military command personnel and military contractors. """"This introduction to the field of radar is intended for actual users of radar. It focuses on the history, main principles, functions, modes, properties and specific nature of modern airborne radar. The book examines radar's

  12. Cassini Scientist for a Day: Encouraging Science Research and Writing for Students on National and International Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman Brachman, R.; Wessen, A.; Piazza, E.

    2011-10-01

    The outreach team for the Cassini mission to Saturn at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) runs an international essay contest called "Cassini Scientist for a Day." Students write essays about Saturn and its rings and moons. The program has been run nine times, increasing in scope with each contest. Students in grades 5 to 12 (ages 10 to 18) gain skills in critical thinking, decision-making, researching, asking good questions, and communicating their ideas to scientists. Winners and their classes participate in teleconferencing question-and-answer sessions with Cassini scientists so students can ask questions to professional scientists. Videos of young Cassini scientists are included in the contest reference materials to provide role models for the students. Thousands of students in 50 countries on 6 continents have participated in the essay contest. Volunteers run the international contests outside of the United States, with their own rules, languages, and prizes.

  13. Introduction to radar target recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Tait, P

    2006-01-01

    This new text provides an overview of the radar target recognition process and covers the key techniques being developed for operational systems. It is based on the fundamental scientific principles of high resolution radar, and explains how the techniques can be used in real systems, taking into account the characteristics of practical radar system designs and component limitations. It also addresses operational aspects, such as how high resolution modes would fit in with other functions such as detection and tracking. Mathematics is kept to a minimum and the complex techniques and issues are

  14. 77 HHz radar for automobile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Lyashuk

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Modern requirements to safety and comfort of drivers and passengers of a car cause continuous development of corresponding technical facilities. Technologies that provide implementation of these requirements are on the first place for the developers of cars. One of the most important requirement is an analysis of road situation, where various sensors are used. One of them is radar. Principle of action, basic parameters and application of radar RS-200 is considered in this article. Radar is used in modern cars of brand Mersedes Benz and works on frequency 77 HHz. It uses the LFM (linear frequency modulation with the programmatic setting of resolution for distance.

  15. Gyroklystron-Powered WARLOC Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danly, B. G.; Cheung, W. J.; Gregers-Hansen, V.; Linde, G.; Ngo, M.

    2003-12-01

    A high-power, coherent, W-band (94 GHz) millimeter-wave radar has been developed at the Naval Research Laboratory. This radar, named WARLOC, employs a 100 kW peak power, 10 kW average power gyro-klystron as the final power amplifier, an overmoded transmission line system, and a quasi-optical duplexer, together with a high gain antenna, four-channel receiver, and state-of-the-art signal processing. The gyro-amplifiers and the implementation in the WARLOC radar will be described.

  16. Space noise synthetic aperture radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulpa, Krzysztof S.

    2006-03-01

    The paper presents limitations of space borne synthetic aperture radars, caused by range and Doppler velocity ambiguities, and the concept of usage of the noise radar technology for creation of high-resolution space SAR images. The noise SAR is free from limitation caused by the periodicity of pulse waveform ambiguity function, and therefore this technology can be used in the future space missions. The basic concept of noise SAR image formation is also presented. The image formation algorithm has been verified using the simulated data produced by Raw Radar Data Simulator.

  17. Under the Radar

    CERN Document Server

    Goss, WM

    2010-01-01

    This is the biography of Ruby Payne-Scott (1912 to 1981). As the first female radio astronomer (and one of the first people in the world to consider radio astronomy), she made classic contributions to solar radio physics. She also played a major role in the design of the Australian government's Council for Scientific and Industrial Research radars, which were in turn of vital importance in the Southwest Pacific Theatre in World War II and were used by Australian, US and New Zealand personnel. From a sociological perspective, her career also offers many examples of the perils of being a female academic in the first half of the 20th century. Written in an engaging style and complemented by many historical photographs this book gives a fascinating insight into the beginning of radio astronomy and the role of a pioneering woman in astronomy.

  18. Lightning on Saturn observed by Cassini ISS and RPWS during 2006-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyudina, U.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Ewald, S. P.; Porco, C.; Fischer, G.

    2009-12-01

    Throughout the Cassini mission thousands of images had been taken on the night side of saturn in search for optical lightning flashes. No flashes were unambiguously detected so far. The reasons for that may be the lightning located too deep and covered by the thick clouds, and thus faint as seen from the orbit, cosmic rays hitting the detector that could be confused with lightning, and the ringshine compromising the observations both by potential saturation of the images and by illuminating small convective clouds whose shape in reflected light can be confused with lightning flash. The only time of nearly zero ringshine in the 30-year-long Saturnian year is during the equinox, which happened on August 11, 2009. Cassini ISS took 211 lightning search images within ten days from the equinox. We will report on possible lightning detections in those images and also in the previous Cassini ISS lightning searches. We also report on Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) and Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) observations that indicate lightning on Saturn. A lightning storm that began in 2007 lasted for 7.5 months. Another storm started in mid-January 2009 and was still active in August of 2009. We will compare these recent storms with those studied by Cassini in 2004 and 2006. In all cases, radio emissions (Saturn Electrostatic Discharges, or SEDs) occur when a rare bright cloud erupts at a unique latitude ˜ 35 degrees South (planetocentric).The cloud typically lasts for several weeks to months, and then both the cloud and the SEDs disappear.The cloud and SED's reappear synchronously after being inactive for several months. The SEDs are periodic with roughly Saturn's rotation rate, and show correlated phase relative to the times when the clouds are seen on the spacecraft-facing side of the planet. The storm clouds erupt to unusually high altitudes and then slowly descend and spread.The eruption lasts for less than a day during which time the SEDs reach their maximum

  19. Temperate Ice Depth-Sounding Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara-Olivares, V. A.; Player, K.; Rodriguez-Morales, F.; Gogineni, P.

    2008-12-01

    Glaciers in several parts of the world are reported to be retreating and thinning rapidly over the last decade. Radar instruments can be used to provide a wealth of information regarding the internal and basal conditions of large and small ice masses. These instruments typically operate in the VHF and UHF regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. For temperate-ice sounding, however, the high water content produces scattering and attenuation in propagating radar waves at VHF and UHF frequencies, which significantly reduce the penetration depths. Radars operating in the HF band are better suited for systematic surveys of the thickness and sub-glacial topography of temperate-ice regions. We are developing a dual-frequency Temperate-Ice-Depth Sounding Radar (TIDSoR) that can penetrate through water pockets, thus providing more accurate measurements of temperate ice properties such as thickness and basal conditions. The radar is a light-weight, low power consumption portable system for surface-based observations in mountainous terrain or aerial surveys. TIDSoR operates at two different center frequencies: 7.7 MHz and 14 MHz, with a maximum output peak power of 20 W. The transmit waveform is a digitally generated linear frequency-modulated chirp with 1 MHz bandwidth. The radar can be installed on aircrafts such as the CReSIS UAV [1], DCH-6 (Twin Otter), or P-3 Orion for aerial surveys, where it could be supported by the airplane power system. For surface based experiments, TIDSoR can operate in a backpack configuration powered by a compact battery system. The system can also be installed on a sled towed by a motorized vehicle, in which case the power supply can be replaced by a diesel generator. The radar consists of three functional blocks: the digital section, the radio-frequency (RF) section, and the antenna, and is designed to weigh less than 2 kg, excluding the power supply. The digital section generates the transmit waveforms as well as timing and control signals

  20. Detection of buried pipes by polarimetric borehole radar; Polarimetric borehole radar ni yoru maisetsukan no kenshutsu jikken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, M.; Niitsuma, H. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Nakauchi, T. [Osaka Gas Co. Ltd., Osaka (Japan)

    1997-05-27

    If the borehole radar is utilized for detection of buried pipes, the underground radar measurement becomes possible even in the situation where the mesurement on the earth surface is difficult, for example, such a place as under the road where there is much traffic. However, since buried pipes are horizontally installed and the existing borehole radar can send/receive only vertical polarization, the measurement conducted comes to be poor in efficiency from a viewpoint of the polarization utilization. Therefore, by introducing the polarimetric borehole radar to the detection of buried pipes, a basic experiment was conducted for the effective detection of horizontal buried pipes. Proposing the use of a slot antenna which can send/receive horizontal polarization in borehole in addition to a dipole antenna which sends/receives vertical polarization, developed was a step frequency type continuous wave radar of a network analyzer basis. As a result of the experiment, it was confirmed that reflection from buried pipes is largely dependent on polarization. Especially, it was found that in the slot dipole cross polarization mesurement, reflection from buried pipes can be emphasized. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Interpolation of the Radial Velocity Data from Coastal HF Radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    similar to the ones used in [20] for OMA processing of HFR observations in the Bodega Bay. The coordinate system is rotated clockwise (north is on...geometry of the 3-radar experiment in the Bodega Bay conducted in spring and summer of 2003 (Fig. 1). In the second series real data acquired on...July 30, 2003 in the Bodega Bay and offshore the coast of Brittany has been used. 2.2.1. Experiments with Simulated Data Simulated data experiments

  2. Air Defense Radar Operations Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Facility consists of laboratories, experimental test equipment including state-of-theart test bed radar, and test ranges. The facilities are used to design, develop,...

  3. Compressive Sensing for MIMO Radar

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Yao; Poor, H Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar systems have been shown to achieve superior resolution as compared to traditional radar systems with the same number of transmit and receive antennas. This paper considers a distributed MIMO radar scenario, in which each transmit element is a node in a wireless network, and investigates the use of compressive sampling for direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation. According to the theory of compressive sampling, a signal that is sparse in some domain can be recovered based on far fewer samples than required by the Nyquist sampling theorem. The DOA of targets form a sparse vector in the angle space, and therefore, compressive sampling can be applied for DOA estimation. The proposed approach achieves the superior resolution of MIMO radar with far fewer samples than other approaches. This is particularly useful in a distributed scenario, in which the results at each receive node need to be transmitted to a fusion center for further processing.

  4. SMAP RADAR Calibration and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, R. D.; Jaruwatanadilok, S.; Chaubel, M. J.; Spencer, M.; Chan, S. F.; Chen, C. W.; Fore, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission launched on Jan 31, 2015. The mission employs L-band radar and radiometer measurements to estimate soil moisture with 4% volumetric accuracy at a resolution of 10 km, and freeze-thaw state at a resolution of 1-3 km. Immediately following launch, there was a three month instrument checkout period, followed by six months of level 1 (L1) calibration and validation. In this presentation, we will discuss the calibration and validation activities and results for the L1 radar data. Early SMAP radar data were used to check commanded timing parameters, and to work out issues in the low- and high-resolution radar processors. From April 3-13 the radar collected receive only mode data to conduct a survey of RFI sources. Analysis of the RFI environment led to a preferred operating frequency. The RFI survey data were also used to validate noise subtraction and scaling operations in the radar processors. Normal radar operations resumed on April 13. All radar data were examined closely for image quality and calibration issues which led to improvements in the radar data products for the beta release at the end of July. Radar data were used to determine and correct for small biases in the reported spacecraft attitude. Geo-location was validated against coastline positions and the known positions of corner reflectors. Residual errors at the time of the beta release are about 350 m. Intra-swath biases in the high-resolution backscatter images are reduced to less than 0.3 dB for all polarizations. Radiometric cross-calibration with Aquarius was performed using areas of the Amazon rain forest. Cross-calibration was also examined using ocean data from the low-resolution processor and comparing with the Aquarius wind model function. Using all a-priori calibration constants provided good results with co-polarized measurements matching to better than 1 dB, and cross-polarized measurements matching to about 1 dB in the beta release. During the

  5. Model-Based Radar Power Calculations for Ultra-Wideband (UWB) Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    performance in complex scenarios. Among these scenarios are ground penetrating radar and forward-looking radar for landmine and improvised explosive...Model-Based Radar Power Calculations for Ultra-Wideband (UWB) Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) by Traian Dogaru ARL-TN-0548 June 2013...2013 Model-Based Radar Power Calculations for Ultra-Wideband (UWB) Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Traian Dogaru Sensors and Electron

  6. Multifunction Radar for Airborne Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-07-01

    technoloigies nuvelles tint fail letur apparition : desc exercent une influence deicisive sur les cotncepts radar de dcmain. ULmnigrationit Treis Grande...various speeds (including speed zero). The aircraft equipped with the radar could also be at any altitude, above any type of earth surface, and...Microwave Backscattering from Water Waves", AGARD Conference on Propagation Factors Affecting Remote Sensing by Radio Waves, AGARD Conf. Proceedings, No

  7. Radar Imaging and Target Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-09

    Methods in Wave Propagation, Vaxjo, Swe- den. • February 19, 2008, "Radar Imaging", math colloquium, Brigham- Young University. • January 31, 2008...manuscript, namely "Radar detection using sparsely distributed 19 apertures in urban environments", Ling Wang, II- Young Son, Trond Varslot, C. Evren...Coinmun. COM- 20, pp. 774-780, 1972. [24] M. Tomlinson, "New automatic equalizer employing modulo arithmetic," Electron. Lett. 7, pp. 138-139, 1971

  8. Haystack Ultrawideband Satellite Imaging Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    enable long-range imaging. In 2013, a major upgrade to the facility was completed, adding a millimeter - wave W-band radar capability to Haystack’s X...diameter antenna was completely rebuilt to provide a 100 μm root-mean-square (rms) surface accuracy to support operation at the 3 mm wave - length (W...electromagnetic wave propagation through the troposphere. − The signal processing system lev- eraged Lincoln Laboratory‘s Radar Open Systems

  9. Cassini Spacecraft In-Flight Swap to Backup Attitude Control Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, David M.

    2010-01-01

    NASA's Cassini Spacecraft, launched on October 15th, 1997 and arrived at Saturn on June 30th, 2004, is the largest and most ambitious interplanetary spacecraft in history. In order to meet the challenging attitude control and navigation requirements of the orbit profile at Saturn, Cassini is equipped with a monopropellant thruster based Reaction Control System (RCS), a bipropellant Main Engine Assembly (MEA) and a Reaction Wheel Assembly (RWA). In 2008, after 11 years of reliable service, several RCS thrusters began to show signs of end of life degradation, which led the operations team to successfully perform the swap to the backup RCS system, the details and challenges of which are described in this paper. With some modifications, it is hoped that similar techniques and design strategies could be used to benefit other spacecraft.

  10. Coded continuous wave meteor radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vierinen, Juha; Chau, Jorge L.; Pfeffer, Nico; Clahsen, Matthias; Stober, Gunter

    2016-03-01

    The concept of a coded continuous wave specular meteor radar (SMR) is described. The radar uses a continuously transmitted pseudorandom phase-modulated waveform, which has several advantages compared to conventional pulsed SMRs. The coding avoids range and Doppler aliasing, which are in some cases problematic with pulsed radars. Continuous transmissions maximize pulse compression gain, allowing operation at lower peak power than a pulsed system. With continuous coding, the temporal and spectral resolution are not dependent on the transmit waveform and they can be fairly flexibly changed after performing a measurement. The low signal-to-noise ratio before pulse compression, combined with independent pseudorandom transmit waveforms, allows multiple geographically separated transmitters to be used in the same frequency band simultaneously without significantly interfering with each other. Because the same frequency band can be used by multiple transmitters, the same interferometric receiver antennas can be used to receive multiple transmitters at the same time. The principles of the signal processing are discussed, in addition to discussion of several practical ways to increase computation speed, and how to optimally detect meteor echoes. Measurements from a campaign performed with a coded continuous wave SMR are shown and compared with two standard pulsed SMR measurements. The type of meteor radar described in this paper would be suited for use in a large-scale multi-static network of meteor radar transmitters and receivers. Such a system would be useful for increasing the number of meteor detections to obtain improved meteor radar data products.

  11. Radar-Derived Quantitative Precipitation Estimation Based on Precipitation Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for improving radar-derived quantitative precipitation estimation is proposed. Tropical vertical profiles of reflectivity (VPRs are first determined from multiple VPRs. Upon identifying a tropical VPR, the event can be further classified as either tropical-stratiform or tropical-convective rainfall by a fuzzy logic (FL algorithm. Based on the precipitation-type fields, the reflectivity values are converted into rainfall rate using a Z-R relationship. In order to evaluate the performance of this rainfall classification scheme, three experiments were conducted using three months of data and two study cases. In Experiment I, the Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88D default Z-R relationship was applied. In Experiment II, the precipitation regime was separated into convective and stratiform rainfall using the FL algorithm, and corresponding Z-R relationships were used. In Experiment III, the precipitation regime was separated into convective, stratiform, and tropical rainfall, and the corresponding Z-R relationships were applied. The results show that the rainfall rates obtained from all three experiments match closely with the gauge observations, although Experiment II could solve the underestimation, when compared to Experiment I. Experiment III significantly reduced this underestimation and generated the most accurate radar estimates of rain rate among the three experiments.

  12. Cassini RTG program. Monthly technical progress report, September 29, 1997--October 26, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-24

    This report describes work on the contract to provide Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) and Ancillary Activities in support of the Cassini Spacecraft launch. The craft was successfully launched on October 15, 1997. Early telemetry results show excellent performance from the three launched RTG modules. A major share of this report describes safety analyses for contamination radii in the event of launch failures and generator destruction, as well as launch related activities.

  13. Upper limits for PH3 and H2S in Titan's Atmosphere from Cassini CIRS

    CERN Document Server

    Nixon, Conor A; Irwin, Patrick G J; Horst, Sarah M; 10.1016/j.icarus.2013.02.024

    2013-01-01

    We have searched for the presence of simple P and S-bearing molecules in Titan's atmosphere, by looking for the characteristic signatures of phosphine and hydrogen sulfide in infrared spectra obtained by Cassini CIRS. As a result we have placed the first upper limits on the stratospheric abundances, which are 1 ppb (PH3) and 330 ppb (H2S), at the 2-sigma significance level.

  14. Coherent Doppler Laser Radar: Technology Development and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has been investigating, developing, and applying coherent Doppler laser radar technology for over 30 years. These efforts have included the first wind measurement in 1967, the first airborne flights in 1972, the first airborne wind field mapping in 1981, and the first measurement of hurricane eyewall winds in 1998. A parallel effort at MSFC since 1982 has been the study, modeling and technology development for a space-based global wind measurement system. These endeavors to date have resulted in compact, robust, eyesafe lidars at 2 micron wavelength based on solid-state laser technology; in a factor of 6 volume reduction in near diffraction limited, space-qualifiable telescopes; in sophisticated airborne scanners with full platform motion subtraction; in local oscillator lasers capable of rapid tuning of 25 GHz for removal of relative laser radar to target velocities over a 25 km/s range; in performance prediction theory and simulations that have been validated experimentally; and in extensive field campaign experience. We have also begun efforts to dramatically improve the fundamental photon efficiency of the laser radar, to demonstrate advanced lower mass laser radar telescopes and scanners; to develop laser and laser radar system alignment maintenance technologies; and to greatly improve the electrical efficiency, cooling technique, and robustness of the pulsed laser. This coherent Doppler laser radar technology is suitable for high resolution, high accuracy wind mapping; for aerosol and cloud measurement; for Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) measurements of atmospheric and trace gases; for hard target range and velocity measurement; and for hard target vibration spectra measurement. It is also suitable for a number of aircraft operations applications such as clear air turbulence (CAT) detection; dangerous wind shear (microburst) detection; airspeed, angle of attack, and sideslip measurement; and fuel savings through

  15. Design of an airborne P-band ice sounding radar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, Jørgen; Skou, Niels; Kusk, Anders

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the top-level design of an airborne, P-band ice sounding radar under development at the Technical University of Denmark. The ice sounder is intended to help gaining experience with the electromagnetic properties of the Antarctic ice sheet at P-band. A secondary objective...

  16. Cassini microwave observations provide clues to the origin of Saturn's C ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z.; Hayes, A. G.; Janssen, M. A.; Nicholson, P. D.; Cuzzi, J. N.; de Pater, I.; Dunn, D. E.; Estrada, P. R.; Hedman, M. M.

    2017-01-01

    Despite considerable study, Saturn's rings continue to challenge current theories for their provenance. Water ice comprises the bulk of Saturn's rings, yet it is the small fraction of non-icy material that is arguably more valuable in revealing clues about the system's origin and age. Herein, we present new measurements of the non-icy material fraction in Saturn's C ring, determined from microwave radiometry observations acquired by the Cassini spacecraft. Our observations show an exceptionally high brightness at near-zero azimuthal angles, suggesting a high porosity of 70-75% for the C ring particles. Furthermore, our results show that most regions in the C ring contain about 1-2% silicates. These results are consistent with an initially nearly pure-ice ring system that has been continuously contaminated by in-falling micrometeoroids over ∼15-90 million years, using the currently accepted value of the micrometeoroid flux at infinity of ∼4.5 × 10-17g cm-2 s-1, and assuming that the C ring optical depth and surface density has not changed significantly during that time. This absolute time scale is inversely proportional not only to the flux at infinity, but also to the amount of gravitational focusing by Saturn the micrometeoroids experience before encountering the rings. We also find an enhanced abundance of non-icy material concentrated in the middle C ring. When assumed to be mixed volumetrically ("intramixed") with water ice, this enhanced contamination reaches a maximum concentration of 6-11% silicates by volume around a ring radius of 83,000 km, depending on the volume mixing model used. This is significantly higher than the inner and outer C ring. As opposed to an intramixing model, we also consider a silicate-core, icy-mantle model to address the fact that silicates may be present in chunks instead of fine powder in the ring particles. Such a model naturally helps to account for the observed opacity distribution. We propose several models to explain the

  17. The Spectral Classes of the Saturnian System Ices: Rings and Satellites Observations by Cassini-VIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Tosi, F.; Coradini, A.; Cerroni, P.; Clark, R. N.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Nicholson, P. D.; Buratti, B. J.; Brown, R. H.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Jaumann, R.; Hedman, M. M.

    2008-12-01

    The entire population of the Saturnian system ices was investigated by VIMS (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) experiment on board Cassini spacecraft. By the end of the nominal mission a very large dataset of hyperspectral data had been collected in the spectral range 0.35-5.0 micron, which includes the regular satellites (Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Hyperion, Iapetus, Phoebe), minor moons (Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, Epimetheus, Telesto, Calypso) and rings. In this work we present an analysis of spectrophotometric indicators selected to describe the properties of the ices (I/F continuum levels, visible spectral slopes, band depths and positions), and which were retrieved from about 1500 full-disk observations of satellites as well as from mosaics of the main rings (A, B, C, CD, F) sampled with a resolution of 125 km/pixel along the radial axis. This comparative method allows us to highlight the spectral differences in this population of objects orbiting in the Saturnian system. In particular we have retrieved the distribution of the water ice abundance, which varies between the almost pure icy surfaces of Enceladus and Calypso to the carbon dioxide- and organic-rich Hyperion, Iapetus and Phoebe. Noteworthy is that a significant dichotomy is observed between the two co-orbital moons Epimetheus and Janus, possibly indicating a different origin and evolutionary process: while the first shows a very red visible spectrum (similar to Hyperion), the second has more neutral visible colors, making it a very peculiar object in the Saturnian system. Rings have very peculiar spectral differences when compared with the icy satellites: in the visible range their spectra are characterized by a spectral knee at bluer wavelengths (at about 520 nm compared to 550 nm on satellites); in the infrared range the 1.5-2.0 micron water ice band depths are in general deeper across the A and B rings, indicative of a larger fraction of pure water ice in comparison to

  18. A radar backscattering mechanism of ocean surface in response to rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinan; Zheng, Quanan; Liu, Ren; Duncan, James H.

    2012-11-01

    The characteristics of ocean surface in response to rainfall and its radar back-scatter are simultaneously measured in laboratory. The experiment is carried out in a water pool that is 1.22 m by 1.22 m with a water depth of 0.3 m. Artificial rainfall is generated from an array of hypodermic needles. The surface characteristics including crowns, stalks, secondary droplets and ring waves are measured with a cinematic Laser-Induced-Florescence (LIF) technique. Our experimental results show that impinging raindrops on the water surface generate various water surface structures with different relative sizes. Among them stalks and crowns comprise the dominant radar backscattering. On the basis of these laboratory experiments and theories of radar scattering from a rough surface, a near-resonance radar backscattering model for quantifying the dependence of the radar return intensity on rain rate on the ocean surface is developed. The model explains the radar response to rain rate simultaneously observed by C-band ASAR and ground-based weather radar. The physical model provides reasonable mechanisms to explain the frequency dependence and polarization behavior of radar signatures from rain cells on the ocean surface. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation, Division of Ocean Sciences under grant OCE962107.

  19. Analysis of Clumps in Saturn's F Ring from Voyager and Cassini

    CERN Document Server

    French, Robert S; Showalter, Mark R; Antonsen, Adrienne K; Packard, Douglas R

    2014-01-01

    Saturn's F ring is subject to dynamic structural changes over short periods. Among the observed phenomena are diffuse extended bright clumps (ECs) ~ 3-40 degrees in longitudinal extent. These ECs appear, evolve, and disappear over a span of days to months. ECs have been seen by the two Voyager spacecraft, the Cassini orbiter, and various ground- and space-based telescopes. Showalter (2004, Icarus, 171, 356-371) analyzed all Voyager images of the F ring and found that there were 2-3 major and 20-40 minor ECs present in the ring at any given time. We expand upon these results by comparing the ECs seen by Voyager to those seen by Cassini in 2004-2010. We find that the number of minor ECs has stayed roughly constant and the ECs have similar distributions of angular width, absolute brightness, and semimajor axis. However, the common exceptionally bright ECs seen by Voyager are now exceedingly rare, with only two instances seen by Cassini in the six years, and they are now also much dimmer relative to the mean ring...

  20. Production of 238PuO2 heat sources for the Cassini mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Timothy G.; Foltyn, Elizabeth M.

    1998-01-01

    NASA's Cassini mission to Saturn, scheduled to launch in October, 1997, is perhaps the most ambitious interplanetary explorer ever constructed. Electric power for the spacecraft's science instruments and on-board computers will be provided by three radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) powered by 216 238PuO2-fueled General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) capsules. In addition, critical equipment and instruments on the spacecraft and Huygens probe will be warmed by 128 Light-Weight Radioisotope Heater Units (LWRHUs). Fabrication and assembly of the GPHS capsules and LWRHU heat sources was performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) between January 1994 and September 1996. During this production campaign, LANL pressed and sintered 315 GPHS fuel pellets and 181 LWRHU pellets. By October 1996, NMT-9 had delivered a total of 235 GPHS capsules to EG&G Mound Applied Technologies (EG&G MAT) in Miamisburg, Ohio. EG&G MAT conditioned the capsules for use, loaded the capsules into the Cassini RTGs, tested the RTGs, and coordinated transportation to Kennedy Space Center (KSC). LANL also fabricated and assembled a total of 180 LWRHUs. The LWRHUs required for the Cassini spacecraft were shipped to KSC in mid-1997.

  1. Cassini capturing of freshly-produced water-group ions in the Enceladus torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaroshenko, V. V.; Miloch, W. J.; Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E.

    2012-09-01

    The water vapor plume on the geological-active south-polar region of the moon Enceladus is recognized as the main source of Saturn's neutral torus centered on the Enceladus orbit. The composition of the torus is dominated by water group species. Recent in situ Cassini plasma spectrometer measurements indicate the existence of freshly produced, slow and non-thermalized water group ions throughout the Enceladus torus including regions far from the moon. We report the results of modeling spacecraft-plasma interactions in the environment relevant for the Enceladus torus to show that new-born non-thermalized ions will inevitably be captured by the electric fields arising around the charged spacecraft. The associated plasma configuration can directly impact the plasma measurements and thus is important for reliable interpretation of data obtained by Cassini instruments in the Enceladus torus. The simulation results appear to be partially supported by Cassini observations and can provide new insights into intricate process of Enceladus-plasma interactions.

  2. Irregular-Moons Science Today and in Cassini's Final Three Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denk, T.; Mottola, S.

    2014-12-01

    The outer or irregular moons belong to the by far most numerous, but least investigated group of moons in the Saturnian system. The group is comprised of at least 38, mainly small objects which orbit at quite large distances to the planet, the rings, the inner regular moon system, and the Cassini spacecraft. As seen from Earth, their apparent visual magnitudes mainly range from ~20 to >25, the phase angles from 0 to 6°. From Cassini, some irregular moons can reach pole-axis directions, convex-hull shapes, and sidereal periods. So far, lightcurve inversion of Ymir revealed a convex shape reminiscent to a triangular prism and a spin-axis direction close to the South Ecliptic pole. The figure shows the lightcurve at 64° phase (bottom left panel), and four equatorial and two polar views of the derived shape model are shown at bottom right. Within Cassini's final three years in Saturn orbit, further observations offer the potential of pole and shape determinations for up to 15 irregular moons and up to 30 rotational periods total. These data may reveal (or already do so) hemispherical color variations, limits for object densities and sizes, pole-direction patterns, correlations of spin frequencies to orbit parameters, and hints for contact binaries or binary natures of the moons. Such information, besides its value per se, provides constraints for the investigation on the formation and evolutionary processes within the Saturnian satellite system.

  3. Estimation of Gravitation Parameters of Saturnian Moons Using Cassini Attitude Control Flight Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krening, Samantha C.

    2013-01-01

    A major science objective of the Cassini mission is to study Saturnian satellites. The gravitational properties of each Saturnian moon is of interest not only to scientists but also to attitude control engineers. When the Cassini spacecraft flies close to a moon, a gravity gradient torque is exerted on the spacecraft due to the mass of the moon. The gravity gradient torque will alter the spin rates of the reaction wheels (RWA). The change of each reaction wheel's spin rate might lead to overspeed issues or operating the wheel bearings in an undesirable boundary lubrication condition. Hence, it is imperative to understand how the gravity gradient torque caused by a moon will affect the reaction wheels in order to protect the health of the hardware. The attitude control telemetry from low-altitude flybys of Saturn's moons can be used to estimate the gravitational parameter of the moon or the distance between the centers of mass of Cassini and the moon. Flight data from several low altitude flybys of three Saturnian moons, Dione, Rhea, and Enceladus, were used to estimate the gravitational parameters of these moons. Results are compared with values given in the literature.

  4. Fiber-based swept-source terahertz radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Wei; Tseng, Tzu-Fang; Kuo, Chung-Chiu; Hwang, Yuh-Jing; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2010-05-01

    We demonstrate an all-terahertz swept-source imaging radar operated at room temperature by using terahertz fibers for radiation delivery and with a terahertz-fiber directional coupler acting as a Michelson interferometer. By taking advantage of the high water reflection contrast in the low terahertz regime and by electrically sweeping at a high speed a terahertz source combined with a fast rotating mirror, we obtained the living object's distance information with a high image frame rate. Our experiment showed that this fiber-based swept-source terahertz radar could be used in real time to locate concealed moving live objects with high stability.

  5. Design, Performance and Optimization for Multimodal Radar Operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surendra S. Bhat

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the underlying methodology behind an adaptive multimodal radar sensor that is capable of progressively optimizing its range resolution depending upon the target scattering features. It consists of a test-bed that enables the generation of linear frequency modulated waveforms of various bandwidths. This paper discusses a theoretical approach to optimizing the bandwidth used by the multimodal radar. It also discusses the various experimental results obtained from measurement. The resolution predicted from theory agrees quite well with that obtained from experiments for different target arrangements.

  6. Bistatic radar using a spaceborne illuminator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitewood, Aric Pierre

    A bistatic radar has a physically separated transmitter and receiver. This research pro gramme investigates a bistatic radar system which uses a spaceborne synthetic aperture radar transmitter on board the European Space Agency's Envisat satellite and a station ary, ground based receiver. The advantages of this variant of the bistatic configuration includes the passive and therefore covert nature of the receiver, its relatively low cost, in addition to the possibility of using a non-cooperative transmitter. The theory behind bistatic SAR systems is covered, including the specific case investi gated. The design, construction and testing of the bistatic receiver, which uses two separate channels, for the direct signal from the satellite (for synchronisation purposes) and the re flected signals from the imaged scene is also described. A SAR processing scheme using an adapted chirp scaling algorithm is presented and demonstrated through simulations to produce focused images for the scenario. The results of several bistatic imaging experiments are analysed through comparisons with theoretical impulse responses, and comparisons with satellite photographs, the corresponding monostatic image produced by Envisat, and the bistatic ambiguity function. It is demonstrated that focused images may be produced with such a system, although the performance achievable is dependent upon the imaging geometry. Different look direc tions of the receiver produce widely differing resolution values. The optimum choice of look direction must be weighed against possible direct signal interference in the reflected signal channel. Other effects, such as azimuth ambiguities caused by the sampling of the mov ing transmitter beam by the pulse repetition frequency may also have an effect, depending upon the combined transmit/receive beam pattern. Aspects of the system that could be investigated in the future are identified, for example the addition of an extra channel to the receiver in order to

  7. Saturn’s icy satellites investigated by Cassini-VIMS. II. Results at the end of nominal mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Clark, R. N.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Coradini, A.; Cerroni, P.; Nicholson, P. D.; McCord, T. B.; Brown, R. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Tosi, F.; Nelson, R. M.; Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.

    2010-04-01

    We report the detailed analysis of the spectrophotometric properties of Saturn's icy satellites as derived by full-disk observations obtained by visual and infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) experiment aboard Cassini. In this paper, we have extended the coverage until the end of the Cassini's nominal mission (June 1st 2008), while a previous paper ( Filacchione, G., and 28 colleagues [2007]. Icarus 186, 259-290, hereby referred to as Paper I) reported the preliminary results of this study. During the four years of nominal mission, VIMS has observed the entire population of Saturn's icy satellites allowing us to make a comparative analysis of the VIS-NIR spectral properties of the major satellites (Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Hyperion, Iapetus) and irregular moons (Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, Epimetheus, Telesto, Calypso, Phoebe). The results we discuss here are derived from the entire dataset available at June 2008 which consists of 1417 full-disk observations acquired from a variety of distances and inclinations from the equatorial plane, with different phase angles and hemispheric coverage. The most important spectrophotometric indicators (as defined in Paper I: I/ F continua at 0.55 μm, 1.822 μm and 3.547 μm, visible spectral slopes, water and carbon dioxide bands depths and positions) are calculated for each observation in order to investigate the disk-integrated composition of the satellites, the distribution of water ice respect to "contaminants" abundances and typical regolith grain properties. These quantities vary from the almost pure water ice surfaces of Enceladus and Calypso to the organic and carbon dioxide rich Hyperion, Iapetus and Phoebe. Janus visible colors are intermediate between these two classes having a slightly positive spectral slope. These results could help to decipher the origins and evolutionary history of the minor moons of the Saturn's system. We introduce a polar representation of the spectrophotometric

  8. Solid-State Cloud Radar System (CRS) Upgrade and Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLinden, Matt; Heymsfield, Gerald; Li, Lihua; Racette, Paul; Coon, Michael; Venkatesh, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    The recent decade has brought rapid development in solid-state power amplifier (SSPA) technology. This has enabled the use of solid-state precipitation radar in place of high-power and high-voltage systems such as those that use Klystron or Magnetron transmitters. The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has recently completed a comprehensive redesign of the 94 gigahertz Cloud Radar System (CRS) to incorporate a solid-state transmitter. It is the first cloud radar to achieve sensitivity comparable to that of a high-voltage transmitter using solid-state. The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Cloud Radar System (CRS) is a 94 gigahertz Doppler radar that flies on the NASA ER-2 high-altitude aircraft. The upgraded CRS system utilizes a state-of-the-art solid-state 94 gigahertz power amplifier with a peak transmit power of 30 watts. The modernized CRS system is detailed here with data results from its deployment during the 2014 Integrated Precipitation and Hydrology Experiment (IPHEX).

  9. Development of a Single-Borehole Radar for Well Logging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-ou Zhou

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available An impulse-based single-borehole radar prototype has been developed for well logging. The borehole radar is comprised of subsurface sonde and surface equipment. An armored 7-conductor well logging cable is used to connect subsurface sonde and surface equipment which is well compatible with the other well logging instruments. The performance experiments of the prototype have been conducted in a test field. The results show that the prototype system is capable of detecting the target which is 8 meters away from the borehole. This radar prototype has been employed in a real oil field well with a depth of about 1600 meters. Compared with conventional resistivity well logging tools, the prototype system provides comprehensive well-bore formation analysis information.  

  10. Correction for hydrometeor attenuation of C band radar data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    C band digital weather radar observed data, collected from the Huaihe River Basin Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (HUBEX), are used for the study of correction of hydrometeor attenuation in the Fuyang region. An iterative algorithm is used for the correction scheme. The preliminary study shows that there may be a big difference between the radar observed reflectivity and the corresponding corrected one. Based upon the hourly precipitation data derived by the radar data sampled from the observations at intervals of 10 min and rain-gauge-recorded hourly precipitation data, it is found that the attenuation correction algorithm gives better results than those from the direct observation. It is also shown that the temperature of hydrometeors may strongly affect the results derived from the attenuation algorithm.

  11. Ultra-wideband noise radar based on optical waveform generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodensky, Daniel; Kravitz, Daniel; Zadok, Avi

    2012-06-01

    A microwave-photonic, ultra-wideband (UWB) noise radar system is proposed and demonstrated. The system brings together photonic generation of UWB waveforms and fiber-optic distribution. The use of UWB noise provides high ranging resolution and better immunity to interception and jamming. Distribution over fibers allows for the separation the radar-operating personnel and equipment from the location of the front-end. The noise waveforms are generated using the amplified spontaneous emission that is associated with stimulated Brillouin scattering in a standard optical fiber, or with an erbium-doped fiber amplifier. Our experiments demonstrate a proof of concept for an integrated radar system, driven by optically generated UWB noise waveforms of more than 1 GHz bandwidth that are distributed over 10 km distance. The detection of concealed metallic object and the resolving of two targets with the anticipated ranging resolution are reported.

  12. HPRF pulse Doppler stepped frequency radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG Teng; REN LiXiang

    2009-01-01

    Stepped frequency radar Is a well known scheme to generate high range resolution profile (HRRP) of targets. Through appropriate radar parameter design, the radar enables both unambiguous velocity measurement and high resolution ranging within a single dwell in a high pulse repetition frequency (HPRF) mode. This paper analyzes in detail the design principle of the HPRF stepped frequency radar system, the solution to its ambiguity issue, as well as its signal processing method. Both theoretical analysis and simulation results demonstrate that the proposed radar scheme can work independently to solve the problem of motion compensation, and is therefore highly applicable to many new types of radar.

  13. Adaptive filters applied on radar signals

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    This master thesis has been performed at SAAB AB in Järfälla, Sweden.A radar warning receiver must alert the user when someone highlights it with radarsignals. Radar signals used today varies and has a wide frequency band. In order todetect all possible radar signals the radar warning receiver must have a widebandwidth. This results in that the noise power will be high in the radar warningreceiver and weak radar signals will be hard to detect or even undetected.The aim of the thesis work was ...

  14. Expression of cassini, a murine gamma-satellite sequence conserved in evolution, is regulated in normal and malignant hematopoietic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arutyunyan Anna

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL cells treated with drugs can become drug-tolerant if co-cultured with protective stromal mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs. Results We performed transcriptional profiling on these stromal fibroblasts to investigate if they were affected by the presence of drug-treated ALL cells. These mitotically inactivated MEFs showed few changes in gene expression, but a family of sequences of which transcription is significantly increased was identified. A sequence related to this family, which we named cassini, was selected for further characterization. We found that cassini was highly upregulated in drug-treated ALL cells. Analysis of RNAs from different normal mouse tissues showed that cassini expression is highest in spleen and thymus, and can be further enhanced in these organs by exposure of mice to bacterial endotoxin. Heat shock, but not other types of stress, significantly induced the transcription of this locus in ALL cells. Transient overexpression of cassini in human 293 embryonic kidney cells did not increase the cytotoxic or cytostatic effects of chemotherapeutic drugs but provided some protection. Database searches revealed that sequences highly homologous to cassini are present in rodents, apicomplexans, flatworms and primates, indicating that they are conserved in evolution. Moreover, CASSINI RNA was induced in human ALL cells treated with vincristine. Surprisingly, cassini belongs to the previously reported murine family of γ-satellite/major satellite DNA sequences, which were not known to be present in other species. Conclusions Our results show that the transcription of at least one member of these sequences is regulated, suggesting that this has a function in normal and transformed immune cells. Expression of these sequences may protect cells when they are exposed to specific stress stimuli.

  15. Microphysical Retrieval from Doppler Radar Reflectivity Using Variational Data Assimilation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yongping; ZHU Guofu; XUE Jishan

    2006-01-01

    One of the microphysical variables, the rainwater mixing ratio qr, is retrieved from the observed reflectivity of Doppler radar by a 3D variational data assimilation system. The qr as an analysis variable is obtained by minimizing a cost function defined as the difference between observed radar reflectivity and its retrieval from qr, plus the difference between qr and its background field from a mesoscale model's prediction. Covariance matrix of the background field's error is determined by the so-called NMC method. A method called the second-order auto-regression (SOAR) is used to calculate the coefficients of regressive filtering to fit in with small spatial scale such as cumulus in the process of spatial transformation. An ideal experiment demonstrates the correctness of this system and a sensitivity experiment proves that the random error of observed reflectivity has effect on the analyzed results. At last an experiment with observed data from the Doppler radar at Ma'anshan City in Anhui Province on 19 June 2002 was performed. The retrieved analysis variable qr in this test shows structures in detail, which coincide with the distribution of the echo picture observed by the radar.

  16. The Geminid meteor shower during the ECOMA sounding rocket campaign: specular and head echo radar observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Stober

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The ECOMA (Existence of Charge state Of meteoric smoke particles in the Middle Atmosphere sounding rocket campaign was conducted during the Geminid meteor shower in December 2010 in order to explore whether there is a change of the properties of meteoric smoke particles due to the stream. In parallel to the rocket flights, three radars monitored the Geminid activity located at the launch site in Northern Norway and in Northern Germany to gain information about the meteor flux into the atmosphere. The results presented here are based on specular meteor radar observations measuring the radiant position, the velocity and the meteor flux into the atmosphere during the Geminids. Further, the MAARSY (Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System radar was operated to conduct meteor head echo experiments. The interferometric capabilities of MAARSY permit measuring the meteor trajectories within the radar beam and to determine the source radiant and geocentric meteor velocity, as well as to compute the meteor orbit.

  17. Coded continuous wave meteor radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Vierinen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The concept of coded continuous wave meteor radar is introduced. The radar uses a continuously transmitted pseudo-random waveform, which has several advantages: coding avoids range aliased echoes, which are often seen with commonly used pulsed specular meteor radars (SMRs; continuous transmissions maximize pulse compression gain, allowing operation with significantly lower peak transmit power; the temporal resolution can be changed after performing a measurement, as it does not depend on pulse spacing; and the low signal to noise ratio allows multiple geographically separated transmitters to be used in the same frequency band without significantly interfering with each other. The latter allows the same receiver antennas to be used to receive multiple transmitters. The principles of the signal processing are discussed, in addition to discussion of several practical ways to increase computation speed, and how to optimally detect meteor echoes. Measurements from a campaign performed with a coded continuous wave SMR are shown and compared with two standard pulsed SMR measurements. The type of meteor radar described in this paper would be suited for use in a large scale multi-static network of meteor radar transmitters and receivers. This would, for example, provide higher spatio-temporal resolution for mesospheric wind field measurements.

  18. Coded continuous wave meteor radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vierinen, J.; Chau, J. L.; Pfeffer, N.; Clahsen, M.; Stober, G.

    2015-07-01

    The concept of coded continuous wave meteor radar is introduced. The radar uses a continuously transmitted pseudo-random waveform, which has several advantages: coding avoids range aliased echoes, which are often seen with commonly used pulsed specular meteor radars (SMRs); continuous transmissions maximize pulse compression gain, allowing operation with significantly lower peak transmit power; the temporal resolution can be changed after performing a measurement, as it does not depend on pulse spacing; and the low signal to noise ratio allows multiple geographically separated transmitters to be used in the same frequency band without significantly interfering with each other. The latter allows the same receiver antennas to be used to receive multiple transmitters. The principles of the signal processing are discussed, in addition to discussion of several practical ways to increase computation speed, and how to optimally detect meteor echoes. Measurements from a campaign performed with a coded continuous wave SMR are shown and compared with two standard pulsed SMR measurements. The type of meteor radar described in this paper would be suited for use in a large scale multi-static network of meteor radar transmitters and receivers. This would, for example, provide higher spatio-temporal resolution for mesospheric wind field measurements.

  19. Improving Weather Radar Precipitation Estimates by Combining two Types of Radars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Ellerbæk; Thorndahl, Søren Liedtke; Rasmussen, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    the two radar types achieves a radar product with both long range and high temporal resolution. It is validated that the blended radar product performs better than the individual radars based on ground observations from laser disdrometers. However, the data combination is challenged by lower performance...

  20. Design of multi-frequency CW radars

    CERN Document Server

    Jankiraman, Mohinder

    2007-01-01

    This book deals with the basic theory for design and analysis of Low Probability of Intercept (LPI) radar systems. The design of one such multi-frequency high resolution LPI radar, PANDORA, is covered.

  1. NOAA NEXt-Generation RADar (NEXRAD) Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of Level III weather radar products collected from Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) stations located in the contiguous United States, Alaska,...

  2. MST radar data-base management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickwar, V. B.

    1983-01-01

    Data management for Mesospheric-Stratospheric-Tropospheric, (MST) radars is addressed. An incoherent-scatter radar data base is discussed in terms of purpose, centralization, scope, and nature of the data base management system.

  3. Resolving SSM/I-Ship Radar Rainfall Discrepancies from AIP-3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The third algorithm intercomparison project (AIP-3) involved rain estimates from more than 50satellite rainfall algorithms and ground radar measurements within the Intensive Flux Array (IFA) over the equatorial western Pacific warm pool region during the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE). Early results indicated that there was a systematic bias between rainrates from satellite passive microwave and ground radar measurements. The mean rainrate from radar measurements is about 50% underestimated compared to that from passive microwave-based retrieval algorithms. This paper is designed to analyze rain patterns from the Florida State University rain retrieval algorithm and radar measurements to understand physically the rain discrepancies. Results show that there is a clear range-dependent bias associated with the radar measurements.However, this range-dependent systematical bias is almost eliminated with the corrected radar rainrates.Results suggest that the effects from radar attenuation correction, calibration and beam filling are the major sources of rain discrepancies. This study demonstrates that rain retrievals based on satellite measurements from passive microwave radiometers such as the Special Sensor of Microwave Imager (SSM/I)are reliable, while rain estimates from ground radar measurements are correctable.

  4. The new approach of polarimetric attenuation correction for improving radar quantitative precipitation estimation(QPE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ji-Young; Suk, Mi-Kyung; Nam, Kyung-Yeub; Ko, Jeong-Seok; Ryzhkov, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    To obtain high-quality radar quantitative precipitation estimation data, reliable radar calibration and efficient attenuation correction are very important. Because microwave radiation at shorter wavelength experiences strong attenuation in precipitation, accounting for this attenuation is the essential work at shorter wavelength radar. In this study, the performance of different attenuation/differential attenuation correction schemes at C band is tested for two strong rain events which occurred in central Oklahoma. And also, a new attenuation correction scheme (combination of self-consistency and hot-spot concept methodology) that separates relative contributions of strong convective cells and the rest of the storm to the path-integrated total and differential attenuation is among the algorithms explored. A quantitative use of weather radar measurement such as rainfall estimation relies on the reliable attenuation correction. We examined the impact of attenuation correction on estimates of rainfall in heavy rain events by using cross-checking with S-band radar measurements which are much less affected by attenuation and compared the storm rain totals obtained from the corrected Z and KDP and rain gages in these cases. This new approach can be utilized at shorter wavelength radars efficiently. Therefore, it is very useful to Weather Radar Center of Korea Meteorological Administration preparing X-band research dual Pol radar network.

  5. Universal Library for Building Radar Operator Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Karankevich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article contains the results of the development of a software library, used for building software interfaces for radars being developed in BMSTU Radioelectronic Technics Scientific and Research Institute. The library is a software application library written in C++ using Qt and OpenGL libraries.The article describes the requirements, that the library is supposed to meet, in particular — cross-platform capabilities and versatility of the solution. The data types, that library uses, are described. The description of theinterface elements developed is shown, and some pictures of their operation are given.The article shows the main interface elements used. They are: «Matrix» that shows twodimensional data, «Waterfall», that is used for time scanning of the parameter specified, and «Plan Position Indicator» that shows circular scan from surveillance radar without geometric distortions.The part «Library implementation» shows the example of radiolocation station interface, that was based on this library, used in the working model of ultrashortpulse radar. Some results of the operation of this interface are also shown. The experiment shows the system working with two people in the field. As people start to move, the system becomes capable of distinguishing moving targets and stationary surface. The article shows the system operation the same way as the system operator can see it through his interface.The conclusion contains brief results of the development, the sphere of application of the software, and the prospects of the further development of the library.

  6. Radar Observation of Insects - Mosquitoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, E.; Downing, J.

    1979-01-01

    Tests were conducted at several sites over the coastal lowlands of New Jersey and over a region of high plains and low mountains in Oklahoma. In one area, a salt marsh in New Jersey, extensive ground tests were combined with laboratory data on expected insect backscatter to arrive at an extremely convincing model of the insect origin of most Dot Angels. A great deal of insight was studied from radar on the buildup and dispersal of insect swarms, since radar can follow where other means of trapping and observation cannot. Data on large-scale behavior as a function of wind and topography are presented. Displayed techniques which show individual or small swarm motion within some larger cloud or mass, or which can show the overall motion over great distances were developed. The influence of wind and terrain on insect motion and dispersal is determined from radar data.

  7. Scanning ARM Cloud Radar Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widener, K; Bharadwaj, N; Johnson, K

    2012-06-18

    The scanning ARM cloud radar (SACR) is a polarimetric Doppler radar consisting of three different radar designs based on operating frequency. These are designated as follows: (1) X-band SACR (X-SACR); (2) Ka-band SACR (Ka-SACR); and (3) W-band SACR (W-SACR). There are two SACRs on a single pedestal at each site where SACRs are deployed. The selection of the operating frequencies at each deployed site is predominantly determined by atmospheric attenuation at the site. Because RF attenuation increases with atmospheric water vapor content, ARM's Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) sites use the X-/Ka-band frequency pair. The Southern Great Plains (SGP) and North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites field the Ka-/W-band frequency pair. One ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) has a Ka/W-SACR and the other (AMF2) has a X/Ka-SACR.

  8. An MSK Waveform for Radar Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Srinivasan, Meera

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a minimum shift keying (MSK) waveform developed for use in radar applications. This waveform is characterized in terms of its spectrum, autocorrelation, and ambiguity function, and is compared with the conventionally used bi-phase coded (BPC) radar signal. It is shown that the MSK waveform has several advantages when compared with the BPC waveform, and is a better candidate for deep-space radar imaging systems such as NASA's Goldstone Solar System Radar.

  9. Radar operation in a hostile electromagnetic environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2014-03-01

    Radar ISR does not always involve cooperative or even friendly targets. An adversary has numerous techniques available to him to counter the effectiveness of a radar ISR sensor. These generally fall under the banner of jamming, spoofing, or otherwise interfering with the EM signals required by the radar sensor. Consequently mitigation techniques are prudent to retain efficacy of the radar sensor. We discuss in general terms a number of mitigation techniques.

  10. Wind Turbine Radar Cross Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Jenn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The radar cross section (RCS of a wind turbine is a figure of merit for assessing its effect on the performance of electronic systems. In this paper, the fundamental equations for estimating the wind turbine clutter signal in radar and communication systems are presented. Methods of RCS prediction are summarized, citing their advantages and disadvantages. Bistatic and monostatic RCS patterns for two wind turbine configurations, a horizontal axis three-blade design and a vertical axis helical design, are shown. The unique electromagnetic scattering features, the effect of materials, and methods of mitigating wind turbine clutter are also discussed.

  11. Highly integrated low power radars

    CERN Document Server

    Saponara, Sergio; Ragonese, Egidio

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, advances in radio detection and ranging technology, sustained by new achievements in the fields of signal processing and electronic components, have permitted the adoption of radars in many civil and defense applications.This resource discusses how highly integrated radar has been adopted by several new markets such as contactless vital sign monitoring (heart rate, breath rate) or harbour traffic control, as well as several applications for vehicle driver assistance. You are provided with scenarios, applications, and requirements, while focusing on the trade-offs between flexi

  12. Compressive sensing for urban radar

    CERN Document Server

    Amin, Moeness

    2014-01-01

    With the emergence of compressive sensing and sparse signal reconstruction, approaches to urban radar have shifted toward relaxed constraints on signal sampling schemes in time and space, and to effectively address logistic difficulties in data acquisition. Traditionally, these challenges have hindered high resolution imaging by restricting both bandwidth and aperture, and by imposing uniformity and bounds on sampling rates.Compressive Sensing for Urban Radar is the first book to focus on a hybrid of two key areas: compressive sensing and urban sensing. It explains how reliable imaging, tracki

  13. Principles of modern radar advanced techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Melvin, William

    2012-01-01

    Principles of Modern Radar: Advanced Techniques is a professional reference for practicing engineers that provides a stepping stone to advanced practice with in-depth discussions of the most commonly used advanced techniques for radar design. It will also serve advanced radar academic and training courses with a complete set of problems for students as well as solutions for instructors.

  14. 46 CFR 130.310 - Radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radar. 130.310 Section 130.310 Shipping COAST GUARD... EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Navigational Equipment § 130.310 Radar. Each vessel of 100 or more gross tons must be fitted with a general marine radar in the pilothouse....

  15. 46 CFR 167.40-40 - Radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radar. 167.40-40 Section 167.40-40 Shipping COAST GUARD... Requirements § 167.40-40 Radar. All mechanically propelled vessels of 1,600 gross tons and over in ocean or coastwise service must be fitted with a marine radar system for surface navigation. Facilities for...

  16. 46 CFR 108.717 - Radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radar. 108.717 Section 108.717 Shipping COAST GUARD... Miscellaneous Equipment § 108.717 Radar. Each self-propelled unit of 1,600 gross tons and over in ocean or coastwise service must have— (a) A marine radar system for surface navigation; and (b) Facilities on...

  17. Efficient Ways to Learn Weather Radar Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qing; Yeary, M. B.; Zhang, Guifu

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. weather radar network is currently being upgraded with dual-polarization capability. Weather radar polarimetry is an interdisciplinary area of engineering and meteorology. This paper presents efficient ways to learn weather radar polarimetry through several basic and practical topics. These topics include: 1) hydrometeor scattering model…

  18. Comparison of mimo radar concepts: Detection performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossum, W.L. van; Huizing, A.G.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, four different array radar concepts are compared: pencil beam, floodlight, monostatic MIMO, and multistatic MIMO. The array radar concepts show an increase in complexity accompanied by an increase in diversity. The comparison between the radar concepts is made by investigating the det

  19. FMCW Radar with Broadband Communication Capability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barrenechea, P.; Elferink, F.H.; Janssen, J.A.A.J.

    2007-01-01

    The use of amplitude modulation to encode information onto an FMCW radar signal is proposed in this paper. This new technique, that has been named AM-FMCW communicating radar, provides a new channel for broadband communication by reusing the radar frequencies and without introducing any distortion i

  20. 46 CFR 15.815 - Radar observers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radar observers. 15.815 Section 15.815 Shipping COAST... Computations § 15.815 Radar observers. (a) Each person in the required complement of deck officers, including... endorsement as radar observer. (b) Each person who is employed or serves as pilot in accordance with...

  1. 46 CFR 11.480 - Radar observer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radar observer. 11.480 Section 11.480 Shipping COAST... ENDORSEMENTS Professional Requirements for Deck Officers § 11.480 Radar observer. (a) This section contains the requirements that an applicant must meet to qualify as a radar observer. (Part 15 of this chapter specifies...

  2. A controlled experiment for water front monitoring using GPR technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miorali, M.; Slob, E.C.; Arts, R.J.

    2010-01-01

    We use a stepped frequency continuous wave (SFCW) radar and an impulse radar to monitor a water flood experiment in a sand box. The SFCW system operates in the bandwidth from 800 MHz to 2.8 GHz. The impulse radar system is bi-static and works with a central frequency of 1 GHz. The sand box is a mete

  3. Thermal mapping of Saturn's main rings by Cassini CIRS: Temperature variations with changing viewing geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, L.; Altobelli, N.; Pilorz, S.; Leyrat, C.; Ferrari, C.; Edgington, S.; Wallis, B.; Pearl, J.; Flasar, F.

    2007-08-01

    After three years in orbit around Saturn, the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) has acquired an broad set of thermal measurements of Saturn's main rings (A, B, C and Cassini Division) for a number of different viewing geometries, most of which are not available from Earth. These thermal measurements include information on physical temperature as well as filling factor. Thermal mapping of both the lit and unlit faces of the rings is being performed within a multidimensional observation space that includes solar phase angle, spacecraft elevation, solar elevation and local hour angle. The largest temperature variations on the lit face of the rings are driven by variations in phase angle while differences in temperature with changing spacecraft elevation are a secondary effect. Ring temperatures decrease with increasing phase angle suggesting a population of slowly rotating ring particles [1]. The largest ring temperatures are measured at zero degrees phase angle. The lit A and B rings both show temperature decreases with decreasing solar elevation while temperature changes in the C ring and Cassini Division are more muted. Variations in the geometrical filling factor are driven primarily by changes in spacecraft elevation. For the least optically thick region of the C ring, the filling factor variations are almost exclusively driven by spacecraft elevation. Our preliminary evaluation of the data set acquired to date will be presented. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA, and at CEA Saclay supported by the "Programme National de Planetologie". References [1] L. Spilker et al., PSS, 54, 1167 (2006).

  4. Temperature variations in Titan's upper atmosphere: Impact on Cassini/Huygens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Kazeminejad

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Temperature variations of Titan's upper atmosphere due to the plasma interaction of the satellite with Saturn's magnetosphere and Titan's high altitude monomer haze particles can imply an offset of up to ±30K from currently estimated model profiles. We incorporated these temperature uncertainties as an offset into the recently published Vervack et al. (2004 (Icarus, Vol. 170, 91-112 engineering model and derive extreme case (i.e. minimum and maximum profiles temperature, pressure, and density profiles. We simulated the Huygens probe hypersonic entry trajectory and obtain, as expected, deviations of the probe trajectory for the extreme atmosphere models compared to the simulation based on the nominal one. These deviations are very similar to the ones obtained with the standard Yelle et al. (1997 (ESA SP-1177 profiles. We could confirm that the difference in aerodynamic drag is of an order of magnitude that can be measured by the probe science accelerometer. They represent an important means for the reconstruction of Titan's upper atmospheric properties. Furthermore, we simulated a Cassini low Titan flyby trajectory. No major trajectory deviations were found. The atmospheric torques due to aerodynamic drag, however, are twice as high for our high temperature profile as the ones obtained with the Yelle maximum profile and more than 5 times higher than the worst case estimations from the Cassini project. We propose to use the Cassini atmospheric torque measurements during its low flybys to derive the atmospheric drag and to reconstruct Titan's upper atmosphere density, pressure, and temperature. The results could then be compared to the reconstructed profiles obtained from Huygens probe measurements. This would help to validate the probe measurements and decrease the error bars.

  5. Precision Navigation of Cassini Images Using Rings, Icy Satellites, and Fuzzy Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Robert S.; Showalter, Mark R.; Gordon, Mitchell K.

    2016-10-01

    Before images from the Cassini spacecraft can be analyzed, errors in the published pointing information (up to ~110 pixels for the Imaging Science Subsystem Narrow Angle Camera) must be corrected so that the line of sight vector for each pixel is known. This complicated and labor-intensive process involves matching the image contents with known features such as stars, rings, or moons. Metadata, such as lighting geometry or ring radius and longitude, must be computed for each pixel as well. Both steps require mastering the SPICE toolkit, a highly capable piece of software with a steep learning curve. Only after these steps are completed can the actual scientific investigation begin.We have embarked on a three-year project to perform these steps for all 400,000+ Cassini ISS images as well as images taken by the VIMS, UVIS, and CIRS instruments. The result will be a series of SPICE kernels that include accurate pointing information and a series of backplanes that include precomputed metadata for each pixel. All data will be made public through the PDS Ring-Moon Systems Node (http://www.pds-rings.seti.org). We expect this project to dramatically decrease the time required for scientists to analyze Cassini data.In a previous poster (French et al. 2014, DPS #46, 422.01) we discussed our progress navigating images using stars, simple ring models, and well-defined icy bodies. In this poster we will report on our current progress including the use of more sophisticated ring models, navigation of "fuzzy" bodies such as Titan and Saturn, and use of crater matching on high-resolution images of the icy satellites.

  6. Abundances of C3Hx Hydrocarbons in Titan's Stratosphere from Cassini CIRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, C. A.; Jennings, D. E.; Bezard, B.; Vinatier, S.; Teanby, N. A.; Sung, K.; Ansty, T. M.; Irwin, P. G.; Gorius, N.; Cottini, V.; Coustenis, A.; Flasar, F. M.

    2014-12-01

    During the ten years since entry into Saturn orbit in 2004, the Cassini spacecraft has made more than 100 close flybys of Titan, measuring the properties of the atmosphere by both in situ and remote sensing techniques. Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) senses the infrared spectrum from 7-1000 μm (1400-10 cm-1), a region which exhibits the vibrational emissions of many different molecular species. CIRS has therefore been able to map the spatial distributions and temporal variations of hydrocarbons, nitriles and other gas species in Titan's atmosphere, yielding information about the chemistry and dynamics. Recently, Nixon et al. (2013) made the first detection of a new stratospheric gas species from Cassini using CIRS - the C3H6 molecule (propene). This filled in a long-time missing link in the chemical picture of Titan's lower atmosphere, since the C3H4 (propyne) and C3H8 (propane) molecules had been detected in 1981 by Voyager 1 IRIS. The inferred abundance of C3H6 is less than both C3H8 and C3H4, and this pattern is repeated also in the C2Hx molecules where C2H4 is less abundant than C2H2 and C2H6. Therefore a pattern emerges whereby: alkanes > alkynes > alkenes within the C2Hx and C3Hx chemical families in the lower stratosphere. We comment on how this trend compares to published photochemical model predictions, and also give updates on the search for C3Hx isomers (allene: CH2CCH2, and cyclopropane: c-C3H6) and C4Hx species using CIRS.

  7. Cassini RTG Acceptance Test Results and RTG Performance on Galileo and Ulysses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, C. E.; Klee, P. M.

    1997-06-01

    Flight acceptance testing has been completed for the RTGs to be used on the Cassini spacecraft which is scheduled for an October 6, 1997 launch to Saturn. The acceptance test program includes vibration tests, magnetic field measurements, properties (weight and c.g.) and thermal vacuum test. This paper presents The thermal vacuum test results. Three RTGs are to be used, F 2, F 6, and F 7. F 5 is tile back up RTG, as it was for the Galileo and Ulysses missions launched in 1989 and 1990, respectively. RTG performance measured during the thermal vacuum tests carried out at die Mound Laboratory facility met all specification requirements. Beginning of mission (BOM) and end of mission (EOM) power predictions have been made based on than tests results. BOM power is predicted to be 888 watts compared to the minimum requirement of 826 watts. Degradation models predict the EOM power after 16 years is to be 640 watts compared to a minimum requirement of 596 watts. Results of small scale module tests are also showing. The modules contain couples from the qualification and flight production runs. The tests have exceeded 28,000 hours (3.2 years) and are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. All test results indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of over five percent are predicted. Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Telemetry data are also shown for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995 and is now in the extended mission.

  8. Improved orbits of Saturn and Jupiter from the Cassini and Juno missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folkner, William M.; Jacobson, Robert Arthur; Jones, Dayton

    2015-08-01

    Since entering orbit about Saturn in 2004, radio tracking data of the Cassini spacecraft has provided accurate measurements of its position leading to marked improvement in the Saturn ephemeris. The Cassini spacecraft orbit period has varied between 14 and 30 days as the orbit was changed to provide views of Saturn’s rings and satellites. This relatively large orbit period has required care to separate the spacecraft orbit relative to Saturn from the orbit of Saturn relative to the Sun. The resulting estimates give a series of range measurements of Saturn relative to Earth with accuracy of ~30 m. In addition to improving the Saturn ephemeris, the range measurements have been used to place stringent upper bounds on possible deviation from General Relativity suggested by the theory of Modified Newtonian Dynamics. The Very Large Baseline Array has been used to observe Cassini and determine the right ascension and declination of Saturn approximately every year since entering orbit. The combination of range and VLBA measurements over more than one-quarter of the Saturn orbit period have resulted in Saturn ephemeris accuracy comparable to that of the inner planets.The Juno spacecraft will enter orbit about Jupiter in July 2016. Juno will be the second spacecraft to orbit Jupiter, but the first to provide a time series of ranging measurements since the Galileo spacecraft high-gain antenna failure prevented range measurements from that mission. Ranging measurements to Juno, combined with VLBA observations, will cover less than one-quarter of an orbit period. But, when combined with the accurate measurements of the Ulysses spacecraft during Jupiter flyby in February 1992, the Jupiter ephemeris accuracy is expected to be close to that of Saturn and the inner planets.

  9. Mars Radar Opens a Planet's Third Dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Radar sounder instruments orbiting Mars have looked beneath the Martian surface and opened up the third dimension for planetary exploration. The technique's success is prompting scientists to think of all the other places in the Solar System where they would like to use radar sounders. The first radar sounder at Mars was the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding (MARSIS) on the European Space Agency's Mars Express Orbiter. It has been joined by the complementary Shallow Subsurface Radar (SHARAD), operating at a different wavelength aboard NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The data in this animation are from SHARAD.

  10. Synthetic aperture radar capabilities in development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    The Imaging and Detection Program (IDP) within the Laser Program is currently developing an X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) to support the Joint US/UK Radar Ocean Imaging Program. The radar system will be mounted in the program`s Airborne Experimental Test-Bed (AETB), where the initial mission is to image ocean surfaces and better understand the physics of low grazing angle backscatter. The Synthetic Aperture Radar presentation will discuss its overall functionality and a brief discussion on the AETB`s capabilities. Vital subsystems including radar, computer, navigation, antenna stabilization, and SAR focusing algorithms will be examined in more detail.

  11. Light weight radioisotope heater unit (LWRHU) production for the Cassini mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinehart, Gary H.

    1997-01-01

    The LWRHU is a 238PuO2 fueled heat source designed to provide one thermal watt in each of various locations on a spacecraft. The heat sources are required to maintain the temperature of specific components within normal operating ranges. The heat source consists of a hot-pressed 238PuO2 fuel pellet, a Pt-30Rh vented capsule, a pyrolytic graphite insulator, and a woven graphite aeroshell assembly. Los Alamos National Laboratory has fabricated 180 heat sources, 157 of which will be used on the Cassini mission.

  12. Dynamics of Saturn's great storm of 2010-2011 from Cassini ISS and RPWS

    CERN Document Server

    Sayanagi, Kunio M; Ewald, Shawn P; Fischer, Georg; Ingersoll, Andrew P; Kurth, William S; Muro, Gabriel D; Porco, Carolyn C; West, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    Saturn's quasi-periodic planet-encircling storms are the largest convecting outbursts in the Solar System. The last eruption was in 1990. A new eruption started in December 2010 and presented the first-ever opportunity to observe such episodic storms from a spacecraft in orbit around Saturn. Here, we analyze images acquired with the Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS), which captured the storm's birth, evolution and demise. In studying the end of the convective activity, we also analyze the Saturn Electrostatic Discharge (SED) signals detected by the Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) instrument. [...

  13. Cassini Plasma Spectrometer Ion Observations Close to Enceladus: E3, E5 and E7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokar, R. L.; Johnson, R. E.; Thomsen, M. F.; Wilson, R. J.; Crary, F. J.; Young, D. T.; Goldstein, R.; Reisenfeld, D. B.; Sittler, E. C.; Coates, A. J.; Paty, C. S.; Jia, Y.; Omidi, N.; Russell, C.

    2009-12-01

    The Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) detected freshly-produced water-group ions (O+, OH+, H2O+, H3O+) and heavier water dimer ions (HxO2)+ very close to Enceladus where the plasma begins to emerge from the south polar plume (1). The data were obtained during two close (52 and 25 km) flybys of Enceladus in 2008 (E3 and E5) and are consistent with measurements from the Cassini Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS). The ions are observed in CAPS detectors looking in the Cassini ram direction close to the ram kinetic energy, indicative of a nearly stagnant plasma flow in the plume. North of Enceladus the plasma slowing commences about 4 to 6 Enceladus radii away, while south of Enceladus signatures of the plasma interaction with the plume are detected 22 Enceladus radii away. Here we review and contrast these observations including the E7 flyby (anticipated Nov. 2, 2009). E7 is planned for a closest approach ~103 km south of Enceladus and CAPS should detect ions at rest with respect to Enceladus and over a broad range of gyrophase angles. Plasma fluid parameters both upstream and downstream of these encounters are extracted from the CAPS data. In addition, we compare the CAPS ion measurements with both fluid and 3D hybrid simulations. The MHD simulations (BATSRUS) are tuned to agree with Cassini Magnetometer (MAG) observations during the encounters then compared with CAPS observations. For example, for the E3 encounter the CAPS/BATSRUS comparison is striking, with features reproduced such as: the overall spatial scale of the interaction, the slowing of the ion flow within the dust plume to less than 5 km/s with respect to Enceladus, the temperature, flow and density signature of the geometric wake, and the flow perturbation along the magnetic field due to wake expansion. For E5, BATSRUS tuned against MAG suggests a 15 km/s bulk plasma flow toward Saturn during the encounter. We search for signatures of this flow in the CAPS ion data. 1.) Tokar,R.L. et al. Geophys. Res

  14. Cassini Imaging of Iapetus and Solution of the Albedo Asymmetry Enigma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denk, Tilmann; Spencer, John

    2014-05-01

    Cassini imaging of Iapetus during one close and several more distant flybys mainly in the first years of the mission revealed an alien and often unique landscape of this third-largest moon in the Saturnian system [1]. The data show numerous impact craters on the bright and dark terrain, equator-facing dark and pole-facing bright crater walls, huge impact basins, rather minor endogenic geologic features, a non-spherical, but ellipsoidal shape, a giant ridge which spans across half of Iapetus' circumference exactly along the equator, a newly detected global 'color dichotomy' presumably formed by dust from retrograde irregular moons, and of course the famous extreme global albedo asymmetry which has been an enigma for more than three centuries. Revealing the cause of this 'albedo dichotomy' enigma of Iapetus, where the trailing side and poles are more than 10x brighter than the leading side, was one of the major tasks for the Cassini mission. It has now been solved successfully. In the mid-1970es, deposition of exogenic dark material on the leading side, originating from outer retrograde moon Phoebe, was proposed as the cause. But this alone could not explain the global shape, sharpness, and complexity of the transition between Iapetus' bright and dark terrain. Mainly with Cassini spectrometer (CIRS) and imaging (ISS) data, all these characteristics and the asymmetry's large amplitude are now plausibly explained by runaway global thermal migration of water ice, triggered by the deposition of dark material on the leading hemisphere. This mechanism is unique to Iapetus among the Saturnian satellites for many reasons. Most important are Iapetus' slow rotation which produces unusually high daytime temperatures and water ice sublimation rates, and the size (gravity) of Iapetus which is small enough for global migration of water ice but large enough that much of the ice is retained on the surface [2]. References: [1] Denk, T., Neukum, G., Roatsch, Th., Porco, C.C., Burns, J

  15. Titan Density Reconstruction Using Radiometric and Cassini Attitude Control Flight Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Luis G., Jr.; Burk, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper compares three different methods of Titan atmospheric density reconstruction for the Titan 87 Cassini flyby. T87 was a unique flyby that provided independent Doppler radiometric measurements on the ground throughout the flyby including at Titan closest approach. At the same time, the onboard accelerometer provided an independent estimate of atmospheric drag force and density during the flyby. These results are compared with the normal method of reconstructing atmospheric density using thruster on-time and angular momentum accumulation. Differences between the estimates are analyzed and a possible explanation for the differences is evaluated.

  16. Wind Retrieval using Marine Radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    Interaction (HiRes) DRI the NATO Undersea Research Center ( NURC ) wants to develop and validate methodologies to retrieve wind field parameters from X-band...marine radar. The main parameters NURC will focus on are the mean surface wind vector as well as the wind gusts in vicinity of the measurement platform

  17. Radar Imaging for Urban Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    targets behind walls," Proceedings of the EUSIPCO 2009, Glasgow, Scotland , August 2009. [13] F. Ahmad and M. G. Amin, "Waveform design for...and Navigation, Vol. 148, No. 3, pp. 130-138, June 2001. [22] E. J. Roth well, W. Sun, "Time domain decon volution of transient radar data," IEEE Trans

  18. Measurements of radar ground returns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loor, G.P. de

    1974-01-01

    The ground based measurement techniques for the determination of the radar back-scatter of vegetation and soils as used in The Netherlands will be described. Two techniques are employed: one covering a large sample area (> 1000 m2) but working at low grazing angels only and one (short range) coverin

  19. Radar for Mapping Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barath, F. T.; Jordan, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    X-band system has 100-m2 resolution. Wide swath imaging radar of synthetic aperature type transmits signal to ground station for subsequent processing into imagery. Concept meets functional requirements for continuously mapping sea ice in north and south polar regions.

  20. A Risk Radar driven by Internet of intelligences serving for emergency management in community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chongfu; Wu, Tong; Renn, Ortwin

    2016-07-01

    Today, most of the commercial risk radars only have the function to show risks, as same as a set of risk matrixes. In this paper, we develop the Internet of intelligences (IOI) to drive a risk radar monitoring dynamic risks for emergency management in community. An IOI scans risks in a community by 4 stages: collecting information and experience about risks; evaluating risk incidents; verifying; and showing risks. Employing the information diffusion method, we optimized to deal with the effective information for calculating risk value. Also, a specific case demonstrates the reliability and practicability of risk radar.

  1. Analysis of the Gran Desierto, Pinacte Region, Sonora, Mexico, via shuttle imaging radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greeley, R.; Christensen, P. R.; Mchone, J. F.; Asmerom, Y.; Zimbelman, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    The radar discriminability of geolian features and their geological setting as imaged by the SIR-A experiment is examined. The Gran Desierto and Pincate volcanio field of Sonora, Mexico was used to analyze the radar characteristics of the interplay of aeolian features and volcano terrain. The area in the Gran Desierto covers 4000 sq. km. and contains sand dunes of several forms. The Pincate volcanio field covers more than 2.000 sq. km. and consists primarily of basaltic lavas. Margins of the field, especially on the western and northern sides, include several maar and maar-like craters; thus obtaining information on their radar characteristics for comparison with impact craters.

  2. Cassini Growth of Population Between Two Metropolitan Cities——A Case Study of Beijing-Tianjin Region, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZONG Yueguang; YANG Wei; MA Qiang; XUE Song

    2009-01-01

    The existing models of population distribution often focus on the region with a single city or even multiple centers, and lack the detailed explorations of the common and special type of urbanization areas with two centers. Taking Beijing-Tianjin region of China, which is a distinct dual-nuclei metropolitan area in the world, as an example and choosing Landsat-5 TM image in 2005, population, etc. As the data, this paper devotes to comprehending and illus-trating a model of Cassini growth of population between the two metropolitan cities through the research of spatial population distribution pattern, aided with RS and GIS techniques. Main technical processes include Kriging interpola-tion of the population data and character simulation of the Cassini ovals. According to the calculation of a/b, a key characteristic index of Cassini growth model, the spatial structures of population distribution were given. When a/b1,it is a curve with two separated loops with a population density more than 3000 persons/km2. When a/b=1, it is a lem-niscate curve with a population density about 3000 persons/km2. When 1(√2), there is an oval-shaped convex curve with a population density less than 500 persons/km2. The results show that owing to the combined action and influence of the regional dual-nuclei, the population distribution of Beijing-Tianjin region is in accord with Cassini model significantly. There-fore, there is Cassini growth of population between the two metropolitan cities in Beijing-Tianjin region. In addition,the process of Cassini growth has extraordinarily instructive significance for judging the development stages of the dual-nuclei metropolitan areas.

  3. All-optical bandwidth-tailorable radar

    CERN Document Server

    Zou, Weiwen; Long, Xin; Zhang, Siteng; Cui, Yuanjun; Chen, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Radar has been widely used in military, security, and rescue. Metamaterial cloak is employed in stealth targets to evade radar detection. Hence modern radar should be reconfigurable at multi-bands for detecting stealth targets, which might be realized based on microwave photonics. Here, we demonstrate an all-optical bandwidth-tailorable radar architecture. It is a coherent system utilizing one mode-locked laser for both signal generation and reception. Heterodyning of two individually filtered optical pulses that are pre-chirped via wavelength-to-time mapping generates wideband linearly-chirped radar signal. The working bands can be flexibly tailored with desired bandwidth at user-preferred carrier frequency. After modulated onto the pre-chirped optical pulse, radar echoes are time-stretched and frequency-compressed by several times. The digitization becomes much easier without loss of detection ability. We believe that the demonstration can innovate the radar's architecture with ultra-high range resolution.

  4. Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox & Tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosmorduc, Vinca; Benveniste, Jerome; Breebaart, Leo; Bronner, Emilie; Dinardo, Salvatore; Earith, Didier; Lucas, Bruno Manuel; Niejmeier, Sander; Picot, Nicolas

    2010-12-01

    The Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox is an "all-altimeter" collection of tools, tutorials and documents designed to facilitate the use of radar altimetry data, including the last mission launched, CryoSat. It has been available from April 2007, and had been demonstrated during training courses and scientific meetings. Nearly 1200 people downloaded it (as of end of June 2010), with many "newcomers" to altimetry among them. Users' feedbacks, developments in altimetry, and practice, showed that new interesting features could be added. Some have been added and/or improved in version 2. Others are ongoing, some are in discussion. The Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox is able: - to read most distributed radar altimetry data, from ERS-1 & 2, Topex/Poseidon, Geosat Follow-on, Jason- 1, Envisat, Jason- 2, CryoSat and also the future Saral and Sentinel 3 missions, - to perform some processing, data editing and statistic, - and to visualize the results. It can be used at several levels/several ways: - as a data reading tool, with APIs for C, Fortran, Matlab and IDL - as processing/extraction routines, through the on-line command mode - as an educational and a quick-look tool both, with the graphical user interface As part of the Toolbox, a Radar Altimetry Tutorial gives general information about altimetry, the technique involved and its applications, as well as an overview of past, present and future missions, including information on how to access data, additional software and documentation. It also presents a series of data use cases, covering all uses of altimetry over ocean, cryosphere and land, showing the basic methods for some of the most frequent manners of using altimetry data. BRAT is developed under contract with ESA and CNES. It is available at http://www.altimetry.info and http://earth.esa.int/brat/

  5. A high-precision K-band LFMCW radar for range measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yingzhuo; Chen, Xiuwei; Zou, Yongliao

    2016-11-01

    K-band LFMCW radar may be applied in high-precision range measurement, if its range resolution is made be close to mm magnitude, good performance is not only needed in hardware design, algorithm selection and optimization is but also needed. In K-band LFMCW radar system, CZT algorithm is modified according to practical radar echo signal, its simulation model is built in the System Generator tool software, the corresponding algorithm is implemented in FPGA. K-band LFMCW radar may be applied in range measurement of great volume storage tank, the outfield experiment was done according to application, experiment result shows that range measurement precision may reach mm magnitude, the system can meet the requirement of remote high-precision measurement.

  6. Earliest recorded ground-based decameter wavelength observations of Saturn's lightning during the giant E-storm detected by Cassini spacecraft in early 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalenko, A. A.; Kalinichenko, N. N.; Rucker, H. O.; Lecacheux, A.; Fischer, G.; Zarka, P.; Zakharenko, V. V.; Mylostna, K. Y.; Grießmeier, J.-M.; Abranin, E. P.; Falkovich, I. S.; Sidorchuk, K. M.; Kurth, W. S.; Kaiser, M. L.; Gurnett, D. A.

    2013-05-01

    We report the history of the first recorded ground-based radio detection of Saturn's lightning using the Ukrainian UTR-2 radiotelescope at frequencies from 20 to 25 MHz. The observations were performed between 29 January and 3 February 2006, during which lighting activity (E-storm) on Saturn was detected by the radio experiment onboard Cassini spacecraft. The minimum detectable flux density (1σ-level) at UTR-2 reached 40 Jy (1Jy=10-26WmHz) for narrowband observations (Δf=10kHz) and 4 Jy for broadband observations (Δf=1MHz), for an effective telescope area of ≈100,000m and integration time of 20 ms. Selection criteria including comparison of simultaneous ON/OFF-source observations were applied to distinguish detection of lightning-associated radio pulses from interference. This allowed us to identify about 70 events with signal-to-noise ratio more than 5. Measured flux densities (between 50 and 700 Jy) and burst durations (between 60 and 220 ms) are in good agreement with extrapolation of previous Cassini measurements to a ground-based observer. This first detection demonstrates the possibility of Solar System planetary lightning studies using large, present and future ground-based radio instruments. The developed methods of observations and identification criteria are also implemented on the UTR-2 radio telescope for the investigation of the next Saturn's storms. Together with recently published UTR-2 measurements of activity measured after the 2006 storm reported here, the results have significant implications for detectable planetary radio emission in our Solar System and beyond.

  7. Alpine radar conversion for LAWR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savina, M.; Burlando, P.

    2012-04-01

    The Local Area Weather Radar (LAWR) is a ship-born weather radar system operating in X-band developed by the DHI Group to detect precipitation in urban areas. To date more than thirty units are installed in different settings around the world. A LAWR was also deployed in the Alps, at 3883 m a.s.l. on the Kl. Matterhorn (Valais, Switzerland). This was the highest LAWR of the world and it led to the development of an Alpine LAWR system that, besides featuring important technological improvements needed to withstand the severe Alpine conditions, required the development of a new Alpine Radar COnversion Model (ARCOM), which is the main focus of this contribution. The LAWR system is equipped with the original FURUNO fan-beam slotted antenna and the original logarithmic receiver, which limits the radar observations to the video signal (L) withour providing the reflectivity (Z). The beam is 0.95 deg wide and 20 deg high. It can detect precipitation to a max range of 60 km. In order to account for the limited availability of raw signal and information and the specific mountain set-up, the conversion model had to be developed differently from the state-of-the-art radar conversion technique used for this class of radars. In particular, the ARCOM is based on a model used to simulate a spatial dependent factor, hereafter called ACF, which is in turn function of parameters that take in account climatological conditions, also used in other conversion methods, but additionally accounting for local radar beam features and for orographic forcings such as the effective sampling power (sP), which is modelled by means of antenna pattern, geometric ground clutter and their interaction. The result is a conversion factor formulated to account for a range correction that is based on the increase of the sampling volume, partial beam blocking and local climatological conditions. The importance of the latter in this study is double with respect to the standard conversion technique for this

  8. Jupiter’s Phase Variations from Cassini: A Testbed for Future Direct-imaging Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorga, L. C.; Jackiewicz, J.; Rages, K.; West, R. A.; Knowles, B.; Lewis, N.; Marley, M. S.

    2016-12-01

    We present empirical phase curves of Jupiter from ∼0° to 140° as measured in multiple optical bandpasses by Cassini/Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) during the Millennium flyby of Jupiter in late 2000 to early 2001. Phase curves are of interest for studying the energy balance of Jupiter and understanding the scattering behavior of the planet as an exoplanet analog. We find that Jupiter is significantly darker at partial phases than an idealized Lambertian planet by roughly 25% and is not well fit by Jupiter-like exoplanet atmospheric models across all wavelengths. We provide analytic fits to Jupiter’s phase function in several Cassini/ISS imaging filter bandpasses. In addition, these observations show that Jupiter’s color is more variable with phase angle than predicted by models. Therefore, the color of even a near Jupiter-twin planet observed at a partial phase cannot be assumed to be comparable to that of Jupiter at full phase. We discuss how the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope and other future direct-imaging missions can enhance the study of cool giants.

  9. THERMAL AND CHEMICAL STRUCTURE VARIATIONS IN TITAN'S STRATOSPHERE DURING THE CASSINI MISSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bampasidis, Georgios; Coustenis, A.; Vinatier, S. [Laboratoire d' Etudes Spatiales et d' Instrumentation en Astrophysique (LESIA), Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, Univ. Paris-Diderot, 5, place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon Cedex (France); Achterberg, R. K. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Lavvas, P. [GSMA, Universite Reims Champagne-Ardenne, F-51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France); Nixon, C. A.; Jennings, D. E.; Flasar, F. M.; Carlson, R. C.; Romani, P. N.; Guandique, E. A. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Teanby, N. A. [School of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1RJ (United Kingdom); Moussas, X.; Preka-Papadema, P.; Stamogiorgos, S., E-mail: gbabasid@phys.uoa.gr [Faculty of Physics, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Panepistimioupolis, GR 15783 Zographos, Athens (Greece)

    2012-12-01

    We have developed a line-by-line Atmospheric Radiative Transfer for Titan code that includes the most recent laboratory spectroscopic data and haze descriptions relative to Titan's stratosphere. We use this code to model Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer data taken during the numerous Titan flybys from 2006 to 2012 at surface-intercepting geometry in the 600-1500 cm{sup -1} range for latitudes from 50 Degree-Sign S to 50 Degree-Sign N. We report variations in temperature and chemical composition in the stratosphere during the Cassini mission, before and after the Northern Spring Equinox (NSE). We find indication for a weakening of the temperature gradient with warming of the stratosphere and cooling of the lower mesosphere. In addition, we infer precise concentrations for the trace gases and their main isotopologues and find that the chemical composition in Titan's stratosphere varies significantly with latitude during the 6 years investigated here, with increased mixing ratios toward the northern latitudes. In particular, we monitor and quantify the amplitude of a maximum enhancement of several gases observed at northern latitudes up to 50 Degree-Sign N around mid-2009, at the time of the NSE. We find that this rise is followed by a rapid decrease in chemical inventory in 2010 probably due to a weakening north polar vortex with reduced lateral mixing across the vortex boundary.

  10. Could Jean-Dominique Cassini see the famous division in Saturn's rings?

    CERN Document Server

    Lozi, Julien; Semery, Alain; Lhomé, Emilie; Jacquinod, Sophie; Combes, Michel; Bernardi, Pernelle; Andretta, Rémi; Motisi, Maxime; Bobis, Laurence; Kaftan, Emilie

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, astronomers want to observe gaps in exozodiacal disks to confirm the presence of exoplanets, or even make actual images of these companions. Four hundred and fifty years ago, Jean-Dominique Cassini did a similar study on a closer object: Saturn. After joining the newly created Observatoire de Paris in 1671, he discovered 4 of Saturn's satellites (Iapetus, Rhea, Tethys and Dione), and also the gap in its rings. He made these discoveries observing through the best optics at the time, made in Italy by famous opticians like Giuseppe Campani or Eustachio Divini. But was he really able to observe this black line in Saturn's rings? That is what a team of optical scientists from Observatoire de Paris - LESIA with the help of Onera and Institut d'Optique tried to find out, analyzing the lenses used by Cassini, and still preserved in the collection of the observatory. The main difficulty was that even if the lenses have diameters between 84 and 239 mm, the focal lengths are between 6 and 50 m, more than the f...

  11. Framing Space: UK Newspaper Reporting of the Beagle 2 and Cassini-Huygens Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jergovic, B.; Miller, S.

    2008-05-01

    Relatively little scholarly work has been done on looking at the portrayal of astronomy and space science in the media. This short article examines the UK press coverage of two space missions: the Beagle 2 mission to Mars and the Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn and its moon Titan. In both cases, the leading scientists exerted a strong influence on what journalists reported, to the extent that some journalists appeared to be almost "embedded" in the mission. For the most part the coverage is positive in tone and the loss of the Beagle 2 spacecraft does not reflect badly on the (later) Cassini-Huygens coverage. Most journalists only covered the actual mission events and, in the case of Huygens, did not follow up to cover the peer-reviewed scientific articles that appeared later. Off-the-cuff comments made by scientists at the time of the missions were widely reported. There appears to be an appreciation by journalists and (by inference) their readership that this was science in the making, and that allowances should be made if these comments later turned out to be inaccurate.

  12. Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) Movies and Other Cool Data from Cassini's Magnetosphere Imaging Instrument (MIMI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusterer, M. B.; Mitchell, D. G.; Krimigis, S. M.; Vandegriff, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Having been at Saturn for over a decade, the MIMI instrument on Cassini has created a rich dataset containing many details about Saturn's magnetosphere. In particular, the images of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) taken by the Ion and Neutral Camera (INCA) offer a global perspective on Saturn's plasma environment. The MIMI team is now regularly making movies (in MP4 format) consisting of consecutive ENA images. The movies correct for spacecraft attitude changes by projecting the images (whose viewing angles can substantially vary from one image to the next) into a fixed inertial frame that makes it easy to view spatial features evolving in time. These movies are now being delivered to the PDS and are also available at the MIMI team web site. Several other higher order products are now also available, including 20-day energy-time spectrograms for the Charge-Energy-Mass Spectrometer (CHEMS) sensor, and daily energy-time spectrograms for the Low Energy Magnetospheric Measurements system (LEMMS) sensor. All spectrograms are available as plots or digital data in ASCII format. For all MIMI sensors, a Data User Guide is also available. This paper presents details and examples covering the specifics of MIMI higher order data products. URL: http://cassini-mimi.jhuapl.edu/

  13. Titan's Topside Ionospheric Composition: Cassini Plasma Spectrometer Ion Mass Spectrometer Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittler, Edward; Hartle, Richard; Ali, Ashraf; Cooper, John; Lipatov, Alexander; Simpson, David; Sarantos, Menelaos; Chornay, Dennis; Smith, Todd

    2017-01-01

    We present ion composition measurements of Titan's topside ionosphere using both T9 and T15 Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) Ion Mass Spectrometer (IMS) measurements. The IMS is able to make measurements of Titan's ionosphere due to ionospheric outflows as originally reported for the T9 flyby. This allows one to take advantage of the unique capabilities of the CAPS IMS which measures both the mass-per-charge (M/Q) of the ions and the fragments of the ions produced inside the sensor such as carbon, nitrogen and oxygen fragments. Specific attention will be given to such ions as NH4 +, N +, O +, CH4 +, CxHy +, and HCNH + ions as examples. The CAPS IMS uses a time-of-flight (TOF) technique which accelerates ions up to 14.6 kV, so they can pass through ultra-thin carbon foils. Neutral fragments are used to measure the ion M/Q and positive fragments to measure the atomic components. We preliminarily find, by using IMS measurements of T9 and T15 ionospheric outflows, evidence for methane group ions, nitrogen ions, ammonium ions, water group ions and CnHm + ions with n = 2, 3, and 4 within Titan's topside ionosphere. E.C. Sittler acknowledges support at Goddard Space Flight Center by the CAPS Cassini Project from JPL funds under contract # NAS703001TONMO711123/1405851.

  14. Jupiter's Phase Variations from Cassini: a testbed for future direct-imaging missions

    CERN Document Server

    Mayorga, L C; Rages, K; West, R A; Knowles, B; Lewis, N; Marley, M S

    2016-01-01

    We present phase curves of Jupiter from 0-140 degrees as measured in multiple optical bandpasses by Cassini/ISS during the Millennium flyby of Jupiter in late 2000 to early 2001. Phase curves are of interest for studying the energy balance of Jupiter and understanding the scattering behavior of Jupiter as an exoplanet analog. We find that Jupiter is significantly darker at partial phases than an idealized Lambertian planet by roughly 25% and is not well fit by Jupiter-like exoplanet atmospheric models across all wavelengths. We provide analytic fits to Jupiter's phase function in several Cassini/ISS imaging filter bandpasses. In addition, these observations show that Jupiter's color is more variable with phase angle than predicted by models. Therefore, the color of even a near Jupiter-twin planet observed at a partial phase cannot be assumed to be comparable to that of Jupiter at full phase. We discuss how WFIRST and other future direct-imaging missions can enhance the study of cool giants.

  15. Cassini CAPS-ELS observations of carbon-based anions and aerosol growth in Titan's ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Ravindra; Coates, Andrew; Wellbrock, Anne; Kataria, Dhiren; Jones, Geraint; Lewis, Gethyn; Waite, J.

    2016-06-01

    Cassini observations of Titans ionosphere revealed an atmosphere rich in positively charged ions with masses up to > 350 amu and negatively charged ions and aerosols with mass over charge ratios as high as 13,800 amu/q. The detection of negatively charged molecules by the Cassini CAPS Electron Spectrometer (CAPS-ELS) was particularly surprising and showed how the synthesis of large aerosol-size particles takes place at altitudes much greater than previously thought. Here, we present further analysis into this CAPS-ELS dataset, through an enhanced understanding of the instrument's response function. In previous studies the intrinsic E/E energy resolution of the instrument did not allow specific species to be identified and the detections were classified into broad mass ranges. In this study we use an updated fitting procedure to show how the ELS mass spectrum can be resolved into specific peaks at multiples of carbon-based anions up to > 100 amu/q. The negatively charged ions and aerosols in Titans ionosphere increase in mass with decreasing altitude, the lightest species being observed close to Titan's exobase of ˜1,450km and heaviest species observed at altitudes < 950km. We identify key stages in this apparent growth process and report on key intermediaries which appear to trigger the rapid growth of the larger aerosol-size particles.

  16. Computer Analysis of Spectrum Anomaly in 32-GHz Traveling-Wave Tube for Cassini Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayton, James A., Jr.; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Kory, Carol L.

    1999-01-01

    Computer modeling of the 32-GHz traveling-wave tube (TWT) for the Cassini Mission was conducted to explain the anomaly observed in the spectrum analysis of one of the flight-model tubes. The analysis indicated that the effect, manifested as a weak signal in the neighborhood of 35 GHz, was an intermodulation product of the 32-GHz drive signal with a 66.9-GHz oscillation induced by coupling to the second harmonic'signal. The oscillation occurred only at low- radiofrequency (RF) drive power levels that are not expected during the Cassini Mission. The conclusion was that the anomaly was caused by a generic defect inadvertently incorporated in the geometric design of the slow-wave circuit and that it would not change as the TWT aged. The most probable effect of aging on tube performance would be a reduction in the electron beam current. The computer modeling indicated that although not likely to occur within the mission lifetime, a reduction in beam current would reduce or eliminate the anomaly but would do so at the cost of reduced RF output power.

  17. Theory of physical libration of the Moon caused by a liquid core: Cassini's motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkin, Yu. V.

    2016-07-01

    This is the first part of a study to develop a modern theory of physical libration of the Moon caused by a liquid core. We use a special approach to studying Moon's rotation relying on Poincaré's planetary model and special forms of equations of motion in Andoyer and Poincaré variables. We construct expansions of the force function of the problem (the second harmonic of the selenopotential) in Andoyer and Poincaré variables for a high-precision description of disturbed orbital motion of the Moon. We investigate the main regularities in lunar rotational motion taken as a body with a solid nonspherical mantle and an ellipsoidal liquid core. The motion of the ideal liquid of the core is simple according to Poincaré. The Cassini laws can be dinamically interpreted for the motion of a synchronous satellite with a liquid core. The Cassini angle (the inclination of the rotation axis relative to the normal to the ecliptic plane) determined by us is very consistent with its determinations from laser observations.

  18. Dynamics Of Saturn'S Mid-scale Storms In The Cassini Era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rio Gaztelurrutia, Teresa; Hueso, R.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.

    2010-10-01

    Convective storms, similar to those in Earth, but of much larger scale, develop often in Saturn's atmosphere. During the Voyagers’ flybys of Saturn in 1981 mid-scale storms, with an horizontal extension of the order of 1000-3000 km were observed to occur mainly in a narrow tropical-latitude band in the Northern hemisphere at latitudes 38-40 deg North. Contrasting with the Voyagers’ era, since the starting of the Cassini mission in 2004, a similar mid-scale convective activity has concentrated in the so-called "storm alley", a narrow band at a symmetric Southern latitude of 38 deg.. In this work, we characterize this storm activity using available visual information provided by Cassini ISS cameras and the continuous survey from the Earth by the International Outer Planets Watch (IOPW) and its online database PVOL (Hueso et al., Planetary and Space Science, 2010). We study the frequency of appearance of storms with sizes above 2000 km, their characteristic size and life-time, as well as their interaction with surrounding dynamical features. In particular we examine the possibility that storms might provide a mechanism of injection of energy into Saturn's jets, the influence of storms in the generation of atmospheric vortices, and the analogies and differences of Voyagers’ and present day jet structure at the relevant latitudes. Acknowledgments: This work has been funded by the Spanish MICIIN AYA2009-10701 with FEDER support and Grupos Gobierno Vasco IT-464

  19. The Cassini-Huygens visit to Saturn an historic mission to the ringed planet

    CERN Document Server

    Meltzer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Cassini-Huygens was the most ambitious and successful space journey ever launched to the outer Solar System. This book examines all aspects of the journey: its conception and planning; the lengthy political processes needed to make it a reality; the engineering and development required to build the spacecraft; its 2.2-billion mile journey from Earth to the Ringed Planet; and the amazing discoveries from the mission. The author traces how the visions of a few brilliant scientists matured, gained popularity, and eventually became a reality. Innovative technical leaps were necessary to assemble such a multifaceted spacecraft and reliably operate it while it orbited a planet so far from our own. The Cassini-Huygens spacecraft design evolved from other deep space efforts, most notably the Galileo mission to Jupiter, enabling the voluminous, paradigm-shifting scientific data collected by the spacecraft.  Some of these discoveries are absolute gems. A small satellite that scientists once thought of as a dead pi...

  20. Emitted Power of Jupiter Based on Cassini CIRS and VIMS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liming; Baines, Kevin H.; Smith, Mark A.; West, Robert A.; Perez-Hoyos, Santiago; Trammel, Harold J.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Conrath, Barney J.; Gierasch, Peter J.; Orton, Glenn S.; Nixon, Conor A.; Filachionne, Gianrico; Fry, Patrick M.; Momary, Thomas W.

    2012-01-01

    The emitted power of Jupiter and its meridional distribution are determined from observations by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) and Visual and Infrared Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard Cassini during its flyby en route to Saturn in late 2000 and early 2001. Jupiter's global- average emitted power and effective temperature are measured to be 14.10+/-0.03 W/sq m and 125.57+/-0.07 K, respectively. On a global scale, Jupiter's 5-micron thermal emission contributes approx. 0.7+/-0.1 % to the total emitted power at the global scale, but it can reach approx. 1.9+/-0.6% at 15degN. The meridional distribution of emitted power shows a significant asymmetry between the two hemispheres with the emitted power in the northern hemisphere 3.0+/-0.3% larger than that in the southern hemisphere. Such an asymmetry shown in the Cassini epoch (2000-01) is not present during the Voyager epoch (1979). In addition, the global-average emitted power increased approx. 3.8+/-1.0% between the two epochs. The temporal variation of Jupiter's total emitted power is mainly due to the warming of atmospheric layers around the pressure level of 200 mbar. The temporal variation of emitted power was also discovered on Saturn (Li et al., 2010). Therefore, we suggest that the varying emitted power is a common phenomenon on the giant planets.

  1. An atlas of bright star spectra in the near infrared from Cassini-VIMS

    CERN Document Server

    Stewart, Paul N; Nicholson, Philip D; Sloan, G C; Hedman, Matthew M

    2015-01-01

    We present the Cassini Atlas Of Stellar Spectra (CAOSS), comprised of near-infrared low-resolution spectra of bright stars recovered from space-based observations by the Cassini spacecraft. The 65 stellar targets in the atlas are predominately M, K and S giants. However it also contains spectra of other bright nearby stars including carbon stars and main sequence stars from A to F. The spectra presented are free of all spectral contamination caused by the Earth's atmosphere, including the detrimental telluric molecular bands which put parts of the near-infrared spectrum out of reach of terrestrial observations. With a single instrument, a spectro-photometric dataset is recovered that spans the near-infrared from 0.8 to 5.1 microns with spectral resolution ranging from R=53.5 to R=325. Spectra have been calibrated into absolute flux units after careful characterisation of the instrumental spectral efficiency. Spectral energy distributions for most stars match closely with literature values. All final data prod...

  2. AN ATLAS OF BRIGHT STAR SPECTRA IN THE NEAR-INFRARED FROM CASSINI-VIMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Paul N.; Tuthill, Peter G. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Nicholson, Philip D. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Sloan, G. C. [Cornell Center for Astrophyics and Planetary Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Hedman, Matthew M., E-mail: p.stewart@physics.usyd.edu.au [Department of Physics, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    We present the Cassini Atlas Of Stellar Spectra (CAOSS), comprised of near-infrared, low-resolution spectra of bright stars recovered from space-based observations by the Cassini spacecraft. The 65 stellar targets in the atlas are predominately M, K, and S giants. However, it also contains spectra of other bright nearby stars including carbon stars and main-sequence stars from A to F. The spectra presented are free of all spectral contamination caused by the Earth's atmosphere, including the detrimental telluric molecular bands which put parts of the near-infrared spectrum out of reach of terrestrial observations. With a single instrument, a spectro-photometric data set is recovered that spans the near-infrared from 0.8 to 5.1 μm with spectral resolution ranging from R = 53.5 to R = 325. Spectra have been calibrated into absolute flux units after careful characterization of the instrumental spectral efficiency. Spectral energy distributions for most stars match closely with literature values. All final data products have been made available online.

  3. Application of a three-dimensional variational method for radar reflectivity data correction in a mudslide-inducing rainstorm simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongli; Xu, Xiangde

    2017-04-01

    Various types of radars with different horizontal and vertical detection ranges are deployed in China, particularly over complex terrain where radar blind zones are common. In this study, a new variational method is developed to correct three-dimensional radar reflectivity data based on hourly ground precipitation observations. The aim of this method is to improve the quality of observations of various types of radar and effectively assimilate operational Doppler radar observations. A mudslide-inducing local rainstorm is simulated by the WRF model with assimilation of radar reflectivity and radial velocity data using LAPS (Local Analysis and Prediction System). Experiments with different radar data assimilated by LAPS are performed. It is found that when radar reflectivity data are corrected using this variational method and assimilated by LAPS, the atmospheric conditions and cloud physics processes are reasonably described. The temporal evolution of radar reflectivity corrected by the variational method corresponds well to observed rainfall. It can better describe the cloud water distribution over the rainfall area and improve the cloud water analysis results over the central rainfall region. The LAPS cloud analysis system can update cloud microphysical variables and represent the hydrometeors associated with strong convective activities over the rainfall area well. Model performance is improved and the simulation of the dynamical processes and moisture transport is more consistent with observation.

  4. Multiband radar characterization of forest biomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, M. Craig; Ulaby, Fawwaz T.

    1990-01-01

    The utility of airborne and orbital SAR in classification, assessment, and monitoring of forest biomes is investigated through analysis of orbital synthetic aperature radar (SAR) and multifrequency and multipolarized airborne SAR imagery relying on image tone and texture. Preliminary airborne SAR experiments and truck-mounted scatterometer observations demonstrated that the three dimensional structural complexity of a forest, and the various scales of temporal dynamics in the microwave dielectric properties of both trees and the underlying substrate would severely limit empirical or semi-empirical approaches. As a consequence, it became necessary to develop a more profound understanding of the electromagnetic properties of a forest scene and their temporal dynamics through controlled experimentation coupled with theoretical development and verification. The concatenation of various models into a physically-based composite model treating the entire forest scene became the major objective of the study as this is the key to development of a series of robust retrieval algorithms for forest biophysical properties. In order to verify the performance of the component elements of the composite model, a series of controlled laboratory and field experiments were undertaken to: (1) develop techniques to measure the microwave dielectric properties of vegetation; (2) relate the microwave dielectric properties of vegetation to more readily measured characteristics such as density and moisture content; (3) calculate the radar cross-section of leaves, and cylinders; (4) improve backscatter models for rough surfaces; and (5) relate attenuation and phase delays during propagation through canopies to canopy properties. These modeling efforts, as validated by the measurements, were incorporated within a larger model known as the Michigan Microwave Canopy Scattering (MIMICS) Model.

  5. First upper limits on the radar cross section of cosmic-ray induced extensive air showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, R. U.; Abe, M.; Abou Bakr Othman, M.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Allen, M.; Anderson, R.; Azuma, R.; Barcikowski, E.; Belz, J. W.; Bergman, D. R.; Besson, D.; Blake, S. A.; Byrne, M.; Cady, R.; Chae, M. J.; Cheon, B. G.; Chiba, J.; Chikawa, M.; Cho, W. R.; Farhang-Boroujeny, B.; Fujii, T.; Fukushima, M.; Gillman, W. H.; Goto, T.; Hanlon, W.; Hanson, J. C.; Hayashi, Y.; Hayashida, N.; Hibino, K.; Honda, K.; Ikeda, D.; Inoue, N.; Ishii, T.; Ishimori, R.; Ito, H.; Ivanov, D.; Jayanthmurthy, C.; Jui, C. C. H.; Kadota, K.; Kakimoto, F.; Kalashev, O.; Kasahara, K.; Kawai, H.; Kawakami, S.; Kawana, S.; Kawata, K.; Kido, E.; Kim, H. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. H.; Kitamura, S.; Kitamura, Y.; Kunwar, S.; Kuzmin, V.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lan, J.; Lim, S. I.; Lundquist, J. P.; Machida, K.; Martens, K.; Matsuda, T.; Matsuyama, T.; Matthews, J. N.; Minamino, M.; Mukai, K.; Myers, I.; Nagasawa, K.; Nagataki, S.; Nakamura, T.; Nonaka, T.; Nozato, A.; Ogio, S.; Ogura, J.; Ohnishi, M.; Ohoka, H.; Oki, K.; Okuda, T.; Ono, M.; Oshima, A.; Ozawa, S.; Park, I. H.; Prohira, S.; Pshirkov, M. S.; Rezazadeh-Reyhani, A.; Rodriguez, D. C.; Rubtsov, G.; Ryu, D.; Sagawa, H.; Sakurai, N.; Sampson, A. L.; Scott, L. M.; Schurig, D.; Shah, P. D.; Shibata, F.; Shibata, T.; Shimodaira, H.; Shin, B. K.; Smith, J. D.; Sokolsky, P.; Springer, R. W.; Stokes, B. T.; Stratton, S. R.; Stroman, T. A.; Suzawa, T.; Takai, H.; Takamura, M.; Takeda, M.; Takeishi, R.; Taketa, A.; Takita, M.; Tameda, Y.; Tanaka, H.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, M.; Thomas, S. B.; Thomson, G. B.; Tinyakov, P.; Tkachev, I.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Troitsky, S.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsutsumi, K.; Uchihori, Y.; Udo, S.; Urban, F.; Vasiloff, G.; Venkatesh, S.; Wong, T.; Yamane, R.; Yamaoka, H.; Yamazaki, K.; Yang, J.; Yashiro, K.; Yoneda, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Yoshii, H.; Zollinger, R.; Zundel, Z.

    2017-01-01

    TARA (Telescope Array Radar) is a cosmic ray radar detection experiment colocated with Telescope Array, the conventional surface scintillation detector (SD) and fluorescence telescope detector (FD) near Delta, Utah, U.S.A. The TARA detector combines a 40 kW, 54.1 MHz VHF transmitter and high-gain transmitting antenna which broadcasts the radar carrier over the SD array and within the FD field of view, towards a 250 MS/s DAQ receiver. TARA has been collecting data since 2013 with the primary goal of observing the radar signatures of extensive air showers (EAS). Simulations indicate that echoes are expected to be short in duration (∼ 10 μs) and exhibit rapidly changing frequency, with rates on the order 1 MHz/μs. The EAS radar cross-section (RCS) is currently unknown although it is the subject of over 70 years of speculation. A novel signal search technique is described in which the expected radar echo of a particular air shower is used as a matched filter template and compared to waveforms obtained by triggering the radar DAQ using the Telescope Array fluorescence detector. No evidence for the scattering of radio frequency radiation by EAS is obtained to date. We report the first quantitative RCS upper limits using EAS that triggered the Telescope Array Fluorescence Detector.

  6. Resolving Enceladus thermal emission at the 10s of meters scale along Baghdad Sulcus using Cassini CIRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorius, Nicolas; Howett, Carly; Spencer, John; Albright, Shane; Jennings, Don; Hurford, Terry; Romani, Paul; Segura, Marcia; Verbiscer, Anne

    2015-11-01

    On 14th April 2012 Cassini executed one of its closest flyby to the South Pole of Enceladus with the primary goal to study the moon’s gravity. During this flyby the Composite InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS) was orientated such that its three focal planes were dragged across Baghdad sulcus. The instrument was specifically configured to record interferograms with 52 seconds duration. CIRS focal plane 1 (17 to 1000 µm) single circular detector provided a spatial resolution of about 300 meters. CIRS focal plane 3 and 4 (9 to 17 µm and 7 to 9 µm) are 2 1x10 detectors arrays. Both arrays were used in pair mode leading to 5 elements per focal plane and a resolution of about 43 meters across track.The ground-track speed was so fast during this observation that this was enough time to observe the entire South Polar Region in a single integration. The thermal sources were passed over so rapidly that it is not possible to reconstruct a spectrum from the resulting interferogram, instead features were created in the interferogram whenever the scene temperature changed. The signature of these features was also altered by bit trimming and band-pass filter convolution. To enable interpretation of the interferograms we developed an innovative new approach that included the development of new instrument models, modification of the flight software and multiple in flight validation experiments. Our preliminary results show temperature variability of the tiger stripes at 10s meters scale along track, providing a constraint on the distribution and temperature profile of Enceladus’ endogenic sources.A similar methodology will be used for the penultimate targeted Enceladus flyby in Oct 28th 2015 and we aim to also present our preliminary analysis of the results from this encounter

  7. Oil Slick Characterization Using Synthetic Aperture Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, C. E.; Breivik, O.; Brekke, C.; Skrunes, S.; Holt, B.

    2015-12-01

    Oil spills are a hazard worldwide with potential of causing high impact disasters, and require an active oil spill response capability to protect personnel, the ecosystem, and the energy supply. As the amount of oil in traditionally accessible reserves decline, there will be increasing oil extraction from the Arctic and deep-water wells, both new sources with high risk and high cost for monitoring and response. Although radar has long been used for mapping the spatial extent of oil slicks, it is only since the Deepwater Horizon spill that synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has been shown capable of characterizing oil properties within a slick, and therefore useful for directing response to the recoverable thicker slicks or emulsions. Here we discuss a 2015 Norwegian oil-on-water spill experiment in which emulsions of known quantity and water-to-oil ratio along with a look-alike slick of plant oil were released in the North Sea and imaged with polarimetric SAR (PolSAR) by NASA's UAVSAR instrument for several hours following release. During the experiment, extensive in situ measurements were made from ship or aircraft with meteorological instruments, released drift buoys, and optical/IR imagers. The experiment was designed to provide validation data for development of a physical model relating polarization-dependent electromagnetic scattering to the dielectric properties of oil mixed with ocean water, which is the basis for oil characterization with SAR. Data were acquired with X-, C-, and L-band satellite-based SARs to enable multi-frequency comparison of characterization capabilities. In addition, the data are used to develop methods to differentiate mineral slicks from biogenic look-alikes, and to better understand slick weathering and dispersion. The results will provide a basis for modeling oil-in-ice spills, currently a high priority for nations involved in Arctic oil exploration. Here we discuss the Norwegian experiment, the validation data, and the results of

  8. Detecting and classifying low probability of intercept radar

    CERN Document Server

    Pace, Philip E

    2008-01-01

    This revised and expanded second edition brings you to the cutting edge with new chapters on LPI radar design, including over-the-horizon radar, random noise radar, and netted LPI radar. You also discover critical LPI detection techniques, parameter extraction signal processing techniques, and anti-radiation missile design strategies to counter LPI radar.

  9. MIMO Radar Using Compressive Sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Yao; Poor, H Vincent

    2009-01-01

    A MIMO radar system is proposed for obtaining angle and Doppler information on potential targets. Transmitters and receivers are nodes of a small scale wireless network and are assumed to be randomly scattered on a disk. The transmit nodes transmit uncorrelated waveforms. Each receive node applies compressive sampling to the received signal to obtain a small number of samples, which the node subsequently forwards to a fusion center. Assuming that the targets are sparsely located in the angle- Doppler space, based on the samples forwarded by the receive nodes the fusion center formulates an l1-optimization problem, the solution of which yields target angle and Doppler information. The proposed approach achieves the superior resolution of MIMO radar with far fewer samples than required by other approaches. This implies power savings during the communication phase between the receive nodes and the fusion center. Performance in the presence of a jammer is analyzed for the case of slowly moving targets. Issues rel...

  10. Array radars solve communication jams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, H. D.

    1982-04-01

    The possibilities of incorporating mobile radar units as slave stations in communications relay applications during times of disrupted communications is examined. The limitations on uses of search, tracking, and multifunction radars are examined, noting that employment of the mobile system entails some tracking by the master phased-arrays to keep the mobile units in focus. The tracking patterns and dwell times are outlined, and the possibility of 700-1000 dwell times of 1220 microsec duration/sec is mentioned as opening the opportunity for high quality data transmissions. Signal-to-noise ratios are formulated for jamming situations, with offsetting tactical features for the jamming including the directivity and gain of the master antenna, the master station's power aperture product, on-axis to off-axis gain ratio, and antenna positioning ability. A slave station must be equipped with a transponder for communications, which are best achieved with pseudo-random coded waveforms.

  11. Effects of Stress Activated Positive-Hole Charge Carriers on Radar Reflectance of Gabbro-Diorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, C.; Vanderbilt, V. C.; Dahlgren, R.; Cherukupally, A.; Freund, F. T.

    2011-12-01

    When load is applied to igneous or high-grade metamorphic rocks, trapped electron vacancy defects are activated and become mobile positive-hole charge carriers. These mobile charge carriers repel each other through Coulomb interactions and move outward from the stressed region. As large numbers of positive-holes reach the surface of the rock, this surface charge may cause an observable change in radar reflectance. In this experiment, a series of holes is drilled into a large gabbro-diorite boulder from the A.R. Wilson Quarry in Aromas, CA. Bustar, an expansive, non-explosive demolition agent, is poured into the holes while a 1.2 GHz radar system measures the amplitude of radar waves reflected from the rock's surface. Over the course of the experiment, the radar antenna is swept repeatedly across one face of the rock, pausing in one of twelve positions to collect data before moving to the next position. At the end of each sweep, the radar is calibrated against both a corner reflector and a flat-plate reflector. This sampling method is employed to detect and assign a cause to transient effects observed at any one location. An initial analysis of the radar data shows a high level of agreement between readings from the flat-plate and corner reflectors, supporting the use of flat-plate reflectors as a calibration source for this omnidirectional radar system. Fitting a trend to the amplitude of the wave reflected from the rock's surface is complicated by the presence of unexpected outliers and noise artifacts from the radar system itself. It appears that such a trend, if present, would likely indicate a change in amplitude of the reflected signal of less than 5 percent over the course of the experiment.

  12. GPHS-RTGs in support of the Cassini Mission. Semi annual technical report, March 31, 1997--September 28, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-20

    This progress report describes work on the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators and Ancillary Activities carried out as part of the Cassini project. Seperate sections of the report describe activities carried out in support of different tasks assigned as part of this contract.

  13. Radar channel balancing with commutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2014-02-01

    When multiple channels are employed in a pulse-Doppler radar, achieving and maintaining balance between the channels is problematic. In some circumstances the channels may be commutated to achieve adequate balance. Commutation is the switching, trading, toggling, or multiplexing of the channels between signal paths. Commutation allows modulating the imbalance energy away from the balanced energy in Doppler, where it can be mitigated with filtering.

  14. Reliability of Naval Radar Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-09-01

    CONFIDENTIAL (THIS PACE IS UNCUIASSFIED) CONFIDENTIAL (U) For airborne radars, 3-M’(Maintenance and Material Management )and RISE (Readiness Improvement...of the 3-M Program reports (3-M from Maintenance and Material Management ) as well as Naval Air Systems Command RISE (Readi-. ness Improvement Summary...TRANSIT PULSE LE11CTR (;As): 12.8 ANTENNA UEIGHr (k 1058 (2331 lbs.) excluding pedestal COMPRESSED PLUE LENGTH (.is): 0.2 BEAN POSITIObiNG TECNIQUES : H)RZ

  15. Radar based autonomous sensor module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styles, Tim

    2016-10-01

    Most surveillance systems combine camera sensors with other detection sensors that trigger an alert to a human operator when an object is detected. The detection sensors typically require careful installation and configuration for each application and there is a significant burden on the operator to react to each alert by viewing camera video feeds. A demonstration system known as Sensing for Asset Protection with Integrated Electronic Networked Technology (SAPIENT) has been developed to address these issues using Autonomous Sensor Modules (ASM) and a central High Level Decision Making Module (HLDMM) that can fuse the detections from multiple sensors. This paper describes the 24 GHz radar based ASM, which provides an all-weather, low power and license exempt solution to the problem of wide area surveillance. The radar module autonomously configures itself in response to tasks provided by the HLDMM, steering the transmit beam and setting range resolution and power levels for optimum performance. The results show the detection and classification performance for pedestrians and vehicles in an area of interest, which can be modified by the HLDMM without physical adjustment. The module uses range-Doppler processing for reliable detection of moving objects and combines Radar Cross Section and micro-Doppler characteristics for object classification. Objects are classified as pedestrian or vehicle, with vehicle sub classes based on size. Detections are reported only if the object is detected in a task coverage area and it is classified as an object of interest. The system was shown in a perimeter protection scenario using multiple radar ASMs, laser scanners, thermal cameras and visible band cameras. This combination of sensors enabled the HLDMM to generate reliable alerts with improved discrimination of objects and behaviours of interest.

  16. Remote Cloud Sensing Intensive Observation Period (RCS-IOP) millimeter-wave radar calibration and data intercomparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekelsky, S.M.; Firda, J.M.; McIntosh, R.E. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    During April 1994, the University of Massachusetts (UMass) and the Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) fielded two millimeter-wave atmospheric radars in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Remote Cloud Sensing Intensive Operation Period (RCS-IOP) experiment. The UMass Cloud Profiling Radar System (CPRS) operates simultaneously at 33.12 GHz and 94.92 GHz through a single antenna. The Penn State radar operates at 93.95 GHz and has separate transmitting and receiving antennas. The two systems were separated by approximately 75 meters and simultaneously observed a variety of cloud types at verticle incidence over the course of the experiment. This abstract presents some initial results from our calibration efforts. An absolute calibration of the UMass radar was made from radar measurements of a trihedral corner reflector, which has a known radar cross-section. A relative calibration of between the Penn State and UMass radars is made from the statistical comparison of zenith pointing measurements of low altitude liquid clouds. Attenuation is removed with the aid of radiosonde data, and the difference in the calibration between the UMass and Penn State radars is determined by comparing the ratio of 94-GHz and 95-GHz reflectivity values to a model that accounts for parallax effects of the two antennas used in the Penn State system.

  17. Polarimetric borehole radar measurement near Nojima fault and its application to subsurface crack characterization; Polarimetric borehole radar ni yoru Nojima danso shuhen no chika kiretsu keisoku jikken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, M.; Taniguchi, Y.; Miwa, T.; Niitsuma, H. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Ikeda, R. [National Research Institute for Disaster Prevention, Tsukuba (Japan); Makino, K. [Geophysical Surveying and Consulting Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-05-27

    Practical application of subsurface crack characterization by the borehole radar measurement to which the radar polarimetric method was introduced was attempted to measuring objects for which the borehole radar has not been much used, for example, the inside of low loss rock mass or fracture zone where cracks tightly exist. A system was trially manufactured which makes the radar polarimetric measurement possible in the borehole at a 1000m depth and with a about 10cm diameter, and a field experiment was conducted for realizing the subsurface crack characterization near the Nojima fault. For the measuring experiment by the polarimetric borehole radar, used were Iwaya borehole and Hirabayashi borehole drilled in the north of Awaji-shima, Hyogo-ken. In a comparison of both polarization systems of Hirabayashi borehole, reflected waves at depths of 1038m and 1047m are relatively stronger in both polarization systems than those with the same polarization form and at different depths, whereas reflected waves around a 1017m depth are strong only as to the parallel polarization system. Characteristics of the polarization in this experiment indirectly reflect crack structures. 6 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Automotive Radar Sensors in Silicon Technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Vipul

    2013-01-01

    This book presents architectures and design techniques for mm-wave automotive radar transceivers. Several fully-integrated transceivers and receivers operating at 22-29 GHz and 77-81 GHz are demonstrated in both CMOS and SiGe BiCMOS technologies. Excellent performance is achieved indicating the suitability of silicon technologies for automotive radar sensors.  This book bridges an existing gap between information available on dependable system/architecture design and circuit design.  It provides the background of the field and detailed description of recent research and development of silicon-based radar sensors.  System-level requirements and circuit topologies for radar transceivers are described in detail. Holistic approaches towards designing radar sensors are validated with several examples of highly-integrated radar ICs in silicon technologies. Circuit techniques to design millimeter-wave circuits in silicon technologies are discussed in depth.  Describes concepts and fundamentals of automotive rada...

  19. Improved Detection of Human Respiration Using Data Fusion Basedon a Multistatic UWB Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Lv

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigated the feasibility for improved detection of human respiration using data fusion based on a multistatic ultra-wideband (UWB radar. UWB-radar-based respiration detection is an emerging technology that has great promise in practice. It can be applied to remotely sense the presence of a human target for through-wall surveillance, post-earthquake search and rescue, etc. In these applications, a human target’s position and posture are not known a priori. Uncertainty of the two factors results in a body orientation issue of UWB radar, namely the human target’s thorax is not always facing the radar. Thus, the radial component of the thorax motion due to respiration decreases and the respiratory motion response contained in UWB radar echoes is too weak to be detected. To cope with the issue, this paper used multisensory information provided by the multistatic UWB radar, which took the form of impulse radios and comprised one transmitting and four separated receiving antennas. An adaptive Kalman filtering algorithm was then designed to fuse the UWB echo data from all the receiving channels to detect the respiratory-motion response contained in those data. In the experiment, a volunteer’s respiration was correctly detected when he curled upon a camp bed behind a brick wall. Under the same scenario, the volunteer’s respiration was detected based on the radar’s single transmitting-receiving channels without data fusion using conventional algorithm, such as adaptive line enhancer and single-channel Kalman filtering. Moreover, performance of the data fusion algorithm was experimentally investigated with different channel combinations and antenna deployments. The experimental results show that the body orientation issue for human respiration detection via UWB radar can be dealt well with the multistatic UWB radar and the Kalman-filter-based data fusion, which can be applied to improve performance of UWB radar in real applications.

  20. Assimilation of Dual-Polarimetric Radar Observations with WRF GSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuanli; Mecikalski, John; Fehnel, Traci; Zavodsky, Bradley; Srikishen, Jayanthi

    2014-01-01

    Dual-polarimetric (dual-pol) radar typically transmits both horizontally and vertically polarized radio wave pulses. From the two different reflected power returns, more accurate estimate of liquid and solid cloud and precipitation can be provided. The upgrade of the traditional NWS WSR-88D radar to include dual-pol capabilities will soon be completed for the entire NEXRAD network. Therefore, the use of dual-pol radar network will have a broad impact in both research and operational communities. The assimilation of dual-pol radar data is especially challenging as few guidelines have been provided by previous research. It is our goal to examine how to best use dual-pol radar data to improve forecast of severe storm and forecast initialization. In recent years, the Development Testbed Center (DTC) has released the community Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) DA system for the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The community GSI system runs in independently environment, yet works functionally equivalent to operational centers. With collaboration with the NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center, this study explores regional assimilation of the dual-pol radar variables from the WSR-88D radars for real case storms. Our presentation will highlight our recent effort on incorporating the horizontal reflectivity (ZH), differential reflectivity (ZDR), specific differential phase (KDP), and radial velocity (VR) data for initializing convective storms, with a significant focus being on an improved representation of hydrometeor fields. In addition, discussion will be provided on the development of enhanced assimilation procedures in the GSI system with respect to dual-pol variables. Beyond the dual-pol variable assimilation procedure developing within a GSI framework, highresolution (=1 km) WRF model simulations and storm scale data assimilation experiments will be examined, emphasizing both model initialization and short-term forecast

  1. Artifacts in Radar Imaging of Moving Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    leads to the wrong object localization and defocusing on the image. For SAR , a moving target’s physical location varies throughout the imaging...Imaging, Synthetic Aperture Radar, Bistatic Radar, Multistatic Radar, Moving Targets, Backprojection 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 133 16. PRICE CODE 17...broadening and range errors were introduced by target motion. This leads to incorrect object localization and defocusing on the image. For SAR , a

  2. Bistatic Forward Scattering Radar Detection and Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Forward Scattering Radar (FSR) is a special type of bistatic radar that can implement image detection, imaging, and identification using the forward scattering signals provided by the moving targets that cross the baseline between the transmitter and receiver. Because the forward scattering effect has a vital significance in increasing the targets’ Radar Cross Section (RCS), FSR is quite advantageous for use in counter stealth detection. This paper first introduces the front line technology u...

  3. Study on the Variational Assimilation Technique for the Retrieval of Wind Fields from Doppler Radar Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN Qilin; XUE Jishan; ZHUANG Shiyu

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduces a variational assimilation technique for the retrieval of wind fields from Doppler radar data. The assimilated information included both the radial velocity (RV) and the movement of radar echo. In this assimilation technique, the key is transforming the movement of radar echo to a new radar measuring variable- "apparent velocity" (AV). Thus, the information of wind is added, and the indeterminacy of recovering two-dimensional wind only by AV was overcome effectively by combining RV with AV. By means of CMA GRAPES-3Dvar and CINRAD data, some experiments were performed. The results show that the method of retrieval of wind fields is useful in obtaining the construction of the weather system.

  4. Study of ultra-wideband radar signals-generated technology using two-channel signal generator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wan Yonglun; Lu Youxin; Si Qiang; Wang Xuegang; Cao Guangping

    2007-01-01

    Synthesis of ultra-wideband (UWB) linear frequency modulation radar signals is a very important technology for microwave imaging, target identification and detection of low radar-cross-section (RCS) targets. A new method of UWB radar signals generation with two-channel signal generator is presented. The realization structure is given; the principle and errors of signal synthesis are analyzed. At the same time, an automatic adjustment measure of signal phase is proposed because of phase discontinuity of waveform in this method. The simulation experiment and analysis results indicate that radar signals with large instantaneous bandwidth can be generated by means of this method on the condition that the high-speed digital devices are limited.

  5. Multi-frequency HF radar measurements of artificial F-region field-aligned irregularities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senior, A.; Borisov, N.; Kosch, M.; Yeoman, T.; Honary, F.; Rietveld, M.

    2004-10-01

    We present radar backscatter power measurements using the CUTLASS HF radar at Hankasalmi, Finland from F-region field-aligned irregularities induced by HF radio pumping with the EISCAT Heating facility. A novel radar operating mode is used in which the radar frequency is rapidly swept through a number of bands, making use of the varying ionospheric refraction to probe different heights within the heated region. We obtain height profiles of backscatter power which correspond to e-folding scale lengths of around 20km for the mean-square electron density perturbations for pump wave interaction heights in the region of 240-250km in daytime conditions. The results are in agreement with previous measurements made by other techniques. We discuss some problems with the method and suggest improvements for future experiments.

  6. A feature extraction method for the signal sorting of interleaved radar pulse serial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Qiang; ZHANG Xingzhou; LI Zheng

    2007-01-01

    In this paper,a new feature extraction method for radar pulse sequences is presented based on structure function and empirical mode decomposition,In this method,2-D feature information was constituted by using radio frequency and time-of-arrival,which analyzed the feature of radar pulse sequences for the very first time by employing structure function and empirical mode decomposition.The experiment shows that the method can efficiently extract the frequency of a period-change radio frequency signal in a complex pulses environment and reveals a new feature for the signal sorting of interleaved radar pulse serial.This paper provides a novel way for extracting the new sorting feature of radar signals.

  7. Water vapor on Titan: the stratospheric vertical profile from Cassini/CIRS infrared spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottini, V.; Jennings, D. E.; Nixon, C. A.; Anderson, C. M.; Gorius, N.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Coustenis, A.; Achterberg, R. K.; Teanby, N. A.; de Kok, R.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Bézard, B.; Lellouch, E.; Flasar, F. M.; Bampasidis, G.

    2012-04-01

    Water vapor in Titan’s middle atmosphere has previously been detected only by disk-average observations from the Infrared Space Observatory (Coustenis et al., 1998). We report here the successful detection of stratospheric water vapor using the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS, Flasar et al., 2004) following an earlier null result (de Kok et al., 2007a). CIRS senses water emissions in the far-infrared spectral region near 50 microns, which we have modeled using two independent radiative transfer and inversion codes (NEMESIS, Irwin et al 2008 and ART, Coustenis et al., 2010). From the analysis of nadir spectra we have derived a mixing ratio of (0.14 ± 0.05) ppb at 100 km, corresponding to a column abundance of approximately (3.7 ± 1.3) × 10^14 mol/cm2. Using limb observations, we obtained mixing ratios of (0.13 ± 0.04) ppb at 125 km and (0.45 ± 0.15) ppb at 225 km of altitude, confirming that the water abundance has a positive vertical gradient as predicted by photochemical models. In the latitude range (80˚S - 30˚N) we see no evidence for latitudinal variations in these abundances within the error bars. References: Coustenis, A.; Salama, A.; Lellouch, E.; Encrenaz, Th.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Samuelson, R. E.; de Graauw, Th.; Feuchtgruber, H.; Kessler, M. F., 1998. Evidence for water vapor in Titan's atmosphere from ISO/SWS data. Astronomy and Astrophysics, v.336, p.L85-L89 Coustenis, A.; Jennings, D. E.; Nixon, C. A.; Achterberg, R. K.; Lavvas, P.; Vinatier, S.; Teanby, N. A.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Carlson, R. C.; Piani, L.; Bampasidis, G.; Flasar, F. M.; Romani, P. N., 2010. Titan trace gaseous composition from CIRS at the end of the Cassini-Huygens prime mission. Icarus, Volume 207, Issue 1, p. 461-476. de Kok, R.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Teanby, N. A.; Lellouch, E.; Bézard, B.; Vinatier, S.; Nixon, C. A.; Fletcher, L.; Howett, C.; Calcutt, S. B.; Bowles, N. E.; Flasar, F. M.; Taylor, F. W. , 2007a. Oxygen compounds in Titan's stratosphere as observed by

  8. Earth-based and Cassini-spacecraft Observations of Irregular Moons of Jupiter and Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denk, Tilmann; Mottola, S.; Roatsch, T.; Rosenberg, H.; Neukum, G.

    2010-10-01

    We observed irregular satellites of Jupiter and Saturn with the ISS camera of the Cassini spacecraft [1] and with the 1.23-m telescope of the Calar Alto observatory in Spain [2]. Scientific goals are the determination of rotation periods, rotation-axis orientations, spin directions, size parameters, color properties, phase curves, and searches for binaries. Himalia (J6), the largest of the irregular jovian moons, has been imaged by Cassini on 18 Dec 2000; a body size of 120±5 km x 150±10 km and an albedo of 0.05±0.01 have been measured [3,4]. Earth-based observations revealed that Himalia's rotation period is probably 9.3 h, which is in agreement with the 9.2 to 9.8 h suggested by [5], although periods of 7.8 or 11.7 h cannot be ruled out yet. In the saturnian system, 10 irregular moons were scheduled for Cassini ISS observations over time spans >9 hrs until end-of-August, 2010. Observation distances vary between 5.6 and 22 million km, corresponding to ISS pixel scales of 34 to 130 km. For the objects measured so far, the rotation periods vary significantly. For instance, Siarnaq (S/2000 S3; size 40 km) and Ymir (S/2000 S1; 18 km) exhibit rotation periods of 6.7 h and 7.3 h, respectively, while Kiviuq (S/2000 S5; 16 km) might take about 22 h for one rotation. First results from the observation campaigns will be presented at the meeting. References: [1] Porco, C.C., et al. (2004), Space Sci. Rev. 115, 363; [2] http://www.caha.es/CAHA/Telescopes/1.2m.html; [3] Denk, T. et al. (2001), Conference on Jupiter (Planet, Satellites & Magnetosphere), Boulder, CO, 25-30 June 2001, abstracts book p. 30-31; [4] Porco, C.C., et al. (2003), Science 299, 1541; [5] Degewij, J., et al. (1980), Icarus 44, 520. We gratefully acknowledge funding by the German Space Agency (DLR) Bonn through grant no. 50 OH 0305.

  9. Ions in the Enceladus plume: Cassini/CAPS ion measurements at high energy resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crary, F.; Coates, A. J.; Hill, T. W.; Jones, G. H.; Tokar, R. L.

    2012-12-01

    During several Cassini encounters with Saturn's satellite, Enceladus, the spacecraft crossed through the plume of water vapor and dust south of the satellite with a spacecraft orientation which allowed the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) to observe ions and nanograin dust particles associated with the plume. During three of these encounters, E7 (November 2, 2009), E17 (March XX, 2012) and E18 (April YY, 2012), the trajectories were very similar and parallel to the equatorial plane (i.e. little north-south velocity, so that the spacecraft moved perpendicular to the rotation axis of Enceladus.) Previous analysis, using data from the CAPS ion mass spectrometer (IMS) and electron spectrometer (ELS), identified cold ions at rest with respect to Enceladus [1], negative water group and water cluster ions [2], and both positively and negatively charged dust particles in the 0.5 to 2 nm (1000 to 20,000 AMU) size range [3,4]. We present observations from the third CAPS sensor, the ion beam spectrometer (IBS). Although this sensor lacks the angular resolution of the other CAPS sensors, it has an energy resolution of 1.4%, roughly an order of magnitude greater than the ELS and IMS sensors. The IBS data allows us to estimate the temperature and flow speed of the low energy ions in the plume, and characterize the structure of the plume ionosphere. We find that the plume is highly structured, down to the 2-s (17 km along track) limit of the instrument's sampling. Distinct regions of cold, dense ions, resembling a collisional ionosphere, are intermixed with a broad background of warmer, non-thermal ions, possibly resulting from charge exchange between magnetospheric ions and plume neutrals. Despite the sensor's lack of intrinsic angular resolution, the ion flux and energy spectra are consistent with a drift velocity away from Saturn and in the direction of the upstream flow. References: [1] Tokar et al., 2009, Cassini detection of Enceladus' cold water-group plume ionosphere

  10. Magnetic signatures of ion cyclotron waves during Cassini's high-inclination orbits of Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeks, Zachary; Simon, Sven

    2017-02-01

    Based on magnetic field data from Cassini's high-inclination orbits of Saturn (radius RS = 60 , 268 km), we analyze the latitudinal distribution of ion cyclotron waves in the giant planet's magnetosphere. Our survey takes into account magnetic field data from all high-inclination orbits between 2004 and 2015. We analyze the dependency of the occurrence rate and amplitude of the ion cyclotron waves on radial distance ρ to Saturn's rotation axis, vertical distance z to Saturn's equatorial plane, and magnetic latitude λ. The occurrence rate of ion cyclotron waves is approximately 100% in Saturn's equatorial plane between the orbits of Enceladus and Dione and decreases to 50% at altitudes of | z | ≈ 0.6RS . Ion cyclotron waves were detected up to | z | = 2.0RS . The occurrence rate displays strong, non-monotonic variations with respect to ρ, z, and λ. The vertical amplitude profile of the waves exhibits an M-like pattern with two distinct peaks near z = ± 0.3RS and the central minimum at z=0. Compared to earlier observations, we find this M-like structure to be inflated in±z direction by a factor of three. The available magnetic field data provides only weak evidence for a local impact of Enceladus and Dione on the ion cyclotron wave field. Using the observed Doppler shift of the ion cyclotron wave frequency during Cassini's high-inclination orbits, we demonstrate the existence of a narrow band of bidirectional wave propagation. This band is centered around Saturn's equatorial plane and possesses a half-width of | z | = 0.15RS , which agrees well with the vertical scale height of Saturn's neutral cloud. To the north of this band, all ion cyclotron waves propagate towards the north (z > 0); and to the south, all waves propagate towards the south (z < 0). In companion with our previous study (Meeks et al., 2016), this survey provides the complete three-dimensional picture of the ion cyclotron wave field between the orbits of Enceladus and Rhea during the Cassini

  11. Ground Penetrating Radar: Ultra-wideband radars for improvised explosive devices and landmine detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yarovoy, A.

    2008-01-01

    For last two decades Ultra-Wideband Ground Penetrating Radars seemed to be a useful tool for detection and classification of landmines and improvised explosive devices (IEDs). However limitations of radar technology considerably limited operational use of these radars. Recent research at TU Delft so

  12. Ground Penetrating Radar: Ultra-wideband radars for improvised explosive devices and landmine detection

    OpenAIRE

    Yarovoy, A.

    2008-01-01

    For last two decades Ultra-Wideband Ground Penetrating Radars seemed to be a useful tool for detection and classification of landmines and improvised explosive devices (IEDs). However limitations of radar technology considerably limited operational use of these radars. Recent research at TU Delft solves the bottleneck problems.

  13. Radar hydrology principles, models, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Yang

    2014-01-01

    ""This is the first book on radar hydrology written by hydrologists. Whereas the excellent knowledge of radar technology by the authors permits an adequate coverage of the principles of rainfall rate estimation by radar, their hydrological background allows them to provide a unique message on the benefits (and on the remaining challenges) in exploiting radar techniques in hydrology. … In a clear and concise manner, the book combines topics from different scientific disciplines into a unified approach aiming to guide the reader through the requirements, strengths, and pitfalls of the applica

  14. Radar reflection off extensive air showers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner F.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the possibility of detecting extensive air showers by the radar technique. Considering a bistatic radar system and different shower geometries, we simulate reflection of radio waves off the static plasma produced by the shower in the air. Using the Thomson cross-section for radio wave reflection, we obtain the time evolution of the signal received by the antennas. The frequency upshift of the radar echo and the power received are studied to verify the feasibility of the radar detection technique.

  15. Search Radar ECM/EA Simulator

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Tests the effectiveness of electronic countermeasures/electronic attack (ECM/EA) equipment and techniques for jamming airborne search and targeting radars....

  16. Future of phased array radar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassyouni, Ahmed

    2011-12-01

    This paper spots the light on the future progress of phased array radar systems, presenting two innovative examples on the directions of development. The first example starts with the classic radar range equation to develop the topology of what is called a "Mobile Adaptive Digital Array Radar" (MADAR) system. The second example discusses the possibility to achieve what is called "Entangled Photonic Radar" (EPR) system. The EPR quantum range equation is derived and compared to the classic one to compare the performance. Block diagrams and analysis for both proposed systems are presented.

  17. Recent advances in geologic mapping by radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, T. G.

    1984-01-01

    Quantitative techniques are available which allow the analysis of SAR images for the derivation of geological surface and process data. In conjunction with calibrated radar sensors operating at several incidence angles, wavelengths, and polarizations, the compilation of multiparameter radar signatures of lithological and geomorphic units can accordingly proceed for geological mapping in unknown areas. While radar image tone can be used in arid zones to derive surface micromorphology, heavily vegetated tropical regions require the analysis of radar image texture by means of Fourier techniques which decompose the image into bandpasses that represent different scales of texture.

  18. Resonance and aspect matched adaptive radar (RAMAR)

    CERN Document Server

    Barrett, Terence William

    2012-01-01

    The book describes a new form of radar for which the target response is frequency, i.e., resonance-dependent. The book provides both prototype designs and empirical results collected from a variety of targets. The new form of radar, called RAMAR (Resonance and Aspect Matched Adaptive Radar) advances radar - mere ranging and detection - to the level of RF spectroscopy, and permits an advance of spectroscopic methods from optical, through infra-red and into the RF spectral range. The book will describe how a target's response can be a function of frequency components in the transmitted signal's

  19. The NASA radar entomology program at Wallops Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, C. R.

    1979-01-01

    NASA contribution to radar entomology is presented. Wallops Flight Center is described in terms of its radar systems. Radar tracking of birds and insects was recorded from helicopters for airspeed and vertical speed.

  20. Radar network communication through sensing of frequency hopping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowla, Farid; Nekoogar, Faranak

    2013-05-28

    In one embodiment, a radar communication system includes a plurality of radars having a communication range and being capable of operating at a sensing frequency and a reporting frequency, wherein the reporting frequency is different than the sensing frequency, each radar is adapted for operating at the sensing frequency until an event is detected, each radar in the plurality of radars has an identification/location frequency for reporting information different from the sensing frequency, a first radar of the radars which senses the event sends a reporting frequency corresponding to its identification/location frequency when the event is detected, and all other radars in the plurality of radars switch their reporting frequencies to match the reporting frequency of the first radar upon detecting the reporting frequency switch of a radar within the communication range. In another embodiment, a method is presented for communicating information in a radar system.

  1. Passive Multistatic Detection of Maritime Targets using Opportunistic Radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    indicator (MTI) radar, phased array radar and synthetic aperture radar ( SAR ) [3]. Thirty years later, in the 1960s, a bistatic radar exploiting a...scattering configuration of bistatic radar is combined with inverse SAR (ISAR) techniques. The bistatic radar, particularly in the forward scatter...realism, the bistatic RCS simulation of the stealthy Republic of Singapore Navy Formidable-class frigate was included to validate the results. The

  2. An Overview on Development of Passive Radar Based on the Low Frequency Band Digital Broadcasting and TV Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Xian-rong

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the detection principle and characteristics of passive radar, this paper describes the development of passive radar based on the low frequency band (HF/VHF/UHF digital broadcasting and TV signal. Based on the radio coverage ratio and technical features of digital broadcasting and TV signals, the research status in abroad, especially in Europe, is introduced at first, on experimental systems, technical parameters, and comparative experiments. Then the latest development of passive radars, in different frequency bands in China, both theory and experimental study are presented. Followed is the commentary on the key techniques and problems of Digital Broadcasting-based Passive Radar (DBPR, including the waveform’s properties and its modification, reference signal extraction, multipath clutter rejection, target detection, tracking, and fusion as well as real-time signal processing. Finally, the prospects of development and application of this kind of passive radar are discussed.

  3. Ground clutter cancellation in incoherent radars: solutions for EISCAT Svalbard radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Turunen

    Full Text Available Incoherent scatter radars measure ionosphere parameters using modified Thomson scatter from free electrons in the target (see e.g. Hagfors, 1997. The integrated cross section of the ionospheric scatterers is extremely small and the measurements can easily be disturbed by signals returned by unwanted targets. Ground clutter signals, entering via the antenna side lobes, can render measurements at the nearest target ranges totally impossible. The EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR, which started measurements in 1996, suffers from severe ground clutter and the ionosphere cannot be measured in any simple manner at ranges less than about 120–150 km, depending on the modulation employed. If the target and clutter signals have different, and clearly identifiable, properties then, in principle, there are always ways to eliminate the clutter. In incoherent scatter measurements, differences in the coherence times of the wanted and unwanted signals can be used for clutter cancellation. The clutter cancellation must be applied to all modulations, usually alternating codes in modern experiments, used for shorter ranges. Excellent results have been obtained at the ESR using a simple pulse-to-pulse clutter subtraction method, but there are also other possibilities.

    Key words: Radio science (ionospheric physics; signal processing; instruments and techniques

  4. Ground clutter cancellation in incoherent radars: solutions for EISCAT Svalbard radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turunen, T.; Markkanen, J.; van Eyken, A. P.

    2000-09-01

    Incoherent scatter radars measure ionosphere parameters using modified Thomson scatter from free electrons in the target (see e.g. Hagfors, 1997). The integrated cross section of the ionospheric scatterers is extremely small and the measurements can easily be disturbed by signals returned by unwanted targets. Ground clutter signals, entering via the antenna side lobes, can render measurements at the nearest target ranges totally impossible. The EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR), which started measurements in 1996, suffers from severe ground clutter and the ionosphere cannot be measured in any simple manner at ranges less than about 120-150 km, depending on the modulation employed. If the target and clutter signals have different, and clearly identifiable, properties then, in principle, there are always ways to eliminate the clutter. In incoherent scatter measurements, differences in the coherence times of the wanted and unwanted signals can be used for clutter cancellation. The clutter cancellation must be applied to all modulations, usually alternating codes in modern experiments, used for shorter ranges. Excellent results have been obtained at the ESR using a simple pulse-to-pulse clutter subtraction method, but there are also other possibilities.

  5. Astrometry of Cassini with the VLBA to improve the Saturn ephemeris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Dayton L.; Folkner, William M.; Jacobson, Robert A.; Jacobs, Christopher S. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Dhawan, Vivek; Romney, Jon [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Fomalont, Ed, E-mail: dayton.jones@jpl.nasa.gov [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Planetary ephemerides have been developed and improved over centuries. They are a fundamental tool for understanding solar system dynamics, and essential for planetary and small body mass determinations, occultation predictions, high-precision tests of general relativity, pulsar timing, and interplanetary spacecraft navigation. This paper presents recent results from a continuing program of high-precision astrometric very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations of the Cassini spacecraft orbiting Saturn, using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). We have previously shown that VLBA measurements can be combined with spacecraft orbit determinations from Doppler and range tracking and VLBI links to the inertial extragalactic reference frame to provide the most accurate barycentric positions currently available for Saturn. Here we report an additional five years of VLBA observations along with improved phase reference source positions, resulting in an improvement in residuals with respect to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's dynamical ephemeris.

  6. Jupiter's Phase Variations from Cassini: a testbed for future direct-imaging missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorga, Laura; Jackiewicz, Jason; Rages, Kathy; West, Robert; Knowles, Ben; Marley, Mark; Lewis, Nikole

    2016-10-01

    Phase curves are important for our understanding of the energy balance and scattering behavior of an exoplanet's atmosphere. In preparation for future direct-imaging missions of Jupiter-like planets, we present phase curves of Jupiter from 0--150 degrees as measured in multiple optical bandpasses by Cassini/ISS during the Millennium flyby of Jupiter in late 2000 to early 2001. We demonstrate and confirm that Jupiter is not well represented by a Lambertian phase function and that its color is more variable with phase angle than predicted by Jupiter-like models. This indicates that a Jupiter-twin observed near quadrature may not be as straightforward to classify as a Jupiter-like planet.

  7. On the nature of MHD and kinetic scale turbulence in the magnetosheath of Saturn: Cassini observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadid, L.; Sahraoui, F.; Kiyani, K. H.; Retino, A.; Modolo, R.; Masters, A.; Dougherty, M.

    2015-10-01

    Low frequency turbulence in Saturn's magnetosheath is investigated using in-situ measurements of the Cassini spacecraft. We focus on the magnetic energy spectra computed in the frequency range # [10-4, 1]Hz. Three main results are reported: 1) The magnetic energy spectra showed a # f-1 scaling at MHD scales followed by an # f-2.6 scaling at the sub-ion scales without forming the so-called inertial range, breaking the universality of the Kolmogorov spectrum in the magnetosheath; 2) The magnetic compressibility and the cross-correlation between the parallel component of the magnetic field and density fluctuations C(#n, #B||) indicate the dominance of the compressible magnetosonic slow modes at MHD scales rather than the Alfvén mode [3] ; 3) Higher order statistics revealed a monofractal (resp. multifractal) behaviour of the turbulent flow behind a quasiperpendicular (resp. quasi-parallel) shock at the subion scales.

  8. Improvement of the Basis for the Solution of the Dirac Equation in Cassini Coordinates

    CERN Document Server

    Hahn, Walter; Surzhykov, Andrey

    2016-01-01

    We propose an improvement of the basis for the solution of the stationary two-centre Dirac equation in Cassini coordinates using the finite-basis-set method presented in [1]. For the calculations in [1], we constructed the basis for approximating the energy eigenfunctions by using smooth piecewise defined polynomials, called B-splines. In the present article, we report that an analysis of the employed representation of the Dirac matrices shows that the above approximation is not efficient using B-spines only. Therefore, we include basis functions which are defined using functions with step-like behaviour instead of B-splines. Thereby, we achieve a significant increase of accuracy of results as compared to [1].

  9. Cassini UVIS observations of Titan ultraviolet airglow intensity dependence with solar zenith angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, E. M.; Ajello, J. M.; Holsclaw, G. M.; West, R. A.; Esposito, L. W.; Bradley, E. T.

    2017-01-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (UVIS) observed the airglow (dayglow and nightglow) of Titan over a range of solar zenith angles (SZA) from 14 to 150° on five separate observations obtained between 2008 and 2012. The modeling of the solar cycle normalized UVIS observations indicates that a Chapman layer function provides a satisfactory fit to the intensity of the EUV and FUV airglow molecular emissions of the N2 Lyman-Birge-Hopfield band system (LBH a1Πg→X1>∑g+), the Carroll-Yoshino band system (c4'1>∑u+→X1>∑g+), and of several atomic multiplets of nitrogen (NI, II) as a function of SZA. This result shows that the strongest contribution to the Titan dayglow occurs by processes (photoelectrons and photodissociation) involving the solar EUV flux rather than magnetospheric particle precipitation that dominates emission excitation in the nightglow.

  10. Flux transfer event observation at Saturn's dayside magnetopause by the Cassini spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasinski, Jamie M.; Slavin, James A.; Arridge, Christopher S.; Poh, Gangkai; Jia, Xianzhe; Sergis, Nick; Coates, Andrew J.; Jones, Geraint H.; Waite, J. Hunter

    2016-07-01

    We present the first observation of a flux rope at Saturn's dayside magnetopause. This is an important result because it shows that the Saturnian magnetopause is conducive to multiple X-line reconnection and flux rope generation. Minimum variance analysis shows that the magnetic signature is consistent with a flux rope. The magnetic observations were well fitted to a constant-α force-free flux rope model. The radius and magnetic flux content of the rope are estimated to be 4600-8300 km and 0.2-0.8 MWb, respectively. Cassini also observed five traveling compression regions (remote signatures of flux ropes), in the adjacent magnetosphere. The magnetic flux content is compared to other estimates of flux opening via reconnection at Saturn.

  11. Flyby Error Analysis Based on Contour Plots for the Cassini Tour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpf, P. W.; Gist, E. M.; Goodson, T. D.; Hahn, Y.; Wagner, S. V.; Williams, P. N.

    2008-01-01

    The maneuver cancellation analysis consists of cost contour plots employed by the Cassini maneuver team. The plots are two-dimensional linear representations of a larger six-dimensional solution to a multi-maneuver, multi-encounter mission at Saturn. By using contours plotted with the dot product of vectors B and R and the dot product of vectors B and T components, it is possible to view the effects delta V on for various encounter positions in the B-plane. The plot is used in operations to help determine if the Approach Maneuver (ensuing encounter minus three days) and/or the Cleanup Maneuver (ensuing encounter plus three days) can be cancelled and also is a linear check of an integrated solution.

  12. Jupiter's Phase Variations from Cassini: a testbed for future direct-imaging missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorga, Laura; Jackiewicz, Jason; Rages, Kathy; West, Robert A.; Knowles, Ben; Lewis, Nikole K.; Marley, Mark S.

    2017-01-01

    Phase curves are important for our understanding of the energy balance and scattering behavior of an exoplanet's atmosphere. In preparation for future direct-imaging missions of Jupiter-like planets, in particular WFIRST, we present phase curves of Jupiter from 0--150 degrees as measured in multiple optical bandpasses by Cassini/ISS during the Millennium flyby of Jupiter in late 2000 to early 2001. We demonstrate and confirm that Jupiter is not well represented by a Lambertian phase function and that its color is more variable with phase angle than predicted by Jupiter-like models. This indicates that a Jupiter-twin observed near quadrature may not be as straightforward to classify as a Jupiter-like planet and comment on the implications for future missions.

  13. Laser Mode Behavior of the Cassini CIRS Fourier Transform Spectrometer at Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasunas, John C.

    2012-01-01

    The CIRS Fourier transform spectrometer aboard the NASA/ESA/ASI Cassini orbiter has been acquiring spectra of the Saturnian system since 2004. The CIRS reference interferometer employs a laser diode to trigger the interferogram sampling. Although the control of laser diode drive current and operating temperature are stringent enough to restrict laser wavelength variation to a small fraction of CIRS finest resolution element, the CIRS instrument does need to be restarted every year or two, at which time it may start in a new laser mode. By monitoring the Mylar absorption features in uncalibrated spectra due to the beam splitter Mylar substrate, it can be shown that these jumps are to adjacent modes and that most of the eight-year operation so far is restricted to three adjacent modes. For a given mode, the wavelength stability appears consistent with the stability of the laser diode drive curren.t and operating temperature.

  14. Cassini finds an oxygen-carbon dioxide atmosphere at Saturn's icy moon Rhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teolis, B D; Jones, G H; Miles, P F; Tokar, R L; Magee, B A; Waite, J H; Roussos, E; Young, D T; Crary, F J; Coates, A J; Johnson, R E; Tseng, W-L; Baragiola, R A

    2010-12-24

    The flyby measurements of the Cassini spacecraft at Saturn's moon Rhea reveal a tenuous oxygen (O(2))-carbon dioxide (CO(2)) atmosphere. The atmosphere appears to be sustained by chemical decomposition of the surface water ice under irradiation from Saturn's magnetospheric plasma. This in situ detection of an oxidizing atmosphere is consistent with remote observations of other icy bodies, such as Jupiter's moons Europa and Ganymede, and suggestive of a reservoir of radiolytic O(2) locked within Rhea's ice. The presence of CO(2) suggests radiolysis reactions between surface oxidants and organics or sputtering and/or outgassing of CO(2) endogenic to Rhea's ice. Observations of outflowing positive and negative ions give evidence for pickup ionization as a major atmospheric loss mechanism.

  15. Cassini in situ observations of long-duration magnetic reconnection in Saturn's magnetotail

    CERN Document Server

    Arridge, Christopher S; Jackman, Caitriona M; Poh, Gang-Kai; Slavin, James A; Thomsen, Michelle F; André, Nicolas; Jia, Xianzhe; Kidder, Ariah; Lamy, Laurent; Radioti, Aikaterina; Reisenfeld, Dan B; Sergis, Nick; Volwerk, Martin; Walsh, Andrew P; Zarka, Philippe; Coates, Andrew J; Dougherty, Michele K

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental process in solar system and astrophysical plasmas, through which stored magnetic energy associated with current sheets is converted into thermal, kinetic and wave energy. Magnetic reconnection is also thought to be a key process involved in shedding internally produced plasma from the giant magnetospheres at Jupiter and Saturn through topological reconfiguration of the magnetic field. The region where magnetic fields reconnect is known as the diffusion region and in this letter we report on the first encounter of the Cassini spacecraft with a diffusion region in Saturn's magnetotail. The data also show evidence of magnetic reconnection over a period of 19 h revealing that reconnection can, in fact, act for prolonged intervals in a rapidly rotating magnetosphere. We show that reconnection can be a significant pathway for internal plasma loss at Saturn. This counters the view of reconnection as a transient method of internal plasma loss at Saturn. These results, although d...

  16. Weak Waves and Wakes in Saturn's Rings: Observations by Cassini ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, J. A.; Tiscareno, M. S.; Porco, C. C.; Dones, H.; Murray, C. D.; Cassini Imaging

    2004-11-01

    At Saturn Orbit Insertion (SOI), the Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) imaged the rings of Saturn with unprecedented resolution and signal/noise. Many features are present with remarkable clarity, including density waves excited by first-order Lindblad resonances with the tiny satellite Atlas, as well as density waves excited by second-order Lindblad resonances with Janus, Prometheus, and Pandora. Additionally, we find much structure due to Pan, the satellite embedded in the Encke Gap. As one moves away from the gap, the Pan disturbances undergo a transition, from features best described as gravitional wakes to features best described as density waves. We will present examples of these phenomena and discuss their implications.

  17. High Angular Resolution Stellar Imaging with Occultations from the Cassini Spacecraft II: Kronocyclic Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Stewart, Paul N; Nicholson, Philip D; Hedman, Matthew M; Lloyd, James P

    2015-01-01

    We present an advance in the use of Cassini observations of stellar occultations by the rings of Saturn for stellar studies. Stewart et al. (2013) demonstrated the potential use of such observations for measuring stellar angular diameters. Here, we use these same observations, and tomographic imaging reconstruction techniques, to produce two dimensional images of complex stellar systems. We detail the determination of the basic observational reference frame. A technique for recovering model-independent brightness profiles for data from each occulting edge is discussed, along with the tomographic combination of these profiles to build an image of the source star. Finally we demonstrate the technique with recovered images of the {\\alpha} Centauri binary system and the circumstellar environment of the evolved late-type giant star, Mira.

  18. Analysis of the Radar Reflectivity of Aircraft Vortex Wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariff, Karim; Wray, Alan; Yan, Jerry (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Radar has been proposed as a way to track wake vortices to reduce aircraft spacing and tests have revealed radar echoes from aircraft wakes in clear air. The results are always interpreted qualitatively using Tatarski's theory of weak scattering by isotropic atmospheric turbulence. The goal of the present work was to predict the value of the radar cross-section (RCS) using simpler models. This is accomplished in two steps. First, the refractive index is obtained. Since the structure of the aircraft wakes is different from atmospheric turbulence, three simple mechanisms specific to vortex wakes are considered: (1) Radial density gradient in a two-dimensional vortex, (2) three-dimensional fluctuations in the vortex cores, and (3) Adiabatic transport of the atmospheric fluid in a two-dimensional oval surrounding the pair of vortices. The index of refraction is obtained more precisely for the two-dimensional mechanisms than for the three-dimensional ones. In the second step, knowing the index of refraction, a scattering analysis is performed. Tatarski's weak scattering approximation is kept but the usual assumptions of a far-field and a uniform incident wave are dropped. Neither assumption is generally valid for a wake that is coherent across the radar beam. For analytical insight, a simpler approximation that invokes, in addition to weak scattering, the far-field and wide cylindrical beam assumptions, is also developed and compared with the more general analysis. The predicted RCS values for the oval surround the vortices (mechanism C) agree with the experiments of Bilson conducted over a wide range of frequencies. However, the predictions have a cut-off away from normal incidence which is not present in the measurements. Estimates suggest that this is due to turbulence in the baroclinic vorticity generated at the boundary of the oval. The reflectivity of a vortex itself (mechanism A) is comparable to that of the oval (mechanism C) but cuts-off at frequencies lower

  19. A Parallel, High-Fidelity Radar Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsley, M.; Fasenfest, B.

    2010-09-01

    Accurate modeling of Space Surveillance sensors is necessary for a variety of applications. Accurate models can be used to perform trade studies on sensor designs, locations, and scheduling. In addition, they can be used to predict system-level performance of the Space Surveillance Network to a collision or satellite break-up event. A high fidelity physics-based radar simulator has been developed for Space Surveillance applications. This simulator is designed in a modular fashion, where each module describes a particular physical process or radar function (radio wave propagation & scattering, waveform generation, noise sources, etc.) involved in simulating the radar and its environment. For each of these modules, multiple versions are available in order to meet the end-users needs and requirements. For instance, the radar simulator supports different atmospheric models in order to facilitate different methods of simulating refraction of the radar beam. The radar model also has the capability to use highly accurate radar cross sections generated by the method of moments, accelerated by the fast multipole method. To accelerate this computationally expensive model, it is parallelized using MPI. As a testing framework for the radar model, it is incorporated into the Testbed Environment for Space Situational Awareness (TESSA). TESSA is based on a flexible, scalable architecture, designed to exploit high-performance computing resources and allow physics-based simulation of the SSA enterprise. In addition to the radar models, TESSA includes hydrodynamic models of satellite intercept and debris generation, orbital propagation algorithms, optical brightness calculations, optical system models, object detection algorithms, orbit determination algorithms, simulation analysis and visualization tools. Within this framework, observations and tracks generated by the new radar model are compared to results from a phenomenological radar model. In particular, the new model will be

  20. Temperature Variations with Changing Solar Elevation in Saturn's Main Rings as Seen by Cassini CIRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, Linda J.; Flandes, A.; Altobelli, N.; Leyrat, C.; Pilorz, S.; Ferrari, C.

    2008-09-01

    During four years in orbit around Saturn, the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) has acquired an extensive set of thermal measurements of Saturn's main rings (A, B, C and Cassini Division). Temperatures were retrieved for the lit and unlit rings over a variety of ring geometries that include solar phase angle, spacecraft elevation, solar elevation and local hour angle. To first order, the largest temperature changes on the lit face of the rings are driven by variations in phase angle while differences in temperature with changing spacecraft elevation and local time are a secondary effect. Once phase angle and local time effects are taken into account, decreases in ring temperature with decreasing solar elevation are observed for both the lit and unlit faces of the rings. For the lit rings,decreases of 2- 4 K are observed in the C ring and larger decreases, 7-10 and 10 - 13 K, are observed in the A and B rings respectively. Our thermal data cover a range of solar elevations from -21 to -12 degrees (south side of the rings). We test two simple models to assess how well they fit the observed decreases in temperature. The first model assumes that the particles are so widely spaced that they do not cast shadows on one another while the second model assumes that the particles are so close together they essentially form a slab. The optically thinnest and optically thickest regions of the rings show the best fits to these two end member models. We present a preliminary report on ring temperature variations as a function of solar elevation in Saturn's rings. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA. Copyright 2008 California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged.